WorldWideScience

Sample records for alpha decay radioisotopes

  1. Alpha indirect conversion radioisotope power source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sychov, Maxim [TRACE Photonics Inc., 1680 West Polk, Charleston, IL 61920 (United States)], E-mail: msychov@yahoo.com; Kavetsky, Alexandr; Yakubova, Galina; Walter, Gabriel; Yousaf, Shahid; Lin, Qian; Chan, Doris; Socarras, Heather; Bower, Kenneth [TRACE Photonics Inc., 1680 West Polk, Charleston, IL 61920 (United States)

    2008-02-15

    Advantages of radioisotope-powered electric generators include long service life, wide temperature range operation and high-energy density. We report development of a long-life generator based on indirect conversion of alpha decay energy. Prototyping used 300 mCi Pu-238 alpha emitter and AlGaAs photovoltaic cells designed for low light intensity conditions. The alpha emitter, phosphor screens, and voltaic arrays were assembled into a power source with the following characteristics: I{sub sc}=14 {mu}A; U{sub oc}=2.3 V; power output -21 {mu}W. Using this prototype we have powered an eight-digit electronic calculator and wrist watch.

  2. Bremsstrahlung in $\\alpha$ Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Takigawa, N; Hagino, K; Ono, A; Brink, D M

    1999-01-01

    A quantum mechanical analysis of the bremsstrahlung in $\\alpha$ decay of $^{210}$Po is performed in close reference to a semiclassical theory. We clarify the contribution from the tunneling, mixed, outside barrier regions and from the wall of the inner potential well to the final spectral distribution, and discuss their interplay. We also comment on the validity of semiclassical calculations, and the possibility to eliminate the ambiguity in the nuclear potential between the alpha particle and daughter nucleus using the bremsstrahlung spectrum.

  3. Laser-assisted {alpha} decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castaneda Cortes, Hector Mauricio; Palffy, Adriana; Keitel, Christoph H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Popruzhenko, Sergey [Moscow State Engineering Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01

    The spontaneous emission of alpha particles by unstable nuclei was one of the first physical processes to be described by quantum tunneling of a quasistationary state, i.e. a long-lived state. The development of new powerful coherent light sources opens the possibility to study the direct interaction between strong laser fields and atomic nuclei, assisting the tunneling of the {alpha} particle through the nuclear barrier. In this work we investigate for the first time the effect of strong laser fields on the tunneling and {alpha} particle emission of several medium-mass and heavy nuclei. To this end we make use of the formalism we have developed starting from the well-known Strong-Field Approximation and its complex trajectories formulation to describe the laser-assisted decay of quasistationary states [1]. The effect of a static as well as optical and X-ray monochromatic fields on the {alpha} decay lifetimes and {alpha} particle emission spectra is determined. We find that even at strong intensities, the laser-induced acceleration of the {alpha} decay is negligible, and only the spectra are significantly changed by the laser field. In particular, for optical fields, high laser intensities can lead to rescattering of the {alpha} particle off the daughter nucleus.

  4. Inflaton Decay in an Alpha Vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Naidu, S; Naidu, Siddartha; Holman, Richard

    2004-01-01

    We study the alpha vacua of de Sitter space by considering the decay rate of the inflaton field coupled to a scalar field placed in an alpha vacuum. We find an {\\em alpha dependent} Bose enhancement relative to the Bunch-Davies vacuum and, surprisingly, no non-renormalizable divergences. We also consider a modified alpha dependent time ordering prescription for the Feynman propagator and show that it leads to an alpha independent result. This result suggests that it may be possible to calculate in any alpha vacuum if we employ the appropriate causality preserving prescription.

  5. Alpha decay favoured isotopes of some superheavy nuclei: Spontaneous fission versus alpha decay

    CERN Document Server

    Kiren, O V; Bubbly, S G

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous fission and alpha decay are the main decay modes for superheavy nuclei. The superheavy nuclei which have small alpha decay half-life compared to spontaneous fission half-life will survive fission and can be detected in the laboratory through alpha decay. We have studied the alpha decay half-life and spontaneous half-life of some superheavy elements in the atomic range Z = 100-130. Spontaneous fission half-lives of superheavy nuclei have been calculated using the phenomenological formula and the alpha decay half-lives using Viola-Seaborg-Sobiczewski formula (Sobiczewski et al. 1989), semi empirical relation of Brown (1992) and formula based on generalized liquid drop model proposed by Dasgupta-Schubert and Reyes (2007). The results are reported here.

  6. An in-cell alpha detection system for radioisotope component assembly operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A remotely operated alpha detection system is being developed for use at the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. It will be used in hot cells being constructed to assemble components of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators for space power applications. The in-cell detection equipment will survey radiological swipe samples to determine smearable surface contamination levels on radioisotope fuel, fueled components, and hot-cell work areas. This system is potentially adaptable to other hot cell and glovebox applications where radiation dose rates and contamination levels are expected to be low. 2 figs

  7. Alpha Decay, Shell Structure, and New Elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENZhong-Zhou; TAIFei; SHENWen-Qing

    2003-01-01

    We systematically analyze the experimental data of alpha decay in even-even heavy nuclei far from stability and find that the Geiger-Nuttall law brea~s for an isotopic chain when its neutron number is across a marc number or there is a deformed subshell. This break can be used to identify new magic numbers of superheavy nuclei. It is also discovered that there is a new linear relation between the logarithm of half-life and the reciprocal of the square root of decay energy for N = 126 and N = 152 isotones. It could be a new law of alpha decay for nuclei with magic neutron numbers but the physics behind it is to be explored. The significance of these researches for the search of new elements is discussed.

  8. Alpha Decay, Shell Structure, and New Elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Zhong-Zhou; TAI Fei; SHEN Wen-Qing

    2003-01-01

    We systematically analyze the experimental data of alpha decay in even-even heavy nuclei far from stabilityand find that the Geiger-Nuttall law breaks for an isotopic chain when its neutron number is across a magic numberor there is a deformed subshell. This break can be used to identify new magic numbers of superheavy nuclei. It is alsodiscovered that there is a new linear relation between the logarithm of half-life and the reciprocal of the square root ofdecay energy for N = 126 and N = 152 isotones. It could be a new law of alpha decay for nuclei with magic neutronnumbers but the physics behind it is to be explored. The significance of these researches for the search of new elementsis discussed.

  9. Alpha decay of {sup 181}Pb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davids, C.N.; Henderson, D.J.; Hermann, R. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The {alpha}-decay energy of {sup 181}Pb was measured as 7211(10) keV and 7044(15). In the first study the isotope was produced in {sup 90}Zr bombardments of {sup 94}Mo and, after traversing a velocity filter, implanted in a position-sensitive Si detector; no half life for {sup 181}Pb was reported. In the second study the isotope was produced in {sup 40}Ca bombardments of {sup 144}Sm and transported to a position in front of a Si(Au) surface barrier detector with a fast He-gas-jet capillary system; an estimate of 50 ms was determined for the {sup 181}Pb half life. Recently we investigated {sup 181}Pb {alpha} decay at ATLAS as part of a survey experiment in which a l-pnA beam of 400-MeV {sup 92}Mo was used to irradiate targets of {sup 89}Y, {sup 90,92,94}Zr, and {sup 92}Mo to examine yields for one- and two-nucleon evaporation products from symmetric cold-fusion reactions. Recoiling nuclei of interest were passed through the Fragment Mass Analyzer and implanted in a double-sided silicon strip detector for {alpha}-particle assay. With the {sup 90}Zr target we observed a group at 7065(20) keV which was correlated with A = 181 recoils and had a half life of 45(20) ms. Our new results for {sup 181}Pb therefore agreed with those of the second study. There was no indication in the {sup 90}Zr + {sup 92}Mo data of the 7211(10)-keV {alpha} particles seen by Keller et al. The interested reader is referred to the 1993 atomic mass evaluation wherein the input {alpha}-decay energies and resultant masses of the light Pb isotopes (including {sup 181}Pb) are discussed.

  10. Biological Effects of Transmutation and Decay of Incorporated Radioisotopes. Proceedings of a Panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Panel on the Biological Effects of Transmutation and Decay of Incorporated Radioisotopes was held by the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna on 9 - 13 October 1967. Fourteen experts from nine countries, representing various relevant disciplines, attended. The Panel investigated the modes and mechanisms of action associated with transmutation and decay radiation events. The aim was to achieve a clearer picture of the present status of these studies and at the same time to help define the main problems and suggest possible ways of solving them. The Panel might thus go some way towards defining the hazards of using labelled compounds in human beings and standards for setting body-burden levels. The papers and discussions centred on the role which such physical and chemical factors of radioisotope decay as transmutation, recoil energy and disintegration radiation play in producing injury when such isotopes as 3H, 14C and 32P are incorporated into vital cellular macro-molecules. Past and present studies on mutation production, chromosome aberration, macro- molecular lesions, and cell survival, were reviewed and analysed. Data, concepts and experimental approaches were examined with an eye to possible productive lines of investigation. The present book contains the papers and discussions

  11. alpha-nucleus potentials, alpha-decay half-lives, and shell closures for superheavy nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Mohr, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Systematic alpha-nucleus folding potentials are used to analyze alpha-decay half-lives of superheavy nuclei. Preformation factors of about several per cent are found for all nuclei under study. The systematic behavior of the preformation factors and the volume integrals of the potentials allows to predict alpha-decay energies and half-lives for unknown nuclei. Shell closures can be determined from measured alpha-decay energies using the discontinuity of the volume integral at shell closures. ...

  12. Alpha decay by cubic plus Yukawa plus exponential model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The half life of alpha decay in some nuclei by using cubic plus Yukawa plus exponential model (CYCM) of Shanmugam and Kamalaharan is calculated in this project and compared with the available experimental values

  13. Unified approach to alpha decay calculations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C S Shastry; S M Mahadevan; K Aditya

    2014-05-01

    With the discovery of a large number of superheavy nuclei undergoing decay through emissions, there has been a revival of interest in decay in recent years. In the theoretical study of decay the -nucleus potential, which is the basic input in the study of -nucleus systems, is also being studied using advanced theoretical methods. In the light of these, theWentzel–Kramers–Brillouin (WKB) approximation method often used for the study of decay is critically examined and its limitations are pointed out. At a given energy, the WKB expression uses barrier penetration formula for the determination of the transmission coefficient. This approach utilizes the -nucleus potential only at the barrier region and ignores it elsewhere. In the present era, when one has more precise experimental information on decay parameters and better understanding of -nucleus potential, it is desirable to use a more precise method for the calculation of decay parameters. We describe the analytic -matrix (SM) method which gives a procedure for the calculation of decay energy and mean life in an integrated way by evaluating the resonance pole of the -matrix in the complex momentum or energy plane. We make an illustrative comparative study of WKB and -matrix methods for the determination of decay parameters in a number of superheavy nuclei.

  14. New experimental limits on the alpha decays of lead isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Beeman, J W; Cardani, L; Casali, N; Di Domizio, S; Fiorini, E; Gironi, L; Nagorny, S S; Nisi, S; Orio, F; Pattavina, L; Pessina, G; Piperno, G; Pirro, S; Previtali, E; Rusconi, C; Tomei, C; Vignati, M

    2013-01-01

    For the first time a PbWO4 crystal was grown using ancient Roman lead and it was run as a cryogenic detector. Thanks to the simultaneous and independent read-out of heat and scintillation light, the detector was able to discriminate beta/gamma interactions with respect to alpha particles down to low energies. New more stringent limits on the alpha decays of the lead isotopes are presented. In particular a limit of T_{1/2} > 1.4*10^20 y at a 90% C.L. was evaluated for the alpha decay of 204Pb to 200Hg.

  15. $\\alpha_{s}$ from the (revised) ALEPH data for $\\tau$ decay

    CERN Document Server

    Boito, Diogo; Maltman, Kim; Osborne, James; Peris, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    We present a new analysis of $\\alpha_s$ from hadronic $\\tau$ decays based on the recently revised ALEPH data. The analysis is based on a strategy which we previously applied to the OPAL data. We critically compare our strategy to the one traditionally used and comment on the main differences. Our analysis yields the values $\\alpha_s(m_\\tau^2)=0.296\\pm 0.010$ using fixed-order perturbation theory, and $\\alpha_s(m_\\tau^2)=0.310\\pm 0.014$ using contour-improved perturbation theory. Averaging these values with our previously obtained values from the OPAL data, we find $\\alpha_s(m_\\tau^2)=0.303\\pm 0.009$, respectively, $\\alpha_s(m_\\tau^2)=0.319\\pm 0.012$, as the most reliable results for $\\alpha_s$ from $\\tau$ decays currently available.

  16. Improved parametrization of the unified model for alpha decay and alpha capture

    CERN Document Server

    Denisov, V Yu; Sedykh, I Yu

    2015-01-01

    The updated data for the ground-state-to-ground-state alpha-transition half-lives in 401 nuclei and the alpha capture cross sections of 40Ca, 44Ca, 59Co, 208Pb and 209Bi are well described in the framework of the unified model for alpha-decay and alpha-capture. The updated values of the alpha decay half-lives, the binding energies of nuclei, the spins of parent and daughter nuclei, and the surface deformation parameters are used for the reevaluation of the model parameters. The data for the ground-state-to-ground-state alpha-decay half-lives are also well described by the empirical relationships.

  17. Alpha-particle decays from excited states in 24Mg

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIOTTA; R; J

    2011-01-01

    Using a cluster model based on the Woods-Saxon potential, alpha-particle decays from excited states in 24Mg have been system atically investigated. Calculations can in general reproduce experimental data, noticing the fact that the preformation factor P of alpha particle in alpha-decaying nuclei is of order from 100 to 10?2. This can be the evidence for the α+20Ne structure in 24Mg. Meanwhile, the results also show the existence of other configurations, such as 16O+2α. Since the calculated decay widths are very sensitive to the angular momentum carried by the outgoing cluster (α particle), our results could serve as a guide to experimental spin assignments.

  18. Comparison of semiempirical formulae for alpha decay half-lives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The semiempirical relationships given by Froeman, Wapstra et al., Viola and Seaborg, Hornshoj et al., Taagepera and Nurmia, Keller and Munzel for alpha decay half-lives are compared with experimental results and with a new formula derived by the authors form the fission theory of alpha decay in even-even, odd-even, even-odd and odd-odd nuclei. By taking into consideration the shell effects, the new formula allows one to obtain a better agreement with experimental data, even in the neighbourhood of the magic numbers

  19. A simple approach to $\\alpha$-decay fine structure

    CERN Document Server

    Delion, D S; Liotta, R J; Wyss, R

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple method to evaluate $\\alpha$-transition rates to low-lying excited states in even-even nuclei. For this a realistic $\\alpha$-daughter double folding interaction is approximated by a parabola in the region where the decay process takes place. This allows us to evaluate the penetration probability analytically. The main experimental features of branching ratios to excited states are reproduced by this simple approach.

  20. Theoretical Study on Alpha-Decay Chains of 294117 and 293117

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENG Zong-Qiang; REN Zhong-Zhou

    2011-01-01

    The newly synthesized element 117 and its alpha-decay chains are systematically investigated in the framework of the relativistic mean field theory with parameter sets NL-Z2 and TMA.The ground-state properties of the superheavy nuclei on the alpha-decay chains of 294117 and 293117 are calculated.The experimental alpha-decay energies and half-lives of the two alpha-decay chains are reasonably reproduced by the model The detailed discussions on the binding energies, alpha-decay energies, half-lives, quadrupole deformations, potential energy curves, and single particle levels of the two alpha-decay chains are made.

  1. Decay properties of /sup 186/Pb and the lead alpha-decay rate anomaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toth, K.S.; Ellis-Akovali, Y.A.; Bingham, C.R.; Moltz, D.M.; Carter, H.K.; Mlekodaj, R.L.; Spejewski, E.H.; Sousa, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    Alpha-decay transitions between ground states of doubly-even nuclei are taken to represent unhindered decays. Reduced widths for these s-wave transitions behave in a regular fashion as a function of both neutron and atomic number. They are largest for nuclei two or four particles beyond a closed shell (with sharp minima at the shell) and they then decrease as the next closure is approached. The s-wave widths for /sup 186/ /sup 188/ /sup 190/ /sup 192/Pb, however, have been reported to behave anomalously, i.e., they purportedly increase by a factor of 30 between /sup 186/Pb (N = 104) and /sup 192/Ob (N = 110) instead of decreasing as one nears N = 126. Theoretical calculations have not reproduced this unusual behavior. The (electron-capture (EC) + ..beta../sup +/) strengths were deduced from K x-ray intensities. A number of corrections are involved in such determinations. We undertook the investigation of the (EC + ..beta../sup +/) decay schemes of these neutron-deficient lead isotopes, in conjunction with studies of their ..cap alpha..-decay properties, to obtain more reliable ..cap alpha..-branching ratios. Herein we present new information on /sup 186/Pb and discuss the partial ..cap alpha.. half-lives for /sup 192/Pb, /sup 190/Pb, /sup 188/Pb, and /sup 186/Pb together with ..cap alpha..-decay rates for even-even nuclei with Z greater than or equal to 78.

  2. Alpha Decay in the Complex Energy Shell Model

    CERN Document Server

    Betan, R Id

    2012-01-01

    Alpha emission from a nucleus is a fundamental decay process in which the alpha particle formed inside the nucleus tunnels out through the potential barrier. We describe alpha decay of $^{212}$Po and $^{104}$Te by means of the configuration interaction approach. To compute the preformation factor and penetrability, we use the complex-energy shell model with a separable T=1 interaction. The single-particle space is expanded in a Woods-Saxon basis that consists of bound and unbound resonant states. Special attention is paid to the treatment of the norm kernel appearing in the definition of the formation amplitude that guarantees the normalization of the channel function. Without explicitly considering the alpha-cluster component in the wave function of the parent nucleus, we reproduce the experimental alpha-decay width of $^{212}$Po and predict an upper limit of T_{1/2}=5.5x10^{-7} sec for the half-life of $^{104}$Te. The complex-energy shell model in a large valence configuration space is capable of providing ...

  3. $\\alpha_s$ from the updated ALEPH data for hadronic $\\tau$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Boito, Diogo; Maltman, Kim; Osborne, James; Peris, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    We extract the strong coupling $\\alpha_s(m_\\tau^2)$ from the recently updated ALEPH non-strange spectral functions obtained from hadronic $\\tau$ decays. We apply a self-consistent analysis method, first tested in the analysis of OPAL data, to extract $\\alpha_s(m_\\tau^2)$ and non-perturbative contributions. The analysis yields $\\alpha_s^{\\rm FO}(m_\\tau^2)=0.296\\pm0.010 $, using Fixed Order Perturbation Theory (FOPT), and $\\alpha^{\\rm CI}_s(m_\\tau^2)= 0.310\\pm0.014$, using Contour Improved Perturbation Theory (CIPT). The weighted average of these results with those previously obtained from OPAL data give $\\alpha_s^{\\rm FO}(m_\\tau^2)=0.303\\pm 0.009$ and $\\alpha_s^{\\rm CI}(m_\\tau^2)=0.319\\pm 0.012$, which gives, after evolution to the $Z$ boson mass scale, $\\alpha^{\\rm FO}_s(m_Z^2)=0.1165\\pm0.0012 $ and $\\alpha_s^{\\rm CI}(m_Z^2)=0.1185\\pm0.0015 $, respectively. We observe that non-perturbative effects limit the accuracy with which $\\alpha_s$ can be extracted from $\\tau$ decay data.

  4. Bremsstrahlung during $\\alpha$-decay: quantum multipolar model

    CERN Document Server

    Maydanyuk, Sergei P

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the improved multipolar model of bremsstrahlung accompanied the $\\alpha$-decay is presented. The angular formalism of calculations of the matrix elements, being enough complicated component of the model, is stated in details. A new definition of the angular (differential) probability of the photon emission in the $\\alpha$-decay is proposed where direction of motion of the $\\alpha$-particle outside (with its tunneling inside barrier) is defined on the basis of angular distribution of its spacial wave function. In such approach, the model gives values of the angular probability of the photons emission in absolute scale, without its normalization on experimental data. Effectiveness of the proposed definition and accuracy of the spectra calculations of the bremsstrahlung spectra are analyzed in their comparison with experimental data for the $^{210}{\\rm Po}$, $^{214}{\\rm Po}$, $^{226}{\\rm Ra}$ and $^{244}{\\rm Cm}$ nuclei, and for some other nuclei predictions are performed (in absolute scale). With ...

  5. On surface clustering and Pauli principle effects in alpha decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of the correct description of nuclear surface region in alpha decay calculations is pointed out. A model is proposed takinq into account explicitly surface clustering and Pauli principle effects which are essential in this region. A method for solving the main integrodifferential equation of the model by using the oscillator shell basis and the Collatz method is worked out. The first numerical results are obtained for nonlocal potential of the atpha particle-daughter nucleus interaction

  6. Cryogenic Detectors for Rare Alpha Decay Search: A New Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casali, N.; Dubovik, A.; Nagorny, S.; Nisi, S.; Orio, F.; Pattavina, L.; Pirro, S.; Schäffner, K.; Tupitsyna, I.; Yakubovskaya, A.

    2016-08-01

    The detection of ^{148}Sm alpha decay with a precise measured half-life of ( {6.4_{-1.3}^{+1.2} }) × 10^{15}y and a Q-value of 1987.3 ± 0.5 keV was achieved by a new experimental approach, where a conventional ZnWO4 scintillating crystal doped with enriched ^{148}Sm isotope is operated as a cryogenic scintillating bolometer (phonon and light channel) at mK-temperatures.

  7. Anti-cluster Decay and Anti-alpha Decay of Antimatter nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Poenaru, D N; Greiner, W

    2015-01-01

    A broad extension of periodic system into the sector of antimatter could be possible sometimes in a remote future. We expect that anti-alpha spontaneous emission from an antimatter nucleus will have the same Q-value and half-life as alpha emission from the corresponding mirror nucleus. This is the consequence of the invariance of binding energy as well as of the surface and Coulomb energy when passing from matter to antimatter nuclei with the the same mass number and the same atomic number. The Q-values and half-lives of all measured up to now 27 cluster radioactivities are given together with Q-values and half-lives of the most important competitor --- $\\alpha$ decay. The lightest anti-alpha emitter, $^8\\bar{Be}$, will have a very short half-life of about $81.9\\cdot 10^{-18}$ s.

  8. $\\alpha_s$ analyses from hadronic tau decays with OPAL and ALEPH data

    CERN Document Server

    Boito, Diogo; Maltman, Kim; Peris, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we extracted the strong coupling, $\\alpha_s(m_\\tau^2)$, from the revised ALEPH data for non-strange hadronic tau decays. Our analysis is based on a method previously used for the determination of the strong coupling from OPAL data. In our strategy, we employ different moments of the spectral functions both with and without pinching, including Duality Violations, in order to obtain fully self-consistent analyses that do not rely on untested assumptions (such as the smallness of higher dimension contributions in the OPE). Here we discuss the $\\alpha_s$ values obtained from the ALEPH and the OPAL data, the robustness of the analysis, as well as non-perturbative contributions from DVs and the OPE. We show that, although the $\\alpha_s$ determination is sound, non-perturbative effects limit the accuracy with which one can extract the strong coupling from tau decay data. Finally, we discuss the compatibility of the data sets and the possibility of a combined analysis.

  9. High efficiency direct thermal to electric energy conversion from radioisotope decay using selective emitters and spectrally tuned solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Flood, Dennis J.; Lowe, Roland A.

    1993-01-01

    Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems are attractive possibilities for direct thermal-to-electric energy conversion, but have typically required the use of black body radiators operating at high temperatures. Recent advances in both the understanding and performance of solid rare-earth oxide selective emitters make possible the use of TPV at temperatures as low as 1200K. Both selective emitter and filter system TPV systems are feasible. However, requirements on the filter system are severe in order to attain high efficiency. A thin-film of a rare-earth oxide is one method for producing an efficient, rugged selective emitter. An efficiency of 0.14 and power density of 9.2 W/KG at 1200K is calculated for a hypothetical thin-film neodymia (Nd2O3) selective emitter TPV system that uses radioisotope decay as the thermal energy source.

  10. Power from Radioisotopes (Rev.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corliss, William R; Mead, Robert L

    1971-01-01

    This booklet discusses Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP), called isotope power generators, that are based on using heat from the decay of radioisotopes to produce electricity. These are the SNAP systems with odd-numbered designators. The basics of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) are discussed and their uses as power sources in space exploration and on earth are described. Various radioisotope heat sources are discussed and a table of RTGs built under the SNAP program listing their uses, electrical power, weight, the radioisotope used, the radioisotope's half-life, and the generator life is given.

  11. Fine structure in the alpha decay of {sup 224} U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Martens, A.; Hauschild, K.; Rezynkina, K. [CNRS-IN2P3, CSNSM, Universite Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Dorvaux, O.; Gall, B.; Dechery, F.; Faure, H. [CNRS-IN2P3, IPHC, Universite de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Yeremin, A.V.; Chelnokov, M.L.; Chepigin, V.I.; Isaev, A.V.; Izosimov, I.N.; Katrasev, D.E.; Kuznetsov, A.N.; Kuznetsova, A.A.; Malyshev, O.N.; Popeko, A.G.; Sokol, E.A.; Svirikhin, A.I. [JINR, FLNR, Dubna (Russian Federation); Piot, J. [CNRS-IN2P3, GANIL, CEA-DSM, Caen (France); Rubert, J. [CNRS-IN2P3, IPHC, Universite de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); CNRS-IN2P3, LPSC, Universite Grenoble-Alpes, Grenoble (France)

    2014-08-15

    {sup 224}U nuclei were populated in fusion-evaporation reactions using a {sup 206}Pb target and an intense {sup 22}Ne beam. Fusion-evaporation residues were separated by the new separator SHELS at the FLNR, Dubna and implanted into a large-area double-sided silicon strip detector. Position- and time-correlated alpha decays were used to identify evaporation residues. A new α -decay line at 8095(11) keV was observed in this work and assigned as the decay from {sup 224}U to the first excited 2{sup +} in the daughter nucleus {sup 220}Th. Coincident photons were also observed allowing to unambiguously determine the excitation energy of the first excited 2{sup +} state in {sup 220}Th to be 386.5(1) keV and not 373.3(1)keV as previously reported. The half-life of {sup 224}U was measured to be 396(17)μs. (orig.)

  12. A fractional calculus approach to investigate the alpha decay processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the nuclear decay equation is taken under consideration by making use of fractional calculus. In this context, the first-order time derivative is changed to a Caputo fractional derivative hence, the resulting equation is the time fractional nuclear decay equation. The solution of this equation is obtained in terms of Mittag–Leffler function which plays an important role to study the non-Markovian feature of physical processes. As an application of this time fractional formalism, alpha decay half-life values have been calculated for Pb, Po, Rn, Ra, Th and U isotopes. Consequently, the theoretical half-life values have been obtained in consistent with the experimental data. The dependence of the order of fractional derivative μ being a measure of fractality of time, on the nuclear structure has been established. In the investigations carried out, we have arrived to the conclusion that for the μ values which are closed to one, where time becomes homogenous and continuous, the shell closure effects are predominant and that the fractional derivative order μ (i.e., fractality of time) and nuclear structure are closely related to each other. (author)

  13. Alpha decay energies and half-lives for possibly synthesized superheavy elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHI Qi-Jun; REN Zhong-Zhou; ZHANG Xiao-Ping; ZHOU Xiao-Hong; GAN Zai-Guo; QIN Zhi; XU Hu-Shan

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the ground state properties of some superheavy nuclei, which may be synthesized in future experiments. Special emphases are placed on the alpha decay energies and half-lives. The alpha decay energies and half-lives from different theoretical models are compared and discussed comprehensively. Through these calculations and comparisons, the optimal superheavy elements to be synthesized in future experiments are proposed theoretically.

  14. Alpha decay as a probe for the structure of neutron-deficient nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Chong

    2016-01-01

    The advent of radioactive ion beam facilities and new detector technologies have opened up new possibilities to investigate the radioactive decays of highly unstable nuclei, in particular the proton emission, $\\alpha$ decay and heavy cluster decays from neutron-deficient (or proton-rich) nuclei around the proton drip line. It turns out that these decay measurements can serve as a unique probe for studying the structure of the nuclei involved. On the theoretical side, the development in nuclear many-body theories and supercomputing facilities have also made it possible to simulate the nuclear clusterization and decays from a microscopic and consistent perspective. In this article we would like to review the current status of these structure and decay studies in heavy nuclei, regarding both experimental and theoretical opportunities. We then discuss in detail the recent progress in our understanding of the nuclear $\\alpha$ formation probabilities in heavy nuclei and their indication on the underlying nuclear st...

  15. Radioisotope instruments

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, J F; Silverleaf, D J

    1971-01-01

    International Series of Monographs in Nuclear Energy, Volume 107: Radioisotope Instruments, Part 1 focuses on the design and applications of instruments based on the radiation released by radioactive substances. The book first offers information on the physical basis of radioisotope instruments; technical and economic advantages of radioisotope instruments; and radiation hazard. The manuscript then discusses commercial radioisotope instruments, including radiation sources and detectors, computing and control units, and measuring heads. The text describes the applications of radioisotop

  16. Study of rare alpha decays with scintillating bolometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardani, L., E-mail: laura.cardani@roma1.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza University of Roma, Roma I-00185 (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Roma, Roma I-00185 (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    Rare α decays can be studied with an unprecedented sensitivity by means of scintillating bolometers, as these detectors can provide a large source mass as well as an excellent resolution and can disentangle the nature of the interacting particle thanks to the different light yield. As an example of the results that can be obtained with this technique, I report the conclusive test on the identification of {sup 209}Bi decay and the measurement of the half-life of this isotope. In addition, I present a measurement with a PbWO{sub 4} scintillating bolometer, in which the lead isotopes decays were studied.

  17. Alpha decay properties of heavy and superheavy elements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G M Carmel Vigila Bai; J Umai Parvathiy

    2015-01-01

    Analysing accurately the lifetimes of -decay chains is an important tool to detect and study the properties of superheavy nuclei. 48Ca is used in the synthesis of superheavy nuclei = 106−118 at Dubna. The experimental work of 48Ca projectiles at Dubna has given an opportunity to study the superheavy element (SHE). Here, the -decay properties for = 106–118 are evaluated using our CYE model and are compared with the available experimental and theoretical values.

  18. Recent $\\alpha$ decay half-lives and analytic expression predictions including superheavy nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Royer, G

    2008-01-01

    New recent experimental $\\alpha$ decay half-lives have been compared with the results obtained from previously proposed formulas depending only on the mass and charge numbers of the $\\alpha$ emitter and the Q$\\alpha$ value. For the heaviest nuclei they are also compared with calculations using the Density-Dependent M3Y (DDM3Y) effective interaction and the Viola-Seaborg-Sobiczewski (VSS) formulas. The correct agreement allows us to make predictions for the $\\alpha$ decay half-lives of other still unknown superheavy nuclei from these analytic formulas using the extrapolated Q$\\alpha$ of G. Audi, A. H. Wapstra, and C. Thibault [Nucl. Phys. A729, 337 (2003)].

  19. Calculation of excitation functions of proton, alpha and deuteron induced reactions for production of medical radioisotopes {sup 122–125}I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artun, Ozan, E-mail: ozanartun@yahoo.com; Aytekin, Hüseyin, E-mail: huseyinaytekin@gmail.com

    2015-02-15

    In this work, the excitation functions for production of medical radioisotopes {sup 122–125}I with proton, alpha, and deuteron induced reactions were calculated by two different level density models. For the nuclear model calculations, the Talys 1.6 code were used, which is the latest version of Talys code series. Calculations of excitation functions for production of the {sup 122–125}I isotopes were carried out by using the generalized superfluid model (GSM) and Fermi-gas model (FGM). The results have shown that generalized superfluid model is more successful than Fermi-gas model in explaining the experimental results.

  20. Study of the Alpha-Decay Chain for7753 194Rn with Relativistic Mean-Field Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENG Zong-Qiang; GUO Jian-You

    2008-01-01

    The structures of the nuclei on the alpha-decay chain of 194Rn are investigated in the deformed relativistic mean-field theory with the effective interaction TMA. We put an emphasis on the ground state properties of 194Rn. The calculated alpha-decay energies and lifetimes are both very close to the experimental data for 186pb and 190po. For 194 Rn, the deviations are a little large on both the alpha-decay energy and the lifetime. We also calculate the alpha-decay energies for the isotopes 192~208Rn. The tendency for the change of the alpha-decay energies with neutron number is correctly reproduced in the relativistic mean-field theory (RMF). In general, the RMF theory can give a good description of the alpha decay chain of 194Rn.

  1. Alpha-decay-induced fracturing in zircon: the transition from the crystalline to the metamict state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A natural single crystal of zircon, ZrSiO4, from Sri Lanka exhibited zonation due to alpha-decay damage. The zones vary in thickness on a scale from one to hundreds of micrometers. The uranium and thorium concentrations vary from zone to zone such that the alpha-decay dose is between 0.2 x 1016 and 0.8 x 1016 alpha-event per milligram (0.15 to 0.60 displacement per atom). The transition from the crystalline to the aperiodic metamict state occurs over this dose range. Differential expansion of individual layers due to variations in their alpha-decay dose caused a systematic pattern of fractures that do not propagate across aperiodic layers. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed a systematic change in the microstructure from a periodic atomic array to an aperiodic array with increasing alpha-decay dose. At doses greater than 0.8 x 1016 alpha-events per milligram there is no evidence for long-range order. This type of damage will accumulate in actinide-bearing, ceramic nuclear waste forms. The systematic pattern of fractures would occur in crystalline phases that are zoned with respect to actinide radionuclides

  2. Alpha-decay--induced fracturing in zircon: the transition from the crystalline to the metamict state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakoumakos, B C; Murakami, T; Lumpkin, G R; Ewing, R C

    1987-06-19

    A natural single crystal of zircon, ZrSiO(4,) from Sri Lanka exhibited zonation due to alpha-decay damage. The zones vary in thickness on a scale from one to hundreds of micrometers. The uranium and thorium concentrations vary from zone to zone such that the alpha-decay dose is between 0.2 x 10(16) and 0.8 x 10(16) alpha-events per milligram (0.15 to 0.60 displacement per atom). The transition from the crystalline to the aperiodic metamict state occurs over this dose range. Differential expansion of individual layers due to variations in their alpha-decay dose caused a systematic pattern of fractures that do not propagate across aperiodic layers. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed a systematic change in the microstructure from a periodic atomic array to an aperiodic array with increasing alpha-decay dose. At doses greater than 0.8 x 10(16) alpha-events per milligram there is no evidence for long-range order. This type of damage will accumulate in actinide-bearing, ceramic nuclear waste forms. The systematic pattern of fractures would occur in crystalline phases that are zoned with respect to actinide radionuclides. PMID:17835739

  3. Role of nuclear surface tension coefficient in alpha decay process of the superheavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper role of nuclear surface tension in alpha decay resulted from the need to improve the Isospin Cluster Model, where the excess of neutron and proton numbers are taken in account effectively of a nucleus in decay calculations. The appropriate value of nuclear surface tension coefficient in proximity potential which plays an important role to estimate the nuclear attraction between two nuclear surfaces is reviewed, in this model. The nuclear proximity force is proportional to the surface tension and its contribution necessarily should be appropriate. The synthesis of super heavy elements, formed by either of cold fusion or hot fusion process, is primarily decay through alpha-particle emission. The successive emission of alpha particles from a superheavy element ends at spontaneous fission

  4. On the Validity of the Geiger-Nuttall Alpha-Decay Law and its Microscopic Basis

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, C; Huyse, M; Liotta, R J; Van Duppen, P; Wyss, R

    2014-01-01

    The Geiger-Nuttall (GN) law relates the partial $\\alpha$-decay half-life with the energy of the escaping $\\alpha$ particle and contains for every isotopic chain two experimentally determined coefficients. The expression is supported by several phenomenological approaches, however its coefficients lack a fully microscopic basis. In this paper we will show that: 1) the empirical coefficients that appear in the GN law have a deep physical meaning and 2) the GN law is successful within the restricted experimental data sets available so far, but is not valid in general. We will show that, when the dependence of logarithm values of the $\\alpha$ formation probability on the neutron number is not linear or constant, the GN law is broken. For the $\\alpha$ decay of neutron-deficient nucleus $^{186}$Po, the difference between the experimental half-life and that predicted by the GN Law is as large as one order of magnitude.

  5. Alpha-decay-induced fracturing in zircon - The transition from the crystalline to the metamict state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakoumakos, Bryan C.; Murakami, Takashi; Lumpkin, Gregory R.; Ewing, Rodney C.

    1987-06-01

    Zonation due to alpha-decay damage in a natural single crystal of zircon from Sri Lanka is discussed. The zones vary in thickness on a scale from one to hundreds of microns. The uranium and thorium concentrations vary from zone to zone such that the alpha decay dose is between 0.2 x 10 to the 16th and 0.8 x 10 to the 16th alpha-events per milligram. The transition from the crystalline to the aperiodic metamict state occurs over this dose range. At doses greater than 0.8 x 10 to the 16th alpha events/mg there is no evidence for long-range order. This type of damage will accumulate in actinide-bearing, ceramic nuclear waste forms. The systematic pattern of fractures would occur in crystalline phases that are zoned with respect to actinide radionuclides.

  6. Study of the excited levels of 233Pa by the 237Np alpha decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The excited levels in 233Pa following the 237Np alpha decay have been studied, by performing different experiences to complete available data and supply new information. Thus, two direct alpha spectrum measurement, one alpha-gamma bidimensional coincidence experiment, three gamma-gamma and gamma-X ray coincidences and some other measurements of the gamma spectrum, direct and coincident with alpha-particles have been made. These last experiences have allowed to obviate usual radiochemical separation methods, the 233Pa radioactive descendent interferences being eliminated by means of the coincidence technic. As a result, a primary decay scheme has been elaborated, including 15 new gamma transitions and two new levels, not observed in the most recent works. (Author) 60 refs

  7. Angular correlations and decay branching ratio for excited state of 7Li*(7,45 MeV) in reactions 7Li(alpha, alpha)7Li*

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of differential cross-sections of alpha-particle inelastic scattering by 7Li nuclei and 7Li(alpha, alpha 6Li)n, 7Li(alpha, alpha alpha)t reactions have been performed at the energy Ea = 27,2 MeV. Probability of 7Li*(7,45 MeV) decay into 6Li + n channel has been determined from the ratio of cross-sections measured in kinematically complete and incomplete experiments. The large discrepancy of this value (P 0,49 ± 0,06) and of those obtained at the study of 7Li*(7,45 MeV) decay in binary reactions can be explained by the influence of Coulomb field of accompanied alpha-particle on the decay of near-threshold resonances in three-particle reactions

  8. Half-lives with Yukawa proximity potential for alpha-decay process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We intend to study the alpha-decay half-lives of some nuclei from ground state to ground state. We consider a potential model with Yukawa proximity potential. We see that the results are in good agreement with the experimental data. (author)

  9. Can a many-nucleon structure be visible in bremsstrahlung emission during $\\alpha$ decay?

    CERN Document Server

    Maydanyuk, Sergei P; Zou, Li-Ping

    2015-01-01

    We analyze if the nucleon structure of the $\\alpha$ decaying nucleus can be visible in the experimental bremsstrahlung spectra of the emitted photons which accompany such a decay. We develop a new formalism of the bremsstrahlung model taking into account distribution of nucleons in the $\\alpha$ decaying nuclear system. We conclude the following: (1) After inclusion of the nucleon structure into the model the calculated bremsstrahlung spectrum is changed very slowly for a majority of the $\\alpha$ decaying nuclei. However, we have observed that visible changes really exist for the $^{106}{\\rm Te}$ nucleus ($Q_{\\alpha}=4.29$ MeV, $T_{1/2}$=70 mks) even for the energy of the emitted photons up to 1 MeV. This nucleus is a good candidate for future experimental study of this task. (2) Inclusion of the nucleon structure into the model increases the bremsstrahlung probability of the emitted photons. (3) We find the following tendencies for obtaining the nuclei, which have bremsstrahlung spectra more sensitive to the ...

  10. The Resonance Theory of Proton and Alpha Decay from Hot Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Karpeshin, F F; Vardaci, E; Brondi, A; Moro, R; Abramovich, S N; Serov, V I; Vardaci, Emanuele; Brondi, Augusto; Moro, Renata

    2005-01-01

    The consecutive microscopic solution is presented of the problem of tunneling of a particle through a potential barrier. The method is applied to the alpha and proton decay of compound systems formed in fusion reaction. Appearance of the peaks in the spectrum of emitted particles is predicted. The peaks correspond to quasistationary states inside the potential barrier.

  11. Investigation of a gas-catcher/ion guide system using alpha-decay recoil products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peraejaervi, K. E-mail: kari.perajarvi@phys.jyu.fi; Huikari, J.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Dendooven, P

    2002-04-22

    {sup 219}Rn recoils from the alpha decay of {sup 223}Ra have been used to study the efficiency and delay time distributions of a gas-catcher/ion guide system. Ions with charge states up to +4 were coming out of the gas cell. Combining efficiency and delay time measurements, ion survival times in plasma free conditions can be deduced.

  12. Plutonium-238 alpha-decay damage study of the ceramic waste form.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, S M [U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415; Barber, T L [U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415; Cummings, D G [U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415; DiSanto, T [U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415; Esh, D W [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001; Giglio, J J [U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415; Goff, K M [U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415; Johnson, S G [U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415; Kennedy, J R [U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415; Jue, J-F [U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415; Noy, M [U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415; O' Holleran, T P [U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415; Sinkler, W [UOP LLC, 25 E Algonquin Road, Des Plaines, IL 60017

    2006-03-27

    An accelerated alpha-decay damage study of a glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form has recently been completed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the physical and chemical durability of the waste form after significant exposure to alpha decay. This accelerated alpha-decay study was performed by doping the ceramic waste form with {sup 238}Pu which has a much greater specific activity than {sup 239}Pu that is normally present in the waste form. The alpha-decay dose at the end of the four year study was approximately 1 x 10{sup 18} alpha-decays/gram of material. An equivalent time period for a similar dose of {sup 239}Pu would require approximately 1100 years. After four years of exposure to {sup 238}Pu alpha decay, the investigation observed little change to the physical or chemical durability of the ceramic waste form (CWF). Specifically, the {sup 238}Pu-loaded CWF maintained it's physical integrity, namely that the density remained constant and no cracking or phase de-bonding was observed. The materials chemical durability and phase stability also did not change significantly over the duration of the study. The only significant measured change was an increase of the unit-cell lattice parameters of the plutonium oxide and sodalite phases of the material and an increase in the release of salt components and plutonium of the waste form during leaching tests, but, as mentioned, these did not lead to any overall loss of waste form durability. The principal findings from this study are: (1) {sup 238}Pu-loaded CWF is similar in microstructure and phase composition to referenced waste form. (2) Pu was observed primarily as oxide comprised of aggregates of nano crystals with aggregates ranging in size from submicron to twenty microns in diameter. (3) Pu phases were primarily found in the intergranular glassy regions. (4) PuO phase shows expected unit cell volume expansion due to alpha decay damage of approximately 0.7%, and the sodalite phase unit cell

  13. Alpha Decay Potential Barriers and Half-Lives and Analytical Formula Predictions for Superheavy Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Guy; Zhang, Hongfei

    The α decay potential barriers are determined in the cluster-like shape path within a generalized liquid drop model including the proximity effects between the α particle and the daughter nucleus and adjusted to reproduce the experimental Qα. The α emission half-lives are determined within the WKB penetration probability. Calculations using previously proposed formulae depending only on the mass and charge of the alpha emitter and Qα are also compared with new experimental alpha-decay half-lives. The agreement allows to provide predictions for the α decay half-lives of other still unknown superheavy nuclei using the Qα determined from the 2003 atomic mass evaluation of Audi, Wapstra and Thibault.

  14. Revisiting alpha decay-based near-light-speed particle propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenwu; Liu, Zhen; Yang, Yang; Du, Shiyu

    2016-08-01

    Interplanet and interstellar travels require long-term propulsion of spacecrafts, whereas the conventional schemes of propulsion are limited by the velocity of the ejected mass. In this study, alpha particles released by nuclear decay are considered as a potential solution for long-time acceleration. The principle of near-light-speed particle propulsion (NcPP) was elucidated and the stopping and range of ions in matter (SRIM) was used to predict theoretical accelerations. The results show that NcPP by means of alpha decay is feasible for long-term spacecraft propulsion and posture adjustment in space. A practical NcPP sail can achieve a speed >150km/s and reach the brink of the solar system faster than a mass equivalent solar sail. Finally, to significantly improve the NcPP sail, the hypothesis of stimulated acceleration of nuclear decay (SAND) was proposed, which may shorten the travel time to Mars to within 20 days.

  15. Alpha decay potential barriers and half-lives and analytical formula predictions for superheavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The α decay potential barriers are determined in the cluster-like shape path within a generalized liquid drop model including the proximity effects between the α particle and the daughter nucleus and adjusted to reproduce the experimental Qα. The α emission half-lives are determined within the WKB penetration probability. Calculations using previously proposed formulae depending only on the mass and charge of the alpha emitter and Qα are also compared with new experimental alpha-decay half-lives. The agreement allows to provide predictions for the α decay half-lives of other still unknown superheavy nuclei using the Qα determined from the 2003 atomic mass evaluation of Audi, Wapstra and Thibault. (author)

  16. Bremsstrahlung emission probability in the {alpha} decay of {sup 210}Po

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boie, Hans-Hermann

    2009-06-03

    A high-statistics measurement of bremsstrahlung emitted in the {alpha} decay of {sup 210}Po has been performed. The measured differential emission probabilities, which could be followed up to {gamma}-energies of {proportional_to} 500 keV, allow for the first time for a serious test of various model calculations of the bremsstrahlung accompanied {alpha} decay. It is shown that corrections to the {alpha}-{gamma} angular correlation due to the interference between the electric dipole and quadrupole amplitudes and due to the relativistic character of the process have to be taken into account. With the experimentally derived angular correlation the measured energydifferential bremsstrahlung emission probabilities show excellent agreement with the fully quantum mechanical calculation. (orig.)

  17. Angular correlation measurements for 4-{alpha} decaying states in {sup 16}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuosmaa, A.H.; Back, B.B.; Betts, R.R. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Previous measurements of the {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,{sup 8}Be){sup 16}O{sup *}(4 {alpha}) reaction identified discrete levels in {sup 16}O which decay by breakup into 4 {alpha} particles through a number of different decay sequences, including {sup 16}O{sup *} {yields} {sup 8}Be + {sup 8}Be and {alpha} + {sup 12}C (O{sub 2}{sup +}). These states are observed in a range of excitation energies where resonances are observed in inelastic {alpha} + {sup 12}C scattering leading to the {sup 8}Be + {sup 8}Be and {alpha} + {sup 12}C final states. These resonances were associated with 4 {alpha}-particle chain configurations in {sup 16}O. Should the states populated in the {sup 12}C + {sup 12}C reaction possess this same extended structure, it would serve as an important piece of evidence supporting the idea that even more deformed structures are formed in the {sup 24}Mg compound system. In order to more firmly make this association, it is important to determine the spins of the states populated in the {sup 12}C + {sup 12}C reaction.

  18. Phenomenological formula for alpha-decay half-lives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A phenomenological formula is presented for the partial half-life from the Q value for α decay. It is constructed in a conventional way by considering the penetrability of a charged particle in a spherical Coulomb potential. Parameters in the formula are fixed because they are determined by physical constants except for the following three adjustable parameters: the product of the collision frequency of an α particle and the formation probability, N; the distance between the charge radius and the radius of an inner point of the Coulomb barrier, r 0; and the odd-mass hindrance, h 0. The values obtained for the three adjustable parameters are reasonable, in contrast with those of conventional models such as the Viola-Seaborg formula. The root-mean-square deviations from experimental partial half-lives for even-even, odd-A, and odd-odd nuclei are 0.344, 0.740, and 0.940 (in log10), respectively. The obtained formula gives half-lives that are two or three times longer than those obtained using the Viola-Seaborg formula in the superheavy nuclear mass region. (author)

  19. Effects of alpha-decay on spent fuel corrosion behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of results in the area of spent fuel characterization as nuclear waste is presented. These studies are focused on primary aspects of spent fuel corrosion, by considering different fuel compositions and burn ups, as well as a wide set of environmental conditions. The key parameter is the storage time of the fuel e.g. in view of spent fuel retrieval or in view of its final disposal. To extrapolate data obtainable from a laboratory-acceptable timescale to those expected after storage periods of interest have elapsed (amounting in the extreme case to geological ages) is a tough challenge. Emphasis is put on key aspects of fuel corrosion related to fuel properties at a given age and environmental conditions expected in the repository: e.g. the fuel activity (radiolysis effects), the effects of helium build-up and of groundwater composition. A wide range of techniques, from traditional leaching experiments to advanced electrochemistry, and of materials, including spent fuel with different compositions/burnups and analogues like the so-called alpha-doped UO2, are employed for these studies. The results confirm the safety of European underground repository concepts. (authors)

  20. Evidence for B0->rho0rho0 Decay and Implications for the CKM Angle alpha

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Abrams, G S; Adye, T; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Albert, J; Aleksan, R; Allen, M T; Allison, J; Altenburg, D D; Andreotti, M; Angelini, C; Anulli, F; Arnaud, N; Asgeirsson, D J; Aston, D; Azzolini, V; Baak, M A; Back, J J; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Band, H R; Banerjee, Sw; Bard, D J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Barrett, M; Bartoldus, R; Batignani, G; Battaglia, M; Bauer, J M; Bechtle, P; Beck, T W; Behera, P K; Bellini, F; Ben-Haim, E; Benelli, G; Berger, N; Bernard, D; Berryhill, J W; Bettarini, S; Bettoni, D; Bevan, A J; Bhuyan, B; Bianchi, F; Biasini, M; Biesiada, J; Blanc, F; Blaylock, G; Blinov, V E; Bloom, P C; Blount, N L; Bomben, M; Bondioli, M; Bonneaud, G R; Bosisio, L; Boutigny, D; Boyd, J T; Bozzi, C; Brandt, T; Brau, J E; Briand, H; Brown, D N; Bruinsma, M; Brunet, S; Buchanan, C; Bugg, W; Bukin, A D; Bula, R; Burchat, P R; Burke, J P; Button-Shafer, J; Buzzo, A; Bóna, M; Cahn, R N; Calabrese, R; Calcaterra, A; Calderini, G; Campagnari, C; Carpinelli, M; Cartaro, C; Castelli, G; Cavallo, N; Cavoto, G; Cenci, R; Chai, X; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Chao, M; Charles, M J; Chauveau, J; Chavez, C A; Chen, A; Chen, C; Chen, E; Chen, J C; Chen, S; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Cheng, C H; Chia, Y M; Cibinetto, G; Clark, P J; Claus, R; Cochran, J; Coleman, J P; Contri, R; Convery, M R; Corwin, L A; Cossutti, F; Cottingham, W N; Covarelli, R; Cowan, G; Cowan, R; Crawley, H B; Cremaldi, L; Cunha, A; Curry, S; Côté, D; D'Orazio, A; Dahmes, B; Dallapiccola, C; Dasu, S; Dauncey, P D; David, P; Davier, M; Davis, C L; De Nardo, Gallieno; De Sangro, R; Del Amo-Sánchez, P; Del Buono, L; Del Re, D; Della Ricca, G; Denig, A G; Di Lodovico, F; Di Marco, E; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, L; Dorfan, J; Druzhinin, V P; Dubitzky, R S; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Dvoretskii, A; Ebert, M; Eckhart, E A; Eckmann, R; Edgar, C L; Edwards, A J; Eigen, G; Eisner, A M; Elmer, P; Emery, S; Ernst, J A; Escalier, M; Eschenburg, V; Eschrich, I; Eyges, V; Fabozzi, F; Faccini, R; Fang, F; Feltresi, E; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Field, R C; Finocchiaro, G; Flacco, C J; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Flood, K T; Ford, W T; Forster, I J; Forti, F; Foulkes, S D; Franek, B; Frey, R; Fritsch, M; Fry, J R; Fulsom, B G; Gabathuler, E; Gaidot, A; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Gamet, R; Gan, K K; Ganzhur, S F; Gary, J W; Gaspero, M; Gatto, C; Gaz, A; George, K A; Giorgi, M A; Gladney, L; Glanzman, T; Godang, R; Golubev, V B; Gowdy, S J; Gradl, W; Graham, M T; Graugès-Pous, E; Grenier, P; Gritsan, A V; Grosdidier, G; Groysman, Y; Haire, M; Halyo, V; Hamano, K; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Hamon, O; Harrison, P F; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hartfiel, B L; Hast, C; Hauke, A; Hawkes, C M; Hearty, C; Held, T; Hertzbach, S S; Heusch, C A; Hill, E J; Hirschauer, J F; Hitlin, D G; Hollar, J J; Hong, T M; Honscheid, K; Hopkins, D A; Hrynóva, T; Hufnagel, D; Hulsbergen, W D; Hutchcroft, D E; Höcker, A; Igonkina, O; Innes, W R; Izen, J M; Jackson, P D; Jackson, P S; Jacobsen, R G; Jain, V; Jasper, H; Jawahery, A; Jessop, C P; Kadyk, J A; Kagan, H; Karyotakis, Yu; Kass, R; Kelsey, M H; Kerth, L T; Khan, A; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kirkby, D; Klose, V; Knecht, N S; Koch, H; Kolb, J A; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kovalskyi, D; Kowalewski, R V; Kozanecki, W; Kreisel, A; Krishnamurthy, M; Kroeger, R; Kroseberg, J; Kukartsev, G; Kutter, P E; Kyberd, P; La Vaissière, C de; Lacker, H M; Lae, C K; Lafferty, G D; Lanceri, L; Lange, D J; Lankford, A J; Latham, T E; Latour, E; Lau, Y P; Lazzaro, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lees, J P; Legendre, M; Leith, D W G S; Lepeltier, V; Leruste, P; Lewandowski, B; Li Gioi, L; Li, S; Li, X; Lista, L; Liu, F; Liu, H; Lo Vetere, M; LoSecco, J M; Lockman, W S; Lombardo, V; Long, O; Lopes-Pegna, D; Lopez-March, N; Lou, X C; Lu, M; Luitz, S; Lund, P; Luppi, E; Lusiani, A; Lutz, A M; Lynch, G; Lynch, H L; Lü, C; Lüth, V; MacFarlane, D B; Macri, M M; Mader, W F; Majewski, S A; Malcles, J; Mallik, U; Mancinelli, G; Mandelkern, M A; Marchiori, G; Margoni, M; Marks, J; Marsiske, H; Martin, E C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Mattison, T S; Mazur, M A; Mazzoni, M A; McKenna, J A; McMahon, T R; Mclachlin, S E; Meadows, B T; Mellado, B; Menges, W; Merkel, J; Messner, R; Meyer, N T; Meyer, W T; Mir, L M; Mishra, K; Mohanty, G B; Monge, M R; Monorchio, D; Moore, T B; Morandin, M; Morganti, M; Morganti, S; Morii, M; Morris, J P; Muheim, F; Müller, D R; Nagel, M; Narsky, I; Nash, J A; Nauenberg, U; Neal, H; Negrini, M; Neri, N; Nicholson, H; Nikolich, M B; Nogowski, R; Nugent, I M; O'Grady, C P; Ocariz, J; Ofte, I; Olaiya, E O; Olivas, A; Olsen, J; Onuchin, A P; Orimoto, T J; Osipenkov, I; Oyanguren, A; Ozcan, V E; Paar, H P; Pacetti, S; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Pan, B; Pan, Y; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Paoloni, E; Paolucci, P; Pappagallo, M; Park, W; Passaggio, S; Patel, P M; Patrignani, C; Patteri, P; Payne, D J; Pelizaeus, M; Pelliccioni, M; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Peruzzi, I M

    2006-01-01

    We search for the decays B0->rho0rho0, B0->rho0f0, and B0->f0f0 in a sample of about 384 million Upsilon(4S)->BBbar decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider at SLAC. We find evidence for B0->rho0rho0 with 3.5 sigma significance and measure the branching fraction BR = (1.07+-0.33+-0.19)10^-6 and longitudinal polarization fraction f_L = 0.87+-0.13+-0.04, where the first uncertainty is statistical, and the second is systematic. The uncertainty on the CKM unitarity angle alpha due to penguin contributions in B-> rho rho decays is 18 degrees at the 1 sigma level. We also set upper limits on the B0->rho0f0 and B0->f0f0 decay rates.

  1. Measurement of $\\alpha_{s}$ and the non-strange spectral functions in hadronic $\\tau$ decays with OPAL

    CERN Document Server

    Menke, S

    1999-01-01

    The spectral functions of the vector current and the axial-vector current have been measured in hadronic tau decays using the OPAL detector at LEP. Within the framework of the Operator Product Expansion a simultaneous determination of the strong coupling constant alpha /sub s/, the non-perturbative operators of dimension 6 and 8 and of the gluon condensate has been performed. Different perturbative descriptions have been compared to the data. The Contour Improved Fixed Order Perturbation Theory gives alpha /sub s/(m/sub tau //sup 2/)=0.348+or-0.009/sub exp/+or-0.019/sub theo/ at the tau - mass scale and alpha /sub s/(m/sub Z//sup 2/)=0.1219+or-0.0010/sub exp/+or-0.0017/sub theo/ at the Z/sup 0/-mass scale. The values obtained for alpha /sub s/(m/sub Z//sup 2/) using Fixed Order Perturbation Theory or Renormalon Chain Resummation are 2.3and 4.1 smaller, respectively. The `running' of the strong coupling between s /sub 0/ approximately=1.3 GeV/sup 2/ and s/sub 0/=m/sub tau //sup 2/ has been tested from direct f...

  2. O(N{sub f}{alpha}{sup 2}) corrections to muon decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart, R.G. [Randall Laboratory pf Physics, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    1997-03-01

    The calculation of the O(N{sub f}{alpha}{sup 2}) corrections to muon decay is described. These are the 2-loop diagrams containing a massless fermion loop and they form an important gauge-invariant subclass. It is shown that all such diagrams can be expressed in terms of universal master integral. We focus on the calculation of box diagrams and in particular on the removal of the ir infrared divergences. (author) 14 refs, 2 figs

  3. Investigation of a gas-catcher/ion guide system using alpha-decay recoil products

    CERN Document Server

    Peraejaervi, K; Rinta-Antila, S; Dendooven, P

    2002-01-01

    sup 2 sup 1 sup 9 Rn recoils from the alpha decay of sup 2 sup 2 sup 3 Ra have been used to study the efficiency and delay time distributions of a gas-catcher/ion guide system. Ions with charge states up to +4 were coming out of the gas cell. Combining efficiency and delay time measurements, ion survival times in plasma free conditions can be deduced.

  4. Alpha-decay energies of superheavy nuclei for the Fayans functional

    CERN Document Server

    Tolokonnikov, S V; Kortelainen, M; Lutostansky, Yu S; Saperstein, E E

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-decay energies for several chains of super-heavy nuclei are calculated by using Fayans functional FaNDF$^0$. They are compared to the experimental data and predictions of two Skyrme functionals, SLy4 and SkM*, and of the macro-micro method as well. The corresponding lifetimes are calculated with the use of the semi-phenomenological formulas by Parkhomenko and Sobiczewski and by Royer and Zhang.

  5. Radioisotope Power Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioisotope power programme of the US Atomic Energy Commission has brought forth a whole new technology of the use of radioisotopes as energy sources in electric power generators. Radioisotope power systems are particularly suited for remote applications where long-lived, compact, reliable power is needed. Able to perform satisfactorily under extreme environmental conditions of temperature, sunlight and electromagnetic radiations, these ''atomic batteries'' are attractive power sources for remote data collecting devices, monitoring systems, satellites and other space missions. Radioisotopes used as fuels generally are either alpha or beta emitters. Alpha emitters are the preferable fuels but are more expensive and less available than beta fuels and are generally reserved for space applications. Beta fuels separated from reactor fission wastes are being used exclusively in land and sea applications at the present. It can be expected, however, that beta emitters such as stiontium-90 eventually will be used in space. Development work is being carried out on generators which will use mixed fission products as fuel. This fuel will be less expensive than the pure radioisotopes since the costs of isotope separation and purification are eliminated. Prototype thermoelectric generators, fuelled with strontium-90 and caesium-137, are now in operation or being developed for use in weather stations, marine navigation aids and deep sea monitoring devices. A plutonium-238 thermoelectric generator is in orbit operating as electric power source in a US Navy TRANSIT satellite. Generators are under development for use on US National Aeronautics and Space Administration missions. The large quantities of radioactivity involved in radioisotope power sources require that special attention be given to safety aspects of the units. Rigid safety requirements have been established and extensive tests have been conducted to insure that these systems can be employed without creating undue

  6. Unified description of the proton, alpha, cluster decays and spontaneously fissions half- life

    CERN Document Server

    Mavrodiev, Strachimir Cht

    2016-01-01

    Some time ago the possibility of classical (without Gamow tunneling) universal description of radioactive nuclei decay was demonstrated. Such possibility is basis on the classical interpretation of Bohmian Psi-field reality in Bohmian-Chetaev mechanics and the hypothesis for the presence of dissipative forces, generated from the Gryzinski translational precession of the charged particles spin, in Langevin- Kramers diffusion mechanism. In this paper is present an unified model of proton, alpha decay, cluster radioactivity and spontaneous fission half-life as explicit function which depends on the total decay energy and kinetic energy, the number of protons and neutrons of daughter product, the number of protons and neutrons of mother nuclei and from a set) unknown digital parameters. The Half- lifes of the 573 nuclei taken from NuDat database together with the recent experimental data from Oganessian provide a basis for discovering the explicit form of the Kramers solution of Langevin type equation in a framew...

  7. Updated determination of $\\alpha_s(m_\\tau^2)$ from tau decays

    CERN Document Server

    Pich, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Using the most recent release of the ALEPH $\\tau$ decay data, we present a very detailed phenomenological update of the $\\alpha_s(m_\\tau^2)$ determination. We have exploited the sensitivity to the strong coupling in many different ways, exploring several complementary methodologies. All determinations turn out to be in excellent agreement, allowing us to extract a very reliable value of the strong coupling. We find $\\alpha_{s}^{(n_f=3)}(m_\\tau^2) = 0.328 \\pm 0.012$ which implies $\\alpha_{s}^{(n_f=5)}(M_Z^{2}) = 0.1197\\pm 0.0014$. We critically revise previous work, and point out the problems flawing some recent analyses which claim slightly smaller values.

  8. O(alpha_s^2) corrections to fermionic Higgs decays in the MSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Mihaila, L

    2010-01-01

    We compute the two-loop corrections of O(alpha_s^2) to the Yukawa couplings in the framework of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). The calculation is performed using the effective Lagrangian approach under the approximation of neglecting the Higgs boson mass with respect to the top quark, gluino and all squark flavour masses. As an application we derive the O(alpha_s^2) corrections to the partial decay width of the lightest Higgs boson to a bottom quark pair. We find that the two-loop corrections are sizable for large values of tan_beta and low CP-odd Higgs boson mass. With our calculation of the O(alpha_s^2) corrections the remaining theoretical uncertainties reduce below a few percent.

  9. Investigation of $\\alpha$-decay rates of $^{221}$Fr, $^{224}$Ra and $^{226}$Ra in different environments

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    It has recently been suggested, and indicated experimentally, that $\\alpha$- decay half-lives are modified by solid state effects in the surrounding environment. We propose here to measure with high accuracy the $\\alpha$-decay half-life of $^{221}$Fr, $^{224}$Ra and $^{226}$Ra in insulators and metals. Furthermore we plan to investigate the temperature dependency of the half-life in these materials (room temperature, 4 K and 10 mK).

  10. Revisiting alpha decay-based near-light-speed particle propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenwu; Liu, Zhen; Yang, Yang; Du, Shiyu

    2016-08-01

    Interplanet and interstellar travels require long-term propulsion of spacecrafts, whereas the conventional schemes of propulsion are limited by the velocity of the ejected mass. In this study, alpha particles released by nuclear decay are considered as a potential solution for long-time acceleration. The principle of near-light-speed particle propulsion (NcPP) was elucidated and the stopping and range of ions in matter (SRIM) was used to predict theoretical accelerations. The results show that NcPP by means of alpha decay is feasible for long-term spacecraft propulsion and posture adjustment in space. A practical NcPP sail can achieve a speed >150km/s and reach the brink of the solar system faster than a mass equivalent solar sail. Finally, to significantly improve the NcPP sail, the hypothesis of stimulated acceleration of nuclear decay (SAND) was proposed, which may shorten the travel time to Mars to within 20 days. PMID:27161512

  11. Shape coexistence and shell-model intruder states in the lead region studied by $\\alpha$ -decay

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % IS336 \\\\ \\\\ Low-lying 0$^+$ states in even-even nuclei near closed shells can be a manifestation of the coexistence of different shapes in the same nucleus. Deformed bandstructures built upon these 0$^+$ states, coexisting at low energy with the ground state band, have been observed in several regions of the nuclear chart, including the Z=82 region. Such structures have been found in the neutron-deficient even Pb nuclei and the mixing between intruder and normal states has been studied by the $\\alpha$- decay of $^{194, 196, 198}$Po towards the 0$^+$ excited and ground states in $^{190, 192, 194}$Pb using $\\alpha$-e-t coincidence events. It is expected that shape coexistence will occur in the light Po isotopes as well. Evidence for a deformed band at low excitation energy in $^{196, 198}$Po has been found in in-beam studies and the $\\alpha$-decay of $^{202}$Rn studied at ISOLDE revealed feeding to a 0$^+$~state at 816~keV in $^{198}$Po. \\\\ \\\\It is our intention to investigate the $^{194, 196}$Po nuclei with ...

  12. Space distributions and decay probability for excited state of 7Li*(7,45 MeV) in reaction 7Li(alpha, alpha6Li)n

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differential cross-sections of excitation and decay of 7Li*(7,45 MeV) resonance into 6Li + n channel in three particle reaction 7Li(alpha, alpha6Li)n at alpha-particle energy of 27,2 MeV have been determined in kinematically complete and incomplete experiments. Usage of position sensitive detector made it possible to obtain the data on space distributions of decay events for full range of possible angles and to determine the total probability of this process, which value essentially differs from the data for binary reactions. This result is agreed with previously obtained [1] and confirms the theoretical calculations [2] of decay branching ratio for short lived near-threshold resonances in three particle reactions

  13. Systematic Study on Alpha Decay Half-Lives of Superheavy Nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The α-decay half-lives of a set of superheavy nuclear isotope chain from Z = 105 to 120 have been analyzed systematically within the WKB method, and some nuclear structure features are found. The decay barriers have been determined in the quasi-molecular shape path within the Generalized Liquid Drop Model (GLDM) including the proximity effects between nucleons in a neck and the mass and charge asymmetry. The results are in reasonable agreement with the published experimental data for the alpha decay half-lives of isotopes of charge 112, 114, and 116, of the element 294118 and of some decay products. A comparison of present calculations with the results by the DDM3Y effective interaction and by the Viola-Seaborg-Sobiczewski (VSS) formulae is also made. The experimental α decay half lives all stand in between the GLDM calculations and VSS formula results. This demonstrates the possibility of these models to provide reasonable estimates for the half-lives of nuclear decays by α emissions for the domain of SHN. The half-lives of these new nuclei are thus well tested from the reasonable consistence of the macroscopic, the microscopic, the empirical formulae and the experimental data. This also shows that the present data of SHN themselves are consistent.It could suggest that the present experimental claims on the existence of new elements Z = 110 ~ 118 are reliable.It is expected that greater deviations of a few SHN between the data and the model may be eliminated by further improvements on the precision of the measurements.

  14. Weak phases $\\gamma$ and $\\alpha$ from $B^{+}$, or $B^{0}$ and $B_{s}$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Gronau, Michael; Gronau, Michael; Pirjol, Dan

    1999-01-01

    An improved method is presented for determining the weak angle $\\gamma$ of the unitarity triangle using decay rates for $B^+\\to K\\pi, B^+\\to K^+\\bar K^0$ and $B^+\\to \\pi^+\\eta$ (or $B^0\\to K\\pi$ and $B_s\\to K \\pi$), their CP-conjugate modes and the CP-averaged rate for $B^\\pm\\to\\pi^\\pm\\pi^{0}$. Using SU(3) symmetry, the annihilation (color-suppressed) contribution in $B^+(B^0)\\to K\\pi$ decays is subtracted away. Electroweak penguin effects are included in a model-independent way. The only significant SU(3) breaking effects are accounted for in the factorization approximation of tree amplitudes. The weak angle $\\alpha$ is obtained as a byproduct.

  15. A Brief Review of Ultra-Rare Alpha Decay Detection Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Tsyganov, Yu S

    2006-01-01

    Three approaches to the measurement of a rare alpha decaying products produced in heavy-ion induced nuclear reactions are described. One is based on a chemical extraction and following deposition of the nuclides under investigation onto the surface of the detector, whereas the second one is associated with long-lived products implanted into silicon detectors by using the electromagnetic separation technique. The third approach relates with an application of real-time mode detection of correlated energy-time-position recoil-alpha sequences from $^{48}$Ca-induced nuclear reactions with actinide targets, like $^{242, 244}$Pu, $^{245,248}$Cm, $^{243}$Am, and $^{249}$Cf. Namely with this technique it has became possible to provide a radical suppression of backgrounds in the full fusion (3-5$n$) reactions aimed at the synthesis of superheavy elements with Z=113-118.

  16. GAMCAT - a personal computer database on alpha particles and gamma rays from radioactive decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The GAMCAT database is a compilation of data describing the alpha particles and gamma rays that occur in the radioactive decay of all known nuclides, adapted for IBM Personal Computers and compatible systems. These compiled data have been previously published, and are now available as a compact database. Entries can be retrieved by defining the properties of the parent nuclei as well as alpha-particle and gamma-ray energies or any combination of these parameters. The system provides fast access to the data and has been completely written in C to run on an AT-compatible computer, with a hard disk and 640K of memory under DOS 2.11 or higher. GAMCAT is available from the Fachinformationszentrum Karlsruhe. (orig.)

  17. Extended systematics of alpha decay half lives for exotic superheavy nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Budaca, A I; Silisteanu, I

    2016-01-01

    The experimentally available data on the alpha decay half lives and Q? values for 96 superheavy nuclei are used to fix the parameters for a modified version of the Brown empirical formula through two fitting procedures which enables its comparison with similar fits using Viola-Seaborg and Royer formulas. The new expressions provide very good agreement with experimental data having fewer or the same number of parameters. All formulas with the obtained parameters are then extrapolated to generate half lives predictions for 125 unknown superheavy alpha emitters. The nuclei where the employed empirical formulas maximally or minimally diverge are pointed out and a selection of 36 nuclei with exceptional superposition of predictions was made for experimental reference.

  18. Predictions on the alpha decay chains of superheavy nuclei with Z =121 within the range 290 $\\leq$ A $\\leq$ 339

    CERN Document Server

    Santhosh, K P

    2016-01-01

    A systematic study on the alpha decay half lives of various isotopes of superheavy element \\textit{Z} = 121 within the range 290 $\\leq$ A $\\leq$ 339 is presented for the first time using Coulomb and proximity potential model for deformed nuclei (CPPMDN). The calculated $\\alpha$ decay half lives of the isotopes within our formalism match well with the values computed using Viola-Seaborg systematic, Universal curve of Poenaru et al., and the analytical formula of Royer. In our study by comparing the $\\alpha$ decay half lives with the spontaneous fission half lives, we have predicted $2\\alpha$ chain from $^{309, 311, 312}$121, $3\\alpha$ chain from $^{310}$121 and $1\\alpha$ chain from $^{313, 314}$121. Clearly our study shows that the isotopes of superheavy element \\textit{Z} = 121 within the mass range 309 $\\leq$ A $\\leq$ 314 will survive fission and can be synthesized and detected in the laboratory via alpha decay. We hope that our predictions will provide a new guide to future experiments.

  19. Relativistic (Z alpha)^2-Corrections and Leading Quantum Electrodynamic Corrections to the Two-Photon Decay Rate of Ionic States

    CERN Document Server

    Wundt, B J; 10.1103/PhysRevA.80.022505

    2009-01-01

    We calculate the relativistic corrections of relative order (Z alpha)^2$ to the two-photon decay rate of higher excited S and D states in ionic atomic systems, and we also evaluate the leading radiative corrections of relative order alpha (Z alpha)^2 ln[(Z alpha)^(-2)]. We thus complete the theory of the two-photon decay rates up to relative order alpha^3 ln(alpha). An approach inspired by nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics is used. We find that the corrections of relative order (Z alpha)^2 to the two-photon decay are given by the zitterbewegung, the spin-orbit coupling and by relativistic corrections to the electron mass, and by quadrupole interactions. We show that all corrections are separately gauge-invariant with respect to a "hybrid" transformation from velocity to length gauge, where the gauge transformation of the wave function is neglected. The corrections are evaluated for the two-photon decay from 2S, 3S, 3D, and 4S states in one-electron (hydrogenlike) systems, with 1S and 2S final states.

  20. Updated Measurement of the CKM Angle alpha Using B0->rho+rho- Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B

    2006-09-26

    The authors present results from an analysis of B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup -} using 316 fb{sup -1} of {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays observed with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. They measure the B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup -} branching fraction, longitudinal polarization fraction f{sub L}, and the CP-violating parameters S{sub long} and C{sub long}: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup -}) = (23.5 {+-} 2.2(stat) {+-} 4.1(syst)) x 10{sup -6}, f{sub L} = 0.977 {+-} 0.024(stat){sub -0.013}{sup +0.015}(syst), S{sub long} = -0.19 {+-} 0.21(stat){sub -0.07}{sup +0.05}(syst), C{sub long} = -0.07 {+-} 0.15(stat) {+-} 0.06(syst). Using an isospin analysis of B {yields} {rho}{rho} decays they determine the angle {alpha} of the unitarity triangle. One of the two solutions, {alpha} [74,117]{sup o} at 68% CL, is compatible with the standard model. All results presented here are preliminary.

  1. Experimental aspects of the adiabatic approach in estimating the effect of electron screening on alpha decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpeshin, F. F., E-mail: fkarpeshin@gmail.com [D.I. Mendeleev Institute for Metrology (VNIIM) (Russian Federation); Trzhaskovskaya, M. B. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Special features of the effect of the electron shell on alpha decay that have important experimental implications are studied within the adiabatic approach. The magnitude of the effect is about several tenths of a percent or smaller, depending on the transition energy and on the atomic number. A dominant role of inner shells is shown: more than 80% of the effect is saturated by 1s electrons. This circumstance plays a crucial role for experiments, making it possible to measure this small effect by a difference method in the same storage rings via a comparison of, for example, decay probabilities in bare nuclei and heliumlike ions. The reasons behind the relative success and the applicability limits of the frozen-shell model, which has been used to calculate the effect in question for more than half a century, are analyzed. An interesting experiment aimed at studying charged alpha-particle states is proposed. This experiment will furnish unique information for testing our ideas of the interplay of nonadiabatic and adiabatic processes.

  2. Trends in the development of radioisotope batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improved methods for producing radioisotopes by nuclear fuel reprocessing and the rapid development of microelectronics offer new possibilities for utilizing radioisotope batteries. A review is given of the main principles of conversion of decay energy into electric power. The current state of such energy sources is evaluated. Finally, new fields of application and further trends in the development are indicated. (author)

  3. Swelling induced by alpha decay in monazite and zirconolite ceramics: A XRD and TEM comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschanels, X.; Seydoux-Guillaume, A. M.; Magnin, V.; Mesbah, A.; Tribet, M.; Moloney, M. P.; Serruys, Y.; Peuget, S.

    2014-05-01

    Zirconolite and monazite matrices are potential ceramics for the containment of actinides (Np, Cm, Am, Pu) which are produced over the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. Actinides decay mainly through the emission of alpha particles, which in turn causes most ceramics to undergo structural and textural changes (amorphization and/or swelling). In order to study the effects of alpha decays on the above mentioned ceramics two parallel approaches were set up. The first involved the use of an external irradiation source, Au, which allowed the deposited recoil energy to be simulated. The second was based on short-lived actinide doping with 238Pu, (i.e. an internal source), via the incorporation of plutonium oxide into both the monazite and zirconolite structures during synthesis. In both types of irradiation experiments, the zirconolite samples became amorphous at room temperature with damage close to 0.3 dpa; corresponding to a critical dose of 4 × 1018 α g-1 (i.e. ∼1.3 × 1021 keV cm-3). Both zirconolite samples also showed the same degree of macroscopic swelling at saturation (∼6%), with ballistic processes being the predominant damaging effect. In the case of the monazite however, the macroscopic swelling and amorphization were dependent on the nature of the irradiation. Externally, (Au), irradiated samples became amorphous while also demonstrating a saturation swelling of up to 8%. In contrast to this, the swelling of the 238Pu doped samples was much smaller at ∼1%. Also, unlike the externally (Au) irradiated monazite these 238Pu doped samples remained crystalline up to 7.5 × 1018 α g-1 (0.8 dpa). XRD, TEM and swelling measurements were used to fully characterize and interpret this behavior. The low swelling and the conservation of the crystalline state of 238Pu doped monazite samples indicates that alpha annealing took place within this material.

  4. Alpha Decay Half-Lives of Some Nuclei from Ground State to Ground State with Yukawa Proximity Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E.Javadimanesh; H.Hassanabadi; A.A.Rajabi; H.Rahimov; S.Zarrinkamar

    2012-01-01

    We study the half-lives of some nuclei via the alpha-decay process from ground state to ground state. To go through the problem, we have considered a potential model with Yukawa proximity potential and have thereby calculated the half-lives. The comparison with the existing data is motivating.

  5. Measurement of the Strong Coupling Constant $\\alpha_s$ and the Vector and Axial-Vector Spectral Functions in Hadronic Tau Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Ashby, S F; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Betts, S; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bobinski, M; Bock, P; Böhme, J; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Bright-Thomas, P G; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Burgard, C; Bürgin, R; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Ciocca, C; Clarke, P E L; Clay, E; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Couyoumtzelis, C; Coxe, R L; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; del Pozo, L A; de Roeck, A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; Doucet, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Estabrooks, P G; Etzion, E; Evans, H G; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanfani, A; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fischer, H M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Geich-Gimbel, C; Geralis, T; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Hargrove, C K; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hillier, S J; Hobson, P R; Höcker, Andreas; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ishii, K; Jacob, F R; Jawahery, A; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Joly, A; Jones, C R; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kowalewski, R V; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Lawson, I; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Liebisch, R; List, B; Littlewood, C; Lloyd, A W; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Liu, D; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markopoulos, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, James L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Polok, J; Przybycien, M B; Rembser, C; Rick, Hartmut; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Roscoe, K; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Rust, D R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sahr, O; Sang, W M; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sproston, M; Stahl, A; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Tafirout, R; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Torrence, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Van Kooten, R; Vannerem, P; Verzocchi, M; Vikas, P; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1999-01-01

    The spectral functions of the vector current and the axial-vector current have been measured in hadronic tau decays using the OPAL detector at LEP. Within the framework of the Operator Product Expansion a simultaneous determination of the strong coupling constant alpha_s, the non-perturbative operators of dimension 6 and 8 and of the gluon condensate has been performed. Different perturbative descriptions have been compared to the data. The Contour Improved Fixed Order Perturbation Theory gives alpha_s(mtau**2) = 0.348 +- 0.009 +- 0.019 at the tau-mass scale and alpha_s(mz**2) = 0.1219 +- 0.0010 +- 0.0017 at the Z-mass scale. The values obtained for alpha_s(mz**2) using Fixed Order Perturbation Theory or Renormalon Chain Resummation are 2.3% and 4.1% smaller, respectively. The running of the strong coupling between s_0 ~1.3 GeV**2 and s_0 = mtau**2 has been tested from direct fits to the integrated differential hadronic decay rate R_tau. A test of the saturation of QCD sum rules at the tau-mass scale has been...

  6. Structure effects in the region of superheavy elements via the $\\alpha$-decay chain of $^{293}$118

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Raj K; Kumar, Rajesh; Balasubramaniam, M; Scheid, W; 10.1088/0954-3899/28/11/310

    2011-01-01

    The $\\alpha$-decay chain of $^{293}$118, first proposed in the Berkeley cold fusion experiment $^{208}$Pb($^{86}$Kr,1n) and now retracted, is calculated by using the preformed cluster model (PCM) of one of us (RKG). Also, the possible branchings of $\\alpha$-particles to heavier cluster decays of all the parents in this chain are calculated for the first time. The calculated Q-values, penetrabilities and preformation factors for $\\alpha$-decays suggest that the $^{285}$114 nucleus with Z=114, N=171 is a magic nucleus, either due to the magicity of Z=114, or of N=172 or of both. The N=172 is proposed to be a magic number in certain relativistic mean-field calculations, but with Z=120. The calculated cluster decays point to new interesting possibilities of $^{14}$C decay of the $^{281}$112 parent, giving rise to a (reasonably) deformed Z=106, N=161, $^{267}$106 daughter (N=162 being now established as the deformed magic shell) or to a doubly magic $^{48}$Ca cluster emitted from any of the parent nucleus in the $...

  7. Systematic study of $\\alpha$ decay half-lives for even-even nuclei within a two-potential approach

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Xiao-Dong; Li, Xiao-Hua

    2015-01-01

    $\\alpha$ decay is a common and important process for natural radioactivity of heavy and superheavy nuclei. The $\\alpha$ decay half-lives for even-even nuclei from Z=62 to Z=118 are systematically researched based on the two-potential approach with a quasi-stationary state approximation. To describe the deviations between experimental half-lives and calculated results due to the nuclear shell structure, a hindrance factor related with $\\alpha$ particle preformation probability is introduced. Our results can well reproduce the experimental data equally to the density-dependent cluster model and the generalized liquid drop model. We also study the isospin effect of nuclear potential in this work. Considering the isospin effect the calculated results improved about 7.3$\\%$.

  8. Predicting decay in free-radical concentration in L-. alpha. -alanine following high-LET radiation exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, J.W. (Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)); Olsen, K.J. (University Hospital of Copenhagen, Herlev (Denmark))

    1989-01-01

    Efforts have been made to develop a model that will predict time-dependent decay in radiation-induced free-radical concentration in L-{alpha}-alanine following heavy-charged-particle exposures. The decay rate depends on radiation quality, dose and dose-rate. For low doses, the decay-rate is approx. 0.5 and 1.5% per year following {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray exposures and Linac-produced X-ray or electron exposures. Decay rates, however, have been found to increase as measured from low average doses, sparse single tracks, of heavy charged particles. We have compared measured decay after exposures to low average doses from high-LET particles with predicted decay calculated as function of particle velocity and charge and detector parameters. The predicted decay is obtained by folding measured decay after Linac-produced electron exposures of very high doses into the calculated dose distribution around the heavy ion's path. Preliminary results show agreement between the experimental data and results obtained from this model, within the experimental uncertainty. (author).

  9. The Higgs-Boson Decay $H\\to gg$ to Order $\\alpha_s^5$ under the mMOM-Scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, Dai-Min; Wu, Xing-Gang; Shen, Jian-Ming

    2015-01-01

    We study the decay width of the Higgs-boson $H\\to gg$ up to order $\\alpha_s^5$ under the minimal momentum space subtraction scheme (mMOM-scheme). To improve the accuracy of perturbative QCD prediction, we adopt the principle of maximum conformality (PMC) to set its renormalization scales. A detailed comparison of the total decay width and the separate decay widths at each perturbative order before and after the PMC scale setting is presented. The PMC adopts the renormalization group equation to fix the optimal scales of the process. After the PMC scale setting, the scale-dependence for both the total and the separate decay widths are greatly suppressed, and the convergence of perturbative QCD series is improved. By taking the Higgs mass $M_H=125.09\\pm 0.21\\pm 0.11$ GeV, as recently given by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations, we predict $\\Gamma(H\\to gg)|_{\\rm mMOM, PMC} = 339.1\\pm 1.7^{+4.0}_{-2.4}$ keV, where the first error is for Higgs mass and the second error is the residual scale dependence by varying the...

  10. A systematic study of proton, alpha and cluster decays in Rhenium isotopes using the effective liquid drop model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Deepthy Maria; Ashok, Nithu; Joseph, Antony

    2016-01-01

    Employing the effective liquid drop model (ELDM), half-lives of proton and alpha decays and probable cluster decays are computed and analyzed for different proton-rich and neutron-rich isotopes of Rhenium. The investigation fortifies the phenomenon of cluster radioactivity (CR) in rare earth nuclei and also affirms the pivotal role played by neutron magicity in cluster decays. ELDM data is compared with that of universal decay law (UDL) model and found to be more efficient than the latter one. Apparently, cluster emissions slacken as the neutron number of daughter nucleus goes up and the linear nature of Geiger-Nuttall (G-N) plots stays unaltered even if the surface potential is incorporated.

  11. Development of a radioisotope heat source for the two-watt radioisotope thermoelectric generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Edwin I.; McNeil, Dennis C.; Amos, Wayne R.

    1992-01-01

    Described is a radioisotope heat source for the Two-Watt Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) which is being considered for possible application by the U.S. Navy and for other Department of Defense applications. The heat source thermal energy (75 Wt) is produced from the alpha decay of plutonium-238 which is in the form of high-fired plutonium dioxide. The capsule is non-vented and consists of three domed cylindrical components each closed with a corresponding sealed end cap. Surrounding the fuel is the liner component, which is fabricated from a tantalum-based alloy, T-111. Also fabricated from T-111 is the next component, the strength member, which serves to meet pressure and impact criteria. The outermost component, or clad, is the oxidation- and corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy, Hastelloy S. This paper defines the design considerations, details the hardware fabrication and welding processes, discusses the addition of yttrium to the fuel to reduce liner embrittlement, and describes the testing that has been conducted or is planned to assure that there is fuel containment not only during the heat source operational life, but also in case of an accident environment.

  12. Radioisotopes as Political Instruments, 1946–1953

    OpenAIRE

    Creager, Angela N. H.

    2009-01-01

    The development of nuclear «piles», soon called reactors, in the Manhattan Project provided a new technology for manufacturing radioactive isotopes. Radioisotopes, unstable variants of chemical elements that give off detectable radiation upon decay, were available in small amounts for use in research and therapy before World War II. In 1946, the U.S. government began utilizing one of its first reactors, dubbed X-10 at Oak Ridge, as a production facility for radioisotopes available for purchas...

  13. [alpha]-Decay damage effects in curium-doped titanate ceramic containing sodium-free high-level nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitamura, Hisayoshi; Matsumoto, Seiichiro; Tsuboi, Takashi; Hashimoto, Masaaki; Togashi, Yoshihiro; Kanazawa, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Ibaraki (Japan)); Stewart, M.W.A.; Vance, E.R.; Hart, K.P.; Ball, C.J. (Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, Lucas Heights, New South Wales (Australia). Lucas Heights Research Labs.); White, T.J.

    1994-09-01

    A polyphase titanate ceramic incorporating sodium-free simulated high-level nuclear waste was doped with 0.91 wt% of [sup 224]Cm to accelerate the effects of long-term self-irradiation arising from [alpha] decays. The ceramic included three main constituent minerals: hollandite, perovskite, and zirconolite, with some minor phases. Although hollandite showed the broadening of its X-ray diffraction lines and small lattice parameter changes during damage in growth, the unit cell was substantially unaltered. Perovskite and zirconolite, which are the primary hosts of curium, showed 2.7% and 2.6% expansions, respectively, of their unit cell volumes after a dose of 12 [times] 10[sup 17] [alpha] decays[center dot]g[sup [minus]1]. Volume swelling due to damage in growth caused an exponential (almost linear) decrease in density, which reached 1.7% after a dose of 12.4 [times] 10[sup 17] [alpha] decays[center dot]g[sup [minus]1]. Leach tests on samples that had incurred doses of 2.0 [times] 10[sup 17] and 4.5 [times] 10[sup 17] [alpha] decays[center dot]g[sup [minus]1] showed that the rates of dissolution of cesium and barium were similar to analogous leach rates from the equivalent cold ceramic, while strontium and calcium leach rates were 2--15 times higher. Although the cerium, molybdenum, strontium, and calcium leach rates in the present material were similar to those in the curium-doped sodium-bearing titanate ceramic reported previously, the cesium leach rate was 3--8 times lower.

  14. Measurement of the CKM Angle Alpha at the BABAR Detector Using B Meson Decays to Rho Final States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihalyi, Attila; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-10-16

    This thesis contains the results of an analysis of B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup -} using 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. From a fitted signal yield of 617 {+-} 52 events, the longitudinal polarizations fraction, f{sub L}, of the decay is measured to be 0.978 {+-} 0.014(stat){sub -0.029}{sup +0.021}(syst). The nearly fully longitudinal dominance of the B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup -} decay allows for a measurement of the time dependent CP parameters S{sub L} and C{sub L}, where the first parameter is sensitive to mixing induced CP violation and the second one to direct CP violation. From the same signal yield, these values are found to be S{sub L} = -0.33 {+-} 0.24(stat){sub -0.14}{sup +0.08}(syst) and C{sub L} = - 0.03 {+-} 0.18(stat) {+-} 0.09(syst). The CKM angle {alpha} is then determined, using these results and the branching fractions and polarizations of the decays B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{rho}{sup 0} and B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup 0}. This measurement is done with an isospin analysis, in which a triangle is constructed from the isospin amplitudes of these three decay modes. A {chi}{sup 2} expression that includes the measured quantities expressed as the lengths of the sides of the isospin triangles is constructed and minimized to determine a confidence level on {alpha}. Selecting the solution compatible with the Standard Model, one obtains {alpha} = 100{sup o} {+-} 13{sup o}.

  15. Non-statistical decay and $\\alpha$-correlations in the $^{12}$C+$^{12}$C fusion-evaporation reaction at 95 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Morelli, L; D'Agostino, M; Gulminelli, F; Bruno, M; Abbondanno, U; Appannababu, S; Barlini, S; Bini, M; Casini, G; Cinausero, M; Degerlier, M; Fabris, D; Gelli, N; Gramegna, F; Kravchuk, V L; Marchi, T; Pasquali, G; Piantelli, S; Valdré, S; Raduta, Ad R

    2014-01-01

    Multiple alpha coincidence and correlations are studied in the reaction $^{12}$C+$^{12}$C at 95 MeV for fusion-evaporation events completely detected in charge. Two specific channels with Carbon and Oxygen residues in coincidence with $\\alpha$-particles are addressed, which are associated with anomalously high branching ratios with respect the predictions by Hauser-Feshbach calculations. Triple alpha emission appears kinematically compatible with a sequential emission from a highly excited Mg. The phase space distribution of $\\alpha$-$\\alpha$ coincidences suggests a correlated emission from a Mg compound, leaving an Oxygen residue excited above the threshold for neutron decay. These observations indicate a preferential $\\alpha$ emission of $^{24}$Mg at excitation energies well above the threshold for $6-\\alpha$ decay.

  16. Yields of Gamma- and X-Ray Radiation of Alpha-Decays of 235U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precise knowledge of gamma- and X-rays emission probabilities of uranium isotopes is vital for accurate gamma-spectrometric determination of the isotopic composition and quantity of uranium. The peak intensity ratio methods employing high resolution gammaspectrometry and intrinsic efficiency calibration approach are known to provide most accurate and reliable isotopic information. When applied to unshielded and moderately shielded material, these methods largely benefit from de-convolution of the 90-100 keV narrow spectral interval, which contains intense gamma- and X-ray lines of major uranium isotopes 235U and 238U. These are the 92.37 keV and 92.79 keV gamma-rays of 238U/234Th, and the 93.35 keV ThKα1 X-rays from alpha-decay of 235U. Although the emission probability ratios of these lines were accurately established, their absolute yields are still lacking accuracy. For instance, as resulted from recent study, the yields of 234Th lines become corrected by 30%, compared with their previous values. This consequently raised a question regarding validity of the yield data for the 93.35 keV line of 235U and triggered the present experimental study. This study was later extended to the reexamination of emission probabilities of other 235U gamma-lines with energies above 205 keV. The experimental data used in the current work was collected using SRM 969 and CRM 146 reference uranium samples. (author)

  17. Theoretical study on the properties of new nuclide sup 2 sup 7 sup 1 110 and its alpha-decay chain

    CERN Document Server

    Ren Zhong Zhou

    2002-01-01

    The structures of the nuclei on the alpha decay chain of sup 2 sup 7 sup 1 110 are investigated using self-consistent relativistic mean-field (RMF) model. The calculated alpha-decay energies are in good agreement with experimental data. The theoretical lifetimes reasonably agree with the data. The properties of sup 2 sup 7 sup 5 112 are predicted. A discussion on the deformed shell around Z = 108 is made

  18. Radioisotope Power Supply Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Between 1998 and 2003, Hi-Z Technology developed and built a 40 mW radioisotope power supply (RPS) that used a 1 watt radioisotope heater unit (RHU) as the energy...

  19. Expected accuracy in a measurement of the CKM angle alpha using a Dalitz plot analysis of B0 ---> rho pi decays in the BTeV project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shestermanov, K.E.; Vasiliev, A.N; /Serpukhov, IHEP; Butler, J.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Kasper, P.; Kiselev, V.V.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Kubota, Y.; Kutschke, R.; Matulenko, Y.A.; Minaev, N.G.; /Serpukhov, IHEP /Fermilab /Minnesota U. /Syracuse U. /INFN, Milan

    2005-12-01

    A precise measurement of the angle {alpha} in the CKM triangle is very important for a complete test of Standard Model. A theoretically clean method to extract {alpha} is provided by B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{pi} decays. Monte Carlo simulations to obtain the BTeV reconstruction efficiency and to estimate the signal to background ratio for these decays were performed. Finally the time-dependent Dalitz plot analysis, using the isospin amplitude formalism for tre and penguin contributions, was carried out. It was shown that in one year of data taking BTeV could achieve an accuracy on {alpha} better than 5{sup o}.

  20. Study of the decay B0(B0bar)-->rho+rho-, and constraints on the CKM angle alpha

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, Bernard; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Le Clerc, C; Lynch, G; Merchant, A M; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, Michael T; Shelkov, V G; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S M; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q L; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, Klaus R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gamet, R; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Cormack, C M; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Green, M G; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L M; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Allmendinger, T; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; La Vaissière, C de; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Anulli, F; Biasini, M; Peruzzi, I M; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martínez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lü, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B J; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, Roy; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Hamel, G; de Monchenault; Kozanecki, Witold; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmüller, O L; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De, G; Nardo; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Elsen, E E; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Vavra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, Patricia R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della, G; Ricca; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R V; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihályi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Rubin, A E; Sekula, S J; Tan, P; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-01-01

    Using a data sample of 89 million Y(4s)-->B0B0bar decays collected with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B Factory at SLAC, we measure the B0(B0bar)-->rho+rho- branching fraction as $(30\\pm 4 stat \\pm 5 syst) \\times 10^{-6}$ and a longitudinal polarization fraction of $f_L = 0.99 \\pm 0.03 stat ^{+0.04}_{-0.03} syst$. We measure the time-dependent-asymmetry parameters of the longitudinally polarized component of this decay as $C_L = -0.17\\pm 0.27 stat \\pm 0.14 syst$ and ${S_L} = -0.42 \\pm 0.42 stat \\pm 0.14 syst$. We present constraints on the CKM angle $\\alpha$.

  1. Evidence for the B0->rho0rho0 Decay and Implications for the CKM Angle alpha

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Bóna, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo-Sánchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Hart, A J; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes,S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van, N; Bakel, M; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martínez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H; al, et

    2006-01-01

    We search for the decays B0->rho0rho0, B0->rho0f0, and B0->f0f0 in a sample of about 348 million Upsilon(4S)->BBbar decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider at SLAC. We find evidence for B0->rho0rho0 with 3.0 sigma significance and measure the branching fraction B = (1.16 +0.37-0.36 +-0.27) 10^{-6} and longitudinal polarization fraction f_L = 0.86 +0.11-0.13 +-0.05. As a consequence, the uncertainty on the CKM unitarity angle alpha due to penguin contributions in B->rhorho decays is estimated to be 18 degrees at 1 sigma level. We also set upper limits on the B0->rho0f0 and B0->f0f0 decay rates. All results are preliminary.

  2. Properties of the Alpha Decay Chain Nuclei of 310126, 292120 and 298114

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ting-Tai; JIANG Wei-Zhou; ZHANG Wei; WANG Kun; ZHU Zhi-Yuan

    2004-01-01

    @@ The properties of the α decay nuclei of 310126, 292120 and 298 114 are investigated in the deformed relativistic meanfield model. The nuclear properties are investigated with the TMA and NL-Z2 parameter sets, and comparedwith Moller's result [At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 59 (1995) 185]. The results show that the α decay energy increases systematically with the increasing proton number. Meanwhile, the a decay energy has a minimum value at the point of shell closure. It is also found that among the three nuclei, 292120 is more possible to be the next doubly magic nucleus.

  3. Diffusion of Implanted Radioisotopes in Solids

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Implantation of radioisotopes into metal and semiconductor samples is performed. The implanted isotope or its decay-product should have a half-life long enough for radiotracer diffusion experiments. Such radioisotopes are utilized to investigate basic diffusion properties in semiconductors and metals and to improve our understanding of the atomic mechanisms of diffusion. For suitably chosen systems the combination of on-line production and clean implantation of radioisotopes at the ISOLDE facility opens new possibilities for diffusion studies in solids. \\\\ \\\\ The investigations are concentrated on diffusion studies of $^{195}$Au in amorphous materials. The isotope $^{195}$Au was obtained from the mass 195 of the mercury beam. $^{195}$Hg decays into $^{195}$Au which is a very convenient isotope for diffusion experiments. \\\\ \\\\ It was found that $^{195}$Au is a slow diffusor in amorphous Co-Zr alloys, whereas Co is a fast diffusor in the same matrix. The ``asymmetry'' in the diffusion behaviour is of considerab...

  4. Alpha Decay Preformation Factors for Even-Even 280-316116 Superheavy Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaif, Norah A. M.; Radiman, Shahidan; Yahaya, Redzuwan; Ahmed, Saad M. Saleh

    2016-06-01

    The success of the cluster formation model (CFM) in deriving an energy-dependent formula for the preformation factors of heavy nuclei has motivated us to expand this approach to the superheavy isotopes (SHI). In this paper, the alpha-cluster formation (preformation factor) behavior inside the parent nuclei of SHI with atomic number Z = 116 and neutron numbers 164 ≤ N ≤ 200 is determined using the alpha preformation formula contained within the CFM. The cluster formation energy of the alpha particles and the total energy of the parent nuclei are calculated on the basis of the various binding energies. Our results clearly show that the CFM remains valid for superheavy nuclei (SHN). In addition, our calculations reveal that the alpha clustering mechanism and formation probability in 280-316116 even-even SHI are similar to those of even-even heavy nuclei in a general sense.

  5. New search for correlated e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs in the {alpha} decay of {sup 241}Am

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernabei, R.; Belli, P.; Di Marco, A. [INFN, Sezione Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); Cappella, F.; D' Angelo, A.; Incicchitti, A. [INFN, Sezione Roma, Rome (Italy); Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); Caracciolo, V.; Castellano, S.; Cerulli, R.; Laubenstein, M. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, INFN, Assergi (Italy); Dai, C.J.; He, H.L.; Ma, X.H.; Sheng, X.D.; Wang, R.G. [Chinese Academy, IHEP, Beijing (China); Montecchia, F. [INFN, Sezione Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile e Ingegneria Informatica, Rome (Italy); Tretyak, V.I. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Kyiv (Ukraine); Ye, Z.P. [Chinese Academy, IHEP, Beijing (China); University of Jing Gangshan, Jiangxi (China)

    2013-05-15

    A new search for production of correlated e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs in the {alpha} decay of {sup 241}Am has been carried out deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory of the INFN by using pairs of NaI(Tl) detectors of the DAMA/LIBRA set-up. The experimental data show an excess of double coincidences of events with energy around 511keV in faced pairs of detectors, which are not explained by known side reactions. This measured excess gives a relative activity {lambda} = (4.70{+-}0.63) x 10{sup -9} for the Internal Pair Production (IPP) with respect to the alpha decay of {sup 241}Am; this value is of the same order of magnitude as previous determinations. In a conservative approach the upper limit {lambda} < 5.5 x 10{sup -9} (90% C.L.) can be derived. It is worth noting that this is the first result on IPP obtained in an underground experiment, and that the {lambda} value obtained in the present work is independent of the live-time estimate. (orig.)

  6. A Study of B0 to rho+rho- Decays and Constraints on the CKM Angle alpha

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Graugès-Pous, E; López, L; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes-Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo-Sánchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Bequilleux, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F R; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Wright, D M; Lange D J; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Fisher, P H; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Lo Secco,J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; De La Vaissière, C; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Pérez, A; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R

    2007-01-01

    We present results from an analysis of B0 to rho+rho- decays using 383.6 million BB-bar pairs collected by the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy $B$ Factory at SLAC. The measurements of the B0 to rho+rho- branching fraction, longitudinal polarization fraction f_L, and the CP-violating parameters S_{long} and C_{long} are: B(B0-> rho+rho-) = (25.5 +/- 2.1 (stat) +3.6/-3.9 (syst))*10^-6 f_L = 0.992 +/- 0.024 (stat) +0.026/-0.013 (syst) S_{long} = -0.17 +/- 0.20 (stat) +0.05/-0.06 (syst) C_{long} = 0.01 +/- 0.15 (stat) +/- 0.06 (syst) We determine the unitarity triangle angle alpha, using an isospin analysis of B to rhorho decays. One of the two solutions, alpha = [73.1, 117.0] degrees at 68% CL is compatible with standard model-based fits of existing data. Constraints on the unitarity triangle are also evaluated using an SU(3) symmetry based approach.

  7. A Study of B0 to rho+rho- Decays and Constraints on theCKM Angle alpha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.

    2007-05-16

    The authors present results from an analysis of B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup -} decays using (383.6 {+-} 4.2) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. The measurements of the B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup -} branching fraction, longitudinal polarization fraction f{sub L}, and the CP-violating parameters S{sub long} and C{sub long} are: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup -}) = (25.5 {+-} 2.1(stat){sub -3.9}{sup +3.6}(syst)) x 10{sup -6}, f{sub L} = 0.992 {+-} 0.024(stat){sub -0.013}{sup +0.026}(syst), S{sub long} = -0.17 {+-} 0.20(stat){sub -0.06}{sup +0.05}(syst), C{sub long} = 0.01 {+-} 0.15(stat) {+-} 0.06(syst). The authors determine the unitarity triangle angle {alpha}, using an isospin analysis of B {yields} {rho}{rho} decays. One of the two solutions, {alpha} = [73.1, 117.0]{sup o} at 68% CL is compatible with standard model-based fits of existing data. Constraints on the unitarity triangle are also evaluated using an SU(3) symmetry based approach.

  8. Alpha-decay studies of the new isotopes sup 1 sup 9 sup 1 At and sup 1 sup 9 sup 3 At

    CERN Document Server

    Kettunen, H; Grahn, T; Greenlees, P T; Jones, P; Julin, R; Juutinen, S; Keenan, A; Kuusiniemi, P; Leino, M; Leppaenen, A P; Nieminen, P; Pakarinen, J; Rahkila, P; Uusitalo, J

    2003-01-01

    Detailed alpha-decay studies have been performed for the neutron-deficient isotopes sup 1 sup 9 sup 1 At and sup 1 sup 9 sup 3 At. The nuclei were produced in fusion-evaporation reactions of sup 5 sup 4 Fe and sup 5 sup 6 Fe ions with a sup 1 sup 4 sup 1 Pr target. The fusion products were separated in-flight using a gas-filled recoil separator and implanted into a position-sensitive silicon detector. The isotopes were identified using position, time and energy correlations between the implants and subsequent alpha-decays. Three alpha-decaying states were identified for sup 1 sup 9 sup 3 At and two for sup 1 sup 9 sup 1 At. The spin and parity of the initial states in the astatine isotopes were deduced based on unhindered alpha-decays to states in the bismuth daughter nuclei. In both astatine isotopes the 1/2 sup + intruder state was determined to be the ground state and a 7/2 sup - state to be the first-excited state. In sup 1 sup 9 sup 3 At the alpha-decay of the 13/2 sup + state was observed in coincidence...

  9. Description of alpha decay and cluster radioactivity in the dinuclear system model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuklin, S. N.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2016-03-01

    A unified description of cluster radioactivity and α-decay of cold nuclei in the dinuclear system model is proposed. Quantum dynamical fluctuations along the charge (mass) asymmetry coordinate determine the spectroscopic factor, and tunneling along the relative distance coordinate determines the penetrability of the barrier of the nucleus-nucleus interaction potential. A new method for calculating the spectroscopic factor is proposed. The hindrance factors for the orbital angular momentum transfer are studied. A potential reason for the half-life to deviate from the Geiger-Nuttall law in α-decays of neutron-deficient nuclei 194, 196Rn is found. The fine structure of α-decays of U and Th isotopes is predicted and characterized. The model is used to describe α-decays from the rotational band of even-even nuclei. The known half-lives in the regions of "lead" and "tin" radioactivities are reproduced well, and the most probable cluster yields are predicted. The cluster decay of excited nuclei is discussed. The relation of cluster radioactivity to spontaneous fission and highly deformed nuclear states is analyzed.

  10. Alpha-particle emission probabilities in the decay of {sup 240}Pu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibbens, G., E-mail: goedele.sibbens@ec.europa.e [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Pomme, S.; Altzitzoglou, T. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Garcia-Torano, E. [Laboratorio de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Janssen, H.; Dersch, R.; Ott, O. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Martin Sanchez, A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Extremadura, Badajoz, E-06071 (Spain); Rubio Montero, M.P. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Extremadura, Merida, Badajoz, E-06800 (Spain); Loidl, M. [Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel, LNE/CEA-LIST, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Coron, N.; Marcillac, P. de [Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale, CNRS, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Semkow, T.M. [Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY 12201 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Sources of enriched {sup 240}Pu were prepared by vacuum evaporation on quartz substrates. High-resolution alpha-particle spectrometry of {sup 240}Pu was performed with high statistical accuracy using silicon detectors and with low statistical accuracy using a bolometer. The alpha-particle emission probabilities of six transitions were derived from the spectra and compared with literature values. Additionally, some alpha-particle emission probabilities were derived from {gamma}-ray intensity measurements with a high-purity germanium detector. The alpha-particle emission probabilities of the three main transitions at 5168.1, 5123.6 and 5021.2 keV were derived from seven aggregate spectra analysed with five different fit functions and the results were compatible with evaluated data. Two additional weak peaks at 4863.5 and 4492.0 keV were fitted separately, using the exponential of a polynomial function to represent the underlying tailing of the larger peaks. The peak at 4655 keV could not be detected by alpha-particle spectrometry, while {gamma}-ray spectrometry confirms that its intensity is much lower than expected from literature.

  11. Ground State Properties of New Element Z = 113 and Its Alpha Decay Chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAI Fei; CHEN Ding-Han; XU Chang; REN Zhong-Zhou

    2005-01-01

    @@ We investigate the ground state properties of the new element 278113 and of the α-decay chain with different models, where the new element Z = 113 has been produced at RIKEN in Japan by cold-fusion reaction [Morita et al.J.Phys.Soc.Jpn.73 (2004) 2593].The experimental decay energies are reproduced by the deformed relativistic mean-field model, by the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock (SHF) model, and by the macroscopic-microscopic model.Theoretical half-lives also reasonably agree with the data.Calculations further show that prolate deformation is important for the ground states of the nuclei in the α-decay chain of 278113.The common points and differences among different models are compared and discussed.

  12. Medical application of radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, S. M.; Kim, E. H. [and others

    2000-05-01

    In this project, we studied following subjects: 1. Clinical research for radionuclide therapy 2. Development of in vitro assay method with radioisotope 3. Development of binary therapy; Boron neutron capture therapy and photodynamic therapy 4. Development of diagnostic methods in radionuclide imaging. The results can be applied for the following objectives: (1) Radionuclide therapy will be applied in clinical practice to treat the cancer patients or other diseases in multi-center trial (2) The newly developed monoclonal antibodies and biomolecules can be used in biology, chemistry or other basic life science research (3) The new methods for the analysis of therapeutic effects, such as dosimetry, and quantitative analysis methods of radioactivity, can be applied in basic research, such as radiation oncology and radiation biology (4) The result of the project will be expected to develop the new radioimmunoassay for drug monitoring following the clinical experiments (5) Boron porphyrin has been successfully labeled with iodine. This enables the pharmacodynamic study of the boron compound in human body (6) A method to evaluate the biological effect of neutrons on tumor cells has been developed (7) The establishment of macro- and microscopic dose assessment using alpha-track autoradiography (8) Clinical application of PDT in bladder cancers, oropharyngeal cancer and skin cancer (9) Radionuclide imaging of estrogen receptor in breast cancer, lipid metabolism, gene therapy, cancers, brain function and heart disease.

  13. Medical application of radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this project, we studied following subjects: 1. Clinical research for radionuclide therapy 2. Development of in vitro assay method with radioisotope 3. Development of binary therapy; Boron neutron capture therapy and photodynamic therapy 4. Development of diagnostic methods in radionuclide imaging. The results can be applied for the following objectives: 1) Radionuclide therapy will be applied in clinical practice to treat the cancer patients or other diseases in multi-center trial 2) The newly developed monoclonal antibodies and biomolecules can be used in biology, chemistry or other basic life science research 3) The new methods for the analysis of therapeutic effects, such as dosimetry, and quantitative analysis methods of radioactivity, can be applied in basic research, such as radiation oncology and radiation biology 4) The result of the project will be expected to develop the new radioimmunoassay for drug monitoring following the clinical experiments 5) Boron porphyrin has been successfully labeled with iodine. This enables the pharmacodynamic study of the boron compound in human body 6) A method to evaluate the biological effect of neutrons on tumor cells has been developed 7) The establishment of macro- and microscopic dose assessment using alpha-track autoradiography 8) Clinical application of PDT in bladder cancers, oropharyngeal cancer and skin cancer 9) Radionuclide imaging of estrogen receptor in breast cancer, lipid metabolism, gene therapy, cancers, brain function and heart disease

  14. Economical Radioisotope Power Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Almost all robotic space exploration missions and all Apollo missions to the moon used Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) to provide electrical power...

  15. Notification determining details of technical standards concerning transport of radioisotopes or goods contaminated by radioisotopes outside works or enterprises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This rule is established under the provisions of the regulation for the execution of the law on the prevention of radiation injuries by radioisotopes. Terms are used in this rule for the same meanings as in the regulation. The concentration of radioisotopes to which the technical standards for transport outside enterprises are not applied is 0.002 micro-curie per gram. The radioisotopes which can be transported as L type transported goods are defined in detail, excluding explosive or spontaneously igniting radioisotopes. The quantity limit of radioisotopes which can be transported as A type transported goods is the values A1 and A2 defined in this rule. The permissible surface density defined by the Director General of the Science and Technology Agency are 1/100,000 micro-curie per cm2 for the radioisotopes emitting alpha-ray, and 1/10,000 micro-curie per cm2 for the radioisotopes which do not emit alpha-ray. The leak quantity of radioisotopes specified by the Director General is 1/1,000,000 of A2 value for BM type transported goods and 1/1,000 of A2 value for BU type goods. The test conditions for each type of transported goods, dangerous goods, the limit of the number of transported goods and signs are stipulated, respectively. Permissible exposure dose is 1.5 rem a year for persons other than radiation workers. (Okada, K.)

  16. Scalar correlator at [symbol: see text](alpha(s)4), Higgs boson decay into bottom quarks, and bounds on the light-quark masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikov, P A; Chetyrkin, K G; Kühn, J H

    2006-01-13

    We compute, for the first time, the absorptive part of the massless correlator of two quark scalar currents in five loops. As physical applications, we consider the [symbol: see text](alpha(s)4) corrections to the decay rate of the standard model Higgs boson into quarks, as well as the constraints on the strange quark mass following from QCD sum rules.

  17. Predictions on the alpha decay half lives of superheavy nuclei with Z = 113 in the range 255 ≤ A ≤ 314

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, K. P.; Augustine, A.; Nithya, C.; Priyanka, B.

    2016-07-01

    An intense study of the alpha decay properties of the isotopes on superheavy element with Z = 113 has been performed within the Coulomb and proximity potential model for deformed nuclei (CPPMDN) within the wide range 255 ≤ A ≤ 314. The predicted alpha decay half lives of 278113 and 282113 and the alpha half lives of their decay products are in good agreement with the experimental data. 6α chains and 4α chains predicted respectively for 278113 and 282113 are in agreement with the experimental observation. Our study shows that the isotopes in the mass range 278 ≤ A ≤ 286 will survive fission and can be synthesized and detected in the laboratory via alpha decay. In our study, we have predicted 6α chains from 279113, 4α chains from 286113, 3α chains from 280,281,283113, 2α chains from 284113 and 1α chain from 285113. We hope that these predictions will be a guideline for future experimental investigations.

  18. Search for shape coexistence in {sup 188,190}Pb via fine structure in the alpha decay of {sup 192,194}Po

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, I.; Davids, C.; Janssens, R.V.F. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The interaction between coexisting shapes in nuclei near closed shells was of great interest in the past decade. Excited 0{sup +} states at low energy can often be identified as the bandheads of structures with differing shapes built on those states, These structures were identified in {sup 190-198}Pb via beta decay and alpha decay {open_quotes}fine structure{close_quotes} studies. Coexistence of different shapes in Pb nuclei was predicted by Nilsson-Strutinsky calculations, in which both the oblate and prolate minima were predicted to have excitation energies near 1 MeV. It was our intention to continue the systematic study of the Pb nuclides by searching for excited O{sup +} states in {sup 188}Pb by observing the fine structure in the alpha decay of {sup 192}Po.

  19. Radioisotope measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioisotope measurement system installed at L.M.R. (Ezeiza Atomic Center of CNEA) allows the measurement of nuclear activity from a wide range of radioisotopes. It permits to characterize a broad range of radioisotopes at several activity levels. The measurement hardware as well as the driving software have been developed and constructed at the Dept. of Instrumentation and Control. The work outlines the system's conformation and its operating concept, describes design characteristics, construction and the error treatment, comments assay results and supplies use advices. Measuring tests carried out employing different radionuclides confirmed the system performing satisfactorily and with friendly operation. (author)

  20. Alpha decay in electron environments of increasing density: From the bare nucleus to compressed matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belloni, Fabio [Institute for Transuranium Elements, European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Postfach 2340, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    The influence of the electron environment on the α decay is elucidated. Within the frame of a simple model based on the generalized Thomas-Fermi theory of the atom, it is shown that the increase of the electron density around the parent nucleus drives a mechanism which shortens the lifetime. Numerical results are provided for {sup 144}Nd, {sup 154}Yb and {sup 210}Po. Depending on the nuclide, fractional lifetime reduction relative to the bare nucleus is of the order of 0.1-1% in free ions, neutral atoms and ordinary matter, but may reach up to 10% at matter densities as high as 10{sup 4}g/cm{sup 3}, in a high-Z matrix. The effect induced by means of state-of-the-art compression techniques, although much smaller than previously found, would however be measurable. The extent of the effect in ultra-high-density stellar environments might become significant and would deserve further investigation. (orig.)

  1. Radioisotopes in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author explains clearly what is radiography, enumerates four major factors in considering a practical source to use namely half-life, penetrating power, half value layer and specific activity and also the advantages and disadvantages in using isotopes. Common radioisotopes used in industrial radiography are iridium, cesium, cobalt and thulium. Main uses of the radioisotopes are for radiographic testing like welding castings, forgoings etc.; thickness, level or density measurement and tracing. (RTD)

  2. From beta-relaxation to alpha-decay: Atomistic picture from molecular dynamics simulations for glass-forming Ni0.5Zr0.5 melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In glass-forming melts the decay of structural fluctuation shows the well known transition from beta-relaxation (von-Schweidler law with exponent b) to alpha-decay (KWW law with exponent beta). Here we present results from molecular dynamics simulations for a metallic glass forming Ni0.5Zr0.5 model aimed at giving an understanding of this transition on the atomistic scale. At the considered temperature below mode coupling Tc, the dynamics of the system can be interpreted by residence of the particles in their neighbour cages and escape from the cages as rare processes. Our analysis yields that the fraction of residing particles is characterized by a hierarchical law in time, with von-Schweidler b explicitly related to the exponent of this law. In the alpha-decay regime the stretching exponent reflects, in addition, floating of the cages due to strain effects of escaped particles. Accordingly, the change from beta-relaxation to alpha-decay indicates the transition from low to large fraction of escaped particles.

  3. Feasibility of observing the {\\alpha} decay chains from isotopes of SHN with Z = 128, Z = 126, Z = 124 and Z = 122

    CERN Document Server

    Santhosh, K P; Nithya, C

    2016-01-01

    Taking the Coulomb and proximity potential model for deformed nuclei (CPPMDN) as the interacting potential for the post-scission region, the alpha decay properties of 34 isotopes of the superheavy nuclei with Z = 128 within the range 306 $\\leq$ A $\\leq$ 339 have been studied, considering both the parent and daughter nuclei to be deformed. The manuscript also deals with the decay properties of the isotopes of Z = 126 (within 288 $\\leq$ A $\\leq$ 339), Z = 124 (within 284 $\\leq$A $\\leq$ 339) and Z = 122 (within 280 $\\leq$ A $\\leq$ 339). The alpha decay half lives thus evaluated has been compared with the values evaluated using other theoretical models and it was seen that, our theoretical alpha decay half lives matches well with these values. Through the present study, we have underlined and have established the fact that, among the 192 isotopes considered in the present study, only those isotopes $^{321-324,328-335}$128, $^{318-320,323-327}$126, $^{305-308,315-322}$124 and $^{298-307,311-314}$122 can be synthes...

  4. A study of the recombination scheme dependence of jet production rates and of. alpha. sub s (Msub(Z sub 0 )) in hadronic Z sup 0 decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akrawy, M.Z.; Alexander, G.; Allison, J.; Allport, P.P.; Anderson, K.J.; Armitage, J.C.; Arnison, G.T.J.; Ashton, P.; Azuelos, G.; Baines, J.T.M.; Ball, A.H.; Banks, J.; Barker, G.J.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, J.R.; Beck, A.; Becker, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, K.W.; Bella, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Binder, U.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Breuker, H.; Brown, R.M.; Brun, R.; Buijs, A.; Burckhart, H.J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Chrin, J.T.M.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Cohen, I.; Collins, W.J.; Conboy, J.E.; Couch, M.; Coupland, M.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.M.; Debu, P.; Deninno, M.M.; Dieckmann, A.; Dittmar, M.; Dixit, M.S.; Duchovni, E.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Dumans, D.J.P.; Elcombe, P.A.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Farthouat, P.; Fischer, H.M.; Fong, D.G.; French, M.T.; Fukunaga, C.; Gaidot, A.; Ganel, O.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Geddes, N.I.; Gee, C.N.P.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Gensler, S.W.; Gentit, F.X.; Giacomelli, G.; G; OPAL Collaboration

    1991-02-01

    Jet production rates in hadronic Z{sup 0} decays are studied using four different recombination schemes to define resolvable jets. The strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s}(Msub(Z{sup 0})) is determined in fits of the corresponding O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}) QCD calculations to the differential 2-jet distributions D{sub 2}(y). Hadronisation corrections and renormalisation scale uncertainties are found to be different for each recombination scheme. Within their overall systematic uncertainties, the four schemes yield consistent values of {alpha}{sub s}(Msub(Z{sup 0})), leading to a final result of {alpha}{sub s}(Msub(Z{sup 0}))=0.118{plus minus}0.008. The error includes the experimental uncertainties ({plus minus}0.003), uncertainties of hadronisation corrections and of the degree of parton virtualities to which the data are corrected, as well as the uncertainty of choosing the renormalisation scale. (orig.).

  5. Accelerated alpha-decay of 232U isotope achieved by exposure of its aqueous solution with gold nanoparticles to laser radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Simakin, A V

    2011-01-01

    Experimental results are presented on laser-induced accelerated alpha-decay of Uranium-232 nuclei under laser exposure of Au nanoparticles in aqueous solutions of its salt. It is demonstrated that the decrease of alpha-activity strongly depends on the peak intensity of the laser radiation in the liquid and is highest at several terawatt per square centimeter. The decrease of alpha-activity of the exposed solutions is accompanied by the deviation of gamma-activities of daughter nuclides of Uranium-232 from their equilibrium values. Possible mechanisms of the laser influence on the alpha-activity are discussed on the basis of the amplification of the electric field of laser wave on metallic nanoparticles.

  6. Properties of Z=120 nuclei and the \\alpha-decay chains of the (292,304)120 isotopes using relativistic and non-relativistic formalisms

    CERN Document Server

    Ahamad, Shakeb; Patra, S K

    2012-01-01

    The ground state and first intrinsic excited state of superheavy nuclei with Z=120 and N=160-204 are investigated using both non-relativistic Skyrme-Hartree-Fock and the axially deformed Relativistic Mean Field formalisms. We employ a simple BCS pairing approach for calculating the energy contribution from pairing interaction. The results for isotopic chain of binding energy, quadrupole deformation parameter, two neutron separation energies and some other observables are compared with the FRDM and some recent macroscopic-microscopic calculations. We predict superdeformed ground state solutions for almost all the isotopes. Considering the possibility of magic neutron number, two different mode of \\alpha-decay chains (292)120 and (304)120 are also studied within these frameworks. The Q_{\\alpha}-values and the half-life T^{\\alpha}_{1/2} for these two different mode of decay chains are compared with FRDM and recent macroscopic-microscopic calculations. The calculation is extended for the \\alpha-decay chains of 29...

  7. Probing the statistical decay and alpha-clustering effects in 12c+12c and 14n+10b reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Morelli, Luca; Agostino, M D; Bruno, M; Gulminelli, F; Cinausero, M; Degerlier, M; Fabris, D; Gramegna, F; Marchi, T; Barlini, S; Bini, M; Casini, G; Gelli, N; Lopez, A; Pasquali, G; Piantelli, S; Valdre', S

    2013-01-01

    An experimental campaign has been undertaken at INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Italy, in order to progress in our understanding of the statistical properties of light nuclei at excitation energies above particle emission threshold, by measuring exclusive data from fusion-evaporation reactions. A first reaction 12C+12C at 7.9 AMeV beam energy has been measured, using the GARFIELD+Ring Counter experimental setup. Fusion-evaporation events have been exclusively selected. The comparison to a dedicated Hauser-Feshbach calculation allows us to give constraints on the nuclear level density at high excitation energy for light systems ranging from C up to Mg. Out-of-equilibrium emission has been evidenced and attributed both to entrance channel effects favoured by the cluster nature of reaction partners and, in more dissipative events, to the persistence of cluster correlations well above the 24Mg threshold for 6 alphas decay. The 24Mg compound nucleus has been studied with a new measurement 14N + 10B at 5.7 AM...

  8. Experimental determination of prompt neutron decay constant of IPEN/MB-01 reactor by Rossi-{alpha} method; Determinacao experimental da constante de decaimento de neutrons prontos do reator IPEN/MB-01 via o metodo Rossi-{alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuramoto, Renato; Santos, Adimir dos; Jerez, Rogerio; Bitelli, Ulysses D' Utra; Diniz, Ricardo; Madi, Tufic [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: ryrkuram@ipen.br

    2005-07-01

    One major objective of this work is to experimentally estimate the prompt neutron decay constant, {alpha}, on the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor at Sao Paulo. In order to achieve our goal, we will use a microscopic noise technique called Rossi-{alpha} method. This method is based on the statistical nature of the fission-chain process. Using a coincidence acquisition system, the rationale is to experimentally determine the probability distribution of detecting neutrons from the same chain. Through a leastsquares fit of this distribution we estimate {alpha}=({beta}{sub eff}-{rho})/{lambda}. The {alpha} parameter will be measured for different sub-critical levels, and the ratio {beta}{sub eff}/{lambda} is obtained via extrapolation to {rho}=0. A specific acquisition system for Rossi-{alpha} measurements has been developed in order to achieve our objective. This system is based on a multichannel scaler controlled by virtual instruments that records the timing of all neutron events, allowing data analysis during the acquisition. The first measurements were performed using one BF{sub 3} detectors positioned at the center of the core of IPEN/MB-01 research reactor. In this work we will present a preliminary set of Rossi-{alpha} measurements performed on the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor at Sao Paulo. (author)

  9. Probing the charged Higgs quantum numbers through the decay H{sup +}{sub {alpha}} {yields} W{sup +}h{sup 0}{sub s}s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz-Cruz, J L [Cuerpo Academico de PartIculas, Campos y Relatividad de la BUAP (Mexico); Felix-Beltran, O [Instituto de Fisica, UNAM, Apdo. Postal 20-364, Mexico 01000 D.F. (Mexico); Hernandez-Sanchez, J [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Carretera a Pachuca Tulancingo Km. 4.5, C. U., C.P. 42020, Pachuca Hidalgo (Mexico); Barradas-Guevara, E [Cuerpo Academico de PartIculas, Campos y Relatividad de la BUAP (Mexico)

    2006-05-15

    The vertex H{sup +}{sub {alpha}} {yields} W{sup -}h{sup 0}{sub s}s, involving the gauge boson W{sup {+-}} and the charged (H{sup {+-}}{sub {alpha}}) and neutral Higgs bosons (h{sup 0}{sub s}s), arises within the context of many extensions of the SM, and it can be used to probe the quantum numbers of the Higgs multiplet. After presenting a general discussion for the expected form of this vertex for arbitrary Higgs representations, we discuss its strength for an extended MSSM with one complex triplet. We find that in this model, there are regions of parameters where the decay H{sup +}{sub {alpha}} {yields} W{sup +}h{sup 0}{sub s}s, is kinematically allowed, and reaches Branching Ratios (BR) that may be detectable, thus allowing to test the properties of the Higgs sector.

  10. Thermal desorption gas chromatography and positron annihilation spectroscopy, contribution to alpha decay studies in actinide-doped matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roudil, D.; Jegou, C.; Vella, F.; Folch, B.; Broudic, V. [Commissariat a l' energie Atomique, Rhone Valley Research Center, 30200 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Pik, R. [CNRS-CRPG, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Barthe, M. F. [CNRS-CEMHTI, 45071 Orleans (France); Cuney, M. [Universite de Nancy, CNRS, CREGU, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Pipon, Y. [IPNL CNRS, IN2P3 UMR 5822, 69622 Villeurbanne (France)

    2009-07-01

    A thermal desorption system coupled with a gas analyzer has been adapted and nuclearized to investigate He behavior in actinide-doped samples used to simulate alpha decay aging. This technique widely used in standard laboratories allows measurements of the helium balance and reduced diffusion coefficients, and a preliminary evaluation of helium locations (related to defects and thermal annealing). In our system implemented in a hot cell, small samples are annealed at up to 1100 C degrees in controlled atmosphere. They are inserted in a 10 to 20 cm{sup 3} vessel connected to a micro gas chromatography detector. Initial system calibration allowed concentration measurements within about 10%. Comparisons with the CNRS/CRPG rare gas analysis laboratory at Nancy (France) were applied on natural uranium oxides originating from Oklo (Gabon) and Mistamisk (Canada). The latest results obtained on Mistamisk samples are in good agreement, with a maximum relative deviation of 14%. The data were used to determine the activation energy of about 1 eV.at{sup -1}. On (U,Pu)O{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} samples the experiments highlight the impact of defects (up to 100 dpa) on He mobility. The defect population must now be characterized to improve our knowledge of He/defect interactions and mechanisms. In addition and synergy to the macroscopic release measurements by gas chromatography, positron annihilation spectroscopy, an effective nondestructive technique for vacancy defect investigation, was also developed and nuclearized in our hot cell laboratory as part of a project supported by the NOMADE and MATINEX research groups. Specific protocols for doped sample analysis were also developed and validated with UO{sub 2} and (U,Pu)O{sub 2} samples. (authors)

  11. Radioisotopes in Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Philip S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Fuccillo, Jr., Domenic A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Gerrard, Martha W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Lafferty, Jr., Robert H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    1967-05-01

    Radioisotopes, man-made radioactive elements, are used in industry primarily for measuring, testing and processing. How and why they are useful is the subject of this booklet. The booklet discusses their origin, their properties, their uses, and how they may be used in the future.

  12. Radioisotopic heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disclosed is a radioisotopic heat source and method for a long life electrical generator. The source includes plutonium dioxide shards and yttrium or hafnium in a container of tantalum-tungsten-hafnium alloy, all being in a nickel alloy outer container, and subjected to heat treatment of from about 15700F to about 17200F for about one h

  13. Wolf-Rayet stars and radioisotope production

    CERN Document Server

    Meynet, G

    1999-01-01

    Radioisotopes are natural clocks which can be used to estimate the age of the solar system. They also influence the shape of supernova light curves. In addition, the diffuse emission at 1.8 MeV from the decay of 26Al may provide a measure of the present day nucleosynthetic activity in the Galaxy. Therefore, even if radionuclides represent only a tiny fraction of the cosmic matter, they carry a unique piece of information. A large number of radioisotopes are produced by massive stars at the time of their supernova explosion. A more or less substantial fraction of them are also synthesized during the previous hydrostatic burning phases. These nuclides are then ejected either at the time of the supernova event, or through stellar winds during their hydrostatic burning phases. This paper focusses of the non explosive ejection of radionuclides by non-rotating or rotating Wolf-Rayet stars.

  14. Manual of radioisotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Manual of Radioisotope Production has been compiled primarily to help small reactor establishments which need a modest programme of radioisotope production for local requirements. It is not comprehensive, but gives guidance on essential preliminary considerations and problems that may be met in the early stages of production. References are included as an aid to the reader who wishes to seek further in the extensive literature on the subject. In preparing the Manual, which is in two parts, the Agency consulted several Member States which already have long experience in radioisotope production. An attempt has been made to condense this experience, firstly, by setting out the technical and economic considerations which govern the planning and execution of an isotope programme and, secondly, by providing experimental details of isotope production processes. Part I covers topics common to all radioisotope processing, namely, laboratory design, handling and dispensing of radioactive solutions, quality control, measurement and radiological safety. Part II contains information on the fifteen radioisotopes in most common use. These are bromine-82, cobalt-58, chromium-51, copper-64, fluorine-18, gold-198, iodine-131, iron-59, magnesium-28, potassium-42, sodium-24, phosphorus-32, sulphur-35, yttrium-90 and zinc-65. Their nuclear properties are described, references to typical applications are given and published methods of production are reviewed; also included are descriptions in detail of the production processes used at several national atomic energy organizations. No attempt has been made to distinguish the best values for nuclear data or to comment on the relative merits of production processes. Each process is presented essentially as it was described by the contributor on the understanding that critical comparisons are not necessary for processes which have been well tried in practical production for many years. The information is presented as a guide to enable

  15. Systematic study of favored \\alpha-decay half-lives of closed shell odd-A and doubly-odd nuclei related to ground and isomeric states

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Xiao-Dong; Li, Xiao-Hua

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we systematically investigate the favored $\\alpha$-decay half-lives and $\\alpha$ preformation probabilities of both odd-$A$ and doubly-odd nuclei related to ground and isomeric states around the doubly magic cores at $Z=82$, $N=82$ and at $Z=82$, $N=126$, respectively, within a two-potential approach from the view of the valence nucleon (or hole). The results show that the $\\alpha$ preformation probability is linear related to $N_\\text{p}N_\\text{n}$ or $N_\\text{p}N_\\text{n}I$, where $N_\\text{p}$, $N_\\text{n}$, and $I$ are the number of valence protons (or holes), the number of valence neutrons (or holes), and the isospin of the parent nucleus, respectively. Fitting the $\\alpha$ preformation probabilities data extracted from the differences between experimental data and calculated half-lives without a shell correction, we give two analytic formulas of the $\\alpha$ preformation probabilities and the values of corresponding parameters. Using those formulas and the parameters, we calculate the $\\alp...

  16. Chromatographic generator systems for the actinides and natural decay series elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAlister, D.R.; Horwitz, E.P. [PG Research Foundation, Lisle, IL (United States)

    2011-07-01

    This work describes chromatographic radionuclide generator systems for the production of actinides and natural decay series elements. The generator systems begin with alpha emitting parent radioisotopes with half-lives (T{sub 1/2}) of greater than one year and produce alpha or beta emitting radioisotopes with half-lives of hours to days. Chromatographic systems were chosen to minimize radiolytic damage to chromatographic supports, preserve the parent activity for repeated use, provide high purity daughter radionuclide tracers, and to minimize or eliminate the need for evaporation of solutions of the parent or daughter nuclides. Useful secondary separations involving the daughters of the initial parent radionuclide are also described. Separation systems for {sup 210}Bi, {sup 210}Po, {sup 211}Pb, {sup 212}Pb, {sup 223}Ra, {sup 224}Ra, {sup 225}Ra, {sup 225}Ac, {sup 227}Th, {sup 228}Th, {sup 231}Th, {sup 234}Th, and {sup 239}Np are outlined in detail. (orig.)

  17. Competition between alpha-decay and spontaneous fission at isotopes of superheavy elements Rf, Db, and Sg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anghel, Claudia Ioana, E-mail: claudia.anghel@theory.nipne.ro [Department of Theoretical Physics, Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Magurele, P.O.Box MG-6, RO-077125 (Romania); University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, RO-077125 Bucharest - Magurele (Romania); Silisteanu, Andrei Octavian [Radiopharmaceutical Research Center, Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Magurele, P.O.Box MG-6, RO-077125 (Romania)

    2015-12-07

    The most important decay modes for heavy and superheavy nuclei are their α-decay and spontaneous fission. This work investigates the evolution and the competition of these decay modes in long isotopic sequences. The partial half-lives are given by minimal sets of parameters extracted from the fit of experimental data and theoretical results. A summary of the experimental and calculated α-decay and spontaneous fission half-lives of the isotopes of elements Rf, Db, and Sg is presented. Some half-life extrapolations for nuclides not yet known are also obtained.

  18. Competition between alpha-decay and spontaneous fission at isotopes of superheavy elements Rf, Db, and Sg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most important decay modes for heavy and superheavy nuclei are their α-decay and spontaneous fission. This work investigates the evolution and the competition of these decay modes in long isotopic sequences. The partial half-lives are given by minimal sets of parameters extracted from the fit of experimental data and theoretical results. A summary of the experimental and calculated α-decay and spontaneous fission half-lives of the isotopes of elements Rf, Db, and Sg is presented. Some half-life extrapolations for nuclides not yet known are also obtained

  19. Alpha-decay branching ratios to high-lying excited-states of the 242Cm→238pu→ 234U →230Th→226Rn decay chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jin-Juan; XU Chang; REN Zhong-Zhou

    2009-01-01

    We present a systematic calculation on the 0c-decay branching ratios to excited-states of an even-even α-decay chain 242Cm→238pu→234U →230Th→226Rn by the improved barrier penetration approach. The changes of the parities between the parent nuclei and the daughter nuclei are properly taken into account. The theoretical values are compared with the available experimental data and the deviation between them is within a factor of 5 in most cases.

  20. States and future trends of the studies of radioisotopic batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The history and current situation of radioisotopic batteries are reviewed, with the emphasis on the introduction of various power-generation mechanisms by nuclear decay energy. The newly developed theories and the new progress are presented. More than that, an insight is given into the prospect and future direction of this field

  1. Radioisotopes and rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To stimulate research into problems of rice cultivation, the International Atomic Energy Agency has placed several research contracts with agricultural institutes in some of its Member States. Some of these research projects deal with problems of soil-plant relations and fertilization, and rice is one of the main crops on which studies are being made. A panel of experts convened by the Agency met in Vienna in May this year to discuss some of the outstanding problems in the uses of radioisotopes in soil-plant relations and fertilization studies, and problems concerning rice were among the principal subjects considered. In a paper presented at the panel meeting. Professor S. Mitsui, of the University of Tokyo, reviewed some of the main uses of radioisotopes in studying problems of rice soils and rice cultivation and suggested several specific topics in this field which could be investigated by isotope techniques

  2. Radioisotope analyzer of barium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Principle of operation and construction of radioisotope barium sulphate analyzer type MZB-2 for fast determination of barium sulphate content in barite ores and enrichment products are described. The gauge equipped with Am-241 and a scintillation detector enables measurement of barium sulphate content in prepared samples of barite ores in the range 60% - 100% with the accuracy of 1%. The gauge is used in laboratories of barite mine and ore processing plant. 2 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab. (author)

  3. Radioisotopes for medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For more than 3 decades, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation has been the country's main supplier of radioisotopes for medical applications. The use of radioisotopes in medicine has revolutionised the diagnosis, management and treatment of many serious diseases such as cancer, heart disease and stroke. It is also beginning to play a key role in neurological disorders such as Parkinson and Alzheimers disease and epilepsy. More recently there has been considerable growth in the application of nuclear medicine to treat sport-related injuries - especially wrist, ankle and knees where more common techniques do not always enable accurate diagnosis. Australia is a recognised leader in nuclear medicine. This can be partially attributed to the close relationship between ANSTO and the medical community in providing opportunities to develop and evaluate new agents to support more effective patient care. A list of commercial isotopes produced in the reactor or the cyclotron and used in medical applications is given. Nuclear medicine plays an important role in the clinical environment and the timely supply of radioisotopes is a key element. ANSTO will continue to be the premier supplier of currently available and developing isotopes to support the health and well being of the Australian community

  4. Radioisotopes for medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, S. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia). Radiopharmaceuticals Division

    1998-03-01

    For more than 3 decades, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation has been the country`s main supplier of radioisotopes for medical applications. The use of radioisotopes in medicine has revolutionised the diagnosis, management and treatment of many serious diseases such as cancer, heart disease and stroke. It is also beginning to play a key role in neurological disorders such as Parkinson and Alzheimers disease and epilepsy. More recently there has been considerable growth in the application of nuclear medicine to treat sport-related injuries - especially wrist, ankle and knees where more common techniques do not always enable accurate diagnosis. Australia is a recognised leader in nuclear medicine. This can be partially attributed to the close relationship between ANSTO and the medical community in providing opportunities to develop and evaluate new agents to support more effective patient care. A list of commercial isotopes produced in the reactor or the cyclotron and used in medical applications is given. Nuclear medicine plays an important role in the clinical environment and the timely supply of radioisotopes is a key element. ANSTO will continue to be the premier supplier of currently available and developing isotopes to support the health and well being of the Australian community 2 tabs., 1 fig.

  5. Improving the measurement of the CKM phase $\\phi_2 = \\alpha$ in $B \\to \\pi \\pi$ and $B \\to \\rho \\rho$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Gronau, Michael

    2016-01-01

    CP-violating asymmetries in $B \\to \\pi \\pi$ and $B \\to \\rho \\rho$ decays can help specify the weak phase $\\phi_2 = \\alpha$ of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-% Maskawa (CKM) matrix. We discuss the impact of improved measurements of these processes such as will be available in the near future, finding special value in better measurement of the time-dependent CP violation parameter $S_{00}$ in $B^0 \\to \\pi^0 \\pi^0$ and $B^0 \\to \\rho^0 \\rho^0$. Reducing the errors on $B \\to \\rho \\rho$ measurements by a factor of two can potentially lead to an error in $\\phi_2 = \\alpha$ just above $2^\\circ$, at which level isospin-breaking corrections must be considered.

  6. Radioisotopes in medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedrosa de Lima, Joao Jose [Servico de Biofisica/Biomatematica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal)

    1998-11-01

    Radioisotopes are extensively used in medicine for diagnosis, either in vivo or in vitro, for therapeutics and also for investigation purposes. Nuclear medicine (Nm) studies in vivo are used to detect minimal amounts of radiopharmaceuticals in organs (the morphology) and their course over time (the function), resulting from physico-chemical interactions of the tracers within the body, in the sequence of specific physiological processes. In vitro applications of radioisotopes have become a most important tool in biochemical analysis. Therapeutic uses of radioisotopes cover from external gamma-ray sources in teleradiotherapy to direct cell irradiation in metabolic therapy. The information, which is conveyed by NM, is essentially metabolic and differs from that supplied by the other imaging techniques, which is basically structural. This quality is important in early detection and diagnosis. Efforts have steadily been made to bring NM imaging as close as possible to an ideal medical diagnostic tool: non-invasive and allowing studies yielding functional, morphological, three-dimensional and quantitative information simultaneously. Of the two tomographic techniques available in NM, positron emission tomography (PET) is probably closer to this goal than single-photon emission tomography (SPECT). High-contrast functional images of the dynamics of labelled molecules (native or functionally similar) that are metabolized by the organs under investigation, are obtained with these techniques. Nuclear medicine has progressed as a result of advances in four strategic areas: the development of new radiopharmaceuticals, the technology and reliability of detectors, the capacity for modelling the metabolic fate of the inputs in the biological systems, and finally the ability to extract and process data. (author)

  7. Frontiers in radioisotope application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes and radiation are being used in numerous and diverse fields to benefit mankind. A glimpse at the recent advances in terms of usage of new radionuclides or new techniques, in some of the important areas are discussed. Use of radionuclides in medicine, industries, agriculture and water resource management are delineated. The various uses of radiation such as cancer therapy, sterilization of medical products, disinfestation of food products, food preservation, industrial radiography, nucleonic gauges, crop mutation to raise better quality seeds, cross-linking and curing of materials, coatings etc. and treatment of municipal waste are discussed. (author). 56 refs., 4 tabs

  8. Study of alpha decay chains of superheavy nuclei and magic number beyond Z = 82 and N = 126

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study various α-decay chains on the basis of the preformed cluster decay model. Our work targets the superheavy elements, which are expected to show extra stability at shell closure. Our computations identify the following combinations of proton and neutron numbers as the most stable nuclei: Z=112, N=161,163; Z=114, N=171,178,179; and Z=124, N=194. We also investigate the alternative of heavy cluster emissions in the decay chain of 301120, instead of α decay. Our study of cluster radioactivity shows that the half-life for 10Be decay in 289114 is larger, indicating enhanced stability at Z=114, N=175. Similar calculations concerning the emission of 14C and 34Si from 301120 find the more stable combinations Z=114, N=173, and Z=106, N=161, respectively. From the same parent, 301120, the emission of a 49−51Ca cluster yielding a Z=100, N=152 daughter is the most probable. (author)

  9. KAERI charged particle cross section library for radioisotope production

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, J H; Kim, D H; Lee, Y O; Zhuang, Y X

    2001-01-01

    This report summarized information and figures describing the 'KAERI Charged Particle Cross Section Library for Radioisotope production' The library contains proton-, deutron-, He-3-, and alpha-induced monitor cross sections, and gamma- and positron-emitter production cross sections. Experimental data and evaluation methods are described, and the evaluated cross sections are compared with those of the IAEA, MENDL, and LA150. The library has cross sections and emission spectra suitable for the transport analysis in the design of radioisotope production system, and are available at http://atom.kaeri.re.kr/ in ENDF-6 format.

  10. Theoretical and experimental \\alpha decay half-lives of the heaviest odd-Z elements and general predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, H F

    2007-01-01

    Theoretical decay half-lives of the heaviest odd-Z nuclei are calculated using the experimental Q value. The barriers in the quasimolecular shape path are determined within a Generalized Liquid Drop Model (GLDM) and the WKB approximation is used. The results are compared with calculations using the Density-Dependent M3Y (DDM3Y) effective interaction and the Viola-Seaborg-Sobiczewski (VSS) formulas. The calculations provide consistent estimates for the half-lives of the decay chains of these superheavy elements. The experimental data stand between the GLDM calculations and VSS ones in the most time. Predictions are provided for the decay half-lives of other superheavy nuclei within the GLDM and VSS approaches using the recent extrapolated Q of Audi, Wapstra, and Thibault [Nucl. Phys. A729, 337 (2003)], which may be used for future experimental assignment and identification.

  11. Miniaturized radioisotope solid state power sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleurial, J.-P.; Snyder, G. J.; Patel, J.; Herman, J. A.; Caillat, T.; Nesmith, B.; Kolawa, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    Electrical power requirements for the next generation of deep space missions cover a wide range from the kilowatt to the milliwatt. Several of these missions call for the development of compact, low weight, long life, rugged power sources capable of delivering a few milliwatts up to a couple of watts while operating in harsh environments. Advanced solid state thermoelectric microdevices combined with radioisotope heat sources and energy storage devices such as capacitors are ideally suited for these applications. By making use of macroscopic film technology, microgenrators operating across relatively small temperature differences can be conceptualized for a variety of high heat flux or low heat flux heat source configurations. Moreover, by shrinking the size of the thermoelements and increasing their number to several thousands in a single structure, these devices can generate high voltages even at low power outputs that are more compatible with electronic components. Because the miniaturization of state-of-the-art thermoelectric module technology based on Bi2Te3 alloys is limited due to mechanical and manufacturing constraints, we are developing novel microdevices using integrated-circuit type fabrication processes, electrochemical deposition techniques and high thermal conductivity substrate materials. One power source concept is based on several thermoelectric microgenerator modules that are tightly integrated with a 1.1W Radioisotope Heater Unit. Such a system could deliver up to 50mW of electrical power in a small lightweight package of approximately 50 to 60g and 30cm3. An even higher degree of miniaturization and high specific power values (mW/mm3) can be obtained when considering the potential use of radioisotope materials for an alpha-voltaic or a hybrid thermoelectric/alpha-voltaic power source. Some of the technical challenges associated with these concepts are discussed in this paper. .

  12. Safe Handling of Radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under its Statute the International Atomic Energy Agency is empowered to provide for the application of standards of safety for protection against radiation to its own operations and to operations making use of assistance provided by it or with which it is otherwise directly associated. To this end authorities receiving such assistance are required to observe relevant health and safety measures prescribed by the Agency. As a first step, it has been considered an urgent task to provide users of radioisotopes with a manual of practice for the safe handling of these substances. Such a manual is presented here and represents the first of a series of manuals and codes to be issued by the Agency. It has been prepared after careful consideration of existing national and international codes of radiation safety, by a group of international experts and in consultation with other international bodies. At the same time it is recommended that the manual be taken into account as a basic reference document by Member States of the Agency in the preparation of national health and safety documents covering the use of radioisotopes.

  13. Radioisotope production in Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan Anuar Wan Awang [Medical Technology Div., Malaysian Inst. for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT) (Malaysia)

    1998-10-01

    Production of Mo-99 by neutron activation of Mo-99 in Malaysia began as early as 1984. Regular supply of the Tc-99m extracted from it to the hospitals began in early 1988 after going through formal registration with the Malaysian Ministry of Health. Initially, the weekly demand was about 1.2 Ci of Mo-99 which catered the needs of 3 nuclear medicine centres. Sensitive to the increasing demand of Tc-99m, we have producing our own Tc-99m generator from imported TeO{sub 2} because irradiation TeO{sub 2} with our reactor give low yield of I-131. We have established the production of radioisotope for industrial use. By next year, Sm-153 EDTMP will be produce after we have license from our competent authority. (author)

  14. Radioisotopes in sedimentology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes have two main uses in sedimentology: they are used for the study of sediment movements in rivers and seas, and for continuous measurements of the amount of sediment suspended in a given medium. These two uses are considered in detail, and brief accounts given of some other uses. Study of sediment movements. After describing the basic technique used in sediment movement studies (injection of a labelled sediment or a simulator into the current, followed by tracking the radioactivity), the author enumerates as fully as possible the problems that can be solved with the help of this technique. Essentially, these problems fall into two groups: 1. Problems related to civil engineering works in coastal areas: the siltation of harbour channels and docks, the formation of banks and bars, the choice of sites for disposing of dredged sediment, the siting of ports, coastline protection, etc. Problems associated with civil engineering works in and near rivers; siting of the water intakes of hydroelectric and nuclear power stations, the effects of construction work on the transport of solids, the construction of dams, the protection of river banks, the construction of jetties, the siltation of lakes, etc. Problems common to these include the transport of effluent and the calibration of hydraulic models. The bibliography is based mainly on fairly recent references and on current research work. 2. Problems related to basic or applied research conducted mainly by universities and research centres: the study of the Quarternary of a particular region, pure sedimentology, the investigation of major sediment transport currents, the confirmation or refutation of transport theories, research into fundamental transport phenomena associated with channel experiments. After referring to the possible exploitation of natural tracers (contained in radioactive waste and fallout), the author discusses the technical aspects of using artificial tracers: the choice of radioisotope

  15. Agricultural application of radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiations and isotopic tracers laboratory (R.I.T.L.) is duly approved B-class laboratory for handling radioactivity and functions as a central research facility of our university which has played a very significant role in ushering green revolution in the country. Radiolabelled fertilizers, insecticides and isotopes mostly supplied by Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology, (BRIT) Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) are being used in our university for the last three decades to study the uptake of fertilizers, micro nutrients, photosynthesis and photorespiration studies in different crop plants, soil-water-plant relations and roots activity, pesticides and herbicides mode of action, plants physiology and microbiology. Main emphasis of research so far has been concentrated on the agricultural productivity. The present talk is an attempt to highlight the enormous potential of radioisotopes to evolve better management of crop system for eco-friendly and sustainable agriculture in the next century. (author)

  16. Milliwatt Radioisotope Stirling Convertor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Studies of potential space missions have highlighted the need for very small electric power supplies for a variety of applications. The light weight radioisotope...

  17. Radioisotopes in the training of medical students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of the discovery of radioisotopes for the progress of science in general and that of biochemistry and physiology in particular has led us to provide experimental practice which enables medical students to become effectively acquainted with the properties and methods of use of radioisotopes, the measurement of their activity, and the possible risks involved in handling them. We have included in the exercises in quantitative determination for third-year medical students (the last pre-clinical year), practice in calibrating micropipettes using a 24Na solution prepared in the TRICO Centre's reactor by irradiating sodium carbonate with slow neutrons. The students make several GM-counter measurements of the activity of the stock solution over a period of time and of the activity of five samples taken with two different micropipettes. They then calculate, by measuring the decay in activity, the half-life of the isotope and relate their measurements to a reference time. In this way they calculate the volume of their micropipettes and the accuracy of the measurements. By means of a statistical analysis they compare the averages for the two pipettes and the accuracy of two operators. (author)

  18. Rhenium Radioisotopes for Therapeutic Radiopharmaceutical Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beets, A.L.; Knapp, F.F., Jr.; Kropp, J.; Lin, W.-Y.; Pinkert, J.; Wang, S.-Y.

    1999-01-18

    The availability of therapeutic radioisotopes at reasonable costs is important for applications in nuclear medicine, oncology and interventional cardiology, Rhenium-186 (Re-186) and rhenium-1 88 (Re-188) are two reactor-produced radioisotope which are attractive for a variety of therapeutic applications, Rhenium-186 has a half-life of 90 hours and decays with emission of a &particle with a maximum energy of 1.08 MeV and a 135 keV (9Yo) gamma which permits imaging. In contrast, Re- 188 has a much shorter half-life of 16.9 hours and emits a p-particle with a much higher energy of 2.12 MeV (Em=) and a 155 keV gamma photon (15Yo) for imaging. While Re-186 is unavailable from a generator system and must be directly produced in a nuclear reactor, Re-188 can also be directly produced in a reactor with high specific activity, but is more conveniently and cost-effectively available as carrier-free sodium perrhenate by saline elution of the alumina-based tungsten-188 (W1 88)/Re-l 88 generator system [1-2]. Since a comprehensive overviewofRe-186 and Re-188 therapeutic agents is beyond the scope of this &tended Abstrac4 the goal is to provide key examples of various agents currently in clinical use and those which are being developed for important clinical applications.

  19. Manual for reactor produced radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes find extensive applications in several fields including medicine, industry, agriculture and research. Radioisotope production to service different sectors of economic significance constitutes an important ongoing activity of many national nuclear programmes. Radioisotopes, formed by nuclear reactions on targets in a reactor or cyclotron, require further processing in almost all cases to obtain them in a form suitable for use. Specifications for final products and testing procedures for ensuring quality are also an essential part of a radioisotope production programme. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has compiled and published such information before for the benefit of laboratories of Member States. The first compilation, entitled Manual of Radioisotope Production, was published in 1966 (Technical Reports Series No. 63). A more elaborate and comprehensive compilation, entitled Radioisotope Production and Quality Control, was published in 1971 (Technical Reports Series No. 128). Both served as useful reference sources for scientists working in radioisotope production worldwide. The 1971 publication has been out of print for quite some time. The IAEA convened a consultants meeting to consider the need for compiling an updated manual. The consultants recommended the publication of an updated manual taking the following into consideration: significant changes have taken place since 1971 in many aspects of radioisotope production; many radioisotopes have been newly introduced while many others have become gradually obsolete; considerable experience and knowledge have been gained in production of important radioisotopes over the years, which can be preserved through compilation of the manual; there is still a need for a comprehensive manual on radioisotope production methods for new entrants to the field, and as a reference. It was also felt that updating all the subjects covered in the 1971 manual at a time may not be practical considering the

  20. Feasibility Study on Simultaneous Multi-Radioisotope Production using Double Stacked Target in MC-50 Cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work was mainly focused on the feasibility of double target system for simultaneous two-radioisotope production. A simple double target was simulated for simultaneous production of 117mSn and 211At. To determine the optimum thickness of target layer, We demonstrated that the combination of double target system with a cyclotron capable of generating 47 MeV alpha particle provides simultaneous production of 117mSn and 211At. The radionuclides are often used in medicine for diagnosis, treatment and research. Alpha and beta(or electron) emitting radionuclides have become a promising method for the treatment of some tumors. 117mSn emits short-range electrons with a high linear energy transfer, and thus a high S value resulting in high quality therapeutic radiation. 211At has gained considerable interest for cancer treatment because its half-life of 7.2 hours matches better with the biological half-life of most carrier molecules. Moreover its decay scheme exhibits practically 100% yield for the emission of α-particles, with very low intensity gamma emissions

  1. Radioisotopes for All - Low-energy accelerators for radioisotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows. Since the development of the tracer principle by George de Hevesy in 1913, radioisotopes have become an integral part of medical practice and research. The imaging modalities Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) have significantly enhanced our understanding of human biology and the development and progression of disease. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) combines the cancer killing of radiation therapy with the targeting precision of immunotherapy to provide personalised cancer treatment. The technetium-99m crisis in 2008 highlighted the fragility of the current radioisotope supply network. Despite the significant impact of the shortages, only a handful of potential solutions have begun to be explored and developed. The supply of Tc-99m is again in doubt, with the shutdown of the High Flux Reactor (HFR) at Petten looming in 2014. Low-energy accelerators have the potential to greatly increase the availability of radioisotopes by providing a small, lower-cost production solution. Implementing these as a system of localised production centres that supply a small area would greatly reduce the impact of a facility shutdown and eliminate the risk of world-wide shortages. An accelerator system that is not tailored to the production of a single isotope will allow researchers to explore new options for SPECT, PET and RIT and improve access to radioisotopes for medical testing. The potential of low-energy accelerators for radioisotope production will be explored. Several case studies of production will be presented using both well-established and new isotopes to the fields of nuclear imaging and radiotherapy. These will include zirconium-89, iodine-123 and titanium-45. Calculated yields will be compared to predicted nuclear medicine requirements. Expected radionuclidic impurities will also be quantified with a discussion of suitable, simple radiochemical separation systems. The DC electrostatic

  2. INR capabilities for radioisotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotope production at INR Pitesti was developed upon the basis of two TRIGA reactors, one stationary and the other pulsed (TRIGA SSR 14 MW and TRIGA ACPR 20000 MW). The TRIGA SSR 14 MW presents two types of neutron spectra in the irradiations channels: a thermal spectrum from a water channel in the core and a channel in the reflector, suitable for irradiations of materials with high thermal neutron cross sections; a hard spectrum of the fuel type obtained through the removal of a fuel pin in a cluster, suitable for irradiations of nuclides with significant epithermal. For the radioisotope production five irradiation devices were used: capsules with the raw materials; capsules for iridium; capsules for radioisotope of medical use; irradiations pins and capsules; capsules with pins. These devices are used for irradiations in the core for production of radioisotopes of industrial use (for instance 192 Ir). For irradiations in the reflector with develop special devices for the production of radioisotope medical used (131 I, 192 Ir and 60 Co). Underway are studies for establishing the optimal conditions for the production of the fission products 99 Mo, 131 I, 133 Xe and of 125 I produce by neutron activation

  3. $\\alpha_s$ review (2016)

    CERN Document Server

    d'Enterria, David

    2016-01-01

    The current world-average of the strong coupling at the Z pole mass, $\\alpha_s(m^2_{Z}) = 0.1181 \\pm 0.0013$, is obtained from a comparison of perturbative QCD calculations computed, at least, at next-to-next-to-leading-order accuracy, to a set of 6 groups of experimental observables: (i) lattice QCD "data", (ii) $\\tau$ hadronic decays, (iii) proton structure functions, (iv) event shapes and jet rates in $e^+e^-$ collisions, (v) Z boson hadronic decays, and (vi) top-quark cross sections in p-p collisions. In addition, at least 8 other $\\alpha_s$ extractions, usually with a lower level of theoretical and/or experimental precision today, have been proposed: pion, $\\Upsilon$, W hadronic decays; soft and hard fragmentation functions; jets cross sections in pp, e-p and $\\gamma$-p collisions; and photon F$_2$ structure function in $\\gamma\\,\\gamma$ collisions. These 14 $\\alpha_s$ determinations are reviewed, and the perspectives of reduction of their present uncertainties are discussed.

  4. Origin of symmetry energy in finite nuclei and density dependence of nuclear matter symmetry energy from measured alpha-decay energies

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Jianmin; Gu, Jianzhong

    2012-01-01

    Based on the Skyrme energy density functional, the spatial distribution of the symmetry energy of a finite nucleus is derived in order to examine whether the symmetry energy of a finite nucleus originates from its interior or from its surface. It is found that the surface part of a heavy nucleus contributes dominantly to its symmetry energy compared to its inner part. The symmetry energy coefficient $a_{\\text{sym}}({A})$ is then directly extracted and the ratio of the surface symmetry coefficient to the volume symmetry coefficient $\\kappa$ is estimated. Meanwhile, with the help of experimental alpha decay energies, a macroscopic method is developed to determine the symmetry energy coefficient of heavy nuclei. The resultant $a_{\\text{sym}}({A})$ is used to analyze the density dependence of the symmetry energy coefficient of nuclear matter around the saturation density, and furthermore, the neutron skin thickness of $^{208}\\text{Pb}$ is deduced which is consistent with the pygmy dipole resonance analysis. In ad...

  5. Apparatus for eluting a daughter radioisotope from a parent radioisotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apparatus for eluting a sterile daughter radioisotope from a parent radioisotope including a case, a generator having a supply of the parent radioisotope therein, a primary shield enclosing the generator for shielding against radioactive emissions from the parent radioisotope, and an annular wall extending up from the bottom of the case defining a compartment for reception of the primary shield thereby to hold the latter in position within the case is described. A vertical web extends between the annular wall and an exterior wall of the case. An auxiliary shield of suitable shielding material (e.g., lead) generally of the height of the primary shield is provided, this auxiliary shield having an inner cylindric surface conforming generally to the outer surface of the annular wall and having a slot therein for receiving the web. Thus, with the auxiliary shield positioned in the case adjacent the annular wall and with the web received by the slot, the auxiliary shield is held by the web in position in the case for shielding the user from excessive radioactive emissions from the generator in the event the radioactive emissions from the generator exceed the shielding capability of the primary shield

  6. Uses of radioisotopes in Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this research project, an inventory for the different radioisotopes that were imported by public and private sectors of Sudan in the period between ( 2007-2011) has been set up. These organizations import the appropriates for different but in general we classify them into these applications: Medical, Industrial, Agricultural and Research. However, each broad discipline is subdivided into subgroups. This inventory will help those who are willing to establish research reactors in Sudan on the type and power of the reactors to be purchases according to the actual needs of Sudan with forecasting of the near and for future needs. Also the expenditure that has been spent by these organizations have been estimated for most of the radioisotopes. It was observed that almost 50% of the expenditure went for the fright charges as these radioisotopes need special handling and care by installing a research reactor in Sudan, the cost of purchasing will be cut down several folds. Also it will help in availability of the radioisotopes with very short half lives (hours to days). This will be reflected in the cut down the cost of tests and provision of new tests.(Author)

  7. Measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry parameter $\\alpha_b$ and the helicity amplitudes for the decay $\\Lambda_b^0\\to J/\\psi\\Lambda^0$ with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Sarah; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernat, Pauline; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia, Olga; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James

    2014-01-01

    A measurement of the parity-violating decay asymmetry parameter, $\\alpha_b$, and the helicity amplitudes for the decay $\\Lambda_b^0\\to J/\\psi(\\mu^+\\mu^-) \\Lambda^0 (p\\pi^-)$ is reported. The analysis is based on 1400 $\\Lambda_b^0$ and $\\bar{\\Lambda}_b^0$ baryons selected in $4.6~\\rm{fb}^{-1}$ of proton--proton collision data with a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. By combining the $\\Lambda_b^0$ and $\\bar{\\Lambda}_b^0$ samples under the assumption of $CP$ conservation, the value of $\\alpha_b$ is measured to be $0.30\\pm0.16 ({\\rm stat})\\pm 0.06 ({\\rm syst})$. This measurement provides a test of theoretical models based on perturbative QCD or heavy-quark effective theory.

  8. Radioisotope x-ray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotope x-ray fluorescence and x-ray preferential absorption (XRA) techniques are used extensively for the analysis of materials, covering such diverse applications as analysis of alloys, coal, environmental samples, paper, waste materials, and metalliferous mineral ores and products. Many of these analyses are undertaken in the harsh environment of industrial plants and in the field. Some are continuous on-line analyses of material being processed in industry, where instantaneous analysis information is required for the control of rapidly changing processes. Radioisotope x-ray analysis systems are often tailored to a specific but limited range of applications. They are simpler and often considerably less expensive than analysis systems based on x-ray tubes. These systems are preferred to x-ray tube techniques when simplicity, ruggedness, reliability, and cost of equipment are important; when minimum size, weight, and power consumption are necessary; when a very constant and predictable x-ray output is required; when the use of high-energy x-rays is advantageous; and when short x-ray path lengths are required to minimize the absorption of low-energy x-rays in air. This chapter reviews radioisotope XRF, preferential absorption, and scattering techniques. Some of the basic analysis equations are given. The characteristics of radioisotope sources and x-ray detectors are described, and then the x-ray analytical techniques are presented. The choice of radioisotope technique for a specific application is discussed. This is followed by a summary of applications of these techniques, with a more detailed account given of some of the applications, particularly those of considerable industrial importance. 79 refs., 28 figs., 7 tabs

  9. Present status of OAP radioisotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotope Production Program (RP), Office of Atoms for Peace (OAP) is a non-profit government organization which responsible for research development and service of radioisotopes. Several research works on radioisotope production have been carried on at OAP. The radioisotope products of successful R and D have been routinely produced to supply for medical, agriculture and research application. The main products are 131I (solution and capsule), 131I-MIBG, 131I-Hippuran, 153Sm-EDTMP, 153Sm-HA, and 99mTc-radiopharmaceutical kits to serve local users. Radioisotopes are very beneficial for science and human welfare so as almost of our products and services are mainly utilized for medical purpose for both diagnosis and therapy. OAP has a policy to serve and response to that community by providing radioisotopes and services with high quality but reasonable price. This policy will give the opportunity to the community to utilize these radioisotopes for their healthcare. (author)

  10. Radioisotope handling facilities and automation of radioisotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If a survey is made of the advances in radioisotope handling facilities, as well as the technical conditions and equipment used for radioisotope production, it can be observed that no fundamental changes in the design principles and technical conditions of conventional manufacture have happened over the last several years. Recent developments are mainly based on previous experience aimed at providing safer and more reliable operations, more sophisticated maintenance technology and radioactive waste disposal. In addition to the above observation, significant improvements have been made in the production conditions of radioisotopes intended for medical use, by establishing aseptic conditions with clean areas and isolators, as well as by introducing quality assurance as governing principle in the production of pharmaceutical grade radioactive products. Requirements of the good manufacturing practice (GMP) are increasingly complied with by improving the technical and organizational conditions, as well as data registration and documentation. Technical conditions required for the aseptic production of pharmaceuticals and those required for radioactive materials conflicting in some aspects are because of the contrasting contamination mechanisms and due consideration of the radiation safety. These can be resolved by combining protection methods developed for pharmaceuticals and radioactive materials, with the necessary compromise in some cases. Automation serves to decrease the radiation dose to the operator and environment as well as to ensure more reliable and precise radiochemical processing. Automation has mainly been introduced in the production of sealed sources and PET radiopharmaceuticals. PC controlled technologies ensure high reliability for the production and product quality, whilst providing automatic data acquisition and registration required by quality assurance. PC control is also useful in the operation of measuring instruments and in devices used for

  11. The radioisotopes and radiations program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This program of the National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina refers to the application and production of radionuclides, their compounds and sealed sources. The applications are carried out in the medical, agricultural, cattle raising and industrial areas and in other engineering branches. The sub-program corresponding to the production of radioactive materials includes the production of radioisotopes and of sealed sources, and an engineering service for radioactive materials production and handling facilities. The sub-program of applications is performed through several groups or laboratories in charge of the biological and technological applications, intensive radiation sources, radiation dosimetry and training of personnel or of potential users of radioactive material. Furthermore, several aspects about technology transfer, technical assistance, manpower training courses and scholarships are analyzed. Finally, some legal aspects about the use of radioisotopes and radiations in Argentina are pointed out. (M.E.L.)

  12. Physical aspects of radioisotope brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report represents an attempt to provide, within a necessarily limited compass, an authoritative guide to all important physical aspects of the use of sealed gamma sources in radiotherapy. Within the report, reference is made wherever necessary to the more extensive but scattered literature on this subject. While this report attempts to cover all the physical aspects of radioisotope 'brachytherapy' it does not, of course, deal exhaustively with any one part of the subject. 384 refs, 3 figs, 6 tabs

  13. Forward and backward electron emission in binary cell of radioisotope current source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was shown that ratio of forward and backward yields for Ti-Ti binary cell of the SERICS was close to other materials. Isotropic emission of alpha particles from the surface of radioisotope source led to dependency of projectile effective charge and convoy electron yield on incidence angle. The influence of convoy electrons on total electron yield can be neglected

  14. Residential radon daughter monitor based on alpha spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioactive daughters of radon-222 pose a serious indoor air quality problem in some circumstances. A technique for measuring the concentrations of these radioisotopes in air is presented. The method involves drawing air through a filter; then, for two time intervals after sampling, counting the alpha decays from polonium-218 and polonium-214 on the filter. The time intervals are optimized to yield the maximum resolution between the individual daughter concentrations. For a total measurement time of 50 minutes, individual daughter concentrations of 1.0 nanocuries per cubic meter are measured with an uncertainty of 20%. A prototype of a field monitor based on this technique is described, as is a field test in which the prototype was used to measure radon daughter concentrations as a function of ventilation conditions in an energy-efficient house

  15. Development of Kabila rocket: A radioisotope heated thermionic plasma rocket engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalomba Mboyi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A new type of plasma rocket engine, the Kabila rocket, using a radioisotope heated thermionic heating chamber instead of a conventional combustion chamber or catalyst bed is introduced and it achieves specific impulses similar to the ones of conventional solid and bipropellant rockets. Curium-244 is chosen as a radioisotope heat source and a thermal reductive layer is also used to obtain precise thermionic emissions. The self-sufficiency principle is applied by simultaneously heating up the emitting material with the radioisotope decay heat and by powering the different valves of the plasma rocket engine with the same radioisotope decay heat using a radioisotope thermoelectric generator. This rocket engine is then benchmarked against a 1 N hydrazine thruster configuration operated on one of the Pleiades-HR-1 constellation spacecraft. A maximal specific impulse and power saving of respectively 529 s and 32% are achieved with helium as propellant. Its advantages are its power saving capability, high specific impulses and simultaneous ease of storage and restart. It can however be extremely voluminous and potentially hazardous. The Kabila rocket is found to bring great benefits to the existing spacecraft and further research should optimize its geometric characteristics and investigate the physical principals of its operation.

  16. Determination of details of regulations concerning transportation of radioisotopes by vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination is defined under the regulation concerning transportation of radioactive materials by vehicles. Permissible surface density shall be 1/100,000 micro-curie per centi-meter2 for radioisotopes emitting alpha rays and 1/10,000 micro-curie per centi-meter2 for radioisotopes not emitting alpha rays. Radioisotope loads are classified to types of L, A, BM and BU. Quantity of radioactivity or radioisotope is stipulated for each type of loads respectively with tables attached. Radioactivity quantity of solid L load is 1/1,000 of Al value in the appendix table. For tritium water of fluid L load radioactivity quantity is 1,000 curie, 100 curie and 1 curie respectively according to the water radioactivity per litre of less than 0.1 curie, less than 1 curie and more than 0.1 curie, and more than 1 curie. Conditions concerning A, BM and BU loads are provided for in detail in the bylaw annexed. Quantity of leaking specified for BM load is 1/1,000,000 of A2 value and in other particular cases A2 value, etc. Leaking quantity for BU load is 1/1,000 of A2 value. Radioactive concentration of radioisotopes to be transferred not as radioactive goods is 1/10,000 of A2 value per gram. (Okada, K.)

  17. Research trends in radioisotopes: a scientometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes or radionuclides are radioactive forms of elements and are usually produced in research reactors and accelerators. They have wide ranging applications in healthcare, industry, food and agriculture, and environmental monitoring. Following over five decades of vast experience accumulated, radioisotope technology has developed to a high degree of sophistication and it is estimated that about 200 radioisotopes are in regular use. This paper attempts to highlight the publication status and growth of radioisotope research across the world and make quantitative and qualitative assessment by way of analyzing the following features of research output based on Web of Science database during the period 1993-2012. (author)

  18. Design of a Chemical Processing Apparatus for Radioisotopes of Short Half-Life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has appeared to us useful to make suggestions to radiochemists having at their disposal a small reactor (e. g., 1012 n/cm2s flux) regarding which radioisotopes they can prepare and the minimum equipment required. The paper comprises three main parts: 1. Possible radioisotopes, which may be divided into two categories: (a) radioisotopes for medical uses, including: Na24, K42, Br82, Cu64, As76, Hg197 and colloidal Au198; and (b) radioisotopes for scientific or industrial uses, including in addition to the above-named: Sb122, As77, Mn56 and Au198 (chloride). 2. Chemical processing, in which two categories of radioisotopes emerge: (a) the category involving simple solution, normally requiring either cold dissolution in water or dilute acid or hot dissolution in concentrated acids. This category includes: Na24, K42, Br12, Hg197, Sb122, Mn56 and Au198 (chloride). (b) The category involving complex separations or transformations, in which fall preparations by Szilard-Chalmers effect, reactions (n, p), (n, γ), followed by β-decay or formation of colloids. The following maybe mentioned: Cu54, As76, As77 and colloidal Au198 and 3. Preparation areas. It is essential that these radioisotopes be prepared in leak-tight and shielded areas and be grouped according to their affinities. We accordingly suggest an apparatus consisting of 3 cells 2 m in length by 1 m in depth, linked together by a conveyor and used, e.g., for the following processes: 1st cell: Introduction of containers, opening and preparation of Na24, K42, and Br82; 2nd cell: Preparation of two out of the following three radioisotopes : Cu64, As76 and colloidal Au198; and 3rd cell: Bringing into solution of radioisotopes for various uses and preparation of Hg197. (author)

  19. List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, D.A.

    1986-08-01

    This document describes radioisotope distribution from DOE facilities to private firms including foreign and other DOE facilities. The information is divided into five sections: (1) isotope suppliers, facility contacts, and isotopes or services supplied; (2) customers, suppliers, and isotopes purchased; (3) isotopes purchased cross-referenced with customer numbers; (4) geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and (5) radioisotope sales and transfer - FY 1985.

  20. Radioisotope studies on coconut nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on coconut nutrition using radioisotopes are reviewed. Methods of soil placement and plant injection techniques for feeding nutrients to coconut have been studied, and irrigation practices for efficient uptake and utilization of nutrients are suggested. The absorption, distribution and translocation pattern of radioactive phosphorus and its incorporation into the nucleic acid fraction in healthy and root (wilt) diseased coconut palms have been studied. Carbon assimilation rates (using carbon-14) in spherical, semispherical and erect canopied coconut palms having different yield characteristics are reviewed and discussed. (author)

  1. Safety Analysis for a Radioisotope Stirling Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is conducting safety analyses of various lowpower Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) design concepts for the U. S. Department of Energy. These systems are electrical power generators converting thermal energy from plutonium (238Pu) decay to electrical energy via a Stirling cycle generator. The design and function are similar to the RTG (Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator) used in space missions since the early 1960's, with a more efficient Stirling cycle generator replacing the proven thermoelectric converter. This paper discusses the methods the INL is employing in the safety analysis effort, along with the software tools, lessons learned, and results. The overall goal of our safety analyses is to determine the probability of an accidental plutonium release over the life of the generator. Historical accident rates for various transportation modes were investigated using event tree methods. Source terms were developed for these accidents including primarily impact, fire, and creep rupture. A negative result was defined as rupture of the tantalum alloy containment vessel surrounding the encapsulated plutonia pellet. Damage due to identified impact accidents was evaluated using non-linear finite element software tools. Material models, gathered from a wide variety of sources, included strain-rate and temperature dependencies on yield strength, strain hardening, and rupture. Both individual component and overall system simulation results will be validated by impact testing to be conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory. Results from deterministic impact, fire, and creep rupture analyses were integrated into the probabilistic (Monte Carlo) risk assessment by correlation functions relating accident parameters to component damage. This approach presented challenges, which are addressed. Other significant issues include limitations of reliable material data at high temperatures and strain rates and development of a technique to

  2. Measurement of Branching Fractions of B decays to K1(1270)pi and K1(1400)pi and Determination of the CKM angle alpha from B0 --> a1(1260) /- pi-/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G. /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-10-30

    We report measurements of the branching fractions of neutral and charged B meson decays to final states containing a K{sub 1}(1270) or K{sub 1}(1400) meson and a charged pion. The data, collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, correspond to 454 million B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation. We measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub 1}(1270){sup +}{pi}{sup -} + K{sub 1}(1400){sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = 3.1{sub 0.7}{sup +0.8} x 10{sup -5} and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K{sub 1}(1270){sup 0}{pi}{sup +} + K{sub 1}(1400){sup 0}{pi}{sup +}) = 2.9{sub -1.7}{sup +2.9} x 10{sup -5} (< 8.2 x 10{sup -5} at 90% confidence level), where the errors are statistical and systematic combined. The B{sup 0} decay mode is observed with a significance of 7.5{sigma}, while a significance of 3.2{sigma} is obtained for the B{sup +} decay mode. Based on these results, we estimate the weak phase {alpha} = (79 {+-} 7 {+-} 11){sup o} from the time dependent CP asymmetries in B{sup 0} {yields} a{sub 1}(1260){sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decays.

  3. Thick target yield measurement of {sup 211}At through the nuclear reaction {sup 209}Bi({alpha}, 2n)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfarano, A [Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, IHCP, Joint Research Centre, via E. Fermi 1, 21020 Ispra, Varese (Italy); Abbas, K [Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, IHCP, Joint Research Centre, via E. Fermi 1, 21020 Ispra, Varese (Italy); Holzwarth, U [Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, IHCP, Joint Research Centre, via E. Fermi 1, 21020 Ispra, Varese (Italy); Bonardi, M [Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN-Milano, LASA, Radiochemistry Laboratory, via F.lli Cervi 201, 20090 Segrate, Milan (Italy); Groppi, F [Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN-Milano, LASA, Radiochemistry Laboratory, via F.lli Cervi 201, 20090 Segrate, Milan (Italy); Alfassi, Z [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Ben Gurion University, 84105 Beer Sheva (Israel); Menapace, E [ENEA, Applied Physics Division, Bologna (Italy); Gibson, P N [Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, IHCP, Joint Research Centre, via E. Fermi 1, 21020 Ispra, Varese (Italy)

    2006-05-15

    Radionuclide Therapy (RNT) and Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) are potentially of great interest for cancer therapy. In many therapeutic applications alpha emitters should be much more effective than already-approved beta emitters due to the short range and high linear energy transfer of alpha particles. {sup 213}Bi is an important alpha emitter already used in clinical trials but the half-life of this radioisotope is short (46 minutes) and so its use is limited for certain therapies. {sup 211}At is potentially very interesting for medical purposes because of its longer half-life of 7.2 hours, and suitable decay scheme. We have studied the cyclotron-based production of {sup 211}At via the reaction {sup 209}Bi({alpha}, 2n), this production route probably being the most promising in the long term. The energy dependence of thick target yields and the reaction cross sections for the production of {sup 211}At and {sup 210}At were determined and found to be in good agreement with literature. The best energy to produce {sup 211}At is 28-29 MeV. The possible production of the undesired, highly radiotoxic, and long-lived alpha-emitting {sup 210}Po (138.38 days), which is produced from decay of {sup 210}At, is also discussed.

  4. Current Status of Radioisotope Applications in Defence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Bhatnagar

    1987-07-01

    Full Text Available Reviews the current status of radioisotope applications in Defence- R&D Establishments, Defence Inspectorates, Ordnance Factories, Public Sector Undertakings under the Defence Ministry, Army, Navy and Air Force Establishments and Military Hospitals. It also lists the users of film badge service in Defence. Training programmes in radioisotope applications in Defence conducted by DRDO organisations have also been highlighted.

  5. Study of Radioisotope Requirements For Power Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, Nathan W

    1962-01-01

    The tables of this report summarize firm and anticipated radioisotope requirements and list the projects for which radioisotope electric power generators may be used. This compilation represents the results of a study made by Nathan W. Snyder of Royal Research Corporation for the Division of Isotopes Development, U. S. Atomic Energy Commission.

  6. Linear accelerator for radioisotope production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansborough, L.D.; Hamm, R.W.; Stovall, J.E.

    1982-02-01

    A 200- to 500-..mu..A source of 70- to 90-MeV protons would be a valuable asset to the nuclear medicine program. A linear accelerator (linac) can achieve this performance, and it can be extended to even higher energies and currents. Variable energy and current options are available. A 70-MeV linac is described, based on recent innovations in linear accelerator technology; it would be 27.3 m long and cost approx. $6 million. By operating the radio-frequency (rf) power system at a level necessary to produce a 500-..mu..A beam current, the cost of power deposited in the radioisotope-production target is comparable with existing cyclotrons. If the rf-power system is operated at full power, the same accelerator is capable of producing an 1140-..mu..A beam, and the cost per beam watt on the target is less than half that of comparable cyclotrons.

  7. US Department of Energy radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Houten, N.C.

    1989-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) prepared this edition of the radioisotope customer list at the request of the Office of Health and Environmental Research (ER-73), Office of Energy Research, US Department of Energy (DOE). This is the 25th report in a series dating from 1964. This report covers DOE radioisotope sales and distribution activities by its facilities to domestic, foreign and other DOE facilities for FY 1988. The report is divided into five sections: radioisotope suppliers, facility contacts, and radioisotopes or services supplied; a list of customers, suppliers, and radioisotopes purchased; a list of radioisotopes purchased cross-referenced to customer numbers; geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and radioisotope sales and transfers -- FY 1988. Radioisotopes not previously reported in this series of reports were argon-37, arsenic-72, arsenic-73, bismuth-207, gadolinium-151, rhenium-188, rhodium-101, selenium-72, xenon-123 and zirconium-88. The total value of DOE radioisotope sales for FY 1988 was $11.1 million, an increase of 3% from FY 1987.

  8. US Department of Energy radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) prepared this edition of the radioisotope customer list at the request of the Office of Health and Environmental Research (ER-73), Office of Energy Research, US Department of Energy (DOE). This is the 25th report in a series dating from 1964. This report covers DOE radioisotope sales and distribution activities by its facilities to domestic, foreign and other DOE facilities for FY 1988. The report is divided into five sections: radioisotope suppliers, facility contacts, and radioisotopes or services supplied; a list of customers, suppliers, and radioisotopes purchased; a list of radioisotopes purchased cross-referenced to customer numbers; geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and radioisotope sales and transfers -- FY 1988. Radioisotopes not previously reported in this series of reports were argon-37, arsenic-72, arsenic-73, bismuth-207, gadolinium-151, rhenium-188, rhodium-101, selenium-72, xenon-123 and zirconium-88. The total value of DOE radioisotope sales for FY 1988 was $11.1 million, an increase of 3% from FY 1987

  9. Orthopositronium lifetime. Analytic results in O ({alpha}) and O ({alpha}{sup 3} ln {alpha})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kniehl, B.A.; Kotikov, A.V.; Veretin, O.L. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2008-06-15

    We present the O({alpha}) and O({alpha}{sup 3}ln {alpha}) corrections to the total decay width of orthopositronium in closed analytic form, in terms of basic transcendental numbers, which can be evaluated numerically to arbitrary precision. (orig.)

  10. Decay constants in geochronology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    IgorM.Villa; PaulR.Renne

    2005-01-01

    Geologic time is fundamental to the Earth Sciences, and progress in many disciplines depends critically on our ability to measure time with increasing accuracy and precision. Isotopic geochronology makes use of the decay of radioactive nuclides as a help to quantify the histories of rock, minerals, and other materials. Both accuracy and precision of radioisotopic ages are, at present, limited by those of radioactive decay constants. Modem mass spectrometers can measure isotope ratios with a precision of 10-4 or better. On the other hand, the uncertainties associated with direct half-life determinations are, in most cases, still at the percent level. The present short note briefly summarizes progress and problems that have been encountered during the Working Group's activity.

  11. Radioisotope Sample Measurement Techniques in Medicine and Biology. Proceedings of the Symposium on Radioisotope Sample Measurement Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The medical and biological applications of radioisotopes depend on two basically different types of measurements, those on living subjects in vivo and those on samples in vitro. The International Atomic Energy Agency has in the past held several meetings on in vivo measurement techniques, notably whole-body counting and radioisotope scanning. The present volume contains the Proceedings of the first Symposium the Agency has organized to discuss the various aspects of techniques for sample measurement in vitro. The range of these sample measurement techniques is very wide. The sample may weigh a few milligrams or several hundred grams, and may be in the gaseous, liquid or solid state. Its radioactive content may consist of a single, known radioisotope or several unknown ones. The concentration of radioactivity may be low, medium or high. The measurements may be made manually or automatically and any one of the many radiation detectors now available may be used. The 53 papers presented at the Symposium illustrate the great variety of methods now in use for radioactive- sample measurements. The first topic discussed is gamma-ray spectrometry, which finds an increasing number of applications in sample measurements. Other sections of the Proceedings deal with: the use of computers in gamma-ray spectrometry and multiple tracer techniques; recent developments in activation analysis where both gamma-ray spectrometry and computing techniques are applied; thin-layer and paper radio chromatographic techniques for use with low energy beta-ray emitters; various aspects of liquid scintillation counting techniques in the measurement of alpha- and beta-ray emitters, including chemical and colour quenching; autoradiographic techniques; calibration of equipment; and standardization of radioisotopes. Finally, some applications of solid-state detectors are presented; this section may be regarded as a preview of important future developments. The meeting was attended by 203 participants

  12. Overview of radioisotope production and utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes are in widespread and increasing daily use throughout the world. Applications include medical diagnosis, treatment of cancer, sterilization of medical disposables, the perservation of food, and the hygienization of waste products. The unique production capabilities of Canadian research reactors and CANDU electrical generating stations have enabled Atomic Energy of Canada Limited to make an important contribution to the growth of this industry. The paper describes the production, processing, transportation and applications of the major radioisotopes in use today. The equipment required for the efficient use of these radioisotopes is described and the potential for growth is discussed

  13. Abstracts of the second conference on radioisotopes and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Second Uzbekistan Conference on radioisotopes and their applications was held on 3-5 October, 2000 in Tashkent, Uzbekistan. The specialists discussed various aspects of modern problems of radiochemistry, radioisotope production, technology of radioisotopes and compounds, activations analysis applications, radionuclides, radioimmunoassays, application of radioisotopes in industry, medicine, biology and agriculture. More than 80 talks were presented in the meeting. (A.A.D.)

  14. Abstracts of the third conference on radioisotopes and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Third Uzbekistan Conference on radioisotopes and their applications was held on 8-10 October, 2002 in Tashkent, Uzbekistan. The specialists discussed various aspects of modern problems of radiochemistry, radioisotope production, technology of radioisotopes and compounds, activations analysis applications, radionuclides, radioimmunoassays, application of radioisotopes in industry, medicine, biology and agriculture. More than 80 talks were presented in the meeting

  15. Summary, the 20th quality control survey for radioisotopes in vitro tests in Japan, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    For advancement of radioisotope in vitro tests such as radioimmunoassay and immunoradiometric assay, the Subcommittee for Radioisotope in vitro Test in Medical and Pharmaceutical Committee of Japan Radioisotope Association has conducted the yearly quality control survey for the test facilities in Japan since 1978. This is the summary of the 20th survey in 1998 where non-radioisotope tests like enzyme-immunoassay were involved as well. The survey was done for 143 facilities: 20 national and public university hospitals, 18 private university hospitals, 8 national hospitals, 13 public hospitals, 21 private hospitals, 41 hygienic laboratories and 22 manufacturers of reagents. Facilities examined intra- and between day-reproducibility, freeze-thaw effect and time change of the measured values on the same samples. Assays were for: growth hormone (h), somatomedin C, follicle stimulating h, luteinizing h, prolactin, thyroid stimulating h, triiodothyronines, thyroxines, thyroxine binding protein, calcitonin, insulin, C-peptide, glucagons, gastrin, testosterones, estradiol, progesterone, gonadotropin, 17{alpha}-hydroxyprogesterone, aldosterone, cortisol, dehydroepiandorosterone sulfate, renin, IgE, digoxin, {alpha}-fetoprotein, carcinoembryonic antigen, tissue polypeptide antigen, CA (125, 19-9 and 15-3), prostatic acid phosphatase, prostate specific antigen, {beta}2-microglobulin, ferritin, and neuron specific enolase. There was no great difference between this and last survey results although tendency of improvement was recognized. There were problems to be solved from the standpoint of clinical practice. (K.H.)

  16. List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamar, D.A.

    1987-10-01

    This document describes radioisotope distribution from DOE facilities to private firms including foreign and other DOE facilities. The information is divided into five sections: (1)isotope suppliers, facility contact, and isotopes or services supplied; (2) customers, suppliers, and isotopes purchased; (3) isotopes purchased cross-referenced with customer numbers; (4) geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and (5) radioisotope sales and transfers for fiscal year 1986.

  17. List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, D.A.

    1985-08-01

    This edition of the radioisotope customer list was prepared at the request of the Office of Health and Environmental Research (ER-73), Office of Energy Research, Department of Energy (DOE). This document describes radioisotope distribution from DOE facilities to private firms including foreign and other DOE facilities. The information is divided into five sections: (1) isotope suppliers, facility contacts, and isotopes or services supplied; (2) customers, suppliers, and isotopes purchased; (3) isotopes purchased cross-referenced with customer numbers; (4) geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and (5) radioisotope sales and transfers - FY 1984.

  18. List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamar, D.A.; Van Houten, N.C.

    1988-08-01

    This edition of the radioisotope customer list was prepared at the request of the Office of Health and Environmental Research (ER-73), Office of Energy Research, US Department of Energy (DOE). This document describes radioisotope distribution from DOE facilities to private firms, including foreign and other DOE facilities. The information is divided into five sections: 1) isotope suppliers, facility contact, and isotopes or services supplied; 2) customers, suppliers, and isotopes purchased; 3) isotopes purchased cross- referenced with customer numbers; 4) geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and 5) radioisotope sales and transfers for fiscal year 1987.

  19. Research reactor production of radioisotopes for medical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than 70% of all radioisotopes applied in medical diagnosis and research are currently produced in research reactors. Research reactors are also an important source of certain radioisotopes, such as 60Co, 90Y, 137Cs and 198Au, which are employed in teletherapy and brachytherapy. For regular medical applications, mainly 29 radionuclides produced in research reactors are used. These are now produced on an 'industrial scale' by many leading commercial manufacturers in industrialized countries as well as by national atomic energy establishments in developing countries. Five main neutron-induced reactions have been employed for the regular production of these radionuclides, namely: (n,γ), (n,p), (n,α), (n,γ) followed by decay, and (n, fission). In addition, the Szilard-Chalmers process has been used in low- and medium-flux research reactors to enrich the specific activity of a few radionuclides (mainly 51Cr) produced by the (n,γ) reaction. Extensive work done over the last three decades has resulted in the development of reliable and economic large-scale production methods for most of these radioisotopes and in the establishment of rigorous specifications and purity criteria for their manifold applications in medicine. A useful spectrum of other radionuclides with suitable half-lives and low to medium toxicity can be produced in research reactors, with the requisite purity and specific activity and at a reasonable cost, to be used as tracers. Thanks to the systematic work done in recent years by many radiopharmaceutical scientists, the radionuclides of several elements, such as arsenic, selenium, rhenium, ruthenium, palladium, cadmium, tellurium, antimony, platinum, lead and the rare earth elements, which until recently were considered 'exotic' in the biomedical field, are now gaining attention. (author)

  20. Radioisotopes: problems of responsibility arising from medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes have brought about great progress in the battle against illnesses of mainly tumoral origin, whether in diagnosis (nuclear medicine) or in treatment (medical radiotherapy). They are important enough therefore to warrant investigation. Such a study is attempted here, with special emphasis, at a time when medical responsibility proceedings are being taken more and more often on the medicolegal problems arising from their medical use. It is hoped that this study on medical responsibility in the use of radioisotopes will have shown: that the use of radioisotopes for either diagnosis or therapy constitutes a major banch of medicine; that this importance implies an awareness by the practitioner of a vast responsibility, especially in law where legislation to ensure protection as strict as in the field of ionizing radiations is lacking. The civil responsibility of doctors who use radioisotopes remains to be defined, since for want of adequate jurisprudence we are reduced to hypotheses based on general principles

  1. Radioisotope Power Systems Technology Development Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) is a multicenter, multiagency (with the Department of Energy (DOE)) program whose purpose is to manage the Science Mission...

  2. Study of the excited levels of 233{sup P}a by the 237{sup N}p alpha decay; Estudio de los niveles excitados en el 233{sup P}a por la desintegracion alfa del 237{sup N}p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, J.; Gaeta, R.; Vano, E.; Los Arcos, J. M.

    1978-07-01

    The excited levels in 233{sup P}a following the 237{sup N}p alpha decay have been studied, by performing different experiences to complete available data and supply new information. Thus, two direct alpha spectrum measurement, one alpha-gamma bidimensional coincidence experiment, three gamma-gamma and gamma-X ray coincidences and some other measurements of the gamma spectrum, direct and coincident with alpha-particles have been made. These last experiences have allowed to obviate usual radiochemical separation methods, the 233{sup P}a radioactive descendent interferences being eliminated by means of the coincidence technic. As a result, a primary decay scheme has been elaborated, including 15 new gamma transitions and two new levels, not observed in the most recent works. (Author) 60 refs.

  3. Studies on application of radiation and radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Rok; Lee, Ji Bok; Lee, Yeong Iil; Jin, Joon Ha; Beon, Myeong Uh; Park, Kyeong Bae; Han, Heon Soo; Jeong, Yong Sam; Uh, Jong Seop; Kang, Kyeong Cheol; Cho, Han Ok; Song, Hui Seop; Yoon, Byeong Mok; Jeon, Byeong Jin; Park, Hong Sik; Kim, Jae Seong; Jeong, Un Soo; Baek, Sam Tae; Cho, Seong Won; Jeon, Yeong Keon; Kim, Joon Yeon; Kwon, Joong Ho; Kim, Ki Yeop; Yang, Jae Seung; No, Yeong Chang; Lee, Yeong Keun; Shin, Byeong Cheol; Park, Sang Joon; Hong, Kwang Pyo; Cho, Seung Yeon; Kang, Iil Joon; Cho, Seong Ki; Jeong, Yeong Joo; Park, Chun Deuk; Lee, Yeong Koo; Seo, Chun Ha; Han, Kwang Hui; Shin, Hyeon Young; Kim, Jong Kuk; Park, Soon Chul; Shin, In Cheol; Lee, Sang Jae; Lee, Ki Un; Lim, Yong Taek; Park, Eung Uh; Kim, Dong Soo; Jeon, Sang Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Res. Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-05-01

    With the completion of construction of KMRR, the facility and technology of radiation application will be greatly improved. This study was performed as follows; (1) Studies on the production and application of radioisotopes. (2) The development of radiation processing technology. (3) The application of Irradiation techniques for food preservation and process improvement. (4) Studies on the radiation application for the development of genetic resources (5) Development of the radioisotope (RI) production facilities for Korea Multipurpose Research Reactor (KMRR).

  4. Studies on application of radiation and radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the completion of construction of KMRR, the facility and technology of radiation application will be greatly improved. This study was performed as follows; (1) Studies on the production and application of radioisotopes. (2) The development of radiation processing technology. (3) The application of Irradiation techniques for food preservation and process improvement. (4) Studies on the radiation application for the development of genetic resources (5) Development of the radioisotope (RI) production facilities for Korea Multipurpose Research Reactor (KMRR)

  5. Medical Radioisotopes Production Without A Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Keur, H.

    2010-05-15

    This report is answering the key question: Is it possible to ban the use of research reactors for the production of medical radioisotopes? Chapter 2 offers a summarized overview on the history of nuclear medicine. Chapter 3 gives an overview of the basic principles and understandings of nuclear medicine. The production of radioisotopes and its use in radiopharmaceuticals as a tracer for imaging particular parts of the inside of the human body (diagnosis) or as an agent in radiotherapy. Chapter 4 lists the use of popular medical radioisotopes used in nuclear imaging techniques and radiotherapy. Chapter 5 analyses reactor-based radioisotopes that can be produced by particle accelerators on commercial scale, other alternatives and the advantages of the cyclotron. Chapter 6 gives an overview of recent developments and prospects in worldwide radioisotopes production. Chapter 7 presents discussion, conclusions and recommendations, and is answering the abovementioned key question of this report: Is it possible to ban the use of a nuclear reactor for the production of radiopharmaceuticals? Is a safe and secure production of radioisotopes possible?.

  6. Investigation of Effects of Neutron Irradiation on Tantalum Alloys for Radioisotope Power System Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tantalum alloys have been used by the U.S. Department of Energy as structural alloys for space nuclear power systems such as Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) since the 1960s. Tantalum alloys are attractive for high temperature structural applications due to their high melting point, excellent formability, good thermal conductivity, good ductility (even at low temperatures), corrosion resistance, and weldability. A number of tantalum alloys have been developed over the years to increase high-temperature strength (Ta-10%W) and to reduce creep strain (T-111). These tantalum alloys have demonstrated sufficient high-temperature toughness to survive the increasing high pressures of the RTG's operating environment resulting from the alpha decay of the 238-plutonium dioxide fuel. However, 238-plutonium is also a powerful neutron source. Therefore, the RTG operating environment produces large amounts of 3-helium and neutron displacement damage over the 30 year life of the RTG. The literature to date shows that there has been very little work focused on the mechanical properties of irradiated tantalum and tantalum alloys and none at the fluence levels associated with a RTG operating environment. The minimum, reactor related, work that has been reported shows that these alloys tend to follow trends seen in the behavior of other BCC alloys under irradiation. An understanding of these mechanisms is important for the confident extrapolation of mechanical-property trends to the higher doses and gas levels corresponding to actual service lifetimes. When comparing the radiation effects between samples of Ta-10%W and T-111 (Ta-8%W-2%Hf) subjected to identical neutron fluences and environmental conditions at temperatures <0.3Tm (∼700 deg. C), evidence suggests the possibility that T-111 will exhibit higher levels of internal damage accumulation and degradation of mechanical properties compared to Ta-10%W

  7. Investigation of Effects of Neutron Irradiation on Tantalum Alloys for Radioisotope Power System Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barklay, Chadwick D.; Kramer, Daniel P.; Talnagi, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Tantalum alloys have been used by the U.S. Department of Energy as structural alloys for space nuclear power systems such as Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) since the 1960s. Tantalum alloys are attractive for high temperature structural applications due to their high melting point, excellent formability, good thermal conductivity, good ductility (even at low temperatures), corrosion resistance, and weldability. A number of tantalum alloys have been developed over the years to increase high-temperature strength (Ta-10%W) and to reduce creep strain (T-111). These tantalum alloys have demonstrated sufficient high-temperature toughness to survive the increasing high pressures of the RTG's operating environment resulting from the alpha decay of the 238-plutonium dioxide fuel. However, 238-plutonium is also a powerful neutron source. Therefore, the RTG operating environment produces large amounts of 3-helium and neutron displacement damage over the 30 year life of the RTG. The literature to date shows that there has been very little work focused on the mechanical properties of irradiated tantalum and tantalum alloys and none at the fluence levels associated with a RTG operating environment. The minimum, reactor related, work that has been reported shows that these alloys tend to follow trends seen in the behavior of other BCC alloys under irradiation. An understanding of these mechanisms is important for the confident extrapolation of mechanical-property trends to the higher doses and gas levels corresponding to actual service lifetimes. When comparing the radiation effects between samples of Ta-10%W and T-111 (Ta-8%W-2%Hf) subjected to identical neutron fluences and environmental conditions at temperatures <0.3Tm (˜700 °C), evidence suggests the possibility that T-111 will exhibit higher levels of internal damage accumulation and degradation of mechanical properties compared to Ta-10%W.

  8. Artificial radioisotopes in food chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Use of uranium for nuclear fission involves the risk of environmental contamination by radiation during the processes of mining, concentration, peaceful and military application and storage, reprocessing and waste disposal. Three of the most dangerous radioisotopes have been followed here as they move through four different food chains. The main bottlenecks for fast and massive transfer are for 131I its rather short half life, for 137Cs the defective plant uptake from soil (and much less so also the pathway through the animal body), and for 90Sr its discrimination relative to calcium in several transport processes in the animal body, and its preference for the bone mass. Hence it is often of advantage for man to use animals as an additional food chain. Known exceptions are discussed: the reindeer and karibou living entirely on lichens during the winter and thereby acquiring for 137Cs nearly identical specific activity as plant food, and cow's milk for iodine during a short period after contamination. 15 refs.; 1 figure; 4 tabs

  9. Development of radioisotope tracer technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to develop the radioisotope tracer technology, which can be used in solving industrial and environmental problems and to build a strong tracer group to support the local industries. In relation to the tracer technology in 1999, experiments to estimate the efficiencies of a sludge digester of a waste water treatment plant and a submerged biological reactor of a dye industry were conducted. As a result, the tracer technology for optimization of facilities related to wastewater treatment has been developed and is believed to contribute to improve their operation efficiency. The quantification of the experimental result was attempted to improve the confidence of tracer technology by ECRIN program which basically uses the MCNP simulation principle. Using thin layer activation technique, wear of tappet shim was estimated. Thin layer surface of a tappet shim was irradiated by proton beam and the correlation between the measured activity loss and the amount of wear was established. The equipment was developed to adjust the energy of proton which collides with the surface of tappet. The tracer project team has participated into the tracer test for estimating the efficiency of RFCC system in SK cooperation. From the experiment the tracer team has obtained the primary elements to be considered for judging the efficiency of RFCC unit. By developing the tracer techniques to test huge industrial units like RFCC, the tracer team will be able to support the local industries that require technical services to solve any urgent trouble. (author)

  10. Development of radioisotope tracer technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Joon Ha; Lee, Myun Joo; Jung, Sung Hee; Park, Soon Chul; Lim, Dong Soon; Kim, Jae Ho; Lee, Jae Choon; Lee, Doo Sung; Cho, Yong Suk; Shin, Sung Kuan

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop the radioisotope tracer technology, which can be used in solving industrial and environmental problems and to build a strong tracer group to support the local industries. In relation to the tracer technology in 1999, experiments to estimate the efficiencies of a sludge digester of a waste water treatment plant and a submerged biological reactor of a dye industry were conducted. As a result, the tracer technology for optimization of facilities related to wastewater treatment has been developed and is believed to contribute to improve their operation efficiency. The quantification of the experimental result was attempted to improve the confidence of tracer technology by ECRIN program which basically uses the MCNP simulation principle. Using thin layer activation technique, wear of tappet shim was estimated. Thin layer surface of a tappet shim was irradiated by proton beam and the correlation between the measured activity loss and the amount of wear was established. The equipment was developed to adjust the energy of proton which collides with the surface of tappet. The tracer project team has participated into the tracer test for estimating the efficiency of RFCC system in SK cooperation. From the experiment the tracer team has obtained the primary elements to be considered for judging the efficiency of RFCC unit. By developing the tracer techniques to test huge industrial units like RFCC, the tracer team will be able to support the local industries that require technical services to solve any urgent trouble. (author)

  11. Circular polarization measurements of Lyman-[alpha] radiation from the decay of the 2[sup 2]P[sub j] states of hydrogen excited by 54. 4 eV electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sile Nic Chormaic; Slevin, J. (Saint Patrick' s Coll., Maynooth (Ireland)); Chwirot, S. (Uniwersytet Mikolaja Kopernika, Torun (Poland). Inst. Fizyki)

    1993-01-14

    New coincidence measurements are reported for the circular polarization of Lyman-[alpha] radiation resulting from the decay of 2[sup 2]P[sub j] states excited by electron impact at an incident energy of 54.4 eV in a range of scattering angles from 5[sup o] [<=] [theta][sub e] [<=] 40[sup o]. The data were obtained using a recently developed efficient polarization analyser for this spectral line and the statistical significance of the data is much better than for previously reported measurements. The data are analysed to yield values for the coherence parameter P[sup +] and show that spin exchange interactions play a significant, if unexpected, role in the dynamic range investigated. (author).

  12. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator/thin fragment impact test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimus, M. A. H.; Hinckley, J. E.

    1998-01-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of 238Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). Because the potential for a launch abort or return from orbit exists for any space mission, the heat source response to credible accident scenarios is being evaluated. This test was designed to provide information on the response of a loaded RTG to impact by a fragment similar to the type of fragment produced by breakup of the spacecraft propulsion module system (PMS). The results of this test indicated that impact of the RTG by a thin aluminum fragment traveling at 306 m/s may result in significant damage to the converter housing, failure of one fueled clad, and release of a small quantity of fuel.

  13. End-on radioisotope thermoelectric generator impact tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimus, M. A. H.; Hinckley, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of 238Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). The modular GPHS design was developed to address both survivability during launch abort and return from orbit. The first two RTG Impact Tests were designed to provide information on the response of a fully loaded RTG to end-on impact against a concrete target. The results of these tests indicated that at impact velocities up to 57 m/s the converter shell and internal components protect the GPHS capsules from excessive deformation. At higher velocities, some of the internal components of the RTG interact with the GPHS capsules to cause excessive localized deformation and failure.

  14. End-on radioisotope thermoelectric generator impact tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimus, M.A.H.; Hhinckley, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of [sup 238]Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). The modular GPHS design was developed to address both survivability during launch abort and return from orbit. The first two RTG Impact Tests were designed to provide information on the response of a fully loaded RTG to end-on impact against a concrete target. The results of these tests indicated that at impact velocities up to 57 m/s the converter shell and internal components protect the GPHS capsules from excessive deformation. At higher velocities, some of the internal components of the RTG interact with the GPHS capsules to cause excessive localized deformation and failure.

  15. Radioisotopes production for applications on the health; Produccion de radioisotopos para aplicaciones en la salud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monroy G, F.; Alanis M, J., E-mail: fabiola.monroy@inin.gob.m [ININ, Departamento de Materiales Radiactivos, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    In the Radioactive Materials Department of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) processes have been studied and developed for the radioisotopes production of interest in the medicine, research, industry and agriculture. In particular five new processes have been developed in the last 10 years by the group of the Radioactive Materials Research Laboratory to produce: {sup 99}Mo/{sup 99m}Tc and {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re generators, the radio lanthanides: {sup 151}Pm, {sup 147}Pm, {sup 161}Tb, {sup 166}Ho, {sup 177}Lu, {sup 131}I and the {sup 32}P. All these radioisotopes are artificial and they can be produced in nuclear reactors and some of them in particle accelerators. The radioisotope generators are of particular interest, as those of {sup 99}Mo/{sup 99m}Tc and {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re presented in this work, because they are systems that allow to produce an artificial radioisotope of interest continually, in these cases the {sup 99m}Tc and the {sup 188}Re, without the necessity of having a nuclear reactor or an particle accelerator. They are compact systems armored and sure perfectly of manipulating that, once the radioactive material has decayed, they do not present radiological risk some for the environment and the population. These systems are therefore of supreme utility in places where it is not had nuclear reactors or with a continuous radioisotope supply, due to their time of decaying, for its cost or for logistical problems in their supply, like it is the case of many hospital centers, of research or industries in our country. (Author)

  16. Studies of radioisotope production with an AVF cyclotron in TIARA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, Toshiaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    The production of radioisotopes to be used mainly for nuclear medicine and biology is studied with an AVF cyclotron in TIARA. A production method of no-carrier-added {sup 186}Re with the {sup 186}W(p,n){sup 186}Re reaction has been developed; this product may be used as a therapeutic agent in radioimmunotherapy due to the adequate nuclear and chemical properties. For the study of the function of plants using a positron-emitter two-dimensional imaging system, a simple method of producing the positron emitter {sup 18}F in water was developed by taking advantage of a highly-energetic {alpha} beam from the AVF cyclotron. (author)

  17. Radioisotope Production for Medical and Physics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mausner, Leonard

    2012-10-01

    Radioisotopes are critical to the science and technology base of the US. Discoveries and applications made as a result of the availability of radioisotopes span widely from medicine, biology, physics, chemistry and homeland security. The clinical use of radioisotopes for medical diagnosis is the largest sector of use, with about 16 million procedures a year in the US. The use of ^99Mo/^99mTc generator and ^18F make up the majority, but ^201Tl, ^123I, ^111In, and ^67Ga are also used routinely to perform imaging of organ function. Application of radioisotopes for therapy is dominated by use of ^131I for thyroid malignancies, ^90Y for some solid tumors, and ^89Sr for bone cancer, but production of several more exotic species such as ^225Ac and ^211At are of significant current research interest. In physics ^225Ra is of interest for CP violation studies, and the actinides ^242Am, ^249Bk, and ^254Es are needed as targets for experiments to create superheavy elements. Large amounts of ^252Cf are needed as a fission source for the CARIBU experiment at ANL. The process of radioisotope production is multidisciplinary. Nuclear physics input based on nuclear reaction excitation function data is needed to choose an optimum target/projectile in order to maximize desired isotope production and minimize unwanted byproducts. Mechanical engineering is needed to address issues of target heating, induced mechanical stress and material compatibility of target and claddings. Radiochemists are involved as well since chemical separation to purify the desired final radioisotope product from the bulk target and impurities is also usually necessary. Most neutron rich species are produced at a few government and university reactors. Other radioisotopes are produced in cyclotrons in the commercial sector, university/hospital based facilities, and larger devices at the DOE labs. The landscape of US facilities, the techniques involved, and current supply challenges will be reviewed.

  18. Search for CP violation in hyperon decays.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zyla, Piotr; Chan, A.; Chen, Y.C.; Ho, C.; Teng, P.K.; Choong, W.S.; Gidal, G.; Fu, Y.; Gu, P.; Jones, T.D.; Luk, K.B.; Turko, B.; James, C.; Volk, J.; Felix, J.; Burnstein, R.A.; Chakrovorty, A.; Kaplan, D.M.; Lederman, L.M.; Luebke, W.; Rajaram, D.; Rubin, H.A.; Solomey, N.; Torun, Y.; White, C.G.; White, S.L.; Leros, N.; Perroud, J.P.; Gustafson, H.R.; Longo, M.J.; Lopez, F.; Park H.K.; Clark, K.; Jenkins, M.; Dukes, E.C.; Durandet, C.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, M.; Lu, L.; Nelson, K.S.

    2002-10-25

    Direct CP violation in nonleptonic hyperon decays can be established by comparing the decays of hyperons and anti-hyperons. For {Xi} decay to {Lambda} {pi} followed by {Lambda} to p{pi}, the proton distribution in the rest frame of Lambda is governed by the product of the decay parameters {alpha}{sub {Xi}} {alpha}{sub {Lambda}}. The asymmetry A{sub {Xi}{Lambda}}, proportional to the difference of {alpha}{sub {Xi}}{alpha}{sub {Lambda}} of the hyperon and anti-hyperon decays, vanishes if CP is conserved. We report on an analysis of a fraction of 1997 and 1999 data collected by the Hyper CP (E871) collaboration during the fixed-target runs at Fermilab. The preliminary measurement of the asymmetry is {Alpha}{sub {Xi}{Lambda}} = [-7 {+-} 12(stat) {+-} 6.2(sys)] x 10{sup -4}, an order of magnitude better than the present limit.

  19. Synchronous Changes of the Shape of Histograms Constructed from the Results of Measurements of 90-Sr Beta-Decay and 239-Pu Alpha-Decay Observed in More than 3000 km Distant Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filin E. Y.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available It was discovered many years ago that histograms constructed from the results of mea- surements of various natural processes are not random. The histogram shape was demonstrated to be determined by the diurnal rotation and circumsolar movement of the Earth and to be independent of the nature of the process considered [1-17]. The results of those works change our basic views about stochasticity of natural processes. When the time series of physical measurements, which are traditionally considered stochastic, are transformed into the series of histograms constructed for an optimally small num- ber of the results (i.e., optimally short segment of the time series, one can see regular changes in the histogram shape. The paper illustrates the main manifestations of this phenomenon by comparing the results of 90 Sr -radioactivity and 239 Pu -decay mea- surements, with the distance between the laboratories in which the data were collected being about 3000 km.

  20. Level structure of 217Rn and 221Ra investigated in the alpha-decay 225Th → 221Ra → 217Rn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclei 221Ra and 217Rn have been investigated in the α-decay chain 225Th → 221Ra → 217Rn through γ-ray and conversion-electron studies. The short-lived 225Th nuclei (T1/2=8 min) were produced in the 226Ra(α, 5n) reaction, and γ-rays and conversion electrons were measured - between the irradiation periods - in coincidence with α-particles. In 221Ra the five lowest levels are interpreted as members of a K=5/2 parity-doublet with ΔEπ=104 keV. These levels, as well as a higher-lying Kπ=3/2+ band, are consistent with an octupole deformation of 221Ra, as expected from theoretical considerations. In 217Rn only three excited levels are observed, with a favoured α-decay to a 5/2+ excited level thus establishing positive parity for the ground state of 221Ra. (orig.)

  1. The Higgs-boson decay H\\;\\to \\;{gg} up to {\\alpha }_{s}^{5}-order under the minimal momentum space subtraction scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Dai-Min; Wang, Sheng-Quan; Wu, Xing-Gang; Shen, Jian-Ming

    2016-07-01

    We study the Higgs-boson decay width {{Γ }}(H\\to {gg}) up to {α }s5 order under the minimal momentum space subtraction (mMOM) scheme. A major uncertainty of a finite-order perturbative quantum chromodymaics (pQCD) prediction is the perceived ambiguity in setting the renormalization scale. In the present paper, to achieve a precise pQCD prediction without renormalization scale uncertainty, we adopt the principle of maximum conformality (PMC) to set the renormalization scale of the process. The PMC has a solid theoretical foundation, which is based on renormalization group invariance and utilizes the renormalization group equation to fix the renormalization scale of the process. The key point of the application of the PMC is how to correctly set the {β i } terms of the process to achieve the correct α s -running behavior at each perturbative order. It is found that the ambiguities in dealing with the {β i } terms of the decay width {{Γ }}(H\\to {gg}) under the \\bar{{{MS}}} scheme can be avoided by using the physical mMOM scheme. For this purpose, for the first time we provide the PMC scale-setting formulas within the mMOM scheme up to a four-loop level. By using the PMC, it is found that a more reliable pQCD prediction on {{Γ }}(H\\to {gg}) can indeed be achieved under the mMOM scheme. As a byproduct, the convergence of the resultant pQCD series has been greatly improved due to the elimination of renormalon terms. By taking the newly measured Higgs mass, M H = 125.09 ± 0.21 ± 0.11 GeV, our PMC prediction of the decay width is, {{Γ }}(H\\to {gg}){| }{{mMOM,}{{PMC}}}=339.3+/- {1.7}-2.4+3.7 keV, in which the first error is from the Higgs mass uncertainty and the second error is the residual renormalization scale dependence by varying the initial renormalization scale {μ }r\\in [{M}H/2,4{M}H].

  2. Commercial Superconducting Electron Linac for Radioisotope Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimm, Terry Lee [Niowave, Inc., Lansing, MI (United States); Boulware, Charles H. [Niowave, Inc., Lansing, MI (United States); Hollister, Jerry L. [Niowave, Inc., Lansing, MI (United States); Jecks, Randall W. [Niowave, Inc., Lansing, MI (United States); Mamtimin, Mayir [Niowave, Inc., Lansing, MI (United States); Starovoitova, Valeriia [Niowave, Inc., Lansing, MI (United States)

    2015-08-13

    The majority of radioisotopes used in the United States today come from foreign suppliers or are generated parasitically in large government accelerators and nuclear reactors. Both of these restrictions limit the availability of radioisotopes and discourage the development and evaluation of new isotopes and for nuclear medicine, science, and industry. Numerous studies have been recommending development of dedicated accelerators for production of radioisotopes for over 20 years (Institute of Medicine, 1995; Reba, et al, 2000; National Research Council, 2007; NSAC 2009). The 2015 NSAC Long Range Plan for Isotopes again identified electron accelerators as an area for continued research and development. Recommendation 1(c) from the 2015 NSAC Isotope report specifically identifies electron accelerators for continued funding for the purpose of producing medical and industrial radioisotopes. Recognizing the pressing need for new production methods of radioisotopes, the United States Congress passed the American Medical Isotope Production Act of 2012 to develop a domestic production of 99Mo and to eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in the production of 99Mo. One of the advantages of high power electron linear accelerators (linacs) is they can create both proton- and neutron-rich isotopes by generating high energy x-rays that knock out protons or neutrons from stable atoms or by fission of uranium. This allows for production of isotopes not possible in nuclear reactors. Recent advances in superconducting electron linacs have decreased the size and complexity of these systems such that they are economically competitive with nuclear reactors and large, high energy accelerators. Niowave, Inc. has been developing a radioisotope production facility based on a superconducting electron linac with liquid metal converters.

  3. List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, D.A.

    1984-08-01

    This document lists DOE's radioisotope production and distribution activities by its facilities at Argonne National Laboratory; Pacific Northwest Laboratory; Idaho Operations Office; Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Savannah River Plant; and UNC Nuclear Industries, Inc. The information is divided into five sections: isotope suppliers, facility contacts, and isotopes or services supplied; lists of customers, suppliers and isotopes purchased; list of isotopes purchased cross-referenced to customer codes; geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and radioisotope sales and transfers - FY 1983.

  4. The progress of radioisotope technology and application in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jinrong; Luo Zhifu

    2008-01-01

    The inception of radioisotope and its application in China are introduced. The research, development, produc-tion, application progress and the future development prospect of radioisotope and its products are described.

  5. List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sixteenth edition of the radioisotope customer list was prepared at the request of the Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of energy Research, Department of Energy (DOE). This document lists DOE's radioisotope production and distribution activities by its facilities at Argonne National Laboratory; Pacific Northwest Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboraory; Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory; Idaho Operations Office; Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory; Mound Facility; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Savannah River Laboratory; and UNC Nuclear Industries, Inc. The information is divided into five sections: (1) isotope suppliers, facility, contracts and isotopes or services supplied; (2) alphabetical list of customers, and isotopes purchased; (3) alphabetical list of isotopes cross-referenced to customer numbers; (4) geographical location of radioisotope customers; and (5) radioisotope sales and transfers-FY 1980

  6. List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fifteenth edition of the radioisotope customer list was prepared at the request of the Division of Financial Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Department of Energy (DOE). This document lists DOE's radioisotope production and distribution activities by its facilities at Argonne National Laboratory; Pacific Northwest Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory; Idaho Operations Office; Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory; Mound Facility; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Rocky Flats Area Office; Savannah River Laboratory; and UNC Nuclear Industries, Inc. The information is divided into five sections: Isotope suppliers, facility, contracts and isotopes or services supplied; alphabetical list of customers, and isotopes purchased; alphabetical list of isotopes cross-referenced to customer numbers; geographical location of radioisotope customers; and radioisotope sales and transfers-FY 1979

  7. List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burlison, J.S. (comp.)

    1980-06-01

    The fifteenth edition of the radioisotope customer list was prepared at the request of the Division of Financial Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Department of Energy (DOE). This document lists DOE's radioisotope production and distribution activities by its facilities at Argonne National Laboratory; Pacific Northwest Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory; Idaho Operations Office; Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory; Mound Facility; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Rocky Flats Area Office; Savannah River Laboratory; and UNC Nuclear Industries, Inc. The information is divided into five sections: Isotope suppliers, facility, contracts and isotopes or services supplied; alphabetical list of customers, and isotopes purchased; alphabetical list of isotopes cross-referenced to customer numbers; geographical location of radioisotope customers; and radioisotope sales and transfers-FY 1979.

  8. List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burlison, J.S. (comp.)

    1981-08-01

    The sixteenth edition of the radioisotope customer list was prepared at the request of the Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of energy Research, Department of Energy (DOE). This document lists DOE's radioisotope production and distribution activities by its facilities at Argonne National Laboratory; Pacific Northwest Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboraory; Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory; Idaho Operations Office; Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory; Mound Facility; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Savannah River Laboratory; and UNC Nuclear Industries, Inc. The information is divided into five sections: (1) isotope suppliers, facility, contracts and isotopes or services supplied; (2) alphabetical list of customers, and isotopes purchased; (3) alphabetical list of isotopes cross-referenced to customer numbers; (4) geographical location of radioisotope customers; and (5) radioisotope sales and transfers-FY 1980.

  9. Development of radioisotope production in the Philippines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabalfin, E.G. [Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Quezon (Philippines)

    1998-10-01

    The Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) started its activities on radioisotope production more than three decades ago, when the Philippine Research Reactor (PRR-1) started operating at its full rated power of 1 MW. Since then, several radionuclides in different chemical forms, were routinely produced and supplied for use in nuclear medicine, industry, agriculture, research and training, until the conversion of the PRR-1 to a 3 MW TRIGA type reactor. After the criticality test of the upgraded reactor, a leak was discovered in the pool liner. With the repair of the reactor still ongoing, routine radioisotope production activities have been reduced to dispensing of imported bulk {sup 131}I. In the Philippines, radioisotopes are widely used in nuclear medicine, with {sup 131}I and {sup 99m}Tc as the major radionuclides of interest. Thus the present radioisotope production program of PNRI is directed to meet this demand. With the technical assistance of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), PNRI is setting up a new {sup 131}I production facility. The in-cell equipment have been installed and tested using both inactive and active target, obtained from BATAN, Indonesia. In order to meet the need of producing {sup 99}Mo-{sup 99m}Tc generators, based on low specific activity reactor-produced {sup 99}Mo, research and development work on the preparation of {sup 99m}Tc gel generators is ongoing. (author)

  10. Radioisotopes and food preservation against insects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book describes how to preserve food from harmful insects by using radioisotopes. It focusses on the impact of ionized radiation on the different stages of insect growth and on its metabolism and immunity. It also discusses the relationship between radiation doses and insect reproduction. It explains the various methods to detect the irradiated foods

  11. ILLUSTRATIONS OF RADIOISOTOPES--DEFINITIONS AND APPLICATIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atomic Energy Commission, Oak Ridge, TN. Div. of Technical Information.

    THIS PUBLICATION IS COMPOSED OF OVER 150 PAGES OF BLACK AND WHITE ILLUSTRATIONS DEALING WITH RADIOISOTOPES AND THEIR USES. THESE ILLUSTRATIONS CONSIST OF CHARTS, GRAPHS, AND PICTORIAL REPRESENTATIONS WHICH COULD BE PREPARED AS HANDOUTS, TRANSPARENCIES FOR OVERHEAD PROJECTION, OR WHICH COULD BE USED IN A NUMBER OF OTHER WAYS FOR PRESENTING SUCH…

  12. List of ERDA radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, J.L.

    1977-03-01

    The thirteenth edition of the ERDA radioisotope customer list has been prepared at the request of the Office of Program Coordination, Office of the Assistant Administrator. The purpose of the document is to list the FY 1976 commercial radioisotope production and distribution activities of ERDA facilities at Argonne National Laboratory, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory, Idaho Operations Office, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Mound Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Savannah River Laboratory, and United Nuclear Industries, Inc.

  13. List of ERDA radioisotope (customers with summary of radioisotope shipments FY 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, J.L.; Gano, S.R. (comp.)

    1976-01-01

    The twelfth edition of the ERDA radioisotope customer list has been prepared at the request of the Division of Biomedical and Environmental Research. The purpose of this document is to list the FY 1975 commercial radioisotope production and distribution activities of USERDA facilities at Argonne National Laboratory, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Brookhaven National Laboratory, United Nuclear Inc., Idaho Operations Office, Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory, Mound Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Savannah River Plant. (TFD)

  14. A high power, Coated Particle Fuel Compact Radioisotope Heat Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jeffrey C.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2001-02-01

    A Coated Particle Fuel Compact, Radioisotope Heater Unit (CPFC-RHU) is proposed, which is capable of generating thermal power in excess of 27 W. This power output is more than four times that of a Hexa-RHU, which generates only six watts of thermal power. The design of the CPFC-RHU is identical to that of the Hexa-RHU, except that the six Pt-30Rh clad fuel pellets and the POCO graphite support in the latter are replaced with single-sized, ZrC coated, 238PuO2 fuel particles ~500 μm in diameter. In addition to fully retaining the helium gas generated by the radioactive decay of the fuel, the CPFC offers promise for enhanced safety. Thermal analyses of the CPFC-RHU show that while the Hexa-RHU is suitable for use in a radioisotope power system (RPS) operating at a converter hot-side temperature of 473 K, the CPFC-RHU could also be used at higher temperatures of 773 K and 973 K with a thermal efficiency >60%. Even at a 473 K converter hot-side temperature, the CPFC-RHU offers higher thermal efficiency (>90%) than the Hexa-RHU (~75%). The CPFC-RHU final design provides constant temperature, with almost uniform radial heat flux to the converter, for enhanced performance, better integration, and higher overall efficiency of the RPS. The present CPFC-RHU fills a gap in the power needs for future space missions requiring electric power of 1-15 W, from a single RPS. .

  15. Measurement of branching fractions of B decays to K1(1270)pi and K1(1400)pi and determination of the CKM angle alpha from B0 --> a1(1260) - pi-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stracka, Simone; /Milan U. /SLAC

    2011-02-07

    In the Standard Model, CP violation in weak interactions involving quarks is parameterized by an irreducible complex phase in the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) quark-mixing-matrix. The precise determination of the CKM elements is a necessary ingredient for a stringent test of the Standard Model predictions, and is a crucial input for reducing the theoretical error in many New Physics searches with flavor, e.g., in the kaon sector. The unitarity of the CKM matrix is typically expressed as a triangle relationship among its parameters, where the area of the so-called Unitarity Triangle visually depicts the amount of asymmetry between the decays of B particles and their antimatter counterparts. In the past few years, the BABAR and Belle experiments have been able to measure all three angles of the triangle from CP asymmetry measurements. The first asymmetry measurements in B particle decays, about ten years ago, allowed to determine {beta}, which is now known to better than 5% precision. The angles {alpha} and {gamma}, measured in much rarer processes, required several years of data taking before analyses could yield reliable answers. A remarkable feature is that the direct measurement of the angles of the Unitarity Triangle generates an area that is consistent with the area predicted by measurement of the sides. In this thesis we have presented the branching fraction measurements of charged and neutral B meson decays to K{sub 1}(1270){pi} and K{sub 1}(1400){pi}, obtained from a data sample of 454 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events. This analysis is particularly challenging from the experimental side since the branching fractions involved are very low, at the level of 10{sup -6} - 10{sup -7}, and the signal is characterized by the simultaneous presence of two overlapping resonances, which exhibit sizeable interference effects. The combined K{sub 1}(1270){pi} and K{sub 1}(1400){pi} signal is therefore modeled with a K-matrix formalism, which accounts for

  16. Charged particle cross-section database for medical radioisotope production: diagnostic radioisotopes and monitor reactions. Final report of a co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medical applications of nuclear radiation are of considerable interest to the IAEA. Cyclotrons and accelerators, available in recent years in an increasing number of countries, are being used for the production of radioisotopes for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The physical basis of this production is described through interaction of charged particles, such as protons, deuterons and alphas, with matter. These processes have to be well understood in order to produce radioisotopes in an efficient and clean manner. In addition to medical radioisotope production, reactions with low energy charged particles are of primary importance for two major applications. Techniques of ion beam analysis use many specific reactions to identify material properties, and in nuclear astrophysics there is interest in numerous reaction rates to understand nucleosynthesis in the Universe. A large number of medically oriented cyclotrons have been running in North America, western Europe and Japan for more than two decades. In recent years, 30-40 MeV cyclotrons and smaller cyclotrons (Ep < 20 MeV) have been installed in several countries. Although the production methods are well established, there are no evaluated and recommended nuclear data sets available. The need for standardization was thus imminent. This was pointed out at three IAEA meetings. Based on the recommendations made at these meetings, the IAEA decided to undertake and organize the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Development of Reference Charged Particle Cross-Section Database for Medical Radioisotope Production. The project was initiated in 1995. It focused on radioisotopes for diagnostic purposes and on the related beam monitor reactions in order to meet current needs. It constituted the first major international effort dedicated to standardization of nuclear data for radioisotope production. It covered the following areas: Compilation of data on the most important reactions for monitoring light ion

  17. Radioisotopes in Hydrology. Proceedings of a Symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing emphasis on the development of water resources poses problems which are of interest to all countries, both developing and advanced, where the demand for water is continuously rising. There is no doubt that greater efforts must be made to evaluate, control and develop water resources using all scientific means available and during recent years increasing attention has been directed to the supplementation of hydrological methods with radioisotope techniques. These techniques have already been applied to a number of problems and their potential usefulness demonstrated. Radioisotopes can be used for stream discharge measurements with an accuracy as good as that obtainable with conventional methods. They are also finding increasing application in the measurement of groundwater direction and velocity, the study of suspected interconnections between different sources of water, and the investigation of mixing processes in rivers and lakes. Radioisotope techniques have been used in different parts of the world for studying the transport of silt in rivers and harbours. Present research is directed towards making these investigations on a quantitative basis which, if successful, would be of great importance in the design of hydraulic structures. The method of finding out the age of groundwater by measuring its natural tritium content can be applied to the determination of the recharge rate of groundwater bodies, so enabling a more rational use of the groundwater reserves without fear of overexploitation. Current research is aimed at using carbon-14 for groundwater-dating to extend the age measurable by tritium. A Symposium on the use of radioisotopes in hydrology was organized by the Agency and held in March 1963 in Tokyo in co-operation with the Japanese Government, for whose material and other assistance and generous hospitality the Agency wishes to record its grateful appreciation. The Symposium was attended by about 100 participants from 14 countries and 5

  18. The strong coupling from tau decays without prejudice

    CERN Document Server

    Boito, Diogo; Jamin, Matthias; Mahdavi, Andisheh; Maltman, Kim; Osborne, James; Peris, Santiago

    2012-01-01

    We review our recent determination of the strong coupling \\alpha_s from the OPAL data for non-strange hadronic tau decays. We find that \\alpha_s(m^2_\\tau) =0.325+-0.018 using fixed-order perturbation theory, and \\alpha_s(m^2_\\tau)=0.347+-0.025 using contour-improved perturbation theory. At present, these values supersede any earlier determinations of the strong coupling from hadronic tau decays, including those from ALEPH data.

  19. Research and development for the application of radioisotope technology in SINR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief systematic account on the research and development for the application of radioisotope technology in Shanghai Institute of Nuclear Research (SINR) is presented. It comprehensively covers the following categories: 1. Radioisotopes produced by cyclotron; 2. Radioisotope-labelled compounds; 3. Radioisotope as source of energy converter; 4. Induced-radioisotope generation as a means for elemental analysis--the activation analysis; 5. Radioisotope equipped with electronic instrument for various application; and 6. Special usage of some radioisotopes

  20. Polarization in heavy quark decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alimujiang, K.

    2006-07-01

    In this thesis I concentrate on the angular correlations in top quark decays and their next.to.leading order (NLO) QCD corrections. I also discuss the leading.order (LO) angular correlations in unpolarized and polarized hyperon decays. In the first part of the thesis I calculate the angular correlation between the top quark spin and the momentum of decay products in the rest frame decay of a polarized top quark into a charged Higgs boson and a bottom quark in Two-Higgs-Doublet-Models: t({up_arrow}) {yields} b + H{sup +}. I provide closed form formulae for the O({alpha}{sub s}) radiative corrections to the unpolarized and the polar correlation functions for m{sub b}{ne}0 and m{sub b}=0. In the second part I concentrate on the semileptonic rest frame decay of a polarized top quark into a bottom quark and a lepton pair: t({up_arrow}){yields}X{sub b}+l{sup +}+{nu}{sub l}. I present closed form expressions for the O({alpha}{sub s}) radiative corrections to the unpolarized part and the polar and azimuthal correlations for m{sub b}{ne}0 and m{sub b}=0. In the last part I turn to the angular distribution in semileptonic hyperon decays. Using the helicity method I derive complete formulas for the leading order joint angular decay distributions occurring in semileptonic hyperon decays including lepton mass and polarization effects. (orig.)

  1. The future of medical radioisotope supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NEA and its High-level Group on the Security of Supply of Medical Radioisotopes (HLG-MR) have been actively examining the causes of supply shortages of the most widely used isotope in medical diagnostic imaging, technetium-99m (99mTc), and its parent isotope molybdenum-99 (99Mo). As a result of this examination, the HLG-MR has developed a policy approach that includes principles and supporting recommendations to address the causes of these supply shortages. Six policy principles were agreed by the HLG-MR in March 2011. These are implementation of full-cost recovery and outage reserve capacity (ORC) for 99Mo production, a government role in the market, conversion to low-enriched uranium targets, international collaboration and periodic reviews of the supply chain. This article describes progress made in the implementation of the six principles and examines the projected global capacity for medical radioisotope production in the near future. (author)

  2. Development of radioisotope labeled polymeric carriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Jin; Jeong, Jea Min; Hwang, Hyun Jeong [Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    This research was performed with the aim of developing polymeric radioisotope or drug carriers for obtaining efficient diagnostic therapeutic efficacy. As polymers, polyethylene oxides, polylactides, polycaprolactone were chosen to prepare the devices including micelle system, microemulsion, nanospheres. In addition, anticancer drug loaded polylactide microparticulates were fabricated as a regional chemotherapeutics for the treatment of cancer. Technetium or radioactive iodine was labeled to the polymeric carriers via ligands such as DTPA and HPP, respectively. Labeling efficiency was above 90% and stable enough up to 24 hours. Moreover, injected polymer carriers demonstrated higher blood maintenance and bone uptake than Tin colloid, a control. These results suggested that radioisotope carrying polymeric particulate are promising tools for diagnosing blood vessels or bones. Besides, anticancer drug loaded particulates demonstrated appropriate maintenance of therapeutic concentration and localization. Therefore it was proposed that this therapeutic system may be potential as a cancer therapy modality. 20 refs., 24 figs.,5 tabs. (Author)

  3. Investigation of probable decays in rhenium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Making use of effective liquid drop model (ELDM), the feasibility of proton and alpha decays and various cluster decays is analysed theoretically. For different neutron-rich and neutron-deficient isotopes of Rhenium in the mass range 150 < A < 200, the half-lives of proton and alpha decays and probable cluster decays are calculated considering the barrier potential as the effective liquid drop one which is the sum of Coulomb, surface and centrifugal potentials. The calculated half-lives for proton decay from various Rhenium isotopes are then compared with the universal decay law (UDL) model to assess the efficiency of the present formalism. Geiger-Nuttal plots of the probable decays are analysed and their respective slopes and intercepts are evaluated

  4. Utilization of radioisotopes in the agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some aspects of radioisotopes utilization in the agriculture, such as, the use of gamma radiation for genetic improvement of plants; the use of C14 as tracer for comprehension of the vegetable physiology; the use of nitrogen and phosphorus isotopes in soil fertilization and plant nutrition; the use of radiation for inset sterelization and, measurement of the humidity and density of soils by neutron moderation and attenuation of gamma radiation, are presented. (M.C.K.)

  5. The efficient importation and distribution of radioisotopes. Suggestions for the most economic importation of radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the course of their work in many Member States, IAEA technical assistance experts have sometimes encountered difficulties in connection with the importation of radioactive isotopes. In some countries they have been consulted as to the possible improvement of import procedures. The purpose of this publication is to summarize the experience that has been gained in the hope that it may be useful both to scientists who wish to import radioisotopes for their work and to public officials who are concerned with the administrative and financial aspects of the problem. This question is of considerable importance because many countries have only limited resources of scientific man-power and foreign exchange and hence it is essential, if these resources are to be utilized fully, that efficient importing procedures be established. Furthermore, the success or failure of technical assistance activities may depend on whether radioisotopes needed for the project can be efficiently imported. Although the data summarized in this publication are based mainly on the experience of medical users of radioisotopes, they are equally applicable to their uses in other fields such as agriculture and hydrology. This publication covers the subject of importation and distribution of radioisotopes, and concludes with a brief section on the domestic production of short-lived radioisotopes in research reactors

  6. Steps of radioisotope separation in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Extraordinary Specialist Committee on Radioisotope Separation of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan has supported various actions on foundation, application and industrialization of the radioisotope separation over past 30 years to continue wide range of actions at a standpoint of specialist, since established in Showa 44 (1969). On June 1993 (Heisei 5), a memorial lecture meeting, as the 100th committee was held at the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN) of Wako-city in Saitama prefecture. At that time, a planning to publish an impressive memorial issue, to prepare orbits and episodes of actions, painful stories and fault examples of developments, and so forth like novels and to use for a future foundation, was determined. For its writing principle, it was settled to the base not to use mathematical equation as possible, to collect the essence like a tale, to collect actual and historical reports, and so on. And, for its writing content, it was determined to report on actual, painful and fault experiences in research and development, on data, topics and human relation, and on what to be remained for references. This book can be used not only for data collected on traces from fundamental to applied studies, technical development for industrialization, and so forth on radioisotope concentration, but also for a knowledge bag to give some hints to a man aiming to overcome a new problem. (G.K.)

  7. Quantitation of renal function using radioisotopic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, J P; Ziessman, H A

    1993-03-01

    Radioisotopic methods are practical for clinical use because they do not require continuous intravenous infusion or urine collection. This obviously is of great advantage in infants and small children, in whom accurate urine collection is difficult, but the techniques apply to adults as well. The ability to determine individual kidney function is a major benefit. Accuracies of the radioisotopic techniques vary but generally are within clinically acceptable ranges. The need for accuracy and reproducibility can be balanced with the desire for speed and convenience when choosing among the different techniques. Methods that use plasma sampling provide greater accuracy and are recommended in cases of severe dysfunction, whereas methods such as Gates' camera method, which eliminates plasma samples, can be completed in minutes. Radioisotopic techniques are most useful in the ranges of mild to moderately decreased function, in which serum creatinine concentration is nondiagnostic, and although they are much less accurate at markedly low renal function levels, so is 24-hour creatinine clearance. In conclusion, radiopharmaceutical agents offer a wide array of possible techniques for simple, accurate, and noninvasive measurement of global as well as individual GFR and ERPF. PMID:8462269

  8. Medical Radioisotope Scanning. Proceedings of a Seminar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of the many and varied uses of radioactive isotopes which have been developed in the past twenty years, their applications in medicine are among the most important. All over the world medical scientists have added radioisotopes to their armament in clinical research, diagnosis and radiotherapy. It is significant that the first scientific meeting organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency was devoted to a medical subject. It is not less significant as a symbol of the close co-operation which has been established between the Agency and other agencies of the United Nations family, that this first seminar was a joint undertaking with the World Health Organization. The determination of the distribution of a radioisotope within the human body - radioisotope scanning - is a technique which has made very rapid progress in the last few years in various medical centres throughout the world, and the necessity of providing an opportunity for an organized exchange of results, experience and opinions was clearly recognised. The value of such an exchange is demonstrated by the extensive discussions which took place and which are recorded in this volume, together with the original papers presented by those who have made such noteworthy contributions to progress in this field.

  9. Separation of radioisotopes from fuel reprocessing waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technology development of radioisotope production from fuel reprocessing high level wastes in Radioisotope Production Division is described. To develop the separation method for partitioning as the waste management and production of useful radioisotopes, the separation of 90Sr, 137Cs and rare earth elements by solvent extraction and ion-exchange has been mainly studied. Ion-exchange resin and HDEHP as the extracting agents were irradiated with a 60Co radiation source to examine their radiation resistances; Both are satisfactory in this respect. Strontium-90 and 137Cs could be separated in 99% purity from a 10l waste solution (about 2 Ci) by ion-exchange using nitric acid as the only eluant. A system of solvent extraction and ion-exchange to treat large volume of the waste was constructed in trial, and its cold test was carried out. The results were satisfactory, with a few points for further improvement. The scheme as it is can be scaled up for an experiment with about 1 KCi of the waste. (auth.)

  10. NEW DIRECTIONS IN RADIOISOTOPE SPECTRUM IDENTIFICATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salaymeh, S.; Jeffcoat, R.

    2010-06-17

    Recent studies have found the performance of commercial handheld detectors with automatic RIID software to be less than acceptable. Previously, we have explored approaches rooted in speech processing such as cepstral features and information-theoretic measures. Scientific advances are often made when researchers identify mathematical or physical commonalities between different fields and are able to apply mature techniques or algorithms developed in one field to another field which shares some of the same challenges. The authors of this paper have identified similarities between the unsolved problems faced in gamma-spectroscopy for automated radioisotope identification and the challenges of the much larger body of research in speech processing. Our research has led to a probabilistic framework for describing and solving radioisotope identification problems. Many heuristic approaches to classification in current use, including for radioisotope classification, make implicit probabilistic assumptions which are not clear to the users and, if stated explicitly, might not be considered desirable. Our framework leads to a classification approach with demonstrable improvements using standard feature sets on proof-of-concept simulated and field-collected data.

  11. The Determination of Components of Radioactive Decay Mixtures by Computer Analysis of Count-Rate Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The components of a mixture of n radioactive isotopes can be determined from the change in activity with time provided that the activity of at least n-1 components changes significantly during the period of observation, either by direct decay or by the growth of decay products. ft is possible to predict a set of possible components for each mixture encountered, based on considerations such as the origin and history of the mixture and the separation chemistry and counting technique(s) used. If such considerations are properly applied, the set of possible components will include all of the actual components in the mixture. The appropriate growth and/or decay equations can then be formulated and solved simultaneously to obtain each component, or the mixture can be resolved graphically by extrapolations of the linear portions of the total decay-growth curve. However, when the number of components is large and/or when complex decay schemes are involved, these two techniques either cannot be applied or the errors associated with the estimates cannot be assessed. Selection of decay components by a least-squares procedure provides better estimates than solution by simultaneous equations alone. Consequently, a least-squares Fortran computer programme (designated CORD) has been developed which solves the general problem: given the times and counts per unit time from a sample, the possible radioisotopic parents and decay schemes and all associated decay constants and detection efficiencies compute the amount of each parent actually present at a predetermined zero time. In addition, the programme yields the amounts of the parents and daughters present at all data times. Initially used with bioassay and environmental samples, the programme has been specifically designed for analysing count-rate data obtained by non-spectroscopic alpha- or beta-counting. However, it should be adaptable to total gamma and spectroscopic data, provided the energy ranges over which these

  12. Recoil-alpha-fission and recoil-alpha-alpha-fission events observed in the reaction Ca-48 + Am-243

    CERN Document Server

    Forsberg, U; Andersson, L -L; Di Nitto, A; Düllmann, Ch E; Gates, J M; Golubev, P; Gregorich, K E; Gross, C J; Herzberg, R -D; Hessberger, F P; Khuyagbaatar, J; Kratz, J V; Rykaczewski, K; Sarmiento, L G; Schädel, M; Yakushev, A; Åberg, S; Ackermann, D; Block, M; Brand, H; Carlsson, B G; Cox, D; Derkx, X; Dobaczewski, J; Eberhardt, K; Even, J; Fahlander, C; Gerl, J; Jäger, E; Kindler, B; Krier, J; Kojouharov, I; Kurz, N; Lommel, B; Mistry, A; Mokry, C; Nazarewicz, W; Nitsche, H; Omtvedt, J P; Papadakis, P; Ragnarsson, I; Runke, J; Schaffner, H; Schausten, B; Shi, Y; Thörle-Pospiech, P; Torres, T; Traut, T; Trautmann, N; Türler, A; Ward, A; Ward, D E; Wiehl, N

    2015-01-01

    Products of the fusion-evaporation reaction Ca-48 + Am-243 were studied with the TASISpec set-up at the gas-filled separator TASCA at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum f\\"ur Schwerionenforschung. Amongst the detected thirty correlated alpha-decay chains associated with the production of element Z=115, two recoil-alpha-fission and five recoil-alpha-alpha-fission events were observed. The latter are similar to four such events reported from experiments performed at the Dubna gas-filled separator. Contrary to their interpretation, we propose an alternative view, namely to assign eight of these eleven decay chains of recoil-alpha(-alpha)-fission type to start from the 3n-evaporation channel 115-288. The other three decay chains remain viable candidates for the 2n-evaporation channel 115-289.

  13. Clinical study of radioisotope clearance from the cerebrospinal fluid space using single photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuchiwaki, H.; Nagasaka, M.; Takada, S.; Ishiguri, H.; Kameyama, H.; Aoyama, Y.

    1989-07-01

    Radioisotope cisternography with statistical analysis was evaluated in 18 patients with suspected hydrocephalus shown by conventional CT, and 4 control patients. Regions of interest were located at cisterna magna, basal cistern, lateral cistern Silvii, interhemispheric cistern, and lateral ventricle using three dimensional SPECT images. A value for constant K was determined for each exponential radioactivity decay curve. On the basis of SPECT-derived K values our patients were grouped into hydrocephalus, nonhydrocephalus, and control patients. Twelve of 14 hydrocephalus patients were treated by shunt operation. Our less-invasive method showed reliable criteria for assessing the cerebrospinal fluid circulation. (orig.).

  14. Nuclear and Radioisotope Propulsion and Power in the Atmosphere of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widdicombe, T.

    A brief history of the use of nuclear fuelled powerplant in space is given along with some working principles of the technology, and recent proposals for spacecraft for the exploration of Titan utilising radioisotope generators are surveyed. Nuclear reaction engines are studied with specific consideration given to their use in Titan's atmosphere, and speculative modifications to one particular spacecraft concept originally conceived of for the exploration of Mars are proposed. A hybrid device producing mechanical power from nuclear decay heat is also suggested for future investigation.

  15. Modes of decay in neutron-rich nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, B; Singh, S K; Lahiri, C; Patra, S K

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the ground, first intrinsic excited states and density distribution for neutron-rich thorium and uranium isotopes, within the framework of relativistic mean field(RMF) approach using axially deformed basis. The total nucleon densities are calculated, from which the cluster-structures inside the parent nuclei are determined. The possible modes of decay, like {\\alpha}-decay and \\b{eta} -decay are analyzed. We find the neutron-rich isotopes are stable against {\\alpha}-decay, however they are very much unstable against \\b{eta} -decay. The life time of these nuclei predicted to be tens of second against \\b{eta} -decay.

  16. Integration of Radioisotope Heat Source with Stirling Engine and Cooler for Venus Internal-Structure Mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schock, Alfred

    1993-10-01

    The primary mission goal is to perform long-term seismic measurements on Venus, to study its largely unknown internal structure. The principal problem is that most payload components cannot long survive Venus's harsh environment, 90 bars at 500 degrees C. To meet the mission life goal, such components must be protected by a refrigerated payload bay. JPL Investigators have proposed a mission concept employing a lander with a spherical payload bay cooled to 25 degrees C by a Stirling cooler powered by a radioisotope-heated Sitrling engine. To support JPL's mission study, NASA/Lewis and MTI have proposed a conceptual design for a hydraulically coupled Stirling engine and cooler, and Fairchild Space - with support of the Department of Energy - has proposed a design and integration scheme for a suitable radioisotope heat source. The key integration problem is to devise a simple, light-weight, and reliable scheme for forcing the radioisotope decay heat to flow through the Stirling engine during operation on Venus, but to reject that heat to the external environment when the Stirling engine and cooler are not operating (e.g., during the cruise phase, when the landers are surrounded by heat shields needed for protection during subsequent entry into the Venusian atmosphere.) A design and integration scheme for achieving these goals, together with results of detailed thermal analyses, are described in this paper. There are 7 copies in the file.

  17. Coefficient Alpha

    OpenAIRE

    Panayiotis Panayides

    2013-01-01

    Heavy reliance on Cronbach’s alpha has been standard practice in many validation studies. However, there seem to be two misconceptions about the interpretation of alpha. First, alpha is mistakenly considered as an indication of unidimensionality and second, that the higher the value of alpha the better. The aim of this study is to clarify these misconceptions with the use of real data from the educational setting. Results showed that high alpha values can be obtained in multidimensional scale...

  18. A report on the extent of radioisotope usage in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A market survey was carried out to study the extent of radioisotope usage in Malaysia. From the survey, the radioisotopes and their activities/quantities that are used in Industry, Medicine and Research were identified. The radioisotopes that are frequently needed or routinely used were also determined and this formed the basis of the recommendations put forward in this report. It is proposed that PUSPATI adopt the concept of a Distribution Centre in order to provide a service to the Malaysian community. (author)

  19. Radioisotope techniques for problem-solving on refineries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasingly, refineries worldwide are recognizing the value of radioisotope technology in studying the operation of on-line plant. Using case studies, this paper illustrates the versatility of radioisotope techniques in a wide range of investigations: the density-profiling of distillation columns; the investigation of leaks on feed/effluent exchangers; on-line flowrate measurement; underground leakage detection. The economic benefits deriving from radioisotope applications are indicated

  20. Vitrified chemically bonded phosphate ceramics for immobilization of radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagh, Arun S.

    2016-04-05

    A method of immobilizing a radioisotope and vitrified chemically bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC) articles formed by the method are described. The method comprises combining a radioisotope-containing material, MgO, a source of phosphate, and optionally, a reducing agent, in water at a temperature of less than 100.degree. C. to form a slurry; curing the slurry to form a solid intermediate CBPC article comprising the radioisotope therefrom; comminuting the intermediate CBPC article, mixing the comminuted material with glass frits, and heating the mixture at a temperature in the range of about 900 to about 1500.degree. C. to form a vitrified CBPC article comprising the radioisotope immobilized therein.

  1. Technical and economical availability of radioisotopes production in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical and economical availability of radioisotopes production in Brazil by a low power research reactor, are done. The importance of radioisotope utilization and controled radiations, in areas such as medicine, industry and cost evaluation for the production in nuclear reactors. In the cost evaluation of a radioisotope production reactor, the studies developed by the Department of Nuclear Engineering of Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais - DEN/UFMG were used. The information analysis justify the technical and economical availability and the necessity of the radioisotopes production in Brazil. (E.G.)

  2. Advanced Radiative Emitters for Radioisotope Thermophotovoltaic Power Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) are critical for future flagship exploration missions in space and on planetary surfaces. Small improvements in the RPS...

  3. Markets for reactor-produced non-fission radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current market segments for reactor produced radioisotopes are developed and reported from a review of current literature. Specific radioisotopes studied in is report are the primarily selected from those with major medical or industrial markets, or those expected to have strongly emerging markets. Relative market sizes are indicated. Special emphasis is given to those radioisotopes that are best matched to production in high flux reactors such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory or the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A general bibliography of medical and industrial radioisotope applications, trends, and historical notes is included

  4. Efficient, Long-Lived Radioisotope Power Generator Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc., (RMD) proposes to develop an alternative very long term, radioisotope power source with thermoelectric power conversion with...

  5. Quantum time scales in alpha tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Kelkar, N G; Nowakowski, M

    2008-01-01

    The theoretical treatment of alpha decay by Gamow is revisited by investigating the quantum time scales in tunneling. The time spent by an alpha particle in front of the barrier and traversing it before escape is evaluated using microscopic alpha nucleus potentials. The half-life of a nucleus is shown to correspond to the time spent by the alpha knocking in front of the barrier. Calculations for medium and super heavy nuclei show that from a multitude of available tunneling time definitions, the transmission dwell time gives the bulk of the lifetime of the decaying state, in most cases.

  6. Workshop on Precision Measurements of $\\alpha_s$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethke, Siegfried; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Hoang, Andre H.; /Vienna U.; Kluth, Stefan; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Schieck, Jochen; /Munich U.; Stewart, Iain W.; Aoki, S.; Beneke, M.; Bethke, S.; Blumlein, J.; Brambilla, N.; Brodsky, S.; /MIT, LNS

    2011-10-01

    These are the proceedings of the Workshop on Precision Measurements of {alpha}{sub s} held at the Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich, February 9-11, 2011. The workshop explored in depth the determination of {alpha}{sub s}(m{sub Z}) in the {ovr MS} scheme from the key categories where high precision measurements are currently being made, including DIS and global PDF fits, {tau}-decays, electro-weak precision observables and Z-decays, event-shapes, and lattice QCD. These proceedings contain a short summary contribution from the speakers, as well as the lists of authors, conveners, participants, and talks.

  7. $b$-hadrons decays at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Turchikhin, Semen; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Recent results on $\\Lambda^0_b$ baryon and $B_c^+$ meson decay studies from the ATLAS experiment at the LHC are presented. These include measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry parameter $\\alpha_b$ and the helicity amplitudes for the $\\Lambda^0_b\\to J/\\psi\\Lambda^0_b$ decay, first observation of the $\\Lambda^0_b\\to\\psi(2S)\\Lambda^0_b$ decay and measurement of its rate relative to the $\\Lambda^0_b\\to J/\\psi\\Lambda^0$ decay, and study of the $B_c^+\\to J/\\psi D_s^{(*)+}$ decay properties.

  8. U.S. Space Radioisotope Power Systems and Applications: Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Robert L.; Bennett, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    Radioisotope power systems (RPS) have been essential to the U.S. exploration of outer space. RPS have two primary uses: electrical power and thermal power. To provide electrical power, the RPS uses the heat produced by the natural decay of a radioisotope (e.g., plutonium-238 in U.S. RPS) to drive a converter (e.g., thermoelectric elements or Stirling linear alternator). As a thermal power source the heat is conducted to whatever component on the spacecraft needs to be kept warm; this heat can be produced by a radioisotope heater unit (RHU) or by using the excess heat of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). As of 2010, the U.S. has launched 41 RTGs on 26 space systems. These space systems have ranged from navigational satellites to challenging outer planet missions such as Pioneer 10/11, Voyager 1/2, Galileo, Ulysses, Cassini and the New Horizons mission to Pluto. In the fall of 2011, NASA plans to launch the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) that will employ the new Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) as the principal power source. Hundreds of radioisotope heater units (RHUs) have been launched to provide warmth to Apollo 11, used to provide heating of critical components in a seismic experiment package, Pioneer 10/11, Voyager 1/2, Galileo, Cassini, Mars Pathfinder, MER rovers, etc. to provide temperature control to critical spacecraft electronics and other mechanical devices such as propulsion system propellant valves. A radioisotope (electrical) power source or system (RPS) consists of three basic elements: (1) the radioisotope heat source that provides the thermal power, (2) the converter that transforms the thermal power into electrical power and (3) the heat rejection radiator. Figure 1 illustrates the basic features of an RPS. The idea of a radioisotope power source follows closely after the early investigations of radioactivity by researchers such as Henri Becquerel (1852-1908), Marie Curie (1867-1935), Pierre Curie (1859

  9. Development of radioisotope preparation and application technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this project is to develop RI production technology utility 'HANARO' and to construct a sound infra-structure for mass production and supply to domestic users. The developed contents and results are as follows: two types of rig for irradiation in reactor core were designed and manufactured. The safety of OR rig during irradiation was identified through various test and it is used for RI production. The prepared IR rig will be used to performance tests for safety. We prepared two welders and welding jigs for production of sealed sources, and equipments for quality control of the welded materials. Production processes and apparatus Cr-51, P-32, I-125 and Sr-89, were developed. Developed results would be used for routine production and supply of radioisotopes. The automatic Tc-99m extraction apparatus was supplied to Libya under IAEA support. For approval on special form radioactive material of the developed Ir-192 source assembly and projector documents were prepared and submitted to MOST. The high dose rate Ir-192 source(diameter 1.1 mm, length 5.2 mm) for RALS and the laser welding system for its fabrication were developed. Production technologies of Ir-192 sources for destructive test and medical therapy were transferred to private company for commercial supply. The chemical immobilization method based on the self-assemble monolayer of ω-functionalized thiol and the sensing scheme based on the beta-emitter labeling method were developed for the fabrication radioimmuno-sensors. Results of this study will be applied to mass production of radioisotopes 'HANARO' and are to contribute the advance of domestic medicine and industry related to radioisotopes

  10. Recent progress in radioisotope production in Vietnam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Van So [Radioisotope Dept., Nuclear Research Institute, Dalat (Viet Nam)

    1998-10-01

    This is a report on the recent progress in radioisotope production in Vietnam. Using a nuclear research reactor of 500 KW with continuous operation cycles of 100 hours a month, the production of some important radioisotopes used in nuclear medicine and research was routinely carried out. More than 80 per cent of irradiation capacity of reactor for radioisotope production were exploited. The radioactivity of more than 150 Ci of {sup 131}I, {sup 99}Mo-{sup 99m}Tc, {sup 32}P, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 153}Sm, {sup 46}Sc, {sup 192}Ir was produced annually. Radiopharmaceuticals such as {sup 131}I-Hippuran and in-vivo Kits for {sup 99m}Tc labelling were also prepared routinely and regularly. More than 10 in-vivo Kits including modern radiopharmaceuticals such as HmPAO kit were supplied to hospitals in Vietnam. The research on the improvement of dry distillation technology for production of {sup 131}I was carried out. As a result obtained a new distillation apparatus made from glass was successfully put to routine use in place of expensive quartz distillation furnace. We have also continued the research programme on the development of {sup 99m}Tc generators using low power research reactors. Gel technology using Zr- and Ti- molybdate gel columns for {sup 99m}Tc generator production was developed and improved continually. Portable {sup 99m}Tc generator using Zr-({sup 99}Mo) molybdate gel column and ZISORB adsorbent column for {sup 99m}Tc concentration were developed. The ZISORB adsorbent of high adsorption capacity for {sup 99}Mo and other parent radionuclides was also studied for the development purpose of alternative technology of {sup 99m}Tc and other different radionuclide generator systems. The studies on the preparation of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals labelling with {sup 153}Sm and {sup 131}I such as {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP, {sup 131}I-MIBG were carried out. (author)

  11. Development of radioisotope preparation and application technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Hyon Soo; Park, K. B.; Bang, H. S. [and others

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop RI production technology utility 'HANARO' and to construct a sound infra-structure for mass production and supply to domestic users. The developed contents and results are as follows: two types of rig for irradiation in reactor core were designed and manufactured. The safety of OR rig during irradiation was identified through various test and it is used for RI production. The prepared IR rig will be used to performance tests for safety. We prepared two welders and welding jigs for production of sealed sources, and equipments for quality control of the welded materials. Production processes and apparatus Cr-51, P-32, I-125 and Sr-89, were developed. Developed results would be used for routine production and supply of radioisotopes. The automatic Tc-99m extraction apparatus was supplied to Libya under IAEA support. For approval on special form radioactive material of the developed Ir-192 source assembly and projector documents were prepared and submitted to MOST. The high dose rate Ir-192 source(diameter 1.1 mm, length 5.2 mm) for RALS and the laser welding system for its fabrication were developed. Production technologies of Ir-192 sources for destructive test and medical therapy were transferred to private company for commercial supply. The chemical immobilization method based on the self-assemble monolayer of {omega}-functionalized thiol and the sensing scheme based on the beta-emitter labeling method were developed for the fabrication radioimmuno-sensors. Results of this study will be applied to mass production of radioisotopes 'HANARO' and are to contribute the advance of domestic medicine and industry related to radioisotopes.

  12. Self-reliance politics in radioisotopes production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Energetic and Nuclear Research Institute (IPEN), owned by National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN), is a non-profit government institution that produces on a national scale more than 18 radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals for nuclear medicine. These radiopharmaceuticals are used in the diagnosis and treatment of more than 1.5 million people in Brazil. This level of production was achieved through the creation of new technologies and automation solutions, because of the difficulty and cost on importation of raw materials and labeling compounds ready for use. In Brazil, only CNEN has authorization to import, manipulate and distribute radiopharmaceuticals. Therefore, the quality of those radioisotopes must comply with international specifications and regulations. Much research and 40 years of improvements has won IPEN international approval for the radiopharmaceuticals that it produces, and quality standards and specifications are today as good as in any other developed country. IPEN has even developed a few solutions in radioisotope production for others countries, such as Cuba and soon Peru. The first step towards self-production was the acquisition of a cyclotron (Cyclone-30) and the improvement of the reactor power from 2 MW to 5 MW. Many technical visits were made to radiopharmaceutical institutions around the world with the purpose of bringing self-reliance and self-development solutions to IPEN. The international radiopharmaceutical community has always contributed to this effort, and only with their help our self-development and self-reliance could be possible. IPEN has ISO 9001-2000 certification and has made efforts to improve the installations in order to achieve Good Manufacturing Practice. Every effort we make today has the goal of making radiopharmaceuticals available for therapy at the most competitive price possible for our institution. (author)

  13. Performance tuned radioisotope thermophotovoltaic space power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, W. E.; Morgan, M. D.; Saban, S. B.

    1998-01-01

    The trend in space exploration is to use many small, low-cost, special-purpose satellites instead of the large, high-cost, multipurpose satellites used in the past. As a result of this new trend, there is a need for lightweight, efficient, and compact radioisotope fueled electrical power generators. This paper presents an improved design for a radioisotope thermophotovoltaic (RTPV) space power system in the 10 W to 20 W class which promises up to 37.6 watts at 30.1% efficiency and 25 W/kg specific power. The RTPV power system concept has been studied and compared to radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) radioisotope, Stirling generators and alkali metal thermal electric conversion (AMTEC) generators (Schock, 1995). The studies indicate that RTPV has the potential to be the lightest weight, most efficient and most reliable of the three concepts. However, in spite of the efficiency and light weight, the size of the thermal radiator required to eliminate excess heat from the PV cells and the lack of actual system operational performance data are perceived as obstacles to RTPV acceptance for space applications. Between 1994 and 1997 EDTEK optimized the key converter components for an RTPV generator under Department of Energy (DOE) funding administered via subcontracts to Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC) and EG&G Mound Applied Technologies Laboratory (Horne, 1995). The optimized components included a resonant micromesh infrared bandpass filter, low-bandgap GaSb PV cells and cell arrays. Parametric data from these components were supplied to OSC who developed and analyzed the performance of 100 W, 20 W, and 10 W RTPV generators. These designs are described in references (Schock 1994, 1995 and 1996). Since the performance of each class of supply was roughly equivalent and simply scaled with size, this paper will consider the OSC 20 W design as a baseline. The baseline 20-W RTPV design was developed by Schock, et al of OSC and has been presented elsewhere. The

  14. Medical Radioisotope Data Survey: 2002 Preliminary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siciliano, Edward R.

    2004-06-23

    A limited, but accurate amount of detailed information about the radioactive isotopes used in the U.S. for medical procedures was collected from a local hospital and from a recent report on the U.S. Radiopharmaceutical Markets. These data included the total number of procedures, the specific types of procedures, the specific radioisotopes used in these procedures, and the dosage administered per procedure. The information from these sources was compiled, assessed, pruned, and then merged into a single, comprehensive and consistent set of results presented in this report. (PIET-43471-TM-197)

  15. Industrial radioisotope economics. Findings of the study group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within twenty years of the availability of radioisotopes in quantity the use of these as tracers has been widely applied in scientific research and in industrial process and product control. Industry spends millions of dollars on these new techniques. Since the overall attitude of industry is to favour methods that involve rapid financial returns the economic benefits must be considerable. In promoting the peaceful uses of atomic energy, the IAEA is actively interested in the international exchange of experience in all applications of radioisotopes. This has been demonstrated by a number of scientific conferences where new results of direct importance to the industrial use of radioisotopes have been presented. In 1963 the IAEA also published literature survey on radioisotope applications described in the scientific literature up to 1960, classified according to industry. However, the available scientific literature was found insufficient to determine the extent of the use of radioisotopes and the economic benefits derived from it. Therefore, further fact-finding efforts were necessary. The IAEA thus decided to carry out an International Survey on the Use of Radioisotopes in Industry. In 1962 the IAEA's highly industrialized Member States Were invited to participate in the Survey; 25 declared their willingness to do so and in due course submitted their national reports. These included information on how radioisotopes were used by industry in each country and indicated the size and form of the economic advantages, primarily in terms of savings made by industry. The findings from the Survey were discussed at a Study Group Meeting on Radioisotope Economics, held in Vienna in March 1964. Forty participants from 22 countries were nominated for this Study Group. The program of the meeting was divided in three parts: (1) experience of the International Survey on the use of radioisotopes in industry; (2) present use of radioisotopes, technical and economic aspects; (3

  16. Tau decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most recent experimental results of τ physics are reviewed. The covered topics include precision measurements of semihadronic τ decay and their impact on tau branching ratio budget, the current status of the tau consistency test, a determination of Michel parameters and τ neutrino helicity, and upper limits on lepton-number violating τ decays. (orig.)

  17. Preparing for Harvesting Radioisotopes from FRIB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peaslee, Graham F. [Hope College, Holland, MI (United States); Lapi, Suzanne E. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-02-02

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is the next generation accelerator facility under construction at Michigan State University. FRIB will produce a wide variety of rare isotopes by a process called projectile fragmentation for a broad range of new experiments when it comes online in 2020. The accelerated rare isotope beams produced in this facility will be more intense than any current facility in the world - in many cases by more than 1000-fold. These beams will be available to the primary users of FRIB in order to do exciting new fundamental research with accelerated heavy ions. In the standard mode of operation, this will mean one radioisotope will be selected at a time for the user. However, the projectile fragmentation process also yields hundreds of other radioisotopes at these bombarding energies, and many of these rare isotopes are long-lived and could have practical applications in medicine, national security or the environment. This project developed new methods to collect these long-lived rare isotopes that are by-products of the standard FRIB operation. These isotopes are important to many areas of research, thus this project will have a broad impact in several scientific areas including medicine, environment and homeland security.

  18. Safety test of transport packages for radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Division of Radioisotope Production, JAERI, has tested safety of type B(M), A and L packages according to the regulations of RI transportation. The type B(M) package weighing about 1800 kg. Used for transport of 192Ir(6540 Ci) and 32P(188 Ci) from reactors to the Radioisotope Production Laboratory, consists of a cylindrical plywood receptacle, aluminum honeycomb shock absorbers, steel framework and a 150 mm wall thickness drawer type lead container. Safety tests for type B(M) included 9 m high free drops in four postures, vertical, horizontal, corner and reverse, 1 m free drops on to an iron rod with in two postures, vertical and horizontal (the latter for punch test) and thermal test. The maximum acceleration in the punch test showed 735 G and in the 9 m drop test 2590 G. For thermal test of the whole package, a large muffle furnace was used. When the temperature of furnace reached 9200C, the package was inserted into it and heated for 30 min. During the test surface temperature of the lead container rose only by 19.10C. In 12.2 m free drop of type A and L package as safety test, 5 ml vials containing simulation RI solution retained their integrity without breakage. (author)

  19. Safe Handling of Radioisotopes. Medical Addendum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency published in 1958 a Manual entitled ''Safe Handling of Radioisotopes'' (Safety Series No. 1 - STI/PUB/1), based on the work of an international panel convened by the Agency. As recommended by that panel and approved by the Agency's Board of Governors, this Addendum has now been prepared, primarily as a supplement to the Manual. It contains information necessary to medical officers concerned with the implementation of the controls given in the Manual. In addition, it is intended to serve as a brief introduction to the medical problems encountered in radiological protection work and to the methods of resolving them. As in the case of the Manual itself, the information given in this Addendum is particularly relevant to the problems encountered by the small user of radioisotopes. Although the basic principles set forth in it apply to all work with radiation sources, the Addendum is not intended to serve as a radiological protection manual for use in reactor installations or large-scale nuclear industry, where more specialized techniques and information are required.

  20. Induced radioisotopes in a linac treatment hall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When linacs operate above 8 MV an undesirable neutron field is produced whose spectrum has three main components: the direct spectrum due to those neutrons leaking out from the linac head, the scattered spectrum due to neutrons produced in the head that collides with the nuclei in the head losing energy and the third spectrum due to room-return effect. The third category of spectrum has mainly epithermal and thermal neutrons being constant at any location in the treatment hall. These neutrons induce activation in the linac components, the concrete walls and in the patient body. Here the induced radioisotopes have been identified in concrete samples located in the hall and in one of the wedges. The identification has been carried out using a gamma-ray spectrometer. - Highlights: • Portland cement samples were located inside a treatment hall with a 15 MV linac. • Induced radioisotopes were measured with a NaI(Tl) γ-ray spectrometer. • 56Mn, 24Na, and 28Al were identified and the specific activity was estimated. • In a wedge, 56Mn was induced by the photoneutrons

  1. Actual and future situations of the use of radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is anticipated to medium term, an increase in the demand of the radioisotopes for medicine, industry and research, as well as the application of new radioisotopes derived from the development of new radiopharmaceuticals products for diagnosis and therapy applications. The personal and clinical dosimetry will have to be prepared for the new challenges. (Author)

  2. Utilization of material testing reactor for radioisotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In April 2000, JAEA (former JAERI) and CTC reached an agreement that we took over the radioisotope production from JAEA. We set up our facility in the Tokai Research and Development Center Nuclear Science Research Institute and started services. In this paper, we state present status of the production of radioisotopes in Japan and development activities in the future. (author)

  3. Guide to the safe handling of radioisotopes in hydrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopic tracers are frequently used in hydrological investigations. This manual provides recommendations on safety measures to be used in these investigations. The annexes provide lists of radioisotopic techniques that have been employed together with an indication of the quantities of isotopes used.

  4. The development of weak alpha source for the application to industrial probability generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have been developing a random number generator and probability generator that utilizes natural random phenomenon of radioactive alpha-decay. The time intervals of electric pulse signals induced in a semiconductor detector are converted to physical random number by measuring the interval as clock pulse counts. Since the time interval has an exponential distribution, ρ(t), depending on the count rate of original electric pulse signals, the probability (P(Δt)) is easily defined by P(Δt)=∫t1t2 ρdt/∫0∞ ρdt. The sealed 100 Bq 244Cm source pieces were supplied from the AEA technology. We selected pin-diode detector as the alpha detector. The source pieces were subjected to the test for thermal stress simulating the bonding process to mount the source into a small chip of probability generator. We confirmed that the sealed surface was not changed after adding the thermal stress by the observation with SEM. We have a next plan to replace 244Cm to natural radioisotope 210Pb. As the first step of this attempt, the methods for collecting 210Pb from several natural resources such as aerosol collected in HEPA filters, ground water, and natural radioactive minerals were surveyed. (author)

  5. Summary. The 19th quality control survey for radioisotope in vitro tests in Japan, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shishiba, Yoshimasa; Shimizu, Taeko [Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Ichihara, Kiyoshi; Kousaka, Tadako; Kobayashi, Hisae; Tsushima, Toshio; Hoshino, Minoru; Mori, Mikio

    1998-11-01

    This summary concerns results of the survey in the title performed by the Subcommittee for Radioisotope in vitro Test in the Medical and Pharmaceutical Committee, Japan Radioisotope Association. The survey was conducted in 161 facilities in Japan including public and private hospitals, health institutes and reagent manufacturers. Samples were sent to the facilities and subjected to examinations of intra- and inter-day reproducibility, freeze-thawing effects and periodical changes of the measured values. Methods employed were RIA, IRMA, EIA, ELISA, LPIA, PAMIA, FIA, FPIA, NIA, LAT, CLIA and ECLIA. Results were analyzed by variation coefficients in the kit and between the kits. Samples were for: growth hormone, somatomedin C, follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, prolactin, thyroid stimulating hormone, triiodothyronine, thyroxine, thyroxine binding globulin, calcitonin, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, gastrin, testosterone, estradiol, progesterone, {beta}human chorionic gonadotropin, 17{alpha}-hydroxyprogesterone, aldosterone, cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone, renin, immunogloblin E, digoxin, {alpha}-fetoprotein, carcinoembryonic antigen, tissue polypeptide antigen, CA125, CA19-9, CA15-3, prostatic acid phosphatase, prostate specific antigen, {beta}{sub 2}-microgloblin and ferritin. Results were found rather unsatistactory for some products in the clinical practice, necessary for improvement of detection for some tests and needed for some kits for solving the problems of difference between kits and of matrix effect. (K.H)

  6. Medical Radioisotope Scanning, Vol. II. Proceedings of the Symposium on Medical Radioisotope Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medical applications of radioisotopes continue to grow in number and importance and medical centres in almost all countries of the world are now using radioactive materials both in the diagnosis and treatment of disease. An increasing proportion of these applications involves studies of the spatial distribution of radioactive material within the human body, for which purpose highly specialized scanning methods have been elaborated. By these methods it is possible to study the position, size and functional state of different organs, to detect tumours, cysts and other abnormalities and to obtain much useful information about regions of the body that are otherwise inaccessible, except by surgery. Progress in scanning methods in recent years has been very rapid and there have been many important advances in instrumentation and technique. The development of new forms of the gamma camera and of colour-scanning techniques are but two examples of recent improvements. The production of new radioisotopes and new labelled compounds has further extended the scope of these methods. To survey these new advances the International Atomic Energy Agency held a Symposium on Medical Radioisotope Scanning in Athens from 20-24 April 1964. The scientific programme of the meeting covered all aspects of scanning methods including theoretical principles, instrumentation, techniques and clinical applications. The World Health Organization assisted in the selection of papers by providing a consultant to the selection committee. The meeting followed the earlier IAEA/WHO Seminar on Medical Radioisotope Scanning in Vienna in 1959, which was attended by 36 participants and at which 14 papers were presented. Some idea of the growth of interest in the subject may be gained from the fact that the Symposium was attended by 160 participants from 26 countries and 4 international organizations, and that 58 papers were presented. The published proceedings, comprising two volumes, contain all the

  7. Medical Radioisotope Scanning. Vol. I. Proceedings of the Symposium on Medical Radioisotope Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medical applications of radioisotopes continue to grow in number and importance and medical centres in almost all countries of the world are now using radioactive materials both in the diagnosis and treatment of disease. An increasing proportion of these applications involves studies of the spatial distribution of radioactive material within the human body, for which purpose highly specialized scanning methods have been elaborated. By these methods it is possible to study the position, size and functional state of different organs, to detect tumours, cysts and other abnormalities and to obtain much useful information about regions of the body that are otherwise inaccessible, except by surgery. Progress in scanning methods in recent years has been very rapid and there have been many important advances in instrumentation and technique. The development of new forms of the gamma camera and of colour-scanning techniques are but two examples of recent improvements. The production of new radioisotopes and new labelled compounds has further extended the scope of these methods. To survey these new advances the International Atomic Energy Agency held a Symposium on Medical Radioisotope Scanning in Athens from 20 - 24 April 1964. The scientific programme of the meeting covered all aspects of scanning methods including theoretical principles, instrumentation, techniques and clinical applications. The World Health Organization assisted in the selection of papers by providing a consultant to the selection committee. The meeting followed the earlier IAEA/WHO Seminar on Medical Radioisotope Scanning in Vienna in 1959, which was attended by 36 participants and at which 14 papers were presented. Some idea of the growth of interest in the subject may be gained from the fact that the Symposium was attended by 160 participants from 26 countries and 4 international organizations, and that 58 papers were presented. The published proceedings, comprising two volumes, contain all the

  8. Integro-differential equation analysis and radioisotope imaging systems. Research proposal. [Testing of radioisotope imaging system in phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, H.

    1976-03-09

    Design modifications of a five-probe focusing collimator coincidence radioisotope scanning system are described. Clinical applications of the system were tested in phantoms using radioisotopes with short biological half-lives, including /sup 75/Se, /sup 192/Ir, /sup 43/K, /sup 130/I, and /sup 82/Br. Data processing methods are also described. (CH)

  9. Decay properties of heavier nuclei and mass formula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uno, Masahiro [Ministry of Education, Science and Culture, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    The stabilities of heavy nuclei, including super-heavy elements, are governed by alpha decay and fission. Some exotic types of decay, such as heavy cluster decay, which does not occur so frequently as to govern stability, have been also reported. The half-time estimations of various types of decay are reviewed. And the possibility of decay, mainly in case of heavy cluster decay, is discussed with Q-value obtained from mass formulae as well. Some topics concerning other types of exotic decay are presented. Recent trends in the research on mass formula are reviewed from the historical point of view, to get perspectives of future development. (Yamamoto, A.)

  10. The 2009 Wolrd Average of $\\alpha_s (M_Z)$

    CERN Document Server

    Bethke, Siegfried

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of $\\alpha_s$, the coupling strength of the Strong Interaction between quarks and gluons, are summarised and an updated value of the world average of $\\alpha_s (M_Z)$ is derived. Building up on previous reviews, special emphasis is laid on the most recent determinations of $\\alpha_s$. These are obtained from $\\tau$-decays, from global fits of electroweak precision data and from measurements of the proton structure function $\\F_2$, which are based on perturbative QCD calculations up to $O(\\alpha_s^4)$; from hadronic event shapes and jet production in $\\epem$ annihilation, based on $O(\\alpha_s^3) $ QCD; from jet production in deep inelastic scattering and from $\\Upsilon$ decays, based on $O(\\alpha_s^2) $ QCD; and from heavy quarkonia based on unquenched QCD lattice calculations. Applying pragmatic methods to deal with possibly underestimated errors and/or unknown correlations, the world average value of $\\alpha_s (M_Z)$ results in $\\alpha_s (M_Z) = 0.1184 \\pm 0.0007$. The measured values of $\\alpha...

  11. Proton Decay

    OpenAIRE

    Raby, Stuart

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the status of supersymmetric grand unified theories [SUSY GUTs] with regards to the observation of proton decay. In this talk we focus on SUSY GUTs in 4 dimensions. We outline the major theoretical uncertainties present in the calculation of the proton lifetime and then present our best estimate of an absolute upper bound on the predicted proton lifetime. Towards the end, we consider some new results in higher dimensional GUTs and the ramifications for proton decay.

  12. Alpha Schottky junction energy source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litz, Marc S.; Fan, Zhaoyang; Carroll, James J.; Bayne, Stephen

    2012-06-01

    Isotope batteries offer solutions for long-lived low-power sensor requirements. Alpha emitting isotopes have energy per decay 103 times that of beta emitters. Alpha particles are absorbed within 20 μm of most materials reducing shielding mitigation. However, damage to materials from the alphas limits their practical use. A Schottky Barrier Diode (SBD) geometry is considered with an alpha emitting contact-layer on a diamond-like crystal semiconductor region. The radiation tolerance of diamond, the safety of alpha particles, combined with the internal field of the SBD is expected to generate current useful for low-power electronic devices over decades. Device design parameters and calculations of the expected current are described.

  13. Energy Recovery Linacs for Commercial Radioisotope Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sy, Amy [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Krafft, Geoffrey A. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Johnson, Rolland [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL; Roberts, Tom; Boulware, Chase; Hollister, Jerry

    2015-09-01

    Photonuclear reactions with bremsstrahlung photon beams from electron linacs can generate radioisotopes of critical interest. An SRF Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) provides a path to a more diverse and reliable domestic supply of short-lived, high-value, high-demand isotopes in a more compact footprint and at a lower cost than those produced by conventional reactor or ion accelerator methods. Use of an ERL enables increased energy efficiency of the complex through energy recovery of the waste electron beam, high electron currents for high production yields, and reduced neutron production and shielding activation at beam dump components. Simulation studies using G4Beamline/GEANT4 and MCNP6 through MuSim, as well as other simulation codes, will design an ERL-based isotope production facility utilizing bremsstrahlung photon beams from an electron linac. Balancing the isotope production parameters versus energy recovery requirements will inform a choice of isotope production target for future experiments.

  14. Emerging applications of radioisotopes in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in the domain of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals has been very noteworthy over the past decade and played a major role in enhancing the Nuclear Medicine practice. A number of them have been employed in the day to day clinical practice and have benefited a large number of patients. For the purpose of systematic discussion, we shall classify into two major heads A. Recent advances in clinical applications of traditional radiotracers. B. Newer Radiopharmaceuticals and their applications. The latter could be further subdivided in to the following: (a) Diagnostic (includes i. PET radiopharmaceuticals and ii. Non-PET radiopharmaceuticals for conventional gamma camera imaging) and (b) Therapeutic advances. In the present communication, we shall explore the major developments emphasizing the country perspective

  15. Radioisotope Power Systems Program: A Program Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamley, John A.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program continues to plan, mature research in energy conversion, and partners with the Department of Energy (DOE) to make RPS ready and available to support the exploration of the solar system in environments where the use of conventional solar or chemical power generation is impractical or impossible to meet potential future mission needs. Recent programs responsibilities include providing investment recommendations to NASA stakeholders on emerging thermoelectric and Stirling energy conversion technologies and insight on NASA investments at DOE in readying a generator for the Mars 2020 mission. This presentation provides an overview of the RPS Program content and status and the approach used to maintain the readiness of RPS to support potential future NASA missions.

  16. Recent progress in development of radioisotope production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Byung Mok [HANARO Center, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-10-01

    The Korea multipurpose research reactor, HANARO(Hi-flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor) is designed and constructed to obtain high density neutron flux (max. 5x10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}sec) with relatively low thermal output (30 MW) in order to utilize for various studies such as fuel and material test, radioisotope production, neutron activation analysis, neutron beam experiment, neutron transmutation doping, etc. HANARO has 32 vertical channels (3 in-core, 4 out-core, 25 reflector) and 7 horizontal channels. KAERI has constructed 4 concrete hot cells for production of Co-60, Ir-192, etc. and 6 lead hot cells for production of medical RIs(I-131, Mo-99, etc.). Other 11 lead hot cells will be completed by Feb. 1998 for production of Sm-153, Dy-165, Ho-166, etc. Clean room facilities were installed for production of radiopharmaceuticals. (author)

  17. Radioisotope Power System Facility shielding analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of calculations for the Radioisotope Power System Facility have been performed. These analyses have determined the shielding required for storage, testing, and transport of 238Pu heat source modules using the Monte Carlo code MCNP3B. The source terms and the assumptions used have been verified by comparison of calculated dose rates with measured ones. This paper describes the methodology used for shielding designs and the utilization of available variance reduction techniques to improve the computational efficiency. The new version of MCNP (MCNP3B) with a repeated structure capability was used. It decreased the chance for computer model errors and greatly decreased the model setup time. 2 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Recent developments in radiation equipment and radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is given of the technology of the uses of radiation equipment and radioisotopes, in which field Canada has long been a world leader. AECL Commercial Products has pioneered many of the most important applications. The development and sale of Co-60 radiation teletherapy units for cancer treatment is a familiar example of such an application and Commercial Products dominates the world market. Another such example is the marketing of Mo-99, which is produced in the NRX and NRU reactors at Chalk River, and from which the short-lived daughter Tc-99 is eluted as required for use in in-vivo diagnosis. New products coming into use for this purpose include Tl-201, I-123, Ga-67 and In-111, all produced in the TRIUMF cyclotron in Vancouver, while I-125 continues to be in demand for in-vitro radioimmunoassays. Radioisotopes continue to play an important part in manufacturing, where their well-known uses include controlling thickness, contents, etc., in production, and industrial radiography. The application of large industrial irradiators for the sterilization of medical products is now a major world industry for which Commercial Products is the main manufacturer. Isotopes are also used in products such as smoke detectors. Isotopes continue to find extensive use as tracers, both in industrial applications and in animal and plant biology studies. Some more recent uses include pest control by the Σsterile maleΣ technique and neutron activation and delayed neutron counting in uranium assay. The review concludes with an account of the development and prospects of AECL Commercial Products. (author)

  19. Status of the NASA Stirling Radioisotope Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    2007-01-01

    Free-piston Stirling power conversion has been considered a candidate for radioisotope power systems for space for more than a decade. Prior to the free-piston Stirling architecture, systems were designed with kinematic Stirling engines that used linkages and rotary alternators to convert heat to electricity. These systems were able to achieve long life by lightly loading the linkages; however, the live was nonetheless limited. When the free-piston configuration was initially proposed, it was thought to be attractive due to the relatively high conversion efficiency, acceptable mass, and the potential for long life and high reliability based on wear-free operation. These features have consistently been recognized by teams that have studied technology options for radioisotope space power systems. Since free-piston Stirling power conversion was first considered for space power applications, there have been major advances in three general areas of development: hardware that has demonstrated long-life and reliability, the success achieved by Stirling cryocoolers in space, and the overall developmental maturity of the technology for both space and terrestrial applications. Based on these advances, free-piston Stirling convertors are currently being developed for space power, and for a number of terrestrial applications. They commonly operate with the power, efficiency, life, and reliability as intended, and much of the development now centers on system integration. This paper will summarize the accomplishments of free-piston Stirling power conversion technology over the past decade, review the status of development with regard to space power, and discuss the challenges that remain.

  20. Training in radioisotope uses for agricultural investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Seventeen students from Cambodia, the Republic of China, India, Israel, Pakistan, the Philippines, Syria, Thailand and the United Arab Republic attended an inter-regional training course on the use of radioisotopes in soil and plant investigations in Manila, Philippines. Held from 3 October to 25 November 1966, the course was organised by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) under the UN Expanded Programme of Technical Assistance. During the first three weeks, the students, most of whom had graduate training or experience in agricultural research, were taught the basic characteristics of isotopes and the techniques of measuring radiation. Lectures and practical laboratory exercises in the more specialized studies of soil-plant relations took up the rest of the time. Some of the topics covered were: field and water culture experiments, measurement of nutrient in the soil, autoradiography of plant materials, plant mutation and breeding, use of radioisotopes in the study of photosynthesis and plant growth, nuclear techniques for determining soil moisture and density, the use of labelled fertilizer in studying the efficient utilization of fertilizer, etc. Dr. Getulio B. Viado, Head of the Training Institute, Philippine Atomic Energy Commission, was Director of the course, while Dr. Shaukat Ahmed, Director of the Atomic Research Centre, West Pakistan, served as Technical Adviser and as a principal lecturer. The teaching staff consisted of Philippine scientists and three visiting professors: Dr. Victor Middelboe of the IAEA Seibersdorf Laboratory, Dr. M.S. Chandraratna of Ceylon and Dr. S.C. Chang of the Republic of China. (author)

  1. A 5 MW TRIGA reactor design for radioisotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production and preparation of commercial-scale quantities of radioisotopes has become an important activity as their medical and industrial applications continue to expand. There are currently various large multipurpose research reactors capable of producing ample quantities of radioisotopes. These facilities, however, have many competing demands placed upon them by a wide variety of researchers and scientific programs which severely limit their radioisotope production capability. A demonstrated need has developed for a simpler reactor facility dedicated to the production of radioisotopes on a commercial basis. This smaller, dedicated reactor could provide continuous fission and activation product radioisotopes to meet commercial requirements for the foreseeable future. The design of a 5 MW TRIGA reactor facility, upgradeable to 10 MW, dedicated to the production of industrial and medical radioisotopes is discussed. A TRIGA reactor designed specifically for this purpose with its demonstrated long core life and simplicity of operation would translate into increased radioisotope production. As an example, a single TRIGA could supply the entire US needs for Mo-99. The facility is based on the experience gained by General Atomics in the design, installation, and construction of over 60 other TRIGAs over the past 35 years. The unique uranium-zirconium hydride fuel makes TRIGA reactors inexpensive to build and operate, reliable in their simplicity, highly flexible due to unique passive safety, and environmentally friendly because of minimal power requirements and long-lived fuel. (author)

  2. Development and application of industrial radioisotope instruments in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Industrial radioisotope instruments are emerging as advanced monitoring, controlling and automation tools for industries in China. Especially the on-line analysis systems based on radioisotope instruments, referred to as nucleonic control systems (NCS), have more and more important role in the modernization and optimization of industrial processes. Over nearly four decades significant progress has been made in the development and application of radioisotope instruments in China. After a brief review of the history of radioisotope instruments, the state of the art of this kind of instruments and recent examples of their applications are given. Technical and economic benefits have resulted from the industrial applications of radioisotope instruments and the sales of products of their own in marketing. It is expected that along with the high speed growth of national economy, there will be greater demand for radioisotope instruments and nucleonic control systems in Chinese industry to promote the technological transformation and progress of traditional industries and to establish high-tech industries with technology-intensive products. Sustained efforts for the research and development of radioisotope instrument should be made to up-grade domestic instruments and to satisfy the needs of the smaller scale industries more common in China for low cost systems. (1 fig., 2 tabs.)

  3. Notification prescribing the quantities of radioisotopes and others

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The notification is wholly revised under the order and the regulations for enforcing the law concerning prevention from radiation hazards due to radioisotopes. The concentration of isotopes emitting radiation shall be 0.002 micro-curie per gram. When not tightly sealed, the quantity of such isotopes shall be 0.1 micro-curie for strontium 90 and isotopes emitting alpha rays, 1 micro-curie for isotopes emitting radiation with half-life of more than 30 days, 10 micro-curie for isotopes emitting radiation with half-life of less than 30 days and 100 micro-curie for Hydrogen 3, Beryllium 7, Carbon 14, Fluorine 18, etc. The quantity of isotopes shall be more than 10 curie for those with automatic indicators and more than 3,000 curie for those interlocked. In the controlled area the permissible dose of exterior radiation is 30 mili-rem for a week. The maximum permissible exposure dose for the workers engaged in radiation business is 3 rem for 3 months. The maximum permissible accumulative dose for such workers is a figure (unit rem) calculated by a formula D = 5(N-18), when D means the permissible accumulative dose and N number of the age. The permissible exposure dose is 12 rem for the urgent work and 1.5 rem for a year for the persons who enter into the controlled area on business. The maximum permissible density in the air, under water and on the surface, etc. are in detail prescribed with tables attached. (Okada, K.)

  4. Utilization of radioisotopes and irradiation in crop protection research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a growing realization of the benefits which may be derived from the application of radioisotopes and radiation sources in the different disciplines of crop protection research. Many investigations which might only be carried out with extreme difficulty or not all by conventional methods, could be pursued with relative ease. Radioisotopes and irradiation have been utilized in understanding the physiology and behaviour of pests and their biochemical processes and in consequence, have contributed beneficially to the development of better control techniques and more effective pesticides. On the environmental aspects, radioisotopic techniques have provided a useful tool in understanding the behaviour, metabolism and residues of pesticides in the environment. (author)

  5. Waste minimization in the Los Alamos Medical Radioisotope Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the mid-1970s the Los Alamos Medical Radioisotope Program has been irradiating target materials to produce and recover radioisotopes for applications in medicine, environmental science, biology, physics, materials research, and other disciplines where radiotracers find utility. By necessity, the chemical processing of targets and the isolation of radioisotopes generates radioactive waste materials. Recent years have brought pressure to discontinue the use of hazardous materials and to minimize radioactive waste volumes. Substantial waste reduction measures have been introduced at the irradiation facility, in processing approaches, and even in the ways the product isotopes are supplied to users

  6. B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, Sheldon

    1992-01-01

    The study of b quarks has now reached a stage where it is useful to review what has been learned so far and also to look at the implications of future studies. The most important observations thus far - measurement of the "B" lifetime, B 0 - B 0 mixing, and the observation of b? u transitions, as well as more mundane results on hadronic and semileptonic transitions - are described in detail by experimentalists who have been closely involved with the measurements. Theoretical progress in understanding b quark decays, including the mechanisms of hadronic and semileptonic decays, are described. S

  7. Current utilization of research reactor on radioisotopes production in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yishu [Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu (China)

    2000-10-01

    The main technical parameters of the four research reactors and their current utilization status in radioisotope manufacture and labeling compounds preparation are described. The radioisotopes, such as Co-60 sealed source, Ir-192 sealed source, {gamma}-knife source, I-131, I-125, Sm-153, P-32 series products, In-113m generator, Tc-99m gel generator, Re-188 gel generator, C-14, Ba-131, Sr-89, {sup 90}Y, etc., and their labeling compounds prepared from the reactor produced radionuclides, such as I-131-MIBG, I-131-Hippure, I-131-capsul, Sm-153-EDTMP, Re-186-HEDP, Re-186-HA, C-14-urea, and radioimmunoassay kits etc. are presented as well. Future development plan of radioisotopes and labeling compounds in China is also given. Simultaneously, the possibility and methods of bilateral or multilateral co-operation in utilization of research reactor, personnel and technology exchange of radioisotope production and labeling compounds is also discussed. (author)

  8. Variable Conductance Heat Pipes for Radioisotope Stirling Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall program objective is to develop a high temperature variable conductance heat pipe (VCHP) backup radiator, and integrate it into a Stirling radioisotope...

  9. Short course on the use of radioisotopes in agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the papers delivered at the short course on the use of radioisotopes in agriculture held in Pretoria, South Africa, 22-24 April 1981. The following topics were discussed: principles of nuclear physics and radioactivity; biological effects of radiation; regulatory control of radioisotopes; basic radiation protection procedures; radiation detectors and counting instrumentation; statistics of radioactive observations; use of the neutron moisture meter in soil moisture determinations; soil moisture content and soil density measurements by the gamma soil moisture meter; trace element analysis; application and use of radioisotopes as tracers in soil studies; applications of isotopes in plants for the study of absorption and transportation of mineral elements; applications of radioisotopes in zoological studies

  10. A historical perspective on radioisotopic tracers in metabolism and biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappin, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Radioisotopes are used routinely in the modern laboratory to trace and quantify a myriad of biochemical processes. The technique has a captivating history peppered with groundbreaking science and with more than its share of Nobel Prizes. The discovery of radioactivity at the end of the 19th century paved the way to understanding atomic structure and quickly led to the use of radioisotopes to trace the fate of molecules as they flowed through complex organic life. The 1940s saw the first radiotracer studies using homemade instrumentation and analytical techniques such as paper chromatography. This article follows the history of radioisotopic tracers from meager beginnings, through to the most recent applications. The author hopes that those researchers involved in radioisotopic tracer studies today will pause to remember the origins of the technique and those who pioneered this fascinating science.

  11. Buffett's Alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frazzini, Andrea; Kabiller, David; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    Berkshire Hathaway has realized a Sharpe ratio of 0.76, higher than any other stock or mutual fund with a history of more than 30 years, and Berkshire has a significant alpha to traditional risk factors. However, we find that the alpha becomes insignificant when controlling for exposures to Betting...

  12. Efficiency of Pm-147 direct charge radioisotope battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kavetskiy, A.; Yakubova, G.; Yousaf, S.M. [TRACE Photonics Inc, 1680 West Polk Avenue, Charleston, IL 61920 (United States); Bower, K., E-mail: kbower@tracephotonics.co [TRACE Photonics Inc, 1680 West Polk Avenue, Charleston, IL 61920 (United States); Robertson, J.D.; Garnov, A. [Department of Chemistry and University of Missouri Research Reactor, 1513 Research Park Drive, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    A theoretical analysis is presented here of the efficiency of direct charge radioisotope batteries based on the efficiency of the radioactive source, the system geometry, electrostatic repulsion of beta particles from the collector, the secondary electron emission, and backscattered beta particles from the collector. Efficiency of various design batteries using Pm-147 sources was experimentally measured and found to be in good agreement with calculations. The present approach can be used for predicting the efficiency for different designs of direct charge radioisotope batteries.

  13. Decay Probability Ratio of Pentaquark Theta^+ State

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, X; Ma, B Q; Chen, Xun; Mao, Yajun; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    2003-01-01

    The pentaquark state of $\\Theta^{+}(uudd\\bar{s})$ has been observed to decay with two decay modes: $\\Theta^+\\to n K^+$ and $\\Theta^+ \\to p K^0$. The decay probability ratio of the two decay modes is studied with general symmetry consideration of isospin, spin, and parity. We arrive at a result of the ratio $\\frac{\\Gamma(\\Theta^+\\to nK^+)}{\\Gamma(\\Theta^+\\to pK^0)} =\\frac{(\\alpha-\\beta)^2}{(\\alpha+\\beta)^2}(\\frac{k_1}{k_2})^{2L+1}$, which is valid for the $\\Theta^+$ state to be a pure isoscalar or isovector state, or an isotensor state with mixture of isoscalar and isovector components with coefficients $\\alpha$ and $\\beta$. The dependence on spin and parity of the pentaquark $\\Theta^+$ state is found to be small due to small difference between the center of mass decay momenta $k_1$ and $k_2$ of the two decay modes. Future experimental results about the decay probability ratio may provide information about the isospin configuration of the pentaquark $\\Theta^+$ state.

  14. Strategy for securing the national supply of radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The global supply shortage of medical radioisotopes caused by the unscheduled shutdown of the aged reactors which supply over 90% of radioisotopes overall the world, has severely affected the normal healthcare system which depend on the technology of molecular imaging for diagnoses and therapy as well as the development of nuclear molecular imaging technology. Purpose: It is urgently needed to develop new alternative technologies to solve the problem of global radioisotope supply shortage. Methods: The proton cyclotron is a potential alternative technology to produce the 99mTc and the most of medical radioisotopes of clinical importance. Results: The quality of 99mTc produced by cyclotron, such as nuclide purity, specific activity and nonradioisotope impurities, has reached and/or exceeded that eluted from 99Mo/99mTc generator produced by reactor. Conclusions: It is the most operational and sustainable way to substitute the conventional global centralized supply by reactors with local centralized supply of radioisotopes by proton cyclotrons for securing the national supply of radioisotopes. (author)

  15. Prospect of radioisotopes and radiation utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation Utilization in Japan has been positioned, together with nuclear power generation, as one of the important cornerstones, and research and development and practical usage of it has been proceeded with steadily in the fields of industry, agriculture, medicine, and so on. In the field of medicine, SPECT and PET facilities, radio-immunoassay, radiotherapy has come widely to practical use. In the field of agriculture and fisheries, improvement of breed, sterile insect technique have been implemented, and eradication of melon fly has been achieved. In the field of industry, it is expected that the practical use of neutron radiography technique and research and development of synthesizing high performance, high function materials are progressed. In the environment preservation area, a pilot test using electron beam to treat the exhaust gases out of coal fired power plants, city garbages combustion facilities, city high way tunnels in order to establish de- sulphur/de-nitrogen technique is carried out. As the international contribution in the field of radiation utilization, the cooperation with developing countries and the cooperation among advanced countries are reported. In this paper, a prospect of radioisotopes and radiation utilization is described. (J.P.N.)

  16. Treatment of animal wastes contaminated with radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With increase of isotope utilizations as tracers in medicine, pharmacy, agriculture, biology and others, the management of resultant organic waste liquids and animal wastes is becoming a major problem. For the animal wastes contaminated with radioisotopes, numbers of studies and tests showed that drying them fully and the subsequent suitable disposal would be the most feasible procedures. This new method is being carried out since last year, which will shortly take the place of the keeping in formalin. For the drying, two alternative processes in particular are being investigated. As the one, freeze-drying apparatuses consist of refrigerating and freeze-drying devices. As the other, microwave-drying apparatuses feature rapid dehydration. The following matters are described: problems emerged in the course of studies and test; the drying processes, i.e. freeze-drying and microwave-drying, and their respective characteristics; and views of the Nuclear Safety Bureau, Science and Technology Agency, on animal waste drying. (J.P.N.)

  17. Versatile PC-logger for radioisotope measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The logger, a personal computer and software is all to set up a radioisotope measuring system. It may find numerous applications in a wide range of disciplines: kinetics description of flow process in industry, slip velocity measurements in hydrotransport, flow rates evaluation in waste water treatment plants, nucleonic gauges in industry, ect. Readings from up to 4 scintillation detectors, the user has set to log, are stored in regular intervals. The user can set the logger to start and stop logging manually, with keyboard or from a program running on a connected PC. Stored data can be transferred to any computer with RS232 serial interface. The logger works equally well together with conventional PC's and 'lap-tops' for field work. Its internal program is stored in nonvolatile RAM. This makes it possible to upgrade or change the code by just down loading a new one. The logger is internal rechargeable batteries for measuring off-line; they remain as a back-up in case the external supply is disconnected or fails. (author)

  18. Safe Handling of Radioisotopes. 1973 Edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under its Statute the International Atomic Energy Agency is empowered to provide for the application of standards of safety for protection against radiation to its own operations and to operations making use of assistance provided by it or with which it is otherwise directly associated. To this end authorities receiving such assistance are required to observe relevant health and safety measures prescribed by the Agency. As a first step, it was considered an urgent task to provide users of radionuclides with a manual of practice for the safe handling of these substances. The first edition of such a manual was published in 1958 and represented the first of the ''Safety Series'', a series of manuals and codes on health and safety published by the Agency. It was prepared after careful consideration of existing national and international codes of radiation safety by a group of international experts and in consultation with other international bodies. This edition presents the second revision. In response to the suggestion made by some Member States, the term 'radioisotopes' has been changed to 'radionuclides' in the title and, as appropriate, in the text because the term 'radionuclides' includes the radioactive element itself as well as the isotopes. The series of manuals and codes published in the Safety Series and the Technical Reports Series give more complete advice to the user on specialized topics.

  19. Perturbative expansion of tau hadronic spectral function moments and alpha_s extractions

    CERN Document Server

    Beneke, Martin; Jamin, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Various moments of the hadronic spectral functions have been employed in the determination of the strong coupling alpha_s from tau decays. In this work we study the behaviour of their perturbative series under different assumptions for the large-order behaviour of the Adler function, extending previous work on the tau hadronic width. We find that the moments can be divided into a small number of classes, whose characteristics depend only on generic features of the moment weight function and Adler function series. Some moments that are commonly employed in alpha_s analyses from tau decays should be avoided because of their perturbative instability. This conclusion is corroborated by a simplified alpha_s extraction from individual moments. Furthermore, under reasonable assumptions for the higher-order behaviour of the perturbative series, fixed-order perturbation theory (FOPT) provides the preferred framework for the renormalization group improvement of all moments that show good perturbative behaviour. Finally...

  20. Coated particle fuel for radioisotope power systems (RPSs) and radioisotope heater units (RHUs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholtis, Joseph A.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    1999-01-01

    Coated particle fuel offers great promise for advanced radioisotope power systems (RPSs) and radioisotope heater units (RHUs) being pursued for future U.S. solar system exploration missions. Potential benefits of this fuel include improved design flexibility and materials compatibility, enhanced safety and performance, and reduced specific mass and volume. This paper describes and discusses coated particle fuel, with emphasis on its applicability, attributes, and potential benefits to future RPSs and RHUs. Additionally, this paper identifies further analyses and verification testing that should be conducted before a commitment is made to fully develop this fuel. Efforts to date indicate there is every reason to believe that the potential benefits of coated particle fuel to future RPSs and RHUs can be demonstrated with a modest, phased analytical and verification test effort. Thus, developmental risk appears minimal, while the potential benefits are substantial. If coated particle fuel is pursued and ultimately developed successfully, it could revolutionize the design and space use of future RPSs and RHUs.

  1. Survey of literature on dispersion ratio and collection ratio of radioisotopes in animal study using radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of literature in the title was performed to know the actual status of the dispersion from excretion and expiration studies of radioisotopes since, at present, the probable dispersion ratio is assumed to be 100% in calculation for legally permitted use of radioisotopes which conceivably being far from the real status and being incompatible with the guideline for pharmacokinetic studies requiring the recovery of >95% of dosed radioactivity in balance study. There are two interpretations for the dispersion; it is the expiration ratio and it is the fraction unrecovered. Survey was done on 11 Japanese and foreign journals in 1985-1996 publishing most of pharmacokinetic studies and on 650 compounds in 358 facilities with 1,975 experiments in total. In those experiments, the total recovery of radioactivity was 95% in average, unrecovered fraction, 5% and expiration ratio, 2%. As for unclide, 14C, 3H, 125I and 35S were surveyed since they occupied 99.4% of the experiments and their dispersion was <5%. Rats were used in 70% of the experiments and the dispersion in all animal experiments was about 5%. Administration route was regardless of the dispersion. (K.H.)

  2. Release of cesium, strontium and europium from soil columns with decaying organic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Column experiments with migration of Sr, Cs and Eu radioisotopes in unsaturated soil containing decaying organic material are described. The Sr release with percolate is greatly enhanced and the Cs release is under certain circumstances also somewhat enhanced, while Eu appears not to be influenced by the organic degradation products. (au)

  3. Alpha fetoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetal alpha globulin; AFP ... Greater than normal levels of AFP may be due to: Cancer in testes , ovaries, biliary (liver secretion) tract, stomach, or pancreas Cirrhosis of the liver Liver cancer ...

  4. Decay scheme of the U235

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the Th231 excited levels from the alpha decay of the U235, is carried out. The alpha particle spectrum was measured by means of a semiconductor counter spectrometer with an effective resolution of 18 keV. Nineteen new lines were identified. The gamma-ray spectrum was measured with thin samples of U235, free from decay products, and in such geometrical conditions, that most of the interference effects were eliminated. The gamma-gamma coincidence spectra have made easier a better knowledge of the transition between the several levels. (Author) 110 refs

  5. History of occupational exposure to natural radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From pre-historic times miners represented the group which received, inadvertently, occupational exposure to natural radionuclides. At the end of the 19th century scientists researching the newly found radiation called ''radioactivity'' became exposed frequently to uranium, thorium and their decay chains, still hardly aware of the potential risks associated with their work. In the first half of the 20th century some employees in the radium industry received high doses in the course of their professional duties as chemists, maintenance workers, or radium dial painters; many of them lacked adequate information on radiation protection. After World War II the increased international demand for uranium in the military and civilian sector caused overexposures of several thousands of miners (volunteers, prisoners), mostly due to the inhalation of elevated levels of radon and its decay products. By comparison on an international scale a relatively small number of workers was exposed to increased levels of thorium and its decay products in the thorium and rare-earth extraction industry. Health effects due to these past exposures range from relatively weak associations to statistically significant excesses for a variety of symptoms, such as respiratory diseases or cancer of the bone, lung or pancreas. An assessment of today industrial exposure situations indicates a wide range of occupations exposed to partly significant levels of natural radionuclides. 36 refs., 7 tabs., 3 figs

  6. Radioisotopic splenoportography in patients with portal hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samejima, Natsuki; Ikeda, Koichiro; Yokoyama, Yasuhiro; Hirata, Satoru

    1989-05-01

    Radio-isotopic splenoportography was performed by injecting /sup 99m/TcO/sub 4//sup -/into the spleens of 46 patients with portal hypertension and 14 patients with various disorders not having portal hypertension. No collateral circulation was demonstrated in the 14 patients without portal hypertension whereas some RI-images of portosystemic collaterals were found in 40 (87.0 per cent) of the 46 patients with portal hypertension. Collaterals were divided into an ascending group and a descending group, the appearance rate of ascending collaterals being 80.4 per cent and that of descending collaterals, 41.3 per cent. There were 3 image patterns in the ascending group, namely, an AZ-pattern in which the azygos vein was demonstrated; a SC-pattern in which the RI-bolus ascended along the esophagus to the neck and the subclavian vein; and an EG-pattern which showed stagnation of the RI-bolus in the esophagogastric region. There were 4 patterns in the descending group, namely; a pattern of gastro-renal caval shunt (GR-pattern); reverse flow patterns into the umbilical or paraumbilical veins (UV-pattern); into the superior mesenteric vein (SMV-pattern); and into the inferior mesenteric vein (IMV-pattern). The appearance of the EG-pattern was seen most frequently (74.4 per cent). The usefulness of this method for surveying the collateral circulation in portal hypertension, estimating the risk of esophageal variceal bleeding and evaluating its treatments, was suggested by the results of this study. (author).

  7. Radioisotopic splenoportography in patients with portal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samejima, N; Ikeda, K; Yokoyama, Y; Hirata, S

    1989-05-01

    Radio-isotopic splenoportography was performed by injecting 99mTcO4- into the spleens of 46 patients with portal hypertension and 14 patients with various disorders not having portal hypertension. No collateral circulation was demonstrated in the 14 patients without portal hypertension whereas some RI-images of portosystemic collaterals were found in 40 (87.0 per cent) of the 46 patients with portal hypertension. Collaterals were divided into an ascending group and a descending group, the appearance rate of ascending collaterals being 80.4 per cent and that of descending collaterals, 41.3 per cent. There were 3 image patterns in the ascending group, namely, an AZ-pattern in which the azygos vein was demonstrated; a SC-pattern in which the RI-bolus ascended along the esophagus to the neck and the subclavian vein; and an EG-pattern which showed stagnation of the RI-bolus in the esophagogastric region. There were 4 patterns in the descending group, namely; a pattern of gastro-renal caval shunt (GR-pattern); reverse flow patterns into the umbilical or paraumbilical veins (UV-pattern); into the superior mesenteric vein (SMV-pattern); and into the inferior mesenteric vein (IMV-pattern). The appearance of the EG-pattern was seen most frequently (74.4 per cent). The usefulness of this method for surveying the collateral circulation in portal hypertension, estimating the risk of esophageal variceal bleeding and evaluating its treatments, was suggested by the results of this study. PMID:2674500

  8. Radioisotopic splenoportography in patients with portal hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radio-isotopic splenoportography was performed by injecting 99mTcO4-into the spleens of 46 patients with portal hypertension and 14 patients with various disorders not having portal hypertension. No collateral circulation was demonstrated in the 14 patients without portal hypertension whereas some RI-images of portosystemic collaterals were found in 40 (87.0 per cent) of the 46 patients with portal hypertension. Collaterals were divided into an ascending group and a descending group, the appearance rate of ascending collaterals being 80.4 per cent and that of descending collaterals, 41.3 per cent. There were 3 image patterns in the ascending group, namely, an AZ-pattern in which the azygos vein was demonstrated; a SC-pattern in which the RI-bolus ascended along the esophagus to the neck and the subclavian vein; and an EG-pattern which showed stagnation of the RI-bolus in the esophagogastric region. There were 4 patterns in the descending group, namely; a pattern of gastro-renal caval shunt (GR-pattern); reverse flow patterns into the umbilical or paraumbilical veins (UV-pattern); into the superior mesenteric vein (SMV-pattern); and into the inferior mesenteric vein (IMV-pattern). The appearance of the EG-pattern was seen most frequently (74.4 per cent). The usefulness of this method for surveying the collateral circulation in portal hypertension, estimating the risk of esophageal variceal bleeding and evaluating its treatments, was suggested by the results of this study. (author)

  9. Azimuthal correlation between the $(\\vec{p}_l,\\vec{p}_{X_b})$ and $(\\vec{p}_l,\\vec{P}_t)$ planes in the semileptonic rest frame decay of a polarized top quark: An $O(\\alpha_s)$ effect

    CERN Document Server

    Groote, S; Kadeer, A; Körner, J G

    2006-01-01

    The azimuthal correlation between the planes formed by the vectors $(\\vec{p}_l,\\vec{p}_{X_b})$ and $(\\vec{p}_l,\\vec{P}_t)$ in the semileptonic rest frame decay of a polarized top quark $t(\\uparrow) \\to X_b + l^+ + \

  10. JENDL FP decay data file 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katakura, Jun-ichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Yoshida, Tadashi [Musashi Inst. of Tech., Tokyo (Japan); Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro [Aichi Shukutoku Univ., Nagakute, Aichi (Japan); Tachibana, Takahiro [Waseda Univ., Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    A decay data file of fission product (FP) nuclides has been developed for the use in nuclear technology field as one of special purpose files of JENDL (Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library) in the format of ENDF/B and it is called JENDL FP Decay Data File 2000. The file includes the decay data for 1229 fission product nuclides: 142 stable and 1087 unstable nuclides. The data included for a nuclide are decay modes, their Q values and branching ratios, average decay energy values of beta-rays, gamma-rays and alpha-particles and their spectral data. The primary source of the decay data is ENSDF (Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File), which is the internationally recognized data file of nuclear structure properties. The data in ENSDF, however, cover only measured ones. The data of the short-lived nuclides needed for the application fields such as decay heat prediction are often incomplete or not measured because of their short half-lives. For such nuclides a theoretical model calculation is applied to derive the needed data such as average decay energies and spectral data. The data in JENDL FP Decay Data File 2000 have been tested by summation calculation comparing its results with measured data of decay heat values and aggregate fission product spectra of various fissioning nuclei. The comparison showed good agreement between the calculated results and the measured values. (author)

  11. Operations of a Radioisotope-based Propulsion System Enabling CubeSat Exploration of the Outer Planets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Steven Howe; Nathan Jerred; Troy Howe; Adarsh Rajguru

    2014-05-01

    Exploration to the outer planets is an ongoing endeavor but in the current economical environment, cost reduction is the forefront of all concern. The success of small satellites such as CubeSats launched to Near-Earth Orbit has lead to examine their potential use to achieve cheaper science for deep space applications. However, to achieve lower cost missions; hardware, launch and operations costs must be minimized. Additionally, as we push towards smaller exploration beds with relative limited power sources, allowing for adequate communication back to Earth is imperative. Researchers at the Center for Space Nuclear Research are developing the potential of utilizing an advanced, radioisotope-based system. This system will be capable of providing both the propulsion power needed to reach the destination and the additional requirements needed to maintain communication while at location. Presented here are a basic trajectory analysis, communication link budget and concept of operations of a dual-mode (thermal and electric) radioisotope-based propulsion system, for a proposed mission to Enceladus (Saturnian icy moon) using a 6U CubeSat payload. The radioisotope system being proposed will be the integration of three sub-systems working together to achieve the overall mission. At the core of the system, stored thermal energy from radioisotope decay is transferred to a passing propellant to achieve high thrust – useful for quick orbital maneuvering. An auxiliary closed-loop Brayton cycle can be operated in parallel to the thrusting mode to provide short bursts of high power for high data-rate communications back to Earth. Additionally, a thermal photovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion system will use radiation heat losses from the core. This in turn can provide the electrical energy needed to utilize the efficiency of ion propulsion to achieve quick interplanetary transit times. The intelligent operation to handle all functions of this system under optimized conditions adds

  12. Studies on the production and application of radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Hyon Soo; Park, K. B.; Kim, J. R.; Yoon, B. M.; Bang, H. S.; Shin, B. C.; Cho, W. K.; Park, U. J.; Park, C. D.; Lee, Y. G.; Suh, C. H.; Shin, H. Y.; Kim, D. S.; Hong, S. B.; Jun, S. S.; Min, E. S.; Jang, K. D.; Kim, J. K.; Kim, S. J.; Yang, S. Y.; Yang, S. H.; Chun, K. J.; Kang, H. Y.; Suh, K. S.; Goo, J. H.; Chung, S. H.; Lee, J. C.; Choi, J. L.; Lee, H. Y.; Bang, K. S.

    1997-09-01

    To produce radioisotopes utilizing the research reactor `HANARO`, development of RI production process, target fabrication, preparation of devices and tools for RI process, preparation of production facility for radiopharmaceuticals, test production for the established process, etc. have been carried out, respectively. Production processes for various kinds of radionuclides were developed and the settled methods were applied to test production using `HANARO`. The results of developed process are as follows: (1) I-131 dry distillation method. (2) Large scale production of Ir-192 sources (3) P-32 production process by distillation under reduced pressure (4) Cr-51 production process using enriched target. To irradiate the target for RI production in `HANARO`, target for neutron irradiation, loading/unloading devices, working table in service pool, remote handling tools, shield cask for irradiated target transfer, etc. were designed and fabricated. The function test of prepared targets and the safety analysis of shielding casks were carried out. License for practical use of the prepared casks were obtained from Ministry of Science and Technology. For production of medical radioisotopes, their production facilities were designed in detail and were installed in RIPF (Radioisotope Production Facility), with full reflection of the basic concept of the good manufacturing practice for radiopharmaceuticals. The constructed GMP facilities have started to be operated after authorization since Jun., 1997. Results of this study will be applied to mass production of radioisotopes in `HANARO` and are to contribute the advance of domestic medicine and industry related to radioisotopes. (author). 7 refs., 7 tabs., 4 figs.

  13. Outlook on radioisotope production at TRIGA SSR 14 MW reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INR Pitesti, endowed with a research nuclear reactor of TRIGA SSR 14 MW type, has developed activities of radioisotope production, being at present licensed for production and selling Ir-192 sources for industrial gamma radiography and Co-60 sources (2,000 Ci) for medical uses (cobalto therapy). A collaboration was initiated with the CPR Department of IFIN-HH Bucharest, particularly after the WWR-S reactor shutdown on December 21, 1997. In the frame of this program the INR Pitesti offers services of raw material irradiations followed by the radioisotope production performed subsequently at the Radioisotope Production Department (CPR) of IFIN-HH Bucharest which also deals with selling the product on internal market . The experimental facilities with the two TRIGA reactors (TRIGA SSR 14 MW and TRIGA ACPR) of INR Pitesti are described. The maximum neutron flux is 2.9 · 1014 n/cm2s. The irradiation channels are of two neutron spectra types. Also the neutron flux is characterized by radial and axial distribution which are taken into account when a given raw material is to be irradiated, to avoid perturbing non-homogeneities in the raw material activation. Five irradiation devices are presented. Preparations are currently under way for production of fission radioisotopes Mo-99, I-131 and Xe-133 and activation radioisotope I-125 for medical application

  14. IN-SITU RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT NEAR THE NOPAL I URANIUM DEPOSIT AT PENA BLANCA, MEXICO: CONSTRAINTS FROM SHORT-LIVED DECAY-SERIES RADIONUCLIDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Luo; T.L. Ku; V. Todd; M. Murrell; J. Alfredo Rodriguez Pineda; J. Dinsmoor; A. Mitchell

    2005-07-11

    For nuclear waste management, an important mechanism by which radioactive waste components are isolated from returning to the human environment, the biosphere, is by the geological barrier in which the effectiveness of the barrier is characterized by in-situ retardation factor, i.e., the transport rate of a radionuclide relative to that of groundwater. As part of natural analog studies of the Yucca Mountain Project of the U. S. Department of Energy, we propose such characterization by using naturally-occurring decay-series radioisotopes as an analog. We collected large-volume (>1000 liters) groundwater samples from three wells (PB, Pozos, and PB4, respectively) near the Nopal I Uranium Ore site at Pena Blanca, Mexico, by using an in-situ Mn-cartridge filtration technique for analysis of short-lived decay-series radionuclides. Results show that the activities of short-lived radioisotopes ({sup 228}Ra, {sup 224}Ra and {sup 223}Ra) and activity ratios of {sup 224}Ra/{sup 228}Ra and {sup 224}Ra/{sup 223}Ra are higher at PB and Pozos than at PB4. In contrast, the {sup 210}Po activity is much lower at PB and Pozos than at PB4. The high Ra activities and activities ratios at PB and Pozos are attributable to the high alpha-recoil input from the aquifer rocks, while the high {sup 210}Po activity at PB4 is due to the enhanced colloidal transport. Based on a uranium-series transport model, we estimate that the in-situ retardation factor of Ra is (0.43 {+-} 0.02) x 10{sup 3} at PB, (1.68 {+-} 0.08) x 10{sup 3} at Pozos, and (1.19 {+-} 0.08) x 10{sup 3} at PB4 and that the mean fracture width in the aquifer rocks is about 0.23 {micro}m at PB, 0.37 {micro}m at Posos, and 4.0 {micro}m at PB4, respectively. The large fracture width at PB4 as derived from the model provides an additional evidence to the inference from the Po measurements that particle-reactive radionuclides are transported mainly as colloidal forms through the large fractures in rocks. Our model also suggests that

  15. IN-SITU RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT NEAR THE NOPAL I URANIUM DEPOSIT AT PENA BLANCA, MEXICO: CONSTRAINTS FROM SHORT-LIVED DECAY-SERIES RADIONUCLIDES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For nuclear waste management, an important mechanism by which radioactive waste components are isolated from returning to the human environment, the biosphere, is by the geological barrier in which the effectiveness of the barrier is characterized by in-situ retardation factor, i.e., the transport rate of a radionuclide relative to that of groundwater. As part of natural analog studies of the Yucca Mountain Project of the U. S. Department of Energy, we propose such characterization by using naturally-occurring decay-series radioisotopes as an analog. We collected large-volume (>1000 liters) groundwater samples from three wells (PB, Pozos, and PB4, respectively) near the Nopal I Uranium Ore site at Pena Blanca, Mexico, by using an in-situ Mn-cartridge filtration technique for analysis of short-lived decay-series radionuclides. Results show that the activities of short-lived radioisotopes (228Ra, 224Ra and 223Ra) and activity ratios of 224Ra/228Ra and 224Ra/223Ra are higher at PB and Pozos than at PB4. In contrast, the 210Po activity is much lower at PB and Pozos than at PB4. The high Ra activities and activities ratios at PB and Pozos are attributable to the high alpha-recoil input from the aquifer rocks, while the high 210Po activity at PB4 is due to the enhanced colloidal transport. Based on a uranium-series transport model, we estimate that the in-situ retardation factor of Ra is (0.43 ± 0.02) x 103 at PB, (1.68 ± 0.08) x 103 at Pozos, and (1.19 ± 0.08) x 103 at PB4 and that the mean fracture width in the aquifer rocks is about 0.23 (micro)m at PB, 0.37 (micro)m at Posos, and 4.0 (micro)m at PB4, respectively. The large fracture width at PB4 as derived from the model provides an additional evidence to the inference from the Po measurements that particle-reactive radionuclides are transported mainly as colloidal forms through the large fractures in rocks. Our model also suggests that in addition to alpha recoil, decay of 226Ra from the adsorbed phases also

  16. The Mars Hopper: a radioisotope powered, impulse driven, long-range, long-lived mobile platform for exploration of Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven D. Howe; Robert C. O' Brien; William Taitano; Doug Crawford; Nathan Jerred; Spencer Cooley; John Crapeau; Steve Hansen; Andrew Klein; James Werner

    2011-02-01

    Planetary exploration mission requirements are becoming more demanding. Due to the increasing cost, the missions that provide mobile platforms that can acquire data at multiple locations are becoming more attractive. Wheeled vehicles such as the MER rovers have proven extremely capable but have very limited range and cannot traverse rugged terrain. Flying vehicles such as balloons and airplanes have been proposed but are problematic due to the very thin atmospheric pressure and the strong, dusty winds present on Mars. The Center for Space Nuclear Research has designed an instrumented platform that can acquire detailed data at hundreds of locations during its lifetime - a Mars Hopper. The Mars Hopper concept utilizes energy from radioisotopic decay in a manner different from any existing radioisotopic power sources—as a thermal capacitor. By accumulating the heat from radioisotopic decay for long periods, the power of the source can be dramatically increased for short periods. The platform will be able to "hop" from one location to the next every 5-7 days with a separation of 5-10 km per hop. Preliminary designs show a platform that weighs around 52 kgs unfueled which is the condition at deployment. Consequently, several platforms may be deployed on a single launch from Earth. With sufficient lifetime, the entire surface of Mars can be mapped in detail by a couple dozen platforms. In addition, Hoppers can collect samples from all over the planet, including gorges, mountains and crevasses, and deliver them to a central location for eventual pick-up by a Mars Sample Return mission. The status of the Mars Hopper development project at the CSNR is discussed.

  17. Investigation of Miniaturized Radioisotope Thermionic Power Generation for General Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duzik, Adam J.; Choi, Sang H.

    2016-01-01

    Radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) running off the radioisotope Pu238 are the current standard in deep space probe power supplies. While reliable, these generators are very inefficient, operating at only approx.7% efficiency. As an alternative, more efficient radioisotope thermionic emission generators (RTIGs) are being explored. Like RTGs, current RTIGs concepts use exotic materials for the emitter, limiting applicability to space and other niche applications. The high demand for long-lasting mobile power sources would be satisfied if RTIGs could be produced inexpensively. This work focuses on exposing several common materials, such as Al, stainless steel, W, Si, and Cu, to elevated temperatures under vacuum to determine the efficiency of each material as inexpensive replacements for thermoelectric materials.

  18. Hair radioactivity as a measure of exposure to radioisotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strain, W. H.; Pories, W. J.; Fratianne, R. B.; Flynn, A.

    1972-01-01

    Since many radioisotopes accumulate in hair, this tropism was investigated by comparing the radioactivity of shaved with plucked hair collected from rats at various time intervals up to 24 hrs after intravenous injection of the ecologically important radioisotopes, iodine-131, manganese-54, strontium-85, and zinc-65. The plucked hair includes the hair follicles where biochemical transformations are taking place. The data indicate a slight surge of each radioisotpe into the hair immediately after injection, a variation of content of each radionuclide in the hair, and a greater accumulation of radioactivity in plucked than in shaved hair. These results have application not only to hair as a measure of exposure to radioisotopes, but also to tissue damage and repair at the hair follicle.

  19. Application of radioisotopes to studies of crystal imperfections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes have been used in two important ways in studying imperfections in alkali halide crystals. The zone refining of the compounds has been monitored by addition of tracers, and segregation coefficients have been determined from such measurements. The other application has been to insert small concentrations of impurity ions into alkali halides in order to study the phonon scattering by such impurities or by the vacancies they introduce; these measurements are carried out at very low temperatures where the phonon mean free path is limited by lattice imperfections. The most commonly used radioisotope in this work has been Ca45. This work is reviewed and some current and possible future applications of radioisotopes in this field are mentioned. (author)

  20. Methods of Fabricating Scintillators with Radioisotopes for Beta Battery Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rensing, Noa M.; Squillante, Michael R.; Tieman, Timothy C.; Higgins, William; Shiriwadkar, Urmila

    2013-01-01

    Technology has been developed for a class of self-contained, long-duration power sources called beta batteries, which harvest the energy contained in the radioactive emissions from beta decay isotopes. The new battery is a significant improvement over the conventional phosphor/solar cell concept for converting this energy in three ways. First, the thin phosphor is replaced with a thick scintillator that is transparent to its own emissions. By using a scintillator sufficiently thick to completely stop all the beta particles, efficiency is greatly improved. Second, since the energy of the beta particles is absorbed in the scintillator, the semiconductor photodetector is shielded from radiation damage that presently limits the performance and lifetime of traditional phosphor converters. Finally, instead of a thin film of beta-emitting material, the isotopes are incorporated into the entire volume of the thick scintillator crystal allowing more activity to be included in the converter without self-absorption. There is no chemical difference between radioactive and stable strontium beta emitters such as Sr-90, so the beta emitter can be uniformly distributed throughout a strontium based scintillator crystal. When beta emitter material is applied as a foil or thin film to the surface of a solar cell or even to the surface of a scintillator, much of the radiation escapes due to the geometry, and some is absorbed within the layer itself, leading to inefficient harvesting of the energy. In contrast, if the emitting atoms are incorporated within the scintillator, the geometry allows for the capture and efficient conversion of the energy of particles emitted in any direction. Any gamma rays associated with secondary decays or Bremsstrahlung photons may also be absorbed within the scintillator, and converted to lower energy photons, which will in turn be captured by the photocell or photodiode. Some energy will be lost in this two-stage conversion process (high-energy particle

  1. Resonances in alpha-nuclei interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpeshin, F F [Fock Institute of Physics, St Petersburg State University, RU-198504 St Petersburg (Russian Federation); La Rana, G [Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche dell' Universita di Napoli, Monte S. Angelo, via Cintia, 80126 Naples (Italy); Vardaci, Emanuele [Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche dell' Universita di Napoli, Monte S. Angelo, via Cintia, 80126 Naples (Italy); Brondi, Augusto [Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche dell' Universita di Napoli, Monte S. Angelo, via Cintia, 80126 Naples (Italy); Moro, Renata [Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche dell' Universita di Napoli, Monte S. Angelo, via Cintia, 80126 Naples (Italy); Abramovich, S N [Russian Federal Nuclear Centre VNIIEF, RU-607190 Sarov, Nizhny Novgorod Region (Russian Federation); Serov, V I [Russian Federal Nuclear Centre VNIIEF, RU-607190 Sarov, Nizhny Novgorod Region (Russian Federation)

    2007-03-15

    Tunnelling of {alpha} particles through the Coulomb barrier is considered. The main attention is given to the effect of sharp peaks arising in the case of coincidence of the {alpha} energy with that of a quasistaionary state within the barrier. The question of the {alpha}-nucleus potential is discussed in this light. The method is applied to the {alpha} decay of a compound nucleus of {sup 135}Pr. The appearance of the peaks in the spectrum of emitted particles is predicted. They can give rise to 'anomalous' properties of some neutron resonances. The peaks can also be observed in the incoming {alpha}-nucleus channel. Observation of the peaks would give unique information about the {alpha}-nucleus potential.

  2. Determination of the radiological impact of radioisotope waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) controls the uses of radioisotopes and the management of wastes resulting from radioisotope use through licences. In most cases, wastes generated through the use of radioisotopes are required by licence condition to be sent to Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories for storage but if the amounts of radioisotope are very small, have a low activity or a very short half-life, the radioisotope is permitted to be released to regular waste management systems. The AECB commissioned this study to determine the doses to individuals working in municipal waste management systems and to populations of cities where small amounts of radioisotopes are disposed of through the municipal waste managment systems. The Hamilton-Burlington area surrounding Hamilton Harbour was selected as the study area. The pathways and dosimetry models were put into a computer spread sheet, to give the model flexibility so that it could be easily modified to model other cities. Within the occupational critical group, the maximum doses were calculated for the Hamilton sewage treatment plant aeration worker at 1.2E-6 Sv/a. If this individual were also a member of the critical group in the general population, the maximum dose would be 2.0E-6 Sv/a. Individual doses to the critical group within the general population were calculated as 7.7E-7 Sv/a for adults and 6.8E-8 Sv/a for infants. These compare to AECB regulatory limits of 5.0E-2 Sv/a per person for atomic radiation workers and 5.0E-3 Sv/a per person for the general public. The collective population dose for the study area was 1.37E-1 person-Sv/a or an average dose of 2.6E-7 Sv/a per person for the 525,000 population

  3. Solid targets for production of radioisotopes with cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of targets for production of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals of cyclotron to medical applications requires a detailed analysis of several variables such as: cyclotron operation conditions, choice of used materials as target and their physicochemical characteristics, activity calculation, the yielding of each radioisotope by irradiation, the competition of nuclear reactions in function of the projectiles energy and the collision processes amongst others. The objective of this work is to determine the equations for the calculation for yielding of solid targets at the end of the proton irradiation. (Author)

  4. Results with radioisotope techniques in veterinary science in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes have been applied to veterinary science in Hungary since the fifties. A short chronologic review on the development of isotope technology is given emphasizing the possibilities offered by the application of closed and open radiation sources, of instrumental neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy, and in vitro nuclear procedures which include competitive protein-binding analysis and radioimmunoassay. The progesterone test, applicable to diagnose the pregnancy of cattles, is carried out generally by RIA. Radioisotopic methods are applied also to determine the thyroid function of cattles, swines and domestic fowls. (V.N.)

  5. Procurement of a fully licensed radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Harold E.; Bearden, Thomas E.

    1991-01-01

    A fully licensed transportation system for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators and Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Units is currently being designed and built. The system will comply with all applicable U.S. Department of Transportation regulations without the use of a ``DOE Alternative.'' The U.S. Department of Transportation has special ``double containment'' requirements for plutonium. The system packaging uses a doubly contained ``bell jar'' concept. A refrigerated trailer is used for cooling the high-heat payloads. The same packaging is used for both high- and low-heat payloads. The system is scheduled to be available for use by mid-1992.

  6. Ablation response testing of simulated radioisotope power supplies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Steven A.; Chan, Chris C.

    1994-05-01

    Results of an experimental program to assess the aerothermal ablation response of simulated radioisotope power supplies are presented. Full-scale general purpose heat source, graphite impact shell, and lightweight radioisotope heater unit test articles are all tested without nuclear fuel in simulated reentry environments. Convective stagnation heating, stagnation pressure, stagnation surface temperature, surface recession profile, and weight loss measurements are obtained for diffusion-limited and sublimation ablation conditions. The recession profile and weight loss measurements show an effect of surface features on the stagnation face. The surface features alter the local heating which in turn affects the local ablation.

  7. The application of radioisotopes in the Argentine technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The different applications of radioisotopes: as sealed sources or tracers, as well as activation analysis have cast a new light on Argentine engineering and industry. The Argentine Atomic Energy Commission is carrying out an active plan for the developement and promotion of these techniques since the 60's. This report describes and analyzes the most outstanding applications, and brings up to date other previous papers on the same subject. It suggests some ideas for achieving a complete penetration of radioisotope techniques into Argentine technology. It also outlines some future perspectives, based on present statistical data. (author)

  8. Synthesis and characterization of radioisotope nanospheres containing two gamma emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jin-Hyuck; Jung, Sung-Hee; Kim, Sang-Ho; Choi, Seong-Ho

    2012-12-01

    Silica-coated gold-silver alloy nanospheres prepared by Stöber's method were irradiated in a nuclear reactor to prepare radioisotope nanospheres for use as radiotracers. The radioisotope nanospheres included two gamma nuclides: (i) Au-198, emitting major photons with 0.412 MeV and (ii) Ag-108, emitting photons with 0.434 and 0.633 MeV. The nanospheres shell and core diameters were 100-112 nm and 20-50 nm, respectively, depending on their preparation. The gamma-emitting nanospheres could be used as tracers in high-temperature petrochemical and refinery processes in which conventional organic radioactive labels will decompose.

  9. Workshop on Precision Measurements of alphas

    CERN Document Server

    Bethke, S; Kluth, S; Schieck, J; Stewart, I W; Aoki, S; Beneke, M; Blumlein, J; Brambilla, N; Brodsky, S; Descotes-Genon, S; Erler, J; Forte, S; Gehrmann, T; Golterman, M; Hashimoto, S; Kronfeld, A; Kuhn, J; Lepage, P; Martin, A; Mateu, V; Menke, S; Nomura, Y; Pahl, C; Petriello, F; Pich, A; Rabbertz, K; Salam, G; Schulz, H; Sommer, R; Steinhauser, M; Webber, B; Yuan, CP; Zanderighi, G

    2011-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the "Workshop on Precision Measurements of alphas" held at the Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich, February 9-11, 2011. The workshop explored in depth the determination of alphas(mZ) in the MS-bar scheme from the key categories where high precision measurements are currently being made, including DIS and global PDF fits, tau-decays, electroweak precision observables and Z-decays, event-shapes, and lattice QCD. These proceedings contain a short summary contribution from the speakers, as well as the lists of authors, conveners, participants, and talks.

  10. SK Model and decay properties of 119299X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, using SK Model we try to study the alpha decay properties of the yet to be formed nucleus 119299X, the formation of which has been proposed by Zagrebaev et. al. The decay properties of other known odd and even superheavy nuclei have already been analyzed with this model

  11. Determination of the Dalitz-plot parameter {alpha} for the decay {eta}{yields}3{pi}{sup 0} with the Crystal Ball at MAMI; Bestimmung des Dalitz-Plot-Parameters {alpha} fuer den Zerfall {eta} {yields} 3{pi}{sup 0} mit dem Crystal Ball am MAMI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unverzagt, Marc

    2008-05-26

    In order to determine the Dalitz-plot parameter {alpha} experiments were evaluated, Which were performed with the Crystal Ball/TAPS facility at the accelerator MAMI of the Institute for Nuclear Physics at the Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz in the years 2004 and 2005. {eta} mesons wer produced via the reaction {gamma}p{yields}{eta}p. From four different analyses the following four in this thesis determined Dalitz-plot parameters with the given statistics resulted: {eta} without proton: {alpha}=-0.0314{+-}0.0013{sub -0.0014}{sup +0.0017} (1.1.10{sup 6} events), {eta} with proton: {alpha}=-0.0338{+-}0.0020{sub -0.0022}{sup +0.0019} (4.2.10{sup 5} events), {delta}{sup +} magnetic dipole moment without proton: {alpha}=-0.0277{+-}0.0013{sub -0.0019}{sup +0.0014} (7.1.10{sup 5} events), {delta}{sup +} magnetic dipole moment with proton: {alpha}=-0.0272{+-}0.0019{sub -0.0043}{sup +0.0022} (3.1.10{sup 5} events).

  12. Remote control: Decommissioning RTGs [radioisotope theromelectric generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several hundred radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) are deployed along the Russian Federation's Arctic coast to power remote lighthouses and navigation beacons. Similar RTGs were also used as power sources in other remote locations in the Russian Federation and elsewhere in the former Soviet Union. All Russian RTG's have out-lived their lifespan and are in need of decommissioning. The RTGs typically contain one or more radionuclide heat sources (RHS) each with an activity of thousands of TBq of strontium-90. This means that they are Category 1 sources as defined in the IAEA international 'Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources'. According to the Federal Atomic Energy Agency of the Russian Federation (Rosatom), there are 651 RTGs at various locations in the Russian Federation which are subject to decommissioning or replacement with alternative sources of energy. The Norwegian Government has played a significant role in international efforts, fully cooperating with Russian authorities to safely decommission RTGs and provide alternative power sources. Norway has actively supported improvement of nuclear safety and security in northwest Russia for more then ten years. Over this period, the Norwegian Government has spent approximately $150 million on a variety of industrial projects, including specific improvements in radioactive waste treatment and storage, physical security, and infrastructure support. The national authority, the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA), takes an active part advising the Government regarding prioritization and quality assurance of all these activities. In addition, the Plan of Action places great emphasis on adequate regulatory supervision. Accordingly, the NRPA programme includes a variety of regulatory support projects. These are designed to assist the Russian authorities in ensuring that work is properly carried out within the framework of Russian law, taking into account international

  13. Over-the-road shock and vibration testing of the radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) convert heat generated by radioactive decay into electricity through the use of thermocouples. The RTGs have a long operating life, are reasonably lightweight, and require little or no maintenance, which make them particularly attractive for use in spacecraft. However, because RTGs contain significant quantities of radioactive materials, normally plutonium-238 and its decay products, they must be transported in packages built in accordance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10 CFR 71). To meet these regulations, a RTG Transportation System (RTGTS) that fully complies with 10 CFR 71 has been developed, which protects RTGs from adverse environmental conditions during normal conditions of transport (e.g., shock, vibration, and heat). To ensure the protection of RTGs from shock and vibration loadings during transport, extensive over-the-road testing was conducted on the RTG'S to obtain real-time recordings of accelerations of the air-ride suspension system trailer floor, packaging, and support structure. This paper provides an overview of the RTG'S, a discussion of the shock and vibration testing, and a comparison of the test results to the specified shock response spectra and power spectral density acceleration criteria

  14. Rescattering effects in eta --> 3pi decays

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Sebastian P; Ditsche, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    The isospin-breaking decay eta --> 3pi is an ideal tool to extract information on light quark mass ratios from experiment. For a precise determination, however, a detailed description of the Dalitz plot distribution is necessary. In that respect, in particular the slope parameter alpha of the neutral decay channel causes some concern, since the one-loop prediction from chiral perturbation theory misses the experimental value substantially. We use the modified non-relativistic effective field-theory, a dedicated framework to analyze final-state interactions beyond one loop including isospin-breaking corrections, to extract charged and neutral Dalitz plot parameters. Matching to chiral perturbation theory at next-to-leading order, we find alpha = -0.025 +- 0.005, in marginal agreement with experimental findings. We derive a relation between charged and neutral decay parameters that points towards a significant tension between the most recent KLOE measurements of these observables.

  15. A time like our own? Radioisotopic calibration of the Ordovician greenhouse to icehouse transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M. Elliot; Singer, Brad S.; Simo, Toni

    2011-11-01

    Tiered interpolation, a new timescale methodology, was used to construct the first radioisotopically-calibrated composite δ 13C curve for the Ordovician period using sanidine 40Ar/ 39Ar age determinations and existing U-Pb geochronology and biostratigraphic zonation. Tiered interpolation intercalates and temporally scales the numerical age of lithostratigraphic horizons by conducting a series of nested projections between hierarchical temporal control points. For primary control points, new 40Ar/ 39Ar ages and legacy U-Pb geochronology were screened to avoid analyses affected by inheritance and daughter loss and calibrated to reflect modern decay constants and standard values. Ages for secondary, tertiary, etc.… control points are obtained via linear interpolation of between higher order control points. In scaling the Ordovician δ 13C composite, the following control point order was applied: (1) radioisotopic ages (2) graptolite Zones, (3) index taxa-based on speciation events (North Atlantic conodont Zones), (4) North American Mid-continent conodont zones, and (5) stratal thicknesses at δ 13C sampled sections. The resulting timescale utilizes the highest resolution of each component, is internally consistent, and is re-scalable as more precise radioisotopic ages become available. It provides a robust framework for independently assessing the accuracy of biostratigraphic composite timescales because it does not rely an assumption of quasi-continuous sediment accumulation and/or speciation. To better calibrate the Late Ordovician and resolve a discrepancy between U-Pb and 40Ar/ 39Ar ages, three new 40Ar/ 39Ar ages were determined via the laser fusion of multiple single sanidine phenocrysts from three bentonitic ash beds from the Late Ordovician marine strata of the upper Mississippi valley where the record of Taconic volcanism is most complete. Fusions of 275 individual sanidine crystals from the Millbrig, Dygerts, and Rifle Hill bentonites yield largely

  16. Opportunities for Decay Counting of Environmental Radioisotopes Using Ultra-low-background Detection Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Runkle, Robert C.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Bonicalzi, Ricco; Moran, James J.; Seifert, Allen; Warren, Glen A.

    2012-08-01

    Executive Summary We present results from a scoping study whose intent was to define challenge measurements to be pursued on the Ultra-Sensitive Nuclear Measurements Initiative. Potential challenge measurements using new radiation detection technology in the shallow underground laboratory that would have substantial impact in environmental science were the focus of this study.

  17. Spallation production of neutron deficient radioisotopes in North America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamriska, D.J.; Peterson, E.J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Carty, J. [US Department of Energy, Office of Isotope Production and Distribution, Germantown, MD (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy produces a number of neutron deficient radioisotopes by high energy proton induced spallation reactions in accelerators at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico and Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York. Research isotopes are also recovered from targets irradiated at TRIUMF in British Columbia, Canada. The radioisotopes recovered are distributed for use in nuclear medicine, environmental research, physics research, and industry worldwide. In addition to the main product line of Sr-82 from either Mo or Rb targets, Cu-67 from ZnO targets, and Ge-68 from RbBr targets, these irradiation facilities also produce some unique isotopes in quantities not available from any other source such as Be-10, Al-26, Mg-28, Si-32, El-44, Fe-52, Gd-248, and Hg-194. We will describe the accelerator irradiation facilities at the Los Alamos and Brookhaven National Laboratories. The high level radiochemical processing facilities at Los Alamos and brief chemical processes from Los Alamos and Brookhaven will be described. Chemical separation techniques have been developed to recover the radioisotopes of interest in both high radiochemical purity and yield and at the same time trying to reduce or eliminate the generation of mixed waste. nearly 75 neutron deficient radioisotopes produced in spallation targets have been produced and distributed to researchers around the world since the inception of the program in 1974

  18. Radioisotope Production Plan and Strategy of Kijang Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kye Hong; Lee, Jun Sig [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    This reactor will be located at Kijang, Busan, Korea and be dedicated to produce mainly medical radioisotopes. Tc-99m is very important isotope for diagnosis and more than 80% of radiation diagnostic procedures in nuclear medicine depend on this isotope. There were, however, several times of insecure production of Mo-99 due to the shutdown of major production reactors worldwide. OECD/NEA is leading member countries to resolve the shortage of this isotope and trying to secure the international market of Mo-99. The radioisotope plan and strategy of Kijang Research Reactor (KJRR) should be carefully established to fit not only the domestic but also international demand on Mo-99. The implementation strategy of 6 principles of HLG-MR should be established that is appropriate to national environments. Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning and Ministry of Health and welfare should cooperate well to organize the national radioisotope supply structure, to set up the reasonable and competitive pricing of radioisotopes, and to cope with the international supply strategy.

  19. Radioisotope techniques for the study of protein turnover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Before the era of isotope-labelled proteins, investigations of protein metabolism were largely based on nitrogen balance studies. They were widely applied in both animal experiments and clinical investigations. In 1959, researchers began using isotope-labelled proteins to study protein metabolism. Examples of radioisotope techniques for the study of protein metabolism are examined in this paper. 7 figs, 1 tab

  20. Radioisotope study of Eustachian tube. A preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Rossi, G.; Campioni, P.; Vaccaro, A.

    1988-08-01

    Radioisotope studies of Eustachian tube are suggested in the preoperative phase of tympanoplasty, in order to assess tubal drainage and secretion. The use of gamma camera fitted to a computer allowed the AA, to calculate some semi-quantitative parameters for an exact assessment of the radioactivity transit from the tympanic cass up to the pharyngeal cavity, throughout the Eustachian tube.

  1. Optimization of water treatment facility by using radioisotope tracer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, J. H.; Lee, M. J.; Jung, S. H.

    1997-01-01

    In order to get the optimization of conventional water treatment facility, radioisotope tracer technique was applied. It is desirable to set the baffles inside of mixing basin for the enhancement of mixing effect. It was appeared that most of flocs were settled down within 60 - 70 % of total length of sedimentation basin even with high flow rate. (author). 2 tabs., 32 figs.

  2. Future Supply of Medical Radioisotopes for the UK Report 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Neilly, Brian; Ballinger, Jim; Buscombe, John; Clarke, Rob; Ellis, Beverley; Flux, Glenn; Fraser, Louise; Hall, Adrian; Owen, Hywel; Paterson, Audrey; Perkins, Alan; Scarsbrook, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The UK has no research nuclear reactors and relies on the importation of 99Mo and other medical radioisotopes (e.g. Iodine-131) from overseas (excluding PET radioisotopes). The UK is therefore vulnerable not only to global shortages, but to problems with shipping and importation of the products. In this context Professor Erika Denton UK national Clinical Director for Diagnostics requested that the British Nuclear Medicine Society lead a working group with stakeholders including representatives from the Science & Technology Facilities Council (STFC) to prepare a report. The group had a first meeting on 10 April 2013 followed by a working group meeting with presentations on 9th September 2013 where the scope of the work required to produce a report was agreed. The objectives of the report are: to describe the status of the use of medical radioisotopes in the UK; to anticipate the potential impact of shortages for the UK; to assess potential alternative avenues of medical radioisotope production for the UK m...

  3. Basic principles and developments of the radioisotope powered voltaic batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic principles and some kinds of voltaic effect type radioisotope batteries are reviewed. This paper is focused on the micro-batteries based on radio-voltaic effect, which are widely used in micro-electromechanical systems (MEMs) and cardiac pacemakers. The prospects of such radio-voltaic isotope batteries are also reported. (authors)

  4. The use of radioisotopes for determination of complex equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes can be used for determination of complex equilibria in solution, provided this solution is in equilibrium with another phase. The most versatile systems for studying aqueous solutions use solvent-extraction and ion-exchange methods. These two methods more seen be to universally practical for determining complex equilibria than EMF, spectrophotometric and other more conventional ones. (author)

  5. Control of radioisotopes and radiation sources in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes and radiation sources are extensively used in Indonesia in medicine, industry, mining, agriculture and research. These materials are controlled by the regulatory authority, according to established legal procedures. The Nuclear Energy Control Board of Indonesia (BAPETEN), which was established in 1998 through the Nuclear Energy Act No. 10/1997, is entrusted with the control of any application of nuclear energy, including the application of radioisotopes and radiation sources, through regulation, licensing and inspection. The control is aimed to assure welfare, security and peace, the safety and health of workers and the public, and environmental protection. The number of licences issued to date is around 2400, consisting of 1600 licences for radioisotopes and radiation sources used in hospitals, 347 in radiography, 256 in industry, 53 in mining, and the rest in many other areas such as research and agriculture. A licence can cover one or more radioisotopes or radiation sources, depending on the location of the user institution. These radioisotopes and radiation sources are Co-60, Cs-137, Ir-192, Ra-226, Am-241, Sr-90, Kr-85, Pm-147, linear accelerator and X-ray, and short half-life radioisotopes such as I-125, I-131 and Tc-99m. There are 10 LINACs, 27 X-ray medicines, 61 radioisotope devices for Co-60 and Cs-137, and 10 mHDR Ir-192 for therapeutic purposes currently used in Indonesia and some Ra-226 in storage. Any activity related to the application of nuclear energy is required to be conducted in a manner which observes safety and security. According to the legal requirements, each user has to employ at least one radiation safety officer. To improve the control of the application of radiation sources and radioactive material in the country, BAPETEN introduced some new approaches to the users, including regular dialogues with radiation safety officers and the management of the users, requalification for radiation protection officers twice in five

  6. The $\\alpha-\\alpha$ fishbone potential revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Day, J P; Elhanafy, M; Smith, E; Woodhouse, R; Papp, Z

    2011-01-01

    The fishbone potential of composite particles simulates the Pauli effect by nonlocal terms. We determine the $\\alpha-\\alpha$ fishbone potential by simultaneously fitting to two-$\\alpha$ resonance energies, experimental phase shifts and three-$\\alpha$ binding energies. We found that essentially a simple gaussian can provide a good description of two-$\\alpha$ and three-$\\alpha$ experimental data without invoking three-body potentials.

  7. Applications of radioisotopes in industry and healthcare in Vietnam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dien, N.N.; Quang, N.H. [Nucealr Research Institute, Dalat, (Viet Nam)

    1997-10-01

    Nowadays, in Vietnam radioisotopes have been used very widely in various socio-economic branches, especially in industry and healthcare. Applications of radioisotopes have significant meaning in economic development, people health protection, as well as in scientific research. In this paper, the present status and main applications of radiation and radioactive isotopes in industry and healthcare in Vietnam are reported. In order to control and monitor industrial processes, nucleonic control systems and radioactive tracer techniques have been utilized. Actually, sealed source applications are popular in Vietnam industry. A number of nuclear control devices and gauges have been used in the various industrial factories, such as liquid level gauges in steel industry, cement and beverage factories; density and moisture gauges in paper industry, etc. Tracer technique and sealed source applications have also been utilized in industrial production plants and in trouble-shooting in the petroleum industry. For medicine purposes, two departments of nuclear medicine were primarily established at the beginning of the 1970s. At the present time, a number of nuclear medicine departments have been set up and they have been equipped with advanced equipment. Main activities are focused on thyroid function studies, nuclear cardiology, brain scans, gastrointestinal studies, bone scans, etc. Since march 1984 Dalat nuclear research reactor of nominal power of 500 kW has been reconstructed and put into operation. This reactor is unique in Vietnam and has become an important scientific tool for development of nuclear techniques and radioisotope applications for socio-economic progress. Thanks to this important scientific tool, a variety of radioisotopes for medicine and industry applications as well as for scientific research has been produced. Utilization of the Dalat research reactor for radioisotope production is also summarized in this paper

  8. Applications of radioisotopes in industry and healthcare in Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays, in Vietnam radioisotopes have been used very widely in various socio-economic branches, especially in industry and healthcare. Applications of radioisotopes have significant meaning in economic development, people health protection, as well as in scientific research. In this paper, the present status and main applications of radiation and radioactive isotopes in industry and healthcare in Vietnam are reported. In order to control and monitor industrial processes, nucleonic control systems and radioactive tracer techniques have been utilized. Actually, sealed source applications are popular in Vietnam industry. A number of nuclear control devices and gauges have been used in the various industrial factories, such as liquid level gauges in steel industry, cement and beverage factories; density and moisture gauges in paper industry, etc. Tracer technique and sealed source applications have also been utilized in industrial production plants and in trouble-shooting in the petroleum industry. For medicine purposes, two departments of nuclear medicine were primarily established at the beginning of the 1970s. At the present time, a number of nuclear medicine departments have been set up and they have been equipped with advanced equipment. Main activities are focused on thyroid function studies, nuclear cardiology, brain scans, gastrointestinal studies, bone scans, etc. Since march 1984 Dalat nuclear research reactor of nominal power of 500 kW has been reconstructed and put into operation. This reactor is unique in Vietnam and has become an important scientific tool for development of nuclear techniques and radioisotope applications for socio-economic progress. Thanks to this important scientific tool, a variety of radioisotopes for medicine and industry applications as well as for scientific research has been produced. Utilization of the Dalat research reactor for radioisotope production is also summarized in this paper

  9. Production capabilities in US nuclear reactors for medical radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzadeh, S.; Callahan, A.P.; Knapp, F.F. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schenter, R.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-11-01

    The availability of reactor-produced radioisotopes in the United States for use in medical research and nuclear medicine has traditionally depended on facilities which are an integral part of the US national laboratories and a few reactors at universities. One exception is the reactor in Sterling Forest, New York, originally operated as part of the Cintichem (Union Carbide) system, which is currently in the process of permanent shutdown. Since there are no industry-run reactors in the US, the national laboratories and universities thus play a critical role in providing reactor-produced radioisotopes for medical research and clinical use. The goal of this survey is to provide a comprehensive summary of these production capabilities. With the temporary shutdown of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in November 1986, the radioisotopes required for DOE-supported radionuclide generators were made available at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). In March 1988, however, the HFBR was temporarily shut down which forced investigators to look at other reactors for production of the radioisotopes. During this period the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) played an important role in providing these services. The HFIR resumed routine operation in July 1990 at 85 MW power, and the HFBR resumed operation in June 1991, at 30 MW power. At the time of the HFBR shutdown, there was no available comprehensive overview which could provide information on status of the reactors operating in the US and their capabilities for radioisotope production. The obvious need for a useful overview was thus the impetus for preparing this survey, which would provide an up-to-date summary of those reactors available in the US at both the DOE-funded national laboratories and at US universities where service irradiations are currently or expected to be conducted.

  10. Semileptonic Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luth, Vera G.; /SLAC

    2012-10-02

    The following is an overview of the measurements of the CKM matrix elements |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub ub}| that are based on detailed studies of semileptonic B decays by the BABAR and Belle Collaborations and major advances in QCD calculations. In addition, a new and improved measurement of the ratios R(D{sup (*)}) = {Beta}({bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)}{tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) is presented. Here D{sup (*)} refers to a D or a D* meson and {ell} is either e or {mu}. The results, R(D) = 0.440 {+-} 0.058 {+-} 0.042 and R(D*) = 0.332 {+-} 0.024 {+-} 0.018, exceed the Standard Model expectations by 2.0{sigma} and 2.7{sigma}, respectively. Taken together, they disagree with these expectations at the 3.4{sigma} level. The excess of events cannot be explained by a charged Higgs boson in the type II two-Higgs-doublet model.

  11. Alpha One Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tested Find Support Find Doctor What Is Alpha-1? Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency (Alpha-1) is a ... results for inhaled augmentation More News Our Number One Goal: Find a cure for Alpha-1. Website ...

  12. Microscopic description of α-decay from superdeformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superdeformed nuclei have been intensively investigated, both experimentally and theoretically, during the last decade. We have studied in this paper alpha decay from superdeformed nuclei. For this we have solved exactly the problem of penetration of the alpha particle through a deformed barrier. We have found that approximate treatments of the penetrability in terms of the deformation, as e. g. the WKB approximation or the classical treatment, are not valid for deformations larger than β2∼ 0.3. We have also presented a formalism to calculate the formation amplitude of alpha particles in superdeformed nuclei, a number which is necessary in evaluating the absolute decay widths. Since this calculation requires the use of single-particle states that can describe processes occurring outside the nuclear surface, we introduced a representation consisting of the eigenvalues of two different harmonic oscillator potentials. The low lying members of the representation correspond to the standard single-particle states used to describe bound properties, while the high lying members correspond to the eigenvalues of a shallow harmonic oscillator potential. Within this representation we used the HFB approximation to describe the structure of the superdeformed nuclei. This single-particle basis allows for a much faster convergency of the computed formation amplitude in the region beyond the nuclear surface, where the interaction becomes practically a Coulomb repulsion between the emitted alpha particle and the daughter nucleus. We can therefore perform calculations which would otherwise be prohibitive. We have thus found that the formation amplitude (and the corresponding alpha decay probability) decreases with the difference between the quadrupole deformations in the mother and daughter nuclei, although this is not a big effect. We assumed that the mother nucleus decays by electromagnetic transitions to the head of a superdeformed band. From here we considered that alpha decay

  13. Scintillation of thin tetraphenyl butadiene films under alpha particle excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Pollmann, Tina; Kuźniak, Marcin

    2010-01-01

    The alpha induced scintillation of the wavelength shifter 1,1,4,4-tetraphenyl-1,3-butadiene (TPB) was studied to improve the understanding of possible surface alpha backgrounds in the DEAP dark matter search experiment. We found that vacuum deposited thin TPB films emit 882 +/-210 photons per MeV under alpha particle excitation. The scintillation pulse shape consists of a double exponential decay with lifetimes of 11 +/-5 ns and 275 +/-10ns.

  14. Perturbative expansion of tau hadronic spectral function moments and alpha_s extractions

    OpenAIRE

    Beneke, Martin; Boito, Diogo; Jamin, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Various moments of the hadronic spectral functions have been employed in the determination of the strong coupling alpha_s from tau decays. In this work we study the behaviour of their perturbative series under different assumptions for the large-order behaviour of the Adler function, extending previous work on the tau hadronic width. We find that the moments can be divided into a small number of classes, whose characteristics depend only on generic features of the moment weight function and A...

  15. Thermophotoelectric converter with radioisotope source of thermal radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of investigating a thermophotoelectric converter with a radioisotope heat source to warm up a radiating surface are presented. Results are given of calculating the efficiency of thermophotoelectric converters with germanium and silicon photocells in the temperature range from 1000 to 1300 K, and of the comparative analysis of experimental and theoretical values of thermophotoelectric converter efficiencies. The possibility of developing a thermophotoconverter with a radioisotope source of thermal energy which has an efficiency of up to 15% is substantiated. It is shown that for effective energy conversion at radiator temperatures of 1000-1300 K it is necessary to use Ge, GaSb, InAs, PbS and PbTe semiconducting materials, and to increase to maximum the reflection coefficient of the photocell back contact and the radiation blackness

  16. Spallation production of neutron deficient radioisotopes in North America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamriska, D.J.; Peterson, E.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Carty, J. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States). Office of Isotope Production and Distribution

    1997-12-31

    The US Department of Energy produces a number of neutron deficient radioisotopes by high energy proton induced spallation reactions in accelerators at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico and Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York. Research isotopes are also recovered from targets irradiated at TRIUMF in British Columbia, Canada. The radioisotopes recovered are distributed for use in nuclear medicine, environmental research, physics research, and industry worldwide. In addition to the main product line of Sr-82 from either Mo or Rb targets, Cu-67 from ZnO targets, and Ge-68 and RbBr targets, these irradiation facilities also produce some unique isotopes in quantities not available from any other source such as Al-26, Mg-28, Si-32, Ti-44, Fe-52, Gd-148, and Hg-194. The authors will describe the accelerator irradiation facilities at the Los Alamos and Brookhaven National Laboratories. The high level radiochemical processing facilities at Los Alamos and brief chemical processes will be described.

  17. Environmental assessment for radioisotope heat source fuel processing and fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) for radioisotope heat source fuel processing and fabrication involving existing facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) near Los Alamos, New Mexico. The proposed action is needed to provide Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) to support the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) CRAF and Cassini Missions. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. 30 refs., 5 figs

  18. Production of radioisotopes within a plasma focus device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, research conducted in the US and in Italy has demonstrated production of radioisotopes in Plasma Focus (PF) devices, and particularly, on what could be termed 'endogenous' production, to wit, production within the plasma itself, as opposed to irradiation of targets. This technique relies on the formation of localized small plasma zones characterized by very high densities and fairly high temperatures. The conditions prevailing in these zones lead to high nuclear reaction rates, as pointed out in previous work by several authors. Further investigation of the cross sections involved has proven necessary to model the phenomena involved. In this paper, the present status of research in this field is reviewed, both with regards to cross section models and to experimental production of radioisotopes. Possible outcomes and further development are discussed. (author)

  19. Process for radioisotope recovery and system for implementing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meikrantz, David H.; Todd, Terry A.; Tranter, Troy J.; Horwitz, E. Philip

    2007-01-02

    A method of recovering daughter isotopes from a radioisotope mixture. The method comprises providing a radioisotope mixture solution comprising at least one parent isotope. The at least one parent isotope is extracted into an organic phase, which comprises an extractant and a solvent. The organic phase is substantially continuously contacted with an aqueous phase to extract at least one daughter isotope into the aqueous phase. The aqueous phase is separated from the organic phase, such as by using an annular centrifugal contactor. The at least one daughter isotope is purified from the aqueous phase, such as by ion exchange chromatography or extraction chromatography. The at least one daughter isotope may include actinium-225, radium-225, bismuth-213, or mixtures thereof. A liquid-liquid extraction system for recovering at least one daughter isotope from a source material is also disclosed.

  20. Radioisotope production at JYFL Accelerator Laboratory in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumpulainen, J.; Hiltunen, J. [MAP Medical Technologies, Inc., Tikkakoski (Finland); Aeystoe, J.; Julin, R.; Liukkonen, E.; Nieminen, V.; Poikolainen, T. [Univ. of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1994-12-31

    MAP Medical Technologies Inc. is a private, research oriented high-tech company, which produces radiopharmaceuticals for both diagnostic and therapeutical purposes. MAP has one nuclear reactor and one high-energy cyclotron at its disposal for research and production. The new production plant was completed in 1992, which was specially designed to fulfil the highest new requirements and standards for production and products. High-energy machines, like the new K130-cyclotron in the University of Jyvaeskylae, have a great potential for producing some special radioisotopes. Thus a solid target station for radioisotope production was planned into the new accelerator laboratory in collaboration between the Department of Physics (JYFL) and MAP. The target station is designed for high-energy intensive light-ion beams delivered from the K130-cyclotron.

  1. Overview on radioisotope production at TRIGA-SSR 14 MW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the technical support provided at Institute for Nuclear Research (INR) Pitesti to accomplish various services concerning isotope production. Also it is presented the study to produce, in collaboration with Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN) Bucharest, I-131, Au-198, Mo-99, Ir-192 isotopes for medical uses. There is presented neutron physics computation for the TRIGA core to establish the proper experimental locations to accomplish the radioisotope production. (authors)

  2. Radio-isotope bone scanning in suspected osteomyelitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usefulness of radio-isotope bone scanning in suspected osteomyelitis has been widely acclaimed. Fourteen children had rectilinear bone scans performed three hours after injection of Tcsup(99m) methylene diphosphonate. A diagnostic accuracy of 56% was achieved, which is lower than in other series. The reasons for this are discussed and the value of bone scanning in the evaluation of osteomyelitis is questioned. (orig.)

  3. Prospective production of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals in divisions of IPPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first reason to commence the work on production of radioisotope production in IPPE, was the requirement of Russia medicine for original generators of technetium. The essential extension of their production in conditions of Moscow city has met the declaiming of the Moscow urban authorities. The important moment was that, in IPPE were objective possibilities to deployment the production of radioisotope production. Nowadays, nomenclature of the radioisotopes which have been produced in IPPE, constitutes 29 positions. The profile of production of radioisotope production was generated also. Restricted possibilities of the ray base, from one side, and the needs(requirement) of domestic medicine with other, in main have spotted this profile. The raw isotopes constitute a minority - on sales volumes ∼ 20 % (in main abroad), the defining part is constituted the form ready for the use by ∼ 80 % (in main in Russia). All 'know-how' is conditionally possible to divide into 3 categories: Base. It is technologies provided with an operating production sector, guaranteeing stable on quality production having a rather wide seller's market; Perspective. It is those technologies, in which the main stages of RESEARCH and DEVELOPMENT are fulfilled with positive result, but the working sites yet are not generated, and on the market are delivered only some samples of production. Are guessed RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT on perfecting the technology; Preparative. The technology, on which there are no regular orders, is not required of an individual working site. Sometimes it is rather precision operations, bound with usage of unique raw material, with a very stiff price of production. (authors)

  4. Radioisotope Concentration in Lake Sediments of Maracaibo, Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maracaibo Lake is one of the most important water basing and oil producing regions in Venezuela. Changes in the local environment have been monitored for chemical pollution in the past. For this study we selected a set of sediment samples collected in the shore and analyzed for its radioisotope content. Results show the gamma emitting isotopes distribution. Isotopes concentrations have been determined within the natural K, Th and U families

  5. Production, control and utilization of radioisotopes including radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From April 29th to May 5th, 1984 27 participants from 21 developing countries stayed within an IAEA Study Tour ('Production, Control and Utilization of Radioisotopes including Radiopharmaceuticals') in the GDR. In the CINR, Rossendorf the reactor, the cyclotron, the technological centre as well as the animal test laboratory were visited. The participants were made familiar by 10 papers with the development, production and control of radiopharmaceuticals in the CINR, Rossendorf. (author)

  6. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system subsystem 143 software development plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This plan describes the activities to be performed and the controls to be applied to the process of specifying, developing, and qualifying the data acquisition software for the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Transportation System Subsystem 143 Instrumentation and Data Acquisition System (IDAS). This plan will serve as a software quality assurance plan, a verification and validation (V and V) plan, and a configuration management plan

  7. Heavy element and actinide decay data: UKHEDD-2 data files

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A re-evaluation has been made of the decay data for 126 heavy elements and actinides of direct application in nuclear fuel cycle calculations. Computer-based data files have been produced in ENDF/B-VI format, including lists of the references used to produce the proposed decay schemes and comments that identify their inadequacies. These evaluated data include half-lives, average decay energies, branching ratios, alpha, beta and gamma-ray energies and emission probabilities, internal conversion coefficients, spontaneous fission decay data and all associated uncertainties. (author)

  8. Advanced radioisotope power source options for Pluto Express

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the drive to reduce mass and cost, Pluto Express is investigating using an advanced power conversion technology in a small Radioisotope Power Source (RPS) to deliver the required mission power of 74 W(electric) at end of mission. Until this year the baseline power source under consideration has been a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG). This RTG would be a scaled down GPHS RTG with an inventory of 6 General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) and a mass of 17.8 kg. High efficiency, advanced technology conversion options are being examined to lower the power source mass and to reduce the amount of radioisotope needed. Three technologies are being considered as the advanced converter technology: the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC), Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) converters, and Stirling Engines. Conceptual designs for each of these options have been prepared. Each converter would require only 2 GPHSs to provide the mission power and would have a mass of 6.1, 7.2, and 12.4 kg for AMTEC, TPV, and Stirling Engines respectively. This paper reviews the status of each technology and the projected performance of an advanced RPS based on each technology. Based on the projected performance and spacecraft integration issues, Pluto Express would prefer to use the AMTEC based RPS. However, in addition to technical performance, selection of a power technology will be based on many other factors

  9. A comparative study of different contaminant radioisotopes in various materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An order was established between the various radioisotopes, in order to compare which of them are a major problem concerning the contamination they originate in the materials using during their process, transportation and protection, consequently a sampling of contaminated materials was realized. These materials were submitted to a decontamination process with different reagents (acids, bases and organic and inorganic salts) varying their concentration through dilution with water. Besides for the same kind of reagent two processes were used, one with turbulence in the reagent through mechanical stirring, and the other static maintaining similar volumes of liquid in the two processes as well as a similar material, form and size of the object during the processes, detection of radiation in the samples were realized through a Geiger-Muller detector in similar periods of time, establishing this way a parallel system of comparison which allowed us to observe gains in the necessary period of time for reaching the same grade of decontamination in the two processes, it was concluded that it is very difficult to reach an order of comparison in the contamination because the periods of treatment vary as a function of the chemical compound containing the radioisotope(s). Besides we can reduce considerably the period of time in a stirring process and predict this necessary period of time for reaching the determined decontamination, provided that there are not permanent contaminations. (author)

  10. NASA's Radioisotope Power Systems Planning and Potential Future Systems Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrajsek, June F.; Woerner, Dave F.; Cairns-Gallimore, Dirk; Johnson, Stephen G.; Qualls, Louis

    2016-01-01

    The goal of NASA's Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program is to make RPS ready and available to support the exploration of the solar system in environments where the use of conventional solar or chemical power generation is impractical or impossible to meet the needs of the missions. To meet this goal, the RPS Program, working closely with the Department of Energy, performs mission and system studies (such as the recently released Nuclear Power Assessment Study), assesses the readiness of promising technologies to infuse in future generators, assesses the sustainment of key RPS capabilities and knowledge, forecasts and tracks the Program's budgetary needs, and disseminates current information about RPS to the community of potential users. This process has been refined and used to determine the current content of the RPS Program's portfolio. This portfolio currently includes an effort to mature advanced thermoelectric technology for possible integration into an enhanced Multi-Mission Radioisotope Generator (eMMRTG), sustainment and production of the currently deployed MMRTG, and technology investments that could lead to a future Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG). This paper describes the program planning processes that have been used, the currently available MMRTG, and one of the potential future systems, the eMMRTG.

  11. The use of radioisotopes for the study of flotation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper considers methods of studying flotation processes with radioisotopes and nuclear radiation. Radioisotopes can be used for studying the fixation of flotation reagents on the surface of minerals where monomolecular coverage of the surface is incomplete. Radiometric and microautoradiographic methods are used in this research. The use of collector reagents containing radioisotopes has explained why some sulphides are difficult to separate by flotation. This difficulty is related to the material composition and structure of these minerals and to the chemical bonds within their crystal lattices. The simultaneous use of radiometric and autoradiographic methods accompanied by solvent-washing of the mineral particles showed the conditions under which dixanthate and other products of the interaction of xanthates with sulphide minerals are formed. The use of radioactive kerosene, and also of kerosene in conjunction with other flotation reagents, made it possible to determine certain features of fixation on molybdenite depending on the kerosene concentration. Contrast and track microautoradiography were used to study the distribution of sulphydryl collector reagents on different particles of galenite in the flotation pulp. The combined effect of these reagents was also studied. Combinations of xanthates of various alcohols produce a more even distribution on the galenite particles, and permit a more efficient use of reagents. C14-labelled tridecylamine was used to study the interaction of a cationic collector with hlibnerite and wolframite. The investigation showed that tridecylamine, when introduced into the flotation process, is substantially absorbed by foaming products. Non-foaming products (quartz, fluorite, calcite) absorb insignificant quantities of reagent. (author)

  12. Gaseous alpha emitter diffusion studies using alpha track method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a very accurate and sensitive analysis method such as alpha track method, the SSNTD group was able to undertake studies on the atomic and molecular processes taking place at low speed and/or very low concentrations, such as diffusion of gaseous alpha radionuclides in gaseous media. For practical application reasons, we began to study the diffusion in air for gaseous alpha radionuclides and aerosols carrying solid alpha radionuclides. The used alpha radionuclides were: Rn-222, as gaseous radionuclide and its solid descendants genetically related, attached to different particles from air, as radioactive aerosols. The source was included into an air tight device with a very well known volume. After 40 days, the radioactive equilibrium was established for all descendants, so that in the device there were the Rn-222 and its descendants, each of them having the same activity. The relative amount/activity ratio of each decay product, at any duration, for any initial mass of Ra-226 parent radionuclide, were calculated using the code UURASE, based on the Bateman general equations, for computing the U-238 radioactive series gamma accumulation. This was adapted for alpha accumulation as ALFAURASE programme. The device which contains the Ra-226 source can be coupled to the calibration system or to the diffusion system, without destroying the radioactive equilibrium. At this coupling, only the radioactive concentration is changed due to the variation of the volume. First of all the device was used for calibrating the CR-39 track detectors for both Rn-222 gaseous radionuclide and aerosol concentration measurements using, in the coupled calibration system, a special 'detector-container' equipped/or not with a filter used for radioactive aerosol stopping. The track detectors CR-39 were etched in NaOH 30%, for 7 hours at 70 deg. C and their studies were performed by optical microscopy using a stereo-microscope Wild M7S and a binocular Zeiss Jena microscope. (authors)

  13. Remote Optical Detection of Alpha Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha emitting radiation sources are typically hard to detect with conventional detectors due to the short range of alpha particles in the air. However, previous studies have shown that remote detection of alpha radiation is possible by measuring the ionization-induced fluorescence of air molecules. The alpha-induced ultraviolet (UV) light is mainly emitted by molecular nitrogen and its fluorescence properties are well known. The benefit of this method is the long range of UV photons in the air. Secondly, the detection is possible also under a strong beta and gamma radiation backgrounds as they do not cause localized molecular excitation. In this work, the optical detection was studied using two different detection schemes; spectral separation of fluorescence from the background lighting and coincidence detection of UV photons originating from a single radiative decay event. Our spectrally integrated measurements have shown that one alpha decay event yields up to 400 fluorescence photons in the air and all these UV photons are induced in a 5 ns time-window. On the other hand, the probability of a background coincidence event in 5 ns scale is very rare compared to the number of background photons. This information can be applied in fluorescence coincidence filtering to discriminate the alpha radiation initiated fluorescence signal from much more intense background lighting. A device called HAUVA (Handheld Alpha UV Application) was built during this work for demonstration purposes. HAUVA utilizes spectral filtering and it is designed to detect alpha emitters from a distance of about 40 cm. Using specially selected room lighting, the device is able to separate 1 kBq alpha emitter from the background lighting with 1 second integration time. (author)

  14. Effect of Low Electric Fields on Alpha Scintillation Light Yield in Liquid Argon

    CERN Document Server

    Agnes, P; Alexander, T; Alton, A K; Asner, D M; Back, H O; Baldin, B; Biery, K; Bocci, V; Bonfini, G; Bonivento, W; Bossa, M; Bottino, B; Brigatti, A; Brodsky, J; Budano, F; Bussino, S; Cadeddu, M; Cadoni, M; Calaprice, F; Canci, N; Candela, A; Caravati, M; Cariello, M; Carlini, M; Catalanotti, S; Cavalcante, P; Chepurnov, A; Cicalò, C; Cocco, A G; Covone, G; D'Angelo, D; D'Incecco, M; Davini, S; De Cecco, S; De Deo, M; De Vincenzi, M; Derbin, A; Devoto, A; Di Eusanio, F; Di Pietro, G; Dionisi, C; Edkins, E; Empl, A; Fan, A; Fiorillo, G; Fomenko, K; Forster, G; Franco, D; Gabriele, F; Galbiati, C; Giagu, S; Giganti, C; Giovanetti, G K; Goretti, A M; Granato, F; Gromov, M; Guan, M; Guardincerri, Y; Hackett, B R; Herner, K; Hughes, D; Humble, P; Hungerford, E V; Ianni, A; James, I; Johnson, T N; Jollet, C; Keeter, K; Kendziora, C L; Koh, G; Korablev, D; Korga, G; Kubankin, A; Li, X; Lissia, M; Loer, B; Lombardi, P; Longo, G; Ma, Y; Machulin, I N; Mandarano, A; Mari, S M; Maricic, J; Marini, L; Martoff, C J; Meregaglia, A; Meyers, P D; Milincic, R; Miller, J D; Montanari, D; Monte, A; Mount, B J; Muratova, V N; Musico, P; Napolitano, J; Agasson, A Navrer; Odrowski, S; Oleinik, A; Orsini, M; Ortica, F; Pagani, L; Pallavicini, M; Pantic, E; Parmeggiano, S; Pelczar, K; Pelliccia, N; Pocar, A; Pordes, S; Pugachev, D A; Qian, H; Randle, K; Ranucci, G; Razeti, M; Razeto, A; Reinhold, B; Renshaw, A L; Rescigno, M; Riffard, Q; Romani, A; Rossi, B; Rossi, N; Rountree, D; Sablone, D; Saggese, P; Sands, W; Savarese, C; Schlitzer, B; Segreto, E; Semenov, D A; Shields, E; Singh, P N; Skorokhvatov, M D; Smirnov, O; Sotnikov, A; Stanford, C; Suvorov, Y; Tartaglia, R; Tatarowicz, J; Testera, G; Tonazzo, A; Trinchese, P; Unzhakov, E V; Verducci, M; Vishneva, A; Vogelaar, B; Wada, M; Walker, S; Wang, H; Wang, Y; Watson, A W; Westerdale, S; Wilhelmi, J; Wojcik, M M; Xiang, X; Xiao, X; Xu, J; Yang, C; Zhong, W; Zhu, C; Zuzel, G

    2016-01-01

    Measurements were made of scintillation light yield of alpha particles from the $^{222}$Rn decay chain within the DarkSide-50 liquid argon time projection chamber. The light yield was found to increase as the applied electric field increased, with alphas in a 200 V/cm electric field exhibiting a $\\sim$2% increase in light yield compared to alphas in no field.

  15. Measurement of the CKM Angle alpha with the B-factories.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevan, Adrian; /Liverpool U.

    2005-12-21

    B-meson decays involving b {yields} u transitions are sensitive to the Unitarity Triangle angle {alpha} (or {phi}{sub 2}). The B-factories at SLAC and KEK have made significant progress toward the measurement of {alpha} in recent years. This paper summarizes the results of the B-factories' constraints on {alpha}.

  16. Digital signal processing for radioactive decay studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D.; Madurga, M.; Paulauskas, S. V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Ackermann, D.; Heinz, S.; Hessberger, F. P.; Hofmann, S. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, D-64220, Darmstadt (Germany); Grzywacz, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Miernik, K.; Rykaczewski, K. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Tan, H. [XIA LLC, Hayward, CA 94544 (United States)

    2011-11-30

    The use of digital acquisition system has been instrumental in the investigation of proton and alpha emitting nuclei. Recent developments extend the sensitivity and breadth of the application. The digital signal processing capabilities, used predominately by UT/ORNL for decay studies, include digitizers with decreased dead time, increased sampling rates, and new innovative firmware. Digital techniques and these improvements are furthermore applicable to a range of detector systems. Improvements in experimental sensitivity for alpha and beta-delayed neutron emitters measurements as well as the next generation of superheavy experiments are discussed.

  17. Some Techniques for Isolating and Using Short-Lived Radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes of a large number of elements have been used extensively at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in ion exchange,solubility and other physical-chemical studies. The use of short-lived radioisotopes in such studies has necessitated development not only of rapid methods of preparing and purifying radioisotopes but also of special techniques for obtaining pertinent information in a relatively short time, often within a few minutes. Some recently-developed methods are described for preparing and purifying short-lived isotopes, particularly those originating from neutron-irradiated materials, including fissionable elements. The latter, of course, are convenient sources of a number of useful short-lived radioisotopes, e. g., Mo99, Te132, and methods are described for rapidly isolating these and other fission products in a earner-free state by ion exchange. Methods of separating short-lived daughter activities from long-lived parents by 'milking' techniques, in which the parent is strongly adsorbed on organic or inorganic ion exchange materials, are also described and typical examples discussed, for example, milking of 1.7-h In113 (from Sn113) and 2.6-min Ba137 (from Cs197). Two applications involving the use of short-lived tracers in chemical studies are described. The first is a ''packed bed'' technique for rapidly measuring the solubilities of sparingly soluble salts which have been tagged with tracers. Some recent results obtained by the method on the solubility of LaF3 in HCl and HCIO4 solutions are described. The second is a rapid method for measuring diffusion coefficients in liquid systems. Thin, porous porcelain frits are saturated with solution containing a radioisotope, then rapidly eluted with solution not containing tracer. Diffusion coefficients may be calculated from the decrease of counting rate of the frit with time,after calibration with a material of known diffusion rate. Because of the short diffusion path used, die measurements may be completed

  18. A Review of the Production of ''Special'' Radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six useful characteristics of radioisotopes and advantages which may be taken of them are cited briefly, with examples. The Information Sheet announcing this Seminar listed four advantages of short-lived over long-lived isotopes. Two other reasons why owners of small research reactors should concern themselves with short half- life isotopes are economy and particular suitability for production, the latter being due to the pronounced effect of half-life on the net rate of production. Besides short half-life, type and energy of emitted radiation should be of concern to producers of isotopes. Nine advantages of a nuclear reactor over a particle accelerator for radioisotope production are outlined. Following this general orientation, a survey of unusual or less frequently used production techniques is presented. These include: (n, p) reactions and secondary reactions such as (t, n) and (t, p) induced by thermal neutrons, various techniques for obtaining useful fluxes of fast neutrons with which to effect other reactions, recoil techniques including classic Szilard-Chalmers reactions, use of charged wires to collect short-lived daughters of gaseous parents, parent-daughter milking system, parasitic irradiations, possible use of ''knocked- on'' protons or deuterons (from the moderator) as a means of effecting reactions such as (p,n), (d,n), etc. and the possible use of circulating ''loops'' in reactors with which to utilize the radiation from ultra-short-lived radioisotopes such as Ag110, In114, 116, Dy155m, etc. Although not a production technique, the possibility of using certain stable isotopes (e. g. of silver) as tracers which can be readily detected via subsequent activation is mentioned. Production figures for Brookhaven's ''special'' radioisotopes are cited to show differences in long- and short-term fluctuations among these isotopes, which are also compared as a class to those in heavier demand supplied by Oak Ridge. Present production methods of all 'special

  19. Study of heavy particle decay from superheavy elements by SK model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy nuclei usually decay by alpha decay or spontaneous fission. These two decay modes are generally the most probable competing processes. Another less probable decay process is cluster radioactivity in which nuclei from carbon to silicon are emitted from Radium to Californium leading to the most stable daughter nucleus, lead. This work reports such a study using the cubic plus Yukawa plus exponential model of Shanmugam and Kamalaharan (SK)

  20. Derivation of a novel formula for α-decay half-life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the basic principle of quantal decay of particle, we derive a formula of logarithm of decay half-life of an alpha particle emitting from a radioactive nucleus. The process of decay is understood as the transition of the particle from an isolated quasi-bound state to a scattering state. In this picture, the decay width is a resonance width in the system consisting of an α-cluster and the residual nucleus

  1. Stirling Convertor for the Stirling Radioisotope Generator Tested as a Prelude to Transition to Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Jeffrey G.; Thieme, Lanny G.

    2004-01-01

    The Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG) is currently being developed by Lockheed Martin Astronautics (Valley Forge, PA) under contract to the Department of Energy (Germantown, MD). In support of this project, the NASA Glenn Research Center has established a near-term technology effort to provide some of the critical data to ensure a successful transition to flight for what will be the first dynamic power system to be used in space. The generator will be a high-efficiency electric power source for potential use on NASA space science missions. The generator will be able to operate in the vacuum of deep space or in an atmosphere such as on the surface of Mars. High system efficiency is obtained through the use of free-piston Stirling power-conversion technology. The power output of the generator will be greater than 100 W at the beginning of life, with the slow decline in power being largely due to decay of the plutonium heat source. Previously, Glenn's supporting technology efforts focused only on the most critical technical issues.

  2. Radioisotope spectrometric method to determine diffusion coefficients in metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief description of the spectrometric installation to study diffusion in metals using #betta#-decay radio-isotopes is presented. Diffusion coefficients of nickel in 70% Co-5% Fe-15% Si-10% B amorphous alloy are determined according to #betta#-radiation absorption in diffusion zone. Plate samples of 10x10 mm size and about 300 μm in thickness are used. Diffusion annealing is conducted during 100 hrs. The calculation of the diffusion coefficients has been carried out by the formula I/I0= esup(μsup(2)Dtau)erfc μ √ Dtau, where I0, I is an initial and a final radiation intensity; μ- an absorption coefficient of 63Ni #betta#-ray in the given material (at calculation μ=1.3x106 m-1 was taken); tau- duration of diffusion annealing; D- diffusion coefficient at the designed temperature. The value of the diffusion coefficient of nickel in 70% Co-5% Fe-15% S-10% B amorphous alloy at the temperature of 200 deg C is turned out to be equal to 4x10-21 m2/s. It should be noted that the self-diffusion coefficient of cobalt in Co-Fe alloy, found by extrapolation from high-temperature region, is equal to 10-35 m2/s, i.e. in 14 orders lower than that of the same basis in amorphous alloy

  3. Present status of research on Re-186 radiopharmaceuticals at Radioisotope Production Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutalib, A. [Radioisotope Production Center, National Atomic Energy Agency Kawasan PUSPIPTEK, Serpong (Indonesia)

    1998-10-01

    Rhenium shows a close chemical similarity to technetium and is suitable for radiotherapy because the {beta}-emitting radionuclides {sup 186}Re (t{sub 1/2} 90 h, E{sub {beta}} = 1.1 MeV, E{sub {gamma}} = 137 keV) and {sup 188}Re (t{sub 1/2} = 17 h, E{sub {beta}} = 2.1 MeV). The {gamma}-emission associated with decay of {sup 186}Re is also useful in scintigraphy. The research on {sup 186}Re radiopharmaceuticals at Radioisotope Production Center has been carried out since April 1997. Interest in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) led us to the development of labeling antibodies with rhenium isotopes. Although there are several methods for coupling radiometal to antibody, we prefer an indirect labeling method in which a bifunctional chelating agent is used for coupling of {sup 186}Re to monoclonal antibodies. In this report we outline the study on the preparation of {sup 186}Re DMSA-TFP as precursor for labeling with monoclonal antibody. (author)

  4. Phosphorus-32 in the Phage Group: radioisotopes as historical tracers of molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creager, Angela N H

    2009-03-01

    The recent historiography of molecular biology features key technologies, instruments and materials, which offer a different view of the field and its turning points than preceding intellectual and institutional histories. Radioisotopes, in this vein, became essential tools in postwar life science research, including molecular biology, and are here analyzed through their use in experiments on bacteriophage. Isotopes were especially well suited for studying the dynamics of chemical transformation over time, through metabolic pathways or life cycles. Scientists labeled phage with phosphorus-32 in order to trace the transfer of genetic material between parent and progeny in virus reproduction. Initial studies of this type did not resolve the mechanism of generational transfer but unexpectedly gave rise to a new style of molecular radiobiology based on the inactivation of phage by the radioactive decay of incorporated phosphorus-32. These 'suicide experiments', a preoccupation of phage researchers in the mid-1950s, reveal how molecular biologists interacted with the traditions and practices of radiation geneticists as well as those of biochemists as they were seeking to demarcate a new field. The routine use of radiolabels to visualize nucleic acids emerged as an enduring feature of molecular biological experimentation. PMID:19268872

  5. Radioisotopic methods for quality control of works and studies while constructing foundations and underground structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The data on the use of radioisotope methods of quality control of various kinds of construction works when building foundations and underground constructions and when carrying out scientific research, are presented. Devices and equipment are described, their block diagrams are presented. The experience in using radioisotope devices to control the quality of construction works, is presented. The problems of economic effectivenes of works using radioisotope devices are solved

  6. SIDA - System for importation distribution and acquisition of radioisotope - User manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SIDA manual (system for importation, distribution and acquisition of radioisotopes) is presented. The SIDA is a system of consult and update to control importation and distribution of radioisotopes in the country. It allows to accompany processes from importation requirement to distribution of radioisotopes, executing the accountancy of I-125, which is distributed for several interprises. The system was developed in CLIPPER87 using DBASE III PLUS data base management. (M.C.K.)

  7. Extreme alpha-clustering in the 18O nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, E D; Goldberg, V Z; Brown, S; Robson, D; Crisp, A M; Cottle, P D; Fu, C; Giles, J; Green, B W; Kemper, K W; Lee, K; Roeder, B T; Tribble, R E

    2009-01-01

    The structure of the 18O nucleus at excitation energies above the alpha decay threshold was studied using 14C+alpha resonance elastic scattering. A number of states with large alpha reduced widths have been observed, indicating that the alpha-cluster degree of freedom plays an important role in this N not equal Z nucleus. However, the alpha-cluster structure of this nucleus is very different from the relatively simple pattern of strong alpha-cluster quasi-rotational bands in the neighboring 16O and 20Ne nuclei. A 0+ state with an alpha reduced width exceeding the single particle limit was identified at an excitation energy of 9.9+/-0.3 MeV. We discuss evidence that states of this kind are common in light nuclei and give possible explanations of this feature.

  8. Auto-correlation and variance-to-mean measurements in a subcritical core obeying multiple alpha-modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergloef, Carl, E-mail: calle@neutron.kth.se [Department of Reactor Physics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Fernandez-Ordonez, Manuel; Villamarin, David; Becares, Vicente; Gonzalez-Romero, Enrique M. [Nuclear Innovation Group, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Bournos, Victor [Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research, National Academy of Sciences, Akad. Krasina str. 99, Minsk (Belarus); Munoz-Cobo, Jose-Luis [Dept Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, Universidad Politechnica, Camino de Vera 14, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-02-15

    Neutron noise measurements based on the Rossi-{alpha} and Feynman-{alpha} methodologies have been performed in a heterogeneous subcritical system. It is shown that the traditional single alpha-mode formulations of the Rossi-{alpha} and Feynman-{alpha} methods are not applicable due to the presence of higher alpha-modes. Formalisms taking into account multiple alpha-modes are applied resulting in satisfactory results. Three alpha-modes could be identified using the Rossi-{alpha} method, whereas only two could be obtained using the Feynman-{alpha} method. In the Feynman-{alpha} case, the possibility to obtain the fastest decaying alpha-mode was diminished due to detector dead time effects. It was found that the slowest decaying alpha-mode does not exactly correspond to the prompt decay found in pulsed neutron source measurements, which confirms the results of previous studies. Strengths and weaknesses of the multiple alpha-mode Rossi-{alpha} and Feynman-{alpha} methods observed in this study are pointed out.

  9. Boundary Harnack principle for $\\Delta + \\Delta^{\\alpha/2}$

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Zhen-Qing; Kim, Panki; Song, Renming; Vondraček, Zoran

    2009-01-01

    For $d\\geq 1$ and $\\alpha \\in (0, 2)$, consider the family of pseudo differential operators $\\{\\Delta+ b \\Delta^{\\alpha/2}; b\\in [0, 1]\\}$ on $\\R^d$ that evolves continuously from $\\Delta$ to $\\Delta + \\Delta^{\\alpha/2}$. In this paper, we establish a uniform boundary Harnack principle (BHP) with explicit boundary decay rate for nonnegative functions which are harmonic with respect to $\\Delta +b \\Delta^{\\alpha/2}$ (or equivalently, the sum of a Brownian motion and an independent symmetric $\\a...

  10. Cluster decay in osmium isotopes using Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, Nithu; Joseph, Deepthy Maria; Joseph, Antony

    2016-02-01

    Cluster radioactivity is a rare cold nuclear process which is intermediate between alpha decay and spontaneous fission. The present work is a theoretical investigation of the feasibility of alpha decay and cluster radioactivity from proton rich Osmium (Os) isotopes with mass number ranging from 162-190. Osmium forms a part of the transition region between highly deformed and spherical nuclei. Calculations have been done using unified fission model and Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) theory. We have chosen only those decays with half-lives falling in measurable range. Geiger-Nuttall plot has been successfully reproduced. The isotope which is most favorable to each decay mode has a magic daughter nucleus.

  11. Radioisotope Stirling Generator Options for Pluto Fast Flyby Mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schock, Alfred

    2012-01-19

    The preceding paper described conceptual designs and analytical results for five Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) options for the Pluto Fast Flyby (PFF) mission, and the present paper describes three Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) options for the same mission. The RSG options are based on essentially the same radioisotope heat source modules used in previously flown RTGs and on designs and analyses of a 75-watt free-piston Stirling engine produced by Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) for NASA's Lewis Research Center. The integrated system design options presented were generated in a Fairchild Space study sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Special Applications, in support of ongoing PFF mission and spacecraft studies that the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is conducting for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). That study's NASA-directed goal is to reduce the spacecraft mass from its baseline value of 166 kg to ~110 kg, which implies a mass goal of less than 10 kg for a power source able to deliver 69 watts(e) at the end of the 9.2-year mission. In general, the Stirling options were found to be lighter than the thermoelectric options described in the preceding paper. But they are less mature, requiring more development, and entailing greater programmatic risk. The Stirling power system mass ranged from 7.3 kg (well below the 10-kg goal) for a non-redundant system to 11.3 kg for a redundant system able to maintain full power if one of its engines fails. In fact, the latter system could deliver as much as 115 watts(e) if desired by the mission planners. There are 2 copies in the file.

  12. Development of Next Generation Segmented Thermoelectric Radioisotope Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleurial, J.; Caillat, T.; Ewell, R. C.

    2005-12-01

    Radioisotope thermoelectric generators have been used for space-based applications since 1961 with a total of 22 space missions that have successfully used RTGs for electrical power production. The key advantages of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) are their long life, robustness, compact size, and high reliability. Thermoelectric converters are easily scalable, and possess a linear current-voltage curve, making power generation easy to control via a shunt regulator and shunt radiator. They produce no noise, vibration or torque during operation. These properties have made RTGs ideally suitable for autonomous missions in the extreme environments of outer space and on planetary surfaces. More advanced radioisotope power systems (RPS) with higher specific power (W/kg) and/or power output are desirable for future NASA missions, including the Europa Geophysical Orbiter mission. For the past few years, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has been developing more efficient thermoelectric materials and has demonstrated significant increases in the conversion efficiency of high temperature thermocouples, up to 14% when operated across a 975K to 300K temperature differential. In collaboration with NASA Glenn Research Center, universities (USC and UNM), Ceramic and Metal Composites Corporation and industrial partners, JPL is now planning to lead the research and development of advanced thermoelectric technology for integration into the next generations of RPS. Preliminary studies indicate that this technology has the potential for improving the RPS specific power by more than 50% over the current state-of-the-art multi-mission RTG being built for the Mars Science Laboratory mission. A second generation advanced RPS is projected at more than doubling the specific power.

  13. Some Uses of Radioisotopes and Radiations in Entomology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reviews the applications of radioisotopes in entomology that have been developed at our two centres during the last few years. Early work (Au198-labelling) related to the bee and more particularly to the radius of dispersion of worker bees from a colony. After investigations on the individual dose received in tagging of this kind, the radioresistance of the bee was determined, the lethal dose being estimated at about 90 kr. Au198 was also used to study exchange of food within a bee-hive. On the other hand, P32 was used for studies of exchange of food, in small hives, between individuals of different functions (males, workers and queens) or different colonies. Similar trophallaxic studies have recently been performed on wasps. Au198 was likewise the basic radioisotope used in work on ant's nests. The most interesting finding from one of the early studies was that exchange of food takes place between nests more than 50 m apart and belonging to different species (Formica rufa and Formica polyctena). A later study, in which an ant run and not the nest itself was labelled, revealed a division of responsibility within the nests the tagged ants were found invariably to explore the same run and to have little contact with other individuals of the same colony. In the same experiment abnormal radioactivity was noted in the ants before labelling, due in particular to (Sr+Nb)95 . This discovery would seem to point to accumulation of radioactive fall-out in ant's nests. At a period of low fall-out, natural radioactivity attributed to K40 was observed and was used for purposes of potassium determination in ants and bees. An attempt was made to label acridians with Ir192 and the findings are described in the paper. Lastly, an autoradiographic study has been made of the distribution of certain radioisotopes (P32 and S35) in the body of the bee. (author)

  14. A radioisotope powered cryobot for penetrating the Europan ice shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Wayne; Bryant, Scott; Zitzelberger, John; Nesmith, Bill

    2001-02-01

    The Cryobot team at JPL has been working on the design of a Cryo-Hydro Integrated Robotic Penetrator System (CHIRPS), which can be used to penetrate the Mars North Polar Cap or the thick sheet ice surrounding Jupiter's moon, Europa. The science for either one of these missions is compelling. For both Mars and Europa the major scientific interest is to reach regions where there is a reservoir of water that may yield signs of past or extant life. Additionally, a Mars polar cap penetration would help us understand both climatic and depositional histories for perhaps as far back as 20 million years. Similarly, penetration of the Europa ice sheet would allow scientists to unravel the mysteries surrounding the thick ice crust, its chemical composition, and subsurface ocean properties. Extreme mass and power constraints make deep drilling/coring impractical. The best way to explore either one of these environments is a cryobot mole penetrator vehicle, which carries a suite of instruments suitable for sampling and analyzing the ice or ocean environments. This paper concentrates on a Europa deep ice (i.e., kilometers thick) application of the CHIRPS, and introduces the reader to the vehicle design with focus on the use of radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) technology as the primary heat (1 kW total) and power source for the robotic vehicle. Radioisotope heater unit (RHU) milli-watt power systems (120 mW total) are also employed to power the mini-radiowave ice transceivers, which are used to relay data through the ice up to the surface lander. The results of modeling and design work for both of these areas are discussed in this paper. Although radioisotope power is baselined for the Europa flight version of the cyrobot, no decision on the final design of the cryobot will be made until the environmental review process is complete. Any use of the cryobot for Mars or Europa will conform to all environmental and planetary protection requirements. .

  15. Milliwatt radioisotope power supply for the PASCAL Mars surface stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Daniel T.; Murbach, Marcus S.

    2001-02-01

    A milliwatt power supply is being developed based on the 1 watt Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Unit (RHU), which has already been used to provide heating alone on numerous spacecraft. In the past year the power supply has been integrated into the design of the proposed PASCAL Mars Network Mission, which is intended to place 24 surface climate monitoring stations on Mars. The PASCAL Mars mission calls for the individual surface stations to be transported together in one spacecraft on a trajectory direct from launch to orbit around Mars. From orbit around Mars each surface station will be deployed on a SCRAMP (slotted compression ramp) probe and, after aerodynamic and parachute deceleration, land at a preselected location on the planet. During descent sounding data and still images will be accumulated, and, once on the surface, the station will take measurements of pressure, temperature and overhead atmospheric optical depth for a period of 10 Mars years (18.8 Earth years). Power for periodic data acquisition and transmission to orbital then to Earth relay will come from a bank of ultracapacitors which will be continuously recharged by the radioisotope power supply. This electronic system has been designed and a breadboard built. In the ultimate design the electronics will be arrayed on the exterior surface of the radioisotope power supply in order to take advantage of the reject heat. This assembly in turn is packaged within the SCRAMP, and that assembly comprises the surface station. An electrically heated but otherwise prototypical power supply was operated in combination with the surface station breadboard system, which included the ultracapacitors. Other issues addressed in this work have been the capability of the generator to withstand the mechanical shock of the landing on Mars and the effectiveness of the generator's multi-foil vacuum thermal insulation. .

  16. Production of actinium-225 for alpha particle mediated radioimmunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boll, Rose A; Malkemus, Dairin; Mirzadeh, Saed

    2005-05-01

    The initial clinical trials for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia have demonstrated the effectiveness of the alpha emitter (213)Bi in killing cancer cells. Bismuth-213 is obtained from a radionuclide generator system from decay of 10-days (225)Ac parent. Recent pre-clinical studies have also shown the potential application of both (213)Bi, and the (225)Ac parent radionuclide in a variety of cancer systems and targeted radiotherapy. This paper describes our five years of experience in production of (225)Ac in partial support of the on-going clinical trials. A four-step chemical process, consisting of both anion and cation exchange chromatography, is utilized for routine separation of carrier-free (225)Ac from a mixture of (228)Th, (229)Th and (232)Th. The separation of Ra and Ac from Th is achieved using the marcoporous anion exchange resin MP1 in 8M HNO(3) media. Two sequential MP1/NO(3) columns provide a separation factor of approximately 10(6) for Ra and Ac from Th. The separation of Ac from Ra is accomplished on a low cross-linking cation exchange resin AG50-X4 using 1.2M HNO(3) as eluant. Two sequential AG50/NO(3) columns provide a separation factor of approximately 10(2) for Ac from Ra. A 60-day processing schedule has been adopted in order to reduce the processing cost and to provide the highest levels of (225)Ac possible. Over an 8-week campaign, a total of approximately 100 mCi of (225)Ac (approximately 80% of the theoretical yield) is shipped in 5-6 batches, with the first batch typically consisting of approximately 50 mCi. After the initial separation and purification of Ac, the Ra pool is re-processed on a bi-weekly schedule or as needed to provide smaller batches of (225)Ac. The averaged radioisotopic purity of the (225)Ac was 99.6 +/- 0.7% with a (225)Ra content of < or =0.6%, and an average (229)Th content of (4(-4)(+5)) x 10(-5)%.

  17. Rhenium-188--a generator-derived radioisotope for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, F F

    1998-10-01

    Rhenium-188 (188Re) is an important therapeutic radioisotope which is obtained on demand as carrier-free sodium perrhenate by saline elution of the tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generator system. With a half-life of 16.9 hours and emission of a high energy beta particle (maximal energy of 2.12 MeV) and a gamma photon (155 keV, 15%) for imaging, 188Re can be provided at reasonable costs for routine preparation of radiopharmaceuticals for cancer treatment. PMID:10851424

  18. Career opportunities in the applications of radiation and radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of radiation and radioisotopes is finally coming into its own after a long and hesitant gestation period. Overshadowed since the inception of the ''Nuclear Age'' by nuclear power generation, this area nevertheless provides real and challenging opportunities involving many different technical specialties and professional skills. Career opportunities are becoming available in those areas involving the use of radioactive isotopes in research, medicine, and industrial process control, and the employment of large radiation outputs, from either accelerator or isotopes, for industrial process applications

  19. Electronic structure of polycrystalline Cd metal using 241Am radioisotope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaka, M. S.; Sharma, G.; Mishra, M. C.; Sharma, B. K.

    2014-04-01

    Electronic structure study of the polycrystalline cadmium metal is reported. The experimental measurement is undertaken on a polycrystalline sheet sample using 59.54 keV radioisotope of 241Am. These results are compared with the ab initio calculations. The theoretical calculations are performed using linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method employing the density functional theories (DFT) and Hartree-Fock (HF) and augmented plane wave (APW) methods. The spherically averaged APW and LCAO based theoretical Compton profiles are in good agreement with the experimental measurement however the APW based theoretical calculations show best agreement.

  20. REVISS / MAYAK: A new partnership in radioisotope supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, N. [REVISS Services Limited, Chesham (United Kingdom); Chikshov, A.I.; Malykh, Y.A. [MAYAK Production Association, Ozyorsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-10-01

    REVISS Services (UK) Limited, the joint venture company formed between Amersham International plc, Production Association MAYAK and Techsnabexport brings together the scientific, manufacturing, marketing and distribution skills and facilities which enable REVISS to be not just a major supplier of radioisotopes and other associated products and services, but the supplier with the largest product range. The paper describes the history and the development of MAYAK and reviews its manufacturing facilities and capabilities and also how MAYAK has moved from being a secret military organisation to become a major and successful commercial organisation

  1. REVISS / MAYAK: A new partnership in radioisotope supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    REVISS Services (UK) Limited, the joint venture company formed between Amersham International plc, Production Association MAYAK and Techsnabexport brings together the scientific, manufacturing, marketing and distribution skills and facilities which enable REVISS to be not just a major supplier of radioisotopes and other associated products and services, but the supplier with the largest product range. The paper describes the history and the development of MAYAK and reviews its manufacturing facilities and capabilities and also how MAYAK has moved from being a secret military organisation to become a major and successful commercial organisation

  2. Parametric System Model for a Stirling Radioisotope Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    A Parametric System Model (PSM) was created in order to explore conceptual designs, the impact of component changes and power level on the performance of the Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG). Using the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS approximately 250 Wth) modules as the thermal building block from which a SRG is conceptualized, trade studies are performed to understand the importance of individual component scaling on isotope usage. Mathematical relationships based on heat and power throughput, temperature, mass, and volume were developed for each of the required subsystems. The PSM uses these relationships to perform component- and system-level trades.

  3. ADVANCED RADIOISOTOPE HEAT SOURCE AND PROPULSION SYSTEMS FOR PLANETARY EXPLORATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. C. O' Brien; S. D. Howe; J. E. Werner

    2010-09-01

    The exploration of planetary surfaces and atmospheres may be enhanced by increasing the range and mobility of a science platform. Fundamentally, power production and availability of resources are limiting factors that must be considered for all science and exploration missions. A novel power and propulsion system is considered and discussed with reference to a long-range Mars surface exploration mission with in-situ resource utilization. Significance to applications such as sample return missions is also considered. Key material selections for radioisotope encapsulation techniques are presented.

  4. A new access control system by fingerprint for radioisotope facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Hiroko; Hirata, Yasuki [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Radioisotope Center; Kondo, Takahiro; Takatsuki, Katsuhiro

    1998-04-01

    We applied a new fingerprint checker for complete access control to the radiation controlled area and to the radioisotope storage room, and prepared softwares for the best use of this checker. This system consists of a personal computer, access controllers, a fingerprint register, fingerprint checkers, a tenkey and mat sensors, permits ten thousand users to register their fingerprints and its hard disk to keep more than a million records of user`s access. Only 1% of users could not register their fingerprints worn-out, registered four numbers for a fingerprint. The softwares automatically provide varieties of reports, caused a large reduction in manual works. (author)

  5. Radioisotope measurement of the velocity of tracheal mucus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioisotope scanning technique for measuring the velocity of tracheal mucus has been developed utilizing a canine model. A solution of stannous phytate labeled with /sup 99m/Tc is introduced percutaneously into the lower trachea and the upward movement of the leading edge of the radioactivity is followed by repeat scanning at 2-minute intervals using a modified rectilinear scanner, thus allowing calculation of the velocity of the mucus. It is believed that this technique may be of value in studying the effect of experimentally induced tracheal injuries on mucus velocity. Possible applications of the technique for the study of the velocity of mucus in the human trachea are discussed

  6. Radioisotope measurement of the velocity of tracheal mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, K J; Palmer, D W; Beste, D J; Carl, G A; Belson, T P; Pelc, L R; Toohill, R J

    1985-04-01

    A radioisotope scanning technique for measuring the velocity of tracheal mucus has been developed utilizing a canine model. A solution of stannous phytate labeled with 99mTc is introduced percutaneously into the lower trachea and the upward movement of the leading edge of the radioactivity is followed by repeat scanning at 2-minute intervals using a modified rectilinear scanner, thus allowing calculation of the velocity of the mucus. It is believed that this technique may be of value in studying the effect of experimentally induced tracheal injuries on mucus velocity. Possible applications of the technique for the study of the velocity of mucus in the human trachea are discussed. PMID:3921912

  7. Radioisotope measurement of the velocity of tracheal mucus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, K.J.; Palmer, D.W.; Beste, D.J.; Carl, G.A.; Belson, T.P.; Pelc, L.R.; Toohill, R.J.

    1985-04-01

    A radioisotope scanning technique for measuring the velocity of tracheal mucus has been developed utilizing a canine model. A solution of stannous phytate labeled with /sup 99m/Tc is introduced percutaneously into the lower trachea and the upward movement of the leading edge of the radioactivity is followed by repeat scanning at 2-minute intervals using a modified rectilinear scanner, thus allowing calculation of the velocity of the mucus. It is believed that this technique may be of value in studying the effect of experimentally induced tracheal injuries on mucus velocity. Possible applications of the technique for the study of the velocity of mucus in the human trachea are discussed.

  8. Decay studies of a long lived high spin isomer of /sup 210/Bi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuggle, D.G.

    1976-08-01

    A source of approximately 30 ..mu..g of pure (> 90%) /sup 210m/Bi (J..pi.. = 9-) was prepared by irradiating /sup 209/Bi in a nuclear reactor. After chemical separations to remove /sup 210/Po from the irradiated bismuth sample were completed, the /sup 210/Bi was electromagnetically separated from the /sup 209/Bi by a series of two isotope separations to create the source mentioned above. This source was then used to conduct alpha, conversion electron, gamma, gamma-gamma coincidence, and alpha-gamma coincidence spectroscopic studies of the decay of /sup 210m/Bi. The partial half life for the alpha decay of /sup 210m/Bi was measured as 3.0 x 10/sup 6/ yr. A lower limit of 10/sup 13/ years was set for the partial half life for the decay of /sup 210m/Bi to /sup 210/Po. Alpha decay of /sup 210m/Bi to 8 excited states of /sup 206/Tl was observed. A lower limit of 10/sup -4/% was set for the branching ratio of the parity forbidden alpha decay of /sup 210/Bi to the /sup 206/Ti ground state. Theoretical decay rates for the alpha decays of /sup 210m/Bi, /sup 210/Bi, /sup 211/Po, and /sup 211m/Po were calculated using the method developed by Hans Mang. A comparison of the calculated and experimentally measured alpha decay rates of /sup 210m/Bi showed good agreement for the relative alpha decay rates.

  9. Is the Double Giant Dipole Resonance Process Responsible for Alpha Emission in Ternary Fission?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Hong-Yin(韩洪银); WAND Yi-Hua(王屹华); G.Mouze

    2001-01-01

    The Monte Carlo program built on the double giant dipole resonance model proposed by Mouze et al. [Nuovo Cimento A 110(1997)1097] was employed to calculate the energy spectrum of alpha particles emitted in the spontaneous ternary fission of 252Cf. It has been found that in the case of the zero orbital angular momentum of alpha particles in the alpha decay of the fragments, the measured alpha spectrum can be reproduced approximately by the model without any adjustable parameter.

  10. Coated Particles Fuel Compact-General Purpose Heat Source for Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel

    2003-01-01

    Coated Particles Fuel Compacts (CPFC) have recently been shown to offer performance advantage for use in Radioisotope Heater Units (RHUs) and design flexibility for integrating at high thermal efficiency with Stirling Engine converters, currently being considered for 100 We. Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems (ARPS). The particles in the compact consist of 238PuO2 fuel kernels with 5-μm thick PyC inner coating and a strong ZrC outer coating, whose thickness depends on the maximum fuel temperature during reentry, the fuel kernel diameter, and the fraction of helium gas released from the kernels and fully contained by the ZrC coating. In addition to containing the helium generated by radioactive decay of 238Pu for up to 10 years before launch and 10-15 years mission lifetime, the kernels are intentionally sized (>= 300 μm in diameter) to prevent any adverse radiological effects on reentry. This paper investigates the advantage of replacing the four iridium-clad 238PuO2 fuel pellets, the two floating graphite membranes, and the two graphite impact shells in current State-Of-The-Art (SOA) General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) with CPFC. The total mass, thermal power, and specific power of the CPFC-GPHS are calculated as functions of the helium release fraction from the fuel kernels and maximum fuel temperature during reentry from 1500 K to 2400 K. For the same total mass and volume as SOA GPHS, the generated thermal power by single-size particles CPFC-GPHS is 260 W at Beginning-Of-Mission (BOM), versus 231 W for the GPHS. For an additional 10% increase in total mass, the CPFC-GPHS could generate 340 W BOM; 48% higher than SOA GPHS. The corresponding specific thermal power is 214 W/kg, versus 160 W/kg for SOA GPHS; a 34% increase. Therefore, for the same thermal power, the CPFC-GPHS is lighter than SOA GPHS, while it uses the same amount of 238PuO2 fuel and same aeroshell. For the same helium release fraction and fuel temperature, binary-size particles CPFC-GPHS could

  11. Study of the ${\\beta}$-decay of $^{12}$B

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    We propose to study the ${\\beta}$-decay of $^{12}$B with a modern segmented Si-detector array to get new and much improved information on states in $^{12}$C above the ${\\alpha}$-threshold. These states mainly decay into final states of three ${\\alpha}$-particles and their study therefore is a challenge for nuclear spectroscopy. The properties of these states is of high current interest for nuclear astrophysics and for the nuclear many-body problem in general. We ask for a total of 15 shifts.

  12. Fission decay of $^{282}$Cn studied using cranking inertia

    CERN Document Server

    Poenaru, D N

    2014-01-01

    Superheavy nuclei produced until now are decaying mainly by $\\alpha$~emission and spontaneous fission. Calculated $\\alpha$~decay half-lives are in agreement with experimental data within one order of magnitude. The discrepancy between theory and experiment can be as high as ten orders of magnitude for spontaneous fission. We analyze a way to improve the accuracy by using the action integral based on cranking inertia and a potential barrier computed by the macroscopic-microscopic method with a two-center shell model. Illustrations are given for $^{282}$Cn which has a measured fission half-life.

  13. Weak decays. [Lectures, phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojcicki, S.

    1978-11-01

    Lectures are given on weak decays from a phenomenological point of view, emphasizing new results and ideas and the relation of recent results to the new standard theoretical model. The general framework within which the weak decay is viewed and relevant fundamental questions, weak decays of noncharmed hadrons, decays of muons and the tau, and the decays of charmed particles are covered. Limitation is made to the discussion of those topics that either have received recent experimental attention or are relevant to the new physics. (JFP) 178 references

  14. decays to baryons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Torsten Leddig

    2012-11-01

    From inclusive measurements, it is known that about 7% of all mesons decay into final states with baryons. In these decays, some striking features become visible compared to mesonic decays. The largest branching fractions come with quite moderate multiplicities of 3–4 hadrons. We note that two-body decays to baryons are suppressed relative to three- and four-body decays. In most of these analyses, the invariant baryon–antibaryon mass shows an enhancement near the threshold. We propose a phenomenological interpretation of this quite common feature of hadronization to baryons.

  15. Inorganic, radioisotopic and organic analysis of 241-AP-101 tank waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battelle received five samples from Hanford waste tank 241-AP-101, taken at five different depths within the tank. No visible solids or organic layer were observed in the individual samples. Individual sample densities were measured, then the five samples were mixed together to provide a single composite. The composite was homogenized and representative sub-samples taken for inorganic, radioisotopic, and organic analysis. All analyses were performed on triplicate sub-samples of the composite material. The sample composite did not contain visible solids or an organic layer. A subsample held at 10 C for seven days formed no visible solids. The characterization of the 241-AP-101 composite samples included: (1) Inductively-coupled plasma spectrometry for Ag, Al, Ba, Bi, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, La, Mg, Mn, Na, Nd, Ni, P, Pb, Pd, Ru, Rh, Si, Sr, Ti, U, Zn, and Zr (Note: Although not specified in the test plan, As, B, Be, Co, Li, Mo, Sb, Se, Sn, Tl, V, W, and Y were also measured and reported for information only) (2) Radioisotopic analyses for total alpha and total beta activities, 3H, 14C, 60Co, 79Se, 90Sr, 99Tc as pertechnetate, 106Ru/Rh, 125Sb, 134Cs, 137Cs, 152Eu, 154Eu, 155Eu, 238Pu, 239+240Pu, 241Am, 242Cm, and 243+244Cm; (3) Inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry for 237Np, 239Pu, 240Pu, 99Tc, 126Sn, 129I, 231Pa, 233U, 234U, 235U, 236U, 238U, 241AMU, 242AMU, 243AMU, As, B, Be, Ce, Co, Cs, Eu, I, Li, Mo, Pr, Rb, Sb, Se, Ta, Te, Th, Tl, V, and W; (4) total U by kinetic phosphorescence analysis; (5) Ion chromatography for Cl, F, NO2, NO3, PO4, SO4, acetate, formate, oxalate, and citrate; (6) Density, inorganic carbon and organic carbon by two different methods, mercury, free hydroxide, ammonia, and cyanide. The 241-AP-101 composite met all contract limits (molar ratio of analyte to sodium or ratio of becquerels of analyte to moles of sodium) defined in Specification 7 for Envelope A. Except for a few cases, the characterization results met or surpassed the

  16. Inorganic, radioisotopic and organic analysis of 241-AP-101 tank waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SK Fiskum; PR Bredt; JA Campbell; LR Greenwood; OT Farmer; GJ Lumetta; GM Mong; RT Ratner; CZ Soderquist; RG Swoboda; MW Urie; JJ Wagner

    2000-06-28

    Battelle received five samples from Hanford waste tank 241-AP-101, taken at five different depths within the tank. No visible solids or organic layer were observed in the individual samples. Individual sample densities were measured, then the five samples were mixed together to provide a single composite. The composite was homogenized and representative sub-samples taken for inorganic, radioisotopic, and organic analysis. All analyses were performed on triplicate sub-samples of the composite material. The sample composite did not contain visible solids or an organic layer. A subsample held at 10 C for seven days formed no visible solids. The characterization of the 241-AP-101 composite samples included: (1) Inductively-coupled plasma spectrometry for Ag, Al, Ba, Bi, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, La, Mg, Mn, Na, Nd, Ni, P, Pb, Pd, Ru, Rh, Si, Sr, Ti, U, Zn, and Zr (Note: Although not specified in the test plan, As, B, Be, Co, Li, Mo, Sb, Se, Sn, Tl, V, W, and Y were also measured and reported for information only) (2) Radioisotopic analyses for total alpha and total beta activities, {sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 60}Co, {sup 79}Se, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc as pertechnetate, {sup 106}Ru/Rh, {sup 125}Sb, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 152}Eu, {sup 154}Eu, {sup 155}Eu, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239+240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 242}Cm, and {sup 243+244}Cm; (3) Inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry for {sup 237}Np, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 126}Sn, {sup 129}I, {sup 231}Pa, {sup 233}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 236}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 241}AMU, {sup 242}AMU, {sup 243}AMU, As, B, Be, Ce, Co, Cs, Eu, I, Li, Mo, Pr, Rb, Sb, Se, Ta, Te, Th, Tl, V, and W; (4) total U by kinetic phosphorescence analysis; (5) Ion chromatography for Cl, F, NO{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}, PO{sub 4}, SO{sub 4}, acetate, formate, oxalate, and citrate; (6) Density, inorganic carbon and organic carbon by two different methods, mercury, free hydroxide, ammonia, and cyanide. The 241-AP-101 composite met all

  17. Dynamic Studies with Radioisotopes in Medicine. Proceedings of the Symposium on Dynamics Studies with Radioisotopes in Clinical Medicine and Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observations on the temporal patterns of uptake, metabolism, clearance or excretion of administered radioactive materials form the basis of many important applications of radioisotopes in clinical medicine and research. Such applications include studies of organ function, of regional blood flow and of the turnover of various substances in the human body. Newly available radioisotopes, new instruments such as gamma came ras, new techniques and new methods of data analysis based on the use of analogue and digital computers are continually enlarging the scope of the applications. Progress in these matters was discussed at the Symposium on Dynamic Studies with Radioisotopes in Clinical Medicine and Research, organized by the lnternational Atomic Energy Agency and held in Rotterdam, The Netherlands, from 31 August to 4 September 1970. A total of 315 participants nominated by 39 countries and 4 international organizations attended, and the 70 papers presented cove r the theoretical aspects of dynamic studies, the development of techniques and instruments for such studies, and specific applications in studies of thyroid, renal, hepatic and splenic function, mineral metabolism, regional blood flow, and cardiac and pulmonary function. The proceedings include the full texts of all the papers presented together with the edited discussions. Invited review papers deal with the general aspects of the various main groups of applications covered. Many of the applications described have already reached the stage of routine use; others are still in the developmental stage. Of particular note in the latter connection are applications based on the quantitative analysis of scintillation camera data. The many papers presented on these topics and the ensuing discussions indicate the great interest now shown in this promising area of development. It is hoped that the proceedings will provide a valuable guide to the present status of the subject

  18. Precise predictions for B -> Xc tau nu decay distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Ligeti, Zoltan

    2014-01-01

    We derive precise standard model predictions for the dilepton invariant mass and the tau energy distributions in inclusive B -> Xc tau nu decay. We include Lambda_QCD^2/m_b^2 and alpha_s corrections using the 1S short-distance mass scheme, and estimate shape function effects near maximal tau energy. These results can improve the sensitivity of b -> c tau nu related observables to beyond standard model physics.

  19. Particle-beam accelerators for radiotherapy and radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The philosophy used in developing the new PIGMI technology was that the parameters chosen for physics research machines are not necessarily the right ones for a dedicated therapy or radioisotope machine. In particular, the beam current and energy can be optimized, and the design should emphasize minimum size, simplicity and reliability of operation, and economy in capital and operating costs. A major part of achieving these goals lay in raising the operating frequency and voltage gradient of the accelerator, which shrinks the diameter and length of the components. Several other technical innovations resulted in major system improvements. One of these is a radically new type of accelerator structure named the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator. This allowed us to eliminate the large, complicated ion source used in previous ion accelerators, and to achieve a very high quality accelerated beam. Also, by using advanced permanent magnet materials to make the focusing elements, the system becomes much simpler. Other improvements have been made in all of the accelerator components and in the methods for operating them. These will be described, and design and costing information examples given for several possible therapy and radioisotope production machines

  20. Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Options for Pluto Fast Flyby Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schock, Alfred

    1994-07-01

    A small spacecraft design for the Pluto Fast Flyby (PFF) mission is under study by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PL) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), for a possible launch as early as 1998. JPL's 1992 baseline design calls for a power source able to furnish an energy output of 3963 kWh and a power output of 69 Watts(e) at the end of the 9.2-year mission. Satisfying those demands is made difficult because NASA management has set a goal of reducing the spacecraft mass from a baseline value of 166 kg to ~110 kg, which implies a mass goal of less than 10 kg for the power source. To support the ongoing NASA/JPL studies, the Department of Energy's Office of Special Applications (DOE/OSA) commissioned Fairchild Space to prepare and analyze conceptual designs of radioisotope power systems for the PFF mission. Thus far, a total of eight options employing essentially the same radioisotope heat source modules were designed and subjected to thermal, electrical, structural, and mass analyses by Fairchild. Five of these - employing thermoelectric converters - are described in the present paper, and three - employing free-piston Stirling converters - are described in the companion paper presented next. The system masses of the thermoelectric options ranged from 19.3 kg to 10.2 kg. In general, the options requiring least development are the heaviest, and the lighter options require more development with greater programmatic risk.

  1. Multi-Watt Small Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Conceptual Design Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Determan, William R.; Otting, William; Frye, Patrick; Abelson, Robert; Ewell, Richard; Miyake, Bob; Synder, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    A need has been identified for a small, light-weight, reliable power source using a radioisotope heat source, to power the next generation of NASA's small surface rovers and exploration probes. Unit performance, development costs, and technical risk are key criteria to be used to select the best design approach. Because safety can be a major program cost and schedule driver, RTG designs should utilize the DOE radioisotope safety program's data base to the maximum extent possible. Other aspects important to the conceptual design include: 1) a multi-mission capable design for atmospheric and vacuum environments, 2) a module size based on one GPHS Step 2 module, 3) use of flight proven thermoelectric converter technologies, 4) a long service lifetime of up to 14 years, 5) maximize unit specific power consistent with all other requirements, and 6) be ready by 2013. Another critical aspect of the design is the thermal integration of the RTG with the rover or probe's heat rejection subsystem and the descent vehicle's heat rejection subsystem. This paper describes two multi-watt RTG design concepts and their integration with a MER-class rover.

  2. Sodium Variable Conductance Heat Pipe for Radioisotope Stirling Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarau, Calin; Anderson, William G.; Walker, Kara

    2009-01-01

    In a Stirling radioisotope system, heat must continually be removed from the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules to maintain the modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. Normally, the Stirling convertor provides this cooling. If the converter stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS, and also ending the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) has been designed to allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling convertor in an Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG). When the Stirling convertor is turned off, the VCHP will activate when the temperatures rises 30 C above the setpoint temperature. A prototype VCHP with sodium as the working fluid was fabricated and tested in both gravity aided and against gravity conditions for a nominal heater head temperature of 790 C. The results show very good agreement with the predictions and validate the model. The gas front was located at the exit of the reservoir when heater head temperature was 790 C while cooling was ON, simulating an operating Advanced Stirling Converter (ASC). When cooling stopped, the temperature increased by 30 C, allowing the gas front to move past the radiator, which transferred the heat to the case. After resuming the cooling flow, the front returned at the initial location turning OFF the VCHP. The against gravity working conditions showed a colder reservoir and faster transients.

  3. Radioisotope flaw detection during the inspection of the NPS equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioisotope method for non-destructive inspection is widely used in the USSR because of its specific features and advantages, namely, the possibility to inspect the items made of various materials, with a wide range of thickness, or located in places access to which is difficult, in the case of absence of power supply, under the effect of high level radiation background, etc. The methods and means of radioisotope flaw detection are used for the following fields of nuclear power engineering: inspection of the equipments during the scheduled preventive and major repairs of nuclear power stations (NPS); during the mounting and assembling of nuclear reactors; and during the manufacture of NPS equipments on the shop scale. Some features and specifications of such facilities are described briefly. The All-Union Scientific Research Institute of Radiation Engineering carries out the investigations connected not only with the apparatuses for flaw detection, but also with their effective applications. As the results of the performed investigations, a method of optimizing instrumental parameters based on the sensitivity and expense, the influence of different factors upon the selected criteria, the radiation exposure dose rate, etc., were suggested. It must be noted that the economical effect produced by the optimization of the technical characteristics of the instruments intended for the inspection has been obtained, as a rule, without additional capital expenses. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  4. The radioisotope osteogram: Kinetic studies of skeletal disorders in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, N.S.

    1959-10-16

    Radioactive strontium can serve as a tracer to gain information concerning calcium metabolism in human subjects. Gamma-emitting Sr{sup 85} is used rather than the much more hazardous, beta-emitting Sr{sup 89} and Sr{sup 90}. (ca{sup 47} -- the ideal tracer for normal calcium -- is quite expensive and difficult to procure.) Very significant information may be obtained merely by measuring and recording the changes in radioactivity in various body areas during the first hour after intravenous injection of the bone-seeking radioisotope. This is accomplished by placing a lead-shielded gamma-scintillation detector in contact with the skin over the sites of interest and recording the activities on a scaler or ratemeter. The activity versus time curves so obtained are called radioisotope osteograms. Data were presented which indicated that Sr{sup 85} osteograms for patients afflicted with osteoporosis, Paget`s disease, tumor metastases to bone, and possibly multiple myeloma, differ significantly from those obtained from subjects with no skeletal abnormalities. Some interpretations of these deviations were discussed. The value of conducting double-tracer tests (e.g. -- Sr{sup 85} plus radio-iodinated serum albumin) was demonstrated, and correlations with excretion data were made. With further refinements the technique may ultimately become useful for certain diagnostic problems in the clinic and.for evaluating the efficacy of treatment of these disorders.

  5. Preliminary studies of Brazilian wood using different radioisotopic sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to availability and particular features, wood was one of the first materials used by mankind with a wide variety of applications. It can be used as raw material for paper and cellulose manufacturing; in industries such as chemical, naval, furniture, sports goods, toys, and musical instrument; in building construction and in the distribution of electric energy. Wood has been widely researched; therefore, wood researchers know that several aspects such as temperature, latitude, longitude, altitude, sunlight, soil, and rainfall index interfere with the growth of trees. This behavior explains why average physical-chemical properties are important when wood is studied. The majority of researchers consider density to be the most important wood property because of its straight relationship with the physical and mechanical properties of wood. There are three types of wood density: basic, apparent and green. The apparent density was used here at 12% of moisture content. In this study, four different types of wood were used: 'freijo', 'jequetiba', 'muiracatiara' and 'ipe'. For wood density determination by non-conventional method, Am-241, Ba-133 and Cs-137 radioisotopic sources; a NaI scintillation detector and a counter were used. The results demonstrated this technique to be quick and accurate. By considering the nuclear parameters obtained as half value layers and linear absorption coefficients, Cs-137 radioisotopic source demonstrated to be the best option to be used for inspection of the physical integrity of electric wooden poles and live trees for future works. (author)

  6. [Clinical study of radioisotopic splenoportography in portal hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Y

    1990-02-01

    Radioisotopic splenoportography was performed in 55 patients with portal hypertension, in whom 52 had various degrees of esophagogastric varices, and in 20 patients without portal hypertension. In the patients with varices, collateral images were obtained in 50 patients (96%) by this method and no image was obtained in the patients without varices. The rate of positively imaged collaterals was as follows: Esophageal varices 69%, the left gastric vein 85%, the short gastric veins 48%, RI stasis in esophagogastric region 65%, the azygos vein 46%, the subclavian vein 25%, the para-umbilical veins 46%, splenorenal /gastrorenal shunts 19%, the inferior mesenteric vein 17%, the left intercostal veins 6%, and Arantius's duct 4%. These rates were superior to that obtained from the conventional transarterial portography. There were some correlations between RI-images by this method and clinical and laboratory findings; patients with ascending collaterals alone tended to have extensive and severe varices and higher rate of bleeding, on the other hand, variceal bleeding was not found and episodes of portosystemic encephalopathy frequently occurred in patients with descending collaterals alone. After successful sclerotherapy, RI-images of esophageal varices disappeared in 92% of the patients. Radioisotopic splenoportography appears to be a useful diagnostic and follow-up modality for patients with portal hypertension and esophagogastric varices. PMID:2325608

  7. Radioisotope Electric Propulsion for Deep Space Sample Return

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noble, Robert J.; /SLAC

    2009-07-14

    The need to answer basic questions regarding the origin of the Solar System will motivate robotic sample return missions to destinations like Pluto, its satellite Charon, and objects in the Kuiper belt. To keep the mission duration short enough to be of interest, sample return from objects farther out in the Solar System requires increasingly higher return velocities. A sample return mission involves several complicated steps to reach an object and obtain a sample, but only the interplanetary return phase of the mission is addressed in this paper. Radioisotope electric propulsion is explored in this parametric study as a means to propel small, dedicated return vehicles for transferring kilogram-size samples from deep space to Earth. Return times for both Earth orbital rendezvous and faster, direct atmospheric re-entry trajectories are calculated for objects as far away as 100 AU. Chemical retro-rocket braking at Earth is compared to radioisotope electric propulsion but the limited deceleration capability of chemical rockets forces the return trajectories to be much slower.

  8. Evaluation of radioisotopic angiocardiography in patent ductus arteriosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic images and curves obtained from radioisotopic angiocardiography (RI-ACG) using video recording system were studied in 5 patients with patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), to disclose any characteristic findings of PDA on this radioisotopic examination. And, the examination was evaluated with referance to diagnosis and assessment of status of PDA, comparing with other radiological examinations including angiocardiography and catheterization. Both the dynamic images and the dynamic curves of RI-ACG showed some characteristic findings of PDA, which was considered to be valuable to differentiate the intracardiac left to right shunt in atrial or ventricular septal defect. It was very characteristic of PDA that dynamic images showed regional dilution and recirculation patterns in the region of the main pulmonary artery to its periphery, and dynamic curves presented shunt waves on the descending limbs of the first circulation waves of both the pulmonary and the left ventricular region of interest. The Degrees of appearance of these characteristic findings showed a tendency to well correlate with the value of the left to right shunt fraction calculated by cathetelization technique. On the other hand, RI-ACG showed useful findings to diagnose pulmonary hypertension or heart failure associated with PDA. And, RI-ACG was very useful to detect an abrupt change of the central circulation dynamics in a patient with PDA, in whom continuous murmur characteristic of PDA desappeared intermittently. (author)

  9. Characterization of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Engineering Unit 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Edward J.; Oriti, Salvatore M.; Schifer, Niholas A.

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress was made developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) 140-W radioisotope power system. While the ASRG flight development project has ended, the hardware that was designed and built under the project is continuing to be tested to support future Stirling-based power system development. NASA Glenn Research Center recently completed the assembly of the ASRG Engineering Unit 2 (EU2). The ASRG EU2 consists of the first pair of Sunpower's Advanced Stirling Convertor E3 (ASC-E3) Stirling convertors mounted in an aluminum housing, and Lockheed Martin's Engineering Development Unit (EDU) 4 controller (a fourth-generation controller). The ASC-E3 convertors and Generator Housing Assembly (GHA) closely match the intended ASRG Qualification Unit flight design. A series of tests were conducted to characterize the EU2, its controller, and the convertors in the flight-like GHA. The GHA contained an argon cover gas for these tests. The tests included measurement of convertor, controller, and generator performance and efficiency; quantification of control authority of the controller; disturbance force measurement with varying piston phase and piston amplitude; and measurement of the effect of spacecraft direct current (DC) bus voltage on EU2 performance. The results of these tests are discussed and summarized, providing a basic understanding of EU2 characteristics and the performance and capability of the EDU 4 controller.

  10. Radiative Corrections to the 2E1 Decay Rate of the 2s-State in Hydrogen-Like Atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Karshenboim, Savely G.; Ivanov, Vladimir G.

    1997-01-01

    Radiative corrections to the 2E1 decay width of the 2s-state in the low-Z hydrogen-like system are examined within logarithmic approximation. The correction is found to be 2.025(1) alpha (Z alpha)^2 / pi log(Z alpha)^2 in units of the non-relativistic rate.

  11. Industrial applications of radioisotopes: techniques and procedures of (NTIS) Nuclear Techniques Industrial Service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotope handling procedures followed by personnel of the Nuclear Techniques Industrial Service (NTIS) during the conduction of investigations in industry are described. Possible radiological implications as a result of the various measuring techniques and different types of plants are discussed. Conditions under which permanent authorization has been granted for the use of radioisotopes are mentioned

  12. Economical and technical feasibility study of some radioisotopes production for medical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The economical and technical feasibility study of the production in reactors of some radioisotopes most used in medicine, are presented. The clinical applications of each radioisotope as well as its radioactive concentrations and specific activities are related. Irradiation procedures based in the foregoing data are given. Part of the study is dedicated to quality control. (M.A.C.)

  13. First collinear laser spectroscopy measurements of radioisotopes from an IGISOL ion source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Billowes, J; Campbell, P; Cochrane, ECA; Cooke, JL; Dendooven, P; Evans, DE; Grant, IS; Griffith, JAR; Honkanen, A; Huhta, M; Levins, JMG; Liukkonen, E; Oinonen, M; Pearson, MR; Penttila, H; Persson, B.L.; Richardson, DS; Tungate, G; Wheeler, P; Zybert, L; Aysto, J

    1997-01-01

    The standard Doppler-free technique of collinear laser spectroscopy has been successfully applied to radioisotopes from the ion-guide isotope separator (IGISOL) at the Universiry of Jyvaskyla. The laser resonance fluorescence signals for the Ba-140.142,Ba-144 radioisotopes show that the ion beam ene

  14. Proceedings, High-Precision $\\alpha_s$ Measurements from LHC to FCC-ee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    d' Enterria, David [CERN; Skands, Peter Z. [Monash U.

    2015-01-01

    This document provides a writeup of all contributions to the workshop on "High precision measurements of $\\alpha_s$: From LHC to FCC-ee" held at CERN, Oct. 12--13, 2015. The workshop explored in depth the latest developments on the determination of the QCD coupling $\\alpha_s$ from 15 methods where high precision measurements are (or will be) available. Those include low-energy observables: (i) lattice QCD, (ii) pion decay factor, (iii) quarkonia and (iv) $\\tau$ decays, (v) soft parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, as well as high-energy observables: (vi) global fits of parton distribution functions, (vii) hard parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, (viii) jets in $e^\\pm$p DIS and $\\gamma$-p photoproduction, (ix) photon structure function in $\\gamma$-$\\gamma$, (x) event shapes and (xi) jet cross sections in $e^+e^-$ collisions, (xii) W boson and (xiii) Z boson decays, and (xiv) jets and (xv) top-quark cross sections in proton-(anti)proton collisions. The current status of the theoretical and experimental uncertainties associated to each extraction method, the improvements expected from LHC data in the coming years, and future perspectives achievable in $e^+e^-$ collisions at the Future Circular Collider (FCC-ee) with $\\cal{O}$(1--100 ab$^{-1}$) integrated luminosities yielding 10$^{12}$ Z bosons and jets, and 10$^{8}$ W bosons and $\\tau$ leptons, are thoroughly reviewed. The current uncertainty of the (preliminary) 2015 strong coupling world-average value, $\\alpha_s(m_Z)$ = 0.1177 $\\pm$ 0.0013, is about 1\\%. Some participants believed this may be reduced by a factor of three in the near future by including novel high-precision observables, although this opinion was not universally shared. At the FCC-ee facility, a factor of ten reduction in the $\\alpha_s$ uncertainty should be possible, mostly thanks to the huge Z and W data samples available.

  15. CP violation in strange baryon decays: A report from Fermilab experiment 871

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, C.; Volk, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Chan, A.; Chen, Y.C.; Ho, C.; Teng, P.K. [Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan, Republic of (China); Choong, W.S.; Fuzesy, R.; Gidal, G.; Luk, K.B.; Turko, B.; Zyla, P. [University of California and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Felix, J.; Moreno, G.; Sosa, M. [University of Guanajuato, 37000 Leon (Mexico); Burnstein, R.A.; Chakravorty, A.; Kaplan, D.M.; Lederman, L.M.; Luebke, W.; Rajaram, D.; Rubin, H.A.; White, C.G.; White, S.L. [Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Leros, N.; Perroud, J.P. [University of Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Gustafson, H.R.; Longo, M.J.; Lopez, F. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Papavassiliou, V. [New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico 88003 (United States); Clark, K.; Jenkins, M. [University of South Alabama, Mobile, Alabama 36688 (United States); Dukes, E.C.; Durandet, C.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, M.; Nelson, K. [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22901 (United States)

    1999-02-01

    Fermilab experiment 871, {ital HyperCP}, is a search for direct CP violation in {Xi} and {Lambda} hyperon decays. A non-zero value in the asymmetry parameter A, defined in terms of the decay parameter products {alpha}{sub {Xi}}{alpha}{sub {Lambda}} and {alpha}{sub {bar {Xi}}}{alpha}{sub {bar {Lambda}}}, would be unambiguous evidence for direct CP violation. The first data-taking run finished at the end of 1997 and accumulated over one billion {Xi}{sup {minus}} and {bar {Xi}}{sup +} decays. A sensitivity in A of {approx}10{sup {minus}4} is expected. A review of CP violation in hyperon decays is given, the {ital HyperCP} detector is described, and the status of the data analysis is discussed. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Radon monitor and control system based upon alpha particle detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system is designed for monitoring or controlling the level of radon in indoor air, based upon measuring alpha particles due to the decay of radon or its daughter atoms. In one embodiment, the alpha particle decay of radon itself is detected and analyzed to control a vent in the heating and air conditioning system to automatically keep the radon level below a preselected level. In another embodiment, the daughter atoms 218Po and 214Po are collected from the indoor air and their alpha particle decays are analyzed to provide a sensitive monitor of radon levels or to control vents in the HVAC system to reduce radon concentrations to permissible levels. In addition, the system provides information on the quality of the air filter and indicates when it needs servicing

  17. Practice of the safe handling of radioisotopes using naturally occurring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We proposed a practical protocol for the safe handling of radiation and radioisotopes using the naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs) 87Rb and 40K. The protocol can be utilized for the education and training course for radiation handling workers. Rubidium chloride solutions were used for the practice of dilution of unsealed radioisotopes instead of 32P. Rubidium chloride and potassium chloride solid radiation sources were used for the practice of monitoring of the surface contamination using the GM survey meter instead of 32P and 14C. Rubidium chloride solutions were also used for the practice of the contamination check by the smear method. Substitution of the radioisotopes under the Laws Concerning the Prevention from Radiation Hazards due to Radioisotope and others to NORMs can be successfully achieved without notable demerits. We supposed that most of the practice for the safe handling of radioisotopes could be carried out outside a controlled area. (author)

  18. Systems for control of weighting out with radioisotope measuring transducers for light industry enterprises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The works of the Riga scientific research institute of radioisotope instrument making in the field of development of radioisotope systems for control of weighting out of textiles and synthetic leather are described. Radioisotope transducers have been constructed on the basis of the effect of attenuation of β-radiation used for raying the controlled material. Examples are given of radioisotope devices created at the Institute for control of woolen cloth humidity, surface density of fibrous base of synthetic leather, for control of weighting out of non-woven fabrics, for control of linear density of flaxen and kenaf bands etc. The problems of metrological provision of radioisotope devices and automatic control systems, and economic efficiency of their application are considered

  19. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2015-01-01

    Processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei comprise a major part of stellar nucleosynthesis and hypothesized mechanisms for thermonuclear supernovae. In an effort towards understanding alpha processes from first principles, we describe in this letter the first ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of nucleons and apply a technique called the adiabatic projection method to reduce the eight-body system to an effective two-cluster system. We find good agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for S-wave and D-wave scattering. The computational scaling with particle number suggests that alpha processes involving heavier nuclei are also within reach in the near future.

  20. High purity materials as targets for radioisotope production: Needs and challenges

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Shivarudrappa; K V Vimalnath

    2005-07-01

    Radionuclides have become powerful and indispensable tools in many endeavours of human activities, most importantly in medicine, industry, biology and agriculture, apart from R&D activities. Ready availability of radionuclides in suitable radiochemical form, its facile detection and elegant tracer concepts are responsible for their unprecedented use. Application of radioisotopes in medicine has given birth to a new branch, viz. nuclear medicine, wherein radioisotopes are used extensively in the diagnosis and treatment of variety of diseases including cancer. Artificial transmutation of an element employing thermal neutrons in a reactor or high energy particle accelerators (cyclotrons) are the routes of radioisotope production world over. Availability of high purity target materials, natural or enriched, are crucial for any successful radioisotope programme. Selection of stable nuclides in suitable chemical form as targets with desired isotopic and chemical purity are among the important considerations in radioisotope production. Mostly the oxide, carbonate or the metal itself are the preferred target forms for neutron activation in a research reactor. Chemical impurities, particularly from the elements of the same group, put a limitation on the purity of the final radioisotope product. Whereas the isotopic impurities result in the production of undesirable radionuclidic impurities, which affect their effective utilization. Isotope Group, BARC, is in the forefront of radioisotope production and supply in the country, meeting demands for gamut of radioisotope applications indigenously for over four decades now. Radioisotopes such as 131I, 99Mo, 32P, 51Cr, 153Sm, 82Br, 203Hg, 198Au etc are produced in TBq quantities every month and supplied to several users and to Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT). Such a large production programme puts a huge demand on the reliable sources of availability of high purity target materials which are at present mostly met

  1. Active Radiation Level Measurement on New Laboratory Instrument for Evaluating the Antibacterial Activity of Radioisotope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joh, Eunha; Park, Jang Guen [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    A disc method has been widely used to measure the antibacterial effect of chemical agents. However, it is difficult to measure the antibacterial effect of radioisotopes using a disc method. A disc method is a method for diffusing a drug by placing the drug containing disc on the medium. In this method, radioisotopes are diffused on the medium and it is difficult to measure the exact effect by radiation. Thus, new laboratory equipment needs to evaluate the antibacterial activity by the radioisotopes. In this study, we measured the radiation level of radioisotopes on a new laboratory instrument using a MCNP. A disc method has been widely used to measure the antibacterial effect of chemical agents. This method uses a drug diffusion system for the measurement of anti-bacterial antibiotics. To measure the antimicrobial activity of a radioisotope, a new type of laboratory instrument is necessary to prevent the drug from spreading. The radioisotopes are used to diagnose and treat cancer. However, studies for anti-biotical use have not progressed. The radiation of radioisotopes has the effect of killing bacteria. Before this study proceeds further, it is necessary to be able to measure the antimicrobial activity of the radioisotope easily in the laboratory. However, in this study, it was possible to measure the antimicrobial activity of the radioisotope in the laboratory using a new laboratory instrument. We intend to start evaluation studies of the antibacterial activity of specific radioisotopes. In addition, it will be possible to develop research to overcome diseases caused by bacteria in the future.

  2. Search for the Decay B0 --> rho0rho0

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Abrams, G S; Adye, T; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Albert, J; Aleksan, Roy; Allison, J; Allmendinger, T; Altenburg, D; Andreotti, M; Angelini, C; Anulli, F; Aston, D; Azzolini, V; Baak, M; Back, J J; Bailey, S; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Band, H R; Banerjee, Sw; Barate, R; Bard, D J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Barrett, M; Bartoldus, R; Batignani, G; Bauer, J M; Beck, T W; Behera, P K; Bellini, F; Benayoun, M; Berger, N; Bernard, D; Berryhill, J W; Best, D; Bettarini, S; Bettoni, D; Bevan, A J; Bhimji, W; Bianchi, F; Biasini, M; Blanc, F; Blaylock, G; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bloom, P; Bóna, M; Bondioli, M; Bonneaud, G R; Borgland, A W; Bosisio, L; Boutigny, D; Bowerman, D A; Boyarski, A M; Boyd, J T; Bozzi, C; Brandenburg, G; Brandt, T; Brau, J E; Breon, A B; Briand, H; Brochard, F; Brose, J; Brown, C L; Brown, C M; Brown, D; Brown, D N; Bruinsma, M; Brunet, S; Bucci, F; Buchanan, C; Buchmüller, O L; Bugg, W; Bulten, H; Burchat, Patricia R; Button-Shafer, J; Buzzo, A; Côté, D; Cahn, R N; Calabrese, R; Calcaterra, A; Calderini, G; Campagnari, C; Capra, R; Carpinelli, M; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; Cavoto, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Chao, M; Charles, E; Charles, M J; Chauveau, J; Chavez, C A; Chen, A; Chen, E; Chen, J C; Chen, S; Cheng, B; Cheng, C H; Chevalier, N; Christ, S; Cibinetto, G; Clark, P J; Claus, R; Cochran, J; Colecchia, F; Coleman, J P; Contri, R; Convery, M R; Cormack, C M; Cossutti, F; Cottingham, W N; Couderc, F; Covarelli, R; Cowan, G; Cowan, R; Crawley, H B; Cremaldi, L M; Cristinziani, M; Crosetti, G; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Dahmes, B; Dallapiccola, C; Danielson, N; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Dauncey, P D; David, P; Davier, M; Davis, C L; Day, C T; De Groot, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Del Buono, L; Della Ricca, G; Di Lodovico, F; Dickopp, M; Dittongo, S; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dorigo, A; Druzhinin, V P; Dubitzky, R S; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Dvoretskii, A; Eckmann, R; Edwards, A J; Egede, U; Eichenbaum, A M; Eigen, G; Eisner, A M; Elmer, P; Elsen, E E; Emery, S; Ernst, J A; Eschenburg, V; Eschrich, I; Fabozzi, F; Faccini, R; Fan, S; Farbin, A; Feltresi, E; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Field, R C; Finocchiaro, G; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Flood, K T; Ford, K E; Ford, W T; Forster, I J; Forti, F; Fortin, D; Foulkes, S D; Franek, B J; Frey, R; Fritsch, M; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gaidot, A; Gaillard, J M; Gaillard, J R; Galeazzi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Gamet, R; Gan, K K; Ganzhur, S F; Gary, J W; Gaspero, M; Gatto, C; Geddes, N I; Gill, M S; Giorgi, M A; Giraud, P F; Giroux, X; Gladney, L; Glanzman, T; Godang, R; Goetzen, K; Golubev, V B; Gopal, G P; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M; Grancagnolo, S; Green, M G; Greene, M G; Grenier, G J; Grenier, P; Gritsan, A V; Grosdidier, G; Groysman, Y; Guo, Q H; Hadavand, H K; Hadig, T; Haire, M; Halyo, V; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Hamon, O; Harrison, P F; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hart, P A; Hartfiel, B L; Harton, J L; Hast, C; Hauke, A; Hawkes, C M; Hearty, C; Held, T; Hertzbach, S S; Heusch, C A; Hicheur, A; Hill, E J; Hitlin, D G; Höcker, A; Hodgkinson, M C; Hollar, J J; Honscheid, K; Hrynóva, T; Hufnagel, D; Hulsbergen, W D; Hutchcroft, D E; Igonkina, O; Innes, W R; Ivanchenko, V N; Izen, J M; Jackson, P D; Jackson, P S; Jacobsen, R G; Jawahery, A; Jayatilleke, S M; Jessop, C P; John, M J J; Johnson, J R; Judd, D; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kagan, H; Karyotakis, Yu; Kass, R; Kelly, M P; Kelsey, M H; Kerth, L T; Khan, A; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kirkby, D; Kitayama, I; Knecht, N S; Koch, H; Kocian, M L; Kofler, R; Kolomensky, Yu G; Koptchev, V B; Kovalskyi, D; Kowalewski, R V; Kozanecki, Witold; Kravchenko, E A; Krishnamurthy, M; Kroeger, R; Kroseberg, J; Kukartsev, G; Kutter, P E; Kyberd, P; Lacker, H M; Lae, C K; Lafferty, G D; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lange, D J; Langenegger, U; Lankford, A J; Laplace, S; Latham, T E; Lau, Y P; Lavin, D; Lazzaro, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lees, J P; Legendre, M; Leith, D W G S; Lepeltier, V; Leruste, P; Lewandowski, B; Li Gioi, L; Li, H; Libby, J; Lillard, V; Lista, L; Liu, R; LoSecco, J M; Lo Vetere, M; Lockman, W S; Lombardo, V; London, G W; Long, O; Lou, X C; Lu, A; Lü, C; Luitz, S; Luppi, E; Lusiani, A; Lüth, V; Lutz, A M; Lynch, G; Lynch, H L; Lyon, A J; MacFarlane, D B; Macri, M; Malcles, J; Mallik, U; Mancinelli, G; Mandelkern, M A; Manfredi, P F; Mangeol, D J J; Marchiori, G; Margoni, M; Marsiske, H; Martínez-Vidal, F; Mattison, T S; Mayer, B; Mazur, M A; Mazzoni, M A; McKenna, J A; McMahon, T R; Meadows, B T; Messner, R; Meyer, T I; Meyer, W T; Miftakov, V; Mihályi, A; Mir, L M; Mohanty, G B; Mohapatra, A K; Mommsen, R K; Monge, M R; Monorchio, D; Moore, T B; Morandin, M; Morgan, S E; Morganti, M; Morganti, S; Morii, M; Morton, G W; Muheim, F; Müller, D R; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Narsky, I; Nash, J A; Nauenberg, U; Neal, H; Negrini, M; Neri, N; Nesom, G; Nicholson, H; Nikolich, M B; Nogowski, R; O'Grady, C P; Ocariz, J; Oddone, P J; Ofte, I; Olaiya, E O; Olivas, A; Olsen, J; Onuchin, A P; Orimoto, T J; Otto, S; Ozcan, V E; Paar, H P; Paick, K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Pan, Y; Panetta, J; Panvini, R S; Paoloni, E; Paolucci, P; Parry, R J; Passaggio, S; Patel, P M; Patrignani, C; Patteri, P; Payne, D J; Pelizaeus, M; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Peruzzi, I M; Petersen, B A; Petersen, T C; Petrak, S; Petzold, A; Piatenko, T; Piccolo, D; Piccolo, M; Piemontese, L; Pierini, M; Pioppi, M; Piredda, G; Pivk, M; Plaszczynski, S; Playfer, S; Pompili, A; Poropat, P; Porter, F C; Posocco, M; Potter, C T; Prell, S; Prepost, R; Pripstein, M; Pulliam, T; Purohit, M V; Qi, N D; Rahatlou, S; Rahimi, A M; Rama, M; Rankin, P; Ratcliff, B N; Raven, G; Re, V; Reidy, J; Ricciardi, S; Richman, J D; Ritchie, J L; Rizzo, G; Roat, C; Roberts, D A; Robertson, S H; Robutti, E; Roe, N A; Röthel, W; Ronan, Michael T; Roney, J M; Rong, G; Roodman, A; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rotondo, M; Rubin, A E; Ryd, A; Saeed, M A; Safai-Tehrani, F; Saleem, M; Salnikov, A A; Salvatore, F; Samuel, A; Sanders, D A; Sandrelli, F; Santroni, A; Saremi, S; Sarti, A; Satpathy, A; Schalk, T; Schindler, R H; Schott, G; Schrenk, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, Klaus R; Schumm, B A; Schune, M H; Schwiening, J; Schwierz, R; Schwitters, R F; Sciacca, C; Sciolla, G; Seiden, A; Sekula, S J; Serednyakov, S I; Sharma, V; Shelkov, V G; Shen, B C; Simani, M C; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Sinev, N B; Skovpen, Yu I; Sloane, R J; Smith, A J S; Smith, J G; Snoek, H L; Snyder, A; Sobie, R J; Soffer, A; Soha, A; Sokoloff, M D; Solodov, E P; Spaan, B; Spanier, S M; Spradlin, P; Stängle, H; Steinke, M; Stelzer, J; Stoker, D P; Stroili, R; Strom, D; Stugu, B; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Summers, D J; Sundermann, J E; T'Jampens, S; Tan, P; Tantot, L; Taras, P; Taylor, F; Taylor, G P; Telnov, A V; Teodorescu, L; Ter-Antonian, R; Therin, G; Thiebaux, C; Thiessen, D; Tiozzo, G; Tisserand, V; Toki, W H; Torrence, E; Tosi, S; Touramanis, C; Treadwell, E; Vasileiadis, G; Vasseur, G; Vavra, J; Verderi, M; Verkerke, W; Vitale, L; Voci, C; Voena, C; Vuagnin, G; Wagner, G; Wagner, S R; Wagoner, D E; Waldi, R; Walsh, J; Wang, K; Wang, P; Wappler, F R; Watson, A T; Weaver, M; Weidemann, A W; Weinstein, A J R; Wenzel, W A; Wilden, L; Williams, D C; Williams, J C; Willocq, S; Wilson, F F; Wilson, J R; Wilson, M G; Wilson, R J; Winter, M A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Won, E; Wong, Q K; Wormser, G; Wright, D H; Wright, D M; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Xie, Y; Yamamoto, R K; Yang, S; Yarritu, A K; Ye, S; Yéche, C; Yi, J; Young, C C; Yu, Z; Yumiceva, F X; Yushkov, A N; Zallo, A; Zeng, Q; Zghiche, A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, H W; Zhu, Y S; Zito, M; De Sangro, R; Del Re, D; La Vaissière, C de

    2004-01-01

    The B --> rho0 rho0 decay mode is searched for in a data sample of about 227 million Upsilon(4S) --> B Bbar decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B factory at SLAC. No significant signal is observed, and an upper limit of 1.1 x 10e-6 (90% C.L.) on the branching fraction is set. Implications on the penguin contribution and constraints on the CKM angle alpha with B --> rho rho decays are discussed. All results are preliminary.

  3. Search for the Decay B^0 -> a^\\pm_1 \\rho^\\mp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.

    2006-05-10

    The authors present a search for the rare B-meson decay B{sup 0} {yields} {alpha}{sub 1}{sup {+-}}{rho}{sup {-+}} with {alpha}{sub 1}{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup {+-}}. We use (110 {+-} 1.2) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEp-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. They obtain an upper limit of 30 x 10{sup -6} (90% C.L.) for the branching fraction product {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {alpha}{sub 1}{sup {+-}}{rho}{sup {-+}}) {Beta}({alpha}{sub 1}{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup {+-}}), where they assume that the {alpha}{sub 1}{sup {+-}} decays exclusively to {rho}{sup 0}{pi}{sup {+-}}.

  4. Summary report of consultants' meeting on high-precision beta-intensity measurements and evaluations for specific PET radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary is given of a Consultants' Meeting on 'High-precision beta-intensity measurements and evaluations for specific PET radioisotopes'. Participants assessed and reviewed the decay data for close to 50 positron-emitting radionuclides. Technical discussions are described in this report, along with the detailed recommendations and a priority list for future work. Direct positron and X-ray measurements are required to resolve a significant number of outstanding issues associated with the radionuclides reviewed. The following new measurements are recommended: gamma-ray emission probability for Cu-64, positron and Xray emission probabilities for Ni-57, Cu-62, Ga-66, As-72, Se-73, Rb-81,82m, Sr-83, Y-86 and Tc-94m. The following immediate evaluations were also recommended: Br-76 and I-120g.. Participants assessed and reviewed the decay data for close to 50 positron-emitting radionuclides. Technical discussions are described in this report, along with the detailed recommendations and a priority list for future work. Direct positron and X-ray measurements are required to resolve a significant number of outstanding issues associated with the radionuclides reviewed. The following new measurements are recommended: gamma-ray emission probability for Cu-64, positron and Xray emission probabilities for Ni-57, Cu-62, Ga-66, As-72, Se-73, Rb-81,82m, Sr-83, Y-86 and Tc-94m. The following immediate evaluations were also recommended: Br-76 and I-120g. (author)

  5. Non-exponential decay of atomic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ishkhanyan, A M

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of non-exponential decay of various quantum quasi-stationary systems. This effect can occur at the times which are greater than the lifetime of a considered system. The mechanism for non-exponential depletion of an initial quasi-stationary state is the cutting of the energy spectrum of final continuous states at long times. We first consider the known examples of cold emission of electrons from metal, tunneling alpha-decay of atomic nuclei, and spontaneous decay in two-level systems. The new physical situations discussed are the single-photon atomic ionization by a weak electromagnetic field and tunneling ionization of atoms by a strong low-frequency electromagnetic field. In both cases the decay obeys a power-law dependence on the (long) interaction time. We find that the most promising possibility for observing non-exponential decay at long times is the single-photon ionization of negative atomic ions near the threshold.

  6. Workshop on High-precision $\\alpha_s$ measurements from LHC to FCC-ee

    CERN Document Server

    d'Enterria, David

    2015-01-01

    This document provides a writeup of all contributions to the workshop on "High precision measurements of $\\alpha_s$: From LHC to FCC-ee" held at CERN, Oct. 12--13, 2015. The workshop explored in depth the latest developments on the determination of the QCD coupling $\\alpha_s$ from 15 methods where high precision measurements are (or will be) available. Those include low-energy observables: (i) lattice QCD, (ii) pion decay factor, (iii) quarkonia and (iv) $\\tau$ decays, (v) soft parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, as well as high-energy observables: (vi) global fits of parton distribution functions, (vii) hard parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, (viii) jets in $e^\\pm$p DIS and $\\gamma$-p photoproduction, (ix) photon structure function in $\\gamma$-$\\gamma$, (x) event shapes and (xi) jet cross sections in $e^+e^-$ collisions, (xii) W boson and (xiii) Z boson decays, and (xiv) jets and (xv) top-quark cross sections in proton-(anti)proton collisions. The current status of the theoretical and experiment...

  7. Radioisotopes and Radiation in Animal and Plant Insect Pest Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crop-pest control is of major economic importance and demands the aid of the latest advances in science. Radioisotopes and radiation are being employed to increase the efficiency of existing insect pest control. They are extremely valuable, since improvements to existing methods depend on having detailed data on the bioecology, toxicology, and so on. Radioactive labelling of insects has been extremely promising in bioecology; the labelling of grain pests (Eurygaster integriceps Put., Hadena sordida Skh.) and grain-pest parasites (Meniscus agnatus Crow, Pseudogonia cinerascens Rond.) has provided information about their areas of migration, habitats, sizes of population and the feeding habits. The same technique was used to determine the rate of propagation of the Colorado beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineota Say), which is subject to quarantine controls; subsequently an extermination programme was carried out on the basis of the data obtained. It also provides a valuable means of studying the extremely complex problems of parasitism and predaceousness, in particular intermediate feeding cycles and chemotaxis. The feeding areas of field rodents have been mapped out with the help of a self-labelling, radioactive-bait technique. Pesticides synthesized with radioisotopes have been used in conjunction with radiochromatography, fluorimetry and other techniques to study the highly complex biochemical processes caused to toxicants in plants and insects. It has also been possible to determine the rate of hydrolysis of organic-phosphorus insecticide compounds of the thiphos and metaphos type as a function of the degree of development and the physiological state of plants as well as of environmental conditions. Data have been obtained on the length of time residual quantities of toxicants are retained in agriculture products following different periods of chemical treatment. Radioisotope techniques have yielded information on various metabolic processes exhibiting different

  8. Rare Decays at LHCb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Sam

    2014-04-01

    Rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons provide an effective method of testing the Standard Model and probing possible new physics scenarios. The LHCb experiment has published a variety of interesting results in this field, some of which are presented here. In particular the measurements of the branching fractions of B(s)0 → μ+μ- which, in combination with CMS, resulted in the first observation of the Bs0 → μ+μ- decay. Other topics include searches for the rare decay D0 → μ+μ-, the lepton flavour violating decays B(s)0 → e±μ∓, and the observation of the ψ(4160) resonance in the region of low recoil in B+ → K+μ+μ- decay. New results on the angular analysis of the decay B0 → K*0μ+μ- with form factor independent observables are also shown.

  9. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A.; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2015-12-01

    Processes such as the scattering of alpha particles (4He), the triple-alpha reaction, and alpha capture play a major role in stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, alpha capture on carbon determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen during helium burning, and affects subsequent carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning stages. It also substantially affects models of thermonuclear type Ia supernovae, owing to carbon detonation in accreting carbon-oxygen white-dwarf stars. In these reactions, the accurate calculation of the elastic scattering of alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei—nuclei with even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons—is important for understanding background and resonant scattering contributions. First-principles calculations of processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei have so far been impractical, owing to the exponential growth of the number of computational operations with the number of particles. Here we describe an ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering that uses lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of protons and neutrons, and apply a technique called the ‘adiabatic projection method’ to reduce the eight-body system to a two-cluster system. We take advantage of the computational efficiency and the more favourable scaling with system size of auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations to compute an ab initio effective Hamiltonian for the two clusters. We find promising agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for s-wave and d-wave scattering. The approximately quadratic scaling of computational operations with particle number suggests that it should be possible to compute alpha scattering and capture on carbon and oxygen in the near future. The methods described here can be applied to ultracold atomic few-body systems as well as to hadronic systems using lattice quantum chromodynamics to describe the interactions of

  10. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2015-12-01

    Processes such as the scattering of alpha particles ((4)He), the triple-alpha reaction, and alpha capture play a major role in stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, alpha capture on carbon determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen during helium burning, and affects subsequent carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning stages. It also substantially affects models of thermonuclear type Ia supernovae, owing to carbon detonation in accreting carbon-oxygen white-dwarf stars. In these reactions, the accurate calculation of the elastic scattering of alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei--nuclei with even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons--is important for understanding background and resonant scattering contributions. First-principles calculations of processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei have so far been impractical, owing to the exponential growth of the number of computational operations with the number of particles. Here we describe an ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering that uses lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of protons and neutrons, and apply a technique called the 'adiabatic projection method' to reduce the eight-body system to a two-cluster system. We take advantage of the computational efficiency and the more favourable scaling with system size of auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations to compute an ab initio effective Hamiltonian for the two clusters. We find promising agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for s-wave and d-wave scattering. The approximately quadratic scaling of computational operations with particle number suggests that it should be possible to compute alpha scattering and capture on carbon and oxygen in the near future. The methods described here can be applied to ultracold atomic few-body systems as well as to hadronic systems using lattice quantum chromodynamics to describe the interactions of

  11. Decay of 120Ba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decay of 120Ba has been studied with an on-line isotope separator. Its half-life was determined to be t1/2=24±2 s. A decay scheme is proposed, based on γ-γ, γ-X, and γ-β+ coincidence measurements, which takes account of all 16 observed γ rays. The total decay energy was measured to be QEC=50±0.3 MeV

  12. Effective Majorana neutrino decay

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, Lucía; Peressutti, Javier; Sampayo, Oscar A

    2016-01-01

    We study the decay of heavy sterile Majorana neutrinos according to the interactions obtained from an effective general theory. We describe the two and three-body decays for a wide range of neutrino masses. The results obtained and presented in this work could be useful for the study of the production and detection of this particles in a variety of high energy physics experiments and astrophysical observations. We show in different figures the dominant branching ratios and the total decay width.

  13. The Oklo Constraints on Alpha-Decay Half-Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffin, Eugene; Molgaard, Joshua

    2003-11-01

    Beginning with Shlyakhter in 1976, Oklo natural reactor data have been used by many authors to put limits on the time variation of "constants" such as the fine structure constant and the strong coupling constant. The Sm-149 resonance absorption data constrain the depth of the nuclear potential well to a small margin of error, determined by various unknowns, such as the reactor temperature. Although this change in well depth is slight, nevertheless at certain critical values the number of nodes in the wavefunction can change precipitously, with a corresponding change in other quantities. We show that even these small variations could allow the U-238 half-life to vary by more than one order of magnitude.

  14. The Oklo Constraints on Alpha-Decay Half-Lives

    CERN Document Server

    Chaffin, E

    2003-01-01

    The Oklo data constrain the depth of the nuclear potential well to a small margin of error, determined by various unknowns, such as the reactor temperature. However, we show that even these small variations could allow the U-238 half-life to vary by more than one order of magnitude.

  15. AMTEC radioisotope power system for the Pluto Express mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Alkali Metal Thermal to Electric Converter (AMTEC) technology has made substantial advances in the last 3 years through design improvements and technical innovations. In 1993 programs began to produce an AMTEC cell specifically for the NASA Pluto Express Mission. A set of efficiency goals was established for this series of cells to be developed. According to this plan, cell number-sign 8 would be 17% efficient but was actually 18% efficient. Achieving this goal, as well as design advances that allow the cell to be compact, has resulted in pushing the cell from an unexciting 2 W/kg and 2% efficiency to very attractive 40 W/kg and 18% measured efficiency. This paper will describe the design and predict the performance of a radioisotope powered AMTEC system for the Pluto Express mission

  16. Multimodality Therapy: Bone-Targeted Radioisotope Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Shi-Ming; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Podoloff, Donald A.; Logothetis, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating data suggest that bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals can be used to treat prostate cancer bone metastasis and improve the clinical outcome of patients with advanced prostate cancer. It remains to be elucidated whether radiopharmaceuticals enhance the disruption of the onco-niche or the eradication of micrometastatic cells in the bone marrow. The purpose of this review is to investigate the role of bone-targeted radioisotope therapy in the setting of multimodality therapy for advanced prostate cancer. We examine available data and evaluate whether dose escalation, newer generations, or repeated dosing of radiopharmaceuticals enhance their antitumor effects and whether their combination with hormone ablative therapy, chemotherapy, or novel targeted therapy can improve clinical efficacy. PMID:20551894

  17. A new adrenal computer imaging technique using dual-radioisotopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohashi,Teruhisa

    1981-06-01

    Full Text Available Computer processed adrenal imaging using dual-radioisotopes, 6 beta-iodomethyl-19-nor-cholest-5(10-en-3 beta-ol-131I and 99mTc-phytate was performed in 12 patients with primary aldosteronism and 4 with Cushing's syndrome due to adrenocortical tumor. Adreno-photoscanning and hepato-photoscanning were performed in the same position 2-4 days following intravenous administration of radiocholesterol. The scintigraphic information was stored on cassettes and scan subtraction and a digital-computer method for data smoothing were performed on an oscilloscope. The tumor site could be determined in all cases until day 4 by this computer processed image.

  18. Contribution of radioisotopes in the diagnosis of lung tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    197Hg, a radioisotope of half life 65 h, injected as acetate builds up in malignant tumours and evolutive inflammatory lesions. In spite of a high proportion of false positives it can lead to a lung cancer diagnosis under well-defined circumstances such as: round lung images, X-ray tuberculosis images persisting after prolonged therapy, treated cancers where it can detect relapses before X-rays and in the difficult case of benign tumours. In man the uptake kinetics of carrier-free 67Cu (half-life 58 h), injected as citrate, are apparently not the same in cancers as in evolutive inflammatory lesions. The false positive yield, through much lower than that observed with 197Hg, is still too high in this preliminary study

  19. Fabrication of light weight radioisotope heater unit hardware components

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Dennis C.

    1996-03-01

    The Light Weight Radioisotope Heater Unit (LWRHU) is planned to be used on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Cassini Mission, to provide localized thermal energy as strategic locations on the spacecraft. These one watt heater units will support the operation of many on-board instruments that require a specific temperature range to function properly. The system incorporates a fuel pellet encapsulated in a vented metallic clad fabricated from platinum-30% rhodium (Pt-30%Rh) tubing, sheet and foil materials. To complete the package, the clad assemblies are placed inside a combination of graphite components. This report describes the techniques employed by Mound related to the fabrication and sub assembly processes of the LWRHU clad hardware components. Included are details concerning configuration control systems, material procurement and certification, hardware fabrication specifics, and special processes that are utilized.

  20. Development of stable isotope separation technology for radioisotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ultimate goal of this project is to construct the domestic production system of stable isotopes O-18 and Tl-203 used as target materials in accelerator for the production of medical radioisotopes F-18 and Tl-201, respectively. In order to achieve this goal, diode laser spectroscopic analytical system was constructed and automatic measurement computer software for the direct analysis of H216O/H218O ratio were developed. Distillation process, laser process, and membrane diffusion process were analyzed for the evaluation of O-18 production. And electromagnetic process, plasma process, and laser process were analyzed for the evaluation of Tl-203 production. UV laser system, IR laser system, and detailed system Tl-203 production were designed. Finally, current and future worldwide demand/supply of stable isotopes O-18 and Tl-203 were estimated

  1. Applications of radiations, radioisotopes and nuclear techniques in biotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Applications of radiations, radioisotopes and other nuclear techniques has contributed a great deal in our understanding of microbial plant and animal biochemistry and molecular biology. Electron microscopy has provided visual evidence for molecular events. Developments in cell tissue culture of both plants and animals and immunology have contributed to advances in what we now refer as biotechnology. This paper focuses on the applications in the high-tech end of biotechnology, limited to the use of recombinant-DNA techniques. Molecular identification of the genes, their cloning and horizontal transfer across the species of microbes, plants and animals and expression of the transferred genes is the major strength of modern biotechnology. The techniques described in this paper have played a significant role in the development of biotechnology. 6 refs

  2. Research on medical applications of radioisotopes and radiation in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian Atomic Energy Commission (AAEC) produces and distributes commercially in Australia and abroad a range of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals for medical applications. The AAEC carries out research and development on new and improved processes and procucts is collaboration with medical specialists in hospitals and research workers in other organisations. Examples of these processes and products are: a gel generator for production of 99mTc; radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis of tumours and brain disease and therapy for arthritis; 64Cu for study of copper metabolism; and monoclonal antibodies for tumour diagnosis and therapy. New medical applications in Australia of neutron irradiation include the measurement of total body nitrogen and neutron capture in boron-labelled compounds in vivo for melanoma therapy. (author)

  3. Radioisotopic studies on pulmonary function in experimental burn shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disturbances in pulmonary ventilation and perfusion, which can initiate severe complications, often lead to many therapeutic failures in burn shock. Early recognition of respiratory disturbances is often required to improve results of treatment of burn shock. The authors investigated changes in pulmonary ventilation and perfusion in napalm-burnt rabbits using 133Xe. Simultaneously, they determined effect of treatment with cytochrome C on pulmonary ventilation and perfusion in animals burnt with napalm. It was found that in napalm-burnt rabbits burn shock was accompanied by a significant deterioration in pulmonary ventilation and perfusion. The most marked changes were observed one and two days after burn. It was also found a beneficial effect of treatment with cytochrome C on alveolar ventilation. The authors pointed out the usefulness of radioisotopic investigations of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion in burn shock. (author)

  4. Dynamic radioisotopic study of the salivary glands. Quantification test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantified dynamic radioisotopic exploration, a new and rational examination, should find its place in a thorough check-up of the salivary glands together with clinical, immunological, anatomopathological and sialographic investigations. The object of this work was to standardise the test procedure with a view to routine use on patients and to define certain quantified parameters representing objectively the different aspects of the salivary functions. Our procedure through reeding sophisticated equipment, is simple to perform and relies on use of: radiotechnetium employed at activities which allow repetitive exlorations whereby pathological changes may be followed; the gamma camera and its data processing system which records all radioactive information obtained on the patient's head. These results will supply the data needed to judge the salivary functions as a whole. The apparatus used provides a remarkable pictorial record made up not only of morphological and functional images at each stage of the examination but also of ciphered radioactivity versus time curves for each of the main salivary glands and for any other zone of interest. From these curves it is then possible to define quantified parameters, reproducible and expressing functional activity. This procedure, safe and painless, seems to suit the patients who lie still without complaint for 60 minutes, 45 minutes for the concentration study and 15 minutes for the post-stimulus excretion study. The dynamic radioisotopic examination of the salivary glands, by the comparison of concentration and excretion images and by the study of parameters, separately and as a whole, is thus a useful complement to other paraclinical examinations and contributes essential information in most salivary diseases

  5. Pathway of radioisotopes from land surface to sewage sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Helmut W.; Yokoo, Yoshiyuki

    2014-05-01

    Radioactive surface contaminations will only partially remain at the original location - a fraction of the inventory will take part in (mainly terrestrial and aquatic) environmental transport processes. The probably best known and most important process comprises the food chain. Besides, the translocation of dissolved and particle-bound radioisotopes with surface waters plays an important role. These processes can have the effect of displacing large radioisotope amounts over considerable distances and of creating new sinks and hot spots, as it is already known for sewage sludge. We are reporting on a combined modeling and experimental project concerning the transport of I-131 and Cs-134/Cs-137 FDNPP 2011 depositions in the Fukushima Prefecture. Well-documented experimental data sets are available for surface deposition and sewage sludge concentrations. The goal is to model the pathway in between, involving surface runoff, transport in the sewer system and processes in the sewage treatment plant. Watershed runoff and sewer transport will be treated with models developed recently by us in other projects. For sewage treatment processes a new model is currently being constructed. For comparison and further validation, historical data from Chernobyl depositions and tracer data from natural and artificial, e.g. medical, isotopes will be used. First results for 2011 data from Fukushima Prefecture will be presented. The benefits of the study are expected to be two-fold: on one hand, the abundant recent and historical data will help to develop and improve environmental transport models; on the other hand, both data and models will help in identifying the most critical points in the envisaged transport pathways in terms of radiation protection and waste management.

  6. Preliminary studies of Brazilian wood using different radioisotopic sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Gilberto; Silva, Leonardo Gondim de Andrade e, E-mail: gcarval@ipen.br, E-mail: ftgasilva@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Due to availability and particular features, wood was one of the first materials used by mankind with a wide variety of applications. It can be used as raw material for paper and cellulose manufacturing; in industries such as chemical, naval, furniture, sports goods, toys, and musical instrument; in building construction and in the distribution of electric energy. Wood has been widely researched; therefore, wood researchers know that several aspects such as temperature, latitude, longitude, altitude, sunlight, soil, and rainfall index interfere with the growth of trees. This behavior explains why average physical-chemical properties are important when wood is studied. The majority of researchers consider density to be the most important wood property because of its straight relationship with the physical and mechanical properties of wood. There are three types of wood density: basic, apparent and green. The apparent density was used here at 12% of moisture content. In this study, four different types of wood were used: 'freijo', 'jequetiba', 'muiracatiara' and 'ipe'. For wood density determination by non-conventional method, Am-241, Ba-133 and Cs-137 radioisotopic sources; a NaI scintillation detector and a counter were used. The results demonstrated this technique to be quick and accurate. By considering the nuclear parameters obtained as half value layers and linear absorption coefficients, Cs-137 radioisotopic source demonstrated to be the best option to be used for inspection of the physical integrity of electric wooden poles and live trees for future works. (author)

  7. Determination of the radiological impact of radioisotope waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AECB commissioned this study to determine the doses to individuals working in municipal waste management systems and to populations of cities where small amounts of radioisotopes are disposed of through the municipal waste management systems. To carry out this study, it was necessary to select a city having: (1) a population size representative of many cities in Canada, (2) many different types of radioisotope users, (3) all the possible municipal waste management systems, (4) a well established data base on its waste management systems. Using this criteria, the Hamilton-Burlington area surrounding Hamilton Harbour was selected. The pathways and dosimetry models were put into a computer spread sheet, to give the model flexibility so that it could be easily modified to model other cities. The model was developed using conservative assumptions and conservative estimates for some parameter values so that the doses calculated by the model are over estimates. Within the occupational critical group, the maximum doses were calculated for the Hamilton sewage treatment plant sludge worker at 1.4E-6 Sv/a. If this individual were also a member of the critical group in the general population the maximum dose would be 2.2E-6 Sv/a. Individual doses to the critical group within the general population were calculated as 7.7E-7 Sv/a for adults and 6.8E-8 Sv/a for infants. These compare to AECB regulatory limits of 5.0E-2 Sv/a per person for atomic radiation workers and 5.0E-3 Sv/a per person for the general public. The collective population dose for the study area was 1.37E-1 person-Sv/a for the 525,000 population

  8. INTRACORPOREAL HEAT DISSIPATION FROM A RADIOISOTOPE-POWERED ARTIFICIAL HEART.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Fred N.; Hagen, Kenneth G.; Whalen, Robert L.; Fuqua, John M.; Norman, John C.

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility of radioisotope-fueled circulatory support systems depends on the ability of the body to dissipate the reject heat from the power source driving the blood pump as well as to tolerate chronic intracorporeal radiation. Our studies have focused on the use of the circulating blood as a heat sink. Initial in vivo heat transfer studies utilized straight tube heat exchangers (electrically and radioisotope energized) to replace a segment of the descending aorta. More recent studies have used a left ventricular assist pump as a blood-cooled heat exchanger. This approach minimizes trauma, does not increase the area of prosthetic interface with the blood, and minimizes system volume. Heat rejected from the thermal engine (vapor or gas cycle) is transported from the nuclear power source in the abdomen to the pump in the thoracic cavity via hydraulic lines. Adjacent tissue is protected from the fuel capsule temperature (900 to 1200 degrees F) by vacuum foil insulation and polyurethane foam. The in vivo thermal management problems have been studied using a simulated thermal system (STS) which approximates the heat rejection and thermal transport mechanisms of the nuclear circulatory support systems under development by NHLI. Electric heaters simulate the reject heat from the thermal engines. These studies have been essential in establishing the location, suspension, surgical procedures, and postoperative care for implanting prototype nuclear heart assist systems in calves. The pump has a thermal impedance of 0.12 degrees C/watt. Analysis of the STS data in terms of an electrical analog model implies a heat transfer coefficient of 4.7 x 10(-3) watt/cm(2) degrees C in the abdomen compared to a value of 14.9 x 10(-3) watt/cm(2) degrees C from the heat exchanger plenum into the diaphragm.

  9. Faddeev calculation of 3 alpha and alpha alpha Lambda systems using alpha alpha resonating-group method kernel

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, Y; Kohno, M; Suzuki, Y; Baye, D; Sparenberg, J M

    2004-01-01

    We carry out Faddeev calculations of three-alpha (3 alpha) and two-alpha plus Lambda (alpha alpha Lambda) systems, using two-cluster resonating-group method kernels. The input includes an effective two-nucleon force for the alpha alpha resonating-group method and a new effective Lambda N force for the Lambda alpha interaction. The latter force is a simple two-range Gaussian potential for each spin-singlet and triplet state, generated from the phase-shift behavior of the quark-model hyperon-nucleon interaction, fss2, by using an inversion method based on supersymmetric quantum mechanics. Owing to the exact treatment of the Pauli-forbidden states between the clusters, the present three-cluster Faddeev formalism can describe the mutually related, alpha alpha, 3 alpha and alpha alpha Lambda systems, in terms of a unique set of the baryon-baryon interactions. For the three-range Minnesota force which describes the alpha alpha phase shifts quite accurately, the ground-state and excitation energies of 9Be Lambda are...

  10. Performance analysis of coated 238PuO2 fuel particles compact for radioisotope heater units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournier, Jean-Michel; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2000-01-01

    A fuel form consisting of coated plutonia fuel particles dispersed in a graphite matrix is being investigated for use in Radioisotope Heater Units (RHUs). The fuel particles consist of a 238PuO2 kernel (300-1200 μm in diameter), a 5-μm PyC inner coating and a ZrC outer coating (>=10 μm). The latter, an extremely strong material at high temperatures, serves as a pressure vessel for maintaining the integrity of the fuel particle and containing the helium generated by radioactive decay. Parametric analyses compared the thermal powers of the coated particle fuel compact (CPFC) RHU and LWRHU. Both utilize Fine-Weave Pierced Fabric (FWPF) aeroshell and PyC insulation sleeves. During normal operation, the fuel temperature is ~800 K, but could reach as much as 1723 K during an accidental re-entry heating. Assuming full helium release, a single-size particle (500 μm) fuel compact would maintain its integrity at a temperature of 1723 K, after 10 years storage time before launch. When replacing the LWRHU fuel pellet, Pt-alloy clad and inner PyC insulation sleeve with CPFC, the calculated thermal power of the CPFC-RHU is 1.5, 2.3 and 2.4 times that of LWRHU, for 100%, 10%, and 5% helium release, respectively, with little change in total mass. A fuel compact using binary-size particles (300 and 1200 μm diameters) would deliver 15% more thermal power. A one-dimensional, transient thermal analysis of the CPFC-RHU showed that during accidental re-entry the maximum fuel temperature in the CPFC would be 1734 K. .

  11. News on C-12 from beta-decay studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fynbo, HOU; Diget, CA; Prezado, Y; Aysto, J; Bergmann, UC; Cederkall, J; Dendooven, P; Fraile, LM; Franchoo, S; Fulton, BR; Huang, W; Huikari, J; Jeppesen, H; Jokinen, A; Jonson, B; Jones, P; Koster, U; Meister, M; Nilsson, T; Nyman, G; Borge, MJG; Riisager, K; Rinta-Antila, S; Vogelius, IS; Tengblad, O; Turrion, M; Wang, Y; Weissman, L; Wilhelmsen, K

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the importance of the spectroscopic properties of the resonances of C-12 just above the 3alpha-threshold, and review the existing experimental information of this region with emphasis on 0(+) and 2(+) states. A new experimental approach for studying the beta-decays of B-12 and N-12 is pre

  12. The GT resonance revealed in beta sup + -decay using new experimental techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Algora, A; Rubio, B; Taín, J L; Agramunt, J; Blomqvist, J M; Batist, L; Borcea, R; Collatz, R; Gadea, A; Gerl, J; Gierlik, M; aGórska, M; Guilbaud, O; Grawe, H; Hellström, M; Hu, Z; Janas, Z; Karny, M; Kirchner, R; Kleinheinz, P; Liu, W; Martínez, T; Moroz, F; Plochocki, A; Rejmund, M; Roeckl, E; Rykaczewski, K; Shibata, M; Szerypo, J; Wittmann, V

    1999-01-01

    The GT beta decay of sup 1 sup 5 sup 0 Ho has been studied with a Total Absorption Spectrometer (TAS), with an array of 6 Euroball CLUSTER Ge detectors (the CLUSTER CUBE), and with an alpha detector. The three techniques complement each other. The results provide the first observation of an extremely sharp resonance in GT beta decay.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of lanthanum phosphate nanoparticles as carriers for 223Ra and 225Ra for targeted alpha therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Targeted alpha therapy (TAT) has the potential for killing micro-metastases with minimum collateral damage to surrounding healthy tissue. In-vivo generator radionuclides, such as223Ra, 225Ra, and 225Ac, are of special interest for radiotherapeutic applications as they emit multiple α-particles during their decay. Utilizing appropriate carriers capable of retaining both the parent radioisotope as well as daughter products is important for the effective delivery of the radioisotope to the tumor site while mitigating global in vivo radiotoxicity. In this work, LaPO4 core and core + 2 shells nanoparticles (NPs) (NPs with 2 layers of cold LaPO4 deposited on the core surfaces) were synthesized containing either 223Ra or225Ra/225Ac, and the retention of the parents and daughters within the NPs in vitro was investigated. Methods: Core LaPO4 NPs were synthesized in aqueous solution by reacting 1 equivalent of La(NO3)3, along with few microcuries of either 223Ra or 225Ra/225Ac, with 1 equivalent of sodium tripolyphosphate (TPP) under moderate heating and purified by membrane dialysis. Core-shell NPs were also synthesized with one (core + 1 shell) and two (core + 2 shells) cold LaPO4 layers deposited onto the radioactive cores. The NPs were then characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and powder x-ray diffraction (XRD). Identification and quantification of radioactive parents and daughters released from the NPs in vitro were investigated using gamma-ray spectroscopy. Results: XRD and TEM analysis revealed that the NPs crystallized in the rhabdophane phase with mean diameters of 3.4 and 6.3 nm for core and core + 2 shells, respectively. The core LaPO4 NPs retained up to 88% of 223Ra over 35 days. However, in the core + 2 shells NPs, the retention of 223Ra and its daughter, 211Pb, was improved to > 99.9% over 27 days. Additionally, the retention of 225Ra/225Ac parents was > 99.98% and ~ 80% for the 221Fr and 213Bi daughters over 35 days for the

  14. Targeted alpha anticancer therapies: update and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen BJ

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Barry J Allen,1,2 Chen-Yu Huang,3 Raymond A Clarke2 1Faculty of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2Faculty of Medicine, Ingham Institute, University of Western Sydney, Liverpool, NSW, Australia; 3Central Clinical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaAbstract: Targeted alpha therapy (TAT is an emerging option for local and systemic cancer treatment. Preclinical research and clinical trials show that alpha-emitting radionuclides can kill targeted cancer cells while sparing normal cells, thus reducing toxicity. 223RaCl2 (Xofigo® is the first alpha emitting radioisotope to gain registration in the US for palliative therapy of prostate cancer bone metastases by indirect physiological targeting. The alpha emitting radioisotopes 211At, 213Bi, 225Ac and 227Th are being used to label targeting vectors such as monoclonal antibodies for specific cancer therapy indications. In this review, safety and tolerance aspects are considered with respect to microdosimetry, specific energy, Monte Carlo model calculations, biodosimetry, equivalent dose and mutagenesis. The clinical efficacy of TAT for solid tumors may also be enhanced by its capacity for tumor anti-vascular (TAVAT effects. This review emphasizes key aspects of TAT research with respect to the PAI2-uPAR complex and the monoclonal antibodies bevacizumab, C595 and J591. Clinical trial outcomes are reviewed for neuroendocrine tumors, leukemia, glioma, melanoma, non-Hodgkins lymphoma, and prostate bone metastases. Recommendations and future directions are proposed.Keywords: biodosimetry, microdosimetry, mutagenesis, PAI2, bevacizumab, C595, J591, tumors, cancer, metastases

  15. Measurements of sin2alpha/phi2 from B -> pipi, rhopi and rhorho modes

    CERN Document Server

    Bevan, A; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, Michael T; Shelkov, V G; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S M; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q L; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, Klaus R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gamet, R; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L M; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Allmendinger, T; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; La Vaissière, C de; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Anulli, F; Biasini, M; Peruzzi, I M; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martínez-Vidal, F; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B J; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, Roy; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmüller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, Gallieno; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Elsen, E E; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Vavra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, Patricia R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R V; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihályi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Rubin, A E; Sekula, S J; Tan, P; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2004-01-01

    B meson decays involving b -> u transitions are sensitive to the unitarity triangle angle alpha (or phi2). The BaBar and Belle experiments have studied B-meson decays to pipi, rhopi and rhorho final states. It is possible to combine these measurements to constrain alpha with a precision of O(10 degrees) and a central value of approximately 100 degrees. These results are consistent with Standard Model expectations.

  16. Evaluation of (alpha,n) Induced Neutrons as a Background for Dark Matter Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Mei, D.-M.; C. Zhang; Hime, A.

    2008-01-01

    Neutrons from ($\\alpha$,n) reactions through thorium and uranium decays are important sources of background for direct dark matter detection. The neutron yields and energy spectra from a range of materials that are used to build dark matter detectors are calculated and tabulated. In addition to thorium and uranium decays, we found that $\\alpha$ particles from samarium, often the dopant of the window materials of photomultiplier tubes (PMT), are also an important source of neutron yield. The r...

  17. Approximate formulation of redistribution in the Ly-alpha, Ly-beta, H-alpha system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, J.; Ballagh, R. J.; Hubeny, I.

    1989-01-01

    Simple approximate formulas are given for the coupled redistribution of Ly-alpha, Ly-beta, and H-alpha, by using well-defined approximations to an essentially exact formulation. These formulas incorporate all the essential physics including Raman scattering, lower state radiative decay, and correlated terms representing emission during a collision which must be retained in order that the emission coefficients are properly behaved in the line wings. Approximate expressions for the appropriate line broadening parameters are collected. Finally, practical expressions for the source functions are given. These are formulated through newly introduced nonimpact redistribution functions, which are shown to be reasonably approximated by existing (ordinary and generalized) redistribution functions.

  18. Rare Semileptonic Charm Decays

    CERN Document Server

    de Boer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of charm mesons decaying semileptonically via Flavor Changing Neutral Currents is presented. We calculate the Wilson coefficients within the Standard Model. A window in the decay distribution, where physics beyond the Standard Model could be measured is identified. Exemplary, we study effects of leptoquark models.

  19. New features in the stability and fission decay of superheavy Thorium isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Satpathy, L.; Patra, S. K.; Choudhury, R. K.

    2006-01-01

    Superheavy isotopes are highly neutron rich nuclei in the vicinity of neutron drip-line, stabilized by shell effect against the instability due to repulsive component of nuclear force, analogous to superheavy elements similarly stabilized against Coulomb instability. Here we discuss the stability and fission decay properties of such nuclei in the $^{254}$Th region and show that they are stable against $\\alpha$ and fission decay and have $\\beta$-decay life time of several tens of seconds. In p...

  20. Exploring clustering in alpha-conjugate nuclei using the thick target inverse kinematic technique for multiple alpha emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbui, M.; Hagel, K.; Gauthier, J.; Wuenschel, S.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Zheng, H.; Giuliani, G.; Rapisarda, G.; Kim, E.-J.; Liu, X.; Natowitz, J. B.; Desouza, R. T.; Hudan, S.; Fang, D.

    2015-10-01

    Searching for alpha cluster states analogous to the 12C Hoyle state in heavier alpha-conjugate nuclei can provide tests of the existence of alpha condensates in nuclear matter. Such states are predicted for 16O, 20Ne, 24Mg, etc. at excitation energies slightly above the decay threshold. The Thick Target Inverse Kinematics (TTIK) technique can be successfully used to study the breakup of excited self-conjugate nuclei into many alpha particles. The reaction 20Ne + α at 11 and 13 AMeV was studied at Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University. Here the TTIK method was used to study both single α-particle emission and multiple α-particle decays. Due to the limited statistics, only events with alpha multiplicity up to three were analyzed. The analysis of the three α-particle emission data allowed the identification of the Hoyle state and other 12C excited states decaying into three alpha particles. The results will be shown and compared with other data available in the literature. Another experiment is planned in August 2015 to study the system 28Si + α at 15 AMeV. Preliminary results will be shown. Supported by the U.S. DOE and the Robert A. Welch Foundation, Grant No. A0330.