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Sample records for alloy-tzm

  1. High energy high rate pulsed power processing of materials by powder consolidation and by railgun deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persad, C.; Marcus, H. L.; Weldon, W. F.

    1987-03-01

    This exploratory research program was initiated to investigate the potential of using pulse power sources for powder consolidation, deposition and other High Energy High Rate Processing. The characteristics of the High Energy High Rate (1MJ/s) powder consolidation using megampere current pulses from a Homopolar Generator, have been defined. Molybdenum Alloy TZM, A Nickel based metallic glass, Copper graphite composites, and P/M Aluminum Alloy X7091 have been investigated. The powder consolidation process produced high densification rates. Density values of 80% to 99% could be obtained with sub second high temperature exposure. Specific energy input and applied pressure were controlling process parameters. Time Temperature Transformation (TTT) concepts underpin a fundamental understanding of pulsed power processing. Deposition experiments were conducted using an exploding foil device (EFD) providing an armature feed to railgun mounted in a vacuum chamber. The material to be deposited - in plasma, gas, liquid or solid state - was accelerated electromagnetically in the railgun and deposited on a substrate.

  2. High-energy high-rate pulsed-power processing of materials by powder consolidation and by railgun deposition. Technical report (Final), 10 April 1985-10 February 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persad, C.; Marcus, H.L.; Weldon, W.F.

    1987-03-31

    This exploratory research program was initiated to investigate the potential of using pulse power sources for powder consolidation, deposition and other high-energy high-rate processing. The characteristics of the high-energy-high-rate (1MJ/s) powder consolidation using megampere current pulses from a homopolar generator, were defined. Molybdenum Alloy TZM, a nickel-based metallic glass, copper/graphite composites, and P/M aluminum alloy X7091 were investigated. The powder-consolidation process produced high densification rates. Density values of 80% to 99% could be obtained with subsecond high-temperature exposure. Specific energy input and applied pressure were controlling process parameters. Time temperature transformation (TTT) concepts underpin a fundamental understanding of pulsed power processing. Inherent control of energy input, and time-to-peak processing temperature developed to be held to short times. Deposition experiments were conducted using an exploding-foil device (EFD) providing an armature feed to railgun mounted in a vacuum chamber. The material to be deposited - in plasma, gas, liquid, or solid state - was accelerated electromagnetically in the railgun and deposited on a substrate. Deposits of a wide variety of single- and multi-specie materials were produced on several types of substrates. In a series of ancillary experiments, pulsed-skin-effect heating and self quenching of metallic conductors was discovered to be a new means of surface modification by high-energy high-rate-processing.

  3. A new system for sodium flux growth of bulk GaN. Part I: System development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Dollen, Paul; Pimputkar, Siddha; Alreesh, Mohammed Abo; Albrithen, Hamad; Suihkonen, Sami; Nakamura, Shuji; Speck, James S.

    2016-12-01

    Though several methods exist to produce bulk crystals of gallium nitride (GaN), none have been commercialized on a large scale. The sodium flux method, which involves precipitation of GaN from a sodium-gallium melt supersaturated with nitrogen, offers potentially lower cost production due to relatively mild process conditions while maintaining high crystal quality. We successfully developed a novel apparatus for conducting crystal growth of bulk GaN using the sodium flux method which has advantages with respect to prior reports. A key task was to prevent sodium loss or migration from the growth environment while permitting N2 to access the growing crystal. We accomplished this by implementing a reflux condensing stem along with a reusable capsule containing a hermetic seal. The reflux condensing stem also enabled direct monitoring of the melt temperature, which has not been previously reported for the sodium flux method. Furthermore, we identified and utilized molybdenum and the molybdenum alloy TZM as a material capable of directly containing the corrosive sodium-gallium melt. This allowed implementation of a crucible-free system, which may improve process control and potentially lower crystal impurity levels. Nucleation and growth of parasitic GaN ("PolyGaN") on non-seed surfaces occurred in early designs. However, the addition of carbon in later designs suppressed PolyGaN formation and allowed growth of single crystal GaN. Growth rates for the (0001) Ga face (+c-plane) were up to 14 μm/h while X-ray omega rocking (ω-XRC) curve full width half-max values were 731″ for crystals grown using a later system design. Oxygen levels were high, >1019 atoms/cm3, possibly due to reactor cleaning and handling procedures.