WorldWideScience

Sample records for alloy steel

  1. High strength, tough alloy steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gareth; Rao, Bangaru V. N.

    1979-01-01

    A high strength, tough alloy steel is formed by heating the steel to a temperature in the austenite range (1000.degree.-1100.degree. C.) to form a homogeneous austenite phase and then cooling the steel to form a microstructure of uniformly dispersed dislocated martensite separated by continuous thin boundary films of stabilized retained austenite. The steel includes 0.2-0.35 weight % carbon, at least 1% and preferably 3-4.5% chromium, and at least one other substitutional alloying element, preferably manganese or nickel. The austenite film is stable to subsequent heat treatment as by tempering (below 300.degree. C.) and reforms to a stable film after austenite grain refinement.

  2. Cleanliness of Alloying Structural Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Hui-xiang; WANG Xin-hua; ZHANG Jing; LI Hai-bo; WANG Wan-jun

    2011-01-01

    Alloying structural steel used for mechanical structures has a high requirement for cleanliness because its failures are greatly affected by non-metallic inclusions and total oxygen content in steel.It has been reported by some steelmaking plants to have some problems in controlling total oxygen content and inclusions during alloying structural steel production.For this purpose,cleanliness control in 0.2C-0.3Si-0.6Mn-1Cr-0.2Mo steel was investigated.Firstly,low melting temperature zone(≤1873 K) of CaO-Al2O3-MgO system and formation condition of low melting temperature inclusions were investigated through thermodynamic equilibrium calculation.On this basis,industrial tests were carried out.Through sampling at different stages,transformation of oxide inclusions and change of total oxygen content in steel were studied.The results show that:in order to form CaO-Al2O3-MgO system inclusions with low melting temperature,mass percent of Al2O3,MgO and CaO in inclusions should be controlled from 37.6% to 70.8%,0 to 17.4% and 25.5% to 60.6%;For the condition of 1873 K and 0.05%(mass percent) dissolved aluminum in steel,the activities of dissolved oxygen,magnesium and calcium should be controlled as 0.298×10-4-2×10-4,0.1×10-5-40×10-5 and 0.8×10-8-180×10-8 respectively.With secondary refining proceeding,average total oxygen content and inclusion amount decrease,the type of most inclusions changes from Al2O3 after tapping to Al2O3-MgO after top slag is formed during ladle furnace refining and finally to CaO-Al2O3-MgO after RH treatment.In the final products,average total oxygen content was 12.7×10-6 and most inclusions were in spherical shape with size less than 5 μm.

  3. 46 CFR 59.20-1 - Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings. 59.20-1 Section 59... BOILERS, PRESSURE VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Castings § 59.20-1 Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings. Defects in carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings may be repaired by welding. The...

  4. Tungsten carbide laser alloying of a low alloyed steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojocaru, Mihai; Taca, Mihaela

    1996-10-01

    Laser alloying is a way to change the composition of metal surfaces in order to improve their corrosion-resistance, high-temperature strength and hardness. The results of a structural and phase analysis of a tungsten carbide based surface layer prepared by laser alloying of a low carbon steel substrate are presented. Structure, phase composition and microhardness of surface alloyed layers have been investigated. The surface of the samples exhibited a thin layer with a different chemical and phase composition. An increase in alloyed surface hardness and wear-resistance was observed.

  5. DEVELOPMENT AND RESEARCH OF THE ECONOMIC ALLOY PARAMAGNETIC STEELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Alifanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The alloys of Fe-Cr-Ni-C system for the purpose of development the economic alloy paramagnetic (not magnetic steels are investigated. A series of alloys are melted for this purpose, deformation is carried out and a structural state was studied.The area for the selection of the chemical composition of the economic alloy steels with stable paramagnetic properties is defined.

  6. Crack stability analysis of low alloy steel primary coolant pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, T.; Kameyama, M. [Kansai Electric Power Company, Osaka (Japan); Urabe, Y. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Takasago (Japan)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    At present, cast duplex stainless steel has been used for the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan and joints of dissimilar material have been applied for welding to reactor vessels and steam generators. For the primary coolant piping of the next APWR plants, application of low alloy steel that results in designing main loops with the same material is being studied. It means that there is no need to weld low alloy steel with stainless steel and that makes it possible to reduce the welding length. Attenuation of Ultra Sonic Wave Intensity is lower for low alloy steel than for stainless steel and they have advantageous inspection characteristics. In addition to that, the thermal expansion rate is smaller for low alloy steel than for stainless steel. In consideration of the above features of low alloy steel, the overall reliability of primary coolant piping is expected to be improved. Therefore, for the evaluation of crack stability of low alloy steel piping to be applied for primary loops, elastic-plastic future mechanics analysis was performed by means of a three-dimensioned FEM. The evaluation results for the low alloy steel pipings show that cracks will not grow into unstable fractures under maximum design load conditions, even when such a circumferential crack is assumed to be 6 times the size of the wall thickness.

  7. New Stainless Steel Alloys for Low Temperature Surface Hardening?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The present contribution showcases the possibility for developing new surface hardenable stainless steels containing strong nitride/carbide forming elements (SNCFE). Nitriding of the commercial alloys, austenitic A286, and ferritic AISI 409 illustrates the beneficial effect of having SNCFE present...... in the stainless steel alloys. The presented computational approach for alloy design enables “screening” of hundreds of thousands hypothetical alloy systems by use of Thermo-Calc. Promising compositions for new stainless steel alloys can be selected based on imposed criteria, i.e. facilitating easy selection...

  8. Bimetallic layered castings alloy steel – carbon cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wróbel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In paper is presented technology of bimetallic layered castings based on founding method of layer coating directly in cast processso-called method of mould cavity preparation. Prepared castings consist two fundamental parts i.e. bearing part and working part (layer. The bearing part of bimetallic layered casting is typical foundry material i.e. ferritic-pearlitic carbon cast steel, whereas working part (layer is plate of austenitic alloy steel sort X10CrNi 18-8. The ratio of thickness between bearing and working part is 8:1. The quality of the bimetallic layered castings was evaluated on the basis of ultrasonic NDT (non-destructive testing, structure and macro- and microhardness researches.

  9. Wear resistant steels and casting alloys containing niobium carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theisen, W.; Siebert, S.; Huth, S. [Lehrstuhl Werkstofftechnik, Ruhr-Univ. Bochum (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    Niobium, like titanium and vanadium, forms superhard MC carbides that remain relatively pure in technical alloys on account of their low solubility for other metallic alloying elements. However, because they have a greater hardness than the precipitated chromium carbides commonly used in wear-resistant alloys, they are suitable as alternative hard phases. This contribution deals with new wear-resistant steels and casting alloys containing niobium carbide. These include a secondary hardening hardfacing alloy, a composite casting alloy for wear applications at elevated temperatures, a white cast iron as well as two variants of a corrosion-resistant cold-work tool steel produced by melt metallurgy and by powder metallurgy. A heat-resistant casting alloy is also discussed. Based on equilibrium calculations the microstructures developing during production of the alloys are analysed, and the results are discussed with respect to important properties such as abrasive wear and corrosion resistance. (orig.)

  10. Deoxidation Behavior of Alloys Bearing Barium in Molten Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yang; JIANG Zhou-hua; JIANG Mao-fa; WANG Jun-wen; GU Wen-bing

    2003-01-01

    The deoxidation behaviors of alloys bearing barium in pipe steel were researched with MgO crucible under argon atmosphere in MoSi2 furnace at 1 873 K. The total oxygen contents of molten steel, the distribution, size and morphology of deoxidation products in the steel were surveyed. The metamorphic mechanism for deoxidation products of alloy bearing barium was also discussed. The results show that applying alloy bearing barium to the pipe steel, very low total oxygen contents can be obtained, and deoxidation products, which easily float up from molten steel, can be changed into globular shape and uniformly distributed in steel. The equilibrium time of total oxygen is about 25 min, and the terminal total oxygen contents range from 0.002 0 % to 0.002 2 % after treating with SiCa wire. The best deoxidizers are SiAlBaCa and SiAlBaCaSr.

  11. Low alloy steel versus ADI – differences and similarities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Krzyńska

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of comparison between the microstructure of selected bainitic low alloy steel and austempered ductile iron ADI are presented. The aim of the comparison was to find out differences and similarities existing in these iron carbon commercial alloys. In this paper our own results on ADI structure and literature data were used. It follows from discussion presented here that both microstructure and properties of ADI are very close that which are observed in low alloy carbon steel. Moreover, we suggest that there is no so doubt to treat ADI mechanical properties as steel containing nodular inclusions of graphite.

  12. Grey interrelation analysis of alloy elements and steel corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Jinglei; Hou Baorong; Huang Yanliang; Guo Gongyu [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao (China). Dept. of Oceanology

    2000-07-01

    Mathematical grey interrelation analysis method was used to study the correlation of alloy elements and low steel corrosion in the splash zone. Eighteen kinds of low alloy steels were selected for 350-day experiments in a large marine corrosion environment simulating apparatus. The analysis results showed that the correlation of alloy elements and alloy corrosion rate is in the order: Mn>Si>P>V>Cu>Al>Cr>Mo. The correlation degree was 0.92, 0.89, 0.86, 0.83, 0.82, 0.82, 0.81, 0.77. (orig.)

  13. 48 CFR 252.225-7030 - Restriction on Acquisition of Carbon, Alloy, and Armor Steel Plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... of Carbon, Alloy, and Armor Steel Plate. 252.225-7030 Section 252.225-7030 Federal Acquisition... Acquisition of Carbon, Alloy, and Armor Steel Plate. As prescribed in 225.7011-3, use the following clause: Restriction on Acquisition of Carbon, Alloy, and Armor Steel Plate (DEC 2006) (a) Carbon, alloy, and...

  14. Comparative Structural Strength Research of Hardened Carbon Steel and Hot-Rolled Alloy Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomolov, A. V.; Zhakupov, A. N.; Kanayev, A. T.; Sikach, I. A.; Tugumov, K. K.

    2016-08-01

    Experiments on quantitative evaluation of fatigue strength showed that St5ps and St5sp carbon steels with A400 strength class can be fully applied for erection of constructions and buildings having cyclical loads during operation. Study of corrosion resistance of hardened carbon steel in comparison with hot-rolled alloy steel consists in difference in structures and hence, difference in intensity of electric and chemical processes featuring presence of steel in concrete. Structure of St5sp steel with A400 strength class in surface area has significantly less corrosion rate than ferritic-perlitic structure of 35GS steel with A400 strength class.

  15. Comparison of Impact Properties for Carbon and Low Alloy Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    O.H. Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    The impact properties of hot rolled carbon steel (used for the manufacture of reinforcement steel bars) and the quenched & tempered (Q&T) low alloy steel (used in the pressure vessel industry) were determined. The microstructure of the hot rolled carbon steel contained ferrite/pearlite phases, while that of the quenched and tempered low alloy steel contained bainite structure. Impact properties were determined for both steels by instrumented impact testing at temperatures between -150 and 200℃. The impact properties comprised total impact energy, ductile to brittle transition temperature, crack initiation and propagation energy, brittleness transition temperature and cleavage fracture stress. The Q&T low alloy steel displayed much higher resistance to ductile fracture at high test temperatures, while its resistance to brittle fracture at low test temperatures was a little higher than that of the hot rolled carbon steel. The results were discussed in relation to the difference in the chemical composition and microstructure for the two steels.

  16. Development of advanced low alloy steel for nuclear RPV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H. C.; Shin, K. S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, B. J. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    Low carbon low alloy steels are used in nuclear power plants as pressure vessel, steam generator, etc. Nuclear pressure vessel material requires good combination of strength/ toughness, good weldability and high resistance to neutron irradiation and corrosion fatigue. For SA508III steels, most widely used in the production of nuclear power plant, attaining toughness is more difficult than strength. When taking into account the loss of toughness due to neutron irradiation, attaining as low transition temperature as possible prior to operation is a critical task in the production of nuclear pressure vessels. In the present study, we investigated detrimental microstructural features of SA508III steels to toughness, then alloy design directions to achieve improved mechanical properties were devised. The next step of alloy design was determined based on phase equilibrium thermodynamics and obtained results. Low carbon low alloy steels having low transition temperatures with enough strength and hardenability were developed. Microstructure and mechanical properties of HAZ of SA508III steels and alloy designed steels were investigated. 22 refs., 147 figs., 38 tabs. (Author)

  17. MODULATED STRUCTURES AND ORDERING STRUCTURES IN ALLOYING AUSTENITIC MANGANESE STEEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L. He; Z.H. Jin; J.D. Lu

    2001-01-01

    The microstructure of Fe-10Mn-2Cr-1.5C alloy has been investigated with transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometer. The superlattice diffraction spots and satellite reflection pattrens have been observed in the present alloy, which means the appearence of the ordering structure and modulated structure in the alloy. It is also proved by X-ray diffraction analysis that the austenite in the alloy is more stable than that in traditional austenitic manganese steel. On the basis of this investigation,it is suggested that the C-Mn ordering clusters exist in austenitic manganese steel and the chromium can strengthen this effect by linking the weaker C-Mn couples together,which may play an important role in work hardening of austenitic manganese steel.

  18. REVIEW AND PROSPECT OF HIGH STRENGTH LOW ALLOY TRIP STEEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L. Li; P. Wollants; Y.L. He; B.C. De Cooman; X.C. Wei; Z.Y. Xu

    2003-01-01

    Research status of high strength low alloy TRIP (transformation induced plasticity)steels for automobile structural parts is briefly described. Composition and microstructure factors especially the morphology, size and volume fraction of retained austenite,which largely influence the strength and ductility of the steel, are reviewed and discussed one after another. Modelling of the inter-critical annealing and martempering processes as well as the designing of the TRIP steel aided by commercial software are introduced. Some special aspects of the dynamic mechanical properties of TRIP steel are firstly reported.

  19. 77 FR 59892 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Affirmative Final Determination of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... International Trade Administration Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Affirmative Final... mm to 5.0 mm. \\1\\ See Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod from Mexico: Affirmative Preliminary... on said entries.\\4\\ \\2\\ See Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod from Mexico: Initiation of...

  20. Potential of rapid heat treatment of titanium alloys and steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivasishin, O.M.; Teliovich, R.V. [Institute of Metal Physics, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1999-05-15

    Rapid heat treatment (RHT) of titanium alloys and steels, which includes rapid heating into the single-phase field, {beta} and {gamma} of titanium alloys and steels, respectively, is reviewed. Heating rate is an important parameter that affects the mechanism and kinetics of phase and/or structural transformation. Refinement of grain structure, formation of micro-chemical inhomogeneity and substructure in the high temperature phase following RHT are addressed. Thermo-kinetic effects during rapid heating of material with an initial metastable (quenched or deformed) microstructure are discussed. The response of titanium alloys and steels to RHT is compared. The improvement in mechanical properties of both material system following RHT is also presented. (orig.) 48 refs.

  1. Effect of alloy elements on the anti-corrosion properties of low alloy steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Baorong Hou; Yantao Li; Yanxu Li; Jinglei Zhang

    2000-06-01

    Effect of alloy elements on corrosion of low alloy steel was studied under simulated offshore conditions. The results showed that the elements Cu, P, Mo, W, V had evident effect on corrosion resistance in the atmosphere zone; Cu, P, V, Mo in the splash zone and Cr, Al, Mo in the submerged zone.

  2. Method of making high strength, tough alloy steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gareth; Rao, Bangaru V. N.

    1979-01-01

    A high strength, tough alloy steel, particularly suitable for the mining industry, is formed by heating the steel to a temperature in the austenite range (1000.degree.-1100.degree. C.) to form a homogeneous austenite phase and then cooling the steel to form a microstructure of uniformly dispersed dislocated martensite separated by continuous thin boundary films of stabilized retained austenite. The steel includes 0.2-0.35 weight % carbon, at least 1% and preferably 3-4.5% chromium, and at least one other subsitutional alloying element, preferably manganese or nickel. The austenite film is stable to subsequent heat treatment as by tempering (below 300.degree. C.) and reforms to a stable film after austenite grain refinement.

  3. Phase transformations and microstructure development in low alloy steel welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babu, S.S.; David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M. [and others

    1995-07-01

    Microstructure development in low alloy steel welds depends on various phase transformations that are a function of weld heating and cooling. The phase changes include non-metallic oxide inclusion formation in the liquid state, weld pool solidification, and solid state transformations. In this paper the mechanism of inclusion formation during low alloy steel welding is considered and the model predictions are compared with published results. The effect of inclusions on the austenite to ferrite transformation kinetics is measured and the mechanisms of transformation are discussed. The austenite gain development is related to the driving force for transformation of {delta} ferrite to austenite.

  4. Diffusion Bonding between TiAl Based Alloys and Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The joint of 40Cr steel and TiAl based alloy has been studied by means of a high frequency induction diffusion welder. The experimental results show that, the higher the temperature and pressure, the higher the strength of the joints. The optimum parameters are: T=1123~1323 K,t=10~30 min, P=5~20 MPa.

  5. Microstructures and properties of low-alloy fire resistant steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bimal Kumar Panigrahi

    2006-02-01

    Microstructures and properties of weldable quality low-alloy fire resistant structural steels (YS: 287–415 MPa) and TMT rebar (YS: 624 MPa) have been investigated. The study showed that it is possible to obtain two-thirds of room temperature yield stress at 600°C with 0.20–0.25% Mo and 0.30–0.55% Cr in low carbon hot rolled structural steel. Microalloying the Cr–Mo steel by niobium or vanadium singly or in combination resulted in higher guaranteed elevated temperature yield stress (250–280 MPa). The final rolling temperature should be maintained above austenite recrystallization stop temperature (∼ 900° C) to minimize dislocation hardening. In a quenched and self-tempered 600 MPa class TMT reinforcement bar steel (YS: 624 MPa), low chromium (0.55%) addition produced the requisite yield stress at 600°C. The low-alloy fire resistant steel will have superior thermal conductivity up to 600°C (> 30 W/m.k) compared to more concentrated alloys.

  6. Strengthening mechanism of steels treated by barium-bearing alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhouhua Jiang; Yang Liu

    2008-01-01

    The deoxidation, desulfurization, dephosphorization, microstructure, and mechanical properties of steels treated by barium-bearing alloys were investigated in laboratory and by industrial tests. The results show that barium takes part in the deoxidation reaction at the beginning of the experiments, generating oxide and sulfide compound inclusions, which easily float up from the molten steel, leading to the rapid reduction of total oxygen content to a very low level. The desulfurization and dephosphorization capabilities of calcium-bearing alloys increase with the addition of barium. The results of OM and SEM observations and mechanical property tests show that the structure of the steel treated by barium-bearing alloys is refined remarkably, the iamellar thickness of pearlitic structure decreases, and the pearlitic morphology shows clustering distribution. Less barium exists in steel substrate and the enrichment of barium-bearing precipitated phase mostly occurs in grain boundary and phase boundary, which can prevent the movement of grain boundary and dislocation during the heat treatment and the deformation processes. Therefore, the strength and toughness of barium-treated steels are improved by the effect of grain-boundary strengthening and nail-prick dislocation.

  7. Laser alloying of the plain carbon steel surface layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Radziszewska

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available As an example of the types of features observed after laser alloying, the addition of Ta to mild carbon steel is described. The system is of interest because such alloying is beneficial in improving surface related properties. The paper describes the microstructure and properties (phase and chemical composition, microhardness of the laser alloyed surface layer. In the investigation the optical microscope, the scanning electron microscope (SEM, chemical (EDS microanalysis composition and microhardness testing methods have been used. Specimens of 0,17 %C plain steel were coated with Ta powder layers. The paints containing organic components were used as the binders during deposition of Ta powder layers on the sample surface. The thickness of Ta deposited layers amounted to 0,16 mm. The specimens were then swept through high power (of nominal power 2,5 kW CW CO2 laser radiation at different speeds.The surface alloyed layers varied in microstructure consisted of fiber like Ta2C + γ eutectics, chemical composition and microhardness. The EDS analyses revealed the enrichment of tantalum in the laser alloyed zone (LAZ. The changes of process parameters had an influence on the hardness of alloyed surface layers: by increasing scanning velocity (from 12 mm/s to 20 mm/s and decreasing laser power (from 1,8 kW to 1,35 kW, the hardness diminished. The wear tests were also carried out which showed that laser alloying of plain carbon steel surface layer led to improvement of their wear resistance.

  8. Liquid Phase Sintering of Highly Alloyed Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Troels

    1996-01-01

    Liquid phase sintering of stainless steel is usually applied to improve corrosion resistance by obtaining a material without an open pore system. The dense structure normally also give a higher strength when compared to conventional sintered steel. Liquid phase sintrering based on addition...... of boride to AISI 316L type steels have previously been studied, but were found to be sensitive to intergranular corrosion due to formation of intermetallic phases rich in chromium and molybdenum. In order to improve this system further, new investigations have focused on the use of higher alloyed stainless...... steel as base material. The stainless base powders were added different amounts and types of boride and sintered in hydrogen at different temperatures and times in a laboratory furnace. During sintering the outlet gas was analyzed and subsequently related to the obtained microstructure. Thermodynamic...

  9. Pressurized metallurgy for high performance special steels and alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Z. H.; Zhu, H. C.; Li, H. B.; Li, Y.; Liu, F. B.

    2016-07-01

    The pressure is one of the basic parameters which greatly influences the metallurgical reaction process and solidification of steels and alloys. In this paper the history and present situation of research and application of pressurized metallurgy, especially pressurized metallurgy for special steels and alloys have been briefly reviewed. In the following part the physical chemistry of pressurized metallurgy is summarized. It is shown that pressurizing may change the conditions of chemical reaction in thermodynamics and kinetics due to the pressure effect on gas volume, solubility of gas and volatile element in metal melt, activity or activity coefficient of components, and change the physical and chemical properties of metal melt, heat transfer coefficient between mould and ingot, thus greatly influencing phase transformation during the solidification process and the solidification structure, such as increasing the solidification nucleation rate, reducing the critical nucleation radius, accelerating the solidification speed and significant macro/micro-structure refinement, and eliminating shrinkage, porosity and segregation and other casting defects. In the third part the research works of pressured metallurgy performed by the Northeastern University including establishment of pressurized induction melting (PIM) and pressurized electroslag remelting (PESR) equipments and development of high nitrogen steels under pressure are described in detail. Finally, it is considered in the paper that application of pressurized metallurgy in manufacture of high performance special steels and alloys is a relatively new research area, and its application prospects will be very broad and bright.

  10. 77 FR 54926 - Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel; Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-06

    ... COMMISSION Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel; Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From Germany... steel standard, line, and pressure pipe from Germany would be likely to lead to continuation or... 2012), entitled Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe from...

  11. TEM study of mechanically alloyed ODS steel powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Jan, E-mail: j.hoffmann@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-AWP), Karlsruhe (Germany); Klimenkov, Michael; Lindau, Rainer; Rieth, Michael [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-AWP), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    Compared to present reactors, modern nuclear power plant concepts are based on materials which can be operated at higher temperatures and up to higher neutron doses. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels - produced by mechanical alloying - with chromium contents of 9 and 14 wt.% (or even more) are typical candidate materials. As the preparation of TEM samples from milled powders is usually very difficult, a new approach has been successfully adopted coming from the TEM sample preparation of biological tissues. Here, the alloyed powder is first embedded and then cut into thin films of 60-90 nm thickness using a microtom. The focal point is to gain a better knowledge of the solution mechanism of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the steel powder during mechanical alloying. Investigations on mechanically alloyed powders containing 13% Cr and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} were made using a Tecnai Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (STEM) with EDX detector. Detailed elemental mappings of the powder particles show the presence of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles after different milling times. The non-dissolved Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase was detected on the surface of the mechanically alloyed powder particles in the specimen alloyed at times down to 24 h. After mechanically alloying of 80 h, no Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase has been detected. Inside the mechanically alloyed powder, no particles were detected. All further results of the elemental mappings after different milling times are analyzed, compared, and discussed in this paper.

  12. Current Status of Development of High Nickel Low Alloy Steels for Commercial Reactor Pressure Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Chul; Lee, B. S.; Park, S. G.; Lee, K. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    SA508 Gr.3 Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steels have been used for nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels up to now. Currently, the design goal of nuclear power plant is focusing at larger capacity and longer lifetime. Requirements of much bigger pressure vessels may cause critical problems in the manufacturing stage as well as for the welding stage. Application of higher strength steel may be required to overcome the technical problems. It is known that a higher strength and fracture toughness of low alloy steels such as SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel could be achieved by increasing the Ni and Cr contents. Therefore, SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel is very attractive as eligible RPV steel for the next generation PWR systems. In this report, we propose the possibility of SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel for an application of next generation commercial RPV, based on the literature research result about development history of the RPV steels and SA508 specification. In addition, we have surveyed the research result of HSLA(High Strength Low Alloy steel), which has similar chemical compositions with SA508 Gr.4N, to understand the problems and the way of improvement of SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel. And also, we have investigated eastern RPV steel(WWER-1000), which has higher Ni contents compared to western RPV steel.

  13. Thermodynamic Modeling as a Strategy for Casting High Alloy Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peri Reddy V; S Raman Sankaranarayanan

    2009-01-01

    Strategies based on thermodynamic calculations can be used to overcome the problems associated with oxides encountered in steel plant operations, which can lead to certain difficulties in the process such as clogging of submerged entry nozzle during continuous casting. Approaches to producing high alloy steels by continuous casting have been taken. One of the strategies to avoid the oxidation of chromium is to add a small amount of other elements (subject to other constraints), which do not cause subsequent problems. The problem has been studied using the Thermo-CalcR software, with related databases; and the results obtained for different process conditions or generic com-positions have been presented.

  14. Susceptibility of two types of low-alloy hull steels to pit initiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianmin Wang; Xuequn Chen; Guomin Li

    2004-01-01

    Four low-alloy hull steels with different alloy elements were selected. Their susceptibility to pitting corrosion was compared by means of electrochemical polarization test. The inclusions in the steels and their pitting corrosion characteristics were studied by an electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA). The results indicate that some inclusions are the main sources of pitting corrosion.The susceptibility of nickel-chromium steel to pit initiation is less than that of manganese steel. Under the same conditions, nickelchromium steel is easier to passivate than manganese steel, and the passive films on nickel-chromium steel surface are more stable than that on manganese steel. In low-alloy steels, the higher the contents of nickel and chromium, the lower the critical passive pH value. In the same kind of steel, multi-phase inclusions containing sulfide are easier to initiate pitting corrosion than other inclusions.

  15. Gas-Carburizing Kinetics of a Low-Alloy Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobili, Luca; Cavallotti, Pietro; Pesetti, Mariella

    2010-02-01

    Gas-carburizing kinetics of a low-alloy steel (Pyrowear 53) was investigated by thermogravimetric experiments. Kinetic curves were modeled by adapting the approximate integral method, and the diffusion coefficient of carbon as well as the rate constant of the surface reaction were estimated. These parameters were evaluated after several carburizing procedures, which differ from each other in the surface treatments performed before the carburizing step. It is known that the carbon enrichment is low when this steel is carburized without any pretreatment, and this behavior was found to be related to a low value of carbon diffusivity. The interaction between the selective oxidation of alloying elements by the carburizing atmosphere and carbon diffusion is discussed. The pretreatment procedures investigated in this work consist of different combinations of oxidation, reduction, and grit-blasting processes. The most effective procedures involve oxidation in dry air or oxidation in wet air followed by grit blasting.

  16. Computer assisted alloy and process design of nuclear structural steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byeong Joo [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    Based on literature research and thermodynamic calculations, it was suggested that toughness of SA508 class 3 steels can be improved by grain refinement using pinning by AIN during forging if alloy contents of Al and N are adjusted. It was also pointed out that the temper embrittlement due to the coarsening of M{sub 2}C carbide may originate from phase transition to the more stable {xi}-carbide. A necessity of experimental works to avoid such a transition by adjustment of alloy composition was claimed. An optimum temperature for the intercirtical heat treatment was derived by thermodynamic= calculation and was found to agree with experimentally derived one. The thermodynamic database and the present calculation scheme can be used as a powerful research tool in further study for design of next generation RPV steels of wide composition range, if combined with the current experimental technology. (Author) 101 refs., 10 tabs., 11 figs.

  17. Description Of Alloy Layer Formation On A Cast Steel Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szajnar J.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A description of alloy layer formation on a steel substrate is presented. Two types of formation are considered: diffusion of carbon and chromium into the solid from the pad in the direction of the cast steel within the FeCrC (grains and diffusion in a layer of liquid chromium cast iron formed in a preceding step. The influence of silicon in the pad on the pad’s transformation into the liquid is also examined. Solidus and liquidus temperatures of high carbon ferrochromium are determined. The larger the content of Si is used in the experiment, the lower the solidus temperature of the FeCrC alloy is observed. This results from the higher intensity of the elements’ diffusion and faster formation of the liquid.

  18. [The LIBS experiment condition optimization of alloy steel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yan; Gao, Xun; Du, Chuang; Zhao, Zhen-Ming; Chen, Wei-Yu; Hao, Zuo-Qiang; Sun, Chang-Kai; Lin, Jing-Quan

    2013-02-01

    Laser induced plasma spectroscopy of alloy steel was produced by Nd : YAG pulsed laser at 1 064 nm, and the spectral signal was detected by high resolution and width controlled ICCD. Several Fe atomic spectral lines such as 404.581, 414.387, 427.176 and 438.355 nm were chosen for analysis, and the effects of different experimental parameters on LIBS spectral signal intensity were investigated. It is shown that the experimental parameters such as pulse energy, laser focus location and laser delay time have great influence on the LIBS signal. LIBS signals with high spectral intensity and signal-background ratio (SBR) as well as the optimum experiment conditions were obtained by optimizing these experiment parameters so as to make composition analysis of the alloy steel.

  19. New alloys to conserve critical elements. [replacing chromium in steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Previous studies and surveys on availability of domestic reserves have shown that chromium is a most critical element within the U.S. metal industry. More precisely, the bulk of chromium is consumed in the production of stainless steels, specifically Type 304 stainless steel (304SS) which contains 18% Cr. The present paper deals with means of reducing chromium in commercial stainless steels by substituting more abundant or less expensive elements with the intent of maintaining the properties of 304SS. The discussion focuses on some of the oxidation and corrosion properties of new substitute stainless steels with only 12% Cr, which represents a potential saving of 33% of the chromium consumed in the production of 304SS. The alloying elements substituted for Cr in 304SS are selected according to their potential for protective oxide formation during high-temperature oxidation; these are Al, Si, Ti, Y, and misch metal which is 99.7% rare-earth metals containing 50 to 55% cerium. Other alloying elements to impart corrosion resistance are Mn, Mo, and V.

  20. Laser cladding of Ni-based alloy on stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Chun-fang; TIAN Xin-li; TAN Yong-sheng; WU Zhi-yuan

    2004-01-01

    The coatings on a stainless steel substrate were conducted by laser cladding of Ni-based alloy, using a 5 kW continuous wave CO2 flow transverse laser. SEM, EDX and X-ray diffraction were used to analyze the microstructure and constituent phases of the obtained coatings by laser cladding with direct injection of the powder into the melt pool. Solidification planar, cellular and dendrite structures were observed in Ni-based alloy coating. There exists an optimum metallurgical bond between Ni-based laser cladding layer and the base material. The high hardness of the Ni-based alloy coating is attributed to the presence of M7C3-type carbides (essentially chromium-riched carbide) dispersed in the γ(Ni,Fe) phase matrix.

  1. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Hot Isostatically Pressed-Produced Stainless Steel/High Alloy Tool Steel Compound Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindwall, Greta; Flyg, Jesper; Frisk, Karin; Sandberg, Odd

    2011-05-01

    Consolidation of tool steel powders and simultaneous joining to a stainless 316L steel are performed by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Two tool steel grades are considered: a high vanadium alloyed carbon tool steel, and a high vanadium and chromium alloyed nitrogen tool steel. The boundary layer arising during diffusion bonding is in focus and, in particular, the diffusion of carbon and nitrogen over the joint. Measurements of the elemental concentration profiles and corrosion tests by the double loop-electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) method are performed. Comparative calculations with the DICTRA software are performed and are found to be in agreement with the experimental results. It is found that the carbon tool steel grade has a more critical influence on the corrosion resistance of the stainless 316L steel in comparison to the nitrogen tool steel grade.

  2. Surface Nb-ALLOYING on 0.4C-13Cr Stainless Steel: Microstructure and Tribological Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shengwang; You, Kai; Liu, Xiaozhen; Zhang, Yihui; Wang, Zhenxia; Liu, Xiaoping

    2016-02-01

    0.4C-13Cr stainless steel was alloyed with niobium using double glow plasma surface alloying and tribological properties of Nb-alloyed steel such as hardness, friction and wear were measured. Effects of the alloying temperature on microstructure and the tribological behavior of the alloyed steel were investigated compared with untreated steel. Formation mechanisms of Nb-alloyed layers and increased wear resistance were also studied. The result shows that after surface Nb-alloying treatment, the 0.4C-13Cr steel exhibits a diffusion adhesion at the alloyed layer/substrate interface and improved tribological property. The friction coefficient of Nb-alloyed steel is decreased by about 0.3-0.45 and the wear rate after Nb-alloying is only 2-5% of untreated steel.

  3. Development of Zn50 Brazing Alloy for Joining Mild Steel to Mild Steel (SAE1018

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.C. Nwigbo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This work has developed new brazing alloys for joining mild steel to mild steel (SAE1018 at a lower temperature. The alloys blends and error analysis were done by experimental design software (Design Expert 8.0.7.1. Design of experiments was done by Scheffe quadratic mixture method. The liquidus temperatures were predicted by calculation of phase diagrams of the alloying metals. The brazing alloys were produced by gravity technique and melted using silicon carbide graphite crucible. The quality of the brazing alloys was analyzed by optical microscopy (OM, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR. Brazed joints were produced by torch method with a commercial flux. Brazing temperatures (liquidus were tracked by a digital infrared/laser pyrometer. Some mechanical properties studied were tensile strength and hardness. Finally, brazed joints produced from the developed brazing alloys were compared to that produced from muntz brass. Six (6 brazing alloys were successfully developed. Zinc and manganese were the main components, to which were added; 3 to 4 %wt silver and 11 to15 %wt modifying element. The microstructure showed a typical eutectic structure with zinc-rich phase distributed uniformly in the matrix with a combination of different sizes of dendrite, rounded blocks of compounds and hypoeutectic structures. AAS results indicated minimal out-gassing of zinc and FT-IR results indicated very low presence of atmospheric gas. The range of brazing temperature for best results was recorded from 690.90 to 735.10 0C. The joints produced from the developed brazing alloys had acceptable strengths with improved stress-strain behaviour compared to muntz brass.

  4. Plasma Nitriding of Low Alloy Sintered Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shiva Mansoorzadeh; Fakhreddin Ashrafizadeh; Xiao-Ying Li; Tom Bell

    2004-01-01

    Fe-3Cr-0.5Mo-0.3C and Fe-3Cr-1.4Mn-0.5Mo-0.367C sintered alloys were plasma nitrided at different temperatures. Characterization was performed by microhardness measurement, optical microscopy, SEM and XRD. Both materials had similar nitriding case properties. 1.4% manganese did not change the as-sintered microstructure considerably.It was observed that monophase compound layer, γ, formed with increasing temperature. Compound layer thickness increased with increasing temperature while nitriding depth increased up to a level and then decreased. Core softening was more pronounced at higher temperature owing to cementite coarsening.

  5. Mössbauer and XRD study of Al-Sn linished steel bimetal alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmann, E.; Silva, L. da; Stichleutner, S.; El-Sharif, M.; Homonnay, Z.; Klencsár, Z.; Sziráki, L.; Chisholm, C. U.; Lak, B.

    2016-12-01

    Aluminium alloy free CS1 type steel (0.06 wt% C, 0.45 wt% Mn) and samples of cold roll bonded steel bimetal alloys (MAS15 and MAS16) were fabricated and investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), 57Fe conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) at room temperature. XRD has revealed only the existence of the alpha iron solid solution (steel) phase in the steel only sample, while identified steel and metallic Al and Sn constituent phases in the bimetallic alloys. 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed the presence of 4 % secondary iron-bearing phase attributed mainly to iron oxide/ oxyhydroxides (ferrihydrite) besides the steel matrix on the surface of the steel sample. A significant difference between the occurrences of the secondary phase of differently prepared bimetal alloys found in their 57Fe CEM spectra allowed to identify the main phase of debris as different iron oxide/ oxyhydroxides.

  6. Galvanic corrosion between dental precious alloys and magnetic stainless steels used for dental magnetic attachments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Noriko; Takada, Yukyo; Okuno, Osamu

    2008-03-01

    In this study, we examined the corrosion behavior of dental precious alloys and magnetic stainless steels, namely SUS 444, SUS XM27, and SUS 447J1, used for dental magnetic attachments. Their galvanic corrosion behavior was evaluated from the viewpoint of corrosion potentials when they were in contact with each other. Rest potentials of the precious alloys were constantly higher than those of magnetic stainless steels. Since most gold alloys raised the corrosion potential more significantly than silver alloys did, silver alloys seemed to be better suited than gold alloys for combination with magnetic stainless steels. However, all corrosion potential values were sufficiently lower than the breakdown potentials of the stainless steels and existed within their passive regions. Based on the findings of this study, SUS XM27 and SUS 447J1--which exhibited higher breakdown potentials than SUS 444--emerged as the preferred choices for combination with gold alloys.

  7. Effect of Stress Relief Annealing on Microstructure & Mechanical Properties of Welded Joints Between Low Alloy Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivas, R.; Das, G.; Das, S. K.; Mahato, B.; Kumar, S.; Sivaprasad, K.; Singh, P. K.; Ghosh, M.

    2017-01-01

    Two types of welded joints were prepared using low alloy carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel as base materials. In one variety, buttering material and weld metal were Inconel 82. In another type, buttering material and weld metal were Inconel 182. In case of Inconel 82, method of welding was GTAW. For Inconel 182, welding was done by SMAW technique. For one set of each joints after buttering, stress relief annealing was done at 923 K (650 °C) for 90 minutes before further joining with weld metal. Microstructural investigation and sub-size in situ tensile testing in scanning electron microscope were carried out for buttered-welded and buttered-stress relieved-welded specimens. Adjacent to fusion boundary, heat-affected zone of low alloy steel consisted of ferrite-pearlite phase combination. Immediately after fusion boundary in low alloy steel side, there was increase in matrix grain size. Same trend was observed in the region of austenitic stainless steel that was close to fusion boundary between weld metal-stainless steel. Close to interface between low alloy steel-buttering material, the region contained martensite, Type-I boundary and Type-II boundary. Peak hardness was obtained close to fusion boundary between low alloy steel and buttering material. In this respect, a minimum hardness was observed within buttering material. The peak hardness was shifted toward buttering material after stress relief annealing. During tensile testing no deformation occurred within low alloy steel and failure was completely through buttering material. Crack initiated near fusion boundary between low alloy steel-buttering material for welded specimens and the same shifted away from fusion boundary for stress relieved annealed specimens. This observation was at par with the characteristics of microhardness profile. In as welded condition, joints fabricated with Inconel 82 exhibited superior bond strength than the weld produced with Inconel 182. Stress relief annealing

  8. Hot Forging of Nitrogen Alloyed Duplex Stainless Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P.Chandramohan; S.S. Mohamed Nazirudeen; S.S. Ramakrishnan

    2007-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels are gaining global importance because of the need for a high strength corrosion resistant material. Three compositions of this group were selected with three different nitrogen contents viz, 0.15 wt pct (alloy 1), 0.23 wt pct (alloy 2) and 0.32 wt pct (alloy 3). The steels were melted in a high frequency induction furnace and hot forged to various reductions from 16% to 62%. In this work, the effect of hot forging on the ferrite content, hardness, yield strength, impact strength and grain orientation (texture) were studied. Fracture analysis on all the forged specimens using SEM reveals that a size reduction of 48% results in maximum ductility and impact strength as well as minimal ferrite content and grain size. Thus the mechanical properties are found to have a direct correlation to ferrite content and grain size. The highest impact strength was observed in specimens with the smallest grain size, which was observed in specimens forged to 48% reduction in size.

  9. Mechanism of Bainite Nucleation in Steel, Iron and Copper Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mokuang KANG; Ming ZHU; Mingxing ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    During the incubation period of isothermal treatment(or aging) within the bainitic transformation temperature range in a salt bath (or quenching in water) immediately after solution treatment, not only are the defects formed at high temperatures maintained, but new defects can also be generated in alloys, iron alloys and steels. Due to the segregation of the solute atoms near defects through diffusion, this leads to non-uniform distributions of solute atoms in the parent phase with distinct regions of both solute enrichment and solute depletion. It is proposed that when the Ms temperature at the solute depleted regions is equal to or higher than the isothermal (or aged) temperature,nucleation of bainite occurs within these solute depleted regions in the manner of martensitic shear. Therefore it is considered that, at least in steel, iron and copper alloy systems, bainite is formed through a shear mechanism within solute depleted regions, which is controlled and formed by the solute atoms diffusion in the parent phase.

  10. 76 FR 45509 - Final Results of Antidumping Duty Changed Circumstances Review: Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-29

    ... Circumstances Review: Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod from Mexico, 75 FR 67685 (November 3, 2010...: Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico, 71 FR 27989 (May 15, 2006). Notification This notice... International Trade Administration Final Results of Antidumping Duty Changed Circumstances Review: Carbon...

  11. 76 FR 78882 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Affirmative Preliminary Determination of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-20

    ... International Trade Administration Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Affirmative Preliminary... Administration, Department of Commerce. SUMMARY: We preliminarily determine that carbon and certain alloy steel wire rod (wire rod) with an actual diameter between 4.75 mm and 5.00 mm produced in Mexico and...

  12. 78 FR 2658 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Rescission of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-14

    ... International Trade Administration Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Rescission of... its administrative review of the antidumping duty order on carbon and certain alloy steel wire rod (``wire rod'') from Mexico for the period October 1, 2011, through September 30, 2012. DATES:...

  13. Cyclic Partial Phase Transformations In Low Alloyed Steels: Modeling and Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, H.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical properties of low alloyed steels are directly determined by their microstructures. Thanks to versatility in their microstructures, the mechanical properties of low alloyed steels are much more adjustable than other materials. In the industry, one of the most effective ways to obtain the m

  14. 48 CFR 225.7011 - Restriction on carbon, alloy, and armor steel plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restriction on carbon, alloy, and armor steel plate. 225.7011 Section 225.7011 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... on carbon, alloy, and armor steel plate....

  15. Compatibility of Austenitic Steel With Molten Lead-Bismuth-Tin Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Rui-qian; LI Yan; WANG Xiao-min

    2011-01-01

    The compatibility of the austenitic AISI 304 steel with Pb-Bi-Sn alloy was analyzed. The AISI 304 steels were immersed in stagnant molten Pb-33.3Bi-33. 3Sn alloy at 400, 500 and 600℃ for different exposure times (100-2 000 h) respectively. XRay diffractio

  16. The quality of the joint between alloy steel and unalloyed cast steel in bimetallic layered castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wróbel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In paper is presented technology of bimetallic layered castings based on founding method of layer coating directly in cast process so-called method of mould cavity preparation. Prepared castings consist two fundamental parts i.e. bearing part and working part (layer. The bearing part of bimetallic layered casting is typical foundry material i.e. ferritic-pearlitic unalloyed cast steel, whereas working part (layer is plate of austenitic alloy steel sort X2CrNi 18-9. The ratio of thickness between bearing and working part is 8:1. The aim of paper was assessed the quality of the joint between bearing and working part in dependence of pouring temperature and carbon concentration in cast steel. The quality of the joint in bimetallic layered castings was evaluated on the basis of ultrasonic non-destructive testing, structure and microhardness researches.

  17. 76 FR 16607 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Notice of Partial Rescission of Antidumping...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    ... International Trade Administration Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Notice of Partial... antidumping duty order on carbon and certain alloy steel wire rod from Mexico. See Antidumping or... carbon and certain alloy steel wire rod from Mexico, in part, with respect to DeAcero, Aceros,...

  18. 78 FR 28190 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... International Trade Administration Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Final Results of... carbon and certain alloy steel wire rod (wire rod) from Mexico. The period of review (POR) is October 1... (the Act). \\1\\ See Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Preliminary Results...

  19. 77 FR 66954 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-08

    ... International Trade Administration Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Preliminary Results of... on carbon and certain alloy steel wire rod (wire rod) from Mexico. The period of review is October 1... Antidumping Duty Orders: Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod from Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico,...

  20. 77 FR 13545 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Notice of Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    ... International Trade Administration Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Notice of Final Results... duty order on carbon and certain alloy steel wire rod (wire rod) from Mexico.\\1\\ This review covers.... \\1\\ See Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod from Mexico: Notice of Preliminary Results...

  1. 76 FR 33218 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Initiation of Anti-Circumvention Inquiry of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... International Trade Administration Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Initiation of Anti... antidumping (AD) order on carbon and certain alloy steel wire rod from Mexico.\\1\\ See Notice of Antidumping Duty Orders: Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod from Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Moldova,...

  2. 76 FR 31940 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Taiwan: Notice of Rescission of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-02

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Taiwan: Notice of Rescission of... welded non-alloy steel pipe from Taiwan. The period of review is November 1, 2009, through October 31... circular welded non-alloy steel pipe from Taiwan. See Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order, Finding,...

  3. 76 FR 49437 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-10

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Preliminary Results... circular welded non-alloy steel pipe from Mexico. This administrative review covers mandatory respondents... Circumstances Review: Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico, 75 FR 82374 (December 30,...

  4. 78 FR 33809 - Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From the People's Republic of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-05

    ... Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From the People's Republic of China: Rescission...'') initiated an administrative review of the antidumping duty order on seamless carbon and alloy steel standard... order on seamless carbon and alloy steel standard, line, and pressure pipe from the People's Republic...

  5. 78 FR 60850 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Brazil: Final Results of the Expedited Second Sunset...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... International Trade Administration Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Brazil: Final Results of the... certain alloy steel wire rod (wire rod) from Brazil would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence... Alloy Steel Wire Rod from Brazil, 67 FR 55805 (August 30, 2002). \\2\\ See Initiation of...

  6. 75 FR 77838 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-14

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary... on circular welded non-alloy steel pipe (``CWP'') from the Republic of Korea (``Korea''). The period... Antidumping Duty Orders: Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from Brazil, the Republic of...

  7. 77 FR 8808 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Extension of the Final Results...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Extension of... antidumping duty administrative review of circular welded non-alloy steel pipe from the Republic of Korea, covering the period November 1, 2009, through October 31, 2010. See Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel...

  8. 77 FR 21968 - Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From the People's Republic of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-12

    ... International Trade Administration Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From the... and alloy steel standard, line, and pressure pipe from the People's Republic of China. The period of... countervailing duty order on seamless carbon and alloy steel standard, line, and pressure pipe from the...

  9. 75 FR 78216 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-15

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Preliminary Results... circular welded non-alloy steel pipe from Mexico. This administrative review covers mandatory respondents... Antidumping Duty Changed Circumstances Review: Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe and Tube...

  10. 76 FR 36089 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of the Antidumping...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Final... circular welded non-alloy steel pipe (``CWP'') from the Republic of Korea (``Korea''), covering the period.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background Following publication of Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From...

  11. 77 FR 73015 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-07

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary... conducting an administrative review of the antidumping duty order on circular welded non-alloy steel pipe... merchandise subject to the order is circular welded non-alloy steel pipe and tube. The product is...

  12. 77 FR 34344 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of the Antidumping...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-11

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Final... circular welded non-alloy steel pipe (``CWP'') from the Republic of Korea (``Korea''). The review covers...: Background Following Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results...

  13. 78 FR 35248 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of Antidumping...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-12

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Final... order on circular welded non-alloy steel pipe (CWP) from the Republic of Korea (Korea) for the period... has been sold at less than normal value. \\1\\ See Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From...

  14. 76 FR 15941 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Extension of the Final Results...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Extension of... antidumping duty administrative review of circular welded non-alloy steel pipe from the Republic of Korea, covering the period November 1, 2008, through October 31, 2009. See Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel...

  15. 78 FR 34342 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Final Results and Partial Rescission of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-07

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Final Results and... duty order on certain circular welded non- alloy steel pipe from Mexico.\\1\\ This administrative review.... \\1\\ See Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Preliminary Results and...

  16. A comparison of material removal mechanism under low stress abrasive condition of steel and hardfacing alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, R.; Prasad, B. K.; Modi, O. P.; Jha, A. K.

    1999-08-01

    The low stress abrasive wear behavior of two types of steels commonly used for making a number of commonly used engineering components has been compared with the composition of a few hardfacing alloys that can be overlayed on the steels to impart a wear-resistant surface. The mechanism of material removal as studied by the scanning electron micrographs of the worn and transverse sections is different for the steels and hardfacing alloys. An attempt has been made to explain the mechanism of material removal for the steels and hardfacing alloys.

  17. Alternative to Nitric Acid for Passivation of Stainless Steel Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Pattie L.; Kolody, Mark; Curran, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion is an extensive problem that affects the Department of Defense (DoD) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The deleterious effects of corrosion result in steep costs, asset downtime affecting mission readiness, and safety risks to personnel. Consequently, it is vital to reduce corrosion costs and risks in a sustainable manner. The DoD and NASA have numerous structures and equipment that are fabricated from stainless steel. The standard practice for protection of stainless steel is a process called passivation. Typical passivation procedures call for the use of nitric acid; however, there are a number of environmental, worker safety, and operational issues associated with its use. Citric acid offers a variety of benefits including increased safety for personnel, reduced environmental impact, and reduced operational cost. DoD and NASA agreed to collaborate to validate citric acid as an acceptable passivating agent for stainless steel. This paper details our investigation of prior work developing the citric acid passivation process, development of the test plan, optimization of the process for specific stainless steel alloys, ongoing and planned testing to elucidate the process' resistance to corrosion in comparison to nitric acid, and preliminary results.

  18. LOCAL LASER ALLOYING OF STAINLESS STEEL 12H18N10T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Vladimir A. Kim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the research of local laser alloying of stainless steel 12X18H10T. The steel resists quenching, but it is widely used in food, chemical, oil-processing and other industries. The alloying was carried out by graphite that provided carbon increase in steel and improvement of surface capacity. The article shows details of the structural transformations leading to surfaces hardening, and micro hardness spreading inside the modified layer.

  19. Probabilistic models for creep-fatigue in a steel alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibisoglu, Fatmagul

    In high temperature components subjected to long term cyclic operation, simultaneous creep and fatigue damage occur. A new methodology for creep-fatigue life assessment has been adopted without the need to separate creep and fatigue damage or expended life. Probabilistic models, described by hold times in tension and total strain range at temperature, have been derived based on the creep rupture behavior of a steel alloy. These models have been validated with the observed creep-fatigue life of the material with a scatter band close to a factor of 2. Uncertainties of the creep-fatigue model parameters have been estimated with WinBUGS which is an open source Bayesian analysis software tool that uses Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to fit statistical models. Secondly, creep deformation in stress relaxation data has been analyzed. Well performing creep equations have been validated with the observed data. The creep model with the highest goodness of fit among the validated models has been used to estimate probability of exceedance at 0.6% strain level for the steel alloy.

  20. Effect of amide type modified rapeseed oil as lubricating additive on friction and wear behavior of steel-steel and steel-aluminum alloy systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Jian-hua; CHEN Bo-shui; LIU Wei-min; DONG Lin; WANG Jiu

    2004-01-01

    A new type of environmentally friendly lube additive-amide type modified rapeseed oil was synthesized and characterized by infrared spectrum. Its effect on the friction and wear behavior of steel-steel and steel-aluminum alloy systems were investigated with a four-ball machine and an Optimol SRV friction and wear tester respectively.The morphographies of the worn surfaces were analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy(SEM). The worn surfaces of the 2024Al alloy block were analyzed by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS). The results show that the modified rapeseed oil as additives can obviously decrease the wear rate and friction coefficient of steel pair and steel-aluminum frictional pair. Its lubrication mechanism is inferred that a high strength complex protection films form on the worn surface of the Al alloy due to the adsorption or tribochemistry reaction of a long chain additive molecule and high reaction activity of N element.

  1. Reactive Boride Brazing on Low-Alloy Automotive Grade Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanisamy, B.; Upadhyaya, A.

    2011-11-01

    Brazing is a widely used process to improve the performance of steels used in automotive applications. The substrate material is often exposed to harsh conditions in these applications and may affect the service life of the component. Reactive boride brazing aims to improve the mechanical properties of the substrate material by forming a ceramic-metal composite coating in a single-step process in situ. In this study, sintered Ancor 4300 low-alloy steel is used as the substrate with chromium-rich braze and chromium-lean braze materials. The mechanical properties of the brazed samples were studied in detail using microindentation hardness measurements and the transverse rupture test. The results indicate that the brazed superlayer has a 10 times higher hardness. There was a significant improvement in the transverse rupture strength of the steel brazed with the chromium-rich boride as compared to the pure substrate material. In an effort to reduce processing time, green compacts of the substrate were also directly brazed and yielded favorable results.

  2. Deformation and fracture of low alloy steels at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriott, D.L.; Stubbins, J.F.; Leckie, F.A.; Muddle, B.

    1988-12-01

    This project formed part of the initiative in the AR TD program to characterize high temperature, time-dependent damage processes in low alloy steels, for use in the construction of coal-gasification plant. This project was broadly aimed at adding to the knowledge base for this bainitic form of 2.25Cr 1Mo steel, as it related to time-dependent performance at elevated temperature. Its original intention was to obtain information in specific grades of 2.25Cr 1Mo steel, in particular those containing reduced residual elements and microalloyed modifications, which were being considered as candidate materials at the time. This objective was subsequently modified, in the course of the contract period, to a more generic study of bainitic steel, using the 2.25Cr 1Mo material as a representative of the class. The main thrust of the project was directed initially at the detrimental effect of cyclic loading on creep resistance and manifesting itself in an apparently severe creep-fatigue interaction. Three subtasks were eventually identified. These are: a study of the evolution of microstructural changes in bainitic materials during steady load creep and under constant amplitude cyclic deformation, investigation of the effect of cyclic softening on the fatigue and creep strength of complex geometries, focusing on circumferentially notched bars, and investigation of the influence of environment as a possible cause of observed fatigue/elevated temperature interaction through its effects on crack initiation and propagation, using EDM notched specimens tested in air and vacuum. Results are discussed. 24 refs., 40 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Enhancement of Impact Toughness by Delamination Fracture in a Low-Alloy High-Strength Steel with Al Alloying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junjie; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Hongji; Guo, Shengwu; Liu, Yongning

    2016-12-01

    The effect of delamination toughening of martensitic steel was investigated both at room and low temperatures [253 K and 233 K (-20 °C and -40 °C)]. Two low-alloy martensitic steels with and without Al alloying were both prepared. Layered structure with white band and black matrix was observed in Al alloyed steel, while a homogeneous microstructure was displayed in the steel without Al. Both steels achieved high strength (tensile strength over 1600 MPa) and good ductility (elongation over 11 pct), but they displayed stark contrasts on impact fracture mode and Charpy impact energy. Delamination fracture occurred in Al alloyed steel and the impact energies were significantly increased both at room temperature (from 75 to 138 J, i.e., nearly improved up to 2 times) and low temperatures [from 47.9 to 71.3 J at 233 K (-40 °C)] compared with the one without Al. Alloying with Al promotes the segregation of Cr, Mn, Si and C elements to form a network structure, which is martensite with higher carbon content and higher hardness than that of the matrix. And this network structure evolved into a band structure during the hot rolling process. The difference of yield stress between the band structure and the matrix gives rise to a delamination fracture during the impact test, which increases the toughness greatly.

  4. Enhancement of Impact Toughness by Delamination Fracture in a Low-Alloy High-Strength Steel with Al Alloying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junjie; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Hongji; Guo, Shengwu; Liu, Yongning

    2016-09-01

    The effect of delamination toughening of martensitic steel was investigated both at room and low temperatures [253 K and 233 K (-20 °C and -40 °C)]. Two low-alloy martensitic steels with and without Al alloying were both prepared. Layered structure with white band and black matrix was observed in Al alloyed steel, while a homogeneous microstructure was displayed in the steel without Al. Both steels achieved high strength (tensile strength over 1600 MPa) and good ductility (elongation over 11 pct), but they displayed stark contrasts on impact fracture mode and Charpy impact energy. Delamination fracture occurred in Al alloyed steel and the impact energies were significantly increased both at room temperature (from 75 to 138 J, i.e., nearly improved up to 2 times) and low temperatures [from 47.9 to 71.3 J at 233 K (-40 °C)] compared with the one without Al. Alloying with Al promotes the segregation of Cr, Mn, Si and C elements to form a network structure, which is martensite with higher carbon content and higher hardness than that of the matrix. And this network structure evolved into a band structure during the hot rolling process. The difference of yield stress between the band structure and the matrix gives rise to a delamination fracture during the impact test, which increases the toughness greatly.

  5. Multilayer Clad Plate of Stainless Steel/Aluminum/Aluminum Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Jiawei; PANG Yuhua; LI Ting

    2011-01-01

    The 3, 5, 20 layer clad plate from austenitic stainless steel, pure aluminum and aluminum alloy sheets were fabricated in different ways. The stretch and interface properties were measured. The result shows that 20 layer clad plate is better than the others. Well-bonded clad plate was successfully obtained in the following procedure: Basic clad sheet from 18 layer A11060/A13003sheets was firstly obtained with an initial rolling reduction of 44% at 450 ℃, followed by annealing at 300 ℃, and then with reduction of 50% at 550 ℃ from STS304 on each side. The best 20 layer clad plate was of 129 MPa bonding strength and 225 MPa stretch strength.

  6. Temperature rise and wear of sliding contact of alloy steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Arindam Roy; Sardar, Santanu; Karmakar, Santanu Kumar

    2016-07-01

    The tribo-failure of machine elements under relative sliding velocities is greatly affected by frictional heating and resultant contact temperature rise. Nevertheless, the tribo-failure of automotive components is a combined effect of mechanical, thermal and chemical phenomena. Over the decades, there have been developed a number of different mathematical models for predicting surface temperature rise at sliding contact under different geometries of asperity contacts and operating conditions. The experimental investigation is still relevant today to find out the surface temperature rise at sliding contact along with the outcomes of friction and wear under various operating conditions for real time applications. The present work aims at finding average surface temperature rise at different sliding velocities, normal loads with different surface roughness experimentally. It also involves to prepare two different rough surfaces of alloy steels and to study their influences in the process of generating contact temperature rise under a given operating conditions.

  7. Friction Welding of Aluminium and Aluminium Alloys with Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Ambroziak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents our actual knowledge and experience in joining dissimilar materials with the use of friction welding method. The joints of aluminium and aluminium alloys with the different types of steel were studied. The structural effects occurring during the welding process were described. The mechanical properties using, for example, (i microhardness measurements, (ii tensile tests, (iii bending tests, and (iv shearing tests were determined. In order to obtain high-quality joints the influence of different configurations of the process such as (i changing the geometry of bonding surface, (ii using the interlayer, or (iii heat treatment was analyzed. Finally, the issues related to the selection of optimal parameters of friction welding process were also investigated.

  8. Process to determine light elements content of steel and alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintella, Cristina M.A.L.T.M.H.; Castro, Martha T.P.O. [Universidade Federal da Bahia (IQ/UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. LabLaser; Mac-Culloch, Joao N.L.M. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The present work reports a process to determine qualitatively and quantitatively elements of molar mass inferior to 23 within materials, by X rays spectra associated with multivariate data analysis, or chemometric analysis. The spectra is acquired between 5 keV and 22 keV when the materials are exposed to X radiation. Here is reported the direct determination of carbon content in steel and metallic alloys. The process is more effective when using spectral regions which are not usually used. From the analysis of these spectral regions which were not considered before, it was possible to detect light elements with molar mass lower than 23, which have low capacity of absorbing and emitting radiation, but have high capacity of scattering radiation. The process here reported has the advantage that X-Ray spectra obtained are calibrated multivariately, showing high potential for development in order to be used in a portable field equipment. (author)

  9. Improving Corrosion Resistance of Q235 Steel by Ni-Cr Alloyed Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jun; ZHANG Pingze; WU Hongyan; BI Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Ni-Cr alloyed layer was formed on surface of Q235 steel by double glow plasma surface metallurgy to improve the corrosion resistance of substrate.The composition and microstructure of alloyed layer was analyzed by SEM and XRD.Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was applied to evaluate the corrosion resistance of the alloyed layer.The results showed working pressure had a great effect on structure of Ni-Cr alloyed layer,and the dense and smooth alloyed layer was prepared at 50 Pa working pressure.Compared with substrate,Ni-Cr alloyed layer exhibited higher corrosion potential,lower corrosion current density and larger charge transfer resistance,which indicated that Ni-Cr alloyed layer significantly modified the corrosion resistance of Q235 steel.

  10. Microscopic study of the structure of the Steel Ni-based Alloy: Hastelloy G35 Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabir, F.; Ben Lenda, O.; Saissi, S.; Marbouh, K.; Tyouke, B.; Zerrouk, L.; Ibnlfassi, A.; Ouzaouit, K.; Elmadani, S.

    2017-03-01

    The study of the influence of heat treatment on changes of mechanical and structural properties of Steel Ni-based Alloy is a highly interdisciplinary topic at the interface of the physical chemistry of metallic materials, which also helps in environmental and economic protection.After heat treatment, the structural and micro-structural studies for the different transformation temperature led to identify phases formed and the morphology. This work has been carried out using different techniques: X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

  11. Galvanic corrosion of rare earth modified AM50 and AZ91D magnesium alloys coupled to steel and aluminium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohedano, M.; Arrabal, R.; Pardo, A.; Paucar, A.; Merino, M. C.; Matykina, E.; Mingo, B.; Garces, G.

    2014-04-01

    Electrochemical and gravimetric measurements were used to examine the effects of neodymium and gadolinium additions on the galvanic corrosion behaviour of AM50 and AZ91D magnesium alloys coupled to A 570 Gr 36 carbon steel and AA2011-AA6082 aluminium alloys. Rare earth modified alloys showed Al{sub 2}Nd/Al{sub 2}Gd and Al-Mn-Nd/Al-Mn-Gd intermetallics, reduced area fraction of {beta}-Mg{sub 1}7Al{sub 1}2 phase and increased corrosion resistance due to increased surface passivity and suppression of micro-galvanic couples. Neodymium and gadolinium additions improved the galvanic corrosion resistance of AM50 alloy, but were less effective in case of the AZ91D alloy. The AA6082 alloy was the most compatible material and the AA2011 alloy was the least compatible. (Author)

  12. Systematic corrosion investigation of various Cu-Sn alloys electrodeposited on mild steel in acidic solution: Dependence of alloy composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suerme, Yavuz, E-mail: ysurme@nigde.edu.t [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Art, Nigde University, 51200 Nigde (Turkey); Guerten, A. Ali [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Art, Osmaniye Korkut Ata University, 80000 Osmaniye (Turkey); Bayol, Emel; Ersoy, Ersay [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Art, Nigde University, 51200 Nigde (Turkey)

    2009-10-19

    Copper-tin alloy films were galvanostatically electrodeposited on the mild steel (MS) by combining the different amount of Cu and Sn electrolytes at a constant temperature (55 deg. C) and pH (3.5). Alloy films were characterized by using the energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and micrographing techniques. Corrosion behaviours were evaluated with electrochemical impedance spectrometry (EIS) and electrochemical polarization measurements. Time gradient of electrolysis process was adjusted to obtain same thickness of investigated alloys on MS. The systematic corrosion investigation of various Cu{sub x}-Sn{sub 100-x} (x = 0-100) alloy depositions on MS substrate were carried out in 0.1 M sulphuric acid medium. Results indicate that the corrosion resistance of the alloy coatings depended on the alloy composition, and the corrosion resistance increased at Cu-Sn alloy deposits in proportion to Sn ratio.

  13. The Evolution of the Segregation Behavior of Alloying Elements in a Low-Alloy Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.J. Papworth; D.B. Knorr; D.B. Williams

    2002-08-21

    The segregation of alloying and impurity elements to prior austenite grain boundaries (PAGBs) in low-alloy steels controls temper-embrittlement although the precise microchemical and microstructural interactions are, as yet, unclear because of the many variables involved. Competing segregation and de-segregation phenomena are observed. For example, Auger analyses of fracture surfaces indicate that brittle fracture is caused by the segregation of P to the PAGB. The addition of small amounts ({approx} 0.5 wt%) of Mo appears to regard, but not stop, temper-embrittlement, possibly due to Mo{sub 2}C precipitates that form at elevated temperatures causing de-segregation of Mo from the PAGB. The relationship between segregation and temper embrittlement is further complicated in commercial alloys by both the number of segregating elements and the complex, multi-stage heat treatments. Auger analysis pre-selects the most embrittled boundaries and so the complete distribution of segregants across all PAGBs cannot be determined by this technique. Previous work has shown how X-ray mapping (XRM) in a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM) offers a more complete view of the distribution of segregants on both non-embrittled and embrittled PAGBs. XRM was used to observe the evolution of the segregation and desegregation of five elements during four successive heat-treatment stages of commercial low-alloy steel forging. In the last and crucial temper-embrittlement stage, increases in the degree and frequency of Ni segregation occur while other elements either segregate, remain constant or desegregate from the PAGBs.

  14. Corrosion Behavior and Durability of Low-Alloy Steel Rebars in Marine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Cheng, Xuequn; Li, Xiaogang; Yue, Pan; Li, Jun

    2016-10-01

    The corrosion resistance of Cr-modified low-alloy steels and HRB400 carbon steel was estimated using the open-circuit potential, potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopic, and weight loss methods in simulated concrete pore solution. Results show that Cr-modified steels exhibit a higher corrosion resistance with a higher critical chloride level (CTL), lower corrosion current density, and higher impedance than carbon steel. The CTL of the steels significantly reduces with increasing temperature. Weight loss measurement shows that the Cr-modified steels exhibit low corrosion rates and small corrosion pitting. The primary constituents of the corrosion scales are Fe2O3, Fe3O4, β-FeOOH, γ-FeOOH, and α-FeOOH. A large amount of α-FeOOH could be detected in the Cr-modified steel corrosion products. Moreover, the Cr-modified steels demonstrate a higher durability than HRB400 carbon steel.

  15. Nanosized controlled surface pretreatment of biometallic alloy 316L stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M; Loftis, Derek; Mahapatro, Anil

    2011-12-01

    Stainless steel (AISI 316L) is a medical grade stainless steel alloy used extensively in medical devices and in the biomedical field. 316L stainless steel was successfully electropolished via an ecologically friendly and biocompatible ionic liquid (IL) medium based on Vitamin B4 (NB4) and resulting in nanosized surface roughness and topography. Voltammetry and chronoamperometry tests determined optimum polishing conditions for the stainless steel alloy while atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) provided surface morphology comparisons to benchmark success of each electropolishing condition. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) combined with SEM revealed significantly smoother surfaces for each alloy surface while indicating that the constituent metals comprising each alloy effectively electropolished at uniform rates.

  16. Static Recrystallization Behavior of Hot Deformed Austenite for Micro-Alloyed Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie HUANG; Zhou XU; Xin XING

    2003-01-01

    Static recrystallization behavior of austenite for micro-alloyed steel during hot rolling was studied and the influence (τ-ε diagram) of holding time and deformation at different deformations and isothermal temperatures on microstructuralstate of austen

  17. 77 FR 43806 - Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From the People's Republic of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-26

    ... International Trade Administration Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From the... Department) initiated an administrative review of the antidumping duty order on seamless carbon and alloy... carbon and alloy steel standard, line, and pressure pipe from the People's Republic of China covering...

  18. Galvanic Interaction between Chalcopyrite and Pyrite with Low Alloy and High Carbon Chromium Steel Ball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Azizi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to investigate the galvanic interaction between pyrite and chalcopyrite with two types of grinding media (low alloy and high carbon chromium steel ball in grinding of a porphyry copper sulphide ore. Results indicated that injection of different gases into mill altered the oxidation-reduction environment during grinding. High carbon chromium steel ball under nitrogen gas has the lowest galvanic current, and low alloy steel ball under oxygen gas had the highest galvanic current. Also, results showed that the media is anodic relative to pyrite and chalcopyrite, and therefore pyrite or chalcopyrite with a higher rest potential acted as the cathode, whilst the grinding media with a lower rest potential acted as the anode, when they are electrochemically contacted. It was also found that low alloy steel under oxygen produced the highest amount of EDTA extractable iron in the slurry, whilst high carbon chromium steel under nitrogen atmosphere led to the lowest amount.

  19. Industrial Experience on the Caustic Cracking of Stainless Steels and Nickel Alloys - A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, R B

    2005-10-09

    Caustic environments are present in several industries, from nuclear power generation to the fabrication of alkalis and alumina. The most common material of construction is carbon steel but its application is limited to a maximum temperature of approximately 80 C. The use of Nickel (Ni) alloys is recommended at higher temperatures. Commercially pure Ni is the most resistant material for caustic applications both from the general corrosion and the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) perspectives. Nickel rich alloys also offer a good performance. The most important alloying elements are Ni and chromium (Cr). Molybdenum (Mo) is not a beneficial alloying element and it dissolves preferentially from the alloy in presence of caustic environments. Austenitic stainless steels such as type 304 and 316 seem less resistant to caustic conditions than even plain carbon steel. Experimental evidence shows that the most likely mechanism for SCC is anodic dissolution.

  20. M2C Precipitate in Isothermal Tempering of High Co-Ni Alloy Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The ultra-strength alloy steel with high content of Co and Ni is typical tempering martensite steel, and the secondary hardening is accomplished by the precipitation of fine scale alloy carbides with black-white contrast until peak-hardening. The crystal structure of precipitates was well determined as M2C with hexagonal by micro-beam diffraction. Observing in HREM, M2C carbides were shown coherent with the ferrite matrix completely and have their own structure.

  1. Aluminizing and subsequent nitriding of plain carbon low alloy steels for piston ring applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bindumadhavan, P.N.; Keng Wah, H.; Prabhakar, O. [Nanyang Technol. Univ., Singapore (Singapore). Div. of Mater. Eng.; Makesh, S. [Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Building, University of Maryland, 20783, College Park, MD (United States); Gowrishankar, N. [I P Rings Ltd., D 11/12, Industrial Estate, 603209, Maraimalainagar (India)

    2000-05-22

    Nitriding is a case hardening process that is commonly used for increasing the wear life of automotive piston rings. However, special alloy steels are required to achieve high surface hardness and nitrided case depth values required by the automotive industry. The cost of such alloy steels is one of the major components of the total cost of the nitrided piston ring. To address this issue, efforts have been directed towards development of cheaper raw materials as substitutes for nitridable steels. In this study, an attempt has been made to increase the surface hardness of two plain carbon low alloy steels by aluminizing and subsequent diffusion treatment and nitriding. The process parameters for the aluminizing operation are discussed. Results indicate that a near twofold increase in surface hardness is achievable by aluminizing followed by diffusion treatment and nitriding (580-1208 HV for EN32B steel and 650-1454 HV for 15CR3 steel). It has also been found that the nitrided case depth obtained (0.11-0.13 mm for EN32B steel and 0.10-0.14 mm for 15CR3 steel) matches well with the general requirements of the piston ring industry. The diffusion of aluminum into the alloy layer has also been discussed and the theoretical predictions were compared with actual values of Al concentration, as obtained by SEM-EDS system. It is found that Fick's law gives a fairly good prediction of the actual Al concentration profile, in spite of the complexity of the diffusion path. X-Ray diffraction studies have confirmed the presence of AlN in the alloy layer, which could be instrumental in the significant increase in surface hardness. It is proposed that aluminizing followed by diffusion treatment and nitriding of plain carbon low alloy steels could provide an alternative to the use of expensive nitridable steels for piston ring applications. (orig.)

  2. Comparison of Channel Segregation Formation in Model Alloys and Steels via Numerical Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y. F.; Chen, Y.; Li, D. Z.; Liu, H. W.; Fu, P. X.

    2016-06-01

    In the current study, the evolutions of channel segregations in several alloy systems, such as the typically used model alloys ( e.g., Ga-In, Sn-Pb, Sn-Bi, Al-Cu, and Ni-based superalloy) and some special steels, are numerically simulated in a cavity solidified unidirectionally. The simulations are based on a modified continuum macrosegregation model with an extension to the multicomponent systems. The results of model alloys and steels indicate that when the thermosolutal convection is strong enough, flow instability occurs, which in turn destabilizes the mushy zone. Subsequently, the channel segregation forms with the continuous interaction between solidification and flow. The formation behavior and severity of channel segregations in various systems are different owing to their distinct melt convection strengths and solidification natures. In the current simulations, channels are apparent for model alloys with high content of solutes, whereas they are slight in some special steels, such as 27SiMn steel, and totally disappear in carbon steels. These occurrence features of channel segregation in simulations of steels are consistent with the analyses by a modified Rayleigh number associated with alloying elements, and both outcomes are well supported by the fully sectioned steel ingots in experiments.

  3. Design and identification of high performance steel alloys for structures subjected to underwater impulsive loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaoding; Latourte, Felix; Feinberg, Zack; Olson, Gregory; Espinosa, Horacio; Micro; Nanomechanics Laboratory Team; Olson Group Team

    2011-06-01

    To characterize the performance of naval structures, underwater blast experiments have been developed. Martensitic and austenitic steel alloys were designed to optimize the performance of structures subjected to impulsive loads. The deformation and fracture characteristics of the designed steel alloys were investigated experimentally and computationally. The experiments were based on an instrumented fluid structure interaction apparatus, in which deflection profiles were recorded. The computational study was based on a modified Gurson damage model able to accurately describe ductile failure under various loading paths. The model was calibrated for two high performance martensitic steels (HSLA-100 and BA-160) and an austenitic steel (TRIP-120). The martensitic steel (BA-160) was designed to maximize strength and fracture toughness while the austenitic steel (TRIP-120) was designed to maximize uniform ductility. The combined experimental-computational approach provided insight into the relationships between material properties and blast resistance of structures.

  4. RBF-Type Artificial Neural Network Model Applied in Alloy Design of Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOU Wei; LIU Ya-xiu; BAI Bing-zhe; FANG Hong-sheng

    2008-01-01

    RBF model, a new type of artificial neural network model was developed to design the content of carbon in low-alloy engineering steels. The errors of the ANN model are. MSE 0. 052 1, MSRE 17. 85%, and VOF 1. 932 9. The results obtained are satisfactory. The method is a powerful aid for designing new steels.

  5. Crystallization of Low-alloyed Construction Cast Steel Modified with V and Ti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Studnicki

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper crystallization studies of low-alloyed construction cast steel were presented for different additions of chromium, nickel and molybdenum modified with vanadium and titanium. Studies were conducted using developed TDA stand, which additionally enabled evaluation of cooling rate influence on crystallization process of investigated alloys.

  6. Tensile and impact behaviour of BATMAN II steels, Ti-bearing reduced activation martensitic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filacchioni, G.; Casagrande, E.; De Angelis, U.; De Santis, G.; Ferrara, D.; Pilloni, L.

    Two series of Reduced Activation Ferrous alloys (RAF) have been produced and studied by Casaccia's Laboratories. These martensitic alloys are named BATMAN steels. They are among the few presently developed RAF materials to exploit Ti as a carbide forming and grain size stabilizing element instead of Ta. In this work their mechanical properties are illustrated.

  7. Effects of WC particle size on the wear resistance of laser surface alloyed medium carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xin; Li, Fu-hai; Kuang, Min; Ma, Wen-you; Chen, Xing-chi; Liu, Min

    2012-01-01

    The CO2 laser surface alloying technique was used to form wear resistance layers on medium carbon steel with a kind of spherical WC powder. The effects of WC particle size on the abrasive wear resistance were thoroughly investigated. The results indicate that the laser alloyed layer is characterized by dendritic primary phase and ledeburite microstructure, consisting of austenite, martensite and carbides of Fe3W3C, W2C and WC. The laser surface alloying with WC powder could improve the abrasive wear resistance of the medium carbon steel by over 63%. The factors such as the hardness, the amount and the distribution of WC particle determined the laser alloyed samples' wear resistance, and the laser alloyed sample with WC powder of 88-100 μm diameter presented the best wear resistance in this study. Furthermore, the wear resistance mechanisms of the laser alloyed layers were also explored.

  8. Plastic Instabilities and Their Consequences in Steels and Other High Strength Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    rate yes Superalloys * Alloy 600 quasi-static no Rend 41 quasi-static no Steels * HY80 quasi-static no ultra-soft5 no low temperatures no AISI 4340...AD-A240 976 ([f) A Final Technical Report Contract No. N00014-88-K-0111 S PLASTIC INSTABILITIES AND THEIR CONSEQUENCES IN STEELS AND OTHER HIGH...PLASTIC INSTABILITIES AND THEIR CONSEQUENCES IN STEELS AND OTHER HIGH STRENGTH ALLOYS Submitted to: Office of Naval Research 800 North Quincy Street

  9. Role of alloying elements and carbides in the chlorine-induced corrosion of steels and alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Jürgen Grabke

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The high temperature corrosion of steels and Ni-base alloys in oxidizing and chloridizing environments is of practical interest in relation to problems in waste incineration plants and power plants using Cl containing fuels. The behaviour of the most important alloying elements Fe, Cr, Ni, Mo, Mn, Si, Al upon corrosion in an oxidizing and chloridizing atmosphere was elucidated: the reactions and kinetics can be largely understood on the base of thermodynamic data, i.e. free energy of chloride formation, vapor pressure of the chlorides and oxygen pressure pO2 needed for the conversion chlorides -> oxides. The mechanism is described by 'active oxidation', comprising inward penetration of chlorine into the scale, formation of chlorides at the oxide/metal interface, evaporation of the chlorides and conversion of the evaporating chlorides into oxides, which occurs in more or less distance from the surface (depending on pO2. This process leads to loose, fragile, multilayered oxides which are unprotective (therefore: active oxidation. Fe and Cr are rapidly transferred into such scale, Ni and Mo are relatively resistant. In many cases, the grain boundaries of the materials are strongly attacked, this is due to a susceptibility of chromium carbides to chloridation. In contrast the carbides Mo2C, TiC and NbC are less attacked than the matrix. Alloys on the basis Fe-Cr-Si proved to be rather resistant, and the alloying elements Ni and Mo clearly retard the attack in an oxidizing and chloridizing environment.

  10. The application limits of alloyed 13%Cr tubular steels for downhole duties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooling, P.J.; Kennani, M.B.; Martin, J.W. [BP Exploration, Sunbury on Thames (United Kingdom); Nice, P.I. [Statoil, Stavanger (Norway)

    1998-12-31

    In the past few years, a new family of materials has entered the downhole tubular market, known as the ``alloyed 13%Cr steels.`` These are a development of the conventional API 5CT grade 13%Cr steels to which alloying elements of Ni, Mo and Cu have been added, hence offering a number of advantages. In the present paper, domains of application for the 95ksi grade alloyed 13%Cr steels with respect to sour service conditions have been defined on pH vs. H{sub 2}S partial pressure plots. Corrosion properties have also been determined for two other aspects; chloride stress corrosion cracking (ClSCC) and high temperature corrosion resistance. The results have reiterated the importance of solution chemistry, pH and H{sub 2}S partial pressure in defining the corrosion properties of steels.

  11. TECHNOLOGICAL COMPLEX OF EQUIPMENT FOR REFINING AND CASTING OF STEEL AND ALLOYS IN THE FOUNDRY AND STEEL INDUSTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Zolotukhin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vulcan TM is a small innovative company, specializing in the manufacture of steel and alloys casting systems and refractory accessories.Available for foundry and metallurgical industries, special technological equipment, designed and manufactured by LLC NPP “Vulkan-TM.”

  12. Study of austenitic stainless steel welded with low alloy steel filler metal. [tensile and impact strength tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, F. A.; Dyke, R. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The tensile and impact strength properties of 316L stainless steel plate welded with low alloy steel filler metal were determined. Tests were conducted at room temperature and -100 F on standard test specimens machined from as-welded panels of various chemical compositions. No significant differences were found as the result of variations in percentage chemical composition on the impact and tensile test results. The weldments containing lower chromium and nickel as the result of dilution of parent metal from the use of the low alloy steel filler metal corroded more severely in a marine environment. The use of a protective finish, i.e., a nitrile-based paint containing aluminum powder, prevented the corrosive attack.

  13. Parameters Optimization of Low Carbon Low Alloy Steel Annealing Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maoyu ZHAO; Qianwang CHEN

    2013-01-01

    A suitable match of annealing process parameters is critical for obtaining the fine microstructure of material.Low carbon low alloy steel (20CrMnTi) was heated for various durations near Ac temperature to obtain fine pearlite and ferrite grains.Annealing temperature and time were used as independent variables,and material property data were acquired by orthogonal experiment design under intercritical process followed by subcritical annealing process (IPSAP).The weights of plasticity (hardness,yield strength,section shrinkage and elongation) of annealed material were calculated by analytic hierarchy process,and then the process parameters were optimized by the grey theory system.The results observed by SEM images show that microstructure of optimization annealing material are consisted of smaller lamellar pearlites (ferrite-cementite)and refining ferrites which distribute uniformly.Morphologies on tension fracture surface of optimized annealing material indicate that the numbers of dimple fracture show more finer toughness obviously comparing with other annealing materials.Moreover,the yield strength value of optimization annealing material decreases apparently by tensile test.Thus,the new optimized strategy is accurate and feasible.

  14. Short-term exposure of low-alloyed steels in Qinghai Salt Lake atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI QiaoXia; WANG ZhenYao; HAN Wei; YU GuoCai; HAN EnHou

    2009-01-01

    The rusts formed on carbon steel and weathering steel exposed in Oinghai Salt Lake atmosphere for 6 months were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared transmission spectroscopy (IRS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe micro analyzer (EPMA) and electrochemical polarization techniques. The two kinds of steels showed the similar corrosion rate, corrosion product composition and electrochemical polarization behavior. Their rusts were mainly composed of β-FeOOH, Fe_8(O,OH)_(16)Cl_(1.3) and a little γ-FeOOH. Cl~- played an important role during the corrosion process of low-alloyed steels. The alloyed elements Cr, Ni and Cu in weathering steel were detected in the rusts; however, they showed no remarkable protective ability.

  15. Laser Alloyed Coatings of TiB2/Graphite on 9Cr18 Stainless Steel Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YING Li-xia; WANG Li-qin; JIA Xiao-mei; GU Le

    2007-01-01

    Modified coatings including carbide of iron, nickel, chromium, silicon, and titanium are obtained on 9Cr18 stainless steel surface by laser alloying. The processing method, the microstructure, the interface, the tribological properties, and the forming mechanisms of the coatings are analyzed. The results show that the microstructure of the alloyed coatings is mainly irregular FeC crystals. Carbides of chromium and iron are around the FeC crystals. Small granular TiC disperses in the alloyed coatings. The microhardness of the alloyed coatings is greatly improved because of the occurrence of carbide with high hardness. At the same time, the wear resistance of the alloyed coatings are higher than that of 9Cr18 stainless steel.

  16. Influence of Trace Alloying Elements on Corrosive Resistance of Cast Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Han-qiao; YAN Xiang; WEI Bo-kang; LIN Han-tong

    2005-01-01

    The influences of trace alloying elements niobium, vanadium and zirconium on the corrosive resistance of 18-8 type cast stainless steel have been studied in deta() orthogonal design experiments. The results show that zirconium is mainly in the form of compound inclusions, which is unfavorable to promote the corrosive resistance of the cast stainless steel. It can alleviate the disadvantageous influence of carbon addition on corrosive resistance when some elements such as vanadium and niobium exist in the steel, and niobium has a remarkable influence on the intergranular corrosive resistance but unobvious on the pitting corrosion, and vanadium has a slightly favorable influence on the corrosive resistance of the steel.

  17. Effects of Nitrogen Content and Austenitization Temperature on Precipitation in Niobium Micro-alloyed Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei CAO; Zhong-min YANG; Ying CHEN; Hui-min WANG; Xiao-li ZHAO

    2015-01-01

    The influences of nitrogen content and austenitization temperature on Nb(C,N)precipitation in niobium micro-alloyed steels were studied by different methods:optical microscopy,tensile tests,scanning electron mi-croscopy,transmission electron microscopy,physicochemical phase analysis,and small-angle X-ray scattering. The results show that the strength of the steel with high nitrogen content is slightly higher than that of the steel with low nitrogen content.The increase in the nitrogen content does not result in the increase in the amount of Nb(C,N) precipitates,which mainly depends on the niobium content in the steel.The mass fraction of small-sized Nb(C,N) precipitates (1-10 nm)in the steel with high nitrogen content is less than that in the steel with low nitrogen con-tent.After austenitized at 1 150 ℃,a number of large cuboidal and needle-shaped particles are detected in the steel with high nitrogen content,whereas they dissolve after austenitized at 1 200 ℃ and the Nb(C,N)precipitates become finer in both steels.Furthermore,the results also show that part of the nitrogen in steel involves the formation of al-loyed cementite.

  18. An Investigation of the Mechanical Properties of a Weldment of 7% Nickel Alloy Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Yeol Park

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, the demand for natural gas has steadily increased for the prevention of environmental pollution. For this reason, many liquefied natural gas (LNG carriers have been manufactured. Since one of the most important issues in the design of LNG carriers is to guarantee structural safety, the use of low-temperature materials is increasing. Among commonly employed low-temperature materials, nickel steel has many benefits such as good strength and outstanding corrosion resistance. Accordingly, nickel steels are one of the most commonly used low-temperature steels for LNG storage tanks. However, the study of fracture toughness with various welding consumables of 7% nickel alloy steel is insufficient for ensuring the structural safety of LNG storage tanks. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate fracture toughness of several different weldments for 7% nickel alloy steels. The weldment of 7% nickel alloy steel was fabricated by tungsten inert gas (TIG, flux cored arc welding (FCAW, and gas metal arc welding (GMAW. In order to assess the material performance of the weldments at low temperature, fracture toughness such as crack tip opening displacement (CTOD and the absorbed impact energy of weldments were compared with those of 9% nickel steel weldments.

  19. [Study on the multivariate quantitative analysis method for steel alloy elements using LIBS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yan-hong; Li, Ying; Tian, Ye; Lu, Yuan

    2014-08-01

    Quantitative analysis of steel alloys was carried out using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) taking into account the complex matrix effects in steel alloy samples. The laser induced plasma was generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm with pulse width of 10 ns and repeated frequency of 10 Hz. The LIBS signal was coupled to the echelle spectrometer and recorded by a high sensitive ICCD detector. To get the best experimental conditions, some parameters, such as the detection delay, the CCDs integral gate width and the detecting position from the sample surface, were optimized. The experimental results showed that the optimum detection delay time was 1.5 micros, the optimal CCDs integral gate width was 2 micros and the best detecting position was 1.5 mm below the alloy sample's surface. The samples used in the experiments are ten standard steel alloy samples and two unknown steel alloy samples. The quantitative analysis was investigated with the optimum experimental parameters. Elements Cr and Ni in steel alloy samples were taken as the detection targets. The analysis was carried out with the methods based on conditional univariate quantitative analysis, multiple linear regression and partial least squares (PLS) respectively. It turned out that the correlation coefficients of calibration curves are not very high in the conditional univariate calibration method. The analysis results were obtained with the unsatisfied relative errors for the two predicted samples. So the con- ditional univariate quantitative analysis method can't effectively serve the quantitative analysis purpose for multi-components and complex matrix steel alloy samples. And with multiple linear regression method, the analysis accuracy was improved effectively. The method based on partial least squares (PLS) turned out to be the best method among all the three quantitative analysis methods applied. Based on PLS, the correlation coefficient of calibration curve for Cr is 0

  20. 78 FR 60316 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Moldova, Trinidad and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    ... order on carbon and certain alloy steel wire rod from Mexico. The Commission found that the respondent... COMMISSION [Investigation Nos. 701-TA-417 and 731-TA-953, 957-959, and 961-962 (Second Review)] Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Moldova, Trinidad and Tobago, and...

  1. 78 FR 63450 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Moldova, Trinidad and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... International Trade Administration, Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico... on carbon and certain alloy steel wire rod (``wire rod'') from Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Moldova... Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Moldova, Trinidad and Tobago, and Ukraine, pursuant to section 751(c) of...

  2. 78 FR 33103 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Moldova, Trinidad and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    ... COMMISSION [Investigation Nos. 701-TA-417 and 731-TA-953, 957-959, 961, and 962 (Second Review)] Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Moldova, Trinidad and Tobago, and Ukraine... countervailing duty order on carbon and certain alloy steel wire rod (``wire rod'') from Brazil and...

  3. 76 FR 34044 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Extension of Time Limits for the Preliminary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Extension of Time Limits... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on carbon and certain alloy steel wire rod from...

  4. 77 FR 73617 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Preliminary Results and Partial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-11

    ... Value: Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico, 57 FR 42953 (September 17, 1992). Notification... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Preliminary...

  5. 75 FR 44763 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico; Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico; Extension of Time... welded non- alloy steel pipe from Mexico. We also received review requests on November 30, 2009,...

  6. 76 FR 52636 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Partial Rescission of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Partial... the antidumping duty order on certain circular welded non-alloy steel pipe (``circular welded...

  7. 75 FR 39917 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time Limit for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration (A-580-809) Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from the Republic of Korea... non-alloy steel pipe from the Republic of Korea, covering the period November 1, 2008 through...

  8. 78 FR 25253 - Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure From the People's Republic of China...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure From the People... seamless carbon and alloy steel standard, line, and pressure pipe ] (``seamless pipe'') from the...

  9. 75 FR 13729 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time Limit for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-23

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from the Republic of Korea: Extension of... circular welded non-alloy steel pipe from the Republic of Korea, covering the period November 1, 2007 through October 31, 2008. See Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from the Republic of Korea:...

  10. Bonding evolution with sintering temperature in low alloyed steels with chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuentes-Pacheco L.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, high performance PM steels for automotive applications follow a processing route that comprises die compaction of water-atomized powder, followed by sintering and secondary treatments, and finishing operations. This study examines Cr-alloyed sintered steels with two level of alloying. In chromium-alloyed steels, the surface oxide on the powder is of critical importance for developing the bonding between the particles during sintering. Reduction of this oxide depends mainly on three factors: temperature, dew point of the atmosphere, and carbothermic reduction provided by the added graphite. The transformation of the initial surface oxide evolves sequence as temperature increases during sintering, depending on the oxide composition. Carbothermic reduction is supposed to be the controlling mechanism, even when sintering in hydrogen-containing atmospheres. The effect of carbothermic reduction can be monitored by investigating the behavior of the specimens under tensile testing, and studying the resultant fracture surfaces.

  11. Mechanics property Study for Interface Bim Composite of Zinc Alloy ZAS35/Carbon Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈基勇; 耿浩然; 杨爱玲

    2002-01-01

    The distortional fields of interface-U-field and V-field-have been obtained after the mechanics property for the geometric distortion of interface of cracked zinc alloy ZAS35/carbon steel is analyzed by means of a laser moire interferometry. The optimum cast preheating temperature has been decided in the light of the experiment of shear strength. After the microstructure of interface of bimetal composite of zinc alloy ZAS35/carbon steel is analyzed and studied with a X ray diffraction and an electronic scanning mirror (ESM), the phase component of metallurgical bond of interface of zinc alloy ZAS35/carbon steel has been gained, and the results of interface scan of distribution of elements Fe/Zn have been obtained with the dip coating temperature of 700(C. The above working theory, the experimental technology and its results will be introduced in this paper, and its results will be analyzed.

  12. Fracture performance of high strength steels, aluminium and magnesium alloys during plastic deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of uniaxial tension tests were performed for 5052 and 6061 aluminum alloys, AZ31B magnesium alloy, TRIP600 and DP600 steels, to obtain a better understanding of their fracture performance. Scanning electron microscope (SEM observation of the microstructure evolution was conducted. The dimple structure, orientation relationship between the fracture surface and tensile direction, necking behavior were analyzed. The fracture mechanism and fracture mode of each material was discussed in detail. The results show that TRIP600 steel is subject to a typical inter-granular ductile fracture combined by shear fracture. DP600 steel belongs to mainly ductility mixed with normal fracture. Both 5052 and 6061 aluminum alloys are subject to a mixed ductility fracture and brittle fracture. AA5052 and AA6061 belong to a typical shear fracture and a normal fracture, respectively. Magnesium AZ31B is typical of a brittle fracture combined with normal fracture.

  13. Effect of the Strain Kind on the Texture and Microstructure of Low-Alloyed Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Shkatulyak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Crystallographic texture and microstructure of low-alloyed steel after twist extrusion (TE and subsequent cold rolling along and across the TE axis were studied. The double axial cylindrical texture with axes 110 and 100 parallel to the TE axis and the vortex-like microstructure are formed in the steel during the TE. The subsequent rolling of extruded steel along the TE axis promotes the forming of typical steel rolling texture as well as the microstructure with elongated grains in rolling direction. Typical steel rolling texture as well as the equiaxed microstructure is formed in extruded steel after rolling in the direction transverse to the TE axis. The mechanisms of formation of the texture are discussed.

  14. Load carrying capacity of RCC beams by replacing steel reinforcement bars with shape memory alloy bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajoria, Kamal M.; Kaduskar, Shreya S.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper the structural behavior of reinforced concrete (RC) beams with smart rebars under two point loading system has been numerically studied, using Finite Element Method. The material used in this study is Super-elastic Shape Memory Alloys (SE SMAs) which contains nickel and titanium. In this study, different quantities of steel and SMA rebars have been used for reinforcement and the behavior of these models under two point bending loading system is studied. A comparison of load carrying capacity for the model between steel reinforced concrete beam and the beam reinforced with S.M.A and steel are performed. The results show that RC beams reinforced with combination of shape memory alloy and steel show better performance.

  15. Fine structures in Fe3Al alloy layer of a new hot dip aluminized steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Li Yajiang; Wang Juan; Zhang Yonglan; X Holly

    2002-12-01

    The fine structure in the Fe–Al alloy layer of a new hot dip aluminized steel (HDA) was examined by means of X-ray diffractometry (XRD), electron diffraction technique, etc. The test results indicated that the Fe–Al alloy layer of the new aluminized steel mainly composed of Fe3Al, FeAl and -Fe (Al) solid solution. There was no brittle phase containing higher aluminum content, such as FeAl3 (59.18% Al) and Fe2Al7 (62.93% Al). The tiny cracks and embrittlement, formerly caused by these brittle phases in the conventional aluminum-coated steel, were effectively eliminated. There was no microscopic defect (such as tiny cracks, pores or loose layer) in the coating. This is favourable to resist high temperature oxidation and corrosion of the aluminized steel.

  16. Erosion Resistance Behaviours of H13 Steel to Molten ADC12 Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIN Yong-an; XU Luo-ping; WU Xiao-chun; LI Lin; WANG Rong

    2004-01-01

    H13 hot work steel samples and surface water vapor oxidized H13 samples were immersed into molten ADC12alloy under static resting or dynamic rotating conditions. Weigh-losing method was used to discover the influences of temperature, time and surface conditions on the erosion resistance of H13 steel. The interfaces between the steel and the molten alloy were studied with optical microscopy to compare the different erosion resistance behaviours. The results show that the composite layer outside of the compounds layers changes obviously with increasing temperature, lasting time or sample movement. The better erosion resistance of H13 steel can be endowed with the oxide films, which would gradually decrease along with the dissolve of the films.

  17. The mechanism of the surface alloy layer creation for cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Walasek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a detailed description of the process of creation of a surface alloy layer (using high-carbon ferrochromium on the cast steel casting. The mechanism of the surface alloy layer is based on the known theories [5,6]. The proposed course of formation of the layers has been extended to decarburization stage of steel. The research included proving the presence of carbon-lean zone. The experiment included the analysis of the distribution of elements and microhardness measurement.

  18. Thermal Activation Analyses of Dynamic Fracture Toughness of High Strength Low Alloy Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A formula is derived for determining the influence of temperatureand loading rate on dynamic fracture toughness of a high strength low alloy steel (HQ785C) from thermal activation analysis of the experimental results of three-point bend specimens as well as introducing an Arrhenius formula. lt is shown that the results obtained by the given formula are in good agreement with the experimental ones in the thermal activation region. The present method is also valuable to describe the relationship between dynamic fracture toughness and temperature and loading rate of other high strength low alloy steels.

  19. Microstructure evaluation in low alloy steel weld metal from convective heat transfer calculations in three dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mundra, K.; DebRoy, T.; Babu, S.S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; David, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Heat transfer and fluid flow during manual metal arc welding of low alloy steels were investigated by solving the equations of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy in three dimensions. Cooling rates were calculated at various locations in the weldment. Calculated cooling rates were coupled with an existing phase transformation model to predict percentages of acicular, allotriomorphic, and Widmanstaetten ferrites in various low alloy steel welds containing different concentration of V and Mn. Computed microstructures were in good agreement with experiment, indicating promise for predicting weld metal microstructure from the fundamentals of transport phenomena.

  20. The Effect of Microstructure on the Abrasion Resistance of Low Alloyed Steels

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, X.

    2016-01-01

    The thesis attempts to develop advanced high abrasion resistant steels with low hardness in combination with good toughness, processability and low alloying additions. For this purpose, a novel multi-pass dual-indenter (MPDI) scratch test approach has been developed to approach the real continuous abrasion process and unravel abrasion damage formation in construction steels, i.e. carrying out scratch tests using a large indenter with different pre-loads to generate a wide pre-scratch with sta...

  1. Stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen embrittlement of thick section high strength low alloy steel.

    OpenAIRE

    Needham, William Donald

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the corrosion performance of weldments of a high strength low alloy(HSLA) steel in a simulated seawater environment. This steel, designated HSLA80, was developed by the United States Navy for use in ship structural applications. Stress corrosion CRACKING(SCC) and hydrogen embrittlement(HEM) were investigated by conducting 42 Wedge-Opening load(WOL) tests as a function of stress intensity and corrosion potential and 33 Slow Strain Rate(SSR) tests...

  2. Cavitation Erosion of Electro Spark Deposited Nitinol vs. Stellite Alloy on Stainless Steel Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-15

    of combining Nitinol (NiTi) superelastic metal alloy with ElectroSpark Deposition (ESD) technology to increase the cavitation erosion resistance of...technocoat.co.jp/sparkdepoe.html. [35] e. a. Bruce D. Sartwell, " Electrospark Deposition for Depot- and Field-Level Component Repair and," Naval Research...EROSION OF ELECTRO SPARK DEPOSITED NITINOL VS. STELLITE® ALLOY ON STAINLESS STEEL SUBSTRATE Theresa A. Hoffard Lean-Miguel San Pedro Mikhail

  3. Electronic Structures and Alloying Behaviors of Ferrite Phases in High Co-Ni Secondary Hardened Martensitic Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@The electronic structure of ferrite (tempered martensite phase) in high Co-Ni secondary hardened martensitic steel has been investigated. The local density of states (LDOS) of alloying elements in the steel displays the relationship between solid solubility and the shape of the LDOS. The bond order integral (BOI) between atoms in the steel shows that the directional bonding of the p orbital of Si or C leads to the brittleness of the steel. At last, ∑BOI between atoms demonstrate that C, Co, Mn, Cr, Mo, Si strengthen the alloyed steel through solid-solution effects.

  4. 76 FR 66899 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Brazil, Mexico, the Republic of Korea, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... pipe from Brazil, Mexico, the Republic of Korea, and Taiwan; and certain circular welded carbon steel... Steel Pipe from Brazil, Mexico, the Republic of Korea, and Taiwan; and Certain Circular Welded Carbon... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Brazil, Mexico,...

  5. A study of steel alloys for potential use in CO2 sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tylczak, Joseph H.; Rawers, James C.; Blankenship, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    The effect of CO2 as a greenhouse gas, and the potential of global warming, has led to the study of sequestration of CO2 as a mineral carbonate. Some of the processes of mineral sequestration involve handing large tonnages of silicate minerals and reacting them with CO2. In this study the Albany Research Center evaluated the effects of wear and corrosion individually, and any possible synergetic effects resulting from a combination of wear and corrosion, on steel alloys that might be used in CO2 sequestration. By understanding the mechanism of slurry material loss, a better selection of erosion/corrosion resistant steel alloys can be chosen which in turn help plan construction costs. Four different conventional alloys were chosen. The alloys include AISI 1080 carbon steel, a 9Cr, 1 Mo steel, a 316 stainless steel, and a heat treatable 440C stainless steel. These materials covered a large range of alloy composition and cost. A variety of erosion and corrosion tests were used to evaluate the steels response to selected sequestration environments. The tests used included: (i) wear from dry Jet and HAET erosion tests, (ii) corrosion from immersion tests, and (iii) slurry erosion/corrosion tests. The slurry wear tests were conducted using a 270-μm silica abrasive in water and a solution (a mixture of sodium chloride, magnesium chloride, and sodium carbonate) saturated with CO2 at pH levels of 4.5 and 9.4. The results of these tests were compared with the results dry erosion and immersion corrosion tests. The results of the various tests were then used to evaluate the mechanism of material loss and determine is the presence of synergetic effects. The corrosion test showed little loss of material for all alloys. The erosion tests showed only a small difference between alloys. The slurry tests showed synergistic effect of combining erosion and corrosion resulted in a significant additional loss of material. It was further found both increasing the hardness and amounts of

  6. Medium carbon vanadium micro alloyed steels for drop forging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeszensky, Gabor; Plaut, Ronald Lesley

    1992-12-31

    Growing competitiveness of alternative manufacturing routes requires cost minimization in the production of drop forged components. The authors analyse the potential of medium carbon, vanadium microalloyed steels for drop forging. Laboratory and industrial experiments have been carried out emphasizing deformation and temperature cycles, strain rates and dwell times showing a typical processing path, associated mechanical properties and corresponding microstructures. The steels the required levels of mechanical properties on cooling after forging, eliminating subsequent heat treatment. The machinability of V-microalloyed steels is also improved when compared with plain medium carbon steels. (author) 17 refs., 19 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Effect of water radiolysis on corrosion: steel, cobalt and nickel alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musa, A.Y.; Behazin, M.; Knapp, Q.W.; Mizzi, D.; Wren, J.C., E-mail: jcwren@uwo.ca [Western Univ., Dept. of Chemistry, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Steel, cobalt and nickel alloys are used in the coolant system (or primary heat transport system) of a nuclear power plant. To understand the effect of γ-radiation on the corrosion mechanism of these alloys, a combination of electrochemical measurements and surface analyses as a function of the water chemistry, with and without γ-radiation present, were performed.Results to date have shown that γ-radiation has a major impact on the corrosion process by changing the corrosion potential in a system. This determines the nature of the oxide phase (chemical state and morphology) that forms on a corroding alloy surface. (author)

  8. Surface microstructures and antimicrobial properties of copper plasma alloyed stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangyu; Huang, Xiaobo; Jiang, Li; Ma, Yong; Fan, Ailan; Tang, Bin

    2011-12-01

    Bacterial adhesion to stainless steel surfaces is one of the major reason causing the cross-contamination and infection in many practical applications. An approach to solve this problem is to enhance the antibacterial properties on the surface of stainless steel. In this paper, novel antibacterial stainless steel surfaces with different copper content have been prepared by a plasma surface alloying technique at various gas pressures. The microstructure of the alloyed surfaces was investigated using glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The viability of bacteria attached to the antibacterial surfaces was tested using the spread plate method. The antibacterial mechanism of the alloyed surfaces was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that gas pressure has a great influence on the surface elements concentration and the depth of the alloyed layer. The maximum copper concentration in the alloyed surface obtained at the gas pressure of 60 Pa is about 7.1 wt.%. This alloyed surface exhibited very strong antibacterial ability, and an effective reduction of 98% of Escherichia coli (E. coli) within 1 h was achieved by contact with the alloyed surface. The maximum thickness of the copper alloyed layer obtained at 45 Pa is about 6.5 μm. Although the rate of reduction for E. coli of this alloyed surface was slower than that of the alloyed surface with the copper content about 7.1 wt.% over the first 3 h, few were able to survive more than 12 h and the reduction reached over 99.9%. The XPS analysis results indicated that the copper ions were released when the copper alloyed stainless steel in contact with bacterial solution, which is an important factor for killing bacteria. Based on an overall consideration of bacterial killing rate and durability, the alloyed surface with the copper content of 2.5 wt.% and the thickness of about 6.5 μm obtained at the gas pressure of 45 Pa is expected

  9. Corrosion of steels in molten gallium (Ga), tin (Sn) and tin lithium alloy (Sn–20Li)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, Masatoshi, E-mail: kondo.masatoshi@nr.titech.ac.jp [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Ishii, Masaomi [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka-shi, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Muroga, Takeo [Department of Helical Plasma Research, National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 502-5292 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Corrosion of RAFM steel, JLF-1, in liquid Sn–20Li was caused by the formation of Fe-Sn alloyed layer. - Highlights: • The corrosion tests were performed for the reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel JLF-1 and the austenitic steel SUS316 in liquid Ga, Sn and Sn-20Li at 873 K up to 750 h. • The weight loss of the specimens exposed to liquid Ga, Sn and Sn-20Li was evaluated. • The corrosion of the steels in liquid Ga was caused by the alloying reaction between Ga and Fe on the steel surface. • The corrosion of the steels in liquid Sn was caused by the alloying reaction between Sn and Fe on the steel surface. • The corrosion of the steels in liquid Sn-20Li was caused by the formation of the Fe-Sn alloyed layer and the diffusion of Sn and Li into the steel matrix. - Abstract: The compatibility of steels in liquid gallium (Ga), tin (Sn) and tin lithium alloy (Sn–20Li) was investigated by means of static corrosion tests. The corrosion tests were performed for reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel JLF-1 (JOYO-HEAT, Fe–9Cr–2W–0.1C) and austenitic steel SUS316 (Fe–18Cr–12Ni–2Mo). The test temperature was 873 K, and the exposure time was 250 and 750 h. The corrosion of these steels in liquid Ga, Sn and Sn–20Li alloy was commonly caused by the formation of a reaction layer and the dissolution of the steel elements into the melts. The reaction layer formed in liquid Ga was identified as Fe{sub 3}Ga from the results of metallurgical analysis and the phase diagram. The growth rate of the reaction layer on the JLF-1 steel showed a parabolic rate law, and this trend indicated that the corrosion could be controlled by the diffusion process through the layer. The reaction layer formed in liquid Sn and Sn–20Li was identified as FeSn. The growth rate had a linear function with exposure time. The corrosion in Sn and Sn–20Li could be controlled by the interface reaction on the layer. The growth rate of the layer formed

  10. Development of a Nitrogen-Modified Stainless-Steel Hardfacing Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ryan Thomas

    A 2nd generation hardfacing alloy, Nitromaxx, has been designed though an integrated approach of chemical modification, characterization, and testing. Nitromaxx is a stainless-steel alloy modified with 0.5wt% nitrogen which has improved elevated temperature properties and wear performance. This is achieved by changing both the microstructure phase balance and inherent deformation characteristics of the metal. The alloy is fabricated by a powder metallurgy-hot isostatic pressing (PM-HIP) method, rather than traditional cladding methods. This allows for alloy property modification by equilibrium heat treatment while eliminating significant fabrication defects, so that component life is extended wear and galling performance is improved. The design approach involved extensive characterization of severely worn and galled surfaces of the 1st generation of hardfacing alloys. Observation of samples after galling testing showed highly inhomogeneous deformation in regions of the gall scar, leading to the design hypothesis that strain-localization is a controlling mechanism in severe wear of stainless-steels. Additionally, the presence and subsequent loss was investigated and correlated microstructurally to the transition to poor galling behavior in the existing stainless steel hardfacing NOREM02. This provided new insight and identification of key microstructural and mechanical properties that improve galling performance: 1) increased strain-hardening rate in the metal matrix at elevated temperature, 2) increased yield strength in the matrix leading to higher hardness, and 3) increased volume fraction of hard, non-deforming phases. All of these alloy design goals can be realized by the addition of nitrogen, which 1) at high concentration is shown to lower the stacking fault energy in the stainless steel matrix, 2) increases interstitial matrix strengthening, and 3) increases the volume fraction of nitride phases. These observations have been confirmed qualitatively and

  11. Plasma Surface Cu Alloyed Layer as a Lubricant on Stainless Steel Sheet:Wear Characteristics and On-job Performance in Incremental Forming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Hongyan; WEI Hongyu; Ghulam Hussain; TAO Kemei; Asif Iqbal; RAO Weifeng

    2016-01-01

    To solve the problems of poor forming and easy adhesion of the stainless steel, Cu alloyed layer on the stainless steels was prepared by the double glow plasma surface alloying technique. The experimental results indicated that the supersaturated copper dispersedly precipitated in grain interior and crystal boundaries and formed the vermicular structure. The tribological tests indicated that the friction coefifcient of the Cu alloyed layer was lower than that of the stainless steels. The wear rate of stainless steel in the presence of Cu alloyed layer was approximately 2-fold lower than that in the absence of the alloyed layer. The results of the incremental forming indicated that the ploughing phenomenon was not observed on the stainless steel in the presence of Cu alloyed layer during the incremental forming, while the stainless steel presented the deep ploughing. Therefore, Cu alloyed layer on stainless steel exhibited excellent self-lubrication and forming properties.

  12. Comparison of heat effects associated with metal cutting method on ST 37 alloy steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Dahil

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, by examining effects of the heat on the cut surface of material formed by the processes, such as Plasma, Laser, Wire Erosion applied on St 37 alloy steel material, it has been determined that minimum cutting damage occurs in wire erosion process.

  13. The Effect of Microstructure on the Abrasion Resistance of Low Alloyed Steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, X.

    2016-01-01

    The thesis attempts to develop advanced high abrasion resistant steels with low hardness in combination with good toughness, processability and low alloying additions. For this purpose, a novel multi-pass dual-indenter (MPDI) scratch test approach has been developed to approach the real continuous a

  14. Strength and toughness improvement of low-alloy steel for nuclear applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H. C.; Lee, S. H.; Ku, Y. M.; Lee, B. J. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    2002-04-01

    Low carbon low alloy steels are used in nuclear power plants as pressure vessel, steam generator, etc. Nuclear pressure vessel material requires good combination of strength/ toughness, good weldability and high resistance to neutron irradiation and corrosion fatigue. For SA508III steels, most widely used in the production of nuclear power plant, attaining good toughness prior to service is one of the utmost designing goals. This work has been carried out by the combination of thermodynamic calculation, microstructural observation and evaluation of designed alloy, and the evaluation of HAZ characteristics. In this work, the means of alloy design developed in the previous study were adopted. Cr/Mo contents was controlled and Ni contents was increased to improve toughness. High toughness values were obtained in designed low carbon steels, with higher strength level than that of SA508III steels. A high CVN energy of 220J was obtained at -100 .deg. C, and a low DBTT of about-100 .deg. C was obtained in 60Cr alloy prepared in this work. 38 refs., 61 figs., 32 tabs. (Author)

  15. Computing solubility products using ab initio methods; precipitation of NbC in low alloyed steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klymko, T.; Sluiter, M.H.F.

    2012-01-01

    The solubility product of NbC in low alloyed steel is computed from electronic density functional methods including the effects of electronic, vibrational, and magnetic excitations. Although many simplifications are made in the computations, agreement with experimental data is within the scatter of

  16. Corrosion resistance of Zn-Co-Fe alloy coatings on high strength steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lodhi, Z.F.; Mol, J.M.C.; Hovestad, A.; Hoen-Velterop, L. 't; Terryn, H.; Wit, J.H.W.de

    2009-01-01

    The corrosion properties of electrodeposited zinc-cobalt-iron (Zn-Co-Fe) alloys (up to 40 wt.% Co and 1 wt.% Fe) on steel were studied by using various electrochemical techniques and compared with zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) coatings in 3.5% NaCl solution. It was found that with an increase in Co con

  17. Influence of Processing and Heat Treatment on Corrosion Resistance and Properties of High Alloyed Steel Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Horst; Weber, Sebastian; Raab, Ulrich; Theisen, Werner; Wagner, Lothar

    2012-09-01

    Corrosion and abrasive wear are two important aspects to be considered in numerous engineering applications. Looking at steels, high-chromium high-carbon tool steels are proper and cost-efficient materials. They can either be put into service as bulk materials or used as comparatively thin coatings to protect lower alloyed construction or heat treatable steels from wear and corrosion. In this study, two different corrosion resistant tool steels were used for the production of coatings and bulk material. They were processed by thermal spraying and super solidus liquid phase sintering as both processes can generally be applied to produce coatings on low alloyed substrates. Thermally sprayed (high velocity oxygen fuel) coatings were investigated in the as-processed state, which is the most commonly used condition for technical applications, and after a quenching and tempering treatment. In comparison, sintered steels were analyzed in the quenched and tempered condition only. Significant influence of alloy chemistry, processing route, and heat treatment on tribological properties was found. Experimental investigations were supported by computational thermodynamics aiming at an improvement of tribological and corrosive resistance.

  18. Mechanical Behavior of Two High Strength Alloy Steels Under Conditions of Cyclic Tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivatsan, T. S.; Manigandan, K.; Sastry, S.; Quick, T.; Schmidt, M. L.

    2014-01-01

    The results of a recent study aimed at understanding the conjoint influence of load ratio and microstructure on the high cycle fatigue properties and resultant fracture behavior of two high strength alloy steels is presented and discussed. Both the chosen alloy steels, i.e., 300M and Tenax™ 310 have much better strength and ductility properties to offer in comparison with the other competing high strength steels having near similar chemical composition. Test specimens were precision machined from the as-provided stock of each steel. The machined specimens were deformed in both uniaxial tension and cyclic fatigue under conditions of stress control. The test specimens of each alloy steel were cyclically deformed over a range of maximum stress at two different load ratios and the number of cycles to failure recorded. The specific influence of load ratio on cyclic fatigue life is presented and discussed keeping in mind the maximum stress used during cyclic deformation. The fatigue fracture surfaces were examined in a scanning electron microscope to establish the macroscopic mode and to concurrently characterize the intrinsic features on the fracture surface. The conjoint influence of nature of loading, maximum stress, and microstructure on cyclic fatigue life is discussed.

  19. Impurity content of reduced-activation ferritic steels and a vanadium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Bloom, E.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to analyze a reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel and a vanadium alloy for low-level impurities that would compromise the reduced-activation characteristics of these materials. The ferritic steel was from the 5-ton IEA heat of modified F82H, and the vanadium alloy was from a 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti. To compare techniques for analysis of low concentrations of impurities, the vanadium alloy was also examined by glow discharge mass spectrometry. Two other reduced-activation steels and two commercial ferritic steels were also analyzed to determine the difference in the level of the detrimental impurities in the IEA heat and steels for which no extra effort was made to restrict some of the tramp impurities. Silver, cobalt, molybdenum, and niobium proved to be the tramp impurities of most importance. The levels observed in these two materials produced with present technology exceeded the limits for low activation for either shallow land burial or recycling. The chemical analyses provide a benchmark for the improvement in production technology required to achieve reduced activation; they also provide a set of concentrations for calculating decay characteristics for reduced-activation materials. The results indicate the progress that has been made and give an indication of what must still be done before the reduced-activation criteria can be achieved.

  20. Microstructural Evolution During Friction Stir Welding of Mild Steel and Ni-Based Alloy 625

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Johnnatan Rodriguez; Ramirez, Antonio J.

    2017-01-01

    Microstructure evolution during friction stir welding (FSW) of mild steel and Ni-based alloy 625 was studied. Regarding the Ni-based alloy, the welding process led to grain refinement caused by discontinuous and continuous dynamic recrystallization, where bulging of the pre-existing grains and subgrain rotation were the primary mechanisms of recrystallization. In the steel, discontinuous dynamic recrystallization was identified as the recovery process experienced by the austenite. Simple shear textures were observed in the regions affected by the deformation of both materials. Although the allotropic transformation obscured the deformation history, the thermo-mechanically affected zone was identified in the steel by simple shear texture components. A new methodology for the study of texture evolution based on rotations of the slip systems using pole figures is presented as an approximation to describe the texture evolution in FSW.

  1. Microstructural Evolution During Friction Stir Welding of Mild Steel and Ni-Based Alloy 625

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Johnnatan Rodriguez; Ramirez, Antonio J.

    2017-03-01

    Microstructure evolution during friction stir welding (FSW) of mild steel and Ni-based alloy 625 was studied. Regarding the Ni-based alloy, the welding process led to grain refinement caused by discontinuous and continuous dynamic recrystallization, where bulging of the pre-existing grains and subgrain rotation were the primary mechanisms of recrystallization. In the steel, discontinuous dynamic recrystallization was identified as the recovery process experienced by the austenite. Simple shear textures were observed in the regions affected by the deformation of both materials. Although the allotropic transformation obscured the deformation history, the thermo-mechanically affected zone was identified in the steel by simple shear texture components. A new methodology for the study of texture evolution based on rotations of the slip systems using pole figures is presented as an approximation to describe the texture evolution in FSW.

  2. Nondestructive inspection assessment of eddy current and electrochemical analysis to separate inconel and stainless steel alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, D.G.; Sorensen, N.R.

    1998-02-01

    This report presents a nondestructive inspection assessment of eddy current and electrochemical analysis to separate inconel alloys from stainless steel alloys as well as an evaluation of cleaning techniques to remove a thermal oxide layer on aircraft exhaust components. The results of this assessment are presented in terms of how effective each technique classifies a known exhaust material. Results indicate that either inspection technique can separate inconel and stainless steel alloys. Based on the experiments conducted, the electrochemical spot test is the optimum for use by airframe and powerplant mechanics. A spot test procedure is proposed for incorporation into the Federal Aviation Administration Advisory Circular 65-9A Airframe & Powerplant Mechanic - General Handbook. 3 refs., 70 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. A Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of Plate Martensite Formation in High-carbon Low Alloy Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Albin Stormvinter; Peter Hedstr(o)m; Annika Borgenstam

    2013-01-01

    The martensitic microstructures in two high-carbon low alloy steels have been investigated by classical and automated crystallographic analysis under a transmission electron microscope.It is found that the martensitic substructure changes from consisting mostly of transformation twins for 1.20 mass% carbon (C) steel to both transformation twins and planar defects on {101}M for 1.67 mass% C steel.In the 1.67 mass% C steel it is further found that small martensite units have a rather homogeneous substructure,while large martensite units are more inhomogeneous.In addition,the martensite units in both steels are frequently found to be of zigzag patterns and have distinct crystallographic relationships with neighboring martensite units,e.g.kink or wedge couplings.Based on the present findings the development of martensite in high-carbon low alloy steels is discussed and a schematic of the martensite formation is presented.Moreover,whether the schematic view can be applied to plate martensite formation in general,is discussed.

  4. Influence of Alloying Elements Corrosion Resistance of Cold on Mechanical Properties and Rolled C-Mn-Si TRIP Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ling-yun; WU Di; LI Zhuang

    2012-01-01

    The rust layer plays an important role in the corrosion of steel in chlorinated environments. Salt spray, po- tentiodynamic polarization curve and tensile test were conducted in laboratory for the specimens after two-stage heat treatment. The influence of the alloying elements on mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of three kinds of steels was investigated by observing the microstructure and the morphologies of rust layer. The results show that the highest value (29%) of total elongation for steel A is obtained. The mechanical property of the specimen for steel C exhibits best strength ductility balance (21 384 MPa ·%) because of the presence of the multiphase microstructures after a two-stage heat treatment and the addition of the alloying elements. The corrosion products are known to be a complex mixture of Fe3O4 , Fe2O3 and α-FeOOH for steel C. The presence of the alloying elements results in the for mation of compact and dense rust layers in steel B and C. Passive film protects the substrate of TRIP (transformation induced plasticity) steel containing a complex mix of multiphase. Superior corrosion performance is exhibited for steel C with low alloying contents due to the enrichment of alloying elements within the rust layers.

  5. Influence of nitrogen alloying on hydrogen embrittlement in AISI 304-type stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannula, S.-P.; Hanninen, H.; Tahtinen, S.

    1984-12-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement of AISI 304-type austenitic stainless steels has been studied with special emphasis on the effects of the nitrogen content of the steels. Hydrogen charging was found to degrade the mechanical properties of all the steels studied, as measured by a tensile test. The fracture surfaces of hydrogen charged specimens were brittle cleavage-like whereas the uncharged specimens showed ductile, dimpled fracture. In sensitized materials transgranular cleavage mode of fracture was replaced by an intergranular mode of fracture and the losses of mechanical properties were higher. Nitrogen alloying decreased the hydrogen-induced losses of mechanical properties by increasing the stabilit of austenite. In sensitized steels the stability of austenite and nitrogen content were found to have only a minor effect on hydrogen embrittlement, except when sensitization had caused ..cap alpha..'-martensite transformation at the grain boundaries.

  6. Influence of nitrogen alloying on hydrogen embrittlement in AISI 304-type stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannula, Simo-Pekka; Hänninen, Hannu; Tähtinen, Seppo

    1984-12-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement of AISI 304-type austenitic stainless steels has been studied with special emphasis on the effects of the nitrogen content of the steels. Hydrogen charging was found to degrade the mechanical properties of all the steels studied, as measured by a tensile test. The fracture surfaces of hydrogen charged specimens were brittle cleavage-like whereas the uncharged specimens showed ductile, dimpled fracture. In sensitized materials transgranular cleavage mode of fracture was replaced by an intergranular mode of fracture and the losses of mechanical properties were higher. Nitrogen alloying decreased the hydrogen-induced losses of mechanical properties by increasing the stability of austenite. In sensitized steels the stability of austenite and nitrogen content were found to have only a minor effect on hydrogen embrittlement, except when sensitization had caused α'-martensite transformation at the grain boundaries.

  7. Study on fatigue resistance of low alloy steels with Mo and Cr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enculescu, E.; Chicet, D. L.; Dia, V.; Stanciu, S.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents, based on a case study, the analysis of the factors that influence the mechanical cyclic fatigue resistance of two grades of low alloy steel with Mo and Cr. It was studied the fatigue behavior in real operating conditions of some active elements manufactured from the two low-alloyed steel grades, elements that are equipping some farm implements. Using the fractographic analysis, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, were analyzed the samples that carried away because of the fatigue fracture. On samples taken from the two brands of low alloy steels with Mo and Cr were performed tempering thermal treatments that modified the structure, in order to improve the operating characteristics. The effect of those thermal treatments was initially observed by microstructural analysis of metallographic prepared samples (by polishing and chemical attack using nital reagent), that revealed a troostite type structure. On the heat-treated samples were determined a number of mechanical properties: hardness, impact strength and tensile test. There was observed an improvement of the impact bending strength for both alloys and a tensile behavior that favors increasing resistance to fatigue.

  8. Influence of silicon addition on the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of low-alloy steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Hebda; H Dębecka; J Kazior

    2015-12-01

    The addition of silicon to low-alloy steel allows to modify the materials' microstructure and thus to improve their corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. The influence of adding different amounts of silicon on the properties (density, transverse rupture strength, microhardness and corrosion resistance) and microstructure of low-alloy steel was investigated. Samples were prepared via the mechanical alloying process, which is the most useful method to homogeneously introduce silicon to low-alloy steel. Sintering was performed by using the spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique. After the SPS process, half of each of the obtained samples was heat-treated in a vacuum furnace. The results show that high-density materials were achieved, and a homogeneous and fine microstructure was obtained. The investigated compositions containing 1 wt% of silicon had better corrosion resistance than samples with 3 wt% of silicon addition. Furthermore, corrosion resistance as well as the mechanical and plastic properties of the samples with 1 wt% of silicon can be further improved by applying heat treatment.

  9. Microstructures and properties of welded joint of TiNi shape memory alloy and stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱小明; 孙大谦; 李明高; 刘卫红

    2004-01-01

    The fracture characteristics of the joint were analyzed by means of scanning electron microscope(SEM).Microstructures of the joint were examined by means of optical microscope, SEM and an image analyzer. The results show that the tensile strength of the inhomogeneous joint of TiNi shape memory alloy and stainless steel is lower than that of the homogeneous joint and a plastic field appears in the heat affected zone on the side of TiNi shape memory alloy. Because TiNi shape memory alloy and stainless steel melted, a brittle as-cast structure was formed in the weld. The tensile strength and the shape memory effect of the inhomogeneous joint are strongly influenced by the changes of composition and structure of the joint. Measures should be taken to reduce the base metal melting and prevent the weld metal from the invasion by O for improving the properties of the TiNi shape memory alloy and stainless steel inhomogeneous joint.

  10. High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steels Manufactured by Nitrogen Gas Alloying and Adding Nitrided Ferroalloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hua-bing; JIANG Zhou-hua; SHEN Ming-hui; YOU Xiang-mi

    2007-01-01

    A simple and feasible method for the production of high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels involves nitrogen gas alloying and adding nitrided ferroalloys under normal atmospheric conditions. Alloying by nitrogen gas bubbling in Fe-Cr-Mn-Mo series alloys was carried out in MoSi2 resistance furnace and air induction furnace under normal atmospheric conditions. The results showed that nitrogen alloying could be accelerated by increasing nitrogen gas flow rate, prolonging residence time of bubbles, increasing gas/molten steel interfaces, and decreasing the sulphur and oxygen contents in molten steel. Nitrogen content of 0.69% in 18Cr18Mn was obtained using air induction furnace by bubbling of nitrogen gas from porous plug. In addition, the nickel-free, high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels with sound and compact macrostructure had been produced in the laboratory using vacuum induction furnace and electroslag remelting furnace under nitrogen atmosphere by the addition of nitrided alloy with the maximum nitrogen content of 0.81 %. Pores were observed in the ingots obtained by melting and casting in vacuum induction furnace with the addition of nitrided ferroalloys and under nitrogen atmosphere. After electroslag remelting of the cast ingots, they were all sound and were free of pores. The yield of nitrogen increased with the decrease of melting rate in the ESR process. Due to electroslag remelting under nitrogen atmosphere and the consequential addition of aluminum as deoxidizer to the slag, the loss of manganese decreased obviously. There existed mainly irregular Al2O3 inclusions and MnS inclusions in ESR ingots, and the size of most of the inclusions was less than 5 μm. After homogenization of the hot rolled plate at 1 150 ℃× 1 h followed by water quenching, the microstructure consisted of homogeneous austenite.

  11. Corrosion of ferritic-martensitic steels and nickel-based alloys in supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaowei

    The corrosion behavior of ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels and Ni-based alloys in supercritical water (SCW) has been studied due to their potential applications in future nuclear reactor systems, fossil fuel power plants and waste treatment processes. 9˜12% chromium ferritic/martensitic steels exhibit good radiation resistance and stress corrosion cracking resistance. Ni-based alloys with an austenitic face-centered cubic (FCC) structure are designed to retain good mechanical strength and corrosion/oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. Corrosion tests were carried out at three temperatures, 360°C, 500°C and 600°C, with two dissolved oxygen contents, 25 ppb and 2 ppm for up to 3000 hours. Alloys modified by grain refinement and reactive element addition were also investigated to determine their ability to improve the corrosion resistance in SCW. A duplex oxide structure was observed in the F/M steels after exposure to 25 ppb oxygen SCW, including an outer oxide layer with columnar magnetite grains and an inner oxide layer constituted of a mixture of spinel and ferrite phases in an equiaxed grain structure. An additional outermost hematite layer formed in the SCW-exposed samples when the oxygen content was increased to 2 ppm. Weight gain in the F/M steels increased with exposure temperatures and times, and followed parabolic growth kinetics in most of the samples. In Ni-based alloys after exposure to SCW, general corrosion and pitting corrosion were observed, and intergranular corrosion was found when exposed at 600°C due to formation of a local healing layer. The general oxide structure on the Ni-based alloys was characterized as NiO/Spinel/(CrxFe 1-x)2O3/(Fe,Ni). No change in oxidation mechanism was observed in crossing the critical point despite the large change in water properties. Corrosion resistance of the F/M steels was significantly improved by plasma-based yttrium surface treatment because of restrained outward diffusion of iron by the

  12. Investigation on laser brazing AA6056 Al alloy to XC18 low-carbon steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianjun Ding; Feiqun Li; Feng Qu; Patrice Peyre; Remy Fabbro

    2005-01-01

    @@ Based on the studies of influence of YAG laser heating conditions for Al alloy melt and steel on wettability,the mechanics of the laser overlap braze welding of 6056 Al and XC18 steel sheet has been investigated.Under the temperature range which is above the melting point of the Al alloy and below the melting point of the steel, two dissimilar metals can be joined by means of laser braze welding. There is no crack observed in the joining area, i.e. Al-Fe intermetallic phase (Fe3Al/FeAl/FeAl3/Fe2Al5) layer formed by solution and diffusion between liquid-solid interface. The temperature range can be defined as the process temperatures of laser braze welding of Al-Fe materials. Selecting a higher laser heating temperature can improve the wettability of Al melt to steel surface, but the intermetallic phase layer is also thicker. When the laser heating temperature is so high that the joining surface of steel is melted, there is a crack trend in the joining area.

  13. Corrosion behavior of EUROFER steel in flowing eutectic Pb-17Li alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konys, J. E-mail: juergen.konys@imf.fzk.de; Krauss, W.; Voss, Z.; Wedemeyer, O

    2004-08-01

    Reduced-activation-ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels are considered for application in fusion technology as structural materials. The alloy EUROFER 97 was developed on the basis of the experience gained with steels of the OPTIFER, MANET and F82H-mod. type. These alloys will be in contact with the liquid breeder Pb-17Li and their corrosion behavior is of significance for their successful application. Corrosion tests of EUROFER 97 in flowing Pb-17Li at 480 deg. C were performed up to about 12 000 h to evaluate the kinetics of the dissolution attack. The exposed samples were analysed by metallography and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with EDX. The results show that EUROFER 97 is attacked by flowing liquid Pb-17Li with a flow velocity of about 0.3 m/s similar to the earlier examined steels and that the typical steel elements are dissolved. The observed attack is of uniform type with values of about 90 {mu}m/year. The corrosion rate is a somewhat smaller for EUROFER compared to the other RAFM steels but with equal activation energy.

  14. Corrosion behavior of Cr/Ni alloy coated ferritic stainless steel in simulated cathodic PEMFC environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rendon, M.; Rivas, S.V.; Arriga, L.G.; Orozco, G. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, Queretaro (Mexico); Perez-Quiroz, J.T. [Inst. Mexicano del Transporte, Queretaro (Mexico); Porcayo, J. [Inst. de Investigaciones Electricas, Morelos (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    The bipolar plate in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) must be corrosion resistant and the interfacial contact resistance (ICR) with the gas diffusion layer must be low. For these reasons, stainless steel with high Cr content is considered to be a viable material for use in bipolar plate construction. This study evaluated the corrosion resistance of ferritic stainless steels 441 and 439, with and without a Cr/Ni coating, under simulated cathodic PEMFC conditions. Steel 441 without coating has a low corrosion current density and can be considered as a candidate material to be used as bipolar plate. The study showed that after the Cr/Ni coating was applied by Thermal Spray Metal method, the corrosion current density increased due to selective dissolution of an alloy element. The corrosion current density of the coatings was higher than the DOE target value, rendering them an unfeasible option to be used in bipolar plates for fuel cell applications. However, previous studies have shown that after the coating was applied, a passivation process improved the corrosion resistance. Although steel 441 appears to be a better candidate than steel 316 because of its lower cost, the behaviour of the Ni-Cr alloys was not satisfactory in corrosive acidic medium. 5 refs.

  15. Development of Forsterite Based Insulating Board for Alloy Steel Con—casting Tundish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAOJi-zeng; ZHOULei; 等

    1994-01-01

    To meet the operation requirement of com-casting tundish for alloy steel.a forsterite based insulating board has been developed.The effects of binder ,fiber and other additives on the properties of the properties of the products have been described;the theoretial reason of assuring containing clear steel by using inorganic binder bonded forsterite based insulating board were also discussed;the mineral composition and microstructure of the products have been analyzed by means of XRD.SEM and microscope ,The results indicate that the forsteite based insulating board with excel-lent performance and dood application results has been obtained.

  16. Estimation of cyclic stress-strain curves for low-alloy steel from hardness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Basan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This article describes investigations into the existence of correlation between experimentally determined cyclic parameters and hardness of quenched and tempered representative low-alloy steel 42CrMo4. A good correlation was found to exist between cyclic strength coefficient K’ and Brinell hardness HB, but not between cyclic strain hardening exponent n‘ and hardness HB. Nevertheless, good agreement between calculated and experimental cyclic stress-strain curves shows that cyclic parameters i.e. cyclic stress-strain curves of the investigated steel can be successfully estimated from its hardness.

  17. Assessment of the Low Alloy Cast Steel Inoculation Effects with Chosen Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bartocha

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Structure, and thus the mechanical properties of steel are primarily a function of chemical composition and the solidification process which can be influenced by the application of the inoculation treatment. This effect depends on the modifier used. The article presents the results of studies designed to assess the effects of structural low alloy steel inoculation by selected modifying additives. The study was performed on nine casts modeled with different inoculants, assessment of the procedure impact was based on the macrostructure of made castings. The ratio of surface area equivalent to the axial zone of the crystals and columnar crystals zone was adopted as a measure of the inoculation effect.

  18. Dynamic Recrystallization and Grain Growth Behavior of 20SiMn Low Carbon Alloy Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Lanfeng; ZHONG Yuexian; MA Qingxian; YUAN Chaolong; MA Lishen

    2008-01-01

    A senes of thermodynamics experiments were used to optimize the hot forging process of 20SiMn low-carbon alloy steel.A dynamic recrystallization and grain growth model was developed for the 20SiMn steel for common production conditions of heavy forgings by doing a nonlinear curve fit of the expenment data.Optimized forging parameters were developed based on the control of the dynamic recrystallization and the MnS secondary phase.The data shows that the initial grain size and the MnS secondary phase all affect the behavior of the 20SiMn dynamic recrystallization and grain growth.

  19. Effect of Nitriding on Fatigue Characteristics of Cr-Mo Alloy Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Kwang Keun; Kim, Jae Hoon; Choi, Hoon Seok [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    CrMo alloy steel was nitrided using two types of processing methods, ion-nitriding processing and nitrocarburizing. Both processes were conducted for a duration of 30 min. To compare the surface hardness of the alloys created by the different processes , microhardness tests were conducted, and fatigue tests of each material were performed by a cantilever rotary bending fatigue test machine (Yamamoto, YRB 200) in the very high cycle regime (N > 10{sup 7}cycle). Fractography of the fractured surfaces was conducted by scanning electron microscopy - to observe the fracture mechanisms of very high cycle fatigue and the effect of the nitriding process on the fatigue characteristics.

  20. Gas bubbles evolution peculiarities in ferritic-martensitic and austenitic steels and alloys under helium-ion irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chernov, [No Value; Kalashnikov, AN; Kahn, BA; Binyukova, SY

    2003-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has been used to investigate the gas bubble evolution in model alloys of the Fe C system, ferritic-martensitic steels of 13Cr type, nickel and austenitic steels under 40-keV helium-ion it. radiation up to a fluence of 5 x 10(20) m(-2) at the temperature of 920 K. It

  1. Literature Survey on the Stress Corrosion Cracking of Low-Alloy Steels in High Temperature Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, H.P

    2002-02-01

    The present report is a summary of a literature survey on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour/ mechanisms in low-alloy steels (LAS) in high-temperature water with special emphasis to primary-pressure-boundary components of boiling water reactors (BWR). A brief overview on the current state of knowledge concerning SCC of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel and piping steels under BWR conditions is given. After a short introduction on general aspects of SCC, the main influence parameter and available quantitative literature data concerning SCC of LAS in high-temperature water are discussed on a phenomenological basis followed by a summary of the most popular SCC models for this corrosion system. The BWR operating experience and service cracking incidents are discussed with respect to the existing laboratory data and background knowledge. Finally, the most important open questions and topics for further experimental investigations are outlined. (author)

  2. Factors affecting the strength of multipass low-alloy steel weld metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, B. M.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanical properties of multipass high-strength steel weld metals depend upon several factors, among the most important being: (1) The interaction between the alloy composition and weld metal cooling rate which determines the as-deposited microstructure; and (2) the thermal effects of subsequent passes on each underlying pass which alter the original microstructure. The bulk properties of a multipass weld are therefore governed by both the initial microstructure of each weld pass and its subsequent thermal history. Data obtained for a high strength low alloy steel weld metal confirmed that a simple correlation exists between mechanical properties and welding conditions if the latter are in turn correlated as weld cooling rate.

  3. Research on CMT welding of nickel-based alloy with stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Cold Metal Transfer (CMT) welding technique is a new welding technique introduced by Fronius company. CMT welding of nickel-based alloy with stainless steel was carried out using CuSi3 filler wire in this paper. Effects of welding parameters, including welding current, welding speed, etc, on weld surface appearance were tested. Microstructure and mechanical properties of CMT weld were studied. The results show that the thickness of interface reaction layer of the nickel-based alloy is 14.3μm, which is only 4.33% of base material. The weld is made up of two phases,α-copper and iron-based solid solution. Rupture occurs initially at the welded seam near the edge of stainless steel in shear test. The maximum shear strength of the CuSi3 welded joint is 184.9MPa.

  4. Experimental and FEM Investigation of Heat Treatment on the Torsional Aspects of D2 Alloy Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safwan M. Al-Qawabah

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This study shows the effect of heat treatment on the torsion aspects of D2 alloy steel, in addition further analysis using ANSYS11 software w as used in investigation. Test specimens were prepared using high accurate machines (CNC however, hardening at different austenite temperature (during hardening namely 1070, 1040, 1010 and 980ºC was studied followed by tempering process at 540ºC . It was found that there was a direct relation between the micro hardness magnitude and the austenite temperature, the maximum was 66.1% that achieved at 1070ºC. This finding was significant because there is a great enhancement in the ability of D2 alloy steel to sustain high torsion loads, where the maximum was 191.1% that achieved at 1070ºC.

  5. Evaluation of High Temperature Corrosion Resistance of Finned Tubes Made of Austenitic Steel And Nickel Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turowska A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper was to evaluate the resistance to high temperature corrosion of laser welded joints of finned tubes made of austenitic steel (304,304H and nickel alloys (Inconel 600, Inconel 625. The scope of the paper covered the performance of corrosion resistance tests in the atmosphere of simulated exhaust gases of the following chemical composition: 0.2% HCl, 0.08% SO2, 9.0% O2 and N2 in the temperature of 800°C for 1000 hours. One found out that both tubes made of austenitic steel and those made of nickel alloy displayed good resistance to corrosion and could be applied in the energy industry.

  6. Automated equipment for determining the magnetic susceptibility of steels and alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Snizhnoi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Automated equipment for determining the susceptibility of steels and alloys proposed. The principle of operation of equipment units and their main characteristics are presented. Microprocessor system with AVR microcontrollers from ATMEL for equipment used. The algorithm of the program a microprocessor system for automatic operation of equipment considered. Dependence of the current compensation of the current force field as a text file on your computer equipment can be formed.

  7. Effect of Tryptophan on the corrosion behavior of low alloy steel in sulfamic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Hesham T.M. Abdel-Fatah; Salah A.M. Rashwan; S.M. Abd El Wahaab; Aliaa A.M. Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Sulfamic acid is widely used in various industrial acid cleaning applications. In the present work, the inhibition effect of Tryptophan (Tryp) on the corrosion of low alloy steel in sulfamic acid solutions at four different temperatures was studied. The investigations involved electrochemical methods (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy; EIS and the new technique electrochemical frequency modulation; EFM) as well as gravimetric measurements. The inhibition efficiency and the apparent activ...

  8. Velocity hardening influence on the martensite transformation nature in constructional average alloy steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsellermaer; V.; V.; Popova; N.; A.; Klimashin; S.; I.; Tihonikova; O.; V.; Konovalov; S.; V.; Kozlov; E.; V.; Gromov; V.; E.

    2005-01-01

    The quantitative study of the hardening velocity influence on the α-phase morphology in 30CrNi3MoVA (0.3% C, 1% Cr,3% Ni, 1% Mo, 1% V) cast average alloy steel after gomogenization (1125℃, 13 h), normalizing (980℃, 10 h) and high tempering (660℃, 10 h. with cooling on air) is the aim of this work.……

  9. Velocity hardening influence on the martensite transformation nature in constructional average alloy steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ The quantitative study of the hardening velocity influence on the α-phase morphology in 30CrNi3MoVA (0.3% C, 1% Cr,3% Ni, 1% Mo, 1% V) cast average alloy steel after gomogenization (1125℃, 13 h), normalizing (980℃, 10 h) and high tempering (660℃, 10 h. with cooling on air) is the aim of this work.

  10. Theoretical calculation of the impact work in the alloying non-quenched and tempered steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Zhilin; LIN; Cheng

    2006-01-01

    Coupled with hot-continuous rolling technology and based on the calculation of the finishing rolling impact work in the non-quenched and tempered Si-Mn steel, the calculations of the finishing rolling impact work in the alloying non-quenched and tempered steel with the elements of Cr, Ni, Mo, W, Cu, V, Nb and Ti are studied with the covalent electron number nA of the strongest bond in alloying phases, the smallest electron density difference △ρ of phase interfaces, and the number of atom states σ(σ') which keep the interface electron density continuous. The calculated results show that the finishing rolling impact work of the alloying non-quenched and tempered steel intensely depends on strengthening mechanisms. The solution strengthening, interface strengthening, precipitation strengthening of pearlite, and dispersion strengthening will result in the decrease of the finishing rolling impact work; the refinement strengthening, the precipitation strengthening of V, Nb and Ti in o-Fe-C-V(Nb, Ti), and the residual austenite containing Ni on the boundary of α-Fe-C-Ni will increase the impact work; and the increments or decrements can be calculated with nA, △ρ, σ(σ') and weights of alloying elements. The calculation formulas of the finishing rolling impact work in this paper are intergraded with the suggested ones of the finishing rolling tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation of the non-quenched and tempered steel. The calculated results agree well with the measured ones.

  11. Vacuum Brazing of TiAl Based Alloy with 40Cr Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周昀; 薛小怀; 吴鲁海; 楼松年

    2004-01-01

    The vacuum brazing of TiAl based alloy with 40Cr steel was investigated using Ag-Cu-Ti filler metal.The experimental results show that the Ag, Cu, Ti atoms in the filler metal and the base metal inter-diffuse toward each other during brazing and react at the interface to form an inter-metallic AlCu2Ti compound which joins two parts to produce a brazing joint with higher strength.

  12. Crack initiation and crack growth behavior of carbon and low-alloy steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavenda, D.J.; Luebbers, P.R.; Chopra, O.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.

    1997-01-01

    Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code specifies fatigue design curves for structural materials. These curves were based on tests of smooth polished specimens at room temperature in air. The effects of reactor coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves, but recent test data illustrate potentially significant effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of carbon and low-alloy steels. Under certain loading and environmental conditions, fatigue lives of test specimens may be a factor of {approx}70 shorter than in air. Results of fatigue tests that examine the influence of reactor environment on crack imitation and crack growth of carbon and low-alloy steels are presented. Crack lengths as a function of fatigue cycles were determined in air by a surface replication technique, and in water by block loading that leaves marks on the fracture surface. Decreases in fatigue life of low-alloy steels in high-dissolved-oxygen (DO) water are primarily caused by the effects of environment during early stages of fatigue damage, i.e., growth of short cracks <100 {micro}m in depth. For crack sizes of >100 {micro}m, crack growth rates in high-DO water are higher than in air by one order of magnitude. The effects of LWR environments on growth of short cracks are discussed.

  13. Nickel-coated Steel Stud to Aluminum Alloy Joints Made by High Frequency Induction Brazing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Jiaqi; WANG Kehong; ZHANG Deku; WANG Jian

    2015-01-01

    Nickel-coated 45 steel studs and 6061 aluminum alloy with 4047 Al alloy foil asfi ller metal were joined by using high frequency induction brazing. The microstructure of Fe/Al brazed joint was studied by means of optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Results showed that 45 steel stud and 6061 aluminum alloy could be successfully joined by high frequency induction brazing with proper processing parameters. The bonding strength of the joint was of the order of 88 MPa. Ni coating on steel stud successfully avoided the generation of Fe-Al intermetallic compound which is brittle by blocking the contact between Al and Fe. Intermetallic compounds, i e,Al3Ni2, Al1.1Ni0.9 and Al0.3Fe3Si0.7 presented in Al side, FeNi and Fe-Al-Ni ternary eutectic structure were formed in Fe side. The micro-hardness in intermetallic compound layer was 313 HV. The joint was brittle fractured in the intermetallic compounds layer of Al side, where plenty of Al3Ni2 intermetallic compounds were distributed continuously.

  14. Softening Behavior of Hardness and Surface Fatigue of Rolling-Sliding Contact in the Case of Developed Alloy Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redda, Daniel Tilahun; Nakanishi, Tsutomu; Deng, Gang

    To get high performance, downsizing and weight saving of the power transmission systems, the improvement of machine elements has been required. In this study, case-carburized gear materials for a high load-carrying capacity were developed. Low-alloyed steels with 1%Cr-0.2%Mo, 1%Cr-0.2%Mo-1%Si and 1%Cr-0.2%Mo-2%Ni (Cr-Mo steel, Cr-Mo-Si steel and Cr-Mo-Ni steel) were melted in a hypoxia vacuum. Test rollers were made of the developed steels, and they were carburized (Type A and Type B), hardened and tempered. Heating retention tests were carried out to investigate the softening behavior of hardness at high heating temperatures in the case of the developed steels. Roller tests were conducted under the rolling-sliding contact and high-load conditions to study the surface fatigue of the developed steels. From the obtained test results, it was found that the softening behavior of surface hardness at high temperatures in the cases of Cr-Mo-Si steel (Type A) and Cr-Mo-Ni steel (Type B) is lower than that in the cases of Cr-Mo steel (Type A) and Cr-Mo steel (Type B). In the cases of Cr-Mo-Si steel (A) and Cr-Mo-Ni steel (B), micro- and small-pitting area ratios are smaller and large-pitting life is longer than those in the cases of Cr-Mo steel(A) and Cr-Mo steel(B) under the same carburizing treatment method and high-load conditions. Furthermore, the relationship between the softening behavior of surface hardness on the heating pattern and the surface fatigue on the rolling-sliding contact of the developed alloy steels was clarified.

  15. Boronization and Carburization of Superplastic Stainless Steel and Titanium-Based Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Matsushita

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Bronization and carburization of fine-grain superplastic stainless steel is reviewed, and new experimental results for fine grain Ti88.5Al4.5V3Fe2Mo2 are reported. In superplastic duplex stainless steel, the diffusion of carbon and boron is faster than in non-superplastic duplex stainless steel. Further, diffusion is activated by uniaxial compressive stress. Moreover, non-superplastic duplex stainless steel shows typical grain boundary diffusion; however, inner grain diffusion is confirmed in superplastic stainless steel. The presence of Fe and Cr carbides or borides is confirmed by X-ray diffraction, which indicates that the diffused carbon and boron react with the Fe and Cr in superplastic stainless steel. The Vickers hardness of the carburized and boronized layers is similar to that achieved with other surface treatments such as electro-deposition. Diffusion of boron into the superplastic Ti88.5Al4.5V3Fe2Mo2 alloy was investigated. The hardness of the surface exposed to boron powder can be increased by annealing above the superplastic temperature. However, the Vickers hardness is lower than that of Ti boride.

  16. Dissimilar metals TIG welding-brazing of aluminum alloy to galvanized steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    San-bao LIN; Jian-ling SONG; Guang-chao MA; Chun-li YANG

    2009-01-01

    Dissimilar metals TIG welding-brazing of aluminum alloy to galvanized steel was investigated, and the wettability and spreadability of aluminum filler metal on the steel surface were analyzed. The resultant joint was characterized in order to determine the brittle intermetallic compound (IMC) in the interfacial layer, and the mechan-ical property of the joint was tested. The results show that the zinc coated layer can improve the wettability and spreadability of liquid aluminum filler metal on the surface of the steel, and the wetting angle can reach less than 20°. The lap joint has a dual characteristic and can be divided into a welding part on the aluminum side and a brazing part on the steel side. The interfacial IMC layer in the steel side is about 9.0 μm in thickness, which transfers from (α-Al + FeAl3) in the welded seam side to (Fe2Al5+ FeAl2) and (FeAl2+ FeAl) in the steel side. The crystal grain of the welded seam is obviously larger in size in the aluminum side. The local incomplete brazing is found at the root of the lap joint, which weakens the property of the joint. The fracture of the joint occurs at the root and the average tensile strength reaches 90 MPa.

  17. Fatigue strain-life behavior of carbon and low-alloy steels, austenitic stainless steels, and Alloy 600 in LWR environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keisler, J.; Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-08-01

    The existing fatigue strain vs. life (S-N) data, foreign and domestic, for carbon and low-alloy steels, austenitic stainless steels, and Alloy 600 used in the construction of nuclear power plant components have been compiled and categorized according to material, loading, and environmental conditions. Statistical models have been developed for estimating the effects of the various service conditions on the fatigue life of these materials. The results of a rigorous statistical analysis have been used to estimate the probability of initiating a fatigue crack. Data in the literature were reviewed to evaluate the effects of size, geometry, and surface finish of a component on its fatigue life. The fatigue S-N curves for components have been determined by adjusting the probability distribution curves for smooth test specimens for the effect of mean stress and applying design margins to account for the uncertainties due to component size/geometry and surface finish. The significance of the effect of environment on the current Code design curve and on the proposed interim design curves published in NUREG/CR-5999 is discussed. Estimations of the probability of fatigue cracking in sample components from BWRs and PWRs are presented.

  18. Effect of Cr content on the corrosion performance of low-Cr alloy steel in a CO2 environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lining; Wang, Bei; Zhu, Jinyang; Li, Wei; Zheng, Ziyi

    2016-08-01

    Low-Cr alloy steel demonstrates lower corrosion rate than does C steel in a high-temperature and high-pressure CO2-containing environment. This study aimed to clarify the role of the Cr content in mitigating corrosion and reports the performance of 1%Cr, 2%Cr, 3%Cr, 4%Cr, 5%Cr, and 6.5%Cr steels. The results show that low-Cr alloy steel in CO2 at 80 °C and 0.8 MPa possesses spontaneous prepassivation characteristics when the Cr content is 3% or higher. Furthermore, the formation and peel-off of a prepassivation film on 3%Cr-6.5%Cr steels surfaces during polarization demonstrate that adequate amount of Cr in the steel substrate can cause protective layer. The main component of prepassivation film on 3%Cr steel is Cr(OH)3. Thus, the role of Cr is revealed. An adequate amount of Cr in the steel substrate causes the formation of protective Cr(OH)3 layer, which helps low-Cr steel to possess prepassivation characteristics. Prepassivation is the reason why low-Cr steel has a lower corrosion rate than C steel.

  19. Influence of yttrium on laser surface alloying organization of 40Cr steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Anqi; LIU Qibin; QIN Shuijie

    2011-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of the metal rollers,Mo+Y2O3 alloy powders were used to coat uniformly on the surface of 40Cr steel roller substrates for the laser surface alloying treatment by a CO2 laser,The results showed that many good consequences were obtained after adding the rare earth oxide Y2O3.The crystal grains of the alloy layer were significantly refine& The boundary of crystal grains was strengthened.The uniformity and density of the rnicrostructure were increased.The hardness and wearing resistance of the alloy layer were considerably improved.The valence electron structure analysis of the alloy layer was made by the empirical electron theory of solids and molecules (EET).The calculated results demonstrated that Y should be mixed in the first stage and Fe should be in the eighteenth hybrid bands.The analyzed outcomes illustrated that the electron theory of the solid solution shows the strengthening effect on the alloying layer,which has enhanced bond and confirmed the experimental results.

  20. Laser Surface Alloying of 316L Stainless Steel with Ru and Ni Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Lekala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The surfaces of AISI 316L stainless steel were laser alloyed with ruthenium powder and a mixture of ruthenium and nickel powders using a cw Nd:YAG laser set at fixed operating parameters. The microstructure, elemental composition, and corrosion characteristics of the alloyed zone were analyzed using optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, and corrosion potential measurements. The depth of alloyed zone was measured using the AxioVision program and found to be approximately 1.8 mm for all the alloyed specimens. Hardness profile measurements through the surface-substrate interface showed a significant increase from 160 HV for the substrate to a maximum of 247 HV for the alloyed layer. The sample laser alloyed with 80 wt% Ni-20 wt% presented the most noble corrosion potential (Ecorr of −0.18 V and the lowest corrosion current density (icorr.

  1. Tool steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højerslev, C.

    2001-01-01

    resistance against abrasive wear and secondary carbides (if any) increase the resistance against plastic deformation. Tool steels are alloyed with carbide forming elements (Typically: vanadium, tungsten, molybdenumand chromium) furthermore some steel types contains cobalt. Addition of alloying elements...

  2. Optimization of the Q-P Process Parameters for Low Alloyed Steels with 0.2% C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jirková H.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In steels which are treated by the quenching and partitioning (Q&P process, carbon content is one of the crucial parameters because carbon contributes greatly to stabilization of retained austenite and strengthens the material. In the present study, the Q&P process was gradually optimised for two low-alloyed steels with 0.2 % carbon content and with and without Cr addition. The results show that the cooling rate, as well as the austenitizing temperature, has a pronounced effect on microstructure evolution. The strength and elongation in the Mn, Si and Cr-alloyed steel was approx. 900 MPa and more than 30 %, respectively.

  3. Orientation Dependence of Cracking in Hot-Dip Zn-Al-Mg Alloy Coatings on a Sheet Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y. B.; Kim, I. G.; Kim, S. G.; Kim, W. T.; Kim, T. C.; Oh, M. S.; Kim, J. S.

    2017-03-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating a basic cause of cracking in hot-dip Zn-Al-Mg alloy coatings on an extra deep drawing quality sheet steel. The electron backscattering diffraction technique was employed to examine the crystallographic planes of the cracks generated before and after bending deformation of the coated steel sheets. It was clarified that the occurrence of cracking in the Zn-Al-Mg alloy coatings absolutely depends on the orientation of the primary Zn and eutectic Zn alloy phases. Finally, a cracking mechanism was proposed on the basis of the anisotropy of thermal expansion and the Young's modulus in the phases constituting the coatings.

  4. Effect of Tryptophan on the corrosion behavior of low alloy steel in sulfamic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham T.M. Abdel-Fatah

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Sulfamic acid is widely used in various industrial acid cleaning applications. In the present work, the inhibition effect of Tryptophan (Tryp on the corrosion of low alloy steel in sulfamic acid solutions at four different temperatures was studied. The investigations involved electrochemical methods (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy; EIS and the new technique electrochemical frequency modulation; EFM as well as gravimetric measurements. The inhibition efficiency and the apparent activation energy have been calculated in the presence and in the absence of Tryp. It is most probable that the inhibition property of Tryp was due to the electrostatic adsorption of the protonated form of Tryp on the steel surface. Adsorption of the inhibitor molecule, onto the steel surface followed the Temkin adsorption isotherm. The thermodynamic parameters of adsorption were determined and discussed. All of the obtained data from the three techniques were in close agreement, which confirmed that EFM technique can be used efficiently for monitoring the corrosion inhibition under the studied conditions.

  5. Mechanism of laser welding on dissimilar metals between stainless steel and W-Cu alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai Chen; Zhiyong Wang; Rongshi Xiao; Tiechuan Zuo

    2006-01-01

    @@ CO2 laser is employed to join a piece of powder metallurgical material (PMM) to a stainless steel in butt joint welding mode. The powder Ni35, as a filler powder, is used. The weld metal comes from three parts of stainless steel, powder Ni35, and Cu in W-Cu PMM. It is indicated that some parts of the W-Cu base metal are heated by laser and the metal Cu at the width of 0.06-0.12 mm from the edge is melted into the melting pool in the laser welding process. The formation of firm weld joint is just because that the melting liquid metal could fill the position occupied by metal Cu and surround the metal W granules fully. The analysis results indicate that the mechanism of the laser welding for stainless steel and W-Cu alloy is a special mode of fusion-brazing welding.

  6. The measurement of phosphorus in low alloy steels by electrochemical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahier, A.; Campsteyn, A.; Verheyen, E.; Verpoucke, G.

    2008-08-15

    The oscillo-polarographic method reported by Chen for the determination of phosphorus in silicates, iron ores, carbonates and tea leaves has been thoroughly studied and enhanced in view of the determination of P in various steels. Together with a carefully selected sample dissolution method, the chromatographic separation reported by Hanada et al. for eliminating the matrix has also been examined. The results of these investigations allowed finding out a path towards the successful electrochemical measurement of P in low alloy ferritic steels without eliminating the matrix. The limit of detection is 5.2 micro gram{sup -1} in the metal. The precision ranges between 5 and 15 % relative to the mean measured values. The finely tuned method has been successfully validated using five NIST standard steels. The chromatographic method remains an option for addressing other metals in the future, should they contain unacceptable levels of possibly interfering elements.. Detailed experimental procedures are given.

  7. Microstructure and mechanical properties of a new type of austempered boron alloyed high silicon cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xiang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, a new type of austempered boron alloyed high silicon cast steel has been developed, and its microstructures and mechanical properties at different temperatures were investigated. The experimental results indicate that the boron alloyed high silicon cast steel comprises a dendritic matrix and interdendritic eutectic borides in as-cast condition. The dendritic matrix is made up of pearlite, ferrite, and the interdendritic eutectic boride is with a chemical formula of M2B (M represents Fe, Cr, Mn or Mo which is much like that of carbide in high chromium white cast iron. Pure ausferrite structure that consists of bainitic ferrite and retained austenite can be obtained in the matrix by austempering treatment to the cast steel. No carbides precipitate in the ausferrite structure and the morphology of borides remains almost unchanged after austempering treatments. Secondary boride particles precipitate during the course of austenitizing. The hardness and tensile strength of the austempered cast steel decrease with the increase of the austempering temperature, from 250 篊 to 400 篊. The impact toughness is 4-11 J昪m-2 at room temperature and the impact fracture fractogragh indicates that the fracture is caused by the brittle fracture of the borides.

  8. Effect of Alloying Elements on Thermal Wear of Cast Hot-Forging Die Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shu-qi; CHEN Kang-min; CUI Xiang-hong; JIANG Qi-chuan; HONG Bian

    2006-01-01

    The effect of main alloying elements on thermal wear of cast hot-forging die steels was studied. The wear mechanism was discussed. The results show that alloying elements have significant influences on the thermal wear of cast hot-forging die steels. The wear rates decrease with an increase in chromium content from 3% to 4% and molybdenum content from 2% to 3%, respectively. With further increase of chromium and molybdenum contents, chromium slightly reduces the wear resistance and molybdenum severely deteriorates the wear resistance with high wear rate. Lower vanadium/carbon ratio (1.5-2.5) leads to a lower wear resistance with higher wear rate. With an increase in vanadium/carbon ratio, the wear resistance of the cast steel substantially increases. When vanadium/carbon ratio is 3, the wear rate reaches the lowest value. The predominant mechanism of thermal wear of cast hot-forging die steels are oxidation wear and fatigue delamination. The Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 or lumps of brittle wear debris are formed on the wear surface.

  9. Formation of Hard Composite Layer on Tool Steel by Laser Alloying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonek M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Investigations include alloying the PMHSS6-5-3 steel surface layer with carbide and ceramic powders WC, VC, TiC, SiC, Si3N4 and Al2O3, using the high power diode laser (HPDL. Laser treatment is especially promising for solving contemporary surface engineering problems making it possible to focus precisely the delivered energy in the form of heat in the surface layer. The structural mechanism was determined of surface layers development, effect was studied of alloying parameters, method on structure refinement and influence of these factors on the mechanical properties of surface layer, and especially on its abrasive wear resistance. The fine grained martensite structure is responsible for hardness increase of the alloyed layer. The tribological wear relationships were determined for laser treated surface layers, determining friction coefficient, and wear trace shape developed due to the abrasive wear of the investigated surfaces. Comparison of the laser treatment parameters and tribological properties of surface layer after remelting and alloying with hard particles of the PMHSS6-5-3 steel using the high power diode laser to obtain the optimum service properties is the outcome of the investigations carried out.

  10. Laser alloying of bearing steel with boron and self-lubricating addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotkowiak Mateusz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available 100CrMnSi6-4 bearing steel has been widely used for many applications, e.g. rolling bearings which work in difficult operating conditions. Therefore, this steel has to be characterized by special properties such as high wear resistance and high hardness. In this study laser-boriding was applied to improve these properties. Laser alloying was conducted as the two step process with two different types of alloying material: amorphous boron only and amorphous boron with addition of calcium fluoride CaF2. At first, the surface was coated with paste including alloying material. Second step of the process consisted in laser re-melting. The surface of sample, coated with the paste, was irradiated by the laser beam. In this study, TRUMPF TLF 2600 Turbo CO2 laser was used. The microstructure, microhardness and wear resistance of both laser-borided layer and laser-borided layer with the addition of calcium fluoride were investigated. The layer, alloyed with boron and CaF2, was characterized by higher wear resistance than the layer after laser boriding only.

  11. Solid particle erosion of steels and nickel based alloys candidates for USC steam turbine blading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cernuschi, Federico; Guardamagna, Cristina; Lorenzoni, Lorenzo [ERSE SpA, Milan (Italy); Robba, Davide [CESI, Milan (Italy)

    2010-07-01

    The main objective of COST536 Action is to develop highly efficient steam power plant with low emissions, from innovative alloy development to validation of component integrity. In this perspective, to improve the operating efficiency, materials capable of withstanding higher operating temperatures are required. For the manufacturing of components for steam power plants with higher efficiency steels and nickel-based alloys with improved oxidation resistance and creep strength at temperature as high as 650 C - 700 C have to be developed. Candidate alloys for manufacturing high pressure steam turbine diaphragms, buckets, radial seals and control valves should exhibit, among other properties, a good resistance at the erosion phenomena induced by hard solid particles. Ferric oxide (magnetite) scales cause SPE by exfoliating from boiler tubes and steam pipes (mainly super-heaters and re-heaters) and being transported within the steam flow to the turbine. In order to comparatively study the erosion behaviour of different materials in relatively short times, an accelerated experimental simulation of the erosion phenomena must be carried out. Among different techniques to induce erosion on material targets, the use of an air jet tester is well recognised to be one of the most valid and reliable. In this work the results of SPE comparative tests performed at high temperatures (550 C, 600 C and 650 C) at different impaction angles on some steels and nickel based alloys samples are reported. (orig.)

  12. Laser surface infiltration of tungsten-carbide in steel and aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahotre, N.B.; Mukherjee, K. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (USA))

    It has been demonstrated that surface modification in metals and alloys can be achieved by laser melting in conjunction with injection of particulate alloying elements in the heated zone. In our current experiments the authors have successfully implanted tungsten-carbide particles on the surface of several grades of carbon-steels as well as on the surface of a structural aluminum alloy. In both cases a significant increase in microhardness has been detected. Hardness profile from the interaction zone to the heat affected zone (HAZ) has been determined. The microstructural features of both the implanted zone and HAZ also have been determined. Effect of laser input energy, nature of tungsten-carbide particle size, size distribution and method of powder injection on the hardness profile have been investigated. Some preliminary examination of surface wear of such implanted material is also conducted. These results are discussed in detail.

  13. Effect of Mn Content and Solution Annealing Temperature on the Corrosion Resistance of Stainless Steel Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihsan-ul-Haq Toor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of two specially designed austenitic stainless steels (SSs having different Nickel (Ni and Manganese (Mn contents was investigated. Prior to electrochemical tests, SS alloys were solution-annealed at two different temperatures, that is, at 1030°C for 2 h and 1050°C for 0.5 h. Potentiodynamic polarization (PD tests were carried out in chloride and acidic chloride, whereas linear polarization resistance (LPR and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS was performed in 0.5 M NaCl solution at room temperature. SEM/EDS investigations were carried out to study the microstructure and types of inclusions present in these alloys. Experimental results suggested that the alloy with highest Ni content and annealed at 1050°C/0.5 hr has the highest corrosion resistance.

  14. Electroless plating of Ni-Zn(Fe)-P alloy on carbon steel sheets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Sen-lin; WU Hui-huang

    2004-01-01

    The autocatalytic deposition of Ni-Zn(Fe)-P alloys were carried out on carbon steel sheets from bath containing nickel sulfate, zinc sulfate, sodium hypophosphite, sodium citrate and boric acid. The effects of pH and mole ratio of NiSO4/ZnSO4 on the deposition rate and the composition of deposit were studied. It is found that the presence of zinc sulfate in the bath has an inhibitory effect on the alloy deposition. As a consequence, the mole fraction of zinc in the deposits never reaches high value, which is less than 18.0%. The structure and surface morphology of Ni-Zn(Fe)-P coatings were charactered by XRD and SEM. The alloys plated at all conditions consist of amorphous phase coexisting with a crystalline cubic Ni phase. The surface morphology of coating is dependent on the deposition parameters.

  15. Wear Evaluation of AISI 4140 Alloy Steel with WC/C Lamellar Coatings Sliding Against EN 8 Using Taguchi Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadam, Nikhil Rajendra; Karthikeyan, Ganesarethinam

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of the experiments in this paper is to use the Taguchi methods to investigate the wear of WC/C coated nitrided AISI 4140 alloy steel. A study of lamellar WC/C coating which were deposited by a physical vapor deposition on nitrided AISI 4140 alloy steel. The investigation includes wear evaluation using Pin-on-disk configuration. When WC/C coated AISI 4140 alloy steel slides against EN 8 steel, it was found that carbon-rich coatings show much lower wear of the countersurface than nitrogen-rich coatings. The results were correlated with the properties determined from tribological and mechanical characterization, therefore by probably selecting the proper processing parameters the deposition of WC/C coating results in decreasing the wear rate of the substrate which shows a potential for tribological application.

  16. Vacuum Brazing TC4 Titanium Alloy to 304 Stainless Steel with Cu-Ti-Ni-Zr-V Amorphous Alloy Foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Honggang; Yang, Zhonglin; Wang, Zengrui; Deng, Dewei; Dong, Chuang

    2014-10-01

    Dissimilar metal vacuum brazing between TC4 titanium alloy and 304 stainless steel was conducted with newly designed Cu-Ti-Ni-Zr-V amorphous alloy foils as filler metals. Solid joints were obtained due to excellent compatibility between the filler metal and stainless steel substrate. Partial dissolution of stainless steel substrate occurred during brazing. The shear strength of the joint brazed with Cu43.75Ti37.5Ni6.25Zr6.25V6.25 foil was 105 MPa and that with Cu37.5Ti25Ni12.5Zr12.5V12.5 was 116 MPa. All the joints fractured through the gray layer in the brazed seam, revealing brittle fracture features. Cr4Ti, Cu0.8FeTi, Fe8TiZr3 and Al2NiTi3C compounds were found in the fractured joint brazed with Cu43.75Ti37.5Ni6.25Zr6.25V6.25 foil, and Fe2Ti, TiCu, Fe8TiZr3 and NiTi0.8Zr0.3 compounds were detected in the joint brazed with Cu37.5Ti25Ni12.5Zr12.5V12.5 foil. The existence of Cr-Ti, Fe-Ti, Cu-Fe-Ti, and Fe-Ti-V intermetallic compounds in the brazed seam caused fracture of the resultant joints.

  17. SECM Study of Effect of Chromium Content on the Localized Corrosion Behavior of Low-Alloy Steels in Chloride Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indira, K.; Nishimura, T.

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates the effect of chromium (Cr) content (0, 1, 3 and 5% Cr) in epoxy-coated alloy steel against corrosion using in situ electrochemical techniques such as EIS and SECM in a 3% NaCl solution. The EIS results revealed that the epoxy-coated Cr steel exhibited higher impedance values than carbon steel, which is attributed to the greater resistance of Cr steel toward corrosion. Based on the cyclic voltammogram results, the tip potentials were set at -0.7, 0.04 and 0.60 V for determining the concentration of dissolved oxygen at cathodic region, and oxidation of Cr2+ and Fe2+ at anodic region, respectively. The SECM measurements showed that, the tip current in the anodic region has decreased with increase in Cr content of the sample, which indicates that the oxidation of Fe2+ and Cr2+ decreases (corrosion is reduced) with the increase in Cr content of the steel. Besides, 5% Cr steel can maintain the highest corrosion resistance, and 1 and 3% Cr steels have higher corrosion resistance than the 0% Cr steel. This higher corrosion resistance of Cr steel samples could be due to the formation of Cr-rich hydro-oxide layers [Cr(OH)3 as a corrosion product] on the surface of the samples. Thus, the epoxy-coated Cr alloy steel has greater corrosion resistance in a chloride-containing environment than the carbon steel. Hence, epoxy-coated Cr alloy steel can be successfully used as a construction material in structures.

  18. Influence of alloying on hydrogen-assisted cracking and diffusible hydrogen content in Cr–Mo steel welds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Albert; V Ramasubbu; N Parvathavarthini; T P S Gill

    2003-06-01

    Study of hydrogen-assisted cracking and measurement of diffusible hydrogen content in different Cr–Mo steel welds shows that under identical conditions, susceptibility to cracking increased and diffusible hydrogen content decrease with increase in alloy content. Hydrogen permeation studies show that hydrogen diffusivity decreases and solubility increases with increase in alloy content. Thus decrease in diffusible hydrogen content with increase in alloying is attributed to increase in apparent solubility and decrease in apparent diffusivity of hydrogen. Analysis of the results indicates that variation of diffusible hydrogen content and apparent diffusivity of hydrogen with alloy content can be represented as a function of carbon equivalent CE1 originally proposed to predict the hardness in the heat-affected zone of alloy steel welds.

  19. Bainitic stabilization of austenite in low alloy steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, M.L.; Olson, G.B.

    1992-01-01

    Stabilization of retained austenite via bainitic transformation was studied in a triple-phase, ferrite/bainite/austenite steel 0.26C1.52Si-1.2Mn. Volume fraction and stability of retained austenite are varied by isothermal transformation time at 752F following intercritical annealing at 1418F. Austenite stability is measured using the Bolling-Richman technique. Austenite content is measured by and austenite carbon content is estimated from lattice parameters. Strength and ductility measured in both uniaxial and plane-strain tension are correlated with austenite amount and stability. While austenite content peaks at 3 minutes transformation time, stability continues to increase out to 5 minutes associated with a saturation of austenite carbon content and continued refinement of austenite particle size. Despite the reduced austenite content of 8 percent, the higher stability provided by the 5 minutes treatment gives superior mechanical properties.

  20. Bainitic stabilization of austenite in low alloy steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, M.L.; Olson, G.B.

    1992-12-31

    Stabilization of retained austenite via bainitic transformation was studied in a triple-phase, ferrite/bainite/austenite steel 0.26C1.52Si-1.2Mn. Volume fraction and stability of retained austenite are varied by isothermal transformation time at 752F following intercritical annealing at 1418F. Austenite stability is measured using the Bolling-Richman technique. Austenite content is measured by and austenite carbon content is estimated from lattice parameters. Strength and ductility measured in both uniaxial and plane-strain tension are correlated with austenite amount and stability. While austenite content peaks at 3 minutes transformation time, stability continues to increase out to 5 minutes associated with a saturation of austenite carbon content and continued refinement of austenite particle size. Despite the reduced austenite content of 8 percent, the higher stability provided by the 5 minutes treatment gives superior mechanical properties.

  1. Impact resistance and fractography of low-alloy martensitic steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Frydman

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper dynamic properties of HTK SOOH, HTK 900H. Hardox 400 and Hardox 500 steeZs in delivcrcd stalc (aftcr hardening andtempering are considered. Charpy V - notch (CVN test rcsults in connection with fractography in the ductilc - to - brittle transitionternpcrature region were analyzed. The impact transition curve obtained from CVN tcst not always predicts properly a behavior ofmaterials in conditions of dynamic loading, so the analyze of character of fracture helps to evalitate the rcal bchavior of ma~crials. Tcstcdsamples were cut out longitudinally and transversely in relation to cold work direction. The results of CVN test far investigated steels, inthe range of temperatures from 40t o 20 "C are presented. Regarding ductilc - to - bri~tlel ransition temperature, there is a significantdiffcrcnce taking into account vatues of Charpy V cncrgy absorbcd and a character of fracture.

  2. Alloying of steel and graphite by hydrogen in nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasikov, E.

    2017-02-01

    In traditional power engineering hydrogen may be one of the first primary source of equipment damage. This problem has high actuality for both nuclear and thermonuclear power engineering. Study of radiation-hydrogen embrittlement of the steel raises the question concerning the unknown source of hydrogen in reactors. Later unexpectedly high hydrogen concentrations were detected in irradiated graphite. It is necessary to look for this source of hydrogen especially because hydrogen flakes were detected in reactor vessels of Belgian NPPs. As a possible initial hypothesis about the enigmatical source of hydrogen one can propose protons generation during beta-decay of free neutrons поскольку inasmuch as protons detected by researches at nuclear reactors as witness of beta-decay of free neutrons.

  3. Alternative Fabrication Routes toward Oxide-Dispersion-Strengthened Steels and Model Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergner, Frank; Hilger, Isabell; Virta, Jouko; Lagerbom, Juha; Gerbeth, Gunter; Connolly, Sarah; Hong, Zuliang; Grant, Patrick S.; Weissgärber, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    The standard powder metallurgy (PM) route for the fabrication of oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels involves gas atomization to produce a prealloyed powder, mechanical alloying (MA) with fine oxide powders, consolidation, and finally thermal/thermomechanical treatment (TMT). It is well established that ODS steels with superior property combinations, for example, creep and tensile strength, can be produced by this PM/MA route. However, the fabrication process is complex and expensive, and the fitness for scaling up to the industrial scale is limited. At the laboratory scale, production of small amounts of well-controlled model systems continues to be desirable for specific purposes, such as modeling-oriented experiments. Thus, from the laboratory to industrial application, there is growing interest in complementary or alternative fabrication routes for ODS steels and related model systems, which offer a different balance of cost, convenience, properties, and scalability. This article reviews the state of the art in ODS alloy fabrication and identifies promising new routes toward ODS steels. The PM/AM route for the fabrication of ODS steels is also described, as it is the current default process. Hybrid routes that comprise aspects of both the PM route and more radical liquid metal (LM) routes are suggested to be promising approaches for larger volumes and higher throughput of fabricated material. Although similar uniformity and refinement of the critical nanometer-sized oxide particles has not yet been demonstrated, ongoing innovations in the LM route are described, along with recent encouraging preliminary results for both extrinsic nano-oxide additions and intrinsic nano-oxide formation in variants of the LM route. Finally, physicochemical methods such as ion beam synthesis are shown to offer interesting perspectives for the fabrication of model systems. As well as literature sources, examples of progress in the authors' groups are also highlighted.

  4. Evaluation of the stress corrosion cracking resistance of several high strength low alloy steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance was studied for high strength alloy steels 4130, 4340, for H-11 at selected strength levels, and for D6AC and HY140 at a single strength. Round tensile and C-ring type specimens were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, salt spray, the atmosphere at Marshall Space Flight Center, and the seacoast at Kennedy Space Center. Under the test conditions, 4130 and 4340 steels heat treated to a tensile strength of 1240 MPa (180 ksi), H-11 and D6AC heat treated to a tensile strength of 1450 MPa (210 ksi), and HY140 (1020 MPa, 148 ksi) are resistant to stress corrosion cracking because failures were not encountered at stress levels up to 75 percent of their yield strengths. A maximum exposure period of one month for alternate immersion in salt water or salt spray and three months for seacoast is indicated for alloy steel to avoid false indications of stress corrosion cracking because of failure resulting from severe pitting.

  5. Fabrication of iron aluminum alloy/steel laminate by clad rolling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masahashi, N.; Watanabe, S.; Hanada, S.; Komatsu, K.; Kimura, G.

    2006-05-01

    Laminates of an iron-aluminum alloy (20Al) and three types of steel—chromium molybdenum (CrMo), high carbon (FeCMn), and precipitation hardening steel with niobium carbide (FeCNb)—were fabricated at 600 °C and 1000 °C by clad rolling based on the compression stress ratio of 20Al to steel. The laminates fabricated at 600 °C exhibit a deformation microstructure with partial recrystallization, while those at 1000 °C reveal a refined microstructure. The 20Al layer of all the laminates exhibit a {001} texture, and the intensity of the texture increases with a decrease in the fabrication temperature and an increase in the reduction. The bending deformability of a laminate increases with a decrease in the compression stress ratio and by a reduction in the intensity of the {001} texture. The clad plate is further rolled at room temperature to a thickness of approximately 150 µm, which enables winding without damage. It is concluded that a high-strength steel at high temperatures and a high Al content in the Fe-Al alloy is beneficial for the fabrication of deformable laminates.

  6. Cracking kinetics of two-phase stainless steel alloys in hydrogen gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perng, T.-P.; Altstetter, C. J.

    1988-01-01

    The kinetics of hydrogen-induced slow crack growth (SCG) under constant load was studied in two stainless steel alloys containing mixtures of bcc and fcc phases. FERRALIUM 255, a duplex stainless steel, consisting of ˜50 pct austenite in a ferrite matrix, was tested in hydrogen gas at 0 to 100 °C with the loading axis both perpendicular and parallel to the rolling direction. In addition, specimens of AISI 301 were deformed in air in different ways to produce various amounts of bcc phase in an austenite matrix prior to testing in H2 gas at room temperature. The kinetics of subcritical slow crack growth (SCG) in these alloys was compared with that for austenitic and for ferritic stainless steels. The SCG rates were rationalized in terms of differences in hydrogen permeation in the two phases. The results confirm that a higher rate of supply and accumulation of hydrogen in the region ahead of the crack tip allows a higher cracking velocity.

  7. Study of electroless Ni-W-P alloy coating on martensitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitasari, Arini; Mabruri, Efendi

    2016-04-01

    Electroless nickel phospor (Ni-P) is widely used in many industries due to their corrosion and wear resistance, coating uniformity, and ability to coat non-conductive surfaces. The unique properties of tungsten such as high hardness, higher melting point, lower coefficient of linear thermal expansion, and high tensile strength have created a lot of interest in developing ternary Ni-W-P alloys. This article presents the study of electroless Ni-W-P alloys coating using acid or alkaline bath on martensitic stainless steel. Nickel sulfate and sodium tungstate were used as nickel and tungsten sources, respectively, and sodium hypophosphite was used as a reducing agent. Acid or alkaline bath refer to bath pH condition was adjusted by adding sulfuric acid. Martensitic stainless steel was immersed in Ni-W-P bath for 15, 30, and 60 minutes. The substrate of martensitic stainless steel was subjected to pre-treatment (polishing and cleaning) and activation prior to electroless plating. The plating characteristics were investigated for concentration ratio of nickel and hypophosphite (1:3), sodium tungstate concentration 0,1 M, immersion time (15 min, 30 min, 60 min), and bath condition (acid, alkaline). The electroless Ni-W-P plating was heat treated at 400°C for 1 hour. Deposits were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and corrosion measurement system (CMS).

  8. Shake table tests and analytical simulations of a steel structure with shape memory alloy dampers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parulekar, Y. M.; Kiran, A. Ravi; Reddy, G. R.; Singh, R. K.; Vaze, K. K.

    2014-12-01

    This study uses the pseudoelastic properties of Ni-Ti shape memory alloy wires for attenuation of the seismic response of a steel structure and evaluates its effectiveness and applicability in seismic response control. In this paper, shake table tests, carried out on a model of a steel structure with and without wire-based shape memory alloy dampers, are discussed in detail. Shake table tests, comprised of free vibration tests and spectrum compatible time history tests, were carried out. The former were used for the evaluation of the frequency and damping, and the later were used to prove the efficacy of the shape memory alloy dampers. Further analytical simulations are carried out using detailed time history analysis utilizing a thermomechanical model of an SMA and taking into account the residual martensite accumulation, which is irreversibly due to cyclic forward/reverse martensitic transformation. Moreover, a simple iterative response spectrum (IRS) method with equivalent damping and stiffness is also used to evaluate the response of the structure with SMA dampers, and it is proved that the method can be conservatively used by designers.

  9. Thermal Diffusivity and Thermal Conductivity of Five Different Steel Alloys in the Solid and Liquid Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilthan, B.; Schützenhöfer, W.; Pottlacher, G.

    2015-08-01

    The need for characterization of thermophysical properties of steel and nickel-based alloys was addressed in the FFG-Bridge Project 810999 in cooperation with a partner from industry, Böhler Edelstahl GmbH & Co KG. To optimize numerical simulations of production processes, such as remelting or plastic deformation, additional, and more accurate data were necessary for the alloys under investigation. With a fast ohmic pulse heating circuit system, the temperature-dependent specific electrical resistivity, density, and specific heat capacity for a set of five high alloyed steels were measured. Hence, using the Wiedemann-Franz law with a Lorenz number of , the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity could be calculated for the solid and liquid phases up to temperatures of 2500 K. This experimental approach is limited by the following requirements for the specimens: they have to be electrically conducting, the melting point has to be high enough for the implemented pyrometric temperature measurement, and one has to be able to draw wires of the material. The latter restriction is technologically challenging with some of the materials being very brittle. For all samples, electrical and temperature signals are recorded and a fast shadowgraph method is used to measure the volume expansion. For each material under investigation, a set of data including the chemical composition, the density at room temperature, solidus and liquidus temperatures, and the change of enthalpy, resistivity, density, thermal conductivity, and thermal diffusivity as a function of temperature is reported.

  10. Interatomic potential to study plasticity in stainless steels: the FeNiCr model alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonny, G.; Terentyev, D.; Pasianot, R. C.; Poncé, S.; Bakaev, A.

    2011-12-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are commonly used materials for in-core components of nuclear light water reactors. In service, such components are exposed to harsh conditions: intense neutron irradiation, mechanical and thermal stresses, and aggressive corrosion environment which all contribute to the components' degradation. For a better understanding of the prevailing mechanisms responsible for the materials degradation, large-scale atomistic simulations are desirable. In this framework we developed an embedded atom method type interatomic potential for the ternary FeNiCr system to model movement of dislocations and their interaction with radiation defects. Special attention has been drawn to the Fe-10Ni-20Cr alloy, whose properties were ensured to be close to those of 316L austenitic stainless steel. In particular, the stacking fault energy and elastic constants are well reproduced. The fcc phase for the Fe-10Ni-20Cr random alloy was proven to be stable in the temperature range 0-900 K and under shear strain up to 5%. For the same alloy the stable glide of screw dislocations and stability of Frank loops was confirmed.

  11. Microstructure design of low alloy transformation-induced plasticity assisted steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ruixian

    The microstructure of low alloy Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) assisted steels has been systematically varied through the combination of computational and experimental methodologies in order to enhance the mechanical performance and to fulfill the requirement of the next generation Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS). The roles of microstructural parameters, such as phase constitutions, phase stability, and volume fractions on the strength-ductility combination have been revealed. Two model alloy compositions (i.e. Fe-1.5Mn-1.5Si-0.3C, and Fe-3Mn-1Si-0.3C in wt%, nominal composition) were studied. Multiphase microstructures including ferrite, bainite, retained austenite and martensite were obtained through conventional two step heat treatment (i.e. intercritical annealing-IA, and bainitic isothermal transformation-BIT). The effect of phase constitution on the mechanical properties was first characterized experimentally via systematically varying the volume fractions of these phases through computational thermodynamics. It was found that martensite was the main phase to deteriorate ductility, meanwhile the C/VA ratio (i.e. carbon content over the volume fraction of austenite) could be another indicator for the ductility of the multiphase microstructure. Following the microstructural characterization of the multiphase alloys, two microstructural design criteria (i.e. maximizing ferrite and austenite, suppressing athermal martensite) were proposed in order to optimize the corresponding mechanical performance. The volume fraction of ferrite was maximized during the IA with the help of computational thermodyanmics. On the other hand, it turned out theoretically that the martensite suppression could not be avoided on the low Mn contained alloy (i.e. Fe- 1.5Mn-1.5Si-0.3C). Nevertheless, the achieved combination of strength (~1300MPa true strength) and ductility (˜23% uniform elongation) on the low Mn alloy following the proposed design criteria fulfilled the

  12. Increasing the fracture toughness of a maraging steel type alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, B.

    1976-03-01

    Mechanisms associated with fracture toughness of maraging steels aged at 550 to 600/sup 0/C are described. A correlation is observed between aging temperature and fracture toughness; this aging temperature is optimum for improved fracture toughness. It is shown that this aging temperature range improves the toughness by reducing the tendency for grain (or lath) boundary cracking, i.e., by reducing the amount of and/or by changing the morphology of the grain (or lath) boundary precipitate. It is suggested that there is an interaction between the formation of austenite and the formation of precipitate on the prior austenite and the lath boundaries, and that if austenite forms sufficiently early in the aging process boundary precipitation may be largely inhibited. This interaction is believed to account for the improved toughness at these aging temperatures. It should be noted that this interaction is independent of the presence of retained austenite after aging and that retained austenite is not responsible for the improved properties since no retained austenite was observed. This explanation for the improved toughness is supported by indirect evidence consisting largely of the relationship between the rate of formation of austenite and the rate of formation Ni/sub 3/Ti as a function of aging temperature.

  13. High Power Laser Welding. [of stainless steel and titanium alloy structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banas, C. M.

    1972-01-01

    A review of recent developments in high power, carbon dixoide laser welding is presented. Deep penetration welding in stainless steel to 0.5-in. thick, high speed welding in thin gage rimmed steel and gas shielded welding in Ti-6Al-4V alloy are described. The effects of laser power, power density, focusing optics, gas-shielding techniques, material properties and weld speed on weld quality and penetration are discussed. It is shown that laser welding performance in thin materials is comparable to that of electron beams. It is further shown that high quality welds, as evidenced by NDT, mechanical and metal-lographic tests, can be achieved. The potential of the laser for industrial welding applications is indicated.

  14. Corrosion of AISI 4130 Steel Alloy under Hydrodynamic Condition in Ethylene Glycol + Water + NO2-Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I. Danaee; M. Niknejad Khomami; A.A. Attar

    2013-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of steel alloy in ethylene glycol-water mixture at different solution rotating speeds was investigated by polarization curves and AC impedance measurements (EIS).The results obtained showed that corrosion rate was not changed significantly at different rotating speeds and was decreased with increasing ethylene glycol concentration.The effect of nitrite as an inhibitor was studied and high inhibition efficiency was obtained.It was found that surface passivation occurred in the presence of inhibitor.The inhibiting effect of the nitrite was explained on the basis of the competitive adsorption between the inorganic anions and the aggressive Cl-ions and the adsorption isotherm basically obeys the Flory-Huggins adsorption isotherm.Thermodynamic parameters for steel corrosion and inhibitor adsorption were determined,which revealed that the adsorption process is spontaneous.

  15. Effect of heat-treatment on the hardness and mechanical properties of Boron Alloyed Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    bin Khiyon Mohammad Raffik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In an automotive industry, hot stamped, die quenched structural components have been widely used to provide extra protection against crash intrusion. Boron alloyed steel exhibit limited ductility, but it also promotes improvement in impact performance. This study analyzed the effect of cooling rate on the hardness and energy absorption. Self-quenched specimens were heated to 850°C and cooled in air of room temperature, water at room temperature and cold water. Vickers hardness test and tensile test was then carried out to analyze the effect of different quenching rate. Self-quenched specimens were compared to the properties of the die-quenched specimens obtained from commercial automobile body. Result shows that boron steel with the highest cooling rate has the highest value of hardness but low in strength.

  16. Surface Chemistry of Aluminium Alloy Slid against Steel Lubricated by Organic Friction Modifier in Hydrocarbon Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Minami

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The lubrication mechanism of aluminium alloy slid against steel was investigated from the standpoint of surface chemistry. Low friction and low wear were observed using glycerol mono-olate in a hydrocarbon as lubricant. Increase in the silicon content in the aluminium alloy during rubbing was observed by surface analyses using (1 Auger electron spectroscopy, (2 scanning electron microscopy along with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and (3 X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Mild removal of the passive state (aluminium oxide from the uppermost surface by the additive during the running-in process was proposed as the lubrication mechanism. The importance of additive chemistry that improves the running-in process was pointed out.

  17. High performance low alloy steels: Up date; Aceros de baja aleacion y alto rendimiento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, M.; Blanco, L.; Sicre-Artalejo, J.; Torralba, J. M.

    2008-07-01

    A highly demanding automobile market requires an intensification of the efforts on increasing the performance and reducing costs of sintered steels, in order to stay in such a competitive market. final properties of sintered parts and their cost depend on two main factors, density and the alloying system. The growing interest for Cr and Mn as alloying elements is due to both price, more suitable than Mo, and the excellent level of properties which are achieved in as sintered parts as well as after the heat treatments. In this work, the possible techniques which lead to an enhancement of density are discussed, such as warm and high velocity compaction, or high temperature sintering moreover it is important to study the synergy between the proposed techniques which may be compatible. (Author) 70 refs.

  18. Spark Plasma Sintering of Low Alloy Steel Modified with Silicon Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hebda M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of adding different amounts of silicon carbide on the properties (density, transverse rupture strength, microhardness and corrosion resistance and microstructure of low alloy steel was investigated. Samples were prepared by mechanical alloying (MA process and sintered by spark plasma sintering (SPS technique. After the SPS process, half of each of obtained samples was heat-treated in a vacuum furnace. The results show that the high-density materials have been achieved. Homogeneous and fine microstructure was obtained. The heat treatment that followed the SPS process resulted in an increase in the mechanical and plastic properties of samples with the addition 1wt. % of silicon carbide. The investigated compositions containing 1 wt.% of SiC had better corrosion resistance than samples with 3 wt.% of silicon carbide addition. Moreover, corrosion resistance of the samples with 1 wt.% of SiC can further be improved by applying heat treatment.

  19. Surface Modification of Micro-Alloyed High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel by Controlled TIG Arcing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, P. K.; Kumar, Ravindra

    2015-02-01

    Surface modification of micro-alloyed HSLA steel plate has been carried out by autogenous conventional and pulse current tungsten inert gas arcing (TIGA) processes at different welding parameters while the energy input was kept constant. At a given energy input the influence of pulse parameters on the characteristics of surface modification has been studied in case of employing single and multi-run procedure. The role of pulse parameters has been studied by considering their summarized influence defined by a factor Φ. The variation in Φ and pulse frequency has been found to significantly affect the thermal behavior of fusion and accordingly the width and penetration of the modified region along with its microstructure, hardness and wear characteristics. It is found that pulsed TIGA is relatively more advantageous over the conventional TIGA process, as it leads to higher hardness, improved wear resistance, and a better control over surface characteristics.

  20. Dynamic strain ageing of deformed nitrogen-alloyed AISI 316 stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrnsten, U.; Toivonen, A. [Materials and Structural Integrity, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Kemistintie 3, P.O. Box 1704, FIN-02044 VTT (Finland); Ivanchenko, M.; Nevdacha, V.; Yagozinskyy, Y.; Haenninen, H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Helsinki University of Technology Puumiehenkuja 3, P.O. Box 4200, FIN-02015 HUT (Finland)

    2004-07-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking has occurred in BWR environment in non-sensitized, deformed austenitic stainless steel materials. The affecting parameters are so far not fully known, but deformation mechanisms may be decisive. The effect of deformation and nitrogen content on the behaviour of austenitic stainless steels was investigated. The materials were austenitic stainless steels of AISI 316L type with different amounts of nitrogen (0.03 - 0.18%) and they were mechanically deformed 0, 5 and 20%. The investigations are focused on the dynamic strain ageing (DSA) behaviour. A few crack growth rate measurements are performed on nuclear grade AISI 316NG material with different degrees of deformation (0, 5 and 20%). The effects of DSA on mechanical properties of these materials are evaluated based on peaks in ultimate tensile strength and strain hardening coefficient and minimum in ductility in the DSA temperature range. Additionally, internal friction measurements have been performed in the temperature range of -100 to 600 deg. C for determining nitrogen interactions with other alloying elements and dislocations (cold-worked samples). The results show an effect of nitrogen on the stainless steel behaviour, e.g. clear indications of dynamic strain ageing and changes in the internal friction peaks as a function of nitrogen content and amount of deformation. (authors)

  1. Examination of the Oxidation Protection of Zinc Coatings Formed on Copper Alloys and Steel Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazoglou, M.; Chaliampalias, D.; Vourlias, G.; Pavlidou, E.; Stergioudis, G.; Skolianos, S.

    2010-01-01

    The exposure of metallic components at aggressive high temperature environments, usually limit their usage at similar application because they suffer from severe oxidation attack. Copper alloys are used in a wide range of high-quality indoor and outdoor applications, statue parts, art hardware, high strength and high thermal conductivity applications. On the other hand, steel is commonly used as mechanical part of industrial set outs or in the construction sector due to its high mechanical properties. The aim of the present work is the examination of the oxidation resistance of pack cementation zinc coatings deposited on copper, leaded brass and steel substrates at elevated temperature conditions. Furthermore, an effort made to make a long-term evaluation of the coated samples durability. The oxidation results showed that bare substrates appear to have undergone severe damage comparing with the coated ones. Furthermore, the mass gain of the uncoated samples was higher than this of the zinc covered ones. Particularly zinc coated brass was found to be more resistant to oxidation conditions in which it was exposed as it has the lower mass gain as compared to the bare substrates and zinc coated copper. Zinc coated steel was also proved to be more resistive than the uncoated steel.

  2. The effects of dynamic load on behaviour of welded joint A-387 Gr. 11 alloyed steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Popović

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The in-service behaviour of alloyed steel A-387 Gr. 11 Class 1, for pressure vessels, used for high temperature applications, depends on the properties of its welded joint, with parent metal (BM, heat-affected-zone (HAZ and weld metal (WM, as constituents. Charpy testing of BM, WM and HAZ, together with, determination of the parameters of fatigue-crack growth and fatigue threshold ΔKth was used, in order to understand, how heterogeneity of structure and different mechanical properties of welded joint constituents affect on crack initiation and propagation.

  3. Interface reaction between nickel-base self-fluxing alloy coating and steel substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsubo, F.; Era, H.; Kishitake, K.

    2000-06-01

    The interface reaction between a nickel-base, self-fluxing alloy coating and a steel substrate has been investigated to examine the formation of “pores,” which are observed along the interface of used boiler tubes. It was found that lumpy precipitates form along the interface instead of pores after heating at high temperatures and that the precipitates are of Fe2B boride. The adhesion strength of the coating is not decreased by the formation of Fe2B precipitates along the interface because of the increase of the adhesion due to interdiffusion.

  4. Effects of heat treatment on properties of multi-element low alloy wear-resistant steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SONG Xu-ding

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper has studied the mechanical properties and heat treatment effects on multi-element low alloy wear-resistant steel (MLAWS used as a material for the liner of rolling mill torii. The results show that when quenched at 900-920℃ and tempered at 350-370℃, the MLAWS has achieved hardness above 60 HRC, tensile strength greater than 1 600 MPa, impact toughness higher than 18J/cm2 and fracture toughness greater than 37 MPa

  5. Status of ATR-A1 irradiation experiment on vanadium alloys and low-activation steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H.; Strain, R.V.; Gomes, I.; Chung, H.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The ATR-A1 irradiation experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was a collaborative U.S./Japan effort to study at low temperatures the effects of neutron damage on vanadium alloys. The experiment also contained a limited quantity of low-activation ferritic steel specimens from Japan as part of the collaboration agreement. The irradiation was completed on May 5, 1996, as planned, after achieving an estimated neutron damage of 4.7 dpa in vanadium. The capsule has since been kept in the ATR water canal for the required radioactivity cool-down. Planning is underway for disassembly of the capsule and test specimen retrieval.

  6. Newly Designed Cr-Mn Alloyed Ultra-high Strength Steel without Boron Addition for Hot-stamping Processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-hui ZHU; Hong-bing ZHOU; Qin-yi LI; Qi-wei CHEN; Hai-rong GU; Yong-gang LIU

    2015-01-01

    A newly designed hot-stamping steel alloyed by chromium (Cr)and manganese (Mn)without boron (B) addition was developed for automobile mass reduction.The experimental results showed the Cr-Mn alloyed steel could be quenched to full martensite microstructure when the cooling rate was higher than 1 4 ℃/s.Yield strength, tensile strength and elongation of the experimental hot stamping part reached 1 1 8 0 MPa,1 6 4 5 MPa and 8.4%, respectively.The experimental hot stamping part possessed higher tensile strength and elongation,compared with conventional hot-stamping steel of 2 2 MnB5 .Furthermore,excellent processing flexibility would be obtained in this novel hot-stamping steel because of its lower critical cooling rate and phase transformation temperature.The design of the composition and investigations of microstructure,mechanical properties and hot-stamping processing were also studied.

  7. Design of Helical Self-Piercing Rivet for Joining Aluminum Alloy and High-Strength Steel Sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, W. Y.; Kim, D. B.; Park, J. G; Kim, D. H.; Kim, K. H.; Lee, I. H.; Cho, H. Y. [Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-15

    A self-piercing rivet (SPR) is a mechanical component for joining dissimilar material sheets such as those of aluminum alloy and steel. Unlike conventional rivets, the SPR directly pierces sheets without the need for drilling them beforehand. However, the regular SPR can undergo buckling when it pierces a high-strength steel sheet, warranting the design of a helical SPR. In this study, the joining and forging processes using the helical SPR were simulated using the commercial FEM code, DEFORM-3D. High-tensile-strength steel sheets of different strengths were joined with aluminum alloy sheets using the designed helical SPR. The simulation results were found to agree with the experimental results, validating the optimal design of a helical SPR that can pierce high-strength steel sheets.

  8. Brazing open cell reticulated copper foam to stainless steel tubing with vacuum furnace brazed gold/indium alloy plating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Stanley R.; Korinko, Paul S.

    2008-05-27

    A method of fabricating a heat exchanger includes brush electroplating plated layers for a brazing alloy onto a stainless steel tube in thin layers, over a nickel strike having a 1.3 .mu.m thickness. The resultant Au-18 In composition may be applied as a first layer of indium, 1.47 .mu.m thick, and a second layer of gold, 2.54 .mu.m thick. The order of plating helps control brazing erosion. Excessive amounts of brazing material are avoided by controlling the electroplating process. The reticulated copper foam rings are interference fit to the stainless steel tube, and in contact with the plated layers. The copper foam rings, the plated layers for brazing alloy, and the stainless steel tube are heated and cooled in a vacuum furnace at controlled rates, forming a bond of the copper foam rings to the stainless steel tube that improves heat transfer between the tube and the copper foam.

  9. Dualism of precipitation morphology in high strength low alloy steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chih-Yuan, Chen, E-mail: chen6563@gmail.com [Department of Energy Engineering, National United University, Miaoli 36003, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chien-Chon, Chen [Department of Energy Engineering, National United University, Miaoli 36003, Taiwan (China); Jer-Ren, Yang, E-mail: jryang@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2015-02-25

    While the role of microalloying elements on precipitation strengthening in ferrite matrix during austenite/ferrite transformation is quite clear, some uncertainty still exists concerning the variability of the microhardness distribution of ferrite grains in the isothermal holding condition. The objective of the present study was to clarify the intrinsic characteristics of carbide precipitation morphology in the ferrite matrix under different processing temperatures and times and to correlate it with austenite decomposition kinetics to elucidate why a large microhardness distribution occurs at low isothermal holding temperature. Better understanding of carbide precipitation behavior can help researchers to determine the root cause of variation in microhardness distribution, which would allow metallurgists to produce high quality steels. Measurement with a Vickers hardness indenter revealed that, in specimens isothermally held at 625 °C, the range of Vickers hardness distribution was 240–420 after 5 min of isothermal holding, and 270–340 after 60 min. For specimens isothermally held at 725 °C, the range of Vickers hardness distribution was 200–330 for 5 min of isothermal holding, and 200–250 for 60 min. Therefore, the average microhardness decreased with the isothermal holding temperature and time, and a larger range of distribution occurred with short isothermal holding times. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed that interface precipitation and random precipitation can occur within the same ferrite grain. The reason is that the austenite decomposition rate varies with transformation temperature and time. An excessively fast austenite/ferrite interface movement velocity, which usually happens in small ferrite grains, would cause these ferrite grains with microalloying elements to exceed their solubility. Furthermore, these microalloying elements will be precipitated randomly after isothermal holding at longer times. Consequently, a large

  10. Calculation of the end-rolling strength in Q235 strip steel by the alloying electron structure parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhilin; LIN Cheng; LIU Yan; GUO Yanchang

    2005-01-01

    Combined with the phase transformations in rolling, the phase configuration, the tensile strength, and the yield strength with different terminal rolling grain sizes in Q235 strip steel have been theoretically calculated using the covalent electron number (nA) of the strongest bond in phase cells and the interface electron density difference (Ap) in alloys. The calculated results agree well with the results of real production. Therefore, the calculation method of terminal rolling tensile and yield strength in the non-quenched-tempered steel containing pearlite is given by the alloying electron structure parameters.

  11. Electrochemical Behavior and Microstructure of Recyclable Aluminium-magmesium Alloy Hot-dip Coating Deposited on Low Carbon Steel Substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Panomkorn KWAKHONG; Apichart ARTNASEAW; Chaiyaput KRUEHONG

    2015-01-01

    With the abundance and good corrosion resistance of aluminium, hot-dip technique was used to prepare the recycled Al with 8.2 mass% Mg alloy coating on low carbon steel substrates. Electrochemical behavior of this coating was investigated by an-odic polarization and open circuit potential measurement. Its microstructure and composition were observed by scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry, respectively. The long lasting corrosion performance of coated steels was in-vestigated under the salt fog spray test. From anodic polarization curves and open circuit potential, recycled Al with 8.2 mass% Mg coating performed adequate sacriifcial ability. At 0.40 V, current density of recycled Al with 8.2 mass% Mg alloy coating was about 200 000 times higher than that of pure recycled Al coating, and was about 0.5 times lower than that of Zn coating. The microstruc-ture of recycled Al with 8.2 mass% Mg alloy coating on the steel substrate consisted of Al3Mg2, Al-Fe intermetallic compound and Al matrix. The results from salt fog spray test showed that recycled Al with 8.2 mass% Mg alloy coated steel had similar corrosion resistance ability to Zn coated steel.

  12. Characterization of Nanocrystallizatin Surface Layer of 0.4C-1Cr Low Alloy Steel Prepared by Ultrasonic Particulate Peening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jun-bao; LIU Yu-liang; ZHAO Xin-qi; WU Jie; SONG Hong-wei; XIONG Tian-ying

    2004-01-01

    A nanostructured surface layer was fabricated in a quenched and tempered 0.4C-1Cr low alloy steel by ultrasonic particulate peening technique. The microstructure of the nanocrystalline surface layer was characterized by means of TEM and Mossbauer spectroscopy. Experimental results reveal that both cementite and ferrite nanocrystals with an average size of 5 nm were formed in the surface layer of the steel, phase transformation of austenite and dissolution of cementite maybe occur in the process of ultrasonic particulate peening.

  13. Characterization of Nanocrystallizatin Surface Layer of 0.4C-1Cr Low Alloy Steel Prepared by Ultrasonic Particulate Peening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGJun-bao; LIUYu-liang; ZHAOXin-qi; WUJie; SONGHong-wei; XIONGTian-ying

    2004-01-01

    A nanostructured surface layer was fabricated in a quenched and tempered 0.4C-ICr low alloy steel by ultrasonic particulate peening technique. The microstructure of the nanocrystalline surface layer was characterized by means of TEM and Moessbauer spectroscopy. Experimental results reveal that both cementite and ferrite nanocrystals with an average size of 5 nm were formed in the surface layer of the steel, phase transformation of austenite and dissolution of cementite maybe occur in the process of ultrasonic particulate peening.

  14. Alloying the X40CrMoV5-1 steel surface layer with tungsten carbide by the use of a high power diode laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrzanski, L.A. [Institute of Engineering Materials and Biomaterials, Silesian University of Technology, 44-100 Gliwice, Konarskiego St. 18A (Poland); Bonek, M. [Institute of Engineering Materials and Biomaterials, Silesian University of Technology, 44-100 Gliwice, Konarskiego St. 18A (Poland)]. E-mail: mb@zmn.mt.polsl.gliwice.pl; Hajduczek, E. [Institute of Engineering Materials and Biomaterials, Silesian University of Technology, 44-100 Gliwice, Konarskiego St. 18A (Poland); Klimpel, A. [Welding Department, Silesian University of Technology, 44-100 Gliwice, Konarskiego St. 18A (Poland)

    2005-07-15

    The paper presents the effect of alloying with tungsten carbide on properties of the X40CrMoV5-1 steel surface layer, using the high power diode laser (HPDL). Selection of laser operating conditions is discussed, as well as thickness of the alloying layer, and their influence on structure and chemical composition of the steel. Analysis of the influence of the process conditions on the thicknesses of the alloyed layer and heat-affected zone is presented.

  15. Alloying the X40CrMoV5-1 steel surface layer with tungsten carbide by the use of a high power diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrzański, L. A.; Bonek, M.; Hajduczek, E.; Klimpel, A.

    2005-07-01

    The paper presents the effect of alloying with tungsten carbide on properties of the X40CrMoV5-1 steel surface layer, using the high power diode laser (HPDL). Selection of laser operating conditions is discussed, as well as thickness of the alloying layer, and their influence on structure and chemical composition of the steel. Analysis of the influence of the process conditions on the thicknesses of the alloyed layer and heat-affected zone is presented.

  16. Gas bubbles evolution peculiarities in ferritic-martensitic and austenitic steels and alloys under helium-ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, I. I.; Kalashnikov, A. N.; Kalin, B. A.; Binyukova, S. Yu

    2003-12-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has been used to investigate the gas bubble evolution in model alloys of the Fe-C system, ferritic-martensitic steels of 13Cr type, nickel and austenitic steels under 40-keV helium-ion irradiation up to a fluence of 5 × 10 20 m -2 at the temperature of 920 K. It was shown that helium-ion irradiation at high temperature resulted in formation of bubbles with a greater size and a smaller density in Fe and ferritic-martensitic steels than those in nickel and austenitic steels. Large gaseous bubbles in ferritic component are uniformly distributed in grains body in Fe-C alloys as well as in ferritic-martensitic steels. The bubbles with a higher density and a smaller size than those in ferritic component are formed in martensitic grains of steels and Fe-C alloys with a high carbon content ( NC>0.01 wt%), which leads to a small level of swelling of martensite in comparison with that of ferrite. In addition, the bubbles in martensitic grains have a tendency to ordered distribution.

  17. Gas bubbles evolution peculiarities in ferritic-martensitic and austenitic steels and alloys under helium-ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernov, I.I. E-mail: chernov@phm.mephi.ru; Kalashnikov, A.N.; Kalin, B.A.; Binyukova, S.Yu

    2003-12-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has been used to investigate the gas bubble evolution in model alloys of the Fe-C system, ferritic-martensitic steels of 13Cr type, nickel and austenitic steels under 40-keV helium-ion irradiation up to a fluence of 5 x 10{sup 20} m{sup -2} at the temperature of 920 K. It was shown that helium-ion irradiation at high temperature resulted in formation of bubbles with a greater size and a smaller density in Fe and ferritic-martensitic steels than those in nickel and austenitic steels. Large gaseous bubbles in ferritic component are uniformly distributed in grains body in Fe-C alloys as well as in ferritic-martensitic steels. The bubbles with a higher density and a smaller size than those in ferritic component are formed in martensitic grains of steels and Fe-C alloys with a high carbon content (N{sub C}>0.01 wt%), which leads to a small level of swelling of martensite in comparison with that of ferrite. In addition, the bubbles in martensitic grains have a tendency to ordered distribution.

  18. Influence of the pulsed plasma treatment on the corrosion resistance of the low-alloy steel plated by Ni-based alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhumaev, P.; Yakushin, V.; Kalin, B.; Polsky, V.; Yurlova, M.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents investigation results of the influence of high temperature pulsed plasma flows (HTPPF) treatment on the corrosion resistance of low-alloy steel 0.2C-Cr-Mn- Ni-Mo cladded by the rapidly quenched nickel-based alloy. A technique that allows obtaining a defect-free clad layer with a good adhesion to the substrate was developed. It is shown that the preliminary treatment of steel samples by nitrogen plasma flows significantly increases their corrosion resistance in the conditions of intergranular corrosion test in a water solution of sulfuric acid. A change of the corrosion mechanism of the clad layer from intergranular to uniform corrosion was observed as a result of sub-microcrystalline structure formation and homogeneous distribution of alloying elements in the plasma treated surface layer thus leading to the significant increase of the corrosion resistance.

  19. Development of Semi-Stochastic Algorithm for Optimizing Alloy Composition of High-Temperature Austenitic Stainless Steels (H-Series) for Desired Mechanical and Corrosion Properties.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dulikravich, George S.; Sikka, Vinod K.; Muralidharan, G.

    2006-06-01

    The goal of this project was to adapt and use an advanced semi-stochastic algorithm for constrained multiobjective optimization and combine it with experimental testing and verification to determine optimum concentrations of alloying elements in heat-resistant and corrosion-resistant H-series stainless steel alloys that will simultaneously maximize a number of alloy's mechanical and corrosion properties.

  20. Effects of Mo Composites on the Corrosion Behaviors of Low Alloy Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Chenghao; GUO Jianwei; HU Xianqi

    2007-01-01

    By using electrochemical and weight loss methods, the effect of MoO42-on the corrosion behaviors of low alloy steel was investigated in the 55%LiBr+0.07 mol/L LiOH solution at high temperature.The results show that MoO42-, being an anodic inhibitor, would form a passive film rapidly and impede both anodic and cathodic reactions. Moreover, Na2MoO4 effectively prevents corrosion in 55%LiBr+0.07 mol/L LiOH solution when its concentration is higher than 200 mg/L. Some elements of alloy, such as chromium and nickel, may cause the widening of passive potential region and the decrease of passive density, which indicates that the corrosion resistance increases. AES analysis shows that molybdenum participates in forming a protection film. The synergistic effect between chromium and molybdenum induces Cr-steel to be in passive state in lower Na2MoO4 concentration.

  1. Strain-induced Precipitation in Ti Micro-alloyed Interstitial-free Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-jun HUI; Yang YU; Lin WANG; Chang WANG; Wen-yuan LI; Bin CHEN

    2016-01-01

    Stress relaxation method was carried out on a Ti micro-alloyed interstitial-free (IF)steel at the tempera-ture ranging from 800 to 1 000 ℃.The results show that the softening kinetics curves of deformed austenite can be divided into three stages.At the first stage,the stress has a sharp drop due to the onset of recrystallization.At the second stage,a plateau appears on the relaxation curves indicating the start and finish of strain-induced precipitation. At the third stage,the stress curves begin to descend again because of coarsening of precipitates.Precipitation-time-temperature (PTT)diagram exhibited a “C”shape,and the nose point of the PTT diagram is located at 900 ℃ and the start precipitation time of 10 s.The theoretical calculation shows that the strain-induced precipitates were con-firmed as almost pure TiC particles.The TiC precipitates were heterogeneously distributed in either a chain-like or cell-like manner observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM),which indicates the precipitates nucleated on dislocations or dislocation substructures.In addition,a thermodynamic analytical model was presented to describe the precipitation in Ti micro-alloyed IF steel,which shows a good agreement between the experimental observation and the predictions of the model.

  2. Femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on steel and titanium alloy for tribological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonse, J.; Koter, R.; Hartelt, M.; Spaltmann, D.; Pentzien, S.; Höhm, S.; Rosenfeld, A.; Krüger, J.

    2014-10-01

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS, ripples) were generated on stainless steel (100Cr6) and titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) surfaces upon irradiation with multiple femtosecond laser pulses (pulse duration 30 fs, central wavelength 790 nm). The experimental conditions (laser fluence, spatial spot overlap) were optimized in a sample-scanning geometry for the processing of large surface areas (5 × 5 mm2) covered homogeneously by the nanostructures. The irradiated surface regions were subjected to white light interference microscopy and scanning electron microscopy revealing spatial periods around 600 nm. The tribological performance of the nanostructured surface was characterized by reciprocal sliding against a ball of hardened steel in paraffin oil and in commercial engine oil as lubricants, followed by subsequent inspection of the wear tracks. For specific conditions, on the titanium alloy a significant reduction of the friction coefficient by a factor of more than two was observed on the laser-irradiated (LIPSS-covered) surface when compared to the non-irradiated one, indicating the potential benefit of laser surface structuring for tribological applications.

  3. XPS and micro-mechanical characterisation of nitrogen ion implanted low alloy steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.O.Olofinjana; Z.Chen; J.M.Bell

    2001-01-01

    The surface composition of low alloy steel after N2+ implantation was studied with X-rayphoto-electron spectroscopy (XPS). The effect of the implantation on the mechanical hardnesswas evaluated by ultra-micro hardness indentation. Chemical characterisation of the surface indi-cated that a thin layer rich in N, C and Si was formed. It is shown that Fe played little role in thechemical composition and the structure of the modified surface. The mechanical hardness of N2+implanted surface was 35-50 GPa compared with a value of 10 GPa for the untreated sample. Itis thought that the high hardness observed on the surface and in the sub-surface was as a resultof chemical modification to form a film of Si doped carbon nitride. There is strong evidence fromthe XPS and the nanoindentation studies that the bonding structure of the C-N in the near surfaceis essentially sp3 types expected in crystalline C3N4. The value of nitrogen ion implantation asprocess for improving the wear resistance of low alloy steels is emphasized.

  4. Original position statistic distribution analysis study of low alloy steel continuous casting billet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Haizhou; ZHAO; Pei; CHEN; Jiwen; LI; Meiling; YANG; Z

    2005-01-01

    The homogeneity of low alloy steels continuous casting billet obtained under different technological conditions has been investigated by original position statistic distribution analysis technique. On the basis of systematic analysis of ten thousands primary optical signals at the corresponding original positions, the quantitative statistic distribution information of each element was obtained. The biggest degrees of segregation of low alloy steel continuous casting billet were calculated accurately according to the quantitative distribution maps of the contents. It was suggested that the weight ratio in a certain content range was used to judge the homogeneity of the materials, and the two models -- the total weight ratio of contents (the degree of statistic homogeneity, H) within the permissive content range (C0±R) and the median value confidence extension ratio (the degree of statistic segregation, S) at 95% of confidence limit of weight ratio -- were put forward. The two models reflect the composition and state distribution regularity of the metal materials in a large region. The difference between the sample with high columnar crystal and the sample with high equiaxed crystal has been studied by using the two models.

  5. Corrosion of aluminium, stainless steels and AISI 680 nickel alloy in nitrogen-based fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kap, I.; Starostin, M.; Shter, G.E.; Grader, G.S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel)

    2012-07-15

    Nitrogen-based compounds can potentially be used as alternative non-carbon or low-carbon fuels. Nevertheless, the corrosion of construction materials at high temperatures and pressures in the presence of such fuel has not been reported yet. This work is focused on the corrosion of AISI Al 6061, 1005 carbon steel (CS), 304, 316L, 310 austenitic stainless steels (SS) and 680 nickel alloy in highly concentrated water solution of ammonium nitrate and urea (ANU). The corrosion at 50 C and ambient pressure and at 350 C and 20 bar was investigated to simulate storage and working conditions. Sodium chloride was added to the fuel (0-5 wt%) to simulate industrial fertilizers and accelerated corrosion environment. Heavy corrosion of CS was observed in ANU solution at 50 C, while Al 6061, 304 and 316L SS showed high resistance both to uniform and pitting corrosion in ANU containing 1% of sodium chloride. Addition of 5% sodium chloride caused pitting of Al 6061 but had no influence on the corrosion of SS. Tests in ANU at 350 C and 20 bar showed pitting on SS 304 and 316L and 680 nickel alloy. The highest corrosion resistance was found for SS 310 due to formation of stable oxide film on its surface. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Tribological Properties of WS2 Nanoparticles Lubricants on Aluminum-Silicon Alloy and Carbon Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riyadh A. AL-SAMARAI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The rheological properties of nanometric tungsten disulphide (WS2 nanoparticles oil lubricants and its tribological performance with two hypereutectic Al-Si alloy and carbon steel are examined. These two oils are used to reduce wear and friction and to explore the actions via tribological pin-on-disk tests. The pin was made from hypereutectic Al-Si alloy on steel disk, taking into consideration the effect of loads (10, 20, 30 N and different speed (200, 300, 400 rpm. Oils with and without WS2 nanoparticles reveal the loss rate due to friction. The results show that WS2 nanoparticles oil-dispersed lubricants are capable of reducing wear, improved by a mechanism which was characterized not only by the viscosity of the WS2 nanoparticles suspensions but also the promotion of contact’s surface as combined anti-corrosion, as well as effective reduction of friction on the surface film. Therefore, a lubricant added to nanoparticles can protect the piston surface.

  7. The Role of Vanadium Carbide Traps in Reducing the Hydrogen Embrittlement Susceptibility of High Strength Alloy Steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-08-01

    A723 steel was not sufficient to induce any appreciable embrittlement. 7.0 4.0 HY80 X 0.0i-r 50 4340 r—,—,—|—i—i—i—r—t—i—i—i—i—I—i—’—’—> l...carbide, V4C3) was identified in the A723 steel by x- ray diffraction. V4C3 traps effectively reduced the hydrogen concentrations at the crack ...ALLOY STEELS G. L. SPENCER D. J. DUQUETTE AUGUST 1998 US ARMY ARMAMENT RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT AND ENGINEERING CENTER CLOSE COMBAT ARMAMENTS CENTER

  8. Initiation of environmentally-assisted cracking in low-alloy steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wire, G.L.; Li, Y.Y.

    1996-06-01

    Environmentally-Assisted Cracking (EAC) in low alloy steels is activated by a critical level of sulfide ions at the crack tip, which is produced from dissolution of sulfide inclusions (MnS, FeS, etc.) in the steel following exposure by a growing crack. EAC of concern herein is the increase of fatigue crack growth rate of up to 40 to 100 times the rate in air that occurs at 240--300 C in high temperature LWR or boiler water environments. The initiation of EAC is the onset of the higher fatigue crack growth rates in fully developed cracks already presumed to be present due to fatigue, stress corrosion cracking, or induced by fabrication. Initiation of EAC is induced by a change in loading parameters causing the fatigue crack growth rate to increase from a small multiple (2--4) to 40--100 times the air rate. A steady state theory developed by Combrade, suggests that EAC will initiate only above a critical crack velocity and cease below this same velocity. However, more recent tests show that EAC can persist down to much lower velocities (100 times lower) in low oxygen water at slightly lower temperatures. A special set of experiments on high sulfur plate material demonstrate that EAC will not initiate from surface cracks with low sulfide inventories at low crack tip velocities. Transient diffusion calculations show that a finite crack extension at a high crack tip velocity is necessary to initiate EAC, providing a possible explanation for the lack of high crack growth observations reported in low alloy steels in structural applications involving low oxygen environments.

  9. Wear Characteristics of Ni-Based Hardfacing Alloy Deposited on Stainless Steel Substrate by Laser Cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Reena; Limaye, P. K.; Kumar, Santosh; Kushwaha, Ram P.; Viswanadham, C. S.; Srivastava, Dinesh; Soni, N. L.; Patel, R. J.; Dey, G. K.

    2015-03-01

    In this study, dry sliding wear characteristics of the Ni-based hardfacing alloy (Ni-Mo-Cr-Si) deposited on stainless steel SS316L substrate by laser cladding have been presented. Dry sliding wear behavior of the laser clad layer was evaluated against two different counter bodies, AISI 52100 chromium steel (~850 VHN) and tungsten carbide ball (~2200 VHN) to study both adhesive and abrasive wear characteristics, in comparison with the substrate SS316L using ball on plate reciprocating wear tester. The wear resistance was evaluated as a function of load and sliding speed for a constant sliding amplitude and sliding distance. The wear mechanisms were studied on the basis of wear surface morphology and microchemical analysis of the wear track using SEM-EDS. Laser clad layer of Ni-Mo-Cr-Si on SS316L exhibited much higher hardness (~700 VHN) than that of substrate SS316L (~200 VHN). The laser clad layer exhibited higher wear resistance as compared to SS316L substrate while sliding against both the counterparts. However, the improvement in the wear resistance of the clad layer as compared to the substrate was much higher while sliding against AISI 52100 chromium steel than that while sliding against WC, at the same contact stress intensity.

  10. Strengthening Mechanisms for Ti-and Nb-Ti-micro-alloyed High-strength Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan-feng MENG; Yi-de WANG; Ying-hui WEI; Bin-qing SHI; Tian-xie CUI; Yu-tian WANG

    2016-01-01

    The strengthening mechanisms of hot-rolled steels micro-alloyed with Ti (ST-TQ500)and Nb-Ti (NT-TQ500)were investigated by examining the microstructures of steels using optical microscope (OM),scanning elec-tron microscope (SEM)and transmission electron microscope (TEM).The results revealed almost no differences in the solute solution strengthening and fine-grained strengthening of the two steels,whereas the contributions of pre-cipitation strengthening and dislocation strengthening were different for ST-TQ500 and NT-TQ500.The measured precipitation strengthening effect of ST-TQ500 was 88 MPa higher than that of NT-TQ500;this difference was pri-marily attributed to the stronger precipitation effect of the Ti-containing nanoscale particles.The dislocation strengthening effect of ST-TQ500 was approximately 80 MPa lower than that of NT-TQ500.This is thought to be related to differences in deformation behavior during the finishing rolling stage;the inhibition of dynamic recrystalli-zation from Nb in NT-TQ500 (Nb-Ti)may lead to higher density of dislocations in the microstructure.

  11. Surface properties of low alloy steel treated by plasma nitrocarburizing prior to laser quenching process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. X.; Yan, M. F.; Li, B.; Guo, L. X.; Zhang, C. S.; Zhang, Y. X.; Bai, B.; Chen, L.; Long, Z.; Li, R. W.

    2015-04-01

    Laser quenching (LQ) technique is used as a part of duplex treatments to improve the thickness and hardness of the surface layers of steels. The present study is to investigate the surface properties of low alloy steel treated by plasma nitrocarburizing (PNC) prior to a laser quenching process (PNC+LQ). The microstructure and properties of PNC+LQ layer determined are compared with those obtained by PNC and LQ processes. OM, XRD, SEM and EDS analyses are utilized for microstructure observation, phases identification, morphology observation and chemical composition detection, respectively. Microhardness tester and pin-on-disc tribometer are used to investigate the mechanical properties of the modified layers. Laser quenching of plasma nitrocarburized (PNC+LQ) steel results in much improved thickness and hardness of the modified layer in comparison with the PNC or LQ treated specimens. The mechanism is that the introduction of trace of nitrogen decreases the eutectoid point, that is, the transformation hardened region is enlarged under the same temperature distribution. Moreover, the layer treated by PNC+LQ process exhibits enhanced wear resistance, due to the lubrication effect and optimized impact toughness, which is contributed to the formation of oxide film consisting of low nitrogen compound (FeN0.076) and iron oxidation (mainly of Fe3O4).

  12. Effects of LWR coolant environments on fatigue design curves of carbon and low-alloy steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. Figures I-9.1 through I-9.6 of Appendix I to Section III of the code specify fatigue design curves for structural materials. While effects of reactor coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the design curves, test data indicate that the Code fatigue curves may not always be adequate in coolant environments. This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steels in light water reactor (LWR) environments. The existing fatigue S-N data have been evaluated to establish the effects of various material and loading variables such as steel type, dissolved oxygen level, strain range, strain rate, temperature, orientation, and sulfur content on the fatigue life of these steels. Statistical models have been developed for estimating the fatigue S-N curves as a function of material, loading, and environmental variables. The results have been used to estimate the probability of fatigue cracking of reactor components. The different methods for incorporating the effects of LWR coolant environments on the ASME Code fatigue design curves are presented.

  13. Chemical elements diffusion in the stainless steel components brazed with Cu-Ag alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voiculescu, I.; Geanta, V.; Vasile, I. M.; Binchiciu, E. F.; Winestoock, R.

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents the study of diffusion of chemical elements through a brazing joint, between two thin components (0.5mm) made of stainless steel 304. An experimental brazing filler material has been used for brazing stainless steel component and then the diffusion phenomenon has been studied, in terms of chemical element displacement from the brazed separation interface. The filler material is in the form of a metal rod coated with ceramic slurry mixture of minerals, containing precursors and metallic powders, which can contribute to the formation of deposit brazed. In determining the distance of diffusion of chemical elements, on both sides of the fusion line, were performed measurements of the chemical composition using electron microscopy SEM and EDX spectrometry. Metallographic analysis of cross sections was performed with the aim of highlight the microstructural characteristics of brazed joints, for estimate the wetting capacity, adherence of filler metal and highlight any imperfections. Analyzes performed showed the penetration of alloying elements from the solder (Ag, Cu, Zn and Sn) towards the base material (stainless steel), over distances up to 60 microns.

  14. 78 FR 76653 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Moldova, Trinidad and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-18

    ... COMMISSION [Investigation Nos. 701-TA-417 and 731-TA-953, 957-959, 961, and 962 (Second Review)] Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Moldova, Trinidad and Tobago, and Ukraine Scheduling of full five-year reviews concerning the countervailing duty order on carbon and certain...

  15. Tempering of martensitic steel for fasteners: Effects of micro-alloying on microstructure and mechanical property evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Öhlund, C.E.I.C.

    2015-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis aims to deepen our understanding of the effect of micro-alloying on the microstructure and mechanical property evolution during tempering of martensitic steel for fasteners. The ongoing trend of engine down-sizing has led to the need for stronger and more temper

  16. [The industrial environment in the electric-furnace steel smelting, converter and open-hearth furnace methods of manufacturing manganese-alloyed steels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnaukh, N G; Petrov, G A; Gapon, V A; Poslednichenko, I P; Shmidt, S E

    1992-01-01

    Inspection of the environment in manganese-alloyed steel production showed inadequate hygienic conditions of the technological processes employed. Air was more polluted by manganese oxides during the oxygen-converter process though their highest concentrations, 38 times exceeding the MAS, appeared during the casting of steel. An electric furnace coated by dust-noise-proof material and gas cleaning is preferable from a hygienic point of view. The influence of unfavourable microclimate, intensive infrared irradiation and loud noise on workers necessitates automation and mechanization of the process in order to improve the working conditions.

  17. Surface and cut-edge corrosion behavior of Zn-Mg-Al alloy-coated steel sheets as a function of the alloy coating microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Min-Suk; Kim, Sang-Heon; Kim, Jong-Sang; Lee, Jae-Won; Shon, Je-Ha; Jin, Young-Sool

    2016-01-01

    The effects of Mg and Al content on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of hot-dip Zn-Mg-Al alloycoated steel sheets were investigated. Pure Zn and Zn-based alloy coatings containing Mg (0-5 wt%) and Al (0.2-55 wt%) were produced by a hot-dip galvanizing method. Mg and Al addition induced formation of intermetallic microstructures, like primary Zn, Zn/MgZn2 binary eutectic, dendric Zn/Al eutectoid, and Zn/Al/MgZn2/ternary eutectic structures in the coating layer. MgZn2-related structures (Zn/MgZn2, Zn/Al/MgZn2, MgZn2) played an important role in increasing the corrosion resistance of Zn-Mg-Al alloy-coated steel sheets. Zn-3%Mg-2.5%Al coating layer containing a large volume of lamellar-shaped Zn/MgZn2 binary eutectic structures showed the best cut-edge corrosion resistance. The analysis indicated that Mg dissolved from MgZn2 in the early stage of corrosion and migrated to the cathodic region of steel-exposed cut-edge area to form dense and ordered protective corrosion products, leading to prolonged cathodic protection of Zn-Mg-Al alloy-coated steel sheets.

  18. Pack cementation Cr-Al coating of steels and Ge-doped silicide coating of Cr-Nb alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Y.R.; Zheng, M.H.; Rapp, R.A. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Carbon steels or low-alloy steels used in utility boilers, heat exchangers, petrochemical plants and coal gasification systems are subjected to high temperature corrosion attack such as oxidation, sulfidation and hot corrosion. The pack cementation coating process has proven to be an economical and effective method to enhance the corrosion resistance by modifying the surface composition of steels. With the aid of a computer program, STEPSOL, pack cementation conditions to produce a ferrite Cr-Al diffusion coating on carbon-containing steels by using elemental Cr and Al powders have been calculated and experimentally verified. The cyclic oxidation kinetics for the Cr-Al coated steels are presented. Chromium silicide can maintain high oxidation resistance up to 1100{degrees}C by forming a SiO{sub 2} protective scale. Previous studies at Ohio State University have shown that the cyclic oxidation resistance of MOSi{sub 2} and TiSi{sub 2} can be further improved by Ge addition introduced during coating growth. The halide-activated pack cementation process was modified to produce a Ge-doped silicide diffusion coating in a single processing step for the ORNL-developed Cr-Nb advanced intermetallic alloy. The oxidation behavior of the silicide-coated Cr-Nb alloy was excellent: weight gain of about 1 mg/cm{sup 2} upon oxidation at 1100{degrees}C in air for 100 hours.

  19. Master curve characterization of the fracture toughness behavior in SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki-Hyoung; Kim, Min-Chul; Lee, Bong-Sang; Wee, Dang-Moon

    2010-08-01

    The fracture toughness properties of the tempered martensitic SA508 Gr.4N Ni-Mo-Cr low alloy steel for reactor pressure vessels were investigated by using the master curve concept. These results were compared to those of the bainitic SA508 Gr.3 Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steel, which is a commercial RPV material. The fracture toughness tests were conducted by 3-point bending with pre-cracked charpy (PCVN) specimens according to the ASTM E1921-09c standard method. The temperature dependency of the fracture toughness was steeper than those predicted by the standard master curve, while the bainitic SA508 Gr.3 steel fitted well with the standard prediction. In order to properly evaluate the fracture toughness of the Gr.4N steels, the exponential coefficient of the master curve equation was changed and the modified curve was applied to the fracture toughness test results of model alloys that have various chemical compositions. It was found that the modified curve provided a better description for the overall fracture toughness behavior and adequate T0 determination for the tempered martensitic SA508 Gr.4N steels.

  20. Modeling of primary dendrite arm spacing variations in thin-slab casting of low carbon and low alloy steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrara, H.; Santillana, B.; Eskin, D. G.; Boom, R.; Katgerman, L.; Abbel, G.

    2012-01-01

    Solidification structure of a High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) steel, in terms of dendrite arm spacing distribution across the shell thickness, is studied in a breakout shell from a thin-slab caster at Tata Steel in IJmuiden. Columnar dendrites were found to be the predominant morphology throughout the shell with size variations across the shell thickness. Primary Dendrite Arm Spacing (PDAS) increases by increasing the distance from meniscus or slab surface. Subsequently, a model is proposed to describe the variation of the PDAS with the shell thickness (the distance from slab surface) under solidifiction conditions experienced in the primary cooling zone of thin-slab casting. The proposed relationship related the PDAS to the shell thickness and, hence, can be used as a tool for predicting solidifcation structure and optimizing the thin-slab casting of low alloy steels.

  1. Calculation of the yield and tensile strength in the alloying non quenched-tempered steel by the electron structure parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhilin; LIN Cheng; LIU Yan; GUO Yanchang

    2005-01-01

    Based on the phase transformations and strengthening mechanisms during roiling, the strength increments △σb under different strengthening mechanisms are calculated with the covalent electron number nA of the strongest bond in phase cells of alloys and the interface electron density difference △ρ matching the interface stress in alloys. The calculation method of the finishing rolling yield strength is proposed, and it is integrated with the proposed calculation formulas of strength of non quenched-tempered steel. Therefore,the general formulas to simultaneously calculate both the finishing rolling strength and the yield strength of the continuous casting-rolling and non quenched-tempered steel are given. Taken the pipeline steel X70 as an example, the predictions of properties and technological parameters are performed before production or online.

  2. Tribological Behavior of Babbitt Alloy Rubbing Against Si3N4 and Steel Under Dry Friction Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xianbing; Chen, Yinxia

    2016-03-01

    The tribological behavior of Babbitt alloy rubbing with Si3N4 ball and steel ball with various sliding speeds at dry friction condition was investigated. It was found that B88 alloy rubbing with Si3N4 ball and steel ball possesses a low sliding wear resistance at dry friction. The wear rate is above 10-4 mm3/Nm, and the friction coefficient is from 0.2 to 0.4. At low sliding speed of 0.05-0.1 m/s, the mainly wear mechanisms are microgroove and fatigue wear, while at high sliding speed of 0.5 m/s, the wear mechanisms depend on plastic deformation and delamination. The high wear rate indicates that it is needed to prevent Babbitt alloy from working at dry friction conditions, while the low friction coefficient suggests that it is not easy to the occurrence of cold weld.

  3. Cessation of environmentally-assisted cracking in a low-alloy steel: Theoretical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wire, G.L.

    1997-02-01

    Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC) can cause increases in fatigue crack growth rates of 40 to 100 times the rate in air for low alloy steels. The increased rates can lead to very large predicted crack growth. EAC is activated by a critical level of dissolved sulfides at the crack tip. Sulfide inclusions (MnS) in the steel produce corrosive sulfides in solution following exposure by a growing crack. In stagnant, low oxygen water conditions considered here, diffusion is the dominant mass transport mechanism acting to change the sulfide concentration within the crack. The average crack tip velocity is below the level required to produce the critical crack tip sulfide ion concentration required for EAC. Crack extension analyses also consider the breakthrough of large, hypothetical embedded defects with the attendant large freshly exposed sulfide inventory. Combrade et al. noted that a large inventory of undissolved metallurgical sulfides on crack flanks could trigger EAC, but did not quantify the effects. Diffusion analysis is extended herein to cover breakthrough of embedded defects with large sulfide inventories. The mass transport via diffusion is limited by the sulfide solubility. As a result, deep cracks in high sulfur steels are predicted to retain undissolved sulfides for extended but finite periods of time t{sub diss} which increase with the crack length and the metallurgical sulfide content in the steel. The analysis shows that the duration of EAC is limited to t{sub diss} providing V{sub eac}, the crack tip velocity associated with EAC is less than V{sub In}, the crack tip velocity below which EAC will not occur in an initially sulfide free crack. This condition on V{sub eac} need only be met for a short time following crack cleanup to turn off EAC. The predicted crack extension due to limited duration of EAC is a small fraction of the initial embedded defect size and would not greatly change calculated crack depths.

  4. Evaluation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility Using Fracture Mechanics Techniques, Part 1. [environmental tests of aluminum alloys, stainless steels, and titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprowls, D. O.; Shumaker, M. B.; Walsh, J. D.; Coursen, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SSC) tests were performed on 13 aluminum alloys, 13 precipitation hardening stainless steels, and two titanium 6Al-4V alloy forgings to compare fracture mechanics techniques with the conventional smooth specimen procedures. Commercially fabricated plate and rolled or forged bars 2 to 2.5-in. thick were tested. Exposures were conducted outdoors in a seacoast atmosphere and in an inland industrial atmosphere to relate the accelerated tests with service type environments. With the fracture mechanics technique tests were made chiefly on bolt loaded fatigue precracked compact tension specimens of the type used for plane-strain fracture toughness tests. Additional tests of the aluminum alloy were performed on ring loaded compact tension specimens and on bolt loaded double cantilever beams. For the smooth specimen procedure 0.125-in. dia. tensile specimens were loaded axially in constant deformation type frames. For both aluminum and steel alloys comparative SCC growth rates obtained from tests of precracked specimens provide an additional useful characterization of the SCC behavior of an alloy.

  5. Corrosion and cracking behaviour of steel and alloys in liquid H{sub 2}S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longaygue, X. [Institut Francais du Petrole, 1 et 4 avenue de Bois Preau 92852 Rueil-Malmaison (France); Duval, S. [Institut Francais du Petrole, BP no 3, 69390 Vernaison (France)

    2004-07-01

    When oil and gas wells with very high partial pressure of H{sub 2}S, e.g. H{sub 2}S-rich gas, are under production, the presence of liquid H{sub 2}S is highly probable in the process operations. Until now, corrosion engineers and materials designers have paid little attention to this situation because it is rarely encountered in practice. However, such a scenario recently met an increasing interest in the context of the Sprex development, a new H{sub 2}S pre-extraction process used for the treatment of very sour natural gases, which produces the separated acid gases as a liquid phase for re-injection to a disposal reservoir. It is generally accepted that pure liquid H{sub 2}S is not corrosive by itself towards carbon or low alloy steels, but the presence of water in production and reservoir fluids could make this medium much more corrosive, although this latter assumption is poorly documented. The aim of this paper is to present the corrosion and cracking behaviour of a pipeline carbon steel and of corrosion resistant alloys (CRA) (with Cr > 16%) after exposure to the following media: i) liquid H{sub 2}S saturated with water, and ii) liquid H{sub 2}O saturated with H{sub 2}S. For both solutions, the addition of solid sulphur on some specimens was considered to take into account the possible introduction of oxygen into the system, followed by a reaction with H{sub 2}S. The tests were performed at 80 deg. C in a laboratory autoclave where both phases coexisted, using U-bend specimens as well as rectangular corrosion coupons. The main conclusion of this study is that liquid H{sub 2}S is rather less critical for corrosion and cracking of construction alloys than 'classical' sour solutions, like H{sub 2}S-saturated water. As a consequence, the materials selection will be governed by the same criteria, with the following alternatives: i) use of carbon steels in conjunction with corrosion inhibitors, e.g. higher operation expense; or ii) selection of a CRA

  6. Master curve analysis of the SA508 Gr. 4N Ni-Mo-Cr low alloy steels for reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ki Hyoung; Wee, Dang Moon [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Chul; Lee, Bong Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    Low alloy steels used as Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPVs) materials directly relate to the safety margin and the life span of reactors. Currently, SA508 Gr.3 low alloy steel is generally used for RPV material. But, for larger capacity and long-term durability of RPV, materials that have better properties including strength and toughness are needed. Therefore, tempered martensitic SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel is considered as a candidate material due to excellent mechanical properties. The fracture toughness loss caused by irradiation embrittlement during reactor operation is one of the important issues for ferritic RPV steels, because the decrease of fracture toughness is directly related to the integrity of RPVs. One reliable and efficient concept to evaluate the fracture toughness of ferritic steels is master curve method. In ASTM E1921, it is clearly mentioned the universal shape of the median toughness-temperature curve for ferritic steels including tempered martensitic steels. However, currently, concerns have arisen regarding the appropriateness of the universal shape in ASTM for the tempered martensitic steels such as Eurofer97. Therefore, it may be necessary to assess the master curve applicability for the tempered martensitic SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel. In this study, the fracture toughness behavior with temperature of the tempered martensitic SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steels was evaluated using the ASTM E1921 master curve method. And the results were compared with those of the bainitic SA508 Gr.3 low alloy steel. Furthermore, the way to define the fracture toughness behavior of Gr.4N steels well is discussed.

  7. Hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and subcritical-crack growth in high-strength steels and nickel base alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, R. P.; Klier, K.; Simmons, G. W.

    1974-01-01

    Coordinated studies of the kinetics of crack growth and of hydrogen adsorption and diffusion were initiated to develop information that is needed for a clearer determination of the rate controlling process and possible mechanism for hydrogen enhanced crack growth, and for estimating behavior over a range of temperatures and pressures. Inconel 718 alloy and 18Ni(200) maraging steel were selected for these studies. 18Ni(250) maraging steel, 316 stainless steel, and iron single crystal of (111) orientation were also included in the chemistry studies. Crack growth data on 18Ni(250) maraging steel from another program are included for comparison. No sustained-load crack growth was observed for the Inconel 718 alloy in gaseous hydrogen. Gaseous hydrogen assisted crack growth in the 18Ni maraging steels were characterized by K-independent (Stage 2) extension over a wide range of hydrogen pressures (86 to 2000 torr or 12 kN/m2 to 266 kN/m2) and test temperatures (-60 C to +100 C). The higher strength 18Ni(250) maraging steel was more susceptible than the lower strength 200 grade. A transition temperature was observed, above which crack growth rates became diminishingly small.

  8. Effects of AlMnCa and AlMnFe Alloys on Deoxidization of Low Carbon and Low Silicon Aluminum Killed Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN Dong-ping; ZHANG Hui-shu; JIANG Zhou-hua

    2008-01-01

    To confirm the effects of AlMnCa and AIMnFe alloys on the deoxidization and modification of Al2O3 inclu-sions, experiments of 4-heat low carbon and low silicon aluminum killed steels deoxidized by AlMnCa and AlMnFe alloys were done in a MoSi2 furnace at 1 873 K. It is found that the 1# A1MnCa alloy has the best ability of deoxidi-zation and modification of Al2 O3 inclusions than 2# A1MnCa and A1MnFe alloys. Steel A deoxidized by 1# AlMnCa alloy has the lowest total oxygen content in the terminal steel, which is 37 × 10-6. Most of the inclusions in the steel deoxidized by 1# AIMnCa alloy are spherical CaO-containing compound inclusions, and 89. 1% of them are smaller than 10 μm. The diameter of the inclusion bigger than 50 μm is not found in the final steels deoxidized by AlMnCa alloys. Whereas, for the steels deoxidized by AlMnFe alloys, most inclusions in the terminal steel are Al2O3 or Al2O3-MnO inclusions, and a few of them are spherical, and only 76. 8% of them are smaller than 10 μm. Some in-clusions bigger than 50 μm are found in the steel D deoxidized by AlMnFe alloy.

  9. Development of brazing foils to join monocrystalline tungsten alloys with ODS-EUROFER steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalin, B.A. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (State University), 31 Kashirskoye Sh., Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: BAKalin@mephi.ru; Fedotov, V.T. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (State University), 31 Kashirskoye Sh., Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Sevrjukov, O.N. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (State University), 31 Kashirskoye Sh., Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Kalashnikov, A.N. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (State University), 31 Kashirskoye Sh., Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Suchkov, A.N. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (State University), 31 Kashirskoye Sh., Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Moeslang, A. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Materialforschung I, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Rohde, M. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Materialforschung I, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2007-08-01

    Results on rapidly solidified filler metals for brazing W with W and monocrystalline W with EUROFER steel (FS) are presented. Rapidly quenched powder-type filler metals based on Ti{sub bal}-V-Cr-Be were developed to braze polycrystalline W with monocrystalline W. In addition, Fe{sub bal}-Ta-Ge-Si-B-Pd alloys were developed to braze monocrystalline W with FS for helium gas cooled divertors and plasma-facing components. The W to FS brazed joints were fabricated under vacuum at 1150 {sup o}C, using a Ta spacer of 0.1 mm in thickness to account for the different thermal expansions. The monocrystalline tungsten as well as the related brazed joints withstood 30 cycles between 750 {sup o}C/20 min and air cooling/3-5 min.

  10. LITERATURE SURVEY OF GASEOUS HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CARBON AND LOW ALLOY STEELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, P; Robert Sindelar, R; Thad Adams, T

    2007-04-18

    Literature survey has been performed for a compendium of mechanical properties of carbon and low alloy steels following hydrogen exposure. The property sets include yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, uniform elongation, reduction of area, threshold stress intensity factor, fracture toughness, and fatigue crack growth. These properties are drawn from literature sources under a variety of test methods and conditions. However, the collection of literature data is by no means complete, but the diversity of data and dependency of results in test method is sufficient to warrant a design and implementation of a thorough test program. The program would be needed to enable a defensible demonstration of structural integrity of a pressurized hydrogen system. It is essential that the environmental variables be well-defined (e.g., the applicable hydrogen gas pressure range and the test strain rate) and the specimen preparation be realistically consistent (such as the techniques to charge hydrogen and to maintain the hydrogen concentration in the specimens).

  11. LITERATURE SURVEY OF GASEOUS HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CARBON AND LOW ALLOY STEELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, P; Andrew Duncan, A; Robert Sindelar, R; Thad Adams, T

    2009-04-27

    Literature survey has been performed for a compendium of mechanical properties of carbon and low alloy steels following hydrogen exposure. The property sets include yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, uniform elongation, reduction of area, threshold stress intensity factor, fracture toughness, and fatigue crack growth. These properties are drawn from literature sources under a variety of test methods and conditions. However, the collection of literature data is by no means complete, but the diversity of data and dependency of results in test method is sufficient to warrant a design and implementation of a thorough test program. The program would be needed to enable a defensible demonstration of structural integrity of a pressurized hydrogen system. It is essential that the environmental variables be well-defined (e.g., the applicable hydrogen gas pressure range and the test strain rate) and the specimen preparation be realistically consistent (such as the techniques to charge hydrogen and to maintain the hydrogen concentration in the specimens).

  12. Predicting the creep life and failure mode of low-alloy steel weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brear, J.M.; Middleton, C.J.; Aplin, P.F. [ERA Technology Ltd., Leatherhead (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-31

    This presentation reviews and consolidates experience gained through a number of research projects and practical plant assessments in predicting both the life and the likely failure mode and location in low alloy steel weldments. The approach adopted begins with the recognition that the relative strength difference between the microstructural regions is a key factor controlling both life and failure location. Practical methods based on hardness measurement and adaptable to differing weld geometries are presented and evidence for correlations between hardness ratio, damage accumulation and strain development is discussed. Predictor diagrams relating weld life and failure location to the service conditions and the hardness of the individual microstructural constituents are suggested and comments are given on the implications for identifying the circumstances in which Type IV cracking is to be expected. (orig.) 6 refs.

  13. BEHAVIOUR OF COPPER AND ALUMINIUM ELECTRODES ON EDM OF EN-8 ALLOY STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DHANANJAY PRADHAN

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Electrical discharge machining (EDM has been recognized as an efficient production method for precision machining of electrically conducting hardened materials. Copper and aluminium are used as electrode materials in this process with Kerosene oil as the dielectric medium. In this work, the behavior of copper and aluminium electrodes on electric discharge machining of EN-8 alloy steel had been studied. Keeping all other machining parameters same, the hardened work material was machined with the two electrodes at different values of peak current, pulse-on time & duty factor according to 23 full factorial design. It has been found that copper shows better results than aluminium in term of surface finish (μm in same dielectric media. Therefore, copper is recommended as a good electrode material.

  14. Status of ATR-A1 irradiation experiment on vanadium alloys and low-activation steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H.; Strain, R.V.; Gomes, I.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Matsui, H. [Tohoku Univ. (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    The ATR-A1 irradiation experiment was a collaborative U.S./Japan effort to study at low temperature the effects of neutron damage on vanadium alloys. The experiment also contained a limited quantity of low-activation ferritic steel specimens from Japan as part of the collaboration agreement. The irradiation started in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) on November 30, 1995, and ended as planned on May 5, 1996. Total exposure was 132.9 effective full power days (EFPDs) and estimated neutron damage in the vanadium was 4.7 dpa. The vehicle has been discharged from the ATR core and is scheduled to be disassembled in the next reporting period.

  15. Mechanism of Residual Stress Reduction in Low Alloy Steel by a Low Frequency Alternating Magnetic Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanli Song; Lin Hua

    2012-01-01

    Residual stress reduction in low alloy steel by a low frequency alternating magnetic treatment and its mechanism were investigated. Experimental results revealed that average stress reductions of 20%-24% were obtained in the welded samples. Moreover, compared with the zones with lower initial stress levels, more remarkable stress reductions were obtained in the stress concentration zones. The microstructures and magnetic domains were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Based on the analysis of the microstructure and magnetic domain changes, the mechanism of stress reduction by the magnetic treatment has been concluded: (1) the magneto-plastic deformations mainly due to the more uniform redistribution of dislocations are the fundamental cause of stress relaxation; and (2) surface topography is also proved to affect the magnetic treatment results to some degree by influencing magnetic domains.

  16. Reduction of Residual Stress in Low Alloy Steel with Magnetic Treatment in Different Directions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Yanli; HUA Lin; WANG Ben

    2009-01-01

    The behavior that different magnetic treatment directions induce various amounts of welding residual stress reductions in low alloy steel was studied.Reductions of 26%-28% in the lon-gitudinal stress σ_x were obtained when low frequency alternating magnetic treatment was applied perpendicularly to the welding bead,whereas reductions of 20%-21% in σ_x were measured by using the same treatment parameters except that the field direction was applied parallel to the bead.It is proposed that different extent of stress reductions caused by the above two treatment directions is at-tributed primarily to the alteration of the energy absorbed by domains from the external magnetic field,which part of energy can arouse plastic deformation in microstructures by the motion of domain walls.

  17. Phase transformation studies af a low alloy steel in the (α + γ phase region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Kanayoa Alaneme

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This research work describes a thermo mechanical investigation of a low alloy steel treated in the (α + γ phase region. The aim is to develop a high tensile, ductile microstructure that could have a wide range of engineering applications. Recent advances in the area of precipitation, recrystallization mechanisms, and α / γ transformations provide strong background to this study. In a preliminary heat treatment, various microstructures (normalized and 450 °C tempered martensite structure were produced and deformed to varying degrees. Subsequently, these microstructures were subjected to various intercritical temperatures (740 and 760 °C for various times and a very high cooling rate. Light (optical microscopic investigations were carried out to study the ensuing microstructures. Mechanical testing results (tensile and hardness values were used to characterize the structures obtained. On analysis of the result, it was observed that well defined micro-duplex structures of ferritic and martensitic nature, possessing good combinations of strength and ductility were obtained.

  18. Comparison of Solid and Hollow Torque Transducer Shaft Response in a High Alloy Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milby, Christopher L.; Hecox, Bryan G.; Wiewel, Joseph L.; Boley, Mark S.

    2007-03-01

    Recent investigations of the torque transducer response function (ambient field signal versus applied torque or shear stress) have been conducted in a 13% chromium and 8% nickel stainless steel alloy in both the hollow shaft and solid shaft configuration. An understanding of both is needed for applications with differing yield strength and hardness requirements. Axial hysteresis measurements conducted before and after heat treatment exhibited little difference in coercivity and retentivity between the two sample types. However, the field mapping and transducer sensitivity studies showed the hollow shaft configuration to have a far superior degree of polarization in the sensory region and to exhibit an enhanced sensitivity, especially after heat treatment. This is most likely due to its more efficient provision of closed circumferential geometry for the field lines and improved grain alignment during heat treatment.

  19. Special Features of Fracture of a Solid-State Titanium Alloy - Nickel - Stainless Steel Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazgaliev, R. G.; Mukhametrakhimov, M. Kh.; Imaev, M. F.; Shayakhmetov, R. U.; Mulyukov, R. R.

    2015-10-01

    Microstructure, nanohardness, and special features of fracture of three-phase titanium alloy and stainless steel joint through a nanostructural nickel foil are investigated. Uniformly distributed microcracks are observed in Ti2Ni and TiN3 layers joined at temperatures above T = 700°C, whereas no microcracks are observed in the TiNi layer. This suggests that the reason for microcracking is an anomalously large change in the linear expansion coefficient of the TiNi layer during austenitic-martensitic transformation. Specimens subjected to mechanical tests at T = 20°C are fractured along different layers of the material, namely, in the central part of the specimen they are fractured along the Ti2Тi/TiNi interface, whereas at the edge they are fractured along the TiNi/TiNi3 interface.

  20. The influence of the corrosion product layer generated on the high strength low-alloy steels welded by underwater wet welding with stainless steel electrodes in seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Qiang; Zou, Yan; Kong, Xiangfeng; Gao, Yang; Dong, Sheng; Zhang, Wei

    2017-02-01

    The high strength low-alloy steels are welded by underwater wet welding with stainless steel electrodes. The micro-structural and electrochemical corrosion study of base metal (BM), weld zone (WZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ) are carried out to understand the influence of the corrosion product layer generated on the high strength low-alloy steels welded by underwater wet welding with stainless steel electrodes, methods used including, potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results indicate that the WZ acts as a cathode and there is no corrosion product on it throughout the immersion period in seawater. The HAZ and BM acts as anodes. The corrosion rates of the HAZ and BM change with the immersion time increasing. In the initial immersion period, the HAZ has the highest corrosion rate because it has a coarse tempered martensite structure and the BM exhibites a microstructure with very fine grains of ferrite and pearlite. After a period of immersion, the BM has the highest corrosion rate. The reason is that the corrosion product layer on the HAZ is dense and has a better protective property while that on the BM is loose and can not inhibit the diffusion of oxygen.

  1. Effect of Copper and Bronze Addition on Corrosion Resistance of Alloyed 316L Stainless Steel Cladded on Plain Carbon Steel by Powder Metallurgy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenjue CHEN; Yueying WU; Jianian SHEN

    2004-01-01

    A sandwich structure with cladding alloyed 316L stainless steel on plain carbon steel was prepared by means of powder metallurgy (PM) processing. Electrolytic Cu and prealloyed bronze (95Cu wt pct, 5Sn wt pct) were added in different contents up to 15% into the surface cladded 316L layers and the effect of alloying concentrations on the corrosion resistance of the 316L cladding layers was studied. The corrosion performances of the cladding samples were studied by immersion tests and potentio-dynamic anodic polarization tests in H2SO4 and FeCl3 solutions. Both 316L and alloyed 316L surface layers with 1.0 mm depth produced by PM cladding had an effect to improve corrosion resistance in H2SO4 and FeCl3 solutions. Small Cu and bronze addition (4%) had a positive effect in H2SO4 and FeCl3 solutions. 4% Cu alloyed 316L surface layer produced by PM cladding showed similar anodic polarization behaviour to the 316L cladding layer in H2SO4 and FeCl3 solutions.

  2. Comparison of spring characteristics of titanium-molybdenum alloy and stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Anahita; Asatourian, Armen

    2017-01-01

    Background Titanium-molybdenum alloy (TMA) and stainless steel (SS) wires are commonly used in orthodontics as arch-wires for tooth movement. However, plastic deformation phenomenon in these arch-wires seems to be a major concern among orthodontists. This study aimed to compare the mechanical properties of TMA and SS wires with different dimensions. Material and Methods Seventy-two wire samples (36 TMA and 36 SS) of three different sizes (19×25, 17×25 and 16×22) were analyzed in vitro, with 12 samples in each group. Various mechanical properties of the wires, including spring-back, bending moment and stiffness were determined using a universal testing machine. Student’s t-test showed statistically significant differences in the mean values of all the groups. In addition, metallographic comparison of SS and TMA wires was conducted under an optical microscope. Results The degree of stiffness of 16×22-sized SS and TMA springs was found to be 12±2 and 5±0.4, respectively, while the bending moment was estimated to be 1927±352 (gm-mm) and 932±16 (gm-mm), respectively; the spring-back index was determined to be 0.61±0.2 and 0.4±.09, respectively (p<0.001). There were no statistically significant differences in spring-back index in larger dimensions of the wires. Conclusions Systematic analysis indicated that springs made of TMA were superior compared to those made of SS. Although both from economic and functionality viewpoints the use of TMA is suggested, further clinical investigations are recommended. Key words:Bending moment, optical microscope, spring-back, stainless steel, stiffness, titanium‒molybdenum alloy. PMID:28149469

  3. Influence of Rare Earths on Improve Impact Property of Structural Alloy Steel with Extra Low Sulfur and Oxygen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Feng; Lin Qin

    2007-01-01

    The influence of rare earth lanthanum and cerium on impact property of structural alloy steel with extra low sulfur and oxygen was studied by impact test and microanalysis. The results showed that rare earths increased impact power of the steel when their contents were about 0.005%. Proper addition of rare earths could purify grain boundaries and decrease amount of inclusions, and reduced the possibility of crack growth along grain boundaries and through inclusions. Therefore, such steel could absorb more crack growth energy while it was impacted. However, if the content of rare earths is excessive, the grain boundary would be weakened and brittle-hard phosphates and Fe-RE intermetallic would be formed, which worsened impact toughness of steel.

  4. Study on Interface Structure and Bond Properties between Cemented Carbide and Tool Steel Blazing with amorphous alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao Ming-dong; Xu Jin-fu; Xu Xue-bo; Zou Gui-sheng; Huang Geng-hua

    2004-01-01

    Cemented Carbide YG11C and Tool Steel Crl2MoV was blazed with Ni-base amorphous alloys, QG-1011,MBF-20 and MBF-75, using dynamics thermodynamics analogue testing machine Gleeble 1500D. The effects of brazing temperature, holding time and holding pressure on micro-structure and bond strength were investigated. Results showed that YG11C and Cr12MoV were all wetted well by these three Ni-base alloys, and the bond strength was as high as 220MPa,320MPa, 320MPa respectively. When the blazing temperature was at the point over the melting point 60-70℃ of Ni-base alloy, the holding time was about 2-10min, the suitable pressure was benefit for improving the brazing quality.Microanalysis showed Co in cemented carbide diffused into liquid brazing alloy and formed the Fe-Co solid .solution.

  5. Structure and Properties of High-Temperature Multilayer Hybrid Material Based on Vanadium Alloy and Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechaykina, Tatyana A.; Nikulin, Sergey A.; Rozhnov, Andrey B.; Khatkevich, Vladimir M.; Rogachev, Stanislav O.

    2017-01-01

    The present work is devoted to the development of new structural composite material having the unique complex of properties for operating in ultrahard conditions that combine high temperatures, radiation, and aggressive environments. A new three-layer composite tube material based on vanadium alloy (V-4Ti-4Cr) protected by stainless steel (Fe-0.2C-13Cr) has been obtained by co-extrusion. Mechanism and kinetics of formation as well as structure, composition, and mechanical properties of "transition" area between vanadium alloy and stainless steel have been studied. The transition area (13- to 22-µm thick) of the diffusion interaction between vanadium alloy and steel was formed after co-extrusion. The microstructure in the transition area was rather complicated comprising different grain sizes in components, but having no defects or brittle phases. Tensile strength of the composite was an average 493 ± 22 MPa, and the elongation was 26 ± 3 pct. Annealing at 1073 K (800 °C) increased the thickness of transition area up to 1.2 times, homogenized microstructure, and slightly changed mechanical properties. Annealing at 1273 K (1000 °C) further increased the thickness of transition area and also lead to intensive grain growth in steel and sometimes to separation between composite components during tensile tests. Annealing at 1073 K (800 °C) is proposed as appropriate heat treatment after co-extrusion of composite providing balance between diffusion interaction thickness and microstructure and monolithic-like behavior of composite during tensile tests.

  6. Environmentally-Assisted Cracking of Low-Alloy Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels under Boiling Water Reactor Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, H.P.; Ritter, S

    2002-02-01

    The present report summarizes the experimental work performed by PSI on the environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC) of low-alloy steels (LAS) in the frame of the RIKORR-project during the period from January 2000 to August 2001. Within this project, the EAC crack growth behaviour of different low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels, weld filler and weld heat-affected zone materials is investigated under simulated transient and steady-state BWR/NWC power operation conditions. The EAC crack growth behaviour of different low-alloy RPV steels was characterized by slow rising load (SRL) / low-frequency corrosion fatigue (LFCF) and constant load tests with pre-cracked fracture mechanics specimens in oxygenated high-temperature water at temperatures of either 288, 250, 200 or 150 C. These tests revealed the following important interim results: Under low-flow and highly oxidizing (ECP >= 100 mV SHE) conditions, the ASME XI 'wet' reference fatigue crack growth curve could be significantly exceeded by cyclic fatigue loading at low frequencies (<0.001 Hz), at high and low load-ratios R, and by ripple loading near to DKth fatigue thresholds. The BWR VIP 60 SCC disposition lines may be significantly or slightly exceeded (even in steels with a low sulphur content) in the case of small load fluctuations at high load ratios (ripple loading) or at intermediate temperatures (200 -250 C) in RPV materials, which show a distinct susceptibility to dynamic strain ageing (DSA). (author)

  7. Structure and Properties of High-Temperature Multilayer Hybrid Material Based on Vanadium Alloy and Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechaykina, Tatyana A.; Nikulin, Sergey A.; Rozhnov, Andrey B.; Khatkevich, Vladimir M.; Rogachev, Stanislav O.

    2017-03-01

    The present work is devoted to the development of new structural composite material having the unique complex of properties for operating in ultrahard conditions that combine high temperatures, radiation, and aggressive environments. A new three-layer composite tube material based on vanadium alloy (V-4Ti-4Cr) protected by stainless steel (Fe-0.2C-13Cr) has been obtained by co-extrusion. Mechanism and kinetics of formation as well as structure, composition, and mechanical properties of "transition" area between vanadium alloy and stainless steel have been studied. The transition area (13- to 22- µm thick) of the diffusion interaction between vanadium alloy and steel was formed after co-extrusion. The microstructure in the transition area was rather complicated comprising different grain sizes in components, but having no defects or brittle phases. Tensile strength of the composite was an average 493 ± 22 MPa, and the elongation was 26 ± 3 pct. Annealing at 1073 K (800 °C) increased the thickness of transition area up to 1.2 times, homogenized microstructure, and slightly changed mechanical properties. Annealing at 1273 K (1000 °C) further increased the thickness of transition area and also lead to intensive grain growth in steel and sometimes to separation between composite components during tensile tests. Annealing at 1073 K (800 °C) is proposed as appropriate heat treatment after co-extrusion of composite providing balance between diffusion interaction thickness and microstructure and monolithic-like behavior of composite during tensile tests.

  8. PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT OF CREEP-RESISTANT FERRITIC STEEL WELDMENTS THROUGH THERMO-MECHANICAL TREATMENT AND ALLOY DESIGN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL; Babu, Prof. Sudarsanam Suresh [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Shassere, Benjamin [ORNL; Yu, Xinghua [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Two different approaches have been proposed for improvement of cross-weld creep properties of the high temperature ferrous structural materials for fossil-fired energy applications. The traditional creep strength-enhanced ferritic (CSEF) steel weldments suffer from Type IV failures which occur at the fine-grained heat affected zone (FGHAZ). In order to minimize the premature failure at FGHAZ in the existing CSEF steels, such as modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic-martensitic steels (Grade 91), a thermo-mechanical treatment consisting of aus-forging/rolling and subsequent aus-aging is proposed which promotes the formation of stable MX carbonitrides prior to martensitic transformation. Such MX remains undissolved during welding process, even in FGHAZ, which successfully improves the cross-weld creep properties. Another approach is to develop a new fully ferrtic, creep-resistant FeCrAl alloy which is essentially free from Type IV failure issues. Fe-30Cr-3Al base alloys with minor alloying additions were developed which achieved a combination of good oxidation/corrosion resistance and improved tensile and creep performance comparable or superior to Grade 92 steel.

  9. Twin-wire Submerged Arc Welding Process of a High-strength Low-alloy Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiuzhi; XU Qinghua; YIN Niandong; XIAO Xinhua

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of thermal cycle curves of a high-strength low-alloy steel (HSLA)subjected twin-wire submerged arc welding (SAW) was introduced. The thermal simulation test was performed by using the obtained curves. The impact toughness at -50 ℃ temperature of the simulated samples was also tested. OM, SEM and TEM of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of some simulation specimens were investigated. The results showed that the HSLA endured the twin-wire welding thermal cycle, generally, the low-temperature toughness values of each part of HAZ was lower than that of the parent materials, and the microstructure of coarse-grained zone(CGHAZ) mainly made up of granular bainite is the reason of the toughness serious deterioration. Coarse grain, grain boundary carbide extract and M-A island with large size and irregular polygon, along the grain boundary distribution, are the reasons for the toughness deterioration of CGHAZ. The research also showed that selected parameters of twin-wire SAW can meet the requirements to weld the test steel.

  10. Experimental Study on Vacuum Carburizing Process for Low-Carbon Alloy Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shaopeng; Wang, Gang; Zhao, Xianhui; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Rong, Yiming

    2013-10-01

    As a low-carbon alloy steel, 20Cr2Ni4A steel has an excellent mechanical properties. It has been used for producing heavy-duty gears, which require good wear and fatigue resistance. The vacuum carburizing process can improve the quality of gears and extend the service life. In this article, a complete heat-treatment process for 20Cr2Ni4A, with carburizing, tempering, quenching and cryogenic steps involved, was proposed. A numerical method was employed to design the carburizing step. The carburized samples were characterized by analysis of carbon profile, surface-retained austenite content, microstructure, and hardness profile. A good microstructure was obtained with acicular-tempered martensite, less-retained austenite, fine granular-dispersed carbides, and was oxide free. The final surface hardness was 64.2HRC, and the case depth was 0.86 mm, which meet the requirements of products. The relationships among process, performance, and microstructure were investigated to understand the inner connection.

  11. Pack Aluminide Coatings Formed at 650℃ for Enhancing Oxidation Resistance of Low Alloy Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.D.Xiang; S.R.Rose; P.K.Datta

    2004-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the feasibility of forming iron aluminide coatings on a commercial 9Cr-1Mo (wt.%) alloy steel by pack cementation at 650℃ in an attempt to improve its high temperature oxidation resistance. Pack powders containing Al, Al2O3 and a series of halide salts were used to carry out the coating deposition experiments, which enabled identification of the most suitable activator for the pack aluminising process at the intended temperature. The effect of pack aluminium content on the growth kinetics and microstructure of the coatings was then studied by keeping deposition conditions and pack activator content constant while increasing the pack aluminium content from 1.4 wt.% to 6 wt.%. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) techniques were used to analyse the phases and microstructures of the coatings formed and to determine depth profiles of coating elements in the coating layer. Oxidation resistance of the coating was studied at 650 ~C in air by intermittent weight measurement at room temperature. It was observed that the coating could substantially enhance the oxidation resistance of the steel under these testing conditions, which was attributed to the capability of the iron aluminide phases to form alumina scale on the coating surface through preferential A1 oxidation.

  12. Characterization and Cytotoxic Assessment of Ballistic Aerosol Particulates for Tungsten Alloy Penetrators into Steel Target Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian E. Schuster

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The nature and constituents of ballistic aerosol created by kinetic energy penetrator rods of tungsten heavy alloys (W-Fe-Ni and W-Fe-Co perforating steel target plates was characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. These aerosol regimes, which can occur in closed, armored military vehicle penetration, are of concern for potential health effects, especially as a consequence of being inhaled. In a controlled volume containing 10 equispaced steel target plates, particulates were systematically collected onto special filters. Filter collections were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM which included energy-dispersive (X-ray spectrometry (EDS. Dark-field TEM identified a significant nanoparticle concentration while EDS in the SEM identified the propensity of mass fraction particulates to consist of Fe and FeO, representing target erosion and formation of an accumulating debris field. Direct exposure of human epithelial cells (A549, a model for lung tissue, to particulates (especially nanoparticulates collected on individual filters demonstrated induction of rapid and global cell death to the extent that production of inflammatory cytokines was entirely inhibited. These observations along with comparisons of a wide range of other nanoparticulate species exhibiting cell death in A549 culture may suggest severe human toxicity potential for inhaled ballistic aerosol, but the complexity of the aerosol (particulate mix has not yet allowed any particular chemical composition to be identified.

  13. Modification of Low-Alloy Steel Surface by Plasma Electrolytic Nitriding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmanov, S. A.; Smirnov, A. A.; Silkin, S. A.; Belkin, P. N.

    2016-07-01

    The structure of the low-alloy steel after plasma electrolytic nitriding (PEN) in electrolyte containing ammonium nitrate was investigated. The cross-sectional microstructure, composition, and phase constituents of modified layer under different processing conditions were characterized. It is shown that anode PEN provides the saturation of steel with nitrogen and formation of α-Fe2O3, FeO, and Fe3O4 oxides, Fe2-3N nitride, and martensite. The aqueous solution that contained 15 wt.% NH4Cl and 5 wt.% NH4NO3 allows one to obtain the hardened layer with a thickness of 80 μm and a microhardness up to 740 HV during 5 min at 850 °C. Surface roughness decreases from 1.5 to 0.8 μm after 5-min PEN at 650 °C. The proposed electrolyte and processing mode (750 °C, 10 min) enable to obtain the decrease in the weight loss after lubricate wear testing by a factor of 2.7. The base-nitrate electrolyte conditioned a decrease in the corrosion current density by a factor of 9 due to passivating effect of the oxide and nitride of iron.

  14. Microstructure, Precipitation, and Mechanical Properties of V-N-Alloyed Steel After Different Cooling Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Fu-Ming; Yang, Zhan-Bing; Li, Chang-Rong

    2016-09-01

    Three cooling processes (direct air cooling, water cooling to 1023 K and 873 K (750 °C and 600 °C) followed by air cooling) after hot rolling are designed to develop V-N-alloyed 600 MPa grade high-strength steel for architectural construction. Microstructural characteristics, precipitation behavior, and mechanical properties were investigated. Experimental results indicate that all microstructures are composed of polygonal ferrite and pearlite. Compared to the microstructure obtained from traditional direct air cooling, the grain size of ferrite is refined from 6.5 to 4.6 μm and the interlamellar spacing of pearlite decreases from 136 to 45 nm, respectively, by the application of accelerated cooling and lower finish cooling temperature. The number fraction of high misorientation angle boundaries increases from 44 to 51 pct. Moreover, the sheet spacing of interphase precipitates decreases from (23 to 26 nm) to (14 to 17 nm) and the size of V(C,N) particles reduces from (5 to 8 nm) to (2 to 5 nm). Furthermore, the optimal mechanical properties are obtained in the steel water cooled to 873 K (600 °C), of which the yield strength, tensile strength, total elongation, uniform elongation, and impact energy at room temperature are 753 MPa, 922 MPa, 22 pct, 11 pct, and 36 J, respectively. Besides, the high yield strength is primarily attributed to the refined grains and precipitation hardening from interphase and random precipitation of nano-scale V(C,N) particles.

  15. Hydrogen effects in nitrogen-alloyed austenitic steels; Wirkung von Wasserstoff in stickstofflegierten austenitischen Staehlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlemann, M.; Mummert, K. [Institut fuer Festkoerper- und Werkstofforschung Dresden e.V. (Germany); Shehata, M.F. [National Research Centre, Cairo (Egypt)

    1998-12-31

    Hydrogen increases the yield strength of nitrogen-alloyed steels, but on the other hand adversely affects properties such as tensile strength and elongation to fracture. The effect is enhanced with increasing nitrogen and hydrogen contents. Under the effect of hydrogen addition, the discontinuous stress-strain characteristic and the distinct elongation limit of hydrogen-free, nitrogen containing steels is no longer observed in the material. This change of mechanical properties is attributed to an interatomic interaction of nitrogen and hydrogen in the lattice, which is shown for instance by such effects as reduction of hydrogen velocity, high solubility, and a particularly strong lattice expansion. The nature of this interaction of nitrogen and hydrogen in the fcc lattice remains to be identified. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Wasserstoff fuehrt in stickstofflegierten Staehlen zu einer Erhoehung der Streckgrenze, aber gleichzeitig zu einer Abnahme der Zugfestigkeit und Bruchdehnung. Dieser Effekt verstaerkt sich mit zunehmenden Stickstoff- und Wasserstoffgehalten. Ein diskontinuierlicher Spannungs-Dehnungsverlauf mit einer ausgepraegten Streckgrenze in wasserstofffreien hochstickstoffhaltigen Staehlen wird nach Wasserstoffeinfluss nicht mehr beobachtet. Die Aenderung der mechanischen Eigenschaften, wird auf eine interatomare Wechselwirkung von Stickstoff und Wasserstoff im Gitter zurueckgefuehrt, die sich u.a. in geringer Wasserstoffdiffusionsgeschwindigkeit, hoher Loeslichkeit und vor allem in extremer Gitteraufweitung aeussert. Insgesamt ist die Natur der Wechselwirkung zwischen Stickstoff und Wasserstoff im kfz Gitter noch nicht aufgeklaert. (orig.)

  16. Pack Aluminide Coatings Formed at 650 ℃ for Enhancing Oxidation Resistance of Low Alloy Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z. D. Xiang; S. R. Rose; P. K. Datta

    2004-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the feasibility of forming iron aluminide coatings on a commercial 9Cr-lMo (wt.%)alloy steel by pack cementation at 650 ℃ in an attempt to improve its high temperature oxidation resistance. Pack powders containing Al, Al2O3 and a series of halide salts were used to carry out the coating deposition experiments, which enabled identification of the most suitable activator for the pack aluminising process at the intended temperature. The effect of pack aluminium content on the growth kinetics and microstructure of the coatings was then studied by keeping deposition conditions and pack activator content constant while increasing the pack aluminium content from 1.4 wt.% to 6 wt.%. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) techniques were used to analyse the phases and microstructures of the coatings formed and to determine depth profiles of coating elements in the coating layer. Oxidation resistance of the coating was studied at 650 ℃ in air by intermittent weight measurement at room temperature. It was observed that the coating could substantially enhance the oxidation resistance of the steel under these testing conditions, which was attributed to the capability of the iron aluminide phases to form alumina scale on the coating surface through preferential Al oxidation.

  17. Interaction of carbon-vacancy complex with minor alloying elements of ferritic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakaev, A.; Terentyev, D.; He, X.; Zhurkin, E. E.; Van Neck, D.

    2014-08-01

    Interstitial carbon, dissolved in bcc matrix of ferritic steels, plays an important role in the evolution of radiation-induced microstructure since it exhibits strong interaction with vacancies. Frequent formation and break-up of carbon-vacancy pairs, occurring in the course of irradiation, affect both kinetics of the accumulation of point defect clusters and carbon spatial distribution. The interaction of typical alloying elements (Mn, Ni, Cu, Si, Cr and P) in ferritic steels used as structural materials in nuclear reactors with a carbon-vacancy complex is analyzed using ab initio techniques. It is found that all the considered solutes form stable triple clusters resulting in the increase of the total binding energy by 0.2-0.3 eV. As a result of the formation of energetically favourable solute-carbon-vacancy triplets, the dissociation energy for vacancy/carbon emission is also increased by ∼0.2-0.3 eV, suggesting that the solutes enhance thermal stability of carbon-vacancy complex. Association of carbon-vacancy pairs with multiple solute clusters is found to be favorable for Ni, Cu and P. The energetic stability of solute(s)-carbon-vacancy complexes was rationalized on the basis of pairwise interaction data and by analyzing the variation of local magnetic moments on atoms constituting the clusters.

  18. Microstructure, Precipitation, and Mechanical Properties of V-N-Alloyed Steel After Different Cooling Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Fu-Ming; Yang, Zhan-Bing; Li, Chang-Rong

    2016-12-01

    Three cooling processes (direct air cooling, water cooling to 1023 K and 873 K (750 °C and 600 °C) followed by air cooling) after hot rolling are designed to develop V-N-alloyed 600 MPa grade high-strength steel for architectural construction. Microstructural characteristics, precipitation behavior, and mechanical properties were investigated. Experimental results indicate that all microstructures are composed of polygonal ferrite and pearlite. Compared to the microstructure obtained from traditional direct air cooling, the grain size of ferrite is refined from 6.5 to 4.6 μm and the interlamellar spacing of pearlite decreases from 136 to 45 nm, respectively, by the application of accelerated cooling and lower finish cooling temperature. The number fraction of high misorientation angle boundaries increases from 44 to 51 pct. Moreover, the sheet spacing of interphase precipitates decreases from (23 to 26 nm) to (14 to 17 nm) and the size of V(C,N) particles reduces from (5 to 8 nm) to (2 to 5 nm). Furthermore, the optimal mechanical properties are obtained in the steel water cooled to 873 K (600 °C), of which the yield strength, tensile strength, total elongation, uniform elongation, and impact energy at room temperature are 753 MPa, 922 MPa, 22 pct, 11 pct, and 36 J, respectively. Besides, the high yield strength is primarily attributed to the refined grains and precipitation hardening from interphase and random precipitation of nano-scale V(C,N) particles.

  19. Special Features of Structure Formation in Pipes from Medium-Carbon Low-Alloy Steel 32G2F Under Heat Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, A. I.; Belikov, S. V.; Musikhin, S. A.; Burmasov, S. P.; Popov, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    Special features of formation of structure and properties of seamless pipes from medium-carbon low-alloy steel for oil and gas applications are considered and associated with chemical inhomogeneity of the metal of the pipes.

  20. Comparison of surface laser alloying of chosen tool steel using Al2O3 and ZrO2 powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Labisz

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In this work there are presented the investigation results of mechanical properties and microstructure of the hot work tool steel 32CrMoV12-28 alloyed with oxide powders like aluminium oxide and zirconium oxide. The purpose of this work was also to determine the laser treatment conditions for surface hardening of the investigation alloys with appliance of transmission electron microscopy.Design/methodology/approach: The investigations were performed using optical microscopy for the microstructure determination. By mind of the transmission electron microscopy the high resolution and phase determination was possible to obtain. The morphology of the ceramic powder particles was studied as well the lattice parameters for the Fe matrix and phase identification using diffraction methods was applied.Findings: After the laser alloying of the hot work tool steel with the selected oxide powders the structure of the samples changes in a way, that there are zones detected like the remelting zone the heat influence zone where the grains are larger and not so uniform as in the metal matrix. The used oxide powders are not present after the laser treatment in the steel matrix.Research limitations/implications: The investigated steel samples were examined metallographically using optical microscope with different image techniques, SEM, TEM and analyzed using a Rockwell hardness tester, also EDS microanalysis and electron diffraction with Fourier transform was made.Practical implications: As an implication for the practice a new technology can be possible to develop, based no diode laser usage. Some other investigation should be performed in the future, but the knowledge found in this research shows an interesting investigation direction.Originality/value: The combination of TEM investigation for laser alloying of hot work tool steels makes the investigation very attractive for automotive and other heavy industries.

  1. Microstructure and Properties of Lap Joint Between Aluminum Alloy and Galvanized Steel by CMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Song; Chen, Su; Dong, Honggang; Zhao, Dongsheng; Zhang, Xiaosheng; Guo, Xin; Wang, Guoqiang

    2016-05-01

    Lap joining of 1-mm-thick Novelist AC 170 PX aluminum alloy to 1.2-mm-thick ST06 Z galvanized steel sheets for automotive applications was conducted by cold metal transfer advanced welding process with ER4043 and ER4047 filler wires. Under the optimized welding parameters with ER4043 filler wire, the tensile shear strength of joint was 189 MPa, reaching 89% of the aluminum alloy base metal. Microstructure and elemental distribution were characterized by optical metalloscope and electron probe microanalysis. The lap joints with ER4043 filler wire had smaller wetting angle and longer bonded line length with better wettability than with ER4047 filler wire during welding with same parameters. The needle-like Al-Fe-Si intermetallic compounds (IMCs) were spalled into the weld and brought negative effect to the tensile strength of joints. With increasing welding current, the needle-like IMCs grew longer and spread further into the weld, which would deteriorate the tensile shear strength.

  2. Effects of H2 Atmospheres on Sintering of Low Alloy Steels Containing Oxygen-Sensitive Masteralloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oro Calderon, Raquel; Jaliliziyaeian, Maryam; Gierl-Mayer, Christian; Danninger, Herbert

    2017-02-01

    Processing of novel sintered steels with compositions including oxygen-sensitive elements requires deep understanding of the chemistry of sintering. The use of H2 atmospheres alleviates the oxygen transference from the base powder to the oxygen-sensitive particles. However, in H2, methane formation at 700-1200°C causes dramatic homogeneous decarburization of the part that affects both mechanical behavior and dimensional stability. The intensity and the critical temperatures of this effect depend strongly on the alloying elements, being significantly enhanced in presence of Si. When combining the alloying elements as Fe-Mn-Si masteralloys, methane formation is enhanced around 760°C due to the high Mn content (40 wt.%) in the masteralloys. Nevertheless, the benefits of H2 towards oxide reduction can still be advantageously used if diluting it in the form of N2-H2 atmospheres, or if limiting the use of H2 to temperatures below 500°C. Thus, decarburization due to methane formation can be successfully controlled.

  3. Electrochemical assessment of some titanium and stainless steel implant dental alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Echevarría, A.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Commercially pure titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V alloy and stainless steel screw implants were evaluated in both Ringer and synthetic saliva physiological solutions at body temperature by EIS (Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy with immersion times of 30 d. Results were simulated as a "sandwich system" composed by four capacitors-resistances connected in series with the solution resistance. A model explaining the results in terms of the porosity and thickness of four different layers, was proposed.

    Se utilizó la técnica de la Espectroscopia de Impedancia Electroquímica para evaluar en soluciones fisiológicas artificiales (Ringer y saliva sintética muestras extraídas de tornillos de implantes dentales certificados de titanio comercialmente puro, aleación Ti-6Al-W y acero inoxidable a temperatura corporal, con tiempos de inmersión hasta de 30 d. Los resultados se simularon mediante un modelo del tipo sandwich de cuatro elementos RC, conectados en serie con una resistencia de la solución. A partir de de esta simulación, se propone un modelo que explica los resultados obtenidos en términos de la evolución de la porosidad y el espesor de cuatro diferentes capas que se desarrollan en la superficie de los materiales evaluados.

  4. Macrophage responses to 316L stainless steel and cobalt chromium alloys with different surface topographies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jordan A; Lamichhane, Sujan; Mani, Gopinath

    2016-11-01

    The surface topography of a biomaterial plays a vital role in determining macrophage interactions and influencing immune response. In this study, we investigated the effect of smooth and microrough topographies of commonly used metallic biomaterials such as 316 L stainless steel (SS) and cobalt-chromium (CoCr) alloys on macrophage interactions. The macrophage adhesion was greater on CoCr compared to SS, irrespective of their topographies. The macrophage activation and the secretion of most pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, and IP-10) were greater on microrough surfaces than on smooth surfaces by day-1. However, by day-2, the macrophage activation on smooth surfaces was also significantly increased up to the same level as observed on the microrough surfaces, with more amount of cytokines secreted. The secretion of anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10) was significantly increased from day-1 to day-2 on all the alloy surfaces with the effect most prominently observed on microrough surfaces. The production of nitric oxide by the macrophages did not show any major substrate-dependent effect. The foreign body giant cells formed by macrophages were least observed on the microrough surfaces of CoCr. Thus, this study demonstrated that the nature of material (SS or CoCr) and their surface topographies (smooth or microrough) strongly influence the macrophage responses. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2658-2672, 2016.

  5. Quantification of oxide particle composition in model oxide dispersion strengthened steel alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    London, A.J., E-mail: andrew.london@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Lozano-Perez, S.; Moody, M.P. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Amirthapandian, S.; Panigrahi, B.K.; Sundar, C.S. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, TN (India); Grovenor, C.R.M. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    Oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels (ODS) are being considered for structural components of future designs of fission and fusion reactors because of their impressive high-temperature mechanical properties and resistance to radiation damage, both of which arise from the nanoscale oxide particles they contain. Because of the critical importance of these nanoscale phases, significant research activity has been dedicated to analysing their precise size, shape and composition (Odette et al., Annu. Rev. Mater. Res. 38 (2008) 471–503 [1]; Miller et al., Mater. Sci. Technol. 29(10) (2013) 1174–1178 [2]). As part of a project to develop new fuel cladding alloys in India, model ODS alloys have been produced with the compositions, Fe–0.3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe–0.2Ti–0.3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe–14Cr–0.2Ti–0.3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The oxide particles in these three model alloys have been studied by APT in their as-received state and following ion irradiation (as a proxy for neutron irradiation) at various temperatures. In order to adequately quantify the composition of the oxide clusters, several difficulties must be managed, including issues relating to the chemical identification (ranging and variable peak-overlaps); trajectory aberrations and chemical structure; and particle sizing. This paper presents how these issues can be addressed by the application of bespoke data analysis tools and correlative microscopy. A discussion follows concerning the achievable precision in these measurements, with reference to the fundamental limiting factors.

  6. Fatigue crack initiation in carbon and low-alloy steels in light water reactor environments : mechanism and prediction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.

    1998-01-27

    Section 111 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code specifies fatigue design curves for structural materials. The effects of reactor coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. Recent test data illustrate potentially significant effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of carbon and low-alloy steels. Under certain loading and environmental conditions, fatigue lives of test specimens may be shorter than those in air by a factor of {approx}70. The crack initiation and crack growth characteristics of carbon and low-alloy steels in LWR environments are presented. Decreases in fatigue life of these steels in high-dissolved-oxygen water are caused primarily by the effect of environment on growth of short cracks < 100 {micro}m in depth. The material and loading parameters that influence fatigue life in LWR environments are defined. Fatigue life is decreased significantly when five conditions are satisfied simultaneously, viz., applied strain range, service temperature, dissolved oxygen in water, and S content in steel are above a threshold level, and loading strain rate is below a threshold value. Statistical models have been developed for estimating the fatigue life of these steels in LWR environments. The significance of the effect of environment on the current Code design curve is evaluated.

  7. Chemical Changes at the Interface Between Low Carbon Steel and an Al-Si Alloy During Solution Heat Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    International audience; The aim of this work was to characterize the chemical changes during solid state solution heat treatment of a metallurgically bonded steel/Al-Si interface. For this purpose, low carbon steel plates covered with the A-S7G03 aluminium alloy (7wt%Si, 0.3wt%Mg analogous to A356) were prepared by dip coating, water-quenching to room temperature and reheating in the solid state at 480-560°C for 3 to 160 hours. Upon reheating at 535 °C, a reaction layer was observed to grow a...

  8. Identification of low cycle fatigue parameters of high strength low-alloy (HSLA steel at room temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bulatović

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Low cycle fatigue test was performed in ambient atmosphere at room temperature. Cycle loading of material, in case of High strength low-alloy steel, entails modifications of its properties and in this paper is therefore shown behavior of fatigue life using low cycle fatigue parameters. More precisely, crack initiation life of tested specimens was computed using theory of Coffin-Manson relation during the fatigue loading. The geometry of the stabilized hysteresis loop of welded joint HSLA steel, marked as Nionikral 70, is also analyzed. This stabilized hysteresis loop is very important for determination of materials properties.

  9. Corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steel, nickel-base alloy and its weldments in aqueous LiBr solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasco-Tamarit, E.; Igual-Munoz, A.; Garcia Anton, J.; Garcia-Garcia, D. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear. E.T.S.I.Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, P.O. Box 22012 E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    With the advances in materials production new alloys have been developed, such as High- Alloy Austenitic Stainless Steels and Nickel-base alloys, with high corrosion resistance. These new alloys are finding applications in Lithium Bromide absorption refrigeration systems, because LiBr is a corrosive medium which can cause serious corrosion problems, in spite of its favourable properties as absorbent. The objective of the present work was to study the corrosion resistance of a highly alloyed austenitic stainless steel (UNS N08031) used as base metal, a Nickel-base alloy (UNS N06059) used as its corresponding filler metal, and the weld metal obtained by the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) procedure. The materials have been tested in different LiBr solutions (400 g/l, 700 g/l, 850 g/l and a commercial 850 g/l LiBr heavy brine containing Lithium Chromate as corrosion inhibitor), at 25 deg. C. Open Circuit Potential tests and potentiodynamic anodic polarization curves have been carried out to obtain information about the general electrochemical behaviour of the materials. The polarization curves of all the alloys tested were typical of passivable materials. Pitting corrosion susceptibility has been evaluated by means of cyclic potentiodynamic curves, which provide parameters to analyse re-passivation properties. The galvanic corrosion generated by the electrical contact between the welded and the base material has been estimated from the polarization diagrams according to the Mixed Potential Method. Samples have been etched to study the microstructure by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The results demonstrate that the pitting resistance of all these materials increases as the LiBr concentration decreases. In general, the presence of chromate tended to shift the pitting potential to more positive values than those obtained in the 850 g/l LiBr solution. (authors)

  10. Improving the corrosion wear resistance of AISI 316L stainless steel by particulate reinforced Ni matrix composite alloying layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Jiang; Zhuo Chengzhi; Tao Jie; Liu Linlin [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 29 Yudao Street, Nanjing 210016 (China); Jiang Shuyun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Southeast University, 2 Sipailou, Nanjing 210096 (China)], E-mail: xujiang73@nuaa.edu.cn

    2009-01-07

    In order to overcome the problem of corrosion wear of AISI 316L stainless steel (SS), two kinds of composite alloying layers were prepared by a duplex treatment, consisting of Ni/nano-SiC and Ni/nano-SiO{sub 2} predeposited by brush plating, respectively, and subsequent surface alloying with Ni-Cr-Mo-Cu by a double glow process. The microstructure of the two kinds of nanoparticle reinforced Ni-based composite alloying layers was investigated by means of SEM and TEM. The electrochemical corrosion behaviour of composite alloying layers compared with the Ni-based alloying layer and 316L SS under different conditions was characterized by potentiodynamic polarization test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Results showed that under alloying temperature (1000 deg. C) conditions, amorphous nano-SiO{sub 2} particles still retained the amorphous structure, whereas nano-SiC particles were decomposed and Ni, Cr reacted with SiC to form Cr{sub 6.5}Ni{sub 2.5}Si and Cr{sub 23}C{sub 6}. In static acidic solution, the corrosion resistance of the composite alloying layer with the brush plating Ni/nano-SiO{sub 2} particles interlayer is lower than that of the Ni-based alloying layer. However, the corrosion resistance of the composite alloying layer with the brush plating Ni/nano-SiO{sub 2} particles interlayer is prominently superior to that of the Ni-based alloying layer under acidic flow medium condition and acidic slurry flow condition. The corrosion resistance of the composite alloying layer with the brush plating Ni/nano-SiC particles interlayer is evidently lower than that of the Ni-based alloying layer, but higher than that of 316L SS under all test conditions. The results show that the highly dispersive nano-SiO{sub 2} particles are helpful in improving the corrosion wear resistance of the Ni-based alloying layer, whereas carbides and silicide phase are deleterious to that of the Ni-based alloying layer due to the fact that the preferential removal of the matrix

  11. Hyperfine fields in Fe-Ni-X alloys and their application to a study of tempering of 9Ni steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fultz, B.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1984-12-01

    Hyperfine interactions due to solutes in Fe-Ni-X alloys were systematized, and interpreted with a model of linear response of hyperfine magnetic fields to magnetic moments. The effects of solutes on the /sup 57/Fe hmf were used for chemical analysis of the austenite formed in 9Ni steel during tempering. Diffusion kinetics of the Ni and X solutes were found to play an important role in the formation of the austenite particles.

  12. 9-12% Cr heat resistant steels. Alloy design, TEM characterisation of microstructure evolution and creep response at 650 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas Jara, David

    2011-03-21

    This work was carried out aiming to design and characterise 9-12% Cr steels with tailormade microstructures for applications in fossil fuel fired power plants. The investigations concentrated in the design and characterisation of heat resistant steels for applications in high oxidising atmospheres (12% Cr) and 9% Cr alloys for components such as rotors (P91). ThermoCalc calculations showed to be a reliable tool for alloy development. The modeling also provided valuable information for the adjustment of the processing parameters (austenisation and tempering temperatures). Two 12% Cr heat resistant steels with a fine dispersion of nano precipitates were designed and produced supported by thermodynamic modeling (ThermoCalc). A detailed characterisation of the microstructure evolution at different creep times (100 MPa / 650 C / 8000 h) was carried out by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The results of the microstructure analysis were correlated with the mechanical properties in order to investigate the influence of different precipitates (especially M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides) on the creep strength of the alloys. Precipitation of Laves phase and Z-phase was observed after several hundred hours creep time. Very few Z-phase of the type Cr(V,Ta)N nucleating from existing (V,Ta)(C,N) was observed. Both alloys show growth and coarsening of Laves phase, meanwhile the MX carbonitrides present a very slow growth and coarsening rate. Alloys containing Laves phase, MX and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates show best creep properties. The influence of hot-deformation and tempering temperature on the microstructure evolution on one of the designed 12% Cr alloys was studied during short-term creep at 80-250 MPa and 650 C. Quantitative determination of dislocation density and sub-grain size in the initial microstructure and after creep was investigated by STEM combined with the high-angle annular dark-field detector (HAADF). A correlation between microstructure

  13. Effects of stress ratio on the temperature-dependent high-cycle fatigue properties of alloy steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Zhi-yang; Wan, Ao-shuang; Xiong, Jun-jiang; Li, Kuang; Liu, Jian-zhong

    2016-12-01

    This paper addresses the effects of stress ratio on the temperature-dependent high-cycle fatigue (HCF) properties of alloy steels 2CrMo and 9CrCo, which suffer from substantial vibrational loading at small stress amplitude, high stress ratio, and high frequency in the high-temperature environments in which they function as blade and rotor spindle materials in advanced gas or steam turbine engines. Fatigue tests were performed on alloy steels 2CrMo and 9CrCo subjected to constant-amplitude loading at four stress ratios and at four and three temperatures, respectively, to determine their temperature-dependent HCF properties. The interaction mechanisms between high temperature and stress ratio were deduced and compared with each other on the basis of the results of fractographic analysis. A phenomenological model was developed to evaluate the effects of stress ratio on the temperature-dependent HCF properties of alloy steels 2CrMo and 9CrCo. Good correlation was achieved between the predictions and actual experiments, demonstrating the practical and effective use of the proposed method.

  14. Brazing technology of Ti alloy/stainless steel dissimilar metal joint at system integrated modular advanced reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Sang Chul; Kim, Sung Ho; Kim, Yong Wan; Kim, Jong In

    2001-02-01

    For the technoldogy development of brazing Ti alloy to stainless steel joints used at SMART, the status of brazing technology development, brazing processes, and the brazing technology of Ti alloy and stainless steel are reviewed. Because fusion welding process cannot be applied due to the formation of intermetallic compounds in the weld metal, brazing joint was selected at the design. The joint part is assembled with a thread composed with male part of Ti alloy tube and female part of stainless tube. The gap in the thread will be filled with brazing filler metal. However, brittle Ti-Fe intermetallic compounds are formed at the surface of stainless steel through the diffusion of Ti at the melt. Brazing conditions should be set-up to reduce the formation of intermetallic compounds. For that, 3 kinds of Ag filler metals were selected as the candidates and heating will be done with induction and electric furnaces. Through measuring of joint strength according to the control of pre- and post-braze treatment, heating rate and heating time, optimal brazing method will be fixed. To qualify the brazing procedure and performance and to check defects in final product, the inspection plan will be established according to the req2wuirements of AWS and ASME.

  15. Effects of stress ratio on the temperature-dependent high-cycle fatigue properties of alloy steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-yang L; Ao-shuang Wan; Jun-jiang Xiong; Kuang Li; Jian-zhong Liu

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the effects of stress ratio on the temperature-dependent high-cycle fatigue (HCF) properties of alloy steels 2CrMo and 9CrCo, which suffer from substantial vibrational loading at small stress amplitude, high stress ratio, and high frequency in the high-temperature environments in which they function as blade and rotor spindle materials in advanced gas or steam turbine engines. Fatigue tests were performed on alloy steels 2CrMo and 9CrCo subjected to constant-amplitude loading at four stress ratios and at four and three temperatures, respectively, to determine their temperature-dependent HCF properties. The interaction mechanisms between high temperature and stress ratio were deduced and compared with each other on the basis of the results of fractographic analysis. A phenomenological model was developed to evaluate the effects of stress ratio on the temperature-dependent HCF properties of alloy steels 2CrMo and 9CrCo. Good correlation was achieved between the predictions and actual experiments, demonstrating the practical and effective use of the proposed method.

  16. Analysis Of The Austenite Grain Growth In Low-Alloy Boron Steel With High Resistance To Abrasive Wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Białobrzeska B.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Today low-alloy steels with boron achieve high resistance to abrasive wear and high strength. These features are obtained by using advanced technology of manufacturing. This makes boron steels increasingly popular and their application more diverse. Application of these steels can extend the lifetime of very expensive machine construction in many industries such as mining, the automotive, and agriculture industries. An interesting subgroup of these materials is steel with boron intended for heat treatment. These steels are supplied by the manufacturer after cold or hot rolling so that it is possible for them to be heat treated in a suitable manner by the purchaser for its specific application. Very important factor that determines the mechanical properties of final product is austenite grain growth occurring during hot working process such us quenching or hot rolling. Investigation of the effect of heating temperature and holding time on the austenite grain size is necessary to understand the growth behavior under different conditions. This article presents the result of investigation of austenite grain growth in selected low-allow boron steel with high resistance to abrasive wear and attempts to describe the influence of chemical composition on this process.

  17. The mechanism of solute-enriched clusters formation in neutron-irradiated pressure vessel steels: The case of Fe-Cu model alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbotin, A. V.; Panyukov, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    Mechanism of solute-enriched clusters formation in neutron-irradiated pressure vessel steels is proposed and developed in case of Fe-Cu model alloys. The suggested solute-drag mechanism is analogous to the well-known zone-refining process. We show that the obtained results are in good agreement with available experimental data on the parameters of clusters enriched with the alloying elements. Our model explains why the formation of solute-enriched clusters does not happen in austenitic stainless steels with fcc lattice structure. It also allows to quantify the method of evaluation of neutron irradiation dose for the process of RPV steels hardening.

  18. The mechanism of solute-enriched clusters formation in neutron-irradiated pressure vessel steels: the case of Fe-Cu model alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Subbotina, A V

    2016-01-01

    Mechanism of solute-enriched clusters formation in neutron-irradiated pressure vessel steels is proposed and developed in case of Fe-Cu model alloys. We show that the obtained results are in a good agreement with available experimental data on the parameters of clusters enriched with the alloying elements. The suggested solute-drag mechanism is analogous to the well-known zone-refining process. Our model explains why the formation of solute-enriched clusters does not happen in austenitic stainless steels with fcc lattice structure. It also allows to quantify the method of evaluation of neutron irradiation dose for the process of RPV steels hardening.

  19. Interplay of microbiological corrosion and alloy microstructure in stress corrosion cracking of weldments of advanced stainless steels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R K Singh Raman

    2003-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of the phenomenon of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of duplex stainless steels and their weldments in marine environments and the potential role of microbial activity in inducing SCC susceptibility. As a precursor to the topic the paper also reviews the performance of the traditional corrosion-resistant alloys and their weldments and the necessity of using duplex stainless steels (DSS), in order to alleviate corrosion problems in marine environments. Given that the performance of weldments of such steels is often unsatisfactory, this review also assesses the research needs in this area. In this context the paper also discusses the recent reports on the role of microorganisms in inducing hydrogen embrittlements and corrosion fatigue.

  20. Corrosion Behavior of Low-Alloy Pipeline Steel Exposed to H2S/CO2-Saturated Saline Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenguang; Gao, Xiuhua; Du, Linxiu; Li, Jianping; Li, Ping; Bai, Xiaolei; Misra, R. D. K.

    2017-02-01

    Immersion experiments were carried out to study H2S/CO2 corrosion behavior of low-alloy pipeline steel in terms of microstructure, corrosion kinetics, corrosion phases, microscopic surface morphology, cross-sectional morphology and elemental distribution. The experimental results indicated that the microstructure of designed steel was tempered martensite. The corrosion rate followed exponential behavior. H2S corrosion dominated the corrosion process, and the corrosion products were mackinawite, greigite and troilite. The corrosion products changed from mackinawite/greigite to mackinawite/troilite, and mackinawite dominated the corrosion phases. The corrosion products became more compact with immersion time, which led to decrease in corrosion rate. The chromium and molybdenum content in the corrosion product was higher than that in the steel substrate.

  1. The effect of variable loading onintegrity of a welded joint of high alloy-steel X20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Burzić

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In present paper, experimental investigations have included the effect of exploitation conditions (exploitation time and temperature on properties of high-cycle fatigue and parameters of fatigue-crack growth of a welded joint of steel X20 CrMoV 12-1 (X20. The effect of exploitation conditions was analysed by testing new pipe and the pipe having been exploited for 116 000 hours. The results obtained by testing and their analysis provide a practical contribution to assessment of quality of a welded joint of steel X20, the aim of which is revitalisation and extension of exploitation life of vital components of thermal power plants manufactured from high-alloy steel for operation at elevated temperatures.

  2. Effect of Heat Treatment on Mechanical Properties and Microstructure Morphology of Low-Alloy High-Strength Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolanowski K.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the influence of different heat treatment processes on the mechanical properties of low-alloy high-strength steel denoted by Polish Standard (PN as 10MnVNb6. One of the findings is that, after aging, the mechanical properties of rolled steel are high: the yield strength may reach > 600 MPa, and the ultimate tensile strength is > 700 MPa. These properties are largely dependent on the grain size and dispersion of the strengthening phase in the ferrite matrix. Aging applied after hot rolling contributes to a considerable rise in the yield strength and ultimate tensile strength. The process of normalization causes a decrease in the average grain size and coalescence (reduction of dispersion of the strengthening phase. When 10MnVNb6 steel was aged after normalization, there was not a complete recovery in its strength properties.

  3. Effect of welding processes on mechanical and microstructural characteristics of high strength low alloy naval grade steel joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ragu Nathan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Naval grade high strength low alloy (HSLA steels can be easily welded by all types of fusion welding processes. However, fusion welding of these steels leads to the problems such as cold cracking, residual stress, distortion and fatigue damage. These problems can be eliminated by solid state welding process such as friction stir welding (FSW. In this investigation, a comparative evaluation of mechanical (tensile, impact, hardness properties and microstructural features of shielded metal arc (SMA, gas metal arc (GMA and friction stir welded (FSW naval grade HSLA steel joints was carried out. It was found that the use of FSW process eliminated the problems related to fusion welding processes and also resulted in the superior mechanical properties compared to GMA and SMA welded joints.

  4. Microstructure characteristics and mechanical property of aluminum alloy/stainless steel lap joints fabricated by MIG welding-brazing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Hongtao, E-mail: hitzht@yahoo.com.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai 264209 (China); Liu Jiakun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai 264209 (China)

    2011-07-25

    Highlights: {yields} Wrought aluminum and stainless steel was joined with welding-brazing process. {yields} Effect of different layers on spreadability of molten filler metal was examined. {yields} Mechanical property of the joints with different heat inputs was investigated. {yields} Microstructure of the joints were also studied by OM, SEM and TEM. {yields} Phase composition was ascertained by diffraction spot and XRD analysis. - Abstract: Lap joints of aluminum alloy 2B50 and stainless steel 1Cr18Ni9Ti were welded by MIG welding-brazing method with 4043 Al-Si filler metal. The effect of aluminizing coating and galvanized zinc coating on fusion metal spreadability were studied. The aluminized coating had limited effect to promote weld surface appearance and obvious micro-cracks were found between the compound layer and the steel side. The fracture in tensile tests occurred at the interfacial layer of the weld with a low tensile strength about 60 MPa. Joints between aluminum alloy and galvanized steel had good surface appearances and the intermetallic compound in fusion zone region close to joint interface was Al{sub 4.5}FeSi. The thickness of the intermetallic compound layer varied from about 5 {mu}m to 15 {mu}m depending on the heat input and the highest tensile strength of lap joint could reached 193.6 MPa when the heat input is 0.846 KJ/cm.

  5. Optimization of pulsed TIG cladding process of stellite alloy on carbon steel using RSM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madadi, F., E-mail: f.madadi@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ashrafizadeh, F. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamanian, M., E-mail: shamanian@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-01-05

    Highlights: > This study is useful to optimize the welding process variables in order to control the heat input and cooling rates such that the hardness and dilution of the clad could be estimated. > Central composite rotatable design technique with five-level, four-factor full-factorial design matrix and mathematical models was used to predict hardness and dilution of pulsed gas tungsten arc weld cladding of stellite6 on carbon steel with high accuracy. > The welding current is an effective parameter affecting heat input and melting. In this regard, it is the most important process parameter which influences the dilution. Increase welding current leads to increase in dilution percentage and vice versa. The effect of percentage on time is less important when compared to the other factors. > The results predicted by mathematical models were close to those obtained by experiments. The confirmation tests also indicated high correlation between the mentioned values. > All of the chosen pulse GTAW parameters were significant and showed a noticeable influence on clad dilution. - Abstract: Stellite 6 is a cobalt-base alloy which is resistant to wear and corrosion and retains these properties at high temperatures. The exceptional wear resistance of Stellite 6 is mainly due to the unique inherent characteristics of the hard carbides dispersed in a Co-Cr alloy matrix. In this study, pulsed tungsten inert gas (TIG) cladding process was carried out to deposit Stellite 6 on plain carbon steel plate. The beneficial effects of this cladding process are low heat input, low distortion, controlled weld bead volume, less hot cracking tendency, less absorption of gases by weld pool and better control of the fusion zone. The dilution effect is a key issue in the quality of cladded layers and, in this regard, the pulsed current tungsten inert gas (PCTIG) was performed to decrease excess heat input and melting of substrate. This paper deals with the investigation of the hardness and

  6. Compatibility of T91 steel with liquid Pb-Bi eutectic alloy at 450 oC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yutuo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Pb-Bi eutectic alloy has been receiving increasing attention as a heavy liquid metal coolant in accelerator driven systems and Generation IV fission reactors. Compatibility of structural materials with liquid Pb-Bi eutectic alloy at high temperature is one of the issues concerned. In the present study, corrosion tests of T91 steel in stagnant Pb-Bi eutectic alloy in saturated oxygen condition at 450 篊 were carried out. After experiments, the thickness and compositional profile of the oxide layer on the specimen were analyzed using SEM and EDX. Analysis results show that the thickness of the oxide layer increases as the exposure time increases from 500 h to 1,000 h. The thickness of the oxide layer remains almost unchanged at 15 to 16 mm from 1,000 to 1,500 h. Formation of a thick and protective oxide layer at 450 oC prevents the penetration of liquid Pb-Bi eutectic alloy into the matrix of the T91 steel.

  7. Influence of additives on electrodeposition of bright Zn–Ni alloy on mild steel from acid sulphate bath

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Shivakumara; U Manohar; Y Arthoba Naik; T V Venkatesha

    2007-10-01

    The influence of a condensation product (CP) of veratraldehyde (VRTD) and -amino benzoic acid (PABA) on Zn–Ni alloy electrodeposited onto mild steel was studied in acidic sulphate solutions. Ethylenediaminetetraaceticacid (EDTA) and cetyltrimethylammoniumbromide (CTAB) were used as complexing and wetting agents, respectively. The effect of bath constituents, pH, current density and temperature on nature of deposit were studied through Hull cell experiments. The bath constituents and operating parameters were optimized. Deposit properties and corrosion resistance were discussed. Throwing power, current efficiency and polarization studies were carried out. SEM photomicrographs of the deposit obtained from optimum bath revealed fine-grained deposit of the alloy in the presence of condensation product and hence modified the morphology of zinc–nickel alloy deposit. IR spectrum of the scrapped deposit showed inclusion of addition agent.

  8. Cessation of environmentally-assisted cracking in a low-alloy steel: Experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y.Y.

    1997-01-01

    The presence of dissolved metallurgical sulfides in pressure vessel and piping steels has been linked to Environmentally-Assisted Cracking (EAC), a phenomenon observed in laboratory tests that results in fatigue crack growth rates as high as 100 times that in air. Previous experimental and analytical work based on diffusion as the mass transport process has shown that surface cracks that are initially clean of sulfides will not initiate EAC in most applications. This is because the average crack tip velocity would not be sufficiently high to expose enough metallurgical sulfides per unit time and produce the sulfide concentration required for EAC. However, there is a potential concern for the case of a relatively large embedded crack breaking through to the wetted surface. Such a crack would not be initially clean of sulfides, and EAC could initiate. This paper presents the results of a series of experiments conducted on two heats of an EAC susceptible, high-sulfur, low-alloy steel in 243{degrees}C low-oxygen water to further study the phenomenon of EAC persistence at low crack tip velocities. A load cycle profile that incorporated a significant load dwell period at minimum load was used. In one experiment, the fatigue cycling history was such that relatively high crack tip velocities at the start of the experiment produced a persistent case of EAC even when crack tip velocities were later reduced to levels below the EAC initiation velocity. The other series of experiments used initial crack tip velocities that were much lower and probably more realistic. Air precracking of the compact tension specimens produced an initial inventory of undissolved sulfides on the crack flanks that directly simulates the array of sulfides expected from the breakthrough of an embedded crack. In all cases, results showed EAC ceased after several hundred hours of cycling.

  9. Accumulation and annealing of radiation defects under low-temperature electron and neutron irradiation of ODS steel and Fe-Cr alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuzov, V. L.; Goshchitskii, B. N.; Sagaradze, V. V.; Danilov, S. E.; Kar'kin, A. E.

    2010-10-01

    The processes of accumulation and annealing of radiation defects at low-temperature (77 K) electron and neutron irradiation and their effect on the physicomechanical properties of Fe-Cr alloys and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel have been studied. It has been shown that the behavior of radiation defects in ODS steel and Fe-Cr alloys is qualitatively similar. Above 250 K, radiation-induced processes of the solid solution decomposition become conspicuous. These processes are much less pronounced in ODS steel because of specific features of its microstructure. Processes related to the overlapping of displacement cascades under neutron irradiation have been considered. It has been shown that, in this case, it is the increase in the size of vacancy clusters, rather than the growth of their concentration, that is prevailing. Possible mechanisms of the radiation hardening of the ODS steel and the Fe-13Cr alloy upon irradiation and subsequent annealing have been discussed.

  10. Comparative study on structure, corrosion and hardness of Zn-Ni alloy deposition on AISI 347 steel aircraft material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnanamuthu, RM. [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Kyung Hee University, 1732 Deogyeong-daero, Gihung, Yongin, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Mohan, S., E-mail: sanjnamohan@yahoo.com [Central Electrochemical Research Institute, (CSIR), Karaikudi 630 006, Tamilnadu (India); Saravanan, G. [Central Electrochemical Research Institute, (CSIR), Karaikudi 630 006, Tamilnadu (India); Lee, Chang Woo, E-mail: cwlee@khu.ac.kr [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Kyung Hee University, 1732 Deogyeong-daero, Gihung, Yongin, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electrodeposition of Zn-Ni alloy on AISI 347 steel as an aircraft material has been carried out from various baths. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of pulse duty cycle on thickness, current efficiency and hardness reached maximum values at 40% duty cycle and for 50 Hz frequencies average current density of 4 A dm{sup -2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The XRF characterizations of 88:12% Zn-Ni alloy provided excellent corrosion resistance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is found that Zn-Ni alloy on AISI 347 aircraft material has better structure and corrosion resistance by pulse electrodeposits from electrolyte-4. - Abstract: Zn-Ni alloys were electrodeposited on AISI 347 steel aircraft materials from various electrolytes under direct current (DCD) and pulsed electrodepositing (PED) techniques. The effects of pulse duty cycle on thickness, current efficiency and hardness of electrodeposits were studied. Alloy phases of the Zn-Ni were indexed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. Microstructural morphology, topography and elemental compositions were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF). The corrosion resistance properties of electrodeposited Zn-Ni alloy in 3.5% NaCl aqueous solution obtained by DCD and PED were compared using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique. Elemental analysis showed that 88% of Zn and 12% of Ni obtained from electrolyte-4 by PED technique at 40% duty cycle for 50 Hz frequencies having better corrosion resistance than that of deposits obtained from other electrolytes.

  11. Mechanical Properties and Corrosion-Abrasion Wear Behavior of Low-Alloy MnSiCrB Cast Steels Containing Cu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Kaishuang; Bai, Bingzhe

    2011-01-01

    Two medium carbon low-alloy MnSiCrB cast steels containing different Cu contents (0.01 wt pct and 0.62 wt pct) were designed, and the effect of Cu on the mechanical properties and corrosion-abrasion wear behavior of the cast steels was studied. The results showed that the low-alloy MnSiCrB cast steels obtained excellent hardenability by a cheap alloying scheme. The microstructure of the MnSiCrB cast steels after water quenching from 1123 K (850 °C) consists of lath martensite and retained austenite. After tempering at 503 K (230 °C), carbides precipitated, and the hardness of the cast steels reached 51 to 52 HRC. The addition of Cu was detrimental to the ductility and impact toughness but was beneficial to the wear resistance in a corrosion-abrasion wear test. The MnSiCrB cast steel with Cu by the simple alloying scheme and heat treatment has the advantages of being high performance, low cost, and environmentally friendly. It is a potential, advanced wear-resistant cast steel for corrosion-abrasion wear conditions.

  12. Gas atomized precursor alloy powder for oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieken, Joel [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-12-13

    Gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was employed as a simplified method for producing precursor powders for oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic stainless steels (e.g., Fe-Cr-Y-(Ti,Hf)-O), departing from the conventional mechanical alloying (MA) process. During GARS processing a reactive atomization gas (i.e., Ar-O2) was used to oxidize the powder surfaces during primary break-up and rapid solidification of the molten alloy. This resulted in envelopment of the powders by an ultra-thin (t < 150 nm) metastable Cr-enriched oxide layer that was used as a vehicle for solid-state transport of O into the consolidated microstructure. In an attempt to better understand the kinetics of this GARS reaction, theoretical cooling curves for the atomized droplets were calculated and used to establish an oxidation model for this process. Subsequent elevated temperature heat treatments, which were derived from Rhines pack measurements using an internal oxidation model, were used to promote thermodynamically driven O exchange reactions between trapped films of the initial Cr-enriched surface oxide and internal Y-enriched intermetallic precipitates. This novel microstructural evolution process resulted in the successful formation of nano-metric Y-enriched dispersoids, as confirmed using high energy X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), equivalent to conventional ODS alloys from MA powders. The thermal stability of these Y-enriched dispersoids was evaluated using high temperature (1200°C) annealing treatments ranging from 2.5 to 1,000 hrs of exposure. In a further departure from current ODS practice, replacing Ti with additions of Hf appeared to improve the Y-enriched dispersoid thermal stability by means of crystal structure modification. Additionally, the spatial distribution of the dispersoids was found to depend strongly on the original rapidly solidified microstructure. To exploit this, ODS microstructures were engineered from

  13. Application of Empirical Electron Theory of Solids and Molecules to Composition Design of Multi-Component Medium-Low-Alloy Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Juyan; XIE Guisheng

    2012-01-01

    For austenitic octahedral segregation structure units,their pure mathematics statistic distributive probability is calculated by the empirical electron theory (EET) of solids and molecules and K-B formula.The practical distributive probability can be obtained only if the statistic distribution of austenitic octahedral segregation structure units and the interaction of the alloying elements in steel are considered.Based on 8 groups of experimental data of original steels,three empirical formulas revealing relationships between material macromechanics factor (Sm) and tensile strength (σb),or impact energy (Aκ),or hardness (HRC) of multi-component medium-low-alloy steels were established,respectively.Through the three empirical formulas,new supersaturated carburizing steel has been successfully designed and developed.The other 2 groups of the original experimental steels are used as the standard steel for testing the percentage error of the new steel.The results show that the calculated values are well consistent with those of measured ones and the new supersaturated carburized steel can meet the requirements of the die assembly of cold-drawn seamless stainless steel tube of Taiyuan Iron & Steel (Group) Company LTD.

  14. Metallurgical and mechanical properties of laser welded high strength low alloy steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyyaravelu, Ramachandran; Kuppan, Palaniyandi; Arivazhagan, Natarajan

    2016-05-01

    The study aimed at investigating the microstructure and mechanical properties of Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser welded high strength low alloy (HSLA) SA516 grade 70 boiler steel. The weld joint for a 4 mm thick plate was successfully produced using minimum laser power of 2 kW by employing a single pass without any weld preheat treatment. The micrographs revealed the presence of martensite phase in the weld fusion zone which could be due to faster cooling rate of the laser weldment. A good correlation was found between the microstructural features of the weld joints and their mechanical properties. The highest hardness was found to be in the fusion zone of cap region due to formation of martensite and also enrichment of carbon. The hardness results also showed a narrow soft zone at the heat affected zone (HAZ) adjacent to the weld interface, which has no effect on the weld tensile strength. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the welded joints were 338 MPa and 549 MPa, respectively, which were higher than the candidate metal. These tensile results suggested that the laser welding process had improved the weld strength even without any weld preheat treatment and also the fractography of the tensile fractured samples showed the ductile mode of failure.

  15. Green superlubricity of Nitinol 60 alloy against steel in presence of castor oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qunfeng; Dong, Guangneng; Martin, Jean Michel

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, first, we show that sliding Nitinol 60 alloy against steel under castor oil lubrication exhibits a new case of superlubricity (coefficient of friction CoF ≪ 0.01). So far, CoF below 0.01 have never been achieved under boundary lubrication at high contact pressure and in presence of vegetable oil as a green lubricant. Next, it is demonstrated that superlubricity is controlled by tribochemical reactions, involving chemical degradation of castor oil and the formation of metal oxy-hydroxides. Finally, to explain these findings, we propose a novel superlubricity mechanism consisting of hexanoic acid molecules intercalated between nickel and iron oxy-hydroxide lamellar layers, a structure very similar to the one found in Fe-Ni batteries. We propose that superlubricity is achieved due to repulsive electrostatic forces acting between the intercalated metal oxy-hydroxide lamellar compounds. This system would be suitable for practical engineering applications in many fields including biotechnologies.

  16. Design and analysis of eccentrically braced steel frames with vertical links using shape memory alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massah, Saeed Reza; Dorvar, Hosein

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, the philosophy behind traditional methods by which structures were designed to withstand natural disasters has gone through major changes. Shape memory alloys (SMAs) are characterized by their superelastic behavior, which enables them to recover their original shape after experiencing large deformations. This characteristic provides an ideal reversibility capacity that can be used in the passive control of buildings exposed to earthquakes. This article has attempted to identify the effects of changing the hysteretic characteristics of SMA materials when they are used as passive control systems in eccentric bracing frames. By evaluating the numerical analysis results obtained from the modeling of an experimental sample and the modeling of the proposed EBF system, the accuracy of the above-stated notion was confirmed. Moreover, the results that pertain to the nonlinear pushover analysis, time-history dynamic analysis and seismic damage analysis of eccentric steel bracing frames of 4-, 9- and 14-story structures indicate that the use of SMA superelastic materials, in addition to effectively improving their ductility, stiffness and lateral strength, provides an excellent reversibility capacity, which considerably reduces both the maximum relative displacement and the residual deformation in the structure.

  17. Deformation Behavior and TExture Evolution of Steel Alloys under Axial-Torsional Loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siriruk, A.; Kant, M.; Penumadu, D.; Garlea, E.; Vogel, S.

    2011-06-01

    Using hollow cylinder samples with suitable geometry obtained from round bar stock, the deformation behavior of bcc Fe based 12L14 steel alloy is evaluated under multi-axial conditions. A stacked strain gage rosette and extensometer mounted on the cylindrical surface at the mid height of the specimen provided strain tensor as a function of applied stress for pure tensile and torsion tests prior to yielding. This study examines elastic and yield behavior and effects of these with respect to texture evolution. Hollow cylinder specimen geometry (tubes) with small wall thickness and relatively (to its thickness) large inner diameter is used. The variation of observed yield surface in deviatoric plane and the effect on mode of deformation (tension versus torsion versus its combination) on stress-strain behavior is discussed. Bulk texture was studied using neutron time-of-flight diffractometer at High-Pressure-Preferred Orientation (HIPPO) - Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) instrument and the evolution of texture and related anisotropy for pure tension versus torsion are also included.

  18. Effect of calcium ions on CO2 corrosion of 3Cr low-alloy steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhijun JIA; Cuiwei DU; Zhiyong LIU; Jin GAO; Xiaogang LI

    2011-01-01

    The effect of calcium ions on the corrosion behavior of 3Cr low-alloy steel in CO2containing sodium chloride solution was investigated by immersion test and electrochemical measurements.It is found that with the addition of Ca2+ to CO2-containing solution,the crazing level of the corrosion scale on the specimen is much slighter than that of the specimen immersed in solution without Ca2+.The pitting on the surface of the specimens immersed in the solution with Ca2+ is relatively small and distributes uniformly all over the surface.The significant change in the anodic polarization curve is attributed to the deposition of the CaCO3.CaCO3 deposits on the specimen surface and gives a protection to the metal substrate.And with the anodic proceeding,the concentration of H+ in the solution increases.The CaCO3 deposition dissolves in the low pH solution and the protection effect disappears.

  19. [Quantitative analysis of alloy steel based on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy with partial least squares method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Zhi-Bo; Sun, Lan-Xiang; Xin, Yong; Li, Yang; Qi, Li-Feng; Yang, Zhi-Jia

    2014-02-01

    In the present paper both the partial least squares (PLS) method and the calibration curve (CC) method are used to quantitatively analyze the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy data obtained from the standard alloy steel samples. Both the major and trace elements were quantitatively analyzed. By comparing the results of two different calibration methods some useful results were obtained: for major elements, the PLS method is better than the CC method in quantitative analysis; more importantly, for the trace elements, the CC method can not give the quantitative results due to the extremely weak characteristic spectral lines, but the PLS method still has a good ability of quantitative analysis. And the regression coefficient of PLS method is compared with the original spectral data with background interference to explain the advantage of the PLS method in the LIBS quantitative analysis. Results proved that the PLS method used in laser induced breakdown spectroscopy is suitable for quantitative analysis of trace elements such as C in the metallurgical industry.

  20. Ultrasonic attenuation peak in steel and aluminum alloy during rotating bending fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogi, Hirotsugu; Hamaguchi, Takayuki; Hirao, Masahiko

    2000-04-01

    Using electromagnetic acoustic resonance (EMAR), we studied the evolution of the surface shearwave attenuation and phase velocity in a 0.45 pct C steel and a 5052 aluminum alloy exposed to rotating bending fatigue. In the EMAR method, we used electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) for the contactless measurements of the axial shear wave, which is a surface shear wave that propagates along a cylindrical surface in the circumferential direction, with an axial polarization. There has been no previous report of continuous and contactless monitoring of the surface wave attenuation and velocity being performed without interrupting the fatigue. The attenuation coefficient always showed sharp peaks around 90 pct of the fatigue life, independent of the fatigue-stress amplitude. To interpret this phenomenon, we made crack-growth observations using replicas and measurements of recovery of attenuation and velocity by stopping the cyclic loading before and after the peak. From these results, we concluded that the evolution of the ultrasonic properties is caused by a drastic change in dislocation mobility being accompanied by the crack growth at the final stage of the fatigue life.

  1. The nonunjform distribution of inclusions in low-alloy steel weld deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugden, A. A. B.; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H.

    1988-03-01

    Nonmetallic inclusions in low-alloy steel welds have an important effect on the microstructure and properties of weld deposits. This work is an attempt at understanding the factors controlling the spatial distribution of such inclusions, with particular emphasis on the uniformity of the distribution and the effect of solidification mode during manual-metal-arc welding. The solidification mode has been controlled by using unusual combinations of base plates and experimental electrodes. It is found that the first phase to solidify (in the form of columnar grains) is delta-ferrite ( δ) when a medium carbon electrode is deposited onto a low carbon substrate, but that it is austenite ( γ) when a low carbon electrode is deposited onto a high carbon substrate. Relatively large inclusions have been found to position themselves preferentially, during solidification, to the columnar grain boundaries of the first phase to solidify, whether this is 8-ferrite or austenite. The results can be understood qualitatively in terms of a surface tension driven Marangoni effect, or in terms of the pushing of solid inclusions by the solidification front. Both mechanisms drive the larger inclusions into cusps in the interface while smaller ones are passively trapped. The implications of the observed nonuniform distribution of inclusions are more severe for solidification with austenite as the primary phase, since the larger inclusions are in that case located in the weakest region of the weld where they also do not contribute to the intragranular nucleation of acicular ferrite.

  2. GASEOUS HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CARBON AND LOW ALLOY STEELS (U)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, P

    2006-06-08

    This report is a compendium of sets of mechanical properties of carbon and low alloy steels following the short-term effects of hydrogen exposure. The property sets include the following: Yield Strength; Ultimate Tensile Strength; Uniform Elongation; Reduction of Area; Threshold Cracking, K{sub H} or K{sub th}; Fracture Toughness (K{sub IC}, J{sub IC}, and/or J-R Curve); and Fatigue Crack Growth (da/dN). These properties are drawn from literature sources under a variety of test methods and conditions. However, the collection of literature data is by no means complete, but the diversity of data and dependency of results in test method is sufficient to warrant a design and implementation of a thorough test program. The program would be needed to enable a defensible demonstration of structural integrity of a pressurized hydrogen system. It is essential that the environmental variables be well-defined (e.g., the applicable hydrogen gas pressure range and the test strain rate) and the specimen preparation be realistically consistent (such as the techniques to charge hydrogen and to maintain the hydrogen concentration in the specimens).

  3. Effect of Multi-Step Tempering on Retained Austenite and Mechanical Properties of Low Alloy Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hamid Reza Bakhsheshi-Rad; Ahmad Monshi; Hossain Monajatizadeh; Mohd Hasbullah Idris; Mohammed Rafiq Abdul Kadir; Hassan Jafari

    2011-01-01

    The effect of multi-step tempering on retained austenite content and mechanical properties of low alloy steel used in the forged cold back-up roll was investigated.Microstructural evolutions were characterized by optical microscope,X-ray diffraction,scanning electron microscope and Feritscope,while the mechanical properties were determined by hardness and tensile tests.The results revealed that the content of retained austenite decreased by about 2% after multi-step tempering.However,the content of retained austenite increased from 3.6% to 5.1% by increasing multi-step tempering temperature.The hardness and tensile strength increased as the austenitization temperature changed from 800 to 920 ℃,while above 920 ℃,hardness and tensile strength decreased.In addition,the maximum values of hardness,ultimate and yield strength were obtained via triple tempering at 520 ℃,while beyond 520 ℃,the hardness,ultimate and yield strength decreased sharply.

  4. Effect of Alloying Additions on the Oxidation of High Speed Steels under Dry and Wet Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F.C. RIZZO; M.J.MONTEIRO; S.R.J.SAUNDERS

    2009-01-01

    An investigation has been carried out into the effects of chromium and vanadium content on the oxidation rate and on the adhesion of oxide scales grown on three different chemical compositions of high speed steels under dry and wet conditions. The oxidation tests were carried out in a thermobalance at 650 ℃ for up to 14.4 ks. The mass gain of the specimens increased with increasing contents of water vapour. Alloy composition had no effect on the oxidation rate in dry conditions. The "adhesion" of the oxide scale was determined using indentation with a Rockwell C diamond and the pull adhesion test to determine the interfacial toughness and the tensile strength of the oxide metal bond, respectively. Generally, the results of the investigation indicated that oxide adhesion was lowest for the specimens exposed to dry conditions, and that with increasing water vapour content, the scale was more adherent. Indentation test results showed that an increase in the Ⅴ concentration was deleterious to oxidc adhesion in both the dry and wet environments, whereas an increase in the Cr-content had little effect on adhesion.

  5. Effects of Alloy Element and Microstructure on Corrosion Resistant Property of Deposited Metals of Weathering Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-ming XIAO; Yun PENG; Cheng-yong MA; Zhi-ling TIAN

    2016-01-01

    Alloy element and microstructure are key factors that dominate mechanical and corrosion resistant properties of weathering steel.The effect of Mo on microstructure,mechanical properties and corrosion resistant property of depos-ited metal was investigated.Experimental results show that with the increase of Mo content in deposited metals,the phase transformation temperature decreases,and the ferrite zone in CCT diagram moves rightward,resulting in en-larged bainite zone and reduced ferrite and pearlite zone.The addition of 0�24 mass% Mo in deposited metal results in the increase of tensile strength,more M-A constituent and less high angle grain which reduce the low temperature toughness.It is found that Mo can raise the weathering resistance of deposited metal in industrial atmosphere.Analy-sis indicates that Mo may enrich in the inner rust layer,produce MoO3 ,enhance the formation of compact rust film and impede the anode dissolution reaction.Granular bainite in deposited metals displays better corrosion resistance than acicular ferrite during the initial corrosion stage,but its long-term influence on the corrosion resistance is limited.

  6. Effect of the La alloying addition on the antibacterial capability of 316L stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, J P; Li, W; Wang, C

    2013-01-01

    316L stainless steel is widely used for fashion jewelry but it can carry a large number of bacteria and cause the potential risk of infection since it has no antimicrobial ability. In this paper, La is used as an alloying addition. The antibacterial capability, corrosion resistance and processability of the La-modified 316L are investigated by microscopic observation, thin-film adhering quantitative bacteriostasis, electrochemical measurement and mechanical test. The investigations reveal that the La-containing 316L exhibits the Hormesis effect against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Escherichia coli DH5α, 0.05 wt.% La stimulates their growth, as La increases, the modified 316L exhibits the improved antibacterial effect. The more amount of La is added, the better antibacterial ability is achieved, and 0.42 wt.% La shows excellent antibacterial efficacy. No more than 0.11 wt.% La addition improves slightly the corrosion resistance in artificial sweat and has no observable impact on the processability of 316L, while a larger La content degrades them. Therefore, the addition of La alone in 316L is difficult to obtain the optimal combination of corrosion resistance, antibacterial capability and processability. In spite of that, 0.15 wt.% La around is inferred to be the trade-off for the best overall performance.

  7. Constitutive equations of a ballistic steel alloy as a function of temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coghe F.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, dynamic tests have been performed on a new ballistic steel alloy by means of split Hopkinson pressure bars (SHPB. The impact behavior was investigated for strain rates ranging from 1000 to 2500 s−1, and temperatures in the range from − 196 to 300∘C. A robotized sample device was developed for transferring the sample from the heating or cooling device to the position between the bars. Simulations of the temperature evolution and its distribution in the specimen were performed using the finite element method. Measurements with thermocouples added inside the sample were carried out in order to validate the FEM simulations. The results show that a thermal gradient is present inside the sample; the average temperature loss during the manipulation of the sample is evaluated. In a last stage, optimal material constants for different constitutive models (Johnson-Cook, Zerilli-Amstrong, Cowper-Symonds has been computed by fitting, in a least square sense, the numerical and experimental stress-strain curves. They have been implemented in a hydrocode for validation using a simple impact problem: an adapted projectile geometry with a truncated nose (.50 calibre fragment simulating projectiles was fired directly against an armor plate. The parameters of the selected strength and failure models were determined. There is a good correspondence between the experimental and computed results. Nevertheless, an improved failure model is necessary to get satisfactory computed residual projectile velocities.

  8. Study of magnetism in Ni-Cr hardface alloy deposit on 316LN stainless steel using magnetic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, G. V. K.; Kumar, Anish; Chakraborty, Gopa; Albert, S. K.; Rao, B. Purna Chandra; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2015-07-01

    Nickel base Ni-Cr alloy variants are extensively used for hardfacing of austenitic stainless steel components in sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs) to avoid self-welding and galling. Considerable difference in the compositions and melting points of the substrate and the Ni-Cr alloy results in significant dilution of the hardface deposit from the substrate. Even though, both the deposit and the substrate are non-magnetic, the diluted region exhibits ferromagnetic behavior. The present paper reports a systematic study carried out on the variations in microstructures and magnetic behavior of American Welding Society (AWS) Ni Cr-C deposited layers on 316 LN austenitic stainless steels, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM). The phase variations of the oscillations of a Co-Cr alloy coated magnetic field sensitive cantilever is used to quantitatively study the magnetic strength of the evolved microstructure in the diluted region as a function of the distance from the deposit/substrate interface, with the spatial resolution of about 100 nm. The acquired AFM/MFM images and the magnetic property profiles have been correlated with the variations in the chemical compositions in the diluted layers obtained by the energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The study indicates that both the volume fraction of the ferromagnetic phase and its ferromagnetic strength decrease with increasing distance from the deposit/substrate interface. A distinct difference is observed in the ferromagnetic strength in the first few layers and the ferromagnetism is observed only near to the precipitates in the fifth layer. The study provides a better insight of the evolution of ferromagnetism in the diluted layers of Ni-Cr alloy deposits on stainless steel.

  9. A comparative assessment of the fracture toughness behavior of ferritic-martensitic steels and nanostructured ferritic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Hoelzer, David T.; Kim, Jeoung Han; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2017-02-01

    The Fe-Cr alloys with ultrafine microstructures are primary candidate materials for advanced nuclear reactor components because of their excellent high temperature strength and high resistance to radiation-induced damage such as embrittlement and swelling. Mainly two types of Fe-Cr alloys have been developed for the high temperature reactor applications: the quenched and tempered ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels hardened primarily by ultrafine laths and carbonitrides and the powder metallurgy-based nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) by nanograin structure and nanoclusters. This study aims at elucidating the differences and similarities in the temperature and strength dependences of fracture toughness in the Fe-Cr alloys to provide a comparative assessment of their high-temperature structural performance. The KJQ versus yield stress plots confirmed that the fracture toughness was inversely proportional to yield strength. It was found, however, that the toughness data for some NFAs were outside the band of the integrated dataset at given strength level, which indicates either a significant improvement or deterioration in mechanical properties due to fundamental changes in deformation and fracture mechanisms. When compared to the behavior of NFAs, the FM steels have shown much less strength dependence and formed narrow fracture toughness data bands at a significantly lower strength region. It appeared that at high temperatures ≥600 °C the NFAs cannot retain the nanostructure advantage of high strength and high toughness either by high-temperature embrittlement or by excessive loss of strength. Irradiation studies have revealed, however, that the NFAs have much stronger radiation resistance than tempered martensitic steels, such as lower radiation-induced swelling, finer helium bubble formation, lower irradiation creep rate and reduced low temperature embrittlement.

  10. Laser surface alloying of FeCoCrAlNi high-entropy alloy on 304 stainless steel to enhance corrosion and cavitation erosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; Wu, C. L.; Zhang, C. H.; Guan, M.; Tan, J. Z.

    2016-10-01

    FeCoCrAlNi high-entropy alloy coating was synthesized with premixed high-purity Co, Cr, Al and Ni powders on 304 stainless steel by laser surface alloying, aiming at improving corrosion and cavitation erosion resistance. Phase constituents, microstructure and microhardness were investigated using XRD, SEM, and microhardness tester, respectively. The cavitation erosion and electrochemical corrosion behavior of FeCoCrAlNi coating in 3.5% NaCl solution were also evaluated using an ultrasonic vibrator and potentiodynamic polarization measurement. Experimental results showed that with appropriate laser processing parameters, FeCoCrAlNi coating with good metallurgical bonding to the substrate could be achieved. FeCoCrAlNi coating was composed of a single BCC solid solution. The formation of simple solid solutions in HEAs was the combined effect of mixing entropy (ΔSmix), mixing enthalpy (ΔHmix), atom-size difference (δ) and valence electron concentration (VEC), and the effect of ΔSmix was much larger than that of the other factors. The microhardness of the FeCoCrAlNi coating was ~3 times that of the 304 stainless steel. Both the corrosion and cavitation erosion resistance of the coating were improved. The cavitation erosion resistance for FeCoCrAlNi HEA coating was ~7.6 times that of 304 stainless steel. The corrosion resistance was also improved as reflected by a reduction in the current density of one order of magnitude as compared with 304 stainless steel.

  11. Mathematical Modeling for Microstructural Evolution in Multi-pass Hot Compression of Q345E Alloy Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Dongsheng; Peng, Yaya

    2015-05-01

    The deformation process and inter-pass time of hot working are always accompanied by complicated microstructural evolution. As a kind of low alloy steels with good malleability, Q345E steel is widely used. The specimens of Q345E steel were heated to 1123, 1223, 1323, 1423, and 1523 K and held for 0, 120, 240, 360, and 480 s, respectively, on Gleeble-3500 thermo-mechanical simulator to develop the austenite grain growth equation of Q345E steel. In addition, the `single-pass hot compression tests,' `double-pass hot compression tests,' and `single-pass hot compression and thermal insulation tests' at temperature from 1123 to 1423 K with the strain rate from 0.01 to 10 s-1 were carried out on Gleeble-3500 thermo-mechanical simulator to investigate the behavior of dynamic recrystallization (DRX), meta-dynamic recrystallization (MDRX), and static recrystallization (SRX), and to establish the mathematical equations of DRX, MDRX, and SRX, which can predict the volume fraction of recrystallization and grain size after recrystallization. The result of error analysis and a 2D finite element simulation model during hot upsetting verifies that the experimental data agree well with the predicted values calculated by these mathematical equations, which indicates that the established mathematical equations can be applied to accurately predict the microstructural evolution of Q345E steel during hot deformation.

  12. Frictional behaviors of some nitrogen ceramics in conformal contact with tin coated Al-Si alloy, steel and MMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Cheng, H. S.; Fine, M. E.

    1994-07-01

    The frictional behavior of certain nitrogen-containing ceramics, such as silicon nitride, alpha sialons, and beta sialons as journal materials were studied in conformal contact with a tin-coated Al-Si alloy (Al-Si/Sn), forged 1141 steel and a cast aluminum matrix composite with silicon carbide reinforcement (cast metal matrix composites (MMC)) as bearing materials while lubricated with SAE 10W30. A case-hardened 1016 steel was also tested with the Al-Si/Sn and cast MMC bearings under the same conditions. The friction values of the ceramic and the steel journal wear pairs were compared and their frictional behaviors were evaluated. Silicon nitride and one of the beta sialons exhibited higher load-supporting capacities than the others when they were in contact with the 1141 steel bearings. The journal surface roughness was found to be very important when the journals were in contact with the Al-Si/Sn bearings. The frictional behavior of the ceramics and cast MMC pairs and the steel and cast MMC pairs were controlled by different wear machanisms, namely for the former, hard particle pull-out and matrix plowing, and for the latter, iron transfer from the journal to the cast MMC bearing surface.

  13. Effects of Gap Width and Groove on the Mechanical Properties of Butt Joint Between Aluminum Alloy and Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Honggang DONG; Chuanqing LIAO

    2013-01-01

    Butt joining of 5A02 aluminum alloy to 304 stainless steel sheets was conducted using gas tungsten arc welding process with Al-12%Si (wt.%,the same below) and Zn-15%Al flux-cored filler wires.The effects of gap width and groove in steel side on the microstructure and tensile strength of the resultant joints were investigated.For the joint made with 0 mm-wide gap and without groove in steel side,severe incomplete brazing zone occurred along the steel side and bottom surfaces,and consequently seriously deteriorated the joint strength.However,presetting 1.5 mm-wide gap or with groove in steel side could promote the wetting of molten filler metal on the faying surfaces,and then significantly enhance the resultant joint strength.Moreover,post-weld heat treatment could further improve the tensile strength of the joints.During tensile testing,the specimens from the joints made with Al-12%Si flux-cored filler wire fractured through the weld or interfacial layer,but those from the heat-treated joints made with Zn-15%Al flux-cored filler wire fractured in the aluminum base metal.

  14. Microstructural evolution at the overlap zones of 12Cr martensitic stainless steel laser alloyed with TiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebiyi, D. I.; Popoola, A. P. I.; Pityana, S. L.

    2014-09-01

    Multiple track laser alloying is characterised by additional heat treatment and differences in the amount of powder deposited at the overlap regions. These result in different microstructural and phase evolution at these regions, which are not obtainable in the single tracks. X12CrNiMo steel has been laser alloyed with TiC using a 4.4 kW continuous wave (CW) Nd:YAG laser. The process parameters were first optimised after which they were kept constant for overlap ratios of 50% and 75%. The depths of the alloyed zone, the mcrostructural evolution, metallurgical structures and compositions are different for the 50% and 75% overlap. The 75% overlap sample has an alloying depth of 4233 μm (about two times that of the 50% overlap). The XRD of the 50% overlap sample reveals the presence of complex carbides, which are absent in that of the 75% overlap. Although both overlap samples have retained martensite, diffractographs show that the martensite of the 75% is richer in carbide. These are attributed to differences in powder catchment, heat build-up and depth of alloying.

  15. Comparative study on the corrosion behavior of the cold rolled and hot rolled low-alloy steels containing copper and antimony in flue gas desulfurization environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S. A.; Kim, J. G.; He, Y. S.; Shin, K. S.; Yoon, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    The correlation between the corrosion and microstructual characteristics of cold rolled and hot rolled low-alloy steels containing copper and antimony was established. The corrosion behavior of the specimens used in flue gas desulfurization systems was examined by electrochemical and weight loss measurements in an aggressive solution of 16.9 vol % H2SO4 + 0.35 vol % HCl at 60°C, pH 0.3. It has been shown that the corrosion rate of hot rolled steel is lower than that of cold rolled steel. The corrosion rate of cold rolled steel was increased by grain refinement, inclusion formation, and preferred grain orientation.

  16. Effect of confining pressure due to external jacket of steel plate or shape memory alloy wire on bond behavior between concrete and steel reinforcing bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eunsoo; Kim, Dongkyun; Park, Kyoungsoo

    2014-12-01

    For external jackets of reinforced concrete columns, shape memory alloy (SMA) wires are easy to install, and they provide active and passive confining pressure; steel plates, on the other hand, only provide passive confining pressure, and their installation on concrete is not convenient because of the requirement of a special device. To investigate how SMA wires distinctly impact bond behavior compared with steel plates, this study conducted push-out bond tests of steel reinforcing bars embedded in concrete confined by SMA wires or steel plates. For this purpose, concrete cylinders were prepared with dimensions of 100 mm x 200 mm, and D-22 reinforcing bars were embedded at the center of the concrete cylinders. External jackets of 1.0 mm and 1.5 mm thickness steel plates were used to wrap the concrete cylinders. Additionally, NiTiNb SMA wire with a diameter of 1.0 mm was wound around the concrete cylinders. Slip of the reinforcing bars due to pushing force was measured by using a displacement transducer, while the circumferential deformation of specimens was obtained by using an extensometer. The circumferential deformation was used to calculate the circumferential strains of the specimens. This study assessed the radial confining pressure due to the external jackets on the reinforcing bars at bond strength from bond stress-slip curves and bond stress-circumferential strain curves. Then, the effects of the radial confining pressure on the bond behavior of concrete are investigated, and an equation is suggested to estimate bond strength using the radial confining pressure. Finally, this study focused on how active confining pressure due to recovery stress of the SMA wires influences bond behavior.

  17. Effect of rare earth cerium and impurity tin on the hot ductility of a Cr-Mo low alloy steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋申华; 徐野威; 陈贤淼; 姜雪

    2016-01-01

    The specimens of 1Cr-0.5Mo low alloy steel, undoped, Sn-doped and Ce+Sn-doped, were austenitized at 1300ºCand then cooled down to different temperatures in the range of 700–1050ºC, followed by tensile tests with the aid of a Gleeble machine. The reduction of area (RA) obtained from the test was employed to evaluate the hot ductility of the steel. The testedspecimens were char-acterized using different techniques. Minor Sn could considerably reduce the RA values of the steel in the whole temperature range, and the hot ductility curve could be widened and deepened. Nevertheless, minor Ce could improve the hot ductility of the Ce+Sn-doped steel by fully suppressing the Sn-induced hot ductility deterioration. FEGSTEM microanalysis showed that the Sn or Ce and Sn atoms segregated to austenite grain boundaries in the Sn-doped or Ce+Sn doped specimens. The detrimental effect of Sn on the hot ductility could be attributed mainly to the segregation of Sn as it could decrease the grain boundary cohesion andin turn enhancedthe grain boundary sliding and cracking. However, this detrimental effect of Sn could be counteracted by the segregation of Ce which could increase the grain boundary cohesion and in turn restrainedthe grain boundary sliding and cracking. Accordingly, a minor addition of rare earth Ce could be an effective method of suppressing the detrimental effectof impurity elements on the hot ductility of a Cr-Mo low alloy steel.

  18. Constitutive Modeling of High-Temperature Flow Behavior of an Nb Micro-alloyed Hot Stamping Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shiqi; Feng, Ding; Huang, Yunhua; Wei, Shizhong; Mohrbacher, Hardy; Zhang, Yue

    2016-03-01

    The thermal deformation behavior and constitutive models of an Nb micro-alloyed 22MnB5 steel were investigated by conducting isothermal uniaxial tensile tests at the temperature range of 873-1223 K with strain rates of 0.1-10 s-1. The results indicated that the investigated steel showed typical work hardening and dynamic recovery behavior during hot deformation, and the flow stress decreased with a decrease in strain rate and/or an increase in temperature. On the basis of the experimental data, the modified Johnson-Cook (modified JC), modified Norton-Hoff (modified NH), and Arrhenius-type (AT) constitutive models were established for the subject steel. However, the flow stress values predicted by these three models revealed some remarkable deviations from the experimental values for certain experimental conditions. Therefore, a new combined modified Norton-Hoff and Arrhenius-type constitutive model (combined modified NH-AT model), which accurately reflected both the work hardening and dynamic recovery behavior of the subject steel, was developed by introducing the modified parameter k ɛ. Furthermore, the accuracy of these constitutive models was assessed by the correlation coefficient, the average absolute relative error, and the root mean square error, which indicated that the flow stress values computed by the combined modified NH-AT model were highly consistent with the experimental values (R = 0.998, AARE = 1.63%, RMSE = 3.85 MPa). The result confirmed that the combined modified NH-AT model was suitable for the studied Nb micro-alloyed hot stamping steel. Additionally, the practicability of the new model was also verified using finite element simulations in ANSYS/LS-DYNA, and the results confirmed that the new model was practical and highly accurate.

  19. On the use of temperature dependences of the coercive force for an analysis of structural and phase changes that occur upon tempering of alloy carbon steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ul'yanov, A. I.; Baranova, I. A.; Chulkina, A. A.; Zagainov, A. V.; Volkov, V. A.

    2014-05-01

    The effect of alloying elements Mn, Cr, and Si on the magnetic hysteresis properties of cementite and model steels with a carbon concentration of 0.6 wt % has been studied. It has been shown that alloying with carbide-forming elements (Mn, Cr) reduces the coercive force and the Curie temperature of cementite. Measurements of the temperature dependences of the coercive force of the model steels with carbon content of 0.6 wt % alloyed with manganese, chromium, or silicon have been performed in the temperature range of -196 to +300°C. It has been established that the local maximum of the coercive force of these steels in this temperature range coincides with the Curie point of the precipitates of the carbide phases. Based on an analysis of the temperature dependences of the coercive force, the content of the alloying element in the precipitates of cementite of steels tempered at different temperatures has been estimated. It has been shown that the character of the dependence of the coercive force of alloy steels on the temperature of tempering in the temperature range of 250-700°C is mainly determined by the coercivity and by the kinetics of the formation of cementite precipitates.

  20. Hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and subcritical-crack growth in high strength steels and nickel base alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, R. P.; Klier, K.; Simmons, G. W.; Chornet, E.

    1973-01-01

    Embrittlement, or the enhancement of crack growth by gaseous hydrogen in high strength alloys, is of primary interest in selecting alloys for various components in the space shuttle. Embrittlement is known to occur at hydrogen gas pressures ranging from fractions to several hundred atmospheres, and is most severe in the case of martensitic high strength steels. Kinetic information on subcritical crack growth in gaseous hydrogen is sparse at this time. Corroborative information on hydrogen adsorption and diffusion is inadequate to permit a clear determination of the rate controlling process and possible mechanism in hydrogen enhanced crack growth, and for estimating behavior over a range of temperatures and pressures. Therefore, coordinated studies of the kinetics of crack growth, and adsorption and diffusion of hydrogen, using identical materials, have been initiated. Comparable conditions of temperature and pressure will be used in the chemical and mechanical experiments. Inconel 718 alloy and 18Ni(200) maraging steel have been selected for these studies. Results from these studies are expected to provide not only a better understanding of the gaseous hydrogen embrittlement phenomenon itself, but also fundamental information on hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and crack growth information that can be used directly for design.

  1. Surface phenomena during the early stages of sintering in steels modified with Fe–Mn–Si–C master alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oro, Raquel, E-mail: raqueld@chalmers.se [Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Rännvägen 2A, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Campos, Mónica, E-mail: campos@ing.uc3m.es [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, IAAB, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Av. Universidad 30, 28911 Leganés, Madrid (Spain); Hryha, Eduard, E-mail: hryha@chalmers.se [Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Rännvägen 2A, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Torralba, José Manuel, E-mail: torralba@ing.uc3m.es [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, IAAB, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Av. Universidad 30, 28911 Leganés, Madrid (Spain); IMDEA Materials Institute, C/Eric Kandel, 2, 28906 Getafe, Madrid (Spain); Nyborg, Lars, E-mail: lars.nyborg@chalmers.se [Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Rännvägen 2A, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2013-12-15

    The characteristics of the metallic powder surface play a critical role in the development of strong bonds between particles during sintering, especially when introducing elements with a high affinity for oxygen. In this study, Mn and Si have been combined in a Fe–Mn–Si–C master alloy powder in order to reduce their chemical activity and prevent oxidation during the heating stage of the sintering process. However, when this master alloy powder is mixed with an iron base powder, differences in chemical activity between both components can lead to an oxygen transfer from the iron base powder to the surface of the master alloy particles. The present research is focused on studying the evolution of the master alloy particle surface during the early stages of sintering. Surface characterization by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) shows that the master alloy powder surface is mostly covered by a thin easily reducible iron oxide layer (∼ 1 nm). Mn–Si particulate oxides are found as inclusions in specific areas of the surface. Evolution of oxides during sintering was studied on green compacts containing iron powder, graphite and Fe–Mn–Si–C master alloy powder that were heat treated in vacuum (10{sup −6} mbar) at different temperatures (from 400, 600, 800 to 1000 °C) and analyzed by means of XPS. Vacuum sintering provides the necessary conditions to remove manganese and silicon oxides from the powder surface in the range of temperatures between 600 °C and 1000 °C. When sintering in vacuum, since the gaseous products from reduction processes are continuously eliminated, oxidation of master alloy particles due to oxygen transfer through the atmosphere is minimized. - Highlights: • Mn and Si were introduced in sintered steels using a master alloy powder. • Surface of the master alloy is mainly covered by an easily reducible iron oxide. • Temperature ranges for oxidation/reduction are identified. • Vacuum conditions avoid oxygen transfer to

  2. Microstructure Evolution in Nano-reinforced Ferritic Steel Processed By Mechanical Alloying and Spark Plasma Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulnat, Xavier; Perez, Michel; Fabregue, Damien; Douillard, Thierry; Mathon, Marie-Hélène; de Carlan, Yann

    2013-11-01

    Oxide-dispersion strengthened ferritic steel was produced by high-energy attrition, leading to a complex nanostructure with deformed ferritic grains. After mechanical alloying, the powder was then consolidated by spark plasma sintering (SPS) using various thermo-mechanical treatments. Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) was also performed on the same powder for comparison. Above 1123 K (850 °C), SPS consolidation-induced heterogeneous microstructure composed of ultra-fine-grained regions surrounded by larger grains. Spatial distribution of the stored energy was measured in the bimodal microstructure using the Kernel average misorientation. In contrary to large recrystallized grains, ultra-fine grains are still substructured with low-angle grain boundaries. The precipitation kinetics of the nano-oxides during consolidation was determined by small-angle neutron scattering. Precipitation mainly occurred during the heating stage, leading to a high density of nanoclusters that are of prime importance for the mechanical properties. Other coarser titanium-enriched oxides were also detected. The multiscale characterization allowed us to understand and model the evolution of the complex microstructure. An analytical evaluation of the contributing mechanisms explains the appearance of the complex grain structure and its thermal stability during further heat treatments. Inhomogeneous distribution of plastic deformation in the powder is the major cause of heterogeneous recrystallization and further grain growth during hot consolidation. Then, the thermal stability of coherent nano-oxides is responsible for effective grain boundary pinning in recovered regions where the driving pressure for recrystallization is lowered. This scenario is confirmed in both SPSed and HIPed materials.

  3. Numerical evaluation of the weldability of the low alloy ferritic steels T/P23 and T/P24

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Roberto Xavier

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A model based on transport equations was numerically implemented by the finite volume method (FVM in a computational code in order to simulate the influence of the heat input, base metal thickness and preheating temperature on the thermal evolution and the cooling rate during the welding of the low alloy ferritic steels T/P23 and T/P24. As a consequence, it was possible to evaluate qualitatively the microstructure at the heat affected zone (HAZ of these steels when a single weld bead was deposited on their surface and calculate the maximum hardness reached at this region. Goldakfs double-ellipsoid heat source model for power density distribution was utilized in order to obtain a good estimate of the cooling rate and dimensions of the fusion zone (FZ. The results are discussed in light of previous work and good agreement between experimental and simulated results was verified.

  4. Guide for Recommended Practices to Perform Crack Tip Opening Displacement Tests in High Strength Low Alloy Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián A. Ávila

    Full Text Available Abstract: Fracture mechanics approach is important for all mechanical and civil projects that might involve cracks in metallic materials, and especially for those using welding as a structural joining process. This methodology can enhance not only the design but also the service life of the structures being constructed. This paper includes detailed consideration of several practical issues related to the experimental procedures to assess the fracture toughness in high strength low alloy steels (HSLA using the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD parameter, specifically pipeline steels for oil and gas transportation. These considerations are important for engineers who are new in the field, or for those looking for guidelines performing different procedures during the experimentation, which usually are difficult to understand from the conventional standards. We discuss on topics including geometry selection, number of replicate tests, fatigue precracking, test procedure selection and realization, reports of results and other aspects.

  5. Simultaneous chromizing-aluminizing coating of low alloy steels by a halide-activated pack cementation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geib, F.D.; Rapp, R.A. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1992-11-01

    The simultaneous chromizing-aluminizing of low-alloy steels has achieved Kanthal-like surface compositions of 16--2lCr and 5--8 wt%Al by the use of cementation packs with a Cr-Al masteralloy and an NH{sub 4}Cl activator salt. An initial preferential deposition of Al into the alloy induces the phase transformation from austenite to ferrite at the 1150{degrees}C process temperature. The low solubility of carbon in ferrite results in the rejection of solute C into the core of the austenitic substrate, thereby preventing the formation of an external Cr-carbide layer, which would otherwise block aluminizing and chromizing. The deposition and rapid diffusion of Cr and Al into the external bcc ferrite layer follows. Parabolic cyclic oxidation kinetics for alumina growth in air were observed over a wide range of relatively low temperatures (637--923{degrees}C).

  6. Simultaneous chromizing-aluminizing coating of low alloy steels by a halide-activated pack cementation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geib, F.D.; Rapp, R.A. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1992-11-01

    The simultaneous chromizing-aluminizing of low-alloy steels has achieved Kanthal-like surface compositions of 16--2lCr and 5--8 wt%Al by the use of cementation packs with a Cr-Al masteralloy and an NH[sub 4]Cl activator salt. An initial preferential deposition of Al into the alloy induces the phase transformation from austenite to ferrite at the 1150[degrees]C process temperature. The low solubility of carbon in ferrite results in the rejection of solute C into the core of the austenitic substrate, thereby preventing the formation of an external Cr-carbide layer, which would otherwise block aluminizing and chromizing. The deposition and rapid diffusion of Cr and Al into the external bcc ferrite layer follows. Parabolic cyclic oxidation kinetics for alumina growth in air were observed over a wide range of relatively low temperatures (637--923[degrees]C).

  7. Laser surface alloying of 316L stainless steel coated with a bioactive hydroxyapatite-titanium oxide composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaith, El-Sayed; Hodgson, Simon; Sharp, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Laser surface alloying is a powerful technique for improving the mechanical and chemical properties of engineering components. In this study, laser surface irradiation process employed in the surface modification off 316L stainless steel substrate using hydroxyapatite-titanium oxide to provide a composite ceramic layer for the suitability of applying this technology to improve the biocompatibility of medical alloys and implants. Fusion of the metal surface incorporating hydroxyapatite-titania ceramic particles using a 30 W Nd:YAG laser at different laser powers, 40, 50 and 70% power and a scan speed of 40 mm s(-1) was observed to adopt the optimum condition of ceramic deposition. Coatings were evaluated in terms of microstructure, surface morphology, composition biocompatibility using XRD, ATR-FTIR, SEM and EDS. Evaluation of the in vitro bioactivity by soaking the treated metal in SBF for 10 days showed the deposition of biomimetic apatite.

  8. Electrochemical Fabrication and Characterization of Corrosion-Resistant, Ternary, Lead-Based Alloys as a New Material for Steel Surface Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliyev, A. Sh.; Tahirli, H. M.; Elrouby, Mahmoud; Soltanova, N. Sh.; Tagiev, D. B.

    2016-06-01

    This article presents the study of the synthesis of the ternary Pb-Sb-Te alloy on the stainless steel substrate via electrochemical method. The corrosion resistance of the electrodeposited alloy has been investigated via subjecting the electro-synthesized alloy to a corrosive medium containing sulfide ions; this medium is similar to the petroleum refining environment. The resulting film of the electrodeposited alloy was analyzed by the scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, and X-ray diffraction to determine the morphology and the phase structure of the electrodeposited film. It was found that the electrodeposited Pb-Sb-Te alloy thin film is a multiphase composition. The obtained data reveal that the most corrosion-resistant phase is the PbSb2Te4 alloy.

  9. Wetting and Interfacial Characteristics of Mg AZ61 Alloy/Galvanized Steel in Cold Metal Transfer Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qiaoli; Yang, Fan; Cao, Rui; Chen, Jianhong; Guo, Tingbiao

    2015-09-01

    The dynamic sessile drop method was used to study the wetting behavior of galvanized steel by molten Mg AZ61 alloy under cold metal transfer condition. The interfacial microstructures were also analyzed by using scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectrometry. The observed results showed that the wetting behavior was directly determined by the wire feed speed (or the heat input). The Al-Fe intermetallic layer and Zn-rich zone were observed both at the interface and at the close of triple line. The formations of these interfacial characteristics satisfy the thermodynamic characteristic of Mg-Al/Fe and Mg-Zn/Fe systems.

  10. Autogeneous Laser and Hybrid Laser Arc Welding of T-joint Low Alloy Steel with Fiber Laser Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unt, A.; Lappalainen, E.; Salminen, A.

    This paper is focused on the welding of low alloy steels S355 and AH36 in thicknesses 6, 8 and 10 mm in T-joint configuration using either autogeneous laser welding or laser-arc hybrid welding (HLAW) with high power fiber lasers. The aim was to obtain understanding of the factors influencing the size of the fillet and weld geometry through methodologically studying effects of laser power, welding speed, beam alignment relative to surface, air gap, focal point position and order of processes (in case of HLAW) and to get a B quality class welds in all thicknesses after parameter optimization.

  11. Effect of Temperature on the Galvanic Corrosion of Cu-Ni Alloy/High Strength Steel in Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Chun Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The galvanic corrosion behavior of Cu-Ni Alloy(B10/high strength steel (921A has been studied using a zero-resistance ammeter (ZRA in seawater at different temperatures. As well as it was systemically investigated by weight loss measurements, electrochemical methods and scanning electron microscope.Results showed 921A acts as the anode and B10 act as the cathodes. The effect of temperature on the galvanic corrosion is important, the corrosion rate became higher with the temperature increased.

  12. Formation of amorphous Ti alloy layers by excimer laser mixing of Ti on AISI 304 stainless-steel surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jervis, T. R.; Nastasi, M.; Zocco, T. G.; Martin, J. A.

    1988-07-01

    We used excimer laser radiation at 308 nm to mix thin layers of Ti into AISI 304 stainless steel. Different numbers of shots at a fluence about twice the threshold for melting varied the amount of mixing. When mixing is sufficiently complete, an amorphous surface layer is formed with Ti substituting for Fe on a one-to-one basis in the alloy. The laser mixing process, unlike Ti ion implantation, does not result in high incorporation of C in the processed layer, although some C from surface and interface contamination is incorporated into the surface layer.

  13. Investigation And Optimization Of EDM Process Of AISI 4140 Alloy Steel Using Various Tool Electrodes: A Review Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishor Lal ,

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research work is to determine the optimized settings of key machining factors like pulse on time, discharge current and duty cycle for AISI 4140 alloy steel using various tool electrodes. The output responses will be measured are material removal rate (MRR,surface roughness(SR and tool wear rate(TWR. Mathematical models are proposed for the above are L27 orthogonal array. The micro structural changes in the work piece after machining process will also be examined by the use of SEM.

  14. Solidification and microstructural aspects of laser-deposited Ni–Mo–Cr–Si alloy on stainless steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Reena Awasthi; Santosh Kumar; D Srivastava; G K Dey

    2010-12-01

    Laser cladding of stainless steel substrate was carried out using Ni–32Mo–15Cr–3Si (wt%) alloy powder. Laser cladding parameters were optimized to obtain defect-free and metallurgically bonded clad. Variation in solidification rate, cooling rate and compositional variation resulted in heterogeneous microstructure. Microstructure was found to be distinctly different in regions of clad cross-section. Majority of the region was found to consist of eutectic of Mo-rich hcp intermetallic Laves phase and NiFe fcc gamma solid solution phases. Extensive microstructural examinations of different clad regions have been carried out using microscopy and microanalysis techniques.

  15. An Assessment of the Mechanical Properties and Microstructural Analysis of Dissimilar Material Welded Joint between Alloy 617 and 12Cr Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiz Waqar Ahmad

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The most effective method to reduce CO2 gas emission from the steam power plant is to improve its performance by elevating the steam temperature to more than 700 °C. For this, it is necessary to develop applicable materials at high temperatures. Ni-based Alloy 617 and 12Cr steel are used in steam power plants, due to their remarkable mechanical properties, high corrosion resistance, and creep strength. However, since Alloy 617 and 12Cr steel have different chemical compositions and thermal and mechanical properties, it is necessary to develop dissimilar material welding technologies. Moreover, in order to guarantee the reliability of dissimilar material welded structures, the assessment of mechanical and metallurgical properties, fatigue strength, fracture mechanical analysis, and welding residual stress analysis should be conducted on dissimilar material welded joints. In this study, first, multi-pass dissimilar material welding between Alloy 617 and 12Cr steel was performed under optimum welding conditions. Next, mechanical properties were assessed, including the static tensile strength, hardness distribution, and microstructural analysis of a dissimilar material welded joint. The results indicated that the yield strength and tensile strength of the dissimilar metal welded joint were higher than those of the Alloy 617 base metal, and lower than those of the 12Cr steel base metal. The hardness distribution of the 12Cr steel side was higher than that of Alloy 617 and the dissimilar material weld metal zone. It was observed that the microstructure of Alloy 617 HAZ was irregular austenite grain, while that of 12Cr steel HAZ was collapsed martensite grain, due to repeatable heat input during multi-pass welding.

  16. The effect of alloy elements on the density variation of steel melt at the interdendritic region during solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y. F.; Chen, Y.; Ma, X. P.; Fu, P. X.; Kang, X. H.; Liu, H. W.; Li, D. Z.

    2016-03-01

    Alloying elements in steels have essential effects on the formation of macrosegregation by inducing a density difference between the mushy zone and the bulk melt, and even by the alteration of the solidified microstructure. Hence, in terms of the thermodynamic laws for solidification of an idealized dilute solution, a systematic theoretical analysis on the effect of elements on the density variation of the interdendritic melt is presented for common Fe-based binary alloys. It shows that density variation closely associates with three crucial parameters: the microsegregation parameter λ, the temp-comp-expansion parameter β and the initial composition CL o . With these derived parameters, a simple analytical model is proposed to assess the influence of alloy elements on density change. The theoretical analysis indicates that compared to silicon, the effect of carbon on the density variation cannot be ignored, which is remarkably different from the previous recognition of these two elements. The macrosegregation induced by carbon only is experimentally validated by two dissected 500 kg ingots with different carbon contents. Furthermore, to directly validate the results of theoretical analysis a macrosegregation model with two different microsegregation laws (lever rule and Scheil equation) is established. Then simulations of the convection during solidification in the experimental 500 kg reference ingot are performed for Fe-C and Fe-Si alloys, respectively. It demonstrates that numerically simulated effects of carbon and silicon on the interdendritic convection induced by density inversion are fairly consistent with the analytical predictions.

  17. A comparative assessment of the fracture toughness behavior of ferritic-martensitic steels and nanostructured ferritic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Hoelzer, David T.; Kim, Jeoung Han; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2017-02-01

    The Fe-Cr alloys with ultrafine microstructures are primary candidate materials for advanced nuclear reactor components because of their excellent high temperature strength and high resistance to radiation-induced damage such as embrittlement and swelling. Mainly two types of Fe-Cr alloys have been developed for the high temperature reactor applications: the quenched and tempered ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels hardened primarily by ultrafine laths and carbonitrides and the powder metallurgy-based nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) by nanograin structure and nanoclusters. This study aims at elucidating the differences and similarities in the temperature and strength dependences of fracture toughness in the Fe-Cr alloys to provide a comparative assessment of their high-temperature structural performance. The KJQ versus yield stress plots confirmed that the fracture toughness was inversely proportional to yield strength. It was found, however, that the toughness data for some NFAs were outside the band of the integrated dataset at given strength level, which indicates either a significant improvement or deterioration in mechanical properties due to fundamental changes in deformation and fracture mechanisms. When compared to the behavior of NFAs, the FM steels have shown much less strength dependence and formed narrow fracture toughness data bands at significantly lower strength region. It appeared that at high temperatures ≥ 600 ºC the NFAs cannot retain the nanostructure advantage of high strength and high toughness either by high-temperature embrittlement or by excessive loss of strength. It is reviewed, however, that the NFAs has much stronger radiation resistance at high temperatures, such as lower radiation-induced swelling, finer helium bubble formation and lower irradiation creep rate.

  18. Nanostructure evolution under irradiation of Fe(C)MnNi model alloys for reactor pressure vessel steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiapetto, M.; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.; Malerba, L.

    2015-06-01

    Radiation-induced embrittlement of bainitic steels is one of the most important lifetime limiting factors of existing nuclear light water reactor pressure vessels. The primary mechanism of embrittlement is the obstruction of dislocation motion produced by nanometric defect structures that develop in the bulk of the material due to irradiation. The development of models that describe, based on physical mechanisms, the nanostructural changes in these types of materials due to neutron irradiation are expected to help to better understand which features are mainly responsible for embrittlement. The chemical elements that are thought to influence most the response under irradiation of low-Cu RPV steels, especially at high fluence, are Ni and Mn, hence there is an interest in modelling the nanostructure evolution in irradiated FeMnNi alloys. As a first step in this direction, we developed sets of parameters for object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulations that allow this to be done, under simplifying assumptions, using a "grey alloy" approach that extends the already existing OKMC model for neutron irradiated Fe-C binary alloys [1]. Our model proved to be able to describe the trend in the buildup of irradiation defect populations at the operational temperature of LWR (∼300 °C), in terms of both density and size distribution of the defect cluster populations, in FeMnNi model alloys as compared to Fe-C. In particular, the reduction of the mobility of point-defect clusters as a consequence of the presence of solutes proves to be key to explain the experimentally observed disappearance of detectable point-defect clusters with increasing solute content.

  19. Functional properties of surface layers of X38CrMoV5-3 hot work tool steel alloyed with HPDL laser

    OpenAIRE

    L.A. Dobrzański; M. Piec; K. Labisz; M. Bonek; A. Klimpel

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Improvement of functional properties alloyed of hot work tool steel surface layers is one of the goals of this paper.Design/methodology/approach: The material used for investigation was the hot work tool steel X38CrMoV5-3. Remelting and alloying of surface layers were made using the HPDL high power diode laser Rofin DL 020 in the laser power range of 1.2-2.3 kW. The carbide powders were applied on specimens prepared and degreased in this way; the powder was mixed with the sodium glas...

  20. Comparison on Mechanical Properties of SA508 Gr.3 Cl.1, Cl.2, and Gr.4N Low Alloy Steels for Pressure Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min-Chul; Park, Sang-Gyu; Lee, Bong-Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ki-Hyoung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    In this study, microstructure and mechanical properties of SA508 Gr.3 Cl. 1, Cl.2, and Gr.4N low alloy steels are characterized to compare their properties. To evaluate the fracture toughness in the transition region, the master curve method according to ASTM E1921 was adopted in the cleavage transition region. Tensile tests and Charpy impact tests were also performed to evaluate the mechanical properties, and a microstructural investigation was carried out. The microstructure and mechanical properties of SA508 Gr.3 Cl.1, Cl2 and Gr.4N low alloy steels were characterized.. The predominant microstructure of SA508 Gr.4N model alloy is tempered martensite, while SA508 Gr.3 Cl.1 and Cl.2 steels show a typical tempered upper bainitic structure. SA508 Gr. 4N model alloy shows the best strength and transition behavior among the three SA508 steels. SA508 Gr.3 Cl.2 steel also has quite good strength, but there is a loss of toughness.

  1. Simultaneous aluminizing and chromizing of steels to form (Fe,Cr){sub 3}Al coatings and Ge-doped silicide coatings of Cr-Zr base alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, M.; He, Y.R.; Rapp, R.A. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-01

    A halide-activated cementation pack involving elemental Al and Cr powders has been used to achieve surface compositions of approximately Fe{sub 3}Al plus several percent Cr for low alloy steels (T11, T2 and T22) and medium carbon steel (1045 steel). A two-step treatment at 925 C and 1150 C yields the codeposition and diffusion of aluminum and chromium to form dense and uniform ferrite coatings of about 400 {micro}m thickness, while preventing the formation of a blocking chromium carbide at the substrate surfaces. Upon cyclic oxidation in air at 700 C, the coated steel exhibits a negligible 0.085 mg/cm{sup 2} weight gain for 1900 one-hour cycles. Virtually no attack was observed on coated steels tested at ABB in simulated boiler atmospheres at 500 C for 500 hours. But coatings with a surface composition of only 8 wt% Al and 6 wt% Cr suffered some sulfidation attack in simulated boiler atmospheres at temperatures higher than 500 C for 1000 hours. Two developmental Cr-Zr based Laves phase alloys (CN129-2 and CN117(Z)) were silicide/germanide coated. The cross-sections of the Ge-doped silicide coatings closely mimicked the microstructure of the substrate alloys. Cyclic oxidation in air at 1100 C showed that the Ge-doped silicide coating greatly improved the oxidation resistance of the Cr-Zr based alloys.

  2. Development of high and medium resistance low alloys steels, cold rolling on USIMINAS; Desenvolvimento de acos de media e alta resistencia, baixa liga laminados a frio na USIMINAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Luiz N.T.; Barcelos, Haroldo; Oliveira Junior, Valdomiro de [USIMINAS, Ipatinga, MG (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    1984-12-31

    Results on laboratory and industrial trials to the production of high strength, low alloy, cold rolled steels are presented. The first of them, class 400 MPa tensile strength, containing P and Mn and the other, class 440-500 MPA tensile strength, containing Mn, Si and Nb as alloying elements. The performance of these two materials in the production of automotive industry is also reported. 4 figs., 11 tabs., 12 refs.

  3. Microstructure Control of Fire-resistant, Low-alloy Steel; An in-situ 3D X-ray Diffraction and A Small-angle X-ray Scattering Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dere, E. G.

    2013-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis aims at deepening our understanding of the formation of the microstructure of steel during thermal processing in order to control the microstructure and thereby improve the fire-resistance of low-alloy steel. The strength of steel decreases during a fire mainly

  4. Characterization of the corrosion behavior of different stainless steel alloys exposed to flowing fresh seawater, using E.I.S technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Muhanna, K. [Petroleum Research and Studies Center, Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, KISR, P.O.Box 24885, Safat 13109 Kuwait (Kuwait)

    2004-07-01

    E.I.S technique was used to characterize the corrosion behavior of UNS NO. S 31600 stainless steel, UNS NO. S 30400 stainless steel and UNS NO. S 62800 sanicro 28 exposed to continuous fresh Seawater. The total exposure time of the test was about 180 days. Two types of additives (4 ppm of Cl{sub 2} and 5 ppm of NH{sub 3}) were also added to the seawater to investigate their effect on the surfaces of these alloys. During the tests, no marine - macro fouling was observed on the surfaces of the tested alloys, as the seawater was filtrated at the Doha Desalination Research Center, where the study was carried out, but only a slimy layer spread on the whole surface of the alloys. The corrosion behavior of each alloy was monitored by the open circuit potential measurement, and the E.I.S technique using the EG and G 352 software and hardware instrument, where the resistance of the solution (R{sub sol}), the resistance of the surface of the tested alloy (R{sub p}), and the double layer capacitance (Cdl) was calculated. Under this study's experimental conditions, results indicated that the stainless steel alloys were highly resistant to marine fouling and corrosion in seawater, and were not affected by the aggressive additives, such as NH{sub 3}, and Cl{sub 2} in the seawater. (author)

  5. Corrosion Behavior of S450EW Low-alloy Weathering Steel in Cyclically Alternate Corrosion Environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-shan WANG; Pei-yang SHI; Cheng-jun LIU; Mao-fa JIANG

    2015-01-01

    Weathering steel is widely used in various ifelds due to its excellent mechanical properties and high corrosion resistance. The effect of chromium content on the S450EW weathering steel in cyclic immersion test was studied. The results indicated that the corrosion resistance of S450EW weathering steel is closely related to chromium content. The addition of chromium signiif-cantly inhibited the weathering steel corrosion. The corrosion rate of experimental steel after 96 h immersion was 1.101 g·m−2·h−1. The rust of S450EW weathering steel was mainly constituted of FeOOH and Fe3O4 phase, and the elevation of chromium content promoted the formation of α-FeOOH. The ifne precipitates of the two phases contributed to the formation of dense dust layer of test steel. Furthermore, the increase of chromium is beneifcial for the cure of original defects and cracks of the rust layer via the enrich-ment of chromium. The corrosion potential and the resistance of corrosion process were thus increased, protecting the experimental steel from further corrosion. A S450EW steel with corrosion resistance more than 1.5 times of Q450NQR1 steel was prepared.

  6. Carbon diffusion and phase transformations during gas carburizing of high-alloyed stainless steels: Experimental study and theoretical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpin, T.; Dulcy, J.; Gantois, M.

    2005-10-01

    Gas carburizing of high-alloyed stainless steels increases surface hardness, as well as the overall mechanical characteristics of the surface. The growth of chromium-rich carbides during carbon transfer into the steel causes precipitation hardening in the surface, but decreases the chromium content in solid solution. In order to maintain a good corrosion resistance in the carburized layer, the stainless steel composition and the carburizing process need to be optimized. To limit the experimental work, a methodology using software for modeling the thermodynamic and kinetic properties in order to simulate carbon diffusion and phase transformations during gas carburizing is presented. Thermodynamic calculations are initially used to find the optimum parameters ( T, carbon wt pct, etc.) in order to maintain the highest Cr and Mo contents in the austenitic solid solution. In a second step, kinetic calculations using the diffusion-controlled transformations (DICTRA) software are used to predict how the amount of the different phases varies and how the carbon profile in the steel changes as a function of time during the process. Experimental carbon profiles were determined using a wavelength-dispersive spectrometer for electron-probe microanalysis (WDS-EPMA), while carbide compositions were measured by energy-dispersive spectroscopy_X (EDS_X) analyses. A good agreement between calculated and experimental values was observed for the Fe-13Cr-5Co-3Ni-2Mo-0.07C and the Fe-12Cr-2Ni-2Mo-0.12C (wt pct) martensitic stainless steels at 955 °C and 980 °C.

  7. Heat Treatment and Properties of Nitrogen Alloyed, Martensitic,Corrosion-resistant Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reinhold Schneider; Klaus Sammt; Roland Rabitsch; Michael Haspel

    2004-01-01

    This paper gives a short introduction to the typical process route and material properties of these steels in comparison to standard martensitic corrosion-resistant steels. The typical response of these steels to various heat treatment parameters is shown and explained using the three grades M333, N360 and M340 (all made by Bohler Edelstahl GmbH) as examples, and the physical metallurgy of these steels and its consequences for practical heat treatment is explained. The correlation between tempering parameters and their effect on the toughness and corrosion properties is explained in particular detail, showing that these new steels not only offer far better property combinations under the usual heat treatment parameters than standard martensitic corrosion-resistant steels, but that they also open the door to extending heat treatment combinations and properties.

  8. An experimental study on the effects of compressive stress on the fatigue crack growth of low-alloy steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D.P.; Hoppe, R.G. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., West Mifflin, PA (United States). Bettis Atomic Power Lab.; Hechmer, J.L. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Barberton, OH (United States); James, B.A. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Dept. of Metallurgy

    1993-12-01

    A series of fatigue crack growth rate tests was conducted in order to study effects of negative stress ratio on fatigue crack growth rate of low-alloy steel in air. Four-point bend specimens were used to simulate linear stress distributions typical of pressure vessel applications. This type of testing adds to knowledge on negative stress ratio effects for low-alloy steels obtained in the past from uniform tension-compression tests. Applied bending stress range was varied over twice the yield strength. Load control was used for tests for which the stress range was less than twice the yield strength and deflection control was used for the higher stress range tests. Crack geometries were both short and long fatigue cracks started at notches and tight fatigue cracks for which crack closure could occur over the full crack face. Results are presented in terms of the stress intensity factor ratio R = K{sub MIN}/K{sub MAX}. The negative R-ratio test results were correlated to an equation of the form da/dN = C[{Delta}K/(A-R)]{sup n}, where A, C, and n are curve fitting parameters. It was found that effects of negative R-ratio on fatigue crack growth rates for even the high stress range tests could be bounded by correlating the above equation to only positive R-ratio test results and extending the resulting equation into the negative R-ratio regime.

  9. Chromium accumulation, microorganism population and enzyme activities in soils around chromium-containing slag heap of steel alloy factory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Shun-hong; PENG Bing; YANG Zhi-hui; CHAI Li-yuan; ZHOU Li-cheng

    2009-01-01

    The environmental risk of chromium pollution is pronounced in soils adjacent to chromate industry. It is important to investigate the functioning of soil microorganisms in ecosystems exposed to long-term contamination by chromium. 45 soil samples obtained from different places of the slag heap in a steel alloy factory were analyzed for chromium contamination level and its effect on soil microorganisms and enzyme activities. The results show that the average concentrations of total Cr in the soil under the slag heap, adjacent to the slag heap and outside the factory exceed the threshold of Secondary Environmental Quality Standard for Soil in China by 354%, 540% and 184%, respectively, and are 15, 21 and 9 times higher than the local background value, respectively. Elevated chromium loadings result in changes in the activity of the soil microbe, as indicated by the negative correlations between soil microbial population and chromium contents. Dehydrogenase activity is greatly depressed by chromium in the soil. The results imply that dehydrogenase activity can be used as an indicator for the chromium pollution level in the area of the steel alloy factory.

  10. Water Droplet and Cavitation Erosion Behavior of Laser-Treated Stainless Steel and Titanium Alloy: Their Similarities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, B. S.

    2013-12-01

    This article deals with water droplet and cavitation erosion behavior of diode laser-treated X10CrNiMoV1222 stainless steel and Ti6Al4V alloy. After laser surface treatment, the water droplet and cavitation erosion resistance (WDER and CER) of these materials improved significantly. The main reason for the improvement is the increased surface hardness and formation of fine-grained microstructures after laser surface treatment. It is observed that there is a similarity in both the phenomena. The WDER and CER can be correlated with a single mechanical property based on modified ultimate resilience (MUR) provided the laser-treated layers are free from microcracks and interface defects. The CER and WDER behavior of HPDL-treated X10CrNiMoV1222 stainless steel and Ti6Al4V alloy samples using different test equipment as per ASTM G32-2003 and ASTM G73-1978, their correlation with MUR, and their damage mechanism compared on the basis of XRD analyses, optical and scanning electron micrographs are discussed and reported in this article.

  11. APPLICATION OF THE AL-CONTAINING FERRO-ALLOYS FOR THE STEEL DEOXIDATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Melnik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of the smelting of converter steel grades 09G2C, C45, 10HSND, S355J2, A322 and others with various options for deoxidation of steel with full and / or partial replacement of secondary aluminum ferroaluminum were shown. Technological and economic efficiency of steel deoxidation with ferroaluminum were confirmed. Found that the replacement of secondary aluminum AB87 to Ferroaluminum FA30 to recovery of aluminum was secured to 17.0–19.9% compared to 11.8–13.1% for deoxidation of the steel by conventional techniques.

  12. Hydrogen diffusion and effect on degradation in welded microstructures of creep-resistant low-alloyed steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhode, Michael

    2016-04-04

    The main challenge for the future is to further increase the power plant thermal efficiency independent of the type of power plant concept, i.e. fossil-fired or nuclear power plant, where the material selection can directly affect reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions. In power plant design, welding is the most applied manufacturing technique in component construction. The necessary weld heat input causes metallurgical changes and phase transitions in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the base materials and in the deposited weld metal. The weld joint can absorb hydrogen during welding or in later service - This absorption can cause degradation of mechanical properties of the materials, and in certain loading conditions, hydrogen-assisted cold cracks can occur. This cracking phenomenon can appear time delayed due to the temperature dependency of the hydrogen diffusion and the presence of a ''critical'' hydrogen concentration. Additionally, each specific weld microstructure shows a certain hydrogen diffusion and solubility that contribute to susceptibility of the cracking phenomenon. Therefore hydrogen cannot be neglected as possible failure effect, which was identified recently in the case of T24 creep-resistant tube-to-tube weld joints. It is necessary to identify and assess the hydrogen effect in weld joints of low-alloyed steel grades for to improve further early detection of possible failures. For each specific weld joint microstructure, it is necessary to separate the interdependencies between mechanical load and the hydrogen concentration. The diffusivity and solubility must be considered to identify hydrogen quantities in the material at any given time. In this case, the effects of mechanical loading were dealt with independently. For the characterization of the mechanical properties, hydrogen charged tensile specimens were investigated for the base materials and thermally simulated HAZ microstructures. The hydrogen diffusion was characterized

  13. Effect of alloying elements on the composition of carbide phases and mechanical properties of the matrix of high-carbon chromium-vanadium steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, V. I.; Tarasenko, L. V.; Utkina, A. N.

    2017-01-01

    Based on the results of phase physicochemical analysis of high-carbon chromium-vanadium steel, the predominant type of carbide that provides high wear resistance has been established, and its amount and amount of carbon in martensite have been determined. Data on the composition and the amount of carbide phase and on the chemical composition of the martensite of high-carbon steel have been obtained, which allows determination of the alloying-element concentration limits. The mechanical testing of heats of a chosen chemical composition has been carried out after quenching and low-temperature tempering. The tests have demonstrated benefits of new steel in wear resistance and bending strength with the fatigue strength being retained, compared to steels subjected to cementation. The mechanism of secondary strengthening of the steel upon high-temperature tempering has been revealed. High-temperature tempering can be applied to articles that are required to possess both high wear resistance and heat resistance.

  14. Cracking behavior and microstructure of austenitic stainless steels and alloy 690 irradiated in BOR-60 reactor, phase I.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y.; Chopra, O. K.; Soppet, W. K.; Shack, W. J.; Yang, Y.; Allen, T. R.; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison

    2010-02-16

    Cracking behavior of stainless steels specimens irradiated in the BOR-60 at about 320 C is studied. The primary objective of this research is to improve the mechanistic understanding of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of core internal components under conditions relevant to pressurized water reactors. The current report covers several baseline tests in air, a comparison study in high-dissolved-oxygen environment, and TEM characterization of irradiation defect structure. Slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests were conducted in air and in high-dissolved-oxygen (DO) water with selected 5- and 10-dpa specimens. The results in high-DO water were compared with those from earlier tests with identical materials irradiated in the Halden reactor to a similar dose. The SSRT tests produced similar results among different materials irradiated in the Halden and BOR-60 reactors. However, the post-irradiation strength for the BOR-60 specimens was consistently lower than that of the corresponding Halden specimens. The elongation of the BOR-60 specimens was also greater than that of their Halden specimens. Intergranular cracking in high-DO water was consistent for most of the tested materials in the Halden and BOR-60 irradiations. Nonetheless, the BOR-60 irradiation was somewhat less effective in stimulating IG fracture among the tested materials. Microstructural characterization was also carried out using transmission electron microscopy on selected BOR-60 specimens irradiated to {approx}25 dpa. No voids were observed in irradiated austenitic stainless steels and cast stainless steels, while a few voids were found in base and grain-boundary-engineered Alloy 690. All the irradiated microstructures were dominated by a high density of Frank loops, which varied in mean size and density for different alloys.

  15. Optimization of mechanical alloying and spark-plasma sintering regimes to obtain ferrite–martensitic ODS steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Staltsov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of structure investigation, distribution uniformity of dispersed particles of Y2O3, porosity and density of the ferritic/martensitic reactor steel EP-450 (0.12C–13Cr–2Mo–Nb–V–B, wt% produced by spark-plasma sintering (SPS are presented. More than 140 samples were produced using different combinations of mechanical alloying (time, speed of attritor rotation and SPS parameters (temperature, speed of reaching preset temperature, pressure and time of exposure under pressure, concentration of strengthening particles. It is determined that the absence of strengthening Y2O3 nano-particles in local volumes of sintered specimens is connected with the imperfection of mechanical alloying, namely, the formation of agglomerates of matrix steel powder containing no oxide nano-particles. It has been determined that the time of mechanical alloying should not exceed 30h to provide minimum powder agglomeration, uniform distribution of Y2O3 particles in the powder mixture and minimum porosity of sintered samples. Spark-plasma sintering should be performed at the lowest possible temperature. As a result it was found that samples with 99% theoretical density can be obtained using the following optimized SPS-parameters: sintering temperature is 1098÷1163K; speed for reaching the preset temperature is >573K/min; load is 70÷80MPa; time of exposure under pressure – either without isothermal exposure, or exposure during ≥3min; optimum quantity of Y2O3 is 0.2÷0.5wt%.

  16. Effect of alloy grain size on the high-temperature oxidation behavior of the austenitic steel TP 347

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Braz Trindade

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Generally, oxide scales formed on high Cr steels are multi-layered and the kinetics are strongly influenced by the alloy grain boundaries. In the present study, the oxidation behaviour of an austenite steel TP347 with different grain sizes was studied to identify the role of grain-boundaries in the oxidation process. Heat treatment in an inert gas atmosphere at 1050 °C was applied to modify the grain size of the steel TP347. The mass gain during subsequent oxidation was measured using a microbalance with a resolution of 10-5 g. The scale morphology was examined using SEM in combination with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. Oxidation of TP347 with a grain size of 4 µm at 750 °C in air follows a parabolic rate law. For a larger grain size (65 µm, complex kinetics is observed with a fast initial oxidation followed by several different parabolic oxidation stages. SEM examinations indicated that the scale formed on specimens with smaller grain size was predominantly Cr2O3, with some FeCr2O4 at localized sites. For specimens with larger grain size the main oxide is iron oxide. It can be concluded that protective Cr2O3 formation is promoted by a high density of fast grain-boundary diffusion paths which is the case for fine-grained materials.

  17. Effects of Zr, Ti, and Al Additions on Nonmetallic Inclusions and Impact Toughness of Cast Low-Alloy Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizyukov, Pavel V.; Giese, Scott R.

    2017-03-01

    A microalloying of the low-carbon and low-alloy cast steel was conducted with Zr, Ti, and Al that were added to the steel in four combinations. After heat treatment, the samples were tested for impact toughness at room temperature using the Charpy method. The highest values of impact toughness were obtained in the group treated with Zr, while Zr-Ti and Zr-Ti-Al groups showed moderate toughness values; the lowest values were observed in the Zr-Al group. Difference among the treatment groups was observed in the fracture mechanisms, morphology, and area distribution of the inclusions. High toughness values achieved in the trials treated with zirconium corresponded with smooth ductile fracture. The metal treated with a combination of zirconium and titanium had a relatively small area occupied by inclusions, but its toughness was also moderate. Lowest impact toughness values corresponded with the larger area occupied by the inclusions in the trials treated with aluminum. Also, a connection between the solubility product [Al][N] and impact toughness was established. The study also provides a qualitative description and quantitative analysis of the nonmetallic inclusions formation as a result of microalloying treatment. The precipitation sequence of the inclusions was described based on the thermochemical calculations for the nonmetallic compounds discovered in the experimental steel. A description of the size distribution, morphology, and composition was conducted for the oxides, nitrides, sulfides, and multiphase particles.

  18. The effect of buffered solutions in corrosion testing of alloyed 13%Cr martensitic stainless steels for mildly sour applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drugli, J.M.; Rogne, T.; Svenning, M.; Axelsen, S. [SINTEF Materials Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Enerhaug, J. [Statoil, Trondheim (Norway)

    1999-11-01

    13% Cr stainless steels may suffer from sulfide stress corrosion cracking in sour environments if hydrogen enters the material. Hydrogen evolution is caused by the cathodic reaction in the corrosion process. As distinct from solutions without buffer, buffered solutions keep the pH stable at the surface almost independent of the electrochemical reactions. The most common initiation process for corrosion of stainless steels is break-down of the passive oxide by subsequent local acidification, which to a certain extent can be prevented in buffered solutions. For local corrosion the risk of corrosion therefore is higher in solutions without buffer than in buffered solutions at the same bulk pH. Hydrogen evolution may also be caused by general corrosion. For this type of corrosion the effect of buffer in the solution may be, contrary to the effect for local corrosion, that general corrosion of 13 Cr (with risk for cracking of loaded specimens) is more readily initiated in buffered solutions than in solutions without buffer at the same pH. With respect to corrosion on ground alloyed 13Cr base material by coupling to carbon steel, it is shown that general corrosion initiates both in strongly and moderately without buffer at pH 3.5, buffered solutions, but not in solution.

  19. Development of bonding techniques for cryogenic components (2). HIP bonding between Cu Alloys and Ti, cryogenic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Shigeru; Ouchi, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Fukaya, Kiyoshi [Nihon Advanced Technology Ltd., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Ishiyama, Shintaro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Tsuchiya, Yoshinori; Nakajima, Hideo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    Several joints between dissimilar materials are required in the superconducting (SC) magnet system of SC linear accelerator or fusion reactor, Pure titanium (Ti) is one of candidate materials for a jacket of SC coil of fusion reactor because Ti is non-magnetic material and has a feature that its thermal expansion is similar to SC material in addition to good corrosion resistance and workability. Also, Ti does not require strict control of environment during reaction heat treatment of SC material. Copper (Cu) or Cu-alloy is used in electrical joints and cryogenic stainless steel (SS) is used in cryogenic pipes. Therefore, it is necessary to develop new bonding techniques for joints between Ti, Cu, and SS because jacket, electrical joint and cryogenic pipe have to be bonded each other to cool SC coils. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has started to develop dissimilar material joints bonded by hot isostatic pressing (HIP), which can bring a high strength joint with good tolerance and can applied to a large or complex geometry device. HIP conditions for Cu-Ti, Cu alloy-Ti, Cu alloy-SS were investigated in this study and most stable HIP condition were evaluated by microscopic observation, tensile and bending tests at room temperature. (author)

  20. Nickel-based alloy/austenitic stainless steel dissimilar weld properties prediction on asymmetric distribution of laser energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Siyu; Ma, Guangyi; Chai, Dongsheng; Niu, Fangyong; Dong, Jinfei; Wu, Dongjiang; Zou, Helin

    2016-07-01

    A properties prediction method of Nickel-based alloy (C-276)/austenitic stainless steel (304) dissimilar weld was proposed and validated based on the asymmetric distribution of laser energy. Via the dilution level DC-276 (the ratio of the melted C-276 alloy), the relations between the weld properties and the energy offset ratio EC-276 (the ratio of the irradiated energy on the C-276 alloy) were built, and the effects of EC-276 on the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of dissimilar welds were analyzed. The element distribution Cweld and EC-276 accorded with the lever rule due to the strong convention of the molten pool. Based on the lever rule, it could be predicted that the microstructure mostly consists of γ phase in each weld, the δ-ferrite phase formation was inhibited and the intermetallic phase (P, μ) formation was promoted with the increase of EC-276. The ultimate tensile strength σb of the weld joint could be predicted by the monotonically increasing cubic polynomial model stemming from the strengthening of elements Mo and W. The corrosion potential U, corrosion current density I in the active region and EC-276 also met the cubic polynomial equations, and the corrosion resistance of the dissimilar weld was enhanced with the increasing EC-276, mainly because the element Mo could help form a steady passive film which will resist the Cl- ingress.

  1. Metal release from stainless steel powders and massive sheets--comparison and implication for risk assessment of alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg, Yolanda; Mazinanian, Neda; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2013-02-01

    Industries that place metal and alloy products on the market are required to demonstrate that they are safe for all intended uses, and that any risks to humans, animals or the environment are adequately controlled. This requires reliable and robust in vitro test procedures. The aim of this study is to compare the release of alloy constituents from stainless steel powders of different grades (focus on AISI 316L) and production routes into synthetic body fluids with the release of the same metals from massive sheets in relation to material and surface characteristics. The comparison is justified by the fact that the difference between massive surfaces and powders from a metal release/dissolution and surface perspective is not clearly elucidated within current legislations. Powders and abraded and aged (24 h) massive sheets were exposed to synthetic solutions of relevance for biological settings and human exposure routes, for periods of up to one week. Concentrations of released iron, chromium, nickel, and manganese in solution were measured, and the effect of solution pH, acidity, complexation capacity, and proteins elucidated in relation to surface oxide composition and its properties. Implications for risk assessments based on in vitro metal release data from alloys are elucidated.

  2. Passive behaviour of alloy corrosion-resistant steel Cr10Mo1 in simulating concrete pore solutions with different pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Zhiyong; Jiang, Jinyang; Sun, Wei; Song, Dan; Ma, Han; Zhang, Jianchun; Wang, Danqian

    2016-12-01

    The passive behaviour of new alloy corrosion-resistant steel Cr10Mo1 and plain carbon steel (as a comparison) in simulating concrete pore solutions of different pH (ranging from 13.5 to 9.0) under open circuit potential conditions, was evaluated by various electrochemical techniques: potentiodynamic polarization, capacitance measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The chemical composition and structure of passive films were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The electrochemical responses of passive films show that Cr10Mo1 steel has an increasing passivity with pH decreasing while carbon steel dose conversely, revealing carbonation does no negative effect on passivation of the corrosion-resistant steel. SIMS reveals that the passive film on the corrosion-resistant steel presents a bilayer structure: an outer layer mainly consisting of Fe oxides and hydroxides, and an inner layer enriched in Cr species, while only a Fe-concentrated layer for carbon steel. According to the XPS analysis results, as the pH decreases, more stable and protective Cr oxides are enriched in the film on Cr10Mo1 steel while Fe oxides gradually decompose. Higher content of Cr oxides in the film layer provides Cr10Mo1 corrosion-resistant steel more excellent passivity at lower pH.

  3. Tensile Strength of Welded Joint of 1Cr18Ni9 Stainless Steel and Nb-1Zr Alloy Jointed by Electron Beam Self-material Brazing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Compared with Nb-1Zr alloy stainless steels have a quite difference in melting point, thermalphysical and electromagnetism properties etc.. Therefore, it is very difficulty to joint by melting weldingmethod. Electron beam self-brazing method is an accepted method to use for this kind of welding. Make

  4. Creep-Rupture Properties and Corrosion Behaviour of 21/4 Cr-1 Mo Steel and Hastelloy X-Alloys in Simulated HTGR Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystrup, Aage; Rittenhouse, P. L.; DiStefano, J. R.

    Hastelloy X and 2/sup 1///sub 4/ Cr-1 Mo steel are being considered as structural alloys for components of a High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) system. Among other mechanical properties, the creep behavior of these materials in HTGR primary coolant helium must be established to form part ...

  5. Metal-induced artifacts in computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging: comparison of a biodegradable magnesium alloy versus titanium and stainless steel controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filli, Lukas [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Luechinger, Roger [University and ETH Zurich, Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Zurich (Switzerland); Frauenfelder, Thomas; Guggenberger, Roman; Farshad-Amacker, Nadja; Andreisek, Gustav [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Beck, Stefan [Synthes GmbH, Zuchwil (Switzerland)

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate metal artifacts induced by biodegradable magnesium - a new class of degradable biomaterial that is beginning to enter the orthopedic routine - on CT and MRI compared to standard titanium and steel controls. Different pins made of titanium, stainless steel, and biodegradable magnesium alloys were scanned using a second-generation dual-energy multidetector CT and a 1.5-T MR scanner. In CT, quantitative assessment of artifacts was performed by two independent readers by measuring the noise in standardized regions of interest close to the pins. In MRI, the artifact diameter was measured. Interobserver agreement was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficients. Artifacts were compared using Mann Whitney U tests. In comparison to stainless steel, biodegradable magnesium alloys induced significantly fewer artifacts in both 1.5-T MRI (p = 0.019-0.021) and CT (p = 0.003-0.006). Compared to titanium, magnesium induced significantly less artifact-related noise in CT (p = 0.003-0.008). Although artifacts were less on MRI for biodegradable magnesium compared to titanium, this result was not statistically significant. Biodegradable magnesium alloys induce substantially fewer artifacts in CT compared to standard titanium and stainless steel, and fewer artifacts in MRI for the comparison with stainless steel. (orig.)

  6. Surface modification of the X40CrMoV5-1 steel by laser alloying and PVD coatings deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Lukaszkowicz

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The paper presents the influence of alloying with NbC powder by the use of a high-power diode laser and TiAlN, AlSiCrN and TiCN gradient coatings deposition by PVD process on microstructure and hardness of the X40CrMoV5-1 steel surface layer.Design/methodology/approach: Microstructure was characterised using optical metallography, scanning and transmission electron microscopy.Findings: In the effect of laser alloying with powders of carbide NbC occurs size reduction of microstructure as well as dispersion hardening through fused in but partially dissolved carbides and consolidation through enrichment of surface layer in alloying additions coming from dissolving carbides. The structure of the PVD coatings consisted of fine crystallites while their average size fitted within the range of 15-50 nm, depending on the coating type. The coatings demonstrated columnar structure.Research limitations/implications: It is necessary to continue the research to determine alloying parameters for demanded properties of hot work tool steels surface layers. Further investigations should be concentrated on the determination of the thermal fatigue resistance of the layers.Practical implications: Good properties of the PVD coatings and the laser treatment make these layers suitable for various technical and industrial applications.Originality/value: Laser alloying by using different carbide powders and HPDL laser is a new way to improve the structure and mechanical properties of the hot work tool steels.

  7. Alloy Design and Development of Cast Cr-W-V Ferritic Steels for Improved High-Temperature Strength for Power Generation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R L; Maziasz, P J; Vitek, J M; Evans, N D; Hashimoto, N

    2006-09-23

    Economic and environmental concerns demand that the power-generation industry seek increased efficiency for gas turbines. Higher efficiency requires higher operating temperatures, with the objective temperature for the hottest sections of new systems {approx} 593 C, and increasing to {approx} 650 C. Because of their good thermal properties, Cr-Mo-V cast ferritic steels are currently used for components such as rotors, casings, pipes, etc., but new steels are required for the new operating conditions. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed new wrought Cr-W-V steels with 3-9% Cr, 2-3% W, 0.25% V (compositions are in wt.%), and minor amounts of additional elements. These steels have the strength and toughness required for turbine applications. Since cast alloys are expected to behave differently from wrought material, work was pursued to develop new cast steels based on the ORNL wrought compositions. Nine casting test blocks with 3, 9, and 11% Cr were obtained. Eight were Cr-W-V-Ta-type steels based on the ORNL wrought steels; the ninth was COST CB2, a 9Cr-Mo-Co-V-Nb cast steel, which was the most promising cast steel developed in a European alloy-development program. The COST CB2 was used as a control to which the new compositions were compared, and this also provided a comparison between Cr-W-V-Ta and Cr-Mo-V-Nb compositions. Heat treatment studies were carried out on the nine castings to determine normalizing-and-tempering treatments. Microstructures were characterized by both optical and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Tensile, impact, and creep tests were conducted. Test results on the first nine cast steel compositions indicated that properties of the 9Cr-Mo-Co-V-Nb composition of COST CB2 were better than those of the 3Cr-, 9Cr-, and 11Cr-W-V-Ta steels. Analysis of the results of this first iteration using computational thermodynamics raised the question of the effectiveness in cast steels of the Cr-W-V-Ta combination versus the Cr

  8. Effect of hydrazine on general corrosion of carbon and low-alloyed steels in pressurized water reactor secondary side water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Järvimäki, Sari [Fortum Ltd, Loviisa Power Plant, Loviisa (Finland); Saario, Timo; Sipilä, Konsta [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd., Nuclear Safety, P.O. Box 1000, FIN-02044 VTT (Finland); Bojinov, Martin, E-mail: martin@uctm.edu [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, Kl. Ohridski Blvd, 8, 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • The effect of hydrazine on the corrosion of steel in secondary side water investigated by in situ and ex situ techniques. • Oxide grown on steel in 100 ppb hydrazine shows weaker protective properties – higher corrosion rates. • Possible explanation of the accelerating effect of higher concentrations of hydrazine on flow assisted corrosion offered. - Abstract: The effect of hydrazine on corrosion rate of low-alloyed steel (LAS) and carbon steel (CS) was studied by in situ and ex situ techniques under pressurized water reactor secondary side water chemistry conditions at T = 228 °C and pH{sub RT} = 9.2 (adjusted by NH{sub 3}). It is found that hydrazine injection to a maximum level of 5.06 μmol l{sup −1} onto surfaces previously oxidized in ammonia does not affect the corrosion rate of LAS or CS. This is confirmed also by plant measurements at Loviisa NPP. On the other hand, hydrazine at the level of 3.1 μmol l{sup −1} decreases markedly the amount and the size of deposited oxide crystals on LAS and CS surface. In addition, the oxide grown in the presence of 3.1 μmol l{sup −1} hydrazine is somewhat less protective and sustains a higher corrosion rate compared to an oxide film grown without hydrazine. These observations could explain the accelerating effect of higher concentrations of hydrazine found in corrosion studies of LAS and CS.

  9. Tool degradation during sheet metal forming of three stainless steel alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadman, Boel; Nielsen, Peter Søe; Wiklund, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate if changes in tool design and tool surface preparation are needed when low-Ni stainless steels are used instead of austenitic stainless steels, the effect on tool degradation in the form of galling was investigated with three different types of stainless steel. The resistance to tool...... degradation was analysed by the strip reduction test, simulating resistance to galling during ironing. It was shown that the surface condition of both the tools and the sheet metal was of importance to the galling resistance. Numerical simulations of the experimental tests were compared with the experimental...

  10. Characterization of transition behavior in SA508 Gr.4N Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steels with microstructural alteration by Ni and Cr contents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ki-Hyoung; Park, Sang-gyu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Nuclear Materials Research Division, KAERI, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min-Chul, E-mail: mckim@kaeri.re.kr [Nuclear Materials Research Division, KAERI, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Bong-Sang [Nuclear Materials Research Division, KAERI, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Wee, Dang-Moon [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-25

    Highlights: {yields} We offer information for determining optimum alloying contents of SA508 Gr.4N steel. {yields} This study shows improvement of toughness with increasing Ni and Cr contents. {yields} Ni content is more effective on the impact toughness than on the fracture toughness. {yields} Cr content is more effective on the fracture toughness. {yields} We offer detailed information on relationship between toughness and microstructure. - Abstract: SA508 Gr.4N Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel, in which Ni and Cr contents are higher than in commercial reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels, may be a candidate RPV material with the improved strength and toughness due to its tempered martensitic microstructure. This study aims at assessing the effects of microstructural factors with alloying element contents on the transition properties of Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steels. Model alloys with different Ni and Cr contents were fabricated and their Charpy impact toughness and fracture toughness were examined in the transition region according to ASTM E23 and E1921 standard procedures, respectively. The test results showed extensive improvements of both impact toughness and fracture toughness with increasing Ni and Cr contents. However, Ni content was more effective on the impact toughness than on the fracture toughness, while Cr content was more effective on the fracture toughness. In order to identify a difference in effects of alloying elements contents on the fracture toughness and impact toughness, the relations between the transition properties and the scale of the microstructural features such as packets and carbides are discussed in detail.

  11. Alloying design of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel for long life FBRs core materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukai, S.; Harada, M.; Okada, H.; Inoue, M.; Nomura, S.; Shikakura, S.; Asabe, K.; Nishida, T.; Fujiwara, M.

    1993-09-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels with excellent swelling resistance and superior high temperature strength are prospective cladding materials for advanced fast breeder reactors. The addition of Ti in 13Cr-3W ODS ferritic steels improved the high temperature strength remarkably by the formation of uniformly distributed ultra-fine oxide particles. ODS ferritic steels have a bamboo-like grain structure and a strong deformation texture. The decrease of creep rupture strength in the bi-axial direction compared to the uni-axial direction is attributed mainly to this unique bamboo grain structure. Nearly equivalent creep rupture strength for both bi-axial and uni-axial direction was successfully attained by introducing the α to γ transformation in ODS martensitic steel.

  12. Conditions of structure formation in sparingly alloyed steels intended for service under enhanced wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krylova, S. E.; Gryzunov, V. I.; Firsova, N. V.; Sokolov, S. O.

    2011-09-01

    A new armor lining steel 100Kh3G2MTR is fabricated and investigated. Different regimes of heat treatment of the steel are studied for the purpose of achieving optimal characteristics of abrasive and shock-abrasive resistance in combination with enhanced surface hardness with satisfactory strength and impact toughness of the metallic matrix. Astructural analysis is performed and the mechanism of phase transformations in the surface layer in the course of heat treatment and in service is described.

  13. Experimental Test of Stainless Steel Wire Mesh and Aluminium Alloy With Glass Fiber Reinforcement Hybrid Composite

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    At present, composite materials are mostly used in aircraft structural components, because of their excellent properties like lightweight, high strength to weight ratio, high stiffness, and corrosion resistance and less expensive. In this experimental work, the mechanical properties of laminate, this is reinforced with stainless steel wire mesh, aluminum sheet metal, perforated aluminum sheet metal and glass fibers to be laminate and investigated. The stainless steel wire mesh and...

  14. THE USE OF OXIDES OF NON-FERROUS METALS FOR ECONOMICAL ALLOYING OF STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Rimoshevski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The research is made to compare characteristics of thermodynamic data on restitution of oxides Ni, Mo and W through slag phase and to evaluate experimental data of melting and alloying in superpower arc furnaces.

  15. Analysis of fracture toughness in transition temperature region of a Mn-Mo-Ni low-alloy steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Ho; Hwang, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sung Hak [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-08-01

    This study is concerned with the analysis of fracture toughness in the transition region of a Mn-Mo-Ni low-alloy steel according to ASTM E1921 standard test method. Elastic-plastic cleavage fracture toughness, K{sub Jc} was determined by 3-point bend tests, using precracked Charpy V-notch (PCVN) specimens, and then the measured K{sub Jc} values were interpreted by the 3-parameter Weibull distribution with a theoretical slope of 4. fractographic observation indicated that the critical distance from a precrack tip to a cleavage initiation site linearly increased with increasing the critical J(J{sub c}) value, and that the stretch zone width had a good correlation with K{sub Jc} value, irrespective of testing temperature. Relationship between J{sub c} and critical distance, local fracture stress, and plane strain fracture toughness were discussed on the basis of the cleavage fracture behavior in the transition temperature region.

  16. Effect of Multistage Heat Treatment on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingdong; Wen, Haiming; Zhang, Han; Gu, Jianfeng; Li, Chuanwei; Lavernia, Enrique J.

    2016-05-01

    The influence of Cu-rich precipitates (CRPs) and reverted austenite (RA) on the strength and impact toughness of a Cu-containing 3.5 wt pct Ni high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel after various heat treatments involving quenching (Q), lamellarization (L), and tempering (T) is studied using electron back-scatter diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and atom probe tomography. The QT sample exhibits high strength but low impact toughness, whereas the QL samples mostly possess improved impact toughness but moderate strength, but the QLT samples again have degraded impact toughness due to additional tempering. The dispersion of nanoscale CRPs, which are formed during tempering, is responsible for the enhanced strength but simultaneously leads to the degraded impact toughness. The RA formed during lamellarization contributes to the improved impact toughness. Based on the present study, new heat treatment schedules are proposed to balance strength and impact toughness by optimizing the precipitation of CRPs and RA.

  17. CORROSION BEHAVIORS OF THE EXPOSED SIDE AND UNDERSIDE OF LOW ALLOY WEATHERING STEEL IN QINGDAO AND WANNING FOR 18 MONTHS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    For 18 months, a newly developed low alloy weathering steel has been exposed in two coastal sites (Qingdao in the north China, Wanning in the south China). The different corrosion behaviors of the exposed side and the underside of the samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), polarization curve, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and N2 adsorp-tion approach. It was found that the samples exhibited higher corrosion rate in Wan-ning than that in Qingdao. The underside of the samples corrodes more seriously than the exposed side in Qingdao, whereas the result in Wanning is just the reverse.The protection performance of rust layers mainly depends on its compactness and the enrichment of Cu and Cr is a secondary causation. The different compactness of rust layers in the exposed side and the underside originates from different corrosion conditions of the two sides.

  18. Friction Stir Welding of Stainless Steel to Al Alloy: Effect of Thermal Condition on Weld Nugget Microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, M.; Gupta, R. K.; Husain, M. M.

    2014-02-01

    Joining of dissimilar materials is always a global challenge. Sometimes it is unavoidable to execute multifarious activities by a single component. In the present investigation, 6061 aluminum alloy and 304 stainless steel were joined by friction stir welding (FSW) at different tool rotational rates. Welded joints were characterized in optical and scanning electron microscopes. Reaction products in the stirring zone (SZ) were confirmed through X-ray diffraction. Joint strength was evaluated by tensile testing. It was found that the increment in average heat input and temperature at the weld nugget (WN) facilitated iron enrichment near the interface. Enhancement in the concentration of iron shifted the nature of intermetallics from the Fe2Al5 to Fe-rich end of the Fe-Al binary phase diagram. The peak microhardness and ultimate tensile strength were found to be maxima at the intermediate tool rotational rate, where Fe3Al and FeAl2 appeared along with Fe2Al5.

  19. Pitting corrosion resistance and bond strength of stainless steel overlay by friction surfacing on high strength low alloy steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Singh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface modification is essential for improving the service properties of components. Cladding is one of the most widely employed methods of surface modification. Friction surfacing is a candidate process for depositing the corrosion resistant coatings. Being a solid state process, it offers several advantages over conventional fusion based surfacing process. The aim of this work is to identify the relationship between the input variables and the process response and develop the predictive models that can be used in the design of new friction surfacing applications. In the current work, austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 was friction surfaced on high strength low alloy steel substrate. Friction surfacing parameters, such as mechtrode rotational speed, feed rate of substrate and axial force on mechtrode, play a major role in determining the pitting corrosion resistance and bond strength of friction surfaced coatings. Friction surfaced coating and base metal were tested for pitting corrosion by potentio-dynamic polarization technique. Coating microstructure was characterized using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Coatings in the as deposited condition exhibited strain-induced martensite in austenitic matrix. Pitting resistance of surfaced coatings was found to be much lower than that of mechtrode material and superior to that of substrate. A central composite design with three factors (mechtrode rotational speed, substrate traverse speed, axial load on mechtrode and five levels was chosen to minimize the number of experimental conditions. Response surface methodology was used to develop the model. In the present work, an attempt has been made to develop a mathematical model to predict the pitting corrosion resistance and bond strength by incorporating the friction surfacing process parameters.

  20. Laser Welding Characterization of Kovar and Stainless Steel Alloys as Suitable Materials for Components of Photonic Devices Packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadhali, M. M. A.; Zainal, Saktioto J.; Munajat, Y.; Jalil, A.; Rahman, R.

    2010-03-01

    The weldability of Kovar and stainless steel alloys by Nd:YAG laser beam is studied through changing of some laser beam parameters. It has been found that there is a suitable interaction of the pulsed laser beam of low power laser pulse with both the two alloys. The change of thermophysical properties with absorbed energy from the laser pulse is discussed in this paper which reports the suitability of both Kovar and stainless steel 304 as the base materials for photonic devices packaging. We used laser weld system (LW4000S from Newport) which employs Nd:YAG laser system with two simultaneous beams output for packaging 980 nm high power laser module. Results of changing both laser spot weld width and penetration depth with changing both the pulse peak power density, pulse energy and pulse duration show that there are good linear relationships between laser pulse energy or peak power density and pulse duration with laser spot weld dimensions( both laser spot weld width and penetration depth). Therefore we concluded that there should be an optimization for both the pulse peak power and pulse duration to give a suitable aspect ratio (laser spot width to penetration depth) for achieving the desired welds with suitable penetration depth and small spot width. This is to reduce the heat affected zone (HAZ) which affects the sensitive optical components. An optimum value of the power density in the order of 105 w/cm2 found to be suitable to induce melting in the welded joints without vaporization. The desired ratio can also be optimized by changing the focus position on the target material as illustrated from our measurements. A theoretical model is developed to simulate the temperature distribution during the laser pulse heating and predict the penetration depth inside the material. Samples have been investigated using SEM with EDS. The metallographic measurements on the weld spot show a suitable weld yield with reasonable weld width to depth ratio.

  1. An experimental study on the effects of compressive stress on the fatigue crack growth of low-alloy steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D.P.; Hoppe, R.G. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., West Mifflin, PA (United States). Bettis Atomic Power Lab.); Hechmer, J.L. (Babcock Wilcox Co., Barberton, OH (United States)); James, B.A. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Metallurgy Dept.)

    1994-08-01

    A series of fatigue crack growth rate tests was conducted in order to study the effects of negative stress ratio upon the fatigue crack growth rate of low-alloy steel in air environment. The tests used four-point bend specimens in order to simulate linear stress distributions typical of many pressure vessel applications. This type of testing adds to the knowledge on negative stress ratio effects for low-alloy steels that in the past have been obtained from uniform tension-compression tests. Additionally, the applied bending stress range was varied from low values of applied stress to high values of applied stress over twice the yield strength. Load control was used for tests for which the stress range was less than twice the yield strength and deflection control was used for the higher stress range tests. The crack geometries involved were both short and long fatigue cracks started at notches and tight fatigue cracks for which crack closure could occur over the full crack face. The results are presented in terms of the stress intensity factor ratio R = K[sub MIN]/K[sub MAX]. The negative R-ratio test results were correlated to an equation of the form da/dN = C[[delta]K/(A-R)][sup n] where A, C and n are curve-fitting parameters. It was found that the effects of negative R-ratio on the fatigue crack growth rates for even the high stress range tests could be bounded by correlating the foregoing equation to only positive R-ratio test results and extending the resulting equation into the negative R-ratio regime.

  2. Influence of mill scale and rust layer on the corrosion resistance of low-alloy steel in simulated concrete pore solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jin-jie; Ming, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic potentiodynamic polarization measurements, and scanning electron microscopy in conjunction with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to investigate the influence of mill scale and rust layer on the passivation capability and chloride-induced corrosion behaviors of conventional low-carbon (LC) steel and low-alloy (LA) steel in simulated concrete pore solution. The results show that mill scale exerts different influences on the corrosion resistance of both steels at various electrochemical stages. We propose that the high long-term corrosion resistance of LA steel is mainly achieved through the synergistic effect of a gradually formed compact, adherent and well-distributed Cr-enriched inner rust layer and the physical barrier protection effect of mill scale.

  3. Influence of processing parameters on lattice parameters in laser deposited tool alloy steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, G.F., E-mail: gfsun82@gmail.com [Center for Laser-Aided Intelligent Manufacturing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109 (United States); School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu, 212013 (China); Bhattacharya, S. [Center for Laser-Aided Intelligent Manufacturing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109 (United States); Dinda, G.P.; Dasgupta, A. [Center for Advanced Technologies, Focus: Hope, Detroit, MI, 48238 (United States); Mazumder, J. [Center for Laser-Aided Intelligent Manufacturing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: {yields} Orientation relationships among phases in the DMD are given. {yields} Martensite lattice parameters increased with laser specific energy. {yields} Austenite lattice parameters decreased with laser specific energy. - Abstract: Laser aided direct metal deposition (DMD) has been used to form AISI 4340 steel coating on the AISI 4140 steel substrate. The microstructural property of the DMD coating was analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry. Microhardness of the DMD was measured with a Vickers microhardness tester. Results indicate that DMD can be used to form dense AISI 4340 steel coatings on AISI 4140 steel substrate. The DMD coating is mainly composed of martensite and retained austenite. Consecutive thermal cycles have a remarkable effect on the microstructure of the plan view of the DMD coating and on the corresponding microhardness distribution. Orientation relationships among austenite, martensite and cementite in the DMD coating followed the ones in conventional heat treated steels. As the laser specific energy decreased, cooling rate increased, and martensite peaks broadened and shifted to a lower Bragg's angle. Also martensite lattice parameters increased and austenite lattice parameters decreased due to the above parameter change.

  4. Effect of copper precipitates on the toughness of low alloy steels for pressure boundary components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foehl, J.; Willer, D.; Katerbau, K.H. [Materialpruefungsanstalt, Univ. Stuttgart (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The ferritic bainitic steel 15NiCuMoNb5 (WB 36)is widely used for pressure boundary components. Due to the high copper content which leads to precipitation hardening high strength and toughness are characteristic for this type of steel. However, in the initial state, there is still a high amount of dissolved copper in an oversaturated state which makes the steel susceptible to thermal ageing. Ageing and annealing experiments were performed, and the change in microstructure was investigated by small angle neutron scattering (SANS), measurements of the residual electric resistance and hardness measurements. A correlation between micro structural changes and changes in mechanical properties could be established. It could clearly be shown that significant effects on strength and toughness have to be considered when the size of the copper rich precipitates vary in the range from 1.2 to 2.2 nm in radius. The changes in microstructure affect both, the Carpy impact transition temperature and the fracture toughness qualitatively and quantitatively in a similar way. The investigations have contributed to a better understanding of precipitation hardening by copper not only for this type of steel but also for copper containing steels and weld subjected to neutron irradiation. (orig.)

  5. Analysis of fracture toughness in the transition-temperature region of an Mn-Mo-Ni low-alloy steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangho; Hwang, Byoungchul; Lee, Sunghak; Lee, Sunghak

    2003-06-01

    This study is concerned with the analysis of fracture toughness in the transition region of an Mn-Mo-Ni low-alloy steel, in accordance with the ASTM E1921 standard test method. Elastic-plastic cleavage fracture toughness ( K Jc ) was determined by three-point bend tests, using precracked Charpy V-notch (PCVN) specimens, and relationships between K Jc , the critical component of J ( J c ), critical distance ( X c ), stretch-zone width (SZW), local fracture stress, and plane-strain fracture toughness ( K Ic were discussed on the basis of the cleavage fracture behavior in the transition region. The master curve and the 95 pct confidence curves well explained the variation in the measured K Jc , and the Weibull slope measured on the Weibull plots was consistent with the theoretical slope of 4. Fractographic observation indicated that X c linearly increased with increasing J c , and that the SZW had a good correlation with K Jc , irrespective of the test temperature. In addition, the local fracture stress was independent of the test temperature, because the tempered bainitic steel used in this study showed a propagation-controlled cleavage fracture behavior.

  6. Effects of grain size on fracture toughness in transition temperature region of Mn-Mo-Ni low-alloy steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sangho; Lee, Sunghak; Lee, Bong Sang

    2003-10-25

    An investigation was conducted into the effect of grain size on fracture toughness in the transition temperature region of Mn-Mo-Ni low-alloy steels used for nuclear pressure vessels. Three kinds of steels with different austenite grain sizes (AGS) were fabricated by varying the contents of Al and N, and their microstructures and mechanical properties were examined. Elastic-plastic cleavage fracture toughness, K{sub Jc}, was determined by three-point bend tests of precracked Charpy V-notch (PCVN) specimens according to ASTM E1921 standard test method. When the AGS decreased, the total number of carbides increased, while the size and the aspect ratio of carbides decreased. Local fracture stresses, estimated from a theoretical stress distribution in front of a crack tip, were found to be mainly determined by the 92nd% size of carbides. Cross-sectional areas beneath fracture surfaces were observed to understand microstructural features to affect the cleavage crack propagation behavior. The results showed that measured cleavage fracture units were smaller than AGSs, indicating that packet boundaries as well as austenite grain boundaries played an important role in the cleavage crack propagation. Based on the electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) results, the cleavage fracture units could also be matched with the effective grain sizes determined by the misorientation tolerance angle of 25 deg.

  7. Relationship between grain size and fracture toughness in transition region of Mn-Mo-Ni low-alloy steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Ho; Lee, Sung Hak [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Yong Jun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-01

    The present study aims at interpreting the effect of grain size on fracture toughness in the transition region of Mn-Mo-Ni low-alloy steels. Three kinds of steels with different austenite grain sizes were fabricated, and their microstructures and mechanical properties were examined. Elastic-plastic cleavage fracture toughness, K{sub Jc}, was determined by 3-point bend tests of precracked Charpy V-notch (PCVN) specimens according to ASTM E1921 standard test method. When the austenite grain size decreased, the total number of carbides increased, while the size and the aspect ratio of carbides decreased. Local fracture stresses, estimated from a theoretical stress distribution in front of a crack tip, were found to be mainly determined by the 92%th size of carbides. Cross-sectional areas beneath fracture surfaces were observed to understand microstructural features to affect the cleavage crack propagation behavior. The results showed that measured cleavage fracture units were smaller than austenite grain sizes, indicating that packet boundaries as well as austenite grain boundaries played an important role in the cleavage crack propagation. Based on the electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) results, the cleavage fracture units could also be matched with the effective grain sizes determined by the misorientation tolerance angle of 25 degree.

  8. Effect of cyclic treatment on the formation of a fragmented structure in a sparingly alloyed martensitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatchikova, T. I.; Yakovleva, I. L.; Delgado Reina, S. Yu.; Plokhikh, A. I.

    2016-11-01

    Methods of metallography and transmission electron microscopy were used to study the structure of a high-alloy low-carbon steel of martensitic VKS-10 class subjected to cyclic treatment according to different regimes. It has been found that the warm deformation in the α state at 700°C causes the fragmentation of the structure; however, the decomposition of the α solid solution and the precipitation of coarse carbides leads to a significant decrease in the strength. It has been shown that 12 cycles of treatment, including austenitizing at 1000°C, rolling at 700°C, and subsequent γ → α transformation during rapid cooling do not lead to a noticeable fragmentation of the structure. It has been found that the deformation of the overcooled austenite by rolling carried out using 12 cycles in the range of temperatures of 700-500°C and subsequent γ → α transformation lead to the formation of a fragmented structure with a large fraction of fine grains with a size less than 0.5 μm. This treatment and the subsequent tempering at 530°C for 1 h allow us to increase the strength and hardness of the VKS-10 steel at an insignificant decrease in the plasticity.

  9. Measurement of residual stresses in a multi-pass low alloy ferritic steel weld using X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, E.J.; Exworthy, L.F.; Flewitt, P.E.J. [Magnox Generation, Berkeley (United Kingdom); Hallam, K. [Interface Analysis Centre, Univ. of Bristol (United Kingdom); Bell, W. [Mitsui Babcock Energy Ltd, Renfrew (United Kingdom)

    2000-07-01

    A trial part through-section excavation manual metal arc repair weld, designed with a view to minimising residual stresses, was prepared by using a critical combination of weld metal strength, bead size and deposition pattern. The repair was in a low alloy ferritic CrMoV steel plate, and the weldment was made using a lower strength C-Mn steel weld metal. Residual stresses have been measured to a high spatial resolution, 1.5 mm, across the weldment using the X-ray diffraction technique with Cr K{alpha} X-radiation. Peak tensile stresses have been identified in the heat affected zone in the parent plate adjacent to the weld metal. Further measurements have been made using the rosette strain gauge centre hole relaxation and deep hole drilling techniques. Results from the experimental techniques are compared and the measured residual stress profiles are discussed with respect to the predictions of a finite element model for this particular multi-pass repair weld. (orig.)

  10. The use of stainless steel and nickel alloys as low-cost cathodes in microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Selembo, Priscilla A.

    2009-05-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are used to produce hydrogen gas from the current generated by bacteria, but low-cost alternatives are needed to typical cathode materials (carbon cloth, platinum and Nafion™). Stainless steel A286 was superior to platinum sheet metal in terms of cathodic hydrogen recovery (61% vs. 47%), overall energy recovery (46% vs. 35%), and maximum volumetric hydrogen production rate (1.5 m3 m-3 day-1 vs. 0.68 m3 m-3 day-1) at an applied voltage of 0.9 V. Nickel 625 was better than other nickel alloys, but it did not perform as well as SS A625. The relative ranking of these materials in MEC tests was in agreement with cyclic voltammetry studies. Performance of the stainless steel and nickel cathodes was further increased, even at a lower applied voltage (0.6 V), by electrodepositing a nickel oxide layer onto the sheet metal (cathodic hydrogen recovery, 52%, overall energy recovery, 48%; maximum volumetric hydrogen production rate, 0.76 m3 m-3 day-1). However, performance of the nickel oxide cathodes decreased over time due to a reduction in mechanical stability of the oxides (based on SEM-EDS analysis). These results demonstrate that non-precious metal cathodes can be used in MECs to achieve hydrogen gas production rates better than those obtained with platinum. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A study on improvement of low alloy steel for nuclear power plant through enhancement of fatigue resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Kwan Seon; Lee, H. C. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-08-01

    The goal of this research project is to improve the low alloy steel for nuclear power plants made in Korea through enhancement of fatigue resistance. In order to achieve this goal, the characterization of SA508-3 steels used pressure vessel, YGN-3,4,5, UCN-3, 4 and JSW was carried out. The major difference of the different products was found to be the grain size. The domestic products showed thick interlath carbide layers which different from the JSW product. The fatigue crack propagation rates were found to be lower in aqueous solution than in air and the difference in the propagation rates increased in the near-threshold region. The fatigue crack propagation rates were significantly lower in vacuum than in other environments. In air and vacuum, the crack closure levels were higher in the near-threshold region and they decreased and reached to the constant values with increasing {delta}K. The crack closure level in aqueous solution was found to be higher than that in air and it increased initially with increasing the exposure time to the solution and reached to the maximum value with increasing {delta}K. 31 refs., 13 tabs., 63 figs. (author)

  12. Wear behavior of the surface alloyed AISI 1020 steel with Fe-Nb-B by TIG welding technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilinc, B., E-mail: bkilinc@sakarya.edu.tr; Durmaz, M.; Abakay, E. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Institute of Arts and Sciences, SakaryaUniversity, Esentepe Campus, 54187Sakarya (Turkey); Sen, U.; Sen, S. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Sakarya University, Esentepe Campus, 54187 Sakarya (Turkey)

    2015-03-30

    Weld overlay coatings also known as hardfacing is a method which involves melting of the alloys and solidification for applied coatings. Recently hardfacing by welding has become a commonly used technique for improvement of material performance in extreme (high temperature, impact/abrasion, erosion, etc.) conditions.In the present study, the coatings were produced from a mixture of ferrous niobium, ferrous boron and iron powders in the ranges of -45µm particle size with different ratio. Fe{sub 12}Nb{sub 5}B{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}NbBalloys were coated on the AISI 1020 steel surface by TIG welding. The phases formed in the coated layer are Fe{sub 2}B, NbB{sub 2}, NbFeB and Fe0,2 Nb{sub 0,8} phases. The hardness of the presence phases are changing between 1689±85 HV{sub 0.01}, and 181±7 HV{sub 0.1}. Microstructural examinations were realized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The wear and friction behaviors of Fe{sub 12}Nb{sub 5}B{sub 3} and Fe2NbB realized on the AISI 1020 steel were investigated by the technique of TIG welding by using ball-on-disk arrangement against alumina ball.

  13. Determination of biocorrosion of low alloy steel by sulfate-reducing Desulfotomaculum sp. isolated from crude oil field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cetin, D.; Doenmez, G. [Faculty of Science, Department of Biology, Ankara University, Tandogan, 06100, Ankara (Turkey); Bilgic, S. [Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Ankara University, Tandogan, 06100, Ankara (Turkey); Doenmez, S. [Faculty of Engineering, Department of Food Engineering, Ankara University, Diskapi, 06110 Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-11-15

    In this study corrosion behavior of low alloy steel, in the presence of anaerobic sulfate-reducing Desulfotomaculum sp. which was isolated from an oil production well, was investigated. In order to determine corrosion rates and mechanisms, mass loss measurements and electrochemical polarization studies were performed without and with bacteria in the culture medium. Scanning electron microscopic observations and energy dispersive X-ray spectra (EDS) analysis were made on steel coupons. The effect of iron concentration on corrosion behavior was determined by Tafel extrapolation method. In a sterile culture medium, as the FeSO{sub 4} . 7H{sub 2}O concentration increased, corrosion potential (E{sub cor}) values shifted towards more anodic potentials and corrosion current density (I{sub cor}) values increased considerably. After inoculation of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), E{sub cor} shifted towards cathodic values. I{sub cor} values increased with increasing incubation time for 10 and 100 mg/L concentrations of FeSO{sub 4} . 7H{sub 2}O. Results have shown that the corrosion activity changed due to several factors such as bacterial metabolites, ferrous sulfide, hydrogen sulfide, iron phosphide, and cathodic depolarization effect. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. Decarburization of ferrochrome and high alloy steels with optimized gas and slag phases towards improved Cr retention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang H.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromium is a high value metal and the retention of the same during the refining of high carbon ferrochrome as well as high alloy steel has significant economic and environmental impacts. The loss of chromium during the decarburization is generally minimized using argon-oxygen mixtures thereby reducing the oxygen partial pressure (PO2 of the oxidant gas. In the current study, experiments were carried out in an induction furnace and CO2 was introduced with the view to partly reduce PO2 and partly as an oxidizer. During these experiments, the decarburization of molten Cr-alloy was conducted using pure O2, pure CO2 or O2+CO2 mixtures. The results demonstrated that the Cr loss can be minimized under CO2 introduction. The kinetic analysis showed that the mass transfer is effective due to the production of 2CO gas molecules from one CO2 molecule during the reaction which will improve the stirring of the bath. Besides, CO2 reacts with carbon in melt is an endothermic reaction, introduction of CO2 could be a cooler during the refining process, hence the temperature could be controlled by controlling the diluting gas amount, in this case, the over heat of bath refractory could be prevented and the lifetime of refractory could be extended.

  15. A new alloy design concept for austenitic stainless steel with tungsten modification for bipolar plate application in PEMFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang Min; Kim, Kyoo Young

    The feasibility of a new alloy design concept utilizing the principle of 'tungsten bronze effect' is critically evaluated for the development of metallic bipolar plates for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). An austenitic stainless steel (ASS) is modified with W and La to improve the stability of the passive film in an acidic environment as well as to reduce the contact resistance by the tungsten bronze effect. The experimental ASS containing W and La was evaluated in a simulated PEMFC environment of H 3PO 4 and H 2SO 4 solutions at 80 °C, and the electrical property was evaluated by performing a contact resistance test. The test results show that the ASS modified with W and La has good passive film stability for corrosion resistance and low contact resistance. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis clearly suggests the possibility of the tungsten bronze effect from the change in valency state of W 6+ to W 5+ in the passive film formed on the modified ASS. The feasibility of a new alloy design concept utilizing the 'tungsten bronze effect' is well demonstrated; however, more study is highly required for the development of metallic bipolar plates of PEMFC.

  16. Microstructure and Interfacial Reactions During Vacuum Brazing of Stainless Steel to Titanium Using Ag-28 pct Cu Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laik, A.; Shirzadi, A. A.; Sharma, G.; Tewari, R.; Jayakumar, T.; Dey, G. K.

    2015-02-01

    Microstructural evolution and interfacial reactions during vacuum brazing of grade-2 Ti and 304L-type stainless steel (SS) using eutectic alloy Ag-28 wt pct Cu were investigated. A thin Ni-depleted zone of -Fe(Cr, Ni) solid solution formed on the SS-side of the braze zone (BZ). Cu from the braze alloy, in combination with the dissolved Fe and Ti from the base materials, formed a layer of ternary compound , adjacent to Ti in the BZ. In addition, four binary intermetallic compounds, CuTi, CuTi, CuTi and CuTi formed as parallel contiguous layers in the BZ. The unreacted Ag solidified as islands within the layers of CuTi and CuTi. Formation of an amorphous phase at certain locations in the BZ could be revealed. The -Ti(Cu) layer, formed due to diffusion of Cu into Ti-based material, transformed to an -Ti + CuTi eutectoid with lamellar morphology. Tensile test showed that the brazed joints had strength of 112 MPa and failed at the BZ. The possible sequence of events that led to the final microstructure and the mode of failure of these joints were delineated.

  17. Microstructure of Steel 5Cr21Mn9Ni4N Alloyed by Rare Earth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The microstructure, composition and shape of precipitated phase under as-cast and finished product state of 5Cr21Mn9Ni4N steel with different rare earth (RE) amount were studied. Mechanical properties of 5Cr21Mn9Ni4N steels withont RE addition and with RE added by 0. 2 % in mass percent were tested respectively. The results indicate that the solid solution amount of RE is about 10-6 -10-5 order of magnitude in 5Cr21Mn9Ni4N steel. Dendrite of as-cast condition is refined obviously and dimension of interstitial phase is shortened when RE is added by 0. 10%-0. 20%. But the microstructure will be coarser if surplus RE is added. Precipitated phase under finished product state distributes evenly in nearly same size with RE added by 0.2% which leads to a largely improved high temperature mechanical property.

  18. Cast, heat-resistant austenitic stainless steels having reduced alloying element content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Pankiw, Roman I [Greensburg, PA

    2010-07-06

    A cast, austenitic steel composed essentially of, expressed in weight percent of the total composition, about 0.4 to about 0.7 C, about 20 to about 30 Cr, about 20 to about 30 Ni, about 0.5 to about 1 Mn, about 0.6 to about 2 Si, about 0.05 to about 1 Nb, about 0.05 to about 1 W, about 0.05 to about 1.0 Mo, balance Fe, the steel being essentially free of Ti and Co, the steel characterized by at least one microstructural component selected from the group consisting of MC, M.sub.23C.sub.6, and M(C, N).

  19. Cast, heat-resistant austenitic stainless steels having reduced alloying element content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Pankiw, Roman I [Greensburg, PA

    2011-08-23

    A cast, austenitic steel composed essentially of, expressed in weight percent of the total composition, about 0.4 to about 0.7 C, about 20 to about 30 Cr, about 20 to about 30 Ni, about 0.5 to about 1 Mn, about 0.6 to about 2 Si, about 0.05 to about 1 Nb, about 0.05 to about 1 W, about 0.05 to about 1.0 Mo, balance Fe, the steel being essentially free of Ti and Co, the steel characterized by at least one microstructural component selected from the group consisting of MC, M.sub.23C.sub.6, and M(C, N).

  20. Brazing diamond grits onto a steel substrate using copper alloys as the filler metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S.-M.; Lin, S.-T.

    1996-12-01

    Surface-set diamond tools were fabricated by an active metal brazing process, using bronze (Cu-8.9Sn) powder and 316L stainless steel powder mixed to various ratios as the braze filler metals. The diamond grits were brazed onto a steel substrate at 1050 °C for 30 min in a dry hydrogen atmosphere. After brazing practice, an intermediate layer rich in chromium formed between the braze filler metal and diamond. A braze filler metal composed of 70 wt % bronze powder and 30 wt % stainless steel powder was found to be optimum in that the diamond grits were strongly impregnated in the filler metal by both mechanical and chemical types of holding. The diamond tools thus fabricated performed better than conventional nickel-plated diamond tools. In service, the braze filler metal wore at almost the same rate as the diamond grits, and no pullout of diamond grits or peeling of the filler metal layer took place.

  1. Effects of alloying elements on fracture toughness in the transition temperature region of base metals and simulated heat-affected zones of Mn-Mo-Ni low-alloy steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangho; Im, Young-Roc; Lee, Sunghak; Lee, Hu-Chul; Kim, Sung-Joon; Hong, Jun Hwa

    2004-07-01

    This study is concerned with the effects of alloying elements on fracture toughness in the transition temperature region of base metals and heat-affected zones (HAZs) of Mn-Mo-Ni low-alloy steels. Three kinds of steels whose compositions were varied from the composition specification of SA 508 steel (grade 3) were fabricated by vacuum-induction melting and heat treatment, and their fracture toughness was examined using an ASTM E1921 standard test method. In the steels that have decreased C and increased Mo and Ni content, the number of fine M2C carbides was greatly increased and the number of coarse M3C carbides was decreased, thereby leading to the simultaneous improvement of tensile properties and fracture toughness. Brittle martensite-austenite (M-A) constituents were also formed in these steels during cooling, but did not deteriorate fracture toughness because they were decomposed to ferrite and fine carbides after tempering. Their simulated HAZs also had sufficient impact toughness after postweld heat treatment. These findings indicated that the reduction in C content to inhibit the formation of coarse cementite and to improve toughness and the increase in Mo and Ni to prevent the reduction in hardenability and to precipitate fine M2C carbides were useful ways to improve simultaneously the tensile and fracture properties of the HAZs as well as the base metals.

  2. Stacking faults and microstrains in strain-hardened surface of nitrogen-alloyed austenitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narkevich, N.; Syrtanov, M.; Mironov, Yu.; Surikova, N.

    2016-11-01

    X-ray diffractometry has been applied to examine the effect of ultrasonic forging and frictional treatment on structural parameters and oriented microstrains responsible for the generation of residual microstresses in austenitic steel Fe-17Cr-19Mn-0.52N. The maximum stacking fault density α = 0.067 is observed in the steel surface layer of thickness 5 µm after frictional treatment. A decrease in the austenite lattice parameter after deformation treatment is associated with the change in the sign (direction) of residual stresses. Surface deformation treatment induces compression of the austenite lattice along the normal to the surface.

  3. Effects of Alloying Elements on the Concentration Profile of Equilibrium Phases in Transformation Induced Plasticity Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    With the two sublattices model, equilibrium compositions of ferrite (α) and austenite (γ) phases, as well as thevolume percent of austenite (γ) in different TRIP steels are calculated. Concentration profiles of carbon, manganese,aluminum and silicon in these steels are also estimated under the lattice fixed frame of reference so as to identifyif the equilibrium state is obtained. Through the comparison between the profiles after different time diffusion, thedistribution of elements in phases is exhibited and the complex effect due to the mutual interaction of the elementson diffusion is discussed.

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of spinodal decomposition in a ternary alloy within a three-phases field: comparison to phase transformation of ferrite in duplex stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emo, Jonathan; Pareige, Cristelle; Saillet, Sébastien; Domain, Christophe; Pareige, Philippe

    2014-06-01

    This work proposes to model phase transformations occurring in duplex stainless steels using atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo in a ternary model alloy. Kinetics are simulated in the three-phase field of a ternary system. Influence of the precipitation of the third phase on the kinetic of spinodal decomposition between the two other phases is studied in order to understand the synergy between spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation which exists in duplex stainless steels. Simulation results are compared to experimental data obtained with atom probe tomography.

  5. Impact of choice of stabilized hysteresis loop on the end result of investigation of high-strength low-alloy (HSLA steel on low cycle fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bulatović

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available High strength low-alloy steel under low cycle fatigue at a certain level of strain controlled achieve stabilized condition. During the fatigue loading stabilized hysteresis loop is determined, which typical cycle of stabilization is calculated as half number of cycles to failure. Stabilized hysteresis loop is a representative of all hysteresis and it’s used to determine all of the parameters for the assessment of low cycle fatigue. This paper shows comparison of complete strain-life curves of low cycle fatigue for two chosen stabilized hysteresis loop cycles of base metal HSLA steel marked as Nionikral 70.

  6. Stress-Corrosion Cracking in High Strength Steels and in Titanium and Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    importance that the newcomer might wonder why the question is not settled almost as the first order of business . The reason is that to prove the... Agricola and J. T. Snyder, "Stress Corrosion of Explosively Deformed High-Strength Alloys," Metals Eng. Quart. 7 (No. 3), 59 (1967). 138. P. N. Orava

  7. The Corrosion Behavior of Stainless Steels and Copper Alloys Exposed to Natural Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    significant changes of the corrosion potential (Ecw) or surface properties. Rotating cylinder experiments indicated that both E., and corrosion rates for...and inorganic chloride corrosion layer that contained alloying elements; a biof ilm; and crystalline, spherical phosphate-rich deposits. All copper...nichtrostendem Stahl und bacteria and diatoms that did not cause significant changes of the Titan entstehenden dfinnen Biofilme bestanden aus

  8. Fabrication of 13Cr-2Mo Ferritic/Martensitic Oxide-Dispersion-Strengthened Steel Components by Mechanical Alloying and Spark-Plasma Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogachev, I.; Grigoryev, E.; Khasanov, O. L.; Olevsky, E.

    2014-06-01

    The outcomes of the mechanical alloying of 13Cr-2Mo ferritic/martensitic steel and yttria (oxide-dispersion-strengthened steel) powders in a ball mill are reported in terms of the powder particle size and morphology evolution. The optimal ball mill rotation speed and the milling time are discussed. The densification kinetics of the mechanically alloyed powder during the process of spark-plasma sintering is analyzed. An optimal set of the compaction processing parameters, including the maximum temperature, the dwell time, and the heating rate, is determined. The specifics of the densification are discussed in terms of the impact of major spark-plasma sintering parameters as well as the possible phase transformations occurring during compaction processing.

  9. Technical basis for the initiation and cessation of environmentally-assisted cracking of low-alloy steels in elevated temperature PWR environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, L.A.

    1997-10-01

    The Section 11 Working Group on Flaw Evaluation of the ASME B and PV Code Committee is considering a Code Case to allow the determination of the conditions under which environmentally-assisted cracking of low-alloy steels could occur in PWR primary environments. This paper provides the technical support basis for such an EAC Initiation and Cessation Criterion by reviewing the theoretical and experimental information in support of the proposed Code Case.

  10. Corrosion Inhibition Propargyl Alcohol on Low Alloy Cr Steel in 0.5 M H2SO4 in the Absence and Presence of Potassium Iodide

    OpenAIRE

    Baghaei Ravari, Fatemeh; Heydari, Mahdi; Dadgarineghad, Athareh

    2011-01-01

    The corrosion and inhibition behaviors of low alloy Cr steel in sulfuric acid in the presence of propargyl alcohol (PA) and potassium iodide (KI) have been studied using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and Tafel polarization method. It was found that the inhibition efficiency increased with PA concentration. The addition of potassium iodide to propargyl alcohol in solution increased the inhibition efficiency of propargyl alcohol. A synergistic effect was observed between KI and P...

  11. Corrosion Inhibition Propargyl Alcohol on Low Alloy Cr Steel in 0.5 M H2SO4 in the Absence and Presence of Potassium Iodide

    OpenAIRE

    Baghaei Ravari, Fatemeh; Heydari, Mahdi; Dadgarineghad, Athareh

    2010-01-01

    The corrosion and inhibition behaviors of low alloy Cr steel in sulfuric acid in the presence of propargyl alcohol (PA) and potassium iodide (KI) have been studied using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and Tafel polarization method. It was found that the inhibition efficiency increased with PA concentration. The addition of potassium iodide to propargyl alcohol in solution increased the inhibition efficiency of propargyl alcohol. A synergistic effect was observed between KI and P...

  12. Mechanical properties and structure of the Cr-Mo-V low-alloyed steel after long-term service in creep condition

    OpenAIRE

    J. Dobrzański; A. Zieliński; H. Krztoń

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: of this paper is to present the changes of the mechanical properties and structure in material components of the power station boiler after long-term creep service made of Cr-Mo-V low-alloyed steel.Design/methodology/approach: The investigated material has been obtained from the Polish power stations. All examined elements have exceeded their assessed life of 100 000 hours. Mechanical properties and structure examinations were carried out on materials after long-term service in creep...

  13. THE INVESTIGATION ON PLASMA ARC TREATMENT OF CHROMIUM PLATED ALLOY STRUCTURE STEEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.M. Fan; J.W. Huang; K.H. Wang; Q. Liu

    2005-01-01

    The technology of plasma arc was used to modify the interface adhesion between chromium coating and steel substrate. The interface microstructure was studied as a function of plasma arc processing parameters. Microstructure analysis was performed by optical microscopy,scanning electron microscopy and electron probe. The microhardness distribution along the depth of a cross-section of the chromium coating and the substrate was measured. The results show the energy density of transferred plasma arc is obviously higher than plasma non-transferred arc. The molten interface was obtained by plasma transferred arc. Interfaces between chromium coating and steel substrate can be divided by plasma non-transferred arc into three classes: non-molten, a little molten and molten. Good interface bonding was obtained by proper process parameters. The microhardness of chromium coating decreases with increasing energy density of plasma arc.

  14. Interfacial Microstructure of Al-Sn-Pb Alloy/Steel During Liquid-Solid Bonding Rolling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Guang-ming; LI Bao-mian; CUI Jian-zhong

    2006-01-01

    Studies were conducted on the interfacial microstructure of a steel/liquid aluminium and its evolution during the bonding rolling process. The effects of wetting time and deformation on the diffusion layer and on the bonding strength were examined. By means of electron microscopy and electron probe analysis, it was found that the diffusion layer is mainly composed of FeAl3. For a steel temperature of 250 ℃ and an aluminium temperature of 850 ℃, the diffusion layer was formed within 3 s, and the shear strength of the samples increased after 8 to 14 s. Although the interface was not damaged, it was deformed notably. For an aluminium temperature of 750 ℃ and a wetting time of 11 to 17 s, the shear strength of the interface remained high, but the interface was obviously broken during rolling, leading to reduced bonding strength.

  15. In-situ SEM observation on fracture behavior of austempered silicon alloyed steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Xiang; Vuorinen Esa; Grahn Jonny

    2009-01-01

    Crack initiation,propagation and microfracture processes of austempered high silicon cast steel have been investigated by using an in-situ tensile stage installed inside a scanning electron microscope chamber. It is revealed that micro cracks always nucleate at the yielding near imperfections and the boundary of matrix-inclusions due to the stress concentration. There are four types of crack propagations in the matrix:crack propagates along the boundary of two clusters of bainitic ferrite;crack propagates along the boundary of ferrite-austenite in bainitic ferrite laths;crack propagates into bainitic ferrite laths;crack nucleates and propagates in the high carbon brittle plate shape martensite which is transformed from some blocky retained austenite due to plastic deformation.Based on the observation and analysis of microfracture processes,a schematic diagram of the crack nucleation and propagation process of high silicon cast steel is proposed.

  16. Modeling of Austenite Grain Growth During Austenitization in a Low Alloy Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Dingqian; Chen, Fei; Cui, Zhenshan

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to develop a pragmatic model to predict austenite grain growth in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel. Austenite grain growth kinetics has been investigated under different heating conditions, involving heating temperature, holding time, as well as heating rate. Based on the experimental results, the mathematical model was established by regression analysis. The model predictions present a good agreement with the experimental data. Meanwhile, grain boundary precipitates and pinning effects on grain growth were studied by transmission electron microscopy. It is found that with the increasing of the temperature, the second-phase particles tend to be dissolved and the pinning effects become smaller, which results in a rapid growth of certain large grains with favorable orientation. The results from this study provide the basis for the establishment of large-sized ingot heating specification for SA508-III steel.

  17. Effect of the carbide phase on the tribological properties of high-manganese antiferromagnetic austenitic steels alloyed with vanadium and molybdenum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshunov, L. G.; Kositsina, I. I.; Sagaradze, V. V.; Chernenko, N. L.

    2011-07-01

    Effect of special carbides (VC, M 6C, Mo2C) on the wear resistance and friction coefficient of austenitic stable ( M s below -196°C) antiferromagnetic ( T N = 40-60°C) steels 80G20F2, 80G20M2, and 80G20F2M2 has been studied. The structure and the effective strength (microhardness H surf, shear resistance τ) of the surface layer of these steels have been studied using optical and electron microscopy. It has been shown that the presence of coarse particles of primary special carbides in the steels 80G20F2, 80G20M2, and 80G20F2M2 quenched from 1150°C decreases the effective strength and the resistance to adhesive and abrasive wear of these materials. This is caused by the negative effect of carbide particles on the toughness of steels and by a decrease in the carbon content in austenite due to a partial binding of carbon into the above-mentioned carbides. The aging of quenched steels under conditions providing the maximum hardness (650°C for 10 h) exerts a substantial positive effect on the parameters of the effective strength ( H surf, τ) of the surface layer and, correspondingly, on the resistance of steels to various types of wear (abrasive, adhesive, and caused by the boundary friction). The maximum positive effect of aging on the wear resistance is observed upon adhesive wear of the steels under consideration. Upon friction with enhanced sliding velocities (to 4 m/s) under conditions of intense (to 500-600°C) friction-induced heating, the 80G20F2, 80G20M2, and, especially, 80G20F2M2 steels subjected to quenching and aging substantially exceed the 110G13 (Hadfield) steel in their tribological properties. This is due to the presence in these steels of a favorable combination of high effective strength and friction heat resistance of the surface layer, which result from the presence of a large amount of special carbides in these steels and from a high degree of alloying of the matrix of these steels by vanadium and molybdenum. In the process of friction

  18. Microstructural study of oxides and carbides used for abrasion properties in high alloyed steels

    OpenAIRE

    LECOMTE-BECKERS, Jacqueline; Magnée, Adrien

    2001-01-01

    For long applications and for many others, a material with properties between hard metal and high speed steel is necessary. This material should have a high resistance to wear together with good toughness. An attractive solution consists in combining in a composite the properties of a tough ferrous matrix with those of hard reinforced particles. In varying the nature and the proportions of reinforcement and matrix, the properties of the composite can cover many applications. Peer reviewed

  19. Standard practice for evaluation of disbonding of bimetallic stainless alloy/steel plate for use in high-pressure, high-temperature refinery hydrogen service

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers a procedure for the evaluation of disbonding of bimetallic stainless alloy/steel plate for use in refinery high-pressure/high-temperature (HP/HT) gaseous hydrogen service. It includes procedures to (1) produce suitable laboratory test specimens, (2) obtain hydrogen charging conditions in the laboratory that are similar to those found in refinery HP/HT hydrogen gas service for evaluation of bimetallic specimens exposed to these environments, and (3) perform analysis of the test data. The purpose of this practice is to allow for comparison of data among test laboratories on the resistance of bimetallic stainless alloy/steels to hydrogen-induced disbonding (HID). 1.2 This practice applies primarily to bimetallic products fabricated by weld overlay of stainless alloy onto a steel substrate. Most of the information developed using this practice has been obtained for such materials. The procedures described herein, may also be appropriate for evaluation of hot roll bonded, explosive bonded...

  20. Behavior of steels in flowing liquid PbBi eutectic alloy at 420-600 deg. C after 4000-7200 h

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, G. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Heinzel, A. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)]. E-mail: annette.heinzel@ihm.fzk.de; Konys, J. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Schumacher, G. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Weisenburger, A. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Zimmermann, F. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Engelko, V. [Efremov Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus, 189631 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Rusanov, A. [IPPE, Bondarenko Square 1, 249020 Obninsk, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation); Markov, V. [CRISM ' PROMETEY' , 193015 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2004-11-01

    This paper presents the results of steel exposure up to 7200 h in flowing LBE at elevated temperatures and is a follow-up paper of that with results of an exposure of up to 2000 h. The examined AISI 316 L, 1.4970 austenitic and MANET 10Cr martensitic steels are suitable as a structural material in LBE (liquid eutectic Pb{sub 45}Bi{sub 55}) up to 550 deg. C, if 10{sup -6} wt% of oxygen is dissolved in the LBE. The martensitic steel develops a thick magnetite and spinel layer while the austenites have thin spinel surface layers at 420 deg. C and thick oxide scales like the martensitic steel at 550 deg. C. The oxide scales protect the steels from dissolution attack by LBE during the whole test period of 7200 h. Oxide scales that spall off are replaced by new protective ones. At 600 deg. C severe attack occurs already after 2000 and 4000 h of exposure. Steels with 8-15 wt% Al alloyed into the surface suffer no corrosion attack at all experimental temperatures and exposure times.

  1. Cracking Tendancies of Restrained Welds in High Strength Low Alloy Steels under Hyperbaric Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-01

    pumped into the habitat and electrically operated environmental control *" equipment mounted in the habitat wall is then used to heat and dry the...2) relatively high amounts of alloying elements, and (3) applications of precisely controlled rolling and heat treatments. They are both in the ell...classifications of theories regarding hydrogen cracking exist and are listed below: VPlanar pressure theories Surface adsorbtIon theories Triaxial stress theories

  2. Aluminizing of plain carbon steel: Effect of temperature on coating and alloy phase morphology at constant holding time

    OpenAIRE

    Isiko, Maureen Bangukira

    2012-01-01

    Aluminized steel possesses excellent physical, chemical and mechanical properties as compared to plain carbon steel. This type of steel has found application in high temperature, oxidizing and corrosive environments. In addition, aluminized steel is more cost effective than stainless steels. The objective of the current study is to study effect of temperature on the thicknesses and phase morphology of the coating and intermetallic layer that is formed during hot-dip aluminizing of steel at a ...

  3. The influence of cooling rate on the microstructure of stainless steel alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmer, J.W.

    1988-09-01

    The emergence of high energy density welding, laser surface modification and rapid solidification as commonly used metallurgical processing techniques has greatly increased the range of cooling rates that can be accessed during the solidification of metals and alloys. The microstructures which develop during these rapid cooling conditions may be significantly different from those which develop during low cooling rate conditions as the result of access to new metastable phases with the additional kinetic limitations that accompany rapid solidification. This investigation explores the influence of cooling rate on a series of seven ternary alloys which span the line of two-fold saturation in the Fe-Ni-Cr system. High speed electron beam surface melting was used to resolidify these alloys at scan speeds up to 5 m/s. The resulting cooling rates were estimated from dendrite arm spacing measurements and were confirmed by heat flow modeling to vary from 7 /times/ 10/sup 0/ /degree/C/s to 8 /times/ 10/sup 6/ /degree/C/s. The microstructures that developed from each solidification condition were examined using optical metallography, electron microprobe analysis, scanning electron microscopy and a vibrating sample magnetometer. These results were used to create diagrams to predict the primary mode of solidification, the ferrite content and the complex microstructural morphologies which develop as a function of interface velocity and composition. 158 refs., 90 figs., 45 tabs.

  4. Corrosion Inhibition Performance of Lignin Extract of Sun Flower (Tithonia Diversifolia on Medium Carbon Low Alloy Steel Immersed in H2SO4 Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth K. ALANEME

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The inhibition potentials of lignin extract of sun flower was investigated by evaluating the corrosion behaviour of medium carbon low alloy steel immersed in 1M H2SO4 solution containing varied concentration of the extract. Mass loss, corrosion rate, and adsorption characterization were utilized to evaluate the corrosion inhibition and adsorption properties of the extract. The results revealed that the lignin extract is an efficient inhibitor of corrosion in mild steel immersed in 1M H2SO4. The corrosion rates were observed to decrease with increase in concentration of lignin extract but increase with temperature. The activation energies and the negative free energy of adsorption obtained from the adsorption studies indicate that the lignin extract is physically adsorbed on the surface of the steel and that the adsorption is strong, spontaneous and fit excellently with the assumptions of the Langmuir adsorption isotherm.

  5. Determination of optimum welding parameters in connecting high alloyed X53CrMnNiN219 and X45CrSi93 steels by friction welding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mehmet Uzkut; Bekir Sadik Ünlü; Mustafa Akdağ

    2011-07-01

    In this study, different welding parameters were applied to two different steels with high alloys and mechanical and metallographical investigations are performed. Thus, the optimum welding parameters were determined for these materials and working conditions. 12.30 diameter steel bars made up of 1.4871 (X53CrMnNiN219) and 1.4718 (X45CrSi93) steel were used as experimental material. The material loss increased with increase in friction and rotating pressure. No fracture at the welding region was observed and the highest fracture energy was identified in B5 group. Based on micro hardness investigation; the hardness profile reached its minimum value at the welding region.

  6. Effect of Sintering Atmosphere and Solution Treatment on Density, Microstructure and Tensile Properties of Duplex Stainless Steels Developed from Pre-alloyed Powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, Arun Prasad; Mahendran, Sudhahar; Ramajayam, Mariappan; Ganesan, Dharmalingam; Chinnaraj, Raj Kumar

    2017-01-01

    In this research, Powder Metallurgy (P/M) of Duplex Stainless Steels (DSS) of different compositions were prepared through pre-alloyed powders and elemental powders with and without addition of copper. The powder mix was developed by pot mill for 12 h to obtain the homogeneous mixture of pre-alloyed powder with elemental compositions. Cylindrical green compacts with the dimensions of 30 mm diameter and 12 mm height were compacted through universal testing machine at a pressure level of 560 ± 10 MPa. These green compacts were sintered at 1350 °C for 2 h in hydrogen and argon atmospheres. Some of the sintered stainless steel preforms were solution treated at 1050 °C followed by water quenching. The sintered as well as solution treated samples were analysed by metallography examination, Scanning Electron Microscopy and evaluation of mechanical properties. Ferrite content of sintered and solution treated DSS were measured by Fischer Ferritoscope. It is inferred that the hydrogen sintered DSS depicted better density (94% theoretical density) and tensile strength (695 MPa) than the argon sintered steels. Similarly the microstructure of solution treated DSS revealed existence of more volume of ferrite grains than its sintered condition. Solution treated hydrogen sintered DSS A (50 wt% 316L + 50 wt% 430L) exhibited higher tensile strength of 716 MPa and elongation of 17%, which are 10-13% increment than the sintered stainless steels.

  7. Fatigue and corrosion fatigue behavior of 13Cr and duplex stainless steel and a welded nickel alloy employed in oil and gas production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, R.M. [Department of Metallurgy Engineering, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre (Brazil); Juca Batista, Ipanema, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul CEP (Brazil); Mueller, I.L. [Department of Metallurgy Engineering, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre (Brazil); Aneron Correia de Oliveira, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil)

    2009-05-15

    The materials used in off-shore oil and gas production, e.g. in risers, are often exposed to cyclic loads from the water movement because of their contact with seawater. These factors acting together can develop a corrosion fatigue (CF) process. A duplex and a 13% chromium (13Cr) wrought stainless steel (SS) and a welded nickel base alloy Inconel 625 were tested at different cyclic load magnitudes in an eccentric fatigue machine type. The specimens were tested in the presence of a corrosive environment at low loading frequencies (0.3 Hz). The medium used was an aqueous solution with 115.000 ppm of chloride, pH adjusted to 4, and CO{sub 2} bubbling inside the solution during the test. The end of the test was determined in maximum 500.000 cycles (23 days for frequency of 0.3 Hz) if no fracture occurred before. In the 13Cr steel the fissure seems to propagate in a uniform unique path, while in the duplex steel the crack changes the direction when passing from the ferritic to austenitic grains. The propagation speed seems to be different in the ferrite and in the austenitic structures. Among the materials tested the Inconel 625 alloy, even being in the welded condition, showed higher CF strength than the SSs; 13Cr shows better results when compared with the duplex steel, even though the last one would be more corrosion resistant. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  8. Biocorrosion of carbon steel alloys by an hydrogenotrophic sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio capillatus isolated from a Mexican oil field separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, E. [IRD, Institut de Recherche pour le Developement, Universites de Provence et de la Mediterranee, ESIL Case 925, 163 Avenue de Luminy, F-13288 Marseille, Cedex 09 (France); Bethencourt, M. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica y Quimica Inorganica, CASEM, Universidad de Cadiz, Poligono Rio San Pedro s/n, 11510 Puerto Real (Spain)]. E-mail: manuel.bethencourt@uca.es; Botana, F.J. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica y Quimica Inorganica, CASEM, Universidad de Cadiz, Poligono Rio San Pedro s/n, 11510 Puerto Real (Spain); Cano, M.J. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica y Quimica Inorganica, CASEM, Universidad de Cadiz, Poligono Rio San Pedro s/n, 11510 Puerto Real (Spain); Sanchez-Amaya, J.M. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica y Quimica Inorganica, CASEM, Universidad de Cadiz, Poligono Rio San Pedro s/n, 11510 Puerto Real (Spain); Corzo, A. [Departamento de Biologia, CASEM, Universidad de Cadiz, Poligono Rio San Pedro s/n, 11510 Puerto Real (Spain); Garcia de Lomas, J. [Departamento de Biologia, CASEM, Universidad de Cadiz, Poligono Rio San Pedro s/n, 11510 Puerto Real (Spain); Fardeau, M.L. [IRD, Institut de Recherche pour le Developement, Universites de Provence et de la Mediterranee, ESIL Case 925, 163 Avenue de Luminy, F-13288 Marseille, Cedex 09 (France); Ollivier, B. [IRD, Institut de Recherche pour le Developement, Universites de Provence et de la Mediterranee, ESIL Case 925, 163 Avenue de Luminy, F-13288 Marseille, Cedex 09 (France)

    2006-09-15

    The hydrogenotrophic sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) Desulfovibrio capillatus (DSM14982{sup T}) was isolated from an oil field separator with serious corrosion problems; this is the study of its role in the corrosion of carbon steels under anaerobic conditions. Immersion tests with two steel alloys, St-35.8 (typical carbon steel employed in European naval industry), and API-5XL52 (weathering alloy steel employed in Mexican oil industries) were performed. Total exposure was 45 days and different concentrations of thiosulfate as electron acceptor for bacterial growth were employed. The samples immersed in media with SRB undergo fast activation and numerous active sites form on the surface. Microscopic observations were made by environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Weight loss and electrochemical testing included open circuit potential (E {sub corr}), polarization resistance (R {sub p}), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and electrochemical noise (EN) were measured with and without bacteria in the culture medium in order to determine corrosion rates and mechanisms. All electrochemical techniques have shown that after the end of the exponential phase the corrosion activity notably increased due to the high concentration of bacterial metabolites. Finally, the corrosion behavior of API-5XL52 was worse than St-35.8.

  9. Effects of combined silicon and molybdenum alloying on the size and evolution of microalloy precipitates in HSLA steels containing niobium and titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlina, Erik J., E-mail: e.pavlina@deakin.edu.au [Deakin University, Institute for Frontier Materials, 75 Pigdons Road, Waurn Ponds, Victoria (Australia); Van Tyne, C.J.; Speer, J.G. [Colorado School of Mines, Advanced Steel Processing and Products Research Center, 1500 Illinois Street, Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-04-15

    The effects of combined silicon and molybdenum alloying additions on microalloy precipitate formation in austenite after single- and double-step deformations below the austenite no-recrystallization temperature were examined in high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steels microalloyed with titanium and niobium. The precipitation sequence in austenite was evaluated following an interrupted thermomechanical processing simulation using transmission electron microscopy. Large (~ 105 nm), cuboidal titanium-rich nitride precipitates showed no evolution in size during reheating and simulated thermomechanical processing. The average size and size distribution of these precipitates were also not affected by the combined silicon and molybdenum additions or by deformation. Relatively fine (< 20 nm), irregular-shaped niobium-rich carbonitride precipitates formed in austenite during isothermal holding at 1173 K. Based upon analysis that incorporated precipitate growth and coarsening models, the combined silicon and molybdenum additions were considered to increase the diffusivity of niobium in austenite by over 30% and result in coarser precipitates at 1173 K compared to the lower alloyed steel. Deformation decreased the size of the niobium-rich carbonitride precipitates that formed in austenite. - Highlights: • We examine combined Si and Mo additions on microalloy precipitation in austenite. • Precipitate size tends to decrease with increasing deformation steps. • Combined Si and Mo alloying additions increase the diffusivity of Nb in austenite.

  10. Microstructure and corrosion resistance of Fe-Al intermetallic coating on 45 steel synthesized by double glow plasma surface alloying technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Xiao-lin; YAO Zheng-jun; GU Xue-dong; CONG Wei; ZHANG Ping-ze

    2009-01-01

    A binary Fe-Al alloyed layer was synthesized on 45 steel by means of double glow plasma surface alloying technique. The corrosion-resisting layer prepared is composed of a sedimentary layer and a diffusion layer, with a total thickness of about 180 μm. The aluminum content of the alloyed layer shows gradual change from surface to the inside of substrate. The ideal profile is beneficial to the metallurgical bonding of the surface alloying layer with substrate materials. The microstructure of both layers consists of the Fe-Al intermetallic compound, which is FeAl with B2 structure in the sedimentary layer and Fe3Al with incompletely ordered DO3 structure in the diffusion layer. The protective film exhibits high micro-hardness. In comparison with the substrate of 45 steel, the corrosion resistance of the aluminized sample is much higher in 2.0% Na2S and 0.05 mol/L Na2SO4 + 0.5 mol/L NaCl mixed solutions.

  11. The Effects of Shot and Laser Peening on Fatigue Life and Crack Growth in 2024 Aluminum Alloy and 4340 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, R. A., Jr.; Matthews, W. T.; Prabhakaran, R.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Dubberly, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    Fatigue and crack growth tests have been conducted on 4340 steel and 2024-T3 aluminum alloy, respectively, to assess the effects of shot peening on fatigue life and the effects of shot and laser peening on crack growth. Two current programs involving fixed and rotary-wing aircraft will not be using shot peened structures. Since the shot peening compressive residual stress depth is usually less than the 0.05-inch initial damage tolerance crack size, it is believed by some that shot peening should have no beneficial effects toward retarding crack growth. In this study cracks were initiated from an electronic-discharged machining flaw which was cycled to produce a fatigue crack of approximately 0.05-inches in length and then the specimens were peened. Test results showed that after peening the crack growth rates were noticeably slower when the cracks were fairly short for both the shot and laser peened specimens resulting in a crack growth life that was a factor of 2 to 4 times greater than the results of the average unpeened test. Once the cracks reached a length of approximately 0.1-inches the growth rates were about the same for the peened and unpeened specimens. Fatigue tests on 4340 steel showed that the endurance limit of a test specimen with a 0.002-inch-deep machining-like scratch was reduced by approximately 40 percent. However, if the "scratched" specimen was shot peened after inserting the scratch, the fatigue life returned to almost 100 percent of the unflawed specimens original fatigue life.

  12. Stress corrosion cracking tests for low and high alloy steels in sour oilfield service. Tests performed at VTT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saarinen, K. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland). Materials and Structural Integrity; Haemaelaeinen, E. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Engineering Materials

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of the studies was to validate the usefulness of the proposed NACE slow strain rate testing method and compare it with the EFC document. In the NACE document the testing takes place at a temperature of 177 deg C, the test solution contains 20 wt% NaCl, the partial pressure of H{sub 2}S varies between 14 and 28 bar and the partial pressure of CO{sub 2} between 14 and 55 bar. In the NACE document the strain rate is determined as 4 x 10{sup -6} 1/s and in the EFC document 1 x 10{sup -6} 1/s. The results showed brittle behaviour for the test material in all of the test environments, and in each case the elongation was less than 5%. For comparison purposes the SSRT was conducted with the test material also in an inert environment (N{sub 2} gas), where the fracture was ductile and elongation 65%. The tests conducted with different strain rates gave the same result, which shows that the difference between EFC and NACE documents within the strain rate is not significant in the environments studied. However, since the alloy 654 SMO, which is considered to have a high resistance to corrosion, failed the SSRT test in the environments determined in the NACE document, the NACE document can be considered too severe for testing of austenitic stainless steels. Since contrary to the NACE document the EFC document does not determine levels for hydrogen sulphide and carbon dioxide, the EFC document can be considered more suitable than the NACE document for testing of austenitic stainless steels for sour service. (author)

  13. Functional properties of surface layers of X38CrMoV5-3 hot work tool steel alloyed with HPDL laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Dobrzański

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Improvement of functional properties alloyed of hot work tool steel surface layers is one of the goals of this paper.Design/methodology/approach: The material used for investigation was the hot work tool steel X38CrMoV5-3. Remelting and alloying of surface layers were made using the HPDL high power diode laser Rofin DL 020 in the laser power range of 1.2-2.3 kW. The carbide powders were applied on specimens prepared and degreased in this way; the powder was mixed with the sodium glass as inorganic binder in proportion of 30% binder and 70% powder. Paste coating 0.5 mm thick was put down in each case.Findings: The hardness changes of the surface layers obtained by remelting and alloying with carbides using the high power diode laser are accompanied with the improved tribological properties compared to the conventionally heat treated steel. The highest abrasion wear resistance, more than 2.5 times higher than that of the base material, was revealed in case the steel alloyed with vanadium carbide.Research limitations/implications: These advantages are the result of features unique to the HPDL, such as: shorter wavelength (thus better beam absorption for most metallic materials, and smaller absorption length and better temporal beam stability (due to beam integration compared to Nd:YAG and CO2 lasers. HPDL materials processing is, therefore, expected to produce better quality and more consistent and repeatable results for applications requiring beam spot sizes larger than 0.5mm diameter. One of the issues of concern in the practical applications of the lasers in materials processing for mass production is the repeatability.Practical implications: The research results indicate to the feasibility and purposefulness of the practical use of remelting and alloying with the ceramic particles using the high power diode laser for manufacturing and regeneration of various tools from the X38CrMoV5-3 hot-work tool steel.Originality/value: The laser

  14. Enhanced boronizing kinetics of alloy steel assisted by surface mechanical attrition treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Haopeng, E-mail: hpyang1993@163.com; Wu, Xiaochun, E-mail: xcwu@staff.shu.edu.cn; Yang, Zhe; Pu, Shengjun; Wang, Hongbin

    2014-03-25

    Highlights: • Nanostructured surface layer is fabricated on H13 steel assisted by SMAT. • The boronizing kinetics of SMAT sample can be enhanced remarkably. • Borided layer can delay fatigue cracks initiation and impede their propagation. -- Abstract: A nanostructured surface layer was fabricated on AISI H13 steel by means of surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT). Boronizing behaviors of the SMAT samples were systematically investigated in comparison with their coarse-grained counterparts. The boron diffusion depth of the SMAT sample with pack boriding treatment at 600 °C for 2 h was about 8 μm, which was much deeper than that of the coarse-grained sample. A much thicker borided layer on the SMAT sample can be synthesized by a duplex boronizing treatment at 600 °C followed by at a higher temperature. The borided layer was composed with monophase of Fe{sub 2}B and the growth of it exhibited a (0 0 2) preferred orientation. Moreover, the activation energy of boron diffusion for the SMAT sample is 140.3 kJ/mol, which is much lower than 209.4 kJ/mol for the coarse-grained counterpart. The results indicate that the boronizing kinetics can be significantly enhanced in the SMAT sample with a duplex boronizing treatment. Furthermore, the thermal fatigue tests show that the borided layer with excellent oxidation resistance and mechanical strength at elevated temperatures could effectively delay the thermal fatigue cracks initiation and impede their propagation. Therefore, the thermal fatigue property of H13 steel with a duplex boronizing treatment can be improved remarkably.

  15. Heat treatment and effects of Cr and Ni in low alloy steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mohammad Abdur Razzak

    2011-12-01

    The effects of Cr and Ni on low carbon steel was observed. Undissolved carbide particles refine the austenite grain size. In the presence of nickel, chromium carbide is less effective in austenite grain refinement than chromium carbide in absence of nickel at temperature below 975°C. Nickel does not produce any austenite grain refinement but presence of nickel promotes the formation of acicular ferrites. It was also found that Ni and Cr as chromium carbide also refines the ferrite grain size and morphology. Cr as chromium carbide is more effective in refining ferrite grain size than nickel.

  16. INFLUENCE OF QUANTITATIVE ALLOYING OF TOOL STEELS FOR HOT DEFORMATION ON THE LEVEL OF HARDENING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Fedulov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of complexly experimental tool steels: C (0,4–0,50%, Si (0,6–1,2%, Mn (0,17–0,8%, Cr (0,8–3%, W (0,9– 4%, Mo (0,01–3.5% and V (0,28–1,8% on their ability to hardening due to only high-temperature tempering after induction melting, casting in the ceramic mold and air cooling (without deformation and after the various modes of complete heat treatment cycle

  17. Numerical Simulations of Tungsten Alloy Rods Penetration into Alumina Ceramic/Armor Steel Composite Target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jin-zhu; HUANG Feng-lei; ZHANG Lian-sheng

    2008-01-01

    The Johnson-Holmquist constitutive ceramic model is re-implemented into the LS-DYNA3D program to simulate the penetration of long rod projectile into ceramic/armor steel composite targets.The damage evolution,fracture propagation,and spall damage in the ceramic/armor targets is represented during the simulation procedure and the accuracy of the penetration depth comparing between the simulating and experimental results is reliable with an error less than 8%.The relationship between the mass efficiency factor.differential factor and ceramic tiles thickness is given out for the penetration results with/without a cover plate.

  18. Improving Hygienic Characteristics of Coated Electrodes for Welding High-Alloy Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Il'yaschenko, D. P.; Chinakhov, D. A.; Ivanov, K. V.; Sadikov, I. D.

    2017-01-01

    The article presents the results of experimental studies showing that the use of an inverter power supply instead of a diode rectifier provides:: fine-droplet electrode metal transfer which reduces generation time by 46% and transfer time by 28%; transfer of alloying elements from welding materials into the weld metal which reduces its loss from the welding line by 6% and the heat affected area by 3%; reducing the emission rate of welding fumes and their components by 23%; reducing specific emission of welding fumes and their components by 23%.

  19. Atomistic simulation for deforming complex alloys with application toward TWIP steel and associated physical insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Xu, Shaofeng; Liu, Jiabin; Li, Xiaoyan; Wei, Yujie; Wang, Hongtao; Gao, Huajian; Yang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    The interest in promoting deformation twinning for plasticity is mounting for advanced materials. In contrast to disordered grain boundaries, highly organized twin boundaries are beneficial to promoting strength-ductility combination. Twinning deformation typically involves the kinetics of stacking faults, its interplay with dislocations, as well as the interactions between dislocations and twin boundaries. While the latter has been intensively studied, the dynamics of stacking faults has been rarely touched upon. In this work, we report new physical insights on the stacking fault dynamics in twin induced plasticity (TWIP) steels. The atomistic simulation is made possible by a newly introduced approach: meta-atom molecular dynamics simulation. The simulation suggests that the stacking fault interactions are dominated by dislocation reactions that take place spontaneously, different from the existing mechanisms. Whether to generate a single stacking fault, or a twinning partial and a trailing partial dislocation, depends upon a unique parameter, namely the stacking fault energy. The latter in turn determines the deformation twinning characteristics. The complex twin-slip and twin-dislocation interactions demonstrate the dual role of deformation twins as both the dislocation barrier and dislocation storage. This duality contributes to the high strength and high ductility of TWIP steels.

  20. Experimental Test of Stainless Steel Wire Mesh and Aluminium Alloy With Glass Fiber Reinforcement Hybrid Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranga Raj R.,

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available At present, composite materials are mostly used in aircraft structural components, because of their excellent properties like lightweight, high strength to weight ratio, high stiffness, and corrosion resistance and less expensive. In this experimental work, the mechanical properties of laminate, this is reinforced with stainless steel wire mesh, aluminum sheet metal, perforated aluminum sheet metal and glass fibers to be laminate and investigated. The stainless steel wire mesh and perforated aluminum metal were sequentially stacked to fabricate, hybrid composites. The aluminum metal sheet is also employed with that sequence to get maximum strength and less weight. The tensile, compressive and flexure tests carried out on the hybrid composite. To investigate the mechanical properties and elastic properties of the metal matrix composite laminate of a material we are using experimental test and theoretical calculation. The experimental work consists of Tensile, compressive and flexural test. The expectation of this project results in the tensile and compressive properties of this hybrid composite it is slightly lesser than carbon fibers but it could facilitate a weight reduction compared with CFRP panels. So this hybrid laminates composite material offering significant weight savings and maximum strength over some other GFRP conventional panels.