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Sample records for allogeneic plasmacytoid dendritic

  1. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: benefit or burden?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auletta, JJ; Devine, SM; Waller, EK

    2016-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) bridge innate and adaptive immune responses and have important roles in hematopoietic engraftment, GvHD and graft-versus-leukemia responses following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). In addition, pDCs mediate antiviral immunity, particularly as they are the body’s primary cellular source of type I interferon. Given their pleiotropic roles, pDCs have emerged as cells that critically impact transplant outcomes, including overall survival. In this article, we will review the pre-clinical and clinical literature, supporting the crucial roles that pDCs assume as key immune effector cells during HCT. PMID:26642333

  2. Reduced intensity allogeneic stem cell transplant for treatment of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm

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    Anand Lokare

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is a rare, aggressive tumor characterized by skin and/or marrow infiltration by CD4+ CD56+ cells. Historically, the tumor was variably thought to arise from either monocytes, T cells or NK cells giving rise to terms such as CD4+/CD56+ acute monoblastic leukemia, primary cutaneous CD4+/CD56+ hematodermic tumor and blastic NK-cell lymphoma. Whilst considerable progress has been made in understanding the histogenesis, the best modality of treatment remains to be defined. We are therefore reporting this case which was successfully treated with a T-deplete allogeneic transplant and the patient is currently alive and in remission 4 years post transplant.

  3. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells migrate in afferent skin lymph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascale, Florentina; Pascale, Florentia; Contreras, Vanessa; Bonneau, Michel; Courbet, Alexandre; Chilmonczyk, Stefan; Bevilacqua, Claudia; Epardaud, Mathieu; Eparaud, Mathieu; Niborski, Violeta; Riffault, Sabine; Balazuc, Anne-Marie; Foulon, Eliane; Guzylack-Piriou, Laurence; Riteau, Beatrice; Hope, Jayne; Bertho, Nicolas; Charley, Bernard; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle

    2008-05-01

    Conventional dendritic cells enter lymph nodes by migrating from peripheral tissues via the lymphatic route, whereas plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC), also called IFN-producing cells (IPC), are described to gain nodes from blood via the high endothelial venules. We demonstrate here that IPC/pDC migrate in the afferent lymph of two large mammals. In sheep, injection of type A CpG oligodinucleotide (ODN) induced lymph cells to produce type I IFN. Furthermore, low-density lymph cells collected at steady state produced type I IFN after stimulation with type A CpG ODN and enveloped viruses. Sheep lymph IPC were found within a minor B(neg)CD11c(neg) subset expressing CD45RB. They presented a plasmacytoid morphology, expressed high levels of TLR-7, TLR-9, and IFN regulatory factor 7 mRNA, induced IFN-gamma production in allogeneic CD4(pos) T cells, and differentiated into dendritic cell-like cells under viral stimulation, thus fulfilling criteria of bona fide pDC. In mini-pig, a CD4(pos)SIRP(pos) subset in afferent lymph cells, corresponding to pDC homologs, produced type I IFN after type A CpG-ODN triggering. Thus, pDC can link innate and acquired immunity by migrating from tissue to draining node via lymph, similarly to conventional dendritic cells. PMID:18424716

  4. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells: From Heart to Vessels

    OpenAIRE

    Rosalinda Sorrentino; Silvana Morello; Aldo Pinto

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases, formerly only attributed to the alterations of the stromal component, are now recognized as immune-based pathologies. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells (pDCs) are important immune orchestrators in heart and vessels. They highly produce IFN type I that promote the polarization of T cells towards a Th1 phenotype; however, pDCs can also participate to suppressive networks via the recruitment of T regulatory cells that downmodulate proinflammatory responses. pDCs populate the ...

  5. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells: From Heart to Vessels

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    Rosalinda Sorrentino

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases, formerly only attributed to the alterations of the stromal component, are now recognized as immune-based pathologies. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells (pDCs are important immune orchestrators in heart and vessels. They highly produce IFN type I that promote the polarization of T cells towards a Th1 phenotype; however, pDCs can also participate to suppressive networks via the recruitment of T regulatory cells that downmodulate proinflammatory responses. pDCs populate the vessel wall layers during pathological conditions, such as atherosclerosis. It is thus clear that a better identification of pDCs activity in cardiovascular diseases can not only elucidate pathological mechanisms but also lead to new therapeutic approaches.

  6. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm with absolute monocytosis at presentation

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    Jaworski JM

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Joseph M Jaworski,1,2 Vanlila K Swami,1 Rebecca C Heintzelman,1 Carrie A Cusack,3 Christina L Chung,3 Jeremy Peck,3 Matthew Fanelli,3 Micheal Styler,4 Sanaa Rizk,4 J Steve Hou1 1Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Department of Pathology, Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital, Darby, PA, USA; 3Department of Dermatology, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 4Department of Hematology/Oncology, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is an uncommon malignancy derived from precursors of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Nearly all patients present initially with cutaneous manifestations, with many having extracutaneous disease additionally. While response to chemotherapy initially is effective, relapse occurs in most, with a leukemic phase ultimately developing. The prognosis is dismal. While most of the clinical and pathologic features are well described, the association and possible prognostic significance between peripheral blood absolute monocytosis (>1.0 K/µL and blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm have not been reported. We report a case of a 68-year-old man who presented with a rash for 4–5 months. On physical examination, there were multiple, dull-pink, indurated plaques on the trunk and extremities. Complete blood count revealed thrombocytopenia, absolute monocytosis of 1.7 K/µL, and a negative flow cytometry study. Biopsy of an abdominal lesion revealed typical features of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm. Patients having both hematologic and nonhematologic malignancies have an increased incidence of absolute monocytosis. Recent studies examining Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients have suggested that this is a negative prognostic factor. The association between

  7. Role of plasmacytoid dendritic cells in breast cancer bone dissemination

    OpenAIRE

    Sawant, Anandi; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2013-01-01

    Elevated levels of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) have been observed as breast cancer disseminates to the bone. The selective depletion of pDC in mice led to a total abrogation of bone metastasis as well as to an increase in TH1 antitumor response, suggesting that pDC may be considered as a potential therapeutic target for metastatic breast cancer.

  8. Human plasmacytoid dendritic cells: from molecules to intercellular communication network

    OpenAIRE

    Till Sebastian Manuel Mathan; Carl Gustav Figdor; Sonja Ingrid Buschow

    2013-01-01

    Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells (pDCs) are a specific subset of naturally occurring dendritic cells, that secrete large amounts of Type I interferon and play an important role in the immune response against viral infection. Several studies have highlighted that they are also effective antigen presenting cells (APCs), making them an interesting target for immunotherapy against cancer. However, the modes of action of pDCs are not restricted to antigen presentation and IFN secretion alone. In this ...

  9. Human Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells: From Molecules to Intercellular Communication Network

    OpenAIRE

    Mathan, Till S. M.; Figdor, Carl G.; Buschow, Sonja I.

    2013-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are a specific subset of naturally occurring dendritic cells, that secrete large amounts of Type I interferon and play an important role in the immune response against viral infection. Several studies have highlighted that they are also effective antigen presenting cells, making them an interesting target for immunotherapy against cancer. However, the modes of action of pDCs are not restricted to antigen presentation and IFN secretion alone. In this review ...

  10. 异基因造血干细胞移植治疗母细胞性浆细胞样树突细胞肿瘤%Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周红升; 许娜; 孙竞; 邓永键; 江千里; 余国攀; 刘启发

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) with intensified conditioning regimen followed by rapidly tapering immunosuppressants and sequential minimal residual disease (MRD)-guided donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) post-transplantation on outcome of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN).Methods Two cases of BPDCN from January 2009 to May 2011 in Nanfang hospital were diagnosed according to 2008 WHO classification of tumours of haematopoietic and lymphoid tissues.Case 1 initially presented with typical cutaneous involvement and was promptly diagnosed with CD+4CD+56LCA+TdT+CD+43 BPDCN by skin biopsy.Case 2 was recognized as acute lymphocyte leukemia and acute non-lymphocytic leukemia,which was diagnosed to BPDCN at recurrence through flow cytometry analysis.Total-body-irradiation plus cyclophosphamide based intensified conditioning regimen were followed by allo-HSCT from sibling donor.Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis consisted of cyclosporine and methotrexate.Anti-thymocyteglobulin was included additionally for haploid donor allo-HSCT.Multi-color labeling flow cytometry was performed to monitor MRD.Rapidly tapering of prophylactic immunosuppressants and sequential MRD-guided donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) were performed to control relapse of primary malignancy.Results Two cases of BPDCN received allo-HSCT from sibling donor after intensified conditioning regimen.Both patients achieved complete remission and complete donor engraftment.Case 1 survived refractory acyclovir-resistant Epstein-Barr virus viremia benefiting from preemptive treatment with rituximab and DLI-induced grade Ⅳ acute GVHD,but died of thrombotic microangiopathy mixed with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage and sepsis on +243 days.Case 2 relapsed just 2 months after allo-HSCT despite DLI and rapidly tapering of CsA,died of sepsis followed by diffuse intravascular coagulation on +101 days.Conclusion BPDCN is

  11. Role of plasmacytoid dendritic cell subsets in allergic asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Maazi, Hadi; Lam, Jonathan; Lombardi, Vincent; Akbari, Omid

    2013-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are major type-I interferon producing cells that play important roles in antiviral immunity and tolerance induction. These cells share a common DC progenitor with conventional DCs and Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 ligand is essential for their development. Several subsets of pDCs have been identified to date including CCR9+, CD9+ and CD2+ pDCs. Recently, three subsets of pDCs were described namely, CD8α−β−, CD8α+β− and CD8α+β+ subsets. Interestingly, CD8α+β− a...

  12. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells in antiviral immunity and autoimmunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) represent a unique and crucial immune cell population capable of producing large amounts of type I interferons (IFNs) in response to viral infection.The function of pDCs as the professional type I IFN-producing cells is linked to their selective expression of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and TLR9,which sense viral nucleic acids within the endosomal compartments.Type I IFNs produced by pDCs not only directly inhibit viral replication but also play an essential role in linking the innate and adaptive immune system.The aberrant activation of pDCs by self nucleic acids through TLR signaling and the ongoing production of type I IFNs do occur in some autoimmune diseases.Therefore,pDC may serve as an attractive target for therapeutic manipulations of the immune system to treat viral infectious diseases and autoimmune diseases.

  13. DMPD: Plasmacytoid dendritic cells: sensing nucleic acids in viral infection andautoimmune diseases. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18641647 Plasmacytoid dendritic cells: sensing nucleic acids in viral infection andautoimmune diseases... (.csml) Show Plasmacytoid dendritic cells: sensing nucleic acids in viral infection andautoimmune diseases....iral infection andautoimmune diseases. Authors Gilliet M, Cao W, Liu YJ. Publication Nat Rev Immunol. 2008 A

  14. Environmental alkylphenols modulate cytokine expression in plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

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    Chih-Hsing Hung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alkylphenols, such as nonylphenol (NP and 4-octylphenol (4-OP, have the potential to disturb immune system due to their weak estrogen-like activity, an effect with potential serious public health impact due to the worldwide distribution of these substances. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs can secrete large amounts of type I IFNs and are critical in immune regulation. However, there has been limited study about the influence of alkylphenols on the function of pDCs. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of alkylphenols on pDC functions in vitro and in vivo and then further explored the involved signaling pathways and epigenetic changes. METHODS: Circulating pDCs from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were treated with alkylphenols with or without CpG stimulation. Alkylphenol-associated cytokine responses, signaling events, histone modifications and viral activity were further examined. In NP-exposed mice, the effect of NP on splenic pDC function and allergic lung inflammation were also assessed. RESULTS: The results showed that NP increased the expression of TNF-α, but suppressed IL-10 production in the range of physiological doses, concomitant with activation of the MKK3/6-p38 signaling pathway and enhanced levels of acetylated histone 3 as well as histone 4 at the TNFA gene locus. Further, in CpG-stimulated pDCs, NP suppressed type I IFNs production, associated with down-regulation of IRF-7 and MKK1/2-ERK-Elk-1 pathways and led to the impaired anti-enterovirus 71 activity in vitro. Additionally, splenic pDCs from NP-exposed mice showed similar cytokine changes upon CpG stimulation under conditions relevant to route and level of exposure in humans. NP treatment also enhanced allergic lung inflammation in vivo. CONCLUSION: Alkylphenols may influence pDCs' functions via their abilities to induce expression of a pro-inflammatory cytokine, TNF-α, and to suppress regulatory cytokines, including IL-10, IFN

  15. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells, Janus-faced sentinels: progesterone, guilty or innocent?

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    Konttinen, Yrjö T; Hänninen, Arno; Fuellen, Georg

    2009-11-01

    Evaluation of: Meier A, Chang JJ, Chan ES et al.: Sex differences in the Toll-like receptor-mediated responses of plasmacytoid dendritic cells to HIV-1. Nat. Med. 15, 955-959 (2009). Stimulation of Toll-like receptor (TLR)7 of plasmacytoid dendritic cells with ssRNA in internalized ribonucleic protein (RNP)-autoantibody complexes causes production of IFN-alpha and IFN signature in several female-dominant autoimmune diseases. This could relate to a gene-dose effect by the X chromosome or disturbances in the systemic endocrine and local intracrine sex steroid production. Meier et al. extend this paradigm to HIV-1-infected women. ssRNA, in oligoribonucleotides or aldrithiol-2-inactivated HIV-1, stimulated plasmacytoid dendritic cells via TLR7 to synthesize high concentrations of IFN-alpha. Women were disfavored and produced more IFN-alpha and subsequently CD38(high)CD8(+) lymphocytes upon similar viral loads in treatment-naive individuals. This predicts rapid progress to AIDS. There was a significant positive correlation between plasma progesterone concentrations and the percentage of responder plasmacytoid dendritic cells. TLR7-related pathways offer many potential targets for the treatment of viral and autoimmune diseases. PMID:20635911

  16. Secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor-competent DNA deposits are potent stimulators of plasmacytoid dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrzeczynska-Moncznik, Joanna; Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka; Zabieglo, Katarzyna; Kapinska-Mrowiecka, Monika; Marewicz, Ewa; Dubin, Adam; Potempa, Jan; Cichy, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). As the main source of IFN type I (IFNI), pDCs are crucial contributors to inflammatory and likely wound-healing responses associated with psoriasis. The mechanisms responsible for activation of pDCs in psoriatic skin are therefore of substantial interest. We demonstrate...

  17. Immunodetection of myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells in mammary carcinomas of female dogs

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    Mayara C. Rosolem

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Dendritic cells have attracted great interest from researchers as they may be used as targets of tumor immune evasion mechanisms. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the dendritic cells (DCs subpopulation in simple type mammary carcinomas in female dogs. Two groups of samples were used: the control group consisted of 18 samples of mammary tissue without changes and the tumor group with 26 simple type mammary carcinomas. In these groups, we evaluated the immunodetection of immature and mature myeloid DCs, plasmacytoid DCs and MHC-II. In mammary tumor, mature myeloid DCs predominated in the peritumoral region, while immature myeloid DCs and plasmacytoid DCs were evident in the intratumoral region. Immunostaining of MHC-II was visualized in mammary acini (control group, in tumor cells and inflammatory infiltration associated with tumors. The comparison between the control and tumor groups showed a statistically significant difference between immature myeloid DCs, mature myeloid DCs and plasmacytoid DCs. The immunodetection of MHC-II was not significant when comparing the groups. The predominance of immature DCs in the tumor group is possibly related to an inefficient immune response, promoting the development and survival of tumor cells. The presence of plasmacytoid DCs in the same group suggests a worse prognosis for female dogs with mammary tumors. Therefore, the ability of differentiation of canine dendritic cells could be influenced by neoplastic cells and by the tumor microenvironment.

  18. Characterization of Virus-Responsive Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells in the Rhesus Macaque

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Eugene; Amrute, Sheela B.; Abel, Kristina; Gupta, Gunjan; Wang, Yichuan; Miller, Christopher J.; Fitzgerald-Bocarsly, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDC) are potent producers of alpha interferon (IFN-α) in response to enveloped viruses and provide a critical link between the innate and adaptive immune responses. Although the loss of peripheral blood PDC function and numbers has been linked to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) progression in humans, a suitable animal model is needed to study the effects of immunodeficiency virus infection on PDC function. The rhesus macaque SIV model closely mimics human HIV ...

  19. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells and neutrophils : underestimated cell populations during the onset of atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Döring, Yvonne

    2011-01-01

    This study focuses on the understanding of the pathophysiological role of neutrophils and plasmacytoid dendritic cells in atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is now agreed to be a chronic inflammatory disease of the vessel wall driven by intense immunological activity, of both, innate and adaptive immunity. Whereas monocytes/macrophages are of paramount importance, polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes (PMN) have recently also been implicated in lesion formation. Given the expansion of these...

  20. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm with leukemic presentation: an Italian multicenter study

    OpenAIRE

    Pagano, Livio; Valentini, Caterina Giovanna; Pulsoni, Alessandro; Fisogni, Simona; Carluccio, Paola; Mannelli, Francesco; Lunghi, Monia; Pica, Gianmatteo; Onida, Francesco; Cattaneo, Chiara; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Di Bona, Eros; Todisco, Elisabetta; Musto, Pellegrino; Spadea, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical features, prognostic factors, and efficacy of treatments in patients with blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm with a leukemic presentation at onset of the disease. In order to do this, a retrospective multicenter study was performed from 2005-2011 in 28 Italian hematology divisions in which 43 cases were collected. Forty-one patients received an induction therapy, consisting of an acute myeloid leukemia-type regimen in 26 patie...

  1. Cutting edge: B220+CCR9- dendritic cells are not plasmacytoid dendritic cells but are precursors of conventional dendritic cells.

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    Segura, Elodie; Wong, June; Villadangos, José A

    2009-08-01

    Mouse lymphoid organs contain two major subsets of dendritic cells (DC) that differ in their phenotype and functions: conventional DC (cDC) and plasmacytoid DC (pDC). Recently, it has been proposed that differential expression of CCR9 could distinguish functionally distinct pDC subsets. We show that B220(+)CCR9(-) DC do not express classical pDC markers and have a developmental origin different from that of pDC. Furthermore, B220(+)CCR9(-) DC do not secrete IFN-alpha in response to CpG and, unlike pDC, can efficiently present exogenous Ags. Our results demonstrate that B220(+)CCR9(-) DC do not represent a subset of pDC. After in vivo transfer, these cells down-regulate B220 expression and convert into the two major cDC subsets, showing that they are a developmental stage of cDC differentiation. PMID:19570827

  2. Ebola Virus Failure to Stimulate Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Interferon Responses Correlates With Impaired Cellular Entry

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, Lawrence W.; Martinez, Osvaldo; Reynard, Olivier; Volchkov, Viktor E.; Basler, Christopher F.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the ability of the Ebola virus to elicit an antiviral response from plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). Exposure of pDCs to Ebola virus did not result in significantly higher levels of interferon-α production than the levels in mock-infected cells. After inoculation with Ebola virus under the same conditions, conventional dendritic cells expressed viral proteins whereas pDCs did not, suggesting that the latter cells were not infected. Assessment of the entry of Ebola virus–like p...

  3. Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm: From Origin of the Cell to Targeted Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laribi, Kamel; Denizon, Nathalie; Besançon, Anne; Farhi, Jonathan; Lemaire, Pierre; Sandrini, Jeremy; Truong, Catherine; Ghnaya, Habib; Baugier de Materre, Alix

    2016-08-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare hematological malignancy with an aggressive clinical course. It is grouped with acute myeloid leukemia-related precursor neoplasms in the 2008 World Health Organization classification. Most patients with BPDCN have skin lesions at diagnosis and subsequent or simultaneous involvement of the bone marrow, peripheral blood, and lymph nodes. Patients usually respond to initial chemotherapy but often relapse. Stem cell transplantation may improve survival. This neoplasm is derived from precursors of plasmacytoid dendritic cells and is characterized by the coexpression of the immunophenotypic markers CD4, CD56, CD123, blood dendritic cell antigen-2, blood dendritic cell antigen-4, CD2AP, and lineage(-). Atypical immunophenotype expression may be present, making diagnosis difficult. BPDCN is often associated with a complex karyotype, frequent deletions of tumor suppressor genes, and mutations affecting either the DNA methylation or chromatin remodeling pathways. A better understanding of the etiology and pathophysiology of this neoplasm could open the way to new therapies targeting specific signaling pathways or involving epigenetics. PMID:27026248

  4. Regulation of B cell function by plasmacytoid dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gujer, Cornelia

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are early sentinels of pathogen exposure and central in the initiation and orchestration of adaptive immune responses. Apart from the prominent role of DCs in the activation of T cells, DCs have been shown to influence humoral B cell mediated responses. DCs are therefore important cells for regulating immune responses to vaccines. Many of the vaccines under development today are against pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and HIV-1 that likely r...

  5. Effect of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection on Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Regulation of Allergic Airway Inflammation.

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuchida, Tomoko; Matsuse, Hiroto; Fukahori, Susumu; Kawano, Tetsuya; Tomari, Shinya; Fukushima, Chizu; Kohno, Shigeru

    2011-01-01

    Background: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) can infect myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) and regulate their function in the development of allergy. It has been widely reported that plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) play a critical role in antiviral innate immunity. In contrast, not much is known about the role of pDCs in the interaction between allergy and viral infection. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of RSV infection on pDC function in the regulation of allergic airway...

  6. CD4 Receptor is a Key Determinant of Divergent HIV-1 Sensing by Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    O’Brien, Meagan; Manches, Olivier; Wilen, Craig; Gopal, Ramya; Huq, Rumana; Wu, Vernon; Sunseri, Nicole; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Author Summary Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) are innate immune cells that are specialized to produce type I interferon (IFN) and to activate adaptive immune responses. Although IFN is an anti-viral cytokine, it may contribute more to pathogenesis than to protection during chronic viral infections, including chronic HIV infection. pDC sense HIV to produce abundant IFN but minimal NF- κB–dependent production of TNFα and minimal up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules, suggesting that HIV...

  7. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells in cutaneous lesions of patients with chromoblastomycosis, lacaziosis, and paracoccidioidomycosis: a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliari, Carla; Kanashiro-Galo, Luciane; Silva, Aline Alves de Lima; Barboza, Tânia Cristina; Criado, Paulo Ricardo; Duarte, Maria Irma Seixas; Brito, Arival Cardoso de; Xavier, Marília Brasil; Unger, Deborah; Maria Moraes Oliveira, Clivia; Quaresma, Juarez Antonio Simões; Sotto, Mirian Nacagami

    2014-05-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are characterized by expression of CD123 and BDCA-2 (Blood Dendritic Cell Antigen 2) (CD303) molecules, which are important in innate and adaptive immunity. Chromoblastomycosis (CBM), lacaziosis or Jorge Lobo's disease (JLD), and paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), are noteworthy in Latin America due to the large number of reported cases. The severity of lesions is mainly determined by the host's immune status and in situ responses. The dendritic cells studied in these fungal diseases are of myeloid origin, such as Langerhans cells and dermal dendrocytes; to our knowledge, there are no data for pDCs. Forty-three biopsies from patients with CBM, 42 from those with JLD and 46 diagnosed with PCM, were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Plasmacytoid cells immunostained with anti-CD123 and anti-CD303 were detected in 16 cases of CBM; in those stained with anti-CD123, 24 specimens were obtained from PCM. We did not detect the presence of pDCs in any specimen using either antibody in JLD. We believe that, albeit a secondary immune response in PCM and CBM, pDCs could act as a secondary source of important cytokines. The BDCA-2 (CD303) is a c-type lectin receptor involved in cell adhesion, capture, and processing of antigens. Through the expression of the c-lectin receptor, there could be an interaction with fungi, similar to other receptors of this type, namely, CD207 in PCM and CD205 and CD209 in other fungal infections. In JLD, the absence of expression of CD123 and CD303 seems to indicate that pDCs are not involved in the immune response. PMID:24782102

  8. Expression of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells, IRF-7, IFN-α mRNA in the Lesions of Psoriasis Vulgaris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the expression of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), interferon regulatory factor-7 (IRF-7) and interferon alpha (IFN- α ) mRNA in skin lesions of patients with psoriasis vulgaris, the expressions of plasmacytoid dendritic cells, IRF-7, IFN-α mRNA in the lesional skin of psoriasis vulgaris were detected by immunohistochemical technique (SP) and RT-PCR. Normal skin of healthy volunteers, serving as control, was also tested. The immunohistochemical study showed that the expression of pDCs in the psoriatic lesions was significantly higher than that in the normal controls. RT-PCR showed that the mRNA expression of IRF-7 was much higher than that in normal controls, but no difference in the expression of IFN-α mRNA was found between two groups. Our findings indicate that up-regulated expression of pDCs, IRF-7mRNA might be involved in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

  9. CD4 Receptor is a Key Determinant of Divergent HIV-1 Sensing by Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Meagan; Manches, Olivier; Wilen, Craig; Gopal, Ramya; Huq, Rumana; Wu, Vernon; Sunseri, Nicole; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2016-04-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) are innate immune cells that sense viral nucleic acids through endosomal Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7/9 to produce type I interferon (IFN) and to differentiate into potent antigen presenting cells (APC). Engagement of TLR7/9 in early endosomes appears to trigger the IRF7 pathway for IFN production whereas engagement in lysosomes seems to trigger the NF-κB pathway for maturation into APC. We showed previously that HIV-1 (HIV) localizes predominantly to early endosomes, not lysosomes, and mainly stimulate IRF7 rather than NF-κB signaling pathways in pDC. This divergent signaling may contribute to disease progression through production of pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory IFN and inadequate maturation of pDCs. We now demonstrate that HIV virions may be re-directed to lysosomes for NF-κB signaling by either pseudotyping HIV with influenza hemagglutinin envelope or modification of CD4 mediated-intracellular trafficking. These data suggest that HIV envelope-CD4 receptor interactions drive pDC activation toward an immature IFN producing phenotype rather than differentiation into a mature dendritic cell phenotype. PMID:27082754

  10. TRAIL-mediated killing of acute lymphoblastic leukemia by plasmacytoid dendritic cell-activated natural killer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lelaidier, Martin; Dìaz-Rodriguez, Yildian; Cordeau, Martine; Cordeiro, Paulo; Haddad, Elie; Herblot, Sabine; Duval, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) still frequently recurs after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), underscoring the need to improve the graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect. Natural killer (NK) cells reconstitute in the first months following HSCT when leukemia burden is at its lowest, but ALL cells have been shown to be resistant to NK cell-mediated killing. We show here that this resistance is overcome by NK cell stimulation with TLR-9-activated plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC...

  11. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells sequester high prion titres at early stages of prion infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Castro-Seoane

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In most transmissible spongiform encephalopathies prions accumulate in the lymphoreticular system (LRS long before they are detectable in the central nervous system. While a considerable body of evidence showed that B lymphocytes and follicular dendritic cells play a major role in prion colonization of lymphoid organs, the contribution of various other cell types, including antigen-presenting cells, to the accumulation and the spread of prions in the LRS are not well understood. A comprehensive study to compare prion titers of candidate cell types has not been performed to date, mainly due to limitations in the scope of animal bioassays where prohibitively large numbers of mice would be required to obtain sufficiently accurate data. By taking advantage of quantitative in vitro prion determination and magnetic-activated cell sorting, we studied the kinetics of prion accumulation in various splenic cell types at early stages of prion infection. Robust estimates for infectious titers were obtained by statistical modelling using a generalized linear model. Whilst prions were detectable in B and T lymphocytes and in antigen-presenting cells like dendritic cells and macrophages, highest infectious titers were determined in two cell types that have previously not been associated with prion pathogenesis, plasmacytoid dendritic (pDC and natural killer (NK cells. At 30 days after infection, NK cells were more than twice, and pDCs about seven-fold, as infectious as lymphocytes respectively. This result was unexpected since, in accordance to previous reports prion protein, an obligate requirement for prion replication, was undetectable in pDCs. This underscores the importance of prion sequestration and dissemination by antigen-presenting cells which are among the first cells of the immune system to encounter pathogens. We furthermore report the first evidence for a release of prions from lymphocytes and DCs of scrapie-infected mice ex vivo, a process that

  12. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells sequester high prion titres at early stages of prion infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Seoane, Rocio; Hummerich, Holger; Sweeting, Trevor; Tattum, M Howard; Linehan, Jacqueline M; Fernandez de Marco, Mar; Brandner, Sebastian; Collinge, John; Klöhn, Peter-Christian

    2012-02-01

    In most transmissible spongiform encephalopathies prions accumulate in the lymphoreticular system (LRS) long before they are detectable in the central nervous system. While a considerable body of evidence showed that B lymphocytes and follicular dendritic cells play a major role in prion colonization of lymphoid organs, the contribution of various other cell types, including antigen-presenting cells, to the accumulation and the spread of prions in the LRS are not well understood. A comprehensive study to compare prion titers of candidate cell types has not been performed to date, mainly due to limitations in the scope of animal bioassays where prohibitively large numbers of mice would be required to obtain sufficiently accurate data. By taking advantage of quantitative in vitro prion determination and magnetic-activated cell sorting, we studied the kinetics of prion accumulation in various splenic cell types at early stages of prion infection. Robust estimates for infectious titers were obtained by statistical modelling using a generalized linear model. Whilst prions were detectable in B and T lymphocytes and in antigen-presenting cells like dendritic cells and macrophages, highest infectious titers were determined in two cell types that have previously not been associated with prion pathogenesis, plasmacytoid dendritic (pDC) and natural killer (NK) cells. At 30 days after infection, NK cells were more than twice, and pDCs about seven-fold, as infectious as lymphocytes respectively. This result was unexpected since, in accordance to previous reports prion protein, an obligate requirement for prion replication, was undetectable in pDCs. This underscores the importance of prion sequestration and dissemination by antigen-presenting cells which are among the first cells of the immune system to encounter pathogens. We furthermore report the first evidence for a release of prions from lymphocytes and DCs of scrapie-infected mice ex vivo, a process that is associated with

  13. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells accumulate and secrete interferon alpha in lymph nodes of HIV-1 patients.

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    Clara Lehmann

    Full Text Available Circulating plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC decline during HIV-1 infection, but at the same time they express markedly higher levels of interferon alpha (IFNalpha, which is associated with HIV-1 disease progression. Here we show an accumulation of pDC in lymph nodes (LN of treatment-naïve HIV-1 patients. This phenomenon was associated with elevated expression of the LN homing marker, CCR7, on pDC in peripheral blood of HIV-1 patients, which conferred increased migratory capacity in response to CCR7 ligands in ex vivo functional assays. LN-homed pDC of HIV-1 patients presented higher CD40 and lower BDCA2 levels, but unchanged CD83 and CD86 expression. In addition, these cells expressed markedly higher amounts of IFNalpha compared to uninfected individuals, and were undergoing faster rates of cell death. These results demonstrate for the first time that in asymptomatic, untreated HIV-1 patients circulating pDC up-regulate CCR7 expression, accumulate in lymph nodes, and express high amounts of IFNalpha before undergoing cell death. Since IFNalpha inhibits cell proliferation and modulates immune responses, chronically high levels of this cytokine in LN of HIV-1 patients may impair differentiation and immune function of bystander CD4(+ T cells, thus playing into the mechanisms of AIDS immunopathogenesis.

  14. CD28 Deficiency Enhances Type I IFN Production by Murine Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells.

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    Macal, Monica; Tam, Miguel A; Hesser, Charles; Di Domizio, Jeremy; Leger, Psylvia; Gilliet, Michel; Zuniga, Elina I

    2016-02-15

    Type I IFNs (IFN-I) are key innate mediators that create a profound antiviral state and orchestrate the activation of almost all immune cells. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are the most powerful IFN-I-producing cells and play important roles during viral infections, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. By comparing gene expression profiles of murine pDCs and conventional DCs, we found that CD28, a prototypic T cell stimulatory receptor, was highly expressed in pDCs. Strikingly, CD28 acted as a negative regulator of pDC IFN-I production upon TLR stimulation but did not affect pDC survival or maturation. Importantly, cell-intrinsic CD28 expression restrained pDC (and systemic) IFN-I production during in vivo RNA and DNA viral infections, limiting antiviral responses and enhancing viral growth early after exposure. Finally, CD28 also downregulated IFN-I response upon skin injury. Our study identified a new pDC regulatory mechanism by which the same CD28 molecule that promotes stimulation in most cells that express it is co-opted to negatively regulate pDC IFN-I production and limit innate responses. PMID:26773151

  15. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm: the first report of two cases treated by 5-azacytidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laribi, Kamel; Denizon, Nathalie; Ghnaya, Habib; Atlassi, Mustapha; Besançon, Anne; Pineau-Vincent, Fabienne; Gaulard, Philippe; Petrella, Tony

    2014-07-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare hematologic malignancy which was first included as an independent cutaneous lymphoma in the 2008 World Health Organisation (WHO) classification (1). BPDCN usually has an extremely poor prognosis, with quick relapses after chemotherapy (2; 3). Here, we report two cases of patients diagnosed in 2011 with BPDCN and myelodysplasia, and who were treated for the first time with 5-azacytidine (5-Aza); a drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and mainly used in the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome (Kaminskas E, et al. 2005 Clin Cancer Res, 11, 3604-8). The first case was an 81-year-old man who presented with unusual CD10+, CD56- immunohistochemistry and 45X, -Y abnormality using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. The second case was a 78-year-old woman who manifested monosomy 13 and chromosome instability due to D13S319 locus deletion in 13q14 as determined by FISH. Both patients showed excellent responses of their skin lesions after one cycle of chemotherapy, and their hematological disease was stabilized; however, pulmonary sepsis set in, followed by neutropenia after the fourth and the fifth cycle of treatment, that is, eight and 9 months postdiagnosis, respectively, leading to patient death. PMID:24571716

  16. CD4- and dynamin-dependent endocytosis of HIV-1 into plasmacytoid dendritic cells

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    Pritschet, Kathrin; Donhauser, Norbert; Schuster, Philipp; Ries, Moritz; Haupt, Sabrina; Kittan, Nicolai A.; Korn, Klaus [Institute of Clinical and Molecular Virology, National Reference Centre for Retroviruses, Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Poehlmann, Stefan [Institute of Virology, Hannover Medical School, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Holland, Gudrun; Bannert, Norbert [Robert Koch-Institute, Center for Biological Security 4, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Bogner, Elke [Institute of Virology, Charite University Hospital, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Schmidt, Barbara, E-mail: baschmid@viro.med.uni-erlangen.de [Institute of Clinical and Molecular Virology, National Reference Centre for Retroviruses, Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-02-20

    Chronic immune activation, triggered by plasmacytoid dendritic cell (PDC) interferon (IFN)-alpha production, plays an important role in HIV-1 pathogenesis. As the entry of HIV-1 seems to be important for the activation of PDC, we directly characterized the viral entry into these cells using immuno-electron microscopy, cellular fractionation, confocal imaging, and functional experiments. After attachment to PDC, viruses were taken up in an energy-dependent manner. The virions were located in compartments positive for caveolin; early endosomal antigen 1; Rab GTPases 5, 7 and 9; lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1. PDC harbored more virus in endocytic vesicles than CD4+ T cells (p < 0.05). Blocking CD4 inhibited the uptake of virions into cytosolic and endosomal compartments. Dynasore, an inhibitor of dynamin-dependent endocytosis, not the fusion inhibitor T-20, reduced the HIV-1 induced IFN-alpha production. Altogether, our morphological and functional data support the role of endocytosis for the entry and IFN-alpha induction of HIV-1 in PDC.

  17. CD4- and dynamin-dependent endocytosis of HIV-1 into plasmacytoid dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic immune activation, triggered by plasmacytoid dendritic cell (PDC) interferon (IFN)-alpha production, plays an important role in HIV-1 pathogenesis. As the entry of HIV-1 seems to be important for the activation of PDC, we directly characterized the viral entry into these cells using immuno-electron microscopy, cellular fractionation, confocal imaging, and functional experiments. After attachment to PDC, viruses were taken up in an energy-dependent manner. The virions were located in compartments positive for caveolin; early endosomal antigen 1; Rab GTPases 5, 7 and 9; lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1. PDC harbored more virus in endocytic vesicles than CD4+ T cells (p < 0.05). Blocking CD4 inhibited the uptake of virions into cytosolic and endosomal compartments. Dynasore, an inhibitor of dynamin-dependent endocytosis, not the fusion inhibitor T-20, reduced the HIV-1 induced IFN-alpha production. Altogether, our morphological and functional data support the role of endocytosis for the entry and IFN-alpha induction of HIV-1 in PDC.

  18. Convergent differentiation: myeloid and lymphoid pathways to murine plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathe, Priyanka; Vremec, David; Wu, Li; Corcoran, Lynn; Shortman, Ken

    2013-01-01

    The developmental origin of IFN-producing plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) has been uncertain. In the present study, we tracked the development of pDCs in cultures of BM precursors stimulated with Flt3 ligand. Common myeloid precursors (CMPs) produced both conventional DCs (cDCs) and pDCs via the DC-restricted common DC precursor. Common lymphoid precursors (CLPs) produced only a few cDCs with variable efficiency, but produced pDCs via a transient intermediate precursor with B-cell potential. The pDCs of both origins produced IFN-α when stimulated with CpG oligonucleotides. The pDCs of CLP origin showed evidence of past RAG1 expression and had D-J rearrangements in IgH genes. Most pDCs and all cDCs of CMP origin lacked these signs of a lymphoid past. However, in these cultures, some pDCs of CMP origin showed evidence of past RAG1 expression and had D-J IgH gene rearrangements; most of these derived from a subset of CMPs already expressing RAG1. PMID:23053574

  19. Efficient Generation of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell from Common Lymphoid Progenitors by Flt3 Ligand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ling Chen

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs, including conventional DCs (cDCs and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs are critical for initiating and controlling the immune response. However, study of DC, particularly pDC, function is hampered by their low frequency in lymphoid organs, and existing methods for in vitro DC generation preferentially favor the production of cDCs over pDCs. Here, we demonstrated that pDCs could be efficiently generated in vitro from common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs using Flt3 ligand (FL in three different culture systems, namely feeder-free, BM-feeder and AC-6-feeder. This was in stark contrast to common DC progenitors (CDPs, in which cDCs were prominently generated under the same conditions. Moreover, the efficiency and function of pDCs generated from these three systems varied. While AC-6 system showed the greatest ability to support pDC development from CLPs, BM-feeder system was able to develop pDCs with better functionality. pDCs could also be expanded in vivo using hydrodynamic gene transfer of FL, which was further enhanced by the combined treatment of FL and IFN-α. Interestingly, IFN-α selectively promoted the proliferation of CLPs and not CDPs, which might contribute to enhanced pDC development. Together, we have defined conditions for in vitro and in vivo generation of pDCs, which may be useful for investigating the biology of pDCs.

  20. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment: Immune Targets for Glioma Therapeutics

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    Marianela Candolfi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus-mediated delivery of the immune-stimulatory cytokine Flt3L and the conditionally cytotoxic thymidine kinase (TK induces tumor regression and long-term survival in preclinical glioma (glioblastoma multiforme [GBM] models. Flt3L induces expansion and recruitment of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs into the brain. Although pDCs can present antigen and produce powerful inflammatory cytokines, that is, interferon α (IFN-α, their role in tumor immunology remains debated. Thus, we studied the role of pDCs and IFN-α in Ad.TK/GCV+ Ad.Flt3L-mediated anti-GBM therapeutic efficacy. Our data indicate that the combined gene therapy induced recruitment of plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs into the tumor mass; which were capable of in vivo phagocytosis, IFN-α release, and T-cell priming. Thus, we next used either pDCs or an Ad vector encoding IFN-α delivered within the tumor microenvironment. When rats were treated with Ad.TK/GCV in combination with pDCs or Ad-IFN-α, they exhibited 35% and 50% survival, respectively. However, whereas intracranial administration of Ad.TK/GCV + Ad.Flt3L exhibited a high safety profile, Ad-IFN-α led to severe local inflammation, with neurologic and systemic adverse effects. To elucidate whether the efficacy of the immunotherapy was dependent on IFN-α-secreting pDCs, we administered an Ad vector encoding B18R, an IFN-α antagonist, which abrogated the antitumoral effect of Ad.TK/GCV + Ad.Flt3L. Our data suggest that IFN-α release by activated pDCs plays a critical role in the antitumor effect mediated by Ad.TK/GCV + Ad.Flt3L. In summary, taken together, our results demonstrate that pDCs mediate anti-GBM therapeutic efficacy through the production of IFN-α, thus manipulation of pDCs constitutes an attractive new therapeutic target for the treatment of GBM.

  1. Immune tolerance of mice allogenic tooth transplantation induced by immature dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Wenying; Deng, Feng; WANG Yu; Ma, Ce; Wang, Yurong

    2015-01-01

    As a common procedure in dentistry for replacing a missing tooth, allogenic tooth transplantation has encountered many difficulties in the clinical application because of immunological rejection. It is hypothesized that immature dendritic cell injection might be a potential alternative method to avoid or alleviate immunological rejection in allogenic tooth transplantation. To test this hypothesis, a mouse model of allogenic and autogeneic tooth transplantation was to established test the immu...

  2. Sensing of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus-Infected Macrophages by Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Nicolás, Obdulio; Auray, Gaël; Sautter, Carmen A; Rappe, Julie C F; McCullough, Kenneth C; Ruggli, Nicolas; Summerfield, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) represents a macrophage (MØ)-tropic virus which is unable to induce interferon (IFN) type I in its target cells. Nevertheless, infected pigs show a short but prominent systemic IFN alpha (IFN-α) response. A possible explanation for this discrepancy is the ability of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) to produce IFN-α in response to free PRRSV virions, independent of infection. Here, we show that the highly pathogenic PRRSV genotype 1 strain Lena is unique in not inducing IFN-α production in pDC, contrasting with systemic IFN-α responses found in infected pigs. We also demonstrate efficient pDC stimulation by PRRSV Lena-infected MØ, resulting in a higher IFN-α production than direct stimulation of pDC by PRRSV virions. This response was strain-independent, required integrin-mediated intercellular contact, intact actin filaments in the MØ and was partially inhibited by an inhibitor of neutral sphingomyelinase. Although infected MØ-derived exosomes stimulated pDC, an efficient delivery of the stimulatory component was dependent on a tight contact between pDC and the infected cells. In conclusion, with this mechanism the immune system can efficiently sense PRRSV, resulting in production of considerable quantities of IFN-α. This is adding complexity to the immunopathogenesis of PRRSV infections, as IFN-α should alert the immune system and initiate the induction of adaptive immune responses, a process known to be inefficient during infection of pigs. PMID:27458429

  3. Donor lung derived myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells differentially regulate T cell proliferation and cytokine production

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    Benson Heather L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Direct allorecognition, i.e., donor lung-derived dendritic cells (DCs stimulating recipient-derived T lymphocytes, is believed to be the key mechanism of lung allograft rejection. Myeloid (cDCs and plasmacytoid (pDCs are believed to have differential effects on T cell activation. However, the roles of each DC type on T cell activation and rejection pathology post lung transplantation are unknown. Methods Using transgenic mice and antibody depletion techniques, either or both cell types were depleted in lungs of donor BALB/c mice (H-2d prior to transplanting into C57BL/6 mice (H-2b, followed by an assessment of rejection pathology, and pDC or cDC-induced proliferation and cytokine production in C57BL/6-derived mediastinal lymph node T cells (CD3+. Results Depleting either DC type had modest effect on rejection pathology and T cell proliferation. In contrast, T cells from mice that received grafts depleted of both DCs did not proliferate and this was associated with significantly reduced acute rejection scores compared to all other groups. cDCs were potent inducers of IFNγ, whereas both cDCs and pDCs induced IL-10. Both cell types had variable effects on IL-17A production. Conclusion Collectively, the data show that direct allorecognition by donor lung pDCs and cDCs have differential effects on T cell proliferation and cytokine production. Depletion of both donor lung cDC and pDC could prevent the severity of acute rejection episodes.

  4. Plasmacytoid dendritic cell dynamics tune interferon-alfa production in SIV-infected cynomolgus macaques.

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    Timothée Bruel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available IFN-I production is a characteristic of HIV/SIV primary infections. However, acute IFN-I plasma concentrations rapidly decline thereafter. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC are key players in this production but primary infection is associated with decreased responsiveness of pDC to TLR 7 and 9 triggering. IFNα production during primary SIV infection contrasts with increased pDC death, renewal and dysfunction. We investigated the contribution of pDC dynamics to both acute IFNα production and the rapid return of IFNα concentrations to pre-infection levels during acute-to-chronic transition. Nine cynomolgus macaques were infected with SIVmac251 and IFNα-producing cells were quantified and characterized. The plasma IFN-I peak was temporally associated with the presence of IFNα(+ pDC in tissues but IFN-I production was not detectable during the acute-to-chronic transition despite persistent immune activation. No IFNα(+ cells other than pDC were detected by intracellular staining. Blood-pDC and peripheral lymph node-pDC both lost IFNα(- production ability in parallel. In blood, this phenomenon correlated with an increase in the counts of Ki67(+-pDC precursors with no IFNα production ability. In tissues, it was associated with increase of both activated pDC and KI67(+-pDC precursors, none of these being IFNα(+ in vivo. Our findings also indicate that activation/death-driven pDC renewal rapidly blunts acute IFNα production in vivo: pDC sub-populations with no IFNα-production ability rapidly increase and shrinkage of IFNα production thus involves both early pDC exhaustion, and increase of pDC precursors.

  5. Highly efficient transduction of human plasmacytoid dendritic cells without phenotypic and functional maturation

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    Plumas Joel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene modified dendritic cells (DC are able to modulate DC functions and induce therapeutic immunity or tolerance in an antigen-specific manner. Among the different DC subsets, plasmacytoid DC (pDC are well known for their ability to recognize and respond to a variety of viruses by secreting high levels of type I interferon. Methods We analyzed here, the transduction efficiency of a pDC cell line, GEN2.2, and of pDC derived from CD34+ progenitors, using lentiviral vectors (LV pseudotyped with different envelope glycoproteins such as the vesicular stomatitis virus envelope (VSVG, the gibbon ape leukaemia virus envelope (GaLV or the feline endogenous virus envelope (RD114. At the same time, we evaluated transgene expression (E-GFP reporter gene under the control of different promoters. Results We found that efficient gene transfer into pDC can be achieved with VSVG-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors (LV under the control of phoshoglycerate kinase (PGK and elongation factor-1 (EF1α promoters (28% to 90% of E-GFP+ cells, respectively in the absence of phenotypic and functional maturation. Surprisingly, promoters (desmin or synthetic C5–12 described as muscle-specific and which drive gene expression in single strand AAV vectors in gene therapy protocols were very highly active in pDC using VSVG-LV. Conclusion Taken together, our results indicate that LV vectors can serve to design pDC-based vaccines in humans, and they are also useful in vitro to evaluate the immunogenicity of the vector preparations, and the specificity and safety of given promoters used in gene therapy protocols.

  6. A systems immunology approach to plasmacytoid dendritic cell function in cytopathic virus infections.

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    Gennady Bocharov

    Full Text Available Plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC-mediated protection against cytopathic virus infection involves various molecular, cellular, tissue-scale, and organism-scale events. In order to better understand such multiscale interactions, we have implemented a systems immunology approach focusing on the analysis of the structure, dynamics and operating principles of virus-host interactions which constrain the initial spread of the pathogen. Using high-resolution experimental data sets coming from the well-described mouse hepatitis virus (MHV model, we first calibrated basic modules including MHV infection of its primary target cells, i.e. pDCs and macrophages (Mphis. These basic building blocks were used to generate and validate an integrative mathematical model for in vivo infection dynamics. Parameter estimation for the system indicated that on a per capita basis, one infected pDC secretes sufficient type I IFN to protect 10(3 to 10(4 Mphis from cytopathic viral infection. This extremely high protective capacity of pDCs secures the spleen's capability to function as a 'sink' for the virus produced in peripheral organs such as the liver. Furthermore, our results suggest that the pDC population in spleen ensures a robust protection against virus variants which substantially down-modulate IFN secretion. However, the ability of pDCs to protect against severe disease caused by virus variants exhibiting an enhanced liver tropism and higher replication rates appears to be rather limited. Taken together, this systems immunology analysis suggests that antiviral therapy against cytopathic viruses should primarily limit viral replication within peripheral target organs.

  7. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Suppress HIV-1 Replication but Contribute to HIV-1 Induced Immunopathogenesis in Humanized Mice

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    Guangming Li; Menglan Cheng; Jun-Ichi Nunoya; Liang Cheng; Haitao Guo; Haisheng Yu; Yong-Jun Liu; Lishan Su; Liguo Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The role of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and pathogenesis remains unclear. HIV-1 infection in the humanized mouse model leads to persistent HIV-1 infection and immunopathogenesis, including type I interferons (IFN-I) induction, immune-activation and depletion of human leukocytes, including CD4 T cells. We developed a monoclonal antibody that specifically depletes human pDC in all lymphoid organs in humanized mice. When pDC were de...

  8. Efficient Sensing of Avian Influenza Viruses by Porcine Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

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    Artur Summerfield

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available H5N1 influenza A virus (IAV infections in human remain rare events but have been associated with severe disease and a higher mortality rate compared to infections with seasonal strains. An excessive release of pro-inflammatory cytokine together with a greater virus dissemination potential have been proposed to explain the high virulence observed in human and other mammalian and avian species. Among the cells involved in the cytokine storm, plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC could play an important role considering their unique capacity to secrete massive amounts of type I interferon (IFN. Considering the role of IFN as a major component of antiviral responses as well as in priming inflammatory responses, we aimed to characterize the induction of IFN-α release upon infection with IAV originating from various avian and mammalian species in a comparative way. In our porcine pDC model, we showed that the viral components triggering IFN responses related to the ability to hemagglutinate, although virosomes devoid of viral RNA were non-stimulatory. Heat-treatment at 65 °C but not chemical inactivation destroyed the ability of IAV to stimulate pDC. All IAV tested induced IFN-α but at different levels and showed different dose-dependencies. H5 and H7 subtypes, in particular H5N1, stimulated pDC at lower doses when compared to mammalian IAV. At high viral doses, IFN-α levels reached by some mammalian IAV surpassed those induced by avian isolates. Although sialic acid-dependent entry was demonstrated, the α-2,3 or α-2,6 binding specificity alone did not explain the differences observed. Furthermore, we were unable to identify a clear role of the hemagglutinin, as the IFN-a doses-response profiles did not clearly differ when viruses with all genes of identical avian origin but different HA were compared. This was found with IAV bearing an HA derived from either a low, a high pathogenic H5N1, or a human H3. Stimulation of pDC was associated with p

  9. Major depletion of plasmacytoid dendritic cells in HIV-2 infection, an attenuated form of HIV disease.

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    Rita Cavaleiro

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC provide an important link between innate and acquired immunity, mediating their action mainly through IFN-alpha production. pDC suppress HIV-1 replication, but there is increasing evidence suggesting they may also contribute to the increased levels of cell apoptosis and pan-immune activation associated with disease progression. Although having the same clinical spectrum, HIV-2 infection is characterized by a strikingly lower viremia and a much slower rate of CD4 decline and AIDS progression than HIV-1, irrespective of disease stage. We report here a similar marked reduction in circulating pDC levels in untreated HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections in association with CD4 depletion and T cell activation, in spite of the undetectable viremia found in the majority of HIV-2 patients. Moreover, the same overexpression of CD86 and PD-L1 on circulating pDC was found in both infections irrespective of disease stage or viremia status. Our observation that pDC depletion occurs in HIV-2 infected patients with undetectable viremia indicates that mechanisms other than direct viral infection determine the pDC depletion during persistent infections. However, viremia was associated with an impairment of IFN-alpha production on a per pDC basis upon TLR9 stimulation. These data support the possibility that diminished function in vitro may relate to prior activation by HIV virions in vivo, in agreement with our finding of higher expression levels of the IFN-alpha inducible gene, MxA, in HIV-1 than in HIV-2 individuals. Importantly, serum IFN-alpha levels were not elevated in HIV-2 infected individuals. In conclusion, our data in this unique natural model of "attenuated" HIV immunodeficiency contribute to the understanding of pDC biology in HIV/AIDS pathogenesis, showing that in the absence of detectable viremia a major depletion of circulating pDC in association with a relatively preserved IFN-alpha production does occur.

  10. Role of PU.1 in MHC Class II Expression via CIITA Transcription in Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Ryosuke; Kasakura, Kazumi; Nakano, Nobuhiro; Hara, Mutsuko; Maeda, Keiko; Okumura, Ko; Ogawa, Hideoki; Yashiro, Takuya; Nishiyama, Chiharu

    2016-01-01

    The cofactor CIITA is a master regulator of MHC class II expression and several transcription factors regulating the cell type-specific expression of CIITA have been identified. Although the MHC class II expression in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) is also mediated by CIITA, the transcription factors involved in the CIITA expression in pDCs are largely unknown. In the present study, we analyzed the role of a hematopoietic lineage-specific transcription factor, PU.1, in CIITA transcription in pDCs. The introduction of PU.1 siRNA into mouse pDCs and a human pDC cell line, CAL-1, reduced the mRNA levels of MHC class II and CIITA. When the binding of PU.1 to the 3rd promoter of CIITA (pIII) in CAL-1 and mouse pDCs was analyzed by a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, a significant amount of PU.1 binding to the pIII was detected, which was definitely decreased in PU.1 siRNA-transfected cells. Reporter assays showed that PU.1 knockdown reduced the pIII promoter activity and that three Ets-motifs in the human pIII promoter were candidates of cis-enhancing elements. By electrophoretic mobility shift assays, it was confirmed that two Ets-motifs, GGAA (-181/-178) and AGAA (-114/-111), among three candidates, were directly bound with PU.1. When mouse pDCs and CAL-1 cells were stimulated by GM-CSF, mRNA levels of PU.1, pIII-driven CIITA, total CIITA, MHC class II, and the amount of PU.1 binding to pIII were significantly increased. The GM-CSF-mediated up-regulation of these mRNAs was canceled in PU.1 siRNA-introduced cells. Taking these results together, we conclude that PU.1 transactivates the pIII through direct binding to Ets-motifs in the promoter in pDCs. PMID:27105023

  11. Immune Adjuvant Efficacy of CpG Oligonucleotide in Cancer Treatment Is Founded Specifically upon TLR9 Function in Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nierkens, S.; Brok, M.H.M.G.M. den; Garcia, Z.; Togher, S.; Wagenaars, J.A.L.; Wassink, M.; Boon, L.; Ruers, T.J.M.; Figdor, C.G.; Schoenberger, S.P.; Adema, G.J.; Janssen, E.M.

    2011-01-01

    The differences in function, location, and migratory pattern of conventional dendritic cells (cDC) and plasmacytoid DCs (pDC) not only point to specialized roles in immune responses but also signify additive and interdependent relationships required to clear pathogens. We studied the in vivo require

  12. The Role of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells in Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses against Alpha Herpes Virus Infections

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    Philipp Schuster

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1999, two independent groups identified plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDC as major type I interferon- (IFN- producing cells in the blood. Since then, evidence is accumulating that PDC are a multifunctional cell population effectively coordinating innate and adaptive immune responses. This paper focuses on the role of different immune cells and their interactions in the surveillance of alpha herpes virus infections, summarizes current knowledge on PDC surface receptors and their role in direct cell-cell contacts, and develops a risk factor model for the clinical implications of herpes simplex and varicella zoster virus reactivation. Data from studies involving knockout mice and cell-depletion experiments as well as human studies converge into a “spider web”, in which the direct and indirect crosstalk between many cell populations tightly controls acute, latent, and recurrent alpha herpes virus infections. Notably, cells involved in innate immune regulations appear to shape adaptive immune responses more extensively than previously thought.

  13. Langerhans cells (CD1a and CD207), dermal dendrocytes (FXIIIa) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (CD123) in skin lesions of leprosy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Kelly Emi; Aarão, Tinara Leila de Sousa; Silva, Luciana Mota; de Sousa, Jorge Rodrigues; de Souza, Juarez; Dias, Leonidas Braga; Oliveira Carneiro, Francisca Regina; Fuzii, Hellen Thais; Quaresma, Juarez Antonio Simões

    2016-02-01

    The clinical course of infection with Mycobacterium leprae varies widely and depends on the pattern of the host immune response. Dendritic cells play an important role in the activation of the innate and adaptive immune system and seem to be essential for the development of the disease. To analyze the presence of epidermal dendritic cells (CD1a and CD207), plasmacytoid dendritic cells (CD123) and dermal dendrocytes (factor XIIIa) in lesion fragments of leprosy patients, skin samples from 30 patients were studied. These samples were submitted to immunohistochemistry against CD1a, CD207, FXIIIa, and CD123. The results showed a larger number of Langerhans cells, detected with the CD1a or CD207 marker, dermal dendrocytes and plasmacytoid dendritic cells in patients with the tuberculoid form. A positive correlation was observed between the Langerhans cell markers CD1a and CD207 in both the tuberculoid and lepromatous forms, and between Langerhans cells and dermal dendrocytes in samples with the tuberculoid form. The present results indicate the existence of a larger number of dendritic cells in patients at the resistant pole of the disease (tuberculoid) and suggest that the different dendritic cells studied play a role, favoring an efficient immune response against infection with M. leprae. PMID:26639680

  14. Interplay of foot-and-mouth disease virus, antibodies and plasmacytoid dendritic cells: virus opsonization under non-neutralizing conditions results in enhanced interferon-alpha responses

    OpenAIRE

    Lannes Nils; Python Sylvie; Summerfield Artur

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is a highly infectious member of the Picornaviridae inducing an acute disease of cloven-hoofed species. Vaccine-induced immune protection correlates with the presence of high levels of neutralizing antibodies but also opsonising antibodies have been proposed as an important mechanism of the immune response contributing to virus clearance by macrophages and leading to the production of type-I interferon (IFN) by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC). T...

  15. Activation of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells in Colon-Draining Lymph Nodes during Citrobacter rodentium Infection Involves Pathogen-Sensing and Inflammatory Pathways Distinct from Conventional Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toivonen, Raine; Kong, Lingjia; Rasool, Omid; Lund, Riikka J; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Hänninen, Arno

    2016-06-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) bear the main responsibility for initiation of adaptive immune responses necessary for antimicrobial immunity. In the small intestine, afferent lymphatics convey Ags and microbial signals to mesenteric lymph nodes (LNs) to induce adaptive immune responses against microbes and food Ags derived from the small intestine. Whether the large intestine is covered by the same lymphatic system or represents its own lymphoid compartment has not been studied until very recently. We identified three small mesenteric LNs, distinct from small intestinal LNs, which drain lymph specifically from the colon, and studied DC responses to the attaching and effacing pathogen Citrobacter rodentium in these. Transcriptional profiling of conventional (CD11c(high)CD103(high)) DC and plasmacytoid (plasmacytoid DC Ag-1(high)B220(+)CD11c(int)) DC (pDC) populations during steady-state conditions revealed activity of distinct sets of genes in these two DC subsets, both in small intestinal and colon-draining LNs. C. rodentium activated DC especially in colon-draining LNs, and gene expression changed in pDC more profoundly than in conventional DC. Among the genes most upregulated in pDC were C-type lectin receptor CLEC4E, IL-1Rs (IL-1R1 and -2), proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1a and IL-6), and TLR6. Our results indicate that colon immune surveillance is distinct from that of the small intestine in terms of draining LNs, and identify pDC as active sentinels of colonic inflammation and/or microbial dysbiosis. PMID:27183629

  16. Low Counts of B Cells, Natural Killer Cells, Monocytes, Dendritic Cells, Basophils, and Eosinophils are Associated with Postengraftment Infections after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgorny, Peter J; Pratt, Laura M; Liu, Yiping; Dharmani-Khan, Poonam; Luider, Joanne; Auer-Grzesiak, Iwona; Mansoor, Adnan; Williamson, Tyler S; Ugarte-Torres, Alejandra; Hoegh-Petersen, Mette; Khan, Faisal M; Larratt, Loree; Jimenez-Zepeda, Victor H; Stewart, Douglas A; Russell, James A; Daly, Andrew; Storek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients are immunocompromised and thus predisposed to infections. We set out to determine the deficiency of which immune cell subset(s) may predispose to postengraftment infections. We determined day 28, 56, 84, and 180 blood counts of multiple immune cell subsets in 219 allogeneic transplant recipients conditioned with busulfan, fludarabine, and Thymoglobulin. Deficiency of a subset was considered to be associated with infections if the low subset count was significantly associated with subsequent high infection rate per multivariate analysis in both discovery and validation cohorts. Low counts of monocytes (total and inflammatory) and basophils, and low IgA levels were associated with viral infections. Low plasmacytoid dendritic cell (PDC) counts were associated with bacterial infections. Low inflammatory monocyte counts were associated with fungal infections. Low counts of total and naive B cells, total and CD56(high) natural killer (NK) cells, total and inflammatory monocytes, myeloid dendritic cells (MDCs), PDCs, basophils and eosinophils, and low levels of IgA were associated with any infections (due to any pathogen or presumed). In conclusion, deficiencies of B cells, NK cells, monocytes, MDCs, PDCs, basophils, eosinophils, and/or IgA plasma cells appear to predispose to postengraftment infections. PMID:26363444

  17. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Act as the Most Competent Cell Type in Linking Antiviral Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Zhang; Fu-Sheng Wang

    2005-01-01

    Appropriate in vivo control of plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC) recruitment and activation is a fundamental requirement for defense against viral infection. During this process, a pivotal event that influences the outcome of viral infection is the production of high levels of type I interferon by pDCs. In particular, recent research findings showed that pDCs not only shape the nature of innate resistance, but are also responsible for the successful transition from innate to adaptive immunity for viral resistance. In addition, pDCs can differentiate into antigen presenting cells that may regulate tolerance to a given pathogen. Importantly, in a series of recent clinical studies,pDCs appeared to be defective in number and function in conditions of chronic viral diseases such as infected with HIV-1, HBV or HCV. pDC-associated clinical antiviral therapy is also emerging. This review describes research findings exanining the functional and antiviral properties of in vivo pDC plasticity.

  18. Plasmacytoid dendritic cell-derived IFNα modulates Th17 differentiation during early Bordetella pertussis infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, V; Smith, A A; You, H; Nguyen, T A; Ferguson, R; Taylor, M; Park, J E; Llontop, P; Youngman, K R; Abramson, T

    2016-05-01

    Whooping cough is a highly contagious respiratory disease caused by Bordetella pertussis (B. pertussis). T helper 17 (Th17) cells have a central role in the resolution of the infection. Emerging studies document that type I interferons (IFNs) suppress Th17 differentiation and interleukin (IL)-17 responses in models of infection and chronic inflammation. As plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are a major source of type I IFNs, we hypothesize that during B. pertussis infection in mice, pDC-derived IFNα inhibits a rapid increase in Th17 cells. We found that IFNα-secreting pDCs appear in the lungs during the early stages of infection, while a robust rise of Th17 cells in the lungs is detected at 15 days post-infection or later. The presence of IFNα led to reduced Th17 differentiation and proliferation in vitro. Furthermore, in vivo blocking of IFNα produced by pDCs during infection with B. pertussis infection resulted in early increase of Th17 frequency, inflammation, and reduced bacterial loads in the airways of infected mice. Taken together, the experiments reported here describe an inhibitory role for pDCs and pDC-derived IFNα in modulating Th17 responses during the early stages of B. pertussis infection, which may explain the prolonged nature of whooping cough. PMID:26462419

  19. A Regulatory Feedback between Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells and Regulatory B Cells Is Aberrant in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Madhvi; Blair, Paul A; Isenberg, David A; Mauri, Claudia

    2016-03-15

    Signals controlling the generation of regulatory B (Breg) cells remain ill-defined. Here we report an "auto"-regulatory feedback mechanism between plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and Breg cells. In healthy individuals, pDCs drive the differentiation of CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) (immature) B cells into IL-10-producing CD24(+)CD38(hi) Breg cells and plasmablasts, via the release of IFN-α and CD40 engagement. CD24(+)CD38(hi) Breg cells conversely restrained IFN-α production by pDCs via IL-10 release. In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), this cross-talk was compromised; pDCs promoted plasmablast differentiation but failed to induce Breg cells. This defect was recapitulated in healthy B cells upon exposure to a high concentration of IFN-α. Defective pDC-mediated expansion of CD24(+)CD38(hi) Breg cell numbers in SLE was associated with altered STAT1 and STAT3 activation. Both altered pDC-CD24(+)CD38(hi) Breg cell interactions and STAT1-STAT3 activation were normalized in SLE patients responding to rituximab. We propose that alteration in pDC-CD24(+)CD38(hi) Breg cell interaction contributes to the pathogenesis of SLE. PMID:26968426

  20. Myeloid Cell Nuclear Differentiation Antigen (MNDA) Expression Distinguishes Extramedullary Presentations of Myeloid Leukemia From Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ryan C; Kim, Jinah; Natkunam, Yasodha; Sundram, Uma; Freud, Aharon G; Gammon, Bryan; Cascio, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Myeloid neoplasms constitute one of the most common malignancies in adults. In most cases these proliferations initially manifest in the blood and marrow; however, extramedullary involvement may precede blood or marrow involvement in a subset of cases, making a definitive diagnosis challenging by morphologic and immunohistochemical assessment alone. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare, aggressive entity that frequently presents in extramedullary sites and can show morphologic and immunophenotypic overlap with myeloid neoplasms. Given that BPDCN and myeloid neoplasms may both initially present in extramedullary sites and that novel targeted therapies may be developed that exploit the unique molecular signature of BPDCN, new immunophenotypic markers that can reliably separate myeloid neoplasms from BPDCN are desirable. We evaluated the utility of myeloid cell nuclear differentiation antigen (MNDA) expression in a series of extramedullary myeloid leukemias (EMLs) and BPDCN. Forty biopsies containing EML and 19 biopsies containing BPDCN were studied by MNDA immunohistochemistry. The majority of myeloid neoplasms showed nuclear expression of MNDA (65%). In contrast, all cases of BPDCN lacked MNDA expression. These findings show that MNDA is expressed in the majority of EMLs and support the inclusion of MNDA immunohistochemistry in the diagnostic evaluation of blastic hematopoietic infiltrates, particularly when the differential diagnosis is between myeloid leukemia and BPDCN. PMID:26796502

  1. Phospholipid Scramblase 1 regulates Toll-like receptor 9-mediated type Ⅰ interferon production in plasmacytoid dendritic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amjad H Talukder; Musheng Bao; Tae Whan Kim; Valeria Facchinetti; Shino Hanabuchi; Laura Bover; Tomasz Zal; Yong-Jun Liu

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) senses microbial DNA in the endosomes of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and triggers MyD88-dependent type 1 interferon (IFN) responses.To better understand TLR9 biology in pDCs,we established a yeast two-hybrid library for the identification of TLR9-interacting proteins.Here,we report that an IFN-inducible protein,phospholipid scramblase 1 (PLSCR1),interacts with TLR9 in pDCs.Knockdown of PLSCR1 expression by siRNA in human pDC cell line led to a 60-70% reduction of IFN-α responses following CpG-ODN (oligodeoxynucleotide) stimulation.Primary pDCs from PLSCR1-deficient mice produced lower amount of type 1 IFN than pDCs from the wild-type mice in response to CpG-ODN,herpes simplex virus and influenza A virus.Following CpG-A stimulation,there were much lower amounts of TLR9 in the early endosomes together with CpG-A in pDCs from PLSCRl-deficient mice.Our study demonstrates that PLSCR1 is a TLR9-interacting protein that plays an important role in pDC's type 1 IFN responses by regulating TLR9 trafficking to the endosomal compartment.

  2. Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase-Expressing Aortic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Protect against Atherosclerosis by Induction of Regulatory T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Tae Jin; Lee, Jun Seong; Machmach, Kawthar; Shim, Dahee; Choi, Junhee; Wi, Young Jin; Jang, Hyung Seok; Jung, In-Hyuk; Kim, Kyeongdae; Yoon, Won Kee; Miah, Mohammad Alam; Li, Bin; Chang, Jinsam; Bego, Mariana G; Pham, Tram N Q; Loschko, Jakob; Fritz, Jörg Hermann; Krug, Anne B; Lee, Seung-Pyo; Keler, Tibor; Guimond, Jean V; Haddad, Elie; Cohen, Eric A; Sirois, Martin G; El-Hamamsy, Ismail; Colonna, Marco; Oh, Goo Taeg; Choi, Jae-Hoon; Cheong, Cheolho

    2016-05-10

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are unique bone-marrow-derived cells that produce large amounts of type I interferon in response to microbial stimulation. Furthermore, pDCs also promote T cell tolerance in sterile-inflammation conditions. However, the immunomodulatory role of aortic pDCs in atherosclerosis has been poorly understood. Here, we identified functional mouse and human pDCs in the aortic intima and showed that selective, inducible pDC depletion in mice exacerbates atherosclerosis. Aortic pDCs expressed CCR9 and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO-1), an enzyme involved in driving the generation of regulatory T cells (Tregs). As a consequence, loss of pDCs resulted in decreased numbers of Tregs and reduced IL-10 levels in the aorta. Moreover, antigen presentation by pDCs expanded antigen-specific Tregs in the atherosclerotic aorta. Notably, Tregs ablation affected pDC homeostasis in diseased aorta. Accordingly, pDCs in human atherosclerotic aortas colocalized with Tregs. Collectively, we identified a mechanism of atheroprotection mediated by tolerogenic aortic pDCs. PMID:27166946

  3. A subset of human plasmacytoid dendritic cells expresses CD8α upon exposure to herpes simplex virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Philipp; Thomann, Sabrina; Werner, Maren; Vollmer, Jörg; Schmidt, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Classical and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DC) play important roles in the defense against murine and human infections with herpes simplex virus (HSV). So far, CD8α expression has only been reported for murine DC. CD8α(+) DC have prominent cross-presenting activities, which are enhanced by murine CD8α(+) PDC. The human orthologue of murine CD8α(+) DC, the CD141 (BDCA3)(+) DC, mainly cross-present after TLR3 ligation. We report here the serendipitous finding that a subset of human PDC upregulates CD8α upon HSV-1 stimulation, as shown by gene array and flow cytometry analyses. CD8α, not CD8ß, was expressed upon exposure. Markers of activation, migration, and costimulation were upregulated on CD8α-expressing human PDC. In these cells, increased cytokine and chemokine levels were detected that enhance development and function of T, B, and NK cells, and recruit immature DC, monocytes, and Th1 cells, respectively. Altogether, human CD8α(+) PDC exhibit a highly activated phenotype and appear to recruit other immune cells to the site of inflammation. Further studies will show whether CD8α-expressing PDC contribute to antigen cross-presentation, which may be important for immune defenses against HSV infections in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26082771

  4. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells are short-lived: reappraising the influence of migration, genetic factors and activation on estimation of lifespan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yifan; Chow, Kevin V.; Soo, Priscilla; Xu, Zhen; Brady, Jamie L.; Lawlor, Kate E.; Masters, Seth L.; O’keeffe, Meredith; Shortman, Ken; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Lew, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) play an important role in immunity to certain pathogens and immunopathology in some autoimmune diseases. They are thought to have a longer lifespan than conventional DCs (cDCs), largely based on a slower rate of BrdU labeling by splenic pDCs. Here we demonstrated that pDC expansion and therefore BrdU labeling by pDCs occurs in bone marrow (BM). The rate of labeling was similar between BM pDCs and spleen cDCs. Therefore, slower BrdU labeling of spleen pDCs likely reflects the “migration time” (∼2 days) for BrdU labeled pDCs to traffic to the spleen, not necessarily reflecting longer life span. Tracking the decay of differentiated DCs showed that splenic pDCs and cDCs decayed at a similar rate. We suggest that spleen pDCs have a shorter in vivo lifespan than estimated utilizing some of the previous approaches. Nevertheless, pDC lifespan varies between mouse strains. pDCs from lupus-prone NZB mice survived longer than C57BL/6 pDCs. We also demonstrated that activation either positively or negatively impacted on the survival of pDCs via different cell-death mechanisms. Thus, pDCs are also short-lived. However, the pDC lifespan is regulated by genetic and environmental factors that may have pathological consequence. PMID:27112985

  5. Synergistic Stimulation with Different TLR7 Ligands Modulates Gene Expression Patterns in the Human Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Line CAL-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Tobias; Steinhagen, Folkert; Weisheit, Christina; Baumgarten, Georg; Hoeft, Andreas; Klaschik, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Objective. TLR7 ligation in plasmacytoid dendritic cells is promising for the treatment of cancer, allergy, and infectious diseases; however, high doses of ligands are required. We hypothesized that the combination of structurally different TLR7 ligands exponentiates the resulting immune response. Methods. CAL-1 (human pDC line) cells were incubated with the TLR7-specific adenine analog CL264 and single-stranded 9.2s RNA. Protein secretion was measured by ELISA. Microarray technique was used to detect modified gene expression patterns upon synergistic stimulation, revealing underlying functional groups and networks. Cell surface binding properties were studied using FACS analysis. Results. CL264 in combination with 9.2s RNA significantly enhanced cytokine and interferon secretion to supra-additive levels. This effect was due to a stronger stimulation of already regulated genes (by monostimulation) as well as to recruitment of thus far unregulated genes. Top scoring canonical pathways referred to immune-related processes. Network analysis revealed IL-1β, IL-6, TNF, and IFN-β as major regulatory nodes, while several minor regulatory nodes were also identified. Binding of CL264 to the cell surface was enhanced by 9.2s RNA. Conclusion. Structurally different TLR7 ligands act synergistically on gene expression patterns and on the resulting inflammatory response. These data could impact future strategies optimizing TLR7-targeted drug design. PMID:26770023

  6. TRAIL-mediated killing of acute lymphoblastic leukemia by plasmacytoid dendritic cell-activated natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelaidier, Martin; Dìaz-Rodriguez, Yildian; Cordeau, Martine; Cordeiro, Paulo; Haddad, Elie; Herblot, Sabine; Duval, Michel

    2015-10-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) still frequently recurs after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), underscoring the need to improve the graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect. Natural killer (NK) cells reconstitute in the first months following HSCT when leukemia burden is at its lowest, but ALL cells have been shown to be resistant to NK cell-mediated killing. We show here that this resistance is overcome by NK cell stimulation with TLR-9-activated plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). NK cell priming with activated pDCs resulted in TRAIL and CD69 up-regulation on NK cells and IFN-γ production. NK cell activation was dependent on IFN-α produced by pDCs, but was not reproduced by IFN-α alone. ALL killing was further enhanced by inhibition of KIR engagement. We showed that ALL lysis was mainly mediated by TRAIL engagement, while the release of cytolytic granules was involved when ALL expressed NK cell activating receptor ligands. Finally, adoptive transfers of activated-pDCs in ALL-bearing humanized mice delayed the leukemia onset and cure 30% of mice. Our data therefore demonstrate that TLR-9 activated pDCs are a powerful tool to overcome ALL resistance to NK cell-mediated killing and to reinforce the GvL effect of HSCT. These results open new therapeutic avenues to prevent relapse in children with ALL. PMID:26320191

  7. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells regulate autoreactive B cell activation via soluble factors and in a cell-to-cell contact manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chuanlin; Cai, Yihua; Marroquin, Jose; Ildstad, Suzanne T; Yan, Jun

    2009-12-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are specialized type I IFN producers, which play an important role in pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders. Dysregulated autoreactive B cell activation is a hallmark in most autoimmune diseases. This study was undertaken to investigate interactions between pDCs and autoreactive B cells. After coculture of autoreactive B cells that recognize self-Ag small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles with activated pDCs, we found that pDCs significantly enhance autoreactive B cell proliferation, autoantibody production, and survival in response to TLR and BCR stimulation. Neutralization of IFN-alpha/beta and IL-6 abrogated partially pDC-mediated enhancement of autoreactive B cell activation. Transwell studies demonstrated that pDCs could provide activation signals to autoreactive B cells via a cell-to-cell contact manner. The involvement of the ICAM-1-LFA-1 pathway was revealed as contributing to this effect. This in vitro enhancement effect was further demonstrated by an in vivo B cell adoptive transfer experiment, which showed that autoreactive B cell proliferation and activation were significantly decreased in MyD88-deficient mice compared with wild-type mice. These data suggest the dynamic interplay between pDCs and B cells is required for full activation of autoreactive B cells upon TLR or BCR stimulation. PMID:19890051

  8. A plasmacytoid dendritic cell (CD123+/CD11c-) based assay system to predict contact allergenicity of chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A predictive allergenicity test system for assessing the contact allergenicity of chemicals is needed by the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industry to monitor product safety in the marketplace. Development of such non-animal alternative assay systems for skin sensitization and hazard identification has been pursued by policy makers and regulatory agencies. We investigated whether phenotypic and functional changes to a subset of dendritic cells (DC), plasmacytoid DC (pDC), could be used to identify contact allergens. To achieve this goal, normal human DC were generated from CD34+ progenitor cells and cryopreserved. Frozen DC were thawed and the pDC fraction (CD123+/CD11c-) was harvested using FACS sorting. The pDC were cultured, expanded, and exposed to chemical allergens (N = 26) or non-allergens (N = 22). Concentrations of each chemical that resulted in >50% viability was determined using FACS analysis of propidium iodide stained cells using pDC from 2 to 5 donors. Expression of the surface marker, CD86, which has been implicated in dendritic cell maturation, was used as a marker of allergenicity. CD86 expression increased (≥1.5-fold) for 25 of 26 allergens (sensitivity = 96%) but did not increase for 19 of 22 non-allergens (specificity = 86%). In a direct comparison to historical data for the regulatory approved, mouse local lymph node assay (LLNA) for 23 allergens and 22 non-allergens, the pDC method had sensitivity and specificity of 96% and 86%, respectively, while the sensitivity and specificity of the LLNA assay was 83% and 82%, respectively. In conclusion, CD86 expression in pDC appears to be a sensitive and specific indicator to identify contact allergenicity. Such an assay method utilizing normal human cells will be useful for high throughput screening of chemicals for allergenicity.

  9. CCR6/CCR10-mediated plasmacytoid dendritic cell recruitment to inflamed epithelia after instruction in lymphoid tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisirak, Vanja; Vey, Nelly; Vanbervliet, Béatrice; Duhen, Thomas; Puisieux, Isabelle; Homey, Bernhard; Bowman, Edward P; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Dubois, Bertrand; Kaiserlian, Dominique; Lira, Sergio A; Puisieux, Alain; Blay, Jean-Yves; Caux, Christophe; Bendriss-Vermare, Nathalie

    2011-11-10

    Absent in peripheral tissues during homeostasis, human plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are described in inflamed skin or mucosa. Here, we report that, unlike blood pDCs, a subset of tonsil pDCs express functional CCR6 and CCR10, and their respective ligands CCL20 and CCL27are detected in inflamed epithelia contacting blood dendritic cell antigen 2(+) pDCs. Moreover, pDCs are recruited to imiquimod-treated skin tumors in WT but not CCR6-deficient mice, and competitive adoptive transfers reveal that CCR6-deficient pDCs are impaired in homing to inflamed skin tumors after intravenous transfer. On IL-3 culture, CCR6 and CCR10 expression is induced on human blood pDCs that become responsive to CCL20 and CCL27/CCL28, respectively. Interestingly, unlike myeloid DC, blood pDCs initially up-regulate CCR7 expression and CCL19 responsiveness on IL-3 ± CpG-B and then acquire functional CCR6 and CCR10. Finally, IL-3-differentiated CCR6(+) CCR10(+) pDCs secrete high levels of IFN-α in response to virus. Overall, we propose an unexpected pDCs migratory model that may best apply for mucosal-associated lymphoid tissues. After CCR7-mediated extravasation into lymphoid tissues draining inflamed epithelia, blood pDCs may be instructed to up-regulate CCR6 and/or CCR10 allowing their homing into inflamed epithelia (in mucosae or skin). At this site, pDCs can then produce IFN-α contributing to pathogen clearance and/or local inflammation. PMID:21937703

  10. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells sequester high prion titres at early stages of prion infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Rocio Castro-Seoane; Holger Hummerich; Trevor Sweeting; M Howard Tattum; Linehan, Jacqueline M.; Mar Fernandez de Marco; Sebastian Brandner; John Collinge; Peter-Christian Klöhn

    2012-01-01

    In most transmissible spongiform encephalopathies prions accumulate in the lymphoreticular system (LRS) long before they are detectable in the central nervous system. While a considerable body of evidence showed that B lymphocytes and follicular dendritic cells play a major role in prion colonization of lymphoid organs, the contribution of various other cell types, including antigen-presenting cells, to the accumulation and the spread of prions in the LRS are not well understood. A comprehens...

  11. Haploinsufficiency for NR3C1, the gene encoding the glucocorticoid receptor, in blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emadali, Anouk; Hoghoughi, Neda; Duley, Samuel; Hajmirza, Azadeh; Verhoeyen, Els; Cosset, Francois-Loic; Bertrand, Philippe; Roumier, Christophe; Roggy, Anne; Suchaud-Martin, Céline; Chauvet, Martine; Bertrand, Sarah; Hamaidia, Sieme; Rousseaux, Sophie; Josserand, Véronique; Charles, Julie; Templier, Isabelle; Maeda, Takahiro; Bruder-Costa, Juliana; Chaperot, Laurence; Plumas, Joel; Jacob, Marie-Christine; Bonnefoix, Thierry; Park, Sophie; Gressin, Remy; Tensen, Cornelis P; Mecucci, Cristina; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Leroux, Dominique; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Nguyen-Khac, Florence; Luquet, Isabelle; Penther, Dominique; Bastard, Christian; Jardin, Fabrice; Lefebvre, Christine; Garnache, Francine; Callanan, Mary B

    2016-06-16

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare and highly aggressive leukemia for which knowledge on disease mechanisms and effective therapies are currently lacking. Only a handful of recurring genetic mutations have been identified and none is specific to BPDCN. In this study, through molecular cloning in an index case that presented a balanced t(3;5)(q21;q31) and molecular cytogenetic analyses in a further 46 cases, we identify monoallelic deletion of NR3C1 (5q31), encoding the glucocorticoid receptor (GCR), in 13 of 47 (28%) BPDCN patients. Targeted deep sequencing in 36 BPDCN cases, including 10 with NR3C1 deletion, did not reveal NR3C1 point mutations or indels. Haploinsufficiency for NR3C1 defined a subset of BPDCN with lowered GCR expression and extremely poor overall survival (P = .0006). Consistent with a role for GCR in tumor suppression, functional analyses coupled with gene expression profiling identified corticoresistance and loss-of-EZH2 function as major downstream consequences of NR3C1 deletion in BPDCN. Subsequently, more detailed analyses of the t(3;5)(q21;q31) revealed fusion of NR3C1 to a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) gene (lincRNA-3q) that encodes a novel, nuclear, noncoding RNA involved in the regulation of leukemia stem cell programs and G1/S transition, via E2F. Overexpression of lincRNA-3q was a consistent feature of malignant cells and could be abrogated by bromodomain and extraterminal domain (BET) protein inhibition. Taken together, this work points to NR3C1 as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor in a subset of BPDCN and identifies BET inhibition, acting at least partially via lncRNA blockade, as a novel treatment option in BPDCN. PMID:27060168

  12. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma exerts systemic effects on the peripheral blood myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells: an indicator of disease severity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dendritic cells (DCs) isolated from tumor bearing animals or from individuals with solid tumors display functional abnormalities and the DC impairment has emerged as one mechanism for tumor evasion from the control of the immune system. Ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common pancreatic cancer, is recognized as a very aggressive cancer type with a mortality that almost matches the rate of incidence. We examined the systemic influence ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) exerted on levels of peripheral blood DCs and inflammatory mediators in comparison to the effects exerted by other pancreatic tumors, chronic pancreatitis, and age-matched controls. All groups examined, including PDAC, had decreased levels of myeloid DCs (MDC) and plasmacytoid DCs (PDC) and enhanced apoptosis in these cells as compared to controls. We found elevated levels of PGE2 and CXCL8 in subjects with PDAC, and chronic pancreatitis. Levels of these inflammatory factors were in part restored in PDAC after tumor resection, whereas the levels of DCs were impaired in the majority of these patients ~12 weeks after tumor removal. Our results prove that solid pancreatic tumors, including PDAC, systemically affect blood DCs. The impairments do not seem to be tumor-specific, since similar results were obtained in subjects with chronic pancreatitis. Furthermore, we found that PDAC patients with a survival over 2 years had significant higher levels of blood DCs compared to patients with less than one year survival. Our findings points to the involvement of inflammation in the destruction of the blood MDCs and PDCs. Furthermore, the preservation of the blood DCs compartment in PDAC patients seems to benefit their ability to control the disease and survival

  13. Lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus induces systemic lymphocyte activation via TLR7-dependent IFNalpha responses by plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph G Ammann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV is a natural infectious agent of mice. Like several other viruses, LDV causes widespread and very rapid but transient activation of both B cells and T cells in lymphoid tissues and the blood. The mechanism of this activation has not been fully described and is the focus of the current studies. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A known inducer of early lymphocyte activation is IFNalpha, a cytokine strongly induced by LDV infection. Neutralization of IFNalpha in the plasma from infected mice ablated its ability to activate lymphocytes in vitro. Since the primary source of virus-induced IFNalpha in vivo is often plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC's, we depleted these cells prior to LDV infection and tested for lymphocyte activation. Depletion of pDC's in vivo eradicated both the LDV-induced IFNalpha response and lymphocyte activation. A primary receptor in pDC's for single stranded RNA viruses such as LDV is the toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7 pattern recognition receptor. Infection of TLR7-knockout mice revealed that both the IFNalpha response and lymphocyte activation were dependent on TLR7 signaling in vivo. Interestingly, virus levels in both TLR7 knockout mice and pDC-depleted mice were indistinguishable from controls indicating that LDV is largely resistant to the systemic IFNalpha response. CONCLUSION: Results indicate that LDV-induced activation of lymphocytes is due to recognition of LDV nucleic acid by TLR7 pattern recognition receptors in pDC's that respond with a lymphocyte-inducing IFNalpha response.

  14. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells orchestrate TLR7-mediated innate and adaptive immunity for the initiation of autoimmune inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hideaki; Arimura, Keiichi; Uto, Tomofumi; Fukaya, Tomohiro; Nakamura, Takeshi; Choijookhuu, Narantsog; Hishikawa, Yoshitaka; Sato, Katsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Endosomal toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated detection of viral nucleic acids (NAs) and production of type I interferon (IFN-I) are key elements of antiviral defense, while inappropriate recognition of self NAs with the induction of IFN-I responses is linked to autoimmunity such as psoriasis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are cells specialized in robust IFN-I secretion by the engagement of endosomal TLRs, and predominantly express sialic acid-binding Ig-like lectin (Siglec)-H. However, how pDCs control endosomal TLR-mediated immune responses that cause autoimmunity remains unclear. Here we show a critical role of pDCs in TLR7-mediated autoimmunity using gene-modified mice with impaired expression of Siglec-H and selective ablation of pDCs. pDCs were shown to be indispensable for the induction of systemic inflammation and effector T-cell responses triggered by TLR7 ligand. pDCs aggravated psoriasiform dermatitis mediated through the hyperproliferation of keratinocytes and enhanced dermal infiltration of granulocytes and γδ T cells. Furthermore, pDCs promoted the production of anti-self NA antibodies and glomerulonephritis in lupus-like disease by activating inflammatory monocytes. On the other hand, Siglec-H regulated the TLR7-mediated activation of pDCs. Thus, our findings reveal that pDCs provide an essential link between TLR7-mediated innate and adaptive immunity for the initiation of IFN-I-associated autoimmune inflammation. PMID:27075414

  15. Contact-dependent abrogation of bone marrow-derived plasmacytoid dendritic cell differentiation by murine mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackstein, Holger; Tschipakow, Inna; Bein, Gregor; Nold, Philipp; Brendel, Cornelia; Baal, Nelli

    2016-07-15

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are rare central regulators of antiviral immunity and unsurpassed producers of interferon-α (IFN-α). Despite their crucial role as a link between innate and adaptive immunity, little is known about the modulation of pDC differentiation by other bone marrow (BM) cells. In this study, we investigated the modulation of pDC differentiation in Flt-3 ligand (Flt3L)-supplemented BM cultures, using highly purified mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that were FACS-isolated from murine BM based on surface marker expression and used after in vitro expansion. Initial analysis revealed an almost complete inhibition of BM-derived pDC expansion in the presence of >2% MSC. This inhibition was cell contact-dependent and soluble factor-independent, as indicated by trans-well experiments. The abrogation of functional pDC development by MSCs was confirmed after TLR9 stimulation, revealing a complete, contact-dependent suppression of the IFN-a producing capacity of pDCs in Flt3L MSC BM co-cultures. MSC selectively inhibited pDC development in contrast to myeloid DC development, as indicated by the significantly increased numbers of myeloid DC in Flt3L-supplemented BM cultures. The absence of significant MSC-mediated inhibitory effects on myeloid DC differentiation was confirmed by additional experiments in GM-CSF/IL-4-supplemented BM cultures. In summary, we describe a novel contact-dependent immunomodulatory mechanism of MSC that targets the BM-derived expansion of functional pDCs. PMID:27233615

  16. SCARB2/LIMP-2 Regulates IFN Production of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells by Mediating Endosomal Translocation of TLR9 and Nuclear Translocation of IRF7

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Hao; Zhang, Jialong; Zhang, Xuyuan; Wang, Yanbing; Yu, Haisheng; Yin, Xiangyun; Li, Jingyun; Du, Peishuang; Plumas, Joel; Chaperot, Laurence; Chen, Jianzhu; Su, Lishan; Liu, Yongjun; Zhang, Liguo

    2015-01-01

    Scavenger receptor class B, member 2 (SCARB2) is essential for endosome biogenesis and reorganization and serves as a receptor for both β-glucocerebrosidase and enterovirus 71. However, little is known about its function in innate immune cells. In this study, we show that, among human peripheral blood cells, SCARB2 is most highly expressed in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), and its expression is further upregulated by CpG oligodeoxynucleotide stimulation. Knockdown of SCARB2 in pDC cell ...

  17. Rotavirus activates lymphocytes from non-obese diabetic mice by triggering toll-like receptor 7 signaling and interferon production in plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Pane

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that rotavirus infection promotes the progression of genetically-predisposed children to type 1 diabetes, a chronic autoimmune disease marked by infiltration of activated lymphocytes into pancreatic islets. Non-obese diabetic (NOD mice provide a model for the human disease. Infection of adult NOD mice with rhesus monkey rotavirus (RRV accelerates diabetes onset, without evidence of pancreatic infection. Rather, RRV spreads to the pancreatic and mesenteric lymph nodes where its association with antigen-presenting cells, including dendritic cells, induces cellular maturation. RRV infection increases levels of the class I major histocompatibility complex on B cells and proinflammatory cytokine expression by T cells at these sites. In autoimmunity-resistant mice and human mononuclear cells from blood, rotavirus-exposed plasmacytoid dendritic cells contribute to bystander polyclonal B cell activation through type I interferon expression. Here we tested the hypothesis that rotavirus induces bystander activation of lymphocytes from NOD mice by provoking dendritic cell activation and proinflammatory cytokine secretion. NOD mouse splenocytes were stimulated with rotavirus and assessed for activation by flow cytometry. This stimulation activated antigen-presenting cells and B cells independently of virus strain and replicative ability. Instead, activation depended on virus dose and was prevented by blockade of virus decapsidation, inhibition of endosomal acidification and interference with signaling through Toll-like receptor 7 and the type I interferon receptor. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells were more efficiently activated than conventional dendritic cells by RRV, and contributed to the activation of B and T cells, including islet-autoreactive CD8+ T cells. Thus, a double-stranded RNA virus can induce Toll-like receptor 7 signaling, resulting in lymphocyte activation. Our findings suggest that bystander activation mediated by type I

  18. Molecular profiling of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm reveals a unique pattern and suggests selective sensitivity to NF-kB pathway inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapienza, MR; Fuligni, F; Agostinelli, C; Tripodo, C; Righi, S; Laginestra, MA; Pileri, A; Mancini, M; Rossi, M; Ricci, F; Gazzola, A; Melle, F; Mannu, C; Ulbar, F; Arpinati, M; Paulli, M; Maeda, T; Gibellini, D; Pagano, L; Pimpinelli, N; Santucci, M; Cerroni, L; Croce, CM; Facchetti, F; Piccaluga, PP; Pileri, SA

    2015-01-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare disease of controversial origin recently recognized as a neoplasm deriving from plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). Nevertheless, it remains an orphan tumor with obscure biology and dismal prognosis. To better understand the pathobiology of BPDCN and discover new targets for effective therapies, the gene expression profile (GEP) of 25 BPDCN samples was analyzed and compared with that of pDCs, their postulated normal counterpart. Validation was performed by immunohistochemistry (IHC), whereas functional experiments were carried out ex vivo. For the first time at the molecular level, we definitely recognized the cellular derivation of BPDCN that proved to originate from the myeloid lineage and in particular, from resting pDCs. Furthermore, thanks to an integrated bioinformatic approach we discovered aberrant activation of the NF-kB pathway and suggested it as a novel therapeutic target. We tested the efficacy of anti-NF-kB-treatment on the BPDCN cell line CAL-1, and successfully demonstrated by GEP and IHC the molecular shutoff of the NF-kB pathway. In conclusion, we identified a molecular signature representative of the transcriptional abnormalities of BPDCN and developed a cellular model proposing a novel therapeutic approach in the setting of this otherwise incurable disease. PMID:24504027

  19. Functional changes of dendritic cells derived from allogeneic partial liver graft undergoing acute rejection in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Qing Xu; Zhen-Xiang Yao

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate functional change of dendritic cells (DCs)derived from allogeneic partial liver graft undergoing acuterejection in rats.METHODS: Allogeneic (SD rat to LEW rat) whole and 50 %partial liver transplantation were performed. DCs from livergrafts 0 hr and 4 days after transplantation were isolated andpropagated in the presence of GM-CSFin vitro. Morphologicalcharacteristics of DCs propagated for 4 days and 10 dayswere observed by electron rmicroscopy. Phenotypical featuresof DCs propagated for 10 days were analyzed by flowcytometry. Expression of IL-12 protein and IL-12 receptormRNA in DCs propagated for 10 days was also measured byWestern blotting and semiquantitative RT-PCR, respectively.Histological grading of rejection were determined.RESULTS: Allogeneic whole liver grafts showed no featuresof rejection at day 4 after transplantation. In contrast,allogeneic partial liver grafts demonstrated moderate tosevere rejection at day 4 after transplantation. DCs derivedfrom allogeneic partial liver graft 4 days after transplantationexhibited typical morphological characteristics of DC after 4days' culture in the presence of GM-CSF. DCs from allogeneicwhole liver graft 0 hr and 4 days after transplantation didnot exhibit typical morphological characteristics of DC untilafter 10 days' culture in the presence of GM-CSF. After 10days' propagationin vitro, DCs derived from allogeneic wholeliver graft exhibited features of immature DC, with absenceof CD40, CD80 and CD86 surface expression, and low levelsof IL-12 proteins (IL-12 p35 and IL-12 p40) and IL-12receptor (IL-12Rβ1 and IL-12Rβ2) mRNA, whereas DCs fromallogeneic partial liver graft 4 days after transplantationdisplayed features of mature DC, with high levels of CD40,CD80 and CD86 surface expression, and as a consequence,higher expression of IL-12 proteins (IL-12 p35 and IL-12 p40)and IL-12 receptors (IL-12Rβ1 and IL-12Rβ2) mRNA thanthose of DCs both from partial liver graft 0 hr and whole livergraft

  20. Rotavirus structural proteins and dsRNA are required for the human primary plasmacytoid dendritic cell IFNalpha response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily M Deal

    Full Text Available Rotaviruses are the leading cause of severe dehydrating diarrhea in children worldwide. Rotavirus-induced immune responses, especially the T and B cell responses, have been extensively characterized; however, little is known about innate immune mechanisms involved in the control of rotavirus infection. Although increased levels of systemic type I interferon (IFNalpha and beta correlate with accelerated resolution of rotavirus disease, multiple rotavirus strains, including rhesus rotavirus (RRV, have been demonstrated to antagonize type I IFN production in a variety of epithelial and fibroblast cell types through several mechanisms, including degradation of multiple interferon regulatory factors by a viral nonstructural protein. This report demonstrates that stimulation of highly purified primary human peripheral plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs with either live or inactivated RRV induces substantial IFNalpha production by a subset of pDCs in which RRV does not replicate. Characterization of pDC responses to viral stimulus by flow cytometry and Luminex revealed that RRV replicates in a small subset of human primary pDCs and, in this RRV-permissive small subset, IFNalpha production is diminished. pDC activation and maturation were observed independently of viral replication and were enhanced in cells in which virus replicates. Production of IFNalpha by pDCs following RRV exposure required viral dsRNA and surface proteins, but neither viral replication nor activation by trypsin cleavage of VP4. These results demonstrate that a minor subset of purified primary human peripheral pDCs are permissive to RRV infection, and that pDCs retain functionality following RRV stimulus. Additionally, this study demonstrates trypsin-independent infection of primary peripheral cells by rotavirus, which may allow for the establishment of extraintestinal viremia and antigenemia. Importantly, these data provide the first evidence of IFNalpha induction in primary

  1. Lichen planus remission is associated with a decrease of human herpes virus type 7 protein expression in plasmacytoid dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J.C. de Vries; M.B.M. Teunissen; F. Zorgdrager; D. Picavet; M Cornelissen

    2007-01-01

    The cause of lichen planus is still unknown. Previously we showed human herpes virus 7 (HHV-7) DNA and proteins in lesional lichen planus skin, and significantly less in non-lesional lichen planus, psoriasis or healthy skin. Remarkably, lesional lichen planus skin was infiltrated with plasmacytoid d

  2. Plasmacytoid, conventional, and monocyte-derived dendritic cells undergo a profound and convergent genetic reprogramming during their maturation

    OpenAIRE

    Manh, Thien-Phong Vu; Alexandre, Yannick; Baranek, Thomas; Crozat, Karine; Dalod, Marc

    2013-01-01

    DCs express receptors sensing microbial, danger or cytokine signals, which when triggered in combination drive DC maturation and functional polarization. Maturation was proposed to result from a discrete number of modifications in conventional DCs (cDCs), in contrast to a cell-fate conversion in plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). cDC maturation is generally assessed by measuring cytokine production and membrane expression of MHC class II and co-stimulation molecules. pDC maturation complexity was demon...

  3. IFN-γ and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase signaling between donor dendritic cells and T cells regulates graft versus host and graft versus leukemia activity

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Ying; Giver, Cynthia R.; Sharma, Akshay; Li, Jian Ming; Darlak, Katarzyna A.; Owens, Lauren M.; Roback, John D.; Galipeau, Jacques; Waller, Edmund K.

    2012-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) can eradicate chemorefractory leukemia through the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) activity of donor T cells. However, the clinical success of allo-HSCT is limited by the graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) activity of donor T cells. We have reported previously that donor bone marrow precursors of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pre-pDCs) can activate donor T cells toward T-helper 1 immune polarization in murine allogeneic HSCT. To optimize the...

  4. Rapid reconstitution of functionally active 6-sulfoLacNAc(+) dendritic cells (slanDCs) of donor origin following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimiola, E; Marini, O; Perbellini, O; Micheletti, A; Vermi, W; Lonardi, S; Costantini, C; Meneghelli, E; Andreini, A; Bonetto, C; Vassanelli, A; Cantini, M; Zoratti, E; Massi, D; Zamo', A; Leso, A; Quaresmini, G; Benedetti, F; Pizzolo, G; Cassatella, M A; Tecchio, C

    2014-10-01

    The role of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages in allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) is critical in determining the extent of graft-versus-host response. The goal of this study was to analyse slanDCs, a subset of human proinflammatory DCs, in haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) sources, as well as to evaluate their 1-year kinetics of reconstitution, origin and functional capacities in peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) of patients who have undergone HSCT, and their presence in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) tissue specimens. slanDCs were also compared to myeloid (m)DCs, plasmacytoid (p)DCs and monocytes in HSC sources and in patients' PB and BM throughout reconstitution. slanDCs accounted for all HSC sources. In patients' PB and BM, slanDCs were identified from day +21, showing median frequencies comparable to healthy donors, donor origin and kinetics of recovery similar to mDCs, pDCs, and monocytes. Under cyclosporin treatment, slanDCs displayed a normal pattern of maturation, and maintained an efficient chemotactic activity and capacity of releasing tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. None the less, they were almost undetectable in GVHD tissue specimens, being present only in intestinal acute GVHD samples. slanDCs reconstitute early, being donor-derived and functionally competent. The absence of slanDCs from most of the GVHD-targeted tissue specimens seems to rule out the direct participation of these cells in the majority of the local reactions characterizing GVHD. PMID:24853271

  5. Type I and III IFNs Produced by Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells in Response to a Member of the Flaviviridae Suppress Cellular Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Elizabeth; Juleff, Nicholas; Windsor, Miriam; Gubbins, Simon; Roberts, Lisa; Morgan, Sophie; Meyers, Gregor; Perez-Martin, Eva; Tchilian, Elma; Charleston, Bryan; Seago, Julian

    2016-05-15

    The pestivirus noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) can suppress IFN production in the majority of cell types in vitro. However, IFN is detectable in serum during acute infection in vivo for ∼5-7 d, which correlates with a period of leucopoenia and immunosuppression. In this study, we demonstrate that a highly enriched population of bovine plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs) produced IFN in response to BVDV in vitro. We further show that the majority of the IFN produced in response to infection both in vitro and in vivo is type III IFN and acid labile. Further, we show IL-28B (IFN-λ3) mRNA is induced in this cell population in vitro. Supernatant from plasmacytoid DCs harvested postinfection with BVDV or recombinant bovine IFN-α or human IL-28B significantly reduced CD4(+) T cell proliferation induced by tubercle bacillus Ag 85-stimulated monocyte-derived DCs. Furthermore, these IFNs induced IFN-stimulated gene expression predominantly in monocyte-derived DCs. IFN-treated immature DCs derived from murine bone marrow also had a reduced capacity to stimulate T cell proliferative responses to tubercle bacillus Ag 85. Immature DCs derived from either source had a reduced capacity for Ag uptake following IFN treatment that is dose dependent. Immunosuppression is a feature of a number of pestivirus infections; our studies suggest type III IFN production plays a key role in the pathogenesis of this family of viruses. Overall, in a natural host, we have demonstrated a link between the induction of type I and III IFN after acute viral infection and transient immunosuppression. PMID:27053760

  6. HHV-6B induces IFN-lambda1 responses in cord plasmacytoid dendritic cells through TLR9.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inger Nordström

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus type 6B (HHV-6B is a strong inducer of IFN-alpha and has the capacity to promote Th1 responses and block Th2 responses in vitro. In this study we addressed whether inactivated HHV-6B can also induce IFN lambda responses and to what extent interferons alpha and lambda affect Th1/Th2 polarization. We show that inactivated HHV-6B induced IFN-lambda1 (IL-29 but not IFN-lambda2 (IL-28A responses in plasmacytoid DC and that this induction was mediated through TLR9. We have previously shown that HHV-6B promotes Th1 responses and blocks Th2 responses in both humans and mice. We now show that neutralization of IFN-alpha but not IFN-lambda1 blocked the HHV-6B-induced enhancement of Th1 responses in MLR, but did not affect the HHV-6-induced dampening of Th2 responses. Similarly, blockage of TLR9 counteracted HHV-6Bs effects on the Th1/Th2 balance. In addition, IFN-alpha but not IFN-lambda1 promoted IFN-gamma production and blocked IL-5 and IL-13 production in purified CD4+ T-cells. The lack of effect of IFN-lambda1 correlated with the absence of the IFN-lambda receptor IL-28Ralfa chain on the cell surface of both resting and activated CD4+ T-cells. We conclude that inactivated HHV-6B is a strong inducer of IFN-lambda1 in plasmacytoid DC and that this induction is TLR9-dependent. However, human CD4+ T-cells do not express the IFN-lambda receptor and are refractory to IFN-lambda1 treatment. The HHV-6B-induced alterations in the Th1/Th2 balance are instead mediated mainly through TLR9 and IFN-alpha.

  7. Siglec-1-positive plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) in human peripheral blood: A semi-mature and myeloid-like subset imbalanced during protective and autoimmune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Theresa R; Taddeo, Adriano; Winter, Oliver; Schulz, Axel Ronald; Mälzer, Julia-Nora; Domingo, Cristina; Biesen, Robert; Alexander, Tobias; Thiel, Andreas; Radbruch, Andreas; Hiepe, Falk; Gerl, Velia

    2016-02-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) play a central role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) as IFN-α producers and promoters of T-cell activation or tolerance. Here, we demonstrated by flow-cytometry and confocal microscopy that Siglec-1, a molecule involved in the regulation of adaptive immunoresponses, is expressed in a subset of semi-mature, myeloid-like pDCs in human blood. These pDCs express lower BDCA-2 and CD123 and higher HLA-DR and CD11c than Siglec-1-negative pDCs and do not produce IFN-α via TLR7/TLR9 engagement. In vitro, Siglec-1 expression was induced in Siglec-1-negative pDCs by influenza virus. Proportions of Siglec-1-positive/Siglec-1-negative pDCs were higher in SLE than in healthy controls and correlated with disease activity. Healthy donors immunized with yellow fever vaccine YFV-17D displayed different kinetics of the two pDC subsets during protective immune response. PDCs can be subdivided into two subsets according to Siglec-1 expression. These subsets may play specific roles in (auto)immune responses. PMID:26674280

  8. Interplay of foot-and-mouth disease virus, antibodies and plasmacytoid dendritic cells: virus opsonization under non-neutralizing conditions results in enhanced interferon-alpha responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lannes Nils

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV is a highly infectious member of the Picornaviridae inducing an acute disease of cloven-hoofed species. Vaccine-induced immune protection correlates with the presence of high levels of neutralizing antibodies but also opsonising antibodies have been proposed as an important mechanism of the immune response contributing to virus clearance by macrophages and leading to the production of type-I interferon (IFN by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC. The present study demonstrates that the opsonising antibody titres mediating enhanced IFN-α responses in pDC were similar to neutralizing titres, when antigenically related viruses from the same serotype were employed. However, sera cross-reacted also with non-neutralized isolates of multiple serotypes, when tested in this assay. Both uncomplexed virus and immune complexed virus stimulated pDC via Toll-like receptor 7. An additional finding of potential importance for strain-specific differences in virulence and/or immunogenicity was that pDC activation by FMDV strongly differed between viral isolates. Altogether, our results indicate that opsonising antibodies can have a broader reactivity than neutralizing antibodies and may contribute to antiviral responses induced against antigenically distant viruses.

  9. A Novel TLR-9 Agonist C792 Inhibits Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell-induced Myeloma Cell Growth and Enhance Cytotoxicity of Bortezomib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Arghya; Tian, Ze; Das, Deepika Sharma; Coffman, Robert L.; Richardson, Paul; Chauhan, Dharminder; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2014-01-01

    Our prior study in multiple myeloma (MM) patients showed increased numbers of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) in the bone marrow (BM) which both contribute to immune dysfunction as well as promote tumor cell growth, survival, and drug resistance. Here we show that a novel Toll-Like Receptor (TLR-9) agonist C792 restores the ability of MM patient-pDCs to stimulate T cell proliferation. Co-culture of pDCs with MM cells induces MM cell growth; and importantly, C792 inhibits pDC-induced MM cell growth and triggers apoptosis. In contrast, treatment of either MM cells or pDCs alone with C792 does not affect the viability of either cell type. In agreement with our in vitro data, C792 inhibits pDC-induced MM cell growth in vivo in a murine xenograft model of human MM. Mechanistic studies show that C792 triggers maturation of pDCs, enhances interferon-α and interferon-λ secretion, and activates TLR-9/MyD88 signaling axis. Finally, C792 enhances the anti-MM activity of bortezomib, lenalidomide, pomalidomide, SAHA, or melphalan. Collectively, our preclinical studies provide the basis for clinical trials of C792, either alone or in combination, to both improve immune function and overcome drug resistance in MM. PMID:24476765

  10. Selective Expression of the MAPK Phosphatase Dusp9/MKP-4 in Mouse Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells and Regulation of IFN-beta Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niedzielska, Magdalena; Raffi, Faizal A. M.; Tel, Jurjen; Muench, Sandra; Jozefowski, Katrin; Alati, Nour; Lahl, Katharina; Mages, Joerg; Billmeier, Ulrike; Schiemann, Matthias; Appelt, Uwe K.; Wirtz, Stefan; Sparwasser, Tim; Hochrein, Hubertus; Figdor, Carl G.; Keyse, Stephen M.; Lang, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) efficiently produce large amounts of type I IFN in response to TLR7 and TLR9 ligands, whereas conventional DCs (cDCs) predominantly secrete high levels of the cytokines IL-10 and IL-12. The molecular basis underlying this distinct phenotype is not well understood....... In this study, we identified the MAPK phosphatase Dusp9/MKP-4 by transcriptome analysis as selectively expressed in pDCs, but not cDCs. We confirmed the constitutive expression of Dusp9 at the protein level in pDCs generated in vitro by culture with Flt3 ligand and ex vivo in sorted splenic p......DCs. Dusp9 expression was low in B220(-) bone marrow precursors and was upregulated during pDC differentiation, concomitant with established pDC markers. Higher expression of Dusp9 in pDCs correlated with impaired phosphorylation of the MAPK ERK1/2 upon TLR9 stimulation. Notably, Dusp9 was not expressed at...

  11. Efficient sensing of infected cells in absence of virus particles by plasmacytoid dendritic cells is blocked by the viral ribonuclease E(rns..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Python

    Full Text Available Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC have been shown to efficiently sense HCV- or HIV-infected cells, using a virion-free pathway. Here, we demonstrate for classical swine fever virus, a member of the Flaviviridae, that this process is much more efficient in terms of interferon-alpha induction when compared to direct stimulation by virus particles. By employment of virus replicon particles or infectious RNA which can replicate but not form de novo virions, we exclude a transfer of virus from the donor cell to the pDC. pDC activation by infected cells was mediated by a contact-dependent RNA transfer to pDC, which was sensitive to a TLR7 inhibitor. This was inhibited by drugs affecting the cytoskeleton and membrane cholesterol. We further demonstrate that a unique viral protein with ribonuclease activity, the viral E(rns protein of pestiviruses, efficiently prevented this process. This required intact ribonuclease function in intracellular compartments. We propose that this pathway of activation could be of particular importance for viruses which tend to be mostly cell-associated, cause persistent infection, and are non-cytopathogenic.

  12. Coxiella burnetii Induces Inflammatory Interferon-Like Signature in Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells: A New Feature of Immune Response in Q Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ka, Mignane B; Mezouar, Soraya; Ben Amara, Amira; Raoult, Didier; Ghigo, Eric; Olive, Daniel; Mege, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) play a major role in antiviral immunity via the production of type I interferons (IFNs). There is some evidence that pDCs interact with bacteria but it is not yet clear whether they are protective or contribute to bacterial pathogenicity. We wished to investigate whether Coxiella burnetii, the agent of Q fever, interacts with pDCs. The stimulation of pDCs with C. burnetii increased the expression of activation and migratory markers (CD86 and CCR7) as determined by flow cytometry and modulated gene expression program as revealed by a microarray approach. Indeed, genes encoding for pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and type I INF were up-regulated. The up-regulation of type I IFN was correlated with an increase in IFN-α release by C. burnetii-stimulated pDCs. We also investigated pDCs in patients with Q fever endocarditis. Using flow cytometry and a specific gating strategy, we found that the number of circulating pDCs was significantly lower in patients with Q fever endocarditis as compared to healthy donors. In addition, the remaining circulating pDCs expressed activation and migratory markers. As a whole, our study identified non-previously reported activation of pDCs by C. burnetii and their modulation during Q fever. PMID:27446817

  13. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Regulate Autoreactive B Cell Activation via Soluble Factors and in a Cell-to-Cell Contact Manner1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chuanlin; Cai, Yihua; Marroquin, Jose; Ildstad, Suzanne T.; Yan, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are specialized type I IFN producers, which play an important role in pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders. Dysregulated autoreactive B cell activation is a hallmark in most autoimmune diseases. This study was undertaken to investigate interactions between pDCs and autoreactive B cells. After co-culture of autoreactive B cells that recognize self-Ag small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles with activated pDCs, we found that pDCs significantly enhance autoreactive B cell proliferation, autoAb production, and survival in response to toll-like receptor (TLR) and BCR stimulation. Neutralization of IFN-α/β and IL-6 abrogated partially pDC-mediated enhancement of autoreactive B cell activation. Transwell studies demonstrated that pDCs could provide activation signals to autoreactive B cells via cell-to-cell contact manner. The involvement of the ICAM-1-LFA-1 pathway was revealed as contributing to this effect. This in vitro enhancement effect was further demonstrated by an in vivo B cell adoptive transfer experiment, which showed that autoreactive B cell proliferation and activation were significantly decreased in MyD-88-deficient mice compared to WT mice. These data suggest the dynamic interplay between pDCs and B cells is required for full activation of autoreactive B cells upon TLR or BCR stimulation. PMID:19890051

  14. Blocking TLR7- and TLR9-mediated IFN-α production by plasmacytoid dendritic cells does not diminish immune activation in early SIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamuda Kader

    Full Text Available Persistent production of type I interferon (IFN by activated plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC is a leading model to explain chronic immune activation in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection but direct evidence for this is lacking. We used a dual antagonist of Toll-like receptor (TLR 7 and TLR9 to selectively inhibit responses of pDC but not other mononuclear phagocytes to viral RNA prior to and for 8 weeks following pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV infection of rhesus macaques. We show that pDC are major but not exclusive producers of IFN-α that rapidly become unresponsive to virus stimulation following SIV infection, whereas myeloid DC gain the capacity to produce IFN-α, albeit at low levels. pDC mediate a marked but transient IFN-α response in lymph nodes during the acute phase that is blocked by administration of TLR7 and TLR9 antagonist without impacting pDC recruitment. TLR7 and TLR9 blockade did not impact virus load or the acute IFN-α response in plasma and had minimal effect on expression of IFN-stimulated genes in both blood and lymph node. TLR7 and TLR9 blockade did not prevent activation of memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in blood or lymph node but led to significant increases in proliferation of both subsets in blood following SIV infection. Our findings reveal that virus-mediated activation of pDC through TLR7 and TLR9 contributes to substantial but transient IFN-α production following pathogenic SIV infection. However, the data indicate that pDC activation and IFN-α production are unlikely to be major factors in driving immune activation in early infection. Based on these findings therapeutic strategies aimed at blocking pDC function and IFN-α production may not reduce HIV-associated immunopathology.

  15. Sterigmatocystin alters the number of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaling; Xing, Xin; Wang, Juan; Xing, Lingxiao; Su, Yanling; Yao, Zhigang; Yan, Xia; Wang, Junling; Zhang, Xianghong

    2012-06-01

    Sterigmatocystin (ST), a mycotoxin with mutagenic, cytotoxic and carcinogenic properties, is commonly found as the contaminant in grains and animal feeds. Of particular interest is the capacity of ST to alter normal immune function when presented in foods. As part of an on-going investigation of ST toxicological effects, we attempt to explore the short-term immunotoxic effects of ST, specifically on FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (FoxP3(+) Tregs) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), by observing changes in number/expression of FoxP3(+) Tregs, pDCs and CD4(+), CD8(+) T cells in BALB/c mice 24h after a single intraperitoneal administration of ST at different dosages (3, 30, 300 and 3000 μg/kg body weight). The present study showed that 24h after ST treatment, the proportion of CD8(+) T cells was decreased in the thymus in ST 3 μg/kg group, while that of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells was increased in the spleen in two treatment groups (3 and 30 μg/kg). The proportion of FoxP3(+) Tregs and FoxP3 expressions were all significantly increased in mPBMCs, the thymus and the spleen. It is noteworthy that the population of pDCs significantly decreased in the thymus as we expected but increased in the spleen as compared with control, which we suspect is resulted from a temporary immune response triggered by the ST inhibition. We believe that ST may exert its immunotoxic effects by stimulating Treg, but inhibiting pDCs in the long-term to contribute its carcinogenic effects. PMID:22429820

  16. Constitutive expression of TNF-related activation-induced cytokine (TRANCE/receptor activating NF-κB ligand (RANK-L by rat plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Anjubault

    Full Text Available Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs are a subset of DCs whose major function relies on their capacity to produce large amount of type I IFN upon stimulation via TLR 7 and 9. This function is evolutionary conserved and place pDC in critical position in the innate immune response to virus. Here we show that rat pDC constitutively express TNF-related activation-induced cytokine (TRANCE also known as Receptor-activating NF-κB ligand (RANKL. TRANCE/RANKL is a member of the TNF superfamily which plays a central role in osteoclastogenesis through its interaction with its receptor RANK. TRANCE/RANK interaction are also involved in lymphoid organogenesis as well as T cell/DC cross talk. Unlike conventional DC, rat CD4(high pDC were shown to constitutively express TRANCE/RANKL both at the mRNA and the surface protein level. TRANCE/RANKL was also induced on the CD4(low subsets of pDC following activation by CpG. The secreted form of TRANCE/RANKL was also produced by rat pDC. Of note, levels of mRNA, surface and secreted TRANCE/RANKL expression were similar to that observed for activated T cells. TRANCE/RANKL expression was found on pDC in all lymphoid organs as well blood and BM with a maximum expression in mesenteric lymph nodes. Despite this TRANCE/RANKL expression, we were unable to demonstrate in vitro osteoclastogenesis activity for rat pDC. Taken together, these data identifies pDC as novel source of TRANCE/RANKL in the immune system.

  17. Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin killed by extended freeze-drying targets plasmacytoid dendritic cells to regulate lung inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagranderie, Micheline; Abolhassani, Mohammad; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen A J; Lima, Carla; Balazuc, Anne-Marie; Vargaftig, B Boris; Marchal, Gilles

    2010-01-15

    We have previously shown that bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) inactivated by extended freeze-drying (EFD) reduces airway hyperresponsiveness, whereas live and heat-killed BCG fail to do so. However, the cells involved in the protective effect and the signaling and transcriptional networks that could reprogram T cell commitment after EFD BCG treatment remained to be elucidated. We investigated whether EFD BCG targets plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) potentially involved in the polarization of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and the transcriptional factors that regulate allergic inflammation. OVA-sensitized mice were s.c. injected with EFD, live, or heat-killed BCG. We analyzed after the injection of the various BCG preparations: 1) pDCs recruited in the draining lymph nodes (day 4); 2) transcription factors involved in inflammation and T cell commitment in spleen and lungs after OVA challenge (day 28). Airway hyperresponsiveness and transcription factors were determined after in vivo depletion of pDCs or Tregs in EFD BCG-treated and OVA-challenged mice. EFD BCG reduced inflammation via the recruitment of pDCs polarizing the differentiation of naive CD4+ T lymphocytes into Tregs. In vivo, pDC or Treg depletion at the time of EFD BCG treatment abrogated the protection against inflammation. EFD BCG treatment upregulated Forkhead-winged helix transcription factor (Treg signature) and downregulated GATA-3 and RORgammat (Th2 and Th17 signatures) more efficiently than live and heat-killed BCG. Moreover, only EFD BCG enhanced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma expression and blocked NF-kappaB activation, cyclooxygenase expression, and p38 MAPK phosphorylation. EFD BCG reduced allergic inflammation by recruiting pDCs that promoted Tregs; EFD BCG acted as a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonist and thus could be used in asthma and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:20007537

  18. Peptidoglycan recognition protein 1 enhances experimental asthma by promoting Th2 and Th17 and limiting regulatory T cell and plasmacytoid dendritic cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shin Yong; Jing, Xuefang; Gupta, Dipika; Dziarski, Roman

    2013-04-01

    Asthma is a common inflammatory disease involving cross-talk between innate and adaptive immunity. We reveal that antibacterial innate immunity protein, peptidoglycan recognition protein (Pglyrp)1, is involved in the development of allergic asthma. Pglyrp1(-/-) mice developed less severe asthma than wild-type (WT) mice following sensitization with house dust mite (allergen) (HDM). HDM-sensitized Pglyrp1(-/-) mice, compared with WT mice, had diminished bronchial hyperresponsiveness (lung airway resistance); numbers of eosinophils, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lungs; inflammatory cell infiltrates in the lungs around bronchi, bronchioles, and pulmonary arteries and veins; lung remodeling (mucin-producing goblet cell hyperplasia and metaplasia and smooth muscle hypertrophy and fibrosis); levels of IgE, eotaxins, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-17 in the lungs; and numbers of Th2 and Th17 cells and expression of their marker genes in the lungs. The mechanism underlying this decreased sensitivity of Pglyrp1(-/-) mice to asthma was increased generation and activation of CD8α(+)β(+) and CD8α(+)β(-) plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) and increased recruitment and activity of regulatory T (Treg) cells in the lungs. In vivo depletion of pDC in HDM-sensitized Pglyrp1(-/-) mice reversed the low responsive asthma phenotype of Pglyrp1(-/-) mice to resemble the more severe WT phenotype. Thus, Pglyrp1(-/-) mice efficiently control allergic asthma by upregulating pDC and Treg cells in the lungs, whereas in WT mice, Pglyrp1 is proinflammatory and decreases pDC and Treg cells and increases proasthmatic Th2 and Th17 responses. Blocking Pglyrp1 or enhancing pDC in the lungs may be beneficial for prevention and treatment of asthma. PMID:23420883

  19. Cigarette smoke attenuates the production of cytokines by human plasmacytoid dendritic cells and enhances the release of IL-8 in response to TLR-9 stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortaz Esmaeil

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (mDCs, pDC are crucial to the immune system, detecting microorganisms and linking the innate and adaptive immunity. pDC are present in small quantities in tissues that are in contact with the external environment; mainly the skin, the inner lining of the nose, lungs, stomach and intestines. They produce large amounts of IFN-α after stimulation and are pivotal for the induction of antiviral responses. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients are known to be more susceptible to viral infections. We have demonstrated that exposure of mDC to cigarette smoke extract (CSE leads to the release of chemokines, however, not much is known about the role of pDC in COPD. In this study, we addressed several key questions with respect to the mechanism of action of CSE on human pDC in an in vitro model. Human pDCs were isolated from normal healthy volunteers and subjected to fresh CSE and the levels of IL-8, TNF-α, IP-10, IL-6, IL-1, IL-12 and IL-10 and IFN-α were studied by both ELISA and real time PCR methods. We observed that CSE augmented the production of IL-8 and suppressed the release of TNF-α, IL-6 and IFN-α. Moreover, CSE suppressed PI3K/Akt signalling in pDC. In conclusion, our data indicate that CSE has both the potential to diminish anti-viral immunity by downregulating the release of IFN-α and other pro-inflammatory cytokines while, at the same time, augmenting the pathogenesis of COPD via an IL-8 induced recruitment of neutrophils.

  20. A palindromic CpG-containing phosphodiester oligodeoxynucleotide as a mucosal adjuvant stimulates plasmacytoid dendritic cell-mediated T(H1 immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-ichi Maeyama

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs, resembling bacterial DNA, are currently tested in clinical trials as vaccine adjuvants. They have the nuclease-resistant phosphorothioate bond; the immune responses elicited differ according to the CpG ODN sequence and vaccination method. To develop a CpG ODN that can induce plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC-mediated T(H1 immunity through the mucosa, we constructed phosphodiester G9.1 comprising one palindromic CpG motif with unique polyguanosine-runs that allows degradation similar to naturally occurring bacterial DNA. METHODS: T(H1 and T(H2 immunity activation was evaluated by cytokine production pattern and T-bet/GATA-3 ratio in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and mouse bone marrow cells. Adjuvanticity was evaluated in mice administered G9.1 with diphtheria toxoid (DT through nasal vaccination. RESULTS: G9.1 exhibited stronger IFN-α-inducing activity than A-class CpG ODN2216 and increased T-bet/GATA-3 ratio by enhancing T-bet expression. Nasally administered G9.1 plus DT induced DT-specific mucosal IgA and serum IgG, but not IgE, responses with antitoxin activity in C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice, possibly due to IFN/BAFF production. Induction of T(H1, but not T(H2-type Abs depended completely on pDCs, the first in vivo demonstration by CpG ODNs. CONCLUSIONS: G9.1 is a promising mucosal adjuvant for induction of pDC-mediated T(H1 immunity.

  1. HIV感染中的浆细胞样树突状细胞研究进展%Research progress on plasmacytoid dendritic cells in HIV infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋映雪; 焦艳梅; 吴昊

    2011-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) produce high levels of interferon (IFN)-α in response to viral infection in humans and act as an important link between innate and adaptive immunity. IFN-α production in patients infected with HIV-1 is deficient. The mechanisms for the decreased circulating pDC and their dysfunction in HIV-infected patients are unknown. Whether IFN-α is beneficial or detrimental in HIV infection remains a matter of debate. The balance between pDC numbers and function is important in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection. Therefore, using absolute pDC counts and function as a biomarker, along with CD4+ cell counts and viral load in HIV-1-infected patients has potential value.%浆细胞样树突状细胞(pDC)是体内产生干扰素(IFN)-α最有力的细胞,并且是固有免疫和适应性免疫之间的重要联系.HIV-1感染者产生IFN-α不足,循环中pDC数量减少并且功能缺陷,其机制尚不明确.IFN-α在HIV感染中是有益还是有害目前仍存在争论.pDC数量和功能的平衡在HIV发病中起重要作用,利用pDC绝对计数和功能检测作为HIV-1感染者生物标记有潜在价值.

  2. Programming of donor T cells using allogeneic δ-like ligand 4-positive dendritic cells to reduce GVHD in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Kazuhiro; Meng, Lijun; Mochizuki, Izumi; Tong, Qing; He, Shan; Liu, Yongnian; Purushe, Janaki; Fung, Henry; Zaidi, M Raza; Zhang, Yanyun; Reshef, Ran; Blazar, Bruce R; Yagita, Hideo; Mineishi, Shin; Zhang, Yi

    2016-06-23

    Alloreactive T cells play a critical role in eliminating hematopoietic malignant cells but are also the mediators of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), a major complication that subverts the success of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). However, induction of alloreactive T cells does not necessarily lead to GVHD. Here we report the development of a cellular programming approach to render alloreactive T cells incapable of causing severe GVHD in both major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-mismatched and MHC-identical but minor histocompatibility antigen-mismatched mouse models. We established a novel platform that produced δ-like ligand 4-positive dendritic cells (Dll4(hi)DCs) from murine bone marrow using Flt3 ligand and Toll-like receptor agonists. Upon allogeneic Dll4(hi)DC stimulation, CD4(+) naïve T cells underwent effector differentiation and produced high levels of interferon γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-17 in vitro, depending on Dll4 activation of Notch signaling. Following transfer, allogeneic Dll4(hi)DC-induced T cells were unable to mediate severe GVHD but preserved antileukemic activity, significantly improving the survival of leukemic mice undergoing allogeneic HSCT. This effect of Dll4(hi)DC-induced T cells was associated with their impaired expansion in GVHD target tissues. IFN-γ was important for Dll4(hi)DC programming to reduce GVHD toxicities of alloreactive T cells. Absence of T-cell IFN-γ led to improved survival and expansion of Dll4(hi)DC-induced CD4(+) T cells in transplant recipients and caused lethal GVHD. Our findings demonstrate that Dll4(hi)DC programming can overcome GVHD toxicity of donor T cells and produce leukemia-reactive T cells for effective immunotherapy. PMID:27143255

  3. Decreased numbers of peripheral blood dendritic cells in patients with coronary artery disease are associated with diminished plasma Flt3 ligand levels and impaired plasmacytoid dendritic cell function

    OpenAIRE

    Van Brussel, Ilse; Van Vré, Emily A; De Meyer, Guido RY; Vrints, Christiaan J.; Bosmans, Johan M; Bult, Hidde

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background: We investigate whether activation of circulating DCs or levels of FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L) and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), haematopoietic growth factors important for dendritic cell (DC) differentiation, could account for reduced blood DC numbers in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. Methods: Concentrations of Flt3L and GM-CSF were measured in plasma from CAD patients (n=15) and controls (n=12). Frequenc...

  4. Detection of plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC) content in peripheral blood and renal tissue of children with henoch-schonlein purpura and its clinical value

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong-Mei Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC) content in peripheral blood and renal tissue of children with henoch-schonlein purpura and its clinical value.Methods:30 cases of henoch-schonlein purpura children with renal damage were enrolled in HSPN group, 30 cases of henoch-schonlein purpura children without renal damage were enrolled in NHSPN group, and 30 cases of healthy volunteers were enrolled in the control group. Then contents of pDC, Th2 cell, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10 and IL-13 in peripheral blood as well as contents of pDC, Th17 cell, IL-17, IL-21 and IL-23 in renal tissue of three groups were detected.Results: (1) pDC contents in peripheral blood of HSPN group and NHSPN group were lower than those of control group and the decrease of pDC contents in peripheral blood of HSPN group was more obvious; CD304 contents in renal tissue of HSPN group and NHSPN group were higher than those of control group and the increase of CD304 contents in renal tissue of HSPN group was more obvious; (2) Th2 cell as well as IL-4, IL-5, IL-10 and IL-13 contents in peripheral blood of HSPN group and NHSPN group were higher than those of control group and the increase of related indexes in peripheral blood of HSPN group was more obvious; Th17 cell as well as IL-17, IL-21 and IL-23 contents in kidney tissue of HSPN group were higher than those of NHSPN group; (3) in peripheral blood, pDC content was negatively correlated with Th2 cell level as well as IL-4, IL-5, IL-10 and IL-13 contents, and in renal tissue, pDC content was positively correlated with Th17 cell level as well as IL-17, IL-21 and IL-23 contents. Conclusions:Abnormal pDC content correlates with the pathogenesis of henoch-schonlein purpura, pDC content decreases in peripheral blood and will result in enhancement of Th2 cell function, and pDC content increases in kidney and will result in enhancement of Th17 cell function.

  5. Clinical and Immunological Effects in Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung-Cancer after Vaccination with Dendritic Cells Exposed to an Allogeneic Tumor Cell Lysate*

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell-Noerregaard, Lotte; Kvistborg, Pia; Zocca, Mai-Britt;

    2013-01-01

    Background: We evaluated the clinical and immunological effects of dendritic cell (DC) vaccination of patients with NSCLC. Autologous DCs were pulsed with a MAGE containing allogeneic melanoma cell lysate (MelCancerVac®, Dandrit Biotech, Copenhagen, Denmark). Imiquimod cream, proleukin and......-layed effect of DC vaccination after completion of the treatment. A prospective randomized phase-IIb or -III is needed to further evaluate the use of MelCancerVac® vaccine treatment in patients with progressive NSCLC....

  6. Clinical and Immunological Effects in Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung-Cancer after Vaccination with Dendritic Cells Exposed to an Allogeneic Tumor Cell Lysate

    OpenAIRE

    Mogens H. Claesson; Ayako W. Pedersen; Pia Kvistborg; Mai-Britt Zocca; Lotte Engell-Noerregaard; Anders Mellemgaard

    2013-01-01

    Background: We evaluated the clinical and immunological effects of dendritic cell (DC) vaccination of patients with NSCLC. Autologous DCs were pulsed with a MAGE containing allogeneic melanoma cell lysate (MelCancerVac&174, Dandrit Biotech,Copenhagen,Denmark). Imiquimod cream, proleukin and celecoxib were used as adjuvants to the vaccines. The objective of the study was to evaluate specific T cell response in vitro by IFNg EliSpot. Secondary objectives were overall survival, response and qua...

  7. Primary cutaneous blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm: two case reports%原发皮肤的母细胞性浆细胞样树突细胞肿瘤二例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨旭芳; 王晓彦; 苗朝阳; 王建峰; 郭付云; 黄彬彬; 张晓艳

    2015-01-01

    Objective To report two cases of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN).Methods The clinical and histopathological manifestation,immunophenotype,treatment and prognosis of BPDCN were analyzed in two patients.Results Both of the patients were female with skin lesions as the initial manifestation.Case 1 presented with purple nodules on the waist,back and left upper limb;histopathological examination revealed that a large number of lymphoid cells diffusely infiltrated the dermis and subcutaneous fat layer,with an uninvolved zone separating the infiltrate from the epidermis.Case 2 presented with a subcutaneous mass around the left knee joint,and histopathological examination showed nodular lymphoid infiltrates in the dermis and subcutaneous tissue.Immunohistochemistry showed positive staining for CD4,CD56,CD123 (strong) and Ki-67 (40%),but negative staining for myeloperoxidase and EBER in both cases,and positive staining for TdT in case 1 but not in case 2.A bone marrow biopsy disclosed active hyperplasia of granulocytic cells,erythroid cells and megakaryocytes,and increased proportion of segmented cells.Immunophenotype analysis revealed that bone marrow was unaffected.Blood routine examination showed anemia in both patients.Patient 1 died two months after the final diagnosis.After chemotherapy with VDLP (vincristine,daunorubicin,L-asparagine and dexamethasone) and CHOP (cyclophosphamide,doxorubicin,vincristine,and prednisolone),skin lesions subsided in patient 2 who also received allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.At the time of this writing,patient 2 was in good condition with no recurrence of skin lesions.Conclusions BPDCN is a rare malignant neoplasm characterized by rapid growth and strong invasion capacity,usually with skin lesions as the initial manifestation.The prognosis of BPDCN is poor and there is no standard treatment.Early diagnosis and timely treatment may improve the prognosis of BPDCN,and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation may

  8. Myxoma virus induces type I interferon production in murine plasmacytoid dendritic cells via a TLR9/MyD88-, IRF5/IRF7-, and IFNAR-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Peihong; Cao, Hua; Merghoub, Taha; Avogadri, Francesca; Wang, Weiyi; Parikh, Tanvi; Fang, Chee-Mun; Pitha, Paula M; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Rahman, Masmudur M; McFadden, Grant; Hu, Xiaoyu; Houghton, Alan N; Shuman, Stewart; Deng, Liang

    2011-10-01

    Poxviruses are large DNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Myxoma virus is a rabbit poxvirus that belongs to the Leporipoxvirus genus. It causes a lethal disease called myxomatosis in European rabbits but cannot sustain any detectable infection in nonlagomorphs. Vaccinia virus is a prototypal orthopoxvirus that was used as a vaccine to eradicate smallpox. Myxoma virus is nonpathogenic in mice, whereas systemic infection with vaccinia virus can be lethal even in immunocompetent mice. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are potent type I interferon (IFN)-producing cells that play important roles in antiviral innate immunity. How poxviruses are sensed by pDCs to induce type I IFN production is not well understood. Here we report that infection of primary murine pDCs with myxoma virus, but not with vaccinia virus, induces IFN-α, IFN-β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and interleukin-12p70 (IL-12p70) production. Using pDCs derived from genetic knockout mice, we show that the myxoma virus-induced innate immune response requires the endosomal DNA sensor TLR9 and its adaptor MyD88, transcription factors IRF5 and IRF7, and the type I IFN positive-feedback loop mediated by IFNAR1. It is independent of the cytoplasmic RNA sensing pathway mediated by the mitochondrial adaptor molecule MAVS, the TLR3 adaptor TRIF, or the transcription factor IRF3. Using pharmacological inhibitors, we demonstrate that myxoma virus-induced type I IFN and IL-12p70 production in murine pDCs is also dependent on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt. Furthermore, our results reveal that the N-terminal Z-DNA/RNA binding domain of vaccinia virulence factor E3, which is missing in the orthologous M029 protein expressed by myxoma virus, plays an inhibitory role in poxvirus sensing and innate cytokine production by murine pDCs. PMID:21835795

  9. Clinical Benefit of Allogeneic Melanoma Cell Lysate-Pulsed Autologous Dendritic Cell Vaccine in MAGE-Positive Colorectal Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toh, Han Chong; Wang, Who-Whong; Chia, Whay Kuang;

    2009-01-01

    were cultured from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), pulsed with the allogeneic MCL, and matured using cytokines that achieved high CD83- and CCR7-expressing DCs. Each patient received up to 10 intradermal vaccinations (3-5 x 10(6) cells per dose) at biweekly intervals. RESULTS: Twenty...

  10. Immature dendritic cells generated from cryopreserved human monocytes show impaired ability to respond to LPS and to induce allogeneic lymphocyte proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Ferreira Silveira

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells play a key role in the immune system, in the sensing of foreign antigens and triggering of an adaptive immune response. Cryopreservation of human monocytes was investigated to understand its effect on differentiation into immature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (imdDCs, the response to inflammatory stimuli and the ability to induce allogeneic lymphocyte proliferation. Cryopreserved (crp-monocytes were able to differentiate into imdDCs, albeit to a lesser extent than freshly (frh-obtained monocytes. Furthermore, crp-imdDCs had lower rates of maturation and cytokine/chemokine secretion in response to LPS than frh-imdDCs. Lower expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (at 24 and 48 h and higher susceptibility to apoptosis in crp-imdDCs than in fresh cells would account for the impaired maturation and cytokine/chemokine secretion observed. A mixed leukocyte reaction showed that lymphocyte proliferation was lower with crp-imdDCs than with frh-imdDCs. These findings suggested that the source of monocytes used to generate human imdDCs could influence the accuracy of results observed in studies of the immune response to pathogens, lymphocyte activation, vaccination and antigen sensing. It is not always possible to work with freshly isolated monocytes but the possible effects of freezing/thawing on the biology and responsiveness of imdDCs should be taken into account.

  11. 异体肿瘤mRNA电转染DC瘤苗的特异性抗骨肉瘤免疫学效应%Anti-osteosarcoma effects of autologous dendritic cells electrotransfected with allogeneic mRNA in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于哲; 耿捷; 戴霞; 靳雷; 范清宇

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination with dendritic cells (DCs) transfected with tumor-derived mRNA antigen has emerged as a promising strategy for generating protective immune responses in mammals. However, the integration of allogeneic osteosarcoma mRNA and autologous DCs has not been fully examined. This study was designed to investigate the antitumor effects of tumor vaccine produced by autologous DCs transfected with allogeneic osteosarcoma mRNA through electroporation in tumor-bearing rats model. In the present study, extraction of rat tumor-mRNA was performed as a two-step procedure. First, total-RN A was extracted by use of Trizol, and then mRNA purification was performed by use of polyT -coated magnetic beads. Then we transfected the allogeneic tumor mRNA to SD rat bone marrow-derived DCs through electroporation. The tumor vaccine was applied to tumor-bearing rat model and the specific antitumor effects of the tumor vaccine were observed. We found that the immunization using autologous DCs electrotransfected with allogeneic osteosarcoma mRNA induced specific CTL responses significantly (P〈0.05) and the cytotoxic activity was confirmed in cold target inhibition assays and using mAbs blocking MHC class Ⅰ molecules. In vivo preimmunized and active therapeutic experiments demonstrated that 70% of the rats immunized with allogeneic osteosarcoma mRNA-transfected DCs were typically able to reject tumor challenge and remained tumor-free. In conclusion, we demonstrated that allogeneic tumor mRNA, isolated from rat osteosarcoma cell line, could be applied to produce tumor vaccine inducing specific antitumor effects, especially in DC-based immunotherapy strategy. This study also provides the foundations for an effective and broadly applicable treatment of a wide range of cancer indications for which tumor -associated antigens have not been identified.%目的 应用肿瘤细胞来源的mRNA转染至树突状细胞(dendritic cells,DCs)已逐渐成为一种颇具潜能的抗肿瘤免疫治

  12. Thrombin regulates the function of human blood dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thrombin is the key enzyme in the coagulation cascade and activates endothelial cells, neutrophils and monocytes via protease-activated receptors (PARs). At the inflammatory site, immune cells have an opportunity to encounter thrombin. However little is known about the effect of thrombin for dendritic cells (DC), which are efficient antigen-presenting cells and play important roles in initiating and regulating immune responses. The present study revealed that thrombin has the ability to stimulate blood DC. Plasmacytoid DC (PDC) and myeloid DC (MDC) isolated from PBMC expressed PAR-1 and released MCP-1, IL-10, and IL-12 after thrombin stimulation. Unlike blood DC, monocyte-derived DC (MoDC), differentiated in vitro did not express PAR-1 and were unresponsive to thrombin. Effects of thrombin on blood DC were significantly diminished by the addition of anti-PAR-1 Ab or hirudin, serine protease inhibitor. Moreover, thrombin induced HLA-DR and CD86 expression on DC and the thrombin-treated DC induced allogenic T cell proliferation. These findings indicate that thrombin plays a role in the regulation of blood DC functions

  13. Evidence for local dendritic cell activation in pulmonary sarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berge Bregje

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disease characterized by a seemingly exaggerated immune response against a difficult to discern antigen. Dendritic cells (DCs are pivotal antigen presenting cells thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis. Paradoxically, decreased DC immune reactivity was reported in blood samples from pulmonary sarcoidosis patients. However, functional data on lung DCs in sarcoidosis are lacking. We hypothesized that at the site of disease DCs are mature, immunocompetent and involved in granuloma formation. Methods We analyzed myeloid DCs (mDCs and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs in broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL and blood from newly diagnosed, untreated pulmonary sarcoidosis patients and healthy controls using 9-color flowcytometry. DCs, isolated from BAL using flowcytometric sorting (mDCs or cultured from monocytes (mo-DCs, were functionally assessed in a mixed leukocyte reaction with naïve allogeneic CD4+ T cells. Using Immunohistochemistry, location and activation status of CD11c+DCs was assessed in mucosal airway biopsies. Results mDCs in BAL, but not in blood, from sarcoidosis patients were increased in number when compared with mDCs from healthy controls. mDCs purified from BAL of sarcoidosis patients induced T cell proliferation and differentiation and did not show diminished immune reactivity. Mo-DCs from patients induced increased TNFα release in co-cultures with naïve allogeneic CD4+ T cells. Finally, immunohistochemical analyses revealed increased numbers of mature CD86+ DCs in granuloma-containing airway mucosal biopsies from sarcoidosis patients. Conclusion Taken together, these finding implicate increased local DC activation in granuloma formation or maintenance in pulmonary sarcoidosis.

  14. 浆细胞样树突状细胞在过敏性紫癜患儿外周血和肾组织中表达的意义%Expression of plasmacytoid dendritic cells in peripheral blood and renal tissues in children with Henoch-Sch(o)nlein purpura

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王娟; 郭桂梅; 夏敏; 郑林; 郝胜; 黄文彦; 何威逊

    2014-01-01

    目的 研究浆细胞样树突状细胞(pDC)在过敏性紫癜(HSP)患儿外周血和肾脏组织中的表达和分布情况,探讨pDC在紫癜性肾炎发病中的作用.方法 40例HSP患儿,其中急性期28例,缓解期12例,分离患儿外周血单个核细胞,流式细胞术检测pDC的表达;设立正常对照组(15例).同时抽提外周血总RNA并反转录为cDNA,以实时荧光定量PCR法检测患者组和正常对照组趋化因子干扰素γ诱导蛋白10 (CXCL10)、CC类趋化因子配体5(CCL5)及相应受体CXC亚家族趋化因子受体3(CXCR3)、趋化因子受体5(CCR5)mRNA的定量表达水平(以2-△△Ct值表示).应用免疫组织化学技术,观察8例行肾活检患者肾脏组织中pDC的分布;设立正常对照(3例).结果 HSP急性期患者外周血pDC表达的百分数为0.051±0.039,低于缓解期的0.181 ±0.082和正常对照组的0.166±0.079(P<0.000 1).HSP患者外周血高表达CXCL10、CCL5,而低表达CXCR3、CCR5.正常对照肾脏组织未见pDC浸润,而紫癜性肾炎患者pDC呈局灶节段分布于肾小球系膜区.结论 pDC在HSP患儿中表达异常,紫癜性肾炎的发生可能与外周血中pDCs在趋化因子作用下向肾组织的迁移,引起局部炎性反应有关.%Objective To investigate the expression and distribution of plasmacytoid dendritic cells(pDC) in peripheral blood and renal tissues in children with Henoch-SchSnlein purpura(HSP),and explore the role of pDCs in the pathogenesis of Henoch-Schtnlein purpura nephritis(HSPN).Methods Among the 40 children with HSP,28 cases were in the active phase(renal biopsy performed in 8 cases of them) and the other 12 in remission phase.Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated,and the expression of pDC was detected by flow cytometry.The normal control group was established (n =15).Total RNA of peripheral blood was extracted and transcripted into cDNA.Sybr green dye based real-time quantitative PCR method was used to compare the expression

  15. The Notch Ligand DLL4 Defines a Capability of Human Dendritic Cells in Regulating Th1 and Th17 Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lijun; Bai, Zhenjiang; He, Shan; Mochizuki, Kazuhiro; Liu, Yongnian; Purushe, Janaki; Sun, Hongxing; Wang, Jian; Yagita, Hideo; Mineishi, Shin; Fung, Henry; Yanik, Gregory A; Caricchio, Roberto; Fan, Xiaoxuan; Crisalli, Lisa M; Hexner, Elizabeth O; Reshef, Ran; Zhang, Yanyun; Zhang, Yi

    2016-02-01

    Notch signaling regulates multiple helper CD4(+) T cell programs. We have recently demonstrated that dendritic cells (DCs) expressing the Notch ligand DLL4 are critical for eliciting alloreactive T cell responses and induction of graft-versus-host disease in mice. However, the human counterpart of murine DLL4(+) DCs has yet to be examined. We report the identification of human DLL4(+) DCs and their critical role in regulating Th1 and Th17 differentiation. CD1c(+) DCs and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) from the peripheral blood (PB) of healthy donors did not express DLL4. In contrast, patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation had a 16-fold more DLL4(+)CD1c(+) DCs than healthy donors. Upon activation of TLR signaling, healthy donor-derived CD1c(+) DCs dramatically upregulated DLL4, as did pDCs to a lesser extent. Activated DLL4(+) DCs were better able to promote Th1 and Th17 differentiation than unstimulated PB DCs. Blocking DLL4 using a neutralizing Ab decreased Notch signaling in T cells stimulated with DLL4(+) DCs, and it reduced the generation of Th1 and Th17 cells. Both NF-κB and STAT3 were crucial for inducing DLL4 in human DCs. Interestingly, STAT3 directly activated DLL4 transcription and inhibiting STAT3 alone was sufficient to reduce DLL4 in activated PB DCs. Thus, DLL4 is a unique functional molecule of human circulating DCs critical for directing Th1 and Th17 differentiation. These findings identify a pathway for therapeutic intervention for inflammatory disorders in humans, such as graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, autoimmunity, and tumor immunity. PMID:26712946

  16. Dendritic Cells and Innate Immunity in Kidney Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuang, Quan; Lakkis, Fadi G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary This review summarizes emerging concepts related to the roles of dendritic cells and innate immunity in organ transplant rejection. First, it highlights the primary role that recipient, rather than donor, dendritic cells have in rejection and reviews their origin and function in the transplanted kidney. Second, it introduces the novel concept that recognition of allogeneic non-self by host monocytes (referred to here as innate allorecognition) is necessary for initiating rejection by ...

  17. Clinical responses in patients with advanced colorectal cancer to a dendritic cell based vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Stefan K; Fischer, Anders; Myschetzky, Peter S;

    2008-01-01

    Patients with disseminated colorectal cancer have a poor prognosis. Preliminary studies have shown encouraging results from vaccines based on dendritic cells. The aim of this phase II study was to evaluate the effect of treating patients with advanced colorectal cancer with a cancer vaccine based...... on dendritic cells pulsed with an allogenic tumor cell lysate. Twenty patients with advanced colorectal cancer were consecutively enrolled. Dendritic cells (DC) were generated from autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells and pulsed with allogenic tumor cell lysate containing high levels of cancer...

  18. Clinical responses in patients with advanced colorectal cancer to a dendritic cell based vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Stefan K; Fischer, Anders; Myschetzky, Peter S; Munksgaard, Signe B; Zocca, Mai-Britt; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Patients with disseminated colorectal cancer have a poor prognosis. Preliminary studies have shown encouraging results from vaccines based on dendritic cells. The aim of this phase II study was to evaluate the effect of treating patients with advanced colorectal cancer with a cancer vaccine based...... on dendritic cells pulsed with an allogenic tumor cell lysate. Twenty patients with advanced colorectal cancer were consecutively enrolled. Dendritic cells (DC) were generated from autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells and pulsed with allogenic tumor cell lysate containing high levels of...

  19. Alternative activation of human plasmacytoid DCs in vitro and in melanoma lesions: involvement of LAG-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camisaschi, Chiara; De Filippo, Annamaria; Beretta, Valeria; Vergani, Barbara; Villa, Antonello; Vergani, Elisabetta; Santinami, Mario; Cabras, Antonello Domenico; Arienti, Flavio; Triebel, Frédéric; Rodolfo, Monica; Rivoltini, Licia; Castelli, Chiara

    2014-07-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) at tumor sites are often tolerogenic. Although pDCs initiate innate and adaptive immunity upon Toll-like receptor (TLR) triggering by pathogens, TLR-independent signals may be responsible for pDC activation and immune suppression in the tumor inflammatory environment. To identify molecules that are potentially involved in alternative pDC activation, we explored the expression and function of lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3) in human pDCs. In this report, we showed the expression of LAG-3 on the cell surface of a subset of circulating human pDCs. LAG-3+ pDCs exhibited a partially mature phenotype and were enriched at tumor sites in samples from melanoma patients. We found that LAG-3 interacted with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) to induce TLR-independent activation of pDCs with limited IFNα and enhanced IL-6 production. This in vitro cytokine profile of LAG-3-activated pDCs paralleled that of tumor-associated pDCs analyzed ex vivo. By confocal microscopy, LAG-3+ pDCs detected in melanoma-invaded lymph nodes (LNs) stained positive for IL-6 and preferentially localized near melanoma cells. These results suggest that LAG-3-mediated activation of pDCs takes place in vivo at tumor sites, and it is in part responsible for directing an immune-suppressive environment. PMID:24441096

  20. Plasmacytoid urothelial carcinoma of the bladder: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Aldousari, Saad; Sircar, Kanishka; Kassouf, Wassim

    2009-01-01

    Plasmacytoid bladder cancer is a rare variant of transitional cell carcinoma. A 57-year-old man was referred to our institution for management of invasive transitional cell carcinoma diagnosed at a peripheral hospital. His complaints were of vague lower abdominal pain with associated urgency and frequency requiring oxybutynin. Metastatic workup was negative and was subsequently scheduled for a radical cystectomy. Routine colonoscopy 3 weeks prior to surgery was negative. Intraoperatively, he ...

  1. Decrease in Circulating Dendritic Cell Precursors in Patients with Peripheral Artery Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Kretzschmar; Ilonka Rohm; Sebastian Schäller; Stefan Betge; Rudin Pistulli; Yevgeniya Atiskova; Hans-R. Figulla; Atilla Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a common manifestation of atherosclerosis. Inflammation is important for initiation and progression of the disease. Dendritic cells (DCs) as antigen-presenting cells play an important role in the immune system. Therefore, we hypothesize that, in patients with PAD, DCPs might be reduced in blood due to their recruitment into the vascular wall and induce a proinflammatory response. The numbers of myeloid DCPs, plasmacytoid DCPs, and total DCPs were analyzed by...

  2. Cytokine-Mediated Loss of Blood Dendritic Cells During Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Acute Infectious Mononucleosis: Implication for Immune Dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panikkar, Archana; Smith, Corey; Hislop, Andrew; Tellam, Nick; Dasari, Vijayendra; Hogquist, Kristin A; Wykes, Michelle; Moss, Denis J; Rickinson, Alan; Balfour, Henry H; Khanna, Rajiv

    2015-12-15

    Acute infectious mononucleosis (IM) is associated with altered expression of inflammatory cytokines and disturbed T-cell homeostasis, however, the precise mechanism of this immune dysregulation remains unresolved. In the current study we demonstrated a significant loss of circulating myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs) during acute IM, a loss correlated with the severity of clinical symptoms. In vitro exposure of blood DCs to acute IM plasma resulted in loss of plasmacytoid DCs, and further studies with individual cytokines showed that exposure to interleukin 10 could replicate this effect. Our data provide important mechanistic insight into dysregulated immune homeostasis during acute IM. PMID:26080368

  3. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasia - a rare type of acute leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Köpeczi Judit Beáta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Neoplasmul cu celule dendritice plasmocitoide blastice (NCDPB, clasificat recent în grupul leucemiilor acute mieloide este o boală hematologică malignă rară cu evoluţie clinică extrem de agresivă. Raportăm cazul unei paciente în vârstă de 55 ani care a prezentat ruptură spontană a splinei. Diagnosticul histopatologic, fără imunohistochimie, a fost de limfom malign non-Hodgkin (LMNH splenic de zonă marginală. Pacienta a primit 4 cure citostatice. Datorită evoluţiei nefavorabile, splina a fost reexaminată histopatologic şi imunohistochimic într-un alt laborator. Diagnosticul de LMNH a fost exclus şi s-a ridicat suspiciunea unei proliferări maligne, posibil mieloide. Datorită neconcordanţei dintre diagnostice s-a efectuat o nouă examinare imunohistochimică într-un al treilea laborator. LMNH se infirmă şi se suspicionează leucemie mieloidă, cu celule NK sau cu celule dendritice plasmocitoide. Pacienta a fost internată în clinica noastră după 8 luni de la diagnosticul iniţial. Imunofenotiparea prin citometrie în flux efectuată din măduva osoasă a evidenţiat 23% blaşti pozitivi pentru markerii CD4, CD56, CD123, HLA-DR, CD38, CD11b, CD2 şi negativi pentru markerii specifici liniilor celulare limfoide B, T, NK şi mielomonocitare. Diagnosticul final a fost NCDPB în fază leucemică. Datorită diversităii prezentării clinice, morfologice şi imunofenotipice a NCDPB, diagnosticul acestei boli maligne rare rămâne o provocare. Imunofenotiparea prin citometrie în flux este superioară examenului imunohistochimic datorită disponibilităţii unui panel mai larg de anticorpi şi posibilităţii de a identifica intensitatea expresiei antigenice. Formele atipice ale NCDPB trebuie să fie recunoscute în timp util pentru a putea trata corespunzător pacienţii cu această boală agresivă.

  4. On the trail of innate immune responses: Plasmacytoid dendritic cells and beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Balzarolo

    2013-01-01

    Our study sheds new light on pDCs development and function, and might provide new clues for optimizing infection and cancer therapy by harnessing pDC cytotoxicity through TRAIL. Furthermore, this study provides interesting clues to understand the innate immune responses towards bacterial nucleic aci

  5. The Influence of IFN-α on Blood Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell in Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chongyang Wu; Liansheng Zhang; Ye Chai; Feixue Song; Pengyun Zeng; Lijuan Li; Lingling Yue; Bin Xiong

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the mechanism of IFN on CML.METHODS Samples of 15 CML patients and 10 healthy controls were studied. The flow cytometry was performed to identify circulating pDCs. The concentration of IFN-α in serum and that in the supematant of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs)cultured after stimulation with CpG ODN2216 were examined both in CML patients and in the healthy controls RESULTS There was significant reduction in the number of circulating pDCs, serum concentration of IFN-α and the capacity of IFN-α producing PBMCs in CML patients compared with those in healthy control individuals (P < 0.001). After the active treatment with IFN-α and hydroxyurea, the quantity and function of pDCs were increased in stabilized patients, especially the function of pDCs in 2 patients achieving major cytogenetic.response (MCR). The proportion and function of pDCs and the serum levels of IFN were inversely correlated with both WBC and age of the patients with CML, and positively correlated with the state of the illness.dysfunction of circulating pDCs. The active treatment with IFN in CML patients may be related to the restoration of pDCs.

  6. Amelanotic melanoma presenting with plasmacytoid morphology and BRAF V600 mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Kocovski

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasmacytoid melanoma is an unusual variant of malignant melanoma. The plasmacytoid morphology can be found in a variety of other malignancies including carcinomas, plasma cell neoplasms, lymphoproliferative disorders, and sarcomas. The authors report a rare case of plasmacytoid amelanotic malignant melanoma in a 78-year-old man presenting with an enlarging palpable, erythematous mass on his left posterior shoulder. A fine needle aspirate showed atypical findings with single amelanotic cells with high nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio, mono- and multi-nucleation with prominent nucleoli and intranuclear inclusions. Review of the excision and immunohistochemical analysis revealed the malignant plasmacytoid cells stained with vimentin, S-100, HMB-45, and other staining patterns consistent with melanoma. Initial evaluation was negative for other sites of disease. However, 4 months later, the patient was noted to have metastatic disease to his lungs and liver. Given that the tumor was noted to be BRAF V600R mutated, the patient was started on single agent dabrafenib. The plasmacytoid morphology can be found in a variety of malignancies. Melanoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any malignancy presenting with plasmacytoid features.

  7. Characterization of a Phenotypically Unique Population of CD13+ Dendritic Cells Resident in the Spleen

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuang, Yan; Mwangi, Waithaka; Brown, Wendy C.; Davis, William C.; Hope, Jayne C.; Palmer, Guy H.

    2006-01-01

    Immature dendritic cells (DCs) resident in bovine spleens represent a distinct CD11a+ CD11c+ CD13+ CD172+ CD205+ population compared to those circulating in peripheral blood or trafficking via afferent lymph. Upon cytokine-induced maturation, splenic DCs both efficiently present antigen in the stimulation of allogeneic lymphocyte proliferation and recall antigen-specific responses.

  8. Expression of Programmed Cell Death 1 Ligands (PD-L1 and PD-L2) in Histiocytic and Dendritic Cell Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Sun, Heather H; Fletcher, Christopher D M; Hornick, Jason L; Morgan, Elizabeth A; Freeman, Gordon J; Hodi, F Stephen; Pinkus, Geraldine S; Rodig, Scott J

    2016-04-01

    Programmed cell death 1 ligands 1 and 2 (PD-L1 and PD-L2) are cell surface proteins expressed by activated antigen-presenting cells and by select malignancies that bind PD-1 on T cells to inhibit immune responses. Antibodies targeting PD-1 or PD-L1 elicit antitumor immunity in a subset of patients, and clinical response correlates with PD-1 ligand expression by malignant or immune cells within the tumor microenvironment. We examined the expression of PD-1 ligands on subsets of antigen-presenting cells and 87 histiocytic and dendritic cell disorders including those that are benign, borderline, and malignant. Within reactive lymphoid tissue, strong PD-L1 is detected on most macrophages, subsets of interdigitating dendritic cells, and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, but not on follicular dendritic cells or Langerhans cells. Macrophage/dendritic cell subsets do not express discernible PD-L2. Seven of 7 cases of sarcoidosis (100%), 6 of 6 cases of histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis (Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease) (100%), 2 of 11 cases of Rosai-Dorfman disease (18%), and 3 of 15 cases of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (20%) exhibited positivity for PD-L1. All cases of sarcoidosis were also positive for PD-L2. Seven of 14 histiocytic sarcomas (50%), 2 of 5 interdigitating dendritic cell sarcomas (40%), 10 of 20 follicular dendritic cell sarcomas (50%), and none of 9 blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasms were positive for PD-L1. Eleven of 20 (55%) follicular dendritic cell sarcomas were also positive for PD-L2. PD-L1 and PD-L2 are useful new markers for identifying select histiocyte and dendritic cell disorders and reveal novel patient populations as rational candidates for immunotherapy. PMID:26752545

  9. Effect of chronic morphine administration on circulating dendritic cells in SIV-infected rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwell, William D; Wagner, Wendeline; Lewis, Mark G; Fan, Xiaoxuan; Rappaport, Jay; Rogers, Thomas J

    2016-06-15

    We studied the effect of chronic morphine administration on the circulating dendritic cell population dynamics associated with SIV infection using rhesus macaques. Animals were either first infected with SIV and then given chronic morphine, or visa versa. SIV infection increased the numbers of myeloid DCs (mDCs), but morphine treatment attenuated this mDC expansion. In contrast, morphine increased the numbers of plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) in SIV-infected animals. Finally, chronic morphine administration (no SIV) transiently increased the numbers of circulating pDCs. These results show that chronic morphine induces a significant alteration in the available circulating levels of critical antigen-presenting cells. PMID:27235346

  10. Activated protein C modulates the proinflammatory activity of dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsumoto T

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Takahiro Matsumoto,1,2* Yuki Matsushima,1* Masaaki Toda,1 Ziaurahman Roeen,1 Corina N D'Alessandro-Gabazza,1,5 Josephine A Hinneh,1 Etsuko Harada,1,3 Taro Yasuma,4 Yutaka Yano,4 Masahito Urawa,1,5 Tetsu Kobayashi,5 Osamu Taguchi,5 Esteban C Gabazza1 1Department of Immunology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsu, Mie Prefecture, 2BONAC Corporation, BIO Factory 4F, Fukuoka, 3Iwade Research Institute of Mycology, 4Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, 5Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsu, Mie Prefecture, Japan *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Previous studies have demonstrated the beneficial activity of activated protein C in allergic diseases including bronchial asthma and rhinitis. However, the exact mechanism of action of activated protein C in allergies is unclear. In this study, we hypothesized that pharmacological doses of activated protein C can modulate allergic inflammation by inhibiting dendritic cells. Materials and methods: Dendritic cells were prepared using murine bone marrow progenitor cells and human peripheral monocytes. Bronchial asthma was induced in mice that received intratracheal instillation of ovalbumin-pulsed dendritic cells. Results: Activated protein C significantly increased the differentiation of tolerogenic plasmacytoid dendritic cells and the secretion of type I interferons, but it significantly reduced lipopolysaccharide-mediated maturation and the secretion of inflammatory cytokines in myeloid dendritic cells. Activated protein C also inhibited maturation and the secretion of inflammatory cytokines in monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Activated protein C-treated dendritic cells were less effective when differentiating naïve CD4 T-cells from Th1 or Th2 cells, and the cellular effect of activated protein C was mediated by its receptors. Mice that received adoptive transfer of activated protein C

  11. Selective Depletion of CD45RA+ T Cells From Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Grafts From HLA-Matched Related and Unrelated Donors in Preventing GVHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-08

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Blast Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Graft Versus Host Disease; Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts

  12. The Current Immune Function of Hepatic Dendritic Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Willy Hsu; Shang-An Shu; Eric Gershwin; Zhe-Xiong Lian

    2007-01-01

    While only a small percentage of the liver as dendritic cells, they play a major role in the regulation of liver immunity. Four major types of dendritic cell subsets include myeloid CD8α-B220-, lymphoid CD8α+B220-,plasmacytoid CD8α-B220+, and natural killer dendritic cell with CD8α-B220-NK1.1+ phenotype. Although these subsets have slightly different characteristics, they are all poor na(i)ve T cell stimulators. In exchange for their reduced capacity for allostimulation, hepatic DCs are equipped with an enhanced ability to secrete cytokines in response to TLR stimulation. In addition, they have increased level of phagocytosis. Both of these traits suggest hepatic DC as part of the innate immune system. With such a high rate of exposure to the dietary and commensal antigens, it is important for the hepatic DCs to have an enhanced innate response while maintaining a tolerogenic state to avoid chronic inflammation. Only upon secondary infectivity does the hepatic DC activate memory T cells for rapid eradication of recurring pathogen. On the other hand, overly tolerogenic characteristics of hepatic DC may be responsible for the increase prevalence of autoimmunity or liver malignancies.

  13. Thy-1+ dendritic cells in murine epidermis are bone marrow-derived

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thy-1+, Ly-5+ dendritic cells have recently been described as a resident cell population in murine epidermis, but their ontogeny and function are unknown. The origin and turnover of epidermal Thy-1+ cells utilizing chimeric mice were investigated. Lethally x-irradiated AKR/J (Thy-1.1+) and AKR/Cum (Thy-1.2+) mice were reconstituted with allogeneic bone marrow cells with or without thymocytes from congenic AKR/Cum or AKR/J mice, respectively. The density of residual indigenous Thy-1.1+ cells in AKR/J chimeras and Thy-1.2+ cells in AKR/Cum chimeras was substantially reduced following x-irradiation, as determined by immunofluorescence staining of epidermal sheets. Epidermal repopulation by allogeneic Thy-1+ dendritic epidermal cells was first observed at 5 weeks in AKR/J chimeras and at 7 weeks in AKR/Cum chimeras and progressed slowly. Repopulation was not enhanced by increasing the number of allogeneic bone marrow cells injected from 2 X 10(7) to 10(8) cells or by the addition of 8 X 10(7) allogeneic thymocytes to the donor inoculate. Epidermal repopulation by allogeneic Thy-1.2+ cells was not seen in AKR/J mice reconstituted with syngeneic bone marrow cells and allogeneic Thy-1.2+ AKR/Cum thymocytes. Taken together, these results indicate that Thy-1+ dendritic epidermal cells are derived from the bone marrow and suggest that they are not related to conventional peripheral T-lymphocytes

  14. Spiraling eutectic dendrites

    OpenAIRE

    Pusztai, Tamás; Rátkai, László; Szállás, Attila; Gránásy, László

    2013-01-01

    Eutectic dendrites forming in a model ternary system have been studied using the phase-field theory. The eutectic and one-phase dendrites have similar forms, and the tip radius scales with the interface free energy as for one-phase dendrites. The steady-state eutectic patterns appearing on these two-phase dendrites include concentric rings, and single- to multiarm spirals, of which the fluctuations choose, a stochastic phenomenon characterized by a peaked probability distribution. The number ...

  15. Plasmacytoid Transitional Cell Carcinoma of Bladder: A Clinico-pathological Study and Review of Literatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Xiaoli; ZHANG Hongtu; SUN Yuntian; LIU Xiuyun

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the pathologic features of plasmacytoid transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder, and to analyze the diagnostic features, criteria for differential diagnosis and the clinical significance of the tumor. Methods: Two cases of bladder plasmacytoid transitional cell carcinoma were studied. Routine paraffin sections with HE staining, Pap smear and immunohistochemistry by S-P method were observed under a light microscope. Pathological and clinical data were analyzed by comparison with early reported cases in literatures. Results: A characteristic feature of this tumor was of deep invasion in the lamina propria and/or muscularis propria, in addition to the component of carcinoma in situ in the mucosa, when tumors were diagnosed. The histological pattern and cytological features showed similarity to a plasmacytoid tumor. The tumor cells were strongly positive for AE1/AE3, CEA and CK18. The prognosis appeared to be worse than ordinary transitional cell carcinoma. Conclusion: The plasmacytoid transitional cell carcinoma of bladder is rare but has typical pathological, immunohistological and clinical features. Pathologists should be aware of this kind of primary tumor of bladder.

  16. Nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    OpenAIRE

    Baron, Frédéric; Beguin, Yves

    2002-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the most effective treatment for selected hematological malignancies. Its curative potential is largely mediated by an immune-mediated destruction of malignant cells by donor lymphocytes termed graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect. However, because of its toxicity, conventional allogeneic HSCT is restricted to younger and fitter patients. These observations led several groups to set up new (less toxic) transplant protocols (nonmyeloab...

  17. Human Liver Stem Cells Suppress T-Cell Proliferation, NK Activity, and Dendritic Cell Differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Stefania Bruno; Cristina Grange; Marta Tapparo; Chiara Pasquino; Renato Romagnoli; Ennia Dametto; Antonio Amoroso; Ciro Tetta; Giovanni Camussi

    2016-01-01

    Human liver stem cells (HLSCs) are a mesenchymal stromal cell-like population resident in the adult liver. Preclinical studies indicate that HLSCs could be a good candidate for cell therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and the immunomodulatory properties of HLSCs on T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells (NKs), and dendritic cells (DCs) in allogeneic experimental settings. We found that HLSCs inhibited T-cell proliferation by a mechanism independent of cell co...

  18. Allogeneic radiation chimeras: long-term studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lethally irradiated mice protected with allogeneic fetal liver cells or with syngeneic or allogeneic marrow and spleen cells treated with antisera to mouse immunoglobulins or to the T cell-associated 0 antigen and their controls were observed for up to 750 days. The best survival rates were found in the large groups given syngeneic marrow and spleen or allogeneic fetal liver cells (70-85 percent 700-day survival); in contrast, 43 percent of the group injected with allogeneic cells treated with anti-0 serum and 19 percent of those given antimmunoglobulin-treated cells were alive 700 days postradiation. Pulmonary infection was the most frequent cause of death of long-term survivors in all groups. Tumor incidence was increased in recipients of allogeneic cells (13 percent versus 4 percent among syngeneic chimeras), but the renal pathology seen in these groups was no greater than that noted in the syngeneic controls. Beginning 600 days after irradiation, mice from experimental and control groups were killed and their spleens were cultured with thymus-dependent antigens and the mitogens concanavalin Λ and lipopolysaccharide, Escherichia coli. The most frequent finding in all groups was mild to moderate impairment of T cell-dependent responses. (U.S.)

  19. Lactotransferrin-Cre reporter mice trace neutrophils, monocytes/macrophages and distinct subtypes of dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacic, Boris; Hoelbl-Kovacic, Andrea; Fischhuber, Katrin M; Leitner, Nicole R; Gotthardt, Dagmar; Casanova, Emilio; Sexl, Veronika; Müller, Mathias

    2014-06-01

    Considerable effort has been expended to identify genes that account for myeloid lineage commitment and development. However, currently available non-invasive mouse models utilize myeloid-specific reporters that are significantly expressed in hematopoietic stem cells as well as lymphoid compartments. Here, we describe a myeloid-specific marker that is not shared by any other lineage. We show that lactotransferrin mRNA is expressed by Gr-1(+)/CD11b(+) cells in the bone marrow, as opposed to hematopoietic stem cells or any peripheral cell population. To follow the progeny of lactotransferrin-expressing bone marrow cells, we generated a mouse model in which a reporter gene is irreversibly activated from the lactotransferrin-promoter. We found that lactotransferrin-reporter labels a majority of neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages and distinct subtypes of dendritic cells, while excluding T, B, natural killer cells, interferon-producing killer dendritic cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells, erythrocytes and eosinophils. Lactotransferrin-reporter(-) bone marrow cells retain lymphoid, erythroid and long-term repopulating potential, while lactotransferrin-reporter(+) bone marrow cells confer only myeloid, but not lymphoid potential. We conclude that lactotransferrin represents a late stage differentiation marker of neutrophils, macrophages and distinct subtypes of dendritic cells. PMID:24561791

  20. Chlamydia pneumoniae infection induced allergic airway sensitization is controlled by regulatory T-cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crother, Timothy R; Schröder, Nicolas W J; Karlin, Justin; Chen, Shuang; Shimada, Kenichi; Slepenkin, Anatoly; Alsabeh, Randa; Peterson, Ellena; Arditi, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP) is associated with induction and exacerbation of asthma. CP infection can induce allergic airway sensitization in mice in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Allergen exposure 5 days after a low dose (mild-moderate), but not a high dose (severe) CP infection induces antigen sensitization in mice. Innate immune signals play a critical role in controlling CP infection induced allergic airway sensitization, however these mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Wild-type, TLR2-/-, and TLR4-/- mice were infected intranasally (i.n.) with a low dose of CP, followed by i.n. exposure to human serum albumin (HSA) and challenged with HSA 2 weeks later. Airway inflammation, immunoglobulins, eosinophils, and goblet cells were measured. Low dose CP infection induced allergic sensitization in TLR2-/- mice, but not in TLR4-/- mice, due to differential Treg responses in these genotypes. TLR2-/- mice had reduced numbers of Tregs in the lung during CP infection while TLR4-/- mice had increased numbers. High dose CP infection resulted in an increase in Tregs and pDCs in lungs, which prevented antigen sensitization in WT mice. Depletion of Tregs or pDCs resulted in allergic airway sensitization. We conclude that Tregs and pDCs are critical determinants regulating CP infection-induced allergic sensitization. Furthermore, TLR2 and TLR4 signaling during CP infection may play a regulatory role through the modulation of Tregs. PMID:21695198

  1. Chlamydia pneumoniae infection induced allergic airway sensitization is controlled by regulatory T-cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy R Crother

    Full Text Available Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP is associated with induction and exacerbation of asthma. CP infection can induce allergic airway sensitization in mice in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Allergen exposure 5 days after a low dose (mild-moderate, but not a high dose (severe CP infection induces antigen sensitization in mice. Innate immune signals play a critical role in controlling CP infection induced allergic airway sensitization, however these mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Wild-type, TLR2-/-, and TLR4-/- mice were infected intranasally (i.n. with a low dose of CP, followed by i.n. exposure to human serum albumin (HSA and challenged with HSA 2 weeks later. Airway inflammation, immunoglobulins, eosinophils, and goblet cells were measured. Low dose CP infection induced allergic sensitization in TLR2-/- mice, but not in TLR4-/- mice, due to differential Treg responses in these genotypes. TLR2-/- mice had reduced numbers of Tregs in the lung during CP infection while TLR4-/- mice had increased numbers. High dose CP infection resulted in an increase in Tregs and pDCs in lungs, which prevented antigen sensitization in WT mice. Depletion of Tregs or pDCs resulted in allergic airway sensitization. We conclude that Tregs and pDCs are critical determinants regulating CP infection-induced allergic sensitization. Furthermore, TLR2 and TLR4 signaling during CP infection may play a regulatory role through the modulation of Tregs.

  2. Natural mannosylation of HIV-1 gp120 imposes no immunoregulatory effects in primary human plasmacytoid dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Jonas Nørskov; Vinner, Lasse; Pedersen, Susanne Brix

    2014-01-01

    with degree of mannosylation, however, subsequent reduction in the original mannosylation level had no effect on the pDC phenotype. Furthermore, two of the infectious HIV-1 strains induced profound necrosis in pDCs, also in a mannose-independent manner. We therefore conclude that natural mannosylation...

  3. Vaccination with autologous dendritic cells pulsed with multiple tumor antigens for treatment of patients with malignant melanoma: results from a phase I/II trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trepiakas, Redas; Berntsen, Annika; Hadrup, Sine Reker;

    2010-01-01

    vaccination with autologous monocyte-derived mature dendritic cells (DC) pulsed with p53, survivin and telomerase-derived peptides (HLA-A2+ patients) or with autologous/allogeneic tumor lysate (HLA-A2(-) patients) in combination with low-dose interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (IFN)-alpha2b....

  4. 供体骨髓来源的未成熟树突状细胞抑制小鼠同种异体牙移植后排斥反应的效果研究%Suppression effects of immature dendritic cells on allogenic teeth rejection in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李闻颖; 邓锋; 王豫蓉; 陈允嘉; 胡辉

    2010-01-01

    目的:研究供体小鼠骨髓来源的未成熟树突状细胞(Immature dendritic cell, imDC)对小鼠同种异体牙移植后排斥反应的抑制效果.方法:运用50 U/ml粒细胞-巨噬细胞集落刺激因子(Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, GM-CSF)诱导出小鼠骨髓来源imDC,流式细胞术鉴定细胞表型,并于同种异体牙移植前1周以2×106个/只回输入受者体内,组织病理切片观察imDC对小鼠同种异体牙移植后排斥反应的抑制效果.结果:imDC回输组与未回输imDC的同种异体牙移植组相比,淋巴细胞浸润减少、炎症反应减轻.结论:imDC可以减轻同种异体牙移植后的排斥反应.

  5. Effect of B7-H1 on Allogeneous T Cell Functions of peripheral Myeloid Dendritic Cells in Patients with HIV Infection%B7-H1对HIV/AIDS患者mDCs活化异源性T淋巴细胞的功能影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐斌; 张政; 吴昊; 汪习成

    2013-01-01

    ),and intracellular IFN-γ and IL-4 were detected by intracellular cytokine staining.Results The results showed that mDCs from HIV patients had a significantly reduced capacity to stimulate allogeneic CD3 + T cell proliferation at all ratios tested compared with healthy controls,while blockade of B7-H1 pathway with 5-H 1 (anti-B7-H1) could significantly reverse the capacity.Blockade of B7-H1 signal,mDCs of HIV patients showed a significantly increased capacity to stimulate allogeneic CD3 + T cells to produce type 1 cytokines such as IFN-γ,IL-12,TNF-α,TNF-β and IL-1 β at the 1∶20 ratio and decreased type 2 cytokines such as IL-4 and IL-10 production compared with a group treated with control Ig.This result was confirmed by intracellular cytokine staining which showed increased mDCs stimulating IFN-γ + CD3 + T cells and declined IL-4 + CD3 + T cells by blocking B7-H1 signal.Conclusion These data suggest that B7-H1 up-regulation on mDCs may be responsible for the defective T-cell immune function in HIV infection.Blockade of B7-H1 in vitro strongly enhances mDC-mediated allostimulatory capacity of T cells proliferation and type 1 cytokines production.Our findings begin to shed light on the notion that B7-H1 blockade represents a potential therapeutic approach for this disease.

  6. Functional changes of dendritic cells in hypersensivity reactions to amoxicillin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M.F. Lima

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A better understanding of dendritic cell (DC involvement in responses to haptenic drugs is needed, because it represents a possible approach to the development of an in vitro test, which could identify patients prone to drug allergies. There are two main DC subsets: plasmacytoid DC (pDC and myeloid DC (mDC. β-lactams form hapten-carrier conjugates and may provide a suitable model to study DC behavior in drug allergy reactions. It has been demonstrated that drugs interact differently with DC in drug allergic and non-allergic patients, but there are no studies regarding these subsets. Our aim was to assess the functional changes of mDC and pDC harvested from an amoxicillin-hypersensitive 32-year-old woman who experienced a severe maculopapular exanthema as reflected in interleukin-6 (IL-6 production after stimulation with this drug and penicillin. We also aim to demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of this method for dendritic cell isolation followed by in vitro stimulation for studies of drug allergy physiopathology. DC were harvested using a double Percoll density gradient, which generates a basophil-depleted cell (BDC suspension. Further, pDC were isolated by blood DC antigen 4-positive magnetic selection and gravity filtration through magnetized columns. After stimulation with amoxicillin, penicillin and positive and negative controls, IL-6 production was measured by ELISA. A positive dose-response curve for IL-6 after stimulation with amoxicillin and penicillin was observed for pDC, but not for mDC or BDC suspension. These preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility of this methodology to expand the knowledge of the effect of dendritic cell activation by drug allergens.

  7. Engraftment of allogeneic dog bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resistance to allogeneic bone-marrow grafts (AR) was found to occur in many species, including the dog. The i.v. administration of silica particles suppressed Ar in vivo in this species. Genetic studies provide suggestive evidence for the existence of a previously unrecognized system or systems in the canine major histocompatibility complex controlling AR

  8. Cutting Edge: ACVRL1 Signaling Augments CD8α+ Dendritic Cell Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Rohit; Jaiswal, Hemant; Chauhan, Kuldeep Singh; Kaushik, Monika; Tailor, Prafullakumar

    2016-08-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a collection of different subtypes, each of which is characterized by specific surface markers, gene-expression patterns, and distinct functions. Members of the IFN regulatory factor family play critical roles in DC development and functions. Recently, Irf8 was shown to activate TGF-β signaling, which led to exacerbated neuroinflammation in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mouse model. We analyzed the effect of Irf8 on TGF-β/bone morphogenetic protein pathway-specific genes in DCs and identified Acvrl1, a type I TGF-β superfamily receptor, as a gene strongly induced by Irf8 expression. Among various DC subtypes, Acvrl1 is differentially expressed in CD8α(+) DCs. ACVRL1 signaling augmented Irf8-directed classical CD8α(+) DC development. Irf8 expression is essential for plasmacytoid DC and CD8α(+) DC development, and this study demonstrates that ACVRL1 signaling plays a pivotal role whereby it suppresses plasmacytoid DC development while enhancing that of CD8α(+) DCs, thus contributing to DC diversity development. PMID:27421479

  9. Reduction of dendritic cells by granulocyte and monocyte adsorption apheresis in patients with ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitz, Grit; Petermann, Sebastian; Liebe, Stefan; Emmrich, Joerg; Ramlow, Wolfgang

    2008-09-01

    The influence of the granulocyte/monocyte apheresis (GMCAP) on cell populations participating in mechanisms of tolerance, e.g. dendritic cells (DCs), is still not very clear. In a first step, we aimed to investigate changes in the DC population of patients suffering from ulcerative colitis (UC) (n = 13) compared to healthy subjects (n = 9). In a second step, we studied the changes in peripheral DCs in a small group of patients with active UC before and after Adacolumn apheresis (n = 7). For this purpose, plasmacytoid and myeloid DCs and their maturation markers CD40, CD80, and CD86 were measured using four-color flow cytometry in the peripheral blood. After apheresis, and in acute flare-ups, we identified a significantly lower number of lymphocytes, plasmacytoid, and myeloid DCs. In conclusion, the additional removal of peripheral DCs by GMCAP, which otherwise would contribute to the inflammatory process in the gut, may lead to a higher tolerogeneic status towards luminal antigens. PMID:18253828

  10. Dissecting the dendritic cell controversy in chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Adam J; Ann D'Angelo, June

    2015-05-01

    Therapeutic vaccines to boost endogenous T-cell immunity rely on the stimulatory capacity of dendritic cells (DCs). The functionality of DCs in chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has been a long-standing debate. Therefore, we have attempted to summarize multiple studies investigating DC function in chronic HBV patients to determine whether common observations can be drawn. We found that the frequency and function of ex vivo-tested myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs were largely intact in patients with HBV infection and similar to those of healthy donor DCs. The main exception was reduced IFN-α production by plasmacytoid DC from chronic HBV patients. This reduced IFN-α production correlated with liver inflammation in multiple studies but not with viral load, suggesting that viral antigens have little effect on DC function. The majority of the confusion about DC function arises from studies reporting the reduced function of healthy donor DCs exposed to various sources of HBV in vitro. These direct effects of viral antigens are in contrast to data from HBV-infected patients. The variations in the assays used and areas that require further investigation are also covered. PMID:25363524

  11. Random fractal dendrites

    OpenAIRE

    Croydon, David (David Alexander); Hambly, Ben M.; Dr. Ben Hambly

    2006-01-01

    Dendrites are tree-like topological spaces, and in this thesis, the physical characteristics of various random fractal versions of this type of set are investigated. This work will contribute to the development of analysis on fractals, an area which has grown considerably over the last twenty years. First, a collection of random self-similar dendrites is constructed, and their Hausdorff dimension is calculated. Previous results determining this quantity for random self-simi...

  12. Radioresistance of dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate radiation sensitivity of dendritic cells in comparison with lymphocytes. T lymphocytes captured from peripheral blood were irradiated by 0 Gy, 10 Gy, 30 Gy. Apoptosis was measured by flowcytometry for staining of annexin V 4 hours after irradiation. Immature and mature dendritic cells processed from blood hematopoietic stem cell were irradiated by 0 Gy, 10 Gy, 30 Gy, 100 Gy respectively and apoptosis was measured by flowcytometry with time differences as 4h, 24h and 48h after irradiation. Morphometric analysis by percent nucleus was measured in three cell groups, also. Lymphocytes showed radiation sensitivity by increasing apoptotic fraction according to radiation dose. However, both mature and immature dendritic cells showed consistent fraction of apoptosis in spite of increasing radiation dose. Percent nucleus ratio is significantly higher in lymphocytes than that of mature or immature dendritic cells. Stimulation of T-cell by dendritic cells was not changed after irradiation. Dendritic cells showed radioresistance which was associated with small size of nucleus in comparison with lymphocytes and this result would be used as a basal data of radio-labelling for the cellular trafficking studies in nuclear medicine fields

  13. Distinct Functions of Specialized Dendritic Cell Subsets in Atherosclerosis and the Road Ahead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alma Zernecke

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerotic vascular disease is modulated by immune mechanisms. Dendritic cells (DCs and T cells are present within atherosclerotic lesions and function as central players in the initiation and modulation of adaptive immune responses. In previous years, we have studied the functional contribution of distinct DC subsets in disease development, namely, that of CCL17-expressing DCs as well as that of plasmacytoid DCs that play specialized roles in disease development. This review focuses on important findings gathered in these studies and dissects the multifaceted contribution of CCL17-expressing DCs and pDCs to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Furthermore, an outlook on future challenges faced when studying DCs in this detrimental disease are provided, and hurdles that will need to be overcome in order to enable a better understanding of the contribution of DCs to atherogenesis are discussed, a prerequisite for their therapeutic targeting in atherosclerosis.

  14. Plastic downregulation of the transcriptional repressor BCL6 during maturation of human dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dendritic cell (DC) maturation links peripheral events initiated by the encounter with pathogens to the activation and expansion of antigen-specific T lymphocytes in secondary lymphoid organs. Here, we describe an as yet unrecognized modulator of human DC maturation, the transcriptional repressor BCL6. We found that both myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs constitutively express BCL6, which is rapidly downregulated following maturation triggered by selected stimuli. Both in unstimulated and maturing DCs, control of BCL6 protein levels reflects the convergence of several mechanisms regulating BCL6 stability, mRNA transcription and nuclear export. By regulating the induction of several genes implicated in the immune response, including inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and survival genes, BCL6 may represent a pivotal modulator of the afferent branch of the immune response

  15. Breast cancer tumor growth is efficiently inhibited by dendritic cell transfusion in a murine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viet Quoc Pham

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability of dendritic cells to efficiently present tumor-derived antigens when primed with tumor cell lysates makes them attractive as an approach for cancer treatment. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of dendritic cell transfusion dose on breast cancer tumor growth in a murine model. Dendritic cells were produced from allogeneic bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells that were cultured in RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with 20 ng/mL GM-CSF and 20 ng/mL IL-4 for 7 days. These cells were checked for maturation before being primed with a cancer cell-derived antigen. Cancer cell antigens were produced by a rapid freeze-thaw procedure using a 4T1 cell line. Immature dendritic cells were loaded with 4T1 cellderived antigens. Dendritic cells were transfused into mice bearing tumors at three different doses, included 5.104, 105, and 106 cells/mouse with a control consisting of RPMI 1640 media alone. The results showed that dendritic cell therapy inhibited breast cancer tumors in a murine model; however, this effect depended on dendritic cell dose. After 17 days, in the treated groups, tumor size decreased by 43%, 50%, and 87.5% for the doses of 5 and times; 104, 105, and 106 dendritic cells, respectively, while tumor size in the control group decreased by 44%. This result demonstrated that dendritic cell therapy is a promising therapy for breast cancer treatment. [Biomed Res Ther 2014; 1(3.000: 85-92

  16. Direct ex vivo analysis of dendritic cells in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lars A Ormandy; Tim F Greten; Anatol F(a)rber; Tobias Cantz; Susanne Petrykowska; Heiner Wedemeyer; Monique H(o)rning; Frank Lehner; Michael P Manns; Firouzeh Korangy

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the phenotype and function of dendritic cells (DC) from patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in order to understand their role in this disease.METHODS: Myeloid dendritic cells were enumerated in peripheral blood of HCC patients. CD80, CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR expression on naive and stimulated myeloid dendritic cells from peripheral blood were analyzed. Myeloid dendritic cells were isolated from peripheral blood and their function was tested. Phagocytosis was analyzed using FITC-dextran beads, peptide specific stimulation, the capacity to stimulate allogeneic T cells and secretion of cytokines upon poly dI:dC was tested.RESULTS: Myeloid dendritic cells were reduced in patients with HCC. No differences in CD80, CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR expression were found on naive and stimulated myeloid dendritic cells from HCC patients and healthy controls. Normal phagocytosis or stimulation of peptide specific T cells was observed in contrast to an impaired allo-stimulatory capacity and a reduced IL-12 secretion.CONCLUSION: Impaired IL-12 production of mDCs in patients could lead to an impaired stimulatory capacity of naive T cells suggesting that IL-12 directed therapies may enhance tumor specific immune responses in HCC patients.

  17. Allogeneic radiation chimeras induced in SPF mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past two decades much has been learned concerning the immunobiology of bone marrow chimeras induced in experimental animals as well as in man. However, from the basic as well as clinical points of view, there still remain many unsolved questions yet to be resolved. In this presentation, we discussed some of our recent results on the immunobiology of radiation chimeras induced in specific-pathogen-free (SPF) mice. These included the following: (a) contribution of graft versus host reaction (GVHR) as well non- GVHR mediated immunologic mechanism(s) to the expression of immunologic dysfunctions observed in allogeneic and certain semiallogeneic chimeras, (b) existence of immunoregulatory mechanism as a basis for the apparent lack of immunologic reactivity (tolerance) to the host- as well as to the donor-type alloantigens in situ in successful allogeneic bone marrow chimeras, and (c) the effect of microflora of the environment on the stability of such immunoregulatory mechanisms and its possible mechanism of action. (auth.)

  18. The Biology of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shizuru, Judith A.; Bhattacharya, Deepta; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina

    2016-01-01

    At the most basic level, success of an allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) procedure relies upon the engraftment of recipients with donor hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that will generate blood formation for the life of that individual. The formula to achieve durable HSC engraftment involves multiple factors including the recipient conditioning regimen, the nature of the genetic disparity between donor and recipient, and the content of the hematopoietic graft. Animal and clinical studies have shown that the biology of host resistance is complex, involving both immune and nonimmune elements. In this article, we review the factors that contribute to host resistance, describe emerging concepts on the basic biology of resistance, and discuss hematopoietic resistance as it relates specifically to patients with severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID)— disorders that bring unique insights into the dynamics of cell replacement by allogeneic HSCs and progenitor cells. PMID:19913629

  19. ALLOGENEIC TRANSPLANTATION FOR CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Chiusolo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Even if Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL often has an indolent behavior with good responsiveness to cytoreductive treatment, about 20% of the patients, so called "poor-risk" patients, show an aggressive course and die within a few years despite early intensive therapies. Criteria for poor-risk disease according to the European Bone Marrow Transplantation (EBMT CLL Transplant Consensus are: purine analogue refractoriness, early relapse after purine analogue combination therapy, CLL with p53 lesion requiring treatment.

    Allogeneic transplant has potential curative role in CLL, however burden with very  high transplant related mortality (TRM rates of 38-50%:

    A major advance in reducing the short-term morbidity and mortality of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT has been the introduction of non-myeloablative or reduced intensity conditioning (RIC regimens to allow engraftment of allogeneic stem cells. There is no doubt that the crucial therapeutic principle of allo-SCT in CLL is graft versus leukemia (GVL activity.

    The major complications of allogeneic SCT in CLL are: chronic graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD affecting quality of life, high graft rejection and infection rates rates correlated with preexisting immunosuppression. Disease relapse remains the major cause of failure after RIC allo-HCT in CLL patients.

    Sensitive minimal residual disease (MRD quantification has strong prognostic impact after transplant.

     

  20. Who is fit for allogeneic transplantation?

    OpenAIRE

    Deeg, H. Joachim; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2010-01-01

    The use of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has expanded progressively, facilitated by the increasing availability of unrelated donors and cord blood, and the inclusion of older patients as transplantation candidates. Indications remain diagnosis-dependent. As novel nontransplantation modalities have been developed concurrently, many patients come to HCT only when no longer responding to such therapy. However, patients with refractory or advanced disease frequently relapse ...

  1. Hepatic complications of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Idilman

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic complications of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation contribute substantially to the overall success of the procedure and represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Early hepatic complications consist of the sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, drug toxicities, infections, and acute graft-versus-host disease, while late hepatic complications consist of chronic graft-versus host disease, chronic viral hepatitis, and iron overload states. Successful management of the hepatic complications of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation is dependent on several factors. These include the recognition and elimination of any pre-transplant risk factors for these problems and the development of strategies to evaluate and prevent them in both the early and later post-transplant periods. The aims of the present review are 1 to identify the early and late hepatic complications of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation, in the chronological order in which they occur, 2 to characterize the diagnostic procedures used to identify them, and finally 3 to present the current therapeutic approaches used to manage these problems.

  2. Dendritic Polymers for Theranostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuan; Mou, Quanbing; Wang, Dali; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yan, Deyue

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic polymers are highly branched polymers with controllable structures, which possess a large population of terminal functional groups, low solution or melt viscosity, and good solubility. Their size, degree of branching and functionality can be adjusted and controlled through the synthetic procedures. These tunable structures correspond to application-related properties, such as biodegradability, biocompatibility, stimuli-responsiveness and self-assembly ability, which are the key points for theranostic applications, including chemotherapeutic theranostics, biotherapeutic theranostics, phototherapeutic theranostics, radiotherapeutic theranostics and combined therapeutic theranostics. Up to now, significant progress has been made for the dendritic polymers in solving some of the fundamental and technical questions toward their theranostic applications. In this review, we briefly summarize how to control the structures of dendritic polymers, the theranostics-related properties derived from their structures and their theranostics-related applications.

  3. Anti tumor vaccination with hybrid dendritic-tumour cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dendritic cells are the most potent antigen-presenting cells, and the possibility of their use for cancer vaccination has renewed the interest in this therapeutic modality. Nevertheless, the ideal immunization protocol with these cells has not been described yet. In this paper we describe the preliminary results of a protocol using autologous tumor and allogeneic dendritic hybrid cell vaccination every 6 weeks, for metastatic melanoma and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients. Thirty-five patients were enrolled between March 2001 and March 2003. Though all patients included presented with large tumor burdens and progressive diseases, 71% of them experienced stability after vaccination, with durations up to 19 months. Among RCC patients 3/22 (14%) presented objective responses. The median time to progression was 4 months for melanoma and 5.7 months for RCC patients; no significant untoward effects were noted. Furthermore, immune function, as evaluated by cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions to recall antigens and by peripheral blood proliferative responses to tumor-specific and nonspecific stimuli, presented a clear tendency to recover in vaccinated patients. These data indicate that dendritic cell-tumor cell hybrid vaccination affects the natural history of advanced cancer and provide support for its study in less advanced patients, who should, more likely, benefit even more from this approach. (author)

  4. Simian immunodeficiency virus interactions with macaque dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teleshova, Natalia; Derby, Nina; Martinelli, Elena; Pugach, Pavel; Calenda, Giulia; Robbiani, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    This chapter summarizes advances in the following areas: (1) dendritic cell (DC)-mediated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) transmission, (2) role of DCs in innate and adaptive immunity against SIV, and (3) approaches to harness DC function to induce anti-SIV responses. The nonhuman primate (NHP) model of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in rhesus macaques and other Asian NHP species is highly relevant to advance the understanding of virus-host interactions critical for transmission and disease pathogenesis. HIV infection is associated with changes in frequency, phenotype, and function of the two principal subsets of DCs, myeloid DCs and plasmacytoid DCs. DC biology during pathogenic SIV infection is strikingly similar to that observed in HIV-infected patients. The NHP models provide an opportunity to dissect the requirements for DC-driven SIV infection and to understand how SIV distorts the DC system to its advantage. Furthermore, the SIV model of mucosal transmission enables the study of the earliest events of infection at the portal of entry that cannot be studied in humans, and, importantly, the involvement of DCs. Nonpathogenic infection in African NHP hosts allows investigations into the role of DCs in disease control. Understanding how DCs are altered during SIV infection is critical to the design of therapeutic and preventative strategies against HIV. PMID:22975875

  5. Modification of dendritic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feria-Velasco, Alfredo; del Angel, Alma Rosa; Gonzalez-Burgos, Ignacio

    2002-01-01

    Since 1890 Ramón y Cajal strongly defended the theory that dendrites and their processes and spines had a function of not just nutrient transport to the cell body, but they had an important conductive role in neural impulse transmission. He extensively discussed and supported this theory in the Volume 1 of his extraordinary book Textura del Sistema Nervioso del Hombre y de los Vertebrados. Also, Don Santiago significantly contributed to a detailed description of the various neural components of the hippocampus and cerebral cortex during development. Extensive investigation has been done in the last Century related to the functional role of these complex brain regions, and their association with learning, memory and some limbic functions. Likewise, the organization and expression of neuropsychological qualities such as memory, exploratory behavior and spatial orientation, among others, depend on the integrity and adequate functional activity of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. It is known that brain serotonin synthesis and release depend directly and proportionally on the availability of its precursor, tryptophan (TRY). By using a chronic TRY restriction model in rats, we studied their place learning ability in correlation with the dendritic spine density of pyramidal neurons in field CA1 of the hippocampus during postnatal development. We have also reported alterations in the maturation pattern of the ability for spontaneous alternation and task performance evaluating short-term memory, as well as adverse effects on the density of dendritic spines of hippocampal CA1 field pyramidal neurons and on the dendritic arborization and the number of dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons from the third layer of the prefrontal cortex using the same model of TRY restriction. The findings obtained in these studies employing a modified Golgi method, can be interpreted as a trans-synaptic plastic response due to understimulation of serotoninergic receptors located in the

  6. Toll-like receptor polymorphisms in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornblit, Brian; Enevold, Christian; Wang, Tao; Spellman, Stephen; Haagenson, Mike; Lee, Stephanie J; Müller, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    To assess the impact of the genetic variation in toll-like receptors (TLRs) on outcome after allogeneic myeloablative conditioning hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), we investigated 29 single nucleotide polymorphisms across 10 TLRs in 816 patients and donors. Only donor genotype of TLR8 rs...... of TLR8 rs3764879 of the donor is associated with outcome after myeloablative conditioned allogeneic HCT....

  7. Batf3 and Id2 have a synergistic effect on Irf8-directed classical CD8α+ dendritic cell development

    KAUST Repository

    Jaiswal, Hemant

    2013-11-13

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are heterogeneous cell populations represented by different subtypes, each varying in terms of gene expression patterns and specific functions. Recent studies identified transcription factors essential for the development of different DC subtypes, yet molecular mechanisms for the developmental program and functions remain poorly understood. In this study, we developed and characterized a mouse DC progenitor-like cell line, designated DC9, from Irf8-/- bone marrow cells as a model for DC development and function. Expression of Irf8 in DC9 cells led to plasmacytoid DCs and CD8α+ DC-like cells, with a concomitant increase in plasmacytoid DC- and CD8α+ DC-specific gene transcripts and induction of type I IFNs and IL12p40 following TLR ligand stimulation. Irf8 expression in DC9 cells led to an increase in Id2 and Batf3 transcript levels, transcription factors shown to be important for the development of CD8α+ DCs. We show that, without Irf8 , expression of Id2 and Batf3 was not sufficient for directing classical CD8α+ DC development. When coexpressed with Irf8, Batf3 and Id2 had a synergistic effect on classical CD8α+ DC development. We demonstrate that Irf8 is upstream of Batf3 and Id2 in the classical CD8α+ DC developmental program and define the hierarchical relationship of transcription factors important for classical CD8α+ DC development.

  8. Magnetic and dendritic catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Deraedt, Christophe; Ruiz, Jaime; Astruc, Didier

    2015-07-21

    The recovery and reuse of catalysts is a major challenge in the development of sustainable chemical processes. Two methods at the frontier between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis have recently emerged for addressing this problem: loading the catalyst onto a dendrimer or onto a magnetic nanoparticle. In this Account, we describe representative examples of these two methods, primarily from our research group, and compare them. We then describe new chemistry that combines the benefits of these two methods of catalysis. Classic dendritic catalysis has involved either attaching the catalyst covalently at the branch termini or within the dendrimer core. We have used chelating pyridyltriazole ligands to insolubilize catalysts at the termini of dendrimers, providing an efficient, recyclable heterogeneous catalysts. With the addition of dendritic unimolecular micelles olefin metathesis reactions catalyzed by commercial Grubbs-type ruthenium-benzylidene complexes in water required unusually low amounts of catalyst. When such dendritic micelles include intradendritic ligands, both the micellar effect and ligand acceleration promote faster catalysis in water. With these types of catalysts, we could carry out azide alkyne cycloaddition ("click") chemistry with only ppm amounts of CuSO4·5H2O and sodium ascorbate under ambient conditions. Alternatively we can attach catalysts to the surface of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), essentially magnetite (Fe3O4) or maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), offering the opportunity to recover the catalysts using magnets. Taking advantage of the merits of both of these strategies, we and others have developed a new generation of recyclable catalysts: dendritic magnetically recoverable catalysts. In particular, some of our catalysts with a γ-Fe2O3@SiO2 core and 1,2,3-triazole tethers and loaded with Pd nanoparticles generate strong positive dendritic effects with respect to ligand loading, catalyst loading, catalytic activity and

  9. Antibody responses in allogeneic radiation chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction of long-lived allogeneic radiation chimeras, free of graft-versus-host disease, has been achieved using serologic elimination of Thy 1+ cells from donor bone marrow. Humoral immune function was not restored in these animals as evidenced by lack of primary antibody responses to a T cell-dependent antigen, namely, sheep erythrocytes (SRBC) both in vivo and in vitro. No evidence for a suppressor cell-mediated mechanism was found. Using separated chimera spleen cell populations and specific helper cell soluble mediators, the functional capabilities of chimera B cells, T cells, and macrophages were assessed. These findings suggested that the failure of chimeras to produce antibody is not the result of impaired B cell, T cell, or macrophage function, but rather, that it is due to ineffective cellular interactions. Physiologic cellular interactions depend upon the sharing of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) determinants between interacting cells. However, the self-recognition repertoire of developing T cells may be influenced by the environment which these cells differentiate such that they learn to recognize host MHC determinants as self. These findings support the interpretation that the immunologic hyporeactivity of allogeneic bone marrow chimeras reflects the role of the host environment in restricting the interactive capabilities of donor-derived cells

  10. Dendritic Cells and Liver Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, Adeeb H.; Aloman, Costica

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells are a relative rare population of specialized antigen presenting cells that are distributed through most lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues and play a critical role in linking the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. The liver contains a heterogeneous population of dendritic cells that may contribute to liver inflammation and fibrosis through a number of mechanisms. This review summarizes current knowledge on the development and characterization of liver dendritic cel...

  11. Systematic Nutritional Support in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuji, Shigeo; Einsele, Hermann; Savani, Bipin N; Kapp, Markus

    2015-10-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has become an established treatment modality for various hematological diseases. However, in allogeneic HSCT, patients often suffer from severe gastrointestinal complications caused by the conditioning regimen and acute/chronic graft-versus-host disease, which requires support by multidisciplinary nutritional support teams (NST). In addition, pretransplantation nutritional status can affect the clinical outcome after allogeneic HSCT. Therefore, it is important to refer the patient to a NST when becoming aware of nutritional problems before allogeneic HSCT. It is also important to follow nutritional status over the long term, as patients often suffer from various nutritional problems, such as malnutrition and metabolic syndrome, even late after allogeneic HSCT. In summary, NST can contribute to the improvement of nutritional status and possibly prognosis at every stage before and after allogeneic HSCT. Here, we aim to give a comprehensive overview of current understanding about nutritional support in allogeneic HSCT and try to provoke a constructive discussion to stimulate further investigation. PMID:26172477

  12. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells turn into foamy dendritic cells with IL-17A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatore, Giulia; Bernoud-Hubac, Nathalie; Bissay, Nathalie; Debard, Cyrille; Daira, Patricia; Meugnier, Emmanuelle; Proamer, Fabienne; Hanau, Daniel; Vidal, Hubert; Aricò, Maurizio; Delprat, Christine; Mahtouk, Karène

    2015-06-01

    Interleukin 17A (IL-17A) is a proinflammatory cytokine involved in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases. In the field of immunometabolism, we have studied the impact of IL-17A on the lipid metabolism of human in vitro-generated monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). Microarrays and lipidomic analysis revealed an intense remodeling of lipid metabolism induced by IL-17A in DCs. IL-17A increased 2-12 times the amounts of phospholipids, cholesterol, triglycerides, and cholesteryl esters in DCs. Palmitic (16:0), stearic (18:0), and oleic (18:ln-9c) acid were the main fatty acid chains present in DCs. They were strongly increased in response to IL-17A while their relative proportion remained unchanged. Capture of extracellular lipids was the major mechanism of lipid droplet accumulation, visualized by electron microscopy and Oil Red O staining. Besides this foamy phenotype, IL-17A induced a mixed macrophage-DC phenotype and expression of the nuclear receptor NR1H3/liver X receptor-α, previously identified in the context of atherosclerosis as the master regulator of cholesterol homeostasis in macrophages. These IL-17A-treated DCs were as competent as untreated DCs to stimulate allogeneic naive T-cell proliferation. Following this first characterization of lipid-rich DCs, we propose to call these IL-17A-dependent cells "foamy DCs" and discuss the possible existence of foamy DCs in atherosclerosis, a metabolic and inflammatory disorder involving IL-17A. PMID:25833686

  13. Anti-CD3 preconditioning separates GVL from GVHD via modulating host dendritic cell and donor T-cell migration in recipients conditioned with TBI

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Nainong; Chen, Ying; He, Wei; Yi, Tangsheng; Zhao, Dongchang; Zhang, Chunyan; Lin, Chia-Lei; Todorov, Ivan; Kandeel, Fouad; Forman, Stephen; Zeng, Defu

    2009-01-01

    Host dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in initiating graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and graft-versus-leukemia (GVL), and separation of GVL from GVHD remains a major challenge in the treatment of hematologic malignancies by allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Here, we show that preconditioning with anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody before conditioning with total body irradiation (TBI) prevents GVHD but retains GVL in a HCT model of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)–...

  14. Functional Role of Dendritic Cells in Patients with Unstable Angina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Dazhu; Sharma Ranjit; ZENG Qiutang

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the function of dendritic cells (DC) in patients with unstable angina, 10 mL of blood was drawn from 30 subjects. 15 patients diagnosed as having unstable angina and 15 healthy subjects were included in an observation and a control groups respectively. The mononuclear cells were separated from the peripheral blood and cultured in RPMI1640 supplemented with recombinant human granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor (rh GM-CSF) and recombinant human interleukin-4 (rh IL-4) to induce dendritic cells. The shape and ultrastructure of DC was examined with electronic microscope. The phenotype of DC was analyzed with FACS and the alloantigen presenting capacity of DC was evaluated by mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). The expression rate of CD86 of DC in patients with unstable angina was (40.7±3.6) %, which was obviously higher than that of normal DC (29.6±2.5 %) (P<0.001). The capacity of the DCs in unstable angina patients to induce allogenic T cells (OD 2.73±1.10), was significantly higher than that of the normal DC (OD:0.9±0.21) (P<0.005). It is suggested that the function of DC in patients with unstable angina is increased, which may play an important role in the initiation of immune reaction in the plaque.

  15. Unique immunomodulatory effects of azelastine on dendritic cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, S; Kietzmann, M; Stark, H; Bäumer, W

    2014-11-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis and atopic dermatitis are among the most common inflammatory skin diseases in western countries, and antigen-presenting cells like dendritic cells (DC) are key players in their pathophysiology. Histamine, an important mediator of allergic reactions, influences DC maturation and cytokine secretion, which led us to investigate the immunomodulatory potential of the well-known histamine H1 receptor antagonists: azelastine, olopatadine, cetirizine, and pyrilamine. Unlike other H1 antihistamines, azelastine decreased lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin-12 secretion from murine bone marrow-derived DC. This effect was independent of histamine receptors H1, H2, or H4 and may be linked to inhibition of the nuclear factor kappa B pathway. Moreover, only azelastine reduced proliferation of allogenic T cells in a mixed leukocyte reaction. We then tested topical application of the H1 antihistamines on mice sensitized against toluene-2,4-diisocyanate, a model of Th2-mediated allergic contact dermatitis. In contrast to the in vitro results, all investigated substances were efficacious in reducing allergic ear swelling. Azelastine has unique effects on dendritic cells and T cell interaction in vitro. However, this did not translate into superior in vivo efficacy for Th2-mediated allergic dermatitis, possibly due to the effects of the antihistamines on other cell types involved in skin inflammation. Future research will have to clarify whether these properties are relevant to in vivo models of allergic inflammation with a different T cell polarization. PMID:25119779

  16. A Rapid Culture Technique Produces Functional Dendritic-Like Cells from Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Ning

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Most anti-cancer immunotherapeutic strategies involving dendritic cells (DC as vaccines rely upon the adoptive transfer of DC loaded with exogenous tumour-peptides. This study utilized human acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells as progenitors from which functional dendritic-like antigen presenting cells (DLC were generated, that constitutively express tumour antigens for recognition by CD8+ T cells. DLC were generated from AML cell lines KG-1 and MUTZ-3 using rapid culture techniques and appropriate cytokines. DLC were evaluated for their cell-surface phenotype, antigen uptake and ability to stimulate allogeneic responder cell proliferation, and production of IFN-γ; compared with DC derived from normal human PBMC donors. KG-1 and MUTZ-3 DLC increased expression of CD80, CD83, CD86, and HLA-DR, and MUTZ-3 DLC downregulated CD14 and expressed CD1a. Importantly, both KG-1 and MUTZ-3-derived DLC promoted proliferation of allogeneic responder cells more efficiently than unmodified cells; neither cells incorporated FITC-labeled dextran, but both stimulated IFN-γ production from responding allogeneic CD8+ T cells. Control DC produced from PBMC using the FastDC culture also expressed high levels of critical cell surface ligands and demonstrated good APC function. This paper indicates that functional DLC can be cultured from the AML cell lines KG-1 and MUTZ-3, and FastDC culture generates functional KG-1 DLC.

  17. Blood dendritic cell frequency declines in idiopathic Parkinson's disease and is associated with motor symptom severity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Ciaramella

    Full Text Available The role of inflammation in Parkinson's Disease (PD is well appreciated, but its underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Our objective was to determine whether dendritic cells (DC, a unique type of migratory immune cells that regulate immunological response and inflammation have an impact on PD. In a case-control study including 80 PD patients and 80 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects, the two main blood subsets of plasmacytoid and myeloid DC were defined by flow cytometry analysis. Clinical evaluation of subjects consisting of cognition and depression assessment was performed using the Mini Mental State Examination and the Beck Depression Inventory. The severity of motor symptoms was measured using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-Part III. Comparison between patient and control DC measures and their relationships with clinical assessments were evaluated.The following main results were obtained: 1 the level of circulating DC (mainly the myeloid subset was significantly reduced in PD patients in comparison with healthy controls; 2 after controlling for depressive and cognitive characteristics, the frequency of myeloid DC was confirmed as one of the independent determinants of PD; 3 the number of both myeloid and plasmacytoid DC was negatively associated with motor symptom severity. Overall, the decline of blood DC, perhaps due to the recruitment of immune cells to the site of disease-specific lesions, can be considered a clue of the immune alteration that characterizes PD, suggesting innovative exploitations of DC monitoring as a clinically significant tool for PD treatment. Indeed, this study suggests that reduced peripheral blood DC are a pathologically-relevant factor of PD and also displays the urgency to better understand DC role in PD for unraveling the immune system contribution to disease progression and thus favoring the development of innovative therapies ideally based on immunomodulation.

  18. Blood dendritic cell frequency declines in idiopathic Parkinson's disease and is associated with motor symptom severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaramella, Antonio; Salani, Francesca; Bizzoni, Federica; Pontieri, Francesco E; Stefani, Alessandro; Pierantozzi, Mariangela; Assogna, Francesca; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Bossù, Paola

    2013-01-01

    The role of inflammation in Parkinson's Disease (PD) is well appreciated, but its underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Our objective was to determine whether dendritic cells (DC), a unique type of migratory immune cells that regulate immunological response and inflammation have an impact on PD. In a case-control study including 80 PD patients and 80 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects, the two main blood subsets of plasmacytoid and myeloid DC were defined by flow cytometry analysis. Clinical evaluation of subjects consisting of cognition and depression assessment was performed using the Mini Mental State Examination and the Beck Depression Inventory. The severity of motor symptoms was measured using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-Part III. Comparison between patient and control DC measures and their relationships with clinical assessments were evaluated.The following main results were obtained: 1) the level of circulating DC (mainly the myeloid subset) was significantly reduced in PD patients in comparison with healthy controls; 2) after controlling for depressive and cognitive characteristics, the frequency of myeloid DC was confirmed as one of the independent determinants of PD; 3) the number of both myeloid and plasmacytoid DC was negatively associated with motor symptom severity. Overall, the decline of blood DC, perhaps due to the recruitment of immune cells to the site of disease-specific lesions, can be considered a clue of the immune alteration that characterizes PD, suggesting innovative exploitations of DC monitoring as a clinically significant tool for PD treatment. Indeed, this study suggests that reduced peripheral blood DC are a pathologically-relevant factor of PD and also displays the urgency to better understand DC role in PD for unraveling the immune system contribution to disease progression and thus favoring the development of innovative therapies ideally based on immunomodulation. PMID:23776473

  19. Cellular therapy following allogeneic stem-cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Rager, Alison; Porter, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) is the most effective approach for many patients with hematologic malignancies. Unfortunately, relapse remains the most common cause of death after allogeneic HSCT, and the prognosis of relapsed disease is poor for most patients. Induction of a graft-versus-leukemia (GVL), or graft-versus-tumor, effect through the use of donor leukocyte infusion (DLI), or donor lymphocyte infusion, has been remarkably successful for relapsed chronic my...

  20. Present and future of allogeneic natural killer cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okjae eLim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are innate lymphocytes that are capable of eliminating tumor cells and are therefore used for cancer therapy. Although many early investigators used autologous NK cells, including lymphokine-activated killer cells, the clinical efficacies were not satisfactory. Meanwhile, human leukocyte antigen (HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation revealed the anti-tumor effect of allogeneic NK cells, and HLA-haploidentical, killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR ligand-mismatched allogeneic NK cells are currently used for many protocols requiring NK cells. Moreover, allogeneic NK cells from non-HLA-related healthy donors have been recently used in cancer therapy. The use of allogeneic NK cells from non-HLA-related healthy donors allows the selection of donor NK cells with higher flexibility and to prepare expanded, cryopreserved NK cells for instant administration without delay for ex vivo expansion. In cancer therapy with allogeneic NK cells, optimal matching of donors and recipients is important to maximize the efficacy of the therapy. In this review, we summarize the present state of allogeneic NK cell therapy and its future directions.

  1. Cigarette Smoke Decreases the Maturation of Lung Myeloid Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calero-Acuña, Carmen; Moreno-Mata, Nicolás; Gómez-Izquierdo, Lourdes; Sánchez-López, Verónica; López-Ramírez, Cecilia; Tobar, Daniela; López-Villalobos, José Luis; Gutiérrez, Cesar; Blanco-Orozco, Ana; López-Campos, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    Background Conflicting data exist on the role of pulmonary dendritic cells (DCs) and their maturation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Herein, we investigated whether disease severity and smoking status could affect the distribution and maturation of DCs in lung tissues of patients undergoing elective pneumectomy or lobectomy for suspected primary lung cancer. Materials and Methods A total of 75 consecutive patients were included. Spirometry testing was used to identify COPD. Lung parenchyma sections anatomically distant from the primary lesion were examined. We used flow cytometry to identify different DCs subtypes—including BDCA1-positive myeloid DCs (mDCs), BDCA3-positive mDCs, and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs)—and determine their maturation markers (CD40, CD80, CD83, and CD86) in all participants. We also identified follicular DCs (fDCs), Langerhans DCs (LDCs), and pDCs in 42 patients by immunohistochemistry. Results COPD was diagnosed in 43 patients (16 current smokers and 27 former smokers), whereas the remaining 32 subjects were classified as non-COPD (11 current smokers, 13 former smokers, and 8 never smokers). The number and maturation of DCs did not differ significantly between COPD and non-COPD patients. However, the results of flow cytometry indicated that maturation markers CD40 and CD83 of BDCA1-positive mDCs were significantly decreased in smokers than in non-smokers (P = 0.023 and 0.013, respectively). Immunohistochemistry also revealed a lower number of LDCs in COPD patients than in non-COPD subjects. Conclusions Cigarette smoke, rather than airflow limitation, is the main determinant of impaired DCs maturation in the lung. PMID:27058955

  2. Bortezomib for the prevention and treatment of graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Homsi, Ahmad Samer; Feng, Yuxin; Duffner, Ulrich; Al Malki, Monzr M; Goodyke, Austin; Cole, Kelli; Muilenburg, Marlee; Abdel-Mageed, Aly

    2016-09-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the standard treatment for a variety of benign and malignant conditions. However, graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) continues to present a major barrier to the success and wide applicability of this procedure. Although current GvHD prevention and treatment regimens exclusively target T cells, bortezomib, a reversible proteasome inhibitor, possesses unique immune regulatory activities that span a wide variety of cellular processes of T and dendritic cells essential for the development of GvHD. Herein, we review the current understanding of the effects of bortezomib in vitro and in animal models and summarize the clinical data relevant to its use in the prevention and treatment of GvHD. We conclude with an outline of the remaining challenges and opportunities to optimize bortezomib's potential role in this setting. PMID:27224851

  3. Development of dendrite polarity in Drosophila neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Sarah E

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drosophila neurons have dendrites that contain minus-end-out microtubules. This microtubule arrangement is different from that of cultured mammalian neurons, which have mixed polarity microtubules in dendrites. Results To determine whether Drosophila and mammalian dendrites have a common microtubule organization during development, we analyzed microtubule polarity in Drosophila dendritic arborization neuron dendrites at different stages of outgrowth from the cell body in vivo. As dendrites initially extended, they contained mixed polarity microtubules, like mammalian neurons developing in culture. Over a period of several days this mixed microtubule array gradually matured to a minus-end-out array. To determine whether features characteristic of dendrites were localized before uniform polarity was attained, we analyzed dendritic markers as dendrites developed. In all cases the markers took on their characteristic distribution while dendrites had mixed polarity. An axonal marker was also quite well excluded from dendrites throughout development, although this was perhaps more efficient in mature neurons. To confirm that dendrite character could be acquired in Drosophila while microtubules were mixed, we genetically disrupted uniform dendritic microtubule organization. Dendritic markers also localized correctly in this case. Conclusions We conclude that developing Drosophila dendrites initially have mixed microtubule polarity. Over time they mature to uniform microtubule polarity. Dendrite identity is established before the mature microtubule arrangement is attained, during the period of mixed microtubule polarity.

  4. Modulation of Female Genital Tract-Derived Dendritic Cell Migration and Activation in Response to Inflammatory Cytokines and Toll-Like Receptor Agonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muki S Shey

    Full Text Available HIV transmission across the genital mucosa is a major mode of new HIV infections in women. The probability of infection may be influenced by several factors including recruitment and activation of HIV target cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs and cytokine production, associated with genital inflammation. We evaluated the role of inflammatory cytokines and TLR signaling in migration and activation of genital tract DCs in the human cervical explant model. Hysterectomy tissues from 10 HIV-negative and 7 HIV-positive donor women were separated into ecto- and endocervical explants, and incubated with inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8, MIP-1β or agonists for TLR4 (LPS, TLR2/1 (PAM3 and TLR7/8 (R848. Migration (frequency and activation (HLA-DR expression of myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs and Langerhans cells were measured by flow cytometry. We observed that cytokines, LPS and PAM3 induced activation of migrating myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs. LPS induced a 3.6 fold lower levels of migration of plasmacytoid DCs from HIV-infected women compared with HIV-uninfected women (median activation indices of 2.932 vs 0.833. There was however a 4.5 fold increase in migration of Langerhans cells in HIV-infected compared with HIV-uninfected women in response to cytokines (median activation indices of 3.539 vs 0.77. Only TLR agonists induced migration and activation of DCs from endocervical explants. Hormonal contraception use was associated with an increase in activation of DC subsets in the endo and ectocervical explants. We conclude that inflammatory signals in the female genital tract induced DC migration and activation, with possible important implications for HIV susceptibility of cervical tissues.

  5. Changes in dendritic cells and dendritic cell subpopulations in peripheral blood of recipients during acute rejection after kidney transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Linlin; Liu Yong; Wu Junjie; Xu Xiuhong; Liu Fen; Feng Lang; Xie Zelin

    2014-01-01

    Background Advances in transplantation immunology show that the balance between dendritic cells (DCs) and their subsets can maintain stable immune status in the induction of tolerance after transplantation.The aim of this study was to investigate if DCs and DC subpopulations in recipient peripheral blood are effective diagnostic indicators of acute rejection following kidney transplantation.Methods Immunofluorescent flow cytometry was used to classify white blood cells (WBCs),the levels of mononuclear cells and DCs (including the dominant subpopulations,plasmacytoid DC (pDC) and myeloid DC (mDC)) in peripheral blood at 0,1,7,and 28 days and 1 year after kidney transplantation in 33 patients.In addition,the blood levels of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-12 were monitored before and after surgery.Fifteen healthy volunteers served as normal controls.Patients were undertaking hemodialysis owing to uremia before surgery.Results The total number of DCs,pDC,and mDC in peripheral blood and the pDC/mDC ratio were significantly lower in patients than controls (P <0.05).Peripheral DCs suddenly decreased at the end of day 1,then gradually increased through day 28 but remained below normal levels.After 1 year,levels were higher than before surgery but lower than normal.The mDC levels were higher in patients with acute rejection before and 1 day after surgery (P <0.005).There was no significant difference in IL-10 and IL-12 levels between patients with and without acute rejection.Conclusion The changes in DCs and DC subpopulations during the acute rejection period may serve as effective markers and referral indices for monitoring the immune state,and predicting rejection and reasonably adjusting immunosuppressants.

  6. Dendrite Injury Triggers DLK-Independent Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle C. Stone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Axon injury triggers regeneration through activation of a conserved kinase cascade, which includes the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK. Although dendrites are damaged during stroke, traumatic brain injury, and seizure, it is not known whether mature neurons monitor dendrite injury and initiate regeneration. We probed the response to dendrite damage using model Drosophila neurons. Two larval neuron types regrew dendrites in distinct ways after all dendrites were removed. Dendrite regeneration was also triggered by injury in adults. Next, we tested whether dendrite injury was initiated with the same machinery as axon injury. Surprisingly, DLK, JNK, and fos were dispensable for dendrite regeneration. Moreover, this MAP kinase pathway was not activated by injury to dendrites. Thus, neurons respond to dendrite damage and initiate regeneration without using the conserved DLK cascade that triggers axon regeneration.

  7. Dendritic cells in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Helden, Mary J; Lambrecht, Bart N

    2013-12-01

    The lungs are constantly exposed to antigens, most of which are non-pathogenic and do not require the induction of an immune response. Dendritic cells (DCs) are situated at the basolateral site of the lungs and continuously scan the environment to detect the presence of pathogens and subsequently initiate an immune response. They are a heterogeneous population of antigen-presenting cells that exert specific functions. Compelling evidence is now provided that DCs are both sufficient and necessary to induce allergic responses against several inhaled harmless allergens. How various DC subsets exactly contribute to the induction of allergic asthma is currently a subject of intense investigation. We here review the current progress in this field. PMID:24455765

  8. Who is fit for allogeneic transplantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeg, H Joachim; Sandmaier, Brenda M

    2010-12-01

    The use of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has expanded progressively, facilitated by the increasing availability of unrelated donors and cord blood, and the inclusion of older patients as transplantation candidates. Indications remain diagnosis-dependent. As novel nontransplantation modalities have been developed concurrently, many patients come to HCT only when no longer responding to such therapy. However, patients with refractory or advanced disease frequently relapse after HCT, even with high-dose conditioning, and more so with reduced-intensity regimens as used for patients of older age or with comorbid conditions. Thus, patients with high-risk malignancies who have substantial comorbidities or are of advanced age are at high risk of both relapse and nonrelapse mortality and should probably not be transplanted. Being in remission or at least having shown responsiveness to pre-HCT therapy is generally associated with increased transplantation success. In addition, to handle the stress associated with HCT, patients need a good social support system and a secure financial net. They must be well informed, not only about the transplantation process, but also about expected or potential post-HCT events, including graft-versus-host disease and delayed effects that may become manifest only years after HCT. PMID:20702782

  9. Tetanus after allogeneic bone-marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief report is presented of a case of tetanus after allogeneic bone-marrow transplantation complicated by radiation-induced pneumonitis. A 30-year-old army sergeant received a bone-marrow transplant from his brother for the treatment of a granulocytic sarcoma after local radiotherapy to the tumour. Six years earlier he had sustained an open, compound fracture of the left tibia and fibula while on army exercise. At the time a pin and plate had been inserted and booster anti-tetanus administered. Bone-marrow transplantation was performed after total body irradiation. Cyclosporin A was given against graft-versus-host disease. Fifty four days after transplantation tetanus was diagnosed and death followed 14 days later. Necropsy disclosed radiation-induced pneumonitis, but no organisms were cultured from the lungs or the old fracture site. It is suggested that spores were incorporated into the wound site before surgery and that oxygenation around the plate became compromised after transplantation, permitting germination of dormant spores, immunosuppression allowing development of the disease. (U.K.)

  10. Can dendritic cells see light?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Aaron C.-H.; Huang, Ying-Ying; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-02-01

    There are many reports showing that low-level light/laser therapy (LLLT) can enhance wound healing, upregulate cell proliferation and has anti-apoptotic effects by activating intracellular protective genes. In the field of immune response study, it is not known with any certainty whether light/laser is proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory. Increasingly in recent times dendritic cells have been found to play an important role in inflammation and the immunological response. In this study, we try to look at the impact of low level near infrared light (810-nm) on murine bone-marrow derived dendritic cells. Changes in surface markers, including MHC II, CD80 and CD11c and the secretion of interleukins induced by light may provide additional evidence to reveal the mystery of how light affects the maturation of dendritic cells as well how these light-induced mature dendritic cells would affect the activation of adaptive immune response.

  11. Allogeneic split-skin grafting in stem cell transplanted patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jan Kyrre Berg; Vindeløv, Lars; Schmidt, G.;

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY: We present a unique case of a bone marrow stem cell transplanted (BMT) patient with cutaneous chronic Graft versus Host Disease (cGvHD) who underwent successful allogeneic split-thickness skin graft (STSG) transplantation. BMT had previously been carried out due to myelodysplasia and non......). Allogeneic skin grafts are known to be acutely rejected. Successful allogeneic STSG has only been reported in sporadic cases of identical twins (isotransplantation). This case is the first to demonstrate what works in theory: the immune system of a stem cell transplanted patient with 100% or mixed stable...... donor chimaerism will not recognise skin from the stem cell donor as foreign. Due to advances in haematology, the number of BMT patients and their long-term survival is expected to increase. cGvHD, predisposing to skin problems and ulcerations, complicates up to 70% of cases of BMT. In BMT patients...

  12. [Graves-Basedow disease after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubas, Beata; Kostecka-Matyja, Marta; Darczuk, Andrzej; Gil, Justyna

    2006-01-01

    One severe aplastic anaemia case who presented autoimmune thyroid disease after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (alloBMT) is described. A 19 year old Polish girl developed Graves' hyperthyroidisms 19 months after allogeneic BMT for severe aplastic anaemia (SAA) donated from her brother. Her serum was positive for thyroid stimulating antibody (TSAb) and anti-thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies (aTPO) while her brother remained euthyroid, seronegative for TSAb, and showed no clinical signs of thyroid pathology. The genetic studies of lymphocytes FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) and analysis of STR (short tandem repeated) fragments suggested, that lymphocytes responsible for hyperthyroidisms were of donor origin. PMID:17133320

  13. Graves-Basedow disease after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One severe aplastic anaemia case who presented autoimmune thyroid disease after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (alloBMT) is described. A 19 year old Polish girldeveloped Graves' hyperthyroidisms 19 months after allogeneic BMT for severe aplastic anaemia (SAA) donated from her brother. Her serum was positive for thyroid stimulating antibody (TSAb) and anti-thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies (aTPO) while her brother remained euthyroid, seronegative for TSAb, and showed no clinical signs of thyroid pathology. The genetic studies of lymphocytes FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) and analysis of STR (short tandem repeated) fragments suggested, that lymphocytes responsible for hyperthyroidisms were of donor origin. (author)

  14. Changes in cytokine and biomarker blood levels in patients with colorectal cancer during dendritic cell-based vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Stefan; Claesson, Mogens; Nielsen, Hans; Rosenberg, Jacob

    Introduction. Immunotherapy based on dendritic cell vaccination has exciting perspectives for treatment of cancer. In order to clarify immunological mechanisms during vaccination it is essential with intensive monitoring of the responses. This may lead to optimization of treatment and prediction of......-inflammatory cytokines in serum of patients who achieved stable disease following vaccination suggest the occurrence of vaccine-induced Th1 responses. Since Th1 responses seem to be essential in cancer immunotherapy this may indicate a therapeutic potential of the vaccine....... responding patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate cytokine and biomarker responses in patients with colorectal cancer treated with a cancer vaccine based on dendritic cells pulsed with an allogeneic melanoma cell lysate. Material and methods. Plasma and serum samples were collected prior to...

  15. Changes in cytokine and biomarker blood levels in patients with colorectal cancer during dendritic cell-based vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Stefan K; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Nielsen, Hans J; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Introduction. Immunotherapy based on dendritic cell vaccination has exciting perspectives for treatment of cancer. In order to clarify immunological mechanisms during vaccination it is essential with intensive monitoring of the responses. This may lead to optimization of treatment and prediction of......-inflammatory cytokines in serum of patients who achieved stable disease following vaccination suggest the occurrence of vaccine-induced Th1 responses. Since Th1 responses seem to be essential in cancer immunotherapy this may indicate a therapeutic potential of the vaccine....... responding patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate cytokine and biomarker responses in patients with colorectal cancer treated with a cancer vaccine based on dendritic cells pulsed with an allogeneic melanoma cell lysate. Material and methods. Plasma and serum samples were collected prior to...

  16. Identification and characterization of human dendritic cell subsets in the steady state: a review of our current knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vineet Indrajit; Metcalf, Jordan Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are generally categorized as a group of rare antigen presenting cells that are to the crucial development of immune responses to pathogens and also of tolerance to self-antigens. Therefore, having the ability to identify DC in specific tissues and to test their functional abilities in the steady state are scientific gaps needing attention. Research on primary human DC is lacking due to their rarity and the difficulty of obtaining tissue samples. However, recent findings have shown that several different DC subsets exist, and that these subsets vary both by markers expressed and functions depending on their specific microenvironment. After discriminating from other cell types, DC can be split into myeloid and plasmacytoid fractions. While plasmacytoid DC express definite markers, CD123 and BDCA-2, myeloid DC encompass several different subsets with overlapping markers expressed. Such markers include the blood DC antigens BDCA-1 and BDCA-3, along with Langerin, CD1a and CD14. Marker specificity is further reduced when accounting for microenvironmental differences, as observed in the blood, primary lymphoid tissues, skin and lungs. The mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR) has been used to measure the strength of antigen presentation by specific DC subsets. Surface markers and MLR require standardization to enable consistent identification of and comparisons between DC subsets. To alleviate these issues, researchers have begun comparing DC subsets at the transcriptional level. This has allowed degrees of relatedness to be determined between DC in different microenvironments, and should be a continued area of focus in years to come. PMID:26956785

  17. Peptidoglycan Recognition Protein Pglyrp1 Enhances Experimental Asthma by Promoting Th2 and Th17 and Limiting Regulatory T Cell and Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Shin Yong; Jing, Xuefang; Gupta, Dipika; Dziarski, Roman

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a common inflammatory disease involving crosstalk between innate and adaptive immunity. We reveal that antibacterial innate immunity protein, peptidoglycan recognition protein 1 (Pglyrp1), is involved in the development of allergic asthma. Pglyrp1−/− mice developed less severe asthma than wild type (WT) mice following sensitization with house dust mite (HDM) allergen. HDM-sensitized Pglyrp1−/− mice, compared with WT mice, had diminished: bronchial hyper-responsiveness (lung airway r...

  18. INFECTION WITH FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE VIRUS CAUSES LOSS OF CIRCULATING PLASMACYTOID DENDRITIC CELLS AND ABROGATES THE INTERFERON ALPHA RESPONSE TO TLR AGONISTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immune evasion by pathogens is often critical to virulence and spread of the infectious agent. Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is considered one of the most contagious infections known yet is very sensitive to both type I and type II interferons (IFN). In many species including swine, plasmacyto...

  19. The Deterministic Dendritic Cell Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie

    2010-01-01

    The Dendritic Cell Algorithm is an immune-inspired algorithm orig- inally based on the function of natural dendritic cells. The original instantiation of the algorithm is a highly stochastic algorithm. While the performance of the algorithm is good when applied to large real-time datasets, it is difficult to anal- yse due to the number of random-based elements. In this paper a deterministic version of the algorithm is proposed, implemented and tested using a port scan dataset to provide a controllable system. This version consists of a controllable amount of parameters, which are experimented with in this paper. In addition the effects are examined of the use of time windows and variation on the number of cells, both which are shown to influence the algorithm. Finally a novel metric for the assessment of the algorithms output is introduced and proves to be a more sensitive metric than the metric used with the original Dendritic Cell Algorithm.

  20. Anti tumor vaccination with hybrid dendritic-tumour cells; Vacinacao antitumoral com celulas hibridas dendriticas tumorais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbuto, Jose Alexandre M.; Neves, Andreia R.; Ensina, Luis Felipe C.; Anselmo, Luciene B. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biomedicas. Dept. de Imunologia; Leite, Katia R.M.; Buzaid, Antonio C.; Camara Lopes, Luiz H. [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2005-09-01

    Dendritic cells are the most potent antigen-presenting cells, and the possibility of their use for cancer vaccination has renewed the interest in this therapeutic modality. Nevertheless, the ideal immunization protocol with these cells has not been described yet. In this paper we describe the preliminary results of a protocol using autologous tumor and allogeneic dendritic hybrid cell vaccination every 6 weeks, for metastatic melanoma and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients. Thirty-five patients were enrolled between March 2001 and March 2003. Though all patients included presented with large tumor burdens and progressive diseases, 71% of them experienced stability after vaccination, with durations up to 19 months. Among RCC patients 3/22 (14%) presented objective responses. The median time to progression was 4 months for melanoma and 5.7 months for RCC patients; no significant untoward effects were noted. Furthermore, immune function, as evaluated by cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions to recall antigens and by peripheral blood proliferative responses to tumor-specific and nonspecific stimuli, presented a clear tendency to recover in vaccinated patients. These data indicate that dendritic cell-tumor cell hybrid vaccination affects the natural history of advanced cancer and provide support for its study in less advanced patients, who should, more likely, benefit even more from this approach. (author)

  1. Sexual function 1-year after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noerskov, K H; Schjødt, I; Syrjala, K L;

    2016-01-01

    Treatment with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is associated with short and long-term toxicities that can result in alterations in sexual functioning. The aims of this prospective evaluation were to determine: (1) associations between HSCT and increased sexual dysfunction...

  2. Eltrombopag for Treatment of Thrombocytopenia after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Takashi; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Yamashita, Takuya; Fuji, Shigeo; Okinaka, Keiji; Kurosawa, Saiko; Kim, Sung-Won; Tanosaki, Ryuji; Fukuda, Takahiro

    2016-05-01

    Persistent thrombocytopenia is a common complication after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Eltrombopag is an oral thrombopoietin receptor agonist whose efficacy against persistent thrombocytopenia after allogeneic HCT has not been well characterized. This retrospective study evaluated the safety and efficacy of eltrombopag in 12 consecutive patients with persistent thrombocytopenia after allogeneic HCT. Eltrombopag was started at 12.5 mg once daily and the dose was increased by 12.5 mg daily every week until platelet counts exceeded 50,000/μL. Five patients had prolonged isolated thrombocytopenia (PIT) and 7 patients had secondary failure of platelet recovery (SFPR). The cumulative incidence rate of successful platelet recovery to ≥50,000/μL without transfusion support was 60% in PIT patients and 71% in SFPR patients. No patients discontinued the drug because of adverse events or intolerability. Notably, the rate of platelet recovery was higher (100% versus 58%; P = .0017) and recovery was faster (median, 33 days versus 137 days; P = .0078) in patients with normal numbers of bone marrow megakaryocytes before starting eltrombopag than in those with decreased numbers of megakaryocytes. Eltrombopag is a promising treatment for both PIT and SFPR after allogeneic HCT. The number of megakaryocytes in bone marrow before eltrombopag treatment may predict the response to eltrombopag. PMID:26785333

  3. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor during allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haastrup, E; Andersen, J; Ostrowski, S R; Høyer-Hansen, G; Heilmann, C; Ullum, H; Müller, K; Jacobsen, N

    2011-01-01

    course of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Twenty SCT patients were included in the study. suPAR was measured by ELISA in daily taken plasma samples during the pretransplant conditioning with chemotherapy and weekly for 1 month after infusion of the graft. suPAR levels before the start of the...

  4. An inverse approach for elucidating dendritic function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Torben-Nielsen

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We outline an inverse approach for investigating dendritic function-structure relationships by optimizing dendritic trees for a-priori chosen computational functions. The inverse approach can be applied in two different ways. First, we can use it as a `hypothesis generator' in which we optimize dendrites for a function of general interest. The optimization yields an artificial dendrite that is subsequently compared to real neurons. This comparison potentially allows us to propose hypotheses about the function of real neurons. In this way, we investigated dendrites that optimally perform input-order detection. Second, we can use it as a `function confirmation' by optimizing dendrites for functions hypothesized to be performed by classes of neurons. If the optimized, artificial, dendrites resemble the dendrites of real neurons the artificial dendrites corroborate the hypothesized function of the real neuron. Moreover, properties of the artificial dendrites can lead to predictions about yet unmeasured properties. In this way, we investigated wide-field motion integration performed by the VS cells of the fly visual system. In outlining the inverse approach and two applications, we also elaborate on the nature of dendritic function. We furthermore discuss the role of optimality in assigning functions to dendrites and point out interesting future directions.

  5. Dendritic Cells and Monocytes with Distinct Inflammatory Responses Reside in Lung Mucosa of Healthy Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharom, Faezzah; Thomas, Saskia; Rankin, Gregory; Lepzien, Rico; Pourazar, Jamshid; Behndig, Annelie F; Ahlm, Clas; Blomberg, Anders; Smed-Sörensen, Anna

    2016-06-01

    Every breath we take contains potentially harmful pathogens or allergens. Dendritic cells (DCs), monocytes, and macrophages are essential in maintaining a delicate balance of initiating immunity without causing collateral damage to the lungs because of an exaggerated inflammatory response. To document the diversity of lung mononuclear phagocytes at steady-state, we performed bronchoscopies on 20 healthy subjects, sampling the proximal and distal airways (bronchial wash and bronchoalveolar lavage, respectively), as well as mucosal tissue (endobronchial biopsies). In addition to a substantial population of alveolar macrophages, we identified subpopulations of monocytes, myeloid DCs (MDCs), and plasmacytoid DCs in the lung mucosa. Intermediate monocytes and MDCs were highly frequent in the airways compared with peripheral blood. Strikingly, the density of mononuclear phagocytes increased upon descending the airways. Monocytes from blood and airways produced 10-fold more proinflammatory cytokines than MDCs upon ex vivo stimulation. However, airway monocytes were less inflammatory than blood monocytes, suggesting a more tolerant nature. The findings of this study establish how to identify human lung mononuclear phagocytes and how they function in normal conditions, so that dysregulations in patients with respiratory diseases can be detected to elucidate their contribution to immunity or pathogenesis. PMID:27183618

  6. Leukemia-associated activating mutation of Flt3 expands dendritic cells and alters T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Colleen M; Nish, Simone A; Yogev, Nir; Waisman, Ari; Reiner, Steven L; Reizis, Boris

    2016-03-01

    A common genetic alteration in acute myeloid leukemia is the internal tandem duplication (ITD) in FLT3, the receptor for cytokine FLT3 ligand (FLT3L). Constitutively active FLT3-ITD promotes the expansion of transformed progenitors, but also has pleiotropic effects on hematopoiesis. We analyzed the effect of FLT3-ITD on dendritic cells (DCs), which express FLT3 and can be expanded by FLT3L administration. Pre-leukemic mice with the Flt3(ITD) knock-in allele manifested an expansion of classical DCs (cDCs) and plasmacytoid DCs. The expansion originated in DC progenitors, was cell intrinsic, and was further enhanced in Flt3(ITD/ITD) mice. The mutation caused the down-regulation of Flt3 on the surface of DCs and reduced their responsiveness to Flt3L. Both canonical Batf3-dependent CD8(+) cDCs and noncanonical CD8(+) cDCs were expanded and showed specific alterations in their expression profiles. Flt3(ITD) mice showed enhanced capacity to support T cell proliferation, including a cell-extrinsic expansion of regulatory T (T reg) cells. Accordingly, these mice restricted alloreactive T cell responses during graft-versus-host reaction, but failed to control autoimmunity without T reg cells. Thus, the FLT3-ITD mutation directly affects DC development, indirectly modulating T cell homeostasis and supporting T reg cell expansion. We hypothesize that this effect of FLT3-ITD might subvert immunosurveillance and promote leukemogenesis in a cell-extrinsic manner. PMID:26903243

  7. A central role for hepatic conventional dendritic cells in supporting Th2 responses during helminth infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundie, Rachel J; Webb, Lauren M; Marley, Angela K; Phythian-Adams, Alexander T; Cook, Peter C; Jackson-Jones, Lucy H; Brown, Sheila; Maizels, Rick M; Boon, Louis; O'Keeffe, Meredith; MacDonald, Andrew S

    2016-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the key initiators of T-helper (Th) 2 immune responses against the parasitic helminth Schistosoma mansoni. Although the liver is one of the main sites of antigen deposition during infection with this parasite, it is not yet clear how distinct DC subtypes in this tissue respond to S. mansoni antigens in vivo, or how the liver microenvironment might influence DC function during establishment of the Th2 response. In this study, we show that hepatic DC subsets undergo distinct activation processes in vivo following murine infection with S. mansoni. Conventional DCs (cDCs) from schistosome-infected mice upregulated expression of the costimulatory molecule CD40 and were capable of priming naive CD4(+) T cells, whereas plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) upregulated expression of MHC class II, CD86 and CD40 but were unable to support the expansion of either naive or effector/memory CD4(+) T cells. Importantly, in vivo depletion of pDCs revealed that this subset was dispensable for either maintenance or regulation of the hepatic Th2 effector response during acute S. mansoni infection. Our data provides strong evidence that S. mansoni infection favors the establishment of an immunogenic, rather than tolerogenic, liver microenvironment that conditions cDCs to initiate and maintain Th2 immunity in the context of ongoing antigen exposure. PMID:26657145

  8. Decrease in Circulating Dendritic Cell Precursors in Patients with Peripheral Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Kretzschmar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral artery disease (PAD is a common manifestation of atherosclerosis. Inflammation is important for initiation and progression of the disease. Dendritic cells (DCs as antigen-presenting cells play an important role in the immune system. Therefore, we hypothesize that, in patients with PAD, DCPs might be reduced in blood due to their recruitment into the vascular wall and induce a proinflammatory response. The numbers of myeloid DCPs, plasmacytoid DCPs, and total DCPs were analyzed by flow cytometry in blood of patients with PAD (n=52 compared to controls (n=60. Femoralis plaques (n=12 of patients who underwent surgery were immunostained for CD209 and CD83 (mDCs as well as CD304, CD123 (pDCs, and HLA-DR. In patients with PAD, a significant decrease in mDCPs, pDCPs, and tDCPs was observed. In immunostaining, markers indicative for mDCs (CD209: 16 versus 8 cells/0.1 mm2, P=0.02; CD83: 19 versus 5 cells/0.1 mm2, P=0.03 were significantly elevated in femoralis plaques compared to control vessels. We show for the first time that mDCPs, pDCPs, and tDCPs are significantly reduced in patients with PAD. Immunohistochemical analysis unraveled that the decrease in DCPs might be due to their recruitment into atherosclerotic plaques.

  9. Tolerance, immunocompetence, and secondary disease in fully allogeneic radiation chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the extent to which secondary disease and mortality in fully allogeneic chimeras (C57BL leads to CBA) is caused (if at all) by a delayed graft-versus-host reaction. Adult CBA males were thymectomized, irradiated, and reconstituted with T-lymphocyte-depleted C57BL or CBA bone marrow cells (BMC), followed three weeks after irradiation by implantation under the kidney capsule of thymic lobes from C57BL or CBA fetal or adult donors. These mice were observed for the development of secondary disease for periods in excess of 250 days, and they were examined at 5 weeks or 4 months for T lymphocyte reactivity and tolerance to alloantigens, using the cell-mediated lympholysis assay (CML). The following results were obtained. First, removal of T lymphocytes with anti-Thy 1 antibody and complement from allogeneic bone marrow did not prevent wasting and eventual death, although it prolonged the lifespan of mice substantially. Second, T lymphocytes generated from bone marrow-derived precursor cells became tolerant of the histocompatibility antigens of the thymus donor strain but remained normally reactive to third-party antigens. Third, allogeneic radiation chimeras did not survive as well as animals reconstituted with syngeneic cells, even when they were demonstrably tolerant in CML. Fourth, C57BL BMC maturing in a CBA host equipped with a C57BL thymus graft did not become tolerant of host antigens, indicating that extra-thymic tolerance does not occur in fully allogeneic--as opposed to semiallogeneic--chimeras. It is argued that the function of B lymphocytes and/or accessory cells is impaired in fully allogeneic radiation chimeras, and that the mortality observed was directly related to the resulting immunodeficiency. The relevance of the results described in this paper to clinical bone marrow transplantation is discussed

  10. Intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms of dendritic morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xintong; Shen, Kang; Bülow, Hannes E

    2015-01-01

    The complex, branched morphology of dendrites is a cardinal feature of neurons and has been used as a criterion for cell type identification since the beginning of neurobiology. Regulated dendritic outgrowth and branching during development form the basis of receptive fields for neurons and are essential for the wiring of the nervous system. The cellular and molecular mechanisms of dendritic morphogenesis have been an intensely studied area. In this review, we summarize the major experimental systems that have contributed to our understandings of dendritic development as well as the intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms that instruct the neurons to form cell type-specific dendritic arbors. PMID:25386991

  11. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhn, Sabine; Ronchese, Franca

    2013-01-01

    The elicitation of efficient antitumor immune responses requires the optimal activation of tumor-associated dendritic cells (DCs). Our comparison of the effect of various immunostimulatory treatments on DCs revealed that the best predictor of the success of immunotherapy is not the activation of existing DC populations, but the appearance of a population of monocyte-derived DC in tumor-draining lymph nodes.

  12. Fast generation of dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvistborg, P; Bøgh, Marie; Claesson, M H; Pedersen, A W

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are potent antigen presenting cells capable of inducing immune responses. DC are widely used as vaccine adjuvant in experimental clinical settings. DC-based vaccines are normally generated using a standard 8day DC protocol (SDDC). In attempts to shorten the vaccine production...

  13. Functional canine dendritic cells can be generated in vitro from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and contain a cytoplasmic ultrastructural marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibisch, C; Pradal, G; Bach, J M; Lieubeau, B

    2005-03-01

    For physiological and practical reasons the dog is a large animal model used increasingly to study the pathogenesis of human diseases and new therapeutic approaches, in particular for immune disorders. However, some immunological resources are lacking in this model, especially concerning dendritic cells. The aim of our study was to develop an efficient method to generate dendritic cells (DC) in vitro from dog peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and to characterize their functional, structural and ultrastructural properties. PBMC were cultured in vitro with IL-4 and GM-CSF. After 1 week of culture, a great proportion of non-adherent cells displayed typical cytoplasmic processes, as evidenced both by optical and electron microscopy. Cytometric analysis revealed the presence of 41.7+/-24.6% CD14+ cells expressing both CD11c and MHC class II molecules. Allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reactions confirmed the ability of these cultures to stimulate the proliferation of allogeneic lymphocytes as already reported as a characteristic of DC in other species. In addition, we describe for the first time the presence in canine DC of cytoplasmic periodic microstructures (PMS) that could represent ultrastructural markers of canine DC. In conclusion, our study provides an easy method to generate DC from PBMC in sufficient numbers for immunological in vitro investigations in dogs, a pre-clinical model for many human diseases. PMID:15847807

  14. Complement protein C1q induces maturation of human dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cosmor, E; Bajtay, Z; Sándor, N;

    2007-01-01

    absence of antibodies, we undertook to investigate whether this complement protein has an impact on various functions of human DCs. Maturation of monocyte-derived immature DCs (imMDCs) cultured on immobilized C1q was followed by monitoring expression of CD80, CD83, CD86, MHCII and CCR7. The functional......Maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) is known to be induced by several stimuli, including microbial products, inflammatory cytokines and immobilized IgG, as demonstrated recently. Since immune complexes formed in vivo also contain C1q, moreover apoptotic cells and several pathogens fix C1q in the...... activity of the cells was assessed by measuring cytokine secretion and their ability to activate allogeneic T lymphocytes. Cytokine production by T cells co-cultured with C1q-matured DCs was also investigated. C1q, but not the structurally related mannose-binding lectin was found to bind to imMDC in a dose...

  15. Genetically Modified Lactococcus lactis for Delivery of Human Interleukin-10 to Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inge L. Huibregtse

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-10 (IL-10 plays an indispensable role in mucosal tolerance by programming dendritic cells (DCs to induce suppressor Th-cells. We have tested the modulating effect of L. lactis secreting human IL-10 (L.  lactisIL-10 on DC function in vitro. Monocyte-derived DC incubated with L.  lactisIL-10 induced effector Th-cells that markedly suppressed the proliferation of allogenic Th-cells as compared to L. lactis. This suppressive effect was only seen when DC showed increased CD83 and CD86 expression. Furthermore, enhanced production of IL-10 was measured in both L.  lactisIL-10-derived DC and Th-cells compared to L. lactis-derived DC and Th-cells. Neutralizing IL-10 during DC-Th-cell interaction and coculturing L.  lactisIL-10-derived suppressor Th-cells with allogenic Th-cells in a transwell system prevented the induction of suppressor Th-cells. Only 130 pg/mL of bacterial-derived IL-10 and 40 times more exogenously added recombinant human IL-10 were needed during DC priming for the generation of suppressor Th-cells. The spatially restricted delivery of IL-10 by food-grade bacteria is a promising strategy to induce suppressor Th-cells in vivo and to treat inflammatory diseases.

  16. Rapamycin Modulates the Maturation of Rat Bone Marrow-derived Dendritic Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingjun DING; Xiang CHENG; Tingting TANG; Rui YAO; Yong CHEN; Jiangjiao XIE; Xian YU; Yuhua LIAO

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to observe the effect of rapamycin (RAPA) on the differentiation and maturation of rat bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) in vitro. BMDCs from Wistar rats were cultured with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor plus interleukin-4in the presence or absence of RAPA (20 ng/mL), and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for 24h before cells and supernatants were collected. Surface phenotype of BMDCs was flow-cytometrically detected to determine the expression of maturation markers, MHC class Ⅱ and CD86. Supematants were analyzed for the production of IL-12 and IFN-γ cytokines by using ELISA.BMDCs were co-cultured with T cells from Lewis rats and mixed lymphocyte reaction was assessed by MTT method. The morphology of BMDCs stimulated with LPS remained immature after RAPA pretreatment. RAPA significantly decreased the CD86 expression, impaired the IL-12 and IFN-γproduction of BMDCs stimulated with LPS, and inhibited the proliferation of allogeneic T cells. In conclusion, RAPA can inhibit the maturation of BMDCs stimulated with LPS in terms of the morphology, surface phenotype, cytokine production, and ability of BMDCs to stimulate the proliferation of allogeneic T cells in vitro.

  17. Microtubule nucleation and organization in dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delandre, Caroline; Amikura, Reiko; Moore, Adrian W

    2016-07-01

    Dendrite branching is an essential process for building complex nervous systems. It determines the number, distribution and integration of inputs into a neuron, and is regulated to create the diverse dendrite arbor branching patterns characteristic of different neuron types. The microtubule cytoskeleton is critical to provide structure and exert force during dendrite branching. It also supports the functional requirements of dendrites, reflected by differential microtubule architectural organization between neuron types, illustrated here for sensory neurons. Both anterograde and retrograde microtubule polymerization occur within growing dendrites, and recent studies indicate that branching is enhanced by anterograde microtubule polymerization events in nascent branches. The polarities of microtubule polymerization events are regulated by the position and orientation of microtubule nucleation events in the dendrite arbor. Golgi outposts are a primary microtubule nucleation center in dendrites and share common nucleation machinery with the centrosome. In addition, pre-existing dendrite microtubules may act as nucleation sites. We discuss how balancing the activities of distinct nucleation machineries within the growing dendrite can alter microtubule polymerization polarity and dendrite branching, and how regulating this balance can generate neuron type-specific morphologies. PMID:27097122

  18. Phase field modeling of dendritic coarsening during isothermal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yutuo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic coarsening in Al-2mol%Si alloy during isothermal solidification at 880K was investigated by phase field modeling. Three coarsening mechanisms operate in the alloy: (a melting of small dendrite arms; (b coalescence of dendrites near the tips leading to the entrapment of liquid droplets; (c smoothing of dendrites. Dendrite melting is found to be dominant in the stage of dendritic growth, whereas coalescence of dendrites and smoothing of dendrites are dominant during isothermal holding. The simulated results provide a better understanding of dendrite coarsening during isothermal solidification.

  19. Delayed type hypersensitivity to allogeneic mouse epidermal cell antigens, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low dose of ultraviolet B radiation impairs the effectiveness of epidermal cell antigens. We studied the effect of ultraviolet B radiation on the delayed type hypersensitivity induced by allogeneic epidermal cell antigen. The delayed type hypersensitivity response was assayed by footpad swelling in mice. When epidermal cells were exposed to ultraviolet B radiation (660 J/m2), their ability to induce T cells of delayed type hypersensitivity activation was markedly inhibited in any combination of recipient mice and allogeneic epidermal cells. The effect of ultraviolet B radiation on epidermal cells was observed before immunization and challenge. Ultraviolet B treated epidermal cells did not induce suppressor T cells in mice. These results indicate that ultraviolet B radiation destroys the antigenicity of epidermal cells. (author)

  20. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Ali

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We report a case series of 12 patients with acute myeloid leukemia who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplant with a matched related donor. Male to female ratio was 1:1. The main complication post-transplant was graft-versus-host disease (n=7 patients. Transplant-related mortality involved one patient; cause of death was multi-organ failure. After a median follow up of 36.0±11.3 months, overall survival was 16%.

  1. Histopathological changes in the liver after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Sloane, JP; Farthing, MJG; Powles, RL

    1980-01-01

    Postmortem and surgical specimens of liver from 20 patients who had undergone allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for a variety of disorders were examined. The lesions fell into five major categories: bile duct atypia often associated with portal tract fibrosis (8 cases), veno-occlusive disease (2 cases), small foci of non-zonal hepatocyte necrosis (3 cases), opportunistic infections (3 cases), and a miscellaneous group of non-specific abnormalities. Our findings, in conjunction with those...

  2. Livskvalitet 2-7 år efter allogen stamcellstransplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Brander Gustafsson, Eva Carin; Sjöström, Maria; Skoglund, Anette

    2009-01-01

    This is an empirical cross-sectional study with the aim to examine the patient’s comprehension about their quality of life within two to seven years after their stem-cell transplantation with reference to physical, social, emotional, psychological and functional wellbeing and to investigate if the patient groups have disease specific problems. Differences in quality of life between men and women and also between allogeneic and stem cell transplantation with an unrelated donor (URD) were studi...

  3. Allogeneic cellular immunotherapy for chronic B-cell leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Hoogendoorn, Mels

    2007-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) following reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) as treatment modality has curative potential in patients suffering from chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) or mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), illustrating susceptibility of these leukemic cells for the graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect. However, effectiveness of this therapy is limited due to low immunogenicity of leukemic cells and the lack of specificity resulting in concurrent development of graft-versus...

  4. Vitamin B12 absorption after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    OpenAIRE

    Milligan, D W; Quick, A; Barnard, D L

    1987-01-01

    The B12 absorption test (Schilling test) with intrinsic factor was used to examine ileal B12 absorption in 26 patients after allogeneic transplantation. The test was well tolerated and showed a profound fall in B12 absorption, which was maximal at two weeks after transplantation and recovered by eight weeks. The predominant influence on absorption at this stage was probably the conditioning schedule, and the presence of acute graft versus host disease (GVHD) was not associated with a further ...

  5. Chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes sciatic nerve repair

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yanru; Zhang, Hui; Katiella, Kaka; Huang, Wenhua

    2014-01-01

    A chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft can reduce postoperative immune rejection, similar to an autologous nerve graft, and can guide neural regeneration. However, it remains poorly understood whether a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with neurotrophic factors provides a good local environment for neural regeneration. This study investigated the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve using a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft com...

  6. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Concurrent Lymphoid Malignancy

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmerman, Zachary; Scott, Bart L.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Maloney, David G; Deeg, H. Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) can be curative for both myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and lymphoid malignancies. Little is known about the efficacy of allogeneic HCT in patients in whom both myeloid and lymphoid disorders are present at the time of HCT. We analyzed outcomes in 21 patients with MDS and concurrent lymphoid malignancy when undergoing allogeneic HCT. Seventeen patients had received extensive prior cytotoxic chemotherapy, including autologous HCT in seven, f...

  7. Role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in mantle cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jonathon B; Burns, Linda J; Bachanova, Veronika

    2015-04-01

    Despite a wide spectrum of treatment options, mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) remains a challenging hematologic malignancy to manage. Advances in front-line therapy, including the monoclonal antibody rituximab and increasing use of cytarabine, have improved remission rates. Autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) can effectively consolidate remission of MCL, leading to encouraging survival beyond 5 yr. However, nearly all patients with MCL will relapse and require salvage therapy. Novel agents such as ibrutinib, bortezomib, and lenalidomide have dramatically expanded the options for treating relapsed MCL. In this review, we summarize the clinical evidence supporting the use of allogeneic donor HCT in MCL and make recommendations on indications for its use. Data suggest that allogeneic donor HCT is the only curative therapy for patients with poor prognosis or aggressive MCL. Patient selection, timing, and optimal use remain a matter of scientific debate and given the rapidly changing therapeutic landscape of MCL, the outcomes of allogeneic HCT should be interpreted in the context of novel therapeutics. PMID:25154430

  8. Chimeric autologous/allogeneic constructs for skin regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Cathy Ann; Tam, Joshua; Steiglitz, Barry M; Bauer, Rebecca L; Peters, Noel R; Wang, Ying; Anderson, R Rox; Allen-Hoffmann, B Lynn

    2014-08-01

    The ideal treatment for severe cutaneous injuries would eliminate the need for autografts and promote fully functional, aesthetically pleasing autologous skin regeneration. NIKS progenitor cell-based skin tissues have been developed to promote healing by providing barrier function and delivering wound healing factors. Independently, a device has recently been created to "copy" skin by harvesting full-thickness microscopic tissue columns (MTCs) in lieu of autografts traditionally harvested as sheets. We evaluated the feasibility of combining these two technologies by embedding MTCs in NIKS-based skin tissues to generate chimeric autologous/allogeneic constructs. Chimeric constructs have the potential to provide immediate wound coverage, eliminate painful donor site wounds, and promote restoration of a pigmented skin tissue possessing hair follicles, sweat glands, and sebaceous glands. After MTC insertion, chimeric constructs and controls were reintroduced into air-interface culture and maintained in vitro for several weeks. Tissue viability, proliferative capacity, and morphology were evaluated after long-term culture. Our results confirmed successful MTC insertion and integration, and demonstrated the feasibility of generating chimeric autologous/allogeneic constructs that preserved the viability, proliferative capacity, and structure of autologous pigmented skin. These feasibility studies established the proof-of-principle necessary to further develop chimeric autologous/allogeneic constructs for the treatment of complex skin defects. PMID:25102552

  9. Clinical Allogeneic and Autologous Islet Cell Transplantation: Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi Matsumoto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Islet cell transplantation is categorized as a β-cell replacement therapy for diabetic patients who lack the ability to secrete insulin. Allogeneic islet cell transplantation is for the treatment of type 1 diabetes, and autologous islet cell transplantation is for the prevention of surgical diabetes after a total pancreatectomy. The issues of allogeneic islet cell transplantation include poor efficacy of islet isolation, the need for multiple donor pancreata, difficulty maintaining insulin independence and undesirable side effects of immunosuppressive drugs. Those issues have been solved step by step and allogeneic islet cell transplantation is almost ready to be the standard therapy. The donor shortage will be the next issue and marginal and/or living donor islet cell transplantation might alleviate the issue. Xeno-islet cell transplantation, β-cell regeneration from human stem cells and gene induction of the naïve pancreas represent the next generation of β-cell replacement therapy. Autologous islet cell transplantation after total pancreatectomy for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis with severe abdominal pain is the standard therapy, even though only limited centers are able to perform this treatment. Remote center autologous islet cell transplantation is an attractive option for hospitals performing total pancreatectomies without the proper islet isolation facilities.

  10. SHIPi Enhances Autologous and Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Fernandes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is a highly effective procedure enabling long-term survival for patients with hematologic malignancy or heritable defects. Although there has been a dramatic increase in the success rate of HSCT over the last two decades, HSCT can result in serious, sometimes untreatable disease due to toxic conditioning regimens and Graft-versus-Host-Disease. Studies utilizing germline knockout mice have discovered several candidate genes that could be targeted pharmacologically to create a more favorable environment for transplant success. SHIP1 deficiency permits improved engraftment of hematopoietic stem-progenitor cells (HS-PCs and produces an immunosuppressive microenvironment ideal for incoming allogeneic grafts. The recent development of small molecule SHIP1 inhibitors has opened a different therapeutic approach by creating transient SHIP1-deficiency. Here we show that SHIP1 inhibition (SHIPi mobilizes functional HS-PC, accelerates hematologic recovery, and enhances donor HS-PC engraftment in both allogeneic and autologous transplant settings. We also observed the expansion of key cell populations known to suppress host-reactive cells formed during engraftment. Therefore, SHIPi represents a non-toxic, new therapeutic that has significant potential to improve the success and safety of therapies that utilize autologous and allogeneic HSCT.

  11. Altered Allogeneic Immune Responses in Middle-Aged Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YiminSun; HanhanLi; AlanN.Langnas

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that leukocyte composition, T cell phenotypes and immune function change in aged mice and humans. However, limited and conflicting results on the age-related immune changes in middle-aged mice were reported. Identification of the characteristics of allogeneic immune responses in aging mice may offer important information for transplantation immunology. The major age-related changes in the immune cell phenotypes and function of 12 months old mice include: 1) the significantly decreased CD4+ cell population in the peripheral blood, the major peripheral CD4+ cells is CD45RBlowCD62Llow memory phenotype; 2) the in vitro responses to alloantigens and Con A of splenocytes markedly reduced; 3) the in vivo secondary humoral immune responses to alloantigens significantly declined; 4) the age-related alteration in the thymus mainly occurred in CD4/CD8 double positive (DP) stage; and 5) increased CD80+ and MHC class II+ cell population in spleens. Thus, the major age-related immune changes in 12 months old mice occurred in CD4+ T cells in the periphery and DP stage in the thymus, which may subsequently lead to the decreased allogeneic immune responses and the different sensitivity to immunosuppressive drugs and treatments. Further studies on the characteristics of allogeneic immunity in aging individuals may help to determine the appropriated treatment for transplant aging individuals. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(6):440-446.

  12. Altered Allogeneic Immune Responses in Middle-Aged Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yimin Sun; Hanhan Li; Alan N. Langnas; Yong Zhao

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that leukocyte composition, T cell phenotypes and immune function change in aged mice and humans. However, limited and conflicting results on the age-related immune changes in middle-aged mice were reported. Identification of the characteristics of allogeneic immune responses in aging mice may offer important information for transplantation immunology. The major age-related changes in the immune cell phenotypes and function of 12 months old mice include: 1) the significantly decreased CD4+ cell population in the peripheral blood, the major peripheral CD4+ cells is CD45RBlowCD62Llow memory phenotype; 2) the in vitro responses to alloantigens and Con A of splenocytes markedly reduced; 3) the in vivo secondary humoral immune responses to alloantigens significantly declined; 4) the age-related alteration in the thymus mainly occurred in CD4/CD8 double positive (DP) stage; and 5) increased CD80+ and MHC class Ⅱ+ cell population in spleens. Thus, the major age-related immune changes in 12 months old mice occurred in CD4+ T cells in the periphery and DP stage in the thymus, which may subsequently lead to the decreased allogeneic immune responses and the different sensitivity to immunosuppressive drugs and treatments. Further studies on the characteristics of allogeneic immunity in aging individuals may help to determine the appropriated treatment for transplant aging individuals. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004; 1(6) :440-446.

  13. Allogeneic leukocytes in cardiac surgery: Good or bad?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneke Brand

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, cardiac surgery is a common procedure requiring a large quantity of allogeneic blood products, which are associated with postoperative complications. Leukocytes present in blood products may play a role in these complications, which are referred to as transfusion-related immunomodulation (TRIM. Several randomized controlled trials (RCTs in different settings investigated the effects of allogeneic leukocytes in red blood cells (RBCs. Cardiac surgery studies reported a reduction in postoperative infections and mortality in patients that received leukocyte-reduced RBCs compared with leukocyte-containing RBCs; this was mainly due to more deaths due to infections and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS in the group that received leukocyte-containing RBCs. Patients with postoperative complications had higher concentrations of inflammatory mediators. These findings suggest that leukocyte-containing transfusion during cardiac surgery induces a second insult to the systemic inflammatory response. In the present review we discuss the possible role of blood transfusions in cardiac surgery. Especially, we focus on the possible role of allogeneic leukocytes associated with postoperative complications after cardiac surgery.

  14. A new method of prefabricated vascularized allogenic bone grafts for maxillo-mandibular reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although there are various applications of allogenic bone grafts, a new technique of prevascularized lyophilized allogenic bone grafting for maxillo-mandibular reconstruction will be presented. Allogenic bone has been made by author's protocol for jaw defects as a powder, chip or block bone type. The author used lyophilized allogenic bone grafts for discontinuity defects as a block bone. In those cases, neovascularization and resorption of the allogenic bone were important factors for success of grafting. To overcome the problems, the author designed the technique of prefabricated vascularization of allogenic bone, which was lyophilized cranium, with an application of bovine BMP or not. Lyophilized cranial bone was designed for the defects and was put into the scalp. After confirming a hot spot via scintigram several months later, vascularized allogenic bone was harvested pedicled on the parietotemporal fascia based on the superficial temporal artery and vein. Vascularized allogenic cranial bone was rotated into the defect and fixed rigidly. Postoperatively, there was no severe resorption and functional disturbance of the mandible. In this technique, BMP seems to be an important role to help osteogenesis and neovascularization. Eight patients underwent prefabricated vascularization of allogenic bone grafts. Among them, four cases of reconstruction in mandibular discontinuity defects and one case of reconstruction in maxillectomy defect underwent this method, which will be presented with good results. This method may be an alternative technique of microvascular free bone graft

  15. Drosophila Sensory Neurons Require Dscam for Dendritic Self Avoidance and Proper Dendritic Field Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Soba, Peter; Zhu, Sijun; Emoto, Kazuo; Younger, Susan; Yang, Shun-Jen; Yu, Hung-Hsiang; Lee, Tzumin; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh-Nung

    2007-01-01

    A neuron’s dendrites typically do not cross one another. This intrinsic self-avoidance mechanism ensures unambiguous processing of sensory or synaptic inputs. Moreover, some neurons respect the territory of others of the same type, a phenomenon known as tiling. Different types of neurons, however, often have overlapping dendritic fields. We found that Down’s syndrome Cell Adhesion Molecule (Dscam) is required for dendritic self-avoidance of all four classes of Drosophila dendritic arborizatio...

  16. Homophilic Dscam interactions control complex dendrite morphogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Michael E Hughes; Bortnick, Rachel; Tsubouchi, Asako; Bäumer, Philipp; Kondo, Masahiro; Uemura, Tadashi; Schmucker, Dietmar

    2007-01-01

    The morphogenesis of complex dendritic fields requires highly specific patterning and dendrite-dendrite recognition mechanisms. Alternative splicing of the Drosophila cell surface receptor Dscam results in up to 38,016 different receptor isoforms and in vitro binding studies suggested that sequence variability in immunoglobulin-like ecto-domains determines the specificity of strictly homophilic interactions. We report that diverse Dscam receptors play an important role in controlling cell-int...

  17. Precipitation dendrites in turbulent pipe flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angheluta, Luiza; Hawkins, Christopher; Hammer, Øyvind; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2013-04-01

    Surface precipitation in pipelines, as well as freezing in water pipes is of great concern in many industrial applications where scaling phenomena becomes a control problem of pipe-clogging or an efficiency reduction in transport. Flow blockage often occurs even when only a small fraction is deposited non-uniformly on the walls in the form of dendrites. Dendritic patterns are commonly encountered in surface precipitation from supersaturated solutions, e.g. calcite dendrites, as well as in solidification from undercooled liquids, e.g. freezing of water into ice dendrites. We explore the mathematical similarities between precipitation and freezing processes and, in particular, investigate the effect of fluid flow on the precipitation dendrites on pipe walls. We use a phase field approach to model surface growth coupled with a lattice Boltzmann method that simulates a channel flow at varying Reynolds number. The dendrites orientation and shape depend non-trivially on the ratio between advection and diffusion, i.e. the Peclet number, as well as the Reynolds number. Roughness induced vortices near growing dendrites at high flow rates further affect the branch splitting of dendrites. We show how the transport rate in a pipeline may depend on the different dendritic morphologies, and provide estimates for the flow conditions that correspond to most efficient transport regimes.

  18. Hierarchical assembly of diphenylalanine into dendritic nanoarchitectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tae Hee; Oh, Jun Kyun; Lee, Gyoung-Ja; Pyun, Su-Il; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2010-09-01

    Highly ordered, multi-dimensional dendritic nanoarchitectures were created via self-assembly of diphenylalanine from an acidic buffer solution. The self-similarity of dendritic structures was characterized by examining their fractal dimensions with the box-counting method. The fractal dimension was determined to be 1.7, which demonstrates the fractal dimension of structures generated by diffusion limited aggregation on a two-dimensional substrate surface. By confining the dendritic assembly of diphenylalanine within PDMS microchannels, the self-similar dendritic growth could be hierarchically directed to create linearly assembled nanoarchitectures. Our approach offers a novel pathway for creating and directing hierarchical nanoarchitecture from biomolecular assembly. PMID:20605423

  19. Effect of intrathymic injection of allogene antigen on immune response to sciatic nerve transplantation in allogenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The latest researches demonstrate that intrathymic injection of MHC antigen which reaches a certain dosage (2 mg, i.e., 4 × 108 cell extraction) can induce immunologic tolerance under non-antilymphocyte serum condition.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of intrathymic injection of allogene antigen on survival and function of sciatic nerve in allogenic mice.DESIGN: Randomized controlled animal study.SETTING: The 4th Affiliated Hosptial of Harbin Medical University.MATERIALS: A total of 32 male donor C57BL/6(H-2b) mice of 4 - 8 weeks old and weighing 18 - 22 g and 44 female receptor Balb/c(H-2d) mice of 4 - 8 weeks old and weighing 18 - 22 g were selected from Heilongjing Veterinary Institution. The animal experiment had got confirmed consent from local ethic committee.METHODS: The experiment was carried out in the Laboratory (Provincial Key Laboratory) of the Fourth Hospital, Harbin Medical University from June 2006 to May 2007. C57BL/6(H-2b) mice were anesthetized to extract MHC (H-2b) antigen from splenic cells and sciatic nerves. Allogenous nerve transplantation group:Mice were given intrathymic injection of 100 μ L saline; two weeks later, frozen sciatic nerves of donor mice were transplanted. Immunosuppressive agent group: Mice were given intrathymic injection of 100 μ L saline; two weeks later, fresh sciatic nerves of donor mice were transplanted. At three days before transplantation, 10 mg/kg per day cyclosporin A was intraperitoneally injected once a day till mice were sacrificed. MHC (H-2b) antigen injection group: Mice were given intrathymic injection of MHC (H-2b)antigen from C57BL/6(H-2b) donor mice; two weeks later, fresh sciatic nerves of donor mice were transplanted. Autogenous nerve transplantation group: Mice were given intrathymic injection of 100 μ L saline; two weeks later, fresh sciatic nerves were transplanted.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ① Three weeks later, transplanted part of exposured sciatic nerve was used to measure the

  20. Differentiation and function of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells under the influence of leflunomide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojić-Vukanić Z.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Leflunomide is an immunosuppressive drug effective in experimental models of transplantation and autoimmune diseases and in the treatment of active rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Having in mind that it has been shown that some other immunosuppressive drugs (glucocorticoids, mycophenolate mofetil, sirolimus etc. impair dendritic cell (DC phenotype and function, we investigated the effect of A77 1726, an active metabolite of leflunomide, on the differentiation and function of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC in vitro. Immature MDDC were generated by cultivating monocytes in medium supplemented with GM-CSF and IL-4. To induce maturation, immature MDDC were cultured for 2 additional days with LPS. A77 1726 (100 μM was added at the beginning of cultivation. Flow cytometric analysis showed that MDDC differentiated in the presence of A77 1726 exhibited an altered phenotype, with a down-regulated surface expression of CD80, CD86, CD54 and CD40 molecules. Furthermore, the continuous presence of A77 1726 during differentiation and maturation prevented successful maturation, judging by the decreased expression of maturation marker CD83, costimulatory and adhesive molecules on A77 1726-treated mature MDDC. In addition, A77 1726-pretreated MDDC exhibited a poor stimulatory capacity of the allogeneic T cells and a low production of IL-10 and IL-18. These data suggest that leflunomide impairs the differentiation, maturation and function of human MDDC in vitro, which is an additional mechanism of its immunosuppressive effect.

  1. Renal dendritic cells: an update

    OpenAIRE

    Velázquez, Peter; Dustin, Michael L.; Peter J Nelson

    2009-01-01

    Discovery into the role of renal dendritic cells (rDCs) in health and disease of the kidney is rapidly accelerating. Progress in deciphering DC precursors and the heterogeneity of monocyte subsets in mice and humans are providing insights into the biology of rDCs. Recent findings have extended knowledge of the origins, anatomy, and function of the rDC network at steady-state and during periods of injury to the renal parenchyma. This brief review highlights these new findings and provides an u...

  2. Titanium implant insertion into dog alveolar ridges augmented by allogenic material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Haanaes, H R; Donath, K;

    1994-01-01

    of 6 weeks allogenic, demineralized and lyophilized dentin or bone was implanted subperiosteally. Titanium implants were installed 5.5 months later in some of the regions. Light and fluorescence microscopic evaluation revealed fibrous encapsulation of the implanted allogenic material, no osteoinduction...

  3. Dysfunction of peripheral blood dendritic cells from patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu-Sheng Wang1; Li-He Xing; Ming-Xu Liu; Cnuan-Lin Zhu; Hui-Gang Liu; Hui- Fen Wang; Zhou-Yun Lei

    2001-01-01

    AIM To identify the property of dendritic cella (DCs) of peripheral blood monocytes (PBMC) in patlents with chronic HBV infection. METHODS Twenty patients with persistent HBV infectlon were included in this study, 10 healthy subjects being used as a control group. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of T cell-depleted populations were incubated and induced into mature dendritic cells in the RPMI-1640 medium in the presence of cytokines GMCSF, IL-4, FLt-3, TNF-α and 100 mL@ L-1 of fetal calf serum for a total of 10 - 12 days. The expressions of surface markers on DCs were evaluated using flow cytometric analysis. ELISA method was used to determine the cytokine levels of interleukin-12 (IL-12) and IL-10 in the supernatant produced by DCs. For detection of the stimulatory capacity of DCs to T cell proliferation,mytomycin C-treated DC were incubated with allogenic T cells. RESULTS A typical morphology of mature DCs from healthy subjects and HBV-infected patients was induced in in vitro incubation, but the proliferation ability and cellular number of DCs from HBV-infected patients significantly decreased compared with healthy individuals. In particular, the expression levels of HLADR, CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2) on DC surface from patients were also lower than that from healthy individuals (0.46 vs 0.92 for HLA-DR, 0.44 vs 0.88 for CD80 and 0.44 vs 0. 84 for CD86, P< 0.05). The stimulatory capacity and production of IL-12 of DCs from patients in allogenic mixed lymphocyte reaction (AMLR) significantly decreased, but the production level of nitric oxide (NO) by DCa simultaneously increased compared with healthy subjects (86± 15 vs 170±22 μmoI@L 1, P<0.05). CONCLUSION The patients with chronic HBV infection have the defective function and immature phenotype of dendritic cells, which may be associated with the inability of efficient presentation of HBV antigens to host immune system for the clearance of HBV.

  4. Plasmacytoid variant of bladder cancer defines patients with poor prognosis if treated with cystectomy and adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the definition of different histologic subtypes of urothelial carcinomas by the World Health Organization (WHO) 2004 classification, description of molecular features and clinical behavior of these variants has gained more attention. We reviewed 205 tumor samples of patients with locally advanced bladder cancer mainly treated within the randomized AUO-AB05/95 trial with radical cystectomy and adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy for histologic subtypes. 178 UC, 18 plasmacytoid (PUC) and 9 micropapillary (MPC) carcinomas of the bladder were identified. Kaplan Meier analysis and backward multivariate Cox’s proportional hazards regression analysis were performed to compare overall survival between the three histologic subtypes. Patients suffering from PUC have the worst clinical outcome regarding overall survival compared to conventional UC and MPC of the bladder that in turn seem have to best clinical outcome (27.4 months, 62.6 months, and 64.2 months, respectively; p=0.013 by Kaplan Meier analysis). Backward multivariate Cox´s proportional hazards regression analysis (adjusted to relevant clinicopathological parameters) showed a hazard ratio of 3.2 (p=0.045) for PUC in contrast to patients suffering from MPC. Histopathological diagnosis of rare variants of urothelial carcinoma can identify patients with poor prognosis

  5. Immunological aspects of allogeneic and autologous mesenchymal stem cell therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogduijn, M J; Roemeling-van Rhijn, M; Korevaar, S S; Engela, A U; Weimar, W; Baan, C C

    2011-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have potential for therapeutic application as an immunomodulatory and regenerative agent. The immunogenicity and survival of MSCs after infusion are, however, not clear and evidence suggests that allogeneic but also autologous MSCs disappear rapidly after infusion. This may be associated with the susceptibility of MSCs to lysis by natural killer (NK) cells, possibly a result of culture-induced stress. In the present study we examined whether NK cell-mediated lysis of MSCs could be inhibited by immunosuppressive drugs. Human MSCs were isolated from adipose tissue and expanded in culture. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were activated with interleukin (IL)-2 (200 U/ml) and IL-15 (10 ng/ml) for 7 days. CD3(-)CD16(+)CD56(+) NK cells were then isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and added to europium-labeled MSCs for 4 hr in the presence or absence of immunosuppressive drugs. Lysis of MSCs was determined by spectrophotometric measurement of europium release. Nonactivated NK cells were not capable of lysing MSCs. Cytokine-activated NK cells showed upregulated levels of granzyme B and perforin and efficiently lysed allogeneic and autologous MSCs. Addition of tacrolimus, rapamycin or sotrastaurin to the lysis assay did not inhibit MSC killing. Furthermore, preincubation of activated NK cells with the immunosuppressive drugs for 24 hr before exposure to MSCs had no effect on MSC lysis. Last, addition of the immunosuppressants before and during the activation of NK cells, reduced NK cell numbers but did not affect their capacity to lyse MSCs. We conclude that the immunosuppressive drugs tacrolimus, rapamycin, and sotrastaurin are not capable of inhibiting the lysis of allogeneic and autologous MSCs by activated NK cells. Other approaches to controlling lysis of MSCs should be investigated, as controlling lysis may determine the efficacy of MSC therapy. PMID:21732766

  6. Vertical solidification of dendritic binary alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, J. C.; Felicelli, S.; Poirier, D. R.

    1991-01-01

    Three numerical techniques are employed to analyze the influence of thermosolutal convection on defect formation in directionally solidified (DS) alloys. The finite-element models are based on the Boussinesq approximation and include the plane-front model and two plane-front models incorporating special dendritic regions. In the second model the dendritic region has a time-independent volume fraction of liquid, and in the last model the dendritic region evolves as local conditions dictate. The finite-element models permit the description of nonlinear thermosolutal convection by treating the dendritic regions as porous media with variable porosities. The models are applied to lead-tin alloys including DS alloys, and severe segregation phenomena such as freckles and channels are found to develop in the DS alloys. The present calculations and the permeability functions selected are shown to predict behavior in the dendritic regions that qualitatively matches that observed experimentally.

  7. Early events in axon/dendrite polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pei-lin; Poo, Mu-ming

    2012-01-01

    Differentiation of axons and dendrites is a critical step in neuronal development. Here we review the evidence that axon/dendrite formation during neuronal polarization depends on the intrinsic cytoplasmic asymmetry inherited by the postmitotic neuron, the exposure of the neuron to extracellular chemical factors, and the action of anisotropic mechanical forces imposed by the environment. To better delineate the functions of early signals among a myriad of cellular components that were shown to influence axon/dendrite formation, we discuss their functions by distinguishing their roles as determinants, mediators, or modulators and consider selective degradation of these components as a potential mechanism for axon/dendrite polarization. Finally, we examine whether these early events of axon/dendrite formation involve local autocatalytic activation and long-range inhibition, as postulated by Alan Turing for the morphogenesis of patterned biological structure. PMID:22715881

  8. RENAL ALLOGENEIC TRANSPLANTATION IN PATIENT WITH HAEMOPHILIA B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Purlo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of successful renal allogeneic transplantation and treatment in a 56-year-old patient with haemophilia B at Hematology Research Center. He has received replacement therapy by factor IX since 2010. The transplant is marked with good renal function during 13 post-transplant months without episodes of rejection or bleeding complications. The complicated surgical interventions are possible in patients with haemophilia В аnd end-stage chronic renal failure in the presence of replacement therapy of IX factor for the purpose of achievement of optimum hemostasis.

  9. Role of dendritic cells infected with human herpesvirus 6 in virus transmission to CD4+ T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is a ubiquitous betaherpesvirus that predominantly infects and replicates in CD4+ T lymphocytes. However, the mechanism of HHV-6 transmission to T cells from the peripheral mucosa is unknown. Here we found that dendritic cells (DCs) can transmit HHV-6 to T cells, resulting in productive infection. In immature monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) infected with HHV-6, viral early and late antigens were expressed, and nucleocapsids containing a DNA core were observed, although few virions were detected in the cytoplasm by electron microscopy, indicating that the maturation of HHV-6 virions may be incomplete in MDDCs. However, HHV-6 transmission from MDDCs to stimulated CD4+ T cells occurred efficiently in coculture of these cells, but not from MDDCs culture supernatants. This transmission was partially inhibited by treating the DCs with a viral DNA synthesis blocker, indicating that viral replication in MDDCs is required for this transmission. Furthermore, myeloid DCs and plasmacytoid DCs infected with HHV-6 could also transmit the virus to stimulated T cells. Thus, DCs may be the first cell population targeted by HHV-6 and could play an important role in the virus' transmission to T cells for their further propagation

  10. A discrete population of IFN λ-expressing BDCA3hi dendritic cells is present in human thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Víctor G; Canseco, Noelia M; Hidalgo, Laura; Valencia, Jaris; Entrena, Ana; Fernández-Sevilla, Lidia M; Hernández-López, Carmen; Sacedón, Rosa; Vicente, Angeles; Varas, Alberto

    2015-08-01

    Human thymus contains two major subpopulations of dendritic cells (DCs), conventional DCs (cDCs) and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs), which are mainly involved in central tolerance and also in protecting the thymus against infections. In blood and peripheral organs cDCs include the subpopulation of BDCA3(hi) DCs, considered as equivalents to mouse CD8α(+) DCs. In this study we describe in human thymus the presence of a discrete population of BDCA3(hi) DCs that, like their peripheral counterparts, express CD13, low-intermediate levels of CD11c, CLEC9A, high levels of XCR1, IRF8 and TLR3, and mostly lack the expression of CD11b, CD14 and TLR7. Thymic BDCA3(hi) DCs display immature features with a low expression of costimulatory molecules and HLA-DR, and a low allostimulatory capacity. Also, BDCA3(hi) DCs exhibit a strong response to TLR3 stimulation, producing high levels of interferon (IFN)-λ1 and CXCL10, which indicates that, similarly to thymic pDCs, BDCA3(hi) DCs can have an important role in thymus protection against viral infections. PMID:25753268

  11. A potential role of karyopherin a2 in the impaired maturation of dendritic cells observed in glioblastoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Gousias

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Patients with glioblastomas demonstrate well-documented immunological impairments including decreased numbers of mature dendritic cells (DCs. Recent data identified karyopherin a2 (KPNA2, a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling receptor, as diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for gliomas. The aim of this ongoing study is to correlate parameters of immunity and nucleocytoplasmic transport in glioblastoma patients. Methods: We preoperatively collected serum from 17 patients with glioblastomas and determined DC subsets (HLA DR+ Lin-, CD34-, CD45+, CD123+, CD11+ were analyzed using a 6-color flow cytometry panel. Expression levels of KPNA2 and nuclear accumulation of p53 were evaluated semi-quantitatively by immunohistochemistry. O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT and isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 (IDH-1 status were assessed by pyrosequencing and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Results: Median expression levels for both KPNA2 and p53 were 5-10%. IDH-1-R132H mutation and MGMT promoter hypermethylation was detected in 3/16 and 1/9 patients, respectively. Mean counts of total mature DCs, myeloid DCs and plasmacytoid DCs were 9.6, 2.1, 3.4 cells/μL. A preliminary analysis suggests an association between low KPNA2 nuclear expression and increased numbers of mature DCs. However, this correlation did not reach statistical significance so far (P = 0.077. Conclusion: Our preliminary data may indicate a role of KPNA2 in the impaired maturation of DCs observed in glioblastoma patients.

  12. Engineering crystals of dendritic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, Oleg; Schubert, Dirk; Müller, Claudia M; Schweizer, W Bernd; Gramlich, Volker; Schneider, Julian; Dolgonos, Grygoriy; Shivanyuk, Alexander

    2009-07-01

    A detailed single-crystal X-ray study of conformationally flexible sulfonimide-based dendritic molecules with systematically varied molecular architectures was undertaken. Thirteen crystal structures reported in this work include 9 structures of the second-generation dendritic sulfonimides decorated with different aryl groups, 2 compounds bearing branches of both second and first generation, and 2 representatives of the first generation. Analysis of the packing patterns of 9 compounds bearing second-generation branches shows that despite their lack of strong directive functional groups there is a repeatedly reproduced intermolecular interaction mode consisting in an anchor-type packing of complementary second-generation branches of neighbouring molecules. The observed interaction tolerates a wide range of substituents in meta- and para-positions of the peripheral arylsulfonyl rings. Quantum chemical calculations of the molecule-molecule interaction energies agree at the qualitative level with the packing preferences found in the crystalline state. The calculations can therefore be used as a tool to rationalize and predict molecular structures with commensurate and non-commensurate branches for programming of different packing modes in crystal. PMID:19549870

  13. Systemic RNA delivery to dendritic cells exploits antiviral defence for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranz, Lena M; Diken, Mustafa; Haas, Heinrich; Kreiter, Sebastian; Loquai, Carmen; Reuter, Kerstin C; Meng, Martin; Fritz, Daniel; Vascotto, Fulvia; Hefesha, Hossam; Grunwitz, Christian; Vormehr, Mathias; Hüsemann, Yves; Selmi, Abderraouf; Kuhn, Andreas N; Buck, Janina; Derhovanessian, Evelyna; Rae, Richard; Attig, Sebastian; Diekmann, Jan; Jabulowsky, Robert A; Heesch, Sandra; Hassel, Jessica; Langguth, Peter; Grabbe, Stephan; Huber, Christoph; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2016-06-16

    Lymphoid organs, in which antigen presenting cells (APCs) are in close proximity to T cells, are the ideal microenvironment for efficient priming and amplification of T-cell responses. However, the systemic delivery of vaccine antigens into dendritic cells (DCs) is hampered by various technical challenges. Here we show that DCs can be targeted precisely and effectively in vivo using intravenously administered RNA-lipoplexes (RNA-LPX) based on well-known lipid carriers by optimally adjusting net charge, without the need for functionalization of particles with molecular ligands. The LPX protects RNA from extracellular ribonucleases and mediates its efficient uptake and expression of the encoded antigen by DC populations and macrophages in various lymphoid compartments. RNA-LPX triggers interferon-α (IFNα) release by plasmacytoid DCs and macrophages. Consequently, DC maturation in situ and inflammatory immune mechanisms reminiscent of those in the early systemic phase of viral infection are activated. We show that RNA-LPX encoding viral or mutant neo-antigens or endogenous self-antigens induce strong effector and memory T-cell responses, and mediate potent IFNα-dependent rejection of progressive tumours. A phase I dose-escalation trial testing RNA-LPX that encode shared tumour antigens is ongoing. In the first three melanoma patients treated at a low-dose level, IFNα and strong antigen-specific T-cell responses were induced, supporting the identified mode of action and potency. As any polypeptide-based antigen can be encoded as RNA, RNA-LPX represent a universally applicable vaccine class for systemic DC targeting and synchronized induction of both highly potent adaptive as well as type-I-IFN-mediated innate immune mechanisms for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27281205

  14. Systemic RNA delivery to dendritic cells exploits antiviral defence for cancer immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranz, Lena M.; Diken, Mustafa; Haas, Heinrich; Kreiter, Sebastian; Loquai, Carmen; Reuter, Kerstin C.; Meng, Martin; Fritz, Daniel; Vascotto, Fulvia; Hefesha, Hossam; Grunwitz, Christian; Vormehr, Mathias; Hüsemann, Yves; Selmi, Abderraouf; Kuhn, Andreas N.; Buck, Janina; Derhovanessian, Evelyna; Rae, Richard; Attig, Sebastian; Diekmann, Jan; Jabulowsky, Robert A.; Heesch, Sandra; Hassel, Jessica; Langguth, Peter; Grabbe, Stephan; Huber, Christoph; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2016-06-01

    Lymphoid organs, in which antigen presenting cells (APCs) are in close proximity to T cells, are the ideal microenvironment for efficient priming and amplification of T-cell responses. However, the systemic delivery of vaccine antigens into dendritic cells (DCs) is hampered by various technical challenges. Here we show that DCs can be targeted precisely and effectively in vivo using intravenously administered RNA-lipoplexes (RNA-LPX) based on well-known lipid carriers by optimally adjusting net charge, without the need for functionalization of particles with molecular ligands. The LPX protects RNA from extracellular ribonucleases and mediates its efficient uptake and expression of the encoded antigen by DC populations and macrophages in various lymphoid compartments. RNA-LPX triggers interferon-α (IFNα) release by plasmacytoid DCs and macrophages. Consequently, DC maturation in situ and inflammatory immune mechanisms reminiscent of those in the early systemic phase of viral infection are activated. We show that RNA-LPX encoding viral or mutant neo-antigens or endogenous self-antigens induce strong effector and memory T-cell responses, and mediate potent IFNα-dependent rejection of progressive tumours. A phase I dose-escalation trial testing RNA-LPX that encode shared tumour antigens is ongoing. In the first three melanoma patients treated at a low-dose level, IFNα and strong antigen-specific T-cell responses were induced, supporting the identified mode of action and potency. As any polypeptide-based antigen can be encoded as RNA, RNA-LPX represent a universally applicable vaccine class for systemic DC targeting and synchronized induction of both highly potent adaptive as well as type-I-IFN-mediated innate immune mechanisms for cancer immunotherapy.

  15. Mesothelioma tumor cells modulate dendritic cell lipid content, phenotype and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne K Gardner

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play an important role in the generation of anti-cancer immune responses, however there is evidence that DCs in cancer patients are dysfunctional. Lipid accumulation driven by tumor-derived factors has recently been shown to contribute to DC dysfunction in several human cancers, but has not yet been examined in mesothelioma. This study investigated if mesothelioma tumor cells and/or their secreted factors promote increases in DC lipid content and modulate DC function. Human monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs were exposed to human mesothelioma tumor cells and tumor-derived factors in the presence or absence of lipoproteins. The data showed that immature MoDCs exposed to mesothelioma cells or factors contained increased lipid levels relative to control DCs. Lipid accumulation was associated with reduced antigen processing ability (measured using a DQ OVA assay, upregulation of the co-stimulatory molecule, CD86, and production of the tolerogenic cytokine, IL-10. Increases in DC lipid content were further enhanced by co-exposure to mesothelioma-derived factors and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, but not low-density lipoproteins. In vivo studies using a murine mesothelioma model showed that the lipid content of tumor-infiltrating CD4+ CD8α- DCs, CD4- CD8α- DCs DCs and plasmacytoid DCs increased with tumor progression. Moreover, increasing tumor burden was associated with reduced proliferation of tumor-antigen-specific CD8+ T cells in tumor-draining lymph nodes. This study shows that mesothelioma promotes DC lipid acquisition, which is associated with altered activation status and reduced capacity to process and present antigens, which may impair the ability of DCs to generate effective anti mesothelioma T cell responses.

  16. Incomplete activation of peripheral blood dendritic cells during healthy human pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Bella, S; Giannelli, S; Cozzi, V; Signorelli, V; Cappelletti, M; Cetin, I; Villa, M L

    2011-05-01

    Successful pregnancy relies on the adaptation of immune responses that allow the fetus to grow and develop in the uterus despite being recognized by maternal immune cells. Dendritic cells (DCs) are central to the control of immune tolerance, and their state of activation at the maternal-decidual interface is critical to the feto-maternal immunological equilibrium. So far, the involvement of circulating DCs has been investigated poorly. Therefore, in this study we investigated whether, during healthy human pregnancy, peripheral blood DCs (PBDCs) undergo changes that may be relevant to the adaptation of maternal immune responses that allow fetal tolerance. In a cross-sectional study, we analysed PBDCs by six-colour flow cytometry on whole blood samples from 47 women during healthy pregnancy progression and 24 non-pregnant controls. We demonstrated that both myeloid and plasmacytoid PBDCs undergo a state of incomplete activation, more evident in the third trimester, characterized by increased expression of co-stimulatory molecules and cytokine production but lacking human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR up-regulation. To investigate the contribution of soluble circulating factors to this phenomenon, we also performed culture experiments showing that sera from pregnant women added to control DCs conditioned a similar incomplete activation that was associated with reduced DC allostimulatory capacity, supporting the in vivo relevance of our findings. We also obtained evidence that the glycoprotein hormone activin-A may contribute to DC incomplete activation. We suggest that the changes of PBDCs occurring during late pregnancy may aid the comprehension of the immune mechanisms operated by the maternal immune system to maintain fetal tolerance. PMID:21352205

  17. Total body irradiation and allogeneic bone-marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study is to present the first case in the Bulgarian oncological practice of total-body irradiation (TBI) followed by allogeneic transplantation of hemopoietic peripheral steam cells from a haploidentical family donor to a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The patient was a 10-year old boy with a verified non-Hodgkin lymphoma - IV clinical stage (leukemia-lymphoma syndrome) with initial mediastinal and bone-marrow engagement. After the disease recurrence the patient was hospitalized in the Transplantation Department of the Specialized Pediatric Hospital for Active Treatment of Oncological Diseases for realizing allogeneic transplantation. The application of the conditioning regime includes Melphalan, Fludarabine, ATG and TBI with 5x2 Gy. The patient was discharged on the 30th day in a good general condition with compensated haematological parameters and stable function of the transplant, and with instructions for the control check-ups and examinations each 14 days till the day + 100. The TBI method applied by the team was simple for realization and did not require special equipment. The patient received irradiation by a vertical radiation beam in a small procedure room in a comfortable spinal and prone position, which allowed the realization of sufficiently homogeneous dose in the body and effective lung protection. The irradiation time was acceptable, compared with the time for the application of horizontal radiation beams at large distances. (authors)

  18. Superior osteogenesis in transplanted allogeneic canine skull following chemical sterilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prolo, D.J.; Pedrotti, P.W.; Burres, K.P.; Oklund, S.

    1982-08-01

    Sterilization of allogeneic bone increases the availability of this tissue for supplanting skeletal defects and effecting fusions. The optimal sterilant destroys micro-organisms, preserves the physical and chemical integrity of bone and possibly even reduces immunogenicity. Cortical bone of skull heals slowly and is variably resorbed. Of 36 dogs, spontaneous regeneration in 72 paired 20 mm defects was constant but always incomplete, and restored only about one third of the cross-sectional area of the defect at six months. The repair in defects replaced with canine allogeneic bony disc, sterilized with ethylene oxide (n . 9), gamma irradiation (n . 7), or methanol/chloroform/iodoacetic acid (n . 7) and then lyophilizedd, was compared with repair in defects filled with aseptically procured lyophilized only (n . 23) discs from the same donor. Criteria for evaluation of implants at six months included volume of defect filled, radiodensity, extent of fusion around circumference, revascularization, and remodeling. Bony discs sterilized with methanol/chloroform/iodoacetic acid remodeled at a superior rate (p less than 0.01). Radiation sterilization resulted in diminished density and inferentially reduced protection of the brain (p less than 0.025). Ethylene oxide, lyophilized implants, and implants lyophilized only produced comparable repair. Whereas an acceptable cranioplasty was achieved in 86% of methanol/chloroform/iodoacetic acid, lyophilize implants, all other alloimplants served an osteoconductive function with a successful repair occurring in 56% to 58%.

  19. Superior osteogenesis in transplanted allogeneic canine skull following chemical sterilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterilization of allogeneic bone increases the availability of this tissue for supplanting skeletal defects and effecting fusions. The optimal sterilant destroys micro-organisms, preserves the physical and chemical integrity of bone and possibly even reduces immunogenicity. Cortical bone of skull heals slowly and is variably resorbed. Of 36 dogs, spontaneous regeneration in 72 paired 20 mm defects was constant but always incomplete, and restored only about one third of the cross-sectional area of the defect at six months. The repair in defects replaced with canine allogeneic bony disc, sterilized with ethylene oxide (n . 9), gamma irradiation (n . 7), or methanol/chloroform/iodoacetic acid (n . 7) and then lyophilizedd, was compared with repair in defects filled with aseptically procured lyophilized only (n . 23) discs from the same donor. Criteria for evaluation of implants at six months included volume of defect filled, radiodensity, extent of fusion around circumference, revascularization, and remodeling. Bony discs sterilized with methanol/chloroform/iodoacetic acid remodeled at a superior rate (p less than 0.01). Radiation sterilization resulted in diminished density and inferentially reduced protection of the brain (p less than 0.025). Ethylene oxide, lyophilized implants, and implants lyophilized only produced comparable repair. Whereas an acceptable cranioplasty was achieved in 86% of methanol/chloroform/iodoacetic acid, lyophilize implants, all other alloimplants served an osteoconductive function with a successful repair occurring in 56% to 58%

  20. Dendritic cells in lung immunopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Peter C; MacDonald, Andrew S

    2016-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) lie at the heart of the innate immune system, specialised at recognising danger signals in many forms including foreign material, infection or tissue damage and initiating powerful adaptive immune and inflammatory responses. In barrier sites such as the lung, the instrumental role that DCs play at the interface between the environment and the host places them in a pivotal position in determining the severity of inflammatory disease. The past few years has seen a significant increase in our fundamental understanding of the subsets of DCs involved in pulmonary immunity, as well as the mechanisms by which they are activated and which they may use to coordinate downstream inflammation and pathology. In this review, we will summarise current understanding of the multi-faceted role that DCs play in the induction, maintenance and regulation of lung immunopathology, with an emphasis on allergic pulmonary disease. PMID:27256370

  1. Dendritic Cells for Anomaly Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie; Aickelin, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Artificial immune systems, more specifically the negative selection algorithm, have previously been applied to intrusion detection. The aim of this research is to develop an intrusion detection system based on a novel concept in immunology, the Danger Theory. Dendritic Cells (DCs) are antigen presenting cells and key to the activation of the human signals from the host tissue and correlate these signals with proteins know as antigens. In algorithmic terms, individual DCs perform multi-sensor data fusion based on time-windows. The whole population of DCs asynchronously correlates the fused signals with a secondary data stream. The behaviour of human DCs is abstracted to form the DC Algorithm (DCA), which is implemented using an immune inspired framework, libtissue. This system is used to detect context switching for a basic machine learning dataset and to detect outgoing portscans in real-time. Experimental results show a significant difference between an outgoing portscan and normal traffic.

  2. DEX-1 and DYF-7 establish sensory dendrite length by anchoring dendritic tips during cell migration

    OpenAIRE

    Heiman, Maxwell G.; Shaham, Shai

    2009-01-01

    Cells are devices whose structures delimit function. For example, in the nervous system, neuronal and glial shapes dictate paths of information flow. To understand how cells acquire their shapes, we examined the formation of a sense organ in C. elegans. Using time-lapse imaging, we found that sensory dendrites form by stationary anchoring of dendritic tips during cell-body migration. A genetic screen identified DEX-1 and DYF-7, extracellular proteins required for dendritic tip anchoring, whic...

  3. Lymphotactin enhances the in-vitro immune efficacy of dendritoma formed by dendritic cells and mouse hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张浩; 蒋国平; 郑树森; 吴丽花; 朱峰; 杨振林

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the in-vitro antitumor immune responses of dendritoma formed by mouse hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and lymphotactin (Lptn) gene modified dendritic cells (DCs). Method: DCs prepared from mouse bone marrow were genetically modified by lymphotactin adenovirus, and fused with H22 cells by polyethylene glycol (PEG). RT-PCR and ELISA were employed to identify lymphotactin expression at mRNA and protein level. Cell phenotypes and fusion efficiency was detected by FACS. The stimulatory effect of DC on T cells was detected by mixed lymphocyte reaction. The cytotoxicity activity against H22 cells was assayed by LDH method. Results: Lymphotactin could be efficiently expressed by DCLptn/H22 hybridoma. DCLptn/H22 cells could induce potent T cell proliferation effect and generate strong cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) reaction against allogenic H22 cells. Conclusion: Lymphotactin genetic modification could enhance the in vitro immune activity of the dendritoma.

  4. Antitumor effect of murine dendritic and tumor cells transduced with IL-2 gene Antitumor effect of murine dendritic and tumor cells transduced with IL-2 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Wojas-Turek

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin (IL- 2 acts on a number of types of immune cells promoting their effector functions. To replace
    systemic administration of recombinant form of this cytokine, various genetically modified cells have been used in
    different preclinical models for tumor growth inhibition. In this study, dendritic or tumor cells transduced with retroviral
    vector carrying IL-2 gene (JAWS II/IL-2, X63/IL-2, MC38/IL-2 cells alone or combined with tumor antigenstimulated
    dendritic cells (JAWS II/TAg were exploited to treat colon carcinoma MC38-bearing mice. After the
    peritumoral injection of vaccine cells, the tumor growth delay and the increase in the number of tumor infiltrating
    CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes were noted. A considerable increase in CD4+ cell influx into tumor tissue was observed
    when JAWS II/IL-2 cells or JAWS II/TAg with syngeneic MC38/IL-2 cells were applied. The increase in
    intensity of CD8+ cell infiltration was associated with immune reaction triggered by the same combination of applied
    cells or JAWS II/TAg with allogeneic X63/IL-2 cells. The effect observed in vivo was accompanied by MC38/0 cell
    specific cytotoxic activity of spleen cells in vitro. Thus, the application of vaccines, including IL-2-secreting cells of
    various origins, was able to induce different antitumor responses polarized by exogenous IL-2 and the encountered
    tumor antigen.Interleukin (IL- 2 acts on a number of types of immune cells promoting their effector functions. To replace
    systemic administration of recombinant form of this cytokine, various genetically modified cells have been used in
    different preclinical models for tumor growth inhibition. In this study, dendritic or tumor cells transduced with retroviral
    vector carrying IL-2 gene (JAWS II/IL-2, X63/IL-2, MC38/IL-2 cells alone or combined with tumor antigenstimulated
    dendritic cells (JAWS II/TAg were exploited to treat colon

  5. Allogeneic corneoscleral limbus tissue transplantation for treatment of the necrosis in porphyria eye disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng; Yan; Yan; Lu; Jie; Yin; Feng; Jiang; Zhen-Ping; Huang

    2014-01-01

    · Porphyria cutanea tarda(PCT) with ocular complications are rarely reported. To the best of our knowledge, no reports exist on allogeneic corneoscleral limbus tissue transplantation for treatment of these.Amniotic membrane grafting had been performed in their patient suffering from porphyria eye disease, but necrosis developed in the grafts. Nevertheless, in our patient, allogeneic corneoscleral limbus transplantation prevented necrosis from development at corneoscleral limbus. So we considered that the allogeneic corneoscleral limbus transplantation might be an option to repair the necrosis in porphyria eye disease with avoiding sunlight and using artificial tear drops.

  6. Mobilization of Dendritic Cell Precursors in Patients With Cancer by Flt3 Ligand Allows the Generation of Higher Yields of Cultured Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marroquin, Carlos E.; Westwood, Jennifer A.; Lapointe, Rejean; Mixon, Arnold; Wunderlich, John R.; Caron, Dania; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Hwu, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Summary Flt3 ligand (Flt3L) stimulates the proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic cells. Subcutaneous Flt3L administration has been shown to effectively manage some murine cancers and in humans, to lead to an increase in peripheral blood monocyte and dendritic cell (DC) counts. In the current study, we determined the effects of Flt3L therapy on patients with melanoma and renal cancer, and in particular, if Flt3L could be used either by enhancing the immunization of patients with melanoma to tumor antigen peptides in vivo, or by mobilizing DC precursors to allow the production of larger numbers of cultured DC. Flt3 ligand administration resulted in a 19-fold increase in DC counts in the peripheral blood of patients. The DC generated in vivo appeared only partially activated, expressing increased levels of CD86, CD33, and major histocompatibility complex class II, but no or low levels of CD80 and CD83. This partial activation may account for the lack of enhanced immune responses to melanoma antigens and absence of clinical responses in the patients even in combination with antigen immunization. Flt3 ligand administration did result, however, in a 7-fold increased yield of monocytes per liter of blood from leukapheresed patients. Dendritic cells were as readily generated from monocytes collected before and after Flt3L therapy, and they stimulated allogeneic T-cell proliferation in a mixed leukocyte reaction to a similar magnitude. Thus, the use of Flt3L may be an important method to mobilize DC precursors to allow patient therapy with larger numbers of cultured DC. PMID:12000870

  7. Dendritic cells transduced with Rsf-1/HBXAP gene generate specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes against ovarian cancer in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Li [Department of Gynecology Oncology, Shan Dong Tumor Hospital, Jinan, Shandong (China); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Kong, Beihua, E-mail: kongbeihua@sdu.edu.cn [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Sheng, Xiugui [Department of Gynecology Oncology, Shan Dong Tumor Hospital, Jinan, Shandong (China); Sheu, Jim Jinn-Chyuan [Human Genetic Center, China Medical University Hospital and Graduate Institute of Chinese Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Shih, Ie-Ming [Departments of Pathology, Oncology, and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States)

    2010-04-09

    Recently, some studies have indicated that Rsf-1/HBXAP plays a role in chromatin remodeling and transcriptional regulation that may contribute to tumorigenesis in ovarian cancer. The present study demonstrates that using dendritic cells (DCs) from human cord blood CD34{sup +} cells transduced with Rsf-1/HBXAP DNA plasmids by nucleofection generate specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) against ovarian cancer in vitro. After transfection, DCs were analyzed for Rsf-1/HBXAP mRNA expression by RT-PCR and protein expression by Western blot. Then the DC phenotypes, T-cell stimulatory capacity, endocytic activity and migration capacity were explored by flow cytometry analysis, allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction, endocytosis and transwell chemotaxis assay, respectively. After transfection, Rsf-1/HBXAP expression was detected at mRNA and protein levels. Allogeneic T-cell proliferation induced by transfected DCs was obviously higher than non-transfected DCs, but the endocytosis capacity and migratory ability were not different. Rsf-1/HBXAP gene-transduced DCs could induce antigen-specific CTL and generate a very potent cytotoxicity to OVCAR3 cells. These data suggest that Rsf-1/HBXAP gene-transduced DCs may be a potential adjuvant immunotherapy for ovarian cancer in clinical applications.

  8. Dendritic cells transduced with Rsf-1/HBXAP gene generate specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes against ovarian cancer in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, some studies have indicated that Rsf-1/HBXAP plays a role in chromatin remodeling and transcriptional regulation that may contribute to tumorigenesis in ovarian cancer. The present study demonstrates that using dendritic cells (DCs) from human cord blood CD34+ cells transduced with Rsf-1/HBXAP DNA plasmids by nucleofection generate specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) against ovarian cancer in vitro. After transfection, DCs were analyzed for Rsf-1/HBXAP mRNA expression by RT-PCR and protein expression by Western blot. Then the DC phenotypes, T-cell stimulatory capacity, endocytic activity and migration capacity were explored by flow cytometry analysis, allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction, endocytosis and transwell chemotaxis assay, respectively. After transfection, Rsf-1/HBXAP expression was detected at mRNA and protein levels. Allogeneic T-cell proliferation induced by transfected DCs was obviously higher than non-transfected DCs, but the endocytosis capacity and migratory ability were not different. Rsf-1/HBXAP gene-transduced DCs could induce antigen-specific CTL and generate a very potent cytotoxicity to OVCAR3 cells. These data suggest that Rsf-1/HBXAP gene-transduced DCs may be a potential adjuvant immunotherapy for ovarian cancer in clinical applications.

  9. Dendritic Spine Pathology in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herms, Jochen; Dorostkar, Mario M

    2016-05-23

    Substantial progress has been made toward understanding the neuropathology, genetic origins, and epidemiology of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease; tauopathies, such as frontotemporal dementia; α-synucleinopathies, such as Parkinson's disease or dementia with Lewy bodies; Huntington's disease; and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with dementia, as well as prion diseases. Recent evidence has implicated dendritic spine dysfunction as an important substrate of the pathogenesis of dementia in these disorders. Dendritic spines are specialized structures, extending from the neuronal processes, on which excitatory synaptic contacts are formed, and the loss of dendritic spines correlates with the loss of synaptic function. We review the literature that has implicated direct or indirect structural alterations at dendritic spines in the pathogenesis of major neurodegenerative diseases, focusing on those that lead to dementias such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases, as well as frontotemporal dementia and prion diseases. We stress the importance of in vivo studies in animal models. PMID:26907528

  10. Artificial Dendritic Cells: Multi-faceted Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells are the crime scene investigators of the human immune system. Their function is to correlate potentially anomalous invading entities with observed damage to the body. The detection of such invaders by dendritic cells results in the activation of the adaptive immune system, eventually leading to the removal of the invader from the host body. This mechanism has provided inspiration for the development of a novel bio-inspired algorithm, the Dendritic Cell Algorithm. This algorithm processes information at multiple levels of resolution, resulting in the creation of information granules of variable structure. In this chapter we examine the multi-faceted nature of immunology and how research in this field has shaped the function of the resulting Dendritic Cell Algorithm. A brief overview of the algorithm is given in combination with the details of the processes used for its development. The chapter is concluded with a discussion of the parallels between our understanding of the human immune system a...

  11. NF-κB activation and zinc finger protein A20 expression in mature dendritic cells derived from liver allografts undergoing acute rejection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Qing Xu; Wei Wang; Lan Xue; Lv-Nan Yan

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of NF-κB activation and zinc finger protein A20 expression in the regulation of maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) derived from liver allografts undergoing acute rejection. METHODS: Sixty donor male SD rats and sixty recipient male LEW rats weighing 220-300 g were randomly divided into whole liver transplantation group and partial liver transplantation group. Allogeneic (SD rat to LEW rat) whole and 50 % partial liver transplantation were performed. DCs from liver grafts 0 hour and 4 days after transplantation were isolated and propagated in the presence of GM-CSF in vitro. Morphological characteristics and phenotypical features of DCs propagated for 10 days were analyzed by electron microscopy and flow cytometry, respectively. NF-κB binding activity, IL-12p70 protein and zinc finger protein A20expression in these DCs were measured by EMSA and Western blotting, respectively. Histological grading of rejection was determined. RESULTS: Allogeneic whole liver grafts showed no signs of rejection on day 4 after the transplantation. In contrast,allogeneic partial liver grafts demonstrated moderate to severe rejection on day 4 after the transplantation. After propagation for 10 days in the presence of GM-CSF in vitro,DCs from allogeneic whole liver grafts exhibited features of immature DC with absence of CD40 surface expression,these DCs were found to exhibit detectable but very low level of NF-κB activity, IL-12 p70 protein and zinc finger protein A20 expression. Whereas, DCs from allogeneic partial liver graft 4 days after transplantation displayed features of mature DC, with high level of CD40 surface expression, and as a consequence, higher expression of IL-12p70 protein, higher activities of NF-κB and higher expression of zinc finger protein A20 compared with those of DCs from whole liver grafts (P<0.001). CONCLUSION: These results suggest that A20expression is up-regulated in response to NF-κB activation in mature DCs derived from

  12. Free energy and dendritic self-organisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan J Kiebel

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we pursue recent observations that, through selective dendritic filtering, single neurons respond to specific sequences of presynaptic inputs. We try to provide a principled and mechanistic account of this selectivity by applying the free energy principle to a dendrite that is immersed in its neuropil or environment. We assume that neurons self-organize to minimise a free energy bound on the self-information or surprise of presynaptic inputs that are sampled. We model this as a selective pruning of dendritic spines that are expressed on a dendritic branch. This pruning occurs when the optimized postsynaptic gain falls below a threshold. Crucially, postsynaptic gain is itself optimized with respect to free energy. Pruning suppresses free energy as the dendrite selects presynaptic signals that conform to its expectations, specified by a generative model implicit in its intracellular kinetics. Not only does this provide a principled account of how neurons organize and selectively sample the myriad of potential presynaptic inputs they are exposed to, but it also connects the optimization of elemental neuronal (dendritic processing to generic (surprise or evidence-based schemes in statistics and machine learning, such as Bayesian model selection and automatic relevance determination.

  13. The host response to allogeneic and xenogeneic biological scaffold materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Timothy J; Badylak, Stephen F

    2015-05-01

    The clinical use of biological scaffold materials has become commonplace. Such scaffolds are composed of extracellular matrix (ECM), or components of ECM, derived from allogeneic or xenogeneic tissues. Such scaffold materials vary widely in their source tissue, processing methods and sterilization methods. The success or failure of an ECM scaffold for a given application is dependent on the host response following implantation; a response that is largely mediated by the innate immune system and which is influenced by a numerous factors, including the processing methods used in the preparation of biological scaffolds. The present paper reviews various aspects of the host response to biological scaffolds and factors that affect this response. In addition, some of the logistical, regulatory and reconstructive implications associated with the use of biological scaffolds are discussed. PMID:24668694

  14. Bullous pemphigoid after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Keisuke; Koike, Kazutoshi; Kobayashi, Chie; Iijima, Shigeruko; Hashimoto, Takashi; Tsuchida, Masahiro

    2015-06-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is an autoimmune skin disorder characterized by subepidermal blisters due to deposit of autoantibody against dermal basement membrane protein. It has been reported that BP can occur after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We describe a patient with BP having autoantibody against BP180 after unrelated-donor HSCT against T lymphoblastic leukemia. The patient was treated with steroid leading to complete resolution of BP, but T lymphoblastic leukemia progressed rapidly after steroid hormone treatment. Given that immunosuppressant may reduce graft-versus-tumor effect, immunomodulatory agents such as nicotinamide and tetracycline, erythromycin, and immunoglobulin may be appropriate as soon as typical blister lesions are seen after HSCT. PMID:26113316

  15. Ready-made allogeneic ABO-specific serum eye drops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harritshøj, Lene Holm; Nielsen, Connie; Ullum, Henrik;

    2014-01-01

    severe ocular surface disorders. METHODS: Serum was derived from 450 ml whole-blood donations from regular male blood donors, produced and tested according to good manufacturing practice and legislation regulating blood products in Denmark. Serum was diluted to 20% (v/v) with NaCl 0.9%, filtered, bottled......PURPOSE: To overcome problems and delays of the preparation of autologous serum eye drops, a production line of ABO-specific allogeneic serum eye drops from male blood donors was set up in a blood bank. Feasibility, clinical routine, safety and efficacy were evaluated in a cohort of patients with......, registered and stored at -30°C in the blood bank. Upon request, frozen ABO-identical serum drops in lots of 14 bottles could be provided immediately. Safety and efficacy were evaluated in 34 patients with severe ocular surface disease refractory to conventional medical therapy. Patients were treated six...

  16. ALLOGENEIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION IN FIRST COMPLETE REMISSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oran, Betul; Weisdorf, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The optimal post-remission therapy of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1) is uncertain. This review summarizes the recent developments in the clinical research and therapeutic applications defining the role of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT) in CR1. Recent findings Molecular markers in combinations with cytogenetics have improved the risk stratification and informed decision-making in patients with AML in CR1. In parallel, several important advances in the transplant field, such as better supportive care, improved transplant technology, increased availability of alternative donors, and reduced-intensity conditioning have improved the safety as well as access of allo-HCT for a larger number of patients. Summary The progress in risk stratification and transplant technology dictate that early donor identification search should be initiated for all eligible AML patients in CR1. PMID:21912256

  17. Engraftment syndrome after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation predicts poor outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lawrence; Frame, David; Braun, Thomas; Gatza, Erin; Hanauer, David A; Zhao, Shuang; Magenau, John M; Schultz, Kathryn; Tokala, Hemasri; Ferrara, James L M; Levine, John E; Reddy, Pavan; Paczesny, Sophie; Choi, Sung Won

    2014-09-01

    Engraftment syndrome (ES), characterized by fever, rash, pulmonary edema, weight gain, liver and renal dysfunction, and/or encephalopathy, occurs at the time of neutrophil recovery after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). In this study, we evaluated the incidence, clinical features, risk factors, and outcomes of ES in children and adults undergoing first-time allogeneic HCT. Among 927 patients, 119 (13%) developed ES at a median of 10 days (interquartile range 9 to 12) after HCT. ES patients experienced significantly higher cumulative incidence of grade 2 to 4 acute GVHD at day 100 (75% versus 34%, P HCT outcomes. Despite early recognition of the syndrome and prompt institution of corticosteroid therapy, outcomes in ES patients were uniformly poor. This study suggests the need for a prospective approach of collecting clinical features combined with correlative laboratory analyses to better characterize ES. PMID:24892262

  18. Differential effect of conditioning regimens on cytokine responses during allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J; Heilmann, C; Jacobsen, N;

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize cytokine responses during conditioning in patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) with the aim to identify which markers that may reliably reflect inflammatory activity during conditioning. We investigated inflammatory and anti...

  19. The Use of Cultured Allogenic Keratinocyte Grafting in a Patient with Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kee Cheol; Park, Bo Young; Kim, Woo Seob; Bae, Tae Hui

    2011-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a rare genetic disease that is known for continuous skin blistering caused by minor trauma. The skin blisters and bullae that develop often cause skin defects. There is no definitive treatment for EB, only symptomatic relief. We report our experience with cultured allogenic keratinocyte grafting in a newborn patient with EB simplex who had unhealed raw surfaces and was not a skin grafting candidate. The skin lesions of the patient were covered with cultured allogenic keratinocyte grafts and re-epithelialized quickly with no scarring. Allogenic keratinocyte grafting reduced pain and produced noticeable improvements in the unhealed wounds. We think that allogenic keratinocyte grafting can play an important role in the management of patients with EB simplex. PMID:22346287

  20. Isolated extramedullary relapse after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for chronic myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Au, WY; Chan, ACL; Lie, AKW; So, JCC; Liang, R.; Kwong, YL

    1998-01-01

    Relapse of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) as extramedullary granulocytic sarcoma (GS) after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is a rare occurrence. We report two patients who developed spinal GS as the first indication of relapse after allogeneic BMT for CML. In both cases, the marrow was in morphologic and karyotypic remission. However, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) successfully demonstrated the presence of a minor Ph-positive clone in the marrow, as well as an occult ...

  1. Alternative Procedures for Reducing Allogeneic Blood Transfusion in Elective Orthopedic Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kleinert, Kathrin; Theusinger, Oliver M.; Nuernberg, Johannes; Werner, Clément M. L.

    2010-01-01

    Perioperative blood loss is a major problem in elective orthopedic surgery. Allogeneic transfusion is the standard treatment for perioperative blood loss resulting in low postoperative hemoglobin, but it has a number of well-recognized risks, complications, and costs. Alternatives to allogeneic blood transfusion include preoperative autologous donation and intraoperative salvage with postoperative autotransfusion. Orthopedic surgeons are often unaware of the different pre- and intraoperative ...

  2. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells that survive combination chemotherapy in vivo remain sensitive to allogeneic immune effects

    OpenAIRE

    Jansson, Johan; Hsu, Yu-Chiao; Kuzin, Igor I.; Campbell, Andrew; Mullen, Craig A.

    2010-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is often performed for patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) whose disease has relapsed after chemotherapy treatment. However, graft versus leukemia (GVL) effects in ALL are generally weak and the mechanisms of this weakness are unknown. These studies tested the hypothesis that ALL cells that have survived conventional chemotherapy in vivo acquire relative resistance to the allogeneic GVL effect. C57BL/6 mice were injected with mur...

  3. 5-Azacytidine as Salvage Treatment in Relapsed Myeloid Tumors after Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Bolaños-Meade, Javier; Smith, B. Douglas; Gore, Steven D.; McDevitt, Michael A.; Luznik, Leo; Fuchs, Ephraim J.; Jones, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Relapse after allogeneic blood or marrow transplantation carries a very poor prognosis. Current strategies for management that include donor lymphocyte infusions (DLIs) and salvage chemotherapies are usually toxic and ineffective. Here we report the outcome of 10 patients with myeloid malignancies that received 5-azacytidine after a failed allogeneic bone marrow transplant. Of the 10 patients, 6 achieved a complete remission, 1 had stable disease, and 3 progressed after a median of 6 cycles a...

  4. Allogeneic corneoscleral limbus tissue transplantation for treatment of the necrosis in porphyria eye disease

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) with ocular complications are rarely reported. To the best of our knowledge, no reports exist on allogeneic corneoscleral limbus tissue transplantation for treatment of these. Amniotic membrane grafting had been performed in their patient suffering from porphyria eye disease, but necrosis developed in the grafts. Nevertheless, in our patient, allogeneic corneoscleral limbus transplantation prevented necrosis from development at corneoscleral limbus. So we conside...

  5. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for primary cutaneous T cell lymphomas

    OpenAIRE

    Paralkar, Vikram R.; Nasta, Sunita Dwivedy; Morrissey, Kelly; Smith, Jacqueline; Vassilev, Pavel; Martin, Mary Ellen; Goldstein, Steven C.; Loren, Alison; Rook, Alain H.; Kim, Ellen J.; Porter, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) are a heterogeneous group of non-Hodgkin lymphomas that are considered incurable. The role of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in the treatment of CTCL is not well defined but may provide potent graft-vs-lymphoma (GVL) activity independent of the conditioning therapy. We present outcomes of 12 extensively-pretreated patients with CTCL who underwent allogeneic HSCT using, most commonly, a reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) regimen. M...

  6. Formation of dendritic metallic nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranjan, Nitesh; Mertig, Michael [Institute for Materials Science, Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials, Dresden University of Technology, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Vinzelberg, Hartmut [IFW Dresden, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Recently, we reported an electrical-field-controlled growth process for the directed bottom-up assembly of one-dimensional palladium nanowires between micro-fabricated electrodes. The wires, grown from an aqueous palladium salt solution by dielectrophoresis, had a thickness of only 5-10 nm and a length of up to several micrometers. The growth process was found to depend largely on the deposition conditions like the strength and the frequency of the applied AC field and the concentration of the metal salt solution. Here, we report the formation of thin, but straight and dendritic metallic nanowires, obtained in the low-frequency regime. The morphology of the wires was characterized by scanning force microscopy (SFM), scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. SFM investigations revealed that the palladium nanowires grown over the glass and silicon substrates have a typical thickness of about 25 nm. Room temperature I-V measurements show them to be Ohmic in nature with a resistance of about 80 kOhm. Low-temperature measurements show the phenomenon of zero bias anomaly. The investigated growth method is capable of controllable in-place formation of complex circuit patterns for future nanoelectronics.

  7. Chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes sciatic nerve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanru; Zhang, Hui; Katiella, Kaka; Huang, Wenhua

    2014-07-15

    A chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft can reduce postoperative immune rejection, similar to an autologous nerve graft, and can guide neural regeneration. However, it remains poorly understood whether a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with neurotrophic factors provides a good local environment for neural regeneration. This study investigated the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve using a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor. An autologous nerve anastomosis group and a chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group were prepared as controls. At 8 weeks after repair, sciatic functional index, evoked potential amplitude of the soleus muscle, triceps wet weight recovery rate, total number of myelinated nerve fibers and myelin sheath thickness were measured. For these indices, values in the three groups showed the autologous nerve anastomosis group > chemically extracted acellular nerve graft + ciliary neurotrophic factor group > chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group. These results suggest that chemically extracted acellular nerve grafts combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor can repair sciatic nerve defects, and that this repair is inferior to autologous nerve anastomosis, but superior to chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve bridging alone. PMID:25221592

  8. Chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes sciatic nerve repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanru Zhang; Hui Zhang; Kaka Katiella; Wenhua Huang

    2014-01-01

    A chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft can reduce postoperative immune re-jection, similar to an autologous nerve graft, and can guide neural regeneration. However, it remains poorly understood whether a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with neurotrophic factors provides a good local environment for neural regenera-tion. This study investigated the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve using a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor. An autologous nerve anastomosis group and a chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group were prepared as controls. At 8 weeks after repair, sciatic functional index, evoked potential amplitude of the soleus muscle, triceps wet weight recovery rate, total number of myelinated nerve fibers and myelin sheath thickness were measured. For these indices, values in the three groups showed the autologous nerve anastomosis group > chemically extracted acellular nerve graft + ciliary neurotrophic factor group > chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group. These results suggest that chemically extracted acellular nerve grafts combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor can repair sciatic nerve defects, and that this repair is inferior to autologous nerve anasto-mosis, but superior to chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve bridging alone.

  9. Increased serum erythropoietin concentration after allogeneic compared with autologous blood transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avall, A; Hyllner, M; Swolin, B; Bengtson, J p; Carlsson, L; Bengtsson, A

    2002-12-01

    Serum erythropoietin (sEPO) level is known to increase as hemoglobin (Hb) concentration decreases during and after preoperative autologous blood donation (PAD). The endogenous erythropoietin (EPO) production after allogeneic blood transfusion has not to our knowledge, been studied. The aim of the present study was to determine whether there is, after surgery, any change in sEPO concentration after allogeneic blood transfusion, and whether there is any difference in EPO response after autologous or allogeneic blood transfusion. Thirty-one patients approaching total hip-joint replacement surgery, were randomized to receive either allogeneic red blood cells (n = 15) or predeposited autologous whole blood transfusion (n = 16). The relationship between Hb, sEPO, and reticulocytes in the recipients were repeatedly analyzed before, during and after surgery. The Hb followed an expected pattern, with a decreased concentration after PAD in the autologous group, then in both groups after surgery. The sEPO concentration was significantly higher in the allogeneic than in the autologous group on day one and day 4-5 postoperatively. The reticulocyte level, on the contrary, was higher in the autologous patients before, one hour after, and one day after surgery. The study showed a greater increase in sEPO concentration after allogeneic blood transfusion than after autologous blood transfusion. There may be an inverse relationship between sEPO and the reticulocyte level. PMID:12509214

  10. Dendrites Inhibition in Rechargeable Lithium Metal Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryanfar, Asghar

    The specific high energy and power capacities of rechargeable lithium metal (Li0) batteries are ideally suited to portable devices and are valuable as storage units for intermittent renewable energy sources. Lithium, the lightest and most electropositive metal, would be the optimal anode material for rechargeable batteries if it were not for the fact that such devices fail unexpectedly by short-circuiting via the dendrites that grow across electrodes upon recharging. This phenomenon poses a major safety issue because it triggers a series of adverse events that start with overheating, potentially followed by the thermal decomposition and ultimately the ignition of the organic solvents used in such devices. In this thesis, we developed experimental platform for monitoring and quantifying the dendrite populations grown in a Li battery prototype upon charging under various conditions. We explored the effects of pulse charging in the kHz range and temperature on dendrite growth, and also on loss capacity into detached "dead" lithium particles. Simultaneously, we developed a computational framework for understanding the dynamics of dendrite propagation. The coarse-grained Monte Carlo model assisted us in the interpretation of pulsing experiments, whereas MD calculations provided insights into the mechanism of dendrites thermal relaxation. We also developed a computational framework for measuring the dead lithium crystals from the experimental images.

  11. Human monocytes undergo functional re-programming during differentiation to dendritic cell mediated by human extravillous trophoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Shao, Qianqian; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Lin; He, Ying; Wang, Lijie; Kong, Beihua; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Maternal immune adaptation is required for a successful pregnancy to avoid rejection of the fetal-placental unit. Dendritic cells within the decidual microenvironment lock in a tolerogenic profile. However, how these tolerogenic DCs are induced and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we show that human extravillous trophoblasts redirect the monocyte-to-DC transition and induce regulatory dendritic cells. DCs differentiated from blood monocytes in the presence of human extravillous trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo displayed a DC-SIGN(+)CD14(+)CD1a(-) phenotype, similar with decidual DCs. HTR8-conditioned DCs were unable to develop a fully mature phenotype in response to LPS, and altered the cytokine secretory profile significantly. Functionally, conditioned DCs poorly induced the proliferation and activation of allogeneic T cells, whereas promoted CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells generation. Furthermore, the supernatant from DC and HTR-8/SVneo coculture system contained significant high amount of M-CSF and MCP-1. Using neutralizing antibodies, we discussed the role of M-CSF and MCP-1 during monocyte-to-DCs differentiation mediated by extravillous trophoblasts. Our data indicate that human extravillous trophoblasts play an important role in modulating the monocyte-to-DC differentiation through M-CSF and MCP-1, which facilitate the establishment of a tolerogenic microenvironment at the maternal-fetal interface. PMID:26857012

  12. Long-term outcomes among older patients following nonmyeloablative conditioning and allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for advanced hematologic malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorror, Mohamed L; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Storer, Barry E;

    2011-01-01

    A minimally toxic nonmyeloablative regimen was developed for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to treat patients with advanced hematologic malignancies who are older or have comorbid conditions....

  13. PU.1 is essential for CD11c expression in CD8(+/CD8(- lymphoid and monocyte-derived dendritic cells during GM-CSF or FLT3L-induced differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Jun Zhu

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs regulate innate and acquired immunity through their roles as antigen-presenting cells. Specific subsets of mature DCs, including monocyte-derived and lymphoid-derived DCs, can be distinguished based on distinct immunophenotypes and functional properties. The leukocyte integrin, CD11c, is considered a specific marker for DCs and it is expressed by all DC subsets. We created a strain of mice in which DCs and their progenitors could be lineage traced based on activity of the CD11c proximal promoter. Surprisingly, we observed levels of CD11c promoter activity that were similar in DCs and in other mature leukocytes, including monocytes, granulocytes, and lymphocytes. We sought to identify DNA elements and transcription factors that regulate DC-associated expression of CD11c. The ets transcription factor, PU.1, is a key regulator of DC development, and expression of PU.1 varies in different DC subsets. GM-CSF increased monocyte-derived DCs in mice and from mouse bone marrow cultured in vitro, but it did not increase CD8(+ lymphoid-derived DCs or B220(+ plasmacytoid DCs. FLT3L increased both monocyte-derived DCs and lymphoid-derived DCs from mouse bone marrow cultured in vitro. GM-CSF increased the 5.3 Kb CD11c proximal promoter activity in monocyte-derived DCs and CD8(+ lymphoid-derived DCs, but not in B220(+ plasmacytoid DCs. In contrast, FLT3L increased the CD11c proximal promoter activity in both monocyte-derived DCs and B220(+ plasmacytoid DCs. We used shRNA gene knockdown and chromatin immunoprecipitation to demonstrate that PU.1 is required for the effects of GM-CSF or FLT3L on monocyte-derived DCs. We conclude that both GM-CSF and FLT3L act through PU.1 to activate the 5.3 Kb CD11c proximal promoter in DCs and to induce differentiation of monocyte-derived DCs. We also confirm that the CD11c proximal promoter is not sufficient to direct lineage specificity of CD11c expression, and that additional DNA elements are required

  14. Detecting Danger: The Dendritic Cell Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie; Cayzer, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The Dendritic Cell Algorithm (DCA) is inspired by the function of the dendritic cells of the human immune system. In nature, dendritic cells are the intrusion detection agents of the human body, policing the tissue and organs for potential invaders in the form of pathogens. In this research, and abstract model of DC behaviour is developed and subsequently used to form an algorithm, the DCA. The abstraction process was facilitated through close collaboration with laboratory- based immunologists, who performed bespoke experiments, the results of which are used as an integral part of this algorithm. The DCA is a population based algorithm, with each agent in the system represented as an 'artificial DC'. Each DC has the ability to combine multiple data streams and can add context to data suspected as anomalous. In this chapter the abstraction process and details of the resultant algorithm are given. The algorithm is applied to numerous intrusion detection problems in computer security including the detection of p...

  15. The Dendritic Hypothesis for Alzheimer’s Disease Pathophysiology

    OpenAIRE

    Cochran, J. Nicholas; Hall, Alicia M.; Roberson, Erik D.

    2013-01-01

    Converging evidence indicates that processes occurring in and around neuronal dendrites are central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. These data support the concept of a “dendritic hypothesis” of AD, closely related to the existing synaptic hypothesis. Here we detail dendritic neuropathology in the disease and examine how Aβ, tau, and AD genetic risk factors affect dendritic structure and function. Finally, we consider potential mechanisms by which these key drivers could affect den...

  16. Allogeneic adipose-derived stem cells promote survival of fat grafts in immunocompetent diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Bai, Xiaozhi; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Yunchuan; Su, Linlin; Chang, Peng; Wang, Xujie; Han, Shichao; Gao, Jianxin; Hu, Xiaolong; Hu, Dahai; Liu, Xiaoyan

    2016-05-01

    Autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) can protect fat grafts in cell-assisted lipotransfer (CAL). However, diabetes alters the intrinsic properties of ADSCs and impairs their function so that they lack these protective effects. We investigate whether allogeneic ADSCs from healthy donors could protect fat grafts in immunocompetent diabetic rats. Syngeniec adipose tissues and ADSCs were derived from diabetic Lewis (LEW) rats, whereas allogeneic ADSCs were from healthy brown-Norway rats. A grafted mixture containing 0.7 ml granule fat and 0.3 ml 6 × 10(6) allogeneic/syngeneic ADSCs was injected subcutaneously on the skulls of diabetic LEW rats. Fat samples were harvested to evaluate the levels of injury and vascularization as shown by perilipin A, CD34 and VEGF at 14 days. The immune response was evaluated with a lymphocytotoxicity test and the CD4/CD8 ratio in peripheral blood at 14 days. The volume retention of fat grafts was measured at 3 months. Healthy allogeneic ADSCs increased the expression levels of perilipin A, CD34 and VEGF at 14 days. The volume retention of fat grafts was improved by allogeneic ADSCs at 3 months. ADSCs were demonstrated to have low immunogenicity by the lymphocyte proliferation test and immunophenotype including MHC and co-stimulatory markers. The lymphocytotoxicity test and CD4/CD8 ratio indicated no obvious immune response elicited by allogeneic ADSCs. Thus, healthy allogeneic ADSCs can promote the survival of fat grafts in this immunocompetent diabetic rat model, with little or no obvious immune rejection. PMID:26662284

  17. Effect of perioperative autologous versus allogeneic blood transfusion on the immune system in gastric cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Background: Allogeneic blood transfusion-induced immunomodulation (TRIM) and its adverse effect on the prognosis of patients treated surgically for cancer remain complex and controversial. However, the potential risk associated with allogeneic blood transfusion has heightened interest in the use of autologous blood transfusion. In the present study, the serum concentrations of neopterin, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), T lymphocyte subsets (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD4+/CD8+) and a possible association between these variables were investigated. The purpose was to further evaluate the effect of autologous versus allogeneic blood transfusion on immunological status in patients undergoing surgery for gastric cancer. Methods: Sixty ASA Ⅰ~Ⅱ(American Society of Anesthesiologists) patients undergoing elective radical resection for stomach cancer were randomly allocated to receive either allogeneic blood transfusion (n=30) or autologous blood transfusion (n=30). Serum concentrations of the neopterin, IFN-γ and T lymphocyte subsets in the recipients were measured before induction of anesthesia, after operation, and on the 5th postoperative day. Results: Both two groups, serum neopterin, IFN-γ, percentages of T-cell subsets (CD3+, CD4+), and CD4+/CD8+ ratio had significantly decreased after operation, but decreased more significantly in group H (receiving allogeneic blood transfusion) than those in group A (receiving autologous whole blood transfusion) (P<0.05). On the 5th postoperative day,serum neopterin, IFN-γ, CD3+, CD4+ T-cells, and CD4+/CD8+ ratio returned to the baseline values in group A. In contrast, the above remain decreasing in group H, where there were no significant relations between serum neopterin and IFN-γ. Conclusion:Perioperative surgical trauma and stress have an immunosuppressive impact on gastric cancer patients. Allogeneic blood transfusion exacerbates the impaired immune response. Autologous blood transfusion might be significantly beneficial for

  18. Silicon dendritic web growth thermal analysis task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, R.; Bhandari, P.

    1985-01-01

    A thermal analysis model is presented which describes the dendritic ribbon process. The model uses a melt-dendrite interface which projects out of the bulk melt as the basic interpretation of the ribbon production process. This is a marked departure from the interpretations of the interface phenomena which were used previously. The model was extensively illustrated with diagrams and pictures of ribbon samples. This model should have great impact on the analyses of experimental data as well as on future design modifications of ribbon-pulling equipment.

  19. Influenza A virus infection of human primary dendritic cells impairs their ability to cross-present antigen to CD8 T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smed-Sörensen, Anna; Chalouni, Cécile; Chatterjee, Bithi; Cohn, Lillian; Blattmann, Peter; Nakamura, Norihiro; Delamarre, Lélia; Mellman, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) infection is normally controlled by adaptive immune responses initiated by dendritic cells (DCs). We investigated the consequences of IAV infection of human primary DCs on their ability to function as antigen-presenting cells. IAV was internalized by both myeloid DCs (mDCs) and plasmacytoid DCs but only mDCs supported viral replication. Although infected mDCs efficiently presented endogenous IAV antigens on MHC class II, this was not the case for presentation on MHC class I. Indeed, cross-presentation by uninfected cells of minute amounts of endocytosed, exogenous IAV was -300-fold more efficient than presentation of IAV antigens synthesized by infected cells and resulted in a statistically significant increase in expansion of IAV-specific CD8 T cells. Furthermore, IAV infection also impaired cross-presentation of other exogenous antigens, indicating that IAV infection broadly attenuates presentation on MHC class I molecules. Our results suggest that cross-presentation by uninfected mDCs is a preferred mechanism of antigen-presentation for the activation and expansion of CD8 T cells during IAV infection. PMID:22412374

  20. Effect of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Infection on the Frequency, Phenotype and Function of Circulating Dendritic Cells in Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sei, Janet J; Waters, Ryan A; Kenney, Mary; Barlow, John W; Golde, William T

    2016-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is a highly contagious virus that causes one of the most devastating diseases in cloven-hoofed animals. Disease symptoms develop within 2 to 3 days of exposure and include fever and vesicular lesions on the tongue and hooves. Dendritic cells (DC) play an essential role in protective immune responses against pathogens. Therefore, investigating their role during FMDV infection would lead to a better understanding of host-pathogen interactions. In this study, following infection of cattle with FMDV, we investigated the frequency and function of conventional (cDC) and plasmacytoid DC (pDC) in blood by using multi-color flow cytometry. We show that the frequency of cDC and pDC increased following FMDV infection and peaked 3 to 4 days post-infection. During peak viremia, the cattle became lymphopenic, the expression of MHC class II molecules on cDC and pDC was dramatically down-regulated, the processing of exogenous antigen by cDC and pDC was impaired, and there was an increase in IL-10 production by DC and monocytes. Notably, after clearance of FMDV from the blood, MHC class II expression returned to pre-infection levels. Altogether, our study demonstrates that in cattle, FMDV inhibits the function of DC, thereby retarding the initiation of adaptive immune responses, potentially enhancing virus shedding during the acute phase of infection. PMID:27008425

  1. Effect of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Infection on the Frequency, Phenotype and Function of Circulating Dendritic Cells in Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sei, Janet J.; Waters, Ryan A.; Kenney, Mary; Barlow, John W.; Golde, William T.

    2016-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is a highly contagious virus that causes one of the most devastating diseases in cloven-hoofed animals. Disease symptoms develop within 2 to 3 days of exposure and include fever and vesicular lesions on the tongue and hooves. Dendritic cells (DC) play an essential role in protective immune responses against pathogens. Therefore, investigating their role during FMDV infection would lead to a better understanding of host-pathogen interactions. In this study, following infection of cattle with FMDV, we investigated the frequency and function of conventional (cDC) and plasmacytoid DC (pDC) in blood by using multi-color flow cytometry. We show that the frequency of cDC and pDC increased following FMDV infection and peaked 3 to 4 days post-infection. During peak viremia, the cattle became lymphopenic, the expression of MHC class II molecules on cDC and pDC was dramatically down-regulated, the processing of exogenous antigen by cDC and pDC was impaired, and there was an increase in IL-10 production by DC and monocytes. Notably, after clearance of FMDV from the blood, MHC class II expression returned to pre-infection levels. Altogether, our study demonstrates that in cattle, FMDV inhibits the function of DC, thereby retarding the initiation of adaptive immune responses, potentially enhancing virus shedding during the acute phase of infection. PMID:27008425

  2. Effect of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Infection on the Frequency, Phenotype and Function of Circulating Dendritic Cells in Cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet J Sei

    Full Text Available Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV is a highly contagious virus that causes one of the most devastating diseases in cloven-hoofed animals. Disease symptoms develop within 2 to 3 days of exposure and include fever and vesicular lesions on the tongue and hooves. Dendritic cells (DC play an essential role in protective immune responses against pathogens. Therefore, investigating their role during FMDV infection would lead to a better understanding of host-pathogen interactions. In this study, following infection of cattle with FMDV, we investigated the frequency and function of conventional (cDC and plasmacytoid DC (pDC in blood by using multi-color flow cytometry. We show that the frequency of cDC and pDC increased following FMDV infection and peaked 3 to 4 days post-infection. During peak viremia, the cattle became lymphopenic, the expression of MHC class II molecules on cDC and pDC was dramatically down-regulated, the processing of exogenous antigen by cDC and pDC was impaired, and there was an increase in IL-10 production by DC and monocytes. Notably, after clearance of FMDV from the blood, MHC class II expression returned to pre-infection levels. Altogether, our study demonstrates that in cattle, FMDV inhibits the function of DC, thereby retarding the initiation of adaptive immune responses, potentially enhancing virus shedding during the acute phase of infection.

  3. Influenza A virus infection of human primary dendritic cells impairs their ability to cross-present antigen to CD8 T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Smed-Sörensen

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV infection is normally controlled by adaptive immune responses initiated by dendritic cells (DCs. We investigated the consequences of IAV infection of human primary DCs on their ability to function as antigen-presenting cells. IAV was internalized by both myeloid DCs (mDCs and plasmacytoid DCs but only mDCs supported viral replication. Although infected mDCs efficiently presented endogenous IAV antigens on MHC class II, this was not the case for presentation on MHC class I. Indeed, cross-presentation by uninfected cells of minute amounts of endocytosed, exogenous IAV was -300-fold more efficient than presentation of IAV antigens synthesized by infected cells and resulted in a statistically significant increase in expansion of IAV-specific CD8 T cells. Furthermore, IAV infection also impaired cross-presentation of other exogenous antigens, indicating that IAV infection broadly attenuates presentation on MHC class I molecules. Our results suggest that cross-presentation by uninfected mDCs is a preferred mechanism of antigen-presentation for the activation and expansion of CD8 T cells during IAV infection.

  4. Gut Dendritic Cell Activation Links an Altered Colonic Microbiome to Mucosal and Systemic T Cell Activation in Untreated HIV-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, SM; Lee, EJ; Kotter, CV; Austin, GL; Gianella, S; Siewe, B; Smith, DM; Landay, AL; McManus, MC; Robertson, CE; Frank, DN; McCarter, MD; Wilson, CC

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1-associated disruption of intestinal homeostasis is a major factor contributing to chronic immune activation and inflammation. Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, but the impact of HIV-1 infection on intestinal DC number and function has not been extensively studied. We compared the frequency and activation/maturation status of colonic myeloid DC (mDC) subsets (CD1c+ and CD1cneg) and plasmacytoid DCs in untreated HIV-1-infected subjects with uninfected controls. Colonic mDCs in HIV-1-infected subjects had increased CD40 but decreased CD83 expression, and CD40 expression on CD1c+ mDCs positively correlated with mucosal HIV-1 viral load, with mucosal and systemic cytokine production, and with frequencies of activated colon and blood T cells. Percent of CD83+CD1c+ mDCs negatively correlated with frequencies of IFN-γ-producing colon CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. CD40 expression on CD1c+ mDCs positively associated with abundance of high prevalence mucosal Prevotella copri and P. stercorea, but negatively associated with a number of low prevalence mucosal species including Rumminococcus bromii. CD1c+ mDC cytokine production was greater in response to in vitro stimulation with Prevotella species relative to R. bromii. These findings suggest that during HIV infection, colonic mDCs become activated upon exposure to mucosal pathobiont bacteria leading to mucosal and systemic immune activation. PMID:25921339

  5. Gut dendritic cell activation links an altered colonic microbiome to mucosal and systemic T-cell activation in untreated HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, S M; Lee, E J; Kotter, C V; Austin, G L; Gianella, S; Siewe, B; Smith, D M; Landay, A L; McManus, M C; Robertson, C E; Frank, D N; McCarter, M D; Wilson, C C

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1-associated disruption of intestinal homeostasis is a major factor contributing to chronic immune activation and inflammation. Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, but the impact of HIV-1 infection on intestinal DC number and function has not been extensively studied. We compared the frequency and activation/maturation status of colonic myeloid DC (mDC) subsets (CD1c(+) and CD1c(neg)) and plasmacytoid DCs in untreated HIV-1-infected subjects with uninfected controls. Colonic mDCs in HIV-1-infected subjects had increased CD40 but decreased CD83 expression, and CD40 expression on CD1c(+) mDCs positively correlated with mucosal HIV-1 viral load, with mucosal and systemic cytokine production, and with frequencies of activated colon and blood T cells. Percentage of CD83(+)CD1c(+) mDCs negatively correlated with frequencies of interferon-γ-producing colon CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. CD40 expression on CD1c(+) mDCs positively associated with abundance of high prevalence mucosal Prevotella copri and Prevotella stercorea but negatively associated with a number of low prevalence mucosal species, including Rumminococcus bromii. CD1c(+) mDC cytokine production was greater in response to in vitro stimulation with Prevotella species relative to R. bromii. These findings suggest that, during HIV infection, colonic mDCs become activated upon exposure to mucosal pathobiont bacteria leading to mucosal and systemic immune activation. PMID:25921339

  6. Analysis of the Expression and Function of Immunoglobulin-Like Transcript 4 (ILT4, LILRB2) in Dendritic Cells from Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-de Blas, Paola del Carmen; Villaseñor-Talavera, Yael Sebastián; Cruz-González, Daniela de Jesús; Baranda, Lourdes; Doníz-Padilla, Lesly; Abud-Mendoza, Carlos; González-Amaro, Roberto; Monsiváis-Urenda, Adriana Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play an important role in the development and maintenance of immune tolerance. Although the inhibitory receptor ILT4/LILRB2 has been related with the tolerogenic phenotype of DC, the possible role of this receptor in the breakdown of DC tolerogenic function in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has not been elucidated. In this study, we analyzed the expression and function of the inhibitory receptor ILT4 in DC from SLE patients. We found that the percentage of ILT4 positive plasmacytoid DC and myeloid DC is significantly diminished in SLE patients. Interestingly, ligation of ILT4 did not affect the maturation or immunogenic capability of DC in healthy controls. In contrast, in SLE patients we observed an inhibitory effect of ILT4 on the immunogenic capability of DC. ILT4 was shown not to have a crucial role in regulating the maturation and function of DC from healthy controls but is partially involved in the maturation process and immunogenic capability of DC from SLE patients, suggesting that other inhibitory receptors, involved in the regulation of DC tolerogenic function, may be impaired in this autoimmune disease. PMID:27057555

  7. Neutrophil function in children following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Michael W; Kelher, Marguerite R; Silliman, Christopher C; Quinones, Ralph

    2016-08-01

    HSCT is a lifesaving procedure for children with malignant and non-malignant conditions. The conditioning regimen renders the patient severely immunocompromised and recovery starts with neutrophil (PMN) engraftment. We hypothesize that children demonstrate minimal PMN dysfunction at engraftment and beyond, which is influenced by the stem cell source and the conditioning regimen. Peripheral blood was serially collected from children at 1 to 12 months following allogeneic HSCT. PMN superoxide (O2-) production, degranulation (elastase), CD11b surface expression, and phagocytosis were assessed. Twenty-five patients, mean age of 10.5 yr with 65% males, comprised the study and transplant types included: 14 unrelated cord blood stem cells (cords), seven matched related bone marrow donors, three matched unrelated bone marrow donors, and one peripheral blood progenitor cells. Engraftment occurred at 24 days. There were no significant differences between controls and patients in PMN O2- production, phagocytosis, CD11b surface expression, and total PMN elastase. Elastase release was significantly decreased <6 months vs. controls (p < 0.05) and showed normalization by six months for cords only. The conditioning regimen did not affect PMN function. PMN function returns with engraftment, save elastase release, which occurs later related to the graft source utilized, and its clinical significance is unknown. PMID:27114335

  8. Pneumatosis intestinalis in children after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeager, A.M.; Kanof, M.E.; Lake, A.M.; Kramer, S.S.; Jones, B.; Saral, R.; Santos, G.W.

    1987-01-01

    Four children, ages 3 to 8 years, developed pneumatosis intestinalis (PI) after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for acute leukemia or severe aplastic anemia. PI was detected at a median of 48 days (range, 10-63 days) after BMT and was associated with abdominal symptoms and clinical signs. All patients had severe systemic and/or highgrade cutaneous acute graft-versus-host disease (AGVHD) at some time after BMT and were receiving corticosteroids at the time of development of PI; however, PI was associated with concomitant severe AGVHD in only one patient. One patient with PI had Hafnia alvei bacteremia and another patient had gastroenteritis due to rotavirus and adenovirus. All patients were treated with supportive care and systemic broad-spectrum antibiotics, and PI resolved 2-16 days after onset. Two patients died with BMT-associated complications unrelated to PI. Multiple factors contribute to the development of PI after BMT, and the prognosis for recovery from PI is good with medical management alone. Overall survival in these patients is dependent on the frequency and severity of other conditions, such as AGVHD and opportunistic infections, after BMT.

  9. CYTOMEGALOVIRUS INTERSTITIAL PNEUMONITIS FOLLOWING ALLOGENEIC PERIPHERAL BLOOD STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xiao-hua; HUANG Lian-sheng; ZHANG Xiao-hong; ZHU Kang-er; XU Yang; WU Dong; ZHAO Xiao-ying

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the risk factors and prophylaxis and treatment of cytomegalovirus interstitial pneumonitis(CMV-IP) after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (allo-PBSCT). Methods: 43 patients who received allo-PBSCT were allocated to either a Gancyclovir(GCV)-prophylaxis group (n=19) or a non-GCV prophylaxis group (n=24).A comparison was made of the incidence of CMV-IP in patients given or not given prophylactic gancyclovir. Results: 9patients in non-GCV prophylaxis group developed late CMV-IP (P<0.05). Graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) may be associated with a high risk of CMV-IP. 5 cases of CMV-IP were successfully treated with GCV, but 3 cases died of CMV-IP.The most common adverse event of GCV was neutropenia, but was reversible. Conclusion: CMV infection was a major cause of interstitial pneumonitis after allo-PBSCT, which correlated strongly with the severity of GVHD. Gancyclovir was shown to be effective in both prophylaxis and treatment of CMV-IP.

  10. Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Vijaya Raj

    2016-06-01

    Observational studies indicate a similar or higher probability of disease control, higher risk of non-relapse mortality (NRM), and similar overall survival (OS) with allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT), compared to autologous SCT, in relapsed or refractory non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Careful patient selection and utilization of reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) alloSCT may allow reduction in NRM. The optimal conditioning regimen and the roles of radioimmunotherapy, T cell depletion, and tandem SCT continue to be explored. Recent studies highlight comparable results with haploidentical SCT and cord blood SCT, thus providing alternate donor sources. Disease relapse and late effects continue to be major problems. Optimization of SCT techniques (e.g., improved graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis), post-transplant monitoring of minimal residual disease, and post-transplant maintenance, or pre-emptive therapy (e.g., with novel therapies) are emerging strategies to reduce the risk of relapse. Survivorship management using a multidisciplinary care approach, adoption of healthy lifestyle, and socioeconomic counseling are integral parts of a high-quality transplant program. PMID:26983957

  11. Prophylaxis of cytomegalovirus infection with ganciclovir in allogeneic marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic marrow transplantation. We studied 14 consecutive CMV-seropositive patients adding ganciclovir (2.5 mg/kg i.v. every 8 hours for 7 days prior to transplant and 6 mg/kg three times a week after neutrophils became >0.5x109/l and the patients were platelet transfusion-independent until d 70) to our previous prophylaxis regimen which consisted of intravenous immunoglobulin and acyclovir. The result was compared with 30 consecutive patients whom we studied with our previous regimen. The addition of ganciclovir did not cause any extra toxicities. The incidence of interstitial pneumonitis and cumulative probability of CMV excretion in the first 100 d post-transplantation was significantly reduced (p = 0.038 and p = 0.035 respectively). The result shows that addition of ganciclovir significantly decreased the incidence of CMV infection in the early post-transplantation period. (au)

  12. Reduced-intensity conditioned allogeneic SCT in adults with AML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshef, R; Porter, D L

    2015-06-01

    AML is currently the most common indication for reduced-intensity conditioned (RIC) allo-SCT. Reduced-intensity regimens allow a potent GVL response to occur with minimized treatment-related toxicity in patients of older age or with comorbidities that preclude the use of myeloablative conditioning. Whether RIC SCT is appropriate for younger and more standard risk patients is not well defined and the field is changing rapidly; a prospective randomized trial of myeloablative vs RIC (BMT-CTN 0901) was recently closed when early results indicated better outcomes for myeloablative regimens. However, detailed results are not available, and all patients in that study were eligible for myeloablative conditioning. RIC transplants will likely remain the standard of care as many patients with AML are not eligible for myeloablative conditioning. Recent publication of mature results from retrospective and prospective cohorts provide contemporary efficacy and toxicity data for these attenuated regimens. In addition, recent studies explore the use of alternative donors, introduce regimens that attempt to reduce toxicity without reducing intensity, and identify predictive factors that pave the way to personalized approaches. These studies paint a picture of the future of RIC transplants. Here we review the current status of RIC allogeneic SCT in AML. PMID:25730186

  13. T cell reconstitution in allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielsen, K; Jordan, K K; Uhlving, H H;

    2015-01-01

    Infections and acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) are major causes of treatment-related mortality and morbidity following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Both complications depend on reconstitution of the T-lymphocyte population based on donor T cells. Although it...... is well established that Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a cytokine essential for de novo T cell development in the thymus and homoeostatic peripheral expansion of T cells, associations between circulating levels of IL-7 and T cell reconstitution following HSCT have not been investigated previously. We...... patients treated with anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) compared with those not treated with ATG (P = 0.0079). IL-7 levels at day +7 were negatively associated with T cell counts at day +30 to +60 (at day +60: CD3(+) : β = -10.6 × 10(6) cells/l, P = 0.0030; CD8(+) : β = -8.4 × 10(6) cells/l, P = 0.061; CD4...

  14. Canine allogeneic bone marrow transplantation: technique and variables influencing engraftment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the toxicity and immune suppression of supralethal total body irradiation (800-2000 rads, 60Co) at three dose intensities (10 rads/min, 49 rads/min, and 100 rads/min). In 79 intensively supported radiation control animals, the LD/sub 50(5)/ (that theoretical dose at which 50 percent of the animals will die within 5 days) for these dose intensities is estimated to be 1556, 941, and 921 rads, respectively. A biomodal pattern of early (median 4 days) and late (median 9 days) deaths was observed corresponding to histopathological evidence of the intestinal and hematopoietic radiation syndromes. Random donor bone marrow transplants were performed in 83 animals to test immune suppression afforded by 800 rads and 1000 rads at dose intensities of either 10 rads/min or 49 rads/min. Bone marrow cell dose was varied to analyze its effect on engraftment. A greater degree of immunosuppression with less toxicity was achieved at the lower dose intensity. A minimum dose of 3-5 x 108 nucleated allogeneic bone marrow cells/kg (readily obtainable from living donors) resulted in a high percentage of engraftment with lethal graft-versus-host disease following conditioning with 1,000 rads midplane at 10 rads/min, the optimum regimen employed

  15. The bHLH-PAS protein Spineless is necessary for the diversification of dendrite morphology of Drosophila dendritic arborization neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Michael D.; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung

    2006-01-01

    Dendrites exhibit a wide range of morphological diversity, and their arborization patterns are critical determinants of proper neural connectivity. How different neurons acquire their distinct dendritic branching patterns during development is not well understood. Here we report that Spineless (Ss), the Drosophila homolog of the mammalian aryl hydrocarbon (dioxin) receptor (Ahr), regulates dendrite diversity in the dendritic arborization (da) sensory neurons. In loss-of-function ss mutants, c...

  16. Differential induction from X-irradiated human peripheral blood monocytes to dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a type of antigen-presenting cell which plays an essential role in the immune system. To clarify the influences of ionizing radiation on the differentiation to DCs, we focused on human peripheral blood monocytes and investigated whether X-irradiated monocytes can differentiate into DCs. The non-irradiated monocytes and 5 Gy-irradiated monocytes were induced into immature DCs (iDCs) and mature DCs (mDCs) with appropriate cytokine stimulation, and the induced cells from each monocyte expressed each DC-expressing surface antigen such as CD40, CD86 and HLA-DR. However, the expression levels of CD40 and CD86 on the iDCs derived from the 5 Gy-irradiated monocytes were higher than those of iDCs derived from non-irradiated monocytes. Furthermore, the mDCs derived from 5 Gy-irradiated monocytes had significantly less ability to stimulate allogeneic T cells in comparison to the mDCs derived from non-irradiated monocytes. There were no significant differences in the phagocytotic activity of the iDCs and cytokines detected in the supernatants conditioned by the DCs from the non-irradiated and irradiated monocytes. These results suggest that human monocytes which are exposed to ionizing radiation can thus differentiate into DCs, but there is a tendency that X-irradiation leads to an impairment of the function of DCs. (author)

  17. Platycodon grandiflorum polysaccharide induces dendritic cell maturation via TLR4 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi Jeong; Ryu, Hwa Sun; Kim, Ji Sung; Lee, Hong Kyung; Kang, Jong Soon; Yun, Jieun; Kim, Sung Yeon; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Youngsoo; Han, Sang-Bae

    2014-10-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) maturation is critical for initiation of the adoptive immune response. DC maturation is often attenuated in several pathological conditions including cancer. In this study, we report the effect of Platycodon grandiflorum polysaccharide (PG) on DC maturation. PG induced phenotypic maturation of DCs, as proved by the increase in the expression of CD40, CD80, CD86, and major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-I/II on the cell surface. PG also induced functional maturation of DCs, as proved by elevated production of interleukin (IL)-12, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and interferon-β, and by enhanced allogeneic T cell stimulation ability of PG-treated DCs. PG efficiently induced maturation of DCs from C3H/HeN mice, which have normal Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4), but not that of DCs from C3H/HeJ mice, which have mutated TLR4, suggesting that TLR4 might be one of the PG receptors in DCs. In line with TLR4 activation, PG increased the phosphorylation of ERK, p38, and JNK, and the nuclear translocation of p-c-Jun, p-CREB, and c-Fos. PG also activated NF-κB signaling, as evidenced by degradation of IκBα/β and nuclear translocation of p65 and p50. In summary, our data suggest that PG induces DC maturation by activating MAPK and NF-κB signaling downstream of TLR4. PMID:25019244

  18. Human Liver Stem Cells Suppress T-Cell Proliferation, NK Activity, and Dendritic Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human liver stem cells (HLSCs are a mesenchymal stromal cell-like population resident in the adult liver. Preclinical studies indicate that HLSCs could be a good candidate for cell therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and the immunomodulatory properties of HLSCs on T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells (NKs, and dendritic cells (DCs in allogeneic experimental settings. We found that HLSCs inhibited T-cell proliferation by a mechanism independent of cell contact and dependent on the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. When compared with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, HLSCs were more efficient in inhibiting T-cell proliferation. At variance with MSCs, HLSCs did not elicit NK degranulation. Moreover, HLSCs inhibited NK degranulation against K562, a NK-sensitive target, by a mechanism dependent on HLA-G release. When tested on DC generation from monocytes, HLSCs were found to impair DC differentiation and DCs ability to induce T-cell proliferation through PGE2. This study shows that HLSCs have immunomodulatory properties similar to MSCs, but, at variance with MSCs, they do not elicit a NK response.

  19. Increased extracellular pressure provides a novel adjuvant stimulus for enhancement of conventional dendritic cell maturation strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine strategies have gained increasing popularity in recent years. Methods for ex vivo generation of immunocompetent mature DCs still require optimization. DCs have been shown to phenotypically mature under elevated pressure. We compared the effects of pressure on DC maturation with LPS- and cytokine-stimulation. Human monocyte-derived immature or LPS- and cytokine-matured DCs were exposed to ambient or 40 mmHg increased pressure for 12 h, then assessed for expression of CD80, CD86, CD40, MHC-I/II, and inflammatory cytokine production. DCs were also evaluated for capacity to stimulate T-cell proliferation by co-culture with allogeneic lymphocytes. Pressure significantly increased cytokine production and expression of all surface molecules on immature DC other than MHC-I and CD40. Pressure/LPS-treated DCs displayed further upregulation of MHC-I, CD40, and IL-12p70. Cytokine-matured DCs appeared less responsive to pressure. T-cell proliferation correlated with MHC expression. Results suggest mechanical stimulation of DCs may provide a useful adjuvant to TLR-agonist maturation strategies.

  20. Effects of low-dose irradiation on enhancement of immunity by dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-doses of irradiation have been reported to have beneficial effects, particularly anti-tumor effects. In this paper, we show the effects of the low-dose irradiation on T cell activation induced by dendritic cells (D Cs). D Cs, which had been pre-irradiated at 0.02-1.0 Gy from a 137Cs source, were cultured with allogeneic T cells, and the proliferation of T cells was then examined. The 0.05 Gy-pre-irradiated D Cs showed the highest proliferation capacity of T cells. The 0.05 Gy-irradiation does not augment the expression of major histocompatibility complexes (MHC s) or co stimulatory molecules on D Cs, as with non-irradiated D Cs or 1 Gy-irradiated D Cs, but does augment the production of Il-2, Il-12 and interferon (If)-γ D Cs. These results suggest that the low-dose irradiation augments T cell-activation capacity through cytokine production by D Cs, which might shift naive helper T cells to Th1 cells. (author)

  1. Effect of ovarian hormones on maturation of dendritic cells from peripheral blood monocytes in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijewardana, Viskam; Sugiura, Kikuya; Wijesekera, Daluthgamage Patsy H; Hatoya, Shingo; Nishimura, Toshiya; Kanegi, Ryoji; Ushigusa, Takahiro; Inaba, Toshio

    2015-07-01

    Previously, we reported that ovarian hormones affect the immune response against E. coli isolated from the dogs affected with pyometra. In order to investigate mechanisms underlying the immune modulation, we examined the effects of ovarian hormones on the generation of dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent antigen presenting cell. DCs were differentiated from peripheral blood monocytes (PBMOs) using a cytokine cocktail. Both estrogen receptor and progesterone receptors were expressed by the PBMOs and immature DCs. When various ovarian hormones were added to the culture for the DC differentiation, progesterone significantly decreased the expression of DC maturation markers, such as CD1a, CD80 and CD86, on mature DCs. Conversely, the addition of estrogen to the cultures increased the expression of CD86, but not other maturation makers. Furthermore, DCs differentiated in the presence of progesterone did not stimulate allogeneic mononuclear cells in PB. Taken together, these results indicate that progesterone diminishes the maturation of DCs, leading to decreased immune responses against invading pathogens. PMID:25715707

  2. Equine infectious anemia virus-infected dendritic cells retain antigen presentation capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine if equine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) were susceptible to equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infection, ex vivo-generated DC were infected with virus in vitro. EIAV antigen was detected by immunofluorescence 3 days post-infection with maximum antigen being detected on day 4, whereas there was no antigen detected in DC incubated with the same amount of heat-inactivated EIAV. No cytolytic activity was observed after EIAVWSU5 infection of DC. These monocyte-derived DC were more effective than macrophages and B cells in stimulating allogenic T lymphocytes. Both infected macrophages and DC stimulated similar levels of memory CTL responses in mixtures of CD8+ and CD4+ cells as detected with 51Cr-release assays indicating that EIAV infection of DC did not alter antigen presentation. However, EIAV-infected DC were more effective than infected macrophages when used to stimulate memory CTL in isolated CD8+ cells. The maintenance of antigen processing and presenting function by EIAV-infected DC in vitro suggests that this function is maintained during in vivo infection

  3. Macrophages and dendritic cells emerge in the liver during intestinal inflammation and predispose the liver to inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Mikami

    Full Text Available The liver is a physiological site of immune tolerance, the breakdown of which induces immunity. Liver antigen-presenting cells may be involved in both immune tolerance and activation. Although inflammatory diseases of the liver are frequently associated with inflammatory bowel diseases, the underlying immunological mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Here we report two murine models of inflammatory bowel disease: RAG-2(-/- mice adoptively transferred with CD4(+CD45RB(high T cells; and IL-10(-/- mice, accompanied by the infiltration of mononuclear cells in the liver. Notably, CD11b(-CD11c(lowPDCA-1(+ plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs abundantly residing in the liver of normal wild-type mice disappeared in colitic CD4(+CD45RB(high T cell-transferred RAG-2(-/- mice and IL-10(-/- mice in parallel with the emergence of macrophages (Mφs and conventional DCs (cDCs. Furthermore, liver Mφ/cDCs emerging during intestinal inflammation not only promote the proliferation of naïve CD4(+ T cells, but also instruct them to differentiate into IFN-γ-producing Th1 cells in vitro. The emergence of pathological Mφ/cDCs in the liver also occurred in a model of acute dextran sulfate sodium (DSS-induced colitis under specific pathogen-free conditions, but was canceled in germ-free conditions. Last, the Mφ/cDCs that emerged in acute DSS colitis significantly exacerbated Fas-mediated hepatitis. Collectively, intestinal inflammation skews the composition of antigen-presenting cells in the liver through signaling from commensal bacteria and predisposes the liver to inflammation.

  4. Hepatitis B virus-like particles access major histocompatibility class I and II antigen presentation pathways in primary dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Jessica M; Cheong, Wan-Shoo; Villadangos, José A; Mintern, Justine D; Netter, Hans J

    2013-04-26

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) represent high density displays of viral proteins that efficiently trigger immunity. VLPs composed of the small hepatitis B virus envelope protein (HBsAgS) are useful vaccine platforms that induce humoral and cellular immune responses. Notably, however, some studies suggest HBsAgS VLPs impair dendritic cell (DC) function. Here we investigated HBsAgS VLP interaction with DC subsets and antigen access to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II antigen presentation pathways in primary DCs. HBsAgS VLPs impaired plasmacytoid DC (pDC) interferon alpha (IFNα) production in response to CpG in vitro, but did not alter conventional DC (cDC) or pDC phenotype when administered in vivo. To assess cellular immune responses, HBsAgS VLPs were generated containing the ovalbumin (OVA) model epitopes OVA(257-264) and OVA(323-339) to access MHCI and MHCII antigen presentation pathways, respectively; both in vitro and following immunisation in vivo. HBsAgS VLP-OVA(257-264) elicited CTL responses in vivo that were not enhanced by inclusion of an additional MHCII helper epitope. HBsAgS VLP-OVA(257-264) administered in vivo was cross-presented by CD8(+) DCs, but not CD8(-) DCs. Therefore, HBsAgS VLPs can deliver antigen to both MHCI and MHCII antigen presentation pathways in primary DCs and promote cytotoxic and helper T cell priming despite their suppressive effect on pDCs. PMID:23473776

  5. Model of Primary Austenite Dendrite Structure in Hypoeutectic Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The solidification of primary austenite in hypoeutectic gray cast iron was studied by stepped grinding and quantitative metallography. The dendrite structure of primary austenite can be described by three models: typical dendrite crystal model, metamorphic dendrite crystal model and network dendrite crystal model. The dendrite crystals formed according to 3rd model is much more than those formed according to other models in this experiment. The primary austenites are connected each other, and the primary stems of austenite could be regarded as secondary arms and vice versa.

  6. Numerical Simulations of Equiaxed Dendrite Growth Using Phase Field Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Phase field method offers the prospect of being able to perform realistic numerical experiments on dendrite growthin a metallic system. In this paper, the equiaxed dendrite evolution during the solidification of a pure material wasnumerically simulated using the phase field model. The equiaxed dendrite growth in a two-dimensional square domainof undercooled melt (nickel) with four-fold anisotropy was simulated. The phase field model equations was solvedusing the explicit finite difference method on a uniform mesh. The formation of various equiaxed dendrite patternswas shown by a series of simulations, and the effect of anisotropy on equiaxed dendrite morphology was investigated.

  7. Dendritic cells in peripheral tolerance and immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Monika; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Pedersen, Anders Elm

    Dendritic cells capable of influencing immunity exist as functionally distinct subsets, T cell-tolerizing and T cell-immunizing subsets. The present paper reviews how these subsets of DCs develop, differentiate and function in vivo and in vitro at the cellular and molecular level. In particular...

  8. Skin Dendritic Cells in Burn Patients

    OpenAIRE

    D’Arpa, N.; D’Amelio, L.; Accardo-Palumbo, A.; Pileri, D.; Mogavero, R.; Amato, G.; Napoli, B.; Alessandro, G.; Lombardo, C.; F. Conte

    2009-01-01

    The body's immunological response to burn injury has been a subject of great inquiry in recent years. Burn injury disturbs the immune system, resulting in a progressive suppression of the immune response that is thought to contribute to the development of sepsis. Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells that possess the ability to stimulate naïve T cells.

  9. Generation of Immune Inhibitory Dendritic Cells and

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abediankenari Saeid

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Variety of positive as well as negative regulatory signals are provided by antigen presenting cell in particular by dendritic cells. In this research, we studied the capacity of dendritic cells to expand antigen-specific T regulatory cells.We also investigated the role of TGF-beta in induction inhibitory functions of dendritic cells in mixed leukocyte reactions.Dendritic cells were generated from blood CD14+ monocytes with granulocyte-Monocyte colony stimulating factor and interleukin-4 with or without TGF-beta (TGF-β-GM-DC or GM-DC. CD4+ T cell were isolated to assess lymphocyte proliferation by lymphocyte transformation test assay and the ratio of CD4+FOXp3+ CD25+ T cells were determined by fluorescene-activated cell sorter. T cell proliferation responses in GM-DC showed a significance antigen-specific proliferative response comparing with TGFβ-GM -DC. T Cell proliferation was inhibited in co-culture system containing DC-treated TGF-β. It can be suggested that the expsansion of T regulatory by TGF-β-GM-DC provides a means for antigen specific control of unwanted immune reactions.

  10. Antigen dynamics of follicular dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesters, B.A.

    2015-01-01

    Stromal-derived follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are a major depot for antigen that are essential for formation of germinal centers, the site where memory and effector B cells differentiate and high-affinity antibody production takes place. Historically, FDCs have been characterized as ‘accessory’

  11. ISOLATION OF CHICKEN FOLLICULAR DENDRITIC CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of the present study was to isolate chicken follicular dendritic cells (FDC). A combination of methods involving panning, iodixanol density gradient centrifugation, and magnetic cell separation technology made it possible to obtain functional FDC from the cecal tonsils from chickens, which h...

  12. DEX-1 and DYF-7 establish sensory dendrite length by anchoring dendritic tips during cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiman, Maxwell G; Shaham, Shai

    2009-04-17

    Cells are devices whose structures delimit function. For example, in the nervous system, neuronal and glial shapes dictate paths of information flow. To understand how cells acquire their shapes, we examined the formation of a sense organ in C. elegans. Using time-lapse imaging, we found that sensory dendrites form by stationary anchoring of dendritic tips during cell-body migration. A genetic screen identified DEX-1 and DYF-7, extracellular proteins required for dendritic tip anchoring, which act cooperatively at the time and place of anchoring. DEX-1 and DYF-7 contain, respectively, zonadhesin and zona pellucida domains, and DYF-7 self-associates into multimers important for anchoring. Thus, unlike other dendrites, amphid dendritic tips are positioned by DEX-1 and DYF-7 without the need for long-range guidance cues. In sequence and function, DEX-1 and DYF-7 resemble tectorins, which anchor stereocilia in the inner ear, suggesting that a sensory dendrite anchor may have evolved into part of a mechanosensor. PMID:19344940

  13. Allogenic inhibition of the stem hemopoietic cells in the bone marrow and embryonic liver in adult mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The maternal effect was shown to influence the degree of allogenic inhibition of stem hemopoietic cells of the embryonic liver and adult bone marrow in CBA and C57Bl/6 mice. The display of allogenic inhibition of stem cells of the embryonic liver and adult bone marrow proved to be similar in C57Bl/6 mice and dissimilar in CBA

  14. Analysis of the results of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation depending on HLA matching of the unrelated donor / recipient pair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. V. Kuzmich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available HLA matching of the donor / recipient pair is a major factor associated with the outcome of allogeneic stem cell transplantation. In the presentstudy we analyzed the risk of severe acute graft-versus-host disease, graft failure, 2.year overall survival of the patients after allogeneic stem cell transplantation depending on HLA matching of the unrelated donor / recipient pair.

  15. Umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells ameliorate graft-versus-host disease following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation through multiple immunoregulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiu-Ling; Liu, Xiao-Yun; Nie, Di-Min; Zhu, Xia-Xia; Fang, Jun; You, Yong; Zhong, Zhao-Dong; Xia, Ling-Hui; Hong, Mei

    2015-08-01

    Although mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are increasingly used to treat graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), their immune regulatory mechanism in the process is elusive. The present study aimed to investigate the curative effect of third-party umbilical cord blood-derived human MSCs (UCB-hMSCs) on GVHD patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) and their immune regulatory mechanism. Twenty-four refractory GVHD patients after allo-HSCT were treated with UCB-hMSCs. Immune cells including T lymphocyte subsets, NK cells, Treg cells and dendritic cells (DCs) and cytokines including interleukin-17 (IL-17) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were monitored before and after MSCs transfusion. The results showed that the symptoms of GVHD were alleviated significantly without increased relapse of primary disease and transplant-related complications after MSCs transfusion. The number of CD3(+), CD3(+)CD4(+) and CD3(+)CD8(+) cells decreased significantly, and that of NK cells remained unchanged, whereas the number of CD4(+) and CD8(+) Tregs increased and reached a peak at 4 weeks; the number of mature DCs, and the levels of TNF-α and IL-17 decreased and reached a trough at 2 weeks. It was concluded that MSCs ameliorate GVHD and spare GVL effect via immunoregulations. PMID:26223913

  16. 5-Azacytidine as Salvage Treatment in Relapsed Myeloid Tumors after Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolaños-Meade, Javier; Smith, B. Douglas; Gore, Steven D.; McDevitt, Michael A.; Luznik, Leo; Fuchs, Ephraim J.; Jones, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Relapse after allogeneic blood or marrow transplantation carries a very poor prognosis. Current strategies for management that include donor lymphocyte infusions (DLIs) and salvage chemotherapies are usually toxic and ineffective. Here we report the outcome of 10 patients with myeloid malignancies that received 5-azacytidine after a failed allogeneic bone marrow transplant. Of the 10 patients, 6 achieved a complete remission, 1 had stable disease, and 3 progressed after a median of 6 cycles administered. Only 1 patient has died (of disease progression), and no flares of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were observed with 5-azacytidine. As of latest follow-up, the median overall survival (OS) for the group was 422.5 days (127–1411). These results further suggest that 5-azacytidine is an active agent after failing an allogeneic bone marrow transplant, and prospective studies are warranted. PMID:20951817

  17. Allogenic sedimentary components of Bear Lake, Utah and Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, J.G.; Dean, W.E.; Reynolds, R.L.; Reheis, M.C.

    2009-01-01

    Bear Lake is a long-lived lake filling a tectonic depression between the Bear River Range to the west and the Bear River Plateau to the east, and straddling the border between Utah and Idaho. Mineralogy, elemental geochemistry, and magnetic properties provide information about variations in provenance of allogenic lithic material in last-glacial-age, quartz-rich sediment in Bear Lake. Grain-size data from the siliciclastic fraction of late-glacial to Holocene carbonate-rich sediments provide information about variations in lake level. For the quartz-rich lower unit, which was deposited while the Bear River fl owed into and out of the lake, four source areas are recognized on the basis of modern fluvial samples with contrasting properties that reflect differences in bedrock geology and in magnetite content from dust. One of these areas is underlain by hematite-rich Uinta Mountain Group rocks in the headwaters of the Bear River. Although Uinta Mountain Group rocks make up a small fraction of the catchment, hematite-rich material from this area is an important component of the lower unit. This material is interpreted to be glacial fl our. Variations in the input of glacial flour are interpreted as having caused quasi-cyclical variations in mineralogical and elemental concentrations, and in magnetic properties within the lower unit. The carbonate-rich younger unit was deposited under conditions similar to those of the modern lake, with the Bear River largely bypassing the lake. For two cores taken in more than 30 m of water, median grain sizes in this unit range from ???6 ??m to more than 30 ??m, with the coarsest grain sizes associated with beach or shallow-water deposits. Similar grain-size variations are observed as a function of water depth in the modern lake and provide the basis for interpreting the core grain-size data in terms of lake level. Copyright ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  18. Nonspecific suppressor elements in murine allogeneic radiation chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spleen cells from long-term mouse allogeneic radiation chimeras were tested for their ability to modulate the graft-versus-host (GVH) or plaque-forming cell (PFC) response of normal lymphocytes transplanted in lethally x-irradiated recipients. In vivo GVH proliferation of normal lymphocytes (syngeneic to donor cells of the chimera) against antigens of host-type in which the chimeric state had been established was reduced by chimera cells. Inhibition varied, some chimeras suppressing GVH more than others and a few not suppressing at all. The suppressive effect was abrogated if the chimera cells were treated with anti-THETA; treatment with anti-IgM did not eliminate this activity. When mixtures of normal donor lymphocytes and chimera cells were given to irradiated recipients genetically different from host or donor, reduction of donor cell GVH also occurred. Further, chimera cells reduced the GVH activity of normal host cells in irradiated recipients differing from the host at one H-2 locus and from the donor at minor histocompatibility loci. The modulating effect of spleen cells from chimeras on the PFC response by normal lymphocytes also varied. Six chimeras induced a 25 to 90% suppression, two enhanced the response, and one showed no effect. Where suppression occurred, treatment of chimera cells with anti-THETA most often, but not always, restored PFC production. Our results show that the suppressive action of splenic lymphoid cells by chimeras is highly nonspecific and variable in expression. We suggest that tolerance in chimeras may be mediated by nonspecific suppressor elements leading to unresponsiveness to a variety of antigens including SRBC

  19. Immune Reconstitution after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Koning, Coco; Plantinga, Maud; Besseling, Paul; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Nierkens, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    Allogeneic (allo) hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has evolved into a potent curative treatment option for a variety of malignant and nonmalignant diseases. The occurrence of complications and mortality after allo-HCT is, however, still high and is strongly associated with immune reconstitution (IR). Therefore, detailed information on IR through immunomonitoring is crucial to improve survival chances after HCT. To date, information about the reconstituting immune system after allo-HCT in pediatric patients is mostly derived from routine standard-of-care measurements. More profound knowledge on IR may provide tools to better predict and modulate adverse reactions and, subsequently, improve survival chances. Here, we provide an overview of IR (eg, immune cell subsets and circulating chemokines/cytokines) after allo-HCT in children, taking into account different cell sources and serotherapy, and discuss strategies to enhance immunomonitoring. We conclude that available IR data after allo-HCT contain limited information on immune cell families (mostly only generic T, B, and NK cells), which would improve with more detailed information on reconstituting cell subsets or effector cell functionality at earlier time points (functionality and may even provide (early) biomarkers for individual disease outcome, such as viral reactivity, graft-versus-host disease, or graft-versus-leukemia. The present data and suggestions for more detailed, standardized, and harmonized immunomonitoring in future (pediatric) allo-HCT studies will pave the path to "precision transplantation:" an individualized HCT approach (including conditioning), based on detailed information on IR and biomarkers, aiming to reduce transplantation related mortality and relapse, and subsequently improve survival chances. PMID:26341398

  20. Comparison of monocyte-derived dendritic cells from colorectal cancer patients, non-small-cell-lung-cancer patients and healthy donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvistborg, P; Bechmann, C M; Pedersen, A W;

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are bone marrow-derived professional antigen presenting cells. Due to their role as potent inducers of immune responses, these cells are widely used as adjuvant in experimental clinical settings for cancer immune therapy. We have developed a DC-based vaccine using autologous...... blood monocytes loaded with allogeneic tumor cell lysate rich in cancer/testis antigens. This vaccine has at present been tested for activity in three phase II clinical trials including two cohorts of patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) and one cohort of patients with advanced non-small-cell-lung-cancer...... (NSCLC). In the present paper we retrospectively compare the maturation profile based on surface marker expression on DCs generated from the three patient cohorts and between cancer patient cohorts and a cohort of healthy donors. Vaccines were generated under cGMP conditions and phenotypic profiles of DC...

  1. Suppression of graft-versus-host disease and retention of graft-versus-tumour reaction by murine genetically engineered dendritic cells following bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yihong; Feng, Saran; Xu, Yujie; Chen, Wanru; Wang, Shuhua; Li, Depeng; Li, Zhenyu; Lu, Qunxian; Pan, Xiuying; Xu, Kailin

    2015-05-01

    The effect of infusion of lentiviral vector‑mediated, genetically engineered dendritic cells (DCs) following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo‑BMT) on graft‑versus‑host disease (GVHD) and graft‑versus‑leukemia (GVL) was investigated in a mouse model. Lentivirus‑mediated expression of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (sTNFR1) converted immature DCs (imDCs) from BABL/c mice into engineered DCs in vitro. An EL4 leukemia allo‑BMT model of BABL/c to C57BL/6 mice was established. Engineered DCs with donor bone marrow cells and splenocytes were subsequently transplanted into myeloablatively irradiated recipients. The average survival duration in the sTNFR1‑ and pXZ9‑imDC groups was significantly prolonged compared with that of the allo‑BMT group (PGVL effects during allo‑BMT. PMID:25529231

  2. Morphological features of allogenic nerve segment in rats after subcutaneous embedment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingtang Gao; Dianming Jiang

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Some studies demonstrate that allogenic peripheral nerve segment embedded subcutaneously significantly reduce the infiltration of lymphocyte and decrease immunological reaction.OBJECTIVE: To observe the gross shape, optical and electron microscope results of allogenic nerve segment in rats 2 weeks after subcutaneous embedment, and compare with subcutaneous emdedment of autologous nerve segment.DESIGN: A randomized and controlled experiment.SETTING: Department of Orthopaedics of Fifth People's Hospital of Zhengzhou; Department of Orthopaedics,First Hospital Affiliated to Chongqing Medical University MATERIALS: Totally 30 adult healthy Wistar male rats, with body mass of (200±20) g, were enrolled. Ten rats were chosen as the donors of allogenic nerve transplantation. The other 20 rats were randomly divided into 2 groups: allogenic nerve embedment group and autologous nerve embedment group, with 10 rats in each one.JEM-1220 transmission electron microscope (Japan) and Olympus BX50 optical microscope (Japan) were used.METHODS: This experiment was carried out at the laboratory of Orthopaedic Department, Chongqing Medical University from October 2000 to April 2002. ① Sciatic nerve of donor rats for allogenic nerve transplantation was cut off at 5 mm distant from pelvic strait.15 mm sciatic nerve segment was chosen from lateral part as graft. Allogenic nerve embedment group: 15 mm sciatic nerve form the donor rats was embedded in the posterior part of right legs. Autologous nerve embedment group: 15 mm sciatic nerve segment of autologous left side was embedded in the posterior side of right legs. ② Nerve segment embedded subcutaneously was taken out at postoperative 2 weeks and performed gross observation; then 5 samples chosen randomly respectively from 2 groups and given haematoxylin-eosin staining and observation under optical microscope (×400);The other 5 samples were made into ultrathin sections (0.5 μm)and observed under transmission electron

  3. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia in remission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagler, Arnon; Rocha, Vanderson; Labopin, Myriam;

    2013-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide (Cy) combined with total-body irradiation (TBI) or with busulfan (Bu) are currently the most common myeloablative regimens used in allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (alloSCT) in adults with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Intravenous (IV) Bu has more predictable bioavailabil......Cyclophosphamide (Cy) combined with total-body irradiation (TBI) or with busulfan (Bu) are currently the most common myeloablative regimens used in allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (alloSCT) in adults with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Intravenous (IV) Bu has more predictable...

  4. Asymmetry in signal propagation between the soma and dendrites plays a key role in determining dendritic excitability in motoneurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojeong Kim

    Full Text Available It is widely recognized that propagation of electrophysiological signals between the soma and dendrites of neurons differs depending on direction, i.e. it is asymmetric. How this asymmetry influences the activation of voltage-gated dendritic channels, and consequent neuronal behavior, remains unclear. Based on the analysis of asymmetry in several types of motoneurons, we extended our previous methodology for reducing a fully reconstructed motoneuron model to a two-compartment representation that preserved asymmetric signal propagation. The reduced models accurately replicated the dendritic excitability and the dynamics of the anatomical model involving a persistent inward current (PIC dispersed over the dendrites. The relationship between asymmetric signal propagation and dendritic excitability was investigated using the reduced models while varying the asymmetry in signal propagation between the soma and the dendrite with PIC density constant. We found that increases in signal attenuation from soma to dendrites increased the activation threshold of a PIC (hypo-excitability, whereas increases in signal attenuation from dendrites to soma decreased the activation threshold of a PIC (hyper-excitability. These effects were so strong that reversing the asymmetry in the soma-to-dendrite vs. dendrite-to-soma attenuation, reversed the correlation between PIC threshold and distance of this current source from the soma. We propose the tight relation of the asymmetric signal propagation to the input resistance in the dendrites as a mechanism underlying the influence of the asymmetric signal propagation on the dendritic excitability. All these results emphasize the importance of maintaining the physiological asymmetry in dendritic signaling not only for normal function of the cells but also for biophysically realistic simulations of dendritic excitability.

  5. Differential induction of inflammatory cytokines by dendritic cells treated with novel TLR-agonist and cytokine based cocktails: targeting dendritic cells in autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gad Monika

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DC are main gate-keepers of the immune system, bridging the innate and adaptive immune system. DCs are able to mature into inflammatory DCs at sites of inflammation in both autoimmune and allergic disease, thereby sustaining a continuous activation of the adaptive immune system at sites of inflammation. This function of DCs makes them attractive target cells for therapeutic intervention in inflammatory diseases. We have designed a DC-based screening model by which drug candidates can be evaluated for their ability to suppress DC maturation into an inflammatory and disease promoting phenotype. Methods Human monocyte derived DCs were differentiated using IL-4 and GM-CSF to immature DCs (imDCs. The imDCs were treated with various combinations of TLR-agonists and pro-inflammatory cytokines to identify cocktails with ability to mature imDCs into inflammatory DCs. The effect of the cocktails on DC maturation was evaluated using ELISA and cytokine arrays to measure secreted cytokines and chemokines. FACS analysis was used to assess expression of maturation markers, and functional studies were carried out using naïve allogeneic T-cells to assay for a Th1-promoting DC phenotype. Results Nine cocktails were designed with potent ability to induce secretion of the Th1-promoting cytokines IL-12p70 and TNFα from imDCs, and three were able to induce the Th17-promoting cytokine IL-23. The cocktails were further characterized using cytokine arrays, showing induction of inflammation related cytokines and chemokines like CXCL10, CCL2, CCL4, CCL8, CCL15, CCL20 and IL-8, of which some are present in a range of autoimmune pathologies. Prostaglandin E2 secretion was identified from DCs treated with TLR agonists poly I:C and peptidoglycan, but not LPS. The cocktails were able to induce DC maturation markers like HLA-DR, CD40, CD80, CD83 and CD86, except the TLR7/8 agonist R848. Functional end-points made by co-culture of

  6. Sleeping dendrites: fiber-optic measurements of dendritic calcium activity in freely moving and sleeping animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Seibt

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dendrites are the post-synaptic sites of most excitatory and inhibitory synapses in the brain, making them the main location of cortical information processing and synaptic plasticity. Although current hypotheses suggest a central role for sleep in proper cognitive function and brain plasticity, virtually nothing is known about changes in dendritic activity across the sleep-wake cycle and how waking experience modifies this activity. To start addressing these questions, we developed a method that allows long-term recordings of EEGs/EMG combined with in vivo cortical calcium (Ca2+ activity in freely moving and sleeping rats. We measured Ca2+ activity from populations of dendrites of layer (L 5 pyramidal neurons (n = 13 rats that we compared with Ca2+ activity from populations of neurons in L2/3 (n = 11 rats. L5 and L2/3 neurons were labelled using bolus injection of OGB1-AM or GCaMP6 (1. Ca2+ signals were detected using a fiber-optic system (cannula diameter = 400µm, transmitting the changes in fluorescence to a photodiode. Ca2+ fluctuations could then be correlated with ongoing changes in brain oscillatory activity during 5 major brain states: active wake [AW], quiet wake [QW], NREM, REM and NREM-REM transition (or intermediate state, [IS]. Our Ca2+ recordings show large transients in L5 dendrites and L2/3 neurons that oscillate predominantly at frequencies In summary, we show that this technique is successful in monitoring fluctuations in ongoing dendritic Ca2+ activity during natural brain states and allows, in principle, to combine behavioral measurement with imaging from various brain regions (e.g. deep structures in freely behaving animals. Using this method, we show that Ca2+ transients from populations of L2/3 neurons and L5 dendrites are deferentially regulated across the sleep/wake cycle, with dendritic activity being the highest during the IS sleep. Our correlation analysis suggests that specific sleep EEG activity during NREM and IS

  7. A Genome-Wide Screen for Dendritically Localized RNAs Identifies Genes Required for Dendrite Morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Mala; Edmund, Hendia; Ennis, Darragh; Schlueter, Marissa A; Marot, Jessica E; Tambasco, Janet; Barlow, Ida; Sigurbjornsdottir, Sara; Mathew, Renjith; Vallés, Ana Maria; Wojciech, Waldemar; Roth, Siegfried; Davis, Ilan; Leptin, Maria; Gavis, Elizabeth R

    2016-01-01

    Localizing messenger RNAs at specific subcellular sites is a conserved mechanism for targeting the synthesis of cytoplasmic proteins to distinct subcellular domains, thereby generating the asymmetric protein distributions necessary for cellular and developmental polarity. However, the full range of transcripts that are asymmetrically distributed in specialized cell types, and the significance of their localization, especially in the nervous system, are not known. We used the EP-MS2 method, which combines EP transposon insertion with the MS2/MCP in vivo fluorescent labeling system, to screen for novel localized transcripts in polarized cells, focusing on the highly branched Drosophila class IV dendritic arborization neurons. Of a total of 541 lines screened, we identified 55 EP-MS2 insertions producing transcripts that were enriched in neuronal processes, particularly in dendrites. The 47 genes identified by these insertions encode molecularly diverse proteins, and are enriched for genes that function in neuronal development and physiology. RNAi-mediated knockdown confirmed roles for many of the candidate genes in dendrite morphogenesis. We propose that the transport of mRNAs encoded by these genes into the dendrites allows their expression to be regulated on a local scale during the dynamic developmental processes of dendrite outgrowth, branching, and/or remodeling. PMID:27260999

  8. Evaluating Local Primary Dendrite Arm Spacing Characterization Techniques Using Synthetic Directionally Solidified Dendritic Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschopp, Mark A.; Miller, Jonathan D.; Oppedal, Andrew L.; Solanki, Kiran N.

    2015-10-01

    Microstructure characterization continues to play an important bridge to understanding why particular processing routes or parameters affect the properties of materials. This statement certainly holds true in the case of directionally solidified dendritic microstructures, where characterizing the primary dendrite arm spacing is vital to developing the process-structure-property relationships that can lead to the design and optimization of processing routes for defined properties. In this work, four series of simulations were used to examine the capability of a few Voronoi-based techniques to capture local microstructure statistics (primary dendrite arm spacing and coordination number) in controlled (synthetically generated) microstructures. These simulations used both cubic and hexagonal microstructures with varying degrees of disorder (noise) to study the effects of length scale, base microstructure, microstructure variability, and technique parameters on the local PDAS distribution, local coordination number distribution, bulk PDAS, and bulk coordination number. The Voronoi tesselation technique with a polygon-side-length criterion correctly characterized the known synthetic microstructures. By systematically studying the different techniques for quantifying local primary dendrite arm spacings, we have evaluated their capability to capture this important microstructure feature in different dendritic microstructures, which can be an important step for experimentally correlating with both processing and properties in single crystal nickel-based superalloys.

  9. A Genome-Wide Screen for Dendritically Localized RNAs Identifies Genes Required for Dendrite Morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Mala; Edmund, Hendia; Ennis, Darragh; Schlueter, Marissa A.; Marot, Jessica E.; Tambasco, Janet; Barlow, Ida; Sigurbjornsdottir, Sara; Mathew, Renjith; Vallés, Ana Maria; Wojciech, Waldemar; Roth, Siegfried; Davis, Ilan; Leptin, Maria; Gavis, Elizabeth R.

    2016-01-01

    Localizing messenger RNAs at specific subcellular sites is a conserved mechanism for targeting the synthesis of cytoplasmic proteins to distinct subcellular domains, thereby generating the asymmetric protein distributions necessary for cellular and developmental polarity. However, the full range of transcripts that are asymmetrically distributed in specialized cell types, and the significance of their localization, especially in the nervous system, are not known. We used the EP-MS2 method, which combines EP transposon insertion with the MS2/MCP in vivo fluorescent labeling system, to screen for novel localized transcripts in polarized cells, focusing on the highly branched Drosophila class IV dendritic arborization neurons. Of a total of 541 lines screened, we identified 55 EP-MS2 insertions producing transcripts that were enriched in neuronal processes, particularly in dendrites. The 47 genes identified by these insertions encode molecularly diverse proteins, and are enriched for genes that function in neuronal development and physiology. RNAi-mediated knockdown confirmed roles for many of the candidate genes in dendrite morphogenesis. We propose that the transport of mRNAs encoded by these genes into the dendrites allows their expression to be regulated on a local scale during the dynamic developmental processes of dendrite outgrowth, branching, and/or remodeling. PMID:27260999

  10. A Genome-Wide Screen for Dendritically Localized RNAs Identifies Genes Required for Dendrite Morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mala Misra

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Localizing messenger RNAs at specific subcellular sites is a conserved mechanism for targeting the synthesis of cytoplasmic proteins to distinct subcellular domains, thereby generating the asymmetric protein distributions necessary for cellular and developmental polarity. However, the full range of transcripts that are asymmetrically distributed in specialized cell types, and the significance of their localization, especially in the nervous system, are not known. We used the EP-MS2 method, which combines EP transposon insertion with the MS2/MCP in vivo fluorescent labeling system, to screen for novel localized transcripts in polarized cells, focusing on the highly branched Drosophila class IV dendritic arborization neurons. Of a total of 541 lines screened, we identified 55 EP-MS2 insertions producing transcripts that were enriched in neuronal processes, particularly in dendrites. The 47 genes identified by these insertions encode molecularly diverse proteins, and are enriched for genes that function in neuronal development and physiology. RNAi-mediated knockdown confirmed roles for many of the candidate genes in dendrite morphogenesis. We propose that the transport of mRNAs encoded by these genes into the dendrites allows their expression to be regulated on a local scale during the dynamic developmental processes of dendrite outgrowth, branching, and/or remodeling.

  11. Simulation of dendritic growth reveals necessary and sufficient parameters to describe the shapes of dendritic trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trottier, Olivier; Ganguly, Sujoy; Bowne-Anderson, Hugo; Liang, Xin; Howard, Jonathon

    For the last 120 years, the development of neuronal shapes has been of great interest to the scientific community. Over the last 30 years, significant work has been done on the molecular processes responsible for dendritic development. In our ongoing research, we use the class IV sensory neurons of the Drosophila melanogaster larva as a model system to understand the growth of dendritic arbors. Our main goal is to elucidate the mechanisms that the neuron uses to determine the shape of its dendritic tree. We have observed the development of the class IV neuron's dendritic tree in the larval stage and have concluded that morphogenesis is defined by 3 distinct processes: 1) branch growth, 2) branching and 3) branch retraction. As the first step towards understanding dendritic growth, we have implemented these three processes in a computational model. Our simulations are able to reproduce the branch length distribution, number of branches and fractal dimension of the class IV neurons for a small range of parameters.

  12. Dendritic nanocomposite for delivery of antibacterial agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pureti Madhu Kumar; PSrinivasa Babu; Shaik Rasheed; Ramadoss Karthikeyan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To develop and explore the use of PEGylated poly (propylene imine) dendritic architecture for the delivery of an anti bacterial bioactive, Trimethoprim. Methods: For this study, PEGylated poly(propylene imine) dendritic architecture was synthesized and loaded with Trimethoprim and targeted to the resistant producing strains of both gram positive and gram negative. The antibacterial activity was carried out by agar well-diffusion method to compare zone of inhibition with standard drug and plain PPI dendrimer. Results: The study showed that the Trimethoprim loaded dendrimer has significant antibacterial activity than the plain PPI dendrimer, but standard drug was not shown zone of inhibition upon both microorganisms butKlebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) the pure drug showed activity. Conclusions: In this study antibacterial activity of synthesized system is also relatively safer and holds potential to deliver any other antibacterial agent to the resistant producing strains.

  13. Dendritic Cells for SYN Scan Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Artificial immune systems have previously been applied to the problem of intrusion detection. The aim of this research is to develop an intrusion detection system based on the function of Dendritic Cells (DCs). DCs are antigen presenting cells and key to activation of the human immune system, behaviour which has been abstracted to form the Dendritic Cell Algorithm (DCA). In algorithmic terms, individual DCs perform multi-sensor data fusion, asynchronously correlating the the fused data signals with a secondary data stream. Aggregate output of a population of cells, is analysed and forms the basis of an anomaly detection system. In this paper the DCA is applied to the detection of outgoing port scans using TCP SYN packets. Results show that detection can be achieved with the DCA, yet some false positives can be encountered when simultaneously scanning and using other network services. Suggestions are made for using adaptive signals to alleviate this uncovered problem.

  14. Effect of radiation therapy on autologous and allogeneic bone grafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Currently no significant literature exists regarding the effects of therapeutic radiation on bone graft integrity in humans. As the combination of these procedures is frequently necessary in the treatment of neoplasms, we have retrospectively analyzed graft outcomes in irradiated sites. Materials and Methods: 40 autologous or allogeneic bone grafts in 35 patients treated at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) between 1977 and 1995 were evaluated. Preoperative radiation was given in 28 cases, postoperative in 21 cases. Radiation was delivered as external beam photons, 160 MeV protons or brachytherapy implant. Doses ranged from 3 to 83 Gy. Grafts were located in the spine (17), pelvis (13), femur (5), humerus (2) and tibia (3). Functional graft survival and healing quality were determined radiographically. Failure free survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and linear regressions were performed using the Wilcoxan method. Results: Overall rates of graft survival were 86% at 1 yr and 73% at 5 yrs. For auto grafts and allografts the 1 yr rates were 100% and 80% (p=.96). No significant differences in outcome based on treatment chronology were found with survival rates of 81% for preoperative treatment and 86% for postoperative treatment. With linear regression analysis there was no relation between outcome and time between surgery and radiation (p=.89). Further, no relation between bone dose (preoperative + postoperative dose), graft dose (postoperative dose) or mean dose/day and outcome was found (p=.50, p=.49 and p=.43). Failures were evenly distributed amongst high and low dose groups. The use of chemotherapy did not significantly effect outcome with a survival rate of 85% compared to 87%. Tobacco use was a significant predictor of failure with 63% graft survival compared to 94% in non-smokers (p=.038). Quality of bone healing rated poor overall, but was highly variable and did not correlate with dose or chronology of therapy

  15. Pulmonary dendritic cells: thinking globally, acting locally

    OpenAIRE

    Randall, Troy D.

    2010-01-01

    The phrase “think globally, act locally” was coined in the early 1970s and directed individuals to clean up their local environment with the ultimate goal of improving the health of the entire planet. Several recent studies indicate that similar considerations apply to the immune system, in which small numbers of leukocytes, such as pulmonary dendritic cells, can modify the local immune environment in the lung and promote a positive outcome for the organism.

  16. Dendritic cells and aging: consequences for autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Anshu; Sridharan, Aishwarya; Prakash, Sangeetha; Agrawal, Harsh

    2012-01-01

    The immune system has evolved to mount immune responses against foreign pathogens and to remain silent against self-antigens. A balance between immunity and tolerance is required as any disturbance may result in chronic inflammation or autoimmunity. Dendritic cells (DCs) actively participate in maintaining this balance. Under steady-state conditions, DCs remain in an immature state and do not mount an immune response against circulating self-antigens in the periphery, which maintains a state ...

  17. Harnessing dendritic cells in inflammatory skin diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Chung-Ching; di Meglio, Paola; Nestle, Frank O

    2011-01-01

    The skin immune system harbors a complex network of dendritic cells (DCs). Recent studies highlight a diverse functional specialization of skin DC subsets. In addition to generating cellular and humoral immunity against pathogens, skin DCs are involved in tolerogenic mechanisms to ensure the maintenance of immune homeostasis, as well as in pathogenesis of chronic inflammation in the skin when excessive immune responses are initiated and unrestrained. Harnessing DCs by directly targeting DC-de...

  18. Follicular dendritic cells in health and disease

    OpenAIRE

    El Shikh, Mohey Eldin M.; Costantino ePitzalis

    2012-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are unique immune cells that contribute to the regulation of humoral immune responses. These cells are located in the B cell follicles of secondary lymphoid tissues where they trap and retain antigens (Ags) in the form of highly immunogenic immune complexes (ICs) consisting of Ag plus specific antibody (Ab) and/or complement proteins. FDCs multimerise Ags and present them polyvalently to B cells in periodically arranged arrays that extensively crosslink the B...

  19. Follicular dendritic cells in health and disease

    OpenAIRE

    El Shikh, Mohey Eldin M.; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2012-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are unique immune cells that contribute to the regulation of humoral immune responses. These cells are located in the B-cell follicles of secondary lymphoid tissues where they trap and retain antigens (Ags) in the form of highly immunogenic immune complexes (ICs) consisting of Ag plus specific antibody (Ab) and/or complement proteins. FDCs multimerize Ags and present them polyvalently to B-cells in periodically arranged arrays that extensively crosslink the B...

  20. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1997-01-01

    Specific aims include: (1) Application of the bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC); (2) Based on clues from spaceflight: compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients; and (3) Initiate studies on the efficiency of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in animal models of experimental fungal infections.

  1. SKIN DENDRITIC CELLS: ACTIVATION, MATURATION AND MIGRATION

    OpenAIRE

    Eaton, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Langerhans’ cells (LC) are the dendritic cells (DC) of the epidermis and, as sentinels of the immune system, act as a bridge between the innate and adaptive immune responses. When LC, and other DC, recognise an antigen or pathogen they mature and are stimulated to migrate to the lymph nodes, where they orchestrate immune responses. Pathogen derived toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands, and chemical allergens, are recognised as being potentially harmful and stimulate LC to mobilise and mature. Cyt...

  2. Bacterial Probiotic Modulation of Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Drakes, Maureen; Blanchard, Thomas; Czinn, Steven

    2004-01-01

    Intestinal dendritic cells are continually exposed to ingested microorganisms and high concentrations of endogenous bacterial flora. These cells can be activated by infectious agents and other stimuli to induce T-cell responses and to produce chemokines which recruit other cells to the local environment. Bacterial probiotics are of increasing use against intestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. They act as nonpathogenic stimuli within the gut to regain immunologic quiescence. ...

  3. Imaging membrane potential in dendritic spines

    OpenAIRE

    Nuriya, Mutsuo; Jiang, Jiang; Nemet, Boaz; Eisenthal, Kenneth B.; Yuste, Rafael

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic spines mediate most excitatory inputs in the brain. Although it is clear that spines compartmentalize calcium, it is still unknown what role, if any, they play in integrating synaptic inputs. To investigate the electrical function of spines directly, we used second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging of membrane potential in pyramidal neurons from hippocampal cultures and neocortical brain slices. With FM 4-64 as an intracellular SHG chromophore, we imaged membrane potential in the so...

  4. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koss, Matthew

    2009-03-01

    The growth of dendrites is governed by the interplay between two simple and familiar processes---the irreversible diffusion of energy, and the reversible work done in the formation of new surface area. To advance our understanding of these processes, NASA sponsored a project that flew on the Space Shuttle Columbia is 1994, 1996, and 1997 to record and analyze benchmark data in an apparent-microgravity ``laboratory.'' In this laboratory, energy transfer by gravity driven convection was essentially eliminated and one could test independently, for the first time, both components of dendritic growth theory. The analysis of this data shows that although the diffusion of energy can be properly accounted for, the results from interfacial physics appear to be in disagreement and alternate models should receive increased attention. Unfortunately, currently and for the foreseeable future, there is no access or financial support to develop and conduct additional experiments of this type. However, the benchmark data of 35mm photonegatives, video, and all supporting instrument data are now available at the IDGE Archive at the College of the Holy Cross. This data may still have considerable relevance to researchers working specifically with dendritic growth, and more generally those working in the synthesis, growth & processing of materials, multiscale computational modeling, pattern formation, and systems far from equilibrium.

  5. Neural pattern formation in networks with dendritic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressloff, P. C.; De Souza, B.

    1998-04-01

    We present a detailed analysis of a recently proposed model of neural pattern formation that is based on the combined effect of diffusion along a neuron's dendritic tree and recurrent interactions along axo-dendritic synaptic connections. For concreteness, we consider a one-dimensional array of analog neurons with the dendritic tree idealized as a one-dimensional cable. Linear stability analysis and bifurcation theory together with numerical simulations are used to establish conditions for the onset of a Turing instability leading to the formation of stable spatial patterns of network output activity. It is shown that the presence of dendritic structure can induce dynamic (time-periodic) spatial pattern formation. Moreover, correlations between the dendritic location of a synapse and the relative positions of neurons in the network are shown to result in spatially oscillating patterns of activity along the dendrites of each neuron.

  6. Molecular identity of dendritic voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorincz, Andrea; Nusser, Zoltan

    2010-05-14

    Active invasion of the dendritic tree by action potentials (APs) generated in the axon is essential for associative synaptic plasticity and neuronal ensemble formation. In cortical pyramidal cells (PCs), this AP back-propagation is supported by dendritic voltage-gated Na+ (Nav) channels, whose molecular identity is unknown. Using a highly sensitive electron microscopic immunogold technique, we revealed the presence of the Nav1.6 subunit in hippocampal CA1 PC proximal and distal dendrites. Here, the subunit density is lower by a factor of 35 to 80 than that found in axon initial segments. A gradual decrease in Nav1.6 density along the proximodistal axis of the dendritic tree was also detected without any labeling in dendritic spines. Our results reveal the characteristic subcellular distribution of the Nav1.6 subunit, identifying this molecule as a key substrate enabling dendritic excitability. PMID:20466935

  7. Numerical Modeling of Dendrite Growth in Al Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许庆彦; 柳百成

    2004-01-01

    Dendritic grains are the most often observed microstructure in metals and alloys. In the past decade, more and more attention has been paid to the modeling and simulation of dendritic microstructures. This paper describes a modified diffusion-limited aggregation model to simulate the complex shape of the dendrite grains during metal solidification. The fractal model was used to simulate equiaxed dendrite growth. The fractal dimensions of simulated Al alloy structures range from 1.63-1.88 which compares well with the experimentally-measured fractal dimension of 1.85; therefore, the model accurately predicts not only the dendritic structure morphology, but also the fractal dimension of the dendrite structure formed during solidification.

  8. Special fractal growth of dendrite copper using a hydrothermal method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yan; Zhang, Zhejuan; Guo, Pingsheng; He, Pingang; Sun, Zhuo

    2011-08-01

    Special fractal dendrite Cu nanostructures have been synthesized through a simple hydrothermal method, and the effects of the volume ratio between glycerol and water and the concentration of H 3PO 3 on the morphologies of dendrite Cu have been studied in detail. The Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) have been used to characterize these Cu products. The results indicate that rhombic diamond and different morphologies of fractal dendrite were prepared because of the accumulation of Cu nuclei based on the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) and the nucleation-limited aggregation (NLA) model. Fortunately, symmetrical leaf-like dendrite Cu nanostructures different from Cu dendrites reported before have been obtained. Additionally, an explanation for the growth of fractal dendrite Cu has been discussed carefully.

  9. Physiological problems in patients undergoing autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevgisun Kapucu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Stem cell transplantation is usually performed in an effort to extend the patient′s life span and to improve their quality of life. This study was conducted to determine the postoperative physiological effects experienced by patients who had undergone autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Methods: The research is a descriptive study conducted with a sample of 60 patients at Stem Cell Transplantation Units in Ankara. Percentile calculation and chi-square tests were used to evaluate the data. Results: When a comparison was made between patients who had undergone allogeneic Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT and those who had undergone autologous HSCT, results indicated that problems occurred more often for the allogeneic HSCT patients. The problems included: Digestion (94.3%, dermatological (76.7%, cardiac and respiratory (66.7%, neurological (66.7%, eye (56.7%, infections (26.7% and Graft Versus Host Disease (5 patients. Furthermore, the problems with pain (50%, numbness and tingling (40%, and speech disorders (3 patients were observed more often in autologous BMT patients. Conclusion: Autologous and allogeneic patients experienced most of physical problems due to they receive high doses of chemotherapy. Therefore, it is recommended that an interdisciplinary support team approach should be usedtohelp reduce and manage the problems that may arise during patient care.

  10. Brain MR imaging abnormalities in pediatric patients after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Emad-Eldin

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: CNS complications after allogenic BMT in pediatric patients could cause a significant clinical problem. MRI can provide early diagnosis and follow-up to monitor treatment changes. Knowing the onset of the presentation of the complication in relation to the chronology of the transplant is important as it provides significant guidance on which causes to consider.

  11. Regulatory T cells and immune tolerance after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Bruinsma (Marieke)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe story of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) begins after the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. It was observed that fallout radiation caused dose-dependent depression of hematopoiesis 1. Research first focused on how to protect the hematopo

  12. Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cells Restore Endothelial Function in Heart Failure by Stimulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney Premer

    2015-05-01

    Interpretation: These findings reveal a novel mechanism whereby allogeneic, but not autologous, MSC administration results in the proliferation of functional EPCs and improvement in vascular reactivity, which in turn restores endothelial function towards normal in patients with HF. These findings have significant clinical and biological implications for the use of MSCs in HF and other disorders associated with endothelial dysfunction.

  13. Pretransplant C-reactive protein as a prognostic marker in allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, Karina Kwi Im; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Heilmann, Carsten; Sengeløv, Henrik; Müller, Klaus Gottlob

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the prognostic role of baseline levels of C-reactive Protein (CRP) as well as CRP levels during conditioning in patients undergoing myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Furthermore, we studied the impact of baseline clinical factors and conditioning regimens on CRP...

  14. The effect of allogenic versus autologue mesenchymal stem cells in bone reconstructio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stefan; Overgaard, Søren; Ding, Ming

    2008-01-01

    . Compared to the control, only the group with allogenic MSC (group#3) proved to have a significant higher mean SFE (Fisher's LSD-test). The other groups (#1 and #2) had a slightly higher mean SFE (Table 2). Discussion and Conclusion: There are shown two interesting things in this minor pilot-study. There is...

  15. Lung function after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for leukaemia or lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nysom, K; Holm, K; Hesse, B;

    1996-01-01

    Longitudinal data were analysed on the lung function of 25 of 29 survivors of childhood leukaemia or lymphoma, who had been conditioned with cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation before allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, to test whether children are particularly vulnerable to pulmonary...

  16. Differential diagnosis of skin lesions after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canninga-van Dijk, MR; Sanders, CJ; Verdonck, LF; Fijnheer, R; van den Tweel, JG

    2003-01-01

    Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (i.e. bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation) is a common procedure in the treatment of various haematological disorders such as aplastic anaemia, (pre)leukaemias, some malignant lymphomas, multiple myeloma and immunodeficiency s

  17. Graft-versus-host disease and graft-versus-tumor effects after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storb, Rainer; Gyurkocza, Boglarka; Storer, Barry E;

    2013-01-01

    We designed a minimal-intensity conditioning regimen for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in patients with advanced hematologic malignancies unable to tolerate high-intensity regimens because of age, serious comorbidities, or previous high-dose HCT. The regimen allows the pures...

  18. On the Feasibility of Utilizing Allogeneic Bone Blocks for Atrophic Maxillary Augmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Monje

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This systematic review was aimed at assessing the feasibility by means of survival rate, histologic analysis, and causes of failure of allogeneic block grafts for augmenting the atrophic maxilla. Material and Methods. A literature search was conducted by one reviewer in several databases. Articles were included in this systematic review if they were human clinical trials in which outcomes of allogeneic bone block grafts were studied by means of survival rate. In addition other factors were extracted in order to assess their influence upon graft failure. Results. Fifteen articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria and subsequently were analyzed in this systematic review. A total of 361 block grafts could be followed 4 to 9 months after the surgery, of which 9 (2.4% failed within 1 month to 2 months after the surgery. Additionally, a weighed mean 4.79 mm (95% CI: 4.51–5.08 horizontal bone gain was computed from 119 grafted sites in 5 studies. Regarding implant cumulative survival rate, the weighed mean was 96.9% (95% CI: 92.8–98.7%, computed from 228 implants over a mean follow-up period of 23.9 months. Histologic analysis showed that allogeneic block grafts behave differently in the early stages of healing when compared to autogenous block grafts. Conclusion. Atrophied maxillary reconstruction with allogeneic bone block grafts represents a reliable option as shown by low block graft failure rate, minimal resorption, and high implant survival rate.

  19. A fatal case of acute HHV-6 myocarditis following allogeneic haemopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Yvonne; Gottlieb, David J; Baewer, David; Blyth, Emily

    2015-11-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is an ubiquitous virus that can reactivate in immunocompromised hosts, resulting in diverse clinical sequelae. We describe a case of fatal acute HHV-6 myocarditis in a patient who underwent allogeneic haemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of biopsy proven HHV-6 myocarditis post-HSCT. PMID:26465970

  20. Pathological Consequence of Misguided Dendritic Cell Differentiation in Histiocytic Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Berres, Marie-Luise; Allen, Carl E.; Merad, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    Histiocytic disorders represent a group of complex pathologies characterized by the accumulation of histiocytes, an old term for tissue-resident macrophages and dendritic cells. Langerhans cell histiocytosis is the most frequent of histiocytosis in humans and has been thought to arise from the abnormal accumulation of epidermal dendritic cells called Langerhans cells. In this chapter, we discuss the origin and differentiation of Langerhans cells and dendritic cells and present accumulated evi...

  1. Murid herpesvirus-4 exploits dendritic cells to infect B cells

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel Gaspar; May, Janet S.; Soumi Sukla; Bruno Frederico; Michael B Gill; Smith, Christopher M.; Belz, Gabrielle T.; Stevenson, Philip G.

    2011-01-01

    Author Summary We detect invading viruses with dendritic cells and eliminate them with lymphocytes. A key interaction is lymphocyte activation by dendritic cells presenting viral antigens. Not all viruses can be eliminated, and some that persist deliberately colonize lymphocytes and dendritic cells, such that parasitism and host defence co-exist within the same sites. Once established, these infections are very hard to eliminate. Therefore to vaccinate against them we must determine how infec...

  2. Nanoparticle-aggregated 3D monocrystalline gold dendritic nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, through a simple and fast electroless metal deposition route, gold dendritic nanostructures are synthesized in aqueous conditions. The gold dendrites with a threefold symmetric characteristic were built up of numerous nanoparticles roughly 5-10 nm in size. The aggregated nanoparticles spontaneously experience a self-assembly process along crystallographic orientations and finally form a monocrystalline dendrite. An oriented attachment mechanism can be used to explain the nanoparticle-aggregated self-assembly process

  3. Hepatitis C Virus Stimulates Murine CD8α-Like Dendritic Cells to Produce Type I Interferon in a TRIF-Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detje, Claudia N.; Riebesehl, Nina; Lienenklaus, Stefan; Steinmann, Eike; Kalinke, Ulrich; Pietschmann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) induces interferon (IFN) stimulated genes in the liver despite of distinct innate immune evasion mechanisms, suggesting that beyond HCV infected cells other cell types contribute to innate immune activation. Upon coculture with HCV replicating cells, human CD141+ myeloid dendritic cells (DC) produce type III IFN, whereas plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) mount type I IFN responses. Due to limitations in the genetic manipulation of primary human DCs, we explored HCV mediated stimulation of murine DC subsets. Coculture of HCV RNA transfected human or murine hepatoma cells with murine bone marrow-derived DC cultures revealed that only Flt3-L DC cultures, but not GM-CSF DC cultures responded with IFN production. Cells transfected with full length or subgenomic viral RNA stimulated IFN release indicating that infectious virus particle formation is not essential in this process. Use of differentiated DC from mice with genetic lesions in innate immune signalling showed that IFN secretion by HCV-stimulated murine DC was independent of MyD88 and CARDIF, but dependent on TRIF and IFNAR signalling. Separating Flt3-L DC cultures into pDC and conventional CD11b-like and CD8α-like DC revealed that the CD8α-like DC, homologous to the human CD141+ DC, release interferon upon stimulation by HCV replicating cells. In contrast, the other cell types and in particular the pDC did not. Injection of human HCV subgenomic replicon cells into IFN-β reporter mice confirmed the interferon induction upon HCV replication in vivo. These results indicate that HCV-replicating cells stimulate IFN secretion from murine CD8α-like DC independent of infectious virus production. Thus, this work defines basic principles of viral recognition by murine DC populations. Moreover, this model should be useful to explore the interaction between dendritic cells during HCV replication and to define how viral signatures are delivered to and recognized by immune cells to trigger IFN

  4. Hepatitis C Virus Stimulates Murine CD8α-Like Dendritic Cells to Produce Type I Interferon in a TRIF-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaender, Stephanie; Grabski, Elena; Detje, Claudia N; Riebesehl, Nina; Lienenklaus, Stefan; Steinmann, Eike; Kalinke, Ulrich; Pietschmann, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) induces interferon (IFN) stimulated genes in the liver despite of distinct innate immune evasion mechanisms, suggesting that beyond HCV infected cells other cell types contribute to innate immune activation. Upon coculture with HCV replicating cells, human CD141+ myeloid dendritic cells (DC) produce type III IFN, whereas plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) mount type I IFN responses. Due to limitations in the genetic manipulation of primary human DCs, we explored HCV mediated stimulation of murine DC subsets. Coculture of HCV RNA transfected human or murine hepatoma cells with murine bone marrow-derived DC cultures revealed that only Flt3-L DC cultures, but not GM-CSF DC cultures responded with IFN production. Cells transfected with full length or subgenomic viral RNA stimulated IFN release indicating that infectious virus particle formation is not essential in this process. Use of differentiated DC from mice with genetic lesions in innate immune signalling showed that IFN secretion by HCV-stimulated murine DC was independent of MyD88 and CARDIF, but dependent on TRIF and IFNAR signalling. Separating Flt3-L DC cultures into pDC and conventional CD11b-like and CD8α-like DC revealed that the CD8α-like DC, homologous to the human CD141+ DC, release interferon upon stimulation by HCV replicating cells. In contrast, the other cell types and in particular the pDC did not. Injection of human HCV subgenomic replicon cells into IFN-β reporter mice confirmed the interferon induction upon HCV replication in vivo. These results indicate that HCV-replicating cells stimulate IFN secretion from murine CD8α-like DC independent of infectious virus production. Thus, this work defines basic principles of viral recognition by murine DC populations. Moreover, this model should be useful to explore the interaction between dendritic cells during HCV replication and to define how viral signatures are delivered to and recognized by immune cells to trigger IFN

  5. CTAB-Influenced Electrochemical Dissolution of Silver Dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Regan, Colm; Zhu, Xi; Zhong, Jun; Anand, Utkarsh; Lu, Jingyu; Su, Haibin; Mirsaidov, Utkur

    2016-04-19

    Dendrite formation on the electrodes of a rechargeable battery during the charge-discharge cycle limits its capacity and application due to short-circuits and potential ignition. However, understanding of the underlying dendrite growth and dissolution mechanisms is limited. Here, the electrochemical growth and dissolution of silver dendrites on platinum electrodes immersed in an aqueous silver nitrate (AgNO3) electrolyte solution was investigated using in situ liquid-cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The dissolution of Ag dendrites in an AgNO3 solution with added cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant was compared to the dissolution of Ag dendrites in a pure aqueous AgNO3 solution. Significantly, when CTAB was added, dendrite dissolution proceeded in a step-by-step manner, resulting in nanoparticle formation and transient microgrowth stages due to Ostwald ripening. This resulted in complete dissolution of dendrites and "cleaning" of the cell of any silver metal. This is critical for practical battery applications because "dead" lithium is known to cause short circuits and high-discharge rates. In contrast to this, in a pure aqueous AgNO3 solution, without surfactant, dendrites dissolved incompletely back into solution, leaving behind minute traces of disconnected silver particles. Finally, a mechanism for the CTAB-influenced dissolution of silver dendrites was proposed based on electrical field dependent binding energy of CTA(+) to silver. PMID:27017834

  6. Synaptically evoked dendritic action potentials in rat neocortical pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, P C; Crill, W E

    1998-05-01

    In a previous study iontophoresis of glutamate on the apical dendrite of layer 5 pyramidal neurons from rat neocortex was used to identify sites at which dendritic depolarization evoked small, prolonged Ca2+ spikes and/or low-threshold Na+ spikes recorded by an intracellular microelectrode in the soma. These spikes were identified as originating in the dendrite. Here we evoke similar dendritic responses by electrical stimulation of presynaptic elements near the tip of the iontophoretic electrode with the use of a second extracellular electrode. In 9 of 12 recorded cells, electrically evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) above a minimum size triggered all-or-none postsynaptic responses similar to those evoked by dendritic glutamate iontophoresis at the same site. Both the synaptically evoked and the iontophoretically evoked depolarizations were abolished reversibly by blockade of glutamate receptors. In all recorded cells, the combination of iontophoresis and an EPSP, each of which was subthreshold for the dendritic spike when given alone, evoked a dendritic spike similar to that evoked by a sufficiently large iontophoresis. In one cell tested, dendritic spikes could be evoked by the summation of two independent subthreshold EPSPs evoked by stimulation at two different locations. We conclude that the dendritic spikes are not unique to the use of glutamate iontophoresis because similar spikes can be evoked by EPSPs. We discuss the implications of these results for synaptic integration and for the interpretation of recorded synaptic potentials. PMID:9582218

  7. Effect of allogenic thymic cells on radioleukaemogenesis in AKR-T1ALD mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When AKR mice are irradiated with a sub-lethal dose (4 times 175 R), thymic lymphosarcomas (L.S.) occur earlier than in controls. This accelerated leukaemogenesis is not inhibited by syngenic restoration with bone marrows cells (BM). Using the AKR/T1ALD substrain which bears 38 chromosomes with 1 metacentric markers, it has been shown that AKR radio-chimaeras restored by T1ALD BM developed two kinds of L.S.: early (radiation-induced) L.S. originating mainly from host cells surviving irradiation and late L.S. from donor cells. The experiments were to investigate the potential influence of normal allogenic thymic cells, with or without syngenic B.M., on the incidence, latency and origin of LS appearing in irradiated AKR recipients. Adding C3H allogenic thymic cells to syngenic B.M. increases the percentage of early L.S. whose latencies are unchanged. Besides, when C3H thymic cells are injected to irradiated controls without syngenic B.M. cells, L.S. are seen to occur significantly earlier than in just the irradiated animals alone. In radio-chimaeras restored by allogenic thymic cells and syngenic B.M., except in one case, all the L.S. were seen to originate from B.M. cells. The interpretation of these results depends on the possible role of allogenic thymic cells on host cells surviving the irradiation, or the exogeneous B.M. In the first case, allogenic thymocytes could induce a graft versus host reaction increasing the post-irradiation depletion of lymphoid system and hastening thymic endoregeneration which is supposed to be the first step towards leukaemogenesis. The second hypothesis, which seems the most likely, would be that C1H thymic cells could selectively act on host cells surviving irradiation and enhance the differenciation of haemopoietic precursors at the expense of the lymphoid cells

  8. Semi-solid Forming of a Damper Housing with Dendritic and Non-dendritic Al-Si-Mg Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChenCM; YangCC; ChaoCG

    2001-01-01

    A motorcycle component of damper housing was made by semi-solid forming process. This was used to investigate the effect of microstructures of feedstock on the formability of semisolid process. The soundness and microstructures of casting parts made by dendritic and non-dendritic feedstock were investigated. Separating of liquid phase was found in the casting produced by dendritic feedstock, which might result in defects of porosity, while uniform microstructures were found in the casting produced by no...

  9. Myxoma Virus Induces Type I Interferon Production in Murine Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells via a TLR9/MyD88-, IRF5/IRF7-, and IFNAR-Dependent Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Peihong; Cao, Hua; Merghoub, Taha; Avogadri, Francesca; Wang, Weiyi; Parikh, Tanvi; Fang, Chee-Mun; Pitha, Paula M.; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Rahman, Masmudur M.; McFadden, Grant; Hu, Xiaoyu; Houghton, Alan N.; Shuman, Stewart; Deng, Liang

    2011-01-01

    Poxviruses are large DNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Myxoma virus is a rabbit poxvirus that belongs to the Leporipoxvirus genus. It causes a lethal disease called myxomatosis in European rabbits but cannot sustain any detectable infection in nonlagomorphs. Vaccinia virus is a prototypal orthopoxvirus that was used as a vaccine to eradicate smallpox. Myxoma virus is nonpathogenic in mice, whereas systemic infection with vaccinia virus can be lethal even in immuno...

  10. Correlation of 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 with plasmacytoid dendrtic cells in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus%SLE血清25羟基维生素D3与浆细胞样树突状细胞相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭培霞; 汪国生; 周晶晶; 马斌; 高二鹏; 钱龙; 厉小梅; 李向培

    2014-01-01

    目的 观察系统性红斑狼疮(systematic lupus erythematosus,SLE)患者血清中25羟基维生素D3 [25(OH)D3]水平变化;25 (OH) D3与体内浆细胞样树突状细胞(plasmacytoid dendritic cell,pDC)数量、pDCs的表面分子及SEE疾病活动指数(SLE disease activity index,SLEDAI)相关性.方法 门诊收取符合条件的SLE患者46例和14例健康对照者的血清,SLE患者按治疗分为未治疗组、单用激素组、激素加羟基氯喹组,放射免疫法测定25(OH)D3水平,流式细胞术测外周血单个核细胞(peripheral blood mononuclear cell,PBMC)中pDCs水平和pDCs表面CD32、CD40、CD86、CD62L、CXCR4表达和改变,比较SEE患者与健康对照组、SEE不同治疗组间检测指标的差别.结果 SLE患者血清25(OH)D3水平较健康对照组低(t=3.06,P=0.003);SLE患者不同治疗组间25 (OH)13水平有统计学差异(F =4.62,P=0.015),未用药组低于激素组;25(OH)D3水平与SEE患者SLEDAI评分呈负相关(r=-0.38,P=0.050);在不同的25 (OH) D3浓度范围下,pDCs的水平、SLEDAI评分差异均有统计学意义(均有P <0.05);25 (OH) D3水平与3组SLE患者pDCs水平及表面分子均无明显相关性(均有P>0.05).结论 SLE患者血清25 (OH) D3水平低下,25(OH)D3水平对pDCs水平及疾病活动度可能有影响.

  11. Ternary eutectic dendrites: Pattern formation and scaling properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rátkai, László; Szállás, Attila; Pusztai, Tamás [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Mohri, Tetsuo [Center for Computational Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Gránásy, László, E-mail: granasy.laszlo@wigner.mta.hu [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Brunel University, Uxbridge, Middlesex UB8 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-21

    Extending previous work [Pusztai et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 032401 (2013)], we have studied the formation of eutectic dendrites in a model ternary system within the framework of the phase-field theory. We have mapped out the domain in which two-phase dendritic structures grow. With increasing pulling velocity, the following sequence of growth morphologies is observed: flat front lamellae → eutectic colonies → eutectic dendritesdendrites with target pattern → partitionless dendrites → partitionless flat front. We confirm that the two-phase and one-phase dendrites have similar forms and display a similar scaling of the dendrite tip radius with the interface free energy. It is also found that the possible eutectic patterns include the target pattern, and single- and multiarm spirals, of which the thermal fluctuations choose. The most probable number of spiral arms increases with increasing tip radius and with decreasing kinetic anisotropy. Our numerical simulations confirm that in agreement with the assumptions of a recent analysis of two-phase dendrites [Akamatsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 105502 (2014)], the Jackson-Hunt scaling of the eutectic wavelength with pulling velocity is obeyed in the parameter domain explored, and that the natural eutectic wavelength is proportional to the tip radius of the two-phase dendrites. Finally, we find that it is very difficult/virtually impossible to form spiraling two-phase dendrites without anisotropy, an observation that seems to contradict the expectations of Akamatsu et al. Yet, it cannot be excluded that in isotropic systems, two-phase dendrites are rare events difficult to observe in simulations.

  12. Ternary eutectic dendrites: Pattern formation and scaling properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extending previous work [Pusztai et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 032401 (2013)], we have studied the formation of eutectic dendrites in a model ternary system within the framework of the phase-field theory. We have mapped out the domain in which two-phase dendritic structures grow. With increasing pulling velocity, the following sequence of growth morphologies is observed: flat front lamellae → eutectic colonies → eutectic dendritesdendrites with target pattern → partitionless dendrites → partitionless flat front. We confirm that the two-phase and one-phase dendrites have similar forms and display a similar scaling of the dendrite tip radius with the interface free energy. It is also found that the possible eutectic patterns include the target pattern, and single- and multiarm spirals, of which the thermal fluctuations choose. The most probable number of spiral arms increases with increasing tip radius and with decreasing kinetic anisotropy. Our numerical simulations confirm that in agreement with the assumptions of a recent analysis of two-phase dendrites [Akamatsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 105502 (2014)], the Jackson-Hunt scaling of the eutectic wavelength with pulling velocity is obeyed in the parameter domain explored, and that the natural eutectic wavelength is proportional to the tip radius of the two-phase dendrites. Finally, we find that it is very difficult/virtually impossible to form spiraling two-phase dendrites without anisotropy, an observation that seems to contradict the expectations of Akamatsu et al. Yet, it cannot be excluded that in isotropic systems, two-phase dendrites are rare events difficult to observe in simulations

  13. CTLA-4 blockade during dendritic cell based booster vaccination influences dendritic cell survival and CTL expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders E; Ronchese, Franca

    2007-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells and critical for the priming of CD8+ T cells. Therefore the use of these cells as adjuvant cells has been tested in a large number of experimental and clinical vaccination studies, in particular cancer vaccine studies. A number of protocols...

  14. Dendritic cells modified by vitamin D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ayako Wakatsuki; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Zocca, Mai-Britt

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent antigen-presenting cells of the immune system, express nuclear receptors for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (VD3) and they are one of its main targets. In the presence of VD3, DCs differentiate into a phenotype that resembles semimature DCs, with reduced T cell...... costimulatory molecules and hampered IL-12 production. These VD3-modulated DCs induce T cell tolerance in vitro using multiple mechanisms such as rendering T cells anergic, dampening of Th1 responses, and recruiting and differentiating regulatory T cells. Due to their ability to specifically target pathological...

  15. Buoyancy effects of a growing, isolated dendrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canright, D.; Davis, S. H.

    1991-01-01

    The buoyancy effect of a growing isolated dendrite on the solidification process in the undercooling liquid material was investigated by developing an analytic solution to the growth/convection problem in powers of a buoyancy parameter G. The solution depends on the Prandtl number P and the Stefan number S (undercooling) for the local velocity and thermal fields and also the buoyant alteration of the interface shape. Results suggest that buoyancy effect for metals (low P) may be qualitatively different from that for organics (high P).

  16. Plasticity of dendritic spines: subcompartmentalization of signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, Lesley A; Yasuda, Ryohei

    2014-01-01

    The ability to induce and study neuronal plasticity in single dendritic spines has greatly advanced our understanding of the signaling mechanisms that mediate long-term potentiation. It is now clear that in addition to compartmentalization by the individual spine, subcompartmentalization of biochemical signals occurs at specialized microdomains within the spine. The spatiotemporal coordination of these complex cascades allows for the concomitant remodeling of the postsynaptic density and actin spinoskeleton and for the regulation of membrane traffic to express functional and structural plasticity. Here, we highlight recent findings in the signaling cascades at spine microdomains as well as the challenges and approaches to studying plasticity at the spine level. PMID:24215443

  17. Gliadin fragments promote migration of dendritic cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chládková, Barbara; Kamanová, Jana; Palová-Jelínková, Lenka; Cinová, Jana; Šebo, Peter; Tučková, Ludmila

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 4 (2011), 938-948. ISSN 1582-1838 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/07/0414; GA ČR GD310/08/H077; GA ČR GA310/08/0447; GA AV ČR IAA500200801; GA AV ČR IAA500200914 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : celiac disease * gliadin * dendritic cell Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 4.125, year: 2011

  18. Organization of TNIK in dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burette, Alain C; Phend, Kristen D; Burette, Susan; Lin, Qingcong; Liang, Musen; Foltz, Gretchen; Taylor, Noël; Wang, Qi; Brandon, Nicholas J; Bates, Brian; Ehlers, Michael D; Weinberg, Richard J

    2015-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2)- and noncatalytic region of tyrosine kinase (NCK)-interacting kinase (TNIK) has been identified as an interactor in the psychiatric risk factor, Disrupted in Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1). As a step toward deciphering its function in the brain, we performed high-resolution light and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry. We demonstrate here that TNIK is expressed in neurons throughout the adult mouse brain. In striatum and cerebral cortex, TNIK concentrates in dendritic spines, especially in the vicinity of the lateral edge of the synapse. Thus, TNIK is highly enriched at a microdomain critical for glutamatergic signaling. PMID:25753355

  19. Metamaterial absorber with random dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weiren; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2010-05-01

    The metamaterial absorber composed of random dendritic cells has been investigated at microwave frequencies. It is found that the absorptivities come to be weaker and the resonant frequency get red shift as the disordered states increasing, however, the random metamaterial absorber still presents high absorptivity more than 95%. The disordered structures can help understanding of the metamaterial absorber and may be employed for practical design of infrared metamaterial absorber, which may play important roles in collection of radiative heat energy and directional transfer enhancement.

  20. Harnessing Dendritic Cells for Tumor Antigen Presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells that are crucial for the induction of anti-tumor T cell responses. As a consequence, research has focused on the harnessing of DCs for therapeutic interventions. Although current strategies employing ex vivo-generated and tumor-antigen loaded DCs have been proven feasible, there are still many obstacles to overcome in order to improve clinical trial successes and offset the cost and complexity of customized cell therapy. This review focuses on one of these obstacles and a pivotal step for the priming of tumor-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells; the in vitro loading of DCs with tumor antigens

  1. Viruses, dendritic cells and the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Barney S

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The interaction between viruses and dendritic cells (DCs is varied and complex. DCs are key elements in the development of a host response to pathogens such as viruses, but viruses have developed survival tactics to either evade or diminish the immune system that functions to kill and eliminate these micro-organisms. In the present review we summarize current concepts regarding the function of DCs in the immune system, our understanding of how viruses alter DC function to attenuate both the virus-specific and global immune response, and how we may be able to exploit DC function to prevent or treat viral infections.

  2. Measles Virus Induces Functional TRAIL Production by Human Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Azocar, Olga; Lamouille, Barbara; Astier, Anne; Rabourdin-Combe, Chantal; Servet-Delprat, Christine

    2000-01-01

    Measles virus infection induces a profound immunosuppression that can lead to serious secondary infections. Here we demonstrate that measles virus induces tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) mRNA and protein expression in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Moreover, measles virus-infected dendritic cells are shown to be cytotoxic via the TRAIL pathway. PMID:10590149

  3. Measles Virus Induces Functional TRAIL Production by Human Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Azocar, Olga; Lamouille, Barbara; Astier, Anne; Rabourdin-Combe, Chantal; Servet-Delprat, Christine

    2000-01-01

    Measles virus infection induces a profound immunosuppression that can lead to serious secondary infections. Here we demonstrate that measles virus induces tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) mRNA and protein expression in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Moreover, measles virus-infected dendritic cells are shown to be cytotoxic via the TRAIL pathway.

  4. Dendritic Spines in Depression: What We Learned from Animal Models

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Qiao; Ming-Xing Li; Chang Xu; Hui-Bin Chen; Shu-Cheng An; Xin-Ming Ma

    2016-01-01

    Depression, a severe psychiatric disorder, has been studied for decades, but the underlying mechanisms still remain largely unknown. Depression is closely associated with alterations in dendritic spine morphology and spine density. Therefore, understanding dendritic spines is vital for uncovering the mechanisms underlying depression. Several chronic stress models, including chronic restraint stress (CRS), chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS), and chronic social defeat stress (CSDS), have ...

  5. Contribution of sublinear and supralinear dendritic integration to neuronal computations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra eTran-Van-Minh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear dendritic integration is thought to increase the computational ability of neurons. Most studies focus on how supralinear summation of excitatory synaptic responses arising from clustered inputs within single dendrites result in the enhancement of neuronal firing, enabling simple computations such as feature detection. Recent reports have shown that sublinear summation is also a prominent dendritic operation, extending the range of subthreshold input-output transformations conferred by dendrites. Like supralinear operations, sublinear dendritic operations also increase the repertoire of neuronal computations, but feature extraction requires different synaptic connectivity strategies for each of these operations. In this article we will review the experimental and theoretical findings describing the biophysical determinants of the three primary classes of dendritic operations: linear, sublinear, and supralinear. We then review a Boolean algebra-based analysis of simplified neuron models, which provides insight into how dendritic operations influence neuronal computations. We highlight how neuronal computations are critically dependent on the interplay of dendritic properties (morphology and voltage-gated channel expression, spiking threshold and distribution of synaptic inputs carrying particular sensory features. Finally, we describe how global (scattered and local (clustered integration strategies permit the implementation of similar classes of computations, one example being the object feature binding problem.

  6. Bilateral Maxillary, Sphenoid Sinuses and Lumbosacral Spinal Cord Extramedullary Relapse of CML Following Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant

    OpenAIRE

    Hosseini, Soudabeh; Ansari, Shahla; Vosough, Parvaneh; Bahoush, Gholamreza; Hamidieh, Amir Ali; Chahardouli, Bahram; Shamsizadeh, Morteza; Mehrazma, Mitra; Dorgalaleh, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Isolated extramedullary relapse of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) after allogeneic stem cell transplant is rare. There is a case report of a child who developed a granulocytic sarcoma of the maxillary and sphenoid sinuses and lumbosacral spinal cord mass 18 months after allogeneic bone marrow transplant for CML. He was presented with per orbital edema and neurological deficit of lower extremities and a mass lesion was found on spinal cord imaging. No evidence of hematologic relapse was id...

  7. Replacement of hematopoietic system by allogeneic stem cell transplantation in myelofibrosis patients induces rapid regression of bone marrow fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kröger Nicolaus; Kvasnicka Michael; Thiele Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Bone marrow fibrosis is a hallmark of primary and post ET/PV myelofibrosis. To investigated the impact of replacement of the hematopoietic system in myelofibrosis patients by allogeneic stem cell transplantation on bone marrow fibrosis, we studied bone marrow fibrosis on bone marrow samples from 24 patients with myelofibrosis before and after dose-reduced conditioning followed by allogeneic stem cell transplantation from related or unrelated donor. Using the European Consensus on Gra...

  8. DNA profiling in peripheral blood, buccal swabs, hair follicles and semen from a patient following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ya-Ting; XIE, MING-KUN; Wu, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Allogeneic peripheral blood stem cells transplantation (allo-PBSCT) or allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT) have been widely used to treat patients exhibiting certain severe illnesses. However, previous studies have shown that the biological materials of allo-PBSCT or allo-BMT recipients may not constitute credible materials for personal identification. In the present study, four types of commonly used samples were collected from a male individual following gender-matched allo-BM...

  9. In Vivo Proof of Concept of Adoptive Immunotherapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Using Allogeneic Suicide Gene-modified Killer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Leboeuf, Céline; Mailly, Laurent; Wu, Tao; Bour, Gaetan; Durand, Sarah,; Brignon, Nicolas; Ferrand, Christophe; Borg, Christophe; Tiberghien, Pierre; Thimme, Robert; Pessaux, Patrick; Marescaux, Jacques; Baumert, Thomas F.; Robinet, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Cell therapy based on alloreactivity has completed clinical proof of concept against hematological malignancies. However, the efficacy of alloreactivity as a therapeutic approach to treat solid tumors is unknown. Using cell culture and animal models, we aimed to investigate the efficacy and safety of allogeneic suicide gene-modified killer cells as a cell-based therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), for which treatment options are limited. Allogeneic killer cells from healthy donors were...

  10. Acute Myeloid Leukaemia of Donor Cell Origin Developing 17 Years after Allogenic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Acute Promyelocytic Leukaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez, Pilar; Alvarez, J. Carlos; Garrido, Pilar; Lorente, J. Antonio; Palacios, Jorge; Ruiz-Cabello, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Donor cell leukaemia (DCL) is a rare complication of allogenic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We report the case of a female patient with acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL), FAB type M3, who developed acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) type M5 of donor origin 17 years after allogenic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) from her HLA-matched sister. Morphology and immunophenotyping showed differences with the initial leukaemia, and short tandem repeat (STR) analysis confirmed donor-type ha...

  11. Human Allogeneic Bone Marrow and Adipose Tissue Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Induce CD8+ Cytotoxic T Cell Reactivity

    OpenAIRE

    Roemeling-van Rhijn, Marieke; Reinders, Marlies E.; Franquesa, Marcella; Engela, Anja U; Korevaar, Sander S; Roelofs, Helene; Genever, Paul G; IJzermans, Jan NM; Betjes, Michiel GH; Baan, Carla C; Weimar, Willem; Hoogduijn, Martin J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction For clinical applications, Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSC) can be isolated from bone marrow and adipose tissue of autologous or allogeneic origin. Allogeneic cell usage has advantages but may harbor the risk of sensitization against foreign HLA. Therefore, we evaluated whether bone marrow and adipose tissue-derived MSC are capable of inducing HLA-specific alloreactivity. Methods MSC were isolated from healthy human Bone Marrow (BM-MSC) and adipose tissue (ASC) donors. Peripheral ...

  12. Immune Monitoring Using mRNA-Transfected Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borch, Troels Holz; Svane, Inge Marie; Met, Özcan

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells are known to be the most potent antigen presenting cell in the immune system and are used as cellular adjuvants in therapeutic anticancer vaccines using various tumor-associated antigens or their derivatives. One way of loading antigen into the dendritic cells is by mRNA electroporation, ensuring presentation of antigen through major histocompatibility complex I and potentially activating T cells, enabling them to kill the tumor cells. Despite extensive research in the field, only one dendritic cell-based vaccine has been approved. There is therefore a great need to elucidate and understand the immunological impact of dendritic cell vaccination in order to improve clinical benefit. In this chapter, we describe a method for performing immune monitoring using peripheral blood mononuclear cells and autologous dendritic cells transfected with tumor-associated antigen-encoding mRNA. PMID:27236804

  13. Synthesis and field emission properties of Cu dendritic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianwen; Yu, Ke; Zhu, Ziqiang

    2010-03-01

    Cu dendritic nanostructures were synthesized on ITO glass substructure by electrochemical deposition. SEM images showed that these Cu dendritic nanostuctures revealed a clear and well-defined dendritic fractal structure with a pronounced trunk and highly ordered branches distributed on both sides of the trunk. The diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) model was used to explain the fractal growth of Cu dendritic nanostructures. Field emission properties of these Cu dendritic nanostructures were measured, which have possessed good performance with the turn-on field of 7.5 V/μm (defined as the electric field required to be detected at a current density of 0.1 mA/cm 2) and the field enhancement factor β of 1094.

  14. Dendrite coherency of Al-Si-Cu alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldman, Natalia L. M.; Dahle, Arne K.; Stjohn, David H.; Arnberg, Lars

    2001-01-01

    The dendrite coherency point of Al-Si-Cu alloys was determined by thermal analysis and rheological measurement methods by performing parallel measurements at two cooling rates for aluminum alloys across a wide range of silicon and copper contents. Contrary to previous findings, the two methods yield significantly different values for the fraction solid at the dendrite coherency point. This disparity is greatest for alloys of low solute concentration. The results from this study also contradict previously reported trends in the effect of cooling rate on the dendritic coherency point. Consideration of the results shows that thermal analysis is not a valid technique for the measurement of coherency. Analysis of the results from rheological testing indicates that silicon concentration has a dominant effect on grain size and dendritic morphology, independent of cooling rate and copper content, and thus is the factor that determines the fraction solid at dendrite coherency for Al-Si-Cu alloys.

  15. Chemomodulation of human dendritic cell function by antineoplastic agents in low noncytotoxic concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tourkova Irina L

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The dose-delivery schedule of conventional chemotherapy, which determines its efficacy and toxicity, is based on the maximum tolerated dose. This strategy has lead to cure and disease control in a significant number of patients but is associated with significant short-term and long-term toxicity. Recent data demonstrate that moderately low-dose chemotherapy may be efficiently combined with immunotherapy, particularly with dendritic cell (DC vaccines, to improve the overall therapeutic efficacy. However, the direct effects of low and ultra-low concentrations on DCs are still unknown. Here we characterized the effects of low noncytotoxic concentrations of different classes of chemotherapeutic agents on human DCs in vitro. DCs treated with antimicrotubule agents vincristine, vinblastine, and paclitaxel or with antimetabolites 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine and methotrexate, showed increased expression of CD83 and CD40 molecules. Expression of CD80 on DCs was also stimulated by vinblastine, paclitaxel, azacytidine, methotrexate, and mitomycin C used in low nontoxic concentrations. Furthermore, 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine, methotrexate, and mitomycin C increased the ability of human DCs to stimulate proliferation of allogeneic T lymphocytes. Thus, our data demonstrate for the first time that in low noncytotoxic concentrations chemotherapeutic agents do not induce apoptosis of DCs, but directly enhance DC maturation and function. This suggests that modulation of human DCs by noncytotoxic concentrations of antineoplastic drugs, i.e. chemomodulation, might represent a novel approach for up-regulation of functional activity of resident DCs in the tumor microenvironment or improving the efficacy of DCs prepared ex vivo for subsequent vaccinations.

  16. A mouse model of adoptive immunotherapeutic targeting of autoimmune arthritis using allo-tolerogenic dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Tolerogenic dendritic cells (tDCs are immunosuppressive cells with potent tolerogenic ability and are promising immunotherapeutic tools for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA. However, it is currently unknown whether allogeneic tDCs (allo-tDCs induce tolerance in RA, and whether the numbers of adoptively transferred allo-tDCs, or the requirement for pulsing with relevant auto-antigens are important. METHODS: tDCs were derived from bone marrow precursors of C57BL/B6 mice, which were induced in vitro by GM-CSF, IL-10 and TGF-β1. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA was modeled in D1 mice by immunization with type II collagen (CII to test the therapeutic ability of allo-tDCs against CIA. Clinical and histopathologic scores, arthritic incidence, cytokine and anti-CII antibody secretion, and CD4(+Th subsets were analyzed. RESULTS: tDCs were characterized in vitro by a stable immature phonotype and a potent immunosuppressive ability. Following adoptive transfer of low doses (5×10(5 of CII-loaded allo-tDCs, a remarkable anti-arthritic activity, improved clinical scores and histological end-points were found. Serological levels of inflammatory cytokines and anti-CII antibodies were also significantly lower in CIA mice treated with CII-pulsed allo-tDCs as compared with allo-tDCs. Moreover, treatment with allo-tDCs altered the proportion of Treg/Th17 cells. CONCLUSION: These findings suggested that allo-tDCs, especially following antigen loading, reduced the severity of CIA in a dose-dependent manner. The dampening of CIA was associated with modulated cytokine secretion, Treg/Th17 polarization and inhibition of anti-CII secretion. This study highlights the potential therapeutic utility of allo-tDCs in autoimmune arthritis and should facilitate the future design of allo-tDC immunotherapeutic strategies against RA.

  17. Encephalitozoon intestinalis Inhibits Dendritic Cell Differentiation through an IL-6-Dependent Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Carmen E; Zorro, Maria M; Sierra, Jelver; Gilchrist, Katherine; Botero, Jorge H; Baena, Andres; Ramirez-Pineda, Jose R

    2016-01-01

    Microsporidia are a group of intracellular pathogens causing self-limited and severe diseases in immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals, respectively. A cellular type 1 adaptive response, mediated by IL-12, IFNγ, CD4+, and CD8+ T cells has been shown to be essential for host resistance, and dendritic cells (DC) play a key role at eliciting anti-microsporidial immunity. We investigated the in vitro response of DC and DC precursors/progenitors to infection with Encephalitozoon intestinalis (Ei), a common agent of human microsporidosis. Ei-exposed DC cultures up-regulated the surface expression of MHC class II and the costimulatory molecules CD86 and CD40, only when high loads of spores were used. A vigorous secretion of IL-6 but not of IL-1β or IL-12p70 was also observed in these cultures. Ei-exposed DC cultures consisted of immature infected and mature bystander DC, as assessed by MHC class II and costimulatory molecules expression, suggesting that intracellular Ei spores deliver inhibitory signals in DC. Moreover, Ei selectively inhibited the secretion of IL-12p70 in LPS-stimulated DC. Whereas Ei-exposed DC promoted allogeneic naïve T cell proliferation and IL-2 and IFNγ secretion in DC-CD4+ T cell co-cultures, separated co-cultures with bystander or infected DCs showed stimulation or inhibition of IFNγ secretion, respectively. When DC precursors/progenitors were exposed to Ei spores, a significant inhibition of DC differentiation was observed without shifting the development toward cells phenotypically or functionally compatible with myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Neutralization experiments demonstrated that this inhibitory effect is IL-6-dependent. Altogether this investigation reveals a novel potential mechanism of immune escape of microsporidian parasites through the modulation of DC differentiation and maturation. PMID:26870700

  18. Encephalitozoon intestinalis inhibits dendritic cell differentiation through an IL-6-dependent mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Elisa Bernal Silva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AbstractMicrosporidia are a group of intracellular pathogens causing self-limited and severe diseases in immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals, respectively. A cellular type 1 adaptive response, mediated by IL-12, IFNg, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells has been shown to be essential for host resistance, and dendritic cells (DC play a key role at eliciting anti-microsporidial immunity. We investigated the in vitro response of DC and DC precursors/progenitors to infection with Encephalitozoon intestinalis (Ei, a common agent of human microsporidosis. Ei-exposed DC cultures up-regulated the surface expression of MHC class II and the costimulatory molecules CD86 and CD40, only when high loads of spores were used. A vigorous secretion of IL-6 but not of IL-1b or IL-12p70 was also observed in these cultures. Ei-exposed DC cultures consisted of immature infected and mature bystander DC, as assessed by MHC class II and costimulatory molecules expression, suggesting that intracellular Ei spores deliver inhibitory signals in DC. Moreover, Ei selectively inhibited the secretion of IL-12p70 in LPS-stimulated DC. Whereas Ei-exposed DC promoted allogeneic naïve T cell proliferation and IL-2 and IFNg secretion in DC-CD4+ T cell co-cultures, separated co-cultures with bystander or infected DCs showed stimulation or inhibition of IFNg secretion, respectively. When DC precursors/progenitors were exposed to Ei spores, a significant inhibition of DC differentiation was observed without shifting the development towards cells phenotypically or functionally compatible with myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Neutralization experiments demonstrated that this inhibitory effect is IL-6-dependent. Altogether this investigation reveals a novel potential mechanism of immune escape of microsporidian parasites through the modulation of DC differentiation and maturation.

  19. The glycoprotein-hormones activin A and inhibin A interfere with dendritic cell maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reichardt Holger M

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pregnancy represents an exclusive situation in which the immune and the endocrine system cooperate to prevent rejection of the embryo by the maternal immune system. While immature dendritic cells (iDC in the early pregnancy decidua presumably contribute to the establishment of peripheral tolerance, glycoprotein-hormones of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta family including activin A (ActA and inhibin A (InA are candidates that could direct the differentiation of DCs into a tolerance-inducing phenotype. Methods To test this hypothesis we generated iDCs from peripheral-blood-monocytes and exposed them to TGF-beta1, ActA, as well as InA and Dexamethasone (Dex as controls. Results Both glycoprotein-hormones prevented up-regulation of HLA-DR during cytokine-induced DC maturation similar to Dex but did not influence the expression of CD 40, CD 83 and CD 86. Visualization of the F-actin cytoskeleton confirmed that the DCs retained a partially immature phenotype under these conditions. The T-cell stimulatory capacity of DCs was reduced after ActA and InA exposure while the secretion of cytokines and chemokines was unaffected. Conclusion These findings suggest that ActA and InA interfere with selected aspects of DC maturation and may thereby help preventing activation of allogenic T-cells by the embryo. Thus, we have identified two novel members of the TGF-beta superfamily that could promote the generation of tolerance-inducing DCs.

  20. Analyzing dendritic growth in a population of immature neurons in the adult dentate gyrus using laminar quantification of disjointed dendrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ShiraRosenzweig

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, new granule neurons are continuously produced throughout adult life. A prerequisite for the successful synaptic integration of these neurons is the sprouting and extension of dendrites into the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. Thus, studies aimed at investigating the developmental stages of adult neurogenesis often use dendritic growth as an important indicator of neuronal health and maturity. Based on the known topography of the dentate gyrus, characterized by distinct laminar arrangement of granule neurons and their extensions, we have developed a new method for analysis of dendritic growth in immature adult-born granule neurons. The method is comprised of laminar quantification of cell bodies, primary, secondary and tertiary dendrites separately and independently from each other. In contrast to most existing methods, laminar quantification of dendrites does not require the use of exogenous markers and does not involve arbitrary selection of individual neurons. The new method relies on immonuhistochemical detection of endogenous markers such as doublecortin to perform a comprehensive analysis of a sub-population of immature neurons. Disjointed, “orphan” dendrites that often appear in the thin histological sections are taken into account. Using several experimental groups of rats and mice, we demonstrate here the suitable techniques for quantifying neurons and dendrites, and explain how the ratios between the quantified values can be used in a comparative analysis to indicate variations in dendritic growth and complexity.

  1. Dendritic Cells in vivo and in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuiWan; MarcelDupasquier

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are crucial cells of the immune system, and bridged the essential connection between innate and adaptive immunity. They reside in the periphery as sentinels where they take up antigens. Upon activation, they migrate to lymphoid organs and present there the processed antigens to T cells, thereby activating them and eliciting a potent immune response. Dendritic cells are bone marrow-derived cells, still big controversies exist about their in vivo development. In vitro, DC can be generated from multiple precursor cells, among them lymphoid and myeloid committed progenitors. Although it remains unknown how DC are generated in vivo, studying the functions of in vitro generated DC results in fundamental knowledge of the DC biology with promising applications for future medicine. Therefore, in this review, we present current protocols for the generation of DC from precursors in vitro. We will do this for the mouse system, where most research occurs and for the human system, where research concentrates on implementing DC biology in disease treatments. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005;2(1):28-35.

  2. Dendritic Cells in vivo and in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Wan; Marcel Dupasquier

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are crucial cells of the immune system, and bridged the essential connection between innate and adaptive immunity. They reside in the periphery as sentinels where they take up antigens. Upon activation,they migrate to lymphoid organs and present there the processed antigens to T cells, thereby activating them and eliciting a potent immune response. Dendritic cells are bone marrow-derived cells, still big controversies exist about their in vivo development. In vitro, DC can be generated from multiple precursor cells, among them lymphoid and myeloid committed progenitors. Although it remains unknown how DC are generated in vivo,studying the functions of in vitro generated DC results in fundamental knowledge of the DC biology with promising applications for future medicine. Therefore, in this review, we present current protocols for the generation of DC from precursors in vitro. We will do this for the mouse system, where most research occurs and for the human system, where research concentrates on implementing DC biology in disease treatments.

  3. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in adults after fractionated body irradiation and high dose cyclophosphamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present short and long-term results of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation after hyper-fractionated total body irradiation and high dose cyclophosphamide in ten patients treated for leukaemia during th period 1985-89. Three patients died from complications connected to the transplantation, while seven are living free from leukaemia 18 to 59 months after transplantation. Two patients need treatment for chronic graft versus host disease. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is expensive and risky. Close cooperation between clinicians and laboratory specialists is essential. The treatment increases long term survival and probably cures certain patients with leukaemia. Some of the patients will need treatment for chronic graft versus host disease and other late sequelae. 19 refs., 2 tabs

  4. Optimal graft source for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant: bone marrow or peripheral blood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Janak; Sharma, Priyadarshani; Bhatt, Vijaya Raj

    2016-08-01

    Peripheral blood (PB), compared with bone marrow graft, has higher stem cell content, leads to faster engraftment and is more convenient for collection. Consequently, the use of PB graft has significantly increased in recent years. Although the use of PB graft is acceptable or even preferred to bone marrow graft in matched related donor allogeneic transplant due to a possibility of improved survival, PB graft increases the risk of chronic graft-versus-host disease and associated long-term toxicities in the setting of matched unrelated donor allogeneic transplant. In haploidentical transplant, mitigation of graft-versus-host disease with the use of post-transplant cyclophosphamide is a hypothesis-generating possibility; however, available studies have significant limitations to draw any definite conclusion. PMID:27168462

  5. Pneumothorax in an early phase after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Ebihara

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Pneumothorax is very rare after early phase of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT and usually accompanied with pulmonary chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD, such as bronchiolitis obliterans and bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia. The present study describes the case of a seventeen-year-old male diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia who underwent allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT. Pneumothorax occurred at day 43 after BMT. Pneumothorax occurred in early phase of HSCT is extremely rare. The early onset of acute GVHD and the entity of cytomegalovirus might worsen the pulmonary tissue damages for the onset of pneumothorax, indicating that we should be aware of the possibility to occur pneumothorax even in the early period after allogeneic HSCT.

  6. How do I manage hyperglycemia/post-transplant diabetes mellitus after allogeneic HSCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuji, S; Rovó, A; Ohashi, K; Griffith, M; Einsele, H; Kapp, M; Mohty, M; Majhail, N S; Engelhardt, B G; Tichelli, A; Savani, B N

    2016-08-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) recipients frequently develop glucose intolerance and post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM). The clinical importance of PTDM and its detrimental impact on HSCT outcomes are under-recognized. After allo-HSCT, various mechanisms can contribute to the development of PTDM. Here we review information about hyperglycemia and PTDM after allo-HSCT as well as PTDM after solid organ transplantation and describe ways to manage hyperglycemia/PTDM after allogeneic HSCT. Taking into consideration a lack of well-established evidence in the field of allo-HSCT, more studies should be conducted in the future, which will require closer multidisciplinary collaboration between hematologists, endocrinologists and nutritionists. PMID:27042848

  7. Distinct activation of primary human BDCA1(+) dendritic cells upon interaction with stressed or infected β cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, B M; Kers-Rebel, E D; Bottino, R; Piganelli, J D; Galama, J M D; Engelse, M A; de Koning, E J P; Adema, G J

    2016-06-01

    Derailment of immune responses can lead to autoimmune type 1 diabetes, and this can be accelerated or even induced by local stress caused by inflammation or infection. Dendritic cells (DCs) shape both innate and adaptive immune responses. Here, we report on the responses of naturally occurring human myeloid BDCA1(+) DCs towards differentially stressed pancreatic β cells. Our data show that BDCA1(+) DCs in human pancreas-draining lymph node (pdLN) suspensions and blood-derived BDCA1(+) DCs both effectively engulf β cells, thus mimicking physiological conditions. Upon uptake of enterovirus-infected, but not mock-infected cells, BDCA1(+) DCs induced interferon (IFN)-α/β responses, co-stimulatory molecules and proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Notably, induction of stress in β cells by ultraviolet irradiation, culture in serum-free medium or cytokine-induced stress did not provoke strong DC activation, despite efficient phagocytosis. DC activation correlated with the amount of virus used to infect β cells and required RNA within virally infected cells. DCs encountering enterovirus-infected β cells, but not those incubated with mock-infected or stressed β cells, suppressed T helper type 2 (Th2) cytokines and variably induced IFN-γ in allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). Thus, stressed β cells have little effect on human BDCA1(+) DC activation and function, while enterovirus-infected β cells impact these cells significantly, which could help to explain their role in development of autoimmune diabetes in individuals at risk. PMID:26888163

  8. Changes in human dendritic cell number and function in severe obesity may contribute to increased susceptibility to viral infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Shea, D

    2013-02-26

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key immune sentinels linking the innate and adaptive immune systems. DCs recognise danger signals and initiate T-cell tolerance, memory and polarisation. They are critical cells in responding to a viral illness. Obese individuals have been shown to have an impaired response to vaccinations against virally mediated conditions and to have an increased susceptibility to multi-organ failure in response to viral illness. We investigated if DCs are altered in an obese cohort (mean body mass index 51.7±7.3 kg m(-2)), ultimately resulting in differential T-cell responses. Circulating DCs were found to be significantly decreased in the obese compared with the lean cohort (0.82% vs 2.53%). Following Toll-like receptor stimulation, compared with lean controls, DCs generated from the obese cohort upregulated significantly less CD83 (40% vs 17% mean fluorescence intensity), a molecule implicated in the elicitation of T-cell responses, particularly viral responses. Obese DCs produced twofold more of the immunosuppressive cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 than lean controls, and in turn stimulated fourfold more IL-4-production from allogenic naive T cells. We conclude that obesity negatively impacts the ability of DCs to mature and elicit appropriate T-cell responses to a general stimulus. This may contribute to the increased susceptibility to viral infection observed in severe obesity.International Journal of Obesity advance online publication, 26 February 2013; doi:10.1038\\/ijo.2013.16.

  9. Dendritic cells loaded with killed breast cancer cells induce differentiation of tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early clinical trials, mostly in the setting of melanoma, have shown that dendritic cells (DCs) expressing tumor antigens induce some immune responses and some clinical responses. A major difficulty is the extension to other tumors, such as breast carcinoma, for which few defined tumor-associated antigens are available. We have demonstrated, using both prostate carcinoma and melanoma as model systems, that DCs loaded with killed allogeneic tumor cell lines can induce CD8+ T cells to differentiate into cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) specific for shared tumor antigens. The present study was designed to determine whether DCs would capture killed breast cancer cells and present their antigens to autologous CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. We show that killed breast cancer cells are captured by immature DCs that, after induced maturation, can efficiently present MHC class I and class II peptides to CD8+ and CD4+ T lymphocytes. The elicited CTLs are able to kill the target cells without a need for pretreatment with interferon gamma. CTLs can be obtained by culturing the DCs loaded with killed breast cancer cells with unseparated peripheral blood lymphocytes, indicating that the DCs can overcome any potential inhibitory effects of breast cancer cells. Loading DCs with killed breast cancer cells may be considered a novel approach to breast cancer immunotherapy and to identification of shared breast cancer antigens

  10. Corruption of dendritic cell antigen presentation during acute GVHD leads to regulatory T-cell failure and chronic GVHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Koyama, Motoko; Le Texier, Laetitia; Markey, Kate A; Cheong, Melody; Kuns, Rachel D; Lineburg, Katie E; Teal, Bianca E; Alexander, Kylie A; Clouston, Andrew D; Blazar, Bruce R; Hill, Geoffrey R; MacDonald, Kelli P A

    2016-08-11

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a major cause of late mortality following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and is characterized by tissue fibrosis manifesting as scleroderma and bronchiolitis obliterans. The development of acute GVHD (aGVHD) is a powerful clinical predictor of subsequent cGVHD, suggesting that aGVHD may invoke the immunologic pathways responsible for cGVHD. In preclinical models in which sclerodermatous cGVHD develops after a preceding period of mild aGVHD, we show that antigen presentation within major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II of donor dendritic cells (DCs) is markedly impaired early after BMT. This is associated with a failure of regulatory T-cell (Treg) homeostasis and cGVHD. Donor DC-restricted deletion of MHC class II phenocopied this Treg deficiency and cGVHD. Moreover, specific depletion of donor Tregs after BMT also induced cGVHD, whereas adoptive transfer of Tregs ameliorated it. These data demonstrate that the defect in Treg homeostasis seen in cGVHD is a causative lesion and is downstream of defective antigen presentation within MHC class II that is induced by aGVHD. PMID:27338097

  11. Changes of dendritic cells and fractalkine in type 2 diabetic patients with unstable angina pectoris: a preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Juying

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been shown that dendritic cells (DCs and fractalkine play a role in accelerating progression of the inflamed atherosclerotic lesions and plaque rupture. We evaluated the numbers and functional changes of DCs and its subsets in human type 2 diabetes with or without unstable angina pectoris (UAP. Methods The study population consisted of 39 diabetic patients (DM:18 without CAD; DM + UAP: 21 with UAP, 18 non-diabetic UAP patients (UAP, and 15 healthy control (Normal. Peripheral blood DCs and its subsets were measured by three color flow cytometry. Serum levels of fractalkine, IL-12, and IFN-α were also measured. The functional status of the monocyte-derived DCs was analyzed by flow cytometry and allogeneic mixed T lymphocytes reaction. Results The percent and absolute numbers of DCs and mDC within the total leukocyte population was similar for Normal and DM, while significantly lower in DM + UAP. pDC numbers were not significantly altered. Serum fractalkine in DM + UAP was highest among the four groups (p = 0.04 vs. UAP, p = 0.0003 vs. DM, p p = 0.01 level. Compared with DM and UAP, the costimulatory molecules CD86 and proliferation of T cells stimulated by DCs were significantly increased in DM + UAP group. Conclusions Our study suggested that increases in the fractalkine level and the number and functional changes of blood DCs might contribute to diabetic coronary atherosclerosis and plaque destabilization.

  12. Dysregulated Circulating Dendritic Cell Function in Ulcerative Colitis Is Partially Restored by Probiotic Strain Lactobacillus casei Shirota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth R. Mann

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dendritic cells regulate immune responses to microbial products and play a key role in ulcerative colitis (UC pathology. We determined the immunomodulatory effects of probiotic strain Lactobacillus casei Shirota (LcS on human DC from healthy controls and active UC patients. Methods. Human blood DC from healthy controls (control-DC and UC patients (UC-DC were conditioned with heat-killed LcS and used to stimulate allogeneic T cells in a 5-day mixed leucocyte reaction. Results. UC-DC displayed a reduced stimulatory capacity for T cells (P<0.05 and enhanced expression of skin-homing markers CLA and CCR4 on stimulated T cells (P<0.05 that were negative for gut-homing marker β7. LcS treatment restored the stimulatory capacity of UC-DC, reflecting that of control-DC. LcS treatment conditioned control-DC to induce CLA on T cells in conjunction with β7, generating a multihoming profile, but had no effects on UC-DC. Finally, LcS treatment enhanced DC ability to induce TGFβ production by T cells in controls but not UC patients. Conclusions. We demonstrate a systemic, dysregulated DC function in UC that may account for the propensity of UC patients to develop cutaneous manifestations. LcS has multifunctional immunoregulatory activities depending on the inflammatory state; therapeutic effects reported in UC may be due to promotion of homeostasis.

  13. Antigen uptake, processing and presentation to T-cells is still functional in dendritic cells surviving photodynamic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) on anti-tumoral immune reactions is still discussed controversially. Several studies have demonstrated that PDT is able to activate immune reactions against tumor antigens. However, there is also evidence that PDT exerts immunosuppressive effects. Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells and play an important role in, both, the induction of immune reactions as well as the induction and maintenance of immunologic tolerance. Therefore, we investigated the effect of hypericin-mediated PDT on the capability of bone marrow-derived DC for antigen uptake, processing and presentation to CD4+ T lymphocytes. Using beta-galactosidase as model antigens we found that, under sublethal PDT conditions, antigen is still incorporated and degraded by surviving DC. PDT-treated DC, in the presence of beta-galactosidase, were still able to re-activate splenic T cells from immunized but not from naive mice. Similarly, naive allogenic T cells were activated in an antigen-independent manner by PDT-treated DC, albeit at lower efficiency as compared to untreated DC. Based on these data, we hypothesize that DC localized in PDT-treated tumor lesions could play a role in the regulation of anti-tumor immune reactions. (author)

  14. Compartmentalized production of CCL17 in vivo: strong inducibility in peripheral dendritic cells contrasts selective absence from the spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alferink, Judith; Lieberam, Ivo; Reindl, Wolfgang; Behrens, Andrea; Weiss, Susanne; Hüser, Norbert; Gerauer, Klaus; Ross, Ralf; Reske-Kunz, Angelika B; Ahmad-Nejad, Parviz; Wagner, Hermann; Förster, Irmgard

    2003-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs)(*) fulfill an important regulatory function at the interface of the innate and adaptive immune system. The thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17) is produced by DCs and facilitates the attraction of activated T cells. Using a fluorescence-based in vivo reporter system, we show that CCL17 expression in mice is found in activated Langerhans cells and mature DCs located in various lymphoid and nonlymphoid organs, and is up-regulated after stimulation with Toll-like receptor ligands. DCs expressing CCL17 belong to the CD11b(+)CD8(-)Dec205(+) DC subset, including the myeloid-related DCs located in the subepithelial dome of Peyer's patches. CCL17-deficient mice mount diminished T cell-dependent contact hypersensitivity responses and display a deficiency in rejection of allogeneic organ transplants. In contrast to lymphoid organs located at external barriers of the skin and mucosa, CCL17 is not expressed in the spleen, even after systemic microbial challenge or after in vitro stimulation. These findings indicate that CCL17 production is a hallmark of local DC stimulation in peripheral organs but is absent from the spleen as a filter of blood-borne antigens. PMID:12615900

  15. CHARACTERISTICS OF SIGNALING PATHWAYS MEDIATING A CYTOTOXIC EFFECT OF DENDRITIC CELLS UPON ACTIVATED Т LYMPHOCYTES AND NK CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Tyrinova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Cytotoxic/pro-apoptogenic effects of IFNα-induced dendritic cells (IFN-DCs directed against Т-lymphocytes and NK cells were investigated in healthy donors. Using an allogenic MLC system, it was revealed that IFN-DCs induce apoptosis of both activated CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocytes, and NK cells. Apoptosis of CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocytes induced by their interaction with IFN-DCs was mediated by various signaling pathways. In particular, activated CD4+Т-lymphocytes were most sensitive to TRAIL- и Fas/ FasL-transduction pathways, whereas activated CD8+ T-lymphocytes were induced to apoptosis via TNFα-mediated pathway. PD-1/B7-H1-signaling pathway also played a distinct role in cytotoxic activity of IFNDCs towards both types of T lymphocytes and activated NK cells. The pro-apoptogenic/cytotoxic activity of IFN-DC against activated lymphocytes may be regarded as a mechanism of a feedback regulation aimed at restriction of immune response and maintenance of immune homeostasis. Moreover, upregulation of proapoptogenic molecules on DCs under pathological conditions may lead to suppression of antigen-specific response, thus contributing to the disease progression.

  16. IFN priming is necessary but not sufficient to turn on a migratory dendritic cell program in lupus monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Pla, Alicia; Patel, Pinakeen; Maecker, Holden T; Rossello-Urgell, Jose; Baldwin, Nicole; Bennett, Lynda; Cantrell, Victoria; Baisch, Jeanine; Punaro, Marilynn; Gotte, Alisa; Nassi, Lorien; Wright, Tracey; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Banchereau, Jacques; Pascual, Virginia

    2014-06-15

    Blood monocytes from children with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) behave similar to dendritic cells (DCs), and SLE serum induces healthy monocytes to differentiate into DCs in a type I IFN-dependent manner. In this study, we found that these monocytes display significant transcriptional changes, including a prominent IFN signature, compared with healthy controls. Few of those changes, however, explain DC function. Exposure to allogeneic T cells in vitro reprograms SLE monocytes to acquire DC phenotype and function, and this correlates with both IFN-inducible (IP10) and proinflammatory cytokine (IL-1β and IL6) expression. Furthermore, we found that both IFN and SLE serum induce the upregulation of CCR7 transcription in these cells. CCR7 protein expression, however, requires a second signal provided by TLR agonists such as LPS. Thus, SLE serum "primes" a subset of monocytes to readily (<24 h) respond to TLR agonists and acquire migratory DC properties. Our findings might explain how microbial infections exacerbate lupus. PMID:24829414

  17. Alloantigen-specific T-cell hyporesponsiveness induced by dnIKK2 gene-transfected recipient immature dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Cai-bin; Wang, Yi; Wang, Qing-ping; Du, Ke-lin; Wen, Duan-gai; Ouyang, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Immature dendritic cells (iDCs) have been shown to be able to induce peripheral T-cell tolerance through distinct pathways. Here, we investigated the tolerogenic property of recipient iDCs whose maturation was arrested by a dominant negative mutant of inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa-B kinase 2 (dnIKK2) gene. We found that dnIKK2-iDCs presented a typical semi-mature morphology and expressed lower levels of CD80 and CD86, slightly higher MHC-II than untransfected iDCs. The expression of these molecules had no significant change even dnIKK2-iDCs were pulsed by donor antigen. In primary mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR), dnIKK2-iDCs exhibited impaired ability to stimulate allogeneic T-cells, but induced CD4(+)CD25(-) T-cell formation. In co-culture MLR, these CD4(+)CD25(-) T-cells suppressed T-cell alloreaction in an antigen-specific manner. Besides, CD4(+)CD25(-) T-cells inhibited IL-2 and IFN-γ release, whereas promoted IL-10 and TGF-β secretion. These data suggested recipient dnIKK2-iDCs could maintain peripheral tolerance through down-regulating costimulatory molecule expressions and inducing CD4(+)CD25(-) T-cell formation. PMID:26253357

  18. Hyperbaric oxygen: an important treatment modality in severe hemorrhagic cystitis after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Deniz Sargın; Murat Tunç; Nuray Gürses; Oktay Perdeci; Sevgi Kalayoğlu-Beşışık; Mustafa Nuri Yenerel

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) is a generally self-limited complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). It may occur in the early or late posttransplant period and can promote sometimes severe morbidity. We analyzed our data regarding HC in allogeneic HSCT patients in order to establish the efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy in severe HC and to document the main problems during its use. Material and Methods: Between March 1993 and August 2006, 161 patients re...

  19. Gender-Dependent Survival of Allogeneic Trophoblast Stem Cells in Liver

    OpenAIRE

    Epple-Farmer, Jessica; Debeb, Bisrat G.; Smithies, Oliver; Binas, Bert

    2009-01-01

    In view of the well-known phenomenon of trophoblast immune privilege, trophoblast stem cells (TSCs) might be expected to be immune privileged, which could be of interest for cell or gene therapies. Yet in the ectopic sites tested so far, TSC transplants fail to show noticeable immune privilege and seem to lack physiological support. However, we show here that after portal venous injection, green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled TSCs survive for several months in the livers of allogeneic fema...

  20. Medial femoral condyle fracture following traumatic allogenic bone transfer - A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondreddi, Vamsi; Roy, Kishore; Yalamanchili, Ranjith Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Open fractures can cause an "out-in" injury, wherein a foreign body can penetrate the skin causing fracture. There are few reports of allogenic bone getting embedded in soft tissue, but one causing fracture to the host bone has not been reported till date. We present a case, wherein a large cortical bony fragment from one individual penetrated the thigh of another person causing fracture of medial femoral condyle during a head-on collision involving two motorbikes. PMID:26155058

  1. Medial femoral condyle fracture following traumatic allogenic bone transfer – A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondreddi, Vamsi; Roy, Kishore; Yalamanchili, Ranjith Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Open fractures can cause an “out-in” injury, wherein a foreign body can penetrate the skin causing fracture. There are few reports of allogenic bone getting embedded in soft tissue, but one causing fracture to the host bone has not been reported till date. We present a case, wherein a large cortical bony fragment from one individual penetrated the thigh of another person causing fracture of medial femoral condyle during a head-on collision involving two motorbikes. PMID:26155058

  2. Endoscopic diagnosis of cytomegalovirus gastritis after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yasuo; Kakugawa; Masahiro; Kami; Takahisa; Matsuda; Yutaka; Saito; Sung-Won; Kim; Takahiro; Fukuda; Shin-ichiro; Mori; Tadakazu; Shimoda; Ryuji; Tanosaki; Daizo; Saito

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To clarify the endoscopic and clinical findings of cytomegalovirus(CMV) gastritis after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation(allo-SCT).METHODS:Between 1999 and 2005,523 patients underwent allo-SCT at our hospital,and 115 of these patients with gastrointestinal symptoms underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy.RESULTS:CMV gastritis was diagnosed pathologically in seven patients(1.3%) with the other 108 patients serving as controls.Six of the seven patients developed positive CMV antigenemia,and...

  3. Bone Marrow GvHD after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Szyska, Martin; Na, Il-Kang

    2016-01-01

    The bone marrow is the origin of all hematopoietic lineages and an important homing site for memory cells of the adaptive immune system. It has recently emerged as a graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) target organ after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT), marked by depletion of both hematopoietic progenitors and niche-forming cells. Serious effects on the restoration of hematopoietic function and immunological memory are common, especially in patients after myeloablative conditioni...

  4. Treatment of Niemann-Pick disease type B by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    OpenAIRE

    Vellodi, A.; Hobbs, J. R.; O'Donnell, N M; Coulter, B S; Hugh-Jones, K.

    1987-01-01

    Allogenic bone marrow transplantation was carried out on a 3 year old girl with Niemann-Pick disease type B. Successful engraftment was achieved, and nine months after the procedure there was definite clearing of the sphingomyelin from the liver and pronounced clearing from the bone marrow. Any patient with Niemann-Pick disease type B complicated by early or severe hepatic impairment should be considered for bone marrow transplantation.

  5. Soluble Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor: Enbrel (Etanercept) for Subacute Pulmonary Dysfunction Following Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Yanik, Gregory A.; Mineishi, Shin; Levine, John E.; Kitko, Carrie L.; White, Eric S.; Vander Lugt, Mark T.; Harris, Andrew C.; Braun, Thomas; Cooke, Kenneth R.

    2011-01-01

    Subacute lung disease, manifested as either obstructive (OLD) or restrictive (RLD) lung dysfunction, is a common complication following allogeneic stem cell transplantation. In each case, therapeutic options are limited, morbidity remains high, and long-term survival is poor. Between 2001 and 2008, 34 patients with noninfectious, obstructive (25) or RLD restrictive lung dysfunction (nine) received etanercept (Enbrel®, Amgen Inc.) 0.4 mg/kg/dose, subcutaneously, twice weekly, for 4 (group A) o...

  6. Mental adjustment to cancer and survival of patients admitted for allogenic hemopoietic stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Grulke, N; Bailer, H; Larbig, W; Kächele, H

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The Mental Adjustment to Cancer Scale (MAC scale) has evolved to a standard measure in the field of psycho-oncology. In this context an attitude called "fighting spirit" gained much attention as a coping style. Some reports suggest that coping efforts as measured by the MAC scale are predictive for survival of breast cancer patients. We explored the predictive power of the MAC scale by using a sample of patients with haematological malignancies undergoing allogenic hemopoietic ste...

  7. The Use of Cultured Allogenic Keratinocyte Grafting in a Patient with Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Kee Cheol; Park, Bo Young; Kim, Han Koo; Kim, Woo Seob; Bae, Tae Hui

    2011-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a rare genetic disease that is known for continuous skin blistering caused by minor trauma. The skin blisters and bullae that develop often cause skin defects. There is no definitive treatment for EB, only symptomatic relief. We report our experience with cultured allogenic keratinocyte grafting in a newborn patient with EB simplex who had unhealed raw surfaces and was not a skin grafting candidate. The skin lesions of the patient were covered with cultured allog...

  8. A Randomized Trial of One vs. Two Doses of Influenza Vaccine Following Allogeneic Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Karras, Nicole A.; Weeres, Matthew; Sessions, Wendy; Xu, Xiyan; DeFor, Todd; Young, Jo-Anne H.; Stefanski, Heather; Brunstein, Claudio; Cooley, Sarah; Miller, Jeffrey S.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Wagner, John E.; Verneris, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Influenza infection following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) can result in severe complications. The effectiveness of the annual vaccine depends on age, immune competence and the antigenic potential of the 3 strains included (1). . We hypothesized that a second vaccine dose, the standard of care for vaccine-naïve children, might improve post-HCT immune responses. Patients >60 days post-HCT were randomized to receive either 1 (n=33) or 2 (n=32) influenza vaccine doses...

  9. Allogeneic and Xenogeneic Transplantation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells in Immunocompetent Recipients Without Immunosuppressants

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Ching-Shwun; Lin, Guiting; Lue, Tom F.

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are well known for their immunomodulatory capabilities. In particular, their immunosuppressive property is believed to permit their allogeneic or even xenogeneic transplantation into immunocompetent recipients without the use of immunosuppressants. Adipose-derived stem cell (ADSC), owing to its ease of isolation from an abundant tissue source, is a promising MSC for the treatment of a wide range of diseases. ADSC has been shown to lack major histocompatibility co...

  10. Korrelation von monoklonalem und polyklonalem Ciclosporinspiegel bei Patienten nach allogener Stammzelltransplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Rech, Dorit

    2010-01-01

    Hintergrund und Ziele: Die allogene Stammzelltransplantation hat sich zu einem Standardverfahren bei zahlreichen malignen und auch nicht malignen hämatologischen Erkrankungen entwickelt. Ein wesentlicher Faktor für diese Entwicklung war die Einführung potenter Immunsuppressiva, um die potentielle Komplikation einer akuten Graft-versus-Host Erkrankung (GvHD) zu verhindern. Ein hauptsächlicher Bestandteil der GvHD-Prophylaxe ist Ciclosporin A (CSA). Um Toxizitäten durch das Medikament zu vermei...

  11. Methods and biomarkers for outcome prediction after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Sairafi, Darius

    2012-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a potent immunotherapeutic procedure but its usability is limited by a high risk of serious complications. A prerequisite for timely initiation of preventive measures is the availability of predictive methods. This thesis aims to evaluate techniques that may potentially be used to assess the risk of some of these complications on the individual level. Defective function of the pattern recognition receptor NOD2, due to natural...

  12. Voriconazole-Induced Periostitis Mimicking Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Sweiss, Karen; Oh, Annie; Rondelli, Damiano; Patel, Pritesh

    2016-01-01

    Voriconazole is an established first-line agent for treatment of invasive fungal infections in patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation (ASCT). It is associated with the uncommon complication of periostitis. We report this complication in a 58-year-old female undergoing HSCT. She was treated with corticosteroids with minimal improvement. The symptoms related to periostitis can mimic chronic graft-versus-host disease in patients undergoing HSCT and clinicians should differentia...

  13. Successful Treatment with Ganciclovir for Cytomegalovirus Duodenitis following Allogenic Bone Marrow Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Jin Hee; Lee, Je-Hwan; Lee, Kyoo-Hyung; Kim, Woo-Kun; Lee, Jung-Shin; Bahng, Hyeseung; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Kim, Yang-Soo; Kim, Onja; Kim, Sang-Hee

    1999-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. CMV enteritis should be considered when nausea and vomiting continue 3 to 4 weeks after bone marrow transplantation (BMT). The treatment of CMV enteritis is not well established. We report a CMV duodenitis patient following allogenic bone marrow transplantation. The patient had prolonged nausea and vomiting for 5 weeks after bone marrow transplantation and CMV duodenitis was diagnosed by t...

  14. Epstein-Barr virus-associated leukemic lymphoma after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamatsu, Hiroyuki; Araki, Raita; Nishimura, Ryosei; Yachie, Akihiro; Espinoza, J Luis; Okumura, Hirokazu; Yoshida, Takashi; Kuzushima, Kiyotaka; Nakao, Shinji

    2016-07-01

    Leukemic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (PTLD) following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation are extremely rare. We can successfully treat an EBV-associated leukemic lymphoma patient with rituximab, cidofovir, and donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI). In the present case, EBV-specific T cells that were present in the peripheral blood before rituximab administration treatment rapidly increased after DLI in association with a decrease in the EBV-DNA load. PMID:27218416

  15. Herpesvirus-Associated Central Nervous System Diseases after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Meiqing Wu; Fen Huang; Xinmiao Jiang; Zhiping Fan; Hongsheng Zhou; Can Liu; Qianli Jiang; Yu Zhang; Ke Zhao; Li Xuan; Xiao Zhai; Fuhua Zhang; Changxin Yin; Jing Sun; Ru Feng

    2013-01-01

    Herpesvirus infections of the central nervous system (CNS) are associated with encephalitis/myelitis and lymphoproliferative diseases in immunocompromised individuals. As of now, data of herpesvirus-associated CNS diseases in transplant recipients is limited. Hence, in this prospective study, we investigated the incidence of herpesvirus-associated CNS diseases and explored the diagnosis of these diseases in 281 allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) recipients. Herpesv...

  16. A disease risk index for patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Armand, Philippe; Gibson, Christopher J.; Cutler, Corey; Ho, Vincent T.; Koreth, John; Alyea, Edwin P.; Ritz, Jerome; Sorror, Mohamed L.; Lee, Stephanie J.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Storer, Barry E.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Antin, Joseph H.; Soiffer, Robert J.; Kim, Haesook T.

    2012-01-01

    The outcome of allogeneic HSCT varies considerably by the disease and remission status at the time of transplantation. Any retrospective or prospective HSCT study that enrolls patients across disease types must account for this heterogeneity; yet, current methods are neither standardized nor validated. We conducted a retrospective study of 1539 patients who underwent transplantation at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women's Hospital from 2000 to 2009. Using multivariable models for ...

  17. A problem-solving education intervention in caregivers and patients during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Bevans, Margaret; Wehrlen, Leslie; Castro, Kathleen; Prince, Patricia; Shelburne, Nonniekaye; Soeken, Karen; Zabora, James; Wallen, Gwenyth R.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of problem-solving education on self-efficacy and distress in informal caregivers of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients. Patient/caregiver teams attended three 1-hour problem-solving education sessions to help cope with problems during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Primary measures included the Cancer Self-Efficacy Scale–transplant and Brief Symptom Inventory–18. Active caregivers reported improvements in se...

  18. Characterizing and optimizing immune responses to leukaemia antigens after allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Rezvani, Katayoun; Lecturer, Clinical Senior; Barrett, A. John

    2008-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation remains a curative treatment for haematological malignancies resistant to other treatment approaches through the unique graft-versus-leukaemia effect (GvL). However, the lack of specificity of this response results in the targeting of normal tissue, and the morbidity and mortality associated with graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). Further improvements in exploiting the GvL effect to prevent relapse in high-risk leukaemias while minimizing toxicity have focu...

  19. Recurrent isolated extramedullary relapses as granulocytic sarcomas following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Au, WY; Chan, ACL; Lie, AKW; Chen, FE; Liang, R.; Kwong, YL

    1998-01-01

    Isolated extramedullary relapses as granulocytic sarcomas (GS) following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are rare events. We describe three such patients who presented with a unique pattern of GS relapse post-BMT. The clinical features included repeated relapses in multiple sites, absence of marrow involvement, and prolonged survival. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) demonstrated persistence of donor hematopoiesis despite disseminated GS....

  20. Monitoring and characterization of T-lymphocyte reconstitution after allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Abu-Khader, Ahmad

    2006-01-01

    After administration of the hematopoietic stem cells inoculum into the eligible patients in the allogeneic setting, many hematopoietic cells reconstitute in the following months to years after transplantation. The reconstituted cells can be pathogen-specific (e.g. cytomegalovirus (CMV)-reactive T cells), leukemia-specific (i.e. graft versus leukemia (GvL) effect) or recipient-specific (e.g. graft-versus-host disease (GvHD)). Thus, valid in vitro immune monitoring strategies should broaden the...

  1. Ikaros deficiency in host hematopoietic cells separates GVL from GVHD after experimental allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Toubai, Tomomi; Guoqing, Hou; Rossi, Corrine; Mathewson, Nathan; Oravecz-Wilson, Katherine; Cummings, Emily; Wu, Julia; Sun, Yaping; Choi, Sung; Reddy, Pavan

    2015-01-01

    The graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT) is critical for its curative potential. Hwever, GVL is tightly linked to graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Among hematological malignancies, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most resistant to GVL, although the reasons for this remain poorly understood. Clinical studies have identified alterations in Ikaros (Ik) transcription factor as the major marker associated with poor ou...

  2. Etanercept for steroid-refractory acute graft versus host disease following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Joo Han; Lee, Hyo Jung; Kim, Sei Rhan; Song, Ga Won; Lee, Seung Kyong; Park, Sun Young; Kim, Ki Chan; Hwang, Sun Hyuk; Park, Joon Seong

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims The treatment for steroid-refractory acute graft versus host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) needs to be standardized. We report our clinical experience with etanercept for steroid-refractory acute GVHD. Methods Eighteen patients who underwent allo-SCT and presented with steroid-refractory acute GVHD at Ajou University Hospital were studied retrospectively. They were given 25 mg of etanercept subcutaneously twice weekly for 4 weeks. The cli...

  3. Effect of plasma viremia on apoptosis and immunophenotype of dendritic cells subsets in acute SIVmac239 infection of Chinese rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou-Jun Xia

    Full Text Available Non-human primates such as Chinese rhesus macaques (Ch Rhs provide good animal models for research on human infectious diseases. Similar to humans, there are two principal subsets of dendritic cells (DCs in the peripheral blood of Ch Rhs: myeloid DCs (mDCs and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs. In this study, two-color fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS analyses were used to identify the main DC subsets, namely CD1c(+ mDCs and pDCs from Ch Rhs. Then, the apoptosis and immunophenotype changes of DCs subsets were first described during the acute phase of SIVmac239 infection. Both the DCs subsets showed decreased CD4 expression and enhanced CCR5 expression; in particular, those of pDCs significantly changed at most time points. Interestingly, the plasma viral loads were negatively correlated with CD4 expression, but were positively correlated with CCR5 expression of pDCs. During this period, both CD1c(+ mDCs and pDCs were activated by enhancing expressions of co-stimulatory molecules, accompanied with increase in CCR7. Either CD80 or CD86 expressed on CD1c(+ mDCs and pDCs was positively correlated with the plasma viral loads. Our analysis demonstrates that the pDCs were more prone to apoptosis after infection during the acute phase of SIVmac239 infection, which may be due to their high expressions of CD4 and CCR5. Both DCs subsets activated through elevating the expression of co-stimulatory molecules, which was beneficial in controlling the replication of SIV. However, a mere broad immune activation initiated by activated DCs may lead to tragic AIDS progression.

  4. Estradiol promotes functional responses in inflammatory and steady-state dendritic cells through differential requirement for activation function-1 of estrogen receptor α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seillet, Cyril; Rouquié, Nelly; Foulon, Eliane; Douin-Echinard, Victorine; Krust, Andrée; Chambon, Pierre; Arnal, Jean-François; Guéry, Jean-Charles; Laffont, Sophie

    2013-06-01

    17β-Estradiol (E2) has been shown to regulate GM-CSF- or Flt3 ligand-driven dendritic cell (DC) development through estrogen receptor (ER) α signaling in myeloid progenitors. ERα regulates transcription of target genes through two distinct activation functions (AFs), AF-1 and AF-2, whose respective involvement varies in a cell type- or tissue-specific manner. In this study, we investigated the role of ERα AFs in the development and effector functions of inflammatory DCs, steady-state conventional DCs, and plasmacytoid DCs (pDC), using mouse lacking either AF-1 or AF-2. In agreement with previous works, we showed that E2 fostered the differentiation and effector functions of inflammatory DCs through ERα-dependent upregulation of IFN regulatory factor (IRF)-4 in GM-CSF-stimulated myeloid progenitors. Interestingly, whereas AF-1 was required for early IRF-4 upregulation in DC precursors, it was dispensable to enhance IRF-4 expression in differentiated DCs to a level compatible with the development of the more functional Ly6C(-) CD11b(+) DC subset. Presence of E2 had no effect on progenitors from either knock-in mice with 7-aa deletion in helix 12 of ERα, lacking AF-2, or ERα(-/-) mice. By contrast, in Flt3 ligand-driven DC differentiation, activation of AF-1 domain was required to promote the development of more functionally competent conventional DCs and pDCs. Moreover, lack of ERα AF-1 blunted the TLR7-mediated IFN-α response of female pDCs in vivo. Thus, our study demonstrates that ERα uses AF-1 differently in steady-state and inflammatory DC lineages to regulate their innate functions, suggesting that selective ER modulators could be used to target specific DC subsets. PMID:23626011

  5. Dendritic Cells Expressing Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1 Correlate with Plaque Stability in Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Patients with Carotid Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Zhifei; Agrawal, Devendra K.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease with atherosclerotic plaques containing inflammatory cells, including T-lymphocytes, dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages that are responsible for progression and destabilization of atherosclerotic plaques. Stressed cells undergoing necrosis release molecules that act as endogenous danger signals to alert and activate innate immune cells. In atherosclerotic tissue the number of DCs increases with the progression of the lesion and produce several inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM)-1 plays a crucial role in inflammation. However, relationship of DCs and the role of TREM-1 with the stability of atherosclerotic plaques have not been examined. In this study, we investigated the heterogeneity of the plaque DCs, myeloid (mDC1 and mDC2) and plasmacytoid (pDCs), and examined the expression of TREM-1 and their co-localization with DCs in the plaques from symptomatic (S) and asymptomatic (AS) patients with carotid stenosis. We found increased expression of HLA-DR, fascin, and TREM-1 and decreased expression of TREM-2 and α-smooth muscle actin in S compared to AS atherosclerotic carotid plaques. Both TREM-1 and fascin were co-localized suggesting increased expression of TREM-1 in plaque DCs of S compared to AS patients. These data were supported by increased mRNA transcripts of TREM-1 and decreased mRNA transcripts of TREM-2 in carotid plaques of S compared to AS patients. There was higher density of both CD1c+ mDC1 and CD141+ mDC2 in the carotid plaques from AS compared to S patients, where as the density of CD303+ pDCs were higher in the carotid plaques of S compared to AS patients. These findings suggest a potential role of pDCs and TREM-1 in atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability. Thus, newer therapies could be developed to selectively block TREM-1 for stabilizing atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:27148736

  6. Incidence, etiology, and outcome of pleural effusions in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Dipenkumar; Jang, Hyejeong; Kim, Seongho; Deol, Abhinav; Ayash, Lois; Bhutani, Divaya; Lum, Lawrence G; Ratanatharathorn, Voravit; Manasa, Richard; Mellert, Kendra; Uberti, Joseph P

    2016-09-01

    Pleural effusion is a known entity in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT); however, the incidence, risk factors, and morbidity-mortality outcomes associated with pleural effusions remain unknown. We retrospectively evaluated pleural effusions in 618 consecutive adult patients who underwent allogeneic HSCT from January 2008 to December 2013 at our institution. Seventy one patients developed pleural effusion at a median of 40 days (range, 1 - 869) post-HSCT with the cumulative incidence of 9.9% (95% CI, 7.7 - 12.5%) at 1 year. Infectious etiology was commonly associated with pleural effusions followed by volume overload and serositis type chronic GVHD. In multivariate analysis, higher comorbidity index (P = 0.03) and active GVHD (P = 0.018) were found to be significant independent predictors for pleural effusion development. Higher comorbidity index, very high disease risk index, ≤7/8 HLA matching, and unrelated donor were associated with inferior overall survival (OS) (P < 0.03). More importantly, patients with pleural effusion were noted to have poor OS in comparison to patients without pleural effusion (P < 0.001). Overall, pleural effusion is a frequently occurring complication after allogeneic HSCT, adding to morbidity and mortality and hence, early identification is required. Am. J. Hematol. 91:E341-E347, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27238902

  7. TNFRSF14 aberrations in follicular lymphoma increase clinically significant allogeneic T-cell responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsiou, Eleni; Okosun, Jessica; Besley, Caroline; Iqbal, Sameena; Matthews, Janet; Fitzgibbon, Jude; Gribben, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Donor T-cell immune responses can eradicate lymphomas after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT), but can also damage healthy tissues resulting in harmful graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Next-generation sequencing has recently identified many new genetic lesions in follicular lymphoma (FL). One such gene, tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily 14 (TNFRSF14), abnormal in 40% of FL patients, encodes the herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) which limits T-cell activation via ligation of the B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator. As lymphoma B cells can act as antigen-presenting cells, we hypothesized that TNFRSF14 aberrations that reduce HVEM expression could alter the capacity of FL B cells to stimulate allogeneic T-cell responses and impact the outcome of AHSCT. In an in vitro model of alloreactivity, human lymphoma B cells with TNFRSF14 aberrations had reduced HVEM expression and greater alloantigen-presenting capacity than wild-type lymphoma B cells. The increased immune-stimulatory capacity of lymphoma B cells with TNFRSF14 aberrations had clinical relevance, associating with higher incidence of acute GVHD in patients undergoing AHSCT. FL patients with TNFRSF14 aberrations may benefit from more aggressive immunosuppression to reduce harmful GVHD after transplantation. Importantly, this study is the first to demonstrate the impact of an acquired genetic lesion on the capacity of tumor cells to stimulate allogeneic T-cell immune responses which may have wider consequences for adoptive immunotherapy strategies. PMID:27103745

  8. Tumor vaccine strategies after allogeneic T-cell depleted bone marrow transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrara James L.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is currently restricted to hematological malignancies because of a lack of anti-tumor activity against solid cancers. We have tested a novel treatment strategy to stimulate specific anti-tumor activity against a solid tumor after transplantation by vaccination with irradiated tumor cells engineered to secrete granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Using the B16 melanoma model, we found that vaccination elicited potent anti-tumor activity in recipients of syngeneic bone marrow transplantation in a time dependent fashion, and that immune reconstitution was critical for the development of anti-tumor activity. Vaccination did not stimulate anti-tumor immunity after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation because of the post-transplantation immunodeficiency associated with graft-versus-host disease. Remarkably, vaccination was effective in stimulating potent and long-lasting anti-tumor activity in recipients of T cell-depleted allogeneic bone marrow. Thus T cells derived from donor stem cells were able to recognize tumor antigens even though they remained tolerant to host histocompatibility antigens. Donor leukocyte infusion from a donor immunized with the recipient-derived B16 vaccines enhanced clinical activity of tumor vaccines without exacerbating graft-versus-host disease and CD4+ T cells are essential for this enhancement. These results demonstrate that vaccination of both donors and recipients can stimulate potent anti-tumor effects without the induction of graft-versus-host disease, and this strategy has important implications for the treatment of patients with solid malignancies.

  9. Reticulated platelets as a marker of platelet recovery after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michur, H; Maślanka, K; Szczepiński, A; Mariańska, B

    2008-12-01

    Reticulated platelets (RP) are the youngest forms of platelets in blood and reflect the rate of bone marrow platelet production. In the present study, we used flow cytometric analysis to determine the percentage of RPs in patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation. We investigated 10 patients after transplantation from HLA identical siblings: five with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), four with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), and one patient with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Of the patients examined, four patients underwent allogeneic bone marrow transplantation and six patients underwent peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. It was observed that the initially reduced percentage of RPs (2.9 +/- 1.7%; mean +/- SD) was significantly higher (P = 0.0109) in all patients (13.6 +/- 6.4%) in the following 10-26 days. The RP percentage peak preceded the recovery of peripheral platelet count up to 45.6 x 10(9)/l on average by 3 days. We found no difference in RP% between the AML and CML patients but we did observe that in CML patients the RP percentage increased on average 7 days earlier than in AML patients. The elevated RP percentage reflects increased bone marrow regeneration and can be considered an additional marker of thrombopoietic recovery in the patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:18983304

  10. Allogeneic radiation chimeras respond to TNP-modified donor and host targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolerance to major histocompatibility antigens as well as the ability to mount a cytotoxic response to hapten-modified cells of bone marrow donor and host origin was studied in allogeneic radiation chimeras. Lethally irradiated (C57BL/6 x DBA/2)F1 hosts reconstituted with anti-Thy 1.2 + C-treated bone marrow from (C57BL/6 x CBA)F1 mice showed tolerance to the MHC antigens of the three parental strains as measured by MLC and CML assay. The chimeras responded normally to unrelated allogeneic cells. Chimeric animals generated a cytotoxic response to hapten-modified cells of both donor (CBA) and host (DBA/2) haplotypes, as well as to C57BL/6, demonstrating that tolerance to the hapten-presenting host haplotype is sufficient to allow a cytotoxic antihapten response, and that processing through a semiallogeneic host environment does not affect the ability to generate a response to hapten in conjunction with self-determinants. Chimeras failed to mount a cytotoxic response to hapten presented on nontolerated allogeneic spleen cells

  11. Outcome of Lower-Intensity Allogeneic Transplantation in non-Hodgkin Lymphoma After Autologous Transplant Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freytes, César O.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Carreras, Jeanette; Burns, Linda J.; Gale, Robert Peter; Isola, Luis; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Seftel, Matthew; Vose, Julie M.; Miller, Alan M.; Gibson, John; Gross, Thomas G.; Rowlings, Philip A.; Inwards, David J.; Pavlovsky, Santiago; Martino, Rodrigo; Marks, David I.; Hale, Gregory A.; Smith, Sonali M.; Schouten, Harry C.; Slavin, Simon; Klumpp, Thomas R.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; van Besien, Koen; Hari, Parameswaran N.

    2012-01-01

    We studied the outcome of allogeneic transplantation after lower-intensity conditioning regimens (reduced-intensity [RIC] and non-myeloablative [NST]) in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) relapsing after autologous transplantation. Non-relapse mortality (NRM), lymphoma progression/relapse, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed in 263 NHL patients. All had relapsed after a prior autologous transplant and then received allogeneic transplantation from related (n = 26) or unrelated donors (n= 237) after RIC (n = 128) or NST (n = 135), and were reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) between 1996 and 2006. Median follow-up of survivors was 68 months (range, 3–111). Three-year NRM was 44% (95% CI, 37%–50%). Lymphoma progression/relapse at three years was 35% (95% CI, 29%–41%). Three-year probabilities of PFS and OS were 21% (95% CI, 16%–27%) and 32% (95% CI, 27%–38%) respectively. Superior performance score, longer interval between transplants, total-body irradiation-based conditioning regimen and lymphoma remission at transplantation correlated with improved PFS. Allogeneic transplantation after lower-intensity conditioning is associated with significant NRM, but can result in long-term PFS. We describe a quantitative risk model based on pretransplant risk factors in order to identify those likely to benefit from this approach. PMID:22198543

  12. Dendritic solidification morphology viewed from the perspective of constructal theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we focus on the application of the constructal theory in predicting the dendritic solid structure. First we analyse the marginal stability criterion from the perspective of the constructal principle. Having as a guiding principle the constructal law we have shown that among the whole range of possible dendrite tip radiuses predicted by the stability analysis the dendrite tip will choose the smallest one, that is a radius equal with the smallest perturbation wavelength leading to instabilities. We identify as well the existence of a competition between the diffusion controlled growth and the dendritic growth. Second, we develop a model for the secondary arm spacing. We identify a competition between the lateral diffusion controlled growth of a needle and the dendritic growth of lateral secondary arms. By analysing this competition we are able to characterize the sidebranching mechanism and to finally compute the secondary arm spacing. The result is in good agreement with the experimental results. Finally, the primary arm spacing is analysed from the perspective of the constructal law. The constructal law predicts that the only way the columnar tips can optimize the solidification process is to minimize the spacing between two adjacent tips, namely λ1. By quantifying the two mechanisms responsible for the selection of λ1, the dendrite division and the dendrite overgrown mechanisms, we were finally able to obtain a model for the primary arm spacing. This model is also validated against various experimental data

  13. NMDA spike/plateau potentials in dendrites of thalamocortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustinaite, Sigita; Kuhn, Bernd; Helm, Paul Johannes; Heggelund, Paul

    2014-08-13

    Dendritic NMDA spike/plateau potentials, first discovered in cortical pyramidal neurons, provide supralinear integration of synaptic inputs on thin and distal dendrites, thereby increasing the impact of these inputs on the soma. The more specific functional role of these potentials has been difficult to clarify, partly due to the complex circuitry of cortical neurons. Thalamocortical (TC) neurons in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus participate in simpler circuits. They receive their primary afferent input from retina and send their output to visual cortex. Cortex, in turn, regulates this output through massive feedback to distal dendrites of the TC neurons. The TC neurons can operate in two modes related to behavioral states: burst mode prevailing during sleep, when T-type calcium bursts largely disrupt the transfer of signals from retina to cortex, and tonic mode, which provides reliable transfer of retinal signals to cortex during wakefulness. We studied dendritic potentials in TC neurons with combined two-photon calcium imaging and whole-cell recording of responses to local dendritic glutamate iontophoresis in acute brain slices from mice. We found that NMDA spike/plateaus can be elicited locally at distal dendrites of TC neurons. We suggest that these dendritic potentials have important functions in the cortical regulation of thalamocortical transmission. NMDA spike/plateaus can induce shifts in the functional mode from burst to tonic by blockade of T-type calcium conductances. Moreover, in tonic mode, they can facilitate the transfer of retinal signals to cortex by depolarization of TC neurons. PMID:25122891

  14. Dendritic mitochondria reach stable positions during circuit development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faits, Michelle C; Zhang, Chunmeng; Soto, Florentina; Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria move throughout neuronal dendrites and localize to sites of energy demand. The prevailing view of dendritic mitochondria as highly motile organelles whose distribution is continually adjusted by neuronal activity via Ca2+-dependent arrests is based on observations in cultured neurons exposed to artificial stimuli. Here, we analyze the movements of mitochondria in ganglion cell dendrites in the intact retina. We find that whereas during development 30% of mitochondria are motile at any time, as dendrites mature, mitochondria all but stop moving and localize stably to synapses and branch points. Neither spontaneous nor sensory-evoked activity and Ca2+ transients alter motility of dendritic mitochondria; and pathological hyperactivity in a mouse model of retinal degeneration elevates rather than reduces motility. Thus, our findings indicate that dendritic mitochondria reach stable positions during a critical developmental period of high motility, and challenge current views about the role of activity in regulating mitochondrial transport in dendrites. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11583.001 PMID:26742087

  15. Adolescent cocaine exposure simplifies orbitofrontal cortical dendritic arbors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren M DePoy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cocaine and amphetamine remodel dendritic spines within discrete cortico-limbic brain structures including the orbitofrontal cortex (oPFC. Whether dendrite structure is similarly affected, and whether pre-existing cellular characteristics influence behavioral vulnerabilities to drugs of abuse, remain unclear. Animal models provide an ideal venue to address these issues because neurobehavioral phenotypes can be defined both before, and following, drug exposure. We exposed mice to cocaine from postnatal days 31-35, corresponding to early adolescence, using a dosing protocol that causes impairments in an instrumental reversal task in adulthood. We then imaged and reconstructed excitatory neurons in deep-layer oPFC. Prior cocaine exposure shortened and simplified arbors, particularly in the basal region. Next, we imaged and reconstructed orbital neurons in a developmental-genetic model of cocaine vulnerability – the p190rhogap+/- mouse. p190RhoGAP is an actin cytoskeleton regulatory protein that stabilizes dendrites and dendritic spines, and p190rhogap+/- mice develop rapid and robust locomotor activation in response to cocaine. Despite this, oPFC dendritic arbors were intact in drug-naïve p190rhogap+/- mice. Together, these findings provide evidence that adolescent cocaine exposure has long-term effects on dendrite structure in the oPFC, and they suggest that cocaine-induced modifications in dendrite structure may contribute to the behavioral effects of cocaine more so than pre-existing structural abnormalities in this cell population.

  16. Control of dendritic morphogenesis by Trio in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri Shivalkar

    Full Text Available Abl tyrosine kinase and its effectors among the Rho family of GTPases each act to control dendritic morphogenesis in Drosophila. It has not been established, however, which of the many GTPase regulators in the cell link these signaling molecules in the dendrite. In axons, the bifunctional guanine exchange factor, Trio, is an essential link between the Abl tyrosine kinase signaling pathway and Rho GTPases, particularly Rac, allowing these systems to act coordinately to control actin organization. In dendritic morphogenesis, however, Abl and Rac have contrary rather than reinforcing effects, raising the question of whether Trio is involved, and if so, whether it acts through Rac, Rho or both. We now find that Trio is expressed in sensory neurons of the Drosophila embryo and regulates their dendritic arborization. trio mutants display a reduction in dendritic branching and increase in average branch length, whereas over-expression of trio has the opposite effect. We further show that it is the Rac GEF domain of Trio, and not its Rho GEF domain that is primarily responsible for the dendritic function of Trio. Thus, Trio shapes the complexity of dendritic arbors and does so in a way that mimics the effects of its target, Rac.

  17. Design of tumor-specific immunotherapies using dendritic cells - effect of bromelain on dendritic cell maturation

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsen, Marie

    2009-01-01

    Immunotherapy using dendritic cells (DC) has shown promising results in clinical trials, but few relevant successes are recorded. Therefore, the choice of an appropriate DC population is critical for the outcome of this treatment. The DC used today in immunotherapy are often matured with a cytokine cocktail consisting of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and PGE2. These cells have deficits in their cytokine production, and also their migratory capacity in vivo needs improvement. After being introduced to br...

  18. Fractal structures of dendrites in GaSe crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikov, N. N.; Borisenko, E. B.; Borisenko, D. N.; Bozhko, S. I.

    2008-07-01

    Solidification of melts at substantial supercooling is associated with instability on the growth front. This causes growth of dendrites, which form as a branched tree in a crystal. In the layered melt-grown GaSe crystals dendrites are observed, if growth rates are rather high [N.N. Kolesnikov, E.B. Borisenko, D.N. Borisenko, V.K. Gartman, Influence of growth conditions on microstructure and properties of GaSe crystals, J. Crystal Growth 300 (2) (2007) 294-298]. Models based on solution of the thermal diffusion problem are traditionally used to describe dendrite growth. Solution of this problem requires information about several physical parameters, such as diffusion coefficient, heat conductivity coefficient and supercooling at the solid/liquid interface. The study of scale invariance of dendrites formed in a crystal provides a new approach to solution of the dynamic growth problem. The calculated fractal dimensionality of the experimentally observed dendrites in GaSe crystals is D=1.7. It coincides with dimensionality of the clusters obtained through computer simulation in terms of the model of diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA). This result provides a new approach to description of the dynamics of dendrite growth. We have shown that the dendrite growth mechanism in the layered semiconductor crystals can be described by a two-dimensional DLA model. It is shown that probabilistic simulation can be used to show the development of a dendrite in any material. In contrast to the classical theories of dendrite growth, this approach does not require information on physical parameters.

  19. Information Fusion for Anomaly Detection with the Dendritic Cell Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie; Tedesco, Gianni

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells are antigen presenting cells that provide a vital link between the innate and adaptive immune system, providing the initial detection of pathogenic invaders. Research into this family of cells has revealed that they perform information fusion which directs immune responses. We have derived a Dendritic Cell Algorithm based on the functionality of these cells, by modelling the biological signals and differentiation pathways to build a control mechanism for an artificial immune system. We present algorithmic details in addition to experimental results, when the algorithm was applied to anomaly detection for the detection of port scans. The results show the Dendritic Cell Algorithm is sucessful at detecting port scans.

  20. Follicular Dendritic Cell Sarcoma of the Abdomen: the Imaging Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Tae Wook; Lee, Soon Jin; Song, Hye Jong [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma is a rare neoplasm that originates from follicular dendritic cells in lymphoid follicles. This disease usually involves the lymph nodes, and especially the head and neck area. Rarely, extranodal sites may be affected, including tonsil, the oral cavity, liver, spleen and the gastrointestinal tract. We report here on the imaging findings of follicular dendritic cell sarcoma of the abdomen that involved the retroperitoneal lymph nodes and colon. It shows as a well-defined, enhancing homogenous mass with internal necrosis and regional lymphadenopathy.

  1. Harnessing dendritic cells in inflammatory skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chung-Ching; Di Meglio, Paola; Nestle, Frank O

    2011-02-01

    The skin immune system harbors a complex network of dendritic cells (DCs). Recent studies highlight a diverse functional specialization of skin DC subsets. In addition to generating cellular and humoral immunity against pathogens, skin DCs are involved in tolerogenic mechanisms to ensure the maintenance of immune homeostasis, as well as in pathogenesis of chronic inflammation in the skin when excessive immune responses are initiated and unrestrained. Harnessing DCs by directly targeting DC-derived molecules or selectively modulate DC subsets is a convincing strategy to tackle inflammatory skin diseases. In this review we discuss recent advances underlining the functional specialization of skin DCs and discuss the potential implication for future DC-based therapeutic strategies. PMID:21295490

  2. Isolation of Human Skin Dendritic Cell Subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, Merry; Jardine, Laura; Haniffa, Muzlifah

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized leukocytes with antigen-processing and antigen-presenting functions. DCs can be divided into distinct subsets by anatomical location, phenotype and function. In human, the two most accessible tissues to study leukocytes are peripheral blood and skin. DCs are rare in human peripheral blood (Nestle et al., J Immunol 151:6535-6545, 1993). These factors led to the extensive use of skin DCs as the "prototype" migratory DCs in human studies. In this chapter, we detail the protocols to isolate DCs and resident macrophages from human skin. We also provide a multiparameter flow cytometry gating strategy to identify human skin DCs and to distinguish them from macrophages. PMID:27142012

  3. Dendritic Cells and Humoral Immunity in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Hideki; Schmitt, Nathalie; Palucka, A. Karolina; Banchereau, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Summary Dendritic cells (DCs) orchestrate the innate and adaptive immune systems to induce tolerance and immunity. DC plasticity and subsets are prominent determinants in the regulation of immune responses. Our recent studies suggest that humoral and cellular immunity is regulated by different myeloid DC subsets with distinct intrinsic properties in humans. While antibody response is preferentially mediated by CD14+ dermal DCs, cytotoxic T cell response is preferentially mediated by Langerhans cells (LCs). Thus, mechanisms whereby DCs induce humoral and cellular immunity appear to be fundamentally distinct. In this review, we will focus on the role of DCs in the development of humoral immunity. We will also discuss the mechanisms whereby DCs induce CD4+ T cells associated with the help of B cell response, including T follicular helper (Tfh) cells, and why human LCs lack this ability. PMID:20309010

  4. Harnessing Human Dendritic Cell Subsets for Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Hideki; Schmitt, Nathalie; Klechevsky, Eynav; Pedroza-Gonzales, Alexander; Matsui, Toshimichi; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon; Fay, Joseph; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques; Palucka, Karolina

    2010-01-01

    Summary Immunity results from a complex interplay between the antigen-nonspecific innate immune system and the antigen-specific adaptive immune system. The cells and molecules of the innate system employ non-clonal recognition receptors including lectins, Toll-like receptors, NOD-like receptors and helicases. B and T lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system employ clonal receptors recognizing antigens or their derived peptides in a highly specific manner. An essential link between innate and adaptive immunity is provided by dendritic cells (DCs). DCs can induce such contrasting states as immunity and tolerance. The recent years have brought a wealth of information on the biology of DCs revealing the complexity of this cell system. Indeed, DC plasticity and subsets are prominent determinants of the type and quality of elicited immune responses. Here we summarize our recent studies aimed at a better understanding of the DC system to unravel the pathophysiology of human diseases and design novel human vaccines. PMID:20193020

  5. Immunotherapy of hematological malignancies using dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Velde, Ann L R; Berneman, Zwi N; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F I

    2008-03-01

    The arsenal of therapeutic weapons against hematological malignancies is constantly growing. Unravelling the secrets of tumor immunobiology has allowed researchers to manipulate the immune system in order to stimulate tumor immunity or to bypass tumor-induced immunosuppression. An area of great interest is active specific immunotherapy where dendritic cell (DC)-based therapeutic vaccines for cancer have definitely grabbed the spotlight. DC are intensively investigated as cellular adjuvants to harness the immune system to fight off cancer by augmenting the number and effector functions of tumor-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. In the present review we present a comprehensive synopsis and an update of the use of DC in hematological malignancies. In the future, more basic research as well as more clinical trials are warranted to fully establish the value of DC vaccination as an adjuvant therapy for modern hematological oncology. PMID:18390412

  6. Harnessing Dendritic Cells for Tumor Antigen Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nierkens, Stefan [Department of Tumor Immunology, Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein 28, Nijmegen 6525 GA (Netherlands); Janssen, Edith M., E-mail: edith.janssen@cchmc.org [Division of Molecular Immunology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Research Foundation, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States)

    2011-04-26

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells that are crucial for the induction of anti-tumor T cell responses. As a consequence, research has focused on the harnessing of DCs for therapeutic interventions. Although current strategies employing ex vivo-generated and tumor-antigen loaded DCs have been proven feasible, there are still many obstacles to overcome in order to improve clinical trial successes and offset the cost and complexity of customized cell therapy. This review focuses on one of these obstacles and a pivotal step for the priming of tumor-specific CD8{sup +} and CD4{sup +} T cells; the in vitro loading of DCs with tumor antigens.

  7. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1998-01-01

    The specific aims of the project were: (1) Application of the NASA bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC). (2) Compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients. (3) Analyze the effectiveness of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in a murine model of experimental fungal disease. Our investigations have provided new insight into DC immunobiology and have led to the development of methodology to evaluate DC in blood of normal donors and patients. Information gained from these studies has broadened our understanding of possible mechanisms involved in the immune dysfunction of space travelers and earth-bound cancer patients, and could contribute to the design of novel therapies to restore/preserve immunity in these individuals. Several new avenues of investigation were also revealed. The results of studies completed during Round 2 are summarized.

  8. Platinum dendritic nanoparticles with magnetic behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted increasing attention for biomedical applications in magnetic resonance imaging, high frequency magnetic field hyperthermia therapies, and magnetic-field-gradient-targeted drug delivery. In this study, three-dimensional (3D) platinum nanostructures with large surface area that features magnetic behavior have been demonstrated. The well-developed 3D nanodendrites consist of plentiful interconnected nano-arms ∼4 nm in size. The magnetic behavior of the 3D dendritic Pt nanoparticles is contributed by the localization of surface electrons due to strongly bonded oxygen/Pluronic F127 and the local magnetic moment induced by oxygen vacancies on the neighboring Pt and O atoms. The magnetization of the nanoparticles exhibits a mixed paramagnetic and ferromagnetic state, originating from the core and surface, respectively. The 3D nanodendrite structure is suitable for surface modification and high amounts of drug loading if the transition temperature was enhanced to room temperature properly.

  9. Burn injury triggered dysfunction in dendritic cell response to TLR9 activation and resulted in skewed T cell functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Shen

    Full Text Available Severe trauma such as burn injury is often associated with a systemic inflammatory syndrome characterized by a hyperactive innate immune response and suppressed adaptive immune function. Dendritic cells (DCs, which sense pathogens via their Toll-like receptors (TLRs, play a pivotal role in protecting the host against infections. The effect of burn injury on TLR-mediated DC function is a debated topic and the mechanism controlling the purported immunosuppressive response remains to be elucidated. Here we examined the effects of burn injury on splenic conventional DC (cDC and plasmacytoid DC (pDC responses to TLR9 activation. We demonstrate that, following burn trauma, splenic cDCs' cytokine production profile in response to TLR9 activation became anti-inflammatory dominant, with high production of IL-10 (>50% increase and low production of IL-6, TNF-α and IL-12p70 (∼25-60% reduction. CD4+ T cells activated by these cDCs were defective in producing Th1 and Th17 cytokines. Furthermore, burn injury had a more accentuated effect on pDCs than on cDCs. Following TLR9 activation, pDCs displayed an immature phenotype with an impaired ability to secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-α, IL-6 and TNF-α and to activate T cell proliferation. Moreover, cDCs and pDCs from burn-injured mice had low transcript levels of TLR9 and several key molecules of the TLR signaling pathway. Although hyperactive innate immune response has been associated with severe injury, our data show to the contrary that DCs, as a key player in the innate immune system, had impaired TLR9 reactivity, an anti-inflammatory phenotype, and a dysfunctional T cell-priming ability. We conclude that burn injury induced impairments in DC immunobiology resulting in suppression of adaptive immune response. Targeted DC immunotherapies to promote their ability in triggering T cell immunity may represent a strategy to improve immune defenses against infection following burn injury.

  10. Dendritic Kv3.3 potassium channels in cerebellar purkinje cells regulate generation and spatial dynamics of dendritic Ca2+ spikes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagha, Edward; Manita, Satoshi; Ross, William N; Rudy, Bernardo

    2010-06-01

    Purkinje cell dendrites are excitable structures with intrinsic and synaptic conductances contributing to the generation and propagation of electrical activity. Voltage-gated potassium channel subunit Kv3.3 is expressed in the distal dendrites of Purkinje cells. However, the functional relevance of this dendritic distribution is not understood. Moreover, mutations in Kv3.3 cause movement disorders in mice and cerebellar atrophy and ataxia in humans, emphasizing the importance of understanding the role of these channels. In this study, we explore functional implications of this dendritic channel expression and compare Purkinje cell dendritic excitability in wild-type and Kv3.3 knockout mice. We demonstrate enhanced excitability of Purkinje cell dendrites in Kv3.3 knockout mice, despite normal resting membrane properties. Combined data from local application pharmacology, voltage clamp analysis of ionic currents, and assessment of dendritic Ca(2+) spike threshold in Purkinje cells suggest a role for Kv3.3 channels in opposing Ca(2+) spike initiation. To study the physiological relevance of altered dendritic excitability, we measured [Ca(2+)](i) changes throughout the dendritic tree in response to climbing fiber activation. Ca(2+) signals were specifically enhanced in distal dendrites of Kv3.3 knockout Purkinje cells, suggesting a role for dendritic Kv3.3 channels in regulating propagation of electrical activity and Ca(2+) influx in distal dendrites. These findings characterize unique roles of Kv3.3 channels in dendrites, with implications for synaptic integration, plasticity, and human disease. PMID:20357073

  11. Probiotics, dendritic cells and bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyisetan, Oladapo; Tracey, Christopher; Hellawell, Giles O

    2012-06-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The suppressor effect of probiotics on superficial bladder cancer is an observed phenomenon but the specific mechanism is poorly understood. The evidence strongly suggests natural killer (NK) cells are the anti-tumour effector cells involved and NK cell activity correlates with the observed anti-tumour effect in mice. It is also known that dendritic cells (DC) cells are responsible for the recruitment and mobilization of NK cells so therefore it may be inferred that DC cells are most likely to be the interphase point at which probiotics act. In support of this, purification of NK cells was associated with a decrease in NK cells activity. The current use of intravesical bacille Calmette-Guérin in the management of superficial bladder cancer is based on the effect of a localised immune response. In the same way, understanding the mechanism of action of probiotics and the role of DC may potentially offer another avenue via which the immune system may be manipulated to resist bladder cancer. Probiotic foods have been available in the UK since 1996 with the arrival of the fermented milk drink (Yakult) from Japan. The presence of live bacterial ingredients (usually lactobacilli species) may confer health benefits when present in sufficient numbers. The role of probiotics in colo-rectal cancer may be related in part to the suppression of harmful colonic bacteria but other immune mechanisms are involved. Anti-cancer effects outside the colon were suggested by a Japanese report of altered rates of bladder tumour recurrence after ingestion of a particular probiotic. Dendritic cells play a central role to the general regulation of the immune response that may be modified by probiotics. The addition of probiotics to the diet may confer benefit by altering rates of bladder tumour recurrence and also alter the response to immune mechanisms involved with the application of intravesical treatments (bacille Calmette

  12. GATA2 regulates dendritic cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onodera, Koichi; Fujiwara, Tohru; Onishi, Yasushi; Itoh-Nakadai, Ari; Okitsu, Yoko; Fukuhara, Noriko; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Shimizu, Ritsuko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Harigae, Hideo

    2016-07-28

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are critical immune response regulators; however, the mechanism of DC differentiation is not fully understood. Heterozygous germ line GATA2 mutations induce GATA2-deficiency syndrome, characterized by monocytopenia, a predisposition to myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia, and a profoundly reduced DC population, which is associated with increased susceptibility to viral infections, impaired phagocytosis, and decreased cytokine production. To define the role of GATA2 in DC differentiation and function, we studied Gata2 conditional knockout and haploinsufficient mice. Gata2 conditional deficiency significantly reduced the DC count, whereas Gata2 haploinsufficiency did not affect this population. GATA2 was required for the in vitro generation of DCs from Lin(-)Sca-1(+)Kit(+) cells, common myeloid-restricted progenitors, and common dendritic cell precursors, but not common lymphoid-restricted progenitors or granulocyte-macrophage progenitors, suggesting that GATA2 functions in the myeloid pathway of DC differentiation. Moreover, expression profiling demonstrated reduced expression of myeloid-related genes, including mafb, and increased expression of T-lymphocyte-related genes, including Gata3 and Tcf7, in Gata2-deficient DC progenitors. In addition, GATA2 was found to bind an enhancer element 190-kb downstream region of Gata3, and a reporter assay exhibited significantly reduced luciferase activity after adding this enhancer region to the Gata3 promoter, which was recovered by GATA sequence deletion within Gata3 +190. These results suggest that GATA2 plays an important role in cell-fate specification toward the myeloid vs T-lymphocyte lineage by regulating lineage-specific transcription factors in DC progenitors, thereby contributing to DC differentiation. PMID:27259979

  13. Passive Dendrites Enable Single Neurons to Compute Linearly Non-separable Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Cazé, Romain Daniel; Humphries, Mark; Gutkin, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Local supra-linear summation of excitatory inputs occurring in pyramidal cell dendrites, the so-called dendritic spikes, results in independent spiking dendritic sub-units, which turn pyramidal neurons into two-layer neural networks capable of computing linearly non-separable functions, such as the exclusive OR. Other neuron classes, such as interneurons, may possess only a few independent dendritic sub-units, or only passive dendrites where input summation is purely sub-linear, and where den...

  14. Actin Remodeling and Polymerization Forces Control Dendritic Spine Morphology

    CERN Document Server

    Miermans, Karsten; Storm, Cornelis; Hoogenraad, Casper

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic spines are small membranous structures that protrude from the neuronal dendrite. Each spine contains a synaptic contact site that may connect its parent dendrite to the axons of neighboring neurons. Dendritic spines are markedly distinct in shape and size, and certain types of stimulation prompt spines to evolve, in fairly predictable fashion, from thin nascent morphologies to the mushroom-like shapes associated with mature spines. This striking progression is coincident with the (re)configuration of the neuronal network during early development, learning and memory formation, and has been conjectured to be part of the machinery that encodes these processes at the scale of individual neuronal connections. It is well established that the structural plasticity of spines is strongly dependent upon the actin cytoskeleton inside the spine. A general framework that details the precise role of actin in directing the transitions between the various spine shapes is lacking. We address this issue, and present...

  15. CD163 positive subsets of blood dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Møller, Holger Jon; Moestrup, Søren Kragh; Møller, Bjarne Kuno

    CD163 and CD91 are scavenging receptors with highly increased expression during the differentiation of monocytes into the anti-inflammatory macrophage phenotype. In addition, CD91 is expressed in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs), where the receptor is suggested to be important for...... internalization of CD91-targeted antigens to be presented on the dendritic cell surface for T-cell stimulation. Despite their overlap in functionality, the expression of CD91 and CD163 has never been compared and the expression of CD163 in the monocyte-dendritic cell lineage is not yet characterized. CD163...... expression in dendritic cells (DCs) was investigated using multicolor flow cytometry in peripheral blood from 31 healthy donors and 15 HIV-1 patients in addition to umbilical cord blood from 5 newborn infants. Total RNA was isolated from MACS purified DCs and CD163 mRNA was determined with real-time reverse...

  16. Supramolecular effects in dendritic systems containing photoactive groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GIANLUCA CAMILLO AZZELLINI

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article are described dendritic structures containing photoactive groups at the surface or in the core. The observed supramolecular effects can be attributed to the nature of the photoactive group and their location in the dendritic architecture. The peripheric azobenzene groups in these dendrimeric compounds can be regarded as single residues that retain the spectroscopic and photochemical properties of free azobenzene moiety. The E and Z forms of higher generation dendrimer, functionalized with azobenzene groups, show different host ability towards eosin dye, suggesting the possibility of using such dendrimer in photocontrolled host-guest systems. The photophysical properties of many dendritic-bipyridine ruthenium complexes have been investigated. Particularly in aerated medium more intense emission and a longer excited-state lifetime are observed as compared to the parent unsubstituted bipyridine ruthenium complexes. These differences can be attributed to a shielding effect towards dioxygen quenching originated by the dendritic branches.

  17. CUB and Sushi multiple domains 3 regulates dendrite development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Tomoharu; Kohno, Takao; Hattori, Mitsuharu

    2016-09-01

    CUB and Sushi multiple domains 3 (CSMD3) is a large protein expressed in fetal and adult brain. Recently, mutations of the CSMD3 gene were identified in schizophrenia and autism patients. However, biochemical properties and functions of the CSMD3 protein remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that CSMD3 is an oligomeric type I transmembrane protein localized in the apical dendrites of hippocampal pyramidal neurons in the postnatal brain. In cultured hippocampal neurons, CSMD3 is expressed only after 7 days in vitro. Overexpression of CSMD3 induced dendritic branching in hippocampal neurons. Regulation of dendritic morphology by CSMD3 depended on the presence of its extracellular region, while CSMD3 intracellular region was dispensable for this activity. These results suggest that CSMD3 acts as a co-receptor of an unidentified membrane protein to regulate dendrite development. Therefore, malfunctions of CSMD3 may be one of the factors in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders. PMID:27033969

  18. Iso-response methods provide direct insight into dendritic computations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Häusler

    2014-04-01

    These results demonstrate that iso-response methods are well suited to unravel complex dendritic computations in model neurons and that they can provide a powerful tool for experimental research with applications in multi-patch or optogenetic recordings.

  19. Lithium Dendrite Suppression with UV-Curable Polysilsesquioxane Separator Binders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Wonjun; Lee, Albert S; Lee, Jin Hong; Hwang, Seung Sang; Kim, Eunkyoung; Hong, Soon Man; Koo, Chong Min

    2016-05-25

    For the first time, an inorganic-organic hybrid polymer binder was used for the coating of hybrid composites on separators to enhance thermal stability and to prevent formation of lithium dendrite in lithium metal batteries. The fabricated hybrid-composite-coated separators exhibited minimal thermal shrinkage compared with the previous composite separators (separators revealed excellent C-rate and cyclability performance due to the prevention of lithium dendrite growth on the lithium anode even after 200 cycles under 0.2-5C (charge-discharge) conditions. The mechanism for lithium dendrite prevention was attributed to exceptional nanoscale surface mechanical properties of the hybrid composite coating layer compared with the lithium metal anode, as the elastic modulus of the hybrid-composite-coated separator far exceeded those of both the lithium metal anode and the required threshold for lithium metal dendrite prevention. PMID:27148625

  20. Dendritic Cells, Viruses, and the Development of Atopic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S. Tam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are important residents of the lung environment. They have been associated with asthma and other inflammatory diseases of the airways. In addition to their antigen-presenting functions, dendritic cells have the ability to modulate the lung environment to promote atopic disease. While it has long been known that respiratory viral infections associate with the development and exacerbation of atopic diseases, the exact mechanisms have been unclear. Recent studies have begun to show the critical importance of the dendritic cell in this process. This paper focuses on these data demonstrating how different populations of dendritic cells are capable of bridging the adaptive and innate immune systems, ultimately leading to the translation of viral illness into atopic disease.