WorldWideScience

Sample records for alligators

  1. Nonpineal melatonin in the alligator (Alligator mississippiensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J J; Gern, W A; Roth, E C; Ralph, C L; Jacobson, E

    1980-10-31

    All living and most fossil representatives of the reptilian subclass Archosauria lack pineal bodies. Arrhythmic, low-level, nonpineal melatonin is present, however, in the blood of Alligator mississippiensis. Although pineal bodies have been implicated in circadian phenomena, these results suggest that arrhytmic melatonin in alligators may not be involved incircadian events and indicate that the pineal is not the only source of the hormone melatonin. The evolutionary loss of the pineal in Archosauria occurred during the Mesozoic, and era noted for its seasonal stability. Arrhythmic melatonin titers inalligators and pineal loss in alligators and other archosaurs may be related to Mesozoic seasonal stability.

  2. Alligator, Alligator mississippiensis, habitat suitability index model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddle, J. Hardin

    2017-01-01

    The 2012 Coastal Master Plan utilized Habitat Suitability Indices (HSIs) to evaluate potential project effects on wildlife species. Even though HSIs quantify habitat condition, which may not directly correlate to species abundance, they remain a practical and tractable way to assess changes in habitat quality from various restoration actions. As part of the legislatively mandated five year update to the 2012 plan, the wildlife habitat suitability indices were updated and revised using literature and existing field data where available. The outcome of these efforts resulted in improved, or in some cases entirely new suitability indices. This report describes the development of the habitat suitability indices for the American alligator, Alligator mississippiensis.

  3. OOGENESIS AND OVARIAN HISTOLOGY OF THE AMERICAN ALLIGATOR ALLIGATOR MISSISSIPPIENSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although folliculogenesis and oogenesis have been observed in numerous reptiles, these phenomena have not been described in detail in a crocodilian. Oogenesis and histological features of the adult ovary of Alligator mississippiensis are described. Using a complex process, the ov...

  4. Alligator mississippiensis (American Alligator): Novel non-native prey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsey, Ruth M.; Ledet, Eric; Carter, Jacoby

    2017-01-01

    American Alligators are opportunistic predators and their food habits have been well studied (Elsey et al. 1992. Proc. Annu. Conf. Southeast. Assoc. Fish Wildl. Agencies 46:57–66, and references therein and below). Composition of

  5. Alligator Rivers analogue project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerden, P.

    1990-01-01

    Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization has extensively evaluated uranium ore bodies in the Alligator Rivers Uranium Province in Australia as analogues of radioactive waste repositories. The work was extended for a three-year program as an international project based on the Koongarra uranium deposit and sponsored by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. The technical program comprises six major sub-projects involving modelling and experimental work: modelling of radionuclide migration; hydrogeology of the Koongarra uranium deposit; uranium/thorium series disequilibria studies; groundwater and colloid studies; fission product studies; transuranic nuclide studies; an outline of the technical programs and a summary of progress in the technical sub-projects is given. This is followed by a series of technical reports which briefly describe current research tasks, and which have been separately indexed

  6. Mortality of American alligators attributed to cannibalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delany, Michael F.; Woodward, Allan R.; Kiltie, Richard A.; Moore, Clinton T.

    2011-01-01

    Mortality of juvenile (Alligator mississippiensis) attributed to cannibalism on Orange Lake, Florida was examined. Alligator web tags used in mark–recapture studies were found in 12% of 267 stomachs sampled from alligators ≥168 cm TL. Captive alligators retained 76% of force-fed tags during a 588-d tag-retention trial. Models relating the probability of tag recovery to the annual probabilities of juvenile survival, cannibalism, tag retention, adult survival, and adult harvest suggested that cannibalism may on average remove 6–7% of the juvenile alligator population annually. Vulnerability continued to 140 cm TL (age 6–8 yr). Cannibalism of juveniles may serve to regulate the alligator population on Orange Lake. Alligator cannibalism may vary widely among populations, depending on demography and environmental conditions. The role and importance of cannibalism in alligator population dynamics should be more fully assessed and environmental and population factors that influence cannibalism identified to better evaluate management programs.

  7. Structural design and mechanical behavior of alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) osteoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chang-Yu; Chen, Po-Yu

    2013-11-01

    Alligator is a well-adapted living fossil covered with dorsal armor. This dermal shield consists of bony plates, called osteoderms, interconnected by sutures and non-mineralized collagen fibers, providing a dual function of protection and flexibility. Osteoderm features a sandwich structure, combining an inner porous core and an outer dense cortex, to offer enhancements for stiffness and energy absorbance. In this study, we investigated the multi-scale structure and mechanical behaviors of the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) osteoderm. Microcomputed tomography was applied to reveal the complex neurovascular network. Through the observation under optical and scanning electron microscopes, the osteoderm was found to consist of woven bone in the dorsal region and lamellar-zonal bone in the ventral region. Nanoindentation and compressive tests were performed to evaluate the mechanical properties of osteoderms. The varying mineral contents and porosity result in a graded mechanical property: a hard and stiff dorsal cortex gradually transform to a more compliant ventral base. Three protective mechanisms optimized for alligator osteoderms were proposed and elucidated. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Amphibious auditory responses of the American alligator (Alligator mississipiensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgs, D M; Brittan-Powell, E F; Soares, D; Souza, M J; Carr, C E; Dooling, R J; Popper, A N

    2002-04-01

    Animals that thrive both on land and underwater are faced with the task of interpreting stimuli in different media. This becomes a challenge to the sensory receptors in that stimuli (e.g., sound, motion) may convey the same type of information but are transmitted with different physical characteristics. We used auditory brainstem responses to examine hearing abilities of a species that makes full use of these two environments, the American alligator (Alligator mississipiensis). In water, alligators responded to tones from 100 Hz to 2,000 Hz, with peak sensitivity at 800 Hz. In air, they responded to tones from 100 Hz to 8,000 Hz, with peak sensitivity around 1,000 Hz. We also examined the contribution to hearing of an air bubble that becomes trapped in the middle ear as the animal submerges. This bubble has been previously implicated in underwater hearing. Our studies show that the trapped air bubble has no affect on auditory thresholds, suggesting the bubble is not an important adaptation for underwater hearing in this species.

  9. Effect of aqueous extract of alligator pepper

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-07-31

    Jul 31, 2016 ... diabetic rats in group B (p > 0.05) and a significant decrease in the weight of litters of treated diabetic pregnant rats in group C (p < 0.05). It was concluded that alligator pepper significantly reduces litter size in pregnant Sprague. Dawley rats with type 1 diabetic mellitus. Key words: Effect, Alligator Pepper, ...

  10. Environmental protection in the Alligator Rivers Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, G.

    1989-01-01

    One of a series of articles on the work of the Office of the Supervising Scientist for the Alligator Rivers Region (OSS) and its Alligator Rivers Region Research Institute (ARRRI), this discusses the environmental protection function of the OSS and the role of the ARRRI in achieving this

  11. Effect of alligator pepper (Zingiberaceae Aframomum melegueta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alligator pepper (Aframomum melegueta) is a spice that is widely used in many cultures for entertainment, religious rites, food flavor and as a part of many traditional doctors medications. Pregnant women are among those who ingest Alligator pepper in these activities. This experiment was carried out to determine the ...

  12. effect of alligator pepper (zingiberaceae aframomum melegueta)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Daniel Owu

    Summary: Alligator pepper (Aframomum melegueta) is a spice that is widely used in many cultures for entertainment, religious rites, food flavor and as a part of many traditional doctors medications. Pregnant women are among those who ingest Alligator pepper in these activities. This experiment was carried out to ...

  13. Fullerene as alligator clips for electrical conduction through ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-04-20

    Apr 20, 2017 ... presented the suitability of fullerene anchoring in coupling anthracene molecule with gold electrodes. AMJ with boron-20 (B-20) and C-20 alligator clips exhibited strongest conduction in contrast to nitrogen, oxygen, fluorine and neon alligator clips. Keywords. HOMO; LUMO; fullerenes; alligator clips; ...

  14. Age- and gender-related accumulation of perfluoroalkyl substances in captive Chinese alligators (Alligator sinensis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jianshe; Zhang, Yating; Zhang, Fang; Yeung, Leo W.Y.; Taniyasu, Sachi; Yamazaki, Eriko; Wang, Renping; Lam, Paul K.S.; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Dai, Jiayin

    2013-01-01

    Fourteen perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) were measured in serum of the highly endangered captive Chinese alligators, whole body homogenates of six kinds of fish (alligator prey species), and pond water (alligator habitat) in the Anhui Research Center for Chinese Alligator Reproduction. Six PFASs, including PFOS and five perfluorinated carboxylates, were detected in all alligator samples. The most dominant PFAS was PFUnDA, with a mean value of 31.4 ng/mL. Significant positive correlations were observed among the six PFASs, suggesting that they shared similar sources of contamination. Significantly higher PFOS and PFUnDA levels were observed in males, but the other four PFCAs did not differ between genders. An age related PFAS bioaccumulation analysis showed a significant negative correlation of the concentrations for five PFCAs to age, which means that higher concentrations were found in younger animals. Bioaccumulation factors (BAF) in fish for PFASs ranged from 21 to 28,000, with lower BAF for PFOA than that for longer carbon chain PFCAs, including PFUnDA, PFDA, and PFNA. Highlights: •The most dominant PFAS was PFUnDA, followed by PFOS and PFDA in all alligator samples. •Significantly higher PFOS and PFUnDA levels were observed in males. •The concentrations of the five PFCAs showed significant negative correlation to age. -- Age- and gender-related accumulation of perfluoroalkyl substances in captive Chinese alligators

  15. An algae-covered alligator rests warily

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    An algae-covered alligator keeps a wary eye open as it rests in one of the ponds at Kennedy Space Center. American alligators feed and rest in the water, and lay their eggs in dens they dig into the banks. The young alligators spend their first several weeks in these dens. The Center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  16. Survival and growth of American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) hatchlings after artificial incubation and repatriation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temsiripong, Y.; Woodward, A.R.; Ross, J.P.; Kubilis, P.S.; Percival, H.F.

    2006-01-01

    Hatchling American Alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) produced from artificially incubated wild eggs were returned to their natal areas (repatriated). We compared artificially incubated and repatriated hatchlings released within and outside the maternal alligator's home range with naturally incubated hatchlings captured and released within the maternal alligator's home range on Lake Apopka, Lake Griffin, and Orange Lake in Florida. We used probability of recapture and total length at approximately nine months after hatching as indices of survival and growth rates. Artificially incubated hatchlings released outside of the maternal alligator's home range had lower recapture probabilities than either naturally incubated hatchlings or artificially incubated hatchlings released near the original nest site. Recapture probabilities of other treatments did not differ significantly. Artificially incubated hatchlings were approximately 6% shorter than naturally incubated hatchlings at approximately nine months after hatching. We concluded that repatriation of hatchlings probably would not have long-term effects on populations because of the resiliency of alligator populations to alterations of early age-class survival and growth rates of the magnitude that we observed. Repatriation of hatchlings may be an economical alternative to repatriation of older juveniles for population restoration. However, the location of release may affect subsequent survival and growth. Copyright 2006 Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles.

  17. Ecological studies on the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) on the Savannah River Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seigel, R.A.; Brandt, L.A.; Knight, J.L.; Novak, S.S.

    1986-06-01

    The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) is the largest vertebrate of the Savannah River Plant (SRP), reaching a maximum length of 3.7 meters (12 feet) and weighing up to 175 kg (385 pounds). Currently, populations in coastal South Carolina are considered Threatened, whereas populations in inland areas (such as the SRP) are still Endangered. Because of their legal status and economic and ecological importance, it is important to determine the environmental impacts of SRP operations on the local alligator population. The major objectives under the Endangered Species Program of the Comprehensive Cooling Water Study (CCWS) were as follows: (1) document and compare the present status and distribution of alligators on the SRP to previous surveys, in order to determine long-term changes in population abundance; (2) establish baseline population and ecological parameters of the Steel Creek population so that the ecological effects of L-Reactor operations can be determined, and (3) conduct ecological research on the immediate impacts of thermal effluents on American alligators. Gladden et al., (1985) summarized data on previous population surveys, temporal changes in the Par Pond population, preliminary results of the Steel Creek surveys and Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) research on the effects of thermal effluents. This report summarizes the current status of the SRP population, presents data on the abundance, movement patterns and activity cycles of the Steel Creek population, and presents additional data on the effect of cooling water releases on alligator ecology and behavior.

  18. Abortifacient properties of alligator pepper ( Aframomum melegueta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alligator pepper (Aframomum melegueta) is used in the Surinam cuisine to flavour dishes such as vegetables (okra and tomatoes recipes), soups (lentil and chicken) and fish recipes. It has a wide use and the eating does not exclude pregnant women who actually use it to terminate unwanted pregnancy. A large percentage ...

  19. Fullerene as alligator clips for electrical conduction through ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... assistance in the formation of robust molecular junctions. In this article, we have presented the suitability of fullerene anchoring in coupling anthracene molecule with gold electrodes. AMJ with boron-20 (B-20) and C-20 alligator clips exhibited strongest conduction in contrast to nitrogen, oxygen, fluorine and neon alligator ...

  20. The Federal Government and the Alligator Rivers Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BURTON, A.

    1989-01-01

    The administrative framework put in place by the Commonwealth and Northern Territory governments to monitor mining activities in the Alligator Rivers Region is presented. The key institutional element is the Coordinating Committee for the Alligator Rivers Region chaired and serviced by the Supervising Scientist and established through legislation

  1. Pathology, physiologic parameters, tissue contaminants, and tissue thiamine in morbid and healthy central Florida adult American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeyfield, D.C.; Ross, J.P.; Carbonneau, D.A.; Terrell, S.P.; Woodward, A.R.; Schoeb, T.R.; Perceval, H.F.; Hinterkopf, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    An investigation of adult alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) mortalities in Lake Griffin, central Florida, was conducted from 1998-2004. Alligator mortality was highest in the months of April and May and annual death count peaked in 2000. Bacterial pathogens, heavy metals, and pesticides were not linked with the mortalities. Blood chemistry did not point to any clinical diagnosis, although differences between impaired and normal animals were noted. Captured alligators with signs of neurologic impairment displayed unresponsive and uncoordinated behavior. Three of 21 impaired Lake Griffin alligators were found to have neural lesions characteristic of thiamine deficiency in the telencephalon, particularly the dorsal ventricular ridge. In some cases, lesions were found in the thalamus, and parts of the midbrain. Liver and muscle tissue concentrations of thiamine (vitamin B"1) were lowest in impaired Lake Griffin alligators when compared to unimpaired alligators or to alligators from Lake Woodruff. The consumption of thiaminase-positive gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum) is thought to have been the cause of the low tissue thiamine and resulting mortalities. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2008.

  2. Biophysics of directional hearing in the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bierman, Hilary S; Thornton, Jennifer L; Jones, Heath G

    2014-01-01

    Physiological and anatomical studies have suggested that alligators have unique adaptations for spatial hearing. Sound localization cues are primarily generated by the filtering of sound waves by the head. Different vertebrate lineages have evolved external and/or internal anatomical adaptations ...... in the extinct dinosaurs....

  3. Perfluorinated Alkyl Acids in Plasma of American Alligators (Alligator Mississippiensis) from Florida and South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangma, Jacqueline T.; Bowden, John A.; Brunell, Arnold M.; Christie, Ian; Finnell, Brendan; Guillette, Matthew P.; Jones, Martin; Lowers, Russell H.; Rainwater, Thomas R.; Reiner, Jessica L.; hide

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to quantitate fourteen perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in 125 adult American alligators at twelve sites across the southeastern US. Of those fourteen PFAAs, nine were detected in 65% - 100% of the samples: PFOA, PFNA, PFDA, PFUnA, PFDoA, PFTriA, PFTA, PFHxS, and PFOS. Males (across all sites) showed significantly higher concentrations of four PFAAs: PFOS (p = 0.01), PFDA (p = 0.0003), PFUnA (p = 0.021), and PFTriA (p = 0.021). Concentrations of PFOS, PFHxS, and PFDA in plasma were significantly different among the sites in each sex. Alligators at Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge and Kiawah Nature Conservancy both exhibited some of the highest PFOS concentrations (medians 99.5 ng/g and 55.8 ng/g respectively) in plasma measured to date in a crocodilian species. A number of positive correlations between PFAAs and snout-vent length (SVL) were observed in both sexes suggesting PFAA body burdens increase with increasing size. In addition, several significant correlations among PFAAs in alligator plasma may suggest conserved sources of PFAAs at each site throughout the greater study area. This study is the first to report PFAAs in American alligators, reveals potential PFAA hot spots in Florida and South Carolina, and provides and additional contaminant of concern when assessing anthropogenic impacts on ecosystem health.

  4. Global DNA methylation loss associated with mercury contamination and aging in the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Frances M; Parrott, Benjamin B; Bowden, John A; Kassim, Brittany L; Somerville, Stephen E; Bryan, Teresa A; Bryan, Colleen E; Lange, Ted R; Delaney, J Patrick; Brunell, Arnold M; Long, Stephen E; Guillette, Louis J

    2016-03-01

    Mercury is a widespread environmental contaminant with exposures eliciting a well-documented catalog of adverse effects. Yet, knowledge regarding the underlying mechanisms by which mercury exposures are translated into biological effects remains incomplete. DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that is sensitive to environmental cues, and alterations in DNA methylation at the global level are associated with a variety of diseases. Using a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry-based (LC-MS/MS) approach, global DNA methylation levels were measured in red blood cells of 144 wild American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) from 6 sites with variable levels of mercury contamination across Florida's north-south axis. Variation in mercury concentrations measured in whole blood was highly associated with location, allowing the comparison of global DNA methylation levels across different "treatments" of mercury. Global DNA methylation in alligators across all locations was weakly associated with increased mercury exposure. However, a much more robust relationship was observed in those animals sampled from locations more highly contaminated with mercury. Also, similar to other vertebrates, global DNA methylation appears to decline with age in alligators. The relationship between age-associated loss of global DNA methylation and varying mercury exposures was examined to reveal a potential interaction. These findings demonstrate that global DNA methylation levels are associated with mercury exposure, and give insights into interactions between contaminants, aging, and epigenetics. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Thermoregulatory adaptations and heat energy budget analyses of the American alligator, Alligator mississippiensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terpin, Kenneth M. [Univ. at Buffalo, NY (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Wild alligators were acclimated to laboratory conditions and thermocouples were surgically implanted at seven locations in the body. Animals were tested at different steady state environmental conditions in a climate space simulation chamber in order to ascertain the effect of heat transfer on body temperature. Results are reported.

  6. Fluctuating water depths affect American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) body condition in the Everglades, Florida, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Laura A.; Beauchamp, Jeffrey S.; Jeffery, Brian M.; Cherkiss, Michael S.; Mazzotti, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Successful restoration of wetland ecosystems requires knowledge of wetland hydrologic patterns and an understanding of how those patterns affect wetland plant and animal populations.Within the Everglades, Florida, USA restoration, an applied science strategy including conceptual ecological models linking drivers to indicators is being used to organize current scientific understanding to support restoration efforts. A key driver of the ecosystem affecting the distribution and abundance of organisms is the timing, distribution, and volume of water flows that result in water depth patterns across the landscape. American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) are one of the ecological indicators being used to assess Everglades restoration because they are a keystone species and integrate biological impacts of hydrological operations through all life stages. Alligator body condition (the relative fatness of an animal) is one of the metrics being used and targets have been set to allow us to track progress. We examined trends in alligator body condition using Fulton’s K over a 15 year period (2000–2014) at seven different wetland areas within the Everglades ecosystem, assessed patterns and trends relative to restoration targets, and related those trends to hydrologic variables. We developed a series of 17 a priori hypotheses that we tested with an information theoretic approach to identify which hydrologic factors affect alligator body condition. Alligator body condition was highest throughout the Everglades during the early 2000s and is approximately 5–10% lower now (2014). Values have varied by year, area, and hydrology. Body condition was positively correlated with range in water depth and fall water depth. Our top model was the “Current” model and included variables that describe current year hydrology (spring depth, fall depth, hydroperiod, range, interaction of range and fall depth, interaction of range and hydroperiod). Across all models, interaction

  7. Alligator osteoderms: Mechanical behavior and hierarchical structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Irene H. [Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Yang, Wen, E-mail: wey005@eng.ucsd.edu [Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Meyers, Marc A. [Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Departments of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Nanoengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Osteoderms are bony scutes embedded underneath the dermal layers of the skin acting as a protection of the alligator (Archosauria: Crocodylia) internal organs and tissues. Additionally, these scutes function as an aid in temperature regulation. The scutes are inter-linked by fibrous connective tissue. They have properties similar to bone and thus have the necessary toughness to provide protection against predators. The scutes consist of hydroxyapatite and have a porosity of approximately 12%. They have a disc-like morphology with a ridge along the middle of the plate, called the keel; the outer perimeter of the disc has depressions, grooves, and jagged edges which anchor the collagen and act as sutures. Computerized tomography reveals the pattern of elongated pores, which emanate from the keel in a radial pattern. Micro-indentation measurements along the cross-section show a zigzag behavior due to the porosity. Compression results indicate that the axial direction is the strongest (UTS ∼ 67 MPa) and toughest (11 MJ/m{sup 3}); this is the orientation in which they undergo the largest external compression forces from predator teeth. Toughening mechanisms are identified through observation of the damage progression and interpreted in mechanistic terms. They are: flattening of pores, microcrack opening, and microcrack growth and coalescence. Collagen plays an essential role in toughening and plasticity by providing bridges that impede the opening of the cracks and prevent their growth. - Highlights: • We characterized the hierarchical structure of alligator scute. • The anisotropic mechanical behavior of alligator scute was studied. • Toughening mechanisms were identified at the micro- and nano-levels.

  8. Gulf-Wide Information System, Environmental Sensitivity Index Alligator Database, Geographic NAD83, LDWF (2001) [esi_gator_LDWF_2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for American alligator in coastal Louisiana. Vector polygons represent alligator habitats with nest density...

  9. Hexavalent Chromium Is Cytotoxic and Genotoxic to American Alligator Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, Sandra S.; Wise, Catherine; Xie, Hong; Guillette, Louis J.; Zhu, Cairong; Wise, John Pierce; Wise, John Pierce

    2015-01-01

    Metals are a common pollutant in the aquatic ecosystem. With global climate change, these levels are anticipated to rise as lower pH levels allow sediment bound metals to be released. The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) is an apex predator in the aquatic ecosystem and is considered a keystone species; as such it serves as a suitable monitor for localized pollution. One metal of increasing concern is hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)). It is present in the aquatic environment and is ...

  10. Analysis of PFAAs in American alligators part 2: Potential dietary exposure of South Carolina hunters from recreationally harvested alligator meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Jessica J; Guillette, Louis J; Lovelace, Susan; Parrott, Benjamin B; Rainwater, Thomas R; Reiner, Jessica L

    2017-11-01

    Exposure to perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs) has been linked to many harmful health effects including reproductive disorders, developmental delays, and altered liver and kidney function. Most human exposure to environmental contaminants, including PFAAs, occurs through consumption of contaminated food or drinking water. This study uses PFAA data from meat samples collected from recreationally harvested American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) in South Carolina to assess potential dietary exposure of hunters and their families to PFAAs. Consumption patterns were investigated using intercept surveys of 23 hunters at a wild game meat processor. An exposure scenario using the average consumption frequency, portion size, and median perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) concentration in alligator meat from all hunt units found the daily dietary exposure to be 2.11ng/kg body weight per day for an adult human. Dietary PFOS exposure scenarios based on location of harvest suggested the highest daily exposure occurs with alligator meat from the Middle Coastal hunt unit in South Carolina. Although no samples were found to exceed the recommended threshold for no consumption of PFOS found in Minnesota state guidelines, exposure to a mixture of PFAAs found in alligator meat and site-specific exposures based on harvest location should be considered in determining an appropriate guideline for vulnerable populations potentially exposed to PFAAs through consumption of wild alligator meat. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Ecological studies on the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) on the Savannah River Plant. Comprehensive Cooling Water Study: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seigel, R.A.; Brandt, L.A.; Knight, J.L.; Novak, S.S.

    1986-06-01

    The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) is the largest vertebrate of the Savannah River Plant (SRP), reaching a maximum length of 3.7 meters (12 feet) and weighing up to 175 kg (385 pounds). Currently, populations in coastal South Carolina are considered Threatened, whereas populations in inland areas (such as the SRP) are still Endangered. Because of their legal status and economic and ecological importance, it is important to determine the environmental impacts of SRP operations on the local alligator population. The major objectives under the Endangered Species Program of the Comprehensive Cooling Water Study (CCWS) were as follows: (1) document and compare the present status and distribution of alligators on the SRP to previous surveys, in order to determine long-term changes in population abundance; (2) establish baseline population and ecological parameters of the Steel Creek population so that the ecological effects of L-Reactor operations can be determined, and (3) conduct ecological research on the immediate impacts of thermal effluents on American alligators. Gladden et al., (1985) summarized data on previous population surveys, temporal changes in the Par Pond population, preliminary results of the Steel Creek surveys and Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) research on the effects of thermal effluents. This report summarizes the current status of the SRP population, presents data on the abundance, movement patterns and activity cycles of the Steel Creek population, and presents additional data on the effect of cooling water releases on alligator ecology and behavior.

  12. Ontogenetic development of otoliths in Alligator Gar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, James M.; Snow, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    The Alligator Gar Atractosteus spatula is a species of conservation concern throughout its range, and better definition of otoliths during early development would aid understanding its life history and ecology. We conducted X-ray computed tomography scans, scanning electron microscopy, and light microscopy to examine the three pairs of otoliths and how they developed over time in relation to fish size and age. The sagittae are the largest, possessing distinct dorsal and ventral lobes covered with small otoconia concentrated in the sulcul region. The sagittae exhibited allometric growth, increasing more rapidly in the ventral lobe than in the dorsal. The asterisci were smaller and also exhibited small otoconia on their surface, but much less than the sagittae. The lapilli were oriented laterally, in contrast to the sagittae and asterisci, which were oriented vertically, with a hump on the dorsum and very large otoconia on the lateral surface that appeared to fuse into the main otolith as the fish grew. Based on size measurements and ring counts in all three pairs of otoliths from 101 known-age Alligator Gar sampled weekly through 91 d after hatch, we developed regression models to examine otolith growth and predict age. All relationships were significant and highly explanatory, but the strongest relationships were between otolith and fish size (for measurements from sagittae) and for age predictions from the lapillus. Age prediction models all resulted in a slope near unity, indicating that ring deposition occurred approximately daily. The first ring in sagittae and lapilli corresponded to swim-up, whereas the first ring formed in asterisci approximately 8 d after swim-up. These results fill a gap in knowledge and can aid understanding of evolutionary processes as well as provide useful information for management and conservation.

  13. Effects of prolonged lung inflation or deflation on pulmonary stretch receptor discharge in the alligator (Alligator mississippiensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschand, Rachel E; Wilson, Jenna L; Burleson, Mark L; Crossley, Dane A; Hedrick, Michael S

    2014-08-15

    The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) is a semi-aquatic diving reptile that has a periodic breathing pattern. Previous work identified pulmonary stretch receptors, that are rapidly and slowly adapting, as well as intrapulmonary chemoreceptors (IPC), sensitive to CO2, that modulate breathing patterns in alligators. The purpose of the present study was to quantify the effects of prolonged lung inflation and deflation (simulated dives) on pulmonary stretch receptors (PSR) and/or IPC discharge characteristics. The effects of airway pressure (0-20 cm H2O), hypercapnia (7% CO2), and hypoxia (5% O2) on dynamic and static responses of PSR were studied in juvenile alligators (mean mass=246 g) at 24°C. Alligators were initially anesthetized with isoflurane, cranially pithed, tracheotomized and artificially ventilated. Vagal afferent tonic and phasic activity was recorded with platinum hook electrodes. Receptor activity was a mixture of slowly adapting PSR (SAR) and rapidly adapting PSR (RAR) with varying thresholds and degrees of adaptation, without CO2 sensitivity. Receptor activity before, during and after 1 min periods of lung inflation and deflation was quantified to examine the effect of simulated breath-hold dives. Some PSR showed a change in dynamic response, exhibiting inhibition for several breaths after prolonged lung inflation. Following 1 min deflation, RAR, but not SAR, exhibited a significant potentiation of burst frequency relative to control. For SAR, the post-inflation receptor inhibition was blocked by CO2 and hypoxia; for RAR, the post-inflation inhibition was potentiated by CO2 and blocked by hypoxia. These results suggest that changes in PSR firing following prolonged inflation and deflation may promote post-dive ventilation in alligators. We hypothesize that PSR in alligators may be involved in recovery of breathing patterns and lung volume during pre- and post-diving behavior and apneic periods in diving reptiles. Copyright © 2014

  14. Hexavalent chromium is cytotoxic and genotoxic to American alligator cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sandra S; Wise, Catherine; Xie, Hong; Guillette, Louis J; Zhu, Cairong; Wise, John Pierce; Wise, John Pierce

    2016-02-01

    Metals are a common pollutant in the aquatic ecosystem. With global climate change, these levels are anticipated to rise as lower pH levels allow sediment bound metals to be released. The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) is an apex predator in the aquatic ecosystem and is considered a keystone species; as such it serves as a suitable monitor for localized pollution. One metal of increasing concern is hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)). It is present in the aquatic environment and is a known human carcinogen and reproductive toxicant. We measured the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Cr(VI) in American alligator cells derived from scute tissue. We found that particulate and soluble Cr(VI) are both cytotoxic and genotoxic to alligator cells in a concentration-dependent manner. These data suggest that alligators may be used as a model for assessing the effects of environmental Cr(VI) contamination as well as for other metals of concern. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Feeding alters blood flow patterns in the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findsen, Anders; Crossley, Dane A; Wang, Tobias

    2018-01-01

    The crocodilian cardiovascular design with a four-chambered heart and a left aorta that emerge from the right ventricle allows blood to be shunted away from the lungs, a right-to-left (R-L) shunt. The adaptive significance of this R-L shunt remains both poorly understood and controversial with particular debate on its putative role during digestion. Here we measure blood flow patterns in the right aorta (RAo), left aorta (LAo) and the coeliac artery (CoA) of undisturbed American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) during fasting and throughout most of the digestive period. Digestion doubled blood flow in the RAo (10.1±0.9 to 20.7±1.5mlmin -1 kg -1 ), whereas LAo increased approximately 3-fold (3.8±0.6 to 12.2±2.1mlmin -1 kg -1 ). Blood flow in the CoA increased more than four-fold during digestion (3.0±0.6 to 13.3±1.6mlmin -1 kg -1 ). The rise in blood flows was achieved by a doubling of heart rate (18.5±3.3 to 37.8±3.6mlmin -1 kg -1 ). Maximal flows measured in all arteries and heart rate occurred in the first hour of the postprandial period and continued for the next 7h. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Estimating sighting proportions of American alligator nests during helicopter survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Kenneth G.; Percival, H. Franklin; Woodward, Allan R.

    2000-01-01

    Proportions of American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) nests sighted during aerial survey in Florida were estimated based upon multiple surveys by different observers. We compared sighting proportions across habitats, nesting seasons, and observer experience levels. The mean sighting proportion across all habitats and years was 0.736 (SE=0.024). Survey counts corrected by the mean sighting proportion reliably predicted total nest counts (7?2=0.933). Sighting proportions did not differ by habitat type (P=0.668) or year P=0.328). Experienced observers detected a greater proportion of nests (P<0.0001) than did either less experienced or inexperienced observers. Reliable estimates of nest abundance can be derived from aerial counts of alligator nests when corrected by the appropriate sighting proportion.

  17. Alligator osteoderms: mechanical behavior and hierarchical structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Irene H; Yang, Wen; Meyers, Marc A

    2014-02-01

    Osteoderms are bony scutes embedded underneath the dermal layers of the skin acting as a protection of the alligator (Archosauria: Crocodylia) internal organs and tissues. Additionally, these scutes function as an aid in temperature regulation. The scutes are inter-linked by fibrous connective tissue. They have properties similar to bone and thus have the necessary toughness to provide protection against predators. The scutes consist of hydroxyapatite and have a porosity of approximately 12%. They have a disc-like morphology with a ridge along the middle of the plate, called the keel; the outer perimeter of the disc has depressions, grooves, and jagged edges which anchor the collagen and act as sutures. Computerized tomography reveals the pattern of elongated pores, which emanate from the keel in a radial pattern. Micro-indentation measurements along the cross-section show a zigzag behavior due to the porosity. Compression results indicate that the axial direction is the strongest (UTS ~67 MPa) and toughest (11 MJ/m(3)); this is the orientation in which they undergo the largest external compression forces from predator teeth. Toughening mechanisms are identified through observation of the damage progression and interpreted in mechanistic terms. They are: flattening of pores, microcrack opening, and microcrack growth and coalescence. Collagen plays an essential role in toughening and plasticity by providing bridges that impede the opening of the cracks and prevent their growth. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Causes of environmental change in the Alligator Rivers region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skidmore, J.

    1990-01-01

    Covering some 28,000 square kilometres of the Northern Territory, the Alligator Rivers Region (ARR) includes the catchments of the East, South and West Alligator Rivers, and many small abandoned uranium mines. To introduce the problems of human impact on the ARR, the toxicologically significant aspects of the local environment were first examined, then the possible effects on it of mining and other human activities. It was found that the most deleterious impact on the region is not caused by mining but by human settlement, introduction of animals (notably the buffalo) and plants, the use of fire and tourism

  19. Seasonal Variation of Total Mercury Burden in the American Alligator (Alligator Mississippiensis) at Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge (MINWR), Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Frances M.; Dorsey, Jonathan E.; Long, Stephen E.; Schock, Tracey B.; Bowden, John A.; Lowers, Russell H.; Guillette, Louis J., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal variation of mercury (Hg) is not well studied in free-ranging wildlife. Atmospheric deposition patterns of Hg have been studied in detail and have been modeled for both global and specific locations with great accuracy and correlates to environment impact. However, monitoring these trends in wildlife is complicated due to local environmental parameters (e.g., rainfall, humidity, pH, bacterial composition) that can affect the transformation of atmospheric Hg to the biologically available forms. Here, we utilized an abundant and healthy population of American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) at Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge (MINWR), FL, and assessed Hg burden in whole blood samples over a span of 7 years (2007 2014; n 174) in an effort to assess seasonal variation of total [Hg]. While the majority of this population is assumed healthy, 18 individuals with low body mass indices (BMI, defined in this study) were captured throughout the 7 year sampling period. These individual alligators exhibited [Hg] that were not consistent with the observed overall seasonal [Hg] variation, and were statistically different from the healthy population of alligators. The alligators with low BMI had elevated concentrations of Hg compared to their age/sex/season matched counterparts with normal BMI. Statistically significant differences were found between the winter and spring seasons for animals with normal BMI. The data in this report supports the conclusion that organismal total [Hg] do fluctuate directly with seasonal deposition rates as well as other seasonal environmental parameters, such as average rainfall and prevailing wind direction. This study highlights the unique environment of MINWR to permit annual assessment of apex predators, such as the American alligator, to determine detailed environmental impact of contaminants of concern.

  20. Fullerene as alligator clips for electrical conduction through ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-04-20

    Apr 20, 2017 ... Therefore, in order to observe the increased conduction of a molecular junction formed by fullerene alligator clips, we considered anthracene, a polyaromatic molecule sandwiched between two gold electrodes with interface being X-20 fullerene, where. X represents boron, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, fluorine.

  1. effect of aqueous extract of alligator pepper (zingiberaceae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Daniel Owu

    Key words: Gestational weight gain, Aqueous Extract, Intra-peritoneal injection, Alligator Pepper,. Nutrition. Introduction. In a study on Gestational weight gain and pregnancy outcome in obese .... A transparent plastic dish was placed on a top loading balance. The meter of the top loading balance was then reset at zero. All.

  2. Blow Flies Visiting Decaying Alligators: Is Succession Synchronous or Asynchronous?

    OpenAIRE

    Nelder, Mark P.; McCreadie, John W.; Major, Clinton S.

    2009-01-01

    Succession patterns of adult blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) on decaying alligators were investigated in Mobile (Ala, USA) during August 2002. The most abundant blow fly species visiting the carcasses were Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart), Cochliomyia macellaria (Fabricus), Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricus), Phormia regina (Meigen), and Lucilia coeruleiviridis (Macquart). Lucilia coeruleiviridis was collected more often during the early stages of decomposition, followed by Chrysomya spp., C...

  3. Alligator Rivers Regions Research Institute research report 1983-84

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The Institute undertakes and coordinates research required to ensure the protection of the environment in the Alligator Rivers Region from any consequences resulting from the mining and processing of uranium ore. Research projects outlined are in aquatic biology, terrestrial ecology, analytical chemistry, environmental radioactivity and geomorphology

  4. Alligators and crocodiles as indicators for restoration of Everglades ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotti, Frank J.; Best, G. Ronnie; Brandt, Laura A.; Cherkiss, Michael S.; Jeffery, Brian M.; Rice, Kenneth G.

    2009-01-01

    Alligators and crocodiles integrate biological impacts of hydrological operations, affecting them at all life stages through three key aspects of Everglades ecology: (1) food webs, (2) diversity and productivity, and (3) freshwater flow. Responses of crocodilians are directly related to suitability of environmental conditions and hydrologic change. Correlations between biological responses and environmental conditions contribute to an understanding of species' status and trends over time. Positive or negative trends of crocodilian populations relative to hydrologic changes permit assessment of positive or negative trends in restoration. The crocodilian indicator uses monitoring parameters (performance measures) that have been shown to be both effective and efficient in tracking trends. The alligator component uses relative density (reported as an encounter rate), body condition, and occupancy rates of alligator holes; the crocodile component uses juvenile growth and hatchling survival. We hypothesize that these parameters are correlated with hydrologic conditions including depth, duration, timing, spatial extent and water quality. Salinity is a critical parameter in estuarine habitats. Assessments of parameters defined for crocodilian performance measures support these hypotheses. Alligators and crocodiles are the charismatic megafauna of the Everglades. They are both keystone and flagship species to which the public can relate. In addition, the parameters used to track trends are easy to understand. They provide answers to the following questions: How has the number of alligators or crocodiles changed? Are the animals fatter or thinner than they should be? Are the animals in the places (in terms of habitat and geography) where they should be? As surely as there is no other Everglades, no other single species defines the Everglades as does the American alligator. The Everglades is the only place in the world where both alligators and crocodiles exist. Crocodilians

  5. Penile anatomy and hypotheses of erectile function in the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis): muscular eversion and elastic retraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, D A

    2013-03-01

    The intromittent organs of most amniotes contain variable-volume hydrostatic skeletons that are stored in a flexible state and inflate with fluid before or during copulation. However, the penis in male crocodilians is notable because its shaft does not seem to change either its shape or bending stiffness as blood enters its vascular spaces before copulation. Here I report that crocodilians may have evolved a mechanism for penile shaft erection that does not require inflation and detumescence. Dissections of the cloaca in sexually mature male American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) show that the cross section of the proximal shaft of the alligator penis contains dense collagenous tissues that do not significantly change shape when fluid is added to the central vascular space. The large amount of collagen in the wall and central space of the alligator penis stiffen the structure so it can be simply everted for copulation and rapidly retracted at its completion. Because no muscles insert directly onto the penis, eversion and retraction must be produced indirectly. My results suggest that the contraction of paired levator cloacae muscles around the anterior end of the cloaca rotates the penis out of the cloacal opening and strains the ligamentum rami that connect the base of the penis to the ischia. When the cloacal muscles relax, the elastic recoil of the ligamentum rami can return the penis to its original position inside the cloaca. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Chronic hypercapnic incubation increases relative organ growth and reduces blood pressure of embryonic American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eme, John; Crossley, Dane A

    2015-04-01

    Reptilian nests can experience natural hypoxic and hypercapnic conditions. We incubated alligator eggs at a female-only producing temperature (30°C) in three conditions: 21% O2/0.04% CO2, 21% O2/3.5% CO2 and 21% O2/7% CO2. Alligator embryos chronically incubated in high CO2 were markedly hypotensive (blood pressure reduced by 46%) and had relatively (mass-specific) enlarged hearts (dry mass increased by 20%), lungs (dry mass increased by 17%), and kidneys (dry mass increased by 14%). This study is the first to chronically incubate reptilian eggs in hypercapnia and suggests that high CO2 alters the cardiovascular phenotype of alligator embryos (low blood pressure, relatively enlarged hearts), as well as the relative size of the organs primarily responsible for acid base balance, lungs and kidneys. The lungs and kidneys are largely non-functional during embryonic development, and the embryonic phenotype of increased relative mass may be a predictive-adaptation to metabolic or respiratory acidosis, such as during exercise or high respiratory CO2. This study demonstrates that phenotypic plasticity of alligator embryos incubated in high CO2 may result in either preferential organ growth, or maintenance of organ growth with reduced somatic growth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Olfactory and solitary chemosensory cells: two different chemosensory systems in the nasal cavity of the American alligator, Alligator mississippiensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen Anne

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nasal cavity of all vertebrates houses multiple chemosensors, either innervated by the Ist (olfactory or the Vth (trigeminal cranial nerve. Various types of receptor cells are present, either segregated in different compartments (e.g. in rodents or mingled in one epithelium (e.g. fish. In addition, solitary chemosensory cells have been reported for several species. Alligators which seek their prey both above and under water have only one nasal compartment. Information about their olfactory epithelium is limited. Since alligators seem to detect both volatile and water-soluble odour cues, I tested whether different sensory cell types are present in the olfactory epithelium. Results Electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry were used to examine the sensory epithelium of the nasal cavity of the American alligator. Almost the entire nasal cavity is lined with olfactory (sensory epithelium. Two types of olfactory sensory neurons are present. Both types bear cilia as well as microvilli at their apical endings and express the typical markers for olfactory neurons. The density of these olfactory neurons varies along the nasal cavity. In addition, solitary chemosensory cells innervated by trigeminal nerve fibres, are intermingled with olfactory sensory neurons. Solitary chemosensory cells express components of the PLC-transduction cascade found in solitary chemosensory cells in rodents. Conclusion The nasal cavity of the American alligator contains two different chemosensory systems incorporated in the same sensory epithelium: the olfactory system proper and solitary chemosensory cells. The olfactory system contains two morphological distinct types of ciliated olfactory receptor neurons.

  8. Sex-steroid and thyroid hormone concentrations in juvenile alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) from contaminated and reference lakes in Florida, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grain, D.A.; Guillette, L.J.; Pickford, D.B.; Percival, H.F.; Woodward, A.R.

    1998-01-01

    Sex-steroid and thyroid hormones are critical regulators of growth and reproduction in all vertebrates, and several recent studies suggest that environmental chemicals can alter circulating concentrations of these hormones. This study examines plasma concentrations of estradiol-171?? (E2), testosterone (T), triiodothyronine (T3), and thyroxine (T4) in juvenile alligators (60-140 cm total length) from two contaminated lakes and one reference lake in Florida. First, the data were analyzed by comparing hormone concentrations among males and females from the different lakes. Whereas there were no differences in plasma E2 concentrations among animals of the three lakes, male alligators from the contaminated lakes (Lake Apopka and Lake Okeechobee) had significantly lower plasma T concentrations compared 10 males from the reference take (Lake Woodruff). Concentrations of thyroid hormones also differed in animals of the three lakes, with T4 concentrations being elevated in Lake Okeechobee males compared to Lake Woodruff males. Second, the relationship between body size and hormone concentration was examined using regression analysis. Most notably for steroid hormones, no clear relationship was detected between E2 and total length in Apopka females (r2 0.09, p = 0.54) or between T and total length in Apopka males (r2 = 0.007, p = 0.75). Females from Apopka (r2 = 0.318, p = 0.09) and Okeechobee (r2 = 0.222, p = 0.09) exhibited weak correlations between T3 and total length. Males from Apopka (r2 = 0.015, p = 0.66) and Okeechobee (r2 = 0.128, p = 0.19) showed no correlation between T4 and total length. These results indicate: some of the previously reported abnormalities in steroid hormones of hatchling alligators persist, at least, through the juvenile years; steroid and thyroid hormones are related to body size in juvenile alligators from the reference lake, whereas alligators living in lakes Apopka and Okeechobee experience alterations in circulating thyroid and steroid

  9. Blow Flies Visiting Decaying Alligators: Is Succession Synchronous or Asynchronous?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark P. Nelder

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Succession patterns of adult blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae on decaying alligators were investigated in Mobile (Ala, USA during August 2002. The most abundant blow fly species visiting the carcasses were Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart, Cochliomyia macellaria (Fabricus, Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricus, Phormia regina (Meigen, and Lucilia coeruleiviridis (Macquart. Lucilia coeruleiviridis was collected more often during the early stages of decomposition, followed by Chrysomya spp., Cochliomyia macellaria, and Phormia regina in the later stages. Lucilia coeruleiviridis was the only synchronous blow fly on the three carcasses; other blow fly species exhibited only site-specific synchrony. Using dichotomous correlations and analyses of variance, we demonstrated that blow fly-community succession was asynchronous among three alligators; however, Monte Carlo simulations indicate that there was some degree of synchrony between the carcasses.

  10. Percutaneous antegrade ureteric stent removal using a rigid alligator forceps.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Given, M F

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of percutaneous antegrade ureteric stent removal using a rigid alligator forceps. Twenty patients were included in our study. Indications for ureteric stent insertion included stone disease (n = 7), malignancy (n = 8) and transplant anastomotic strictures (n = 5). Stent retrieval was carried out for proximal stent placement\\/migration in seven patients and encrustation in the remaining 13. Twenty-two stents were successfully retrieved in 20 patients. There was one technical failure (5%). There were no major complications. We had four minor complications, which included nephrostomy site pain (n = 2), periprocedural sepsis (n = 1) and a small urinoma (n = 1). All patients settled with conservative management. Percutaneous radiologically guided antegrade ureteric stent removal with an alligator forceps is safe and effective, particularly when initial surgical removal has failed.

  11. Rib kinematics during lung ventilation in the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis): an XROMM analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocklehurst, Robert J; Moritz, Sabine; Codd, Jonathan; Sellers, William I; Brainerd, Elizabeth L

    2017-09-01

    The current hypothesis regarding the mechanics of breathing in crocodylians is that the double-headed ribs, with both a capitulum and tuberculum, rotate about a constrained axis passing through the two articulations; moreover, this axis shifts in the caudal thoracic ribs, as the vertebral parapophysis moves from the centrum to the transverse process. Additionally, the ventral ribcage in crocodylians is thought to possess additional degrees of freedom through mobile intermediate ribs. In this study, X-ray reconstruction of moving morphology (XROMM) was used to quantify rib rotation during breathing in American alligators. Whilst costovertebral joint anatomy predicted overall patterns of motion across the ribcage (decreased bucket handle motion and increased calliper motion), there were significant deviations: anatomical axes overestimated pump handle motion and, generally, ribs in vivo rotate about all three body axes more equally than predicted. The intermediate ribs are mobile, with a high degree of rotation measured about the dorsal intracostal joints, especially in the more caudal ribs. Motion of the sternal ribs became increasingly complex caudally, owing to a combination of the movements of the vertebral and intermediate segments. As the crocodylian ribcage is sometimes used as a model for the ancestral archosaur, these results have important implications for how rib motion is reconstructed in fossil taxa, and illustrate the difficulties in reconstructing rib movement based on osteology alone. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Dietary pathways through lizards of the Alligator Rivers Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, C.D.; Morton, S.R.; Braithwaite, R.W.; Wombey, J.C.

    1984-07-01

    A broad survey of the diets of 46 species of terrestrial and arboreal lizards from the families Gekkonidae, Pygopodidae, Agamidae and Scincidae was carried out in the Alligator Rivers Region, and the diets of three of the species were examined in detail by monthly sampling near the Ranger uranium mine. The study shows that, in the event of contamination of the waterbodies, only two species of lizards face any risk of contamination through their food

  13. Biomonitoring Heavy Metal Pollution Using an Aquatic Apex Predator, the American Alligator, and Its Parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez, Marisa; Merchant, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring the bioaccumulation of chemical elements within various organismal tissues has become a useful tool to survey current or chronic levels of heavy metal exposure within an environment. In this study, we compared the bioaccumulations of As, Cd, Cu, Fe, Pb, Se, and Zn between the American alligator, Alligator mississippiensis, and its parasites in order to establish their use as bioindicators of heavy metal pollution. Concomitant with these results, we were interested to determine if parasites were more sensitive bioindicators of heavy metals relative to alligators. We found parasites collectively accumulated higher levels of As, Cu, Se, and Zn in comparison to their alligator hosts, whereas Fe, Cd, and Pb concentrations were higher in alligators. Interestingly, Fe levels were significantly greater in intestinal trematodes than their alligator hosts when analyzed independently from other parasitic taxa. Further analyses showed alligator intestinal trematodes concentrated As, Cu, Fe, Se, and Zn at significantly higher levels than intestinal nematodes and parasites from other organs. However, pentastomids also employed the role as a good biomagnifier of As. Interestingly, parasitic abundance decreased as levels of As increased. Stomach and intestinal nematodes were the poorest bioaccumulators of metals, yet stomach nematodes showed their ability to concentrate Pb at orders of magnitude higher in comparison to other parasites. Conclusively, we suggest that parasites, particularly intestinal trematodes, are superior biomagnifiers of As, Cu, Se, and Zn, whereas alligators are likely good biological indicators of Fe, Cd, and Pb levels within the environment. PMID:26555363

  14. A new species of leech of the genus Placobdella (Hirudinida, Glossiphoniidae from the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis in Mississippi, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J. Richardson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available To date, the only species of leech reported from the American Alligator, Alligator mississippiensis is Placobdella multilineata. Seven specimens of a previously undescribed species of Placobdella were collected from the feet and lower jaw of a single female alligator from the Pascagoula River Wildlife Management Area, George County, Mississippi. The new species was named Placobdella siddalli Richardson & Moser, sp. n., in honor of the contributions of Dr. Mark Siddall to our understanding of the biology of leeches. Placobdella siddalli Richardson & Moser is similar to other papillated members of the genus Placobdella, but differs from Placobdella ali Hughes & Siddall, 2007, Placobdella rugosa (Verrill, 1874, Placobdella multilineata Moore, 1953, and Placobdella papillifera (Verrill, 1872 in coloration, papillation, ventral striping, and in the possession of a relatively large caudal sucker. In addition, molecular comparison of 626 nucleotides of CO-I between the new species and other papillated leeches (P. ali, P. multilineata, Placobdella ornata, P. papillifera, P. rugosa revealed interspecific differences of 14.0–18.0% (88–113 nucleotides.

  15. Alligator Rivers Analogue Project. Final Report - Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerden, P.; Lever, D.A.; Sverjensky, D.A.; Townley, L.R.

    1992-01-01

    This summary report, which highlights the work and findings of the Alligator Rivers Analogue Project (ARAP) is one of a series of 16 volumes, listed below. Detailed descriptions and results are provided in Volumes 2 to 16. Full acknowledgment to individual contributions is provided in the individual reports, and in Appendix I of this report. The findings from the technical studies are discussed in the context of assessments of the long-term performance of geological repositories for radioactive wastes, which are being undertaken in many countries. They are also considered in an integrated 'Scenario Development' approach, aimed to understand the formation of the ore deposit. Despite their inherent uncertainties, the findings provide a basis for assessing the way in which radionuclides will migrate in environments with a variety of geologic settings and over a range of different geologic timescales. Thus, section 2 of this report discusses the concept of using uranium deposits as natural analogues and refers to a number of such studies, including those at the Koongarra deposit in the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory of Australia. Section 3 reviews early scientific work in the Alligator Rivers Region and summarises the results of the analogue studies undertaken between 1981 and 1987 that were funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) and the UK Department of the Environment (UKDoE). Section 4 describes the objectives of ARAP and the manner in which the study was conducted and provides a general outline of the project and a summary of the findings. A general description of the Koongarra ore deposit, the focus of ARAP, is provided in Section 5, with Sections 6-13 providing summaries of the work carried out to characterise the site in detail and provide data for modelling. Sections 14-18 discuss how this data was used in modelling and how the results may be applied for performance assessment studies. Finally, Section 19 considers the

  16. Plants of the Alligator Rivers Region, Northern Territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowie, I.D.; Finlayson, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    Published and unpublished lists of plants of the Alligator Rivers Region have been combined into a single, up-to-date check-list. The list has been designed to replace fragmented, regional listings with a single document suitable for use by both professional and amateur botanists. The list is ordered in the taxonomic sequence adopted for the Flora of Australia and includes 1346 species from 165 families. These are 1275 native and 71 alien species listed. Separate lists of rare species are given and discussed

  17. Comparison of metabolic substrates in alligators and several birds of prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweazea, Karen L; McMurtry, John P; Elsey, Ruth M; Redig, Patrick; Braun, Eldon J

    2014-08-01

    On average, avian blood glucose concentrations are 1.5-2 times those of mammals of similar mass and high concentrations of insulin are required to lower blood glucose. Whereas considerable data exist for granivorous species, few data are available for plasma metabolic substrate and glucoregulatory hormone concentrations for carnivorous birds and alligators. Birds and mammals with carnivorous diets have higher metabolic rates than animals consuming diets with less protein whereas alligators have low metabolic rates. Therefore, the present study was designed to compare substrate and glucoregulatory hormone concentrations in several birds of prey and a phylogenetically close relative of birds, the alligator. The hypothesis was that the combination of carnivorous diets and high metabolic rates favored the evolution of greater protein and fatty acid utilization leading to insulin resistance and high plasma glucose concentrations in carnivorous birds. In contrast, it was hypothesized that alligators would have low substrate utilization attributable to a low metabolic rate. Fasting plasma substrate and glucoregulatory hormone concentrations were compared for bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), great horned owls (Bubo virginianus), red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), and American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis). Avian species had high circulating β-hydroxybutyrate (10-21 mg/dl) compared to alligators (2.81 ± 0.16 mg/dl). In mammals high concentrations of this byproduct of fatty acid utilization are correlated with insulin resistance. Fasting glucose and insulin concentrations were positively correlated in eagles whereas no relationship was found between these variables for owls, hawks or alligators. Additionally, β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations were low in alligators. Similar to carnivorous mammals, ingestion of a high protein diet may have favored the utilization of fatty acids and protein for energy thereby promoting the development of insulin

  18. ALTERED HISTOLOGY OF THE THYMUS AND SPLEEN IN CONTAMINANT-EXPOSED JUVENILE AMERICAN ALLIGATORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morphological difference in spleen and thymus are closely related to functional immune differences. Hormonal regulation of the immune system has been demonstrated in reptilian splenic and thymic tissue. Spleens and thymus were obtained from juvenile alligators at two reference si...

  19. Scale-Dependent Habitat Selection and Size-Based Dominance in Adult Male American Alligators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Bradley A; Vilella, Francisco J; Belant, Jerrold L

    2016-01-01

    Habitat selection is an active behavioral process that may vary across spatial and temporal scales. Animals choose an area of primary utilization (i.e., home range) then make decisions focused on resource needs within patches. Dominance may affect the spatial distribution of conspecifics and concomitant habitat selection. Size-dependent social dominance hierarchies have been documented in captive alligators, but evidence is lacking from wild populations. We studied habitat selection for adult male American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis; n = 17) on the Pearl River in central Mississippi, USA, to test whether habitat selection was scale-dependent and individual resource selectivity was a function of conspecific body size. We used K-select analysis to quantify selection at the home range scale and patches within the home range to determine selection congruency and important habitat variables. In addition, we used linear models to determine if body size was related to selection patterns and strengths. Our results indicated habitat selection of adult male alligators was a scale-dependent process. Alligators demonstrated greater overall selection for habitat variables at the patch level and less at the home range level, suggesting resources may not be limited when selecting a home range for animals in our study area. Further, diurnal habitat selection patterns may depend on thermoregulatory needs. There was no relationship between resource selection or home range size and body size, suggesting size-dependent dominance hierarchies may not have influenced alligator resource selection or space use in our sample. Though apparent habitat suitability and low alligator density did not manifest in an observed dominance hierarchy, we hypothesize that a change in either could increase intraspecific interactions, facilitating a dominance hierarchy. Due to the broad and diverse ecological roles of alligators, understanding the factors that influence their social dominance

  20. Scale-Dependent Habitat Selection and Size-Based Dominance in Adult Male American Alligators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley A Strickland

    Full Text Available Habitat selection is an active behavioral process that may vary across spatial and temporal scales. Animals choose an area of primary utilization (i.e., home range then make decisions focused on resource needs within patches. Dominance may affect the spatial distribution of conspecifics and concomitant habitat selection. Size-dependent social dominance hierarchies have been documented in captive alligators, but evidence is lacking from wild populations. We studied habitat selection for adult male American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis; n = 17 on the Pearl River in central Mississippi, USA, to test whether habitat selection was scale-dependent and individual resource selectivity was a function of conspecific body size. We used K-select analysis to quantify selection at the home range scale and patches within the home range to determine selection congruency and important habitat variables. In addition, we used linear models to determine if body size was related to selection patterns and strengths. Our results indicated habitat selection of adult male alligators was a scale-dependent process. Alligators demonstrated greater overall selection for habitat variables at the patch level and less at the home range level, suggesting resources may not be limited when selecting a home range for animals in our study area. Further, diurnal habitat selection patterns may depend on thermoregulatory needs. There was no relationship between resource selection or home range size and body size, suggesting size-dependent dominance hierarchies may not have influenced alligator resource selection or space use in our sample. Though apparent habitat suitability and low alligator density did not manifest in an observed dominance hierarchy, we hypothesize that a change in either could increase intraspecific interactions, facilitating a dominance hierarchy. Due to the broad and diverse ecological roles of alligators, understanding the factors that influence their

  1. Scale-dependent habitat selection and size-based dominance in adult male American alligators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Bradley A.; Vilella, Francisco; Belant, Jerrold L.

    2016-01-01

    Habitat selection is an active behavioral process that may vary across spatial and temporal scales. Animals choose an area of primary utilization (i.e., home range) then make decisions focused on resource needs within patches. Dominance may affect the spatial distribution of conspecifics and concomitant habitat selection. Size-dependent social dominance hierarchies have been documented in captive alligators, but evidence is lacking from wild populations. We studied habitat selection for adult male American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis; n = 17) on the Pearl River in central Mississippi, USA, to test whether habitat selection was scale-dependent and individual resource selectivity was a function of conspecific body size. We used K-select analysis to quantify selection at the home range scale and patches within the home range to determine selection congruency and important habitat variables. In addition, we used linear models to determine if body size was related to selection patterns and strengths. Our results indicated habitat selection of adult male alligators was a scale-dependent process. Alligators demonstrated greater overall selection for habitat variables at the patch level and less at the home range level, suggesting resources may not be limited when selecting a home range for animals in our study area. Further, diurnal habitat selection patterns may depend on thermoregulatory needs. There was no relationship between resource selection or home range size and body size, suggesting size-dependent dominance hierarchies may not have influenced alligator resource selection or space use in our sample. Though apparent habitat suitability and low alligator density did not manifest in an observed dominance hierarchy, we hypothesize that a change in either could increase intraspecific interactions, facilitating a dominance hierarchy. Due to the broad and diverse ecological roles of alligators, understanding the factors that influence their social dominance

  2. Environment Protection (Alligator Rivers Region) Act 1978, No.28

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The main object of this Act is to provide for the appointment of a Supervising Scientist responsible for supervising protection of the environment in the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory from the effects of uranium mining operations. His functions include advising the competent Minister on the effects of uranium mining operations on the environment and on standards, practices and procedures for its protection and restoration. The Act also sets up a Co-ordinating Committee responsible for programmes for research into the environmental effects of such mining operations and also keeping under review standards, practices and procedures for environmental protection in relation thereto. Finally the Act provides for the establishment of a Research Institute managed by the Supervising Scientist, to promote and assist in research as well as to collect information on the environmental effects of uranium mining operations. (NEA) [fr

  3. Remediating the South Alligator Valley uranium mining legacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawcett, M.; Waggitt, P.

    2010-01-01

    In late 1950s and early 1960s 13 uranium mines operated in the South Alligator Valley of Australia's Northern Territory. Once sales contracts had been filled the mines were abandoned and no remediation took place. In the 1980s the valley was designated as part of Stage 3 of the adjacent World Heritage-listed, Kakadu National Park. Proposals for remediation were only seriously put forward when the land was returned to the traditional Aboriginal owners, the Gunlom Land Trust, in 1996. Although they leased the land back so it would remain a part of Kakadu National Park the traditional Aboriginal owners required remediation to be complete by 2015. This paper tells the story of the development and implementation of the remediation process from the start of planning in 1998 to completion in 2009; and finally it describes the development of stakeholder relationships and the initial plans for long term stewardship. (author)

  4. Biochemical composition of the alligator pipefish, Syngnathoides biaculeatus (Bloch, 1785)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanaye, Sushant Vilas; Pawar, Ashwini Pandurang; Rivonker, Chandrasheker Umanath; Sreepada, Rayadurga Anantha; Ansari, Zakir Ali; Ram, Anirudh

    2017-11-01

    Considering the economic importance in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and lack of baseline information, we evaluated the proximate composition, fatty acid and amino acid profiles, trace element content and C:N ratio in the alligator pipefish, Syngnathoides biaculeatus. Amongst proximate principals, a crude protein formed the major biochemical component ((58.9±2.2)% dry weight). Mean percent concentrations (dry weight) of other components such as a total lipid (TL), ash and nitrogen-free extract measured were, (1.8±0.2)%, (19.2±2.2)% and (20.1±0.45)%, respectively. The fatty acid profile revealed the presence of 27 saturated fatty acids (SFA) with 13 straight-chained and 14 branched-chained, 28 unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) with 14 monounsaturated and 14 polyunsaturated and nine other minor fatty acids. Mean percent contributions of total SFAs and UFAs to TL were found to be (55.41±0.24)% and (44.05±0.25)%, respectively. Altogether, 16 different amino acids with an equal number of essential (EAA) and non-essential (NAA) ones were identified. Percent contributions by EAA and NAA to the total amino acid content were 38.11% and 61.89%, respectively. Trace metal concentrations in S. biaculeatus were generally low and their distribution followed the order, Mg>Fe>Zn>Mn>Cu>Cr>Ni>Hg>Co. The C:N ratio was (4.37±0.04)%. The profile of major biochemical constituents in alligator pipefish, S. biaculeatus revealed its potential use in TCM as well as a nutritional diet for human consumption. The results of the study would also form the basis for formulation and optimization of diets for the culture of S. biaculeatus.

  5. A Chinese alligator in heliox: formant frequencies in a crocodilian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reber, Stephan A; Nishimura, Takeshi; Janisch, Judith; Robertson, Mark; Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2015-08-01

    Crocodilians are among the most vocal non-avian reptiles. Adults of both sexes produce loud vocalizations known as 'bellows' year round, with the highest rate during the mating season. Although the specific function of these vocalizations remains unclear, they may advertise the caller's body size, because relative size differences strongly affect courtship and territorial behaviour in crocodilians. In mammals and birds, a common mechanism for producing honest acoustic signals of body size is via formant frequencies (vocal tract resonances). To our knowledge, formants have to date never been documented in any non-avian reptile, and formants do not seem to play a role in the vocalizations of anurans. We tested for formants in crocodilian vocalizations by using playbacks to induce a female Chinese alligator (Alligator sinensis) to bellow in an airtight chamber. During vocalizations, the animal inhaled either normal air or a helium/oxygen mixture (heliox) in which the velocity of sound is increased. Although heliox allows normal respiration, it alters the formant distribution of the sound spectrum. An acoustic analysis of the calls showed that the source signal components remained constant under both conditions, but an upward shift of high-energy frequency bands was observed in heliox. We conclude that these frequency bands represent formants. We suggest that crocodilian vocalizations could thus provide an acoustic indication of body size via formants. Because birds and crocodilians share a common ancestor with all dinosaurs, a better understanding of their vocal production systems may also provide insight into the communication of extinct Archosaurians. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. American alligator digestion rate of blue crabs and its implications for stomach contents analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nifong, James C.; Rosenblatt, Adam E.; Johnson, Nathan A.; Barichivich, William; Silliman, Brian; Heithaus, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Stomach contents analysis (SCA) provides a snap-shot observation of a consumer's diet. Interpretation of SCA data can be complicated by many factors, including variation in gastric residence times and digestion rates among prey taxa. Although some SCA methods are reported to efficiently remove all stomach contents, the effectiveness of these techniques has rarely been tested for large irregular shaped prey with hard exoskeletons. We used a controlled feeding trial to estimate gastric residency time and decomposition rate of a large crustacean prey item, the Blue Crab (Callinectes sapidus), which is consumed by American Alligators (Alligator mississippiensis), an abundant apex predator in coastal habitats of the southeastern United States. The decomposition rate of C. sapidus in the stomachs of A. mississippiensis followed a predictable pattern, and some crab pieces remained in stomachs for at least 14 days. We also found that certain portions of C. sapidus were prone to becoming caught within the stomach or esophagus, meaning not all crab parts are consistently recovered using gastric lavage techniques. However, because the state of decomposition of crabs was predictable, it is possible to estimate time since consumption for crabs recovered from wild alligators. This information, coupled with a detailed understanding of crab distributions and alligator movement tactics could help elucidate patterns of cross-ecosystem foraging by the American Alligator in coastal habitats

  7. Animal-borne imaging reveals novel insights into the foraging behaviors and Diel activity of a large-bodied apex predator, the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C Nifong

    Full Text Available Large-bodied, top- and apex predators (e.g., crocodilians, sharks, wolves, killer whales can exert strong top-down effects within ecological communities through their interactions with prey. Due to inherent difficulties while studying the behavior of these often dangerous predatory species, relatively little is known regarding their feeding behaviors and activity patterns, information that is essential to understanding their role in regulating food web dynamics and ecological processes. Here we use animal-borne imaging systems (Crittercam to study the foraging behavior and activity patterns of a cryptic, large-bodied predator, the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis in two estuaries of coastal Florida, USA. Using retrieved video data we examine the variation in foraging behaviors and activity patterns due to abiotic factors. We found the frequency of prey-attacks (mean = 0.49 prey attacks/hour as well as the probability of prey-capture success (mean = 0.52 per attack were significantly affected by time of day. Alligators attempted to capture prey most frequently during the night. Probability of prey-capture success per attack was highest during morning hours and sequentially lower during day, night, and sunset, respectively. Position in the water column also significantly affected prey-capture success, as individuals' experienced two-fold greater success when attacking prey while submerged. These estimates are the first for wild adult American alligators and one of the few examples for any crocodilian species worldwide. More broadly, these results reveal that our understandings of crocodilian foraging behaviors are biased due to previous studies containing limited observations of cryptic and nocturnal foraging interactions. Our results can be used to inform greater understanding regarding the top-down effects of American alligators in estuarine food webs. Additionally, our results highlight the importance and power of using animal

  8. Animal-borne imaging reveals novel insights into the foraging behaviors and Diel activity of a large-bodied apex predator, the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nifong, James C; Nifong, Rachel L; Silliman, Brian R; Lowers, Russell H; Guillette, Louis J; Ferguson, Jake M; Welsh, Matthew; Abernathy, Kyler; Marshall, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Large-bodied, top- and apex predators (e.g., crocodilians, sharks, wolves, killer whales) can exert strong top-down effects within ecological communities through their interactions with prey. Due to inherent difficulties while studying the behavior of these often dangerous predatory species, relatively little is known regarding their feeding behaviors and activity patterns, information that is essential to understanding their role in regulating food web dynamics and ecological processes. Here we use animal-borne imaging systems (Crittercam) to study the foraging behavior and activity patterns of a cryptic, large-bodied predator, the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) in two estuaries of coastal Florida, USA. Using retrieved video data we examine the variation in foraging behaviors and activity patterns due to abiotic factors. We found the frequency of prey-attacks (mean = 0.49 prey attacks/hour) as well as the probability of prey-capture success (mean = 0.52 per attack) were significantly affected by time of day. Alligators attempted to capture prey most frequently during the night. Probability of prey-capture success per attack was highest during morning hours and sequentially lower during day, night, and sunset, respectively. Position in the water column also significantly affected prey-capture success, as individuals' experienced two-fold greater success when attacking prey while submerged. These estimates are the first for wild adult American alligators and one of the few examples for any crocodilian species worldwide. More broadly, these results reveal that our understandings of crocodilian foraging behaviors are biased due to previous studies containing limited observations of cryptic and nocturnal foraging interactions. Our results can be used to inform greater understanding regarding the top-down effects of American alligators in estuarine food webs. Additionally, our results highlight the importance and power of using animal-borne imaging when

  9. Influences of sex, incubation temperature, and environmental quality on gonadal estrogen and androgen receptor messenger RNA expression in juvenile American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Brandon C; Milnes, Matthew R; Kohno, Satomi; Katsu, Yoshinao; Iguchi, Taisen; Guillette, Louis J

    2010-01-01

    Gonadal steroid hormone receptors play a vital role in transforming ligand signals into gene expression. We have shown previously that gonads from wild-caught juvenile alligators express greater levels of estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) than estrogen receptor 2 (ESR2). Furthermore, sexually dimorphic ESR2 mRNA expression (female > male) observed in animals from the reference site (Lake Woodruff, FL, USA) was lost in alligators from the contaminated Lake Apopka (FL, USA). We postulated that environmental contaminant exposure could influence gonadal steroid hormone receptor expression. Here, we address questions regarding gonadal estrogen and androgen receptor (AR) mRNA expression in 1-yr-old, laboratory-raised alligators. What are relative expression levels within gonads? Do these levels vary between sexes or incubation temperatures? Can contaminant exposure change these levels? We observed a similar pattern of expression (ESR1 > AR > ESR2) in ovary and testis. However, both incubation temperature and environment modulated expression. Males incubated at 33.5 degrees C expressed greater AR levels than females incubated at 30 degrees C; dimorphic expression was not observed in animals incubated at 32 degrees C. Compared to Lake Woodruff alligators, Lake Apopka animals of both sexes showed lesser ESR2 mRNA expression levels. Employing cluster analyses, we integrated these receptor expression patterns with those of steroidogenic factors. Elevated ESR2 and CYP19A1 expressions were diagnostic of alligator ovary, whereas elevated HSD3B1, CYP11A1, and CYP17A1 expressions were indicative of testis. In contrast, AR, ESR1, and NR5A1 showed variable expressions that were not entirely associated with sex. These findings demonstrate that the mRNA expression of receptors required for steroid hormone signaling are modified by exposure to environmental factors, including temperature and contaminants.

  10. The pulmonary anatomy of Alligator mississippiensis and its similarity to the avian respiratory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, R Kent; Farmer, C G

    2012-04-01

    Using gross dissections and computed tomography we studied the lungs of juvenile American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis). Our findings indicate that both the external and internal morphology of the lungs is strikingly similar to the embryonic avian respiratory system (lungs + air sacs). We identified bronchi that we propose are homologous to the avian ventrobronchi (entobronchi), laterobronchi, dorsobronchi (ectobronchi), as well as regions of the lung hypothesized to be homologous to the cervical, interclavicular, anterior thoracic, posterior thoracic, and abdominal air sacs. Furthermore, we suggest that many of the features that alligators and birds share are homologous and that some of these features are important to the aerodynamic valve mechanism and are likely plesiomorphic for Archosauria. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Environment Protection (Alligator Rivers Region) Amendment Act 1987 - No 17 of 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This Act amends the Environment Protection (Alligator Rivers Region) Act 1978. The amendments mainly concern definition of general mining operations and specification of the functions of the Supervisory Scientist and the Research Institute in relation to general mining in an environment conservation zone (parts of the Alligator Rivers Region). The 1978 Act provided for the appointment of a Supervising Scientist responsible for supervising protection of the environment against the effects of uranium mining in the Region, and for the creation of a Research Institute under his management. (NEA) [fr

  12. Water hyacinths and alligator weeds for removal of silver, cobalt, and strontium from polluted waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolverton, B. C.; Mcdonald, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Water hyacinths and alligator weeds demonstrated the ability to rapidly remove heavy metals from an aqueous system by root absorption and concentration. Water hyacinths demonstrated the ability to remove 0.439 mg of silver, 0.568 mg of cobalt, and 0.544 mg of strontium in an ionized form per gram of dry plant material in a 24-hour period. Alligator weeds removed a maximum of 0.439 mg of silver, 0.130 mg of cobalt, and 0.161 mg of strontium per gram of dry plant material per day.

  13. Evaluating the effect of sample type on American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) analyte values in a point-of-care blood analyser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Matthew T; Finger, John W; Winzeler, Megan E; Tuberville, Tracey D

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of wildlife health has been enhanced by the ability of point-of-care (POC) blood analysers to provide biochemical analyses of non-domesticated animals in the field. However, environmental limitations (e.g. temperature, atmospheric humidity and rain) and lack of reference values may inhibit researchers from using such a device with certain wildlife species. Evaluating the use of alternative sample types, such as plasma, in a POC device may afford researchers the opportunity to delay sample analysis and the ability to use banked samples. In this study, we examined fresh whole blood, fresh plasma and frozen plasma (sample type) pH, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2), bicarbonate (HCO3 (-)), total carbon dioxide (TCO2), base excess (BE), partial pressure of oxygen (PO2), oxygen saturation (sO2) and lactate concentrations in 23 juvenile American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) using an i-STAT CG4+ cartridge. Our results indicate that sample type had no effect on lactate concentration values (F 2,65 = 0.37, P = 0.963), suggesting that the i-STAT analyser can be used reliably to quantify lactate concentrations in fresh and frozen plasma samples. In contrast, the other seven blood parameters measured by the CG4+ cartridge were significantly affected by sample type. Lastly, we were able to collect blood samples from all alligators within 2 min of capture to establish preliminary reference ranges for juvenile alligators based on values obtained using fresh whole blood.

  14. A limnological survey of the Alligator Rivers Region. 1. Diatoms (Bacillariophyceae) of the region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, D.P.

    1983-08-01

    This study was undertaken as part of a study of the algae of the Alligator Rivers Region in general, and of the Magela Creek in particular, to support an investigation into the possible use of native algae as an indicator of any changes in water quality which might occur as a result of uranium mining and milling in the Region

  15. Several techniques for the preparation of flour from carcasses of the Pantanal alligator (Caiman crocodilus yacare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitória Regina Takeuchi FERNANDES

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractFlour prepared via current assay methodologies from the carcasses of the Pantanal alligator (Caiman crocodilus yacare was analyzed for its chemical composition, minerals, fatty acids, and sensorial profile. Carcasses of the Pantanal alligator, originating from the Coocrijapan scientific zoo, Cáceres MT Brazil, were utilized. The carcasses were cooked for 60 minutes in a pressure cooker with water containing 2% salt and 5% chimichurri. The cooked carcasses were then ground and the mass was used for the manufacture of flour via three techniques: non-smoked, hot-smoked, and liquid-smoked. After each technique, the carcasses were dehydrated at 60ºC for 3h and were ground. Alligator flour was then produced. The moisture of liquid-smoked flour (10.97% was higher than that of non-smoked flour (3.78% and hot-smoked flour (4.43%. The flours provided high protein (57.11% - 58.27% and ash (23.45 – 26.42% rates, and were predominantly calcium (6.77% - 7.69%, phosphorus (3.67% - 4.05%, and iron (73.13 – 273.73 ppm/100 mg. Smoked-flour had a better acceptance rate by tasters when compared to non-smoked flour. Results show that flours produced from alligator carcasses had high protein, ash, and mineral rates and a reasonable acceptability by most tasters.

  16. The complete mitochondrial genome of Alligator mississippiensis and the separation between recent archosauria (birds and crocodiles).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, A; Arnason, U

    1997-12-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the alligator, Alligator mississippiensis, was sequenced. The size of the molecule is 16,642 nucleotides. Previously reported rearrangements of tRNAs in crocodile mitochondrial genomes were confirmed and, relative to mammals, no other deviations of gene order were observed. The analysis of protein-coding genes of the alligator showed an evolutionary rate that is roughly the same as in mammals. Thus, the evolutionary rate in the alligator is faster than that in birds as well as that in cold-blooded vertebrates. This contradicts hypotheses of constant body temperatures or high metabolic rate being correlated with elevated molecular evolutionary rates. It is commonly acknowledged that birds are the closest living relatives to crocodiles. Birds and crocodiles represent the only archosaurian survivors of the mass extinction at the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary. On the basis of mitochondrial protein-coding genes, the Haemothermia hypothesis, which defines birds and mammals as sister groups and thus challenges the traditional view, could be rejected. Maximum-likelihood branch length data of amino acid sequences suggest that the divergence between the avian and crocodilian lineages took place at approximately equal to 254 MYA.

  17. The oldest record of Alligator sinensis from the Late Pliocene of Western Japan, and its biogeographic implication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Masaya; Takahashi, Keiichi; Kobayashi, Yoshitsugu

    2016-07-01

    The late Cenozoic fossil record of alligators in East Asia is crucial in understanding the origin and past distribution of Asian alligators that are now represented by a single species, Alligator sinensis. This study reports a partial skeleton of A. sinensis from the Late Pliocene (approximately 3.0 Ma) of western Japan. This Japanese A. sinensis is large in size (>200 cm total length), comparable to the maximum size of extant individuals. It demonstrates the oldest record of A. sinensis and wider distribution of this species in the past. Tectonic and geographic history of East Asia suggests that alligators presumably dispersed into Japan before 25 Ma or after 10 Ma, yet finally were wiped out from Japan due to the semi-isolated condition of the Japanese island arc and the deteriorated climate during the Plio-Pleistocene.

  18. Total phenolic content and in-vitro antioxidant activities from methanolic extract of alligator pipefish, Syngnathoides biaculeatus (Bloch, 1785)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sanaye, S.V.; Pise, N.M.; Pawar, A.P.; Parab, P.P.; Sreepada, R.A.; Pawar, H.B.; Murugan, A.

    Alligator pipefish, Syngnathoides biaculeatus (Bloch, 1785) is one of the heavily traded and expensive ingredient in traditional Chinese medicines and there were no reports on its antioxidant activities Total phenolic content (TPC) and in...

  19. EAARL coastal topography--Alligator Point, Louisiana, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Bonisteel-Cormier, J.M.; Wright, C.W.; Brock, J.C.; Nagle, D.B.; Vivekanandan, Saisudha; Fredericks, Xan; Barras, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of Alligator Point, Louisiana, acquired on March 5 and 6, 2010. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multispectral color-infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine aircraft, but the instrument was deployed on a Pilatus PC-6. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight-line definition, flight-path plotting, lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have

  20. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Hydrogeological modelling. Final Report - Volume 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Townley, L.R.; Trefry, M.G.; Barr, A.D. [CSIRO Div of Water Resources, PO Wembley, WA (Australia); Braumiller, S. [Univ of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept of Hydrology and Water Resources; Kawanishi, M. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Abiko-Shi, Chiba-Ken (Japan)] [and others

    1992-12-31

    This volume describes hydrogeological modelling carried out as part of the Alligator Rivers Analogue Project. Hydrogeology has played a key integrating role in the Project, largely because water movement is believed to have controlled the evolution of the Koongarra uranium Orebody and therefore affects field observations of all types at all scales. Aquifer testing described uses the concept of transmissivity in its interpretation of aquifer response to pumping. The concept of an aquifer, a layer transmitting significant quantities of water in a mainly horizontal direction, seems hard to accept in an environment as heterogeneous as that at Koongarra. But modelling of aquifers both in one dimension and two dimensionally in plan has contributed significantly to our understanding of the site. A one-dimensional model with three layers (often described as a quasi two dimensional model) was applied to flow between the Fault and Koongarra Creek. Being a transient model, this model was able to show that reverse flows can indeed occur back towards the Fault, but only if there is distributed recharge over the orebody as well as a mechanism for the Fault, or a region near the Fault, to remove water from the simulated cross-section. The model also showed clearly that the response of the three-layered system, consisting of a highly weathered zone, a fractured transmissive zone and a less conductive lower schist zone, is governed mainly by the transmissivity and storage coefficient of the middle layer. The storage coefficient of the higher layer has little effect. A two-dimensional model in plan used a description of anisotropy to show that reverse flows can also occur even without a conducting Fault. Modelling of a three-dimensional region using discrete fractures showed that it is certainly possible to simulate systems like that observed at Koongarra, but that large amounts of data are probably needed to obtain realistic descriptions of the fracture networks. Inverse modelling

  1. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Hydrogeological modelling. Final Report - Volume 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townley, L.R.; Trefry, M.G.; Barr, A.D.; Braumiller, S.

    1992-01-01

    This volume describes hydrogeological modelling carried out as part of the Alligator Rivers Analogue Project. Hydrogeology has played a key integrating role in the Project, largely because water movement is believed to have controlled the evolution of the Koongarra uranium Orebody and therefore affects field observations of all types at all scales. Aquifer testing described uses the concept of transmissivity in its interpretation of aquifer response to pumping. The concept of an aquifer, a layer transmitting significant quantities of water in a mainly horizontal direction, seems hard to accept in an environment as heterogeneous as that at Koongarra. But modelling of aquifers both in one dimension and two dimensionally in plan has contributed significantly to our understanding of the site. A one-dimensional model with three layers (often described as a quasi two dimensional model) was applied to flow between the Fault and Koongarra Creek. Being a transient model, this model was able to show that reverse flows can indeed occur back towards the Fault, but only if there is distributed recharge over the orebody as well as a mechanism for the Fault, or a region near the Fault, to remove water from the simulated cross-section. The model also showed clearly that the response of the three-layered system, consisting of a highly weathered zone, a fractured transmissive zone and a less conductive lower schist zone, is governed mainly by the transmissivity and storage coefficient of the middle layer. The storage coefficient of the higher layer has little effect. A two-dimensional model in plan used a description of anisotropy to show that reverse flows can also occur even without a conducting Fault. Modelling of a three-dimensional region using discrete fractures showed that it is certainly possible to simulate systems like that observed at Koongarra, but that large amounts of data are probably needed to obtain realistic descriptions of the fracture networks. Inverse modelling

  2. Hydrodynamic analysis, performance assessment, and actuator design of a flexible tail propulsor in an artificial alligator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philen, Michael; Neu, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    The overall objective of this research is to develop analysis tools for determining actuator requirements and assessing viable actuator technology for design of a flexible tail propulsor in an artificial alligator. A simple hydrodynamic model that includes both reactive and resistive forces along the tail is proposed and the calculated mean thrust agrees well with conventional estimates of drag. Using the hydrodynamic model forces as an input, studies are performed for an alligator ranging in size from 1 cm to 2 m at swimming speeds of 0.3–1.8 body lengths per second containing five antagonistic pairs of actuators distributed along the length of the tail. Several smart materials are considered for the actuation system, and preliminary analysis results indicate that the acrylic electroactive polymer and the flexible matrix composite actuators are potential artificial muscle technologies for the system

  3. Nutrient and organochlorine pesticide concentrations in American alligator eggs and their associations with clutch viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauschenberger, R Heath; Sepúlveda, Maria S; Wiebe, Jon J; Wiebe, Janet E; Honeyfield, Dale C; Gross, Timothy S

    2009-12-01

    Since the early 1900s, the lakes of the Ocklawaha basin in central Florida have experienced ecological degradation due to anthropogenic development. One species affected by this degradation is the American alligator Alligator mississippiensis, which has suffered from poor clutch viability and embryo mortality. Although some studies indicate that organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) may be involved, OCPs do not account for all of the variation seen in hatch rates. Indeed, nutrition and non-OCP contaminants have been associated with developmental problems in fish and birds. Our study evaluated embryo mortality in alligators at reference and OCP-contaminated sites as a function of exposure to OCPs, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), along with egg nutrients (Zn, Se, and vitamins A, E, and B1). The four-pronged study consisted of a case-control cohort study, an expanded field study, a topical egg treatment thiamine amelioration experiment, and a topical egg treatment thiamine antagonist experiment. The results from the two field studies suggested that the total thiamine levels in the eggs were positively associated with clutch viability and negatively associated with the lipid content and certain OCPs measured in egg yolks. In addition, PCBs, PAHs, Zn, Se, and vitamins A and E were not found to be associated with the observed clutch viability defects. The thiamine levels in the eggs explained 38% of the variation in clutch survival in the case-control cohort study and 27% in the expanded field study. The topical egg treatment experiments were successful in elevating the thiamine concentrations in the albumin but not the yolk. No significant differences were noted among treatment groups in either egg treatment experiment with respect to clutch survival. In summary, thiamine egg concentrations explain some of the variation in the clutch viability of free-ranging alligators, but the cause-effect relationships are still unclear.

  4. High Resolution Electron Microbeam Examination and 3D Reconstruction of Alligator Gar Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-27

    Distribution Unlimited UU UU UU UU 27-06-2016 15-Nov-2012 14-Nov-2015 Final Report: High Resolution Electron Microbeam Examination and 3D...Resolution Electron Microbeam Examination and 3D reconstruction of Alligator Gar Scale Report Title Engineered laminate composites have been widely used...peer-reviewed journals: Number of Non Peer-Reviewed Conference Proceeding publications (other than abstracts): Peer-Reviewed Conference Proceeding

  5. Do egg-laying crocodilian (Alligator mississippiensis) archosaurs form medullary bone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, M H; Elsey, R M; Dacke, C G; Horner, J R; Lamm, E-T

    2007-04-01

    It is beyond question that Mesozoic dinosaurs, like Aves and Crocodylia, are archosaurs. However, within the archosaurian clade, the origin and distribution of some major features are less clear, particularly with respect to reproductive physiology. Medullary bone, a highly mineralized, bony reproductive tissue present in the endosteal cavities of all extant egg-laying birds thus far examined, has recently been reported in Tyrannosaurus rex. Its presence or absence in extant crocodilians, therefore, may shed light on the timing of its evolutionary appearance. If medullary bone is present in all three taxa, it arose before the three lineages diverged. However, if medullary bone arose after this divergence, it may be present in both extinct dinosaurs and birds, or in birds only. If present in extinct dinosaurs and birds, but not crocodilians, it would indicate that it arose in the common ancestor of this clade, thus adding support to the closer phylogenetic relationship of dinosaurs and birds relative to crocodilians. Thus, the question of whether the crocodilian Alligator mississippiensis forms medullary bone during the production of eggs has important evolutionary significance. Our examination of long bones from several alligators (two alligators with eggs in the oviducts, one that had produced eggs in the past but was not currently in reproductive phase, an immature female and an adult male) shows no differences on the endosteal surfaces of the long bones, and no evidence of medullary bone, supporting the hypothesis that medullary bone first evolved in the dinosaur-bird line, after the divergence of crocodilians from this lineage.

  6. Estimating spawning times of Alligator Gar (Atractosteus spatula) in Lake Texoma, Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Richard A.; Long, James M.

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, juvenile Alligator Gar were sampled in the reservoir-river interface of the Red River arm of Lake Texoma. The Red River, which flows 860 km along Oklahoma’s border with Texas, is the primary in-flow source of Lake Texoma, and is impounded by Denison Dam. Minifyke nets were deployed using an adaptive random cluster sampling design, which has been used to effectively sample rare species. Lapilli otoliths (one of the three pair of ear stones found within the inner ear of fish) were removed from juvenile Alligator Gar collected in July of 2013. Daily ages were estimated by counting the number of rings present, and spawn dates were back-calculated from date of capture and subtracting 8 days (3 days from spawn to hatch and 5 days from hatch to swimup when the first ring forms). Alligator Gar daily age estimation ranged from 50 to 63 days old since swim-up. Spawn dates corresponded to rising pool elevations of Lake Texoma and water pulses of tributaries.

  7. Aeromonas hydrophila as an agent of infection in alligators. Phase I, final report. Progress report, September 1, 1976--September 30, 1977, Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorden, R.W.; Esch, G.W.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental alligators were exposed to various concentrations of young, washed cells of Aeromonas hydrophila under controlled conditions. Responses of all alligators were monitored on the basis of: observations of external lesions; immunoglobulin production; blood chemistry and hematology; bacteriology, parasitology, and pathology of internal organs, skeletal muscle and external lesions at necropsy. The findings are summarized.

  8. Variation in Nest Temperatures of the American Alligator Found on the Kennedy Space Center Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowers, Russell; Guillette, Louis J.; Weiss, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Information on nest temperatures of the American Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) constructed in the wild is limited. Nesting temperatures during a critical thermal sensitive period determine the sex of alligators and are therefore critical in establishing the sex biases in recruitment efforts of alligators within a given community. Nest components, varying environmental conditions, and global warming could have a significant impact on nest temperatures, thus affecting future generations of a given population. One hundred and seventy four programmable thermistors were inserted into fifty eight nests from 2010 through 2015 nesting cycles. Three thermistors were placed inside each nest cavity (one on top of the eggs, one in the middle of the eggs, and one at the bottom of the clutch of the eggs) to collect temperature profiles in the incubation chamber and throughout the entire incubation period. One thermistor was also placed near or above these nests to obtain an ambient air temperature profile. Once retrieved, data from these thermistors were downloaded to examine temperature profiles throughout the incubation period as well as during the period of sexual determination. These data would help establish survival rates related to nest temperature and predict sex ratio of recruited neonates at the Kennedy Space Center. Over three million temperatures have been recorded since 2010 for the alligator thermistor study giving us insight to the recruitment efforts found here. Precipitation was the largest influence on nesting temperatures outside of daily photoperiod, with immediate changes of up to eight degrees Celsius.

  9. Heterophil/Lymphocyte Alterations as a Measure of Stress in American Alligators in Relation to Anthropogenic Disturbance in a Louisiana Intermediate Marsh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Murray

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Numerous anthropogenic factors represent environmental threats to Gulf Coast wetland ecosystems and associated fauna. American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis have been subject to long-term management and used as ecological and physiological indicators of habitat quality in response to anthropogenic events and stochastic natural disasters. The present study monitored heterophil to lymphocyte ratios (an indicator of stress, in American alligators in a Louisiana intermediate marsh from 2009 to 2011, a time period that coincides with an oil inundation event that occurred in 2011. Sixteen alligators were observed and processed morphometrically (total length, snout-vent length and body mass. Heterophil to lymphocyte ratios were negatively correlated with size, suggesting larger American alligators were physiologically more resilient to the disturbance, more able to actively avoid these poor conditions, or are less affected by localized disturbance.

  10. A new distributional record of alligator pipefish, Syngnathoides biaculeatus (Bloch, 1785) along Goa, central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sanaye, S.V.; Rivonker, C.U.; Ansari, Z.A.; Sreepada, R.A.

    along the coastal waters of Goa, central west coast of India, a single male alligator pipefish, S. biaculeatus (Bloch, 1785), accidentally caught in gill net with shredded branches of seaweed Sargassum sp., at depth of 20 m on 15 January 2012 formed... coast of India Results A single male specimen of alligator pipefish (Fig. 2) accidentally caught in one of the gill net (25 mm mesh size) operated in the bay estuarine system of Zuari River at a depth of 20 m. The collected specimen was observed...

  11. Post-hatching development of mitochondrial function, organ mass and metabolic rate in two ectotherms, the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis and the common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K. G. Sirsat

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The ontogeny of endothermy in birds is associated with disproportionate growth of thermogenic organs and increased mitochondrial oxidative capacity. However, no similar study has been made of the development of these traits in ectotherms. For comparison, we therefore investigated the metabolism, growth and muscle mitochondrial function in hatchlings of a turtle and a crocodilian, two ectotherms that never develop endothermy. Metabolic rate did not increase substantially in either species by 30 days post-hatching. Yolk-free body mass and heart mass did not change through 30 days in alligators and heart mass was a constant proportion of body mass, even after 1 year. Yolk-free body mass and liver mass grew 36% and 27%, respectively, in turtles during the first 30 days post-hatch. The mass-specific oxidative phosphorylation capacity of mitochondria, assessed using permeabilized muscle fibers, increased by a non-significant 47% in alligator thigh and a non-significant 50% in turtle thigh over 30 days, but did not increase in the heart. This developmental trajectory of mitochondrial function is slower and shallower than that previously observed in ducks, which demonstrate a 90% increase in mass-specific oxidative phosphorylation capacity in thigh muscles over just a few days, a 60% increase in mass-specific oxidative phosphorylation capacity of the heart over a few days, and disproportionate growth of the heart and other organs. Our data thus support the hypothesis that these developmental changes in ducks represent mechanistic drivers for attaining endothermy.

  12. The alligator woman's tale: remembering Nicaragua's "first self-declared lesbian".

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rivera, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Carmen Aguirre (1931-1971) was a young woman who lived as a self-made man in the 1960s under the brutal, yet populist, right-wing Somoza dictatorship in Nicaragua. Carmen was known as Carmelo or la Caimana (the alligator woman). This article sheds light not only on la Caimana's life, but on how he is remembered today in Nicaragua. It addresses dynamics of Nicaragua's sexual past, present, and future, as well as theoretical questions dealing with identity, sex, and politics.

  13. Characterization of microsatellite DNA markers for the alligator snapping turtle, Macrochelys temminckii: Primer note

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackler, J.C.; Van Den Bussche, Ronald A.; Leslie, David M.

    2007-01-01

    Two trinucleotide and seven tetranucleotide microsatellite loci were isolated from an alligator snapping turtle Macrochelys temminckii. To assess the degree of variability in these nine microsatellite loci, we genotyped 174 individuals collected from eight river drainage basins in the southeastern USA. These markers revealed a moderate degree of allelic diversity (six to 16 alleles per locus) and observed heterozygosity (0.166-0.686). These polymorphic microsatellite loci provide powerful tools for population genetic studies for a species that is afforded some level of conservation protection in every state in which it occurs. ?? 2006 The Authors.

  14. Supervising Scientist for the Alligator Rivers Region Annual Report 1996-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    One of the most significant developments during the year was the submission by Energy Resources of Australia Ltd of its Environmental Impact Statement for Jabiluka. The proposal is significantly different in technical detail from the Ranger and Nabarlek mines owing to the proposal to mine underground. Evaluation of the Environmental Performance of the uranium mines of the Alligator Rivers Region continued, with twice-yearly Environmental Performance Reviews (EPR) of Ranger and Nabarlek, and results reported to the Alligator Rivers Region Advisory Committee (ARRAC). Ongoing technical consultations took place through meetings of the Ranger Minesite Technical Committee. Issues relating to water disposal were addressed through the Ranger Water Management Working Group. Submissions were made regarding the Jabiluka Environmental Impact Assessment process and technical advice was provided to the Environmental Assessment Branch of Environment Australia during the assessment. The organisation's research program has reflected strategic directions set last year by the Alligator Rivers Region Technical Committee (ARRTC) concerning environmental impacts of mining. Key projects assess radiation exposure by members of the public as a result of uranium mining, the effectiveness of artificial wetlands in the treatment of mine waters, and the development of methods to assess the effectiveness of options for rehabilitation. Development of the research program into wetlands protection and management continued, including establishment of a coordinated monitoring program to measure and assess coastal change as a benchmark for monitoring effects of climate change in the Alligator Rivers Region (a key part of a national network). Other research activities included water quality research for the National River Health Program and revision of the National Water Quality Management Strategy, Water Quality Guidelines for Fresh and Marine Waters and conclusion of research projects in the Mount

  15. The first fossil skull of Alligator sinensis from the Pleistocene, Taiwan, with a paleogeographic implication of the species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsi-yin, Shan; Yen-nien, Cheng; Xiao-chun, Wu

    2013-06-01

    A nearly complete fossil skull of Alligatoridae from the Pleistocene, Penghu Channel, east of Taiwan, is reported. It can be referred to the most latest clade of Alligatorinae, which includes Alligator sinensis, Alligator mississippiensis and Alligator mefferdi, on the basis of the following features: the splenial is excluded from the mandibular symphysis; the anterior tip of the splenial passes dorsal to the Meckelian groove; and the mandible is gently curved between the fourth alveoli and the mid dentary. It differs from A. mississippiensis and A. mefferdi mainly in the following characters: the breadth between the supratemporal fenestrae is approximately equal to the interorbital width, the snout is about half the length of the skull; and the anterior part of the snout is subtriangular in dorsal view. These features suggest that the Penghu alligator is most probably referable to A. sinensis. This is the only fossil skull of A. sinensis known. The discovery of the skull in Penghu Channel not only provides the first solid fossil evidence to indicate that the geological distribution of A. sinensis extended farther southeast than the historical/archeological range of the species but also adds new information on the biodiversity of the Penghu fauna.

  16. Potential impact of Dare County landfills on Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winger, P.V.; Lasier, P.J.; Augspurger, T.

    2005-01-01

    Runoff of leachate from East Lake and Dare County Construction and Demolition Debris landfills has the potential to impact wildlife resources at Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, Dare and Hyde Counties, North Carolina. Sediment quality of samples collected in August 2000 at 14 locations down-gradient from the landfills was assessed by measuring metal and organic contaminants in the sediments, chronic toxicity of solid-phase sediment (28-d static-renewal exposures; survival and growth as test endpoints) and acute toxicity of sediment porewater (96-h static exposures) to Hyalella azteca (Crustacea: Amphipoda). In addition, contaminant bioaccumulation from 4 sediments was determined using 28-d exposures of Lumbriculus variegatus (freshwater oligochaete). Although survival was not impaired, length of H. azteca was significantly reduced in sediments from 5 locations. Pore water from 4 locations was acutely toxic to H. azteca. Metals and a few polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were bioaccumulated by L. variegatus from the sediments. Several metals and PAHs exceeded sediment quality guidelines, and metals in porewater from several sites exceeded water quality criteria for the protection of aquatic wildlife. Runoff of leachate from the landfills has reduced sediment quality and has the potential to adversely affect wildlife resources at Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge.

  17. Reduction in penis size and plasma testosterone concentrations in juvenile alligators living in a contaminated environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillette, L J; Pickford, D B; Crain, D A; Rooney, A A; Percival, H F

    1996-01-01

    The development of the male reproductive ducts and external genitalia in vertebrates is dependent on elevated androgen concentrations during embryonic development and the period of postnatal growth. We have observed that a population of juvenile alligators living on Lake Apopka exhibit significantly smaller penis size (24% average decrease) and lower plasma concentrations of testosterone (70% lower concentrations) when compared to animals of similar size on Lake Woodruff. In addition to smaller phalli, no relationship exists between plasma testosterone concentrations and penile size in males from Lake Apopka, whereas a positive relationship exists for males from Lake Woodruff. The alligators on Lake Apopka are known to have elevated concentrations of the antiandrogenic DDT breakdown product p.p'-DDE stored in their fat. We suggest a number of hypotheses that could explain the modification in the phenotype of the juvenile male living in Lake Apopka. These modifications in phenotype include a smaller penis size, lower plasma androgen concentrations, and lack of responsiveness of the penis to the plasma androgens present.

  18. A radon and meteorological measurement network for the Alligator Rivers Region, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, P; Tims, S; Ryan, B; Bollhöfer, A

    2004-01-01

    The network described in this paper has been set up to provide detailed time-series data on concentrations of 222Rn in air at various locations within the Alligator Rivers Region, over a time frame of several years. These data will be important in assessing the effects of uranium mining operations on radon levels in the region, both in providing baseline and monitoring data and in calibrating and verifying predictive models. At present, three stations are operating in the region with a fourth being commissioned. Each station logs half hourly average radon concentrations and relevant meteorological data (wind speed, direction and variability, air pressure and temperature, relative humidity, soil temperature, rain and sunshine rates). It is intended to operate the four stations at selected locations for one- or two-year intervals, at the end of which three will be moved to new locations (one station at Mudginberri will be kept as a constant control station). Sites for which extensive datasets are currently available include: Jabiru Town, Jabiru East, Djarr Djarr, East Alligator Ranger Station and Nabarlek minesite. Illustrative data from these sites are presented.

  19. A radon and meteorological measurement network for the Alligator Rivers Region, Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, P. E-mail: paul.martin@deh.gov.au; Tims, S. E-mail: steve.tims@anu.edu.au; Ryan, B. E-mail: bruce.ryan@ea.gov.au; Bollhoefer, A. E-mail: andreas.bollhoefer@ea.gov.au

    2004-07-01

    The network described in this paper has been set up to provide detailed time-series data on concentrations of {sup 222}Rn in air at various locations within the Alligator Rivers Region, over a time frame of several years. These data will be important in assessing the effects of uranium mining operations on radon levels in the region, both in providing baseline and monitoring data and in calibrating and verifying predictive models. At present, three stations are operating in the region with a fourth being commissioned. Each station logs half hourly average radon concentrations and relevant meteorological data (wind speed, direction and variability, air pressure and temperature, relative humidity, soil temperature, rain and sunshine rates). It is intended to operate the four stations at selected locations for one- or two-year intervals, at the end of which three will be moved to new locations (one station at Mudginberri will be kept as a constant control station). Sites for which extensive datasets are currently available include: Jabiru Town, Jabiru East, Djarr Djarr, East Alligator Ranger Station and Nabarlek minesite. Illustrative data from these sites are presented.

  20. Physiological variability in yearling alligators: clutch differences at rest and during activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagatto, B; Crossley, D A; Altimiras, J; Elsey, R M; Hicks, J W

    2012-05-01

    The adult phenotype of an organism is the result of its genotype, the environment, and the interaction between the two. Assessing the relative contribution of these factors to the final adult phenotype continues to occupy researchers. Studies have shown clutch effects early in development but few have investigated the persistence of clutch effects on a longer time scale. Five clutches of American alligators were reared for 1 year in a common environment then assessed for the presence of clutch effects as they related to morphological and physiological characteristics. After 1 year, significant clutch effects were evident in all size related variables despite open access to food. Additionally, lung and liver masses remained different between clutches after animal mass was taken into account. Although clutch had no effect on resting heart rate, it significantly contributed to mean arterial pressure. During swimming and exhaustive exercise, the resulting respiratory and metabolic acidoses were strongly dependent on clutch. Therefore, while the environment can have significant influences on the American alligator from hatching to death, the measureable contribution of genetics to the morphology and physiology of the organism remains evident, even after 1 year of common rearing conditions. It behooves researchers to acknowledge and control for clutch effects when designing experiments. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Skeletochronology and isotopic analysis of a captive individual of Alligator mississippiensis Daudin, 1802

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Klein

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, bone histology and isotope composition (C, N, O of a femur and three postcranial osteoderms from an approximately 23–25 year-old captive female Alligator mississippiensis Daudin, 1802 were analyzed to infer the recorded life history. The number of visible annual growth marks in the femur cross-section is less than the known age for the individual concerned, this information clearly shows that skeletochronology has certain limits. However, bone histology reflects very well the traceable life history of this individual and its slow growth in early ontogeny. Bone histology on the basis of the osteoderms shows massive remodeling and an only incompletely preserved growth record, reflecting the egg-laying status of this individual. Interestingly, the carbon and especially the nitrogen isotope compositions of the osteoderms differ from those of the femur. This presumably reflects dietary changes and/or differences in resorption and remodeling processes during tissue formation of these bones. The N, C, and O isotope composition of the femur is consistent with the food and water the alligator had ingested during the last years of its life. Thus, contrary to the osteoderms, the femur yields reliable data for the reconstruction of an individual's dietary and environmental history. doi:10.1002/mmng.200900002

  2. Quantification of intraskeletal histovariability in Alligator mississippiensis and implications for vertebrate osteohistology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly N. Woodward

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Bone microanalyses of extant vertebrates provide a necessary framework from which to form hypotheses regarding the growth and skeletochronology of extinct taxa. Here, we describe the bone microstructure and quantify the histovariability of appendicular elements and osteoderms from three juvenile American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis to assess growth mark and tissue organization within and amongst individuals, with the intention of validating paleohistological interpretations. Results confirm previous observations that lamellar and parallel fibered tissue organization are typical of crocodylians, and also that crocodylians are capable of forming woven tissue for brief periods. Tissue organization and growth mark count varies across individual skeletal elements and reveal that the femur, tibia, and humerus had the highest annual apposition rates in each individual. Cyclical growth mark count also varies intraskeletally, but data suggest these inconsistencies are due to differing medullary cavity expansion rates. There was no appreciable difference in either diaphyseal circumference or cyclical growth mark circumferences between left and right element pairs from an individual if diaphyses were sampled from roughly the same location. The considerable intraskeletal data obtained here provide validation for long-held paleohistology assumptions, but because medullary expansion, cyclical growth mark formation, and variable intraskeletal growth rates are skeletal features found in tetrapod taxa living or extinct, the validations presented herein should be considered during any tetrapod bone microanalysis.

  3. Vegetative propagation capacity of invasive alligator weed through small stolon fragments under different treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xuemei; Li, Haiyan; Yang, Yunfei; Zhi, Heng; Li, Chengcheng; Guo, Jian

    2017-01-01

    The ability to propagate via small diaspores is crucial for the invasion of a clone plant that does not reproduce sexually in its introduced range. We investigated the effects of node and internode adjacent mode, fragment type, burial orientation and position of the node in relation to the soil surface on the sprouting and growth of alligator weed (Alternanthera philoxeroides (Martius) Griseb.). All the factors had effects and interaction effects on the sprouting rate and growth. As a whole fragment in all treatments, the fragments with basal node buried upward on the soil surface, exhibited the best above-ground growth and root growth. The one-node fragment with basal node buried downward above the soil surface and upward under the soil surface significantly decreased the above-ground growth and root growth compared to that of the two-node fragment. Therefore, the one-node fragments were more affected by environmental conditions than the two-node fragments. The results indicated that reducing the number of nodes of a fragment and burying the node under the soil or orienting it downward above the soil surface could be applied to control the invasion of alligator weed. PMID:28262788

  4. Alligator Rivers Region Research Institute: annual research summary 1989-1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The Alligator Rivers Region Research Institute (ARRRI) research activities are associated with an assessment of environmental effect of mining in the region. While emphasis on baseline research is now much reduced, some projects are still necessary because of significant changes in the Magela Creek system, because new areas of proposed mining have been identified (e.g. Coronation Hill) and because the emphasis now being placed on rehabilitation research requires a sound knowledge of the Region's flora. The ARRRI rehabilitation research program has concentrated on the Ranger mine site, principally because it is at a critical planning stage where detailed research information is required. With regard to the development of techniques, research at the Institute has led to the development of specific analytical methods or protocols that can be used in assessing environmental impact. 39 tabs., 42 figs

  5. Diets and abundances of aquatic and semi-aquatic reptiles in the Alligator Rivers Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shine, R.

    1986-01-01

    The mining and milling of uranium in the Alligator River Region in the Northern Territory has raised the possibility that heavy metals and radionuclides might escape into the aquatic system and be accumulated by the reptilian fauna. Aquatic and semi-aquatic reptiles are regularly eaten by Aboriginal people of the region, and data on diets and reproduction of these species, as well as on their dispersion and abundance, are essential before the possibility that reptiles might act as pathways for these contaminants to Aboriginals can be assessed. The objectives of this study were to provide quantitative data on the diets of filesnakes, sand goannas and water goannas, to provide information on seasonal changes in their abundance and distribution within the Magela Creek system; and to describe their reproductive cycles

  6. Spermiogenesis in the imbricate alligator lizard, Barisia imbricata (Reptilia, Squamata, Anguidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribbins, Kevin M; Rheubert, Justin L; Touzinsky, Katherine; Hanover, Jessica; Matchett, Caroline L; Granados-González, Gisela; Hernández-Gallegos, Oswaldo

    2013-06-01

    Although the events of spermiogenesis are commonly studied in amniotes, the amount of research available for Squamata is lacking. Many studies have described the morphological characteristics of mature spermatozoa in squamates, but few detail the ultrastructural changes that occur during spermiogenesis. This study's purpose is to gain a better understanding of the subcellular events of spermatid development within the Imbricate Alligator Lizard, Barisia imbricata. The morphological data presented here represent the first complete ultrastructural study of spermiogenesis within the family Anguidae. Samples of testes from four specimens collected on the northwest side of the Nevado de Toluca, México, were prepared using standard techniques for transmission electron microscopy. Many of the ultrastructural changes occurring during spermiogenesis within B. imbricata are similar to that of other squamates (i.e., early acrosome formation, chromatin condensation, flagella formation, annulus present, and a prominent manchette). However, there are a few unique characteristics within B. imbricata spermatids that to date have not been described during spermiogenesis in other squamates. For example, penetration of the acrosomal granule into the subacrosomal space to form the basal plate of the perforatorium during round spermatid development, the clover-shaped morphology of the developing nuclear fossa of the flagellum, and the bulbous shape to the perforatorium are all unique to the Imbricate Alligator Lizard. These anatomical character differences may be valuable nontraditional data that along with more traditional matrices (such as DNA sequences and gross morphological data) may help elucidate phylogenetic relationships, which are historically considered controversial within Squamata. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Ontogeny of the Middle-Ear Air-Sinus System in Alligator mississippiensis (Archosauria: Crocodylia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufeau, David L; Witmer, Lawrence M

    2015-01-01

    Modern crocodylians, including Alligator mississippiensis, have a greatly elaborated system of pneumatic sinuses invading the cranium. These sinuses invade nearly all the bones of the chondrocranium and several bony elements of the splanchnocranium, but patterns of postnatal paratympanic sinus development are poorly understood and documented. Much of crocodylomorph--indeed archosaurian--evolution is characterized by the evolution of various paratympanic air sinuses, the homologies of which are poorly understood due in large part to the fact that individual sinuses tend to become confluent in adults, obscuring underlying patterns. This study seeks to explore the ontogeny of these sinuses primarily to clarify the anatomical relations of the individual sinuses before they become confluent and thus to provide the foundation for later studies testing hypotheses of homology across extant and extinct Archosauria. Ontogeny was assessed using computed tomography in a sample of 13 specimens covering an almost 19-fold increase in head size. The paratympanic sinus system comprises two major inflations of evaginated pharyngeal epithelium: the pharyngotympanic sinus, which communicates with the pharynx via the lateral (true) Eustachian tubes and forms the cavum tympanicum proprium, and the median pharyngeal sinus, which communicates with the pharynx via the median pharyngeal tube. Each of these primary inflations gives rise to a number of secondary inflations that further invade the bones of the skull. The primary sinuses and secondary diverticula are well developed in perinatal individuals of Alligator, but during ontogeny the number and relative volumes of the secondary diverticula are reduced. In addition to describing the morphological ontogeny of this sinus system, we provide some preliminary exploratory analyses of sinus function and allometry, rejecting the hypothesis that changes in the volume of the paratympanic sinuses are simply an allometric function of braincase

  8. Ontogeny of the Middle-Ear Air-Sinus System in Alligator mississippiensis (Archosauria: Crocodylia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Dufeau

    Full Text Available Modern crocodylians, including Alligator mississippiensis, have a greatly elaborated system of pneumatic sinuses invading the cranium. These sinuses invade nearly all the bones of the chondrocranium and several bony elements of the splanchnocranium, but patterns of postnatal paratympanic sinus development are poorly understood and documented. Much of crocodylomorph--indeed archosaurian--evolution is characterized by the evolution of various paratympanic air sinuses, the homologies of which are poorly understood due in large part to the fact that individual sinuses tend to become confluent in adults, obscuring underlying patterns. This study seeks to explore the ontogeny of these sinuses primarily to clarify the anatomical relations of the individual sinuses before they become confluent and thus to provide the foundation for later studies testing hypotheses of homology across extant and extinct Archosauria. Ontogeny was assessed using computed tomography in a sample of 13 specimens covering an almost 19-fold increase in head size. The paratympanic sinus system comprises two major inflations of evaginated pharyngeal epithelium: the pharyngotympanic sinus, which communicates with the pharynx via the lateral (true Eustachian tubes and forms the cavum tympanicum proprium, and the median pharyngeal sinus, which communicates with the pharynx via the median pharyngeal tube. Each of these primary inflations gives rise to a number of secondary inflations that further invade the bones of the skull. The primary sinuses and secondary diverticula are well developed in perinatal individuals of Alligator, but during ontogeny the number and relative volumes of the secondary diverticula are reduced. In addition to describing the morphological ontogeny of this sinus system, we provide some preliminary exploratory analyses of sinus function and allometry, rejecting the hypothesis that changes in the volume of the paratympanic sinuses are simply an allometric

  9. alpha-Crystallin A sequences of Alligator mississippiensis and the lizard Tupinambis teguixin: molecular evolution and reptilian phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, W W; Zweers, A; Versteeg, M; Dessauer, H C; Goodman, M

    1985-11-01

    The amino acid sequences of the eye lens protein alpha-crystallin A from many mammalian and avian species, two frog species, and a dogfish have provided detailed information about the molecular evolution of this protein and allowed some useful inferences about phylogenetic relationships among these species. We now have isolated and sequenced the alpha-crystallins of the American alligator and the common tegu lizard. The reptilian alpha A chains appear to have evolved as slowly as those of other vertebrates, i.e., at two to three amino acid replacements per 100 residues in 100 Myr. The lack of charged replacements and the general types and distribution of replacements also are similar to those in other vertebrate alpha A chains. Maximum-parsimony analyses of the total data set of 67 vertebrate alpha A sequences support the monophyletic origin of alligator, tegu, and birds and favor the grouping of crocodilians and birds as surviving sister groups in the subclass Archosauria.

  10. Necropsy findings in American alligator late-stage embryos and hatchlings from northcentral Florida lakes contaminated with organochlorine pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, M.S.; Del, Piero F.; Wiebe, J.J.; Rauschenberger, H.R.; Gross, T.S.

    2006-01-01

    Increased American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) embryo and neonatal mortality has been reported from several northcentral Florida lakes contaminated with old-use organochlorine pesticides (OCPs). However, a clear relationship among these contaminants and egg viability has not been established, suggesting the involvement of additional factors in these mortalities. Thus, the main objective of this study was to determine the ultimate cause of mortality of American alligator late-stage embryos and hatchlings through the conduction of detailed pathological examinations, and to evaluate better the role of OCPs in these mortalities. Between 2000 and 2001, 236 dead alligators were necropsied at or near hatching (after ???65 days of artificial incubation and up to 1 mo of age posthatch). Dead animals were collected from 18 clutches ranging in viability from 0% to 95%. Total OCP concentrations in yolk ranged from ???100 to 52,000 ??g/kg, wet weight. The most common gross findings were generalized edema (34%) and organ hyperemia (29%), followed by severe emaciation (14%) and gross deformities (3%). Histopathologic examination revealed lesions in 35% of the animals, with over half of the cases being pneumonia, pulmonary edema, and atelectasis. Within and across clutches, dead embryos and hatchlings compared with their live cohorts were significantly smaller and lighter. Although alterations in growth and development were not related to yolk OCPs, there was an increase in prevalence of histologic lesions in clutches with high OCPs. Overall, these results indicate that general growth retardation and respiratory abnormalities were a major contributing factor in observed mortalities and that contaminants may increase the susceptibility of animals to developing certain pathologic conditions. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2006.

  11. Geomorphological assessment of sites and impoundments for the long term containment of uranium mill tailings in the Alligator Rivers Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    East, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents a program of current and future research into those geomorphological processes likely to affect the long term containment of uranium mill tailings in the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory. Research is directed at three main areas: identification of geomorphic hazards at proposed impoundment sites; determination of erosion rates on impoundment slopes; and prediction of patterns of fluvial dispersal of released tailings. Each necessitates consideration of present and future geomorphic processes

  12. Joint histology in Alligator mississippiensis challenges the identification of synovial joints in fossil archosaurs and inferences of cranial kinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailleul, Alida M; Holliday, Casey M

    2017-03-29

    Archosaurs, like all vertebrates, have different types of joints that allow or restrict cranial kinesis, such as synovial joints and fibrous joints. In general, synovial joints are more kinetic than fibrous joints, because the former possess a fluid-filled cavity and articular cartilage that facilitate movement. Even though there is a considerable lack of data on the microstructure and the structure-function relationships in the joints of extant archosaurs, many functional inferences of cranial kinesis in fossil archosaurs have hinged on the assumption that elongated condylar joints are (i) synovial and/or (ii) kinetic. Cranial joint microstructure was investigated in an ontogenetic series of American alligators, Alligator mississippiensis All the presumably synovial, condylar joints found within the head of the American alligator (the jaw joint, otic joint and laterosphenoid-postorbital (LS-PO) joint) were studied by means of paraffin histology and undecalcified histology paired with micro-computed tomography data to better visualize three-dimensional morphology. Results show that among the three condylar joints of A. mississippiensis , the jaw joint was synovial as expected, but the otherwise immobile otic and LS-PO joints lacked a synovial cavity. Therefore, condylar morphology does not always imply the presence of a synovial articulation nor mobility. These findings reveal an undocumented diversity in the joint structure of alligators and show that crocodylians and birds build novel, kinetic cranial joints differently. This complicates accurate identification of synovial joints and functional inferences of cranial kinesis in fossil archosaurs and tetrapods in general. © 2017 The Author(s).

  13. The influence of floodplain geomorphology and hydrologic connectivity on alligator gar (Atractosteus spatula) habitat along the embanked floodplain of the Lower Mississippi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Most, Merel; Hudson, Paul F.

    2018-02-01

    The floodplain geomorphology of large lowland rivers is intricately related to aquatic ecosystems dependent upon flood pulse dynamics. The alligator gar (Atractosteus spatula) is native to the Lower Mississippi River and dependent upon floodplain backwater areas for spawning. In this study we utilize a geospatial approach to develop a habitat suitability index for alligator gar that explicitly considers hydrologic connectivity and the floodplain geomorphology along a frequently inundated segment of the Lower Mississippi River. The data sets include Landsat imagery, a high-resolution LiDAR digital elevation model (DEM), National Hydrography Dataset (NHD), and hydrologic and geomorphic data. A habitat suitability index is created based on the extent and frequency of inundation, water depth, temperature, and vegetation. A comparison between the remote sensing approach and the NHD revealed substantial differences in the area and location of water bodies available for alligator gar spawning. The final habitat suitability index indicates that a modest proportion (19%) of the overall embanked floodplain is available for alligator gar spawning. Opportunities exist for management efforts to utilize engineered and natural geomorphic features to facilitate hydrologic connectivity at flow levels below flood stage that would expand the habitat of alligator gar across the floodplain. The study results have direct implications regarding environmental restoration of the Lower Mississippi, an iconic example of an embanked meandering river floodplain.

  14. Formation and regression of the corpus luteum of the American alligator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillette, L.J.; Woodward, A.R.; You-Xiang, Q.; Cox, M.C.; Matter, J.H.; Gross, T.S.

    1995-01-01

    Luteal morphology of the American alligator is unique when compared to other reptiles but is similar to that of its phylogenetic relatives, the birds. The theca is extensively hypertrophied, but the granulosa never fills the cavity formed following the ovulation of the ovum. The formation of the corpus luteum (CL) is correlated with elevated plasma progesterone concentrations, which decline dramatically after oviposition with the onset of luteolysis. Unlike those of most other reptiles, the central luteal cell mass is composed of two cell types; one presumably is derived from the granulosa, whereas the other is from the theca interna. Both cell types are present throughout gravidity but only one cell type is seen during mid to late luteolysis. A significant decline in luteal volume occurs following oviposition and continues throughout the post-oviposition period. The fastest decline in luteal volume occurs in the month immediately after oviposition; this rate then slows. Luteolysis appears to continue for a year or more following oviposition, as distinct structures of luteal origin can still be identified in animals 9 months after oviposition. The size of persistent CL can be used to determine whether a given female oviposited during the previous nesting season. Females with CL having volumes greater than 0.2 cm2 or CL diameters greater than 0.4 cm were active the previous season. 

  15. Ecological studies on the freshwater fishes of the Alligator Rivers region, Northern Territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, K.A.; Allen, S.A.; Pollard, D.A.; Cook, M.G.

    1990-01-01

    The tropical climate of the Alligator Rivers Region (ARR) has a distinctive wet-dry cycle , resulting in seasonal flows in the creeks and rivers of its catchments. The present study, begun in August 1978, was aimed at developing an ecological monitoring system that would detect any changes to the freshwater fish communities brought about by recent uranium mining and processing in the lowlands of the ARR. The focus of the synecological studies, was a description of spatial and temporal patterns in the community structure of the fish fauna. Interpretation of these patterns was made possible by the collection of detailed environmental data from the study sites. It was found that of the ARR seasonal changes in environmental conditions were so marked that they often obscured the effects of environmental gradients along a watercourse and differing environmental conditions characteristics of different types of waterbody. Hence it may not be entirely satisfactory to define environmental zones in these catchments based on overall environmental conditions through the whole seasonal cycle, because changes in any one such zone between seasons result in very marked changes in the fish communities of habitats in that zone. 34 refs., 22 tabs., 45 figs., 3 maps

  16. Postparietal and prehatching ontogeny of the supraoccipital in Alligator mississippiensis (Archosauria, Crocodylia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klembara, J

    2001-08-01

    The first record of the postparietal bone of Alligator mississippiensis, documented by transverse histological sections, is presented. It is the first evidence of the presence of this bone within Recent reptiles. The postparietal is present in a specimen with a head length of 32.3 mm. The bone is a small dermal plate lying ventrally and posteriorly to the posterior margin of the parietal and dorsally to the trabecular bone, forming a dorsal surface of the supraoccipital portion of the neural endocranium. The trabecular bone develops perichondrally from the dorsal surface of the tectal cartilaginous bridge spanning between the dorsal portions of the otic capsules and occipital pilae. The bridge probably represents the fused tectum synoticum posterior plus tectum posterius. Later in ontogeny, the bridge ossifies endochondrally. The endochondrally ossifying bridge together with its perichondrally ossifying trabecular bone form the future supraoccipital. The trabecular bone is the integral part of the cranial endoskeleton and ontogenetically distinct from the dermal postparietal bone. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. A database of radionuclide activity and metal concentrations for the Alligator Rivers Region uranium province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doering, Che; Bollhöfer, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a database of radionuclide activity and metal concentrations for the Alligator Rivers Region (ARR) uranium province in the Australian wet-dry tropics. The database contains 5060 sample records and 57,473 concentration values. The data are for animal, plant, soil, sediment and water samples collected by the Environmental Research Institute of the Supervising Scientist (ERISS) as part of its statutory role to undertake research and monitoring into the impacts of uranium mining on the environment of the ARR. Concentration values are provided in the database for 11 radionuclides ( 227 Ac, 40 K, 210 Pb, 210 Po, 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 228 Th, 230 Th, 232 Th, 234 U, 238 U) and 26 metals (Al, As, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P, Pb, Rb, S, Sb, Se, Sr, Th, U, V, Zn). Potential uses of the database are discussed. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The International intraval project. Phase 1 case 8: The Alligator rivers natural analogue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerden, P.

    1992-01-01

    INTRAVAL is an international coordinated research program for predicting the potential radionuclide migration in the geosphere with the use of mathematical models. Such models are used to help assess the long-term safety of radioactive waste disposal systems. The objective of the Alligator Rivers Analogue Project (ARAP) is to identify and study long-term processes that have been significant in the development of the uranium dispersion zone at the Koongarra uranium ore deposit in the Northern Territory of Australia. This report includes a description of the site geology and gives an outline of the experimental programs, which are aimed to study the hydrogeology and geochemistry of the system, and the distribution of uranium and its daughter radionuclides in the rock strata. The extensive databases that have resulted from these studies have been used to develop and test hydrological, geochemical and transport models. A good basis has been established for modelling the transport of radionuclides in the porous, weathered zone of the Koongarra uranium deposit and its surroundings. A number of preliminary transport, hydrology and geochemical modelling reports are given, with the Koongarra databases also being used to test a Performance Assessment model. The possible application of scenario development procedures to the Koongarra site is discussed. 106 refs., 67 figs., 28 tabs

  19. Environmental surveillance monitoring in the Alligator Rivers Region. Report for the six months period ending 30 September 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This report outlines the activities of the Northern Territory Supervising Authorities in meeting their responsibilities for environmental management and surveillance, occupational safety, relating to uranium mining and environment protection in the Alligator Rivers Region. Environmental monitoring was carried out at the Nabarlek Mine, which site has now been rehabilitated and revegetated, and at Ranger, the only mine currently operating in the region. Other uranium projects such as Jabiluka and Koongarra have been delayed due to the former Commonwealth Government's 'three mines policy'. 4 tabs., 10 figs

  20. Up-regulation of the alligator CYP3A77 gene by toxaphene and dexamethasone and its short term effect on plasma testosterone concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunderson, M.P. [Department of Zoology, University of Florida, P.O. Box 118525, Gainesville, FL 32611-8525 (United States) and University of Victoria, Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Petch 249/251, P.O. Box 3055 STN CSC, Victoria B.C., V8W 3P6 (Canada)]. E-mail: mgunders@uvic.ca; Kohno, S. [Center for Integrative Bioscience, National Institute for Basic Biology, Okazaki National Research Institutes, 5-1 Higashiyama Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Blumberg, B. [Department of Developmental and Cell Biology, University of California, 2113E McGaugh Hall, Irvine, CA 92697-2300 (United States); Iguchi, T. [Center for Integrative Bioscience, National Institute for Basic Biology, Okazaki National Research Institutes, 5-1 Higashiyama Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Guillette, L.J. [Department of Zoology, University of Florida, P.O. Box 118525, Gainesville, FL 32611-8525 (United States)]. E-mail: ljg@zoo.ufl.edu

    2006-06-30

    In this study we describe an alligator hepatic CYP3A gene, CYP3A77, which is inducible by dexamethasone and toxaphene. CYP3A plays a broad role in biotransforming both exogenous compounds and endogenous hormones such as testosterone and estradiol. Alligators collected from sites in Florida that are contaminated with organochlorine compounds exhibit differences in sex steroid concentrations. Many organochlorine compounds induce CYP3A expression in other vertebrates; hence, CYP3A induction by organochlorine contaminants could increase biotransformation and clearance of sex steroids by CYP3A and provide a plausible mechanism for the lowering of endogenous sex steroid concentrations in alligator plasma. We used real time PCR to examine whether known and suspected CYP3A inducers (dexamethasone, metyrapone, rifampicin, and toxaphene) up-regulate steady state levels of hepatic CYP3A77 transcript to determine if induction patterns in female juvenile alligators are similar to those reported in other vertebrates and whether toxaphene, an organochlorine compound found in high concentrations in Lake Apopka alligators, induces this gene. Estrogen receptor {alpha} (ER{alpha}), estrogen receptor {beta} (ER{beta}), androgen receptor (AR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), progesterone receptor (PR), and steroid-xenobiotic receptor (SXR) transcripts were also measured to determine whether any of these nuclear receptors are also regulated by these compounds in alligators. Dexamethasone (4.2-fold) and toxaphene (3.5-fold) significantly induced CYP3A77 gene transcript, whereas rifampicin (2.8-fold) and metyrapone (2.1-fold) up-regulated ER{beta} after 24 h. None of the compounds significantly up-regulated AR, ER{alpha}, GR, PR, or SXR over this time period. Plasma testosterone (T) did not change significantly after 24 h in alligators from any of the treatment groups. Dexamethasone treated animals exhibited a strong relationship between the 24 h plasma T concentrations and CYP3A77 (R {sup

  1. Study of Metal Resistance Potential of the Cd, Cr Tolerant Alligator Weed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suparna Pal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background – Environmental deterioration due to heavy metal pollution is a major global concern for its immense importance in the ecosystem. Indiscriminate use of heavy metals for rapid urbanization and industrial exploration is a pressing threat to human health. Among this Cd and Cr contamination is most dangerous as these metals directly enter into the food chain due to their higher solubility and mobility. Identification of a metal tolerant native plant species would be helpful to decontaminate Cd and Cr polluted land. In our previous study, field investigations were conducted to evaluate the tolerance potential of Alligator weed to Cd and Cr.Alligator weed [Alternanthera philoxeroides (Mart. Griseb ],is the most widely distributed perennial stoloniferous herb in these contaminated areas in and around Kolkata. Purpose of the study – To establish metal tolerant capacity of the species , different biochemical parameters assessing its metal accumulation capacity and reflecting its detoxification mechanism were studied. For these purpose, the same plant collected from the highest metal contaminated area was grown under laboratory condition with external application of various concentration of Cd and Cr individually and synergistically (0.5, 0.8, 1.0, 1.2, 1.5, 1.8 mM. To estimate the hazardous effects of Cd and Cr on this weed, membrane damage was quantified in form of lipid peroxidation i.e MDA production. The metal uptake and accumulation potential was estimated by measuring the Cd and Cr concentration in root and shoot. Some soil parameters such as Orgnaic Carbon, Cation exchange capacity were also studied to explain the bio availability of metals. Various biochemical parameters such as free proline content, non protein- thiol content and zymogram analysis of antioxidative isozymes (such as, Guiacol peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase and ascorbate peroxidase were studied to assess its metal resistant capacity. Result

  2. Histology-based morphology of the neurocentral synchondrosis in Alligator mississippiensis (Archosauria, Crocodylia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikejiri, Takehito

    2012-01-01

    Morphology of the neurocentral synchondroses--thin cartilaginous layers between centra and neural arches--are documented in the extant crocodilian, Alligator mississippiensis (Archosauria, Crocodylia). Examination of dry skeletons demonstrates that neurocentral suture closure occurs in very late postnatal ontogeny (after reaching sexual maturity and/or body size ca. 40% from the upper range). Before sexual maturity (body length (BL) ≥ ca. 1.80 m), completely fused centra and neural arches are restricted to the caudal vertebral series. In contrast, the presacral vertebrae often remain unfused throughout postnatal ontogeny, retaining open sutures in very mature individuals (BL ≥ 2.80 m). These unfused centra and neural arches are structurally supported by the relatively large surface area of the neurocentral junctions, which results from primarily horizontal (mediolateral) increases with strong positive allometry. Cleared and stained specimens show that the cartilaginous neurocentral synchondrosis starts to form after approximately 40 embryonic days. Histological examination of the neurocentral junction in dorsal and anterior caudal vertebrae of six individuals (BL = 0.28-3.12 m) shows : (1) neurocentral fusion is the result of endochondral ossification of the neurocentral synchondrosis, (2) the neurocentral synchondrosis exhibits bipolar organization of three types of cartilaginous cells, and (3) complex neurocentral sutures (i.e., curved, zigzagged, and/or interdigitated boundaries) come from clumping of bone cells of the neural arches and centra into the neurocentral synchondrosis. The last two morphological features can be advantageous for delaying neurocentral fusion, which seems to be unique in crocodilians and possibly their close relatives, including nonavian dinosaurs and other Mesozoic archosaurs. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Evaluating potential effects of widening US 64 on the black bear population of Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, Dare County, North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    This report summarizes research conducted along US Highway 64 (US 64) and US Highway 264 (US 264) in Alligator : River National Wildlife Refuge (ARNWR), Dare County, NC regarding the proposed expansion of US 64. The study site : included the areas ad...

  4. INTRAVAL phase 2, test case 8. Alligator Rivers Natural Analogue - Modelling of uranium transport in the weathered zone at Koongarra (Australia). Progress report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Weerd H; Hassanizadeh SM; Richardson-van der Poel MA; LBG

    1993-01-01

    A study of uranium transport in the Koongarra site of Alligator Rivers Uranium deposit (Australia) is carried out. The analysis of the solid phase uranium concentration measured at various depths provides a useful picture of the dispersion process. Results of this analysis seem to support the

  5. Case history of the discovery of the Jabiluka uranium deposits, East Alligator River region, Northern Territory of Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowntree, J.C.; Mosher, D.V.

    1976-01-01

    Pancontinental Mining Limited acquired exploration rights over an area in the East Alligator River Region, Northern Territory, Australia, in 1970. Subsequently, Getty Oil Development Company Limited acquired a substantial minority interest in the property. The Jabiluka deposits were discovered during the course of exploration and are currently the largest of the four major uranium deposits in the East Alligator River Region. This region at present contains 24% of the western world's reasonably assured resources of uranium. The exploration techniques employed during primary and secondary exploration on the property between 1971 and 1975 and during the delineation of the Jabiluka deposits are discussed in detail. The case history illustrates the exploration philosophy which was successfully employed on the Jabiluka property. The philosophy encompasses the following points: The need for an assessment on the limits of airborne radiometric surveys; the necessity for detection and evaluation of point source anomalies; the necessity for exploration along extensions of favourable lithologies; and the desirability of modification of exploration techniques on different types of anomalies. Some aspects of this philosophy may be useful in exploration for similar stratabound uranium deposits in other areas. (author)

  6. A Comprehensive Analysis of the Phylogeny, Genomic Organization and Expression of Immunoglobulin Light Chain Genes in Alligator sinensis, an Endangered Reptile Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan; Zhang, Chenglin; Wu, Xiaobing; Han, Haitang; Zhao, Yaofeng; Ren, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Crocodilians are evolutionarily distinct reptiles that are distantly related to lizards and are thought to be the closest relatives of birds. Compared with birds and mammals, few studies have investigated the Ig light chain of crocodilians. Here, employing an Alligator sinensis genomic bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library and available genome data, we characterized the genomic organization of the Alligator sinensis IgL gene loci. The Alligator sinensis has two IgL isotypes, λ and κ, the same as Anolis carolinensis. The Igλ locus contains 6 Cλ genes, each preceded by a Jλ gene, and 86 potentially functional Vλ genes upstream of (Jλ-Cλ)n. The Igκ locus contains a single Cκ gene, 6 Jκs and 62 functional Vκs. All VL genes are classified into a total of 31 families: 19 Vλ families and 12 Vκ families. Based on an analysis of the chromosomal location of the light chain genes among mammals, birds, lizards and frogs, the data further confirm that there are two IgL isotypes in the Alligator sinensis: Igλ and Igκ. By analyzing the cloned Igλ/κ cDNA, we identified a biased usage pattern of V families in the expressed Vλ and Vκ. An analysis of the junctions of the recombined VJ revealed the presence of N and P nucleotides in both expressed λ and κ sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the V genes revealed V families shared by mammals, birds, reptiles and Xenopus, suggesting that these conserved V families are orthologous and have been retained during the evolution of IgL. Our data suggest that the Alligator sinensis IgL gene repertoire is highly diverse and complex and provide insight into immunoglobulin gene evolution in vertebrates. PMID:26901135

  7. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Hydrogeological field studies. Final Report - Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, S.N. [Univ of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona (United States). Dept of Hydrology and Water Resources; Marley, R.D. [D.B. Stephens and Associates Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Norris, J.R. [Hydro Geo Chem Inc., Tucson, Arizona (United States)

    1992-12-31

    The hydrogeology of the Koongarra site was interpreted primarily from long-term hydrographs, water-level maps, water injection tests, aquifer pumping tests, logs of boreholes, and chemical analyses of groundwater samples. Data have been collected over a 21-year period starting with test-drilling in 1970. The first intensive period of hydrogeologic investigations was from 1978 through 1981 and was related to anticipated exploitation of uranium ore at Koongarra. The second period was from 1986 through 1991 and was related to the international Alligator Rivers Analogue Project under the direction of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation. The conclusion which can be drawn from the chemical data is that water moving out of the No. 1 ore deposit is diluted rapidly with recharge from the surface as it migrates down the hydraulic gradient. Most of the groundwater outside of the ore deposit does not originate from the ore deposit, and flow models which assume unmodified stream tubes extending out of the ore deposit in a downgradient direction do not reflect the true system. Water in the ore deposit itself, must come from slow upward seepage through the fault zone. Owing to the fact that this water must be at least hundreds of years old, observed fluctuations of water levels in the deposit must reflect pressure head variations induced by seasonal recharge to the overlying surficial materials. Water level fluctuations do not signify a yearly displacement of water deep in the system. Water in the deeper part of the ore must be almost static compared to obvious rapid groundwater circulation in the area around PH88. Small changes in pH, temperature and specific electrical conductivity during aquifer tests indicate a complex hydraulic system which has a variable response to pumping as a function of time. Low concentration in tritium and Carbon-14 together with high concentrations of dissolved helium in the groundwaters all suggested strongly that semi static

  8. IgH loci of American alligator and saltwater crocodile shed light on IgA evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magadán-Mompó, Susana; Sánchez-Espinel, Christian; Gambón-Deza, Francisco

    2013-07-01

    Immunoglobulin loci of two representatives of the order Crocodylia were studied from full genome sequences. Both Alligator mississippiensis and Crocodylus porosus have 13 genes for the heavy chain constant regions of immunoglobulins. The IGHC locus contains genes encoding four immunoglobulins M (IgM), one immunoglobulin D (IgD), three immunoglobulins A (IgA), three immunoglobulins Y (IgY), and two immunoglobulins D2 (IgD2). IgA and IgD2 genes were found in reverse transcriptional orientation compared to the other Ig genes. The IGHD gene contains 11 exons, four of which containing stop codons or sequence alterations. As described in other reptiles, the IgD2 is a chimeric Ig with IgA- and IgD-related domains. This work clarifies the origin of bird IgA and its evolutionary relationship with amphibian immunoglobulin X (IgX) as well as their links with mammalian IgA.

  9. Characterization of Inhibitor of Growth 2 tumor suppressor in Alligator mississippiensis, its conservation in Archosauria, and response to thyroid stimulating hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbing, Caren C; Crump, Kate; Bailey, Carmen M; Kohno, Satomi; Veldhoen, Nik; Song, Yue; Bryan, Teresa; Bermudez, Dieldrich S; Ausió, Juan; Guillette, Louis J

    2007-02-01

    Inhibitor of growth 2 (ING2) belongs to a family of tumor suppressors that are important regulators of a wide range of cellular processes including proliferation, apoptosis, and DNA repair. ING family members are found in yeast, plants, invertebrates and many vertebrate species. However, to date, ING has not been characterized in reptiles. Herein we describe the isolation of expressed ING2 sequence in the American alligator, Alligator mississippiensis, and compare this sequence with that isolated in the chicken. We identify features that are unique to these two representatives of the Archosaurs including conservation of specific amino acid residues and the absence of an adenylate residue in the 5' end of the nucleotide sequence relative to frogs and mammals. The latter feature results in an alteration of the coding potential leading to distinctive N-termini. Injection of juvenile alligators with thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), which increases endogenous thyroid hormones, results in the modulation of ING2 transcript levels. Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed a reduction in the steady-state levels of ING2 mRNA in the phallus/cliterophallus, lung, and liver by 48 h after TSH injection. ING2 expression in the thyroid gland, gonad, and heart was unaffected by TSH treatment. These data indicate that control of ING2 expression by the thyroid axis may be conserved among species and is tissue-dependent.

  10. AHR and CYP1A expression link historical contamination events to modern day developmental effects in the American alligator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Matthew D; Galligan, Thomas M; Rainwater, Thomas R; Moore, Brandon C; Wilkinson, Philip M; Guillette, Louis J; Parrott, Benjamin B

    2017-11-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that initiates a transcriptional pathway responsible for the expression of CYP1A subfamily members, key to the metabolism of xenobiotic compounds. Toxic planar halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, including dioxin and PCBs, are capable of activating the AHR, and while dioxin and PCB inputs into the environment have been dramatically curbed following strict regulatory efforts in the United States, they persist in the environment and exposures remain relevant today. Little is known regarding the effects that long-term chronic exposures to dioxin or dioxin-like compounds might have on the development and subsequent health of offspring from exposed individuals, nor is much known regarding AHR expression in reptilians. Here, we characterize AHR and CYP1A gene expression in embryonic and juvenile specimen of a long-lived, apex predator, the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis), and investigate variation in gene expression profiles in offspring collected from sites conveying differential exposures to environmental contaminants. Both age- and tissue-dependent patterning of AHR isoform expression are detected. We characterize two downstream transcriptional targets of the AHR, CYP1A1 and CYP1A2, and describe conserved elements of their genomic architecture. When comparisons across different sites are made, hepatic expression of CYP1A2, a direct target of the AHR, appears elevated in embryos from a site associated with a dioxin point source and previously characterized PCB contamination. Elevated CYP1A2 expression is not persistent, as site-specific variation was absent in juveniles originating from field-collected eggs but reared under lab conditions. Our results illustrate the patterning of AHR gene expression in a long-lived environmental model species, and indicate a potential contemporary influence of historical contamination. This research presents a novel opportunity to link

  11. New insight into the anatomy of the hyolingual apparatus of Alligator mississippiensis and implications for reconstructing feeding in extinct archosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiheng; Clarke, Julia A

    2015-07-01

    Anatomical studies of the cranium of crocodilians motivated by an interest in its function in feeding largely focused on bite force, the jaw apparatus and associated muscles innervated by the trigeminal nerve. However, the ossified and cartilaginous elements of the hyoid and the associated hyolingual muscles, innervated by the facial, hypoglossal and glossopharyngeal nerves, received much less attention. Crocodilians are known to retain what are ancestrally the 'Rhythmic Hyobranchial Behaviors' such as buccal oscillation, but show diminished freedom and movement for the hyobranchial apparatus and the tongue in food transport and manipulation. Feeding among crocodilians, generally on larger prey items than other reptilian outgroups, involves passive transport of the food within the mouth. The tongue in extant crocodilians is firmly attached to the buccal floor and shows little movement during feeding. Here, we present a detailed anatomical description of the myology of the hyolingual apparatus of Alligator mississippiensis, utilizing contrast-enhanced micro-computed tomography and dissection. We construct the first three-dimensional (3D) description of hyolingual myology in Alligator mississippiensis and discuss the detailed implications of these data for our understanding of hyolingual muscle homology across Reptilia. These anatomical data and an evaluation of the fossil record of hyoid structures also shed light on the evolution of feeding in Reptilia. Simplification of the hyoid occurs early in the evolution of archosaurs. A hyoid with only one pair of ceratobranchials and a weakly ossified or cartilaginous midline basihyal is ancestral to Archosauriformes. The comparison with non-archosaurian reptilian outgroup demonstrates that loss of the second set of ceratobranchials as well as reduced ossification in basihyal occurred prior to the origin of crown-clade archosaurs, crocodilians and birds. Early modification in feeding ecology appears to characterize the

  12. Development of the dermal skeleton in Alligator mississippiensis (Archosauria, Crocodylia) with comments on the homology of osteoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickaryous, Matthew K; Hall, Brian K

    2008-04-01

    The dermal skeleton (=exoskeleton) has long been recognized as a major determinant of vertebrate morphology. Until recently however, details of tissue development and diversity, particularly among amniotes, have been lacking. This investigation explores the development of the dermatocranium, gastralia, and osteoderms in the American alligator, Alligator mississippiensis. With the exception of osteoderms, elements of the dermal skeleton develop early during skeletogenesis, with most initiating ossification prior to mineralization of the endoskeleton. Characteristically, circumoral elements of the dermatocranium, including the pterygoid and dentigerous elements, are among the first to form. Unlike other axially arranged bones, gastralia develop in a caudolateral to craniomedial sequence. Osteoderms demonstrate a delayed onset of development compared with the rest of the skeleton, not appearing until well after hatching. Osteoderm development is asynchronous across the body, first forming dorsally adjacent to the cervical vertebrae; the majority of successive elements appear in caudal and lateral positions. Exclusive of osteoderms, the dermal skeleton initiates osteogenesis via intramembranous ossification. Following the establishment of skeletal condensations, some preossified spicules become engorged with many closely packed clusters of chondrocyte-like cells in a bone-like matrix. This combination of features is characteristic of chondroid bone, a tissue otherwise unreported among nonavian reptiles. No secondary cartilage was identified in any of the specimens examined. With continued growth, dermal bone (including chondroid bone) and osteoid are resorbed by multinucleated osteoclasts. However, there is no evidence that these cells contribute to the rugose pattern of bony ornamentation characteristic of the crocodylian dermatocranium. Instead, ornamentation develops as a result of localized concentrations of bone deposited by osteoblasts. Osteoderms develop in the

  13. Land application of waste waters in the Alligator Rivers region, Northern Territory - environmental constraints on design and operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kearns, A.

    1986-01-01

    The existing uranium mines in the Alligator River Region presently operate under a no release water management regime for water stored within the designated restricted release zones (RRZ). This water is of variable quality ranging from rainwater influenced by runoff from the mill sites and ore stockpiles to mill process water stored within the trailings repositories. There is a pressing need to reduce the volume of stored RRZ water at Nabarlek as a prerequisite to decommissioning. There is also a requirement at Ranger to rapidly reduce the volume of stored water in the mine pit at the end of the season to allow the mining of ore. Land application of RRZ water by spray irrigation has been investigated at both sites because it offers the benefits of applying chemical constituents in the wastewater within a clearly defined irrigation area. the environmental planning for the design of a land application system involves calculations of the chemical load in the wastewater and evaluation of the assimilative capacity of the soil-plant system. The monsoon climate, lateritic soil and fluctuating water table creates a unique set of environmental constraints and conditions in which to design and operate a successful land application system for the treatment of stored water at minesites within ecologically sensitive areas

  14. Mining in the Alligator Rivers Region, northern Australia: Assessing potential and actual effects on ecosystem and human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dam, R.A. van; Humphrey, C.L.; Martin, P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of issues related to surface water contamination arising from uranium mining activities in the Alligator Rivers Region (ARR) of northern Australia, and a program of research and monitoring that must assess the potential and actual effects on ecosystem and human health. The program of assessing effects on aquatic ecosystems involves a four-tiered approach including the derivation of local water quality guideline trigger values, direct toxicity assessment of mine waters prior to their release, creekside or in situ monitoring for early warning of adverse effects during mine water release, and longer-term monitoring of macroinvertebrate and fish communities. Bioaccumulation in aquatic biota is also assessed, and is an issue of importance not only to ecosystem health, but also to the health of local Aboriginal people. The aquatic animals they consume represent potential sources of radiological dose, and as a result, a major component of the program to assess potential effects on human health is the prediction of doses to Aboriginal people living downstream of mining activities. Acknowledging the assumptions and uncertainties, the calculation of concentration factors for local aquatic (and other) food sources allows the prediction of potential radiological exposure to people following hypothetical mine water releases. The approaches described form the basis of best-practice protocols that are relevant at both regional and national levels

  15. Processamento da carne do jacaré do pantanal (Caiman crocodilus yacare Meat processing of pantanal alligator (Caiman crocodilus yacare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Fernando Romanelli

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de um estudo de algumas formas de processamento da carne de jacaré do pantanal como uma alternativa de consumo, de uma forma não convencional, da carne dessa espécie. Testa-se, ao mesmo tempo, a utilização de carne de cortes normalmente descartados tais como o tronco e os membros. Dessa forma relatam-se os seguintes processamentos: produtos de salsicharia não embutidos (tipo hambúrguer, carne em conserva (enlatado, carne curada e não cozida (defumada e produto curado e cozido (tipo apresuntado. Avalia-se a qualidade dos produtos através da análise sensorial e mede-se estatisticamente o grau de sua aceitação.This study considers different ways of processing alligator swampland meat as an alternative of consumption in a non conventional way for that species. It also evaluates the utilization of the meat coming from parts normally discarded such as muscle of the trunk and membranes. The following processes were accomplished to reach the objective: non sausage products (type hamburger preserved meat (canned, non-cooked cured meat (smoky, and cured cooked product (type ham. The quality of the products was evaluated through sensorial analyses and the data were submited to statistical treatment to determine the acceptance degree.

  16. Geomorphological assessment of sites and impoundments for the long term containment of uranium mill tailings in the Alligator Rivers Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    East, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    Current and future research into the geomorphological processes likely to affect the long term containment of uranium mill tailings in the Alligator Rivers Region is directed at three main areas: identification of geomorphic hazards at proposed impoundment sites; determination of erosion rates on impoundment slopes; and prediction of patterns of fluvial dispersal of released tailings. Each necessitates consideration of present and future geomorphic processes. Process rates during the next few thousand years might be predictable by extrapolation of contemporary and past (i.e. Holocene) climates, sea-levels and depositional environments, evidence for which is preserved in the sedimentary record. In current projects, the Late Quarternary stratigraphy of Magela Creek are examined to provide data for modelling of present and future sedimentological processes. Site stability evaluation entails recognition of present and future geomorphic hazards at impoundment sites, and includes fluvial and hillslope erosion, extreme flood events and mass movements. The life of a tailings impoundment is further determined by the intensity of erosional processes acting upon its slopes and their cover materials. A knowledge of present and future erosion rates will allow the optimisation of slope characteristics and materials in the impoundment design

  17. Ontogeny of the palatoquadrate and adjacent lateral cranial wall of the endocranium in prehatching Alligator mississippiensis (Archosauria: Crocodylia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klembara, Jozef

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to gain insight into the ossification sequence of the palatoquadrate and the adjacent lateral cranial wall of prehatching Alligator mississippiensis, a process about which there is almost no published information. Results were obtained by studying serial histological sections of the series of ontogenetic stages and enlarged wax-plate models of several stages. The cartilage of the palatoquadrate starts to ossify endochondrally in the quadrate portion of the pars pterygoquadrata palatoquadrati in Stage 6A. In this stage, a bone, called the lamina palatoquadrati anterior here, appears at and close to the anteromedial wall of the cartilaginous pterygoid portion of the pars pterygoquadrata. The lamina palatoquadrati anterior ossifies in membrane. Later in ontogeny, the lamina palatoquadrati anterior spreads into the cavum epiptericum and sheathes the posterior portion of the trigeminal ganglion laterally. The jaw adductor muscles insert at the outer surface of the lamina palatoquadrati anterior. The lamina palatoquadrati anterior is a new structure not previously recorded in crocodylians or any other Recent reptile. The topology, mode of ossification, and functional anatomy of the lamina palatoquadrati anterior correspond to those of the membranous ossification of the alisphenoid of marsupials. Another bone, called the lamina prootici anterior here, spreads in membrane from the anterolateral wall of the prootic portion of the otic capsule into the prootic fenestra, above the trigeminal ganglion. The lamina prootici anterior represents a structure not recorded previously in crocodylians. It contributes to the orbitotemporal braincase wall.

  18. Pentadactyl ground state of the manus of Alligator mississippiensis and insights into the evolution of digital reduction in Archosauria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Hans C E; Heppleston, Audrey C; Elsey, Ruth M

    2010-11-15

    The three-fingered state of the avian manus poses intriguing questions about the evolution of digit reduction. Although digit reduction in most tetrapods appears to be the product of straightforward digit loss, avian digit reduction may have occurred with a dissociation of digit position from digit identity. The three digits of birds have the ancestral identities of I, II, and III but develop from an early pentadactyl ground state from digital anlage 2, 3, and 4. A series of hypotheses have been proposed in an attempt to explain this disparity, including a recent suggestion that the anteriormost condensation visible in the avian limb bud is in fact a vestigial structure from a hexadactyl ancestral ground state. We investigated this proposal by presenting sets of compatible evolutionary developmental trajectories starting from a hexadactyl state to test hypotheses of digit reduction. The development of skeletogenic mesenchymal condensations in a crocodylian, the closest extant relative to birds, is used to identify any extra precartiloginous digital vestiges. A developmental series of Alligator mississippiensis forelimb buds reveal only five digital anlagen, supports a pentadactyl ground state for the archosaurian manus, and rejects portions of the evolutionary developmental trajectories proposed. This condition lends further support to the contribution of a homeotic transformation during digit reduction in avian ancestry to account for the dissociation between digital identity and developmental position. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  19. Estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1; ERα), not ESR2 (ERβ), modulates estrogen-induced sex reversal in the American alligator, a species with temperature-dependent sex determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Satomi; Bernhard, Melissa C; Katsu, Yoshinao; Zhu, Jianguo; Bryan, Teresa A; Doheny, Brenna M; Iguchi, Taisen; Guillette, Louis J

    2015-05-01

    All crocodilians and many turtles exhibit temperature-dependent sex determination where the temperature of the incubated egg, during a thermo-sensitive period (TSP), determines the sex of the offspring. Estrogens play a critical role in sex determination in crocodilians and turtles, as it likely does in most nonmammalian vertebrates. Indeed, administration of estrogens during the TSP induces male to female sex reversal at a male-producing temperature (MPT). However, it is not clear how estrogens override the influence of temperature during sex determination in these species. Most vertebrates have 2 forms of nuclear estrogen receptor (ESR): ESR1 (ERα) and ESR2 (ERβ). However, there is no direct evidence concerning which ESR is involved in sex determination, because a specific agonist or antagonist for each ESR has not been tested in nonmammalian species. We identified specific pharmaceutical agonists for each ESR using an in vitro transactivation assay employing American alligator ESR1 and ESR2; these were 4,4',4''-(4-propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl)trisphenol (PPT) and 7-bromo-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1,3-benzoxazol-5-ol (WAY 200070), respectively. Alligator eggs were exposed to PPT or WAY 200070 at a MPT just before the TSP, and their sex was examined at the last stage of embryonic development. Estradiol-17β and PPT, but not WAY 200070, induced sex reversal at a MPT. PPT-exposed embryos exposed to the highest dose (5.0 μg/g egg weight) exhibited enlargement and advanced differentiation of the Müllerian duct. These results indicate that ESR1 is likely the principal ESR involved in sex reversal as well as embryonic Müllerian duct survival and growth in American alligators.

  20. A crucial role of paralogous β-defensin genes in the Chinese alligator innate immune system revealed by the first determination of a Crocodilia defensin cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ke-Yi; Wang, Xin; Wan, Qiu-Hong; Fang, Sheng-Guo

    2018-04-01

    The β-defensin, one of the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), is a significant component of the innate immune with a broad range of antimicrobial activities. Differing from the widely-studied mammals and birds, limited information about β-defensins has been reported in reptiles, especially in crocodilians. As a same ancient species as dinosaurs and the most endangered species of 23 crocodilians, the survival of Chinese alligator (Alligator sinensis) means a powerful immune system and possible involvement of AMPs in its immune resistance. In this study, we identified 20 novel Alligator sinensisβ-defensin genes (AsBDs) from a 390 kb region using bioinformatic and experimental approaches, and successfully distinguished six orthologous AsBDs to birds and nine paralogous AsBDs undergoing gene duplication events. The amino acid alignment shows that the AsBD paralogs, like α-defensins, encode a significantly longer pro-piece comparing with the orthologs. The calculation of non-synonymous (d N ) and synonymous (d S ) substitutions in the mature peptide reveals that the AsBD paralogs experience a significantly higher selective pressure (d N /d S ) than the orthologs, but a similar evolutionary force to α-defensins. The gene expression result indicates that the AsBD paralogs have a significantly higher expression level than the orthologos in gastrointestinal tract where the host is vulnerable to enteric pathogenic bacteria, as observed in α-defensins. These three pieces of evidence demonstrate that the AsBD paralogs do play an important role in maintaining long-term survival of this endangered reptile. Thus, this survey of AsBDs on the genomic structure, evolutionary characteristics, and expression pattern provides a genetic and immunological foundation for further investigating their antimicrobial function and alternative antibiotics potentiality. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Thermoregulation and temperature relations of alligators and other large ectotherms inhabiting thermally stressed habitats. Annual progress report, 1 July 1976--30 September 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spotila, J.R.

    1977-06-01

    Progress is reported on studies of the biophysical and thermal relationships between large ectotherms and their aquatic environment. Data are reported from laboratory and field studies on alligators, turtles, and fish. Mathematical models of the effect of body size and physical characteristics on temperature regulation of ectotherms and of thermal stress in aquatic organisms were developed. Results are included of field studies on the physiological and behavioral adjustments of turtles in response to changes in water temperature produced by thermal effluents in PAR Pond at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

  2. Characterization of mineral coatings associated with a Pleistocene‐Holocene rock art style: The Northern Running Figures of the East Alligator River region, western Arnhem Land, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope L. King

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This data article contains mineralogic and chemical data from mineral coatings associated with rock art from the East Alligator River region. The coatings were collected adjacent to a rock art style known as the “Northern Running Figures” for the purposes of radiocarbon dating (doi:10.1016/j.jasrep.2016.11.016; (T. Jones, V. Levchenko, P.L. King, U. Troitzsch, D. Wesley, 2017 [1]. This contribution includes raw and processed powder X-ray Diffraction data, Scanning Electron Microscopy energy dispersive spectroscopy data, and Fourier Transform infrared spectral data.

  3. Water in the Lithospheric Mantle Beneath a Phanerozoic Continental Belt: FTIR Analyses of Alligator Lake Xenoliths (Yukon, Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelber, McKensie; Peslier, Ann H.; Brandon, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    Water in the mantle influences melting, metasomatism, viscosity and electrical conductivity. The Alligator Lake mantle xenolith suite is one of three bimodal peridotite suites from the northern Canadian Cordillera brought to the surface by alkali basalts, i.e., it consists of chemically distinct lherzolites and harzburgites. The lherzolites have equilibration temperatures about 50 C lower than the harzburgites and are thought to represent the fertile upper mantle of the region. The harzburgites might have come from slightly deeper in the mantle and/or be the result of a melting event above an asthenospheric upwelling detected as a seismic anomaly at 400-500 km depth. Major and trace element data are best interpreted as the lherzolite mantle having simultaneously experienced 20-25% partial melting and a metasomatic event to create the harzburgites. Well-characterized xenoliths are being analyzed for water by FTIR. Harzburgites contain 29-52 ppm H2O in orthopyroxene (opx) and (is) approximately140 ppm H2O in clinopyroxene (cpx). The lherzolites have H2O contents of 27-150 ppm in opx and 46-361 ppm in cpx. Despite correlating with enrichments in LREE, the water contents of the harzburgite pyroxenes are low relative to those of typical peridotite xenoliths, suggesting that the metasomatic agents were water-poor, contrarily to what has been suggested before. The water content of cpx is about double that of opx indicating equilibrium. Olivine water contents are low ((is) less than 5 ppm H2O) and out of equilibrium with those of opx and cpx, which may be due to H loss during xenolith ascent. This is consistent with olivines containing more water in their cores than their rims. Olivines exclusively exhibit water bands in the 3400-3000 cm-1 range, which may be indicative of a reduced environment.

  4. Ontogeny of the partial secondary wall of the otoccipital region of the endocranium in prehatching Alligator mississippiensis (Archosauria, Crocodylia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klembara, Jozef

    2005-12-01

    The ontogeny of the posterior otic and anterior occipital portions of the neural endocranium of prehatching Alligator mississippiensis was investigated by reconstruction from sectioned material. In Stage 6 of this species, in which the endochondral ossification of the otoccipital region of the neural endocranium is only in its very early stage, two bony outgrowths-laminae-are present at the external wall of the posterior portion of the neural endocranium. The anterior lamina arises from the external surface of the basal plate at the level of the posterior margin of the subcapsular process; the posterior lamina arises from the external surface of that portion of the pila occipitalis that forms the posteroventral wall of the metotic fissure. During ontogeny, both laminae lying in the anteroposterior sequence ossify in membrane, fuse together, grow laterodorsally, and fuse with the lateral wall of the lateral semicircular canal and the crista parotica. This lamina forms a new, secondary wall enclosing the posterior section of the otic capsule and contains the large external jugular foramen (or foramen vagi) in its basal portion. The laminae, designated lamina juxtaotica anterior and posterior (lamina juxtaotica when fused together), have not been recorded previously in crocodylians and are absent in all other Recent reptiles. From the functional point of view, the juxtaotic lamina 1) forms the margins of the external jugular foramen, and 2) forms the floor of the posterior section of the Eustachian tube. In birds, the structure called the metotic cartilage, which arises in ontogeny as an independent element, has a similar position as the juxtaotic lamina. However, the two structures differ in their developmental origins and their relation to the Eustachian tube and the ramus hyomandibularis of the facialis nerve. Moreover, there is no external jugular foramen in birds. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Six-monthly report on surveillance of environmental monitoring in Alligator Rivers Region for the period 1 April-30 September 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This report outlines the activities of Northern Territory Government authorities (Department of Mines and Energy (DME), Conservation Commission and Department of Health and Community Services (DHCS) in meeting their responsibilities for surveillance of environmental monitoring in the Alligator Rivers Region for the period 1 April to 30 September 1988. The responsibility for DME activities derives principally from the Mining Act, the Mines Safety Control Act, the Control of Waters Act and the Uranium Mining (Environment Control) Act, referred to in this report as the UMEC Act. The Land Conservation Unit (LCU) of the Conservation Commission and the Occupational and Environmental Health Branch of DHCS, furnish technical advice to the Alligator Rivers Region Unit of DME, which then collates the data for Authorizations, approvals and compliance reports. The responsibilities of the Conservation Commission derive from the Soil Conservation and Land Utilization Act. DHCS activities derive from, in addition to the relevant Mines Acts, the Silicosis and Tuberculosis (Mine Workers and Prospectors) Act, Radiation (Safety Control) Act and the Public Health Act

  6. Thermoregulation and temperature relations of alligators and other large ectotherms inhabiting thermally stressed habitats. Annual progress report, July 1, 1975--June 30, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spotila, J.R.

    1976-03-01

    The effects of radiation and convection on the equilibrium body temperatures of alligators have been determined. Gaping has been shown to be an effective thermoregulatory device for retarding heat gain in the heads of these animals. Initial time dependent experiments have been completed and ketamine hydrochloride has been shown to be an effective anesthetic for alligators. Evaporative water loss rates have been measured as a function of size, temperature and wind speed for the turtle Chrysemys scripta. Convection coefficients have been determined and climate spaces are being formulated. Field studies are under way at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Convection coefficients for largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides change as a function of temperature and water speed. Steady state heat energy budgets have been computed for this fish. The effects of arsenic and temperature on the temperature tolerance of larval muskellunge, Esox masquinongy, have been determined. The thermal tolerances of several species of minnows have also been measured. The role of the skin in the control of evaporation from amphibians and reptiles has been assessed. During the past year one article has been published, two are in press, one is in review, and eight are in preparation. Five masters theses will be completed by July 1976

  7. ANÁLISE MICROBIOLÓGICA DA CARNE DE JACARÉ DO PANTANAL (Caiman crocodilus yacare MICROBIAL ANALYSIS CHARACTERISTICS OF THE ALLIGATOR'S MEAT (Caiman crocodilus yacare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Leite HOFFMANN

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi realizar o levantamento das características microbiológicas da carne do jacaré, através da detecção e/ou enumeração dos microrganismos mais comumente encontrados na carne. Pela inexistência de padrões na legislação brasileira para a carne de jacaré, os resultados foram comparados com os padrões microbiológicos existentes para carne bovina e pescado. Encontrou-se a presença de S. aureus e de Salmonella sp, resultados estes considerados insatisfatórios, o que nos permitiu, classificar o produto como impróprio para o consumo. O trabalho sugere também, procedimentos para evitar e/ou minimizar a presença desses microrganismos indesejáveis na carne.This work subjects to collect data of the microbial characteristics of the alligator meat, and also to identify the microrganisms that can be found in it. The current Brazilian legislation does not have any specific regulations for the alligator meat, then the results were compaired to the microbial standards for the fresh beef and fish. The results has showed the presence of the S. aureus and Salmonella sp. These results let us to classify the product submited to the test, as unsatisfactory and, therefore, inadequate to the human consumption. The present study also suggests some procedures to avoid or minimize the presence of these microrganisms.

  8. Hear You Later Alligator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jeppe Veirum; Knoche, Hendrik

    2017-01-01

    Many musical instruments exhibit an inherent latency or delayed auditory feedback (DAF) between actuator activation and the occurrence of sound. We investigated how DAF (73ms and 250ms) affects musically trained (MT) and non-musically trained (NMT) people’s ability to synchronize the audible strum...

  9. Radionuclide migration around uranium ore bodies in the Alligator Rivers region of the Northern Territory, Australia - analogue of radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airey, P.L.; Roman, D.; Golian, C.; Short, S.; Nightingale, T.; Lowson, R.T.; Davey, B.G.; Gray, D.

    1984-01-01

    Appropriate geochemical analogues may be used to reduce the uncertainties in predicting the long-term transport of actinides, radium and fission products from laboratory adsorption and hydrological data. In this study the migration of uranium series nuclides within, and down-gradient of ore bodies in the Alligator Rivers uranium province of the Northern Territory of Australia is described. A mathematical framework was developed to permit calculation of the rate of leaching or deposition of uranium and radium between defined zones of the ore bodies, and the rate of loss of the nuclides due to groundwater transport and surface erosion. A detailed study was made of the distribution of uranium, thorium and radium isotopes within various minerals comprising the weathered ore assemblage. Uranium and thorium concentrate principally in the iron minerals and radium in the clay-quartz phases. Substantial disequilibria are observed, which are attributed to a combination of α-recoil and chemical effects. Evidence of the relative lability of iron phases is presented. The transport of uranium series nuclides in groundwater intersecting the deposits was investigated. Down-gradient of the Ranger One deposit, the maximum retardation factor of uranium is 250. The role of colloids in groundwater transport is being studied. Uranium is transported principally in solution. There appears to be an equilibrium between solute and articulate uranium

  10. Sedimentation of the basal Kombolgie Formation (Upper Precambrian-Carpentarian) Northern Territory, Australia: possible significance in the genesis of the underlying Alligator Rivers unconformity-type uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojakangas, R.W.

    1979-10-01

    The 1400 to 1500 My old Kombolgie Formation of the MacArthur Basin of the Northern Territory overlies or has overlain unconformity-type uranium deposits including Jabiluka, Ranger, Koongarra, Nabarlek and the small deposits of the South Alligator River Valley. A brief study of the basal portion of the formation showed it to consist entirely of mature conglomerates and quartzose sandstones. Analysis of the bedding types (planar cross beds, trough cross beds and parallel beds) and other sedimentary structures (mainly ripple marks and parting lineation) fit a braided alluvial plain model. A paleocurrent study utilizing about 400 measurements from nine localities located along the westward-facing 250 kilometer-long erosional escarpment of the Arnhem Land Plateau showed the dominant paleocurrent trend to be from west and northwest towards the east and southeast, with local divergence. The data and interpretation presented are relevant to the supergene model of uranium deposition at the unconformity, for they add to the suggestion that additional uranium deposits similar to Jabiluka Two may underlie the Kombolgie Formation eastward from the present escarpment

  11. Using the American alligator and a repeated-measures design to place constraints on in vivo shoulder joint range of motion in dinosaurs and other fossil archosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Joel D; Hutson, Kelda N

    2013-01-15

    Using the extant phylogenetic bracket of dinosaurs (crocodylians and birds), recent work has reported that elbow joint range of motion (ROM) studies of fossil dinosaur forearms may be providing conservative underestimates of fully fleshed in vivo ROM. As humeral ROM occupies a more central role in forelimb movements, the placement of quantitative constraints on shoulder joint ROM could improve fossil reconstructions. Here, we investigated whether soft tissues affect the more mobile shoulder joint in the same manner in which they affect elbow joint ROM in an extant archosaur. This test involved separately and repeatedly measuring humeral ROM in Alligator mississippiensis as soft tissues were dissected away in stages to bare bone. Our data show that the ROMs of humeral flexion and extension, as well as abduction and adduction, both show a statistically significant increase as flesh is removed, but then decrease when the bones must be physically articulated and moved until they separate from one another and/or visible joint surfaces. A similar ROM pattern is inferred for humeral pronation and supination. All final skeletonized ROMs were less than initial fully fleshed ROMs. These results are consistent with previously reported elbow joint ROM patterns from the extant phylogenetic bracket of dinosaurs. Thus, studies that avoid separation of complementary articular surfaces may be providing fossil shoulder joint ROMs that underestimate in vivo ROM in dinosaurs, as well as other fossil archosaurs.

  12. Thermoregulation and temperature relations of alligators and other large ectotherms inhabiting thermally stressed habitats. Progress report, 1 October 1974--30 September 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spotila, J.R.

    1977-06-01

    Significant progress has been made in determining the mechanisms by which large ectotherms adjust to thermal stress in their natural environment. The effect of mouth gaping on head temperatures and the role of radiation, conduction and convection on body temperatures of alligators have been determined. The utility of energy budget modeling as a method for studying the thermoregulatory mechanisms of animals has been demonstrated. Steady state and time dependent models of body temperature have been tested. Convection coefficients and evaporative water loss rates have been measured for the turtle, Chysemys scripta. Climate space diagrams have been formulated and are being tested. Behavioral thermoregulation of turtles has been studied in PAR pond on the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, S.C. Steady state energy budget equations have been computed for largemouth bass. Experimental heat transfer coefficients indicate that most heat transfer is through the body wall and not via the gills. A time dependent model is being tested. It predicts the body temperature of a fish in a heterothermal environment. Theoretical calculations have been made of the effects of body size, color, and metabolism on the temperature regulation of ectotherms

  13. The impact of bone and suture material properties on mandibular function in Alligator mississippiensis: testing theoretical phenotypes with finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, David A; Porro, Laura B; Iriarte-Diaz, Jose; Lemberg, Justin B; Holliday, Casey M; Anapol, Fred; Ross, Callum F

    2011-01-01

    The functional effects of bone and suture stiffness were considered here using finite element models representing three different theoretical phenotypes of an Alligator mississippiensis mandible. The models were loaded using force estimates derived from muscle architecture in dissected specimens, constrained at the 18th and 19th teeth in the upper jaw and 19th tooth of the lower jaw, as well as at the quadrate-articular joint. Stiffness was varied systematically in each theoretical phenotype. The three theoretical phenotypes included: (i) linear elastic isotropic bone of varying stiffness and no sutures; (ii) linear elastic orthotropic bone of varying stiffness with no sutures; and (iii) linear elastic isotropic bone of a constant stiffness with varying suture stiffness. Variation in the isotropic material properties of bone primarily resulted in changes in the magnitude of principal strain. By comparison, variation in the orthotropic material properties of bone and isotropic material properties of sutures resulted in: a greater number of bricks becoming either more compressive or more tensile, changing between being either dominantly compressive or tensile, and having larger changes in the orientation of maximum principal strain. These data indicate that variation in these model properties resulted in changes to the strain regime of the model, highlighting the importance of using biologically verified material properties when modeling vertebrate bones. When bones were compared within each set, the response of each to changing material properties varied. In two of the 12 bones in the mandible, varied material properties within sutures resulted in a decrease in the magnitude of principal strain in bricks adjacent to the bone/suture interface and decreases in stored elastic energy. The varied response of the mandibular bones to changes in suture stiffness highlights the importance of defining the appropriate functional unit when addressing relationships of

  14. Estudo do aproveitamento das vísceras do jacaré do pantanal (Caiman crocodilus yacare em farinha de carne Study of the utilization of the pantanal alligator's viscera for meat flour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Fernando Romanelli

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve por objetivo a produção de farinha de carne a partir das vísceras do jacaré do pantanal (Caiman crocodilus yacare e o estudo das propriedades físico-químicas, bioquímicas e bacteriológicas da farinha elaborada. Essas características que servem de parâmetro de controle de qualidade, são normalmente exigidas na comercialização de farinhas de carne elaboradas a partir de vísceras e outros materiais de descarte para animais de consumo doméstico. Os resultados obtidos do pH, acidez solúvel, composição percentual dos componentes, dos minerais Ca e P, digestibilidade em pepsina, aspecto microbiológico (presença de "salmonela" e estabilidade avaliada pelo nº de TBARS da farinha mostram ser viável o uso das vísceras do jacaré do pantanal como fonte alternativa de nutrientes para incorporação nas formulações de ração animal .The present paper shidied study the production of the meat flour from the pantanal alligator's viscera as well as the physic-chemical, biochemical and microbiological proprieties of the obtained flour. These proprieties can be parameters of quality control and are normally demanded in the trade of meat flour made from viscera and other discharge animals for domestic use.The results obtained from pH, soluble acidity, components percentual composition, Ca and P minerals, digestibility in pepsin, the microbiological aspect (salmonella determination, and the stability to the meat flour according to the evaluation of the number of TBARS, demonstrate the use of the viscera of the pantanal alligator are feasible as alternate source of nutrients for the incorporation in the formulating of animal feed.

  15. Clay vein and its implication for uranium exploration activity in the northern part of the Alligator Rivers Uranium Field, northern Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasao, Eiji

    2003-01-01

    Clay veins have been found by uranium exploration drilling around the Black Rock uranium prospect in the northern part of the alligator Rivers Uranium Field (ARUF), northern Australia. The mineralogical and chemical features are described to clarify relations with uranium mineralization, because it is not accompanied by uranium mineralization. X-ray diffraction and chemical analysis for major elements indicate that the clay vein consists mainly of chlorite (clinochlore to ferroan clinochlore) and lesser mica clay mineral (t-1M dominant). The clay vein is compared with the clay alteration zone around the uranium deposits in ARUF in terms of mode of occurrence, mineral and chemical compositions. Mineral composition of the clay vein is only in accordance with that of the inner alteration halo of the clay alteration zone. It is, however, different from mineral composition of the outer alteration halo in terms of lack of Fe chlorite in the clay vein. Chemical composition of the clay vein is similar to that of the clay alteration zone, except for lack in the vein of high iron content which is observed in some samples of the alteration zone. As a whole, the feature of the clay vein corresponds to the inner alteration zone around the uranium deposit in ARUF. The mode of occurrence of the clay vein is very different from that of the clay alteration zone. Mode of occurrence, and mineral and chemical compositions of the clay vein resemble a chlorite vein in the Lower to Middle Proterozoic sandstone above the Jabiluka deposit, one of major uranium deposit in the ARUF. Because of the similarity between the clay and the chlorite veins, the clay vein is regarded as marginal facies of an alteration zone. The fluid that formed the clay vein is estimated to have been oxidized, because of the existence of hematite and ubiquitous Mg chlorite. This nature is in accordance with the mineralizing fluid that formed the inner alteration zone in the Nabarlek deposit. In conclusion, the vein

  16. Coronary blood flow in the anesthetized American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, Bjarke; Elfwing, Magnus; Elsey, Ruth M.; Wang, Tobias; Crossley, Dane A.

    2016-01-01

    Coronary circulation of the heart evolved early within ectothermic vertebrates and became of vital importance to cardiac performance in some teleost fish, mammals and birds. In contrast, the role and function of the coronary circulation in ectothermic reptiles remains largely unknown. Here, we

  17. Produção de betacianina em erva-de-jacaré cultivada in vitro com diferentes concentrações de sulfato de cobre Betacyanin production in alligator weed, grown in vitro, with different concentrations of copper sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janieli Cristina Perotti

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A manipulação da concentração dos microelementos no meio de cultura representa uma boa estratégia para aumentar a produção de metabólitos secundários em cultura de tecidos. Este trabalho teve por objetivo demonstrar a influência do sulfato de cobre na produção de betacianina e na multiplicação de plantas de Alternanthera philoxeroides (erva-de-jacaré cultivadas in vitro. Segmentos nodais, obtidos de plantas pré-estabelecidas e após três subcultivos, foram inoculados em meio MS, com diferentes concentrações de CuSO4 (0; 25; 75; 125; 175; 200µM. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi inteiramente casualizado, com seis concentrações de CuSO4 e cinco repetições representadas por um frasco contendo quatro explantes. Os resultados foram submetidos à análise de variância, à regressão polinomial e a análises de correlação entre as variáveis morfológicas e a produção de betacianina. Concentrações acima de 75µM diminuíram a altura das plantas, o número de brotos e gemas e o crescimento radicular, enquanto que, na concentração de 125µM, houve a maior produção de massa fresca. A produção de betacianina aumentou 60% em relação ao controle com 175µM de CuSO4. Ocorreu crescimento das plantas em todas as concentrações de CuSO4 testadas, com exceção de 200µM, sendo esta considerada tóxica.The manipulation of concentration of trace elements in the culture medium represents a good strategy to increase the production of secondary metabolites in tissue culture. This study aimed to demonstrate the influence of copper sulphate in the production of betacyanin and the multiplication of plants of Alternanthera philoxeroides (alligator weed cultured in vitro. Nodal segments, obtained from plants pre-stablished and after three subcultures, were inoculated in basic MS with different concentrations of CuSO4 (0, 25, 75, 125, 175, 200µM. The results were subjected to analysis of variance, polynomial regression and

  18. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Geochemical Data Bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, D.G.; Read, D.

    1992-01-01

    The Koongarra uranium deposit in the Northern Territory of Australia is being studied to evaluate the processes involved in the geochemical alteration of the ore body and the formation of the uranium dispersion fan. A broad range of research is being undertaken into the geochemistry and hydrology of the site with the aim of understanding the transport of radionuclides through the system. During the project a range of geochemical and hydrogeochemical models have been developed to account for measured data from the site and with which to predict site evolution. The majority of these models are based on the premise of thermodynamic chemical equilibrium and employ fundamental thermodynamic data to characterise the chemistry of the system. From the differences which exist between the thermodynamic data bases (Appendices I and II) it is possible to gain a view of the level of uncertainty associated with thermodynamic data in each set of calculations. This report gives a brief introduction to the geochemical processes underlying the models, and details the equations used to quantify the more common of these processes (e.g. aqueous speciation and mineral solubility). A description is given of the computer codes (EQ3/6, PHREEQE, MINTEQ) most commonly used during the project for geochemical modelling. Their key features are highlighted and comparisons made. It is concluded that the degree of uncertainty in geochemical modelling studies arising as a result of using one code rather than another is relatively insignificant when compared to that related to differences in the underlying data bases. 73 refs., 3 figs

  19. Avaliação físico química da carne de jacaré-do-pantanal (Caiman yacare Daudin 1802 de idades diferentes Physichist chymistry evaluation of swampland alligator meat (Caiman yacare Daudin 1802 of different ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Vicente Neto

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de avaliar a composição química e física da carne de jacaré-do-pantanal (Caiman yacare Daudin 1802, de idades diferentes, foram coletadas amostras de dois cortes de 10 jacarés-do-pantanal, sendo: 05 animais 14 meses e 05 animais com 26 meses, criados em cativeiro. Os cortes utilizados foram filé da cauda e filé do dorso. Foram determinados na composição química: umidade, proteína, extrato etéreo e cinzas; e na composição física: perda de peso por cozimento (PPC e força de cisalhamento (FC. Houve interação (PWith the objective of evaluating the chemical and physical composition of swampland alligator meat (Caiman yacare Daudin 1802, of different ages, samples of two courts of 10 swampland alligator were collected, being: 05 animals 14 months and 05 animals with 26 months, servants in captivity. The used courts were of tail and neck. They were certain in the chemical composition: moisture, protein, ethereal extract and ashes; and in the physical composition: weight loss for cooking (WLC and break force (BF. There was interaction (P<0.05 for moisture and for break force (BF. The animals with 14 months presented average of higher moisture (76.75% in the tail that the animals with 26 months (74.48%. The averages of ethereal extract varied of: 0.40% to 0.54% among the courts for the animals of 14 months and of 0.51% to 0.84% for the animals of 26 months. The found protein values were: 23.57% in the tail and 24.37% in the neck in the animals of 14 months; and of 24.26% in the tail and 23.74% in the neck for the animals of 26 months. The medium value of WLC, in the animals with 14 months was larger (40.02%, that in the animals of 26 months (33.82%. The animals abated with age of 14 months presented softer meat and values of ethereal extract smaller the animals abated with 26 months, demonstrating for these parameters a better physical and chemical quality.

  20. Caracterização do processo de rigor mortis do músculo Ilio-ischiocaudalis de jacaré-do-pantanal (Caiman crocodilus yacare e maciez da carne Characterization of rigor mortis process of muscle Ilio-ischiocaudalis of pantanal alligator (Caiman crocodilus yacare and meat tenderness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Paulino Vieira

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho utilizou seis carcaças de jacaré-do-pantanal (Caiman crocodilus yacare com o objetivo de caracterizar o processo de rigor mortis do músculo Ílio-ischiocaudalis durante o resfriamento industrial e avaliar a maciez dessa carne. Os jacarés foram escolhidos aleatoriamente e abatidos na Cooperativa de Criadores do Jacaré do Pantanal (COOCRIJAPAN, Cáceres, Mato Grosso. Após a sangria, aferiu-se as variações das temperaturas da câmara de resfriamento, das carcaças e o pH. Foram colhidas amostras para determinação do comprimento de sarcômero, da força de cisalhamento e perdas por cozimento em diferentes intervalos de tempo (0,5, 3, 5, 7, 10, 12, 15, 24 e 36h. A temperatura da câmara de resfriamento variou de 2,6°C (0,5h a 0,9°C (36h e a temperatura média das carcaças variou de 21,0°C a 4,2°C, respectivamente. O pH médio inicial do músculo foi de 6,7 e o final 5,6 e a contração máxima do sarcômero do músculo Ilio-ischiocaudalis ocorreu na 15ª hora após a sangria (1,5µm. Essa carne apresentou força de cisalhamento menor que 6,0kg.This paper studied six pantanal alligators (Caiman crocodilus yacare carcass with goal of rigor mortis process characterization of Ilio-ischiocaudalis muscle during industrial cooling and meat tenderness. The alligators were randomly assembled and slaughtered at Cooperativa de Criadores do Jacaré do Pantanal (COOCRIJAPAN - Cáceres- Mato Grosso After exsanguination, were mensured temperature of chilling room and carcasses, pH and samples were collected for determination the sarcomere length, shear force and cooking loss at different times (0.5, 3, 5, 7, 10, 12, 15, 24 and 36 hours. The temperature of chilling room varied from 2.6°C (0.5h to 0.9°C (36h and the mean carcass temperature from 21.0°C to 4.2°C, respectively. The mean initial pH of the muscle was 6.7 and the final was 5.6. The smallest sarcomere size ocurred at 15 hours after exsanguination (1.5µm. This meat presents

  1. When You're Up to Your Ears in Alligators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumbach, Donna

    1997-01-01

    Discusses 10 challenges media specialists must overcome to effectively use technology in education. Highlights include people opposed to technology; teacher training to help develop collaborative relationships; establishing and using a comprehensive technology plan; assuming more professional responsibility; and empowerment. (LRW)

  2. De novo characterization of the alligator weed (Alternanthera ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These factors included 121 transcription factors, 108 kinases, 136 transporters and 178 genes that were related to stress. Twelve transcription factors were randomly selected for further analysis. The expression level of each transcription factor was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR, and the results of this secondary analysis ...

  3. 75 FR 34365 - Safety Zone, Alligator River, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... interest, since immediate action is needed to ensure the safety of human life and property from the hazards... River centered at (35[deg]54'3'' N/ 076[deg]00'25'' W) a position directly under the U.S. Highway 64..., design, or operation; test methods; sampling procedures; and related management systems practices) that...

  4. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Geophysics, petrophysics and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emerson, D.W.; Mills, K.J.; Hallett, M.S.; Cao, L.Q.; Miyakawa, K.

    1992-01-01

    The geophysical and geological field work at Koongarra (including borehole core logging) showed that the site itself is a folded, faulted, variably fractured Precambrian psammitic and pelitic schist sequence with a quasi-horizontal weathered zone superimposed on the steeply dipping rock fabric. The site is flanked by a high resistivity younger sandstone unit to the northwest and by a magnetic amphibolite/ferricrete sequence to the far southeast. The data interpretations elicited the essential structural and broad lithological elements. Gravity, magnetic and electrical laboratory and field studies confirmed a broad folded fractured sequence of dipping layered host rocks weathered in their upper parts and trending in a southwest-northeast direction. Qualitatively interpreted anomalies indicated the trend of the main groundwater movement to the south where dolomites are thought to act as a sink. These drainage features have SP, resistivity and radiometric expression. The roles of the Kombolgie Sandstone as a source of water and the Koongarra Fault as a barrier or otherwise were not established owing to the lack of sufficient samples for testing and also on account of the difficulty of geophysical access over the site's rugged escarpment. 40 refs., 13 tabs., 69 figs

  5. Alligator Rivers analogue project. Final Report. Volume 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains a description of the distribution of minerals and elements at Koongarra, including the distribution of radionuclides. The Koongarra orebody is situated 225 km east of Darwin in the Northern Territory of Australia. The zone of primary uranium mineralisation has been intersected by weathering conditions, and this has resulted in the formation of a secondary ore zone and dispersion fan in the weathered zone. The uranium distribution over the site was investigated to determine the extent and direction of uranium migration from the primary uranium mineralisation. The depth patterns of uranium concentration were also investigated to elucidate depths. The distribution of elements, rock and minerals, and how they may affect uranium mobility, or indicate interactions between uranium and solid phases, were considered. Multi-elemental analyses were carried out on many samples to provide basic concentration data about various geochemically significant elements, and to elucidate how the elements interact with one another, the solid substrate and the groundwater. This included the analysis of bulk rock samples, visually distinct sub-samples, different particle sizes and chemically defined phases. Similarly, mineralogical data supplied information on the substrate reacting with the groundwater. Extensive studies were undertaken to elucidate the form of uranium in the weathered zones. These involved optical and electron microscopy studies and auto-radiography. Spatial trends of uranium series disequilibria in bulk rock, secondary uranium minerals and different chemically defined phases were analysed. These give information about uranium deposition and leaching, the evolution of the dispersion fan, the roles and relative importance of different mineralogical phases and processes involved in the retardation of radionuclides. 157 refs., 31 tabs., 87 figs.

  6. Effect of aqueous extract of alligator pepper (Zingiberaceae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is therefore a need to develop a drug or food supplement that would reduce weight gain without causing adverse effects on the fetus. Aframomum ... It is against this background that the present investigation examines the possibility of its beneficial effects on pregnancy, using Sprague Dawley rat as the animal model.

  7. Integrative and comparative reproductive biology: From alligators to xenobiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Krista A; Roark, Alison M; Boggs, Ashley S P; Bowden, John A; Cruze, Lori; Edwards, Thea M; Hamlin, Heather J; Cantu, Theresa M; McCoy, Jessica A; McNabb, Nicole A; Wenzel, Abby G; Williams, Cameron E; Kohno, Satomi

    2016-11-01

    Dr. Louis J. Guillette Jr. thought of himself as a reproductive biologist. However, his interest in reproductive biology transcended organ systems, life history stages, species, and environmental contexts. His integrative and collaborative nature led to diverse and fascinating research projects conducted all over the world. He doesn't leave us with a single legacy. Instead, he entrusts us with several. The purpose of this review is to highlight those legacies, in both breadth and diversity, and to illustrate Dr. Guillette's grand contributions to the field of reproductive biology. He has challenged the field to reconsider how we think about our data, championed development of novel and innovative techniques to measure endocrine function, helped define the field of endocrine disruption, and lead projects to characterize new endocrine disrupting chemicals. He significantly influenced our understanding of evolution, and took bold and important steps to translate all that he has learned into advances in human reproductive health. We hope that after reading this manuscript our audience will appreciate and continue Dr. Guillette's practice of open-minded and passionate collaboration to understand the basic mechanisms driving reproductive physiology and to ultimately apply those findings to protect and improve wildlife and human health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Geomorphology and paleoclimatic history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyrwoll, K.H.

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this volume is to discuss the likely influence of geomorphological and palaeoclimatic controls on the development of the secondary dispersion fan at Koongarra. For the Koongarra area the Phanerozoic was a time of tectonic stability and predominantly subaerial denudation. The structural geology of the region facilitated the erosion of the Kombolgie Formation, setting in train the development of Koongarra Valley. With the removal of the Kombolgie cover the surface of the Cahill Formation could then be eroded. The geochemical controls on the development of the secondary dispersion fan require the orebody to be located in an oxidising weathering environment. Under the present weathering regimes it seems that this implies that the orebody is located at a depth of less than 30 m. From estimates of the present regional denudation rates of the area and wider geomorphological considerations, it is concluded that the top of the orebody would have reached such a depth at some time in the last 1-6 million years. The climates of the Late Quaternary provide some guide to Pleistocene climatic events. The most intense aridity coincided with times of global glacial maxima. There is also evidence that in the Late Cenozoic there were times of elevated rates of chemical weathering. However, the timing, nature and duration of such events is unclear. 171 refs., 4 tabs., 35 refs

  9. Alligator Rivers analogue project. Final Report. Volume 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This volume contains a description of the distribution of minerals and elements at Koongarra, including the distribution of radionuclides. The Koongarra orebody is situated 225 km east of Darwin in the Northern Territory of Australia. The zone of primary uranium mineralisation has been intersected by weathering conditions, and this has resulted in the formation of a secondary ore zone and dispersion fan in the weathered zone. The uranium distribution over the site was investigated to determine the extent and direction of uranium migration from the primary uranium mineralisation. The depth patterns of uranium concentration were also investigated to elucidate depths. The distribution of elements, rock and minerals, and how they may affect uranium mobility, or indicate interactions between uranium and solid phases, were considered. Multi-elemental analyses were carried out on many samples to provide basic concentration data about various geochemically significant elements, and to elucidate how the elements interact with one another, the solid substrate and the groundwater. This included the analysis of bulk rock samples, visually distinct sub-samples, different particle sizes and chemically defined phases. Similarly, mineralogical data supplied information on the substrate reacting with the groundwater. Extensive studies were undertaken to elucidate the form of uranium in the weathered zones. These involved optical and electron microscopy studies and auto-radiography. Spatial trends of uranium series disequilibria in bulk rock, secondary uranium minerals and different chemically defined phases were analysed. These give information about uranium deposition and leaching, the evolution of the dispersion fan, the roles and relative importance of different mineralogical phases and processes involved in the retardation of radionuclides. 157 refs., 31 tabs., 87 figs

  10. Evaluating the effect of sample type on American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) analyte values in a point-of-care blood analyser

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, Matthew T.; Finger, John W.; Winzeler, Megan E.; Tuberville, Tracey D.

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of wildlife health has been enhanced by the ability of point-of-care (POC) blood analysers to provide biochemical analyses of non-domesticated animals in the field. However, environmental limitations (e.g. temperature, atmospheric humidity and rain) and lack of reference values may inhibit researchers from using such a device with certain wildlife species. Evaluating the use of alternative sample types, such as plasma, in a POC device may afford researchers the opportunity to d...

  11. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Geochemistry of 239Pu, 129I, 99Tc and 36Cl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabryka-Martin, J.T.; Curtis, D.B.

    1992-01-01

    One objective of this research programme has been to evaluate the applicability of uranium orebodies as natural analogues for testing radionuclide release-rate models used in performance assessment activities. The investigated nuclides included three of the most persistent radioactive constituents of high-level wastes from nuclear fission power reactors: plutonium-239, iodine-129, and technetium-99. The feasibility of uranium minerals as analogues for the behavior of these nuclear reaction products (NRP) in spent fuel relies upon a capability to characterise NRP concentrations in the source minerals. Measured abundances of natural 239 Pu, 99 Tc and 129 I in uranium ores are compared to calculated abundances in order to evaluate the degree to retention of these radionuclides by the ore. This modelling study also shows the extent to which various NRP are correlated, such that one provides a constraint on the production rates of others. Under most conditions, 36 Cl, another long-lived neutron-capture product found in uranium ores, is shown to be an ideal in-situ monitor of the 235 U fission rate, which is the dominant source term for 129 I and possibly a significant one for 99 Tc. Similarly, 239 Pu/U ratios can be used to establish limits on the 238 U neutron-induced fission rate; the ratios measured in this study suggest that 238 U induced fission comprises 129 I and 99 Tc. 79 refs., 21 tabs., 18 figs

  12. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Weathering and its effects on uranium redistribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, H.; Ohnuki, T.; Yanase, N.; Sato, T.; Kimura, H.; Sekine, K.; Nagano, T.; Klessa, D.A.; Conoley, C.; Nakashima, S.; Ewing, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    In the vicinity of the uranium ore deposit at Koongarra, quartz-chlorite schist, the ore host rock, has been subjected to weathering. Although quartz is resistant to weathering, chlorite has been altered to clays and iron minerals. The chlorite weathering and the uranium association with the weathered minerals are the main topics of this study. In order to clarify the weathering of chlorite and its effects on the redistribution of uranium, the processes, mechanisms, and kinetics of the chlorite weathering, and the uranium concentrations in minerals were examined by various methods: X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe analysis, transmission electron microscopy, autoradiography, visible spectroscopy, alpha and gamma spectrometry. The observed results were compared to those calculated, based on two different models developed for the present study. Water-rock interactions have resulted in the weathering of chlorite and precipitation and sorption of uranyl from the groundwaters with the weathering products. It is concluded that the chlorite weathering affects the uranium retardation factor, and thus uranium redistribution at Koongarra. 55 refs., 20 tabs., 120 figs

  13. The Alligator Farther From the Canoe: Shaping the Post-Civil War Syrian Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-30

    CIVIL WAR SYRIAN ARMY POST- CIVIL WAR SYRIAN ARMY SHAPING THE POST- CIVIL WAR SYRIAN ARMY 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...Department of the Navy. 14. ABSTRACT Over the last four years, the Syrian Civil War has created a horrific internal humanitarian disaster, displaced...within the Levant region the United States should pursue the creation of a post- Civil War Syrian

  14. Global warming increases the interspecific competitiveness of the invasive plant alligator weed, Alternanthera philoxeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Ismail, Mohannad; Ding, Jianqing

    2017-01-01

    Global warming could accelerate the spread of invasive species to higher latitudes and intensify their effects on native species. Here, we report results of two years of field surveys along a latitudinal gradient (21°N to 31°N) in southern China, to determine the species structure of the invasive plant Alternanthera philoxeroides community. We also performed a replacement series experiment (mono and mixed) to evaluate the effects of elevated temperature on the competitiveness of A. philoxeroides with the native co-occurring species Digitaria sanguinalis. In the field survey, we found that the dominance of A. philoxeroides increased with increasing of latitude gradient while cover of D. sanguinalis decreased. In monospecific plantings, artificial warming reduced the length of D. sanguinalis roots. In mixed plantings, warming reduced both A. philoxeroides abundance and D. sanguinalis stem length when A. philoxeroides was more prevalent in the planting. Warming also significantly reduced D. sanguinalis biomass, but increased that of A. philoxeroides. In addition, elevated temperatures significantly reduced the relative yield (RY) of D. sanguinalis, particularly when A. philoxeroides was planted in higher proportion in the plot. These results suggest that the invasiveness of A. philoxeroides increased with increasing latitude, and that warming may increase the effectiveness of its interspecific competition with D. sanguinalis. Hence, under global warming conditions, the harm to native species from A. philoxeroides would increase at higher latitudes. Our findings are critical for predicting the invasiveness of alien species under climate change. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Beyond the Egg Carton Alligator: To Recycle Is To Recall and Restore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congdon, Kristin G.

    2000-01-01

    States that the art of recycling has more to do with connecting people with objects, traditions, and rituals than sustaining the natural environment. Discusses some lessons learned in four categories: (1) recycling as self-sufficiency; (2) recycling as renewal; (3) recycling as a spiritual activity; and (4) recycling as aesthetic transformation.…

  16. Phenotypic variation and water selection potential in the stem structure of invasive alligator weed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Leshan; Yang, Beifen; Guan, Wenbin; Li, Junmin

    2016-02-01

    The morphological and anatomical characteristics of stems have been found to be related to drought resistance in plants. Testing the phenotypic selection of water availability on stem anatomical traits would be useful for exploring the evolutionary potential of the stem in response to water availability. To test the phenotypic variation of the stem anatomical traits of an invasive plant in response to water availability, we collected a total of 320 individuals of Alternanthera philoxeroides from 16 populations from terrestrial and aquatic habitats in 8 plots in China and then analyzed the variation, differentiation, plasticity and selection potential of water availability on the stem anatomical traits. We found that except for the thickness of the cortex, all of the examined phenotypic parameters of the A. philoxeroides stem were significantly and positively correlated with soil water availability. The phenotypic differentiation coefficient for all of the anatomical structural parameters indicated that most of the variation existed between habitats within the same plot, whereas there was little variation among plots or among individuals within the same habitat except for variation in the thickness of the cortex. A significant phenotypic plasticity response to water availability was found for all of the anatomical traits of A. philoxeroides stem except for the thickness of the cortex. The associations between fitness and some of the anatomical traits, such as the stem diameter, the cortex area-to-stem area ratio, the pith cavity area-to-stem area ratio and the density of vascular bundles, differed with heterogeneous water availability. In both the aquatic and terrestrial habitats, no significant directional selection gradient was found for the stem diameter, the cortex area-to-stem area ratio or the density of vascular bundles. These results indicated that the anatomical structure of the A. philoxeroides stem may play an important role in the adaptation to changes in water availability.

  17. Environmental impact of the Ranger uranium mine, Alligator Rivers Region, Northern Territory, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, A.; Needham, S.

    2002-01-01

    Stringent environmental controls have been applied to the Ranger mine, in the Northern Territory of Australia, because of its location in an area of outstanding natural and cultural values. The adjacent Kakadu National Park contains a wild and extensive biodiversity, striking landscapes, ancient Aboriginal rock art and a living Aboriginal culture. A special regime of biological, radiological and chemical monitoring has been applied to protect the environment and detect even very low intensity impacts. The results from this regime demonstrate to the government and general public that the high conservation values of the national park around the mine are being properly protected. This paper describes the techniques used to measure environmental impact at Ranger, and summarizes the results of over 20 years of monitoring. The overwhelming conclusion is that a very high standard of environmental protection has been achieved. (author)

  18. Uranium mineralization in the Rum Jungle-Alligator Rivers Province, Northern Territory, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodson, R.G.; Needham, R.S.; Wilkes, P.G.; Page, R.W.; Smart, P.G.; Watchman, A.L.

    1974-01-01

    Renewed interest in uranium exploration in northern Australia in the late 1960s led to the discovery of one of the most important uranium fields in the world. To obtain an understanding of the geological setting of the uranium deposits, and to provide guidelines for future exploration, the Bureau of Mineral Resources (BMR) undertook an investigation which included semi-detailed mapping, aided by geophysical surveys, isotopic dating, and stratigraphic drilling. From the results so far obtained and from the important data made available by mining companies engaged in exploration in the region, a pattern of uranium mineralization can be recognized, particularly in relation to the Lower Proterozoic sedimentation of the region. (author)

  19. Carbon dioxide transport in alligator blood and its erythrocyte permeability to anions and water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, F B; Wang, T; Jones, D R

    1998-01-01

    + binding. Erythrocyte volume, plasma pH, and plasma HCO3- concentration also varied little with the degree of oxygenation. Diffusional water permeability was higher in oxygenated than deoxygenated RBCs. The RBCs have rapid band 3-mediated Cl- and HCO3- transport, which was not affected by degree...

  20. Uranium mine rehabilitation: the story of the South Alligator Valley intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waggitt, Peter W.

    2004-01-01

    The rehabilitation of radioactively contaminated sites is an activity generally regarded with suspicion by the community. This is certainly the case for Australian Aboriginal traditional landowners. This paper describes the historical background to, and the successful development and implementation of, a consultation and planning process to rehabilitate former uranium mining and milling facilities on Aboriginal lands of the World Heritage-listed Kakadu National Park in northern Australia. The process of developing an appropriate community communication and consultation process to allay concerns about radioactivity is a cornerstone of the rehabilitation program. The initial stages of the program's implementation are also described. This program is also the first example of a radiological intervention under modern environmental and radiation protection legislation in the region. It was necessary to develop radiological standards for use in the program as none had been promulgated under existing relevant legislation

  1. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Geochemical modelling of present-day groundwaters. Final Report - Volume 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sverjensky, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    The main purpose of this report is to summarize geochemical modeling studies of the present-day Koongarra groundwaters. Information on the present-day geochemistry and geochemical processes at Koongarra forms a basis for a present-day analogue for nuclear waste migration. The present-day analogue is built on studies of the mineralogy and petrology of the Koongarra deposit, and chemical analyses of present-day groundwaters from the deposit. The overall approach taken in the present study has been to carry out a series of aqueous speciation and state of saturation calculations, including chemical mass transfer calculations, to address the possible control over the chemistry of the present-day for the groundwaters at Koongarra. The most important implication of the present study for the migration of radionuclides is the strong role played by the water-rock interactions, both above and below the water table, influencing the overall chemical evolution of the groundwaters. Thus, the results show that the chemical evolution of waters is strongly controlled by the initial availability of CO 2 and the mineral assemblage encountered, which together determine the major element evolution of the waters by controlling the pH. The relative rates of evolution of the pH and the oxidation state of the groundwaters are also critical to the mobility of uranium. The shallow Koongarra waters are sufficiently oxidising that they can dissolve and transport uranium even under acidic conditions. Under the more reducing condition of the deep groundwaters, is the pH level that permits uranium transport as carbonate complexes. However, if the oxidation state decreases to much lower levels, it would be expected that uranium become immobile. All the speciation and state of saturation calculations carried out in the present study are available from the author, on request

  2. Carbon dioxide transport in alligator blood and its erythrocyte permeability to anions and water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, F B; Wang, T; Jones, D R

    1998-01-01

    contributed about equally in deoxygenated cells. The nonbicarbonate buffer values of RBCs and Hb were high, and the Hb showed a significant fixed acid Haldane effect. Binding of HCO3- on deoxygenation occurred without a change in RBC intracellular pH, revealing equivalence between oxylabile HCO3- and H...

  3. The Closest Alligator to the Boat: Mexico’s Drug-Fueled Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    outside stimulus. This plays into why cartels are able to so freely recruit new members into their ranks. Machismo , a learned response and a real...part of Hispanic culture, is one of the overriding forces driving the Latin American male psyche. Machismo , directly translated from Spanish...closest English word to machismo is macho which seems to be an out of vogue word in 2010 America. In America, it is acceptable to be in touch with

  4. Cytogenetic effect of Alternanthera philoxeroides (alligator weed) on Agasicles hygrophila (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in its native range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant polyploidy potentially affects plant-insect interactions; however, its effect on insect fitness remains largely unexplored. Alternanthera philoxeroides is a South American amphibious Amaranthaceae, which invades aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Different morphotypes and cytotypes were identif...

  5. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Geochemical modelling of secondary uranium ore formation. Final Report - Volume 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sverjensky, D.; Bennett, D.G.; Read, D.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to establish how the uranyl phosphate zone at the Koongarra site was formed. The overall approach taken in the present study employed theoretical chemical mass transfer calculations and models that permit investigation and reconstruction of the kinds of waters that could produce the uranyl phosphate zone. These calculations have used the geological and mineralogical data for the Koongarra weathered zone (Volumes 2, 8, and 9 of this series), to constrain the initial compositions and reactions undergone by groundwater during the formation of the uranyl phosphate zone. In carrying out these calculations the present-day analyses of Koongarra waters are used only as a guide to the possible initial composition of the fluids associated with the formation of the phosphate zone. Aqueous speciation, saturation state and chemical mass transfer calculations were carried out using the computer programs EQ3NR and EQ6 (Wolery, 1983; Wolery et al., 1984) and a thermodynamic database generated at The Johns Hopkins University over the last eight years which is tabulated in the Appendix 1 to Volume 12 of this series. Despite uncertainties in the thermodynamic characterisation of species, all the above calculations suggest that the uranyl phosphate zone at Koongarra has not formed from present-day groundwaters (Volume 12 of this series). The present-day groundwaters in the weathered zone (eg. at 13 m depth) appear to be undersaturated with respect to saleeite. Furthermore, as present-day groundwaters descend below the water table they rapidly lose their atmospheric oxygen imprint, as is typical of most groundwaters, and become even more reducing in character. Under these circumstances, the groundwaters become more undersaturated with respect to saleeite than the shallow groundwaters. Because much of the phosphate zone is currently below the water table, under saturated zone conditions, it is suggested in the present study that the uranyl phosphate zone must have formed in the geologic past under unsaturated zone conditions

  6. Continuous bottom temperature measurements in strategic areas of the Florida Reef Tract at Alligator Reef, 2005 - 2007 (NODC Accession 0019351)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This ongoing project began in 1988. A total of 38 subsurface recording thermographs have been deployed in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS)and at...

  7. Continuous bottom temperature measurements in strategic areas of the Florida Reef Tract at Alligator Reef, 2005 - 2007 (NODC Accession 0019351)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this project is to document bottom seawater temperature in strategic areas of the Florida Reef Tract on a continuing basis and make that information...

  8. Continuous bottom temperature measurements in strategic areas of the Florida Reef Tract at Alligator Reef, 1990- 2005 (NODC Accession 0002753)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This ongoing project began in 1988. A total of 38 subsurface recording thermographs have been deployed in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS)and at...

  9. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Application of scenario development method in evaluation of the Koongarra Analogue. Final Report - Volume 16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skagius, K.; Wingefors, S.

    1992-01-01

    The study of natural analogues has been established as one of the most important methods for validation of concepts and models applied for the assessment of long-term performance of repositories for nuclear waste. The objectives of such studies range from detailed investigations of processes and features on a small scale to attempts of explaining the evolution of whole sites. For studies of specific processes it may well be as important to consider the larger scale settings as boundary conditions. This appreciation of context and an integrated view may be as important for evaluation of most natural analogues as for performance assessments. This is more evident the more the evaluation depends on a knowledge about the evolution of the natural analogue. The attempted formulation of scenarios of the Koongarra Analogue has been based on the external conditions and external features. A rapid weathering of the host rock, i.e. the chlorite schist, is assumed to have started around the onset of the Pleistocene Ice Age (ca 1.6 Ma BP). The eventual oxidation and mobilization of the uranium ore could then have occurred under unsaturated or saturated conditions. This leads to the following major scenarios: (1) Uranyl Phosphates formed under unsaturated conditions, with a periodical evolution of the dispersion fan in conjunction with alternating dry (glacial) and wet (interglacial) periods during the Pleistocene Ice Age; (2) Uranyl Phosphates formed under unsaturated conditions as a single event, taking place either early or late during the Pleistocene Ice Age; (3)Uranyl Phosphates formed under saturated conditions, in conjunction with periods of higher and lower flow due to the climatic cycling. Although the original objectives may not have been fully achieved, this work is believed to contribute to a better understanding of the Koongarra Analogue as well as to give a basis for further scenario work

  10. 50 CFR 23.70 - How can I trade internationally in American alligator and other crocodilian skins, parts, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) CONVENTION ON INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN ENDANGERED SPECIES OF WILD FAUNA AND FLORA (CITES) International Trade...-export certificates. (b) Definitions. Terms used in this section are defined as follows: (1) Crocodilian...

  11. Detailed Project Report and Environmental Assessment on Upper Gordons Creek, Urban Flood Damage Reduction Measures at Hattiesburg, Mississippi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-01

    Estimate for the KID Plan vith Construction by Phases ................................. I...and the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis). Species listed as threatened whose range includes the study area is the Eastern indigo snake

  12. Environmental Compliance Assessment System (ECAS). North Carolina Supplement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Ridley Turtle Lepidochelys kempii E Hawksbill Turtle Eretmochelys imbricala E Leatherback Turtle Dernwchelys coriacea T American Alligator Alligator...boschianum T Dwarf Filmy-fern Trichomanes petersii T Mottled Trillium Trillium discolor T Dwarf Bladderwort Utricularia olivacea E = Endangered T

  13. Continuous bottom temperature measurements in strategic areas of the Florida Reef Tract at Alligator Reef, 1990-2005 (NODC Accession 0002753)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this project is to document bottom seawater temperature in strategic areas of the Florida Reef Tract on a continuing basis and make that information...

  14. Phenotypic differentiation is associated with gender plasticity and its responsive delay to environmental changes in Alternanthera philoxeroides--phenotypic differentiation in alligator weed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    Full Text Available Phenotypic plasticity is common in many taxa, and it may increase an organism's fitness in heterogeneous environments. However, in some cases, the frequency of environmental changes can be faster than the ability of the individual to produce new adaptive phenotypes. The importance of such a time delay in terms of individual fitness and species adaptability has not been well studied. Here, we studied gender plasticity of Alternanthera philoxeroides to address this issue through a reciprocal transplant experiment. We observed that the genders of A. philoxeroides were plastic and reversible between monoclinous and pistillody depending on habitats, the offspring maintained the maternal genders in the first year but changed from year 2 to 5, and there was a cubic relationship between the rate of population gender changes and environmental variations. This relationship indicates that the species must overcome a threshold of environmental variations to switch its developmental path ways between the two genders. This threshold and the maternal gender stability cause a significant delay of gender changes in new environments. At the same time, they result in and maintain the two distinct habitat dependent gender phenotypes. We also observed that there was a significant and adaptive life-history differentiation between monoclinous and pistillody individuals and the gender phenotypes were developmentally linked with the life-history traits. Therefore, the gender phenotypes are adaptive. Low seed production, seed germination failure and matching phenotypes to habitats by gender plasticity indicate that the adaptive phenotypic diversity in A. philoxeroides may not be the result of ecological selection, but of gender plasticity. The delay of the adaptive gender phenotype realization in changing environments can maintain the differentiation between gender systems and their associated life-history traits, which may be an important component in evolution of novel traits and taxonomic diversity.

  15. Coronation Hill U-Au mine, South Alligator Valley, Northern Territory: an epigenetic sandstone-type deposit hosted by debris-flow conglomerate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Needham, R.S.; Stuart-Smith, P.G.

    1987-01-01

    The host rock at the Coronation Hill U-Au mine is a debris flow conglomerate, developed in a high-energy fluvial environment during deposition of the Coronation Sandstone of the El Sherana Group. Mineralisation took place by movement of low-temperature fluids from the U-enriched volcanics into the conduit sandstone and eventually into the reduced debris flow conglomerate and carbonaceous shale

  16. Continuous bottom temperature measurements in strategic areas of the Florida Reef Tract at Alligator Reef, 2007-2010 (NODC Accession 0093017)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this project is to document bottom seawater temperature in strategic areas of the Florida Reef Tract on a continuing basis and make that information...

  17. Managing the Ranger uranium mine in the Alligator Rivers Region -there is much more to this business enterprise than just production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggate, J.

    1984-01-01

    Environmental protection is very closely and continuously regulated at the Ranger uranium mine. Since the commencement of operations at Ranger the company has operated within these regulations and demonstrated clearly that yellowcake can be produced efficiently, economically and safely. The company also recognises that in order to ensure continuity of production, it will have to continue to operate within these strictly supervised regulations

  18. Effects of Methanol Seed Extract of Aframomum melegueta (Alligator Pepper on Wistar Rats with 2,4-Dinitrophenylhydrazine-induced Hemolytic Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damilola A. Omoboyowa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of parasitic infections such as malaria, which leads to decrease in hematological indices, the major cause of anemia, constitutes a serious health challenge in many developing countries such as Nigeria. This study investigated the effect of methanol seed extract of Aframomum melegueta on selected hematological indices of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNPH-induced anemic rats model. The toxicity study and qualitative phytochemical screening of the extract were carried out using standard procedure. Twenty Wistar rats were grouped into five of four rats each (n = 4. Group I: Normal control; Group II: Negative control; Group III: administered 20 ml/kg b.w. of Astifer (Standard drug; Group IV and V were administered 200 and 400 mg/kg b.w. of the extract, respectively. The animals of Groups II to V were induced with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (20 mg/kg b.w. once daily for seven consecutive days; their blood samples were collected by ocular puncture into heparinized capillary tubes for hematological analysis and animals with packed cell volume (PCV ≥ 30% reduction were considered anemic for the study. The result of the qualitative phytochemical analysis showed that the methanol extract tested positive to alkaloids, carbohydrate, saponins, flavonoids, steroids, terpenoids, and anthraquinones. Acute toxicity and lethality studies on methanol extract showed an oral LD50 equal or less than 5000 mg/kg b.w. in mice. The rats administered 20 ml/kg b.w. of Astifer showed significant (P 0.05 decrease in hemoglobin count, RBC, platelet, neutrophils and lymphocyte count compared with the normal control animals. The rats administered 400 mg/kg b.w. of A. melegueta showed significant (P 0.05 lower PCV, RBC, WBC count, and lymphocyte count compared with anemic rats administered with 0.3 ml of normal saline. It can be concluded that Aframomum melegueta seed has beneficial immunological and hematological properties in Wistar rats and possessed erythropoietic potentials at minimal dose that support its use for treating anemia.

  19. The synthesis of pi-electron molecular rods with a thiophene or thieno[3,2-b]thiophene core unit and sulfur alligator clips

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seidler, A.; Svoboda, J.; Dekoj, Václav; Vacek Chocholoušová, Jana; Vacek, Jaroslav; Stará, Irena G.; Starý, Ivo

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 22 (2013), s. 2795-2798 ISSN 0040-4039 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400550919 Grant - others:Rada Programu interní podpory projektů mezinárodní spolupráce AV ČR(CZ) M200550914 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : molecular wires * thiophene OPE rods * thiophene OPV rods * UV spectra * HOMO-LUMO gaps Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.391, year: 2013

  20. Tectonic survey of deposits related to discordance of the precambrian era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ey, F.; Gauthier-Lafaye, F.

    1983-01-01

    Uranium deposits of Alligator River in Australia and of North Saskatchewan are compared. Common points are stratigraphic position, regional metamorphism, associated tectonic structure and importance of hydrothermalism [fr

  1. Supplementary data: Table 1. Identification numbers of sequences ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lenovo

    Supplementary data: Table 1. Identification numbers of sequences used in alignment and phylogenetic analysis. Species. Gene. Identification numbers. Alligator sinensis. Sox7. XP_006028221.1. Alligator mississippiensis. Sox18. XP_006273131.1. Bos taurus. Sox17. NP_001193180.1. Cyprinus carpio. Sox7. KY860088.

  2. African Journal of Biotechnology - Vol 7, No 17 (2008)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assesment of the water quality and prevalence of water borne diseases in Amassoma, Niger Delta, Nigeria · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT ... Eggshell membranes as a noninvasive sampling for molecular studies of Chinese alligators (Alligator sinensis) · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL ...

  3. Revised stratigraphic nomenclature and correlation of early proterozoic rocks of the Darwin - Katherine region, Northern Territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Needham, R.S.; Stuart-Smith, P.G.

    1984-01-01

    New stratigraphic names and correlations are given for parts of the Early Proterozoic Pine Creek Geosyncline metasedimentary sequence and overlying felsic volcanics of the Darwin-Katherine region. They have significant implications for the stratigraphic distribution of uranium mineralisation in the Rum Jungle, Alligator Rivers and South Alligator Valley uranium fields

  4. 50 CFR 17.42 - Special rules-reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special rules-reptiles. 17.42 Section 17... Special rules—reptiles. (a) American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis)—(1) Definitions. For purposes... those activities which come under the jurisdiction of the National Marine Fisheries Service, subpart E...

  5. 50 CFR 23.36 - What are the requirements for an export permit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the Wild Export of Skins/Products of Bobcat, Canada Lynx, River Otter, Brown Bear, Gray Wolf, and American Alligator Taken under an Approved State or Tribal Program Personal Pets, One-time Export Plants...

  6. Minimization of reflection cracks in flexible pavements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    This report describes the performance of fabrics used under overlays in an effort to minimize longitudinal and alligator cracking in flexible pavements. It is concluded, although the sample size is small, that the treatments will extend the pavement ...

  7. Water Quality Management Studies, Middle Black Warrior and Lower Tombigbee Rivers, Warrior and Demopolis Lakes, July 1978-October 1979.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-01

    indicwn Family Yerbenaceae Genus Lippia lanceolata L. nodiflora Family Solanaceae Genus Datura stramoniwn Family Scrophulariaceae Genera Pacopa repens...Pluchea ccmphorata Eclipta alba 3-9 most abundant at a location, were the giant cutgrass (Zizancpsis milacea), alligator weed (Alternanthera

  8. Development and Quality Evaluation of a Non-Alcoholic Beverage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    % and 1.0% extracts of ginger and alligator pepper respectively. Two varieties of cocoyam, namely Colocasia esculenta and Xanthosoma sagittifolium were used. The purpose of this study is to develop an acceptable flavoured non alcoholic ...

  9. Lizard Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stings Alligator, Crocodile, and Iguana Bites Animal Bites Bee, Wasp, Hornet, and Ant ... in Arizona, Sonora, Mexico, and adjacent areas. The venom of these lizards is somewhat similar in content ...

  10. Transmyocardial Laser Revascularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TMLR by studying the hearts of alligators and snakes, where blood to feed the heart muscle goes ... lower risk of heart attack. Heart Health Research Education The Institute News Giving Contact Search THI Resources ...

  11. EMERGING ISSUES RELATED TO ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS AND ENVIRONMENTAL ANDROGENS AND ANTIANDROGENS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildlife populations from contaminated ecosystems display a variety of reproductive alterations including cryptorchidism in the Florida panther, small baculum in young male otters, small penises in alligators, sex reversal in fish, and altered social behavior in birds. In some c...

  12. Cultural Resources Investigations of the West Bank Hurricane Protection Project, Jefferson Parish, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    common understory component. Poison-ivy (Rhus toxicodendron var. vulgaris ), Virginia creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia), supple-jack (Berchemia...Lutra canadensis), mink (Mustela vison), squirrel ( Sciurus carolinensis), nutria (Myocastor coypus), opossum (Didelphis virginiana), and alligator

  13. Lizard Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the Professional version Home Injuries and Poisoning Bites and Stings Lizard Bites Medical Dictionary Also of Interest (Quiz) ... Version. DOCTORS: Click here for the Professional Version Bites and Stings Introduction to Bites and Stings Alligator, Crocodile, and ...

  14. Tupinambis merianae as nest predators of crocodilians and turtles in Florida, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotti, Frank J.; McEachern, Michelle A.; Rochford, Michael; Reed, Robert; Ketterlin Eckles, Jennifer; Vinci, Joy; Edwards, Jake; Wasilewki, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Tupinambis merianae, is a large, omnivorous tegu lizard native to South America. Two populations of tegus are established in the state of Florida, USA, but impacts to native species are poorly documented. During summer 2013, we placed automated cameras overlooking one American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) nest, which also contained a clutch of Florida red-bellied cooter (Pseudemys nelsoni) eggs, and one American crocodile (Crocodylus acutus) nest at a site in southeastern Florida where tegus are established. We documented tegu activity and predation on alligator and turtle eggs at the alligator nest, and tegu activity at the crocodile nest. Our finding that one of the first two crocodilian nests to be monitored was depredated by tegus suggests that tegus should be further evaluated as a threat to nesting reptiles in Florida.

  15. Australian uranium - the environmental issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saddler, H.

    1980-01-01

    The principal theme of this paper is the changing pattern of issues which have dominated the environmental debate over uranium mining in Australia. These issues include the safeguards policy, a domestic energy policy, nuclear waste, economic development, particular environmental problems of the Alligator Rivers region and the social impact of uranium mining on the Aborigines. The special administrative arrangements which the Government has established for environmental protection in the Alligator Rivers region are outlined

  16. Protect the Nation, Project Power, Provide Freedom of the Seas. Department of the Navy Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Financial Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    usage in buildings . The DON has signed contracts for larger uses of solar power, and is considering geothermal , hydrothermal, wave, solar, and wind...Squadron (RIVRON) 1 set a security perimeter while conducting a hot extract drill during Exercise Bold Alligator 2012. Bold Alligator is the largest...Solution, which consolidates wholesale and retail supply functions, in Spring 2010. This functionality is directly benefiting our warfighters

  17. Factors affecting individual foraging specialization and temporal diet stability across the range of a large “generalist” apex predator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Adam E.; Nifong, James C.; Heithaus, Michael R.; Mazzotti, Frank J.; Cherkiss, Michael S.; Jeffery, Brian M.; Elsey, Ruth M.; Decker, Rachel A.; Silliman, Brian R.; Guillette, Louis J.; Lowers, Russell H.; Larson, Justin C.

    2015-01-01

    Individual niche specialization (INS) is increasingly recognized as an important component of ecological and evolutionary dynamics. However, most studies that have investigated INS have focused on the effects of niche width and inter- and intraspecific competition on INS in small-bodied species for short time periods, with less attention paid to INS in large-bodied reptilian predators and the effects of available prey types on INS. We investigated the prevalence, causes, and consequences of INS in foraging behaviors across different populations of American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis), the dominant aquatic apex predator across the southeast US, using stomach contents and stable isotopes. Gut contents revealed that, over the short term, although alligator populations occupied wide ranges of the INS spectrum, general patterns were apparent. Alligator populations inhabiting lakes exhibited lower INS than coastal populations, likely driven by variation in habitat type and available prey types. Stable isotopes revealed that over longer time spans alligators exhibited remarkably consistent use of variable mixtures of carbon pools (e.g., marine and freshwater food webs). We conclude that INS in large-bodied reptilian predator populations is likely affected by variation in available prey types and habitat heterogeneity, and that INS should be incorporated into management strategies to efficiently meet intended goals. Also, ecological models, which typically do not consider behavioral variability, should include INS to increase model realism and applicability.

  18. Fusion Patterns in the Skulls of Modern Archosaurs Reveal That Sutures Are Ambiguous Maturity Indicators for the Dinosauria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alida M Bailleul

    Full Text Available The sutures of the skulls of vertebrates are generally open early in life and slowly close as maturity is attained. The assumption that all vertebrates follow this pattern of progressive sutural closure has been used to assess maturity in the fossil remains of non-avian dinosaurs. Here, we test this assumption in two members of the Extant Phylogenetic Bracket of the Dinosauria, the emu, Dromaius novaehollandiae and the American alligator, Alligator mississippiensis, by investigating the sequence and timing of sutural fusion in their skulls. As expected, almost all the sutures in the emu skull progressively close (i.e., they get narrower and then obliterate during ontogeny. However, in the American alligator, only two sutures out of 36 obliterate completely and they do so during embryonic development. Surprisingly, as maturity progresses, many sutures of alligators become wider in large individuals compared to younger, smaller individuals. Histological and histomorphometric analyses on two sutures and one synchondrosis in an ontogenetic series of American alligator confirmed our morphological observations. This pattern of sutural widening might reflect feeding biomechanics and dietary changes through ontogeny. Our findings show that progressive sutural closure is not always observed in extant archosaurs, and therefore suggest that cranial sutural fusion is an ambiguous proxy for assessing maturity in non-avian dinosaurs.

  19. Multidisciplinary study of radionuclides and heavy-metal concentrations in wildlife on phosphate-mined and reclaimed lands. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pritchard, P.C.H.; Bloodwell, J.M.

    1986-11-01

    The phosphate-rich mineral deposits of central Florida tend to exhibit background radiation levels that are elevated due to the uranium and its decay products found in association with the ore. The report documents radioactivity levels in two groups of animals that had heretofore not been examined by other investigators -- aquatic reptiles (American alligators, softshell turtles, and Florida cooter turtles) and terrestrial mammals (armadillos), based on the criterion that these species have significant proportions of their mass comprised of bony tissue likely to show elevated concentrations of radium. The alligator bones contained only low concentrations of radium, and there were no significant differences between alligators collected from mined, mineralized-unmined, or unmineralized land. Whether the levels of radium in the bones of the turtles represents a hazard to the health of these long-lived animals or to humans who may consume their flesh is unclear

  20. Pramana – Journal of Physics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The conductance of a single molecule transport junction comprising anthracene molecular junction (AMJ) with fullerene as alligator clips was investigated using a b − i n i t i o density functional theory (DFT) in the Landauer–Imry regime of coherent tunnelling transport. In our previous research, we have already calculatedthe ...

  1. Effects of Breeds and Spices on Water Holding Capacity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five muscles, semitendinosus (ST), Biceps femoris (BF), Longissimusdorsi, (LD), Triceps brachii (TB) and Brachialis (BC) were excised from twelve Goats buck carcasses of two breeds, the West African Dwarf and Red Sokoto, 50g of each muscle was cooked with four different spices; ginger (A) garlic (B), alligator pepper ...

  2. behavioural and olfactory responses of sitophilus zeamais

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admin

    The oleoresins extracted from the seeds of alligator pepper, Aframomum melegueta and ginger, Zingiber officinale rhizome using methanol, was ... problems to food security in Africa (Markham et al.,. 1994). Weight losses of over 30% ... dry weight losses of farm-stored maize for a storage period of 6 months caused by S.

  3. The Limits of Intervention: Soviet Naval Power Projection Capabilities and the Decision to Intervene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-01

    shiff !lded a. Kresta IX. ASa crui er,-a convqrted verd ccmnad 9ontrol ship1a Ksin, SA Kotlin , a Kri agk, anda two Alligators. 11o f bov *ships, e...and evacuation seemed possible. As the coarse of the war continued to turn against the Cubans and the INLA, a SAN Kotlin destroyer began to transit

  4. Admiral Gorshkov on ’Navies in War and Peace’

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-09-01

    SSGN and V-Class SSN. SAM Kotlin and Alligator LSV began delivery in 1966. Kanin began delivery in 1968. 67. A conference of the 24 European... Kotlin built at 12 per year and all this class have been modernized or con- verted. The distant deployment of all three classes is handicapped by

  5. 29 CFR 570.65 - Occupations involved in the operations of circular saws, band saws, and guillotine shears (Order...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... include other types of shearing machines, using a different form of shearing action, such as alligator... or student-learners under the conditions prescribed in § 570.50 (b) and (c). Effective Date Note: At... operated vertically and used to shear materials. The term shall not include other types of shearing...

  6. Environmental Assessment, Buildings 4133 and Building 4143, Historic Building Demolitions, Barksdale Air Foce Base, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    hooded warbler and Carolina wren . Reptiles include the alligator, box turtle, cottonmouth, common garter snake and copperhead. There are no federally...Polioptila caerulea Hooded Warbler Wilsonia citrine Carolina Wren Thryothorus ludovicianus MAMMALS White-tailed Deer Odocoileus...tripped and gabled red tile roofs, French windows and wrought iron rails. In addition to being architecturally significant, many of the houses in the

  7. 75 FR 53328 - Proposed Information Collection; OMB Control Number 1018-0093; Federal Fish and Wildlife License...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-31

    ... parks; botanical gardens; nurseries; museums; universities; antique dealers; exotic pet industry..., lynx, river otter, American alligator, Alaskan brown bear, black bear, and gray wolf. 3-200-27/Export... 335 369 30 minutes......... 185 of Personal Pets (WBCA and or CITES). 3-200-47/Import of Birds for 7...

  8. Australia and uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    A brief justification of the Australian Government's decision to mine and export Australian Uranium is presented along with a description of the Alligator River Region in the Northern Territory where the major mines are to be located. Aboriginal interests and welfare in the region, the proposed Kakadu National Park and the economic benefits resulting from uranium development are also briefly covered. (J.R.)

  9. Current Issue

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of aqueous extract of alligator pepper (Zingiberacea aframomum melegueta) on litter size of alloxan induced diabetic Sprague Dawley rats · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. E. Ehiagwina, U. Inegbenebor, 90-94 ...

  10. Modeling Uranium Transport in Koongarra, Australia: The Effect of a Moving Weathering Zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijnse, A.; Weerd, van de H.; Hassanizadeh, S.M.

    2001-01-01

    Natural analogues are an important source of long-term data and may be viewed as naturally occurring experiments that often include processes, phenomena, and scenarios that are important to nuclear waste disposal safety assessment studies. The Koongarra uranium deposit in the Alligator Rivers region

  11. The regulation of uranium mining in the Northern Territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedd, M.

    1989-01-01

    The regulatory framework developed for uranium mining operations in the Northern Territory is reviewed. The respective roles of the Commonwealth Government, State Government and other regulatory authority are described. Whilst complex, expensive and cumbersome the regulatory process has so far ensured input from diverse interest groups and it allowed for environmental protection control in the Alligator River Region

  12. International Journal of Herbs and Pharmacological Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-01-31

    Jan 31, 2015 ... This study was carried out to determine the effect of intraperitoneally injected aqueous extract of alligator pepper (AP) on the serum levels of Sodium (Na), Potassium (K) and chloride (Cl). Twenty adult female Sprague dawley rats aged five months and weighing between 150 - 200g were randomly allocated ...

  13. Ranger uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Details of alterations to the Atomic Energy Act 1953 are described which authorize the Australian Atomic Energy Commission, Peko-Wallsend Operations Ltd., and Electrolytic Zinc Company of Australasia Limited to carry out uranium mining operations in the Alligator Rivers region of the Northern Territory of Australia

  14. Science: What Reptiles Are and Aren't

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Gerry S.

    1978-01-01

    Many children have an enormous fascination for reptiles of all kinds--snakes, turtles, tortoises, crocodiles, alligators and lizards. Whatever the reason for their interest, you can channel the enthusiasm of reptile fans and build the interest of curious students with a few simple activities, e.g., getting acquainted with reptile characteristics…

  15. Large reptiles and cold temperatures: Do extreme cold spells set distributional limits for tropical reptiles in Florida?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotti, Frank J.; Cherkiss, Michael S.; Parry, Mark; Beauchamp, Jeff; Rochford, Mike; Smith, Brian J.; Hart, Kristen M.; Brandt, Laura A.

    2016-01-01

    Distributional limits of many tropical species in Florida are ultimately determined by tolerance to low temperature. An unprecedented cold spell during 2–11 January 2010, in South Florida provided an opportunity to compare the responses of tropical American crocodiles with warm-temperate American alligators and to compare the responses of nonnative Burmese pythons with native warm-temperate snakes exposed to prolonged cold temperatures. After the January 2010 cold spell, a record number of American crocodiles (n = 151) and Burmese pythons (n = 36) were found dead. In contrast, no American alligators and no native snakes were found dead. American alligators and American crocodiles behaved differently during the cold spell. American alligators stopped basking and retreated to warmer water. American crocodiles apparently continued to bask during extreme cold temperatures resulting in lethal body temperatures. The mortality of Burmese pythons compared to the absence of mortality for native snakes suggests that the current population of Burmese pythons in the Everglades is less tolerant of cold temperatures than native snakes. Burmese pythons introduced from other parts of their native range may be more tolerant of cold temperatures. We documented the direct effects of cold temperatures on crocodiles and pythons; however, evidence of long-term effects of cold temperature on their populations within their established ranges remains lacking. Mortality of crocodiles and pythons outside of their current established range may be more important in setting distributional limits.

  16. Developmental cardiovascular physiology of the olive ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, Dane Alan; Crossley, Janna Lee; Smith, Camilla; Harfush, Martha; Sánchez-Sánchez, Hermilo; Garduño-Paz, Mónica Vanessa; Méndez-Sánchez, José Fernando

    2017-09-01

    Our understanding of reptilian cardiovascular development and regulation has increased substantially for two species the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) and the common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina) during the past two decades. However, what we know about cardiovascular maturation in many other species remains poorly understood or unknown. Embryonic sea turtles have been studied to understand the maturation of metabolic function, but these studies have not addressed the cardiovascular system. Although prior studies have been pivotal in characterizing development, and factors that influence it, the development of cardiovascular function, which supplies metabolic function, is unknown in sea turtles. During our investigation we focused on quantifying how cardiovascular morphological and functional parameters change, to provide basic knowledge of development in the olive ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea). Embryonic mass, as well as mass of the heart, lungs, liver, kidney, and brain increased during turtle embryo development. Although heart rate was constant during this developmental period, arterial pressure approximately doubled. Further, while embryonic olive ridley sea turtles lacked cholinergic tone on heart rate, there was a pronounced beta adrenergic tone on heart rate that decreased in strength at 90% of incubation. This beta adrenergic tone may be partially originating from the sympathetic nervous system at 90% of incubation, with the majority originating from circulating catecholamines. Data indicates that olive ridley sea turtles share traits of embryonic functional cardiovascular maturation with the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) but not the common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. JMBR VOLUME 16 Number 1 June 2017.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fine Print

    2017-06-01

    Jun 1, 2017 ... Avocado pear, also called alligator pear or butter pear, is produced by avocado trees which originated from Mexico and. Central America, and it belongs to the. Lauraceae family and genus parseal. It is rich in protein, vitamins, and essential minerals required for maintaining good health. The fruits are used ...

  18. Uranium and the park : or how to research and assess the environmental impact of a uranium mine on an adjacent park that features on the world heritage list

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    The activities of the Office of the Supervising Scientist, established to protect the Alligator Rivers Region in the Northern Territory of Australia from the potential effects of uranium mining operations, are described. Research which accounts for 75 per cent of the Office's biology, plant ecology, environmental chemistry, environmental radioactivity and man, environmental modelling and geomorphology

  19. Getting Crafty with the NGSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofel-Grehl, Colby; Litts, Breanne; Searle, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, electricity and circuits are taught using alligator clips, lightbulbs, batteries, and wires. Although these circuits engage students in building, they don't always provide opportunities for students to deeply explore energy, electricity, polarity, and circuitry. Multimedia Circuits is a curricular unit made up of three projects that…

  20. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    determined and the 1:1 sex ratio is maintained. In many species of reptiles, environmental factors such as temperature play an important role in determining the sex ratio (Head et al. 1987). For example, in alligators, crocodiles and turtles, during the early stages of embryogenesis, temperature has a determining effect on the ...

  1. 77 FR 7172 - Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge, Sequoyah, Muskogee, and Haskell Counties, OK; Comprehensive...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-10

    .... Fish and Wildlife Service, Southwest Regional Office, P.O. Box 1306, Albuquerque, NM 87103. In-Person..., Sequoyah NWR, Route 1, Box 18-A, Vian, OK 74962; phone: 918-773-5251 x 29; fax: 918-773-5598; or Carol..., prothonotary warblers, wood ducks, mallards, teal, common snipe, alligator snapping turtles, white-tailed deer...

  2. Physical Properties of Climbing Black Pepper ( Piper nigrum ) and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mass, density and moisture loss of climbing pepper were significantly affected by drying temperature and duration at 5% level of significance. Other climbing pepper physical properties under study were not influenced significantly. All alligator pepper properties considered were not significant (p > 0.05). Climbing pepper ...

  3. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Onyia, Kevin A. Vol 6, No 2 (2009) - Articles Abortifacient properties of alligator pepper (Aframomum melegueta) seeds. Abstract. ISSN: 0189-8442. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use ...

  4. Chemical composition and some functional properties of soluble ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Then, DSFPE was examined for their proximate chemical composition. Significant differences were observed between Deglet Nour and Allig DSFPE: Carbohydrate was 64 against 58%, protein was 33 against 38%, and ash was 2 against 3%, respectively. Glutamic acid presented the largest amount, varying from 17.14% ...

  5. Proceedings of IEEE International Conference on Nanotechnology (4th) held at the Technische Universitat Muenchen, Munich, Germany on 17-19 Aug 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    Magnetic Force Microscopy, A. Dias (Departamento de Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte-MG...2004 "Chatting" in Iraq 2/26/2004 NOAA and U.S. Navy Uncover Secrets of Lost Civil War Submarine USS Alligator 12/15/2003 Accessibility at ONR This

  6. An Evolutionary Framework for Experimental Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    sources of variation in replication are many. At the genetic level, variation can arise from mutation , recombination and gene flow. Competition for...Fish White-Crested Tiger Heron Husky Dog Fruitfly Chameleon Iguana African Elephant American Alligator Great Horned Owl Mourning Dove Human Crustacean

  7. Deer-Auto Collisions in Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Believe it or not, when it comes to our worst enemy in the animal kingdom, sharks, alligators, snakes and other commonly feared animals need not apply. In fact, none of the "terrifying" animals portrayed as " killers" in our culture are responsible f...

  8. Perspectives

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    determined and the 1:1 sex ratio is maintained. In many species of reptiles, environmental factors such as temperature play an important role in determining the sex ratio (Head et al. 1987). For example, in alligators, crocodiles and turtles, during the early stages of embryogenesis, temperature has a determining effect on the ...

  9. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 6001 - 6050 of 11090 ... Vol 7, No 13 (2008), Identification and phylogenetic analysis of a bacterium isolated from the cloaca of Chinese alligator, Abstract PDF. R Ma, X Wu, R Wang, C Wang, J Zhu. Vol 8, No 6 (2009), Identification and phylogenetic analysis of filamentous Cyanobacteria using random amplified ...

  10. Uranium Mining (Environment Control) Act 1979 No 46 of 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this Act is to control the mining of uranium in the Alligator Rivers Region with a view to lessening any damage which may be caused to the environment. The Act provides for the control of mining of certain substances, for an authorization system for construction and use of facilities, equipment and processes as well as for environmental protection requirements. (NEA) [fr

  11. Pace's Maxims for Homegrown Library Projects. Coming Full Circle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Andrew K.

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses six maxims by which to run library automation. The following maxims are discussed: (1) Solve only known problems; (2) Avoid changing data to fix display problems; (3) Aut viam inveniam aut faciam; (4) If you cannot make it yourself, buy something; (5) Kill the alligator closest to the boat; and (6) Just because yours is…

  12. Uranium mining and indigenous social impact issues - Kakadu Region, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellings, P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports on indigenous social impact issues in the Kakadu/Alligators Rivers region of Australia. It briefly outlines the social history of the region, reflects on local, national and international attention being given to the impact of regional development on local indigenous (bininj) people, notes how social impact issues are being addressed and suggests some lessons learnt. (author)

  13. A repeated-measures analysis of the effects of soft tissues on wrist range of motion in the extant phylogenetic bracket of dinosaurs: Implications for the functional origins of an automatic wrist folding mechanism in Crocodilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Joel David; Hutson, Kelda Nadine

    2014-07-01

    A recent study hypothesized that avian-like wrist folding in quadrupedal dinosaurs could have aided their distinctive style of locomotion with semi-pronated and therefore medially facing palms. However, soft tissues that automatically guide avian wrist folding rarely fossilize, and automatic wrist folding of unknown function in extant crocodilians has not been used to test this hypothesis. Therefore, an investigation of the relative contributions of soft tissues to wrist range of motion (ROM) in the extant phylogenetic bracket of dinosaurs, and the quadrupedal function of crocodilian wrist folding, could inform these questions. Here, we repeatedly measured wrist ROM in degrees through fully fleshed, skinned, minus muscles/tendons, minus ligaments, and skeletonized stages in the American alligator Alligator mississippiensis and the ostrich Struthio camelus. The effects of dissection treatment and observer were statistically significant for alligator wrist folding and ostrich wrist flexion, but not ostrich wrist folding. Final skeletonized wrist folding ROM was higher than (ostrich) or equivalent to (alligator) initial fully fleshed ROM, while final ROM was lower than initial ROM for ostrich wrist flexion. These findings suggest that, unlike the hinge/ball and socket-type elbow and shoulder joints in these archosaurs, ROM within gliding/planar diarthrotic joints is more restricted to the extent of articular surfaces. The alligator data indicate that the crocodilian wrist mechanism functions to automatically lock their semi-pronated palms into a rigid column, which supports the hypothesis that this palmar orientation necessitated soft tissue stiffening mechanisms in certain dinosaurs, although ROM-restricted articulations argue against the presence of an extensive automatic mechanism. Anat Rec, 297:1228-1249, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Comparison of different biopsy forceps models for tissue sampling in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussmann, Christian; Schoepfer, Alain M; Safroneeva, Ekaterina; Haas, Nadine; Godat, Sébastien; Sempoux, Christine; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Straumann, Alex

    2016-12-01

    Background and aims: Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a mixed inflammatory and fibrostenotic disease. Unlike superficial inflammatory changes, subepithelial fibrosis is not routinely sampled in esophageal biopsies. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of deep esophageal sampling with four different types of biopsy forceps. Patients and methods: In this cross-sectional study, esophageal biopsies were taken in 30 adult patients by one expert endoscopist. Biopsies sampled from distal esophagus using a static jaw forceps (Olympus, FB-11K-1) were compared with proximal biopsies sampled with static jaw (Olympus, FB-45Q-1), alligator jaw (Olympus, FB-210K), and large-capacity forceps (Boston Scientific, Radial Jaw 4). One pathologist calculated the surface area of epithelial and subepithelial layers in hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained biopsies. Results: Subepithelial tissue was acquired in 97 % (static jaw FB-11K-1), 93 % (static jaw FB-45Q-1), 80 % (alligator jaw), and 55 % (large-capacity) of samples. Median (interquartile [IQR]) ratios of surface area of epithelial to subepithelial tissue were: static jaw FB-45Q-1, 1.07 (0.65 - 4.465); static jaw FB-11K-1, 1.184 (0.608 - 2.545); alligator jaw, 2.353 (1.312 - 4.465); and large-capacity, 2.71 (1.611 - 4.858). The static jaw models obtained a larger surface area of subepithelial tissue compared with the alligator jaw ( P   90 % of biopsies and appear to be superior to alligator or large-capacity forceps in sampling larger amounts of subepithelial tissue. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Protection of the Environment near the Ranger uranium mine. Supervising Scientist report 139

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, A.; Needham, S.

    1999-01-01

    The Alligator Rivers Region, comprising an area of approximately 28 000 km 2 , is broadly defined by the catchments of the East, South and West Alligator Rivers. It is of outstanding heritage value for its unusual combination of largely uninhabited areas with attractive wild scenery, is highly biodiverse, and has a very large concentration of Aboriginal rock art of world significance. Its national and international importance is recognised by the inclusion of Kakadu National Park on the Register of the National Estate and its inscription on the World Heritage List. The flood plain areas within Kakadu are recognised as one of Australia's Wetlands of International Importance listed under the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance

  16. Total recovery of nitrogen and phosphorus from three wetland plants by fast pyrolysis technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wu-Jun; Zeng, Fan-Xin; Jiang, Hong; Yu, Han-Qing

    2011-02-01

    Fast pyrolysis of three wetland plants (Alligator weed, Oenanthe javanica and Typha angustifolia) in a vertical drop fixed bed reactor was investigated in this study. The experiments were carried out at different pyrolysis temperatures, and the maximum bio-oil yields achieved were 42.3%, 40.2% and 43.6% for Alligator weed, Oenanthe javanica and Typha angustifolia, respectively. The elemental composition of the bio-oil and char were analyzed, and the results show that a low temperature was appropriate for the nitrogen and phosphorus enrichment in char. GC-MS analysis shows that nitrogenous compounds, phenols and oxygenates were the main categories in the bio-oil. A series of leaching tests were carried out to examine the recovery of the nitrogen and phosphorus in the char, and the results indicate that significant fractions of nitrogen and phosphorus could be recovered by leaching process. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nabarlek rehabilitation: the supervising scientist's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapantis, A.

    2001-01-01

    Nabarlek is an important milestone in the history of uranium mining in Australia representing the first of the modern day uranium mines to have gone full cycle from inception to reinstatement under a strict regime of government supervision and compliance. Consequently, there are pressures to get it right and at the same time redress the poor public image of uranium mine site rehabilitation that arose from mining activities at Rum Jungle and the South Alligator Valley in the 1960s. As stated by the Chair of the Nabarlek Minesite Technical Committee (8 September 1999), Nabarlek provides: (An) opportunity to demonstrate to the world the successful rehabilitation of a uranium mine under world's best practice methods. Also, the lessons learnt from the rehabilitation of Nabarlek will undoubtedly feed into processes elsewhere, particularly in the Alligator Rivers Region (ARR)

  18. Record length, mass, and clutch size in the nonindigenous Burmese Python, Python bivittatus Kuhl 1820 (Squamata: Pythonidae), in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysko, Kenneth L.; Hart, Kristen M.; Smith, Brian J.; Selby, Thomas H.; Cherkiss, Michael S.; Coutu, Nicholas T.; Reichart, Rebecca M.; Nuñez, Leroy P.; Mazzotti, Frank J.; Snow, Ray W.

    2012-01-01

    The Burmese Python, Python bivittatus Kuhl 1820 (Squamata: Pythonidae), is indigenous to northern India,east to southern China, and south to Vietnam and a few islands in Indonesia (Barker and Barker 2008, Reed and Rodda 2009). This species has been introduced since at least 1979 in southern Florida, USA, where it likely began reproducing and became established during the 1980s (Meshaka et al. 2000, Snowet al. 2007b,Kraus 2009, Krysko et al. 2011, Willson et al. 2011). Python bivittatus has been documented in Florida consuming a variety of mammals and birds, and the American Alligator(Alligator mississippiensis) (Snowet al. 2007a, 2007b; Harvey et al. 2008; Rochford et al. 2010b; Holbrook and Chesnes 2011), many of which are protected species. Herein, we provide details on two of the largest known wild P. bivittatus in Florida to date, including current records on length,mass,clutch size, and diet.

  19. Harlequin Ichthyosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashemzadeh Ahmad

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available It is an autosomal recessive, and occasionally autosomal dominant mutant extremely rare disorder with only 100 reported case in literature. This fatal disorder occur in both sexes and all races. In most circumstances the newborn die soon after birth Also it is known as harlequin fetus, alligator baby or keratosis diffusa fatalis."nBecause of its rarity, we report 2 cases of this disorder, here.

  20. Let's do comprehension 5-6

    CERN Document Server

    Brodie, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Let's Do Comprehension is a brand new series of six titles in the popular 'Let's Do' range. Each book contains a rich variety of stimulating reading passages, accompanied by questions of varying difficulty. Designed to be used at home, each book includes tips and clues from Alice the Alligator as well as extra challenges in Brodie's Brain Boosters. There is a clear answer section for reference by parents and children, together with bright, colourful reward stickers.

  1. Let's do comprehension 8-9

    CERN Document Server

    Brodie, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Let's Do Comprehension is a brand new series of six titles in the popular 'Let's Do' range. Each book contains a rich variety of stimulating reading passages, accompanied by questions of varying difficulty. Designed to be used at home, each book includes tips and clues from Alice the Alligator as well as extra challenges in Brodie's Brain Boosters. There is a clear answer section for reference by parents and children, together with bright, colourful reward stickers.

  2. Snakes in the wrong places: Gordon Rodda’s career in invasive species research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jim

    2012-01-01

    When USGS research zoologist Gordon G. Rodda was a graduate student at Cornell University studying behavioral biology of alligators —or later, completing a post-doc at the Smithsonian Institute studying the social behavior of green iguanas in Venezuela or following that, as a statistics and sociobiology instructor at the University of Tennessee—he did not foresee that his professional future was in snakes. Lots of snakes, and in places they don’t belong.

  3. Contingency planning and risk analysis for water and tailings management at Ranger Uranium Mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNally, P.E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes some of the more likely risks and contingency procedures associated with the extremely variable monsoonal climate of the Alligator Rivers region in the Northern Territory in relation to the Ranger Uranium Mine. The tailings management system is basically a large storage impoundment and a reticulation system that delivers tailings sludge and recycles supernatant water. It is a closed circuit within the water management system and is dealt with as an integral part of that system

  4. Sound Localization Strategies in Three Predators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carr, Catherine E; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we compare some of the neural strategies for sound localization and encoding interaural time differences (ITDs) in three predatory species of Reptilia, alligators, barn owls and geckos. Birds and crocodilians are sister groups among the extant archosaurs, while geckos are lepidosaurs...... spatial locations, while geckos may use a meter strategy or population code composed of broadly sensitive neurons that represent ITD via changes in the firing rate....

  5. Overview of the TREC 2014 Federated Web Search Track

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Chronicling America News e002 CCSB Academic e101 CNN News e003 CERN Documents Academic e102 Forbes News e004 CiteSeerX Academic e104 JSOnline News e005... Disease Control and Prevention Health e156 Cnet Software e064 Family Practice notebook Health e157 GitHub Software e065 Health Finder Health e158...bluffs 7235 silicone roof coatings 7236 lomustine 7239 roundabout safety 7242 hague convention 7249 largest alligator on record 7250 collagen vascular

  6. Cartilaginous epiphyses in extant archosaurs and their implications for reconstructing limb function in dinosaurs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey M Holliday

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Extinct archosaurs, including many non-avian dinosaurs, exhibit relatively simply shaped condylar regions in their appendicular bones, suggesting potentially large amounts of unpreserved epiphyseal (articular cartilage. This "lost anatomy" is often underappreciated such that the ends of bones are typically considered to be the joint surfaces, potentially having a major impact on functional interpretation. Extant alligators and birds were used to establish an objective basis for inferences about cartilaginous articular structures in such extinct archosaur clades as non-avian dinosaurs. Limb elements of alligators, ostriches, and other birds were dissected, disarticulated, and defleshed. Lengths and condylar shapes of elements with intact epiphyses were measured. Limbs were subsequently completely skeletonized and the measurements repeated. Removal of cartilaginous condylar regions resulted in statistically significant changes in element length and condylar breadth. Moreover, there was marked loss of those cartilaginous structures responsible for joint architecture and congruence. Compared to alligators, birds showed less dramatic, but still significant changes. Condylar morphologies of dinosaur limb bones suggest that most non-coelurosaurian clades possessed large cartilaginous epiphyses that relied on the maintenance of vascular channels that are otherwise eliminated early in ontogeny in smaller-bodied tetrapods. A sensitivity analysis using cartilage correction factors (CCFs obtained from extant taxa indicates that whereas the presence of cartilaginous epiphyses only moderately increases estimates of dinosaur height and speed, it has important implications for our ability to infer joint morphology, posture, and the complicated functional movements in the limbs of many extinct archosaurs. Evidence suggests that the sizes of sauropod epiphyseal cartilages surpassed those of alligators, which account for at least 10% of hindlimb length. These data

  7. NEA international co-operative projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This text is consecrated at the international co-operative projects of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) in the field of reactor safety (Halden reactor project, Loft project, studies on the damaged Three Mile Island unit-2 reactor, inspection of reactor steel components, incident reporting system) and in the field of radioactive waste management (Stripa project, geochemical data bases, Alligator river project, seabed disposal of high-level radioactive waste, decommissioning of nuclear facilities)

  8. Persistent organic pollutants and bone tissue : Studies in wild and experimental animals

    OpenAIRE

    Lundberg, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    Since the mid 1900s, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of osteoporotic-related fractures in the industrialised world. The reason for this is unknown, but there could be a link between the increased use and production of chemicals and effects on bone. Many chemicals possess endocrine-disrupting properties, affecting reproductive tissues and other endocrine-regulated tissues, such as bone tissue. In this thesis, studies have been performed on wild (alligator and...

  9. Avaliação da qualidade microbiológica e nutritiva de carnes exóticas

    OpenAIRE

    Sfaciotte, Ricardo Antonio Pilegi; Universidade Estadual de Maringá; Vignoto, Vanessa Karla Capoia; Universidade Estadual de Maringá; Cardozo, Rejane Machado; Universidade Estadual de Maringá; Munhoz, Patrícia Marques; Universidade Estadual de Maringá; Pinto, Adriana Aparecida; Universidade Estadual de Maringá; Wosiacki, Sheila Rezler; Universidade Estadual de Maringá; Ferraro, Gisela Cristiane; Universidade Estadual de Maringá; Barbosa, Maria José Baptista; Universidade Estadual de Maringá

    2015-01-01

    Vacuum-packed and frozen of ostrich (Struthio camelus), alligator (Caiman latirostris) and wild boar (Sus scrofa) meat samples were obtained in an authorized commercial store in Maringá/Paraná. Of each kind meat were analyzed 6 samples, where were studied counts of mesophilic aerobic bacteria, aerobic bacteria psichrophilic, coliforms, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus spp., and protein and fat analysis. The results of aerobic mesophilic bacteria ranged between <1.0 a 3.6 log CFU/g, bein...

  10. Pulmonary anatomy in the Nile crocodile and the evolution of unidirectional airflow in Archosauria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma R. Schachner

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The lungs of birds have long been known to move air in only one direction during both inspiration and expiration through most of the tubular gas-exchanging bronchi (parabronchi. Recently a similar pattern of airflow has been observed in American alligators, a sister taxon to birds. The pattern of flow appears to be due to the arrangement of the primary and secondary bronchi, which, via their branching angles, generate inspiratory and expiratory aerodynamic valves. Both the anatomical similarity of the avian and alligator lung and the similarity in the patterns of airflow raise the possibility that these features are plesiomorphic for Archosauria and therefore did not evolve in response to selection for flapping flight or an endothermic metabolism, as has been generally assumed. To further test the hypothesis that unidirectional airflow is ancestral for Archosauria, we measured airflow in the lungs of the Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus. As in birds and alligators, air flows cranially to caudally in the cervical ventral bronchus, and caudally to cranially in the dorsobronchi in the lungs of Nile crocodiles. We also visualized the gross anatomy of the primary, secondary and tertiary pulmonary bronchi of C. niloticus using computed tomography (CT and microCT. The cervical ventral bronchus, cranial dorsobronchi and cranial medial bronchi display similar characteristics to their proposed homologues in the alligator, while there is considerable variation in the tertiary and caudal group bronchi. Our data indicate that the aspects of the crocodilian bronchial tree that maintain the aerodynamic valves and thus generate unidirectional airflow, are ancestral for Archosauria.

  11. Surveys of tidal river systems in the northern territory of Australia and their crocodile populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorlicek, G.C.; Messel, H.; Green, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides an update on the population dynamics of Crocodylus porous in the tidal waterways of Van Diemen Gulf and the Southern Gulf of Carpentaria, Australia, during 1984 and 1985. Contents: Prologue; Dedication; Introduction; Status of Crocodylus porous. July 1984, in the tidal waterways of the Alligator Region and in the Adelaide River System of Northern Australia: recovery underway; Resurvey of Crocodylus porous populations in the tidal waterways of the southern Gulf of Carpentaria, September - October 1985; Local knowledge - Northern Australia style.

  12. Effects of life-history requirements on the distribution of a threatened reptile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Denise M; Ligon, Day B; Patton, Jason C; Papeş, Monica

    2017-04-01

    Survival and reproduction are the two primary life-history traits essential for species' persistence; however, the environmental conditions that support each of these traits may not be the same. Despite this, reproductive requirements are seldom considered when estimating species' potential distributions. We sought to examine potentially limiting environmental factors influencing the distribution of an oviparous reptile of conservation concern with respect to the species' survival and reproduction and to assess the implications of the species' predicted climatic constraints on current conservation practices. We used ecological niche modeling to predict the probability of environmental suitability for the alligator snapping turtle (Macrochelys temminckii). We built an annual climate model to examine survival and a nesting climate model to examine reproduction. We combined incubation temperature requirements, products of modeled soil temperature data, and our estimated distributions to determine whether embryonic development constrained the northern distribution of the species. Low annual precipitation constrained the western distribution of alligator snapping turtles, whereas the northern distribution was constrained by thermal requirements during embryonic development. Only a portion of the geographic range predicted to have a high probability of suitability for alligator snapping turtle survival was estimated to be capable of supporting successful embryonic development. Historic occurrence records suggest adult alligator snapping turtles can survive in regions with colder climes than those associated with consistent and successful production of offspring. Estimated egg-incubation requirements indicated that current reintroductions at the northern edge of the species' range are within reproductively viable environmental conditions. Our results highlight the importance of considering survival and reproduction when estimating species' ecological niches, implicating

  13. Pulmonary anatomy in the Nile crocodile and the evolution of unidirectional airflow in Archosauria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachner, Emma R; Hutchinson, John R; Farmer, Cg

    2013-01-01

    The lungs of birds have long been known to move air in only one direction during both inspiration and expiration through most of the tubular gas-exchanging bronchi (parabronchi). Recently a similar pattern of airflow has been observed in American alligators, a sister taxon to birds. The pattern of flow appears to be due to the arrangement of the primary and secondary bronchi, which, via their branching angles, generate inspiratory and expiratory aerodynamic valves. Both the anatomical similarity of the avian and alligator lung and the similarity in the patterns of airflow raise the possibility that these features are plesiomorphic for Archosauria and therefore did not evolve in response to selection for flapping flight or an endothermic metabolism, as has been generally assumed. To further test the hypothesis that unidirectional airflow is ancestral for Archosauria, we measured airflow in the lungs of the Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus). As in birds and alligators, air flows cranially to caudally in the cervical ventral bronchus, and caudally to cranially in the dorsobronchi in the lungs of Nile crocodiles. We also visualized the gross anatomy of the primary, secondary and tertiary pulmonary bronchi of C. niloticus using computed tomography (CT) and microCT. The cervical ventral bronchus, cranial dorsobronchi and cranial medial bronchi display similar characteristics to their proposed homologues in the alligator, while there is considerable variation in the tertiary and caudal group bronchi. Our data indicate that the aspects of the crocodilian bronchial tree that maintain the aerodynamic valves and thus generate unidirectional airflow, are ancestral for Archosauria.

  14. Pulmonary anatomy in the Nile crocodile and the evolution of unidirectional airflow in Archosauria

    OpenAIRE

    Schachner, Emma R.; Hutchinson, John R.; Farmer, CG

    2013-01-01

    The lungs of birds have long been known to move air in only one direction during both inspiration and expiration through most of the tubular gas-exchanging bronchi (parabronchi). Recently a similar pattern of airflow has been observed in American alligators, a sister taxon to birds. The pattern of flow appears to be due to the arrangement of the primary and secondary bronchi, which, via their branching angles, generate inspiratory and expiratory aerodynamic valves. Both the anatomical similar...

  15. A comparative study of piscine defense: The scales of Arapaima gigas, Latimeria chalumnae and Atractosteus spatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Vincent R; Quan, Haocheng; Yang, Wen; Ritchie, Robert O; Meyers, Marc A

    2017-09-01

    We compare the characteristics of the armored scales of three large fish, namely the Arapaima gigas (arapaima), Latimeria chalumnae (coelacanth), and Atractosteus spatula (alligator gar), with specific focus on their unique structure-mechanical property relationships and their specialized ability to provide protection from predatory pressures, with the ultimate goal of providing bio-inspiration for manmade materials. The arapaima has flexible and overlapping cycloid scales which consist of a tough Bouligand-type arrangement of collagen layers in the base and a hard external mineralized surface, protecting it from piranha, a predator with extremely sharp teeth. The coelacanth has overlapping elasmoid scales that consist of adjacent Bouligand-type pairs, forming a double-twisted Bouligand-type structure. The collagenous layers are connected by collagen fibril struts which significantly contribute to the energy dissipation, so that the scales have the capability to defend from predators such as sharks. The alligator gar has inflexible articulating ganoid scales made of a hard and highly mineralized enamel-like outer surface and a tough dentine-like bony base, which resist powerful bite forces of self-predation and attack by alligators. The structural differences between the three scales correspond with the attack of their predators, and show refined mechanisms which may be imitated and incorporated into superior bioinspired and biomimetic designs that are specialized to resist specific modes of predation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Androgynous rex - the utility of chevrons for determining the sex of crocodilians and non-avian dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Gregory M; Kristopher Lappin, A; Larson, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The sex of non-avian dinosaurs has been inferred on numerous occasions using a variety of anatomical criteria, but the efficacy of none has been proven. Nearly 50 years ago Romer suggested that the cranial-most or first chevron in the tails of some reptiles, including crocodilians, is sexually dimorphic. Recent work on this subject purportedly substantiated that the female first chevron articulates in a more caudal position than in males. Furthermore, it was concluded that this element is shorter in females. These phenotypic attributes theoretically provide a broader cloacal passageway for eggs by ovipositing females and a greater attachment area for male "penile retractor muscles". Because theropod dinosaurs such as Tyrannosaurus rex presumably show similar variation in chevron anatomy, the same criteria has been advocated for sexing dinosaurs. We tested the neontological model for the chevron sexual dimorphism hypothesis using a skeletonized growth series of American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) of known sex. No statistical support for the hypothesis was found. Furthermore, analysis of a diversity of crocodilian taxa from museum collections revealed similar findings suggesting the alligator results are not taxon specific. Study of well-preserved tyrannosaurid dinosaurs in museum collections showed nearly invariant chevron positioning like that seen in crocodilians. This suggests the usefulness of chevron anatomy for sexing dinosaurs is tenuous.

  17. Towards an understanding of the evolution of the chorioallantoic placenta: steroid biosynthesis and steroid hormone signaling in the chorioallantoic membrane of an oviparous reptile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruze, Lori; Kohno, Satomi; McCoy, Michael W; Guillette, Louis J

    2012-09-01

    Amniotes, mammals, reptiles, and birds form common extraembryonic membranes during development to perform essential functions, such as protection, nutrient transfer, gas exchange, and waste removal. Together with the maternal uterus, extraembryonic membranes of viviparous (live-bearing) amniotes develop as an endocrine placenta that synthesizes and responds to steroid hormones critical for development. The ability of these membranes to synthesize and respond to steroid hormone signaling has traditionally been considered an innovation of placental amniotes. However, our laboratory recently demonstrated that this ability extends to the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of an oviparous (egg-laying) amniote, the domestic chicken, and we hypothesized that steroidogenic extraembryonic membranes could be an evolutionarily conserved characteristic of all amniotes because of similarities in basic structure, function, and shared evolutionary ancestry. In this study, we examined steroid hormone synthesis and signaling in the CAM of another oviparous amniote, the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis). We quantified mRNA expression of a steroidogenic factor involved in the regulation of steroidogenesis (NR5A1), the key steroidogenic enzymes involved in the synthesis of progestins (HSD3B1), androgens (CYP17A1), and estrogens (CYP19A1), and the receptors involved in the signaling of progestins (PR), androgens (AR), estrogens (ESR1 and ESR2), and glucocorticoids (GR). Furthermore, we performed protein immunolocalization for PR and ESR1. Collectively, our findings indicate that the alligator CAM has the capability to regulate, synthesize, and respond to steroid hormone signaling, thus, supporting our hypothesis that the extraembryonic membranes of Amniota share a unifying characteristic, that is, the ability to synthesize and respond to steroid hormones.

  18. The role of nuclear techniques in the long-term prediction of radionuclide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airey, P.L.; Duerden, P.

    1985-01-01

    Problems associated with the long-term prediction of the migration of radionuclides, and the role of natural analogues in reducing the inherent uncertainties are discussed. Particular reference is made to the evaluation of uranium ore bodies in the Alligator Rivers region, Northern Territory, as analogues of high-level radioactive waste repositories. A range of nuclear techniques has been used to identify the role of colloids, of alpha recoil and of mineralogy in transport. Specific mention is made of a method being developed which enables models of the migration of solute through fractured rock to be assessed via a combination of alpha track, fission track and PIXE/PIGME techniques

  19. The role of Geographic Information Systems in the Office of the Supervising Scientist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    A Geographic Information System (GIS), embedded in a Decision Support System linking spatial data bases and biophysical models of the environment, will be an important tool in the design and assessment of rehabilitation of uranium mines in the Alligator Rivers Region. The Office of the Supervising Scientist (OSS) and the Northern Territory of University are collaborating in the development of GIS and its introduction into rehabilitation planning. The achievements obtained to date are briefly outlined. There is every expectation that the system developed by OSS will be of general use in environmental assessment and management. 33 refs., 1 fig

  20. Annual report 1982-83

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The Office of the Supervising Scientist was established to implement laws, develop procedures and undertake research related to environmental protection of the uranium mining areas of the Alligator Rivers Region in the Northern Territory Information on administration, environmental protection arrangements, supervisory and assessment activities and research activities is presented. The research projects described are concerned with ecological systems in the region and the investigation of the probable short-term impact on these systems of the release of contaminants resulting from uranium mining operations. Appendices on legislation, agreements, authorisations and approvals, environmental requirements for the Ranger and Nabarlek projects, and environmental infringements and incidents are included

  1. Sewing machine needle retrieval from distal airways using flexible bronchoscope under fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, Talha; Shafiq, Adnan; Hafeez, Abdul; Saqib, Muhammad; Farooq, Sidrah

    2016-01-01

    18-year-old lady was admitted through emergency department after she accidently aspirated a long sewing machine needle into her airways. Upon examination, she was anxious with normal vital signs and without any respiratory distress with SpO 2 of 98% on air. Systemic examination was normal except slightly reduced breath sounds intensity on right lower side of chest. Her chest radiograph revealed needle in right lower lobe but it was not visualized on bronchoscopic examination of airways up to sub segmental level. Using flexible bronchoscope under fluoroscope guidance, needle was retrieved successfully from posterior basal sub segment of right lower lobe utilizing alligator biopsy forceps, without any noticeable complication.

  2. Application of vascular aquatic plants for pollution removal, energy and food production in a biological system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolverton, B. C.; Barlow, R. M.; Mcdonald, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Vascular aquatic plants such as water hyacinths (Eichhornia crassipes) (Mart.) Solms and alligator weeds (Alternanthera philoxeroides) (Mart.) Griesb., when utilized in a controlled biological system (including a regular program of harvesting to achieve maximum growth and pollution removal efficiency), may represent a remarkably efficient and inexpensive filtration and disposal system for toxic materials and sewage released into waters near urban and industrial areas. The harvested and processed plant materials are sources of energy, fertilizer, animal feed, and human food. Such a system has industrial, municipal, and agricultural applications.

  3. A Universal Spring-Probe System for Reliable Probing of Electrochemical Lab-on-a-Chip Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon-Keun Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For achieve sensitivity in lab-on-a-chip electrochemical detection, more reliable probing methods are required, especially for repeated measurements. Spring-probes are a promising candidate method which can replace needle-like probes and alligator clips that usually produce scratches on the surface of gold electrodes due to the strong physical contacts needed for electrochemical measurements. The superior reliability of amperometric measurements by a spring-probe system was compared with results by conventional probing methods. We demonstrated that a universal spring-probe system would be potentially suitable to achieve high performance in lab-on-a-chip devices using electrochemical detection.

  4. Delineation of marsh types from Corpus Christi Bay, Texas, to Perdido Bay, Alabama, in 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enwright, Nicholas M.; Hartley, Stephen B.; Couvillion, Brady R.; Michael G. Brasher,; Jenneke M. Visser,; Michael K. Mitchell,; Bart M. Ballard,; Mark W. Parr,; Barry C. Wilson,

    2015-07-23

    Coastal zone managers and researchers often require detailed information regarding emergent marsh vegetation types (that is, fresh, intermediate, brackish, and saline) for modeling habitat capacities and needs of marsh dependent taxa (such as waterfowl and alligator). Detailed information on the extent and distribution of emergent marsh vegetation types throughout the northern Gulf of Mexico coast has been historically unavailable. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey, in collaboration with the Gulf Coast Joint Venture, the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Ducks Unlimited, Inc., and the Texas A&M University-Kingsville, produced a classification of emergent marsh vegetation types from Corpus Christi Bay, Texas, to Perdido Bay, Alabama.

  5. Reactividad inmunoquímica de sueros anti- Caiman yacare y Caiman latirostris frente a sueros de diferentes especies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Roodt, Adolfo Rafael

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió la reactividad inmunoquímica entre los sueros de distintas especies de reptiles frente a sueros hiperinmunes experimentales anti-suero de Caiman yacare y anti-suero de Caiman latirostris. Los sueros que se probaron fueron los homólogos de Caiman yacare, Caiman latirostris y los heterólogos de Alligator missisipiensis, Tupinambis merinae, Tupinambis rufescens, Chelonoidis chilensis, Clelia rustica, Waglerophis merremii, Lystrophys dorbignyi, Phyton molurus, Boa constrictor occidentalis, Eunectes notaeus, Crotalus durissus terrificus, Bothrops alternatus, Bothrops diporus, Bothrops jararaca, Bothrops jararacussu, Bothrops moojeni, Pitangus sulphuratus y Gallus gallus. La reactividad inmunoquímica se determinó mediante las técnicas de doble inmunodifusión y ELISA, mostrándose importante entre los sueros de los crocodrílidos y baja entre estos y los de las otras especies de reptiles estudiadas. Se observó mayor reactividad entre los antisueros anti-Caiman respecto a los sueros de Caiman latirostris y Caiman yacare que frente al suero de Alligator missisipiensis. Además, se encontró una fuerte reactividad entre ambos sueros anti-Caiman y el de Gallus gallus poniendo en evidencia la fuerte reactividad entre los sueros de arcosaurios. In order to study the immunochemical reactivity among sera from different species of reptiles regarding sera from Caiman, the immunoreactivity of sera from reptiles against antisera to Caiman yacare or anti-Caiman latirostris sera was studied. These hiperimmune sera were tested against sera from Alligator missisipiensis, Tupinambis merinae, Tupinambis rufescens, Chelonoidis chilensis, Clelia rustica, Waglerophis merremii, Lystrophys dorbignyi, Phyton molurus, Boa constrictor occidentalis, Eunectes notaeus, Crotalus durissus terrificus, Bothrops alternatus, Bothrops neuwiedii, Bothrops jararaca, Bothrops jararacussu, Bothrops moojeni, Pitangus sulphuratus and Gallus gallus. The immunochemical

  6. The petroglyphs of Dowzdaghi, Northwestern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Kazempur

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with recording and interpreting a complex of petroglyphs at Dowzdaghi in the northern part of Iranian Azerbaijan in Northwestern Iran. The assemblage can be divided into four sub-assemblages; the designs and images depicted on the surfaces of isolated boulders usually constitute a panel and sometimes individual motifs and inscriptions. The investigations have revealed more than 400 carved and scratched drawings on rock boulders on Mt. Dowzdaghi. The main themes include anthropomorphic figures, animals (ibex, with long elaborated curved horn, deer, dog, horse, bull, ram, fox, snake, alligator, and hedgehog, hunting scenes, Arabic and Persian inscriptions, and symbolic designs.

  7. Thiamin, riboflavin, and alpha-tocopherol content of exotic meats and loss due to gamma radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakritz, L; Fox, J B; Thayer, D W

    1998-12-01

    Changes in thiamin, riboflavin, and alpha-tocopherol concentrations due to gamma irradiation were followed in alligator, caiman, bison, and ostrich (exotic) meats. The proximate composition showed that the exotic meats generally had lower fat content than domestic animal meats and that the thiamin content of the reptiles was lower. The changes in the vitamins due to irradiation were similar to those previously observed for domestic species. The results indicate that the loss of vitamins in these species is negligible insofar as the American diet is concerned, and that the concept of "chemiclearance" is applicable to exotic meats.

  8. GAPR2: A DTN Routing Protocol for Communications in Challenged, Degraded, and Denied Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    over a DTN network. The buses were the mainstay of the network, though various other nodes also included over the life of the project; even turtles on...invading southward as illustrated by the red box and arrows. Bold Alligator Beach Landing Figure 3.4: Overview of Military Scenario Garnetian forces have...5-15 10 km / 2.5MBps MEU steaming box Table 3.1: Military Node Attributes The ground combat element in this scenario is deployed as 7 platoons and

  9. Recent developments in Australia's uranium mining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, I.B.; McKay, A.D.

    1998-01-01

    Australia's economic, demonstrated resources of uranium (U) at the end of 1996 amounted to 622,000 tonnes U, the largest of any country. Uranium is currently produced at two mining/milling operations in Australia - Ranger in the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory, and Olympic Dam in South Australia. Improved market conditions and recent changes to Government policies have encouraged Australian companies to commit to the expansion of existing operations and the development of new uranium mines. Australia's annual production is likely to increase from its present level of 6000 tonncs (t) U 3 O 8 to approximately 12 000 t U 3 O 8 by the year 2000. (author)

  10. Environmental impact of uranium mining and milling in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levins, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    Australia has almost twenty per cent of the Western World's low-cost uranium reserves, located mostly in the Alligator Rivers region of the Northern Territory. At present, only one uranium mill is operating in Australia, but a number of new mills are planned for the early 1980s. Details are given of Australian uranium mining and milling proposals and the measures taken to minimize their environmental impact. Major factors affecting environmental impact are discussed, including treatment of liquid wastes, water management, control of radon and other airborne releases, and disposal of tailings. (auth)

  11. Endoscopic diagnosis and management of an unusual nasal foreign body in a mare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turke M. Shawaf

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Occurrence of intra-nasal foreign bodies is uncommon in horses. This report describes -for the first time- a case of a 4-year-old Arabian-cross mare with unilateral mucopurulent nasal discharge, epistaxis and exercise intolerance due to intra-nasal foreign body. Clinical signs, radiography and endoscopic examination confirmed the presence of a tooth fragment (foreign body embedded in the ventral valve of the left nasal cavity. The foreign body was successfully removed using alligator forceps under endoscopic guidance.

  12. An Overview of My Internship with the Ecological Program at John F. Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Samantha

    2010-01-01

    During my internship with Innovative Health Applications, I participated in numerous longterm research projects involving the study of various plant and animal life at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). I observed the monitoring of nesting sea turtles. I learned about the transfer of egg clutches from the northern Gulf Coast in an effort to help the hatchlings avoid the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. I gained knowledge of tracking the movements of important sport fish and sharks in this area using a hydro-acoustic tag and receiver system. This effort included routinely taking water quality data at multiple sites around KSC. Alligator population and nesting assessments was another part of my internship. I observed the biologists take morphometric measurements, blood, urine and tissue samples from alligators found in KSC waterways. I assisted in taking photosynthesis and reflectance measurements on various scrub oaks and palmettos. I participated in Florida Scrub-Jay surveys in an effort to monitor their population trends and was involved in Southeastern beach mouse trapping and identification. I also assisted in seagrass surveys monitoring the health of the seagrass beds.

  13. Tidal salt marshes of the southeast Atlantic Coast: A community profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegert, R.G.; Freeman, B.J.

    1990-09-01

    This report is part of a series of community profiles on the ecology of wetland and marine communities. This particular profile considers tidal marshes of the southeastern Atlantic coast, from North Carolina south to northern Florida. Alone among the earth's ecosystems, coastal communities are subjected to a bidirectional flooding sometimes occurring twice each day; this flooding affects successional development, species composition, stability, and productivity. In the tidally influenced salt marsh, salinity ranges from less than 1 ppt to that of seawater. Dominant plant species include cordgrasses (Spartina alterniflora and S. cynosuroides), black needlerush (Juncus romerianus), and salt marsh bulrush (Scirpus robustus). Both terrestrail and aquatic animals occur in salt marshes and include herons, egrets ospreys (Pandion haliaetus), bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), alligators (Alligator Mississippiensis), manatees (Trichecus manatus), oysters, mussels, and fiddler crabs. Currently, the only significant direct commercial use of the tidal salt marshes is by crabbers seeking the blue crab Callinectes sapidus, but the marshes are quite important recreationally, aesthetically, and educationally. 151 refs., 45 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Using scenario planning to evaluate the impacts of climate change on wildlife populations and communities in the Florida Everglades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catano, Christopher P; Romañach, Stephanie S; Beerens, James M; Pearlstine, Leonard G; Brandt, Laura A; Hart, Kristen M; Mazzotti, Frank J; Trexler, Joel C

    2015-04-01

    It is uncertain how climate change will impact hydrologic drivers of wildlife population dynamics in freshwater wetlands of the Florida Everglades, or how to accommodate this uncertainty in restoration decisions. Using projections of climate scenarios for the year 2060, we evaluated how several possible futures could affect wildlife populations (wading birds, fish, alligators, native apple snails, amphibians, threatened and invasive species) across the Everglades landscape and inform planning already underway. We used data collected from prior research and monitoring to parameterize our wildlife population models. Hydrologic data were simulated using a spatially explicit, regional-scale model. Our scenario evaluations show that expected changes in temperature, precipitation, and sea level could significantly alter important ecological functions. All of our wildlife indicators were negatively affected by scenarios with less rainfall and more evapotranspiration. Under such scenarios, habitat suitability was substantially reduced for iconic animals such as wading birds and alligators. Conversely, the increased rainfall scenario benefited aquatic prey productivity and apex predators. Cascading impacts on non-native species is speculative, but increasing temperatures could increase the time between cold events that currently limit expansion and abundance of non-native fishes, amphibians, and reptiles with natural ranges in the tropics. This scenario planning framework underscored the benefits of proceeding with Everglades restoration plans that capture and clean more freshwater with the potential to mitigate rainfall loss and postpone impacts of sea level rise.

  15. Host use and seasonality of Culex (Melanoconion) iolambdis (Diptera: Culicidae) from eastern Florida, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blosser, Erik M; Stenn, Tanise; Acevedo, Carolina; Burkett-Cadena, Nathan D

    2016-12-01

    Culex (Melanoconion) iolambdis (Dyar, 1918) is a mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) species found throughout much of tropical America, including southern Florida. Relatively few reports are available regarding the ecology of Cx. iolambdis, despite its widespread distribution and putative involvement in transmission of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. To quantify habitat and host utilization, adults of Cx. iolambdis were sampled from resting shelters at a field site in Vero Beach, Florida, over a 12-month period. Culex iolambdis (1109 males, 3072 females) constituted more than half (56.76%) of all mosquitoes sampled (24 species) and was active year-round. Unfed females and gravid females of Cx. iolambdis were significantly more abundant in mangrove habitat, while males and blood-fed females were not. PCR-based bloodmeal analysis of 305 females revealed that Cx. iolambdis has very wide host breadth, feeding on birds (37.0% overall), reptiles (26.6%), amphibians (23.3%) and mammals (13.1%). Green heron (Butorides virescens), Southern leopard frog (Lithobates sphenocephala) and American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) were the most commonly fed upon hosts. Bloodmeals from different host classes varied significantly with season, suggesting that Cx. iolambdis may play a role in the amplification and epidemic transmission of zoonotic arboviruses affecting human health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Automatic Pavement Crack Recognition Based on BP Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A feasible pavement crack detection system plays an important role in evaluating the road condition and providing the necessary road maintenance. In this paper, a back propagation neural network (BPNN is used to recognize pavement cracks from images. To improve the recognition accuracy of the BPNN, a complete framework of image processing is proposed including image preprocessing and crack information extraction. In this framework, the redundant image information is reduced as much as possible and two sets of feature parameters are constructed to classify the crack images. Then a BPNN is adopted to distinguish pavement images between linear and alligator cracks to acquire high recognition accuracy. Besides, the linear cracks can be further classified into transversal and longitudinal cracks according to the direction angle. Finally, the proposed method is evaluated on the data of 400 pavement images obtained by the Automatic Road Analyzer (ARAN in Northern China and the results show that the proposed method seems to be a powerful tool for pavement crack recognition. The rates of correct classification for alligator, transversal and longitudinal cracks are 97.5%, 100% and 88.0%, respectively. Compared to some previous studies, the method proposed in this paper is effective for all three kinds of cracks and the results are also acceptable for engineering application.

  17. Viruses in reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, Ellen

    2011-09-21

    The etiology of reptilian viral diseases can be attributed to a wide range of viruses occurring across different genera and families. Thirty to forty years ago, studies of viruses in reptiles focused mainly on the zoonotic potential of arboviruses in reptiles and much effort went into surveys and challenge trials of a range of reptiles with eastern and western equine encephalitis as well as Japanese encephalitis viruses. In the past decade, outbreaks of infection with West Nile virus in human populations and in farmed alligators in the USA has seen the research emphasis placed on the issue of reptiles, particularly crocodiles and alligators, being susceptible to, and reservoirs for, this serious zoonotic disease. Although there are many recognised reptilian viruses, the evidence for those being primary pathogens is relatively limited. Transmission studies establishing pathogenicity and cofactors are likewise scarce, possibly due to the relatively low commercial importance of reptiles, difficulties with the availability of animals and permits for statistically sound experiments, difficulties with housing of reptiles in an experimental setting or the inability to propagate some viruses in cell culture to sufficient titres for transmission studies. Viruses as causes of direct loss of threatened species, such as the chelonid fibropapilloma associated herpesvirus and ranaviruses in farmed and wild tortoises and turtles, have re-focused attention back to the characterisation of the viruses as well as diagnosis and pathogenesis in the host itself.

  18. Continuation of studies on thermoregulation of fish and turtles in thermally stressed habitats. Summary progress report, 1 October 1977-30 September 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spotila, J.R.

    1980-05-01

    Biophysical-behavioral-ecological models have been completed to explain the behavioral thermoregulation of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and turtles (Chrysemys scripta). Steady state and time dependent mathematical models accurately predict the body temperatures of largemouth bass. Field experiments using multichannel radio transmitters have provided temperatures of several body compartments of free ranging bass in their natural habitat. Initial studies have been completed to describe the behavioral thermoregulation of bass in a reactor cooling reservoir. Energy budgets, fundamental climate spaces, and realized climate spaces have been completed for the turtle, C. scripta. We have described the behavioral thermoregulation of C. scripta in Par Pond, S.C. and have measured its movements, home ranges and population levels in heated and unheated arms of the reservoir. Operative environmental temperature is a good predictor of the basking behavior of this turtle. A new synthesis explained the evolution of thermoregulatory strategies among animals. Laboratory experiments clarified the effects of movement, diving and temperature on the blood flow of alligators. Other experiments defined the role of boundary layers in controlling the evaporation of water from the surfaces of turtles and alligators in still and moving air. Nutritional status may be an important factor affecting the thermoregulatory behavior of turtles.

  19. Three crocodilian genomes reveal ancestral patterns of evolution among archosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Richard E; Braun, Edward L; Armstrong, Joel; Earl, Dent; Nguyen, Ngan; Hickey, Glenn; Vandewege, Michael W; St John, John A; Capella-Gutiérrez, Salvador; Castoe, Todd A; Kern, Colin; Fujita, Matthew K; Opazo, Juan C; Jurka, Jerzy; Kojima, Kenji K; Caballero, Juan; Hubley, Robert M; Smit, Arian F; Platt, Roy N; Lavoie, Christine A; Ramakodi, Meganathan P; Finger, John W; Suh, Alexander; Isberg, Sally R; Miles, Lee; Chong, Amanda Y; Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Gongora, Jaime; Moran, Christopher; Iriarte, Andrés; McCormack, John; Burgess, Shane C; Edwards, Scott V; Lyons, Eric; Williams, Christina; Breen, Matthew; Howard, Jason T; Gresham, Cathy R; Peterson, Daniel G; Schmitz, Jürgen; Pollock, David D; Haussler, David; Triplett, Eric W; Zhang, Guojie; Irie, Naoki; Jarvis, Erich D; Brochu, Christopher A; Schmidt, Carl J; McCarthy, Fiona M; Faircloth, Brant C; Hoffmann, Federico G; Glenn, Travis C; Gabaldón, Toni; Paten, Benedict; Ray, David A

    2014-12-12

    To provide context for the diversification of archosaurs--the group that includes crocodilians, dinosaurs, and birds--we generated draft genomes of three crocodilians: Alligator mississippiensis (the American alligator), Crocodylus porosus (the saltwater crocodile), and Gavialis gangeticus (the Indian gharial). We observed an exceptionally slow rate of genome evolution within crocodilians at all levels, including nucleotide substitutions, indels, transposable element content and movement, gene family evolution, and chromosomal synteny. When placed within the context of related taxa including birds and turtles, this suggests that the common ancestor of all of these taxa also exhibited slow genome evolution and that the comparatively rapid evolution is derived in birds. The data also provided the opportunity to analyze heterozygosity in crocodilians, which indicates a likely reduction in population size for all three taxa through the Pleistocene. Finally, these data combined with newly published bird genomes allowed us to reconstruct the partial genome of the common ancestor of archosaurs, thereby providing a tool to investigate the genetic starting material of crocodilians, birds, and dinosaurs. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. A study of radionuclides, metals and stable lead isotope ratios in sediments and soils in the vicinity of natural U-mineralisation areas in the Northern Territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frostick, A.; Bollhoefer, A.; Parry, D.

    2011-01-01

    Australian guidelines recommend that tailings materials from uranium (U) mining and milling be contained without any detrimental impact on the environment for at least 1000 years. Natural analogue sites are being investigated to determine if they can provide data on the rates of natural erosion processes which occur over these timescales, for input into predictive geomorphic computer models. This paper presents radionuclide, metal and stable lead (Pb) isotope data from sediment cores and surface soils in the vicinity of two mineralised areas in the Alligator Rivers Region. Surface scrapes from the natural Anomaly no. 2, south of the Ranger mineral lease, exhibit radiogenic 206 Pb/ 207 Pb and 208 Pb/ 207 Pb ratios, and elevated U and metal concentrations typical for a near surface U anomaly. In contrast, samples taken from the Koongarra mineral lease (KML) show radionuclide activity and metal concentrations similar to natural areas elsewhere in the Alligator Rivers Region and Pb isotope ratios are closer to present day average crustal ratios (PDAC), as the orebodies at KML are covered by surficial sand. A sediment core collected from Anbangbang Billabong, downstream of KML, exhibits small variations in Pb isotope ratios that indicate that approximately 1% of the upper sediments in the sediment core may be derived from material originating from the U anomaly at Koongarra.

  1. Chronic effects of atrazine exposure and recovery in freshwater benthic diatoms from two communities with different pollution histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Rebecca J; Mitrovic, Simon M; Lim, Richard P; Kefford, Ben J

    2017-08-01

    Diffuse agricultural runoff into rivers can result in contamination with herbicides for prolonged periods of time. Chronic exposure to herbicides has the potential to alter toxic impacts in primary producers such as benthic diatoms. Determining how individual diatom taxa respond to herbicide exposure over varied exposure durations is essential for assessing herbicide impacts. This study investigated the responses of various benthic diatom taxa and effects at the community level over 12days of atrazine exposure. Diatom communities were collected from two sites with differing exposure histories; a relatively unpolluted site (Alligator Creek) and an agricultural stream (Barratta Creek) known to be polluted by atrazine and other herbicides. Diatom community composition and the proportion of healthy cells per taxon were assessed at 0, 2, 3, 6, 9 and 12days of atrazine exposure. Pollution history altered the response of the diatom community to atrazine exposure. In the Alligator Creek diatom community there was a shift in composition towards more tolerant taxa and the loss of sensitive taxa in atrazine exposed treatments. The sensitive taxon (Gomphonema truncatum) was consistently affected by atrazine toxicity. Conversely, the polluted Barratta Creek diatom community was not strongly affected by atrazine exposure. Our study shows that during chronic atrazine exposure some taxa demonstrated the ability to recover despite initial toxicity response. Recovery could be an important trait for understanding the ecological effect of herbicide exposure on diatom species in nature and in applied circumstances such as biomonitoring indices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Annual Report 1993-1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    As a result of an amendment to the Environment Protection (Alligator River Region) Act 1979 - EP(ARR) in December 1993, the Supervising Scientist and his support organisation has been amalgamated with the Environment Protection Agency (EPA), in the Department of the Environment, Sport and Territories (DEST). All corporate information, including financial and personnel matters, relating to the operation of the Supervising Scientist during 1993-94 has therefore been incorporated in the DEST 1993-94 Annual Report. This report contains the information required in the EP(ARR) Act, namely: any directions given to the Supervising Scientist by the minister; information on the collection and assessment of information relating to the environmental effects of mining in the Alligator Rivers Region; standards, practices and procedures in relation to mining operations adopted or changed during the year, and the environmental effects of those changes; measures taken to protect or restore the environment from the effects of mining in the region; requirements forming prescribed instruments which were enacted, made, adopted or issued and which relate to the environment; implementation of the prescribed instruments related to the environment; and a statement of the cost of operations of the Supervising Scientist. The changes in organisational and operational arrangements introduced as a consequence of the 1993 amendment to the EP(ARR) Act are also described, as are results of research undertaken to underpin the supervisory and assessment roles of the Supervising Scientist. Details of all published and unpublished papers are included in the Appendix 4. 18 figs., 4 tabs

  3. Evaluation of microbiology and nutritive quality of exotic meats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Antonio Pilegi Sfaciotte

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Vacuum-packed and frozen of ostrich (Struthio camelus, alligator (Caiman latirostris and wild boar (Sus scrofa meat samples were obtained in an authorized commercial store in Maringá/Paraná. Of each kind meat were analyzed 6 samples, where were studied counts of mesophilic aerobic bacteria, aerobic bacteria psichrophilic, coliforms, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus spp., and protein and fat analysis. The results of aerobic mesophilic bacteria ranged between <1.0 a 3.6 log CFU/g, being the biggest counting in ostrich meat. The meat that had the biggest counting of micro-organisms psychrotrophs was also the ostrich, but even so, it was not considered high, ranging between 2.3 and 2.7 log CFU/g. There were no counting for coliforms and E. coli on wild boar and alligator meats (except sample 4 of wild boar meat that had a count of 1.0 log CFU/g of coliforms but, all ostrich meat had count, ranged between 1.3 a 2.7 log CFU/g. In generally, the literature shows that wild animals meats have higher protein values (19.5 to 22.8% CP than domestic animals, this values agree with the values found in this work, 19.9 to 29.9% CP.

  4. Using scenario planning to evaluate the impacts of climate change on wildlife populations and communities in the Florida Everglades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catano, Christopher P.; Romañach, Stephanie S.; Beerens, James M.; Pearlstine, Leonard G.; Brandt, Laura A.; Hart, Kristen M.; Mazzotti, Frank J.; Trexler, Joel C.

    2015-01-01

    It is uncertain how climate change will impact hydrologic drivers of wildlife population dynamics in freshwater wetlands of the Florida Everglades, or how to accommodate this uncertainty in restoration decisions. Using projections of climate scenarios for the year 2060, we evaluated how several possible futures could affect wildlife populations (wading birds, fish, alligators, native apple snails, amphibians, threatened and invasive species) across the Everglades landscape and inform planning already underway. We used data collected from prior research and monitoring to parameterize our wildlife population models. Hydrologic data were simulated using a spatially explicit, regional-scale model. Our scenario evaluations show that expected changes in temperature, precipitation, and sea level could significantly alter important ecological functions. All of our wildlife indicators were negatively affected by scenarios with less rainfall and more evapotranspiration. Under such scenarios, habitat suitability was substantially reduced for iconic animals such as wading birds and alligators. Conversely, the increased rainfall scenario benefited aquatic prey productivity and apex predators. Cascading impacts on non-native species is speculative, but increasing temperatures could increase the time between cold events that currently limit expansion and abundance of non-native fishes, amphibians, and reptiles with natural ranges in the tropics. This scenario planning framework underscored the benefits of proceeding with Everglades restoration plans that capture and clean more freshwater with the potential to mitigate rainfall loss and postpone impacts of sea level rise.

  5. Neuromuscular diversity in archosaur deep dorsal thigh muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatesy, S M

    1994-01-01

    The living members of the clade Archosauria, crocodilians and birds, differ markedly in the morphology of their deep dorsal thigh muscles. To investigate whether this diversity is accompanied by differences in motor pattern and muscle function, the hindlimbs of representative archosaurs were studied by electromyography and cineradiography during terrestrial locomotion. In a crocodilian, Alligator, the iliofemoralis and pubo-ischio-femoralis internus part 2 are both active during the swing phase of the stride cycle. This appears to be the primitive motor pattern for archosaurs. There are four avian homologues of these muscles in the helmeted guineafowl, Numida. These are primarily active in the propulsive phase (iliotrochantericus caudalis and iliotrochantericus medius), the swing phase (iliotrochantericus cranialis) and a speed-dependent combination of the propulsive and/or swing phases (iliofemoralis externus). Differences between Alligator and Numida in the number and attachment of deep dorsal muscles are associated with dissimilar motor patterns and functions. Evolutionary modifications of neuromuscular control must be recognized when evaluating avian locomotor history, but are rarely considered by paleontologists. Even within the deep dorsal thigh muscles of Numida, developmentally and anatomically similar muscles are active out-of-phase. Therefore, although the actions of two adjacent muscles appear equivalent, their functions may differ dramatically. The diversity of deep dorsal thigh muscles in modern birds may be a good model for studying the relationship between activity pattern and peripheral morphology.

  6. A study of radionuclides, metals and stable lead isotope ratios in sediments and soils in the vicinity of natural U-mineralisation areas in the Northern Territory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frostick, A., E-mail: Alison.Frostick@cdu.edu.au [Charles Darwin University, School of Environment and Life Sciences, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); ERISS, GPO Box 461, Darwin NT 0801 (Australia); Bollhoefer, A. [ERISS, GPO Box 461, Darwin NT 0801 (Australia); Parry, D. [AIMS, PO Box 41775, Casuarina NT 0811 (Australia)

    2011-10-15

    Australian guidelines recommend that tailings materials from uranium (U) mining and milling be contained without any detrimental impact on the environment for at least 1000 years. Natural analogue sites are being investigated to determine if they can provide data on the rates of natural erosion processes which occur over these timescales, for input into predictive geomorphic computer models. This paper presents radionuclide, metal and stable lead (Pb) isotope data from sediment cores and surface soils in the vicinity of two mineralised areas in the Alligator Rivers Region. Surface scrapes from the natural Anomaly no. 2, south of the Ranger mineral lease, exhibit radiogenic {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb and {sup 208}Pb/{sup 207}Pb ratios, and elevated U and metal concentrations typical for a near surface U anomaly. In contrast, samples taken from the Koongarra mineral lease (KML) show radionuclide activity and metal concentrations similar to natural areas elsewhere in the Alligator Rivers Region and Pb isotope ratios are closer to present day average crustal ratios (PDAC), as the orebodies at KML are covered by surficial sand. A sediment core collected from Anbangbang Billabong, downstream of KML, exhibits small variations in Pb isotope ratios that indicate that approximately 1% of the upper sediments in the sediment core may be derived from material originating from the U anomaly at Koongarra.

  7. Comparative histology of some craniofacial sutures and skull-base synchondroses in non-avian dinosaurs and their extant phylogenetic bracket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailleul, Alida M; Horner, John R

    2016-08-01

    Sutures and synchondroses, the fibrous and cartilaginous articulations found in the skulls of vertebrates, have been studied for many biological applications at the morphological scale. However, little is known about these articulations at the microscopic scale in non-mammalian vertebrates, including extant archosaurs (birds and crocodilians). The major goals of this paper were to: (i) document the microstructure of some sutures and synchondroses through ontogeny in archosaurs; (ii) compare these microstructures with previously published sutural histology (i.e. that of mammals); and (iii) document how these articulations with different morphological degrees of closure (open or obliterated) appear histologically. This was performed with histological analyses of skulls of emus, American alligators, a fossil crocodilian and ornithischian dinosaurs (hadrosaurids, pachycephalosaurids and ceratopsids). Emus and mammals possess a sutural periosteum until sutural fusion, but it disappears rapidly during ontogeny in American alligators. This study identified seven types of sutural mineralized tissues in extant and extinct archosaurs and grouped them into four categories: periosteal tissues; acellular tissues; fibrous tissues; and intratendinous tissues. Due to the presence of a periosteum in their sutures, emus and mammals possess periosteal tissues at their sutural borders. The mineralized sutural tissues of crocodilians and ornithischian dinosaurs are more variable and can also develop via a form of necrosis for acellular tissues and metaplasia for fibrous and intratendinous tissues. It was hypothesized that non-avian dinosaurs, like the American alligator, lacked a sutural periosteum and that their primary mode of ossification involved the direct mineralization of craniofacial sutures (instead of intramembranous ossification found in mammals and birds). However, we keep in mind that a bird-like sutural microstructure might have arisen within non-avian saurichians. While

  8. Taxonomic revision of Eoalligator (Crocodylia, Brevirostres and the paleogeographic origins of the Chinese alligatoroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-yin Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. The primarily Neotropical distribution of living alligatoroids raises questions as to when and how the ancestors of Alligator sinensis migrated to China. As phylogeny provides a necessary framework for historical biogeographic issues, determining the phylogenetic positions of the Chinese alligatoroids is a crucial step towards understanding global alligatoroid paleobiogeography. Besides the unnamed alligatoroids from the Eocene of Guangdong Province, three Chinese fossil taxa have been referred to Alligatoroidea: Alligator luicus, Eoalligator chunyii and Eoalligator huiningensis. However, none of these fossil taxa has been included in a phylogenetic analysis. The genus Eoalligator was established to accommodate E. chunyii from Guangdong Province. E. huiningensis from Anhui Province was later erected as a second species, despite no distinctive similarities with E. chunyii. By contrast, the putative crocodyline Asiatosuchus nanlingensis was established based on material from Guangdong Province, close to the E. chunyii specimens geographically and stratigraphically. Furthermore, specimens of A. nanlingensis and E. chunyii share four distinctive characters, but display no evident differences. As a result, the taxonomic relationships of these three species require restudy. Methods. In this paper, all specimens of E. chunyii and E. huiningensis are reassessed in detail, and compared to specimens of A. nanlingensis. Detailed re-descriptions and revised diagnoses are provided, and a cladistic analysis is carried out to assess the phylogenetic positions of E. chunyii, E. huiningensis and A. nanlingensis. Results. The analysis recovers E. chunyii and A. nanlingensis as sister taxa among basal Crocodylidae, while P. huiningensis is posited as an alligatoroid. Two key characters support the monophyly E. chunyii + A. nanlingensis: sulcus within surangular, and anteroposteriorly oriented surangular-articular suture. The former character is unique

  9. Annual report of ecological research at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-05-01

    Studies on mineral cycling are concerned with availability of stable elements and radionuclides to the biota of the southeastern coastal plain; the role of primary producers, consumers, and detritivores in cycling processes; the factors that limit or regulate rate processes in southeastern ecosystems; the importance of interactions among energy flow, thermal environments, and mineral cycling processes on rates of biomass buildup and transfer within southeastern ecosystems; the extent to which transfer coefficients are modified by population processes that influence the temporal or spatial turnover of compartmental standing crops; and the validation of models of cycling processes in southeastern ecosystems at various sites on the southeastern coastal plain. Research in thermal ecology is being conducted on macrophytes, snails, fishes, high parasites, shrimp, crayfish, turtles, and alligators

  10. Team training in the skies: does crew resource management (CRM) training work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, E; Burke, C S; Bowers, C A; Wilson, K A

    2001-01-01

    The aviation community has invested great amounts of money and effort into crew resource management (CRM) training. Using D. L. Kirkpatrick's (1976) framework for evaluating training, we reviewed 58 published accounts of CRM training to determine its effectiveness within aviation. Results indicated that CRM training generally produced positive reactions, enhanced learning, and promoted desired behavioral changes. However, we cannot ascertain whether CRM has an effect on an organization's bottom line (i.e., safety). We discuss the state of the literature with regard to evaluation of CRM training programs and, as a result, call for the need to conduct systematic, multilevel evaluation efforts that will show the true effectiveness of CRM training. As many evaluations do not collect data across levels (as suggested by D. L. Kirkpatrick, 1976, and by G. M. Alliger, S. I. Tannenbaum, W. Bennett, Jr., & H. Traver, 1997), the impact of CRM cannot be truly determined; thus more and better evaluations are needed and should be demanded.

  11. Perception versus reality: Bridging the gap between quantitative and qualitative information relating to the risks of uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Needham, S.

    2002-01-01

    Environmental impact of uranium mining in Australia is frequently raised as an issue of public concern. However, the level of concern both in terms of public agitation and political response has diminished over the last decade, largely as a consequence of many years of demonstrated high levels of environmental protection achieved at Australian uranium mines. Another reason is because of improved information now accessible to the public on mine environmental management systems, monitoring results, and audit outcomes. This paper describes some communication methods developed for the uranium mines of the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory. These methods have improved the effectiveness of dialogue between stakeholders, and better inform the public about the levels of environmental protection achieved and the level of risk to the environment and the community. A simple approach is described which has been developed to help build a mutual understanding between technocrats and the lay person on perceptions of risk and actual environmental impact. (author)

  12. In vitro antibiotic susceptibility of Mycoplasma iguanae proposed sp. nov. isolated from vertebral lesions of green iguanas (Iguana iguana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, Megan E; Demcovitz, Dina L; Plourdé, Daisy R; Rotstein, David S; Brown, Daniel R

    2006-06-01

    Mycoplasma iguanae proposed species nova was isolated from vertebral abscesses of two feral iguanas (Iguana iguana) from Florida. Three strains were evaluated for sensitivity to a variety of antibiotics. The minimum inhibitory concentrations for M. iguanae, assessed by broth dilution methods, of clindamycin, doxycycline, enrofloxacin, oxytetracycline, and tylosin (all iguanae strain 2327T was subcultured without antibiotics to assess mycoplasmacidal activity. Clindamycin, doxycycline, oxytetracycline, and tylosin were bacteriostatic from 0.1 to 0.5 microg/ml, whereas enrofloxacin was bactericidal at 20 ng/ml. An enrofloxacin dosage of 5-10 mg/kg achieves peak plasma concentrations >1 microg/ml, with an elimination half-life of 6-20 hr, in alligators. Although concentrations achieved in the vertebrae by i.m. or i.v. injection are probably lower than those in plasma, these data suggest that enrofloxacin may be useful to treat M. iguanae mycoplasmosis in iguanas.

  13. The Gulf Sturgeon in the Suwannee River - Questions and Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulak, Kenneth J.; Randall, Michael T.

    2009-01-01

    Sturgeons and paddlefishes are modern descendants of an ancient group of freshwater fishes, the Chondrostei (a group of bony fishes with mostly cartilaginous skeletons). Sturgeons evolved during the Age of the Dinosaurs, and have prospered in the large rivers and lakes of North America, Europe and Asia for 200 million years. Together with alligators and crocodiles, they survived the mass extinction at the end of the Mesozoic Era, when the dinosaurs and many other groups of animals disappeared forever. They originated prior to the creation of the Atlantic Ocean, when the Northern Hemisphere supercontinent Pangea broke into North America and Eurasia. Most sturgeons are highly specialized to feed in the sediment on small invertebrate prey, a radical evolutionary departure from most of their fish-eating ancestors.

  14. Reptilian prey of the sonora mud turtle (Kinosternon sonoriense) with comments on saurophagy and ophiophagy in North American Turtles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovich, J.; Drost, C.; Monatesti, A.J.; Casper, D.; Wood, D.A.; Girard, M.

    2010-01-01

    We detected evidence of predation by the Sonora mud turtle (Kinosternon sonoriense) on the Arizona alligator lizard (Elgaria kingii nobilis) and the ground snake (Sonora semiannulata) at Montezuma Well, Yavapai County, Arizona. Lizards have not been reported in the diet of K. sonoriense, and saurophagy is rare in turtles of the United States, having been reported previously in only two other species:, the false map turtle (Graptemys pseudogeographica) and the eastern box turtle (Terrapene carolina). While the diet of K. sonoriense includes snakes, ours is the first record of S. semiannulata as food of this turtle. Ophiophagy also is rare in turtles of the United States with records for only five other species of turtles. Given the opportunistic diets of many North American turtles, including K. sonoriense, the scarcity of published records of saurophagy and ophiophagy likely represents a shortage of observations, not rarity of occurrence.

  15. Thinking with Crocodiles: An Iconic Animal at the Intersection of Early-Modern Religion and Natural Philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinreich, Spencer J

    2015-01-01

    This paper seeks to explore how culturally and religiously significant animals could shape discourses in which they were deployed, taking the crocodile as its case study. Beginning with the textual and visual traditions linking the crocodile with Africa and the Middle East, I read sixteenth- and seventeenth-century travel narratives categorizing American reptiles as "crocodiles" rather than "alligators," as attempts to mitigate the disruptive strangeness of the Americas. The second section draws on Ann Blair's study of "Mosaic Philosophy" to examine scholarly debates over the taxonomic identity of the biblical Leviathan. I argue that the language and analytical tools of natural philosophy progressively permeated religious discourse. Finally, a survey of more than 25 extant examples of the premodern practice of displaying crocodiles in churches, as well as other crocodilian elements in Christian iconography, provides an explanation for the ubiquity of crocodiles in Wunderkammern, as natural philosophy appropriated ecclesial visual vocabularies.

  16. Thermoregulatory behavior is widespread in the embryos of reptiles and birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Teng; Zhao, Bo; Zhou, Yong-Kang; Hu, Rui; Du, Wei-Guo

    2014-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that thermoregulatory behavior occurs not only in posthatching turtles but also in turtles prior to hatching. Does thermoregulatory behavior also occur in the embryos of other reptile and bird species? Our experiments show that such behavior is widespread but not universal in reptile and bird embryos. We recorded repositioning within the egg, in response to thermal gradients, in the embryos of three species of snakes (Xenochrophis piscator, Elaphe bimaculata, and Zaocys dhumnades), two turtles (Chelydra serpentina and Ocadia sinensis), one crocodile (Alligator sinensis), and four birds (Coturnix coturnix, Gallus gallus domesticus, Columba livia domestica, and Anas platyrhynchos domestica). However, we detected no significant thermoregulation by the embryos of two lizard species (Takydromus septentrionalis and Phrynocephalus frontalis). Overall, embryonic thermoregulatory behavior is widespread in reptile as well as bird species but may be unimportant in the small eggs laid by most lizards.

  17. Discrete fracture simulations of the hydrogeology at Koongarra, Northern Territory, Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smoot, J.L.

    1992-04-01

    The US Department of Energy is studying the Alligator Rivers Natural Analogue Project site at Koongarra, Northern Territory, Australia to investigate and simulate radionuclide migration in fractured rocks. Discrete fracture simulations were conducted within a cubic volume (180-m edge length) of fractured Cahill Formation schist oriented with one major axis parallel to the trend of the Koongarra Fault. Five hundred fractures are simulated within this domain. The fractures have a mean orientation parallel to the idealized plane of the Koongarra Fault dipping 55{degrees} SE. Simple flow modeling of this fracture network was conducted by assigning constant head boundaries to upgradient and downgradient vertical faces of the cube, which trend parallel to the fault. No-flow boundaries were assigned to all other faces. The fracture network allows hydraulic communication across the block, in spite of relatively low fracture density across the block.

  18. Visualisasi Iklan Media Cetak KPK sejak Masa Berdiri hingga ‘Serangan Koruptor’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendy Yuliansyah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Corruption is every nation’s problem in all over the world, including Indonesia. Classified as an extraordinary crime, Komisi Pemberantasan Korupsi (KPK were established to eradicate it. In order to implement its tasks, it campaignes in several kind of media including printed advertisement. At first of its establishment, KPK was ambitiously active to prevent and crack corruption to whole com- munity level including the state officials. However, when KPK was criminalized, and lizard against alligator, public opinions stated that it was a counter attack from the corruptors. This condition has affected its printed advertisement, which was designed and produced by itself. The research shows that its visualization has been changed, from its first editions up to the corruptor’s attack phase. The changes included message, color, illustration and typhography.   Keywords: visualization, advertisement, mass media, KPK.

  19. Dihydroazulene Photochromism:Synthesis, Molecular Electronics and Hammett Correlations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broman, Søren Lindbæk

    This thesis describes the development of a versatile synthetic protocol for preparation of a large selection of dihydroazulenes (DHAs) with both electron withdrawing and donating groups. By UV-Vis and NMR spectroscopies and even in a single-molecule junction, their ability to undergo a light......-coupling reactions, systems with either one or two “molecular alligator clips” were prepared. These were studied in solution by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and in a single-molecule junction, the latter by the group of Danilov and Kubatkin at the Chalmers University of Technology. A single-molecule device......-reaction (VHF → DHA), studied by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. In seven different model systems, the rate of back-reaction was found to obey a Hammett correlation when plotting ln(k) against the appropriate σ-values. These plots were used to estimate the σ-value of substituents which have not yet been...

  20. DETECTION OF CRACKS IN ASPHALT PAVEMENT DURING ROAD INSPECTION PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin STANIEK

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Road inspection is one of key processes of a pavement management system, whose function is to examine and describe the road infrastructure condition. When thoroughly performed, it provides the information required to implement an adequate road infrastructure maintenance policy and plan ad hoc repairs or refurbishments. This article discusses a solution for automatic asphalt pavement cracking detection, based on image-processing technology. This solution makes it possible to identify different crack types, i.e., transverse, longitudinal, alligator-type and technological cracks. The detection process is based on the application of various methods, including statistical difference identification for pre-assumed image analysis directions, i.e., in and opposite to the test vehicle running direction. The purpose of the morphological and filtering operations applied was to reduce the image noise level. The solution proposed was verified using video material in the form of a sequence of images recorded using the test vehicle.

  1. Tyrannosaurus was not a fast runner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, John R; Garcia, Mariano

    2002-02-28

    The fastest gait and speed of the largest theropod (carnivorous) dinosaurs, such as Tyrannosaurus, is controversial. Some studies contend that Tyrannosaurus was limited to walking, or at best an 11 m s(-1) top speed, whereas others argue for at least 20 m s(-1) running speeds. We demonstrate a method of gauging running ability by estimating the minimum mass of extensor (supportive) muscle needed for fast running. The model's predictions are validated for living alligators and chickens. Applying the method to small dinosaurs corroborates other studies by showing that they could have been competent runners. However, models show that in order to run quickly, an adult Tyrannosaurus would have needed an unreasonably large mass of extensor muscle, even with generous assumptions. Therefore, it is doubtful that Tyrannosaurus and other huge dinosaurs (approximately 6,000 kg) were capable runners or could reach high speeds.

  2. Natural flexible dermal armor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen; Chen, Irene H; Gludovatz, Bernd; Zimmermann, Elizabeth A; Ritchie, Robert O; Meyers, Marc A

    2013-01-04

    Fish, reptiles, and mammals can possess flexible dermal armor for protection. Here we seek to find the means by which Nature derives its protection by examining the scales from several fish (Atractosteus spatula, Arapaima gigas, Polypterus senegalus, Morone saxatilis, Cyprinius carpio), and osteoderms from armadillos, alligators, and leatherback turtles. Dermal armor has clearly been developed by convergent evolution in these different species. In general, it has a hierarchical structure with collagen fibers joining more rigid units (scales or osteoderms), thereby increasing flexibility without significantly sacrificing strength, in contrast to rigid monolithic mineral composites. These dermal structures are also multifunctional, with hydrodynamic drag (in fish), coloration for camouflage or intraspecies recognition, temperature and fluid regulation being other important functions. The understanding of such flexible dermal armor is important as it may provide a basis for new synthetic, yet bioinspired, armor materials. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Reptiles and Amphibians as Potential Reservoir Hosts of Chikungunya Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco-Lauth, Angela M; Hartwig, Airn E; Bowen, Richard A

    2018-03-01

    Chikungunya virus is an emerging arbovirus of significant human-health concern. Little is known about its sylvatic cycle, including whether ectothermic vertebrates are permissive to infection. In this study, individuals from ten species of reptiles and amphibians were inoculated with chikungunya virus and samples of blood were tested to characterize viremia and seroconversion. Viremia was not detected in cane toads, house geckos, or American alligators, but most of the green iguanas, red-eared sliders, ball and Burmese pythons, leopard frogs, Texas toads, and garter snakes developed viremia. Peak virus titers in serum of up to 4.5, 4.7, and 5.1 log 10 plaque-forming units per milliliter were observed for garter snakes, ball pythons, and Texas toads, respectively. These results add to those of other studies that have suggested a possible role for ectothermic vertebrates in the ecology of arbovirus maintenance and transmission in nature.

  4. Australian uranium resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battey, G.C.; Miezitis, Y.; McKay, A.D.

    1987-01-01

    Australia's uranium resources amount to 29% of the WOCA countries (world outside centrally-planned-economies areas) low-cost Reasonably Assured Resources and 28% of the WOCA countries low-cost Estimated Additional Resources. As at 1 January 1986, the Bureau of Mineral Resources estimated Australia's uranium resources as: (1) Cost range to US$80/kg U -Reasonably Assured Resources, 465 000 t U; Estimated Additional Resources, 256 000 t U; (2) Cost range US$80-130/kg U -Reasonably Assured Resources, 56 000 t U; Estimated Additional Resources, 127 000 t U. Most resources are contained in Proterozoic unconformity-related deposits in the Alligator Rivers uranium field in the Northern Territory (Jabiluka, Ranger, Koongarra, Nabarlek deposits) and the Proterozoic stratabound deposit at Olympic Dam on the Stuart Shelf in South Australia

  5. Tunisian date (Phoenix dactylifera L.) by-products: Characterization and potential effects on sensory, textural and antioxidant properties of dairy desserts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jridi, Mourad; Souissi, Nabil; Salem, Marwa Ben; Ayadi, M A; Nasri, Moncef; Azabou, Samia

    2015-12-01

    Three Tunisian date varieties, Deglet Nour, Kentichi and Allig, served to produce syrups and powders, which were then examined for their physico-chemical composition and antioxidant properties. Different proportions of these sweetening-like agents were incorporated to produce nine different formulations of dairy desserts, with lower amount of added sugars to avoid any artificial flavoring or coloring agents. Sensory and color evaluation data revealed that incorporating Deglet Nour and Kentichi syrup offers the most desirable formulation. Furthermore, syrup polysaccharides and fibers contribute to better maintain the final product texture. In addition, date by-products create a good source of natural thickening agents, involved in enhancing apparent viscosity and spontaneous exudation. Thanks to their high content in phenolic compounds, date by-products considerably improve antioxidant activities of the formulated desserts. Therefore, they could be valued as natural ingredients in the formulation of novel dairy products with high nutritional-properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The potential of the Kakadu National Park Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-11-01

    The Committee reviewed the potential of the Kakadu National Park region in the Northern Territory with particular reference to the nature of the resources available for exploitation and the impact of utilisation of these resources, particularly mining and tourism. Individual chapters discuss the Park, tourism, mineral resources (particularly the environmental and economic impacts of the Ranger Uranium Mine and the potential impacts of mining the Koongarra and Jabiluka deposits), the town of Jabiru, commercial fishing, other issues (the scientific resource, crocodiles, introduced species and fire), and park management and control (including a review of the role of the Office of the Supervising Scientist for the Alligator Rivers Region). A number of recommendations are made and the dissenting report of three of the Committee's members is included

  7. The role of ants in minesite restoration in the Kakadu region of Australia's Northern Territory, with particular reference to their use as bioindicators. Supervising Scientist report 130

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, A.N.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of land rehabilitation following mining in environmentally sensitive areas is often ecosystem restoration, rather than simply revegetation. This is the case at Ranger uranium mine (RUM) in the Alligator Rivers Region of Australia's Northern Territory. Effective methods of monitoring ecological restoration are therefore required. Ants have frequently been used as indicators of restoration success following mining in northern Australia, but the extent to which ants actually provide a reliable indication of ecological change has been poorly documented. This study aimed, primarily, to investigate the degree to which ants provide an indication of the general status of ecosystems and, secondarily, to examine the direct role of ants in ecosystem restoration. The final outcome was the development of procedures for using ants as bioindicators of restoration success following mining in the Ranger uranium mine region

  8. The role of collagen on the structural response of dermal layers in mammals and fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Vincent Robert

    We study in depth the role of collagen in the protective layers of mammals (skin) and fish (scales) in depth to reveal its contribution to their mechanical performance. In order to gain an understanding of the structure property relations, we investigate its hierarchical arrangement and how it results in a specialized response. For rabbit skin, chosen as a model material for the dermis of vertebrates, deformation is expressed in terms of four mechanisms of collagen fibril activity that virtually eliminate the possibility of tearing in notched samples: fibril straightening, fibril reorientation towards the tensile direction, elastic stretching, and interfibrillar sliding. A model reflecting the in vivo shape of collagen is derived. The model incorporates the effects of its elasticity, viscoelasticity, and orientation. For arapaima and alligator gar scales, we investigate their protective function and identify key features which result in their resistance to failure. For the elasmoid scales of the arapaima, we show that the scale has a Bouligand-like arrangement of collagen layers which stretch, rotate, and delaminate to dissipate energy and arrest cracking prior to catastrophic failure. Atop the foundation are mineral ridges; this arrangement provides high toughness and resistance to penetration by predator teeth. We show that the ganoid scales of the alligator gar have a boney composite foundation of collagen and hydroxyapatite as well as an external surface of pure hydroxyapatite. Failure averting features of the gar scale include: crack inhibiting mineral decussation in the external ganoine layer; mineral crystals and tubules which deflect cracks in the bony region; and saw-tooth ridges along the interface between the two scale layers which direct cracks away from the weak interface. Furthermore, the scale's geometry is optimized to provide full coverage while accommodating physiological motion. Key features of the scale morphology are replicated in a bioinspired

  9. Seasonal variability in Arctic temperatures during the early Eocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, J. J.; Fricke, H. C.; Humphrey, J.; Hackett, L.; Newbrey, M.; Hutchison, H.

    2009-12-01

    As a deep time analog for today’s rapidly warming Arctic region, early Eocene (~53 Ma) rocks on Ellesmere Island, Arctic Canada (~79° N.) preserve evidence of lush swamp forests inhabited by turtles, alligators, primates, tapirs, and hippo-like Coryphodon. Although the rich flora and fauna of the early Eocene Arctic imply warmer, wetter conditions that at present, quantitative estimates of Eocene Arctic climate are rare. By analyzing oxygen isotope ratios of biogenic phosphate from mammal, fish, and turtle fossils from a single locality on central Ellesmere Island, we provide estimates of early Eocene Arctic temperature, including mean annual temperature (MAT) of ~ 8° C, mean annual range in temperature (MART) of ~ 16.5° C, warm month mean temperature (WMMT) of 16 - 19° C, and cold month mean temperature (CMMT) of 0 - 1° C. Our seasonal range in temperature is similar to the range in estimated MAT obtained using different proxies. In particular, unusually high estimates of early Eocene Arctic MAT and sea surface temperature (SST) by others that are based upon the distribution of branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) membrane lipids in terrestrial soil bacteria and marine Crenarchaeota fall within our range of WMMT, suggesting a bias towards summer values. Consequently, caution should be taken when using these methods to infer MAT and SST that, in turn, are used to constrain climate models. From a paleontologic perspective, our temperature estimates verify that alligators and tortoises, by way of nearest living relative-based climatic inference, are viable paleoclimate proxies for mild, above-freezing year-round temperatures. Although in both of these reptiles, past temperature tolerances were greater than in their living descendants.

  10. Age and paragenesis of mineralisation at Coronation Hill uranium deposit, Northern Territory, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Karin; Meffre, Sebastien; Davidson, Garry

    2014-06-01

    Coronation Hill is a U + Au + platinum group elements deposit in the South Alligator Valley (SAV) field in northern Australia, south of the better known unconformity-style U East Alligator Rivers (EAR) field. The SAV field differs from the EAR by having a more complex basin-basement architecture. A volcanically active fault trough (Jawoyn Sub-basin) developed on older basement and then was disrupted by renewed faulting, before being buried beneath regional McArthur Basin sandstones that are also the main hanging wall to the EAR deposits. Primary mineralisation at Coronation Hill formed at 1607 ± 26 Ma (rather than 600-900 Ma as previously thought), and so it is likely that the SAV was part of a single west McArthur Basin dilational event. Most ore is hosted in sub-vertical faults and breccias in the competent volcanic cover sequence. This favoured fluid mixing, acid buffering (forming illite) and oxidation of Fe2+ and reduced C-rich assemblages as important uranium depositional mechanisms. However, reduction of U in fractured older pyrite (Pb model age of 1833 ± 67 Ma) is an important trap in diorite. Some primary ore was remobilised at 675 ± 21 Ma to form coarse uraninite + Ni-Co pyrite networks containing radiogenic Pb. Coronation Hill is polymetallic, and in this respect resembles the `egress'-style U deposits in the Athabascan Basin (Canada). However, these are all cover-hosted. A hypothesis for further testing is that Coronation Hill is also egress-style, with ores formed by fluids rising through basement-hosted fault networks (U reduction by diorite pyrite and carbonaceous shale), and into veins and breccias in the overlying Jawoyn Sub-basin volcano-sedimentary succession.

  11. Continuation of studies on thermoregulation of fish and turtles in thermally stressed habitats. Annual progress report, 1 October 1978-30 September 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spotila, J.R.

    1979-06-01

    A time dependent mathematical model accurately predicts heart, brain, and gut temperatures of largemouth bass. Body diameter, insulation thickness, and tissue thermal conductivity are controlling variables in the transfer of heat between a fish and water. Fish metabolic rate and water velocity across fish surfaces do not appreciably affect heat transfer rates. Multichannel temperature transmitters telemeter body temperatures of free swimming bass in Pond C on the Savannah River Plant while the behavior of those fish and other bass is recorded by an observer. Field studies of the home ranges and movements of turtles in Par Pond on the Savannah River Plant are completed. We have recorded the movements of 30 individuals fitted with radio transmitters. Distinct differences are apparent in the behavior of turtles in areas affected by heated effluents as compared to those in control areas. Calculations and theoretical analysis of the transient energy exchange of turtles are continuing. Laboratory experiments using /sup 133/Xe indicate that blood flow in the muscles and skin of alligators increases 2 to 6 fold during movement. Relative variation is similar in magnitude to that seen in human muscle. Evaporative water loss from alligators decreases as body size increases. The ratios of respiratory to cutaneous water loss are 1.80 at 5/sup 0/C, 1.18 at 25/sup 0/C and 0.85 at 35/sup 0/C. Boundary layer resistances to evaporative water loss are 6 fold less than predicted by calculations of aerodynamic boundary layers. Body size is a primary factor in determining the thermoregulatory strategy that is to be used by a given animal.Operative environmental temperatures (T/sub e/) are as high as 60/sup 0/C for a turtle basking on a log in the sun. In a rainstorm T/sub e/ drops to 18/sup 0/C. Experiments to measure T/sub e/ for turtles in normal and thermally affected areas are now continuing on the Savannah River Plant. (ERB)

  12. Characterisation and expression of Sox9 in the Leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valleley, E M; Cartwright, E J; Croft, N J; Markham, A F; Coletta, P L

    2001-04-15

    Since the discovery of the sex-determining gene, Sry, a number of genes have been identified which are involved in sex determination and gonadogenesis in mammals. Although Sry is known to be the testis-determining factor in mammals, this is not the case in non-mammalian vertebrates. Sox9 is another gene that has been shown to have a male-specific role in sex determination, but, unlike Sry, Sox9 has been shown to be involved in sex determination in mammals, birds, and reptiles. This is the first gene to be described that has a conserved role in sex determination in species with either chromosomal or environmental sex-determining mechanisms. Many reptiles do not have sex chromosomes but exhibit temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD). Sox9 has been shown to be expressed in both turtle and alligator during gonadogenesis. To determine if Sox9 also has a role in a gecko species with TSD, we studied gonadal expression of Sox9 during embryonic development of the Leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius). Gecko Sox9 was found to be highly conserved at the nucleotide level when compared to other vertebrate species including human, chick, alligator, and turtle. Sox9 was found to be expressed in embryos incubated at the male-producing temperature (32.5 degrees C) as well as in embryos incubated at the female-producing temperatures (26 and 34 degrees C), Northern blot analysis showed that Sox9 was expressed at both temperatures from morphological stages 31 to 37. mRNA in situ hybridisation on isolated urogenital systems showed expression at both female- and male-producing temperatures up to stage 36. After this stage, no expression was seen in the female gonads but expression remained in the male. These data provide further evidence that Sox9 is an essential component of a testis-determining pathway that is conserved in species with differing sex-determining mechanisms.

  13. Histological evidence for muscle insertion in extant amniote femora: implications for muscle reconstruction in fossils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petermann, Holger; Sander, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Since the 19th century, identification of muscle attachment sites on bones has been important for muscle reconstructions, especially in fossil tetrapods, and therefore has been the subject of numerous biological and paleontological studies. At the microscopic level, in histological thin sections, the only features that can be used reliably for identifying tendon-bone or muscle-tendon-bone interactions are Sharpey's fibers. Muscles, however, do not only attach to the bone indirectly with tendons, but also directly. Previous studies failed to provide new indicators for muscle attachment, or to address the question of whether muscles with direct attachment can be identified histologically. However, histological identification of direct muscle attachments is important because these attachments do not leave visible marks (e.g. scars and rugosities) on the bone surface. We dissected the right hind limb and mapped the muscle attachment sites on the femur of one rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), one Alligator mississippiensis, and one turkey (Meleagris cuniculus). We then extracted the femur and prepared four histological thin sections for the rabbit and the turkey and five histological thin sections for the alligator. Sharpey's fibers, vascular canal orientation, and a frayed periosteal margin can be indicators for indirect but also direct muscle attachment. Sharpey's fibers can be oriented to the cutting plane of the thin section at high angles, and two Sharpey's fibers orientations can occur in one area, possibly indicating a secondary force axis. However, only about 60% of mapped muscle attachment sites could be detected in thin sections, and frequently histological features suggestive of muscle attachment occurred outside mapped sites. While these insights should improve our ability to successfully identify and reconstruct muscles in extinct species, they also show the limitations of this approach. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Anatomy © 2013 Anatomical Society.

  14. On the Morphological Description of Tracheal and Esophageal Displacement and Its Phylogenetic Distribution in Avialae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy J Klingler

    Full Text Available This research examines the evolution and phylogenetic distribution of a peculiar and often overlooked character seen in birds, herein called tracheal and esophageal displacement. Tracheal and esophageal displacement refers to an asymmetrically situated trachea and/or esophagus along the length of the neck. This contrasts with what would be perceived as the "normal" (midsagittal placement of these organs, wherein the two organs are situated along the ventral midline of the neck with no deviation. A total of forty-two bird species were examined (thirty-six of which came from dissections whereas six came from comments from previous literature or personal observations, as well as turtles, lizards, crocodylians, and mammals. This study found that essentially all birds have a laterally displaced trachea and/or esophagus. Lizards and mammals were seen to have normal, midsagittally placed tracheae and esophagi. Crocodylians were interesting in that alligators were defined by a normally situated trachea and esophagus whereas some crocodiles were characterized by displacement. In birds, the displacement may occur gradually along the neck, or it may happen immediately upon exiting the oropharynx. Displacement of these organs in birds is the result of a heavily modified neck wherein muscles that restrict mobility of the trachea and esophagus in lizards, alligators, and mammals (e.g., m. episternocleidomastoideus, m. omohyoideus, and m. sternohyoideus no longer substantially restrict positions of the trachea and esophagus in birds. Rather, these muscles are modified in ways which may assist with making tracheal movements. The implications of this study may provide interesting insights for future comparisons in extinct taxa.

  15. Archosauriform endocranial morphology and osteological evidence for semiaquatic sensory adaptations in phytosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessner, Emily J; Stocker, Michelle R

    2017-11-01

    The examination of endocranial data of archosauriforms has led to advances on the evolution of body size, nerve pathways, and sensory abilities. However, much of that research has focused on bird-line archosaurs, resulting in a skewed view of Archosauria. Phytosauria, a hypothesized sister taxon to or early-branching member of Archosauria, provides a potential outgroup condition. Most previous phytosaur endocranial studies were executed without the use of modern technology and focused on derived members of Phytosauria. We present a comparative CT examination of the internal cranial anatomy of Wannia scurriensis, the most basal known parasuchid phytosaur. Wannia scurriensis shows some overall similarity with extant crocodylians and derived phytosaurs in general endocranial shape, a large hypophyseal fossa, and trigeminal (CN V) innervation, but as a whole, the endocast has noticeable differences to crocodylians and other phytosaurs. The pineal region is expanded dorsally as in other phytosaurs but also laterally (previously unrecognized). CN V exits the pons in a more dorsal position than in Parasuchus hislopi, Machaeroprosopus mccauleyi, or Smilosuchus gregorii. Wannia scurriensis also exhibits a larger hypophyseal fossa relative to brain size than observed in P. hislopi or S. gregorii, which may indicate more rapid growth. The well-preserved semicircular canals have lateral canals that are angled more anteroventrally than in derived phytosaurs. Extensive facial innervation from the large CN V indicates increased rostrum sensitivity and mechanoreceptive abilities as in Alligator mississippiensis. These endocranial similarities among phytosaurs and with Alligator indicate conserved ecological and functional results of an aquatic lifestyle, and highlight a need for further exploration of endocranial anatomy among Archosauriformes. © 2017 Anatomical Society.

  16. Molecular evolution and expression of archosaurian β-keratins: diversification and expansion of archosaurian β-keratins and the origin of feather β-keratins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwold, Matthew J; Sawyer, Roger H

    2013-09-01

    The archosauria consist of two living groups, crocodilians, and birds. Here we compare the structure, expression, and phylogeny of the beta (β)-keratins in two crocodilian genomes and two avian genomes to gain a better understanding of the evolutionary origin of the feather β-keratins. Unlike squamates such as the green anole with 40 β-keratins in its genome, the chicken and zebra finch genomes have over 100 β-keratin genes in their genomes, while the American alligator has 20 β-keratin genes, and the saltwater crocodile has 21 β-keratin genes. The crocodilian β-keratins are similar to those of birds and these structural proteins have a central filament domain and N- and C-termini, which contribute to the matrix material between the twisted β-sheets, which form the 2-3 nm filament. Overall the expression of alligator β-keratin genes in the integument increases during development. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrates that a crocodilian β-keratin clade forms a monophyletic group with the avian scale and feather β-keratins, suggesting that avian scale and feather β-keratins along with a subset of crocodilian β-keratins evolved from a common ancestral gene/s. Overall, our analyses support the view that the epidermal appendages of basal archosaurs used a diverse array of β-keratins, which evolved into crocodilian and avian specific clades. In birds, the scale and feather subfamilies appear to have evolved independently in the avian lineage from a subset of archosaurian claw β-keratins. The expansion of the avian specific feather β-keratin genes accompanied the diversification of birds and the evolution of feathers. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone from brains of reptiles: turtles (Pseudemys scripta) and snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, N M; Whittier, J M

    1988-03-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-like peptides were present in whole brain extracts of turtle (Pseudemys scripta) and snake (Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis) with higher content and concentration in the turtle brain. The peptides were identified by cross-reactivity profiles with four GnRH antisera and by retention times on reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) compared with synthetic GnRH standards. Turtle brain extracts contained two HPLC peaks that cross-reacted with GnRH antisera; these peaks eluted from the HPLC in the same positions as chicken I and II GnRH. Snake brain extracts contained only one major HPLC peak (and two minor peaks in some brains) that cross-reacted with anti-GnRH sera; the major peak eluted with the same retention time as chicken I GnRH. Mammalian, salmon, and lamprey GnRH-like peptides were not detected. In extracts from both turtle and snake brains, the cross-reactivity profile of the HPLC peaks compared with those of synthetic chicken I and II GnRH showed a similar order of sensitivity with four antisera. It is likely that chicken I and II GnRH-like peptides were present in ancestral reptiles prior to the evolution of the three living reptilian subclasses of Anapsida (turtle), Lepidosauria (snake and lizard), and Archosauria (alligator). This assertion is based on the present demonstration and work by others showing that chicken I and II GnRH-like peptides are in turtle and alligator, chicken I is in snake, and chicken II is in lizard.

  18. Postembryonic Nephrogenesis and Persistence of Six2-Expressing Nephron Progenitor Cells in the Reptilian Kidney.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troy Camarata

    Full Text Available New nephron formation (nephrogenesis ceases in mammals around birth and is completely absent in adults. In contrast, postembryonic nephrogenesis is well documented in the mesonephric kidneys of fishes and amphibians. The transient mesonephros in reptiles (including birds and mammals is replaced by the metanephros during embryogenesis. Thus, one may speculate that postembryonic nephrogenesis is restricted to the mesonephric kidney. Previous reports have suggested the metanephros of non-avian reptiles (hereafter reptiles may continually form nephrons throughout life. We investigated the presence of adult nephrogenesis in reptiles by examining adult kidneys from several species including Trachemys scripta, Chrysemys picta, Boa constrictor, Tupinambis tegu, Anolis carolinensis, and Alligator mississipiensis among others. We found that all major reptilian groups (Testudines, Crocodylia, and Squamates showed the presence of adult nephrogenesis. The total amount of nephrogenesis varied greatly between species with turtles displaying the highest density of nephrogenesis. In contrast, we were unable to detect adult nephrogenesis in monotremes, and in the iguanid A. carolinensis. Nephron progenitor cells express the transcription factor Six2, which in mammals, becomes downregulated as the progenitor cell population is exhausted and nephrogenesis ends. Using the alligator as a model, we were able to detect Six2-positive cap mesenchyme cells in the adult kidney, which spatially correlated with areas of nephrogenesis. These results suggest that the metanephric kidney of reptiles has maintained the ability to continually grow new nephrons during postembryonic life, a process lost early in mammalian evolution, likely due to the persistence of a Six2-expressing progenitor cell population.

  19. Identification of Pavement Distress Types and Pavement Condition Evaluation Based on Network Level Inspection for Jazan City Road Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mubaraki

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The first step in establishing a pavement management system (PMS is road network identification. An important feature of a PMS is the ability to determine the current condition of a road network and predict its future condition. Pavement condition evaluation may involve structure, roughness, surface distress, and safety evaluation. In this study, a pavement distress condition rating procedure was used to achieve the objectives of this study. The main objectives of this study were to identify the common types of distress that exist on the Jazan road network (JRN, either on main roads or secondary roads, and to evaluate the pavement condition based on network level inspection. The study was conducted by collecting pavement distress types from 227 sample units on main roads and 500 sample units from secondary roads. Data were examined through analysis of common types of distress identified in both main and secondary roads. Through these data, pavement condition index (PCI for each sample unit was then calculated. Through these calculations, average PCIs for the main and secondary roads were determined. Results indicated that the most common pavement distress types on main roads were patching and utility cut patching, longitudinal and transverse cracking, polished aggregate, weathering and raveling, and alligator cracking. The most common pavement distress types on secondary roads were weathering and raveling, patching and utility cut patching, longitudinal and transverse cracking, potholes, and alligator cracking. The results also indicated that 65% of Jazan's main road network has an average pavement condition rating of very good while only 30% of Jazan's secondary roads network has an average pavement condition.

  20. Iodine-enhanced micro-CT imaging: methodological refinements for the study of the soft-tissue anatomy of post-embryonic vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gignac, Paul M; Kley, Nathan J

    2014-05-01

    The now widespread use of non-destructive X-ray computed tomography (CT) and micro-CT (µCT) has greatly augmented our ability to comprehensively detail and quantify the internal hard-tissue anatomy of vertebrates. However, the utility of X-ray imaging for gaining similar insights into vertebrate soft-tissue anatomy has yet to be fully realized due to the naturally low X-ray absorption of non-mineralized tissues. In this study, we show how a wide diversity of soft-tissue structures within the vertebrate head-including muscles, glands, fat deposits, perichondria, dural venous sinuses, white and gray matter of the brain, as well as cranial nerves and associated ganglia-can be rapidly visualized in their natural relationships with extraordinary levels of detail using iodine-enhanced (i-e) µCT imaging. To date, Lugol's iodine solution (I2 KI) has been used as a contrast agent for µCT imaging of small invertebrates, vertebrate embryos, and certain isolated parts of larger, post-embryonic vertebrates. These previous studies have all yielded promising results, but visualization of soft tissues in smaller invertebrate and embryonic vertebrate specimens has generally been more complete than that for larger, post-embryonic vertebrates. Our research builds on these previous studies by using high-energy µCT together with more highly concentrated I2 KI solutions and longer staining times to optimize the imaging and differentiation of soft tissues within the heads of post-embryonic archosaurs (Alligator mississippiensis and Dromaius novaehollandiae). We systematically quantify the intensities of tissue staining, demonstrate the range of anatomical structures that can be visualized, and generate a partial three-dimensional reconstruction of alligator cephalic soft-tissue anatomy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Fate of Airborne Contaminants in Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winger, P.V.; Lasier, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    Designation of Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge as a Class I Air Quality Area (given the highest level of protection possible from air pollutants under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977) affords mandatory protection of the Refuge's airshed through the permit-review process for planned developments. Rainfall is the major source of water to the swamp, and potential impacts from developments to the airshed are high. To meet management needs for baseline information, chemical contributions from atmospheric deposition and partitioning of anions and cations, with emphasis on mercury and lead, in the various matrices of the Swamp were determined between July 1993 and April 1995. Chemistry of rainfall was determined on an event basis from one site located at Refuge Headquarters. Field samples of surface water, pore water, floc and sediment were collected from four locations on the Refuge: Chesser Prairie, Chase Prairie, Durden Prairie, and the Narrows. A sediment core sample was collected from the Refuge interior at Bluff Lake for aging of mercury deposition. Rainfall was acidic (pH 4.8) with sulfate concentrations averaging 1.2 mg/L and nitrate averaging 0.8 mg/L. Lead in rainfall averaged 1 ?g/L and total and methylmercury concentrations were 11.7 ng/L and 0.025 ng/L, respectively. The drought of 1993 followed by heavy rains during the fall and winter caused a temporary alteration in the cycling and availability of trace-elements within the different matrices of the Swamp. Surface water was acidic (pH 3.8 to 4.1), dilute (specific conductance 35-60 ?S/cm), and highly organic (DOC 35-50 mg/L). Sediment and floc were also highly organic (>90%). Total mercury averaged 3.6 ng/L in surface water, 9.0 ng/L in pore water and about 170 ng/g in floc and sediments. Mercury bioaccumulated in the biota of the Refuge: fish fillets (Centrarchus macropterus, Esox niger, Lepomus gulosus and Amia calva) had >2 ?g/g dry weight, alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) >4 ?g/g dry

  2. A yeast estrogen screen for examining the relative exposure of cells to natural and xenoestrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, S F; Robinson, M K; Notides, A C; Guillette, L J; McLachlan, J A

    1996-01-01

    Xenoestrogens, such as o,p'-DDT and octyl phenol (OP), have been associated with reproductive abnormalities in various wildlife species. Xenoestrogens mimic the natural estrogen 17 beta-estradiol and compete for binding to the estrogen receptor. Even though the affinity of o,p'-DDT and OP for the estrogen receptor is approximately 1000-fold lower than 17 beta-estradiol, the actions of xenoestrogens could be enhanced if their bioavailability in serum were greater than 17 beta-estradiol. To test this hypothesis, the yeast estrogen screen (YES) was created by expressing human estrogen receptor (hER) and two estrogen response elements (ERE) linked to the lacZ gene. The beta-galactosidase activity of the YES system was significantly increased after treatment with 17 beta-estradiol or the xenoestrogens diethylstilbestrol (DES), o,p'-DDT, and OP but not with vehicle, antiestrogen ICI 164,384, dexamethasone, or testosterone. To determine whether serum proteins affected the bioavailability of natural estrogens compared to xenoestrogens, albumin, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), or charcoal-stripped serum were added to the YES system and beta-galactosidase activity assayed. Albumin and SHBG decreased beta-galactosidase activity in the presence of estradiol to a greater extent than DES, o,p'-DDT, and OP. Human and alligator charcoal-stripped serum were also effective at selectively reducing beta-galactosidase activity in the presence of estradiol compared to xenoestrogens. Human serum was more effective than alligator serum in reducing beta-galactosidase activity in the presence of xenoestrogens, indicating that serum may serve as a biomarker for sensitivity to xenoestrogens. Selective binding of 17 beta-estradiol by proteins in serum indicates that certain xenoestrogens may exert greater estrogenicity than originally predicted. The estrogenic potency of a compound involves its binding affinity, bioavailability in serum, and persistence in the environment. Our data

  3. A comparative study of bio-inspired protective scales using 3D printing and mechanical testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Roberto; Balit, Yanis; Barthelat, Francois

    2017-06-01

    Flexible natural armors from fish, alligators or armadillo are attracting an increasing amount of attention for their unique combinations of hardness, flexibility and light weight. The extreme contrast of stiffness between hard scales and surrounding soft tissues gives rise to unusual and attractive mechanisms, which now serve as models for the design of bio-inspired armors. Despite this growing interest, there is little guideline for the choice of materials, optimum thickness, size, shape and arrangement for the protective scales. In this work, we explore how the geometry and arrangement of hard scales can be tailored to promote scale-scale interactions. We use 3D printing to fabricate arrays of scales with increasingly complex geometries and arrangements, from simple squares with no overlap to complex ganoid-scales with overlaps and interlocking features. We performed puncture tests and flexural tests on each of the 3D printed materials, and we report the puncture resistance - compliance characteristics of each design on an Ashby chart. The interactions between the scales can significantly increase the resistance to puncture, and these interactions can be maximized by tuning the geometry and arrangement of the scales. Interestingly, the designs that offer the best combinations of puncture resistance and flexural compliance are similar to the geometry and arrangement of natural teleost and ganoid scales, which suggests that natural evolution has shaped these systems to maximize flexible protection. This study yields new insights into the mechanisms of natural dermal armor, and also suggests new designs for personal protective systems. Flexible natural armors from fishes, alligators or armadillos are attracting an increasing amount of attention for their unique and attractive combinations of hardness, flexibility and low weight. Despite a growing interest in bio-inspired flexible protection, there is still little guideline for the choice of materials, optimum

  4. Chemical composition, true nutrient digestibility, and true metabolizable energy of novel pet food protein sources using the precision-fed cecectomized rooster assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, P; Utterback, P L; Parsons, C M; Hancock, L; Swanson, K S

    2016-08-01

    A wide variety of animal protein-based ingredients is commonly used in the pet food products. The raw ingredients and processing procedures used may greatly affect protein quality. Testing the quality of alternative protein sources is necessary and contributes to the sustainability of pet foods. The objective of this study was to test the chemical composition of 8 protein sources intended for use in dog and cat foods (calamari meal, pork peptone, alligator meal, lamb meal, venison meal, chicken meal, and 2 duck meals), and evaluate their true nutrient digestibility and nitrogen-corrected true ME (TMEn) using the precision-fed cecectomized rooster assay. Calamari meal and pork peptone had lower ash (4.4 and 3.6% of DM, respectively) but greater CP (88.1 and 80.5% of DM, respectively) and either greater or similar GE (5.6 and 5.3 kcal/g of DM, respectively) compared with alligator, lamb, venison, chicken, and duck meals (11.8 to 24.5% ash, 58.7 to 65.9% CP, and 4.6 to 5.3 kcal GE/g). Acid-hydrolyzed fat (AHF) was lower in calamari meal (8.7% of DM) compared with the other proteins tested (15.5-22.1% of DM). True nutrient digestibility was variable among the protein sources (52 to 79% of DM, 60 to 83% of OM, 78 to 92% of AHF, and 70 to 89% of GE) with pork peptone having the highest DM, AHF, and GE digestibility and calamari meal having the highest OM digestibility. True indispensable AA digestibility was highest for calamari meal, with all AA having a digestibility greater than 90%. Except for histidine, all indispensable AA had a digestibility over 85% for pork peptone. In contrast, true indispensable AA digestibility was lowest for lamb meal, with histidine having digestibility less than 70% and the other entire indispensable AA having digestibility between 72 and 88%. The TMEn of calamari meal (4.82 kcal/g DM and 86.9% of GE) was greater ( foods and justifies further in vivo testing of novel protein sources.

  5. Check-list of the pentastomid parasites crocodilians and freshwater chelonians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, K; Boomker, J

    2006-03-01

    Based on published records and own data a summary is given of the geographical distribution of the currently known species of pentastomid parasites infecting crocodiles and alligators, as well as freshwater chelonians. A brief generic diagnosis is provided for each genus. Fourteen out of the currently 23 living crocodilian species have been recorded as being host to one or more pentastomes. Out of the 32 pentastome species six are considered species inquirendae. Presently, six genera of crocodilian pentastomes, Agema, Alofia, Leiperia, Sebekia, Selfia and Subtriquetra are recognized. African crocodiles harbour eight pentastome species, six of which have been recorded from the Nile crocodile, Crocodylus niloticus. Three species belong to the genus Sebekia, Alofia being represented by two and Leiperia by only one species. Two species, Alofia parva and Agema silvae-palustris, occur in the dwarf crocodile, Osteolaemus tetraspis, and the slender-snouted crocodile, Crocodylus cataphractus, exclusively, but a single Sebekia species is shared with the Nile crocodile. The genus Agema is endemic to the African region. Infective stages of the pentastome Subtriquetra rileyi, thought to utilize Nile crocodiles as final hosts, have been recovered only from fishes. The largest number of pentastome species is found in the Australasian region. Of these, the Indo-Pacific crocodile, Crocodylus porosus, harbours seven, representing the genera Alofia, Sebekia, Leiperia and Selfia. Selfia is exclusive to the latter host. The genus Subtriquetra has been reported from "Indian crocodiles", a term possibly referring to either Crocodylus palustris, Crocodylus porosus or Gavialis gangeticus. Ten species of pentastomes parasitizing the crocodilian genera Alligator, Caiman, Crocodylus and Melanosuchus have been recorded from the Neotropical region including the southern states of the North American continent. The two most wide-spread pentastome genera, Alofia and Sebekia, have been recorded

  6. Bioaccumulation of trace elements in fish as an early detection of impact from uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauerland, C.; Buckle, D.; Humphrey, C.; Jones, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    The open-cut Ranger uranium mine is located in the Alligator Rivers Region about 250 km east of Darwin, northern Australia. In this paper we evaluate a two-decade time series of monitoring data to assess bioaccumulation of contaminants in fish collected from the first permanent water body downstream of the mine (Mudginberri Billabong) and from a control site (Sandy Billabong). Due to the potential for enrichment of some contaminants in fish tissues, the bioaccumulation monitoring can provide early warning of levels of metals that could impact on human health. A review of long-term monitoring data, ranging from 1980 (pre-mining) to 2003, of selected metals (cadmium, copper, lead, manganese, uranium and zinc) revealed that none of these contaminants have significantly increased over time, and that fish tissue concentrations are similar for Mudginberri Billabong and Sandy Billabong. Most copper and zinc tissue concentrations are above the generally expected levels for fish flesh at both the 'impact' and control site (i.e. the 90th percentile of the Australian National Residue Survey Results, 2003) reflecting the naturally higher metal and radionuclide concentrations in the Alligator Rivers Region. Lead concentrations in all fish flesh studied are below the maximum level of 0.5 mg/kg wet weight (Australian and New Zealand food standards). Concentrations of the selected metals are higher in viscera than in flesh. This indicates their potential to bioaccumulate in fish, which is also consistent with the published literature. In all fish analysed in this study, concentrations of uranium and manganese are lower than for copper, lead and zinc. In recent years (2000, 2002 and 2003) fish tissues were analysed more comprehensively for a suite of over 20 contaminants in flesh, liver, gill and bone tissues. Interestingly, the metals appeared to accumulate in specific fish organs: aluminium was highest in gill; barium, lead, manganese and uranium were highest in bones; and

  7. Vascular patterns in the heads of crocodilians: blood vessels and sites of thermal exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, William Ruger; Sedlmayr, Jayc C; Witmer, Lawrence M

    2016-12-01

    Extant crocodilians are a highly apomorphic archosaur clade that is ectothermic, yet often achieve large body sizes that can be subject to higher heat loads. Therefore, the anatomical and physiological roles that blood vessels play in crocodilian thermoregulation need further investigation to better understand how crocodilians establish and maintain cephalic temperatures and regulate neurosensory tissue temperatures during basking and normal activities. The cephalic vascular anatomy of extant crocodilians, particularly American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) was investigated using a differential-contrast, dual-vascular injection technique and high resolution X-ray micro-computed tomography (μCT). Blood vessels were digitally isolated to create representations of vascular pathways. The specimens were then dissected to confirm CT results. Sites of thermal exchange, consisting of the oral, nasal, and orbital regions, were given special attention due to their role in evaporative cooling and cephalic thermoregulation in other diapsids. Blood vessels to and from sites of thermal exchange were studied to detect conserved vascular patterns and to assess their ability to deliver cooled blood to neurosensory tissues. Within the orbital region, both the arteries and veins demonstrated consistent branching patterns, with the supraorbital, infraorbital, and ophthalmotemporal vessels supplying and draining the orbit. The venous drainage of the orbital region showed connections to the dural sinuses via the orbital veins and cavernous sinus. The palatal region demonstrated a vast plexus that comprised both arteries and veins. The most direct route of venous drainage of the palatal plexus was through the palatomaxillary veins, essentially bypassing neurosensory tissues. Anastomotic connections with the nasal region, however, may provide an alternative route for palatal venous blood to reach neurosensory tissues. The nasal region in crocodilians is probably the most

  8. Scaling of standard metabolic rate in estuarine crocodiles Crocodylus porosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Roger S; Gienger, C M; Brien, Matthew L; Tracy, Christopher R; Charlie Manolis, S; Webb, Grahame J W; Christian, Keith A

    2013-05-01

    Standard metabolic rate (SMR, ml O2 min(-1)) of captive Crocodylus porosus at 30 °C scales with body mass (kg) according to the equation, SMR = 1.01 M(0.829), in animals ranging in body mass of 3.3 orders of magnitude (0.19-389 kg). The exponent is significantly higher than 0.75, so does not conform to quarter-power scaling theory, but rather is likely an emergent property with no single explanation. SMR at 1 kg body mass is similar to the literature for C. porosus and for alligators. The high exponent is not related to feeding, growth, or obesity of captive animals. The log-transformed data appear slightly curved, mainly because SMR is somewhat low in many of the largest animals (291-389 kg). A 3-parameter model is scarcely different from the linear one, but reveals a declining exponent between 0.862 and 0.798. A non-linear model on arithmetic axes overestimates SMR in 70% of the smallest animals and does not satisfactorily represent the data.

  9. Numerical Investigation of Shock Wave Propagation in Bone-Like Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelms, Matt; Rajendran, Arunachalam

    In this investigation, the effects of shock wave propagation in bone-like biomineralized tissue was investigated. The Alligator gar (Atractosteus spatula) exoskeleton is comprised of many disparate scales that provide a biological analog for potential design of flexible protective material systems. The penetration resistant fish scale was modeled by simulating a plate impact test configuration using ABAQUS®finite element (FE) software. The gar scale is identified as a two-phase, (1) hydroxyapatite mineral and (2) collagen protein, biological composite with two distinct layers where a stiff, ceramic-like ganoine overlays a soft, highly ductile bone. The geometry and variation of elastic modulus were determined from high-resolution scanning electron microscopy and dynamic nanoindentation experimentation to develop an idealized computational model for RVE-based FE simulations. The numerical analysis shows the effects of different functional material property variations on the stress histories and energy dissipation generated by wave propagation. Given the constitutive behaviors of the two layers are distinctly different, a brittle tensile damage model was employed to describe the ganoine and Drucker-Prager plasticity was used for the nonlinear response of the bone.

  10. Erosional stability of rehabilitated uranium mine structures incorporating natural landform characteristics, northern tropical Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    East, T.J.; Uren, C.J.; Noller, B.N.; Cull, R.F.; Curley, P.M.; Unger, C.J.

    1994-01-01

    Australian Government guidelines specify that tailings containment structures at rehabilitated uranium mines in the Alligator Rivers Region of tropical northern Australia should have an engineered structural life of 1000 years. As part of the containment structure design process, erosion plots incorporating both regional geomorphological characteristics (concave hillslope profiles and a weathering-resistant rock cover of schist) and more conventional engineering design parameters (straight slopes and mine waste rock) were constructed at the Ranger Uranium Mine. The plots were monitored for storm runoff, and concentrations of solutes, suspended solids and selected ions over successive wet seasons. The concave slopes (the hillslope analogues) had lower peak discharges and lower concentrations of suspended solids than the straight slopes. However, solute concentrations in runoff from the schist covered (hillslope) slopes were higher than from the waste rock covered plots. Solute (mainly magnesium sulfate) concentrations for both rock types decreased by about an order of magnitude over the wet season. High sulfate concentrations are also likely to decrease substantially after several wet seasons, due to settlement of the waste rock and a reduction in rates of weathering. Development of a vegetation cover on the rehabilitated landforms will reduce the high suspended sediment concentrations. These initial results suggest that rehabilitated uranium mine structures which utilise selected features of stable natural landforms in their design may have greater erosional stability than more conventionally engineered structures. (orig.)

  11. Discovery of the elusive leptin in birds: identification of several 'missing links' in the evolution of leptin and its receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy W Prokop

    Full Text Available Leptin is a pleiotropic protein best known for regulation of appetite and fat storage in mammals. While many leptin orthologs have been identified among vertebrates, an authentic leptin in birds has remained elusive and controversial. Here we identify leptin sequence from the Peregrine falcon, Falco peregrinus (pfleptin, and identify sequences from two other birds (mallard and zebra finch, and 'missing' vertebrates (elephant shark, alligator, Indian python, Chinese soft-shelled turtle, and coelacanth. The pattern of genes surrounding leptin (snd1, rbm28 is syntenic between the falcon and mammalian genomes. Phylogenetic analysis of all known leptin protein sequences improves our understanding of leptin's evolution. Structural modeling of leptin orthologs highlights a highly conserved hydrophobic core in the four-helix cytokine packing domain. A docked model of leptin with the leptin receptor for Peregrine falcon reveals several conserved amino acids important for the interaction and possible coevolution of leptin with its receptor. We also show for the first time, an authentic avian leptin sequence that activates the JAK-STAT signaling pathway. These newly identified sequences, structures, and tools for avian leptin and its receptor will allow elucidation of the function of these proteins in feral and domestic birds.

  12. Injuries, envenomations and stings from exotic pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, Clifford; Steedman, Catrina

    2012-07-01

    A variety of exotic vertebrate and invertebrate species are kept as 'pets' including fishes, amphibians (for example, frogs and toads), reptiles (turtles, crocodiles, lizards and snakes), birds, mammals (for example, primates, civets, and lions), and invertebrates (for example spiders, scorpions, and centipedes), and ownership of some of these animals is rising. Data for 2009-2011 suggest that the number of homes with reptiles rose by approximately 12.5%. Recent surveys, including only some of these animals, indicated that they might be present in around 18.6% of homes (equal to approximately 42 million animals of which around 40 million are indoor or outdoor fish). Many exotic 'pets' are capable of causing injury or poisoning to their keepers and some contacts prove fatal. We examined NHS Health Episode Statistics for England using selected formal categories for hospital admissions and bed days for 2004-2010 using the following categories of injury, envenomation or sting; bitten or struck by crocodile or alligator; bitten or crushed by other reptiles: contact with venomous snakes and lizards; contact with scorpions. Between 2004 and 2010 these data conservatively show a total of 760 full consultation episodes, 709 admissions and 2,121 hospital bed days were associated with injuries probably from exotic pets. Injuries, envenomations and stings from exotic pets constitute a small but important component of emerging medical problems. Greater awareness of relevant injuries and medical sequelae from exotic pet keeping may help medics formulate their clinical assessment and advice to patients.

  13. Moving Forward With the Past: History and Identity in Marie-Célie Agnant’s La Dot de Sara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy M. Schultz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Francophone writers and theorists have long worked to establish a cultural identity true to their collective past and free of Western authority and influence. They reflect in their works the need to find their own voice and validate their own perspective in the face of a history fraught with colonial influence and domination. Marie-Célie Agnant, a Francophone writer of Haitian descent living in Montreal, addresses this search for history and identity through the lens of Haitian immigrant characters in her works, namely La Dot de Sara (1995, Le Livre d’Emma (2001, and Un alligator nommé Rosa (2007. Agnant’s works treat the questions of identity and belonging through the experiences of her characters who are exiled from their native roots. Past histories must be recovered, transmitted and often translated repeatedly in order to maintain a connection to one’s cultural identity and history. This re-visioning of their past history and identity, however, often conflicts with the daily lives of her characters, interfering with their adjustment to their new host culture and preventing them from fully participating in contemporary society. The quandary of preserving a connection to the past while participating in modern society reveals itself most poignantly in La Dot de Sara .

  14. Geophysical Characterization Of Groundwater in the Mangrove Lakes Region of Everglades National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiflai, M. E.; Whitman, D.; Price, R.; Frankovich, T.; Allen, J.

    2017-12-01

    Everglades National Park has been adversely impacted by past human activities that altered freshwater flow through the system. The Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) makes an effort to increase the flow of fresh water and modify the groundwater chemistry in Everglades National Park (ENP). This paper aims to present the changes in surface and ground water chemistry in response to CERP project. Electromagnetic (EM) surveys were conducted in Alligator Creek (West Lake) and McCormick Creek (Seven Palm) from 2013 to 2017. During the survey a GSSI Profiler EMP-400, multi- frequency Electromagnetic (EM) conductivity meter was deployed in a flat bottomed plastic kayak towed behind a motorized skiff. An inverse model of the data is performed by constraining the resistivity value of the surface water fixed. Then, the salinity of the groundwater is estimated by assuming a formation factor of 5. In the McCormick Creek system, between January 2016 and February 2017 the salinity of the groundwater shows a considerable decreases. In the northern end of Seven Palm, the salinity decreases from 3.64 PSU in 2016 to 2.5 PSU in 2017. In the southern end the salinity decreases from 8.05 PSU in 2016 to 3.05 in 2017. This demonstrates how the salinity of the groundwater increase from north to south and decreases yearly. Future work will integrate the EM data with DC resistivity measurements collected from a floating Schlumberger array.

  15. Reproductive effects from oestrogen activity in polluted water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumpter, J.P. [Brunel Univ., Uxbridge (United Kingdom). Dept. of Biology and Biochemistry

    1998-12-31

    A new area of ecotoxicology, now usually called endocrine disruption, has arisen in the last few years. However, despite the present topicality of this issue, some of the best documented examples of endocrine disruption were reported a decade or more ago (see, for example, Fry, 1995). The issue is concerned with the effects of chemicals that mimic endogenous hormones on the physiology of exposed wildlife and humans. As many of these xenohormones minic steroid hormones, especially oestrogens and androgens, most of the reported effects have involved effects on the reproductive system of exposed organisms. Many of these reported effects on wildlife have concerned aquatic, rather than terrestrial, organisms (even the well-documented effects on birds are primarily concerned with water birds, which feed predominantly on fish); the reproductive abnormalities seen in alligators living in some lakes in Florida and the oestrogenic effects on fish reported in British rivers (this example is discussed in detail below) provide good examples of the type of effects observed in aquatic organisms. This predominance of effects on aquatic organisms could reflect an unconscious bias of the interests of research scientists (are there more wildlife biologists interested in aquatic, rather than terrestrial, animals?), but is perhaps more likely a consequence of the fact that the aquatic environmemnt is the ultimate `sink` for the international or unintentional disposal of much waste. (orig.)

  16. Jabiluka gold-uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Jabiluka gold-uranium deposit, 230km east of Darwin in the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory, was discovered by Pancontinental Mining Limited in 1971. Jabiluka, with reserves in excess of 200,000 tonnes of contained U 3 O 8 in two deposits 500 metres apart, is the world's largest high grade uranium deposit and also contains nearly 12 tonnes of gold. It is proposed that only the larger deposit, Jabiluka II will be mined - by underground extraction methods, and that 275,000 tonnes of ore per year will be mined and processed to produce 1,500 tonnes of U 3 O 8 and up to 30,000 oz of gold. The revenue from the uranium sales is estimated to be of the order of A$100 million per year at A$30/lb. By the end of 1982 all necessary mining and environmental approvals had been obtained and significant marketing progress made. With the Australian Labor Party winning Commonwealth Government in the 1983 election, Pancontinental's permission to seek sales contracts was withdrawn and development of the Jabiluka deposit ceased. Jabiluka remains undeveloped - awaiting a change in Australian Government policy on uranium. figs., maps

  17. Darwin’s earthworms (Annelida, Oligochaeta, Megadrilacea with review of cosmopolitan Metaphire peguana–species group from Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blakemore, R.J.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A chance visit to Darwin allowed inspection of and addition to Northern Territory (NT Museum’s earthworm collection. Native Diplotrema zicsii sp. nov. from Alligator River, Kakadu NP is described. Town samples were dominated by cosmopolitan exotic Metaphire bahli (Gates, 1945 herein keyed and compared morpho-molecularly with M. peguana (Rosa, 1890 requiring revision of allied species including Filipino Pheretima philippina (Rosa, 1891, P. p. lipa and P. p. victorias sub-spp. nov. A new P. philippina-group now replaces the dubia-group of Sims & Easton, 1972 and Amynthas carinensis (Rosa, 1890 further replaces their sieboldi-group. Lumbricid Eisenia fetida (Savigny, 1826 and Glossoscolecid Pontoscolex corethrurus (Müller, 1857 are confirmed introductions to the NT. mtDNA barcodes newly include Metaphire houlleti (Perrier, 1872 and Polypheretima elongata (Perrier, 1872 spp.-complexes from the Philippines. Pithemera philippinensis James & Hong, 2004 and Pi. glandis Hong & James, 2011 are new synonyms of Pi. bicincta (Perrier, 1875 that is common in Luzon. Vietnamese homonym Pheretima thaii Nguyen, 2011 (non P. thaii Hong & James, 2011 is replaced with Pheretima baii nom. nov. Two new Filipino taxa are also described: Pleionogaster adya sp. nov. from southern Luzon and Pl. miagao sp. nov. from western Visayas.

  18. Estimating cranial musculoskeletal constraints in theropod dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautenschlager, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    Many inferences on the biology, behaviour and ecology of extinct vertebrates are based on the reconstruction of the musculature and rely considerably on its accuracy. Although the advent of digital reconstruction techniques has facilitated the creation and testing of musculoskeletal hypotheses in recent years, muscle strain capabilities have rarely been considered. Here, a digital modelling approach using the freely available visualization and animation software Blender is applied to estimate cranial muscle length changes and optimal and maximal possible gape in different theropod dinosaurs. Models of living archosaur taxa (Alligator mississippiensis, Buteo buteo) were used in an extant phylogenetically bracketed framework to validate the method. Results of this study demonstrate that Tyrannosaurus rex, Allosaurus fragilis and Erlikosaurus andrewsi show distinct differences in the recruitment of the jaw adductor musculature and resulting gape, confirming previous dietary and ecological assumptions. While the carnivorous taxa T. rex and Allo. fragilis were capable of a wide gape and sustained muscle force, the herbivorous therizinosaurian E. andrewsi was constrained to small gape angles.

  19. Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN)—A decade of serving hydrologic information to scientists and resource managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Eduardo; Conrads, Paul; Swain, Eric; Beerens, James M.

    2017-10-30

    IntroductionThe Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN) provides scientists and resource managers with regional maps of daily water levels and depths in the freshwater part of the Greater Everglades landscape. The EDEN domain includes all or parts of five Water Conservation Areas, Big Cypress National Preserve, Pennsuco Wetlands, and Everglades National Park. Daily water-level maps are interpolated from water-level data at monitoring gages, and depth is estimated by using a digital elevation model of the land surface. Online datasets provide time series of daily water levels at gages and rainfall and evapotranspiration data (https://sofia.usgs.gov/eden/). These datasets are used by scientists and resource managers to guide large-scale field operations, describe hydrologic changes, and support biological and ecological assessments that measure ecosystem response to the implementation of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan. EDEN water-level data have been used in a variety of biological and ecological studies including (1) the health of American alligators as a function of water depth, (2) the variability of post-fire landscape dynamics in relation to water depth, (3) the habitat quality for wading birds with dynamic habitat selection, and (4) an evaluation of the habitat of the Cape Sable seaside sparrow.

  20. Uptake of uranium and thorium series radionuclides by the waterlily, Nymphaea violacea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, H.B.L. [Lund Univ. Teaching Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics; Hancock, G.; Johnston, A.; Murray, A.S. [Alligator Rivers Region Research Inst., Jabiru (Australia)

    1993-10-01

    The waterlily, Nymphaea violacea, is a major aquatic macrophyte in the waters of the Alligator Rivers Region, Northern Territory, Australia. It is also a traditional Aboriginal diet item, and is considered to be potentially one of the main contributors to the effective dose equivalent arising from consumption of so called bush food in the region. Because of the proximity of the Ranger Uranium Mine (RUM), the activity concentrations of the U and Th series radionuclides have been studied in water, sediment and waterlily during different seasons at five sites downstream of the mine site. The objectives of the study were to identify the major source of radionuclide uptake by the plant; i.e. water or sediment; to assess the concentration factors/ratios needed for predicting the radiation exposure of the critical group resulting from any discharge of water to the aquatic environment from the Ranger uranium mine; to estimate the natural radiation exposure of the public arising from consumption of waterlilies. (Author).

  1. Erosional stability of rehabilitated uranium mine structures incorporating natural landform characteristics, northern tropical Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    East, T.J. [Bureau of Resource Sciences, Canberra (Australia); Uren, C.J. [Alligator Rivers Region Research Institute, Jabiru Northern Territory (Australia); Noller, B.N. [Alligator Rivers Region Research Institute, Jabiru Northern Territory (Australia); Cull, R.F. [Alligator Rivers Region Research Institute, Jabiru Northern Territory (Australia); Curley, P.M. [Ranger Uranium Mines, Jabiru Northern Territory (Australia); Unger, C.J. [Ranger Uranium Mines, Jabiru Northern Territory (Australia)

    1994-09-01

    Australian Government guidelines specify that tailings containment structures at rehabilitated uranium mines in the Alligator Rivers Region of tropical northern Australia should have an engineered structural life of 1000 years. As part of the containment structure design process, erosion plots incorporating both regional geomorphological characteristics (concave hillslope profiles and a weathering-resistant rock cover of schist) and more conventional engineering design parameters (straight slopes and mine waste rock) were constructed at the Ranger Uranium Mine. The plots were monitored for storm runoff, and concentrations of solutes, suspended solids and selected ions over successive wet seasons. The concave slopes (the hillslope analogues) had lower peak discharges and lower concentrations of suspended solids than the straight slopes. However, solute concentrations in runoff from the schist covered (hillslope) slopes were higher than from the waste rock covered plots. Solute (mainly magnesium sulfate) concentrations for both rock types decreased by about an order of magnitude over the wet season. High sulfate concentrations are also likely to decrease substantially after several wet seasons, due to settlement of the waste rock and a reduction in rates of weathering. Development of a vegetation cover on the rehabilitated landforms will reduce the high suspended sediment concentrations. These initial results suggest that rehabilitated uranium mine structures which utilise selected features of stable natural landforms in their design may have greater erosional stability than more conventionally engineered structures. (orig.)

  2. Division of Stress and Wildlife Ecology FY-1985 highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The major objective of the Division is to examine the influences of natural and man-made stressors on plant and animal populations and communities, primarily in southeastern ecosystems. Special attention is given to understanding the ecology and life history of wildlife populations, particularly those native to the SRP. The research programs are ultimately designed to assess the responses of populations and communities to various perturbations, but emphasis is placed on basic ecological studies that establish the solid foundation of information necessary to conduct applied research. Specific studies have looked at the availability and utilization of habitat types by various species. Biomass and reproduction studies on different vertebrate species have yielded comparative information on variation between populations in different geographic regions. Research on the endangered species that occur on the SRP has provided background data necessary to allow SREL scientists to recommend control and mitigation measures for the American alligator and wood stork. Investigations of waterfowl utilization patterns in reactor-affected and unaffected aquatic habitats on the SRP have yielded valuable information on the effects of reactor operations on these game species. Electrophoretic and morphological measurements have been made on a number of the local vertebrate species in addressing problems in genetics and population dynamics. Special emphasis has been placed on the actual or potential effects of reactor operations on fish, including larval fish in riverine swamp systems, and on several game and non-game species of reptiles and mammals

  3. Agency interaction at the Savannah River Plant under the Endangered Species Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The 300 square mile Savannah River Plant (SRP) offers a variety of protected habitats for endangered species including the alligator (resident), red-cockaded woodpecker (resident), short-nose sturgeon (migratory), and wood stork (fish-forager). The most recent of these four species to be listed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (US FWS) is the wood stork. It had been observed prior to 1983 as an infrequent forager in the SRP Savannah River Swamp which adjoins SRP on the south and southwest. In anticipation of its listing as an endangered species, DOE-SR requested in the spring of 1983 that the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, conduct field surveys and studies of the nearest colony of wood storks to SRP (the Birdsville colony in north-central Georgia). The objective of these studies was to determine potential effects of the flooding of the Steel Creek swamp area with cooling water from L-Reactor. L-Reactor, which is proposed for restart, has not been operated since 1968. The survey found that wood storks forage in the Steel Creek delta swamp area of the Savannah River at SRP. Based on the numbers of storks at various foraging locations, sites at SRP ranked higher than non-SRP sites during the pre-fledging phase of the colony. Cold flow testing of L-Reactor also demonstrated that foraging sites in the Steel Creek delta would be unavailable during L-Reactor operation because of increased water levels

  4. Annual Report 1995-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    The report provides background information on uranium mining in the Alligator Rivers Region (ARR), the objectives, functions, resources and 1995-1996 performance indicators for the Supervising Scientist. It also contains program reports for the various supervisory and research programs of the organisation. The focus of scientific research by the Environmental Research Institute of the Supervising Scientist has been reassessed and collaborative mechanisms established with Energy Resources of Australia Ltd., to improve the efficiency and timeliness of the research being conducted in the region. Activities outside ARR included continuation of a joint program with the Tasmanian Government to evaluate options for remediation of environmental impacts due to the Mount Lyell copper-gold mine; participation in program with the EPA to promote the adoption of best practice environmental management by the mining industry (the mining industry is contributing extensively to this program); development of a partnership with ACMRR to enhance the level of training and strategic research into environmental issues in mining; provision of environmental management service to the Indian Ocean Territories on behalf of the Commonwealth Territories Office; membership of the Visiting Ship(Nuclear) Panel; and provision of advice on a range of domestic and international mining, radiological and nuclear issues to the Minister and on behalf of Department of Energy Science and Tourism. 26 figs., 9 tabs

  5. Early development and differentiation of the Laysan albatross (Phoebastria immutabilis (Rothschild, 1893): Procellariiformes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehorek, Susan J; Smith, Timothy D; Beeching, Simon C

    2016-09-01

    Bird incubation is subdivided into two phases: differentiation (embryonic phase) and growth (fetal phase). Most birds have a relatively short incubation period (20-30 days) with the phase transition occurring midway through the incubation period. The Laysan albatross (Phoebastris immutabilis) is a large pelagic bird with a long incubation period. The purpose of this study was to document the differentiation phase with the aim of ascertaining the impact of a lengthened incubation on embryonic development. Eighty-two previously collected albatross embryos were examined, measured, and staged. The albatross was found to develop more slowly than smaller birds, with a rate similar to other long-incubating birds. Legs and wings grow at similar rates but exhibit variation in growth among their anatomical components. While the albatross embryos shared some morphological stages with chickens, they were more similar to ducks and pelicans. Special features of the albatross not shared with the Gallianserae (chickens and ducks) included an alligator-like curved tail, narial tubes, and a cloacal bulge. Further examination of other larger pelagic birds with long incubation periods are needed to determine the uniqueness of the Laysan albatross embryonic development. Although much embryonic phase growth was documented in the postnatal period, little is known about the later, fetal phase in Laysan albatross. Future studies should involve examination of later (post day 32) fetuses. J. Morphol. 277:1231-1249, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. A FEASIBILITY STUDY ON USE OF GENERIC MOBILE LASER SCANNING SYSTEM FOR DETECTING ASPHALT PAVEMENT CRACKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Chen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to automatically detect pavement cracks on urban roads by employing the 3D point clouds acquired by a mobile laser scanning (MLS system. Our method consists of four steps: ground point filtering, high-pass convolution, matched filtering, and noise removal. First, a voxel-based upward growing method is applied to construct Digital Terrain Model (DTM of the road surface. Then, a high-pass filter convolutes the DTM to detect local elevation changes that may embed cracking information. Next, a two-step matched filter is applied to extract crack features. Lastly, a noise removal process is conducted to refine the results. Instead of using MLS intensity, this study takes advantages of the MLS elevation information to perform automated crack detection from large-volume, mixed-density, unstructured MLS point clouds. Four types of cracks including longitudinal, transvers, random, and alligator cracks are detected. Our results demonstrated that the proposed method works well with the RIEGL VMX-450 point clouds and can detect cracks in moderate-to-severe severity (13 - 25 mm within a 200 m by 30 m urban road segment located in Kingston, Ontario, at one time. Due to the resolution capability, small cracks with slight severity remain unclear in the MLS point cloud.

  7. Determination of the antioxidant capacity, total phenolic and flavonoid contents of seeds from three commercial varieties of culinary dates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacopo Mistrello

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Date seeds are a major waste product of the date industry that could offer potentially valuable material for the production of useful food ingredients. The aim of the present study was to investigate the seeds of three date varieties of the UK market (Deglet Nour, Khouat Allig, and Zahidi for their proximate composition, total phenolic (TPC, total flavonoid (TFC contents and total antioxidant capacity (TAC with a view to their eventual industrial application. Carbohydrates were present in the highest concentrations varying between 74.13 and 76.54 g 100 g-1 of date seed powder (DSP on dry weight (DW basis, followed in descending order by fats (7.64-8.84 g 100 g-1 and proteins (4.35-5.51 g 100 g-1. Potassium was found in high amounts with values ranging between 280.55 and 293.13 mg 100 g-1. The majority of the total phenolic content (2058-2984 mg GAE 100 g-1 was assumed to be composed of flavonoids (1271-1932 mg CAE 100 g-1. These families of dietary phenolics may be the major ones responsible for the high antioxidant capacity reported in date seeds, which varied from 12540 and 27699 µmol TE 100 g-1. These results suggest that date seeds can be considered a potential raw material for natural, active ingredients for food applications as well as an unexplored source of novel nutraceuticals and dietary supplements.

  8. The vertebrates from the Lower Ladinian (Middle Triassic) bonebed of Lamerden (Germany) as palaeoenvironment indicators in the Germanic Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedrich, Cajus G.

    2015-11-01

    A marine/limnic vertebrate fauna is described from the enodis/posseckeri Bonebed mixed in a bivalve shell-rich bioclastic carbonate rudstone at the eastern coastal margin of the Rhenish Massif mainland at Lamerden (Germany) within the western Germanic Basin (Central Europe). The condensation layer is of Fassanian (Ladinian, Middle Triassic) in age. The vertebrate biodiversity includes five different shark, and several actinopterygian fish species represented by teeth and scales. Abundant isolated bones from a small- and a large-sized pachypleurosaur Neusticosaurus species, which can be composed as incomplete skeletons, originate from dense populations of different individual age stages. Important facies indicator reptiles are from the thalattosaur Blezingeria ichthyospondyla which postcranial skeleton is reconstructed hypothetically using additional postcranial bones from similar aged various German localities. The vertebrate biodiversity of the enodis/posseckeri bonebed of Lamerden reflect a limnic/fluvial freshwater influenced fauna (amphibians/terrestrial and marine reptiles) with dominance of normal saline marine influences. Macroalgae meadow adapted placodont reptiles are absent in Lamerden, as well as open marine-adapted ichthyosaurs, supporting a lagoon with fresh water influence position at the Rhenish Massif mainland coast. In those contemporanous brackish lagoons, which seem to be isochronous to northern Tethys lagoons of the Kalschieferzone at the Monte San Giorgio (Switzerland/Italy), small pachypleurosaurs were abundant prey in both regions for reptile predators, especially large paraxial swimming alligator habitus-like Paranothosaurus, which even contain stomach contents of pachypleurosaurs.

  9. Crocodilians and other reptiles: bioindicators of pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manolis, S.C.; Webb, G.J.; Britton, A.R.

    2002-01-01

    The detrimental effects of environmental contamination and pollution (e.g. heavy metals, organochlorines, radionuclides) on wildlife are generally not well known or understood. Research is providing baseline information for various groups of animals, usually because of their sensitivity to changes in their environment (e.g. fish, amphibians), but also where there is a potential conservation threat (e.g. marine mammals). Little research has been directed at reptiles, which may be good bioindicators of their environment. Crocodilians in particular, because of their position in the food chain, aquatic habits and longevity (generally >50 years; Webb and Manolis 1989) may reflect changes in an area over longer periods (Burger et al., 2000). Radioactive contaminants are not generally encountered in crocodilian populations. Radiocesium levels in American alligators living near a reservoir receiving radionuclide-contaminated water from a nuclear reactor were quantified by Brisbin (1989); levels were lower than in various prey items (e.g. fish, waterbirds). This paper provides a brief overview on environmental contamination and reptiles, with particular reference to crocodilians

  10. Herpetofauna of the Northwest Amazon forest in the state of Maranhão, Brazil, with remarks on the Gurupi Biological Reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio de Freitas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the biodiversity of an area is the first step for establishing effective interventions for conservation, especially when it comes to herpetofauna, since 4.1% and 9.2%, respectively, of Brazilian amphibians and reptiles are endangered. The aim of this study is to identify the composition of the herpetofauna occurring in the Northwest Amazonian state of Maranhão, with a focus on the Gurupi Biological Reserve and surrounding areas. Samples were collected between May 2012 and October 2013 (18 months, through pitfall traps, time constrained active search, and opportunistic encounters, and these records were supplemented by specimens collected by third parties and by bibliographic records. A total of 131 species were recorded: 31 species of amphibians and 100 species of reptiles (six testudines, 30 lizards, two amphisbaenas, 60 snakes and two alligators, including some species new to the state of Maranhão and the northeast region of Brazil. This inventory contributes to the knowledge of the herpetofauna for the Belém Endemism Center, the most devastated region of the Brazilian Amazon, and considered poorly sampled.

  11. Herpetofauna of the Northwest Amazon forest in the state of Maranhão, Brazil, with remarks on the Gurupi Biological Reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Marco Antonio; Vieira, Ruhan Saldanha; Entiauspe-Neto, Omar Machado; Sousa, Samantha Oliveira E; Farias, Tayse; Sousa, Alanna Grazieli; de Moura, Geraldo Jorge Barbosa

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the biodiversity of an area is the first step for establishing effective interventions for conservation, especially when it comes to herpetofauna, since 4.1% and 9.2%, respectively, of Brazilian amphibians and reptiles are endangered. The aim of this study is to identify the composition of the herpetofauna occurring in the Northwest Amazonian state of Maranhão, with a focus on the Gurupi Biological Reserve and surrounding areas. Samples were collected between May 2012 and October 2013 (18 months), through pitfall traps, time constrained active search, and opportunistic encounters, and these records were supplemented by specimens collected by third parties and by bibliographic records. A total of 131 species were recorded: 31 species of amphibians and 100 species of reptiles (six testudines, 30 lizards, two amphisbaenas, 60 snakes and two alligators), including some species new to the state of Maranhão and the northeast region of Brazil. This inventory contributes to the knowledge of the herpetofauna for the Belém Endemism Center, the most devastated region of the Brazilian Amazon, and considered poorly sampled.

  12. Respiratory evolution facilitated the origin of pterosaur flight and aerial gigantism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon P A M Claessens

    Full Text Available Pterosaurs, enigmatic extinct Mesozoic reptiles, were the first vertebrates to achieve true flapping flight. Various lines of evidence provide strong support for highly efficient wing design, control, and flight capabilities. However, little is known of the pulmonary system that powered flight in pterosaurs. We investigated the structure and function of the pterosaurian breathing apparatus through a broad scale comparative study of respiratory structure and function in living and extinct archosaurs, using computer-assisted tomographic (CT scanning of pterosaur and bird skeletal remains, cineradiographic (X-ray film studies of the skeletal breathing pump in extant birds and alligators, and study of skeletal structure in historic fossil specimens. In this report we present various lines of skeletal evidence that indicate that pterosaurs had a highly effective flow-through respiratory system, capable of sustaining powered flight, predating the appearance of an analogous breathing system in birds by approximately seventy million years. Convergent evolution of gigantism in several Cretaceous pterosaur lineages was made possible through body density reduction by expansion of the pulmonary air sac system throughout the trunk and the distal limb girdle skeleton, highlighting the importance of respiratory adaptations in pterosaur evolution, and the dramatic effect of the release of physical constraints on morphological diversification and evolutionary radiation.

  13. Contamination of groundwater by the fumigants ethylene dibromide (EDB) and dibromochloropropane (DBCP) near McBee, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landmeyer, James E.; Campbell, Bruce G.

    2010-01-01

    McBee is a small town of about 700 people located in Chesterfield County, South Carolina, in the Sandhills region of the upper Coastal Plain. The halogenated organic compounds ethylene dibromide (EDB) and dibromochloropropane (DBCP) have been detected in several public and domestic supply and irrigation wells since 2002 at concentrations above their U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Maximum Contaminant Limits of 0.05 and 0.2 microgram per liter (µg/L), respectively. The source(s) and release histories of EDB and DBCP to local groundwater are unknown, but believed to be related to their historical use between the 1940s and their ban in the late 1970s as fumigants to control nematode damage in peach orchards. However, gasoline and jet-fuel supplies also contained EDB and are an alternative source of contamination to groundwater. The detection of EDB and DBCP in water wells has raised health concerns because groundwater is the sole source of water supply in the McBee area. In April 2010, forensic, geochemical-based investigation was initiated by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Alligator Rural Water & Sewer Company to provide additional data regarding EDB and DBCP in local groundwater. The investigation includes an assessment of the use, release, and disposal history of EDB and DBCP in the area, the distribution of EDB and DBCP concentrations in the unsaturated zone, and transport and fate in groundwater.

  14. Environmental compliance requirements for uranium mines in northern Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waggit, P.; Zapantis, A.; Triggs, M.

    2001-01-01

    The current phase of uranium mining in the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory of Australia began in the late 70's and is governed by a large number of legislative and administrative requirements. The primary responsibility for environmental regulation rests with the Northern Territory Government but the legislative framework is complex and involves agencies of the Commonwealth Government as well as the Aboriginal traditional owners. Two of the current uranium mining projects, Ranger and Jabiluka, are surrounded by the World Heritage listed Kakadu National Park. Thirteen former mines are located within the Park and one former mine, Nabarlek, is in the same catchment as part of the Park, in West Arnhem Land. For these reasons, environmental management at the operating mines has to be of the highest standard and environmental requirements are attached to all laws and agreements controlling the operating facilities. The paper describes the spirit and rationale behind the regulations as well as the operating details and methodology of the regulatory system in place for the operating mines. An integral part of the overall environmental protection regime is a bi-annual program of Environmental Audits and Environmental Performance Reviews and regular reporting to a stakeholder committee. Other elements include internal and external environmental auditing at the minesites as well as programs of routine monitoring, check monitoring and reporting on a scale and frequency rarely seen elsewhere. Public concern and perception is considered to be a valid issue requiring attention

  15. Taxonomic guide and historical review of starfishes in northeastern Brazil (Echinodermata, Asteroidea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondim, Anne Isabelley; Christoffersen, Martin Lindsey; Pereira Dias, Thelma Lúcia

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Presently more than 1900 species of sea stars are recognized, of which 77 are recorded for the coast of Brazil. Although the first starfish record in Brazil was published 363 years ago, our knowledge of this fauna remains unsatisfactory from a systematic and ecological point of view, particularly in the north and northeastern regions of the country. This study provides the first annotated list of sea stars from northeastern Brazil. Material described herein is housed at the collections of the Federal University of Paraíba, Federal University of Sergipe, and the Federal University of Bahia, Museum of Zoology of the University of São Paulo and Museu Nacional do Rio de Janeiro. Twenty-one species were identified, belonging to 12 genera, 10 families, and 5 orders. Descriptions of species are provided. Three new occurrences were recorded for northeast Brazil: Astropecten alligator, Luidia ludwigi scotti, and Mithrodia clavigera. Highest diversities of Asteroidea were encountered for the states of Bahia (n = 14 spp), Paraíba (n = 12 spp) and Pernambuco (n = 9 spp). No species were recorded for the states of Maranhão and Sergipe. Sandy substrates and depths below 10 m were the least sampled areas over the continental shelf. Herein we provide a first panorama on the fauna of Asteroidea occurring in the northeast region of Brazil, hopefully to function as a basic reference for biodiversity studies in this poorly studied area. PMID:25408612

  16. A test of the validity of range of motion studies of fossil archosaur elbow mobility using repeated-measures analysis and the extant phylogenetic bracket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Joel D; Hutson, Kelda N

    2012-06-15

    Recent studies have presented range of motion (ROM) data in degrees for dinosaur forelimb joints, usually via physical manipulation of one individual. Using these data, researchers have inferred limb orientations, postures, gaits, ecological functions and even phylogenetic trends within clades. However, important areas of concern remain unaddressed; for example, how does ROM at a forelimb joint change after soft tissues are lost in archosaurs? And are fossil ROM methodologies amenable to reproducibility and statistical analysis? Here, we investigated these questions using the extant phylogenetic bracket of dinosaurs. Repeated measures of elbow joint ROM from Struthio camelus and Alligator mississippiensis forelimbs were statistically analyzed as they were sequentially dissected through five levels of tissue removal treatment. Our data indicate that there are no statistically significant differences in repeated measures of ROM between observers who use the same techniques. Extrinsic soft tissues, such as integument, muscles and ligaments were found to impede ROM at the elbow joint. Intrinsic soft tissues, such as articular cartilage, may increase ROM. The hypothesis that the articular surfaces of the bones within the elbow joints of archosaurs provide a general approximation of mobility is supported. Final ROMs were less than the initial ROMs in both taxa, which suggests that prior reports of elbow joint ROMs in degrees for nonavian dinosaurs may represent conservative estimates. We conclude that if observer bias and other variables are controlled for, ROM studies of fossil archosaur limbs can obtain useful degree data for inferring joint mobility in vivo.

  17. Otorrhagia bleeding due to leech bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Askari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leeches are blood-sucking hermaphroditic parasites that attach to vertebrate hosts, bite through the skin, and suck out blood. When leeches feed, they secrete an anticoagulant (hirudin, which helps them get a full meal of blood. This is the first report of leech removal from external auditory canal. Previous leech involvement cases were explained in nasopharynx, larynx, pharynx, eye, and gastrointestinal tract. Prominent sign of all cases was active bleeding from the leech attachment site; that stopped with leech removal. A 24-year-old man was presented to Al-Zahra hospital with left otorrhagia and otalgia from 2 days ago. After suction of ear a small soft foreign body was seen in the external ear near the tympanic membrane, then the ear filled with glycerine phenice, the patient explained decreased movement of foreign body. Four hours later the bloody discharge stopped and otalgia decreased. After suction of clots, a leech was extruded from external auditory canal by alligator. Leech infestation is a rare cause of otorrhagia and should be suspected in the endemic region in all of unusual bleeding; it can be diagnosed and treated by exact inspection and removal.

  18. Role of Chromosome Changes in Evolution and Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornsorn Srikulnath

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The karyotypes of most species of crocodilians were studied using conventional and molecular cytogenetics. These provided an important contribution of chromosomal rearrangements for the evolutionary processes of Crocodylia and Sauropsida (birds and reptiles. The karyotypic features of crocodilians contain small diploid chromosome numbers (30~42, with little interspecific variation of the chromosome arm number (fundamental number among crocodiles (56~60. This suggested that centric fusion and/or fission events occurred in the lineage, leading to crocodilian evolution and diversity. The chromosome numbers of Alligator, Caiman, Melanosuchus, Paleosuchus, Gavialis, Tomistoma, Mecistops, and Osteolaemus were stable within each genus, whereas those of Crocodylus (crocodylians varied within the taxa. This agreed with molecular phylogeny that suggested a highly recent radiation of Crocodylus species. Karyotype analysis also suggests the direction of molecular phylogenetic placement among Crocodylus species and their migration from the Indo-Pacific to Africa and The New World. Crocodylus species originated from an ancestor in the Indo-Pacific around 9~16 million years ago (MYA in the mid-Miocene, with a rapid radiation and dispersion into Africa 8~12 MYA. This was followed by a trans-Atlantic dispersion to the New World between 4~8 MYA in the Pliocene. The chromosomes provided a better understanding of crocodilian evolution and diversity, which will be useful for further study of the genome evolution in Crocodylia.

  19. Epigenetic control of gonadal aromatase (cyp19a1 in temperature-dependent sex determination of red-eared slider turtles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuiko Matsumoto

    Full Text Available In the red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta, a species with temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD, the expression of the aromatase gene during gonad development is strictly limited to the female-producing temperature. The underlying mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we identified the upstream 5'-flanking region of the aromatase gene, gonad-specific promoter, and the temperature-dependent DNA methylation signatures during gonad development in the red-eared slider turtle. The 5'-flanking region of the slider aromatase exhibited sequence similarities to the aromatase genes of the American alligator, chicken, quail, and zebra finch. A putative TATA box was located 31 bp upstream of the gonad-specific transcription start site. DNA methylation at the CpG sites between the putative binding sites of the fork head domain factor (FOX and vertebrate steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1 and adjacent TATA box in the promoter region were significantly lower in embryonic gonads at the female-producing temperature compared the male-producing temperature. A shift from male- to female-, but not from female- to male-, producing temperature changed the level of DNA methylation in gonads. Taken together these results indicate that the temperature, particularly female-producing temperature, allows demethylation at the specific CpG sites of the promoter region which leads the temperature-specific expression of aromatase during gonad development.

  20. Developmental effects of Arochlor 1242 in American kestrels and associated hormone concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, J.B.; Henry, P.F.P.; Rattner, B.A.

    1996-01-01

    Recently, diverse field and experimental studies have been brought together to suggest that abnormal sexual and reproductive development in wildlife might be caused by the endocrine-like activity of pollutants acting on embryos. For example, hormonal and gonadal anomalies in juvenile alligators from Florida are associated with exposure to DDT and dicofol, experimental work on laboratory rodents has identified estrogenic and androgenic properties of several pollutants, including polychlorinated biphenyls, and injection of gull eggs with metabolites of DDT produces intersex gonads in the male hatchlings. Very little evidence is available for birds that demonstrates a deficit in reproductive capability by this mechanism. Our breeding and egg-injection studies are investigating the potential of Aroclor 1242 and hydroxylated PCB congener 30, both with known estrogenic activity, to alter the course of embryonic development of reproductive structures and to affect later reproductive function in American kestrels. Findings from young birds whose parents were exposed indicated that gonadal morphology appeared consistent with the genetic sex of exposed birds; testes of exposed birds showed no difference in size or symmetry when compared to controls. Histological preparations showed very little intersexuality of male testes; females had ovaries that were indistinguishable from controls. Female hatchlings tended to show increased androgen and decreased estrogen in their serum with greater dose of Aroclor; females hatchlings that resulted from injected eggs showed an opposite trend. Analyses in progress include LHRH and catecholamine concentrations in the brain.

  1. Characterization of bradykinin-related peptides generated in the plasma of six sarcopterygian species (African lungfish, amphiuma, coachwhip, bullsnake, gila monster, and Gray's monitor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z; Secor, S M; Lance, V A; Masini, M A; Vallarino, M; Conlon, J M

    1998-10-01

    Incubation of heat-denatured plasma from six species occupying different evolutionary positions within the Sarcopterygian lineage [the dipnoan, Protopterus annectens (African lungfish); the urodele, Amphiuma tridactylum (three-toed amphiuma); the colubrid snakes, Pituophis melanoleucus sayi (bullsnake) and Masticophis flagellum (coachwhip); and the lizards Heloderma suspectum (Gila monster) and Varanus Grayi (Gray's monitor)] with trypsin generated bradykinin-related peptides that were detected by radioimmunoassay using an antiserum raised against mammalian bradykinin (BK). The peptides were purified by HPLC and their primary structures were established as lungfish [Tyr1,Gly2,Ala7,Pro8]BK, amphiuma [Phe1,Ile2, Leu5]BK, bullsnake and coachwhip [Val1,Thr6]BK, Gila monster [Leu2, Thr6]BK, and Gray's monitor [Thr6]BK. Monitor BK is identical to the peptide generated in turtle and alligator plasma and coachwhip/bullsnake BK shows one amino acid substitution (Ala1 --> Val) compared with the peptide generated in the plasma of the python. The data provide further evidence for the widespread occurrence of a kallikrein-kininogen system in nonmammalian vertebrates but indicate that the primary structure of BK has been poorly conserved during evolution. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  2. The influence of deformation-induced microvoids on mechanical failure of AISI A8-Mod martensitic tool steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi-Nanesa, Hadi; Jahazi, Mohammad; Heidari, Majid; Levasseur, Tom

    2017-10-01

    Tool steels are considered as hard to deform materials since they have a mixture of soft ferritic matrix with hard carbides as secondary particles. In this study, 5 mm thick plates of AISI A8-Modified tool steel were subjected to cold rolling prior to the quench-temper cycle with the view to investigate the work hardening behavior of this steel during rolling and to reduce the brittleness of the product after the quench-temper cycle. 5mm thick samples were rolled 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 (%) under similar conditions and then cut parallel to the rolling direction. Microstructure evolution, deformation-induced microvoids, and hardness evolution as a function of prior deformation were investigated. Electron microscopy was used to investigate the root causes for the formation of microvoids and potential alligatoring failure. The influence of microvoids on mechanical properties after the quench-temper cycle was evaluated through bending tests. Results showed no failure for 50% cold rolled sample in comparison with fracture for non-deformed sample indicating that prior deformation could be a novel route for improving the in service properties of these alloys. Hardness of 50% cold rolled after thermal hardening was lower than that for non-deformed sample. The analysis of prior austenite grain size, volume fraction of retained austenite, and volume fraction of carbides for both testing conditions showed that hardness reduction can be related to the presence of microvoids formed in the microstructure during rolling.

  3. Pavement cracking measurements using 3D laser-scan images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang, W; Xu, B

    2013-01-01

    Pavement condition surveying is vital for pavement maintenance programs that ensure ride quality and traffic safety. This paper first introduces an automated pavement inspection system which uses a three-dimensional (3D) camera and a structured laser light to acquire dense transverse profiles of a pavement lane surface when it carries a moving vehicle. After the calibration, the 3D system can yield a depth resolution of 0.5 mm and a transverse resolution of 1.56 mm pixel −1 at 1.4 m camera height from the ground. The scanning rate of the camera can be set to its maximum at 5000 lines s −1 , allowing the density of scanned profiles to vary with the vehicle's speed. The paper then illustrates the algorithms that utilize 3D information to detect pavement distress, such as transverse, longitudinal and alligator cracking, and presents the field tests on the system's repeatability when scanning a sample pavement in multiple runs at the same vehicle speed, at different vehicle speeds and under different weather conditions. The results show that this dedicated 3D system can capture accurate pavement images that detail surface distress, and obtain consistent crack measurements in repeated tests and under different driving and lighting conditions. (paper)

  4. Uptake of uranium and thorium series radionuclides by the waterlily, Nymphaea violacea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, H.B.L.

    1993-01-01

    The waterlily Nymphaea violacea is a major aquatic macrophyte in the waters of the Alligator Rivers Region, Northern Territory, Australia. It is also a traditional Aboriginal diet item, and is considered to be potentially one of the main contributors to the effective dose equivalent arising from consumption of so called bush food in the region. Because of the proximity of the Ranger Uranium Mine (RUM), the activity concentrations of the U and Th series radionuclides have been studied in water, sediment and waterlily during different seasons at five sites downstream of the mine site. The objectives of the study are: 1. To identify the major source of radionuclide uptake by the plant; i.e. water or sediment; 2. To assess the concentration factors/ratios needed for predicting the radiation exposure of the critical group resulting from any discharge of water to the aquatic environment from the Ranger uranium mine; 3. To estimate the natural radiation exposure of the public arising from consumption of waterlilies. (Author)

  5. RING finger protein 121 facilitates the degradation and membrane localization of voltage-gated sodium channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Kazutoyo; Low, Sean E.; Yamada, Kenta; Saint-Amant, Louis; Zhou, Weibin; Muto, Akira; Asakawa, Kazuhide; Nakai, Junichi; Kawakami, Koichi; Kuwada, John Y.; Hirata, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Following their synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV) are transported to the membranes of excitable cells, where they often cluster, such as at the axon initial segment of neurons. Although the mechanisms by which NaV channels form and maintain clusters have been extensively examined, the processes that govern their transport and degradation have received less attention. Our entry into the study of these processes began with the isolation of a new allele of the zebrafish mutant alligator, which we found to be caused by mutations in the gene encoding really interesting new gene (RING) finger protein 121 (RNF121), an E3-ubiquitin ligase present in the ER and cis-Golgi compartments. Here we demonstrate that RNF121 facilitates two opposing fates of NaV channels: (i) ubiquitin-mediated proteasome degradation and (ii) membrane localization when coexpressed with auxiliary NaVβ subunits. Collectively, these results indicate that RNF121 participates in the quality control of NaV channels during their synthesis and subsequent transport to the membrane. PMID:25691753

  6. The use of geochemical speciation modelling to predict the impact of uranium to freshwater biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markich, S.J.; Brown, P.L.; Jeffree, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    Uranium is the prime potential contaminant in mine waste waters that may be released from the Ranger Uranium Mine (RUM) into the receiving waters of the Magela Creek, Alligator Rivers Region, Northern Australia. The potential ecological impact of the migration of uranium, that would result from an elevation in its concentration above background, in the Magela Creek downstream of the RUM, has been experimentally investigated by integrating biomonitoring with geochemical speciation modelling. The freshwater bivalve Velesunio angasi, abundant throughout the Magela Creek catchment, was exposed to a variety of uranium concentrations in a synthetic Magela Creek water, at four pH levels (5.0, 5.3, 5.5 and 6.0), in the presence (3.05 and 7.50 mg l -1 ) and absence of a model fulvic acid (FA), and its behavioural response was measured. Speciation modelling, using the HARPHRQ code, provided evidence that UO 2+ 2 and UO 2 OH + are the uranium species most responsible (ca. 96%) for eliciting an adverse behavioural response when UO 2+ 2 is assigned twice the toxic effect of UO 2 OH + . This finding rejects the notion that biota respond specifically to the sum total of inorganic uranyl species. (orig.)

  7. Saltwater intrusion history shapes the response of bacterial communities upon rehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Tiffanie M; Streten, Claire; Gibb, Karen S; Chariton, Anthony A

    2015-01-01

    Saltwater intrusion (SWI) can result in the loss of dominant vegetation from freshwater habitats. In northern Australia, sea level is predicted to rise 17-50 cm by 2030-2070. This will exacerbate the impact of SWI, threatening Ramsar-listed habitats. Soil bacteria in these habitats play a significant role in biogeochemical cycling, regulating availability of essential nutrients such as nitrogen to vegetation. However, there is limited understanding as to how SWI will impact these soil bacteria. Floodplain soil samples were collected from the South Alligator River floodplain in Northern Australia from sites with contrasting histories of SWI. A SWI event was simulated over 7 days with treatments of saltwater and freshwater. Bacterial community composition before and after treatment were measured using next generation sequencing of bacterial DNA. Sites with no history of SWI showed no significant changes in community taxonomic composition following treatments, suggesting the community at these sites have broad functional capacity which may be due to their historic conditioning over many years. Sites with a history of SWI showed a significant response to both treatments. Following saltwater treatment, there was an increase in sulfate-reducing bacteria, which are known to have an impact on carbon and nitrogen cycling. We suggest that the impact of SWI causes a shift in the soil bacteria which alters the community to one which is more specialised, with implications for the cycling of essential elements and nutrients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Geology and recognition criteria for veinlike uranium deposits of the lower to middle Proterozoic unconformity and strata-related types. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlkamp, F.J.; Adams, S.S.

    1981-01-01

    The discovery of the Rabbit Lake deposit, Saskatchewan, in 1968 and the East Alligator Rivers district, Northern Territory, Australia, in 1970 established the Lower-Middle Proterozoic veinlike-type deposits as one of the major types of uranium deposits. The term veinlike is used in order to distinguish it from the classical magmatic-hydrothermal vein or veintype deposits. The veinlike deposits account for between a quarter and a third of the Western World's proven uranium reserves. Lower-Middle Proterozoic veinlike deposits, as discussed in this report include several subtypes of deposits, which have some significantly different geologic characteristics. These various subtypes appear to have formed from various combinations of geologic processes ranging from synsedimentary uranium precipitation through some combination of diagenesis, metamorphism, metasomatism, weathering, and deep burial diagenesis. Some of the deposit subtypes are based on only one or two incompletely described examples; hence, even the classification presented in this report may be expected to change. Geologic characteristics of the deposits differ significantly between most districts and in some cases even between deposits within districts. Emphasis in this report is placed on deposit descriptions and the interpretations of the observers

  9. Geology and recognition criteria for veinlike uranium deposits of the lower to middle Proterozoic unconformity and strata-related types. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlkamp, F.J.; Adams, S.S.

    1981-01-01

    The discovery of the Rabbit Lake deposit, Saskatchewan, in 1968 and the East Alligator Rivers district, Northern Territory, Australia, in 1970 established the Lower-Middle Proterozoic veinlike-type deposits as one of the major types of uranium deposits. The term veinlike is used in order to distinguish it from the classical magmatic-hydrothermal vein or veintype deposits. The veinlike deposits account for between a quarter and a third of the Western World's proven uranium reserves. Lower-Middle Proterozoic veinlike deposits, as discussed in this report include several subtypes of deposits, which have some significantly different geologic characteristics. These various subtypes appear to have formed from various combinations of geologic processes ranging from synsedimentary uranium precipitation through some combination of diagenesis, metamorphism, metasomatism, weathering, and deep burial diagenesis. Some of the deposit subtypes are based on only one or two incompletely described examples; hence, even the classification presented in this report may be expected to change. Geologic characteristics of the deposits differ significantly between most districts and in some cases even between deposits within districts. Emphasis in this report is placed on deposit descriptions and the interpretations of the observers.

  10. Multimodeling: new approaches for linking ecological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Louis J.; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Scott, J. Michael; Heglund, Patricia J.; Morrison, Michael L.

    2006-01-01

    The Everglades region of South Florida presents one of the major natural system management challenges facing the United States. With its assortment of alligators, crocodiles, manatees, panthers, large mixed flocks of wading birds, highly diverse subtropical flora, and sea of sawgrass, the ecosystem is unique in this country (Davis and Ogden 1994). The region is also perhaps the largest human-controlled system on the planet in that the major environmental factor influencing the region is water, and water flows are managed on a daily basis--subject to the vagaries of rainfall--by a massive system of locks, pumps, canals, and levees constructed over the past century. The changes brought about by such control have led to extensive modifications of historical patterns and magnitudes of flow, causing large declines in many native species, extensive changes in nutrient cycling and vegetation across south Florida, and great increases in pollutants such as mercury. Constrained by the conflicting demands of agriculture, urban human populations, and wildlife for control of water resources, and the varying agendas of hosts of government agencies and nongovernmental organizations, there is now an ongoing effort to plan for major changes to the system with expenditure estimates of eight billion dollars or more over the next several decades (USACOE 1999). Carrying out such planning, particularly as it impacts the natural systems of the region, provides one of the major challenges to the new field of computational ecology.

  11. Joint Ecosystem Modeling (JEM) ecological model documentation volume 1: Estuarine prey fish biomass availability v1.0.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romañach, Stephanie S.; Conzelmann, Craig; Daugherty, Adam; Lorenz, Jerome L.; Hunnicutt, Christina; Mazzotti, Frank J.

    2011-01-01

    Estuarine fish serve as an important prey base in the Greater Everglades ecosystem for key fauna such as wading birds, crocodiles, alligators, and piscivorous fishes. Human-made changes to freshwater flow across the Greater Everglades have resulted in less freshwater flow into the fringing estuaries and coasts. These changes in freshwater input have altered salinity patterns and negatively affected primary production of the estuarine fish prey base. Planned restoration projects should affect salinity and water depth both spatially and temporally and result in an increase in appropriate water conditions in areas occupied by estuarine fish. To assist in restoration planning, an ecological model of estuarine prey fish biomass availability was developed as an evaluation tool to aid in the determination of acceptable ranges of salinity and water depth. Comparisons of model output to field data indicate that the model accurately predicts prey biomass in the estuarine regions of the model domain. This model can be used to compare alternative restoration plans and select those that provide suitable conditions.

  12. Optimal Maintenance Works for the Aborshada Road in the Western Region of Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Medhat Abdelrahman; Elbasher, Abdelbary Altayb

    2014-09-01

    In this research, the condition of a road pavement was investigated for the Aborshada Road in the Gharian region of Libya to determine the optimal maintenance works. Previously, a simple engineering judgment was the only procedure followed by the Gharian municipal engineers for evaluating pavements and prioritizing maintenance. The surface condition of the Aborshada Road pavement was investigated using "the Pavement Condition Index (PCI)" visual technique. The pavement was inspected to survey the different distresses in each sample unit. Ninteen pavement distresses were classified according to the PCI standards (PCI for roads and parking lots became an ASTM standard in 2007 (D6433-07)). It was necessary to know the most common distresses of the Aborshada Road to provide assistance for the decision maker in his evaluation of the pavement and the optimum repair method to be selected. This study reveals the actual performance of the pavements and suggests the research required for dealing with the pavement maintenance problem in Libya, especially in the western region. The best maintenance alternative for Aborshada Road was Case No. 3 (Potholes, Long. & Trans. Cracking and Alligator Crack Maintenance). Also, the most common pavement distresses on the Aborshada Road were Distress Nos. 1, 3, 6, 7, 10 and 13 according to the ASTM - D6433-07 classification

  13. Comparative architectural properties of limb muscles in Crocodylidae and Alligatoridae and their relevance to divergent use of asymmetrical gaits in extant Crocodylia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Vivian; Molnar, Julia; Parker, William; Pollard, Andrea; Nolan, Grant; Hutchinson, John R

    2014-12-01

    Crocodiles and their kin (Crocodylidae) use asymmetrical (bounding and galloping) gaits when moving rapidly. Despite being morphologically and ecologically similar, it seems alligators and their kin (Alligatoridae) do not. To investigate a possible anatomical basis for this apparent major difference in locomotor capabilities, we measured relative masses and internal architecture (fascicle lengths and physiological cross-sectional areas) of muscles of the pectoral and pelvic limbs of 40 individuals from six representative species of Crocodylidae and Alligatoridae. We found that, relative to body mass, Crocodylidae have significantly longer muscle fascicles (increased working range), particularly in the pectoral limb, and generally smaller muscle physiological cross-sectional areas (decreased force-exerting capability) than Alligatoridae. We therefore hypothesise that the ability of some crocodylians to use asymmetrical gaits may be limited more by the ability to make large, rapid limb motions (especially in the pectoral limb) than the ability to exert large limb forces. Furthermore, analysis of scaling patterns in muscle properties shows that limb anatomy in the two clades becomes more divergent during ontogeny. Limb muscle masses, fascicle lengths and physiological cross-sectional areas scale with significantly larger coefficients in Crocodylidae than Alligatoridae. This combination of factors suggests that inter-clade disparity in maximal limb power is highest in adult animals. Therefore, despite their apparent morphological similarities, both mean values and scaling patterns suggest that considerable diversity exists in the locomotor apparatus of extant Crocodylia. © 2014 Anatomical Society.

  14. Complete mitochondrial DNA sequences of the green turtle and blue-tailed mole skink: statistical evidence for archosaurian affinity of turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumazawa, Y; Nishida, M

    1999-06-01

    Turtles have highly specialized morphological characteristics, and their phylogenetic position has been under intensive debate. Previous molecular studies have not established a consistent and statistically well supported conclusion on this issue. In order to address this, complete mitochondrial DNA sequences were determined for the green turtle and the blue-tailed mole skink. These genomes possess an organization of genes which is typical of most other vertebrates, such as placental mammals, a frog, and bony fishes, but distinct from organizations of alligators and snakes. Molecular evolutionary rates of mitochondrial protein sequences appear to vary considerably among major reptilian lineages, with relatively rapid rates for snake and crocodilian lineages but slow rates for turtle and lizard lineages. In spite of this rate heterogeneity, phylogenetic analyses using amino acid sequences of 12 mitochondrial proteins reliably established the Archosauria (birds and crocodilians) and Lepidosauria (lizards and snakes) clades postulated from previous morphological studies. The phylogenetic analyses further suggested that turtles are a sister group of the archosaurs, and this untraditional relationship was provided with strong statistical evidence by both the bootstrap and the Kishino-Hasegawa tests. This is the first statistically significant molecular phylogeny on the placement of turtles relative to the archosaurs and lepidosaurs. It is therefore likely that turtles originated from a Permian-Triassic archosauromorph ancestor with two pairs of temporal fenestrae behind the skull orbit that were subsequently lost. The traditional classification of turtles in the Anapsida may thus need to be reconsidered.

  15. The paranasal air sinuses of predatory and armored dinosaurs (archosauria: theropoda and ankylosauria) and their contribution to cephalic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witmer, Lawrence M; Ridgely, Ryan C

    2008-11-01

    The paranasal air sinuses and nasal cavities were studied along with other cephalic spaces (brain cavity, paratympanic sinuses) in certain dinosaurs via CT scanning and 3D visualization to document the anatomy and examine the contribution of the sinuses to the morphological organization of the head as a whole. Two representatives each of two dinosaur clades are compared: the theropod saurischians Majungasaurus and Tyrannosaurus and the ankylosaurian ornithischians Panoplosaurus and Euoplocephalus. Their extant archosaurian outgroups, birds and crocodilians (exemplified by ostrich and alligator), display a diversity of paranasal sinuses, yet they share only a single homologous antorbital sinus, which in birds has an important subsidiary diverticulum, the suborbital sinus. Both of the theropods had a large antorbital sinus that pneumatized many of the facial and palatal bones as well as a birdlike suborbital sinus. Given that the suborbital sinus interleaves with jaw muscles, the paranasal sinuses of at least some theropods (including birds) were actively ventilated rather than being dead-air spaces. Although many ankylosaurians have been thought to have had extensive paranasal sinuses, most of the snout is instead (and surprisingly) often occupied by a highly convoluted airway. Digital segmentation, coupled with 3D visualization and analysis, allows the positions of the sinuses to be viewed in place within both the skull and the head and then measured volumetrically. These quantitative data allow the first reliable estimates of dinosaur head mass and an assessment of the potential savings in mass afforded by the sinuses. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Morphology of the ovary of Caiman crocodilus (Crocodylia: Alligatoridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, Martha L; De Pérez, Gloria R; Ramírez Pinilla, Martha Patricia

    2004-02-01

    We describe the ovarian histology and characterize the folliculogenesis of adult females of Caiman crocodilus in order to compare them with other species of Reptilia. The gonad has a thin irregular cortex and a well-developed reticular stroma, composed of vascularized chordae, drained by large lymphatic vessels and separated by extensive lacunae. Simple cuboidal to squamous epithelium, dense connective tissue with numerous elastin fibers, and smooth muscle constitute the ovarian wall. This morphology is similar to that of other Crocodylia, Aves and Testudines. Germinal nests are distributed in the ovarian cortex, some of them with oogonia. Oocytes leave the germinal nests with a single layered cuboidal granulosa, remaining simple during vitellogenesis, as in other Archosauria and Testudines and different from Squamata. As the oocyte grows, the theca is formed by numerous fibroblasts, collagen fibers, and smooth muscle fibers, becoming very thick, highly vascularized and developing muscle bands at advanced vitellogenesis. Folliculogenesis shares morphological features with other species of Reptilia. The corpus luteum is similar to that described for Archosauria; during luteolysis, the theca shrinks and the amount of luteinic cells decreases. The relationship of the corpus luteum to vitellogenesis and egg maintenance is unclear in Crocodylia. Follicular regression in Caiman crocodilus corresponds to an invasive atresia type. Histological features seen in the ovary of Caiman crocodilus are similar to those described in Alligator mississippiensis indicating that these features could be shared among Crocodylia. Also several of these morphological characteristics are observed in Aves suggesting a similar reproductive functional morphology in Archosauria.

  17. CONSIDERAÇÕES MORFOMÉTRICAS DA BACIA DO RIO UBERABINHA – MINAS GERAIS / Morphometric considerations of the Uberabinha river basin – Minas Gerais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Feltran Filho

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The hydrographic basins demonstrate variables and attributes that make them unique. Themorphometric method that permits the utilization of techniques to obtain the indexes of existingnumber relations among the attributes of a drainage basin makes the knowledge of the variouslinear, area and hypsometric variables possible, which, added to the variable qualitatives,multiplies the possibilities for space analysis. The results obtained by this method serve as acomplement an aid to better explain the interaction that takes place among all the landscapeelements. This being the case, in this study, some basic morphometric surveys are sought in orderto obtain better knowledge of the hydrographic basin of the Uberabinha river, which will make itpossible to subsidize its planning. To reach this objective, cartographic maps from IBGE and theimage from the satellite TM/Landsat 5 from INPE to the scale of 1:100000 were used and computerprograms AutoCAD Map R13 and SPRING 4.2 were used to make the calculations. From theresults obtained, it was verified that the principal source of the Uberabinha river is, in realityfrom the Beija-Flor (Humming-bird creek and not from the Jacaré (Alligator stream. The greatdifference in the density of the rivers between the upper and lower thirds of the basin was alsoconfirmed. Another important geomorphological conclusion is the fact of its being a young basin.

  18. Shock Wave Propagation in Functionally Graded Mineralized Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelms, Matthew; Hodo, Wayne; Livi, Ken; Browning, Alyssa; Crawford, Bryan; Rajendran, A. M.

    2017-06-01

    In this investigation, the effects of shock wave propagation in bone-like biomineralized tissue was investigated. The Alligator gar (Atractosteus spatula) exoskeleton is comprised of many disparate scales that provide a biological analog for potential design of flexible protective material systems. The gar scale is identified as a two-phase, (1) hydroxyapatite mineral and (2) collagen protein, biological composite with two distinct layers where a stiff, ceramic-like ganoine overlays a soft, highly ductile ganoid bone. Previous experimentations has shown significant softening under compressive loading and an asymmetrical stress-strain response for analogous mineralized tissues. The structural features, porosity, and elastic modulus were determined from high-resolution scanning electron microscopy, 3D micro-tomography, and dynamic nanoindentation experiments to develop an idealized computational model for FE simulations. The numerical analysis employed Gurson's yield criterion to determine the influence of porosity and pressure on material strength. Functional gradation of elastic moduli and certain structural features, such as the sawtooth interface, are explicitly modeled to study the plate impact shock profile for a full 3-D analysis using ABAQUS finite element software.

  19. Development of the Ranger uranium milling operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baily, P.A.

    1982-01-01

    The development and operation of the Ranger uranium project is described. In 1969 Ranger discovered a uranium-bearing ore deposit in the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory of Australia. Extensive testwork on drill core samples proved the viability of the extraction of the uranium and a process flowsheet and plant design criteria were developed based on a conventional crushing, grinding, acid leach, C.C.D., solvent extraction circuit. Detailed design concentrated on plant layout, materials of construction, equipment vendor selection and process control. These factors required special attention because of the remote location of the mine and the high cost and difficulty in obtaining trained labour for such sites. Environmental considerations were key factors in design. The mine is located adjacent to a national park and has an average rainfall of 1,600 mm. No water or liquid effluents are to be released from the project area and thus water management is a key factor. Tailings are ponded in an impervious earth-rockfill dam

  20. Severe lamotrigine toxicosis in a dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawyer D

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Danielle Sawyer, Kathryn Gates Emergency and Critical Care Department, Advanced Critical Care and Emergency Specialty Services, Culver City, CA, USA Objective: The objective of this study was to describe a case of severe lamotrigine toxicosis in a dog, which was successfully treated using minimal medical interventions. Case summary: A 7-month-old male, intact, Labrador mix was evaluated because of acute onset of vomiting, rigidity, and dull mentation after ingesting lamotrigine tablets. The estimated oral dose that had been ingested was 278 mg/kg (611.6 mg/lb. Physical examination was unremarkable other than abnormalities noted in the cardiovascular and neurological systems. Neurological examination revealed dull mentation, vertical nystagmus, four-legged extensor limb rigidity, and alligator rolling. Cardiovascular examination revealed pale pink mucous membranes and multifocal ventricular tachycardia. Intravenous (IV fluids were started at three times maintenance (180 mL/kg/day. Methocarbamol (100 mg/kg [220 mg/lb], rectally and lidocaine (2 mg/kg [4.4 mg/lb, IV] were administered. Twenty-four and seventy-two hours after presentation, the dog was clinically normal with no ventricular tachycardia being noted. Conclusion: Lamotrigine (6-[2,3-dichlorophenyl]-1,2,4-triazine-3,5-diamine is an anticonvulsant medication used in humans, which inhibits voltage-gated sodium channels. The clinical success of this case suggests that administration of only methocarbamol for the neurologic effects and lidocaine for the arrhythmias, as well as supportive IV fluid therapy, could be a successful treatment strategy for dogs, even with severe lamotrigine toxicosis. Keywords: arrhythmia, toxicity, multifocal ventricular tachycardia, poison

  1. Comparative Genome Analyses Reveal Distinct Structure in the Saltwater Crocodile MHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Deakin, Janine; Godinez, Ricardo M.; Shan, Xueyan; Peterson, Daniel G.; Marthey, Sylvain; Lyons, Eric; McCarthy, Fiona M.; Isberg, Sally R.; Higgins, Damien P.; Chong, Amanda Y.; John, John St; Glenn, Travis C.; Ray, David A.; Gongora, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a dynamic genome region with an essential role in the adaptive immunity of vertebrates, especially antigen presentation. The MHC is generally divided into subregions (classes I, II and III) containing genes of similar function across species, but with different gene number and organisation. Crocodylia (crocodilians) are widely distributed and represent an evolutionary distinct group among higher vertebrates, but the genomic organisation of MHC within this lineage has been largely unexplored. Here, we studied the MHC region of the saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) and compared it with that of other taxa. We characterised genomic clusters encompassing MHC class I and class II genes in the saltwater crocodile based on sequencing of bacterial artificial chromosomes. Six gene clusters spanning ∼452 kb were identified to contain nine MHC class I genes, six MHC class II genes, three TAP genes, and a TRIM gene. These MHC class I and class II genes were in separate scaffold regions and were greater in length (2–6 times longer) than their counterparts in well-studied fowl B loci, suggesting that the compaction of avian MHC occurred after the crocodilian-avian split. Comparative analyses between the saltwater crocodile MHC and that from the alligator and gharial showed large syntenic areas (>80% identity) with similar gene order. Comparisons with other vertebrates showed that the saltwater crocodile had MHC class I genes located along with TAP, consistent with birds studied. Linkage between MHC class I and TRIM39 observed in the saltwater crocodile resembled MHC in eutherians compared, but absent in avian MHC, suggesting that the saltwater crocodile MHC appears to have gene organisation intermediate between these two lineages. These observations suggest that the structure of the saltwater crocodile MHC, and other crocodilians, can help determine the MHC that was present in the ancestors of archosaurs. PMID:25503521

  2. Ability of four emergent macrophytes to remediate permethrin in mesocosm experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, M T; Kröger, R; Cooper, C M; Smith, S

    2009-08-01

    Increased focus is being placed on the ability of native vegetation to mitigate potential harmful effects of agricultural runoff, especially pyrethroid insecticides. Replicate 379 L Rubbermaid tubs (1.25 m [l] x 0.6 m [w] x 0.8 m [h]) were planted with individual species of cutgrass (Leersia oryzoides), cattails (Typha latifolia), bur-reed (Sparganium americanum), and powdery alligator-flag (Thalia dealbata), all common wetland macrophytes found in the Mississippi Delta, USA, agricultural region. Permethrin-enriched water (target concentration, 5 microg L(-1)) was pumped in at a 4-h hydraulic retention time at one end of the tub and discharged at the far end. Water samples were collected from discharge at 1-h intervals for 12 h and analyzed for permethrin concentrations. Permethrin removal rates were compared for the four different plant treatments and nonvegetated sediment-water controls. Results indicated that no particular single plant species was more effective at removing permethrin in water relative to unplanted controls. Overall mass reductions (from inflow to outflow) for cis-permethrin ranged from 67% +/- 6% in T. latifolia to 71% +/- 2% in L. oryzoides. The trans-permethrin overall mass reductions ranged from 76% +/- 4% in S. americanum to 82% +/- 2% in the unplanted control. Sediment and plant samples collected at the study conclusion indicated that 77%-95% of measured permethrin mass was associated with sediment for mesocosms planted with L. oryzoides, T. latifolia, and T. dealbata. Conversely, mesocosms planted with S. americanum had 83% of measured mass associated with the plant material. Specific plant-pesticide retention studies can lead to improved planning for best management practices and remediation techniques such as constructed wetlands and vegetated agricultural drainage ditches.

  3. Australia's uranium export potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosher, D.V.

    1981-01-01

    During the period 1954-71 in Australia approximately 9000 MT of U 3 O 8 was produced from five separate localities. Of this, 7000 MT was exported to the United Kingdom and United States and the balance stockpiled by the Australian Atomic Energy Commission (AAEC). Australia's uranium ore reserves occur in eight deposits in three states and the Northern Territory. However, 83% of Australia's reserves are contained in four deposits in lower Proterozoic rocks in the East Alligator River region of the Northern Territory. The AAEC has calculated Australia's recoverable uranium reserves by eliminating estimated losses during the mining and milling of the ores. AAEC has estimated reasonably assured resources of 289,000 MT of uranium at a recovery cost of less than US$80 per kilogram uranium. The companies have collectively announced a larger ore reserve than the Australian Atomic Energy Commission. This difference is a result of the companies adopting different ore reserve categories. On August 25, 1977, the federal government announced that Australia would develop its uranium resources subject to stringent environmental controls, recognition of Aboriginal Land Rights, and international safeguards. Australian uranium production should gradually increase from 1981 onward, growing to 10,000 to 15,000 MT by 1985-86. Further increases in capacity may emerge during the second half of the 1980s when expansion plans are implemented. Exploration for uranium has not been intensive due to delays in developing the existing deposits. It is likely that present reserves can be substantially upgraded if more exploration is carried out. 6 figures, 3 tables

  4. The effect of weathering on the distribution of uranium and associated elements at Koongarra, Northern Territory, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edis, Robert

    1992-03-01

    The aim of work described in this thesis was to investigate some aspects of the redistribution of U and other elements, at the Koongarra No.1 U ore deposit in the Northern Territory of Australia. Aspects of the redistribution of U which are considered in this thesis include the spatial patterns of remobilised U; the associations of U with minerals and elements and how these change with weathering, and transport of material by colloids present in the groundwater. The Koongarra No.1 U ore deposit is currently being studied as a natural analogue of a high level radioactive waste repository, as part of the Alligator Rivers Analogue Project. As spent fuel is a proposed waste form for geological burial, the study of uraninite leaching in an ore body makes a very good analogue of a breached repository. Work presented in this thesis was undertaken as part of that study. Aspects of the redistribution considered here include spatial patterns of redistributed U, associations between U, other elements and minerals, and transport of material by groundwater colloids. Techniques employed include:- thin section analyses (optical analysis, autoradiography, electron microprobe, and scanning electron microscopy); mineralogical and chemical analyses (x-ray diffraction, x-ray fluorescence, PIXE-PIGME, neutron activation, and infra-red spectrophotometry); groundwater colloid sampling and concentrating (tangential and stirred cell ultrafiltration); transmission electron microscopy for the examination of colloids and scanning electron microscopy for the examination of prefilters. The redistribution of U during weathering appeared to follow the distribution of Fe oxides. Uranium present in the groundwater responsible for the weathering would then have absorbed onto the freshly precipitated and highly sorptive Fe oxides. Uranium concentrations appeared to be correlative to the degree of weathering, and the corresponding amount of Fe oxides. 339 refs., 36 tabs., 83 figs

  5. What lies beneath: sub-articular long bone shape scaling in eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs suggests different locomotor adaptations for gigantism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew F Bonnan

    Full Text Available Eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs both evolved lineages of huge terrestrial herbivores. Although significantly more saurischian dinosaurs were giants than eutherians, the long bones of both taxa scale similarly and suggest that locomotion was dynamically similar. However, articular cartilage is thin in eutherian mammals but thick in saurischian dinosaurs, differences that could have contributed to, or limited, how frequently gigantism evolved. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that sub-articular bone, which supports the articular cartilage, changes shape in different ways between terrestrial mammals and dinosaurs with increasing size. Our sample consisted of giant mammal and reptile taxa (i.e., elephants, rhinos, sauropods plus erect and non-erect outgroups with thin and thick articular cartilage. Our results show that eutherian mammal sub-articular shape becomes narrow with well-defined surface features as size increases. In contrast, this region in saurischian dinosaurs expands and remains gently convex with increasing size. Similar trends were observed in non-erect outgroup taxa (monotremes, alligators, showing that the trends we report are posture-independent. These differences support our hypothesis that sub-articular shape scales differently between eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs. Our results show that articular cartilage thickness and sub-articular shape are correlated. In mammals, joints become ever more congruent and thinner with increasing size, whereas archosaur joints remained both congruent and thick, especially in sauropods. We suggest that gigantism occurs less frequently in mammals, in part, because joints composed of thin articular cartilage can only become so congruent before stress cannot be effectively alleviated. In contrast, frequent gigantism in saurischian dinosaurs may be explained, in part, by joints with thick articular cartilage that can deform across large areas with increasing load.

  6. First record of eocene bony fishes and crocodyliforms from Canada's Western Arctic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaelyn J Eberle

    time between the two extant alligatorid lineages Alligator mississippiensis and A. sinensis, and high-latitude dispersal across Beringia.

  7. Baseline requirements for assessment of mining impact using biological monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphrey, C.L.; Dostine, P.L. [Office of the Supervising Scientist, Jabiru, NT (Australia). Alligator Rivers Region Research Institute; Faith, D.P. [CSIRO, Div. of Wildlife and Ecology, Lyneham, ACT (Australia)

    1995-03-01

    Biological monitoring programmes for environmental protection should provide for both early detection of possible adverse effects, and assessment of the ecological significance of these effects. Monitoring techniques are required that include responses sensitive to the impact, that can be subjected to rigorous statistical analysis and for which statistical power is high. Such issues in baseline research of `what and how to measure?` and `for how long?` have been the focus of a programme being developed to monitor and assess effects of mining operations on the essentially pristine, freshwater ecosystems of the Alligator Rivers Region (ARR) in tropical northern Australia. Application of the BACIP (Before, After, Control, Impact, Paired differences) design, utilizing a form of temporal replication, to univariate (single species) and multivariate (community) data is described. The BACIP design incorporates data from single control and impact sites. We argue for modification of the design for particular studies conducted in streams, to incorporate additional independent control sites from adjacent catchment. Inferential power, by way of (i) more confidently attributing cause to an observed change and (ii) providing information about the ecological significance of the change, will be enhanced using a modified BACIP design. In highly valued environments such as the ARR, monitoring programmes require application of statistical tests with high power to guarantee that an impact no greater than a prescribed amount has gone undetected. A minimum number of baseline years using the BACIP approach would therefore be required in order to achieve some desired level of statistical power. This paper describes the results of power analyses conducted on 2-5 years (depending upon the technique) of baseline data from streams of the ARR and discuss the implications of these results for management. 44 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  8. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF PAVEMENT CRACK DETECTION USING KERNEL-BASED TECHNIQUES IN ASPHALT ROAD SURFACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Miraliakbari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing demand for the digital survey and acquisition of road pavement conditions, there is also the parallel growing need for the development of automated techniques for the analysis and evaluation of the actual road conditions. This is due in part to the resulting large volumes of road pavement data captured through digital surveys, and also to the requirements for rapid data processing and evaluations. In this study, the Canon 5D Mark II RGB camera with a resolution of 21 megapixels is used for the road pavement condition mapping. Even though many imaging and mapping sensors are available, the development of automated pavement distress detection, recognition and extraction systems for pavement condition is still a challenge. In order to detect and extract pavement cracks, a comparative evaluation of kernel-based segmentation methods comprising line filtering (LF, local binary pattern (LBP and high-pass filtering (HPF is carried out. While the LF and LBP methods are based on the principle of rotation-invariance for pattern matching, the HPF applies the same principle for filtering, but with a rotational invariant matrix. With respect to the processing speeds, HPF is fastest due to the fact that it is based on a single kernel, as compared to LF and LBP which are based on several kernels. Experiments with 20 sample images which contain linear, block and alligator cracks are carried out. On an average a completeness of distress extraction with values of 81.2%, 76.2% and 81.1% have been found for LF, HPF and LBP respectively.

  9. Ecosystem Level Methane Dynamics in a Southern Forest Wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, B.; Minick, K.; Miao, G.; Furst, J.; Domec, J. C.; Sun, G.; McNulty, S.; King, J. S.; Noormets, A.

    2017-12-01

    Methane (CH4) budgets of most ecosystems remain poorly defined, particularly for the forested wetlands of the Southeastern United States.These once abundant ecosystems are unique in the amount of sequestered soil carbon they hold, and because of their interaction with climate through their contribution to both CO2 and CH4 exchange. The stability of the large C stocks in the vegetation and soil of these ecosystems is largest in submerged anoxic conditions, even though methanogenic processes still occur. However, the pressure from land development and drainage, more variable hydrology, and salt-water intrusion can alter the magnitude and balance of aerobic and anaerobic decomposition processes. Here we report five years of CH4 and CO2 fluxes from a forested wetland in the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge (ARNWR) on the Albemarle-Pamlico Peninsula of North Carolina, USA. Time series of eddy covariance based estimates of CH4 fluxes from 2012 to 2016 show large temporal variation, with seasonal progression in daily mean fluxes from June through October. The peak methane emission coincided with the peak of gross primary production and ecosystem level respiration. The combined responses of these fluxes increases the uncertainty in whether wetlands will be sources or sinks of carbon. CH4 fluxes demonstrated strong variability and different environmental regulation across years and seasons. Water table depth and atmospheric pressure regulated synoptic and seasonal patterns of CH4 emissions. Across all years, the forested wetland emitted CH4 at rates far exceeding those reported for mid-latitude wetlands and rice paddy systems.

  10. What lies beneath: sub-articular long bone shape scaling in eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs suggests different locomotor adaptations for gigantism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnan, Matthew F; Wilhite, D Ray; Masters, Simon L; Yates, Adam M; Gardner, Christine K; Aguiar, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs both evolved lineages of huge terrestrial herbivores. Although significantly more saurischian dinosaurs were giants than eutherians, the long bones of both taxa scale similarly and suggest that locomotion was dynamically similar. However, articular cartilage is thin in eutherian mammals but thick in saurischian dinosaurs, differences that could have contributed to, or limited, how frequently gigantism evolved. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that sub-articular bone, which supports the articular cartilage, changes shape in different ways between terrestrial mammals and dinosaurs with increasing size. Our sample consisted of giant mammal and reptile taxa (i.e., elephants, rhinos, sauropods) plus erect and non-erect outgroups with thin and thick articular cartilage. Our results show that eutherian mammal sub-articular shape becomes narrow with well-defined surface features as size increases. In contrast, this region in saurischian dinosaurs expands and remains gently convex with increasing size. Similar trends were observed in non-erect outgroup taxa (monotremes, alligators), showing that the trends we report are posture-independent. These differences support our hypothesis that sub-articular shape scales differently between eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs. Our results show that articular cartilage thickness and sub-articular shape are correlated. In mammals, joints become ever more congruent and thinner with increasing size, whereas archosaur joints remained both congruent and thick, especially in sauropods. We suggest that gigantism occurs less frequently in mammals, in part, because joints composed of thin articular cartilage can only become so congruent before stress cannot be effectively alleviated. In contrast, frequent gigantism in saurischian dinosaurs may be explained, in part, by joints with thick articular cartilage that can deform across large areas with increasing load.

  11. First record of eocene bony fishes and crocodyliforms from Canada's Western Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Jaelyn J; Gottfried, Michael D; Hutchison, J Howard; Brochu, Christopher A

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of Eocene non-marine vertebrates, including crocodylians, turtles, bony fishes, and mammals in Canada's High Arctic was a critical paleontological contribution of the last century because it indicated that this region of the Arctic had been mild, temperate, and ice-free during the early - middle Eocene (∼53-50 Ma), despite being well above the Arctic Circle. To date, these discoveries have been restricted to Canada's easternmost Arctic - Ellesmere and Axel Heiberg Islands (Nunavut). Although temporally correlative strata crop out over 1,000 km west, on Canada's westernmost Arctic Island - Banks Island, Northwest Territories - they have been interpreted as predominantly marine. We document the first Eocene bony fish and crocodyliform fossils from Banks Island. We describe fossils of bony fishes, including lepisosteid (Atractosteus), esocid (pike), and amiid, and a crocodyliform, from lower - middle Eocene strata of the Cyclic Member, Eureka Sound Formation within Aulavik National Park (∼76°N. paleolat.). Palynology suggests the sediments are late early to middle Eocene in age, and likely spanned the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO). These fossils extend the geographic range of Eocene Arctic lepisosteids, esocids, amiids, and crocodyliforms west by approximately 40° of longitude or ∼1100 km. The low diversity bony fish fauna, at least at the family level, is essentially identical on Ellesmere and Banks Islands, suggesting a pan-High Arctic bony fish fauna of relatively basal groups around the margin of the Eocene Arctic Ocean. From a paleoclimatic perspective, presence of a crocodyliform, gar and amiid fishes on northern Banks provides further evidence that mild, year-round temperatures extended across the Canadian Arctic during early - middle Eocene time. Additionally, the Banks Island crocodyliform is consistent with the phylogenetic hypothesis of a Paleogene divergence time between the two extant alligatorid lineages Alligator

  12. Safe and cost-effective ultrasound guided removal of retained intrauterine device: our experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Usha; Astudillo-Dávalos, Fausto E; Gerkowicz, Sabrina A

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and difference in cost of ultrasound guided removal of retained intrauterine device (IUD). A total of 23 women underwent ultrasound-guided retrieval of retained IUDs between January 2013 and March 2014. Transvaginal ultrasound was performed in all cases to assess the localization of the IUD. Under transabdominal ultrasound guidance, either the crochet type IUD hook (Gyneas, Goussainville, France) or Alligator forceps were used to grasp the IUD and remove it from the uterine cavity. The costs of the ultrasound guided procedure and the hysteroscopic removal of the IUD were compared. Twenty-three patients who failed IUD removal in the clinic were referred to our department for ultrasound-guided removal. All patients had an IUD present in the uterine cavity. Eleven patients had Paragard IUDs (48%), eight had Mirena IUDs (35%), three had Lippes loop (13%), and one had a ring IUD (4%). The patients' ages ranged from 20-56 years. The IUDs were in place for 8 months to 23 years. Of the 23 patients with retained IUDs, 19 were successfully removed (83%), and 4 underwent hysteroscopic removal of IUD. The IUD removal cost in the operating room on average was $3562 US dollars and the cost of ultrasound-guided removal was $465 US dollars. Retained intrauterine devices with or without strings can often be safely removed in an office-based setting under ultrasound guidance at less cost than in the operating room, even in cases with embedded IUDs. Our experience leads us to propose in-office IUD removal under ultrasound guidance as the first line in management of retained IUDs after failed removal by conventional practices. Ultrasound provides numerous advantages including direct visualization in a less invasive manner than hysteroscopy. Three-dimensional imaging can also be used for enhanced perspective. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparative genome analyses reveal distinct structure in the saltwater crocodile MHC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weerachai Jaratlerdsiri

    Full Text Available The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is a dynamic genome region with an essential role in the adaptive immunity of vertebrates, especially antigen presentation. The MHC is generally divided into subregions (classes I, II and III containing genes of similar function across species, but with different gene number and organisation. Crocodylia (crocodilians are widely distributed and represent an evolutionary distinct group among higher vertebrates, but the genomic organisation of MHC within this lineage has been largely unexplored. Here, we studied the MHC region of the saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus and compared it with that of other taxa. We characterised genomic clusters encompassing MHC class I and class II genes in the saltwater crocodile based on sequencing of bacterial artificial chromosomes. Six gene clusters spanning ∼452 kb were identified to contain nine MHC class I genes, six MHC class II genes, three TAP genes, and a TRIM gene. These MHC class I and class II genes were in separate scaffold regions and were greater in length (2-6 times longer than their counterparts in well-studied fowl B loci, suggesting that the compaction of avian MHC occurred after the crocodilian-avian split. Comparative analyses between the saltwater crocodile MHC and that from the alligator and gharial showed large syntenic areas (>80% identity with similar gene order. Comparisons with other vertebrates showed that the saltwater crocodile had MHC class I genes located along with TAP, consistent with birds studied. Linkage between MHC class I and TRIM39 observed in the saltwater crocodile resembled MHC in eutherians compared, but absent in avian MHC, suggesting that the saltwater crocodile MHC appears to have gene organisation intermediate between these two lineages. These observations suggest that the structure of the saltwater crocodile MHC, and other crocodilians, can help determine the MHC that was present in the ancestors of archosaurs.

  14. Remediation of a large contaminated reactor cooling reservoir: Resolving and environmental/regulatory paradox

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowers, J.A.: Gladden, J.B.; Hickey, H.M.; Jones, M.P.; Mackey, H.E.; Mayer, J.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Doswell, A. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    1994-05-01

    This paper presents a case study of a former reactor cooling water reservoir, PAR Pond, located Savannah River Site. PAR Pond, a 2640 acre, man-made reservoir was built in 1958 and until 1988, received cooling water from two DOE nuclear production reactors, P and R. The lake sediments were contaminated with low levels of radiocesium (CS-137) and transuranics in the late 1950s and early 1960s because of leaking fuel elements. Elevated levels of mercury accumulated in the sediments from pumping water from the Savannah River to maintain a full pool. PAR Ponds` stability, size, and nutrient content made a significant, unique, and highly studied ecological resource for fish and wildlife populations until it was partially drained in 1991 due to a depression in the downslope of the earthen dam. The drawdown, created 1340 acres of exposed, radioactively contaminated sediments along 33 miles of shoreline. This led US EPA to declare PAR Pond as a CERCLA operable unit subject to remediation. The drawdown also raised concerns for the populations of aquatic plants, fish, alligators, and endangered species and increased the potential for off-site migration of contaminated wildlife from contact with the exposed sediments. Applicable regulations, such as NEPA and CERCLA, require wetland loss evaluations, human health and ecological risk assessments, and remediation feasibility studies. DOE is committed to spending several million dollars to repair the dam for safety reasons, even though the lake will probably not be used for cooling purposes. At the same time, DOE must make decisions whether to refill and expend additional public funds to maintain a full pool to reduce the risks defined under CERCLA or spend hundreds of millions in remediation costs to reduce the risks of the exposed sediments.

  15. Adipose tissue concentrations of PCB, HCB, chlordane, PBDE and P,P'-DDE and the risk for endometrial cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstroem, G.; Bavel, B. van; Bjoernfoth, H. [MTM Research Centre, Oerebro Univ., Oerebro (Sweden); Hardell, L. [Dept. of Oncology, Univ. Hospital, Oerebro (Sweden)

    2004-09-15

    Environmental pollutants with hormonal activity, such as xenoestrogens, have for several years been of concern as potential risk factors for hormone dependant tumors. Impacts of increasing levels of xenoestrogens have been observed in aquatic organisms. In humans concern has been focused on ''endocrine disrupting chemicals'' with either estrogenic or antiestrogenic activities. Some persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and especially the hydroxylated metabolites, and chlordanes, have been postulated to be endocrine disruptors. PCBs have been shown to reverse gonadal sex in turtle5 and abnormalities of reproductive development has been described in juvenile alligators living in contaminated environment in Florida. Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) has been shown to have endocrine-disrupting properties. Also p,p'-dichlorodiphenyl-dichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) the most persistent metabolite of p,p'-DDT has been postulated to be an environmental endocrine disruptor. In a case-control study on patients with testicular cancer we found higher concentrations of PCBs, HCB and chlordanes in mothers to cases than in mothers to controls. Similar concentrations were found in cases with testicular cancer as in the population controls. The study gave support to the hypothesis that exposure to endocrine disruptors during the fetal period may be of etiologic importance in the etiology of testicular cancer. Another hormone dependent cancer is endometrial cancer. It accounted for 5.8% of all cancers incidents among Swedish women in 2002. The cumulative probability of developing the disease before 85 years of age was 2.8% in 2002. Estrogen replacement has been suggested as a risk factor among several others. The first cases of endometrial cancer among women using estrogen replacement therapy were reported in early 1960's. Is there a relationship between levels of POPs and incidence rate? The aim is to investigate

  16. Citizen Science as a Tool for Augmenting Museum Collection Data from Urban Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dakota M. Spear

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Museum collections are critical to contemporary biological research, but museum acquisitions have declined in recent decades, hampering researchers' ability to use collections to assess species responses to habitat modification, urbanization, and global climate change. Citizen science may be a key method to bolster museum collections data, particularly from urban regions, where ongoing data collection is critical to our understanding of ecosystem dynamics in a highly modified and variable landscape. In this study, we compare data collected as part of the citizen-science project Reptiles and Amphibians of Southern California (RASCals, hosted on the platform iNaturalist (www.inaturalist.org, to data in the VertNet database (www.vertnet.org, which houses millions of museum collection records from over 250 natural-history collections, for four focal species, including a native lizard of conservation concern that has declined with urbanization, a native lizard that is widespread in urban areas, and two invasive aquatic species. We compared numbers of VertNet records over time to modern RASCals records, and the number of records collected from urban, suburban, and protected areas from both databases. For all species, citizen-science records were generated much more rapidly than museum records. For three of our four focal species, RASCals participants over 27 months documented from 70 to 750% more records than were added to the VertNet database after 1990. For the urban-tolerant southern alligator lizard, RASCals participants collected nearly 45 times more modern urban records than are contained in the VertNet database. For all other species, the majority of RASCals records were collected within suburban or other highly modified landscapes, demonstrating the value of citizen science for collecting data within urban and suburban ecosystems. As new museum acquisitions decline, citizen-science projects like RASCals may become critical to the maintenance

  17. Estimation and Uncertainty of Recent Carbon Accumulation and Vertical Accretion in Drained and Undrained Forested Peatlands of the Southeastern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Judith Z.; Fuller, Christopher C.; Orlando, James; Salas, Antonia; Wurster, Frederic C.; Duberstein, Jamie A.

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how drainage impacts carbon densities and recent rates (past 50 years) of vertical accretion and carbon accumulation in southeastern forested peatlands. We compared these parameters in drained maple-gum (MAPL), Atlantic white cedar (CDR), and pocosin (POC) communities in the Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge (GDS) of Virginia/North Carolina and in an intact (undrained) CDR swamp in the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge (AR) of North Carolina. Peat cores were analyzed for bulk density, percent organic carbon, and 137Cs and 210Pb. An uncertainty analysis of both 137Cs and 210Pb approaches was used to constrain error at least partially related to mobility of both radioisotopes. GDS peats had lower porosities (89.6% (SD = 1.71) versus 95.3% (0.18)) and higher carbon densities (0.082 (0.021) versus 0.037 (0.009) g C cm-3) than AR. Vertical accretion rates (0.10-0.56 cm yr-1) were used to estimate a time period of 84-362 years for reestablishment of peat lost during the 2011 Lateral West fire at the GDS. Carbon accumulation rates ranged from 51 to 389 g C m-2 yr-1 for all sites. In the drained (GDS) versus intact (AR) CDR sites, carbon accumulation rates were similar with 137Cs (87GDS versus 92AR g C m-2 yr-1) and somewhat less at the GDS than AR as determined with 210Pb (111GDS versus 159AR g C m-2 yr-1). Heightened productivity and high polyphenol content of peat may be responsible for similar rates of carbon accumulation in both drained and intact CDR peatlands.

  18. Identification, chromosomal arrangements and expression analyses of the evolutionarily conserved prmt1 gene in chicken in comparison with its vertebrate paralogue prmt8.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chun Wang

    Full Text Available Nine protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs are conserved in mammals and fish. Among these, PRMT1 is the major type I PRMT for asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA formation and is the most conserved and widely distributed one. Two chicken prmt1 splicing variants were assembled and confirmed by RT-PCR experiments. However, only two scaffolds containing single separate prmt1 exon with high GC contents are present in the current chicken genome assembly. Besides, prmt1 exons are scattered in separate small scaffolds in most avian species. Complete prmt1 gene has only been predicted from two falcon species with few neighboring genes. Crocodilians are considered close to the common ancestor shared by crocodilians and birds. The gene arrangements around prmt1 in American alligator are different from that in birds but are largely conserved in human. Orthologues of genes in a large segment of human chromosomal 19 around PRMT1 are missing or not assigned to the current chicken chromosomes. In comparison, prmt8, the prmt1 paralogue, is on chicken chromosome 1 with the gene arrangements downstream of prmt8 highly conserved in birds, crocodilians, and human. However, the ones upstream vary greatly in birds. Biochemically, we found that though prmt1 transcripts were detected, limited or none PRMT1 protein was present in chicken tissues. Moreover, a much higher level of PRMT8 protein was detected in chicken brain than in mouse brain. While PRMT8 is brain specific in other vertebrate species studied, low level of PRMT8 was present in chicken but not mouse liver and muscle. We also showed that the ADMA level in chicken was similar to that in mouse. This study provides the critical information of chicken PRMT1 and PRMT8 for future analyses of the function of protein arginine methyltransferases in birds.

  19. Transition from embryonic to adult epidermis in reptiles occurs by the production of corneous beta-proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    The adaptation of the epidermis in amniote vertebrates to life on land took place by a drastic change from an embryonic epidermis made of two-four periderm layers to a terrestrial-proof epidermis. This transition occurred by the increase in types and number of specialized corneous proteins coded by genes of the Epidermal Differentiation Complex. The prevalent types of corneous proteins produced in the reptilian epidermis contain a beta-sheet region of high amino acid homology which allows their polymerization into a meshwork of filaments forming the hard corneous material of scales and claws. The present immunogold ultrastructural study shows that this transition occurs with the synthesis of glycine-rich corneous beta-proteins (formerly indicated as beta-keratins) that are added to the initial framework of acidic intermediate filaments produced in the embryonic epidermis of lizards, snake, alligator and turtle. These corneous beta-proteins are accumulated in the transitional and definitive layers of reptilian epidermis formed underneath the transitory two-four layered embryonic epidermis. In the more specialized reptiles capable of shedding the epidermis as a single unit, such as lizards and snakes, special glycine-cysteine rich beta-proteins are initially produced in a single layer immediately formed beneath the embryonic epidermis, the oberhautchen. The latter layer allows the in ovo shedding of the embryonic epidermis in preparation for hatching, and in the following shedding cycles of the adult epidermis. The production of specialized corneous-specific beta-proteins in addition to intermediate filament keratins was probably an essential addition for terrestrial life during the evolution of reptiles into different lineages, including birds. The increase of glycine and cysteine in epidermal proteins enhanced the hydrophobicity, insolubility and mechanical strength of the stratum corneum in these amniotes.

  20. Tooth counts through growth in diapsid reptiles: implications for interpreting individual and size-related variation in the fossil record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Caleb Marshall; VanBuren, Collin S; Larson, Derek W; Brink, Kirstin S; Campione, Nicolás E; Vavrek, Matthew J; Evans, David C

    2015-04-01

    Tooth counts are commonly recorded in fossil diapsid reptiles and have been used for taxonomic and phylogenetic purposes under the assumption that differences in the number of teeth are largely explained by interspecific variation. Although phylogeny is almost certainly one of the greatest factors influencing tooth count, the relative role of intraspecific variation is difficult, and often impossible, to test in the fossil record given the sample sizes available to palaeontologists and, as such, is best investigated using extant models. Intraspecific variation (largely manifested as size-related or ontogenetic variation) in tooth counts has been examined in extant squamates (lizards and snakes) but is poorly understood in archosaurs (crocodylians and dinosaurs). Here, we document tooth count variation in two species of extant crocodylians (Alligator mississippiensis and Crocodylus porosus) as well as a large varanid lizard (Varanus komodoensis). We test the hypothesis that variation in tooth count is driven primarily by growth and thus predict significant correlations between tooth count and size, as well as differences in the frequency of deviation from the modal tooth count in the premaxilla, maxilla, and dentary. In addition to tooth counts, we also document tooth allometry in each species and compare these results with tooth count change through growth. Results reveal no correlation of tooth count with size in any element of any species examined here, with the exception of the premaxilla of C. porosus, which shows the loss of one tooth position. Based on the taxa examined here, we reject the hypothesis, as it is evident that variation in tooth count is not always significantly correlated with growth. However, growth trajectories of smaller reptilian taxa show increases in tooth counts and, although current samples are small, suggest potential correlates between tooth count trajectories and adult size. Nevertheless, interspecific variation in growth patterns

  1. Land application for disposal of excess water: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, G.H.

    1992-01-01

    Water management is an important factor in the operation of uranium mines in the Alligator Rivers Region, located in the Wet-Dry tropics. For many project designs, especially open cut operations, sole reliance on evaporative disposal of waste water is ill-advised in years where the Wet season is above average. Instead, spray irrigation, or the application of excess water to suitable areas of land, has been practised at both Nabarlek and Ranger. The method depends on water losses by evaporation from spray droplets, from vegetation surfaces and from the ground surface; residual water is carried to the groundwater system by percolation. The solutes are largely transferred to the soils where heavy metals and metallic radionuclides attach to particles in the soil profile with varying efficiency depending on soil type. Major solutes that can occur in waste water from uranium mines are less successfully immobilised in soil. Sulphate is essentially conservative and not bound within the soil profile; ammonia is affected by soil reactions leading to its decomposition. The retrospective viewpoint of history indicates the application of a technology inadequately researched for local conditions. The consequences at Nabarlek have been the death of trees on one application area and the creation of contaminated groundwater which has moved into the biosphere down gradient and affected the ecology of a local stream. At Ranger, the outcome of land application has been less severe in the short term but the effective adsorption of radionuclides in surface soils has lead to dose estimates which will necessitate restrictions on future public access unless extensive rehabilitation is carried out. 2 refs., 1 tab

  2. Small sample sizes in the study of ontogenetic allometry; implications for palaeobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Caleb Marshall; Vavrek, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative morphometric analyses, particularly ontogenetic allometry, are common methods used in quantifying shape, and changes therein, in both extinct and extant organisms. Due to incompleteness and the potential for restricted sample sizes in the fossil record, palaeobiological analyses of allometry may encounter higher rates of error. Differences in sample size between fossil and extant studies and any resulting effects on allometric analyses have not been thoroughly investigated, and a logical lower threshold to sample size is not clear. Here we show that studies based on fossil datasets have smaller sample sizes than those based on extant taxa. A similar pattern between vertebrates and invertebrates indicates this is not a problem unique to either group, but common to both. We investigate the relationship between sample size, ontogenetic allometric relationship and statistical power using an empirical dataset of skull measurements of modern Alligator mississippiensis. Across a variety of subsampling techniques, used to simulate different taphonomic and/or sampling effects, smaller sample sizes gave less reliable and more variable results, often with the result that allometric relationships will go undetected due to Type II error (failure to reject the null hypothesis). This may result in a false impression of fewer instances of positive/negative allometric growth in fossils compared to living organisms. These limitations are not restricted to fossil data and are equally applicable to allometric analyses of rare extant taxa. No mathematically derived minimum sample size for ontogenetic allometric studies is found; rather results of isometry (but not necessarily allometry) should not be viewed with confidence at small sample sizes.

  3. Optimization of important production factors of a non-alcoholic beverage from roselle calyx, sorghum stem sheath and local spices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adekanye, B.R.,

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available RSM was used to optimize the important processing variables for a non-alcoholic beverage (NAB from roselle calyx, sorghum stem sheath and two local spices. A CCRD consisting of six variables reduced to five for mathematical convenience [Roselle Calyx/Sorghum Stem Sheath, (RC/SSS, 0-75/25-100 g, ginger (0-1.50 g/100ml, Alligator Pepper (AP, 0-1.50 g/100ml, Extraction Temperature (ET, 80-100oC and Time of Extraction (TOE, 20-40 min] with five coded levels (-2,-1, 0, +1, +2 were studied with two replications, making 54 experiments. Mathematical models were developed for the responses [Vitamin C (VC, Total Carotenoids (TC, 1, 1 -Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, Total Phenols (TP, pH, Total Titratable Acidity (TTA] for making a prediction during NAB production. Storage stability indices [pH, VC, TTA, Total Viable (TVC and coliform counts] of the beverage were monitored for 28 days. The optimum processing variables were RC/SSS, 66.67 g/33.33 g; ginger, 0.375 g/100ml; AP, 0.375 g/100ml; ET, 85°C; and TOE, 35 min, yielding actual values of 15.33, 1757.2, 0.306 (mg/100ml, 89.21% for VC, TC, TP and DPPH respectively. The developed mathematical models for the measured responses could be successfully used for their prediction during non-alcoholic beverage production with a correlation coefficient (R2 ranging from 0.84-0.99. Reduction in pH (4.98-2.66 and VC (15.33 -12.69 mg/100 ml were observed while TTA increased (1.70-5.02% during storage. There was no coliform growth throughout the storage period, however, after 7 days, TVC was 7x102 CFU/ml.

  4. Shape of articular surface of crocodilian (Archosauria) elbow joints and its relevance to sauropsids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Shin-ichi; Taru, Hajime; Suzuki, Daisuke

    2010-07-01

    The determination of area and shape of articular surfaces on the limb bones of extinct archosaurs is difficult because of postmortem decomposition of the fibrous tissue and articular cartilages that provide the complex three-dimensional joint surfaces in vivo. This study aims at describing the shape of the articular cartilages in the elbow joints of six crocodilian specimens; comparing its structure with that of four birds, three testudines, and five squamates; and comparing the shapes of the surfaces of the calcified and the articular cartilages in the elbow joints of an Alligator specimen. The shapes of the articular cartilages of crocodilian elbow joint are shown to resemble those of birds. The humerus possesses an olecranon fossa positioned approximately at the midportion of the distal epiphysis and bordering the margin of the extensor side of the articular surface. The ulna possesses a prominent intercotylar process at approximately the middle of its articular surface, and splits the surface into the radial and ulnar cotylae. This divides the articular cartilage into an articular surface on the flexor portion, and the olecranon on the extensor portion. The intercotylar process fits into the olecranon fossa to restrict elbow joint extension. Dinosaurs and pterosaurs, phylogenetically bracketed by Crocodylia and Aves (birds), may have possessed a similar olecranon fossa and intercotylar process on their articular cartilages. Although these shapes are rarely recognizable on the bones, their impressions on the surfaces of the calcified cartilages provide an important indication of the extensor margin of the articular surfaces. This, in turn, helps to determine the maximum angle of extension of the elbow joint in archosaurs.

  5. Comparative analysis of epidermal differentiation genes of crocodilians suggests new models for the evolutionary origin of avian feather proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holthaus, Karin Brigit; Strasser, Bettina; Lachner, Julia; Sukseree, Supawadee; Sipos, Wolfgang; Weissenbacher, Anton; Tschachler, Erwin; Alibardi, Lorenzo; Eckhart, Leopold

    2018-02-12

    The epidermis of amniotes forms a protective barrier against the environment and the differentiation program of keratinocytes, the main cell type in the epidermis, has undergone specific alterations in the course of adaptation of amniotes to a broad variety of environments and lifestyles. The epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) is a cluster of genes expressed at late stages of keratinocyte differentiation in both sauropsids and mammals. In the present study we identified and analyzed the crocodilian equivalent of the EDC. The gene complement of the EDC of both the American alligator and the saltwater crocodile were determined by comparative genomics, de novo gene prediction and identification of EDC transcripts in published transcriptome data. We found that crocodilians have an organization of the EDC similar to that of their closest living relatives, the birds, with which they form the clade Archosauria. Notable differences include the specific expansion of a subfamily of EDC genes in crocodilians and the loss of distinct ancestral EDC genes in birds. Identification and comparative analysis of crocodilian orthologs of avian feather proteins suggest that the latter evolved by cooption and sequence modification of ancestral EDC genes, and that the amplification of an internal highly cysteine-enriched amino acid sequence motif gave rise to the feather component Epidermal Differentiation Cysteine Rich Protein (EDCRP) in the avian lineage. Thus, sequence diversification of EDC genes contributed to the evolutionary divergence of the crocodilian and avian integuments. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  6. Complete mitochondrial genome suggests diapsid affinities of turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zardoya, R; Meyer, A

    1998-11-24

    Despite more than a century of debate, the evolutionary position of turtles (Testudines) relative to other amniotes (reptiles, birds, and mammals) remains uncertain. One of the major impediments to resolving this important evolutionary problem is the highly distinctive and enigmatic morphology of turtles that led to their traditional placement apart from diapsid reptiles as sole descendants of presumably primitive anapsid reptiles. To address this question, the complete (16,787-bp) mitochondrial genome sequence of the African side-necked turtle (Pelomedusa subrufa) was determined. This molecule contains several unusual features: a (TA)n microsatellite in the control region, the absence of an origin of replication for the light strand in the WANCY region of five tRNA genes, an unusually long noncoding region separating the ND5 and ND6 genes, an overlap between ATPase 6 and COIII genes, and the existence of extra nucleotides in ND3 and ND4L putative ORFs. Phylogenetic analyses of the complete mitochondrial genome sequences supported the placement of turtles as the sister group of an alligator and chicken (Archosauria) clade. This result clearly rejects the Haematothermia hypothesis (a sister-group relationship between mammals and birds), as well as rejecting the placement of turtles as the most basal living amniotes. Moreover, evidence from both complete mitochondrial rRNA genes supports a sister-group relationship of turtles to Archosauria to the exclusion of Lepidosauria (tuatara, snakes, and lizards). These results challenge the classic view of turtles as the only survivors of primary anapsid reptiles and imply that turtles might have secondarily lost their skull fenestration.

  7. Age of uranium ores at Ranger and Jabiluka unconformity vein deposits, Northern Territory, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, K.R.; Grauch, R.I.; Nutt, C.J.; Frishman, D.; Nash, J.T.; Simmons, K.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Ranger and Jabiluka uranium deposits are the largest in the Alligator Rivers Uranium Field (ARUF), which contains at least 20% of the world's low-cost uranium reserves. Ore occurs in early Proterozoic metasediments, below an unconformity with sandstones of the 1.65 Ga Kombolgie Formation. This study uses U-Pb isotope data from over 60 whole-rock drill core samples that contained a variety of mineral assemblages and textures. Data for Ranger samples indicate a well-defined age of 1.74 +/-.02 Ga. This 1.74 Ga age is distinctly pre-Kombolgie, so the Ranger deposit cannot have been formed by processes requiring its presence. This Ranger age is consistent, however, with mineralization related to heating associated with either the emplacement of early post-metamorphic granites, or possibly with intrusion of the nearby Oenpelli Dolerite. In contrast, data for the least-altered Jabiluka ores yield a concordia-intercept age of 1.44 +/-.02 Ga--significantly younger than the Ranger age, and also younger than the Komobolgie. This age may correspond to a regional thermal event, as indicated both by mafic dikes of roughly this age and a zircon lower-intercept age from a nearby granite-gneiss. Thus, together with the well-defined ∼900 Ma age of ores at the Nabarlek deposit, there are at least 3 distinct periods of major U-mineralization in the ARUF. Data for both Ranger and Jabiluka indicate the same, profound isotopic disturbance at some time in the interval of 0.4-0.6 Ga. Possibly this time corresponds to the development of basins and associated basalt flows to the W and SW, a suggested by Crick et. al. (1980)

  8. Soluble scute proteins of healthy and ill desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, B.L.; Li, C.; Berry, K.H.; Denslow, N.D.; Jacobson, E.R.; Sawyer, R.H.; Williams, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    Objectives - To characterize protein composition of shell scute of desert tortoises and to determine whether detectable differences could be used to identify healthy tortoises from tortoises with certain illnesses. Animals - 20 desert tortoises. Procedures - Complete postmortem examinations were performed on all tortoises. Plastron scute proteins were solubilized, scute proteins were separated by use of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and proteins were analyzed, using densitometry. Two-dimensional immobilized pH gradient-PAGE (2D IPG-PAGE) and immunoblot analysis, using polyclonal antisera to chicken-feather ?? keratin and to alligator-scale ?? keratin, were conducted on representative samples. The 14-kd proteins were analyzed for amino acid composition. Results - The SDS-PAGE and densitometry revealed 7 distinct bands, each with a mean relative protein concentration of > 1 %, ranging from 8 to 47 kd, and a major protein component of approximately 14 kd that constituted up to 75% of the scute protein. The 2D IPG-PAGE revealed additional distinct 62-and 68-kd protein bands. On immunoblot analysis, the 14-, 32-, and 45-kd proteins reacted with both antisera. The 14-kd proteins had an amino acid composition similar to that of chicken ?? keratins. There was a substantial difference in the percentage of the major 14-kd proteins from scute of ill tortoises with normal appearing shells, compared with 14-kd proteins of healthy tortoises. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - The major protein components of shell scute of desert tortoises have amino acid composition and antigenic features of ?? keratins. Scute protein composition may be altered in tortoises with certain systemic illnesses.

  9. Groundwater availability in the Crouch Branch and McQueen Branch aquifers, Chesterfield County, South Carolina, 1900-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Bruce G.; Landmeyer, James E.

    2014-01-01

    , totaled about 1,117 square miles. Major types of data used as input to the model included groundwater levels, groundwater-use data, and hydrostratigraphic data, along with estimates and measurements of stream base flows made specifically for this study. The groundwater-flow model was calibrated to groundwater-level and stream base-flow conditions from 1900 to 2012 using 39 stress periods. The model was calibrated with an automated parameter-estimation approach using the computer program PEST, and the model used regularized inversion and pilot points. The groundwater-flow model was calibrated using field data that included groundwater levels that had been collected between 1940 and 2012 from 239 wells and base-flow measurements from 44 locations distributed within the study area. To better understand recharge and inter-aquifer interactions, seven wells were equipped with continuous groundwater-level recording equipment during the course of the study, between 2008 and 2012. These water levels were included in the model calibration process. The observed groundwater levels were compared to the simulated ones, and acceptable calibration fits were achieved. Root mean square error for the simulated groundwater levels compared to all observed groundwater levels was 9.3 feet for the Crouch Branch aquifer and 8.6 feet for the McQueen Branch aquifer. The calibrated groundwater-flow model was then used to calculate groundwater budgets for the entire study area and for two sub-areas. The sub-areas are the Alligator Rural Water and Sewer Company well field near McBee, South Carolina, and the Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge acquisition boundary area. For the overall model area, recharge rates vary from 56 to 1,679 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) with a mean of 737 Mgal/d over the simulation period (1900–2012). The simulated water budget for the streams and rivers varies from 653 to 1,127 Mgal/d with a mean of 944 Mgal/d. The simulated “storage-in term” ranges from 0

  10. Assessment of the off-site geomorphic impacts of uranium mining on Magela Creek, Northern territory, Australia. Supervising Scientist report 156

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erskine, W.D.; Saynor, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this report was to review all of the existing data relevant to the discharge of solutes and particulate material from the rehabilitated mine site at Ranger uranium mine and from nearby tributaries of Magela Creek; determine the fate of particulates in the off-site system; and collate and review all of the existing material relevant to an understanding of the long-term behaviour of Magela Creek and its tributaries. In relation to the first task, rainfall at the Ranger uranium mine is acidic and has a low dissolved solids and nutrient content. Magela Creek water is characterised by very low conductivity and low suspended solids concentrations that exhibit exhaustion as the Wet season progresses. The suspended particulate matter of Magela Creek contained approximately 25% organic matter, 15% iron oxide, and the remainder consisted of varying amounts of clay (predominantly kaolinite with some chlorite) quartz and aluminium oxide. Sediment and solute yields of Magela Creek are less than 11.8 and 2.5 t/km 2 yr, respectively, and are low by world standards. Bedload yield is relatively high proportion (48.6%) of the total sediment load yield and this occurs at all scales from waste rock dump plots to major rivers in the Alligator Rivers Region. In relation to the second task it was demonstrated that not all of the sediment eroded from the rehabilitated mine site during the 1000 years structural life will be exported off-site. Published empirical relationships of sediment delivery ratios versus catchment area indicate that between 50 and 76% of the eroded sediment will be retained on the rehabilitated mine site. The most significant sediment storage sites downstream of the mine site will be the mine site tributaries and their associated floodplains and backflow billabongs. It is predicted that between 3.1 and 10.2 x 10 6 t will be exported to the mine site tributaries and that between 3.1 and 7.0 x 10 6 t will be stored there. Copyright (2000) Commonwealth of

  11. Status of scientific knowledge, recovery progress, and future research directions for the Gulf Sturgeon, Acipenser oxyrinchus desotoi Vladykov, 1955

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulak, Kenneth J.; Parauka, F; Slack, W. Todd; Ruth, T; Randall, Michael T.; Luke, K; Mette, M. F; Price, M. E

    2016-01-01

    The Gulf Sturgeon, Acipenser oxyrinchus desotoi, is an anadromous species of Acipenseridae and native to North America. It currently inhabits and spawns in the upper reaches of seven natal rivers along the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico from the Suwannee River, Florida, to the Pearl River, Louisiana, during spring to autumn. Next to the Alligator Gar (Atractosteus spatula), the Gulf Sturgeon is currently the largest fish species occurring in U.S. Gulf Coast rivers, attaining a length of 2.35 m and weights exceeding 135 kg, but historically attained a substantially larger size. Historically, the spawning populations existed in additional rivers from which the species has been wholly or nearly extirpated, such as the Mobile and Ochlockonee rivers, and possibly the Rio Grande River. Most Gulf Sturgeon populations were decimated by unrestricted commercial fishing between 1895–1910. Subsequently most populations remained unrecovered or extirpated due to continued harvest until the 1970s–1980s, and the construction of dams blocking access to ancestral upriver spawning grounds. Late 20th Century harvest bans and net bans enacted by the several Gulf Coast states have stabilized several populations and enabled the Suwannee River population to rebound substantially and naturally. Hatchery supplementation has not been necessary in this regard to date. Sturgeon are resilient and adaptable fishes with a geological history of 150 million years. Research undertaken since the 1970s has addressed many aspects of Gulf Sturgeon life history, reproduction, migration, population biology, habitat requirements, and other aspects of species biology. However, many knowledge gaps remain, prominently including the life history of early developmental stages in the first year of life. Natural population recovery is evident for the Suwannee River population, but seems promising as well for at least four other populations. The Pascagoula and Pearl River populations face a challenging

  12. Recent developments in Australia's uranium mining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKay, A.D.

    2001-01-01

    Uranium is produced at two mining/milling operations in Australia - Ranger in the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory, and Olympic Dam in South Australia. In 1996, Ranger produced 4138 tonnes (t) U 3 O 8 from stockpiled ore mined from Ranger No. 1 Orebody. The capacity of the Ranger mill is being expanded to 5000 tonnes per annum (tpa) U 3 O 8 to coincide with the commencement of mining from No. 3 Orebody in mid-1997. The Olympic Dam copper-uranium-gold-silver deposit is the world's largest deposit of low cost uranium. The operation currently has an annual production of 85,000 t copper, 1700 t U 3 O 8 and associated gold and silver. WMC Ltd proposes to expand annual production to 200 000 t copper and approximately 4600 t U 3 O 8 by end of 1999. The environmental impact of the expansion is being assessed jointly by both Commonwealth and South Australian Governments. A draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) was released in May. Since its election in March 1996, the Liberal/National Party Coalition Government has made a number of changes to the Commonwealth Government's policies relating to uranium mining, including removal of the former Government's 'three mines' policy, and relaxation of the guidelines for foreign investment in Australian uranium mines. These changes, together with an improved outlook for the uranium market, have resulted in proposals to develop new mines at Jabiluka (Northern Territory), Kintyre (Western Australia) and Beverley (South Australia). Energy Resources of Australia Ltd proposes to develop an underground mine at Jabiluka with the ore to be processed at Ranger mill. Initial production will be 1800 tpa U 3 O 8 which will increase to 4000 tpa U 3 O 8 by the 14th year. The draft EIS was released for public comment in October 1996, and the final EIS is to be released in June 1997. Canning Resources Ltd proposes to mine the Kintyre deposit by open cut methods commencing in 1999 with an annual production of 1200 tpa U 3 O 8

  13. Folk toys in Central Thailand: Product development for a creative economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanna Pichetpruth

    2015-11-01

    , cap gun, nungstrik gun, whistle, pong-pang, bamboo flute, wote and wihoksaipha; 2 pleasure and imaginative toys, such as kanghan, rotated kanghan, airplane, kalong, chackachan, pla-tapian, waling karian bird and flying bird; 3 games, such as kalakaokwai, wooden alligators, wooden swords and arrows; and 4 models, such as talapcap, trucks, tricycles, boats, lookfat, kites, eko, mokawmokeang, dinosaurs, buffalo, tang, motorcycles, jet planes and house models. Nowadays, toys are made as an enterprise, using more external materials, chemical colors, different styles and models. Furthermore, toy production helps to conserve central Thai identity, child growth and Thai lifestyle.

  14. Aluminium phosphate sulphate minerals (APS) associated with proterozoic unconformity-type uranium deposits: crystal-chemical characterisation and petrogenetic significance; Les sulfates phosphates d'aluminium hydrates (APS) dans l'environnement des gisements d'uranium associes a une discordance proterozoique: caracterisation cristallochimique et signification petrogenetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaboreau, St

    2005-07-01

    Aluminium phosphate sulfate minerals (APS) are particularly widespread and spatially associated with hydrothermal clay alteration in both the East Alligator River Uranium Field (Northern Territory, Australia) and the Athabasca basin (Saskatchewan, Canada), in the environment of proterozoic unconformity-related uranium deposits (URUD). The purpose of this study is both: 1) to characterize the nature and the origin of the APS minerals on both sides of the middle proterozoic unconformity between the overlying sandstones and the underlying metamorphic basement rocks that host the uranium ore bodies, 2) to improve our knowledge on the suitability of these minerals to indicate the paleo-conditions (redox, pH) at which the alteration processes relative to the uranium deposition operated. The APS minerals result from the interaction of oxidising and relatively acidic fluids with aluminous host rocks enriched in monazite. Several APS-bearing clay assemblages and APS crystal-chemistry have also been distinguished as a function of the distance from the uranium ore bodies or from the structural discontinuities which drained the hydrothermal solutions during the mineralisation event. One of the main results of this study is that the index mineral assemblages, used in the recent literature to describe the alteration zones around the uranium ore bodies, can be theoretically predicted by a set of thermodynamic calculations which simulate different steps of fluid-rock interaction processes related to a downward penetrating of hyper-saline, oxidizing and acidic diagenetic fluids through the lower sandstone units of the basins and then into the metamorphic basement rocks. The above considerations and the fact that APS with different crystal-chemical compositions crystallized in a range of fO{sub 2} and pH at which uranium can either be transported in solution or precipitated as uraninite in the host-rocks make these minerals not only good markers of the degree of alteration of the

  15. The structure and composition of Holocene coral reefs in the Middle Florida Keys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Lauren T.; Stathakopoulos, Anastasios; Kuffner, Ilsa B.

    2016-07-21

    records of the Holocene history of reefs in the region. The objectives of the present study were to (1) provide general descriptions of unpublished core records from Alligator Reef and (2) collect and describe new Holocene reef cores from two additional locations in the Middle Keys: Sombrero and Tennessee Reefs.

  16. Aluminium phosphate sulphate minerals (APS) associated with proterozoic unconformity-type uranium deposits: crystal-chemical characterisation and petrogenetic significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaboreau, St.

    2005-01-01

    Aluminium phosphate sulfate minerals (APS) are particularly widespread and spatially associated with hydrothermal clay alteration in both the East Alligator River Uranium Field (Northern Territory, Australia) and the Athabasca basin (Saskatchewan, Canada), in the environment of proterozoic unconformity-related uranium deposits (URUD). The purpose of this study is both: 1) to characterize the nature and the origin of the APS minerals on both sides of the middle proterozoic unconformity between the overlying sandstones and the underlying metamorphic basement rocks that host the uranium ore bodies, 2) to improve our knowledge on the suitability of these minerals to indicate the paleo-conditions (redox, pH) at which the alteration processes relative to the uranium deposition operated. The APS minerals result from the interaction of oxidising and relatively acidic fluids with aluminous host rocks enriched in monazite. Several APS-bearing clay assemblages and APS crystal-chemistry have also been distinguished as a function of the distance from the uranium ore bodies or from the structural discontinuities which drained the hydrothermal solutions during the mineralisation event. One of the main results of this study is that the index mineral assemblages, used in the recent literature to describe the alteration zones around the uranium ore bodies, can be theoretically predicted by a set of thermodynamic calculations which simulate different steps of fluid-rock interaction processes related to a downward penetrating of hyper-saline, oxidizing and acidic diagenetic fluids through the lower sandstone units of the basins and then into the metamorphic basement rocks. The above considerations and the fact that APS with different crystal-chemical compositions crystallized in a range of fO 2 and pH at which uranium can either be transported in solution or precipitated as uraninite in the host-rocks make these minerals not only good markers of the degree of alteration of the

  17. Investigation of Primary Causes of Load-Related Cracking in Asphalt Concrete Pavement in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hong Joon

    This dissertation presents causes of cracking in asphalt concrete pavement in North Carolina through field investigation and laboratory experiments with field extracted material. North Carolina is experiencing higher than anticipated rates of fatigue cracking compared to other state. These higher than expected rates could be reflective of the national trends in mix design practice or could be caused by structural pavement failures. The problems associated with premature cracking in North Carolina pavements point to the need to evaluate the North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT) mixes, processes, and measures to ensure that these factors properly balance the goals of preventing cracking and minimizing permanent deformation. Without solid data from in-service pavements, any conclusions regarding the causes of these failures might be pure conjecture. Accordingly, this research examines material properties through laboratory experiments using field-extracted materials and investigates in situ pavements and pavement structure. In order to assess condition of existing pavement, alligator cracking index (ACI) was developed. The asphalt content in the top layer that exhibits top-down cracking or bottom-up cracking has a proportional relationship to ACI values. The air void content in a bottom layer that exhibits top-down cracking or bottom-up cracking shows an inverse proportional relationship to ACI values. These observations reflect reasonable results. A comparison between ACI and asphalt film thickness values does not produce noteworthy findings, but somewhat reasonable results are evident once the range of comparison is narrowed down. Thicker film thicknesses show higher ACI values. From field core visual observations, road widening is identified as a major cause of longitudinal cracking. Regions with observed layer interface separation tend to have low ACI values. Through tensile strain simulation based on actual field conditions, it is observed that

  18. Transcriptomic responses to environmental temperature by turtles with temperature-dependent and genotypic sex determination assessed by RNAseq inform the genetic architecture of embryonic gonadal development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srihari Radhakrishnan

    Full Text Available Vertebrate sexual fate is decided primarily by the individual's genotype (GSD, by the environmental temperature during development (TSD, or both. Turtles exhibit TSD and GSD, making them ideal to study the evolution of sex determination. Here we analyze temperature-specific gonadal transcriptomes (RNA-sequencing validated by qPCR of painted turtles (Chrysemys picta TSD before and during the thermosensitive period, and at equivalent stages in soft-shell turtles (Apalone spinifera-GSD, to test whether TSD's and GSD's transcriptional circuitry is identical but deployed differently between mechanisms. Our data show that most elements of the mammalian urogenital network are active during turtle gonadogenesis, but their transcription is generally more thermoresponsive in TSD than GSD, and concordant with their sex-specific function in mammals [e.g., upregulation of Amh, Ar, Esr1, Fog2, Gata4, Igf1r, Insr, and Lhx9 at male-producing temperature, and of β-catenin, Foxl2, Aromatase (Cyp19a1, Fst, Nf-kb, Crabp2 at female-producing temperature in Chrysemys]. Notably, antagonistic elements in gonadogenesis (e.g., β-catenin and Insr were thermosensitive only in TSD early-embryos. Cirbp showed warm-temperature upregulation in both turtles disputing its purported key TSD role. Genes that may convert thermal inputs into sex-specific development (e.g., signaling and hormonal pathways, RNA-binding and heat-shock were differentially regulated. Jak-Stat, Nf-κB, retinoic-acid, Wnt, and Mapk-signaling (not Akt and Ras-signaling potentially mediate TSD thermosensitivity. Numerous species-specific ncRNAs (including Xist were differentially-expressed, mostly upregulated at colder temperatures, as were unannotated loci that constitute novel TSD candidates. Cirbp showed warm-temperature upregulation in both turtles. Consistent transcription between turtles and alligator revealed putatively-critical reptilian TSD elements for male (Sf1, Amh, Amhr2 and female (Crabp2 and

  19. Transcriptomic responses to environmental temperature by turtles with temperature-dependent and genotypic sex determination assessed by RNAseq inform the genetic architecture of embryonic gonadal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Srihari; Literman, Robert; Neuwald, Jennifer; Severin, Andrew; Valenzuela, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    Vertebrate sexual fate is decided primarily by the individual's genotype (GSD), by the environmental temperature during development (TSD), or both. Turtles exhibit TSD and GSD, making them ideal to study the evolution of sex determination. Here we analyze temperature-specific gonadal transcriptomes (RNA-sequencing validated by qPCR) of painted turtles (Chrysemys picta TSD) before and during the thermosensitive period, and at equivalent stages in soft-shell turtles (Apalone spinifera-GSD), to test whether TSD's and GSD's transcriptional circuitry is identical but deployed differently between mechanisms. Our data show that most elements of the mammalian urogenital network are active during turtle gonadogenesis, but their transcription is generally more thermoresponsive in TSD than GSD, and concordant with their sex-specific function in mammals [e.g., upregulation of Amh, Ar, Esr1, Fog2, Gata4, Igf1r, Insr, and Lhx9 at male-producing temperature, and of β-catenin, Foxl2, Aromatase (Cyp19a1), Fst, Nf-kb, Crabp2 at female-producing temperature in Chrysemys]. Notably, antagonistic elements in gonadogenesis (e.g., β-catenin and Insr) were thermosensitive only in TSD early-embryos. Cirbp showed warm-temperature upregulation in both turtles disputing its purported key TSD role. Genes that may convert thermal inputs into sex-specific development (e.g., signaling and hormonal pathways, RNA-binding and heat-shock) were differentially regulated. Jak-Stat, Nf-κB, retinoic-acid, Wnt, and Mapk-signaling (not Akt and Ras-signaling) potentially mediate TSD thermosensitivity. Numerous species-specific ncRNAs (including Xist) were differentially-expressed, mostly upregulated at colder temperatures, as were unannotated loci that constitute novel TSD candidates. Cirbp showed warm-temperature upregulation in both turtles. Consistent transcription between turtles and alligator revealed putatively-critical reptilian TSD elements for male (Sf1, Amh, Amhr2) and female (Crabp2 and Hspb1

  20. Hierarchical structure and mechanical properties of snake (Naja atra) and turtle (Ocadia sinensis) eggshells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yin; Chen, Po-Yu

    2016-02-01

    After hundreds of million years of evolution, natural armors have evolved in various organisms, and has manifested in diverse forms such as eggshells, abalone shells, alligator osteoderms, turtle shells, and fish scales. Eggshells serve as multifunctional shields for successful embryogenesis, such as protection, moisture control and thermal regulation. Unlike calcareous avian eggshells which are brittle and hard, reptilians have leathery eggshells that are tough and flexible. Reptilian eggshells can withstand collision damages when laid in holes and dropped onto each other, and reduce abrasion caused by buried sand. In this study, we investigate structure and mechanical properties of eggshells of Taiwan cobra snake (Naja atra) and Chinese striped-neck turtle (Ocadia sinensis). From Acid Fuchsin Orange G (AFOG) staining and ATR-FTIR examination, we found that both eggshells are mainly composed of keratin. The mechanical properties of demineralized snake and turtle eggshells were evaluated by tensile and fracture tests and show distinctly difference. Turtle eggshells are relatively stiff and rigid, while snake eggshells behave as elastomers, which are highly extensible and reversible. The exceptional deformability (110-230% tensile strain) and toughness of snake eggshells are contributed by the wavy and random arrangement of keratin fibers as well as collagen layers. Multi-scale toughening mechanisms of snake eggshells were observed and elucidated, including crack deflection and twisting, fibers reorientation, sliding and bridging, inter-laminar shear effect, as well as the α-β phase transition of keratin. Inspirations from the structural and mechanical designs of reptilian eggshells may lead to the synthesis of tough, extensible, lightweight composites which could be further applied in the flexible devices, packaging and bio-medical fields. Amniotic eggshells serve as multifunctional shields for successful embryogenesis. The avian eggshells have been extensively

  1. Status of the Island Night Lizard and Two Non-Native Lizards on Outlying Landing Field San Nicolas Island, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellers, Gary M.; Drost, Charles A.; Murphey, Thomas G.

    2008-01-01

    More than 900 individually marked island night lizards (Xantusia riversiana) were captured on San Nicolas Island, California, between 1984 and 2007 as part of an ongoing study to monitor the status of this threatened species. Our data suggest that at least a few lizards are probably more than 20 years old, and one lizard would be 31.5 years old if it grew at an average rate for the population. Ages of 20 and 30 years seem reasonable given the remarkably slow growth during capture intervals of more than a decade for five of the lizards which we estimated to be 20 or more years old. Like other lizards, island night lizard growth rates vary by size, with larger lizards growing more slowly. In general, growth rates were somewhat greater on San Nicolas Island (compared with Santa Barbara Island), and this increase was sustained through all of the intermediate size classes. The higher growth rate may account for the somewhat larger lizards present on San Nicolas Island, although we cannot discount the possibility that night lizards on San Nicolas are merely living longer. The high percentage of small lizards in the Eucalyptus habitat might seem to reflect a healthy population in that habitat, but the high proportion of small lizards appears to be caused by good reproduction in the 1900s and substantially poorer reproduction in subsequent years. The Eucalyptus habitat has dried quite a bit in recent years. Night lizards in the Haplopappus/Grassland habitat have shown an increase in the proportion of larger lizards since 2000. There has also been an increase in the proportion of large lizards in the Rock Cobble habitat at Redeye Beach. However, there are has been some change in habitat with more elephant seals occupying the same area just above the high tide as do the night lizards. Southern alligator lizards and side-blotched lizards are both non-native on San Nicolas Island. Neither lizard causes obvious harm to island night lizards, and management time and effort should

  2. Threatened and Endangered Species Survey for Patrick Air Force Base, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddy, Donna M.; Stolen, Eric D.; Schmalzer, Paul A.; Larson, Vickie L.; Hall, Patrice; Hensley, Melissa A.

    1997-01-01

    characteristic of species that occur in the Indian River Lagoon system. Twenty-five species of waterbirds were observed during quarterly surveys on PAFB, including five species listed as species of special concern by the state of Florida: Snowy Egret (Egretta thula), Little Blue Heron (Egretta caerulea), Tricolored Heron (Egretta tricolo4, White Ibis (Eudocimus albus), and Brown Pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis). The Golf Course was used extensively by almost all species of waterbirds on PAFB. Twenty-two species of shorebirds were observed on PAFB. Although no listed species were observed, the potential exists for several protected species of shorebirds to use the beach at PAFB during some parts of the year. The Airfield runways and associated grass areas were important sites at PAFB for loafing and feeding for some shorebirds. Surveys of rooftop nesting by Least Terns (Stema antillarum) on PAFB found a large colony on a rooftop in the PAFB Industrial Area. This colony produced some independent young. Two rooftop Least Tern colonies reported from previous years were inactive during 1996. A small number of Black Skimmers (Rhynchops nigee attempted to nest at the Least Ten colony but were unsuccessful. Surveys for the gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus) revealed burrows and tortoises only at the Waste Study Site; five burrows and three tortoises were observed. No Florida scrub lizards (Sceloporus woodi), eastern indigo snakes (Drymarchon corais couperl), or diamondback terrapins (Malademys terrapin terrapin) were observed. American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) were observed on the Golf Course and using ditches, ponds, and areas along the Banana River. The amount of dune habitat could be expanded by not mowing areas adjacent to the dunes to allow dune species to colonize and expand. Planting dune species as part of the beach renourishment project will also increase this habitat. Exotic plants dominate several areas on the base and are used by threatened, endangered, and

  3. Injuries and envenoming by aquatic animals in fishermen of Coxim and Corumbá municipalities, state of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil: identification of the causative agents, clinical aspects and first aid measures Traumas e envenenamentos por animais aquáticos em pescadores de Coxim e Corumbá, estado de Mato Grosso do Sul, Brasil: identificação de agentes causadores, aspectos clínicos e medidas de primeiros socorros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geovane Cândido da Silva

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The fishes of continental Brazil have socioeconomic importance due to their potential for sport fishing and commercial and subsistence uses, as seen in the Upper Paraguay River Basin, particularly in the municipalities of the Pantanal region, where it is the second largest economic activity. Injuries caused in professional fishermen are common and poorly studied, as in other regions of the country. METHODS: Data were obtained from questionnaires and interviews with 100 professional fishermen, 50 in each municipality, between December 2008 and October 2009. RESULTS: All the fishermen reported some kind of injury caused by fish stings (78% of injuries and fish, alligator and snake bites (22% on the hands (46% of cases and feet (35% of cases. Most of the patients had mild symptoms. The most severe cases were associated with secondary bacterial infections and required specific treatment and prolonged recovery associated with social and economic losses. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study indicate that the stressful work conditions, inattention to basic preventive measures and carelessness were factors that contributed to accidents and that the toxicity and ability to inflict mechanical trauma of some aquatic species, plus the ineffective use of first aid and hospital treatment, contributed to the high morbidity and complications in many cases. Data from this study are relevant to the fishing communities of the Pantanal region, since they reveal high rates of accidents, lack of knowledge concerning first aid, initial treatment, injury prevention and lack of medical follow-up of the population.INTRODUÇÃO: Os peixes continentais do Brasil têm grande importância socioeconômica, tanto pelo potencial para a pesca esportiva, quanto para a pesca comercial e de subsistência, como é notado na bacia do Alto Rio Paraguai, particularmente, nos municípios da região do Pantanal. Ferimentos e envenenamentos em pescadores profissionais s

  4. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    In Australia most exploration for uranium has been conducted by companies and individuals. The geological mapping and airborne radiometric surveying conducted by the BMR is made available to interested persons. Exploration for uranium in Australia can be divided into two periods - 1947 to 1961 and 1966-1977. During the first period the Commonwealth Government introduced measures to encourage uranium exploration including a system of rewards for the discovery of uranium ore. This reward system resulted in extensive activity by prospectors particularly in the known mineral fields. Equipped with a Geiger counter or scintillometer, individuals with little or no experience in prospecting could compete with experienced prospectors and geologists. During this period several relative small uranium deposits were discovered generally by prospectors who found outcropping mineralisation. The second phase of uranium exploration in Australia began in 1966 at which time reserves amounted to only 6,200 tonnes of uranium and by 3 977 reserves had been increased to 289,000 tonnes. Most of the exploration was done by companies with substantial exploration budgets utilising more advanced geological and geophysical techniques. In the field of airborne radiometer the development of multi-channel gamma ray spectrometers with large volume crystal detectors increased the sensitivity of the tool as a uranium detector and resulted in several major discoveries. Expenditure or exploration for uranium increased from 1966 to 1971 but has declines in recent years. After listing the major geological elements of Australia, its uranium production and resources are discussed. During the period 1954-71 the total production of uranium concentrate in Australia amounted to 7,780 tonnes of uranium, and was derived from deposits at Rum Jungle (2,990 tonnes U) and the South Alligator River (610 tonnes U) in the Northern Territory, Mary Kathleen (3,460 tonnes U) in Queensland and Radium Hill (720 tonnes U

  5. Descripción histológica del oviducto de Caiman crocodilus fuscus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramiro Elduardo Bahamón Vanegas

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Se describe la histología del oviducto de 27 hembras de Caiman crocodilus fuscusdurante tresetapas del ciclo reproductivo anual (previtelogénesis, vitelogénesis y gravidez por microscopíaóptica de alta resolución (MOAR y, en algunas regiones, por microscopía electrónica detransmisión (MET. Con ayuda de pruebas histoquímicas (ácido peryódico de Schiff P.A.S. yazul de Alcian A.A., pH 2,4, se aproxima la función de cada una de las regiones. El oviductode C. c. fuscuses un órgano pareado, funcional, en forma de tubo muy contorneado. Desdeel extremo proximal al caudal se reconocen histológicamente las siguientes regiones:infundíbulo anterior, infundíbulo posterior, tubo, transición tubo-útero anterior, úteroanterior, útero posterior y vagina. Tres capas conforman la pared del oviducto: una externade revestimiento (serosa con células cúbicas bajas que no presentan cambios significativosa lo largo del ciclo reproductivo, una capa muscular longitudinal externa y circular internaque cambian según el estado reproductivo y la región, y una capa mucosa más interna. Lamucosa se hipertrofia en vitelogénesis y gravidez y está revestida por cuatro tipos de células:ciliadas, no ciliadas y secretoras PAS y AA positivas las cuales producen mucosubstanciasácidas o neutras que pueden lubricar la superficie de la mucosa y/o tomar parte de huevoen formación. Glándulas tubulares simples se encuentran en la mucosa del tubo y úteroanterior, presentan actividad secretora (PAS y AA negativa durante todo el ciclo y se ramifican en vitelogénesis y gravidez. En el útero posterior hay glándulas tubulares simples sinevidencia de secreción, las células glandulares son similares a las células del útero poste-rior de Alligator mississippiensisy a las células que transportan iones y material el dilución deloviducto de las aves (Gallus domesticus; estas glándulas no se describen en el oviducto de otrosreptiles y al parecer son únicas de

  6. Delineation of marsh types of the Texas coast from Corpus Christi Bay to the Sabine River in 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enwright, Nicholas M.; Hartley, Stephen B.; Brasher, Michael G.; Visser, Jenneke M.; Mitchell, Michael K.; Ballard, Bart M.; Parr, Mark W.; Couvillion, Brady R.; Wilson, Barry C.

    2014-01-01

    Coastal zone managers and researchers often require detailed information regarding emergent marsh vegetation types for modeling habitat capacities and needs of marsh-reliant wildlife (such as waterfowl and alligator). Detailed information on the extent and distribution of marsh vegetation zones throughout the Texas coast has been historically unavailable. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation and collaboration with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via the Gulf Coast Joint Venture, Texas A&M University-Kingsville, the University of Louisiana-Lafayette, and Ducks Unlimited, Inc., has produced a classification of marsh vegetation types along the middle and upper Texas coast from Corpus Christi Bay to the Sabine River. This study incorporates approximately 1,000 ground reference locations collected via helicopter surveys in coastal marsh areas and about 2,000 supplemental locations from fresh marsh, water, and “other” (that is, nonmarsh) areas. About two-thirds of these data were used for training, and about one-third were used for assessing accuracy. Decision-tree analyses using Rulequest See5 were used to classify emergent marsh vegetation types by using these data, multitemporal satellite-based multispectral imagery from 2009 to 2011, a bare-earth digital elevation model (DEM) based on airborne light detection and ranging (lidar), alternative contemporary land cover classifications, and other spatially explicit variables believed to be important for delineating the extent and distribution of marsh vegetation communities. Image objects were generated from segmentation of high-resolution airborne imagery acquired in 2010 and were used to refine the classification. The classification is dated 2010 because the year is both the midpoint of the multitemporal satellite-based imagery (2009–11) classified and the date of the high-resolution airborne imagery that was used to develop image objects. Overall accuracy corrected for bias (accuracy

  7. Relations between total phosphorus and orthophosphorus concentrations and rainfall, surface-water discharge, and groundwater levels in Big Cypress Seminole Indian Reservation, Florida, 2014–16

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, W. Scott; Sifuentes, Dorothy F.

    2018-02-06

    The Seminole Tribe of Florida (the Tribe) is partnering with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to develop a numeric phosphorus criterion for the 52,000-acre Big Cypress Seminole Indian Reservation (BCSIR), which is located downgradient of the Everglades Agricultural Area, and of other public and private lands, in southeastern Hendry County and northwestern Broward County in southern Florida. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Tribe, used water-quality data collected between October 2014 and September 2016 by the Tribe and the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD), along with data from rainfall gages, surface-water stage and discharge gages, and groundwater monitoring wells, to (1) examine the relations between local hydrology and measured total phosphorus (TP) and orthophosphorus (OP) concentrations and (2) identify explanatory variables for TP concentrations. Of particular concern were conditions when TP exceeded 10 parts per billion (ppb) (0.01 milligram per liter [mg/L]) given that the State of Florida and the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians Alligator Alley Reservation (located downstream of the BCSIR) have adopted a 10-ppb maximum TP criterion for surface waters.From October 2014 to September 2016, the Tribe collected 47–52 samples at each of nine water-quality sites for analysis of TP and OP, except at one site where 28 samples were collected. For all sites sampled, concentrations of TP (as phosphorus [P]) ranged from less than 0.002 mg/L (2 ppb) to a maximum of nearly 0.50 mg/L (500 ppb), whereas concentrations of OP (as P), the reactive form of inorganic phosphorus readily absorbed by plants and (or) abiotically absorbed, ranged from less than 0.003 mg/L (3 ppb) to a maximum of 0.24 mg/L (240 ppb). The median and interquartile ranges of concentrations of TP and OP in the samples collected in 2014–16 by the Tribe were similar to the median and interquartile ranges of concentrations in samples collected by the SFWMD at

  8. Radiological impact assessment of uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.

    2000-02-01

    This thesis presents improved methods for predicting and assessing the dose to humans resulting from uranium mining and milling operations with the primary focus being on the local and regional component of dose to members of the public. Throughout, examples are presented from operating (Ranger) and rehabilitated (Nabarlek) uranium mine in the tropical Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory of Australia. Four major pathways are examined with relation to the Ranger mine dispersion of radionuclides in creek waters with uptake into the food chain, dispersion of radionuclides in groundwater, atmospheric transport of radon and radon progeny, and wet and dry deposition of activity on airborne dust. An improved model has been developed for the prediction of dose following release of wastewaters from Ranger into the Magela Creek system. The available data on radionuclide uptake into organism of the creek system were reviewed for incorporation into the model. Calculations using the model indicate that the most important organism for radiological impact are freshwater mussels, followed by fish. The behaviour of U, Ra, Th and Ac in the groundwater system in the vicinity of the Ranger tailings dam has been investigated using alpha- and gamma-spectrometry techniques. Ra, U and Ac isotope concentrations have increased with time in some bores, but this is shown in the case of Ra to be due to removal of native Ra from the aquifer rocks by increasing cation concentrations. Formation of barite is also occurring in the vicinity of some bores, leading to a removal of some Ra from solution. The situation with U is less clear. U-234/U-238 ratios have decreased with increasing U-238 concentrations in a number of bores, but generally remain above the tailings dam water value of 1.00. The most likely explanation is that the increasing size of mine structures such as waste rock dumps and ore stockpile has led to a change in conditions in the aquifer such that U ha become

  9. Water-quality trends and basin activities and characteristics for the Albemarle-Pamlico estuarine system, North Carolina and Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harned, D.A.; Davenport, M.S.

    1990-01-01

    The Albemarle-Pamlico estuarine system has a total basin area of nearly 31,000 square miles and includes the Neuse, Tar, Pamlico, Roanoke, Chowan, and Alligator Rivers, and the Albemarle, Pamlico, Currituck, Croatan, and Roanoke Sounds. Albemarle Sound receives the greatest freshwater inflow of all the sounds in the estuarine system. Inflow to this sound averages about 13,500 cubic feet per second. Inflow to Pamlico Sound from the Pamlico River averages around 5,400 cubic feet per second, and average inflow into the Neuse River estuary is about 6,100 cubic feet per second. Approximately one-half of the inflow into the system is from ground-water discharge. The Neuse River basin has had the greatest increases in wastewater discharges (650 percent since the 1950's) and had the greatesttotal wastewater discharges of any of the basins in the study area, averaging about 200 million gallons per day in 1988. Wastewater discharges into the Neuse and Tar Rivers were nearly equal to the 7-day, 10-year low flows for these rivers. Land-use data compiled in 1973 for the lower parts of the Neuse River basin and lower part of the Tar-Pamlico River basin indicate that 25 percent of the area was evergreen forest, 25 percent was forested wetlands, 20 percent was cropland and pasture, 12 percent was mixed forest, 10 percent was nonforested wetland, and 4 percent was urban. The amount of nonforested wetland in the part of the study area along the Outer Banks declined 6.5 percent from 1973 to 1983. The numbers of farms and acreage in agricultural use in the study area have declined since the 1920's. A decrease of more than 60 percentin the number of farms was shown between the early 1950's and 1982. Fertilizer sales increased through the 1970's, but declined in the 1980's. Manufacturing employment has increased in the last 30 years, while agricultural employment has decreased. Data from seven stations of the U.S. Geological Survey National Stream Quality Accounting Network were used to

  10. Environmental Chemistry Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-08-01

    the Great Lakes may contain more than 600,000 kg of the herbicide and that its residence time there is in years. Atrazine concentrations in rivers that flow into these lakes can exceed 20,000 ppt (i.e., 20 ppb) (9). There are about 600 basic ingredients in the 34,000 pesticides registered with the U.S. EPA. Approximately 75% of all U.S. cropland and 70% of livestock are treated with pesticides. In 1991, 495 million pounds of herbicides, 175 million pounds of insecticides, 75 million pounds of fungicides, and 72 million pounds of other pesticides were used; this accounted for three-quarters of all pesticide use in the United States (10). Environmental EstrogensDDT and its metabolite DDE, as well as methoxychlor, dieldrin, kepone, and some PCB's are thought to be environmental estrogens. These synthetic compounds are found in the environment and mimic the action of the sex hormone estrogen because they can bind to the estrogen receptor in cells. Some scientists are worried that they can disrupt the hormone balance in human eggs and fetuses, thus causing reproductive abnormalities. Examples of reproductive problems caused by such chemicals have already been observed in wildlife, such as alligators in Florida. They may also play a role in inducing cancer in humans (11). The U.S. EPA has issued a 2000-page draft of its reassessment of the health risks of dioxins. The report reaffirms their 1985 conclusion that it is a probable cause of cancer in humans. Even trace amounts of dioxins may also disrupt regulatory hormones, produce reproductive and immune-system disorders, and lead to abnormal fetal development. Although waste combustion produces 95% of all known dioxin emissions in the United States, about half its source is unknown. Dioxin levels in the environment were small until about 1930, peaked about 1970, and have declined since then. Human body burdens of dioxins may also have declined. The Toxic Equivalent intake of dioxins and furans of Americans is currently about

  11. The Chemical and Educational Appeal of the Orange Juice Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelter, Paul B.; Carr, James D.; Johnson, Tanya; Mauricio Castro-Acuña, Carlos

    1996-12-01

    characterized by seeing educational possibilities in so many things, created a modified version of the clock, with the atomic numbers of the elements representing the hours in the day (see Fig. 2) in his internationally popular workshops. Due largely to Talesnick's efforts, the orange juice clock is a standard demonstration in many chemistry programs and presentations. Figure 2.Irwin Talesnick represents the hours of the day by the corresponding elements in his clock. The Procedure This can be done as a demonstration or as an activity, although at about 10 per clock, expense does become an issue. There are no unusual safety precautions with this demonstration. We know of no accidents that have occurred with the orange juice clock. The demonstration requires: a single AA-cell battery-operated wall clock with a sweep-second hand a medium-sized beaker (600 mL is fine) enough orange juice or other electrolyte mixture or solution to fill the beaker about 2/3 full (tap water often works fine!) a 20-30-cm magnesium strip, coiled at one end or wrapped around a popsicle stick a 20-30-cm copper strip, coiled at one end alligator clips to connect the strips to the battery terminals on the clock a stand against which to lean the setup The demonstration is put together as shown in Figure 3. Connect the magnesium to the "-" contact of the clock and the copper to the "+" contact. Immerse the other ends of the strips into the solution. The clock will start to tick within a few seconds. If it does not work within a short period of time, check that the strips are well connected to the battery terminals, are hooked to the proper poles, and are not touching each other. The clock should keep reasonably close time (in orange juice) for a couple of days, or until the magnesium is nearly completely oxidized. Figure 3.A schematic of the orange juice clock seup. Video of orange juice clock. In video, the copper electrode is on the left and the magnesium electrode is on the right. Video was filmed and