WorldWideScience

Sample records for allied health occupations

  1. Prestige of Allied Health Professions: Perceptions of Occupational and Physical Therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Harry J.; Chan, Fong

    1986-01-01

    Fifty-six occupational therapists and 48 physical therapists were surveyed to determine how they rate various allied health occupations in terms of social status. Findings indicate that both groups rate status similarly, although they rate occupational therapy lower than physical therapy, pointing to the need for image enhancement. (CH)

  2. Allied Health Occupations II. Radiologic Technologist Aide Component. Student Learning Guide. Middletown Public Schools Curriculum Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middletown Public Schools, CT.

    This volume outlines the requirements and content of a second-year course in allied health occupations education that is designed to provide students with a practical understanding of the work done by the radiologic team and to enable them to acquire some basic skills used in the X-ray department. Addressed in the individual units of the course…

  3. Occupational Analysis: Hospital Radiologic Technologist. The UCLA Allied Health Professions Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, Glenn D.; And Others

    In an effort to meet the growing demand for skilled radiologic technologists and other supportive personnel educated through the associate degree level, a national survey was conducted as part of the UCLA Allied Health Professions Project to determine the tasks performed by personnel in the field and lay the groundwork for development of…

  4. Respiratory Care/Inhalation Therapy Occupations: Task Analysis Data. UCLA Allied Health Professions Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeland, Thomas E.; Goldsmith, Katherine L.

    This study's objectives were to explore and analyze task interrelationships among department personnel; determine what specific tasks are currently performed in inhalation therapy/respiratory care departments; propose a series of appropriate tasks for occupational titles; and report future plans of the AHPP in the area of study. Contents include…

  5. Allied health professionals with 2020 vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Thomas W; Gallicchio, Vincent S

    2007-01-01

    Allied health professionals in all disciplines must be visionary as they address education, training, and health care delivery in the next decade. Examined herein are forces of change in education, training, health care, the recognition of essential leadership styles, and the paradigm shifts facing the allied health profession in the health care arena. Some visionary directions are offered for allied health professionals to consider as health policy and clinical agendas emerge toward the year 2020.

  6. Occupational health

    CERN Document Server

    Fingret, Dr Ann

    2013-01-01

    Offers a comprehensive view of health and safety issues at work. An invaluable resource for managers, personnel professionals and occupational health practitioners. Recommended by the Institute of Personnel Management.

  7. Occupational Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occupational health problems occur at work or because of the kind of work you do. These problems can include ... by exposure to radiation Exposure to germs in health care settings Good job safety and prevention practices ...

  8. 75 FR 56549 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Safety and Occupational Health...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Institute for Occupational Safety and... occupational safety and health, and allied areas. It is the intent of NIOSH to support broad-based research... delivery of occupational safety and health services, and the prevention of work-related injury and...

  9. Predictors of Success for Allied Health Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Steven C.

    1989-01-01

    A study of 424 allied health students (259 dental hygiene, 104 radiologic technology, and 61 respiratory therapy) found that the greater predictors of their academic success were the natural science subscore on the American College Test (ACT), high school grade point average, and class rank, age, and composite ACT score. (SK)

  10. 77 FR 75633 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    ... (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2... research issues in occupational safety and health, and allied areas. It is the intent of NIOSH to support... improvements in the delivery of occupational safety and health services, and the prevention of...

  11. 75 FR 5333 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-02

    ... (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2... cycles pertaining to research issues in occupational safety and health, and allied areas. It is the... projects, which will lead to improvements in the delivery of occupational safety and health services,...

  12. 77 FR 27776 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2... and funding cycles pertaining to research issues in occupational safety and health, and allied areas... focused research projects, which will lead to improvements in the delivery of occupational safety...

  13. 77 FR 51810 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    ... (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2... and funding cycles pertaining to research issues in occupational safety and health, and allied areas... focused research projects, which will lead to improvements in the delivery of occupational safety...

  14. 76 FR 18220 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    ... (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2... and funding cycles pertaining to research issues in occupational safety and health, and allied areas... focused research projects, which will lead to improvements in the delivery of occupational safety...

  15. [Citizens: allies of the health system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venne, Michel

    2014-03-01

    Many international declarations recognize citizen participation as an important driver of success for health policy; however, in most countries the implementation of this principle has been delayed. Yet well-known phenomena, like ageing and incurred costs, should motivate decision makers to rely more on citizens and make them allies of the system, giving them power and responsibility. Citizens can first exercise this responsibility within the areas of prevention and health promotion. This responsibility then expands to include mutual assistance between community members. It is called upon in the definition of new social norms. It is recognized by the participation of citizens in health care decision-making bodies. Lastly, this responsibility applies when the time comes to choose which health services will be covered by the public system and which will be sent on to private insurers. The reasons to create a space for citizens are many. The methods to do it exist. What is needed is political willpower and means.

  16. Diffusion of a quality improvement programme among allied health professionals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluijs, E.M.; Dekker, J.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To assess the diffusion of a quality improvement (QI) programme among allied health professions in The Netherlands. Design: Descriptive study, based on a questionnaire distributed to allied health professionals; response rate, 63%. Settings and participants: All subsectors in health care

  17. Building an Interdisciplinary Faculty Team for Allied Health Gerontology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glista, Sandra; Petersons, Maija

    2003-01-01

    An interdisciplinary team from various college allied health departments implemented Project AGE: Alliance for Gerontology Education to develop content to infuse in courses on the themes of age and culture, assistive technology, collaboration, and consumer health education. One goal was to foster interaction among allied health students to prepare…

  18. Health Occupations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... around the clock, people who work in the health care industry provide care for millions of people, ... newborns to the very ill. In fact, the health care industry is one of largest providers of ...

  19. The Allied Health Care Professional's Role in Assisting Medical Decision Making at the End of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Heather

    2012-01-01

    As a patient approaches the end of life, he or she faces a number of very difficult medical decisions. Allied health care professionals, including speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and occupational therapists (OTs), can be instrumental in assisting their patients to make advance care plans, although their traditional job descriptions do not…

  20. Research culture in allied health: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Donna; McKinstry, Carol; Cotchett, Matthew; Williams, Cylie; Haines, Terry

    2016-06-07

    Research evidence is required to guide optimal allied health practice and inform policymakers in primary health care. Factors that influence a positive research culture are not fully understood, and nor is the impact of a positive research culture on allied health professionals. The aim of this systematic review was to identify factors that affect allied health research culture and capacity. An extensive search of 11 databases was conducted in June 2015. Studies were included if they were published in English, had full-text availability and reported research findings relating to allied health professions. Study quality was evaluated using the McMaster Critical Review Forms. Fifteen studies were eligible for inclusion. A meta-analysis was not performed because of heterogeneity between studies. Allied health professionals perceive that their individual research skills are lower in comparison to their teams and organisation. Motivators for conducting research for allied health professionals include developing skills, increasing job satisfaction and career advancement. Barriers include a lack of time, limited research skills and other work roles taking priority. Multilayered strategies, such as collaborations with external partners and developing research leadership positions, aimed at addressing barriers and enablers, are important to enhance allied health research culture and capacity.

  1. Faculty research productivity in allied health settings: a TQM approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, M; Baker, D; Gable, C; Michael, S; Wintch, K

    1993-01-01

    Faculty research productivity in colleges of allied health has often been discussed in the literature over the last five years. Articles have focused on the problem of faculty research productivity from various viewpoints, but none have used a theoretical framework to analyze the problem. The total quality management (TQM) framework is currently being used in health care to improve quality and productivity. This article uses the TQM framework to synthesize literature concerning faculty research productivity and verifies the current relevance of synthesis findings using an allied health faculty survey. These analyses show that the TQM framework is useful in suggesting ways to increase faculty research productivity in colleges of allied health.

  2. Brandon/Hill selected list of print books and journals in allied health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Dorothy R; Stickell, Henry N

    2003-01-01

    This list of 434 books and 79 journals is intended as a selection guide for print literature to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number of and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the educational programs listed and recognized by the American Medical Association and other accrediting bodies. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (169 books and 32 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (2002 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $36,744. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $14,465.

  3. Influencers of career choice among allied health students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-West, A P

    1991-01-01

    This study focused on the factors that influence students' choice of an allied health profession. A survey of 153 students in three allied health programs at the University of Connecticut revealed that "the need to help others," "prestige," "professional autonomy," "opportunities for advancement," "income potential," and "the effect of the specialty on family and personal life," were the major influencers of career choice among allied health students. Only a few students regarded malpractice suits and AIDS as negative influencers. While medical laboratory science majors regarded these as important factors, dietetics and physical therapy majors did not. The article suggests further use of these findings by program directors and career counselors.

  4. Allied Health Field, Tenth Grade. Introduction to Allied Health and the Health Care Team. Operation TACT [Toward an Allied Health Career Today] Curriculum [and Teachers' Handbook].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tracy

    The two-part set consists of a student handbook and a related teachers' handbook in allied health education for use at the tenth grade level. The student handbook consists of seven units which focus on the biology curriculum: (1) community water examination, (2) bacteriological examination of water, (3) the microscope, (4) microbes and man, (5)…

  5. Occupational burnout and health

    OpenAIRE

    Ahola, Kirsi

    2007-01-01

    Occupational burnout and heath Occupational burnout is assumed to be a negative consequence of chronic work stress. In this study, it was explored in the framework of occupational health psychology, which focusses on psychologically mediated processes between work and health. The objectives were to examine the overlap between burnout and ill health in relation to mental disorders, musculoskeletal disorders, and cardiovascular diseases, which are the three commonest disease groups causing...

  6. Allied health deans' and program directors' perspectives of specialized accreditation effectiveness and reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Sarah S; Morrone, Anastasia S; Gable, Karen E

    2004-01-01

    Criticisms, calls for change, and recommendations for specialized accreditation improvement have been made by individuals or groups external to the daily operations of allied health educational programs, frequently as opinion pieces or articles lacking a research foundation. While there is a great deal of concern related to specialized accreditation, little input has been provided from those within, and integral to, allied health educational programs affected by specialized accreditation standards. The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of selected allied health deans and program directors regarding specialized accreditation effectiveness and reform. Survey research was used to study perspectives of allied health deans and program directors located in four-year colleges and universities and in academic health centers and medical schools. Surveys were mailed to program directors offering-programs in clinical laboratory sciences and medical technology, nuclear medicine technology, occupational therapy, physical therapy, radiation therapy, and radiography. Simultaneously, allied health deans located within these institutions were surveyed. A total of 773 surveys were mailed and 424 valid responses were received, yielding a response rate of 55%. The results affirmed the role of accreditation as an effective system for assuring quality in higher education. The role of specialized accreditation in improving the quality of allied health programs was clearly articulated by the respondents. Respondents voiced strong opposition to governmental or state-level requirements for accountability and emphasized the vital role of peer evaluators. Significant differences in deans' and program directors' perspectives related to specialized accreditation were evident. Whereas deans and program directors agreed with the purposes of specialized accreditation, they expressed less support for the process and effectiveness, and critique and reform, of specialized

  7. Unmanned Aerial Systems in Occupational Hygiene-Learning from Allied Disciplines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eninger, Robert M; Johnson, Robert L

    2015-10-01

    Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) technologies are rapidly developing, lowering cost, and technology barriers for their use in numerous applications. This review and commentary summarizes relevant literature in allied fields and evaluates potential application and utility of UAS technology in the discipline of occupational hygiene. Disciplines closely related to occupational hygiene are moving to investigate potential uses--and in some cases--already employing this technology for research or commercial purposes. The literature was reviewed to formulate a cross-sectional picture of how UAS technology is being used in these closely allied disciplines which could inform or guide potential use in occupational hygiene. Discussed are UAS applications in environmental monitoring, emergency response, epidemiology, safety, and process optimization. A rapidly developing state of the art indicates that there is potential utility for this technology in occupational hygiene. Benefits may include cost savings, time savings, and averting hazardous environments via remote sensing. The occupational hygiene community can look to allied fields to garner lessons and possible applications to their own practice.

  8. Research experience and research interests of allied health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Delwyne; Taylor, Nicholas F; Taylor, Nicholas; Leggat, Sandra G

    2009-01-01

    Allied heath professionals are expected to utilize evidence-based practices in their workplaces, and there is an increasing expectation that clinicians will become involved in clinical research. With the aim of establishing the level of interest and experience in clinical research among allied health professionals in Australia, 132 allied health professional in Australia were surveyed to determine their level of interest and their level of experience in clinical research. The Research Spider survey tool was used to examine clinicians' level of research experience and level of research interest across ten core areas. These areas included writing a research proposal, using quantitative methods, publishing research, writing and presenting a research report, analysing and interpreting results, using qualitative research methods, critically reviewing literature, finding relevant literature, generating research ideas and applying for research funding. Overall, allied health professionals rated themselves as having "little research experience." While clinicians' level of interest in research was significantly greater than their level of research experience, clinicians as a whole only had "some interest" in research. Fifteen percent of the sample were very interested in research. The results of this study have implications for the implementation of education and support programs aimed at providing clinical research opportunities for allied health professionals.

  9. Occupational health in Yugoslavia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstev, Srmena; Perunicic, Bogoljub; Vidakovic, Aleksandar

    2002-01-01

    Occupational health in Yugoslavia was once well organized in accordance with WHO declarations and ILO conventions and recommendations. Since the 1990s, the system has been disrupted by destruction of the former Yugoslavia, wars, refugees, changes in the economy, and NATO bombardment. Economic trends, main industries, and employment and unemployment conditions in Yugoslavia are presented. The organization of occupational health services, their tasks, and prevailing problems are discussed. Occupational diseases and relevant research and educational opportunities are described. The authors conclude by suggesting approaches to improving worker's health in the future.

  10. Marketing occupational health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, M J; Harris, J C

    1981-01-01

    A very basic part of marketing success is determining areas of your business in which you have a competitive advantage. In drafting a marketing plan for the Denver Clinic, the competitive advantages group practices have in the area of occupational health were quickly realized. This competitive edge is presented along with the Denver Clinic's marketing strategies and plans to capitalize on occupational healthcare advantages.

  11. The perceptual domain: a taxonomy for allied health educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, E Z

    1981-08-01

    A taxonomy of the perceptual domain was proposed over a decade ago. It is hierarchical, as are the taxonomies in the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains. Perception involves extraction of information from presenting stimuli, and there is progression of information extraction as the hierarchy is ascended. Perceptual performance at the higher levels of the taxonomy assumes perceptual abilities at the lower levels. A modified version of the perceptual taxonomy applicable to allied health education is presented. Methods concerning application of the taxonomy are suggested. Use of the taxonomy of the perceptual domain would help allied health educators plan instruction and evaluate teaching.

  12. Extended roles for allied health professionals: an updated systematic review of the evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saxon RL

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Robyn L Saxon,1–3 Marion A Gray,1,2 Florin I Oprescu1,2 1School of Health and Sports Sciences, Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering, 2Cluster for Health Improvement, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, QLD, 3Queensland Health, Brisbane, QLD, Australia Background: Internationally, health care services are under increasing pressure to provide high quality, accessible, timely interventions to an ever increasing aging population, with finite resources. Extended scope roles for allied health professionals is one strategy that could be undertaken by health care services to meet this demand. This review builds upon an earlier paper published in 2006 on the evidence relating to the impact extended scope roles have on health care services. Methods: A systematic review of the literature focused on extended scope roles in three allied health professional groups, ie, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and speech pathology, was conducted. The search strategy mirrored an earlier systematic review methodology and was designed to include articles from 2005 onwards. All peer-reviewed published papers with evidence relating to effects on patients, other professionals, or the health service were included. All papers were critically appraised prior to data extraction. Results: A total of 1,000 articles were identified by the search strategy; 254 articles were screened for relevance and 21 progressed to data extraction for inclusion in the systematic review. Conclusion: Literature supporting extended scope roles exists; however, despite the earlier review calling for more robust evaluations regarding the impact on patient outcomes, cost-effectiveness, training requirements, niche identification, or sustainability, there appears to be limited research reported on the topic in the last 7 years. The evidence available suggests that extended scope practice allied health practitioners could be a cost-effective and consumer

  13. The availability of allied health care in Dutch nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, M.E. de; Leemrijse, C.J.; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Ribbe, M.W.; Dekker, J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the availability of allied health care in nursing homes in the Netherlands, and its dependency on characteristics of the nursing home. Methods. Structured surveys by telephone were carried out in a sample of 100 from a country total of 286 somatic (for somatic patients only) an

  14. Population Health and Occupational Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braveman, Brent

    2016-01-01

    Occupational therapy practitioners play an important role in improving the health of populations through the development of occupational therapy interventions at the population level and through advocacy to address occupational participation and the multiple determinants of health. This article defines and explores population health as a concept and describes the appropriateness of occupational therapy practice in population health. Support of population health practice as evidenced in the official documents of the American Occupational Therapy Association and the relevance of population health for occupational therapy as a profession are reviewed. Recommendations and directions for the future are included related to celebration of the achievements of occupational therapy practitioners in the area of population health, changes to the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework and educational accreditation standards, and the importance of supporting, recognizing, rewarding, and valuing occupational therapy practitioners who assume roles in which direct care is not their primary function.

  15. Carotenoids: potential allies of cardiovascular health?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alessandra Gammone

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are a class of natural, fat-soluble pigments found principally in plants. They have potential antioxidant biological properties because of their chemical structure and interaction with biological membranes. Epidemiologic studies supported the hypothesis that antioxidants could be used as an inexpensive means of both primary and secondary cardiovascular disease (CVD prevention. In fact, the oxidation of low-density lipoproteins (LDL in the vessels plays a key role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. The resistance of LDL to oxidation is increased by high dietary antioxidant intake, so that carotenoids, as part of food patterns such as the Mediterranean diet, may have beneficial effects on cardiovascular health too. Further properties of carotenoids leading to a potential reduction of cardiovascular risk are represented by lowering of blood pressure, reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and markers of inflammation (such as C-reactive protein, and improvement of insulin sensitivity in muscle, liver, and adipose tissues. In addition, recent nutrigenomics studies have focused on the exceptional ability of carotenoids in modulating the expression of specific genes involved in cell metabolism. The aim of this review is to focus attention to this effect of some carotenoids to prevent CVD.

  16. The occupational health audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R L

    1976-02-01

    The final report contains no magic or proprietary secrets. It is simply a logical review of what exists with an orderly recommendation of what should be done. To repeat -- many times the hardest part of any job is getting started. The purpose of this exercise is to provide a plan and a way to get started. This may seem like something so obvious that it is not needed. But a review of existing occupational health programs dispels that view. Five years after the enactment of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, hundreds of thousands of physical examinations are still being performed in a total vacuum; examinations whose contents bear little relationship to the hazards encountered. Countless laboratory determinations are being provided to personnel officers and plant managers who have absolutely no background in interpreting the meaning of those results. Millions of records are being meticulously kept with no goal in mind as to what purpose they should serve nor consideration for the privacy of individuals. In short, untold millions of dollars are being wasted while the things that should be done are left undone because, to quote, "the cost is too high." Often health professionals are employed by an organization because health crises have developed which force expert handling. The health professional enters chaos and is kept so busy answering fire-calls that there is no time for the orderly evaluation of needs and the development of operating routines required to prevent new crises from developing. Today's crises are being addressed while tomorrow's crises are developing out of routine situations. The health professional is not at fault; rather, executive management has failed to provide the necessary systems to meet its responsibilities. So long as this situation prevails, there is a need for someone to take the time to develop an orderly approach to occupational health surveillance. When such a condition exists, it is time to call in an independent auditor

  17. A controlled vocabulary for nursing and allied health in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flor, P; Jakobsson, A; Mogset, I; Taylor, S; Aasen, S E

    2001-03-01

    Nursing and allied health libraries at educational institutions in Norway have generally indexed their book collections with uncontrolled terms. With the reorganization of higher education in 1994, the majority of these libraries joined BIBSYS, which is a joint library system for higher education and research in Norway. This has led to chaos when searching the joint catalogue for literature on nursing and related fields. A term such as 'behaviour problems' may have up to five synonyms. In an attempt to improve the quality of searching the health literature, BIBSYS appointed a working group in the Spring of 1999 to find a suitable controlled vocabulary for this subject area, and to see how this vocabulary could be integrated into BIBSYS. The group presented its recommendations in October 1999. The report has been well received by the BIBSYS Board and by user groups. There are no Norwegian vocabularies that are suitable for use in nursing and allied health, therefore it will be necessary to translate and combine existing thesauri. The group has looked at the Nordic Multilingual Thesaurus on Health Promotion, the Swedish Spriline Thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) and CINAHL Subject Heading List. Other relevant thesauri are AMED/CATS Thesaurus, Bioethics Thesaurus (Bioethicsline) and the RCN thesaurus. The group recommends the development of a Norwegian thesaurus based on a translation of parts of MeSH and CINAHL Subject Heading List.

  18. Factors associated with sense of community among allied health students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haar, Mindy; Scanlan, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a substantial increase in online education in the health professions, as well as growing recognition that teamwork and collaboration are essential to success. While the impact of students' sense of community on factors such as course satisfaction and retention has been studied among college enrollees in general, there is little research exploring this concept among allied health students. To address this shortcoming, a convenience sample of students enrolled in a large northeastern school of health-related professions was surveyed to gather information on their demographics, curriculum and selected course attributes, perceived instructor teaching perspectives, and sense of community. Univariate analysis indicated that entry-level students experienced a greater sense of community than post-professional students. Multivariate analysis revealed that instructor-determined factors of encouraging discussion, encouraging expression of opinions, and specifying response times best predicted sense of community. With all other variables controlled, perceptions of community were significantly lower in online courses, among students for whom English was their second language, and in courses where instructors were perceived as focused primarily on content delivery. This study supports promoting selected course and instructor-related attributes associated with sense of community in allied health education, with a particular focus on both non-native English speakers and post-professional students. Enhancement of online courses with strategies that increase instructor presence, better engage students, and facilitate interaction also are warranted.

  19. Occupational Health for Health Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prevention practices. They can reduce your risk of health problems. Use protective equipment, follow infection control guidelines, ... manage stress. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

  20. ADEA/AAL Institute for Allied Health Educators: Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Overman, Pamela R; Grzesikowski, Tami; Tucker-Lively, Felicia; Weinstein, George; Haden, N Karl

    2015-05-01

    Revised accreditation standards for dental and dental hygiene education programs have increased emphasis on faculty development that can improve teaching and learning, foster curricular change including use of teaching and learning technologies, and enhance retention and satisfaction of faculty. The American Dental Education Association (ADEA) and Academy for Academic Leadership (AAL) established the Institute for Allied Health Educators (IAHE) in 2007 to address faculty development needs for allied dental and allied health educators. In 2009, it was transitioned to an online program, which resulted in increased enrollment and diversity of participants. After seven years, a comprehensive program evaluation was warranted. The authors developed an online questionnaire based on Kirkpatrick's four-level model of training evaluation; for this study, levels one (satisfaction), two (knowledge and skill acquisition), and three (behavior change) were examined. Of the 400 program participants invited to take part in the study, a 38% response rate was achieved, with the majority indicating full-time faculty status. Nearly all (95-97%) of the respondents agreed or strongly agreed the program contributed to their teaching effectiveness, and 88-96% agreed or strongly agreed it enhanced their knowledge of educational concepts and strategies. In addition, 83% agreed or strongly agreed the program helped them develop new skills and confidence with technology, with 69% agreeing or strongly agreeing that it helped them incorporate technology into their own educational setting. Nearly 90% were highly positive or positive in their overall assessment of the program; 95% indicated they would recommend it to a colleague; and 80% agreed or strongly agreed they had discussed what they learned with faculty colleagues at their home institutions who had not attended the program. Positive findings from this evaluation provide evidence that the IAHE has been able to meet its goals.

  1. A Reaction to: What about Health Educators? Nutrition Education for Allied Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Lori W.; Knol, Linda; Meyer, Mary Kay

    2012-01-01

    "What about Health Educators? Nutrition Education for Allied Health Professionals" describes an important issue in health care that is the provision of nutrition education. Obesity and chronic disease rates are rapidly increasing. Due to increase in the prevalence rates of obesity and nutrition-related chronic diseases, there is a growing need for…

  2. Allied health care in Parkinson's disease: referral, consultation, and professional expertise.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijkrake, M.J.; Keus, S.H.J.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Overeem, S.; Mulleners, W.; Bloem, B.R.; Munneke, M.

    2009-01-01

    There is evidence for the efficacy of allied health care in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, barriers exist that hamper implementation of evidence into daily practice. We conducted a survey to investigate: (1) to what extent PD patients currently utilize allied health care for relevant problems in

  3. Organisational governance structures in allied health services: a decade of change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, R A

    2001-01-01

    A ten year review of developments in the organisation and management of allied health services in Australian acute care public hospitals reveals a steady transformation away from a medically managed universal model towards more complex and contested models of governance. This article revisits early observations about the reorganisation of allied health services and presents more recent research findings to guide managerial decision-making about restructuring the diverse disciplines that constitute allied health. A new organisational model "integrated decentralization" is presented as an approach to managing allied health services which accommodates multiple stakeholder demands in the context of New Public Management (NPM) related reforms. The focus on the institutional level is complemented by examining developments in the profile and activity of allied health at the regional, state and national levels to present a more comprehensive picture of change over the decade of the 1990s.

  4. Occupational health nursing in hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirdi, Henriett Éva; Hong, OiSaeng

    2014-10-01

    This article is the first about occupational health nursing in Hungary. The authors describe the Hungarian health care and occupational health care systems, including nursing education and professional organizations for occupational health nurses. The Fundamental Law of Hungary guarantees the right of every employee to healthy and safe working conditions, daily and weekly rest times and annual paid leave, and physical and mental health. Hungary promotes the exercise of these rights by managing industrial safety and health care, providing access to healthy food, supporting sports and regular physical exercise, and ensuring environmental protection. According to the law, the responsibility for regulation of the occupational health service lies with the Ministry of Human Resources. Safety regulations are under the aegis of the Ministry of National Economy.

  5. Coal gasification and occupational health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R J; McKay, W J; Evans, J M

    1978-12-01

    Identification and prevention of health effects due to occupational exposures in coal gasification processes requires a basic knowledge of the technological process by which gasification proceeds. This paper presents an overview of the technology and a rational approach to health hazard identification based upon the concept of the unit operation specific micro environment. A final section is devoted to summarizing current research efforts being carried out under the aegis of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

  6. The effectiveness of allied health care in patients with ataxia: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fonteyn, E.M.R.; Keus, S.H.J.; Verstappen, C.C.P.; Schols, L.; Groot, I.J.M. de; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2014-01-01

    Many patients with cerebellar ataxia have serious disabilities in daily life, while pharmacological treatment options are absent. Therefore, allied health care is considered to be important in the management of these patients. The goal of this review is to evaluate scientific evidence for allied hea

  7. Allied Health Field, Seventh Grade. Operation TACT [Toward an Allied Health Career Today] Field Test Curriculum 1973-1975 [and Teachers' Handbook].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connecticut Univ., Storrs. School of Allied Health Professions.

    The two-part set consists of a student handbook and a related teachers' handbook in allied health education for use at the seventh grade level. The student handbook contains four units: (1) investigating health care needs, (2) mental health--study of different types of job roles and their related activities and skills, (3) treatment--diagnosis of…

  8. Teaching Occupational Health to Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegman, David H.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    A comprehensive training program is described that prepares students to identify and prevent occupational disease, emphasizing public health. Content areas include epidemiology and biostatistics, toxicology, industrial hygiene, safety and ergonomics, policy issues, administration, and clinical aspects. (Author/LBH)

  9. Improving health services in developing countries with new types of public and allied health personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blayney, K D; Trulove, J W

    1982-10-01

    Allied health manpower in developing countries should be able to serve the specific needs of these countries in solving malnutrition, diarrheal disease, and other health problems. Disease patterns tend to evolve in stages with each stage requiring a special type of health manpower: 1) the 1st stage where infectious diseases are linked to poverty, malnutrition, and poor personal hygiene for which personnel trained to improve health through providing safe water supplies, improving sanitation, and immunizing the population are needed; 2) in the 2nd stages, diseases such as cancer, arthritis, and cardiac diseases exist, requiring extensive technology such as is available in the US; and 3) the 3rd stage relates to an awareness of health hazards (caused by the environment, by the lifestyle dysfunctions of the society, and an emphasis on health promotion) and implies a responsibility for one's own health by the individual; this is a difficult stage to apply to developing countries since the ability to bring about change assumes literacy on the part of the population which is not always the case. Since most developing countries need to cause change in the 1st stage, more public health personnel such as sanitarians and generalist workers are needed. Training of these personnel should include on-the-job education; traditionally trained US allied health professionals are not always equipped to deal with health problems in developing countries. Health educators should look to the lessons learned by the US in the allied health movement: 1) the system of control that national membership organizations have over schooling and the job environment has contributed to an increased cost of health care delivery, unnecessary prolonged curricula, overspecialization, extreme protectionism for membership, and inappropriate fractionalization of health care delivery; 2) the emphasis on prolonged curricula sometimes causes the student to lose sight of the supposed direct relationship between

  10. Allied health team management of rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, J R; Brandt, K D

    1984-09-01

    The use of a coordinated team of allied health professionals (AHPs) to treat patients with rheumatoid arthritis assigned to experimental groups (EG) and comparison groups (CG) was assessed. The EG patients were evaluated regularly by each AHP team member, whereas CG patients were seen by AHPs only upon referral. Of the 10 EG and 13 CG patients who remained in the study for 2 years, the EG patients initially exhibited somewhat greater disease activity than CG (as reflected by erythrocyte sedimentation rate and duration of morning stiffness). After 2 years, EG patients demonstrated less disease activity than at the outset, whereas CG patients either showed little change in these parameters or deteriorated during the study. Grip strength, which was initially similar in the two groups, improved in EG patients but decreased in CG patients, so that after 2 years a significant difference was noted between the two groups (p less than .05). Tendency to lose hand range of motion was also greater in CG than in EG patients. Some EG patients showed improvement in finger flexion deformities during the study. Furthermore, EG patients showed a greater tendency to acquire positive attitudes regarding themselves and family relationships. These results suggest that ongoing "team care" may be more efficacious than episodic use of AHPs in management of patients with mild rheumatoid arthritis.

  11. Systematic review of knowledge translation strategies in the allied health professions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Shannon D

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge translation (KT aims to close the research-practice gap in order to realize and maximize the benefits of research within the practice setting. Previous studies have investigated KT strategies in nursing and medicine; however, the present study is the first systematic review of the effectiveness of a variety of KT interventions in five allied health disciplines: dietetics, occupational therapy, pharmacy, physiotherapy, and speech-language pathology. Methods A health research librarian developed and implemented search strategies in eight electronic databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, ERIC, PASCAL, EMBASE, IPA, Scopus, CENTRAL using language (English and date restrictions (1985 to March 2010. Other relevant sources were manually searched. Two reviewers independently screened the titles and abstracts, reviewed full-text articles, performed data extraction, and performed quality assessment. Within each profession, evidence tables were created, grouping and analyzing data by research design, KT strategy, targeted behaviour, and primary outcome. The published descriptions of the KT interventions were compared to the Workgroup for Intervention Development and Evaluation Research (WIDER Recommendations to Improve the Reporting of the Content of Behaviour Change Interventions. Results A total of 2,638 articles were located and the titles and abstracts were screened. Of those, 1,172 full-text articles were reviewed and subsequently 32 studies were included in the systematic review. A variety of single (n = 15 and multiple (n = 17 KT interventions were identified, with educational meetings being the predominant KT strategy (n = 11. The majority of primary outcomes were identified as professional/process outcomes (n = 25; however, patient outcomes (n = 4, economic outcomes (n = 2, and multiple primary outcomes (n = 1 were also represented. Generally, the studies were of low methodological quality. Outcome

  12. Weight Management Advice for Clients with Overweight or Obesity: Allied Health Professional Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne J. Snodgrass

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of obesity is increasing. The potential for allied health professionals to intervene through the provision of lifestyle advice is unknown. This study aimed to determine the knowledge, attitudes and practices of health professionals in the provision of dietary and physical activity advice for clients with overweight or obesity. Dietitians, exercise physiologists, nurses, occupational therapists, physiotherapists and psychologists (n = 296 working in New South Wales were surveyed using paper-based and online methods. The majority of health professionals (71% believed that providing weight management advice was within their scope of practice; 81% provided physical activity advice but only 57% provided dietary advice. Other than dietitians, few had received training in client weight management during their professional qualification (14% or continuing education (16%. Providing dietary advice was associated with: believing it was within their scope of practice (OR 3.9, 95% CI 1.9–7.9, p < 0.01, training during their entry-level qualification (OR 7.2, 3.2–16.4, p < 0.01 and having departmental guidelines (OR 4.7, 2.1–10.9, p < 0.01. Most health professionals are willing to provide lifestyle advice to clients with overweight or obesity but few have received required training. Developing guidelines and training for in client weight management may potentially impact on rising obesity levels.

  13. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit Search The CDC The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Note: Javascript is disabled or ... and Events NIOSH Contact Information Related Federal Agencies Occupational Safety and Health Administration Mine Safety and Health Administration ...

  14. Instructional Analysis for Health Occupations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East Texas State Univ., Commerce. Occupational Curriculum Lab.

    This instructional analysis centers on identifying the skills, related knowledge, teacher activities, and student activities that are central to teaching various topics included in the core curriculum for health occupations courses. Addressed in the volume are the following instructional areas: first aid; medical terminology; medical asepsis;…

  15. Addressing Agricultural Issues in Health Care Education: An Occupational Therapy Curriculum Program Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallfield, Stacy; Anderson, Angela J.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Medical and allied health professionals who work in agricultural states frequently address the needs of clients who live and work in rural and frontier environments. The primary occupations of those living in rural areas include farming, ranching, or other agriculture-related work. Farming is consistently ranked as one of the most…

  16. A national survey of admissions criteria and processes in selected allied health professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, A H; Chase, L M; Lefkowitz, R; Morton-Rias, D; Chambers, C; Joe, J; Holmes, G; Bloomberg, S

    1995-01-01

    A national survey of admissions criteria and procedures was conducted for allied health programs in diagnostic medical imaging, health information management, nurse-midwifery, occupational therapy, physical therapy, and physician assistant education. From a sample of 462, 63.2% responded. The survey canvassed general program information, prerequisites, admissions procedures, and demographic trends. Respondents were primarily from public institutions with faculty actively involved in admissions. The most common prerequisites were anatomy/physiology, physics, biology, chemistry, and psychology; and the most frequently required admissions criteria were GPA, references, interviews, science GPA, and writing sample. Standardized tests were rarely utilized. The following were the major prerequisite characteristics and skills considered: academic skills, communication skills, problem-solving abilities, maturity/confidence, motivation, and work/study habits. Changing demographics were reported, including an increase in second-career, older, and ethnically diverse applicants. Also discussed were nontraditional and minority applicant admissions issues. Future research suggestions include use of noncognitive variables, and academic and clinical outcome studies. The utility of this information for validation/revision of admissions criteria are presented.

  17. Achievements and challenges on policies for allied health professionals who use telehealth in the Canadian Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailey, D; Foerster, V; Nakagawa, B; Wapshall, T M; Murtagh, J A; Smitten, J; Steblecki, J A; Wong, G

    2005-01-01

    We formulated policies and procedures for allied health professionals (AHPs) who provide services using telehealth in Nunavut, Canada's newest Arctic territory. These are a supplement to the clinical policies and procedures already established for Nunavut physicians and nurses. The services were in the areas of audiology, dietetics/nutrition, midwifery, occupational therapy, ophthalmic services, pharmacy, physiotherapy, psychology, respiratory therapy, social work and speech therapy. Documents specific to each of the services were developed, drawing on information from Government of Nunavut data, Nunavut healthcare providers and links made through the Internet. Topics included the scope and limitations of telehealth services, staff responsibilities, training and reporting, professional standards and cultural considerations. We also considered generic policies covering common issues such as jurisdiction, licensing and liability. The policies and procedures for AHPs will enhance and expand the successes already achieved with telehealth in Nunavut. The challenges are to balance the preferred approaches to service provision with the realities of health care and communications in an Arctic setting.

  18. [Certified occupational physician system of Japan Society for Occupational Health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogami, Akira; Higashi, Toshiaki

    2013-10-01

    Certified Occupational Physician System (COPS) of Japan Society for Occupational Health has been in existence for 21 years, since 1992. UOEH has supported this system as a secretary general. In this report, we review the 2012 revision of COPS. With the new title of Certified Associate Occupational Physician (CAOP), this revision was established to produce well-educated and experienced occupational physicians. The title of COP is not competitive but independent to other titles such as occupational physician, medical advisor in industrial health or industrial health consultant. In addition, the aim of COPS is not the replacement to these existing systems. Furthermore, the COP should be active in industrial and occupational health, and should cooperate with existing systems through the sharing of experience and knowledge.

  19. Allied health personnel's attitudes and perceptions of teamwork supporting children with developmental concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Peggy A; Malone, D Michael

    2005-01-01

    This report describes the attitudes and perceptions of allied health personnel toward the efficacy and performance characteristics of school-based teams supporting children with developmental concerns. Sixty-three allied health personnel were asked to complete the Attitudes About Teamwork Survey, the Team Characteristics Survey, and the Team Process Perception Survey. Respondents held a generally positive attitude about teamwork. Respondents' beliefs about the efficacy of the team process were moderately associated with critical performance characteristics. Effect sizes associated with these data suggest that the results were not only statistically significant but also noteworthy. Respondents also provided their perspectives on the benefits, limitations, supports, and recommendations of teamwork. Results were consistent with both the general teamwork literature and that focused on allied health professions. The authors describe practical implications of the results and directions for further investigation on this topic.

  20. Arthritis Research and Education in Nursing and Allied Health: A Forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Health Service (DHHS), Rockville, MD.

    A summary of proceedings of the Forum on Arthritis Research and Education in Nursing and Allied Health is presented. The keynote address, "The Burden of Arthritis," by Dorothy P. Rice, provides data collected by the National Center for Health Statistics on the prevalence of arthritis, the burden it imposes, and the volume, type, and cost…

  1. Tackling racism as a "wicked" public health problem: Enabling allies in anti-racism praxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Came, Heather; Griffith, Derek

    2017-03-16

    Racism is a "wicked" public health problem that fuels systemic health inequities between population groups in New Zealand, the United States and elsewhere. While literature has examined racism and its effects on health, the work describing how to intervene to address racism in public health is less developed. While the notion of raising awareness of racism through socio-political education is not new, given the way racism has morphed into new narratives in health institutional settings, it has become critical to support allies to make informing efforts to address racism as a fundamental cause of health inequities. In this paper, we make the case for anti-racism praxis as a tool to address inequities in public health, and focus on describing an anti-racism praxis framework to inform the training and support of allies. The limited work on anti-racism rarely articulates the unique challenges or needs of allies or targets of racism, but we seek to help fill that gap. Our anti-racism praxis for allies includes five core elements: reflexive relational praxis, structural power analysis, socio-political education, monitoring and evaluation and systems change approaches. We recognize that racism is a modifiable determinant of health and racial inequities can be eliminated with the necessary political will and a planned system change approach. Anti-racism praxis provides the tools to examine the interconnection and interdependence of cultural and institutional factors as a foundation for examining where and how to intervene to address racism.

  2. A Proposed Curriculum on Death and Dying for the Allied Health Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Marie C.

    1980-01-01

    This article summarizes the existing curricular models on death education for health professions students. A proposed course design for allied health professions students modified from Bloch's medical education objectives for a thanatology course is presented. The development of listening skills is given special emphasis. (Author/CT)

  3. Developing Occupational Health Care Services For Better Customer Satisfaction : a case-study- Lohja Occupational Health

    OpenAIRE

    Pulliainen, Petra

    2015-01-01

    The renewal of Good Occupational Health Practice in Finland brings new challenges and triggers self-examination among occupational health care providers. Successful renewal of occupational health care practices emphasizes activity, commitment and trustworthiness from occupational health care providers but also from the customer companies. For this co-operation to work effectively, communication in a common language increases its’ importance furthermore. Since purchasing occupational health ca...

  4. Retention in the allied health workforce: boomers, generation X, and generation Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Jenny; Saggers, Sherry; Wildy, Helen

    2009-01-01

    The recruitment and retention of allied health workers present challenges for organizations in Australia and internationally. Australia, in common with other developed countries, faces the prospect of a rapidly aging population and the high turnover of younger allied health workers (the majority of whom are female) from employing organizations. Emphases on the individual characteristics of Boomer, Generation X, and Generation Y workers may provide a useful starting base for recruitment and retention strategies, but our study shows that these need to be contextualized within broader political, social, and structural factors that take account of gender and the changing needs of workers over their life span.

  5. Occupational health scenario of Indian informal sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Anjali; Vyas, Heer; Nag, Pranab

    2016-08-05

    Workers in the Indian informal sector are engaged with different occupations. These occupations involve varied work related hazards. These occupational hazards are a consequent risk to health. The study aimed to determine occupational health scenario in the Indian Informal sector. One thousand eleven hundred twenty two workers from five different occupations namely weaving (handloom and power loom), construction, transportation, tobacco processing and fish processing were assessed by interviewer administered health questionnaire. Workers suffered from musculo-skeletal complaints, respiratory health hazards, eye problems and skin related complaints. There was a high prevalence of self-reported occupational health problems in the selected sectors. The study finds that workers have occupational exposures to multiple hazards. The absence of protective guards aggrevate their health condition. The study attempts to draws an immediate attention on the existing health scenario of the Indian Informal sector.

  6. Does occupational health nursing exist in India?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajnarayan R Tiwari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Occupational health services are important to develop healthy and productive work forces, which should be delivered through occupational health team. Occupational health nurse (OHN is an important member of this team and is required to apply nursing principles in conserving the health of workers in occupational settings. Purpose: This article attempts to map the occupational health nursing courses in India and design competencies and curriculum for such a course. Materials and Methods: Information through the Internet, printed journals, and perspectives of the key stakeholders were the principal sources of data. Discussion: In India, there is a need to initiate a course on occupational health nursing to provide occupational health services for the organized and unorganized sector workforce. A certificate course for occupational health nursing for 3-4 months duration offered through contact session mode can be an opportune beginning. However, to cater employed nurses an online course can be another effective alternative. The theoretical part should essentially include modules on occupational diseases, industrial hygiene, and occupational health legislation, whereas the modules on practical aspects can include visits to industries. Taking into account the existing norms of Indian Factories Act for hazardous units of organized sector an estimated 1,34,640 OHNs are required. Conclusion: There is a need-supply gap in the number of occupational health nursing manpower in India, which can be attributed to the absence of any course to train such manpower.

  7. The Mental Vitality @ Work study: design of a randomized controlled trial on the effect of a workers' health surveillance mental module for nurses and allied health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Dijk Frank JH

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Employees in health care service are at high risk for developing mental health complaints. The effects of mental health complaints on work can have serious consequences for the quality of care provided by these workers. To help health service workers remain healthy and productive, preventive actions are necessary. A Workers' Health Surveillance (WHS mental module may be an effective strategy to monitor and promote good (mental health and work performance. The objective of this paper is to describe the design of a three arm cluster randomized controlled trial on the effectiveness of a WHS mental module for nurses and allied health professionals. Two strategies for this WHS mental module will be compared along with data from a control group. Additionally, the cost effectiveness of the approaches will be evaluated from a societal perspective. Methods The study is designed as a cluster randomized controlled trial consisting of three arms (two intervention groups, 1 control group with randomization at ward level. The study population consists of 86 departments in one Dutch academic medical center with a total of 1731 nurses and allied health professionals. At baseline, after three months and after six months of follow-up, outcomes will be assessed by online questionnaires. In both intervention arms, participants will complete a screening to detect problems in mental health and work functioning and receive feedback on their screening results. In cases of impairments in mental health or work functioning in the first intervention arm, a consultation with an occupational physician will be offered. The second intervention arm offers a choice of self-help e-mental health interventions, which will be tailored based on each individual's mental health state and work functioning. The primary outcomes will be help-seeking behavior and work functioning. Secondary outcomes will be mental health and wellbeing. Furthermore, cost-effectiveness in

  8. A Learner-Centered Molecular Modeling Exercise for Allied Health Majors in a Biochemistry Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Terace M.; Ershler, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Learner-centered molecular modeling exercises in college science courses can be especially challenging for nonchemistry majors as students typically have a higher degree of anxiety and may not appreciate the relevance of the work. This article describes a learner-centered project given to allied health majors in a Biochemistry course. The project…

  9. Respiratory Therapy Discipline Advisory Group Final Report. Kentucky Allied Health Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentucky Council on Public Higher Education, Frankfort.

    Respiratory therapy education in Kentucky and articulation within the field are examined, based on the Kentucky Allied Health Project (KAHP), which designed a statewide system to promote entry and exit of prepared personnel at a variety of educational levels. The KAHP model promotes articulation in learning, planning, and resource utilization. The…

  10. Radiological Sciences Discipline Advisory Group Final Report. Kentucky Allied Health Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentucky Council on Public Higher Education, Frankfort.

    Radiological sciences education in Kentucky and articulation within this field are examined, based on the Kentucky Allied Health Project (KAHP), which designed an articulated statewide system to promote entry and exit of personnel at a variety of educational levels. The KAHP model promotes articulation in learning, planning, and resource…

  11. A National Study of Student Selection Practices in the Allied Health Professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Marie C.; Crowley, Judeth A.

    1982-01-01

    Reports the outcomes of a 1978 national survey of candidate selection practices in 4 baccalaureate level and 7 associate degree level allied health disciplines. Found that few programs conducted evaluation of their admissions activities and that physical therapy and dental hygiene programs were the most structured in student selection. (JOW)

  12. The availability and use of allied health care in care homes in the Midlands, UK: commentaries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemrijse, C.; Veenhof, C.; Boer, M.E. de

    2009-01-01

    The demographic trends of continuing growth of the number of older people will lead to an increasing need for long-term services such as nursing homes. The intensive work delivered by the rehabilitative services provided in the nursing homes includes care by a variety of allied health care personnel

  13. Impairment measures in rheumatic disorders for rehabilitation medicine and allied health care: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinkels, R.A.H.M.; Bouter, L.M.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study is to provide a critical overview of available instruments to assess impairments in patients with rheumatic disorders, and to recommend reliable and valid instruments for use in allied health care and rehabilitation medicine. A computer-aided literature search (1982–2004)

  14. Past and future use of the ICF (former ICIDH) by nursing and allied health professionals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerkens, Y.F.; Brug, Y. van der; Napel, H.M.T.D. ten; Ravensberg, C.D. van

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study describes the use of the ICIDH by allied health professionals and the nursing professions in The Netherlands. It is an example for showing how in recent years the application of the ICIDH has developed within professions. The data elements of patient descriptors documented by nur

  15. Impairment measures in rheumatic disorders for rehabilitation medicine and allied health care: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinkels, R.A.H.M.; Bouter, L.M.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Ende, van den C.H.M.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study is to provide a critical overview of available instruments to assess impairments in patients with rheumatic disorders, and to recommend reliable and valid instruments for use in allied health care and rehabilitation medicine. A computer-aided literature search (1982-2004)

  16. The Impact of Word Processing on Office Administration in the Medical and Allied Health Professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Naomi Dornfeld

    The effect of word processing equipment on the future medical secretarial science curriculum was studied. A literature search focused on word processing and the medical and allied health professions, word processing and business education, and futuring of and changes in the secretarial science curriculum. Questionnaires to identify various aspects…

  17. Plagiarism: using a collaborative approach in an online allied health professions course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, Patricia L

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions to increase the awareness and understanding of plagiarism among undergraduate students enrolled in an online allied health professions course in a community college in the Midwestern United States. The results suggested that the interventions were effective in educating students about how to avoid plagiarism.

  18. Self-Medication Practice Among Allied and Non-Allied Health Students of the University of Santo Tomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAY P. JAZUL

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available – Self-medication is presumed to be widely practiced around the world. This can be defined as the use of drugs to treat self-diagnosed disorders or symptoms, or the intermittent or continued use of a prescribed drug for chronic or recurrent disease or symptoms. High level of education and professional status has also been mentioned as predictive factors for self-medication. Students from the allied and nonallied health institutions of the University of Santo Tomas were assessed for the factors of self-medication practices.A total of 66 graduating students were asked to accomplish the questionnaire. To ensure valid responses, the researchers supervised the respondents on accomplishing the questionnaires. Mean and range summarized the age while counts and percentages summarized the gender, school, practice of selfmedication, therapeutic classes, health conditions, reasons and sources of self-medication. A total of 55 reported that they practice self-medication. On the total 66 respondents practicing self-medication is antibiotics, anti-allergic and antihistamine, and decongestants. The 55 respondents documented headache to be the most self-treated health condition followed by cough and cold, toothache, muscle pain pimples, back/chest pain, dizziness, and diarrhea/constipation. Significantly greater percentage of females (p=0.038 use antibiotics. Respondents with high self-care orientation are self-medicating on antibiotics (p=0.027, anti-allergic (p<0.001, and herbal medicine (p=0.001 than respondents with low self-care orientation.

  19. Integration of Practice Experiences into the Allied Health Curriculum: Curriculum and Pedagogic Considerations Before, during and after Work-Integrated Learning Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Srivalli Vilapakkam; McAllister, Lindy

    2015-01-01

    Work-integrated learning (WIL) is an essential component of all allied health university courses. In allied health, learning that occurs during WIL experiences and the relationship between academic and WIL experiences are not well understood. Good integration of WIL experiences into the allied health curriculum is key to realizing the full…

  20. Building interdisciplinary teamwork among allied health students through live clinical case simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buelow, Janet R; Rathsack, Christi; Downs, David; Jorgensen, Kathy; Karges, Joy R; Nelson, Debralee

    2008-01-01

    A limited, yet growing, body of research suggests that health care students educated in interdisciplinary teamwork may become more collaborative professionals in the workplace, which, in turn, may foster more productive and satisfied health care professionals. Researchers also have identified lower mortality and morbidity rates, fewer hospitalizations, decreased costs, and improved function by patients among significant health benefits of interdisciplinary teamwork, especially when it is applied to underserved and geriatric populations. Such positive outcomes have prompted medical schools and accreditation boards of many allied health professions to add interdisciplinary education into their training requirements. Meeting these requirements has challenged universities, where there are multiple allied health programs and limited time, faculty, and financial resources to coordinate interdisciplinary education. The challenges have been magnified by insufficient research on the most effective methods to educate university students about interdisciplinary teamwork. This article presents the background, evolution, and key building blocks of one such method: a simulation-based workshop designed at our university over 7 years to educate its allied health students about various health professions through shared learning, interaction, and collaboration.

  1. The South Australian Allied Health Workforce survey: helping to fill the evidence gap in primary health workforce planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitford, Deirdre; Smith, Tony; Newbury, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    There is a lack of detailed evidence about the allied health workforce to inform proposed health care reforms. The South Australian Allied Health Workforce (SAAHW) survey collected data about the demographic characteristics, employment, education and recruitment and retention of allied health professionals in South Australia. The SAAHW questionnaire was widely distributed and 1539 responses were received. The average age of the sample was 40 years; males were significantly older than females, the latter making up 82% of respondents. Three-quarters of the sample worked in the city; 60% worked full time and the remainder in part-time, casual or locum positions. 'Work-life balance' was the most common attraction to respondents' current jobs and 'Better career prospects' the most common reason for intending to leave. Practice in a rural location was influenced by rural background and rural experience during training. A greater proportion of Generation Y (1982-2000) respondents intended to leave within 2 years than Generation X (1961-81) or Baby Boomers (1943-60). Most respondents were satisfied with their job, although some reported lack of recognition of their knowledge and skills. Systematic, robust allied health workforce data are required for integrated and sustainable primary health care delivery.

  2. Occupational Health and Safety Problems in Health Workers

    OpenAIRE

    Meral Saygun

    2012-01-01

    There are many health and safety risks in occupational environment. These are causing occupational diseases and accidents that can directly affect individual’s health. One of the hazardous occupational places is health service area. Health workers are experienced with biological, chemical, physical, ergonomic and psycho-social risks in health service areas, especially in hospitals. Many researches from our country inform that these problems reached serious levels in last years and cause...

  3. Nutrition economics - food as an ally of public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoir-Wijnkoop, I; Jones, P J; Uauy, R; Segal, L; Milner, J

    2013-03-14

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) are a major and increasing contributor to morbidity and mortality in developed and developing countries. Much of the chronic disease burden is preventable through modification of lifestyle behaviours, and increased attention is being focused on identifying and implementing effective preventative health strategies. Nutrition has been identified as a major modifiable determinant of NCD. The recent merging of health economics and nutritional sciences to form the nascent discipline of nutrition economics aims to assess the impact of diet on health and disease prevention, and to evaluate options for changing dietary choices, while incorporating an understanding of the immediate impacts and downstream consequences. In short, nutrition economics allows for generation of policy-relevant evidence, and as such the discipline is a crucial partner in achieving better population nutritional status and improvements in public health and wellness. The objective of the present paper is to summarise presentations made at a satellite symposium held during the 11th European Nutrition Conference, 28 October 2011, where the role of nutrition and its potential to reduce the public health burden through alleviating undernutrition and nutrition deficiencies, promoting better-quality diets and incorporating a role for functional foods were discussed.

  4. Do structured arrangements for multidisciplinary peer group supervision make a difference for allied health professional outcomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuipers P

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Pim Kuipers,1,2 Susan Pager,1 Karen Bell,3 Fiona Hall,4 Melissa Kendall2,5,6 1Centre for Functioning and Health Research, Metro South Health, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; 2Centre for Community Science, School of Human Services, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia; 3Darling Downs Hospital and Health Service, Queensland, Australia; 4Allied Health Professions Office of Queensland, Health Service and Innovation Division, Queensland, Australia; 5Acquired Brain Injury Outreach Service, Metro South Health, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; 6Transitional Rehabilitation Programme, Metro South Health, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia Abstract: Peer group supervision, particularly in multidisciplinary formats, presents a potential means of providing professional support, and specifically clinical supervision, for allied health professionals. Debate exists regarding the extent to which the activities of these groups should be formalized. Results drawn from an evaluation of a large-scale peer group supervision initiative are described. Analysis of 192 responses from professionals involved in peer groups indicates that participants in groups that used formal documentation – which adopted the tools provided in training, and particularly those that used formal evaluation of their groups – rated their groups as having better processes and greater impact. Interestingly, multidisciplinary peer groups were rated as having similar impacts, processes, and purposes as the more homogenous single-discipline groups. It is concluded that the implementation of formal arrangements enhances the processes and outcomes of peer groups implemented for professional support and clinical supervision. Multidisciplinary membership of such groups is perceived as equally beneficial as single-discipline groups. Keywords: allied health, professional supervision, clinical supervision, professional support, multidisciplinary

  5. [Allergies in occupational health. Prevention aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Herrero, M T; Iñiguez de la Torre, M V Ramírez; Capdevila García, L M; López-González, A A; Terradillos García, M J

    2012-04-01

    The concern in all countries of occupational health has led to the study of occupational risk factors and their impact on health. But maintaining the health of workers is increasingly complex, especially in occupational allergic diseases, which have increased in parallel with the increased use in industries of potentially irritating chemicals or allergens, leading to skin or respiratory sensitization. Diseases arising from these immunological substances are classified by Spanish Legislation as occupational diseases, as set out in Royal Decree 1299/2006, of November 10, 2006 (Group 1, Group 4 and Group 5). The most important ones in occupational medicine are allergic respiratory diseases and dermatological allergic diseases, although there are other allergies of interest, such as those involving mucous membranes (allergic eye diseases). A joint collaboration between the different medical disciplines involved to improve prevention at work is highly desirable.

  6. Guiding principles in a merger of allied health and nursing schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siler, William L; Royeen, Charlotte Brasic

    2007-01-01

    Mergers have long been a reality in higher education during periods of financial challenge. More recently, academic mergers have evolved to become a strategy for achieving academic excellence, broadening institutional vision, and solidifying the competitive position of the merged entities. This report summarizes literature focused on critical considerations when evaluating and implementing mergers in an academic environment using a conceptual model adapted from Kotter. In addition, this paper reports on the planning and initial 9 months of the merger between the Edward and Margaret Doisy School of Allied Health Professions and the School of Nursing to form the Edward and Margaret Doisy College of Health Sciences at Saint Louis University.

  7. International survey of occupational health nurses' roles in multidisciplinary teamwork in occupational health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Bonnie; Kono, Keiko; Marziale, Maria Helena Palucci; Peurala, Marjatta; Radford, Jennifer; Staun, Julie

    2014-07-01

    Access to occupational health services for primary prevention and control of work-related injuries and illnesses by the global workforce is limited (World Health Organization [WHO], 2013). From the WHO survey of 121 (61%) participating countries, only one-third of the responding countries provided occupational health services to more than 30% of their workers (2013). How services are provided in these countries is dependent on legal requirements and regulations, population, workforce characteristics, and culture, as well as an understanding of the impact of workplace hazards and worker health needs. Around the world, many occupational health services are provided by occupational health nurses independently or in collaboration with other disciplines' professionals. These services may be health protection, health promotion, or both, and are designed to reduce health risks, support productivity, improve workers' quality of life, and be cost-effective. Rantanen (2004) stated that basic occupational health services must increase rather than decline, especially as work becomes more complex; workforces become more dynamic and mobile, creating new models of work-places; and jobs become more precarious and temporary. To better understand occupational health services provided by occupational health nurses globally and how decisions are made to provide these services, this study examined the scope of services provided by a sample of participating occupational health nurses from various countries.

  8. Occupational Health Record-keeping System (OHRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Occupational Health Record-keeping System (OHRS) is part of the Clinical Information Support System (CISS) portal framework and the initial CISS partner system. OHRS...

  9. Occupational health and safety in medical museums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westhorpe, R N

    2008-07-01

    Medical museum collections provide challenges in occupational health and safety that do not become apparent in many other collections. During the recent development of the Geoffrey Kaye Museum of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists, these challenges were addressed, following the guidelines of the Occupational Health and Safety Regulations of the State of Victoria. This paper details these regulations and their necessary application in this specialist museum.

  10. Evidence for Mental Health Occupational Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Hitch

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on the evidence for mental health occupational therapy in peer-reviewed journals from 2000 to 2013. Descriptive and inductive methods were used to address this question, with evidence from CINAHL, OTDBase, PSYCInfo, SCOPUS, and Google Scholar® included. Many articles (n = 1,747 were found that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. A total of 47 different methods were used to develop evidence for mental health occupational therapy, and evidence appeared in 300 separate peer-reviewed journals. It takes on average 7 months for an article to progress from submission to acceptance, and a further 7 months to progress from acceptance to publication. More than 95% of articles published between 2000 and 2002 were cited at least once in the following decade, and around 70% of these citations were recorded in non-occupational therapy journals. The current evidence base for mental health occupational therapy is both substantial and diverse.

  11. Age and gender as predictors of allied health quality stroke care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luker JA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Julie A Luker1, Julie Bernhardt2, Karen A Grimmer-Somers11International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; 2School of Physiotherapy, La Trobe University Melbourne, Victoria, Australia and Stroke Division, Florey Neurosciences Institutes Heidelberg Heights, Melbourne, Victoria, AustraliaBackground: Improvement in acute stroke care requires the identification of variables which may influence care quality. The nature and impact of demographic and stroke-related variables on care quality provided by allied health (AH professionals is unknown.Aims: Our research explores the association of age and gender on an index of acute stroke care quality provided by AH professionals.Methods: A retrospective clinical audit of 300 acute stroke patients extracted data on AH care, patients' age and gender. AH care quality was determined by the summed compliance with 20 predetermined process indicators. Our analysis explored relationships between this index of quality, age, and gender. Age was considered in different ways (as a continuous variable, and in different categories. It was correlated with care quality, using gender-specific linear and logistic regression models. Gender was then considered as a confounder in an overall model.Results: No significant association was found for any treatment of age and the index of AH care quality. There were no differences in gender-specific models, and gender did not significantly adjust the age association with care quality.Conclusion: Age and gender were not predictors of the quality of care provided to acute stroke patients by AH professionals.Keywords: acute stroke, allied health, quality of care, age, gender

  12. A systematic review of the individual determinants of research evidence use in allied health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizarondo L

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available L Lizarondo, K Grimmer-Somers, S KumarInternational Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, AustraliaBackground: The use of evidence-based practice (EBP is often not reflected in allied health (AH practitioners’ day-to-day practice (the research-practice gap. Research suggests that considerable differences between and within AH disciplines exist, which require different approaches in order to influence practice behavior. It is therefore important to develop a better understanding of what influences individual AH practitioners’ adoption of evidence into daily practice.Objective: This systematic review aims to examine the individual characteristics of AH practitioners which determine their uptake of evidence into practice.Methods: Studies which examined individual factors or variables that influence research evidence use by any AH practitioner were included in the review. The methodological quality of the included papers was assessed using the Quality Assessment and Validity Tool for Cross-sectional Studies. A narrative summary of the findings was presented.Results: Six studies were included and the methodological quality scores indicated that two were weak and the remainder had moderate–weak quality. The review demonstrated that factors such as educational degree or academic qualification, involvement in research or EBP-related activities, and practitioners’ perceptions, attitudes and beliefs about research and EBP are significant predictors of self-reported research evidence use in AH. The effect of other factors such as professional characteristics, clinical setting/work environment, information-seeking behavior and sociodemographic variables are less clear. Whether there is an interaction effect between evidence-uptake factors has not been tested.Conclusion: Improving the research knowledge of clinicians and overcoming negative attitudes toward EBP have the potential to move AH

  13. PATHWAYS TO HEALTH CAREERS, EXPLORING HEALTH OCCUPATIONS AND PROFESSIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health Careers Council of Illinois, Chicago.

    CAREERS IN THE AREAS OF DENTISTRY, DIETETICS, MEDICAL RECORD LIBRARY SCIENCE, MEDICAL LABORATORY WORK, MEDICINE, NURSING, OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY, OPTOMETRY, PHARMACY, PHYSICAL THERAPY, PODIATRY, PUBLIC HEALTH, RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY, SOCIAL WORK, VETERINARY MEDICINE, HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION, AND OTHER HEALTH OCCUPATIONS ARE DESCRIBED IN TERMS OF THE…

  14. Integrated occupational health care at sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Olaf Chresten

    2011-01-01

    Workplace Health Promotion is the combined efforts of employers, employees and society to improve the health and well-being of people at work. Integrated maritime health care can be defined as the total maritime health care function that includes the prevention of health risks from harmful...... exposures during life at sea and work place health promotion. SEAHEALTH and some of the shipping companies have already added workplace health promotion to occupational health care programs. The purpose of this article is to reinforce this trend by adding some international perspectives and by providing...

  15. A university's contribution to occupational health.

    OpenAIRE

    Schilling, R S

    1993-01-01

    The first Chair of Occupational Health in the United Kingdom was established by Manchester University in 1945 and held by Ronald Lane, a consultant physician and experienced factor doctor. In his department, occupational medicine was taught as a clinical discipline to both undergraduates and postgraduates. Research was based mostly on clinical observation of workpeople in the field or as hospital outpatients. Although work has become less hazardous, with major risks like pneumoconiosis and le...

  16. Occupational health in fairy tales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivolta, Alice; Arienti, Federica; Smith, Derek R; Cesana, Giancarlo; Riva, Michele A

    2016-05-03

    Myths and folklore, as expressions of popular beliefs, provide valuable information on medical knowledge in earlier times. Fairy tales have often recounted occupational maladies throughout the ages and also provide some insight into the toxic effects of certain metals, such as mercury. Much historical information can be gleaned from unexpected sources, and as such, fairy tales should be more carefully scrutinized by contemporary researchers with an interest in the historical origins of workplace injury and disease.

  17. [Educational program in the Medical Science Course, Kitasato University School of Allied Health Sciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitasato, Hidero; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Ohbu, Makoto; Obata, Fumiya; Ogawa, Zensuke; Sato, Yuichi; Hattori, Manabu; Saito-Taki, Tatsuo; Hara, Kazuya; Okano, Tetsuroh; Kubo, Makoto; Maruyama, Hiroko; Tsuchiya, Benio; Okazaki, Toshio; Ishii, Naohito; Nishimura, Yukari; Takada, Nobukazu; Abe, Michiko; Hachimura, Kazuo; Tanigawa, Kozo; Katagiri, Masato

    2008-07-01

    The aim of education in the Medical Laboratory Science course, Kitasato University School of Allied Health Sciences, is to bring up train students who have Kitasato spirit, for careers in laboratory medicine of hospital or scientific staff of medical companies or as researchers. General and enlightening education concerning "Kitasato spirit" and professional education composed of major subjects was carried out in the first and during the 2nd and two third of 3rd grade, respectively. Medical practice and research training were alternatively carried out for 6 months between November of the 3rd year and November of the 4th year, in order to gain practical experience. Two problem-based learning (PBL) tutorial courses, "Infectious Diseases Course" and "Team Medical Care--Interprofessional Collaborations" were also carried out at the end of the 3rd and beginning of the 4th years, respectively, in order to convert a memory to knowledge. Team medical care course enrolls 1000 students at the School of Allied Health Sciences, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy and Kitasato College Applied Clinical Dietetics Course, is now one of special courses available at our university. This attempt is thought to result in a way of thinking that recognizes the importance of co-operation as a team member and personal contributions to actual team medical care.

  18. 75 FR 10629 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... Labor Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and...; ] DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION:...

  19. [Quality assurance in occupational health services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalak, J

    1996-01-01

    The general conditions influencing the quality assurance and audit in Polish occupational health services are presented. The factors promoting or hampering the implementation of quality assurance and audits are also discussed. The major influence on the transformation of Polish occupational health services in exorted by employers who are committed to cover the costs of the obligatory prophylactic examination of their employees. This is the factor which also contributes to the improvement of quality if services. The definitions of the most important terms are reviewed to highlight their accordance with the needs of occupational health services in Poland. The examples of audit are presented and the elements of selected methods of auditing are suggested to be adopted in Poland.

  20. Becoming an Academic: The Reconstruction of Identity by Recently Appointed Lecturers in Nursing, Midwifery and the Allied Health Professions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Caroline; Boyd, Pete

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the workplace learning experiences of recently appointed lecturers in UK higher education in nursing, midwifery and the allied health professions. Health care practitioners, appointed to academic posts in Universities, are experts in their respective clinical fields and hold strong practitioner identities developed through…

  1. Occupational Safety and Health Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Indonesian Irish Italian Japanese Javanese Kannada Kazakh Khmer Korean Kurdish (Kurmanji) Kyrgyz Lao Latin Latvian Lithuanian Luxembourgish ... New Recommended practices for safety and health programs Learn how a strong workplace safety and health program ...

  2. Building competency in the novice allied health professional through peer coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladyshewsky, Richard K

    2010-01-01

    The development of competence is an ongoing journey, and one that is particularly punctuated in the early part of a health professional's career. These novice practitioners need to recognize that the challenges inherent in building competency might be resolved more readily by engaging with peers. This paper outlines what it means to be a novice practitioner, and how peer coaching can be used to support professional development in the allied health sciences. An overview of the reasoning process and how peer coaching and experiential learning can be used to build competence is described. A structured and formal approach to peer coaching is outlined in this paper. Novices who embrace this professional development strategy will find the model of coaching practice and underlying strategies described in this paper beneficial to their experience. The importance of formalizing the process and the underlying communication skills needed for coaching are described in detail with accompanying examples to illustrate the model in practice.

  3. Successfully living with chronic arthritis. The role of the allied health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taal, Erik; Bobietinska, Elzbieta; Lloyd, Jill; Veehof, Martine; Rasker, Wietske Jm; Oosterveld, F G J Frits; Rasker, J J Hans

    2006-03-01

    The treatment and care of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is complex and various health professionals with different areas of expertise may be involved. The objective of this article is to review the treatments and their efficacy as provided by health care professionals in RA care. The requirements for further research in this area are formulated. To achieve better effects of treatment it is necessary to improve the coordination of services as provided by the different specialists. The important roles of the patients themselves in the care and management of the disease are emphasized, as well as the roles of the informal caregivers such as a spouse or other family members and friends and the role of patient societies. The possible role of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) to improve the communication and facilitate the coordination among health professionals and between patients and health professionals is mentioned. The topics presented in this article may encourage further discussion and research, particularly concerning the effects of the treatments as provided by allied health professionals. Health professionals play an important role in the life of patients with rheumatic disorders, in all the domains of the ICF: body functions and structure, activities (action by an individual) and participation (involvement in a life situation). Health professionals in rheumatology can make the difference in the lives of RA patients and their families.

  4. Towards an occupational safety and health culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwetsloot, G.I.J.M.; Steijger, N.

    2014-01-01

    Occupational safety and health (OSH) is a highly regulated area that appears to be based on rational planning and logical management approaches, e.g. OSM Management Systems: employers and employees of organisations should be aware of OSH risks, assess these risks systematically, provide the necessar

  5. The Hospice Concept: Health Occupation 305.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schobel, Deborah A.

    A description is provided of "The Hospice Concept," an elective course offered as part of a two-year college health occupations curriculum. The course is designed to further the students understanding of the multiple facets of death and dying and to prepare them to be hospice volunteers. Following a course description and a glossary of…

  6. The Predictive Value of Selected Extrinsic and Intrinsic Indicators of Overall Job Satisfaction in Diagnostic Radiological Technology, Radiation Therapy, and Nuclear Medicine Technology Allied Health Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavers, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    Healthcare is the largest industry in the United States and 60 percent of its 14 million workers are in allied health jobs. The need to attract and retain allied health faculty is critical to preparing a competent workforce in healthcare. This study reports the results of a survey of 259 faculty members working in diagnostic radiologic technology,…

  7. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Technical Support Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-12-29

    0575 N5-95-1 Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) Technical Support Committee U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY CARDEROCK DIVISION, NAVAL...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The National Shipbuilding Research Program, Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) Technical Support...SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIMED. Sp-5 Safety and Health Final Report Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) Technical Support Committee Task No

  8. 75 FR 44967 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-30

    ...: 2010-18767] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institute for Occupational Safety and... Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). ACTION... Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), 4676 Columbia Parkway, MS C-46, Cincinnati, OH...

  9. Occupational Health and Safety and Employer Motivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasle, Peter; Jensen, Per Langå

    2004-01-01

    It is often argued and supported by a number of case studies that investment in human factors and occupational health and safety can pay. But any employer has a number of possible in-vestments, and many of these may have a larger marginal utility than health and safety. In addition it is often...... difficult to calculate the exact pay off for human factors and health and safety – how to calculate higher motivation for instance. The economic benefit as a possible driving force for improvement of occupational health and safety is likely to exist but it must be considered a relatively weak force. Another...... possible motivator is state regulation but it does not by itself constitute a strong motivator as the frequency of inspections and the level of fines are low in most countries. But as a signal about legitimacy it is an important factor. It is the necessity to secure legitimacy which seems to be the most...

  10. [The emergence of positive occupational health psychology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Arnold B; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Alfredo; Derks, Daantje

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the emerging concept of Positive Occupational Health Psychology (POHP). We discuss the usefulness of focusing on positive constructs in order to understand the path to health and well-being at work. We describe research findings on several POHP topics, including engagement, psychological capital, and job crafting. Additionally, we review the first positive interventions in this field and conclude by identifying some specific questions for future research.

  11. Evaluation of a supplementary retention program for black allied health sciences students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesser, A; Lewis, L; Abbott, B; Vericella, B

    1993-01-01

    The Medical College of Georgia's (MCG's) Minority Academic Advising Program (MAAP), which began in 1984, is a supplementary retention program for Black students. This paper describes an evaluation study of the effectiveness of MAAP within the MCG School of Allied Health Sciences (SAHS). The study sample consisted of 89 Black students who enrolled in the SAHS from fall 1978 to fall 1982 (preMAAP period) plus 129 Black students who entered the SAHS from fall 1984 through fall 1988 (MAAP period). The comparison group consisted of all other students who entered the SAHS (n = 1,884) within those same time periods. Using an evaluation design produced by merging a quasi-experimental and a time-series design, the authors found that the MAAP succeeded in increasing both the Black student retention-to-graduation rate and the time-persisted-in-program, to the extent that Black students achieved parity with other SAHS students.

  12. [The occupational health of medical personnel of psychiatric institutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzhenskaia, E V

    2013-01-01

    The article considers the issues of self-assessment of occupational health by medical personnel of psychiatric service. The main issues and areas of occupation health disorders are identified. The main directions of disorders prevention are presented.

  13. Methodological Orientations of Articles Appearing in Allied Health's Top Journals: Who Publishes What and Where

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderman, Pamela Lea McCloud

    2012-01-01

    This study examined articles published in the major peer-reviewed journals, either hard copy, web, or both formats, in five allied health professions from January 2006 to December 2010. Research journals used in this study include: "Journal of Dental Hygiene," "Journal of the American Dietetic Association," "Journal of…

  14. Developing eLearning Technologies to Implement Competency Based Medical Education: Experiences from Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagunwa, Thomas; Lwoga, Edda

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides the practical experience of developing an eLearning technology as a tool to implement Competency-based Medical Education (CBME) in Tanzania medical universities, with a specific focus on Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences. The paper provides a background to eLearning and the early attempt to adopt it in 2006 at…

  15. The Use of Technical Skill Standards in the Admissions Process for Florida Allied Dental Health Education Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, Rita H.

    2001-01-01

    Among 47 respondents from 26 Florida institutions offering allied dental health education programs, 66% have no established technical skill standards for admissions; a sizeable number felt the need for uniform published standards. Although a majority had some knowledge of the Americans with Disabilities Act, 96% responded negatively regarding its…

  16. Attitudes on Barriers and Benefits of Distance Education among Mississippi Delta Allied Health Community College Faculty, Staff, and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield-Johnson, Susan; Mohn, Richard S.; Mitra, Amal K.; Young, Rebekah; McCullers, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Online distance education creates increased opportunities for continuing education and advanced training for allied health professionals living in underserved and geographically isolated areas. The purpose of this article was to explore attitudes on barriers and benefits of distance education technology among underrepresented minority allied…

  17. Student Perceptions and Learning Outcomes of Blended Learning in a Massive First-Year Core Physiology for Allied Health Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Janelle; Meehan-Andrews, Terri; Weerakkody, Nivan; Hughes, Diane L.; Rathner, Joseph A.

    2017-01-01

    Evidence shows that factors contributing to success in physiology education for allied health students at universities include not only their high school achievement and background but also factors such as confidence with their teachers and quality of their learning experience, justifying intensive and continued survey of students' perceptions of…

  18. A systematic review of professional supervision experiences and effects for allied health practitioners working in non-metropolitan health care settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ducat WH

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Wendy H Ducat,1,3 Saravana Kumar2 1Cunningham Centre, Darling Downs Hospital and Health Service, Australia; 2School of Health Sciences, International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, Sansom Institute, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia; 3Rural Clinical School, School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia Introduction: In regional, rural, and remote settings, allied health professional supervision is one organizational mechanism designed to support and retain the workforce, provide clinical governance, and enhance service delivery. A systematic approach to evaluating the evidence of the experience and effects of professional supervision for non-metropolitan allied health practitioners and their service delivery is needed. Methods: Studies investigating the experience and effects of professional supervision across 17 allied health disciplines in non-metropolitan health services were systematically searched for using standardized keywords across seven databases. The initial search identified 1,574 references. Of these studies, five met inclusion criteria and were subject to full methodological appraisal by both reviewers. Two studies were primarily qualitative with three studies primarily quantitative in their approach. Studies were appraised using McMaster critical appraisal tools and data were extracted and synthesized. Results: Studies reported the context specific benefits and challenges of supervision in non-metropolitan areas and the importance of supervision in enhancing satisfaction and support in these areas. Comparison of findings between metropolitan and non-metropolitan settings within one study suggested that allied health in non-metropolitan settings were more satisfied with supervision though less likely to access it and preferred supervision with other non-metropolitan practitioners over access to more experienced supervisors. One study in a regional health service identified the lack

  19. [Positive occupational health psychology: an introduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Arnold B; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Alfredo

    2012-02-01

    This article introduces the monographic section on Positive Occupational Health Psychology (POHP), presenting eight theoretical and empirical papers about diverse topics. Traditionally, research on occupational health has mainly been focused on causes of diseases and on identifying and preventing work factors related to worker's impaired health. However, this biased view may not provide a complete understanding of the mechanisms that lead to employee well-being and performance. We discuss the differences of POHP with similar constructs, and review reasons for its importance in the development of this field. Overall, the studies included in the monographic section show the usefulness of focusing on positive constructs, and present ideas and questions that we hope may help to further our progress in the field of POHP.

  20. Occupational Safety and Health in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Ismael; Huerta-Mercado, Raul

    2015-01-01

    Peru is a country located on the Pacific coast of South America with a population of more than 30 million inhabitants. In the past 10 years, Peru has had a steady economic growth. Peru is predominantly an extractive industry country, but the manufacturing and construction sectors are booming. It is in this context that regulations have been implemented to protect the safety and health of workers. One of the most important regulations is the Law on Safety and Health at Work, which has been recently promulgated. Regulations are complemented by training and education in occupational safety and health. The measures are yet to be fully implemented thus a positive effect in reducing accidents and occupational diseases at work has not yet been seen.

  1. Occupational Health Hazards in ICU Nursing Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Eri Shimizu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed occupational health hazards for Intensive Care Unit (ICU nurses and nursing technicians, comparing differences in the number and types of hazards which occur at the beginning and end of their careers. A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out with 26 nurses and 96 nursing technicians from a public hospital in the Federal District, Brazil. A Likert-type work-related symptom scale (WRSS was used to evaluate the presence of physical, psychological, and social risks. Data were analyzed with the use of the SPSS, version 12.0, and the Kruskal-Wallis test for statistical significance and differences in occupational health hazards at the beginning and at the end of the workers' careers. As a workplace, ICUs can cause work health hazards, mostly physical, to nurses and nursing technicians due to the frequent use of physical energy and strength to provide care, while psychological and social hazards occur to a lesser degree.

  2. Study of occupation health risk assessment on Chinese coal mine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Guo-qing; YAN Xiang-nong

    2007-01-01

    Factors of occupation health hazard were identified and analyzed, and indexes system of occupation health risk assessment were established by applying fuzzy theory and system safety technique, the weights of index system were obtained by AHP, finally a reasonable mathematics model of occupation health risk assessment was accomplished by an example.

  3. Environmental and Occupational Exposures in Immigrant Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pracha P. Eamranond

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Immigrants comprise vulnerable populations that are frequently exposed to a multitude of environmental and occupational hazards. The historical context behind state and federal legislation has helped to foster an environment that is particularly hostile toward caring for immigrant health. Current hazards include toxic exposures, air and noise pollution, motor vehicle accidents, crowded living and work environments with inadequate ventilation, poor sanitation, mechanical injury, among many others. Immigrants lack the appropriate training, materials, health care access, and other resources to reduce their exposure to preventable environmental and occupational health risks. This dilemma is exacerbated by current anti-immigrant sentiments, miscommunication between native and immigrant populations, and legislation denying immigrants access to publicly funded medical care. Given that current health policy has failed to address immigrant health appropriately and political impetus is lacking, efforts should also focus on alternative solutions, including organized labor. Labor unions that serve to educate workers, survey work environments, and defend worker rights will greatly alleviate and prevent the burden of disease incurred by immigrants. The nation’s health will benefit from improved regulation of living and workplace environments to improve the health of immigrants, regardless of legal status.

  4. What constitutes an excellent allied health care professional? A multidisciplinary focus group study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paans, Wolter; Wijkamp, Inge; Wiltens, Egbert; Wolfensberger, Marca V

    2013-01-01

    Background Determining what constitutes an excellent allied health care professional (AHCP) is important, since this is what will guide the development of curricula for training future physical therapists, oral hygienists, speech therapists, diagnostic radiographers, and dietitians. This also determines the quality of care. Aim To describe perspectives of AHCPs on which characteristics are commonly associated with an excellent AHCP. Methods AHCPs’ perspectives were derived from three focus group discussions. Twenty-one health care professionals participated. The final analysis of the focus group discussions produced eight domains, in which content validity was obtained through a Delphi panel survey of 27 contributing experts. Results According to the survey, a combination of the following characteristics defines an excellent AHCP: (1) cognizance, to obtain and to apply knowledge in a broad multidisciplinary health care field; (2) cooperativity, to effectively work with others in a multidisciplinary context; (3) communicative, to communicate effectively at different levels in complex situations; (4) initiative, to initiate new ideas, to act proactively, and to follow them through; (5) innovative, to devise new ideas and to implement alternatives beyond current practices; (6) introspective, to self-examine and to reflect; (7) broad perspective, to capture the big picture; and (8) evidence-driven, to find and to use scientific evidence to guide one’s decisions. Conclusion The AHCPs perspectives can be used as a reference for personal improvement for supervisors and professionals in clinical practice and for educational purposes. These perspectives may serve as a guide against which talented students can evaluate themselves. PMID:24049449

  5. 77 FR 33495 - Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Notice of MACOSH..., Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health, authorized the preparation of this...

  6. 75 FR 28661 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Request for nominations to serve on the National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH)....

  7. 77 FR 62536 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-15

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Notice of renewal of... Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Deborah...

  8. 78 FR 68865 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement of FACOSH meeting. SUMMARY: The Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH)...

  9. 75 FR 52988 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement of meeting of the National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) and NACOSH...

  10. 77 FR 58174 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement of FACOSH meeting. SUMMARY: The Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH)...

  11. 75 FR 13783 - Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-23

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: MACOSH meeting; Notice. SUMMARY: The Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH)...

  12. 76 FR 54806 - Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-02

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Notice of MACOSH Meeting. SUMMARY: The Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH)...

  13. 76 FR 39902 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Request for nominations to serve on the Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH). SUMMARY:...

  14. 75 FR 28659 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement of meeting of the National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH). SUMMARY:...

  15. 76 FR 32374 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-06

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement of meetings of the National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) and NACOSH...

  16. 78 FR 21977 - Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Notice of... Occupational Safety and Health. The Committee will better enable OSHA to perform its duties under...

  17. 75 FR 66797 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH), Charter Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-29

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH), Charter Renewal AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION... National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) for two years. FOR...

  18. 77 FR 31398 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement of meetings of the National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) and NACOSH...

  19. 75 FR 78775 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement of meeting of the National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) and NACOSH...

  20. 75 FR 2890 - OSHA Listens: Occupational Safety and Health Administration Stakeholder Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-19

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration OSHA Listens: Occupational Safety and Health Administration Stakeholder Meeting AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is announcing a...

  1. Telecommuting: Occupational health considerations for employee health and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, M L

    2000-06-01

    1. Information technology has moved "work" out of a centralized location. Employees who telecommute pose significant challenges and considerations for the practice of occupational health nursing. 2. Employer and employee benefits associated with telecommuting are reportedly associated with high levels of job satisfaction. However, the occupational health and safety risks of this new work environment need to be fully assessed and understood. 3. The ergonomic controls to minimize the risk of repetitive motion injuries are the same for both office and home locations. Additional attention need to be paid to implementing risk controls for other physical hazards and psychosocial considerations, as well as personal safety and security issues. 4. The scope of occupational health nursing practice needs to remain dynamic, recognizing the impact new technologies have on the workplace, to continue to meet the needs of the changing workplace.

  2. Directory of Academic Programs in Occupational Safety and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, William J., III; And Others

    This booklet describes academic program offerings in American colleges and universities in the area of occupational safety and health. Programs are divided into five major categories, corresponding to each of the core disciplines: (1) occupational safety and health/industrial hygiene, (2) occupational safety, (3) industrial hygiene, (4)…

  3. What constitutes an excellent allied health care professional? A multidisciplinary focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paans W

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Wolter Paans, Inge Wijkamp, Egbert Wiltens, Marca V Wolfensberger Research and Innovation Group Talent Development in Higher Education and Society, Hanze University of Applied Sciences, Groningen, The Netherlands. Background: Determining what constitutes an excellent allied health care professional (AHCP is important, since this is what will guide the development of curricula for training future physical therapists, oral hygienists, speech therapists, diagnostic radiographers, and dietitians. This also determines the quality of care. Aim: To describe perspectives of AHCPs on which characteristics are commonly associated with an excellent AHCP. Methods: AHCPs' perspectives were derived from three focus group discussions. Twenty-one health care professionals participated. The final analysis of the focus group discussions produced eight domains, in which content validity was obtained through a Delphi panel survey of 27 contributing experts. Results: According to the survey, a combination of the following characteristics defines an excellent AHCP: (1 cognizance, to obtain and to apply knowledge in a broad multidisciplinary health care field; (2 cooperativity, to effectively work with others in a multidisciplinary context; (3 communicative, to communicate effectively at different levels in complex situations; (4 initiative, to initiate new ideas, to act proactively, and to follow them through; (5 innovative, to devise new ideas and to implement alternatives beyond current practices; (6 introspective, to self-examine and to reflect; (7 broad perspective, to capture the big picture; and (8 evidence-driven, to find and to use scientific evidence to guide one's decisions. Conclusion: The AHCPs perspectives can be used as a reference for personal improvement for supervisors and professionals in clinical practice and for educational purposes. These perspectives may serve as a guide against which talented students can evaluate themselves. Keywords: clinical

  4. Occupational Safety and Health Act: A Responsibility for Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Teacher, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Presents implications of the Occupational Safety and Health Act for science teachers both as workers and as they encourage, in students, the development of positive safety attitudes for future occupations. (PEB)

  5. 75 FR 62147 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-07

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement of meeting and member appointments. SUMMARY: The Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and...

  6. 77 FR 43616 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-25

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Request for nominations to serve on NACOSH. SUMMARY: The Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and...

  7. 76 FR 71077 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement of... advise the Secretary of Labor (Secretary) on all matters relating to the occupational safety and...

  8. 76 FR 28816 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-18

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement of meeting and member appointment. SUMMARY: The Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and...

  9. 77 FR 22355 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement of FACOSH meeting and member appointments. SUMMARY: The Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety...

  10. 75 FR 35090 - Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-21

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement of... workgroup meetings scheduled for July 13-14, 2010. The Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational...

  11. 78 FR 30337 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-22

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement of FACOSH meeting and member appointments. SUMMARY: The Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety...

  12. 76 FR 60085 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Request for nominations to serve on NACOSH. SUMMARY: The Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and...

  13. Leadership in athletic training: implications for practice and education in allied health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutz, Matthew R

    2010-01-01

    Leadership behaviors are an important aspect of athletic training and are needed within all allied health care disciples. A two-phase, exploratory, non-experimental research study using a Delphi technique and a randomly selected sample of athletic trainers (n = 161) was conducted to determine leadership competencies perceived to be important for athletic training practice and education. The Delphi technique (phase one) resulted in the Leadership Development in Athletic Training instrument (LDAT). In the national survey (phase two), respondents used the LDAT to rate the importance of leadership competencies for athletic training practice and for athletic training education. Coefficient alphas ranged from α = 0.83 to 0.97 and provided satisfactory estimates of internal consistency. Concurrent, construct, and convergent validity were established. Forty-nine leadership competencies were rated important for practice and 48 for education (M = 1.5, p ≤ 0.001). Exploratory factor analysis revealed that leadership competencies were organized by four constructs (with six emphases): 1) personality characteristics, 2) diagnosing context and people skills, 3) communication and initiative, and 4) strategic thinking. Repeated measures ANOVA with Sidak post-hoc adjustments indicated each leadership construct significantly increased in importance as the level of the ATEP progressed.

  14. Occupational Safety and Health Guide (OSH Guide) (CD-ROM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal agencies in assessing their compliance with the standards of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, and it may be used in...combination with an agency-specific manual. The OSH Guide is based on Title 29, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 1910, Occupational Safety and Health...Standards, and Part 1926, Safety and Health Regulations for Construction. Part 1960, Basic Program Elements for Federal Employee Occupational Safety and Health Programs and Related Mafters, is also included.

  15. Knowledge and beliefs concerning evidence-based practice amongst complementary and alternative medicine health care practitioners and allied health care professionals: A questionnaire survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Khalid S

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence-based practice (EBP has become an important competency in many allied and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM health care practitioners' professional standards of proficiency. Methods To compliment an EBP course for allied health care professionals and CAM practitioners, we undertook a questionnaire survey to assess learning needs. We developed a questionnaire to measure allied health care professionals and CAM practitioners' basic knowledge, skills and beliefs concerning the main principles of EBP. The questionnaires were administered to all attendees of one-day EBP workshops. Results During 2004–5 we surveyed 193 allied health care professionals and CAM practitioners who attended one-day EBP courses prior to commencement of teaching. Of the respondents 121 (62.7% were allied health care professionals and 65 (33.7% practitioners stated that they work in the CAM field Our survey found that the majority of the respondents had not previously attended a literature appraisal skills workshop (87.3% or received formal training in research methods (69.9%, epidemiology (91.2% or statistics (80.8%. Furthermore, 67.1% of practitioners specified that they felt that they had not had adequate training in EBM and they identified that they needed more training and education in the principles of EBM (86.7%. Differences in knowledge and beliefs concerning EBP amongst allied and CAM practitioners were found and length of time since qualification was also found to be an important factor in practitioner's beliefs. More CAM practitioners compared to allied health professionals accessed educational literature via the Internet (95.3% v 68.1%, p = 0.008. Whilst, practitioners with more than 11 years experience felt that original research papers were far more confusing (p = 0.02 than their less experienced colleagues. Conclusion The results demonstrate that practitioner's learning needs do vary according to the type of profession

  16. The issue of mental health in occupational health surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Henrique da Costa Leão

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the issue of mental health in the Occupational Health Surveillance (VISAT context. It seeks to present theoretical aspects and institutional policies contributing to the incorporation of mental health dimensions into the VISAT process, in view of the pressing need to attend to this demand that is becoming increasingly important in the occupational health area, especially within the scope of the National Comprehensive Occupational Healthcare Network (RENAST. Some theoretical approaches and practical experiences in mental health and work are systematically presented and discussed in this essay. A survey is also conducted of potential strategies to integrate mental health into VISAT actions. It is our view that the origins of illnesses and ensuing harm are closely linked to the elements involved in work organization and management. Consequently, surveillance practices should include and identify generating components of these negative aspects. The diversity of illnesses caused by work processes and conditions calls for major investment to ascertain and change the situations that give rise to such illnesses.

  17. Workplace Safety and Health Topics: Industries and Occupations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health and Workplace Exposure Control Nanotechnology Occupational Health Psychology Office Environment and Worker Safety and Health Outdoor ... CDC Jobs Funding LEGAL Policies Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton Road Atlanta , GA 30329- ...

  18. Hawaii State Plan for Occupational Safety and Health. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-21

    This document announces the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) decision to modify the Hawaii State Plan's ``final approval'' determination under Section 18(e) of the Occupational Safety and Health Act (the Act) and to transition to ``initial approval'' status. OSHA is reinstating concurrent federal enforcement authority over occupational safety and health issues in the private sector, which have been solely covered by the Hawaii State Plan since 1984.

  19. A survey of occupational therapy practitioners in mental health

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    As part of the College of Occupational Therapists’ Mental Health Project, a survey of occupational therapists practising in mental health in the UK was conducted. A questionnaire was sent to 200 members of the Association of Occupational Therapists in Mental Health and achieved a 68.5% response rate. The majority of the 137 respondents were female, with Senior I staff between 20 and 30 years of age who were unlikely to have worked in another area forming the largest group. Although most...

  20. What about Health Educators? Nutrition Education for Allied Health Professionals: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettienne-Gittens, Reynolette; Lisako, E.; McKyer, J.; Goodson, Patricia; Guidry, Jeffrey; Outley, Corliss

    2012-01-01

    Background: Health educators are critical members of the health care team who may be called upon to provide nutrition education. However, are health educators prepared for this task? What have scholars concluded regarding this pertinent topic? Purpose: This study has three purposes: (1) to determine the definition of and criteria for nutrition…

  1. The assumed relation between occupation and inequality in health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Østergaard; Kanstrup, Anne Marie; Josephsson, Staffan

    2015-01-01

    on assumptions regarding the relation between occupation and inequality in health, and statements on the need to explore this relation. Conclusion: Basic theory and reasoning, as well as empirical studies, on inequality in health are missing in occupational science and therapy. Based on the findings......Background: Occupational science and therapy scholars have argued that research on inequality in health is needed. Simultaneously, a knowledge gap between how to understand and take action on health inequalities exists in occupational science and therapy. Objective: To identify how inequality...

  2. 76 FR 52330 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-22

    ... (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2... standard grants review and funding cycles pertaining to research issues in occupational safety and health... support more focused research projects, which will lead to improvements in the delivery of...

  3. Five Years of Acute Stroke Unit Care: Comparing ASU and Non-ASU Admissions and Allied Health Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isobel J. Hubbard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Evidence indicates that Stroke Units decrease mortality and morbidity. An Acute Stroke Unit (ASU provides specialised, hyperacute care and thrombolysis. John Hunter Hospital, Australia, admits 500 stroke patients each year and has a 4-bed ASU. Aims. This study investigated hospital admissions over a 5-year period of all strokes patients and of all patients admitted to the 4-bed ASU and the involvement of allied health professionals. Methods. The study retrospectively audited 5-year data from all stroke patients admitted to John Hunter Hospital (n=2525 and from nonstroke patients admitted to the ASU (n=826. The study’s primary outcomes were admission rates, length of stay (days, and allied health involvement. Results. Over 5 years, 47% of stroke patients were admitted to the ASU. More male stroke patients were admitted to the ASU (chi2=5.81; P=0.016. There was a trend over time towards parity between the number of stroke and nonstroke patients admitted to the ASU. When compared to those admitted elsewhere, ASU stroke patients had a longer length of stay (z=−8.233; P=0.0000 and were more likely to receive allied healthcare. Conclusion. This is the first study to report 5 years of ASU admissions. Acute Stroke Units may benefit from a review of the healthcare provided to all stroke patients. The trends over time with respect to the utilisation of the John Hunter Hospitall’s ASU have resulted in a review of the hospitall’s Stroke Unit and allied healthcare.

  4. Behavioral health leadership: new directions in occupational mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Amy B; Saboe, Kristin N; Anderson, James; Sipos, Maurice L; Thomas, Jeffrey L

    2014-10-01

    The impact of stress on mental health in high-risk occupations may be mitigated by organizational factors such as leadership. Studies have documented the impact of general leadership skills on employee performance and mental health. Other researchers have begun examining specific leadership domains that address relevant organizational outcomes, such as safety climate leadership. One emerging approach focuses on domain-specific leadership behaviors that may moderate the impact of combat deployment on mental health. In a recent study, US soldiers deployed to Afghanistan rated leaders on behaviors promoting management of combat operational stress. When soldiers rated their leaders high on these behaviors, soldiers also reported better mental health and feeling more comfortable with the idea of seeking mental health treatment. These associations held even after controlling for overall leadership ratings. Operational stress leader behaviors also moderated the relationship between combat exposure and soldier health. Domain-specific leadership offers an important step in identifying measures to moderate the impact of high-risk occupations on employee health.

  5. Efficiency of workplace surveys conducted by Finnish occupational health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savinainen, Minna; Oksa, Panu

    2011-07-01

    In Finland, workplace surveys are used to identify and assess health risks and problems caused by work and make suggestions for continuous improvement of the work environment. With the aid of the workplace survey, occupational health services can be tailored to a company. The aims of this study were to determine how occupational health professionals gather data via the workplace survey and the effect survey results have on companies. A total of 259 occupational health nurses and 108 occupational health physicians responded to the questionnaire: 84.2% were women and 15.8% were men. The mean age of the respondents was 48.8 years (range, 26 to 65 years). Usually occupational health nurses and foremen and sometimes occupational health physicians and occupational safety and health representatives initiate the workplace survey. More than 90% of the surveys were followed by action proposals, and about 50% of these were implemented. The proposals implemented most often concerned personal protective equipment and less often leadership. Survey respondents should have both the opportunity and the authority to affect resources, the work environment, work arrangements, and tools. Teamwork among occupational health and safety professionals, management, and employees is vital for cost-effectively solving today's complex problems at workplaces around the globe.

  6. Gender issues on occupational safety and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Eugenio; Vona, Rosa; Monterosso, Davide; Giammarioli, Anna Maria

    2016-01-01

    The increasing proportion of women in the workforce raises a range of gender-related questions about the different effects of work-related risks on men and women. Few studies have characterized gender differences across occupations and industries, although at this time, the gender sensitive approach is starting to acquire relevance in the field of human preventive medicine. The European Agency for Safety and Health at Work has encouraged a policy of gender equality in all European member states. Italy has adopted European provisions with new specific legislation that integrates the previous laws and introduces the gender differences into the workplace. Despite the fact that gender equal legislation opportunities have been enacted in Italy, their application is delayed by some difficulties. This review examines some of these critical aspects.

  7. Occupational health nursing practice through the Human Caring lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Dianne L

    2010-01-01

    Many health care and academic centers have adopted Watson's Theory of Human Caring as their guiding principle; the theory is also used in other disciplines, such as library science. Human caring theory offers occupational health nurses as structure that not only defines a focus for practice, but also provides a basis for moral and philosophical practice analyses. In particular, nurses may find this theory useful in confirming the definition of "caring" and reconsidering what nursing is all about. More importantly, consideration and application of this theory may lead to research on its applicability to the field of occupational health nursing. This article presents the science and philosophy of human caring, specifically Watson's Theory of Human Caring. Two case studies are presented that demonstrate how the theory could be used to evaluate occupational health nursing practice. To demonstrate its possible relevance as an occupational health nursing framework, an analysis of and comparison to existing occupational health nursing guidelines are detailed and discussed.

  8. Inpatients’ perspectives of occupational therapy in acute mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, KH; Morris, J; Craik, C

    2007-01-01

    Background Research into service users’ views of occupational therapy in acute mental health is extremely limited. This collaborative study between South West London and St George’s Mental Health NHS Trust and Brunel University (UK) obtained inpatients’ perspectives of occupational therapy. Methods Service users and occupational therapists were involved in designing a self-report questionnaire and, following training, in recruiting participants and collecting data. Results Si...

  9. 32 CFR 989.27 - Occupational safety and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Occupational safety and health. 989.27 Section 989.27 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.27 Occupational safety and health....

  10. Occupational Safety and Health Systems: A Three-Country Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, W. T.

    1983-01-01

    This article compares the occupational safety and health systems of Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States, looking at the origins of their legislation and its effects on occupational safety and health, with a view to determining what lessons may emerge, particularly for developing countries. (Author/SSH)

  11. Marital Status and Occupational Success Among Mental Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, John H.; Spray, S. Lee

    1970-01-01

    Concludes that personal relations, professional experiences and occupational success form a network of relationships which integrate the occupational and nonoccupational roles of highly specialized practitioners. Part of a Study of Careers in the Mental Health Field, supported by National Institute of Mental Health Grant MH-09192 and directed by…

  12. A Rational-Emotive Approach to Occupational Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinrach, Stephen G.

    1980-01-01

    Occupational mental health deals with the quality of life associated with work. This article demonstrates how rational emotive therapy can be applied to occupational mental health, and suggests counselors be sensitive to stress of work as well as home. (Author/JAC)

  13. A study of student perceptions of learning transfer from a human anatomy and physiology course in an allied health program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, Leigh S.

    The purpose of this study was two-fold. First the study was designed to determine student perceptions regarding the perceived degree of original learning from a human anatomy and physiology course, and the student perception of the use of the knowledge in an allied health program. Second, the intention of the study was to establish student beliefs on the characteristics of the transfer of learning including those factors which enhance learning transfer and those that serve as barriers to learning transfer. The study participants were those students enrolled in any allied health program at a community college in a Midwest state, including: nursing, radiology, surgical technology, health information technology, and paramedic. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected and analyzed from the responses to the survey. A sub-group of participants were chosen to participate in semi-structured formal interviews. From the interviews, additional qualitative data were gathered. The data collected through the study demonstrated student perception of successful transfer experiences. The students in the study were able to provide specific examples of learning transfer experienced from the human anatomy and physiology course in their allied health program. Findings also suggested students who earned higher grades in the human anatomy and physiology course perceived greater understanding and greater use of the course's learning objectives in their allied health program. The study found the students believed the following learning activities enhances the transfer of learning: (1) Providing application of the information or skills being learned during the instruction of the course content enhances the transfer of learning. (2) Providing resource materials and activities which allow the students to practice the content being taught facilitates the transfer of learning. The students made the following recommendations to remove barriers to the transfer of learning: (1

  14. Future of mental health occupational therapy: student perspective and concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Sarah; Bunger, Theresa; Courchesne, Kim; Smith, Katie A; Willoughby, M Marie

    2007-01-01

    Occupational therapy has been gradually slipping away from its foundation in mental health practice. In order to provide the best services to individuals with mental health disorders, the occupational therapy profession must maintain and expand its involvement in this area of practice. The purpose of this paper is to explore the threats and opportunities to promote education and practice in mental health from a student perspective. The authors reviewed the literature, distributed questionnaires, and conducted focus groups with occupational therapy students at a southeastern university. Based on findings in the literature and of the focus groups with students, the authors have drawn a list of suggestions to improve the visibility of occupational therapy in mental health care. These suggestions are for occupational therapy educational programs, mental health practitioners, AOTA, and state associations.

  15. Implementation of a patient safety incident management system as viewed by doctors, nurses and allied health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travaglia, Joanne F; Westbrook, Mary T; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2009-05-01

    Incident reporting systems have become a central mechanism of most health services patient safety strategies. In this article we compare health professionals' anonymous, free text responses in an evaluation of a newly implemented electronic incident management system. The professions' answers were compared using classic content analysis and Leximancer, a computer assisted text analysis package. The classic analysis identified issues which differentiated the professions. More doctors commented on lack of feedback following incidents and evaluated the system negatively. More allied health staff found that the system lacked fields necessary to report incidents. More nurses complained incident reporting was time consuming. The Leximancer analysis revealed that while the professions all used the more frequently employed concepts (which described basic components of the reporting system), nurses and allied health shared many additional concepts concerned with actual reporting. Doctors applied fewer and more unique (used only by one profession) concepts when writing about the system. Doctors' unique concepts centred on criticism of the incident management system and the broader implications of safety issues, while the other professions' unique concepts focused on more practical issues. The classic analysis identified specific problems needing to be targeted in ongoing modifications of the system. The Leximancer findings, while complementing the classical analysis results, gave greater insight into professional groups' attitudes that relate to use of the system, e.g. doctors' relatively limited conceptual vocabulary regarding the system was consistent with their lower incident reporting rates. Such professional differences in reaction to healthcare innovations may constrain inter-disciplinary communication and cooperation.

  16. Measuring the quality of allied health services in Australia: is it a case of “the more we learn, the less we know?”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milanese S

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Karen Grimmer-Somers, Steve Milanese, Saravana KumarInternational Centre for Allied Health Evidence (iCAHE, University of South Australia, North Terrace, Adelaide, AustraliaBackground: Sensitive and reliable measurement of allied health (AH service quality is in its infancy. This is largely related to the complexity of the AH discipline-mix, the services these disciplines provide, and the locations in which services are provided. AH is variably described, with up to 49 disciplines being listed in the literature. These disciplines often undertake a range of interlinked activities such as assessment and diagnosis, counseling, therapy and rehabilitation, manufacture, education, and service organization. AH disciplines work in a range of roles in a range of public and private sector organizations, and often consult with their patients/clients a number of times for the management of one condition. They operate under a variety of funding models, and often within service delivery constraints. This evidence-informed analytical review outlines factors which should be considered by allied health leaders, reflecting clinicians, policy-makers, managers, and academics, in regards to making an informed choice of sensitive and reliable measures of AH service quality. Strong, visionary, and collaborative leadership is required to ensure that allied health activities and outcomes are measured and reported effectively and efficiently.Keywords: allied health (AH, sensitive, reliable measures, health service quality

  17. A protocol for literature triage in online learning for the net-generation nursing and allied health care students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ateya

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Nursing and allied health care students use online learning resources with their own perspective of learning, often combined with curiosity. Although, students are overwhelmed with access to an enormous pool of information, we hypothesized that students may not possess the skills to appraise the merits of all online resources. Our pilot survey results have shown that students’ knowledge of literature appraisal is inadequate. Circumventing this barrier requires adopting a three-phase protocol for literature triage such as: selection, appraisal, and critical reading. These skills would facilitate assessing all aspects of the literature, and identifying the best learning material.

  18. [Strengthen the prevention of occupational trichloroethylene health hazards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianjun

    2015-03-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a widely used organic solvent and an important industrial material. It can be absorbed into the body through respiratory tract and skin, and cause occupational hazards. The acute hazard induced by TCE is occupational medicamentosa-like dermatitis. Epidemiological data showed that long-term occupational exposure to TCE could also increase the risk of cancer and cause damage to reproductive system and nervous system. Thus, it is of great significance to strengthen the prevention of occupational TCE health hazards. In this paper, the health hazards and preventive measures of TCE are reviewed.

  19. 75 FR 13785 - Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH); Request for Nominations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-23

    ... listing the candidate's qualifications to serve on the committee, each nomination should state that the... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH); Request for Nominations AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA),...

  20. Georgia Maternal and Infant Health Research Group (GMIHRG): Mobilizing Allied Health Students and Community Partners to Put Data into Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zertuche, Adrienne D; Spelke, Bridget; Julian, Zoë; Pinto, Meredith; Rochat, Roger

    2016-07-01

    Purpose Despite having an obstetrician/gynecologist (ob/gyn) workforce comparable to the national average, Georgia is ranked 50th in maternal mortality and 40th in infant mortality. The Georgia Maternal and Infant Health Research Group (GMIHRG) was founded in 2010 to evaluate and address this paradox. Description In the several years since GMIHRG's inception, its graduate allied health student researchers and advisors have collaborated with community partners to complete several requisite research initiatives. Their initial work demonstrated that over half the Georgia areas outside metropolitan Atlanta lack adequate access to obstetric services, and their subsequent research evaluated the reasons for and the consequences of this maldistribution of obstetric providers. Assessment In order to translate their workforce and outcomes data for use in policymaking and programming, GMIHRG created reader-friendly reports for distribution to a wide variety of stakeholders and prepared concise, compelling presentations with targeted recommendations for change. This commitment to advocacy ultimately enabled them to: (a) inspire the Georgia Study Committees on Medicaid Reform and Medical Education, (b) influence Georgia General Assembly abortion bills, medical scholarship/loan legislation, and appropriations, and (c) motivate programming initiatives to improve midwifery education and perinatal regionalization in Georgia. Conclusion GMIHRG members have employed inventive research methods and maximized collaborative partnerships to enable their data on Georgia's maternal and infant outcomes and obstetric workforce to effectively inform state organizations and policymakers. With this unique approach, GMIHRG serves as a cost-efficient and valuable model for student engagement in the translation of research into advocacy efforts, policy change, and innovative programming.

  1. Types of social media (Web 2.0) used by Australian allied health professionals to deliver early twenty-first-century practice promotion and health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    Types of social media (Web 2.0) usage associated with eight of Australia's major allied health professions (AHPs, n = 935) were examined. Australian AHPs are interacting with Web 2.0 technologies for personal use but are failing to implement such technologies throughout their health professions to deliver health care. Australian AHPs are willing to undertake online educational courses designed to up skill them about how Web 2.0 may be used for practice promotion and health care delivery in the early twenty-first century. Participants in this study indicated that educational courses that were offered online would be the preferred mode of delivery.

  2. Occupational exposures and health outcomes among Latina hotel cleaners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yu-Chin Jerrie; Apostolopoulos, Yorghos; Hatzudis, Kiki; Sönmez, Sevil

    2014-01-01

    The poor working conditions of Latina hotel cleaners render them particularly vulnerable to elevated occupational hazards that lead to adverse health outcomes. This article presents a comprehensive review of occupational risks (including physical, chemical, biological, and psychosocial risk factors) and health outcomes (including musculoskeletal disorders, respiratory diseases, dermatological diseases and allergies, and psychological disorders) for Latina hotel cleaners, within their unique sociocultural contexts. Preventive interventions for improving Latina hotel cleaners' work and health conditions are recommended.

  3. National survey of occupational therapy managers in mental health

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    This study, part of the College of Occupational Therapists' Mental Health Project, surveyed occupational therapy managers in mental health to gather data about them, the services they managed and their opinions on current and future issues of importance. A questionnaire was sent to the 184 managers who it was believed worked in mental health and it achieved a 65.2% response rate. The majority of the 120 respondents were female, with Head II therapists between the ages of 31 and 40 forming...

  4. Health Track System—An Automated Occupational Medical System

    OpenAIRE

    Compton, Jack E.; Hartridge, Anne D.; Maluish, Andrew G.

    1980-01-01

    The development of an automated occupational health and hazards system is being undertaken at the Department of Energy by Electronic Data Systems. This system, called the Health Track System (HTS), involves the integration and collection of data from the fields of occupational medicine, industrial hygiene, health physics, safety and personnel. This in itself is an exciting prospect, however, the scope of the system calls for it to be installed throughout DOE and contractor organizations acros...

  5. An exploration of issues of management and intention to stay: allied health professionals in South West Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagnitti, Karen; Schoo, Adrian; Dunbar, James; Reid, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    Management of allied health staff and services often has implications for staff stability and retention. A survey of allied health staff in South West Victoria was conducted in 2003 to explore issues relating to recruitment and retention. Findings relating to management and retention of staff in their current job are addressed in this report. A total of 138 staff returned their questionnaires. Results were related to Maslow's hierarchy of needs, level of belonging, with professional needs identified as feeling supported, orientation to the position, clear job description, and able to recommend the position to others. Qualitative data showed that recommending the position was associated with job satisfaction, autonomy, flexibility, and variety of work. The immediate management structure was significantly related to retention. Reasons given for intending to leave were related to management categories. These were management structure, lack of career structure, and lack of professional support. Reasons given by respondents for not recommending their current position were as follows: not for long-term career, risk of deskilling if staying too long, and financially unrewarding. These reasons were also related to management. Positive reasons for staying, which were related to management, included flexible work conditions, variety of clinical and management experience, good working environment, good support, and autonomy. Recommendations are given for organizational development and training for managers.

  6. Fostering expertise in occupational health nursing: levels of skill development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, P G; Hays, B J

    1996-02-01

    1. Levels of nursing expertise described by Benner--novice, advanced beginner, competent, proficient, and expert--hold potential for fostering improved practice among occupational health nurses. 2. Lacking a clear understanding of the full potential of the role of the occupational health nurse, employers may not reward the development of clinical expertise that incorporates employee advocacy within the context of written standards and guidelines. 3. Expertise in occupational health nursing can be fostered by job descriptions that incorporate a broader view of nursing (one that stresses judgment and advocacy), retention and longevity, innovative strategies for consultation and collegial interaction to foster mentoring, and distance learning strategies.

  7. Occupational Therapy in Multidisciplinary Residency in Family and Community Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luzianne Feijó Alexandre Paiva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we report the experiences of occupational therapist during the Multidisciplinary Residency Program in Family and Community Health in Fortaleza, Ceará state, Brazil. With the creation of the Support Center for Family Health – NASF, occupational therapists began to participate more effectively in the Family Health Strategy of the Brazilian National Health System. Given this rocess, the category, which historically has trained its professionals following the biomedical model, is faced with the challenge to build a new field of knowledge. Objective: To analyze the inclusion of occupational therapy in the Family Health Strategy within the scope of Multidisciplinary Residency. Methodology: This is a descriptive study of qualitative approach, which was based on the experience of four occupational therapy resident students, performed through the documental analysis of field diaries, scientific papers, and case studies produced between 2009 and 2011. Results: The occupational therapists as well as the other NASF professionals operated the logic of Matrix Support to the Family Health teams, sharing their knowledge and assisting in resolving complex cases of the families, groups, and communities served. In this context, we found people with different relationships with their doings and a reduced repertoire of activities. The occupational therapists invested in the creation or consolidation of groups in the Family Health Centers and in the territory, which also stood as living and socializing spaces, focusing on prevention and health promotion.

  8. Astronomy Allies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flewelling, Heather; Alatalo, Katherine A.

    2017-01-01

    Imagine you are a grad student, at your first conference, and a prominent senior scientist shows interest in your work, and he makes things get way too personal? What would you do? Would you report it? Or would you decide, after a few other instances of harassment, that maybe you shouldn't pursue astronomy? Harassment is under-reported, the policies can be difficult to understand or hard to find, and it can be very intimidating as a young scientist to report it to the proper individuals. The Astronomy Allies Program is designed to help you with these sorts of problems. We are a group of volunteers that will help by doing the following: provide safe walks home during the conference, someone to talk to confidentially, as an intervener, as a resource to report harassment. The Allies are a diverse group of scientists committed to acting as mentors, advocates, and liaisons. The Winter 2015 AAS meeting was the first meeting that had Astronomy Allies, and Astronomy Allies provided a website for information, as well as a twitter, email, and phone number for anyone who needs our help or would like more information. We posted about the Astronomy Allies on the Women In Astronomy blog, and this program resonates with many people: either they want to help, or they have experienced harassment in the past and don't want to see it in the future. Harassment may not happen to most conference participants, but it's wrong, it's against the AAS anti-harassment policy ( http://aas.org/policies/anti-harassment-policy ), it can be very damaging, and if it happens to even one person, that is unacceptable. We intend to improve the culture at conferences to make it so that harassers feel they can't get away with their unprofessional behavior.

  9. Occupational Pesticide Exposures and Respiratory Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Ye

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Pesticides have been widely used to control pest and pest-related diseases in agriculture, fishery, forestry and the food industry. In this review, we identify a number of respiratory symptoms and diseases that have been associated with occupational pesticide exposures. Impaired lung function has also been observed among people occupationally exposed to pesticides. There was strong evidence for an association between occupational pesticide exposure and asthma, especially in agricultural occupations. In addition, we found suggestive evidence for a link between occupational pesticide exposure and chronic bronchitis or COPD. There was inconclusive evidence for the association between occupational pesticide exposure and lung cancer. Better control of pesticide uses and enforcement of safety behaviors, such as using personal protection equipment (PPE in the workplace, are critical for reducing the risk of developing pesticide-related symptoms and diseases. Educational training programs focusing on basic safety precautions and proper uses of personal protection equipment (PPE are possible interventions that could be used to control the respiratory diseases associated with pesticide exposure in occupational setting.

  10. Occupational pesticide exposures and respiratory health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ming; Beach, Jeremy; Martin, Jonathan W; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan

    2013-11-28

    Pesticides have been widely used to control pest and pest-related diseases in agriculture, fishery, forestry and the food industry. In this review, we identify a number of respiratory symptoms and diseases that have been associated with occupational pesticide exposures. Impaired lung function has also been observed among people occupationally exposed to pesticides. There was strong evidence for an association between occupational pesticide exposure and asthma, especially in agricultural occupations. In addition, we found suggestive evidence for a link between occupational pesticide exposure and chronic bronchitis or COPD. There was inconclusive evidence for the association between occupational pesticide exposure and lung cancer. Better control of pesticide uses and enforcement of safety behaviors, such as using personal protection equipment (PPE) in the workplace, are critical for reducing the risk of developing pesticide-related symptoms and diseases. Educational training programs focusing on basic safety precautions and proper uses of personal protection equipment (PPE) are possible interventions that could be used to control the respiratory diseases associated with pesticide exposure in occupational setting.

  11. OSH for development : occupational safety and health for development

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    This book is written for professionals in developing countries, for occupational safety and health specialists, production engineers, managers and trade union representatives. The book links occupational safety and health with production and productivity, showing the positive relationship between good and safe working conditions and sustainable high productivity. The book makes use of research results, and is intended to be used in connection with training activities, but does not concentrate...

  12. DoD Occupational Safety and Health Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-10-26

    TIC ’I Department of Defense . LECTE INSTRUCTION• 0~v 15 1993 •A2267" October 26, 1984 _. AD-A272 637 NUMBER 6055.1 SUBJECT: DoD Occupational Safety and...and State Occupational Safety and Health Inspections and Investigations at •r%3 Contractor Workplaces on Department of Defense Installations," June 29...thereby updating the policy, procedures, and responsibilities for administering a comprehensive DoD on-the-job occupational safety and health (OSH

  13. An overview of occupational health research in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnihotram Ramanakumar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent industrialization and globalizations are changing the Indian occupational morbidity drastically. Traditionally labor-oriented markets are on change towards more automation and mechanization, at the same time general awareness about occupational safety, occupational and environmental hazards were not spread in the society. This review will provide an overview of existing evidence from community based epidemiological studies and address the growing needs for evidence-based occupational health research in India. Review of all published results. Occupational research is seen as more complex issue in India, which Includes child labor; poor industrial legislation; vast informal sector; less attention to industrial hygiene and poor surveillance data across the country. While India experiencing economic transition, occupational research approach should balance between understanding the modern industrial exposures and health risks of traditional sectors like agriculture and plantations. Strategies like modern occupational health legislation, enforcement machinery in sub-district level, training to health professionals, need for epidemiological evidence and international collaborations were discussed to deal with the situation.

  14. Business law. Fundamentals for the occupational health nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arruda, Kimberley A

    2002-05-01

    1. A basic understanding of the judicial system will enable occupational health nurses to read court opinions and have a better understanding of whether or how they or their companies are affected by the decision. With this knowledge, occupational health nurses can help their organization avoid legal liability by ensuring that the company does not act contrary to the decisions of the controlling courts. 2. As they are often involved in the process of contracting for goods and services, occupational health nurses need to be aware of general contract terminology and negotiating techniques so they will be better able to protect their companies. In addition, occupational health nurses can also assist in the actual contract drafting process with knowledge of a few concepts, such as the description, caption, operative language of the agreement, and definitions, of a contract. 3. Occupational health nurses are often called upon to be expert witnesses and can play an integral part in the litigation process. Because of the importance of expert witnesses, occupational health nurses must have an understanding of how to effectively provide expert witness testimony.

  15. Epistemic reflections on Occupational Therapy in Mental Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Assis Costa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Occupational therapy, along with other professions, is provoked to think its performance in the area of mental health in light of the new perspectives of assistance to people with mental distress. Considering the psychiatric reform as a backdrop, the aim of this paper is to discuss the theoretical conceptions that supported the interventions of occupational therapy in this field, and the new demands presented to professionals.To this end, a study of narrative review, whose search was conducted in the Lilacs, Medline and SciELO databases , with the descriptors ‘Occupational Therapy’, ‘Mental Health’ and ‘Health Care’, between 1990 and 2012. One hundred sixteen indexed articles were found: 109 in LILACS and seven in SciELO, and 25 articles were analyzed. The results reveal the approaches that have underpinned occupational therapy, from the asylum model to the care model in mental health, indicating the challenges to be faced by the profession in the transition process to the current model of mental health. We conclude that the occupational therapist should be the one responsible to mediate the reinvention of the mental health users’ interaction with their multifaceted everyday activities/actions in order to contribute to the process of mental health care transformation, producing new ways of thinking and practicing occupational therapy

  16. Occupational health and psychological well-being of industrial employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Bhardwaj

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : In the present era of globalization of business the nature of work organizations and its environment are changing radically extending noticeable impact on individual′s job, safety, health, and well-being. Material & Methods : The present study was designed to examine the effects of overall occupational health on psychological well-being in a sample of 150 line-staff operating in a production organization. Psychometrically standardized scales were employed to assess the extent of occupational health and psychological well-being. Results : The analyses of the obtained data revealed that occupational health positively correlates with employees′ mental health. Conclusion : The employees who perceived their work and its physical and psycho-social environment as to be adequate and healthy maintained relatively better overall mental health.

  17. Occupational health assessment of chromite toxicity among Indian miners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Prasad Das

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Elevated concentration of hexavalent chromium pollution and contamination has contributed a major health hazard affecting more than 2 lakh mine workers and inhabitants residing in the Sukinda chromite mine of Odisha, India. Despite people suffering from several forms of ill health, physical and mental deformities, constant exposure to toxic wastes and chronic diseases as a result of chromite mining, there is a tragic gap in the availability of ′scientific′ studies and data on the health hazards of mining in India. Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Odisha State Pollution Control Board and the Odisha Voluntary Health Association data were used to compile the possible occupational health hazards, hexavalent chromium exposure and diseases among Sukinda chromite mines workers. Studies were reviewed to determine the routes of exposure and possible mechanism of chromium induced carcinogenicity among the workers. Our studies suggest all forms of hexavalent chromium are regarded as carcinogenic to workers however the most important routes of occupational exposure to Cr (VI are inhalation and dermal contact. This review article outlines the physical, chemical, biological and psychosocial occupational health hazards of chromite mining and associated metallurgical processes to monitor the mining environment as well as the miners exposed to these toxicants to foster a safe work environment. The authors anticipate that the outcome of this manuscript will have an impact on Indian chromite mining industry that will subsequently bring about improvements in work conditions, develop intervention experiments in occupational health and safety programs.

  18. Occupational exposure and awareness of Occupational safety and health among cloth dyeing workers in Jaipur India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishan Kant Upadhyay

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Objectives: We assessed the health risk factors and awareness of Occupational safety and health of workers in cloth dyeing industry of Jaipur. Methods: A pretested questionnaire was used to evaluate the health problems and awareness of occupational safety and health among workers. Results: The majority of these workers were suffering from eye irritation, back pain, allergies, general weakness, with most workers having three to five of these health problems. Our study reported higher incidence of musculoskeletal and respiratory diseases among workers in different age groups. Conclusion: A large number of diseases in different age groups is an indication that this industry exposes workers to many health hazards and lack of awareness and non availability of PPE in this industry is aggravating the health problems of the workers.

  19. OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO LUNG PROBLEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihir Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODCUTION: WHO’s definition of Physical, social and mental well - being is explained below. A positive mental health state indicates that the individual enjoys his routine; there are no undue conflicts. Health reiteration become s more imperative than health maintenanc e, where society’s responsibility is paramount. Health economics enables us to examine the burden caused by illness. In India, 620 million people live in rural area; only 9% of every one billion populatio n is covered under health schemes. Only 2% of GDP is spent on health, where the recommended percentage is 5%. In addition to this only 5% of annual family income is spent on curative health care. In the recent past rapid deterioration in the quality of environment has over - burdened the health problem. Occu pational Health is one of the environmental health sciences, concerned broadly with the health effects of work and of working conditions. Occupational illnesses and injuries have long been a preventable blight to health. A part from occupational diseases t here are some hazards which will impair health of employees in industries. Workers in every Occupation are faced with a multitude of hazards in the work place. Ronald Blake has classified occupational hazards into the following four categories. The most pr essing environmental health problems today, in terms of death and illness worldwide are those associated with poor households and communities in the development countries. According to WHO and the World Bank, environmental improvement at the household and community level would make the greatest difference for global health. This Article also focuses on the lung disease mainly occurring du e to hazards caused by the patient occupation. A good number of diseases like COAD, asthma and pneumoconiosis afflict the concerned population. Discussion has been made in threadbare about these problems in this article

  20. 77 FR 58488 - Hawaii State Plan for Occupational Safety and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-21

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration 29 CFR Part 1952 RIN 1218-AC78 Hawaii State Plan for Occupational Safety and Health AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Department of Labor. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This document announces the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's...

  1. 78 FR 54923 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-06

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Request for nominations to serve on the Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH). SUMMARY: The Assistant Secretary...

  2. Curricular transformation of health professions education in Tanzania: the process at Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (2008-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngassapa, Olipa D; Kaaya, Ephata E; Fyfe, Molly V; Lyamuya, Eligius F; Kakoko, Deodatus C; Kayombo, Edmund J; Kisenge, Rodrick R; Loeser, Helen; Mwakigonja, Amos R; Outwater, Anne H; Martin-Holland, Judy; Mwambete, Kennedy D; Kida, Irene; Macfarlane, Sarah B

    2012-01-01

    Tanzania requires more health professionals equipped to tackle its serious health challenges. When it became an independent university in 2007, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS) decided to transform its educational offerings to ensure its students practice competently and contribute to improving population health. In 2008, in collaboration with the University of California San Francisco (UCSF), all MUHAS's schools (dentistry, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, and public health and social sciences) and institutes (traditional medicine and allied health sciences) began a university-wide process to revise curricula. Adopting university-wide committee structures, procedures, and a common schedule, MUHAS faculty set out to: (i) identify specific competencies for students to achieve by graduation (in eight domains, six that are inter-professional, hence consistent across schools); (ii) engage stakeholders to understand adequacies and inadequacies of current curricula; and (iii) restructure and revise curricula introducing competencies. The Tanzania Commission for Universities accredited the curricula in September 2011, and faculty started implementation with first-year students in October 2011. We learned that curricular revision of this magnitude requires: a compelling directive for change, designated leadership, resource mobilization inclusion of all stakeholders, clear guiding principles, an iterative plan linking flexible timetables to phases for curriculum development, engagement in skills training for the cultivation of future leaders, and extensive communication.

  3. Health promotion overview: evidence-based strategies for occupational health nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrowski, Jill J; Snelling, Anastasia M; Kalicki, Michelle

    2014-08-01

    Health promotion practice has evolved over the past four decades in response to the rising rates of chronic disease. The focus of health promotion is attaining wellness by managing modifiable risk factors, such as smoking, diet, or physical activity. Occupational health nurses are often asked to conduct worksite health promotion programs for individuals or groups, yet may be unfamiliar with evidence-based strategies. Occupational health nurses should lead interprofessional groups in designing and implementing worksite health promotion programs. This article introduces occupational health nurses to health promotion concepts and discusses evidence-based theories and planning models that can be easily introduced into practice.

  4. Conducting Organizational-level occupational health interventions: What works?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karina; Randall, Raymond; Holten, Ann-Louise

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in how organizational-level occupational health interventions aimed at improving psychosocial working conditions and employee health and well-being may be planned, implemented and evaluated. It has been claimed that such interventions have...... the alteration of the way in which work is designed, organized and managed. The methods identified are the Risk Management approach and the Management Standards from Great Britain, the German Health Circles approach, Work Positive from Ireland and Prevenlab from Spain. Comparative analyses reveal...... their appropriateness in conducting organizationallevel occupational health interventions. Finally, we discuss where we still need more research to determine the working ingredients of organizational-level occupational health interventions....

  5. Mental health evidence in the American Journal of Occupational Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, Mariana; Jaffe, Lynn; Gibson, Robert W

    2010-01-01

    We reviewed the mental health articles published in the American Journal of Occupational Therapy (AJOT) from 2008 through 2009 in light of meeting the Centennial Vision charge of supporting practice through evidence. Seven articles that addressed mental health practice were published in AJOT over these years. Review of the articles found that only two addressed effectiveness of occupational therapy intervention; one was rated as Level II evidence, and the other was rated as Level V evidence. Two articles addressed instrument development and testing. Three articles were basic research studies that expanded consideration about the needs of people with mental health conditions. Scholars and clinicians have begun to embrace the charge of the Centennial Vision to support practice with evidence and continue to embrace mental health practice but have a distance to travel. We hope that in the coming years, the profession will see more evidence published in AJOT supporting mental health as practiced by occupational therapists.

  6. Differences between African-American and Caucasian students on enrollment influences and barriers in kinesiology-based allied health education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfield, J P; Cobler, D C; Lam, Eddie T C; Zhang, James; Chitiyo, George

    2012-06-01

    Kinesiology departments have recently started to offer allied health education programs to attract additional students to teacher education units (9). Although allied health professions offer increased work opportunities, insufficient enrollment and training of minority students in these academic fields contribute to underrepresentation in the workforce (3). To improve workforce diversity, kinesiology departments must understand how enrollment influences and barriers differ by race among prospective students. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify differences in allied health education enrollment influences and enrollment barriers between minority and Caucasian students. Participants (n = 601) consisted of students enrolled in kinesiology-based allied health education programs. Multivariate ANOVA was used to compare group differences in enrollment decision making. "Personal influence," "career opportunity," and "physical self-efficacy" were all significantly stronger enrollment influences among African-American students than among Caucasian students, and "social influence," "experiential opportunity," "academic preparation," and "physical self-efficacy" were all perceived as significantly greater barriers compared with Caucasian students. Findings support the need to recruit African-American students through sport and physical education settings and to market program-based experiential opportunities.

  7. Cost Effective Analysis of New Markets: First Steps of Enrollment Management for Nursing and Allied Health Programs. AIR 1997 Annual Forum Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Thomas J.; Nordone, Ronald; Donovan, Joseph W.; Thygeson, William

    This paper describes the initial analyses needed to help institutions of higher education plan majors in nursing and allied health as institutions look for new markets based on demographic and employment factors. Twelve variables were identified and weighted to describe an ideal recruitment market. Using a three-phase process, potential U.S.…

  8. A Commentary on the Social Responsibility of Occupational Therapy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellariou, Dikaios; Pollard, Nick

    2013-01-01

    As one of the allied health professions, occupational therapy has adopted a primarily clinical focus on human occupation (or the process of daily life) and this is reflected in education, which has until recently tended to overlook contextual social factors such as poverty, marginalisation, exclusion, unemployment, incarceration and immigration.…

  9. Optimizing referral of patients with neuromuscular disorders to allied health care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterse, A.J.; Cup, E.H.C.; Akkermans, R.P.; Hendricks, H.T.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Wilt, G.J. van der; Oostendorp, R.A.B.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To report the predictive validity of the perceived limitations in activities and need questionnaire (PLAN-Q), a screening instrument to support neurologists to select patients with neuromuscular disorders (NMD) for referral for a one-off consultation by occupational therapist

  10. Occupational health and safety in the mining industry in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laraqui, C H; Caubet, A; Harourate, K; Laraqui, O; Verger, C

    1999-01-01

    The mining sector is one of the pillars of our national economy. Our paper concerns safety and occupational health in the mining sector in Morocco. This sector employs 60,000 persons, more than half of them working in the phosphate sectors. There are 36 occupational medical services, with 83 practitioners 395 nurses and 91 agents, protecting 43,926 workers (73% of all personnel). The task of labour inspection in this sector is entrusted to mining engineers. The statistics of the central department of industrial inspection in mines from 1975 to 1995 show a fall in occupational injuries and a progressive increase reported in occupational diseases, 96% of which are silicosis. The improvement of prevention and health at work in the mining sector in Morocco has led to a reduction in occupational hazards and specially occupational injuries. However, an effort seems required so as to generalize occupational medical and safety services in all the mining enterprises and in the craft mining sector in particular.

  11. Measuring compliance of conducting an occupational health risk assessment in the occupational health nurse’s practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolene de Jager

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Occupational health nurses (OHNs are qualified registered nurses with a postgraduate qualification in occupational health nursing. An important activity of OHNs is to identify and assess health risks in the workplace. Health risk assessments (HRAs are conducted by OHNs to determine all the occupational health stressors, for example noise, vibration and chemical substances. The authors conducted legal compliance occupational health audits and observed that 85% (n = 23 of OHNs in different settings conduct HRAs only to a limited extent. The following objective was formulated for the study: To explore and describe the extent to which OHNs conduct HRAs as it is a legal requirement for compliance; and the possible reasons for not adhering to the regulation and conduct them only to a limited extent. A quantitative, descriptive design was used in this study. A sampling frame was developed from a list of all the members of the South African Society of Occupational Health Nursing Practitioners (SASOHN in Gauteng. From the target population of OHNs in Gauteng, a systematic cluster sampling method was used. A self-developed questionnaire was distributed by mail and e-mail, and authors sent respondents reminders. The authors ensured that validity, reliability and ethical standards were adhered to. The findings revealed that OHNs are mature, experienced, predominately female practitioners who operate on behalf of a disproportionately large number of workers. Four factors influencing these nurses in conducting an HRA to a limited extent were identified: competence, ignorance about the role of the OHN, workload and attitude.

  12. Current issues in occupational health nursing. A Canadian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, C

    1991-07-01

    The National Association of Occupational Health Nurses is still in its infancy and is striving to become an interest group under the umbrella of the Canadian Nurses Association. This will bring together the provincial associations in a common goal of promoting worker health and safety. The diversity of the country and the sheer magnitude of the various occupations of Canadians reflect the need for the occupational health nurse to be well educated and kept abreast of new developments. Changes in the worksite echo changes in health and safety legislation that will help to improve conditions in the workplace. Future challenges arise from changes in the work force and the nature of work and include: ergonomic issues, job stress, older workers, EAPs, and increased competition.

  13. Occupational therapy in mental health: A review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    This review of the literature was conducted as part of the development of a position paper on the way ahead for research, education and practice in occupational therapy in mental health. It included publications over the past decade and concentrated on the British Journal of Occupational Therapy. Recognising experience from other countries would be beneficial, aspects of the literature from the National Journals in American, Canada and Australia which were most relevant to practice in the U...

  14. Epistemic reflections on Occupational Therapy in Mental Health

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Occupational therapy, along with other professions, is provoked to think its performance in the area of mental health in light of the new perspectives of assistance to people with mental distress. Considering the psychiatric reform as a backdrop, the aim of this paper is to discuss the theoretical conceptions that supported the interventions of occupational therapy in this field, and the new demands presented to professionals.To this end, a study of narrative review, whose search ...

  15. Promoting Resilience in Schools: A View from Occupational Health Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers teacher resilience from the viewpoint of a discipline concerned with the interactions between work design, management style and employee health and well-being: occupational health psychology. It will be suggested that there are strong parallels between interventions designed to promote resilience and those designed to reduce…

  16. Units of Instruction. Health Occupations Education. Volume I. [Teacher's Guide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    East Texas State Univ., Commerce. Occupational Curriculum Lab.

    Ten units on health occupations are presented in this teacher's guide. The units are the following: recording vital signs; job application and interview; grooming and personal hygiene; health careers; medical careers; medical ethics; medical terminology and abbreviations; medical asepsis; basic patient care (e.g., measuring and recording fluid…

  17. Occupational exposure to pesticides and respiratory health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mamane

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to review the available literature regarding the link between occupational exposure to pesticides and respiratory symptoms or diseases. Identification of epidemiological studies was performed using PubMed. 41 articles were included, 36 regarding agricultural workers and five regarding industry workers. Among the 15 cross-sectional studies focusing on respiratory symptoms and agricultural pesticide exposure, 12 found significant associations with chronic cough, wheeze, dyspnoea, breathlessness or chest tightness. All four studies on asthma found a relationship with occupational exposure, as did all three studies on chronic bronchitis. The four studies that performed spirometry reported impaired respiratory function linked to pesticide exposure, suggestive of either obstructive or restrictive syndrome according to the chemical class of pesticide. 12 papers reported results from cohort studies. Three out of nine found a significant relationship with increased risk of wheeze, five out of nine with asthma and three out of three with chronic bronchitis. In workers employed in pesticide production, elevated risks of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (two studies out of three and impaired respiratory function suggestive of an obstructive syndrome (two studies out of two were reported. In conclusion, this article suggests that occupational exposure to pesticides is associated with an increased risk of respiratory symptoms, asthma and chronic bronchitis, but the causal relationship is still under debate.

  18. Occupational exposure to pesticides and respiratory health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamane, Ali; Baldi, Isabelle; Tessier, Jean-François; Raherison, Chantal; Bouvier, Ghislaine

    2015-06-01

    This article aims to review the available literature regarding the link between occupational exposure to pesticides and respiratory symptoms or diseases. Identification of epidemiological studies was performed using PubMed. 41 articles were included, 36 regarding agricultural workers and five regarding industry workers. Among the 15 cross-sectional studies focusing on respiratory symptoms and agricultural pesticide exposure, 12 found significant associations with chronic cough, wheeze, dyspnoea, breathlessness or chest tightness. All four studies on asthma found a relationship with occupational exposure, as did all three studies on chronic bronchitis. The four studies that performed spirometry reported impaired respiratory function linked to pesticide exposure, suggestive of either obstructive or restrictive syndrome according to the chemical class of pesticide. 12 papers reported results from cohort studies. Three out of nine found a significant relationship with increased risk of wheeze, five out of nine with asthma and three out of three with chronic bronchitis. In workers employed in pesticide production, elevated risks of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (two studies out of three) and impaired respiratory function suggestive of an obstructive syndrome (two studies out of two) were reported. In conclusion, this article suggests that occupational exposure to pesticides is associated with an increased risk of respiratory symptoms, asthma and chronic bronchitis, but the causal relationship is still under debate.

  19. 76 FR 60535 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-29

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Reopening of the record and extension of... submitting nominations for membership on the Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and...

  20. Petroleum Refining, Industrial Chemical, Drug, and Paper and Allied Products Industries. Reprinted from the Occupational Outlook Handbook, 1978-79 Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Labor Statistics (DOL), Washington, DC.

    Focusing on occupations in refining and industrial chemical, drug, and paper manufacturing industries, this document is one in a series of forty-one reprints from the Occupational Outlook Handbook providing current information and employment projections for individual occupations and industries through 1985. The specific occupations covered in…

  1. A thematic analysis of the role of the organisation in building allied health research capacity: a senior managers’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golenko Xanthe

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence-based practice aims to achieve better health outcomes in the community. It relies on high quality research to inform policy and practice; however research in primary health care continues to lag behind that of other medical professions. The literature suggests that research capacity building (RCB functions across four levels; individual, team, organisation and external environment. Many RCB interventions are aimed at an individual or team level, yet evidence indicates that many barriers to RCB occur at an organisational or external environment level. This study asks senior managers from a large healthcare organisation to identify the barriers and enablers to RCB. The paper then describes strategies for building allied health (AH research capacity at an organisational level from a senior managers’ perspective. Methods This qualitative study is part of a larger collaborative RCB project. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with nine allied health senior managers. Recorded interviews were transcribed and NVivo was used to analyse findings and emergent themes were defined. Results The dominant themes indicate that the organisation plays an integral role in building AH research capacity and is the critical link in creating synergy across the four levels of RCB. The organisation can achieve this by incorporating research into its core business with a whole of organisation approach including its mission, vision and strategic planning. Critical success factors include: developing a co-ordinated and multidisciplinary approach to attain critical mass of research-active AH and enhance learning and development; support from senior managers demonstrated through structures, processes and systems designed to facilitate research; forming partnerships to increase collaboration and sharing of resources and knowledge; and establishing in internal framework to promote recognition for research and career path

  2. Promoting Occupational Safety and Health for Cambodian Entertainment Sector Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Lee-Nah; Howard, Richard; Torriente, Anna Maria; Por, Chuong

    2016-08-01

    Cambodia has developed booming textile, garment, tourism, and entertainment service industries since the mid-1990s. The 2007 global financial crisis pushed many garment workers, who lost their jobs, into the entertainment sector. Entertainment workers are typically engaged informally by their employers and are subjected to long working hours, sexual harassment, and violence. Many who sell beverages are forced into excessive alcohol consumption as part of their work. Many are also expected by their employers and clients to provide sexual services. To address unsafe and unhealthy working conditions for these workers, an innovative occupational safety and health regulation was adopted in 2014. This first-of-its-kind occupational safety and health regulation was developed jointly by the Cambodian Ministry of Labour and Vocational Training and employers' and workers' organizations in the entertainment sector. The implementation of this regulation can also be a viable contribution of occupational safety and health to HIV interventions for these workers.

  3. Integrated occupational safety and health management solutions and industrial cases

    CERN Document Server

    Häkkinen, Kari; Niskanen, Toivo

    2015-01-01

    Maximizing reader insights into a new movement toward leadership approaches that are collaborated and shared,  and which views Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) and performance excellence within the wider examination of leadership relationships and practices, this book argues that these relationships and processes are so central to the establishment of OSH functioning that studying them warrants a broad, cross-disciplinary, multiple method analysis. Exploring the complexity of leadership by the impact that contexts (e.g., national and organizational culture) may have on leaders, this book discusses the related literature, then moves forward to show how a more comprehensive practical approach to Occupational Safety and Health and performance excellence can function on levels pertaining to events, individuals, groups, and organizations. This book proposes that greater clarity in understanding leadership in Occupational Safety and Health and performance excellence can be developed from addressing two fundame...

  4. Occupational safety and health education and training for underserved populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Tom; Flynn, Michael; Weinstock, Deborah; Zanoni, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the essential elements of effective occupational safety and health education and training programs targeting underserved communities. While not an exhaustive review of the literature on occupational safety and health training, the paper provides a guide for practitioners and researchers to the key factors they should consider in the design and implementation of training programs for underserved communities. It also addresses issues of evaluation of such programs, with specific emphasis on considerations for programs involving low-literacy and limited-English-speaking workers.

  5. A success of a genetics educational intervention for nursing and dietetic students: A model for incorporating genetics into nursing and allied health curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cragun, Deborah L; Couch, Sarah C; Prows, Cynthia A; Warren, Nancy S; Christianson, Carol A

    2005-01-01

    Allied health care professionals and nurses provide genetic-related client services, such as eliciting family medical history information and discussing the genetic component of health conditions. However, these professionals report a lack of confidence in their ability to perform genetic services and have little formal education in genetics. A barrier to incorporating genetics into allied health curricula includes the limited flexibility to expand curricula. This barrier was addressed by incorporating a Web-based tutorial on basic genetics and a lecture on the genetics of diabetes into preexisting undergraduate nutrition courses for nursing and dietetic students. The vast majority of students enrolled in these required courses participated in the intervention. Most participants agreed that genetics is important to their future career. Following the intervention, students' knowledge of genetics and confidence in their ability to provide genetic-related services increased significantly. Despite the short-term success and positive student evaluations, a single educational intervention does not appear to be sufficient for students to become proficient in performing the recommended genetic competencies for all health care professionals. Recommendations and resources for incorporating genetics into allied health curricula are included.

  6. Enhancing teamwork among allied health students: evaluation of an interprofessional workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodger, Sylvia; Mickan, Sharon; Marinac, Julie; Woodyatt, Gail

    2005-01-01

    This report outlines the teamwork learning outcomes of an interprofessional workshop conducted with a cohort of 81 graduate-entry students of occupational therapy, physiotherapy, speech pathology, and audiology. This four-hour workshop was based around a case scenario of a child with developmental coordination disorder. This report describes and evaluates the development of knowledge and skills of teamwork that were facilitated through this workshop. Students completed questionnaires before and after the workshop about their knowledge of teamwork, requisites for working together, the utility of the workshop, and learning outcomes. The evaluation indicated that the workshop was successful from the students' perspectives in confirming the importance of teamwork and the processes of communication and collaborative goal setting. Students refined their own professional roles and developed an appreciation of the contribution of other professions and parents. This recognition of the comparative value of different professional contributions in providing holistic patient care is one of the starting points for education about interprofessional teamwork.

  7. 29 CFR 1960.80 - Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and health programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and... EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Evaluation of Federal Occupational Safety and Health Programs § 1960.80 Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and...

  8. Occupational health and health care in Russia and Russian Arctic: 1980–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey A. Dudarev

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is a paradox in Russia and its Arctic regions which reports extremely low rates of occupational diseases (ODs, far below those of other socially and economically advanced circumpolar countries. Yet, there is widespread disregard for occupational health regulations and neglect of basic occupational health services across many industrial enterprises. Study design and methods. This review article presents official statistics and summarises the results of a search of peer-reviewed scientific literature published in Russia on ODs and occupational health care in Russia and the Russian Arctic, within the period 1980–2010. Results. Worsening of the economic situation, layoff of workers, threat of unemployment and increased work load happened during the “wild market” industrial restructuring in 1990–2000, when the health and safety of workers were of little concern. Russian employers are not legally held accountable for neglecting safety rules and for underreporting of ODs. Almost 80% of all Russian industrial enterprises are considered dangerous or hazardous for health. Hygienic control of working conditions was minimised or excluded in the majority of enterprises, and the health status of workers remains largely unknown. There is direct evidence of general degradation of the occupational health care system in Russia. The real levels of ODs in Russia are estimated to be at least 10–100 times higher than reported by official statistics. The low official rates are the result of deliberate hiding of ODs, lack of coverage of working personnel by properly conducted medical examinations, incompetent management and the poor quality of staff, facilities and equipment. Conclusions. Reform of the Russian occupational health care system is urgently needed, including the passing of strong occupational health legislation and their enforcement, the maintenance of credible health monitoring and effective health services for workers

  9. Successfully living with chronic arthritis : the role of the allied health professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taal, E.; Bobiatynska, E.; Lloyd, J.; Veehof, M.M.; Rasker, W.J.; Oosterveld, F.G.J.; Rasker, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    The treatment and care of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is complex and various health professionals with different areas of expertise may be involved. The objective of this article is to review the treatments and their efficacy as provided by health care professionals in RA care. The requi

  10. Managing workplace depression: an untapped opportunity for occupational health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Kelly; McKibbin, Laura

    2004-03-01

    Depression is one of the most prevalent and costly health issues affecting the American work force. Despite well established research demonstrating the association between employee depression and reduced on-the-job productivity, increased absenteeism, and higher health care use, most employers remain largely unresponsive to the need for company based depression initiatives. Organizational and individual barriers can prevent companies from effectively managing employee depression. Organizational barriers include information gaps, lack of data to justify increased investment in employee mental health programs, and employers' ambiguous roles in addressing depression. Individual barriers such as an inability to recognize signs and symptoms; stigma; confidentiality and privacy concerns; and unavailability of easily accessible, quality resources can keep employees who are depressed from seeking treatment. Many occupational health professionals may feel ill prepared or uncomfortable taking the lead in creating more aggressive worksite responses to depression, but they are, perhaps, in the best of all possible positions within an organization to succeed. Occupational health professionals have the credentials, credibility, training, and experience necessary to build a strong case for business leaders for why investing in workplace depression programs is so important. Occupational health professionals are the most qualified to design and deliver destigmatized, customer friendly programs and services for employees to access for help with depression, and to integrate their services with other departments such as benefits, health promotion, EAP, and human resources, to create an effective, organization-wide depression initiative.

  11. Leadership and occupational safety and health (OSH): an expert analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsler, D.; Flintrop, J.; Kaluza, S.; Hauke, A.; Starren, A.; Drupsteen, L.; Bell, N.

    2012-01-01

    In EU legislation as well as in scientific literature ever more attention is being paid to the important role of leadership in the improvement of Occupational Safety and Health (OSH). Improving the safety behaviour of employees requires understanding of the good leadership practices that can help pr

  12. Health Occupations Education Program Development Guide No. 5: Dental Assisting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Div. of Occupational Education Instruction.

    The bulletin, which is part of the New York State "Health Occupations Education Program Development Guide Series," focuses on the dental assisting program. The curriculum is designed to provide training for dental assistants in their assistant role at chairside, in the dental operatory and laboratory, and in the dental office and reception area. A…

  13. Occupational safety and health issues associated with green building

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terwoert, J.; Ustailieva, E.

    2013-01-01

    This e-fact provides information on the work-related risk factors and the occupational safety and health (OSH) issues associated the planning and construction of green buildings, their maintenance, renovation (retrofitting), demolition, on-site waste collection. Some of these OSH risks are new compa

  14. [Evaluating occupational health risk in titanium alloys production workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazarova, E L

    2007-01-01

    The authors present data on evaluation of personified and non-personified occupational risk of health disorders in titanium alloys production workers, concerning hygienic, medical and biologic, social and psychologic criteria. One-digit assessment of the work conditions is suggested.

  15. 77 FR 22358 - Occupational Safety and Health Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Occupational Safety and Health Administration Preparations for the 23rd Session of the UN Sub-Committee of... Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: OSHA invites interested parties...

  16. 78 FR 11651 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (BSC, NIOSH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (BSC, NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a) (2) of the... demonstrations relating to occupational safety and health and to mine health. The Board of Scientific Counselors shall provide guidance to the Director, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health...

  17. Frequency of occupational injuries and the health status of workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Jovica M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Occupational injuries are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among workers. The aim of this study was to analyze the frequency of occupational injuries and health status of workers. Material and methods The examined group consisted of 3.750 workers with health disorders. The control group included 1.800 healthy workers. Both groups were similar in terms of many factors that could contribute to the occurrence of occupational injuries. The injury rates were calculated in both groups. Results Workers with psychomotor and sensorimotor disorders, neuroses, obstructive sleep apnea, arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hearing, vascular and sight impairments have been frequently injured compared to workers with other diseases. Discussion Due to the belief that accidents and occupational injuries are preventable, it is an imperative to study those factors which are likely to contribute to occurrence of accidents. The contributing factors could be the physical and mental state of workers. Conclusion Occupational injuries are significantly more common in the examined group than in controls.

  18. Health and quality of life vs. occupational activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Kowalska

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The level of quality of life and health status of the population largely depends on the determinants related to occupational activity. The results of reviewed bibliography indicate a significant and growing importance of employment conditions on the quality of life and population health status in most countries of the world, especially in those with market economy. Of the evaluated determinants the following factors should be listed in particular: sources and the amount of income, stability of the income and employment, the nature of work and the degree of job satisfaction, as well as autonomy and career prospects. Moreover, they proved that the situation of persisting and long-term unemployment and precarious employment leads to a significant deterioration in the quality of life and health, especially among young people. In conclusion, the study of quality of life and population health status should take into consideration factors related to occupational activity. Med Pr 2016;67(5:663–671

  19. Clinical trials in allied medical fields: A cross-sectional analysis of World Health Organization International Clinical Trial Registry Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kannan

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: The number of clinical trials done in allied fields of medicine other than the allopathic system has lowered down, and furthermore focus is required regarding the methodological quality of these trials and more support from various organizations.

  20. Use of Shadowing-Based Learning in an Allied Health Microbiology Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex A. Lowrey

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Students in an undergraduate microbiology course for health professions majors perform a shadowing-based learning exercise for their course project. Students accomplish this by shadowing a health care professional of their choice, specifically incorporating basic microbiological concept themes into their observations. These concept themes include the biological nature, health effects, detection, and control of microorganisms. Upon completion of the shadowing experience, students present a concise report, which is graded on how well the students connect course scientific concepts with actual clinical practice.

  1. Directory of Postsecondary Schools with Occupational Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Evelyn R.

    This directory of schools which provide occupational training lists public and private schools which offer programs in preparation for a specific career. The types of listings include schools classified as vocational/technical, business/commercial, cosmetology/barber, flight, arts/design, hospital, and allied health; technical institutes,…

  2. Occupational health problems among migrant and seasonal farm workers.

    OpenAIRE

    Mobed, K; Gold, E B; Schenker, M B

    1992-01-01

    Migrant and seasonal farm workers are one of the most underserved and understudied populations in the United States. The total US population of such farm workers has been estimated at 5 million, of whom about 20% live or work in California. Farm workers perform strenuous tasks and are exposed to a wide variety of occupational risks and hazards. Low socioeconomic status and poor access to health care also contribute to existing health problems in this population. Potential farm work-related he...

  3. Cost-benefit analysis in occupational health: A comparison of intervention scenarios for occupational asthma and rhinitis among bakery workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijster, T.; Duuren-Stuurman, B. van; Heederik, D.; Houba, R.; Koningsveld, E.; Warren, N.; Tielemans, E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Use of cost-benefit analysis in occupational health increases insight into the intervention strategy that maximises the cost-benefit ratio. This study presents a methodological framework identifying the most important elements of a cost-benefit analysis for occupational health settings.

  4. Student perceptions and learning outcomes of blended learning in a massive first-year core physiology for allied health subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Janelle; Meehan-Andrews, Terri; Weerakkody, Nivan; Hughes, Diane L; Rathner, Joseph A

    2017-03-01

    Evidence shows that factors contributing to success in physiology education for allied health students at universities include not only their high school achievement and background but also factors such as confidence with their teachers and quality of their learning experience, justifying intensive and continued survey of students' perceptions of their learning experience. Here we report data covering a 3-yr period in a physiology subject that has been redesigned for blended and online presentation. Consistent with previous reports, we show that when we undertook a blended mode of delivery, students demonstrated better grades than traditional modes of teaching; however the absence of didactic teaching in this subject resulted in lower grades overall. Students have very strong positive attitudes to weekly quizzes (80% positive approval) but report ambivalent attitudes to online self-directed learning (61% negative perception), even though they had 2-h weekly facilitated workshops. Overwhelmingly, students who undertook the subject in a self-directed online learning mode requested more face-to-face-teaching (70% of comments). From these data, we suggest that there is a quantifiable benefit to didactic teaching in the blended teaching mode that is not reproduced in online self-directed learning, even when face-to-face guided inquiry-based learning is embedded in the subject.

  5. Using a Team Structure for Student-Assisted Facilitation of Laboratories in an Introductory Allied Health Microbiology Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Jesse Sanchez

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available As many instructors have noted, it is challenging to lead a successful microbiology laboratory, especially for students without sufficient prerequisite training such as in pre-allied health/nursing classes. In the community college setting, this is compounded by the lack of adequate resources, especially teaching assistants or others, to help individual students during a laboratory experience. In addition, there is much transition in the student population of the college so asking students who have completed a class to help in this setting is often impractical. To modify our system to allow students to more easily ask questions and get feedback, we designed a student facilitator system. This system allowed each student to be a leader of the team for a particular laboratory experience. Each student was individually trained to be supportive of the team as a whole. This program is useful in that it can be applied to any class-based laboratory setting to provide better student team interactions than if there were no facilitator.

  6. Risky business: Lived experience mental health practice, nurses as potential allies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Louise; Happell, Brenda; Reid-Searl, Kerry

    2016-09-21

    Mental health policy includes a clear expectation that consumers will participate in all aspects of the design and delivery of mental health services. This edict has led to employment roles for people with lived experience of significant mental health challenges and service use. Despite the proliferation of these roles, research into factors impacting their success or otherwise is limited. This paper presents findings from a grounded theory study investigating the experiences of Lived Experience Practitioners in the context of their employment. In-depth interviews were conducted with 13 Lived Experience Practitioners. Risk was identified as a core category, and included sub-categories: vulnerability, 'out and proud', fear to disclose, and self-care. Essentially participants described the unique vulnerabilities of their mental health challenges being known, and while there were many positives about disclosing there was also apprehension about personal information being so publically known. Self-care techniques were important mediators against these identified risks. The success of lived experience roles requires support and nurses can play an important role, given the size of the nursing workforce in mental health, the close relationships nurses enjoy with consumers and the contribution they have made to the development of lived experience roles within academia.

  7. Involvement of practice nurses and allied health professionals in the development and management of care planning processes for patients with chronic disease – A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, KM; Adaji, A; Schattner, PS

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Medicare items were introduced in 2005 to encourage general practitioners (GPs) to involve other healthcare providers in the management of patients with chronic disease. However, there appears to be barriers to converting financial incentives and the use of information technology as a communication tool to better patient outcomes. The aim of this study was to explore these barriers from the perspectives of practice nurses and allied health practitioners.

  8. Occupational safety and health management among five ASEAN countries: Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, and Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buranatrevedh, Surasak

    2015-03-01

    Occupational safety and health is one of important issues for workforce movement among ASEAN countries. The objective was to study laws, main agencies, and law enforcement regarding occupational safety and health in Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, and Singapore. This documentary research covered laws, main agencies' duties, and occupational safety and health law enforcement in Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, and Singapore. Thailand has its Occupational Safety, Health, and Work EnvironmentAct 2011. Its main agency was Department of Labor Protection and Welfare. Indonesia had WorkSafety Act (Law No. 1, 1970). Its main agency was Department of Manpower and Transmigration. Malaysia had Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) 1994. Its main agency is the Department of Occupational Safety and Health. The Philippines has its Occupational Safety and Health Standards. Its main agency was Department ofLabor and Employment. Singapore has its Workplace Safety and Health Act 2006. Its main agency is Occupational Safety and Health Division. Occupational safety and health law enforcement among each county covers work environment surveillance, workers' health surveillance, advice about prevention and control of occupational health hazards, training and education of employers and employees, data systems, and research. Further in-depth surveys of occupational safety and health among each ASEAN county are needed to develop frameworks for occupational safety and health management for all ASEAN countries.

  9. The American Association of Occupational Health Nurses' Respiratory Protection Education Program and Resources Webkit for Occupational Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompeii, Lisa; Byrd, Annette; Delclos, George L; Conway, Sadie H

    2016-12-01

    Organizations are required to adhere to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Respiratory Protection Standard (29 CFR 1910.134) if they have workers that wear a respirator on the job. They must also have an employee "suitably trained" to administer their program. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and its National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory have worked to champion the occupational health nurse in this role by collaborating with the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses to develop free, online respiratory protection training and resources (RPP Webkit). This article describes the development, content, and success of this training. To date, 724 participants have completed the training, 32.6% of whom lead their organization's respiratory protection program, 15.3% who indicated they will lead a program in the near future, and 52% who did not lead a program, but indicated that the training was relevant to their work. The majority "strongly agreed" the training was applicable to their work and it enhanced their professional expertise.

  10. Development and early experience from an intervention to facilitate teamwork between general practices and allied health providers: the Team-link study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zwar Nick

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper describes the development and implementation of an intervention to facilitate teamwork between general practice and outside allied and community health services and providers. Methods A review of organizational theory and a qualitative study of 9 practices was used to design an intervention which was applied in four Divisions of General Practice and 26 urban practices. Clinical record review and qualitative interviews with participants were used to determine the key lessons from its implementation. Results Facilitating teamwork across organizational boundaries was very challenging. The quality of the relationship between professionals was of key importance. This was enabled by joint education and direct communication between providers. Practice nurses were key links between general practices and allied and community health services. Conclusions Current arrangements for Team Care planning provide increased opportunities for access to allied health. However the current paper based system is insufficient to build relationships or effectively share roles as part of a patient care team. Facilitation is feasible but constrained by barriers to communication and trust.

  11. [Need for occupational and environmental allergology in occupational health - the 45th Japanese society of Occupational and Environmental Allergy Annual Meeting 2014 in Fukuoka].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishikawa, Reiko; Oshikawa, Chie

    2014-12-01

    The 45th Japanese Society of Occupational and Environmental Allergy (OEA) Annual Meeting 2014 was held in Fukuoka city in conjunction with a technical course for occupational health physicians to learn occupational and environmental diseases more deeply. Allergic reaction due to low concentrations of chemical and biological materials is important in toxicological diseases due to highly concentrated chemical materials in the field of occupational and environmental medicine. In this paper we describe the activities of the OEA, which was established in 1970 and has completely cured patients with severe occupational asthma, such as the regional Konjac asthma in Gunma prefecture and Sea Squirt asthma in Hiroshima prefecture. Regard for the occupational environment will prevent the onset and/or exacerbation of allergic occupational disease in individual employees with allergy. Occupational cancer of the bile duct and asbestosis are also current, serious issues that should be resolved as soon as possible. It is desirable for the occupational health physician to have a large stock of knowledge about toxicological and allergic diseases in various occupational settings to maintain the health and safety of workers.

  12. Occupational Blood Exposure among Health Care Personnel and Hospital Trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Hajjaji Darouiche

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood and body fluid Exposure is a major occupational safety problems for health care workers. Therefore, we conducted a descriptive and retrospective study to identify the characteristics of blood exposure accidents in health care settings which lasted five years (2005-2009 at the two university hospitals of Sfax. We have 593 blood exposure accidents in health care settings 152 (25.6% health personnel and 441 (74.4% trainees' doctors, nurses and health technicians. The mechanism of blood and body fluid exposure was accidental needle-stick injury in 78.9% of health staff, and 81% of trainees, accidental cut in 14.7% of health workers and 10.2% of trainees. The increasing severity of blood exposure accidents is linked to the lack of safe behavior against this risk.

  13. Occupational blood exposure among health care personnel and hospital trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjaji Darouiche, M; Chaabouni, T; Jmal Hammami, K; Messadi Akrout, F; Abdennadher, M; Hammami, A; Karray, H; Masmoudi, M L

    2014-01-01

    Blood and body fluid Exposure is a major occupational safety problems for health care workers. Therefor We conducted a descriptive and retrospective study to identify the characteristics of blood exposure accidents in health care settings which lasted five years (2005-2009) at the two university hospitals of Sfax. We have 593 blood exposure accidents in health care settings 152 (25.6%) health personnel and 441 (74.4%) trainees' doctors, nurses and health technicians. The mechanism of blood and body fluid exposure was accidental needle-stick injury in 78.9% of health staff, and 81% of trainees, accidental cut in 14.7% of health workers and 10.2% of trainees. The increasing severity of blood exposure accidents is linked to the lack of safe behavior against this risk.

  14. Deployment-related mental health support: comparative analysis of NATO and allied ISAF partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Vermetten

    2014-08-01

    members. Conclusion: This analysis demonstrated that in all five partners state-of-the-art preventative mental healthcare was included in the last deployment in Afghanistan, including a positive approach towards strengthening the mental resilience, a focus on self-regulatory skills and self-empowerment, and several initiatives that were well-integrated in a military context. These initiatives were partly/completely implemented by the military/colleagues/supervisors and applicable during several phases of the deployment cycle. Important new developments in operational mental health support are recognition of the role of social leadership and enhancement of operational peer support. This requires awareness of mental problems that will contribute to reduction of the barriers to care in case of problems. Finally, comparing mental health support services across countries can contribute to optimal preparation for the challenges of military deployment.

  15. An investigation of academic dishonesty in allied health: incidence and definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falleur, D

    1990-01-01

    Educators in the health sciences are concerned about academic dishonesty and are searching for methods to control misconduct. If students falsify academic work, their behavior pattern may continue in professional practice, endangering the health and well-being of the patients in their care. This paper presents the results of a study of the attitudes and experiences regarding dishonest academic behaviors of a sample of 244 students and 31 faculty in the School of Health Professions at Southwest Texas State University. Student and faculty definitions of dishonest behavior were compared, and the incidence of dishonest behavior and the experiences of faculty in recognizing and disciplining students for academic misconduct were analyzed. Major findings included: 1) faculty, undergraduate, and graduate students differ in their definitions of some types of dishonest behavior; and 2) the most common types of dishonest behavior identified by faculty and students involve cheating and plagiarism. Future research is warranted with attention given to the causal factors leading to academic dishonesty and patterns of dishonesty in academic and practice settings.

  16. 29 CFR 1960.19 - Other Federal agency standards affecting occupational safety and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... safety and health. 1960.19 Section 1960.19 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Standards § 1960.19 Other Federal agency standards affecting occupational safety and health. (a) Where employees of different...

  17. 77 FR 75600 - Policy Statement on Occupational Safety and Health Standards for Aircraft Cabin Crewmembers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Standards for Aircraft Cabin Crewmembers; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY... regarding the regulation of some occupational safety and health conditions affecting cabin crewmembers on aircraft by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. The comment period is scheduled to close...

  18. A Survey of Occupational Safety & Health Libraries in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Karen S.

    There is very little published information available about occupational safety and health libraries. This study identified, described, and compared the occupational safety and health libraries in the United States. The questionnaire first filtered out those libraries that did not fit the definition of an occupational safety and health library;…

  19. 77 FR 39743 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-05

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2012-16468] DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Occupational Safety and Health Administration [Docket No. OSHA-2012-0022] Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Request for nominations to serve on...

  20. 29 CFR 1902.6 - Consultation with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Safety and Health. 1902.6 Section 1902.6 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... Occupational Safety and Health. The Assistant Secretary will consult, as appropriate, with the Director of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health with regard to plans submitted by the States...

  1. Core competencies for UK occupational health nurses: a Delphi study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demou, E.; Kiran, S.; Gaffney, M.; Stevenson, M.; Macdonald, E. B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Occupational health nurses (OHNs) play a pivotal role in the delivery of occupational health (OH) services. Specific competency guidance has been developed in a number of countries, including the UK. While it is acknowledged that UK OHN practice has evolved in recent years, there has been no formal research to capture these developments to ensure that training and curricula remain up-to-date and reflect current practice. Aims To identify current priorities among UK OHNs of the competencies required for OH practice. Methods A modified Delphi study undertaken among representative OHN networks in the UK. This formed part of a larger study including UK and international occupational physicians. The study was conducted in two rounds using a questionnaire based on available guidance on training competencies for OH practice, the published literature, expert panel reviews and conference discussions. Results Consensus among OHNs was high with 7 out of the 12 domains scoring 100% in rating. ‘Good clinical care’ was the principal domain ranked most important, followed by ‘general principles of assessment & management of occupational hazards to health’. ‘Research methods’ and ‘teaching & educational supervision’ were considered least important. Conclusions This study has established UK OHNs’ current priorities on the competencies required for OH practice. The timing of this paper is opportune with the formal launch of the Faculty of Occupational Health Nursing planned in 2018 and should inform the development of competency requirements as part of the Faculty’s goals for standard setting in OHN education and training. PMID:27492470

  2. Successful business process design. Business plan development for the occupational health services unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalina, C M; Fitko, J

    1997-02-01

    1. The occupational health nurse is often mandated by management to validate health services offered and programs developed for employees as valuable to the business and company mission. 2. The business plan of the occupational health service is a working document, changing as needs of the client/customer and internal and external business and socio-economic environment evolve. 3. Alignment with and support of the company mission, goals, and objectives is another method of proving good occupational health is good business. 4. Business planning is a basic business tool the wise and prudent occupational health nurse can use in proving good occupational health is vital to the success of a company.

  3. Engaging Allied-Health Students with Virtual Learning Environment Using Course Management System Tutorial Site

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Nguyen; Mangala Tawde

    2013-01-01

    Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II are major gateway courses into nursing and other health related sciences careers.  Being a New York City community college, the students at Queensborough Community College are highly diverse not only in their ethnic and cultural background, but also in the levels of preparedness. When they take Human Anatomy-Physiology I as the first pre-requisite class, many are either freshman or returning students after a hiatus. Many students lack formal training in S...

  4. Exploring the need for an occupational health service for those working in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, R; Miller, D; Tweed, P; Campbell, I

    1997-11-01

    A research nurse interviewed 55 practice staff in 11 general practices to ascertain their views about their needs for occupational health care. In a second parallel study, a specialist in occupational medicine undertook an in-depth audit of occupational health provision in five other general practices with respect to the organization, the health and safety process, the services and the working environment. In the first study, the majority of practice staff reported the need for various aspects of occupational health care, particularly stress at work. In the second study, general practitioners and practice managers possessed a basic awareness of occupational health matters such as Health and Safety legislation, but their limited knowledge was not translated into effective management. General practice staff did not know where to obtain occupational health advice; most practices had no policies or procedures in place to manage health and safety. Both studies illustrate the need for expert occupational health advice in primary care.

  5. Precautions used by occupational health nursing students during clinical placements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.M.M. Maja

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Protection of health care workers including students from being infected when caring for high risk patients is a major cause for concern to all promoting occupational health. Safety of every employee is mandatory. Furthermore, universal guidelines for precautions must be used by all interacting with high risk patients and clients to protect themselves and prevent the spread of infection. The aim of this paper was to ascertain the availability of universal guidelines for precautions against the spread of infection in clinical settings and determine the precautions used by OHN students during their clinical placements. To realise these objectives, a quantitative and descriptive design was followed. A purposive sampling method was used to select 45 Occupational health nursing students who participated in the study.Data was collected with the use of a structured questionnaire and the results revealed that: most units where OHN students were placed for clinical experience had guidelines for universal precautions although these were not always accessible to them; regarding compliance to universal precautions, OHN students were reportedly aware of the hazards of failure to comply although in some emergencies and where personal protective material was not available, they had to provide care without using protective equipments. Recommendations made include that employers and staff at all occupational settings must ensure that updated guidelines for universal precautions are available and accessible to every body interacting with high risk patients; health care providers and students must be fully informed about and should always adhere to universal precautions.

  6. Occupational safety and health in India: now and the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingle, Shyam

    2012-01-01

    India, a growing economy and world's largest democracy, has population exceeding 1.2 billion. Out of this huge number, 63.6% form working age group. More than 90% work in the informal economy, mainly agriculture and services. Less than 10% work in the organized sector; mainly industry, mining and some services. New service industries like Information Technology (IT), Business Process Outsourcing (BPO) are increasing rapidly; so is the proportion of females in the workforce. The occupational safety and health (OSH) scenario in India is complex. Unprecedented growth and progress go hand in hand with challenges such as huge workforce in unorganized sector, availability of cheap labor, meager public spending on health, inadequate implementation of existing legislation, lack of reliable OSH data, shortage of OSH professionals, multiplicity of statutory controls, apathy of stakeholders and infrastructure problems. The national policy on OSH at workplace, adopted by the government in 2009, is yet to be implemented. Some of the major occupational risks are accidents, pneumoconiosis, musculoskeletal injuries, chronic obstructive lung diseases; pesticide poisoning and noise induced hearing loss. The three most important OSH needs are: 1. legislation to extend OSH coverage to all sectors of working life including the unorganized sector; 2. spreading the awareness about OSH among stakeholders; 3. development of OSH infrastructure and OSH professionals. Other issues include integration of occupational health with primary health care.

  7. OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY USING DATA MINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Ruso

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Large amounts of the data gathered in organizations through business operations won’t have utility value unless they are used in a proper way. With growing amount of data, the issue of their storage, processing and analysis is becoming more complex. The proper data usage and analysis should provide guidance, solutions and the basis for predictions with the objective of improving and initiating future smart decisions based on the acquired results. Data mining is the tool which exactly enables discovering of emerging patterns and important business information. This work presents the example of Data Mining implementation in the field of workplace health, safety and welfare at HIP- Petrohemija, in Pančevo, as well as various approaches of data analysis and processing by various authors in this field.

  8. Tuberculosis control and occupational health services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.T. Mets

    1984-09-01

    Full Text Available The W.H.O. (1982 estimates that the annual risk of infection with tuberculosis in most developing countries is in the order of 3 to 5%. Every year 4-million to 5-million highly infectious cases of tuberculosis occur in those countries, according to the WHO Technical Report No. 671. This report also states that case finding and chemotherapy, combined as one entity, must be considered to be the most powerful weapon in tuberculosis control. Since case finding in those countries depends principally on the examination of patients presenting with relevant symptoms to a health facility, it is recommended that all staff at such facilities should be properly trained and motivated to identify potential tuberculosis patients.

  9. Influencing Factors of Radiological Technologist Image of Allied Health College Students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Jong Kwon; Shin, Seong Gyu [Dept. of Radiology, Dong A University Medical Center, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Perception level and social position of radiological technologist influence satisfaction level of their job. This study aims to use foundational data to improve perception level and social position of radiological technologists. We conducted interviews and a fill-out survey with 233 students who have been majoring in health-related fields at five universities and colleges located in Busan and who finished internship programs. The study analyzed 233 answer sheets excluding 17 inadequate answer sheets using T-test, ANOVA and multiple regression analysis with SAS9.1. The mean score of perception level was 3.33{+-}0.56. The personal image of radiological technologist showed the best score(3.43{+-}0.56) whereas the social image showed the worst(3.12{+-}0.79). According to the classification of the subject, the answer, 'radiological technologist is specialized job', showed the best score(3.99{+-}0.79). The answer 'radiological technologist suffered from less stress and workload than others when they work usually' showed the worst score(2.88{+-}0.98). According to the classification of each health-related major, the mean score of students who are a major in the department of the radiological technologist was the best(3.46{+-}0.46) and the students who are major in department of the physical therapy was the worst(3.24{+-}0.40). The radiological technologist have to effort to make positive image in the hospital. It is possible to be developed their knowledge and professionalism by cooperating between school and hospital as well as advertising with mass madia.

  10. Building the occupational health team: keys to successful interdisciplinary collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachs, Joy E

    2005-04-01

    Teamwork among occupational health and safety professionals, management, and employees is vital to solving today's complex problems cost-effectively. No single discipline can meet all the needs of workers and the workplace. However, teamwork can be time-consuming and difficult if attention is not given to the role of the team leader, the necessary skills of team members, and the importance of a supportive environment. Bringing team members together regularly to foster positive relationships and infuse them with the philosophy of strength in diversity is essential for teams to be sustained and work to be accomplished. By working in tandem, occupational health and safety professionals can become the model team in business and industry delivering on their promise of a safe and healthy workplace for America's work force.

  11. Proceedings from the 1998 Occupational Health Conference: Benchmarking for Excellence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffler, G. Wyckliffe (Editor); O'Donnell, Michele D. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The theme of the 1998 NASA Occupational Health Conference was "Benchmarking for Excellence." Conference participants included NASA and contractor Occupational Health professionals, as well as speakers from NASA, other Federal agencies and private companies. Addressing the Conference theme, speakers described new concepts and techniques for corporate benchmarking. They also identified practices used by NASA, other Federal agencies, and by award winning programs in private industry. A two-part Professional Development Course on workplace toxicology and indoor air quality was conducted a day before the Conference. A program manager with the International Space Station Office provided an update on station activities and an expert delivered practical advice on both oral and written communications. A keynote address on the medical aspects of space walking by a retired NASA astronaut highlighted the Conference. Discipline breakout sessions, poster presentations, and a KSC tour complemented the Conference agenda.

  12. Development of a respiratory protection survey instrument for occupational health nurses: an educational project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taormina, Deborah; Burgel, Barbara J

    2013-02-01

    The Institute of Medicine (2011) report Occupational Health Nurses and Respiratory Protection: Improving Education and Training outlined seven recommendations to improve the competency of occupational health nurses in respiratory protection. An advisory group was convened in December 2011, with stakeholder representation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health/National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory, American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., American Board for Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., Association of Occupational Health Professionals in Healthcare, American Nurses Association, and Institute of Medicine Standing Committee on Personal Protective Equipment for Workplace Safety and Health. The initial work of the advisory group included developing and administering a survey to assess current occupational health nurse roles and responsibilities relevant to respiratory protection. Development of the survey was led by a master's student and advisor who worked with the advisory group. The process of tool development and preliminary findings are presented in this article.

  13. Occupational safety and health issues associated with green building

    OpenAIRE

    Terwoert, J.; Ustailieva, E.

    2013-01-01

    This e-fact provides information on the work-related risk factors and the occupational safety and health (OSH) issues associated the planning and construction of green buildings, their maintenance, renovation (retrofitting), demolition, on-site waste collection. Some of these OSH risks are new compared with traditional construction sites and are associated with new green materials, technologies or design. Other risks are well-known to the construction sector but they arise in new situations o...

  14. Uneasy allies: pro-choice physicians, feminist health activists and the struggle for abortion rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joffe, C E; Weitz, T A; Stacey, C L

    2004-09-01

    Abortion represents a particularly interesting subject for a social movements analysis of healthcare issues because of the involvement of both feminist pro-choice activists and a segment of the medical profession. Although both groups have long shared the same general goal of legal abortion, the alliance has over time been an uneasy one, and in many ways a contradictory one. This paper traces points of convergence as well as points of contention between the two groups, specifically: highlighting the tensions between the feminist view of abortion as a women-centred service, with a limited, 'technical' role for the physicians, and the abortion-providing physicians' logic of further medicalization/professional upgrading of abortion services as a response to the longstanding marginality and stigmatisation of abortion providers. Only by noting the evolving relationships between these two crucial sets of actors can one fully understand the contemporary abortion rights movement. We conclude by speculating about similar patterns in medical/lay relationships in other health social movements where 'dissident doctors' and lay activists are similarly seeking recognition for medical services that are controversial.

  15. Engaging Allied-Health Students with Virtual Learning Environment Using Course Management System Tutorial Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Nguyen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II are major gateway courses into nursing and other health related sciences careers.  Being a New York City community college, the students at Queensborough Community College are highly diverse not only in their ethnic and cultural background, but also in the levels of preparedness. When they take Human Anatomy-Physiology I as the first pre-requisite class, many are either freshman or returning students after a hiatus. Many students lack formal training in Science or Biology and are overwhelmed by the depth and immensity of the material presented in above courses. Though the enrollment for these classes is heavy; above factors lead to high attrition rates. However one common feature of this new generation of students is their access and familiarity to the internet, digital technology and other techno gadgets such as smart phones, tablets, etc. Though it is hard for us to accept, it is a fact that today’s generation of students (generation Y is more techno savvy and these gadgets engage (or distract them more than books. This indicated a clear need for developing alternatives to traditional teaching methods to engage students of an urban community college setting. We decided to investigate if a web-based supplemental tutorial would help engage these students and thus help them build their course knowledge base to improve their academic performance.

  16. Primary health care to elderly people: Occupational Therapy actions perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassio Batista Alves

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, Occupational Therapy (OT was legislated in 1969, and was introduced into the Primary Health Care (PHC in the 90s. At this level of care, the OT serves various stages of human development, including aging, in a perspective of care and active aging line, seeks to optimize opportunities for health, participation and safety, using clinical reasoning in order to plan, guide, conduct and reflect their actions in producing the line of care. This career considers human activities as part of the construction of the man himself as an expertise area and seeks to understand the relationships that the active human establishes in its life and health. This study aimed to verify the actions and identify the occupational therapy line of care with the elderly in APS. This is a qualitative study that used a semi-structured interview applied during April to May 2013 with six occupational therapists that cared for older people in the APS at Uberaba-MG. The data was analyzed using the Collective Subject Discourse (CSD technique. We observed that the OT actions to produce line of care for the elderly happen according to the general public care, whether individual or group, with the team during case discussions, referrals or work management and the territory during the territorial diagnosis and networks formation, all permeated by the principles of fairness, integrity, intersectoriality and clinical reasoning in OT.

  17. Kaizen: ergonomics approach to occupational health and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumashiro, Masaharu

    2011-12-01

    Kaizen (work improvement) is the forte of Japanese industry. Kaizen activities were born in the early 20th century under the name efficiency research. These activities were the beginning of industrial engineering (IE). Later on people began to rethink the single-minded devotion to improving productivity. Then the job re-design concept was developed. The main target of kaizen in the area of occupational health and safety in Japanese manufacturing is the improvement of inadequate working posture followed by the improvement of work for transporting and lifting heavy objects. Unfortunately, the kaizen activities undertaken by most Japanese companies are still focused on improving productivity and quality. The know-how for promoting kaizen activities that integrate the three aspects of IE, occupational health, and ergonomics is not being accumulated, however. In particular, the IE techniques should be incorporated into kaizen activities aimed at occupational safety and health, and the quantitative assessment of workload is required. In addition, it is important for on-the-job kaizen training in the ERGOMA Approach for production supervisors, who are the main advocates of IE kaizen.

  18. An Important Psychosocial Risk in Occupational Health: Mobbing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hulya Gul

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Mobbing, a rising issue in the occupational health area, has recently been paid attention more and more in the academic and business settings. Mobbing is a series of action having multidimensional features socially and psychologically, and it is frequent in occupational environment. Mobbing may present itself as behaviors, words, acts, gestures, or writings that affect personality, dignity, physical, and psychological integrity. Early 1990’s were the time studies about mobbing started to be done, indicating its negative effects on both individual and the working place. These extend from stress and depression to psychosomatic disorders, and even chronicle diseases and cardiovascular problems. Workplace mobbing is repetitive, unreasonable malicious behavior directed toward an employee or a group of employees, that creates risk to health and safety. It may manifest as intimidation, physical violence, discrimination, threats, social isolation, and destabilization. The most prominent result is lack of continuity. Organizational problems, time pressure, lack of leadership and task definition etc. are defined to be potential risk factors. For prevention, there must be an organized intervention including a strategically approach towards mobbing and a positive environment at workplace. There is a need for standardization, and studies to define and evaluate mobbing behavior in order to make a comparison between different cultures and occupations. In this review article mobbing was examined with the view of public health. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2009; 8(6.000: 515-520

  19. Occupational health and the rural worker: agriculture, mining, and logging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, D S

    1990-10-01

    More than 50 million Americans live in rural areas. These rural residents often work for small businesses or in the extraction industries (farming, mining, and logging). Because of the size of the businesses, the mandate of the Occupation Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) does not cover these workers and they are seldom afforded the same protection as urban workers. This review focuses on the special health problems facing farm workers, farmers, miners, and loggers. Farm workers are often ill and are affected by psychological illness, injuries, parasites, skin diseases, and the dangers of agrichemicals. Farm owners also face the hazards of stress and have very high rates of suicide. In addition, they are often injured on the job and suffer the highest rate of job related fatality of any work group. The complex farm environment presents a continuous threat to the lungs. This danger has worsened with the increased use of confinement buildings for poultry, hogs, and cattle. As farming has changed with increased mechanization, attendant medical problems have arisen. These "illnesses of innovation" are important. Mining and logging also are dangerous occupations with acute and chronic problems including respiratory illness, vascular problems, and malignancy. The decade of the 1990s must be one of increased attention to rural occupational health care and research.

  20. [ILO plan of action (2010-2016) on occupational safety and health and new list of occupational diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisov, É I; Mazitova, N N; Shemetova, M V; Chelishcheva, M Iu; Chesalin, P V

    2011-01-01

    ILO plan of action (2010-2016) to achieve widespread ratification and effective implementation of the occupational safety and health instruments (Convention No. 155, its 2002 Protocol and Convention No. 187) is discussed. ILO documents on recording and notification as well as new list of occupational diseases (revised 2010) are considered.

  1. A Safe and Healthful Work Environment: Development and Testing of an Undergraduate Occupational Health Nursing Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullagh, Marjorie C; Berry, Peggy

    2015-08-01

    Occupational health nursing focuses on promotion and restoration of health, prevention of illness and injury, protection from work-related and environmental hazards, and corporate profitability. Quality education about the relationship between work and health is critical for nurses' success regardless of work setting, and is consistent with Healthy People 2020 goals, but is lacking or limited in some programs. This report introduces an innovative occupational health nursing curriculum for students enrolled in baccalaureate nursing programs. The process of designing and pilot testing this novel curriculum, its alignment with nursing competencies, and its format and learning activities are described. Preparing professional nurses to understand the role of the occupational health nurse and the relationship between work and health is an essential curricular consideration for contemporary nursing education.

  2. Occupational health issues in marine and freshwater research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtenay Glenn

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Marine and freshwater scientists are potentially exposed to a wide variety of occupational hazards. Depending on the focus of their research, risks may include animal attacks, physiological stresses, exposure to toxins and carcinogens, and dangerous environmental conditions. Many of these hazards have been investigated amongst the general population in their recreational use of the environment; however, very few studies have specifically related potential hazards to occupational exposure. For example, while the incidence of shark and crocodile attacks may invoke strong emotions and the occupational risk of working with these animals is certainly real, many more people are stung by jellyfish or bitten by snakes or dogs each year. Furthermore, a large proportion of SCUBA-related injuries and deaths are incurred by novice or uncertified divers, rather than professional divers using aquatic environments. Nonetheless, marine and freshwater research remains a potentially risky occupation, and the likelihood of death, injury and long-term health impacts still needs to be seriously considered.

  3. [Students awareness of health teaching: evaluation of "health education" course and the occupational health nursing practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikawa, Junko; Majima, Yukie; Ishihara, Itsuko

    2003-09-01

    The "health education" course is an important part of the baccalaureate curriculum in nursing. It is essential to teach students effective health education in a client oriented way. In order to improve the quality and content of this course, we extracted students descriptions from records of 44 students who had carried out group health education during nursing practice for the occupational health nursing course. We then analyzed students written sentences on their views concerning health teaching. After sentence analysis, we categorized these concepts into groups and titled them. The results of clarification of categories showed that the most common student awareness was in regard to technical and instructional skills, such as precise and suitable language selection for laymen, and utilization of teaching devices or mediums, during implementation of health teaching(43.6%). Secondly, assessment of health needs for a certain working population(10.3%), and effective teaching types such as instructional participant volunteers and full participation(9.2%) were deemed important. Thirdly, identification of the role of the occupational nurse(7.7%), and lastly the necessity of evaluation(2.3%) were considered necessary. Over all, in this study we found that students were most concerned about the instructional skills during the presentation of health education. Also, these results suggest that development of contents in the "health education" course to reinforce students assessment and evaluative abilities should be incorporated into the course. Furthermore, faculties who teach a "health education" course should provide a large variety of teaching materials and creative instructional methods for the students.

  4. [Report of courses on "Occupational dermatology" and "Occupational skin and respiratory allergies" organized by the Nordic Institute for Advanced Training in Occupational Health (NIVA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belleri, L; Gelmi, M; Mascagni, P

    2004-01-01

    The Nordic Institute of Advanced Training in Occupational Health (NIVA), has been organising courses for around 10 years, aimed to the constant up-date of Occupational Medicine. The courses "Occupational dermatology" and "Occupational skin and respiratory allergies", held in 2001 and 2002, analysed some occupational medicine aspects such as allergic contact dermatitis in metal workers, latex disease, allergies in odontoiatric workers, correct patch test performing. The courses has underlined the importance of the cooperation between occupational physician and dermatologist or other specialists, and the project of a standard questionnaire monitoring the exposure to allergic substances. This article is a summary of an extended publication available on the following URLs: http://www.unibs.it/medlav http://www.gimle.fsm.it.

  5. 29 CFR 1960.35 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. 1960.35 Section 1960.35 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) BASIC PROGRAM ELEMENTS FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL...

  6. 48 CFR 1371.113 - Department of Labor occupational safety and health standards for ship repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... occupational safety and health standards for ship repair. 1371.113 Section 1371.113 Federal Acquisition... CONSTRUCTION AND SHIP REPAIR Provisions and Clauses 1371.113 Department of Labor occupational safety and health standards for ship repair. Insert clause 1352.271-82, Department of Labor Occupational Safety and...

  7. 77 FR 72998 - Policy Statement on Occupational Safety and Health Standards for Aircraft Cabin Crewmembers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-07

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Parts 91, 121, 125 and 135 Policy Statement on Occupational Safety... a proposed policy statement regarding the regulation of some occupational safety and health conditions affecting cabin crewmembers on aircraft by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration...

  8. 78 FR 78362 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Personal; Notice of public meeting in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Institute for Occupational Safety and... Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of... Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces...

  9. 78 FR 12065 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Personal Protective Technology for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Institute for Occupational Safety and... Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC... Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...

  10. 29 CFR 2200.108 - Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission. 2200.108 Section 2200.108 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND... Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission. The seal of the Commission shall consist of: A gold...

  11. 78 FR 51729 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (BSC, NIOSH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    ... Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (BSC, NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a) (2) of the... Director, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health on research and prevention programs... evaluate the degree to which the activities of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and...

  12. 29 CFR 1960.12 - Dissemination of occupational safety and health program information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dissemination of occupational safety and health program information. 1960.12 Section 1960.12 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Administration § 1960.12 Dissemination...

  13. 29 CFR 1960.11 - Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance. 1960.11 Section 1960.11 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) BASIC PROGRAM ELEMENTS FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL...

  14. 29 CFR 1960.79 - Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs. 1960.79 Section 1960.79 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) BASIC PROGRAM ELEMENTS FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL...

  15. 29 CFR 1912.5 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health. 1912.5 Section 1912.5 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND... Matters § 1912.5 National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health. (a) Section 7(a) of...

  16. 78 FR 9054 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Respiratory Protection for Healthcare...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Institute for Occupational Safety and... for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC... Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...

  17. Occupational health management system: A study of expatriate construction professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, I Y S; Leung, M Y; Liu, A M M

    2016-08-01

    Due to its direct impact on the safety and function of organizations, occupational health has been a concern of the construction industry for many years. The inherent complexity of occupational health management presents challenges that make a systems approach essential. From a systems perspective, health is conceptualized as an emergent property of a system in which processes operating at the individual and organizational level are inextricably connected. Based on the fundamental behavior-to-performance-to-outcome (B-P-O) theory of industrial/organizational psychology, this study presents the development of an I-CB-HP-O (Input-Coping Behaviors-Health Performance-Outcomes) health management systems model spanning individual and organizational boundaries. The model is based on a survey of Hong Kong expatriate construction professionals working in Mainland China. Such professionals tend to be under considerable stress due not only to an adverse work environment with dynamic tasks, but also the need to confront the cross-cultural issues arising from expatriation. A questionnaire was designed based on 6 focus groups involving 44 participants, and followed by a pilot study. Of the 500 questionnaires distributed in the main study, 137 valid returns were received, giving a response rate of 27.4%. The data were analyzed using statistical techniques such as factor analysis, reliability testing, Pearson correlation analysis, multiple regression modeling, and structural equation modeling. Theories of coping behaviors and health performance tend to focus on the isolated causal effects of single factors and/or posits the model at single, individual level; while industrial practices on health management tend to focus on organizational policy and training. By developing the I-CB-HP-O health management system, incorporating individual, interpersonal, and organizational perspectives, this study bridges the gap between theory and practice while providing empirical support for a

  18. INTERDISCIPLINARY MODULE IN PREVENTION AND HEALTH PROMOTION IN POPULATION HEALTH FOR OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY AND PHYSIOTHERAPY STUDENTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose is to provide physiotherapy and occupational therapy students at the University College Cvu vita in Holstebro, Denmark, the opportunity to develop competences for interdisciplinary working situations concerning promotion of population health. RELEVANCE: The Danish Ministry...... and occupational health. The occupational therapy and physiotherapy students are mixed in interdisciplinary groups of 4-5 students connected to a private company or a public institution. Together the group and the company/institution formulate work related, or population health related issues and co...... of preventive activities, and on the background of this course, the bachelor level students are prepared for professional challenges in connection to changing community based health promotion and rehabilitation in the Danish welfare system. KEYWORDS: Prevention, population health, interdisciplinary work...

  19. A qualitative review of existing national and international occupational safety and health policies relating to occupational sedentary behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coenen, Pieter; Gilson, Nicholas; Healy, Genevieve N; Dunstan, David W; Straker, Leon M

    2017-04-01

    Prolonged sedentary time is now recognised as an emergent ergonomics issue. We aimed to review current occupational safety and health policies relevant to occupational sedentary behaviour. An electronic search for documents was conducted on websites of ergonomics and occupational safety and health organisations from 10 countries and six international/pan-European agencies. Additionally, 43 informants (nine countries) were contacted and an international conference workshop held. 119 documents (e.g. legislation, guidelines, codes of practice) were identified. Using a qualitative synthesis, it was observed that many jurisdictions had legal frameworks establishing a duty of care for employers, designers/manufacturers/suppliers and employees. While no occupational authority policies focusing specifically on sedentary behaviour were found, relevant aspects of existing policies were identified. We highlight implications for ergonomics research and practice and recommend the development of policy to specifically address occupational sedentary behaviour and support workplace initiatives to assess and control the risks of this emergent hazard.

  20. [Occupational risk and health disorders criteria in metal mining industry workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheglova, A V

    2009-01-01

    Evaluating occupational risk of health disorders in metal mining industry workers providing various ore extraction modes enabled to reveal early clinical, laboratory and functional markers of occupational and general diseases.

  1. [Comparative analysis of occupational health services practice of international companies of oil and gas industry and ILO Convention "Occupational Health Services"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevorkian, É V; Spiridonov, V L; Shatokhin, A S; Ékgardt, E V; Avdokhin, A V; Iakovlev, A P

    2013-01-01

    A comparative analysis of current work practices of occupational health services of international companies of Russian oil & gas industry and provisions of ILO Convention 161 and Recommendation 171 "Occupational Health Services" has been carried out. Proposals for improvement and harmonization of labor legislation related to this problem have been formulated.

  2. Occupational Health Hazards among Healthcare Workers in Kampala, Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawlance Ndejjo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the occupational health hazards faced by healthcare workers and the mitigation measures. Methods. We conducted a cross-sectional study utilizing quantitative data collection methods among 200 respondents who worked in 8 major health facilities in Kampala. Results. Overall, 50.0% of respondents reported experiencing an occupational health hazard. Among these, 39.5% experienced biological hazards while 31.5% experienced nonbiological hazards. Predictors for experiencing hazards included not wearing the necessary personal protective equipment (PPE, working overtime, job related pressures, and working in multiple health facilities. Control measures to mitigate hazards were availing separate areas and containers to store medical waste and provision of safety tools and equipment. Conclusion. Healthcare workers in this setting experience several hazards in their workplaces. Associated factors include not wearing all necessary protective equipment, working overtime, experiencing work related pressures, and working in multiple facilities. Interventions should be instituted to mitigate the hazards. Specifically PPE supply gaps, job related pressures, and complacence in adhering to mitigation measures should be addressed.

  3. Allied Health Leadership in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Invitational Conference Proceedings (Williamsburg, Virginia, April 17-19, 1986).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kra, Eleanor, Ed.

    The following papers are included: "Opening Remarks" (McTernan); "Conference Goals and Plans" (Douglas); "Challenge to Leadership" (Pearson); "Implications of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention for the Practice of Respiratory Care" (Axton); "Health Promotion Strategies in Dietetic Practice"…

  4. State of mental health research in the American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 2008-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutman, Sharon A

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I examine the state of mental health research in the American Journal of Occupational Therapy from 2008 to 2011. Although other practice areas have seen an increase in the number and rigor of intervention effectiveness studies, mental health occupational therapy research has been insufficient to support the profession's role in traditional mental health services. Strategies to enhance the profession's role in mental health practice are suggested and include using occupational therapy behavioral health management research in school-based and transition services to support occupational therapy's role in traditional mental health practice settings.

  5. 77 FR 42462 - Hawaii State Plan for Occupational Safety and Health; Proposed Modification of 18(e) Plan Approval

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-19

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration 29 CFR Part 1952 RIN 1218-AC78 Hawaii State Plan for Occupational Safety and Health; Proposed Modification of 18(e) Plan Approval AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health...; request for written comments. SUMMARY: Hawaii administers an occupational safety and health state...

  6. Attitudes toward the elderly with CNS trauma: a cross-sectional study of neuroscientists, clinicians, and allied-health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Julio C; Fehlings, Michael G

    2009-02-11

    Despite the potential impact of ageist attitudes on outcomes of central nervous system (CNS)-injured patients, little has been reported on this issue. Given this, we sought to conduct a questionnaire-based survey to assess the attitudes toward the elderly among basic and clinical neuroscientists, clinicians, and allied-health professionals whose research or medical practice is focused on neurotrauma. We also reviewed all abstracts presented in the National Neurotrauma Symposia from 1984 to 2007 and identified previous studies on the potential effects of age/aging on outcomes. The Kogan's Old People (KOP) scale was used to assess attitudes toward elderly individuals among all members of the National Neurotrauma Society (NNS). Of the 504 registered members, 137 subjects completed the survey that was re-mailed for non-respondents 4 weeks apart. There were no significant differences between respondents of the first and second mailings regarding their demographic and professional profiles or regarding their responses. These results support the validity of our findings in spite of the relatively low mail survey response rate (27.2%). Female gender was significantly associated with more positive attitudes toward old people compared to males. Clinicians showed significantly fewer negative attitudes toward old people in comparison with basic and clinical neuroscientists. Of the 4,194 abstracts reviewed, we identified only 44 studies (1.05%) that were explicitly focused on the effects of aging/old age on neurotrauma. In conclusion, our questionnaire-based survey, which appears to be representative of the population of interest, recognized significant differences in the attitudes toward old people among various professional groups and between male and female professionals. These findings may reflect a lack of knowledge and misconceptions regarding the impact of aging and old age on outcomes after CNS trauma. Further research on the impact of aging on outcomes after

  7. Bilateral environmental and occupational health program with India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Mike; Campolucci, Sharon; Falk, Henry; Ganguly, N K; Saiyed, H N; Shah, Bela

    2003-08-01

    In spite of considerable economic progress in recent years, India continues to face challenges dealing with poverty, unemployment, malnutrition, disease and disability. The governments of India and the United States have formed a collaborative effort to address outstanding issues in the fields of environmental and occupational health. The Joint Statement on Indo-U.S. Collaboration in Environmental and Occupational Health, which was approved by the Minister of the Indian Union of Health and Family Welfare and the Secretary of Health and Human Services of the United State in Geneva in May of 2002, formalizes the collaborative relationship and calls for the development of Implementation Guidelines. The Implementation Guidelines establish a Joint Working Group, which is responsible for identifying and implementing the collaborative projects. The collaborating organizations have identified three broad areas for collaboration: emergency preparedness and response; training, education, and technology transfer; and research. Within the three broad areas, the organizations have identified two subject areas for initiation: arsenicosis and asbestosis. Researchers and health officials in both India and the U.S. share interest in both research and interventions efforts in these subject areas. As many as 42 million people in the West Bengal area of India may be exposed to arsenic in drinking water at concentrations of health concern. Similarly, as many as 10 million industrial or mine workers in India may be exposed to asbestos or other dusts at concentrations of health concern. The first Joint Working Group meeting is scheduled for March 2003 in New Delhi and will consider these subject areas in developing collaborative projects. Other tasks being undertaken by the signatory agencies include expanding the relationship to include academic and nongovernmental organizations and obtaining funds for the various projects from governmental and nongovernmental sources.

  8. Occupational Safety and Health Guide (OSH Guide) (CD-ROM). Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guide is intended for use by Federal agencies in assessing their compliance with the standards of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration... Occupational Safety and Health Standards, and Part 1926, Safety and Health Regulations for Construction. Part 1960, Basic Program Elements for Federal...Employee Occupational Safety and Health Programs and Related Matters, as modified to address relevant requirements of Part 1904, is also included.

  9. Personal health systems and value creation mechanisms in occupational health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auvinen, Ari-Matti

    2007-01-01

    Personal Health Systems are believed to have great business potential among citizens, but they might reach also an important market in occupational health care. However, in reaching the occupational health care market, it is important to understand the value creation and value configuration mechanisms of this particular market. This paper also claims that in such a business-to-business market service integrators are needed to compose for the various customers specific offerings combing a tailored variety of products and services to suit their specific needs.

  10. Moldy buildings, health of their occupants and fungal prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihinova, D; Pieckova, E

    2012-01-01

    Microscopic fungi are important biological pollutants in the indoor environment, they are spread generally: on building materials, carpets, ceiling tiles, insulations, any surfaces, wallpapers, or in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems. Molds are able to grow on any materials, as long as moisture and oxygen are available. Exposure to fungi in indoor environments (esp. in water-damaged buildings) can cause adverse health effects, such as allergy, asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonia, mucous membrane irritation, different toxic effects, or even mycoses (in immunocompromised individuals) - alone or in combination. As serious adverse health effects could be caused antifungal prevention is an absolute need.This review article summarizes the occurrence of fungi in the indoor environment of buildings and their contribution to occupants´ health problems, and preventive measures against molds (Tab. 1, Fig. 1, Ref. 48).

  11. Potential occupational health hazards in the microelectronics industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDou, J

    1983-02-01

    The microelectronics industry is a major user of a wide variety of chemicals and other toxic materials. In the recent past semiconductor manufacturers have located in many countries and brought a new set of challenging clinical problems to occupational physicians. California, an area with a significant history in the statistical study of health and safety in the microelectronics industry, presents some evidence of potential health hazards in the semiconductor manufacturing process. The Semiconductor Industry Study done in California in 1981 explains the application of many toxic materials in the semiconductor manufacturing process, including a variety of solvents, acids, and metals such as arsenic. The Study documents the extensive use of dopant gases, primarily arsine, phosphine and diborane. Further study is necessary to assure the health and safety of microelectronics workers, particularly in the application of dopant gases.

  12. Annotated Bibliography on Inservice Training for Allied Professionals and Nonprofessionals in Community Mental Health. Public Health Service Publication No. 1901.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health Services and Mental Health Administration (DHEW), Bethesda, MD.

    This annotated bibliography presents 169 entries of materials published between 1960 and 1967 classified into the following sections: (1) Physicians--Roles and Continuing Education, (2) Nurses, (3) School Psychologists, (4) Teachers, Special Educators, (5) Clergy, (6) Social Work Technicians, Welfare Workers, (7) Police, (8) Mental Health Workers…

  13. Occupational safety among dental health-care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoji, Shigehiro; Ishihama, Kohji; Yamada, Hidefumi; Okayama, Masaki; Yasuda, Kouichi; Shibutani, Tohru; Ogasawara, Tadashi; Miyazawa, Hiroo; Furusawa, Kiyofumi

    2010-01-01

    Compared to other health-care workers, dental health-care workers come in close contact with patients and use a variety of sharp and high-speed rotating instruments. It is important to understand the characteristics of the occupational accidents that occur. We reviewed incident reports from April 1, 2005, to March 31, 2010, at Matsumoto Dental University Hospital. In addition, questionnaires dealing with identification of occupational safety issues, especially splash exposures, were conducted for dentists, dental hygienists, and nurses. Thirty-two occupational injuries were reported during the study period, including 23 sharp instrument injuries (71.9%), 6 splash exposures (18.8%), and 3 others. Of the six splash exposures, only two cases involved potential contamination with blood or other potentially infectious patient material. Of the 66 workers who experienced sharps injuries, 20 workers (30.3%, 20/66) reported them to the hospital work safety team. The questionnaire revealed high incident of splash exposures and conjunctiva exposures: 87.9% (51/58) and 60.3% (35/58) in dentists and 88.6% (39/44) and 61.4% (27/44) in dental hygienists. The compliance rate for routine use of protective eyewear was 60.3% (35/58) for dentists and 34.1% (15/44) for hygienists. Of the presented informational items included in the questionnaire, those that strongly persuaded respondents to use protective eyewear were 'splatters from the patient's mouth contain blood' (90%, 99/110) and 'dental operations at our clinic are performed based only on a questionnaire without serious examinations for HBV, HCV, and HIV' (71.8%, 79/110). The reason of low compliance of protective eyewear among dentists might relate to fine dental procedures. Appropriate information is important for the motive of wearing personal protective equipment, and an early educational program may have a potential to increase compliance with the use of that equipment.

  14. Zoonoses of occupational health importance in contemporary laboratory animal research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankenson, F Claire; Johnston, Nancy A; Weigler, Benjamin J; Di Giacomo, Ronald F

    2003-12-01

    In contemporary laboratory animal facilities, workplace exposure to zoonotic pathogens, agents transmitted to humans from vertebrate animals or their tissues, is an occupational hazard. The primary (e.g., macaques, pigs, dogs, rabbits, mice, and rats) and secondary species (e.g., sheep, goats, cats, ferrets, and pigeons) of animals commonly used in biomedical research, as classified by the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine, are established or potential hosts for a large number of zoonotic agents. Diseases included in this review are principally those wherein a risk to biomedical facility personnel has been documented by published reports of human cases in laboratory animal research settings, or under reasonably similar circumstances. Diseases are listed alphabetically, and each section includes information about clinical disease, transmission, occurrence, and prevention in animal reservoir species and humans. Our goal is to provide a resource for veterinarians, health-care professionals, technical staff, and administrators that will assist in the design and on-going evaluation of institutional occupational health and safety programs.

  15. Occupational safety and health criteria for responsible development of nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, P. A.; Geraci, C. L.; Murashov, V.; Kuempel, E. D.; Zumwalde, R. D.; Castranova, V.; Hoover, M. D.; Hodson, L.; Martinez, K. F.

    2014-01-01

    Organizations around the world have called for the responsible development of nanotechnology. The goals of this approach are to emphasize the importance of considering and controlling the potential adverse impacts of nanotechnology in order to develop its capabilities and benefits. A primary area of concern is the potential adverse impact on workers, since they are the first people in society who are exposed to the potential hazards of nanotechnology. Occupational safety and health criteria for defining what constitutes responsible development of nanotechnology are needed. This article presents five criterion actions that should be practiced by decision-makers at the business and societal levels—if nanotechnology is to be developed responsibly. These include (1) anticipate, identify, and track potentially hazardous nanomaterials in the workplace; (2) assess workers' exposures to nanomaterials; (3) assess and communicate hazards and risks to workers; (4) manage occupational safety and health risks; and (5) foster the safe development of nanotechnology and realization of its societal and commercial benefits. All these criteria are necessary for responsible development to occur. Since it is early in the commercialization of nanotechnology, there are still many unknowns and concerns about nanomaterials. Therefore, it is prudent to treat them as potentially hazardous until sufficient toxicology, and exposure data are gathered for nanomaterial-specific hazard and risk assessments. In this emergent period, it is necessary to be clear about the extent of uncertainty and the need for prudent actions.

  16. Incivility and Sexual Harassment at the Workplace: Occupational Health Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Díaz G

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, interest and research on workplace aggression have increased, since it is a serious occupational health problem with negative consequences for both employees and organizations. Objective: to analyze the relationships between different forms of workplace aggression (incivility and sexual harassment, counterproductive work behaviors, and job satisfaction. Methodology: a cross-sectional study, involving 460 employees from the services sector of Madrid, Spain. Self-report questionnaires were used to assess the employees’ potential exposure to workplace aggression, as well as their level of job satisfaction, and the manifestation of negative behaviors towards the organization. Results: a significant negative association was found between the studied forms of workplace aggression and job satisfaction. Likewise, a significant positive association between the forms of workplace aggression and counterproductive work behaviors was also found. Conclusions: workplace aggression may have negative consequences for a company. It can affect employee satisfaction and encourage counterproductive behaviors. Therefore, it is important, within the field of occupational health, to implement programs that prevent workplace aggression as well as clear intervention protocols to address it whenever it occurs.

  17. Occupational health for an ageing workforce: do we need a geriatric perspective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koh David

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Extending retirement ages and anti-age discrimination policies will increase the numbers of older workers in the future. Occupational health physicians may have to draw upon the principles and experience of geriatric medicine to manage these older workers. Examples of common geriatric syndromes that will have an impact on occupational health are mild cognitive impairment and falls at the workplace. Shifts in paradigms and further research into the occupational health problems of an ageing workforce will be needed.

  18. 76 FR 72980 - Occupational Safety and Health State Plans; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Occupational Safety and Health State Plans; Extension of the... AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Request for public comments... and program regarding State Plans for the development and enforcement of state occupational safety...

  19. Occupational accidents involving biological material among public health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodi, Mônica Bonagamba; Marziale, Maria Helena Palucci; Robazzi, Maria Lúcia do Carmo Cruz

    2007-01-01

    This descriptive research aimed to recognize the occurrence of work accidents (WA) involving exposure to biological material among health workers at Public Health Units in Ribeirão Preto-SP, Brazil. A quantitative approach was adopted. In 2004, 155 accidents were notified by means of the Work Accident Communication (WAC). Sixty-two accidents (40%) involved exposure to biological material that could cause infections like Hepatitis and Aids. The highest number of victims (42 accidents) came from the category of nursing aids and technicians. Needles were responsible for 80.6% of accidents and blood was the biological material involved in a majority of occupational exposure cases. This subject needs greater attention, so that prevention measures can be implemented, which consider the peculiarities of the activities carried out by the different professional categories.

  20. Occupational health-related experiences in rural Tasmania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Barbara; Berens, Heidi

    2010-07-01

    This descriptive, explorative study sought to identify the occupational-related health experiences of community nurses in their workday within rural North West Tasmania. Tasmania is one of eight states and territories that form Australia. The findings indicate the majority of community nurses consider their health average or better, although 30% reported being overweight; 5% reported smoking; 60% reported feeling tense, anxious or depressed sometimes during the week. In the 12 months prior to survey 48% of participants had experienced a work-related injury or illness. At least two thirds of participants spent an average of 1.5 hours teaching nursing students and 2 hours teaching medical students, per week. Hazards (needlestick injury, items obstructing passageways, debris within homes), dogs and use of mobile telephones were regularly associated with weekly work incidents. Interestingly, more time was spent in a day on documentation than with clients or professional development.

  1. Collaborative field research and training in occupational health and ergonomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogi, K

    1998-01-01

    Networking collaborative research and training in Asian developing countries includes three types of joint activities: field studies of workplace potentials for better safety and health, intensive action training for improvement of working conditions in small enterprises, and action-oriented workshops on low-cost improvements for managers, workers, and farmers. These activities were aimed at identifying workable strategies for making locally adjusted improvements in occupational health and ergonomics. Many improvements have resulted as direct outcomes. Most these improvements were multifaceted, low-cost, and practicable using local skills. Three common features of these interactive processes seem important in facilitating realistic improvements: 1) voluntary approaches building on local achievements; 2) the use of practical methods for identifying multiple improvements; and 3) participatory steps for achieving low-cost results first. The effective use of group work tools is crucial. Stepwise training packages have thus proven useful for promoting local problem-solving interventions based on voluntary initiatives.

  2. 医学技术一级学科建设基础理论研究%Basic Theory Research on Allied Health Professions as A Primary Discipline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺庆军; 万学红

    2013-01-01

    Allied Health Professions is a new primary discipline of medicine in China. This paper studies the evolution, disciplinary connotation, research object, academic domains and nature, disciplinary framework, and significance and influence of the construction and development of Allied Health Professions, and points out that the disciplinary construction process still needs to enrich a theoretical system, branch disciplines to be differentiated, high-end talents in lack, and multi-level talent cultivation and degree systems to be constructed.%医学技术是我国医学门类下的新兴一级学科,通过分析医学技术一级学科的发展历程、学科内涵、研究对象、学科性质、学科体系、学科建设的意义和作用等方面,指出该学科发展建设过程中仍存在理论体系尚待丰富、分支学科尚需分化、高端人才缺乏、多层次人才培养和学位体系需要构建等问题.

  3. Occupational safety among dental health-care workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigehiro Shimoji

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Shigehiro Shimoji1, Kohji Ishihama1,2, Hidefumi Yamada1, Masaki Okayama1, Kouichi Yasuda1,3, Tohru Shibutani3,4, Tadashi Ogasawara2,5, Hiroo Miyazawa2,3, Kiyofumi Furusawa11Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Matsumoto Dental University, Shiojiri, Japan; 2Infection Control Team, 3Risk Management Working Team, Matsumoto Dental University Hospital, Shiojiri, Japan; 4Department of Dental Anesthesiology, 5Department of Special Care Dentistry, Matsumoto Dental University, Shiojiri, JapanAbstract: Compared to other health-care workers, dental health-care workers come in close contact with patients and use a variety of sharp and high-speed rotating instruments. It is important to understand the characteristics of the occupational accidents that occur. We reviewed incident reports from April 1, 2005, to March 31, 2010, at Matsumoto Dental University Hospital. In addition, questionnaires dealing with identification of occupational safety issues, especially splash exposures, were conducted for dentists, dental hygienists, and nurses. Thirty-two occupational injuries were reported during the study period, including 23 sharp instrument injuries (71.9%, 6 splash exposures (18.8%, and 3 others. Of the six splash exposures, only two cases involved potential contamination with blood or other potentially infectious patient material. Of the 66 workers who experienced sharps injuries, 20 workers (30.3%, 20/66 reported them to the hospital work safety team. The questionnaire revealed high incident of splash exposures and conjunctiva exposures: 87.9% (51/58 and 60.3% (35/58 in dentists and 88.6% (39/44 and 61.4% (27/44 in dental hygienists. The compliance rate for routine use of protective eyewear was 60.3% (35/58 for dentists and 34.1% (15/44 for hygienists. Of the presented informational items included in the questionnaire, those that strongly persuaded respondents to use protective eyewear were ‘splatters from the patient’s mouth contain blood

  4. Occupational stress among staff nurses: Controlling the risk to health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nursing has been identified as an occupation that has high levels of stress. Job stress brought about hazardous impacts not only on nurses′ health but also on their abilities to cope with job demands. Objectives: This study aimed at finding out the degree of work-related stress among the staff nurses and various determinants, which have a impact on it. Materials and Methods: Institutional-based cross-sectional study conducted on GNM qualified nurses. Predesigned and pre-tested questionnaire covering their sociodemographic variables in part I and professional life stress scale by David Fontana in part II. Analysis used was Chi-square test and logistic regression for various factors. Results: Risk for professional stress due to poor and satisfactory doctor′s attitude was found about 3 and 4 times more than with excellent attitude of doctors toward the staff nurses. A statistically significant association (P < 0.024 between department of posting and level of stress. Nurses reported that they had no time for rest, of whom 42% were suffering from moderate-to-severe stress. The nurses who felt that the job was not tiring were found to be less stressed as those who perceived job as tiring (OR = 0.43. Conclusion: The main nurses′ occupational stressors were poor doctor′s attitude, posting in busy departments (emergency/ICU, inadequate pay, too much work, and so on. Thus, hospital managers should initiate strategies to reduce the amount of occupational stress and should provide more support to the nurses to deal with the stress.

  5. Incidence of occupational exposures in a tertiary health care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrita Shriyan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Occupational exposure to Hepatitis B virus (HBV, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a cause of concern to all health care workers (HCWs, especially those, in hospitals. Among the HCWs, nurses, interns, technicians, resident doctors and housekeeping staff have the highest incidence of occupational exposure. Aims: To analyze the cases of needle stick injuries and other exposures to patient′s blood or body fluids among health care workers. Materials and Methods: A detailed account of the exposure is documented which includes incidence of needle stick injuries (NSI and implementation of post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP as per the hospital guidelines. We report a two-year continuing surveillance study where 255 health care workers (HCWs were included. PEP was given to HCWs sustaining NSI or exposures to blood and body fluids when the source is known sero-positive or even unknown where the risk of transmission is high. Follow-up of these HCW′s was done after three and six months of exposure. Results: Of the 255 HCWs, 59 sustained needle stick injuries and two were exposed to splashes. 31 of the NSI were from known sources and 28 from unknown sources. From known sources, thirteen were seropositive; seven for HIV, three for HCV and three for HBV. Nineteen of them sustained needle stick during needle re-capping, six of them during clean up, six of them while discarding into the container, 17 during administration of injection, eight of them during suturing, two occurred in restless patient, 17 during needle disposal. Conclusion: So far, no case of sero-conversion as a result of needle stick injuries was reported at our center.

  6. Health disparities by occupation, modified by education: a cross-sectional population study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkers, Anita C; Westert, Gert P; Schellevis, Francois G

    2007-01-01

    Background Socio-economic disparities in health status are frequently reported in research. By comparison with education and income, occupational status has been less extensively studied in relation to health status or the occurrence of specific chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate health disparities in the working population based on occupational position and how they were modified by education. Methods Our data were derived from the National Survey of General Practice that comprised 104 practices in the Netherlands. 136,189 working people aged 25–64 participated in the study. Occupational position was assessed by the International Socio-Economic Index of occupational position (ISEI). Health outcomes were self-perceived health status and physician-diagnosed diseases. Odds ratios were estimated using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results The lowest occupational position was observed to be associated with poor health in men (OR = 1.6, 95% CI 1,5 to 1.7) and women (OR = 1.3, 95% CI 1.2 to 1.4). The risk of poor health gradually decreased in relation to higher occupational positions. People with the lowest occupational positions were more likely to suffer from depression, diabetes, ischaemic heart disease, arthritis, muscle pain, neck and back pain and tension headache, in comparison to people with the highest occupational position (OR 1.2 to 1.6). A lower educational level induced an additional risk of poor health and disease. We found that gender modified the effects on poor health when both occupational position and education were combined in the analysis. Conclusion A low occupational position was consistently associated working people with poor health and physician-diagnosed morbidity. However a low educational level was not. Occupational position and education had a combined effect on self-perceived health, which supports the recent call to improve the conceptual framework of health disparities. PMID:17686141

  7. Health disparities by occupation, modified by education: a cross-sectional population study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westert Gert P

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Socio-economic disparities in health status are frequently reported in research. By comparison with education and income, occupational status has been less extensively studied in relation to health status or the occurrence of specific chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate health disparities in the working population based on occupational position and how they were modified by education. Methods Our data were derived from the National Survey of General Practice that comprised 104 practices in the Netherlands. 136,189 working people aged 25–64 participated in the study. Occupational position was assessed by the International Socio-Economic Index of occupational position (ISEI. Health outcomes were self-perceived health status and physician-diagnosed diseases. Odds ratios were estimated using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results The lowest occupational position was observed to be associated with poor health in men (OR = 1.6, 95% CI 1,5 to 1.7 and women (OR = 1.3, 95% CI 1.2 to 1.4. The risk of poor health gradually decreased in relation to higher occupational positions. People with the lowest occupational positions were more likely to suffer from depression, diabetes, ischaemic heart disease, arthritis, muscle pain, neck and back pain and tension headache, in comparison to people with the highest occupational position (OR 1.2 to 1.6. A lower educational level induced an additional risk of poor health and disease. We found that gender modified the effects on poor health when both occupational position and education were combined in the analysis. Conclusion A low occupational position was consistently associated working people with poor health and physician-diagnosed morbidity. However a low educational level was not. Occupational position and education had a combined effect on self-perceived health, which supports the recent call to improve the conceptual framework of health disparities.

  8. Boot Camp for Occupational Health Nurses: Understanding Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Debra M; Olszewski, Kimberly

    2015-08-01

    Social media is a buzzword frequently referred to in marketing materials, general media, and personal conversations. Although many refer to the term social media, some individuals do not understand its meaning or how it affects their daily lives at work and home. Since the expansion of the Internet to web 2.0, multiple platforms of communication occur virtually through various social media. Understanding and learning how to use these platforms are essential to stay connected with friends, family, and colleagues; advance connections to professional organizations; and extend educational opportunities. This article presents basic information for occupational health nurses to improve their understanding of social media and how to communicate virtually using different platforms safely and securely.

  9. Occupational Safety and Health Activities Conducted across Countries in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Keun; Khai, Ton T

    2015-06-01

    Three occupational safety and health (OSH) activities, one international and two national workshops, were documented as part of OSH activities conducted under the International Labor Organization/Korea Partnership Program in the year 2011-2012. This study aimed to provide information on what the three OSH activities were implemented and how they contributed to the improvement of OSH in Asian countries. The international workshop was useful for the participants to understand a variety of information on OSH as well as participatory action-oriented training (PAOT) approaches at the regional and global levels. The two national workshops were practical for participants to strengthen their knowledge and skills on the PAOT at the enterprise and national levels. The study shows that the three OSH activities contributed to the understanding of the participants on OSH and PAOT, and that the activities promoted the improvement of OSH across countries in Asia.

  10. Occupational health and safety management in micro and small enterprises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasle, Peter

    2015-01-01

    . However, OHS is always managed in one way or the other, and the important point is to learn how the owner-manager focus on the core business can be integrated with improvement of the work environment. It is therefore crucial to understand the thinking of owner-managers and their social relations...... with the employees in order to develop support programmes for micro and small enterprises which successfully improves conditions for owner-managers as well as their employees.......Occupational health and safety management (OHSM) in micro and small enterprises may look like an odd ex-pression. Most owner-managers do not think of OHSM as something to give priority. They are occupied with management of the core business which in many cases constitute a simple fight for survival...

  11. Economic Techniques of Occupational Health and Safety Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorov, Aleksandr I.; Beregovaya, Irina B.; Khanzhina, Olga A.

    2016-10-01

    The article deals with the issues on economic techniques of occupational health and safety management. Authors’ definition of safety management is given. It is represented as a task-oriented process to identify, establish and maintain such a state of work environment in which there are no possible effects of hazardous and harmful factors, or their influence does not go beyond certain limits. It was noted that management techniques that are the part of the control mechanism, are divided into administrative, organizational and administrative, social and psychological and economic. The economic management techniques are proposed to be classified depending on the management subject, management object, in relation to an enterprise environment, depending on a control action. Technoeconomic study, feasibility study, planning, financial incentives, preferential crediting of enterprises, pricing, profit sharing and equity, preferential tax treatment for enterprises, economic regulations and standards setting have been distinguished as economic techniques.

  12. Occupational Therapy in mental health: the occupation as an entity, agent and means of treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moruno Miralles, P

    2004-12-01

    looking after the person?; Does occupying in any way mean making Occupational Therapy?; Could the prescription of children's activities be a counter-indication for health?; Does making something therapeutic necessarily imply making Occupational Therapy?Definitely, I think at this point we must keep wondering about what we do as Occupational Therapists, which is our scope of study, what do we pursue with our intervention...in short , what do we call Occupational Therapy?

  13. A survey of occupational health hazards among 7,610 female workers in China's electronics industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenlan; Lao, Xiang Qian; Pang, Shulan; Zhou, Jianjiao; Zhou, Anshou; Zou, Jianfang; Mei, Liangying; Yu, Ignatius Tak-sun

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the occupational hazards among Chinese female workers in the electronics industry, the authors systematically sampled a total of 8,300 female workers at random across 4 provinces in a variety of electronics factories. A detailed questionnaire was used to collect information on occupational hazards and the occurrence of occupation-related diseases. The results show that 4,283 female workers (51.9%) were exposed to 1 or more occupational hazards. The most common chemical hazard was organic solvent, and the second most common was heavy metals. The ergonomic hazards included repetitive movements, poor standing posture, and the lifting of heavy goods. More than 60% of the female workers self-reported occupation-related diseases. These results showed that occupational health hazards were common in the electronics industry in China and that they caused serious occupation-related health problems for the female workers therein.

  14. [Development of a Crisis Management Manual for Occupational Health Experts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Juri; Tateishi, Seiichiro; Igarashi, Yu; Ide, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Hara, Tatsuhiko; Kobashi, Masaki; Inoue, Megumi; Kawashima, Megumi; Okada, Takeo; Mori, Koji

    2015-12-01

    When crises such as natural disasters or industrial accidents occur in workplaces, not only the workers who are injured, but also those who engage in emergency or recovery work may be exposed to various health hazards. We developed a manual to enable occupational health (OH) experts to prevent health hazards. The manual includes detailed explanations of the characteristics and necessary actions for each need in the list of "OH Needs During Crisis Management" developed after an analysis of eight cases in our previous research. We changed the endings of explanatory sentences so that users could learn how often each need occurred in these eight cases. We evaluated the validity of the manual using two processes: 1) Providing the manual to OH physicians during an industrial accident; 2) Asking crisis management experts to review the manual. We made improvements based on their feedback and completed the manual. The manual includes explanations about 99 OH needs, and users can learn how and what to do for each need during various crisis cases. Because additional OH needs may occur in other crises, it is necessary to collect information about new cases and to improve the comprehensiveness of the manual continuously. It is critical that this crisis management manual be available when a crisis occurs. We need to inform potential users of the manual through various media, as well as by posting it on our website.

  15. Occupational Safety and Related Impacts on Health and the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watterson, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The inter-relationship between safety, health and the ‘environment’ is a complex and at times a relatively neglected topic. In this issue, ‘safety’ is often viewed by contributors as ‘health and safety’ and includes occupationally-related ill health as well as injury or harm to employees and the wider public. ‘Environment’ is also interpreted in the widest sense covering both physical and work environments with upstream work hazards presenting risks to downstream communities. The focus is very much on exploring and where possible addressing the challenges, some old and some facing workers in a range of public and private settings and also at times their nearby communities. The 19 papers in the issue cover public and private sectors, global and very local populations, macro-theoretical perspectives, large epidemiological and some single factory or hospital site small case studies. A number of the papers are just beginning to explore and draw out for the first time the risks from hazards in their part of the world. The methodologies adopted also range from lab-based studies through ergonomic assessments and interventions to therapeutic approaches. PMID:27782047

  16. Occupational therapists’ conceptions on mental health care line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Helena Pereira de Paiva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The care line recommended by the Brazilian Health System - SUS must be attained by every professionalof the area, milieu and subject. This study aimed to know the occupational therapists’ conceptions about the lineof care in mental health. The data of this study were obtained from a questionnaire sent via virtual network ofcontacts and snowball technique. Data were subjected to qualitative and quantitative analysis. Most participantswere professionals from the southeast region of the country with over five years of training. They exercise theprofessional activity mainly in Psychiatric Hospitals, Psychosocial Assistance Centers – CAPS II and MentalHealth Clinics. There was no registry of professional performance in Residential Therapeutic Services – SRTand Outpatient Clinics - UBS. Regarding care line, six participants did not respond and five were unaware of theterm, followed by the psychosocial rehabilitation principles and therapeutic project; only one answer identified care line as a practice based on care management with reception principles and articulation of social networksand services. Results showed that the professionals’ practices are little guided in care line logic; however, thereis the need systematization of the assistance according this logic in order to apply the Psychiatric Reform,searching the quality of life improvement and reestablishment of the citizenship of people with psychologicaldistress insofar as, in addition to optimizing the care network, which promotes comprehensive humane careand social contractualism.

  17. [Concomitant influence of occupational and social risk factors on health of workers engaged into powder metallurgy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shur, P Z; Zaĭtseva, N V; Kostarev, V G; Lebedeva-Nesevria, N A; Shliapnikov, D M

    2012-01-01

    Results of health risk evaluation in workers engaged into powder metallurgy, using complex of hygienic, medical, epidemiologic and sociologic studies, enable to define priority occupational and social risk factors, to assess degree of their influence on the workers' health and to identify occupationally induced diseases.

  18. New forms of contractual relationships and the implications for occupational safety and health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudswaard, A.; André, J.C.; Ekstedt, E.

    2002-01-01

    Changes in the world of work can give rise to new risk areas or change the way that occupational safety and health needs to be managed. This has implications for workplaces themselves and also for the occupational safety and health system. For this reason the 'changing world of work' has been a prio

  19. Occupational Safety and Health Program Guidelines for Colleges and Universities. An Administrative Resource Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbey, Frank W.; Hatch, Loren L.

    Designed as an aid for establishing and strengthening occupational safety and health programs on college and university campuses, this administrator guide is divided into four chapters. The first chapter defines and gives background information on the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA). In addition, it presents a discussion of what the OSHA…

  20. Five years of mental health research in the American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 2009-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutman, Sharon A; Raphael-Greenfield, Emily I

    2014-01-01

    In the past 5 years, the number of research articles on occupational therapy in mental health published in the American Journal of Occupational Therapy has steadily declined. This article identifies the strengths and limitations of this body of research and provides directions for practitioners and researchers to enhance the profession's role as a valued mental health service provider.

  1. Occupational exposure to blood and body fluids: new postexposure prophylaxis recommendations. United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuny, E; Carpenter, W M

    1998-04-01

    Dental health care professionals continue to suffer exposure incidents from instruments contaminated with blood and/or body fluids from patients. Each of these cases requires that a rigid protocol be followed for their evaluation. New information regarding the risk factors for HIV-seroconversion following an exposure incident have been identified. Recent data has demonstrated that a 79 percent reduction in disease transmission may be possible with a new combination drug therapy. The anti-retroviral drugs included in this new regimen are now standard in the management of occupational exposure to HIV. Several factors set dentistry apart from other health care occupations, and these differences appear to have an effect on the risks associated with occupational exposures. This article explores these risk factors and the new recommendations for postexposure care.

  2. The Role of Occupational Therapy in Community-Based Programming: Addressing Childhood Health Promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Kugel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obesity and poor health habits impact youth’s health and occupational participation. Occupational therapy’s role in preventing and treating obesity continues to emerge in the research literature. This article explores the impact of a community-based program emphasizing health and wellness for female youth. Methods: Five girls 11 to 13 years of age participated in the healthy occupations program. Before and after the program, the participants engaged in an individual semi-structured interview and completed the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure and the CATCH Kids Club Questionnaire. The youth participated in a focus group midprogram. Results: The participants were receptive to information regarding healthy behaviors and initiated positive health behavior changes after implementation of a 7-week healthy lifestyle community- based program. Conclusion: Occupational therapy can collaborate with community partners to provide programming focused on health promotion and prevention as part of the interprofessional approach to preventing and treating childhood obesity and building healthier communities.

  3. The effects of occupational health and safety management on work environment and health: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torp, S; Moen, B E

    2006-11-01

    According to Norway's Internal Control Regulation, all companies are required to have an occupational health and safety (H&S) management system. This study investigated the effects of implementing or improving occupational H&S management on the work environment, H&S-related behaviour and musculoskeletal health of workers in small and medium-sized companies. A one-year prospective cohort study, using self-administered questionnaires, was performed among the managers and blue-collar workers in 226 motor vehicle repair garages. Out of 1559 workers that responded at baseline 721 workers could be identified at follow-up. These 721 workers were included in the study. The workers in companies with improved H&S management from baseline to follow-up reported increased satisfaction with the H&S activities at the garage; improved support from management and colleagues; improved health-related support and control; and increased participation in H&S activities.

  4. [Occupational stress and early health effects in migrant workers in an electronics manufacturing service enterprise].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X M; Li, S; Zhang, Q Y; Wang, C; Ji, Y Q; Wang, J; Shi, J

    2016-10-20

    Objective: To investigate occupational stress in migrant workers in an electronics manufacturing service enterprise and the association between occupational stress and early health effects, such as job burnout, depressive tendency, and insomnia. Methods: In August 2015, stratified random cluster sampling was used to select 1 097 migrant workers in an electronics manufacturing service enterprise. The Job Demand-Autonomy Questionnaire and effort-reward imbalance questionnaire were used to investigate occupational stress with the types of high workload and effort-reward imbalance, and Burnout Inventory, depression scale, and self-management sleep questionnaire were used to investigate the early health effects of occupational stress. Results: In these migrant workers, the detection rates of occupational stress with the types of high workload and effort-reward imbalance were 69.8%(766/1 097) and 11.9%(131/1 097). The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the workers who had occupational stress with the types of high workload and effort-reward imbalance had significantly higher risks of job burnout and depressive tendencies than those who did not have these two types of occupational stress (Prisks of job burnout and depressive tendencies than those who had occupational stress with the type of high workload (Prisk of insomnia than those who did not have this type of occupational stress (Penterprise. The workers who have occupational stress with the type of effort-reward imbalance have higher risks of job burnout and depressive tendencies than those who have occupational stress with the type of high workload.

  5. Defense Health Care: DOD Needs to Clarify Policies Related to Occupational and Environmental Health Surveillance and Monitor Risk Mitigation Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    and environmental health surveillance OEHSA Occupational and Environmental Health Site Assessment POEMS Periodic Occupational and...inhalation from burn pits in Iraq and Afghanistan, the Institute of Medicine was unable to determine whether long -term health effects are likely to result...Washington, D.C.: May 1, 2012). 5See Institute of Medicine for the Department of Veterans’ Affairs. Long -Term Health Consequences of Exposure to Burn

  6. Monitoring Indoor Air Quality for Enhanced Occupational Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitarma, Rui; Marques, Gonçalo; Ferreira, Bárbara Roque

    2017-02-01

    Indoor environments are characterized by several pollutant sources. Because people spend more than 90% of their time in indoor environments, several studies have pointed out the impact of indoor air quality on the etiopathogenesis of a wide number of non-specific symptoms which characterizes the "Sick Building Syndrome", involving the skin, the upper and lower respiratory tract, the eyes and the nervous system, as well as many building related diseases. Thus, indoor air quality (IAQ) is recognized as an important factor to be controlled for the occupants' health and comfort. The majority of the monitoring systems presently available is very expensive and only allow to collect random samples. This work describes the system (iAQ), a low-cost indoor air quality monitoring wireless sensor network system, developed using Arduino, XBee modules and micro sensors, for storage and availability of monitoring data on a web portal in real time. Five micro sensors of environmental parameters (air temperature, humidity, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and luminosity) were used. Other sensors can be added for monitoring specific pollutants. The results reveal that the system can provide an effective indoor air quality assessment to prevent exposure risk. In fact, the indoor air quality may be extremely different compared to what is expected for a quality living environment. Systems like this would have benefit as public health interventions to reduce the burden of symptoms and diseases related to "sick buildings".

  7. Occupational therapy: cost-effective solutions for changing health system needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rexe, Kate; Lammi, Brenda McGibbon; Zweck, Claudia von

    2013-01-01

    Evidence shows occupational therapy interventions are cost-effective in treating or preventing injury and improving health outcomes in areas such as falls prevention, musculoskeletal injury, stroke rehabilitation, early intervention in developmental disabilities, respiratory rehabilitation and home care. Additional research indicates opportunities for occupational therapy to play an increased role in the management of health outcomes in complex and chronic diseases, pain management, non-pharmaceutical mental health interventions, dementia, end-of-life or palliative care and home care. This article aligns the discussion of health system transformation with literature identifying the cost-effectiveness of occupational therapy in Canada.

  8. An integrative review of social and occupational factors influencing health and wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, MaryBeth; Muldoon, Orla T; Pettigrew, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic approaches to health and wellbeing have traditionally assumed that meaningful activity or occupation contributes to health and quality of life. Within social psychology, everyday activities and practices that fill our lives are believed to be shaped by structural and systemic factors and in turn these practices can form the basis of social identities. In occupational therapy these everyday activities are called occupations. Occupations can be understood as a contextually bound synthesis of meaningful doing, being, belonging and becoming that influence health and wellbeing. We contend that an integrative review of occupational therapy and social psychology literature will enhance our ability to understand the relationship between social structures, identity and dimensions of occupation by elucidating how they inform one another, and how taken together they augment our understanding of health and wellbeing This review incorporates theoretical and empirical works purposively sampled from databases within EBSCO including CINAHL, psychINFO, psychArticles, and Web of Science. Search terms included: occupation, therapy, social psychology, occupational science, health, wellbeing, identity, structures and combinations of these terms. In presenting this review, we argue that doing, being and belonging may act as an important link to widely acknowledged relationships between social factors and health and wellbeing, and that interventions targeting individual change may be problematic.

  9. An integrative review of social and occupational factors influencing health and wellbeing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MaryBeth eGallagher

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic approaches to health and wellbeing have traditionally assumed that meaningful activity or occupation contributes to health and quality of life. Within social psychology, everyday activities and practices that fill our lives are believed to be shaped by structural and systemic factors and in turn these practices can form the basis of social identities. In occupational therapy these everyday activities are called occupations. Occupations can be understood as a contextually bound synthesis of meaningful doing, being, belonging and becoming that influence health and wellbeing. We contend that an integrative review of occupational therapy and social psychology literature will enhance our ability to understand the relationship between social structures, identity and dimensions of occupation by elucidating how they inform one another, and how taken together they augment our understanding of health and wellbeing This review incorporates theoretical and empirical works purposively sampled from databases within EBSCO including CINAHL, psychINFO, psychArticles and Web of Science. Search terms included: occupation, therapy, social psychology, occupational science, health, wellbeing, identity, structures and combinations of these terms. In presenting this review, we argue that doing, being and belonging may act as an important link to widely acknowledged relationships between social factors and health and wellbeing, and that interventions targeting individual change may be problematic.

  10. The Perceptions of Students in the Allied Health Professions towards Stroke Rehabilitation Teams and the SLP's Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insalaco, Deborah; Ozkurt, Elcin; Santiago, Dign

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions and knowledge of final-year speech-language pathology (SLP), physical and occupational therapy (PT, OT) students toward stroke rehabilitation teams and the SLPs' roles on them. The investigators adapted a survey developed by (Felsher & Ross, 1994) and administered it to 35 PT, 35 OT, and…

  11. The Use of Pre-Admission Data to Predict Levels of Success in Selected Allied Health Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalz, Gretchen M.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A study of 82 occupational therapy, 84 physicians' assistant, and 117 physical therapy students found that scores on the Otis Quick-Scoring Mental Abilities Tests, admissions essays, number of credits earned at a previous institution, and cumulative grade point average were significant predictors of students' academic success. (SK)

  12. Role for Occupational Therapy in Community Mental Health: Using Policy to Advance Scholarship of Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffey, Lisa; Burson, Kathrine A; Januszewski, Celeste; Pitts, Deborah B; Preissner, Katharine

    2015-01-01

    Occupational therapists must be aware of professional and policy trends. More importantly, occupational therapists must be involved in efforts to influence policy both for the profession and for the people they serve (Bonder, 1987). Using the state of Illinois as an example, this article reviews the policies and initiatives that impact service decisions for persons with psychiatric disabilities as well as the rationale for including occupational therapy in community mental health service provision. Despite challenges in building a workforce of occupational therapists in the mental health system, this article makes the argument that the current climate of emerging policy and litigation combined with the supporting evidence provides the impetus to strengthen mental health as a primary area of practice. Implications for scholarship of practice related to occupational therapy services in community mental health programs for individuals with psychiatric disability are discussed.

  13. [Health literacy as an element of the Polish occupational health system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobras, Maciej

    Nowadays it is believed that a comprehensive approach towards one's health requires the development and subsequent mastering of health literacy. Although this term has no Polish equivalent, it applies to the ability of individuals to access, analyze and understand information necessary to make informed health decisions. In this publication it is suggested that 'biegłość zdrowotna' can be used as a corresponding Polish term. This publication is based on the review of the available literature (in Polish and in English) on health literacy. To illustrate the hypothetical level of health literacy among Polish employers and employees reports of the Chief Labour Inspectorate and individual items from the Second European Survey of Enterprises on New and Emerging Risks (ESENER-2) were used. The analysis proves that health literacy is a multidimensional concept which has been studied and investigated so far only in relation to chosen nosological units, but practically it does not appear in relation to occupational health. There are reasons to believe that in Poland the low level of health literacy among both employers and employees, lies at the forefront of a passive approach towards the safeguarding of workers health. The concept of health literacy needs further dissemination in Poland, whereas the main area of future research should be the design of the Polish tool for assessing health literacy. The national system of occupational health seems to offer a possible ground for implementing such a concept, especially bearing in mind that within the current system there are several entities and services, which have the legal mandate to undertake informative and advisory duties - exactly those, which help build and master health literacy skills. Med Pr 2016;67(5):681-689.

  14. PTSD and trauma in Austria's elderly: influence of wartime experiences, postwar zone of occupation, and life time traumatization on today's mental health status—an interdisciplinary approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias M. Glück

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: While in recent years epidemiological studies on World War (WW II-related traumatization and prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD in elderly persons have been conducted for various European countries, for Austria, these numbers are unknown. Objective: The focus of this epidemiologic study was to picture the current mental health status and prevalence of PTSD and lifetime traumatic events in Austria's elderly with respect to WWII and subsequent occupation. Method: In an interdisciplinary approach of psychologists and historians, 316 elderly Austrians (born before 1946 were interviewed for symptoms of PTSD and lifetime traumatization (Traumatic Life Events Questionnaire, PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version, current mental health (Brief Symptom Inventory, wartime-related trauma, and traumatic experiences with occupational forces. These factors were also compared regarding the zone of occupation (Allied vs. Soviet. Data were collected between March and September 2010. Results: 97.5% of the sample reported at least one lifetime trauma. War-related traumata were reported by 92.7% and non-war-related traumata by 82.3%; 40.2% experienced traumatic events with occupational forces. PTSD was present in 1.9% of the sample and up to 13.9% taking subthreshold PTSD into account. Both, the presence of symptoms indicative of PTSD and subthreshold PTSD implied weaker current mental health (regarding General Distress: odds ratios up to 25.51; 95% CI = 9.82 to 66.27. Independent of PTSD diagnosis persons from the Soviet occupied zone showed higher levels of Interpersonal Sensitivity, Global Distress, and Phobic Anxiety. Prevalence of PTSD was independent of gender. Conclusions: Our results corroborate findings from other European countries that PTSD is a common disorder in the elderly due to WWII experience and that PTSD and trauma affect mental health even across long periods of time. Postwar distressing conditions also pose a further risk

  15. Demonstrating the cost effectiveness of an expert occupational and environmental health nurse: application of AAOHN's success tools. American Association of Occupational Health Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J A; Smith, P S

    2001-12-01

    According to DiBenedetto, "Occupational health nurses enhance and maximize the health, safety, and productivity of the domestic and global work force" (1999b). This project clearly defined the multiple roles and activities provided by an occupational and environmental health nurse and assistant, supported by a part time contract occupational health nurse. A well defined estimate of the personnel costs for each of these roles is helpful both in demonstrating current value and in future strategic planning for this department. The model highlighted both successes and a business cost savings opportunity for integrated disability management. The AAOHN's Success Tools (1998) were invaluable in launching the development of this cost effectiveness model. The three methods were selected from several tools of varying complexities offered. Collecting available data to develop these metrics required internal consultation with finance, human resources, and risk management, as well as communication with external health, safety, and environmental providers in the community. Benchmarks, surveys, and performance indicators can be found readily in the literature and online. The primary motivation for occupational and environmental health nurses to develop cost effectiveness analyses is to demonstrate the value and worth of their programs and services. However, it can be equally important to identify which services are not cost effective so knowledge and skills may be used in ways that continue to provide value to employers (AAOHN, 1996). As evidence based health care challenges the occupational health community to demonstrate business rationale and financial return on investment, occupational and environmental health nurses must meet that challenge if they are to define their preferred future (DiBenedetto, 2000).

  16. Changing the conversation--the occupational health nurse's role in integrated HS3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Marjorie D

    2009-07-01

    Occupational health nurses have the skills and knowledge to provide a holistic perspective in advancing their company's triple bottom line, healthy people, healthy planet, and healthy profits. The HS3 model provides a road map for integrating health, safety, sustainability, and stewardship, all of which directly impact every company's triple bottom line. Occupational health nurses can use the HS3 model to promote healthy lifestyles, reduce risk and injuries, protect the natural environment, and improve resource alignment. Occupational health nurses have a unique opportunity to demonstrate the value they bring to their employers using synergistic HS3 planning that cost-effectively links work injury management, health promotion, environmental protection, safety training and surveillance, and regulatory compliance. Implementing the HS3 model requires occupational health nurses to be innovators who can change the conversation.

  17. The Use of Personal Narrative in Classroom Case Study Analysis to Improve Long-term Knowledge Retention and Cultivate Professional Qualities in Allied Health Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda M. Young

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the use of two different case study formats (clinically-oriented cases versus personally-oriented cases to determine which was most effective in promoting long-term retention of clinically significant microbiology concepts, developing patient empathy, improving comprehension of patient compliance problems, and facilitating student understanding of transcultural health care concerns. The analysis was conducted in multiple sections of three different introductory microbiology classes targeting specific cohorts: nursing students, pharmacy students and other allied health students (pre-med, pre-PA, CLS, etc.. Retention of course content was determined by evaluation of multiple-choice and short answer examinations at least three weeks after completing case studies. Evaluation of patient empathy, understanding of patient compliance issues and transcultural health care concerns were determined via student surveys. The results of the study indicated that personalized cases significantly improved long-term retention of course content. In addition, student responses indicated that personalized case studies were more effective in developing patient empathy and aiding students in understanding issues patients have with complying with treatment recommendations. Finally, personalized case studies were effective tools for introducing students to the challenges of transcultural health care.

  18. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Depression Among U.S. Military Health Care Professionals Deployed in Support of Operations in Iraq and Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    the following health care occupations: physician, nurse, dentist, veterinarian , biomedical sciences or allied health, health service administration, or... veterinarians ); (c) biomedical, allied health professional, and dentists; and (d) medical admin- istration and health services. Groupings were based on likely...Jacobson, I. G., Smith, T. C., Smith, B., Wells, T. S., Reed, R. J., & Ryan, M. A. (2008). US military service members vaccinated against smallpox in

  19. 48 CFR 1352.271-82 - Department of Labor occupational safety and health standards for ship repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... occupational safety and health standards for ship repair. 1352.271-82 Section 1352.271-82 Federal Acquisition... of Provisions and Clauses 1352.271-82 Department of Labor occupational safety and health standards... Occupational Safety and Health Standards for Ship Repair (APR 2010) The contractor, in performance of all...

  20. Strategies and methods to promote occupational health in low-income countries : industrial counselling in tanneries in India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.G. Öry

    1997-01-01

    textabstractConcern for occupational health and safety has a long tradition in Westem countries. In these countries, well-established disciplines are able to recognize and control inherent risks of industrial processes. The occupational health care system is well-developed and occupational health se

  1. Important, misunderstood, and challenging: a qualitative study of nurses’ and allied health professionals’ perceptions of implementing self-management for patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young HML

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hannah ML Young,1 Lindsay D Apps,1 Samantha L Harrison,1 Vicki L Johnson-Warrington,1 Nicky Hudson,2 Sally J Singh1,3 1National Institute of Health Research CLAHRC-LNR Pulmonary Rehabilitation Research Group, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, 2School of Applied Social Sciences, De Montfort University, Leicester, 3Applied Research Centre in Health and Lifestyle Interventions, Coventry University, Coventry, UK Background: In light of the growing burden of COPD, there is increasing focus on the role of self-management for this population. Currently, self-management varies widely. Little is known either about nurses’ and allied health professionals’ (AHPs’ understanding and provision of self-management in clinical practice. This study explores nurses’ and AHPs’ understanding and implementation of supported COPD self-management within routine clinical practice. Materials and methods: Nurses and AHPs participated in face-to-face semistructured interviews to explore their understanding and provision of COPD self-management, as well as their perceptions of the challenges to providing such care. Purposive sampling was used to select participants from a range of professions working within primary, community, and secondary care settings. Three researchers independently analyzed each transcript using a thematic approach. Results: A total of 14 participants were interviewed. Nurses and AHPs viewed self-management as an important aspect of COPD care, but often misunderstood what it involved, leading to variation in practice. A number of challenges to supporting self-management were identified, which related to lack of time, lack of insight regarding training needs, and assumptions regarding patients’ perceived self-management abilities. Conclusion: Nurses and AHPs delivering self-management require clear guidance, training in the use of effective self-management skills, and education that challenges their preconceptions regarding

  2. Enforcement of occupational safety and health regulations in Nigeria: An exploration

    OpenAIRE

    Umeokafor, Nnedinma; Isaac, David; Jones, Keith; Umeadi, Boniface

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the enforcement of occupational safety and health (OSH) regulations; it validates the state of enforcement of OSH regulations by extracting the salient issues that influence enforcement of OSH regulations in Nigeria. It’s the duty of the Federal Ministry of Labour and Productivity (Inspectorate Division) to enforce the Factories Act of 1990, while the Labour, Safety, Health and Welfare Bill of 2012 empowers the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health of Nigeria...

  3. Jewelry boxes contaminated by Aspergillus oryzae: an occupational health risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellanger, Anne-Pauline; Roussel, Anaïs; Millon, Laurence; Delaforge, Marcel; Reboux, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, 100,000 jewelry boxes, manufactured in China, were delivered to a jewelry manufacturer in Besançon, France. All the boxes were contaminated by mold. Because the workers refused to handle these jewelry boxes, the company contacted our laboratory to determine how to deal with the problem. Three choices were available: (1) decontaminate the boxes, (2) return the boxes to the Chinese manufacturer, or (3) destroy the entire shipment. Based on microscopic identification, the culture analysis was positive for A. oryzae. This could not be confirmed by molecular techniques because of the genetic proximity of A. oryzae and A. flavus. Because A. flavus can produce aflatoxins, we tested for them using mass spectrometry. Aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, G2, and M1 were not detected; however, given the specifics of this situation, we could not discard the possibility of the presence of other aflatoxins, such as P1, B3, GM2, and ethoxyaflatoxin B2. We concluded that the contamination by A. oryzae was probably due to food products. However, because of the possible presence of aflatoxins, occupational health risks could not be entirely ruled out. The decision was therefore taken to destroy all the jewelry boxes by incineration. To avoid a similar situation we propose: (1) to maintain conditions limiting mold contamination during production (not eating on the work site, efficient ventilation systems); (2) to desiccate the products before sending them; and (3) to closely control the levels of dampness during storage and transport.

  4. Ergonomics and occupational safety and health: an ILO perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Shengli

    2010-10-01

    The ILO has a mandate to protect workers against sickness, diseases and injuries due to workplace hazards and risks including ergonomic and work organization risk factors. One of the main functions for the ILO is to develop international standards related to labour and work. ILO standards have exerted considerable influence on the laws and regulations of member States. The ILO standards take the form of international Conventions and Recommendations. ILO Conventions and Recommendations relevant to protection of workers against ergonomic risk factors at the workplace include Convention No. 127 and Recommendation No.128 which specify the international requirements concerning the manual transport of a load. To help member States in applying the ILO standards, the ILO produces practical guides and training manuals on ergonomics at work and collects and analyses national practices and laws on ergonomics at the workplace. The ILO also conducts technical cooperation activities in many countries on ergonomics to support and strengthen the capacities of its tripartite constituents in dealing with workplace ergonomic and work organization risks. The ILO's technical cooperation activities give priorities on the promotion of voluntary, participatory and action-oriented actions to improve working conditions and work organizations of the small and medium sized enterprises. This paper reviews ILO's policies and activities on ergonomics in relation to occupational safety and health and prescribes ILO's considerations for its future work on ergonomics.

  5. The Dearth of Mental Health Research in Occupational Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Diane

    1984-01-01

    Reasons for the lack of research in occupational therapy include small numbers of doctoral level occupational therapists, the psychobehavioral/biochemical dichotomy, the lack of a theoretical framework, the level of research instruction, the impact of a predominantly female profession, and the attitudes of institutions. (SK)

  6. OCCUPATIONAL RISK SITUATION OF HEALTH STAFF THAT IS WORKING AT THE EMERGENCY HEALTH STATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevinc Kant Sokel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the risks of occupational hazards in Emergency Medical Care Staff, a research has been planned. The universe of the descriptive research consists of Ambulance Chief Physician staff. The speed of the application is 79.84% (210/263. The questionnaire which consists of questions about sociodemographic attributes, occupational hazard and protective application has been applied face to face between the dates 01-31 January in 2014. The analysis of the data is made on the SPSS 19,0 program. Specifications have been evaluated by percentage and occupational hazards have been evaluated by chi-square test. In the statistical analysises was utilized 0.05 threshold limit value as significance level. 55.7% of participants are men, 63.8% of participants are married, 52.4 % of participants are emergency medical technician and 59,0% of them are working in A2 station and 5.2% of them are working in operation center. The youngest group paramedics (25,1+/-4,5 years are ATTs (25,4+/-4,7 years. The participants occupational hazards has been observed for the last one year and having occupational accidents risk is 9,0%, 44.3% in musculoskeletal discomfort, 22.9% of the risk of contact with blood and body fluids were determined. 11.0 % of traffic accident in the ambulance is 15.7% psychological self as often / very often stated that you feel bad . When we examine the factors that affect the participants occupational risk, the incidence of work-related accidents in the under-30 group was higher ( p = 0.044 . Physicians and other health care professional or work-related illness in more risky (p = 0.009. Review status of musculoskeletal disorders were more frequent in women (p < 0.001. Paramedic ( 18.2 % and drivers ( 16.3 % in the ambulance traffic accident was determined to be at risk for. As determined above in emergency health station staff for the prevention of occupational risks and factors that affect the work to be done. [J Contemp Med 2015; 5

  7. REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH IN RICKSHAW DRIVERS: Occupational Exposure to Environmental Stressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghulam. Nabi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: In urban environment, exposure to the emission of motor vehicles is common. In urban peoples it is a very difficult task to distinguish among peoples with different grades of momentous period exposure to such pollutants. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of diesel exhaust, gasoline emission, Particulate Matter (PM noise and heat on the reproductive health of rickshaw drivers. Methods: Adult married male individuals were recruited randomly in the study from Btkhella, Malakand agency, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. Two groups were made, control (n=45 and rickshaw drivers (n=50. A special questionnaire was designed about occupational activities, socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. From both groups 5 mL of the blood was collected and was analyze for serum total testosterone and cortisol using Biocheck (USA and Antibodies-online GmbH (Germany kits. Results: In control group the Mean±SEM of total serum testosterone was 657.6±16.84 ng/dl and cortisol was 443.8±14.67 mU/L. In rickshaw drivers the Mean±SEM of total serum testosterone was 577.1±11.42 ng/dl and cortisol was 595.1±8.879mU/L. In rickshaw drivers there was a significant reduction in total serum testosterone (P0.0002 but a significant increase in serum cortisol level (P < 0.0001 at 95% confidence interval. Conclusions: Reproductive health problems like decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, absent morning and nocturnal erection, ejaculatory problems, primary infertility and secondary infertility were prevalent in rickshaw drivers but, no such problems were found in control group. Chronic exposure to pollutants such as diesel exhaust, gasoline emission, Particulate Matter (PM noise and heat negatively regulate Hypothalmo-Pituitary Gonadal axis (HPG leading  to reproductive problems.

  8. Occupational safety and health guidelines for chemical hazards. Supplement IV-OHG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This document is the fourth in a seris of supplements to the 1981 Publication NIOSH/OSHA Occupational Health Guidelines for Chemical Hazards. The 62 guidelines presented here in the fourth supplement include 11 revisions of previously issued guidelines and 51 new guidelines. The 62 occupational safety and health guidelines presented here are being published to disseminate technical information about chemical hazards to workers, employers, and occupational safety and health professionals. Each guideline includes (1) data on the chemical name and synonyms, cemnical and physical properties, exposure limits, and signs and symptoms of exposure, personal protective equipment, and control procedures.

  9. Environmental and occupational health research and training needs in Colombia: A Delphi study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Villamizar, Laura A.; González, Beatriz Elena; Vera, Lina María; Patz, Jonathan; Bautista, Leonelo E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Environmental factors contribute with 16% of the burden of disease in Colombia. A main obstacle in implementing national and regional environmental and occupational health policies is the limited knowledge on the local ability to study and control the impact of harmful exposures on health. Objective To identify needs for research and training in environmental and occupational health in Colombia. Materials and methods We conducted a three-round hybrid Delphi study. A group of environmental and occupational health Colombian experts (n=16) from government agencies, universities, and research centers was recruited to participate in the study. Expert’s opinions on research and training needs were gathered through online questionnaires, followed by an in-person meeting. The percentage of agreement and the coefficient of variation were used to measure consensus. Results Air pollution and chemical products were considered the most important environmental and occupational exposures, due to their significant impact on chronic non-communicable diseases, such as respiratory diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. Research on the effects of outdoor air pollution on cardiovascular and respiratory diseases was considered of the greatest importance. Priority training areas included environmental and occupational health risk assessment, exposure modeling, advanced statistical methods, urban planning, occupational safety and hygiene, and epidemiology and toxicology. Conclusions These findings provide a valuable input for the definition and implementation of national environmental and occupational health policies and for the development of a regional hub aimed at strengthening the capacity for research and training in Colombia. PMID:26535742

  10. The initial evaluation in the working process of occupational therapists in the mental health system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alana de Paiva Nogueira Fornereto Gozzi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available : In the field of mental health, Occupational Therapy uses different references in practice development. It is important to observe how occupational therapists in the mental health system assess users’ demands on their work scenarios. In this research, we aimed to study the assessment process of occupational therapists in different services of the mental health system. A descriptive cross-sectional case study was conducted using a qualitative approach. Data were obtained through interviews with occupational therapists integrated to the mental health services of a specific region. The region studied belongs to a Regional Health Department in the state of São Paulo. The thematic analysis method was applied to the data collected allowing the dentification of categories of analysis. The results obtained from one of these categories (the assessment process of occupational therapists showed that most of the professionals interviewed do perform the initial evaluation. This assessment was carried out informally in every case employing tools built by the professionals themselves during their own practices. In addition, patients with chronic mental illnesses are usually admitted in the Occupational Therapy services studied. These characteristics, obtained from active professionals, are useful in the creation of technical criteria for users’ admission in Occupational Therapy mental health treatment.

  11. 78 FR 48683 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Personal Protective Technology (PPT...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Institute for Occupational Safety and... Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the... report entitled Preventing Transmission of Pandemic Influenza and Other Viral Respiratory...

  12. The health paradox of occupational and leisure-time physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtermann, A; Hansen, J V; Burr, H;

    2012-01-01

    Background Occupational and leisure-time physical activity are considered to provide similar health benefits. The authors tested this hypothesis. Methods A representative sample of Danish employees (n=7144, 52% females) reported levels of occupational and leisure-time physical activity in 2005. L...

  13. Occupational Allergic Diseases in Kitchen and Health Care Workers: An Underestimated Health Issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Bilge

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study evaluated the frequencies of allergic symptoms and rate of upper respiratory infections during the past year in the general population, kitchen workers (KW and health care workers (HCW. Methods. The European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS was used to inquire retrospectively about asthma and asthma-like symptoms and the number of treatments required for previous upper respiratory tract infections (URTI: acute pharyngitis, acute sinusitis, etc. during the past year for health care workers, kitchen workers, and members of the general population. Adjusted odds ratios by gender, age, and smoking status were calculated. Results. 579 subjects (186 from the general population, 205 KW, and 188 HCW; 263 females, 316 males participated in the study. Noninfectious (allergic rhinitis was significantly higher in the HCW and KW groups than in the general population (P<0.001. Cumulative asthma was significantly higher only in the HCW group (P<0.05. In addition, the HCW and KW groups had significantly higher risks of ≥2/year URTI (OR: 1.59, 95% CI: 1.07–2.38 versus OR: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.05–2.38 than the general population. Conclusion. Occupational allergic respiratory diseases are an important and growing health issue. Health care providers should become familiar with workplace environments and environmental causes of occupational rhinitis and asthma.

  14. Do knowledge infrastructure facilities support Evidence-Based Practice in occupational health? An exploratory study across countries among occupational physicians enrolled on EBM courses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.I.R. Hugenholtz; K. Nieuwenhuijsen; J.K. Sluiter; F.J.H. van Dijk

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) is an important method used by occupational physicians (OPs) to deliver high quality health care. The presence and quality of a knowledge infrastructure is thought to influence the practice of EBM in occupational health care. This study explores th

  15. Occupational stress and self-perceived oral health in Brazilian adults: a Pro-Saude study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovana Pereira da Cunha Scalco

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this study is to investigate the association between occupational stress and self-perception of oral health. Data were obtained through a self-administered questionnaire filled out in a Pró-Saúde Study by 3253 administrative technical staff from Rio de Janeiro's State University. Occupational stress was measured by means of a questionnaire elaborated in 1970 by Karasek, duly shortened by Thorell in 1988. Ordinal logistic regression was used for data analysis, subsequently adjusted for three blocks of variables. Workers exposed to high occupational demands and little occupational control and to passive work had higher chances of self-perception of worse oral health, when compared with those exposed to low occupational demands, there being no association observed in those exposed to active work. However, in the multiple regression model the following estimates were reduced in magnitude and lost statistical significance, namely high occupational demands and passive work. Workers exposed to high occupational demands revealed worse self-reported oral health, which seems to be partly explained by health behavior patterns, the presence of oral health problems and seeking dental services at longer intervals than once per year.

  16. [Good practice in occupational health services: prophylactic care and occupational activation of people with disabilities due to respiratory diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiszniewska, Marta; Tymoszuk, Diana; Lipińska-Ojrzanowska, Agnieszka; Wagrowska-Koski, Ewa; Walusiak-Skorupa, Jolanta

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory diseases are a cause of long-term sickness absence, and even of partial or complete inability to work. This paper presents the first in Poland description of principles of good practice in occupational health service provided for people with respiratory diseases. The issues concerning the certification of the ability to work in this group of patients are discussed. The key-principles of preventive care of workers with obstructive and interstitial lung diseases with particular attention paid to the control of major risk factors are also presented. The importance of possible contraindications for job performance by workers affected by these diseases, as well as the responsibilities of occupational health physicians were highlighted. M

  17. A Healthy Investment: Building the Facilities to Train the Next Generation of Nursing and Allied Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Bob

    2013-01-01

    A growing number of community colleges are investing in new facilities and programs to train health care workers in a variety of professions, including nursing, radiology, health information technology, physical therapy, dentistry, and surgical technology. Community colleges have historically offered job training programs in health care, but with…

  18. 76 FR 28790 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (BSC, NIOSH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-18

    ... Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (BSC, NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... dictate. Contact Person for More Information: Roger Rosa, Executive Secretary, BSC, NIOSH, CDC, 395...

  19. What are occupational safety and health management systems and why do companies implement them?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwetsloot, G.I.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    In company practice and in governmental legislation, it is increasingly acknowledged that occupational safety and health (OSH) management should be performed systematically and continually. Implementing an OSH Management System (OSH MS) is the major strategy to achieve this.

  20. Stepwise health surveillance for bronchial irritability syndrome in workers at risk of occupational respiratory disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.K. Post (Wendel); K.M. Venables (Katherine); D. Ross (David); P. Cullinan (Paul); D. Heederik (Dick); A. Burdorf (Alex)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: Questionnaires, lung function tests, and peak flow measurements are widely used in occupational health care to screen for subjects with respiratory disease. However, the diagnostic performance of these tests is often poor. Application of these te

  1. Evaluation of occupational health interventions using a randomized controlled trial: challenges and alternative research designs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelvis, R.M; Oude Hengel, K.M.; Burdorf, A.; Blatter, B.M.; Strijk, J.E.; Beek, A.J. van

    2015-01-01

    Occupational health researchers regularly conduct evaluative intervention research for which a randomized controlled trial (RCT) may not be the most appropriate design (eg, effects of policy measures, organizational interventions on work schedules). This article demonstrates the appropriateness of a

  2. National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Partnered Development of Cryogenic Life Support Technologies Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Partnering with National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to develop several cryogenically based life support technologies to be used in mine...

  3. Community-based occupational/environmental health studies: The challenges and the dilemmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Rajan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Occupational/environmental health studies present phenomenal operational challenges to execute as per protocols due to their peculiarities and idiosyncrasies. Unlike in infectious diseases, where there is genuine desire for disease eradication by the affected communities, in environmental/occupational health studies, the dynamics are totally different, with vested interest groups working hard to maintain status quo. There are dimensions of economic dependence, politics, fear, suspicion, pressure tactics, intense lobbying, etc, that make community-based studies related to occupational/environmental health aspects very difficult. It′s not that the communities affected due to occupation/environment are not concerned about their health, but their participation is very tentative in nature; in the face of slightest risk, they would rather want to play it safe and withdraw, for their economics is at stake-not to forget vested interest groups who could go to any extent to sabotage any good work in favor of affected communities.

  4. Trial-based economic evaluations in occupational health: Principles, methods, and recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dongen, J.M. van; Wier, M.F. van; Tompa, E.; Bongers, P.M.; Beek, A.J. van der; Tulder, M.W. van; Bosmans, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    To allocate available resources as efficiently as possible, decision makers need information on the relative economic merits of occupational health and safety (OHS) interventions. Economic evaluations can provide this information by comparing the costs and consequences of alternatives. Nevertheless,

  5. Occupation-as-Means to Mental Health: A Review of the Literature, and a Call for Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebeiro, Karen L.

    1998-01-01

    A literature review uncovered a discrepancy between occupational therapy theory about occupations as a means to mental health and the research conducted in this area. The research gap may explain the lack of recognition for the value of occupational therapy in mental health. (SK)

  6. [Risk communication in analysis of occupational health risk for industrial workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barg, A O; Lebedeva-Nesevrya, N A

    2015-01-01

    The article covers problems of risk communication system function on industrial enterprise. Sociologic study in machinery construction enterprise of Perm area helped to consider main procedures of informing on occupational risk for health of workers exposed to occupational hazards, to describe features and mechanisms of risk communication, to specify its model. The authors proved that main obstacles for efficient system of occupational risks communication are insufficiently thorough legal basis, low corporative social responsibility of the enterprise and low social value of health for workers. This article was prepared with the support of the Russian Humanitarian Science Foundation (Project No. 14-16-59011).

  7. Is occupation a good predictor of self-rated health in China?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Xie

    Full Text Available China's rapidly changing economic landscape has led to widening social inequalities. Occupational status in terms of occupational type and prestige may reflect these socio-structural shifts of social position and be more predictive of self-rated health status than income and education, which may only reflect more gradual acquisitions of social status over time. The goals of this study were to understand the role of occupational status in predicting self-rated health, which is well known to be associated with long-term mortality, as well as compare the occupational status to the other major socioeconomic indicators of income and education.Data from the 2010 baseline surveys of the China Family Panel Studies, which utilized multi-stage probability sampling with implicit stratification was used. Logistic regression was used to examine the relationship of various socioeconomic indicators (i.e. occupational status, income, and education with self-rated health as the primary outcome of interest. A series of models considered the associations of occupational category or occupational prestige with self-rated health.The final sample consisted of 14,367 employed adults aged 18-60, which was nationally representative of working adults in China. We found that occupation was not a major predictor of self-rated health in China when age, ethnicity, location, marital status, physical and mental health status were controlled for, with the exception of women working in lower grade management and professional jobs (OR = 1.82, 95% CI: 1.03-3.22. In comparison, income followed by education exhibited greater association with self-rated health. The highest income group had the least probability to report poor health (In men: OR = 0.30, 95% CI: 0.21-0.43. In women: OR = 0.44, 95% CI: 0.26-0.73. People educated with junior high school had better self-rated health than those with primary and below education level (In men: OR = 0.62, 95% CI: 0.50-0.75. In women: OR = 0

  8. Da medicina do trabalho à saúde do trabalhador From occupational medicine to workers' health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Mendes

    1991-10-01

    Full Text Available Ensaio de revisão sobre a evolução dos conceitos e práticas da medicina do trabalho à saúde do trabalhador, passando pela saúde ocupacional. Busca-se responder às seguintes questões: quais as características básicas da medicina do trabalho (na sua origem e na sua evolução; como e por que evoluiu a medicina do trabalho para a saúde ocupacional; por que o modelo da saúde ocupacional se mostrou insuficiente; em que contexto surge a saúde do trabalhador; quais as principais características da saúde do trabalhador.The evolution of the concepts and practice of occupational medicine, occupational health and workers' health is tentatively reviewed. An attemp is made to answer the following questions: what were the major characteristics of occupational medicine throughout its evolution? How and why did occupational medicine evolve into occupational health? Why has the "occupational health model" become inadequate? Writhin what context did workers' health arise? What are the principal characteristics of workers' health?

  9. Allies in the struggle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draughn, Tricia; Elkins, Becki; Roy, Rakhi

    2002-10-01

    SUMMARY Providing a community that is committed to standards, diversity, and enhancement of the academic environment is often difficult. Offering an Allies or Safe Zone program is among of the first steps an institution can take to achieve a community that embraces diversity and creates a learning environment that is accepting of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered individuals. While there are many opportunities in institutional group settings to address these issues, they often go either unnoticed or untapped. How can being an ally impact the greater institutional environment? This paper will discuss the campus environment for LGBT students, examine existing Allies and Safe Zone programs, and offer a framework to assist program coordinators and participants in establishing comprehensive programs to change the campus climate and develop institutional environments that are gay affirmative.

  10. 77 FR 47850 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (BSC, NIOSH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-10

    ... Technologies, and Health Hazard Evaluations; Construction Safety and Health, Respiratory Disease Studies, and... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (BSC, NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the...

  11. Enhancement of Anatomical Learning and Developing Clinical Competence of First-Year Medical and Allied Health Profession Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keim Janssen, Sarah A.; VanderMeulen, Stephane P.; Shostrom, Valerie K.; Lomneth, Carol S.

    2014-01-01

    Hands-on educational experiences can stimulate student interest, increase knowledge retention, and enhance development of clinical skills. The Lachman test, used to assess the integrity of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), is commonly performed by health care professionals and is relatively easy to teach to first-year health profession…

  12. Does an advantageous occupational position make women happier in contemporary Japan? Findings from the Japanese Study of Health, Occupation, and Psychosocial Factors Related Equity (J-HOPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maki Umeda

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Occupational position is one of the determinants of psychological health, but this association may differ for men and women depending on the social context. In contemporary Japanese society, occupational gender segregation persists despite increased numbers of women participating in the labour market, which may contribute to gender specific patterns in the prevalence of poor psychological health. The present study examined gender specific associations between occupational position and psychological health in Japan, and the potential mediating effects of job control and effort–reward imbalance in these associations. We used data obtained from 7123 men and 2222 women, aged between 18 and 65 years, who participated in an occupational cohort study, the Japanese Study of Health, Occupation, and Psychosocial Factors Related Equity (J-HOPE, between 2011 and 2012. We used logistic regression to examine the association between occupational position and poor psychological health, adjusted for age, working hours, household income and education, as well as psychosocial work characteristics (job control and effort–reward imbalance. The prevalence of poor psychological health increased from manual/service occupations (23% to professionals/managers (38% among women, while it did not vary by occupational position among men. In women, the significant association between occupational position and psychological health was not explained by job control, but was attenuated by effort–reward imbalance. Our findings suggest that Japanese women in more advantaged occupational positions are likely to be at a greater risk for poor psychological health due to higher levels of effort–reward imbalance at work.

  13. The Endocrine System [and] Instructor's Guide: The Endocrine System. Health Occupations Education Module: Instructional Materials in Anatomy and Physiology for Pennsylvania Health Occupations Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Evaluation Systems, Inc., Amherst, MA.

    This module on the endocrine system is one of 17 modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. It is part of an eight-unit miniseries on anatomy and physiology within the series of 17 modules. Following a preface which explains to the student how to use the…

  14. Identification and Hierarchy of Main Electronic Health Record Components in Occupational Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorin TRIFF

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the legal requirements relating to structuring of medical records in occupational medicine and international requirements regarding the certification of electronic health records we have focused on structuring and then evaluating an EHR model in occupational medicine that integrates the main functions and certification criteria required by the European and US certification bodies. The application we designed, called Medmun, structured for use in occupational medicine practices based on the model of medical file provided by the Romanian legislation, integrates both necessary components of occupational medicine practice for administration of characteristic information related to socio-economic unit, work place, health surveillance as well as components of specific EHR functionality. The application has been submitted for free evaluation by specialist physicians of five counties over a period of nine months and subsequently assessed using a questionnaire on the usefulness of specific functional components in the EHR occupational medicine practice. The model was positively evaluated after experimental employment by occupational health practitioners. They consider that absence of legislative support for EHR implementation in medical practice is the main obstacle to the use of such applications in occupational medicine practice.

  15. Occupational Respiratory Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Shortfall Questionnaire Home Diseases and Conditions Occupational Respiratory Disease Occupational Respiratory Disease Condition Occupational HealthPrevention and WellnessStaying Healthy Share ...

  16. [The operational role of the occupational health physician in the assessment and management of health risks related to night risks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucci, Nicola; Giorgi, Gabriele; Gonnelli, Irene Margherita; Garbarino, Sergio; Cupelli, Vincenzo; Arcangelil, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    The operational role of the occupational health physician in the assessment and management of health risks related to night work. Night work, in the last 30-40 years, has been extended to almost all areas of employment. The potential effects on workers' health--related to the disruption of circadian rhythms--are now well defined and studied in the Literature. All issues about the protection of safety and health for night workers are governed by the Italian Legislative Decree no. 66/2003 and subsequent amendments. The management of night work hasn't been included into the main Law on Occupational Safety and Health (Italian Legislative Decree no. 81/2008 and subsequent amendments) and a coordination between the two disciplines is desirable. The occupational health physician, as a global consultant for the protection of all health issues into a company, has to evaluate the potential effects of night work on health, both individually and as a group of workers. In this way, the physician may use either traditional tools (history, physical examination, blood tests) or innovative tools (questionnaires, health promotion programs, interventions on shift schedules). In the management of night work is useful to employ schedules that respect both psychophysical integrity and social welfare of workers and the needs of the production. The occupational health physician plays a significant role in information and training of workers, both individually and as a group of workers, and in the organization of health promotion programs (whit a voluntary participation by the workers).

  17. Training of occupational therapists for Primary Health Care (PHC: contributions to the debate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Maris Nicolau

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Herein presented are the topics debated at the research group meeting on Training of OccupationalTherapists for Primary Health Care (PHC that took place during the First National Seminar on OccupationalTherapy in PHC, at the XII Brazilian Congress and IX Latin American Congress of Occupational Therapy inOctober 2011 in Sao Paulo, Brazil. In addition, the field of vocational training for PHC is situated within the context of the Unified Health System (UHS and its importance for the training of occupational therapists. Wepresent relevant aspects of specific National Curriculum Guidelines suggested for the professional training atthis level of care, which have also been addressed by the Reorientation of Vocational Training in Health Policy(PRO Health. Experiences gained by the authors’ educational institutions when training at this level of care arealso presented. It was possible to conclude that undergraduate studies at this level of care enables students andteachers to come into close contact with health demands and needs, health-disease process and its determinants,within a scenario closer to the everyday life of the people being cared and the service they receive. The teachingof Occupational Therapy (OT at PHC further allows the debate of its contributions in promoting health andpreventing disease, early diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation, which may facilitate the access to populationspreviously not considered priority by the PHC. This seminar was important for discussing the challenges oflinking the OT profession to the UHS.

  18. Implementation of virtual patients in the training for occupational health in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radon, Katja; Carvalho, Denise; Calvo, Maria Julia; Struempell, Stephanie; Herrera, Veronica; Wengenroth, Laura; Kausel, Gudrun; Marchetti, Nella; Rojas, Daniel Segura; Russ, Paul; Hege, Inga

    2011-01-01

    Health professionals trained in occupational health are essential to reduce the burden of occupational accidents and diseases. However, training resources are limited globally. We aimed to promote occupational health and safety (OHS) using virtual patients (VPs) in Brazil, Chile, and Germany. Virtual patients were created in three Latin-American health centers. So-called "partner VPs" comparing the distinct health care systems were designed. Translation, adaptation to different medical and legal systems, expert review, implementation into under- and postgraduate teaching, and user evaluation were performed. Twelve VPs covering traditional and contemporary OHS issues are available in Spanish, Portuguese, and English. Overall, 2371 students used the VPs. The number of Latin American users who evaluated VP content and relevance for their professional career was statistically significantly higher than the number of German students. VPs are a feasible learning method for OHS in middle-income countries. Partner VPs seem to be useful for teaching global aspects.

  19. Occupational Prestige and Appropriateness: The Views of Mental Health Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvene, Arnold M.; Collins, Anne M.

    1976-01-01

    Because of the extensive social and cultural changes associated with the women's equal rights movement, this study asked questions about how occupational prestige is related to differential views of women's roles with female and male psychotherapists, advanced graduate students, and secondary school counselors. (Author)

  20. Improving occupational safety and health by integration into product development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broberg, Ole

    1996-01-01

    A cross-sectional case study was performed in a large company producing electro-mechanical products for industrial application. The objectives were: (i) to study the product development process and the role of key actors', (ii) to identify current practice on integrating occupational safety and h...

  1. Health Canada compares occupants' health in new R-2000 and conventional houses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2000-11-01

    Health of people moving into new R-2000 and similar new conventional houses were studied by Health Canada. The survey which began in 1996 concentrated on New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. The objective was to identify a scientific foundation for the anecdotal evidence that residents of R-2000 homes experienced significant health benefits. Questionnaires were administered to one member of each household upon moving into the new house, and again one year later. The questionnaire asked about characteristics of the house they were moving from, including perceptions of its indoor air quality , demographics, general level of health, medications taken by each member of the family and whether and to what extent each member of the household experienced each of 13 symptoms such as headache, fatigue, dry or itchy skin, runny nose, blocked nose, sneezing, cough, wheeze, nausea, diarrhoea, and some control symptoms not normally associated with air quality. Preliminary results of this survey indicate that of people who moved into R-2000 houses 94 per cent claimed improved indoor air quality, compared to 77 per cent in conventional houses. Similarly, 56 per cent of R-2000 home occupants reported general health improvements, compared to only 32 per cent in conventional houses. Ten per cent reported deterioration of their health one year after moving into the new houses. A second phase of the survey , which will include more houses, will include measurements of air change rates, mould species and counts, allergens, formaldehyde and volatile organic compounds.

  2. A Mental Health Survey of Different Ethnic and Occupational Groups in Xinjiang, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ailing; Liu, Bo; Jiang, Yu; Zhao, Junling; Zhang, Guanghui; Liu, Jiwen

    2017-01-01

    Poor mental health has become a serious social and public health-care burden. This cross-sectional study used multistage stratified cluster random sampling to gather mental health information from 11,891 adults (18–60 years) employed in various occupations categorized according to the Chinese Standard Occupational Classification. Mental health was measured by the General Health Questionnaire, and participants exceeding the cut-off score were defined as having poor mental health. The overall prevalence of poor mental health was 23.8%. The prevalence of poor mental health was significantly higher in the Han ethnic group than Kazak ethnic group and in health-care workers, teachers, and civil servants compared to manual workers. Females (odds ratios (OR) = 1.139, 95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.012–3.198) and knowledge workers (1.697, 1.097–2.962) were risk factors for poor mental health, while Kazak ethnicity (0.465, 0.466–0.937), other minority status (non-Han) (0.806, 0.205–0.987), and working ≥15 years in the same occupation (0.832, 0.532–0.932) were protective (p mental health in Xinjiang, China, is higher in the Kazak ethnic group than the Han ethnic group. The prevalence of poor mental health is higher among knowledge workers than in manual workers due to high incidences of poor mental health in civil servants, health-care workers, and teachers.

  3. Demands, constructions and challenges experienced by occupational therapists in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda dos Reis

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To understand the demands, constructions and challenges experienced by occupational therapists in primary health care in Fortaleza city, Ceará, Brazil. Methods: This is a qualitative study conducted with 13 occupational therapists of the Support Centers for Family Health. It used the focus group method in March 2011 at the headquarters of the Regional Council of Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy – 6th Region. After the thematic analysis of the material, with theoritical contributions of occupational therapy and collective health, the following categories emerged: construction of work processes; demand and assisted population; contributions and challenges of the occupational therapists. Results: It could be observed that occupational therapists encouraged teams to perform joint actions through health promotion activities for priority groups and created room for planning the construction of comprehensive care between healthcare teams and users, highlighting the challenges of the territory as a space for interdisciplinary achievements, where the problem resolution requires sensitivity and recognition by the professional categories in field. Conclusion: It is understood that diversities and specificities inherent to the territory relate to the needs, and the community daily routine, in addition to the field stresses, counters the team work logic, implying fragility in the actions of supporters. doi:10.5020/18061230.2013.p356

  4. Promoting prevention with economic arguments – The case of Finnish occupational health services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhonen Aki

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both social and ethical arguments have been used to support preventive occupational health services (OHS. During the 1990s it became more common to support political argumentation for occupational health and safety by converting the consequences of ill health at work into monetary units. In addition, OHS has been promoted as a profitable investment for companies, and this aspect has been used by OHS providers in their marketing. Our intention was to study whether preventive occupational health services positively influence a company's economic performance. Methods We combined the financial statements provided by Statistics Finland and employers' reimbursement applications for occupational health services (OHS costs to the Social Insurance Institution. The data covered the years 1997, 1999 and 2001 and over 6000 companies. We applied linear regression analysis to assess whether preventive OHS had had a positive influence on the companies' economic performance after two or four years. Results Resources invested in preventive OHS were not positively related to a company's economic performance. In fact, the total cost of preventive OHS per turnover was negatively correlated to economic performance. Conclusion Even if OHS has no effect on the economic performance of companies, it may have other effects more specific to OHS. Therefore, we recommend that the evaluation of prevention in OHS should move towards outcome measures, such as sickness absence, disability pension and productivity, when applicable, both in occupational health service research and in practice at workplaces.

  5. Occupational risk of overweight and obesity: an analysis of the Australian Health Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merom Dafna

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adults spend about one third of their day at work and occupation may be a risk factor for obesity because of associated socioeconomic and behavioral factors such as physical activity and sedentary time. The aim of this study was to examine body mass index (BMI and prevalence of overweight and obesity by occupation and explore the contributions of socioeconomic factors and lifestyle behaviors (including leisure time and commuting physical activity, diet, smoking, and alcohol to occupational risk. Methods Secondary analyses of the National Health Survey in Australia (2005 were conducted for working age adults (20 to 64 years. Linear and logistic regression models using BMI as either dichotomous or continuous response were computed for occupation type. Model 1 was age-adjusted, Model 2 adjusted for age and socioeconomic variables and Model 3 adjusted for age, socioeconomic variables and lifestyle behaviours. All models were stratified by gender. Results Age-adjusted data indicated that men in associate professional (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.10-1.63 and intermediate production and transport (OR 1.24 95% CI 1.03-1.50 occupations had a higher risk of BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 than those without occupation, and women in professional (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.61-0.82, management (OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.56-0.92 and advanced clerical and service occupations (OR 0.73 95% CI 0.58-0.93 had a lower risk. After adjustment for socioeconomic factors no occupational group had an increased risk but for males, professionals, tradesmen, laborers and elementary clerical workers had a lower risk as did female associate professionals and intermediate clerical workers. Adjustment for lifestyle factors explained the lower risk in the female professional and associate professionals but failed to account for the lower odds ratios in the other occupations. Conclusions The pattern of overweight and obesity among occupations differs by gender. Healthy lifestyle behaviors appear to

  6. Effects on health of non-occupational exposure to airborne mineral fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, M J; Saracci, R

    1989-01-01

    The most prominent potential marker of disease-related non-occupational exposure to mineral fibres is mesothelioma. Although many cases of mesothelioma have resulted from occupational exposure to asbestos, some have been associated with para-occupational domestic and/or neighbourhood exposure and have been reported in case series, case-control studies and a cohort study among non-occupationally exposed subjects. However, little information is available on mesothelioma as a direct consequence of general environmental asbestos exposure. Such cases of mesothelioma related to non-occupational exposure to asbestos as have occurred to date are likely to have resulted from past exposures much higher than those prevailing at the present time (in the developed countries); numbers will therefore probably decrease in the future. Very high rates of mesothelioma have been reported as a result of exposure to erionite. No studies are available on the effects of non-occupational exposure to man-made mineral fibres but, among occupationally exposed workers, a risk of mesothelioma is not apparent. There are suggestions of raised lung cancer rates among household contacts of asbestos workers and among individuals exposed to erionite. Non-malignant parenchymal and pleural abnormalities have been observed in subjects exposed non-occupationally to asbestos and erionite, but these are not necessarily associated with malignant lesions. Quantitative risk estimates of adverse effects on health have not been derived from these studies, essentially because of the absence of fibre exposure measurements.

  7. Establishing Priorities for Occupational Health Research among Women Working in the Maquiladora Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedillo Becerril LA; Harlow; Sánchez; Monroy

    1997-07-01

    In order to estimate the prevalence of potentially hazardous exposures and the frequencies of, types of, and reasons for job transitions among women working in the Mexican maquiladora industry, an age- and occupation-stratified sample of 479 women, aged 16-40 years, living in 12 neighborhoods in Tijuana were interviewed. Considerable transition between industrial sectors was observed. About 20% had left their last job in a maquiladora because of hazardous or stressful working conditions and work-related health problems. Chemical exposures, ergonomic risks, noise, and stress were reported. The sociodemographic characteristics and occupational risk profile of the maquiladora workforce, considered in the broader context of Mexico's development, indicate that occupational health research in the maquiladora should focus on musculoskeletal injuries, adverse reproductive outcomes, neurologic damage, and mental illness. Appropriate methods for investigating occupational risks in a highly mobile workforce will need to be developed in order to avoid sampling bias and identify appropriate comparison groups.

  8. The ratification status of ILO conventions related to occupational safety and health and its relationship with reported occupational fatality rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Donald J; Takahashi, Ken; Sakuragi, Sonoko; Yoshino, Masako; Hoshuyama, Tsutomu; Imai, Teppei; Takala, Jukka

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between the ratification status of occupational safety and health (OSH)-related ILO conventions and reported occupational fatality rates of ILO member countries, while controlling for possible confounding factors. ILO member states were divided into 4 levels of income status, based on the gross national income per capita. Seventeen conventions designated as OSH-related were examined. Reported country occupational fatality rates were compared according to the ratification status of these 17 conventions and multiple regression analyses were conducted to assess the relationship between the fatality rates, ratification status, income level and length of ILO membership. Fatality rates were inversely and significantly related to income levels. In general, non-ratifying countries had higher work-related fatality rates than ratifying countries. A statistical model for identifying predictors of fatal injury rates showed that a larger number of conventions ratified was significantly associated with lower fatality rates. The fact that non-ratifying countries generally have higher fatality rates than ratifying ones supports the notion that all countries should promote ratification of ILO conventions aimed at improving OSH conditions.

  9. Occupational Health Screenings of U.S. Air Force Remotely Piloted Aircraft (Drone) Operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    these operations are being conducted. There are a number of resources to assist RPA operators with identifying and improving occupational health ...access to flight medicine providers, health and wellness resources (such as the base gym ), and programs (e.g., tobacco cessation). Health ...and behaviors of RPA operators to identify areas for change to improve health and morale. The group e-mail invitation to participate had an

  10. Exposure To Violence And Occupational Satisfaction Of Health Personnal In A Health Group Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elcin Balci

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In this study, it evaluted that exposure to violence and effect of this exposure to occupational satisfaction of health personel in Melikgazi Health Group Area. Materials And Methods: This cross sectional and descriptive study was performed in April-May 2006. Sampling not planned, it assumed to reach all of health personel. Data were analysed using computer and chi square test were used for statistical analyses. Lesser than 0,05 values were accepted as statistically significant. Results: Of the research group 66,7 % were female and 33,3 % were male. Mean age was 34,48 ± 5,73 years. Of the study participants were working in health center, 80,4 % day time and 19,6 % in night time and mean duration of working was 11,99 ± 5,3 years. Of the study group 57,1 % were chosen profession willingly and 65,5 % of them didn’t want to their children chose same profession. Of the study group 68,2 % were thought their fare were not enough. Of the study group, 50,3 % were experinced verbal and/or physical violence with different degrees. Of the violence victims 63,6 % were working in night shift of health centers and most of them doctors. Conclusion: Exposure to violence during work effects the satisfaction negativeley. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(1.000: 13-18

  11. Code of Sustainable Practice in Occupational and Environmental Health and Safety for Corporations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castleman, Barry; Allen, Barbara; Barca, Stefania; Bohme, Susanna Rankin; Henry, Emmanuel; Kaur, Amarjit; Massard-Guilbaud, Genvieve; Melling, Joseph; Menendez-Navarro, Alfredo; Renfrew, Daniel; Santiago, Myrna; Sellers, Christopher; Tweedale, Geoffrey; Zalik, Anna; Zavestoski, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    At a conference held at Stony Brook University in December 2007, "Dangerous Trade: Histories of Industrial Hazard across a Globalizing World," participants endorsed a Code of Sustainable Practice in Occupational and Environmental Health and Safety for Corporations. The Code outlines practices that would ensure corporations enact the highest health and environmentally protective measures in all the locations in which they operate. Corporations should observe international guidelines on occupational exposure to air contaminants, plant safety, air and water pollutant releases, hazardous waste disposal practices, remediation of polluted sites, public disclosure of toxic releases, product hazard labeling, sale of products for specific uses, storage and transport of toxic intermediates and products, corporate safety and health auditing, and corporate environmental auditing. Protective measures in all locations should be consonant with the most protective measures applied anywhere in the world, and should apply to the corporations' subsidiaries, contractors, suppliers, distributors, and licensees of technology. Key words: corporations, sustainability, environmental protection, occupational health, code of practice.

  12. Will the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's Proposed Standards for Occupational Exposure to Respirable Crystalline Silica Reduce Workplace Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Susan E; Morriss, Andrew P

    2015-07-01

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is developing regulations to amend existing standards for occupational exposure to respirable crystalline silica by establishing a new permissible exposure limit as well as a series of ancillary provisions for controlling exposure. This article briefly reviews OSHA's proposed regulatory approach and the statutory authority on which it is based. It then evaluates OSHA's preliminary determination of significant risk and its analysis of the risk reduction achievable by its proposed controls. It recognizes that OSHA faces multiple challenges in devising a regulatory approach that reduces exposures and health risks and meets its statutory goal. However, the greatest challenge to reducing risks associated with silica exposure is not the lack of incentives (for either employers or employees) but rather lack of information, particularly information on the relative toxicity of different forms of silica. The article finds that OSHA's proposed rule would contribute little in the way of new information, particularly since it is largely based on information that is at least a decade old--a significant deficiency, given the rapidly changing conditions observed over the last 45 years. The article concludes with recommendations for alternative approaches that would be more likely to generate information needed to improve worker health outcomes.

  13. The occupational safety and health scorecard – a business case example for strategic management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koper, B.; Moller, K.; Zwetsloot, G.I.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Human resources and health issues are crucial in terms of corporate competitiveness. However, systematic, continuous and strategically aligned occupational safety and health (OSH) management is scarcely applied in companies. One major reason for this could be the lack of generally accepte

  14. Health Occupations Education I. Module No. I-A to I-G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunmeyer, Kathryn; And Others

    This set of 7 modules on medical and surgical asepsis is 1 of 11 sets in the Health Occupations Education I instructional package for the first year of a 2-year course of study. The materials are designed to prepare students through individualized instruction for entry-level job opportunities on health care teams in a variety of practice settings.…

  15. 76 FR 73689 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... Labor and the Secretary of Health and Human Services on matters relating to the administration of the OSH Act. NACOSH is a continuing advisory body and operates in accordance with the OSH Act, the Federal... Michaels, Ph.D., MPH, Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health, directed...

  16. Insertion of occupational therapists in the support centers for family health of Fortaleza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Reis

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Today, Family Health Support Centers (FHSC characterize new environment for the activity of occupational therapists in Primary Health Care. Aiming to understand this new insertion we carried out a descriptive study of qualitative nature. Through a focus group, we obtained data on the subject from 13 occupation therapists that have worked in FHSCs in the municipality of Fortaleza, Ceará state, Brazil. The material obtained was categorized by thematic analysis and interpreted based on collective health and occupation therapy frameworks. The results and discussion converged to the categories of (1 Insertion of occupational therapists in the FHSNs studied, and (2 Working conditions: a place characterized by fragilities and overcoming. Our findings point to the need to establish a common agenda between FHSN professionals and Family Health Strategy teams; difficulties in establishing bonds between the supporters and the supported in the work process; working precariousness and material shortage. The encounter of such professionals potentiated reflections about the working processes and the exchange of experiences, raising awareness to new perspectives for occupational therapy in Primary Health Care and to the need to make these professionals’ performances in this specific context more public.

  17. Health impact of climate change on occupational health and productivity in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasitorn Taptagaporn

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The rise in global temperature is well documented. Changes in temperature lead to increases in heat exposure, which may impact health ranging from mild heat rashes to deadly heat stroke. Heat exposure can also aggravate several chronic diseases including cardiovascular and respiratory disease. Objective: This study examined the relationship between climate condition and health status and productivity in two main categories of the occupational setting – where one setting involves heat generated from the industry and the other with heat in a natural setting. Design: This cross-sectional study included four industrial sites (pottery industry, power plant, knife industry, and construction site and one agricultural site in the Pathumthani and Ayutthaya provinces. Exposure data were comprised of meteorological data and heat exposure including relative humidity (RH measured by Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT monitor. Heat index was calculated to measure the effects of heat exposure on the study population, which consisted of 21 workers at five worksites; a questionnaire was also used to collect data on workers. Results: Among the five workplaces, the outdoor WBGT was found to be highest at 34.6°C during 12:00 and 1:00 PM at the agricultural site. It was found that four out of five study sites had heat indices in the ‘extreme caution,’ where heat cramp and exhaustion may be possible and one site showed a value of 41°C that falls into the category of ‘danger,’ where sunstroke and heat exhaustion are likely and prolonged exposure may lead to heatstroke. Productivity as perceived by the workers revealed that only the construction and pottery industry workers had a loss of productivity ranged from 10 to 60 %. Conclusions: Climate conditions in Thailand potentially affect both the health and productivity in occupational settings.

  18. Self-reported occupational health problems among dentists in Himachal Pradesh, India: A descriptive survey

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    Vinay Kumar Bhardwaj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Occupation-related health problems are associated with risk or danger as a consequence of the nature of working conditions. Unique working conditions in dentistry can affect the health of dentists. Aim: The aim of this study is to collect information from dentists in Himachal Pradesh concerning common occupation-related health problems, their knowledge and the precautions they commonly took to avoid such problems. Settings and Design: Questionnaire survey conducted on a systematic random sample of 465 dentists among 1395 dentists registered in the state dental council. Materials and Methods: Questionnaires were sent by mail in September 2011 to systematic random sample of 465 dentists. The dentists were asked to complete the questionnaire and return it by mail using the stamped addressed envelope provided. Statistically Analysis Used: The data were analyzed using the software Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 15 (SPSS Inc., Chicago. Z test was used for statistical comparison. Results: The response rate from the dentists was 81.7%. The most common problem experienced was musculoskeletal pain (46.1% followed by allergic dermatitis of the hands (7.6%. Nearly, all of the respondent dentists wore gloves (100% and face masks (97.4% during work. 1/10 th respondents reported that they had received instructions or training through interactive workshops in occupational health and safety. Conclusions: There seems to be a substantial demand for continuing education on occupational health and safety among dentists in Himachal Pradesh. Hence, more emphasis on occupational health and safety is put into dental training with more continuing education activities on occupational health and safety to practicing dentists.

  19. The Effect of Engagement in Everyday Occupations, Role Overload and Social Support on Health and Life Satisfaction among Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, Michal Avrech; Jarus, Tal

    2015-06-01

    One of the founding assumptions underlying the health professions is the belief that there is a strong relationship between engagement in occupations, health, and wellbeing. The ability to perform everyday occupations (occupational performance) has a positive effect on health and wellbeing. However, there is also conflicting evidence indicating that participation in multiple roles or in certain occupations may lead to poorer health. Therefore, there is a need to better understand this relationship. The purpose of the present study was to examine three possible theoretical models to explain mothers' health and life satisfaction from the perspective of their occupational performance, their role load, and their social support. 150 married mothers, ages of 25-45, who had at least one child between the ages of one to ten years, participated in the study. Data were collected by using seven self-report questionnaires. The models were analyzed using Structural Equation Modeling. The results show that social support has a direct effect on mothers' physical health and life satisfaction and an indirect effect, mediated through the occupational performance variables, on mothers' mental health and life satisfaction. Role overload does not affect mothers' health and life satisfaction. These results suggest that mothers could benefit from health programs that help them manage their occupational routines. Such programs should focus on improving the mother's occupational performance and adapting her social environment to fit her occupational needs.

  20. The Effect of Engagement in Everyday Occupations, Role Overload and Social Support on Health and Life Satisfaction among Mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Avrech Bar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the founding assumptions underlying the health professions is the belief that there is a strong relationship between engagement in occupations, health, and wellbeing. The ability to perform everyday occupations (occupational performance has a positive effect on health and wellbeing. However, there is also conflicting evidence indicating that participation in multiple roles or in certain occupations may lead to poorer health. Therefore, there is a need to better understand this relationship. The purpose of the present study was to examine three possible theoretical models to explain mothers’ health and life satisfaction from the perspective of their occupational performance, their role load, and their social support. 150 married mothers, ages of 25–45, who had at least one child between the ages of one to ten years, participated in the study. Data were collected by using seven self-report questionnaires. The models were analyzed using Structural Equation Modeling. The results show that social support has a direct effect on mothers’ physical health and life satisfaction and an indirect effect, mediated through the occupational performance variables, on mothers’ mental health and life satisfaction. Role overload does not affect mothers’ health and life satisfaction. These results suggest that mothers could benefit from health programs that help them manage their occupational routines. Such programs should focus on improving the mother’s occupational performance and adapting her social environment to fit her occupational needs.

  1. Occupational physical activity assessment for chronic disease prevention and management: A review of methods for both occupational health practitioners and researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Kenneth A; Browning, Raymond C

    2016-01-01

    Occupational physical activity (OPA) is an occupational exposure that impacts worker health. OPA is amenable to measurement and modification through the hierarchy of controls. Occupational exposure scientists have roles in addressing inadequate physical activity, as well as excessive or harmful physical activity. Occupational health researchers can contribute to the development of novel OPA exposure assessment techniques and to epidemiologic studies examining the health impacts of physical activity at work. Occupational health practitioners stand to benefit from understanding the strengths and limitations of physical activity measurement approaches, such as accelerometers in smartphones, which are already ubiquitous in many workplaces and in some worksite health programs. This comprehensive review of the literature provides an overview of physical activity monitoring for occupational exposure scientists. This article summarizes data on the public health implications of physical activity at work, highlighting complex relationships with common chronic diseases. This article includes descriptions of several techniques that have been used to measure physical activity at work and elsewhere, focusing in detail on pedometers, accelerometers, and Global Positioning System technology. Additional subjective and objective measurement strategies are described as well.

  2. Industrial Counseling: Linking Occupational and Environmental Health in Tanneries of Kanpur, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öry; Rahman; Shukla; Zwaag; Burdorf

    1996-10-01

    This paper describes an occupational health program in tanneries in Kanpur, India. The program was instituted as part of a bilateral cooperative effort of India and The Netherlands focusing on providing engineering solutions to prevent industrial waste and community sewage from polluting the Ganges river. The occupational health program was linked to the environmental activities by adopting the concept of industrial counseling. This method aims to increase production and product quality of enterprises and at the same time improve working conditions in these enterprises. The tanneries in Kanpur were targeted for industrial counseling by the Indo-Dutch Environmental and Sanitary Engineering Project Kanpur- Mirzapur under the Ganga Action Plan. Recovery of chrome from wastewater, automation of hydraulic press machines, use of an air-pollution-prevention system in the spray-painting section, and automation of transport are examples of measures used to increase productivity and improve leather quality. Working conditions were improved by adding local exhaust ventilation, mechanizing material transfer, instituting safer procedures for storage and use of toxic materials, and introducing breathing apparatus for operations done in confined spaces to prevent hydrogen sulfide intoxication. The linkage of occupational health problems to environmental issues proved to be effective in drawing attention to working conditions. Also, the application of simple survey techniques to identify and evaluate environmental and occupational hazards substantially increased awareness of these hazards and comprehension of the need to adopt changes among employers, workers, and occupational health professionals. The article discusses the core elements of this successful program.

  3. Creating a Culture of Prevention in Occupational Safety and Health Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yangho; Park, Jungsun; Park, Mijin

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of occupational injuries and diseases associated with industrialization has declined markedly following developments in science and technology, such as engineering controls, protective equipment, safer machinery and processes, and greater adherence to regulations and labor inspections. Although the introduction of health and safety management systems has further decreased the incidence of occupational injuries and diseases, these systems are not effective unless accompanied by a positive safety culture in the workplace. The characteristics of work in the 21(st) century have given rise to new issues related to workers' health, such as new types of work-related disorders, noncommunicable diseases, and inequality in the availability of occupational health services. Overcoming these new and emerging issues requires a culture of prevention at the national level. The present paper addresses: (1) how to change safety cultures in both theory and practice at the level of the workplace; and (2) the role of prevention culture at the national level.

  4. Complying with Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations: a guide for compounding pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixon, Bill; Nain, John

    2013-01-01

    In the compounding pharmacy, compliance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations is essential to protect employees and customers from exposure to hazardous substances and a dangerous environment, to avert heavy fines and penalties levied for noncompliance, and to fulfill the moral obligation of pharmacists to do no harm. Without adequate vigilance, compounders are vulnerable to lapses in adherence to Occupational Safety and Health Administration requirements, the results of which can be dire in a climate of increased scrutiny about the safety and integrity of pharmaceutical compounding. Proactively addressing necessary compliance with essential safety regulations can only benefit compounders and their staff and clients, and guidance from an expert in Occupational Safety and Health Administration requirements can be a key factor in accomplishing that goal.

  5. Improving occupational safety and health among Mexican immigrant workers: a binational collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael A; Check, Pietra; Eggerth, Donald E; Tonda, Josana

    2013-11-01

    Latino immigrants are 50% more likely than all workers in the United States to experience a fatal injury at work. Occupational safety and health (OSH) organizations often find that the approaches and networks they successfully use to promote OSH among U.S.-born workers are ineffective at reaching Latino immigrants. This article describes the collaboration between the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and the Mexican Ministry of Foreign Affairs (Secretaría de Relaciones Exteriores) to promote OSH among Mexican immigrant workers. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs operates 50 consulates throughout the U.S. that provide four million discrete service contacts with Mexican citizens annually. The focus of this ongoing collaboration is to develop the internal capacity of Mexican institutions to promote OSH among Mexican immigrants while simultaneously developing NIOSH's internal capacity to create effective and sustainable initiatives to better document and reduce occupational health disparities for Mexican immigrants in the U.S.

  6. Factors Predicting the Provision of Smoking Cessation Services Among Occupational Health Nurses in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatdokmaiprai, Kannikar; Kalampakorn, Surintorn; McCullagh, Marjorie; Lagampan, Sunee; Keeratiwiriyaporn, Sansanee

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors predicting occupational health nurses' provision of smoking cessation services. Data were collected via a self-administered questionnaire distributed to 254 occupational health nurses in Thailand. Analysis by structural equation modeling revealed that self-efficacy directly and positively influenced smoking cessation services, and mediated the relationship between workplace factors, nurse factors, and smoking cessation services. The final model had good fit to the data, accounting for 20.4% and 38.0% of the variance in self-efficacy and smoking cessation services, respectively. The findings show that self-efficacy is a mediator that influences provision of smoking cessation services by occupational health nurses. Interventions to enhance nurses' self-efficacy in providing smoking cessation services are expected to promote provision of smoking cessation services to workers.

  7. The discipline of ergonomics in Cuba within the occupational health framework: background and trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Yaniel; Rodríguez, Yordán; Viña, Silvio

    2013-01-01

    The concept of ergonomics was introduced in Cuba at the beginning of the 1970s. More than 40 years later, the prevailing approach to workers' health is still generally reactive rather than proactive, despite the commitment of the government to the subject. A factor influencing this issue is, generally, lack of recognition of the benefits of establishing ergonomic principles within most occupational activities. Recent progress to move occupational health practice toward a more preventive approach has been conducted, frequently with international support. The introduction of a set of Cuban standards proposing the necessity of ergonomic evaluations is an example of this progress. The main challenge for Cuban ergonomists is to transfer knowledge to occupational health practitioners in order to be in concordance with basic standards and regulations regarding ergonomics. The article offers a short description of the history of ergonomics and an overview of ergonomics practice in Cuba.

  8. The injured and diseased farmer: occupational health, embodiment and technologies of harm and care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelock, Kirsten

    2012-05-01

    Occupational health in agriculture is a significant public health issue in industrialised agricultural nations. This article reports on 26 in-depth interviews with farmers throughout New Zealand. Farmers are exposed to a range of technologies which place them at risk of injury and disease and/or prevent injury and disease. In this article these technologies are respectively conceptualised as technologies of harm and technologies of care. Despite being vulnerable to high rates of injury, fatality and occupationally related diseases the uptake of technologies of care amongst farmers in New Zealand is poor. The analysis draws on body theory to explore the meaning attached to injury and disease and to examine the socio-cultural field of agriculture. It is argued that the key features of subjective embodiment and social, cultural and symbolic capital can undermine the uptake of technologies of care, ensuring poor occupational health outcomes on New Zealand farms.

  9. Posttraumatic stress disorder in reserve veterans: important reintegration considerations for the occupational health nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Lynn A; Burns, Candace

    2015-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a serious mental health concern for returning U.S. military personnel who have a higher prevalence rate of PTSD than the general population. Among the military population, reserve service members are at increased risk of developing PTSD compared with full-time active duty service members mainly due to difficulty reintegrating into civilian life. Understanding the social risk factors along with the protective effects social support has on PTSD in veterans will provide occupational health professionals the opportunity to support reserve veterans with adjustment into post-deployment life. This literature review examines PTSD in reserve veterans, with a focus on occupational factors, social factors, guideline recommendations, available resources, as well as provides suggestions for occupational health nurses caring for reserve veterans returning to the workplace.

  10. Role of occupational health in managing non-communicable diseases in Brunei Darussalam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pg Khalifah Pg Ismail

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Like most ASEAN countries, Brunei faces an epidemic of non-communicable diseases. To deal with the complexity of NCDs prevention, all perspectives - be it social, familial or occupational – need to be considered. In Brunei Darussalam, occupational health services (OHS offered by its Ministry of Health, among others, provide screening and management of NCDs at various points of service. The OHS does not only issue fitness to work certificates, but is a significant partner in co-managing patients’ health conditions, with the advantage of further management at the workplace. Holistic approach of NCD management in the occupational setting is strengthened with both employer and employee education and participation, targeting several approaches including risk management and advocating healthy lifestyles as part of a healthy workplace programme.

  11. Wounding the messenger: the new economy makes occupational health indicators too good to be true.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azaroff, Lenore S; Lax, Michael B; Levenstein, Charles; Wegman, David H

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and workers' compensation insurers reported dramatic drops in rates of occupational injuries and illnesses during the 1990s. The authors argue that far-reaching changes in the 1980s and 1990s, including the rise of precarious employment, falling wages and opportunities, and the creation of a super-vulnerable population of immigrant workers, probably helped create this apparent trend by preventing employees from reporting some injuries and illnesses. Changes in the health care system, including loss of access to health care for growing numbers of workers and increased obstacles to the use of workers' compensation, compounded these effects by preventing the diagnosis and documentation of some occupational injuries and illnesses. Researchers should examine these forces more closely to better understand trends in occupational health.

  12. Career choices in allied health: A study of influencing factors on students of medical technology at an Indian University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sammita J Jadhav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In India, entry level medical technology (MT students usually decide their career choice before the commencement of the graduate programs. There is no provision for assimilating the intricacies of different specializations in the field of MT. Aim: The research aims at identifying the factors that play a major role in reaching a career choice by MT students and disseminating this information to stakeholders for effective program design and delivery. Setting and Designs: An exploratory study was carried out at an Indian university on 78 students of MT programs in Cardiac care, dialysis, respiratory therapy, imaging sciences, clinical laboratory, operation theater and Anesthesia technology. Materials and Methods: Students were surveyed to ascertain the influencing factors that shape their preferences for career choice preceded by focus group interview. Statistical Analysis: Data was analyzed using SPSS Inc. Version 16.0; frequency distribution was used to obtain valid percentage. Cross tabulation was used to arrive at P value. Results: The prime factors influencing career choices emerged as Hospital infrastructure (91.3%, working environment (87%, alumni (P = 0.04 and status of specialization (P = 0.02 at 95% of the confidence interval however; profile of patient, use of equipment and career growth (78% also played an influential role. Conclusion: It is critical to understand and address the influencing factors that affect career choices; necessitating academia and the health care industry to partner in creating better adapted medical technologists.

  13. [The application of two occupation health risk assessment models in a wooden furniture manufacturing industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, A H; Leng, P B; Bian, G L; Li, X H; Mao, G C; Zhang, M B

    2016-10-20

    Objective: To explore the applicability of 2 different models of occupational health risk assessment in wooden furniture manufacturing industry. Methods: American EPA inhalation risk model and ICMM model of occupational health risk assessment were conducted to assess occupational health risk in a small wooden furniture enterprises, respectively. Results: There was poor protective measure and equipment of occupational disease in the plant. The concentration of wood dust in the air of two workshops was over occupational exposure limit (OEL) , and the CTWA was 8.9 mg/m(3) and 3.6 mg/m(3), respectively. According to EPA model, the workers who exposed to benzene in this plant had high risk (9.7×10(-6) ~34.3×10(-6)) of leukemia, and who exposed to formaldehyde had high risk (11.4 × 10(-6)) of squamous cell carcinoma. There were inconsistent evaluation results using the ICMM tools of standard-based matrix and calculated risk rating. There were very high risks to be attacked by rhinocarcinoma of the workers who exposed to wood dust for the tool of calculated risk rating, while high risk for the tool of standard-based matrix. For the workers who exposed to noise, risk of noise-induced deafness was unacceptable and medium risk using two tools, respectively. Conclusion: Both EPA model and ICMM model can appropriately predict and assessthe occupational health risk in wooden furniture manufactory, ICMM due to the relatively simple operation, easy evaluation parameters, assessment of occupational- disease-inductive factors comprehensively, and more suitable for wooden furniture production enterprise.

  14. National Occupational Health Service policies and programs for workers in small-scale industries in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, S; Sheng, W; Levine, S P

    2000-01-01

    Over the 14 years since economic reform began, and the restructuring of the economy to encourage international trade, a large number of township enterprises have been developed and put into operation in the Peoples Republic of China. From 1978 to 1991, the number of enterprises has increased 11.5 times; the number of employees has increased 2.4 times; the fixed assets have increased 13.7 times; and the value of the total output has increased 22.5 times. In this article, a report is given on a sample survey in 30 counties in 1990, which showed that 82.69% of rural industrial enterprises had at least one type of occupational hazard in their work environments. Workers engaged in at least one type of hazardous working environment accounted for 33.91% of the blue-collar workers. Physical examinations were performed for seven types of occupational diseases: silicosis, coal worker's pneumoconiosis, asbestosis, chronic lead poisoning, benzene analogs poisoning, chronic chromium poisoning, and noise-induced hearing loss. The total detectable rate of the seven types of occupational diseases was 4.4% among those workers. In addition, 11% had illnesses suspected of being (though not proven to be) caused by occupational exposures. Most township enterprises do not provide basic occupational health services. The coverage of five routine occupational health service activities provided for township enterprises were very limited, from 1.4 to 36%.

  15. The occupational therapist in Primary Health Care: representation in journals and Brazilian congresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Gonçalves de Carrasco Bassi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the 2000’s, supported by governmental investments in the Family Health Strategy, reflections onthe subject of Primary Health Care (PHC began to arise, which in Brazil was called Basic Health Care. As partof the research in the Primary Health Care matter, an analysis on the occupational therapy work in this contextwas carried out. This article seeks to present a discussion map of the category about its intervention in the areabased in two national Journals of Occupational Therapy and the main local forum of discussion, the Brazilian Congress of Occupational Therapy. Articles with this thematic published between 2000 and 2011, as well as thescientific knowledge presented in the last seven congresses (1999-2011 were searched. Twenty-one full articleson this theme published in specialized Periodicals during this period were selected. The investigation showed thatmost articles related to the assistance of the occupational therapist to disabled people in Primary Health Care,mainly results of research and education studies carried out by universities from the State of Sao Paulo. Withrespect to the papers presented in the congresses, from a total of 3755, 191 (5% scientific congress presentationsconcerned Primary Health Care. Results showed an increase in the discussions on this theme during the studyperiod. It was possible to conclude that more importance has been given to this theme and more comprehensiveresearches are needed to support knowledge improvement in this field.

  16. Occupational Therapy and Sexual and Reproductive Health Promotion in Adolescence: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontijo, Daniela Tavares; de Sena e Vasconcelos, Anna Carolina; Monteiro, Rosana Juliet Silva; Facundes, Vera Lúcia Dutra; Trajano, Maria de Fátima Cordeiro; de Lima, Luciane Soares

    2016-03-01

    Occupational therapy can contribute to sexual and reproductive health through health education. The purpose of this study was to describe an occupational therapy intervention aimed at sexual and reproductive health promotion in adolescents. Fifty-eight adolescents were involved in the study, before, during and after the interventions. Educative activities such as puzzles, storytelling, mime and board games were used, which occupational therapy faculty and students had constructed. The games were employed as mediators for gaining knowledge in sexual and reproductive health. Outcome was measured using a questionnaire, audio recordings and field diaries. The data were analysed by descriptive statistics and thematic content analysis. The results showed the adolescents' increased knowledge of sexual and reproductive health information immediately after the intervention. The thematic analysis was grouped into three categories: the adolescents' initial expectations regarding the project, reflections on the process experienced during the interventions and use of educational games by occupational therapists. The importance of rapport and dialogue was highlighted in the construction of interventions based on participatory methods. The absence of a longitudinal follow-up is a limitation in this study. Further research is important to systematically assess sexual health promotion strategies in adolescence.

  17. Overview and characteristics of some occupational exposures and health risks on offshore oil and gas installations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Ron

    2003-04-01

    This review considers the nature, and recognition and control, of health risks in the offshore oil and gas industry from the occupational hygiene point of view. Particular attention is given to the changes in the nature of exposure and control of inhalation risks from substances hazardous to health in the UK sector, but other risks (e.g. dermatitis, noise and vibration) are also considered. The amount of published information on exposure to these hazards in the sector, or indeed on long-term health outcomes of working offshore, is limited. The approach taken to occupational health and hygiene in the sector has to be set in the context of the challenge of working in a remote and hostile environment where attention to safety and the need for emergency response to acute, rather than chronic, medical events are vital. However, changes in attitudes towards occupational health in the sector, legislation, the impact of environmental protection requirements and technology have all contributed to increasing the attention given to assessment and control of chemical and physical hazards. The health risks and benefits associated with the abandonment of installations, the application of new technologies, recovery of oil from ever deeper waters, lower staffing levels, environmental changes, the ageing workforce and the recognition of exposure patterns needing further attention/control (sequential multiple exposures, smaller workforce, peak/short-term exposures, etc.) are other current and future occupational hygiene challenges.

  18. Enfermagem na equipa de saúde ocupacional Salud laboral en enfermería Nursing in the occupational health team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Santos

    2012-03-01

    Economic Evaluation Database, entender qué lugar ocupa la enfermería en el equipo de salud laboral y describir cómo esta se lleva a cabo en diferentes países con diversas perspectivas y objetivos. La salud laboral incluye actualmente un enfoque integral, que abarca aspectos no laborales que interfieren en la salud del trabajador y puede englobar a la familia y/o a la comunidad. A nivel internacional, las tareas predominantemente curativas han dado paso a otras de prevención y de gestión, con numerosos programas que la enfermera de salud laboral está capacitada para dirigir, asumiendo así un papel central, completo e integrativo dentro del equipo. Por último, es fundamental cuantificar los costes de las actividades previas y posteriores para valorizar su trabajo financieramente, atendiendo así a la gestión de la entidad empleadora.Portuguese law does not define the precise qualifications of occupational health nurses or their role in the occupational health team. A literature review was carried out using the keywords “nursing work and occupational health,” in the databases Medline with Full Text, MedicLatina, Academic Search, CINAHL Plus with Full Text, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systemic Reviews, Cochrane Methodology Register, Nursing and Allied Health Collection, Health Technology Assess and NHS Economic Evaluation Database, The aim was to understand the place of nursing in occupational health, describing how this is implemented in different countries with different perspectives and goals. Occupational health now uses a comprehensive approach which includes non-work aspects that interfere with worker health and may include family and/or community. Internationally, predominantly curative tasks have given way to others centered on prevention and management, with numerous programs that the occupational health nurse is able to lead, assuming a central role, fully integrated within the team. Finally, it is crucial to

  19. Integrating occupational safety and health information into vocational and technical education and other workforce preparation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Paul A; Stephenson, Carol Merry; Okun, Andrea H; Palassis, John; Biddle, Elyce

    2005-03-01

    The high rates of injury among young workers are a pressing public health issue, especially given the demand of the job market for new workers. Young and new workers experience the highest rates of occupational injuries of any age group. Incorporating occupational safety and health (OSH) information into the more than 20 000 vocational and other workforce preparation programs in the United States might provide a mechanism for reducing work-related injuries and illnesses among young and new workers. We assessed the status of including OSH information or training in workforce preparation programs and found there is an inconsistent emphasis on OSH information.

  20. Application of coal mine dynamic safety management and occupational health and safety management system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hua; WANG Chun-qiu; CAO Qing-gui; LIU Ye-jiao; LIN Xiao-fei

    2007-01-01

    A method system was put forward based on the occupational health and safety management system to develop the dynamic safety management of coal mine. It aimed at the problems in the mining safety management and was put in practice in Lingxin coal mine of Ningxia Coal Industry Group Co., Ltd.. And good effect was obtained in safety work. It developed the mining dynamic safety management based on the building of occupational health and safety management system of mining enterprise and its main contents are as follows: timely identification and dynamic control of accident risk, persistent improvement of safety management performance according to the "PDCA" circle.

  1. Incorporation of occupational health and safety in cleaner production projects in South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedlund, Frank Huess

    2002-01-01

    occupational health and safety into the environmental activities that take place at company level. Two ways of doing so are explored, the main distinction being company size. For large companies, integration of management systems may be attractive. For small companies, integration into a less formal network......The purpose of this research is to reveal ways in which occupational health and safety can be integrated in environmental cleaner production projects. Of particular interest are those cleaner production projects that are run by the Danish government's environmental assistance agency, Danced...

  2. [Occupational health care as a basis of occupational medicine monitoring in small companies. Common occupational medicine/ergonomic approach to prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schian, H M

    1991-11-01

    Set out from various specific angles, the concept concerning a modern common industrial medicine/safety/ergonomics approach can be fitted into the present legal framework. Adapted according to specific needs, this approach can equally be applied in all areas--health promotion, prevention, cure, rehabilitation. Those involved in the current debate about industrial health policies start out from the premise that industrial medicine could contribute strongly in this respect. While the workmen's compensation scheme, together with the industrial medical profession, is to a considerable extent involved in the subject as a whole on the basis of the industrial safety Act, its competencies are however limited, being in actual fact confined to the field of health maintenance in the occupational context. The examinations they effect in this framework cannot be based on a holistic medical orientation, because our constitution has expressly excluded the private sphere of the individual (self-management domain). Hence, there are very little chances of success for any attempt of changing current health care practice solely via the workmen's compensation administrations. It currently is, rather, the health and pension insurance schemes who hold the potential for influence. The common approach of industrial medicine, safety and ergonomics outlined may be of considerable use also in view of their goals, and holds sufficient justification for their intervening favourably in the ongoing debate about quality and quantity of industrial medical service provision with the ministries in charge.

  3. Mexican urban occupational health in the US: a population at risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gany, Francesca; Dobslaw, Rebecca; Ramirez, Julia; Tonda, Josana; Lobach, Iryna; Leng, Jennifer

    2011-04-01

    Mexicans are the largest immigrant group in the US. Little is known about their urban occupational health status. We assess occupational illness, injury, and safety training among New York City Mexican immigrants. This study is a consecutive sample of the Mexican immigrant population utilizing Mexican Consulate services in New York City over two weeks in March 2009. Bilingual research assistants approached persons waiting in line at the Consulate and administered an occupational health questionnaire. 185 people agreed to participate. Most work in restaurants (37%), cleaning (18%), construction (12%), babysitting/nanny (7%), retail (9%), and factories (5%). 22% had received safety training. 18% reported work-related pain or illness. 18% suffered from a job-related injury since immigrating. Most injuries were in construction, factories, and restaurants. 29% had not reported their injury. This study provides evidence that the urban Mexican immigrant population is at high risk for work-related illness and injury, is not receiving adequate safety training, and is under-reporting occupational injury. Culturally and linguistically responsive community outreach programs are needed to provide occupational health and safety information and resources for urban Mexican workers.

  4. Occupational Therapy in Primary Health Care: reflections on the populations assisted

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Leme Gomes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This work is the result of reflections of a group discussion among professionals, students and teachersheld during the First Symposium on Occupational Therapy in Primary Health Care (PHC in 2011, which aimedto reflect on issues related to the populations assisted by the occupational therapist in PHC. The discussionssuggested two areas of consideration: (1 the challenges in the composition of care lines as well as living conditionsof the population assisted by occupational therapy; (2 the general practice of occupational therapists and theirinclusion in interdisciplinary teams. Participants reported that, in PHC, they provide assistance to populationstraditionally accompanied by Occupational Therapy such as people under psychological distress, people with disabilities, children with developmental delay, among others. The discussion pointed out that the difficultyof access to services, the weakness in the constitution of the lines of comprehensive health care and neglectof services to a number of groups that are excluded from care, define the profile of the population monitoredand the potential of assistance. These factors are related to the formation of PHC and “SUS” (Brazilian HealthSystem in the country. On the other hand, the living conditions of the population assisted, marked by povertyand social exclusion, the fragmentation of PHC practices, and the need for the professional to have a generalistprofile, being able to act interdisciplinarily and intersectorally, were considered crucial for the construction ofnew working tolls, theoretical improvement, and greater theoretical basis of professional performance in PHC.

  5. Occupational Research; Health Occupations Education Abstracts of Iowa Research, 1960-1968.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbits, Thomas F., Comp.

    Thirty-five abstracts represent studies on administration, ambulance service, comprehensive health manpower planning, curriculum, dental hygiene, graduate follow-up, hospital inservice training, the medical-surgical staff nurse position, nonprofessional rehabilitation personnel, economics of collective bargaining by nurses, operating room…

  6. Knowledge and Attitudes of Allied Health Professional Students regarding the Stroke Rehabilitation Team and the Role of the Speech and Language Therapist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Aine; Pettigrew, Catharine M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: One of the major barriers to effective team working among healthcare professionals is a lack of knowledge of each other's roles. The importance of understanding Irish healthcare students' attitudes towards team working and each other's roles led to the development of this study. Aims: The aims were to investigate allied health…

  7. Occupational safety and health, green chemistry, and sustainability: a review of areas of convergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Paul A; McKernan, Lauralynn T; Heidel, Donna S; Okun, Andrea H; Dotson, Gary Scott; Lentz, Thomas J; Geraci, Charles L; Heckel, Pamela E; Branche, Christine M

    2013-04-15

    With increasing numbers and quantities of chemicals in commerce and use, scientific attention continues to focus on the environmental and public health consequences of chemical production processes and exposures. Concerns about environmental stewardship have been gaining broader traction through emphases on sustainability and "green chemistry" principles. Occupational safety and health has not been fully promoted as a component of environmental sustainability. However, there is a natural convergence of green chemistry/sustainability and occupational safety and health efforts. Addressing both together can have a synergistic effect. Failure to promote this convergence could lead to increasing worker hazards and lack of support for sustainability efforts. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has made a concerted effort involving multiple stakeholders to anticipate and identify potential hazards associated with sustainable practices and green jobs for workers. Examples of potential hazards are presented in case studies with suggested solutions such as implementing the hierarchy of controls and prevention through design principles in green chemistry and green building practices. Practical considerations and strategies for green chemistry, and environmental stewardship could benefit from the incorporation of occupational safety and health concepts which in turn protect affected workers.

  8. Strategies and policies deteriorate occupational health situation in India: A review based on social determinant framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandal Asish

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Overwhelming evidence shows that hazardous work, working conditions, and environment fail to maintain homeostasis results in death or severe disability. Up to the 1980s, governments did not pay major attention to occupational health in developing countries, including India. The Bhopal Gas Tragedy, in 1984, was the turning point in the history of health and safety in India. It was time for the government to think deeply and review the existing legislative measures, for the upliftment of the occupational health situation in India. However, all the services remain grossly underutilized because of inadequate strategies, policies, and the lack of a proper monitoring mechanism, for occupational workers. The present study reviews the fact that Inaction or Destruction of Demands, Use of Power, Appeal to the existing bias of the system, and Exportation and Flexibility of the workers are some of the main reasons for the alarming situation of the Occupational Health Policy (OHP in India. The existing and traditional condition of the laborers before and after independence is also highlighted in this article. Finally the threats are identified and options are provided to improve the health conditions of the workers.

  9. Occupational safety and health, green chemistry, and sustainability: a review of areas of convergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    With increasing numbers and quantities of chemicals in commerce and use, scientific attention continues to focus on the environmental and public health consequences of chemical production processes and exposures. Concerns about environmental stewardship have been gaining broader traction through emphases on sustainability and “green chemistry” principles. Occupational safety and health has not been fully promoted as a component of environmental sustainability. However, there is a natural convergence of green chemistry/sustainability and occupational safety and health efforts. Addressing both together can have a synergistic effect. Failure to promote this convergence could lead to increasing worker hazards and lack of support for sustainability efforts. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has made a concerted effort involving multiple stakeholders to anticipate and identify potential hazards associated with sustainable practices and green jobs for workers. Examples of potential hazards are presented in case studies with suggested solutions such as implementing the hierarchy of controls and prevention through design principles in green chemistry and green building practices. Practical considerations and strategies for green chemistry, and environmental stewardship could benefit from the incorporation of occupational safety and health concepts which in turn protect affected workers. PMID:23587312

  10. Functional assessment in mental health: lessons from occupational therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Joan C.; Holm, Margo B.

    2016-01-01

    Occupational therapists have been conducting functional assessments since World War I, and this accumulated experience has taught us several critical lessons. First, a comprehensive profile of a patient's functioning requires multiple assessment methods. Second, assessment content and measurement constructs must change with the times. Third, technology can enhance and extend functional assessment. Fourth, performance-based assessments of everyday activities can also be used to measure body functions/impairments. However, while deconstructing activities into body functions/impairments is possible, the results do not reflect patients' abilities to integrate the cognitive, motor, sensory and affective functions necessary to complete a complex activity. Finally, the differential complexity of everyday activities that a patient can master or successfully complete can also provide a ruler with which to measure progress. PMID:27489454

  11. Functional assessment in mental health: lessons from occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Joan C; Holm, Margo B

    2016-06-01

    Occupational therapists have been conducting functional assessments since World War I, and this accumulated experience has taught us several critical lessons. First, a comprehensive profile of a patient's functioning requires multiple assessment methods. Second, assessment content and measurement constructs must change with the times. Third, technology can enhance and extend functional assessment. Fourth, performance-based assessments of everyday activities can also be used to measure body functions/impairments. However, while deconstructing activities into body functions/impairments is possible, the results do not reflect patients' abilities to integrate the cognitive, motor, sensory and affective functions necessary to complete a complex activity. Finally, the differential complexity of everyday activities that a patient can master or successfully complete can also provide a ruler with which to measure progress.

  12. [Return on investment for occupational health: review of methods and recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydlewska-Liszkowska, Izabela

    2010-01-01

    The impact of the population health on the national economy, occupational risk factors and economic consequences of workers' behaviors in the workplace are the subject of health economics studies. Conditions and behaviors at work are recognized as one of the major economic factors. These relations are analyzed and evaluated with use of methods that combine economic consequences of working conditions, management and enterprise finances. The methods of assessing this impact are well known but the ability to implement them in practice is still limited. There are two main types of methods: methods for measuring economic relations between the work environment and enterprise management and methods for the economic analysis of investments in the work environment and occupational health. Methods for assessing economic effectiveness of working conditions limited to measurements of costs of absenteeism at work are also used. One of the methodological options in this regard is return on investment (ROI) for occupational health. ROI has been applied in many firms all over the world. Depending on the analytical assumptions and the scope of research, the ROI value ranged between more than 1 and 13. This means that the increase in return on investment for occupational health has been observed. There are examples that the return on invested resources cannot be always obtained. ROI accounting gives employers an opportunity of increasing effectiveness. Evidence of the real value of health investment enables to provide the platform of discussion among managers and other persons responsible for occupational health management. The results of the studies cannot be overestimated as an element of economic incentives system. Based on the review of the methods and results of their implementation some recommendations can be formulated.

  13. The Mental Vitality @ Work study: design of a randomized controlled trial on the effect of a workers' health surveillance mental module for nurses and allied health professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.R. Gärtner; S.M. Ketelaar; O. Smeets; L. Bolier; E. Fischer; F.J.H. van Dijk; K. Nieuwenhuijsen; J.K. Sluiter

    2011-01-01

    Employees in health care service are at high risk for developing mental health complaints. The effects of mental health complaints on work can have serious consequences for the quality of care provided by these workers. To help health service workers remain healthy and productive, preventive actions

  14. Occupational health and environment research 1983: Health, Safety, and Environment Division. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voelz, G.L. (comp.)

    1985-05-01

    The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environmental protection. These activities are designed to protect the workers, the public, and the environment. Evaluation of respiratory protective equipment included the XM-30 and M17A1 military masks, use of MAG-1 spectacles in respirators, and eight self-contained units. The latter units were used in an evaluation of test procedures used for Bureau of Mines approval of breathing apparatuses. Analyses of air samples from field studies of a modified in situ oil shale retorting facility were performed for total cyclohexane extractables and selected polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. Aerosols generation and characterization of effluents from oil shale processing were continued as part of an inhalation toxicology study. Additional data on plutonium excretion in urine are presented and point up problems in using the Langham equation to predict plutonium deposition in the body from long-term excretion data. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1983 showed the highest estimated radiation dose from Laboratory operations to be about 26% of the natural background radiation dose. Several studies on radionuclides and their transport in the Los Alamos environment are described. The chemical quality of surface and ground water near the geothermal hot dry rock facility is described. Short- and long-term consequences to man from releases of radionuclides into the environment can be simulated by the BIOTRAN computer model, which is discussed brirfly.

  15. Occupational therapists' experience of working with immigrant clients in mental health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooremamali, Parvin; Persson, Dennis; Eklund, Mona

    2011-06-01

    Sweden's cultural diversity generates considerable challenges for occupational therapists. The aim of this study was to explore experiences and perceptions of occupational therapists working with immigrant psychiatric clients from the Middle East region. The study included interviews with eight occupational therapists employed in mental health care and working in a variety of settings. The data collection and analysis were carried out in accordance with the grounded theory approach. One core category, "the challenges of the multicultural therapeutic journey-a journey on a winding road" was identified. The core category included three categories: dilemmas in clinical practice, feelings and thoughts, and building cultural bridges, in turn comprising sub-categories and components. The results showed that the many dilemmas influencing effective multicultural occupational therapy were cultural, societal, and professional in nature. The dilemmas influenced feelings and thoughts, in turn influencing both motivation for seeking cultural knowledge and choice of adequate strategies in which the multicultural therapeutic relationship could develop. The results imply that culturally congruent occupational therapy practice needs to be further developed and more research is needed on how cultural issues can be met in occupational therapy practice.

  16. Health Occupations Curriculum. Skills and Theory for Practical Nurse. Units 18, 19, and 20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix.

    Part of a health occupations program, these instructional units consist of materials for use by those who are studying to become practical nurses. Covered in the units are the following: the nursing care of mothers and newborns (obstetrics, prenatal care and complications, patient needs, care of the newborn, prematurity, medications, and cultural…

  17. Sustainable workplaces of the future – European Research Challenges for occupational safety and health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anonymous

    2012-01-01

    Via a consultation process, the PEROSH members identified what occupational safety and health topics the European institutes specialised in, and what they see as the major trends and future challenges in the world of work and their impact on OSH. A second part of the consultation analysed future res

  18. Skills Conversion Project: Chapter 17, Occupational Safety and Health. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Society of Professional Engineers, Washington, DC.

    The greatest employment opportunity for safety professionals at the present time is with the Department of Labor for enforcement of the Williams-Steiger Act, which establishes the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). As part of a federal study of job possibilities for displaced aerospace and defense technical professionals, it was…

  19. Occupational safety and health in nanotechnology and Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murashov, Vladimir; Engel, Stefan; Savolainen, Kai; Fullam, Brian; Lee, Michelle; Kearns, Peter

    2009-10-01

    The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), an intergovernmental organization, is playing a critical global role in ensuring that emerging technologies, such as nanotechnology, are developed responsibly. This article describes OECD activities around occupational safety and health of nanotechnology and provides state-of-the-science overview resulting from an OECD workshop on exposure assessment and mitigation for nanotechnology workplace.

  20. National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Partnered Development of Cryogenic Life Support Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Partnering with National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to develop several cyrogenically based life support technologies to be used in mine escape and rescue scenarios. Technologies developed for mine rescue directly benefit future NASA rescue and ground operation missions.

  1. Occupational Safety and Health Professionals' Training in Italy: Qualitative Evaluation Using T-LAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaleo, Bruno; Cangiano, Giovanna; Calicchia, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the evaluation of a training course on chemicals for occupational safety and health (OSH) professionals. The study aims were to assess the effectiveness of the course; to find out what type of training met these workers' needs best, as their role is vital in the management of safety at work; and to…

  2. Validation of the PHQ-15 for Somatoform Disorder in the Occupational Health Care Setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vroege, Lars; Hoedeman, Rob; Nuyen, Jasper; Sijtsma, Klaas; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Within the occupational health setting, somatoform disorders are a frequent cause of sick leave. Few validated screening questionnaires for these disorders are available. The aim of this study is to validate the PHQ-15 in this setting. Methods In a cross-sectional study of 236 sickliste

  3. Recommended System Design for the Occupational Health Management Information System (OHMIS). Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-01

    REQUIREMENTS MONITORINC Inform user (List of User Outstanding executes D %quirements) re~ui reD n~~~m t/ i* ta Sk i nputs I d Isposi- Any Canion of sks on task...o Generate employee characteristics profile by facility for use during walk -through surveys o Generate tabulations of occupational health and

  4. Carcinogens, Teratogens and Mutagens: Their Impact on Occupational Health, Particularly for Women in Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, J. E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Pregnant women, especially those working in veterinary medicine, face occupational health/disease risks from mutagens, teratogens, and carcinogens. These hazards can be placed into three categories: physical, chemical, and biological. Each of these hazards is discussed with examples. (Author/JN)

  5. 76 FR 65729 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (BSC, NIOSH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-24

    ...) Implementation of the National Academies Program Recommendations for Respiratory Diseases, Hearing Loss... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (BSC, NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the...

  6. Effect of renovating an office building on occupants' comfort and health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pejtersen, Jan; Brohus, H.; Hyldgaard, C. E.;

    2001-01-01

    and health. Physiological examinations of eyes, nose and lungs were performed on each occupant. Physical, chemical and sensory measurements were performed before and after the intervention. The renewal of the flooring material was performed after a sensory test of alternative solutions in the laboratory...

  7. Feasibility of a cohort study on health risks caused by occupational exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breckenkamp, Jürgen; Berg-Beckhoff, Gabriele; Münster, Eva

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility of performing a cohort study on health risks from occupational exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) in Germany. METHODS: A set of criteria was developed to evaluate the feasibility of such a cohort study...

  8. 76 FR 9577 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health: Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health: Notice of Charter Renewal This gives notice under the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463) of October 6, 1972, that the Board of Scientific...

  9. Promoting occupational safety and health through the supply chain Literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ustailieva, E.; Starren, A.; Eeckelaert, L.; Lopes Nunes, I.; Hauke, A.

    2012-01-01

    This report sheds light on occupational safety and health (OSH) within complex supply chain networks. Based on a literature, policy and case study review it attempts to give an overview of how OSH can be managed and promoted through the supply chain, and which drivers, incentives and instruments exi

  10. Project CHOICE: #105. A Career Unit for Grades 3 and 4. Nursing. (Health Occupations Career Cluster).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern County Superintendent of Schools, Bakersfield, CA.

    This teaching unit, Nursing, is one in a series of career guides developed by Project CHOICE (Children Have Options in Career Education) to provide the classroom teacher with a source of career-related activities linking third and fourth grade elementary classroom experiences with the world of work. Part of the Health Occupations Career Cluster,…

  11. [Taking Care of Asylum Seekers: Occupational Health Aspects with a Special Focus on Vaccination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, S; Hörmansdorfer, S; Ackermann, N; Höller, C; Brenner, B; Herr, C

    2016-04-01

    Employees and volunteers often feel insecure about the potential transmission of infectious diseases when taking care of asylum seekers. It could be shown that overall only a minor risk of infection emanates from asylum seekers. However, aspects of occupational health and vaccination should be kept in mind.Besides the standard vaccination the Standing Committee on Vaccination (STIKO) recommends for occupational indication, which is given for employees and volunteers in asylum facilities, vaccination against hepatitis A, hepatitis B, polio (if the last vaccination was more than 10 years before) as well as influenza (seasonal).According to the German Occupational Safety and Health Act taking care of the employer has to determine which exposures might occur at the workplace (risk assessment) and define necessary protection measures. Depending on task and exposure when taking care of asylum seekers different acts (e. g. biological agents regulation) and technical guidelines for the handling biological agents (e. g. TRBA 250 or TRBA 500) have to be applied.The Bavarian Health and Food Safety Authority (LGL) has published several information sheets regarding "asylum seekers and health management" for employees and volunteers from the non-medical as well as the medical area (www.lgl.bayern.de search term "Asylbewerber"). With theses publications insecurities in taking care of asylum seekers should be prevented. Furthermore the employer gets support in the implementation of legal obligations to ensure occupational safety for the employees.

  12. Medical Asepsis. Kit No. 302. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide. Health Occupations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Gloria

    This instructor's manual and student learning guide comprise a module on medical asepsis for a secondary-level health occupations program. The six activities in the module cover medical asepsis terms; ways organisms spread; types of medical asepsis; aseptic equipment care; proper handwashing; and procedures for using masks, gloves, and gowns.…

  13. Occupational Safety and Health culture assessment - A review of main approaches and selected tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, T.N.; Eeckeleaert, L.; Starren, A.; Scheppingen, A. van; Fox, D.; Bruck, C.

    2011-01-01

    Occupational safety and health culture, or more briefly 'OSH culture', can be seen as a concept for exploring how informal organisational aspects influence OSH in a positive or negative way. The aim is to convey up-to-date information on this complex topic in a straightforward, condensed way, trying

  14. Health workforce remuneration: Comparing wage levels, ranking, and dispersion of 16 occupational groups in 20 countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.G. Tijdens (Kea); D.H. de Vries (Daniel); S.M. Steinmetz

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: This article represents the first attempt to explore remuneration in Human Resources for Health (HRH), comparing wage levels, ranking and dispersion of 16 HRH occupational groups in 20 countries (Argentina, Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, the Czech Republic, Finlan

  15. Health Workforce Remuneration: comparing wage levels, ranking and dispersion of 16 occupational groups in 20 countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijdens, K.; de Vries, D.H.; Steinmetz, S.

    2013-01-01

    Background This article represents the first attempt to explore remuneration in Human Resources for Health (HRH), comparing wage levels, ranking and dispersion of 16 HRH occupational groups in 20 countries (Argentina, Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, the Czech Republic, Finland, Germany, I

  16. Health workforce remuneration: Comparing wage levels, ranking and dispersion of 16 occupational groups in 20 countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijdens, K.; de Vries, D.H.

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on remuneration in the Human Resources for Health (HRH), comparing wage levels, ranking and dispersion of 16 HRH occupations in 20 countries (Argentina, Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Czech Republic, Finland, Germany, India, Mexico, Netherlands, Poland, Russian Feder

  17. Modeling Dental Health Care Workers' Risk of Occupational Infection from Bloodborne Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capilouto, Eli; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The brief paper offers a model which permits quantification of the dental health care workers' risk of occupationally acquiring infection from bloodborne pathogens such as human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B virus. The model incorporates five parameters such as the probability that any individual patient is infected and number of patients…

  18. Environmental and Occupational Health Information Resources from the National Library of Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Philip Wexler

    2004-01-01

    @@ For nearly forty years,the National Library of Medicine' s(NLM)Toxicology and Environmental Health Information Program(TEHIP) has been a signifcant leader in organizing and providing public access to an extensive storehouse of environmental, occupational medicine, and toxicological information through its online databases.

  19. [The concept of Mental Health from the perspective of Occupational Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneri, Sara María; Pérez, Laura Raquel

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this text is to share the way we think and organize information in order to build our perspective of Mental Health from Occupational Therapy on the basis of our academic instruction. We use the word "building" because we understand this as a dynamic, flexible, and ever changing process in which the Occupational Therapist implement diverse verbal and material resources according to the moment in the Health-Disease process. We hope that this revision will offer a specific view of the meaning of "doing" from the Occupational Therapy perspective; process that implies different stages in a permanent reflection between theory and praxis. The main purpose is that persons, groups or communities reach the best opportunities of autonomy and quality of life. We will cover notions about risk and psychosocial dysfunction in articulation with the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) followed by the paradigm that have transformed our clinical practice in every level in which Occupational Therapy intervenes. We do not pretend to arrive to conclusions but to question certain ideas that we have inherited from other health-disciplines like: chronic/acute; adapted/mis-adapted; disqualified/ rehabilitated, and that have influenced our profession.

  20. Regulatory risk control through mandatory occupational safety and health (OSH) certification and testing regimes (CTRs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwetsloot, G.I.J.M.; Hale, A.; Zwanikken, S.

    2011-01-01

    Governments make increasing use of private certification and testing infrastructures as an alternative for traditional regulatory arrangements in several areas including occupational safety and health (OSH).This research, commissioned by the Dutch Inspectorate for Work and Income (IWI), concerns an

  1. The occupational health of Southeast Asians in Lowell: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azaroff, Lenore S; Levenstein, Charles; Wegman, David H

    2004-01-01

    To assess the occupational health of a group of vulnerable workers, Southeast Asians, in Lowell, Massachusetts, researchers surveyed 160 residents of Cambodian or Lao ethnicity regarding working conditions, health problems, and use of medical services. Over 40% reported work in electronics and computer assembly. A fourth of those currently employed held temporary jobs. Workplace hazards included soldering fumes; inadequate ventilation; prolonged sitting or standing; awkward postures; unguarded machinery; shift work; long hours; and pressure to produce quickly. Common work-related health problems included sprains and strains, headache, dizziness, and flu-like symptoms. Less than a third of the respondents knew about workers' compensation. Household surveys can provide otherwise unavailable occupational health data for defined populations.

  2. Occupational Therapists in the Supplemental Health care in the municipality of Jundiai, State of São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela de Souza Ruyz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Supplemental Health has become an emergent field of Occupational Therapy practice.Objectives: This study aims to identify the current forms of participation and proposals of the occupationaltherapists involved in the Supplemental Health care in the municipality of Jundiai, State of Sao Paulo.Method: A qualitative research on occupational therapy practice was carried out. Results: The participationof occupational therapists in the Supplemental Health care occurs in private clinics that render service to thehealth medical organizations - HMOs. The occupational therapists’ activities are concentrated in the childrenand adult outpatient clinics and in the domiciliary and school spaces. Its approach values personal needs andmulti-professional actions. Conclusions: Despite the actual movement of the National Agency of SupplementalHealth in regulating the sector, occupational therapists face the following professional challenges: becomingcontractors of the HMOs, presenting their professional practices and approaches to the Supplementary Healthguidelines of the Unified Health System.

  3. Occupational health and safety of workers in agriculture and horticulture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, P

    2000-01-01

    Working in agriculture and horticulture gives considerable job satisfaction. The tasks are often interesting; you can see the result of your own work, watch your crop grow and mature; you have an affinity with nature and can follow the changes in the seasons. However, today it is a dangerous work environment fraught with occupational injuries and diseases due to hazardous situations and to physiological, physical, biological, chemical, psychological, and sociological factors. The ongoing rapid development may, on the other hand, bring about many changes during the next decades with more farmers and growers switching to organic production. Moreover, increased awareness of animal welfare also may lead to improved working conditions. Large-scale operations with fewer family-operated agricultural businesses might mean fewer injuries among children and older farmers. A consequence of large-scale operations may also be better regulation of working conditions. The greater use of automation technology eliminates many harmful working postures and movements when milking cows and carrying out other tasks. Information technology offers people the opportunity to gain more knowledge about their work. Labeling food produced in a worker-friendly work environment may give the consumers a chance to be involved in the process.

  4. The Occupational Health Nurse (OHN) and the Implications for Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    and obtectivies. unit. 1. Develops philosophy an wriffen goabs and oci iws for the occupational helth program. 2. Conducts periodic revi of...confidential health records. 3. Counsel and/or provide crisis intervention for workers and interpersonal, family and/or work related problems. - Review...their employees. - Identify resources in the community that might be used when providing crisis intervention. 4. Consult on health and safety matters

  5. [Activities of voivodeship occupational medicine centers in workplace health promotion in 2008].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goszczyńska, Eliza

    2010-01-01

    The paper aims to present the activities of the largest Voivodeship Occupational Medicine Centers (VOMCs) in Poland in the area of workplace health promotion in 2008. It was compiled on the basis of written reports concerning these activities sent by the Centers to the Polish National Center for Workplace Health Promotion, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Łódź. Their analysis shows a greatly varied level of engagement in and understanding of health promotion--from simple single actions (in the field of health education and screening) to long-running programs, including various ways of influencing people the programs are addressed to. In 2008, there were 78 such programs in the country, the most popular of them were those focused on occupational voice disorders and tobacco smoke). VOMCs perceive external factors, unfavorable or indifferent attitudes towards promoting health of their employees on the part of employers as well as financial constraints, as the most common obstacles in undertaking activities in the field of workplace health promotion. At the same time, they link achievements in this field mostly with their own activities, including effective cooperation with various partners and their well qualified and experienced employees.

  6. Why and how should we assess occupational health impacts in integrated product policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofstetter, P.; Norris, G.A. [US EPA, Cincinnati, OH (USA). National Risk Management Research Laboratory

    2003-05-15

    Integrated product policy (IPP) and life cycle assessment (LCA) focus traditionally on environmental impacts. The authors investigated whether occupational health impacts should be included in LCA and IPP. using data from 491 industry sectors including supply chain impacts, occupational health impacts being measured in disability adjusted life years (DALYs) per dollars output. Environmental health impact intensities were high for coal mining, electric service (utilities), iron and steel making and non ferrous metals manufacturing. A comparison suggests that United States occupational health impacts are about 10 times smaller than environmental health impacts and are, relatively speaking, important only for sectors with hazardous working environments but low environmental impacts. A consequential rather than attributional view suggests that a method to assess true consequences on long-term health impacts by product policies needs to be able to predict effects from present-day work place exposure and to account for likely changes in the labor market, including changes in unemployment rates and other substitution mechanisms. 70 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Agricultural occupational health and safety perspectives among Latino-American youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perla, M E; Iman, Esmeralda; Campos, Leticia; Perkins, Alexandra; Liebman, Amy K; Miller, Mary E; Beaudet, Nancy J; Karr, Catherine J

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural work is one of the most dangerous jobs for adolescents. Through a university-community partnership, the authors surveyed young primarily acculturated Latino-American farmworkers 14 to 18 years of age regarding their agricultural work experience. Topics included occupational health and safety education, work history, and information sources. The authors also evaluated the Rapid Clinical Assessment Tool (RCAT), a pictorial tool for identifying agricultural tasks to enhance discussion with clinical providers. One hundred forty youth with farmwork experience completed the survey; 6% reported a previous work-related injury or illness and 53% reported receiving some workplace health and safety training. Correct identification of legally restricted duties for youth varied but were generally low: participants identified working alone past 8 pm (57%), driving a forklift (56%), doing roofing work (39%), working in freezers (34%), and driving a delivery vehicle (30%). The Internet was identified as the most likely and reliable place youth would go to find information on workplace health and safety. Few (15%) reported clinician-initiated conversations on occupational health; however, a high proportion responded positively to questions regarding the usefulness of the RCAT for this purpose. This study highlights the need for workplace health and safety guidance for youth employed in agriculture. The results support Internet-based outreach and use of the RCAT to help facilitate occupational health discussions in clinical settings.

  8. Self-care and yoga-academic-practice collaboration for occupational health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Gina

    2013-12-01

    High rates of stress and burnout among nurses and other health care providers justify the exploration of innovative interventions designed to reduce stress and promote self-care among this population. A growing body of evidence supports the physical and psychosocial benefits of yoga and suggests the potential for yoga to support self-care and reduce stress among health care providers. This article describes the formation of an academic-practice collaboration to use yoga as a model for occupational health and wellness among nurses employed at a tax-supported urban health system. In addition, recommendations for program sustainability over time are discussed.

  9. Mindfulness meditation for veterans---implications for occupational health providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar, Norma G

    2008-08-01

    Mindfulness meditation (MfM) is a mind-body therapy identified by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Initially taught in a formal classroom setting, MfM is a sustainable intervention with minimal costs that can be used over time. For veterans, after mastery, this technique shows promise in improving health outcomes and quality of life. This article describes MfM, discusses the conceptual framework and evidence-based research for MfM, and identifies the implications of MfM use by health care providers who are caring for war veterans.

  10. Appraisal of Risk Perception in Occupational Health and Safety Research in Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilhorst

    1996-10-01

    This paper addresses scientists in the field of occupational health and safety, with a special emphasis on research in developing countries. The article is based on findings of and a method used in a recent study of occupational health and safety in mines in Africa and Latin America. Dialog between technical experts and social scientists is needed to synthesize the values of society and the facts of nature into policy decisions that are both politically legitimate and consistent with the current state of technical knowledge. The author asks how researchers in the field of occupational health can take two axioms of the social sciences into account: 1) the concept of human agency, and 2) the notion that risk perception is socially constructed: rather than being determined by "real" risks, it is shaped by the adversarial context of, among other factors, the nature of labor relations, values in society, and personal histories. With regard to first axiom, it is shown why actors' risk perceptions and their context need indeed to be taken seriously. With regard to the second, a methodologic outline is given to complement technical research on occupational hygiene with risk-perception appraisal. The method is actor-oriented, building on the perceptions, views, and opinions of the different groups of relevant actors. Systematic integration of this method into technological studies could enrich them, contributing substantially to their applicability.

  11. Work improvement and occupational safety and health management systems: common features and research needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogi, Kazutaka

    2002-04-01

    There is a growing trend in re-orientating occupational health research towards risk management. Such a trend is accelerated by the increasing attention to occupational safety and health management systems. The trend, also seen in many Asian countries, is offering new opportunities for strengthening primary prevention. Useful examples are provided from recent work improvement projects dealing with technology transfer, small workplaces and rural areas. Common features of both these work improvement projects and accepted occupational risk management principles are reviewed based on recent experiences in Asian countries. Such features seem highly relevant in examining the occupational health research strategies. These experiences clearly show that locally adjusted procedures for risk assessment and control must be developed. There are new research needs concerning (a) the effective ways to encourage voluntary control at the workplace; (b) practical methods for local risk assessment; and (c) the types of participatory steps leading to continual improvements in the varying local context. Criteria of action-oriented research that can contribute to more effective risk control in different settings are discussed. Six relevant criteria may be mentioned: (a) adaptive risk management; (b) work/risk relationships; (c) action-oriented risk assessment; (d) use of collective expertise; (e) participation of local people; and (f) mutual learning. It appears crucial to stimulate research into the practical risk control procedures adjusted to the local situation.

  12. Occupational Health and Industrial Wind Turbines: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Robert W.; Ambrose, Stephen E.; Krogh, Carmen M. E.

    2011-01-01

    Industrial wind turbines (IWTs) are being installed at a fast pace globally. Researchers, medical practitioners, and media have reported adverse health effects resulting from living in the environs of IWTs. While there have been some anecdotal reports from technicians and other workers who work in the environs of IWTs, little is known about the…

  13. Performance scorecard for occupational safety and health management systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernâni Veloso Neto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The pro-active and systematic search for best performances should be the two assumptions of any management system, so safety and health management in organizations must also be guided by these same precepts. However, the scientific production evidences that the performance evaluation processes in safety and health continue to be guided, in their essence, by intermittency, reactivity and negativity, which are not consistent with the assumptions referenced above. Therefore, it is essential that health and safety at work management systems (HSW MS are structured from an active and positive viewpoint, focusing on continuous improvement. This implies considering performance evaluation processes that incorporate, on the one hand, monitoring, measuring and verification procedures, and on the other hand, structured matrixes of results that capture the key factors of success, by mobilizing both reactive and proactive indicators. One of the instruments that can fulfill these precepts of health and safety performance evaluation is the SafetyCard, a performance scorecard for HSW MS that we developed and will seek to outline and demonstrate over this paper.

  14. AMED: The Allied and Complementary Medicine Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardell, Emily

    2016-01-01

    AMED: The Allied and Complementary Medicine Database is a resource from the Health Care Information Service of the British Library. AMED offers access to complementary and alternative medicine topics, such as acupuncture, chiropractic, herbalism, homeopathy, hospice care, hypnosis, palliative care, physiotherapy, podiatry, and rehabilitation. This column features a sample search to demonstrate the type of information available within AMED. AMED is available through the EBSCOhost and OVID platforms.

  15. Comparison of AIHA ISO 9001-based occupational health and safety management system guidance document with a manufacturer's occupational health and safety assessment instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyjack, D T; Levine, S P; Holtshouser, J L; Schork, M A

    1998-06-01

    Numerous manufacturing and service organizations have integrated or are considering integration of their respective occupational health and safety management and audit systems into the International Organization for Standardization-based (ISO) audit-driven Quality Management Systems (ISO 9000) or Environmental Management Systems (ISO 14000) models. Companies considering one of these options will likely need to identify and evaluate several key factors before embarking on such efforts. The purpose of this article is to identify and address the key factors through a case study approach. Qualitative and quantitative comparisons of the key features of the American Industrial Hygiene Association ISO-9001 harmonized Occupational Health and Safety Management System with The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. management and audit system were conducted. The comparisons showed that the two management systems and their respective audit protocols, although structured differently, were not substantially statistically dissimilar in content. The authors recommend that future studies continue to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of various audit protocols. Ideally, these studies would identify those audit outcome measures that can be reliably correlated with health and safety performance.

  16. The effect of renovating an office building on occupants' comfort and health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pejtersen, Jan; Brohus, H.; Hyldgaard, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    An intervention study was performed in an office building in which there were severe indoor climate complaints among the occupants. In one part of the building a new heating and ventilation strategy was implemented by renovating the HVAC system, and a carpet floor material was replaced with a low......-emitting vinyl floor; the other part of the building was kept unchanged, serving as a control. A comprehensive indoor climate investigation, including a questionnaire study of the occupants' comfort and health, was performed before and after the intervention. The intervention was performed after detailed...... laboratory studies on alternative flooring materials and alternative ventilation strategies. The occupants' adverse perceptions and symptoms were significantly reduced by the intervention. The improvement of the indoor climate was most pronounced in the cellular offices, where both the floor material...

  17. Money Matters: Recommendations for Financial Stress Research in Occupational Health Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Robert R; Cheung, Janelle H

    2016-08-01

    Money is arguably the most important resource derived from work and the most important source of stress for contemporary employees. A substantial body of research supports the relationship between access to financial resources and health and well-being, both at individual and aggregated (e.g. national) levels of analysis. Yet, surprisingly little occupational health psychology research has paid attention to financial issues experienced specifically by those in the labour force. With these issues in mind, the overarching goal of the present paper was to address conceptual and measurement issues in the study of objective and subjective aspects of financial stress and review several assessment options available to occupational health psychology researchers for both aspects of financial stress. Where appropriate, we offer guidance to researchers about choices among various financial stress measures and identify issues that require further research attention. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Occupational health for what were, a well work force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiller, Roger [MSF, Stowmarket (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    This paper contrasts the offshore scene of 30 years ago with today, within the limits of inadequate monitoring, then and now. It identifies stress, bullying, change, long working hours and offshore trips and lifestyle as major factors that now have to be addressed if the health of the ageing work force is not to be compromised. Activity external to formal working hours such as travel to and from home and domestic and social relationships are all modified by the nature of offshore work but rarely acknowledged as the responsibility of the employer or operator. The development of a superior lifelong health tracking system is essential for long-term surveillance and epidemiological studies. The acceptance by operators of their long-term responsibilities for staff and the families of offshore workers needs to be better developed. (author)

  19. Collaboration between infection control and occupational health in three continents: a success story with international impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndelu Lindiwe

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Globalization has been accompanied by the rapid spread of infectious diseases, and further strain on working conditions for health workers globally. Post-SARS, Canadian occupational health and infection control researchers got together to study how to better protect health workers, and found that training was indeed perceived as key to a positive safety culture. This led to developing information and communication technology (ICT tools. The research conducted also showed the need for better workplace inspections, so a workplace audit tool was also developed to supplement worker questionnaires and the ICT. When invited to join Ecuadorean colleagues to promote occupational health and infection control, these tools were collectively adapted and improved, including face-to-face as well as on-line problem-based learning scenarios. The South African government then invited the team to work with local colleagues to improve occupational health and infection control, resulting in an improved web-based health information system to track incidents, exposures, and occupational injury and diseases. As the H1N1 pandemic struck, the online infection control course was adapted and translated into Spanish, as was a novel skill-building learning tool that permits health workers to practice selecting personal protective equipment. This tool was originally developed in collaboration with the countries from the Caribbean region and the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO. Research from these experiences led to strengthened focus on building capacity of health and safety committees, and new modules are thus being created, informed by that work. The products developed have been widely heralded as innovative and interactive, leading to their inclusion into “toolkits” used internationally. The tools used in Canada were substantially improved from the collaborative adaptation process for South and Central America and South Africa. This international

  20. Methodology for matrix support: interfaces between Occupational Therapy and the health care organizing tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone de Pádua Ayresb

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses matrix support as a tool for transforming the ways of organizing health care,particularly concerning primary care. To this end, it conceptualizes the subject and reflects on the growing roleof the Occupational Therapist in matrix teams since the creation of the Centers of Support for Family HealthCare (NASF by the Brazilian Health Agency. Moreover, it discusses the issues raised during the workshopon “Teamwork and matrix support in Primary Health Care” held in October 2011, at the Primary Health CareSymposium of the XII Brazilian Congress and IX Latin American Congress of Occupational Therapy. It introducesreflections on the challenges encountered in the practice of matrix support in the everyday work in the NASFs.It was possible to observe that the obstacles found have been impairing workers’ activities; nevertheless, what isvalued in this article is the importance of the identification of these obstacles as the first step to overcome them,as well as the occupational therapist’s role as one of the actors of the transformations needed.