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Sample records for allelic association study

  1. Association studies using family pools of outcrossing crops based on allele-frequency estimates from DNA sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashraf, Bilal; Jensen, Just; Asp, Torben

    2014-01-01

    from sequence read-counts for mapping. We show that, under additivity assumptions, there is a linear relationship between the family phenotype and family allele frequency, and that a regression of family phenotype on family allele frequency will estimate twice the allele substitution effect at a locus....... However, medium-to-low sequencing depth causes underestimation of the true allele substitution effect. An expression for this underestimation is derived for the case that parents are diploid, such that F2 families have up to four dosages of every allele. Using simulation studies, estimation of the allele...... effect from F2-family pools was verified and it was shown that the underestimation of the allele effect is correctly described. The optimal design for an association study when sequencing budget would be fixed is obtained using large sample size and lower sequence depth, and using higher SNP density...

  2. A Theoretical Framework for Association Studies in F2 Family Pools Using Allele Frequencies from Genotyping-By-Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janss, Luc L; Ashraf, Bilal H; Greve-Pedersen, Morten

    a sequencing approach to obtain Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) frequencies is considered here. In this work we develop the theoretical framework to perform association studies using allele frequencies from such F2 family pools. We show that expected allele frequencies in the F2 families will have...

  3. How allele frequency and study design affect association test statistics with misrepresentation errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escott-Price, Valentina; Ghodsi, Mansoureh; Schmidt, Karl Michael

    2014-04-01

    We evaluate the effect of genotyping errors on the type-I error of a general association test based on genotypes, showing that, in the presence of errors in the case and control samples, the test statistic asymptotically follows a scaled non-central $\\chi ^2$ distribution. We give explicit formulae for the scaling factor and non-centrality parameter for the symmetric allele-based genotyping error model and for additive and recessive disease models. They show how genotyping errors can lead to a significantly higher false-positive rate, growing with sample size, compared with the nominal significance levels. The strength of this effect depends very strongly on the population distribution of the genotype, with a pronounced effect in the case of rare alleles, and a great robustness against error in the case of large minor allele frequency. We also show how these results can be used to correct $p$-values.

  4. A study of the association of childhood asthma with HLA alleles in the population of Siliguri, West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lama, M; Chatterjee, M; Chaudhuri, T K

    2014-09-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease for which a strong genetic basis is firmly established. It is a complex disorder influenced by gene-environment interaction. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes have been shown to be consistently associated with asthma and its related phenotypes in various populations. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of the selected HLA classes I and II allelic groups in asthmatic and control groups. HLA typing was performed using polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific typing (PCR-SSP) method. The allele frequency was estimated by direct counting. Frequency of each HLA allelic group was compared between asthmatic group and control group using χ(2) test. P-value was corrected by multiplying with the number of the allelic groups studied. Odds ratio (OR) and its corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) for each allelic group were calculated using graphpad instat 3.10. The results of this study showed a significantly higher frequency of HLA-DRB1*03 in asthmatics than in controls (11.43% vs 3.64%, OR = 3.78, 95% CI = 1.61-8.85, P = 0.0025, Pcorr  population. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Association between Neurocognitive Impairment and the Short Allele of the 5-HTT Promoter Polymorphism in Depression: A Pilot Study

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    Hely Kalska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Depression has been shown to be associated with cognitive deficits in various cognitive domains. However, it is still unclear which factors contribute to cognitive impairment. The objective of this study was to find out whether a functional polymorphism in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR gene is associated with the impairment of cognitive functioning among depressed patients. In a pilot study, a sample of 19 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD and 19 healthy controls was investigated with an extensive psychiatric and neuropsychological examination. All participants were genotyped for 5-HTTLPR. Depressed patients with the short allele of the 5-HTT promoter region exhibited inferior cognitive performance compared to patients with the long allele polymorphism. In healthy controls, no association between genotype and cognitive performance was found. The result suggests that in MDD patients with the short allele of the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism the vulnerability to cognitive impairment is increased compared to MDD patients without the short allele inheritance. These preliminary findings need to be confirmed in a larger cohort of MDD patients.

  6. Association between HLA Class I and Class II Alleles and the Outcome of West Nile Virus Infection: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanteri, Marion C.; Kaidarova, Zhanna; Peterson, Trevor; Cate, Steven; Custer, Brian; Wu, Shiquan; Agapova, Maria; Law, Jacqueline P.; Bielawny, Thomas; Plummer, Frank; Tobler, Leslie H.; Loeb, Mark; Busch, Michael P.; Bramson, Jonathan; Luo, Ma; Norris, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Background West Nile virus (WNV) infection is asymptomatic in most individuals, with a minority developing symptoms ranging from WNV fever to serious neuroinvasive disease. This study investigated the impact of host HLA on the outcome of WNV disease. Methods A cohort of 210 non-Hispanic mostly white WNV+ subjects from Canada and the U.S. were typed for HLA-A, B, C, DP, DQ, and DR. The study subjects were divided into three WNV infection outcome groups: asymptomatic (AS), symptomatic (S), and neuroinvasive disease (ND). Allele frequency distribution was compared pair-wise between the AS, S, and ND groups using χ2 and Fisher's exact tests and P values were corrected for multiple comparisons (Pc). Allele frequencies were compared between the groups and the North American population (NA) used as a control group. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the potential synergistic effect of age and HLA allele phenotype on disease outcome. Results The alleles HLA-A*68, C*08 and DQB*05 were more frequently associated with severe outcomes (ND vs. AS, P A*68 = 0.013/Pc = 0.26, P C*08 = 0.0075/Pc = 0.064, and P DQB1*05 = 0.029/Pc = 0.68), However the apparent DQB1*05 association was driven by age. The alleles HLA-B*40 and C*03 were more frequently associated with asymptomatic outcome (AS vs. S, P B*40 = 0.021/Pc = 0.58 and AS vs. ND P C*03 = 0.039/Pc = 0.64) and their frequencies were lower within WNV+ subjects with neuroinvasive disease than within the North American population (NA vs. S, P B*40 = 0.029 and NA vs. ND, P C*03 = 0.032). Conclusions Host HLA may be associated with the outcome of WNV disease; HLA-A*68 and C*08 might function as “susceptible” alleles, whereas HLA-B*40 and C*03 might function as “protective” alleles. PMID:21829673

  7. HLA Class II Allele, Haplotype, and Genotype Associations with Type 1 Diabetes in Benin: A Pilot Study

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    Kaossarath A. Fagbemi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Several studies have reported the implication of HLA-DR/DQ loci in the susceptibility to type 1 diabetes (T1D. Since no such study has yet been performed in Benin, this pilot one aimed at assessing HLA class II allele, haplotype, and genotype associations with T1D. Material and Methods. Class II HLA genotyping was performed in 51 patients with T1D and 51 healthy unrelated controls by means of the PCR-SSP method. The diagnosis of T1D was set up according to American Diabetes Association criteria. Odds ratio (OR and its 95% confidence interval (95% CI were calculated to assess the associations between T1D and HLA alleles, haplotypes, and genotypes. Results. Participants were aged 1–24 years. T1D was significantly associated with DR3, DQA1∗05:01, DQB1∗02:01, and DR3-DR4. No significant associations were observed with DR4, DQB1∗03:02, and DQB1∗06:02. Conclusion. Certain HLA class II alleles, haplotypes, and genotypes were related to T1D and may be used as genetic susceptibility markers to T1D in Benin.

  8. Detecting low frequent loss-of-function alleles in genome wide association studies with red hair color as example.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Liu

    Full Text Available Multiple loss-of-function (LOF alleles at the same gene may influence a phenotype not only in the homozygote state when alleles are considered individually, but also in the compound heterozygote (CH state. Such LOF alleles typically have low frequencies and moderate to large effects. Detecting such variants is of interest to the genetics community, and relevant statistical methods for detecting and quantifying their effects are sorely needed. We present a collapsed double heterozygosity (CDH test to detect the presence of multiple LOF alleles at a gene. When causal SNPs are available, which may be the case in next generation genome sequencing studies, this CDH test has overwhelmingly higher power than single SNP analysis. When causal SNPs are not directly available such as in current GWA settings, we show the CDH test has higher power than standard single SNP analysis if tagging SNPs are in linkage disequilibrium with the underlying causal SNPs to at least a moderate degree (r²>0.1. The test is implemented for genome-wide analysis in the publically available software package GenABEL which is based on a sliding window approach. We provide the proof of principle by conducting a genome-wide CDH analysis of red hair color, a trait known to be influenced by multiple loss-of-function alleles, in a total of 7,732 Dutch individuals with hair color ascertained. The association signals at the MC1R gene locus from CDH were uniformly more significant than traditional GWA analyses (the most significant P for CDH = 3.11×10⁻¹⁴² vs. P for rs258322 = 1.33×10⁻⁶⁶. The CDH test will contribute towards finding rare LOF variants in GWAS and sequencing studies.

  9. Functional study of a genetic marker allele associated with resistance to Ascaris suum in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skallerup, Per; Thamsborg, Stig M.; Jørgensen, Claus B.

    2014-01-01

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP TXNIP and SNP ARNT), both on chromosome 4, have been reported to be associated with roundworm (Ascaris suum) burden in pigs. In the present study, we selected pigs with two SNP TXNIP genotypes (AA; n=24 and AB; n=24) which, from eight weeks of age were...

  10. CollapsABEL: an R library for detecting compound heterozygote alleles in genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Kaiyin; Karssen, Lennart C; Kayser, Manfred; Liu, Fan

    2016-04-08

    Compound Heterozygosity (CH) in classical genetics is the presence of two different recessive mutations at a particular gene locus. A relaxed form of CH alleles may account for an essential proportion of the missing heritability, i.e. heritability of phenotypes so far not accounted for by single genetic variants. Methods to detect CH-like effects in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) may facilitate explaining the missing heritability, but to our knowledge no viable software tools for this purpose are currently available. In this work we present the Generalized Compound Double Heterozygosity (GCDH) test and its implementation in the R package CollapsABEL. Time-consuming procedures are optimized for computational efficiency using Java or C++. Intermediate results are stored either in an SQL database or in a so-called big.matrix file to achieve reasonable memory footprint. Our large scale simulation studies show that GCDH is capable of discovering genetic associations due to CH-like interactions with much higher power than a conventional single-SNP approach under various settings, whether the causal genetic variations are available or not. CollapsABEL provides a user-friendly pipeline for genotype collapsing, statistical testing, power estimation, type I error control and graphics generation in the R language. CollapsABEL provides a computationally efficient solution for screening general forms of CH alleles in densely imputed microarray or whole genome sequencing datasets. The GCDH test provides an improved power over single-SNP based methods in detecting the prevalence of CH in human complex phenotypes, offering an opportunity for tackling the missing heritability problem. Binary and source packages of CollapsABEL are available on CRAN ( https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/CollapsABEL ) and the website of the GenABEL project ( http://www.genabel.org/packages ).

  11. Study on the association of BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles with clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seventy-five Iranian Holstein cattle which comprised of two different groups (49 susceptible cattle to clinical mastitis and 26 resistant cattle to clinical mastitis) as well as forty-five Sarabi breed cattle were studied randomly for polymorphism in BoLA-DRB3.2 gene. Genotyping by single strand conformation polymorphism- ...

  12. New susceptibility and resistance HLA-DP alleles to HBV-related diseases identified by a trans-ethnic association study in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Nao; Sawai, Hiromi; Kashiwase, Koichi; Minami, Mutsuhiko; Sugiyama, Masaya; Seto, Wai-Kay; Yuen, Man-Fung; Posuwan, Nawarat; Poovorawan, Yong; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Matsuura, Kentaro; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Kurosaki, Masayuki; Asahina, Yasuhiro; Izumi, Namiki; Kang, Jong-Hon; Hige, Shuhei; Ide, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Kazuhide; Sakaida, Isao; Murawaki, Yoshikazu; Itoh, Yoshito; Tamori, Akihiro; Orito, Etsuro; Hiasa, Yoichi; Honda, Masao; Kaneko, Shuichi; Mita, Eiji; Suzuki, Kazuyuki; Hino, Keisuke; Tanaka, Eiji; Mochida, Satoshi; Watanabe, Masaaki; Eguchi, Yuichiro; Masaki, Naohiko; Murata, Kazumoto; Korenaga, Masaaki; Mawatari, Yoriko; Ohashi, Jun; Kawashima, Minae; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Mizokami, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed the association between SNPs located on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II genes, including HLA-DP and HLA-DQ, and chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, mainly in Asian populations. HLA-DP alleles or haplotypes associated with chronic HBV infection or disease progression have not been fully identified in Asian populations. We performed trans-ethnic association analyses of HLA-DPA1, HLA-DPB1 alleles and haplotypes with hepatitis B virus infection and disease progression among Asian populations comprising Japanese, Korean, Hong Kong, and Thai subjects. To assess the association between HLA-DP and chronic HBV infection and disease progression, we conducted high-resolution (4-digit) HLA-DPA1 and HLA-DPB1 genotyping in a total of 3,167 samples, including HBV patients, HBV-resolved individuals and healthy controls. Trans-ethnic association analyses among Asian populations identified a new risk allele HLA-DPB1*09 ∶ 01 (P = 1.36 × 10(-6); OR= 1.97; 95% CI, 1.50-2.59) and a new protective allele DPB1*02 ∶ 01 (P = 5.22 × 10(-6); OR = 0.68; 95% CI, 0.58-0.81) to chronic HBV infection, in addition to the previously reported alleles. Moreover, DPB1*02 ∶ 01 was also associated with a decreased risk of disease progression in chronic HBV patients among Asian populations (P = 1.55 × 10(-7); OR = 0.50; 95% CI, 0.39-0.65). Trans-ethnic association analyses identified Asian-specific associations of HLA-DP alleles and haplotypes with HBV infection or disease progression. The present findings will serve as a base for future functional studies of HLA-DP molecules in order to understand the pathogenesis of HBV infection and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  13. The TGFBR1*6A allele is not associated with susceptibility to colorectal cancer in a Spanish population: a case-control study

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    Barberá Víctor-Manuel

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TGF-β receptor type I is a mediator of growth inhibitory signals. TGFBR1*6A (rs11466445 is a common polymorphic variant of the TGF-β receptor I gene and has been associated with tumour susceptibility. Nevertheless, the role of this polymorphism as a risk factor for colorectal cancer is controversial. The aim of this study was to assess the association between TGFBR1*6A and colorectal cancer, age, sex, tumour location and tumour stage in a Spanish population. Methods The case-control study involved 800 Spanish subjects: 400 sporadic colorectal cancer patients and 400 age-, sex-, and ethnic-matched controls. The odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence interval (95% CI for the TGFBR1*6A polymorphism were calculated using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age and sex. Analysis of somatic mutations at the GCG repeat of TGFBR1 exon 1 and germline allele-specific expression were also conducted to obtain further information on the contribution of the TGFBR1*6A allele to CRC susceptibility. Results There was no statistically significant association between the TGFBR1*6A allele and CRC (p > 0.05. The OR was 1.147 (95% CI: 0.799–1.647 for carriers of the TGFBR1*6A allele and 0.878 (95% CI: 0.306–2.520 for homozygous TGFBR1*6A individuals compared with the reference. The frequency of the polymorphism was not affected by age, sex or tumour stage. The TGFBR1*6A allele was more prevalent among colon tumour patients than among rectal tumour patients. Tumour somatic mutations were found in only two of 69 cases (2.9%. Both cases involved a GCG deletion that changed genotype 9A/9A in normal DNA to genotype 9A/8A. Interestingly, these two tumours were positive for microsatellite instability, suggesting that these mutations originated because of a deficient DNA mismatch repair system. Allele-specific expression of the 9A allele was detected in seven of the 14 heterozygous 9A/6A tumour cases. This could have been caused by linkage

  14. The TGFBR1*6A allele is not associated with susceptibility to colorectal cancer in a Spanish population: a case-control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillejo, Adela; Guillén-Ponce, Carmen; Carrato, Alfredo; Soto, José-Luís; Mata-Balaguer, Trinidad; Montenegro, Paola; Ochoa, Enrique; Lázaro, Rafael; Martínez-Cantó, Ana; Castillejo, María-Isabel; Guarinos, Carla; Barberá, Víctor-Manuel

    2009-01-01

    TGF-β receptor type I is a mediator of growth inhibitory signals. TGFBR1*6A (rs11466445) is a common polymorphic variant of the TGF-β receptor I gene and has been associated with tumour susceptibility. Nevertheless, the role of this polymorphism as a risk factor for colorectal cancer is controversial. The aim of this study was to assess the association between TGFBR1*6A and colorectal cancer, age, sex, tumour location and tumour stage in a Spanish population. The case-control study involved 800 Spanish subjects: 400 sporadic colorectal cancer patients and 400 age-, sex-, and ethnic-matched controls. The odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) for the TGFBR1*6A polymorphism were calculated using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age and sex. Analysis of somatic mutations at the GCG repeat of TGFBR1 exon 1 and germline allele-specific expression were also conducted to obtain further information on the contribution of the TGFBR1*6A allele to CRC susceptibility. There was no statistically significant association between the TGFBR1*6A allele and CRC (p > 0.05). The OR was 1.147 (95% CI: 0.799–1.647) for carriers of the TGFBR1*6A allele and 0.878 (95% CI: 0.306–2.520) for homozygous TGFBR1*6A individuals compared with the reference. The frequency of the polymorphism was not affected by age, sex or tumour stage. The TGFBR1*6A allele was more prevalent among colon tumour patients than among rectal tumour patients. Tumour somatic mutations were found in only two of 69 cases (2.9%). Both cases involved a GCG deletion that changed genotype 9A/9A in normal DNA to genotype 9A/8A. Interestingly, these two tumours were positive for microsatellite instability, suggesting that these mutations originated because of a deficient DNA mismatch repair system. Allele-specific expression of the 9A allele was detected in seven of the 14 heterozygous 9A/6A tumour cases. This could have been caused by linkage disequilibrium of the TGFBR1*6A allele with

  15. Genome-wide association study of subtype-specific epithelial ovarian cancer risk alleles using pooled DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earp, Madalene A; Kelemen, Linda E; Magliocco, Anthony M; Swenerton, Kenneth D; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Lu, Yi; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Fasching, Peter A; Lambrechts, Diether; Despierre, Evelyn; Vergote, Ignace; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Doherty, Jennifer A; Rossing, Mary Anne; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Friel, Grace; Moysich, Kirsten B; Odunsi, Kunle; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Lurie, Galina; Goodman, Marc T; Carney, Michael E; Thompson, Pamela J; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bogdanova, Natalia; Leminen, Arto; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa M; Butzow, Ralf; Bunker, Clareann H; Modugno, Francesmary; Edwards, Robert P; Ness, Roberta B; du Bois, Andreas; Heitz, Florian; Schwaab, Ira; Harter, Philipp; Karlan, Beth Y; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Jensen, Allan; Kjær, Susanne K; Høgdall, Claus K; Høgdall, Estrid; Lundvall, Lene; Sellers, Thomas A; Fridley, Brooke L; Goode, Ellen L; Cunningham, Julie M; Vierkant, Robert A; Giles, Graham G; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; Southey, Melissa C; Liang, Dong; Wu, Xifeng; Lu, Karen; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Levine, Douglas A; Bisogna, Maria; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Iversen, Edwin S; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Berchuck, Andrew; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L; Poole, Elizabeth M; Tworoger, Shelley S; Bandera, Elisa V; Chandran, Urmila; Orlow, Irene; Olson, Sara H; Wik, Elisabeth; Salvesen, Helga B; Bjorge, Line; Halle, Mari K; van Altena, Anne M; Aben, Katja K H; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Massuger, Leon F A G; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie T; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A; Lissowska, Jolanta; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Dicks, Ed; Dennis, Joe; Easton, Douglas F; Song, Honglin; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Pharoah, Paul D P; Eccles, Diana; Campbell, Ian G; Whittemore, Alice S; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Rothstein, Joseph H; Flanagan, James M; Paul, James; Brown, Robert; Phelan, Catherine M; Risch, Harvey A; McLaughlin, John R; Narod, Steven A; Ziogas, Argyrios; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Menon, Usha; Gayther, Simon A; Ramus, Susan J; Wu, Anna H; Pearce, Celeste L; Pike, Malcolm C; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Szafron, Lukasz M; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Cook, Linda S; Le, Nhu D; Brooks-Wilson, Angela

    2014-05-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a heterogeneous cancer with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Variants influencing the risk of developing the less-common EOC subtypes have not been fully investigated. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of EOC according to subtype by pooling genomic DNA from 545 cases and 398 controls of European descent, and testing for allelic associations. We evaluated for replication 188 variants from the GWAS [56 variants for mucinous, 55 for endometrioid and clear cell, 53 for low-malignant potential (LMP) serous, and 24 for invasive serous EOC], selected using pre-defined criteria. Genotypes from 13,188 cases and 23,164 controls of European descent were used to perform unconditional logistic regression under the log-additive genetic model; odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals are reported. Nine variants tagging six loci were associated with subtype-specific EOC risk at P < 0.05, and had an OR that agreed in direction of effect with the GWAS results. Several of these variants are in or near genes with a biological rationale for conferring EOC risk, including ZFP36L1 and RAD51B for mucinous EOC (rs17106154, OR = 1.17, P = 0.029, n = 1,483 cases), GRB10 for endometrioid and clear cell EOC (rs2190503, P = 0.014, n = 2,903 cases), and C22orf26/BPIL2 for LMP serous EOC (rs9609538, OR = 0.86, P = 0.0043, n = 892 cases). In analyses that included the 75 GWAS samples, the association between rs9609538 (OR = 0.84, P = 0.0007) and LMP serous EOC risk remained statistically significant at P < 0.0012 adjusted for multiple testing. Replication in additional samples will be important to verify these results for the less-common EOC subtypes.

  16. Detecting low frequent loss-of-function alleles in genome wide association studies with red hair color as example

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Liu (Fan); M.V. Struchalin (Maksim); K. van Duijn (Kate); A. Hofman (Albert); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractMultiple loss-of-function (LOF) alleles at the same gene may influence a phenotype not only in the homozygote state when alleles are considered individually, but also in the compound heterozygote (CH) state. Such LOF alleles typically have low frequencies and moderate to large effects.

  17. An update on HLA alleles associated with adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke-Galindo, Ingrid; LLerena, Adrián; López-López, Marisol

    2017-05-24

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are considered as an important cause of morbidity and mortality. The hypersensitivity reactions are immune-mediated ADRs, which are dose-independent, unpredictable and have been associated with several HLA alleles. The present review aimed to describe HLA alleles that have been associated with different ADRs in populations worldwide, the recommendations of regulatory agencies and pharmacoeconomic information and databases for the study of HLA alleles in pharmacogenetics. A systematic search was performed in June 2016 of articles relevant to this issue in indexed journals and in scientific databases (PubMed and PharmGKB). The information of 95 association studies found was summarized. Several HLA alleles and haplotypes have been associated with ADRs induced mainly by carbamazepine, allopurinol, abacavir and nevirapine, among other drugs. Years with the highest numbers of publications were 2013 and 2014. The majority of the reports have been performed on Asians and Caucasians, and carbamazepine was the most studied ADR drug inducer. Two HLA alleles' databases are described, as well as the recommendations of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the European Medicine Agency and the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium. Pharmacoeconomic studies on this issue are also mentioned. The strongest associations remain for HLA-B*58:01, HLA-B*57:01, HLA-B*15:02 and HLA-A*31:01 but only in certain populations; therefore, studies on different ethnic groups would be useful. Due to the improvement of drug therapy and the economic benefit that HLA screening represents, investigations on HLA alleles associated with ADR should continue.

  18. A 9-year prospective population-based study on the association between the APOE*E4 allele and late-life depression in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Ingmar; Waern, Margda; Duberstein, Paul; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Börjesson-Hanson, Anne; Östling, Svante; Guo, Xinxin; Kern, Jürgen; Gustafson, Deborah; Gudmundsson, Pia; Marlow, Thomas; Kern, Silke

    2015-11-15

    It is well established that there is an association between the apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele (APOE*E4) and Alzheimer's disease. It is less clear whether there is also an association with geriatric depression. We examined the relationship between APOE*E4 and 5-year incidence of depression in a Swedish population-based sample of older adults without dementia and excluding older adults who developed dementia within 4 years after the diagnosis of depression. In 2000-2001, 839 women and men (age range, 70-92 years; mean age, 73.8 years) free from dementia and depression underwent neuropsychiatric and neuropsychological examinations and genotyping of the APOE*E4 allele. Follow-up evaluations were conducted in 2005 and 2009.The association between APOE*E4 allele and 5-year incidence of depression was examined, while avoiding possible confounding effects of clinical or preclinical dementia by excluding participants who had dementia at study entry, subsequently developed dementia during the 9-year follow-up period, or had a decline in Mini-Mental State Examination score of ≥5 points. Among subjects without depression at study entry and without dementia or significant cognitive decline during the subsequent 9 years, APOE*E4 was prospectively associated with more severe depressive symptoms (b = 1.56, p = .007), incident minor depression (odds ratio = 1.99 [confidence interval = 1.11-3.55], p = .020), and any depression (odds ratio = 1.75 [confidence interval = 1.01-3.03], p = .048). The presence of the APOE*E4 allele predicted future depression in this Swedish population study, even after excluding depressed individuals who later developed dementia, suggesting that the APOE*E4 allele could potentially identify people at high risk for clinically significant depression. Copyright © 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Significant overlap between human genome-wide association-study nominated breast cancer risk alleles and rat mammary cancer susceptibility loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jennifer; Samuelson, David J

    2014-01-27

    Human population-based genome-wide association (GWA) studies identify low penetrance breast cancer risk alleles; however, GWA studies alone do not definitively determine causative genes or mechanisms. Stringent genome- wide statistical significance level requirements, set to avoid false-positive associations, yield many false-negative associations. Laboratory rats (Rattus norvegicus) are useful to study many aspects of breast cancer, including genetic susceptibility. Several rat mammary cancer associated loci have been identified using genetic linkage and congenic strain based-approaches. Here, we sought to determine the amount of overlap between GWA study nominated human breast and rat mammary cancer susceptibility loci. We queried published GWA studies to identify two groups of SNPs, one that reached genome-wide significance and one comprised of SNPs failing a validation step and not reaching genome- wide significance. Human genome locations of these SNPs were compared to known rat mammary carcinoma susceptibility loci to determine if risk alleles existed in both species. Rat genome regions not known to associate with mammary cancer risk were randomly selected as control regions. Significantly more human breast cancer risk GWA study nominated SNPs mapped at orthologs of rat mammary cancer loci than to regions not known to contain rat mammary cancer loci. The rat genome was useful to predict associations that had met human genome-wide significance criteria and weaker associations that had not. Integration of human and rat comparative genomics may be useful to parse out false-negative associations in GWA studies of breast cancer risk.

  20. The type 2 diabetes risk allele of TMEM154-rs6813195 associates with decreased beta cell function in a study of 6,486 Danes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Neergaard Harder

    Full Text Available A trans-ethnic meta-analysis of type 2 diabetes genome-wide association studies has identified seven novel susceptibility variants in or near TMEM154, SSR1/RREB1, FAF1, POU5F1/TCF19, LPP, ARL15 and ABCB9/MPHOSPH9. The aim of our study was to investigate associations between these novel risk variants and type 2 diabetes and pre-diabetic traits in a Danish population-based study with measurements of plasma glucose and serum insulin after an oral glucose tolerance test in order to elaborate on the physiological impact of the variants.Case-control analyses were performed in up to 5,777 patients with type 2 diabetes and 7,956 individuals with normal fasting glucose levels. Quantitative trait analyses were performed in up to 5,744 Inter99 participants naïve to glucose-lowering medication. Significant associations between TMEM154-rs6813195 and the beta cell measures insulinogenic index and disposition index and between FAF1-rs17106184 and 2-hour serum insulin levels were selected for further investigation in additional Danish studies and results were combined in meta-analyses including up to 6,486 Danes.We confirmed associations with type 2 diabetes for five of the seven SNPs (TMEM154-rs6813195, FAF1-rs17106184, POU5F1/TCF19-rs3130501, ARL15-rs702634 and ABCB9/MPHOSPH9-rs4275659. The type 2 diabetes risk C-allele of TMEM154-rs6813195 associated with decreased disposition index (n=5,181, β=-0.042, p=0.012 and insulinogenic index (n=5,181, β=-0.032, p=0.043 in Inter99 and these associations remained significant in meta-analyses including four additional Danish studies (disposition index n=6,486, β=-0.042, p=0.0044; and insulinogenic index n=6,486, β=-0.037, p=0.0094. The type 2 diabetes risk G-allele of FAF1-rs17106184 associated with increased levels of 2-hour serum insulin (n=5,547, β=0.055, p=0.017 in Inter99 and also when combining effects with three additional Danish studies (n=6,260, β=0.062, p=0.0040.Studies of type 2 diabetes intermediary

  1. CollapsABEL: An R library for detecting compound heterozygote alleles in genome-wide association studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Zhong (Kaiyin); L.C. Karssen (Lennart); M.H. Kayser (Manfred); F. Liu (Fan)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Compound Heterozygosity (CH) in classical genetics is the presence of two different recessive mutations at a particular gene locus. A relaxed form of CH alleles may account for an essential proportion of the missing heritability, i.e. heritability of phenotypes so far not

  2. The Type 2 Diabetes Risk Allele of TMEM154-rs6813195 Associates with Decreased Beta Cell Function in a Study of 6,486 Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev-Harder, Marie; Appel, Emil Vincent Rosenbaum; Grarup, Niels

    2015-01-01

    insulinogenic index and disposition index and between FAF1-rs17106184 and 2-hour serum insulin levels were selected for further investigation in additional Danish studies and results were combined in meta-analyses including up to 6,486 Danes. RESULTS: We confirmed associations with type 2 diabetes for five...... of the seven SNPs (TMEM154-rs6813195, FAF1-rs17106184, POU5F1/TCF19-rs3130501, ARL15-rs702634 and ABCB9/MPHOSPH9-rs4275659). The type 2 diabetes risk C-allele of TMEM154-rs6813195 associated with decreased disposition index (n=5,181, β=-0.042, p=0.012) and insulinogenic index (n=5,181, β=-0.032, p=0.......043) in Inter99 and these associations remained significant in meta-analyses including four additional Danish studies (disposition index n=6,486, β=-0.042, p=0.0044; and insulinogenic index n=6,486, β=-0.037, p=0.0094). The type 2 diabetes risk G-allele of FAF1-rs17106184 associated with increased levels of 2...

  3. Association and linkage studies of the TAQI A1 allele at the dopamine D{sub 2} receptor gene in samples of female and male alcoholics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neiswanger, K.; Hill, S.Y.; Kaplan, B.B. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-14

    To address the controversy surrounding DRD2 and alcoholism, we performed linkage and association studies utilizing alcoholic men from high density families largely uncontaminated by other psychopathology and female alcoholics for whom secondary drug dependence (averaging 10 years later onset) was a prominent feature. The males and females were combined for a total of 52 alcoholics, and compared to 30 controls screened for the absence of alcoholism and other psychopathology, revealing a significant association between the frequency of the TaqI allele and alcoholism. However, linkage and family-based association study, placed in the context of the literature, suggest that minimizing psychopathology in control groups is probably a more important explanation for divergent results than either sampling error or population stratification. When combined with the complete lack of within-family evidence, we conclude that the association, while not specific to the alcoholism phenotype, per se. 37 refs., 2 tabs.

  4. Genome-wide association study of subtype-specific epithelial ovarian cancer risk alleles using pooled DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Earp, M.A.; Kelemen, L.E.; Magliocco, A.M.; Swenerton, K.D.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Lu, Y.; Hein, A.; Ekici, A.B.; Beckmann, M.W.; Fasching, P.A.; Lambrechts, D.; Despierre, E.; Vergote, I.; Lambrechts, S.; Doherty, J.A.; Rossing, M.A.; Chang-Claude, J.; Rudolph, A.; Friel, G.; Moysich, K.B.; Odunsi, K.; Sucheston-Campbell, L.; Lurie, G.; Goodman, M.T.; Carney, M.E.; Thompson, P.J.; Runnebaum, I.B.; Durst, M.; Hillemanns, P.; Dork, T.; Antonenkova, N.; Bogdanova, N.; Leminen, A.; Nevanlinna, H.; Pelttari, L.M.; Butzow, R.; Bunker, C.H.; Modugno, F.; Edwards, R.P.; Ness, R.B.; Bois, A. du; Heitz, F.; Schwaab, I.; Harter, P.; Karlan, B.Y.; Walsh, C.; Lester, J.; Jensen, A.; Kjaer, S.K.; Hogdall, C.K.; Hogdall, E.; Lundvall, L.; Sellers, T.A.; Fridley, B.L.; Goode, E.L.; Cunningham, J.M.; Vierkant, R.A.; Giles, G.G.; Baglietto, L.; Severi, G.; Southey, M.C.; Liang, D.; Wu, X.; Lu, K.; Hildebrandt, M.A.T.; Levine, D.A.; Bisogna, M.; Schildkraut, J.M.; Iversen, E.S.; Weber, R.P.; Berchuck, A.; Cramer, D.W; Terry, K.L.; Poole, E.M.; Tworoger, S.S.; Bandera, E.V.; Chandran, U.; Orlow, I.; Olson, S.H.; Wik, E.; Salvesen, H.B.; Bjorge, L.; Halle, M.K.; Altena, A.M. van; Aben, K.K.H.; Kiemeney, B.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Pejovic, T.; Bean, Y.T.; Cybulski, C.; Gronwald, J.; Lubinski, J.; Wentzensen, N.; Brinton, L.A.; Lissowska, J.; Garcia-Closas, M.; Dicks, E.; et al.,

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a heterogeneous cancer with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Variants influencing the risk of developing the less-common EOC subtypes have not been fully investigated. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of EOC according to subtype by

  5. Genome-wide association study of subtype-specific epithelial ovarian cancer risk alleles using pooled DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Earp, Madalene A; Kelemen, Linda E; Magliocco, Anthony M

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a heterogeneous cancer with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Variants influencing the risk of developing the less-common EOC subtypes have not been fully investigated. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of EOC according to subtype by...

  6. A favorable cardiometabolic profile is associated with the G allele of the genetic variant rs5068 in African Americans: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Cannone

    Full Text Available In whites, the minor G allele of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP genetic variant rs5068 is associated with higher circulating levels of ANP and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP, lower risk of hypertension, higher high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol plasma levels, and lower prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome. The observed phenotype is consistent with the blood pressure lowering and metabolic properties of ANP and BNP. The cardiovascular and metabolic phenotype associated with rs5068 genotypes in African Americans is undefined. We genotyped 1631 African Americans in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA for rs5068 and investigated their phenotype. Genotype frequencies of rs5068 were 93.2% AA (n = 1520, 6.7% AG (n = 110 and 0.1% GG (n = 1. All subsequent analyses are AG + GG versus AA genotype. Using a Bonferroni corrected level of significance of 0.005, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (23% vs 38%, age-sex-adjusted p = 0.002 and triglycerides plasma values (76 vs 90 mg/dl, age-sex-BMI adjusted p = 0.004 were both significantly lower in the AG+GG genotypes. In the AG+GG genotypes, the prevalence of diabetes (8% vs 18%, age-sex-BMI-adjusted p = 0.02 and insulin plasma levels tended to be lower (4.8 vs 5.7 μU/ml, age-sex-BMI adjusted p = 0.04 whereas HDL-cholesterol levels tended to be higher (55 vs 50 mg/dl, age-sex-BMI-adjusted p = 0.04. No association was found with hypertension. The association between the rs5068 G allele and a favorable metabolic phenotype is now shown in African Americans. The rs5068 AG+GG genotypes are associated with lower prevalence of metabolic syndrome and lower triglycerides values.

  7. Autoimmune disease classification by inverse association with SNP alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Sirota

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available With multiple genome-wide association studies (GWAS performed across autoimmune diseases, there is a great opportunity to study the homogeneity of genetic architectures across autoimmune disease. Previous approaches have been limited in the scope of their analysis and have failed to properly incorporate the direction of allele-specific disease associations for SNPs. In this work, we refine the notion of a genetic variation profile for a given disease to capture strength of association with multiple SNPs in an allele-specific fashion. We apply this method to compare genetic variation profiles of six autoimmune diseases: multiple sclerosis (MS, ankylosing spondylitis (AS, autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD, rheumatoid arthritis (RA, Crohn's disease (CD, and type 1 diabetes (T1D, as well as five non-autoimmune diseases. We quantify pair-wise relationships between these diseases and find two broad clusters of autoimmune disease where SNPs that make an individual susceptible to one class of autoimmune disease also protect from diseases in the other autoimmune class. We find that RA and AS form one such class, and MS and ATD another. We identify specific SNPs and genes with opposite risk profiles for these two classes. We furthermore explore individual SNPs that play an important role in defining similarities and differences between disease pairs. We present a novel, systematic, cross-platform approach to identify allele-specific relationships between disease pairs based on genetic variation as well as the individual SNPs which drive the relationships. While recognizing similarities between diseases might lead to identifying novel treatment options, detecting differences between diseases previously thought to be similar may point to key novel disease-specific genes and pathways.

  8. Decreased insulin secretion and increased risk of type 2 diabetes associated with allelic variations of the WFS1 gene: the Data from Epidemiological Study on the Insulin Resistance Syndrome (DESIR) prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheurfa, N; Brenner, G M; Reis, A F; Dubois-Laforgue, D; Roussel, R; Tichet, J; Lantieri, O; Balkau, B; Fumeron, F; Timsit, J; Marre, M; Velho, G

    2011-03-01

    We investigated associations of allelic variations in the WFS1 gene with insulin secretion and risk of type 2 diabetes in a general population prospective study. We studied 5,110 unrelated French men and women who participated in the prospective Data from Epidemiological Study on the Insulin Resistance Syndrome (DESIR) study. Additional cross-sectional analyses were performed on 4,472 French individuals with type 2 diabetes and 3,065 controls. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped: rs10010131, rs1801213/rs7672995 and rs734312. We observed statistically significant associations between the major alleles of the three variants and prevalent type 2 diabetes in the DESIR cohort at baseline. Cox analyses showed an association between the G-allele of rs10010131 and incident type 2 diabetes (HR 1.34, 95% CI 1.08-1.70, p = 0.007). Similar results were observed for the G-allele of rs1801213 and the A-allele of rs734312. The GGA haplotype was associated with an increased risk of diabetes as compared with the ACG haplotype (HR 1.26, 95% CI 1.04-1.42, p = 0.02). We also observed statistically significant associations of the three SNPs with plasma glucose, HbA(1c) levels and insulin secretion at baseline and throughout the study in individuals with type 2 diabetes or at risk of developing diabetes. However, no association was observed in those who remained normoglycaemic at the end of the follow-up. Associations between the three variants and type 2 diabetes were replicated in cross-sectional studies of type 2 diabetic patients in comparison with a non-diabetic control group. The most frequent haplotype at the haplotype block containing the WFS1 gene modulated insulin secretion and was associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes.

  9. A common allele on chromosome 9 associated with coronary heartdisease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McPherson, Ruth; Pertsemlidis, Alexander; Kavaslar, Nihan; Stewart, Alexandre; Roberts, Robert; Cox, David R.; Hinds, David; Pennachio, Len; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Folsom, Aaron R.; Boerwinkle,Eric; Hobbs, Helen H.; Cohen, Jonathan C.

    2007-03-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major cause of death in Western countries. Here we used genome-wide association scanning to identify a 58 kb interval on chromosome 9 that was consistently associated with CHD in six independent samples. The interval contains no annotated genes and is not associated with established CHD risk factors such as plasma lipoproteins, hypertension or diabetes. Homozygotes for the risk allele comprise 20-25% of Caucasians and have a {approx}30-40% increased risk of CHD. These data indicate that the susceptibility allele acts through a novel mechanism to increase CHD risk in a large fraction of the population.

  10. Population based allele frequencies of disease associated polymorphisms in the Personalized Medicine Research Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Deanna S; Ivacic, Lynn C; Stefanski, Elisha L; McCarty, Catherine A

    2010-06-17

    There is a lack of knowledge regarding the frequency of disease associated polymorphisms in populations and population attributable risk for many populations remains unknown. Factors that could affect the association of the allele with disease, either positively or negatively, such as race, ethnicity, and gender, may not be possible to determine without population based allele frequencies.Here we used a panel of 51 polymorphisms previously associated with at least one disease and determined the allele frequencies within the entire Personalized Medicine Research Project population based cohort. We compared these allele frequencies to those in dbSNP and other data sources stratified by race. Differences in allele frequencies between self reported race, region of origin, and sex were determined. There were 19544 individuals who self reported a single racial category, 19027 or (97.4%) self reported white Caucasian, and 11205 (57.3%) individuals were female. Of the 11,208 (57%) individuals with an identifiable region of origin 8337 or (74.4%) were German.41 polymorphisms were significantly different between self reported race at the 0.05 level. Stratification of our Caucasian population by self reported region of origin revealed 19 polymorphisms that were significantly different (p = 0.05) between individuals of different origins. Further stratification of the population by gender revealed few significant differences in allele frequencies between the genders. This represents one of the largest population based allele frequency studies to date. Stratification by self reported race and region of origin revealed wide differences in allele frequencies not only by race but also by region of origin within a single racial group. We report allele frequencies for our Asian/Hmong and American Indian populations; these two minority groups are not typically selected for population allele frequency detection. Population wide allele frequencies are important for the design and

  11. Association of allelic variation in genes mediating aspects of energy homeostasis with weight gain during administration of antipsychotic drugs (CATIE Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant K Tiwari

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Antipsychotic drugs are widely used in treating schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and other psychiatric disorders. Many of these drugs, despite their therapeutic advantages, substantially increase body weight. We assessed the association of alleles of 31 genes implicated in body weight regulation with weight gain among patients being treated with specific antipsychotic medications in the CATIE trial, we found that rs2237988 in ATP-binding cassette subfamily C member 8 (ABCC8 , and rs11643744 and rs9922047 in Fat Mass and Obesity Associated (FTO were associated with such weight gain.

  12. Novel HLA Class I Alleles Associated with Indian Leprosy Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Shankarkumar

    2003-01-01

    A*0101, Cw*04011, and Cw*0602 leprosy patients was observed when compared to the controls. Further haplotype A*1102-B*4006-Cw*1502 was significantly increased among the lepromatous leprosy patients when compared to the controls. It seems that HLA class I alleles play vital roles in disease association/pathogenesis with leprosy among Indians.

  13. HLA-A alleles differentially associate with severity to Plasmodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA), particularly HLA-B and class II alleles have been differentially associated with disease outcomes in different populations following infection with the malaria Plasmodium falciparum. However, the effect of HLA-A on malaria infection and/or disease is not fully understood. Recently, HLA-A ...

  14. Filaggrin null alleles are not associated with hand eczema or contact allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørkov, Anne Lerbæk; Bisgaard, H; Agner, T

    2007-01-01

    association with hand eczema or contact allergy are unexplored. OBJECTIVES: To explore associations between the variant alleles, hand eczema, contact allergy and atopic dermatitis. METHODS: In total, 183 adult individuals participated in a clinical examination of the hands, patch testing and filaggrin...... genotyping. Children without any evidence of atopic dermatitis from the Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC) study were used as controls. The chi(2) test was used for comparison of allele frequencies. RESULTS: The majority (73%) had hand eczema, 25% had contact allergy and 14% had...... a diagnosis of atopic dermatitis. The association between atopic dermatitis and the filaggrin variant alleles was confirmed (odds ratio 3.5, P = 0.015). Allele frequencies in individuals with hand eczema or contact allergy were not statistically significantly increased. CONCLUSION: There is no association...

  15. A Genome-wide Association Study Identifies Risk Alleles in Plasminogen and P4HA2 Associated with Giant Cell Arteritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carmona, Francisco David; Vaglio, Augusto; Mackie, Sarah L.; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Monach, Paul A.; Castañeda, Santos; Solans, Roser; Morado, Inmaculada C.; Narváez, Francisco Javier; Ramentol-Sintas, Marc; Pease, Colin T.; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Watts, Richard; Khalidi, Nader A.; Langford, Carol A.; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Boiardi, Luigi; Beretta, Lorenzo; Govoni, Marcello; Emmi, Giacomo; Bonatti, Francesco; Cimmino, Marco A.; Witte, Torsten; Neumann, Thomas; Holle, Julia; Schönau, Verena; Sailler, Laurent; Papo, Thomas; Haroche, Julien; Mahr, Alfred; Mouthon, Luc; Molberg, Øyvind; Diamantopoulos, Andreas P.; Voskuyl, Alexandre E.; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Daikeler, Thomas; Berger, Christoph T.; Molloy, Eamonn S.; O'Neill, Lorraine; Blockmans, Daniel; Lie, Benedicte A.; McLaren, Paul J; Vyse, Timothy J.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Allanore, Yannick; Koeleman, Bobby P.C.; Callejas-Rubio, José Luis; Caminal-Montero, Luis; Corbera-Bellalta, Marc; de Miguel, Eugenio; López, J. Bernardino Díaz; García-Villanueva, María Jesús; Gómez-Vaquero, Carmen; Guijarro-Rojas, Mercedes; Hidalgo-Conde, Ana; Marí-Alfonso, Begoña; Berriochoa, Agustín Martínez; Zapico, Aleida Martínez; Martínez-Taboada, Víctor Manuel; Miranda-Filloy, José A.; Monfort, Jordi; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Pérez-Conesa, Mercedes; Prieto-González, Sergio; Raya, Enrique; Fernández, Raquel Ríos; Sánchez-Martín, Julio; Sopeña, Bernardo; Tío, Laura; Unzurrunzaga, Ainhoa; Gough, Andrew; Isaacs, John D.; Green, Michael; McHugh, Neil J.; Hordon, Lesley; Kamath, Sanjeet; Nisar, Mohammed; Patel, Yusuf; Yee, Cee Seng; Stevens, Robert; Nandi, Pradip; Nandagudi, Anupama; Jarrett, Stephen; Li, Charles; Levy, Sarah; Mollan, Susan; Salih, Abdel; Wordsworth, Oliver; Sanders, Emma; Roads, Esme; Gill, Anne; Carr, Lisa; Routledge, Christine; Culfear, Karen; Nugaliyadde, Asanka; James, Lynne; Spimpolo, Jenny; Kempa, Andy; Mackenzie, Felicity; Fong, Rosanna; Peters, Genessa; Rowbotham, Bridie; Masqood, Zahira; Hollywood, Jane; Gondo, Prisca; Wood, Rose; Martin, Steve; Rashid, Lubna Haroon; Robinson, James I.; Morgan, Mike; Sorensen, Louise; Taylor, John C.; Carette, Simon; Chung, Sharon; Cuthbertson, David; Forbess, Lindsy J.; Gewurz-Singer, Ora; Hoffman, Gary S.; Koening, Curry L.; Maksimowicz-McKinnon, Kathleen M.; McAlear, Carol A.; Moreland, Larry W.; Pagnoux, Christian; Seo, Philip; Specks, Ulrich; Spiera, Robert F.; Sreih, Antoine G.; Warrington, Kenneth J.; Weisman, Michael H; Barrett, Jennifer H.; Cid, María C.; Salvarani, Carlo; Merkel, Peter A.; Morgan, Ann W.; González-Gay, Miguel A.; Martín, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is the most common form of vasculitis in individuals older than 50 years in Western countries. To shed light onto the genetic background influencing susceptibility for GCA, we performed a genome-wide association screening in a well-powered study cohort. After imputation,

  16. Association of HLA-DQA1 and DQB1 alleles with keloids in Chinese Hans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wen-Sheng; Wang, Jian-Feng; Yang, Sen; Xiao, Feng-Li; Quan, Cheng; Cheng, Hui; Wang, Pei-Guang; Zhang, An-Ping; Cai, Li-Qiong; Zhang, Xue-Jun

    2008-11-01

    Some studies have suggested that human HLA status might potentiate development of keloids phenotype, and exists ethnic differences. No report has been published about HLA-DQA1 and DQB1 alleles associated with keloids in Chinese Hans. To investigate whether HLA-DQA1 and DQB1 alleles are associated with genetic susceptibility to keloids in Chinese Hans. Polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP) method was used to analyze the distribution of HLA-DQA1 and DQB1 alleles among 192 patients with keloids and 273 healthy controls in Chinese Hans. (1) The frequencies of HLA-DQA1*0104, DQB1*0501 and DQB1*0503 (OR = 2.13, P(c) = 0.0063; OR = 14.42, P(c) HLA-DQA1 and DQB1 alleles and haplotypes with keloids.

  17. Shared peptide binding of HLA Class I and II alleles associate with cutaneous nevirapine hypersensitivity and identify novel risk alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavlos, Rebecca; McKinnon, Elizabeth J.; Ostrov, David A.

    2017-01-01

    specificities and binding pocket structure. We demonstrate that primary predisposition to cutaneous NVP HSR, seen across ancestral groups, can be attributed to a cluster of HLA-C alleles sharing a common binding groove F pocket with HLA-C*04:01. An independent association with a group of class II alleles which......Genes of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system encode cell-surface proteins involved in regulation of immune responses, and the way drugs interact with the HLA peptide binding groove is important in the immunopathogenesis of T-cell mediated drug hypersensitivity syndromes. Nevirapine (NVP......), is an HIV-1 antiretroviral with treatment-limiting hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) associated with multiple class I and II HLA alleles. Here we utilize a novel analytical approach to explore these multi-allelic associations by systematically examining HLA molecules for similarities in peptide binding...

  18. [Study on the association between the polymorphism of HLA-DQA1 alleles and type 2 diabetes in Yunnan Han nationality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong-ying; Tai, Wen-lin; Yuan, Hui-yun; Xu, Mian; Li, Jiang; Ren, Chun-feng; Du, Juan

    2004-06-01

    To investigate the association between the polymorphism of HLA-DQA1 alleles and type 2 diabetes mellitus in Yunnan Hans. Polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific primers(PCR-SSP) genotyping method was conducted in 108 Han patients with type 2 diabetes and 56 ethnically matched controls from the same area of Yunnan Province. HLA-DQA1*0301(RR=3.092, PHLA-DQA1*0401 (RR=0.371, PHLA-DQA1*0302 (RR=3.356, PHLA-DQA1*0301 and DQA1*0501 are susceptible genes of type 2 diabetes in Yunnan Han nationality; in reverse, HLA-DQA1*0401 is a resistant gene. HLA-DQA1*0302 is a susceptible gene of type 2 diabetic nephropathy.

  19. Mannose-binding lectin variant alleles and HLA-DR4 alleles are associated with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Soren; Baslund, Bo; Madsen, Hans O.

    2002-01-01

    /GCA, MBL variant alleles were associated with signs of increased inflammatory activity and clinical signs of arteritic manifestations. This was not found for HLA-DR4 alleles. These findings indicate that HLA-DR4 and MBL are contributing to the pathophysiology of GCA at different levels in the disease......OBJECTIVE: To determine whether variant alleles of the mannose-binding lectin (MBL) gene causing low serum concentrations of MBL and/or polymorphisms of HLA-DRB1 are associated with increased susceptibility to polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) and giant cell arteritis (GCA) or particular clinical...... phenotypes of PMR/GCA. METHODS: MBL and HLA-DRB1 alleles were determined by polymerase chain reaction in 102 Danish patients with PMR (n = 37) or GCA (n = 65). Two hundred fifty and 193 healthy individuals served as controls for MBL and HLA genotyping, respectively. RESULTS: The prevalence of MBL variant...

  20. Tumour necrosis factor allele variants and their association with the occurrence and severity of malaria in African children: a longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gichohi-Wainaina, W.N.; Boonstra, A.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Demir, A.Y.; Veenemans, J.; Verhoef, H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is central to the immune response to Plasmodium infection. Its plasma concentration is influenced by allele variants in the promoter region of TNF. The study’s objectives were to assess TNF allele variants (TNF-1031 , TNF-308 ): (1) modulation of malaria rates

  1. Narcolepsy-Associated HLA Class I Alleles Implicate Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tafti, M.; Lammers, G.J.; Dauvilliers, Y.; Overeem, S.; Mayer, G.; Nowak, J.; Pfister, C.; Dubois, V.; Eliaou, J.F.; Eberhard, H.P.; Liblau, R.; Wierzbicka, A.; Geisler, P.; Bassetti, C.L.; Mathis, J.; Lecendreux, M.; Khatami, R.; Heinzer, R.; Haba-Rubio, J.; Feketeova, E.; Baumann, C.R.; Kutalik, Z.; Tiercy, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: Narcolepsy with cataplexy is tightly associated with the HLA class II allele DQB1*06:02. Evidence indicates a complex contribution of HLA class II genes to narcolepsy susceptibility with a recent independent association with HLA-DPB1. The cause of narcolepsy is supposed be an

  2. Estimation of allele frequency and association mapping using next-generation sequencing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersen Gitte

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estimation of allele frequency is of fundamental importance in population genetic analyses and in association mapping. In most studies using next-generation sequencing, a cost effective approach is to use medium or low-coverage data (e.g., X. However, SNP calling and allele frequency estimation in such studies is associated with substantial statistical uncertainty because of varying coverage and high error rates. Results We evaluate a new maximum likelihood method for estimating allele frequencies in low and medium coverage next-generation sequencing data. The method is based on integrating over uncertainty in the data for each individual rather than first calling genotypes. This method can be applied to directly test for associations in case/control studies. We use simulations to compare the likelihood method to methods based on genotype calling, and show that the likelihood method outperforms the genotype calling methods in terms of: (1 accuracy of allele frequency estimation, (2 accuracy of the estimation of the distribution of allele frequencies across neutrally evolving sites, and (3 statistical power in association mapping studies. Using real re-sequencing data from 200 individuals obtained from an exon-capture experiment, we show that the patterns observed in the simulations are also found in real data. Conclusions Overall, our results suggest that association mapping and estimation of allele frequencies should not be based on genotype calling in low to medium coverage data. Furthermore, if genotype calling methods are used, it is usually better not to filter genotypes based on the call confidence score.

  3. Human leukocyte Antigen-B*27 allele subtype prevalence and disease association of ankylosing spondylitis among south indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Haridas

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: The current study indicates that a majority of South Indian AS patients are associated with HLA-B*27 alleles. In addtion we found that HLA-B*27 associated AS patients presented with more severe axial manifestations.

  4. Association Between PAH Mutations and VNTR Alleles in the West Azerbaijani PKU Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Morteza; Rad, Isa Abdi; Jazani, Nima Hosseini; Zarrin, Rasoul; Ghazavi, Ahad

    2014-09-01

    We report the frequency of IVS10nt546, R261Q, S67P, R252W, and R408W mutations linked to PAH VNTR alleles in the west Azerbaijani PKU patients. VNTR alleles and IVS10nt546, R261Q, S67P, R252W, R408W mutations were studied in a total of 20 PKU patients by PCR and RFLP-PCR. Our analysis showed that 95% of cases were homozygote for an allele containing eight-repeat VNTR (VNTR8); while 5% were homozygote for an allele containing three-repeat VNTR (VNTR3). The IVS10nt546, R252W, and R261Q mutations were associated with VNTR8 allele, and also, R252W and S67P mutations were associated with VNTR3 allele. VNTR8 was common among mutant alleles as were IVS10nt546-VNTR8 (50%), R252W-VNTR8 (2.5%), and R261Q-VNTR8 (22.5%). The association of VNTR3 was found as R252W-VNTR3 (2.5%) and S67P-VNTR3 (2.5%) among studied cases. The frequency of IVS10nt546-VNTR8/IVS10nt546-VNTR8, IVS10nt546-VNTR8/ND-VNTR8, IVS10nt546-VNTR8/R252W-VNTR8, R261Q-VNTR8/R261Q-VNTR8, R261Q-VNTR8/ND-VNTR8, and S67P-VNTR3/ R252W-VNTR3 were 30%, 35%, 5%, 20%, 5%, and 5%, respectively. R408W mutation was not found in this study. The present report is the first in its own kind in the west Azerbaijani population (Iran) and implies that the most common PKU mutation in this population, IVS10nt546, is exclusively associated with VNTR8 allele, and IVS10nt546-VNTR8 alleles testing should be considered for routine carrier screening and prenatal diagnostic setting.

  5. Allelic variation in a willow warbler genomic region is associated with climate clines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith W Larson

    Full Text Available Local adaptation is an important process contributing to population differentiation which can occur in continuous or isolated populations connected by various amounts of gene flow. The willow warbler (Phylloscopus trochilus is one of the most common songbirds in Fennoscandia. It has a continuous breeding distribution where it is found in all forested habitats from sea level to the tree line and therefore constitutes an ideal species for the study of locally adapted genes associated with environmental gradients. Previous studies in this species identified a genetic marker (AFLP-WW1 that showed a steep north-south cline in central Sweden with one allele associated with coastal lowland habitats and the other with mountainous habitats. It was further demonstrated that this marker is embedded in a highly differentiated chromosome region that spans several megabases. In the present study, we sampled 2,355 individuals at 128 sites across all of Fennoscandia to study the geographic and climatic variables associated with the allele frequency distributions of WW1. Our results demonstrate that 1 allele frequency patterns significantly differ between mountain and lowland populations, 2 these allele differences coincide with extreme temperature conditions and the short growing season in the mountains, and milder conditions in coastal areas, and 3 the northern-allele or "altitude variant" of WW1 occurs in willow warblers that occupy mountainous habitat regardless of subspecies. Finally these results suggest that climate may exert selection on the genomic region associated with these alleles and would allow us to develop testable predictions for the distribution of the genetic marker based on climate change scenarios.

  6. Specific human leukocyte antigen class I and II alleles associated with hepatitis C virus viremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuniholm, Mark H; Kovacs, Andrea; Gao, Xiaojiang; Xue, Xiaonan; Marti, Darlene; Thio, Chloe L; Peters, Marion G; Terrault, Norah A; Greenblatt, Ruth M; Goedert, James J; Cohen, Mardge H; Minkoff, Howard; Gange, Stephen J; Anastos, Kathryn; Fazzari, Melissa; Harris, Tiffany G; Young, Mary A; Strickler, Howard D; Carrington, Mary

    2010-05-01

    Studies of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and their relation with hepatitis C virus (HCV) viremia have had conflicting results. However, these studies have varied in size and methods, and few large studies assessed HLA class I alleles. Only one study conducted high-resolution class I genotyping. The current investigation therefore involved high-resolution HLA class I and II genotyping of a large multiracial cohort of U.S. women with a high prevalence of HCV and HIV. Our primary analyses evaluated associations between 12 HLA alleles identified through a critical review of the literature and HCV viremia in 758 HCV-seropositive women. Other alleles with >5% prevalence were also assessed; previously unreported associations were corrected for multiple comparisons. DRB1*0101 (prevalence ratio [PR] = 1.7; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.1-2.6), B*5701 (PR=2.0; 95% CI = 1.0-3.1), B*5703 (PR = 1.7; 95% CI = 1.0-2.5), and Cw*0102 (PR = 1.9; 95% CI = 1.0-3.0) were associated with the absence of HCV RNA (i.e., HCV clearance), whereas DRB1*0301 (PR = 0.4; 95% CI = 0.2-0.7) was associated with HCV RNA positivity. DQB1*0301 was also associated with the absence of HCV RNA but only among HIV-seronegative women (PR = 3.4; 95% CI = 1.2-11.8). Each of these associations was among those predicted. We additionally studied the relation of HLA alleles with HCV infection (serostatus) in women at high risk of HCV from injection drug use (N = 838), but no significant relationships were observed. HLA genotype influences the host capacity to clear HCV viremia. The specific HLA associations observed in the current study are unlikely to be due to chance because they were a priori hypothesized.

  7. Association of HLA class II alleles and CTLA-4 polymorphism with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana J EI Wafai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is a progressive complex autoimmune disease in which combinations of environmental as well as genetic factors contribute to T-cell mediated destruction of insulin-secreting β-cells of the pancreas. HLA class II alleles on chromosome 6p21 [insulin dependent diabetes mellitus 1 (IDDM1], especially DR and DQ, show strong association with T1DM. In addition, several studies have suggested that polymorphisms in the CTLA-4 gene (IDDM12 on chromosome 2q33 form part of the genetic susceptibility for type 1 diabetes. The aim of this study was to analyze HLA alleles of the DQB1 and DRB1 genes using polymerase chain reaction using sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP technique and to investigate the asso-ciation of the A49G CTLA-4 polymorphism using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP analysis in Lebanese T1DM patients. The study was conduc-ted on 39 Lebanese T1DM patients. Results of HLA typing showed an increased frequency of the HLA-DQB1FNx010201, HLA-DQB1FNx010302, HLA-DRB1FNx010301 and HLA-DRB1FNx010401 alleles, sugges-ting risk association and thus can be considered as susceptibility alleles. On the other hand, strong protection against the disease was conferred by the HLA-DRB1FNx01110101, HLA-DQB1FNx010301 and HLADQB1FNx010601 alleles. RFLP analysis of the A49G polymorphism showed a significant increase in the G allele and GG genotype frequencies in patients, suggesting that CTLA-4 may be considered as a susceptibility gene for the development of T1DM in the Lebanese population. Analysis of the two polymorphisms showed no detectable association between the two genes. However, a significant negative association of the G allele with the DQB1FNx010201 allele was ob-served. This might indicate that the two genetic risk factors, namely HLA and CTLA-4, act independently of each other with no additive effect.

  8. Susceptible and Protective Associations of HLA Alleles and Haplotypes with Cervical Cancer in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathika, Chinniah; Murali, Vijayan; Dhivakar, Mani; Kamaraj, Raju; Malini, Ravi Padma; Ramgopal, Sivanadham; Balakrishnan, Karuppiah

    2016-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes have been implicated in cervical cancer in several populations. To study the predispositions of HLA alleles/haplotypes with cervical cancer. Clinically diagnosed and PAP smear confirmed cervical cancer patients (n 48) and age matched controls (n 47) were genotyped for HLA-A,-B,-DRB1* and DQB1* alleles by PCR-SSP methods. The frequencies of alleles DRB1*04 (OR=2.57), DRB1*15 (OR=2.04), DQB1*0301 (OR=4.91), DQB1*0601 (OR=2.21), B*15 (OR=13.03) and B*07 (OR=6.23) were higher in cervical cancer patients than in the controls. The frequencies of alleles DRB1*10 (OR=0.22) and B*35 (OR=0.19) were decreased. Strong disease associations were observed for haplotypes DRB1*15-DQB1*0601 (OR=6.56; HLA-C* typing of 8 patients who possessed a unique three locus haplotype 'A*11-B*07-DRB1*04' (8/48; 16.66%; OR=6.51; cancer. Strong susceptible associations were documented for HLA alleles B*15, B*07, DRB1*04, DRB1*15, DQB1*0301, DQB1*0601 and haplotypes DRB1*15-DQB1*0601 and DRB1*14-DQB1*0501. Further, protective associations were evidenced for alleles B*35 and DRB1*10 and haplotypes A*11-B*35 and DRB1*10-DQB1*0501 with cervical cancer in South India.

  9. Loss of RNA expression and allele-specific expression associated with congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean, David M.; Homsy, Jason; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Patel, Neil; Gorham, Joshua; DePalma, Steven R.; Ware, James S.; Zaidi, Samir; Ma, Wenji; Patel, Nihir; Lifton, Richard P.; Chung, Wendy K.; Kim, Richard; Shen, Yufeng; Brueckner, Martina; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Sharp, Andrew J.; Seidman, Christine E.; Gelb, Bruce D.; Seidman, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD), a prevalent birth defect occurring in 1% of newborns, likely results from aberrant expression of cardiac developmental genes. Mutations in a variety of cardiac transcription factors, developmental signalling molecules and molecules that modify chromatin cause at least 20% of disease, but most CHD remains unexplained. We employ RNAseq analyses to assess allele-specific expression (ASE) and biallelic loss-of-expression (LOE) in 172 tissue samples from 144 surgically repaired CHD subjects. Here we show that only 5% of known imprinted genes with paternal allele silencing are monoallelic versus 56% with paternal allele expression—this cardiac-specific phenomenon seems unrelated to CHD. Further, compared with control subjects, CHD subjects have a significant burden of both LOE genes and ASE events associated with altered gene expression. These studies identify FGFBP2, LBH, RBFOX2, SGSM1 and ZBTB16 as candidate CHD genes because of significantly altered transcriptional expression. PMID:27670201

  10. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Adoue, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    There are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are functional....../or mechanisms. Thereafter, using data from a genome-wide map of allelic expression associated SNPs, 313 genetic variants were selected and their association with breast cancer risk was then evaluated in 46,451 breast cancer cases and 42,599 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 41 studies participating...... in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The associations were evaluated with overall breast cancer risk and with estrogen receptor negative and positive disease. One novel breast cancer susceptibility locus on 4q21 (rs11099601) was identified (OR = 1.05, P = 5.6x10-6). rs11099601 lies in a 135 kb linkage...

  11. Association of gliadin antibodies, HLA alleles, and schizophrenia in Cuban population patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Galván

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several lines of evidence have suggested an interesting link between gluten ingestion and schizophrenia. For example, increased levels of gliadin and transglutaminase antibodies have been observed in patients with schizophrenia. Methods: To verify these observations we compared the prevalence of gliadin and transglutaminse antibodies, as well as the presence of the HLA alleles, HLA DQA1*0501-DQB1*02 (DQ2 and HLA-DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302 (DQ8, among patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. A total of 108 patients with schizophrenia and 60 healthy controls were evaluated. Gliadin antibodies were determined by a visual semiquantitative assay and tissue transglutaminase antibodies were determined both by one-step immunochromatografic assay and ELISA. HLA typing was performed by PCR amplification using sequence-specific primers for each allele. Results: We found a strong association between the presence of gliadin antibodies and schizophrenia (OR 3.488; 95% CI, 1.43-8.44. However, tissue transglutaminase antibodies were not detected in either group neither by immunochromatograpic or ELISA. No significant association was found for the DQ2 or DQ8 heterodimer and the disease, but a significant positive association between schizophrenia and HLA alleles DQA1*0301 and DQB1*02 was present (OR = 2.80; 95% CI, 1.27-6.17, and OR = 2.37, 95% CI, 1.24-4.53, respectively. Conclusions: The present study showed that the presence of gliadin antibodies was not correlated with the presence of HLA DQA1*0301 or DQB1*02 alleles within the group of patients with schizophrenia. Our study replicates the findings that anti-gliadin antibodies are associated with schizophrenia but also suggests that the presence of these antibodies and the HLA alleles DQB1*02 and DQA1*0301 are independently associated with susceptibility to schizophrenia.

  12. Association of polymorphous alleles of class II HLA genes with Graves' disease (GD in Tuvinian population

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    I V Osokina

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to consider association of polymorphous alleles of class II HLA genes with Graves’ disease (GD in Tuvinian population. Methods. HLAgenotyping was accomplished in 40 GD patients and 164 volunteers randomly selected in Tuvinian population (native Siberian population, Mongoloids. GD was diagnosed accordind to the clinical and laboratory criteria. HLAgenotyping for 14 DRB1 alleles, 8 DQA1 alleles and 13 DQB1 alleles was performed by polymerase chain reaction sequencespecific primers (DNATechnology, Russia. Statistical analysis was performed using the Excoffer, Schneider and Kuffer package. RR have been calculated using Woolf method. Results. We found the HLAmarkers of predisposition to GD in Tuvinians: HLA DQA1*0501( RR = 1.76; p < 0.05 and DQB1*0301 (RR = 1.44; p < 0.05. Analysis of the HLA haplotypes showed, that DRB1*13DQA1*0501 DQB1*0301 was associated with an increased risk of GD (RR = 3.53. The protective were DRB1*0302 (RR = 0.19 and haplotype DRB1*04DQA1*0301DQB1*0302 (RR = 0.02. Conclusions. This molecular genetic study has been shown that HLA DQA1*0501, DQB1*0301 and haplotype DRB1*13DQA1*0501DQB1*0301 associated with Graves’ disease in Tuvinian population.

  13. Association of apolipoprotein E allele {epsilon}4 with late-onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucotte, G.; David, F.; Berriche, S. [Regional Center of Neurogenetics, Reims (France)] [and others

    1994-09-15

    Apolipoprotein E, type {epsilon}4 allele (ApoE {epsilon}4), is associated with late-onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease (AD) in French patients. The association is highly significant (0.45 AD versus 0.12 controls for {epsilon}4 allele frequencies). These data support the involvement of ApoE {epsilon}4 allele as a very important risk factor for the clinical expression of AD. 22 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  14. MHC Class II alleles in ulcerative colitis-associated colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrity-Park, M M; Loftus, E V; Sandborn, W J; Bryant, S C; Smyrk, T C

    2009-09-01

    Patients with ulcerative colitis are at risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). Although prior studies have shown a link between HLA genotypes and ulcerative colitis (UC) susceptibility, none have investigated HLA genotypes and UC-CRC. We therefore investigated HLA-DR/DQ alleles in UC-CRC cases and UC-controls. Furthermore, since methylation of the Class II transactivator (CIITA) gene may silence HLA expression in tumours, we correlated HLA allele frequencies with CIITA gene methylation and HLA-DR expression. Cases and controls were matched for duration/extent of ulcerative colitis, age, ethnicity and gender, but not for primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). DNA was extracted from archived tissue blocks from 114 UC-CRC cases and 114 UC-controls. HLA-DR/DQ genotyping was performed using sequence-specific-oligonucleotide polymerase chain reaction (SSO-PCR). CIITA methylation was determined using methylation-specific PCR. HLA-DR immunohistochemistry was done following standard protocols. UC-CRC cases were more likely than UC-controls to carry the DR17 or DR13 alleles (passociated with CIITA methylation (p = 0.04 and 0.02, respectively). UC-controls more frequently carried the DR7, DR1 or DQ5 alleles (p = 0.002, 0.05 or 0.01, respectively). After adjusting for PSC, DR17 remained significantly associated with an increased risk for UC-CRC while DR7 and DQ5 remained protective. We report a significant association between specific HLA alleles and either the risk for (DR17) or protection from (DR7, DQ5) UC-CRC. This suggests a possible genetic predisposition for increased UC-CRC risk. In addition, DQ2 and DR17 were associated with CIITA methylation.

  15. VNTR alleles associated with the {alpha}-globin locus are haplotype and population related

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinson, J.J.; Clegg, J.B.; Boyce, A.J. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1994-09-01

    The human {alpha}-globin complex contains several polymorphic restriction-enzyme sites (i.e., RFLPs) linked to form haplotypes and is flanked by two hypervariable VNTR loci, the 5{prime} hypervariable region (HVR) and the more highly polymorphic 3{prime}HVR. Using a combination of RFLP analysis and PCR, the authors have characterized the 5{prime}HVR and 3{prime}HVR alleles associated with the {alpha}-globin haplotypes of 133 chromosomes, and they here show that specific {alpha}-globin haplotypes are each associated with discrete subsets of the alleles observed at these two VNTR loci. This statistically highly significant association is observed over a region spanning {approximately} 100 kb. With the exception of closely related haplotypes, different haplotypes do not share identically sized 3{prime}HVR alleles. Earlier studies have shown that {alpha}-globin haplotype distributions differ between populations; the current findings also reveal extensive population substructure in the repertoire of {alpha}-globin VNTRs. If similar features are characteristic of other VNTR loci, this will have important implications for forensic and anthropological studies. 42 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. HLA-A and HLA-B alleles associated in psoriasis patients from Mumbai, Western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankarkumar Umapathy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psoriasis, a common autoimmune disorder characterized by T cell-mediated keratinocyte hyperproliferation, is known to be associated with the presence of certain specific Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA alleles. Aim: To evaluate distribution of HLA-A and HLA-B alleles and hence identify the susceptible allele of psoriasis from patients in Western India. Materials and Methods: The study design included 84 psoriasis patients and 291 normal individuals as controls from same geographical region. HLA-A and HLA-B typing was done using Serology typing. Standard statistical analysis was followed to identify the odds ratio (OR, allele frequencies, and significant P value using Graphpad software. Results: The study revealed significant increase in frequencies of HLA-A2 (OR-3.976, P<0.0001, B8 (OR-5.647, P<0.0001, B17 (OR-5.452, P<0.0001, and B44 (OR-50.460, P<0.0001, when compared with controls. Furthermore, the frequencies of HLA-A28 (OR-0.074, P=0.0024, B5 (OR-0.059, P<0.0001, B12 (OR-0.051, P=0.0002, and B15 (OR-0.237, P=0.0230 were significantly decreased in psoriasis patients. Conclusion: This study shows the strong association of HLA-A2, B8, and B17 antigens with psoriasis conferring susceptibility to psoriasis patients from Western India, while the antigens HLA-A28, B5, and B12 show strong negative association with the disease.

  17. HLA-A AND HLA-B ALLELES ASSOCIATED IN PSORIASIS PATIENTS FROM MUMBAI, WESTERN INDIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umapathy, Shankarkumar; Pawar, Aruna; Mitra, R; Khuperkar, D; Devaraj, J P; Ghosh, K; Khopkar, U

    2011-01-01

    Background: Psoriasis, a common autoimmune disorder characterized by T cell-mediated keratinocyte hyperproliferation, is known to be associated with the presence of certain specific Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) alleles. Aim: To evaluate distribution of HLA-A and HLA-B alleles and hence identify the susceptible allele of psoriasis from patients in Western India. Materials and Methods: The study design included 84 psoriasis patients and 291 normal individuals as controls from same geographical region. HLA-A and HLA-B typing was done using Serology typing. Standard statistical analysis was followed to identify the odds ratio (OR), allele frequencies, and significant P value using Graphpad software. Results: The study revealed significant increase in frequencies of HLA-A2 (OR-3.976, P<0.0001), B8 (OR-5.647, P<0.0001), B17 (OR-5.452, P<0.0001), and B44 (OR-50.460, P<0.0001), when compared with controls. Furthermore, the frequencies of HLA-A28 (OR-0.074, P=0.0024), B5 (OR-0.059, P<0.0001), B12 (OR-0.051, P=0.0002), and B15 (OR-0.237, P=0.0230) were significantly decreased in psoriasis patients. Conclusion: This study shows the strong association of HLA-A2, B8, and B17 antigens with psoriasis conferring susceptibility to psoriasis patients from Western India, while the antigens HLA-A28, B5, and B12 show strong negative association with the disease. PMID:22121262

  18. Comprehensive genotyping in two homogeneous Graves' disease samples reveals major and novel HLA association alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Lung Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Graves' disease (GD is the leading cause of hyperthyroidism and thyroid eye disease inherited as a complex trait. Although geoepidemiology studies showed relatively higher prevalence of GD in Asians than in Caucasians, previous genetic studies were contradictory concerning whether and/or which human leukocyte antigen (HLA alleles are associated with GD in Asians. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a case-control association study (499 unrelated GD cases and 504 controls and a replication in an independent family sample (419 GD individuals and their 282 relatives in 165 families. To minimize genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity, we included only ethnic Chinese Han population in Taiwan and excluded subjects with hypothyroidism. We performed direct and comprehensive genotyping of six classical HLA loci (HLA-A, -B, -C, -DPB1, -DQB1 and -DRB1 to 4-digit resolution. Combining the data of two sample populations, we found that B*46:01 (odds ratio under dominant model [OR]  = 1.33, Bonferroni corrected combined P [P(Bc]  = 1.17 x 10⁻², DPB1*05:01 (OR  = 2.34, P(Bc = 2.58 x 10⁻¹⁰, DQB1*03:02 (OR  = 0.62, P(Bc  = 1.97 x 10⁻², DRB1*15:01 (OR  = 1.68, P(Bc = 1.22 x 10⁻² and DRB1*16:02 (OR  = 2.63, P(Bc  = 1.46 x 10⁻⁵ were associated with GD. HLA-DPB1*05:01 is the major gene of GD in our population and singly accounts for 48.4% of population-attributable risk. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These GD-associated alleles we identified in ethnic Chinese Hans, and those identified in other Asian studies, are totally distinct from the known associated alleles in Caucasians. Identification of population-specific association alleles is the critical first step for individualized medicine. Furthermore, comparison between different susceptibility/protective alleles across populations could facilitate generation of novel hypothesis about GD pathophysiology and indicate a new direction for future

  19. Association of chronic fatigue syndrome with human leucocyte antigen class II alleles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J; Fritz, E L; Kerr, J R; Cleare, A J; Wessely, S; Mattey, D L

    2005-01-01

    Background: A genetic component to the development of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) has been proposed, and a possible association between human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II antigens and chronic fatigue immune dysfunction has been shown in some, but not all, studies. Aims: To investigate the role of HLA class II antigens in CFS. Methods: Forty nine patients with CFS were genotyped for the HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQA1, and HLA-DQB1 alleles and the frequency of these alleles was compared with a control group comprising 102 normal individuals from the UK. All patients and controls were from the same region of England and, apart from two patients, were white. Results: Analysis by 2 × 2 contingency tables revealed an increased frequency of HLA-DQA1*01 alleles in patients with CFS (51.0% v 35%; odds ratio (OR), 1.93; p  =  0.008). HLA-DQB1*06 was also increased in the patients with CFS (30.2% v 20.0%; OR, 1.73, p  =  0.052). Only the association between HLA-DQA1*01 and CFS was significant in logistic regression models containing HLA-DQA1*01 and HLA-DRQB1*06, and this was independent of HLA-DRB1 alleles. There was a decreased expression of HLA-DRB1*11 in CFS, although this association disappeared after correction for multiple comparisons. Conclusions: CFS may be associated with HLA-DQA1*01, although a role for other genes in linkage disequilibrium cannot be ruled out. PMID:16049290

  20. Association between the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele and late onset of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Timm, Sally; Wang, August G

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The 32-bp deletion allele in chemokine receptor CCR5 has been associated with several immune-mediated diseases and might be implicated in schizophrenia as well. METHOD: The authors genotyped DNA samples from 268 schizophrenia patients and 323 healthy subjects. Age at first admission...... of the deletion allele in the latter subgroup of patients. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele is a susceptibility factor for schizophrenia with late onset. Alternatively, the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele may act as a modifier by delaying the onset of schizophrenia without...

  1. Association of HLA-A and Non-Classical HLA Class I Alleles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlini, Federico; Ferreira, Virginia; Buhler, Stéphane; Tous, Audrey; Eliaou, Jean-François; René, Céline; Chiaroni, Jacques; Picard, Christophe; Di Cristofaro, Julie

    2016-01-01

    The HLA-A locus is surrounded by HLA class Ib genes: HLA-E, HLA-H, HLA-G and HLA-F. HLA class Ib molecules are involved in immuno-modulation with a central role for HLA-G and HLA-E, an emerging role for HLA-F and a yet unknown function for HLA-H. Thus, the principal objective of this study was to describe the main allelic associations between HLA-A and HLA-H, -G, -F and -E. Therefore, HLA-A, -E, -G, -H and -F coding polymorphisms, as well as HLA-G UnTranslated Region haplotypes (referred to as HLA-G UTRs), were explored in 191 voluntary blood donors. Allelic frequencies, Global Linkage Disequilibrium (GLD), Linkage Disequilibrium (LD) for specific pairs of alleles and two-loci haplotype frequencies were estimated. We showed that HLA-A, HLA-H, HLA-F, HLA-G and HLA-G UTRs were all in highly significant pairwise GLD, in contrast to HLA-E. Moreover, HLA-A displayed restricted associations with HLA-G UTR and HLA-H. We also confirmed several associations that were previously found to have a negative impact on transplantation outcome. In summary, our results suggest complex functional and clinical implications of the HLA-A genetic region. PMID:27701438

  2. Association of HLA-A and Non-Classical HLA Class I Alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlini, Federico; Ferreira, Virginia; Buhler, Stéphane; Tous, Audrey; Eliaou, Jean-François; René, Céline; Chiaroni, Jacques; Picard, Christophe; Di Cristofaro, Julie

    2016-01-01

    The HLA-A locus is surrounded by HLA class Ib genes: HLA-E, HLA-H, HLA-G and HLA-F. HLA class Ib molecules are involved in immuno-modulation with a central role for HLA-G and HLA-E, an emerging role for HLA-F and a yet unknown function for HLA-H. Thus, the principal objective of this study was to describe the main allelic associations between HLA-A and HLA-H, -G, -F and -E. Therefore, HLA-A, -E, -G, -H and -F coding polymorphisms, as well as HLA-G UnTranslated Region haplotypes (referred to as HLA-G UTRs), were explored in 191 voluntary blood donors. Allelic frequencies, Global Linkage Disequilibrium (GLD), Linkage Disequilibrium (LD) for specific pairs of alleles and two-loci haplotype frequencies were estimated. We showed that HLA-A, HLA-H, HLA-F, HLA-G and HLA-G UTRs were all in highly significant pairwise GLD, in contrast to HLA-E. Moreover, HLA-A displayed restricted associations with HLA-G UTR and HLA-H. We also confirmed several associations that were previously found to have a negative impact on transplantation outcome. In summary, our results suggest complex functional and clinical implications of the HLA-A genetic region.

  3. Association of low-activity MAOA allelic variants with violent crime in incarcerated offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetler, Dean A; Davis, Chad; Leavitt, Kathryn; Schriger, Ilana; Benson, Katie; Bhakta, Samir; Wang, Lam Chee; Oben, Cynthia; Watters, Matthew; Haghnegahdar, Tara; Bortolato, Marco

    2014-11-01

    The main enzyme for serotonin degradation, monoamine oxidase (MAO) A, has recently emerged as a key biological factor in the predisposition to impulsive aggression. Male carriers of low-activity variants of the main functional polymorphism of the MAOA gene (MAOA-uVNTR) have been shown to exhibit a greater proclivity to engage in violent acts. Thus, we hypothesized that low-activity MAOA-uVNTR alleles may be associated with a higher risk for criminal violence among male offenders. To test this possibility, we analyzed the MAOA-uVNTR variants of violent (n = 49) and non-violent (n = 40) male Caucasian and African-American convicts in a correctional facility. All participants were also tested with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS-11) and Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (BPAQ) to assess their levels of childhood trauma exposure, impulsivity and aggression, respectively. Our results revealed a robust (P crime. This association was replicated in the group of Caucasian violent offenders (P crime charges were not associated with CTQ, BIS-11 and BPAQ scores, carriers of low-activity alleles exhibited a mild, yet significant (P < 0.05) increase in BIS-11 total and attentional-impulsiveness scores. In summary, these findings support the role of MAOA gene as a prominent genetic determinant for criminal violence. Further studies are required to confirm these results in larger samples of inmates and evaluate potential interactions between MAOA alleles and environmental vulnerability factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Risk of autoimmune diabetes in APECED: association with short alleles of the 5'insulin VNTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, J; Varin, D S E; Hamelin, C E; Hallgren, A; Kämpe, O; Carel, J-C; Perheentupa, J; Deal, C L

    2010-10-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) is a rare autoimmune disease causing a wide spectrum of autoimmune dysfunction potentially including diabetes of an autoimmune etiology. We have previously described a pair of discordant APECED siblings and pointed to a possible role of 5'insulin variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) locus IDDM2 in the appearance of diabetes within this disease. In vitro studies have previously suggested that class I VNTR alleles were associated with decreased fetal thymic insulin expression. We genotyped the 5'INS VNTR locus and several flanking 11p15.5 markers in 50 Finnish APECED subjects and explored the possible contribution of IDDM2 in the development of diabetes. The shorter 5'INS VNTR class I alleles (APECED subjects than in non-diabetic APECED subjects. Logistic regression analysis revealed that having 1 short (APECED.

  5. Association of HLA-DRB1 alleles and neuropsychological function in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Yi-Ling; Wu, Yu-Yu; Chen, Chia-Hsiang; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Huang, Yu-Shu; Chien, Wei-Hsien; Hu, Fu-Chang; Chao, Yu-Lin

    2012-02-01

    Evidence suggests an association between autism and immune dysfunction. The associations between human lymphocyte antigen (HLA)-A2, B44, DRβ1*04 (DR4), C4B, and haplotype B44-SC30-DR4 and autism have been reported in western countries but there is a lack of such information in Asian population. This study aimed to assess the association between HLA-DRB1 allele frequencies and the clinical phenomenology of autism. The sample included 141 participants (male, 87.2%), who were diagnosed with autistic disorder based on clinical assessments and structured interviews using the Chinese version of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised, and 156 healthy controls (male, 38.6%). The HLA-DRB1 alleles were determined by sequencing-based typing method. A subsample of patients (n=39) were assessed for intelligence and neuropsychological functions. The results showed that the pattern of DRB1 allele frequencies was significantly different between patients with autism and the controls (P=0.047). After adjusting for sex by haplotype regression, the frequencies of DR4, DR11, and DR14 were significantly different between patients with autism and healthy controls. In addition, patients with autism and DR4, DR11, or DR14 had different performance on intelligence and neuropsychology tests. Despite a relatively small sample size and a case-control association design, the findings suggest HLA-DRB1 gene might be associated with autism in Han Chinese. The true functional variants associated with autism in our samples remain to be further clarified. It warrants a replication study of a larger family sample and to validate the HLA genetic association with autism and its influence on neuropsychological function.

  6. Association of ABO Blood Group Phenotype and Allele Frequency with Chikungunya Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pairaya Rujirojindakul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The objective of this study was to investigate the association of the ABO blood group phenotype and allele frequency with CHIK fever. Methods. A rural community survey in Southern Thailand was conducted in August and September 2010. A total of 506 villagers were enrolled. Cases were defined as individuals having anti-CHIK IgG by hemagglutination ≥1 : 10. Results. There were 314 cases (62.1% with CHIK seropositivity. Females were less likely to have positive anti-CHIK IgG with odds ratio (OR (95% CI of 0.63 (0.43, 0.93. All samples tested were Rh positive. Distribution of CHIK seropositivity versus seronegativity (P value in A, B, AB, and O blood groups was 80 versus 46 (0.003, 80 versus 48 (0.005, 24 versus 20 (0.55, and 130 versus 78 (<0.001, respectively. However, chi-square test between ABO and CHIK infection showed no statistical significance P=0.76. Comparison of the ABO blood group allele frequency between CHIK seropositivity and seronegativity was not statistically significant. Conclusion. This finding demonstrated no association of the ABO blood group phenotypes and allele frequencies with CHIK infection.

  7. A robust and powerful two-step testing procedure for local ancestry adjusted allelic association analysis in admixed populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Qing; Xu, Zheng; Raffield, Laura M; Chang, Suhua; Wu, Di; Lange, Ethan M; Reiner, Alex P; Li, Yun

    2018-04-01

    Genetic association studies in admixed populations allow us to gain deeper understanding of the genetic architecture of human diseases and traits. However, population stratification, complicated linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns, and the complex interplay of allelic and ancestry effects on phenotypic traits pose challenges in such analyses. These issues may lead to detecting spurious associations and/or result in reduced statistical power. Fortunately, if handled appropriately, these same challenges provide unique opportunities for gene mapping. To address these challenges and to take these opportunities, we propose a robust and powerful two-step testing procedure Local Ancestry Adjusted Allelic (LAAA) association. In the first step, LAAA robustly captures associations due to allelic effect, ancestry effect, and interaction effect, allowing detection of effect heterogeneity across ancestral populations. In the second step, LAAA identifies the source of association, namely allelic, ancestry, or the combination. By jointly modeling allele, local ancestry, and ancestry-specific allelic effects, LAAA is highly powerful in capturing the presence of interaction between ancestry and allele effect. We evaluated the validity and statistical power of LAAA through simulations over a broad spectrum of scenarios. We further illustrated its usefulness by application to the Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe) African American participants for association with hemoglobin levels. We were able to replicate independent groups' previously identified loci that would have been missed in CARe without joint testing. Moreover, the loci, for which LAAA detected potential effect heterogeneity, were replicated among African Americans from the Women's Health Initiative study. LAAA is freely available at https://yunliweb.its.unc.edu/LAAA. © 2017 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  8. Association between the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele and late onset of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, H.B.; Timm, S.; Wang, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The 32-bp deletion allele in chemokine receptor CCR5 has been associated with several immune-mediated diseases and might be implicated in schizophrenia as well. METHOD: The authors genotyped DNA samples from 268 schizophrenia patients and 323 healthy subjects. Age at first admission...... to a psychiatric hospital department served as a measure of disease onset. RESULTS: Patients and comparison subjects differed marginally in their genotype distribution, with a slightly higher frequency of the deletion allele seen in the patients. The authors found the deletion allele to be associated with higher......-onset schizophrenia) and healthy subjects differed significantly. This was reflected in an increased frequency of the deletion allele in the patient subgroup. Patients with ages at first admission below and above 40 years significantly differed in distribution of genotypes and alleles, with an overrepresentation...

  9. Widespread signatures of positive selection in common risk alleles associated to autism spectrum disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Polimanti

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The human brain is the outcome of innumerable evolutionary processes; the systems genetics of psychiatric disorders could bear their signatures. On this basis, we analyzed five psychiatric disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorder (ASD, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, and schizophrenia (SCZ, using GWAS summary statistics from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium. Machine learning-derived scores were used to investigate two natural-selection scenarios: complete selection (loci where a selected allele reached fixation and incomplete selection (loci where a selected allele has not yet reached fixation. ASD GWAS results positively correlated with incomplete-selection (p = 3.53*10-4. Variants with ASD GWAS p<0.1 were shown to have a 19%-increased probability to be in the top-5% for incomplete-selection score (OR = 1.19, 95%CI = 1.11-1.8, p = 9.56*10-7. Investigating the effect directions of minor alleles, we observed an enrichment for positive associations in SNPs with ASD GWAS p<0.1 and top-5% incomplete-selection score (permutation p<10-4. Considering the set of these ASD-positive-associated variants, we observed gene-expression enrichments for brain and pituitary tissues (p = 2.3*10-5 and p = 3*10-5, respectively and 53 gene ontology (GO enrichments, such as nervous system development (GO:0007399, p = 7.57*10-12, synapse organization (GO:0050808, p = 8.29*10-7, and axon guidance (GO:0007411, p = 1.81*10-7. Previous genetic studies demonstrated that ASD positively correlates with childhood intelligence, college completion, and years of schooling. Accordingly, we hypothesize that certain ASD risk alleles were under positive selection during human evolution due to their involvement in neurogenesis and cognitive ability.

  10. Searching for alleles associated with complicated outcomes after burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Robert C; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Purdue, Gary F

    2007-01-01

    Sepsis is a serious and growing health problem among patients admitted to intensive care units. When accompanied by organ failure, sepsis carries a 30-50% case-fatality rate. Although our understanding of burn pathophysiology has grown in recent years, we are still unable to identify accurately patients who are at increased risk for infectious complications and death. Genetic predisposition is likely to explain a portion of this variation. Understanding which genes and allelic variants contribute to disease risk would increase our ability to predict who is at increased risk and intervene accordingly, as well as identify molecular targets for novel and individualized therapies. Several obstacles exist to identification of which specific alleles and loci contribute to patient risk, including achievement of sufficient statistical power, population admixture and epistatic interaction among multiple genes and environmental factors. Although increasing sample size will resolve most, if not all, of these issues, slow patient accrual often makes this solution impractical for a single institution within a reasonable timeframe. This situation is complicated by the fact that traditional analysis methods perform poorly in the face of data sparseness. Identification of risk factors for severe sepsis and death after burn injury will likely require collaborative patient enrollment as well as development of advanced analytical methodologies. While overcoming these obstacles may prove difficult, the effort is warranted, as the ultimate benefit to patients is considerable.

  11. Genotyping of a tri-allelic polymorphism by a novel melting curve assay in MTHFD1L: an association study of nonsyndromic Cleft in Ireland

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Minguzzi, Stefano

    2012-04-20

    AbstractBackgroundPolymorphisms within the MTHFD1L gene were previously associated with risk of neural tube defects in Ireland. We sought to test the most significant MTHFD1L polymorphisms for an association with risk of cleft in an Irish cohort. This required the development of a new melting curve assay to genotype the technically challenging MTHFD1L triallelic deletion\\/insertion polymorphism (rs3832406).MethodsMelting curve analysis was used to genotype the MTHFD1L triallelic deletion\\/insertion polymorphism (rs3832406) and a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism rs17080476 in an Irish cohort consisting of 981 Irish case-parent trios and 1,008 controls. Tests for association with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate and cleft palate included case\\/control analysis, mother\\/control analysis and Transmission Disequilibrium Tests of case-parent trios.ResultsA successful melting curve genotyping assay was developed for the deletion\\/insertion polymorphism (rs3832406). The TDT analysis initially showed that the rs3832406 polymorphism was associated with isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate. However, corrected p-values indicated that this association was not significant.ConclusionsMelting Curve Analysis can be employed to successfully genotype challenging polymorphisms such as the MTHFD1L triallelic deletion\\/insertion polymorphism (DIP) reported here (rs3832406) and is a viable alternative to capillary electrophoresis. Corrected p-values indicate no association between MTHFD1L and risk of cleft in an Irish cohort.

  12. LAPTM4B allele *2 is associated with breast cancer susceptibility and prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lysosome-associated protein transmembrane 4 beta (LAPTM4B has two alleles named LAPTM4B*1 and LAPTM4B*2. Allele *1 contains only one copy of a 19-bp sequence at the 5'UTR in the first exon, whereas this sequence of allele*2 is duplicated and arrayed as a tandem repeat. Previous studies revealed that LAPTM4B polymorphisms contribute to the risk of certain types of cancers. This study aimed to investigate the polymorphism of LAPTM4B in breast cancer by analysis the correlation of LAPTM4B genotype with breast cancer susceptibility, clinicopathologic features and prognosis. METHODS: Genotyping of the LAPTM4B polymorphism was determined by PCR method. The expression levels of LAPTM4B in breast cancer tissues and breast cancer cell lines were determined by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR analysis. The correlation of LAPTM4B genotype with clinicopathologic parameters and prognosis were assessed statistically. RESULTS: The results of qRT-PCR analysis indicated that LAPTM4B*2 was associated with the higher level of LAPTM4B expression compared with the LAPTM4B*1 in both breast cancer cell lines and breast cancer tissues. We found that LAPTM4B*2 was associated with an increased risk for breast cancer. LAPTM4B*2 was significantly associated with higher histopathologic grade, lymph node metastasis and poor prognosis. CONCLUSION: LAPTM4B*2 is a risk factor associated with breast cancer susceptibility and poor prognosis. LAPTM4B*2 may be a potential predicative marker for the susceptibility, progression and metastasis of breast cancer.

  13. QTL detection and elite alleles mining for stigma traits in Oryza sativa by association mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing Dang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Stigma traits are very important for hybrid seed production in Oryza sativa, which is a self-pollinated crop; however, the genetic mechanism controlling the traits is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the phenotypic data of 227 accessions across two years and assessed their genotypic variation with 249 simple sequence repeat (SSR markers. By combining phenotypic and genotypic data, a genome-wide association (GWA map was generated. Large phenotypic variations in stigma length (STL, stigma brush-shaped part length (SBPL and stigma non-brush-shaped part length (SNBPL were found. Significant positive correlations were identified among stigma traits. In total, 2,072 alleles were detected among 227 accessions, with an average of 8.3 alleles per SSR locus. GWA mapping detected 6 quantitative trait loci (QTLs for the STL, 2 QTLs for the SBPL and 7 QTLs for the SNBPL. Eleven, 5, and 12 elite alleles were found for the STL, SBPL and SNBPL, respectively. Optimal cross designs were predicted for improving the target traits. The detected genetic variation in stigma traits and QTLs provides helpful information for cloning candidate STL genes and breeding rice cultivars with longer STLs in the future.

  14. No evidence for allelic association between bipolar disorder and monoamine oxidase A gene polymorphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craddock, N.; Daniels, J.; Roberts, E. [Univ. of Wales, College of Medicine, Cardiff (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-08-14

    We have tested the hypothesis that DNA markers in the MAOA gene show allelic association with bipolar affective disorder. Eighty-four unrelated Caucasian patients with DSM III-R bipolar disorder and 84 Caucasian controls were typed for three markers in MAOA: a dinucleotide repeat in intron 2, a VNTR in intron 1, and an Fnu4HI RFLP in exon 8. No evidence for allelic association was observed between any of the markers and bipolar disorder. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  15. Allele *1 of HS1.2 enhancer associates with selective IgA deficiency and IgM concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giambra, Vincenzo; Cianci, Rossella; Lolli, Serena; Mattioli, Claudia; Tampella, Giacomo; Cattalini, Marco; Kilic, Sebnem S; Pandolfi, Franco; Plebani, Alessandro; Frezza, Domenico

    2009-12-15

    Selective IgA deficiency (IGAD) is the most common primary immunodeficiency, yet its pathogenesis is elusive. The IG (heavy) H chain human 3' Regulatory Region harbors three enhancers and has an important role in Ig synthesis. HS1.2 is the only polymorphic enhancer of the 3' RRs. We therefore evaluated HS1.2 allelic frequencies in 88 IGAD patients and 101 controls. Our data show that IGAD patients have a highly significant increase of homozygousity of the allele *1 (39% in the IGAD patients and 15% in controls), with an increase of 2.6-fold. Allele *4 has a similar trend of allele *2, both showing a significant decrease of frequency in IGAD. No relationship was observed between allele *1 frequencies and serum levels of IgG. However, allele *1 was associated in IGAD patients with relatively low IgM levels (within the 30th lowest percentile of patients). The HS1.2 polymorphism influences Ig seric production, but not IgG switch, in fact 30th lowest or highest percentile of IgG in patients did not associate to different frequencies of HS1.2 alleles. The control on normal healthy subjects did not correlate high or low levels of IgM or IgG with HS1.2 allelic frequence variation. Overall our candidate gene approach confirms that the study of polymorphisms in human diseases is a valid tool to investigate the function of these Regulatory Regions that confers multiple immune features.

  16. Genetic Diversity and Elite Allele Mining for Grain Traits in Rice (Oryza sativa L.) by Association Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edzesi, Wisdom M; Dang, Xiaojing; Liang, Lijun; Liu, Erbao; Zaid, Imdad U; Hong, Delin

    2016-01-01

    Mining elite alleles for grain size and weight is of importance for the improvement of cultivated rice and selection for market demand. In this study, association mapping for grain traits was performed on a selected sample of 628 rice cultivars using 262 SSRs. Grain traits were evaluated by grain length (GL), grain width (GW), grain thickness (GT), grain length to width ratio (GL/GW), and 1000-grain weight (TGW) in 2013 and 2014. Our result showed abundant phenotypic and genetic diversities found in the studied population. In total, 2953 alleles were detected with an average of 11.3 alleles per locus. The population was divided into seven subpopulations and the levels of linkage disequilibrium (LD) ranged from 34 to 84 cM. Genome-wide association mapping detected 10 marker trait association (MTAs) loci for GL, 1MTAs locus for GW, 7 MTAs loci for GT, 3 MTAs loci for GL/GW, and 1 MTAs locus for TGW. Twenty-nine, 2, 10, 5, and 3 elite alleles were found for the GL, GW, GT, GL/GW, and TGW, respectively. Optimal cross designs were predicted for improving the target traits. The accessions containing elite alleles for grain traits mined in this study could be used for breeding rice cultivars and cloning the candidate genes.

  17. Tri-allelic pattern at the TPOX locus: a familial study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picanço, Juliane Bentes; Raimann, Paulo Eduardo; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano; Alvarez, Luís; Amorim, António; Batista Dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel; Alho, Clarice Sampaio

    2014-02-10

    Alleles at the TPOX STR locus have 6-14 different numbers of a four-nucleotide (AATG) repeat motif arranged in tandem. Although tri-allelic genotypes are generally rare, the TPOX tri-allelic pattern has a higher frequency, varying widely among populations. Despite this, there are few accurate reports to disclose the nature of the TPOX third allele. In this work we present data obtained from 45 individuals belonging to the same pedigree, in which there are cases of tri-allelic TPOX genotypes. The subjects were apparently healthy with a normal biological development. We noticed six tri-allelic cases in this family, and all of them were women. Karyotype analysis showed no occurrence of partial 2p trisomy. All the tri-allelic cases had the genotype 8-10-11, probably due to three copies of the TPOX STR sequence in all cells (Type 2 tri-allelic pattern). Based on previous data we assumed the allele 10 as the TPOX third allele. The pedigree analyses show evidences that the TPOX extra-allele was the allele10, it is placed far from the main TPOX locus, and that there is a potential linkage of the TPOX extra-allele-10 with Xq. This was the first study that included a large pedigree analysis in order to understand the nature TPOX tri-allelic pattern. © 2013.

  18. The ACE deletion allele is associated with Israeli elite endurance athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Offer; Amir, Ruthie; Yamin, Chen; Attias, Eric; Eynon, Nir; Sagiv, Moran; Sagiv, Michael; Meckel, Yoav

    2007-09-01

    An Alu insertion (I)/deletion (D) polymorphism in the angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) gene has been associated with ACE activity. Opposing effects on elite athletic performance have been proposed for the I and D alleles; while the D allele favours improved endurance ability, the I allele promotes more power-orientated events. We tested this hypothesis by determining the frequency of ACE ID alleles amongst 121 Israeli top-level athletes classified by their sporting discipline (marathon runners or sprinters). Genotyping for ACE ID was performed using polymerase chain reaction on DNA from leucocytes. The ACE genotype and allele frequencies were compared with those of 247 healthy individuals. Allele and genotype frequencies differed significantly between the groups. The frequency of the D allele was 0.77 in the marathon runners, 0.66 in the control subjects (P = 0.01) and 0.57 in the sprinters (P = 0.002). The ACE DD genotype was more prevalent among the endurance athletes (0.62) than among the control subjects (0.43, P = 0.004) and the power athletes (0.34, P = 0.004). In the group of elite athletes, the odds ratio of ACE DD genotype being an endurance athlete was 3.26 (95% confidence interval 1.49-7.11), and of ACE II genotype was 0.41 (95% confidence interval 0.14-1.19). We conclude that in Israeli elite marathon runners the frequency of the ACE D allele and ACE DD genotype seems to be higher than in sprinters, suggesting a positive association between the D allele and the likelihood of being an elite endurance athlete in some ethnic groups.

  19. Association of a common allelic polymorphism (C677T) in the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase gene with a reduced risk of osteoporotic fractures. A case control study in Danish postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, H L; Madsen, J S; Madsen, B

    2002-01-01

    Twin studies indicate a substantial genetic component in the development of osteoporosis. One of the latest studied candidate genes is the one coding for methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) (C677T) in which a point mutation gives rise to a thermolabile variant of MTHFR. The aim of this s...... associated with BMD at the lower forearm or with ultrasound parameters measured at the calcaneus. However, a significant increase in the odds ratio of fracture was found for the wild-type C-allele....... of this study was to investigate the influence of this mutation on peripheral measures of bone density and on the odds ratios (OR) for hip and lower forearm fracture in a case control study of Danish postmenopausal women. A total of 74 women with lower forearm fracture, 41 women with hip fracture, and 207 age...... fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Only 2 of 21 individuals with the TT genotype had sustained a fracture as opposed to 46 of 142 with the CT genotype and 67 of 159 with the CC genotype (P = 0.007). Using logistic regression, the following odds ratios were found when comparing the individuals...

  20. Low frequency of the scrapile resistance-associated allele and presence of lysine-171 allele of the prion protein gene in Italian Biellese ovine breed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acutis, P.L.; Sbaiz, L.; Verburg, F.J.; Riina, M.V.; Ru, G.; Moda, G.; Caramelli, M.; Bossers, A.

    2004-01-01

    Frequencies of polymorphisms at codons 136, 154 and 171 of the prion protein (PrP) gene were studied in 1207 pure-bred and cross-bred Italian Biellese rams, a small ovine breed of about 65 000 head in Italy. Aside from the five most common alleles (VRQ, ARQ, ARR, AHQ and ARH), the rare ARK allele

  1. Allelic Imbalances in Radiation—Associated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Rosemann

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML can develop as a secondary malignancy following radiotherapy, but also following low-dose environmental or occupational radiation exposure. Therapy-related AML frequently carries deletions of chromosome 5q and/or 7, but for low-dose exposure associated AML this has not been described. For the present study we performed genome-wide screens for loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH in a set of 19 AML cases that developed after radiation-exposure following the Chernobyl accident. Using Affymetrix SNP arrays we found large regions of LOH in 16 of the cases. Eight cases (42% demonstrated LOH at 5q and/or 7, which is a known marker of complex karyotypic changes and poor prognosis. We could show here for the first time that exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation induces AML with molecular alterations similar to those seen in therapy-related cases.

  2. SORT1 protective allele is associated with attenuated postprandial: lipaemia in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Kimberly E; Karlos, Angela E; Gnatiuk, Elizabeth A; Shearer, Jane; Reimer, Raylene A; Hittel, Dustin S

    2014-10-01

    Elevated levels of lipids and lipoproteins have strong genetic determinants and are recognized as key risk factors for atherogenesis and cardiovascular disease, particularly in the postprandial state. The aim of the study to determine whether young adults, when stratified by genotype at the rs646776 variant of the 1p13 locus, displayed differential postprandial responses to an oral fat tolerance test. Participants (n=30) received a high-fat mixed meal (91 g; 55% kcal from fat) after an overnight fast and a fat-exclusion meal (3.9 g; 6% kcal from fat) at 8 hours postprandially. Blood samples were obtained at t=0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 24 hours for lipoprotein analyses via nuclear magnetic resonance profiling. Carriers of the minor, protective allele (TC/CC) displayed lower fasting (TC/CC, 30.1±3.0 nmol/L versus TT, 48.8±5.1 nmol/L; Ppostprandial (TC/CC, 44.2±3.1 nmol/L versus TT, 57.0±4.5 nmol/L; P=0.03) very low-density lipoprotein and chylomicron particle number in addition to triglyceride content when compared with individuals homozygous for the major, risk allele (TT). We report a novel association between the SORT1 1p13 locus and extent of postprandial lipaemia. These results provide evidence of decreased exposure to atherogenic particles in carriers of the minor SORT1 allele, suggesting relative protection against cardiovascular disease when compared with TT homozygotes. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. HLA-DRB1 allele association with rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility and severity in Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourad, Jamil; Monem, Fawza

    2013-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a complex multifactorial chronic disease. The importance of human leukocyte antigen as a major genetic risk factor for RA was studied worldwide. Although it is widely distributed in different Syrian areas, studies of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles' role are absent. The aim of our study was to determine the association of HLA-DRB1 alleles with the susceptibility and severity of RA in Syria. Eighty-six RA patients and 200 healthy controls from Syria were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP). Anti-CCP antibodies were measured by ELISA. Rheumatoid factor (RF), C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and disease activity score 28 (DAS-28) values were obtained from patients' medical records. DAS-28 was used to assess the clinical severity of the patients. The HLA-DRB1*01, *04, and *10 frequencies showed a strong association with the disease susceptibility (OR = 2.29, 95% CI = 1.11-4.75, P = 0.022; OR = 3.16, 95% CI = 2.0 -4.8, P < 0.0001; OR = 2.43, 95% CI = 1.07-5.51, P = 0.029 respectively), while the frequencies of HLA-DRB1*11, and *13 were significantly lower in RA patients than in controls (OR = 0.49, 95% CI = 0.3-0.8, P = 0.004; OR = 0.32, 95% CI = 0.15-0.69, P = 0.002, respectively). The other HLA-DRB1 alleles showed no significant difference. The frequency of anti-CCP antibodies was higher in shared epitope (SE) positive patients compared with SE-negative patients (OR = 5.5, 95% CI = 2-15.1, P = 0.00054). DAS-28 of RA patients didn't show significant difference between the SE negative and the SE positive groups. Our results indicate that HLA-DRB1*01, *04, and *10 alleles are related with RA, while HLA-DRB1*11 and *13 protect against RA in the Syrian population.

  4. HLA-DRB1 alleles associated with polymyalgia rheumatica in northern Italy: correlation with disease severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvarani, C.; Boiardi, L.; Mantovani, V.; Ranzi, A.; Cantini, F.; Olivieri, I.; Bragliani, M.; Collina, E.; Macchioni, P.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To examine the association of HLA-DRB1 alleles with polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) in a Mediterranean country and to explore the role of HLA-DRB1 genes in determining disease severity.
METHODS—A five year prospective follow up study of 92 consecutive PMR patients diagnosed by the secondary referral centre of rheumatology of Reggio Emilia, Italy was conducted. HLA-DRB1 alleles were determined in the 92 patients, in 29 DR4 positive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, and in 148 controls from the same geographical area by polymerase chain reaction amplification and oligonucleotide hybridisation.
RESULTS—No significant differences were observed in the frequencies of HLA-DRB1 types and in the expression of HLA-DRB 70-74 shared motif between PMR and controls. The frequency of the patients with double dose of epitope was low and not significantly different in PMR and in controls. No significant differences in the distribution of HLA-DR4 subtypes were observed between DR4+ PMR, DR+ RA, and DR4+ controls. Results of the univariate analysis indicated that an erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) at diagnosis > 72 mm 1st h, the presence of HLA-DR1, DR10, rheumatoid epitope, and the type of rheumatoid epitope were significant risk factors associated with relapse/recurrence. Cox proportional hazards modelling identified two variables that independently increased the risk of relapse/recurrence: ESR at diagnosis > 72 mm 1st h (RR=1.5) and type 2 (encoded by a non-DR4 allele) rheumatoid epitope (RR=2.7).
CONCLUSION—These data from a Mediterranean country showed no association of rheumatoid epitope with PMR in northern Italian patients. A high ESR at diagnosis and the presence of rheumatoid epitope encoded by a non-DR4 allele are independent valuable markers of disease severity.

 PMID:10225816

  5. Novel association of the obesity risk-allele near Fas Apoptotic Inhibitory Molecule 2 (FAIM2) gene with heart rate and study of its effects on myocardial infarction in diabetic participants of the PREDIMED trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corella, Dolores; Sorlí, Jose V; González, José I; Ortega, Carolina; Fitó, Montserrat; Bulló, Monica; Martínez-González, Miguel Angel; Ros, Emilio; Arós, Fernando; Lapetra, José; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Serra-Majem, Lluís; Ruiz-Gutierrez, Valentina; Fiol, Miquel; Coltell, Oscar; Vinyoles, Ernest; Pintó, Xavier; Martí, Amelia; Saiz, Carmen; Ordovás, José M; Estruch, Ramón

    2014-01-06

    The Fas apoptotic pathway has been implicated in type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Although a polymorphism (rs7138803; G > A) near the Fas apoptotic inhibitory molecule 2 (FAIM2) locus has been related to obesity, its association with other cardiovascular risk factors and disease remains uncertain. We analyzed the association between the FAIM2-rs7138803 polymorphism and obesity, blood pressure and heart rate in 7,161 participants (48.3% with type 2 diabetes) in the PREDIMED study at baseline. We also explored gene-diet interactions with adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) and examined the effects of the polymorphism on cardiovascular disease incidence per diabetes status after a median 4.8-year dietary intervention (MedDiet versus control group) follow-up. We replicated the association between the FAIM2-rs7138803 polymorphism and greater obesity risk (OR: 1.08; 95% CI: 1.01-1.16; P = 0.011; per-A allele). Moreover, we detected novel associations of this polymorphism with higher diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and heart rate at baseline (B = 1.07; 95% CI: 0.97-1.28 bmp in AA vs G-carriers for the whole population), that remained statistically significant even after adjustment for body mass index (P = 0.012) and correction for multiple comparisons. This association was greater and statistically significant in type-2 diabetic subjects (B = 1.44: 95% CI: 0.23-2.56 bmp; P = 0.010 for AA versus G-carriers). Likewise, these findings were also observed longitudinally over 5-year follow-up. Nevertheless, we found no statistically significant gene-diet interactions with MedDiet for this trait. On analyzing myocardial infarction risk, we detected a nominally significant (P = 0.041) association in type-2 diabetic subjects (HR: 1.86; 95% CI:1.03-3.37 for AA versus G-carriers), although this association did not remain statistically significant following correction for multiple comparisons. We confirmed the FAIM2-rs7138803

  6. [Association between the polymorphism of HLA-DQA1 alleles and type 2 diabetes in Yi nationality of Yunnan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong-ying; Ren, Chun-feng; Xue, Li; Yuan, Hui-yun; Xu, Mian; Tai, Wen-lin; Li, Jiang; Yang, Yu; Du, Juan

    2005-12-01

    To investigate the association between the polymorphism of HLA-DQA1 alleles and type 2 diabetes in Yi nationality of Yunnan. Polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) genotyping method was conducted in 58 ethnic Yi patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 82 ethnically matched controls from Chuxiong of Yunnan. Then a study was made on the association between the polymorphism of HLA-DQA1 alleles and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The frequency of HLA-DQA1*0301 allele in the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus was significantly higher than that in the healthy controls (P=0.002, RR=3.097), and the frequency of HLA-DQA1*0601 in the patients was significantly lower (P=0.025, RR=0.429). In Yi nationality of Yunnan, HLA-DQA1*0301 allele may be a susceptible gene and the HLA-DQA1*0601 allele may protect individuals from the risk of diabetes mellitus.

  7. Narcolepsy-Associated HLA Class I Alleles Implicate Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafti, Mehdi; Lammers, Gert J.; Dauvilliers, Yves; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Mayer, Geert; Nowak, Jacek; Pfister, Corinne; Dubois, Valérie; Eliaou, Jean-François; Eberhard, Hans-Peter; Liblau, Roland; Wierzbicka, Aleksandra; Geisler, Peter; Bassetti, Claudio L.; Mathis, Johannes; Lecendreux, Michel; Khatami, Ramin; Heinzer, Raphaël; Haba-Rubio, José; Feketeova, Eva; Baumann, Christian R.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Tiercy, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Narcolepsy with cataplexy is tightly associated with the HLA class II allele DQB1*06:02. Evidence indicates a complex contribution of HLA class II genes to narcolepsy susceptibility with a recent independent association with HLA-DPB1. The cause of narcolepsy is supposed be an autoimmune attack against hypocretin-producing neurons. Despite the strong association with HLA class II, there is no evidence for CD4+ T-cell-mediated mechanism in narcolepsy. Since neurons express class I and not class II molecules, the final effector immune cells involved might include class I-restricted CD8+ T-cells. Methods: HLA class I (A, B, and C) and II (DQB1) genotypes were analyzed in 944 European narcolepsy with cataplexy patients and in 4,043 control subjects matched by country of origin. All patients and controls were DQB1*06:02 positive and class I associations were conditioned on DQB1 alleles. Results: HLA-A*11:01 (OR = 1.49 [1.18–1.87] P = 7.0*10−4), C*04:01 (OR = 1.34 [1.10–1.63] P = 3.23*10−3), and B*35:01 (OR = 1.46 [1.13–1.89] P = 3.64*10−3) were associated with susceptibility to narcolepsy. Analysis of polymorphic class I amino-acids revealed even stronger associations with key antigen-binding residues HLA-A-Tyr9 (OR = 1.32 [1.15–1.52] P = 6.95*10−5) and HLA-C-Ser11 (OR = 1.34 [1.15–1.57] P = 2.43*10−4). Conclusions: Our findings provide a genetic basis for increased susceptibility to infectious factors or an immune cytotoxic mechanism in narcolepsy, potentially targeting hypocretin neurons. Citation: Tafti M, Lammers GJ, Dauvilliers Y, Overeem S, Mayer G, Nowak J, Pfister C, Dubois V, Eliaou JF, Eberhard HP, Liblau R, Wierzbicka A, Geisler P, Bassetti CL, Mathis J, Lecendreux M, Khatami R, Heinzer R, Haba-Rubio J, Feketeova E, Baumann CR, Kutalik Z, Tiercy JM. Narcolepsy-associated HLA class I alleles implicate cell-mediated cytotoxicity. SLEEP 2016;39(3):581–587. PMID:26518595

  8. Association between suicide attempt and a tri-allelic functional polymorphism in serotonin transporter gene promoter in Chinese patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chi-Fa; Lung, For-Wey; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; O'Nions, Elizabeth; Hung, Tai-Hsin; Chong, Mian-Yoon; Wu, Ching-Kuan; Wen, Jung-Kwang; Lin, Pao-Yen

    2011-10-31

    Mounting evidence supports the association between a polymorphism in the serotonin transporter gene promoter region (5-HTTLPR) and suicidal behaviour. Recently, a novel variant of the 5-HTTLPR L allele was identified. The previously unknown L(G) allele produced similar levels of gene expression to the S allele and might have been misclassified as a "high-expression" allele in previous association studies. In this study, we aimed to compare the genotype distribution of the tri-allelic 5-HTTLPR polymorphism in 168 Chinese patients with schizophrenia, including 60 suicide attempters and 108 non-suicide attempters. In our analysis, which used the L(A) dominant model, it was found that the L(A) allele carriers were significantly more likely to have attempted suicide (p=0.035). Further analysis showed this association existed only in male patients (p=0.012). A similar association between the L(A) allele and violent suicide attempt was also found (p=0.028). In addition, logistic regression confirmed our findings that male L(A) allele carriers were at a higher risk of suicide, although the lack of a significant association in females may reflect insufficient power due to small sample size. However, no association was found when we examined the traditional bi-allelic 5-HTTLPR. These findings differ from those reported in Caucasian subjects, where no associations have been reported. Different genetic backgrounds may give rise to different allelic distribution, causing differential effects on the expression of endophenotypes of suicide behaviours. Although the potential influence of multiple comparisons might weaken our findings, our study provides preliminary evidence for a potentially gender-specific role of a "high-expression" 5-HTTLPR polymorphism in susceptibility to suicide in Chinese patients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Association between HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1 alleles and risk of early pregnancy loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipak-Szmigiel, Olimpia; Ronin-Walknowska, Elzbieta; Mikłaszewicz, Andrzej; Dołubeczko, Aneta; Zejmo, Maria; Giedrys-Kalemba, Stefania

    2007-10-01

    The aim of the study is to identify HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1 allele and to assess the risk of early pregnancy loss of women, couples with reproductive failure in the first trimester of pregnancy in comparison with fertile women, couples. The study group (B) enrolled 61 couples with reproductive failure and the control group (C) enrolled 20 fertile couples with at least 2 children. HLA-DQA1 gene typing was performed using PCR-sequence-specific primer (SSP) on the high resolution level according to established procedure of labeling and using the detection kit (FASTYPE DQASSP Typing, FASTYPE DQA "High Resolution" Typing Sheet) purchased from Bio-Synthesis (USA). In female patient the highest risk quotient was associated with alleles HLA-DQA 01101/0105 OR 7.19 (95% CI 1.18-5.23; p=0.03) and HLA-DQB5 OR 3.67 (95% CI=1.11-12.0; p=0.037). The lowest but statistically significant risk of pregnancy failure in this group was related to allele HLA-DQB6 OR 0.48 (95% CI=0.22-1.04; p=0.087). In patient and control couples the significantly increased risk of pregnancy failure was related to the frequency of HLA-DQB5 allele OR 2.3 (95% CI 1.09-4.82; p=0,035). The lowest risk quotient in the patient couples was associated with HLA-DQ 0302/0303 allele OR 0.44 (95% CI 0.14-1.36; p=ns). HLA-DQA and HLA-DQB allele might influence pregnancy outcome in the Polish population, but further studies are necessary in this regard.

  10. High frequency of intermediate alleles on Huntington disease-associated haplotypes in British Columbia's general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semaka, Alicia; Kay, Chris; Doty, Crystal N; Collins, Jennifer A; Tam, Natalie; Hayden, Michael R

    2013-12-01

    Intermediate alleles (27-35 CAG, IAs) for Huntington disease (HD) usually do not confer the disease phenotype but are prone to CAG repeat instability. Consequently, offspring are at-risk of inheriting an expanded allele in the HD range (≥36 CAG). IAs that expand into a new mutation have been hypothesized to be more susceptible to instability compared to IAs identified on the non-HD side of a family from the general population. Frequency estimates for IAs are limited and have largely been determined using clinical samples of HD or related disorders, which may result in an ascertainment bias. This study aimed to establish the frequency of IAs in a sample of a British Columbia's (B.C.) general population with no known association to HD and examine the haplotype of new mutation and general population IAs. CAG sizing was performed on 1,600 DNA samples from B.C.'s general population. Haplotypes were determined using 22 tagging SNPs across the HTT gene. 5.8% of individuals were found to have an IA, of which 60% were on HD-associated haplotypes. There was no difference in the haplotype distribution of new mutation and general population IAs. These findings suggest that IAs are relatively frequent in the general population and are often found on haplotypes associated with expanded CAG lengths. There is likely no difference in the propensity of new mutation and general population IAs to expand into the disease range given that they are both found on disease-associated haplotypes. These findings have important implications for clinical practice. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. HLA alleles associated with slow progression to AIDS truly prefer to present HIV-1 p24

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghans, José A M; Mølgaard, Anne; de Boer, Rob J

    2007-01-01

    affinity of the best-binding p24 epitopes and the relative hazard of HIV-1 disease progression for a large number of HLA molecules. When the epitopes targeted by protective HLA alleles were mapped to the known p24 structure, we found that mutations in these epitopes are likely to disturb the p24 dimer......BACKGROUND: The mechanism behind the association between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules and the rate of HIV-1 disease progression is still poorly understood. Recent data suggest that "protective" HLA molecules, i.e. those associated with a low HIV-1 viral load and relatively slow disease...... and effect, we predicted HIV-1 epitopes from the whole genome of HIV-1, and found that protective HLA alleles have a true preference for the p24 Gag protein, while non-protective HLA alleles preferentially target HIV-1 Nef. In line with this, we found a significant negative correlation between the predicted...

  12. HLA Alleles Associated with Slow Progression to AIDS Truly Prefer to Present HIV-1 p24

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghans, J. A.; Molgaard, A.; Boer, R. J. de

    2007-01-01

    affinity of the best-binding p24 epitopes and the relative hazard of HIV-1 disease progression for a large number of HLA molecules. When the epitopes targeted by protective HLA alleles were mapped to the known p24 structure, we found that mutations in these epitopes are likely to disturb the p24 dimer......BACKGROUND: The mechanism behind the association between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules and the rate of HIV-1 disease progression is still poorly understood. Recent data suggest that "protective" HLA molecules, i.e. those associated with a low HIV-1 viral load and relatively slow disease...... and effect, we predicted HIV-1 epitopes from the whole genome of HIV-1, and found that protective HLA alleles have a true preference for the p24 Gag protein, while non-protective HLA alleles preferentially target HIV-1 Nef. In line with this, we found a significant negative correlation between the predicted...

  13. Variant alleles of the CYP1B1 gene are associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trubicka, Joanna; Byrski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Złowocka, Elżbieta; Kładny, Józef; Banaszkiewicz, Zbigniew; Wiśniowski, Rafał; Kowalska, Elżbieta; Lubinski, Jan; Scott, Rodney J; Grabowska-Kłujszo, Ewa; Suchy, Janina; Masojć, Bartłomiej; Serrano-Fernandez, Pablo; Kurzawski, Grzegorz; Cybulski, Cezary; Górski, Bohdan; Huzarski, Tomasz

    2010-01-01

    CYP1B1 is a P450 enzyme which is involved in the activation of pro-carcinogens to carcinogens as well as sex hormone metabolism. Because differences in the activity of the enzyme have been correlated with variant alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), it represents an attractive candidate gene for studies into colorectal cancer susceptibility. We genotyped 597 cancer patients and 597controls for three CYP1B1 SNPs, which have previously been shown to be associated with altered enzymatic activity. Using the three SNPs, eight different haplotypes were constructed. The haplotype frequencies were estimated in cases and controls and then compared. The odds ratio for each tumour type, associated with each haplotype was estimated, with reference to the most common haplotype observed in the controls. The three SNPs rs10012, rs1056827 and rs1056836 alone did not provide any significant evidence of association with colorectal cancer risk. Haplotypes of rs1056827 and rs10012 or rs1056827 and rs1056836 revealed an association with colorectal cancer which was significantly stronger in the homozygous carriers. One haplotype was under represented in the colorectal cancer patient group compared to the control population suggesting a protective effect. Genetic variants within the CYP1B1 that are associated with altered function appear to influence susceptibility to a colorectal cancer in Poland. Three haplotypes were associated with altered cancer risk; one conferred protection and two were associated with an increased risk of disease. These observations should be confirmed in other populations

  14. Two independent alleles at 6q23 associated with risk of rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plenge, Robert M; Cotsapas, Chris; Davies, Leela; Price, Alkes L; de Bakker, Paul I W; Maller, Julian; Pe'er, Itsik; Burtt, Noel P; Blumenstiel, Brendan; DeFelice, Matt; Parkin, Melissa; Barry, Rachel; Winslow, Wendy; Healy, Claire; Graham, Robert R; Neale, Benjamin M; Izmailova, Elena; Roubenoff, Ronenn; Parker, Alexander N; Glass, Roberta; Karlson, Elizabeth W; Maher, Nancy; Hafler, David A; Lee, David M; Seldin, Michael F; Remmers, Elaine F; Lee, Annette T; Padyukov, Leonid; Alfredsson, Lars; Coblyn, Jonathan; Weinblatt, Michael E; Gabriel, Stacey B; Purcell, Shaun; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K; Shadick, Nancy A; Daly, Mark J; Altshuler, David

    2009-01-01

    To identify susceptibility alleles associated with rheumatoid arthritis, we genotyped 397 individuals with rheumatoid arthritis for 116,204 SNPs and carried out an association analysis in comparison to publicly available genotype data for 1,211 related individuals from the Framingham Heart Study1. After evaluating and adjusting for technical and population biases, we identified a SNP at 6q23 (rs10499194, ∼150 kb from TNFAIP3 and OLIG3) that was reproducibly associated with rheumatoid arthritis both in the genome-wide association (GWA) scan and in 5,541 additional case-control samples (P = 10−3, GWA scan; P < 10−6, replication; P = 10−9, combined). In a concurrent study, the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) has reported strong association of rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility to a different SNP located 3.8 kb from rs10499194 (rs6920220; P = 5 × 10−6 in WTCCC)2. We show that these two SNP associations are statistically independent, are each reproducible in the comparison of our data and WTCCC data, and define risk and protective haplotypes for rheumatoid arthritis at 6q23. PMID:17982456

  15. Association of HLA-A and Non-Classical HLA Class I Alleles

    OpenAIRE

    Carlini, Federico; Ferreira, Virginia; Buhler, St?phane; Tous, Audrey; Eliaou, Jean-Fran?ois; Ren?, C?line; Chiaroni, Jacques; Picard, Christophe; Di Cristofaro, Julie

    2016-01-01

    The HLA-A locus is surrounded by HLA class Ib genes: HLA-E, HLA-H, HLA-G and HLA-F. HLA class Ib molecules are involved in immuno-modulation with a central role for HLA-G and HLA-E, an emerging role for HLA-F and a yet unknown function for HLA-H. Thus, the principal objective of this study was to describe the main allelic associations between HLA-A and HLA-H, -G, -F and -E. Therefore, HLA-A, -E, -G, -H and -F coding polymorphisms, as well as HLA-G UnTranslated Region haplotypes (referred to a...

  16. Mannose-binding lectin variant alleles and HLA-DR4 alleles are associated with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Soren; Baslund, Bo; Madsen, Hans O.

    2002-01-01

    phenotypes of PMR/GCA. METHODS: MBL and HLA-DRB1 alleles were determined by polymerase chain reaction in 102 Danish patients with PMR (n = 37) or GCA (n = 65). Two hundred fifty and 193 healthy individuals served as controls for MBL and HLA genotyping, respectively. RESULTS: The prevalence of MBL variant...

  17. The association of eba-175 alleles with the outcome of malaria in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The association of eba-175 alleles with the outcome of malaria in Nigerian children. OK Amodu, SA Olaniyan, OO Omotade. Abstract. Malaria remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Nigeria. Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte binding antigen-175, eba-175, plays an important role in the invasion of host cells ...

  18. Association of HLA-DQA1 and -DQB1 alleles with type I diabetes in Arabs: a meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzeh, A R; Nair, P; Al-Khaja, N; Al Ali, M T

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed at assessing the nature and significance of associations between various alleles of HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1, and type I diabetes (T1D) in Arab populations. Evidence from literature (published before 20 April 2015) was amassed and analysed through multiple meta-analyses, which yielded effect summary odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for 24 alleles and 4 haplotypes. A total of 1273 cases and 1747 controls from 16 studies were analysed. High levels of significance were obtained to support higher T1D risk when harbouring DQA1*03:01. The alleles DQB1*02:01 and *03:02 and the haplotypes DR3 and DR4 were significant risk factors, albeit with high publication heterogeneity. The protective effects of DQA1*01:01, DQB1*05:03, *06:02, *06:03, and *06:04 were robustly suggested by all indicators of meta-analyses. The haplotypes DR7 and DR11 were strongly suggested to be protective in Arabs. A relatively small number of studies have emerged from Arab countries, mostly with inadequate power on an individual basis. This study fills the gap by providing significant size effect of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and completes the continuum of global ethnic differences in this context. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Major histocompatibility complex alleles associated with parasite susceptibility in wild giant pandas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Wu, Q; Hu, Y; Wu, H; Wei, F

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphism is thought to be driven by antagonistic coevolution between pathogens and hosts, mediated through either overdominance or frequency-dependent selection. However, investigations under natural conditions are still rare for endangered mammals which often exhibit depleted variation, and the mechanism of selection underlying the maintenance of characteristics remains a considerable debate. In this study, 87 wild giant pandas were used to investigate MHC variation associated with parasite load. With the knowledge of the MHC profile provided by the genomic data of the giant panda, seven DRB1, seven DQA1 and eight DQA2 alleles were identified at each single locus. Positive selection evidenced by a significantly higher number of non-synonymous substitutions per non-synonymous codon site relative to synonymous substitutions per synonymous codon site could only be detected at the DRB1 locus, which leads to the speculation that DRB1 may have a more important role in dealing with parasite infection for pandas. Coprological analyses revealed that 55.17% of individuals exhibited infection with 1-2 helminthes and 95.3% of infected pandas carried Baylisascaris shroederi. Using a generalized linear model, we found that Aime-DRB1*10 was significantly associated with parasite infection, but no resistant alleles could be detected. MHC heterozygosity of the pandas was found to be uncorrelated with the infection status or the infection intensity. These results suggested that the possible selection mechanisms in extant wild pandas may be frequency dependent rather than being determined by overdominance selection. Our findings could guide the candidate selection for the ongoing reintroduction or translocation of pandas.

  20. Human leukocyte antigen class I and II alleles and cervical adenocarcinoma: a pooled analysis of two epidemiologic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboobeh eSafaeian

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Associations between human leukocyte antigens (HLA alleles and cervical cancer are largely representative of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, the major histologic subtype. We evaluated the association between HLA class I (A, B, and C and class II (DRB1 and DQB1 loci and risk of cervical adenocarcinoma (ADC, a less common but aggressive histologic subtype.We pooled data from the Eastern and Western US cervical cancer studies, and evaluated the association between individual alleles and allele combinations and ADC (n=630 ADC; n=775 controls. Risk estimates were calculated for 11 a priori (based on known associations with cervical cancer regardless of histologic type and 38 non a priori common alleles, as odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI, adjusted for age and study. In exploratory analysis, we compared the risk associations between subgroups with HPV16 or HPV18 DNA in ADC tumor tissues in the Western US study cases and controls. Three of the a priori alleles were significantly associated with decreased risk of ADC (DRB1*13:01 (OR=0.61; 95%CI:0.41-0.93, DRB1*13:02 (OR=0.49; 95%CI:0.31-0.77, and DQB1*06:03 (OR=0.64; 95%CI:0.42-0.95; one was associated with increased risk (B*07:02(OR=1.39; 95%CI:1.07-1.79. Among alleles not previously reported, DQB1*06:04 (OR=0.46; 95%CI: 0.27-0.78 was associated with decreased risk of ADC and C*07:02 (OR=1.41; 95%CI:1.09-1.81 was associated with increased risk. We did not observe a difference by histologic subtype. ADC was most strongly associated with increased risk with B*07:02/C*07:02 alleles (OR=1.33; 95%CI:1.01-1.76 and decreased risk with DRB1*13:02/DQB1*06:04 (OR=0.41; 95%CI:0.21-0.80. Results suggest that HLA allele associations with cervical ADC are similar to those for cervical SCC. An intriguing finding was the difference in risk associated with several alleles restricted to HPV16 or HPV18 related tumors, consistent with the hypothesis that HLA recognition is HPV type specific.

  1. A new analysis tool for individual-level allele frequency for genomic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hsin-Chou; Lin, Hsin-Chi; Huang, Mei-Chu; Li, Ling-Hui; Pan, Wen-Harn; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Chen, Yuan-Tsong

    2010-07-05

    Allele frequency is one of the most important population indices and has been broadly applied to genetic/genomic studies. Estimation of allele frequency using genotypes is convenient but may lose data information and be sensitive to genotyping errors. This study utilizes a unified intensity-measuring approach to estimating individual-level allele frequencies for 1,104 and 1,270 samples genotyped with the single-nucleotide-polymorphism arrays of the Affymetrix Human Mapping 100K and 500K Sets, respectively. Allele frequencies of all samples are estimated and adjusted by coefficients of preferential amplification/hybridization (CPA), and large ethnicity-specific and cross-ethnicity databases of CPA and allele frequency are established. The results show that using the CPA significantly improves the accuracy of allele frequency estimates; moreover, this paramount factor is insensitive to the time of data acquisition, effect of laboratory site, type of gene chip, and phenotypic status. Based on accurate allele frequency estimates, analytic methods based on individual-level allele frequencies are developed and successfully applied to discover genomic patterns of allele frequencies, detect chromosomal abnormalities, classify sample groups, identify outlier samples, and estimate the purity of tumor samples. The methods are packaged into a new analysis tool, ALOHA (Allele-frequency/Loss-of-heterozygosity/Allele-imbalance). This is the first time that these important genetic/genomic applications have been simultaneously conducted by the analyses of individual-level allele frequencies estimated by a unified intensity-measuring approach. We expect that additional practical applications for allele frequency analysis will be found. The developed databases and tools provide useful resources for human genome analysis via high-throughput single-nucleotide-polymorphism arrays. The ALOHA software was written in R and R GUI and can be downloaded at http://www.stat.sinica.edu.tw/hsinchou/genetics/aloha/ALOHA.htm.

  2. A new analysis tool for individual-level allele frequency for genomic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Wen-Harn

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allele frequency is one of the most important population indices and has been broadly applied to genetic/genomic studies. Estimation of allele frequency using genotypes is convenient but may lose data information and be sensitive to genotyping errors. Results This study utilizes a unified intensity-measuring approach to estimating individual-level allele frequencies for 1,104 and 1,270 samples genotyped with the single-nucleotide-polymorphism arrays of the Affymetrix Human Mapping 100K and 500K Sets, respectively. Allele frequencies of all samples are estimated and adjusted by coefficients of preferential amplification/hybridization (CPA, and large ethnicity-specific and cross-ethnicity databases of CPA and allele frequency are established. The results show that using the CPA significantly improves the accuracy of allele frequency estimates; moreover, this paramount factor is insensitive to the time of data acquisition, effect of laboratory site, type of gene chip, and phenotypic status. Based on accurate allele frequency estimates, analytic methods based on individual-level allele frequencies are developed and successfully applied to discover genomic patterns of allele frequencies, detect chromosomal abnormalities, classify sample groups, identify outlier samples, and estimate the purity of tumor samples. The methods are packaged into a new analysis tool, ALOHA (Allele-frequency/Loss-of-heterozygosity/Allele-imbalance. Conclusions This is the first time that these important genetic/genomic applications have been simultaneously conducted by the analyses of individual-level allele frequencies estimated by a unified intensity-measuring approach. We expect that additional practical applications for allele frequency analysis will be found. The developed databases and tools provide useful resources for human genome analysis via high-throughput single-nucleotide-polymorphism arrays. The ALOHA software was written in R and R GUI and

  3. A new analysis tool for individual-level allele frequency for genomic studies

    OpenAIRE

    Pan Wen-Harn; Li Ling-Hui; Huang Mei-Chu; Lin Hsin-Chi; Yang Hsin-Chou; Wu Jer-Yuarn; Chen Yuan-Tsong

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Allele frequency is one of the most important population indices and has been broadly applied to genetic/genomic studies. Estimation of allele frequency using genotypes is convenient but may lose data information and be sensitive to genotyping errors. Results This study utilizes a unified intensity-measuring approach to estimating individual-level allele frequencies for 1,104 and 1,270 samples genotyped with the single-nucleotide-polymorphism arrays of the Affymetrix Human...

  4. A novel JK null allele associated with typing discrepancies among African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingsley, Katrina L; Posadas, Jeff B; Moulds, Joann M; Gaur, Lakshmi K

    2013-01-01

    The Jknun (Jk-3) phenotype, attributable to null or silenced alleles, has predominantly been found in persons of Polynesian descent. With the increased use of molecular genotyping, many new silencing mutations have been identified in persons of other ethnic backgrounds. To date, only two JK null alleles have been reported in African Americans, JK*01N.04 and JK*OlN.OS.A comparative study was undertaken to determine whether JK mutations were present in the regional African American population. Results of donor genotyping were compared with previously recorded results of serologic tests, and discrepant results were investigated. Although the two previously identified polymorphisms were not detected in the discrepant samples, a novel allele (191G>A) was identified and was assigned the ISBT number JK*02N.09. This study illustrates a limitation of using single-nucleotide polymorphisms for prediction of blood group antigens.

  5. PyHLA: tests for the association between HLA alleles and diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Yanhui; Song, You-Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Background Recently, several tools have been designed for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array and next-generation sequencing (NGS) data. These tools provide high-throughput and cost-effective approaches for identifying HLA types. Therefore, tools for downstream association analysis are highly desirable. Although several tools have been designed for multi-allelic marker association analysis, they were designed only for microsatellite markers an...

  6. Association between HLA Class I Alleles and Proviral Load in HTLV-I Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraperesis (HAM/TSP) Patients in Iranian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghaddosi, Mahdi; Rezaee, S A Rahim; Rafatpanah, Houshang; Rajaei, Taraneh; Farid Hosseini, Reza; Narges, Valizadeh

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between HLA class I alleles (HLA-A*02, HLA-A*24, HLA-Cw*08, HLA-B5401) and proviral load in HTLV-I associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraperesis (HAM/TSP) patients in Iranian population. 20 new cases of HAM/TSP patients and 30 HTLV-I infected healthy carriers were recruited. Peripheral blood samples were collected. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated. DNA was extracted from PBMC.HTLV-I proviral load was calculated by Taqman quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). PCR sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP) reactions were performed to detect HLA-A, HLA-B and, HLA-Cw alleles. There was no significant difference in sex and age between asymptomatic and HAM/TSP group. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare proviral load between HAM/TSP patients and healthy carrier. Provirus load of HAM/TSP patients was significantly higher than that of HCs (P=0.003, Mann-Whitney U test).Odd ratio was calculated to determine association between class I alleles including (HLA-A*02, HLA-A*24, HLA-Cw*08) and risk of HAM/TSP development. We couldn't find any association between these class I alleles and risk of HAM/TSP development in our study. In our survey HLA-A*02, HLA-A24, HLA-Cw*08 didn't have protective effect on proviral load (P=0.075, P=0.060 and 0.650 Mann-Whitney U test respectively). In conclusion, certain HLA alleles with protective effect in one population may have not similar effect in other population. This may be because of pathogen polymorphism or host genetic heterogeneity and allele frequency in desired population.

  7. Association of HLA-DRB1 alleles with susceptibility to mixed connective tissue disease in Polish patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradowska-Gorycka, A; Stypińska, B; Olesińska, M; Felis-Giemza, A; Mańczak, M; Czuszynska, Z; Zdrojewski, Z; Wojciechowicz, J; Jurkowska, M

    2016-01-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is a systemic autoimmune disease, originally defined as a connective tissue inflammatory syndrome with overlapping features of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM) and systemic sclerosis (SSc), characterized by the presence of antibodies against components of the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (U1snRNP). The aim of the study was to assess the frequency of (high-resolution-typed) DRB1 alleles in a cohort of Polish patients with MCTD (n = 103). Identification of the variants potentially associated with risk and protection was carried out by comparison with the DKMS Polish Bone Marrow Donor Registry (41306 alleles). DRB1*15:01 (odds ratio (OR): 6.06; 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.55-8.06), DRB1*04 (OR: 3.69; 95% CI 2.69-5.01) and *09:01 (OR: 8.12; 95% CI 2.15-21.75) were identified as risk alleles for MCTD, while HLA-DRB1*07:01 allele was found to be protective (OR: 0.50; 95% CI 0.28-0.83). The carrier frequency of the DRB1*01 was higher in MCTD patients compared with controls, although the differences were not statistically significant. Our results confirm the modulating influence of HLA-DRB1 genotypes on development of connective tissue diseases such as MCTD. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Common breast cancer-predisposition alleles are associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Spurdle, Amanda B; Sinilnikova, Olga M

    2008-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 confer high risks of breast cancer. However, evidence suggests that these risks are modified by other genetic or environmental factors that cluster in families. A recent genome-wide association study has shown that common alleles at single nucleotide...... polymorphisms (SNPs) in FGFR2 (rs2981582), TNRC9 (rs3803662), and MAP3K1 (rs889312) are associated with increased breast cancer risks in the general population. To investigate whether these loci are also associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, we genotyped these SNPs in a sample...... of 10,358 mutation carriers from 23 studies. The minor alleles of SNP rs2981582 and rs889312 were each associated with increased breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers (per-allele hazard ratio [HR] = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.20-1.45, p(trend) = 1.7 x 10(-8) and HR = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.02-1.24, p(trend) = 0...

  9. Association between allelic variants of the human glucocorticoid receptor gene and autoimmune diseases: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Cristian; Marcos, Miguel; Carbonell, Cristina; Mirón-Canelo, José Antonio; Espinosa, Gerard; Cervera, Ricard; Chamorro, Antonio-Javier

    2018-03-08

    The human glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1) is considered to play a role in the differences and sensitivities of the glucocorticoid response in individuals with autoimmune diseases. The objective of this study was to examine by means of a systematic review previous findings regarding allelic variants of NR3C1 in relation to the risk of developing systemic autoimmune diseases. Studies that analysed the genotype distribution of NR3C1 allelic variants among patients with systemic autoimmune diseases were retrieved. A meta-analysis was conducted with a random effects model. Odds ratios (ORs) and their confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. In addition, sub-analysis by ethnicity, sensitivity analysis and tests for heterogeneity of the results were performed. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria for meta-analysis. We found no evidence that the analysed NR3C1 polymorphisms, rs6198, rs56149945, and rs6189/rs6190, modulate the risk of developing a systemic autoimmune disease. Nonetheless, a protective role for the minor allele of rs41423247 was found among Caucasians (OR = 0.78; 95% CI: 0.65, 0.92; P = 0.004). A subgroup analysis according to underlying diseases revealed no significant association either for Behçet's disease or rheumatoid arthritis, while correlations between NR3C1 polymorphisms and disease activity or response to glucocorticoids could not be evaluated due to insufficient data. There is no clear evidence that the analysed NR3C1 allelic variants confer a risk for developing systemic autoimmune diseases although the minor G allele of rs41423247 may be protective among Caucasians. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Common alleles in candidate susceptibility genes associated with risk and development of epithelial ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notaridou, Maria; Quaye, Lydia; Dafou, Dimitra; Jones, Chris; Song, Honglin; Høgdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Christensen, Lise; Høgdall, Claus; Blaakaer, Jan; McGuire, Valerie; Wu, Anna H.; Van Den Berg, David J.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Wozniak, Eva; Sher, Tanya; Jacobs, Ian J.; Tyrer, Jonathan; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Moorman, Patricia G.; Iversen, Edwin S.; Jakubowska, Anna; Mędrek, Krzysztof; Lubiński, Jan; Ness, Roberta B.; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Lurie, Galina; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Carney, Michael E.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Rossing, Mary Anne; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Thiel, Falk C.; Ekici, Arif B.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Gronwald, Jacek; Fasching, Peter A.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Goodman, Marc T.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Berchuck, Andrew; Pearce, C. Leigh; Whittemore, Alice S.; Menon, Usha; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Gayther, Simon A.; Ramus, Susan J.

    2011-01-01

    Common germline genetic variation in the population is associated with susceptibility to epithelial ovarian cancer. Microcell-mediated chromosome transfer and expression microarray analysis identified nine genes associated with functional suppression of tumorogenicity in ovarian cancer cell lines; AIFM2, AKTIP, AXIN2, CASP5, FILIP1L, RBBP8, RGC32, RUVBL1 and STAG3. Sixty-three tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs) in these genes were genotyped in 1,799 invasive ovarian cancer cases and 3,045 controls to look for associations with disease risk. Two SNPs in RUVBL1, rs13063604 and rs7650365, were associated with increased risk of serous ovarian cancer [HetOR = 1.42 (1.15–1.74) and the HomOR = 1.63 (1.10–1.42), p-trend = 0.0002] and [HetOR = 0.97 (0.80–1.17), HomOR = 0.74 (0.58–0.93), p-trend = 0.009], respectively. We genotyped rs13063604 and rs7650365 in an additional 4,590 cases and 6,031 controls from ten sites from the United States, Europe and Australia; however, neither SNP was significant in Stage 2. We also evaluated the potential role of tSNPs in these nine genes in ovarian cancer development by testing for allele-specific loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in 286 primary ovarian tumours. We found frequent LOH for tSNPs in AXIN2, AKTIP and RGC32 (64, 46 and 34%, respectively) and one SNP, rs1637001, in STAG3 showed significant allele-specific LOH with loss of the common allele in 94% of informative tumours (p = 0.015). Array comparative genomic hybridisation indicated that this nonrandom allelic imbalance was due to amplification of the rare allele. In conclusion, we show evidence for the involvement of a common allele of STAG3 in the development of epithelial ovarian cancer. PMID:20635389

  11. Nonrandom allele associations between unlinked protein loci: are the polymorphisms of the immunoglobulin constant regions adaptive?

    OpenAIRE

    van der Loo, W; Arthur, C P; Richardson, B J; Wallage-Drees, M; Hamers, R

    1987-01-01

    Consistent linkage disequilibrium was observed between independently segregating protein loci. In natural populations of the European rabbit Oryctolagus cuniculus, highly significant, nonrandom associations between alleles of the constant regions of the immunoglobulin light and heavy chains were found, both within localities and between localities. We suggest that the population genetic data presented here are relevant to the adaptive significance of the genetic polymorphisms of the antibody ...

  12. Certain HLA alleles are associated with stress-triggered Graves' disease and influence its course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vita, Roberto; Lapa, Daniela; Trimarchi, Francesco; Vita, Giuseppe; Fallahi, Poupak; Antonelli, Alessandro; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    There are no studies on HLA analysis in patients in whom Graves' disease (GD) hyperthyroidism has been preceded by ≥1 stressful event. The aim of the present study was to identify predisposing or protecting HLA alleles and their effects on the course of GD in this subset of patients. We performed serological HLA typing in 58 Caucasian patients with stress-related GD and in 130 matched healthy controls (HC). We also performed genomic HLA typing in 20/58 patients and in all HC. Five HLA alleles and three loci were more frequent in patients compared to HC: B8, Cw7, C*07, C*17, DR3, DR4, DRB1*04, and DQ2. In contrast, B14 was less frequent in patients than in HC. Depending on outcome after ATD withdrawal (remission, exacerbation on-ATD, relapse off-ATD), in patients, some alleles/loci were over-represented, while others were under-represented. Age, FT3, and FT4 fold increase over the upper normal limit at onset were different depending on the allele/locus carried. In GD patients with stress-triggered hyperthyroidism, HLA typing may be helpful in predicting the outcome of the disease after ATD withdrawal.

  13. Type I plasminogen activator inhibitor 4G allele frequency is associated with chronic venous insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katrancioglu, N; Manduz, S; Ozen, F; Yilmaz, M Birhan; Karahan, O; Ozdemir, O; Berkan, O

    2010-01-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) is a common disease associated with poor quality of life. Genetic polymorphisms causing coagulation abnormalities may account for some of the CVI pathogenesis. Type I plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) is responsible for fibrinolytic system regulation, and plasma levels of PAI-1 are strongly correlated with PAI-1 4G/5G gene polymorphism. The association between PAI-1 4G/5G gene polymorphism and CVI was investigated. In 34 consecutive patients with clinically overt CVI, the PAI-1 4G/4G polymorphism was detected in three cases (8.8%); the 4G/5G polymorphism was detected in 28 (82.4%). In 34 age- and sex-matched controls, the PAI-1 4G/4G polymorphism was detected in one case (2.9%) and the 4G/5G polymorphism was detected in 14 cases (41.2%). The PAI-1 4G allele was found significantly more frequently in CVI patients than in controls. The 4G allele was associated with a 3.25-fold increase in CVI risk. Thus, a relationship between CVI and the PAI-1 4G allele is apparent.

  14. HLA allele associations in idiopathic recurrent spontaneous abortion patients from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U Shankarkumar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Rejection of semiallogenic foetus in recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA has been postulated to be a consequence of genetic and immunological phenomena. Aim: To evaluate the role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA alleles in RSA in Indian couples. Settings and Design : A case-control study. Materials and Methods : Eighty-one randomly selected couples with unexplained three or more RSAs and a control group of 97 couples with live birth belonging to the same ethnic background, referred to the Gynaecology Department, KEM Hospital were included in the case-control study. Serological HLA A and B typing was done followed by molecular subtypes, defined using PCR-SSOP technique for HLA A, B, and C in 40 couples and DRB1FNx01 and DQB1FNx01 in 28 couples which were then compared with appropriate case 46 and 88 controls. Results : Serologically A3 (15.43% vs . 4.43%; odds ratio (OR = 4.34; P = 0.0002 and B17 (25.3% vs . 11.34%; OR = 3.49; P = 0.0001 were increased. Haplotype A1-B17 was significantly increased. Molecular subtyping revealed that AFNx01030102 (11.25% vs . 4.34%; OR = 3.00; P = 0.07, BFNx015701 (11.25% vs . 1.08%; OR = 13.10; P = 0.003, CwFNx01120201 (25% vs . 4.34%; OR = 10.50; P = 2.05E-05, HLA DRB1FNx01030101 (17.85% vs . 3.40%; OR = 7.6; P = 0.0001, DRB1FNx01150101 (32.14% vs . 13.63%; OR = 4.8; P = 0.0003, and DQB1FNx01060101 (35.71% vs . 29.34%; OR = 2.3; P = 0.004 were significantly increased in patients. A differential association was noticed when compared with reported world RSA patients. Conclusion: The HLA alleles AFNx01030101, BFNx015701, CwFNx01120201, DRB1FNx01030101, and DRB1FNx01150101 as well as their associated ancestral haplotype may play a significant role in development of RSA in India.

  15. Association and Validation of Yield-Favored Alleles in Chinese Cultivars of Common Wheat (Triticumaestivum L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Guo

    Full Text Available Common wheat is one of the most important crops in China, which is the largest producer in the world. A set of 230 cultivars was used to identify yield-related loci by association mapping. This set was tested for seven yield-related traits, viz. plant height (PH, spike length (SL, spikelet number per spike (SNPS, kernel number per spike (KNPS, thousand-kernel weight (TKW, kernel weight per spike (KWPS, and sterile spikelet number (SSN per plant in four environments. A total of 106 simple sequence repeat (SSR markers distributed on all 21 chromosomes were used to screen the set. Twenty-one and 19 of them were associated with KNPS and TKW, respectively. Association mapping detected 73 significant associations across 50 SSRs, and the phenotypic variation explained (R2 by the associations ranged from 1.54 to 23.93%. The associated loci were distributed on all chromosomes except 4A, 7A, and 7D. Significant and potentially new alleles were present on 8 chromosomes, namely 1A, 1D, 2A, 2D, 3D, 4B, 5B, and 6B. Further analysis showed that genetic effects of associated loci were greatly influenced by association panels, and the R2 of crucial loci were lower in modern cultivars than in the mini core collection, probably caused by strong selection in wheat breeding. In order to confirm the results of association analysis, yield-related favorable alleles Xgwm135-1A138, Xgwm337-1D186, Xgwm102-2D144, and Xgwm132-6B128 were evaluated in a double haploid (DH population derived from Hanxuan10 xLumai14.These favorable alleles that were validated in various populations might be valuable in breeding for high-yield.

  16. Association between pro-inflammatory alleles and allergic phenotypes in Xhosa adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurence, Craig; van der Merwe, Lize; Zhang, Guicheng; Le Souëf, Peter; Levin, Michael

    2018-01-04

    Significant differences exist in the prevalence, spectrum, and severity of allergic diseases between developing and developed countries and between subpopulations within single countries. These discrepancies likely result from a complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors. However, the precise nature of the contribution of ethnicity to genetic differences in the predisposition to allergic disease is not yet fully understood. In particular, there is a paucity of literature regarding the genetic determinants of allergic disease in people of black African origin with little or no genetic admixture. We aimed to analyze associations between 27 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and allergy phenotypes in the local Xhosa population. A convenience sample of 213 Xhosa teenagers was enrolled at a local high school. Phenotypic data were collected in the form of a symptom questionnaire, skin prick tests for common food and aeroallergens, total serum IgE, and IgE to Ascaris lumbricoides. In addition, genotyping was performed to establish the prevalence of putative pro-inflammatory alleles. We demonstrated several significant associations between polymorphisms and allergy phenotypes. In particular, 2 polymorphisms in the IL-10 gene (IL10 -592A>C and IL10 -1082A>G) and 1 in the IL-4 gene (IL4 -589C>T) showed multiple associations with allergic sensitization and asthma phenotypes. Other polymorphisms, across a multitude of genes with discrepant functions, showed less consistent associations. This study represents an important first step in genotype/phenotype association in this population. Further research is required to confirm or refute our findings. © 2018 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

  17. Higher FKBP5, COMT, CHRNA5, and CRHR1 allele burdens are associated with PTSD and interact with trauma exposure: implications for neuropsychiatric research and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boscarino JA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Joseph A Boscarino1,2, Porat M Erlich1,3, Stuart N Hoffman4, Xiaopeng Zhang51Center for Health Research, Geisinger Clinic, Danville, PA, 2Department of Psychiatry, 3Department of Medicine, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, 4Department of Neurology, 5Department of Anesthesiology, Geisinger Clinic, Danville, PA, USAObjective: The study aim was to assess the cumulative burden of polymorphisms located within four genetic loci previously associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD among outpatients at risk for PTSD.Methods: Diagnostic interviews were completed and DNA samples collected among 412 pain patients to determine if FKBP5 (rs9470080, COMT (rs4680, CHRNA5 (rs16969968, and CRHR1 (rs110402 single nucleotide polymorphisms were cumulatively associated with increased risk for PTSD.Results: In bivariate analyses, it was found that a count of specific PTSD risk alleles located within FKBP5, COMT, CHRNA5, and CRHR1 genetic loci (allele range = 0–6, mean count = 2.92, standard deviation = 1.36 was associated with lifetime (t [409] = 3.430, P = 0.001 and early onset PTSD (t [409] = 4.239, P = 0.000028. In logistic regression, controlling for demographic factors, personality traits, and trauma exposures, this risk allele count remained associated with both lifetime (odds ratio = 1.49, P = 0.00158 and early onset PTSD (odds ratio = 2.36, P = 0.000093. Interaction effects were also detected, whereby individuals with higher risk allele counts and higher trauma exposures had an increased risk of lifetime PTSD (allele count × high trauma, P = 0.026 and early onset PTSD (allele count × high trauma, P = 0.016 in these logistic regressions. Those with no or few risk alleles appeared resilient to PTSD, regardless of exposure history.Conclusion: A cumulative risk allele count involving four single nucleotide polymorphisms located within the FKBP5, COMT, CHRNA5, and CRHR1 genes are associated with PTSD. Level of trauma exposure

  18. High Prevalence of ITPA Alleles Associated with Ribavirin-Induced Hemolytic Anemia Among Mexican Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Aldaco, Karina; Rebello Pinho, João R; Panduro, Arturo; Martinez-Lopez, Erika; Gleyzer, Ketti; Fierro, Nora; Roman, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of two functional polymorphisms (rs1127354 and rs7270101) of the inosine triphosphatase (ITPA) gene associated with ribavirin-induced hemolytic anemia (RIHA) during antiviral therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection varies by ethnicity. In Mexico, the distribution of these polymorphisms among Native Amerindians (NA) and admixed population (Mestizos) is unknown. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of the ITPA polymorphisms among healthy NA and Mestizos, as well as in HCV patients from West Mexico. In a cross-sectional study, 600 unrelated subjects (322 Mestizos, 100 NA, and 178 treatment-naïve, HCV-infected Mestizos patients) were enrolled. A medical history was registered. ITPA genotype was determined by Real-Time PCR. Fst-values and genetic relatedness between study and reference populations were assessed. The frequency of the risk genotypes rs1127354CC and rs7270101AA was higher among NA (98-100%) than in Mestizos (87-92.9%), (p < 0.05). The NA presented the highest prevalence of the rs1127354CC genotype reported worldwide. The Fst-values revealed a genetic relatedness among Mexican NA, South Americans and African populations (p > 0.05). The frequency of the predicted risk for RIHA was higher among NA (98%) than in Mestizos (80.5%) and HCV-infected patients (81.5%) (p < 0 .01). The CC/AA alleles were associated with lower values of total bilirubin, aspartate/alanine aminotransferases, and aspartate-to-platelet-ratio-index score among HCV-patients. A high prevalence of the ITPA polymorphisms associated with RIHA was found in Mexican NA. These polymorphisms could be a useful tool for evaluating potential adverse effects and the risk or benefit of antiviral therapy in Mexicans and other admixed populations.

  19. Association of HLA-DQA1 and DQB1 alleles with alolpecia areata in Chinese Hans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Feng-Li; Zhou, Fu-Sheng; Liu, Jiang-Bo; Yan, Kai-Lin; Cui, Yong; Gao, Min; Liang, Yan-Hua; Sun, Liang-Dan; Zhou, Shun-Ming; Zhu, Ya-Gang; Zhang, Xue-Jun; Yang, Sen

    2005-11-01

    Accumulative evidences have shown that certain HLA loci are associated with alopecia areata (AA), but with existing differences in ethnic distribution. No report has ever been published about this in Chinese Hans. To investigate whether HLA-DQA1 and DQB1 alleles are associated with AA, and the correlation of the HLA profile with age of onset, severity, duration of current attack, recurrence and family history of AA in Chinese Hans. The polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP) method was used to analyze the distribution of HLA-DQA1 and DQB1 alleles in 192 patients with AA and 273 healthy controls in Chinese Hans. The significant increased frequencies of HLA-DQA1*0104 (OR=3.38, P(c)HLA-DQA1*0606 (OR=3.73, P(c)HLA-DQA1*0104 (OR=5.31, P(c)HLA-DQA1 and DQB1 alleles and haplotypes with AA. There may be differences in genetic background in patients with different duration.

  20. Lack of association between TaqI A1 Allele of dopamine D2 receptor gene and alcohol-use disorders in Atayal natives of Taiwan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chia-Hsiang Chen [Cheng Hsin Rehabilitation and Medical Center, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Shih-Hsiang Chien; Hai-Gwo Hwu [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1996-09-20

    Association studies between the A1 allele of the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) gene TaqI A polymorphism and alcoholism remain controversial. A recent study from Japan demonstrated that the A1 allele is associated with severe alcoholism in the Japanese population. We were interested in knowing if this association also exists in the Atayals of Taiwan, who were found to have a higher prevalence of alcohol-use disorders than the Han Chinese in Taiwan. Genotype and allele frequencies were determined in alcohol-abusing, alcohol-dependent, and nonalcoholic control Atayal natives in Taiwan. A1 allele frequencies in alcohol-dependent, alcohol-abusing, and normal control Atayals were 0.39, 0.42, and 0.39, respectively. No difference in A1 allele frequency was found among these three groups. Our data do not support the hypothesis that the A1 allele of the TaqI A polymorphism of the DRD2 gene increases susceptibility to alcohol-use disorders in the Atayals of Taiwan. 18 refs., 1 tab.

  1. Cervical cancer in Indian women reveals contrasting association among common sub-family of HLA class I alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhale, Priyanka; Mania-Pramanik, Jayanti; Sonawani, Archana; Idicula-Thomas, Susan; Kerkar, Shilpa; Tongaonkar, Hemant; Chaudhari, Hemangi; Warke, Himangi; Salvi, Vinita

    2014-12-01

    We studied the relationship between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I alleles and cervical cancer among Indian women. Seventy-five cervical cancer cases were compared with 175 noncancer controls. Cervical biopsy tissue specimen from cancer cases and cervical swab specimen from controls were collected for HPV detection and typing. Blood was taken for HLA typing by PCR-SSOP method. The impact of HLA class I alleles on cervical cancer risk was evaluated using StatCalc program (Epi Info version 6.0.4. CDC Atlanta, GA, USA), and confirmed with Bonferroni correction. Results revealed HLA-B*37, HLA-B*58 were associated significantly with increased risk while HLA-B*40 with decreased risk for cervical cancer. At high-resolution analysis after Bonferroni correction, HLA-B*37:01 allele was associated with increased risk, whereas HLA-B*40:06 was with decreased risk for cervical cancer. HLA-B*37:01 and HLA-B*40:06 belong to the same superfamily of HLA-B44. In silico analysis revealed different binding affinities of HLA-B*37:01 and HLA-B*40:06 for the epitopes predicted for E6 and L1 proteins of HPV16. The higher binding affinity of epitopes to B*40:06, as revealed by docking studies, supports the hypothesis that this allele is able to present the antigenic peptides more efficiently than B*37:01 and thereby can protect the carriers from the risk of cervical cancer. Thus, there is a clear indication that HLA plays an important role in the development of cervical cancer in HPV-infected women. Identification of these factors in high-risk HPV-infected women may help in reducing the cervical cancer burden in India.

  2. Allele Variants of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Heat-Labile Toxin Are Globally Transmitted and Associated with Colonization Factors

    KAUST Repository

    Joffré, Enrique

    2015-01-15

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing world. ETEC-mediated diarrhea is orchestrated by heat-labile toxin (LT) and heat-stable toxins (STp and STh), acting in concert with a repertoire of more than 25 colonization factors (CFs). LT, the major virulence factor, induces fluid secretion after delivery of a monomeric ADP-ribosylase (LTA) and its pentameric carrier B subunit (LTB). A study of ETEC isolates from humans in Brazil reported the existence of natural LT variants. In the present study, analysis of predicted amino acid sequences showed that the LT amino acid polymorphisms are associated with a geographically and temporally diverse set of 192 clinical ETEC strains and identified 12 novel LT variants. Twenty distinct LT amino acid variants were observed in the globally distributed strains, and phylogenetic analysis showed these to be associated with different CF profiles. Notably, the most prevalent LT1 allele variants were correlated with major ETEC lineages expressing CS1 + CS3 or CS2 + CS3, and the most prevalent LT2 allele variants were correlated with major ETEC lineages expressing CS5 + CS6 or CFA/I. LTB allele variants generally exhibited more-stringent amino acid sequence conservation (2 substitutions identified) than LTA allele variants (22 substitutions identified). The functional impact of LT1 and LT2 polymorphisms on virulence was investigated by measuring total-toxin production, secretion, and stability using GM1-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (GM1-ELISA) and in silico protein modeling. Our data show that LT2 strains produce 5-fold more toxin than LT1 strains (P < 0.001), which may suggest greater virulence potential for this genetic variant. Our data suggest that functionally distinct LT-CF variants with increased fitness have persisted during the evolution of ETEC and have spread globally.

  3. Risk alleles for systemic lupus erythematosus in a large case-control collection and associations with clinical subphenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly E Taylor

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a genetically complex disease with heterogeneous clinical manifestations. Recent studies have greatly expanded the number of established SLE risk alleles, but the distribution of multiple risk alleles in cases versus controls and their relationship to subphenotypes have not been studied. We studied 22 SLE susceptibility polymorphisms with previous genome-wide evidence of association (p < 5 x 10⁻¹²⁸ in 1919 SLE cases from 9 independent Caucasian SLE case series and 4813 independent controls. The mean number of risk alleles in cases was 15.1 (SD 3.1 while the mean in controls was 13.1 (SD 2.8, with trend p = 4 x 10⁻⁸. We defined a genetic risk score (GRS for SLE as the number of risk alleles with each weighted by the SLE risk odds ratio (OR. The OR for high-low GRS tertiles, adjusted for intra-European ancestry, sex, and parent study, was 4.4 (95% CI 3.8-5.1. We studied associations of individual SNPs and the GRS with clinical manifestations for the cases: age at diagnosis, the 11 American College of Rheumatology classification criteria, and double-stranded DNA antibody (anti-dsDNA production. Six subphenotypes were significantly associated with the GRS, most notably anti-dsDNA (OR(high-low = 2.36, p = 9e-9, the immunologic criterion (OR(high-low = 2.23, p = 3e-7, and age at diagnosis (OR(high-low = 1.45, p = 0.0060. Finally, we developed a subphenotype-specific GRS (sub-GRS for each phenotype with more power to detect cumulative genetic associations. The sub-GRS was more strongly associated than any single SNP effect for 5 subphenotypes (the above plus hematologic disorder and oral ulcers, while single loci are more significantly associated with renal disease (HLA-DRB1, OR = 1.37, 95% CI 1.14-1.64 and arthritis (ITGAM, OR = 0.72, 95% CI 0.59-0.88. We did not observe significant associations for other subphenotypes, for individual loci or the sub-GRS. Thus our

  4. No evidence of association between mutant alleles of the CYP27B1 gene and MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Maria; Caillier, Stacy; Mero, Inger-Lise; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Celius, Elisabeth G.; Aarseth, Jan; Torkildsen, Øivind; Harbo, Hanne F.; Oksenberg, Jorge; Hauser, Stephen L.; Sawcer, Stephen; Compston, Alastair

    2012-01-01

    An association has previously been reported between susceptibility to multiple sclerosis and the rare mutant alleles of the CYP27B1 gene responsible for autosomal recessive Vitamin D Dependent Rickets type 1 (VDDR1). In an attempt to replicate this finding, we screened 495 multiplex families and 2092 single affected families, together with 4594 cases and 3583 controls (a total of 17073 individuals) but were unable to find any evidence supporting this putative association. Our data do not indicate that mutations responsible for VDDR1 influence the risk of developing multiple sclerosis. PMID:23444327

  5. Pharmacogenetic relevance of the CYP2C9*3 allele in a tenoxicam bioequivalence study performed on Spaniards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiró, A M; Novalbos, J; Zapater, P; Moreu, R; López-Rodríguez, R; Rodríguez, V; Abad-Santos, F; Horga, J F

    2009-01-01

    We performed a study to quantify CYP2C9 and CYP2C8 alleles influence on the variability observed in tenoxicam pharmacokinetic (PK) and implication in a bioequivalence study design performed on Spaniards. Eighteen healthy volunteers were included in an open, randomized, crossover, phase I bioequivalence study. Significant increases were found in CYP2C9*3 alleles vs. *1 and *2 in AUC(0-infinity) (median (min-max)): 256 (230-516) vs. 150 (100-268) and 169 (124-197) microg h/mL (p<0.01) and half-life time (t1/2) 102 (79-36) vs. 56 (45-94) and 64 (60-80)h (p<0.01). Non-significant differences were observed in C(max) 1.9 (1.8-2.9) vs. 2.4 (1.7-3.4), 2.5 (1.6-2.9) microg/mL or in according to CYP2C8 alleles presence. CYP2C9*3 allele is associated to a longer elimination time of tenoxicam. PK parameters calculated in bioequivalence studies (AUC(0-infinity), t1/2) may be influenced by the presence of CYP2C9*3 allele resulting in a high variability. Thus, bioequivalence studies of tenoxicam formulations should be designed considering genotype profile.

  6. Some but not all of HLA-II alleles are associated with cervical cancer in Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jinxiao; Xu, Anlong; Xie, Yufen; Awonuga, Awoniyi O; Lin, Zhongqiu

    2008-12-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is closely associated with the human papillomavirus (HPV). Although most patients are able to clear the infection over time, some eventually develop cancer, suggesting the existence of other factors that determine malignant progression. Such factors may include genetic susceptibility. To determine whether human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II is related to CC among Han race population in the Guangdong region of China, HLA class II typing were carried out by polymerase chain reaction in 126 patients with CC and 88 selected controls. The allele and haplotype frequencies in both the study and control groups were calculated. The occurrence of DPB1 *1301 [odds ratio (OR), 2.66; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.12-6.29], DPB1 *0202 (OR, 3.65; CI, 1.04-12.80), DQB1 *030302(OR, 1.85; CI, 1.04-3.27), and DQB1 *050301(OR, 3.94; CI, 1.48-10.46) alleles were more common in the study group than control. This suggests that these alleles may confer susceptibility to CC in the Guangdong Province. In a similar fashion, the occurrence of DRB1 *13-DQB1 *06 (OR, 0.17; 95% CI, 0.04-0.80) haplotype was significantly lower in the study patients compared with the controls and may confer a decreased risk of CC among Han race population in the Guangdong Province of China.

  7. The CFTR Met 470 allele is associated with lower birth rates in fertile men from a population isolate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülüm Kosova

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Although little is known about the role of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR gene in reproductive physiology, numerous variants in this gene have been implicated in etiology of male infertility due to congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD. Here, we studied the fertility effects of three CBAVD-associated CFTR polymorphisms, the (TGm and polyT repeat polymorphisms in intron 8 and Met470Val in exon 10, in healthy men of European descent. Homozygosity for the Met470 allele was associated with lower birth rates, defined as the number of births per year of marriage (P = 0.0029. The Met470Val locus explained 4.36% of the phenotypic variance in birth rate, and men homozygous for the Met470 allele had 0.56 fewer children on average compared to Val470 carrier men. The derived Val470 allele occurs at high frequencies in non-African populations (allele frequency = 0.51 in HapMap CEU, whereas it is very rare in African population (Fst = 0.43 between HapMap CEU and YRI. In addition, haplotypes bearing Val470 show a lack of genetic diversity and are thus longer than haplotypes bearing Met470 (measured by an integrated haplotype score [iHS] of -1.93 in HapMap CEU. The fraction of SNPs in the HapMap Phase2 data set with more extreme Fst and iHS measures is 0.003, consistent with a selective sweep outside of Africa. The fertility advantage conferred by Val470 relative to Met470 may provide a selective mechanism for these population genetic observations.

  8. Oligoclonal band status in Scandinavian multiple sclerosis patients is associated with specific genetic risk alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inger-Lise Mero

    Full Text Available The presence of oligoclonal bands (OCB in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF is a typical finding in multiple sclerosis (MS. We applied data from Norwegian, Swedish and Danish (i.e. Scandinavian MS patients from a genome-wide association study (GWAS to search for genetic differences in MS relating to OCB status. GWAS data was compared in 1367 OCB positive and 161 OCB negative Scandinavian MS patients, and nine of the most associated SNPs were genotyped for replication in 3403 Scandinavian MS patients. HLA-DRB1 genotypes were analyzed in a subset of the OCB positive (n = 2781 and OCB negative (n = 292 MS patients and compared to 890 healthy controls. Results from the genome-wide analyses showed that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from the HLA complex and six other loci were associated to OCB status. In SNPs selected for replication, combined analyses showed genome-wide significant association for two SNPs in the HLA complex; rs3129871 (p = 5.7×10(-15 and rs3817963 (p = 5.7×10(-10 correlating with the HLA-DRB1*15 and the HLA-DRB1*04 alleles, respectively. We also found suggestive association to one SNP in the Calsyntenin-2 gene (p = 8.83×10(-7. In HLA-DRB1 analyses HLA-DRB1*15∶01 was a stronger risk factor for OCB positive than OCB negative MS, whereas HLA-DRB1*04∶04 was associated with increased risk of OCB negative MS and reduced risk of OCB positive MS. Protective effects of HLA-DRB1*01∶01 and HLA-DRB1*07∶01 were detected in both groups. The groups were different with regard to age at onset (AAO, MS outcome measures and gender. This study confirms both shared and distinct genetic risk for MS subtypes in the Scandinavian population defined by OCB status and indicates different clinical characteristics between the groups. This suggests differences in disease mechanisms between OCB negative and OCB positive MS with implications for patient management, which need to be further studied.

  9. Oligoclonal band status in Scandinavian multiple sclerosis patients is associated with specific genetic risk alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mero, Inger-Lise; Gustavsen, Marte W; Sæther, Hanne S; Flåm, Siri T; Berg-Hansen, Pål; Søndergaard, Helle B; Jensen, Poul Erik H; Berge, Tone; Bjølgerud, Anja; Muggerud, Aslaug; Aarseth, Jan H; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Celius, Elisabeth G; Sellebjerg, Finn; Hillert, Jan; Alfredsson, Lars; Olsson, Tomas; Oturai, Annette Bang; Kockum, Ingrid; Lie, Benedicte A; Andreassen, Bettina Kulle; Harbo, Hanne F

    2013-01-01

    The presence of oligoclonal bands (OCB) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a typical finding in multiple sclerosis (MS). We applied data from Norwegian, Swedish and Danish (i.e. Scandinavian) MS patients from a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to search for genetic differences in MS relating to OCB status. GWAS data was compared in 1367 OCB positive and 161 OCB negative Scandinavian MS patients, and nine of the most associated SNPs were genotyped for replication in 3403 Scandinavian MS patients. HLA-DRB1 genotypes were analyzed in a subset of the OCB positive (n = 2781) and OCB negative (n = 292) MS patients and compared to 890 healthy controls. Results from the genome-wide analyses showed that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the HLA complex and six other loci were associated to OCB status. In SNPs selected for replication, combined analyses showed genome-wide significant association for two SNPs in the HLA complex; rs3129871 (p = 5.7×10(-15)) and rs3817963 (p = 5.7×10(-10)) correlating with the HLA-DRB1*15 and the HLA-DRB1*04 alleles, respectively. We also found suggestive association to one SNP in the Calsyntenin-2 gene (p = 8.83×10(-7)). In HLA-DRB1 analyses HLA-DRB1*15∶01 was a stronger risk factor for OCB positive than OCB negative MS, whereas HLA-DRB1*04∶04 was associated with increased risk of OCB negative MS and reduced risk of OCB positive MS. Protective effects of HLA-DRB1*01∶01 and HLA-DRB1*07∶01 were detected in both groups. The groups were different with regard to age at onset (AAO), MS outcome measures and gender. This study confirms both shared and distinct genetic risk for MS subtypes in the Scandinavian population defined by OCB status and indicates different clinical characteristics between the groups. This suggests differences in disease mechanisms between OCB negative and OCB positive MS with implications for patient management, which need to be further studied.

  10. High resolution human leukocyte antigen class I allele frequencies and HIV-1 infection associations in Chinese Han and Uyghur cohorts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhou Liu

    Full Text Available Host immunogenetic factors such as HLA class I polymorphism are important to HIV-1 infection risk and AIDS progression. Previous studies using high-resolution HLA class I profile data of Chinese populations appeared insufficient to provide information for HIV-1 vaccine development and clinical trial design. Here we reported HLA class I association with HIV-1 susceptibility in a Chinese Han and a Chinese Uyghur cohort.Our cohort included 327 Han and 161 Uyghur ethnic individuals. Each cohort included HIV-1 seropositive and HIV-1 seronegative subjects. Four-digit HLA class I typing was performed by sequencing-based typing and high-resolution PCR-sequence specific primer. We compared the HLA class I allele and inferred haplotype frequencies between HIV-1 seropositive and seronegative groups. A neighbor-joining tree between our cohorts and other populations was constructed based on allele frequencies of HLA-A and HLA-B loci. We identified 58 HLA-A, 75 HLA-B, and 32 HLA-Cw distinct alleles from our cohort and no novel alleles. The frequency of HLA-B*5201 and A*0301 was significantly higher in the Han HIV-1 negative group. The frequency of HLA-B*5101 was significantly higher in the Uyghur HIV-1 negative group. We observed statistically significant increases in expectation-maximization (EM algorithm predicted haplotype frequencies of HLA-A*0201-B*5101 in the Uyghur HIV-1 negative group, and of Cw*0304-B*4001 in the Han HIV-1 negative group. The B62s supertype frequency was found to be significantly higher in the Han HIV-1 negative group than in the Han HIV-1 positive group.At the four-digit level, several HLA class I alleles and haplotypes were associated with lower HIV-1 susceptibility. Homogeneity of HLA class I and Bw4/Bw6 heterozygosity were not associated with HIV-1 susceptibility in our cohort. These observations contribute to the Chinese HLA database and could prove useful in the development of HIV-1 vaccine candidates.

  11. Allozyme marker loci associated with favorable alleles for grain yield in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mišević, D; Gerić, I; Tadić, B

    1990-10-01

    The evaluation of germplasm to identify its potential as a source of new favorable alleles is a time-consuming phase of maize hybrid breeding programs. The objective of this paper was to study the relationship between allozyme diversity and quantitative estimators of the relative number of new favorable alleles for grain yield, present in donor lines but not present in the elite hybrid. Twenty-two maize inbred lines representing heterotic groups from the United States (US) and Yugoslavia (YU) were used as donors to estimate the presence of new favorable alleles for grain yield improvement for the hybrid B73 x Mo17. In a second experiment, a 15-line diallel was grown, and 13 single crosses differing in allozyme relatedness measure (ARM) and heterotic grouping were considered as targets to be improved by the remaining 13 lines. Minimally biased estimates of new favorable alleles for grain yield (μG) and ARM values were made for all donor lines within each target hybrid. Donor lines were grouped in four allozyme-pedigree classes for each target hybrid to compare the effect of allozyme diversity with pedigree diversity. Pedigree dissimilarities had significant effects on μG estimates. Dissimilar pedigree classes had higher μG estimates than similar pedigree classes. Allozyme differences between donor inbred lines and target hybrids had inconsistent effects on μG estimates. Significant differences in μG estimates among allozyme classes were found for 31% of the target hybrids. Classes with similar allozymes had higher μG estimates more frequently than classes with disimilar allozymes. Correlation coefficients between μG estimates and ARM values were low and not significant for 12 of the 14 target hybrids.

  12. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumour subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J.; Barrowdale, Daniel; Domchek, Susan M.; Eccles, Diana; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ramus, Susan J.; Robson, Mark; Sherman, Mark; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Lee, Andrew; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Hansen, Thomas vO; Nielsen, Finn C.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Osorio, Ana; Muñoz-Repeto, Iván; Durán, Mercedes; Godino, Javier; Pertesi, Maroulio; Benítez, Javier; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Cattaneo, Elisa; Bonanni, Bernardo; Viel, Alessandra; Pasini, Barbara; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Savarese, Antonella; Bernard, Loris; Radice, Paolo; Hamann, Ute; Verheus, Martijn; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Wijnen, Juul; Gómez García, Encarna B.; Nelen, Marcel R.; Kets, C. Marleen; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M. A.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; van Os, Theo; Rookus, Matti; Frost, Debra; Jones, J. Louise; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Cook, Jackie; Donaldson, Alan; Dorkins, Huw; Gregory, Helen; Eason, Jacqueline; Houghton, Catherine; Barwell, Julian; Side, Lucy E.; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Peock, Susan; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Rhiem, Kerstin; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Kast, Karin; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schoenbuchner, Ines; Fiebig, Britta; Heinritz, Wolfram; Schäfer, Dieter; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Fassy-Colcombet, Marion; Cornelis, François; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Pujol, Pascal; Coupier, Isabelle; Lebrun, Marine; Kientz, Caroline; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Isaacs, Claudine; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Soucy, Penny; Dumont, Martine; Simard, Jacques; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; D'Andrea, Emma; Fox, Stephen; Yan, Max; Rebbeck, Tim; Olopade, Olufunmilayo; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Lynch, Henry T.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Szabo, Csilla; Offit, Kenneth; Sakr, Rita; Gaudet, Mia; Bhatia, Jasmine; Kauff, Noah; Singer, Christian F.; tea, Muy-Kheng; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Imyanitov, Evgeny; O'Malley, Frances P.; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Glendon, Gordon; Toland, Amanda E.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Soller, Maria; Henriksson, Karin; Wachenfeldt, von Anna; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Karlsson, Per; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Beattie, Mary; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; John, Esther M.; Daly, Mary B.; Buys, Saundra M.; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy; Miron, Alexander F.; Goldgar, David; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Cole, Trevor; Ong, Kai-Ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; James, Margaret; Paterson, Joan; Downing, Sarah; Taylor, Amy; Rogers, T.; Kennedy, John M.; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Drummond, Sarah; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Hill, Kathryn; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Duncan, Alexis; Jacobs, Chris; Langman, Caroline; Whaite, Anna; Chu, Carol; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Taylor, Jane; Male, Alison; Berlin, Cheryl; Collier, Rebecca; Douglas, Fiona; Claber, Oonagh; Jobson, Irene; Walker, Lisa; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Robertson, Lisa; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Hodgson, Shirley; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eddy, Charlotte; Tripathi, Vishakha; Attard, Virginia; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; McBride, Donna; Smalley, Sarah; Barjhoux, Laure; Verny-Pierre, Carole; Giraud, Sophie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Buecher, Bruno; Houdayer, Claude; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; de Pauw, Antoine; Roussy, Gustave; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrde, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bérard, Léon; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Baclesse, François; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Eisinger, François; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Barouk-Simonet, Emmanuelle; Bonnet, Françoise; Bubien, Virginie; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Peysselon, Magalie; Coron, Fanny; Faivre, Laurence; Prieur, Fabienne; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Lacassagne, Antoine; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Delnatte, Capucine; Snyder, Carrie L.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Verhoef, S.; Verheus, M.; van 't Veer, L. J.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Collée, M.; van den Ouweland, A. M. W.; Jager, A.; Hooning, M. J.; van Asperen, C. J.; Wijnen, J. T.; Vreeswijk, M. P.; Tollenaar, R. A.; Devilee, P.; Ligtenberg, M. J.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ausems, M. G.; Aalfs, C. M.; Gille, J. J. P.; Waisfisz, Q.; Gomez-Garcia, E. B.; van Roozendaal, C. E.; Blok, Marinus J.; Caanen, B.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van der Hout, A. H.; Mourits, M. J.; Vasen, H. F.; Nordling, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Åke; Loman, Niklas; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Jernström, Helena; Harbst, Katja; Lindblom, Annika; Liljegren, Annelie; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Melin, Beatrice; Grönberg, Henrik; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Ehrencrona, Hans; Rosenquist, Richard; Dahl, Niklas

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2

  13. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumour subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); F.J. Couch (Fergus); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); S.M. Domchek (Susan); D. Eccles (Diana); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); S.J. Ramus (Susan); M. Robson (Mark); M.E. Sherman (Mark); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); A. Lee (Andrew); L. McGuffog (Lesley); S. Healey (Sue); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); F.C. Nielsen (Finn); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); A. Osorio (Ana); I. Muñoz-Repeto (Iván); M. Durán (Mercedes); J. Godino (Javier); M. Pertesi (Maroulio); J. Benítez (Javier); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); E. Cattaneo (Elisa); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); A. Viel (Alessandra); B. Pasini (Barbara); L. Papi (Laura); L. Ottini (Laura); A. Savarese (Antonella); L. Bernard (Loris); P. Radice (Paolo); U. Hamann (Ute); M. Verheus (Martijn); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); M.R. Nelen (Marcel); C.M. Kets; C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); M.M.A. Tilanus-Linthorst (Madeleine); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); T.V. Os (Theo); M.A. Rookus (Matti); D. Frost (Debra); J.L. Jones (J Louise); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); R. Eeles (Rosalind); L. Izatt (Louise); J.W. Adlard (Julian); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); J. Cook (Jackie); A. Donaldson (Alan); H. Dorkins (Huw); H. Gregory (Helen); J. Eason (Jacqueline); C. Houghton (Catherine); J. Barwell (Julian); L. Side (Lucy); E. McCann (Emma); A. Murray (Alexandra); S. Peock (Susan); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); C.W. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); I. Ruehl (Ina); N. Arnold (Norbert); D. Niederacher (Dieter); C. Sutter (Christian); H. Deissler (Helmut); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); K. Kast (Karin); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); I. Schoenbuchner (Ines); B. Fiebig (Britta); W. Heinritz (Wolfram); D. Schäfer (Dieter); H. Gevensleben (Heidrun); V. Caux-Moncoutier (Virginie); M. Fassy-Colcombet (Marion); F. Cornelis (Franco̧is); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); M. Léone (Mélanie); N. Boutry-Kryza (N.); A. Hardouin (Agnès); P. Berthet (Pascaline); D.W. Muller (Danièle); J.P. Fricker (Jean Pierre); I. Mortemousque (Isabelle); P. Pujol (Pascal); I. Coupier (Isabelle); M. Lebrun (Marine); C. Kientz (Caroline); M. Longy (Michel); N. Sevenet (Nicolas); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); C. Isaacs (Claudine); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); T. Heikinen (Tuomas); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); I. Blanco (Ignacio); C. Lazaro (Conxi); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); P. Soucy (Penny); M. Dumont (Martine); J. Simard (Jacques); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Tognazzo (Silvia); E. D'Andrea (Emma); S.B. Fox (Stephen); M. Yan (Max); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); H. Lynch (Henry); P.A. Ganz (Patricia); G. Tomlinson (Gail); X. Wang (Xing); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); C. Szabo (Csilla); K. Offit (Kenneth); R. Sakr (Rita); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); K.P. Bhatia (Kailash); N. Kauff (Noah); C.F. Singer (Christian); M.-K. Tea; D. Gschwantler-Kaulich (Daphne); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); P.L. Mai (Phuong); M.H. Greene (Mark); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); F.P. O'Malley (Frances); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); G. Glendon (Gord); A.E. Toland (Amanda); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); M. Thomassen (Mads); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; A.-B. Skytte (Anne-Bine); M.A. Caligo (Maria); M. Soller (Maria); K. Henriksson (Karin); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (M.); P. Karlsson (Per); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); M.S. Beattie (Mary); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); K.B. Moysich (Kirsten); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); B. Karlan; J. Gross (Jenny); E.M. John (Esther); M.B. Daly (Mary); S.S. Buys (Saundra); M.C. Southey (Melissa); J.L. Hopper (John); M.-B. Terry (Mary-Beth); W. Chung (Wendy); A. Miron (Alexander); D. Goldgar (David); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); D.F. Easton (Douglas); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtypes

  14. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumor subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J; Barrowdale, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtype...

  15. Association of an INSIG2 obesity allele with cardiovascular phenotypes is gender and age dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdman Robert

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The INSIG2 gene has been implicated in cholesterol metabolism and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP near INSIG2 has been shown to be associated with obesity. We sought to determine the relationship of the INSIG2 SNP to cardiovascular disease (CVD related phenotypes. Methods and Results Nine hundred forty six patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI in wave 5 of the multicenter NHLBI Dynamic Registry were genotyped using RT-PCR/TaqMan/allelic discrimination for the rs7566605 SNP near the INSIG2 gene. Clinical variables analyzed include demographics, medical history, and procedural details. The prevalence of peripheral vascular disease (PVD was significantly higher in older men (≥65 years who were either homozygous or carriers of the obesity/lipid risk allele ("C" compared to non-carriers (odds ratio 3.4, p = 0.013 using a logistic regression model incorporating history of hypercholesterolemia, history of hypertension, cerebrovascular disease, history of diabetes, and BMI. A similar relationship with cerebrovascular disease was found in older (>65 women (odds ratio 3.4, p = 0.013. The INSIG2 SNP was not associated with BMI, nor with other clinical variables. Conclusion Age and gender may influence the association of the INSIG2 obesity SNP with PVD and cerebrovascular disease in patients with pre-existing CVD.

  16. Several different lactase persistence associated alleles and high diversity of the lactase gene in the admixed Brazilian population.

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    Deise C Friedrich

    Full Text Available Adult-type hypolactasia is a common phenotype caused by the lactase enzyme deficiency. The -13910 C>T polymorphism, located 14 Kb upstream of the lactase gene (LCT in the MCM6 gene was associated with lactase persistence (LP in Europeans. This polymorphism is rare in Africa but several other variants associated with lactase persistence were observed in Africans. The aims of this study were to identify polymorphisms in the MCM6 region associated with the lactase persistence phenotype and to determine the distribution of LCT gene haplotypes in 981 individuals from North, Northeast and South Brazil. These polymorphisms were genotyped by PCR based methods and sequencing. The -13779*C,-13910*T, -13937*A, -14010*C, -14011*T LP alleles previously described in the MCM6 gene region that acts as an enhancer for the LCT gene were identified in Brazilians. The most common LP allele was -13910*T. Its frequency was highly correlated with European ancestry in the Brazilian populations investigated. The -13910*T was higher (0.295 in southern Brazilians of European ancestry and lower (0.175 in the Northern admixed population. LCT haplotypes were derived from the 10 LCT SNPs genotyped. Overall twenty six haplotypes previously described were identified in the four Brazilian populations studied. The Multidimensional Scaling analysis showed that Belém, in the north, was closer to Amerindians. Northeastern and southern Afro-descendants were more related with Bantu-speaking South Africans whereas the Southern population with European ancestry grouped with Southern and Northern Europeans. This study shows a high variability considering the number of LCT haplotypes observed. Due to the highly admixed nature of the Brazilian populations, the diagnosis of hypolactasia in Brazil, based only in the investigation of the -13910*T allele is an oversimplification.

  17. Retinal angiomatous proliferation associated with risk alleles of ARMS2/HTRA1 gene polymorphisms in Japanese patients

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    Ohkuma Y

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Yasuhiro Ohkuma,1 Takaaki Hayashi,1 Tsutomu Sakai,1 Akira Watanabe,1 Hisashi Yamada,2 Masakazu Akahori,3 Takeshi Itabashi,3 Takeshi Iwata,3 Toru Noda,4 Hiroshi Tsuneoka11Department of Ophthalmology, 2Department of Molecular Genetics, Institute of DNA Medicine, The Jikei University School of Medicine, 3Division of Molecular and Cellular Biology, National Institute of Sensory Organs, 4Division of Ophthalmology, National Hospital Organization Tokyo Medical Center, Tokyo, JapanBackground: The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between ARMS2/HTRA1, CFH, and C3 gene polymorphisms and retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP, an infrequent and severe form of exudative age-related macular degeneration, which is characterized by intraretinal neovascularization.Methods: Diagnosis of RAP was based on fundus photographs, images of fluorescein and indocyanine green angiographies, and optical coherence tomography findings. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, A69S (rs10490924 in ARMS2, rs11200638 in HTRA1, I62V (rs800292 in CFH, Y402H (rs1061170 in CFH, R80G (rs2230199 in C3, and rs2241394 in C3, were genotyped in eight Japanese patients with RAP.Results: The two SNPs in the ARMS2/HTRA1 were in complete linkage disequilibrium. The frequency of the risk T allele in ARMS2 (the risk A allele in HTRA1 was 93.8% in the RAP patients. The frequency of homozygosity for the risk genotype TT of ARMS2 (the risk genotype AA of HTRA1 was 87.5%. The frequency of the non-risk allele (A of I62V was 100%. The frequencies of risk alleles of Y402H, R80G, and rs2241394 were 12.5%, 0%, and 18.8%, respectively.Conclusion: Our results suggest that the risk alleles of the ARMS2/HTRA1 SNPs may be associated with development of RAP and play a major role in the pathogenesis of intraretinal angiogenesis.Keywords: age-related macular degeneration, retinal angiomatous proliferation, single nucleotide polymorphisms, ARMS2/HTRA1 genes, components of the complement

  18. Association of HLA-BFNx011502 allele and carbamazepine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome among Indians

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    Mehta Timir

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS and toxic epidermal necrolysis are severe cutaneous reactions caused by certain drugs, including antiepileptic carbamazepine. A strong association has been reported between human leucocyte antigen (HLA-BFNx011502 and carbamazepine-induced SJS in Han Chinese patients. European studies suggested that HLA-BFNx011502 is not a universal marker but is ethnicity-specific for Asians. Aim: To study the association between HLA-BFNx011502 and carbamazepine-induced SJS in Indian patients. Methods: Eight individuals who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of SJS induced by carbamazepine were identified and HLA-B molecular typing was performed. HLA-B genotyping was carried out by polymerase chain reaction using sequence-specific primers. Results: Out of eight patients studied for genotype, six patients were found to have the HLA-BFNx011502 allele. Conclusion: This study suggests an association between HLA-BFNx011502 and carbamazepine-induced SJS in Indian patients.

  19. Unraveling Multiple MHC Gene Associations with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Model Choice Indicates a Role for HLA Alleles and Non-HLA Genes in Europeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, David L.; Taylor, Kimberly E.; Fernando, Michelle M.A.; Nititham, Joanne; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Barcellos, Lisa F.; Behrens, Timothy W.; Cotsapas, Chris; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Graham, Robert R.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Harley, John B.; Hauser, Stephen L.; Hom, Geoffrey; Langefeld, Carl D.; Noble, Janelle A.; Rioux, John D.; Seldin, Michael F.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Vyse, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    We have performed a meta-analysis of the major-histocompatibility-complex (MHC) region in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) to determine the association with both SNPs and classical human-leukocyte-antigen (HLA) alleles. More specifically, we combined results from six studies and well-known out-of-study control data sets, providing us with 3,701 independent SLE cases and 12,110 independent controls of European ancestry. This study used genotypes for 7,199 SNPs within the MHC region and for classical HLA alleles (typed and imputed). Our results from conditional analysis and model choice with the use of the Bayesian information criterion show that the best model for SLE association includes both classical loci (HLA-DRB1∗03:01, HLA-DRB1∗08:01, and HLA-DQA1∗01:02) and two SNPs, rs8192591 (in class III and upstream of NOTCH4) and rs2246618 (MICB in class I). Our approach was to perform a stepwise search from multiple baseline models deduced from a priori evidence on HLA-DRB1 lupus-associated alleles, a stepwise regression on SNPs alone, and a stepwise regression on HLA alleles. With this approach, we were able to identify a model that was an overwhelmingly better fit to the data than one identified by simple stepwise regression either on SNPs alone (Bayes factor [BF] > 50) or on classical HLA alleles alone (BF > 1,000). PMID:23084292

  20. Determination of frequencies of alleles, associated with the pseudodeficiency of lysosomal hydrolases, in population of Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkhovych, N V; Gorovenko, N G

    2016-01-01

    The pseudodeficiency of lysosomal hydrolases described as a significant reduction in enzyme activi­ty in vitro in clinically healthy individuals, can lead to diagnostic errors in the process of biochemical analysis of lysosomal storage disease in case of its combination with pathology of another origin. Pseudodeficiency is mostly caused by some non-pathogenic changes in the corresponding gene. These changes lead to the in vitro lability of the enzyme molecule, whereas in vivo the enzyme retains its functional activity. To assess the prevalence of the most common lysosomal hydrolases pseudodeficiency alleles in Ukraine, we have determined the frequency of alleles c.1055A>G and c.* 96A>G in the ARSA gene, substitutions c.739C>T (R247W) and c.745C>T (R249W) in the HEXA gene, c.1726G>A (G576S) and c.2065G>A (E689K) in the GAA gene, c.937G>T (D313Y) in the GLA1 gene and c.898G>A (A300T) in the IDUA gene in a group of 117 healthy individuals from different regions of the country and 14 heterozygous carriers of pathogenic mutations in the HEXA gene (parents of children with confirmed diagnosis of Tay-Sachs disease). The total frequency of haplotypes, associated with arylsulfatase A pseudodeficiency, in healthy people in Ukraine (c.1055G/c.*96G and c.1055G/c.*96A haplotypes) was 10.3%. The frequency of c.739C>T (R247W) allele, associated with hexo­saminidase A pseudodeficiency, among Tay-Sachs carriers from Ukraine was 7.1%. The total frequency of α-glucosidase pseudodeficiency haplotypes in healthy individuals in Ukraine (c.1726A/c.2065A and c.1726G/c.2065A haplotypes) was 2.6%. No person among examined individuals with the substitution c.937G>T (D313Y) in the GLA1 gene and c.898G>A (A300T) in the IDUA gene was found. The differential diagnostics of lysosomal storage diseases requires obligatory determination of the presence of the pseudodeficiency alleles, particularly the ones with high incidence in the total population. Ignoring phenomenon of pseudodeficiency may

  1. Determination of frequencies of alleles, associated with the pseudodeficiency of lysosomal hydrolases, in population of Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Olkhovych

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The pseudodeficiency of lysosomal hydrolases described as a significant reduction in enzyme activi­ty in vitro in clinically healthy individuals, can lead to diagnostic errors in the process of biochemical analysis of lysosomal storage disease in case of its combination with pathology of another origin. Pseudodeficiency is mostly caused by some non-pathogenic changes in the corresponding gene. These changes lead to the in vitro lability of the enzyme molecule, whereas in vivo the enzyme retains its functional activity. To assess the prevalence of the most common lysosomal hydrolases pseudodeficiency alleles in Ukraine, we have determined the frequency of alleles c.1055A>G and c.* 96A>G in the ARSA gene, substitutions c.739C>T (R247W and c.745C>T (R249W in the HEXA gene, c.1726G>A (G576S and c.2065G>A (E689K in the GAA gene, c.937G>T (D313Y in the GLA1 gene and c.898G>A (A300T in the IDUA gene in a group of 117 healthy individuals from different regions of the country and 14 heterozygous carriers of pathogenic mutations in the HEXA gene (parents of children with confirmed diagnosis of Tay-Sachs disease. The total frequency of haplotypes, associated with arylsulfatase A pseudodeficiency, in healthy people in Ukraine (c.1055G/c.*96G and c.1055G/c.*96A haplotypes was 10.3%. The frequency of c.739C>T (R247W allele, associated with hexo­saminidase A pseudodeficiency, among Tay-Sachs carriers from Ukraine was 7.1%. The total frequency of α-glucosidase pseudodeficiency haplotypes in healthy individuals in Ukraine (c.1726A/c.2065A and c.1726G/c.2065A haplotypes was 2.6%. No person among examined individuals with the substitution c.937G>T (D313Y in the GLA1 gene and c.898G>A (A300T in the IDUA gene was found. The differential diagnostics of lysosomal storage diseases requires obligatory determination of the presence of the pseudodeficiency alleles, particularly the ones with high incidence in the total population. Ignoring phenomenon of

  2. Strong allelic association between Sjoegren-Larsson syndrome and D17S805

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pigg, M.; Jagell, S.; Sillen, A. [University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Sjoegren-Larsson Syndrom (SLS) is characterized by congenital ichthyosis, spastic di- or tetraplegia and mental retardation. It is an autosomal recessive trait that has been described in many populations, but is particularly frequent in the northern part of Sweden. A defect in the enzyme fatty alcohol: NAD+ oxidoreductase (FAD) has been suggested, but the molecular mechanism has not been elucidated. Based on linkage analysis and allelic association, the disorder has now been mapped to chromosome 17. Meiotic recombinations suggests that the gene is flanked by D17S805 on the centromeric and D17S783 and D17S925 on the telomeric side. These three markers map to the same location in reference pedigrees. Strong allelic association (chi-square 60.28, p<0.0003) to D17S805 suggests that the mutation is located at a limited distance on the telomeric side of this marker. It is possible that the gene can be identified by functional complementation of SLS cells using YACs from this region. Alternatively, positional cloning should be possible in this presumable small area. The markers identified are close and informative enough to allow accurate genetic diagnosis.

  3. The Birth Weight Lowering C-Allele of rs900400 Near LEKR1 and CCNL1 Associates with Elevated Insulin Release following an Oral Glucose Challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Ehm A; Harder, Marie N; Pilgaard, Kasper

    2011-01-01

    and the Finnish METSIM study we found that the birth weight lowering allele was associated with increased insulin release measured by the insulinogenic index (ß = 2.25% [0.59; 3.91], P = 0.008) and with an increased disposition index (ß = 1.76% [0.04; 3.49], P = 0.05). Conclusion The birth weight lowering effect......-IR) and disposition index were studied in 5,484 Danish and 6,915 Finnish non-diabetic individuals and combined in meta-analyses. Results The C-allele of rs900400 was associated with a 22.1 g lower birth weight ([-41.3;-3.0], P = 0.024) per allele. Moreover, in combined analyses of the Danish Inter99 study...

  4. Site-specific antibodies distinguish single amino acid substitutions in position 57 in HLA-DQ beta-chain alleles associated with insulin-dependent diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atar, D; Dyrberg, T; Michelsen, Birgitte

    1989-01-01

    The HLA-DQ beta-chain gene shows a close association with susceptibility or resistance to autoimmune insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and it has been suggested that the amino acid in position 57 may be of pathogenetic importance. To study the expression of the IDDM associated HLA-DQ beta......-chain alleles, we immunized rabbits with 12 to 13 amino acid long peptides representing HLA-DQw7 and -DQw8 allelic sequences, differing only by one amino acid in position 57 being aspartic acid (Asp) and alanine (Ala), respectively. Immunoblot analysis of lymphoblastoid cells showed that several antisera...... amino acid substitutions in predetermined positions of allelic HLA-DQ beta-chain gene products. Such sera should become useful to detect and investigate HLA associated susceptibility to autoimmune diseases in man....

  5. Homology modelling of frequent HLA class-II alleles: A perspective to improve prediction of HLA binding peptide and understand the HLA associated disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Manju; Farooq, Umar; Jaiswal, Varun

    2016-10-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) plays significant role via the regulation of immune system and contribute in the progression and protection of many diseases. HLA molecules bind and present peptides to T- cell receptors which generate the immune response. HLA peptide interaction and molecular function of HLA molecule is the key to predict peptide binding and understanding its role in different diseases. The availability of accurate three dimensional (3D) structures is the initial step towards this direction. In the present work, homology modelling of important and frequent HLA-DRB1 alleles (07:01, 11:01 and 09:01) was done and acceptable models were generated. These modelled alleles were further refined and cross validated by using several methods including Ramachandran plot, Z-score, ERRAT analysis and root mean square deviation (RMSD) calculations. It is known that numbers of allelic variants are related to the susceptibility or protection of various infectious diseases. Difference in amino acid sequences and structures of alleles were also studied to understand the association of HLA with disease susceptibility and protection. Susceptible alleles showed more amino acid variations than protective alleles in three selected diseases caused by different pathogens. Amino acid variations at binding site were found to be more than other part of alleles. RMSD values were also higher at variable positions within binding site. Higher RMSD values indicate that mutations occurring at peptide binding site alter protein structure more than rest of the protein. Hence, these findings and modelled structures can be used to design HLA-DRB1 binding peptides to overcome low prediction accuracy of HLA class II binding peptides. Furthermore, it may help to understand the allele specific molecular mechanisms involved in susceptibility/resistance against pathogenic diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Detection of allelic variability at wheat loci associated with resistance to Fusarium ssp. using molecular markers - microsatellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kačavenda Dragana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium head blight (FHB, caused primarily by Fusarium graminearum, is one of the most important fungal diseases of wheat. It may cause severe yield and quality losses in humid and warm conditions. However, the most important concern is the mycotoxin contamination of grain. Breeding of cultivars resistant to FHB is the best way to control the disease. In order to examine possibilities for application molecular markers - microsatellites in selecting for resistance to FHB, allelic variability at wheat loci associated with resistance to Fusarium ssp. was saidied using two microsatellite markers: GWM533 (chromosome 3B and GWM156 (chromosome 5A. Detection of the allelic polymorphism was conducted compared to the cultivars Sumai 3, Frontana and Amigo which are widely used as FHB resistance sources. In 23 French genotypes and 25 genotypes developed at the Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops in Novi Sad, 5 alleles (GWM533 and 6 alleles (GWM156 were detected. In 15 genotypes at loci GWM533 and 10 genotypes at loci GWM156 same allele was detected as in some of standard cultivars. Obtained results should be evaluated at field experiments in order to confirm corelation between presence of specific allele and resistance to fusarium head blight and in order to examine importance of alleles that are not detected in standard cultivars.

  7. Risk alleles for systemic lupus erythematosus in a large case-control collection and associations with clinical subphenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kimberly E; Chung, Sharon A; Graham, Robert R; Ortmann, Ward A; Lee, Annette T; Langefeld, Carl D; Jacob, Chaim O; Kamboh, M Ilyas; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Tsao, Betty P; Moser, Kathy L; Gaffney, Patrick M; Harley, John B; Petri, Michelle; Manzi, Susan; Gregersen, Peter K; Behrens, Timothy W; Criswell, Lindsey A

    2011-02-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a genetically complex disease with heterogeneous clinical manifestations. Recent studies have greatly expanded the number of established SLE risk alleles, but the distribution of multiple risk alleles in cases versus controls and their relationship to subphenotypes have not been studied. We studied 22 SLE susceptibility polymorphisms with previous genome-wide evidence of association (p manifestations for the cases: age at diagnosis, the 11 American College of Rheumatology classification criteria, and double-stranded DNA antibody (anti-dsDNA) production. Six subphenotypes were significantly associated with the GRS, most notably anti-dsDNA (OR(high-low) = 2.36, p = 9e-9), the immunologic criterion (OR(high-low) = 2.23, p = 3e-7), and age at diagnosis (OR(high-low) = 1.45, p = 0.0060). Finally, we developed a subphenotype-specific GRS (sub-GRS) for each phenotype with more power to detect cumulative genetic associations. The sub-GRS was more strongly associated than any single SNP effect for 5 subphenotypes (the above plus hematologic disorder and oral ulcers), while single loci are more significantly associated with renal disease (HLA-DRB1, OR = 1.37, 95% CI 1.14-1.64) and arthritis (ITGAM, OR = 0.72, 95% CI 0.59-0.88). We did not observe significant associations for other subphenotypes, for individual loci or the sub-GRS. Thus our analysis categorizes SLE subphenotypes into three groups: those having cumulative, single, and no known genetic association with respect to the currently established SLE risk loci.

  8. DLA class II alleles are associated with risk for canine symmetrical lupoid onychodystrophy [corrected](SLO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Wilbe

    Full Text Available Symmetrical lupoid onychodystrophy (SLO is an immune-mediated disease in dogs affecting the claws with a suggested autoimmune aethiology. Sequence-based genotyping of the polymorphic exon 2 from DLA-DRB1, -DQA1, and -DQB1 class II loci were performed in a total of 98 SLO Gordon setter cases and 98 healthy controls. A risk haplotype (DRB1*01801/DQA1*00101/DQB1*00802 was present in 53% of cases and 34% of controls and conferred an elevated risk of developing SLO with an odds ratio (OR of 2.1. When dogs homozygous for the risk haplotype were compared to all dogs not carrying the haplotype the OR was 5.4. However, a stronger protective haplotype (DRB1*02001/DQA1*00401/DQB1*01303, OR = 0.03, 1/OR = 33 was present in 16.8% of controls, but only in a single case (0.5%. The effect of the protective haplotype was clearly stronger than the risk haplotype, since 11.2% of the controls were heterozygous for the risk and protective haplotypes, whereas this combination was absent from cases. When the dogs with the protective haplotype were excluded, an OR of 2.5 was obtained when dogs homozygous for the risk haplotype were compared to those heterozygous for the risk haplotype, suggesting a co-dominant effect of the risk haplotype. In smaller sample sizes of the bearded collie and giant schnauzer breeds we found the same or similar haplotypes, sharing the same DQA1 allele, over-represented among the cases suggesting that the risk is associated primarily with DLA-DQ. We obtained conclusive results that DLA class II is significantly associated with risk of developing SLO in Gordon setters, thus supporting that SLO is an immune-mediated disease. Further studies of SLO in dogs may provide important insight into immune privilege of the nail apparatus and also knowledge about a number of inflammatory disorders of the nail apparatus like lichen planus, psoriasis, alopecia areata and onycholysis.

  9. Allele frequency net 2015 update: new features for HLA epitopes, KIR and disease and HLA adverse drug reaction associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Galarza, Faviel F; Takeshita, Louise Y C; Santos, Eduardo J M; Kempson, Felicity; Maia, Maria Helena Thomaz; da Silva, Andrea Luciana Soares; Teles e Silva, André Luiz; Ghattaoraya, Gurpreet S; Alfirevic, Ana; Jones, Andrew R; Middleton, Derek

    2015-01-01

    It has been 12 years since the Allele Frequency Net Database (AFND; http://www.allelefrequencies.net) was first launched, providing the scientific community with an online repository for the storage of immune gene frequencies in different populations across the world. There have been a significant number of improvements from the first version, making AFND a primary resource for many clinical and scientific areas including histocompatibility, immunogenetics, pharmacogenetics and anthropology studies, among many others. The most widely used part of AFND stores population frequency data (alleles, genes or haplotypes) related to human leukocyte antigens (HLA), killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR), major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related genes (MIC) and a number of cytokine gene polymorphisms. AFND now contains >1400 populations from more than 10 million healthy individuals. Here, we report how the main features of AFND have been updated to include a new section on 'HLA epitope' frequencies in populations, a new section capturing the results of studies identifying HLA associations with adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and one for the examination of infectious and autoimmune diseases associated with KIR polymorphisms-thus extending AFND to serve a new user base in these growing areas of research. New criteria on data quality have also been included. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Mechanisms and Disease Associations of Haplotype-Dependent Allele-Specific DNA Methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Catherine; Lang, Charles F.; Lin, John; Darbary, Huferesh; Krupska, Izabela; Gaba, Aulona; Petukhova, Lynn; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul; Gallagher, Mary P.; Goland, Robin S.; Clynes, Raphael A.; Dwork, Andrew; Kral, John G.; Monk, Catherine; Christiano, Angela M.; Tycko, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Haplotype-dependent allele-specific methylation (hap-ASM) can impact disease susceptibility, but maps of this phenomenon using stringent criteria in disease-relevant tissues remain sparse. Here we apply array-based and Methyl-Seq approaches to multiple human tissues and cell types, including brain, purified neurons and glia, T lymphocytes, and placenta, and identify 795 hap-ASM differentially methylated regions (DMRs) and 3,082 strong methylation quantitative trait loci (mQTLs), most not previously reported. More than half of these DMRs have cell type-restricted ASM, and among them are 188 hap-ASM DMRs and 933 mQTLs located near GWAS signals for immune and neurological disorders. Targeted bis-seq confirmed hap-ASM in 12/13 loci tested, including CCDC155, CD69, FRMD1, IRF1, KBTBD11, and S100A∗-ILF2, associated with immune phenotypes, MYT1L, PTPRN2, CMTM8 and CELF2, associated with neurological disorders, NGFR and HLA-DRB6, associated with both immunological and brain disorders, and ZFP57, a trans-acting regulator of genomic imprinting. Polymorphic CTCF and transcription factor (TF) binding sites were over-represented among hap-ASM DMRs and mQTLs, and analysis of the human data, supplemented by cross-species comparisons to macaques, indicated that CTCF and TF binding likelihood predicts the strength and direction of the allelic methylation asymmetry. These results show that hap-ASM is highly tissue specific; an important trans-acting regulator of genomic imprinting is regulated by this phenomenon; and variation in CTCF and TF binding sites is an underlying mechanism, and maps of hap-ASM and mQTLs reveal regulatory sequences underlying supra- and sub-threshold GWAS peaks in immunological and neurological disorders. PMID:27153397

  11. Association between population structure and allele frequencies of the glycogen synthase 1 mutation in the Austrian Noriker draft horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druml, T; Grilz-Seger, G; Neuditschko, M; Brem, G

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the allele frequency of the glycogen synthase 1 (GYS1) mutation associated with polysaccharide storage myopathy type 1 in the Austrian Noriker horse. Furthermore, we examined the influence of population substructures on the allele distribution. The study was based upon a comprehensive population sample (208 breeding stallions and 309 mares) and a complete cohort of unselected offspring from the year 2014 (1553 foals). The mean proportion of GYS1 carrier animals in the foal cohort was 33%, ranging from 15% to 50% according to population substructures based on coat colours. In 517 mature breeding horses the mutation carrier frequency reached 34%, ranging on a wider scale from 4% to 62% within genetic substructures. We could show that the occurrence of the mutated GYS1 allele is influenced by coat colour; genetic bottlenecks; and assortative, rotating and random mating strategies. Highest GYS1 carrier frequencies were observed in the chestnut sample comprising 50% in foals, 54% in mares and 62% in breeding stallions. The mean inbreeding of homozygous carrier animals reached 4.10%, whereas non-carrier horses were characterized by an inbreeding coefficient of 3.48%. Lowest GYS1 carrier frequencies were observed in the leopard spotted Noriker subpopulation. Here the mean carrier frequency reached 15% in foals, 17% in mares and 4% in stallions and inbreeding decreased from 3.28% in homozygous non-carrier horses to 2.70% in heterozygous horses and 0.94% in homozygous carriers. This study illustrates that lineage breeding and specified mating strategies result in genetic substructures, which affect the frequencies of the GYS1 gene mutation. © 2016 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  12. Association between alleles of the transforming growth factor alpha locus and cleft lip and palate in the Chilean population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jara, L.; Blanco, R.; Chiffelle, I. [Univ. of Chile, Santiago (Chile)] [and others

    1995-07-17

    Two RFLPs at the TGFA locus were studied in 39 unrelated Chilean (Caucasoid-Mongoloid) patients with non-syndromic cleft lip/palate [CL(P)] and 51 control individuals. A highly significant association between BamHI A2 allele and CL(P) was detected ({chi}{sub 2} = 6.00; P = 0.014), while no association was found between TaqI RFLPs and clefting. No significant differences were found when comparing genotypes by type of cleft and a positive or negative family history of clefting. Our results seem to support rather definitively the association between TGFA and clefting but not support the hypothesis that TGFA is a major causal gene of CL(P). 29 refs., 5 tabs.

  13. Human leucocyte antigens class II allele and haplotype association with Type 1 Diabetes in Madeira Island (Portugal).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spínola, H; Lemos, A; Couto, A R; Parreira, B; Soares, M; Dutra, I; Bruges-Armas, J; Brehm, A; Abreu, S

    2017-12-01

    This study confirms for Madeira Island (Portugal) population the Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) susceptible and protective Human leucocyte antigens (HLA) markers previously reported in other populations and adds some local specificities. Among the strongest T1D HLA associations, stands out, as susceptible, the alleles DRB1*04:05 (OR = 7.3), DQB1*03:02 (OR = 6.1) and DQA1*03:03 (OR = 4.5), as well as the haplotypes DRB1*04:05-DQA1*03:03-DQB1*03:02 (OR = 100.9) and DRB1*04:04-DQA1*03:01-DQB1*03:02 (OR = 22.1), and DQB1*06:02 (OR = 0.07) and DRB1*15:01-DQA1*01:02-DQB1*06:02 (OR = 0.04) as protective. HLA-DQA1 positive for Arginine at position 52 (Arg52) (OR = 15.2) and HLA-DQB1 negative for Aspartic acid at the position 57 (Asp57) (OR = 9.0) alleles appear to be important genetic markers for T1D susceptibility, with higher odds ratio values than any single allele and than most of the haplotypes. Genotypes generated by the association of markers Arg52 DQA1 positive and Asp57 DQB1 negative increase T1D susceptibility much more than one would expected by a simple additive effect of those markers separately (OR = 26.9). This study also confirms an increased risk for DRB1*04/DRB1*03 heterozygote genotypes (OR = 16.8) and also a DRB1*04-DQA1*03:01-DQB1*03:02 haplotype susceptibility dependent on the DRB1*04 allele (DRB1*04:01, OR = 7.9; DRB1*04:02, OR = 3.2; DRB1*04:04, OR = 22.1). © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Identification of SNPs associated with muscle yield and quality traits using allelic-imbalance analysis analyses of pooled RNA-Seq samples in rainbow trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coding/functional SNPs change the biological function of a gene and, therefore, could serve as “large-effect” genetic markers. In this study, we used two bioinformatics pipelines, GATK and SAMtools, for discovering coding/functional SNPs with allelic-imbalances associated with total body weight, mus...

  15. Prevalence of high-risk alleles in the LOXL1 gene and its association with pseudoexfoliation syndrome and exfoliation glaucoma in a Latin American population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaimes, Martha; Rivera-Parra, David; Miranda-Duarte, Antonio; Valdés, Gerardo; Zenteno, Juan Carlos

    2012-03-01

    Pseudoexfoliation syndrome (XFS) is a major risk factor for exfoliation glaucoma (XFG). A significant association exists between XFG and several SNPs in the lysyl oxidase-like 1 (LOXL1) gene. The purpose of this study was to report the results of the first association study between LOXL1 polymorphisms and XFS and/or XFG in a Latin American population. Genotypes of three high-risk SNPs of LOXL1 (rs1048661, rs3825942, and rs2165241) were analyzed by direct sequencing. A case-control study was conducted with 102 unrelated XFS/XFG Mexican patients (42 XFS/60 XFG) as well as 97 control subjects. Allele frequencies, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, and haplotype association analysis were assessed with the Haplo View software. The T allele of the intronic SNP rs2165241 was more frequent in XFS/XFG patients than in controls (OR [95% CI] = 2.41 [1.59-3.64]; p = 0.00001). The G allele of rs3825942 was found in a higher frequency in XFS/XFG than in controls (100% vs 95% respectively, p = 0.0019). No significant association between XFS and the rs1048661 (R141L) SNP was observed. The TGT haplotype was observed in a higher frequency in patients than in controls (p = 0.025), and produced the highest risk in our study (OR [95% CI] = 3.20 [1.09-9.39]; p = 0.025). This is the first study associating LOXL1 gene polymorphism and XFS/XFG in Latin America. LOXL1 variants are associated with an elevated risk for XFS/XFG in the Mexican population. A higher risk was conferred by the T allele of the intronic rs2165241 SNP rather than by the worldwide "high-risk" G allele of rs3825942.

  16. HLA alleles and HLA-B27 haplotypes associated with susceptibility and severity of ankylosing spondylitis in a Portuguese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel-Santos, F M; Matos, M; Ligeiro, D; Mourão, A F; Ribeiro, C; Costa, J; Santos, H; Barcelos, A; Pinto, P; Cruz, M; Sousa, E; Santos, R A; Fonseca, J E; Trindade, H; Guedes-Pinto, H; Branco, J C

    2013-12-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 is the mostly known major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Nonetheless, there is substantial evidence that other MHC genes appear to be associated with the disease, although it has not yet been established whether these associations are driven by direct associations or by linkage disequilibrium (LD) mechanisms. We aimed to investigate the contributions of HLA class I and II alleles and B27-haplotypes for AS in a case-control study. A total of 188 HLA-B27 AS cases and 189 HLA-B27 healthy controls were selected and typed for HLA class I and II by the Luminex polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific oligonucleotide probe (PCR-SSOP) method. Allelic and haplotypic distributions were estimated by maximum likelihood method using Arlequin v3.11 and statistical analysis were performed by Stata10.1. No associations were found between non-HLA-B27 loci and AS susceptibility, but several associations were observed for phenotypic features of the disease. DRB1*08 was identified as a risk factor for uveitis and DQB1*04 seems to provide protection for AS severity (functional, metrological and radiological indexes). A*02/B27/C*02/DRB1*01/DQB1*05 [P<0.0001; odds ratio (OR) = 39.06; 95% confidence interval (CI) (2.34-651)] is the only haplotype that seems to confer susceptibility to AS. Moreover, the haplotype A*02/B27/C*01/DRB1*08/DQB1*04 seems to provide protection for disease functional and radiological repercussions. Our findings are compatible with the hypothesis that other genes within the HLA region besides HLA-B27 might play some role in AS susceptibility and severity. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Association of the C47T Polymorphism in SOD2 with Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer’s Disease in Carriers of the APOEε4 Allele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gamarra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress plays an important part in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI, the prodromal phase of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Recent evidence shows that polymorphisms in the SOD2 gene affect the elimination of the reactive oxygen species (ROS generated in mitochondria. The aim of this study was to determine whether the functional rs4880 SNP in the SOD2 gene is a risk factor associated with aMCI and sporadic AD. 216 subjects with aMCI, 355 with AD, and 245 controls have been studied. The SNP rs4880 of the SOD2 gene was genotyped by RT-PCR and the APOE genotype was determined by PCR and RFLPs. Different multinomial logistic regression models were used to determine the risk levels for aMCI and AD. Although the T allele of the SOD2 rs4880 SNP gene (rs4880-T is not an independent risk for aMCI or AD, this allele increases the risk to aMCI patients carrying at least one APOEε4 allele. Moreover, rs4880-T allele and APOEε4 allele combination has been found to produce an increased risk for AD compared to aMCI reference patients. These results suggest that APOEε4 and rs4880-T genotype may be a risk for aMCI and a predictor of progression from aMCI to AD.

  18. Evidence of an association between the Arg72 allele of the peptide YY and increased risk of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torekov, Signe S; Larsen, Lesli H; Glümer, Charlotte

    2005-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that variants in the gene encoding the prepropeptide YY (PYY) associate with type 2 diabetes and/or obesity. Mutation analyses of DNA from 84 patients with obesity and familial type 2 diabetes identified two polymorphisms, IVS3 + 68C>T and Arg72Thr, and one rare variant......, +151C>A of PYY. The common allele of the Arg72Thr variant associated with type 2 diabetes with an allele frequency of the Arg allele of 0.667 (95% CI 0.658-0.677) among 4,639 glucose-tolerant subjects and 0.692 (0.674-0.710) among 1,326 patients with type 2 diabetes (P = 0.005, odds ratio 1.19 [95% CI...... 1.05-1.35]). The same polymorphism associated with overweight (25

  19. Association of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaeker, Karoline B

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Cis-acting regulatory SNPs resulting in differential allelic expression (DAE) may, in part, explain the underlying phenotypic variation associated with many complex diseases. To investigate whether common variants associated with DAE were involved in breast cancer susceptibility among BR...

  20. ZNF804A risk allele is associated with relatively intact gray matter volume in patients with schizophrenia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donohoe, Gary

    2011-02-01

    ZNF804A rs1344706 is the first genetic risk variant to achieve genome wide significance for psychosis. Following earlier evidence that patients carrying the ZNF804A risk allele had relatively spared memory function compared to patient non-carriers, we investigated whether ZNF804A was also associated with variation in brain volume. In a sample of 70 patients and 38 healthy participants we used voxel based morphometry to compare homozygous (AA) carriers of the ZNF804A risk allele to heterozygous and homozygous (AC\\/CC) non-carriers for both whole brain volume and specific regions implicated in earlier ZNF804A studies-the dorsolateral pre-frontal cortex, the hippocampus, and the amygdala. For patients, but not for controls, we found that homozygous \\'AA\\' risk carriers had relatively larger gray matter volumes than heterozygous\\/homozygous non-carriers (AC\\/CC), particularly for hippocampal volumes. These data are consistent with our earlier behavioral data and suggest that ZNF804A is delineating a schizophrenia subtype characterized by relatively intact brain volume. Establishing if this represents a discrete molecular pathogenesis with consequences for nosology and treatment will be an important next step in understanding ZNF084A\\'s role in illness risk.

  1. ALFRED: An Allele Frequency Database for Microevolutionary Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth K Kidd

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Many kinds of microevolutionary studies require data on multiple polymorphisms in multiple populations. Increasingly, and especially for human populations, multiple research groups collect relevant data and those data are dispersed widely in the literature. ALFRED has been designed to hold data from many sources and make them available over the web. Data are assembled from multiple sources, curated, and entered into the database. Multiple links to other resources are also established by the curators. A variety of search options are available and additional geographic based interfaces are being developed. The database can serve the human anthropologic genetic community by identifying what loci are already typed on many populations thereby helping to focus efforts on a common set of markers. The database can also serve as a model for databases handling similar DNA polymorphism data for other species.

  2. Breast Cancer Family History and Allele-Specific DNA Methylation in the Legacy Girls Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hui-Chen; Do, Catherine; Andrulis, Irene L; John, Esther M; Daly, Mary B; Buys, Saundra S; Chung, Wendy K; Knight, Julia A; Bradbury, Angela R; Keegan, Theresa H M; Schwartz, Lisa; Krupska, Izabela; Miller, Rachel L; Santella, Regina M; Tycko, Benjamin; Terry, Mary Beth

    2018-02-13

    Family history, a well-established risk factor for breast cancer, can have both genetic and environmental contributions. Shared environment in families as well as epigenetic changes that also may be influenced by shared genetics and environment may also explain familial clustering of cancers. Epigenetic regulation, such as DNA methylation, can change the activity of a DNA segment without a change in the sequence; environmental exposures experienced across the life course can induce such changes. However, genetic-epigenetic interactions, detected as methylation quantitative trait loci (mQTLs; a.k.a. meQTLs) and haplotype-dependent allele-specific methylation (hap-ASM), can also contribute to inter-individual differences in DNA methylation patterns. To identify differentially methylated regions (DMRs) associated with breast cancer susceptibility, we examined differences in white blood cell DNA methylation in 29 candidate genes in 426 girls (ages 6-13 years) from the LEGACY Girls Study, 239 with and 187 without a breast cancer family history (BCFH). We measured methylation by targeted massively parallel bisulfite sequencing (bis-seq) and observed BCFH DMRs in two genes: ESR1 (Δ 4.9%, P = 0.003) and SEC16B (Δ 3.6%, P = 0.026), each of which has been previously implicated in breast cancer susceptibility and pubertal development. These DMRs showed high inter-individual variability in methylation, suggesting the presence of mQTLs/hap-ASM. Using single nucleotide polymorphisms data in the bis-seq amplicon, we found strong hap-ASM in SEC16B (with allele specific-differences ranging from 42% to 74%). These findings suggest that differential methylation in genes relevant to breast cancer susceptibility may be present early in life, and that inherited genetic factors underlie some of these epigenetic differences.

  3. The birth weight lowering C-allele of rs900400 near LEKR1 and CCNL1 associates with elevated insulin release following an oral glucose challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehm A Andersson

    Full Text Available The first genome-wide association study on birth weight was recently published and the most significant associated birth weight lowering variant was the rs900400 C-allele located near LEKR1 and CCNL1. We aimed to replicate the association with birth weight in the Danish Inter99 study and furthermore to evaluate associations between rs900400 and indices of insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity obtained by oral glucose tolerance tests in adults from the Danish Inter99 study and the Finnish, Metabolic Syndrome in Men (METSIM sample.For 4,744 of 6,784 Inter99 participants, midwife journals were traced through the Danish State Archives and association of rs900400 with birth weight was examined. Associations between rs900400 and fasting serum insulin, fasting plasma glucose, insulinogenic index, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and disposition index were studied in 5,484 Danish and 6,915 Finnish non-diabetic individuals and combined in meta-analyses.The C-allele of rs900400 was associated with a 22.1 g lower birth weight ([-41.3;-3.0], P = 0.024 per allele. Moreover, in combined analyses of the Danish Inter99 study and the Finnish METSIM study we found that the birth weight lowering allele was associated with increased insulin release measured by the insulinogenic index (β = 2.25% [0.59; 3.91], P = 0.008 and with an increased disposition index (β = 1.76% [0.04; 3.49], P = 0.05.The birth weight lowering effect of the C-allele of rs900400 located near LEKR1 and CCNL1 was replicated in the Danish population. Furthermore the C-allele was associated with increased insulin response following oral glucose stimulation in a meta-analysis based on Danish and Finnish non-diabetic individuals.

  4. An allele associated with a non-detectable amount of alpha s2 casein in goat milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramunno, L; Longobardi, E; Pappalardo, M; Rando, A; Di Gregorio, P; Cosenza, G; Mariani, P; Pastore, N; Masina, P

    2001-02-01

    The goat CSN1S2 locus is characterized by the presence of three alleles, A, B and C, all associated with about 2.5 g/l of protein per allele. The SDS-PAGE analysis of 441 individual milk samples obtained from goats belonging to a population reared in Southern Italy showed that the milk produced by three goats did not apparently contain alpha s2-casein, whereas milk produced by 37 goats showed a less intense electrophoretic band of this casein fraction (about 50%). These results can be explained by hypothesizing the presence of another allele at this locus, CSN1S2o, associated with a 'null' content of alpha s2-casein. Southern blot, PCR and PCR-RFLP analyses of the DNA region containing the CSN1S2 gene of individuals producing milk with and without alpha s2-casein did not show differences between the two groups. As a consequence, goats producing milk without alpha s2-casein carry an apparently intact gene. The first results obtained by sequencing part of the CSN1S2o allele revealed a G-->A transition at nucleotide 80 of the 11th exon which creates a stop codon and could be responsible for the absence of the alpha s2-casein in goat milk. This mutation eliminates a NcoI restriction site. A test based on this polymorphism has been established in order to identify carriers of the CSN1S2o allele.

  5. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumor subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J; Barrowdale, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtype...... subtypes. As more risk modifying variants are identified, incorporating these associations into breast cancer subtype-specific risk models may improve clinical management for mutation carriers....

  6. HLA-B*57:01 allele prevalence in HIV-infected North American subjects and the impact of allele testing on the incidence of abacavir-associated hypersensitivity reaction in HLA-B*57:01-negative subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Catherine Butkus; Margolis, David A; Shaefer, Mark S; Ross, Lisa L

    2017-04-11

    The presence of the HLA-B*57:01 allele in HIV-infected subjects is associated with a higher risk of abacavir-associated hypersensitivity reaction (ABC HSR). HLA-B*57:01 allele prevalence varies in different populations, but HLA-B*57:01 testing with immunological confirmation has had a negative predictive value for ABC HSR between 97 and 100%. In the ASSURE study (EPZ113734), the HLA-B*57:01 prevalence in virologically suppressed, antiretroviral treatment-experienced, HIV-infected subjects from the United States, including Puerto Rico, was assessed. Three hundred eighty-five subjects were screened; 13 were HLA-B*57:01 positive and 372 were negative. Only HLA-B*57:01-negative, abacavir-naive subjects were eligible to enroll into the ASSURE trial. Eleven of the 13 subjects who possessed the HLA-B*57:01 allele were white, the other 2 were African-American. There was no geographic clustering of HLA-B*57:01-positive subjects, and the incidence correlated roughly with those states with the greatest numbers of subjects screened. Similarly, there was no statistically significant correlation between subjects who possessed or lacked the allele and age, gender, ethnicity or CD4+ T-cell numbers. The incidence of ABC HSR following abacavir initiation was also evaluated. Only 1 of 199 HLA-B*57:01-negative subjects (an African-American male) randomized to receive abacavir-containing treatment developed symptoms consistent with suspected ABC HSR; ABC HSR was not immunologically confirmed. These findings confirm the utility of HLA-B*57:01 allele testing to reduce the frequency of ABC HSR. The prevalence of HLA-B*57:01 positivity was higher in white than in African-American subjects. In HLA-B*57:01-negative subjects, suspected ABC HSR is very rare, but should lead to discontinuation of abacavir when ABC HSR cannot be definitively excluded from the differential diagnosis. The ASSURE (EPZ113734) study was registered on ClinicalTrials.gov registration on April 8th 2010 and the

  7. Characterization of Jk(a+(weak)): a new blood group phenotype associated with an altered JK*01 allele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wester, Elisabet S; Storry, Jill R; Olsson, Martin L

    2011-02-01

    The clinically important Kidd (JK) blood group system is considered to be relatively uncomplicated, both serologically and genetically. The JK*01 and JK*02 alleles give rise to Jk(a) and Jk(b) antigens, respectively, and silenced alleles result in Jk(a-b-). Other inherited variants analogous to Fy(x) and weak D phenotypes have not been characterized for JK, although recent abstracts indicate their presence. Six index samples from individuals whose RBCs reacted variably or weakly with different sources of anti-Jk(a) and 300 controls of the four known JK phenotypes were investigated by standard serology, flow cytometry, Western blotting, and the urea hemolysis test. Molecular analysis, including allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR), DNA sequencing, and transcript analysis by real-time PCR, was performed. All Jk(a+(w)b-) and Jk(a+(w)b+) index samples were homo- or heterozygous for an altered JK*01 allele carrying 130G>A (Glu44Lys) and the JK*02-associated silent SNPs 588G and Intron 9 -46g. Blood donor screening indicated an allele frequency of 0.042. Titration and flow cytometry with anti-Jk(a) gave lower values in index samples compared to controls, as did anti-Jk3 titers. Donors with 130A also showed significantly decreased Jk(a) density by flow cytometry versus 130G. Western blotting with anti-UT-B demonstrated weaker reactivity with Jk(a+(w)) membranes while JK mRNA levels could not discriminate index samples from controls. The urea hemolysis test was only moderately affected in two Jk(a+(w)b-) samples. A new phenotype with weakened Jk(a) expression on RBCs is associated with a JK*01-like allele, which may constitute a risk for hemolytic transfusion reactions if antigen-positive units are missed by routine serology. © 2010 American Association of Blood Banks.

  8. The PNPLA3 rs738409 G-Allele Associates with Reduced Fasting Serum Triglyceride and Serum Cholesterol in Danes with Impaired Glucose Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, N. T.; Grarup, N.; Banasik, K.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aim: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common condition, associated with hepatic insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome including hyperglycaemia and dyslipidemia. We aimed at studying the potential impact of the NAFLD-associated PNPLA3 rs738409 G-allele on NAFLD......-related metabolic traits in hyperglycaemic individuals. Methods: The rs738409 variant was genotyped in the population-based Inter99 cohort examined by an oral glucose-tolerance test, and a combined study-sample consisting of 192 twins (96 twin pairs) and a sub-set of the Inter99 population (n = 63) examined...... by a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp (n(total) = 255). In Inter99, we analyzed associations of rs738409 with components of the WHO-defined metabolic syndrome (n = 5,847) and traits related to metabolic disease (n = 5,663). In the combined study sample we elucidated whether the rs738409 G-allele altered hepatic...

  9. Combination of interleukin-10 gene promoter polymorphisms with HLA-DRB1*15 allele is associated with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Shahbazi

    2017-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: The IL-10 and HLA-DRB1*15 polymorphisms were associated with the susceptibility to MS in Iranian patients. Our results suggest that gene-gene interaction of IL-10 polymorphisms and HLA-DRB1*15 alleles may be important factors in the development of MS.

  10. MicroRNA-3148 modulates allelic expression of toll-like receptor 7 variant associated with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Deng

    Full Text Available We previously reported that the G allele of rs3853839 at 3'untranslated region (UTR of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7 was associated with elevated transcript expression and increased risk for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE in 9,274 Eastern Asians [P = 6.5×10(-10, odds ratio (OR (95%CI = 1.27 (1.17-1.36]. Here, we conducted trans-ancestral fine-mapping in 13,339 subjects including European Americans, African Americans, and Amerindian/Hispanics and confirmed rs3853839 as the only variant within the TLR7-TLR8 region exhibiting consistent and independent association with SLE (Pmeta = 7.5×10(-11, OR = 1.24 [1.18-1.34]. The risk G allele was associated with significantly increased levels of TLR7 mRNA and protein in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs and elevated luciferase activity of reporter gene in transfected cells. TLR7 3'UTR sequence bearing the non-risk C allele of rs3853839 matches a predicted binding site of microRNA-3148 (miR-3148, suggesting that this microRNA may regulate TLR7 expression. Indeed, miR-3148 levels were inversely correlated with TLR7 transcript levels in PBMCs from SLE patients and controls (R(2 = 0.255, P = 0.001. Overexpression of miR-3148 in HEK-293 cells led to significant dose-dependent decrease in luciferase activity for construct driven by TLR7 3'UTR segment bearing the C allele (P = 0.0003. Compared with the G-allele construct, the C-allele construct showed greater than two-fold reduction of luciferase activity in the presence of miR-3148. Reduced modulation by miR-3148 conferred slower degradation of the risk G-allele containing TLR7 transcripts, resulting in elevated levels of gene products. These data establish rs3853839 of TLR7 as a shared risk variant of SLE in 22,613 subjects of Asian, EA, AA, and Amerindian/Hispanic ancestries (Pmeta  = 2.0×10(-19, OR = 1.25 [1.20-1.32], which confers allelic effect on transcript turnover via differential binding to the epigenetic

  11. A cis-eQTL of HLA-DRB1 and a frameshift mutation of MICA contribute to the pattern of association of HLA alleles with cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dan; Gyllensten, Ulf

    2014-04-01

    The association of classic human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles with risk of cervical cancer has been extensively studied, and a protective effect has consistently been found for DRB1*1301, DQA1*0103, and/or DQB1*0603 (these three alleles are in perfect linkage disequilibrium [LD] and often occur on the same haplotype in Europeans), while reports have differed widely with respect to the effect of HLA-B*07, DRB1*1501, and/or DQB1*0602 (the last two alleles are also in perfect LD in Europeans). It is not clear whether the reported HLA alleles are responsible for the differences in cervical cancer susceptibility, or if functional variants at other locations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region may explain the effect. In order to assess the relative contribution of both classic HLA alleles and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MHC region to cervical cancer susceptibility, we have imputed classic HLA alleles in 1034 cervical cancer patients and 3948 controls in a Swedish population for an integrated analysis. We found that the protective haplotype DRB1*1301-DQA1*0103-DQB1*0603 has a direct effect on cervical cancer and always occurs together with the C allele of a HLA-DRB1 cis-eQTL (rs9272143), which increases the expression of HLA-DRB1. The haplotype rs9272143C-DRB1*1301-DQA1*0103-DQB1*0603 conferred the strongest protection against cervical cancer (odds ratio [OR] = 0.41, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.32-0.52, P = 6.2 × 10(-13)). On the other hand, the associations with HLA-B*0702 and DRB1*1501-DQB1*0602 are attributable to the joint effects of both the HLA-DRB1 cis-eQTL (rs9272143) and a frameshift mutation (G inserion of rs67841474, also known as A5.1) of the MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence A gene (MICA). Variation in LD between the classic HLA loci, rs9272143 and rs67841474 between populations may explain the different associations of HLA-B*07 and DRB1*1501-DQB1*0602 with cervical cancer between studies. The

  12. Computational characterization of residue couplings and micropolymorphism-induced changes in the dynamics of two differentially disease-associated human MHC class-I alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serçinoğlu, Onur; Ozbek, Pemra

    2018-02-01

    Human major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) - or human leukocyte antigen (HLA) - proteins present intracellularly processed peptides to cytotoxic T lymphocytes in the adaptive immune response to pathogens. A high level of polymorphism in human MHC I proteins defines the peptide-binding specificity of thousands of different MHC alleles. However, polymorphism as well as the peptide ligand can also affect the global dynamics of the complex. In this study, we conducted classical molecular dynamics simulations of two HLA alleles, the ankylosing spondylitis (AS) associated/tapasin-dependent HLA-B*27:05 and nondisease-associated/tapasin-independent HLA-B*27:09, both in peptide-free forms as well as complex with four different peptides ligands. Our results indicate that in peptide-free form, the single amino acid substitution distinguishing the two alleles (D116H), leads to a weaker dynamic coupling of residues in the tapasin-dependent HLA-B*27:05. In peptide-bound form, several residues of the binding-groove, mostly in A and B pockets, show hinge-like behavior in the global motion of the MHC. Moreover, allele-dependent changes are shown in residue interactions, affecting the B-pocket as well as the beta-2-microglobulin (β2m)-facing residues of the HLA chain.

  13. Endochondral ossification pathway genes and postmenopausal osteoporosis: Association and specific allele related serum bone sialoprotein levels in Han Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunzhi; Liu, Haiyan; Zhang, Chen; Zhang, Tianxiao; Zhang, Bo; Li, Lu; Chen, Gang; Fu, Dongke; Wang, KunZheng

    2015-11-16

    Osteoporosis is a systemic skeletal disorder characterized by reduced bone mineral density (BMD) and disrupted bone architecture, predisposing the patient to increased fracture risk. Evidence from early genetic epidemiological studies has indicated a major role for genetics in the development of osteoporosis and the variation in BMD. In this study, we focused on two key genes in the endochondral ossification pathway, IBSP and PTHLH. Over 9,000 postmenopausal Han Chinese women were recruited, and 54 SNPs were genotyped. Two significant SNPs within IBSP, rs1054627 and rs17013181, were associated with BMD and postmenopausal osteoporosis by the two-stage strategy, and rs17013181 was also significantly associated with serum IBSP levels. Moreover, one haplotype (rs12425376-rs10843047-rs42294) covering the 5' end of PTHLH was associated with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Our results provide evidence for the association of these two key endochondral ossification pathway genes with BMD and osteoporosis in postmenopausal Han Chinese women. Combined with previous findings, we provide evidence that a particular SNP in IBSP has an allele-specific effect on mRNA levels, which would, in turn, reflect serum IBSP levels.

  14. HLA-DQA1 and DQB1 alleles are associated with genetic susceptibility to psoriasis vulgaris in Chinese Han.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuejun; Wei, Shengcai; Yang, Sen; Wang, Zaixing; Zhang, Anping; He, Pingping; Wang, Hongyan

    2004-03-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris is a chronic skin disorder characterized by infiltration of inflammatory elements, keratinocyte hyperproliferation and altered differentiation. Although the pathogenesis of psoriasis is not fully understood, there is solid evidence of a susceptibility locus in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region. To investigate whether HLA-DQA1 and DQB1 alleles are associated with genetic susceptibility to psoriasis vulgaris in Chinese Han. The polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP) method was used to analyse the distribution of HLA-DQA1 and DQB1 alleles in 189 patients with psoriasis and 273 healthy controls. The HLA-DQA1*0104 (OR = 2.33, P = 0.0001154, Pc = 2.0 x 10-3), DQA1*0201 (OR = 3.36, P 0.05) and DQB1*0303 (OR = 1.55, P = 0.0377, Pc > 0.05) alleles were more prevalent in patients with psoriasis vulgaris than in controls, and HLA-DQA1*0501 (OR = 0.30, P = 0.0000039, Pc HLA-DQA1*0104 (OR = 2.42, P = 0.0001159, Pc HLA-DQA1*0104 and DQA1*0201 were more prevalent in patients with or without a family history of psoriasis. However, the DQA1*0501 allele was only more prevalent in patients without a family history of psoriasis. HLA-DQA1*0104 and DQA1*0201 alleles may be psoriasis susceptibility genes or may be in close linkage with the susceptibility genes. The HLA-DQA1*0501 allele seems to have a protective effect against the development of psoriasis vulgaris in Chinese Han. There may be a difference in genetic background between psoriasis patients with and without a family history of psoriasis.

  15. A genomic study on distribution of human leukocyte antigen (HLA-A and HLA-B alleles in Lak population of Iran

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    Farhad Shahsavar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Anthropological studies based on the highly polymorphic gene, human leukocyte antigen (HLA, provide useful information for bone marrow donor registry, forensic medicine, disease association studies, as well as infertility treatment, designing peptide vaccines against tumors, and infectious or autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to determine HLA-A and HLA-B allele frequencies in 100 unrelated Lak/lᴂk/individuals from Lorestan province of Iran. Finally, we compared the results with that previously described in Iranian population. Commercial HLA-Type kits from BAG (Lich, Germany company were used for determination of the HLA-A and HLA-B allele frequencies in genomic DNA, based on polymerase chain reaction with sequence specific primer (PCR-SSP assay. The differences between the populations in distribution of HLA-A and HLA-B alleles were estimated by chi-squared test with Yate's correction. The most frequent HLA-A alleles were *24 (20%, *02 (18%, *03 (12% and *11 (10%, and the most frequent HLA-B alleles were *35 (24%, *51 (16%, *18 (6% and *38 (6% in Lak population. HLA-A*66 (1%, *74(1% and HLA-B*48 (1%, *55(1% were the least observed frequencies in Lak population. Our results based on HLA-A and HLA-B allele frequencies showed that Lak population possesses the previously reported general features of Iranians but still with unique.

  16. Influence of allelic variations in relation to norepinephrine and mineralocorticoid receptors on psychopathic traits: a pilot study

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    Guillaume Durand

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Past findings support a relationship between abnormalities in the amygdala and the presence of psychopathic traits. Among other genes and biomarkers relevant to the amygdala, norepinephrine and mineralocorticoid receptors might both play a role in psychopathy due to their association with traits peripheral to psychopathy. The purpose is to examine if allelic variations in single nucleotide polymorphisms related to norepinephrine and mineralocorticoid receptors play a role in the display of psychopathic traits and executive functions. Methods Fifty-seven healthy participants from the community provided a saliva sample for SNP sampling of rs5522 and rs5569. Participants then completed the Psychopathic Personality Inventory–Short Form (PPI-SF and the Tower of Hanoi. Results Allelic variations of both rs5522 and rs5569 were significant when compared to PPI-SF total score and the fearless dominance component of the PPI-SF. A significant result was also obtained between rs5522 and the number of moves needed to complete the 5-disk Tower of Hanoi. Conclusion This pilot study offers preliminary results regarding the effect of allelic variations in SNPs related to norepinephrine and mineralocorticoid receptors on the presence of psychopathic traits. Suggestions are provided to enhance the reliability and validity of a larger-scale study.

  17. Bi-allelic Mutations in PKD1L1 Are Associated with Laterality Defects in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetrini, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Lisa C A; Akdemir, Zeynep C; Braxton, Alicia; Azamian, Mahshid S; Eldomery, Mohammad K; Miller, Kathryn; Kois, Chelsea; Sack, Virginia; Shur, Natasha; Rijhsinghani, Asha; Chandarana, Jignesh; Ding, Yan; Holtzman, Judy; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Eng, Christine M; Hanchard, Neil A; Harel, Tamar; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Belmont, John W; Lupski, James R; Yang, Yaping

    2016-10-06

    Disruption of the establishment of left-right (L-R) asymmetry leads to situs anomalies ranging from situs inversus totalis (SIT) to situs ambiguus (heterotaxy). The genetic causes of laterality defects in humans are highly heterogeneous. Via whole-exome sequencing (WES), we identified homozygous mutations in PKD1L1 from three affected individuals in two unrelated families. PKD1L1 encodes a polycystin-1-like protein and its loss of function is known to cause laterality defects in mouse and medaka fish models. Family 1 had one fetus and one deceased child with heterotaxy and complex congenital heart malformations. WES identified a homozygous splicing mutation, c.6473+2_6473+3delTG, which disrupts the invariant splice donor site in intron 42, in both affected individuals. In the second family, a homozygous c.5072G>C (p.Cys1691Ser) missense mutation was detected in an individual with SIT and congenital heart disease. The p.Cys1691Ser substitution affects a highly conserved cysteine residue and is predicted by molecular modeling to disrupt a disulfide bridge essential for the proper folding of the G protein-coupled receptor proteolytic site (GPS) motif. Damaging effects associated with substitutions of this conserved cysteine residue in the GPS motif have also been reported in other genes, namely GPR56, BAI3, and PKD1 in human and lat-1 in C. elegans, further supporting the likely pathogenicity of p.Cys1691Ser in PKD1L1. The identification of bi-allelic PKD1L1 mutations recapitulates previous findings regarding phenotypic consequences of loss of function of the orthologous genes in mice and medaka fish and further expands our understanding of genetic contributions to laterality defects in humans. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Associations of MHC class II alleles with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in patients from North India.

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    Rani, R; Sood, A; Lazaro, A M; Stastny, P

    1999-06-01

    Thirty-four insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) patients from North India were studied with respect to their HLA class II alleles including those of the DRB1, DQA1, DQB1 and DPB1 loci, using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and hybridization with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes (SSOP). They were compared with the class II alleles of 94 normal adult controls from the same ethnic background. The results show a statistically significant increase of DRB1*03011 (p < 0.00001), DQB1*0201 (p < 0.007), DQA1*0501 (0.0027) and DPB1*2601 (p < 0.0042) in patients compared to controls. DR*04 was not significantly increased. However, homozygosity for DRB1*03011 was increased more than expected. DRB1*1501 and *1502 did not show a significant decrease in the patients. However, DRB1*0701 was decreased significantly, but this difference did not remain significant when the p value was corrected for the number of alleles tested. Similarly, DPB1*2601 was increased significantly in the patients but did not remain significant after p was corrected for the number of alleles tested. However, DPB1*2601 was increased, and remained significant after correction, in patients not having HLA-DR3. We also studied the possible role of aspartic acid at codon 57 of the DQ beta chain in protection against development of diabetes, and arginine at codon 52 of the DQ alpha chain in susceptibility. We observed an increase in non-Asp57 alleles in DQ beta and Arg52 in DQ alpha in the patients, however, this effect seems to be due to the fact that the most prevalent haplotype in diabetic patients: DRB1*03011-DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201, has DQB1 and DQA1 alleles which carry non-Asp57 and Arg52, respectively.

  19. Favorable Alleles for Stem Water-Soluble Carbohydrates Identified by Association Analysis Contribute to Grain Weight under Drought Stress Conditions in Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Runzhi; Chang, Xiaoping; Jing, Ruilian

    2015-01-01

    Drought is a major environmental constraint to crop distribution and productivity. Stem water-soluble carbohydrates (WSC) buffer wheat grain yield against conditions unfavorable for photosynthesis during the grain filling stage. In this study, 262 winter wheat accessions and 209 genome-wide SSR markers were collected and used to undertake association analysis based on a mixed linear model (MLM). The WSC in different internodes at three growth stages and 1000-grain weight (TGW) were investigated under four environmental regimes (well-watered, drought stress during the whole growth period, and two levels of terminal drought stress imposed by chemical desiccation under the well-watered and drought stress during the whole growth period conditions). Under diverse drought stress conditions, WSC in lower internodes showed significant positive correlations with TGW, especially at the flowering stage under well-watered conditions and at grain filling under drought stress. Sixteen novel WSC-favorable alleles were identified, and five of them contributed to significantly higher TGW. In addition, pyramiding WSC favorable alleles was not only effective for obtaining accessions with higher WSC, but also for enhancing TGW under different water regimes. During the past fifty years of wheat breeding, WSC was selected incidentally. The average number of favorable WSC alleles increased from 1.13 in the pre-1960 period to 4.41 in the post-2000 period. The results indicate a high potential for using marker-assisted selection to pyramid WSC favorable alleles in improving WSC and TGW in wheat. PMID:25768726

  20. TNF-α -308 A allele is associated with an increased risk of distant metastasis in rectal cancer patients from Southwestern China.

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    Zhen Li

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, an important factor in systematic inflammation, is reportedly involved in several cancer types. The TNF-α -308 G>A (rs1800629 polymorphism in the promoter region influences TNF-α production. The association between TNF-α -308 G>A polymorphism and colorectal cancer (CRC is not fully understood, especially the connections between TNF-α -308 G>A polymorphism and clinical features of CRC. In this study, TNF-α -308 G>A polymorphism was genotyped in 1140 individuals with or without CRC from Southwestern China. In case-control studies, we found no association between TNF-α -308 G>A polymorphism and CRC risk. Analysis of the correlations between TNF-α -308 G>A polymorphism and clinical features of CRC revealed that TNF-α -308 A allele was associated with higher body mass index (BMI larger tumor size, and distant tumor metastasis in all CRC patients. Notably, rectal cancer (a subtype of CRC patients with TNF-α -308 A allele had a very high risk of distant tumor metastasis [odds ratio (OR = 4.481; 95% confidence interval (CI: 2.072-9.693; P = 0.00025]. The association between TNF-α -308 A allele and distant tumor metastasis remained even significant after adjusting all clinical characteristics (OR = 7.099; 95% CI: 2.482-20.301; P = 0.000256 in rectal cancer patients. Our results suggested that TNF-α -308 A allele was significantly associated with distant tumor metastasis in rectal cancer patients.

  1. Combined Linkage and Association Analyses of the 124-bp Allele of Marker D2S2944 with Anxiety, Depression, Neuroticism and Major Depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beem, A.L.; de Geus, E.J.C.; Hottenga, J.J.; Sullivan, P.F.; Willemsen, G.; Slagboom, P.E.; Boomsma, D.I.

    2006-01-01

    A central issue in psychiatric genetics is whether positive findings replicate. Zubenko et al. (2002b, Mol. Psychiatry 7:460-467) reported an association of the 124-bp allele of D2S2944 with recurrent early-onset major depression for females. We tested for association of this allele to continuous

  2. Combined linkage and association analyses of the 124-bp allele of marker D2S2944 with anxiety, depression, neuroticism and major depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beem, A. Leo; Geus, Eco J. C. de; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Slagboom, P. Eline; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2006-01-01

    A central issue in psychiatric genetics is whether positive findings replicate. Zubenko et al. (2002b, Mol. Psychiatry 7:460-467) reported an association of the 124-bp allele of D2S2944 with recurrent early-onset major depression for females. We tested for association of this allele to continuous

  3. HLA-DQA1, DQB1 and DRB1 alleles associated with Takayasu arteritis in the Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Naqiang; Wang, Zhiguang; Dang, Aimin; Zhu, Xilin; Liu, Ying; Zheng, Deyu; Liu, Guozhang

    2015-04-01

    Takayasu arteritis (TA) is a chronic large-vessel vasculitis of unknown etiology. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles play an important role in the development of TA. Sequence specific primer-polymerase chain reaction was used to detect 10 alleles of the HLA-DQA1 gene and 13 alleles of the HLA-DQB1, -DRB1 gene. A significant increase in the frequencies of DRB1(∗)07 (Pc<0.01, OR=3.44, CI: 2.15-5.52) was observed among TA patients compared with the control group. The significantly increased frequencies of the haplotype DQA1(∗)03:01-DQB1(∗)03:01-DRB1(∗)07 (Corrected P-values<0.01) were observed in TA patients. But in the analysis of clinical manifestations, there are no significant associations with the HLA-DRB1(∗)07 allele. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Novel association of the obesity risk-allele near Fas Apoptotic Inhibitory molecule 2 (FAIM2) gene with heart rate and study of its effects on myocardial infarction in diabetic participants of the PREDIMED trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Fas apoptotic pathway has been implicated in type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Although a polymorphism (rs7138803; G'>'A) near the Fas apoptotic inhibitory molecule 2 (FAIM2) locus has been related to obesity, its association with other cardiovascular risk factors and disease remains u...

  5. The association of HLA-DQB1, -DQA1 and -DPB1 alleles with anti- glomerular basement membrane (GBM disease in Chinese patients

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    Zhou Xu-Jie

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human leukocyte antigen (HLA alleles are associated with many autoimmune diseases, including anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM disease. In our previous study, it was demonstrated that HLA-DRB1*1501 was strongly associated with anti-GBM disease in Chinese. However, the association of anti-GBM disease and other HLA class II genes, including HLA-DQB1, -DQA1,-DPB1 alleles, has rarely been investigated in Asian, especially Chinese patients. The present study further analyzed the association between anti-GBM disease and HLA-DQB1, -DQA1, and -DPB1 genes. Apart from this, we tried to locate the potential risk amino acid residues of anti-GBM disease. Methods This study included 44 Chinese patients with anti-GBM disease and 200 healthy controls. The clinical and pathological data of the patients were collected and analyzed. Typing of HLA-DQB1, -DQA1 and -DPB1 alleles were performed by bi-directional sequencing of exon 2 using the SeCoreTM Sequencing Kits. Results Compared with normal controls, the prevalence of HLA-DPB1*0401 was significantly lower in patients with anti-GBM disease (3/88 vs. 74/400, p = 4.4 × 10-4, pc = 0.039. Comparing with normal controls, the combination of presence of DRB1*1501 and absence of DPB1*0401 was significantly prominent among anti-GBM patients (p = 2.0 × 10-12, pc = 1.7 × 10-10. Conclusions HLA-DPB1*0401 might be a protective allele to anti-GBM disease in Chinese patients. The combined presence of DRB1*1501 and absence of DPB1*0401 might have an even higher risk to anti-GBM disease than HLA-DRB1*1501 alone.

  6. Prevalence of bovine dermatophilosis and disease-associated alleles in zebu Goudali cattle and their Italian Simmental crosses ranching in the western highland plateau savannah of Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojong, Bessong Willington; Saccà, Elena; Bessong, Pascal; Piasentier, Edi

    2016-10-01

    Abundance of native pastures makes Cameroon's western highland savannah (WHS) a hotspot for low-input beef-type cattle. Dumbo Ranch is central to cattle seed stock multiplication in WHS and holds that Dermatophilus congolensis infection undermines production. The bovine BoLA-DRB3 has been variously demonstrated as the principal gene of the major histocompatibility locus associated with immunity and resistance to dermatophilosis in cattle. We studied the profile of dermatophilosis prevalence in zebu Goudali (G) and its Simmental composite, SimGoud (SG), at Dumbo Ranch and determined the distribution of a dermatophilosis-associated susceptibility allele of the BoLA-DRB3 gene by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We recorded a 42 % prevalence of dermatophilosis in the studied cohort (337 animals). Dermatophilosis was more common in older cattle than in cattle ≤36 months (p ≤ 0.05). G was more affected compared to SG, because of the prevalence of the disease in the oldest animals and the age distribution of the experimental subjects. No susceptible homozygote was observed. About 85 and 15 % of the cohort carried the homozygous resistant and heterozygous condition, respectively. This genotype distribution was not affected by cattle type. The study confirms the presence of dermatophilosis among G and SG cattle in WHS. However, there was no correlation between the presence of the disease-associated susceptible allele considered and clinical manifestation. Screening for this dermatophilosis resistance-associated allele of BoLA-DRB3 gene appeared not useful for selection of G and SG in WHS.

  7. The association of the HLA-A*24:02, B*39:01 and B*39:06 alleles with type 1 diabetes is restricted to specific HLA-DR/DQ haplotypes in Finns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikk, M-L; Heikkinen, T; El-Amir, M I; Kiviniemi, M; Laine, A-P; Härkönen, T; Veijola, R; Toppari, J; Knip, M; Ilonen, J

    2017-04-01

    We analysed the previously reported association of the HLA-A*24:02, B*18 and B*39 alleles with type 1 diabetes and diabetes associated autoimmunity in the Finnish population applying HLA-DR/DQ stratification. Haplotype transmission was analysed in 2424 nuclear families from the Finnish Paediatric Diabetes Register. Survival analysis was applied to study the development of islet autoantibodies and further progression to clinical diabetes in the prospective follow-up cohort from the Finnish Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention (DIPP) Study. The subjects were genotyped for specific HLA class I alleles by sequence-specific hybridization using lanthanide labelled nucleotide probes. The HLA-B*39:06 allele was found almost exclusively on the (DR8)-DQB1*04 haplotype in which its presence changed the disease risk status of the whole haplotype from neutral to predisposing. The HLA-A*24:02 and the B*39:01 alleles increased the diabetes-associated risk of the DRB1*04:04-DQA1*03-DQB1*03:02 haplotype but the alleles were in linkage disequilibrium and no independent effect could be detected. Within the DIPP cohort, neither the A*24:02 nor the B*39:01 allele were associated with seroconversion but were in contrast associated with increased progression from seroconversion to clinical disease. The independent predisposing effect of the HLA-B*39:06 allele with type 1 diabetes was confirmed in the Finnish population but the association of the A*24:02 and B*39:01 alleles remained inconclusive whilst both A*24:02 and B*39:01 affected the progression rate from seroconversion to autoantibody positivity to overt type 1 diabetes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Short rare hTERT-VNTR2-2nd alleles are associated with prostate cancer susceptibility and influence gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Se-Lyun; Cheon, Sang-Hyeon; Leem, Sun-Hee; Jung, Se-Il; Do, Eun-Ju; Lee, Se-Ra; Lee, Sang-Yeop; Chu, In-Sun; Kim, Wun-Jae; Jung, Jaeil; Kim, Choung Soo

    2010-01-01

    The hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase) gene contains five variable number tandem repeats (VNTR) and previous studies have described polymorphisms for hTERT-VNTR2-2 nd . We investigated how allelic variation in hTERT-VNTR2-2 nd may affect susceptibility to prostate cancer. A case-control study was performed using DNA from 421 cancer-free male controls and 329 patients with prostate cancer. In addition, to determine whether the VNTR polymorphisms have a functional consequence, we examined the transcriptional levels of a reporter gene linked to these VNTRs and driven by the hTERT promoter in cell lines. Three new rare alleles were detected from this study, two of which were identified only in cancer subjects. A statistically significant association between rare hTERT-VNTR2-2 nd alleles and risk of prostate cancer was observed [OR, 5.17; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09-24.43; P = 0.021]. Furthermore, the results indicated that these VNTRs inserted in the enhancer region could influence the expression of hTERT in prostate cancer cell lines. This is the first study to report that rare hTERT VNTRs are associated with prostate cancer predisposition and that the VNTRs can induce enhanced levels of hTERT promoter activity in prostate cancer cell lines. Thus, the hTERT-VNTR2-2 nd locus may function as a modifier of prostate cancer risk by affecting gene expression

  9. The type 2 diabetes associated minor allele of rs2237895 KCNQ1 associates with reduced insulin release following an oral glucose load.

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    Johan Holmkvist

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Polymorphisms in the potassium channel, voltage-gated, KQT-like subfamily, member 1 (KCNQ1 have recently been reported to associate with type 2 diabetes. The primary aim of the present study was to investigate the putative impact of these KCNQ1 polymorphisms (rs2283228, rs2237892, rs2237895, and rs2237897 on estimates of glucose stimulated insulin release. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Genotypes were examined for associations with serum insulin levels following an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT in a population-based sample of 6,039 middle-aged and treatment-naïve individuals. Insulin release indices estimated from the OGTT and the interplay between insulin sensitivity and insulin release were investigated using linear regression and Hotelling T2 analyses. Applying an additive genetic model the minor C-allele of rs2237895 was associated with reduced serum insulin levels 30 min (mean+/-SD: (CC 277+/-160 vs. (AC 280+/-164 vs. (AA 299+/-200 pmol/l, p = 0.008 after an oral glucose load, insulinogenic index (29.6+/-17.4 vs. 30.2+/-18.7vs. 32.2+/-22.1, p = 0.007, incremental area under the insulin curve (20,477+/-12,491 vs. 20,503+/-12,386 vs. 21,810+/-14,685, p = 0.02 among the 4,568 individuals who were glucose tolerant. Adjustment for the degree of insulin sensitivity had no effect on the measures of reduced insulin release. The rs2237895 genotype had a similar impact in the total sample of treatment-naïve individuals. No association with measures of insulin release were identified for the less common diabetes risk alleles of rs2237892, rs2237897, or rs2283228. CONCLUSION: The minor C-allele of rs2237895 of KCNQ1, which has a prevalence of about 42% among Caucasians was associated with reduced measures of insulin release following an oral glucose load suggesting that the increased risk of type 2 diabetes, previously reported for this variant, likely is mediated through an impaired beta cell function.

  10. Association of IL8 and IL10 gene allelic variants with ischemic stroke risk and prognosis

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    Kucherenko A. M.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Evaluating a role of IL8 gene –781 C/T, and IL10 gene –592C/A polymorphisms as genetic markers of ischemic stroke risk. Methods. A case group consisted of 183 patients with ischemic stroke, which were treated in the Brain Vascular Pathology unit of SI «Institute of Gerontology of NAMS of Ukraine». A control group included 88 healthy individuals older than 65 years without any history of ischemic stroke. Genotyping was performed using PCR followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Results. Significantly (P < 0,05 higher frequency of IL8 –781T allele carriers in the case group (81,6 % comparing to the control (70,1% was revealed. –781T allele carriers have nearly 2-fold increased ischemic stroke development risk (OR = 1.886; 95 % CI: 1.041–3.417. Significantly (P < 0,05 higher frequency of IL10 gene –592C allele carriers was observed in the patients with ischemic stroke (98,2% comparing to the control (90,7 %. The ischemic stroke development risk in such individuals is 5-fold increased (OR = 5.71; 95 % CI: 1.48–22.11. It was revealed that –592C allele homozygotes with ischemic stroke have more than 2-fold higher improvement (according to the Rankin scale chances during the first fortnight of treatment (OR = 2,76; 95 % CI: 1,26–6,07. Conclusions. On the basis of the obtained significant differences, IL8 gene –781T and IL10 gene –592C variants may be considered the factors of ischemic stroke hereditary susceptibility. Besides, IL10 gene –592CC genotype is a genetic marker of the patients state positive dynamics during first two weeks of treatment.

  11. Association between the seven-repeat allele of the dopamine-4 receptor gene (DRD4) and spontaneous food intake in pre-school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Patrícia Pelufo; Portella, André Krumel; Kennedy, James L; Gaudreau, Hélène; Davis, Caroline; Steiner, Meir; Soares, Claudio N; Matthews, Stephen G; Sokolowski, Marla B; Dubé, Laurette; Loucks, Eric B; Hamilton, Jill; Meaney, Michael J; Levitan, Robert D

    2014-02-01

    Studies in adults show associations between the hypofunctional seven-repeat allele (7R) of the dopamine-4 receptor gene (DRD4), increased eating behaviour and/or obesity, particularly in females. We examined whether 7R is associated with total caloric intake and/or food choices in pre-schoolers. 150 four-year-old children taking part in a birth cohort study in Canada were administered a snack test meal in a laboratory setting. Mothers also filled out a food frequency questionnaire to address childrens' habitual food consumption. Total caloric and individual macronutrient intakes during the snack meal and specific types of foods as reported in the food diaries were compared across 7R allele carriers vs. non-carriers, using current BMI as a co-variate. We found significant sex by genotype interactions for fat and protein intake during the snack test. Post hoc testing revealed that in girls, but not boys, 7R carriers ate more fat and protein than did non-carriers. Based on the food diaries, across both sexes, 7R carriers consumed more portions of ice cream and less vegetables, eggs, nuts and whole bread, suggesting a less healthy pattern of habitual food consumption. The 7R allele of DRD4 influences macronutrient intakes and specific food choices as early as four years of age. The specific pattern of results further suggests that prior associations between the 7R allele and adult overeating/obesity may originate in food choices observable in the preschool years. Longitudinal follow-up of these children will help establish the relevance of these findings for obesity risk and prevention. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. No evidence of association between mutant alleles of the CYP27B1 gene and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Maria; Caillier, Stacy; Mero, Inger-Lise; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Celius, Elisabeth G; Aarseth, Jan; Torkildsen, Øivind; Harbo, Hanne F; Oksenberg, Jorge; Hauser, Stephen L; Sawcer, Stephen; Compston, Alastair

    2013-03-01

    An association has previously been reported between susceptibility to multiple sclerosis and the rare mutant alleles of the CYP27B1 gene responsible for autosomal recessive vitamin D-dependent rickets type 1 (VDDR1). In an attempt to replicate this finding, we screened 495 multiplex families and 2,092 single affected families, together with 4,594 cases and 3,583 controls (a total of 17,073 individuals) but were unable to find any evidence supporting this putative association. Our data do not indicate that mutations responsible for VDDR1 influence the risk of developing multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2013 American Neurological Association.

  13. Human Leukocyte Antigen Class II Alleles Are Associated with Hepatitis C Virus Natural Susceptibility in the Chinese Population

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    Ming Yue

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Human leukocyte antigen (HLA class II molecule influences host antigen presentation and anti-viral immune response. The aim of this study was to investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within HLA class II gene were associated with different clinical outcomes of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. Three HLA class II SNPs (rs3077, rs2395309 and rs2856718 were genotyped by TaqMan assay among Chinese population, including 350 persistent HCV infection patients, 194 spontaneous viral clearance subjects and 973 HCV-uninfected control subjects. After logistic regression analysis, the results indicated that the rs2856718 TC genotype was significantly associated with the protective effect of the HCV natural susceptibility (adjusted OR: 0.712, 95% CI: 0.554–0.914 when compared with reference TT genotype, and this remained significant after false discovery rate (FDR correction (p = 0.024. Moreover, the protective effect of rs2856718 was observed in dominant genetic models (adjusted OR: 0.726, 95% CI: 0.574–0.920, and this remained significant after FDR correction (p = 0.024. In stratified analysis, a significant decreased risk was found in rs2856718C allele in the male subgroup (adjusted OR: 0.778, 95% CI: 0.627–0.966 and hemodialysis subgroup (adjusted OR: 0.713, 95% CI: 0.552–0.921. Our results indicated that the genetic variations of rs2856718 within the HLA-DQ gene are associated with the natural susceptibility to HCV infection among the Chinese population.

  14. Association of an Agouti allele with fawn or sable coat color in domestic dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryere, Tom G; Kerns, Julie A; Barsh, Gregory S; Schmutz, Sheila M

    2005-04-01

    The type of pigment synthesized in mammalian hair, yellow-red pheomelanin or black-brown eumelanin, depends on the interaction between Agouti protein and the Melanocortin 1 receptor. Although the genetics of pigmentation is broadly conserved across most mammalian species, pigment type-switching in domestic dogs is unusual because a yellow-tan coat with variable amounts of dark hair is thought to be caused by an allele of the Agouti locus referred to as fawn or sable (a(y)). In a large survey covering thirty seven breeds, we identified an Agouti allele with two missense alterations, A82S and R83H, which was present (heterozygous or homozygous) in 41 dogs (22 breeds) with a fawn or sable coat, but was absent from 16 dogs (8 breeds) with a black-and-tan or tricolor phenotype. In an additional 33 dogs (14 breeds) with a eumelanic coat, 8 (German Shepherd Dogs, Groenendaels, Schipperkes, or Shetland Sheepdogs) were homozygous for a previously reported mutation, non-agouti R96C; the remainder are likely to have carried dominant black, which is independent of and epistatic to Agouti. This work resolves some of the complexity in dog coat color genetics and provides diagnostic opportunities and practical guidelines for breeders.

  15. Association of IFIH1 and other autoimmunity risk alleles with selective IgA deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ricardo C; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang; Graham, Robert R; Gateva, Vesela; Fontán, Gumersindo; Lee, Annette T; Ortmann, Ward; Urcelay, Elena; Fernández-Arquero, Miguel; Núñez, Concepción; Jorgensen, Gudmundur; Ludviksson, Björn R; Koskinen, Sinikka; Haimila, Katri; Clark, Hilary F; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K; Behrens, Timothy W; Hammarström, Lennart

    2010-09-01

    To understand the genetic predisposition to selective immunoglobulin A deficiency (IgAD), we performed a genome-wide association study in 430 affected individuals (cases) from Sweden and Iceland and 1,090 ethnically matched controls, and we performed replication studies in two independent European cohorts. In addition to the known association of HLA with IgAD, we identified association with a nonsynonymous variant in IFIH1 (rs1990760G>A, P = 7.3 x 10(-10)) which was previously associated with type 1 diabetes and systemic lupus erythematosus. Variants in CLEC16A, another known autoimmunity locus, showed suggestive evidence for association (rs6498142C>G, P = 1.8 x 10(-7)), and 29 additional loci were identified with P < 5 x 10(-5). A survey in IgAD of 118 validated non-HLA autoimmunity loci indicated a significant enrichment for association with autoimmunity loci as compared to non-autoimmunity loci (P = 9.0 x 10(-4)) or random SNPs across the genome (P < 0.0001). These findings support the hypothesis that autoimmune mechanisms may contribute to the pathogenesis of IgAD.

  16. Albinism and disease causing pathogens in Tanzania: are alleles that are associated with OCA2 being maintained by balancing selection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuli, Abbas M; Valenzuela, Robert K; Kamugisha, Erasmus; Brilliant, Murray H

    2012-12-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism type 2 (OCA2) is present at significantly higher frequencies in sub-Saharan African populations compared to populations in other regions of the world. In Tanzania and other sub-Saharan countries, most OCA2 is associated with a common 2.7kb deletion allele. Leprosy is also in high prevalence in sub-Saharan African populations. The infectious agent of leprosy, Mycobacterium leprae, contains a gene, 38L, that is similar to OCA2. Hypopigmented patches of skin are early symptoms that present with infection of leprosy. In consideration of both the genetic similarity of OCA2 and the 38L gene of M. leprae and the involvement of pigmentation in both disorders, we hypothesized that the high rates of OCA2 may be due to heterozygote advantage. Hence, we hypothesized that carriers of the 2.7kb deletion allele of OCA2 may provide a protective advantage from infection with leprosy. We tested this hypothesis by determining the carrier frequency of the 2.7kb deletion allele from a sample of 240 individuals with leprosy from Tanzania. The results were inconclusive due to the small sample size; however, they enabled us to rule out a large protective effect, but perhaps not a small advantage. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is another infectious organism prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa that contains a gene, arsenic-transport integral membrane protein that is also similar to OCA2. Interestingly, chromosomal region 15q11-13, which also contains OCA2, was reported to be linked to tuberculosis susceptibility. Although variants within OCA2 were tested for association, the 2.7kb deletion allele of OCA2 was not tested. This led us to hypothesize that the deletion allele may confer resistance to susceptibility. Confirmation of our hypothesis would enable development of novel pharmocogenetic therapies for the treatment of tuberculosis, which in turn, may enable development of drugs that target other pathogens that utilize a similar infection mechanism as M. tuberculosis

  17. Variations in the APOE allele or BDNF Val66Met polymorphism are not associated with changes in cognitive function following a tertiary education intervention in older adults: the Tasmanian Healthy Brain Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thow, Megan E; Summers, Mathew J; Summers, Jeffery J; Saunders, Nichole L; Vickers, James C

    2017-07-01

    The apolipoprotein (APOE) ε4 allele and the Met variant of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphism are associated with reduced cognitive function in older adults. The aim of this study was to examine the independent and interactional effect of the APOE ε4 allele and BDNF Val66Met polymorphism on cognitive function in a cohort of healthy older adults who had undertaken further university level education. Multiple group latent growth curve modeling revealed no change in cognitive function over time in APOE ε4-carriers or in BDNF Met-carriers, nor in carriers of both APOE-ε4 and BDNF-Met alleles. Further, the results indicate that allelic variation in either APOE or BDNF does not modify the beneficial effects of a university-based education intervention on cognitive function over a 4-year period following the intervention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Parent-of-origin-specific allelic associations among 106 genomic loci for age at menarche

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, John R. B.; Day, Felix; Elks, Cathy E.

    2014-01-01

    Age at menarche is a marker of timing of puberty in females. It varies widely between individuals, is a heritable trait and is associated with risks for obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, breast cancer and all-causemortality(1). Studies of rare human disorders of puberty and animal...

  19. Association of Apolipoprotein E Alleles with Susceptibility to Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Iranian Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Askari

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: The results show a moderate positive association between APOE &epsilon2 and AMD, but current data does not show any role for APOE &epsilon4 in protection from AMD. However, more studies are required to reveal the possible role of APOE in the pathogenesis of AMD.

  20. Association between GSTM1 and GSTT1 allelic variants and head and neck squamous cell cancinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUNDS: GSTM1 and GSTT1 are involved in the detoxification of carcinogens such as smoking by-products, and polymorphisms in these two genes with a result of loss of enzyme activity may increase risk of carcinogenesis. Although many epidemiological studies have investigated the association between GSTM1 or GSTT1 null genotype and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC, the results remain conflicting. To elucidate the overall association of GSTM1, GSTT1 and HNSCC, we included all available studies and performed this meta-analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A dataset including 42 articles for GSTM1, 32 articles for GSTT1, and 15 articles for GSTM1 and GSTT1 in combination were identified by a search in PubMed. Associations beween HNSCC and polymorphisms of GSTM1 and GSTT1 alone and in combination were analysed by software RevMan 5.1. Stratification analysis on ethnicity and smoking status, sensitivity analysis, heterogeneity among studies and their publication bias were also tested. Association was found in overall analysis between HNSCC and GSTM1 and GSTT1 null genotype. Stratified by ethnicity, we found increased risks of HNSCC in carriers with GSTM1 null genotype in Asian, GSTT1 null genotype in South American, and dual null genotype in European and Asian. When stratified by smoking, a more significant association of GSTM1 null genotype with HNSCC risk was observed in smokers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This meta-analysis presented additional evidence of the association between GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms and HNSCC risk.

  1. Association of allelic variation in PtoXET16A with growth and wood properties in Populus tomentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bowen; Zhang, Deqiang

    2014-09-23

    Xyloglucan endo-transglycosylases (XETs) modify the xyloglucan-cellulose framework of plant cell walls and, thus, affect cell wall expansion and strength. Dissecting the mechanism by which natural variation in XETs affects wood properties can inform breeding efforts to improve wood quality and yield traits. To this end, we isolated a full-length PtoXET16A cDNA clone from Populus tomentosa. Real-time PCR analysis showed that PtoXET16A was maximally expressed in the root, followed by phloem, cambium, and developing xylem, suggesting that PtoXET16A plays important roles in the development of vascular tissues. Nucleotide diversity and linkage disequilibrium analysis revealed that PtoXET16A has high single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) diversity (π = 0.01266 and θ(w) = 0.01392) and low linkage disequilibrium (r² ≥ 0.1, within 900 bp). SNP- and haplotype-based association analyses of 426 individuals from a natural population indicated that nine SNPs (including two non-synonymous markers and one splicing variant) (p ≤ 0.05, false discovery rate Q ≤ 0.01), and nine haplotypes (p ≤ 0.05) were significantly associated with growth and wood properties, each explaining from 3.40%-10.95% of phenotypic variance. This work shows that examination of allelic variation and linkage disequilibrium by a candidate-gene-based approach can help to decipher the genetic basis of wood formation. Moreover, the SNP markers identified in this study can potentially be applied for marker-assisted selection to improve growth and wood-property traits in Populus.

  2. Association between amylin and amyloid-β peptides in plasma in the context of apolipoprotein E4 allele.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Qiao Qiu

    Full Text Available Amylin, a pancreatic peptide that readily crosses the blood brain barrier (BBB, and amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ, the main component of amyloid plaques and a major component of Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology in the brain, share several features. These include having similar β-sheet secondary structures, binding to the same receptor, and being degraded by the same protease. Thus, amylin may be associated with Aβ, but the nature of their relationship remains unclear. In this study, we used human samples to study the relationship between plasma amylin and Aβ in the context of the apolipoprotein E alleles (ApoE. We found that concentrations of Aβ1-42 (P<0.0001 and Aβ1-40 (P<0.0001 increased with each quartile increase of amylin. Using multivariate regression analysis, the study sample showed that plasma amylin was associated with Aβ1-42 (β = +0.149, SE = 0.025, P<0.0001 and Aβ1-40 (β = +0.034, SE = 0.016, P = 0.04 as an outcome after adjusting for age, gender, ethnicity, ApoE4, BMI, diabetes, stroke, kidney function and lipid profile. This positive association between amylin and Aβ1-42 in plasma was found regardless of the ApoE genotype. In contrast, the relationship between amylin and Aβ1-40 in plasma seen in ApoE4 non-carriers disappeared in the presence of ApoE4. Using AD mouse models, our recent study demonstrates that intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of synthetic amylin enhances the removal of Aβ from the brain into blood, thus resulting in increased blood levels of both amylin and Aβ. The positive association between amylin and Aβ, especially Aβ1-42, in human blood samples is probably relevant to the findings in the AD mouse models. The presence of ApoE4 may attenuate amylin's capacity to remove Aβ, especially Aβ1-40, from the AD brain.

  3. A single nomenclature and associated database for alleles at the MHC class II DRB1 locus of sheep: IPD-MHC-OLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development of standardised nomenclatures with associated databases containing reference sequences for alleles at polymorphic loci within the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) has been facilitated by the development of the Immuno Polymorphism Database (IPD-MHC). Recently, included within I...

  4. Associations of common breast cancer susceptibility alleles with risk of breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Neuhausen, Susan L; Robson, Mark; Barrowdale, Daniel; McGuffog, Lesley; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Andrulis, Irene L; Spurdle, Amanda B; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Engel, Christoph; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Nevanlinna, Heli; Thomassen, Mads; Southey, Melissa; Radice, Paolo; Ramus, Susan J; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Lee, Andrew; Healey, Sue; Nussbaum, Robert L; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Arun, Banu K; James, Paul; Karlan, Beth Y; Lester, Jenny; Cass, Ilana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Steele, Linda; v O Hansen, Thomas; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Nielsen, Finn C; Dennis, Joe; Cunningham, Julie; Hart, Steven; Slager, Susan; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Tafur, Isaac; Hander, Mary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Roversi, Gaia; Scuvera, Giulietta; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariani, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Varesco, Liliana; Papi, Laura; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Giannini, Giuseppe; Fostira, Florentia; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D Gareth; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Douglas, Fiona; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Ong, Kai-ren; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E; Kennedy, M John; Rogers, Mark T; Porteous, Mary E; Morrison, Patrick J; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Ellis, Steve; Godwin, Andrew K; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Steinemann, Doris; Bogdanova-Markov, Nadja; Kast, Karin; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Gehrig, Andrea; Markiefka, Birgid; Buecher, Bruno; Lefol, Cédrick; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Barjhoux, Laure; Faivre, Laurence; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bonadona, Valérie; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Isaacs, Claudine; Van Maerken, Tom; Claes, Kathleen; Piedmonte, Marion; Andrews, Lesley; Hays, John; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Khan, Sofia; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Aalfs, Cora M; de Lange, J L; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Wijnen, Juul T; van Roozendaal, K E P; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van der Luijt, Rob B; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Teulé, Alex; Menendez, Mireia; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Arason, Adalgeir; Maugard, Christine; Soucy, Penny; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Teixeira, Manuel R; Olswold, Curtis; Lindor, Noralane; Pankratz, Vernon S; Hallberg, Emily; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I; Vijai, Joseph; Jacobs, Lauren; Corines, Marina; Lincoln, Anne; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Gschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Phelan, Catherine M; Mai, Phuong L; Greene, Mark H; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Glendon, Gord; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria A; Friedman, Eitan; Berger, Raanan; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; Arver, Brita; Loman, Niklas; Borg, Ake; Ehrencrona, Hans; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2014-12-31

    More than 70 common alleles are known to be involved in breast cancer (BC) susceptibility, and several exhibit significant heterogeneity in their associations with different BC subtypes. Although there are differences in the association patterns between BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and the general population for several loci, no study has comprehensively evaluated the associations of all known BC susceptibility alleles with risk of BC subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. We used data from 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 carriers to analyze the associations between approximately 200,000 genetic variants on the iCOGS array and risk of BC subtypes defined by estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and triple-negative- (TN) status; morphologic subtypes; histological grade; and nodal involvement. The estimated BC hazard ratios (HRs) for the 74 known BC alleles in BRCA1 carriers exhibited moderate correlations with the corresponding odds ratios from the general population. However, their associations with ER-positive BC in BRCA1 carriers were more consistent with the ER-positive associations in the general population (intraclass correlation (ICC) = 0.61, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.45 to 0.74), and the same was true when considering ER-negative associations in both groups (ICC = 0.59, 95% CI: 0.42 to 0.72). Similarly, there was strong correlation between the ER-positive associations for BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers (ICC = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.52 to 0.78), whereas ER-positive associations in any one of the groups were generally inconsistent with ER-negative associations in any of the others. After stratifying by ER status in mutation carriers, additional significant associations were observed. Several previously unreported variants exhibited associations at P BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers and the general population are explained to a large extent by differences in the prevalence of ER-positive and ER

  5. High frequency of the DRD2/ANKK1 A1 allele in Mexican Native Amerindians and Mestizos and its association with alcohol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panduro, Arturo; Ramos-Lopez, Omar; Campollo, Octavio; Zepeda-Carrillo, Eloy Alfonso; Gonzalez-Aldaco, Karina; Torres-Valadez, Rafael; Roman, Sonia

    2017-03-01

    Mexico has an ancient tradition of alcohol drinking influenced by genetic and sociocultural factors. This study aimed to determine the distribution of the DRD2/ANKK1 TaqIA polymorphism in Mexican populations and to analyze its association with heavy drinking. In a cross-sectional and analytical study, 680 unrelated subjects including two Native Amerindians groups (87 Nahuas and 139 Huicholes), and two Mestizos groups (158 subjects from Tepic, Nayarit and 296 subjects from Guadalajara, Jalisco) were enrolled. DRD2/ANKK1 genotyping was performed by PCR-RFLP and allelic discrimination assays. Genetic analyses were conducted by Arlequin and Structure software. Heavy drinking was defined as ≥300g alcohol/week. The association of the DRD2/ANKK1 TaqIA polymorphism with heavy drinking was estimated. Heavy drinking was prevalent in 64.7% of the study population. The DRD2/ANKK1 A1 allele prevailed in 67% and 65% of Nahuas and Huicholes, respectively and 51% and 47.3% in Mestizos from Tepic and Guadalajara, respectively. Heavy drinking was associated with the A1A1 genotype in the Mestizos of Guadalajara (A1A1 vs. A1A2 OR=4.79, 95%CI 1.81-12.68, p=0.0006; A1A1 vs. A1A2+A2A2, OR=4.09, 95%CI 1.56-10.68, p=0.0021) and in the Mestizos from Tepic (A1A1 vs. A1A2, OR=5.92, 95%CI 2.12-16.49, p=0.0002); A2A2, OR=14.56, 95%CI 3.57-59.24, p=0.00004); A1A2+A2A2, OR=6.68, 95%CI 2.42-18.42, p=0.00005). In Native Amerindians, a lack of association was found. High frequencies of the DRD2/ANKK1 A1 allele were present in Mexican populations. Native Amerindians exhibited the highest frequencies of the A1 allele documented worldwide to date. The A1A1 genotype was associated with heavy drinking in Mestizos. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Oligoclonal band status in Scandinavian multiple sclerosis patients is associated with specific genetic risk alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mero, Inger-Lise; Gustavsen, Marte W; Sæther, Hanne S

    2013-01-01

    The presence of oligoclonal bands (OCB) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a typical finding in multiple sclerosis (MS). We applied data from Norwegian, Swedish and Danish (i.e. Scandinavian) MS patients from a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to search for genetic differences in MS relating...... at onset (AAO), MS outcome measures and gender. This study confirms both shared and distinct genetic risk for MS subtypes in the Scandinavian population defined by OCB status and indicates different clinical characteristics between the groups. This suggests differences in disease mechanisms between OCB...

  7. The prevalence of PI*S and PI*Z SERPINA1 alleles in healthy individuals and COPD patients in Saudi Arabia: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jameil, Noura; Hassan, Amina A; Hassanato, Rana; Isac, Sree R; Otaiby, Maram Al; Al-Shareef, Fadwa; Al-Maarik, Basmah; Ajeyan, Iman Al; Al-Bahloul, Khloud; Ghani, Samina; Al-Torbak, Dana

    2017-10-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is an acute phase protein produced in hepatocytes. Its deficiency affects the lungs and liver. A case-control study was carried out to determine the prevalence of 2 common deficiency alleles, PI*S and PI*Z, for alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) in both healthy and chronic obstructive pulmmonary disease (COPD)-affected Saudi populations and to clarify the importance of genetic tests in the screening of people at risk for COPD.One thousand blood samples from healthy individuals and 1000 from COPD-affected Saudi individuals were genotyped for the above-mentioned alleles, using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), with the exclusion of any other nationalities. Data were analyzed by determining the allele and genotype frequencies through gene counting and its confidence intervals. The allele frequencies, derived by the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium method, were analyzed by Pearson Chi-squared tests. The confidence intervals for genotype frequencies were calculated using exploratory software for confidence intervals.Of the 1000 COPD patients included in our study, the prevalence of PI*S and PI*Z was 21.8% and 7.7%, respectively, while within the 1000 normal samples, these alleles occurred in 8.9% of patients for PI*S and 1.6% for PI*Z. The AAT deficiency genotype frequencies (PI*ZZ, PI*SS, and PI*SZ) were 6.5 per 1000 and 87 per 1000 for normal and COPD-affected Saudi individuals.Our results indicated a high prevalence of AATD alleles in the normal Saudi population and an association between AAT deficiency and pulmonary disease development. Additionally, our research confirms the importance of genetic screening to achieve early and accurate diagnosis of AATD.

  8. Frequency of the MDR1 mutant allele associated with multidrug sensitivity in dogs from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monobe MM

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Marina M Monobe,1 João P Araujo Junior,2 Kari V Lunsford,3 Rodrigo C Silva,4 Camilo Bulla41Department of Veterinary Clinics, School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, 2Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Biosciences Institute, Sao Paulo State University (UNESP, Botucatu, Brazil; 3Department of Clinical Sciences and Animal Health Center, 4Department of Pathobiology and Population Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi, MS, USAAbstract: To date, a 4-bp deletion in the MDR1 gene has been detected in more than ten dog breeds, as well as in mixed breed dogs, in several countries, however information regarding this mutation in dogs from Brazil is lacking. For this reason, 103 Collies, 77 Border Collies, 76 Shetland Sheepdogs, 20 Old English Sheepdogs, 55 German Shepherds, 16 Australian Shepherds, and 53 Whippets from Brazil were screened for the presence of the mutation. The heterozygous mutated genotype, MDR1 (+/−, frequency found for Collies, Australian Shepherd, and Shetland Sheepdog was 50.5% (95% CI =41.1%–59.9%, 31.3% (95% CI =8.6%–53.2%, and 15.8% (95% CI =7.7%–23.9%, respectively. Homozygous mutated genotype, MDR1 (−/−, was detected only in Collies 35.9%. The MDR1 allele mutant frequency found for Collies, Australian Shepherd, and Shetland Sheepdog was 61.2% (95% CI =54.8%–67.5%, 15.6% (95% CI =3.1%–28.2%, and 7.9% (95% CI =3.7%–12.1%, respectively. Additionally, even free of the mutant allele, the maximum mutant prevalence (MMP in that population, with 95% CI, was 3.8%, 5.2%, 5.4%, and 13.8% for Border Collies, German Shepherds, Whippets, and Old English Sheepdogs, respectively. In this way, this information is important, not only for MDR1 genotype-based breeding programs and international exchange of breeding animals of predisposed breeds, but also for modification of drug therapy for breeds at risk.Keywords: P-glycoprotein, MDR1 mutation, ivermectin, dog, drug

  9. Preferential binding to Elk-1 by SLE-associated IL10 risk allele upregulates IL10 expression.

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    Daisuke Sakurai

    Full Text Available Immunoregulatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10 is elevated in sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE correlating with disease activity. The established association of IL10 with SLE and other autoimmune diseases led us to fine map causal variant(s and to explore underlying mechanisms. We assessed 19 tag SNPs, covering the IL10 gene cluster including IL19, IL20 and IL24, for association with SLE in 15,533 case and control subjects from four ancestries. The previously reported IL10 variant, rs3024505 located at 1 kb downstream of IL10, exhibited the strongest association signal and was confirmed for association with SLE in European American (EA (P = 2.7×10⁻⁸, OR = 1.30, but not in non-EA ancestries. SNP imputation conducted in EA dataset identified three additional SLE-associated SNPs tagged by rs3024505 (rs3122605, rs3024493 and rs3024495 located at 9.2 kb upstream, intron 3 and 4 of IL10, respectively, and SLE-risk alleles of these SNPs were dose-dependently associated with elevated levels of IL10 mRNA in PBMCs and circulating IL-10 protein in SLE patients and controls. Using nuclear extracts of peripheral blood cells from SLE patients for electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we identified specific binding of transcription factor Elk-1 to oligodeoxynucleotides containing the risk (G allele of rs3122605, suggesting rs3122605 as the most likely causal variant regulating IL10 expression. Elk-1 is known to be activated by phosphorylation and nuclear localization to induce transcription. Of interest, phosphorylated Elk-1 (p-Elk-1 detected only in nuclear extracts of SLE PBMCs appeared to increase with disease activity. Co-expression levels of p-Elk-1 and IL-10 were elevated in SLE T, B cells and monocytes, associated with increased disease activity in SLE B cells, and were best downregulated by ERK inhibitor. Taken together, our data suggest that preferential binding of activated Elk-1 to the IL10 rs3122605-G allele

  10. Dual matrilineal geographic distribution of Korean type 2 diabetes mellitus-associated -11,377 G adiponectin allele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jee-Hye; Min, Na Young; Park, Sang Kil; Gavaachimed, Lkhagvasuren; Ko, Young Jong; Han, Sung Hoon; Kim, Kyung Yong; Kim, Kijung; Lee, Kwang Ho; Park, Ae Ja

    2014-12-01

    The present study was performed to identify the susceptible single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for the prediction of Korean type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and to clarify the matrilineal origin of Korean T2DM‑specific SNPs. Fourteen SNPs from the adiponectin (ADIPOQ), hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 and glucokinase genes in the Korean population were analyzed. Only one SNP, ‑11,377 C/G on the ADIPOQ gene, was finally determined to be responsible for the incidence of Korean T2DM (P=0.028). The G‑T‑T‑A haplotype at positions ‑11,377, +45, +276 and +349 on the ADIPOQ gene was also associated with a high incidence of Korean T2DM (P=0.023). In addition, the susceptibility of Korean individuals to T2DM appears to be affected by their matrilineal origin. Of note, the group of Southern origin, consisting of mitochondrial DNA macrohaplogroups F and R, was predisposed to T2DM, whereas the group of Northern origin, consisting of haplogroups A and Y, was resistant to T2DM. This implied that the differential genetics between the two groups, which were formed from the initial peopling of the proto‑Korean population via Southern and Northern routes to the present time, may explain their differing susceptibility to T2DM. In conclusion, from Southern Asia Northward, a matrilineal origin of Korean individuals appears to be responsible for the prevalence of Korean T2DM caused by the ‑11,377 G allele.

  11. HLA DRB1/DQB1 alleles and DRB1-DQB1 haplotypes and the risk of rheumatoid arthritis in Tunisians: a population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagha, A; Messadi, A; Boussaidi, S; Kochbati, S; Tazeghdenti, A; Ghazouani, E; Almawi, W Y; Yacoubi-Loueslati, B

    2016-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease, which affects synovial joints, and is influenced by environmental and genetic factors, in particular the human leucocyte antigen (HLA) system. In our study, we investigated the association of HLA class II DRB1 and DQB1 alleles and DRB1-DQB1 haplotypes with RA susceptibility in Tunisian subjects. Therefore, HLA class II low-resolution genotyping was done in 110 RA patients and 116 controls, with a HLA-DRB1*04 high-resolution typing. Our results showed a strong association between HLA-DRB1*04/DRB1*04:05 alleles and RA presence, which persisted after correcting for multiple comparisons (Pc HLA-DRB1*04:03 allele (Pc = 15.2 × 10-4). However, increased frequency of DQB1*05 (Pc = 0.020) and decreased frequency of DRB1*04:03 subtype (Pc = 0.032) were seen in RF+ patients than controls. Moreover, when RA patients were compared to controls, DRB1*04-DQB1*03 haplotype was associated with RA susceptibility in Tunisians (Pc = 16.8 × 10-5), independently of RF status. Conversely, DRB1*01 allele and DRB1*01-DQB1*05 haplotype was highly present in RF+ vs RF- groups (Pc HLA class II alleles and haplotypes association with RA susceptibility with secondary Sjögren's syndrome (sSS) showed a predisposing effect of DRB1*04 (Pc HLA-DRB1*04, specifically HLA-DRB1*04:05 subtype, and DRB1*04-DQB1*03 haplotype with RA susceptibility in Tunisians, independently of seropositivity or the sSS presence. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Allelic variation in PtoPsbW associated with photosynthesis, growth, and wood properties in Populus tomentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Longxin; Wang, Bowen; Du, Qingzhang; Chen, Jinhui; Tian, Jiaxing; Yang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Deqiang

    2017-02-01

    Photosynthesis is one of the most important reactions on earth. PsbW, a nuclear-encoded subunit of photosystem II (PSII), stabilizes PSII structure and plays an important role in photosynthesis. Here, we used candidate gene-based linkage disequilibrium (LD) mapping to detect significant associations between allelic variations of PtoPsbW and traits related to photosynthesis, growth, and wood properties in Populus tomentosa. PtoPsbW showed the highest expression in leaves and it increased during the development of these leaves, suggesting that PtoPsbW may play an important role in plant growth and development. Analysis of nucleotide diversity and LD revealed that PtoPsbW has low single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) diversity (π tot  = 0.0048 and θ w  = 0.0050) and relatively low average value of LD (0.1500), indicating that PtoPsbW is conserved due to its indispensable function. Using single-SNP associations in an association population of 435 individuals, we identified five significant associations at the threshold of P ≤ 0.05, explaining 3.28-15.98 % of the phenotypic variation. Haplotype-based association analyses indicated that 13 haplotypes (P ≤ 0.05) from six blocks were associated with photosynthesis, growth, and wood properties. Our work shows that identifying allelic variation and LD can help to decipher the genetic basis of photosynthesis and could potentially be applied for molecular marker-assisted selection in Populus.

  13. Allelic association, DNA resequencing and copy number variation at the metabotropic glutamate receptor GRM7 gene locus in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandaswamy, Radhika; McQuillin, Andrew; Curtis, David; Gurling, Hugh

    2014-06-01

    Genetic markers at the GRM7 gene have shown allelic association with bipolar disorder (BP) in several case-control samples including our own sample. In this report, we present results of resequencing the GRM7 gene in 32 bipolar samples and 32 random controls selected from 553 bipolar cases and 547 control samples (UCL1). Novel and potential etiological base pair changes discovered by resequencing were genotyped in the entire UCL case-control sample. We also report on the association between GRM7 and BP in a second sample of 593 patients and 642 controls (UCL2). The three most significantly associated SNPs in the original UCL1 BP GWAS sample were genotyped in the UCL2 sample, of which none were associated. After combining the genotype data for the two samples only two (rs1508724 and rs6769814) of the original three SNP markers remained significantly associated with BP. DNA sequencing revealed mutations in three cases which were absent in control subjects. A 3'-UTR SNP rs56173829 was found to be significantly associated with BP in the whole UCL sample (P = 0.035; OR = 0.482), the rare allele being less common in cases compared to controls. Bioinformatic analyses predicted a change in the centroid secondary structure of RNA and alterations in the miRNA binding sites for the mutated base of rs56173829. We also validated two deletions and a duplication within GRM7 using quantitative-PCR which provides further support for the pre-existing evidence that copy number variants at GRM7 may have a role in the etiology of BP. © 2014 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Expansion of a urethritis-associated Neisseria meningitidis clade in the United States with concurrent acquisition of N. gonorrhoeae alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retchless, Adam C; Kretz, Cécilia B; Chang, How-Yi; Bazan, Jose A; Abrams, A Jeanine; Norris Turner, Abigail; Jenkins, Laurel T; Trees, David L; Tzeng, Yih-Ling; Stephens, David S; MacNeil, Jessica R; Wang, Xin

    2018-03-02

    Increased reports of Neisseria meningitidis urethritis in multiple U.S. cities during 2015 have been attributed to the emergence of a novel clade of nongroupable N. meningitidis within the ST-11 clonal complex, the "U.S. NmNG urethritis clade". Genetic recombination with N. gonorrhoeae has been proposed to enable efficient sexual transmission by this clade. To understand the evolutionary origin and diversification of the U.S. NmNG urethritis clade, whole-genome phylogenetic analysis was performed to identify its members among the N. meningitidis strain collection from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, including 209 urogenital and rectal N. meningitidis isolates submitted by U.S. public health departments in eleven states starting in 2015. The earliest representatives of the U.S. NmNG urethritis clade were identified from cases of invasive disease that occurred in 2013. Among 209 urogenital and rectal isolates submitted from January 2015 to September 2016, the clade accounted for 189/198 male urogenital isolates, 3/4 female urogenital isolates, and 1/7 rectal isolates. In total, members of the clade were isolated in thirteen states between 2013 and 2016, which evolved from a common ancestor that likely existed during 2011. The ancestor contained N. gonorrhoeae-like alleles in three regions of its genome, two of which may facilitate nitrite-dependent anaerobic growth during colonization of urogenital sites. Additional gonococcal-like alleles were acquired as the clade diversified. Notably, one isolate contained a sequence associated with azithromycin resistance in N. gonorrhoeae, but no other gonococcal antimicrobial resistance determinants were detected. Interspecies genetic recombination contributed to the early evolution and subsequent diversification of the U.S. NmNG urethritis clade. Ongoing acquisition of N. gonorrhoeae alleles by the U.S. NmNG urethritis clade may facilitate the expansion of its ecological niche while also increasing the

  15. [Study of allelic polymorphism of (GATA)n-containing loci in parthenogenetic lizards Darevskia unisexualis (Lacertidae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korchagin, V I; Martirosian, I A; Omel'chenko, A V; Darevskiĭ, I S; Ryskov, A P; Tokarskaia, O N

    2004-10-01

    The genesis of mini- and microsatellite loci, which is under extensive study in humans and some other bisexual species, have been virtually overlooked in species with clonal mode of reproduction. Earlier, using multilocus DNA fingerprinting, we have examined variability of some mini- and microsatellite DNA markers in parthenogenetic lizards from the genus Darevskia. In particular, mutant (GATA)n-restrictive DNA fragments were found in Darevskia unisexualis. In the present study, we examined intraspecific polymorphism of three cloned loci of D. unisexualis--Du323, Du215, and Du281--containing (GATA)7GAT(GATA)2, GAT(GATA)9, and (GATA)10TA(GATA) microsatellite clusters, respectively. Different levels of intrapopulation and interpopulation variability of these loci were found. Locus Du281 showed the highest polymorphism--six allelic variants (in the sample of 68 DNA specimens). Three alleles were found for locus Du215. The Du325 locus was electrophoretically invariant. The primers chosen for loci Du323, Du215, and Du281 were also used for PCR analysis of homologous loci in two presumptive parental bisexual species, D. valentini and D. nairensis. The PCR products of the corresponding loci of the parental species had approximately the same size (approximately 200 bp) as their counterparts in D. unisexualis, but the polymorphism levels of the paternal, maternal, and hybrid species were shown to be somewhat different. These data on the structure of the D. unisexualis loci provide a possibility to study genetic diversity in the parthenogenetic species D. unisexualis and other related unisexual and bisexual species of this genus, which can provide new information on the origin of parthenogenetic species and on the phylogenetic relationships in the genus Darevskia. These data can also be used for resolving problems of marking the lizard genome, which is still poorly studied.

  16. Study of Cytochrome P450 2E1 and its allele Variants in Liver Injury of Nondiabetic, Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Obese Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NELSON M VARELA

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available CYP2E1 enzyme is related to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH due to its ability for reactive oxygen species production, which can be influenced by polymorphisms in the gene. The aim of this study was to investigate hepatic levels, activity, and polymorphisms of the CYP2E1 gene to correlate it with clinical and histological features in 48 female obese NASH patients. Subjects were divided into three groups: (i normal; (ii steatosis; and (iii steatohepatitis. CYP2E1 protein level was assayed in microsomes from liver biopsies, and in vivo chlorzoxazone hydroxylation was determined by HPLC. Genomic DNA was isolated for genotype analysis through PCR. The results showed that liver CYP2E1 content was significantly higher in the steatohepatitis (45%; p=0.024 and steatosis (22%; p=0.032 group compared with normal group. Chlorzoxazone hydroxylase activity showed significant enhancement in the steatohepatitis group (15%, p=0.027 compared with the normal group. c2 rare allele of RsallPstl polymorphisms but no C allele of Dral polymorphism was positively associated with CHZ hydroxylation, which in turn is correlated with liver CYP2E1 content (r=0.59; p=0.026. In conclusion, c2 allele is positively associated with liver injury in NASH. This allele may determine a higher transcriptional activity of the gene, with consequent enhancement in pro-oxidant activity of CYP2E1 thus affording liver toxicity

  17. Association of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms of PADI4 and HLA-DRB1 Alleles with Susceptibility to Rheumatoid Arthritis-Related Lung Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Seung Taek; Kim, Song Soo; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, So Young; Kim, Kwangwoo; Kwon, In Sun; Kim, Ji Na; Park, Won Hong; Yoo, In Seol; Yoo, Su-Jin; Kim, Jin Hyun; Kang, Seong Wook; Shim, Seung-Cheol

    2016-10-01

    Lung diseases (LD) are common extra-articular manifestations in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, little is known about factors associated with susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis-related lung diseases (RA-LD). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of PADI4 and HLA-DRB1 alleles were associated with RA-LD. Blood samples and clinical data were collected from 116 consecutive RA patients who satisfied the 1987 American College of Rheumatology classification criteria. RA-LD was diagnosed using high-resolution computed tomography of the chest. All patients were genotyped for SNPs of PADI4 and HLA-DRB1 alleles and analyzed for full amino acid sequence of the HLA protein corresponding to a 4-digit HLA typing. Data were analyzed by independent t test (or Mann-Whitney test) for continuous variables, Chi-square test (or Fisher's exact test) and trend test for categorical variables, and logistic regression analysis. Ninety-four (81.0 %) RA patients had LD, of which eight (6.9 %) had interstitial lung disease (ILD) and 92 (79.3 %) had airway abnormalities in which 64 (55.2 %) showed bronchiectasis and 47 (40.5 %) revealed bronchial wall thickening. The recessive genotype of padi4_92 was susceptible to airway abnormalities (OR = 2.22, 95 % CI = 1.05-4.49, p = 0.034). Tryptophan at position 9 of HLA-DRB1 sequence was associated with the susceptibility to RA-ILD (OR = 22.89, 95 % CI = 1.20-432.56, p = 0.037). PADI4 polymorphisms and HLA-DRB1 alleles could attribute differently to the development of airway abnormalities and ILD, respectively, in RA.

  18. Association of HLA-A and HLA-B Alleles with Lamotrigine-Induced Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions in the Thai Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napatrupron Koomdee

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lamotrigine (LTG is commonly used for treatment of epilepsy and bipolar disorder. It is one of the common cause of cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR. Clinical symptoms of LTG-induced CADR range from maculopapular exanthema (MPE to severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCAR. This study aimed to determine the association of the LTG-induced CADR with human leukocyte antigen (HLA alleles in Thai patients.Methods: Fifteen patients with LTG-induced CADR [10 MPE; 4 Stevens–Johnson syndrome; and 1 drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms] and 50 LTG-tolerant controls were included in the study. HLA-A and HLA-B genotyping was performed using polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific oligonucleotides probes.Results: The proportion of HLA-A∗02:07 and HLA-B∗15:02 allele carriers were significantly higher in the LTG-induced CADR group than in the tolerant controls [odds ratio (OR: 7.83; 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.60–38.25; P = 0.013, and OR: 4.89; 95% CI: 1.28–18.67; P = 0.014]. In addition, subjects with HLA-A∗33:03, HLA-B∗15:02, and HLA-B∗44:03 were significantly higher in the LTG-induced MPE group than in the tolerant controls (OR: 8.27; 95% CI: 1.83–37.41; P = 0.005, OR: 7.33; 95% CI: 1.63–33.02; P = 0.005; and OR: 10.29; 95% CI: 1.45–72.81; P = 0.029. In contrast to the LTG-induced MPE group, there were no significant differences between HLA alleles and LTG-induced SCAR group.Conclusion:HLA-A∗02:07 and HLA-B∗15:02 were associated with LTG-induced CADR in Thai patients. We also identified an association between HLA-A∗33:03, HLA-B∗15:02, and HLA-B∗44:03 and LTG-induced MPE in this population. These results suggest that these alleles could be useful screening markers for preventing CADR before LTG treatment in Thai patients, but further replication studies with larger sample sizes are needed.

  19. Association of HLA-DQ alleles with the presence of an anti-β₂-glycoprotein I antibody in patients with recurrent miscarriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X; Liang, P-Y; Li, G-G; Diao, L-H; Liu, C-C; Huang, C-Y; Wu, T-H; Xu, J; Zeng, Y

    2016-01-01

    Immunogenetic studies have suggested that autoantibody production is commonly associated with particular human leukocyte antigens (HLA) class II genotypes in certain autoimmune diseases. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the production of anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibody (aβ2GPI) was associated with particular HLA-DQ alleles in patients with recurrent miscarriage (RM). The HLA-DQ genotypes in 126 patients with RM were determined using the polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primer method. Both the IgG and IgM isotypes of aβ2GPI were measured via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Positive results for either IgG or IgM on two occasions within an interval of 12 weeks were defined as antiphospholipid antibody-positive. The frequencies of the HLA-DQA1*01:02 [odds ratio (OR) 3.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-7.0, Pc = 0.018] and HLA-DQB1*02:01 alleles (OR 4.6, 95% CI 2.1-10.2, Pc = 9.18 × 10(-4)) were significantly increased in aβ2GPI-positive RM patients compared with aβ2GPI-negative RM patients. These results suggest that the HLA-DQA1*0102 and HLA-DQB1*0201 alleles may be involved in the production of aβ2GPI in RM patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Common alleles in candidate susceptibility genes associated with risk and development of epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Notaridou, Maria; Quaye, Lydia; Dafou, Dimitra

    2011-01-01

    Common germline genetic variation in the population is associated with susceptibility to epithelial ovarian cancer. Microcell-mediated chromosome transfer and expression microarray analysis identified nine genes associated with functional suppression of tumorogenicity in ovarian cancer cell lines...

  1. The T-allele of TCF7L2 rs7903146 associates with a reduced compensation of insulin secretion for insulin resistance induced by 9 days of bed rest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alibegovic, Amra C; Sonne, Mette P; Højbjerre, Lise

    2010-01-01

    , the TCF7L2 rs7903146 did not influence peripheral insulin action or the rate of lipolysis before or after bed rest. CONCLUSIONS: Healthy carriers of the T-allele of TCF7L2 rs7903146 exhibit a diminished increase of insulin secretion in response to intravenous glucose to compensate for insulin resistance......OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine whether the type 2 diabetes-associated T-allele of transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) rs7903146 associates with impaired insulin secretion to compensate for insulin resistance induced by bed rest. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 38....... The genetic analyses were done assuming a dominant model of inheritance. RESULTS: The first-phase insulin response (FPIR) was significantly lower in carriers of the T-allele compared with carriers of the CC genotype before bed rest, with and without correction for insulin resistance. The incremental rise...

  2. ABO locus O1 allele and risk of myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Beckerath, Nicolas; Koch, Werner; Mehilli, Julinda; Gorchakova, Olga; Braun, Siegmund; Schömig, Albert; Kastrati, Adnan

    2004-01-01

    An association between ABO blood group and myocardial infarction (MI) has been described. One probable mechanism underlying this association is the influence of ABO blood group on plasma von Willebrand factor (vWF) levels. We conducted this genetic study to test whether the ABO O1 allele is associated with low vWF plasma levels and with a reduced risk of MI. Cases consisted of 793 consecutive, angiographically examined patients with either acute or prior MI. As controls served 340 angiographically examined patients with neither coronary artery disease nor signs of MI. ABO1 locus alleles (A1, A2, B, O1, O2) were identified with polymerase chain reaction and fluorogenic probes. The distribution of O1 alleles in the MI group versus the control group was: no O1 allele (15.4%/10.0%), one O1 allele (49.7%/50.0%) and two O1 alleles (34.9%/40.0%) (P = 0.035). O1 allele carriage was associated with a 39% reduction in the risk of MI unadjusted odds ratio, 0.61; 95% confidence interval, 0.41-0.91). The significant association was maintained after adjustment for other cardiovascular risk factors. vWF antigen levels correlated with the number of O1 alleles (P = 0.00003) in a separate control group (n = 164). Carriage of the O1 allele is associated with a decreased risk of myocardial infarction, with homozygosity providing the greatest protection. Copyright 2004 Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

  3. Origin and differential selection of allelic variation at TAS2R16 associated with salicin bitter taste sensitivity in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Michael C; Ranciaro, Alessia; Zinshteyn, Daniel; Rawlings-Goss, Renata; Hirbo, Jibril; Thompson, Simon; Woldemeskel, Dawit; Froment, Alain; Rucker, Joseph B; Omar, Sabah A; Bodo, Jean-Marie; Nyambo, Thomas; Belay, Gurja; Drayna, Dennis; Breslin, Paul A S; Tishkoff, Sarah A

    2014-02-01

    Bitter taste perception influences human nutrition and health, and the genetic variation underlying this trait may play a role in disease susceptibility. To better understand the genetic architecture and patterns of phenotypic variability of bitter taste perception, we sequenced a 996 bp region, encompassing the coding exon of TAS2R16, a bitter taste receptor gene, in 595 individuals from 74 African populations and in 94 non-Africans from 11 populations. We also performed genotype-phenotype association analyses of threshold levels of sensitivity to salicin, a bitter anti-inflammatory compound, in 296 individuals from Central and East Africa. In addition, we characterized TAS2R16 mutants in vitro to investigate the effects of polymorphic loci identified at this locus on receptor function. Here, we report striking signatures of positive selection, including significant Fay and Wu's H statistics predominantly in East Africa, indicating strong local adaptation and greater genetic structure among African populations than expected under neutrality. Furthermore, we observed a "star-like" phylogeny for haplotypes with the derived allele at polymorphic site 516 associated with increased bitter taste perception that is consistent with a model of selection for "high-sensitivity" variation. In contrast, haplotypes carrying the "low-sensitivity" ancestral allele at site 516 showed evidence of strong purifying selection. We also demonstrated, for the first time, the functional effect of nonsynonymous variation at site 516 on salicin phenotypic variance in vivo in diverse Africans and showed that most other nonsynonymous substitutions have weak or no effect on cell surface expression in vitro, suggesting that one main polymorphism at TAS2R16 influences salicin recognition. Additionally, we detected geographic differences in levels of bitter taste perception in Africa not previously reported and infer an East African origin for high salicin sensitivity in human populations.

  4. Allelic Variations at Four Major Maturity E Genes and Transcriptional Abundance of the E1 Gene Are Associated with Flowering Time and Maturity of Soybean Cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yueqiang; Chen, Xin; Ren, Haixiang; Yang, Jiayin; Cheng, Wen; Zong, Chunmei; Gu, Heping; Qiu, Hongmei; Wu, Hongyan; Zhang, Xingzheng; Cui, Tingting; Xia, Zhengjun

    2014-01-01

    The time to flowering and maturity are ecologically and agronomically important traits for soybean landrace and cultivar adaptation. As a typical short-day crop, long day conditions in the high-latitude regions require soybean cultivars with photoperiod insensitivity that can mature before frost. Although the molecular basis of four major E loci (E1 to E4) have been deciphered, it is not quite clear whether, or to what degree, genetic variation and the expression level of the four E genes are associated with the time to flowering and maturity of soybean cultivars. In this study, we genotyped 180 cultivars at E1 to E4 genes, meanwhile, the time to flowering and maturity of those cultivars were investigated at six geographic locations in China from 2011 to 2012 and further confirmed in 2013. The percentages of recessive alleles at E1, E2, E3 and E4 loci were 38.34%, 84.45%, 36.33%, and 7.20%, respectively. Statistical analysis showed that allelic variations at each of four loci had a significant effect on flowering time as well as maturity. We classified the 180 cultivars into eight genotypic groups based on allelic variations of the four major E loci. The genetic group of e1-nf representing dysfunctional alleles at the E1 locus flowered earliest in all the geographic locations. In contrast, cultivars in the E1E2E3E4 group originated from the southern areas flowered very late or did not flower before frost at high latitude locations. The transcriptional abundance of functional E1 gene was significantly associated with flowering time. However, the ranges of time to flowering and maturity were quite large within some genotypic groups, implying the presence of some other unknown genetic factors that are involved in control of flowering time or maturity. Known genes (e.g. E3 and E4) and other unknown factors may function, at least partially, through regulation of the expression of the E1 gene. PMID:24830458

  5. Allelic variation at Glu-1 loci and its association with grain quality of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The high molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS) are important determinants of wheat flour quality. The HMW-GS patterns of the major released wheat cultivars in Sudan, in addition to some advanced lines, were analyzed using SDS-PAGE. The associations of the HMW-GS quality scores (Glu-1 QS) with the flour ...

  6. Allelic variation at Glu-1 loci and its association with grain quality of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Valued Acer Customer

    2011-11-09

    Nov 9, 2011 ... The high molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS) are important determinants of wheat flour quality. The HMW-GS patterns of the major released wheat cultivars in Sudan, in addition to some advanced lines, were analyzed using SDS-PAGE. The associations of the HMW-GS quality scores (Glu-1.

  7. The G allele at the g.70014208A>G in the MYBPC1 gene associated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-11

    Apr 11, 2014 ... 14360166) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports,. Science and Technology of Japan, and by the research funds of. Japanese Livestock Technology Association. References. Boylston T. D., Morgan S. A., Johnson K. A., Busboom J. R.,. Wright R. W. and Reeves J. J. 1995 Lipid-content and composi-.

  8. Molecular evaluation of genetic diversity and association studies in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecular evaluation of genetic diversity and association studies in rice. (Oryza sativa L.) C. Vanniarajan, K. K. Vinod and Andy Pereira. J. Genet. 91, 9–19. Table 1. Chromosome-wise distribution of SSR alleles and their number (k), polymorphic information content (PIC) and allele discrimination index (Dm). Chromosome.

  9. A comprehensive study of oculocutaneous albinism type 1 reveals three previously unidentified alleles on the TYR gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Ying; Wei, Ai-Hua; He, Xin; Zhou, Zhi-Yong; Lian, Shi; Zhu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a congenital genetic disorder characterized by defects in melanin production. OCA type 1 (OCA1) is the most serious and common type of OCA. This study characterized mutations associated with OCA1 in a series of Chinese patients. We recruited 41 unrelated patients with OCA and 100 healthy subjects from the Chinese Han population. Genomic DNA was extracted from their blood samples. Mutational analysis of tyrosinase (TYR) genes was conducted using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing, specifically to test the 100 control subjects and exclude the possibility of polymorphism. Mutational analysis and bioinformatics study were performed in TYR mutations. Among the 24 (58.5%) patients with OCA1, 21 different TYR mutations were identified, including three previously unidentified alleles (PUAs): one frameshift mutation (c.216delA) and two missense mutations (A241T and N364K). The proband mutation A241T carries three possible mutations in complex OCA. The findings of this study expand current knowledge and data of mutations associated with OCA1 in China and allow us to estimate or explore the mutation spectrum and relative frequencies of the TYR gene in the Chinese population.

  10. Frequency of the CCRD32 allele in Brazilians: a study in colorectal cancer and in HTLV-I infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Rinaldo W.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of a 32-bp deletion in the cc-chemokine receptor-5 gene (CCR5delta32 allele that renders homozygous individuals highly resistant to HIV infection has prompted worldwide investigations of the frequency of the CCR5delta32 allele in regional populations. It is important to ascertain if CCR5delta32 is a factor to be considered in the overall epidemiology of HIV in individual populations. With this in mind we determined the CCR5delta32 allele frequency in a large sample (907 individuals of the southeastern Brazilian urban population, stratified as follows: 322 healthy unrelated individuals, 354 unselected colorectal cancer patients, and 229 blood donors. The three groups displayed essentially identical allelic frequencies of CCR5delta32 and pairwise comparisons did not show significant differences. Thus, our results can be pooled to provide a reliable estimate of the CCR5delta32 allele frequency in the southeastern Brazil of 0.053 ± 0.005. The blood donors comprised 50 HTLV-I serologically negative individuals, 115 non-symptomatic individuals HTLV-I positive by ELISA but with indeterminate Western blot results, 49 healthy blood donors HTLV-I positive both at ELISA and Western blot and 15 patients with clinical spinal cord disease (HAM. A suggestive trend was observed, with the CCR5delta32 frequencies decreasing progressively in these four categories. However, when we applied Fischer's exact test no significant differences emerged. We believe that further studies in larger cohorts should be performed to ascertain whether the CCR5delta32 allele influences the chance of becoming infected or developing clinical symptoms of HTLV-I infection.

  11. Associations of common breast cancer susceptibility alleles with risk of breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Robson, Mark; Barrowdale, Daniel; McGuffog, Lesley; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Andrulis, Irene L.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Engel, Christoph; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Nevanlinna, Heli; Thomassen, Mads; Southey, Melissa; Radice, Paolo; Ramus, Susan J.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Lee, Andrew; Healey, Sue; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; James, Paul; Karlan, Beth Y.; Lester, Jenny; Cass, Ilana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Steele, Linda; v O Hansen, Thomas; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Nielsen, Finn C.; Dennis, Joe; Cunningham, Julie; Hart, Steven; Slager, Susan; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Tafur, Isaac; Hander, Mary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Roversi, Gaia; Scuvera, Giulietta; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariani, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Varesco, Liliana; Papi, Laura; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Giannini, Giuseppe; Fostira, Florentia; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Douglas, Fiona; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Ong, Kai-Ren; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Ellis, Steve; Godwin, Andrew K.; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Steinemann, Doris; Bogdanova-Markov, Nadja; Kast, Karin; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Gehrig, Andrea; Markiefka, Birgid; Buecher, Bruno; Lefol, Cédrick; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Barjhoux, Laure; Faivre, Laurence; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bonadona, Valérie; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Isaacs, Claudine; van Maerken, Tom; Claes, Kathleen; Piedmonte, Marion; Andrews, Lesley; Hays, John; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Khan, Sofia; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Aalfs, Cora M.; de Lange, J. L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Wijnen, Juul T.; van Roozendaal, K. E. P.; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Teulé, Alex; Menendez, Mireia; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Arason, Adalgeir; Maugard, Christine; Soucy, Penny; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Olswold, Curtis; Lindor, Noralane; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Hallberg, Emily; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I.; Vijai, Joseph; Jacobs, Lauren; Corines, Marina; Lincoln, Anne; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Gschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; tea, Muy-Kheng; Phelan, Catherine M.; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Glendon, Gord; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria A.; Friedman, Eitan; Berger, Raanan; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; Arver, Brita; Loman, Niklas; Borg, Ake; Ehrencrona, Hans; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Perkins, Jo; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Cole, Trevor; Hoffman, Jonathan; James, Margaret; Paterson, Joan; Downing, Sarah; Taylor, Amy; Murray, Alexandra; McCann, Emma; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Drummond, Sarah; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Hill, Kathryn; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Duncan, Alexis; Jacobs, Chris; Langman, Caroline; Dorkins, Huw; Serra-Feliu, Gemma; Ellis, Ian; Lalloo, Fiona; Taylor, Jane; Side, Lucy; Male, Alison; Berlin, Cheryl; Eason, Jacqueline; Collier, Rebecca; Claber, Oonagh; Jobson, Irene; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eddy, Charlotte; Tripathi, Vishakha; Attard, Virginia; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; McBride, Donna; Smalley, Sarah; Weaver, Joellen; Bove, Betsy; Sinilnikova, Olga; Verny-Pierre, Carole; Calender, Alain; Giraud, Sophie; Léone, Mélanie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Houdayer, Claude; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; de Pauw, Antoine; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Caron, Olivier; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Lasset, Christine; Handallo, Sandrine; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Remenieras, Audrey; Eisinger, François; Coupier, Isabelle; Pujol, Pascal; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Barouk-Simonet, Emmanuelle; Bonnet, Françoise; Bubien, Virginie; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Peysselon, Magalie; Coron, Fanny; Lebrun, Marine; Kientz, Caroline; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Delnatte, Capucine; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Sokolowska, Johanna; Bronner, Myriam; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Damette, Alexandre; Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie L.; Coene, Ilse; Crombez, Brecht; Segura, Pedro Perez; Romero, Atocha; Diaque, Paula; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Muranen, Taru A.; Erkkilä, Irja; Palola, Virpi; Rookus, M. A.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Verhoef, S.; Schmidt, M. K.; Wijnands, R.; Collée, J. M.; van den Ouweland, A. M. W.; Hooning, M. J.; Seynaeve, C.; van Deurzen, C. H. M.; Obdeijn, I. M.; van Asperen, C. J.; Wijnen, J. T.; Tollenaar, R. A. E. M.; Devilee, P.; van Cronenburg, T. C. T. E. F.; Kets, C. M.; Mensenkamp, A. R.; Ausems, M. G. E. M.; van der Luijt, R. B.; van Os, T. A. M.; Gille, J. J. P.; Waisfisz, Q.; Gómez-Garcia, E. B.; Blok, M. J.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van der Hout, A. H.; Mourits, M. J.; de Bock, G. H.; Vasen, H. F.; Siesling, S.; Overbeek, L. I. H.; Papp, Janos; Vaszko, Tibor; Bozsik, Aniko; Pocza, Timea; Franko, Judit; Balogh, Maria; Domokos, Gabriella; Ferenczi, Judit; Balmaña, J.; Capella, Gabriel; Dumont, Martine; Tranchant, Martine

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: More than 70 common alleles are known to be involved in breast cancer (BC) susceptibility, and several exhibit significant heterogeneity in their associations with different BC subtypes. Although there are differences in the association patterns between BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation

  12. Associations of common breast cancer susceptibility alleles with risk of breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); M. Robson (Mark); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); L. McGuffog (Lesley); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); C.W. Engel (Christoph); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); M. Thomassen (Mads); M.C. Southey (Melissa); P. Radice (Paolo); S.J. Ramus (Susan); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); A. Lee (Andrew); S. Healey (Sue); R. Nussbaum (Robert); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B.K. Arun (Banu); M. James (Margaret); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); I. Cass (Ilana); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); M.J. Daly (Mark); D. Goldgar (David); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); L. Tihomirova (Laima); N. Tung (Nadine); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); L. Steele (Linda); T. v O Hansen (Thomas); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); F. Nielsen (Finn); J. Dennis (Joe); J.M. Cunningham (Julie); S. Hart (Stewart); S. Slager (Susan); A. Osorio (Ana); J. Benítez (Javier); M. Duran (Mercedes); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); I. Tafur (Isaac); M. Hander (Mary); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); G. Roversi (Gaia); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); P. Mariani (Paolo); S. Volorio (Sara); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); L. Varesco (Liliana); L. Papi (Laura); M.G. Tibiletti (Maria Grazia); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); F. Fostira (Florentia); I. Konstantopoulou (I.); J. Garber (Judy); U. Hamann (Ute); A. Donaldson (Alan); C. Brewer (Carole); C. Foo (Claire); D.G. Evans (Gareth); D. Frost (Debra); D. Eccles (Diana); F. Douglas (Fiona); A. Brady (A.); J. Cook (Jackie); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); L. Adlard; J. Barwell (Julian); K. Ong; L.J. Walker (Lisa); L. Izatt (Louise); L. Side (Lucy); M.J. Kennedy (John); M.T. Rogers (Mark); M.E. Porteous (Mary); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); R. Platte (Radka); R. Eeles (Ros); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); S. Hodgson (Shirley); S.D. Ellis (Steve); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); A. Meindl (Alfons); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); D. Niederacher (Dieter); C. Sutter (Christian); D. Steinemann (Doris); N. Bogdanova-Markov (Nadja); K. Kast (Karin); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); B. Markiefka (Birgid); B. Buecher (Bruno); C. Lefol (Cédrick); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); E. Rouleau (Etienne); F. Prieur (Fabienne); F. Damiola (Francesca); L. Barjhoux (Laure); L. Faivre (Laurence); M. Longy (Michel); N. Sevenet (Nicolas); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); V. Bonadona (Valérie); V. Caux-Moncoutier (Virginie); C. Isaacs (Claudine); T. Van Maerken (Tom); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); M. Piedmonte (Marion); L. Andrews (Lesley); J. Hays (John); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); S. Khan (Sofia); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); J.L. de Lange (J.); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); K.E. van Roozendaal (Kees); A.R. Mensenkamp (Arjen); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); C.H.M. van Deurzen (Carolien); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); E. Olah; O. Díez (Orland); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); A. Teulé (A.); M. Menéndez (Mireia); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); C. Cybulski (Cezary); J. Gronwald (Jacek); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); A. Arason (Adalgeir); C. Maugard; P. Soucy (Penny); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Agata (Simona); P.J. Teixeira; C. Olswold (Curtis); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); B. Hallberg (Boubou); X. Wang (Xianshu); C. Szabo (Csilla); J. Vijai (Joseph); L. Jacobs (Lauren); M. Corines (Marina); A. Lincoln (Anne); A. Berger (Andreas); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D.G. Kaulich (Daphne Gschwantler); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; C. Phelan (Catherine); P.L. Mai (Phuong); M.H. Greene (Mark); G. Rennert (Gad); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); G. Glendon (Gord); A.E. Toland (Amanda); A. Bojesen (Anders); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); U.B. Jensen; M.A. Caligo (Maria); E. Friedman (Eitan); R. Berger (Raanan); Y. Laitman (Yael); J. Rantala (Johanna); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); N. Loman (Niklas); Å. Borg (Åke); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); J. Simard (Jacques); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); K. Offit (Kenneth); F.J. Couch (Fergus); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); CIMBA; EMBRACE Study; Breast Cancer Family; GEMO Study Collaborators; HEBON; KConFab Investigators

    2014-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: More than 70 common alleles are known to be involved in breast cancer (BC) susceptibility, and several exhibit significant heterogeneity in their associations with different BC subtypes. Although there are differences in the association patterns between BRCA1 and BRCA2

  13. Polymorphisms in HLA-C and KIR alleles are not associated with HAM/TSP risk in HTLV-1-infected subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assone, Tatiane; Malta, Fernanda M; Bakkour, Sonia; Montalvo, Leilani; Paiva, Arthur M; Smid, Jerusa; de Oliveira, Augusto César Penalva; de Toledo Gonçalves, Fernanda; do Carmo Luiz, Olinda; Fonseca, Luiz Augusto M; Norris, Philip J; Casseb, Jorge

    2018-01-15

    Several genetic polymorphisms may be related to susceptibility or resistance to viral disease outcomes. Immunological or genetic factors may act as major triggers of the immune pathogenesis of HAM/TSP. This study investigated the association of immune related genetic polymorphisms with viral and immunological markers. 247 HTLV-1-infected volunteers, drawn from a larger group of HTLV-infected subjects followed at the Institute of Infectious Diseases "Emilio Ribas" (IIER) for up to 19 years, participated in this study, which ran from June 2011 to July 2016. The subjects were classified according to their neurological status into two groups: Group 1 (160 asymptomatic individuals) and Group 2 (87 HAM/TSP patients). Samples were tested for spontaneous lymphocyte proliferation (LPA) and HTLV-1 proviral load (PVL) and for IFN-λ4, HLA-C and KIR genotypes using qPCR. We found associations between LPA (p=0.0001) with HAM/TSP and confirmed the IFN-λ4 polymorphism rs8099917, allele GG, as a protective factor using a recessive model (OR=3.22, CI=1.10-9.47). Polymorphisms in HLA-C and KIR alleles were not associated with risk of developing HAM/TSP. We demonstrated that age, LPA and an IFN-λ4 polymorphism were associated with progression to HAM/TSP. Understanding HAM/TSP pathogenesis can provide important markers of prognostic value for clinical management, and contribute to the discovery of new therapeutic interventions in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Maternal HY-restricting HLA class II alleles are associated with poor long-term outcome in recurrent pregnancy loss after a boy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Astrid Marie; Steffensen, Rudi; Christiansen, Ole Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    PROBLEM: Women with secondary recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) after a boy have a reduced chance of live birth in the first pregnancy after referral if they carry HY-restricting HLA class II alleles, but long-term chance of live birth is unknown. METHODS OF STUDY: Live birth was compared for 540...... II alleles decreased chance of live birth: 0 vs 1: hazard ratio 0.75 (95% CI 0.55-1.02); 0 vs 2: HR 0.62 (0.40-0.94). Carriage of HY-restricting HLA class II alleles decreased chance of live birth only if the firstborn was a boy: boy vs girl: HR 0.72 (95% CI 0.55-0.98). CONCLUSION: Maternal carriage...... of HY-restricting HLA class II alleles decreases long-term chance of live birth in women with RPL after a boy....

  15. Genome-wide linkage and association mapping identify susceptibility alleles in ABCC4 for Kawasaki disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khor, C.C.; Davila, S.; Shimizu, C.; Sheng, S.; Matsubara, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Newburger, J.W.; Baker, A.; Burgner, D.; Breunis, W.; Kuijpers, T.; Wright, V.J.; Levin, M.; Hibberd, M.L.; Burns, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a self limited vasculitis in which host genetics plays a prominent role. To further the understanding of the role of host genetics in KD, a three-stage genetic study was conducted that began with a family linkage study and ultimately involved more than 3000 individuals to

  16. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumor subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J; Barrowdale, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtypes...... in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers defined by estrogen (ER) or progesterone receptor (PR) status of the tumor. METHODS: We used genotype data on up to 11,421 BRCA1 and 7,080 BRCA2 carriers, of whom 4,310 had been affected with breast cancer and had information on either ER or PR status of the tumor......, to assess the associations of twelve loci with breast cancer tumor characteristics. Associations were evaluated using a retrospective cohort approach. RESULTS: The results suggested stronger associations with ER-positive breast cancer than ER-negative for eleven loci in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Among...

  17. Identification and Molecular Analysis of Four New Alleles at the W1 Locus Associated with Flower Color in Soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaramoorthy, Jagadeesh; Park, Gyu Tae; Chang, Jeong Ho; Lee, Jeong-Dong; Kim, Jeong Hoe; Seo, Hak Soo; Chung, Gyuhwa; Song, Jong Tae

    2016-01-01

    In soybean, flavonoid 3′5′-hydroxylase (F3′5′H) and dihydroflavonol-4-reductase (DFR) play a crucial role in the production of anthocyanin pigments. Loss-of-function of the W1 locus, which encodes the former, or W3 and W4, which encode the latter, always produces white flowers. In this study, we searched for new genetic components responsible for the production of white flowers in soybean and isolated four white-flowered mutant lines, i.e., two Glycine soja accessions (CW12700 and CW13381) and two EMS-induced mutants of Glycine max (PE1837 and PE636). F3′5′H expression in CW12700, PE1837, and PE636 was normal, whereas that in CW13381 was aberrant and missing the third exon. Sequence analysis of F3′5′H of CW13381 revealed the presence of an indel (~90-bp AT-repeat) in the second intron. In addition, the F3′5′H of CW12700, PE1837, and PE636 harbored unique single-nucleotide substitutions. The single nucleotide polymorphisms resulted in substitutions of amino acid residues located in or near the SRS4 domain of F3′5′H, which is essential for substrate recognition. 3D structure modeling of F3′5′H indicated that the substitutions could interfere with an interaction between the substrate and heme group and compromise the conformation of the active site of F3′5′H. Recombination analysis revealed a tight correlation between all of the mutant alleles at the W1 locus and white flower color. On the basis of the characterization of the new mutant alleles, we discussed the biological implications of F3′5′H and DFR in the determination of flower colors in soybean. PMID:27442124

  18. A Novel ABCA4 Mutation Associated with a Late-Onset Stargardt Disease Phenotype: A Hypomorphic Allele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy S. Kaway

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stargardt disease (STGD is the most common juvenile hereditary macular dystrophy. In the majority of cases, the diagnosis is made prior to 20 years of age and usually leads to loss of central vision. Late-onset STGD affects a smaller number of patients. Identifying genetic changes which could be associated with clinically important differences in severity or presentation of the disease is important for understanding the mechanisms of visual loss and for planning future therapeutic approaches. Methods: We report a patient with the classic phenotype of STGD with late-onset mild disease exhibiting a slow clinical progression over 14 months of follow-up. Results: A 37-year-old man presented with STGD and good vision of 6/24 in the right eye and of 6/6 in the left eye as well as typical electrophysiology findings. Objective and subjective visual deterioration was not noted over a period of 14 months. Macular genetic testing revealed a novel missense mutation in ABCA4 (Thr829Met combined with Gly1961Glu, a classic STGD mutation usually associated with a moderately severe phenotype. Conclusions: It is suggested that the Thr829Met mutation could give rise to a hypomorphic allele of the ABC transporter with a resultant phenotype of comparatively mild STGD.

  19. The Study of Morphological Traits and Identification of Self-incompatibility Alleles in Almond Cultivars and Genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousa Rasouli

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of an almond collection using morphological variables and identification of self-incompatibility genotype  is useful for selecting pollinizers and for the design of crossing in almond breeding programs. In this study, important morphological traits and self-incompatibilities in 71 almond cultivars and genotypes were studied. Simple and multiplex specific PCR analyses were used in order to identify self-incompatibility alleles. Based on the results, cultivars and genotypes including ‘Dir Ras–e-Savojbolagh’, ‘D-124’, ‘D-99’, ‘Shahrood 12’, ‘Tuono’, ‘Nonpareil’, ‘Price’, ‘Mirpanj-e-Tehran’, ‘Pakotahe-e- Taleghan’, ‘V-13-34’, ‘V-16-8, ‘V-11-10’, ‘Zarghan 10’, ‘Uromiyeh 68’, ‘Barg dorosht-e-Hamedan’ and ‘Yazd 60’ were late flowering and had the highest quality of nut and kernel characters. The result of the PCR method using combined primers AS1II and AmyC5R showed amplification of ten self-incompatibility alleles (S1, S2, S3, S5, S6, S7, S8, S10, S12,and S unknown allele and three Sfalleles. Moreover, S1 had the highest frequencies in comparison with other known S-alleles. Also, unknown alleles with different sizes were detected and 58 new bands were found in some cultivars.

  20. A microsatellite study for determination of allelic variation of Kurdish population-Kurdistan region-Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad, Media J.; Amin, Bushra K.

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was detecting genetic variations for the Kurdish population in Kurdistan region-Iraq, using fifteen autosomal STR loci. Buccal swabs were collected and depositing on Nucleic Card (Copan, Italia Spa) from 302 healthy unrelated Iraqi Kurds in five provinces of Kurdistan region-Iraq. Fifteen autosomal STR loci are D8S1179, D21S11, D7S820, CSF1PO, D3S1358, TH01, D13S317, D16S539, D2S1338, D19S433, vWA, TPOX, D18S51, D5S818, FGA and Amelogenin included in the AmpFlSTR Identifiler® Direct PCR Amplification Kit (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA, USA). No significant departure from Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) expectations were observed in 10 from 15 STR loci analyzed (a 5% significance level was taken). The exceptions were the CSF1PO, D3S1358, D13S317, D16S539 and D2S1338 loci. Statistical parameters of forensic efficiencies were estimated for the loci, based on allelic frequencies. The mean of observed heterozygosity, expected heterozygosity and PIC values across the 15 loci were 0.762, 0.797 and 0.768 respectively, indicating high gene diversity. The combined probability of exclusion, power of discrimination, probability of matching value for all the 15 STR loci were 0.9999968; 0.9999999 and 4.966×10-17, respectively. These parameters indicated the importance of the loci for forensic genetic purposes and paternity testing.

  1. The Type 2 Diabetes Associated Minor Allele of rs2237895 KCNQ1 Associates with Reduced Insulin Release Following an Oral Glucose Load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunak, Søren; Holmkvist, J; Banasik, K

    2009-01-01

    , and rs2237897) on estimates of glucose stimulated insulin release. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Genotypes were examined for associations with serum insulin levels following an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in a population-based sample of 6,039 middle-aged and treatment-naïve individuals. Insulin......+/-SD: (CC) 277+/-160 vs. (AC) 280+/-164 vs. (AA) 299+/-200 pmol/l, p = 0.008) after an oral glucose load, insulinogenic index (29.6+/-17.4 vs. 30.2+/-18.7vs. 32.2+/-22.1, p = 0.007), incremental area under the insulin curve (20,477+/-12,491 vs. 20,503+/-12,386 vs. 21,810+/-14,685, p = 0.02) among the 4...... for the less common diabetes risk alleles of rs2237892, rs2237897, or rs2283228. CONCLUSION: The minor C-allele of rs2237895 of KCNQ1, which has a prevalence of about 42% among Caucasians was associated with reduced measures of insulin release following an oral glucose load suggesting that the increased risk...

  2. Association of H2A{sup b} with resistance to collagen-induced arthritis in H2-recombinant mouse strains: An allele associated with reduction of several apparently unrelated responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchison, N.A.; Brunner, M.C. [Deutsches Rheuma-Forschungszentrum, Berlin (Germany)

    1995-02-01

    HLA class II alleles can protect against immunological diseases. Seeking an animal model for a naturally occurring protective allele, we screened a panel of H2-congenic and recombinant mouse strains for ability to protect against collagen-induced arthritis. The strains were crossed with the susceptible strain DBA/1, and the F{sub 1} hybrids immunized with cattle and chicken type II collagen. Hybrids having the H2A{sup b} allele displayed a reduced incidence and duration of the disease. They also had a reduced level of pre-disease inflammation, but not of anti-collagen antibodies. The allele is already known to be associated with reduction of other apparently unrelated immune responses, suggesting that some form of functional differentiation may operate that is not exclusively related to epitope-binding. It is suggested that this may reflect allelic variation in the class II major histocompatibility complex promoter region. 42 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Association of the cad-n1 allele with increased stem growth and wood density in full-sib families of loblolly pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Q. Yu; B. Li; C.D. Nelson; S.E. McKeand; T.J. Mullin

    2005-01-01

    Stem growth and wood density associated with a mutant null (cad-nl) allele were examined in three 15-year old loblolly pine half-diallel tests established on two sites in the southern United States. In each half-diallel test, one or two cad-nl heterozygous parents were crossed with five unrelated wild-type parents to produce five...

  4. Association of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ and HLA-DQA1/DQB1 alleles with Vogt–Koyanagi–Harada disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing; Deng, Tuo; Zhu, Linxin; Zhong, Jingxiang

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ and HLA-DQA1/DQB1 alleles with Vogt–Koyanagi–Harada (VKH), providing further evidences on the genetic background of this disease. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was conducted on the relationship of HLA-DQ and/or HLA-DQA1/DQB1 alleles with VKH through PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, VIP, and databases for grey literature. The last search was in October 2017. Pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) was calculated from extracted data to access the strength of the association between a genotype and VKH. Results: HLA-DQ4 was confirmed to increase the risk of VKH significantly (OR = 4.63, 95% CI: 1.74–12.31, P = .002), while HLA-DQ1 seemed to reduce VKH occurrence with OR = 0.32 (95% CI: 0.22–0.47, P HLA-DQA1∗0301-(OR = 4.52, 95% CI: 1.42–14.35, P = .01) and HLA-DQB1∗0401-(OR = 23.12, 95% CI: 11.54–46.31, P HLA-DQA1∗0103, 0401, 0501 and HLA-DQB1∗0301, 0402, 0601, 0603 were significant protective genetic factors. Conclusion: We concluded that HLA-DQ4 carriers had a higher risk of VKH and HLA-DQ1 seemed to be protective. People with positive HLA-DQA1∗0301 and HLA-DQB1∗0401 demonstrated to be more susceptible to VKH. HLA-DQA1∗0103, 0401, 0501 and HLA-DQB1∗0301, 0402, 0601, 0603 could be potential protectors. PMID:29443768

  5. Host microsatellite alleles in malaria predisposition?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trivedi Rajni

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is a serious, sometimes fatal, disease caused by Plasmodium infection of human red blood cells. The host-parasite co-evolutionary processes are well understood by the association of coding variations such as G6PD, Duffy blood group receptor, HLA, and beta-globin gene variants with malaria resistance. The profound genetic diversity in host is attributed to polymorphic microsatellites loci. The microsatellite alleles in bacterial species are known to have aided their survival in fatal environmental conditions. The fascinating question is whether microsatellites are genomic cushion in the human genome to combat disease stress and has cause-effect relationships with infections. Presentation of the hypothesis It is hypothesized that repeat units or alleles of microsatellites TH01 and D5S818, located in close proximity to beta-globin gene and immune regulatory region in human play a role in malaria predisposition. Association of alleles at aforesaid microsatellites with malaria infection was analysed. To overrule the false association in unrecognized population stratification, structure analysis and AMOVA were performed among the sampled groups. Testing of hypothesis Associations of microsatellite alleles with malaria infection were verified using recombination rate, Chi-square, and powerful likelihood tests. Further investigation of population genetic structure, and AMOVA was done to rule out the confounding effects of population stratification in interpretation of association studies. Implication of the hypothesis Lower recombination rate (θ between microsatellites and genes implicated in host fitness; positive association between alleles -13 (D5S818, 9 (TH01 and strong susceptibility to Plasmodium falciparum; and alleles-12 (D5S818 and 6 (TH01 rendering resistance to human host were evident. The interesting fact emerging from the study was that while predisposition to malaria was a prehistoric attribute, among TH01

  6. Frequencies distribution of dihydrofolate reductase and dihydropteroate synthetase mutant alleles associated with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum population from Hadhramout Governorate, Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamaga, Omar A A; Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Lim, Yvonne A L

    2015-12-22

    Malaria in Yemen is mainly caused by Plasmodium falciparum and 25% of the population is at high risk. Sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) had been used as monotherapy against P. falciparum. Emergence of chloroquine resistance led to the shift in anti-malarial treatment policy in Yemen to artemisinin-based combination therapy, that is artesunate (AS) plus SP as first-line therapy for uncomplicated malaria and artemether-lumefantrine as second-line treatment. This study aimed to screen mutations in the dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) and dihydropteroate synthetase (dhps) genes associated with SP resistance among P. falciparum population in Hadhramout governorate, Yemen. Genomic DNA was extracted from dried blood spots of 137 P. falciparum isolates collected from a community-based study. DNA was amplified using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subsequently sequenced for Pfdhfr and Pfdhps genes. Sequences were analysed for mutations in Pfdhfr gene codons 51, 59, 108, and 164 and in Pfdhps gene codons 436, 437, and 540. A total of 128 and 114 P. falciparum isolates were successfully sequenced for Pfdhfr and Pfdhps genes, respectively. Each Pfdhfr mutant allele (I51 and N108) in P. falciparum population had a frequency of 84%. Pfdhfr R59 mutant allele was detected in one isolate. Mutation at codon 437 (G437) in the Pfdhps gene was detected in 44.7% of falciparum malaria isolates. Frequencies of Pfdhfr double mutant genotype (I51C59N108I164) and Pfdhfr/Pfdhps triple mutant genotype (I51C59N108I164-S436G437K540) were 82.8 and 39.3%, respectively. One isolate harboured Pfdhfr triple mutant genotype (I51, R59, N108, I164) and Pfdhfr/Pfdhps quadruple mutant genotype (I51R59N108I164-S436G437K540). High frequencies of Pfdhfr and Pfdhps mutant alleles and genotypes in P. falciparum population in Hadhramout, Yemen, highlight the risk of developing resistance for SP, the partner drug of AS, which subsequently will expose the parasite to AS monotherapy increasing then the

  7. Association of the HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 Alleles in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetic Nephropathy in the Han Ethnicity of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ze-Jun; Sun, Pei; Guo, Gang; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Li-Ming

    2013-01-01

    HLA gene system is one of the most polymorphic regions of the human genome. The association of HLA class II genes in T1DM pathogenesis has been reported for several ethnicities. Associations of HLA class II genes with T2DM have revealed inconsistent results. Moreover, correlations between DN and HLA alleles remain unclear. We carried out DNA typing chip by specific medium resolution typing probes in 310 T2DM subjects (including 210 patients with DN and 100 patients without DN) in addition to 100 healthy controls. Differences were found between patients with T2DM and the control group in the frequencies of the HLA-DQA1∗0301 (15.5% versus 8.0%, P HLA-DQA1∗0501 alleles (16.6% versus 8.5%, P HLA-DQA1∗0302 (6.9% versus 13.5%, P HLA-DQA1∗0301 and HLA-DQA1∗0501 alleles are markers of susceptibility for T2DM, and the HLA-DQB1∗0501 allele is associated with a protective effect on DN in Han ethnicity of China.

  8. Association of the HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 Alleles in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetic Nephropathy in the Han Ethnicity of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze-Jun Ma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available HLA gene system is one of the most polymorphic regions of the human genome. The association of HLA class II genes in T1DM pathogenesis has been reported for several ethnicities. Associations of HLA class II genes with T2DM have revealed inconsistent results. Moreover, correlations between DN and HLA alleles remain unclear. We carried out DNA typing chip by specific medium resolution typing probes in 310 T2DM subjects (including 210 patients with DN and 100 patients without DN in addition to 100 healthy controls. Differences were found between patients with T2DM and the control group in the frequencies of the HLA-DQA1*0301 (15.5% versus 8.0%, P<0.01 and the HLA-DQA1*0501 alleles (16.6% versus 8.5%, P<0.01. Differences were found between patients with DN and without DN in the frequencies of the HLA-DQA1*0302 (6.9% versus 13.5%, P<0.01 and HLA-DQB1*0501 alleles (5.8% versus 14.5%, P<0.01. Diabetes duration and systolic blood pressure were independent risk factors associated with DN (OR=2.277 and 1.366, resp., P<0.05, whereas the HLA-DQB1*0501 llele had a protective effect on DN (OR=0.53, P<0.05. These data suggest the HLA-DQA1*0301 and HLA-DQA1*0501 alleles are markers of susceptibility for T2DM, and the HLA-DQB1*0501 allele is associated with a protective effect on DN in Han ethnicity of China.

  9. Comparison of HLA allelic imputation programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason H Karnes

    Full Text Available Imputation of human leukocyte antigen (HLA alleles from SNP-level data is attractive due to importance of HLA alleles in human disease, widespread availability of genome-wide association study (GWAS data, and expertise required for HLA sequencing. However, comprehensive evaluations of HLA imputations programs are limited. We compared HLA imputation results of HIBAG, SNP2HLA, and HLA*IMP:02 to sequenced HLA alleles in 3,265 samples from BioVU, a de-identified electronic health record database coupled to a DNA biorepository. We performed four-digit HLA sequencing for HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DPB1, and -DQB1 using long-read 454 FLX sequencing. All samples were genotyped using both the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip platform and a GWAS platform. Call rates and concordance rates were compared by platform, frequency of allele, and race/ethnicity. Overall concordance rates were similar between programs in European Americans (EA (0.975 [SNP2HLA]; 0.939 [HLA*IMP:02]; 0.976 [HIBAG]. SNP2HLA provided a significant advantage in terms of call rate and the number of alleles imputed. Concordance rates were lower overall for African Americans (AAs. These observations were consistent when accuracy was compared across HLA loci. All imputation programs performed similarly for low frequency HLA alleles. Higher concordance rates were observed when HLA alleles were imputed from GWAS platforms versus the HumanExome BeadChip, suggesting that high genomic coverage is preferred as input for HLA allelic imputation. These findings provide guidance on the best use of HLA imputation methods and elucidate their limitations.

  10. Beyond mean allelic effects: A locus at the major color gene MC1R associates also with differing levels of phenotypic and genetic (co)variance for coloration in barn owls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San-Jose, Luis M; Ducret, Valérie; Ducrest, Anne-Lyse; Simon, Céline; Roulin, Alexandre

    2017-10-01

    The mean phenotypic effects of a discovered variant help to predict major aspects of the evolution and inheritance of a phenotype. However, differences in the phenotypic variance associated to distinct genotypes are often overlooked despite being suggestive of processes that largely influence phenotypic evolution, such as interactions between the genotypes with the environment or the genetic background. We present empirical evidence for a mutation at the melanocortin-1-receptor gene, a major vertebrate coloration gene, affecting phenotypic variance in the barn owl, Tyto alba. The white MC1R allele, which associates with whiter plumage coloration, also associates with a pronounced phenotypic and additive genetic variance for distinct color traits. Contrarily, the rufous allele, associated with a rufous coloration, relates to a lower phenotypic and additive genetic variance, suggesting that this allele may be epistatic over other color loci. Variance differences between genotypes entailed differences in the strength of phenotypic and genetic associations between color traits, suggesting that differences in variance also alter the level of integration between traits. This study highlights that addressing variance differences of genotypes in wild populations provides interesting new insights into the evolutionary mechanisms and the genetic architecture underlying the phenotype. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  11. Expression of human PTPN22 alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C; Barington, T; Husby, S

    2007-01-01

    Considering the female predominance in most of the autoimmune disorders that associate with the PTPN22 Trp620 variant and the complexity by which this variant influences immunologic tolerance, the objective of this study was to ascertain if the allele-specific expression of the disease...... and 72 h of activation, respectively, the expression of PTPN22 1858C- and T-alleles increased to the same extent (P=0.64). The present result essentially excludes such phenomena as a partial explanation for the female predominance in most of the autoimmune disorders that associate with the PTPN22 Trp620...

  12. Interaction between BDNF rs6265 Met allele and low family cohesion is associated with smaller left hippocampal volume in pediatric bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeni, Cristian Patrick; Mwangi, Benson; Cao, Bo; Hasan, Khader M; Walss-Bass, Consuelo; Zunta-Soares, Giovana; Soares, Jair C

    2016-01-01

    Genetic and environmental factors are implicated in the onset and evolution of pediatric bipolar disorder, and may be associated to structural brain abnormalities. The aim of our study was to assess the impact of the interaction between the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) rs6265 polymorphism and family functioning on hippocampal volumes of children and adolescents with bipolar disorder, and typically-developing controls. We evaluated the family functioning cohesion subscale using the Family Environment Scale-Revised, genotyped the BDNF rs6265 polymorphism, and performed structural brain imaging in 29 children and adolescents with bipolar disorder, and 22 healthy controls. We did not find significant differences between patients with BD or controls in left or right hippocampus volume (p=0.44, and p=0.71, respectively). However, we detected a significant interaction between low scores on the cohesion subscale and the presence of the Met allele at BNDF on left hippocampal volume of patients with bipolar disorder (F=3.4, p=0.043). None of the factors independently (BDNF Val66Met, cohesion scores) was significantly associated with hippocampal volume differences. small sample size, cross-sectional study. These results may lead to a better understanding of the impact of the interaction between genes and environment factors on brain structures associated to bipolar disorder and its manifestations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Binding Patterns Associated Aß-HSP60 p458 Conjugate to HLA-DR-DRB Allele of Human in Alzheimer's Disease: An In Silico Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmadas, Naveen; Panda, Pritam Kumar; Durairaj, Sudarsanam

    2016-04-23

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex, irreversible, progressive brain disorder, which diminishes memory in a slow pace and thinking skills; ranked third by experts. It is a complex disorder that involves numerous cellular and subcellular alterations. The pathogenesis of AD is still unknown, but for better understanding, we proposed an in silico analysis to find out the binding patterns associated with HSP60. Several experimental conclusions have been drawn to understand the actual mechanism behind the forming of aggregation due to misfolding. Protein misfolding disorder is experimentally identified by the accumulation of protein aggregates at the intracellular or extracellular region of brain that adversely affects the cell functioning by disrupting the connection between the cells and ultimately leading to cell death. To unravel the mystery behind the mechanism of AD through computational approach, the current proposal shows the designing of Aß-HSP60 p458 conjugate followed by secondary structure analysis, which is further targeted to HLA-DR-DRB allele of human. The antigenicity of Aß (1-42) peptide is the major concern in our study predicted through PVS server, which provides an insight into the immunogenic behavior of Aß peptide. The mechanism involved in the interaction of HSP60-Aß conjugate with HLA-DR-DRB allele considering the fact that Aß (1-42) is highly immunogenic in human and interactions evoked highly robust T-cell response through MHC class II binding predictions. It was assisted by molecular dynamics simulation of predicted HSP60 structure followed by validation through Ramachandran plot analysis and protein-protein interaction of Aß (1-42) with HSP60.

  14. High intestinal cholesterol absorption is associated with cardiovascular disease and risk alleles in ABCG8 and ABO: evidence from the LURIC and YFS cohorts and from a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbernagel, Günther; Chapman, M John; Genser, Bernd; Kleber, Marcus E; Fauler, Günter; Scharnagl, Hubert; Grammer, Tanja B; Boehm, Bernhard O; Mäkelä, Kari-Matti; Kähönen, Mika; Carmena, Rafael; Rietzschel, Ernst R; Bruckert, Eric; Deanfield, John E; Miettinen, Tatu A; Raitakari, Olli T; Lehtimäki, Terho; März, Winfried

    2013-07-23

    This study sought to determine whether high intestinal cholesterol absorption represents a cardiovascular risk factor and to link ABCG8 and ABO variants to cardiovascular disease (CVD). Plant sterol-enriched functional foods are widely used for cholesterol lowering. Their regular intake yields a 2-fold increase in circulating plant sterol levels that equally represent markers of cholesterol absorption. Variants in ABCG8 and ABO have been associated with circulating plant sterol levels and CVD, thereby suggesting atherogenic effects of plant sterols or of cholesterol uptake. The cholestanol-to-cholesterol ratio (CR) was used as an estimate of cholesterol absorption because it is independent of plant sterols. First, we investigated the associations of 6 single nucleotide polymorphisms in ABCG8 and ABO with CR in the LURIC (LUdwisghafen RIsk and Cardiovascular health study) and the YFS (Young Finns Study) cohorts. Second, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate whether CR might be related to CVD. In LURIC, the minor alleles of rs4245791 and rs4299376 and the major alleles of rs41360247, rs6576629, and rs4953023 of the ABCG8 gene and the minor allele of rs657152 of the ABO gene were significantly associated with higher CR. Consistent results were obtained for rs4245791, rs4299376, rs6576629, and rs4953023 in YFS. The meta-analysis, including 6 studies and 4,362 individuals, found that CR was significantly increased in individuals with CVD. High cholesterol absorption is associated with risk alleles in ABCG8 and ABO and with CVD. Harm caused by elevated cholesterol absorption rather than by plant sterols may therefore mediate the relationships of ABCG8 and ABO variants with CVD. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Apolipoprotein E4 Allele and Gait Performance in Mild Cognitive Impairment: Results From the Gait and Brain Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Ryota; Montero-Odasso, Manuel

    2017-11-09

    The apolipoprotein E polymorphism ε4 allele (ApoE4) and gait impairment are both known risk factors for developing cognitive decline and dementia. However, it is unclear the interrelationship between these factors, particularly among older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) who are considered as prodromal for Alzheimer's disease. This study aimed to determine whether ApoE4 carrier individuals with MCI may experience greater impairment in gait performance. Fifty-six older adults with MCI from the "Gait and Brain Study" who were identified as either ApoE4 carriers (n = 20) or non-ApoE4 carriers (n = 36) with 1 year of follow-up were included. Gait variability, the main outcome variable, was assessed as stride time variability with an electronic walkway. Additional gait variables and cognitive performance (mini-mental state examination [MMSE] and Montreal Cognitive Assessment [MoCA]) were also recorded. Covariates included age, sex, education level, body mass index, and number of comorbidities. Baseline characteristics were similar for both groups. Repeated measures analysis of covariance showed that gait stride time and stride length variabilities significantly increased in ApoE4 carriers but was maintained in the non-ApoE4 carriers. Similarly, ApoE4 carriers showed greater decrease in MMSE score at follow-up. In this sample of older adults with MCI, the presence of at least one copy of ApoE4 was associated with the development of both increased gait variability and cognitive decline during 1 year of follow-up. ApoE4 genotype might be considered as a potential mediator of decline in mobility function in MCI; future studies with larger samples are needed to confirm our preliminary findings. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. The FOXO3A rs2802292 G-Allele Associates with Improved Peripheral and Hepatic Insulin Sensitivity and Increased Skeletal Muscle-FOXO3A mRNA Expression in Twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banasik, Karina; Ribel-Madsen, Rasmus; Gjesing, Anette P

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The minor G-allele of FOXO3A rs2802292 has been associated with longevity. We aimed to investigate whether a phenotype related to healthy metabolic aging could be identified in individuals carrying the longevity-associated FOXO3A rs2802292 G-allele. Research Design and Methods: rs28022...

  17. Ancestry of the Timorese: Age-related macular degeneration associated genotype and allele sharing among human populations from throughout the world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaux A Morrison

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We observed that the third leading cause of blindness in the world, age-related macular degeneration (AMD, occurs at a very low documented frequency in a population-based cohort from Timor-Leste. Thus, we determined a complete catalogue of the ancestry of the Timorese by analysis of whole exome chip data and haplogroup analysis of SNP genotypes determined by sequencing the Hypervariable I and II regions of the mitochondrial genome and 17 genotyped YSTR markers obtained from 535 individuals. We genotyped 20 previously reported AMD-associated SNPs in the Timorese to examine their allele frequencies compared to and between previously documented AMD cohorts of varying ethnicities. For those without AMD (average age > 55 years, genotype and allele frequencies were similar for most SNPs with a few exceptions. The major risk allele of HTRA1 rs11200638 (10q26 was at a significantly higher frequency in the Timorese, as well as 3 of the 5 protective CFH (1q32 SNPs (rs800292, rs2284664, and rs12066959. Additionally, the most commonly associated AMD-risk SNP, CFH rs1061170 (Y402H, was also seen at a much lower frequency in the Korean and Timorese populations than in the assessed Caucasian populations (C ~7% vs. ~40%, respectively. The difference in allele frequencies between the Timorese population and the other genotyped populations, along with the haplogroup analysis, also highlight the genetic diversity of the Timorese. Specifically, the most common ancestry groupings were Oceanic (Melanesian and Papuan and Eastern Asian (specifically Han Chinese. The low prevalence of AMD in the Timorese population (2 of 535 randomly selected participants may be due to the enrichment of protective alleles in this population at the 1q32 locus.

  18. Further studies of the influence of apolipoprotein B alleles on glucose and lipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Joan; Poulsen, Pernille; Vaag, Allan

    2003-01-01

    The effect of five genetic polymorphisms in the apolipoprotein B gene on parameters of lipid and glucose metabolism was assessed in 564 Danish mono- and dizygotic twins. Genotypes in apolipoprotein B T71I (ApaLI RFLP), A591V (AluI RFLP), L2712P (MvaI RFLP), R3611Q (MspI RFLP), and E4154K (Eco...... for the effect of gender, age, glucose tolerance status, and body mass index. The effect of genotype on the risk of having impaired glucose metabolism was calculated by logistic regression analysis. Finally, linkage between allele sharing and physiological parameters was calculated by the new Haseman......-Elston method. The allele frequencies of all five polymorphisms were similar to those previously reported for Caucasian populations. The L2711P (MvaI RFLP) polymorphism influenced LDL-cholesterol and LDL-to-HDL measures (p = 0.04 and 0.03, respectively), while the R3611Q (MspI RFLP) polymorphism had an effect...

  19. APOL1 Risk Alleles Are Associated With More Severe Arteriosclerosis in Renal Resistance Vessels With Aging and Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Hughson

    2016-05-01

    Discussion: With the limitation of the small number of subjects contributing to the positive results, the findings imply that APOL1 risk alleles recessively augment small-vessel arteriosclerosis in conjunction with age and hypertension. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis was not a significant finding, indicating that in the early stages of arterionephrosclerosis, the primary pathologic influence of APOL1 genotype is vascular rather than glomerular.

  20. [Study on the correlation between chronic asymptomatic HBV carriers of yin asthenia constitution and genotypes of HLA-DRB1 and HLA DQA1 alleles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jian-chun; Xiao, Li-na; Xun, Yun-hao

    2012-08-01

    To study on the correlation between chronic asymptomatic HBV carriers (ASC) of yin asthenia constitution and genotypes of HLA-DRB1 and HLA DQA1 alleles. Totally 105 ASC were assigned to two groups according to their constitutions, i.e., the yin asthenia group (47 cases) and the non-yin asthenia group (58 cases). The genotypes of HLA-DRB1 and HLA DQA1 alleles were determined using PCR-SSP. The gene frequency of HLA-DRB1 * 09 allele and HLA-DQA1 * 0301 allele (being 12.1% and 19.1%) were obviously lower in the yin asthenia group than in the non-yin asthenia group (being 27.8% and 39.7%, P HLA-DQA1 * 0501 allele were obviously higher in the yin asthenia group (being 12.1% and 28.7%) than in the non-yin asthenia group (4.3% and 9.5%), showing statistical difference (P HLA-DQA1 * 0301 allele might be the molecular bases for non-yin asthenia patients with ASC. HLA-DRB1 * 11 allele and HLA-DQA1 * 0501 allele might be the molecular bases for yin asthenia patients with ASC.

  1. The minor C-allele of rs2014355 in ACADS is associated with reduced insulin release following an oral glucose load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornbak, Malene; Banasik, Karina; Justesen, Johanne Marie

    2011-01-01

    -coenzyme A dehydrogenase (ACADM) impair fatty acid beta-oxidation. Chronic exposure to fatty acids due to an impaired beta-oxidation may down-regulate the glucose-stimulated insulin release and result in an increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). We aimed to investigate whether the two variants associate with altered...... an oral glucose load (per allele effect (beta)=-3.8% (-6.3%;-1.3%), P=0.003), reduced incremental area under the insulin curve (beta=-3.6% (-6.3%;-0.9%), P=0.009), reduced acute insulin response (beta=-2.2% (-4.2%;0.2%), P=0.03), and with increased insulin sensitivity ISIMatsuda (beta= 2.9% (0.5%;5.2%), P......=0.02). The C-allele did not associate with two other measures of insulin sensitivity or with a derived disposition index. The C-allele was not associated with T2D in the case-control analysis (OR 1.07, 95% CI 0.96-1.18, P=0.21). rs11161510 of ACADM did not associate with any indices of glucose...

  2. Allelic Variation in the Perennial Ryegrass FLOWERING LOCUS T Gene is Associated with Changes in Flowering Time across a Range of Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skøt, Leif; Sanderson, Ruth; Thomas, Ann

    2011-01-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) gene and its orthologs in other plant species (e.g. rice [Oryza sativa] OsFTL2/Hd3a) have an established role in the photoperiodic induction of flowering response. The genomic and phenotypic variations associated with the perennial...... or structured association with further correction using genomic control indicated significant associations between LpFT3 and variation in flowering time. These associations were corroborated in a validation population segregating for the same major alleles. The most "diagnostic" region of genomic variation...

  3. Risk allelic load in Th2 and Th3 cytokines genes as biomarker of susceptibility to HPV-16 positive cervical cancer: a case control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres-Poveda, K.; Burguete-García, A. I.; Bahena-Román, M.; Méndez-Martínez, R.; Zurita-Díaz, M. A.; López-Estrada, G.; Delgado-Romero, K.; Peralta-Zaragoza, O.; Bermúdez-Morales, V. H.; Cantú, D.; García-Carrancá, A.; Madrid-Marina, V.

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the host cellular immune response allow persistent infections with High-Risk Human Papillomavirus (HR-HPV) and development of premalignant cervical lesions and cervical cancer (CC). Variations of immunosuppressive cytokine levels in cervix are associated with the natural history of CC. To assess the potential role of genetic host immunity and cytokines serum levels in the risk of developing CC, we conducted a case–control study paired by age. Peripheral blood samples from patients with CC (n = 200) and hospital controls (n = 200), were used to evaluate nine biallelic SNPs of six cytokine genes of the adaptive immune system by allelic discrimination and cytokines serum levels by ELISA. After analyzing the SNP association by multivariate logistic regression adjusted by age, CC history and smoking history, three Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10) and one Th3 (TGFB1) cytokine were significantly associated with CC. Individuals with at least one copy of the following risk alleles: T of SNP (−590C > T IL-4), C of SNP (−573G > C IL-6), A of SNP (−592C > A IL-10), T of SNP (−819C > T IL-10) and T of SNP (−509C > T TGFB1), had an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 2.08 (95 % CI 1.475–2.934, p = 0.0001), an OR of 1.70 (95 % CI 1.208–2.404, p = 0.002), an OR of 1.87 (95 % CI 1.332–2.630, p = 0.0001), an OR of 1.67 (95 % CI 1.192–2.353, p = 0.003) and an OR of 1.91 (95 % CI 1.354–2.701, p = 0.0001), respectively, for CC. The burden of carrying two or more of these risk alleles was found to have an additive effect on the risk of CC (p trend = 0.0001). Finally, the serum levels of Th2 and Th3 cytokines were higher in CC cases than the controls; whereas IFNG levels, a Th1 cytokine, were higher in controls than CC cases. The significant associations of five SNPs with CC indicate that these polymorphisms are potential candidates for predicting the risk of development of CC, representing a risk allelic load for CC and can be used as a biomarker of

  4. Alpha tryptase allele of Tryptase 1 (TPSAB1) gene associated with Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) and Dengue Shock Syndrome (DSS) in Vietnam and Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez, Clara Vasquez; Roman, Arthur Dessi; Lan, Nguyen Thi Phuong; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Mercado, Edelwisa Segubre; Espino, Fe Esperanza; Perez, Ma Lucila M; Huong, Vu Thi Que; Thuy, Tran Thi; Tham, Vo Dinh; Nga, Cao Thi Phi; Ha, Tran Thi Ngoc; Bilar, Josie M; Bajaro, Jemimah Dawn P; Baello, Benilda Q; Kikuchi, Mihoko; Yasunami, Michio; Morita, Kouichi; Watanabe, Naohiro; Karbwang, Juntra; Hirayama, Kenji

    2015-05-01

    We previously reported, significantly higher levels of Chymase and Tryptase in early stage plasma of DSS patients prior to the occurrence of shock suggesting a possible role of mast cells in dengue pathogenesis. To further investigate, we analyzed CMA1 promoter SNP (rs1800875) and TPSAB1 gene alleles, which encode the Human Chymase and α- and β- tryptase 1 enzymes respectively, for susceptibility to Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) and Dengue Shock Syndrome (DSS) in patients from hospitals in Vietnam (Ho Chi Minh City and Vinh Long) and the Philippines. While the CMA1 promoter SNP (rs1800875) was not associated with DHF/DSS, the homozygous form of α-tryptase allele was associated with DSS patients in Vinh Long and the Philippines (OR=3.52, pDengue infection. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Variant mannose-binding lectin alleles are not associated with susceptibility to or outcome of invasive pneumococcal infection in randomly included patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Gitte; Weis, Nina; Madsen, Hans O

    2002-01-01

    for pneumococcal infections. To assess the influence of MBL genotypes on the course and outcome of invasive pneumococcal disease, clinical data for 141 adult patients were collected prospectively and their genotypes were determined. All patients included had positive blood cultures for Streptococcus pneumoniae....... The distribution of variant MBL alleles related to low MBL serum concentrations was similar among the patients and healthy individuals, and MBL genotype was not associated with infection outcome. Thus, in a random adult population with invasive pneumococcal infection, MBL does not seem to play a role......Invasive pneumococcal disease is a serious infection that primarily affects very young children and elderly or immunocompromised individuals but also affects previously healthy people. Variant mannose-binding lectin (MBL) alleles are associated with recurrent infections and may be a risk factor...

  6. The expansion ability but not the quality of HIV-specific CD8(+) T cells is associated with protective human leucocyte antigen class I alleles in long-term non-progressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Mariola; Peris, Alejandra; Soriano, Vincent; Lozano, Sara; Vicario, José Luis; Rallón, Norma I; Restrepo, Clara; Benito, José M

    2011-11-01

    Studies in long-term non-progressors (LTNP) have suggested that the quality of the CD8(+) response may involve protective human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I alleles. However, studies examining the expansion ability of different functional CD8(+) T cells and their association with HLA class I alleles are lacking. LTNP, untreated typical progressors (TP) and patients successfully on highly active retroviral therapy (HAART) during 1 year (HP) were included. HLA class I typing was performed using a sequence-specific primer assay. Functional subsets of Gag- and Nef-specific CD8(+) cells were analysed based on the production of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1β, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-2. Their expansion abilities were evaluated after 10-day culture in the presence of Gag and Nef human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) peptides. No differences were seen when comparing quantitative and qualitative HIV-specific CD8(+) T cell responses according to the presence/absence of protective HLA alleles (B*58 and B*27 supertypes) in each group. However, LTNP with protective HLA alleles showed a higher expansion ability of Gag-specific MIP(+) TNF(+) IL-2(+) T cells and Nef-specific MIP(+) TNF(+) IL-2(+) . HLA-B*5701+LTNP displayed a higher expansion ability of Gag and Nef-specific MIP(+) TNF(-) IL-2(+) T cells than HLA-B*5701-LTNP. This was not so for HLA-B*2705. No differences were seen in the expansion ability according to the presence/absence of protective HLA alleles in TP and HP. The expansion ability of polyfunctional CD8(+) T cells is modulated by HLA class I alleles and targeted protein. LTNP with HLA class I protective alleles (mainly B*5701) display better expansion ability of polyfunctional HIV-specific CD8(+) T cells than the rest, suggesting that factors other than HLA-B*5701 must contribute to the control of viral replication in other LTNP. Furthermore, these attributes of HIV-specific CD8(+) T are not restored by HAART; thus, adjuvant

  7. Allele coding in genomic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christensen Ole F

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic data are used in animal breeding to assist genetic evaluation. Several models to estimate genomic breeding values have been studied. In general, two approaches have been used. One approach estimates the marker effects first and then, genomic breeding values are obtained by summing marker effects. In the second approach, genomic breeding values are estimated directly using an equivalent model with a genomic relationship matrix. Allele coding is the method chosen to assign values to the regression coefficients in the statistical model. A common allele coding is zero for the homozygous genotype of the first allele, one for the heterozygote, and two for the homozygous genotype for the other allele. Another common allele coding changes these regression coefficients by subtracting a value from each marker such that the mean of regression coefficients is zero within each marker. We call this centered allele coding. This study considered effects of different allele coding methods on inference. Both marker-based and equivalent models were considered, and restricted maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods were used in inference. Results Theoretical derivations showed that parameter estimates and estimated marker effects in marker-based models are the same irrespective of the allele coding, provided that the model has a fixed general mean. For the equivalent models, the same results hold, even though different allele coding methods lead to different genomic relationship matrices. Calculated genomic breeding values are independent of allele coding when the estimate of the general mean is included into the values. Reliabilities of estimated genomic breeding values calculated using elements of the inverse of the coefficient matrix depend on the allele coding because different allele coding methods imply different models. Finally, allele coding affects the mixing of Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms, with the centered coding being

  8. DQB1*06:02 allele-specific expression varies by allelic dosage, not narcolepsy status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiner Lachmi, Karin; Lin, Ling; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek

    2012-01-01

    The association of narcolepsy-cataplexy, a sleep disorder caused by the loss of hypocretin/orexin neurons in the hypothalamus, with DQA1*01:02-DQB1*06:02 is one of the tightest known single-allele human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations. In this study, we explored genome-wide expression...

  9. Association of XRCC1 Trp194 allele with risk of breast cancer, and Ki67 protein status in breast tumor tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, Chiya; Ghaderi, Bayazid; Amini, Sabrieh; Abdi, Mohammad; Roshani, Daem

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the role of this polymorphism as a risk factor for breast cancer in Kurdish patients and to investigate the possible association between Arg194Trp x-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) gene polymorphisms with clinical and histopathological outcomes of patients with breast cancer. A total of 100 breast cancer patients and 200 cancer-free controls in Kurdish population of Kurdistan state admitted to Tohid Hospital, Sanandaj, Kurdistan, Iran between January 2012 and May 2015 were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Tissue expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesteron receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2/neu), and Ki67 were evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The Arg194Trp genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction- restriction fragment length polymorphism method.  Our data showed that the risk for breast cancer increased significantly among the Trp variant of XRCC1. Statistically significant association was found between codon 194 polymorphisms and tissue expression of Ki67. The Trp allele of codon 194 XRCC1 is a potential risk factor for breast cancer in Kurdish ethnicity. Furthermore, effect of this polymorphism on clinical and histological features of breast cancer was significant.

  10. HLA Dr beta 1 alleles in Pakistani patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqi, N.; Ahmed, T.A.; Bashir, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine frequencies of HLA DR beta 1 alleles in rheumatoid arthritis in Pakistani patients. Study Design: Cross sectional / analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Immunology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi in collaboration with Rheumatology departments of Military Hospital, Rawalpindi and Fauji Foundation Hospital, Rawalpindi, from January 2009 to January 2010. Methodology: HLA DR beta 1 genotyping of one hundred Pakistani patients, diagnosed as having RA as per American College of Rheumatology revised criteria 1987, was done. HLA DR beta 1 genotyping was carried out at allele group level (DR beta 1*01-DR beta 1*16) by sequence specific primers in RA patients. Comparison of HLA DR beta 1 allele frequencies between patients and control groups was made using Pearson's chi-square test to find possible association of HLA DR?1 alleles with RA in Pakistani rheumatoid patients. Results: HLA DR beta 1*04 was expressed with significantly increased frequency in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (p <0.05). HLA DR?1*11 was expressed statistically significantly more in control group as compared to rheumatoid patients indicating a possible protective effect. There was no statistically significant difference observed in frequencies of HLA DR beta 1 allele *01, DR beta 1 allele *03, DR beta 1 allele *07, DR beta 1 allele *08, DR beta 1 allele *09, DR beta 1 allele *10, DR beta 1 allele *12, DR beta 1 allele *13, DR beta 1 allele *14, DR?1 allele *15 and DR beta 1 allele *16 between patients and control groups. Conclusion: The identification of susceptible HLA DR beta 1 alleles in Pakistani RA patients may help physicians to make early decisions regarding initiation of early intensive therapy with disease modifying anti rheumatic medicines and biological agents decreasing disability in RA patients. (author)

  11. T cell cross-reactivity between coxsackievirus and glutamate decarboxylase is associated with a murine diabetes susceptibility allele

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    Limited regions of amino acid sequence similarity frequently occur between microbial antigens and host proteins. It has been widely anticipated that during infection such sequence similarities could induce cross-reactive T cell responses, thereby initiating T cell- mediated autoimmune disease. However, the nature of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted antigen presentation confers a number of constraints that should make this type of T cell cross-reactivity a rare, MHC allele-dep...

  12. Association of HY-restricting HLA class II alleles with pregnancy outcome in patients with recurrent miscarriage subsequent to a firstborn boy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henriette Svarre; Steffensen, Rudi; Varming, Kim

    2009-01-01

    birth. This study explores the putative impact of known HY-presenting HLA alleles on future pregnancy outcome in women with at least three consecutive miscarriages following a birth [secondary recurrent miscarriage (SRM)]. HLA-A, -B, -DRB1, DRB3-5 and DQB1 genotyping was performed in 358 SRM patients...... and in 203 of their children born prior to the miscarriages. The subsequent live birth in women with boys prior to the miscarriages compared with girls is lower in women with HY-restricting HLA class II alleles [odds ratio (OR): 0.17 (0.1-0.4), P = 0.0001]. One HY-restricting HLA class II allele in women...... with firstborn boys significantly reduces the chances of a live birth [OR: 0.46 (0.2-0.9), P = 0.02]. Two HY-restricting HLA class II alleles further reduced this chance [OR: 0.21 (0.1-0.7), P = 0.02]. HY-restricting HLA class II did not reduce the chances of a live birth in SRM women with firstborn girls. HY...

  13. Genetic variation at selected SNPs in the leptin gene and association of alleles with markers of kidney disease in a Xhosa population of South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikechi G Okpechi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a significant public health problem that leads to end-stage renal disease (ESRD with as many as 2 million people predicted to need therapy worldwide by 2010. Obesity is a risk factor for CKD and leptin, the obesity hormone, correlates with body fat mass and markers of renal function. A number of clinical and experimental studies have suggested a link between serum leptin and kidney disease. We hypothesised that variants in the leptin gene (LEP may be associated with markers of CKD in indigenous black Africans. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Black South Africans of Xhosa (distinct cultural Bantu-speaking population descent were recruited for the study and four common polymorphisms of the LEP (rs7799039, rs791620, rs2167270 and STS-U43653 [ENSSNP5824596] were analysed for genotype and haplotype association with urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, Serum creatinine (Scr and serum leptin level. In one of the four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs we examined, an association with the renal phenotypes was observed. Hypertensive subjects with the T allele (CT genotype of the ENSSNP5824596 SNP had a significantly higher eGFR (p = 0.0141, and significantly lower Scr (p = 0.0137. This was confirmed by haplotype analysis. Also, the haplotype GAAC had a modest effect on urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio in normotensive subjects (p = 0.0482. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that genetic variations of the LEP may be associated with phenotypes that are markers of CKD in black Africans.

  14. Genetic variation at selected SNPs in the leptin gene and association of alleles with markers of kidney disease in a Xhosa population of South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okpechi, Ikechi G; Rayner, Brian L; van der Merwe, Lize; Mayosi, Bongani M; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Tiffin, Nicki; Ramesar, Rajkumar

    2010-02-05

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a significant public health problem that leads to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) with as many as 2 million people predicted to need therapy worldwide by 2010. Obesity is a risk factor for CKD and leptin, the obesity hormone, correlates with body fat mass and markers of renal function. A number of clinical and experimental studies have suggested a link between serum leptin and kidney disease. We hypothesised that variants in the leptin gene (LEP) may be associated with markers of CKD in indigenous black Africans. Black South Africans of Xhosa (distinct cultural Bantu-speaking population) descent were recruited for the study and four common polymorphisms of the LEP (rs7799039, rs791620, rs2167270 and STS-U43653 [ENSSNP5824596]) were analysed for genotype and haplotype association with urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), Serum creatinine (Scr) and serum leptin level. In one of the four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) we examined, an association with the renal phenotypes was observed. Hypertensive subjects with the T allele (CT genotype) of the ENSSNP5824596 SNP had a significantly higher eGFR (p = 0.0141), and significantly lower Scr (p = 0.0137). This was confirmed by haplotype analysis. Also, the haplotype GAAC had a modest effect on urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio in normotensive subjects (p = 0.0482). These results suggest that genetic variations of the LEP may be associated with phenotypes that are markers of CKD in black Africans.

  15. Type 2 diabetes risk allele near CENTD2 is associated with decreased glucose-stimulated insulin release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Trine; Sparsø, T; Grarup, N

    2011-01-01

    By combining multiple genome-wide association (GWA) studies and comprehensive replication efforts, 12 novel type 2 diabetes associated loci have recently been discovered. Here we evaluate the effect of lead variants of these loci on estimates of insulin release and insulin resistance derived from...

  16. Association of carbamazepine-induced severe cutaneous drug reactions and HLA-B*1502 allele status, and dose and treatment duration in paediatric neurology patients in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Kok Wee; Chan, Derrick W S; Cheung, Yin Bun; Ching, Leng Kee; Hie, Szu Liang; Thomas, Terrence; Ling, Simon; Tan, Ene Choo

    2014-06-01

    To determine the association between severe cutaneous drug reactions (SCDR), HLA-B*1502 allelism, carbamazepine dose and treatment duration in a Singapore paediatric population. Case-control study of SCDR with carbamazepine and HLA-B*1502. We recruited 32 cases, 5 with Steven Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermolytic Necrolysis (SJS/TEN) (2 Chinese, 3 Malay), 6 with hypersensitivity syndrome (HSS) (5 Chinese, 1 Indian), 11 with minor drug reactions (9 Chinese, 2 Malay) and 10 controls (7 Chinese, 2 Malay, 1 Indian). HLA-B*1502 allelism was assayed. HLA-B*1502 status and the type of drug reaction were compared using univariate analysis. The time-span from treatment onset to reaction and the dose-time to reaction association in the 3 groups were analysed. HLA-B*1502 was positive in: 5/5 (SJS/TEN), 0/6 (HSS), 1/11 (minor drug reactions) and 1/10 controls. OR for SJS/TEN in HLA-B*1502-positive patients relative to that in HLA-B*1502-negative patients was estimated by exact logistic regression to be 27.20 (95% CI 2.67 to ∞). Median treatment duration (days) until allergic reactions was 12 (range 11-13), 16 (range 10-37) and 11 (range 0-63) for SJS/TEN, HSS and minor drug reactions, respectively. Median dose at onset of reactions was 6.2 mg/kg/day (range 4.6-7.4), 9.8 mg/kg/day (range 7.7-12.2) and 6.7 mg/kg/day (range 3.6-20.0) for the 3 groups, respectively. HLA-B*1502 positivity increases the odds of carbamazepine-induced SCDR in Singapore children of Chinese and Malay ethnicity. Adverse drug reactions to carbamazepine occurred within 2 weeks and at low doses. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Sampling for microsatellite-based population genetic studies: 25 to 30 individuals per population is enough to accurately estimate allele frequencies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie L Hale

    Full Text Available One of the most common questions asked before starting a new population genetic study using microsatellite allele frequencies is "how many individuals do I need to sample from each population?" This question has previously been answered by addressing how many individuals are needed to detect all of the alleles present in a population (i.e. rarefaction based analyses. However, we argue that obtaining accurate allele frequencies and accurate estimates of diversity are much more important than detecting all of the alleles, given that very rare alleles (i.e. new mutations are not very informative for assessing genetic diversity within a population or genetic structure among populations. Here we present a comparison of allele frequencies, expected heterozygosities and genetic distances between real and simulated populations by randomly subsampling 5-100 individuals from four empirical microsatellite genotype datasets (Formica lugubris, Sciurus vulgaris, Thalassarche melanophris, and Himantopus novaezelandia to create 100 replicate datasets at each sample size. Despite differences in taxon (two birds, one mammal, one insect, population size, number of loci and polymorphism across loci, the degree of differences between simulated and empirical dataset allele frequencies, expected heterozygosities and pairwise F(ST values were almost identical among the four datasets at each sample size. Variability in allele frequency and expected heterozygosity among replicates decreased with increasing sample size, but these decreases were minimal above sample sizes of 25 to 30. Therefore, there appears to be little benefit in sampling more than 25 to 30 individuals per population for population genetic studies based on microsatellite allele frequencies.

  18. Sampling for Microsatellite-Based Population Genetic Studies: 25 to 30 Individuals per Population Is Enough to Accurately Estimate Allele Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Marie L.; Burg, Theresa M.; Steeves, Tammy E.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most common questions asked before starting a new population genetic study using microsatellite allele frequencies is “how many individuals do I need to sample from each population?” This question has previously been answered by addressing how many individuals are needed to detect all of the alleles present in a population (i.e. rarefaction based analyses). However, we argue that obtaining accurate allele frequencies and accurate estimates of diversity are much more important than detecting all of the alleles, given that very rare alleles (i.e. new mutations) are not very informative for assessing genetic diversity within a population or genetic structure among populations. Here we present a comparison of allele frequencies, expected heterozygosities and genetic distances between real and simulated populations by randomly subsampling 5–100 individuals from four empirical microsatellite genotype datasets (Formica lugubris, Sciurus vulgaris, Thalassarche melanophris, and Himantopus novaezelandia) to create 100 replicate datasets at each sample size. Despite differences in taxon (two birds, one mammal, one insect), population size, number of loci and polymorphism across loci, the degree of differences between simulated and empirical dataset allele frequencies, expected heterozygosities and pairwise FST values were almost identical among the four datasets at each sample size. Variability in allele frequency and expected heterozygosity among replicates decreased with increasing sample size, but these decreases were minimal above sample sizes of 25 to 30. Therefore, there appears to be little benefit in sampling more than 25 to 30 individuals per population for population genetic studies based on microsatellite allele frequencies. PMID:22984627

  19. DQB1*06:02-Associated Pathogenic Anti-Myelin Autoimmunity in Multiple Sclerosis-like disease: Potential role of DQB1*06:02 as a disease predisposing allele.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathali eKaushansky

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Susceptibility to Multiple Sclerosis (MS has been linked mainly to the HLA-DRB1 locus, with the HLA-DR15 haplotype (DRB1*1501-DQA1*0102-DQB1*0602- DRB5*0101 dominating MS-risk in Caucasians. Although genes in the HLA-II region, particularly DRB1*1501, DQA1*0102-DQB1*0602, are in tight linkage disequilibrium (LD, genome-wide-association and gene candidate studies identified the DRB1*15:01 allele as the primary risk factor in MS. Many genetic and immune-functional studies have indicated DRB1*15:01 as a primary risk factor in MS, while only some functional studies suggested a disease-modifying role for the DRB5*01 or DQB1*06 alleles. In this respect, the susceptibility of DRB1*15:01- transgenic (Tg mice to MBP- or MOG-induced MS-like disease is consistent with primary contribution of DRB1*15:01 to HLA-DR15+ MS. The studies summarized here show that susceptibility to MS-like disease, induced in HLA- humanized mice by MOBP or by the PLP, one of the most prominent encephalitogenic target-antigens implicated in human MS, is determined by DQB1*06:02, rather than by the DRB1*15:01 allele. These findings not only offer a rationale for a potential role for DQB1*06:02 in predisposing susceptibility to MS, but also suggest a more complex and differential functional role for HLA-DR15 alleles, depending on the primary target myelin antigen. However, the conflict between these findings in HLA-Tg mice and the extensive genome-wide-association studies (GWASs which could not detect any significant effect from the DQB1*06:02 allele on MS risk is rather puzzling. Functional analysis of MS PBLs for DQB1*06:02-associated anti-myelin autoimmunity may resolve whether or not the DQB1*06:02 is associated with MS pathogenesis.

  20. FRAXA and FRAXE: Evidence against segregation distortion and for an effect of intermediate alleles on learning disability

    OpenAIRE

    Teague, J. W.; Morton, N. E.; Dennis, N. R.; Curtis, G.; McKechnie, N.; Macpherson, J. N.; Murray, A.; Pound, M. C.; Sharrock, A. J.; Youings, S. A.; Jacobs, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    There have been several claims of segregation distortion (meiotic drive) for loci associated with diseases caused by trinucleotide repeats, leading us to test for this phenomenon in a large study of the X-linked loci FRAXA and FRAXE. We found no evidence of meiotic drive in females and no convincing evidence in males, where the limitation of risk to daughters creates a testing bias for alleles of interest. Alleles for pre- and full mutation, intermediate alleles, and common alleles were analy...

  1. Association of the HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 Alleles in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetic Nephropathy in the Han Ethnicity of China

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Ze-Jun; Sun, Pei; Guo, Gang; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Li-Ming

    2013-01-01

    HLA gene system is one of the most polymorphic regions of the human genome. The association of HLA class II genes in T1DM pathogenesis has been reported for several ethnicities. Associations of HLA class II genes with T2DM have revealed inconsistent results. Moreover, correlations between DN and HLA alleles remain unclear. We carried out DNA typing chip by specific medium resolution typing probes in 310 T2DM subjects (including 210 patients with DN and 100 patients without DN) in addition to ...

  2. ANALYSIS OF SEQUENCE POLYMORPHISM OF SCR CLASS I AND II ALLELES AND STUDY REGULATION OF THEIR EXPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana ŽALUDOVÁ

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Self-incompatibility (AI is a widespread mechanism used by flowering plants to prevent inbreeding depression and helps create and maintain genetic diversity within a species. Oilseed rape (Brassica napus L. and especially its modern varieties are characterized by high level of self-fertility. In an effort to increase the production current breeding is focused on the production of inbred lines for making the F1 hybrids and the self-incompatibility can be an interesting tool for production self- sterile lines. In Brassica napus, we found two recessive alleles of a gene SCR II. Different expression of both alleles does not correspond to phenotypic manifestation of self-incompatibility and we can assume that it is prevailed by repressor gene that does not lie on the S-locus. This is also reason, why the SCR gene cannot serve as a molecular marker of self-incompatibility in Brassica napus, although many authors believe that this gene is essential in AI reaction. Brassica napus belong to plants with complex genetic constitution, is composed by two genomes, A and C, which give the possibility of different interactions and makes it difficult to study compared with diploid B. rapa and B. oleracea. In further study it is therefore important to focus on the interactions between genes SCR, SRK and SLG, and their influence on others, such as supressor gene systems.

  3. Pomology observations, morphometric analysis, ultrastructural study and allelic profiles of "olivastra Seggianese" endocarps from ancient olive trees (Olea europaea L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanesi, Claudio; Sorbi, Andrea; Paolucci, Elisa; Antonucci, Francesca; Menesatti, Paolo; Costa, Corrado; Pallottino, Federico; Vignani, Rita; Cimato, Antonio; Ciacci, Andrea; Cresti, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    Preliminary studies of historical sources and remote sensing were used to identify ancient olive trees near archaeological sites and heritage buildings in the Orcia Valley (Siena, Italy). Distinctive characters were assessed by traditional pomological observation. Trees with similar characters were selected on the basis of the features of endocarps, the only structure that survives aerobic deterioration and conserves useful botanical information for centuries. Non-invasive morphometric analysis of endocarp size and shape established morphological variations in individuals of different populations. Plastid organization in the endocarp and location of DNA in the endocarp tegument were detected by morphological and ultrastructural observations using light and electron microscopy. Cytoplasmic markers with high polymorphism were used to test similarity of endocarp and leaf DNA within individuals and to confirm low variability and minimal divergence between individuals. The ancient trees studied showed the same allelic profiles and therefore belonged to a distinct cultivar. The traditional pomological descriptions of the trees, leaves and fruits, morphometric analysis of size, and shape elliptic Fourier analysis of endocarp outline, ultrastructural observations and allelic profiles of endocarp tegument delineated the general species-specific qualities of the cultivar "olivastra Seggianese" of the Orcia Valley. Copyright © 2010 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Allele-specific recognition by LILRB3 and LILRA6 of a cytokeratin 8-associated ligand on necrotic glandular epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Des C; Hewitt, Colin R A; López-Álvarez, María R; Jahnke, Martin; Russell, Alasdair I; Radjabova, Valeria; Trowsdale, Alice R Z; Trowsdale, John

    2016-03-29

    The LILRs are a family of receptors that regulate the activities of myelomonocytic cells. We found that specific allelic variants of two related members of the LILR family, LILRB3 and LILRA6, interact with a ligand exposed on necrotic glandular epithelial cells. The extracellular domains of LILRB3 and LILRA6 are very similar and their genes are highly polymorphic. A commonly occurring allele, LILRB3*12, displayed particularly strong binding of these necrotic cells and further screening of the products of LILRB3 alleles identified motifs that correlated with binding. Immunoprecipitation of the ligand from epithelial cell lysates using recombinant LILRB3*12, identified cytokeratins 8, 18 and 19. Purified proteins obtained from epithelial cell lysates, using anti-cytokeratin 8 antibodies, were able to activate LILRB3*12 reporter cells. Knock-down of cytokeratin 8 in epithelial cells abrogated expression of the LILRB3 ligand, while staining with recombinant LILRB3*12 showed co-localisation with cytokeratin 8 and 18 in permeabilised breast cancer cells. Necrosis is a common feature of tumours. The finding of a necrosis-associated ligand for these two receptors raises the possibility of a novel interaction that alters immune responses within the tumour microenvironment. Since LILRB3 and LILRA6 genes are highly polymorphic the interaction may influence an individual's immune response to tumours.

  5. HPV has left the building – the absence of detectable HPV DNA and the presence of r allele/s for the P72R polymorphism in the TP53 gene may call for more aggressive therapeutic approach in HPV-associated tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petkova, Rumena; Chelenkova, Pavlina; Yemendzhiev, Husein; Tsekov, Iliya; Kalvatchev, Zlatko; Chakarov, Stoyan

    2013-01-01

    HPV infection is a major pathogenetic factor in cervical carcinoma as well as in many of the squamous cancers of head and neck and other epithelial cancers. Persistence of HPV DNA detectable by routine methods is considered to be a risk factor for advanced CIN and, in patients treated by surgery or non-surgical treatment modalities (radiotherapy, chemotherapy), HPV persistence is believed to be associated with increased risk for local recurrence. In terms of survival, however, it has been repeatedly proven that patients with cervical cancer and other HPV-associated cancers with detectable HPV DNA tend to have better outcomes than patients with HPV-negative tumours. The P72R polymorphism in the human TP53 gene has been contemplated as an independent phenotype modifier in cancers, especially the R allele which has been shown to confer higher pro-apoptotic properties to the resultant p53 protein. It has been demonstrated, however, that RR homozygotes were much more common in study groups with HPV-associated tumours than the other two genotypes and that the P allele in P/R heterozygotes was preferentially lost while the R allele was preferentially retained and mutated. It is possible that HPV-dependent carcinogenesis strictly relies on the presence of HPV and the expression of the E6 and E7 onco proteins only in the initial phases of transformation of infected cells (e.g. CIN). It may be associated with activation of latent HPV that would create a background of decreased control over the integrity of the genome of the host cell. The process can develop further by mechanisms independent of the presence of HPV and if the virus clears at some later point, that would not halt the already ongoing neoplastic transformation. Absence of HPV DNA in cervical tumours, whether before or after treatment, is not a reason to decrease vigilant monitoring and rule out the need for further treatment, as it may be quite possible that the TP53 gene of the infected cells has already been

  6. [Association between genotype and allele frequencies of CYP2A6*12 and rs16969968 in CHRNA5 variants with smoking and body mass index in young subjects from Northeast Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrego-Soto, Gissela; Costilla-Esquivel, Antonio; Padilla-Rivas, Gerardo Raymundo; Cázares-Samaniego, Paulina Janeth; Posadas-Valay, Rodolfo; Velasco-Castañón, José Gerardo; Mercado-Longoria, Roberto; Ortiz-López, Rocío; Rojas-Martínez, Augusto

    2015-11-01

    Several studies have reported that variants rs16969968 G>A of the CHRNA5 gene and CYP2A6*12 of the CYP2A6 gene are associated with smoking and smoking refusal, respectively. In addition, some studies report that a higher cigarette consumption is associated with low body mass index (BMI). To analyze the allele and genotypic frequencies of these variants and their impact on smoking and BMI. A blood sample was obtained and a survey about smoking habits was answered by 319 university students aged 18 to 35 years (127 women, 171 smokers), living in Northeastern Mexico. Genetic variants were studied by polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphism and their frequencies were associated with smoking and BMI. No associations were found between the analyzed variants and smoking in the study groups. However, there was an association among non-smoking subjects between the A allele of rs16969968 and high a BMI (p < 0.01). This last variant may be involved in food-addiction disorders.

  7. Association of the HLA-B alleles with carbamazepine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis in the Javanese and Sundanese population of Indonesia: the important role of the HLA-B75 serotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuliwulandari, Rika; Kristin, Erna; Prayuni, Kinasih; Sachrowardi, Qomariyah; Suyatna, Franciscus D; Menaldi, Sri Linuwih; Wichukchinda, Nuanjun; Mahasirimongkol, Surakameth; Cavallari, Larisa H

    2017-12-01

    Carbamazepine (CBZ) is a common cause of life-threatening cutaneous adverse drug reactions such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). Previous studies have reported a strong association between the HLA genotype and CBZ-induced SJS/TEN. We investigated the association between the HLA genotype and CBZ-induced SJS/TEN in Javanese and Sundanese patients in Indonesia. Nine unrelated patients with CBZ-induced SJS/TEN and 236 healthy Javanese and Sundanese controls were genotyped for HLA-B and their allele frequencies were compared. The HLA-B*15:02 allele was found in 66.7% of the patients with CBZ-induced SJS/TEN, but only in 29.4% of tolerant control (p = 0.029; odds ratio [OR]: 6.5; 95% CI: 1.2-33.57) and 22.9% of healthy controls (p = 0.0021; OR: 6.78; 95% CI: 1.96-23.38). These findings support the involvement of HLA-B*15:02 in CBZ-induced SJS/TEN reported in other Asian populations. Interestingly, we also observed the presence of the HLA-B*15:21 allele. HLA-B*15:02 and HLA-B*15:21 are members of the HLA-B75 serotype, for which a greater frequency was observed in CBZ-induced SJS/TEN (vs tolerant control [p = 0.0078; OR: 12; 95% CI: 1.90-75.72] and vs normal control [p = 0.0018; OR: 8.56; 95% CI: 1.83-40]). Our findings suggest that screening for the HLA-B75 serotype can predict the risk of CBZ-induced SJS/TEN more accurately than screening for a specific allele.

  8. Sample size computation for association studies using case–parents ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sample size for case–control association studies is discussed. Materials and methods. Parameter settings. We consider a candidate locus with two alleles A and a where. A is putatively associated with the disease status (increasing. Keywords. sample size; association tests; genotype relative risk; power; autism. Journal of ...

  9. Inosine triphosphatase allele frequency and association with ribavirin-induced anaemia in Brazilian patients receiving antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathália Delvaux

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Inosine triphosphatase (ITPA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are strongly associated with protection against ribavirin (RBV-induced anaemia in European, American and Asian patients; however, there is a paucity of data for Brazilian patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ITPA SNP (rs7270101/rs1127354 frequency in healthy and hepatitis C virus (HCV-infected patients from Brazil and the association with the development of severe anaemia during antiviral therapy. ITPA SNPs were determined in 200 HCV infected patients and 100 healthy individuals by sequencing. Biochemical parameters and haemoglobin (Hb levels were analysed in 97 patients who underwent antiviral therapy. A combination of AArs7270101+CCrs1127354 (100% ITPase activity was observed in 236/300 individuals. Anaemia was observed in 87.5% and 86.2% of treated patients with AA (rs7270101 and CC genotypes (rs1127354, respectively. Men with AA (rs7270101 showed a considerable reduction in Hb at week 12 compared to those with AC/CC (p = 0.1475. In women, there was no influence of genotype (p = 0.5295. For rs1127354, men with the CC genotype also showed a sudden reduction in Hb compared to those with AC. Allelic distribution of rs7270101 and rs1127354 shows high rates of the genotypes AA and CC, respectively, suggesting that the study population had a great propensity for developing RBV-induced anaemia. A progressive Hb reduction during treatment was observed; however, this reduction was greater in men at week 12 than in women.

  10. Beneficial role of D allele in controlling ACE levels: a study among ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pathway which maintains homeostasis blood pressure in the body and any variation in the levels is reported to be associated with various complex diseases. The DD genotype is found to increase ACE levels, which is associated with cardiovascular diseases and decrease in ACE levels are associated with kidney diseases.

  11. A genome-wide screen in human embryonic stem cells reveals novel sites of allele-specific histone modification associated with known disease loci

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Prendergast, James G D

    2012-05-19

    AbstractBackgroundChromatin structure at a given site can differ between chromosome copies in a cell, and such imbalances in chromatin structure have been shown to be important in understanding the molecular mechanisms controlling several disease loci. Human genetic variation, DNA methylation, and disease have been intensely studied, uncovering many sites of allele-specific DNA methylation (ASM). However, little is known about the genome-wide occurrence of sites of allele-specific histone modification (ASHM) and their relationship to human disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent and characteristics of sites of ASHM in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs).ResultsUsing a statistically rigorous protocol, we investigated the genomic distribution of ASHM in hESCs, and their relationship to sites of allele-specific expression (ASE) and DNA methylation. We found that, although they were rare, sites of ASHM were substantially enriched at loci displaying ASE. Many were also found at known imprinted regions, hence sites of ASHM are likely to be better markers of imprinted regions than sites of ASM. We also found that sites of ASHM and ASE in hESCs colocalize at risk loci for developmental syndromes mediated by deletions, providing insights into the etiology of these disorders.ConclusionThese results demonstrate the potential importance of ASHM patterns in the interpretation of disease loci, and the protocol described provides a basis for similar studies of ASHM in other cell types to further our understanding of human disease susceptibility.

  12. Association of the CYP1B1*3 allele with survival in patients with prostate cancer receiving docetaxel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.M. Sissung (Tristan); R. Danesi (Romano); D.K. Price (Douglas); S.M. Steinberg (Seth); R. de Wit (Ronald); M. Zahid (Muhammad); N. Gaikwad (Nilesh); E. Cavalieri (Ercole); W.L. Dahut (William); D.L. Sackett (Dan); W.D. Figg (William); A. Sparreboom (Alex)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractUsing a single nucleotide polymorphism association study in 52 men with prostate cancer receiving docetaxel, we found that individuals carrying two copies of the CYP1B1*3 polymorphic variant had a poor prognosis after docetaxel-based therapies compared with individuals carrying at least

  13. Alleles versus mutations: Understanding the evolution of genetic architecture requires a molecular perspective on allelic origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, David L

    2015-12-01

    Perspectives on the role of large-effect quantitative trait loci (QTL) in the evolution of complex traits have shifted back and forth over the past few decades. Different sets of studies have produced contradictory insights on the evolution of genetic architecture. I argue that much of the confusion results from a failure to distinguish mutational and allelic effects, a limitation of using the Fisherian model of adaptive evolution as the lens through which the evolution of adaptive variation is examined. A molecular-based perspective reveals that allelic differences can involve the cumulative effects of many mutations plus intragenic recombination, a model that is supported by extensive empirical evidence. I discuss how different selection regimes could produce very different architectures of allelic effects under a molecular-based model, which may explain conflicting insights on genetic architecture from studies of variation within populations versus between divergently selected populations. I address shortcomings of genome-wide association study (GWAS) practices in light of more suitable models of allelic evolution, and suggest alternate GWAS strategies to generate more valid inferences about genetic architecture. Finally, I discuss how adopting more suitable models of allelic evolution could help redirect research on complex trait evolution toward addressing more meaningful questions in evolutionary biology. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  14. Allele coding in genomic evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Standen, Ismo; Christensen, Ole Fredslund

    2011-01-01

    Genomic data are used in animal breeding to assist genetic evaluation. Several models to estimate genomic breeding values have been studied. In general, two approaches have been used. One approach estimates the marker effects first and then, genomic breeding values are obtained by summing marker...... effects. In the second approach, genomic breeding values are estimated directly using an equivalent model with a genomic relationship matrix. Allele coding is the method chosen to assign values to the regression coefficients in the statistical model. A common allele coding is zero for the homozygous...... this centered allele coding. This study considered effects of different allele coding methods on inference. Both marker-based and equivalent models were considered, and restricted maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods were used in inference. \\paragraph*{Results:} Theoretical derivations showed that parameter...

  15. High resolution human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I and class II allele typing in Mexican mestizo women with sporadic breast cancer: case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barquera Rodrigo

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of breast cancer is multifactorial. Hormonal, environmental factors and genetic predisposition, among others, could interact in the presentation of breast carcinoma. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA alleles play an important role in immunity (cellular immunity and may be important genetic traits. HLAAllele-specific interaction has not been well established. Recently, several studies had been conducted in order to do so, but the results are controversial and in some instances contradictory. Methods We designed a case-control study to quantify the association of HLA class I and II genes and breast cancer. HLA typing was performed by high resolution sequence-specific oligotyping after DNA amplification (PCR-SSOP of 100 breast cancer Mexican mestizo patients and 99 matched healthy controls. Results HLA-A frequencies that we were able to observe that there was no difference between both groups from the statistical viewpoint. HLA-B*1501 was found three times more common in the case group (OR, 3.714; p = 0.031. HLA-Cw is not a marker neither for risk, nor protection for the disease, because we did not find significant statistical differences between the two groups. DRB1*1301, which is expressed in seven cases and in only one control, observing an risk increase of up to seven times and DRB1*1602, which behaves similarly in being present solely in the cases (OR, 16.701; 95% CI, 0.947 – 294.670. DQ*0301-allele expression, which is much more common in the control group and could be protective for the presentation of the disease (OR, 0.078; 95% CI, 0.027–0.223, p = 0.00001. Conclusion Our results reveal the role of the MHC genes in the pathophysiology of breast cancer, suggesting that in the development of breast cancer exists a disorder of immune regulation. The triggering factor seems to be restricted to certain ethnic groups and certain geographical regions since the relevant MHC alleles are highly diverse. This is the

  16. High resolution human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II allele typing in Mexican mestizo women with sporadic breast cancer: case-control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantú de León, David; Yu, Neng; Yunis, Edmond J; Granados, Julio; Pérez-Montiel, Delia; Villavicencio, Verónica; Carranca, Alejandro García; Betancourt, Alejandro Mohar; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; López-Tello, Alberto; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Barquera, Rodrigo

    2009-01-01

    The development of breast cancer is multifactorial. Hormonal, environmental factors and genetic predisposition, among others, could interact in the presentation of breast carcinoma. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles play an important role in immunity (cellular immunity) and may be important genetic traits. HLAAllele-specific interaction has not been well established. Recently, several studies had been conducted in order to do so, but the results are controversial and in some instances contradictory. We designed a case-control study to quantify the association of HLA class I and II genes and breast cancer. HLA typing was performed by high resolution sequence-specific oligotyping after DNA amplification (PCR-SSOP) of 100 breast cancer Mexican mestizo patients and 99 matched healthy controls. HLA-A frequencies that we were able to observe that there was no difference between both groups from the statistical viewpoint. HLA-B*1501 was found three times more common in the case group (OR, 3.714; p = 0.031). HLA-Cw is not a marker neither for risk, nor protection for the disease, because we did not find significant statistical differences between the two groups. DRB1*1301, which is expressed in seven cases and in only one control, observing an risk increase of up to seven times and DRB1*1602, which behaves similarly in being present solely in the cases (OR, 16.701; 95% CI, 0.947 – 294.670). DQ*0301-allele expression, which is much more common in the control group and could be protective for the presentation of the disease (OR, 0.078; 95% CI, 0.027–0.223, p = 0.00001). Our results reveal the role of the MHC genes in the pathophysiology of breast cancer, suggesting that in the development of breast cancer exists a disorder of immune regulation. The triggering factor seems to be restricted to certain ethnic groups and certain geographical regions since the relevant MHC alleles are highly diverse. This is the first study in Mexican population where high resolutions HLA

  17. Genetic background (DDD/Sgn versus C57BL/6J) strongly influences postnatal growth of male mice carrying the A(y) allele at the agouti locus: identification of quantitative trait loci associated with diabetes and body weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suto, Jun-ichi; Satou, Kunio

    2013-05-04

    Mice carrying the A(y) allele at the agouti locus become obese and are heavier than their non-A(y) littermates. However, this does not hold true for the genetic background of the DDD mouse strain. At 22 weeks of age, DDD.Cg-A(y) females are heavier than DDD females, whereas DDD.Cg-A(y) males are lighter than DDD males. This study aimed to determine the possible cause and identify the genes responsible for the lower body weight of DDD.Cg-A(y) males. Growth curves of DDD.Cg-A(y) mice were analyzed and compared with those of B6.Cg-A(y) mice from 5 to 25 weeks. In DDD.Cg-A(y) males, body weight gain stopped between 16 and 17 weeks and the body weight gradually decreased; thus, the lower body weight was a consequence of body weight loss. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was performed in backcrossed (BC) males of DDD × (B6 × DDD.Cg-A(y)) F(1)-A(y) mice. For the body weight at 25 weeks, significant QTLs were identified on chromosomes 1 and 4. The DDD allele was associated with a lower body weight at both loci. In particular, the QTL on chromosome 4 interacted with the A(y) allele. Furthermore, suggestive QTLs for plasma glucose and high molecular weight adiponectin levels were coincidentally mapped to chromosome 4. The DDD allele was associated with increased glucose and decreased adiponectin levels. When the body weight at 25 weeks and plasma glucose levels were considered as dependent and independent variables, respectively, BC A(y) males were classified into two groups according to statistical analysis using the partition method. Mice of one group had significantly higher glucose and lower adiponectin levels than those of the other group and exhibited body weight loss as observed with DDD-A(y) males. The lower body weight of DDD.Cg-A(y) male mice was a consequence of body weight loss. Diabetes mellitus has been suggested to be a possible contributory factor causing body weight loss. The QTL on distal chromosome 4 contained the major responsible genes. This QTL

  18. Association of selected human leukocyte antigen alleles (HLA-DQA1*0102, HLA-DQA1*0103 and HLA–DQB1*0301) with Helicobacter pylori infection among dyspeptic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Piyumali Sandareka Arachchi; Chinthika Prabhashinie Gunasekara; Manjula Manoji Weerasekera; Nushka Lahiri Ubhayawardana; Deepaka Weerasekera; Kamani Samarasinghe; Bimalka Seneviratne; Neluka Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori has been identified as a group I carcinogenic bacteria that infect the gastric mucosa leading to gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, lymphoma and gastric cancer. Pathogenesis of H. pylori depends on the virulence of the strain, host immune response and modulating factors like smoking and diet. Objective: This study aimed to assess the association of selected HLA (Human Leukocyte Antigen) alleles; HLA-DQA1*0102, HLA-DQA1*0103 and HLA-DQB1*0301, with the pr...

  19. A Hypomorphic PALB2 Allele Gives Rise to an Unusual Form of FA-N Associated with Lymphoid Tumour Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J Byrd

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients with biallelic truncating mutations in PALB2 have a severe form of Fanconi anaemia (FA-N, with a predisposition for developing embryonal-type tumours in infancy. Here we describe two unusual patients from a single family, carrying biallelic PALB2 mutations, one truncating, c.1676_1677delAAinsG;(p.Gln559ArgfsTer2, and the second, c.2586+1G>A; p.Thr839_Lys862del resulting in an in frame skip of exon 6 (24 amino acids. Strikingly, the affected individuals did not exhibit the severe developmental defects typical of FA-N patients and initially presented with B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The expressed p.Thr839_Lys862del mutant PALB2 protein retained the ability to interact with BRCA2, previously unreported in FA-N patients. There was also a large increased chromosomal radiosensitivity following irradiation in G2 and increased sensitivity to mitomycin C. Although patient cells were unable to form Rad51 foci following exposure to either DNA damaging agent, U2OS cells, in which the mutant PALB2 with in frame skip of exon 6 was induced, did show recruitment of Rad51 to foci following damage. We conclude that a very mild form of FA-N exists arising from a hypomorphic PALB2 allele.

  20. Allelic variation in PtGA20Ox associates with growth and wood properties in Populus spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaxing Tian

    Full Text Available Populus tomentosa is an economically important tree crop that produces wood for lumber, pulp, paper, and biofuels. Wood quality traits are likely to be strongly affected by the plant hormone gibberellic acid (GA, which regulates growth. GA20Ox encodes one of the major regulatory enzymes of GA biosynthesis and may therefore play a large role in growth and wood quality. Here, linkage disequilibrium (LD studies were used to identify significant associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within PtGA20Ox and growth and wood-quality traits of P. tomentosa. We isolated a full-length GA20Ox cDNA from Populus tomentosa by reverse transcription (RT-PCR; this 1401 bp cDNA clone had an open reading frame of 1158 bp and encoded a protein of 385 amino acids. PtGA20Ox transcripts were maximally expressed in the mature xylem of vascular tissues, suggesting that PtGA20Ox is highly expressed and specifically associated with secondary xylem formation. Resequencing the PtGA20Ox locus of 36 individuals identified 55 SNPs, and the frequency of SNPs was 1/31 bp. The 29 most common SNPs (frequency>0.1 were genotyped in an association population (426 individuals that was also phenotyped for key growth and wood quality traits. LD did not extend over the entire gene (r(2<0.1, within 500 bp, demonstrating that a candidate-gene-based LD approach may the best way to understand the molecular basis underlying quantitative variation in this species. SNP- and haplotype-based association analyses indicated that four SNPs (false discovery rate Q<0.05 and 14 haplotypes (P<0.05 were significantly associated with growth and wood properties. The phenotypic variance explained by each SNP ranged from 3.44% to 14.47%. The SNP markers identified in this study can be applied to breeding programs for the improvement of growth and wood-property traits by marker-assisted selection.

  1. Frequency of the CCRdelta32 allele in Brazilians: a study in colorectal cancer and in HTLV-I infection

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Rinaldo W.; Pires, Edina R.; Duarte, Ana P.M.; Moura, Ricardo P. de; Monteiro, Elisangela; Torloni, Humberto; Proietti, Anna B.; Simpson, Andrew J.G.; Pena, Sérgio D.J.

    2000-01-01

    The identification of a 32-bp deletion in the cc-chemokine receptor-5 gene (CCR5delta32 allele) that renders homozygous individuals highly resistant to HIV infection has prompted worldwide investigations of the frequency of the CCR5delta32 allele in regional populations. It is important to ascertain if CCR5delta32 is a factor to be considered in the overall epidemiology of HIV in individual populations. With this in mind we determined the CCR5delta32 allele frequency in a large sample (907 in...

  2. Association of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: identification of a modifier of breast cancer risk at locus 11q22.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaeker, Karoline B; Pastinen, Tomi; Droit, Arnaud; Lemaçon, Audrey; Adlard, Julian; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L; Arason, Adalgeir; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K; Azzollini, Jacopo; Bane, Anita; Barjhoux, Laure; Barrowdale, Daniel; Benitez, Javier; Berthet, Pascaline; Blok, Marinus J; Bobolis, Kristie; Bonadona, Valérie; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bradbury, Angela R; Brewer, Carole; Buecher, Bruno; Buys, Saundra S; Caligo, Maria A; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; De la Hoya, Miguel; De Leeneer, Kim; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan Chun; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Eccles, Diana; Eeles, Ros; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Ejlertsen, Bent; Engel, Christoph; Gareth Evans, D; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Foretova, Lenka; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Fountzilas, George; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Ganschow, Pamela; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; Gayther, Simon A; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldgar, David E; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Hahnen, Eric; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Hays, John L; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hulick, Peter J; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Joseph, Vijai; Just, Walter; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Karlan, Beth Y; Kets, Carolien M; Kirk, Judy; Kriege, Mieke; Laitman, Yael; Laurent, Maïté; Lazaro, Conxi; Leslie, Goska; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Loman, Niklas; Loud, Jennifer T; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mariani, Milena; Mazoyer, Sylvie; McGuffog, Lesley; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Montagna, Marco; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nussbaum, Robert L; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Ong, Kai-Ren; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Osorio, Ana; Papi, Laura; Park, Sue Kyung; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Segura, Pedro Perez; Peterlongo, Paolo; Phelan, Catherine M; Radice, Paolo; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Rookus, Matti A; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Sevenet, Nicolas; Shah, Payal D; Singer, Christian F; Slavin, Thomas P; Snape, Katie; Sokolowska, Johanna; Sønderstrup, Ida Marie Heeholm; Southey, Melissa; Spurdle, Amanda B; Stadler, Zsofia; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Tan, Yen; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teulé, Alex; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tihomirova, Laima; Tischkowitz, Marc; Tognazzo, Silvia; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Tung, Nadine; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van der Luijt, Rob B; van Engelen, Klaartje; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wijnen, Juul T; Rebbeck, Timothy; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J; Nord, Silje; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C; Simard, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Cis-acting regulatory SNPs resulting in differential allelic expression (DAE) may, in part, explain the underlying phenotypic variation associated with many complex diseases. To investigate whether common variants associated with DAE were involved in breast cancer susceptibility among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, a list of 175 genes was developed based of their involvement in cancer-related pathways. Using data from a genome-wide map of SNPs associated with allelic expression, we assessed the association of ~320 SNPs located in the vicinity of these genes with breast and ovarian cancer risks in 15,252 BRCA1 and 8211 BRCA2 mutation carriers ascertained from 54 studies participating in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. We identified a region on 11q22.3 that is significantly associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (most significant SNP rs228595 p = 7 × 10 -6 ). This association was absent in BRCA2 carriers (p = 0.57). The 11q22.3 region notably encompasses genes such as ACAT1, NPAT, and ATM. Expression quantitative trait loci associations were observed in both normal breast and tumors across this region, namely for ACAT1, ATM, and other genes. In silico analysis revealed some overlap between top risk-associated SNPs and relevant biological features in mammary cell data, which suggests potential functional significance. We identified 11q22.3 as a new modifier locus in BRCA1 carriers. Replication in larger studies using estrogen receptor (ER)-negative or triple-negative (i.e., ER-, progesterone receptor-, and HER2-negative) cases could therefore be helpful to confirm the association of this locus with breast cancer risk.

  3. Allelic variation in PtGA20Ox associates with growth and wood properties in Populus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jiaxing; Du, Qingzhang; Chang, Mengqi; Zhang, Deqiang

    2012-01-01

    Populus tomentosa is an economically important tree crop that produces wood for lumber, pulp, paper, and biofuels. Wood quality traits are likely to be strongly affected by the plant hormone gibberellic acid (GA), which regulates growth. GA20Ox encodes one of the major regulatory enzymes of GA biosynthesis and may therefore play a large role in growth and wood quality. Here, linkage disequilibrium (LD) studies were used to identify significant associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within PtGA20Ox and growth and wood-quality traits of P. tomentosa. We isolated a full-length GA20Ox cDNA from Populus tomentosa by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR; this 1401 bp cDNA clone had an open reading frame of 1158 bp and encoded a protein of 385 amino acids. PtGA20Ox transcripts were maximally expressed in the mature xylem of vascular tissues, suggesting that PtGA20Ox is highly expressed and specifically associated with secondary xylem formation. Resequencing the PtGA20Ox locus of 36 individuals identified 55 SNPs, and the frequency of SNPs was 1/31 bp. The 29 most common SNPs (frequency>0.1) were genotyped in an association population (426 individuals) that was also phenotyped for key growth and wood quality traits. LD did not extend over the entire gene (r(2)wood properties. The phenotypic variance explained by each SNP ranged from 3.44% to 14.47%. The SNP markers identified in this study can be applied to breeding programs for the improvement of growth and wood-property traits by marker-assisted selection.

  4. Alteration of fecal microbiota profiles in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Associations with HLA-B27 allele and disease status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Di Paola

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Alteration of gut microbiota is involved in several chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, and gut microbial pro-arthritogenic profiles have been hypothesized. Intestinal inflammation may be involved in spondyloarthropathies and in a subset of patients affected by Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA, the most common chronic rheumatic disease of childhood. We compared the fecal microbiota composition of JIA patients with healthy subjects (HS, evaluating differences in microbial profiles between sub-categories of JIA, such as enthesitis-related arthritis (JIA-ERA, in which inflammation of entheses occurs, and polyarticular JIA, non-enthesitis related arthritis (JIA-nERA. Through taxon-level analysis, we discovered alteration of fecal microbiota components that could be involved in subclinical gut inflammation, and promotion of joint inflammation. We observed abundance in Ruminococcaceae in both JIA categories, reduction in Clostridiaceae and Peptostreptococcaceae in JIA-ERA, and increase in Veillonellaceae in JIA-nERA, respectively compared with HS. Among the more relevant genera, we found an increase in Clostridium cluster XIVb, involved in colitis and arthritis, in JIA-ERA patients compared with HS, and a trend of decrease in Faecalibacterium, known for anti-inflammatory properties, in JIA-nERA compared with JIA-ERA and HS. Differential abundant taxa identified JIA patients for the HLA-B27 allele, including Bilophila, Clostridium cluster XIVb, Oscillibacter and Parvimonas. Prediction analysis of metabolic functions showed that JIA-ERA metagenome was differentially enriched in bacterial functions related to cell motility and chemotaxis, suggesting selection of potential virulence traits. We also discovered differential microbial profiles and intra-group variability among active disease and remission, suggesting instability of microbial ecosystem in autoimmune diseases with respect to healthy status. Similarly

  5. Allele copy number and underlying pathology are associated with subclinical severity in equine type 1 polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Rosie J; Livesey, Leanda; Schumacher, John; Henke, Nicole; Massey, Claire; Brock, Kenny V; Fernandez-Fuente, Marta; Piercy, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Equine type 1 polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM1), a common glycogenosis associated with an R309H founder mutation in the glycogen synthase 1 gene (GYS1), shares pathological features with several human myopathies. In common with related human disorders, the pathogenesis remains unclear in particular, the marked phenotypic variability between affected animals. Given that affected animals accumulate glycogen and alpha-crystalline polysaccharide within their muscles, it is possible that physical disruption associated with the presence of this material could exacerbate the phenotype. The aim of this study was to compare the histopathological changes in horses with PSSM1, and specifically, to investigate the hypothesis that the severity of underlying pathology, (e.g. vacuolation and inclusion formation) would (1) be higher in homozygotes than heterozygotes and (2) correlate with clinical severity. Resting and post-exercise plasma creatine kinase (CK) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) enzyme activity measurements and muscle pathology were assessed in matched cohorts of PSSM1 homozygotes, heterozygotes or control horses. Median (interquartile range (IR)) resting CK activities were 364 (332-764) U/L for homozygotes, 301 (222-377) U/L for heterozygotes and 260 (216-320) U/L for controls, and mean (+/- SD) AST activity for homozygotes were 502 (+/116) U/L, for heterozygotes, 357 (+/-92) U/L and for controls, 311 (+/-64) U/L and were significantly different between groups (P = 0.04 and P = 0.01 respectively). Resting plasma AST activity was significantly associated with the severity of subsarcolemmal vacuolation (rho = 0.816; P = 0.01) and cytoplasmic inclusions (rho = 0.766; P = 0.01). There were fewer type 2× and more type 2a muscle fibres in PSSM1-affected horses. Our results indicate that PSSM1 has incomplete dominance. Furthermore, the association between plasma muscle enzyme activity and severity of underlying pathology suggests that physical disruption of

  6. Allele copy number and underlying pathology are associated with subclinical severity in equine type 1 polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosie J Naylor

    Full Text Available Equine type 1 polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM1, a common glycogenosis associated with an R309H founder mutation in the glycogen synthase 1 gene (GYS1, shares pathological features with several human myopathies. In common with related human disorders, the pathogenesis remains unclear in particular, the marked phenotypic variability between affected animals. Given that affected animals accumulate glycogen and alpha-crystalline polysaccharide within their muscles, it is possible that physical disruption associated with the presence of this material could exacerbate the phenotype. The aim of this study was to compare the histopathological changes in horses with PSSM1, and specifically, to investigate the hypothesis that the severity of underlying pathology, (e.g. vacuolation and inclusion formation would (1 be higher in homozygotes than heterozygotes and (2 correlate with clinical severity. Resting and post-exercise plasma creatine kinase (CK and aspartate aminotransferase (AST enzyme activity measurements and muscle pathology were assessed in matched cohorts of PSSM1 homozygotes, heterozygotes or control horses. Median (interquartile range (IR resting CK activities were 364 (332-764 U/L for homozygotes, 301 (222-377 U/L for heterozygotes and 260 (216-320 U/L for controls, and mean (+/- SD AST activity for homozygotes were 502 (+/116 U/L, for heterozygotes, 357 (+/-92 U/L and for controls, 311 (+/-64 U/L and were significantly different between groups (P = 0.04 and P = 0.01 respectively. Resting plasma AST activity was significantly associated with the severity of subsarcolemmal vacuolation (rho = 0.816; P = 0.01 and cytoplasmic inclusions (rho = 0.766; P = 0.01. There were fewer type 2× and more type 2a muscle fibres in PSSM1-affected horses. Our results indicate that PSSM1 has incomplete dominance. Furthermore, the association between plasma muscle enzyme activity and severity of underlying pathology suggests that physical disruption of

  7. Expression of the multiple sclerosis-associated MHC class II Allele HLA-DRB1*1501 is regulated by vitamin D.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreeram V Ramagopalan

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a complex trait in which allelic variation in the MHC class II region exerts the single strongest effect on genetic risk. Epidemiological data in MS provide strong evidence that environmental factors act at a population level to influence the unusual geographical distribution of this disease. Growing evidence implicates sunlight or vitamin D as a key environmental factor in aetiology. We hypothesised that this environmental candidate might interact with inherited factors and sought responsive regulatory elements in the MHC class II region. Sequence analysis localised a single MHC vitamin D response element (VDRE to the promoter region of HLA-DRB1. Sequencing of this promoter in greater than 1,000 chromosomes from HLA-DRB1 homozygotes showed absolute conservation of this putative VDRE on HLA-DRB1*15 haplotypes. In contrast, there was striking variation among non-MS-associated haplotypes. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed specific recruitment of vitamin D receptor to the VDRE in the HLA-DRB1*15 promoter, confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments using lymphoblastoid cells homozygous for HLA-DRB1*15. Transient transfection using a luciferase reporter assay showed a functional role for this VDRE. B cells transiently transfected with the HLA-DRB1*15 gene promoter showed increased expression on stimulation with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (P = 0.002 that was lost both on deletion of the VDRE or with the homologous "VDRE" sequence found in non-MS-associated HLA-DRB1 haplotypes. Flow cytometric analysis showed a specific increase in the cell surface expression of HLA-DRB1 upon addition of vitamin D only in HLA-DRB1*15 bearing lymphoblastoid cells. This study further implicates vitamin D as a strong environmental candidate in MS by demonstrating direct functional interaction with the major locus determining genetic susceptibility. These findings support a connection between the main epidemiological and

  8. [Association of haplotype formed on HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQA1 alleles with outcomes of hepatitis B virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Liang-ping; Li, Xing-wang; Liu, Ying; Sun, Guo-chang; Chen, Zhi-hai; Zhu, Xi-lin; Hu, Quan-you; Li, Hui

    2006-08-01

    To assess the association of haplotype of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQA1 alleles with outcomes of hepatitis B virus infection in Han population of north China. Two hundred and seven chronic hepatitis B (HB) patients, two hundred and twelve chronic asymptomatic hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers (HBV carrier) and one hundred and forty-eight self-limited HBV infection were investigated for HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQA1 alleles by sequence specific-polymerase chain reaction (PCR-SSP). The frequency of DRB1*04-DQA1*0301 haplotype was 10.03% in self-limited HBV infection subjects, significantly higher than that in chronic HB patients (3.66%) (P=0.0005)ûthe frequency of DRB1*15/*16-DQA1*0102 haplotype was 6.80% in self-limited HBV infection subjects, significantly higher than 1.94% in chronic HB patients (P=0.0012) and 1.65% in asymptomatic HBV carriers (P=0.0004)ûwhile the frequency of DRB1*04-DQA1*0302 haplotype was 3.10% in chronic HB patients, higher than that in self-limited HBV infection subjects (0.39%) (P=0.0077). Individuals with different haplotypes composed of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQA1 might have different outcomes of HBV infection.

  9. Whole Genome Re-Sequencing and Characterization of Powdery Mildew Disease-Associated Allelic Variation in Melon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathishkumar Natarajan

    Full Text Available Powdery mildew is one of the most common fungal diseases in the world. This disease frequently affects melon (Cucumis melo L. and other Cucurbitaceous family crops in both open field and greenhouse cultivation. One of the goals of genomics is to identify the polymorphic loci responsible for variation in phenotypic traits. In this study, powdery mildew disease assessment scores were calculated for four melon accessions, 'SCNU1154', 'Edisto47', 'MR-1', and 'PMR5'. To investigate the genetic variation of these accessions, whole genome re-sequencing using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform was performed. A total of 754,759,704 quality-filtered reads were generated, with an average of 82.64% coverage relative to the reference genome. Comparisons of the sequences for the melon accessions revealed around 7.4 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, 1.9 million InDels, and 182,398 putative structural variations (SVs. Functional enrichment analysis of detected variations classified them into biological process, cellular component and molecular function categories. Further, a disease-associated QTL map was constructed for 390 SNPs and 45 InDels identified as related to defense-response genes. Among them 112 SNPs and 12 InDels were observed in powdery mildew responsive chromosomes. Accordingly, this whole genome re-sequencing study identified SNPs and InDels associated with defense genes that will serve as candidate polymorphisms in the search for sources of resistance against powdery mildew disease and could accelerate marker-assisted breeding in melon.

  10. Serotonergic 5HTTLPR/rs25531 s-allele homozygosity associates with violent suicides in male citalopram users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahikainen, Anna-Liina; Majaharju, Salla; Haukka, Jari; Palo, Jukka U; Sajantila, Antti

    2017-10-01

    Depressive disorders are involved as a background factor in over 50% of suicide cases. The most widely used antidepressants today are serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). However, not all users benefit from SSRI medication. Although the overall number of suicides in Finland have decreased notably during the last decade, the annual rate is still relatively high, particularly in male population. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the genetic variants associated with decreased citalopram efficiency, 5HTTLPR/rs25531, and increased impulsive behavior, MAOA-uVNTR and HTR2B Q20*, are more frequent among citalopram users committing suicide than among the citalopram users in general. Also the effect of alcohol was evaluated. The study population comprised 349 suicide victims (184 males and 165 females). Based on the suicide method used, cases were divided into two groups; violent (88 males and 49 females) and non-violent (96 males and 116 females). The control group (284; 159 males and 125 females) consisted of citalopram users who died of causes other than suicide. We found that male citalopram users with low functioning s/s genotype of 5HTTLPR/rs25531 were in increased risk to commit violent suicide (OR 2.50, 95%CI 1.15-5.42, p = 0.020). Surprisingly, high blood alcohol concentration was observed to be a risk factor only in non-violent suicides (both males and females), but not in violent ones. No association between suicides and MAOA-uVNTR and HTR2B Q20*, which have been previously connected to violent and impulsive behavior, was detected. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Beneficial role of D allele in controlling ACE levels: a study among ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    because II genotype is found to be absent in age groups above 50 years. This study shows the individuals with ID genotype have high advantage because of higher frequency of heterozygote (ID) is indicative of advantage in the pop- ulation by maintaining lower ACE levels followed by DD individuals (table 3). Discussion.

  12. C allele of the rs2209972 single nucleotide polymorphism of the insulin degrading enzyme gene and Alzheimer's disease in type 2 diabetes, a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Hermosillo, Hugo; Díaz De León-González, Enrique; Palacios-Corona, Rebeca; Cedillo-Rodríguez, Javier Armando; Camacho-Luis, Abelardo; Reyes-Romero, Miguel Arturo; Medina-Chávez, Juan Humberto; Blandón, Pedro A

    2015-02-20

    In the last few decades we have witnessed an interesting transformation of the population pyramids throughout the world. As the population's life expectancy increases, there are more chronic diseases such as diabetes mellitus and dementias, and both of them have shown an association. To determine the association between Alzheimer's disease in diabetic patients and the insulin degrading enzyme in outpatients of a second level Hospital in Monterrey, Mexico. This was a case control study in which we included outpatients from the Geriatrics Clinic of a Hospital in Northeastern Mexico. Cases were patients with a Mini Mental Score Exam (MMSE) below 24 and DSM-IV criteria for Dementia. Controls were patients who had MMSE scores greater than 24. Data from 97 patients were analyzed. Regarding physical examination and the results of laboratory tests, there were no differences between the two groups (p>0.05). A 98% prevalence of the insulin degrading enzyme was documented in the sample studied. We found an association between a homozygous status for the CC genotype and Dementia with an estimated Odds Ratio (OR) of 2.5 (CI 95% 1.6-3.3) on the bivariate test, while, on the multivariate analysis, the OR was estimated 3.3 (CI 95% 1.3-8.2). Evidence shows that cognitive impairment is more frequent among those exposed to the C allele of the rs2209972 SNP of the insulin degrading enzyme gene. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Multiple phosphoglucomutase alleles in Toxorhynchites splendens (Diptera: Culcidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, H S; Chan, K L; Dhaliwal, S S; Burton, J J; Cheong, W H; Mak, J W

    1980-09-15

    Multiple phosphoglucomutase (E.C. 2.7.5.1) alleles are found in the mosquito Toxorhynchites splendens. The sample studied reveals 3 Pgm alleles whose frequencies are in good accord with Hardy-Weinberg expectations. The most frequent allele is that controlling a phenotype with an intermediate electrophoretic mobility. Each Pgm allele determines a two-band electrophoretic pattern.

  14. Type 2 diabetes risk alleles near ADCY5, CDKAL1 and HHEX-IDE are associated with reduced birthweight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, E A; Pilgaard, K; Pisinger, C

    2010-01-01

    The fetal insulin hypothesis suggests that variation in the fetal genotype influencing insulin secretion or action may predispose to low birthweight and type 2 diabetes. We examined associations between 25 confirmed type 2 diabetes risk variants and birthweight in individuals from the Danish Inte...

  15. Association of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression : identification of a modifier of breast cancer risk at locus 11q22.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaeker, Karoline B; Pastinen, Tomi; Droit, Arnaud; Lemaçon, Audrey; Adlard, Julian; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L; Arason, Adalgeir; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K; Azzollini, Jacopo; Bane, Anita; Barjhoux, Laure; Barrowdale, Daniel; Benitez, Javier; Berthet, Pascaline; Blok, Marinus J; Bobolis, Kristie; Bonadona, Valérie; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bradbury, Angela R; Brewer, Carole; Buecher, Bruno; Buys, Saundra S; Caligo, Maria A; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; De la Hoya, Miguel; De Leeneer, Kim; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan Chun; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Eccles, Diana; Eeles, Ros; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Ejlertsen, Bent; Engel, Christoph; Gareth Evans, D; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Foretova, Lenka; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Fountzilas, George; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Ganschow, Pamela; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; Gayther, Simon A; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldgar, David E; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Hahnen, Eric; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Hays, John L; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hulick, Peter J; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Joseph, Vijai; Just, Walter; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Karlan, Beth Y; Kets, Carolien M; Kirk, Judy; Kriege, Mieke; Laitman, Yael; Laurent, Maïté; Lazaro, Conxi; Leslie, Goska; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Loman, Niklas; Loud, Jennifer T; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mariani, Milena; Mazoyer, Sylvie; McGuffog, Lesley; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Montagna, Marco; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nussbaum, Robert L; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Ong, Kai-Ren; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Osorio, Ana; Papi, Laura; Park, Sue Kyung; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Segura, Pedro Perez; Peterlongo, Paolo; Phelan, Catherine M; Radice, Paolo; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Rookus, Matti A; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Sevenet, Nicolas; Shah, Payal D; Singer, Christian F; Slavin, Thomas P; Snape, Katie; Sokolowska, Johanna; Sønderstrup, Ida Marie Heeholm; Southey, Melissa; Spurdle, Amanda B; Stadler, Zsofia; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Tan, Yen; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teulé, Alex; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tihomirova, Laima; Tischkowitz, Marc; Tognazzo, Silvia; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Tung, Nadine; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van der Luijt, Rob B; van Engelen, Klaartje; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wijnen, Juul T; Rebbeck, Timothy; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J; Nord, Silje; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C; Simard, Jacques

    PURPOSE: Cis-acting regulatory SNPs resulting in differential allelic expression (DAE) may, in part, explain the underlying phenotypic variation associated with many complex diseases. To investigate whether common variants associated with DAE were involved in breast cancer susceptibility among BRCA1

  16. Deciphering Natural Allelic Variation in Switchgrass for Biomass Yield and Quality Using a Nested Association Mapping Population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Malay C. [The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Inc., Ardmore, OK (United States). Forage Improvement Division (FID); Brummer, E. Charles [The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Inc., Ardmore, OK (United States); Kaeppler, Shawn [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Bhandari, Hem S. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-10-28

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a C4 grass with high biomass yield potential and a model species for bioenergy feedstock development. Understanding the genetic basis of quantitative traits is essential to facilitate genome-enabled breeding programs. The nested association mapping (NAM) analysis combines the best features of both bi-parental and association analyses and can provide high power and high resolution in QTL detection and will ensure significant improvements in biomass yield and quality. To develop a NAM population of switchgrass, 15 highly diverse genotypes with specific characteristics were selected from a diversity panel and crossed to a recurrent parent, AP13, a genotype selected for whole genome sequencing and parent of a mapping population. Ten genotypes from each of the 15 F1 families were then chain crossed. Progenies form each family were randomly selected to develop the NAM population. The switchgrass NAM population consists of a total of 2000 genotypes from 15 families. All the progenies, founder parents, F1 parents (n=2350) were evaluated in replicated field trials at Ardmore, OK and Knoxville, TN. Phenotypic data on plant height, tillering ability, regrowth, flowering time, and biomass yield were collected. Dried biomass samples were also analyzed using prediction equations of NIRS at the Noble Foundation and for lignin content, S/G ratio, and sugar release characteristics at the NREL. Genomic shotgun sequencing of 15 switchgrass NAM founder parental genomes at JGI produced 28-66 Gb high-quality sequence data. Alignment of these sequences with the reference genome, AP13 (v3.0), revealed that up to 99% of the genomic sequences mapped to the reference genome. A total of 2,149 individuals from NAM populations were sequenced by exome capture and two sets of 15 SNP matrices (one for each family) were generated. QTL associated with important traits have been identified and verified in breeding populations. The QTL detected and their associated

  17. Human leukocyte antigen-e alleles are associated with hepatitis c virus, torque teno virus, and toxoplasma co-infections but are not associated with hepatitis b virus, hepatitis d virus, and GB virus c co-infections in human immunodeficiency virus patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afiono Agung Prasetyo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Data regarding the distribution of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA-E alleles and their association with blood-borne pathogen infections/co-infections are limited for many populations, including Indonesia. Aims: The aim of this study was to analyze the association between HLA-E allelic variants and infection with blood-borne pathogens such as hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV, hepatitis D virus (HDV, torque teno virus (TTV, GB virus C (GBV-C, and Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii in Indonesian Javanese human immunodeficiency virus (HIV patients. Settings and Design: A total of 320 anti-HIV-positive blood samples were analyzed for HBV, HCV, HDV, TTV, GBV-C, and T. gondii infection status and its association with HLA-E allelic variants. Materials and Methods: Nucleic acid was extracted from plasma samples and used for the molecular detection of HBV DNA, HCV RNA, HDV RNA, TTV DNA, and GBV-C RNA, whereas hepatitis B surface antigen, anti-HCV, immunoglobulin M and G (IgM and IgG anti-T. gondii were detected through serological testing. The blood samples were genotyped for HLA-E loci using a sequence-specific primer-polymerase chain reaction. Statistical Analysis Used: Either the Chi-square or Fisher′s exact test was performed to analyze the frequency of HLA-E alleles and blood-borne pathogen infections in the population. Odds ratios (ORs were calculated to measure the association between the antibodies found and the participants′ possible risk behaviors. A logistic regression analysis was used to assess the associations. Results: HLA-EFNx010101/0101 was associated with HCV/TTV co-infection (adjusted OR [aOR]: 3.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.156-10.734; P = 0.027 and IgM/IgG anti-Toxo positivity (aOR: 27.0; 95% CI: 3.626-200.472; P = 0.001. HLA-EFNx010103/0103 was associated with TTV co-infection (aOR: 2.7; 95% CI: 1.509-4.796; P = 0.001. Conclusions: HLA-E alleles in Indonesian Javanese HIV patients were found to be associated

  18. Lipoprotein(a) and HIV: Allele-Specific Apolipoprotein(a) Levels Predict Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in HIV-Infected Young Women in the Women's Interagency HIV Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enkhmaa, Byambaa; Anuurad, Erdembileg; Zhang, Wei; Li, Chin-Shang; Kaplan, Robert; Lazar, Jason; Merenstein, Dan; Karim, Roksana; Aouizerat, Brad; Cohen, Mardge; Butler, Kenneth; Pahwa, Savita; Ofotokun, Igho; Adimora, Adaora A; Golub, Elizabeth; Berglund, Lars

    2017-05-01

    In the general population, lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] has been established as an independent causal risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Lp(a) levels are to a major extent regulated by a size polymorphism in the apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)] gene. The roles of Lp(a)/apo(a) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related elevated cardiovascular disease risk remain unclear. The associations between total plasma Lp(a) level, allele-specific apo(a) level, an Lp(a) level carried by individual apo(a) alleles, and common carotid artery intima-media thickness were assessed in 150 HIV-infected and 100 HIV-uninfected women in the WIHS (Women's Interagency HIV Study). Linear regression analyses with and without adjustments were used. The cohort was young (mean age, ≈31 years), with the majority being Blacks (≈70%). The prevalence of a small size apo(a) (≤22 Kringle repeats) or a high Lp(a) level (≥30 mg/dL) was similar by HIV status. Total plasma Lp(a) level ( P =0.029) and allele-specific apo(a) level carried by the smaller apo(a) sizes ( P =0.022) were significantly associated with carotid artery intima-media thickness in the HIV-infected women only. After accounting for confounders (age, race, smoking, body mass index, blood pressure, hepatitis C virus coinfection, menopause, plasma lipids, treatment status, CD4 + T cell count, and HIV/RNA viral load), the association remained significant for both Lp(a) ( P =0.035) and allele-specific apo(a) level carried by the smaller apo(a) sizes ( P =0.010) in the HIV-infected women. Notably, none of the other lipids/lipoproteins was associated with carotid artery intima-media thickness. Lp(a) and allele-specific apo(a) levels predict carotid artery intima-media thickness in HIV-infected young women. Further research is needed to identify underlying mechanisms of an increased Lp(a) atherogenicity in HIV infection. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. SIGLEC16 encodes a DAP12-associated receptor expressed in macrophages that evolved from its inhibitory counterpart SIGLEC11 and has functional and non-functional alleles in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huan; Lakner, Ursula; de Bono, Bernard; Traherne, James A; Trowsdale, John; Barrow, Alexander D

    2008-08-01

    Sialic acid binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglec) are important components of immune recognition. The organization of Siglec genes in different species is consistent with rapid selection imposed by pathogens. We studied SIGLEC11 genes in human, rodent, dog, cow and non-human primates. The lineages of SIGLEC11 genes in these species have undergone dynamic gene duplication and conversion, forming a potential inhibitory (SIGLEC11)/activating (SIGLEC16) receptor pair in chimpanzee and humans. A cDNA encoding human Siglec-16, currently classed as a pseudogene in the databases (SIGLECP16), is expressed in various cell lines and tissues. A polymorphism screen for the two alleles (wild type and four-base pair deletion, 4bpDelta) of SIGLEC16 found their frequencies to be 50% amongst the UK population. A search for donor sequences for SIGLEC16 revealed a subfamily of activating Siglec with charged transmembrane domains predicted to associate with ITAM-encoding adaptor proteins. In support of this, Siglec-16 was expressed at the cell surface in the presence of DAP12, but not the FcRgamma chain. Using antisera specific to the cytoplasmic tail of Siglec-16, we identified Siglec-16 expression in CD14(+) tissue macrophages and in normal human brain, cancerous oesophagus and lung. This is the first activating human Siglec receptor found to have functional and non-functional alleles within the population.

  20. Prevalence and prognostic impact of allelic imbalances associated with leukemic transformation of Philadelphia chromosome–negative myeloproliferative neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Utz O.; Lee, Dhong Hyun Tony; Kawamata, Norihiko; Iwanski, Gabriela B.; Lasho, Terra; Weiss, Tamara; Nowak, Daniel; Koren-Michowitz, Maya; Kato, Motohiro; Sanada, Masashi; Shih, Lee-Yung; Nagler, Arnon; Raynaud, Sophie D.; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Mesa, Ruben; Haferlach, Torsten; Gilliland, D. Gary; Tefferi, Ayalew; Ogawa, Seishi; Koeffler, H. Phillip

    2010-01-01

    Philadelphia chromosome–negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) including polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and primary myelofibrosis show an inherent tendency for transformation into leukemia (MPN-blast phase), which is hypothesized to be accompanied by acquisition of additional genomic lesions. We, therefore, examined chromosomal abnormalities by high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array in 88 MPN patients, as well as 71 cases with MPN-blast phase, and correlated these findings with their clinical parameters. Frequent genomic alterations were found in MPN after leukemic transformation with up to 3-fold more genomic changes per sample compared with samples in chronic phase (P disease progression including not only established targets (ETV6, TP53, and RUNX1) but also new candidate genes on 7q, 16q, 19p, and 21q. Moreover, trisomy 8 or amplification of 8q24 (MYC) was almost exclusively detected in JAK2V617F− cases with MPN-blast phase. Remarkably, copy number–neutral loss of heterozygosity (CNN-LOH) on either 7q or 9p including homozygous JAK2V617F was related to decreased survival after leukemic transformation (P = .01 and P = .016, respectively). Our high-density SNP-array analysis of MPN genomes in the chronic compared with leukemic stage identified novel target genes and provided prognostic insights associated with the evolution to leukemia. PMID:20068225

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a native human tRNA synthetase whose allelic variants are associated with Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Wei; Schimmel, Paul; Yang, Xiang-Lei, E-mail: xlyang@scripps.edu [Departments of Molecular Biology and Chemistry, The Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, BCC-379, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States)

    2006-12-01

    Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a native human tRNA synthetase whose allelic variants are associated with Charcot–Marie–Tooth Disease. Glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) is one of a group of enzymes that catalyze the synthesis of aminoacyl-tRNAs for translation. Mutations of human and mouse GlyRSs are causally associated with Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease, the most common genetic disorder of the peripheral nervous system. As the first step towards a structure–function analysis of this disease, native human GlyRS was expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystal belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or its enantiomorphic space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 91.74, c = 247.18 Å, and diffracted X-rays to 3.0 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contained one GlyRS molecule and had a solvent content of 69%.

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a native human tRNA synthetase whose allelic variants are associated with Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Wei; Schimmel, Paul; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2006-01-01

    Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a native human tRNA synthetase whose allelic variants are associated with Charcot–Marie–Tooth Disease. Glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) is one of a group of enzymes that catalyze the synthesis of aminoacyl-tRNAs for translation. Mutations of human and mouse GlyRSs are causally associated with Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease, the most common genetic disorder of the peripheral nervous system. As the first step towards a structure–function analysis of this disease, native human GlyRS was expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystal belonged to space group P4 3 2 1 2 or its enantiomorphic space group P4 1 2 1 2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 91.74, c = 247.18 Å, and diffracted X-rays to 3.0 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contained one GlyRS molecule and had a solvent content of 69%

  3. HLA Class I Allele Frequencies in Southern Iranian Women with Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razmkhah, Mahboobeh; Ghaderi, Abbas

    2013-02-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in women worldwide. It has been revealed that elevated risk for malignancy may be associated with certain HLA alleles. This study was performed to assess the association of HLA class I alleles with breast cancer in women in Southern Iran. Eighty nine patients included for analyzing the HLA class I alleles frequency using complement dependent cytotoxicity microassay and results were compared to 86 gender-matched healthy volunteers. There were significantly more patients with A24(9) allele than those of healthy individuals (38.2% versus 16.3%) (P-value=0.002). In contrast, HLA-A1 had significantly much less expression in the patient group compared to the controls (P- value=0.04). A24(9) allele appears to be one of the factors increasing an individual's the susceptibility to breast cancer in our population but further investigation might be required.

  4. Novel Loci Associated with Usual Sleep Duration: The CHARGE Consortium Genome-Wide Association Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Hek, Karin; Chen, Ting-hsu; Watson, Nathaniel F.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Byrne, Enda M.; Cornelis, Marilyn; Warby, Simon C.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Cherkas, Lynn; Evans, Daniel S.; Grabe, Hans J.; Lahti, Jari; Li, Man; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lumley, Thomas; Marciante, Kristin D.; Pérusse, Louis; Psaty, Bruce M.; Robbins, John; Tranah, Gregory J.; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Wilk, Jemma B.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Bellis, Claire; Biffar, Reiner; Bouchard, Claude; Cade, Brian; Curhan, Gary C.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Ewert, Ralf; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fülöp, Tibor; Gehrman, Philip R.; Goodloe, Robert; Harris, Tamara B.; Heath, Andrew C.; Hernandez, Dena; Hofman, Albert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hunter, David J.; Jensen, Majken K.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Kähönen, Mika; Kao, Linda; Kraft, Peter; Larkin, Emma K.; Lauderdale, Diane S.; Luik, Annemarie I.; Medici, Marco; Montgomery, Grant W.; Palotie, Aarno; Patel, Sanjay R.; Pistis, Giorgio; Porcu, Eleonora; Quaye, Lydia; Raitakari, Olli; Redline, Susan; Rimm, Eric B.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Smith, Albert V.; Spector, Tim D.; Teumer, Alexander; Uitterlinden, André G.; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Widen, Elisabeth; Willemsen, Gonneke; Young, Terry; Zhang, Xiaoling; Liu, Yongmei; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hu, Frank; Mangino, Massimo; Martin, Nicholas G.; O’Connor, George T.; Stone, Katie L.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Viikari, Jorma; Gharib, Sina A.; Punjabi, Naresh M.; Räikkönen, Katri; Völzke, Henry; Mignot, Emmanuel; Tiemeier, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Usual sleep duration is a heritable trait correlated with psychiatric morbidity, cardiometabolic disease and mortality, although little is known about the genetic variants influencing this trait. A genome-wide association study of usual sleep duration was conducted using 18 population-based cohorts totaling 47,180 individuals of European ancestry. Genome-wide significant association was identified at two loci. The strongest is located on chromosome 2, in an intergenic region 35–80 kb upstream from the thyroid-specific transcription factor PAX8 (lowest p=1.1 ×10−9). This finding was replicated in an African-American sample of 4771 individuals (lowest p=9.3 × 10−4). The strongest combined association was at rs1823125 (p=1.5 × 10−10, minor allele frequency 0.26 in the discovery sample, 0.12 in the replication sample), with each copy of the minor allele associated with a sleep duration 3.1 minutes longer per night. The alleles associated with longer sleep duration were associated in previous genome-wide association studies with a more favorable metabolic profile and a lower risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Understanding the mechanisms underlying these associations may help elucidate biological mechanisms influencing sleep duration and its association with psychiatric, metabolic and cardiovascular disease. PMID:25469926

  5. Type 2 Diabetes Risk Alleles Demonstrate Extreme Directional Differentiation among Human Populations, Compared to Other Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong; Corona, Erik; Sikora, Martin; Dudley, Joel T.; Morgan, Alex A.; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Nilsen, Geoffrey B.; Ruau, David; Lincoln, Stephen E.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Butte, Atul J.

    2012-01-01

    Many disease-susceptible SNPs exhibit significant disparity in ancestral and derived allele frequencies across worldwide populations. While previous studies have examined population differentiation of alleles at specific SNPs, global ethnic patterns of ensembles of disease risk alleles across human diseases are unexamined. To examine these patterns, we manually curated ethnic disease association data from 5,065 papers on human genetic studies representing 1,495 diseases, recording the precise risk alleles and their measured population frequencies and estimated effect sizes. We systematically compared the population frequencies of cross-ethnic risk alleles for each disease across 1,397 individuals from 11 HapMap populations, 1,064 individuals from 53 HGDP populations, and 49 individuals with whole-genome sequences from 10 populations. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) demonstrated extreme directional differentiation of risk allele frequencies across human populations, compared with null distributions of European-frequency matched control genomic alleles and risk alleles for other diseases. Most T2D risk alleles share a consistent pattern of decreasing frequencies along human migration into East Asia. Furthermore, we show that these patterns contribute to disparities in predicted genetic risk across 1,397 HapMap individuals, T2D genetic risk being consistently higher for individuals in the African populations and lower in the Asian populations, irrespective of the ethnicity considered in the initial discovery of risk alleles. We observed a similar pattern in the distribution of T2D Genetic Risk Scores, which are associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes in the Diabetes Prevention Program cohort, for the same individuals. This disparity may be attributable to the promotion of energy storage and usage appropriate to environments and inconsistent energy intake. Our results indicate that the differential frequencies of T2D risk alleles may contribute to the observed

  6. Type 2 diabetes risk alleles demonstrate extreme directional differentiation among human populations, compared to other diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Chen

    Full Text Available Many disease-susceptible SNPs exhibit significant disparity in ancestral and derived allele frequencies across worldwide populations. While previous studies have examined population differentiation of alleles at specific SNPs, global ethnic patterns of ensembles of disease risk alleles across human diseases are unexamined. To examine these patterns, we manually curated ethnic disease association data from 5,065 papers on human genetic studies representing 1,495 diseases, recording the precise risk alleles and their measured population frequencies and estimated effect sizes. We systematically compared the population frequencies of cross-ethnic risk alleles for each disease across 1,397 individuals from 11 HapMap populations, 1,064 individuals from 53 HGDP populations, and 49 individuals with whole-genome sequences from 10 populations. Type 2 diabetes (T2D demonstrated extreme directional differentiation of risk allele frequencies across human populations, compared with null distributions of European-frequency matched control genomic alleles and risk alleles for other diseases. Most T2D risk alleles share a consistent pattern of decreasing frequencies along human migration into East Asia. Furthermore, we show that these patterns contribute to disparities in predicted genetic risk across 1,397 HapMap individuals, T2D genetic risk being consistently higher for individuals in the African populations and lower in the Asian populations, irrespective of the ethnicity considered in the initial discovery of risk alleles. We observed a similar pattern in the distribution of T2D Genetic Risk Scores, which are associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes in the Diabetes Prevention Program cohort, for the same individuals. This disparity may be attributable to the promotion of energy storage and usage appropriate to environments and inconsistent energy intake. Our results indicate that the differential frequencies of T2D risk alleles may

  7. Hypermethylated SUPERMAN epigenetic alleles in arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, S E; Meyerowitz, E M

    1997-08-22

    Mutations in the SUPERMAN gene affect flower development in Arabidopsis. Seven heritable but unstable sup epi-alleles (the clark kent alleles) are associated with nearly identical patterns of excess cytosine methylation within the SUP gene and a decreased level of SUP RNA. Revertants of these alleles are largely demethylated at the SUP locus and have restored levels of SUP RNA. A transgenic Arabidopsis line carrying an antisense methyltransferase gene, which shows an overall decrease in genomic cytosine methylation, also contains a hypermethylated sup allele. Thus, disruption of methylation systems may yield more complex outcomes than expected and can result in methylation defects at known genes. The clark kent alleles differ from the antisense line because they do not show a general decrease in genomic methylation.

  8. Investigation of MGMT and DAPK1 methylation patterns in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma using allelic MSP-pyrosequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lasse Sommer; Treppendahl, Marianne Bach; Asmar, Fazila

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor genes MGMT and DAPK1 become methylated in several cancers including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). However, allelic methylation patterns have not been investigated in DLBCL. We developed a fast and cost-efficient method for the analysis of allelic methylation based...... on pyrosequencing of methylation specific PCR (MSP) products including a SNP. Allelic methylation patterns were reliably analyzed in standards of known allelic methylation status even when diluted in unmethylated DNA to below 1% methylation. When studying 148 DLBCL patients MGMT and DAPK1 methylation was observed...... in 19% and 89%, respectively, and among methylated and heterozygous patients 29% and 55%, respectively, were biallelically methylated. An association between the T-allele of the rs16906252 SNP and MGMT methylation was observed (p-value=0.04), and DAPK1 methylation of the A-allele was associated...

  9. Family-based association study of DRD4 gene in methylphenidate-responded Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Wing-Leung Leung

    Full Text Available The 48-basepair (48-bp variable number tandem repeat (VNTR polymorphism in exon 3 of the dopamine receptor D4 gene (DRD4 is implicated in the etiology of attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. In particular, ADHD in European-ancestry population is associated with an increased prevalence of the 7-repeat (7R allele of the exon 3 VNTR. However, it is intriguing to note that the 7R allele has been found to be of very low prevalence in the Chinese general population. In a previous case-control study, our research team had found that the 7R allele was similarly absent in Chinese ADHD children in Hong Kong. Instead, there was an increased prevalence of the 2R allele in Chinese ADHD children. Interestingly, in Asian samples, the 2R allele had been found to be an evolutionary derivative of the 7R allele with equivalent biochemical functionality. So, the finding of an association between ADHD and 2R allele in Chinese population does not exactly contradict the original 7R allele finding in European-ancestry population. However, given the potential pitfall of population stratification in the previous case-control design, this current study tested the 2R allele and ADHD association using a methodologically more rigorous family-based approach on 33 Chinese ADHD probands who had favorable clinical responses to stimulant medication (methylphenidate. Haplotype Relative Risk (HRR analysis and Transmission Disequilibrium Test (TDT both showed a significant preferential transmission of the 2R allele from the biological parents to ADHD probands (pone-tailed = 0.038, OR = 2.04; pone-tailed = 0.048, OR = 2.29, respectively. A second hypothesis speculates that it is the deviation, including 7R and 2R alleles, from the conserved ancestral 4R allele which confers risk to ADHD. Thus, a preferential transmission of non-4R alleles, against the 4R allele, from biological parents to their ADHD probands is predicted. Both HRR analysis and TDT confirmed such

  10. Allele-specific recognition by LILRB3 and LILRA6 of a cytokeratin 8 - associated ligand on necrotic glandular epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Des C.; Hewitt, Colin R.A.; L?pez-?lvarez, Mar?a R.; Jahnke, Martin; Russell, Alasdair I.; Radjabova, Valeria; Trowsdale, Alice R.Z.; Trowsdale, John

    2016-01-01

    The LILRs are a family of receptors that regulate the activities of myelomonocytic cells. We found that specific allelic variants of two related members of the LILR family, LILRB3 and LILRA6, interact with a ligand exposed on necrotic glandular epithelial cells. The extracellular domains of LILRB3 and LILRA6 are very similar and their genes are highly polymorphic. A commonly occurring allele, LILRB3*12, displayed particularly strong binding of these necrotic cells and further screening of the...

  11. A candidate gene association study of bone mineral density in an Iranian population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Alireza Dastgheib

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The genetic epidemiology of variation in bone mineral density (BMD and osteoporosis is not well studied in Iranian populations and needs more research. We report a candidate gene association study of BMD variation in a healthy cross sectional study of 501 males and females sampled from the IMOS study Shiraz, Iran. We selected to study the association with 21 SNPs located in the 7 candidate genes LRP5, RANK, RANKL, OPG, P2RX7, VDR and ESR1. BMD was measured at the three sites L2-L4, neck of femur and total hip. Association between BMD and each SNP was assessed using multiple linear regression assuming an allele dose (additive effect on BMD (adjusted for age and sex. Statistically significant (at the unadjusted 5% level associations were seen with 7 SNPs in 5 of the candidate genes. Two SNPs showed statistically significant association with more than one BMD site. Significant association was seen between BMD at all three sites with the VDR SNP rs731246 (L2-L4 p=0.038; neck of femur p=0.001 and total hip p<0.001. The T allele was consistently associated with lower BMD than the C allele. Significant association was also seen for the P2RX7 SNP rs3751143 where the G allele was consistently associated with lower BMD than the T allele, (L2-L4 p=0.069; neck of femur p=0.024, total hip p=0.045.

  12. Association of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ and HLA-DQA1/DQB1 alleles with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing; Deng, Tuo; Zhu, Linxin; Zhong, Jingxiang

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ and HLA-DQA1/DQB1 alleles with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH), providing further evidences on the genetic background of this disease. A comprehensive literature search was conducted on the relationship of HLA-DQ and/or HLA-DQA1/DQB1 alleles with VKH through PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, VIP, and databases for grey literature. The last search was in October 2017. Pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) was calculated from extracted data to access the strength of the association between a genotype and VKH. HLA-DQ4 was confirmed to increase the risk of VKH significantly (OR = 4.63, 95% CI: 1.74-12.31, P = .002), while HLA-DQ1 seemed to reduce VKH occurrence with OR = 0.32 (95% CI: 0.22-0.47, P HLA-DQA1*0301-(OR = 4.52, 95% CI: 1.42-14.35, P = .01) and HLA-DQB1*0401-(OR = 23.12, 95% CI: 11.54-46.31, P HLA-DQA1*0103, 0401, 0501 and HLA-DQB1*0301, 0402, 0601, 0603 were significant protective genetic factors. We concluded that HLA-DQ4 carriers had a higher risk of VKH and HLA-DQ1 seemed to be protective. People with positive HLA-DQA1*0301 and HLA-DQB1*0401 demonstrated to be more susceptible to VKH. HLA-DQA1*0103, 0401, 0501 and HLA-DQB1*0301, 0402, 0601, 0603 could be potential protectors.

  13. Early effect of ApoE-epsilon 4 allele on cognitive results in a group of highly performing subjects: the EVA study. Etude sur le Vieillissement Artériel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berr, C; Dufouil, C; Brousseau, T; Richard, F; Amouyel, P; Marceteau, E; Alpérovitch, A

    1996-10-25

    We examined the association between apolipoprotein E (ApoE) epsilon 4 allele and cognitive performances in a population sample of 1174 high functioning volunteers aged 59-71 years. The neuropsychological battery included the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and nine tests assessing visual attention, verbal memory, visual processing, logical reasoning, psychomotor rapidity, visual memory, auditory attention and verbal fluency. The ratio of genotypes with zero, one or two epsilon 4 alleles was 70.6%, 21.4% and 1.9%, respectively. The epsilon 4 allele was significantly associated with lower scores for visual attention, psychomotor rapidity and MMSE. In the best performer subgroup (MMSE score above 25, n = 1028), all relationships persisted. Our findings demonstrate that the ApoE-epsilon 4 allele is early associated with low normal cognitive performances in areas which are not specifically affected at the subclinical onset of dementia.

  14. Allelic heterogeneity of G6PD deficiency in West Africa and severe malaria susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Taane G; Fry, Andrew E; Auburn, Sarah; Campino, Susana; Diakite, Mahamadou; Green, Angela; Richardson, Anna; Teo, Yik Y; Small, Kerrin; Wilson, Jonathan; Jallow, Muminatou; Sisay-Joof, Fatou; Pinder, Margaret; Sabeti, Pardis; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P; Rockett, Kirk A

    2009-08-01

    Several lines of evidence link glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency to protection from severe malaria. Early reports suggested most G6PD deficiency in sub-Saharan Africa was because of the 202A/376G G6PD A- allele, and recent association studies of G6PD deficiency have employed genotyping as a convenient way to determine enzyme status. However, further work has suggested that other G6PD deficiency alleles are relatively common in some regions of West Africa. To investigate the consequences of unrecognized allelic heterogeneity on association studies, in particular studies of G6PD deficiency and malaria, we carried out a case-control analysis of 2488 Gambian children with severe malaria and 3875 controls. No significant association was found between severe malaria and the 202A/376G G6PD A- allele when analyzed alone, but pooling 202A/376G with other deficiency alleles revealed the signal of protection (male odds ratio (OR) 0.77, 95% CI 0.62-0.95, P=0.016; female OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.56-0.89, P=0.004). We have identified the 968C mutation as the most common G6PD A- allele in The Gambia. Our results highlight some of the consequences of allelic heterogeneity, particularly the increased type I error. They also suggest that G6PD-deficient male hemizygotes and female heterozygotes are protected from severe malaria.

  15. Bipolar disorder and the pseudoautosomal region: An association study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsian, A.; Todd, R.D. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1994-03-15

    From family, adoption, and twin studies it is clear that genetic factors play an important role in the etiology of bipolar disorder (McGuffin and Katz: The Biology of Depression, Gaskell, London, 1986). Recently Yoneda et al. reported an association between an allele (A4) of a VNTR marker (DXYS20) for the pseudoautosomal region and bipolar disorder in a Japanese population. In order to test for this association in a Caucasian population, we have typed a sample of 52 subjects with bipolar disorder and 61 normal controls. The bipolar subjects are probands of multiple incidence families. The normal controls are an epidemiologically ascertained sample of middle-aged, unrelated individuals. The two groups were matched for sex and ethnic background. There were no significant differences in the allele or genotype frequencies of DXYS20 between the two groups. In particular, there was no significant difference in the frequency of the A4 allele in normal controls and bipolar patients (0.377 vs. 0.317, respectively). The prevalence of the A4 allele in bipolar patients and normal controls was 0.567 and 0.622, respectively. We were not able to replicate the results of the 1992 Yoneda et al. study. 15 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. Nucleotide variation and identification of novel blast resistance alleles of Pib by allele mining strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramkumar, G; Madhav, M S; Devi, S J S Rama; Prasad, M S; Babu, V Ravindra

    2015-04-01

    Pib is one of significant rice blast resistant genes, which provides resistance to wide range of isolates of rice blast pathogen, Magnaporthe oryzae. Identification and isolation of novel and beneficial alleles help in crop enhancement. Allele mining is one of the best strategies for dissecting the allelic variations at candidate gene and identification of novel alleles. Hence, in the present study, Pib was analyzed by allele mining strategy, and coding and non-coding (upstream and intron) regions were examined to identify novel Pib alleles. Allelic sequences comparison revealed that nucleotide polymorphisms at coding regions affected the amino acid sequences, while the polymorphism at upstream (non-coding) region affected the motifs arrangements. Pib alleles from resistant landraces, Sercher and Krengosa showed better resistance than Pib donor variety, might be due to acquired mutations, especially at LRR region. The evolutionary distance, Ka/Ks and phylogenetic analyzes also supported these results. Transcription factor binding motif analysis revealed that Pib (Sr) had a unique motif (DPBFCOREDCDC3), while five different motifs differentiated the resistance and susceptible Pib alleles. As the Pib is an inducible gene, the identified differential motifs helps to understand the Pib expression mechanism. The identified novel Pib resistant alleles, which showed high resistance to the rice blast, can be used directly in blast resistance breeding program as alternative Pib resistant sources.

  17. Applicability of major histocompatibility complex DRB1 alleles as markers to detect vertebrate hybridization: a case study from Iberian ibex × domestic goat in southern Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alasaad Samer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hybridization between closely related wild and domestic species is of great concern because it can alter the evolutionary integrity of the affected populations. The high allelic variability of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC loci usually excludes them from being used in studies to detect hybridization events. However, if a the parental species don’t share alleles, and b one of the parental species possesses an exceptionally low number of alleles (to facilitate analysis, then even MHC loci have the potential to detect hybrids. Results By genotyping the exon2 of the MHC class II DRB1 locus, we were able to detect hybridization between domestic goats (Capra hircus and free-ranging Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica hispanica by molecular means. Conclusions This is the first documentation of a Capra pyrenaica × Capra hircus hybridization, which presented us the opportunity to test the applicability of MHC loci as new, simple, cost-effective, and time-saving approach to detect hybridization between wild species and their domesticated relatives, thus adding value to MHC genes role in animal conservation and management.

  18. Use of allele scores as instrumental variables for Mendelian randomization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Stephen; Thompson, Simon G

    2013-08-01

    An allele score is a single variable summarizing multiple genetic variants associated with a risk factor. It is calculated as the total number of risk factor-increasing alleles for an individual (unweighted score), or the sum of weights for each allele corresponding to estimated genetic effect sizes (weighted score). An allele score can be used in a Mendelian randomization analysis to estimate the causal effect of the risk factor on an outcome. Data were simulated to investigate the use of allele scores in Mendelian randomization where conventional instrumental variable techniques using multiple genetic variants demonstrate 'weak instrument' bias. The robustness of estimates using the allele score to misspecification (for example non-linearity, effect modification) and to violations of the instrumental variable assumptions was assessed. Causal estimates using a correctly specified allele score were unbiased with appropriate coverage levels. The estimates were generally robust to misspecification of the allele score, but not to instrumental variable violations, even if the majority of variants in the allele score were valid instruments. Using a weighted rather than an unweighted allele score increased power, but the increase was small when genetic variants had similar effect sizes. Naive use of the data under analysis to choose which variants to include in an allele score, or for deriving weights, resulted in substantial biases. Allele scores enable valid causal estimates with large numbers of genetic variants. The stringency of criteria for genetic variants in Mendelian randomization should be maintained for all variants in an allele score.

  19. Study on the association of BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles with clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-04-12

    Apr 12, 2010 ... CCA C), DRB315F (5'-GGAGGG GGC GCG AGC AGT TGA ACG) and DRB327R (5'-GGG CGG GGC GTT CTC CAT TAG TGT AGC). (Ledwidge et al., 2001) were used for the PCR amplification of the. DRB3 exon 2. For each reaction, 10 µl volumes using 50 ng DNA, 1. U AmpliTaq DNA polymerase, 5 pmol ...

  20. HLA-DQA1/B1 alleles as putative susceptibility markers in congenital toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokawa, Paulo Tadashi; Targa, Lília Spaleta; Yamamoto, Lidia; Rodrigues, Jonatas Cristian; Kanunfre, Kelly Aparecida; Okay, Thelma Suely

    2016-05-18

    Host and parasite genotypes are among the factors associated with congenital toxoplasmosis pathogenesis. As HLA class II molecules play a key role in the immune system regulation, the aim of this study was to investigate whether HLA-DQA1/B1 alleles are associated with susceptibility or protection to congenital toxoplasmosis. One hundred and twenty-two fetuses with and 103 without toxoplasmosis were studied. The two study groups were comparable according to a number of socio-demographic and genetic variables. HLA alleles were typed by PCR-SSP. In the HLA-DQA1 region, the allele frequencies showed that *01:03 and *03:02 alleles could confer susceptibility (OR= 3.06, p = 0.0002 and OR= 9.60, p= 0.0001, respectively) as they were more frequent among infected fetuses. Regarding the HLA-DQB1 region, the *05:04 allele could confer susceptibility (OR = 6.95, p HLA-DQA1 susceptibility alleles. In the present study, a discriminatory potential of HLA-DQA1/B1 alleles to identify susceptibility to congenital toxoplasmosis and the most severe cases has been shown.

  1. Semiparametric Allelic Tests for Mapping Multiple Phenotypes: Binomial Regression and Mahalanobis Distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Arunabha; Witte, John S; Ghosh, Saurabh

    2015-12-01

    Binary phenotypes commonly arise due to multiple underlying quantitative precursors and genetic variants may impact multiple traits in a pleiotropic manner. Hence, simultaneously analyzing such correlated traits may be more powerful than analyzing individual traits. Various genotype-level methods, e.g., MultiPhen (O'Reilly et al. []), have been developed to identify genetic factors underlying a multivariate phenotype. For univariate phenotypes, the usefulness and applicability of allele-level tests have been investigated. The test of allele frequency difference among cases and controls is commonly used for mapping case-control association. However, allelic methods for multivariate association mapping have not been studied much. In this article, we explore two allelic tests of multivariate association: one using a Binomial regression model based on inverted regression of genotype on phenotype (Binomial regression-based Association of Multivariate Phenotypes [BAMP]), and the other employing the Mahalanobis distance between two sample means of the multivariate phenotype vector for two alleles at a single-nucleotide polymorphism (Distance-based Association of Multivariate Phenotypes [DAMP]). These methods can incorporate both discrete and continuous phenotypes. Some theoretical properties for BAMP are studied. Using simulations, the power of the methods for detecting multivariate association is compared with the genotype-level test MultiPhen's. The allelic tests yield marginally higher power than MultiPhen for multivariate phenotypes. For one/two binary traits under recessive mode of inheritance, allelic tests are found to be substantially more powerful. All three tests are applied to two different real data and the results offer some support for the simulation study. We propose a hybrid approach for testing multivariate association that implements MultiPhen when Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) is violated and BAMP otherwise, because the allelic approaches assume HWE

  2. Alarmingly High Segregation Frequencies of Quinolone Resistance Alleles within Human and Animal Microbiomes Are Not Explained by Direct Clinical Antibiotic Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Wesley; Hershberg, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance poses a major threat to human health. It is therefore important to characterize the frequency of resistance within natural bacterial environments. Many studies have focused on characterizing the frequencies with which horizontally acquired resistance genes segregate within natural bacterial populations. Yet, very little is currently understood regarding the frequency of segregation of resistance alleles occurring within the housekeeping targets of antibiotics. We surveyed a large number of metagenomic datasets extracted from a large variety of host-associated and non host-associated environments for such alleles conferring resistance to three groups of broad spectrum antibiotics: streptomycin, rifamycins, and quinolones. We find notable segregation frequencies of resistance alleles occurring within the target genes of each of the three antibiotics, with quinolone resistance alleles being the most frequent and rifamycin resistance alleles being the least frequent. Resistance allele frequencies varied greatly between different phyla and as a function of environment. The frequency of quinolone resistance alleles was especially high within host-associated environments, where it averaged an alarming ∼40%. Within host-associated environments, resistance to quinolones was most often conferred by a specific resistance allele. High frequencies of quinolone resistance alleles were also found within hosts that were not directly treated with antibiotics. Therefore, the high segregation frequency of quinolone resistance alleles occurring within the housekeeping targets of antibiotics in host-associated environments does not seem to be the sole result of clinical antibiotic usage. PMID:26019163

  3. A risk allele for nicotine dependence in CHRNA5 is a protective allele for cocaine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grucza, Richard A; Wang, Jen C; Stitzel, Jerry A; Hinrichs, Anthony L; Saccone, Scott F; Saccone, Nancy L; Bucholz, Kathleen K; Cloninger, C Robert; Neuman, Rosalind J; Budde, John P; Fox, Louis; Bertelsen, Sarah; Kramer, John; Hesselbrock, Victor; Tischfield, Jay; Nurnberger, John I; Almasy, Laura; Porjesz, Bernice; Kuperman, Samuel; Schuckit, Marc A; Edenberg, Howard J; Rice, John P; Goate, Alison M; Bierut, Laura J

    2008-12-01

    A nonsynonymous coding polymorphism, rs16969968, of the CHRNA5 gene that encodes the alpha-5 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been found to be associated with nicotine dependence. The goal of this study was to examine the association of this variant with cocaine dependence. Genetic association analysis was performed in two independent samples of unrelated case and control subjects: 1) 504 European Americans participating in the Family Study on Cocaine Dependence (FSCD) and 2) 814 European Americans participating in the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA). In the FSCD, there was a significant association between the CHRNA5 variant and cocaine dependence (odds ratio = .67 per allele, p = .0045, assuming an additive genetic model), but in the reverse direction compared with that previously observed for nicotine dependence. In multivariate analyses that controlled for the effects of nicotine dependence, both the protective effect for cocaine dependence and the previously documented risk effect for nicotine dependence were statistically significant. The protective effect for cocaine dependence was replicated in the COGA sample. In COGA, effect sizes for habitual smoking, a proxy phenotype for nicotine dependence, were consistent with those observed in FSCD. The minor (A) allele of rs16969968, relative to the major G allele, appears to be both a risk factor for nicotine dependence and a protective factor for cocaine dependence. The biological plausibility of such a bidirectional association stems from the involvement of nAChRs with both excitatory and inhibitory modulation of dopamine-mediated reward pathways.

  4. Allele Workbench: transcriptome pipeline and interactive graphics for allele-specific expression.

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    Carol A Soderlund

    Full Text Available Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor, where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense, and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available

  5. Enhancement of allele discrimination by introduction of nucleotide mismatches into siRNA in allele-specific gene silencing by RNAi.

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    Yusuke Ohnishi

    Full Text Available Allele-specific gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi is therapeutically useful for specifically inhibiting the expression of disease-associated alleles without suppressing the expression of corresponding wild-type alleles. To realize such allele-specific RNAi (ASP-RNAi, the design and assessment of small interfering RNA (siRNA duplexes conferring ASP-RNAi is vital; however, it is also difficult. In a previous study, we developed an assay system to assess ASP-RNAi with mutant and wild-type reporter alleles encoding the Photinus and Renilla luciferase genes. In line with experiments using the system, we realized that it is necessary and important to enhance allele discrimination between mutant and corresponding wild-type alleles. Here, we describe the improvement of ASP-RNAi against mutant alleles carrying single nucleotide variations by introducing base substitutions into siRNA sequences, where original variations are present in the central position. Artificially mismatched siRNAs or short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs against mutant alleles of the human Prion Protein (PRNP gene, which appear to be associated with susceptibility to prion diseases, were examined using this assessment system. The data indicates that introduction of a one-base mismatch into the siRNAs and shRNAs was able to enhance discrimination between the mutant and wild-type alleles. Interestingly, the introduced mismatches that conferred marked improvement in ASP-RNAi, appeared to be largely present in the guide siRNA elements, corresponding to the 'seed region' of microRNAs. Due to the essential role of the 'seed region' of microRNAs in their association with target RNAs, it is conceivable that disruption of the base-pairing interactions in the corresponding seed region, as well as the central position (involved in cleavage of target RNAs, of guide siRNA elements could influence allele discrimination. In addition, we also suggest that nucleotide mismatches at the 3'-ends of sense

  6. Bipolar disorder risk alleles in children with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmelmann, B G; Hinney, A; Scherag, A; Pütter, C; Pechlivanis, S; Cichon, S; Jöckel, K-H; Schreiber, S; Wichmann, H E; Albayrak, Ö; Dauvermann, M; Konrad, K; Wilhelm, C; Herpertz-Dahlmann, B; Lehmkuhl, G; Sinzig, J; Renner, T J; Romanos, M; Warnke, A; Lesch, K P; Reif, A; Hebebrand, J

    2013-11-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may share common genetic risk factors as indicated by the high co-morbidity of BD and ADHD, their phenotypic overlap especially in pediatric populations, the high heritability of both disorders, and the co-occurrence in families. We therefore examined whether known polygenic BD risk alleles are associated with ADHD. We chose the eight best SNPs of the recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) of BD patients of German ancestry and the nine SNPs from international GWAS meeting a 'genome-wide significance' level of α = 5 × 10(-8). A GWAS was performed in 495 ADHD children and 1,300 population-based controls using HumanHap550v3 and Human660 W-Quadv1 BeadArrays. We found no significant association of childhood ADHD with single BD risk alleles surviving adjustment for multiple testing. Yet, risk alleles for BD and ADHD were directionally consistent at eight of nine loci with the strongest support for three SNPs in or near NCAN, BRE, and LMAN2L. The polygene analysis for the BP risk alleles at all 14 loci indicated a higher probability of being a BD risk allele carrier in the ADHD cases as compared to the controls. At a moderate power to detect association with ADHD, if true effects were close to estimates from GWAS for BD, our results suggest that the possible contribution of BD risk variants to childhood ADHD risk is considerably lower than for BD. Yet, our findings should encourage researchers to search for common genetic risk factors in BD and childhood ADHD in future studies.

  7. Association between KIR genotypes and HLA-B alleles on viral load in Southern Brazilian individuals infected by HIV-1 subtypes B and C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes-Cardoso, Juliana; Süffert, Theodoro Armando; Correa, Maria da Gloria; Jobim, Luiz Fernando Job; Jobim, Mariana; Salim, Patricia Hartstein; Arruda, Monica Barcelos; Boullosa, Lidia Theodoro; Tanuri, Amilcar; Porto, Luis Cristóvão; Ferreira, Orlando C

    2016-10-01

    There is a great variety of HIV-1 subtypes circulating in Brazil, including subtype C, whose prevalence is on the rise, particularly in the southern region. Many host and viral genetic factors may be involved in this trend. We evaluated the influence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I alleles and killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genotypes on viral set point and T-CD4(+) parameters in 84 treatment-naïve HIV-1-positive individuals. Frequency data in the infected group were compared to data of 548 healthy control subjects. Individuals with the KIR AA genotype had a higher viral load (VL) than individuals with the KIR Bx genotype. The HIV-1 group was subdivided into three subgroups according to HLA-B allele presence: those with protection to disease alleles (HLA-B(+)), accelerated disease progression alleles (HLA-B(-)), or neither (HLA-B(o)) were grouped. We observed a significant effect of the HLA-B allele presence on VL. The HLA-B(+) group had significantly lower VL than the HLA-B(-) group and trended toward a lower VL than the HLA-B(o) group. There were significant differences between groups expressing extreme VL values: KIR-AA+HLA-B(-) vs. KIR Bx+HLA-B(+) and KIR-AA+HLA-B(o)vs. KIR Bx+HLA-B(+). The relationship of KIR/HLA host genetics with slow HIV disease progression in southern Brazil may be useful for vaccine developers, epidemiologists, and clinicians. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. KIR2DL2/2DL3-E35 alleles are functionally stronger than -Q35 alleles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, Rafijul; Thapa, Rajoo; Bao, Ju; Li, Ying; Zheng, Jie; Leung, Wing

    2016-03-01

    KIR2DL2 and KIR2DL3 segregate as alleles of a single locus in the centromeric motif of the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene family. Although KIR2DL2/L3 polymorphism is known to be associated with many human diseases and is an important factor for donor selection in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the molecular determinant of functional diversity among various alleles is unclear. In this study we found that KIR2DL2/L3 with glutamic acid at position 35 (E35) are functionally stronger than those with glutamine at the same position (Q35). Cytotoxicity assay showed that NK cells from HLA-C1 positive donors with KIR2DL2/L3-E35 could kill more target cells lacking their ligands than NK cells with the weaker -Q35 alleles, indicating better licensing of KIR2DL2/L3+ NK cells with the stronger alleles. Molecular modeling analysis reveals that the glutamic acid, which is negatively charged, interacts with positively charged histidine located at position 55, thereby stabilizing KIR2DL2/L3 dimer and reducing entropy loss when KIR2DL2/3 binds to HLA-C ligand. The results of this study will be important for future studies of KIR2DL2/L3-associated diseases as well as for donor selection in allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

  9. MICB Allele Genotyping on Microarrays by Improving the Specificity of Extension Primers.

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    In-Cheol Baek

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I chain-related gene B (MICB encodes a ligand for activating NKG2D that expressed in natural killer cells, γδ T cells, and αβ CD8+ T cells, which is associated with autoimmune diseases, cancer, and infectious diseases. Here, we have established a system for genotyping MICB alleles using allele-specific primer extension (ASPE on microarrays. Thirty-six high quality, allele-specific extension primers were evaluated using strict and reliable cut-off values using mean fluorescence intensity (MFI, whereby an MFI >30,000 represented a positive signal and an MFI <10,000 represented a negative signal. Eight allele-specific extension primers were found to be false positives, five of which were improved by adjusting their length, and three of which were optimized by refractory modification. The MICB alleles (*002:01, *003, *005:02/*010, *005:03, *008, *009N, *018, and *024 present in the quality control panel could be exactly defined by 22 allele-specific extension primers. MICB genotypes that were identified by ASPE on microarrays were in full concordance with those identified by PCR-sequence-based typing. In conclusion, we have developed a method for genotyping MICB alleles using ASPE on microarrays; which can be applicable for large-scale single nucleotide polymorphism typing studies of population and disease associations.

  10. Genetic dissection of the Drosophila melanogaster female head transcriptome reveals widespread allelic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Elizabeth G; Sanderson, Brian J; McNeil, Casey L; Long, Anthony D; Macdonald, Stuart J

    2014-05-01

    Modern genetic mapping is plagued by the "missing heritability" problem, which refers to the discordance between the estimated heritabilities of quantitative traits and the variance accounted for by mapped causative variants. One major potential explanation for the missing heritability is allelic heterogeneity, in which there are multiple causative variants at each causative gene with only a fraction having been identified. The majority of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) implicitly assume that a single SNP can explain all the variance for a causative locus. However, if allelic heterogeneity is prevalent, a substantial amount of genetic variance will remain unexplained. In this paper, we take a haplotype-based mapping approach and quantify the number of alleles segregating at each locus using a large set of 7922 eQTL contributing to regulatory variation in the Drosophila melanogaster female head. Not only does this study provide a comprehensive eQTL map for a major community genetic resource, the Drosophila Synthetic Population Resource, but it also provides a direct test of the allelic heterogeneity hypothesis. We find that 95% of cis-eQTLs and 78% of trans-eQTLs are due to multiple alleles, demonstrating that allelic heterogeneity is widespread in Drosophila eQTL. Allelic heterogeneity likely contributes significantly to the missing heritability problem common in GWAS studies.

  11. Genetic dissection of the Drosophila melanogaster female head transcriptome reveals widespread allelic heterogeneity.

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    Elizabeth G King

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Modern genetic mapping is plagued by the "missing heritability" problem, which refers to the discordance between the estimated heritabilities of quantitative traits and the variance accounted for by mapped causative variants. One major potential explanation for the missing heritability is allelic heterogeneity, in which there are multiple causative variants at each causative gene with only a fraction having been identified. The majority of genome-wide association studies (GWAS implicitly assume that a single SNP can explain all the variance for a causative locus. However, if allelic heterogeneity is prevalent, a substantial amount of genetic variance will remain unexplained. In this paper, we take a haplotype-based mapping approach and quantify the number of alleles segregating at each locus using a large set of 7922 eQTL contributing to regulatory variation in the Drosophila melanogaster female head. Not only does this study provide a comprehensive eQTL map for a major community genetic resource, the Drosophila Synthetic Population Resource, but it also provides a direct test of the allelic heterogeneity hypothesis. We find that 95% of cis-eQTLs and 78% of trans-eQTLs are due to multiple alleles, demonstrating that allelic heterogeneity is widespread in Drosophila eQTL. Allelic heterogeneity likely contributes significantly to the missing heritability problem common in GWAS studies.

  12. Identification of transcriptome SNPs for assessing allele-specific gene expression in a super-hybrid rice Xieyou9308.

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    Rongrong Zhai

    Full Text Available Hybridization, a common process in nature, can give rise to a vast reservoir of allelic variants. Combination of these allelic variants may result in novel patterns of gene action and is thought to contribute to heterosis. In this study, we analyzed genome-wide allele-specific gene expression (ASGE in the super-hybrid rice variety Xieyou9308 using RNA sequencing technology (RNA-Seq. We identified 9325 reliable single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs distributed throughout the genome. Nearly 68% of the identified polymorphisms were CT and GA SNPs between R9308 and Xieqingzao B, suggesting the existence of DNA methylation, a heritable epigenetic mark, in the parents and their F1 hybrid. Of 2793 identified transcripts with consistent allelic biases, only 480 (17% showed significant allelic biases during tillering and/or heading stages, implying that trans effects may mediate most transcriptional differences in hybrid offspring. Approximately 67% and 62% of the 480 transcripts showed R9308 allelic expression biases at tillering and heading stages, respectively. Transcripts with higher levels of gene expression in R9308 also exhibited R9308 allelic biases in the hybrid. In addition, 125 transcripts were identified with significant allelic expression biases at both stages, of which 74% showed R9308 allelic expression biases. R9308 alleles may tend to preserve their characteristic states of activity in the hybrid and may play important roles in hybrid vigor at both stages. The allelic expression of 355 transcripts was highly stage-specific, with divergent allelic expression patterns observed at different developmental stages. Many transcripts associated with stress resistance were differently regulated in the F1 hybrid. The results of this study may provide valuable insights into molecular mechanisms of heterosis.

  13. FRAXA and FRAXE: evidence against segregation distortion and for an effect of intermediate alleles on learning disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teague, J W; Morton, N E; Dennis, N R; Curtis, G; McKechnie, N; Macpherson, J N; Murray, A; Pound, M C; Sharrock, A J; Youings, S A; Jacobs, P A

    1998-01-20

    There have been several claims of segregation distortion (meiotic drive) for loci associated with diseases caused by trinucleotide repeats, leading us to test for this phenomenon in a large study of the X-linked loci FRAXA and FRAXE. We found no evidence of meiotic drive in females and no convincing evidence in males, where the limitation of risk to daughters creates a testing bias for alleles of interest. Alleles for pre- and full mutation, intermediate alleles, and common alleles were analyzed separately, with the same negative results that are extended in the discussion to claims of meiotic drive for other diseases. On the other hand, an excess risk of learning difficulties was confirmed for intermediate FRAXA alleles (relative risk, 2.58 +/- .74) and suggested for intermediate FRAXE alleles. The penetrance of learning difficulty is low, the risk being estimated as .039 for FRAXA common alleles and .101 for intermediate alleles. Because of their lower gene frequency, full mutations are a less frequent cause of learning difficulty than intermediate alleles, which contribute .0020 to total prevalence and .0012 to attributable prevalence of learning difficulty.

  14. A refined study of FCRL genes from a genome-wide association study for Graves' disease.

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    Shuang-Xia Zhao

    Full Text Available To pinpoint the exact location of the etiological variant/s present at 1q21.1 harboring FCRL1-5 and CD5L genes, we carried out a refined association study in the entire FCRL region in 1,536 patients with Graves' disease (GD and 1,516 sex-matched controls by imputation analysis, logistic regression, and cis-eQTL analysis. Among 516 SNPs with P<0.05 in the initial GWAS scan, the strongest signals associated with GD and correlated to FCRL3 expression were located at a cluster of SNPs including rs7528684 and rs3761959. And the allele-specific effects for rs3761959 and rs7528684 on FCRL3 expression level revealed that the risk alleles A of rs3761959 and C of rs7528684 were correlated with the elevated expression level of FCRL3 whether in PBMCs or its subsets, especially in CD19(+ B cells and CD8(+ T subsets. Next, the combined analysis with 5,300 GD cases and 4,916 control individuals confirmed FCRL3 was a susceptibility gene of GD in Chinese Han populations, and rs3761959 and rs7528684 met the genome-wide association significance level (P(combined = 2.27×10(-12 and 7.11×10(-13, respectively. Moreover, the haplotypes with the risk allele A of rs3761959 and risk allele C of rs7528684 were associated with GD risk. Finally, our epigenetic analysis suggested the disease-associated C allele of rs7528684 increased affinity for NF-KB transcription factor. Above data indicated that FCRL3 gene and its proxy SNP rs7528684 may be involved in the pathogenesis of GD by excessive inhibiting B cell receptor signaling and the impairment of suppressing function of Tregs.

  15. A refined study of FCRL genes from a genome-wide association study for Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shuang-Xia; Liu, Wei; Zhan, Ming; Song, Zhi-Yi; Yang, Shao-Ying; Xue, Li-Qiong; Pan, Chun-Ming; Gu, Zhao-Hui; Liu, Bing-Li; Wang, Hai-Ning; Liang, Liming; Liang, Jun; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Yuan, Guo-Yue; Li, Chang-Gui; Chen, Ming-Dao; Chen, Jia-Lun; Gao, Guan-Qi; Song, Huai-Dong

    2013-01-01

    To pinpoint the exact location of the etiological variant/s present at 1q21.1 harboring FCRL1-5 and CD5L genes, we carried out a refined association study in the entire FCRL region in 1,536 patients with Graves' disease (GD) and 1,516 sex-matched controls by imputation analysis, logistic regression, and cis-eQTL analysis. Among 516 SNPs with P<0.05 in the initial GWAS scan, the strongest signals associated with GD and correlated to FCRL3 expression were located at a cluster of SNPs including rs7528684 and rs3761959. And the allele-specific effects for rs3761959 and rs7528684 on FCRL3 expression level revealed that the risk alleles A of rs3761959 and C of rs7528684 were correlated with the elevated expression level of FCRL3 whether in PBMCs or its subsets, especially in CD19(+) B cells and CD8(+) T subsets. Next, the combined analysis with 5,300 GD cases and 4,916 control individuals confirmed FCRL3 was a susceptibility gene of GD in Chinese Han populations, and rs3761959 and rs7528684 met the genome-wide association significance level (P(combined) = 2.27×10(-12) and 7.11×10(-13), respectively). Moreover, the haplotypes with the risk allele A of rs3761959 and risk allele C of rs7528684 were associated with GD risk. Finally, our epigenetic analysis suggested the disease-associated C allele of rs7528684 increased affinity for NF-KB transcription factor. Above data indicated that FCRL3 gene and its proxy SNP rs7528684 may be involved in the pathogenesis of GD by excessive inhibiting B cell receptor signaling and the impairment of suppressing function of Tregs.

  16. Genetic association study of selected candidate genes (ApoB, LPL, Leptin and telomere length in obese and hypertensive individuals

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    Saini Divyalakshmi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A genetic study was carried out among obese and hypertensive individuals from India to assess allelic association, if any, at three candidate loci: Apolipoprotein B (ApoB minisatellite and two tetranucleotide repeat loci; LPL (Lipoprotein lipase and Leptin. Attempt has also been made to find out whether telomere length attrition is associated with hypertension and obese individuals. Methods Venous blood samples were collected from 37 normal, 35 obese and 47 hypertensive individuals. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC and PCR amplifications were achieved using locus specific primers. Genotyping of ApoB minisatellite was performed using 4% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE followed by silver staining, whereas LPL and Leptin loci were genotyped using ALF Express™ DNA sequencer. Telomere length was determined using a recently developed real time based quantitative PCR, where the relative telomere length was determined by calculating the relative ratio of telomere (T and single copy gene (S PCR products which is expressed as T/S ratio. Results All the three loci are highly polymorphic, display high heterozygosity and conform to Hardy-Weinberg's equilibrium expectations. ApoB minisatellite displayed 14 alleles, whereas LPL and Leptin tetranucleotide loci were having 9 and 17 alleles, respectively. Interestingly two new alleles (9 and 11 repeats were detected at ApoB locus for the first time. The alleles at Leptin locus were classified as Class I (lower alleles: 149-200 bp and Class II alleles (higher alleles: >217 bp. Higher alleles at ApoB (>39 repeats, predominant allele 9 at LPL and alleles 164 bp and 224 bp at Leptin loci have shown allelic association with hypertensive individuals. After adjusting the influence of age and gender, the analysis of co-variance (ANCOVA revealed the relative telomere length (T/S ratio in hypertensive individuals to be (1.01 ± 0.021, which was

  17. The Effect of CYP2B6, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4 Alleles on Methadone Binding: A Molecular Docking Study

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    Nik Nur Syazana Bt Nik Mohamed Kamal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Current methadone maintenance therapy (MMT is yet to ensure 100% successful treatment as the optimum dosage has yet to be determined. Overdose leads to death while lower dose causes the opioid withdrawal effect. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP in cytochrome P450s (CYPs, the methadone metabolizers, have been showen to be the main factor for the interindividual variability of methadone clinical effects. In this study, we investigated the effect of SNPs in three major methadone metabolizers (CYP2B6, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4 on methadone binding affinity. Results showed that CYP2B6*11, CYP2B6*12, CYP2B6*18, and CYP3A4*12 have significantly higher binding affinity to R-methadone compared to wild type. S-methadone has higher binding affinity in CYP3A4*3, CYP3A4*11, and CYP3A4*12 compared to wild type. R-methadone was shown to be the active form of methadone; thus individuals with CYP alleles that binds better to R-methadone will have higher methadone metabolism rate. Therefore, a higher dosage of methadone is necessary to obtain the opiate effect compared to a normal individual and vice versa. These results provide an initial prediction on methadone metabolism rate for individuals with mutant type CYP which enables prescription of optimum methadone dosage for individuals with CYP alleles.

  18. Haplotype-based allele mining in the Japan-MAGIC rice population.

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    Ogawa, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Eiji; Ohtani, Toshikazu; Kanno, Noriko; Tsunematsu, Hiroshi; Nonoue, Yasunori; Yano, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Toshio; Yonemaru, Jun-Ichi

    2018-03-12

    Multi-parent advanced generation inter-cross (MAGIC) lines have broader genetic variation than bi-parental recombinant inbred lines. Genome-wide association study (GWAS) using high number of DNA polymorphisms such as single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is a popular tool for allele mining in MAGIC populations, in which the associations of phenotypes with SNPs are investigated; however, the effects of haplotypes from multiple founders on phenotypes are not considered. Here, we describe an improved method of allele mining using the newly developed Japan-MAGIC (JAM) population, which is derived from eight high-yielding rice cultivars in Japan. To obtain information on the haplotypes in the JAM lines, we predicted the haplotype blocks in the whole chromosomes using 16,345 SNPs identified via genotyping-by-sequencing analysis. Using haplotype-based GWAS, we clearly detected the loci controlling the glutinous endosperm and culm length traits. Information on the alleles of the eight founders, which was based on the effects of mutations revealed by the analysis of next-generation sequencing data, was used to narrow down the candidate genes and reveal the associations between alleles and phenotypes. The haplotype-based allele mining (HAM) proposed in this study is a promising approach to the detection of allelic variation in genes controlling agronomic traits in MAGIC populations.

  19. Plasminogen alleles influence susceptibility to invasive aspergillosis.

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    Aimee K Zaas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis (IA is a common and life-threatening infection in immunocompromised individuals. A number of environmental and epidemiologic risk factors for developing IA have been identified. However, genetic factors that affect risk for developing IA have not been clearly identified. We report that host genetic differences influence outcome following establishment of pulmonary aspergillosis in an exogenously immune suppressed mouse model. Computational haplotype-based genetic analysis indicated that genetic variation within the biologically plausible positional candidate gene plasminogen (Plg; Gene ID 18855 correlated with murine outcome. There was a single nonsynonymous coding change (Gly110Ser where the minor allele was found in all of the susceptible strains, but not in the resistant strains. A nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (Asp472Asn was also identified in the human homolog (PLG; Gene ID 5340. An association study within a cohort of 236 allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT recipients revealed that alleles at this SNP significantly affected the risk of developing IA after HSCT. Furthermore, we demonstrated that plasminogen directly binds to Aspergillus fumigatus. We propose that genetic variation within the plasminogen pathway influences the pathogenesis of this invasive fungal infection.

  20. [Association study of chromosome 4 STRs polymorphisms with nasopharyngeal carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiu-Chan; O'Brien, Stephen J; Winkler, Cheryl; Scott, Kevin; Hutcheson, Holli; David, Victor; Kessing, Bailey; Zheng, Yu-Ming; Liao, Jian; Lui, Yan; Guy, de The; Zeng, Yi

    2006-07-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a complex disease caused by an interaction of EBV chronic infection, environment and host genes, in a multi-step process of carcinogenesis. However, which genetic factors play an important role in the development of chronic EBV infection and NPC remain elusive. The objective of this study is to identify genetic variations associated with two key clinical stages of NPC development: persistent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of nasopharyngeal epithelia and progression to NPC. We inspected a NPC-associated region on the short arm of chromosome 4 previously implicated by a genome-wide linkage analysis of familial NPC. We determined genotypes for 319 alleles in 34 microsatellite markers spanning an 18 Mb region in 350 NPC cases, 288 individuals with IgA antibodies to EBV capsid antigen (IgA/VCA+) and 346 controls seronegative for IgA antibodies to EBV capsid antigen (IgA/VCA-). The cases and controls were Han Chinese from Wuzhou city and Cangwu County, Guangxi province where the incidence of NPC is as high as 25-50 per 100,000 individuals. Comparing NPC cases to IgA/VCA+ subjects, we found 9 alleles marginally associated with developing NPC from IgA+ status, 5 for risk (OR=1.51-5.36, P=0.01-0.03) and 4 for restrictive (OR=0.3-0.71, P=0.02-0.045). Comparing IgA/VCA+ subjects and IgA/VCA- controls, and comparing all IgA seropositives with and without NPC to IgA seronegatives revealed 12 significant and 3 highly significant (P<0.01) alleles associated with IgA+ serostatus in the two comparing groups. Alleles D4S3241-136 (P=0.004, OR=1.91, 95% CI=1.2-3.0) and D4S3347-213 (P=0.001, OR=1.6, 95% CI=1.2-2.1) were for risk. Allele D4S174-202 (P=0.001, OR=0.5, 95%CI=0.3-0.7) was restrictive. However, statistical significance was lost for all when corrected for multiple comparisons test. Our study could not affirm the genetic association within this region with NPC as did another pedigree study, but provide an opportunity for further gene

  1. An innovative procedure of genome-wide association analysis fits studies on germplasm population and plant breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jianbo; Meng, Shan; Zhao, Tuanjie; Xing, Guangnan; Yang, Shouping; Li, Yan; Guan, Rongzhan; Lu, Jiangjie; Wang, Yufeng; Xia, Qiuju; Yang, Bing; Gai, Junyi

    2017-11-01

    The innovative RTM-GWAS procedure provides a relatively thorough detection of QTL and their multiple alleles for germplasm population characterization, gene network identification, and genomic selection strategy innovation in plant breeding. The previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been concentrated on finding a handful of major quantitative trait loci (QTL), but plant breeders are interested in revealing the whole-genome QTL-allele constitution in breeding materials/germplasm (in which tremendous historical allelic variation has been accumulated) for genome-wide improvement. To match this requirement, two innovations were suggested for GWAS: first grouping tightly linked sequential SNPs into linkage disequilibrium blocks (SNPLDBs) to form markers with multi-allelic haplotypes, and second utilizing two-stage association analysis for QTL identification, where the markers were preselected by single-locus model followed by multi-locus multi-allele model stepwise regression. Our proposed GWAS procedure is characterized as a novel restricted two-stage multi-locus multi-allele GWAS (RTM-GWAS, https://github.com/njau-sri/rtm-gwas ). The Chinese soybean germplasm population (CSGP) composed of 1024 accessions with 36,952 SNPLDBs (generated from 145,558 SNPs, with reduced linkage disequilibrium decay distance) was used to demonstrate the power and efficiency of RTM-GWAS. Using the CSGP marker information, simulation studies demonstrated that RTM-GWAS achieved the highest QTL detection power and efficiency compared with the previous procedures, especially under large sample size and high trait heritability conditions. A relatively thorough detection of QTL with their multiple alleles was achieved by RTM-GWAS compared with the linear mixed model method on 100-seed weight in CSGP. A QTL-allele matrix (402 alleles of 139 QTL × 1024 accessions) was established as a compact form of the population genetic constitution. The 100-seed weight QTL-allele matrix was

  2. M-protein gene-type distribution and hyaluronic acid capsule in group A Streptococcus clinical isolates in Chile: association of emm gene markers with csrR alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, A; Rojas, P; Rodríguez, C; Undabarrena, A; Garate, C; Riedel, I; Román, J C; Kalergis, A M; García, P

    2012-07-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes causes a variety of infections because of virulence factors such as capsular hyaluronic acid and M protein. The aim of this study was to determine emm types and capsule phenotype in 110 isolates of S. pyogenes from patients with invasive (sterile sites) and non-invasive (mainly pharyngitis) infections in Chile, and the relationship between both virulence factors. The most abundant types found were emm12, emm1, emm4 and emm28 and their distribution was similar to that seen in Latin America and developed countries, but very different from that in Asia and Pacific Island countries. Ten of 16 emm types identified in pharyngeal isolates were found in sterile-site isolates, and three of nine emm types of sterile-site isolates occurred in pharyngeal isolates; three emm subtypes were novel. The amount of hyaluronic acid was significantly higher in sterile-site isolates but did not differ substantially among emm types. Only three isolates were markedly capsulate and two of them had mutations in the csrR gene that codes for a repressor of capsule synthesis genes. We found a non-random association between emm types and csrR gene alleles suggesting that horizontal gene transfer is not freely occurring in the population.

  3. An evolutionary framework for association testing in resequencing studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Ryan King

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Sequencing technologies are becoming cheap enough to apply to large numbers of study participants and promise to provide new insights into human phenotypes by bringing to light rare and previously unknown genetic variants. We develop a new framework for the analysis of sequence data that incorporates all of the major features of previously proposed approaches, including those focused on allele counts and allele burden, but is both more general and more powerful. We harness population genetic theory to provide prior information on effect sizes and to create a pooling strategy for information from rare variants. Our method, EMMPAT (Evolutionary Mixed Model for Pooled Association Testing, generates a single test per gene (substantially reducing multiple testing concerns, facilitates graphical summaries, and improves the interpretation of results by allowing calculation of attributable variance. Simulations show that, relative to previously used approaches, our method increases the power to detect genes that affect phenotype when natural selection has kept alleles with large effect sizes rare. We demonstrate our approach on a population-based re-sequencing study of association between serum triglycerides and variation in ANGPTL4.

  4. Local Adaptation by Alleles of Small Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeaman, Sam

    2015-10-01

    Population genetic models predict that alleles with small selection coefficients may be swamped by migration and will not contribute to local adaptation. But if most alleles contributing to standing variation are of small effect, how does local adaptation proceed? Here I review predictions of population and quantitative genetic models and use individual-based simulations to illustrate how the architecture of local adaptation depends on the genetic redundancy of the trait, the maintenance of standing genetic variation (V(G)), and the susceptibility of alleles to swamping. Even when population genetic models predict swamping for individual alleles, considerable local adaptation can evolve at the phenotypic level if there is sufficient V(G). However, in such cases the underlying architecture of divergence is transient: F(ST) is low across all loci, and no locus makes an important contribution for very long. Because this kind of local adaptation is mainly due to transient frequency changes and allelic covariances, these architectures will be difficult--if not impossible--to detect using current approaches to studying the genomic basis of adaptation. Even when alleles are large and resistant to swamping, architectures can be highly transient if genetic redundancy and mutation rates are high. These results suggest that drift can play a critical role in shaping the architecture of local adaptation, both through eroding V(G) and affecting the rate of turnover of polymorphisms with redundant phenotypic effects.

  5. A model for fine mapping in family based association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehringer, Stefan; Pfeiffer, Ruth M

    2009-01-01

    Genome wide association studies for complex diseases are typically followed by more focused characterization of the identified genetic region. We propose a latent class model to evaluate a candidate region with several measured markers using observations on families. The main goal is to estimate linkage disequilibrium (LD) between the observed markers and the putative true but unobserved disease locus in the region. Based on this model, we estimate the joint distribution of alleles at the observed markers and the unobserved true disease locus, and a penetrance parameter measuring the impact of the disease allele on disease risk. A family specific random effect allows for varying baseline disease prevalences for different families. We present a likelihood framework for our model and assess its properties in simulations. We apply the model to an Alzheimer data set and confirm previous findings in the ApoE region.

  6. HLA- DR Alleles in Pakistani Patients of Pemphigus Vulgaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S. W.; Ahmad, T. A.; Bashir, M.; Iftikhar, N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine frequency of HLA-DR alleles in Pakistani patients of pemphigus vulgaris in comparison with local healthy controls. Study Design: Cross-sectional, comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Immunology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP), Rawalpindi, from January 2011 to January 2014. Methodology: Twenty eight patients with biopsy proven diagnosis of pemphigus vulgaris referred from Department of Dermatology, Military Hospital, Rawalpindi were included. Patients were compared with a group of 150 unrelated local healthy subjects. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood collected in Tri-potassium EDTA. HLA-DRB1 typing was carried out on allele level (DRB1*01 - DRB1*16) using SSP (sequence specific primers). HLA type was determined by agarose gel electrophoresis and results recorded. Phenotype frequency of various alleles among patient group and control group was calculated by direct counting and significance of their association was determined by Fisher's exact test/ Chi square test. Results: A total of 12 male and 16 female patients, with age ranging from 21 to 34 (mean 23.4 years) were genotype for HLA-DRB1 loci. A statistically significant association of the disease with HLA-DRB1*04 was observed (50% versus 20.7% in controls, p < 0.05). Conclusion: There is a strong association of HLA-DRB1*04 with pemphigus vulgaris in Pakistani population. (author)

  7. Update on allele nomenclature for human cytochromes P450 and the Human Cytochrome P450 Allele (CYP-allele) Nomenclature Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Sarah C; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Interindividual variability in xenobiotic metabolism and drug response is extensive and genetic factors play an important role in this variation. A majority of clinically used drugs are substrates for the cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme system and interindividual variability in expression and function of these enzymes is a major factor for explaining individual susceptibility for adverse drug reactions and drug response. Because of the existence of many polymorphic CYP genes, for many of which the number of allelic variants is continually increasing, a universal and official nomenclature system is important. Since 1999, all functionally relevant polymorphic CYP alleles are named and published on the Human Cytochrome P450 Allele (CYP-allele) Nomenclature Web site (http://www.cypalleles.ki.se). Currently, the database covers nomenclature of more than 660 alleles in a total of 30 genes that includes 29 CYPs as well as the cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR) gene. On the CYP-allele Web site, each gene has its own Webpage, which lists the alleles with their nucleotide changes, their functional consequences, and links to publications identifying or characterizing the alleles. CYP2D6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP3A4 are the most important CYPs in terms of drug metabolism, which is also reflected in their corresponding highest number of Webpage hits at the CYP-allele Web site.The main advantage of the CYP-allele database is that it offers a rapid online publication of CYP-alleles and their effects and provides an overview of peer-reviewed data to the scientific community. Here, we provide an update of the CYP-allele database and the associated nomenclature.

  8. Allele-specific KRT1 expression is a complex trait.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Tao

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The differential expression of alleles occurs commonly in humans and is likely an important genetic factor underlying heritable differences in phenotypic traits. Understanding the molecular basis of allelic expression differences is thus an important challenge. Although many genes have been shown to display differential allelic expression, this is the first study to examine in detail the cumulative effects of multiple cis-regulatory polymorphisms responsible for allele-specific expression differences. We have used a variety of experimental approaches to identify and characterize cis-regulatory polymorphisms responsible for the extreme allele-specific expression differences of keratin-1 (KRT1 in human white blood cells. The combined data from our analyses provide strong evidence that the KRT1 allelic expression differences result from the haplotypic combinations and interactions of five cis-regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs whose alleles differ in their affinity to bind transcription factors and modulate KRT1 promoter activity. Two of these cis-regulatory SNPs bind transcriptional activators with the alleles on the high-expressing KRT1 haplotype pattern having a higher affinity than the alleles on the low-expressing haplotype pattern. In contrast, the other three cis-regulatory SNPs bind transcriptional inhibitors with the alleles on the low-expressing haplotype pattern having a higher affinity than the alleles on the high-expressing haplotype pattern. Our study provides important new insights into the degree of complexity that the cis-regulatory sequences responsible for allele-specific transcriptional regulation have. These data suggest that allelic expression differences result from the cumulative contribution of multiple DNA sequence polymorphisms, with each having a small effect, and that allele-specific expression can thus be viewed as a complex trait.

  9. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antoniou, Antonis C.; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Soucy, Penny; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Cattaneo, Elisa; Barile, Monica; Pensotti, Valeria; Pasini, Barbara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Giannini, Giuseppe; Putignano, Anna Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Radice, Paolo; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Birk Jensen, Uffe; Crüger, Dorthe G.; Caligo, Maria A.; Laitman, Yael; Milgrom, Roni; Kaufman, Bella; Paluch-Shimon, Shani; Friedman, Eitan; Loman, Niklas; Harbst, Katja; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Ehrencrona, Hans; Melin, Beatrice; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Gorski, Bohdan; Osorio, Ana; Ramón Y Cajal, Teresa; Fostira, Florentia; Andrés, Raquel; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Rookus, Matti A.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Nelen, Marcel R.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; van Os, Theo A. M.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Devilee, Peter; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Leyland, Jean; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Ong, Kai-Ren; Cook, Jackie; Douglas, Fiona; Paterson, Joan; Kennedy, M. John; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Godwin, Andrew; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Buecher, Bruno; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Faivre, Laurence; Bronner, Myriam; Prieur, Fabienne; Nogues, Catherine; Rouleau, Etienne; Pujol, Pascal; Coupier, Isabelle; Frénay, Marc; Hopper, John L.; Daly, Mary B.; Terry, Mary B.; John, Esther M.; Buys, Saundra S.; Yassin, Yosuf; Miron, Alexander; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F.; tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Dressler, Anne Catharina; Hansen, Thomas v O.; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Barkardottir, Rosa Bjork; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Offit, Kenneth; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Small, Laurie; Boggess, John; Blank, Stephanie; Basil, Jack; Azodi, Masoud; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine S.; Olah, Edith; Bozsik, Aniko; teo, Soo-Hwang; Seldon, Joyce L.; Beattie, Mary S.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Sluiter, Michelle D.; Diez, Orland; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Kast, Karin; Deissler, Helmut; Niederacher, Dieter; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Schönbuchner, Ines; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Dumont, Martine; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tischkowitz, Marc; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Chun Ding, Yuan; Fredericksen, Zachary; Wang, Xianshu; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Couch, Fergus; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Cole, Trevor; McKeown, Carole; Hoffman, Jonathan; Donaldson, Alan; Downing, Sarah; Taylor, Amy; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark T.; McCann, Emma; John Kennedy, M.; Barton, David; East, South; Porteous, Mary; Drummond, Sarah; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Hill, Kathryn; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Duncan, Alexis; Jacobs, Chris; Langman, Caroline; Whaite, Anna; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; Chu, Carol; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Gareth Evans, D.; Taylor, Jane; Thames, N. E.; Side, Lucy; Male, Alison; Berlin, Cheryl; Eason, Jacqueline; Collier, Rebecca; Claber, Oonagh; Jobson, Irene; Walker, Lisa; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Robertson, Lisa; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Hodgson, Shirley; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eddy, Charlotte; Tripathi, Vishakha; Attard, Virginia; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; McBride, Donna; Smalley, Sarah; Sutter, Christian; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Fiebig, Britta; Heinritz, Wolfram; Schäfer, Dieter; Köhler, Juliane; Bérard, Léon; Sinilnikova, Olga; Verny-Pierre, Carole; Giraud, Sophie; Léone, Mélanie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Houdayer, Claude; Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrde, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnés; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Eisinger, François; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Muller, Daniéle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Coron, Fanny; Lebrun, Marine; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Delnatte, Capucine; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie L.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Verhoef, S.; Verheus, M.; van ‘t Veer, L. J.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Rookus, M. A.; Collée, M.; van den Ouweland, A. M. W.; Jager, A.; Hooning, M. J.; Tilanus-Linthorst, M. M. A.; Seynaeve, C.; van Asperen, C. J.; Wijnen, J. T.; Vreeswijk, M. P.; Tollenaar, R. A.; Devilee, P.; Ligtenberg, M. J.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ausems, M. G.; van der Luijt, R. B.; Aalfs, C. M.; Gille, J. J. P.; Waisfisz, Q.; Gomez-Garcia, E. B.; van Roozendaal, C. E.; Blok, Marinus J.; Caanen, B.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van der Hout, A. H.; Mourits, M. J.; Vasen, H. F.; Karlsson, Per; Nordling, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Åke; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Jernström, Helena; Henriksson, Karin; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Liljegren, Annelie; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Grönberg, Henrik; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Brandell, Richard Rosenquist; Dahl, Niklas

    2011-01-01

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility variants:

  10. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); C. Kartsonaki (Christiana); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); P. Soucy (Penny); L. McGuffog (Lesley); S. Healey (Sue); A. Lee (Andrew); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); E. Cattaneo (Elisa); M. Barile (Monica); V. Pensotti (Valeria); B. Pasini (Barbara); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); A.L. Putignano; L. Varesco (Liliana); P. Radice (Paolo); P.L. Mai (Phuong); M.H. Greene (Mark); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); G. Glendon (Gord); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); M. Thomassen (Mads); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; D. Cruger (Dorthe); M.A. Caligo (Maria); Y. Laitman (Yael); R. Milgrom (Roni); B. Kaufman (Bella); S. Paluch-Shimon (Shani); E. Friedman (Eitan); N. Loman (Niklas); K. Harbst (Katja); A. Lindblom (Annika); B. Melin (Beatrice); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); J. Gronwald (Jacek); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); T. Byrski (Tomasz); C. Cybulski (Cezary); B. Górski (Bohdan); A. Osorio (Ana); T.R. Cajal; F. Fostira (Florentia); R. Andres (Raquel); J. Benitez (Javier); U. Hamann (Ute); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); M.A. Rookus (Matti); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); M.R. Nelen (Marcel); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); P. Devilee (Peter); H. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); E.B.G. Garcia; S. Peock (Susan); M. Cook (Margaret); D. Frost; R. Platte (Radka); J. Leyland (Jean); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); R. Eeles (Rosalind); L. Izatt (Louise); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); D. Eccles (Diana); K.-R. Ong; F. Douglas (Fiona); J. Paterson (Joan); M.J. Kennedy (John); Z. Miedzybrodzka (Zosia); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); B. Buecher (Bruno); M. Belotti (Muriel); C. Tirapo (Carole); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); L. Barjhoux (Laure); C. Lasset (Christine); D. Leroux (Dominique); L. Faivre (Laurence); M. Bronner (Myriam); F. Prieur (Fabienne); C. Nogues (Catherine); E. Rouleau (Etienne); P. Pujol (Pascal); I. Coupier (Isabelle); M. Frenay (Marc); J. Hopper (John); M.J. Daly (Mark); M-B. Terry (Mary-beth); E.M. John (Esther); S.S. Buys (Saundra); Y. Yassin (Yosuf); A. Miron (Alexander); D. Goldgar (David); C.F. Singer (Christian); M.-K. Tea; G. Pfeiler (Georg); C. Dressler (Catherina); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); L. Jønson (Lars); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); T. Kircchoff (Tomas); K. Offit (Kenneth); M. Piedmonte (Marion); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); L. Small (Laurie); J.F. Boggess (John); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); J. Basil (Jack); M. Azodi (Masoud); A.E. Toland (Amanda); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Tognazzo (Silvia); S. Agata (Simona); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); L. Sucheston (Lara); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); C.S. Walsh (Christine); E. Olah (Edith); A. Bozsik (Aniko); S.-H. Teo (Soo-Hwang); J.L. Seldon (Joyce); M.S. Beattie (Mary); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); M.D. Sluiter (Michelle); O. Diez (Orland); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); C.W. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); I. Ruehl (Ina); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); K. Kast (Karin); H. Deissler (Helmut); D. Niederacher (Dieter); N. Arnold (Norbert); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); I. Schönbuchner (Ines); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); M. Dumont (Martine); J. Chiquette (Jocelyne); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); J. Beesley (Jonathan); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); X. Wang (Xing); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); F.J. Couch (Fergus); J. Simard (Jacques); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); P. Karlsson (Per); M. Nordling (Margareta); A. Bergman (Annika); Z. Einbeigi (Zakaria); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (M.); S. Liedgren (Sigrun); Å. Borg (Åke); H. Olsson (Hans); U. Kristoffersson (Ulf); H. Jernström (H.); K. Henriksson (Karin); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); A. Liljegren (Annelie); G. Barbany-Bustinza (Gisela); J. Rantala (Johanna); H. Grönberg (Henrik); E.-L. Stattin; M. Emanuelsson (Monica); R.R. Brandell; N. Dahl (Niklas); S. Verhoef; M. Verheus (Martijn); L.J. van 't Veer (Laura); F.E. van Leeuwen; J.M. Collée (Margriet); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); A. Jager (Agnes); M.M.A. Tilanus-Linthorst (Madeleine); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); M.P. Vreeswijk (Maaike); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); M.J. Ligtenberg (Marjolijn); N. Hoogerbrugge (Nicoline); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); J.J.P. Gille (Jan); Q. Waisfisz (Quinten); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); C.E. van Roozendaal (Cees); M.J. Blok (Marinus); B. Caanen; J.C. Oosterwijk; A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); M.J. Mourits; H.F. Vasen (Hans); H. Gregory (Helen); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); L. Jeffers (Lisa); T.J. Cole (Trevor); C. McKeown (Carole); J. Hoffman (Jonathan); A. Donaldson (Alan); S. Downing (Sarah); A. Taylor (Amy); A. Murray (Alexandra); M.T. Rogers (Mark); E. McCann (Emma); M.E. Porteous (Mary); S. Drummond (Sarah); C. Brewer (Carole); E. Kivuva (Emma); A. Searle (Anne); S. Goodman (Selina); K. Hill (Kathryn); V. Murday (Victoria); N. Bradshaw (Nicola); L. Snadden (Lesley); M. Longmuir (Mark); C. Watt (Catherine); S. Gibson (Sarah); E. Haque (Eshika); E. Tobias (Ed); A. Duncan (Alexis); C. Jacobs (Chris); C. Langman (Caroline); A. Whaite (Anna); H. Dorkins (Huw); J. Barwell (Julian); C. Chu (Chengbin); J. Miller (Julie); I.O. Ellis (Ian); C. Houghton (Catherine); L. Side (Lucy); A. Male (Alison); C. Berlin (Cheryl); J. Eason (Jacqueline); R. Collier (Rebecca); O. Claber (Oonagh); I. Jobson (Irene); L.J. Walker (Lisa); D. McLeod (Diane); D. Halliday (Dorothy); S. Durell (Sarah); B. Stayner (Barbara); S. Shanley (Susan); N. Rahman (Nazneen); R. Houlston (Richard); E.K. Bancroft (Elizabeth); L. D'Mello (Lucia); E. Page (Elizabeth); A. Ardern-Jones (Audrey); K. Kohut (Kelly); J. Wiggins (Jennifer); E. Castro (Elena); A. Mitra (Anita); L. Robertson (Lisa); O. Quarrell (Oliver); C. Bardsley (Cathryn); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); D.E. Barton (David); S. Goff (Sheila); G. Brice (Glen); L. Winchester (Lizzie); C. Eddy (Charlotte); V. Tripathi (Vishakha); V. Attard (Virginia); A. Lucassen (Anneke); G. Crawford (Gillian); D. McBride (Donna); S. Smalley (Sarah); J.W. Adlard (Julian); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractTwo single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility

  11. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Sinilnikova, Olga M

    2011-01-01

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility variants: rs...... to a better understanding of the biology of tumour development in these women....

  12. An association study between polymorphism of alcohol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to identify the genetic risk factors which include alcohol metabolizing genes and neurotransmitter related genes for alcoholism in Yunnan Han population. Eight allelic variants of five genes were genotyped from 332 Yunnan Han individuals (including 118 alcohol-dependent patients (DSM-IV ...

  13. Studies of DNA repair in saccharomyces cerevisiae. I. Characterization of a new allele of RAD6. II. Investigation of events in the first cell cycle after DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douthwright-Fasse, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    Studies in two independent, but related, areas of DNA repair have been carried out in Saccharomyces cerevisiae; characterization of a new allele in the RAD6 gene which suggests that the gene is multifunctional, and utilization of photoreactivation as a probe of events occurring during the first cell cycle after DNA damage. Strains carrying the new allele, designated rad6-4, are as sensitive to uv and ionizing radiation as those carrying rad6-1 or rad6-3 but, unlike them, are capable of induced mutagenesis and sporulation. Although rad6-4 may well be a missense mutation, the evidence shows that it is unlikely that this phenotype is due to leakiness. Instead, the data suggest that the RAD6 gene is multifunctional. One function is necessary to recover from DNA damage in an error-free manner, and the other is concerned with mutagenic processes and sporulation. Rad6-1 and rad6-3 strains are deficient in both of these functions, while rad6-4 strains are deficient only in the error-free function. The loss of photoreversibility (LOP) of ultraviolet induced mutations to arginine independence in an excision defective strain carrying arg4-17 examines the events occurring in the first cell cycle after DNA damage. LOP is dependent upon de novo protein synthesis. LOP begins immediately after UV irradiation, before semiconservative DNA synthesis takes place, and is complete after four hours in growth medium.There is no evidence indicating whether the normal function of the protein is involved in excision repair, or in one of the two repair processes believed to be inducible; induced mutagenesis or recombinational repair

  14. Studies of DNA repair in saccharomyces cerevisiae. I. Characterization of a new allele of RAD6. II. Investigation of events in the first cell cycle after DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douthwright-Fasse, Jane Ann [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Studies in two independent, but related, areas of DNA repair have been carried out in Saccharomyces cerevisiae; characterization of a new allele in the RAD6 gene which suggests that the gene is multifunctional, and utilization of photoreactivation as a probe of events occurring during the first cell cycle after DNA damage. Strains carrying the new allele, designated rad6-4, are as sensitive to uv and ionizing radiation as those carrying rad6-1 or rad6-3 but, unlike them, are capable of induced mutagenesis and sporulation. Although rad6-4 may well be a missense mutation, the evidence shows that it is unlikely that this phenotype is due to leakiness. Instead, the data suggest that the RAD6 gene is multifunctional. One function is necessary to recover from DNA damage in an error-free manner, and the other is concerned with mutagenic processes and sporulation. Rad6-1 and rad6-3 strains are deficient in both of these functions, while rad6-4 strains are deficient only in the error-free function. The loss of photoreversibility (LOP) of ultraviolet induced mutations to arginine independence in an excision defective strain carrying arg4-17 examines the events occurring in the first cell cycle after DNA damage. LOP is dependent upon de novo protein synthesis. LOP begins immediately after UV irradiation, before semiconservative DNA synthesis takes place, and is complete after four hours in growth medium.There is no evidence indicating whether the normal function of the protein is involved in excision repair, or in one of the two repair processes believed to be inducible; induced mutagenesis or recombinational repair.

  15. Mutation intolerant genes and targets of FMRP are enriched for nonsynonymous alleles in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonenko, Ganna; Richards, Alexander L; Walters, James T; Pocklington, Andrew; Chambert, Kimberly; Al Eissa, Mariam M; Sharp, Sally I; O'Brien, Niamh L; Curtis, David; Bass, Nicholas J; McQuillin, Andrew; Hultman, Christina; Moran, Jennifer L; McCarroll, Steven A; Sklar, Pamela; Neale, Benjamin M; Holmans, Peter A; Owen, Michael J; Sullivan, Patrick F; O'Donovan, Michael C

    2017-10-01

    Risk of schizophrenia is conferred by alleles occurring across the full spectrum of frequencies from common SNPs of weak effect through to ultra rare alleles, some of which may be moderately to highly penetrant. Previous studies have suggested that some of the risk of schizophrenia is attributable to uncommon alleles represented on Illumina exome arrays. Here, we present the largest study of exomic variation in schizophrenia to date, using samples from the United Kingdom and Sweden (10,011 schizophrenia cases and 13,791 controls). Single variants, genes, and gene sets were analyzed for association with schizophrenia. No single variant or gene reached genome-wide significance. Among candidate gene sets, we found significant enrichment for rare alleles (minor allele frequency [MAF] schizophrenia by excluding a role for uncommon exomic variants (0.01 ≤ MAF ≥ 0.001) that confer a relatively large effect (odds ratio [OR] > 4). We also show risk alleles within this frequency range exist, but confer smaller effects and should be identified by larger studies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II alleles which confer susceptibility or protection in the Morphea in Adults and Children (MAC) cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobe, Heidi; Ahn, Chul; Arnett, Frank; Reveille, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine human leukocyte antigen class I (HLA-class I) and II (HLA-class II) alleles associated with morphea (localized scleroderma) in the Morphea in Adults and Children (MAC) cohort by a nested case–control association study. Methods Morphea patients were included from MAC cohort and matched controls from the NIH/NIAMS Scleroderma Family Registry and DNA Repository and Division of Rheumatology at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. HLA- Class II genotyping and SSCP typing was performed of HLA-A, -B, -C alleles. Associations between HLA-Class I and II alleles and morphea as well as its subphenotypes were determined. Results There were 211 cases available for HLA-class I typing with 726 matched controls and 158 cases available for HLA Class-II typing with 1108 matched controls. The strongest associations were found with DRB1*04:04 (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.4–4.0 P=0.002) and HLA-B*37 conferred the highest OR among Class I alleles (3.3, 95% CI 1.6–6.9, P= 0.0016). Comparison with risk alleles in systemic sclerosis determined using the same methods and control population revealed one common allele (DRB*04:04). Conclusion Results of the present study demonstrate specific HLA Class I and II alleles are associated with morphea and likely generalized and linear subtypes. The associated morphea alleles are different than in scleroderma, implicating morphea is also immunogenetically distinct. Risk alleles in morphea are also associated with conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other autoimmune conditions. Population based studies indicate patients with RA have increased risk of morphea, implicating a common susceptibility allele. PMID:25223600

  17. Lack of evidence for association of primary sclerosing cholangitis and primary biliary cirrhosis with risk alleles for Crohn's disease in Polish patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaj Pawel

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous papers have addressed the association of mutations and polymorphisms of susceptibility genes with autoimmune inflammatory disorders. We investigated whether polymorphisms that confer susceptibility to Crohn's disease could be classified also as predisposing factors for the development of primary sclerosing cholangitis and primary biliary cirrhosis in Polish patients. Methods The study included 60 patients with CD, 77 patients with PSC, of which 61 exhibited IBD (40 UC, 8 CD, and 13 indeterminate colitis, and 144 patients with PBC. All the patients were screened against Crohn's disease associating genetic polymorphisms. The polymorphisms were chosen according to previously confirmed evidence for association with Crohn's disease, including Pro268Ser, Arg702Trp, Gly908Arg and 1007fs in NOD2/CARD15, Leu503Phe/-207G>C in SLC22A4/OCTN1/SLC22A5/OCTN2, Arg30Gln in DLG5, Thr300Ala in ATG16L1, and Arg381Gln, His3Gln and exon-3'UTR in IL23R. Genotyping was carried out using TaqMan SNP genotyping assays. Results We confirmed a strong association between three NOD2/CARD15 gene variants (Pro268Ser, OR = 2.52, 95% CI = 1.34 – 4.75; (Arg702Trp, OR = 6.65, 95% CI = 1.99 – 22.17; (1007fs, OR = 9.59, 95% CI = 3.94 – 23.29, and a weak association between both the protective OCTN1/OCTN2 CC haplotype (OR = 0.28, 95% CI = 0.08 – 0.94, and a variant of ATG16L1 gene (Thr300Ala, OR = 0.468, 95% CI = 0.24 – 0.90 with Crohn's disease. In contrast, none of the polymorphisms exhibited association with susceptibility to primary sclerosing cholangitis and primary biliary cirrhosis, including a group of primary sclerosing cholangitis patients with concurrent IBD. Conclusion Although the clinical data indicate non-random co-occurrence of inflammatory bowel disease and primary sclerosing cholangitis, consistently with the previously published studies, no genetic association was found between the genetic variants predisposing to Crohn

  18. Allelic polymorphism of Ovar-DRB1 exon2 gene and parasite resistance in two dairy sheep breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavros Spetsarias

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Ovar-DRB1 gene locus is one of the most polymorphic genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (Ovar-MHC and holds a functional role to antigen presentation. The aim of this study was: a to describe the Ovar-DRB1 locus variability in two dairy Greek sheep breeds and b to investigate associations between this variability with resistance to gastrointestinal parasitosis. Blood and faecal samples were collected from 231 and 201 animals of Arta and Kalarrytiko breeds, respectively. The identification of alleles was performed using the sequence–base method. Faecal egg counting (FEC of the gastrointestinal parasites and measures of blood plasma pepsinogen levels were performed in order to evaluate parasitological parameters. From this study in the overall examined animals, thirty-nine Ovar-DRB1 alleles were identified, among them, ten new alleles, reported for the first time in the literature. In Arta breed a total of twenty-four alleles were found. Among the detected alleles, ten were breed specific and five were new. Regarding the Kalarrytiko breed, twenty-nine alleles were found, fifteen of them were unique and nine were new. The studied breeds differed in their allelic profile, with only 12 common from the total of 134 different recorded genotypes. A higher number of animals with high parasitic load and high plasma pepsinogen values were found in Kalarrytiko. Associations between Ovar-DRB1 alleles with FEC values were found with certain heterozygous genotypes to present significantly reduced FEC values. The large number of detected alleles with low frequencies and the fact that the majority of animals were heterozygous, make hard to find strong associations

  19. Investigation of MGMT and DAPK1 methylation patterns in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma using allelic MSP-pyrosequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Lasse Sommer; Treppendahl, Marianne Bach; Asmar, Fazila; Girkov, Mia Seremet; Nielsen, Helene Myrtue; Kjeldsen, Tina Ellegaard; Ralfkiaer, Elisabeth; Hansen, Lise Lotte; Grønbæk, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor genes MGMT and DAPK1 become methylated in several cancers including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). However, allelic methylation patterns have not been investigated in DLBCL. We developed a fast and cost-efficient method for the analysis of allelic methylation based on pyrosequencing of methylation specific PCR (MSP) products including a SNP. Allelic methylation patterns were reliably analyzed in standards of known allelic methylation status even when diluted in unmethylated DNA to below 1% methylation. When studying 148 DLBCL patients MGMT and DAPK1 methylation was observed in 19% and 89%, respectively, and among methylated and heterozygous patients 29% and 55%, respectively, were biallelically methylated. An association between the T-allele of the rs16906252 SNP and MGMT methylation was observed (p-value = 0.04), and DAPK1 methylation of the A-allele was associated with shorter overall survival (p-value = 0.006). In future cancer research allelic MSP-pyrosequencing may be used to study a wide range of other loci. PMID:24071855

  20. Anti-citrullinated glucose-6-phosphate isomerase peptide antibodies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis are associated with HLA-DRB1 shared epitope alleles and disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, N; Matsumoto, I; Ito, I; Kawasaki, A; Tanaka, Y; Inoue, A; Tsuboi, H; Suzuki, T; Hayashi, T; Ito, S; Tsuchiya, N; Sumida, T

    2013-04-01

    To identify and characterize anti-citrullinated glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) peptide antibodies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Nine GPI arginine-bearing peptides in human GPI protein were selected and cyclic citrullinated GPI peptides (CCG-1-9) were constructed. Samples were obtained from RA (n = 208), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (n = 101), Sjögren's syndrome (SS; n = 101) and healthy controls (n = 174). Antibodies against CCG-1-9 were measured, and anti-citrullinated α-enolase-1 (CEP-1), -cyclic citrullinated peptides (CCP) and -GPI proteins antibodies were also examined. Patients with RA were genotyped for HLA-DRB1. The numbers of shared epitope (SE) alleles were counted and compared with those of the autoantibodies. Rabbit GPI was citrullinated with rabbit peptidylarginine deiminase and immunoblot analysis of RA sera performed. The levels of autoantibodies were compared before and after treatment with TNF antagonists in 58 RA patients. Anti-CCG-2, -4 and -7 antibodies were detected in 25·5, 33·2 and 37·0% patients with RA, respectively, and these antibodies were very specific for RA (specificity, 98·1-99·7%). Altogether, 44·2, 86·1 and 13·9% of RA sera were positive for anti-CEP-1, -CCP and -GPI protein antibodies, respectively. Anti-CCG-2, -4 and -7 antibodies were correlated with anti-CCP and anti-CEP-1 antibodies and with the presence of HLA-DRB1 SE alleles. Citrullinated GPI protein was detected using RA sera. Treatment with tumour necrosis factor antagonists reduced significantly the levels of anti-CCG-2 and -7 but not of anti-CEP-1 antibodies. This is the first report documenting the presence of anti-CCG antibodies in RA. Anti-CCG-2 and -7 antibodies could be considered as markers for the diagnosis of RA and its disease activity. © 2012 British Society for Immunology.

  1. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies to identify prostate cancer susceptibility loci associated with aggressive and non-aggressive disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin Al Olama, Ali; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Schumacher, Fredrick R

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple common genetic variants associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer (PrCa), but these explain less than one-third of the heritability. To identify further susceptibility alleles, we conducted a meta-analysis of four GWAS inc...

  2. Allelic imbalance of multiple sclerosis susceptibility genes IKZF3 and IQGAP1 in human peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshari, Pankaj K; Harbo, Hanne F; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Aarseth, Jan H; Bos, Steffan D; Berge, Tone

    2016-04-14

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Recent genome-wide studies have revealed more than 110 single nucleotide polymorphisms as associated with susceptibility to multiple sclerosis, but their functional contribution to disease development is mostly unknown. Consistent allelic imbalance was observed for rs907091 in IKZF3 and rs11609 in IQGAP1, which are in strong linkage disequilibrium with the multiple sclerosis associated single nucleotide polymorphisms rs12946510 and rs8042861, respectively. Using multiple sclerosis patients and healthy controls heterozygous for rs907091 and rs11609, we showed that the multiple sclerosis risk alleles at IKZF3 and IQGAP1 are expressed at higher levels as compared to the protective allele. Furthermore, individuals homozygous for the multiple sclerosis risk allele at IQGAP1 had a significantly higher total expression of IQGAP1 compared to individuals homozygous for the protective allele. Our data indicate a possible regulatory role for the multiple sclerosis-associated IKZF3 and IQGAP1 variants. We suggest that such cis-acting mechanisms may contribute to the multiple sclerosis association of single nucleotide polymorphisms at IKZF3 and IQGAP1.

  3. Bayesian graphical models for genomewide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verzilli, Claudio J; Stallard, Nigel; Whittaker, John C

    2006-07-01

    As the extent of human genetic variation becomes more fully characterized, the research community is faced with the challenging task of using this information to dissect the heritable components of complex traits. Genomewide association studies offer great promise in this respect, but their analysis poses formidable difficulties. In this article, we describe a computationally efficient approach to mining genotype-phenotype associations that scales to the size of the data sets currently being collected in such studies. We use discrete graphical models as a data-mining tool, searching for single- or multilocus patterns of association around a causative site. The approach is fully Bayesian, allowing us to incorporate prior knowledge on the spatial dependencies around each marker due to linkage disequilibrium, which reduces considerably the number of possible graphical structures. A Markov chain-Monte Carlo scheme is developed that yields samples from the posterior distribution of graphs conditional on the data from which probabilistic statements about the strength of any genotype-phenotype association can be made. Using data simulated under scenarios that vary in marker density, genotype relative risk of a causative allele, and mode of inheritance, we show that the proposed approach has better localization properties and leads to lower false-positive rates than do single-locus analyses. Finally, we present an application of our method to a quasi-synthetic data set in which data from the CYP2D6 region are embedded within simulated data on 100K single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Analysis is quick (<5 min), and we are able to localize the causative site to a very short interval.

  4. Potyviral resistance derived from cultivars of Phaseolus vulgaris carrying bc-3 is associated with the homozygotic presence of a mutated eIF4E allele

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naderpour, Masoud; Lund, Ole Søgaard; Larsen, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factors (eIFs) play a central role in potyviral infection. Accordingly, mutations in the gene encoding eIF4E have been identified as a source of recessive resistance in several plant species. In common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, four recessive genes, bc-1, bc-2, bc......-3 and bc-u, have been proposed to control resistance to the potyviruses Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) and Bean common mosaic necrosis virus. In order to identify molecular entities for these genes, we cloned and sequenced P. vulgaris homologues of genes encoding the eIF proteins eIF4E, eIF(iso)4E...... resistance and eIF4E genotype was subsequently analysed in an F2 population derived from the P. vulgaris all-susceptible genotype and a genotype carrying bc-3. F2 plants homozygous for the eIF4E mutant allele were found to display at least the same level of resistance to BCMV as the parental resistant...

  5. HLA- DR Alleles in Pakistani Patients of Pemphigus Vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sara Waqar; Iftikhar, Nadia; Ahmed, Tahir Aziz; Bashir, Mukarram

    2015-04-01

    To determine frequency of HLA-DR alleles in Pakistani patients of pemphigus vulgaris in comparison with local healthy controls. Cross-sectional, comparative study. Department of Immunology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP), Rawalpindi, from January 2011 to January 2014. Twenty eight patients with biopsy proven diagnosis of pemphigus vulgaris referred from Department of Dermatology, Military Hospital, Rawalpindi were included. Patients were compared with a group of 150 unrelated local healthy subjects. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood collected in Tri-potassium EDTA. HLA-DRB1 typing was carried out on allele level (DRB1*01--DRB1*16) using SSP (sequence specific primers). HLA type was determined by agarose gel electrophoresis and results recorded. Phenotype frequency of various alleles among patient group and control group was calculated by direct counting and significance of their association was determined by Fisher's exact test/ Chi square test. A total of 12 male and 16 female patients, with age ranging from 21 to 34 (mean 23.4 years) were genotyped for HLA-DRB1 loci. A statistically significant association of the disease with HLA-DRB1*04 was observed (50% versus 20.7% in controls, p pemphigus vulgaris in Pakistani population.

  6. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Sinilnikova, Olga M

    2011-01-01

    11249433 at 1p11.2 and rs999737 in RAD51L1 at 14q24.1. Although previously identified breast cancer susceptibility variants have been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, the involvement of these SNPs to breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers...... is currently unknown. To address this, we genotyped these SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers from 42 studies from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. In the analysis of 14 123 BRCA1 and 8053 BRCA2 mutation carriers of European ancestry, the 6q25.1 SNPs (r(2) = 0.14) were...... for BRCA2 carriers (HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.01-1.28, P-trend = 0.031). SNP rs11249433 (1p11.2) was associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.02-1.17, P-trend = 0.015), but was not associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR = 0.97, 95...

  7. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Sinilnikova, Olga M

    2011-01-01

    11249433 at 1p11.2 and rs999737 in RAD51L1 at 14q24.1. Although previously identified breast cancer susceptibility variants have been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, the involvement of these SNPs to breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers...... is currently unknown. To address this, we genotyped these SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers from 42 studies from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. In the analysis of 14 123 BRCA1 and 8053 BRCA2 mutation carriers of European ancestry, the 6q25.1 SNPs (r(2) = 0.14) were...... independently associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 mutation carriers [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11-1.23, P-trend = 4.5 × 10(-9) for rs2046210; HR = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.18-1.40, P-trend = 1.3 × 10(-8) for rs9397435], but only rs9397435 was associated with the risk...

  8. Design of association studies with pooled or un-pooled next-generation sequencing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Su Yeon; Li, Yingrui; Guo, Yiran

    2010-01-01

    Most common hereditary diseases in humans are complex and multifactorial. Large-scale genome-wide association studies based on SNP genotyping have only identified a small fraction of the heritable variation of these diseases. One explanation may be that many rare variants (a minor allele frequency...

  9. Is APOE ε3 a favourable factor for the longevity: an association study ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-08-19

    Aug 19, 2011 ... have recently found several candidate genes that influence human lifespan, only the role of APOE in longevity has been consistently demonstrated. Studies indicate that the ε4 allele, which is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and. Alzheimer's disease (AD), is less frequent in long-lived indi-.

  10. The protease inhibitor PI*S allele and COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersh, C P; Ly, N P; Berkey, C S

    2005-01-01

    In many countries, the protease inhibitor (SERPINA1) PI*S allele is more common than PI*Z, the allele responsible for most cases of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) due to severe alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency. However, the risk of COPD due to the PI*S allele is not clear. The current...... authors located studies that addressed the risk of COPD or measured lung function in individuals with the PI SZ, PI MS and PI SS genotypes. A separate meta-analysis for each genotype was performed. Aggregating data from six studies, the odds ratio (OR) for COPD in PI SZ compound heterozygotes compared...... with PI MM (normal) individuals was significantly increased at 3.26 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.24-8.57). In 17 cross-sectional and case-control studies, the OR for COPD in PI MS heterozygotes was 1.19 (95%CI: 1.02-1.38). However, PI MS genotype was not associated with COPD risk after correcting...

  11. Prevalence of HLA DQB1*0602 allele in patients with migraine

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho, Fernando Morgadinho Santos; Pradella-Hallinan, Márcia; Abud, Paulo Corrêa; Predazzoli Neto, Mario; Moreira, Fabio; Bittencourt, Lia Rita Azeredo; Peres, Mario Fernandes Pietro; Tufik, Sérgio

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have shown a high prevalence of migraine among narcoleptic patients. HLA-DQB1*0602 and HLA DRB1 alleles are closely associated with narcolepsy. An increase in the HLA-DRB1 allele frequency in patients with visual aura has raised greater awareness of the genetic background in migraine. PURPOSE: Since the regions DR and DQ of the HLA are in tightly linkage desiquilibrium we hypothesize that HLA-DQB1*0602 might be associated to the pathophysiology of migraine. METHOD: We anal...

  12. Association of the 5HTR2A gene with suicidal behavior: CASE-control study and updated meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Castro Thelma Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The polymorphism rs6313 (T102C has been associated with suicidal behavior in case–control and meta-analysis studies, but results and conclusions remain controversial. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between T102C with suicidal behavior in a case–control study and, to assess the combined evidence – this case–control study and available data from other related studies – we carried out a meta-analysis. Methods We conducted a case–control study that included 161 patients with suicide attempts and 244 controls; we then performed a meta-analysis. The following models were evaluated in the meta-analysis: A C allele vs T allele; B T allele vs C allele; C Caucasian population, D Asian population, and E suicide attempters with schizophrenia. Results We found an association between attempted suicide and control participants for genotype (χ2=6.28, p=0.04, df=2 and allele (χ2=6.17, p=0.01, df=1, OR 1.48 95% IC: 1.08-2.03 frequencies in the case–control study. The meta-analysis, comprising 23 association studies (including the present one, showed that the rs6313 polymorphism is not associated with suicidal behavior for the following comparisons:T allele vs C allele (OR: 1.03; 95% CI 0.93-1.13; p(Z=0.44; C allele vs T allele: (OR:0.99; 95% CI: 0.90-1.08; p(Z=0.22; Caucasians (OR:1.09; 95% CI: 0.96-1.23, and Asians (OR:0.96; 95% CI: 0.84-1.09. Conclusion Our results showed association between the rs6313 (T102C polymorphism and suicidal behavior in the case–control study. However, the meta-analysis showed no evidence of association. Therefore, more studies are necessary to determine conclusively an association between T102C and suicidal behavior.

  13. Genetic structure, diversity, and allelic richness in composite collection and reference set in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gowda Cholenahalli LL

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant genetic resources (PGR are the basic raw materials for future genetic progress and an insurance against unforeseen threats to agricultural production. An extensive characterization of PGR provides an opportunity to dissect structure, mine allelic variations, and identify diverse accessions for crop improvement. The Generation Challenge Program http://www.generationcp.org conceptualized the development of "composite collections" and extraction of "reference sets" from these for more efficient tapping of global crop-related genetic resources. In this study, we report the genetic structure, diversity and allelic richness in a composite collection of chickpea using SSR markers, and formation of a reference set of 300 accessions. Results The 48 SSR markers detected 1683 alleles in 2915 accessions, of which, 935 were considered rare, 720 common and 28 most frequent. The alleles per locus ranged from 14 to 67, averaged 35, and the polymorphic information content was from 0.467 to 0.974, averaged 0.854. Marker polymorphism varied between groups of accessions in the composite collection and reference set. A number of group-specific alleles were detected: 104 in Kabuli, 297 in desi, and 69 in wild Cicer; 114 each in Mediterranean and West Asia (WA, 117 in South and South East Asia (SSEA, and 10 in African region accessions. Desi and kabuli shared 436 alleles, while wild Cicer shared 17 and 16 alleles with desi and kabuli, respectively. The accessions from SSEA and WA shared 74 alleles, while those from Mediterranean 38 and 33 alleles with WA and SSEA, respectively. Desi chickpea contained a higher proportion of rare alleles (53% than kabuli (46%, while wild Cicer accessions were devoid of rare alleles. A genotype-based reference set captured 1315 (78% of the 1683 composite collection alleles of which 463 were rare, 826 common, and 26 the most frequent alleles. The neighbour-joining tree diagram of this reference set represents

  14. HLA alleles association with changes in bone mineral density in HIV-1-infected adults changing treatment to tenofovir-emtricitabine or abacavir-lamivudine.

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    Hila Haskelberg

    Full Text Available There are limited data regarding the influence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA polymorphisms on reduced bone mineral density (BMD. We investigated the relationship between HLA supertypes and BMD in HIV-infected adults changing their existing treatment to tenofovir-emtricitabine (TDF-FTC or abacavir-lamivudine (ABC-3TC in the STEAL study.Lumbar spine and right hip BMD were measured by Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA. HLA genotypes at the 2-digit level were classified into class I and II supertypes. Student's t-tests were used to test the association between HLA supertypes and changes in hip and spine BMD over 96 weeks for the whole cohort and stratified by randomised groups. The relationship between HLA supertypes and BMD was also assessed in the subgroup of participants that were naïve to both ABC and TDF at study entry.Class II supertypes were mainly associated with hip BMD change. Overall, compared to participants not carrying HLA-DQ3, participants expressing DQ3 had less bone loss over 96 weeks at both the hip and spine (hip: 0.003 vs. -0.006 g/cm2, 95%CI 0.002 to 0.017, p = 0.016; spine: 0.006 vs. -0.006 g/cm2, 95%CI 0.001 to 0.023, p = 0.041. In participants that were naïve to both ABC and TDF at baseline and randomised to TDF-FTC, DQ3 was significantly associated with less bone loss compared with those not carrying DQ3 (hip: 0.001 vs. -0.032 g/cm2; diff 0.033; 95%CI 0.017 to 0.049; p<0.001; spine: 0.007 vs. -0.023 g/cm2; diff 0.035; 95%CI 0.014 to 0.056; p = 0.001.In this cohort of HIV-infected adults, there was an association between bone status and HLA supertypes, particularly HLA-DQ3.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00192634.

  15. Genome-wide association study of plasma polyunsaturated fatty acids in the InCHIANTI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiko Tanaka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA have a role in many physiological processes, including energy production, modulation of inflammation, and maintenance of cell membrane integrity. High plasma PUFA concentrations have been shown to have beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease and mortality. To identify genetic contributors of plasma PUFA concentrations, we conducted a genome-wide association study of plasma levels of six omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in 1,075 participants in the InCHIANTI study on aging. The strongest evidence for association was observed in a region of chromosome 11 that encodes three fatty acid desaturases (FADS1, FADS2, FADS3. The SNP with the most significant association was rs174537 near FADS1 in the analysis of arachidonic acid (AA; p = 5.95 x 10(-46. Minor allele homozygotes had lower AA compared to the major allele homozygotes and rs174537 accounted for 18.6% of the additive variance in AA concentrations. This SNP was also associated with levels of eicosadienoic acid (EDA; p = 6.78 x 10(-9 and eicosapentanoic acid (EPA; p = 1.07 x 10(-14. Participants carrying the allele associated with higher AA, EDA, and EPA also had higher low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C and total cholesterol levels. Outside the FADS gene cluster, the strongest region of association mapped to chromosome 6 in the region encoding an elongase of very long fatty acids 2 (ELOVL2. In this region, association was observed with EPA (rs953413; p = 1.1 x 10(-6. The effects of rs174537 were confirmed in an independent sample of 1,076 subjects participating in the GOLDN study. The ELOVL2 SNP was associated with docosapentanoic and DHA but not with EPA in GOLDN. These findings show that polymorphisms of genes encoding enzymes in the metabolism of PUFA contribute to plasma concentrations of fatty acids.

  16. Identification of a cys-ser substitution in the 5-HT{sub 2C} (HTR2C) receptor gene and allelic association to violent behavior and alcoholism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lappalainen, J.; Ozaki, N.; Goldman, D. [National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Rockville, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that brain serotonergic functions, including behavioral and neurochemical responses to 5-HT{sub 2C} agonist, are abnormal in some individuals with alcoholism and aggressive behaviors. The aim of the present study was to identify coding sequence variants in the human 5-HT{sub 2C} receptor gene which may cause abnormal or variant function of this receptor. Using SSCP analysis, a non-conservative cys-ser substitution was found in the 5-HT{sub 2C} receptor (designated 5-HT{sub 2Ccys} and 5-HT{sub 2Cser}). The polymorphism was typed in CEPH families to genetically map the gene. To test for association of the variant to alcoholism, violent behavior and serotonin function, the 5-HT{sub 2C} genotypes of 151 non-related Finnish male alcoholic violent offenders and impulsive fire setters and 127 Finnish psychiatrically interviewed healthy male volunteers were determined. CSF 5-HIAA concentrations were available for 74 alcoholic violent offenders and 25 healthy volunteers. Linkage analysis placed the 5-HT{sub 2C} gene on Xq21, a region that has been previously shown to contain genes for several mental retardation syndromes. The 5-HT{sub 2Ccys}/5-HT{sub 2Cser} genotype frequencies in alcoholic violent offenders and controls differed significantly (0.90/0.10 and 0.82/0.18, respectively, P=0.048). The association was found to be strongest in the violent offenders who did not fulfill the criteria for antisocial personality disorder (5-HT{sub 2Ccys}/5-HT{sub 2Cser} 0.93/0.07, p=0.021). No association was found between CSF 5-HIAA concentrations and 5-HT{sub 2C} genotype. These results implicate a 5-HT{sub 2C} receptor amino acid substitution in predisposition to alcohol abuse and violent behavior in a subgroup of alcoholics.

  17. Spatial proximity of homologous alleles and long noncoding RNAs regulate a switch in allelic gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratigi, Kalliopi; Kapsetaki, Manouela; Aivaliotis, Michalis; Town, Terrence; Flavell, Richard A; Spilianakis, Charalampos G

    2015-03-31

    Physiological processes rely on the regulation of total mRNA levels in a cell. In diploid organisms, the transcriptional activation of one or both alleles of a gene may involve trans-allelic interactions that provide a tight spatial and temporal level of gene expression regulation. The mechanisms underlying such interactions still remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that lipopolysaccharide stimulation of murine macrophages rapidly resulted in the actin-mediated and transient homologous spatial proximity of Tnfα alleles, which was necessary for the mono- to biallelic switch in gene expression. We identified two new complementary long noncoding RNAs transcribed from the TNFα locus and showed that their knockdown had opposite effects in Tnfα spatial proximity and allelic expression. Moreover, the observed spatial proximity of Tnfα alleles depended on pyruvate kinase muscle isoform 2 (PKM2) and T-helper-inducing POZ-Krüppel-like factor (ThPOK). This study suggests a role for lncRNAs in the regulation of somatic homologous spatial proximity and allelic expression control necessary for fine-tuning mammalian immune responses.

  18. A donor-specific QTL, exhibiting allelic variation for leaf sheath hairiness in a nested association mapping population, is located on barley chromosome 4H

    KAUST Repository

    Saade, Stephanie

    2017-12-07

    Leaf sheath hairiness is a morphological trait associated with various advantages, including tolerance to both abiotic and biotic stresses, thereby increasing yield. Understanding the genetic basis of this trait in barley can therefore improve the agronomic performance of this economically important crop. We scored leaf sheath hairiness in a two-year field trial in 1,420 BC1S3 lines from the wild barley nested association mapping (NAM) population HEB-25. Leaf sheath hairiness segregated in six out of 25 families with the reference parent Barke being glabrous. We detected the major hairy leaf sheath locus Hs (syn. Hsh) on chromosome 4H (111.3 cM) with high precision. The effects of the locus varied across the six different wild barley donors, with donor of HEB family 11 conferring the highest score of leaf sheath hairiness. Due to the high mapping resolution present in HEB-25, we were able to discuss physically linked pentatricopeptide repeat genes and subtilisin-like proteases as potential candidate genes underlying this locus. In this study, we proved that HEB-25 provides an appropriate tool to further understand the genetic control of leaf sheath hairiness in barley. Furthermore, our work represents a perfect starting position to clone the gene responsible for the 4H locus observed.

  19. A donor-specific QTL, exhibiting allelic variation for leaf sheath hairiness in a nested association mapping population, is located on barley chromosome 4H.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Saade

    Full Text Available Leaf sheath hairiness is a morphological trait associated with various advantages, including tolerance to both abiotic and biotic stresses, thereby increasing yield. Understanding the genetic basis of this trait in barley can therefore improve the agronomic performance of this economically important crop. We scored leaf sheath hairiness in a two-year field trial in 1,420 BC1S3 lines from the wild barley nested association mapping (NAM population HEB-25. Leaf sheath hairiness segregated in six out of 25 families with the reference parent Barke being glabrous. We detected the major hairy leaf sheath locus Hs (syn. Hsh on chromosome 4H (111.3 cM with high precision. The effects of the locus varied across the six different wild barley donors, with donor of HEB family 11 conferring the highest score of leaf sheath hairiness. Due to the high mapping resolution present in HEB-25, we were able to discuss physically linked pentatricopeptide repeat genes and subtilisin-like proteases as potential candidate genes underlying this locus. In this study, we proved that HEB-25 provides an appropriate tool to further understand the genetic control of leaf sheath hairiness in barley. Furthermore, our work represents a perfect starting position to clone the gene responsible for the 4H locus observed.

  20. Cost-effective genome-wide estimation of allele frequencies from pooled DNA in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozerov Mikhail

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New sequencing technologies have tremendously increased the number of known molecular markers (single nucleotide polymorphisms; SNPs in a variety of species. Concurrently, improvements to genotyping technology have now made it possible to efficiently genotype large numbers of genome-wide distributed SNPs enabling genome wide association studies (GWAS. However, genotyping significant numbers of individuals with large number of SNPs remains prohibitively expensive for many research groups. A possible solution to this problem is to determine allele frequencies from pooled DNA samples, such ‘allelotyping’ has been presented as a cost-effective alternative to individual genotyping and has become popular in human GWAS. In this article we have tested the effectiveness of DNA pooling to obtain accurate allele frequency estimates for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L. populations using an Illumina SNP-chip. Results In total, 56 Atlantic salmon DNA pools from 14 populations were analyzed on an Atlantic salmon SNP-chip containing probes for 5568 SNP markers, 3928 of which were bi-allelic. We developed an efficient quality control filter which enables exclusion of loci showing high error rate and minor allele frequency (MAF close to zero. After applying multiple quality control filters we obtained allele frequency estimates for 3631 bi-allelic loci. We observed high concordance (r > 0.99 between allele frequency estimates derived from individual genotyping and DNA pools. Our results also indicate that even relatively small DNA pools (35 individuals can provide accurate allele frequency estimates for a given sample. Conclusions Despite of higher level of variation associated with array replicates compared to pool construction, we suggest that both sources of variation should be taken into account. This study demonstrates that DNA pooling allows fast and high-throughput determination of allele frequencies in Atlantic salmon enabling cost

  1. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Four Loci Associated with Eruption of Permanent Teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Shaffer, John R.; Hansen, Thomas; Esserlind, Ann-Louise; Boyd, Heather A.; Nohr, Ellen A.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Paternoster, Lavinia; Evans, David M.; Weyant, Robert J.; Levy, Steven M.; Lathrop, Mark; Smith, George Davey; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Olesen, Jes; Werge, Thomas; Marazita, Mary L.; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Melbye, Mads

    2011-01-01

    The sequence and timing of permanent tooth eruption is thought to be highly heritable and can have important implications for the risk of malocclusion, crowding, and periodontal disease. We conducted a genome-wide association study of number of permanent teeth erupted between age 6 and 14 years, analyzed as age-adjusted standard deviation score averaged over multiple time points, based on childhood records for 5,104 women from the Danish National Birth Cohort. Four loci showed association at Peruption and were also known to influence height and breast cancer, respectively. The two other loci pointed to genomic regions without any previous significant genome-wide association study results. The intronic SNP rs7924176 in ADK could be linked to gene expression in monocytes. The combined effect of the four genetic variants was most pronounced between age 10 and 12 years, where children with 6 to 8 delayed tooth eruption alleles had on average 3.5 (95% confidence interval: 2.9–4.1) fewer permanent teeth than children with 0 or 1 of these alleles. PMID:21931568

  2. Inheritance of a novel mutated allele of the OCA2 gene associated with high incidence of oculocutaneous albinism in a Polynesian community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, Helene C; Chen, Wei; Wicking, Carol; Sturm, Richard A

    2010-02-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism type 2 (OCA2) is a human autosomal-recessive hypopigmentation disorder associated with pathological mutations of the OCA2 gene. In this study, we investigated a form of OCA in a Polynesian population with an observed phenotype characterized by fair skin, some brown nevi present in the sun-exposed areas and green or blue eyes. Hair presented with a unique red coloration since birth, with tones ranging across individuals from Yellow-Red to Brown-Red, or Auburn. We genetically screened for mutations in the OCA2 and MC1R genes as their products have previously been shown to be associated with red hair/fair skin and OCA2. The SLC45A2 gene was also screened to identify any possible relation to skin color variation. We have identified a novel missense substitution in the OCA2 gene (Gly775Asp) responsible for OCA2 in individuals of Polynesian heritage from Tuvalu. The estimated incidence of this form of OCA2 in the primary study community is believed to occur at one of the highest recorded rates of albinism at approximately 1 per 669 individuals. In addition, we have analyzed four unrelated individuals with albinism who have Polynesian heritage from three other separate communities and found they carry the same OCA2 mutation. We also analyzed an out-group comprising three unrelated individuals with albinism of Melanesian ancestries from two separate communities, one Australian Aboriginal and three Australian Caucasians, and did not detect this mutation. We hypothesize that this mutation may be Polynesian specific and that it originated from a common founder.

  3. Genome-wide association study SNPs in the human genome diversity project populations: does selection affect unlinked SNPs with shared trait associations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casto, Amanda M; Feldman, Marcus W

    2011-01-06

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 2,000 trait-SNP associations, and the number continues to increase. GWAS have focused on traits with potential consequences for human fitness, including many immunological, metabolic, cardiovascular, and behavioral phenotypes. Given the polygenic nature of complex traits, selection may exert its influence on them by altering allele frequencies at many associated loci, a possibility which has yet to be explored empirically. Here we use 38 different measures of allele frequency variation and 8 iHS scores to characterize over 1,300 GWAS SNPs in 53 globally distributed human populations. We apply these same techniques to evaluate SNPs grouped by trait association. We find that groups of SNPs associated with pigmentation, blood pressure, infectious disease, and autoimmune disease traits exhibit unusual allele frequency patterns and elevated iHS scores in certain geographical locations. We also find that GWAS SNPs have generally elevated scores for measures of allele frequency variation and for iHS in Eurasia and East Asia. Overall, we believe that our results provide evidence for selection on several complex traits that has caused changes in allele frequencies and/or elevated iHS scores at a number of associated loci. Since GWAS SNPs collectively exhibit elevated allele frequency measures and iHS scores, selection on complex traits may be quite widespread. Our findings are most consistent with this selection being either positive or negative, although the relative contributions of the two are difficult to discern. Our results also suggest that trait-SNP associations identified in Eurasian samples may not be present in Africa, Oceania, and the Americas, possibly due to differences in linkage disequilibrium patterns. This observation suggests that non-Eurasian and non-East Asian sample populations should be included in future GWAS.

  4. Identification, genealogical structure and population genetics of S-alleles in Malus sieversii, the wild ancestor of domesticated apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, X; Cai, Z; Liu, W; Ge, S; Tang, L

    2017-09-01

    The self-incompatibility (SI) gene that is specifically expressed in pistils encodes the SI-associated ribonuclease (S-RNase), functioning as the female-specificity determinant of a gametophytic SI system. Despite extensive surveys in Malus domestica, the S-alleles have not been fully investigated for Malus sieversii, the primary wild ancestor of the domesticated apple. Here we screened the M. sieversii S-alleles via PCR amplification and sequencing, and identified 14 distinct alleles in this species. By contrast, nearly 40 are present in its close wild relative, Malus sylvestris. We further sequenced 8 nuclear genes to provide a neutral reference, and investigated the evolution of S-alleles via genealogical and population genetic analyses. Both shared ancestral polymorphism and an excess of non-synonymous substitution were detected in the S-RNases of the tribe Maleae in Rosaceae, indicating the action of long-term balancing selection. Approximate Bayesian Computations based on the reference neutral loci revealed a severe bottleneck in four of the six studied M. sieversii populations, suggesting that the low number of S-alleles found in this species is mainly the result of diversity loss due to a drastic population contraction. Such a bottleneck may lead to ambiguous footprints of ongoing balancing selection detected at the S-locus. This study not only elucidates the constituents and number of S-alleles in M. sieversii but also illustrates the potential utility of S-allele number shifts in demographic inference for self-incompatible plant species.

  5. Genetic Association Study of KCNQ5 Polymorphisms with High Myopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Maurice K. H.; Leung, Kim Hung; Kao, Patrick Y. P.; Liu, Long Qian

    2017-01-01

    Identification of genetic variations related to high myopia may advance our knowledge of the etiopathogenesis of refractive error. This study investigated the role of potassium channel gene (KCNQ5) polymorphisms in high myopia. We performed a case-control study of 1563 unrelated Han Chinese subjects (809 cases of high myopia and 754 emmetropic controls). Five tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of KCNQ5 were genotyped, and association testing with high myopia was conducted using logistic regression analysis adjusted for sex and age to give Pasym values, and multiple comparisons were corrected by permutation test to give Pemp values. All five noncoding SNPs were associated with high myopia. The SNP rs7744813, previously shown to be associated with refractive error and myopia in two GWAS, showed an odds ratio of 0.75 (95% CI 0.63–0.90; Pemp = 0.0058) for the minor allele. The top SNP rs9342979 showed an odds ratio of 0.75 (95% CI 0.64–0.89; Pemp = 0.0045) for the minor allele. Both SNPs are located within enhancer histone marks and DNase-hypersensitive sites. Our data support the involvement of KCNQ5 gene polymorphisms in the genetic susceptibility to high myopia and further exploration of KCNQ5 as a risk factor for high myopia. PMID:28884119

  6. Genetic Association Study of KCNQ5 Polymorphisms with High Myopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Liao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of genetic variations related to high myopia may advance our knowledge of the etiopathogenesis of refractive error. This study investigated the role of potassium channel gene (KCNQ5 polymorphisms in high myopia. We performed a case-control study of 1563 unrelated Han Chinese subjects (809 cases of high myopia and 754 emmetropic controls. Five tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of KCNQ5 were genotyped, and association testing with high myopia was conducted using logistic regression analysis adjusted for sex and age to give Pasym values, and multiple comparisons were corrected by permutation test to give Pemp values. All five noncoding SNPs were associated with high myopia. The SNP rs7744813, previously shown to be associated with refractive error and myopia in two GWAS, showed an odds ratio of 0.75 (95% CI 0.63–0.90; Pemp = 0.0058 for the minor allele. The top SNP rs9342979 showed an odds ratio of 0.75 (95% CI 0.64–0.89; Pemp = 0.0045 for the minor allele. Both SNPs are located within enhancer histone marks and DNase-hypersensitive sites. Our data support the involvement of KCNQ5 gene polymorphisms in the genetic susceptibility to high myopia and further exploration of KCNQ5 as a risk factor for high myopia.

  7. Expression of sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor (SREBF 2 and SREBF cleavage-activating protein (SCAP in human atheroma and the association of their allelic variants with sudden cardiac death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kytömäki Leena

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disturbed cellular cholesterol homeostasis may lead to accumulation of cholesterol in human atheroma plaques. Cellular cholesterol homeostasis is controlled by the sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor 2 (SREBF-2 and the SREBF cleavage-activating protein (SCAP. We investigated whole genome expression in a series of human atherosclerotic samples from different vascular territories and studied whether the non-synonymous coding variants in the interacting domains of two genes, SREBF-2 1784G>C (rs2228314 and SCAP 2386A>G, are related to the progression of coronary atherosclerosis and the risk of pre-hospital sudden cardiac death (SCD. Methods Whole genome expression profiling was completed in twenty vascular samples from carotid, aortic and femoral atherosclerotic plaques and six control samples from internal mammary arteries. Three hundred sudden pre-hospital deaths of middle-aged (33–69 years Caucasian Finnish men were subjected to detailed autopsy in the Helsinki Sudden Death Study. Coronary narrowing and areas of coronary wall covered with fatty streaks or fibrotic, calcified or complicated lesions were measured and related to the SREBF-2 and SCAP genotypes. Results Whole genome expression profiling showed a significant (p = 0.02 down-regulation of SREBF-2 in atherosclerotic carotid plaques (types IV-V, but not in the aorta or femoral arteries (p = NS for both, as compared with the histologically confirmed non-atherosclerotic tissues. In logistic regression analysis, a significant interaction between the SREBF-2 1784G>C and the SCAP 2386A>G genotype was observed on the risk of SCD (p = 0.046. Men with the SREBF-2 C allele and the SCAP G allele had a significantly increased risk of SCD (OR 2.68, 95% CI 1.07–6.71, compared to SCAP AA homologous subjects carrying the SREBF-2 C allele. Furthermore, similar trends for having complicated lesions and for the occurrence of thrombosis were found, although the

  8. Altered Ca2+ kinetics associated with α-actinin-3 deficiency may explain positive selection for ACTN3 null allele in human evolution.

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    Stewart I Head

    Full Text Available Over 1.5 billion people lack the skeletal muscle fast-twitch fibre protein α-actinin-3 due to homozygosity for a common null polymorphism (R577X in the ACTN3 gene. α-Actinin-3 deficiency is detrimental to sprint performance in elite athletes and beneficial to endurance activities. In the human genome, it is very difficult to find single-gene loss-of-function variants that bear signatures of positive selection, yet intriguingly, the ACTN3 null variant has undergone strong positive selection during recent evolution, appearing to provide a survival advantage where food resources are scarce and climate is cold. We have previously demonstrated that α-actinin-3 deficiency in the Actn3 KO mouse results in a shift in fast-twitch fibres towards oxidative metabolism, which would be more "energy efficient" in famine, and beneficial to endurance performance. Prolonged exposure to cold can also induce changes in skeletal muscle similar to those observed with endurance training, and changes in Ca2+ handling by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR are a key factor underlying these adaptations. On this basis, we explored the effects of α-actinin-3 deficiency on Ca2+ kinetics in single flexor digitorum brevis muscle fibres from Actn3 KO mice, using the Ca2+-sensitive dye fura-2. Compared to wild-type, fibres of Actn3 KO mice showed: (i an increased rate of decay of the twitch transient; (ii a fourfold increase in the rate of SR Ca2+ leak; (iii a threefold increase in the rate of SR Ca2+ pumping; and (iv enhanced maintenance of tetanic Ca2+ during fatigue. The SR Ca2+ pump, SERCA1, and the Ca2+-binding proteins, calsequestrin and sarcalumenin, showed markedly increased expression in muscles of KO mice. Together, these changes in Ca2+ handling in the absence of α-actinin-3 are consistent with cold acclimatisation and thermogenesis, and offer an additional explanation for the positive selection of the ACTN3 577X null allele in populations living in cold environments

  9. Genome-wide association study identifies three novel genetic markers associated with elite endurance performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmetov, Ii; Kulemin, Na; Popov, Dv

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the association between multiple single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), aerobic performance and elite endurance athlete status in Russians. By using GWAS approach, we examined the association between 1,140,419 SNPs and relative maximal oxygen consumption rate ([Formula: see text]O2......max) in 80 international-level Russian endurance athletes (46 males and 34 females). To validate obtained results, we further performed case-control studies by comparing the frequencies of the most significant SNPs (with P endurance athletes and opposite cohorts (192...... Russian controls, 1367 European controls, and 230 Russian power athletes). Initially, six 'endurance alleles' were identified showing discrete associations with [Formula: see text]O2max both in males and females. Next, case-control studies resulted in remaining three SNPs (NFIA-AS2 rs1572312, TSHR rs...

  10. Ovarian cancer susceptibility alleles and risk of ovarian cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramus, Susan J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Złowocka, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; van Asperen, Christi J.; van Roozendaal, K. E. P.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Collée, J. Margriet; Kriege, Mieke; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Jacobs, Chris; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Douglas, Fiona; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E.; Kennedy, M. John; Pathak, Harsh; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Calender, Alain; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Faivre, Laurence; Loustalot, Catherine; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; John, Esther M.; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F.; tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v O.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; van Le, Linda; Hoffman, James S.; Ewart Toland, Amanda; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Issacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Iganacio; Tornero, Eva; Navarro, Matilde; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Olah, Edith; Vaszko, Tibor; teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; Dorfling, Cecelia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Diez, Orland; Kwong, Ava; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Fiebig, Britta; Schäfer, Dieter; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Plante, Marie; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V. Shane; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Gayther, Simon A.; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Ong, Kai-Ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; Donaldson, Alan; James, Margaret; Downing, Sarah; Taylor, Amy; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark T.; McCann, Emma; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Drummond, Sarah; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Hill, Kathryn; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Duncan, Alexis; Izatt, Louise; Langman, Caroline; Whaite, Anna; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; Serra-Feliu, Gemma; Ellis, Ian; Houghton, Catherine; Taylor, Jane; Side, Lucy; Male, Alison; Berlin, Cheryl; Eason, Jacqueline; Collier, Rebecca; Claber, Oonagh; Jobson, Irene; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Robertson, Lisa; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eddy, Charlotte; Tripathi, Vishakha; Attard, Virginia; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; McBride, Donna; Smalley, Sarah; Sinilnikova, Olga; Barjhoux, Laure; Verny-Pierre, Carole; Giraud, Sophie; Léone, Mélanie; Buecher, Bruno; Houdayer, Claude; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrede, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Urhammer, Nancy; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Eisinger, François; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Coupier, Isabelle; Pujol, Pascal; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révilliion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Barouk-Simonet, Emmanuelle; Bonnet, Françoise; Bubien, Virginie; Sevenet, Nicolas; Longy, Michel; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Peysselon, Megalie; Coron, Fanny; Prieur, Fabienne; Lebrun, Marine; Kientz, Caroline; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Delnatte, Capucine; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie L.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Verhoef, S.; Verheus, M.; van't Veer, L. J.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Collée, M.; van den Ouweland, A. M. W.; Jager, A.; Hooning, M. J.; Tilanus-Linthorst, M. M. A.; Seynaeve, C.; van Asperen, C. J.; Wijnen, J. T.; Vreeswijk, M. P.; Tollenaar, R. A.; Devilee, P.; Ligtenberg, M. J.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ausems, M. G.; van der Luijt, R. B.; van Os, T. A.; Gille, J. J. P.; Waisfisz, Q.; Gomez-Garcia, E. B.; van Roozendaal, C. E.; Blok, Marinus J.; Caanen, B.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van der Hout, A. H.; Mourits, M. J.; Vasen, H. F.; Thorne, Heather; Niedermayr, Eveline; Gill, Mona; Collins, Lucine; Gokgoz, Nalan; Selander, Teresa; Weerasooriya, Nayana; Karlsson, Per; Nordlilng, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Åke; Loman, Niklas; Soller, Maria; Jernström, Helena; Harbst, Katja; Henriksson, Karin; Arver, Brita; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Grönberg, Henrik; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Ehrencrona, Hans; Rosenquist, Richard; Dahl, Niklas

    2012-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancer. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified six alleles associated with risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated four of these loci as potential modifiers of

  11. Allelic determinants of vitamin d insufficiency, bone mineral density, and bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trummer, Olivia; Schwetz, Verena; Walter-Finell, Daniela; Lerchbaum, Elisabeth; Renner, Wilfried; Gugatschka, Markus; Dobnig, Harald; Pieber, Thomas R; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara

    2012-07-01

    Low 25-hydroxycholecalciferol [25(OH) vitamin D] status is known to play an important role in many diseases with focus on bone health. Based on recently reported genetic determinants of vitamin D insufficiency, we aimed to analyze genetic variants of group-specific component (GC), 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR7), and cytochrome P450IIR-1 (CYP2R1) for association with vitamin D levels, bone mineral density (BMD), and bone fractures. We conducted a cross-sectional BMD and fracture study and a prospective cohort study. The cross-sectional study comprised participants of a BMD screening study, and the prospective cohort study comprised nursing home subjects. The cross-sectional study included 342 subjects (mean age, 55.3 ± 12.0 yr), and the prospective study included 1093 subjects (mean age, 84.0 ± 6.0 yr). Patients were stratified by GC, DHCR7, and CYP2R1 genotypes. For each gene, the allele associated with lower 25(OH) vitamin D levels was designated as "risk allele." The potential role of these risk alleles in fracture risk was analyzed by logistic regression analysis including age and sex as confounders. We measured BMD and fractures. GC genotypes were significantly associated with lower mean 25(OH) vitamin D levels in both cohorts (P = 0.001 and P = 0.048, respectively). There was no significant association of BMD with any of the genotypes. None of the alleles was associated with past fractures, whereas the DHCR7 G-allele was significantly associated with prospective fractures (odds ratio, 0.68; 95% confidence interval, 0.51-0.92; P = 0.011). The DHCR7 gene polymorphism may be a predictor for fracture risk.

  12. Allelic variation within the S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase gene family is associated with wood properties in Chinese white poplar (Populus tomentosa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qingzhang; Wang, Lu; Zhou, Daling; Yang, Haijiao; Gong, Chenrui; Pan, Wei; Zhang, Deqiang

    2014-01-01

    S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) is the only eukaryotic enzyme capable of S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine (SAH) catabolism for the maintenance of cellular transmethylation potential. Recently, biochemical and genetic studies in herbaceous species have obtained important discoveries in the function of SAHH, and an extensive characterization of SAHH family in even one tree species is essential, but currently lacking. Here, we first identified the SAHH family from Populus tomentosa using molecular cloning method. Phylogenetic analyses of 28 SAHH proteins from dicotyledons, monocotyledons, and lower plants revealed that the sequences formed two monophyletic groups: the PtrSAHHA with PtoSAHHA and PtrSAHHB with PtoSAHHB. Examination of tissue-specific expression profiles of the PtoSAHH family revealed similar expression patterns; high levels of expression in xylem were found. Nucleotide diversity and linkage disequilibrium (LD) in the PtoSAHH family, sampled from P. tomentosa natural distribution, revealed that PtoSAHH harbors high single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) diversity (π = 0.01059 ± 0.00122 and 0.00930 ± 0.00079,respectively) and low LD (r2 > 0.1, within 800 bp and 2,200 bp, respectively). Using an LD-linkage analysis approach, two noncoding SNPs (PtoSAHHB_1065 and PtoSAHHA_2203) and the corresponding haplotypes were found to significantly associate with α-cellulose content, and a nonsynonymous SNP (PtoSAHHB_410) within the SAHH signature motifs showed significant association with fiber length, with an average of 3.14% of the phenotypic variance explained. The present study demonstrates that PtoSAHHs were split off prior to the divergence of interspecies in Populus, and SAHHs may play a key role promoting transmethylation reactions in the secondary cell walls biosynthesis in trees. Hence, our findings provide insights into SAHH function and evolution in woody species and also offer a theoretical basis for marker-aided selection breeding to improve the

  13. Functional Analysis of the Aurora Kinase A Ile31 Allelic Variant in Human Prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Matarasso

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of the centrosome-associated serine/ threonine kinase Aurora Kinase A (AURKA has been demonstrated in both advanced prostate cancer and high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia lesions. The single-nucleotide polymorphism T91A (Phe3lile has been implicated in AURKA overexpression and has been suggested as a low-penetrance susceptibility allele in multiple human cancers, including prostate cancer. We studied the transcriptional consequences of the AURKA Ile31 allele in 28 commercial normal prostate tissue RNA samples (median age, 27 years. Significant overexpression of AURKA was demonstrated in homozygous and heterozygous AURKA Ile31 prostate RNA (2.07-fold and 1.93-fold, respectively; P < .05. Expression levels of 1509 genes differentiated between samples homozygous for Phe31 alleles and samples homozygous for Ile31 alleles (P = .05. Gene Ontology classification revealed overrepresentation of cell cycle arrest, ubiquitin cycle, antiapoptosis, angiogenesisrelated genes. When these hypothesis-generating results were subjected to more stringent statistical criteria, overexpression of a novel transcript of the natural killer tumor recognition sequence (NKTR gene was revealed and validated in homozygous Ile31 samples (2.6-fold; P < .05. In summary, our data suggest an association between the AURKA Ile31 allele and an altered transcriptome in normal non-neopasic prostates.

  14. Detecting rare variants in case-parents association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang-Fu Cheng

    Full Text Available Despite the success of genome-wide association studies (GWASs in detecting common variants (minor allele frequency ≥0.05 many suggested that rare variants also contribute to the genetic architecture of diseases. Recently, researchers demonstrated that rare variants can show a strong stratification which may not be corrected by using existing methods. In this paper, we focus on a case-parents study and consider methods for testing group-wise association between multiple rare (and common variants in a gene region and a disease. All tests depend on the numbers of transmitted mutant alleles from parents to their diseased children across variants and hence they are robust to the effect of population stratification. We use extensive simulation studies to compare the performance of four competing tests: the largest single-variant transmission disequilibrium test (TDT, multivariable test, combined TDT, and a likelihood ratio test based on a random-effects model. We find that the likelihood ratio test is most powerful in a wide range of settings and there is no negative impact to its power performance when common variants are also included in the analysis. If deleterious and protective variants are simultaneously analyzed, the likelihood ratio test was generally insensitive to the effect directionality, unless the effects are extremely inconsistent in one direction.

  15. RHD alleles in the Tunisian population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchari, Mouna; Jemni-Yaacoub, Saloua; Chakroun, Taher; Abdelkefi, Saida; Houissa, Batoul; Hmida, Slama

    2013-01-01

    Background: A comprehensive survey of RHD alleles in Tunisia population was lacking. The aim of this study was to use a multiplex RHD typing assay for simultaneous detection of partial D especially with RHD/RHCE deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequence exchange mechanism and some weak D alleles. Materials and Methods: Six RHD specific primer sets were designed to amplify RHD exons 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 9. DNA from 2000 blood donors (1777 D+ and 223 D-) from several regions was selected for RHD genotyping using a PCR multiplex assay. Further molecular investigations were done to characterize the RHD variants that were identified by the PCR multiplex assay. Results: In the 1777 D+ samples, only 10 individuals showed the absence of amplification of exons 4 and 5 that were subsequently identified by PCR-SSP as weak D type 4 variants. No hybrid allele was detected. In the 223 D-, RHD amplification of some exons was observed only in 5 samples: 4 individuals expressed only RHD exon 9, and one subject lacking exons 4 and 5. These samples were then screened by PCR-SSPs on d(C) ces and weak D type 4, respectively. Conclusion: The weak D type 4 appears to be the most common D variant allele. We have not found any partial D variant. Findings also indicated that RHD gene deletion is the most prevalent cause of the D- phenotype in the Tunisian population. PMID:24014941

  16. RHD alleles in the Tunisian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouna Ouchari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A comprehensive survey of RHD alleles in Tunisia population was lacking. The aim of this study was to use a multiplex RHD typing assay for simultaneous detection of partial D especially with RHD/RHCE deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA sequence exchange mechanism and some weak D alleles. Materials and Methods: Six RHD specific primer sets were designed to amplify RHD exons 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 9. DNA from 2000 blood donors (1777 D+ and 223 D- from several regions was selected for RHD genotyping using a PCR multiplex assay. Further molecular investigations were done to characterize the RHD variants that were identified by the PCR multiplex assay. Results: In the 1777 D+ samples, only 10 individuals showed the absence of amplification of exons 4 and 5 that were subsequently identified by PCR-SSP as weak D type 4 variants. No hybrid allele was detected. In the 223 D-, RHD amplification of some exons was observed only in 5 samples: 4 individuals expressed only RHD exon 9, and one subject lacking exons 4 and 5. These samples were then screened by PCR-SSPs on d(C ce s and weak D type 4, respectively. Conclusion: The weak D type 4 appears to be the most common D variant allele. We have not found any partial D variant. Findings also indicated that RHD gene deletion is the most prevalent cause of the D- phenotype in the Tunisian population.

  17. Comparative frequency and allelic distribution of ABO and Rh (D ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Allelic distribution of major blood groups (ABO and rhesus) has not been defined in Bangladeshi population. Determinants of blood group frequency in this region have not been studied properly. Aim: To determine ABO and rhesus blood group frequency and allelic distribution in a multiethnic area of ...

  18. Comparative frequency and allelic distribution of ABO and Rh (D ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gourab Dewan

    2015-02-18

    Feb 18, 2015 ... Abstract Background: Allelic distribution of major blood groups (ABO and rhesus) has not been defined in Bangladeshi population. Determinants of blood group frequency in this region have not been studied properly. Aim: To determine ABO and rhesus blood group frequency and allelic distribution in a.

  19. Estimation of allelic frequencies for ABO and Rh blood groups

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mostafa Saadat

    2015-02-18

    Feb 18, 2015 ... Estimation of allelic frequencies for ABO and Rh blood groups. Dear Editor. Estimation of the allelic frequencies for genetic markers is very important in genetic studies. Also investigation of the concordance between observed and expected value based on the Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) is strongly ...

  20. Apolipoprotein E4 allele does not influence serum triglyceride ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated how the APOε4 allele affects the serum triglyceride response after a fatmeal in apparently healthy black South African young adults. Sixty students were successfully screened for APOE genotype using Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) and were divided into four groups; the ε2 allele ...

  1. A large study reveals no Association between APOE and Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federoff, Monica; Jimenez-Rolando, Belen; Nalls, Michael A; Singleton, Andrew B

    2012-01-01

    Background Research focusing on the role of APOE in Parkinson’s disease (PD) has been largely inconclusive, creating a broad discrepancy in association studies. Objective To elucidate the role of APOE alleles in PD risk by studying a large sample size and controlling for population substructure. Patients and Methods In total, 3465 case and control samples were genotyped, obtained from the NINDS Neurogenetics repository. Results No significant differences in ε4 dosages exist between PD cases and controls. The frequency of ε4 carriers differed slightly between cases and controls at 24% (580/2412) and 26% (270/1053), respectively. Likewise, mean dosages of APOE ε2 were not significantly different between cases and controls. APOE ε2 carriers were observed at a frequency of 13.6% (329/2412) among cases and 15% (158/1053) among controls. Logistic regression models evaluating PD as possibly associated with ε4 or ε2 carrier status and allele dosages yielded no significant results. The mean MMSE score among all PD cases was 28.35 (SD = 2.58) and memory loss was reported in only 11.9% (105/879) of cases. Linear regression models comparing MMSE scores as predicted by ε4 or ε2 carrier status and allele dosages were not significant. Conclusions There is no association between APOE epsilon alleles and Parkinson’s disease. PMID:22349451

  2. Positive selection of deleterious alleles through interaction with a sex-ratio suppressor gene in African Buffalo: a plausible new mechanism for a high frequency anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hooft, Pim; Greyling, Ben J; Getz, Wayne M; van Helden, Paul D; Zwaan, Bas J; Bastos, Armanda D S

    2014-01-01

    Although generally rare, deleterious alleles can become common through genetic drift, hitchhiking or reductions in selective constraints. Here we present a possible new mechanism that explains the attainment of high frequencies of deleterious alleles in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) population of Kruger National Park, through positive selection of these alleles that is ultimately driven by a sex-ratio suppressor. We have previously shown that one in four Kruger buffalo has a Y-chromosome profile that, despite being associated with low body condition, appears to impart a relative reproductive advantage, and which is stably maintained through a sex-ratio suppressor. Apparently, this sex-ratio suppressor prevents fertility reduction that generally accompanies sex-ratio distortion. We hypothesize that this body-condition-associated reproductive advantage increases the fitness of alleles that negatively affect male body condition, causing genome-wide positive selection of these alleles. To investigate this we genotyped 459 buffalo using 17 autosomal microsatellites. By correlating heterozygosity with body condition (heterozygosity-fitness correlations), we found that most microsatellites were associated with one of two gene types: one with elevated frequencies of deleterious alleles that have a negative effect on body condition, irrespective of sex; the other with elevated frequencies of sexually antagonistic alleles that are negative for male body condition but positive for female body condition. Positive selection and a direct association with a Y-chromosomal sex-ratio suppressor are indicated, respectively, by allele clines and by relatively high numbers of homozygous deleterious alleles among sex-ratio suppressor carriers. This study, which employs novel statistical techniques to analyse heterozygosity-fitness correlations, is the first to demonstrate the abundance of sexually-antagonistic genes in a natural mammal population. It also has important

  3. Positive selection of deleterious alleles through interaction with a sex-ratio suppressor gene in African Buffalo: a plausible new mechanism for a high frequency anomaly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pim van Hooft

    Full Text Available Although generally rare, delet