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Sample records for allelic association study

  1. Allelic association studies of genome wide association data can reveal errors in marker position assignments

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    Curtis David

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome wide association (GWA studies provide the opportunity to develop new kinds of analysis. Analysing pairs of markers from separate regions might lead to the detection of allelic association which might indicate an interaction between nearby genes. Methods 396,591 markers typed in 541 subjects were studied. 7.8*1010 pairs of markers were screened and those showing initial evidence for allelic association were subjected to more thorough investigation along with 10 flanking markers on either side. Results No evidence was detected for interaction. However 6 markers appeared to have an incorrect map position according to NCBI Build 35. One of these was corrected in Build 36 and 2 were dropped. The remaining 3 were left with map positions inconsistent with their allelic association relationships. Discussion Although no interaction effects were detected the method was successful in identifying markers with probably incorrect map positions. Conclusion The study of allelic association can supplement other methods for assigning markers to particular map positions. Analyses of this type may usefully be applied to data from future GWA studies.

  2. HLA alleles associated with the adaptive immune response to smallpox vaccine: a replication study.

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    Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Pankratz, V Shane; Salk, Hannah M; Kennedy, Richard B; Poland, Gregory A

    2014-09-01

    We previously reported HLA allelic associations with vaccinia virus (VACV)-induced adaptive immune responses in a cohort of healthy individuals (n = 1,071 subjects) after a single dose of the licensed smallpox (Dryvax) vaccine. This study demonstrated that specific HLA alleles were significantly associated with VACV-induced neutralizing antibody (NA) titers (HLA-B*13:02, *38:02, *44:03, *48:01, and HLA-DQB1*03:02, *06:04) and cytokine (HLA-DRB1*01:03, *03:01, *10:01, *13:01, *15:01) immune responses. We undertook an independent study of 1,053 healthy individuals and examined associations between HLA alleles and measures of adaptive immunity after a single dose of Dryvax-derived ACAM2000 vaccine to evaluate previously discovered HLA allelic associations from the Dryvax study and determine if these associations are replicated with ACAM2000. Females had significantly higher NA titers than male subjects in both study cohorts [median ID50 discovery cohort 159 (93, 256) vs. 125 (75, 186), p smallpox vaccine-induced adaptive immune responses are significantly influenced by HLA gene polymorphisms. These data provide information for functional studies and design of novel candidate smallpox vaccines.

  3. Phenome-Wide Association Study for Alcohol and Nicotine Risk Alleles in 26394 Women.

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    Polimanti, Renato; Kranzler, Henry R; Gelernter, Joel

    2016-10-01

    To identify novel traits associated with alleles known to predispose to alcohol and nicotine use, we conducted a phenome-wide association study (PheWAS) in a large multi-population cohort. We investigated 7688 African-Americans, 1133 Asian-Americans, 14 081 European-Americans, and 3492 Hispanic-Americans from the Women's Health Initiative, analyzing alleles at the CHRNA3-CHRNA5 locus, ADH1B, and ALDH2 with respect to phenotypic traits related to anthropometric characteristics, dietary habits, social status, psychological traits, reproductive history, health conditions, and nicotine/alcohol use. In ADH1B trans-population meta-analysis and population-specific analysis, we replicated prior associations with drinking behaviors and identified multiple novel phenome-wide significant and suggestive findings related to psychological traits, socioeconomic status, vascular/metabolic conditions, and reproductive health. We then applied Bayesian network learning algorithms to provide insight into the causative relationships of the novel ADH1B associations: ADH1B appears to affect phenotypic traits via both alcohol-mediated and alcohol-independent effects. In an independent sample of 2379 subjects, we also replicated the novel ADH1B associations related to socioeconomic status (household gross income and highest grade finished in school). For CHRNA3-CHRNA5 risk alleles, we replicated association with smoking behaviors, lung cancer, and asthma. There were also novel suggestive CHRNA3-CHRNA5 findings with respect to high-cholesterol-medication use and distrustful attitude. In conclusion, the genetics of alcohol and tobacco use potentially has broader implications on physical and mental health than is currently recognized. In particular, ADH1B may be a gene relevant for the human phenome via both alcohol metabolism-related mechanisms and other alcohol metabolism-independent mechanisms.

  4. Study on the association of BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles with clinical mastitis in Norwegian Red cows.

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    Kulberg, S; Heringstad, B; Guttersrud, O A; Olsaker, I

    2007-08-01

    Genotyping of bovine leucocyte antigen DRB3.2 (BoLA-DRB3.2) in a total of 523 Norwegian Red (NR) cows from two groups selected for high protein yield and low clinical mastitis, respectively, identified 27 previously reported BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles across the groups. Significant differences in BoLA-DRB3.2 allele frequencies were found between the selection groups. Alleles *13, *18, *22 and *27 had a significantly higher frequency in cows selected for low clinical mastitis, while alleles *3, *9, *11 and *26 had a higher frequency in cows selected for high protein yield. Associations between BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles and clinical mastitis were analysed based on mastitis data from 741,072 first-lactation NR cows, of which 452 were genotyped. Alleles *22 and *26 were found to be associated with increased clinical mastitis, while alleles *7, *11, *18 and *24 had a favourable effect on mastitis resistance. Contradictory results from different studies investigating associations between BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles and mastitis indicate that future studies should focus on associations of mastitis with BoLA haplotypes rather than with single BoLA genes.

  5. Association study of human VN1R1 pheromone receptor gene alleles and gender.

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    Mitropoulos, Constantinos; Papachatzopoulou, Adamantia; Menounos, Panagiotis G; Kolonelou, Christina; Pappa, Magda; Bertolis, George; Gerou, Spiros; Patrinos, George P

    2007-01-01

    Pheromones are water-soluble chemicals that elicit neuroendocrine and physiological changes, while they also provide information about gender within individuals of the same species. VN1R1 is the only functional pheromone receptor in humans. We have undertaken a large mutation screening approach in 425 adult individuals from the Hellenic population to investigate whether the allelic differences, namely alleles 1a and 1b present in the human VN1R1 gene, are gender specific. Here we show that both VN1R1 1a and 1b alleles are found in chromosomes of both male and female subjects at frequency of 26.35% and 73.65%, respectively. Given the fact that those allelic differences potentially cause minor changes in the protein conformation and its transmembrane domains, as simulated by the TMHMM software, our data suggest that the allelic differences in the human VN1R1 gene are unlikely to be associated with gender and hence to contribute to distinct gender-specific behavior.

  6. Association studies using family pools of outcrossing crops based on allele-frequency estimates from DNA sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashraf, Bilal; Jensen, Just; Asp, Torben;

    2014-01-01

    (resulting in higher LD with causative mutations) and lower sequencing depth. Therefore, association studies using genotyping by sequencing are optimal and use low sequencing depth per sample. The developed framework for association studies using allele frequencies from sequencing can be modified for other...

  7. A Theoretical Framework for Association Studies in F2 Family Pools Using Allele Frequencies from Genotyping-By-Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janss, Luc L; Ashraf, Bilal H; Greve-Pedersen, Morten

    a sequencing approach to obtain Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) frequencies is considered here. In this work we develop the theoretical framework to perform association studies using allele frequencies from such F2 family pools. We show that expected allele frequencies in the F2 families will have......In Perennial ryegrass breeding, F2's derived from parental crosses are sown in plots and phenotypes and genotypes are obtained as single measurements for the whole F2 family pool. For genotypes this means that quantitative assays must be used to obtain allele frequencies. For this purpose...... individuals. This effect is caused by extreme families (homozygote x homozygote) being less frequent than extreme (homozygote) individuals. We finally consider the effects of using sequencing to obtain allele frequencies, which will cause inaccuracy in the frequency estimate due to obtaining a limited number...

  8. Association between Neurocognitive Impairment and the Short Allele of the 5-HTT Promoter Polymorphism in Depression: A Pilot Study

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    Hely Kalska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Depression has been shown to be associated with cognitive deficits in various cognitive domains. However, it is still unclear which factors contribute to cognitive impairment. The objective of this study was to find out whether a functional polymorphism in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR gene is associated with the impairment of cognitive functioning among depressed patients. In a pilot study, a sample of 19 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD and 19 healthy controls was investigated with an extensive psychiatric and neuropsychological examination. All participants were genotyped for 5-HTTLPR. Depressed patients with the short allele of the 5-HTT promoter region exhibited inferior cognitive performance compared to patients with the long allele polymorphism. In healthy controls, no association between genotype and cognitive performance was found. The result suggests that in MDD patients with the short allele of the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism the vulnerability to cognitive impairment is increased compared to MDD patients without the short allele inheritance. These preliminary findings need to be confirmed in a larger cohort of MDD patients.

  9. Pilot association study of the beta-glucocerebrosidase N370S allele and Parkinson's disease in subjects of Jewish ethnicity.

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    Clark, Lorraine N; Nicolai, Angelique; Afridi, Shehla; Harris, Juliette; Mejia-Santana, Helen; Strug, Lisa; Cote, Lucien J; Louis, Elan D; Andrews, Howard; Waters, Cheryl; Ford, Blair; Frucht, Steven; Fahn, Stanley; Mayeux, Richard; Ottman, Ruth; Marder, K

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the beta-glucocerebrosidase gene cause Gaucher's disease, one of the most common lysosomal lipid storage diseases in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. The occurrence of parkinsonism in patients with Type 1 Gaucher's disease has been noted previously. In this pilot study, we evaluated a possible association between Parkinson's disease (PD) and the beta-glucocerebrosidase gene N370S allele (nt.1226 A>G) in 160 Parkinson's disease patients and 92 controls of Jewish ethnicity. We observed a higher frequency of the N370S genotype in PD cases (NS and SS, 10.7%) compared to controls (NS and SS 4.3%); however, the difference was not statistically significant (chi(2) = 3.4, P = 0.2). A total of 17 PD cases carry the N370S allele, including 2 homozygotes and 15 heterozygotes. The N370S allele (nt.1226 A>G) may be associated with PD in patients of Jewish ethnicity and should be examined in a larger study.

  10. A note on the use of the generalized odds ratio in meta-analysis of association studies involving bi- and tri-allelic polymorphisms

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    Mingroni-Netto Regina C

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The generalized odds ratio (GOR was recently suggested as a genetic model-free measure for association studies. However, its properties were not extensively investigated. We used Monte Carlo simulations to investigate type-I error rates, power and bias in both effect size and between-study variance estimates of meta-analyses using the GOR as a summary effect, and compared these results to those obtained by usual approaches of model specification. We further applied the GOR in a real meta-analysis of three genome-wide association studies in Alzheimer's disease. Findings For bi-allelic polymorphisms, the GOR performs virtually identical to a standard multiplicative model of analysis (e.g. per-allele odds ratio for variants acting multiplicatively, but augments slightly the power to detect variants with a dominant mode of action, while reducing the probability to detect recessive variants. Although there were differences among the GOR and usual approaches in terms of bias and type-I error rates, both simulation- and real data-based results provided little indication that these differences will be substantial in practice for meta-analyses involving bi-allelic polymorphisms. However, the use of the GOR may be slightly more powerful for the synthesis of data from tri-allelic variants, particularly when susceptibility alleles are less common in the populations (≤10%. This gain in power may depend on knowledge of the direction of the effects. Conclusions For the synthesis of data from bi-allelic variants, the GOR may be regarded as a multiplicative-like model of analysis. The use of the GOR may be slightly more powerful in the tri-allelic case, particularly when susceptibility alleles are less common in the populations.

  11. The TGFBR1*6A allele is not associated with susceptibility to colorectal cancer in a Spanish population: a case-control study

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    Barberá Víctor-Manuel

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TGF-β receptor type I is a mediator of growth inhibitory signals. TGFBR1*6A (rs11466445 is a common polymorphic variant of the TGF-β receptor I gene and has been associated with tumour susceptibility. Nevertheless, the role of this polymorphism as a risk factor for colorectal cancer is controversial. The aim of this study was to assess the association between TGFBR1*6A and colorectal cancer, age, sex, tumour location and tumour stage in a Spanish population. Methods The case-control study involved 800 Spanish subjects: 400 sporadic colorectal cancer patients and 400 age-, sex-, and ethnic-matched controls. The odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence interval (95% CI for the TGFBR1*6A polymorphism were calculated using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age and sex. Analysis of somatic mutations at the GCG repeat of TGFBR1 exon 1 and germline allele-specific expression were also conducted to obtain further information on the contribution of the TGFBR1*6A allele to CRC susceptibility. Results There was no statistically significant association between the TGFBR1*6A allele and CRC (p > 0.05. The OR was 1.147 (95% CI: 0.799–1.647 for carriers of the TGFBR1*6A allele and 0.878 (95% CI: 0.306–2.520 for homozygous TGFBR1*6A individuals compared with the reference. The frequency of the polymorphism was not affected by age, sex or tumour stage. The TGFBR1*6A allele was more prevalent among colon tumour patients than among rectal tumour patients. Tumour somatic mutations were found in only two of 69 cases (2.9%. Both cases involved a GCG deletion that changed genotype 9A/9A in normal DNA to genotype 9A/8A. Interestingly, these two tumours were positive for microsatellite instability, suggesting that these mutations originated because of a deficient DNA mismatch repair system. Allele-specific expression of the 9A allele was detected in seven of the 14 heterozygous 9A/6A tumour cases. This could have been caused by linkage

  12. Fitness costs associated with evolved herbicide resistance alleles in plants.

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    Vila-Aiub, Martin M; Neve, Paul; Powles, Stephen B

    2009-12-01

    Predictions based on evolutionary theory suggest that the adaptive value of evolved herbicide resistance alleles may be compromised by the existence of fitness costs. There have been many studies quantifying the fitness costs associated with novel herbicide resistance alleles, reflecting the importance of fitness costs in determining the evolutionary dynamics of resistance. However, many of these studies have incorrectly defined resistance or used inappropriate plant material and methods to measure fitness. This review has two major objectives. First, to propose a methodological framework that establishes experimental criteria to unequivocally evaluate fitness costs. Second, to present a comprehensive analysis of the literature on fitness costs associated with herbicide resistance alleles. This analysis reveals unquestionable evidence that some herbicide resistance alleles are associated with pleiotropic effects that result in plant fitness costs. Observed costs are evident from herbicide resistance-endowing amino acid substitutions in proteins involved in amino acid, fatty acid, auxin and cellulose biosynthesis, as well as enzymes involved in herbicide metabolism. However, these resistance fitness costs are not universal and their expression depends on particular plant alleles and mutations. The findings of this review are discussed within the context of the plant defence trade-off theory and herbicide resistance evolution.

  13. New Susceptibility and Resistance HLA-DP Alleles to HBV-Related Diseases Identified by a Trans-Ethnic Association Study in Asia

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    Kashiwase, Koichi; Minami, Mutsuhiko; Sugiyama, Masaya; Seto, Wai-Kay; Yuen, Man-Fung; Posuwan, Nawarat; Poovorawan, Yong; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Matsuura, Kentaro; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Kurosaki, Masayuki; Asahina, Yasuhiro; Izumi, Namiki; Kang, Jong-Hon; Hige, Shuhei; Ide, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Kazuhide; Sakaida, Isao; Murawaki, Yoshikazu; Itoh, Yoshito; Tamori, Akihiro; Orito, Etsuro; Hiasa, Yoichi; Honda, Masao; Kaneko, Shuichi; Mita, Eiji; Suzuki, Kazuyuki; Hino, Keisuke; Tanaka, Eiji; Mochida, Satoshi; Watanabe, Masaaki; Eguchi, Yuichiro; Masaki, Naohiko; Murata, Kazumoto; Korenaga, Masaaki; Mawatari, Yoriko; Ohashi, Jun; Kawashima, Minae; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Mizokami, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed the association between SNPs located on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II genes, including HLA-DP and HLA-DQ, and chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, mainly in Asian populations. HLA-DP alleles or haplotypes associated with chronic HBV infection or disease progression have not been fully identified in Asian populations. We performed trans-ethnic association analyses of HLA-DPA1, HLA-DPB1 alleles and haplotypes with hepatitis B virus infection and disease progression among Asian populations comprising Japanese, Korean, Hong Kong, and Thai subjects. To assess the association between HLA-DP and chronic HBV infection and disease progression, we conducted high-resolution (4-digit) HLA-DPA1 and HLA-DPB1 genotyping in a total of 3,167 samples, including HBV patients, HBV-resolved individuals and healthy controls. Trans-ethnic association analyses among Asian populations identified a new risk allele HLA-DPB1*09∶01 (P = 1.36×10−6; OR = 1.97; 95% CI, 1.50–2.59) and a new protective allele DPB1*02∶01 (P = 5.22×10−6; OR = 0.68; 95% CI, 0.58–0.81) to chronic HBV infection, in addition to the previously reported alleles. Moreover, DPB1*02∶01 was also associated with a decreased risk of disease progression in chronic HBV patients among Asian populations (P = 1.55×10−7; OR = 0.50; 95% CI, 0.39–0.65). Trans-ethnic association analyses identified Asian-specific associations of HLA-DP alleles and haplotypes with HBV infection or disease progression. The present findings will serve as a base for future functional studies of HLA-DP molecules in order to understand the pathogenesis of HBV infection and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:24520320

  14. The type 2 diabetes risk allele of TMEM154-rs6813195 associates with decreased beta cell function in a study of 6,486 Danes.

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    Marie Neergaard Harder

    Full Text Available A trans-ethnic meta-analysis of type 2 diabetes genome-wide association studies has identified seven novel susceptibility variants in or near TMEM154, SSR1/RREB1, FAF1, POU5F1/TCF19, LPP, ARL15 and ABCB9/MPHOSPH9. The aim of our study was to investigate associations between these novel risk variants and type 2 diabetes and pre-diabetic traits in a Danish population-based study with measurements of plasma glucose and serum insulin after an oral glucose tolerance test in order to elaborate on the physiological impact of the variants.Case-control analyses were performed in up to 5,777 patients with type 2 diabetes and 7,956 individuals with normal fasting glucose levels. Quantitative trait analyses were performed in up to 5,744 Inter99 participants naïve to glucose-lowering medication. Significant associations between TMEM154-rs6813195 and the beta cell measures insulinogenic index and disposition index and between FAF1-rs17106184 and 2-hour serum insulin levels were selected for further investigation in additional Danish studies and results were combined in meta-analyses including up to 6,486 Danes.We confirmed associations with type 2 diabetes for five of the seven SNPs (TMEM154-rs6813195, FAF1-rs17106184, POU5F1/TCF19-rs3130501, ARL15-rs702634 and ABCB9/MPHOSPH9-rs4275659. The type 2 diabetes risk C-allele of TMEM154-rs6813195 associated with decreased disposition index (n=5,181, β=-0.042, p=0.012 and insulinogenic index (n=5,181, β=-0.032, p=0.043 in Inter99 and these associations remained significant in meta-analyses including four additional Danish studies (disposition index n=6,486, β=-0.042, p=0.0044; and insulinogenic index n=6,486, β=-0.037, p=0.0094. The type 2 diabetes risk G-allele of FAF1-rs17106184 associated with increased levels of 2-hour serum insulin (n=5,547, β=0.055, p=0.017 in Inter99 and also when combining effects with three additional Danish studies (n=6,260, β=0.062, p=0.0040.Studies of type 2 diabetes intermediary

  15. A common mutation associated with the Duarte galactosemia allele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsas, L.J.; Dembure, P.P.; Langley, S.; Paulk, E.M.; Hjelm, L.N.; Fridovich-Keil, J. (Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States))

    1994-06-01

    The human cDNA and gene for galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) have been cloned and sequenced. A prevalant mutation (Q188R) is known to cause classic galactosemia (G/G). G/G galactosemia has an incidence of 1/38,886 in 1,396,766 Georgia live-born infants, but a more common variant of galactosemia, Duarte, has an unknown incidence. The proposed Duarte biochemical phenotypes of GALT are as follows: D/N, D/D, and D/G, which have [approximately]75%, 50%, and 25% of normal GALT activity, respectively. In addition, the D allele has isoforms of its enzyme that have more acidic pI than normal. Here the authors systematically determine (a) the prevalence of an A-to-G transition at base pair 2744 of exon 10 in the GALT gene, a transition that produces a codon change converting asparagine to aspartic acid at position 314 (N314D), and (b) the association of this mutation with the Duarte biochemical phenotype. The 2744G nucleotide change adds an AvaII (SinI) cut site, which was identified in PCR-amplified DNA. In 111 biochemically unphenotyped controls with no history of galactosemia, 13 N314D alleles were identified (prevalence 5.9%). In a prospective study, 40 D alleles were biochemically phenotyped, and 40 N314D alleles were found. By contrast, in 36 individuals known not to have the Duarte biochemical phenotype, no N314D alleles were found. The authors conclude that the N314D mutation is a common allele that probably causes the Duarte GALT biochemical phenotype and occurs in a predominantly Caucasian, nongalactosemic population, with a prevalence of 5.9%. 36 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Association of hepatic lipase -514T allele with coronary artery disease and ankle-brachial index, dependence on the lipoprotein phenotype: the GENES study.

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    Céline Verdier

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Relationship between hepatic lipase (LIPC polymorphism and coronary artery disease (CAD has often led to contradictory results. We studied this relation by genotyping rs1800588 in the LIPC promoter in a case-control study on CAD (the GENES study. We also investigated the relationship between this polymorphism and the ankle-brachial index (ABI, which is predictive of atherosclerosis progression and complications in patients at high cardiovascular risk. METHODS: 557 men aged 45-74 with stable coronary artery disease and 560 paired controls were genotyped for rs1800588. Medical data, clinical examination including determination of ABI and biological measurements related to cardiovascular risk factors enabled multivariate analyses and multiple adjustments. RESULTS: CAD cases showed a higher T-allele frequency than controls (0.246 vs 0.192, p = 0.003. An interaction has been found between LIPC polymorphism and triglycerides (TG levels regarding risk of CAD: TT-homozigosity was associated with an Odds ratio (OR of 6.4 (CI: 1.8-22.3 when TG were below 1.5 g/L, but no association was found at higher TG levels (OR = 1.34, CI: 0.3-5.9. The distribution of LIPC genotypes was compared between CAD patients with normal or abnormal ABI and impact of LIPC polymorphism on ABI was determined. Following multiple adjustments, association of the T-allele with pejorative ABI (<0.90 was significant for heterozygotes and for all T-carriers (OR = 1.55, CI: 1.07-2.25. CONCLUSION: The -514T LIPC allele is associated with CAD under normotriglyceridemic conditions and constitutes an independent determinant of pejorative ABI in coronary patients.

  17. CollapsABEL: An R library for detecting compound heterozygote alleles in genome-wide association studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Zhong (Kaiyin); L.C. Karssen (Lennart); M.H. Kayser (Manfred); F. Liu (Fan)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Compound Heterozygosity (CH) in classical genetics is the presence of two different recessive mutations at a particular gene locus. A relaxed form of CH alleles may account for an essential proportion of the missing heritability, i.e. heritability of phenotypes so far not acc

  18. Association and linkage studies of the TAQI A1 allele at the dopamine D{sub 2} receptor gene in samples of female and male alcoholics

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    Neiswanger, K.; Hill, S.Y.; Kaplan, B.B. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-14

    To address the controversy surrounding DRD2 and alcoholism, we performed linkage and association studies utilizing alcoholic men from high density families largely uncontaminated by other psychopathology and female alcoholics for whom secondary drug dependence (averaging 10 years later onset) was a prominent feature. The males and females were combined for a total of 52 alcoholics, and compared to 30 controls screened for the absence of alcoholism and other psychopathology, revealing a significant association between the frequency of the TaqI allele and alcoholism. However, linkage and family-based association study, placed in the context of the literature, suggest that minimizing psychopathology in control groups is probably a more important explanation for divergent results than either sampling error or population stratification. When combined with the complete lack of within-family evidence, we conclude that the association, while not specific to the alcoholism phenotype, per se. 37 refs., 2 tabs.

  19. Short mucin 6 alleles are associated with H pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thai V Nguyen; Marcel JR Janssen; Paulien Gritters; René HM te Morsche; Joost PH Drenth; Henri van Asten; Robert JF Laheij; Jan BMJ Jansen

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between mucin 6(MUC6) VNTR length and H pylori infection.METHODS: Blood samples were collected from patients visiting the Can Tho General Hospital for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. DNA was isolated from whole blood, the repeated section was cut out using a restriction enzyme (Pvu Ⅱ) and the length of the allele fragments was determined by Southern blotting. H pylori infection was diagnosed by 14C urea breath test. For analysis, MUC6 allele fragment length was dichotomized as being either long (> 13.5 kbp) or short (≤ 13.5 kbp)and patients were classified according to genotype [long-long (LL), long-short (LS), short-short (SS)].RESULTS: 160 patients were studied (mean age 43years, 36% were males, 58% H pylori positive). MUC6Pvu Ⅱ-restricted allele fragment lengths ranged from 7 to 19 kbp. Of the patients with the LL, LS, SS MUC6genotype, 43% (24/56), 57% (25/58) and 76% (11/46)were infected with H pylori, respectively (P = 0.003).CONCLUSION: Short MUC6 alleles are associated with H pylori infection.

  20. Genome-wide association study of subtype-specific epithelial ovarian cancer risk alleles using pooled DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Earp, Madalene A; Kelemen, Linda E; Magliocco, Anthony M

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a heterogeneous cancer with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Variants influencing the risk of developing the less-common EOC subtypes have not been fully investigated. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of EOC according to subtype by...

  1. HLA-DRB1 Class II antigen level alleles are associated with persistent HPV infection in Mexican women; a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major risk factor for malignant lesions and cervical cancer. A widely studied element in the search for genetic factors influencing risk HPV infection diseases is allelic variation of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) locus. The study was designed to search for HLA susceptibility alleles contributing to the persistence of HPV infection in Mexican women. Methods A total of 172 subjects were divided into three groups...

  2. Common Kibra alleles are associated with human memory performance.

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    Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; Stephan, Dietrich A; Huentelman, Matthew J; Hoerndli, Frederic J; Craig, David W; Pearson, John V; Huynh, Kim-Dung; Brunner, Fabienne; Corneveaux, Jason; Osborne, David; Wollmer, M Axel; Aerni, Amanda; Coluccia, Daniel; Hänggi, Jürgen; Mondadori, Christian R A; Buchmann, Andreas; Reiman, Eric M; Caselli, Richard J; Henke, Katharina; de Quervain, Dominique J-F

    2006-10-20

    Human memory is a polygenic trait. We performed a genome-wide screen to identify memory-related gene variants. A genomic locus encoding the brain protein KIBRA was significantly associated with memory performance in three independent, cognitively normal cohorts from Switzerland and the United States. Gene expression studies showed that KIBRA was expressed in memory-related brain structures. Functional magnetic resonance imaging detected KIBRA allele-dependent differences in hippocampal activations during memory retrieval. Evidence from these experiments suggests a role for KIBRA in human memory.

  3. Autoimmune disease classification by inverse association with SNP alleles.

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    Marina Sirota

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available With multiple genome-wide association studies (GWAS performed across autoimmune diseases, there is a great opportunity to study the homogeneity of genetic architectures across autoimmune disease. Previous approaches have been limited in the scope of their analysis and have failed to properly incorporate the direction of allele-specific disease associations for SNPs. In this work, we refine the notion of a genetic variation profile for a given disease to capture strength of association with multiple SNPs in an allele-specific fashion. We apply this method to compare genetic variation profiles of six autoimmune diseases: multiple sclerosis (MS, ankylosing spondylitis (AS, autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD, rheumatoid arthritis (RA, Crohn's disease (CD, and type 1 diabetes (T1D, as well as five non-autoimmune diseases. We quantify pair-wise relationships between these diseases and find two broad clusters of autoimmune disease where SNPs that make an individual susceptible to one class of autoimmune disease also protect from diseases in the other autoimmune class. We find that RA and AS form one such class, and MS and ATD another. We identify specific SNPs and genes with opposite risk profiles for these two classes. We furthermore explore individual SNPs that play an important role in defining similarities and differences between disease pairs. We present a novel, systematic, cross-platform approach to identify allele-specific relationships between disease pairs based on genetic variation as well as the individual SNPs which drive the relationships. While recognizing similarities between diseases might lead to identifying novel treatment options, detecting differences between diseases previously thought to be similar may point to key novel disease-specific genes and pathways.

  4. The Type 2 Diabetes Risk Allele of TMEM154-rs6813195 Associates with Decreased Beta Cell Function in a Study of 6,486 Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev-Harder, Marie; Appel, Emil Vincent Rosenbaum; Grarup, Niels

    2015-01-01

    risk variants and type 2 diabetes and pre-diabetic traits in a Danish population-based study with measurements of plasma glucose and serum insulin after an oral glucose tolerance test in order to elaborate on the physiological impact of the variants. METHODS: Case-control analyses were performed in up...... to 5,777 patients with type 2 diabetes and 7,956 individuals with normal fasting glucose levels. Quantitative trait analyses were performed in up to 5,744 Inter99 participants naïve to glucose-lowering medication. Significant associations between TMEM154-rs6813195 and the beta cell measures...... through reduced beta cell function. The impact of the diabetes risk G-allele of FAF1-rs17106184 on increased 2-hour insulin levels is however unexplained....

  5. Genome-wide detection of allele specific copy number variation associated with insulin resistance in African Americans from the HyperGEN study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marguerite R Irvin

    Full Text Available African Americans have been understudied in genome wide association studies of diabetes and related traits. In the current study, we examined the joint association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and copy number variants (CNVs with fasting insulin and an index of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR in the HyperGEN study, a family based study with proband ascertainment for hypertension. This analysis is restricted to 1,040 African Americans without diabetes. We generated allele specific CNV genotypes at 872,243 autosomal loci using Birdsuite, a freely available multi-stage program. Joint tests of association for SNPs and CNVs were performed using linear mixed models adjusting for covariates and familial relationships. Our results highlight SNPs associated with fasting insulin and HOMA-IR (rs6576507 and rs8026527, 3.7*10(-7≤P≤1.1*10(-5 near ATPase, class V, type 10A (ATP10A, and the L Type voltage dependent calcium channel (CACNA1D, rs1401492, P≤5.2*10(-6. ATP10A belongs to a family of aminophospholipid-transporting ATPases and has been associated with type 2 diabetes in mice. CACNA1D has been linked to pancreatic beta cell generation in mice. The two most significant copy variable markers (rs10277702 and rs361367; P<2.0*10(-4 were in the beta variable region of the T-cell receptor gene (TCRVB. Human and mouse TCR has been shown to mimic insulin and its receptor and could contribute to insulin resistance. Our findings differ from genome wide association studies of fasting insulin and other diabetes related traits in European populations, highlighting the continued need to investigate unique genetic influences for understudied populations such as African Americans.

  6. Significant Association of HLA-B Alleles and Genotypes in Thai Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apichaya Puangpetch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder. Many susceptible causative genes have been identified. Most of the previous reports showed the relationship between the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA gene and etiology of autism. In order to identify HLA-B alleles associated with autism in Thai population, we compared the frequency of HLA-B allele in 364 autistic subjects with 952 normal subjects by using a two-stage sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe system (PCR-SSOP method based on flow-cytometry technology. HLA-B⁎13:02 (P=0.019, OR = 2.229, HLA-B⁎38:02 (P=0.049, OR = 1.628, HLA-B⁎44:03 (P=0.016, OR = 1.645, and HLA-B⁎56:01 (P = 1.78 × 10−4, OR = 4.927 alleles were significantly increased in autistic subjects compared with normal subjects. Moreover, we found that the HLA-B⁎18:02 (P=0.016, OR = 0.375 and HLA-B⁎46:12 (P=0.008, OR = 0.147 alleles were negatively associated with autism when compared to normal controls. Both alleles might have a protective role in disease development. In addition, four HLA-B genotypes of autistic patients had statistically significant relationship with control groups, consisting of HLA-B⁎3905/⁎5801 (P=0.032, OR = 24.697, HLA-B⁎2704/⁎5801 (P=0.022, OR = 6.872, HLA-B⁎3501/⁎4403 (P=0.021, OR = 30.269, and HLA-B⁎1801/⁎4402 (P = 0.017, OR = 13.757. This is the first report on HLA-B associated with Thai autism and may serve as a marker for genetic susceptibility to autism in Thai population.

  7. A common allele on chromosome 9 associated with coronary heartdisease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McPherson, Ruth; Pertsemlidis, Alexander; Kavaslar, Nihan; Stewart, Alexandre; Roberts, Robert; Cox, David R.; Hinds, David; Pennachio, Len; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Folsom, Aaron R.; Boerwinkle,Eric; Hobbs, Helen H.; Cohen, Jonathan C.

    2007-03-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major cause of death in Western countries. Here we used genome-wide association scanning to identify a 58 kb interval on chromosome 9 that was consistently associated with CHD in six independent samples. The interval contains no annotated genes and is not associated with established CHD risk factors such as plasma lipoproteins, hypertension or diabetes. Homozygotes for the risk allele comprise 20-25% of Caucasians and have a {approx}30-40% increased risk of CHD. These data indicate that the susceptibility allele acts through a novel mechanism to increase CHD risk in a large fraction of the population.

  8. Association of allelic variation in genes mediating aspects of energy homeostasis with weight gain during administration of antipsychotic drugs (CATIE Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant K Tiwari

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Antipsychotic drugs are widely used in treating schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and other psychiatric disorders. Many of these drugs, despite their therapeutic advantages, substantially increase body weight. We assessed the association of alleles of 31 genes implicated in body weight regulation with weight gain among patients being treated with specific antipsychotic medications in the CATIE trial, we found that rs2237988 in ATP-binding cassette subfamily C member 8 (ABCC8 , and rs11643744 and rs9922047 in Fat Mass and Obesity Associated (FTO were associated with such weight gain.

  9. Estimation of allele frequency and association mapping using next-generation sequencing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Su Yeon; Lohmueller, Kirk E; Albrechtsen, Anders;

    2011-01-01

    Estimation of allele frequency is of fundamental importance in population genetic analyses and in association mapping. In most studies using next-generation sequencing, a cost effective approach is to use medium or low-coverage data (e.g., <15X). However, SNP calling and allele frequency estimati...... in such studies is associated with substantial statistical uncertainty because of varying coverage and high error rates....

  10. Filaggrin null alleles are not associated with hand eczema or contact allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørkov, Anne Lerbæk; Bisgaard, H; Agner, T;

    2007-01-01

    association with hand eczema or contact allergy are unexplored. OBJECTIVES: To explore associations between the variant alleles, hand eczema, contact allergy and atopic dermatitis. METHODS: In total, 183 adult individuals participated in a clinical examination of the hands, patch testing and filaggrin...... genotyping. Children without any evidence of atopic dermatitis from the Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC) study were used as controls. The chi(2) test was used for comparison of allele frequencies. RESULTS: The majority (73%) had hand eczema, 25% had contact allergy and 14% had...... a diagnosis of atopic dermatitis. The association between atopic dermatitis and the filaggrin variant alleles was confirmed (odds ratio 3.5, P = 0.015). Allele frequencies in individuals with hand eczema or contact allergy were not statistically significantly increased. CONCLUSION: There is no association...

  11. A platform for interrogating cancer-associated p53 alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Brot, A; Kurtz, P; Regan, E; Jakubowski, B; Abrams, J M

    2017-01-12

    p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancer. Compelling evidence argues that full transformation involves loss of growth suppression encoded by wild-type p53 together with poorly understood oncogenic activity encoded by missense mutations. Furthermore, distinguishing disease alleles from natural polymorphisms is an important clinical challenge. To interrogate the genetic activity of human p53 variants, we leveraged the Drosophila model as an in vivo platform. We engineered strains that replace the fly p53 gene with human alleles, producing a collection of stocks that are, in effect, 'humanized' for p53 variants. Like the fly counterpart, human p53 transcriptionally activated a biosensor and induced apoptosis after DNA damage. However, all humanized strains representing common alleles found in cancer patients failed to complement in these assays. Surprisingly, stimulus-dependent activation of hp53 occurred without stabilization, demonstrating that these two processes can be uncoupled. Like its fly counterpart, hp53 formed prominent nuclear foci in germline cells but cancer-associated p53 variants did not. Moreover, these same mutant alleles disrupted hp53 foci and inhibited biosensor activity, suggesting that these properties are functionally linked. Together these findings establish a functional platform for interrogating human p53 alleles and suggest that simple phenotypes could be used to stratify disease variants.

  12. Reintroduction of a Homocysteine Level-Associated Allele into East Asians by Neanderthal Introgression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ya; Ding, Qiliang; He, Yungang; Xu, Shuhua; Jin, Li

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we present an analysis of Neanderthal introgression at the dipeptidase 1 gene, DPEP1. A Neanderthal origin for the putative introgressive haplotypes was demonstrated using an established three-step approach. This introgression was under positive natural selection, reached a frequency of >50%, and introduced a homocysteine level- and pigmentation-associated allele (rs460879-T) into East Asians. However, the same allele was also found in non-East Asians, but not from Neanderthal introgression. It is likely that rs460879-T was lost in East Asians and was reintroduced subsequently through Neanderthal introgression. Our findings suggest that Neanderthal introgression could reintroduce an important previously existing allele into populations where the allele had been lost. This study sheds new light on understanding the contribution of Neanderthal introgression to the adaptation of non-Africans.

  13. Multiple origins of Plasmodium falciparum dihydropteroate synthetase mutant alleles associated with sulfadoxine resistance in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumb, Vanshika; Das, Manoj K; Singh, Neeru; Dev, Vas; Khan, Wajihullah; Sharma, Yagya D

    2011-06-01

    With the spread of chloroquine (CQ)-resistant malaria in India, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) alone or in combination with artesunate is used as an alternative antimalarial drug. Due to continuous drug pressure, the Plasmodium falciparum parasite is exhibiting resistance to antifolates because of mutations in candidate genes dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) and dihydropteroate synthetase (dhps). Our earlier study on flanking microsatellite markers of dhfr mutant alleles from India had shown a single origin of the pyrimethamine resistance and some minor haplotypes which shared haplotypes with Southeast Asian (Thailand) strains. In the present study, we have analyzed 193 of these Indian P. falciparum isolates for 15 microsatellite loci around dhps to investigate the genetic lineages of the mutant dhps alleles in different parts of the country. Eighty-one of these samples had mutant dhps alleles, of which 62 were from Andaman and Nicobar Islands and the remaining 19 were from mainland India. Of 112 isolates with a wild-type dhps allele, 109 were from mainland India and only 3 were from Andaman and Nicobar Islands. Consistent with the model of selection, the mean expected heterozygosity (H(e)) around mutant dhps alleles (H(e) = 0.55; n = 81) associated with sulfadoxine resistance was lower (P ≤ 0.05) than the mean H(e) around the wild-type dhps allele (H(e) = 0.80; n = 112). There was more genetic diversity in flanking microsatellites of dhps than dhfr among these isolates, which confirms the assertion that dhps mutations are at a very early stage of fixation in the parasite population. Microsatellite haplotypes around various mutant dhps alleles suggest that the resistant dhps alleles have multiple independent origins in India, especially in Andaman and Nicobar Islands. Determining the genetic lineages of the resistant dhps alleles on Andaman and Nicobar Islands and mainland India is significant, given the role of Asia in the intercontinental spread of chloroquine

  14. Narcolepsy-Associated HLA Class I Alleles Implicate Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tafti, M.; Lammers, G.J.; Dauvilliers, Y.; Overeem, S.; Mayer, G.; Nowak, J.; Pfister, C.; Dubois, V.; Eliaou, J.F.; Eberhard, H.P.; Liblau, R.; Wierzbicka, A.; Geisler, P.; Bassetti, C.L.; Mathis, J.; Lecendreux, M.; Khatami, R.; Heinzer, R.; Haba-Rubio, J.; Feketeova, E.; Baumann, C.R.; Kutalik, Z.; Tiercy, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: Narcolepsy with cataplexy is tightly associated with the HLA class II allele DQB1*06:02. Evidence indicates a complex contribution of HLA class II genes to narcolepsy susceptibility with a recent independent association with HLA-DPB1. The cause of narcolepsy is supposed be an autoi

  15. Tumor transcriptome sequencing reveals allelic expression imbalances associated with copy number alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuch, Brian B; Laborde, Rebecca R; Xu, Xing; Gu, Jian; Chung, Christina B; Monighetti, Cinna K; Stanley, Sarah J; Olsen, Kerry D; Kasperbauer, Jan L; Moore, Eric J; Broomer, Adam J; Tan, Ruoying; Brzoska, Pius M; Muller, Matthew W; Siddiqui, Asim S; Asmann, Yan W; Sun, Yongming; Kuersten, Scott; Barker, Melissa A; De La Vega, Francisco M; Smith, David I

    2010-02-19

    Due to growing throughput and shrinking cost, massively parallel sequencing is rapidly becoming an attractive alternative to microarrays for the genome-wide study of gene expression and copy number alterations in primary tumors. The sequencing of transcripts (RNA-Seq) should offer several advantages over microarray-based methods, including the ability to detect somatic mutations and accurately measure allele-specific expression. To investigate these advantages we have applied a novel, strand-specific RNA-Seq method to tumors and matched normal tissue from three patients with oral squamous cell carcinomas. Additionally, to better understand the genomic determinants of the gene expression changes observed, we have sequenced the tumor and normal genomes of one of these patients. We demonstrate here that our RNA-Seq method accurately measures allelic imbalance and that measurement on the genome-wide scale yields novel insights into cancer etiology. As expected, the set of genes differentially expressed in the tumors is enriched for cell adhesion and differentiation functions, but, unexpectedly, the set of allelically imbalanced genes is also enriched for these same cancer-related functions. By comparing the transcriptomic perturbations observed in one patient to his underlying normal and tumor genomes, we find that allelic imbalance in the tumor is associated with copy number mutations and that copy number mutations are, in turn, strongly associated with changes in transcript abundance. These results support a model in which allele-specific deletions and duplications drive allele-specific changes in gene expression in the developing tumor.

  16. Estimation of allele frequency and association mapping using next-generation sequencing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersen Gitte

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estimation of allele frequency is of fundamental importance in population genetic analyses and in association mapping. In most studies using next-generation sequencing, a cost effective approach is to use medium or low-coverage data (e.g., X. However, SNP calling and allele frequency estimation in such studies is associated with substantial statistical uncertainty because of varying coverage and high error rates. Results We evaluate a new maximum likelihood method for estimating allele frequencies in low and medium coverage next-generation sequencing data. The method is based on integrating over uncertainty in the data for each individual rather than first calling genotypes. This method can be applied to directly test for associations in case/control studies. We use simulations to compare the likelihood method to methods based on genotype calling, and show that the likelihood method outperforms the genotype calling methods in terms of: (1 accuracy of allele frequency estimation, (2 accuracy of the estimation of the distribution of allele frequencies across neutrally evolving sites, and (3 statistical power in association mapping studies. Using real re-sequencing data from 200 individuals obtained from an exon-capture experiment, we show that the patterns observed in the simulations are also found in real data. Conclusions Overall, our results suggest that association mapping and estimation of allele frequencies should not be based on genotype calling in low to medium coverage data. Furthermore, if genotype calling methods are used, it is usually better not to filter genotypes based on the call confidence score.

  17. Mannose-binding lectin variant alleles and HLA-DR4 alleles are associated with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Soren; Baslund, Bo; Madsen, Hans O.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether variant alleles of the mannose-binding lectin (MBL) gene causing low serum concentrations of MBL and/or polymorphisms of HLA-DRB1 are associated with increased susceptibility to polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) and giant cell arteritis (GCA) or particular clinical...... phenotypes of PMR/GCA. METHODS: MBL and HLA-DRB1 alleles were determined by polymerase chain reaction in 102 Danish patients with PMR (n = 37) or GCA (n = 65). Two hundred fifty and 193 healthy individuals served as controls for MBL and HLA genotyping, respectively. RESULTS: The prevalence of MBL variant...... alleles in controls, patients with PMR only, and patients with GCA was 37, 32, and 53% (p = 0.01), respectively. HLA-DRB1*04 was found in 47% of patients with PMR only and in 54% of patients with GCA, which differed significantly from the 35% found in controls (p = 0.01). HLA-DR4 alleles were...

  18. Allelic variation in a willow warbler genomic region is associated with climate clines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith W Larson

    Full Text Available Local adaptation is an important process contributing to population differentiation which can occur in continuous or isolated populations connected by various amounts of gene flow. The willow warbler (Phylloscopus trochilus is one of the most common songbirds in Fennoscandia. It has a continuous breeding distribution where it is found in all forested habitats from sea level to the tree line and therefore constitutes an ideal species for the study of locally adapted genes associated with environmental gradients. Previous studies in this species identified a genetic marker (AFLP-WW1 that showed a steep north-south cline in central Sweden with one allele associated with coastal lowland habitats and the other with mountainous habitats. It was further demonstrated that this marker is embedded in a highly differentiated chromosome region that spans several megabases. In the present study, we sampled 2,355 individuals at 128 sites across all of Fennoscandia to study the geographic and climatic variables associated with the allele frequency distributions of WW1. Our results demonstrate that 1 allele frequency patterns significantly differ between mountain and lowland populations, 2 these allele differences coincide with extreme temperature conditions and the short growing season in the mountains, and milder conditions in coastal areas, and 3 the northern-allele or "altitude variant" of WW1 occurs in willow warblers that occupy mountainous habitat regardless of subspecies. Finally these results suggest that climate may exert selection on the genomic region associated with these alleles and would allow us to develop testable predictions for the distribution of the genetic marker based on climate change scenarios.

  19. Association of HLA class II alleles and CTLA-4 polymorphism with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana J EI Wafai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is a progressive complex autoimmune disease in which combinations of environmental as well as genetic factors contribute to T-cell mediated destruction of insulin-secreting β-cells of the pancreas. HLA class II alleles on chromosome 6p21 [insulin dependent diabetes mellitus 1 (IDDM1], especially DR and DQ, show strong association with T1DM. In addition, several studies have suggested that polymorphisms in the CTLA-4 gene (IDDM12 on chromosome 2q33 form part of the genetic susceptibility for type 1 diabetes. The aim of this study was to analyze HLA alleles of the DQB1 and DRB1 genes using polymerase chain reaction using sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP technique and to investigate the asso-ciation of the A49G CTLA-4 polymorphism using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP analysis in Lebanese T1DM patients. The study was conduc-ted on 39 Lebanese T1DM patients. Results of HLA typing showed an increased frequency of the HLA-DQB1FNx010201, HLA-DQB1FNx010302, HLA-DRB1FNx010301 and HLA-DRB1FNx010401 alleles, sugges-ting risk association and thus can be considered as susceptibility alleles. On the other hand, strong protection against the disease was conferred by the HLA-DRB1FNx01110101, HLA-DQB1FNx010301 and HLADQB1FNx010601 alleles. RFLP analysis of the A49G polymorphism showed a significant increase in the G allele and GG genotype frequencies in patients, suggesting that CTLA-4 may be considered as a susceptibility gene for the development of T1DM in the Lebanese population. Analysis of the two polymorphisms showed no detectable association between the two genes. However, a significant negative association of the G allele with the DQB1FNx010201 allele was ob-served. This might indicate that the two genetic risk factors, namely HLA and CTLA-4, act independently of each other with no additive effect.

  20. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Adoue, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The associations were evaluated with overall breast cancer risk and with estrogen receptor negative and positive disease. One novel breast cancer susceptibility locus on 4q21 (rs11099601) was identified (OR = 1.05, P = 5.6x10-6). rs11099601 lies in a 135 kb linkage...... candidates for further investigation as disease-causing variants. To investigate whether common variants associated with differential allelic expression were involved in breast cancer susceptibility, a list of genes was established on the basis of their involvement in cancer related pathways and....../or mechanisms. Thereafter, using data from a genome-wide map of allelic expression associated SNPs, 313 genetic variants were selected and their association with breast cancer risk was then evaluated in 46,451 breast cancer cases and 42,599 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 41 studies participating...

  1. Mannose-binding lectin variant alleles and HLA-DR4 alleles are associated with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Soren; Baslund, Bo; Madsen, Hans Ole

    2002-01-01

    To determine whether variant alleles of the mannose-binding lectin (MBL) gene causing low serum concentrations of MBL and/or polymorphisms of HLA-DRB1 are associated with increased susceptibility to polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) and giant cell arteritis (GCA) or particular clinical phenotypes of PMR/GCA....

  2. Association of gliadin antibodies, HLA alleles, and schizophrenia in Cuban population patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Galván

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several lines of evidence have suggested an interesting link between gluten ingestion and schizophrenia. For example, increased levels of gliadin and transglutaminase antibodies have been observed in patients with schizophrenia. Methods: To verify these observations we compared the prevalence of gliadin and transglutaminse antibodies, as well as the presence of the HLA alleles, HLA DQA1*0501-DQB1*02 (DQ2 and HLA-DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302 (DQ8, among patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. A total of 108 patients with schizophrenia and 60 healthy controls were evaluated. Gliadin antibodies were determined by a visual semiquantitative assay and tissue transglutaminase antibodies were determined both by one-step immunochromatografic assay and ELISA. HLA typing was performed by PCR amplification using sequence-specific primers for each allele. Results: We found a strong association between the presence of gliadin antibodies and schizophrenia (OR 3.488; 95% CI, 1.43-8.44. However, tissue transglutaminase antibodies were not detected in either group neither by immunochromatograpic or ELISA. No significant association was found for the DQ2 or DQ8 heterodimer and the disease, but a significant positive association between schizophrenia and HLA alleles DQA1*0301 and DQB1*02 was present (OR = 2.80; 95% CI, 1.27-6.17, and OR = 2.37, 95% CI, 1.24-4.53, respectively. Conclusions: The present study showed that the presence of gliadin antibodies was not correlated with the presence of HLA DQA1*0301 or DQB1*02 alleles within the group of patients with schizophrenia. Our study replicates the findings that anti-gliadin antibodies are associated with schizophrenia but also suggests that the presence of these antibodies and the HLA alleles DQB1*02 and DQA1*0301 are independently associated with susceptibility to schizophrenia.

  3. Allelic diversity associated with aridity gradient in wild emmer wheat populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Zvi; Saranga, Yehoshua; Krugman, Tamar; Abbo, Shahal; Nevo, Eviatar; Fahima, Tzion

    2008-01-01

    The association between allelic diversity and ecogeographical variables was studied in natural populations of wild emmer wheat [Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides (Körn.) Thell.], the tetraploid progenitor of cultivated wheat. Patterns of allelic diversity in 54 microsatellite loci were analyzed in a collection of 145 wild emmer wheat accessions representing 25 populations that were sampled across naturally occurring aridity gradient in Israel and surrounding regions. The obtained results revealed that 56% of the genetic variation resided among accessions within populations, while only 44% of the variation resided between populations. An unweighted pair-group method analysis (UPGMA) tree constructed based on the microsatellite allelic diversity divided the 25 populations into six major groups. Several groups were comprised of populations that were collected in ecologically similar but geographically remote habitats. Furthermore, genetic differentiation between populations was independent of the geographical distances. An interesting evolutionary phenomenon is highlighted by the unimodal relationship between allelic diversity and annual rainfall (r = 0.74, P < 0.0002), indicating higher allelic diversity in populations originated from habitats with intermediate environmental stress (i.e. rainfall 350-550 mm year(-1)). These results show for the first time that the 'intermediate-disturbance hypothesis', explaining biological diversity at the ecosystem level, also dominates the genetic diversity within a single species, the lowest hierarchical element of the biological diversity.

  4. Tumor transcriptome sequencing reveals allelic expression imbalances associated with copy number alterations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian B Tuch

    Full Text Available Due to growing throughput and shrinking cost, massively parallel sequencing is rapidly becoming an attractive alternative to microarrays for the genome-wide study of gene expression and copy number alterations in primary tumors. The sequencing of transcripts (RNA-Seq should offer several advantages over microarray-based methods, including the ability to detect somatic mutations and accurately measure allele-specific expression. To investigate these advantages we have applied a novel, strand-specific RNA-Seq method to tumors and matched normal tissue from three patients with oral squamous cell carcinomas. Additionally, to better understand the genomic determinants of the gene expression changes observed, we have sequenced the tumor and normal genomes of one of these patients. We demonstrate here that our RNA-Seq method accurately measures allelic imbalance and that measurement on the genome-wide scale yields novel insights into cancer etiology. As expected, the set of genes differentially expressed in the tumors is enriched for cell adhesion and differentiation functions, but, unexpectedly, the set of allelically imbalanced genes is also enriched for these same cancer-related functions. By comparing the transcriptomic perturbations observed in one patient to his underlying normal and tumor genomes, we find that allelic imbalance in the tumor is associated with copy number mutations and that copy number mutations are, in turn, strongly associated with changes in transcript abundance. These results support a model in which allele-specific deletions and duplications drive allele-specific changes in gene expression in the developing tumor.

  5. Evaluation of a DLA-79 allele associated with multiple immune-mediated diseases in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedenberg, Steven G; Buhrman, Greg; Chdid, Lhoucine; Olby, Natasha J; Olivry, Thierry; Guillaumin, Julien; O'Toole, Theresa; Goggs, Robert; Kennedy, Lorna J; Rose, Robert B; Meurs, Kathryn M

    2016-03-01

    Immune-mediated diseases are common and life-threatening disorders in dogs. Many canine immune-mediated diseases have strong breed predispositions and are believed to be inherited. However, the genetic mutations that cause these diseases are mostly unknown. As many immune-mediated diseases in humans share polymorphisms among a common set of genes, we conducted a candidate gene study of 15 of these genes across four immune-mediated diseases (immune-mediated hemolytic anemia, immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, immune-mediated polyarthritis (IMPA), and atopic dermatitis) in 195 affected and 206 unaffected dogs to assess whether causative or predictive polymorphisms might exist in similar genes in dogs. We demonstrate a strong association (Fisher's exact p = 0.0004 for allelic association, p = 0.0035 for genotypic association) between two polymorphic positions (10 bp apart) in exon 2 of one allele in DLA-79, DLA-79*001:02, and multiple immune-mediated diseases. The frequency of this allele was significantly higher in dogs with immune-mediated disease than in control dogs (0.21 vs. 0.12) and ranged from 0.28 in dogs with IMPA to 0.15 in dogs with atopic dermatitis. This allele has two non-synonymous substitutions (compared with the reference allele, DLA-79*001:01), resulting in F33L and N37D amino acid changes. These mutations occur in the peptide-binding pocket of the protein, and based upon our computational modeling studies, are likely to affect critical interactions with the peptide N-terminus. Further studies are warranted to confirm these findings more broadly and to determine the specific mechanism by which the identified variants alter canine immune system function.

  6. Allelic variants of DYX1C1 are not associated with dyslexia in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saviour Pushpa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Dyslexia is a hereditary neurological disorder that manifests as an unexpected difficulty in learning to read despite adequate intelligence, education, and normal senses. The prevalence of dyslexia ranges from 3 to 15% of the school aged children. Many genetic studies indicated that loci on 6p21.3, 15q15-21, and 18p11.2 have been identified as promising candidate gene regions for dyslexia. Recently, it has been suggested that allelic variants of gene, DYX1C1 influence dyslexia. In the present study, exon 2 and 10 of DYX1C1 has been analyzed to verify whether these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs influence dyslexia, in our population. Our study identified 4 SNPs however, none of these SNPS were found to be significantly associated with dyslexia suggesting DYX1C1 allelic variants are not associated with dyslexia.

  7. Association analysis of fiber quality traits and exploration of elite alleles in Upland cotton cultivars/accessions (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Caiping; Ye, Wenxue; Zhang, Tianzhen; Guo, Wangzhen

    2014-01-01

    Exploring the elite alleles and germplasm accessions related to fiber quality traits will accelerate the breeding of cotton for fiber quality improvement. In this study, 99 Gossypium hirsutum L. accessions with diverse origins were used to perform association analysis of fiber quality traits using 97 polymorphic microsatellite marker primer pairs. A total of 107 significant marker-trait associations were detected for three fiber quality traits under three different environments, with 70 detected in two or three environments and 37 detected in only one environment. Among the 70 significant marker-trait associations, 52.86% were reported previously, implying that these are stable loci for target traits. Furthermore, we detected a large number of elite alleles associated simultaneously with two or three traits. These elite alleles were mainly from accessions collected in China, introduced to China from the United States, or rare alleles with a frequency of less than 5%. No one cultivar contained more than half of the elite alleles, but 10 accessions were collected from China and the two introduced from the United States did contain more than half of these alleles. Therefore, there is great potential for mining elite alleles from germplasm accessions for use in fiber quality improvement in modern cotton breeding.

  8. Association of the Apolipoprotein E 2 Allele with Concurrent Occurrence of Endometrial Hyperplasia and Endometrial Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana I. Ivanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Genes encoding proteins with antioxidant properties may influence susceptibility to endometrial hyperplasia (EH and endometrial carcinoma (ECa. Patients with EH (n = 89, EH concurrent with ECa (n = 76, ECa (n = 186, and healthy controls (n = 1110 were genotyped for five polymorphic variants in the genes involved in metabolism of lipoproteins (APOE Cys112Arg and Arg158Cys, iron (HFE Cys282Tyr and His63Asp, and catecholamines (COMT Val158Met. Patients and controls were matched by ethnicity (all Caucasians, age, body mass index (BMI, and incidence of hypertension and diabetes. The frequency of the APOE E 2 allele (158Cys was higher in patients with EH + ECa than in controls (P = 0.0012, PBonferroni = 0.018, OR = 2.58, 95% CI 1.49–4.45. The APOE E 4 allele (112Arg was more frequently found in patients with EH than in controls and HFE minor allele G (63Asp had a protective effect in the ECa group, though these results appeared to be nonsignificant after correction for multiple comparisons. The results of the study indicate that E 2 allele might be associated with concurrent occurrence of EH and ECa.

  9. No association between MspI allele of the ADRA2A polymorphism and ADHD: meta-analysis of family-based studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiffrin, Nina D; Gruber, June; Glatt, Stephen J; Faraone, Stephen V

    2013-08-01

    There is evidence for a genetic contribution to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), although no candidate genes have attained genome-wide significance to date. Given that the noradrenergic system has been implicated in ADHD, the gene for the α2-adrenergic receptor (ADRA2A) has been hypothesized to contribute to the pathogenesis of ADHD. The present investigation reports results from a meta-analysis of family-based studies that did not find a significant association between the MspI polymorphism of the ADRA2A gene and ADHD.

  10. Comprehensive genotyping in two homogeneous Graves' disease samples reveals major and novel HLA association alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Lung Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Graves' disease (GD is the leading cause of hyperthyroidism and thyroid eye disease inherited as a complex trait. Although geoepidemiology studies showed relatively higher prevalence of GD in Asians than in Caucasians, previous genetic studies were contradictory concerning whether and/or which human leukocyte antigen (HLA alleles are associated with GD in Asians. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a case-control association study (499 unrelated GD cases and 504 controls and a replication in an independent family sample (419 GD individuals and their 282 relatives in 165 families. To minimize genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity, we included only ethnic Chinese Han population in Taiwan and excluded subjects with hypothyroidism. We performed direct and comprehensive genotyping of six classical HLA loci (HLA-A, -B, -C, -DPB1, -DQB1 and -DRB1 to 4-digit resolution. Combining the data of two sample populations, we found that B*46:01 (odds ratio under dominant model [OR]  = 1.33, Bonferroni corrected combined P [P(Bc]  = 1.17 x 10⁻², DPB1*05:01 (OR  = 2.34, P(Bc = 2.58 x 10⁻¹⁰, DQB1*03:02 (OR  = 0.62, P(Bc  = 1.97 x 10⁻², DRB1*15:01 (OR  = 1.68, P(Bc = 1.22 x 10⁻² and DRB1*16:02 (OR  = 2.63, P(Bc  = 1.46 x 10⁻⁵ were associated with GD. HLA-DPB1*05:01 is the major gene of GD in our population and singly accounts for 48.4% of population-attributable risk. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These GD-associated alleles we identified in ethnic Chinese Hans, and those identified in other Asian studies, are totally distinct from the known associated alleles in Caucasians. Identification of population-specific association alleles is the critical first step for individualized medicine. Furthermore, comparison between different susceptibility/protective alleles across populations could facilitate generation of novel hypothesis about GD pathophysiology and indicate a new direction for future

  11. Molecular analysis of chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance-associated alleles in Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Nicaragua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridaran, Sankar; Rodriguez, Betzabe; Soto, Aida Mercedes; Macedo De Oliveira, Alexandre; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2014-05-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is used as a first-line therapy for the treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Nicaragua. We investigated the prevalence of molecular markers associated with CQ and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) resistance in P. falciparum isolates obtained from the North Atlantic Autonomous Region of Nicaragua. Blood spots for this study were made available from a CQ and SP drug efficacy trial conducted in 2005 and also from a surveillance study performed in 2011. Polymorphisms in P. falciparum CQ resistance transporter, dihydrofolate reductase, and dihydropteroate synthase gene loci that are associated with resistance to CQ, pyrimethamine, and sulfadoxine, respectively, were detected by DNA sequencing. In the 2005 dataset, only 2 of 53 isolates had a CQ resistance allele (CVIET), 2 of 52 had a pyrimethamine resistance allele, and 1 of 49 had a sulfadoxine resistance allele. In the 2011 dataset, none of 45 isolates analyzed had CQ or SP resistance alleles.

  12. HLA-A and HLA-B alleles associated in psoriasis patients from Mumbai, Western India

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    Shankarkumar Umapathy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psoriasis, a common autoimmune disorder characterized by T cell-mediated keratinocyte hyperproliferation, is known to be associated with the presence of certain specific Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA alleles. Aim: To evaluate distribution of HLA-A and HLA-B alleles and hence identify the susceptible allele of psoriasis from patients in Western India. Materials and Methods: The study design included 84 psoriasis patients and 291 normal individuals as controls from same geographical region. HLA-A and HLA-B typing was done using Serology typing. Standard statistical analysis was followed to identify the odds ratio (OR, allele frequencies, and significant P value using Graphpad software. Results: The study revealed significant increase in frequencies of HLA-A2 (OR-3.976, P<0.0001, B8 (OR-5.647, P<0.0001, B17 (OR-5.452, P<0.0001, and B44 (OR-50.460, P<0.0001, when compared with controls. Furthermore, the frequencies of HLA-A28 (OR-0.074, P=0.0024, B5 (OR-0.059, P<0.0001, B12 (OR-0.051, P=0.0002, and B15 (OR-0.237, P=0.0230 were significantly decreased in psoriasis patients. Conclusion: This study shows the strong association of HLA-A2, B8, and B17 antigens with psoriasis conferring susceptibility to psoriasis patients from Western India, while the antigens HLA-A28, B5, and B12 show strong negative association with the disease.

  13. Association of low-activity MAOA allelic variants with violent crime in incarcerated offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetler, Dean A; Davis, Chad; Leavitt, Kathryn; Schriger, Ilana; Benson, Katie; Bhakta, Samir; Wang, Lam Chee; Oben, Cynthia; Watters, Matthew; Haghnegahdar, Tara; Bortolato, Marco

    2014-11-01

    The main enzyme for serotonin degradation, monoamine oxidase (MAO) A, has recently emerged as a key biological factor in the predisposition to impulsive aggression. Male carriers of low-activity variants of the main functional polymorphism of the MAOA gene (MAOA-uVNTR) have been shown to exhibit a greater proclivity to engage in violent acts. Thus, we hypothesized that low-activity MAOA-uVNTR alleles may be associated with a higher risk for criminal violence among male offenders. To test this possibility, we analyzed the MAOA-uVNTR variants of violent (n = 49) and non-violent (n = 40) male Caucasian and African-American convicts in a correctional facility. All participants were also tested with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS-11) and Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (BPAQ) to assess their levels of childhood trauma exposure, impulsivity and aggression, respectively. Our results revealed a robust (P crime. This association was replicated in the group of Caucasian violent offenders (P crime charges were not associated with CTQ, BIS-11 and BPAQ scores, carriers of low-activity alleles exhibited a mild, yet significant (P genetic determinant for criminal violence. Further studies are required to confirm these results in larger samples of inmates and evaluate potential interactions between MAOA alleles and environmental vulnerability factors.

  14. Association of HLA-DRB1 alleles and neuropsychological function in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Yi-Ling; Wu, Yu-Yu; Chen, Chia-Hsiang; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Huang, Yu-Shu; Chien, Wei-Hsien; Hu, Fu-Chang; Chao, Yu-Lin

    2012-02-01

    Evidence suggests an association between autism and immune dysfunction. The associations between human lymphocyte antigen (HLA)-A2, B44, DRβ1*04 (DR4), C4B, and haplotype B44-SC30-DR4 and autism have been reported in western countries but there is a lack of such information in Asian population. This study aimed to assess the association between HLA-DRB1 allele frequencies and the clinical phenomenology of autism. The sample included 141 participants (male, 87.2%), who were diagnosed with autistic disorder based on clinical assessments and structured interviews using the Chinese version of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised, and 156 healthy controls (male, 38.6%). The HLA-DRB1 alleles were determined by sequencing-based typing method. A subsample of patients (n=39) were assessed for intelligence and neuropsychological functions. The results showed that the pattern of DRB1 allele frequencies was significantly different between patients with autism and the controls (P=0.047). After adjusting for sex by haplotype regression, the frequencies of DR4, DR11, and DR14 were significantly different between patients with autism and healthy controls. In addition, patients with autism and DR4, DR11, or DR14 had different performance on intelligence and neuropsychology tests. Despite a relatively small sample size and a case-control association design, the findings suggest HLA-DRB1 gene might be associated with autism in Han Chinese. The true functional variants associated with autism in our samples remain to be further clarified. It warrants a replication study of a larger family sample and to validate the HLA genetic association with autism and its influence on neuropsychological function.

  15. Association between the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele and late onset of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, H.B.; Timm, S.; Wang, A.G.;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The 32-bp deletion allele in chemokine receptor CCR5 has been associated with several immune-mediated diseases and might be implicated in schizophrenia as well. METHOD: The authors genotyped DNA samples from 268 schizophrenia patients and 323 healthy subjects. Age at first admission...... of the deletion allele in the latter subgroup of patients. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele is a susceptibility factor for schizophrenia with late onset. Alternatively, the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele may act as a modifier by delaying the onset of schizophrenia without...

  16. Association between the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele and late onset of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Timm, Sally; Wang, August G;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The 32-bp deletion allele in chemokine receptor CCR5 has been associated with several immune-mediated diseases and might be implicated in schizophrenia as well. METHOD: The authors genotyped DNA samples from 268 schizophrenia patients and 323 healthy subjects. Age at first admission......-onset schizophrenia) and healthy subjects differed significantly. This was reflected in an increased frequency of the deletion allele in the patient subgroup. Patients with ages at first admission below and above 40 years significantly differed in distribution of genotypes and alleles, with an overrepresentation...... of the deletion allele in the latter subgroup of patients. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele is a susceptibility factor for schizophrenia with late onset. Alternatively, the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele may act as a modifier by delaying the onset of schizophrenia without...

  17. Association of ABO Blood Group Phenotype and Allele Frequency with Chikungunya Fever

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    Pairaya Rujirojindakul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The objective of this study was to investigate the association of the ABO blood group phenotype and allele frequency with CHIK fever. Methods. A rural community survey in Southern Thailand was conducted in August and September 2010. A total of 506 villagers were enrolled. Cases were defined as individuals having anti-CHIK IgG by hemagglutination ≥1 : 10. Results. There were 314 cases (62.1% with CHIK seropositivity. Females were less likely to have positive anti-CHIK IgG with odds ratio (OR (95% CI of 0.63 (0.43, 0.93. All samples tested were Rh positive. Distribution of CHIK seropositivity versus seronegativity (P value in A, B, AB, and O blood groups was 80 versus 46 (0.003, 80 versus 48 (0.005, 24 versus 20 (0.55, and 130 versus 78 (<0.001, respectively. However, chi-square test between ABO and CHIK infection showed no statistical significance P=0.76. Comparison of the ABO blood group allele frequency between CHIK seropositivity and seronegativity was not statistically significant. Conclusion. This finding demonstrated no association of the ABO blood group phenotypes and allele frequencies with CHIK infection.

  18. Distribution of FMR-1 and associated microsatellite alleles in a normal Chinese population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, N.; Houck, G.E. Jr.; Li, S.; Dobkin, C.; Brown, W.T. [New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, Staten Island, NY (United States); Xixian Liu; Shen Gou [Tongji Medical Univ., Wuhan (China)

    1994-07-15

    The CGG repeat size distribution of the fragile X mental retardation gene (FMR-1) was studied in a population of normal Chinese X chromosomes along with that of two proximal microsatellite polymorphic markers: FRAXAC1 and DXS548. The most common CGG repeat allele was 29 (47.2%) with 30 being second most common (26%). This distribution was different from that seen in Caucasian controls, where the most common allele was 30 repeats. Other differences with Caucasian controls included a secondary model peak at 36 repeats and the absence of peaks at 20 or 23 repeats. There were only two FRAXAC1 and five DXS548 alleles found in the Chinese sample. A striking linkage disequilibrium of FMR-1 alleles with FRAXAC1 alleles was observed, in that 90% of the 29 CGG repeat alleles but only 41% of the 30 CGG repeat alleles had the FRAXAC1 152 bp allele (18 AC repeats). This disequilibrium suggests that slippage between the closely spaced normal CGG repeat alleles, 29 and 30, and between 152 and 154 FRAXAC1 alleles is very rare. This study lays the groundwork for an understanding of founder chromosome effects in comparing Asian and Caucasian populations. 29 refs., 5 tabs.

  19. Genotyping of a tri-allelic polymorphism by a novel melting curve assay in MTHFD1L: an association study of nonsyndromic Cleft in Ireland

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Minguzzi, Stefano

    2012-04-20

    AbstractBackgroundPolymorphisms within the MTHFD1L gene were previously associated with risk of neural tube defects in Ireland. We sought to test the most significant MTHFD1L polymorphisms for an association with risk of cleft in an Irish cohort. This required the development of a new melting curve assay to genotype the technically challenging MTHFD1L triallelic deletion\\/insertion polymorphism (rs3832406).MethodsMelting curve analysis was used to genotype the MTHFD1L triallelic deletion\\/insertion polymorphism (rs3832406) and a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism rs17080476 in an Irish cohort consisting of 981 Irish case-parent trios and 1,008 controls. Tests for association with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate and cleft palate included case\\/control analysis, mother\\/control analysis and Transmission Disequilibrium Tests of case-parent trios.ResultsA successful melting curve genotyping assay was developed for the deletion\\/insertion polymorphism (rs3832406). The TDT analysis initially showed that the rs3832406 polymorphism was associated with isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate. However, corrected p-values indicated that this association was not significant.ConclusionsMelting Curve Analysis can be employed to successfully genotype challenging polymorphisms such as the MTHFD1L triallelic deletion\\/insertion polymorphism (DIP) reported here (rs3832406) and is a viable alternative to capillary electrophoresis. Corrected p-values indicate no association between MTHFD1L and risk of cleft in an Irish cohort.

  20. 164Ile allele in the beta2-Adrenergic receptor gene is associated with risk of elevated blood pressure in women. The Copenhagen City Heart Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sethi, Amar A; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Jensen, Gorm B;

    2005-01-01

    Since beta2-adrenergic receptors are important regulators of blood pressure, genetic variation in this receptor could explain risk of elevated blood pressure in selected individuals. We tested the hypothesis that Gly16Arg, Gln27Glu, and Thr164Ile in the beta2-adrenergic receptor gene associated w...

  1. The SOD2 C47T polymorphism influences NAFLD fibrosis severity: evidence from case-control and intra-familial allele association studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Serri, Ahmad; Anstee, Quentin M; Daly, Ann K; Day, Christopher P.; Dongiovanni, Paola; Fargion, Silvia; Fracanzani, Anna; Leathart, Julian B.S.; Nobili, Valerio; Patch, Julia; Valenti, Luca

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a complex disease trait where genetic variations and environment interact to determine disease progression. The association of PNPLA3 with advanced disease has been consistently demonstrated but many other modifier genes remain unidentified. In NAFLD, increased fatty acid oxidation produces high levels of reactive oxygen species. Manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), encoded by the SOD2 gene, plays an important role in protect...

  2. QTL detection and elite alleles mining for stigma traits in Oryza sativa by association mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing Dang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Stigma traits are very important for hybrid seed production in Oryza sativa, which is a self-pollinated crop; however, the genetic mechanism controlling the traits is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the phenotypic data of 227 accessions across two years and assessed their genotypic variation with 249 simple sequence repeat (SSR markers. By combining phenotypic and genotypic data, a genome-wide association (GWA map was generated. Large phenotypic variations in stigma length (STL, stigma brush-shaped part length (SBPL and stigma non-brush-shaped part length (SNBPL were found. Significant positive correlations were identified among stigma traits. In total, 2,072 alleles were detected among 227 accessions, with an average of 8.3 alleles per SSR locus. GWA mapping detected 6 quantitative trait loci (QTLs for the STL, 2 QTLs for the SBPL and 7 QTLs for the SNBPL. Eleven, 5, and 12 elite alleles were found for the STL, SBPL and SNBPL, respectively. Optimal cross designs were predicted for improving the target traits. The detected genetic variation in stigma traits and QTLs provides helpful information for cloning candidate STL genes and breeding rice cultivars with longer STLs in the future.

  3. Triglyceride associated polymorphisms of the APOA5 gene have very different allele frequencies in Pune, India compared to Europeans

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    Chandak Giriraj R

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The APOA5 gene variants, -1131T>C and S19W, are associated with altered triglyceride concentrations in studies of subjects of Caucasian and East Asian descent. There are few studies of these variants in South Asians. We investigated whether the two APOA5 variants also show similar association with various lipid parameters in Indian population as in the UK white subjects. Methods We genotyped 557 Indian adults from Pune, India, and 237 UK white adults for -1131T>C and S19W variants in the APOA5 gene, compared their allelic and genotype frequency and determined their association with fasting serum triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL and LDL cholesterol levels using univariate general linear analysis. APOC3 SstI polymorphism was also analyzed in 175 Pune Indian subjects for analysis of linkage disequilibrium with the APOA5 variants. Results The APOA5 -1131C allele was more prevalent in Indians from Pune (Pune Indians compared to UK white subjects (allele frequency 20% vs. 4%, p = 0.00001, whereas the 19W allele was less prevalent (3% vs. 6% p = 0.0015. Patterns of linkage disequilibrium between the two variants were similar between the two populations and confirmed that they occur on two different haplotypes. In Pune Indians, the presence of -1131C allele and the 19W allele was associated with a 19% and 15% increase respectively in triglyceride concentrations although only -1131C was significant (p = 0.0003. This effect size was similar to that seen in the UK white subjects. Analysis of the APOC3 SstI polymorphism in 175 Pune Indian subjects showed that this variant is not in appreciable linkage disequilibrium with the APOA5 -1131T>C variant (r2 = 0.07. Conclusion This is the first study to look at the role of APOA5 in Asian Indian subjects that reside in India. The -1131C allele is more prevalent and the 19W allele is less prevalent in Pune Indians compared to UK Caucasians. We confirm that the APOA5 variants are associated

  4. HLA-DRB1 and -DRB3 allele frequencies and haplotypic associations in Koreans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Eun Young; Park, Hyejin; Roh, Eun Youn; Park, Myoung Hee

    2004-03-01

    We have investigated the frequencies of human leukocyte antigen-DRB1 (HLA-DRB1) and -DRB3 alleles and DRB1-DRB3 haplotypic associations in 800 Koreans. DRB1 genotyping was done using polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific oligonucleotide (PCR-SSO) and PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) methods. DRB3 genotyping was done on 447 samples carrying DRB3-associated DRB1 alleles (DRB1*03, *11, *12, *13, and *14) using PCR-SSCP method. The allele frequencies of DRB3*0101, DRB3*0202, and DRB3*0301 were 0.073, 0.136, and 0.120, respectively, and we found one case of a probable new allele (DRB3*01new, 0.001). DRB1-DRB3 haplotypes with frequency (HF) > 0.005 exhibited strong associations between DRB3*0101 and DRB1*1201, *1301, and *1403; between DRB3*0301 and DRB1*1202 and *1302; between DRB3*0202 and DRB1*0301, *1101, *1401, *1405, and *1406 alleles. Most of the DRB1 alleles with frequency > 0.005 were exclusively associated with particular DRB3 alleles with relative linkage disequilibrium values of 1.0, except for DRB1*1201, *1202 and *1301; the rare presence (HF DRB3*0202 associations were observed for these DRB1 alleles. We also investigated and presented rare DRB1-DRB3 associations in additional 6000 Koreans. Comparison with other ethnic groups revealed that DRB1*0301 and *1301 related DRB1-DRB3 haplotypes vary among different populations, in that Koreans and other Asian populations show less diversity compared with Caucasoids or African Americans.

  5. 8q24 Cancer risk allele associated with major metastatic risk in inflammatory breast cancer.

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    François Bertucci

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Association studies have identified low penetrance alleles that participate to the risk of cancer development. The 8q24 chromosomal region contains several such loci involved in various cancers that have been recently studied for their propensity to influence the clinical outcome of prostate cancer. We investigated here two 8q24 breast and colon cancer risk alleles in the close vicinity of the MYC gene for their role in the occurrence of distant metastases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A retrospective series of 449 patients affected with breast or colon adenocarcinoma was genotyped for the rs13281615 and/or rs6983267 SNPs. Statistical analyses were done using the survival package v2.30 in the R software v2.9.1. The two SNPs did not influence the development of distant metastases of colon cancer; rs6983267 showed a mild effect on breast cancer. However, this effect was greatly emphasized when considering inflammatory breast cancer (IBC solely. Replicated on a larger and independent series of IBC the contribution of the genotype to the metastatic risk of IBC was found an independent predictor of outcome (p = 2e-4; OR 8.3, CI95:2.6-33. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study shows first that the monitoring of this specific germline variation may add a substantial tool for IBC prognostication, an aggressive disease that evolves towards distant metastases much more frequently than non-IBC and for which no reliable prognostic factor is available in medical practice. Second, it more generally suggests that risk alleles, while associated with low susceptibility, could correlate with a high risk of metastasis.

  6. The derived allele of ASPM is associated with lexical tone perception.

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    Patrick C M Wong

    Full Text Available The ASPM and MCPH1 genes have been implicated in the adaptive evolution of the human brain [Mekel-Bobrov N. et al., 2005. Ongoing adaptive evolution of ASPM, a brain size determinant in homo sapiens. Science 309; Evans P.D. et al., 2005. Microcephalin, a gene regulating brain size, continues to evolve adaptively in humans. Science 309]. Curiously, experimental attempts have failed to connect the implicated SNPs in these genes with higher-level brain functions. These results stand in contrast with a population-level study linking the population frequency of their alleles with the tendency to use lexical tones in a language [Dediu D., Ladd D.R., 2007. Linguistic tone is related to the population frequency of the adaptive haplogroups of two brain size genes, ASPM and microcephalin. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 104]. In the present study, we found a significant correlation between the load of the derived alleles of ASPM and tone perception in a group of European Americans who did not speak a tone language. Moreover, preliminary results showed a significant correlation between ASPM load and hemodynamic responses to lexical tones in the auditory cortex, and such correlation remained after phonemic awareness, auditory working memory, and non-verbal IQ were controlled. As in previous studies, no significant correlation between ASPM and cognitive measures were found. MCPH1 did not correlate with any measures. These results suggest that the association between the recently derived allele of ASPM is likely to be specific and is tied to higher level brain functions in the temporal cortex related to human communication.

  7. Narcolepsy-Associated HLA Class I Alleles Implicate Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafti, Mehdi; Lammers, Gert J.; Dauvilliers, Yves; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Mayer, Geert; Nowak, Jacek; Pfister, Corinne; Dubois, Valérie; Eliaou, Jean-François; Eberhard, Hans-Peter; Liblau, Roland; Wierzbicka, Aleksandra; Geisler, Peter; Bassetti, Claudio L.; Mathis, Johannes; Lecendreux, Michel; Khatami, Ramin; Heinzer, Raphaël; Haba-Rubio, José; Feketeova, Eva; Baumann, Christian R.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Tiercy, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Narcolepsy with cataplexy is tightly associated with the HLA class II allele DQB1*06:02. Evidence indicates a complex contribution of HLA class II genes to narcolepsy susceptibility with a recent independent association with HLA-DPB1. The cause of narcolepsy is supposed be an autoimmune attack against hypocretin-producing neurons. Despite the strong association with HLA class II, there is no evidence for CD4+ T-cell-mediated mechanism in narcolepsy. Since neurons express class I and not class II molecules, the final effector immune cells involved might include class I-restricted CD8+ T-cells. Methods: HLA class I (A, B, and C) and II (DQB1) genotypes were analyzed in 944 European narcolepsy with cataplexy patients and in 4,043 control subjects matched by country of origin. All patients and controls were DQB1*06:02 positive and class I associations were conditioned on DQB1 alleles. Results: HLA-A*11:01 (OR = 1.49 [1.18–1.87] P = 7.0*10−4), C*04:01 (OR = 1.34 [1.10–1.63] P = 3.23*10−3), and B*35:01 (OR = 1.46 [1.13–1.89] P = 3.64*10−3) were associated with susceptibility to narcolepsy. Analysis of polymorphic class I amino-acids revealed even stronger associations with key antigen-binding residues HLA-A-Tyr9 (OR = 1.32 [1.15–1.52] P = 6.95*10−5) and HLA-C-Ser11 (OR = 1.34 [1.15–1.57] P = 2.43*10−4). Conclusions: Our findings provide a genetic basis for increased susceptibility to infectious factors or an immune cytotoxic mechanism in narcolepsy, potentially targeting hypocretin neurons. Citation: Tafti M, Lammers GJ, Dauvilliers Y, Overeem S, Mayer G, Nowak J, Pfister C, Dubois V, Eliaou JF, Eberhard HP, Liblau R, Wierzbicka A, Geisler P, Bassetti CL, Mathis J, Lecendreux M, Khatami R, Heinzer R, Haba-Rubio J, Feketeova E, Baumann CR, Kutalik Z, Tiercy JM. Narcolepsy-associated HLA class I alleles implicate cell-mediated cytotoxicity. SLEEP 2016;39(3):581–587. PMID:26518595

  8. Association of pancreatic polypeptide with mild cognitive impairment varies by APOE ε4 allele

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    Rosebud O. Roberts

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a preliminary case-control investigation of the association of pancreatic polypeptide (PP with mild cognitive impairment (MCI in 202 MCI cases (mean age, 81.6 years and 202 age- and sex-matched cognitively normal controls in the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging. Plasma PP was measured and examined as the natural logarithm or dichotomized at the median. The OR (95% CI of MCI increased with increasing PP (1.46 [1.04-2.05]. There was a negative interaction of PP with APOE ε4 allele; compared to the reference group (no APOE ε4 allele and low PP, the OR (95% CI for combinations of ε4 and PP were: 2.64 (1.39-5.04 for APOE ε4 plus low PP; 2.09 (1.27-3.45 for no APOE ε4 plus high PP; and 1.91 (1.04-3.53 for no APOE ε4 plus high PP (P for interaction = .017. There was also a trend toward a negative interaction with type 2 diabetes (P for interaction=.058. Compared to no diabetes and low PP, the OR (95% CI was 3.02 (1.22-7.46 for low PP plus diabetes but 1.80 (1.01-3.22 for high PP plus diabetes. Participants with high PP had a greater mean weight loss (kilograms per decade than persons with low PP (-2.26 [4.08] vs. -1.72 (5.28; P=.034. MCI cases had a non-significantly greater weight loss per decade compared to controls. These findings suggest that high PP alone or jointly with APOE e4 allele or type 2 diabetes is associated with MCI, and that high PP may mitigate some effects of APOE e4 allele and type 2 diabetes on cognition. Potential mechanisms may involve PP-related weight loss and centrally mediated effects of PP on cognition. These findings remain to be validated in other studies.

  9. Low frequency of the scrapile resistance-associated allele and presence of lysine-171 allele of the prion protein gene in Italian Biellese ovine breed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acutis, P.L.; Sbaiz, L.; Verburg, F.J.; Riina, M.V.; Ru, G.; Moda, G.; Caramelli, M.; Bossers, A.

    2004-01-01

    Frequencies of polymorphisms at codons 136, 154 and 171 of the prion protein (PrP) gene were studied in 1207 pure-bred and cross-bred Italian Biellese rams, a small ovine breed of about 65 000 head in Italy. Aside from the five most common alleles (VRQ, ARQ, ARR, AHQ and ARH), the rare ARK allele wa

  10. Association of BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles with tick (Boophilus microplus) resistance in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, M L; Machado, M A; Nascimento, C S; Silva, M V G B; Teodoro, R L; Furlong, J; Prata, M C A; Campos, A L; Guimarães, M F M; Azevedo, A L S; Pires, M F A; Verneque, R S

    2006-08-31

    Losses caused by bovine tick burdens in tropical countries have a tremendous economic impact on production systems. Besides reducing production, this parasite can cause death in the most susceptible animals. The use of commercial acaricides has been the major method of control, but their misuse has led to tick resistance to many chemicals. More recently, vaccines have been used in some countries without solving the problem completely. An alternative could be the development of resistant animals and the use of genetic markers and candidate genes that could help with the enormous task of selecting resistant animals. The bovine lymphocyte antigen genes (BoLA) have been shown to be associated with some parasitic infestations and disease incidence. Thus, the objective of the present study was to determine the association of BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles with tick resistance in cattle. The study was conducted on 231 F2 (Gyr x Holstein) animals that were artificially infested with 10,000 tick larvae. Log of tick count +1 was used as the dependent variable in a mixed animal model with allele substitution effects in addition to fixed effects of year and season at tick count, sex of calves, age of animal at tick count, hair type (short-straight, short-curl, long-straight, and long-curl), coat color (white, >75% white, 50- 75% white, and 25-50% white), and additive genetic, permanent environmental and residual effects as random. Females showed fewer ticks than males. Animals with short-straight hair were more resistant to tick infestation than animals with long-curl hair, and animals with whiter coat color also had fewer ticks. An association between BoLA alleles and lower tick number was found for alleles DRB3.2 *18, *20 and *27 at the 5% significance level. Also, one allele (DRB3.2*16) showed an association at the 10% level. Allele *27 was the most frequent in the population (30.7%), followed by alleles *16 (10.8%), *20 (8.7%) and *18 (2.4%). These results suggest that BoLA-DRB3

  11. Type 2 Diabetes Risk Alleles Near BCAR1 and in ANK1 Associate With Decreased ß-Cell Function Whereas Risk Alleles Near ANKRD55 and GRB14 Associate With Decreased Insulin Sensitivity in the Danish Inter99 Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Marie N; Ribel-Madsen, Rasmus; Justesen, Johanne M

    2013-01-01

    insulinogenic (P = .005) and disposition (P = .002) indexes. The G allele of ANKRD55 rs459193 associated with decreased Matsuda index (P = .02) adjusted for waist circumference. The C allele of GRB14 rs13389219 associated with both increased insulinogenic (P = .04) and decreased Matsuda (P = .05) indexes. All...... insulinogenic, disposition, BIGTT, and Matsuda indexes.Results:We confirmed associations of ZMIZ1, KLHDC5, CILP2, HMG20A, ANK1, ANKRD55, and BCAR1 with T2D. The risk T allele of BCAR1 rs7202877 associated with decreased disposition index (P = .02). The C allele of ANK1 rs516946 associated with decreased...

  12. Type 2 Diabetes Risk Alleles Near BCAR1 and in ANK1 Associate With Decreased β-Cell Function Whereas Risk Alleles Near ANKRD55 and GRB14 Associate With Decreased Insulin Sensitivity in the Danish Inter99 Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Marie Neergaard; Ribel-Madsen, Rasmus; Justesen, Johanne Marie

    2013-01-01

    insulinogenic (P = .005) and disposition (P = .002) indexes. The G allele of ANKRD55 rs459193 associated with decreased Matsuda index (P = .02) adjusted for waist circumference. The C allele of GRB14 rs13389219 associated with both increased insulinogenic (P = .04) and decreased Matsuda (P = .05) indexes. All...... insulinogenic, disposition, BIGTT, and Matsuda indexes.Results:We confirmed associations of ZMIZ1, KLHDC5, CILP2, HMG20A, ANK1, ANKRD55, and BCAR1 with T2D. The risk T allele of BCAR1 rs7202877 associated with decreased disposition index (P = .02). The C allele of ANK1 rs516946 associated with decreased...

  13. Association of BoLA-DRB3 alleles with mastitis resistance and susceptibility in Japanese Holstein cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Tatsuyuki; Furuta, Hiroki; Kondo, Yasuko; Mukoyama, Harutaka

    2012-05-01

    In this study, 714 cows from 26 dairy herds were reclassified as healthy or mastitic cows on the basis of long-term somatic cell count (SCC) in milk. Cows with more than three consecutive lactation records of SCC from the first or second to fifth lactation, were selected, and their BoLA-DRB3 (DRB3) alleles were identified using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. Cows with an SCC of 300 000 cells/mL in two consecutive tests or four non-consecutive tests or cows with an SCC of > 500 000 cells/mL in any one test during lactation, regardless of parity, were classified as mastitic (n=201). Mastitic cows (n=153) from another 40 herds were considered to be infected if bacteriological testing revealed mastitis pathogens in milk. Their DRB3 alleles were identified using PCR-sequence-based typing (PCR-SBT). The differences in DRB3 allelic frequencies between healthy cows and cows with various degrees of mastitis were re-investigated. Moreover, the associations of various amino acid motifs in DRB3 alleles with resistance or susceptibility to mastitis pathogens were re-examined. DRB3.2*8(DRB3*1201) and DRB3.2*16(DRB3*1501) alleles were found to be associated with susceptibility, while DRB3.2*22(DRB3*1101), DRB3.2*23(DRB3*2703), and DRB3.2*24(DRB3*0101) alleles were found to be associated with resistance.

  14. HLA Alleles Associated with Slow Progression to AIDS Truly Prefer to Present HIV-1 p24

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghans, J. A.; Molgaard, A.; Boer, R. J. de;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The mechanism behind the association between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules and the rate of HIV-1 disease progression is still poorly understood. Recent data suggest that "protective" HLA molecules, i.e. those associated with a low HIV-1 viral load and relatively slow disease...... and effect, we predicted HIV-1 epitopes from the whole genome of HIV-1, and found that protective HLA alleles have a true preference for the p24 Gag protein, while non-protective HLA alleles preferentially target HIV-1 Nef. In line with this, we found a significant negative correlation between the predicted...... affinity of the best-binding p24 epitopes and the relative hazard of HIV-1 disease progression for a large number of HLA molecules. When the epitopes targeted by protective HLA alleles were mapped to the known p24 structure, we found that mutations in these epitopes are likely to disturb the p24 dimer...

  15. Association of BoLA-DRB3.2 Alleles with BLV Infection Profiles (Persistent Lymphocytosis/Lymphosarcoma) and Lymphocyte Subsets in Iranian Holstein Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikbakht Brujeni, Gholamreza; Ghorbanpour, Reyhaneh; Esmailnejad, Atefeh

    2016-04-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is the best-characterized genetic region associated with resistance and susceptibility to a wide range of diseases. In cattle, the most important example of the relationship between the MHC and infectious diseases has been established by the resistance to Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection. The association of the bovine MHC class II BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles with BLV infection profiles was examined. BoLA-DRB3.2 allelic diversity was determined in 190 Iranian Holstein cattle using direct sequencing method. Association of the DRB3.2 alleles with BLV infection profiles was found as the odds ratio. Effects of the alleles on lymphocyte subsets were also evaluated by multivariate regression analysis and GLM procedures. The studied cattle were categorized into three groups: BLV seronegative, BLV seropositive with persistent lymphocytosis (PL), and BLV seropositive with lymphosarcoma (LS). The PL profile was significantly associated with the BoLA-DRB3.2*0101, *1101 and *4201 alleles, although the *3202 allele mediating resistance to PL was observed. Significant association was found between the BoLA-DRB3.2*1802, *3202, and *0901 alleles and susceptibility to LS, while the *0101 and *1101 alleles were associated with resistance to LS. BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles also showed a significant correlation with CD4, CD8, CD21 cells and CD4/CD8 ratio. Allelic differences influence the immune response to BLV infection and developing the disease profile. These differences also have important consequences for tumor resistance.

  16. The ACE DD genotype and D-allele are associated with exceptional longevity: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garatachea, Nuria; Marín, Pedro J; Lucia, Alejandro

    2013-09-01

    The ACE I/D polymorphism has been associated with longevity, although not consistently. The objective of this study was to detect the possible unequal distribution of the alleles and genotypes of this polymorphism among centenarians and younger segments of the population. Relevant data were extracted from studies in the literature, comparing genotype and allele frequencies between centenarians and younger controls. The association of ACE I/D polymorphism with exceptional longevity was analyzed in a total of 1803 centenarians and 10,484 controls using the chi-square test with the Yates correction. We conducted combined analyses for all ethnic groups studied in the literature (Caucasian, Chinese and Korean) as well as for Caucasians only. The DD genotype (odds ratio (OR): 1.25 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02-1.54), P=0.032) and the D-allele were more frequent in Caucasian centenarians compared with their younger controls (OR: 1.16 (95% CI: 1.05-1.28), P0.05). The present meta-analysis indicates that the ACE D-allele and the DD genotype might confer a modest, albeit significant advantage to reach exceptional longevity.

  17. Design of functional small interfering RNAs targeting amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-associated mutant alleles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG Chang-ming; DING Hong-liu

    2011-01-01

    Background RNA interference (RNAi) is a potential cure for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) caused by dominant,gain-of-function superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutations. The success of such therapy relies on the functional small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that can effectively deliver RNAi. This study aimed to design the functional siRNAs targeting ALS-associated mutant alleles.Methods A modified dual luciferase system containing human SOD1 mRNA target was established to quantify siRNA efficacy. Coupled with validated siRNAs identified in the literature, we analyzed the rationale of siRNA design and subsequently developed an asymmetry rule-based strategy for designing siRNA. We then further tested the effectiveness of this design strategy in converting a naturally symmetric siRNA into functional siRNAs with favorable asymmetry for gene silencing of SOD1 alleles.Results The efficacies of siRNAs could vary tremendously by one base-pair position change. Functional siRNAs could target the whole span of SOD1 mRNA coding sequence as well as non-coding region. While there is no distinguishable pattern of the distribution of nucleobases in these validated siRNAs, the high percent of GC count at the last two positions of siRNAs (P18 and P19) indicated a strong effect of asymmetry rule. Introducing a mismatch at position 1 of the 5' of antisense strand of siRNA successfully converted the inactive siRNA into functional siRNAs that silence SOD1 with desired efficacy.Conclusions Asymmetry rule-based strategy that incorporates a mismatch into siRNA most consistently enhances RNAi efficacy and guarantees producing functional siRNAs that successfully silence ALS-associated SOD1 mutant alleles regardless target positions. This strategy could also be useful to design siRNAs for silencing other disease-associated dominant, gain-of-function mutant genes.

  18. Allelic associations of two polymorphic microsatellites in intron 40 of the human von Willebrand factor gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, S.D.J.; De Souza, K.T. (Nucleo de Genetica Medica de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil)); De Andrade, M.; Chakraborty, R. (Univ. of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX (United States))

    1994-01-18

    At intron 40 of the von Willebrand factor (vWF) gene, two GATA-repeat polymorphic sites exist that are physically separated by 212 bp. At the first site (vWF1 locus), seven segregating repeat alleles were observed in a Brazilian Caucasian population, and at the second (vWF2 locus) there were eight alleles, detected through PCR amplifications of this DNA region. Haplotype analysis of individuals revealed 36 different haplotypes in a sample of 338 chromosomes examined. Allele frequencies between generations and gender at each locus were not significantly different, and the genotype frequencies were consistent with their Hardy-Weinberg expectations. Linkage disequilibrium between loci is highly significant with positive allele size association; that is, large alleles at the loci tend to occur together, and so do the same alleles. Variability at each locus appeared to have arisen in a stepwise fashion, suggesting replication slippage as a possible mechanism of production of new alleles. However, the authors observed an increased number of haplotypes, in contrast with the predictions of a stepwise production of variation in the entire region, suggesting some form of cooperative changes between loci that could be due to either gene conversion, or a common control mechanism of production of new variation at these repeat polymorphism sites. The high degree of polymorphism (gene diversity values of 72% and 78% at vWF1 and vWF2, respectively, and of 93% at the haplotype level) makes these markers informative for paternity testing, genetic counseling, and individual-identification purposes.

  19. ROCK2 allelic variants are not associated with pre-eclampsia susceptibility in the Finnish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, H; Laivuori, H; Kerkelä, E; Jiao, H; Hiltunen, L; Heino, S; Tiala, I; Knuutila, S; Rasi, V; Kere, J; Kivinen, K

    2009-07-01

    The rho-associated coiled-coil protein kinase 2 (ROCK2) gene has been suggested to associate with general hypertension and is therefore a plausible functional candidate gene for pre-eclampsia. ROCK2 maps to chromosome 2p25, which we have implicated previously in a linkage study of pre-eclampsia. We have re-sequenced exons and putative promoter region of ROCK2 in up to 30 pre-eclampsia patients and 22 controls and genotyped putative functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) as well as tagging SNPs from HapMap in a Finnish case-control data set-340 affected and 357 matched control individuals-for a genetic association study of ROCK2 in pre-eclampsia. Even though several new SNPs were discovered, we did not detect significant allelic or haplotypic association between ROCK2 and pre-eclampsia. We assessed ROCK2 expression in placentas by microarray analysis, but no significant expression differences were observed when comparing preeclamptic and normotensive pregnancies. We conclude that common genetic variation in ROCK2 is unlikely to make a major contribution to the risk of pre-eclampsia, but cannot exclude the possibility of having missed non-coding functional variants or rare coding variants.

  20. Three cadherin alleles associated with resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis in pink bollworm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Shai; Biggs, Robert W.; Sisterson, Mark S.; Shriver, Laura; Ellers-Kirk, Christa; Higginson, Dawn; Holley, Daniel; Gahan, Linda J.; Heckel, David G.; Carrière, Yves; Dennehy, Timothy J.; Brown, Judith K.; Tabashnik, Bruce E.

    2003-01-01

    Evolution of resistance by pests is the main threat to long-term insect control by transgenic crops that produce Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins. Because inheritance of resistance to the Bt toxins in transgenic crops is typically recessive, DNA-based screening for resistance alleles in heterozygotes is potentially much more efficient than detection of resistant homozygotes with bioassays. Such screening, however, requires knowledge of the resistance alleles in field populations of pests that are associated with survival on Bt crops. Here we report that field populations of pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella), a major cotton pest, harbored three mutant alleles of a cadherin-encoding gene linked with resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac and survival on transgenic Bt cotton. Each of the three resistance alleles has a deletion expected to eliminate at least eight amino acids upstream of the putative toxin-binding region of the cadherin protein. Larvae with two resistance alleles in any combination were resistant, whereas those with one or none were susceptible to Cry1Ac. Together with previous evidence, the results reported here identify the cadherin gene as a leading target for DNA-based screening of resistance to Bt crops in lepidopteran pests. PMID:12695565

  1. The acylphosphatase (Acyp) alleles associate with male hybrid sterility in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalak, Pawel; Ma, Daina

    2008-06-15

    Hybrid defects are believed to result from genetic incompatibilities between genes that have evolved in separate parental lineages. These genetic dysfunctions on the hybrid genomic background, also known as Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities, can be an incipient signature of speciation, and as such - a subject of active research. Here we present evidence that Acyp locus (CG16870) that encodes acylphosphatase, a small enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of acylphosphates and participates in ion transport across biological membranes, is involved in genetic incompatibilities leading to male sterility in hybrids between Drosophila simulans and D. mauritiana. There is a strong association between Acyp alleles (genotype) and the sterility/fertility pattern (phenotype), as well as between the phenotype, the genotype and its transcriptional activity. Allele-specific expression in hybrids heterozygous for Acyp suggests a cis-type regulation of this gene, where an allele from one of the parental species (D. simulans) is consistently overexpressed.

  2. Association of HLA-DQA1 and -DQB1 alleles with type I diabetes in Arabs: a meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzeh, A R; Nair, P; Al-Khaja, N; Al Ali, M T

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed at assessing the nature and significance of associations between various alleles of HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1, and type I diabetes (T1D) in Arab populations. Evidence from literature (published before 20 April 2015) was amassed and analysed through multiple meta-analyses, which yielded effect summary odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for 24 alleles and 4 haplotypes. A total of 1273 cases and 1747 controls from 16 studies were analysed. High levels of significance were obtained to support higher T1D risk when harbouring DQA1*03:01. The alleles DQB1*02:01 and *03:02 and the haplotypes DR3 and DR4 were significant risk factors, albeit with high publication heterogeneity. The protective effects of DQA1*01:01, DQB1*05:03, *06:02, *06:03, and *06:04 were robustly suggested by all indicators of meta-analyses. The haplotypes DR7 and DR11 were strongly suggested to be protective in Arabs. A relatively small number of studies have emerged from Arab countries, mostly with inadequate power on an individual basis. This study fills the gap by providing significant size effect of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and completes the continuum of global ethnic differences in this context.

  3. Diversity of HLA-B17 alleles and haplotypes in East Asians and a novel Cw6 allele (Cw*0604) associated with B*5701.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, T; Ogawa, A; Tokunaga, K; Ishikawa, Y; Kashiwase, K; Tanaka, H; Park, M H; Jia, G J; Chimge, N O; Sideltseva, E W; Akaza, T; Tadokoro, K; Takahashi, T; Juji, T

    1999-06-01

    The distribution of HLA-B17 alleles and their association with HLA-A, -C and -DRB1 alleles were investigated in seven East Asian populations Japanese, South Korean, Chinese-Korean, Man, Northern Han, Mongolian and Buryat populations). The B17 alleles were identified from genomic DNA using group-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by hybridization with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes (SSOP). In all of these East Asian populations, except Japanese and Chinese-Koreans, B*5701 was detected and strongly associated with A*0101, Cw*0602 and DRB1*0701. In contrast, B*5801 was detected in all the seven populations and strongly associated with A*3303, Cw*0302, DRB1*0301 and DRB1*1302. The A*3303-Cw*0302-B*5801-DRB1*1302 haplotype was observed in South Korean, Chinese-Korean, Buryat and Japanese populations, while A*3303-Cw*0302-B*5801-DRB1*0301 was predominantly observed in the Mongolian population. A similar haplotype, A*0101-Cw*0302-B*5801-DRB1*1302, was observed in the Buryat population. A novel Cw6 allele, Cw*0604, was identified in the Man population. This Cw allele was observed on the haplotype A*0101-B*5701-DRB1*0701. Thus, we confirmed, at the sequence level, that the common haplotypes carrying B*5701 and B*5801 have been conserved and shared in East Asian populations.

  4. Variant alleles of the CYP1B1 gene are associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background CYP1B1 is a P450 enzyme which is involved in the activation of pro-carcinogens to carcinogens as well as sex hormone metabolism. Because differences in the activity of the enzyme have been correlated with variant alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), it represents an attractive candidate gene for studies into colorectal cancer susceptibility. Methods We genotyped 597 cancer patients and 597controls for three CYP1B1 SNPs, which have previously been shown to be associated with altered enzymatic activity. Using the three SNPs, eight different haplotypes were constructed. The haplotype frequencies were estimated in cases and controls and then compared. The odds ratio for each tumour type, associated with each haplotype was estimated, with reference to the most common haplotype observed in the controls. Results The three SNPs rs10012, rs1056827 and rs1056836 alone did not provide any significant evidence of association with colorectal cancer risk. Haplotypes of rs1056827 and rs10012 or rs1056827 and rs1056836 revealed an association with colorectal cancer which was significantly stronger in the homozygous carriers. One haplotype was under represented in the colorectal cancer patient group compared to the control population suggesting a protective effect. Conclusion Genetic variants within the CYP1B1 that are associated with altered function appear to influence susceptibility to a colorectal cancer in Poland. Three haplotypes were associated with altered cancer risk; one conferred protection and two were associated with an increased risk of disease. These observations should be confirmed in other populations. PMID:20701755

  5. Variant alleles of the CYP1B1 gene are associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trubicka Joanna

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CYP1B1 is a P450 enzyme which is involved in the activation of pro-carcinogens to carcinogens as well as sex hormone metabolism. Because differences in the activity of the enzyme have been correlated with variant alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, it represents an attractive candidate gene for studies into colorectal cancer susceptibility. Methods We genotyped 597 cancer patients and 597controls for three CYP1B1 SNPs, which have previously been shown to be associated with altered enzymatic activity. Using the three SNPs, eight different haplotypes were constructed. The haplotype frequencies were estimated in cases and controls and then compared. The odds ratio for each tumour type, associated with each haplotype was estimated, with reference to the most common haplotype observed in the controls. Results The three SNPs rs10012, rs1056827 and rs1056836 alone did not provide any significant evidence of association with colorectal cancer risk. Haplotypes of rs1056827 and rs10012 or rs1056827 and rs1056836 revealed an association with colorectal cancer which was significantly stronger in the homozygous carriers. One haplotype was under represented in the colorectal cancer patient group compared to the control population suggesting a protective effect. Conclusion Genetic variants within the CYP1B1 that are associated with altered function appear to influence susceptibility to a colorectal cancer in Poland. Three haplotypes were associated with altered cancer risk; one conferred protection and two were associated with an increased risk of disease. These observations should be confirmed in other populations.

  6. Common breast cancer-predisposition alleles are associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Spurdle, Amanda B; Sinilnikova, Olga M;

    2008-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 confer high risks of breast cancer. However, evidence suggests that these risks are modified by other genetic or environmental factors that cluster in families. A recent genome-wide association study has shown that common alleles at single nucleotide...... polymorphisms (SNPs) in FGFR2 (rs2981582), TNRC9 (rs3803662), and MAP3K1 (rs889312) are associated with increased breast cancer risks in the general population. To investigate whether these loci are also associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, we genotyped these SNPs in a sample...... of 10,358 mutation carriers from 23 studies. The minor alleles of SNP rs2981582 and rs889312 were each associated with increased breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers (per-allele hazard ratio [HR] = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.20-1.45, p(trend) = 1.7 x 10(-8) and HR = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.02-1.24, p(trend) = 0...

  7. Human leukocyte antigen class I and II alleles and cervical adenocarcinoma: a pooled analysis of two epidemiologic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboobeh eSafaeian

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Associations between human leukocyte antigens (HLA alleles and cervical cancer are largely representative of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, the major histologic subtype. We evaluated the association between HLA class I (A, B, and C and class II (DRB1 and DQB1 loci and risk of cervical adenocarcinoma (ADC, a less common but aggressive histologic subtype.We pooled data from the Eastern and Western US cervical cancer studies, and evaluated the association between individual alleles and allele combinations and ADC (n=630 ADC; n=775 controls. Risk estimates were calculated for 11 a priori (based on known associations with cervical cancer regardless of histologic type and 38 non a priori common alleles, as odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI, adjusted for age and study. In exploratory analysis, we compared the risk associations between subgroups with HPV16 or HPV18 DNA in ADC tumor tissues in the Western US study cases and controls. Three of the a priori alleles were significantly associated with decreased risk of ADC (DRB1*13:01 (OR=0.61; 95%CI:0.41-0.93, DRB1*13:02 (OR=0.49; 95%CI:0.31-0.77, and DQB1*06:03 (OR=0.64; 95%CI:0.42-0.95; one was associated with increased risk (B*07:02(OR=1.39; 95%CI:1.07-1.79. Among alleles not previously reported, DQB1*06:04 (OR=0.46; 95%CI: 0.27-0.78 was associated with decreased risk of ADC and C*07:02 (OR=1.41; 95%CI:1.09-1.81 was associated with increased risk. We did not observe a difference by histologic subtype. ADC was most strongly associated with increased risk with B*07:02/C*07:02 alleles (OR=1.33; 95%CI:1.01-1.76 and decreased risk with DRB1*13:02/DQB1*06:04 (OR=0.41; 95%CI:0.21-0.80. Results suggest that HLA allele associations with cervical ADC are similar to those for cervical SCC. An intriguing finding was the difference in risk associated with several alleles restricted to HPV16 or HPV18 related tumors, consistent with the hypothesis that HLA recognition is HPV type specific.

  8. Allele-specific methylation occurs at genetic variants associated with complex disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John N Hutchinson

    Full Text Available We hypothesize that the phenomenon of allele-specific methylation (ASM may underlie the phenotypic effects of multiple variants identified by Genome-Wide Association studies (GWAS. We evaluate ASM in a human population and document its genome-wide patterns in an initial screen at up to 380,678 sites within the genome, or up to 5% of the total genomic CpGs. We show that while substantial inter-individual variation exists, 5% of assessed sites show evidence of ASM in at least six samples; the majority of these events (81% are under genetic influence. Many of these cis-regulated ASM variants are also eQTLs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocytes and/or in high linkage-disequilibrium with variants linked to complex disease. Finally, focusing on autoimmune phenotypes, we extend this initial screen to confirm the association of cis-regulated ASM with multiple complex disease-associated variants in an independent population using next-generation bisulfite sequencing. These four variants are implicated in complex phenotypes such as ulcerative colitis and AIDS progression disease (rs10491434, Celiac disease (rs2762051, Crohn's disease, IgA nephropathy and early-onset inflammatory bowel disease (rs713875 and height (rs6569648. Our results suggest cis-regulated ASM may provide a mechanistic link between the non-coding genetic changes and phenotypic variation observed in these diseases and further suggests a route to integrating DNA methylation status with GWAS results.

  9. The COMT Val158 allele is associated with impaired delayed-match-to-sample performance in ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthews Natasha

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study explored the association between three measures of working memory ability and genetic variation in a range of catecholamine genes in a sample of children with ADHD. Methods One hundred and eighteen children with ADHD performed three working memory measures taken from the CANTAB battery (Spatial Span, Delayed-match-to-sample, and Spatial Working Memory. Associations between performance on working memory measures and allelic variation in catecholamine genes (including those for the noradrenaline transporter [NET1], the dopamine D4 and D2 receptor genes [DRD4; DRD2], the gene encoding dopamine beta hydroxylase [DBH] and catechol-O-methyl transferase [COMT] were investigated using regression models that controlled for age, IQ, gender and medication status on the day of test. Results Significant associations were found between performance on the delayed-match-to-sample task and COMT genotype. More specifically, val/val homozygotes produced significantly more errors than did children who carried a least one met allele. There were no further associations between allelic variants and performance across the other working memory tasks. Conclusions The working memory measures employed in the present study differed in the degree to which accurate task performance depended upon either the dynamic updating and/or manipulation of items in working memory, as in the spatial span and spatial working memory tasks, or upon the stable maintenance of representations, as in the delay-match–to-sample task. The results are interpreted as evidence of a relationship between tonic dopamine levels associated with the met COMT allele and the maintenance of stable working memory representations required to perform the delayed-match-to-sample-task.

  10. Association of HLA class II alleles with sensitization to cow dander Bos d 2, an important occupational allergen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppinen, Anu; Peräsaari, Juha; Taivainen, Antti; Kinnunen, Tuure; Saarelainen, Soili; Rytkönen-Nissinen, Marja; Jeal, Hayley; Jones, Meinir; Virtanen, Tuomas

    2012-01-01

    Allergic sensitization results from a complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Earlier studies have shown that highly polymorphic HLA genes are associated with a variety of allergies. Several important respiratory allergens belong to the family of lipocalin proteins. These include occupational sensitizers, such as cow Bos d 2 or rat Rat n 1, and prevalent indoor sensitizers, such as dog Can f 1 or cockroach Bla g 4. HLA associations with sensitization to lipocalin allergens are incompletely known. In the present study we have investigated an association between HLA alleles and sensitization to the major cow allergen Bos d 2. The HLA-DR/DQ genotypes of 40 Bos d 2-sensitized subjects having occupational asthma were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the results were compared with the genotypes of 151 unrelated Finnish subjects. The frequencies of HLA class II alleles DRB1*0101, DRB1*0404, DQB1*0302, and DQB1*0501 were significantly higher among Bos d 2-sensitized than among control subjects. In addition, the allergic subjects expressed significantly lower frequencies of HLA-DRB1*0301 and DQB1*0201 alleles than did the control subjects. These data suggest that the HLA class II alleles DRB1*0101, DRB1*0404, DQB1*0302, and DQB1*0501, and the haplotypes that include them, are associated with sensitization to the major cow allergen Bos d 2, whereas HLA-DRB1*0301 and DQB1*0201 are dissociated with it. Amino acid analysis provides a biologically plausible explanation for the HLA associations.

  11. MicroRNA Genetic Variation: From Population Analysis to Functional Implications of Three Allele Variants Associated with Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torruella-Loran, Ignasi; Laayouni, Hafid; Dobon, Begoña; Gallego, Alicia; Balcells, Ingrid; Garcia-Ramallo, Eva; Espinosa-Parrilla, Yolanda

    2016-10-01

    Nucleotide variants in microRNA regions have been associated with disease; nevertheless, few studies still have addressed the allele-dependent effect of these changes. We studied microRNA genetic variation in human populations and found that while low-frequency variants accumulate indistinctly in microRNA regions, the mature and seed regions tend to be depleted of high-frequency variants, probably as a result of purifying selection. Comparison of pairwise population fixation indexes among regions showed that the seed had higher population fixation indexes than the other regions, suggesting the existence of local adaptation in the seed region. We further performed functional studies of three microRNA variants associated with cancer (rs2910164:C > G in MIR146A, rs11614913:C > T in MIR196A2, and rs3746444:A > G in both MIR499A and MIR499B). We found differences in the expression between alleles and in the regulation of several genes involved in cancer, such as TP53, KIT, CDH1, CLH, and TERT, which may result in changes in regulatory networks related to tumorigenesis. Furthermore, luciferase-based assays showed that MIR499A could be regulating the cadherin CDH1 and the cell adhesion molecule CLH1 in an allele-dependent fashion. A better understanding of the effect of microRNA variants associated with disease could be key in our way to a more personalized medicine.

  12. Effective marker alleles associated with type II resistance of wheat to Fusarium head blight infection in fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molecular markers associated with known quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for type 2 resistance to Fusarium head blight (FHB) in bi-parental mapping populations usually have more than two alleles in breeding populations. Therefore, understanding the association of each allele with FHB response is parti...

  13. Association of HLA-DRB1 alleles with susceptibility to mixed connective tissue disease in Polish patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradowska-Gorycka, A; Stypińska, B; Olesińska, M; Felis-Giemza, A; Mańczak, M; Czuszynska, Z; Zdrojewski, Z; Wojciechowicz, J; Jurkowska, M

    2016-01-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is a systemic autoimmune disease, originally defined as a connective tissue inflammatory syndrome with overlapping features of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM) and systemic sclerosis (SSc), characterized by the presence of antibodies against components of the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (U1snRNP). The aim of the study was to assess the frequency of (high-resolution-typed) DRB1 alleles in a cohort of Polish patients with MCTD (n = 103). Identification of the variants potentially associated with risk and protection was carried out by comparison with the DKMS Polish Bone Marrow Donor Registry (41306 alleles). DRB1*15:01 (odds ratio (OR): 6.06; 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.55-8.06), DRB1*04 (OR: 3.69; 95% CI 2.69-5.01) and *09:01 (OR: 8.12; 95% CI 2.15-21.75) were identified as risk alleles for MCTD, while HLA-DRB1*07:01 allele was found to be protective (OR: 0.50; 95% CI 0.28-0.83). The carrier frequency of the DRB1*01 was higher in MCTD patients compared with controls, although the differences were not statistically significant. Our results confirm the modulating influence of HLA-DRB1 genotypes on development of connective tissue diseases such as MCTD.

  14. Unusual association of three rare alleles and a mismatch in a case of paternity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchi, Chiara; Pesaresi, Mauro; Alessandrini, Federica; Onofri, Valerio; Arseni, Alessia; Tagliabracci, Adriano

    2004-03-01

    This study reports a paternity case analyzed by the AmpFlSTR Identifiler Kit (AB) in which father and daughter shared three rare alleles for D19S433, D18S51 and TH01 microsatellites. The case also showed an apparent exclusion, due to a mutation at the D3S 1358 microsatellite. Sequencing analysis was performed to assess the size of the rare alleles and to establish their structure, which revealed some molecular variations in regions flanking the motif repeats.

  15. HLA allele associations in idiopathic recurrent spontaneous abortion patients from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U Shankarkumar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Rejection of semiallogenic foetus in recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA has been postulated to be a consequence of genetic and immunological phenomena. Aim: To evaluate the role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA alleles in RSA in Indian couples. Settings and Design : A case-control study. Materials and Methods : Eighty-one randomly selected couples with unexplained three or more RSAs and a control group of 97 couples with live birth belonging to the same ethnic background, referred to the Gynaecology Department, KEM Hospital were included in the case-control study. Serological HLA A and B typing was done followed by molecular subtypes, defined using PCR-SSOP technique for HLA A, B, and C in 40 couples and DRB1FNx01 and DQB1FNx01 in 28 couples which were then compared with appropriate case 46 and 88 controls. Results : Serologically A3 (15.43% vs . 4.43%; odds ratio (OR = 4.34; P = 0.0002 and B17 (25.3% vs . 11.34%; OR = 3.49; P = 0.0001 were increased. Haplotype A1-B17 was significantly increased. Molecular subtyping revealed that AFNx01030102 (11.25% vs . 4.34%; OR = 3.00; P = 0.07, BFNx015701 (11.25% vs . 1.08%; OR = 13.10; P = 0.003, CwFNx01120201 (25% vs . 4.34%; OR = 10.50; P = 2.05E-05, HLA DRB1FNx01030101 (17.85% vs . 3.40%; OR = 7.6; P = 0.0001, DRB1FNx01150101 (32.14% vs . 13.63%; OR = 4.8; P = 0.0003, and DQB1FNx01060101 (35.71% vs . 29.34%; OR = 2.3; P = 0.004 were significantly increased in patients. A differential association was noticed when compared with reported world RSA patients. Conclusion: The HLA alleles AFNx01030101, BFNx015701, CwFNx01120201, DRB1FNx01030101, and DRB1FNx01150101 as well as their associated ancestral haplotype may play a significant role in development of RSA in India.

  16. Association of BoLA DRB3 and DQA1 alleles with susceptibility to Neospora caninum and reproductive outcome in Quebec Holstein cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Anne E; Geary, Timothy G; Baillargeon, Paul; Schwab, Andreas J; Fecteau, Gilles

    2009-10-28

    The BoLA DRB3 and DQA1 genes are part of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II in cattle. These genes are highly polymorphic and have been associated with resistance to several diseases, such as mastitis, Bovine Leukemia Virus (BLV) and dermatophilis. Sequenced based typing of these genes has been carried out extensively from blood samples; however it is often impractical or expensive to obtain such samples. Repositories of well-characterized serum from cattle are readily available in many veterinary research facilities. This paper reports a retrospective analysis of BoLA class II genotypes of cattle obtained from stored serum samples from Holstein cattle from Québec dairy farms, which were obtained as part of a previous study on bovine neosporosis. It was possible to genotype 56 cattle with known infection status for Neospora caninum. We identified 14 different DRB3 and 10 different DQA1 alleles in this population. The allele frequency distribution was consistent with previously studied cattle populations, and alleles known to be associated with BLV and mastitis were present. No association was found between allele frequency distribution of DRB3 or DQA genes and infection with N. caninum. However, an association of allele DRB3*1001 and allele DRB3*2703 with resistance and susceptibility to pregnancy loss, irrespective of infection status, was identified.

  17. Lack of association of apoE ε4 allele with insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragogna, Francesca; Lattuada, Guido; Ruotolo, Giacomo; Luzi, Livio; Perseghin, Gianluca

    2012-02-01

    ApoE is a polymorphic protein involved in the metabolism of plasma lipoproteins; the ε4 allele was shown to be associated with coronary and aortic atherosclerosis in age-dependent fashion mediated by unknown mechanisms. This study was undertaken to assess whether the apoE isoforms in humans were associated with normal glucose tolerance and with metabolic and inflammatory risk factors of CVD. ApoE genotype was assessed in 365 individuals. Of those, 309 were studied in the postabsorptive conditions and 142 of them also underwent a 3h-OGTT; 56 additional subjects were studied by means of the insulin clamp in combination with [6,6-2H2] glucose infusion. ApoE genotype frequencies were similar to those previously reported and were not influenced by age and BMI. Fasting plasma glucose, insulin, FFA, the lipid profile, surrogate markers (HOMA-IR, OGTT-derived index) as well as the clamp-derived parameters or insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion were not different by apoE genotypes. Serum adipokines concentrations (leptin, adiponectin, resistin) and markers of inflammation (serum fasting hsCRP and MCP1/CCL2) were also not different by apoE genotypes. In the subgroup of young ε4 carriers which underwent the clamp procedure, a higher fasting endogenous glucose production was detected. ApoE genotype was not associated with insulin resistance or altered insulin secretion, and no abnormalities in the typical circulating endocrine, metabolic, and inflammatory features of the insulin resistance syndrome were detected.

  18. Helicobacter pylori outer membrane protein Q allele distribution is associated with distinct pathologies in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakoob, Javed; Abbas, Zaigham; Khan, Rustam; Salim, Saima Azhar; Awan, Safia; Abrar, Ambar; Jafri, Wasim

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) strains expressing outer membrane protein Q (HopQ) promote adherence to the gastric epithelial cell. We characterized HopQ alleles in relation to H. pylori-related disease, histology and virulence markers. Gastric biopsies were obtained at esophagogastroduodenoscopy from patients with upper gastrointestinal symptoms. H. pylori culture, histology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for HopQ types, cagA, cagA-promoter and vacA alleles were performed. DNA extracted was used for PCR. Sequencing of PCR products of HopQ types 1 and 2 was followed by BLAST query. We examined 241 H. pylori isolates. HopQ type 1 was positive in 70 (29%) isolates, type 2 in 60 (25%) isolates, while both type 1 and type 2 in 111 (46%) H. pylori isolates, respectively. Nonulcer dyspepsia (NUD) was associated with HopQ type 2 in 48 (41%) isolates, while gastric carcinoma (GC) in 37 (53%) (P<0.001) with type 1 isolates. Gastric ulcers (GU) were 39 (46%) (P<0.001) in H. pylori infection with multiple HopQ alleles compared to 6 (23%) in HopQ type 1. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that multiple HopQ alleles were associated with GU OR 2.9 (1.07-7.8) (P=0.03). HopQ type 1 was associated with cagA 58 (84%) (P<0.001) and cagA-promoter 58 (83%) (P<0.001) compared to 14 (23%) and 17 (28%) respectively, in type 2. VacAs1a was associated with HopQ type 1 in 59 (84%) isolates compared to HopQ type 2 in 35 (58%) (P=0.002) isolates. VacAm1 was associated with HopQ type 1 in 53 (76%) isolates compared to HopQ type 2 in 32 (53%) (P=0.004) isolates. H. pylori infection with multiple HopQ alleles was predominant. H. pylori infection with single HopQ type 1 was associated with GC in the presence of other H. pylori virulence markers.

  19. Higher FKBP5, COMT, CHRNA5, and CRHR1 allele burdens are associated with PTSD and interact with trauma exposure: implications for neuropsychiatric research and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boscarino JA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Joseph A Boscarino1,2, Porat M Erlich1,3, Stuart N Hoffman4, Xiaopeng Zhang51Center for Health Research, Geisinger Clinic, Danville, PA, 2Department of Psychiatry, 3Department of Medicine, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, 4Department of Neurology, 5Department of Anesthesiology, Geisinger Clinic, Danville, PA, USAObjective: The study aim was to assess the cumulative burden of polymorphisms located within four genetic loci previously associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD among outpatients at risk for PTSD.Methods: Diagnostic interviews were completed and DNA samples collected among 412 pain patients to determine if FKBP5 (rs9470080, COMT (rs4680, CHRNA5 (rs16969968, and CRHR1 (rs110402 single nucleotide polymorphisms were cumulatively associated with increased risk for PTSD.Results: In bivariate analyses, it was found that a count of specific PTSD risk alleles located within FKBP5, COMT, CHRNA5, and CRHR1 genetic loci (allele range = 0–6, mean count = 2.92, standard deviation = 1.36 was associated with lifetime (t [409] = 3.430, P = 0.001 and early onset PTSD (t [409] = 4.239, P = 0.000028. In logistic regression, controlling for demographic factors, personality traits, and trauma exposures, this risk allele count remained associated with both lifetime (odds ratio = 1.49, P = 0.00158 and early onset PTSD (odds ratio = 2.36, P = 0.000093. Interaction effects were also detected, whereby individuals with higher risk allele counts and higher trauma exposures had an increased risk of lifetime PTSD (allele count × high trauma, P = 0.026 and early onset PTSD (allele count × high trauma, P = 0.016 in these logistic regressions. Those with no or few risk alleles appeared resilient to PTSD, regardless of exposure history.Conclusion: A cumulative risk allele count involving four single nucleotide polymorphisms located within the FKBP5, COMT, CHRNA5, and CRHR1 genes are associated with PTSD. Level of trauma exposure

  20. A new analysis tool for individual-level allele frequency for genomic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Wen-Harn

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allele frequency is one of the most important population indices and has been broadly applied to genetic/genomic studies. Estimation of allele frequency using genotypes is convenient but may lose data information and be sensitive to genotyping errors. Results This study utilizes a unified intensity-measuring approach to estimating individual-level allele frequencies for 1,104 and 1,270 samples genotyped with the single-nucleotide-polymorphism arrays of the Affymetrix Human Mapping 100K and 500K Sets, respectively. Allele frequencies of all samples are estimated and adjusted by coefficients of preferential amplification/hybridization (CPA, and large ethnicity-specific and cross-ethnicity databases of CPA and allele frequency are established. The results show that using the CPA significantly improves the accuracy of allele frequency estimates; moreover, this paramount factor is insensitive to the time of data acquisition, effect of laboratory site, type of gene chip, and phenotypic status. Based on accurate allele frequency estimates, analytic methods based on individual-level allele frequencies are developed and successfully applied to discover genomic patterns of allele frequencies, detect chromosomal abnormalities, classify sample groups, identify outlier samples, and estimate the purity of tumor samples. The methods are packaged into a new analysis tool, ALOHA (Allele-frequency/Loss-of-heterozygosity/Allele-imbalance. Conclusions This is the first time that these important genetic/genomic applications have been simultaneously conducted by the analyses of individual-level allele frequencies estimated by a unified intensity-measuring approach. We expect that additional practical applications for allele frequency analysis will be found. The developed databases and tools provide useful resources for human genome analysis via high-throughput single-nucleotide-polymorphism arrays. The ALOHA software was written in R and R GUI and

  1. Association of HLA-B Alleles With Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection in the Yi Ethnic Group in Sichuan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MING-YAN XU; YI-MING SHAO; KUN-XUE HONG; XIAO-LING DENG; JUN LI; HONG PENG; YU-HUA RUAN; GUAN-MING QIN; HUI XING; XIAO-HU XU

    2004-01-01

    Objective To determine the distribution of HLA-B alleles in the Chinese Yi ethnic group and its association with HIV infection. Methods One hundred and six unrelated healthy HIV negative and 73 HIV positive Chinese Yi ethnic individuals were typed by PCR-SSP. Results The frequency of alleles B*07, B*35, and B*46 were increased in HIV-1-positive subjects, whereas the alleles B*55, B*44 and B*78 were absent in the HIV-infected persons studied. The B*46 allele was present in a significantly higher gene frequency among HIV-1-positive individuals (P=0.02, OR=3.32, 95% CI=1.13-9.78) compared with control subjects. Conclusion HLA-B*46 may be associated with its susceptibility to HIV-1 infections.

  2. Association of the CYP1B1*3 allele with survival in patients with prostate cancer receiving docetaxel

    OpenAIRE

    Sissung, Tristan; Danesi, Romano; Price, Douglas; Steinberg, Seth; Wit, Ronald; Zahid, Muhammad; Gaikwad, Nilesh; Cavalieri, Ercole; Dahut, William; Sackett, Dan; Figg, William; Sparreboom, Alex

    2008-01-01

    textabstractUsing a single nucleotide polymorphism association study in 52 men with prostate cancer receiving docetaxel, we found that individuals carrying two copies of the CYP1B1*3 polymorphic variant had a poor prognosis after docetaxel-based therapies compared with individuals carrying at least one copy of the CYP1B1*1 allele (30.6 versus 12.8 months; P = 0.0004). The association between CYP1B1*3 and response to therapy was not observed in similar subjects receiving non-taxane-based thera...

  3. Allele Variants of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Heat-Labile Toxin Are Globally Transmitted and Associated with Colonization Factors

    KAUST Repository

    Joffré, Enrique

    2015-01-15

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing world. ETEC-mediated diarrhea is orchestrated by heat-labile toxin (LT) and heat-stable toxins (STp and STh), acting in concert with a repertoire of more than 25 colonization factors (CFs). LT, the major virulence factor, induces fluid secretion after delivery of a monomeric ADP-ribosylase (LTA) and its pentameric carrier B subunit (LTB). A study of ETEC isolates from humans in Brazil reported the existence of natural LT variants. In the present study, analysis of predicted amino acid sequences showed that the LT amino acid polymorphisms are associated with a geographically and temporally diverse set of 192 clinical ETEC strains and identified 12 novel LT variants. Twenty distinct LT amino acid variants were observed in the globally distributed strains, and phylogenetic analysis showed these to be associated with different CF profiles. Notably, the most prevalent LT1 allele variants were correlated with major ETEC lineages expressing CS1 + CS3 or CS2 + CS3, and the most prevalent LT2 allele variants were correlated with major ETEC lineages expressing CS5 + CS6 or CFA/I. LTB allele variants generally exhibited more-stringent amino acid sequence conservation (2 substitutions identified) than LTA allele variants (22 substitutions identified). The functional impact of LT1 and LT2 polymorphisms on virulence was investigated by measuring total-toxin production, secretion, and stability using GM1-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (GM1-ELISA) and in silico protein modeling. Our data show that LT2 strains produce 5-fold more toxin than LT1 strains (P < 0.001), which may suggest greater virulence potential for this genetic variant. Our data suggest that functionally distinct LT-CF variants with increased fitness have persisted during the evolution of ETEC and have spread globally.

  4. Microsatellite allele dose and configuration establishment (MADCE): an integrated approach for genetic studies in allopolyploids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van T.; Noordijk, Y.; Dubos, T.; Bink, M.C.A.M.; Visser, R.G.F.; Weg, van de W.E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genetic studies in allopolyploid plants are challenging because of the presence of similar sub-genomes, which leads to multiple alleles and complex segregation ratios. In this study, we describe a novel method for establishing the exact dose and configuration of microsatellite alleles fo

  5. The CFTR Met 470 allele is associated with lower birth rates in fertile men from a population isolate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülüm Kosova

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Although little is known about the role of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR gene in reproductive physiology, numerous variants in this gene have been implicated in etiology of male infertility due to congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD. Here, we studied the fertility effects of three CBAVD-associated CFTR polymorphisms, the (TGm and polyT repeat polymorphisms in intron 8 and Met470Val in exon 10, in healthy men of European descent. Homozygosity for the Met470 allele was associated with lower birth rates, defined as the number of births per year of marriage (P = 0.0029. The Met470Val locus explained 4.36% of the phenotypic variance in birth rate, and men homozygous for the Met470 allele had 0.56 fewer children on average compared to Val470 carrier men. The derived Val470 allele occurs at high frequencies in non-African populations (allele frequency = 0.51 in HapMap CEU, whereas it is very rare in African population (Fst = 0.43 between HapMap CEU and YRI. In addition, haplotypes bearing Val470 show a lack of genetic diversity and are thus longer than haplotypes bearing Met470 (measured by an integrated haplotype score [iHS] of -1.93 in HapMap CEU. The fraction of SNPs in the HapMap Phase2 data set with more extreme Fst and iHS measures is 0.003, consistent with a selective sweep outside of Africa. The fertility advantage conferred by Val470 relative to Met470 may provide a selective mechanism for these population genetic observations.

  6. [Frequent allelic losses in tumor-associated stromal cells and tumor epitelium of prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekeeva, T V; Popova, O P; Shegaĭ, P V; Zavalishina, L E; Andreeva, Iu Iu; Zaletaev, D V; Nemtsova, M V

    2008-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that tumor microenvironment plays a critical role in carcinogenesis. Accumulation of genetic alterations is typical not only for cancer epithelial cells but tumor-associated fibroblasts as well. Tumor epithelia, tumor-associated stroma from prostatectomy specimens of patients with prostate cancer and cells from prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and adjacent stroma from males with PIN were isolated by using laser capture microdissection. Microsatellite allelotyping was evaluated using 4 highly polymorphic markers for chromosomal regions 8p22, 16q23-24 and 13q14. Incidences of alterations (loss of heterozygosity or allelic imbalance) were 48% for region 8p22, 72% for 16q23 and 37% for 13q14. The LOH frequencies in tumor-associated stroma cells were very similar. Alterations at chromosome 13q were significantly associated with advanced tumor stage, whereas AI at 16q was also associated with high Gleason score and lymph node metastasis. We find some incidences of allelic imbalance in premalignant lesions in epithelial (16-27%) and stromal (7-22%) components. Our results show that the frequencies of genetic aberrations are as high in stromal cells as in tumor cells.

  7. Variant alleles of the CYP1B1 gene are associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility

    OpenAIRE

    Trubicka Joanna; Grabowska-Kłujszo Ewa; Suchy Janina; Masojć Bartłomiej; Serrano-Fernandez Pablo; Kurzawski Grzegorz; Cybulski Cezary; Górski Bohdan; Huzarski Tomasz; Byrski Tomasz; Gronwald Jacek; Złowocka Elżbieta; Kładny Józef; Banaszkiewicz Zbigniew; Wiśniowski Rafał

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background CYP1B1 is a P450 enzyme which is involved in the activation of pro-carcinogens to carcinogens as well as sex hormone metabolism. Because differences in the activity of the enzyme have been correlated with variant alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), it represents an attractive candidate gene for studies into colorectal cancer susceptibility. Methods We genotyped 597 cancer patients and 597controls for three CYP1B1 SNPs, which have previously been shown to be ...

  8. The PNPLA3 rs738409 G-allele associates with reduced fasting serum triglyceride and serum cholesterol in Danes with impaired glucose regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Nikolaj Thure; Grarup, Niels; Banasik, Karina

    2012-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common condition, associated with hepatic insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome including hyperglycaemia and dyslipidemia. We aimed at studying the potential impact of the NAFLD-associated PNPLA3 rs738409 G-allele on NAFLD-related metabolic...

  9. Assessment of allelic diversity in intron-containing Mal d 1 genes and their association to apple allergenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolhaar Suzanne THP

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mal d 1 is a major apple allergen causing food allergic symptoms of the oral allergy syndrome (OAS in birch-pollen sensitised patients. The Mal d 1 gene family is known to have at least 7 intron-containing and 11 intronless members that have been mapped in clusters on three linkage groups. In this study, the allelic diversity of the seven intron-containing Mal d 1 genes was assessed among a set of apple cultivars by sequencing or indirectly through pedigree genotyping. Protein variant constitutions were subsequently compared with Skin Prick Test (SPT responses to study the association of deduced protein variants with allergenicity in a set of 14 cultivars. Results From the seven intron-containing Mal d 1 genes investigated, Mal d 1.01 and Mal d 1.02 were highly conserved, as nine out of ten cultivars coded for the same protein variant, while only one cultivar coded for a second variant. Mal d 1.04, Mal d 1.05 and Mal d 1.06 A, B and C were more variable, coding for three to six different protein variants. Comparison of Mal d 1 allelic composition between the high-allergenic cultivar Golden Delicious and the low-allergenic cultivars Santana and Priscilla, which are linked in pedigree, showed an association between the protein variants coded by the Mal d 1.04 and -1.06A genes (both located on linkage group 16 with allergenicity. This association was confirmed in 10 other cultivars. In addition, Mal d 1.06A allele dosage effects associated with the degree of allergenicity based on prick to prick testing. Conversely, no associations were observed for the protein variants coded by the Mal d 1.01 (on linkage group 13, -1.02, -1.06B, -1.06C genes (all on linkage group 16, nor by the Mal d 1.05 gene (on linkage group 6. Conclusion Protein variant compositions of Mal d 1.04 and -1.06A and, in case of Mal d 1.06A, allele doses are associated with the differences in allergenicity among fourteen apple cultivars. This information

  10. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumour subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); F.J. Couch (Fergus); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); S.M. Domchek (Susan); D. Eccles (Diana); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); S.J. Ramus (Susan); M. Robson (Mark); M.E. Sherman (Mark); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); A. Lee (Andrew); L. McGuffog (Lesley); S. Healey (Sue); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); F.C. Nielsen (Finn); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); A. Osorio (Ana); I. Muñoz-Repeto (Iván); M. Durán (Mercedes); J. Godino (Javier); M. Pertesi (Maroulio); J. Benítez (Javier); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); E. Cattaneo (Elisa); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); A. Viel (Alessandra); B. Pasini (Barbara); L. Papi (Laura); L. Ottini (Laura); A. Savarese (Antonella); L. Bernard (Loris); P. Radice (Paolo); U. Hamann (Ute); M. Verheus (Martijn); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); M.R. Nelen (Marcel); C.M. Kets; C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); M.M.A. Tilanus-Linthorst (Madeleine); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); T.V. Os (Theo); M.A. Rookus (Matti); D. Frost (Debra); J.L. Jones (J Louise); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); R. Eeles (Rosalind); L. Izatt (Louise); J.W. Adlard (Julian); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); J. Cook (Jackie); A. Donaldson (Alan); H. Dorkins (Huw); H. Gregory (Helen); J. Eason (Jacqueline); C. Houghton (Catherine); J. Barwell (Julian); L. Side (Lucy); E. McCann (Emma); A. Murray (Alexandra); S. Peock (Susan); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); C. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); I. Ruehl (Ina); N. Arnold (Norbert); D. Niederacher (Dieter); C. Sutter (Christian); H. Deissler (Helmut); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); K. Kast (Karin); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); I. Schoenbuchner (Ines); B. Fiebig (Britta); W. Heinritz (Wolfram); D. Schäfer; H. Gevensleben (Heidrun); V. Caux-Moncoutier (Virginie); M. Fassy-Colcombet (Marion); F. Cornelis (Franco̧is); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); M. Léone (Mélanie); N. Boutry-Kryza (N.); A. Hardouin (Agnès); P. Berthet (Pascaline); D.W. Muller (Danièle); J.P. Fricker (Jean Pierre); I. Mortemousque (Isabelle); P. Pujol (Pascal); I. Coupier (Isabelle); M. Lebrun (Marine); C. Kientz (Caroline); M. Longy (Michel); N. Sevenet (Nicolas); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); C. Isaacs (Claudine); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); T. Heikinen (Tuomas); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); I. Blanco (Ignacio); C. Lazaro (Conxi); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); P. Soucy (Penny); M. Dumont (Martine); J. Simard (Jacques); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Tognazzo (Silvia); E. D'Andrea (Emma); S.B. Fox (Stephen); M. Yan (Max); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); H. Lynch (Henry); P.A. Ganz (Patricia); G. Tomlinson (Gail); X. Wang (Xing); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); C. Szabo (Csilla); K. Offit (Kenneth); R. Sakr (Rita); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); K.P. Bhatia (Kailash); N. Kauff (Noah); C.F. Singer (Christian); M.-K. Tea; D. Gschwantler-Kaulich (Daphne); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); P.L. Mai (Phuong); M.H. Greene (Mark); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); F.P. O'Malley (Frances); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); G. Glendon (Gord); A.E. Toland (Amanda); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); M. Thomassen (Mads); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; A.-B. Skytte (Anne-Bine); M.A. Caligo (Maria); M. Soller (Maria); K. Henriksson (Karin); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (M.); P. Karlsson (Per); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); M.S. Beattie (Mary); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); K.B. Moysich (Kirsten); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); B. Karlan; J. Gross (Jenny); E.M. John (Esther); M.B. Daly (Mary); S.S. Buys (Saundra); M.C. Southey (Melissa); J.L. Hopper (John); M.-B. Terry (Mary-Beth); W. Chung (Wendy); A. Miron (Alexander); D. Goldgar (David); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); D.F. Easton (Douglas); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtypes

  11. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumour subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers : results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J.; Barrowdale, Daniel; Domchek, Susan M.; Eccles, Diana; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ramus, Susan J.; Robson, Mark; Sherman, Mark; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Lee, Andrew; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Nielsen, Finn C.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Osorio, Ana; Munoz-Repeto, Ivan; Duran, Mercedes; Godino, Javier; Pertesi, Maroulio; Benitez, Javier; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Cattaneo, Elisa; Bonanni, Bernardo; Viel, Alessandra; Pasini, Barbara; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Savarese, Antonella; Bernard, Loris; Radice, Paolo; Hamann, Ute; Verheus, Martijn; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Wijnen, Juul; Garcia, Encarna B. Gomez; Nelen, Marcel R.; Kets, C. Marleen; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M. A.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; van Os, Theo; Rookus, Matti; Frost, Debra; Jones, J. Louise; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Cook, Jackie; Donaldson, Alan; Dorkins, Huw; Gregory, Helen; Eason, Jacqueline; Houghton, Catherine; Barwell, Julian; Side, Lucy E.; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Peock, Susan; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Rhiem, Kerstin; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Kast, Karin; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schoenbuchner, Ines; Fiebig, Britta; Heinritz, Wolfram; Schaefer, Dieter; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Fassy-Colcombet, Marion; Cornelis, Francois; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Leone, Melanie; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Hardouin, Agnes; Berthet, Pascaline; Muller, Daniele; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Pujol, Pascal; Coupier, Isabelle; Lebrun, Marine; Kientz, Caroline; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Isaacs, Claudine; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Soucy, Penny; Dumont, Martine; Simard, Jacques; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; D'Andrea, Emma; Fox, Stephen; Yan, Max; Rebbeck, Tim; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Lynch, Henry T.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Szabo, Csilla; Offit, Kenneth; Sakr, Rita; Gaudet, Mia; Bhatia, Jasmine; Kauff, Noah; Singer, Christian F.; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Imyanitov, Evgeny; O'Malley, Frances P.; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Glendon, Gordon; Toland, Amanda E.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Soller, Maria; Henriksson, Karin; Wachenfeldt, von Anna; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Karlsson, Per; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Beattie, Mary; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; John, Esther M.; Daly, Mary B.; Buys, Saundra M.; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy; Miron, Alexander F.; Goldgar, David; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 an

  12. HLA-DRB1 alleles encoding the "shared epitope" are associated with susceptibility to developing rheumatoid arthritis whereas HLA-DRB1 alleles encoding an aspartic acid at position 70 of the beta-chain are protective in Mexican Mestizos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Morales, J A; Vargas-Alarcón, G; Flores-Villanueva, P O; Villarreal-Garza, C; Hernández-Pacheco, G; Yamamoto-Furusho, J K; Rodríguez-Pérez, J M; Pérez-Hernández, N; Rull, M; Cardiel, M H; Granados, J

    2004-03-01

    The risk to develop rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been associated with the presence of HLA-DRB1 alleles encoding the "shared epitope" (SE). Additionally, HLA-DRB1 alleles encoding an aspartic acid at position 70 (D70+ ) have been associated with protection against the development of RA. In this study we tested the association between either SE or D70+ and rheumatoid arthritis in Mexican Mestizos. We included 84 unrelated Mexican Mestizos patients with RA and 99 unrelated healthy controls. The HLA-typing was performed by PCR-SSO and PCR-SSP. We used the chi-squared test to detect differences in proportions of individuals carrying at least one SE or D70+ between patients and controls. We found that the proportion of individuals carrying at least one HLA-DRB1 allele encoding the SE was significantly increased in RA cases as compared to controls (p(c) = 0.0004, OR = 4.1, 95% CI = 2.2-7.7). The most frequently occurring allele was HLA-DRB1*0404 (0.161 vs 0.045). Moreover, we observed a significantly increased proportion of HLA-DRB1 SE+ cases with RF titers above the median (p = 0.005). Conversely, the proportion of individuals carrying at least one HLA-DRB1 allele encoding the D70+ was significantly decreased (p(c) = 0.004, OR = 0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.7) among RA patients compared with controls. In conclusion, the SE is associated with RA in Mexican Mestizos as well as with the highest titers of RF.

  13. Association of HLA-BFNx011502 allele and carbamazepine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome among Indians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Timir

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS and toxic epidermal necrolysis are severe cutaneous reactions caused by certain drugs, including antiepileptic carbamazepine. A strong association has been reported between human leucocyte antigen (HLA-BFNx011502 and carbamazepine-induced SJS in Han Chinese patients. European studies suggested that HLA-BFNx011502 is not a universal marker but is ethnicity-specific for Asians. Aim: To study the association between HLA-BFNx011502 and carbamazepine-induced SJS in Indian patients. Methods: Eight individuals who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of SJS induced by carbamazepine were identified and HLA-B molecular typing was performed. HLA-B genotyping was carried out by polymerase chain reaction using sequence-specific primers. Results: Out of eight patients studied for genotype, six patients were found to have the HLA-BFNx011502 allele. Conclusion: This study suggests an association between HLA-BFNx011502 and carbamazepine-induced SJS in Indian patients.

  14. Association of HLA-DRB1 Alleles with Polymyositis/ Dermatomyositis in Northern Chinese Hans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟宁; 张庆瑞; 韩秀萍; 宋芳吉

    2002-01-01

    The HLA system is a highly polymorphic antigen and genetic system in human,and different population has different distribution of HLA alleles. Polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM) are idiopathic inflammatory myopathies that are characterized clinically by proximal muscle weakness, elevations of serum muscle enzymes, especially creatine kinase (CK), and typical abnormal findings on electromyography. Significant association has been reported between PM/DM and HLA-DR3/DRB1 0301, DRB8/DRB1 08, DR6 and DR2.

  15. Pharmacogenetic relevance of the CYP2C9*3 allele in a tenoxicam bioequivalence study performed on Spaniards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiró, A M; Novalbos, J; Zapater, P; Moreu, R; López-Rodríguez, R; Rodríguez, V; Abad-Santos, F; Horga, J F

    2009-01-01

    We performed a study to quantify CYP2C9 and CYP2C8 alleles influence on the variability observed in tenoxicam pharmacokinetic (PK) and implication in a bioequivalence study design performed on Spaniards. Eighteen healthy volunteers were included in an open, randomized, crossover, phase I bioequivalence study. Significant increases were found in CYP2C9*3 alleles vs. *1 and *2 in AUC(0-infinity) (median (min-max)): 256 (230-516) vs. 150 (100-268) and 169 (124-197) microg h/mL (p<0.01) and half-life time (t1/2) 102 (79-36) vs. 56 (45-94) and 64 (60-80)h (p<0.01). Non-significant differences were observed in C(max) 1.9 (1.8-2.9) vs. 2.4 (1.7-3.4), 2.5 (1.6-2.9) microg/mL or in according to CYP2C8 alleles presence. CYP2C9*3 allele is associated to a longer elimination time of tenoxicam. PK parameters calculated in bioequivalence studies (AUC(0-infinity), t1/2) may be influenced by the presence of CYP2C9*3 allele resulting in a high variability. Thus, bioequivalence studies of tenoxicam formulations should be designed considering genotype profile.

  16. Several different lactase persistence associated alleles and high diversity of the lactase gene in the admixed Brazilian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Deise C; Santos, Sidney E B; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea K C; Hutz, Mara H

    2012-01-01

    Adult-type hypolactasia is a common phenotype caused by the lactase enzyme deficiency. The -13910 C>T polymorphism, located 14 Kb upstream of the lactase gene (LCT) in the MCM6 gene was associated with lactase persistence (LP) in Europeans. This polymorphism is rare in Africa but several other variants associated with lactase persistence were observed in Africans. The aims of this study were to identify polymorphisms in the MCM6 region associated with the lactase persistence phenotype and to determine the distribution of LCT gene haplotypes in 981 individuals from North, Northeast and South Brazil. These polymorphisms were genotyped by PCR based methods and sequencing. The -13779*C,-13910*T, -13937*A, -14010*C, -14011*T LP alleles previously described in the MCM6 gene region that acts as an enhancer for the LCT gene were identified in Brazilians. The most common LP allele was -13910*T. Its frequency was highly correlated with European ancestry in the Brazilian populations investigated. The -13910*T was higher (0.295) in southern Brazilians of European ancestry and lower (0.175) in the Northern admixed population. LCT haplotypes were derived from the 10 LCT SNPs genotyped. Overall twenty six haplotypes previously described were identified in the four Brazilian populations studied. The Multidimensional Scaling analysis showed that Belém, in the north, was closer to Amerindians. Northeastern and southern Afro-descendants were more related with Bantu-speaking South Africans whereas the Southern population with European ancestry grouped with Southern and Northern Europeans. This study shows a high variability considering the number of LCT haplotypes observed. Due to the highly admixed nature of the Brazilian populations, the diagnosis of hypolactasia in Brazil, based only in the investigation of the -13910*T allele is an oversimplification.

  17. Several different lactase persistence associated alleles and high diversity of the lactase gene in the admixed Brazilian population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deise C Friedrich

    Full Text Available Adult-type hypolactasia is a common phenotype caused by the lactase enzyme deficiency. The -13910 C>T polymorphism, located 14 Kb upstream of the lactase gene (LCT in the MCM6 gene was associated with lactase persistence (LP in Europeans. This polymorphism is rare in Africa but several other variants associated with lactase persistence were observed in Africans. The aims of this study were to identify polymorphisms in the MCM6 region associated with the lactase persistence phenotype and to determine the distribution of LCT gene haplotypes in 981 individuals from North, Northeast and South Brazil. These polymorphisms were genotyped by PCR based methods and sequencing. The -13779*C,-13910*T, -13937*A, -14010*C, -14011*T LP alleles previously described in the MCM6 gene region that acts as an enhancer for the LCT gene were identified in Brazilians. The most common LP allele was -13910*T. Its frequency was highly correlated with European ancestry in the Brazilian populations investigated. The -13910*T was higher (0.295 in southern Brazilians of European ancestry and lower (0.175 in the Northern admixed population. LCT haplotypes were derived from the 10 LCT SNPs genotyped. Overall twenty six haplotypes previously described were identified in the four Brazilian populations studied. The Multidimensional Scaling analysis showed that Belém, in the north, was closer to Amerindians. Northeastern and southern Afro-descendants were more related with Bantu-speaking South Africans whereas the Southern population with European ancestry grouped with Southern and Northern Europeans. This study shows a high variability considering the number of LCT haplotypes observed. Due to the highly admixed nature of the Brazilian populations, the diagnosis of hypolactasia in Brazil, based only in the investigation of the -13910*T allele is an oversimplification.

  18. Widespread signatures of positive selection in common risk alleles associated to autism spectrum disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The human brain is the outcome of innumerable evolutionary processes; the systems genetics of psychiatric disorders could bear their signatures. On this basis, we analyzed five psychiatric disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorder (ASD), bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, and schizophrenia (SCZ), using GWAS summary statistics from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium. Machine learning-derived scores were used to investigate two natural-selection scenarios: complete selection (loci where a selected allele reached fixation) and incomplete selection (loci where a selected allele has not yet reached fixation). ASD GWAS results positively correlated with incomplete-selection (p = 3.53*10−4). Variants with ASD GWAS pgene-expression enrichments for brain and pituitary tissues (p = 2.3*10−5 and p = 3*10−5, respectively) and 53 gene ontology (GO) enrichments, such as nervous system development (GO:0007399, p = 7.57*10−12), synapse organization (GO:0050808, p = 8.29*10−7), and axon guidance (GO:0007411, p = 1.81*10−7). Previous genetic studies demonstrated that ASD positively correlates with childhood intelligence, college completion, and years of schooling. Accordingly, we hypothesize that certain ASD risk alleles were under positive selection during human evolution due to their involvement in neurogenesis and cognitive ability. PMID:28187187

  19. Human placental alkaline phosphatase electrophoretic alleles: Quantitative studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucarelli, Paola; Scacchi, Renato; Corbo, Rosa Maria; Benincasa, Alberto; Palmarino, Ricciotti

    1982-01-01

    Human placental alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity has been determined in specimens obtained from 562 Italian subjects. The mean activities of the three common homozygotes (Pl 2 = 4.70 ± 0.24, Pl 1 = 4.09 ± 0.08, and Pl 3 = 2.15 ± 0.71 μmol of p-nitrophenol produced) were significantly different. The differences among the various allelic forms account for 10% of the total quantitative variation of the human placental alkaline phosphatase. PMID:7072721

  20. Retinal angiomatous proliferation associated with risk alleles of ARMS2/HTRA1 gene polymorphisms in Japanese patients

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    Ohkuma Y

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Yasuhiro Ohkuma,1 Takaaki Hayashi,1 Tsutomu Sakai,1 Akira Watanabe,1 Hisashi Yamada,2 Masakazu Akahori,3 Takeshi Itabashi,3 Takeshi Iwata,3 Toru Noda,4 Hiroshi Tsuneoka11Department of Ophthalmology, 2Department of Molecular Genetics, Institute of DNA Medicine, The Jikei University School of Medicine, 3Division of Molecular and Cellular Biology, National Institute of Sensory Organs, 4Division of Ophthalmology, National Hospital Organization Tokyo Medical Center, Tokyo, JapanBackground: The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between ARMS2/HTRA1, CFH, and C3 gene polymorphisms and retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP, an infrequent and severe form of exudative age-related macular degeneration, which is characterized by intraretinal neovascularization.Methods: Diagnosis of RAP was based on fundus photographs, images of fluorescein and indocyanine green angiographies, and optical coherence tomography findings. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, A69S (rs10490924 in ARMS2, rs11200638 in HTRA1, I62V (rs800292 in CFH, Y402H (rs1061170 in CFH, R80G (rs2230199 in C3, and rs2241394 in C3, were genotyped in eight Japanese patients with RAP.Results: The two SNPs in the ARMS2/HTRA1 were in complete linkage disequilibrium. The frequency of the risk T allele in ARMS2 (the risk A allele in HTRA1 was 93.8% in the RAP patients. The frequency of homozygosity for the risk genotype TT of ARMS2 (the risk genotype AA of HTRA1 was 87.5%. The frequency of the non-risk allele (A of I62V was 100%. The frequencies of risk alleles of Y402H, R80G, and rs2241394 were 12.5%, 0%, and 18.8%, respectively.Conclusion: Our results suggest that the risk alleles of the ARMS2/HTRA1 SNPs may be associated with development of RAP and play a major role in the pathogenesis of intraretinal angiogenesis.Keywords: age-related macular degeneration, retinal angiomatous proliferation, single nucleotide polymorphisms, ARMS2/HTRA1 genes, components of the complement

  1. A common polymorphism in the promoter region of the TNFSF4 gene is associated with lower allele-specific expression and risk of myocardial infarction.

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    Massimiliano Ria

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The TNFSF4/TNFRSF4 system, along with several other receptor-ligand pairs, is involved in the recruitment and activation of T-cells and is therefore tentatively implicated in atherosclerosis and acute coronary syndromes. We have previously shown that genetic variants in TNFSF4 are associated with myocardial infarction (MI in women. This prompted functional studies of TNFSF4 expression. METHODS AND RESULTS: Based on a screening of the TNFSF4 genomic region, a promoter polymorphism (rs45454293 and a haplotype were identified, conceivably involved in gene regulation. The rs45454293T-allele, in agreement with the linked rs3850641G-allele, proved to be associated with increased risk of MI in women. Haplotype-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation of activated polymerase II, as a measure of transcriptional activity in vivo, suggested that the haplotype including the rs45454293 and rs3850641 polymorphisms is functionally important, the rs45454293T- and rs3850641G-alleles being associated with lower transcriptional activity in cells heterozygous for both polymorphisms. The functional role of rs45454293 on transcriptional levels of TNFSF4 was clarified by luciferase reporter assays, where the rs45454293T-allele decreased gene expression when compared with the rs45454293C-allele, while the rs3850641 SNP did not have any effect on TNFSF4 promoter activity. Electromobility shift assay showed that the rs45454293 polymorphism, but not rs3850641, affects the binding of nuclear factors, thus suggesting that the lower transcriptional activity is attributed to binding of one or more transcriptional repressor(s to the T-allele. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that the TNFSF4 rs45454293T-allele is associated with lower TNFSF4 expression and increased risk of MI.

  2. Association of BoLA-DRB3 alleles with tick-borne disease tolerance in dairy cattle in a tropical environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duangjinda, M; Jindatajak, Y; Tipvong, W; Sriwarothai, J; Pattarajinda, V; Katawatin, S; Boonkum, W

    2013-09-23

    Tick-borne disease is one of the most harmful tropical diseases in dairy production. Selection of dairy cows for tolerance to tick-borne disease is a challenging concept for dairy breeders in the tropics. The objectives of this study were (1) to detect specific tick-borne pathogen in cattle of different genetics and (2) to examine the polymorphisms of DRB3.2 alleles in Thai dairy cattle and find the allelic association with tick-borne disease tolerance. Specific primers to Anaplasma marginale (AM), Babesia bigemina (BG) and Babesia bovis (BB) were used to detect the infections by PCR. The results showed that the high proportion of infections were found in Bos indicus (Sahiwal, n=95) and crossbred Holstein × Zebu (75:25 Holstein:Zebu, n=101), compared to high Holstein fraction crossbreed (≥ 87.5% Holstein, n=187). The proportion of triple infections was also highly found in high Holstein fractions crossbreed. This study confirmed that Zebuine (Bos indicus) had a higher degree of tolerance, even when infected by tick-borne pathogens, compared to high Holstein fraction crossbred. The associated alleles of DRB3.2 for tick-borne pathogen infection tolerance were found: DRB3*14 and *41 were found to be tolerant to A. marginale; *14 to B. bovis; and *10 and *51 to B. bigemina. These tolerance alleles could be used as potential markers for selection in dairy genetic evaluation. The associated alleles for susceptibility were also found: *2 was found to be susceptible to A. marginale; *3 and *16 to B. bovis; and *20 to B. bigemina. These susceptibility alleles could be used as markers for culling, and selection favoring susceptibility alleles should be considered to maintain heterozygote advantage and pathogen-specific memories in the herd.

  3. Association of aplastic anaemia and Fanconi's disease with HLA-DRB1 alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yari, F; Sobhani, M; Vaziri, M Z; Bagheri, N; Sabaghi, F; Talebian, A

    2008-12-01

    One of the most fascinating areas of research within the field of histocompatibility at present time concerns an observation that a major human histocompatibility system, human leucocyte antigen (HLA), is deeply involved in the development of a great number of diseases. Major histocompatibility complex is the most polymorphic system in the genome of different species. Recognition of HLA alleles could be useful in transplantation and disease studies. Genetic construct of HLA DRB1 was studied in Iranian normal populations and patients with aplastic anaemia and Fanconi's disease. DNA was extracted from the whole blood of 466 normal, 35 aplastic anaemia and 10 Fanconi's individuals. Then DRB1 gene polymorphism was studied by polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primer method. The HLA DRB1 gene analysis showed increase of DRB1*07 in aplastic anaemia patients compared to normal population (P = 0.02). According to this study, the frequency of DRB1*07 in normal individuals was 8.3, and in aplastic anaemia patients, 15.7%. Additionally, the frequency of DRB1*04 in normal, aplastic anaemia and Fanconi's individuals was 10, 5.7 and 20%, respectively. Our results of investigation showed correlation between some HLA alleles with the studied diseases. We reported the frequency of various DR types in aplastic and Fanconi's patients. This study could imply the possible role of HLA-DRB1*07 in the incidence of aplastic anaemia. Moreover, the frequency of DRB1*04, DRB1*03 and DRB1*15 alleles showed intermediate correlation with Fanconi's anaemia.

  4. Efficient CRISPR-rAAV engineering of endogenous genes to study protein function by allele-specific RNAi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaulich, Manuel; Lee, Yeon J; Lönn, Peter; Springer, Aaron D; Meade, Bryan R; Dowdy, Steven F

    2015-04-20

    Gene knockout strategies, RNAi and rescue experiments are all employed to study mammalian gene function. However, the disadvantages of these approaches include: loss of function adaptation, reduced viability and gene overexpression that rarely matches endogenous levels. Here, we developed an endogenous gene knockdown/rescue strategy that combines RNAi selectivity with a highly efficient CRISPR directed recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus (rAAV) mediated gene targeting approach to introduce allele-specific mutations plus an allele-selective siRNA Sensitive (siSN) site that allows for studying gene mutations while maintaining endogenous expression and regulation of the gene of interest. CRISPR/Cas9 plus rAAV targeted gene-replacement and introduction of allele-specific RNAi sensitivity mutations in the CDK2 and CDK1 genes resulted in a >85% site-specific recombination of Neo-resistant clones versus ∼8% for rAAV alone. RNAi knockdown of wild type (WT) Cdk2 with siWT in heterozygotic knockin cells resulted in the mutant Cdk2 phenotype cell cycle arrest, whereas allele specific knockdown of mutant CDK2 with siSN resulted in a wild type phenotype. Together, these observations demonstrate the ability of CRISPR plus rAAV to efficiently recombine a genomic locus and tag it with a selective siRNA sequence that allows for allele-selective phenotypic assays of the gene of interest while it remains expressed and regulated under endogenous control mechanisms.

  5. Association of BoLA DRB3 alleles with variability in immune response among the crossbred cattle vaccinated for foot-and-mouth disease (FMD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowane, G R; Sharma, A K; Sankar, M; Narayanan, K; Das, Biswajit; Subramaniam, S; Pattnaik, B

    2013-08-01

    Polymorphism of bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) DRB3 gene is being intensively investigated for potential association with economically important diseases of cattle. Accordingly, we investigated the association of DRB3 Exon 2 polymorphism as evidenced by the variation in the binding pockets with variability in immune response to inactivated trivalent (O, A and Asia1) foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) vaccine in a closed population of crossbred cattle. Antibody titer of ≥ 1.8 was set as the cut off value to distinguish the protected (≥ 1.8) and unprotected (DRB3 alleles 0201, 0801 and 1501 always ranked high for protective immune response whereas alleles 0701, 1103 and 1101 consistently ranked low for unprotected immune response for all the three serotypes. Rank correlation of DRB3 alleles among the three serotypes was positive, high in magnitude and statistically significant (P<0.05). Logistic regression analysis revealed that odds of protection from the vaccine were highest for all the three serotypes if allele (∗)1501 was present and strengthened the results of allele ranking. Predicted amino acid substitution in the peptide binding pockets revealed that all the important sites had high Wu-Kabat index. Similarly, specific residues in pockets were crucial for immune response to FMD vaccine. There were specific substitutions in un-protected alleles such as absence of acidic amino acids substituted by basic amino acid at β71, presence of non-polar cysteine or basic histidine at β30 and presence of polar tyrosine at β37. From the observations, we hypothesize that the substitutions lead to unique conformational changes in the protein products of the studied alleles that would associate with the protective or unprotective antibody response to FMDV vaccine. The knowledge has potential implications in future selection programs if integrated with the complete BoLA haplotype details and production traits of the herd.

  6. Association between allelic variation due to short tandem repeats in tRNA gene of Entamoeba histolytica and clinical phenotypes of amoebiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Virendra; Ghoshal, Ujjala; Mittal, Balraj; Dhole, Tapan N; Ghoshal, Uday C

    2014-05-01

    Genotypes of Entamoeba histolytica (E. histolytica) may contribute clinical phenotypes of amoebiasis such as amoebic liver abscess (ALA), dysentery and asymptomatic cyst passers state. Hence, we evaluated allelic variation due to short tandem repeats (STRs) in tRNA gene of E. histolytica and clinical phenotypes of amoebiasis. Asymptomatic cyst passers (n=24), patients with dysentery (n=56) and ALA (n=107) were included. Extracted DNA from stool (dysentery, asymptomatic cyst passers) and liver aspirate was amplified using 6 E. histolytica specific tRNA-linked STRs (D-A, A-L, N-K2, R-R, S-Q, and S(TGA)-D) primers. PCR products were subjected to sequencing. Association between allelic variation and clinical phenotypes was analyzed. A total of 9 allelic variations were found in D-A, 8 in A-L, 4 in N-K2, 5 in R-R, 10 in S(TAG)-D and 7 in S-Q loci. A significant association was found between allelic variants and clinical phenotypes of amoebiasis. This study reveals that allelic variation due to short tandem repeats (STRs) in tRNA gene of E. histolytica is associated different clinical outcome of amoebiasis.

  7. Association between alleles of the transforming growth factor alpha locus and cleft lip and palate in the Chilean population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jara, L.; Blanco, R.; Chiffelle, I. [Univ. of Chile, Santiago (Chile)] [and others

    1995-07-17

    Two RFLPs at the TGFA locus were studied in 39 unrelated Chilean (Caucasoid-Mongoloid) patients with non-syndromic cleft lip/palate [CL(P)] and 51 control individuals. A highly significant association between BamHI A2 allele and CL(P) was detected ({chi}{sub 2} = 6.00; P = 0.014), while no association was found between TaqI RFLPs and clefting. No significant differences were found when comparing genotypes by type of cleft and a positive or negative family history of clefting. Our results seem to support rather definitively the association between TGFA and clefting but not support the hypothesis that TGFA is a major causal gene of CL(P). 29 refs., 5 tabs.

  8. Association between high expression macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) alleles and West Nile virus encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rituparna; Loughran, Kerry; Murchison, Charles; Qian, Feng; Leng, Lin; Song, Yan; Montgomery, Ruth R; Loeb, Mark; Bucala, Richard

    2016-02-01

    Infection with mosquito-borne West Nile virus (WNV) is usually asymptomatic but can lead to severe WNV encephalitis. The innate cytokine, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), is elevated in patients with WNV encephalitis and promotes viral neuroinvasion and mortality in animal models. In a case-control study, we examined functional polymorphisms in the MIF locus in a cohort of 454 North American patients with neuroinvasive WNV disease and found patients homozygous for high-expression MIF alleles to be >20-fold (p=0.008) more likely to have WNV encephalitis. These data indicate that MIF is an important determinant of severity of WNV neuropathogenesis and may be a therapeutic target.

  9. Allele frequency net 2015 update: new features for HLA epitopes, KIR and disease and HLA adverse drug reaction associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Galarza, Faviel F; Takeshita, Louise Y C; Santos, Eduardo J M; Kempson, Felicity; Maia, Maria Helena Thomaz; da Silva, Andrea Luciana Soares; Teles e Silva, André Luiz; Ghattaoraya, Gurpreet S; Alfirevic, Ana; Jones, Andrew R; Middleton, Derek

    2015-01-01

    It has been 12 years since the Allele Frequency Net Database (AFND; http://www.allelefrequencies.net) was first launched, providing the scientific community with an online repository for the storage of immune gene frequencies in different populations across the world. There have been a significant number of improvements from the first version, making AFND a primary resource for many clinical and scientific areas including histocompatibility, immunogenetics, pharmacogenetics and anthropology studies, among many others. The most widely used part of AFND stores population frequency data (alleles, genes or haplotypes) related to human leukocyte antigens (HLA), killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR), major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related genes (MIC) and a number of cytokine gene polymorphisms. AFND now contains >1400 populations from more than 10 million healthy individuals. Here, we report how the main features of AFND have been updated to include a new section on 'HLA epitope' frequencies in populations, a new section capturing the results of studies identifying HLA associations with adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and one for the examination of infectious and autoimmune diseases associated with KIR polymorphisms-thus extending AFND to serve a new user base in these growing areas of research. New criteria on data quality have also been included.

  10. Microsatellite allele A5.1 of MHC class I chain-related gene A is associated with latent autoimmune diabetes in adults in Latvia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzina, L; Shtauvere-Brameus, A; Rumba, I; Sanjeevi, C B

    2002-04-01

    NIDDM is one of the most common forms of diabetes. The diagnosis is based on WHO classification, which is a clinical classification and misses the autoimmune diabetes in adults. Therefore, among the clinically diagnosed NIDDM cases, there can be a certain number of patients with latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA). The MICA gene is located in the MHC class I region and is expressed by monocytes, keratinocytes, and endothelial cells. Sequence determination of the MICA gene identifies trinucleotide repeat (GCT) microsatellite polymorphism, which identifies 5 alleles with 4, 5, 6, and 9 repetitions of GCT (A4, A5, A6, and A9) or 5 repetitions of GCT with 1 additional G insertion for allele A5.1. From our previous studies, we have shown that microsatellite allele A5 of MICA is associated with IDDM. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that certain MICA alleles are associated with LADA among clinically diagnosed NIDDM. Out of 100 clinically diagnosed NIDDM patients, 49 tested positive for GAD65 and IA-2 antibodies by use of 35S RIA. Samples from these 49 patients and 96 healthy controls were analyzed for MICA by PCR amplification, and fragment sizes were determined in an ABI prism DNA sequencer. Our results show that MICA allele A5.1 is significantly increased in antibody-positive (GAD65 or IA-2) NIDDM patients [35/49 (72%)] when compared to healthy controls [22/96 (23%)] (OR = 8.4; P < 0.0001). However, we do not see any association with each of the antibodies separately. From our study, we conclude that (a) MICA allele A5.1 is associated with LADA and (b) MICA may play an important role in the etiopathogenesis of LADA.

  11. Association of BLV infection profiles with alleles of the BoLA-DRB3.2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliarena, M A; Poli, M; Sala, L; Ceriani, C; Gutierrez, S; Dolcini, G; Rodríguez, E M; Mariño, B; Rodríguez-Dubra, C; Esteban, E N

    2008-08-01

    Bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) causes lymphosarcoma and persistent lymphocytosis (PL). Some MHC class II gene polymorphisms have been associated with resistance and susceptibility to the development of lymphosarcoma and PL, as well as with a reduced number of circulating BLV-infected lymphocytes. Previously, 230 BLV-infected Holstein cattle were classified into two infection profiles characterized by low and high proviral loads (LPL and HPL respectively). Here, the influence of the polymorphism at the BoLA-DRB3.2* gene of these animals was examined. After genotyping, the association between the BoLA-DRB3.2* alleles and the BLV infection profile was determined as the odds ratio (OR). Two subtypes of allele *11 were identified (ISAG*0901 and *0902). Allele ISAG*0902 showed a stronger association with the LPL profile (OR = 8.24; P DRB3.2* alleles were assigned to three categories: resistant (R), susceptible (S) and neutral (N). Based on their DRB3 genotypes, cattle were classified as homozygous or heterozygous. The RR and RN genotypes were associated with the LPL profile, while the SS and NS genotypes were associated with the HPL profile. The RS genotype could not be associated with any particular profile. Our results show that allele ISAG*0902 appears to be the best BLV resistance marker in Holstein cattle.

  12. Combined Effects of GSTM1 Null Allele and APOL1 Renal Risk Alleles in CKD Progression in the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodonyi-Kovacs, Gabor; Ma, Jennie Z; Chang, Jamison; Lipkowitz, Michael S; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Winkler, Cheryl Ann; Le, Thu H

    2016-10-01

    Apolipoprotein L-1 (APOL1) high-risk alleles and the glutathione-S-transferase-μ1 (GSTM1) null allele have been shown separately to associate with CKD progression in the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK) trial participants. Here, we determined combined effects of GSTM1 null and APOL1 high-risk alleles on clinical outcomes in 682 AASK participants who were classified into four groups by GSTM1 null or active genotype and APOL1 high- or low-risk genotype. We assessed survival differences among these groups by log-rank test and Cox regression adjusted for important clinical variables for time to GFR event (change in GFR of 50% or 25-ml/min per 1.73 m(2) decline), incident ESRD, death, or composite outcomes. The groups differed significantly in event-free survival for incident ESRD and composite outcomes (P≤0.001 by log-rank test). Compared with the reference GSTM1 active/APOL1 low-risk group, other groups had these hazard ratios for the composite outcome of incident ESRD and change in GFR: GSTM1 active/APOL1 high-risk hazard ratio, 2.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.76 to 5.90 (P=0.15); GSTM1 null/APOL1 low-risk hazard ratio, 2.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.08 to 3.88 (P=0.03); and GSTM1 null/APOL1 high-risk hazard ratio, 3.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.51 to 5.96 (P=0.002). In conclusion, GSTM1 null and APOL1 high-risk alleles deleteriously affect CKD progression among blacks with hypertension, and subjects with both GSTM1 null and APOL1 high-risk genotypes had highest risk of adverse renal outcomes. Larger cohorts are needed to fully explore interactions of GSTM1 and APOL1 genotypes in other subgroups.

  13. Association of the CYP1B1*3 allele with survival in patients with prostate cancer receiving docetaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sissung, Tristan M; Danesi, Romano; Price, Douglas K; Steinberg, Seth M; de Wit, Ronald; Zahid, Muhammad; Gaikwad, Nilesh; Cavalieri, Ercole; Dahut, William L; Sackett, Dan L; Figg, William D; Sparreboom, Alex

    2008-01-01

    Using a single nucleotide polymorphism association study in 52 men with prostate cancer receiving docetaxel, we found that individuals carrying two copies of the CYP1B1*3 polymorphic variant had a poor prognosis after docetaxel-based therapies compared with individuals carrying at least one copy of the CYP1B1*1 allele (30.6 versus 12.8 months; P=0.0004). The association between CYP1B1*3 and response to therapy was not observed in similar subjects receiving non-taxane-based therapy (P=0.18). The systemic clearance of docetaxel was also unrelated to CYP1B1 genotype status (P=0.39), indicating that the association of CYP1B1*3 with clinical response is not due to docetaxel metabolism. To explain these results, we hypothesized that an indirect gene-drug interaction was interfering with the primary mechanism of action of docetaxel, tubulin polymerization. We therefore conducted tubulin polymerization experiments with taxanes in the presence or absence of certain CYP1B1 estrogen metabolites, which are known to bind to nucleophilic sites in proteins and DNA, that revealed the primary estrogen metabolite of CYP1B1, 4-hydroxyestradiol (4-OHE2), when oxidized to estradiol-3,4-quinone strongly inhibits tubulin polymerization. The 4-OHE2 is also formed more readily by the protein encoded by the CYP1B1*3 allele, validating further our data in patients. Furthermore, estradiol-3,4-quinone reacted in vitro with docetaxel to form the 4-OHE2-docetaxel adduct. This pilot study provides evidence that CYP1B1*3 may be an important marker for estimating docetaxel efficacy in patients with prostate cancer. This link is likely associated with CYP1B1*3 genotype-dependent estrogen metabolism.

  14. Association of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaeker, Karoline B

    2017-01-01

    1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, a list of 175 genes was developed based of their involvement in cancer-related pathways. METHODS: Using data from a genome-wide map of SNPs associated with allelic expression, we assessed the association of ~320 SNPs located in the vicinity of these genes with breast...

  15. Risk alleles of USF1 gene predict cardiovascular disease of women in two prospective studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Upstream transcription factor 1 (USF1 is a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor controlling several critical genes in lipid and glucose metabolism. Of some 40 genes regulated by USF1, several are involved in the molecular pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Although the USF1 gene has been shown to have a critical role in the etiology of familial combined hyperlipidemia, which predisposes to early CVD, the gene's potential role as a risk factor for CVD events at the population level has not been established. Here we report the results from a prospective genetic-epidemiological study of the association between the USF1 variants, CVD, and mortality in two large Finnish cohorts. Haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms exposing all common allelic variants of USF1 were genotyped in a prospective case-cohort design with two distinct cohorts followed up during 1992-2001 and 1997-2003. The total number of follow-up years was 112,435 in 14,140 individuals, of which 2,225 were selected for genotyping based on the case-cohort study strategy. After adjustment for conventional risk factors, we observed an association of USF1 with CVD and mortality among females. In combined analysis of the two cohorts, female carriers of a USF1 risk haplotype had a 2-fold risk of a CVD event (hazard ratio [HR] 2.02; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.16-3.53; p = 0.01 and an increased risk of all-cause mortality (HR 2.52; 95% CI 1.46-4.35; p = 0.0009. A putative protective haplotype of USF1 was also identified. Our study shows how a gene identified in exceptional families proves to be important also at the population level, implying that allelic variants of USF1 significantly influence the prospective risk of CVD and even all-cause mortality in females.

  16. Association between HLA-DRB1, HLA-DRQB1 alleles, and CD4(+)CD28(null) T cells in a Chinese population with coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenjie; Cui, Ying; Zhen, Lihui; Huang, Lijuan

    2011-03-01

    CD4(+)CD28(null) T cells are present in increased numbers in the peripheral blood of patients with acute coronary syndrome. However, the triggers of expansion of these cells are unclear. Susceptibility to coronary heart disease (CHD) is strongly associated with alleles of human leukocyte antigen (HLA), but it is not equally strong in different human populations. The objective of the study was to investigate association between CD4(+)CD28(null) T cells and HLA-DRB1 alleles. The HLA alleles were determined by polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) method, in a group of CHD patients and control subjects from the same area. The number of CD4(+)CD28(null) T cells was measured using the flow cytometry technique. The HLA-DRB1*01 (RR = 4.705, P Chinese population, and increased numbers of CD4(+)CD28(null) T cells were found in association with HLA-DRB1*04 (17.1%) and DRB*01 (12.9%), while decreased numbers of CD4(+)CD28(null) T cells were present in subjects with DRB1*15 (0.8%). CHD in Chinese population is strongly associated with HLA-DRB1*01 and DRB1*04 haplotypes, and formation of CD4(+)CD28(null) T cells was related to HLA-DRB1*01, DRB1*04, and DRB1*15 alleles.

  17. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha allele 2 shows an association with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in Latvians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtauvere-Brameus, A; Dabadghao, P; Rumba, I; Sanjeevi, C B

    2002-04-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is one of the most common chronic diseases. It is an autoimmune disease. Genes contributing the most for development of IDDM are located on chromosome 6p21.3 in the region called the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). HLA-DQ8/DR4 and DQ2/DR3 have shown positive association with IDDM, while DQ6 has negative association with IDDM in most Caucasian populations. The location of the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) gene in the MHC suggests the role of TNF in the etiology of IDDM as an autoimmune disease. The TNF region contains several polymorphisms that are associated with different levels of TNF-alpha production and susceptibility to autoimmune and infectious diseases. Ninety-two Latvian IDDM patients corresponding to WHO diagnostic criteria and 107 unrelated age- and sex-matched healthy controls were analyzed for the frequency of TNF-alpha alleles to test the hypothesis that TNF-alpha is associated with IDDM. We found that TNF-alpha microsatellite allele 2 is associated with IDDM, 29/92 (32%), versus 14/107 (13%) in healthy controls. The test of the strongest association of the MICA A5 allele and TNF-alpha allele 2 with IDDM showed that both are independently associated with the disease.

  18. ZNF804A risk allele is associated with relatively intact gray matter volume in patients with schizophrenia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donohoe, Gary

    2011-02-01

    ZNF804A rs1344706 is the first genetic risk variant to achieve genome wide significance for psychosis. Following earlier evidence that patients carrying the ZNF804A risk allele had relatively spared memory function compared to patient non-carriers, we investigated whether ZNF804A was also associated with variation in brain volume. In a sample of 70 patients and 38 healthy participants we used voxel based morphometry to compare homozygous (AA) carriers of the ZNF804A risk allele to heterozygous and homozygous (AC\\/CC) non-carriers for both whole brain volume and specific regions implicated in earlier ZNF804A studies-the dorsolateral pre-frontal cortex, the hippocampus, and the amygdala. For patients, but not for controls, we found that homozygous \\'AA\\' risk carriers had relatively larger gray matter volumes than heterozygous\\/homozygous non-carriers (AC\\/CC), particularly for hippocampal volumes. These data are consistent with our earlier behavioral data and suggest that ZNF804A is delineating a schizophrenia subtype characterized by relatively intact brain volume. Establishing if this represents a discrete molecular pathogenesis with consequences for nosology and treatment will be an important next step in understanding ZNF084A\\'s role in illness risk.

  19. Type 2 diabetes risk allele near CENTD2 is associated with decreased glucose-stimulated insulin release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T; Sparsø, T; Grarup, N;

    2011-01-01

    By combining multiple genome-wide association (GWA) studies and comprehensive replication efforts, 12 novel type 2 diabetes associated loci have recently been discovered. Here we evaluate the effect of lead variants of these loci on estimates of insulin release and insulin resistance derived from...... an oral glucose tolerance test. We examined 12 lead variants in or near HMGA2, CENTD2 (also known as ARAP1), KLF14, PRC1, TP53INP1, ZBED3, ZFAND6, CHCHD9, DUSP9, KCNQ1, BCL11A and HNF1A in 5,722 middle-aged people from the population-based Inter99 sample. Carriers of the major diabetogenic allele of rs...... decreased BIGTT-AIR (2.6%, p = 0.01). No associations with intermediate metabolic traits were found in women. For the remaining ten lead variants no consistent associations were demonstrated. Of the lead variants from 12 novel type 2 diabetes associated loci, CENTD2 significantly associated with increased...

  20. Association of HLA-DRB1, DQB1 Alleles with Chronic Urticaria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jing; TAN Zhijian; LI Jiawen; XIONG Ping

    2005-01-01

    Summary: In order to investigate the association of genotypes of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles with the genetic susceptibility of chronic urticaria (CU), genotypes of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 genes were detected by polymerase chain reactions with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) in 42 patients with CU (19 men and 23 women, mean age 30.67±12.45 y old as well as 193 racially matched healthy persons in ethnic Han from Hubei provinece. Gene frequencies of HLA-DRB1*12, *0901 (RR=3.11, χ2=7.579, P=0.006; RR=2.47, χ2=5.684, P=0.017) were significantly increased in CU patients as compared with that in healthy people. Gene frequencies of HLA-DQB1*05 (RR=0.26, χ2=6.683, P=0.01) were significantly decreased in CU patients. It was suggested that CU was found strongly associated with HLA-DRB1*12, *0901 and HLA-DQB1*05, the former might be the genetic markers for susceptibility to CU, but the latter might play a resistive role.

  1. Allele-specific chromatin remodeling in the ZPBP2/GSDMB/ORMDL3 locus associated with the risk of asthma and autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlaan, Dominique J; Berlivet, Soizik; Hunninghake, Gary M; Madore, Anne-Marie; Larivière, Mathieu; Moussette, Sanny; Grundberg, Elin; Kwan, Tony; Ouimet, Manon; Ge, Bing; Hoberman, Rose; Swiatek, Marcin; Dias, Joana; Lam, Kevin C L; Koka, Vonda; Harmsen, Eef; Soto-Quiros, Manuel; Avila, Lydiana; Celedón, Juan C; Weiss, Scott T; Dewar, Ken; Sinnett, Daniel; Laprise, Catherine; Raby, Benjamin A; Pastinen, Tomi; Naumova, Anna K

    2009-09-01

    Common SNPs in the chromosome 17q12-q21 region alter the risk for asthma, type 1 diabetes, primary biliary cirrhosis, and Crohn disease. Previous reports by us and others have linked the disease-associated genetic variants with changes in expression of GSDMB and ORMDL3 transcripts in human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). The variants also alter regulation of other transcripts, and this domain-wide cis-regulatory effect suggests a mechanism involving long-range chromatin interactions. Here, we further dissect the disease-linked haplotype and identify putative causal DNA variants via a combination of genetic and functional analyses. First, high-throughput resequencing of the region and genotyping of potential candidate variants were performed. Next, additional mapping of allelic expression differences in Yoruba HapMap LCLs allowed us to fine-map the basis of the cis-regulatory differences to a handful of candidate functional variants. Functional assays identified allele-specific differences in nucleosome distribution, an allele-specific association with the insulator protein CTCF, as well as a weak promoter activity for rs12936231. Overall, this study shows a common disease allele linked to changes in CTCF binding and nucleosome occupancy leading to altered domain-wide cis-regulation. Finally, a strong association between asthma and cis-regulatory haplotypes was observed in three independent family-based cohorts (p = 1.78 x 10(-8)). This study demonstrates the requirement of multiple parallel allele-specific tools for the investigation of noncoding disease variants and functional fine-mapping of human disease-associated haplotypes.

  2. The Dopaminergic Reward System and Leisure Time Exercise Behavior: A Candidate Allele Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Huppertz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Twin studies provide evidence that genetic influences contribute strongly to individual differences in exercise behavior. We hypothesize that part of this heritability is explained by genetic variation in the dopaminergic reward system. Eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in DRD1: rs265981, DRD2: rs6275, rs1800497, DRD3: rs6280, DRD4: rs1800955, DBH: rs1611115, rs2519152, and in COMT: rs4680 and three variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs in DRD4, upstream of DRD5, and in DAT1 were investigated for an association with regular leisure time exercise behavior. Materials and Methods. Data on exercise activities and at least one SNP/VNTR were available for 8,768 individuals aged 7 to 50 years old that were part of the Netherlands Twin Register. Exercise behavior was quantified as weekly metabolic equivalents of task (MET spent on exercise activities. Mixed models were fitted in SPSS with genetic relatedness as a random effect. Results. None of the genetic variants were associated with exercise behavior (P>.02, despite sufficient power to detect small effects. Discussion and Conclusions. We did not confirm that allelic variants involved in dopaminergic function play a role in creating individual differences in exercise behavior. A plea is made for large genome-wide association studies to unravel the genetic pathways that affect this health-enhancing behavior.

  3. Endochondral ossification pathway genes and postmenopausal osteoporosis: Association and specific allele related serum bone sialoprotein levels in Han Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunzhi; Liu, Haiyan; Zhang, Chen; Zhang, Tianxiao; Zhang, Bo; Li, Lu; Chen, Gang; Fu, Dongke; Wang, KunZheng

    2015-11-16

    Osteoporosis is a systemic skeletal disorder characterized by reduced bone mineral density (BMD) and disrupted bone architecture, predisposing the patient to increased fracture risk. Evidence from early genetic epidemiological studies has indicated a major role for genetics in the development of osteoporosis and the variation in BMD. In this study, we focused on two key genes in the endochondral ossification pathway, IBSP and PTHLH. Over 9,000 postmenopausal Han Chinese women were recruited, and 54 SNPs were genotyped. Two significant SNPs within IBSP, rs1054627 and rs17013181, were associated with BMD and postmenopausal osteoporosis by the two-stage strategy, and rs17013181 was also significantly associated with serum IBSP levels. Moreover, one haplotype (rs12425376-rs10843047-rs42294) covering the 5' end of PTHLH was associated with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Our results provide evidence for the association of these two key endochondral ossification pathway genes with BMD and osteoporosis in postmenopausal Han Chinese women. Combined with previous findings, we provide evidence that a particular SNP in IBSP has an allele-specific effect on mRNA levels, which would, in turn, reflect serum IBSP levels.

  4. Characterization of newly established colorectal cancer cell lines: correlation between cytogenetic abnormalities and allelic deletions associated with multistep tumorigenesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hans Gerdes; Abul Elahi; Quanguang Chen; Suresh C. Jhanwar

    2000-01-01

    We have established a series of 20 colorectal cancer cell lines and performed cytogenetic and RFLP analyses to show that the recurrent genetic abnormalities of chromosomes 1, 5, 17 and 18 associated with multistep tumorigenesis in colorectal cancer, and frequently detected as recurrent abnormalities in primary tumours, are also retained in long-term established cell lines. Earlier studies by us and other investigators showed that allelic losses of chromosomes 1 and 17 in primary colorectal cancers predicted poorer survival for the patients $(P = 0.03)$. We utilized the cell lines to identify specific chromosomal sites or gene(s) on chromosomes 1 and 17 which confer more aggressive phenotype. Cytogenetic deletions of chromosome 1p were detected in 14 out of the 20 (70%) cell lines, whereas allelic deletions for 1p using polymorphic markers were detected in 13 out of 18 (72%) informative cell lines for at least one polymorphic marker. We have performed Northern blotting, immunohistochemical staining (p53 mRNA, protein) and RFLP analysis using several probes including p53 and nm23. RFLP analysis using a total of seven polymorphic markers located on 17p and 17q arms showed allelic losses around the p53 locus in 16 out of the 20 cell lines (80%), four of which were losses of the p53 locus itself. In addition, seven cell lines (out of nine informative cases) also showed losses of the nm23 gene, four with concurrent losses of the p53 locus, while the remaining three were homozygous. In addition, five out of seven cell lines with nm23 deletions were derived from hepatic metastatic tumours, and one cell line was obtained from recurrent tumour. A comparison between allelic deletions of 1p and functional loss of nm23 gene revealed a close association between these two events in cell lines derived from hepatic metastasis. Following immunohistochemical staining, nine out of the twenty cell lines showed high levels (25–80%) of mutant p53, four showed intermediate levels (< 20

  5. Multiple rare variants as a cause of a common phenotype: several different lactase persistence associated alleles in a single ethnic group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Catherine J E; Raga, Tamiru Oljira; Tarekegn, Ayele; Browning, Sarah L; Elamin, Mohamed F; Bekele, Endashaw; Thomas, Mark G; Weale, Michael E; Bradman, Neil; Swallow, Dallas M

    2009-12-01

    Persistence of intestinal lactase into adulthood allows humans to use milk from other mammals as a source of food and water. This genetic trait has arisen by convergent evolution and the derived alleles of at least three different single nucleotide polymorphisms (-13910C>T, -13915T>G, -14010G>C) are associated with lactase persistence in different populations. Each allele occurs on an extended haplotype, consistent with positive directional selection. The SNPs are located in an 'enhancer' sequence in an intron of a neighboring gene (MCM6) and modulate lactase transcription in vitro. However, a number of lactase persistent individuals carry none of these alleles, but other low-frequency single nucleotide polymorphisms have been observed in the same region. Here we examine a cohort of 107 milk-drinking Somali camel-herders from Ethiopia. Eight polymorphic sites are identified in the enhancer. -13915*G and -13907*G (a previously reported candidate) are each significantly associated with lactase persistence. A new allele, -14009*G, has borderline association with lactase persistence, but loses significance after correction for multiple testing. Sequence diversity of the enhancer is significantly higher in the lactase persistent members of this and a second cohort compared with non-persistent members of the two groups (P = 7.7 x 10(-9) and 1.0 x 10(-3)). By comparing other loci, we show that this difference is not due to population sub-structure, demonstrating that increased diversity can accompany selection. This contrasts with the well-documented observation that positive selection decreases diversity by driving up the frequency of a single advantageous allele, and has implications for association studies.

  6. A cis-eQTL of HLA-DRB1 and a frameshift mutation of MICA contribute to the pattern of association of HLA alleles with cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dan; Gyllensten, Ulf

    2014-04-01

    The association of classic human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles with risk of cervical cancer has been extensively studied, and a protective effect has consistently been found for DRB1*1301, DQA1*0103, and/or DQB1*0603 (these three alleles are in perfect linkage disequilibrium [LD] and often occur on the same haplotype in Europeans), while reports have differed widely with respect to the effect of HLA-B*07, DRB1*1501, and/or DQB1*0602 (the last two alleles are also in perfect LD in Europeans). It is not clear whether the reported HLA alleles are responsible for the differences in cervical cancer susceptibility, or if functional variants at other locations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region may explain the effect. In order to assess the relative contribution of both classic HLA alleles and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MHC region to cervical cancer susceptibility, we have imputed classic HLA alleles in 1034 cervical cancer patients and 3948 controls in a Swedish population for an integrated analysis. We found that the protective haplotype DRB1*1301-DQA1*0103-DQB1*0603 has a direct effect on cervical cancer and always occurs together with the C allele of a HLA-DRB1 cis-eQTL (rs9272143), which increases the expression of HLA-DRB1. The haplotype rs9272143C-DRB1*1301-DQA1*0103-DQB1*0603 conferred the strongest protection against cervical cancer (odds ratio [OR] = 0.41, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.32-0.52, P = 6.2 × 10(-13)). On the other hand, the associations with HLA-B*0702 and DRB1*1501-DQB1*0602 are attributable to the joint effects of both the HLA-DRB1 cis-eQTL (rs9272143) and a frameshift mutation (G inserion of rs67841474, also known as A5.1) of the MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence A gene (MICA). Variation in LD between the classic HLA loci, rs9272143 and rs67841474 between populations may explain the different associations of HLA-B*07 and DRB1*1501-DQB1*0602 with cervical cancer between studies. The

  7. Two HLA DRB 1 alleles confer independent genetic susceptibility to Graves disease: relevance of cross-population studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marga, M; Denisova, A; Sochnev, A; Pirags, V; Farid, N R

    2001-08-01

    Recent studies of Graves disease (GD) employing genome scanning techniques excluded the major histocompatibility complex as a contributor to disease liability. These findings contradict earlier population association studies. Our own earlier studies have also emphasized that genetic variation in human populations may give novel clues to disease liability and manifestations. To this end, we studied HLA class II alleles in 47 Latvian GD patients and 111 matched healthy controls. As expected, we found that DRB1*03 and DQA1*0501 (OR = 3.6, P = 0.029 and OR 2.35, P = 0.0373, respectively) were associated with GD. Unforeseen, DRB1*04 was found to be significantly increased in the patients compared to controls (OR 3.267, corrected P = 0.0319). The two DRB1 alleles conferred two non-overlapping and independent susceptibilities to GD, in that only three patients were positive for both alleles, and the removal of each allele in turn resulted in only the other DRB1 allele showing significant association with the disease. There was no heterogeneity between the two patient groups (DRB1*03 positive and DRB1*04 positive) in clinical characteristics or disease manifestations. The phenotype DRB1*03 and/or DRB1*04 was found in 34/47 patients compared to 27/111 controls yielding an OR of 7.395 (P corrected = 0.000019). We examined the structural basis of DRB1 susceptibility to GD in light of this and previous studies, showing that DRB1*03, 04, and 08 were positively associated with the disease, whereas DRB1*07 was negatively associated. Differences in protein sequences were noted at residues 54, 57, 59, and 66; positions 54, 57, and 66 are on the same face of the alpha helix. The canonical arginine 54 is replaced by glutamine in DRB1*07. At position 66, asparagine in DRB1*03 and tyrosine in DRB1*04 are replaced by phenylalanine in DRB1*07. Residue 59, likely involved in pocket formation in the antigen binding groove, is modified by replacement of tyrosine in DRB1*03, 08, and 04 and

  8. Vitamin D Responsive Elements within the HLA-DRB1 Promoter Region in Sardinian Multiple Sclerosis Associated Alleles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murru, Maria Rita; Corongiu, Daniela; Tranquilli, Stefania; Fadda, Elisabetta; Murru, Raffaele; Schirru, Lucia; Secci, Maria Antonietta; Costa, Gianna; Asunis, Isadora; Cuccu, Stefania; Fenu, Giuseppe; Lorefice, Lorena; Carboni, Nicola; Mura, Gioia; Rosatelli, Maria Cristina; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D response elements (VDREs) have been found in the promoter region of the MS-associated allele HLA-DRB1*15∶01, suggesting that with low vitamin D availability VDREs are incapable of inducing *15∶01 expression allowing in early life autoreactive T-cells to escape central thymic deletion. The Italian island of Sardinia exhibits a very high frequency of MS and high solar radiation exposure. We test the contribution of VDREs analysing the promoter region of the MS-associated DRB1 *04∶05, *03∶01, *13∶01 and *15∶01 and non-MS-associated *16∶01, *01, *11, *07∶01 alleles in a cohort of Sardinians (44 MS patients and 112 healthy subjects). Sequencing of the DRB1 promoter region revealed a homozygous canonical VDRE in all *15∶01, *16∶01, *11 and in 45/73 *03∶01 and in heterozygous state in 28/73 *03∶01 and all *01 alleles. A new mutated homozygous VDRE was found in all *13∶03, *04∶05 and *07∶01 alleles. Functionality of mutated and canonical VDREs was assessed for its potential to modulate levels of DRB1 gene expression using an in vitro transactivation assay after stimulation with active vitamin D metabolite. Vitamin D failed to increase promoter activity of the *04∶05 and *03∶01 alleles carrying the new mutated VDRE, while the *16∶01 and *03∶01 alleles carrying the canonical VDRE sequence showed significantly increased transcriptional activity. The ability of VDR to bind the mutant VDRE in the DRB1 promoter was evaluated by EMSA. Efficient binding of VDR to the VDRE sequence found in the *16∶01 and in the *15∶01 allele reduced electrophoretic mobility when either an anti-VDR or an anti-RXR monoclonal antibody was added. Conversely, the Sardinian mutated VDRE sample showed very low affinity for the RXR/VDR heterodimer. These data seem to exclude a role of VDREs in the promoter region of the DRB1 gene in susceptibility to MS carried by DRB1* alleles in Sardinian patients. PMID:22848563

  9. Beneficial role of D allele in controlling ACE levels: a study among Brahmins of north India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SHOBHA KUMARI; NIDHI SHARMA; SUNIL THAKUR; PRAKASH R. MONDAL; KKALLUR N. SARASWATHY

    2016-06-01

    India being a country with vast diversity is expected to have different dietary and life style patterns which in turn may lead topopulation-specific environmental risk factors. Further, the interaction of these risk factors with the genetic makeup of pop-ulation makes it either susceptible or resistant to cardiovascular disease. One such candidate gene is angiotensin convertingenzyme (ACE) for various cardiovascular mechanisms. ACE is the key enzyme of the renin angiotensin aldosterone systempathway which maintains homeostasis blood pressure in the body and any variation in the levels is reported to be associatedwith various complex diseases. The DD genotype is found to increase ACE levels, which is associated with cardiovasculardiseases and decrease in ACE levels are associated with kidney diseases. The aim of this study was to understand the distribu-tion of ACE I/D polymorphism and ACE levels among Brahmins of National Capital Region (NCR) north India, with respectto age and sex ratio distribution. In this study, 136 subjects of which 50 males and 86 females, who were unrelated up to firstcousin, aged 25 to70 years were studied.ACEgene was found to be polymorphic with high frequency of heterozygote (ID)followed by II and DD genotypes. The studied population was found to be in Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium with respect toACE I/D polymorphism (P =0.55). I allele frequency was found to be higher (0.560) than the D allele (0.44). The medianlevel of ACE was found to be 65.96 ng/mL (48.12–86.24) which is towards lower side of the normal range. ACE levels werefound to be increased among individual having either of the homozygotes that is II or DD and higher frequency of heterozy-gote (ID) is indicative of advantage in the population by maintaining lower ACE levels. The limitation of the present study islow sample size, however, the merit is that the subjects belonged to a Mendalian population with a common gene pool

  10. Evidence of an association between the Arg72 allele of the peptide YY and increased risk of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torekov, Signe S; Larsen, Lesli H; Glümer, Charlotte;

    2005-01-01

    1.05-1.35]). The same polymorphism associated with overweight (25 oral glucose...... tolerance test (OGTT) (P = 0.03), an increased area under the curve for the post-OGTT plasma glucose level (P = 0.03), and a lower insulinogenic index (P = 0.01). In conclusion, the common Arg allele of the PYY Arg72Thr variant modestly associates with type 2 diabetes and with type 2 diabetes...

  11. B-RAF mutant alleles associated with Langerhans cell histiocytosis, a granulomatous pediatric disease.

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    Takeshi Satoh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH features inflammatory granuloma characterised by the presence of CD1a+ dendritic cells or 'LCH cells'. Badalian-Very et al. recently reported the presence of a canonical (V600EB-RAF mutation in 57% of paraffin-embedded biopsies from LCH granuloma. Here we confirm their findings and report the identification of two novel B-RAF mutations detected in LCH patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: Mutations of B-RAF were observed in granuloma samples from 11 out of 16 patients using 'next generation' pyrosequencing. In 9 cases the mutation identified was (V600EB-RAF. In 2 cases novel polymorphisms were identified. A somatic (600DLATB-RAF insertion mimicked the structural and functional consequences of the (V600EB-RAF mutant. It destabilized the inactive conformation of the B-RAF kinase and resulted in increased ERK activation in 293 T cells. The (600DLATB-RAF and (V600EB-RAF mutations were found enriched in DNA and mRNA from the CD1a+ fraction of granuloma. They were absent from the blood and monocytes of 58 LCH patients, with a lower threshold of sequencing sensitivity of 1%-2% relative mutation abundance. A novel germ line (T599AB-RAF mutant allele was detected in one patient, at a relative mutation abundance close to 50% in the LCH granuloma, blood monocytes and lymphocytes. However, (T599AB-RAF did not destabilize the inactive conformation of the B-RAF kinase, and did not induce increased ERK phosphorylation or C-RAF transactivation. CONCLUSIONS: Our data confirmed presence of the (V600EB-RAF mutation in LCH granuloma of some patients, and identify two novel B-RAF mutations. They indicate that (V600EB-RAF and (600DLATB-RAF mutations are somatic mutants enriched in LCH CD1a(+ cells and absent from the patient blood. Further studies are needed to assess the functional consequences of the germ-line (T599AB-RAF allele.

  12. B-RAF Mutant Alleles Associated with Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis, a Granulomatous Pediatric Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hui-chun; Mian, Sophie; Trouillet, Celine; Mufti, Ghulam; Emile, Jean-Francois; Fraternali, Franca; Donadieu, Jean; Geissmann, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    Background Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) features inflammatory granuloma characterised by the presence of CD1a+ dendritic cells or ‘LCH cells’. Badalian-Very et al. recently reported the presence of a canonical V600EB-RAF mutation in 57% of paraffin-embedded biopsies from LCH granuloma. Here we confirm their findings and report the identification of two novel B-RAF mutations detected in LCH patients. Methods and Results Mutations of B-RAF were observed in granuloma samples from 11 out of 16 patients using ‘next generation’ pyrosequencing. In 9 cases the mutation identified was V600EB-RAF. In 2 cases novel polymorphisms were identified. A somatic 600DLATB-RAF insertion mimicked the structural and functional consequences of the V600EB-RAF mutant. It destabilized the inactive conformation of the B-RAF kinase and resulted in increased ERK activation in 293 T cells. The 600DLATB-RAF and V600EB-RAF mutations were found enriched in DNA and mRNA from the CD1a+ fraction of granuloma. They were absent from the blood and monocytes of 58 LCH patients, with a lower threshold of sequencing sensitivity of 1%–2% relative mutation abundance. A novel germ line T599AB-RAF mutant allele was detected in one patient, at a relative mutation abundance close to 50% in the LCH granuloma, blood monocytes and lymphocytes. However, T599AB-RAF did not destabilize the inactive conformation of the B-RAF kinase, and did not induce increased ERK phosphorylation or C-RAF transactivation. Conclusions Our data confirmed presence of the V600EB-RAF mutation in LCH granuloma of some patients, and identify two novel B-RAF mutations. They indicate that V600EB-RAF and 600DLATB-RAF mutations are somatic mutants enriched in LCH CD1a+ cells and absent from the patient blood. Further studies are needed to assess the functional consequences of the germ-line T599AB-RAF allele. PMID:22506009

  13. Coding variants at hexa-allelic amino acid 13 of HLA-DRB1 explain independent SNP associations with follicular lymphoma risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Jia Nee; Smedby, Karin E; Akers, Nicholas K; Berglund, Mattias; Irwan, Ishak D; Jia, Xiaoming; Li, Yi; Conde, Lucia; Darabi, Hatef; Bracci, Paige M; Melbye, Mads; Adami, Hans-Olov; Glimelius, Bengt; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Padyukov, Leonid; Humphreys, Keith; Enblad, Gunilla; Skibola, Christine F; de Bakker, Paul I W; Liu, Jianjun

    2013-07-11

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma represents a diverse group of blood malignancies, of which follicular lymphoma (FL) is a common subtype. Previous genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II region multiple independent SNPs that are significantly associated with FL risk. To dissect these signals and determine whether coding variants in HLA genes are responsible for the associations, we conducted imputation, HLA typing, and sequencing in three independent populations for a total of 689 cases and 2,446 controls. We identified a hexa-allelic amino acid polymorphism at position 13 of the HLA-DR beta chain that showed the strongest association with FL within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region (multiallelic p = 2.3 × 10⁻¹⁵). Out of six possible amino acids that occurred at that position within the population, we classified two as high risk (Tyr and Phe), two as low risk (Ser and Arg), and two as moderate risk (His and Gly). There was a 4.2-fold difference in risk (95% confidence interval = 2.9-6.1) between subjects carrying two alleles encoding high-risk amino acids and those carrying two alleles encoding low-risk amino acids (p = 1.01 × 10⁻¹⁴). This coding variant might explain the complex SNP associations identified by GWASs and suggests a common HLA-DR antigen-driven mechanism for the pathogenesis of FL and rheumatoid arthritis.

  14. Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness Locus on Chromosome 7832-q33 Identified by Linkage and Allelic Imbalance Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillippa J. Neville

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The biologic aggressiveness of prostate tumors is an important indicator of prognosis. Chromosome 7g32-q33 was recently reported to show linkage to more aggressive prostate cancer, based on Gleason score, in a large sibling pair study. We report confirmation and narrowing of the linked region using finer-scale genotyping. We also report a high frequency of allelic imbalance. (AI defined within this locus in a series of 48 primary prostate tumors from men unselected for family history or disease status. The highest frequency of AI was observed with adjacent markers D7S2531. (52% and D7S1804. (36%. These two markers delineated a common region of AI, with 24 tumors exhibiting interstitial AI involving one or both markers. The 1.1-Mb candidate region contains relatively few transcripts. Additionally, we observed positive associations between interstitial AI at D7S1804 and early age at diagnosis. (P=.03 as well as a high combined Gleason score and tumor stage. (P=.06. Interstitial AI at D7S2531 was associated with a positive family history of prostate cancer. (P=.05. These data imply that we have localized a prostate cancer tumor aggressiveness loci to chromosome 7832-q33 that is involved in familial and nonfamilial forms of prostate cancer.

  15. Arginine vasopressin 1a receptor RS3 promoter microsatellites in schizophrenia: a study of the effect of the "risk" allele on clinical symptoms and facial affect recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golimbet, Vera; Alfimova, Margarita; Abramova, Lilia; Kaleda, Vasily; Gritsenko, Inga

    2015-02-28

    We studied AVPR1A RS3 polymorphism in schizophrenic patients and controls. AVPR1A RS3 was not associated with schizophrenia. The allele 327bp implicated in autism and social behavior was associated with negative symptoms and tended to be linked to patient facial affect recognition suggesting its impact on schizophrenia social phenotypes.

  16. Novel association of the obesity risk-allele near Fas Apoptotic Inhibitory molecule 2 (FAIM2) gene with heart rate and study of its effects on myocardial infarction in diabetic participants of the PREDIMED trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Fas apoptotic pathway has been implicated in type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Although a polymorphism (rs7138803; G'>'A) near the Fas apoptotic inhibitory molecule 2 (FAIM2) locus has been related to obesity, its association with other cardiovascular risk factors and disease remains u...

  17. Genome-wide association meta-analysis of cortical bone mineral density unravels allelic heterogeneity at the RANKL locus and potential pleiotropic effects on bone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia Paternoster

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous genome-wide association (GWA studies have identified SNPs associated with areal bone mineral density (aBMD. However, this measure is influenced by several different skeletal parameters, such as periosteal expansion, cortical bone mineral density (BMD(C cortical thickness, trabecular number, and trabecular thickness, which may be under distinct biological and genetic control. We have carried out a GWA and replication study of BMD(C, as measured by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT, a more homogenous and valid measure of actual volumetric bone density. After initial GWA meta-analysis of two cohorts (ALSPAC n = 999, aged ∼15 years and GOOD n = 935, aged ∼19 years, we attempted to replicate the BMD(C associations that had p<1×10(-5 in an independent sample of ALSPAC children (n = 2803 and in a cohort of elderly men (MrOS Sweden, n = 1052. The rs1021188 SNP (near RANKL was associated with BMD(C in all cohorts (overall p = 2×10(-14, n = 5739. Each minor allele was associated with a decrease in BMD(C of ∼0.14SD. There was also evidence for an interaction between this variant and sex (p = 0.01, with a stronger effect in males than females (at age 15, males -6.77mg/cm(3 per C allele, p = 2×10(-6; females -2.79 mg/cm(3 per C allele, p = 0.004. Furthermore, in a preliminary analysis, the rs1021188 minor C allele was associated with higher circulating levels of sRANKL (p<0.005. We show this variant to be independent from the previously aBMD associated SNP (rs9594738 and possibly from a third variant in the same RANKL region, which demonstrates important allelic heterogeneity at this locus. Associations with skeletal parameters reflecting bone dimensions were either not found or were much less pronounced. This finding implicates RANKL as a locus containing variation associated with volumetric bone density and provides further insight into the mechanism by which the RANK/RANKL/OPG pathway

  18. The type 2 diabetes associated minor allele of rs2237895 KCNQ1 associates with reduced insulin release following an oral glucose load.

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    Johan Holmkvist

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Polymorphisms in the potassium channel, voltage-gated, KQT-like subfamily, member 1 (KCNQ1 have recently been reported to associate with type 2 diabetes. The primary aim of the present study was to investigate the putative impact of these KCNQ1 polymorphisms (rs2283228, rs2237892, rs2237895, and rs2237897 on estimates of glucose stimulated insulin release. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Genotypes were examined for associations with serum insulin levels following an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT in a population-based sample of 6,039 middle-aged and treatment-naïve individuals. Insulin release indices estimated from the OGTT and the interplay between insulin sensitivity and insulin release were investigated using linear regression and Hotelling T2 analyses. Applying an additive genetic model the minor C-allele of rs2237895 was associated with reduced serum insulin levels 30 min (mean+/-SD: (CC 277+/-160 vs. (AC 280+/-164 vs. (AA 299+/-200 pmol/l, p = 0.008 after an oral glucose load, insulinogenic index (29.6+/-17.4 vs. 30.2+/-18.7vs. 32.2+/-22.1, p = 0.007, incremental area under the insulin curve (20,477+/-12,491 vs. 20,503+/-12,386 vs. 21,810+/-14,685, p = 0.02 among the 4,568 individuals who were glucose tolerant. Adjustment for the degree of insulin sensitivity had no effect on the measures of reduced insulin release. The rs2237895 genotype had a similar impact in the total sample of treatment-naïve individuals. No association with measures of insulin release were identified for the less common diabetes risk alleles of rs2237892, rs2237897, or rs2283228. CONCLUSION: The minor C-allele of rs2237895 of KCNQ1, which has a prevalence of about 42% among Caucasians was associated with reduced measures of insulin release following an oral glucose load suggesting that the increased risk of type 2 diabetes, previously reported for this variant, likely is mediated through an impaired beta cell function.

  19. The minor C-allele of rs2014355 in ACADS is associated with reduced insulin release following an oral glucose load

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    Pisinger Charlotta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A genome-wide association study (GWAS using metabolite concentrations as proxies for enzymatic activity, suggested that two variants: rs2014355 in the gene encoding short-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (ACADS and rs11161510 in the gene encoding medium-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (ACADM impair fatty acid β-oxidation. Chronic exposure to fatty acids due to an impaired β-oxidation may down-regulate the glucose-stimulated insulin release and result in an increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D. We aimed to investigate whether the two variants associate with altered insulin release following an oral glucose load or with T2D. Methods The variants were genotyped using KASPar® PCR SNP genotyping system and investigated for associations with estimates of insulin release and insulin sensitivity following an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT in a random sample of middle-aged Danish individuals (nACADS = 4,324; nACADM = 4,337. The T2D-case-control study involved a total of ~8,300 Danish individuals (nACADS = 8,313; nACADM = 8,344. Results In glucose-tolerant individuals the minor C-allele of rs2014355 of ACADS associated with reduced measures of serum insulin at 30 min following an oral glucose load (per allele effect (β = -3.8% (-6.3%;-1.3%, P = 0.003, reduced incremental area under the insulin curve (β = -3.6% (-6.3%;-0.9%, P = 0.009, reduced acute insulin response (β = -2.2% (-4.2%;0.2%, P = 0.03, and with increased insulin sensitivity ISIMatsuda (β = 2.9% (0.5%;5.2%, P = 0.02. The C-allele did not associate with two other measures of insulin sensitivity or with a derived disposition index. The C-allele was not associated with T2D in the case-control analysis (OR 1.07, 95% CI 0.96-1.18, P = 0.21. rs11161510 of ACADM did not associate with any indices of glucose-stimulated insulin release or with T2D. Conclusions In glucose-tolerant individuals the minor C-allele of rs2014355 of ACADS was associated with reduced

  20. Tannerella forsythia and the HLA-DQB1 allele are associated with susceptibility to periodontal disease in Japanese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura-Kuroki, Junko; Yamashita, Kie; Shimooka, Shohachi

    2009-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a multiple factor disease caused by genetic factors, environmental factors, and periodontal bacteria (periodontal pathogens). The present study aimed to elucidate the risk factors for periodontal disease in Japanese adolescents. Subjects (11-16 years old) were classified into three groups: localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP), periodontal attachment loss (PAL), and periodontally healthy (PH) groups. Genomic DNA isolated from the buccal mucosa was used for single-nucleotide polymorphism analyses of the candidate genes (interleukin-1alpha-889; interleukin-1alpha +4845; interleukin-1beta +3954; an immunoglobulin G Fc gamma receptor, FcgammaRIIa-R/H131; and a human leukocyte antigen class II allele, HLA-DQB1) of aggressive periodontitis. Subgingival plaque samples obtained from the same subjects were used for 16S rRNAbased polymerase chain reaction analysis of five important periodontal pathogens (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia). Tannerella forsythia was detected in the deepest periodontal pockets in all subjects in the LAP and PAL groups. The prevalence of an atypical BamHI restriction site in HLA-DQB1 of the LAP group was significantly higher than that in the PH and PAL groups. Furthermore, all subjects who had the atypical BamHI restriction site in HLA-DQB1 had T. forsythia infection. These results suggested that T. forsythia is associated with periodontal disease in Japanese adolescents and also suggested that HLA-DQB1 is related to LAP and is associated with T. forsythia infection.

  1. Association between amylin and amyloid-β peptides in plasma in the context of apolipoprotein E4 allele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wei Qiao; Wallack, Max; Dean, Michael; Liebson, Elizabeth; Mwamburi, Mkaya; Zhu, Haihao

    2014-01-01

    Amylin, a pancreatic peptide that readily crosses the blood brain barrier (BBB), and amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ), the main component of amyloid plaques and a major component of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology in the brain, share several features. These include having similar β-sheet secondary structures, binding to the same receptor, and being degraded by the same protease. Thus, amylin may be associated with Aβ, but the nature of their relationship remains unclear. In this study, we used human samples to study the relationship between plasma amylin and Aβ in the context of the apolipoprotein E alleles (ApoE). We found that concentrations of Aβ1-42 (PApoE4, BMI, diabetes, stroke, kidney function and lipid profile. This positive association between amylin and Aβ1-42 in plasma was found regardless of the ApoE genotype. In contrast, the relationship between amylin and Aβ1-40 in plasma seen in ApoE4 non-carriers disappeared in the presence of ApoE4. Using AD mouse models, our recent study demonstrates that intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of synthetic amylin enhances the removal of Aβ from the brain into blood, thus resulting in increased blood levels of both amylin and Aβ. The positive association between amylin and Aβ, especially Aβ1-42, in human blood samples is probably relevant to the findings in the AD mouse models. The presence of ApoE4 may attenuate amylin's capacity to remove Aβ, especially Aβ1-40, from the AD brain.

  2. Association between a high-expressing interferon-gamma allele and a lower frequency of kidney angiomyolipomas in TSC2 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabora, Sandra L; Roberts, Penelope; Nieto, Andres; Perez, Ron; Jozwiak, Sergiusz; Franz, David; Bissler, John; Thiele, Elizabeth A; Sims, Katherine; Kwiatkowski, David J

    2002-10-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a familial hamartoma syndrome in which renal involvement is common and, at times, life threatening. We have investigated the potential effect of a non-TSC gene on renal disease in a cohort of 172 TSC patients with TSC2 mutations. Patients were genotyped for an interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) microsatellite polymorphism, within intron 1, for which one common allele (allele 2, with 12 CA repeats) has been shown to have a higher expression of IFN-gamma. A chi(2) analysis was used to examine the association between IFN-gamma allele 2 and the development of kidney angiomyolipomas (KAMLs) in this TSC2 cohort. Because of the age-dependent development of KAMLs in TSC, we initially focused on the 127 patients who were >5 years old. Additional subgroup analyses were done to investigate the influence of age and gender. The transmission/disequilibrium test (TDT) was also performed in a subset of this cohort (46 probands) for whom parent and/or sibling samples were available for analysis. Both chi(2) analysis and TDT suggested an association between IFN-gamma allele 2 and the absence of KAMLs in patients who have known TSC2 mutations. Among the 127 patients who were >5 years old, KAMLs were present in 95 (75%) and were absent in 32 (25%). In the group with KAML present, the frequency of IFN-gamma allele 2 was 56%; in the group with KAML absent, the frequency of IFN-gamma allele 2 was significantly higher, at 78% (P=.02, by chi(2) analysis). The family-based TDT analysis gave similar results, with a TDT statistic (TDT chi2=5.45) corresponding to a P value of.02. Subgroup analyses show that both age and gender may influence the impact of this association. Although these results should be replicated in other populations with TSC, the present study suggests that modifier genes play a role in the variable expression of TSC and also suggests a potential therapy for KAMLs in patients with TSC.

  3. Association of IL8 and IL10 gene allelic variants with ischemic stroke risk and prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kucherenko A. M.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Evaluating a role of IL8 gene –781 C/T, and IL10 gene –592C/A polymorphisms as genetic markers of ischemic stroke risk. Methods. A case group consisted of 183 patients with ischemic stroke, which were treated in the Brain Vascular Pathology unit of SI «Institute of Gerontology of NAMS of Ukraine». A control group included 88 healthy individuals older than 65 years without any history of ischemic stroke. Genotyping was performed using PCR followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Results. Significantly (P < 0,05 higher frequency of IL8 –781T allele carriers in the case group (81,6 % comparing to the control (70,1% was revealed. –781T allele carriers have nearly 2-fold increased ischemic stroke development risk (OR = 1.886; 95 % CI: 1.041–3.417. Significantly (P < 0,05 higher frequency of IL10 gene –592C allele carriers was observed in the patients with ischemic stroke (98,2% comparing to the control (90,7 %. The ischemic stroke development risk in such individuals is 5-fold increased (OR = 5.71; 95 % CI: 1.48–22.11. It was revealed that –592C allele homozygotes with ischemic stroke have more than 2-fold higher improvement (according to the Rankin scale chances during the first fortnight of treatment (OR = 2,76; 95 % CI: 1,26–6,07. Conclusions. On the basis of the obtained significant differences, IL8 gene –781T and IL10 gene –592C variants may be considered the factors of ischemic stroke hereditary susceptibility. Besides, IL10 gene –592CC genotype is a genetic marker of the patients state positive dynamics during first two weeks of treatment.

  4. Apolipoprotein E epsilon 4 allele is associated with ventricular expansion rate and surface morphology in dementia and normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussotte, Florence F; Gutman, Boris A; Madsen, Sarah K; Colby, John B; Narr, Katherine L; Thompson, Paul M

    2014-06-01

    The apolipoprotein E epsilon 4 allele (ApoE-ε4) is the strongest known genetic risk factor for late onset Alzheimer's disease. Expansion of the lateral ventricles occurs with normal aging, but dementia accelerates this process. Brain structure and function depend on ApoE genotype not just for Alzheimer's disease patients but also in healthy elderly individuals, and even in asymptomatic young individuals. Therefore, we hypothesized that the ApoE-ε4 allele is associated with altered patterns of longitudinal ventricular expansion, in dementia and normal aging. We tested this hypothesis in a large sample of elderly participants, using a linear discriminant analysis-based approach. Carrying more ApoE-ε4 alleles was associated with faster ventricular expansion bilaterally and with regional patterns of lateral ventricle morphology at 1- and 2-year follow up, after controlling for sex, age, and dementia status. ApoE genotyping is considered critical in clinical trials of Alzheimer's disease. These findings, combined with earlier investigations showing that ApoE is also directly implicated in other conditions, suggest that the selective enrollment of ApoE-ε4 carriers may empower clinical trials of other neurological disorders.

  5. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: Identification of a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 4q21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Adoue, Véronique; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Canisius, Sander; Lemaçon, Audrey; Droit, Arnaud; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Baynes, Caroline; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Burwinkel, Barbara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G; Goldberg, Mark S; González-Neira, Anna; Grenaker-Alnæs, Grethe; Guénel, Pascal; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hallberg, Emily; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kataja, Vesa; Lambrechts, Diether; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindblom, Annika; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Maranian, Mel; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Milne, Roger L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olswold, Curtis; Peto, Julian; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rudolph, Anja; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Southey, Melissa C; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Vachon, Celine; Van Den Ouweland, Ans M W; Wang, Qin; Winqvist, Robert; Zheng, Wei; Benitez, Javier; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M; Pharoah, Paul D P; Kristensen, Vessela; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Pastinen, Tomi; Nord, Silje; Simard, Jacques

    2016-12-06

    There are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are functional candidates for further investigation as disease-causing variants. To investigate whether common variants associated with differential allelic expression were involved in breast cancer susceptibility, a list of genes was established on the basis of their involvement in cancer related pathways and/or mechanisms. Thereafter, using data from a genome-wide map of allelic expression associated SNPs, 313 genetic variants were selected and their association with breast cancer risk was then evaluated in 46,451 breast cancer cases and 42,599 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 41 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The associations were evaluated with overall breast cancer risk and with estrogen receptor negative and positive disease. One novel breast cancer susceptibility locus on 4q21 (rs11099601) was identified (OR = 1.05, P = 5.6x10-6). rs11099601 lies in a 135 kb linkage disequilibrium block containing several genes, including, HELQ, encoding the protein HEL308 a DNA dependant ATPase and DNA Helicase involved in DNA repair, MRPS18C encoding the Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein S18C and FAM175A (ABRAXAS), encoding a BRCA1 BRCT domain-interacting protein involved in DNA damage response and double-strand break (DSB) repair. Expression QTL analysis in breast cancer tissue showed rs11099601 to be associated with HELQ (P = 8.28x10-14), MRPS18C (P = 1.94x10-27) and FAM175A (P = 3.83x10-3), explaining about 20%, 14% and 1%, respectively of the variance inexpression of these genes in breast carcinomas.

  6. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: Identification of a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 4q21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adoue, Véronique; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Canisius, Sander; Lemaçon, Audrey; Droit, Arnaud; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Baynes, Caroline; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Burwinkel, Barbara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G.; Goldberg, Mark S.; González-Neira, Anna; Grenaker-Alnæs, Grethe; Guénel, Pascal; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamann, Ute; Hallberg, Emily; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hopper, John L.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kataja, Vesa; Lambrechts, Diether; Marchand, Loic Le; Lindblom, Annika; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Maranian, Mel; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Milne, Roger L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olswold, Curtis; Peto, Julian; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rudolph, Anja; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Southey, Melissa C.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Vachon, Celine; Van Den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Wang, Qin; Winqvist, Robert; Investigators, kConFab/AOCS; Zheng, Wei; Benitez, Javier; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Kristensen, Vessela; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Pastinen, Tomi; Nord, Silje; Simard, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    There are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are functional candidates for further investigation as disease-causing variants. To investigate whether common variants associated with differential allelic expression were involved in breast cancer susceptibility, a list of genes was established on the basis of their involvement in cancer related pathways and/or mechanisms. Thereafter, using data from a genome-wide map of allelic expression associated SNPs, 313 genetic variants were selected and their association with breast cancer risk was then evaluated in 46,451 breast cancer cases and 42,599 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 41 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The associations were evaluated with overall breast cancer risk and with estrogen receptor negative and positive disease. One novel breast cancer susceptibility locus on 4q21 (rs11099601) was identified (OR = 1.05, P = 5.6x10-6). rs11099601 lies in a 135 kb linkage disequilibrium block containing several genes, including, HELQ, encoding the protein HEL308 a DNA dependant ATPase and DNA Helicase involved in DNA repair, MRPS18C encoding the Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein S18C and FAM175A (ABRAXAS), encoding a BRCA1 BRCT domain-interacting protein involved in DNA damage response and double-strand break (DSB) repair. Expression QTL analysis in breast cancer tissue showed rs11099601 to be associated with HELQ (P = 8.28x10-14), MRPS18C (P = 1.94x10-27) and FAM175A (P = 3.83x10-3), explaining about 20%, 14% and 1%, respectively of the variance inexpression of these genes in breast carcinomas. PMID:27792995

  7. Ruminant rhombencephalitis-associated Listeria monocytogenes alleles linked to a multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balandyté, Lina; Brodard, Isabelle; Frey, Joachim; Oevermann, Anna; Abril, Carlos

    2011-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is among the most important food-borne pathogens and is well adapted to persist in the environment. To gain insight into the genetic relatedness and potential virulence of L. monocytogenes strains causing central nervous system (CNS) infections, we used multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) to subtype 183 L. monocytogenes isolates, most from ruminant rhombencephalitis and some from human patients, food, and the environment. Allelic-profile-based comparisons grouped L. monocytogenes strains mainly into three clonal complexes and linked single-locus variants (SLVs). Clonal complex A essentially consisted of isolates from human and ruminant brain samples. All but one rhombencephalitis isolate from cattle were located in clonal complex A. In contrast, food and environmental isolates mainly clustered into clonal complex C, and none was classified as clonal complex A. Isolates of the two main clonal complexes (A and C) obtained by MLVA were analyzed by PCR for the presence of 11 virulence-associated genes (prfA, actA, inlA, inlB, inlC, inlD, inlE, inlF, inlG, inlJ, and inlC2H). Virulence gene analysis revealed significant differences in the actA, inlF, inlG, and inlJ allelic profiles between clinical isolates (complex A) and nonclinical isolates (complex C). The association of particular alleles of actA, inlF, and newly described alleles of inlJ with isolates from CNS infections (particularly rhombencephalitis) suggests that these virulence genes participate in neurovirulence of L. monocytogenes. The overall absence of inlG in clinical complex A and its presence in complex C isolates suggests that the InlG protein is more relevant for the survival of L. monocytogenes in the environment.

  8. Three intragenic suppressors of a GTPase-deficient allele of GNAS associated with McCune-Albright syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcic, Kyle; Tobar-Rubin, Raquel; Janevska, Daniela; Carroll, Julie; Din, Eraj; Alvarez, Rebecca; Haick, Jennifer; Pals-Rylaarsdam, Robin

    2014-06-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in heterotrimeric G-protein α subunits are associated with a variety of human diseases. McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is caused by mutations in GNAS, the gene encoding Gs. Alterations at Arg201 significantly reduce the GTPase activity of the protein, rendering it constitutively active. In this study, we have constructed a library of random mutations in a constitutively active yeast GPA1 gene carrying a mutation homologous to the McCune-Albright allele (Arg297His). Intragenic suppressors found at sites with homology to the human Gs protein were tested for their ability to suppress the constitutive activity of an Arg201His mutation in Gs. Three intragenic suppressors, at Phe142, Arg231, and Leu266, were able to suppress elevated basal cAMP responses caused by Arg201His when expressed in HEK293 cells. A range of amino acid substitutions was introduced at each of these sites to investigate the chemical requirements for intragenic suppression. The ability of Gs proteins carrying the suppressor mutations alone to mediate receptor-induced cAMP production was measured. These results offer potential sites on Gs that could serve as drug targets for MAS therapies.

  9. Human Leukocyte Antigen Class II Alleles Are Associated with Hepatitis C Virus Natural Susceptibility in the Chinese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Yue

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Human leukocyte antigen (HLA class II molecule influences host antigen presentation and anti-viral immune response. The aim of this study was to investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within HLA class II gene were associated with different clinical outcomes of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. Three HLA class II SNPs (rs3077, rs2395309 and rs2856718 were genotyped by TaqMan assay among Chinese population, including 350 persistent HCV infection patients, 194 spontaneous viral clearance subjects and 973 HCV-uninfected control subjects. After logistic regression analysis, the results indicated that the rs2856718 TC genotype was significantly associated with the protective effect of the HCV natural susceptibility (adjusted OR: 0.712, 95% CI: 0.554–0.914 when compared with reference TT genotype, and this remained significant after false discovery rate (FDR correction (p = 0.024. Moreover, the protective effect of rs2856718 was observed in dominant genetic models (adjusted OR: 0.726, 95% CI: 0.574–0.920, and this remained significant after FDR correction (p = 0.024. In stratified analysis, a significant decreased risk was found in rs2856718C allele in the male subgroup (adjusted OR: 0.778, 95% CI: 0.627–0.966 and hemodialysis subgroup (adjusted OR: 0.713, 95% CI: 0.552–0.921. Our results indicated that the genetic variations of rs2856718 within the HLA-DQ gene are associated with the natural susceptibility to HCV infection among the Chinese population.

  10. Sex-specific association of the human PTPN22 1858T-allele with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C; Hansen, D; Husby, S

    2007-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a common organ-specific autoimmune disease of complex aetiology, involving the interaction of a large number of disease-associated genes. By comparison of a Danish population sample of 253 Caucasian children and adolescents with T1D and a control group consisted of 354...... of the risk allele and its association with age at onset in female T1D children and adolescents indicates that the genetic contribution to disease pathogenesis is more prominent in females in this population of Danish patients Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Sep...

  11. Allele loss and down-regulation of heparanase gene are associated with the progression and poor prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Liang Huang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The role of heparanase (HPSE gene in cancers including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is currently controversial. This study was aimed at investigating the impact of genetic alteration and expression change of HPSE on the progression and prognosis of HCC. METHODS: The HPSE gene was studied in three different aspects: (1 loss of heterozygosity (LOH by a custom SNP microarray and DNA copy number by real-time PCR; (2 mRNA level by qRT-PCR; and (3 protein expression by immunohistochemistry. The clinical significances of allele loss and expression change of HPSE were analyzed. RESULTS: Microarray analysis showed that the average LOH frequency for 10 SNPs located within HPSE gene was 31.6%, three of which were significantly correlated with tumor grade, serum HBV-DNA level, and AFP concentration. In agreement with SNP LOH data, DNA copy number loss of HPSE was observed in 38.74% (43/111 of HCC cases. HPSE mRNA level was notably reduced in 74.1% (83/112 of tumor tissues compared with non-tumor liver tissues, which was significantly associated with DNA copy number loss, increased tumor size, and post-operative metastasis. HPSE protein level was also remarkably reduced in 66.3% (53/80 of tumor tissues, which was correlated with tumor grade. Patients with lower expression level of HPSE mRNA or protein had a significantly lower survival rate than those with higher expression. Cox regression analysis suggested that HPSE protein was an independent predictor of overall survival in HCC patients. CONCLUSIONS: The results in this study demonstrate that genetic alteration and reduction of HPSE expression are associated with tumor progression and poor prognosis of HCCs, suggesting that HPSE behaves like a tumor suppressor gene and is a potential prognostic marker for HCC patients.

  12. Quinine Bitterness and Grapefruit Liking Associate with Allelic Variants in TAS2R31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, John E; Feeney, Emma L; Nolden, Alissa A; McGeary, John E

    2015-07-01

    Multiple psychophysical gene-association studies suggest a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) within the bitter receptor gene TAS2R19 on chromosome 12 may be functional. Previously, the Arg299Cys SNP (rs10772420) has been associated with differential bitterness of quinine and differential liking for grapefruit juice. However, quinine does not activate TAS2R19 in vitro; likewise, limonin and naringin, bitter compounds in grapefruit, do not activate TAS2R19 in vitro. Here, we examined quinine bitterness (whole-mouth swish-and-spit stimuli and regionally delivered quinine across 4 loci) and remembered liking for grapefruit juice to test whether they associate with SNPs in another nearby gene, TASR2R31. We observed SNP-phenotype associations between whole-mouth quinine bitterness and self-reported liking for grapefruit juice with SNPs in TAS2R31, and regional quinine bitterness followed a similar trend, but did not reach significance. Present data provide independent replication of prior associations reported for TAS2R19. However, we also observed strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) between TAS2R19 and TAS2R31 SNPs. When present data are considered in light of existing functional expression data, this suggests phenotypic associations reported previously for rs10772420 may potentially be due to LD between this SNP and polymorphism(s) in, or closer to, TAS2R31. If confirmed, this would reduce the number of TAS2Rs with putatively functional polymorphisms to 5.

  13. Association of Apolipoprotein E Alleles with Susceptibility to Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Iranian Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Askari

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: The results show a moderate positive association between APOE &epsilon2 and AMD, but current data does not show any role for APOE &epsilon4 in protection from AMD. However, more studies are required to reveal the possible role of APOE in the pathogenesis of AMD.

  14. Parent-of-origin-specific allelic associations among 106 genomic loci for age at menarche

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.R.B. Perry (John); F.R. Day (Felix); C.E. Elks (Cathy); P. Sulem (Patrick); D. Thompson (Deborah); T. Ferreira (Teresa); C. He (Chunyan); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); T. Esko (Tõnu); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); E. Albrecht (Eva); W.Q. Ang (Wei); T. Corre (Tanguy); D.L. Cousminer (Diana); B. Feenstra (Bjarke); N. Franceschini (Nora); A. Ganna (Andrea); A.D. Johnson (Andrew); S. Kjellqvist (Sanela); K.L. Lunetta (Kathryn); G. Mcmahon (George); I.M. Nolte (Ilja); L. Paternoster (Lavinia); E. Porcu (Eleonora); G.D. Smith; L. Stolk (Lisette); A. Teumer (Alexander); N. Tsernikova (Natalia); E. Tikkanen (Emmi); S. Ulivi (Shelia); E.K. Wagner (Erin K.); N. Amin (Najaf); L.J. Bierut (Laura); E.M. Byrne (Enda); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); D.L. Koller (Daniel); M. Mangino (Massimo); T.H. Pers (Tune); L.M. Yerges-Armstrong (Laura); J.H. Zhao; I.L. Andrulis (Irene); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); F. Atsma (Femke); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias W.); J. Benítez (Javier); C. Blomqvist (Carl); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); H. Brenner (Hermann); J.E. Buring (Julie); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); J. Chen (Jinhui); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); J.M. Collee (Margriet); F.J. Couch (Fergus); D.J. Couper (David); A.D. Coviello (Andrea); A. Cox (Angela); K. Czene (Kamila); P. d' Adamo (Pio); G.D. Smith; I. de Vivo (Immaculata); E.W. Demerath (Ellen); J. Dennis (Joe); P. Devilee (Peter); A.K. Dieffenbach (Aida Karina); A.M. Dunning (Alison); G. Eiriksdottir (Gudny); K. Hagen (Knut); P.A. Fasching (Peter); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); H. Flyger (Henrik); T. Foroud (Tatiana); L. Franke (Lude); M. Garcia (Melissa); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); F. Geller (Frank); E.E.J. De Geus (Eco E. J.); G.G. Giles (Graham); D.F. Gudbjartsson (Daniel); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); P. Guénel (Pascal); S. Guo (Suiqun); P. Hall (Per); U. Hamann (Ute); R. Haring (Robin); C.A. Hartman (Catharina); A.C. Heath (Andrew); A. Hofman (Albert); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); J.L. Hopper (John); F.B. Hu (Frank); D. Hunter (David); D. Karasik (David); D.P. Kiel (Douglas P.); J.A. Knight (Julia); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); Z. Kutalik (Zoltán); S. Lai (Sandra); D. Lambrechts (Diether); A. Lindblom (Annika); R. Mägi (Reedik); P.K. Magnusson (Patrik); A. Mannermaa (Arto); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); G. Masson (Gisli); P.F. McArdle (Patrick); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); M. Melbye (Mads); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); E. Mihailov (Evelin); L. Milani (Lili); R.L. Milne (Roger L); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); P. Neven (Patrick); C. Nohr (Christian); A.J. Oldehinkel (Albertine); B.A. Oostra (Ben); A. Palotie (Aarno); M. Peacock (Munro); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy L.); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); J. Peto (Julian); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); D.S. Postma (Dirkje); A. Pouta (Anneli); K. Pykäs (Katri); P. Radice (Paolo); S.M. Ring (Susan); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); A. Robino (Antonietta); L.M. Rose (Lynda); A. Rudolph (Anja); V. Salomaa (Veikko); S. Sanna (Serena); D. Schlessinger (David); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); M.C. Southey (Mellissa C.); U. Sovio (Ulla); M.J. Stampfer (Meir J.); D. Stöckl (Doris); A.M. Storniolo (Anna M.); N. Timpson (Nicholas); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); J.A. Visser (Jenny); P. Vollenweider (Peter); H. Völzke (Henry); G. Waeber (Gérard); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); H. Wallaschofski (Henri); Q. Wang (Qing); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); R. Winqvist (Robert); B.H.R. Wolffenbuttel (Bruce H. R.); M.J. Wright (Margaret); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); M.J. Econs (Michael); K.T. Khaw; R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); J.P. Rice (John); E.A. Streeten (Elizabeth); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); B.Z. Alizadeh (Behrooz); S.M. Bergmann (Sven); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); H.A. Boyd (Heather); L. Crisponi (Laura); P. Gasparini (Paolo); C. Gieger (Christian); T.B. Harris (Tamara); E. Ingelsson (Erik); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); P. Kraft (Peter); D.A. Lawlor (Debbie); A. Metspalu (Andres); C.E. Pennell (Craig); P.M. Ridker (Paul); H. Snieder (Harold); T.I.A. Sørensen; T.D. Spector (Timothy); D.P. Strachan (David P.); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); N.J. Wareham (Nick); E. Widen (Elisabeth); M. Zygmunt (Marek); A. Murray (Anna); D.F. Easton (Douglas); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); J. Murabito (Joanne); K.K. Ong (Ken K.)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAge at menarche is a marker of timing of puberty in females. It varies widely between individuals, is a heritable trait and is associated with risks for obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, breast cancer and all-cause mortality. Studies of rare human disorders of puberty and

  15. Parent-of-origin-specific allelic associations among 106 genomic loci for age at menarche

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perry, John R. B.; Day, Felix; Elks, Cathy E.; Sulem, Patrick; Thompson, Deborah J.; Ferreira, Teresa; He, Chunyan; Chasman, Daniel I.; Esko, Toenu; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Albrecht, Eva; Ang, Wei Q.; Corre, Tanguy; Cousminer, Diana L.; Feenstra, Bjarke; Franceschini, Nora; Ganna, Andrea; Johnson, Andrew D.; Kjellqvist, Sanela; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; McMahon, George; Nolte, Ilja M.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Porcu, Eleonora; Smith, Albert V.; Stolk, Lisette; Teumer, Alexander; Tsernikova, Natalia; Tikkanen, Emmi; Ulivi, Sheila; Wagner, Erin K.; Amin, Najaf; Bierut, Laura J.; Byrne, Enda M.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Koller, Daniel L.; Mangino, Massimo; Pers, Tune H.; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Atsma, Femke; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Benitez, Javier; Blomqvist, Carl; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Buring, Julie E.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen; Chen, Jinhui; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Collee, J. Margriet; Couch, Fergus J.; Couper, David; Coviello, Andrea D.; Cox, Angela; Czene, Kamila; D'adamo, Adamo Pio; Smith, George Davey; De Vivo, Immaculata; Demerath, Ellen W.; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dieffenbach, Aida K.; Dunning, Alison M.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Eriksson, Johan G.; Fasching, Peter A.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Flyger, Henrik; Foroud, Tatiana; Franke, Lude; Garcia, Melissa E.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Geller, Frank; de Geus, Eco E. J.; Giles, Graham G.; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guenel, Pascal; Guo, Suiqun; Hall, Per; Hamann, Ute; Haring, Robin; Hartman, Catharina A.; Heath, AndrewC.; Hofman, Albert; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hopper, John L.; Hu, Frank B.; Hunter, David J.; Karasik, David; Kiel, Douglas P.; Knight, Julia A.; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lai, Sandra; Lambrechts, Diether; Lindblom, Annika; Maegi, Reedik; Magnusson, Patrik K.; Mannermaa, Arto; Martin, Nicholas G.; Masson, Gisli; McArdle, Patrick F.; McArdle, Wendy L.; Melbye, Mads; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Milne, Roger L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Nohr, Ellen A.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Oostra, Ben A.; Palotie, Aarno; Peacock, Munro; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Pouta, Anneli; Pylkaes, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Ring, Susan; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M.; Rudolph, Anja; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Southey, Mellissa C.; Sovio, Ulla; Stampfer, Meir J.; Stoeckl, Doris; Storniolo, Anna M.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tyrer, Jonathan; Visser, Jenny A.; Vollenweider, Peter; Voelzke, Henry; Waeber, Gerard; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wang, Qin; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winqvist, Robert; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Wright, Margaret J.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Econs, Michael J.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Loos, Ruth J. F.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Rice, John P.; Streeten, Elizabeth A.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Bergmann, Sven; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boyd, Heather A.; Crisponi, Laura; Gasparini, Paolo; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B.; Ingelsson, Erik; Jaervelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kraft, Peter; Lawlor, Debbie; Metspalu, Andres; Pennell, Craig E.; Ridker, Paul M.; Snieder, Harold; Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.; Spector, Tim D.; Strachan, David P.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Widen, Elisabeth; Zygmunt, Marek; Murray, Anna; Easton, Douglas F.; Stefansson, Kari; Murabito, Joanne M.; Ong, Ken K.

    2014-01-01

    Age at menarche is a marker of timing of puberty in females. It varies widely between individuals, is a heritable trait and is associated with risks for obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, breast cancer and all-causemortality(1). Studies of rare human disorders of puberty and animal mo

  16. Association of the HLA-DRB1*0701 allele with perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmatic antibodies in Mexican patients with severe ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jesus K Yamamoto-Furusho; Luis Uscanga-Domínguez; Alondra Lopez-Martinez; Julio Granados

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine the association between the HLA-DRB1 alleles and perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmatic antibodies (p-ANCA) positive in Mexican patients with ulcerative colitis (UC).METHODS: Ninety Mexican mestizo patients (45 females) with UC, confirmed by biopsy, were studied. High resolution HLA typing was performed by PCR-SSO reverse dot blot and PCR-SSP. Molecular typing techniques were applied to define HLA-DRB1 alleles. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunofluorescence techniques were used to detect p-ANCA.RESULTS: Forty-eight (53%) UC patients were positive for p-ANCA by ELISA and IF. We found that p-ANCA-positive UC patients had a significantly increased frequency of HLA-DR7 compared with p-ANCA-negative controls (22% vs 5.1%; pC=0.02, OR=5.2, CI 95%:1.06-37.82). Disease activity was scored as severe in 20 patients, moderate in 8, mild in 14 and no activity in the remaining 38 patients according to the Truelove and Witts criteria. Subgroup analysis showed a significantly increased frequency of the HLA-DRB1*07 allele in 15 of 20 UC patients with severe activity of UC and p-ANCA positivity [100% vs 0%; pC=0.0000001; OR=35]. No significant differences were found between p-ANCA positive patients, HLA-DR alleles and other clinical features such as extraintestinal manifestations, proctocolectomy and extension.CONCLUSION: The HLA-DRB1*07 is associated with p-ANCA positive UC Mexican patients.

  17. Association between GSTM1 and GSTT1 allelic variants and head and neck squamous cell cancinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUNDS: GSTM1 and GSTT1 are involved in the detoxification of carcinogens such as smoking by-products, and polymorphisms in these two genes with a result of loss of enzyme activity may increase risk of carcinogenesis. Although many epidemiological studies have investigated the association between GSTM1 or GSTT1 null genotype and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC, the results remain conflicting. To elucidate the overall association of GSTM1, GSTT1 and HNSCC, we included all available studies and performed this meta-analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A dataset including 42 articles for GSTM1, 32 articles for GSTT1, and 15 articles for GSTM1 and GSTT1 in combination were identified by a search in PubMed. Associations beween HNSCC and polymorphisms of GSTM1 and GSTT1 alone and in combination were analysed by software RevMan 5.1. Stratification analysis on ethnicity and smoking status, sensitivity analysis, heterogeneity among studies and their publication bias were also tested. Association was found in overall analysis between HNSCC and GSTM1 and GSTT1 null genotype. Stratified by ethnicity, we found increased risks of HNSCC in carriers with GSTM1 null genotype in Asian, GSTT1 null genotype in South American, and dual null genotype in European and Asian. When stratified by smoking, a more significant association of GSTM1 null genotype with HNSCC risk was observed in smokers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This meta-analysis presented additional evidence of the association between GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms and HNSCC risk.

  18. Association between amylin and amyloid-β peptides in plasma in the context of apolipoprotein E4 allele.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Qiao Qiu

    Full Text Available Amylin, a pancreatic peptide that readily crosses the blood brain barrier (BBB, and amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ, the main component of amyloid plaques and a major component of Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology in the brain, share several features. These include having similar β-sheet secondary structures, binding to the same receptor, and being degraded by the same protease. Thus, amylin may be associated with Aβ, but the nature of their relationship remains unclear. In this study, we used human samples to study the relationship between plasma amylin and Aβ in the context of the apolipoprotein E alleles (ApoE. We found that concentrations of Aβ1-42 (P<0.0001 and Aβ1-40 (P<0.0001 increased with each quartile increase of amylin. Using multivariate regression analysis, the study sample showed that plasma amylin was associated with Aβ1-42 (β = +0.149, SE = 0.025, P<0.0001 and Aβ1-40 (β = +0.034, SE = 0.016, P = 0.04 as an outcome after adjusting for age, gender, ethnicity, ApoE4, BMI, diabetes, stroke, kidney function and lipid profile. This positive association between amylin and Aβ1-42 in plasma was found regardless of the ApoE genotype. In contrast, the relationship between amylin and Aβ1-40 in plasma seen in ApoE4 non-carriers disappeared in the presence of ApoE4. Using AD mouse models, our recent study demonstrates that intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of synthetic amylin enhances the removal of Aβ from the brain into blood, thus resulting in increased blood levels of both amylin and Aβ. The positive association between amylin and Aβ, especially Aβ1-42, in human blood samples is probably relevant to the findings in the AD mouse models. The presence of ApoE4 may attenuate amylin's capacity to remove Aβ, especially Aβ1-40, from the AD brain.

  19. Albinism and disease causing pathogens in Tanzania: are alleles that are associated with OCA2 being maintained by balancing selection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuli, Abbas M; Valenzuela, Robert K; Kamugisha, Erasmus; Brilliant, Murray H

    2012-12-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism type 2 (OCA2) is present at significantly higher frequencies in sub-Saharan African populations compared to populations in other regions of the world. In Tanzania and other sub-Saharan countries, most OCA2 is associated with a common 2.7kb deletion allele. Leprosy is also in high prevalence in sub-Saharan African populations. The infectious agent of leprosy, Mycobacterium leprae, contains a gene, 38L, that is similar to OCA2. Hypopigmented patches of skin are early symptoms that present with infection of leprosy. In consideration of both the genetic similarity of OCA2 and the 38L gene of M. leprae and the involvement of pigmentation in both disorders, we hypothesized that the high rates of OCA2 may be due to heterozygote advantage. Hence, we hypothesized that carriers of the 2.7kb deletion allele of OCA2 may provide a protective advantage from infection with leprosy. We tested this hypothesis by determining the carrier frequency of the 2.7kb deletion allele from a sample of 240 individuals with leprosy from Tanzania. The results were inconclusive due to the small sample size; however, they enabled us to rule out a large protective effect, but perhaps not a small advantage. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is another infectious organism prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa that contains a gene, arsenic-transport integral membrane protein that is also similar to OCA2. Interestingly, chromosomal region 15q11-13, which also contains OCA2, was reported to be linked to tuberculosis susceptibility. Although variants within OCA2 were tested for association, the 2.7kb deletion allele of OCA2 was not tested. This led us to hypothesize that the deletion allele may confer resistance to susceptibility. Confirmation of our hypothesis would enable development of novel pharmocogenetic therapies for the treatment of tuberculosis, which in turn, may enable development of drugs that target other pathogens that utilize a similar infection mechanism as M. tuberculosis

  20. Parent-of-origin-specific allelic associations among 106 genomic loci for age at menarche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, John R B; Day, Felix; Elks, Cathy E; Sulem, Patrick; Thompson, Deborah J; Ferreira, Teresa; He, Chunyan; Chasman, Daniel I; Esko, Tõnu; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Albrecht, Eva; Ang, Wei Q; Corre, Tanguy; Cousminer, Diana L; Feenstra, Bjarke; Franceschini, Nora; Ganna, Andrea; Johnson, Andrew D; Kjellqvist, Sanela; Lunetta, Kathryn L; McMahon, George; Nolte, Ilja M; Paternoster, Lavinia; Porcu, Eleonora; Smith, Albert V; Stolk, Lisette; Teumer, Alexander; Tšernikova, Natalia; Tikkanen, Emmi; Ulivi, Sheila; Wagner, Erin K; Amin, Najaf; Bierut, Laura J; Byrne, Enda M; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Koller, Daniel L; Mangino, Massimo; Pers, Tune H; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Hua Zhao, Jing; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Atsma, Femke; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blomqvist, Carl; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Buring, Julie E; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen; Chen, Jinhui; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Collée, J Margriet; Couch, Fergus J; Couper, David; Coviello, Andrea D; Cox, Angela; Czene, Kamila; D'adamo, Adamo Pio; Davey Smith, George; De Vivo, Immaculata; Demerath, Ellen W; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dieffenbach, Aida K; Dunning, Alison M; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Eriksson, Johan G; Fasching, Peter A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Flyger, Henrik; Foroud, Tatiana; Franke, Lude; Garcia, Melissa E; García-Closas, Montserrat; Geller, Frank; de Geus, Eco E J; Giles, Graham G; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guénel, Pascal; Guo, Suiqun; Hall, Per; Hamann, Ute; Haring, Robin; Hartman, Catharina A; Heath, Andrew C; Hofman, Albert; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Hu, Frank B; Hunter, David J; Karasik, David; Kiel, Douglas P; Knight, Julia A; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lai, Sandra; Lambrechts, Diether; Lindblom, Annika; Mägi, Reedik; Magnusson, Patrik K; Mannermaa, Arto; Martin, Nicholas G; Masson, Gisli; McArdle, Patrick F; McArdle, Wendy L; Melbye, Mads; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Milne, Roger L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Nohr, Ellen A; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Oostra, Ben A; Palotie, Aarno; Peacock, Munro; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D P; Postma, Dirkje S; Pouta, Anneli; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Ring, Susan; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M; Rudolph, Anja; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Southey, Mellissa C; Sovio, Ulla; Stampfer, Meir J; Stöckl, Doris; Storniolo, Anna M; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tyrer, Jonathan; Visser, Jenny A; Vollenweider, Peter; Völzke, Henry; Waeber, Gerard; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wang, Qin; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winqvist, Robert; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Wright, Margaret J; Boomsma, Dorret I; Econs, Michael J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Loos, Ruth J F; McCarthy, Mark I; Montgomery, Grant W; Rice, John P; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Bergmann, Sven; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boyd, Heather A; Crisponi, Laura; Gasparini, Paolo; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B; Ingelsson, Erik; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kraft, Peter; Lawlor, Debbie; Metspalu, Andres; Pennell, Craig E; Ridker, Paul M; Snieder, Harold; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Spector, Tim D; Strachan, David P; Uitterlinden, André G; Wareham, Nicholas J; Widen, Elisabeth; Zygmunt, Marek; Murray, Anna; Easton, Douglas F; Stefansson, Kari; Murabito, Joanne M; Ong, Ken K

    2014-10-02

    Age at menarche is a marker of timing of puberty in females. It varies widely between individuals, is a heritable trait and is associated with risks for obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, breast cancer and all-cause mortality. Studies of rare human disorders of puberty and animal models point to a complex hypothalamic-pituitary-hormonal regulation, but the mechanisms that determine pubertal timing and underlie its links to disease risk remain unclear. Here, using genome-wide and custom-genotyping arrays in up to 182,416 women of European descent from 57 studies, we found robust evidence (P < 5 × 10(-8)) for 123 signals at 106 genomic loci associated with age at menarche. Many loci were associated with other pubertal traits in both sexes, and there was substantial overlap with genes implicated in body mass index and various diseases, including rare disorders of puberty. Menarche signals were enriched in imprinted regions, with three loci (DLK1-WDR25, MKRN3-MAGEL2 and KCNK9) demonstrating parent-of-origin-specific associations concordant with known parental expression patterns. Pathway analyses implicated nuclear hormone receptors, particularly retinoic acid and γ-aminobutyric acid-B2 receptor signalling, among novel mechanisms that regulate pubertal timing in humans. Our findings suggest a genetic architecture involving at least hundreds of common variants in the coordinated timing of the pubertal transition.

  1. Parent-of-origin specific allelic associations among 106 genomic loci for age at menarche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Deborah J; Ferreira, Teresa; He, Chunyan; Chasman, Daniel I; Esko, Tõnu; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Albrecht, Eva; Ang, Wei Q; Corre, Tanguy; Cousminer, Diana L; Feenstra, Bjarke; Franceschini, Nora; Ganna, Andrea; Johnson, Andrew D; Kjellqvist, Sanela; Lunetta, Kathryn L; McMahon, George; Nolte, Ilja M; Paternoster, Lavinia; Porcu, Eleonora; Smith, Albert V; Stolk, Lisette; Teumer, Alexander; Tšernikova, Natalia; Tikkanen, Emmi; Ulivi, Sheila; Wagner, Erin K; Amin, Najaf; Bierut, Laura J; Byrne, Enda M; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Koller, Daniel L; Mangino, Massimo; Pers, Tune H; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Zhao, Jing Hua; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Atsma, Femke; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blomqvist, Carl; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Buring, Julie E; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen; Chen, Jinhui; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Collée, J. Margriet; Couch, Fergus J; Couper, David; Coveillo, Andrea D; Cox, Angela; Czene, Kamila; D’adamo, Adamo Pio; Smith, George Davey; De Vivo, Immaculata; Demerath, Ellen W; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dieffenbach, Aida K; Dunning, Alison M; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Eriksson, Johan G; Fasching, Peter A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Flyger, Henrik; Foroud, Tatiana; Franke, Lude; Garcia, Melissa E; García-Closas, Montserrat; Geller, Frank; de Geus, Eco EJ; Giles, Graham G; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guénel, Pascal; Guo, Suiqun; Hall, Per; Hamann, Ute; Haring, Robin; Hartman, Catharina A; Heath, Andrew C; Hofman, Albert; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Hu, Frank B; Hunter, David J; Karasik, David; Kiel, Douglas P; Knight, Julia A; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lai, Sandra; Lambrechts, Diether; Lindblom, Annika; Mägi, Reedik; Magnusson, Patrik K; Mannermaa, Arto; Martin, Nicholas G; Masson, Gisli; McArdle, Patrick F; McArdle, Wendy L; Melbye, Mads; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Milne, Roger L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Nohr, Ellen A; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Oostra, Ben A; Palotie, Aarno; Peacock, Munro; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul DP; Postma, Dirkje S; Pouta, Anneli; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Ring, Susan; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M; Rudolph, Anja; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Southey, Mellissa C; Sovio, Ulla; Stampfer, Meir J; Stöckl, Doris; Storniolo, Anna M; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tyrer, Jonathan; Visser, Jenny A; Vollenweider, Peter; Völzke, Henry; Waeber, Gerard; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wang, Qin; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winqvist, Robert; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce HR; Wright, Margaret J; Boomsma, Dorret I; Econs, Michael J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Loos, Ruth JF; McCarthy, Mark I; Montgomery, Grant W; Rice, John P; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Bergmann, Sven; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boyd, Heather A; Crisponi, Laura; Gasparini, Paolo; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B; Ingelsson, Erik; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kraft, Peter; Lawlor, Debbie; Metspalu, Andres; Pennell, Craig E; Ridker, Paul M; Snieder, Harold; Sørensen, Thorkild IA; Spector, Tim D; Strachan, David P; Uitterlinden, André G; Wareham, Nicholas J; Widen, Elisabeth; Zygmunt, Marek; Murray, Anna; Easton, Douglas F

    2014-01-01

    Age at menarche is a marker of timing of puberty in females. It varies widely between individuals, is a heritable trait and is associated with risks for obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, breast cancer and all-cause mortality1. Studies of rare human disorders of puberty and animal models point to a complex hypothalamic-pituitary-hormonal regulation2,3, but the mechanisms that determine pubertal timing and underlie its links to disease risk remain unclear. Here, using genome-wide and custom-genotyping arrays in up to 182,416 women of European descent from 57 studies, we found robust evidence (P<5×10−8) for 123 signals at 106 genomic loci associated with age at menarche. Many loci were associated with other pubertal traits in both sexes, and there was substantial overlap with genes implicated in body mass index and various diseases, including rare disorders of puberty. Menarche signals were enriched in imprinted regions, with three loci (DLK1/WDR25, MKRN3/MAGEL2 and KCNK9) demonstrating parent-of-origin specific associations concordant with known parental expression patterns. Pathway analyses implicated nuclear hormone receptors, particularly retinoic acid and gamma-aminobutyric acid-B2 receptor signaling, among novel mechanisms that regulate pubertal timing in humans. Our findings suggest a genetic architecture involving at least hundreds of common variants in the coordinated timing of the pubertal transition. PMID:25231870

  2. The Minor Allele of rs7574865 in the STAT4 Gene Is Associated with Increased mRNA and Protein Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamana, Amalia; López-Santalla, Mercedes; Castillo-González, Raquel; Ortiz, Ana María; Martín, Javier; García-Vicuña, Rosario; González-Álvaro, Isidoro

    2015-01-01

    Objective The T allele of rs7574865 in STAT4 confers risk of developing autoimmune disorders. However, its functional significance remains unclear. Here we analyze how rs7574865 affects the transcription of STAT4 and its protein expression. Methods We studied 201 patients (80% female; median age, 54 years; median disease duration, 5.4 months) from PEARL study. Demographic, clinical, laboratory and therapeutic data were collected at each visit. IL-6 serum levels were measured by enzyme immune assay. The rs7574865 was genotyped using TaqMan probes. The expression levels of STAT4 mRNA were determined at 182 visits from 69 patients using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. STAT4 protein was assessed by western blot in 62 samples from 34 patients. To determine the effect of different variables on the expression of STAT4 mRNA and protein, we performed multivariate longitudinal analyses using generalized linear models. Results After adjustment for age, disease activity and glucocorticoid dose as confounders, the presence of at least one copy of the T allele of rs7574865 was significantly associated with higher levels of STAT4 mRNA. Similarly, TT patients showed significantly higher levels of STAT4 protein than GG patients. IL-6 induced STAT4 and STAT5 phosphorylation in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Patients carrying at least one T allele of rs7574865 displayed lower levels of serum IL-6 compared to GG homozygous; by contrast the production of C-reactive protein was similar in both populations. Conclusion Our data suggest that the presence of the rs7574865 T allele enhances STAT4 mRNA transcription and protein expression. It may enhance the signaling of molecules depending on the STAT4 pathway. PMID:26569609

  3. Type 2 diabetes in a central Indian population: association with PPARG2 P121A allele but not ENPP1 K121Q

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathi AK

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Arvind Kumar Tripathi,1 Smriti Shukla,1 Mrigendra Kumar Dwivedi,1 Jitendra Kumar Tripathi,1 Ugam Kumari Chauhan,1 Manoj Indurkar,2 Shivam Singh1 1Centre for Biotechnology Studies, Awdhesh Pratap Singh University, 2Department of Medicine, Shyam Shah Medical College, Rewa, India Background: It is known that genetic and environmental factors may influence susceptibility to type 2 diabetes and its complications. Objective: In the investigation reported here we selected the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR G2 (rs1801282 and ENPP1, also called PC-1 (rs1044498 gene polymorphisms to determine whether there is a genetic association between these, obesity, and type 2 diabetes. We also examined and environmental factors influencing type 2 diabetes. Design and methods: The study was carried out on a central Indian population of 190 diabetics and 210 healthy controls. Anthropometric data were collected during sample collection. A genetic polymorphism study of PPARG2 and ENPP1 was undertaken using a polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism method and the observed genotype frequencies, allele frequencies, and carriage rates of the PPARG2 and ENPP1 polymorphisms were recorded. Results: The patterns of genotype and allele distribution in both groups suggested a significant association between PPARG2 Pro12Ala major allele A carriage (AA carriage and type 2 diabetes. Further, the results also show the protective effect of the minor allele G. Overall, we found that the distribution of ENPP1 K121Q genotypes was not significantly different between healthy controls and diabetic patients. Thus, ENPP1 polymorphism was not found to be associated with type 2 diabetes in a central Indian population. Body mass index was also found to be significantly higher in female diabetic patient group than in female healthy controls (P = 0.0388, while there was no significant difference in body mass index for males in the case group compared

  4. Evidence for the 'good genes' model: association of MHC class II DRB alleles with ectoparasitism and reproductive state in the neotropical lesser bulldog bat, Noctilio albiventris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Schad

    Full Text Available The adaptive immune system has a major impact on parasite resistance and life history strategies. Immunological defence is costly both in terms of immediate activation and long-term maintenance. The 'good genes' model predicts that males with genotypes that promote a good disease resistance have the ability to allocate more resources to reproductive effort which favours the transmission of good alleles into future generations. Our study shows a correlation between immune gene constitution (Major Histocompatibility Complex, MHC class II DRB, ectoparasite loads (ticks and bat flies and the reproductive state in a neotropical bat, Noctilio albiventris. Infestation rates with ectoparasites were linked to specific Noal-DRB alleles, differed among roosts, increased with body size and co-varied with reproductive state particularly in males. Non-reproductive adult males were more infested with ectoparasites than reproductively active males, and they had more often an allele (Noal-DRB*02 associated with a higher tick infestation than reproductively active males or subadults. We conclude that the individual immune gene constitution affects ectoparasite susceptibility, and contributes to fitness relevant trade-offs in male N. albiventris as suggested by the 'good genes' model.

  5. Evidence for the 'good genes' model: association of MHC class II DRB alleles with ectoparasitism and reproductive state in the neotropical lesser bulldog bat, Noctilio albiventris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schad, Julia; Dechmann, Dina K N; Voigt, Christian C; Sommer, Simone

    2012-01-01

    The adaptive immune system has a major impact on parasite resistance and life history strategies. Immunological defence is costly both in terms of immediate activation and long-term maintenance. The 'good genes' model predicts that males with genotypes that promote a good disease resistance have the ability to allocate more resources to reproductive effort which favours the transmission of good alleles into future generations. Our study shows a correlation between immune gene constitution (Major Histocompatibility Complex, MHC class II DRB), ectoparasite loads (ticks and bat flies) and the reproductive state in a neotropical bat, Noctilio albiventris. Infestation rates with ectoparasites were linked to specific Noal-DRB alleles, differed among roosts, increased with body size and co-varied with reproductive state particularly in males. Non-reproductive adult males were more infested with ectoparasites than reproductively active males, and they had more often an allele (Noal-DRB*02) associated with a higher tick infestation than reproductively active males or subadults. We conclude that the individual immune gene constitution affects ectoparasite susceptibility, and contributes to fitness relevant trade-offs in male N. albiventris as suggested by the 'good genes' model.

  6. Implication of HLA-C and KIR alleles in human papillomavirus infection and associated cervical lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Roberta; Gentili, Valentina; Rotola, Antonella; Bortolotti, Daria; Cassai, Enzo; Di Luca, Dario

    2014-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) regulation of host immune response leads to cervical lesions. In particular, natural killer (NK) cells are crucial for HPV control. Since specific HLA-I/KIR interactions modify NK cell activation, we analyzed HLA-C and KIR alleles in HPV infection and lesion development in 150 controls, 33 condyloma acuminatum, and 111 invasive cervical cancer (ICC) patients. We showed an increase in HLA-C1/KIR2DL2 and HLA-C1/KIR2DL3 pairs in HPV high-risk infected patients (OR 3.05, 3.24) with ICC (OR 1.33, 3.68). These data suggest HLA-C and KIR typing as risk marker for HPV infection and lesion evolution.

  7. High frequency of loss of allelic integrity at Wilms′ tumor suppressor gene-1 locus in advanced breast tumors associated with aggressiveness of the tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Gupta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The product of Wilms′ tumor suppressor gene (WT1, a nuclear transcription factor, regulates the expression of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF and transforming growth factor (TGF systems, both of which are implicated in breast tumorigenesis and are known to facilitate angiogenesis. In the present study, WT1 allelic integrity was examined by Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH studies in infiltrating breast carcinoma (n=60, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS (n=10 and benign breast disease (n=5 patients, to determine its possible association with tumor progression. Methods: LOH at the WT1 locus (11p13 as determined by PCR-RFLP for Hinf1 restriction site and was subsequently examined for its association with intratumoral expression of various growth factors i.e. TGF-β1, IGF-II, IGF-1R and angiogenesis (VEGF and Intratumoral micro-vessel density in breast carcinoma. Results: Six of 22 (27.2% genetically heterozygous of infiltrating breast carcinoma and 1 of 4 DCIS cases showed loss of one allele at WT1 locus. Histologically, the tumors with LOH at WT1 were Intraductal carcinoma (IDC and were of grade II and III. There was no correlation in the appearance of LOH at WT1 locus with age, tumor stage, menopausal status, chemotherapy status and lymph node metastasis. The expression of factor IGF-II and its receptor, IGF-1R was significantly higher in carcinoma having LOH at WT1 locus. A positive correlation was observed between the TGF-β1, VEGF expression and IMD scores in infiltrating carcinoma. Conclusions: The current study indicates that the high frequency of loss of allelic integrity at Wilms′ tumor suppressor gene-1 locus in high-graded breast tumors is associated with aggressiveness of the tumor.

  8. Association between protective and deleterious HLA alleles with multiple sclerosis in Central East Sardinia.

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    Roberta Pastorino

    Full Text Available The human leukocyte antigen (HLA complex on chromosome 6p21 has been unambiguously associated with multiple sclerosis (MS. The complex features of the HLA region, especially its high genic content, extreme polymorphism, and extensive linkage disequilibrium, has prevented to resolve the nature of HLA association in MS. We performed a family based association study on the isolated population of the Nuoro province (Sardinia to clarify the role of HLA genes in MS. The main stage of our study involved an analysis of the ancestral haplotypes A2Cw7B58DR2DQ1 and A30Cw5B18DR3DQ2. On the basis of a multiplicative model, the effect of the first haplotype is protective with an odds ratio (OR = 0.27 (95% confidence interval CI 0.13-0.57, while that of the second is deleterious, OR 1.78 (95% CI 1.26-2.50. We found both class I (A, Cw, B and class II (DR, DQ loci to have an effect on MS susceptibility, but we saw that they act independently from each other. We also performed an exploratory analysis on a set of 796 SNPs in the same HLA region. Our study supports the claim that Class I and Class II loci act independently on MS susceptibility and this has a biological explanation. Also, the analysis of SNPs suggests that there are other HLA genes involved in MS, but replication is needed. This opens up new perspective on the study of MS.

  9. Preferential binding to Elk-1 by SLE-associated IL10 risk allele upregulates IL10 expression.

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    Daisuke Sakurai

    Full Text Available Immunoregulatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10 is elevated in sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE correlating with disease activity. The established association of IL10 with SLE and other autoimmune diseases led us to fine map causal variant(s and to explore underlying mechanisms. We assessed 19 tag SNPs, covering the IL10 gene cluster including IL19, IL20 and IL24, for association with SLE in 15,533 case and control subjects from four ancestries. The previously reported IL10 variant, rs3024505 located at 1 kb downstream of IL10, exhibited the strongest association signal and was confirmed for association with SLE in European American (EA (P = 2.7×10⁻⁸, OR = 1.30, but not in non-EA ancestries. SNP imputation conducted in EA dataset identified three additional SLE-associated SNPs tagged by rs3024505 (rs3122605, rs3024493 and rs3024495 located at 9.2 kb upstream, intron 3 and 4 of IL10, respectively, and SLE-risk alleles of these SNPs were dose-dependently associated with elevated levels of IL10 mRNA in PBMCs and circulating IL-10 protein in SLE patients and controls. Using nuclear extracts of peripheral blood cells from SLE patients for electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we identified specific binding of transcription factor Elk-1 to oligodeoxynucleotides containing the risk (G allele of rs3122605, suggesting rs3122605 as the most likely causal variant regulating IL10 expression. Elk-1 is known to be activated by phosphorylation and nuclear localization to induce transcription. Of interest, phosphorylated Elk-1 (p-Elk-1 detected only in nuclear extracts of SLE PBMCs appeared to increase with disease activity. Co-expression levels of p-Elk-1 and IL-10 were elevated in SLE T, B cells and monocytes, associated with increased disease activity in SLE B cells, and were best downregulated by ERK inhibitor. Taken together, our data suggest that preferential binding of activated Elk-1 to the IL10 rs3122605-G allele

  10. Association of distinct allelic haplotypes of DISC1 with psychotic and bipolar spectrum disorders and with underlying cognitive impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palo, Outi M; Antila, Mervi; Silander, Kaisa; Hennah, William; Kilpinen, Helena; Soronen, Pia; Tuulio-Henriksson, Annamari; Kieseppä, Tuula; Partonen, Timo; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Peltonen, Leena; Paunio, Tiina

    2007-10-15

    Bipolar disorder (BPD) and schizophrenia (SCZ) have at least a partially convergent aetiology and thus may share genetic susceptibility loci. Multiple lines of evidence emphasize the role of disrupted-in-schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) gene in psychotic disorders such as SCZ. We monitored the association of allelic variants of translin-associated factor X (TSNAX)/DISC1 gene cluster using 13 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 723 members of 179 Finnish BPD families. Consistent with an earlier finding in Finnish SCZ families, the haplotype T-A of rs751229 and rs3738401 at the 5' end of DISC1 was over-transmitted to males with psychotic disorder (P = 0.008; for an extended haplotype P = 0.0007 with both genders). Haplotypes at the 3' end of DISC1 associated with bipolar spectrum disorder (P = 0.0002 for an under-transmitted haplotype T-T of rs821616 and rs1411771, for an extended haplotype P = 0.0001), as did a two-SNP risk haplotype at the 5' end of TSNAX (P = 0.007). The risk haplotype for psychotic disorder also associated to perseverations (P = 0.035; for rs751229 alone P = 0.0012), and a protective haplotype G-T-G with rs1655285 in addition to auditory attention (P = 0.0059). The 3' end variants associated with several cognitive traits, with the most robust signal for rs821616 and verbal fluency and rs980989 and psychomotor processing speed (P = 0.011 for both). These results support involvement of DISC1 in the genetic aetiology of BPD and suggest that its distinct variants contribute to variation in the dimensional features of psychotic and bipolar spectrum disorders. Finding of alternative associating haplotypes in the same set of BPD families gives evidence for allelic heterogeneity within DISC1, eventually leading to heterogeneity in the clinical outcome as well.

  11. Allelic variation in PtoPsbW associated with photosynthesis, growth, and wood properties in Populus tomentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Longxin; Wang, Bowen; Du, Qingzhang; Chen, Jinhui; Tian, Jiaxing; Yang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Deqiang

    2017-02-01

    Photosynthesis is one of the most important reactions on earth. PsbW, a nuclear-encoded subunit of photosystem II (PSII), stabilizes PSII structure and plays an important role in photosynthesis. Here, we used candidate gene-based linkage disequilibrium (LD) mapping to detect significant associations between allelic variations of PtoPsbW and traits related to photosynthesis, growth, and wood properties in Populus tomentosa. PtoPsbW showed the highest expression in leaves and it increased during the development of these leaves, suggesting that PtoPsbW may play an important role in plant growth and development. Analysis of nucleotide diversity and LD revealed that PtoPsbW has low single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) diversity (π tot = 0.0048 and θ w = 0.0050) and relatively low average value of LD (0.1500), indicating that PtoPsbW is conserved due to its indispensable function. Using single-SNP associations in an association population of 435 individuals, we identified five significant associations at the threshold of P ≤ 0.05, explaining 3.28-15.98 % of the phenotypic variation. Haplotype-based association analyses indicated that 13 haplotypes (P ≤ 0.05) from six blocks were associated with photosynthesis, growth, and wood properties. Our work shows that identifying allelic variation and LD can help to decipher the genetic basis of photosynthesis and could potentially be applied for molecular marker-assisted selection in Populus.

  12. Frequency of the MDR1 mutant allele associated with multidrug sensitivity in dogs from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monobe MM

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Marina M Monobe,1 João P Araujo Junior,2 Kari V Lunsford,3 Rodrigo C Silva,4 Camilo Bulla41Department of Veterinary Clinics, School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, 2Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Biosciences Institute, Sao Paulo State University (UNESP, Botucatu, Brazil; 3Department of Clinical Sciences and Animal Health Center, 4Department of Pathobiology and Population Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi, MS, USAAbstract: To date, a 4-bp deletion in the MDR1 gene has been detected in more than ten dog breeds, as well as in mixed breed dogs, in several countries, however information regarding this mutation in dogs from Brazil is lacking. For this reason, 103 Collies, 77 Border Collies, 76 Shetland Sheepdogs, 20 Old English Sheepdogs, 55 German Shepherds, 16 Australian Shepherds, and 53 Whippets from Brazil were screened for the presence of the mutation. The heterozygous mutated genotype, MDR1 (+/−, frequency found for Collies, Australian Shepherd, and Shetland Sheepdog was 50.5% (95% CI =41.1%–59.9%, 31.3% (95% CI =8.6%–53.2%, and 15.8% (95% CI =7.7%–23.9%, respectively. Homozygous mutated genotype, MDR1 (−/−, was detected only in Collies 35.9%. The MDR1 allele mutant frequency found for Collies, Australian Shepherd, and Shetland Sheepdog was 61.2% (95% CI =54.8%–67.5%, 15.6% (95% CI =3.1%–28.2%, and 7.9% (95% CI =3.7%–12.1%, respectively. Additionally, even free of the mutant allele, the maximum mutant prevalence (MMP in that population, with 95% CI, was 3.8%, 5.2%, 5.4%, and 13.8% for Border Collies, German Shepherds, Whippets, and Old English Sheepdogs, respectively. In this way, this information is important, not only for MDR1 genotype-based breeding programs and international exchange of breeding animals of predisposed breeds, but also for modification of drug therapy for breeds at risk.Keywords: P-glycoprotein, MDR1 mutation, ivermectin, dog, drug

  13. Allele variations in the OCA2 gene (pink-eyed-dilution locus) are associated with genetic susceptibility to melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannot, Anne-Sophie; Meziani, Roubila; Bertrand, Guylene; Gérard, Benedicte; Descamps, Vincent; Archimbaud, Alain; Picard, Catherine; Ollivaud, Laurence; Basset-Seguin, Nicole; Kerob, Delphine; Lanternier, Guy; Lebbe, Celeste; Saiag, P; Crickx, Beatrice; Clerget-Darpoux, Françoise; Grandchamp, Bernard; Soufir, Nadem; Melan-Cohort

    2005-08-01

    The occuloalbinism 2 (OCA2) gene, localized at 15q11, encodes a melanosomal transmembrane protein that is involved in the most common form of human occulo-cutaneous albinism, a human genetic disorder characterized by fair pigmentation and susceptibility to skin cancer. We wondered whether allele variations at this locus could influence susceptibility to malignant melanoma (MM). In all, 10 intragenic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 113 patients with melanomas and in 105 Caucasian control subjects with no personal or family history of skin cancer. By comparing allelic distribution between cases and controls, we show that MM and OCA2 are associated (p value=0.030 after correction for multiple testing). Then, a recently developed strategy, the 'combination test' enabled us to show that a combination formed by two SNPs was most strongly associated to MM, suggesting a possible interaction between intragenic SNPs. In addition, the role of OCA2 on MM risk was also detected using a logistic model taking into account the presence of variants of the melanocortin 1 receptor gene (MC1R, a key pigmentation gene) and all pigmentation characteristics as melanoma risk factors. Our data demonstrate that a second pigmentation gene, in addition to MC1R, is involved in genetic susceptibility to melanoma.

  14. Associations between allelic polymorphism of the BMP Binding Endothelial Regulator and phenotypic variation of cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunping; Gui, Linsheng; Li, Yaokun; Plath, Martin; Zan, Linsen

    2015-12-01

    The BMP Binding Endothelial Regulator (BMPER) is an inhibitor of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), which play fundamental roles in adipocyte differentiation, fat development and energy balance. The objectives of this study were to detect polymorphisms of BMPER gene in four indigenous Chinese cattle populations and to investigate their effects on body size traits. Initially, three SNPs, namely G100597A (SNP1), C105331A (SNP2), and G105521A (SNP3) and eight distinct haplotypes were identified. In a total of 12 SNP-SNP combinations, SNP2-SNP3 had a strong linkage in Qinchuan cattle. These four cattle populations belong to intermediate genetic diversity at three SNP loci except Shuxuan cattle population in SNP3. At SNP1, genotype AA was associated with an increased body size. For SNP2, the heterozygous genotype individuals had a greater rump length than those of two other homozygotic genotypes. At SNP3, individuals with GG genotype had smaller rump length and hip width. A total of seven haplotype combinations were detected in Qinchuan cattle population and association analysis results showed individuals with Haplotype combination 4/2 (AAA/CAA) had greater rump length than those with Hap3/1 and Hap3/3 (P cattle breeding.

  15. The T-allele of TCF7L2 rs7903146 associates with a reduced compensation of insulin secretion for insulin resistance induced by 9 days of bed rest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alibegovic, Amra C; Sonne, Mette P; Højbjerre, Lise

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine whether the type 2 diabetes-associated T-allele of transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) rs7903146 associates with impaired insulin secretion to compensate for insulin resistance induced by bed rest. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 38...... of FPIR in response to insulin resistance induced by bed rest was lower in carriers of the T-allele (P resistance...... healthy young Caucasian men were studied before and after bed rest using the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp technique combined with indirect calorimetry preceded by an intravenous glucose tolerance test. The TCF7L2 rs7903146 was genotyped using allelic discrimination performed with an ABI 7900 system...

  16. Common alleles in candidate susceptibility genes associated with risk and development of epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Notaridou, Maria; Quaye, Lydia; Dafou, Dimitra;

    2011-01-01

    Common germline genetic variation in the population is associated with susceptibility to epithelial ovarian cancer. Microcell-mediated chromosome transfer and expression microarray analysis identified nine genes associated with functional suppression of tumorogenicity in ovarian cancer cell lines...

  17. Allele-specific PCR for detecting the deafness-associated mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yu; Xia, Bo-Hou; Liu, Qi; Li, Mei-Ya; Huang, Shui-Xian; Zhuo, Guang-Chao

    2016-10-10

    Mutations in mitochondrial 12S rRNA (MT-RNR1) are the important causes of sensorineural hearing loss. Of these mutations, the homoplasmic m.1555A>G or m.1494C>T mutation in the highly conserved A-site of MT-RNR1 gene has been found to be associated with both aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss in many families worldwide. Since the m.1555A>G and m.1494C>T mutations are sensitive to ototoxic drugs, therefore, screening for the presence of these mutations is important for early diagnosis and prevention of deafness. For this purpose, we recently developed a novel allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) which is able to simultaneously detect these mutations. To assess its accuracy, in this study, we employed this method to screen the frequency of m.1555A>G and m.1494C>T mutations in 200 deafness patients and 120 healthy subjects. Consequently, four m.1555A>G and four m.1494C>T mutations were identified; among these, only one patient with the m.1494C>T mutation had an obvious family history of hearing loss. Strikingly, clinical evaluation showed that this family exhibited a high penetrance of hearing loss. In particular, the penetrances of hearing loss were 80% with the aminoglycoside included and 20% when excluded. PCR-Sanger sequencing of the mitochondrial genomes confirmed the presence of the m.1494C>T mutation and identified a set of polymorphisms belonging to mitochondrial haplogroup A. However, the lack of functional variants in mitochondrial and nuclear modified genes (GJB2 and TRMU) in this family indicated that mitochondrial haplogroup and nuclear genes may not play important roles in the phenotypic expression of the m.1494C>T mutation. Thus, other modification factors, such as environmental factor, aminoglycosides or epigenetic modification may have contributed to the high penetrance of hearing loss in this family. Taken together, our data showed that this assay is an effective approach that could be used for detection the deafness-associated MT-RNR1

  18. Association between HLA-Class I and HLA-Class II Alleles and Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infection in Iraqi Patients from Baghdad City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhal Abdulmohaimen Mohammed

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pulmonary tuberculosis (PT is one of the endemic diseases in Iraq, and among the suggested predisposing factors are alleles of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA system. We sought to investigate the association between HLA-class I (A and B and -class II (DR and DQ alleles in a sample of PT Iraqi patients. Methods: lymphocytes of 105 PT patients and 40 controls were phenotyped for HLA-A, -B, -DR, and -DQ alleles by means of the microlymphocytotoxicity test using a panel of monoclonal antisera. Results: HLA frequencies of B18 (16.2 vs. 2.5%; OD=7.53 and DR1 (51.4 vs. 10.0%; OD=9.53 alleles were significantly increased in the patients as compared with the controls, while B5 (6.7 vs. 25.0%, DR8 (1.9 vs. 17.5%, and DQ3 (11.4 vs. 45.0% alleles were significantly decreased. However, a significant corrected level was maintained for only DR1, DR8, and DQ3 alleles (Pc=1.9×10-5, 0.02 and 1.0×10-4, respectively. Conclusion: The results confirm the predisposing and protecting roles of HLA alleles in PT.

  19. [Polymorphism of human HLA-DRB1 leukocyte antigen alleles and its association to juvenile rheumatoid arthritis in a sample of Colombian mestizo children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavito, Gloria; Malagón, Clara; Ramírez, Luis A; De La Cruz, Oscar F; Uribe, Oscar; Navarro, Edgar; Iglesias, Antonio; Martínez, Paz; Jaraquemada, Dolores; Egea, Eduardo

    2003-09-01

    Oligotypes of the human leukocyte antigen HLA Class II, DRB1 alleles were characterized at the molecular level in a group of Colombian children suffering juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). The distribution of these alleles was examined in a group of Colombian mestizo children (genetic admixture of Amerindians, Europeans and Africans) suffering from clinically distinct JRA subsets in order to detect HLA allele frequency differences in patients with different JRA subsets. A group of 65 patients with JRA and 65 controls were characterized for the subtypes of the HLA-DRB1 alleles using polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes (PCR-SSOP). The oligotyping protocol recommended by the 12th International Histocompatibility Workshop held in St. Malo, Paris, in 1996, was used. Subtype HLA-DRB1*1104 was the allele most strongly associated with susceptibility to JRA (Fisher's p = 0.013, odds ratio (OR) = 16.79, etiologic fraction (EF) = 0.93). HLA-DRB1*1602 was also associated with susceptibility to a lesser degree (Fisher's p = 0.016, OR = 8.98, EF = 0.88). HLA-DRB1 alleles participating in JRA protection were HLA-DRB1*1501 (preventive fraction (PF) = 0.466, p = 0.005) and HLA DRB1*1402 (PF = 0.49, p = 0.009). The relationship between some HLA-DRB1 alleles and clinical features was also compared. The presence of rheumatic factor was associated with the alleles HLA-DRB1*0407 (p = 0.05, OR = 11.2, EF = 0.45) and HLA-DRB1*1302 (p = 0.02, OR = 22.8, EF = 0.63). There was also an association between HLA-DRB1*0701 (p = 0.001, OR = 58, EF = 0.73) with expressing ANA +. We found that in the oligoarticular subset, the allele HLA-DRB1*1104 (p = 0.0034, OR = 41.53, EF = 0.97) was the one expressed most commonly. In the poliarticular group, the alleles most frequently expressed were HLA-DRB1*0404 (Fisher's p = 0.012, OR = 8.75, EF = 0.88). In patients with systemic JRA, the HLA-DRB1*1602 allele (p = 0.005, OR = 21.33, EF = 0.95) was most frequent. These

  20. FMR1 alleles in Tasmania: a screening study of the special educational needs population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, R J; Holden, J J A; Zhang, C; Curlis, Y; Slater, H R; Burgess, T; Kirkby, K C; Carmichael, A; Heading, K D; Loesch, D Z

    2005-01-01

    The distribution of fragile X mental retardation-1 (FMR1) allele categories, classified by the number of CGG repeats, in the population of Tasmania was investigated in 1253 males with special educational needs (SEN). The frequencies of these FMR1 categories were compared with those seen in controls as represented by 578 consecutive male births. The initial screening was based on polymerase chain reaction analysis of dried blood spots. Inconclusive results were verified by Southern analysis of a venous blood sample. The frequencies of common FMR1 alleles in both samples, and of grey zone alleles in the controls, were similar to those in other Caucasian populations. Consistent with earlier reports, we found some (although insignificant) increase of grey zone alleles in SEN subjects compared with controls. The frequencies of predisposing flanking haplotypes among grey zone males FMR1 alleles were similar to those seen in other Caucasian SEN samples. Contrary to expectation, given the normal frequency of grey zone alleles, no premutation (PM) or full mutation (FM) allele was detected in either sample, with only 15 fragile X families diagnosed through routine clinical admissions registered in Tasmania up to 2002. An explanation of this discrepancy could be that the C19th founders of Tasmania carried few PM or FM alleles. The eight to ten generations since white settlement of Tasmania has been insufficient time for susceptible grey zone alleles to evolve into the larger expansions.

  1. 广州地区人类白细胞抗原-Ⅰ类与丙型肝炎病毒-6a型感染相关性的研究%Study on association between hepatitis C-6a and HLA-Ⅰ allele in Guangzhou area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏文杰; 叶欣; 付涌水; 王怡仲; 许茹; 徐秀章; 陈扬凯; 贝春花

    2011-01-01

    Objective :To study the association between hepatitis C-6a and HLA-Ⅰ allele in Guangzhou area .Methods :250 individuals of HCV antibodies positive and 621 health blood donors in Guangzhou area were enrolled in this study .Nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR ) was applied to detect HCV RNA in the sera .The gene sequences in E1 and NS5B area were detected for gene typing of HCV .LUMINEX SSO methods was used to detect the HLA-Ⅰ allele .The relative risk was evaluated in regular formular .Results :There were 69 samples as HCV-6a gene type in the 250 persons .RR value in A * 33 ,A * 30 was beyond 4 ,and RR value in B * 56 ,B * 54 ,B * 55 ,B * 58 ,B * 76 was also more than 4 .Conclusion :HLA-A19 and HLA-B22 are important genetic factor for infection of HCV-6a .%目的:广州地区HLA-Ⅰ类抗原和HCV-6a感染相关性的研究.方法:选取2002~2008年HCV抗体检测双试剂阳性无偿献血者250名,随机抽取621名广州地区无血缘关系的健康无偿献血者作为对照,用逆转录-套式聚合酶链反应扩增HCVE1和 NS5B基因,对E1和NS5B区扩增阳性的PCR产物核苷酸序列测定,将所测定的HCVE1、NS5B进行基因分型.LUMINEX-SSO方法检测HLA-A,B 检测样本HLA-A,B位点.根据公式对HLA型别相关性的相对危险性进行评估.结果:250名无偿献血者中有69个样本的HCVE1和NS5B区分型结果为HCV-6a,占到分析总数的27.6%.A*33、A*30与HCV-6a感染相关评估的RR值均大于4,B*56、B*54、B*55、B*58、B*76与HCV-6a感染相关评估的RR值均大于4,与HCV-6a感染具有强关联性.结论:广州地区HCV-6a的感染与A*19和B*22存在强关联性,对HCV-6a的地域性流行、治疗和预后评价有一定预见作用.

  2. Antibody response against three widespread bovine viruses is not impaired in Holstein cattle carrying bovine leukocyte antigen DRB3.2 alleles associated with bovine leukemia virus resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliarena, M A; Poli, M; Ceriani, C; Sala, L; Rodríguez, E; Gutierrez, S; Dolcini, G; Odeon, A; Esteban, E N

    2009-01-01

    Due to the wide dissemination of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection among dairy cattle, control and eradication programs based on serological detection of infected cattle and subsequent culling face a major economic task. In Argentina, genetic selection of cattle carrying alleles of the bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) DRB3.2 gene associated with BLV-infection resistance, like *0902, emerges as the best additional tool toward controlling virus spread. A potential risk in expanding or segregating BoLA selected populations of cattle is that it might increase susceptibility to other common viruses. Special concern raises the strong association found between low proviral load and low antibody titer against major BLV structural proteins. This phenomenon might depend on host genetic factors influencing other viruses requiring, unlike BLV, strong and long-lasting humoral immune response to prevent infection. In this study, we demonstrate that there is no association among neutralizing antibody titers against foot and mouth disease virus, bovine viral diarrhea virus, or bovine herpesvirus type 1 and polymorphism of the BoLA DRB3.2 gene. Conversely, there is strong association between BoLA DRB3.2*0902 and low antibody titers against 2 BLV structural proteins--env gp51 and gag p24--to date, the best BLV resistance marker. There is also significant association between low antibody titers against gp51 and p24 and BoLA DRB3.2*1701 and low antibody titers against p24 and BoLA DRB3.2*1101 or 02. Our data suggest that increasing BoLA-selected BLV-resistant cattle or segregating BoLA-associated alleles to BLV susceptibility would not affect the resistance or the predisposition to bovine viral diarrhea virus, bovine herpesvirus type 1, or foot and mouth disease virus infection.

  3. Site-specific antibodies distinguish single amino acid substitutions in position 57 in HLA-DQ beta-chain alleles associated with insulin-dependent diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atar, D; Dyrberg, T; Michelsen, Birgitte

    1989-01-01

    The HLA-DQ beta-chain gene shows a close association with susceptibility or resistance to autoimmune insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and it has been suggested that the amino acid in position 57 may be of pathogenetic importance. To study the expression of the IDDM associated HLA-DQ beta......-chain alleles, we immunized rabbits with 12 to 13 amino acid long peptides representing HLA-DQw7 and -DQw8 allelic sequences, differing only by one amino acid in position 57 being aspartic acid (Asp) and alanine (Ala), respectively. Immunoblot analysis of lymphoblastoid cells showed that several antisera...... recognized a 29-kDa protein, equivalent to the expected molecular size of the HLA-DQ beta-chain to yield two antisera specific for HLA-DQw7 (pos. 57Asp) and three antisera for HLA-DQw8 (pos. 57Ala) positive cells. Analysis of HLA-DR 3/4 positive IDDM patients (n = 24) and controls (n = 19) showed that all...

  4. Further Evidence for an Association of ABCR Alleles with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Allikmets, Rando

    2000-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) accounts for >50% of the registered visual disability among North American and Western European populations and has been associated both with environmental factors, such as smoking, and with genetic factors. Previously we have reported disease-associated variants in the ABCR (also called ABCA4) gene in a subset of patients affected with this complex disorder. We have now tested our original hypothesis, that ABCR is a dominant susceptibility locus for AMD...

  5. Distribution and effects of polymorphic RANTES gene alleles in HIV/HCV coinfection - A prospective cross-sectional study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Golo Ahlenstiel; Tilman Sauerbruch; Ulrich Spengler; Rainer P Woitas; Agathe Iwan; Jacob Nattermann; Karin Bueren; Jürgen K Rockstroh; Hans H Brackmann; Bernd Kupfer; Oifert Landt; Amnon Peled

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Chemokines and their receptors are crucial for immune responses in HCV and HIV infection. RANTES gene polymorphisms lead to altered gene expression and influence the natural course of HIV infection. Therefore,these mutations may also affect the course of HIV/HCV coinfection.METHODS: We determined allele frequencies of RANTES-403 (G→A), RANTES-28 (C→G) and RANTESIN1.1 (T→C) polymorphisms using real-time PCR and hybridization probes in patients with HIV (n = 85), HCV (n= 112), HIV/HCV coinfection (n = 121), and 109 healthy controls. Furthermore, HIV and HCV loads as well as CD4+ and CD8+ cell counts were compared between different RANTES genotypes.RESULTS: Frequencies of RANTES-403 A, RANTES-28 G and RANTES-IN1.1 C alleles were higher in HIV infected patients than in healthy controls (-403: 28.2% vs 15.1%,P = 0.002; -28: 5.4% vs 2.8%, not significant; IN1.1:19.0% vs 11.0%, P = 0.038). In HIV/HCV coinfected patients, these RANTES alleles were less frequent than in patients with HIV infection alone (15.4% P = 0.002;1.7%; P = 0.048; 12.0%; not significant). Frequencies of these alleles were not significantly different between HIV/HCV positive patients, HCV positive patients and healthy controls.CONCLUSION: All three RANTES polymorphisms showed increased frequencies of the variant allele exclusively in patients with HIV monoinfection. The finding that the frequencies of these alleles remained unaltered in HIV/HCV coinfected patients suggests that HCV coinfection interferes with selection processes associated with these alleles in HIV infection.

  6. Further evidence for an association of ABCR alleles with age-related macular degeneration. The International ABCR Screening Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allikmets, R

    2000-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) accounts for >50% of the registered visual disability among North American and Western European populations and has been associated both with environmental factors, such as smoking, and with genetic factors. Previously we have reported disease-associated variants in the ABCR (also called ABCA4) gene in a subset of patients affected with this complex disorder. We have now tested our original hypothesis, that ABCR is a dominant susceptibility locus for AMD, by screening 1,218 unrelated AMD patients of North American and Western European origin and 1,258 comparison individuals from 15 centers in North America and Europe for the two most frequent AMD-associated variants found in ABCR. These two sequence changes, G1961E and D2177N, were found in one allele of ABCR in 40 patients ( approximately 3.4%), and in 13 control subjects ( approximately 0.95%). Fisher's two-sided exact test confirmed that these two variants are associated with AMD at a statistically significant level (PAMD is elevated approximately threefold in D2177N carriers and approximately fivefold in G1961E carriers. The identification of a gene that confers risk of AMD is an important step in unraveling this complex disorder.

  7. A study of allelic polymorphism of four short tandem repeats in the population of northwestern Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aseev, M.V.; Skakun, V.N.; Baranov, V.S. [Ott Institute of Obstetrics and Gynecology, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1995-06-01

    Characteristics of the allelic polymorphisms of the trimeric AGC repeat of the androgen receptor gene (Xq11-12), exon 1 (AR); the tetrameric ATCT repeat of the von Willebrand factor gene (12p12), intron 40 (vWF); the AGAT repeat of the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene (Xq26) (HPRT); and the AGAT repeat of anonymous DNA sequences of the short arm of chromosome X (STRX1) were studied in 160 DNA samples from unrelated inhabitants of northwestern Russia using the method of polymerase chain reaction. Seventeen, ten, eight, and nine alleles were revealed electrophoretically for short tandem repeats of AR, vWF, HPRT, and STRX1, respectively. The heterozygosity indices for these repeats were 0.80, 0.70, 0.54, and 0.58, respectively. The values for AR and vWF correlated with those expected according to the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, whereas the values for HPRT and STRX1 differed significantly from those theoretically expected. The individualization potentials were 0.045, 0.135, 0.095, and 0.061 for the short tandem repeats of AR, vWF, HPRT, and STRX1, respectively. The distribution of genotypes for the set of these four loci in the population studied was determined. The possibilities of using the studied polymorphic marker systems in molecular diagnosis of the corresponding monogenic diseases - spinal and bulbar muscle atrophy (AR), Lesch-Nyhan disease (HPRT), and von Willebrand disease (vWF) - as well as in population human genetics, testing of personal identity, and molecular approaches to the estimation of mutagenic activity are discussed. 17 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Parent-of-origin-specific allelic associations among 106 genomic loci for age at menarche

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, John R. B.; Day, Felix; Elks, Cathy E.

    2014-01-01

    . Menarche signals were enriched in imprinted regions, with three loci (DLK1-WDR25, MKRN3-MAGEL2 and KCNK9) demonstrating parent-of-origin-specific associations concordant with known parental expression patterns. Pathway analyses implicated nuclear hormone receptors, particularly retinoic acid and gamma...

  9. Associations of common breast cancer susceptibility alleles with risk of breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); M. Robson (Mark); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); L. McGuffog (Lesley); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); C. Engel (Christoph); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); M. Thomassen (Mads); M.C. Southey (Melissa); P. Radice (Paolo); S.J. Ramus (Susan); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); A. Lee (Andrew); S. Healey (Sue); R. Nussbaum (Robert); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B.K. Arun (Banu); M. James (Margaret); B. Karlan; K.J. Lester (Kathryn); I. Cass (Ilana); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); M.J. Daly (Mark); D. Goldgar (David); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); L. Tihomirova (Laima); N. Tung (Nadine); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); L. Steele (Linda); T. v O Hansen (Thomas); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); F. Nielsen (Finn); J. Dennis (Joe); J.M. Cunningham (Julie); S. Hart (Stewart); S. Slager (Susan); A. Osorio (Ana); J. Benítez (Javier); M. Duran (Mercedes); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); I. Tafur (Isaac); M. Hander (Mary); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); G. Roversi (Gaia); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); P. Mariani (Paolo); S. Volorio (Sara); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); L. Varesco (Liliana); L. Papi (Laura); M.G. Tibiletti (Maria Grazia); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); F. Fostira (Florentia); I. Konstantopoulou (I.); J. Garber (Judy); U. Hamann (Ute); A. Donaldson (Alan); C. Brewer (Carole); C. Foo (Claire); D.G. Evans (Gareth); D. Frost (Debra); D. Eccles (Diana); F. Douglas (Fiona); A. Brady (A.); J. Cook (Jackie); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); L. Adlard; J. Barwell (Julian); K. Ong; L.J. Walker (Lisa); L. Izatt (Louise); L. Side (Lucy); M.J. Kennedy (John); M.T. Rogers (Mark); M.E. Porteous (Mary); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); R. Platte (Radka); R. Eeles (Ros); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); S. Hodgson (Shirley); S.D. Ellis (Steve); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); A. Meindl (Alfons); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); D. Niederacher (Dieter); C. Sutter (Christian); D. Steinemann (Doris); N. Bogdanova-Markov (Nadja); K. Kast (Karin); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); B. Markiefka (Birgid); B. Buecher (Bruno); C. Lefol (Cédrick); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); E. Rouleau (Etienne); F. Prieur (Fabienne); F. Damiola (Francesca); L. Barjhoux (Laure); L. Faivre (Laurence); M. Longy (Michel); N. Sevenet (Nicolas); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); V. Bonadona (Valérie); V. Caux-Moncoutier (Virginie); C. Isaacs (Claudine); T. Van Maerken (Tom); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); M. Piedmonte (Marion); L. Andrews (Lesley); J. Hays (John); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); S. Khan (Sofia); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); J.L. de Lange (J.); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); K.E. van Roozendaal (Kees); A.R. Mensenkamp (Arjen); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); C.H.M. van Deurzen (Carolien); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); E. Olah; O. Díez (Orland); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); A. Teulé (A.); M. Menéndez (Mireia); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); C. Cybulski (Cezary); J. Gronwald (Jacek); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); A. Arason (Adalgeir); C. Maugard; P. Soucy (Penny); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Agata (Simona); P.J. Teixeira; C. Olswold (Curtis); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); B. Hallberg (Boubou); X. Wang (Xianshu); C. Szabo (Csilla); J. Vijai (Joseph); L. Jacobs (Lauren); M. Corines (Marina); A. Lincoln (Anne); A. Berger (Andreas); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D.G. Kaulich (Daphne Gschwantler); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; C. Phelan (Catherine); P.L. Mai (Phuong); M.H. Greene (Mark); G. Rennert (Gad); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); G. Glendon (Gord); A.E. Toland (Amanda); A. Bojesen (Anders); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); U.B. Jensen; M.A. Caligo (Maria); E. Friedman (Eitan); R. Berger (Raanan); Y. Laitman (Yael); J. Rantala (Johanna); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); N. Loman (Niklas); Å. Borg (Åke); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); J. Simard (Jacques); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); K. Offit (Kenneth); F.J. Couch (Fergus); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); CIMBA; EMBRACE Study; Breast Cancer Family; GEMO Study Collaborators; HEBON; KConFab Investigators

    2014-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: More than 70 common alleles are known to be involved in breast cancer (BC) susceptibility, and several exhibit significant heterogeneity in their associations with different BC subtypes. Although there are differences in the association patterns between BRCA1 and BRCA2 muta

  10. A commonly carried allele of the obesity-related FTO gene is associated with reduced brain volume in the healthy elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, April J; Stein, Jason L; Hua, Xue; Lee, Suh; Hibar, Derrek P; Leow, Alex D; Dinov, Ivo D; Toga, Arthur W; Saykin, Andrew J; Shen, Li; Foroud, Tatiana; Pankratz, Nathan; Huentelman, Matthew J; Craig, David W; Gerber, Jill D; Allen, April N; Corneveaux, Jason J; Stephan, Dietrich A; DeCarli, Charles S; DeChairo, Bryan M; Potkin, Steven G; Jack, Clifford R; Weiner, Michael W; Raji, Cyrus A; Lopez, Oscar L; Becker, James T; Carmichael, Owen T; Thompson, Paul M

    2010-05-04

    A recently identified variant within the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene is carried by 46% of Western Europeans and is associated with an approximately 1.2 kg higher weight, on average, in adults and an approximately 1 cm greater waist circumference. With >1 billion overweight and 300 million obese persons worldwide, it is crucial to understand the implications of carrying this very common allele for the health of our aging population. FTO is highly expressed in the brain and elevated body mass index (BMI) is associated with brain atrophy, but it is unknown how the obesity-associated risk allele affects human brain structure. We therefore generated 3D maps of regional brain volume differences in 206 healthy elderly subjects scanned with MRI and genotyped as part of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. We found a pattern of systematic brain volume deficits in carriers of the obesity-associated risk allele versus noncarriers. Relative to structure volumes in the mean template, FTO risk allele carriers versus noncarriers had an average brain volume difference of approximately 8% in the frontal lobes and 12% in the occipital lobes-these regions also showed significant volume deficits in subjects with higher BMI. These brain differences were not attributable to differences in cholesterol levels, hypertension, or the volume of white matter hyperintensities; which were not detectably higher in FTO risk allele carriers versus noncarriers. These brain maps reveal that a commonly carried susceptibility allele for obesity is associated with structural brain atrophy, with implications for the health of the elderly.

  11. A commonly carried allele of the obesity-related FTO gene is associated with reduced brain volume in the healthy elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Jason L.; Hua, Xue; Lee, Suh; Hibar, Derrek P.; Leow, Alex D.; Dinov, Ivo D.; Toga, Arthur W.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Shen, Li; Foroud, Tatiana; Pankratz, Nathan; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Craig, David W.; Gerber, Jill D.; Allen, April N.; Corneveaux, Jason J.; Stephan, Dietrich A.; DeCarli, Charles S.; DeChairo, Bryan M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Jack, Clifford R.; Weiner, Michael W.; Raji, Cyrus A.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Becker, James T.; Carmichael, Owen T.; Thompson, Paul M.; Weiner, Michael; Thal, Leon; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowki, John; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Gamst, Anthony; Potter, William Z.; Montine, Tom; Anders, Dale; Bernstein, Matthew; Felmlee, Joel; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene; Bandy, Dan; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Trojanowki, John; Shaw, Les; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Korecka, Magdalena; Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Harvey, Danielle; Gamst, Anthony; Kornak, John; Kachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J.; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Vorobik, Remi; Quinn, Joseph; Schneider, Lon; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Spann, Bryan; Fleisher, Adam S.; Vanderswag, Helen; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Morris, John C.; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Badger, Beverly; Grossman, Hillel; Tang, Cheuk; Stern, Jessica; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Bach, Julie; Duara, Ranjan; Isaacson, Richard; Strauman, Silvia; Albert, Marilyn S.; Pedroso, Julia; Toroney, Jaimie; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J; De Santi, Susan M; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Aiello, Marilyn; Clark, Christopher M.; Pham, Cassie; Nunez, Jessica; Smith, Charles D.; Given II, Curtis A.; Hardy, Peter; DeKosky, Steven T.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Porsteinsson, Anton; McCallum, Colleen; Cramer, Steven C.; Mulnard, Ruth A.; McAdams-Ortiz, Catherine; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Laubinger, Mary M.; Bartzokis, George; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Lu, Po H.; Fletcher, Rita; Parfitt, Francine; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin; Herring, Scott; Hake, Ann M.; van Dyck, Christopher H.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Bifano, Laurel A.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Graham, Simon; Caldwell, Curtis; Feldman, Howard; Assaly, Michele; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek R.; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Gitelman, Darren; Johnson, Nancy; Mesulam, Marsel; Sadowsky, Carl; Villena, Teresa; Mesner, Scott; Aisen, Paul S.; Johnson, Kathleen B.; Behan, Kelly E.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Rentz, Dorene M.; Johnson, Keith A.; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Ashford, Wes; Sabbagh, Marwan; Connor, Donald; Obradov, Sanja; Killiany, Ron; Norbash, Alex; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Jayam-Trouth, Annapurni; Wang, Paul; Auchus, Alexander P.; Huang, Juebin; Friedland, Robert P.; DeCarli, Charles; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Kittur, Smita; Mirje, Seema; Johnson, Sterling C.; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T-Y; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Highum, Diane; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre N.; Hendin, Barry A.; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Beversdorf, David Q.; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Gandy, Sam; Marenberg, Marjorie E.; Rovner, Barry W.; Pearlson, Godfrey; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Saykin, Andrew J.; Santulli, Robert B.; Pare, Nadia; Williamson, Jeff D.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Potter, Huntington; Ashok Raj, B.; Giordano, Amy; Ott, Brian R.; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Cohen, Ronald; Wilks, Kerri L.

    2010-01-01

    A recently identified variant within the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene is carried by 46% of Western Europeans and is associated with an ~1.2 kg higher weight, on average, in adults and an ~1 cm greater waist circumference. With >1 billion overweight and 300 million obese persons worldwide, it is crucial to understand the implications of carrying this very common allele for the health of our aging population. FTO is highly expressed in the brain and elevated body mass index (BMI) is associated with brain atrophy, but it is unknown how the obesity-associated risk allele affects human brain structure. We therefore generated 3D maps of regional brain volume differences in 206 healthy elderly subjects scanned with MRI and genotyped as part of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. We found a pattern of systematic brain volume deficits in carriers of the obesity-associated risk allele versus noncarriers. Relative to structure volumes in the mean template, FTO risk allele carriers versus noncarriers had an average brain volume difference of ~8% in the frontal lobes and 12% in the occipital lobes—these regions also showed significant volume deficits in subjects with higher BMI. These brain differences were not attributable to differences in cholesterol levels, hypertension, or the volume of white matter hyperintensities; which were not detectably higher in FTO risk allele carriers versus noncarriers. These brain maps reveal that a commonly carried susceptibility allele for obesity is associated with structural brain atrophy, with implications for the health of the elderly. PMID:20404173

  12. Pathogenicity of a disease-associated human IL-4 receptor allele in experimental asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachdjian, Raffi; Mathias, Clinton; Al Khatib, Shadi; Bryce, Paul J; Kim, Hong S; Blaeser, Frank; O'Connor, Brian D; Rzymkiewicz, Danuta; Chen, Andrew; Holtzman, Michael J; Hershey, Gurjit K; Garn, Holger; Harb, Hani; Renz, Harald; Oettgen, Hans C; Chatila, Talal A

    2009-09-28

    Polymorphisms in the interleukin-4 receptor alpha chain (IL-4R alpha) have been linked to asthma incidence and severity, but a causal relationship has remained uncertain. In particular, a glutamine to arginine substitution at position 576 (Q576R) of IL-4R alpha has been associated with severe asthma, especially in African Americans. We show that mice carrying the Q576R polymorphism exhibited intense allergen-induced airway inflammation and remodeling. The Q576R polymorphism did not affect proximal signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 6 activation, but synergized with STAT6 in a gene target- and tissue-specific manner to mediate heightened expression of a subset of IL-4- and IL-13-responsive genes involved in allergic inflammation. Our findings indicate that the Q576R polymorphism directly promotes asthma in carrier populations by selectively augmenting IL-4R alpha-dependent signaling.

  13. Genome-wide linkage and association mapping identify susceptibility alleles in ABCC4 for Kawasaki disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khor, C.C.; Davila, S.; Shimizu, C.; Sheng, S.; Matsubara, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Newburger, J.W.; Baker, A.; Burgner, D.; Breunis, W.; Kuijpers, T.; Wright, V.J.; Levin, M.; Hibberd, M.L.; Burns, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a self limited vasculitis in which host genetics plays a prominent role. To further the understanding of the role of host genetics in KD, a three-stage genetic study was conducted that began with a family linkage study and ultimately involved more than 3000 individuals to id

  14. Genome-wide linkage and association mapping identify susceptibility alleles in ABCC4 for Kawasaki disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khor, Chiea Chuen; Davila, Sonia; Shimizu, Chisato; Sheng, Stephanie; Matsubara, Tomoyo; Suzuki, Yasuo; Newburger, Jane W.; Baker, Annette; Burgner, David; Breunis, Willemijn; Kuijpers, Taco; Wright, Victoria J.; Levin, Michael; Hibberd, Martin L.; Burns, Jane C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Kawasaki disease (KD) is a self limited vasculitis in which host genetics plays a prominent role. To further the understanding of the role of host genetics in KD, a three-stage genetic study was conducted that began with a family linkage study and ultimately involved more than 3000 indivi

  15. Association of the amino acid motifs of BoLA-DRB3 alleles with mastitis pathogens in Japanese Holstein cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Tatsuyuki; Mukoyama, Harutaka; Furuta, Hiroki; Kondo, Yasuko; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Aida, Yoko; Kosugiyama, Motoaki; Tomogane, Hiroshi

    2009-10-01

    The association of the polymorphism of bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA-DRB3) genes, identified by the polymerase chain reaction sequence-based typing (PCR-SBT) method, with resistance and susceptibility to mastitis caused by Streptococci, coagulase-negative Staphylococci, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus was investigated. Blood samples for DNA extraction were collected from 170 Holstein cows (129 mastitis and 41 healthy cows) from 5 districts in Chiba prefecture, Japan. Susceptibility or resistance to the mastitis-causing pathogens was thought to vary by the presence of amino acid substitutions at the 9, 11, 13, and 30 positions. DRB3*0101 and DRB3*1501 had amino acid motifs of Glu(9), Ser(11), Ser(13), and Tyr(30), and they were considered to have susceptibility to all 4 mastitis pathogens. In contrast, DRB3*1101 and DRB3*1401 had amino acid motifs of Gln(9), His(11), Gly(13), and His(30) in these positions, and they also had Val(86), so these alleles were considered to have resistance to Streptococcal and coagulase-negative Staphylococcal mastitis. However, in the case of Escherichia coli mastitis, amino acid substitutions at the 9, 11, 13, and 30 positions had little effect, but rather substitutions at the 47, 67 positions of pocket 7, and at the 71, 74 positions of pocket 4, Tyr(47), Ile(67), Ala(71), and Ala(74), were associated with resistance. This motif was present in DRB3*1201.

  16. Admixture as a tool for finding linked genes and detecting that difference from allelic association between loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, R; Weiss, K M

    1988-12-01

    Admixture between genetically different populations may produce gametic association between gene loci as a function of the genetic difference between parental populations and the admixture rate. This association decays as a function of time since admixture and the recombination rate between the loci. Admixture between genetically long-separated human populations has been frequent in the centuries since the age of exploration and colonization, resulting in numerous hybrid descendant populations today, as in the Americas. This represents a natural experiment for genetic epidemiology and anthropology, in which to use polymorphic marker loci (e.g., restriction fragment length polymorphisms) and disequilibrium to infer a genetic basis for traits of interest. In this paper we show that substantial disequilibrium remains today under widely applicable situations, which can be detected without requiring inordinately close linkage between trait and marker loci. Very disparate parental allele frequencies produce large disequilibrium, but the sample size needed to detect such levels of disequilibrium can be large due to the skewed haplotype frequency distribution in the admixed population. Such situations, however, provide power to differentiate between disequilibrium due just to population mixing from that due to physical linkage of loci--i.e., to help map the genetic locus of the trait. A gradient of admixture levels between the same parental populations may be used to test genetic models by relating admixture to disequilibrium levels.

  17. The Type 2 Diabetes Associated Minor Allele of rs2237895 KCNQ1 Associates with Reduced Insulin Release Following an Oral Glucose Load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunak, Søren; Holmkvist, J; Banasik, K;

    2009-01-01

    , and rs2237897) on estimates of glucose stimulated insulin release. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Genotypes were examined for associations with serum insulin levels following an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in a population-based sample of 6,039 middle-aged and treatment-naïve individuals. Insulin......+/-SD: (CC) 277+/-160 vs. (AC) 280+/-164 vs. (AA) 299+/-200 pmol/l, p = 0.008) after an oral glucose load, insulinogenic index (29.6+/-17.4 vs. 30.2+/-18.7vs. 32.2+/-22.1, p = 0.007), incremental area under the insulin curve (20,477+/-12,491 vs. 20,503+/-12,386 vs. 21,810+/-14,685, p = 0.02) among the 4...... for the less common diabetes risk alleles of rs2237892, rs2237897, or rs2283228. CONCLUSION: The minor C-allele of rs2237895 of KCNQ1, which has a prevalence of about 42% among Caucasians was associated with reduced measures of insulin release following an oral glucose load suggesting that the increased risk...

  18. Distribution of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel (Nav) Alleles among the Aedes aegypti Populations In Central Java Province and Its Association with Resistance to Pyrethroid Insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayono, Sayono; Hidayati, Anggie Puspa Nur; Fahri, Sukmal; Sumanto, Didik; Dharmana, Edi; Hadisaputro, Suharyo; Asih, Puji Budi Setia; Syafruddin, Din

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of insecticide resistant Aedes aegypti mosquitoes has hampered dengue control efforts. WHO susceptibility tests, using several pyrethroid compounds, were conducted on Ae. aegypti larvae that were collected and raised to adulthood from Semarang, Surakarta, Kudus and Jepara in Java. The AaNaV gene fragment encompassing kdr polymorphic sites from both susceptible and resistant mosquitoes was amplified, and polymorphisms were associated with the resistant phenotype. The insecticide susceptibility tests demonstrated Ae, aegypti resistance to the pyrethroids, with mortality rates ranging from 1.6%-15.2%. Three non-synonymous polymorphisms (S989P, V1016G and F1534C) and one synonymous polymorphism (codon 982) were detected in the AaNaV gene. Eight AaNaV alleles were observed in specimens from Central Java. Allele 3 (SGF) and allele 7 (PGF) represent the most common alleles found and demonstrated strong associations with resistance to pyrethroids (OR = 2.75, CI: 0.97-7.8 and OR = 7.37, CI: 2.4-22.5, respectively). This is the first report of 8 Ae. aegypti AaNaV alleles, and it indicates the development of resistance in Ae. aegypti in response to pyrethroid insecticide-based selective pressure. These findings strongly suggest the need for an appropriate integrated use of insecticides in the region. The 989P, 1016G and 1534C polymorphisms in the AaNaV gene are potentially valuable molecular markers for pyrethroid insecticide resistance monitoring.

  19. Distribution of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel (Nav Alleles among the Aedes aegypti Populations In Central Java Province and Its Association with Resistance to Pyrethroid Insecticides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayono Sayono

    Full Text Available The emergence of insecticide resistant Aedes aegypti mosquitoes has hampered dengue control efforts. WHO susceptibility tests, using several pyrethroid compounds, were conducted on Ae. aegypti larvae that were collected and raised to adulthood from Semarang, Surakarta, Kudus and Jepara in Java. The AaNaV gene fragment encompassing kdr polymorphic sites from both susceptible and resistant mosquitoes was amplified, and polymorphisms were associated with the resistant phenotype. The insecticide susceptibility tests demonstrated Ae, aegypti resistance to the pyrethroids, with mortality rates ranging from 1.6%-15.2%. Three non-synonymous polymorphisms (S989P, V1016G and F1534C and one synonymous polymorphism (codon 982 were detected in the AaNaV gene. Eight AaNaV alleles were observed in specimens from Central Java. Allele 3 (SGF and allele 7 (PGF represent the most common alleles found and demonstrated strong associations with resistance to pyrethroids (OR = 2.75, CI: 0.97-7.8 and OR = 7.37, CI: 2.4-22.5, respectively. This is the first report of 8 Ae. aegypti AaNaV alleles, and it indicates the development of resistance in Ae. aegypti in response to pyrethroid insecticide-based selective pressure. These findings strongly suggest the need for an appropriate integrated use of insecticides in the region. The 989P, 1016G and 1534C polymorphisms in the AaNaV gene are potentially valuable molecular markers for pyrethroid insecticide resistance monitoring.

  20. Association of BoLA-DRB3 alleles identified by a sequence-based typing method with mastitis pathogens in Japanese Holstein cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Tatsuyuki; Mukoyama, Harutaka; Furuta, Hiroki; Kondo, Yasuko; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Aida, Yoko; Kosugiyama, Motoaki; Tomogane, Hiroshi

    2009-10-01

    The association of the polymorphism of bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA-DRB3) genes identified by the polymerase chain reaction sequence-based typing (PCR-SBT) method with resistance and susceptibility to mastitis caused by pathogenic bacteria was investigated. Blood samples for DNA extraction were collected from 194 Holstein cows (41 healthy cows and 153 mastitis cows including 24 mixed-infection cows infected with 2 or 3 species of pathogens) from 5 districts of Chiba prefecture, Japan. Sixteen BoLA-DRB3 alleles were detected. The 4 main alleles of DRB3*0101, *1501, *1201, and *1101 constituted 56.8% of the total number of alleles detected. Mastitis cows were divided into 2 groups: group 1 with single-infection cows and group 2 with all mastitis cows including 24 mixed-infection cows. The differences in the frequencies of BoLA-DRB3 alleles and the number of cows homozygous or heterozygous for each BoLA-DRB3 allele between healthy cows and the 2 groups of mastitis cows were evaluated. Furthermore, similar comparisons were performed between healthy cows and the 2 groups of mastitis cows for each mastitis pathogen. It was considered that the 4 alleles, namely, DRB3*0101, *1501, *1201, and *1101 had specific resistance and susceptibility to 4 different mastitis pathogens. Thus, DRB3*0101 might be associated with susceptibility to coagulase-negative Staphylococci and Escherichia coli, and DRB3*1501 might be associated with susceptibility to Escherichia coli. However, DRB3*1101 might be associated with resistance to Streptococci and coagulase-negative Staphylococci, and DRB3*1201, with resistance to Streptococci, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus.

  1. Polymorphic SVA retrotransposons at four loci and their association with classical HLA class I alleles in Japanese, Caucasians and African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulski, Jerzy K; Shigenari, Atsuko; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2010-04-01

    Polymorphic insertion frequencies of the retrotransposons known as the "SVA" elements were investigated at four loci in the MHC class I genomic region to determine their allele and haplotype frequencies and associations with the HLA-A, -B or -C genes for 100 Japanese, 100 African Americans, 174 Australian Caucasians and 66 reference cell lines obtained from different ethnic groups. The SVA insertions representing different subfamily members varied in frequency between none for SVA-HF in Japanese and 65% for SVA-HB in Caucasians or African Americans with significant differences in frequencies between the three populations at least at three loci. The SVA loci were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium except for the SVA-HA locus which deviated significantly in African Americans and Caucasians possibly because of a genomic deletion of this locus in individuals with the HLA-A*24 allele. Strong linkage disequilibria and high percentage associations between the human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I gene alleles and some of the SVA insertions were detected in all three populations in spite of significant frequency differences for the SVA and HLA class I alleles between the three populations. The highest percentage associations (>86%) were between SVA-HB and HLA-B*08, -B*27, -B*37 to -B*41, -B*52 and -B*53; SVA-HC and HLA-B*07; SVA-HA and HLA-A*03, -A*11 and -A*30; and SVA-HF and HLA-A*03 and HLA-B*47. From pairwise associations in the three populations and the homozygous cell line results, it was possible to deduce the SVA and HLA class I allelic combinations (haplotypes), population differences and the identity by descent of several common HLA-A allelic lineages.

  2. The Cys326 allele of the 8-oxoguanine DNA N-glycosylase 1 gene as a risk factor in smoking- and drinking-associated larynx cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowska, Elzbieta; Janik-Papis, Katarzyna; Rydzanicz, Malgorzata; Zuk, Karolina; Kaczmarczyk, Dariusz; Olszewski, Jurek; Szyfter, Krzysztof; Blasiak, Janusz; Morawiec-Sztandera, Alina

    2009-12-01

    Tobacco smoke-related products and ethanol would induce oxidative modifications to the DNA bases, thereby contributing to larynx cancer. Human 8-oxoguanine DNA N-glycosylase 1 (hOGG1) deals with oxidative DNA damage, and the base changes in the hOGG1 gene may alter the susceptibility of the human cells to tobacco smoke-related compounds and/or ethanol. In the present work, we investigated the association between smoking, drinking or the Ser326Cys polymorphism of the hOGG1 gene and the risk of larynx cancer in a Polish population. It has been reported that the Ser326 allele exhibits higher activity than the Cys326 variant. In this study, 253 age-matched controls and 253 patients with larynx cancer were enrolled. The polymorphism was determined with DNA from blood lymphocytes by polymerase chain reaction. The frequencies (%) of the genotypes were Ser/Ser 65.6, Ser/Cys 30.4, and Cys/Cys 4.0 in the controls and those in patients were 55.7, 36.0 and 8.3, respectively. Stratification of individuals according to their smoking and drinking habits indicated that these habits might be significant risk factors in larynx cancer. The Ser/Cys and Cys/Cys genotypes are significantly associated with the increased risk of larynx cancer. These genotypes increased the risk ratio of larynx cancer among heavy smokers, but did not change the risk in former smokers and moderate smokers. These genotypes also increased the risk of larynx cancer in moderate and heavy drinkers. Therefore, the Cys326 allele of the hOGG1 gene may increase the risk of larynx cancer associated with smoking or alcohol consumption.

  3. Identification and Molecular Analysis of Four New Alleles at the W1 Locus Associated with Flower Color in Soybean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadeesh Sundaramoorthy

    Full Text Available In soybean, flavonoid 3'5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H and dihydroflavonol-4-reductase (DFR play a crucial role in the production of anthocyanin pigments. Loss-of-function of the W1 locus, which encodes the former, or W3 and W4, which encode the latter, always produces white flowers. In this study, we searched for new genetic components responsible for the production of white flowers in soybean and isolated four white-flowered mutant lines, i.e., two Glycine soja accessions (CW12700 and CW13381 and two EMS-induced mutants of Glycine max (PE1837 and PE636. F3'5'H expression in CW12700, PE1837, and PE636 was normal, whereas that in CW13381 was aberrant and missing the third exon. Sequence analysis of F3'5'H of CW13381 revealed the presence of an indel (~90-bp AT-repeat in the second intron. In addition, the F3'5'H of CW12700, PE1837, and PE636 harbored unique single-nucleotide substitutions. The single nucleotide polymorphisms resulted in substitutions of amino acid residues located in or near the SRS4 domain of F3'5'H, which is essential for substrate recognition. 3D structure modeling of F3'5'H indicated that the substitutions could interfere with an interaction between the substrate and heme group and compromise the conformation of the active site of F3'5'H. Recombination analysis revealed a tight correlation between all of the mutant alleles at the W1 locus and white flower color. On the basis of the characterization of the new mutant alleles, we discussed the biological implications of F3'5'H and DFR in the determination of flower colors in soybean.

  4. Molecular characterization of five new S alleles associated with self-incompatibility in local Spanish almond cultivars

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Almond is a highly heterozygous species with a high number of S-alleles controlling its gametophytic self-incompatibility system (GSI). In this work we have analysed Spanish local almond cultivars for S-RNase allele diversity. By cloning and sequencing five new S-RNase alleles were identified: S31 (804 bp) in 'Pou de Felanitx' and 'Totsol', S32 (855 bp) in 'Taiatona', S33 (1165 bp) in 'Pou d'Establiments' and 'Muel', S34 (1663 bp) in 'Pané-Barquets', and S35 (1658 bp) in 'Planeta de les Garri...

  5. Tumor site- and stage-specific associations between allelic variants of glutathione S-transferase and DNA-repair genes and overall survival in colorectal cancer patients receiving 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Yu Lai

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Our retrospective cohort study investigated the effect of tumor site and stage on the associations between the allelic variants of glutathione S-transferase (GST and DNA-repair genes and overall survival (OS in CRC patients treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU-based adjuvant chemotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We genotyped GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1 Ile105Val, XRCC1 Arg399Gln, XRCC3 Thr241Met, and XPD Lys751Gln in 491 CRC patients between 1995 and 2001. A Cox proportional-hazards model was used to calculate the hazard ratios (HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs for the relationships between the allelic variants and OS. Survival analyses were performed for each allelic variant by using the log-rank test and Kaplan-Meier analysis. RESULTS: The CRC patients with the XPD Gln allelic variants had poorer survival than patients with the Lys/Lys genotype (HR  =1.38, 95% CI  =1.02-1.87, and rectal cancer patients had the poorest survival among them (HR  =1.87, 95% CI  =1.18-2.95. A significantly shorter OS was observed among stage II/III colon cancer patients with the XRCC1 Gln allelic variants (HR  =1.69, 95% CI  =1.06-2.71, compared to those with XRCC1 Arg/Arg genotype. In the combined analysis of the XRCC1 and XPD genes patients with stage II/III tumors, the poorest OS occurred in colon cancer patients with the XRCC1 Gln and XPD Gln allelic variants (HR  =2.60, 95% CI  =1.19-5.71 and rectal cancer patients with the XRCC1 Arg/Arg and XPD Gln allelic variants (HR  =2.77, 95% CI  =1.25-6.17. CONCLUSION: The XPD and XRCC1 allelic variants may be prognostic markers for CRC patients receiving 5-FU based chemotherapy. The contributions of the XPD and XRCC1 allelic variants to OS are tumor site- and/or stage-dependent.

  6. Associations among Epstein-Barr virus subtypes, human leukocyte antigen class I alleles, and the development of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder in bone marrow transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Görzer, Irene; Puchhammer-Stöckl, Elisabeth; van Esser, Joost W J; Niesters, Hubert G M; Cornelissen, Jan J

    2007-01-01

    The association between Epstein-Barr virus subtype, human leukocyte antigen class I alleles, and the development of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder was examined in a group of 25 bone marrow transplant recipients. A highly statistically significant correlation was observed between th

  7. Distribution of the lactase persistence-associated variant alleles -13910* T and -13915* G among the people of Oman and Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abri, Abdul Rahim; Al-Rawas, Omar; Al-Yahyaee, Saeed; Al-Habori, Molham; Al-Zubairi, Adel Sharaf; Bayoumi, Riad

    2012-06-01

    The high prevalence of lactase persistence (LP) among the people of Saudi Arabia is associated with the -13915(*)G variant allele upstream of the lactase gene (LCT). We, therefore, examined the frequency of the commonly known LP associated SNPs among randomly collected samples from Omani and Yemeni adult populations and obtained further data on the distribution of the two most common LP-associated variants, -13910(*)T and -13915T(*)G, in the Arabian Peninsula. The DNA fragment containing all the reported LP- associated SNPs was amplified and genotyped. The frequency of the -13915(*)G allele was highest among Dhofari Arabs of southern Oman (0.72) followed by Yemeni Arabs (0.54) and Arabs of northern Oman (0.14). It was not detected in Omanis of Asian origin. The frequency of the -13910(*)T allele was extremely low in Arabs of northern and southern Oman (0.00-0.01) and Yemenis (0.002). However, it had a frequency of 0.160 among Omanis of Asian origin. Results show that the highest frequency of the LCT -13915(*)G variant allele appears to be in the south of the Arabian Peninsula with clinal decrease within the Peninsula and further out in surrounding countries.

  8. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: Identification of a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 4q21

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Hamdi (Yosr); Soucy, P. (Penny); Adoue, V. (Véronique); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); S. Canisius (Sander); Lemaçon, A. (Audrey); A. Droit (Arnaud); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); Arndt, V. (Volker); Baynes, C. (Caroline); C. Blomqvist (Carl); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet K.); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); A.-L. Borresen-Dale (Anne-Lise); J.S. Brand (Judith S.); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); Brenner, H. (Hermann); A. Broeks (Annegien); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); Couch, F.J. (Fergus J.); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); J. Dennis (Joe); P. Devilee (Peter); T. Dörk (Thilo); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); M. Eriksson (Mats); P.A. Fasching (Peter); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); H. Flyger (Henrik); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); Giles, G.G. (Graham G.); M.S. Goldberg (Mark); A. González-Neira (Anna); G. Grenaker Alnæs (Grethe); P. Guénel (Pascal); L. Haeberle (Lothar); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); U. Hamann (Ute); Hallberg, E. (Emily); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); J.L. Hopper (John); A. Jakubowska (Anna); M. Jones (Michael); M. Kabisch (Maria); V. Kataja (Vesa); Lambrechts, D. (Diether); L. Le Marchand (Loic); A. Lindblom (Annika); J. Lubinski (Jan); A. Mannermaa (Arto); M. Maranian (Melanie); S. Margolin (Sara); Marme, F. (Frederik); R.L. Milne (Roger); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); P. Neven (Patrick); C. Olswold (Curtis); J. Peto (Julian); Plaseska-Karanfilska, D. (Dijana); K. Pykäs (Katri); P. Radice (Paolo); A. Rudolph (Anja); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); X.-O. Shu (Xiao-Ou); M.C. Southey (Melissa); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); D. Torres (Diana); T. Truong (Thérèse); C. Vachon (Celine); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); Q. Wang (Qin); R. Winqvist (Robert); W. Zheng (Wei); J. Benítez (Javier); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.M. Dunning (Alison); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); Kristensen, V. (Vessela); P. Hall (Per); D.F. Easton (Douglas); T. Pastinen (Tomi); S. Nord (Silje); J. Simard (Jacques)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThere are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are fun

  9. PCR bias in amplification of androgen receptor alleles, a trinucleotide repeat marker used in clonality studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutter, G L; Boynton, K A

    1995-04-25

    Trinucleotide CAG repeats in the X-linked human androgen receptor gene (HUMARA) have proved a useful means of determining X chromosome haplotypes, and when combined with methylation analysis of nearby cytosine residues permits identification of non-random X inactivation in tumors of women. Co-amplification of two alleles in a heterozygote generates PCR products which differ in the number of CAG units, and thus their melting and secondary structure characteristics. We have shown that under optimal conditions amplification efficiency of two HUMARA alleles is near-equivalent, generating PCR products in a ratio proportional to that of the genomic template. In contrast, reduction of template quantity, damage of template by ultraviolet irradiation or addition of monovalent salts (sodium chloride, sodium acetate or ammonium acetate) produces highly variable imbalances of allelic PCR products, with a strong tendency to preferentially amplify lower molecular weight alleles. Variability and biasing was diminished by substitution of 7-deaza-2'-dGTP for dGTP during amplification, an intervention which reduces stability of intramolecular and intermolecular GC base pairing. We conclude that DNA which is scanty, damaged or salt contaminated may display amplification bias of GC-rich PCR targets, potentially confounding accurate interpretation or reproducibility of assays which require co-amplification of alleles.

  10. Distribution of BoLA-DRB3 Allelic Frequencies and Identification of Two New Alleles in Iranian Buffalo Breed

    OpenAIRE

    Mosafer, J.; Heydarpour, M.; Manshad, E.; Russell, G.; Sulimova, G. E.

    2012-01-01

    The role of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in the immune response makes it an attractive candidate gene for associations with disease resistance and susceptibility. This study describes genetic variability in the BoLA-DRB3 in Iranian buffaloes. Heminested PCR-RFLP method was used to identify the frequency of BoLA-DRB3 alleles. The BoLA-DRB3 locus is highly polymorphic in the study herd (12 alleles). Almost 63.50% of the alleles were accounted for by four alleles (BoLA-DRB3.2 *48, ...

  11. Association of the HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 Alleles in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetic Nephropathy in the Han Ethnicity of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze-Jun Ma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available HLA gene system is one of the most polymorphic regions of the human genome. The association of HLA class II genes in T1DM pathogenesis has been reported for several ethnicities. Associations of HLA class II genes with T2DM have revealed inconsistent results. Moreover, correlations between DN and HLA alleles remain unclear. We carried out DNA typing chip by specific medium resolution typing probes in 310 T2DM subjects (including 210 patients with DN and 100 patients without DN in addition to 100 healthy controls. Differences were found between patients with T2DM and the control group in the frequencies of the HLA-DQA1*0301 (15.5% versus 8.0%, P<0.01 and the HLA-DQA1*0501 alleles (16.6% versus 8.5%, P<0.01. Differences were found between patients with DN and without DN in the frequencies of the HLA-DQA1*0302 (6.9% versus 13.5%, P<0.01 and HLA-DQB1*0501 alleles (5.8% versus 14.5%, P<0.01. Diabetes duration and systolic blood pressure were independent risk factors associated with DN (OR=2.277 and 1.366, resp., P<0.05, whereas the HLA-DQB1*0501 llele had a protective effect on DN (OR=0.53, P<0.05. These data suggest the HLA-DQA1*0301 and HLA-DQA1*0501 alleles are markers of susceptibility for T2DM, and the HLA-DQB1*0501 allele is associated with a protective effect on DN in Han ethnicity of China.

  12. Associations of common breast cancer susceptibility alleles with risk of breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This is the final version of the article. It was first published by BioMed Central at http://www.breast-cancer-research.com/content/16/6/3416 Introduction: More than 70 common alleles are known to be involved in breast cancer (BC) susceptibility and several exhibit significant heterogeneity in their associations with different BC subtypes. Although there are differences in the association patterns between BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and the general population for several loc...

  13. Type 2 Diabetes Risk Allele UBE2E2 Is Associated With Decreased Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Release in Elderly Chinese Han Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kuanfeng; Jiang, Lin; Zhang, Mei; Zheng, Xuqin; Gu, Yong; Wang, Zhixiao; Cai, Yun; Dai, Hao; Shi, Yun; Zheng, Shuai; Chen, Yang; Ji, Li; Xu, Xinyu; Chen, Heng; Sun, Min; Yang, Tao

    2016-05-01

    Recently, rs163182 in KCNQ1, rs7612463 in UBE2E2, rs7119 in HMG20A, and rs6815464 in MAEA were discovered as type 2 diabetes (T2D) loci unique to Asians, and rs13342692 in SLC16A11 were newly reported as T2D loci in multiethnicities by genome-wide association (GWA) studies. The aim of the present study is to ascertain the potential associations between these variants and T2D risk in the Chinese population, and characterize diabetic-related quantitative traits underlying these variants.A total of 4268 Chinese Han individuals (1754 patients with T2D and 2514 glucose-tolerant health subjects, age ≥40 years) were genotyped for these 5 variants. All the health individuals underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), and measures of insulin release and sensitivity were estimated from insulinogenic, BIGTT, Matsuda, and disposition indices. The associations were determined by using logistic regression analysis.After adjustment for age, sex, and BMI, rs163182 in KCNQ1 (P = 0.002) and rs7612463 in UBE2E2 (P = 0.024) were found to be associated with T2D risk in Chinese Han population. The risk C allele of rs7612463 in UBE2E2 is associated with decreased IGI (P = 0.001), BIGTT-AIR (P = 0.002), CIR (P = 0.002), and DI (P = 0.006). The other 4 variants did not associate with insulin release or sensitivity.UBE2E2 rs7612463 may mediate its diabetogenic impact on insulin response, which highly depends on the impairment of β-cell function.

  14. A novel allele of L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase is associated with enhanced drought tolerance through affecting stomatal aperture in common wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juncheng; Li, Bin; Yang, Yanping; Mu, Peiyuan; Qian, Weiqiang; Dong, Lingli; Zhang, Kunpu; Liu, Xin; Qin, Huanju; Ling, Hongqing; Wang, Daowen

    2016-07-22

    In higher plants, L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (GLDH) plays important roles in ascorbic acid (AsA) biosynthesis and assembly of respiration complex I. Here we report three homoeologous genes (TaGLDH-A1, -B1 and -D1) encoding common wheat GLDH isozymes and a unique allelic variant (TaGLDH-A1b) associated with enhanced drought tolerance. TaGLDH-A1, -B1 and -D1 were located on chromosomes 5A, 5B and 5D, respectively, and their transcripts were found in multiple organs. The three homoeologs each conferred increased GLDH activity when ectopically expressed in tobacco. Decreasing TaGLDH expression in wheat significantly reduced GLDH activity and AsA content. TaGLDH-A1b differed from wild type allele TaGLDH-A1a by an in-frame deletion of three nucleotides. TaGLDH-A1b was biochemically less active than TaGLDH-A1a, and the total GLDH activity levels were generally lower in the cultivars carrying TaGLDH-A1b relative to those with TaGLDH-A1a. Interestingly, TaGLDH-A1b cultivars showed stronger water deficiency tolerance than TaGLDH-A1a cultivars, and TaGLDH-A1b co-segregated with decreased leaf water loss in a F2 population. Finally, TaGLDH-A1b cultivars generally exhibited smaller leaf stomatal aperture than TaGLDH-A1a varieties in control or water deficiency environments. Our work provides new information on GLDH genes and function in higher plants. TaGLDH-A1b is likely useful for further studying and improving wheat tolerance to drought stress.

  15. The FOXO3A rs2802292 G-Allele Associates with Improved Peripheral and Hepatic Insulin Sensitivity and Increased Skeletal Muscle-FOXO3A mRNA Expression in Twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banasik, Karina; Ribel-Madsen, Rasmus; Gjesing, Anette P;

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The minor G-allele of FOXO3A rs2802292 has been associated with longevity. We aimed to investigate whether a phenotype related to healthy metabolic aging could be identified in individuals carrying the longevity-associated FOXO3A rs2802292 G-allele. Research Design and Methods: rs2802292...

  16. C4B null alleles are not associated with genetic polymorphisms in the adjacent gene CYP21A2 in autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odell J Dennis

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research indicates that the etiology of autism has a strong genetic component, yet so far the search for genes that contribute to the disorder, including several whole genome scans, has led to few consistent findings. However, three studies indicate that the complement C4B gene null allele (i.e. the missing or nonfunctional C4B gene is significantly more frequent in individuals with autism. Due to the close proximity of the CYP21A2 gene to the C4B locus (3 kb it was decided to examine samples from autistic subjects, including many with known C4B null alleles for common CYP21A2 mutations. Methods Samples from subjects diagnosed with autism and non-autistic controls (controls previously typed for C4B null alleles were studied. Allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR methods were used to determine 8 of the most common CYP21A2 genetic mutations, known to completely or partially inhibit 21-hydroxylase, the enzyme encoded by the CYP21A2 gene. Results Although the combined autism and control study subjects had 50 C4B null alleles only 15 CYP21A2 mutations were detected in over 2250 genotypes. Eight mutations were detected in the autistic samples and 7 in the controls. The frequency of CYP21A2 mutations was similar between the autism and control samples. Only one individual (autistic carried a chromosome containing both C4B null allele and CYP21A2 mutations.

  17. Ancestry of the Timorese: age-related macular degeneration associated genotype and allele sharing among human populations from throughout the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Margaux A.; Magalhaes, Tiago R.; Ramke, Jacqueline; Smith, Silvia E.; Ennis, Sean; Simpson, Claire L.; Portas, Laura; Murgia, Federico; Ahn, Jeeyun; Dardenne, Caitlin; Mayne, Katie; Robinson, Rosann; Morgan, Denise J.; Brian, Garry; Lee, Lucy; Woo, Se J.; Zacharaki, Fani; Tsironi, Evangelia E.; Miller, Joan W.; Kim, Ivana K.; Park, Kyu H.; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Stambolian, Dwight; DeAngelis, Margaret M.

    2015-01-01

    We observed that the third leading cause of blindness in the world, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), occurs at a very low documented frequency in a population-based cohort from Timor-Leste. Thus, we determined a complete catalog of the ancestry of the Timorese by analysis of whole exome chip data and haplogroup analysis of SNP genotypes determined by sequencing the Hypervariable I and II regions of the mitochondrial genome and 17 genotyped YSTR markers obtained from 535 individuals. We genotyped 20 previously reported AMD-associated SNPs in the Timorese to examine their allele frequencies compared to and between previously documented AMD cohorts of varying ethnicities. For those without AMD (average age > 55 years), genotype and allele frequencies were similar for most SNPs with a few exceptions. The major risk allele of HTRA1 rs11200638 (10q26) was at a significantly higher frequency in the Timorese, as well as 3 of the 5 protective CFH (1q32) SNPs (rs800292, rs2284664, and rs12066959). Additionally, the most commonly associated AMD-risk SNP, CFH rs1061170 (Y402H), was also seen at a much lower frequency in the Korean and Timorese populations than in the assessed Caucasian populations (C ~7 vs. ~40%, respectively). The difference in allele frequencies between the Timorese population and the other genotyped populations, along with the haplogroup analysis, also highlight the genetic diversity of the Timorese. Specifically, the most common ancestry groupings were Oceanic (Melanesian and Papuan) and Eastern Asian (specifically Han Chinese). The low prevalence of AMD in the Timorese population (2 of 535 randomly selected participants) may be due to the enrichment of protective alleles in this population at the 1q32 locus. PMID:26217379

  18. Distribution of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel (Nav) Alleles among the Aedes aegypti Populations In Central Java Province and Its Association with Resistance to Pyrethroid Insecticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayono, Sayono; Hidayati, Anggie Puspa Nur; Fahri, Sukmal; Sumanto, Didik; Dharmana, Edi; Hadisaputro, Suharyo; Asih, Puji Budi Setia; Syafruddin, Din

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of insecticide resistant Aedes aegypti mosquitoes has hampered dengue control efforts. WHO susceptibility tests, using several pyrethroid compounds, were conducted on Ae. aegypti larvae that were collected and raised to adulthood from Semarang, Surakarta, Kudus and Jepara in Java. The AaNaV gene fragment encompassing kdr polymorphic sites from both susceptible and resistant mosquitoes was amplified, and polymorphisms were associated with the resistant phenotype. The insecticide susceptibility tests demonstrated Ae, aegypti resistance to the pyrethroids, with mortality rates ranging from 1.6%–15.2%. Three non-synonymous polymorphisms (S989P, V1016G and F1534C) and one synonymous polymorphism (codon 982) were detected in the AaNaV gene. Eight AaNaV alleles were observed in specimens from Central Java. Allele 3 (SGF) and allele 7 (PGF) represent the most common alleles found and demonstrated strong associations with resistance to pyrethroids (OR = 2.75, CI: 0.97–7.8 and OR = 7.37, CI: 2.4–22.5, respectively). This is the first report of 8 Ae. aegypti AaNaV alleles, and it indicates the development of resistance in Ae. aegypti in response to pyrethroid insecticide-based selective pressure. These findings strongly suggest the need for an appropriate integrated use of insecticides in the region. The 989P, 1016G and 1534C polymorphisms in the AaNaV gene are potentially valuable molecular markers for pyrethroid insecticide resistance monitoring. PMID:26939002

  19. The minor C-allele of rs2014355 in ACADS is associated with reduced insulin release following an oral glucose load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornbak, Malene; Banasik, Karina; Justesen, Johanne Marie;

    2011-01-01

    insulin release following an oral glucose load or with T2D. Methods The variants were genotyped using KASPar(R) PCR SNP genotyping system and investigated for associations with estimates of insulin release and insulin sensitivity following an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in a random sample of middle...... an oral glucose load (per allele effect (beta)=-3.8% (-6.3%;-1.3%), P=0.003), reduced incremental area under the insulin curve (beta=-3.6% (-6.3%;-0.9%), P=0.009), reduced acute insulin response (beta=-2.2% (-4.2%;0.2%), P=0.03), and with increased insulin sensitivity ISIMatsuda (beta= 2.9% (0.5%;5.2%), P......=0.02). The C-allele did not associate with two other measures of insulin sensitivity or with a derived disposition index. The C-allele was not associated with T2D in the case-control analysis (OR 1.07, 95% CI 0.96-1.18, P=0.21). rs11161510 of ACADM did not associate with any indices of glucose...

  20. APOL1 Risk Alleles Are Associated With More Severe Arteriosclerosis in Renal Resistance Vessels With Aging and Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Hughson

    2016-05-01

    Discussion: With the limitation of the small number of subjects contributing to the positive results, the findings imply that APOL1 risk alleles recessively augment small-vessel arteriosclerosis in conjunction with age and hypertension. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis was not a significant finding, indicating that in the early stages of arterionephrosclerosis, the primary pathologic influence of APOL1 genotype is vascular rather than glomerular.

  1. Pleiotropic effects associated with an allele enabling the flea beetle Phyllotreta nemorum to use Barbarea vulgaris as a host plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breuker, C.J.; Jong, de P.W.; Victoir, K.; Vrieling, K.; Brakefield, P.M.

    2007-01-01

    In the Danish region of Kværkeby, a mutation in an, as yet, unknown single autosomal gene has resulted in a dominant resistance (R-) allele in the flea beetle Phyllotreta nemorum L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Alticinae). It enables the beetle to overcome the defences of Barbarea vulgaris ssp. arcua

  2. PCR bias in amplification of androgen receptor alleles, a trinucleotide repeat marker used in clonality studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Mutter, G L; Boynton, K A

    1995-01-01

    Trinucleotide CAG repeats in the X-linked human androgen receptor gene (HUMARA) have proved a useful means of determining X chromosome haplotypes, and when combined with methylation analysis of nearby cytosine residues permits identification of non-random X inactivation in tumors of women. Co-amplification of two alleles in a heterozygote generates PCR products which differ in the number of CAG units, and thus their melting and secondary structure characteristics. We have shown that under opt...

  3. Genetic variation at selected SNPs in the leptin gene and association of alleles with markers of kidney disease in a Xhosa population of South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikechi G Okpechi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a significant public health problem that leads to end-stage renal disease (ESRD with as many as 2 million people predicted to need therapy worldwide by 2010. Obesity is a risk factor for CKD and leptin, the obesity hormone, correlates with body fat mass and markers of renal function. A number of clinical and experimental studies have suggested a link between serum leptin and kidney disease. We hypothesised that variants in the leptin gene (LEP may be associated with markers of CKD in indigenous black Africans. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Black South Africans of Xhosa (distinct cultural Bantu-speaking population descent were recruited for the study and four common polymorphisms of the LEP (rs7799039, rs791620, rs2167270 and STS-U43653 [ENSSNP5824596] were analysed for genotype and haplotype association with urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, Serum creatinine (Scr and serum leptin level. In one of the four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs we examined, an association with the renal phenotypes was observed. Hypertensive subjects with the T allele (CT genotype of the ENSSNP5824596 SNP had a significantly higher eGFR (p = 0.0141, and significantly lower Scr (p = 0.0137. This was confirmed by haplotype analysis. Also, the haplotype GAAC had a modest effect on urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio in normotensive subjects (p = 0.0482. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that genetic variations of the LEP may be associated with phenotypes that are markers of CKD in black Africans.

  4. Rapid assay of A2058T-mutated 23S rRNA allelic profiles associated with high-level macrolide resistance in Moraxella catarrhalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Ryoichi; Kasai, Ayako; Ogihara, Shinji; Yamada, Kageto; Tao, Kazuyuki

    2015-09-01

    We report on a restriction fragment-length polymorphism (HpyCH4III) assay for profile analysis of 23S rRNA gene A2058T-mutated alleles associated with high-level macrolide resistance in Moraxella catarrhalis. Our assay results were supported by DNA sequencing analysis, allowed for simultaneous testing of many strains, and produced results from pure-cultured colonies within 4 h.

  5. Novel PLA2G6 mutations associated with an exonic deletion due to non-allelic homologous recombination in a patient with infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Shimojima, Keiko; Shibata, Takashi; Akiyama, Mari; Oka, Makio; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Yoshinaga, Harumi; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Novel PLA2G6 mutations associated with p.Asp283Asn and a unique intragenic deletion of exons 4 and 5 due to non-allelic homologous recombination were identified in a Japanese female patient with typical infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy. The patient showed progressive tetraplegia beginning at 9 months. An electroencephalogram showed a diffuse increase in fast waves, and brain magnetic resonance imaging showed progressive brain atrophy and T2 hypointensity in the globus pallidus. PMID:27081553

  6. Comparison of HLA allelic imputation programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Christian M.; Bastarache, Lisa; Gaudieri, Silvana; Glazer, Andrew M.; Steiner, Heidi E.; Mosley, Jonathan D.; Mallal, Simon; Denny, Joshua C.; Phillips, Elizabeth J.; Roden, Dan M.

    2017-01-01

    Imputation of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles from SNP-level data is attractive due to importance of HLA alleles in human disease, widespread availability of genome-wide association study (GWAS) data, and expertise required for HLA sequencing. However, comprehensive evaluations of HLA imputations programs are limited. We compared HLA imputation results of HIBAG, SNP2HLA, and HLA*IMP:02 to sequenced HLA alleles in 3,265 samples from BioVU, a de-identified electronic health record database coupled to a DNA biorepository. We performed four-digit HLA sequencing for HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DPB1, and -DQB1 using long-read 454 FLX sequencing. All samples were genotyped using both the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip platform and a GWAS platform. Call rates and concordance rates were compared by platform, frequency of allele, and race/ethnicity. Overall concordance rates were similar between programs in European Americans (EA) (0.975 [SNP2HLA]; 0.939 [HLA*IMP:02]; 0.976 [HIBAG]). SNP2HLA provided a significant advantage in terms of call rate and the number of alleles imputed. Concordance rates were lower overall for African Americans (AAs). These observations were consistent when accuracy was compared across HLA loci. All imputation programs performed similarly for low frequency HLA alleles. Higher concordance rates were observed when HLA alleles were imputed from GWAS platforms versus the HumanExome BeadChip, suggesting that high genomic coverage is preferred as input for HLA allelic imputation. These findings provide guidance on the best use of HLA imputation methods and elucidate their limitations. PMID:28207879

  7. Association between HLA-B51 alleles and Behcet's disease in Chinese Han nationality%HLA-B51与白塞病相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓建; 陈明华; 郑志忠

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the possible association between HLA-B51 alleles and Behcet's disease (BD). Methods Totally, 61 Chinese patients of Han nationality, who were diagnosed with BD according to the International Study Group (ISG) criteria, were recruited. The control cohort consisted of 100 healthy individuals. Blood samples were obtained from all the subjects. PCR-sequenee specific primers (SSPs) were used to for the genotyping of HLA-B51 alleles (HLA-B5101-HLA-B5109). Results Com- pared with the control group (11 positive, 11% ), the frequency of HLA-B51 (18 positive, 29.5% ) was sig- nificantly increased in BD patients (χ2=8.79, P<0.01, RR=3.39). The HLA-B51-positive patients and controls consistently carried HLA-B5101 allele with no other alleles observed. There were 15 males and 3 females in HLA-B51 positive patients, 22 males and 21 females in HLA-B51-negative patients, and signifi- cant differences in gender distribution was observed between HLA-B51-positive and negative patients (P<0.05 ). Moreover, the average age of onset in HLA-B51-positive patients significantly differed from that in HLA-B51-negative patients (28.4±10 years vs 37.3±12 years, P<0.05). However, no significant differ- ences were noticed in the clinical types, course, skin lesions, prevalence of genital ulcer, eye damage, joint involvement, or pathergy reaction between HLA-B51-positive and -negative patients (P0.05). Conclu- sions This study supports that HLA-B5101 allele is associated not only with the development of BD, but also with the gender and onset age of patients with BD of Chinese Han nationality.%目的 探讨HLA-B51等位基因和白塞病的相关性.方法 应用PCR-SSP(序列特异性引物)技术对61例中国汉族白塞病患者及100例正常人对照的HLA-B5101~HLA-B5109等位基因进行检测.结果 与对照组(11例阳性,11%)相比,白塞病组HLA-B51频率(18例阳性,29.5%)明显增高(χ2=8.79,P<0.01,RR=3.39),且白塞病组与对照组中HLA-B51

  8. Identification of a member of the catalase multigene family on wheat chromosome 7A associated with flour b* colour and biological significance of allelic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dora A; Walker, Esther; Francki, Michael G

    2015-12-01

    Carotenoids (especially lutein) are known to be the pigment source for flour b* colour in bread wheat. Flour b* colour variation is controlled by a quantitative trait locus (QTL) on wheat chromosome 7AL and one gene from the carotenoid pathway, phytoene synthase, was functionally associated with the QTL on 7AL in some, but not all, wheat genotypes. A SNP marker within a sequence similar to catalase (Cat3-A1snp) derived from full-length (FL) cDNA (AK332460), however, was consistently associated with the QTL on 7AL and implicated in regulating hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to control carotenoid accumulation affecting flour b* colour. The number of catalase genes on chromosome 7AL was investigated in this study to identify which gene may be implicated in flour b* variation and two were identified through interrogation of the draft wheat genome survey sequence consisting of five exons and a further two members having eight exons identified through comparative analysis with the single catalase gene on rice chromosome 6, PCR amplification and sequencing. It was evident that the catalase genes on chromosome 7A had duplicated and diverged during evolution relative to its counterpart on rice chromosome 6. The detection of transcripts in seeds, the co-location with Cat3-A1snp marker and maximised alignment of FL-cDNA (AK332460) with cognate genomic sequence indicated that TaCat3-A1 was the member of the catalase gene family associated with flour b* colour variation. Re-sequencing identified three alleles from three wheat varieties, TaCat3-A1a, TaCat3-A1b and TaCat3-A1c, and their predicted protein identified differences in peroxisomal targeting signal tri-peptide domain in the carboxyl terminal end providing new insights into their potential role in regulating cellular H2O2 that contribute to flour b* colour variation.

  9. Ovine MHC class II DRB1 alleles associated with resistance or susceptibility to development of bovine leukemia virus-induced ovine lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Y; Kabeya, H; Onuma, M; Kasai, N; Okada, K; Aida, Y

    1999-02-15

    For the further characterization of bovine leukemia virus (BLV)-induced leukemogenesis, we investigated the association between polymorphism of ovine leukocyte antigen (OLA)-DRB1 gene and tumor development after infection of sheep with BLV. We infected 28 sheep with BLV and cloned exon 2 of the OLA-DRB1 gene from asymptomatic animals and from animals with lymphoma Sequence analysis revealed that, among 12 healthy sheep without any evidence of tumor, ten (83.3%) carried DRB1 alleles encoding Arg-Lys (RK) at positions beta70/71 as compared with only 6 (37.5%) of the 16 sheep with lymphoma, which suggested that alleles encoding the RK motif might protect against development of tumors after infection by BLV. By contrast, alleles encoding Ser-Arg (SR) at positions beta70/71 were present at a significantly elevated frequency in sheep with lymphoma as compared with the healthy carriers, which indicated that OLA-DRB1 alleles encoding the SR motif might be positively related to susceptibility to tumor development. The two amino acids in these motifs line a pocket that accommodates the side chain of a bound peptide according to a model of the crystal structure of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR1. To analyze immunoreactions of sheep with alleles that encoded RK or SR at beta70/71, we selected sheep with either the RK/SR genotypes or the SR/SR genotypes and immunized them with a mixture of multiple synthetic antigenic peptides that corresponded to T-helper, T-cytotoxic, and B-cell epitopes of the BLV envelope glycoprotein gp51. Two weeks after the last immunization, all of the sheep were challenged with BLV. Sheep with the RK/SR genotype produced neutralizing antibodies against BLV; they eliminated BLV completely within 28 weeks of the BLV challenge, and they gave strong lymphocyte-proliferative responses to the peptides used for immunization. Moreover, such animals did not develop lymphoma. By contrast, sheep with the SR/SR genotype continued to produce BLV throughout the

  10. Association of the CYP1B1*3 allele with survival in patients with prostate cancer receiving docetaxel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.M. Sissung (Tristan); R. Danesi (Romano); D.K. Price (Douglas); S.M. Steinberg (Seth); R. de Wit (Ronald); M. Zahid (Muhammad); N. Gaikwad (Nilesh); E. Cavalieri (Ercole); W.L. Dahut (William); D.L. Sackett (Dan); W.D. Figg (William); A. Sparreboom (Alex)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractUsing a single nucleotide polymorphism association study in 52 men with prostate cancer receiving docetaxel, we found that individuals carrying two copies of the CYP1B1*3 polymorphic variant had a poor prognosis after docetaxel-based therapies compared with individuals carrying at least

  11. Inosine triphosphatase allele frequency and association with ribavirin-induced anaemia in Brazilian patients receiving antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathália Delvaux

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Inosine triphosphatase (ITPA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are strongly associated with protection against ribavirin (RBV-induced anaemia in European, American and Asian patients; however, there is a paucity of data for Brazilian patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ITPA SNP (rs7270101/rs1127354 frequency in healthy and hepatitis C virus (HCV-infected patients from Brazil and the association with the development of severe anaemia during antiviral therapy. ITPA SNPs were determined in 200 HCV infected patients and 100 healthy individuals by sequencing. Biochemical parameters and haemoglobin (Hb levels were analysed in 97 patients who underwent antiviral therapy. A combination of AArs7270101+CCrs1127354 (100% ITPase activity was observed in 236/300 individuals. Anaemia was observed in 87.5% and 86.2% of treated patients with AA (rs7270101 and CC genotypes (rs1127354, respectively. Men with AA (rs7270101 showed a considerable reduction in Hb at week 12 compared to those with AC/CC (p = 0.1475. In women, there was no influence of genotype (p = 0.5295. For rs1127354, men with the CC genotype also showed a sudden reduction in Hb compared to those with AC. Allelic distribution of rs7270101 and rs1127354 shows high rates of the genotypes AA and CC, respectively, suggesting that the study population had a great propensity for developing RBV-induced anaemia. A progressive Hb reduction during treatment was observed; however, this reduction was greater in men at week 12 than in women.

  12. Inosine triphosphatase allele frequency and association with ribavirin-induced anaemia in Brazilian patients receiving antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvaux, Nathália; da Costa, Vanessa Duarte; da Costa, Maristella Matos; Villar, Livia Melo; Coelho, Henrique Sérgio Moraes; Esberard, Eliane Bordalo Cathalá; Flores, Priscila Pollo; Brandão-Mello, Carlos Eduardo; Villela-Nogueira, Cristiane Alves; de Almeida, Adilson José; Lampe, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Inosine triphosphatase (ITPA) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are strongly associated with protection against ribavirin (RBV)-induced anaemia in European, American and Asian patients; however, there is a paucity of data for Brazilian patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ITPA SNP (rs7270101/rs1127354) frequency in healthy and hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients from Brazil and the association with the development of severe anaemia during antiviral therapy. ITPA SNPs were determined in 200 HCV infected patients and 100 healthy individuals by sequencing. Biochemical parameters and haemoglobin (Hb) levels were analysed in 97 patients who underwent antiviral therapy. A combination of AArs7270101+CCrs1127354 (100% ITPase activity) was observed in 236/300 individuals. Anaemia was observed in 87.5% and 86.2% of treated patients with AA (rs7270101) and CC genotypes (rs1127354), respectively. Men with AA (rs7270101) showed a considerable reduction in Hb at week 12 compared to those with AC/CC (p = 0.1475). In women, there was no influence of genotype (p = 0.5295). For rs1127354, men with the CC genotype also showed a sudden reduction in Hb compared to those with AC. Allelic distribution of rs7270101 and rs1127354 shows high rates of the genotypes AA and CC, respectively, suggesting that the study population had a great propensity for developing RBV-induced anaemia. A progressive Hb reduction during treatment was observed; however, this reduction was greater in men at week 12 than in women. PMID:26154744

  13. Vestibular function is associated with residual low-frequency hearing loss in patients with bi-allelic mutations in the SLC26A4 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jinsei; Seo, Young Wook; Choi, Jae Young; Kim, Sung Huhn

    2016-05-01

    DFNB4 is non-syndromic, autosomal recessive type of hearing loss with an enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) caused by mutations in SLC26A4/pendrin. Although the characteristics of hearing loss are well known in DFNB4, vestibular function remains inconclusive. We evaluated the vestibular function of 31 patients with bi-allelic mutations in SLC26A4/pendrin and analyzed genetic, radiological, and audiological correlations with vestibular function. In a caloric test, unilateral and bilateral vestibulopathies were detected in 45.2% and 6.4% of patients, respectively; however, only 22.6% had subjective vertigo symptoms. While vestibular phenotype was not significantly associated with specific mutations in genetic alleles or the sizes of the endolymphatic sac and vestibular aqueduct, a residual hearing threshold at a low frequency (500 Hz) was definitely correlated with vestibular function in DFNB4 (p = 0.005). These findings may indicate that vestibular function in DFNB4 deteriorates unilaterally in ears when hearing loss occurs. In conclusion, DFNB4 shows vestibular dysfunction, which is strongly linked to hearing loss at low frequencies without any allelic or anatomical predisposing factor.

  14. Allelic Variation in the Perennial Ryegrass FLOWERING LOCUS T Gene is Associated with Changes in Flowering Time across a Range of Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skøt, Leif; Sanderson, Ruth; Thomas, Ann

    2011-01-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) gene and its orthologs in other plant species (e.g. rice [Oryza sativa] OsFTL2/Hd3a) have an established role in the photoperiodic induction of flowering response. The genomic and phenotypic variations associated with the perennial...... ryegrass (Lolium perenne) ortholog of FT, designated LpFT3, was assessed in a diverse collection of nine European germplasm populations, which together constituted an association panel of 864 plants. Sequencing and genotyping of a series of amplicons derived from the nine populations, containing...... or structured association with further correction using genomic control indicated significant associations between LpFT3 and variation in flowering time. These associations were corroborated in a validation population segregating for the same major alleles. The most "diagnostic" region of genomic variation...

  15. A Dominant Allele of Arabidopsis Pectin-Binding Wall-Associated Kinase Induces a Stress Response Suppressed by MPK6 but Not MPK3 Mutations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bruce D.Kohorn; Susan L.Kohorn; Tanya Todorova; Gillian Baptiste; Kevin Stansky; Meghan McCullough

    2012-01-01

    The plant cell wall is composed of a matrix of cellulose fibers,flexible pectin polymers,and an array of assorted carbohydrates and proteins.The receptor-like Wall-Associated Kinases(WAKs)of Arabidopsis bind pectin in the wall,and are necessary both for cell expansion during development and for a response to pathogens and wounding.Mitogen Activated Protein Kinases(MPKs)form a major signaling link between cell surface receptors and both transcriptional and enzyme regulation in eukaryotes,and Arabidopsis MPK6 and MPK3 indeed have important roles in development and the response to stress and pathogens.A dominant allele of WAK2 requires kinase activity and activates a stress response that includes an increased ROS accumulation and the up-regulation of numerous genes involved in pathogen resistance,wounding,and cell wall biogenesis.This dominant allele requires a functional pectin binding and kinase domain,indicating that it is engaged in a WAK signaling pathway.A null mutant of the major plasma membrane ROS-producing enzyme complex,rbohd/f does not suppress the WAK2cTAP-induced phenotype.A mpk6,but not a mpk3,null allele is able to suppress the effects of this dominant WAK2 mutation,thus distinguishing MPK3 and MPK6,whose activity previously was thought to be redundant.Pectin activation of gene expression is abated in a wak2-null,but is tempered by the WAK-dominant allele that induces elevated basal stress-related transcript levels.The results suggest a mechanism in which changes to the cell wall can lead to a large change in cellular responses and help to explain how pathogens and wounding can have general effects on growth.

  16. Association of HLA-DRB1 Alleles with Ulcerative Colitis in the City of Kerman, South Eastern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojgan Mohammadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The association of HLA class II genes with ulcerative colitis (UC as an autoimmune disease has been investigated for several years. However, factors responsible for genetic predisposition of this disease have so far not been clearly understood. In this study, for the first time, we aimed to investigate the association between HLA-DRB1 types and UC in the population of Kerman, a city southeast Iran.HLA typing was performed among 85 UC patients and 95 healthy controls using PCRamplification, employing sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP. The DRB1 frequencies were determined in the patients and controls.HLA-DRB1*04 was negatively associated with UC. Furthermore, HLA-DRB1*13 was significantly associated with severity of the disease (p=0.01 among UC patients.This is the novel result that describes an association of HLA-DRB1*13 with UC and also shows the protective role of HLA-DRB1*04 against the disease in people of Kerman.

  17. Rat MHC-linked peptide transporter alleles strongly influence peptide binding by HLA-B27 but not B27-associated inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, W A; Leong, L Y; Satumtira, N; Butcher, G W; Howard, J C; Richardson, J A; Slaughter, C A; Hammer, R E; Taurog, J D

    1996-02-15

    Rats transgenic for the human MHC molecule HLA-B27 were used to study the effect of two alleles, cima and cimb, which are associated with peptide transport by the MHC-encoded Tap2 transporter, on the function of HLA-B27 as a restriction element for CTL recognition of the male H-Y minor H Ag and on the multisystem inflammatory disease characteristic of B27 transgenic rats. Anti-H-Y CTL generated in cima B27 transgenic rats lysed male B27 cimb/b targets significantly less well than cima/a or cima/b targets. Addition of exogenous H-Y peptides to male B27 cimb/b targets increased susceptibility to lysis to the level of cima/a targets. Male B27 cimb/b cells were less efficient than cima/a cells in competitively inhibiting CTL lysis of female B27 cima/a targets sensitized with exogenous H-Y peptides. 3H-Labeled peptides eluted from B27 molecules of lymphoblasts from rats of two cimb and three cima RT1 haplotypes showed that the cimb peptide pool favors comparatively longer and/or more hydrophobic peptides. These results indicate that RT1-linked Tap2 polymorphism in the rat strongly influences peptide loading of HLA-B27. Nonetheless, the prevalence and severity of multisystem inflammatory lesions were comparable in backcross rats bearing either cima/b or cimb/b. It thus appears either that binding of specific peptides to B27 is unimportant in the pathogenesis of B27-associated disease or that the critical peptides, unlike H-Y and many others, are not influenced by Tap transporter polymorphism.

  18. Allele coding in genomic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christensen Ole F

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic data are used in animal breeding to assist genetic evaluation. Several models to estimate genomic breeding values have been studied. In general, two approaches have been used. One approach estimates the marker effects first and then, genomic breeding values are obtained by summing marker effects. In the second approach, genomic breeding values are estimated directly using an equivalent model with a genomic relationship matrix. Allele coding is the method chosen to assign values to the regression coefficients in the statistical model. A common allele coding is zero for the homozygous genotype of the first allele, one for the heterozygote, and two for the homozygous genotype for the other allele. Another common allele coding changes these regression coefficients by subtracting a value from each marker such that the mean of regression coefficients is zero within each marker. We call this centered allele coding. This study considered effects of different allele coding methods on inference. Both marker-based and equivalent models were considered, and restricted maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods were used in inference. Results Theoretical derivations showed that parameter estimates and estimated marker effects in marker-based models are the same irrespective of the allele coding, provided that the model has a fixed general mean. For the equivalent models, the same results hold, even though different allele coding methods lead to different genomic relationship matrices. Calculated genomic breeding values are independent of allele coding when the estimate of the general mean is included into the values. Reliabilities of estimated genomic breeding values calculated using elements of the inverse of the coefficient matrix depend on the allele coding because different allele coding methods imply different models. Finally, allele coding affects the mixing of Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms, with the centered coding being

  19. A genome-wide screen in human embryonic stem cells reveals novel sites of allele-specific histone modification associated with known disease loci

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Prendergast, James G D

    2012-05-19

    AbstractBackgroundChromatin structure at a given site can differ between chromosome copies in a cell, and such imbalances in chromatin structure have been shown to be important in understanding the molecular mechanisms controlling several disease loci. Human genetic variation, DNA methylation, and disease have been intensely studied, uncovering many sites of allele-specific DNA methylation (ASM). However, little is known about the genome-wide occurrence of sites of allele-specific histone modification (ASHM) and their relationship to human disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent and characteristics of sites of ASHM in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs).ResultsUsing a statistically rigorous protocol, we investigated the genomic distribution of ASHM in hESCs, and their relationship to sites of allele-specific expression (ASE) and DNA methylation. We found that, although they were rare, sites of ASHM were substantially enriched at loci displaying ASE. Many were also found at known imprinted regions, hence sites of ASHM are likely to be better markers of imprinted regions than sites of ASM. We also found that sites of ASHM and ASE in hESCs colocalize at risk loci for developmental syndromes mediated by deletions, providing insights into the etiology of these disorders.ConclusionThese results demonstrate the potential importance of ASHM patterns in the interpretation of disease loci, and the protocol described provides a basis for similar studies of ASHM in other cell types to further our understanding of human disease susceptibility.

  20. The apolipoprotein E epsilon4-allele and antihypertensive treatment are associated with increased risk of cerebral MRI white matter hyperintensities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgh, P; Garde, Ellen; Mortensen, Erik Lykke;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Apolipoprotein E-epsilon4 (APOE-epsilon4) is a potential risk factor for cerebral vascular disease. The aim of the present study was to examine the relative importance of APOE-epsilon4 and other relevant risk factors for the extent of cerebral white matter hyperintensity (WMH...... the relative importance of the potential risk factors. RESULTS: APOE genotype and antihypertensive treatment were significantly associated with severity of total WMH load (P epsilon4 and WMH. Pharmaceutical treatment for arterial...

  1. Genetic association studies in drug-induced liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Ann K; Day, Chris P

    2009-11-01

    Genetic studies on drug-induced liver injury (DILI) have proved challenging, both because of their rarity and their difficulty in replicating observed effects. However, significant progress has now been achieved by both candidate-gene and genome-wide association studies. These two approaches are considered in detail, together with examples of DILI due to specific drugs where consistent associations have been reported. Particular consideration is given to associations between antituberculosis drug-related liver injury and the "slow acetylator" genotype for N-acetyltransferase 2, amoxicillin/clavulanate-related liver injury, and the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II DRB1*1501 allele and flucloxacillin-related injury and the HLA class I B*5701 allele. Although these associations are drug-specific, the possibility that additional, more general susceptibility genes for DILI exist requires further investigation, ideally by genome-wide association studies involving international collaboration. The possibility of interethnic variation in susceptibility to DILI also requires further study.

  2. Cooperation of Adhesin Alleles in Salmonella-Host Tropism

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Masi, Leon; Yue, Min; Hu, Changmin; Rakov, Alexey V.; Rankin, Shelley C.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Allelic combinations and host specificities for three fimbrial adhesins, FimH, BcfD, and StfH, were compared for 262 strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Newport, a frequent human and livestock pathogen. Like FimH, BcfD had two major alleles (designated A and B), whereas StfH had two allelic groups, each with two alleles (subgroup A1 and A2 and subgroup B1 and B2). The most prevalent combinations of FimH/BcfD/StfH alleles in S. Newport were A/A/A1 and B/B/B1. The former set was most frequently found in bovine and porcine strains, whereas the latter combination was most frequently found in environmental and human isolates. Bacteria genetically engineered to express Fim, Bcf, or Stf fimbriae on their surface were tested with the different alleles for binding to human, porcine, and bovine intestinal epithelial cells. The major allelic combinations with bovine and porcine strains (A/A/A1) or with human isolates (B/B/B1) provided at least two alleles capable of binding significantly better than the other alleles to an intestinal epithelial cell line from the respective host(s). However, each combination of alleles kept at least one allele mediating binding to an intestinal epithelial cell from another host. These findings indicated that allelic variation in multiple adhesins of S. Newport contributes to bacterial adaptation to certain preferential hosts without losing the capacity to maintain a broad host range. IMPORTANCE Salmonella enterica remains a leading foodborne bacterial pathogen in the United States; infected livestock serve often as the source of contaminated food products. A study estimated that over a billion Salmonella gastroenteritis cases and up to 33 million typhoid cases occur annually worldwide, with 3.5 million deaths. Although many Salmonella strains with a broad host range present preferential associations with certain host species, it is not clear what determines the various levels of host adaptation. Here, causal properties of host

  3. Association of HY-restricting HLA class II alleles with pregnancy outcome in patients with recurrent miscarriage subsequent to a firstborn boy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henriette Svarre; Steffensen, Rudi; Varming, Kim

    2009-01-01

    Healthy females, pregnant with a boy, generate immune responses against male-specific minor histocompatibility (HY) antigens. The clinical importance of these responses is evident in stem cell transplantation. Birth of a boy prior to a series of miscarriages reduces the chance of a subsequent live......-restricting HLA class II alleles are associated with a decreased chance of a live birth in SRM women with firstborn boys. These findings strongly indicate an aberrant maternal immune reaction against fetal HY-antigens in SRM. The results may shed light on the as-yet unknown immunological causes of SRM and may...... help understand the successful maternal acceptance of the fetal semi-allograft....

  4. Alpha tryptase allele of Tryptase 1 (TPSAB1) gene associated with Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) and Dengue Shock Syndrome (DSS) in Vietnam and Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez, Clara Vasquez; Roman, Arthur Dessi; Lan, Nguyen Thi Phuong; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Mercado, Edelwisa Segubre; Espino, Fe Esperanza; Perez, Ma Lucila M; Huong, Vu Thi Que; Thuy, Tran Thi; Tham, Vo Dinh; Nga, Cao Thi Phi; Ha, Tran Thi Ngoc; Bilar, Josie M; Bajaro, Jemimah Dawn P; Baello, Benilda Q; Kikuchi, Mihoko; Yasunami, Michio; Morita, Kouichi; Watanabe, Naohiro; Karbwang, Juntra; Hirayama, Kenji

    2015-05-01

    We previously reported, significantly higher levels of Chymase and Tryptase in early stage plasma of DSS patients prior to the occurrence of shock suggesting a possible role of mast cells in dengue pathogenesis. To further investigate, we analyzed CMA1 promoter SNP (rs1800875) and TPSAB1 gene alleles, which encode the Human Chymase and α- and β- tryptase 1 enzymes respectively, for susceptibility to Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) and Dengue Shock Syndrome (DSS) in patients from hospitals in Vietnam (Ho Chi Minh City and Vinh Long) and the Philippines. While the CMA1 promoter SNP (rs1800875) was not associated with DHF/DSS, the homozygous form of α-tryptase allele was associated with DSS patients in Vinh Long and the Philippines (OR=3.52, pDSS were combined in Vinh Long (OR=1.5, p=0.034) and the Philippines (OR=2.36, p=0.0004); in Ho Chi Minh City when DHF and DSS were combine an association was observed, but it was not statistically significant (OR=1.5, p=0.0505). Therefore, the α-tryptase might have a possible effect on the susceptibility to severe form of Dengue infection.

  5. [Features of the distribution of BoLA-A antigens and alleles of the BoLA-DRB3 gene in Black Pied cattle in relation to association with leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, L K; Sulimova, G E; Orlova, A R; Udina, I G; Pavlenko, S P

    1997-01-01

    The character of distribution of BoLA class-I antigens was studied in Black Pied cattle populations differing in status in relation to leukemia. Associative relationships of distinct antigens with resistance and susceptibility to leukemia were revealed. Using the statusmetria method, an integral estimate of predisposition to leukemia (Z) was calculated taking into consideration the contribution of each antigen in the immunogenetic status of the animal. The interval of Z values was determined, which allowed animals to be divided into groups according to resistance or susceptibility to leukemia. Alleles of the BoLA-DRB3 gene were typed in subsamples of animals with leukemia and healthy animals by the PCR-RFLP method. Twenty alleles of the gene were detected, and their frequencies were determined in both subsamples. Alleles mediating resistance of animals to leukemia (BoLA-DRB3.2*11, *23, and *28) were distributed in the group of healthy animals with frequencies of 0.079, 0.132, and 0.053, respectively; they were completely absent in animals with leukemia. The data on the estimate of animal status in relation to leukemia, which were obtained by the method of statusmetria taking in consideration the real contribution of the each class-I antigen in the detection of the disease risk (value Z), and data of allele typing by the PCR-RFLP method were shown to be in good agreement. The possibility of using BoLA class-I antigen typing in herds to determine the number of animals with leukemia was demonstrated.

  6. Dideoxy single allele-specific PCR - DSASP new method to discrimination allelic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonidas Moura Lima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer (GC is a multifactorial disease with a high mortality rate in Brazil and worldwide. This work aimed to evaluate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP rs1695, in the Glutathione S-Transferase Pi (GSTP1 gene in GC samples by comparative analysis Specific PCR - ASP and Dideoxy Single Allele-Specific PCR - DSASP methods. The DSASP is the proposed new method for allelic discrimination. This work analyzed 60 GC samples, 26 diffuse and 34 intestinal types. The SNP rs1695 of the GSTP1 gene was significantly associated with GC analyzed by DSASP method (χ2 = 9.7, P 0.05. These results suggest that the SNP rs1695 of the GSTP1 gene was a risk factor associated with gastric carcinogens is and the DSASP method was a new successfully low-cost strategy to study allelic discrimination.

  7. ANALYSIS OF SEQUENCE POLYMORPHISM OF SCR CLASS I AND II ALLELES AND STUDY REGULATION OF THEIR EXPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana ŽALUDOVÁ

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Self-incompatibility (AI is a widespread mechanism used by flowering plants to prevent inbreeding depression and helps create and maintain genetic diversity within a species. Oilseed rape (Brassica napus L. and especially its modern varieties are characterized by high level of self-fertility. In an effort to increase the production current breeding is focused on the production of inbred lines for making the F1 hybrids and the self-incompatibility can be an interesting tool for production self- sterile lines. In Brassica napus, we found two recessive alleles of a gene SCR II. Different expression of both alleles does not correspond to phenotypic manifestation of self-incompatibility and we can assume that it is prevailed by repressor gene that does not lie on the S-locus. This is also reason, why the SCR gene cannot serve as a molecular marker of self-incompatibility in Brassica napus, although many authors believe that this gene is essential in AI reaction. Brassica napus belong to plants with complex genetic constitution, is composed by two genomes, A and C, which give the possibility of different interactions and makes it difficult to study compared with diploid B. rapa and B. oleracea. In further study it is therefore important to focus on the interactions between genes SCR, SRK and SLG, and their influence on others, such as supressor gene systems.

  8. Allelic variation in PtGA20Ox associates with growth and wood properties in Populus spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaxing Tian

    Full Text Available Populus tomentosa is an economically important tree crop that produces wood for lumber, pulp, paper, and biofuels. Wood quality traits are likely to be strongly affected by the plant hormone gibberellic acid (GA, which regulates growth. GA20Ox encodes one of the major regulatory enzymes of GA biosynthesis and may therefore play a large role in growth and wood quality. Here, linkage disequilibrium (LD studies were used to identify significant associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within PtGA20Ox and growth and wood-quality traits of P. tomentosa. We isolated a full-length GA20Ox cDNA from Populus tomentosa by reverse transcription (RT-PCR; this 1401 bp cDNA clone had an open reading frame of 1158 bp and encoded a protein of 385 amino acids. PtGA20Ox transcripts were maximally expressed in the mature xylem of vascular tissues, suggesting that PtGA20Ox is highly expressed and specifically associated with secondary xylem formation. Resequencing the PtGA20Ox locus of 36 individuals identified 55 SNPs, and the frequency of SNPs was 1/31 bp. The 29 most common SNPs (frequency>0.1 were genotyped in an association population (426 individuals that was also phenotyped for key growth and wood quality traits. LD did not extend over the entire gene (r(2<0.1, within 500 bp, demonstrating that a candidate-gene-based LD approach may the best way to understand the molecular basis underlying quantitative variation in this species. SNP- and haplotype-based association analyses indicated that four SNPs (false discovery rate Q<0.05 and 14 haplotypes (P<0.05 were significantly associated with growth and wood properties. The phenotypic variance explained by each SNP ranged from 3.44% to 14.47%. The SNP markers identified in this study can be applied to breeding programs for the improvement of growth and wood-property traits by marker-assisted selection.

  9. Novel Loci Associated with Usual Sleep Duration: The CHARGE Consortium Genome-Wide Association Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Hek, Karin; Chen, Ting-hsu; Watson, Nathaniel F.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Byrne, Enda M.; Cornelis, Marilyn; Warby, Simon C.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Cherkas, Lynn; Evans, Daniel S.; Grabe, Hans J.; Lahti, Jari; Li, Man; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lumley, Thomas; Marciante, Kristin D.; Pérusse, Louis; Psaty, Bruce M.; Robbins, John; Tranah, Gregory J.; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Wilk, Jemma B.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Bellis, Claire; Biffar, Reiner; Bouchard, Claude; Cade, Brian; Curhan, Gary C.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Ewert, Ralf; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fülöp, Tibor; Gehrman, Philip R.; Goodloe, Robert; Harris, Tamara B.; Heath, Andrew C.; Hernandez, Dena; Hofman, Albert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hunter, David J.; Jensen, Majken K.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Kähönen, Mika; Kao, Linda; Kraft, Peter; Larkin, Emma K.; Lauderdale, Diane S.; Luik, Annemarie I.; Medici, Marco; Montgomery, Grant W.; Palotie, Aarno; Patel, Sanjay R.; Pistis, Giorgio; Porcu, Eleonora; Quaye, Lydia; Raitakari, Olli; Redline, Susan; Rimm, Eric B.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Smith, Albert V.; Spector, Tim D.; Teumer, Alexander; Uitterlinden, André G.; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Widen, Elisabeth; Willemsen, Gonneke; Young, Terry; Zhang, Xiaoling; Liu, Yongmei; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hu, Frank; Mangino, Massimo; Martin, Nicholas G.; O’Connor, George T.; Stone, Katie L.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Viikari, Jorma; Gharib, Sina A.; Punjabi, Naresh M.; Räikkönen, Katri; Völzke, Henry; Mignot, Emmanuel; Tiemeier, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Usual sleep duration is a heritable trait correlated with psychiatric morbidity, cardiometabolic disease and mortality, although little is known about the genetic variants influencing this trait. A genome-wide association study of usual sleep duration was conducted using 18 population-based cohorts totaling 47,180 individuals of European ancestry. Genome-wide significant association was identified at two loci. The strongest is located on chromosome 2, in an intergenic region 35–80 kb upstream from the thyroid-specific transcription factor PAX8 (lowest p=1.1 ×10−9). This finding was replicated in an African-American sample of 4771 individuals (lowest p=9.3 × 10−4). The strongest combined association was at rs1823125 (p=1.5 × 10−10, minor allele frequency 0.26 in the discovery sample, 0.12 in the replication sample), with each copy of the minor allele associated with a sleep duration 3.1 minutes longer per night. The alleles associated with longer sleep duration were associated in previous genome-wide association studies with a more favorable metabolic profile and a lower risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Understanding the mechanisms underlying these associations may help elucidate biological mechanisms influencing sleep duration and its association with psychiatric, metabolic and cardiovascular disease. PMID:25469926

  10. An obesity-associated risk allele within the FTO gene affects human brain activity for areas important for emotion, impulse control and reward in response to food images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiemerslage, Lyle; Nilsson, Emil K; Solstrand Dahlberg, Linda; Ence-Eriksson, Fia; Castillo, Sandra; Larsen, Anna L; Bylund, Simon B A; Hogenkamp, Pleunie S; Olivo, Gaia; Bandstein, Marcus; Titova, Olga E; Larsson, Elna-Marie; Benedict, Christian; Brooks, Samantha J; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2016-05-01

    Understanding how genetics influences obesity, brain activity and eating behaviour will add important insight for developing strategies for weight-loss treatment, as obesity may stem from different causes and as individual feeding behaviour may depend on genetic differences. To this end, we examined how an obesity risk allele for the FTO gene affects brain activity in response to food images of different caloric content via functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Thirty participants homozygous for the rs9939609 single nucleotide polymorphism were shown images of low- or high-calorie food while brain activity was measured via fMRI. In a whole-brain analysis, we found that people with the FTO risk allele genotype (AA) had increased activity compared with the non-risk (TT) genotype in the posterior cingulate, cuneus, precuneus and putamen. Moreover, higher body mass index in the AA genotype was associated with reduced activity to food images in areas important for emotion (cingulate cortex), but also in areas important for impulse control (frontal gyri and lentiform nucleus). Lastly, we corroborate our findings with behavioural scales for the behavioural inhibition and activation systems. Our results suggest that the two genotypes are associated with differential neural processing of food images, which may influence weight status through diminished impulse control and reward processing.

  11. Human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen-DQA1*0501 allele associated with genetic susceptibility of Graves disease in a Caucasian population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatsuo, Yanagawa; Ampica, Mangklakruks; Youn-Bok Chang; Yasuyuki, Okamoto; Fisfalen, M.E.; Curran, P.G.; Degroot, L.J. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States))

    1993-06-01

    Graves disease (GB) is an autoimmune disease of the thyroid gland. Genes of, or closely associated to, the HLA complex are assumed to contribute to the genetic predisposition to GD. The authors have previously reported an increased frequency of HLA-DR3/DQ3 in Caucasian patients with GD, and recently the importance of Dw24 encoded by DRB3 gene has been suggested. To further investigate the associations of GD and these genes, 94 unrelated patients with GD and 75 control subjects were typed for HLA-DRB3, -DRB1, and -DQA1, and -DQB1, using sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes to analyze polymerase chain reaction amplified DNA (PCR-SSO). Three findings emerged from these studies. (1) The frequency of subjects positive for DQA1*0501 (GD, 73.4% vs. control 42.7%, P = 0.0001, RR = 3.71) was significantly increased among patients. The frequency of DR3 (GD, 34.0% vs. control 17.3%, P = 0.0146, RR = 2.46), which is in tight linkage disequilibrium with DQA1*0501, was also increased; however, it was not significant when the P value was corrected for the number of antigens tested. Neither DQB1 nor DRB3 alleles were significantly increased in frequency. (2) After exclusion of DR3-positive subjects, DQA1*0501 was still significantly increased (GD, 59.7% vs. control 30.6%, P = 0.0012, Pc < 0.01, RR = 3.35) among patients. (3) The distributions of Dw24 and Dw25,26 (Dw25 or Dw26) did not differ between patients and controls on either DR3 positive or negative groups. These findings suggest the DQA1*0501, or a closely associated unknown gene, confers susceptibility to GD, while Dw24 is not directly involved. The importance of DR3, however, remains to be elucidated, because of the fixed linkage with DQA1*0501. 34 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  12. Six new DR52-associated DRB1 alleles, three of DR8, two of DR11, and one of DR6, reflect a variety of mechanisms which generate polymorphism in the MHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A G; Nelson, J L; Regen, L; Guthrie, L A; Donadi, E; Mickelson, E M; Hansen, J A

    1996-08-01

    We have sequenced DNA from six new DR52-associated DRB1 alleles initially detected by PCR/SSOP analysis. Three DR8 associated alleles differed from previously known alleles by single nucleotide substitutions. DRB1*0807 and DRB1*0811 both vary from DRB1*08021 at codon 57 resulting in two different amino acids at this residue. DRB1*0807 was identified in samples of Brazilian origin while *0811 was identified among samples from the Tlingit Native American population of Southeast Alaska. DRB1*0814, identified in a family of Chinese origin, differed from DRB1*08032 at codon 12 at both the nucleotide and the amino acid level. In addition, two alleles of DR11, DRB1*1113 and *1119, were each detected in Caucasian individuals. DRB1*1113 differs from other DR11 alleles at codons 37, 67, 70 and 74, while DRB1*1119 differs from *1101 by a single nucleotide substitution at codon 67. Finally, DRB1*1418 was detected in a sample from an Asian or Pacific Islander and shares sequences with several other DR52-associated DRB1 alleles. These six DRB1 alleles appear to have been generated by either gene conversion events, DRB1*1113 and *1418, or by point mutations, DRB1*0814, *0807, *0811 and *1119, although the single nucleotide substitutions found in the latter three alleles are also present in at least one other DRB1 allele and, therefore, could have been the product of gene conversions.

  13. A Hypomorphic PALB2 Allele Gives Rise to an Unusual Form of FA-N Associated with Lymphoid Tumour Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J Byrd

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients with biallelic truncating mutations in PALB2 have a severe form of Fanconi anaemia (FA-N, with a predisposition for developing embryonal-type tumours in infancy. Here we describe two unusual patients from a single family, carrying biallelic PALB2 mutations, one truncating, c.1676_1677delAAinsG;(p.Gln559ArgfsTer2, and the second, c.2586+1G>A; p.Thr839_Lys862del resulting in an in frame skip of exon 6 (24 amino acids. Strikingly, the affected individuals did not exhibit the severe developmental defects typical of FA-N patients and initially presented with B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The expressed p.Thr839_Lys862del mutant PALB2 protein retained the ability to interact with BRCA2, previously unreported in FA-N patients. There was also a large increased chromosomal radiosensitivity following irradiation in G2 and increased sensitivity to mitomycin C. Although patient cells were unable to form Rad51 foci following exposure to either DNA damaging agent, U2OS cells, in which the mutant PALB2 with in frame skip of exon 6 was induced, did show recruitment of Rad51 to foci following damage. We conclude that a very mild form of FA-N exists arising from a hypomorphic PALB2 allele.

  14. Development of a TaqMan Allelic Discrimination Assay for detection of Single Nucleotides Polymorphisms associated with anti-malarial drug resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamau Edwin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anti-malarial drug resistance poses a threat to current global efforts towards control and elimination of malaria. Several methods are used in monitoring anti-malarial drug resistance. Molecular markers such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP for example are increasingly being used to identify genetic mutations related to anti-malarial drug resistance. Several methods are currently being used in analysis of SNP associated with anti-malarial drug resistance and although each one of these methods has unique strengths and shortcoming, there is still need to improve and/or develop new methods that will close the gap found in the current methods. Methods TaqMan Allelic Discrimination assays for detection of SNPs associated with anti-malarial drug resistance were designed for analysis on Applied Biosystems PCR platform. These assays were designed by submitting SNP sequences associated with anti-malarial drug resistance to Applied Biosystems website. Eleven SNPs associated with resistance to anti-malarial drugs were selected and tested. The performance of each SNP assay was tested by creating plasmid DNAs carrying codons of interests and analysing them for analysis. To test the sensitivity and specificity of each SNP assay, 12 clinical samples were sequenced at codons of interest and used in the analysis. Plasmid DNAs were used to establish the Limit of Detection (LoD for each assay. Results Data from genetic profiles of the Plasmodium falciparum laboratory strains and sequence data from 12 clinical samples was used as the reference method with which the performance of the SNP assays were compared to. The sensitivity and specificity of each SNP assay was establish at 100%. LoD for each assay was established at 2 GE, equivalent to less than 1 parasite/μL. SNP assays performed well in detecting mixed infection and analysis of clinical samples. Conclusion TaqMan Allelic Discrimination assay provides a good alternative tool in

  15. HLA-DQ β1 alleles associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infectivity and EBV gp42 binding to cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Wei; Gabriel, Erin; Aguilar, Fiona; Hoshino, Yo; Miyadera, Hiroko; Hess, Christoph; Hornung, Ronald L.

    2017-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infects B cells and ~95% of adults are infected. EBV glycoprotein gp42 is essential for entry of virus into B cells. EBV gp42 binds to the β1 chain of HLA-DQ, -DR, and -DP on B cells, and uses these molecules for infection. To investigate if certain HLA-DQ alleles are associated with EBV seronegativity, we recruited ~3,300 healthy adult blood donors, identified 106 EBV-seronegative individuals, and randomly selected a control group of EBV-seropositive donors from the donor pool. A larger than expected proportion of EBV-seronegative subjects were HLA-DQ β1 *04/*05 and *06/*06, and to a lesser extent, *02/*03, compared with the control group, while a larger than expected portion of EBV-seropositive persons were HLA-DQ β1 *02/*02. We examined the ability of EBV gp42 to bind to different HLA-DQ molecules using human and mouse cells stably expressing these alleles. EBV gp42 bound less effectively to cells expressing HLA-DQ β1 *04/*05, *06/*06, or *03/*03 than to cells expressing HLA-DQ β1 *02/*02. These data are consistent with our observations of increased EBV seronegativity with DQ β1 *04/*05 or *06/*06 alleles. These findings emphasize the importance of a single genetic locus (HLA-DQ β1) to influence infectivity with EBV. PMID:28239644

  16. High resolution human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I and class II allele typing in Mexican mestizo women with sporadic breast cancer: case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barquera Rodrigo

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of breast cancer is multifactorial. Hormonal, environmental factors and genetic predisposition, among others, could interact in the presentation of breast carcinoma. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA alleles play an important role in immunity (cellular immunity and may be important genetic traits. HLAAllele-specific interaction has not been well established. Recently, several studies had been conducted in order to do so, but the results are controversial and in some instances contradictory. Methods We designed a case-control study to quantify the association of HLA class I and II genes and breast cancer. HLA typing was performed by high resolution sequence-specific oligotyping after DNA amplification (PCR-SSOP of 100 breast cancer Mexican mestizo patients and 99 matched healthy controls. Results HLA-A frequencies that we were able to observe that there was no difference between both groups from the statistical viewpoint. HLA-B*1501 was found three times more common in the case group (OR, 3.714; p = 0.031. HLA-Cw is not a marker neither for risk, nor protection for the disease, because we did not find significant statistical differences between the two groups. DRB1*1301, which is expressed in seven cases and in only one control, observing an risk increase of up to seven times and DRB1*1602, which behaves similarly in being present solely in the cases (OR, 16.701; 95% CI, 0.947 – 294.670. DQ*0301-allele expression, which is much more common in the control group and could be protective for the presentation of the disease (OR, 0.078; 95% CI, 0.027–0.223, p = 0.00001. Conclusion Our results reveal the role of the MHC genes in the pathophysiology of breast cancer, suggesting that in the development of breast cancer exists a disorder of immune regulation. The triggering factor seems to be restricted to certain ethnic groups and certain geographical regions since the relevant MHC alleles are highly diverse. This is the

  17. Whole Genome Re-Sequencing and Characterization of Powdery Mildew Disease-Associated Allelic Variation in Melon.

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    Sathishkumar Natarajan

    Full Text Available Powdery mildew is one of the most common fungal diseases in the world. This disease frequently affects melon (Cucumis melo L. and other Cucurbitaceous family crops in both open field and greenhouse cultivation. One of the goals of genomics is to identify the polymorphic loci responsible for variation in phenotypic traits. In this study, powdery mildew disease assessment scores were calculated for four melon accessions, 'SCNU1154', 'Edisto47', 'MR-1', and 'PMR5'. To investigate the genetic variation of these accessions, whole genome re-sequencing using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform was performed. A total of 754,759,704 quality-filtered reads were generated, with an average of 82.64% coverage relative to the reference genome. Comparisons of the sequences for the melon accessions revealed around 7.4 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, 1.9 million InDels, and 182,398 putative structural variations (SVs. Functional enrichment analysis of detected variations classified them into biological process, cellular component and molecular function categories. Further, a disease-associated QTL map was constructed for 390 SNPs and 45 InDels identified as related to defense-response genes. Among them 112 SNPs and 12 InDels were observed in powdery mildew responsive chromosomes. Accordingly, this whole genome re-sequencing study identified SNPs and InDels associated with defense genes that will serve as candidate polymorphisms in the search for sources of resistance against powdery mildew disease and could accelerate marker-assisted breeding in melon.

  18. Whole Genome Re-Sequencing and Characterization of Powdery Mildew Disease-Associated Allelic Variation in Melon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Kim, Hoy-Taek; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Veerappan, Karpagam; Park, Jong-In; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Powdery mildew is one of the most common fungal diseases in the world. This disease frequently affects melon (Cucumis melo L.) and other Cucurbitaceous family crops in both open field and greenhouse cultivation. One of the goals of genomics is to identify the polymorphic loci responsible for variation in phenotypic traits. In this study, powdery mildew disease assessment scores were calculated for four melon accessions, 'SCNU1154', 'Edisto47', 'MR-1', and 'PMR5'. To investigate the genetic variation of these accessions, whole genome re-sequencing using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform was performed. A total of 754,759,704 quality-filtered reads were generated, with an average of 82.64% coverage relative to the reference genome. Comparisons of the sequences for the melon accessions revealed around 7.4 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 1.9 million InDels, and 182,398 putative structural variations (SVs). Functional enrichment analysis of detected variations classified them into biological process, cellular component and molecular function categories. Further, a disease-associated QTL map was constructed for 390 SNPs and 45 InDels identified as related to defense-response genes. Among them 112 SNPs and 12 InDels were observed in powdery mildew responsive chromosomes. Accordingly, this whole genome re-sequencing study identified SNPs and InDels associated with defense genes that will serve as candidate polymorphisms in the search for sources of resistance against powdery mildew disease and could accelerate marker-assisted breeding in melon.

  19. Alteration of Fecal Microbiota Profiles in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. Associations with HLA-B27 Allele and Disease Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paola, Monica; Cavalieri, Duccio; Albanese, Davide; Sordo, Maddalena; Pindo, Massimo; Donati, Claudio; Pagnini, Ilaria; Giani, Teresa; Simonini, Gabriele; Paladini, Alessia; Lionetti, Paolo; De Filippo, Carlotta; Cimaz, Rolando

    2016-01-01

    Alteration of gut microbiota is involved in several chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, and gut microbial “pro-arthritogenic” profiles have been hypothesized. Intestinal inflammation may be involved in spondyloarthropathies and in a subset of patients affected by Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA), the most common chronic rheumatic disease of childhood. We compared the fecal microbiota composition of JIA patients with healthy subjects (HS), evaluating differences in microbial profiles between sub-categories of JIA, such as enthesitis-related arthritis (JIA-ERA), in which inflammation of entheses occurs, and polyarticular JIA, non-enthesitis related arthritis (JIA-nERA). Through taxon-level analysis, we discovered alteration of fecal microbiota components that could be involved in subclinical gut inflammation, and promotion of joint inflammation. We observed abundance in Ruminococcaceae in both JIA categories, reduction in Clostridiaceae and Peptostreptococcaceae in JIA-ERA, and increase in Veillonellaceae in JIA-nERA, respectively, compared with HS. Among the more relevant genera, we found an increase in Clostridium cluster XIVb, involved in colitis and arthritis, in JIA-ERA patients compared with HS, and a trend of decrease in Faecalibacterium, known for anti-inflammatory properties, in JIA-nERA compared with JIA-ERA and HS. Differential abundant taxa identified JIA patients for the HLA-B27 allele, including Bilophila, Clostridium cluster XIVb, Oscillibacter, and Parvimonas. Prediction analysis of metabolic functions showed that JIA-ERA metagenome was differentially enriched in bacterial functions related to cell motility and chemotaxis, suggesting selection of potential virulence traits. We also discovered differential microbial profiles and intra-group variability among active disease and remission, suggesting instability of microbial ecosystem in autoimmune diseases with respect to healthy status. Similarly to

  20. Alteration of fecal microbiota profiles in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Associations with HLA-B27 allele and disease status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Di Paola

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Alteration of gut microbiota is involved in several chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, and gut microbial pro-arthritogenic profiles have been hypothesized. Intestinal inflammation may be involved in spondyloarthropathies and in a subset of patients affected by Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA, the most common chronic rheumatic disease of childhood. We compared the fecal microbiota composition of JIA patients with healthy subjects (HS, evaluating differences in microbial profiles between sub-categories of JIA, such as enthesitis-related arthritis (JIA-ERA, in which inflammation of entheses occurs, and polyarticular JIA, non-enthesitis related arthritis (JIA-nERA. Through taxon-level analysis, we discovered alteration of fecal microbiota components that could be involved in subclinical gut inflammation, and promotion of joint inflammation. We observed abundance in Ruminococcaceae in both JIA categories, reduction in Clostridiaceae and Peptostreptococcaceae in JIA-ERA, and increase in Veillonellaceae in JIA-nERA, respectively compared with HS. Among the more relevant genera, we found an increase in Clostridium cluster XIVb, involved in colitis and arthritis, in JIA-ERA patients compared with HS, and a trend of decrease in Faecalibacterium, known for anti-inflammatory properties, in JIA-nERA compared with JIA-ERA and HS. Differential abundant taxa identified JIA patients for the HLA-B27 allele, including Bilophila, Clostridium cluster XIVb, Oscillibacter and Parvimonas. Prediction analysis of metabolic functions showed that JIA-ERA metagenome was differentially enriched in bacterial functions related to cell motility and chemotaxis, suggesting selection of potential virulence traits. We also discovered differential microbial profiles and intra-group variability among active disease and remission, suggesting instability of microbial ecosystem in autoimmune diseases with respect to healthy status. Similarly

  1. T-cell receptor V sub. alpha. and C sub. alpha. alleles associated with multiple sclerosis and myasthenia gravis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oksenberg, J.R.; Cavalli-Sforza, L.L.; Steinman, L. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA)); Sherritt, M.; Bernard, C.C. (LaTrobe Univ., Victoria (Australia)); Begovich, A.B.; Erlich, H.A. (Cetus Corporation, Emeryville, CA (USA))

    1989-02-01

    Polymorphic markers in genes encoding the {alpha} chain of the human T-cell receptor (TcR) have been detected by Southern blot analysis in Pss I digests. Polymorphic bands were observed at 6.3 and 2.0 kilobases (kb) with frequencies of 0.30 and 0.44, respectively, in the general population. Using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, the authors amplified selected sequences derived from the full-length TcR {alpha} cDNA probe. These PcR products were used as specific probes to demonstrate that the 6.3-kb polymorphic fragment hybridizes to the variable (V)-region probe and the 2.0-kb fragment hybridizes to the constant (C)-region probe. Segregation of the polymorphic bands was analyzed in family studies. To look for associations between these markers and autoimmune diseases, the authors have studied the restriction fragment length polymorphism distribution of the Pss I markers in patients with multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, and Graves disease. Significant differences in the frequency of the polymorphic V{sub {alpha}} and C{sub {alpha}} markers were identified between patients and healthy individuals.

  2. Association of the bovine leukocyte antigen major histocompatibility complex class II DRB3*4401 allele with host resistance to the Lone Star tick, Amblyomma americanum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untalan, Pia M; Pruett, John H; Steelman, C Dayton

    2007-04-10

    The MHC of cattle, known as the bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) complex, plays an integral role in disease and parasite susceptibility, and immune responsiveness of the host. While susceptibility to tick infestation in cattle is believed to be heritable, genes that may be responsible for the manifestation of this phenotype remain elusive. In an effort to analyze the role that genes within the BoLA complex may play in host resistance to ticks, we have evaluated components of this system within a herd of cattle established at our laboratory that has been phenotyped for ectoparasite susceptibility. Of three microsatellite loci within the BoLA complex analyzed, alleles of two microsatellite loci within the BoLA class IIa cluster (DRB1-118 and DRB3-174) associated with the tick-resistant phenotype, prompting further investigation of gene sequences within the DRB3 region. DRB3 is a class IIa gene, the second exon of which is highly polymorphic since it encodes the antigen recognition site of the DR class II molecule. Analysis of the second exon of the DRB3 gene from the phenotyped calves in our herd revealed a significant association between the DRB3*4401 allele and the tick-resistant phenotype. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a putative association between a class IIa DRB3 sequence and host resistance to the Lone Star tick. Elucidation of the mechanism involved in tick resistance will contribute to improving breeding schemes for parasite resistance, which will be beneficial to the cattle industry.

  3. Distribution of BoLA-DRB3 allelic frequencies and identification of two new alleles in Iranian buffalo breed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosafer, J; Heydarpour, M; Manshad, E; Russell, G; Sulimova, G E

    2012-01-01

    The role of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in the immune response makes it an attractive candidate gene for associations with disease resistance and susceptibility. This study describes genetic variability in the BoLA-DRB3 in Iranian buffaloes. Heminested PCR-RFLP method was used to identify the frequency of BoLA-DRB3 alleles. The BoLA-DRB3 locus is highly polymorphic in the study herd (12 alleles). Almost 63.50% of the alleles were accounted for by four alleles (BoLA-DRB3.2 ∗48, ∗20, ∗21, and obe) in Iranian buffalo. The DRB3.2 ∗48 allele frequency (24.20%) was higher than the others. The frequencies of the DRB3.2 ∗20 and DRB3.2 ∗21 are 14.52 and 14.00, respectively, and obe and gbb have a new pattern. Significant distinctions have been found between Iranian buffalo and other cattle breed studied. In the Iranian buffaloes studied alleles associated with resistance to various diseases are found.

  4. Distribution of BoLA-DRB3 Allelic Frequencies and Identification of Two New Alleles in Iranian Buffalo Breed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mosafer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC in the immune response makes it an attractive candidate gene for associations with disease resistance and susceptibility. This study describes genetic variability in the BoLA-DRB3 in Iranian buffaloes. Heminested PCR-RFLP method was used to identify the frequency of BoLA-DRB3 alleles. The BoLA-DRB3 locus is highly polymorphic in the study herd (12 alleles. Almost 63.50% of the alleles were accounted for by four alleles (BoLA-DRB3.2 *48, *20, *21, and obe in Iranian buffalo. The DRB3.2 *48 allele frequency (24.20% was higher than the others. The frequencies of the DRB3.2 *20 and DRB3.2 *21 are 14.52 and 14.00, respectively, and obe and gbb have a new pattern. Significant distinctions have been found between Iranian buffalo and other cattle breed studied. In the Iranian buffaloes studied alleles associated with resistance to various diseases are found.

  5. Type of uromodulin mutation and allelic status influence onset and severity of uromodulin-associated kidney disease in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemter, Elisabeth; Prueckl, Petra; Sklenak, Stefanie; Rathkolb, Birgit; Habermann, Felix A; Hans, Wolfgang; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Fuchs, Helmut; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Wolf, Eckhard; Aigner, Bernhard; Wanke, Ruediger

    2013-10-15

    Uromodulin-associated kidney disease (UAKD) is a dominant heritable renal disease in humans which is caused by mutations in the uromodulin (UMOD) gene and characterized by heterogeneous clinical appearance. To get insights into possible causes of this heterogeneity of UAKD, we describe the new mutant mouse line Umod(C93F), leading to disruption of a putative disulfide bond which is also absent in a known human UMOD mutation, and compare the phenotype of this new mouse line with the recently published mouse line Umod(A227T). In both mutant mouse lines, which were both bred on the C3H background, the Umod mutations cause a gain-of-toxic function due to a maturation defect of the mutant uromodulin leading to a dysfunction of thick ascending limb of Henle's loop (TALH) cells of the kidney. Umod mutant mice exhibit increased plasma urea and Cystatin levels, impaired urinary concentration ability, reduced fractional excretion of uric acid and nephropathological alterations including uromodulin retention in TALH cells, interstitial fibrosis and inflammatory cell infiltrations, tubular atrophy and occasional glomerulo- und tubulocystic changes, a phenotype highly similar to UAKD in humans. The maturation defect of mutant uromodulin leads to the accumulation of immature uromodulin in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and to ER hyperplasia. Further, this study was able to demonstrate for the first time in vivo that the severity of the uromodulin maturation defect as well as onset and speed of progression of renal dysfunction and morphological alterations are strongly dependent on the particular Umod mutation itself and the zygosity status.

  6. A candidate gene association study of bone mineral density in an Iranian population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Alireza Dastgheib

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The genetic epidemiology of variation in bone mineral density (BMD and osteoporosis is not well studied in Iranian populations and needs more research. We report a candidate gene association study of BMD variation in a healthy cross sectional study of 501 males and females sampled from the IMOS study Shiraz, Iran. We selected to study the association with 21 SNPs located in the 7 candidate genes LRP5, RANK, RANKL, OPG, P2RX7, VDR and ESR1. BMD was measured at the three sites L2-L4, neck of femur and total hip. Association between BMD and each SNP was assessed using multiple linear regression assuming an allele dose (additive effect on BMD (adjusted for age and sex. Statistically significant (at the unadjusted 5% level associations were seen with 7 SNPs in 5 of the candidate genes. Two SNPs showed statistically significant association with more than one BMD site. Significant association was seen between BMD at all three sites with the VDR SNP rs731246 (L2-L4 p=0.038; neck of femur p=0.001 and total hip p<0.001. The T allele was consistently associated with lower BMD than the C allele. Significant association was also seen for the P2RX7 SNP rs3751143 where the G allele was consistently associated with lower BMD than the T allele, (L2-L4 p=0.069; neck of femur p=0.024, total hip p=0.045.

  7. A Study of GluK1 Kainate Receptor Polymorphisms in Down Syndrome Reveals Allelic Non-Disjunction at 1173(C/T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debarati Ghosh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms underlying Down syndrome (DS-related mental retardation (MR remain poorly understood. In trisomic offspring, non-disjunction may result in the reduction to homozygosity of a susceptibility allele inherited from a heterozygous parent. Accordingly, we sought evidence for allelic non-disjunction in the GluK1 gene that encodes the critical kainite-binding glutamate receptor subunit-5, maps to chromosome 21q22.1 in the DS critical region and is expressed in brain regions responsible for learning and memory. Three polymorphisms of GluK1 [522(A/C rs363538; 1173(C/T rs363430 and 2705(T/C rs363504] were genotyped in 86 DS patient families by means of PCR-coupled RFLP assays and evaluated with respect to allele frequency, heterozygosity, linkage disequilibrium, stage and parental origin of allelic non-disjunction. We report that the distribution of allele frequencies is in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Moderate heterozygosity (0.339 and a major allele frequency of 0.78 render the 1173(C/T marker informative. Pair-wise comparisons reveal that 522(A/C-1173(C/T [χ2 = 31.2, df = 1, p = 0.0001; D’ = 0.42] and 1173(C/T-2705(T/C [χ2 = 18.3, df = 1, p = 0.0001; D’ = 0.34] are in significant linkage disequilibrium of weak magnitude. The estimated ratio of meiosis-I to meiosis-II errors arising from allelic non-disjunction of 1173(C/T is 4:1 in maternal cases and 2:1 in paternal cases. Studies including additional markers and patient samples are warranted to further substantiate present findings.

  8. Frequency of the CCRdelta32 allele in Brazilians: a study in colorectal cancer and in HTLV-I infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinaldo W. Pereira

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The identification of a 32-bp deletion in the cc-chemokine receptor-5 gene (CCR5delta32 allele that renders homozygous individuals highly resistant to HIV infection has prompted worldwide investigations of the frequency of the CCR5delta32 allele in regional populations. It is important to ascertain if CCR5delta32 is a factor to be considered in the overall epidemiology of HIV in individual populations. With this in mind we determined the CCR5delta32 allele frequency in a large sample (907 individuals of the southeastern Brazilian urban population, stratified as follows: 322 healthy unrelated individuals, 354 unselected colorectal cancer patients, and 229 blood donors. The three groups displayed essentially identical allelic frequencies of CCR5delta32 and pairwise comparisons did not show significant differences. Thus, our results can be pooled to provide a reliable estimate of the CCR5delta32 allele frequency in the southeastern Brazil of 0.053 ± 0.005. The blood donors comprised 50 HTLV-I serologically negative individuals, 115 non-symptomatic individuals HTLV-I positive by ELISA but with indeterminate Western blot results, 49 healthy blood donors HTLV-I positive both at ELISA and Western blot and 15 patients with clinical spinal cord disease (HAM. A suggestive trend was observed, with the CCR5delta32 frequencies decreasing progressively in these four categories. However, when we applied Fischer's exact test no significant differences emerged. We believe that further studies in larger cohorts should be performed to ascertain whether the CCR5delta32 allele influences the chance of becoming infected or developing clinical symptoms of HTLV-I infection.A observação de que indivíduos homozigotos para uma deleção de 32 pares de base no gene que codifica para o receptor 5 de cc-quimiocinas apresentam um menor risco de contrair a infecção por HIV-1 levou à investigação da freqüência deste polimorfismo em várias populações mundiais.

  9. Fine-mapping the HOXB region detects common variants tagging a rare coding allele: evidence for synthetic association in prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J Saunders

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The HOXB13 gene has been implicated in prostate cancer (PrCa susceptibility. We performed a high resolution fine-mapping analysis to comprehensively evaluate the association between common genetic variation across the HOXB genetic locus at 17q21 and PrCa risk. This involved genotyping 700 SNPs using a custom Illumina iSelect array (iCOGS followed by imputation of 3195 SNPs in 20,440 PrCa cases and 21,469 controls in The PRACTICAL consortium. We identified a cluster of highly correlated common variants situated within or closely upstream of HOXB13 that were significantly associated with PrCa risk, described by rs117576373 (OR 1.30, P = 2.62×10(-14. Additional genotyping, conditional regression and haplotype analyses indicated that the newly identified common variants tag a rare, partially correlated coding variant in the HOXB13 gene (G84E, rs138213197, which has been identified recently as a moderate penetrance PrCa susceptibility allele. The potential for GWAS associations detected through common SNPs to be driven by rare causal variants with higher relative risks has long been proposed; however, to our knowledge this is the first experimental evidence for this phenomenon of synthetic association contributing to cancer susceptibility.

  10. Association of Rare Loss-Of-Function Alleles in HAL, Serum Histidine: Levels and Incident Coronary Heart Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Yu (Bing); A.H. Li (Alexander H.); D. Muzny (Donna); N. Veeraraghavan (Narayanan); P.S. de Vries (Paul); J.C. Bis (Joshua); S. Musani (Solomon); D. Alexander (Danny); A.C. Morrison (Alanna); O.H. Franco (Oscar); A.G. Uitterlinden (Andre G.); A. Hofman (Albert); A. Dehghan (Abbas); J.G. Wilson (James); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); R. Gibbs (Richard); P. Wei (Peng); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground-Histidine is a semiessential amino acid with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Few data are available on the associations between genetic variants, histidine levels, and incident coronary heart disease (CHD) in a population-based sample. Methods and Results-By cond

  11. Human leukocyte antigen-e alleles are associated with hepatitis c virus, torque teno virus, and toxoplasma co-infections but are not associated with hepatitis b virus, hepatitis d virus, and GB virus c co-infections in human immunodeficiency virus patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afiono Agung Prasetyo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Data regarding the distribution of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA-E alleles and their association with blood-borne pathogen infections/co-infections are limited for many populations, including Indonesia. Aims: The aim of this study was to analyze the association between HLA-E allelic variants and infection with blood-borne pathogens such as hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV, hepatitis D virus (HDV, torque teno virus (TTV, GB virus C (GBV-C, and Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii in Indonesian Javanese human immunodeficiency virus (HIV patients. Settings and Design: A total of 320 anti-HIV-positive blood samples were analyzed for HBV, HCV, HDV, TTV, GBV-C, and T. gondii infection status and its association with HLA-E allelic variants. Materials and Methods: Nucleic acid was extracted from plasma samples and used for the molecular detection of HBV DNA, HCV RNA, HDV RNA, TTV DNA, and GBV-C RNA, whereas hepatitis B surface antigen, anti-HCV, immunoglobulin M and G (IgM and IgG anti-T. gondii were detected through serological testing. The blood samples were genotyped for HLA-E loci using a sequence-specific primer-polymerase chain reaction. Statistical Analysis Used: Either the Chi-square or Fisher′s exact test was performed to analyze the frequency of HLA-E alleles and blood-borne pathogen infections in the population. Odds ratios (ORs were calculated to measure the association between the antibodies found and the participants′ possible risk behaviors. A logistic regression analysis was used to assess the associations. Results: HLA-EFNx010101/0101 was associated with HCV/TTV co-infection (adjusted OR [aOR]: 3.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.156-10.734; P = 0.027 and IgM/IgG anti-Toxo positivity (aOR: 27.0; 95% CI: 3.626-200.472; P = 0.001. HLA-EFNx010103/0103 was associated with TTV co-infection (aOR: 2.7; 95% CI: 1.509-4.796; P = 0.001. Conclusions: HLA-E alleles in Indonesian Javanese HIV patients were found to be associated

  12. Human Leukocyte Antigen-E Alleles are Associated with Hepatitis C Virus, Torque Teno Virus, and Toxoplasma Co-infections but are not Associated with Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis D Virus, and GB Virus C Co-infections in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetyo, Afiono Agung; Dharmawan, Ruben; Raharjo, Irvan; Hudiyono

    2016-01-01

    Context: Data regarding the distribution of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-E alleles and their association with blood-borne pathogen infections/co-infections are limited for many populations, including Indonesia. Aims: The aim of this study was to analyze the association between HLA-E allelic variants and infection with blood-borne pathogens such as hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D virus (HDV), torque teno virus (TTV), GB virus C (GBV-C), and Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) in Indonesian Javanese human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients. Settings and Design: A total of 320 anti-HIV-positive blood samples were analyzed for HBV, HCV, HDV, TTV, GBV-C, and T. gondii infection status and its association with HLA-E allelic variants. Materials and Methods: Nucleic acid was extracted from plasma samples and used for the molecular detection of HBV DNA, HCV RNA, HDV RNA, TTV DNA, and GBV-C RNA, whereas hepatitis B surface antigen, anti-HCV, immunoglobulin M and G (IgM and IgG) anti-T. gondii were detected through serological testing. The blood samples were genotyped for HLA-E loci using a sequence-specific primer-polymerase chain reaction. Statistical Analysis Used: Either the Chi-square or Fisher's exact test was performed to analyze the frequency of HLA-E alleles and blood-borne pathogen infections in the population. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated to measure the association between the antibodies found and the participants’ possible risk behaviors. A logistic regression analysis was used to assess the associations. Results: HLA-E*101/0101 was associated with HCV/TTV co-infection (adjusted OR [aOR]: 3.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.156-10.734; P = 0.027) and IgM/IgG anti-Toxo positivity (aOR: 27.0; 95% CI: 3.626-200.472; P = 0.001). HLA-E*103/0103 was associated with TTV co-infection (aOR: 2.7; 95% CI: 1.509-4.796; P = 0.001). Conclusions: HLA-E alleles in Indonesian Javanese HIV patients were found to be associated with HCV, TTV, and

  13. Bipolar disorder and the pseudoautosomal region: An association study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsian, A.; Todd, R.D. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1994-03-15

    From family, adoption, and twin studies it is clear that genetic factors play an important role in the etiology of bipolar disorder (McGuffin and Katz: The Biology of Depression, Gaskell, London, 1986). Recently Yoneda et al. reported an association between an allele (A4) of a VNTR marker (DXYS20) for the pseudoautosomal region and bipolar disorder in a Japanese population. In order to test for this association in a Caucasian population, we have typed a sample of 52 subjects with bipolar disorder and 61 normal controls. The bipolar subjects are probands of multiple incidence families. The normal controls are an epidemiologically ascertained sample of middle-aged, unrelated individuals. The two groups were matched for sex and ethnic background. There were no significant differences in the allele or genotype frequencies of DXYS20 between the two groups. In particular, there was no significant difference in the frequency of the A4 allele in normal controls and bipolar patients (0.377 vs. 0.317, respectively). The prevalence of the A4 allele in bipolar patients and normal controls was 0.567 and 0.622, respectively. We were not able to replicate the results of the 1992 Yoneda et al. study. 15 refs., 2 tabs.

  14. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumour subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J; Barrowdale, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    -negative breast cancer risk for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. In BRCA2 carriers, SNPs in FGFR2, TOX3, LSP1, SLC4A7/NEK10, 5p12, 2q35, and1p11.2 were significantly associated with ER-positive but not ER-negative disease. Similar results were observed when differentiating breast cancer cases by PR status...

  15. Association of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: identification of a modifier of breast cancer risk at locus 11q22.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Hamdi (Yosr); Soucy, P. (Penny); Kuchenbaeker, K.B. (Karoline B.); Pastinen, T. (Tomi); A. Droit (Arnaud); Lemaçon, A. (Audrey); J.W. Adlard (Julian); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A. Arason (Adalgeir); N. Arnold (Norbert); B.K. Arun (Banu); J. Azzollini; A.L. Bane (Anita L.); Barjhoux, L. (Laure); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); J. Benítez (Javier); P. Berthet (Pascaline); M.J. Blok (Marinus); K.A. Bobolis (Kristie A.); V. Bonadona (Valérie); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); Bradbury, A.R. (Angela R.); C. Brewer (Carole); B. Buecher (Bruno); Buys, S.S. (Saundra S.); M.A. Caligo (Maria); Chiquette, J. (Jocelyne); W. Chung (Wendy); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); Daly, M.B. (Mary B.); F. Damiola (Francesca); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); K. De Leeneer (Kim); O. Díez (Orland); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); S.M. Domchek (Susan); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); D. Eccles (Diana); R. Eeles (Ros); Z. Einbeigi (Zakaria); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); EMBRACE; C. Engel (Christoph); Gareth Evans, D.; L. Feliubadaló (L.); L. Foretova (Lenka); F. Fostira (Florentia); Foulkes, W.D. (William D.); G. Fountzilas (George); E. Friedman (Eitan); D. Frost (Debra); P. Ganschow (Pamela); P.A. Ganz (Patricia A.); J. Garber (Judy); S.A. Gayther (Simon); GEMO Study Collaborators; A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); A.K. Godwin (Andrew K.); D. Goldgar (David); M.H. Greene (Mark H.); J. Gronwald (Jacek); E. Hahnen (Eric); U. Hamann (Ute); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); S. Hart (Stewart); J. Hays (John); HEBON; F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); P.J. Hulick (Peter); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); C. Isaacs (Claudine); L. Izatt (Louise); A. Jakubowska (Anna); M. James (Margaret); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); U.B. Jensen; E.M. John (Esther); V. Joseph (Vijai); Just, W. (Walter); Kaczmarek, K. (Katarzyna); Karlan, B.Y. (Beth Y.); KConFab Investigators; C.M. Kets; J. Kirk (Judy); Kriege, M. (Mieke); Y. Laitman (Yael); Laurent, M. (Maïté); C. Lazaro (Conxi); Leslie, G. (Goska); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); F. Lesueur (Fabienne); A. Liljegren (Annelie); N. Loman (Niklas); J.T. Loud (Jennifer); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); Mariani, M. (Milena); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); L. McGuffog (Lesley); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); A. Meindl (Alfons); A. Miller (Austin); M. Montagna (Marco); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); R.L. Nussbaum (Robert L.); Olah, E. (Edith); O.I. Olopade (Olufunmilayo I.); K.-R. Ong (Kai-Ren); J.C. Oosterwijk (Jan); A. Osorio (Ana); L. Papi (Laura); S.K. Park (Sue K.); Pedersen, I.S. (Inge Sokilde); B. Peissel (Bernard); P.P. Segura (Pedro Perez); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); C. Phelan (Catherine); P. Radice (Paolo); J. Rantala (Johanna); Rappaport-Fuerhauser, C. (Christine); G. Rennert (Gad); A.L. Richardson (Andrea); M. Robson (Mark); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); M.A. Rookus (Matti); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); N. Sevenet (Nicolas); Shah, P.D. (Payal D.); C.F. Singer (Christian); Slavin, T.P. (Thomas P.); Snape, K. (Katie); J. Sokolowska (Johanna); Sønderstrup, I.M.H. (Ida Marie Heeholm); M.C. Southey (Melissa); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); Stadler, Z. (Zsofia); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); G. Sukiennicki (Grzegorz); C. Sutter (Christian); Tan, Y. (Yen); M.-K. Tea; P.J. Teixeira; A. Teulé (A.); S.-H. Teo; M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); M. Thomassen (Mads); L. Tihomirova (Laima); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); S. Tognazzo (Silvia); A.E. Toland (Amanda); N. Tung (Nadine); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); K. van Engelen (Klaartje); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); K. Offit (Kenneth); Couch, F.J. (Fergus J.); S. Nord (Silje); D.F. Easton (Douglas F.); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); Simard, J. (Jacques)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Cis-acting regulatory SNPs resulting in differential allelic expression (DAE) may, in part, explain the underlying phenotypic variation associated with many complex diseases. To investigate whether common variants associated with DAE were involved in breast cancer susceptibility

  16. Deciphering Natural Allelic Variation in Switchgrass for Biomass Yield and Quality Using a Nested Association Mapping Population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Malay C. [The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Inc., Ardmore, OK (United States). Forage Improvement Division (FID); Brummer, E. Charles [The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Inc., Ardmore, OK (United States); Kaeppler, Shawn [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Bhandari, Hem S. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-10-28

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a C4 grass with high biomass yield potential and a model species for bioenergy feedstock development. Understanding the genetic basis of quantitative traits is essential to facilitate genome-enabled breeding programs. The nested association mapping (NAM) analysis combines the best features of both bi-parental and association analyses and can provide high power and high resolution in QTL detection and will ensure significant improvements in biomass yield and quality. To develop a NAM population of switchgrass, 15 highly diverse genotypes with specific characteristics were selected from a diversity panel and crossed to a recurrent parent, AP13, a genotype selected for whole genome sequencing and parent of a mapping population. Ten genotypes from each of the 15 F1 families were then chain crossed. Progenies form each family were randomly selected to develop the NAM population. The switchgrass NAM population consists of a total of 2000 genotypes from 15 families. All the progenies, founder parents, F1 parents (n=2350) were evaluated in replicated field trials at Ardmore, OK and Knoxville, TN. Phenotypic data on plant height, tillering ability, regrowth, flowering time, and biomass yield were collected. Dried biomass samples were also analyzed using prediction equations of NIRS at the Noble Foundation and for lignin content, S/G ratio, and sugar release characteristics at the NREL. Genomic shotgun sequencing of 15 switchgrass NAM founder parental genomes at JGI produced 28-66 Gb high-quality sequence data. Alignment of these sequences with the reference genome, AP13 (v3.0), revealed that up to 99% of the genomic sequences mapped to the reference genome. A total of 2,149 individuals from NAM populations were sequenced by exome capture and two sets of 15 SNP matrices (one for each family) were generated. QTL associated with important traits have been identified and verified in breeding populations. The QTL detected and their associated

  17. Multiple post-domestication origins of kabuli chickpea through allelic variation in a diversification-associated transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma Penmetsa, R; Carrasquilla-Garcia, Noelia; Bergmann, Emily M; Vance, Lisa; Castro, Brenna; Kassa, Mulualem T; Sarma, Birinchi K; Datta, Subhojit; Farmer, Andrew D; Baek, Jong-Min; Coyne, Clarice J; Varshney, Rajeev K; von Wettberg, Eric J B; Cook, Douglas R

    2016-09-01

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum) is among the founder crops domesticated in the Fertile Crescent. One of two major forms of chickpea, the so-called kabuli type, has white flowers and light-colored seed coats, properties not known to exist in the wild progenitor. The origin of the kabuli form has been enigmatic. We genotyped a collection of wild and cultivated chickpea genotypes with 538 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and examined patterns of molecular diversity relative to geographical sources and market types. In addition, we examined sequence and expression variation in candidate anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway genes. A reduction in genetic diversity and extensive genetic admixture distinguish cultivated chickpea from its wild progenitor species. Among germplasm, the kabuli form is polyphyletic. We identified a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor at chickpea's B locus that conditions flower and seed colors, orthologous to Mendel's A gene of garden pea, whose loss of function is associated invariantly with the kabuli type of chickpea. From the polyphyletic distribution of the kabuli form in germplasm, an absence of nested variation within the bHLH gene and invariant association of loss of function of bHLH among the kabuli type, we conclude that the kabuli form arose multiple times during the phase of phenotypic diversification after initial domestication of cultivated chickpea.

  18. Disease-Concordant Twins Empower Genetic Association Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Qihua; Li, Weilong; Vandin, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies with moderate sample sizes are underpowered, especially when testing SNP alleles with low allele counts, a situation that may lead to high frequency of false-positive results and lack of replication in independent studies. Related individuals, such as twin pairs...... concordant for a disease, should confer increased power in genetic association analysis because of their genetic relatedness. We conducted a computer simulation study to explore the power advantage of the disease-concordant twin design, which uses singletons from disease-concordant twin pairs as cases...... and ordinary healthy samples as controls. We examined the power gain of the twin-based design for various scenarios (i.e., cases from monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs concordant for a disease) and compared the power with the ordinary case-control design with cases collected from the unrelated patient...

  19. A new method for studying population genetics of cyst nematodes based on Pool-Seq and genomewide allele frequency analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimee, Benjamin; Duceppe, Marc-Olivier; Véronneau, Pierre-Yves; Lafond-Lapalme, Joël; Jean, Martine; Belzile, François; Bélair, Guy

    2015-11-01

    Cyst nematodes are important agricultural pests responsible for billions of dollars of losses each year. Plant resistance is the most effective management tool, but it requires a close monitoring of population genetics. Current technologies for pathotyping and genotyping cyst nematodes are time-consuming, expensive and imprecise. In this study, we capitalized on the reproduction mode of cyst nematodes to develop a simple population genetic analysis pipeline based on genotyping-by-sequencing and Pool-Seq. This method yielded thousands of SNPs and allowed us to study the relationships between populations of different origins or pathotypes. Validation of the method on well-characterized populations also demonstrated that it was a powerful and accurate tool for population genetics. The genomewide allele frequencies of 23 populations of golden nematode, from nine countries and representing the five known pathotypes, were compared. A clear separation of the pathotypes and fine genetic relationships between and among global populations were obtained using this method. In addition to being powerful, this tool has proven to be very time- and cost-efficient and could be applied to other cyst nematode species.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a native human tRNA synthetase whose allelic variants are associated with Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Wei; Schimmel, Paul; Yang, Xiang-Lei, E-mail: xlyang@scripps.edu [Departments of Molecular Biology and Chemistry, The Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, BCC-379, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States)

    2006-12-01

    Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a native human tRNA synthetase whose allelic variants are associated with Charcot–Marie–Tooth Disease. Glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) is one of a group of enzymes that catalyze the synthesis of aminoacyl-tRNAs for translation. Mutations of human and mouse GlyRSs are causally associated with Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease, the most common genetic disorder of the peripheral nervous system. As the first step towards a structure–function analysis of this disease, native human GlyRS was expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystal belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or its enantiomorphic space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 91.74, c = 247.18 Å, and diffracted X-rays to 3.0 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contained one GlyRS molecule and had a solvent content of 69%.

  1. Multiple chronic pain states are associated with a common amino acid-changing allele in KCNS1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costigan, Michael; Belfer, Inna; Griffin, Robert S.; Dai, Feng; Barrett, Lee B.; Coppola, Giovanni; Wu, Tianxia; Kiselycznyk, Carly; Poddar, Minakshi; Lu, Yan; Diatchenko, Luda; Smith, Shad; Cobos, Enrique J.; Zaykin, Dmitri; Allchorne, Andrew; Shen, Pei-Hong; Nikolajsen, Lone; Karppinen, Jaro; Mannikko, Minna; Kelempisioti, Anthi; Goldman, David; Maixner, William; Geschwind, Daniel H.; max, Mitchell B.; Seltzer, Ze'ev; woolf, Clifford J.

    2010-01-01

    Not all patients with nerve injury develop neuropathic pain. The extent of nerve damage and age at the time of injury are two of the few risk factors identified to date. In addition, preclinical studies show that neuropathic pain variance is heritable. To define such factors further, we performed a

  2. Study on allelism between blast resistance gene Pi-zh(t) in indica variety Zhaiyeqing 8(ZYQS) and known blast resistance gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEICailin; WANGJiulin; MAOShihong; ZHULihuang; LINGZhongzhuan

    1997-01-01

    One blast resistance gene Pi-zh(t) from indica-variety ZYQ8 was identified using molecular markers in 1992. Studies on the allelism between gene Pi-zh(t) and known blast resis tance genes was presented in this paper.

  3. DQB1*06:02 allele-specific expression varies by allelic dosage, not narcolepsy status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiner Lachmi, Karin; Lin, Ling; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek;

    2012-01-01

    The association of narcolepsy-cataplexy, a sleep disorder caused by the loss of hypocretin/orexin neurons in the hypothalamus, with DQA1*01:02-DQB1*06:02 is one of the tightest known single-allele human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations. In this study, we explored genome-wide expression...... in peripheral white blood cells of 50 narcolepsy versus 47 controls (half of whom were DQB1*06:02 positive) and observed the largest differences between the groups in the signal from HLA probes. Further studies of HLA-DQ expression (mRNA and protein in a subset) in 125 controls and 147 narcolepsy cases did...... indicate that allelic dosage is transmitted into changes in heterodimer availability, a phenomenon that may explain the increased risk for narcolepsy in DQB1*06:02 homozygotes versus heterozygotes....

  4. Intragenic suppression of a constitutively active allele of Gsα associated with McCune-Albright syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobar-Rubin, Raquel; Sultan, Dahlia; Janevska, Daniela; Turcic, Kyle; Carroll, Julie; Ooms, Laura; Pals-Rylaarsdam, Robin

    2013-04-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is a human genetic disorder caused by a mutation that constitutively activates the G(s)α subunit by abolishing GTP hydrolysis. MAS patients suffer from a range of endocrinopathies as well as polyostotic fibrous dysplasia of bone. We previously identified an intragenic suppressor of the MAS mutation in a yeast system, which substituted two residues in the GTP-binding site of Gpa1: L318P and D319V to suppress the constitutive activity of an R297H mutation, corresponding to the human F222P, D223V, and R201H mutations respectively. To extend these studies, the human GNAS gene was subjected to site-directed mutagenesis. Constructs expressing the MAS mutation (R201H), the MAS mutation plus the mutations homologous to the yeast suppressors (R201H, F222P/D223V), or the yeast suppressor mutation alone (F222P/D223V) were transfected into HEK293 cells, and basal and receptor-stimulated cAMP levels were measured. Expression of R201H increased the basal cAMP levels and decreased the EC(50) for hormone-stimulated cAMP production. These effects were dependent on the amount of R201H protein expressed. R201H, F222P/D223V abolished the constitutive activity of the MAS mutation and caused responses to hormone that were not different from those measured in cells expressing WT G(s)α. Interestingly, F222P/D223V behaved similar to R201H in causing increases in basal cAMP production, thus demonstrating constitutive activity. Substitution of another acidic (E) or polar (N, T, and G) amino acid at position 223 caused no suppression of R201H activity, while substitution of a second nonpolar amino acid (A) at this position partially suppressed, and the larger polar I residue completely suppressed the effects of R201H.

  5. ApolipoproteinE ε4 allelic variant, cognitive decline and psychosis in Alzheimer disease: a review of the literature and suggestions for upcoming studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Spoletini

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein E (ApoE ε4 allele represents a well known vascular risk factor for developing Alzheimer disease (AD and differences in ApoE genotypes may explain a part of the variability in AD phenotypes. In fact, ApoE ε4 allele possession seems to be associated with a more precocious age of onset, greater episodic memory impairment, and psychotic symptoms. The first question we discuss regards the role of ApoE ε4 on cognitive progression of AD. In fact, while a general agreement exists about the role played by ApoE ε4 on the precocious onset of AD, cognitive decline has been differently associated with ApoE ε4 allele possession in AD patients in a continuum of faster decline, no effect, and slower decline. An attemptable interpretation is that the biological processes leading to the onset of AD are different from those involved in determining its clinical course. The second question regards the possible relationship between the presence of the degenerative pathological hallmarks of the disease in specific cerebral areas and different cognitive or behavioural symptoms. In fact, there is evidence that degenerative pathology in hippocampal formation and frontal cortex reflects the progression of cognitive deficits in brain aging and AD and that hypometabolism in right frontal lobe and greater frontal neuropsychological deficits occur in AD patients with psychosis in comparison to those without. The third question regards, specifically, the relationship between ApoE ε4 variant and behavioural symptoms. In fact, there is evidence supporting the link between being carriers of ApoE ε4 allele and severity of delusions, mostly at the early stage of the illness. In an interpretative challenge, we suggest that the link between being carriers of ApoE ε4 allele and suffering from delusions in AD may be explained by frontal lobe dysfunctions. Finally, we hypothesize that the most precocious onset of AD illness, described in carriers of ApoE ε4

  6. High prevalence of CYP2C19*2 allele in Roma samples: study on Roma and Hungarian population samples with review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipeky, Csilla; Weber, Agnes; Szabo, Melinda; Melegh, Bela I; Janicsek, Ingrid; Tarlos, Greta; Szabo, Istvan; Sumegi, Katalin; Melegh, Bela

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of our study was to characterise the CYP2C19*2 and CYP2C19*3 alleles in healthy Roma and Hungarian populations. DNA of 500 Roma and 370 Hungarian subjects were genotyped for CYP2C19*2 (G681A, rs4244285) and CYP2C19*3 (G636A, rs4986893) by PCR-RFLP assay and direct sequencing. Significant differences were found comparing the Roma and Hungarian populations in CYP2C19 681 GG (63.6 vs. 75.9%), GA (31.8 vs. 23.0%), AA (4.6 vs. 1.1%), GA+AA (36.4 vs. 24.1%) and A allele frequencies (0.205 vs. 0.125) (pRoma and Hungarian samples in CYP2C19*1 (79.5 vs. 87.4%) and CYP2C19*2 (20.5 vs. 12.6%) alleles, respectively (pRoma than in Hungarians, respectively. Genotype distribution of the Roma population was similar to those of the population of North India, however, a major difference was found in the frequency of the CYP2C19*2 allele, which is likely a result of admixture with European lineages. In conclusion, the frequencies of the CYP2C19 alleles, genotypes and corresponding extensive, intermediate and poor metabolizer phenotypes studied here in the Hungarian population are similar to those of other European Caucasian populations, but display clear differences when compared to the Roma population.

  7. Determining fertility in a bovine subject comprises detecting in a sample from the bovine subject the presence or absence of genetic marker alleles associated with a trait indicative of fertility of the bovine subject and/or off-spring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    for determining fertility in a bovine subject; and selecting bovine subjects for breeding purposes (all claimed). DETAILED DESCRIPTION - Determining fertility in a bovine subject comprises detecting in a sample from the bovine subject the presence or absence of two or more genetic marker alleles......NOVELTY - Determining fertility in a bovine subject comprises detecting in a sample from the bovine subject the presence or absence of two or more genetic marker alleles that are associated with a trait indicative of fertility of the bovine subject and/or off-spring. USE - The methods are useful...... purposes; and (2) a diagnostic kit for detecting the presence or absence in a bovine subject of two or more genetic marker alleles comprising a detection member....

  8. Type 2 diabetes risk alleles demonstrate extreme directional differentiation among human populations, compared to other diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Chen

    Full Text Available Many disease-susceptible SNPs exhibit significant disparity in ancestral and derived allele frequencies across worldwide populations. While previous studies have examined population differentiation of alleles at specific SNPs, global ethnic patterns of ensembles of disease risk alleles across human diseases are unexamined. To examine these patterns, we manually curated ethnic disease association data from 5,065 papers on human genetic studies representing 1,495 diseases, recording the precise risk alleles and their measured population frequencies and estimated effect sizes. We systematically compared the population frequencies of cross-ethnic risk alleles for each disease across 1,397 individuals from 11 HapMap populations, 1,064 individuals from 53 HGDP populations, and 49 individuals with whole-genome sequences from 10 populations. Type 2 diabetes (T2D demonstrated extreme directional differentiation of risk allele frequencies across human populations, compared with null distributions of European-frequency matched control genomic alleles and risk alleles for other diseases. Most T2D risk alleles share a consistent pattern of decreasing frequencies along human migration into East Asia. Furthermore, we show that these patterns contribute to disparities in predicted genetic risk across 1,397 HapMap individuals, T2D genetic risk being consistently higher for individuals in the African populations and lower in the Asian populations, irrespective of the ethnicity considered in the initial discovery of risk alleles. We observed a similar pattern in the distribution of T2D Genetic Risk Scores, which are associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes in the Diabetes Prevention Program cohort, for the same individuals. This disparity may be attributable to the promotion of energy storage and usage appropriate to environments and inconsistent energy intake. Our results indicate that the differential frequencies of T2D risk alleles may

  9. Type 2 diabetes risk alleles demonstrate extreme directional differentiation among human populations, compared to other diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong; Corona, Erik; Sikora, Martin; Dudley, Joel T; Morgan, Alex A; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Nilsen, Geoffrey B; Ruau, David; Lincoln, Stephen E; Bustamante, Carlos D; Butte, Atul J

    2012-01-01

    Many disease-susceptible SNPs exhibit significant disparity in ancestral and derived allele frequencies across worldwide populations. While previous studies have examined population differentiation of alleles at specific SNPs, global ethnic patterns of ensembles of disease risk alleles across human diseases are unexamined. To examine these patterns, we manually curated ethnic disease association data from 5,065 papers on human genetic studies representing 1,495 diseases, recording the precise risk alleles and their measured population frequencies and estimated effect sizes. We systematically compared the population frequencies of cross-ethnic risk alleles for each disease across 1,397 individuals from 11 HapMap populations, 1,064 individuals from 53 HGDP populations, and 49 individuals with whole-genome sequences from 10 populations. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) demonstrated extreme directional differentiation of risk allele frequencies across human populations, compared with null distributions of European-frequency matched control genomic alleles and risk alleles for other diseases. Most T2D risk alleles share a consistent pattern of decreasing frequencies along human migration into East Asia. Furthermore, we show that these patterns contribute to disparities in predicted genetic risk across 1,397 HapMap individuals, T2D genetic risk being consistently higher for individuals in the African populations and lower in the Asian populations, irrespective of the ethnicity considered in the initial discovery of risk alleles. We observed a similar pattern in the distribution of T2D Genetic Risk Scores, which are associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes in the Diabetes Prevention Program cohort, for the same individuals. This disparity may be attributable to the promotion of energy storage and usage appropriate to environments and inconsistent energy intake. Our results indicate that the differential frequencies of T2D risk alleles may contribute to the observed

  10. Replication of association between ELAVL4 and Parkinson disease: the GenePD study

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeStefano, Anita L.; Latourelle, Jeanne; Lew, Mark F.; Suchowersky, Oksana; Klein, Christine; Golbe, Lawrence I.; Mark, Margery H.; Growdon, John H.; Wooten, G. Fredrick; Watts, Ray; Guttman, Mark; Racette, Brad A.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Marlor, Lynn; Shill, Holly A.; Singer, Carlos; Goldwurm, Stefano; Pezzoli, Gianni; Saint-Hilaire, Marie H.; Hendricks, Audrey E.; Gower, Adam; Williamson, Sally; Nagle, Michael W.; Wilk, Jemma B.; Massood, Tiffany; Huskey, Karen W.; Baker, Kenneth B.; Itin, Ilia; Litvan, Irene; Nicholson, Garth; Corbett, Alastair; Nance, Martha; Drasby, Edward; Isaacson, Stuart; Burn, David J.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Al-hinti, Jomana; Moller, Anette T.; Ostergaard, Karen; Sherman, Scott J.; Roxburgh, Richard; Snow, Barry; Slevin, John T.; Cambi, Franca; Gusella, James F.; Myers, Richard H.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic variants in embryonic lethal, abnormal vision, Drosophila-like 4 (ELAVL4) have been reported to be associated with onset age of Parkinson disease (PD) or risk for PD affection in Caucasian populations. In the current study we genotyped three single nucleotide polymorphisms in ELAVL4 in a Caucasian study sample consisting of 712 PD patients and 312 unrelated controls from the GenePD study. The minor allele of rs967582 was associated with increased risk of PD (odds ratio = 1.46, nominal P value = 0.011) in the GenePD population. The minor allele of rs967582 was also the risk allele for PD affection or earlier onset age in the previously studied populations. This replication of association with rs967582 in a third cohort further implicates ELAVL4 as a PD susceptibility gene. PMID:18587682

  11. Investigation of MGMT and DAPK1 methylation patterns in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma using allelic MSP-pyrosequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lasse Sommer; Treppendahl, Marianne Bach; Asmar, Fazila;

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor genes MGMT and DAPK1 become methylated in several cancers including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). However, allelic methylation patterns have not been investigated in DLBCL. We developed a fast and cost-efficient method for the analysis of allelic methylation based...... on pyrosequencing of methylation specific PCR (MSP) products including a SNP. Allelic methylation patterns were reliably analyzed in standards of known allelic methylation status even when diluted in unmethylated DNA to below 1% methylation. When studying 148 DLBCL patients MGMT and DAPK1 methylation was observed...... in 19% and 89%, respectively, and among methylated and heterozygous patients 29% and 55%, respectively, were biallelically methylated. An association between the T-allele of the rs16906252 SNP and MGMT methylation was observed (p-value=0.04), and DAPK1 methylation of the A-allele was associated...

  12. Meta-analysis of Dense Genecentric Association Studies Reveals Common and Uncommon Variants Associated with Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanktree, Matthew B.; Guo, Yiran; Murtaza, Muhammed; Glessner, Joseph T.; Bailey, Swneke D.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Lettre, Guillaume; Ongen, Halit; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Johnson, Toby; Shen, Haiqing; Nelson, Christopher P.; Klopp, Norman; Baumert, Jens; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pankratz, Nathan; Pankow, James S.; Shah, Sonia; Taylor, Kira; Barnard, John; Peters, Bas J.; M. Maloney, Cliona; Lobmeyer, Maximilian T.; Stanton, Alice; Zafarmand, M. Hadi; Romaine, Simon P.R.; Mehta, Amar; van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Gong, Yan; Price, Tom S.; Smith, Erin N.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Li, Yun R.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Atwood, Larry D.; Bailey, Kristian M.; Bhatt, Deepak; Bauer, Florianne; Behr, Elijah R.; Bhangale, Tushar; Boer, Jolanda M.A.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Brown, Morris; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Carty, Cara; Chandrupatla, Hareesh R.; Chen, Wei; Connell, John; Dalgeorgou, Chrysoula; Boer, Anthonius de; Drenos, Fotios; Elbers, Clara C.; Fang, James C.; Fox, Caroline S.; Frackelton, Edward C.; Fuchs, Barry; Furlong, Clement E.; Gibson, Quince; Gieger, Christian; Goel, Anuj; Grobbee, Diederik E.; Hastie, Claire; Howard, Philip J.; Huang, Guan-Hua; Johnson, W. Craig; Li, Qing; Kleber, Marcus E.; Klein, Barbara E.K.; Klein, Ronald; Kooperberg, Charles; Ky, Bonnie; LaCroix, Andrea; Lanken, Paul; Lathrop, Mark; Li, Mingyao; Marshall, Vanessa; Melander, Olle; Mentch, Frank D.; J. Meyer, Nuala; Monda, Keri L.; Montpetit, Alexandre; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Nakayama, Karen; Nondahl, Dave; Onipinla, Abiodun; Rafelt, Suzanne; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Otieno, F. George; Patel, Sanjey R.; Putt, Mary E.; Rodriguez, Santiago; Safa, Radwan N.; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Simpson, Claire; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Suver, Christine; Swergold, Gary; Sweitzer, Nancy K.; Thomas, Kelly A.; Thorand, Barbara; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tischfield, Sam; Tobin, Martin; Tomaszweski, Maciej; Verschuren, W.M. Monique; Wallace, Chris; Winkelmann, Bernhard; Zhang, Haitao; Zheng, Dongling; Zhang, Li; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Clarke, Robert; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Danesh, John; Day, Ian N.; Schork, Nicholas J.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Delles, Christian; Duggan, David; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofker, Marten H.; Humphries, Steve E.; Kivimaki, Mika; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Mega, Jessica L.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Morrow, David A.; Palmen, Jutta; Redline, Susan; Shields, Denis C.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sleiman, Patrick M.; Smith, George Davey; Farrall, Martin; Jamshidi, Yalda; Christiani, David C.; Casas, Juan P.; Hall, Alistair S.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; D. Christie, Jason; Berenson, Gerald S.; Murray, Sarah S.; Illig, Thomas; Dorn, Gerald W.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Sever, Peter; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Caulfield, Mark; Talmud, Philippa J.; Topol, Eric; Engert, James C.; Wang, Kai; Dominiczak, Anna; Hamsten, Anders; Curtis, Sean P.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Lange, Leslie A.; Sabatine, Marc S.; Trip, Mieke; Saleheen, Danish; Peden, John F.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; März, Winfried; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Klungel, Olaf H.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke Hilse; Schadt, Eric E.; Johnson, Julie A.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Papanicolaou, George J.; Grant, Struan F.A.; Munroe, Patricia B.; North, Kari E.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Gaunt, Tom R.; Anand, Sonia S.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Soranzo, Nicole; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Reiner, Alex; Hegele, Robert A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Keating, Brendan J.

    2011-01-01

    Height is a classic complex trait with common variants in a growing list of genes known to contribute to the phenotype. Using a genecentric genotyping array targeted toward cardiovascular-related loci, comprising 49,320 SNPs across approximately 2000 loci, we evaluated the association of common and uncommon SNPs with adult height in 114,223 individuals from 47 studies and six ethnicities. A total of 64 loci contained a SNP associated with height at array-wide significance (p < 2.4 × 10−6), with 42 loci surpassing the conventional genome-wide significance threshold (p < 5 × 10−8). Common variants with minor allele frequencies greater than 5% were observed to be associated with height in 37 previously reported loci. In individuals of European ancestry, uncommon SNPs in IL11 and SMAD3, which would not be genotyped with the use of standard genome-wide genotyping arrays, were strongly associated with height (p < 3 × 10−11). Conditional analysis within associated regions revealed five additional variants associated with height independent of lead SNPs within the locus, suggesting allelic heterogeneity. Although underpowered to replicate findings from individuals of European ancestry, the direction of effect of associated variants was largely consistent in African American, South Asian, and Hispanic populations. Overall, we show that dense coverage of genes for uncommon SNPs, coupled with large-scale meta-analysis, can successfully identify additional variants associated with a common complex trait. PMID:21194676

  13. Functional study of a genetic marker allele associated with resistance to Ascaris suum in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skallerup, Per; Thamsborg, Stig M.; Jørgensen, Claus B.;

    2014-01-01

    trickle-infected with A. suum until necropsy at week 8 post first infection (PI), to test the hypothesis that pigs with the AA genotype would have higher levels of resistance than pigs of the AB genotype. We used different indicators of resistance (worm burden, faecal egg counts, number of liver white...... spots and A. suum-specific serum IgG antibody levels). Pigs of the AA genotype had lower mean macroscopic worm burden (2.4 vs. 19.3; P=0.06), lower mean total worm burden (26.5 vs. 70.1; P=0.06) and excreted fewer A. suum eggs at week 8 PI (mean number of eggs/g faeces: 238 vs. 1259; P=0.14) than pigs...

  14. Apolipoprotein E alleles in Alzheimer`s and Parkinson`s patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poduslo, S.E. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Schwankhaus, J.D. [Department of Veterans Affairs, Lubbock, TX (United States)

    1994-09-01

    A number of investigators have found an association between the apolipoprotein E4 allele and Alzheimer`s disease. The E4 allele appears at a higher frequency in late onset familial Alzheimer`s patients. In our studies we obtained blood samples from early and late onset familial and sporadic Alzheimer`s patients and spouses, as well as from Parkinson`s patients. The patients were diagnosed as probable Alzheimer`s patients after a neurological examination, extensive blood work, and a CAT scan. The diagnosis was made according to the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria. The apolipoprotein E4 polymorphism was detected after PCR amplification of genomic DNA, restriction enzyme digestion with Hhal, and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Ethidium bromide-stained bands at 91 bp were designated as allele 3, at 83 bp as allele 2, and at 72 bp as allele 4. Of the 84 probable Alzheimer`s patients (all of whom were Caucasian), 47 were heterozygous and 13 were homozygous for the E4 allele. There were 26 early onset patients; 13 were heterozygous and 7 homozygous for the E4 allele. The frequencies for the E4 allele for late onset familial patients was 0.45 and for sporadic patients was 0.37. We analyzed 77 spouses with an average age of 71.9 {plus_minus} 7.4 years as controls, and 15 were heterozygous for the E4 allele for an E4 frequency of 0.097. Of the 53 Parkinson`s patients, 11 had the E4 allele for a frequency of 0.113. Thus our findings support the association of the ApoE4 allele with Alzheimer`s disease.

  15. Genome-wide association study of relative telomere length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Jennifer; Kraft, Peter; Chasman, Daniel I; Savage, Sharon A; Mirabello, Lisa; Berndt, Sonja I; Weissfeld, Joel L; Han, Jiali; Hayes, Richard B; Chanock, Stephen J; Hunter, David J; De Vivo, Immaculata

    2011-05-10

    Telomere function is essential to maintaining the physical integrity of linear chromosomes and healthy human aging. The probability of forming proper telomere structures depends on the length of the telomeric DNA tract. We attempted to identify common genetic variants associated with log relative telomere length using genome-wide genotyping data on 3,554 individuals from the Nurses' Health Study and the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial that took part in the National Cancer Institute Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility initiative for breast and prostate cancer. After genotyping 64 independent SNPs selected for replication in additional Nurses' Health Study and Women's Genome Health Study participants, we did not identify genome-wide significant loci; however, we replicated the inverse association of log relative telomere length with the minor allele variant [C] of rs16847897 at the TERC locus (per allele β = -0.03, P = 0.003) identified by a previous genome-wide association study. We did not find evidence for an association with variants at the OBFC1 locus or other loci reported to be associated with telomere length. With this sample size we had >80% power to detect β estimates as small as ±0.10 for SNPs with minor allele frequencies of ≥0.15 at genome-wide significance. However, power is greatly reduced for β estimates smaller than ±0.10, such as those for variants at the TERC locus. In general, common genetic variants associated with telomere length homeostasis have been difficult to detect. Potential biological and technical issues are discussed.

  16. Genome-wide association study of relative telomere length.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Prescott

    Full Text Available Telomere function is essential to maintaining the physical integrity of linear chromosomes and healthy human aging. The probability of forming proper telomere structures depends on the length of the telomeric DNA tract. We attempted to identify common genetic variants associated with log relative telomere length using genome-wide genotyping data on 3,554 individuals from the Nurses' Health Study and the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial that took part in the National Cancer Institute Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility initiative for breast and prostate cancer. After genotyping 64 independent SNPs selected for replication in additional Nurses' Health Study and Women's Genome Health Study participants, we did not identify genome-wide significant loci; however, we replicated the inverse association of log relative telomere length with the minor allele variant [C] of rs16847897 at the TERC locus (per allele β = -0.03, P = 0.003 identified by a previous genome-wide association study. We did not find evidence for an association with variants at the OBFC1 locus or other loci reported to be associated with telomere length. With this sample size we had >80% power to detect β estimates as small as ±0.10 for SNPs with minor allele frequencies of ≥0.15 at genome-wide significance. However, power is greatly reduced for β estimates smaller than ±0.10, such as those for variants at the TERC locus. In general, common genetic variants associated with telomere length homeostasis have been difficult to detect. Potential biological and technical issues are discussed.

  17. Associations between GPX1 Pro198Leu polymorphism, erythrocyte GPX activity, alcohol consumption and breast cancer risk in a prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn-Haren, Gitte; Olsen, A.; Tjonneland, A.;

    2006-01-01

    -control study was to determine whether GPX1 Pro198Leu and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity in prospectively collected blood samples are associated with breast cancer risk among postmenopausal women and whether GPX activity levels are associated with other known breast cancer risk factors. We matched 377......-allele but not for the T-allele. Results from this prospective study suggest that the GPX1 Pro198Leu-associated lowered GPX activity is associated with higher breast cancer risk among Danish women....

  18. Hypermethylated SUPERMAN epigenetic alleles in arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, S E; Meyerowitz, E M

    1997-08-22

    Mutations in the SUPERMAN gene affect flower development in Arabidopsis. Seven heritable but unstable sup epi-alleles (the clark kent alleles) are associated with nearly identical patterns of excess cytosine methylation within the SUP gene and a decreased level of SUP RNA. Revertants of these alleles are largely demethylated at the SUP locus and have restored levels of SUP RNA. A transgenic Arabidopsis line carrying an antisense methyltransferase gene, which shows an overall decrease in genomic cytosine methylation, also contains a hypermethylated sup allele. Thus, disruption of methylation systems may yield more complex outcomes than expected and can result in methylation defects at known genes. The clark kent alleles differ from the antisense line because they do not show a general decrease in genomic methylation.

  19. An evolutionary framework for association testing in resequencing studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Ryan King

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Sequencing technologies are becoming cheap enough to apply to large numbers of study participants and promise to provide new insights into human phenotypes by bringing to light rare and previously unknown genetic variants. We develop a new framework for the analysis of sequence data that incorporates all of the major features of previously proposed approaches, including those focused on allele counts and allele burden, but is both more general and more powerful. We harness population genetic theory to provide prior information on effect sizes and to create a pooling strategy for information from rare variants. Our method, EMMPAT (Evolutionary Mixed Model for Pooled Association Testing, generates a single test per gene (substantially reducing multiple testing concerns, facilitates graphical summaries, and improves the interpretation of results by allowing calculation of attributable variance. Simulations show that, relative to previously used approaches, our method increases the power to detect genes that affect phenotype when natural selection has kept alleles with large effect sizes rare. We demonstrate our approach on a population-based re-sequencing study of association between serum triglycerides and variation in ANGPTL4.

  20. Apolipoprotein E4 allele is associated with substantial changes in the plasma lipids and hyaluronic acid content in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowska, E; Maciejewska, D; Ossowski, P; Drozd, A; Ryterska, K; Banaszczak, M; Milkiewicz, M; Raszeja-Wyszomirska, J; Slebioda, M; Milkiewicz, P; Jelen, H

    2013-12-01

    Fat may affect progression of liver damage in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). In this study we characterize the state of lipid metabolism in 22 patients with NAFLD and different Apo-E variants. Total concentration of plasma total fatty acids was quantified by gas chromatography, while their derivatives by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC ESI MS/MS). The ratio of plasma saturated fatty acid to monounsaturated fatty acid increased, whereas the ratio of polyunsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids was reduced in Apo-E4 carriers. Simultaneously, the levels of individual plasma linoleic, arachidonic, and alpha linolenic acids significantly increased in subjects with the Apo-E4 allele. The 15-lipoxygenase metabolite, 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid, was significantly higher in Apo-E3 carriers (pacid was significantly elevated in Apo-E4 carriers (phyaluronic acid concentration (pacid synthesis and fatty acid dysfunction may induce fibrosis, while an inflammatory process may be the main cause of fibrosis in Apo-E3 carriers.

  1. Peptide-binding motifs associated with MHC molecules common in Chinese rhesus macaques are analogous to those of human HLA supertypes and include HLA-B27-like alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mothé, Bianca R.; Southwood, Scott; Sidney, John

    2013-01-01

    that they may be a better model for HIV. Nevertheless, the specific mechanism(s) accounting for these kinetics remains unclear. The study of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules, including their MHC/peptide-binding motifs, provides valuable information for measuring cellular immune responses...... in humans. All six alleles characterized in the present study were found to have specificities analogous to HLA supertype alleles. These data contribute to the concept that Chinese rhesus macaque MHC immunogenetics is more similar to HLA than their Indian rhesus macaque counterparts and thereby warrants...

  2. Genetic association study of selected candidate genes (ApoB, LPL, Leptin and telomere length in obese and hypertensive individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saini Divyalakshmi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A genetic study was carried out among obese and hypertensive individuals from India to assess allelic association, if any, at three candidate loci: Apolipoprotein B (ApoB minisatellite and two tetranucleotide repeat loci; LPL (Lipoprotein lipase and Leptin. Attempt has also been made to find out whether telomere length attrition is associated with hypertension and obese individuals. Methods Venous blood samples were collected from 37 normal, 35 obese and 47 hypertensive individuals. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC and PCR amplifications were achieved using locus specific primers. Genotyping of ApoB minisatellite was performed using 4% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE followed by silver staining, whereas LPL and Leptin loci were genotyped using ALF Express™ DNA sequencer. Telomere length was determined using a recently developed real time based quantitative PCR, where the relative telomere length was determined by calculating the relative ratio of telomere (T and single copy gene (S PCR products which is expressed as T/S ratio. Results All the three loci are highly polymorphic, display high heterozygosity and conform to Hardy-Weinberg's equilibrium expectations. ApoB minisatellite displayed 14 alleles, whereas LPL and Leptin tetranucleotide loci were having 9 and 17 alleles, respectively. Interestingly two new alleles (9 and 11 repeats were detected at ApoB locus for the first time. The alleles at Leptin locus were classified as Class I (lower alleles: 149-200 bp and Class II alleles (higher alleles: >217 bp. Higher alleles at ApoB (>39 repeats, predominant allele 9 at LPL and alleles 164 bp and 224 bp at Leptin loci have shown allelic association with hypertensive individuals. After adjusting the influence of age and gender, the analysis of co-variance (ANCOVA revealed the relative telomere length (T/S ratio in hypertensive individuals to be (1.01 ± 0.021, which was

  3. Segregation of microsatellite alleles and residual heterogosity at single loci in homozygous androgenetic common carp (Cyprino carpio L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanck, M.W.T.; Palstra, A.P.; Weerd, van de M.; Leffering, C.P.; Poel, van der J.J.; Bovenhuis, H.; Komen, J.

    2001-01-01

    Thirty-three androgenetic progeny groups of common carp were analysed using 11 microsatellite markers to (i) verify the homozygous status of the 566 androgenetic individuals, (ii) analyse the microsatellite allele segregation, and (iii) study the possible association of microsatellite alleles with p

  4. Alarmingly High Segregation Frequencies of Quinolone Resistance Alleles within Human and Animal Microbiomes Are Not Explained by Direct Clinical Antibiotic Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Wesley; Hershberg, Ruth

    2015-05-26

    Antibiotic resistance poses a major threat to human health. It is therefore important to characterize the frequency of resistance within natural bacterial environments. Many studies have focused on characterizing the frequencies with which horizontally acquired resistance genes segregate within natural bacterial populations. Yet, very little is currently understood regarding the frequency of segregation of resistance alleles occurring within the housekeeping targets of antibiotics. We surveyed a large number of metagenomic datasets extracted from a large variety of host-associated and non host-associated environments for such alleles conferring resistance to three groups of broad spectrum antibiotics: streptomycin, rifamycins, and quinolones. We find notable segregation frequencies of resistance alleles occurring within the target genes of each of the three antibiotics, with quinolone resistance alleles being the most frequent and rifamycin resistance alleles being the least frequent. Resistance allele frequencies varied greatly between different phyla and as a function of environment. The frequency of quinolone resistance alleles was especially high within host-associated environments, where it averaged an alarming ∼ 40%. Within host-associated environments, resistance to quinolones was most often conferred by a specific resistance allele. High frequencies of quinolone resistance alleles were also found within hosts that were not directly treated with antibiotics. Therefore, the high segregation frequency of quinolone resistance alleles occurring within the housekeeping targets of antibiotics in host-associated environments does not seem to be the sole result of clinical antibiotic usage.

  5. Replication of genetic association studies in aortic stenosis in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreault, Nathalie; Ducharme, Valérie; Lamontagne, Maxime; Guauque-Olarte, Sandra; Mathieu, Patrick; Pibarot, Philippe; Bossé, Yohan

    2011-11-01

    Only a handful of studies have attempted to unravel the genetic architecture of calcific aortic valve stenosis (AS). The goal of this study was to validate genes previously associated with AS. Seven genes were assessed: APOB, APOE, CTGF, IL10, PTH, TGFB1, and VDR. Each gene was tested for a comprehensive set of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). SNPs were genotyped in 457 patients who underwent surgical aortic valve replacement, and allele frequencies were compared to 3,294 controls. A missense mutation in the APOB gene was significantly associated with AS (rs1042031, E4181K, p = 0.00001). A second SNP located 5.6 kilobases downstream of the APOB stop codon was also associated with the disease (rs6725189, p = 0.000013). Six SNPs surrounding the IL10 locus were strongly associated with AS (0.02 > p > 6.2 × 10⁻¹¹). The most compelling association for IL10 was found with a promoter polymorphism (rs1800872) well known to regulate the production of the encoded anti-inflammatory cytokine. The frequency of the low-producing allele was greater in cases compared to controls (30% vs 20%, p = 6.2 × 10⁻¹¹). SNPs in PTH, TGFB1, and VDR had nominal p values <0.05 but did not resist Bonferroni correction. In conclusion, this study suggests that subjects carrying specific polymorphisms in the IL10 and APOB genes are at higher risk for developing AS.

  6. Applicability of major histocompatibility complex DRB1 alleles as markers to detect vertebrate hybridization: a case study from Iberian ibex × domestic goat in southern Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alasaad Samer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hybridization between closely related wild and domestic species is of great concern because it can alter the evolutionary integrity of the affected populations. The high allelic variability of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC loci usually excludes them from being used in studies to detect hybridization events. However, if a the parental species don’t share alleles, and b one of the parental species possesses an exceptionally low number of alleles (to facilitate analysis, then even MHC loci have the potential to detect hybrids. Results By genotyping the exon2 of the MHC class II DRB1 locus, we were able to detect hybridization between domestic goats (Capra hircus and free-ranging Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica hispanica by molecular means. Conclusions This is the first documentation of a Capra pyrenaica × Capra hircus hybridization, which presented us the opportunity to test the applicability of MHC loci as new, simple, cost-effective, and time-saving approach to detect hybridization between wild species and their domesticated relatives, thus adding value to MHC genes role in animal conservation and management.

  7. Identification and characterization of variant alleles at CODIS STR loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allor, Catherine; Einum, David D; Scarpetta, Marco

    2005-09-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) profiles from 32,671 individuals generated by the ABI Profiler Plus and Cofiler systems were screened for variant alleles not represented within manufacturer-provided allelic ladders. A total of 85 distinct variants were identified at 12 of the 13 CODIS loci, most of which involve a truncated tetranucleotide repeat unit. Twelve novel alleles, identified at D3S1358, FGA, D18S51, D5S818, D7S820 and TPOX, were confirmed by nucleotide sequence analysis and include both insertions and deletions involving the repeat units themselves as well as DNA flanking the repeat regions. Population genetic data were collected for all variants and frequencies range from 0.0003 (many single observations) to 0.0042 (D7S820 '10.3' in North American Hispanics). In total, the variant alleles identified in this study are carried by 1.6% of the estimated 1 million individuals tested annually in the U.S. for the purposes of parentage resolution. A paternity case involving a recombination event of paternal origin is presented and demonstrates how variant alleles can significantly strengthen the genetic evidence in troublesome cases. In such instances, increased costs and turnaround time associated with additional testing may be eliminated.

  8. Complex and multi-allelic copy number variation in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, Christina L; McCarroll, Steven A

    2015-09-01

    Hundreds of copy number variants are complex and multi-allelic, in that they have many structural alleles and have rearranged multiple times in the ancestors who contributed chromosomes to current humans. Not only are the relationships of these multi-allelic CNVs (mCNVs) to phenotypes generally unknown, but many mCNVs have not yet been described at the basic levels-alleles, allele frequencies, structural features-that support genetic investigation. To date, most reported disease associations to these variants have been ascertained through candidate gene studies. However, only a few associations have reached the level of acceptance defined by durable replications in many cohorts. This likely stems from longstanding challenges in making precise molecular measurements of the alleles individuals have at these loci. However, approaches for mCNV analysis are improving quickly, and some of the unique characteristics of mCNVs may assist future association studies. Their various structural alleles are likely to have different magnitudes of effect, creating a natural allelic series of growing phenotypic impact and giving investigators a set of natural predictions and testable hypotheses about the extent to which each allele of an mCNV predisposes to a phenotype. Also, mCNVs' low-to-modest correlation to individual single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may make it easier to distinguish between mCNVs and nearby SNPs as the drivers of an association signal, and perhaps, make it possible to preliminarily screen candidate loci, or the entire genome, for the many mCNV-disease relationships that remain to be discovered.

  9. Detection of bovine leukocyte antigen DRB3 alleles as candidate markers for clinical mastitis resistance in Holstein x Zebu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duangjinda, M; Buayai, D; Pattarajinda, V; Phasuk, Y; Katawatin, S; Vongpralub, T; Chaiyotvittayakul, A

    2009-02-01

    Bovine leukocyte antigen DRB3 alleles from Holstein x Zebu crossbred dairy cows (n = 409) were analyzed using the PCR-RFLP technique. Exon II of DRB3 was amplified using locus-specific primers (HLO30/HLO32), followed by digestion with 3 restriction enzymes (RsaI, BstyI, and HaeIII). Forty alleles were found with frequency ranging from 0.005 to 0.139. The most frequently detected alleles of Holstein x Zebu were DRB3*16, *51, *23, *11, *8, and *1, accounting for 61.12% of the alleles in the population. Detection of candidate alleles for clinical mastitis occurrence was performed by logistic regression. It was found that percentage of Holstein fraction in crossbred cows had a nonsignificant effect (P > 0.05). However, parity had a significant effect on mastitis occurrence. In addition, DRB3*1 and *52 were the most associated with the occurrence of clinical mastitis, whereas *15, *51, and *22 were associated with resistance in crossbred populations. This is the first report of association of DRB3*15 and *51 with mastitis resistance. The association was validated by examining the candidate alleles in another commercial population. Highly susceptible (n = 43) and resistant (n = 42) groups of Holstein x Zebu cows were investigated. The result confirmed that DRB3*1 and *52 could be considered as susceptibility alleles, whereas *15, *51, and *22 could be considered as resistant alleles in Holstein x Zebu raised under tropical conditions. In addition, allele effects on 305-d milk production were estimated by BLUP. It was shown that most alleles associated with high clinical mastitis occurrence were related to increased milk yield. This study revealed that allele DRB3*10 had the greatest effect on increasing milk yield with moderate resistance to clinical mastitis, which could be used as a potential marker for selection in dairy genetic evaluation.

  10. Multiethnic genetic association studies improve power for locus discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara L Pulit

    Full Text Available To date, genome-wide association studies have focused almost exclusively on populations of European ancestry. These studies continue with the advent of next-generation sequencing, designed to systematically catalog and test low-frequency variation for a role in disease. A complementary approach would be to focus further efforts on cohorts of multiple ethnicities. This leverages the idea that population genetic drift may have elevated some variants to higher allele frequency in different populations, boosting statistical power to detect an association. Based on empirical allele frequency distributions from eleven populations represented in HapMap Phase 3 and the 1000 Genomes Project, we simulate a range of genetic models to quantify the power of association studies in multiple ethnicities relative to studies that exclusively focus on samples of European ancestry. In each of these simulations, a first phase of GWAS in exclusively European samples is followed by a second GWAS phase in any of the other populations (including a multiethnic design. We find that nontrivial power gains can be achieved by conducting future whole-genome studies in worldwide populations, where, in particular, African populations contribute the largest relative power gains for low-frequency alleles (<5% of moderate effect that suffer from low power in samples of European descent. Our results emphasize the importance of broadening genetic studies to worldwide populations to ensure efficient discovery of genetic loci contributing to phenotypic trait variability, especially for those traits for which large numbers of samples of European ancestry have already been collected and tested.

  11. Nucleotide variation and identification of novel blast resistance alleles of Pib by allele mining strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramkumar, G; Madhav, M S; Devi, S J S Rama; Prasad, M S; Babu, V Ravindra

    2015-04-01

    Pib is one of significant rice blast resistant genes, which provides resistance to wide range of isolates of rice blast pathogen, Magnaporthe oryzae. Identification and isolation of novel and beneficial alleles help in crop enhancement. Allele mining is one of the best strategies for dissecting the allelic variations at candidate gene and identification of novel alleles. Hence, in the present study, Pib was analyzed by allele mining strategy, and coding and non-coding (upstream and intron) regions were examined to identify novel Pib alleles. Allelic sequences comparison revealed that nucleotide polymorphisms at coding regions affected the amino acid sequences, while the polymorphism at upstream (non-coding) region affected the motifs arrangements. Pib alleles from resistant landraces, Sercher and Krengosa showed better resistance than Pib donor variety, might be due to acquired mutations, especially at LRR region. The evolutionary distance, Ka/Ks and phylogenetic analyzes also supported these results. Transcription factor binding motif analysis revealed that Pib (Sr) had a unique motif (DPBFCOREDCDC3), while five different motifs differentiated the resistance and susceptible Pib alleles. As the Pib is an inducible gene, the identified differential motifs helps to understand the Pib expression mechanism. The identified novel Pib resistant alleles, which showed high resistance to the rice blast, can be used directly in blast resistance breeding program as alternative Pib resistant sources.

  12. HLA DRB1 alleles and hepatitis C virus infection in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Noha Mohamed Hosni; Soliman, Amin Roshdy; El-Khashab, Sahier Omar; Hanna, Mariam Onsy Farag

    2013-01-01

    T cell responses against HCV are regulated by the host's human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles, which thus are ideal candidate genes to investigate for associations with HCV susceptibility. We aimed to identify associations of HLA DRB1* alleles with HCV infection in a high risk of exposure population, chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients on dialysis, and to study any possible relationships with allele zygosity. The study population comprised 110 HCV infected and 143 HCV uninfected CKD patients undergoing regular hemodialysis. HLA DRB1* alleles were determined using polymerase chain reaction followed by hybridization with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes. We found a significant negative association between HLA DRB1*03 and HCV infection, but the association did not retain significance after adjustment for multiple comparisons. HLA DRB1*03 was found at reduced frequency in HCV antibody positive compared to HCV antibody negative CKD patients on regular dialysis (corrected p was not significant). No significant association between HCV infection and HLA DRB1* zygosity was observed. Our results suggest that there is minimal evidence for a significant role of a particular HLA DRB1* allele or allele zygosity in the susceptibility or protection to HCV in high-risk hemodialysis patients with similar exposure to infection.

  13. Enhancement of allele discrimination by introduction of nucleotide mismatches into siRNA in allele-specific gene silencing by RNAi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Ohnishi

    Full Text Available Allele-specific gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi is therapeutically useful for specifically inhibiting the expression of disease-associated alleles without suppressing the expression of corresponding wild-type alleles. To realize such allele-specific RNAi (ASP-RNAi, the design and assessment of small interfering RNA (siRNA duplexes conferring ASP-RNAi is vital; however, it is also difficult. In a previous study, we developed an assay system to assess ASP-RNAi with mutant and wild-type reporter alleles encoding the Photinus and Renilla luciferase genes. In line with experiments using the system, we realized that it is necessary and important to enhance allele discrimination between mutant and corresponding wild-type alleles. Here, we describe the improvement of ASP-RNAi against mutant alleles carrying single nucleotide variations by introducing base substitutions into siRNA sequences, where original variations are present in the central position. Artificially mismatched siRNAs or short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs against mutant alleles of the human Prion Protein (PRNP gene, which appear to be associated with susceptibility to prion diseases, were examined using this assessment system. The data indicates that introduction of a one-base mismatch into the siRNAs and shRNAs was able to enhance discrimination between the mutant and wild-type alleles. Interestingly, the introduced mismatches that conferred marked improvement in ASP-RNAi, appeared to be largely present in the guide siRNA elements, corresponding to the 'seed region' of microRNAs. Due to the essential role of the 'seed region' of microRNAs in their association with target RNAs, it is conceivable that disruption of the base-pairing interactions in the corresponding seed region, as well as the central position (involved in cleavage of target RNAs, of guide siRNA elements could influence allele discrimination. In addition, we also suggest that nucleotide mismatches at the 3'-ends of sense

  14. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies to identify prostate cancer susceptibility loci associated with aggressive and non-aggressive disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin Al Olama, Ali; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Schumacher, Fredrick R

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple common genetic variants associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer (PrCa), but these explain less than one-third of the heritability. To identify further susceptibility alleles, we conducted a meta-analysis of four GWAS inc...

  15. The PTPN22 1858T allele but not variants in the proximal promoter region of IL-21 gene is associated with the susceptibility to type 1 diabetes and the presence of autoantibodies in a Brazilian cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainardi-Novo, D T O; Santos, A S; Fukui, R T; Gamberini, M; Correia, M R S; Ruiz, M O; Mangueira, C L P; Matioli, S R; Vasconcelos, D M; Silva, M E R

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-21 and protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor 22 (PTPN22) regulate lymphocyte function and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diabetes. We sequenced the proximal promoter of the IL-21 gene for the first time and analysed the PTPN22 1858T polymorphism in type 1A diabetes (T1AD) patients and healthy controls (HC). We correlated the frequencies of islet and extra-pancreatic autoantibodies with genotypes from both loci. The case series comprised 612 T1AD patients and 792 HC. Genotyping of PTPN22 C1858T was performed on 434 T1AD patients and 689 HC. The −448 to +83 base pairs (bp) region of the IL-21 gene was sequenced in 309 Brazilian T1AD and 189 HC subjects. We also evaluated human leucocyte antigen (HLA) DR3/DR4 alleles. The frequencies of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65), tyrosine phosphatase-like protein (IA)-2, anti-nuclear antibody (ANA), thyroid peroxidase (TPO), thyroglobulin (TG), thyrotrophin receptor autoantibody (TRAb), anti-smooth muscle (ASM) and 21-hydroxylase (21-OH) autoantibodies were higher in T1AD patients than in HC. The PTPN22 1858T allele was associated with an increased risk for developing T1AD [odds ratio (OR) = 1·94; P A) was found in only one patient. In conclusion, only PTPN22 C1858T polymorphism and HLA-DR3 and/or DR4 alleles, but not allelic variants in the 5′-proximal region of the IL-21 gene were associated with T1AD risk. Patients with T1AD had increased frequencies of anti-islet-cell, anti-thyroid, anti-nuclear, anti-smooth muscle and anti-21-OH autoantibodies. The C1858T PTPN22 polymorphism was also associated with a higher frequency of GAD65 and TG autoantibodies. PMID:23480181

  16. Meiosis study in a population sample from Nigeria: allele frequencies and mutation rates of 16 STR loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohoff, Carsten; Schürenkamp, Marianne; Brinkmann, Bernd

    2009-05-01

    Allele frequencies for the 16 short tandem repeat (STR) loci D2S1338, D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D8S1179, D13S317, D16S539, D18S51, D19S433, D21S11, ACTBP2, CSF1PO, FGA, TH01, TPOX and VWA were determined for 337 immigrants from Nigeria. All loci were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. More than 6,000 meiotic transfers were investigated and ten mutations were observed. Single mutations were observed in the STR systems D2S1338, D3S1358, D7S820, D8S1179, D16S539 and FGA, whereas two mutations were observed in the systems D21S11 and VWA.

  17. The study of Allelic Frequency of ABO and Rh D Blood Group among the Banjara Population of Akola District, Maharashtra, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravind Chavhan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of ABO blood groups and Rh (D factor has been studied in the Banjara population. In the present study O, A, B, and AB blood group percentages of Banjaras of Akola district of Maharashtra are recorded as 27.64%, 22.91%, 37.45% and 12% respectively and the Rh negative incidences recorded as 02.55%. The allelic frequencies of O, A, B and AB groups in the combined data of same community found to be 0.5196, 0.2880, and 0.1924 respectively and Rh (D positive as 0.8405.

  18. Genome-wide association study identifies four loci associated with eruption of permanent teeth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Geller

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The sequence and timing of permanent tooth eruption is thought to be highly heritable and can have important implications for the risk of malocclusion, crowding, and periodontal disease. We conducted a genome-wide association study of number of permanent teeth erupted between age 6 and 14 years, analyzed as age-adjusted standard deviation score averaged over multiple time points, based on childhood records for 5,104 women from the Danish National Birth Cohort. Four loci showed association at P<5×10(-8 and were replicated in four independent study groups from the United States and Denmark with a total of 3,762 individuals; all combined P-values were below 10(-11. Two loci agreed with previous findings in primary tooth eruption and were also known to influence height and breast cancer, respectively. The two other loci pointed to genomic regions without any previous significant genome-wide association study results. The intronic SNP rs7924176 in ADK could be linked to gene expression in monocytes. The combined effect of the four genetic variants was most pronounced between age 10 and 12 years, where children with 6 to 8 delayed tooth eruption alleles had on average 3.5 (95% confidence interval: 2.9-4.1 fewer permanent teeth than children with 0 or 1 of these alleles.

  19. Insights into kidney diseases from genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuttke, Matthias; Köttgen, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Over the past decade, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have considerably improved our understanding of the genetic basis of kidney function and disease. Population-based studies, used to investigate traits that define chronic kidney disease (CKD), have identified >50 genomic regions in which common genetic variants associate with estimated glomerular filtration rate or urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Case-control studies, used to study specific CKD aetiologies, have yielded risk loci for specific kidney diseases such as IgA nephropathy and membranous nephropathy. In this Review, we summarize important findings from GWAS and clinical and experimental follow-up studies. We also compare risk allele frequency, effect sizes, and specificity in GWAS of CKD-defining traits and GWAS of specific CKD aetiologies and the implications for study design. Genomic regions identified in GWAS of CKD-defining traits can contain causal genes for monogenic kidney diseases. Population-based research on kidney function traits can therefore generate insights into more severe forms of kidney diseases. Experimental follow-up studies have begun to identify causal genes and variants, which are potential therapeutic targets, and suggest mechanisms underlying the high allele frequency of causal variants. GWAS are thus a useful approach to advance knowledge in nephrology.

  20. Two amino acid substitutions in apolipoprotein B are in complete allelic association with the antigen group (x/y) polymorphism: Evidence for little recombination in the 3 prime end of the human gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunning, A.M.; Renges, H.H.; Xu, Chunfang; Peacock, R.; Humphries, S.E.; Talmud, P.; Laxer, G. (Bickbeck Coll., London (England)); Brasseur, R. (Free Univ. of Brussels (Belgium)); Tikkanen, M.J. (Univ. of Helsinki (Switzerland)); Buetler, R. (Swiss Red Cross, Berne (Switzerland)); Saha, N. (National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore)); Hamsten, A. (Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)); Rosseneu, M. (A.Z. St-Jan, Brugge (Belgium))

    1992-01-01

    The authors report the identification of an A-to-G base change, in exon 29 of the apolipoprotein B (apo B) gene, that results in the substitution of serine for asparagine at residue 4,311 of mature apo B100. In a recent publication, Huang et al. have reported a C-to-T base change in exon 26 that causes the substitution of leucine for proline at residue 2712 of apo B. The authors have found complete linkage disequilibrium between the alleles at both these sites and an immunochemical polymorphism of LDL designated antigen group (x/y) (Ag(x/y)) in a sample of 118 Finnish individuals. This implies that either one of these substitutions - or both of them combined - could be the molecular basis of the Ag(x/y) antigenic determinants, with the allele encoding serine{sub 4311} plus leucine{sub 2,712} representing the Ag(x) epitope, and that encoding asparagine{sub 4,311} plus proline{sub 2,712} the Ag(y) epitope. In a sample of 90 healthy Swedish individuals the Leu{sub 2,712}/Ser{sub 4,311} allele is associated both with reduced serum levels of LDL cholesterol and apo B and with raised levels of HDL. They have also genotyped 523 individuals from European, Asian, Chinese, and Afro-Caribbean populations and have found complete association between the sites encoding residues 2,712 and 4,311 in all of these samples, although there are large allele frequency differences between these populations. Taken together, these data suggest that, since the divergence of the major ethnic groups, there has been little or no recombination in the 3' end of the human apo B gene.

  1. Evolutionary triangulation: informing genetic association studies with evolutionary evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Minjun; Graham, Britney E; Zhang, Ge; Harder, Reed; Kodaman, Nuri; Moore, Jason H; Muglia, Louis; Williams, Scott M

    2016-01-01

    Genetic studies of human diseases have identified many variants associated with pathogenesis and severity. However, most studies have used only statistical association to assess putative relationships to disease, and ignored other factors for evaluation. For example, evolution is a factor that has shaped disease risk, changing allele frequencies as human populations migrated into and inhabited new environments. Since many common variants differ among populations in frequency, as does disease prevalence, we hypothesized that patterns of disease and population structure, taken together, will inform association studies. Thus, the population distributions of allelic risk variants should reflect the distributions of their associated diseases. Evolutionary Triangulation (ET) exploits this evolutionary differentiation by comparing population structure among three populations with variable patterns of disease prevalence. By selecting populations based on patterns where two have similar rates of disease that differ substantially from a third, we performed a proof of principle analysis for this method. We examined three disease phenotypes, lactase persistence, melanoma, and Type 2 diabetes mellitus. We show that for lactase persistence, a phenotype with a simple genetic architecture, ET identifies the key gene, lactase. For melanoma, ET identifies several genes associated with this disease and/or phenotypes related to it, such as skin color genes. ET was less obviously successful for Type 2 diabetes mellitus, perhaps because of the small effect sizes in known risk loci and recent environmental changes that have altered disease risk. Alternatively, ET may have revealed new genes involved in conferring disease risk for diabetes that did not meet nominal GWAS significance thresholds. We also compared ET to another method used to filter for phenotype associated genes, population branch statistic (PBS), and show that ET performs better in identifying genes known to associate with

  2. Determination of allele frequency in pooled DNA: comparison of three PCR-based methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkening, Stefan; Hemminki, Kari; Thirumaran, Ranjit Kumar; Bermejo, Justo Lorenzo; Bonn, Stefan; Försti, Asta; Kumar, Rajiv

    2005-12-01

    Determination of allele frequency in pooled DNA samples is a powerful and efficient tool for large-scale association studies. In this study, we tested and compared three PCR-based methods for accuracy, reproducibility, cost, and convenience. The methods compared were: (i) real-time PCR with allele-specific primers, (ii) real-time PCR with allele-specific TaqMan probes, and (iii) quantitative sequencing. Allele frequencies of three single nucleotide polymorphisms in three different genes were estimated from pooled DNA. The pools were made of genomic DNA samples from 96 cases with basal cell carcinoma of the skin and 96 healthy controls with known genotypes. In this study, the allele frequency estimation made by real-time PCR with allele-specific primers had the smallest median deviation (MD) from the real allele frequency with 1.12% (absolute percentage points) and was also the cheapest method. However; this method required the most time for optimization and showed the highest variation between replicates (SD = 6.47%). Quantitative sequencing, the simplest method, was found to have intermediate accuracies (MD = 1.44%, SD = 4.2%). Real-time PCR with TaqMan probes, a convenient but very expensive method, had an MD of 1.47% and the lowest variation between replicates (SD = 3.18%).

  3. Design of association studies with pooled or un-pooled next-generation sequencing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Su Yeon; Li, Yingrui; Guo, Yiran

    2010-01-01

    Most common hereditary diseases in humans are complex and multifactorial. Large-scale genome-wide association studies based on SNP genotyping have only identified a small fraction of the heritable variation of these diseases. One explanation may be that many rare variants (a minor allele frequency...

  4. Genome-wide association study of insect bite hypersensitivity in Dutch Shetland pony mares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurink, A; Ducro, B J; Bastiaansen, J W M; Frankena, K; van Arendonk, J A M

    2013-02-01

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is the most common allergic disease present in horses worldwide. It has been shown that IBH is under genetic control, but the knowledge of associated genes is limited. We conducted a genome-wide association study to identify and quantify genomic regions contributing to IBH in the Dutch Shetland pony population. A total of 97 cases and 91 controls were selected and matched on withers height, coat colour and pedigree to minimise the population stratification. A blood sample was collected from participating Shetland pony mares, their IBH phenotype was scored and the owner filled in a questionnaire. A total of 40 021 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were fitted in a univariable logistic model fitting an additive effect. Analysis revealed no effects of population stratification. Significant associations with IBH were detected for 24 SNPs on 12 chromosomes [-log(10) (P-value) > 2.5]. Odds ratios of allele substitution effects of the unfavourable allele were between 1.94 and 5.95. The most significant SNP was found on chromosome 27, with an odds ratio of 2.31 and with an allele frequency of the unfavourable allele of 0.72 in cases and 0.53 in controls. Genome-wide association studies on additional horse populations are desired to validate the identified associations, to identify the genes involved in IBH and to develop genomic tools to decrease IBH prevalence.

  5. Identification of transcriptome SNPs for assessing allele-specific gene expression in a super-hybrid rice Xieyou9308.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongrong Zhai

    Full Text Available Hybridization, a common process in nature, can give rise to a vast reservoir of allelic variants. Combination of these allelic variants may result in novel patterns of gene action and is thought to contribute to heterosis. In this study, we analyzed genome-wide allele-specific gene expression (ASGE in the super-hybrid rice variety Xieyou9308 using RNA sequencing technology (RNA-Seq. We identified 9325 reliable single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs distributed throughout the genome. Nearly 68% of the identified polymorphisms were CT and GA SNPs between R9308 and Xieqingzao B, suggesting the existence of DNA methylation, a heritable epigenetic mark, in the parents and their F1 hybrid. Of 2793 identified transcripts with consistent allelic biases, only 480 (17% showed significant allelic biases during tillering and/or heading stages, implying that trans effects may mediate most transcriptional differences in hybrid offspring. Approximately 67% and 62% of the 480 transcripts showed R9308 allelic expression biases at tillering and heading stages, respectively. Transcripts with higher levels of gene expression in R9308 also exhibited R9308 allelic biases in the hybrid. In addition, 125 transcripts were identified with significant allelic expression biases at both stages, of which 74% showed R9308 allelic expression biases. R9308 alleles may tend to preserve their characteristic states of activity in the hybrid and may play important roles in hybrid vigor at both stages. The allelic expression of 355 transcripts was highly stage-specific, with divergent allelic expression patterns observed at different developmental stages. Many transcripts associated with stress resistance were differently regulated in the F1 hybrid. The results of this study may provide valuable insights into molecular mechanisms of heterosis.

  6. Genome-wide association study of colorectal cancer in Hispanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, Stephanie L.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Edlund, Christopher K.; Conti, David V.; Ihenacho, Ugonna; Wan, Peggy; Van Den Berg, David; Casey, Graham; Fortini, Barbara K.; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A.; Moreno-Macías, Hortensia; Huerta-Chagoya, Alicia; Ordóñez-Sánchez, María Luisa; Rodríguez-Guillén, Rosario; Cruz-Bautista, Ivette; Rodríguez-Torres, Maribel; Muñóz-Hernández, Linda Liliana; Arellano-Campos, Olimpia; Gómez, Donají; Alvirde, Ulices; González-Villalpando, Clicerio; González-Villalpando, María Elena; Le Marchand, Loic; Haiman, Christopher A.; Figueiredo, Jane C.

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 58 susceptibility alleles across 37 regions associated with the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) with P < 5×10−8. Most studies have been conducted in non-Hispanic whites and East Asians; however, the generalizability of these findings and the potential for ethnic-specific risk variation in Hispanic and Latino (HL) individuals have been largely understudied. We describe the first GWAS of common genetic variation contributing to CRC risk in HL (1611 CRC cases and 4330 controls). We also examine known susceptibility alleles and implement imputation-based fine-mapping to identify potential ethnicity-specific association signals in known risk regions. We discovered 17 variants across 4 independent regions that merit further investigation due to suggestive CRC associations (P < 1×10−6) at 1p34.3 (rs7528276; Odds Ratio (OR) = 1.86 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.47–2.36); P = 2.5×10−7], 2q23.3 (rs1367374; OR = 1.37 (95% CI: 1.21–1.55); P = 4.0×10−7), 14q24.2 (rs143046984; OR = 1.65 (95% CI: 1.36–2.01); P = 4.1×10−7) and 16q12.2 [rs142319636; OR = 1.69 (95% CI: 1.37–2.08); P=7.8×10−7]. Among the 57 previously published CRC susceptibility alleles with minor allele frequency ≥1%, 76.5% of SNPs had a consistent direction of effect and 19 (33.3%) were nominally statistically significant (P < 0.05). Further, rs185423955 and rs60892987 were identified as novel secondary susceptibility variants at 3q26.2 (P = 5.3×10–5) and 11q12.2 (P = 6.8×10−5), respectively. Our findings demonstrate the importance of fine mapping in HL. These results are informative for variant prioritization in functional studies and future risk prediction modeling in minority populations. PMID:27207650

  7. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); C. Kartsonaki (Christiana); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); P. Soucy (Penny); L. McGuffog (Lesley); S. Healey (Sue); A. Lee (Andrew); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); E. Cattaneo (Elisa); M. Barile (Monica); V. Pensotti (Valeria); B. Pasini (Barbara); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); A.L. Putignano; L. Varesco (Liliana); P. Radice (Paolo); P.L. Mai (Phuong); M.H. Greene (Mark); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); G. Glendon (Gord); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); M. Thomassen (Mads); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; D. Cruger (Dorthe); M.A. Caligo (Maria); Y. Laitman (Yael); R. Milgrom (Roni); B. Kaufman (Bella); S. Paluch-Shimon (Shani); E. Friedman (Eitan); N. Loman (Niklas); K. Harbst (Katja); A. Lindblom (Annika); B. Melin (Beatrice); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); J. Gronwald (Jacek); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); T. Byrski (Tomasz); C. Cybulski (Cezary); B. Górski (Bohdan); A. Osorio (Ana); T.R. Cajal; F. Fostira (Florentia); R. Andres (Raquel); J. Benitez (Javier); U. Hamann (Ute); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); M.A. Rookus (Matti); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); M.R. Nelen (Marcel); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); P. Devilee (Peter); H. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); E.B.G. Garcia; S. Peock (Susan); M. Cook (Margaret); D. Frost; R. Platte (Radka); J. Leyland (Jean); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); R. Eeles (Rosalind); L. Izatt (Louise); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); D. Eccles (Diana); K.-R. Ong; F. Douglas (Fiona); J. Paterson (Joan); M.J. Kennedy (John); Z. Miedzybrodzka (Zosia); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); B. Buecher (Bruno); M. Belotti (Muriel); C. Tirapo (Carole); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); L. Barjhoux (Laure); C. Lasset (Christine); D. Leroux (Dominique); L. Faivre (Laurence); M. Bronner (Myriam); F. Prieur (Fabienne); C. Nogues (Catherine); E. Rouleau (Etienne); P. Pujol (Pascal); I. Coupier (Isabelle); M. Frenay (Marc); J. Hopper (John); M.J. Daly (Mark); M-B. Terry (Mary-beth); E.M. John (Esther); S.S. Buys (Saundra); Y. Yassin (Yosuf); A. Miron (Alexander); D. Goldgar (David); C.F. Singer (Christian); M.-K. Tea; G. Pfeiler (Georg); C. Dressler (Catherina); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); L. Jønson (Lars); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); T. Kircchoff (Tomas); K. Offit (Kenneth); M. Piedmonte (Marion); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); L. Small (Laurie); J.F. Boggess (John); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); J. Basil (Jack); M. Azodi (Masoud); A.E. Toland (Amanda); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Tognazzo (Silvia); S. Agata (Simona); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); L. Sucheston (Lara); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); C.S. Walsh (Christine); E. Olah (Edith); A. Bozsik (Aniko); S.-H. Teo; J.L. Seldon (Joyce); M.S. Beattie (Mary); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); M.D. Sluiter (Michelle); O. Diez (Orland); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); C. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); I. Ruehl (Ina); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); K. Kast (Karin); H. Deissler (Helmut); D. Niederacher (Dieter); N. Arnold (Norbert); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); I. Schönbuchner (Ines); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); M. Dumont (Martine); J. Chiquette (Jocelyne); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); J. Beesley (Jonathan); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); X. Wang (Xing); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); F.J. Couch (Fergus); J. Simard (Jacques); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); P. Karlsson (Per); M. Nordling (Margareta); A. Bergman (Annika); Z. Einbeigi (Zakaria); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (M.); S. Liedgren (Sigrun); Å. Borg (Åke); H. Olsson (Hans); U. Kristoffersson (Ulf); H. Jernström (H.); K. Henriksson (Karin); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); A. Liljegren (Annelie); G. Barbany-Bustinza (Gisela); J. Rantala (Johanna); H. Grönberg (Henrik); E.-L. Stattin; M. Emanuelsson (Monica); R.R. Brandell; N. Dahl (Niklas); S. Verhoef; M. Verheus (Martijn); L.J. van 't Veer (Laura); F.E. van Leeuwen; J.M. Collee (Margriet); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); A. Jager (Agnes); M.M.A. Tilanus-Linthorst (Madeleine); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); M.P. Vreeswijk (Maaike); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); M.J. Ligtenberg (Marjolijn); N. Hoogerbrugge (Nicoline); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); J.J.P. Gille (Jan); Q. Waisfisz (Quinten); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); C.E. van Roozendaal (Cees); M.J. Blok (Marinus); B. Caanen; J.C. Oosterwijk; A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); M.J. Mourits; H.F. Vasen (Hans); H. Gregory (Helen); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); L. Jeffers (Lisa); T.J. Cole (Trevor); C. McKeown (Carole); J. Hoffman (Jonathan); A. Donaldson (Alan); S. Downing (Sarah); A. Taylor (Amy); A. Murray (Alexandra); M.T. Rogers (Mark); E. McCann (Emma); M.E. Porteous (Mary); S. Drummond (Sarah); C. Brewer (Carole); E. Kivuva (Emma); A. Searle (Anne); S. Goodman (Selina); K. Hill (Kathryn); V. Murday (Victoria); N. Bradshaw (Nicola); L. Snadden (Lesley); M. Longmuir (Mark); C. Watt (Catherine); S. Gibson (Sarah); E. Haque (Eshika); E. Tobias (Ed); A. Duncan (Alexis); C. Jacobs (Chris); C. Langman (Caroline); A. Whaite (Anna); H. Dorkins (Huw); J. Barwell (Julian); C. Chu (Chengbin); J. Miller (Julie); I.O. Ellis (Ian); C. Houghton (Catherine); L. Side (Lucy); A. Male (Alison); C. Berlin (Cheryl); J. Eason (Jacqueline); R. Collier (Rebecca); O. Claber (Oonagh); I. Jobson (Irene); L.J. Walker (Lisa); D. McLeod (Diane); D. Halliday (Dorothy); S. Durell (Sarah); B. Stayner (Barbara); S. Shanley (Susan); N. Rahman (Nazneen); R. Houlston (Richard); E. Bancroft (Elizabeth); L. D'Mello (Lucia); E. Page (Elizabeth); A. Ardern-Jones (Audrey); K. Kohut (Kelly); J. Wiggins (Jennifer); E. Castro (Elena); A. Mitra (Anita); L. Robertson (Lisa); O. Quarrell (Oliver); C. Bardsley (Cathryn); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); D.E. Barton (David); S. Goff (Sheila); G. Brice (Glen); L. Winchester (Lizzie); C. Eddy (Charlotte); V. Tripathi (Vishakha); V. Attard (Virginia); A. Lucassen (Anneke); G. Crawford (Gillian); D. McBride (Donna); S. Smalley (Sarah); J.W. Adlard (Julian); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractTwo single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility var

  8. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Sinilnikova, Olga M

    2011-01-01

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility variants: rs...... to a better understanding of the biology of tumour development in these women....

  9. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antoniou, Antonis C.; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Soucy, Penny; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Cattaneo, Elisa; Barile, Monica; Pensotti, Valeria; Pasini, Barbara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Giannini, Giuseppe; Putignano, Anna Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Radice, Paolo; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Crueger, Dorthe G.; Caligo, Maria A.; Laitman, Yael; Milgrom, Roni; Kaufman, Bella; Paluch-Shimon, Shani; Friedman, Eitan; Loman, Niklas; Harbst, Katja; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Ehrencrona, Hans; Melin, Beatrice; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Gorski, Bohdan; Osorio, Ana; Ramon y Cajal, Teresa; Fostira, Florentia; Andres, Raquel; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Rookus, Matti A.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Nelen, Marcel R.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; van Os, Theo A. M.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Devilee, Peter; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Garcia, Encarna B. Gomez; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Leyland, Jean; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Ong, Kai-ren; Cook, Jackie; Douglas, Fiona; Paterson, Joan; Kennedy, M. John; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Godwin, Andrew; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Buecher, Bruno; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Faivre, Laurence; Bronner, Myriam; Prieur, Fabienne; Nogues, Catherine; Rouleau, Etienne; Pujol, Pascal; Coupier, Isabelle; Frenay, Marc; Hopper, John L.; Daly, Mary B.; Terry, Mary B.; John, Esther M.; Buys, Saundra S.; Yassin, Yosuf; Miron, Alexander; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F.; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Dressler, Anne Catharina; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Jonson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Barkardottir, Rosa Bjork; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Offit, Kenneth; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Small, Laurie; Boggess, John; Blank, Stephanie; Basil, Jack; Azodi, Masoud; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine S.; Olah, Edith; Bozsik, Aniko; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Seldon, Joyce L.; Beattie, Mary S.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Sluiter, Michelle D.; Diez, Orland; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Kast, Karin; Deissler, Helmut; Niederacher, Dieter; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Schoenbuchner, Ines; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Dumont, Martine; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tischkowitz, Marc; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Fredericksen, Zachary; Wang, Xianshu; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Couch, Fergus; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2011-01-01

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility variants: rs112

  10. Association of the 5HTR2A gene with suicidal behavior: CASE-control study and updated meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Castro Thelma Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The polymorphism rs6313 (T102C has been associated with suicidal behavior in case–control and meta-analysis studies, but results and conclusions remain controversial. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between T102C with suicidal behavior in a case–control study and, to assess the combined evidence – this case–control study and available data from other related studies – we carried out a meta-analysis. Methods We conducted a case–control study that included 161 patients with suicide attempts and 244 controls; we then performed a meta-analysis. The following models were evaluated in the meta-analysis: A C allele vs T allele; B T allele vs C allele; C Caucasian population, D Asian population, and E suicide attempters with schizophrenia. Results We found an association between attempted suicide and control participants for genotype (χ2=6.28, p=0.04, df=2 and allele (χ2=6.17, p=0.01, df=1, OR 1.48 95% IC: 1.08-2.03 frequencies in the case–control study. The meta-analysis, comprising 23 association studies (including the present one, showed that the rs6313 polymorphism is not associated with suicidal behavior for the following comparisons:T allele vs C allele (OR: 1.03; 95% CI 0.93-1.13; p(Z=0.44; C allele vs T allele: (OR:0.99; 95% CI: 0.90-1.08; p(Z=0.22; Caucasians (OR:1.09; 95% CI: 0.96-1.23, and Asians (OR:0.96; 95% CI: 0.84-1.09. Conclusion Our results showed association between the rs6313 (T102C polymorphism and suicidal behavior in the case–control study. However, the meta-analysis showed no evidence of association. Therefore, more studies are necessary to determine conclusively an association between T102C and suicidal behavior.

  11. CYP2C9*2 allele increases risk for hypoglycemia in POR*1/*1 type 2 diabetic patients treated with sulfonylureas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragia, G; Tavridou, A; Elens, L; Van Schaik, R H N; Manolopoulos, V G

    2014-01-01

    It is previously shown that carriers of the defective allele CYP2C9*3 that leads to impaired sulfonylurea metabolism are at increased sulfonylurea-induced hypoglycemia risk due to diminished drug metabolism, whereas no effect of CYP2C9*2 allele was found. Recently, a polymorphism in P450 oxidoreductase (POR) gene, assigned as POR*28 allele, was associated with increased CYP2C9 activity. The aim of this study was to assess i) the effect of POR*28 allele on sulfonylurea-induced hypoglycemia risk and ii) the association of CYP2C9*2 allele with hypoglycemia risk in non-carriers of POR*28 allele. The study group consisted of 176 patients with diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treated with sulfonylureas, of whom 92 patients had experienced at least one drug-associated hypoglycemic event (cases), while 84 had never experienced a hypoglycemic event (controls). POR*28 allele was detected by use of real-time TaqMan PCR. POR*28 allele was not associated with sulfonyl-urea-induced hypoglycemia. In POR*1/*1 patients, CYP2C9*1/*2 genotype was more common in cases than in controls (32.7 vs. 14.3%, p=0.041). In a model adjusted for age, BMI, duration of T2DM and renal function, and POR*1/*1 entered as a selection variable, CYP2C9*2 allele increased the hypoglycemia risk in response to sulfonylurea (odds ratio: 3.218, p=0.031). In conclusion, our results suggest that POR*28 allele is masking the association of CYP2C9*2 allele with sulfonyl-urea-induced hypoglycemia. Therefore, POR*28 allele is an important source of CYP2C9 activity variability and combined with CYP2C9 gene poly-morphisms may explain individual variability in the effect of sulfonylureas.

  12. The association between small vessel infarcts and the activities of amyloid-β peptide degrading proteases in apolipoprotein E4 allele carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haihao; Bhadelia, Rafeeque A; Liu, Zhiheng; Vu, Linh; Li, Huajie; Scott, Tammy; Bergethon, Peter; Mwamburi, Mkaya; Rosenzweig, James L; Rosenberg, Irwine; Qiu, Wei Qiao

    2013-11-01

    Small vessel (SV) and large vessel (LV) brain infarcts are distinct pathologies. Using a homebound elderly sample, the numbers of either infarct subtypes were similar between those apolipoprotein E4 allele (ApoE4) carriers (n = 80) and noncarriers (n = 243). We found that the higher the number of SV infarcts, but not LV infarcts, a participant had, the higher the activity of substrate V degradation in serum especially among ApoE4 carriers (β = +0.154, SE = 0.031, P ApoE4.

  13. Power assessment for genetic association study of human longevity using offspring of long-lived subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Qihua; Zhao, Jing Hua; Li, Shuxia;

    2010-01-01

    Recently, an indirect genetic association approach that compares genotype frequencies in offspring of long-lived subjects and offspring from random families has been introduced to study gene-longevity associations. Although the indirect genetic association has certain advantages over the direct...... and the proportional hazard model for generating individual lifespan. Family genotype data is generated using a genetic linkage program for given SNP allele frequency. Power is estimated by setting the type I error rate at 0.05 and by calculating the Armitage's chi-squared test statistic for 200 replicate samples...... for each setting of the specified allele risk and frequency parameters under different modes of inheritance and for different sample sizes. The indirect genetic association analysis is a valid approach for studying gene-longevity association, but the sample size requirement is about 3-4 time larger than...

  14. Rare alleles within the CYP2E1 (MEOS system) could be associated with better short-term health outcome after acute methanol poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubacek, Jaroslav A; Pelclova, Daniela; Seidl, Zdenek; Vaneckova, Manuela; Klempir, Jiri; Ruzicka, Evzen; Ridzon, Petr; Urban, Pavel; Fenclova, Zdenka; Petrik, Vit; Diblik, Pavel; Kuthan, Pavel; Miovsky, Michal; Janikova, Barbara; Adamkova, Vera; Zakharov, Sergey

    2015-02-01

    Genetic polymorphisms influence the metabolism of ethanol and methanol, but the potential effects of genetic predisposition on the clinical course, outcome and short-term health sequelae of acute methanol poisoning are unknown. To evaluate the role of the MEOS system in methanol poisoning, we analysed the effect of three polymorphisms (RsaI - rs2031920; PstI - rs3813867; insertion/deletion I/D) within the CYP2E1 enzyme (MEOS system) in 50 adult survivors of methanol poisoning and compared their genotype frequencies with 460 controls. The minor allele frequencies of all three polymorphisms were below 5% in both groups. We did not detect significant differences in the genotype frequencies between survivors of methanol poisoning and controls (p = 0.34 for the RsaI variant; p = 0.59 for the PstI variant and p = 0.21 for the I/D polymorphism). The carriers of at least one minor allele in the CYP2E1 gene had less severe clinical symptoms and better short-term outcome after acute poisoning. Variants within the CYP2E1 gene are likely not significant genetic determinants of acute methanol poisoning (if survivors are analysed), but they may influence the severity of methanol poisoning and its visual/central nervous system (CNS) outcome.

  15. A functional polymorphism in the Eta-1 promoter is associated with allele specific binding to the transcription factor Sp1 and elevated gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshoj, Tina; Ryder, Lars P; Madsen, Hans O

    2005-01-01

    Early T lymphocyte activator 1 (Eta-1), also known as Osteopontin, is a cytokine produced by macrophages and T lymphocytes. It is involved in the regulation of IL-12 and IL-10 expression in macrophages and stimulates the polarization of T cells to the Th1 subset. Three promoter polymorphisms...... of the human Eta-1 gene, -443T/C, -156delG/G, -66T/G, were investigated for possible influence on gene expression. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) with nuclear extract from the human myeloid leukaemia premonocyte cell line, THP-1, revealed sequence specific binding of the transcription factor Sp1...... to the -66T allele but not the -66G allele, and haplotype -443C/-156G/-66T showed a marked increase in promoter activity of a luciferase reporter gene. Thus, a substitution of the T-base with G at position -66 in the Eta-1 promoter modulates the promoter activity of the Eta-1 gene, which might influence...

  16. Distribution of BoLA-DRB3 allelic frequencies and identification of a new allele in the iranian cattle breed sistani (Bos indicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, A; Nassiry, M R; Mosafer, J; Mohammadabadi, M R; Sulimova, G E

    2009-02-01

    The distribution of the frequencies of BoLA-DRB3 gene alleles in the Iranian cattle breed Sistani was studied by the PCR-RFLP ("hemi-nested") assay using restriction endonucleases RsaI, HaeIII and BstYI. In the examined cattle breed (65 animals) 32 alleles have been identified one of which being described for the first time (6.15% frequency). The nucleotide sequence of the polymorphic region of exon 2 of this allele has been determined and submitted in the GeneBank database under accession number DQ486519. The submitted sequence has maximum homology (92%) with the previously described sequence DRB3-mRNA from Bos indicus (AccN X79346) and differs from it by 24 nucleotide substitutions which result in 16 amino acid substitutions. The peptide (on the basis of the reconstructed amino acid sequence) has 89% identity to the sequence encoded by the BIDRBF 188 locus (Bos indicus). The results obtained permit the sequence described by us to be considered as a new allele of the BoLA-DRB3 gene (DRB3.2**X). The total frequency of the main six alleles (DRB3.2*X, *10, *11, *20, *34 and *X) occurring with a frequency of over 5% is about 60% in Iranian Sistani cattle. Fifteen alleles have DRB3.2*8 allele (21.54%) like in other previously described breeds of Bos indicus (up to 23.07%). The Iranian breed Sistani has a high level of similarity by the spectrum of BoLA-DRB3 alleles and their frequencies to other Bos indicus breeds and significantly differs by these criteria from the Bos taurus breeds. The Iranian Sistani herd under study includes alleles associated with to resistance to leukemia (DRB3.2*ll and *23) and to different forms of mastitis (DRB3.2*2, *7, *11, *23 and *24) although their frequencies are low (from 0.77 to 5.37%). On the whole, a high level of diversity of BoLA-DRB3 gene alleles and the availability of alleles associated with resistance to different diseases makes this breed of interest for breeding practice.

  17. Power for genetic association study of human longevity using the case-control design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Qihua; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhang, Dongfeng

    2008-01-01

    The efficiency of the popular case-control design in gene-longevity association studies needs to be verified because, different from a binary trait, longevity represents only the extreme end of the continuous life span distribution without a clear cutoff for defining the phenotype. In this paper...... for rare alleles with multiplicative or dominant effects, it performs poorly for rare recessive alleles. Power is drastically reduced when nonagenarians are considered cases, with a more than 5-fold difference in the size of the case sample required to achieve comparable power as that found...

  18. Detecting rare variants in case-parents association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang-Fu Cheng

    Full Text Available Despite the success of genome-wide association studies (GWASs in detecting common variants (minor allele frequency ≥0.05 many suggested that rare variants also contribute to the genetic architecture of diseases. Recently, researchers demonstrated that rare variants can show a strong stratification which may not be corrected by using existing methods. In this paper, we focus on a case-parents study and consider methods for testing group-wise association between multiple rare (and common variants in a gene region and a disease. All tests depend on the numbers of transmitted mutant alleles from parents to their diseased children across variants and hence they are robust to the effect of population stratification. We use extensive simulation studies to compare the performance of four competing tests: the largest single-variant transmission disequilibrium test (TDT, multivariable test, combined TDT, and a likelihood ratio test based on a random-effects model. We find that the likelihood ratio test is most powerful in a wide range of settings and there is no negative impact to its power performance when common variants are also included in the analysis. If deleterious and protective variants are simultaneously analyzed, the likelihood ratio test was generally insensitive to the effect directionality, unless the effects are extremely inconsistent in one direction.

  19. The Preliminary Study on Relationship between HPV-associated Cervical Cancer and p53 Codon 72 Polymorphism in Sichuan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIMingrong; HEYuedong; YANGXiaoyun; HOUMinmin; CAOZeyi

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between HPV-associated cervical cancer and p53 codon 72 polymorphism in Sichuan Province. Methods: Three groups of women were studied: 30 women for normal control; 30 women with ovarian cancer; 50 women with cervical cancer. DNA from peripheral blood samples and from pathologic tissue sections was examined by PCR with allele-specific primers. Results:The proportions of individuals homozygons for the arginine allele, homozygous for the proline allele and heterozygous for the two alleles were 33.3%, 6.7% and 60% respectively among normal women; 40%, 6.7% and 53.3% in women with ovarian cancer respectively; 80%, 6% and 14% in women with cervical cancer respectively. X2 analysis showed significant differences in the proportions. Conclusion: In this population,individuals homozygons for the arginine variant of codon 72 of the p53 gene were at increased risk of cervical cancer.

  20. Plasminogen alleles influence susceptibility to invasive aspergillosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee K Zaas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis (IA is a common and life-threatening infection in immunocompromised individuals. A number of environmental and epidemiologic risk factors for developing IA have been identified. However, genetic factors that affect risk for developing IA have not been clearly identified. We report that host genetic differences influence outcome following establishment of pulmonary aspergillosis in an exogenously immune suppressed mouse model. Computational haplotype-based genetic analysis indicated that genetic variation within the biologically plausible positional candidate gene plasminogen (Plg; Gene ID 18855 correlated with murine outcome. There was a single nonsynonymous coding change (Gly110Ser where the minor allele was found in all of the susceptible strains, but not in the resistant strains. A nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (Asp472Asn was also identified in the human homolog (PLG; Gene ID 5340. An association study within a cohort of 236 allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT recipients revealed that alleles at this SNP significantly affected the risk of developing IA after HSCT. Furthermore, we demonstrated that plasminogen directly binds to Aspergillus fumigatus. We propose that genetic variation within the plasminogen pathway influences the pathogenesis of this invasive fungal infection.

  1. Identification of β-globin haplotypes linked to sickle hemoglobin (Hb S) alleles in Mazandaran province, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghajani, Faeghe; Mahdavi, Mohammad Reza; Kosaryan, Mehrnoush; Mahdavi, Mehrad; Hamidi, Mohaddese; Jalali, Hossein

    2016-12-21

    Carrier frequency of the β(S) allele has been reported to be 0.19% in Mazandaran province, northern Iran. Haplotype analysis of the β(S) allele helps trace the origin of its encoded hemoglobin (Hb) variant, Hb S, in a region. The aim of this study was to investigate the haplotypes associated with β(S) alleles in Mazandaran province. Capillary electrophoresis was carried out to detect individuals suspected to have a βS allele(s). DNA analysis (PCR-RFLP) was used for final confirmation. To identify 5\\' to 3\\' β-globin gene cluster haplotypes associated with β(S) alleles, family linkage analysis was applied. Six polymorphic sites (HincII 5' to ε, XmnI 5' to (G)γ, HindIII in (G)γ, HindIII in (A)γ, HincII 3' to ψβ and AvaII in β) were investigated using the PCR-RFLP method. Five different haplotypes were linked to β(S) alleles, while β(A) alleles were associated with nine haplotypes. Among the β(S) alleles, 53.9% were associated with the Benin (----++) haplotype, and the Arab-Indian (+++-++) haplotype had the second-highest frequency (23%). Unlike southern provinces, where the Arab-Indian haplotype is prominent, the Benin haplotype is the most frequent haplotype in northern Iran, and this may represent a founder effect. Since the Benin haplotype does not carry the XmnI polymorphism 5' to the (G)γ gene, which is responsible for high expression of Hb F, a severe form of sickle cell disease can be anticipated in patients that are homozygous for the β(S) allele in the northern region.

  2. HLA allele distribution distinguishes sporadic inclusion body myositis from hereditary inclusion body myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffman, B M; Sivakumar, K; Simonis, T; Stroncek, D; Dalakas, M C

    1998-04-15

    We studied the HLA class II associations in patients with sporadic inclusion body myositis (s-IBM) and hereditary inclusion body myopathies (h-IBM) and attempted to distinguish these myopathies on the basis of HLA allele assignments. Forty-five patients, 30 with s-IBM and 15 with h-IBM, underwent HLA class II allele-specific typing using polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific primers for 71 alleles contained in the DRbeta1, DRbeta3-5, and DQbeta1 loci. In s-IBM, we found a high (up to 77%) frequency of DRbeta1*0301, DRbeta3*0101 (or DRbeta3*0202) and DQbeta1*0201 alleles. No significant association with alleles in the DR and DQ haplotypes was found among the 15 h-IBM patients. The strong association of prominent alleles with s-IBM, but not h-IBM, suggests that s-IBM is a distinct disorder with an immunogenetic background that differs from h-IBM.

  3. The Effect of CYP2B6, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4 Alleles on Methadone Binding: A Molecular Docking Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nik Nur Syazana Bt Nik Mohamed Kamal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Current methadone maintenance therapy (MMT is yet to ensure 100% successful treatment as the optimum dosage has yet to be determined. Overdose leads to death while lower dose causes the opioid withdrawal effect. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP in cytochrome P450s (CYPs, the methadone metabolizers, have been showen to be the main factor for the interindividual variability of methadone clinical effects. In this study, we investigated the effect of SNPs in three major methadone metabolizers (CYP2B6, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4 on methadone binding affinity. Results showed that CYP2B6*11, CYP2B6*12, CYP2B6*18, and CYP3A4*12 have significantly higher binding affinity to R-methadone compared to wild type. S-methadone has higher binding affinity in CYP3A4*3, CYP3A4*11, and CYP3A4*12 compared to wild type. R-methadone was shown to be the active form of methadone; thus individuals with CYP alleles that binds better to R-methadone will have higher methadone metabolism rate. Therefore, a higher dosage of methadone is necessary to obtain the opiate effect compared to a normal individual and vice versa. These results provide an initial prediction on methadone metabolism rate for individuals with mutant type CYP which enables prescription of optimum methadone dosage for individuals with CYP alleles.

  4. A unified framework integrating parent-of-origin effects for association study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feifei Xiao

    Full Text Available Genetic imprinting is the most well-known cause for parent-of-origin effect (POE whereby a gene is differentially expressed depending on the parental origin of the same alleles. Genetic imprinting is related to several human disorders, including diabetes, breast cancer, alcoholism, and obesity. This phenomenon has been shown to be important for normal embryonic development in mammals. Traditional association approaches ignore this important genetic phenomenon. In this study, we generalize the natural and orthogonal interactions (NOIA framework to allow for estimation of both main allelic effects and POEs. We develop a statistical (Stat-POE model that has the orthogonal estimates of parameters including the POEs. We conducted simulation studies for both quantitative and qualitative traits to evaluate the performance of the statistical and functional models with different levels of POEs. Our results showed that the newly proposed Stat-POE model, which ensures orthogonality of variance components if Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE or equal minor and major allele frequencies is satisfied, had greater power for detecting the main allelic additive effect than a Func-POE model, which codes according to allelic substitutions, for both quantitative and qualitative traits. The power for detecting the POE was the same for the Stat-POE and Func-POE models under HWE for quantitative traits.

  5. Interrogation of allelic chromatin states in human cells by high-density ChIP-genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Nicholas; Adoue, Véronique; Ge, Bing; Chen, Shu-Huang; Kwan, Tony; Pastinen, Tomi

    2014-09-01

    Allele-specific (AS) assessment of chromatin has the potential to elucidate specific cis-regulatory mechanisms, which are predicted to underlie the majority of the known genetic associations to complex disease. However, development of chromatin landscapes at allelic resolution has been challenging since sites of variable signal strength require substantial read depths not commonly applied in sequencing based approaches. In this study, we addressed this by performing parallel analyses of input DNA and chromatin immunoprecipitates (ChIP) on high-density Illumina genotyping arrays. Allele-specificity for the histone modifications H3K4me1, H3K4me3, H3K27ac, H3K27me3, and H3K36me3 was assessed using ChIP samples generated from 14 lymphoblast and 6 fibroblast cell lines. AS-ChIP SNPs were combined into domains and validated using high-confidence ChIP-seq sites. We observed characteristic patterns of allelic-imbalance for each histone-modification around allele-specifically expressed transcripts. Notably, we found H3K4me1 to be significantly anti-correlated with allelic expression (AE) at transcription start sites, indicating H3K4me1 allelic imbalance as a marker of AE. We also found that allelic chromatin domains exhibit population and cell-type specificity as well as heritability within trios. Finally, we observed that a subset of allelic chromatin domains is regulated by DNase I-sensitive quantitative trait loci and that these domains are significantly enriched for genome-wide association studies hits, with autoimmune disease associated SNPs specifically enriched in lymphoblasts. This study provides the first genome-wide maps of allelic-imbalance for five histone marks. Our results provide new insights into the role of chromatin in cis-regulation and highlight the need for high-depth sequencing in ChIP-seq studies along with the need to improve allele-specificity of ChIP-enrichment.

  6. Lack of evidence for association of primary sclerosing cholangitis and primary biliary cirrhosis with risk alleles for Crohn's disease in Polish patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaj Pawel

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous papers have addressed the association of mutations and polymorphisms of susceptibility genes with autoimmune inflammatory disorders. We investigated whether polymorphisms that confer susceptibility to Crohn's disease could be classified also as predisposing factors for the development of primary sclerosing cholangitis and primary biliary cirrhosis in Polish patients. Methods The study included 60 patients with CD, 77 patients with PSC, of which 61 exhibited IBD (40 UC, 8 CD, and 13 indeterminate colitis, and 144 patients with PBC. All the patients were screened against Crohn's disease associating genetic polymorphisms. The polymorphisms were chosen according to previously confirmed evidence for association with Crohn's disease, including Pro268Ser, Arg702Trp, Gly908Arg and 1007fs in NOD2/CARD15, Leu503Phe/-207G>C in SLC22A4/OCTN1/SLC22A5/OCTN2, Arg30Gln in DLG5, Thr300Ala in ATG16L1, and Arg381Gln, His3Gln and exon-3'UTR in IL23R. Genotyping was carried out using TaqMan SNP genotyping assays. Results We confirmed a strong association between three NOD2/CARD15 gene variants (Pro268Ser, OR = 2.52, 95% CI = 1.34 – 4.75; (Arg702Trp, OR = 6.65, 95% CI = 1.99 – 22.17; (1007fs, OR = 9.59, 95% CI = 3.94 – 23.29, and a weak association between both the protective OCTN1/OCTN2 CC haplotype (OR = 0.28, 95% CI = 0.08 – 0.94, and a variant of ATG16L1 gene (Thr300Ala, OR = 0.468, 95% CI = 0.24 – 0.90 with Crohn's disease. In contrast, none of the polymorphisms exhibited association with susceptibility to primary sclerosing cholangitis and primary biliary cirrhosis, including a group of primary sclerosing cholangitis patients with concurrent IBD. Conclusion Although the clinical data indicate non-random co-occurrence of inflammatory bowel disease and primary sclerosing cholangitis, consistently with the previously published studies, no genetic association was found between the genetic variants predisposing to Crohn

  7. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Sinilnikova, Olga M

    2011-01-01

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility variants: rs......11249433 at 1p11.2 and rs999737 in RAD51L1 at 14q24.1. Although previously identified breast cancer susceptibility variants have been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, the involvement of these SNPs to breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers......% CI: 0.92-1.02, P-trend = 0.20). SNP rs999737 (RAD51L1) was not associated with breast cancer risk for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers (P-trend = 0.27 and 0.30, respectively). The identification of SNPs at 6q25.1 associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers will lead...

  8. Disagreement in genotyping results of drug resistance alleles of the Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) gene by allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) assays and Sanger sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Divya; Lather, Manila; Dykes, Cherry L; Dang, Amita S; Adak, Tridibes; Singh, Om P

    2016-01-01

    The rapid spread of antimalarial drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum over the past few decades has necessitated intensive monitoring of such resistance for an effective malaria control strategy. P. falciparum dihydropteroate synthase (Pfdhps) and P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) genes act as molecular markers for resistance against the antimalarial drugs sulphadoxine and pyrimethamine, respectively. Resistance to pyrimethamine which is used as a partner drug in artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) is associated with several mutations in the Pfdhfr gene, namely A16V, N51I, C59R, S108N/T and I164L. Therefore, routine monitoring of Pfdhfr-drug-resistant alleles in a population may help in effective drug resistance management. Allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) is one of the commonly used methods for molecular genotyping of these alleles. In this study, we genotyped 55 samples of P. falciparum for allele discrimination at four codons of Pfdhfr (N51, C59, S108 and I164) by ASPCR using published methods and by Sanger's DNA sequencing method. We found that the ASPCR identified a significantly higher number of mutant alleles as compared to the DNA sequencing method. Such discrepancies arise due to the non-specificity of some of the allele-specific primer sets and due to the lack of sensitivity of Sanger's DNA sequencing method to detect minor alleles present in multiple clone infections. This study reveals the need of a highly specific and sensitive method for genotyping and detecting minor drug-resistant alleles present in multiple clonal infections.

  9. Fine genetic mapping of the Batten disease locus (CLN3) by haplotype analysis and demonstration of allelic association with chromosome 16p microsatellite loci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchison, H.M.; McKay, T.R. [Univ. College London Medical School (United Kingdom); Thompson, A.D.; Mulley, J.C.; Kozman, H.M.; Richards, R.I.; Callen, D.F. [Women and Children`s Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); Stallings, R.L.; Doggett, N.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Attwood, J. [Galton Lab., London (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1993-05-01

    Batten disease, juvenile onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by accumulation of autofluorescent lipopigment in neurons and other cell types. The disease locus (CLN3) has previously been assigned to chromosome 16p. The genetic localization of CLN3 has been refined by analyzing 70 families using a high-resolution map of 15 marker loci encompassing the CLN3 region on 16p. Crossovers in three maternal meioses allowed localization of CLN3 to the interval between D16S297 and D16S57. Within that interval alleles at three highly polymorphic dinucleotide repeat loci (D16S288, D16S298, D16S299) were found to be in strong linkage disequilibrium with CLN3. Analysis of haplotypes suggests that a majority of CLN3 chromosomes have arisen from a single founder mutation. 15 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Genome-wide association study meta-analysis identifies seven new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Eli A.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Remmers, Elaine F.; Xie, Gang; Eyre, Stephen; Thomson, Brian P.; Li, Yonghong; Kurreeman, Fina A. S.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Hinks, Anne; Guiducci, Candace; Chen, Robert; Alfredsson, Lars; Amos, Christopher I.; Ardlie, Kristin G.; Barton, Anne; Bowes, John; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Burtt, Noel P.; Catanese, Joseph J.; Coblyn, Jonathan; Coenen, Marieke JH; Costenbader, Karen H.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Crusius, J. Bart A.; Cui, Jing; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; De Jager, Phillip L.; Ding, Bo; Emery, Paul; Flynn, Edward; Harrison, Pille; Hocking, Lynne J.; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Kastner, Daniel L.; Ke, Xiayi; Lee, Annette T.; Liu, Xiangdong; Martin, Paul; Morgan, Ann W.; Padyukov, Leonid; Posthumus, Marcel D.; Radstake, Timothy RDJ; Reid, David M.; Seielstad, Mark; Seldin, Michael F.; Shadick, Nancy A.; Steer, Sophia; Tak, Paul P.; Thomson, Wendy; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H. M.; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E.; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; van Riel, Piet LCM; Weinblatt, Michael E.; Wilson, Anthony G.; Wolbink, Gert Jan; Wordsworth, Paul; Wijmenga, Cisca; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Toes, Rene E. M.; de Vries, Niek; Begovich, Ann B.; Worthington, Jane; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Klareskog, Lars; Plenge, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    To identify novel genetic risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analysis of 5,539 autoantibody positive RA cases and 20,169 controls of European descent, followed by replication in an independent set of 6,768 RA cases and 8,806 controls. Of 34 SNPs selected for replication, 7 novel RA risk alleles were identified at genome-wide significance (P<5×10−8) in analysis of all 41,282 samples. The associated SNPs are near genes of known immune function, including IL6ST, SPRED2, RBPJ, CCR6, IRF5, and PXK. We also refined the risk alleles at two established RA risk loci (IL2RA and CCL21) and confirmed the association at AFF3. These new associations bring the total number of confirmed RA risk loci to 31 among individuals of European ancestry. An additional 11 SNPs replicated at P<0.05, many of which are validated autoimmune risk alleles, suggesting that most represent bona fide RA risk alleles. PMID:20453842

  11. Forensic Loci Allele Database (FLAD): Automatically generated, permanent identifiers for sequenced forensic alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Neste, Christophe; Van Criekinge, Wim; Deforce, Dieter; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to predict if and when massively parallel sequencing of forensic STR loci will replace capillary electrophoresis as the new standard technology in forensic genetics. The main benefits of sequencing are increased multiplexing scales and SNP detection. There is not yet a consensus on how sequenced profiles should be reported. We present the Forensic Loci Allele Database (FLAD) service, made freely available on http://forensic.ugent.be/FLAD/. It offers permanent identifiers for sequenced forensic alleles (STR or SNP) and their microvariants for use in forensic allele nomenclature. Analogous to Genbank, its aim is to provide permanent identifiers for forensically relevant allele sequences. Researchers that are developing forensic sequencing kits or are performing population studies, can register on http://forensic.ugent.be/FLAD/ and add loci and allele sequences with a short and simple application interface (API).

  12. Allelic variants of melanocortin 3 receptor gene (MC3R) and weight loss in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    L. Santos, José; De la Cruz, Rolando; Holst, Claus;

    2011-01-01

    receptor gene (MC3R) have been associated with childhood obesity, higher BMI Z-score and elevated body fat percentage compared to non-carriers. The aim of this study is to assess the association in adults between allelic variants of MC3R with weight loss induced by energy-restricted diets....

  13. Evidence for schizophrenia susceptibility alleles in the Indian population: An association of neurodevelopmental genes in case-control and familial samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jajodia, Ajay; Kaur, Harpreet; Kumari, Kalpana; Gupta, Meenal; Baghel, Ruchi; Srivastava, Ankit; Sood, Mamta; Chadda, Rakesh Kumar; Jain, Sanjeev; Kukreti, Ritushree

    2015-03-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder with lifetime prevalence of ~1% worldwide. A genotyping study was conducted using a custom panel of Illumina 1536 SNPs in 840 schizophrenia cases and 876 controls (351 patients and 385 controls from North India; and 436 patients, 401 controls and 143 familial samples with 53 probands containing 37 complete and 16 incomplete trios from South India). Meta-analysis of this population of Indo-European and Dravidian ancestry identified three strongly associated variants with schizophrenia: STT3A (rs548181, p=1.47×10(-5)), NRG1 (rs17603876, p=8.66×10(-5)) and GRM7 (rs3864075, p=4.06×10(-3)). Finally, a meta-analysis was conducted comparing our data with data from the Schizophrenia Psychiatric Genome-Wide Association Study Consortium (PGC-SCZ) that supported rs548181 (p=1.39×10(-7)). In addition, combined analysis of sporadic case-control association and a transmission disequilibrium test in familial samples from South Indian population identified three associations: rs1062613 (p=3.12×10(-3)), a functional promoter variant of HTR3A; rs6710782 (p=3.50×10(-3)), an intronic variant of ERBB4; and rs891903 (p=1.05×10(-2)), an intronic variant of EBF1. The results support the risk variants observed in the earlier published work and suggest a potential role of neurodevelopmental genes in the schizophrenia pathogenesis.

  14. TP53*P72 allele influences negatively female life expectancy in a population of central Italy: cross-sectional study and genetic-demographic approach analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pietro, Fabio; Dato, Serena; Carpi, Francesco M; Corneveaux, Jason J; Serfaustini, Simona; Maoloni, Sebastiano; Mignini, Fiorenzo; Huentelman, Matthew J; Passarino, Giuseppe; Napolioni, Valerio

    2013-05-01

    The association of TP53 P72R (rs1042522) with longevity remains uncertain and varies with ethnicity. Here, we tested its association with longevity in a cross-sectional population of Central Italy (18-106 years, N = 1,072), by integrating demographic information and frequency data to account for the different survival rates between sexes through the application of a genetic-demographic approach. rs1042522 affects females longevity, showing significant associations in Comparison 2 (Age Class 3 [>91 years] vs Age Class 2 [73-91 years]) under both additive (odds ratio [OR] 0.574; p = .006) and dominant (OR 0.513; p = .006) models. The TP53*P72 allele is significantly underrepresented in Age Class 3 only in women (OR 0.575; p = .008). The genetic-demographic approach demonstrated that the frequency of female TP53*P72 carriers underwent a significant reduction after 82 years (OR 0.586; p = .002). The same analyses gave nonsignificant results in men. The discrepancies among the results obtained on rs1042522 for longevity could result from the pleiotropic effects of p53 and the potential ethnic variation of its functional variants.

  15. Medication-wide association studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.B. Ryan (Patrick); D. Madigan (David); P.E. Stang (Paul); M.J. Schuemie (Martijn); G. Hripcsak (G.)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractUndiscovered side effects of drugs can have a profound effect on the health of the nation, and electronic health-care databases offer opportunities to speed up the discovery of these side effects. We applied a "medication-wide association study" approach that combined multivariate analys

  16. SNP CHARACTERISTICS PREDICT REPLICATION SUCCESS IN ASSOCIATION STUDIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlov, Ivan P.; Moore, Jason H.; Peng, Bo; Jin, Jennifer L.; Gorlova, Olga Y.; Amos, Christopher I.

    2014-01-01

    Successful independent replication is the most direct approach for distinguishing real genotype-disease associations from false discoveries in Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). Selecting SNPs for replication has been primarily based on p-values from the discovery stage, although additional characteristics of SNPs may be used to improve replication success. We used disease-associated SNPs from more than 2,000 published GWASs to identify predictors of SNP reproducibility. SNP reproducibility was defined as a proportion of successful replications among all replication attempts. The study reporting association for the first time was considered to be discovery and all consequent studies targeting the same phenotype replications. We found that −Log(P), where P is a p-value from the discovery study, is the strongest predictor of the SNP reproducibility. Other significant predictors include type of the SNP (e.g. missense vs intronic SNPs) and minor allele frequency. Features of the genes linked to the disease-associated SNP also predict SNP reproducibility. Based on empirically defined rules, we developed a reproducibility score (RS) to predict SNP reproducibility independently of −Log(P). We used data from two lung cancer GWAS studies as well as recently reported disease-associated SNPs to validate RS. Minus Log(P) outperforms RS when the very top SNPs are selected, while RS works better with relaxed selection criteria. In conclusion, we propose an empirical model to predict SNP reproducibility, which can be used to select SNPs for validation and prioritization. PMID:25273843

  17. The minor C-allele of rs2014355 in ACADS is associated with reduced insulin release following an oral glucose load

    OpenAIRE

    Pisinger Charlotta; Lauritzen Torsten; Sandbæk Annelli; Andersson Åsa; Sandholt Camilla H; Krarup Nikolaj T; Justesen Johanne M; Banasik Karina; Hornbak Malene; Witte Daniel R; Sørensen Thorkild IA; Pedersen Oluf; Hansen Torben

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background A genome-wide association study (GWAS) using metabolite concentrations as proxies for enzymatic activity, suggested that two variants: rs2014355 in the gene encoding short-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (ACADS) and rs11161510 in the gene encoding medium-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (ACADM) impair fatty acid β-oxidation. Chronic exposure to fatty acids due to an impaired β-oxidation may down-regulate the glucose-stimulated insulin release and result in an increa...

  18. Genome-wide association study of blood pressure extremes identifies variant near UMOD associated with hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandosh Padmanabhan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a heritable and major contributor to the global burden of disease. The sum of rare and common genetic variants robustly identified so far explain only 1%-2% of the population variation in BP and hypertension. This suggests the existence of more undiscovered common variants. We conducted a genome-wide association study in 1,621 hypertensive cases and 1,699 controls and follow-up validation analyses in 19,845 cases and 16,541 controls using an extreme case-control design. We identified a locus on chromosome 16 in the 5' region of Uromodulin (UMOD; rs13333226, combined P value of 3.6 × 10⁻¹¹. The minor G allele is associated with a lower risk of hypertension (OR [95%CI]: 0.87 [0.84-0.91], reduced urinary uromodulin excretion, better renal function; and each copy of the G allele is associated with a 7.7% reduction in risk of CVD events after adjusting for age, sex, BMI, and smoking status (H.R. = 0.923, 95% CI 0.860-0.991; p = 0.027. In a subset of 13,446 individuals with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR measurements, we show that rs13333226 is independently associated with hypertension (unadjusted for eGFR: 0.89 [0.83-0.96], p = 0.004; after eGFR adjustment: 0.89 [0.83-0.96], p = 0.003. In clinical functional studies, we also consistently show the minor G allele is associated with lower urinary uromodulin excretion. The exclusive expression of uromodulin in the thick portion of the ascending limb of Henle suggests a putative role of this variant in hypertension through an effect on sodium homeostasis. The newly discovered UMOD locus for hypertension has the potential to give new insights into the role of uromodulin in BP regulation and to identify novel drugable targets for reducing cardiovascular risk.

  19. Bovine leukocyte antigen major histocompatibility complex class II DRB3*2703 and DRB3*1501 alleles are associated with variation in levels of protection against Theileria parva challenge following immunization with the sporozoite p67 antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballingall, Keith T; Luyai, Anthony; Rowlands, G John; Sales, Jill; Musoke, Anthony J; Morzaria, Subash P; McKeever, Declan J

    2004-05-01

    Initial laboratory trials of an experimental subunit vaccine against Theileria parva based on the 67-kDa major sporozoite surface antigen revealed a range of responses to challenge. We have analyzed convergence in seven sets of monozygotic twins which suggests that genetic factors may have an influence in determining the degree of protection provided by p67 immunization. In addition, we have examined whether allelic diversity at major histocompatibility complex class II loci influences protection. Analysis of bovine leukocyte antigen DRB3 diversity in 201 animals identified significant associations with vaccine success (DRB3*2703; P = 0.027) and vaccine failure (DRB3*1501; P = 0.013). Furthermore, DRB3*2703 was associated with the likelihood of immunized animals showing little to no clinical signs of disease following challenge. We discuss the acquired and innate immune mechanisms that may be behind the associations described here.

  20. GLRB allelic variation associated with agoraphobic cognitions, increased startle response and fear network activation: a potential neurogenetic pathway to panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckert, J; Weber, H; Villmann, C; Lonsdorf, T B; Richter, J; Andreatta, M; Arias-Vasquez, A; Hommers, L; Kent, L; Schartner, C; Cichon, S; Wolf, C; Schaefer, N; von Collenberg, C R; Wachter, B; Blum, R; Schümann, D; Scharfenort, R; Schumacher, J; Forstner, A J; Baumann, C; Schiele, M A; Notzon, S; Zwanzger, P; Janzing, J G E; Galesloot, T; Kiemeney, L A; Gajewska, A; Glotzbach-Schoon, E; Mühlberger, A; Alpers, G; Fydrich, T; Fehm, L; Gerlach, A L; Kircher, T; Lang, T; Ströhle, A; Arolt, V; Wittchen, H-U; Kalisch, R; Büchel, C; Hamm, A; Nöthen, M M; Romanos, M; Domschke, K; Pauli, P; Reif, A

    2017-02-07

    The molecular genetics of panic disorder (PD) with and without agoraphobia (AG) are still largely unknown and progress is hampered by small sample sizes. We therefore performed a genome-wide association study with a dimensional, PD/AG-related anxiety phenotype based on the Agoraphobia Cognition Questionnaire (ACQ) in a sample of 1370 healthy German volunteers of the CRC TRR58 MEGA study wave 1. A genome-wide significant association was found between ACQ and single non-coding nucleotide variants of the GLRB gene (rs78726293, P=3.3 × 10(-8); rs191260602, P=3.9 × 10(-8)). We followed up on this finding in a larger dimensional ACQ sample (N=2547) and in independent samples with a dichotomous AG phenotype based on the Symptoms Checklist (SCL-90; N=3845) and a case-control sample with the categorical phenotype PD/AG (Ncombined =1012) obtaining highly significant P-values also for GLRB single-nucleotide variants rs17035816 (P=3.8 × 10(-4)) and rs7688285 (P=7.6 × 10(-5)). GLRB gene expression was found to be modulated by rs7688285 in brain tissue, as well as cell culture. Analyses of intermediate PD/AG phenotypes demonstrated increased startle reflex and increased fear network, as well as general sensory activation by GLRB risk gene variants rs78726293, rs191260602, rs17035816 and rs7688285. Partial Glrb knockout mice demonstrated an agoraphobic phenotype. In conjunction with the clinical observation that rare coding GLRB gene mutations are associated with the neurological disorder hyperekplexia characterized by a generalized startle reaction and agoraphobic behavior, our data provide evidence that non-coding, although functional GLRB gene polymorphisms may predispose to PD by increasing startle response and agoraphobic cognitions.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 7 February 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2017.2.

  1. HLA alleles association with changes in bone mineral density in HIV-1-infected adults changing treatment to tenofovir-emtricitabine or abacavir-lamivudine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hila Haskelberg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are limited data regarding the influence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA polymorphisms on reduced bone mineral density (BMD. We investigated the relationship between HLA supertypes and BMD in HIV-infected adults changing their existing treatment to tenofovir-emtricitabine (TDF-FTC or abacavir-lamivudine (ABC-3TC in the STEAL study. METHODS: Lumbar spine and right hip BMD were measured by Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA. HLA genotypes at the 2-digit level were classified into class I and II supertypes. Student's t-tests were used to test the association between HLA supertypes and changes in hip and spine BMD over 96 weeks for the whole cohort and stratified by randomised groups. The relationship between HLA supertypes and BMD was also assessed in the subgroup of participants that were naïve to both ABC and TDF at study entry. RESULTS: Class II supertypes were mainly associated with hip BMD change. Overall, compared to participants not carrying HLA-DQ3, participants expressing DQ3 had less bone loss over 96 weeks at both the hip and spine (hip: 0.003 vs. -0.006 g/cm2, 95%CI 0.002 to 0.017, p = 0.016; spine: 0.006 vs. -0.006 g/cm2, 95%CI 0.001 to 0.023, p = 0.041. In participants that were naïve to both ABC and TDF at baseline and randomised to TDF-FTC, DQ3 was significantly associated with less bone loss compared with those not carrying DQ3 (hip: 0.001 vs. -0.032 g/cm2; diff 0.033; 95%CI 0.017 to 0.049; p<0.001; spine: 0.007 vs. -0.023 g/cm2; diff 0.035; 95%CI 0.014 to 0.056; p = 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort of HIV-infected adults, there was an association between bone status and HLA supertypes, particularly HLA-DQ3. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00192634.

  2. Identification of a cys-ser substitution in the 5-HT{sub 2C} (HTR2C) receptor gene and allelic association to violent behavior and alcoholism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lappalainen, J.; Ozaki, N.; Goldman, D. [National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Rockville, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that brain serotonergic functions, including behavioral and neurochemical responses to 5-HT{sub 2C} agonist, are abnormal in some individuals with alcoholism and aggressive behaviors. The aim of the present study was to identify coding sequence variants in the human 5-HT{sub 2C} receptor gene which may cause abnormal or variant function of this receptor. Using SSCP analysis, a non-conservative cys-ser substitution was found in the 5-HT{sub 2C} receptor (designated 5-HT{sub 2Ccys} and 5-HT{sub 2Cser}). The polymorphism was typed in CEPH families to genetically map the gene. To test for association of the variant to alcoholism, violent behavior and serotonin function, the 5-HT{sub 2C} genotypes of 151 non-related Finnish male alcoholic violent offenders and impulsive fire setters and 127 Finnish psychiatrically interviewed healthy male volunteers were determined. CSF 5-HIAA concentrations were available for 74 alcoholic violent offenders and 25 healthy volunteers. Linkage analysis placed the 5-HT{sub 2C} gene on Xq21, a region that has been previously shown to contain genes for several mental retardation syndromes. The 5-HT{sub 2Ccys}/5-HT{sub 2Cser} genotype frequencies in alcoholic violent offenders and controls differed significantly (0.90/0.10 and 0.82/0.18, respectively, P=0.048). The association was found to be strongest in the violent offenders who did not fulfill the criteria for antisocial personality disorder (5-HT{sub 2Ccys}/5-HT{sub 2Cser} 0.93/0.07, p=0.021). No association was found between CSF 5-HIAA concentrations and 5-HT{sub 2C} genotype. These results implicate a 5-HT{sub 2C} receptor amino acid substitution in predisposition to alcohol abuse and violent behavior in a subgroup of alcoholics.

  3. Allelic polymorphism of Ovar-DRB1 exon2 gene and parasite resistance in two dairy sheep breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavros Spetsarias

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Ovar-DRB1 gene locus is one of the most polymorphic genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (Ovar-MHC and holds a functional role to antigen presentation. The aim of this study was: a to describe the Ovar-DRB1 locus variability in two dairy Greek sheep breeds and b to investigate associations between this variability with resistance to gastrointestinal parasitosis. Blood and faecal samples were collected from 231 and 201 animals of Arta and Kalarrytiko breeds, respectively. The identification of alleles was performed using the sequence–base method. Faecal egg counting (FEC of the gastrointestinal parasites and measures of blood plasma pepsinogen levels were performed in order to evaluate parasitological parameters. From this study in the overall examined animals, thirty-nine Ovar-DRB1 alleles were identified, among them, ten new alleles, reported for the first time in the literature. In Arta breed a total of twenty-four alleles were found. Among the detected alleles, ten were breed specific and five were new. Regarding the Kalarrytiko breed, twenty-nine alleles were found, fifteen of them were unique and nine were new. The studied breeds differed in their allelic profile, with only 12 common from the total of 134 different recorded genotypes. A higher number of animals with high parasitic load and high plasma pepsinogen values were found in Kalarrytiko. Associations between Ovar-DRB1 alleles with FEC values were found with certain heterozygous genotypes to present significantly reduced FEC values. The large number of detected alleles with low frequencies and the fact that the majority of animals were heterozygous, make hard to find strong associations

  4. Association study between the Taq1A (rs1800497 polymorphism and schizophrenia in a Brazilian sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quirino Cordeiro

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a severe psychotic disorder with recurrent relapse and functional impairment. It results from a poorly understood gene-environment interaction. The Taq1A polymorphism (located in the gene cluster NTAD is a likely candidate for schizophrenia. Its rs1800497 polymorphism was shown to be associated with DRD2 gene expression. Therefore the present work aims to investigate a possible association between schizophrenia and such polymorphism. The compared distribution of the alleles and genotypes of the studied polymorphism was investigated in a Brazilian sample of 235 patients and 834 controls. Genotypic frequencies were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. There was a trend of allelic association between the Taq1A polymorphism (rs1800497 with schizophrenia in the studied sample. However no statistically differences were found between cases and controls when analyzed by gender or schizophrenia subtypes.

  5. Tracing pastoralist migrations to southern Africa with lactase persistence alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macholdt, Enrico; Lede, Vera; Barbieri, Chiara; Mpoloka, Sununguko W; Chen, Hua; Slatkin, Montgomery; Pakendorf, Brigitte; Stoneking, Mark

    2014-04-14

    Although southern African Khoisan populations are often assumed to have remained largely isolated during prehistory, there is growing evidence for a migration of pastoralists from eastern Africa some 2,000 years ago, prior to the arrival of Bantu-speaking populations in southern Africa. Eastern Africa harbors distinctive lactase persistence (LP) alleles, and therefore LP alleles in southern African populations may be derived from this eastern African pastoralist migration. We sequenced the lactase enhancer region in 457 individuals from 18 Khoisan and seven Bantu-speaking groups from Botswana, Namibia, and Zambia and additionally genotyped four short tandem repeat (STR) loci that flank the lactase enhancer region. We found nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms, of which the most frequent is -14010(∗)C, which was previously found to be associated with LP in Kenya and Tanzania and to exhibit a strong signal of positive selection. This allele occurs in significantly higher frequency in pastoralist groups and in Khoe-speaking groups in our study, supporting the hypothesis of a migration of eastern African pastoralists that was primarily associated with Khoe speakers. Moreover, we find a signal of ongoing positive selection in all three pastoralist groups in our study, as well as (surprisingly) in two foraging groups.

  6. The T allele of rs7903146 TCF7L2 is associated with impaired insulinotropic action of incretin hormones, reduced 24 h profiles of plasma insulin and glucagon, and increased hepatic glucose production in young healthy men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilgaard, K; Jensen, C B; Schou, J H

    2009-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We studied the physiological, metabolic and hormonal mechanisms underlying the elevated risk of type 2 diabetes in carriers of TCF7L2 gene. METHODS: We undertook genotyping of 81 healthy young Danish men for rs7903146 of TCF7L2 and carried out various beta cell tests including: 24...... altered alpha cell function. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Elevated hepatic glucose production and reduced insulinotropic effect of incretin hormones contribute to an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in carriers of the rs7903146 risk T allele of TCF7L2....

  7. A new DRB1*1202 allele (DRB1*12022) found in association with DQA1*0102 and DQB1*0602 in two Black narcoleptic subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behar, E.; Grumet, F.C. [Stanford Univ. Blood Center, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Lin, X.; Mignot, E. [Stanford Univ. Sleep Disorders Center, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1995-01-01

    DQB1*0602 is a better genetic marker than DR2 for narcolepsy susceptibility across all ethnic groups; for instance, only 75% of African American narcoleptics are DR2+ compared with 96% DQB1*0602+. We studied DRB1 genes of DR2- but DQB1*0602+ African American patients with cataplexy and observed two with an unusual DR12, DQA1*0102, DQB1*0602 haplotype; a new allelic variant of DRB1*1202 has been designated DRB*12022. 8 refs.

  8. Altered Ca2+ kinetics associated with α-actinin-3 deficiency may explain positive selection for ACTN3 null allele in human evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart I Head

    Full Text Available Over 1.5 billion people lack the skeletal muscle fast-twitch fibre protein α-actinin-3 due to homozygosity for a common null polymorphism (R577X in the ACTN3 gene. α-Actinin-3 deficiency is detrimental to sprint performance in elite athletes and beneficial to endurance activities. In the human genome, it is very difficult to find single-gene loss-of-function variants that bear signatures of positive selection, yet intriguingly, the ACTN3 null variant has undergone strong positive selection during recent evolution, appearing to provide a survival advantage where food resources are scarce and climate is cold. We have previously demonstrated that α-actinin-3 deficiency in the Actn3 KO mouse results in a shift in fast-twitch fibres towards oxidative metabolism, which would be more "energy efficient" in famine, and beneficial to endurance performance. Prolonged exposure to cold can also induce changes in skeletal muscle similar to those observed with endurance training, and changes in Ca2+ handling by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR are a key factor underlying these adaptations. On this basis, we explored the effects of α-actinin-3 deficiency on Ca2+ kinetics in single flexor digitorum brevis muscle fibres from Actn3 KO mice, using the Ca2+-sensitive dye fura-2. Compared to wild-type, fibres of Actn3 KO mice showed: (i an increased rate of decay of the twitch transient; (ii a fourfold increase in the rate of SR Ca2+ leak; (iii a threefold increase in the rate of SR Ca2+ pumping; and (iv enhanced maintenance of tetanic Ca2+ during fatigue. The SR Ca2+ pump, SERCA1, and the Ca2+-binding proteins, calsequestrin and sarcalumenin, showed markedly increased expression in muscles of KO mice. Together, these changes in Ca2+ handling in the absence of α-actinin-3 are consistent with cold acclimatisation and thermogenesis, and offer an additional explanation for the positive selection of the ACTN3 577X null allele in populations living in cold environments

  9. Altered Ca2+ kinetics associated with α-actinin-3 deficiency may explain positive selection for ACTN3 null allele in human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Stewart I; Chan, Stephen; Houweling, Peter J; Quinlan, Kate G R; Murphy, Robyn; Wagner, Sören; Friedrich, Oliver; North, Kathryn N

    2015-01-01

    Over 1.5 billion people lack the skeletal muscle fast-twitch fibre protein α-actinin-3 due to homozygosity for a common null polymorphism (R577X) in the ACTN3 gene. α-Actinin-3 deficiency is detrimental to sprint performance in elite athletes and beneficial to endurance activities. In the human genome, it is very difficult to find single-gene loss-of-function variants that bear signatures of positive selection, yet intriguingly, the ACTN3 null variant has undergone strong positive selection during recent evolution, appearing to provide a survival advantage where food resources are scarce and climate is cold. We have previously demonstrated that α-actinin-3 deficiency in the Actn3 KO mouse results in a shift in fast-twitch fibres towards oxidative metabolism, which would be more "energy efficient" in famine, and beneficial to endurance performance. Prolonged exposure to cold can also induce changes in skeletal muscle similar to those observed with endurance training, and changes in Ca2+ handling by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) are a key factor underlying these adaptations. On this basis, we explored the effects of α-actinin-3 deficiency on Ca2+ kinetics in single flexor digitorum brevis muscle fibres from Actn3 KO mice, using the Ca2+-sensitive dye fura-2. Compared to wild-type, fibres of Actn3 KO mice showed: (i) an increased rate of decay of the twitch transient; (ii) a fourfold increase in the rate of SR Ca2+ leak; (iii) a threefold increase in the rate of SR Ca2+ pumping; and (iv) enhanced maintenance of tetanic Ca2+ during fatigue. The SR Ca2+ pump, SERCA1, and the Ca2+-binding proteins, calsequestrin and sarcalumenin, showed markedly increased expression in muscles of KO mice. Together, these changes in Ca2+ handling in the absence of α-actinin-3 are consistent with cold acclimatisation and thermogenesis, and offer an additional explanation for the positive selection of the ACTN3 577X null allele in populations living in cold environments during recent

  10. Expression of sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor (SREBF 2 and SREBF cleavage-activating protein (SCAP in human atheroma and the association of their allelic variants with sudden cardiac death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kytömäki Leena

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disturbed cellular cholesterol homeostasis may lead to accumulation of cholesterol in human atheroma plaques. Cellular cholesterol homeostasis is controlled by the sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor 2 (SREBF-2 and the SREBF cleavage-activating protein (SCAP. We investigated whole genome expression in a series of human atherosclerotic samples from different vascular territories and studied whether the non-synonymous coding variants in the interacting domains of two genes, SREBF-2 1784G>C (rs2228314 and SCAP 2386A>G, are related to the progression of coronary atherosclerosis and the risk of pre-hospital sudden cardiac death (SCD. Methods Whole genome expression profiling was completed in twenty vascular samples from carotid, aortic and femoral atherosclerotic plaques and six control samples from internal mammary arteries. Three hundred sudden pre-hospital deaths of middle-aged (33–69 years Caucasian Finnish men were subjected to detailed autopsy in the Helsinki Sudden Death Study. Coronary narrowing and areas of coronary wall covered with fatty streaks or fibrotic, calcified or complicated lesions were measured and related to the SREBF-2 and SCAP genotypes. Results Whole genome expression profiling showed a significant (p = 0.02 down-regulation of SREBF-2 in atherosclerotic carotid plaques (types IV-V, but not in the aorta or femoral arteries (p = NS for both, as compared with the histologically confirmed non-atherosclerotic tissues. In logistic regression analysis, a significant interaction between the SREBF-2 1784G>C and the SCAP 2386A>G genotype was observed on the risk of SCD (p = 0.046. Men with the SREBF-2 C allele and the SCAP G allele had a significantly increased risk of SCD (OR 2.68, 95% CI 1.07–6.71, compared to SCAP AA homologous subjects carrying the SREBF-2 C allele. Furthermore, similar trends for having complicated lesions and for the occurrence of thrombosis were found, although the

  11. The protease inhibitor PI*S allele and COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersh, C P; Ly, N P; Berkey, C S

    2005-01-01

    In many countries, the protease inhibitor (SERPINA1) PI*S allele is more common than PI*Z, the allele responsible for most cases of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) due to severe alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency. However, the risk of COPD due to the PI*S allele is not clear. The current...... authors located studies that addressed the risk of COPD or measured lung function in individuals with the PI SZ, PI MS and PI SS genotypes. A separate meta-analysis for each genotype was performed. Aggregating data from six studies, the odds ratio (OR) for COPD in PI SZ compound heterozygotes compared...... with PI MM (normal) individuals was significantly increased at 3.26 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.24-8.57). In 17 cross-sectional and case-control studies, the OR for COPD in PI MS heterozygotes was 1.19 (95%CI: 1.02-1.38). However, PI MS genotype was not associated with COPD risk after correcting...

  12. Association study of prostate cancer susceptibility variants with risks of invasive ovarian, breast, and colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, H.; Koessler, T.; Ahmed, S.

    2008-01-01

    test of association was a comparison of genotype frequencies between cases and controls, and a test for trend stratified by study where appropriate. Genotype-specific odds ratios (OR) were estimated by logistic regression. SNP rs2660753 (chromosome 3p12) showed evidence of association with ovarian...... cancer [per minor allele OR, 1.19; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.04-1.37; P(trend) = 0.012]. This association was stronger for the serous histologic subtype (OR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.09-1.53; P = 0.003). SNP rs7931342 (chromosome 11q13) showed some evidence of association with breast cancer (per minor...

  13. HLA Class I and II alleles, heterozygosity and HLA-KIR interactions are associated with rates of genital HSV shedding and lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaret, A; Dong, L; John, M; Mallal, S A; James, I; Warren, T; Gaudieri, S; Koelle, D M; Wald, A

    2016-12-01

    Variation at HLA and KIR loci is associated with the severity of viral infections. To assess associations of genital HSV-2 infection with human HLA and KIR genetic loci, we measured the frequencies of genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) DNA detection and of genital lesions in HSV-2 seropositive persons. We followed 267 HSV-2 seropositive persons who collected daily genital swabs and recorded lesions for ⩾30 days. All persons were laboratory-documented as HIV-seronegative, and all were Caucasian by self-report. HSV detection rate and lesion frequency were compared by genotype using Poisson regression. Overall, HSV was detected on 19.1% of days and lesions on 11.6% of days. The presence of HLA-A*01 was directly associated with HSV detection frequency, whereas the presence of HLA-C*12 was inversely associated with HSV detection frequency. The presence of HLA-A*01 was directly associated with lesion rate, while HLA-A*26, -C*01 and -DQB1*0106 were associated with decreased lesions. We observed an interaction between the absence of both 2DS4del and HLA-Bw4 and higher lesion rate. Heterozygosity of HLA was also associated with reduced lesion frequency. Immune control of genital HSV infection relies on multiple interacting immunogenetic elements, including epistatic interactions between HLA and KIR.

  14. HLA-B alleles of the Cayapa of Ecuador: New B39 and B15 alleles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garber, T.L.; Butler, L.M.; Watkins, D.I. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    Recent data suggest that HLA-B locus alleles can evolve quickly in native South American populations. To investigate further this phenomenon of new HLA-B variants among Amerindians, we studied samples from another South American tribe, the Cayapa from Ecuador. We selected individuals for HLA-B molecular typing based upon their HLA class II typing results. Three new variants of HLA-B39 and one new variant of HLA-B15 were found in the Cayapa: HLA-B*3905, HLA-B*3906, HLA-B*3907, and HLA-B*1522. A total of thirteen new HLA-B alleles have now been found in the four South American tribes studied. Each of these four tribes studied, including the Cayapa, had novel alleles that were not found in any of the other tribes, suggesting that many of these new HLA-B alleles may have evolved since the Paleo-Indians originally populated South America. Each of these 13 new alleles contained predicted amino acid replacements that were located in the peptide binding site. These amino acid replacements may affect the sequence motif of the bound peptides, suggesting that these new alleles have been maintained by selection. New allelic variants have been found for all common HLA-B locus antigenic groups present in South American tribes with the exception of B48. In spite of its high frequency in South American tribes, no evidence for variants of B48 has been found in all the Amerindians studied, suggesting that B48 may have unique characteristics among the B locus alleles. 70 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. HLA-B alleles of the Cayapa of Ecuador: new B39 and B15 alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, T L; Butler, L M; Trachtenberg, E A; Erlich, H A; Rickards, O; De Stefano, G; Watkins, D I

    1995-01-01

    Recent data suggest that HLA-B locus alleles can evolve quickly in native South American populations. To investigate further this phenomenon of new HLA-B variants among Amerindians, we studied samples from another South American tribe, the Cayapa from Ecuador. We selected individuals for HLA-B molecular typing based upon their HLA class II typing results. Three new variants of HLA-B39 and one new variant of HLA-B15 were found in the Cayapa: HLA-B*3905, HLA-B*3906, HLA-B*3907, and HLA-B*1522. A total of thirteen new HLA-B alleles have now been found in the four South American tribes studied. Each of these four tribes studied, including the Cayapa, had novel alleles that were not found in any of the other tribes, suggesting that many of these new HLA-B alleles may have evolved since the Paleo-Indians originally populated South America. Each of these 13 new alleles contained predicted amino acid replacements that were located in the peptide binding site. These amino acid replacements may affect the sequence motif of the bound peptides, suggesting that these new alleles have been maintained by selection. New allelic variants have been found for all common HLA-B locus antigenic groups present in South American tribes with the exception of B48. In spite of its high frequency in South American tribes, no evidence for variants of B48 has been found in all the Amerindians studied, suggesting that B48 may have unique characteristics among the B locus alleles.

  16. Molecular identification of rare FY*Null and FY*X alleles in Caucasian thalassemic family from Sardinia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfroi, Silvia; Scarcello, Antonio; Pagliaro, Pasqualepaolo

    2015-10-01

    Molecular genetic studies on Duffy blood group antigens have identified mutations underlying rare FY*Null and FY*X alleles. FY*Null has a high frequency in Blacks, especially from sub-Saharan Africa, while its frequency is not defined in Caucasians. FY*X allele, associated with Fy(a-b+w) phenotype, has a frequency of 2-3.5% in Caucasian people while it is absent in Blacks. During the project of extensive blood group genotyping in patients affected by hemoglobinopathies, we identified FY*X/FY*Null and FY*A/FY*Null genotypes in a Caucasian thalassemic family from Sardinia. We speculate on the frequency of FY*X and FY*Null alleles in Caucasian and Black people; further, we focused on the association of FY*X allele with weak Fyb antigen expression on red blood cells and its identification performing high sensitivity serological typing methods or genotyping.

  17. A novel mutation of the ACADM gene (c.145C>G associated with the common c.985A>G mutation on the other ACADM allele causes mild MCAD deficiency: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briand Gilbert

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A female patient, with normal familial history, developed at the age of 30 months an episode of diarrhoea, vomiting and lethargy which resolved spontaneously. At the age of 3 years, the patient re-iterated vomiting, was sub-febrile and hypoglycemic, fell into coma, developed seizures and sequels involving right hemi-body. Urinary excretion of hexanoylglycine and suberylglycine was low during this metabolic decompensation. A study of pre- and post-prandial blood glucose and ketones over a period of 24 hours showed a normal glycaemic cycle but a failure to form ketones after 12 hours fasting, suggesting a mitochondrial β-oxidation defect. Total blood carnitine was lowered with unesterified carnitine being half of the lowest control value. A diagnosis of mild MCAD deficiency (MCADD was based on rates of 1-14C-octanoate and 9, 10-3H-myristate oxidation and of octanoyl-CoA dehydrogenase being reduced to 25% of control values. Other mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation proteins were functionally normal. De novo acylcarnitine synthesis in whole blood samples incubated with deuterated palmitate was also typical of MCADD. Genetic studies showed that the patient was compound heterozygous with a sequence variation in both of the two ACADM alleles; one had the common c.985A>G mutation and the other had a novel c.145C>G mutation. This is the first report for the ACADM gene c.145C>G mutation: it is located in exon 3 and causes a replacement of glutamine to glutamate at position 24 of the mature protein (Q24E. Associated with heterozygosity for c.985A>G mutation, this mutation is responsible for a mild MCADD phenotype along with a clinical story corroborating the emerging literature view that patients with genotypes representing mild MCADD (high residual enzyme activity and low urinary levels of glycine conjugates, similar to some of the mild MCADDs detected by MS/MS newborn screening, may be at risk for disease presentation.

  18. Allelic variations of a light harvesting chlorophyll a/b-binding protein gene (Lhcb1 associated with agronomic traits in barley.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanshi Xia

    Full Text Available Light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-binding protein (LHCP is one of the most abundant chloroplast proteins in plants. Its main function is to collect and transfer light energy to photosynthetic reaction centers. However, the roles of different LHCPs in light-harvesting antenna systems remain obscure. Exploration of nucleotide variation in the genes encoding LHCP can facilitate a better understanding of the functions of LHCP. In this study, nucleotide variations in Lhcb1, a LHCP gene in barley, were investigated across 292 barley accessions collected from 35 different countries using EcoTILLING technology, a variation of the Targeting Induced Local Lesions In Genomes (TILLING. A total of 23 nucleotide variations were detected including three insert/deletions (indels and 20 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Among them, 17 SNPs were in the coding region with nine missense changes. Two SNPs with missense changes are predicted to be deleterious to protein function. Seventeen SNP formed 31 distinguishable haplotypes in the barley collection. The levels of nucleotide diversity in the Lhcb1 locus differed markedly with geographic origins and species of accessions. The accessions from Middle East Asia exhibited the highest nucleotide and haplotype diversity. H. spontaneum showed greater nucleotide diversity than H. vulgare. Five SNPs in Lhcb1 were significantly associated with at least one of the six agronomic traits evaluated, namely plant height, spike length, number of grains per spike, thousand grain weight, flag leaf area and leaf color, and these SNPs may be used as potential markers for improvement of these barley traits.

  19. Genetic structure, diversity, and allelic richness in composite collection and reference set in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gowda Cholenahalli LL

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant genetic resources (PGR are the basic raw materials for future genetic progress and an insurance against unforeseen threats to agricultural production. An extensive characterization of PGR provides an opportunity to dissect structure, mine allelic variations, and identify diverse accessions for crop improvement. The Generation Challenge Program http://www.generationcp.org conceptualized the development of "composite collections" and extraction of "reference sets" from these for more efficient tapping of global crop-related genetic resources. In this study, we report the genetic structure, diversity and allelic richness in a composite collection of chickpea using SSR markers, and formation of a reference set of 300 accessions. Results The 48 SSR markers detected 1683 alleles in 2915 accessions, of which, 935 were considered rare, 720 common and 28 most frequent. The alleles per locus ranged from 14 to 67, averaged 35, and the polymorphic information content was from 0.467 to 0.974, averaged 0.854. Marker polymorphism varied between groups of accessions in the composite collection and reference set. A number of group-specific alleles were detected: 104 in Kabuli, 297 in desi, and 69 in wild Cicer; 114 each in Mediterranean and West Asia (WA, 117 in South and South East Asia (SSEA, and 10 in African region accessions. Desi and kabuli shared 436 alleles, while wild Cicer shared 17 and 16 alleles with desi and kabuli, respectively. The accessions from SSEA and WA shared 74 alleles, while those from Mediterranean 38 and 33 alleles with WA and SSEA, respectively. Desi chickpea contained a higher proportion of rare alleles (53% than kabuli (46%, while wild Cicer accessions were devoid of rare alleles. A genotype-based reference set captured 1315 (78% of the 1683 composite collection alleles of which 463 were rare, 826 common, and 26 the most frequent alleles. The neighbour-joining tree diagram of this reference set represents

  20. Replication studies in longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varcasia, O; Garasto, S; Rizza, T;

    2001-01-01

    In Danes we replicated the 3'APOB-VNTR gene/longevity association study previously carried out in Italians, by which the Small alleles (less than 35 repeats) had been identified as frailty alleles for longevity. In Danes, neither genotype nor allele frequencies differed between centenarians and 20...

  1. Principal components analysis corrects for stratification in genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Alkes L; Patterson, Nick J; Plenge, Robert M; Weinblatt, Michael E; Shadick, Nancy A; Reich, David

    2006-08-01

    Population stratification--allele frequency differences between cases and controls due to systematic ancestry differences-can cause spurious associations in disease studies. We describe a method that enables explicit detection and correction of population stratification on a genome-wide scale. Our method uses principal components analysis to explicitly model ancestry differences between cases and controls. The resulting correction is specific to a candidate marker's variation in frequency across ancestral populations, minimizing spurious associations while maximizing power to detect true associations. Our simple, efficient approach can easily be applied to disease studies with hundreds of thousands of markers.

  2. Interleukin-1 gene complex in schizophrenia: an association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz, Pilar A; Garcia-Portilla, Maria P; Arango, Celso; Morales, Blanca; Martinez-Barrondo, Sara; Alvarez, Victoria; Coto, Eliecer; Fernandez, Juan; Bousono, Manuel; Bobes, Julio

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the association between three polymorphisms of the interleukin-1 (IL-1) gene complex and schizophrenia. We genotyped 228 outpatients with schizophrenia (DSM-IV criteria) and 419 unrelated healthy controls. The following polymorphisms were analyzed: IL-1alpha -889 C/T, IL-1beta +3953 C/T, and IL-1RA (86 bp)n. No significant differences in genotype or in allelic distribution of the Il-1alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-1RA polymorphisms were found. Estimated haplotype frequencies were similar in both groups. Our data do not suggest that genetically determined changes in the IL-1 gene complex confer increased susceptibility for schizophrenia.

  3. Study of the possible association of HLA Class II, CD4, and CD3 polymorphisms with schizophrenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamani, M.G.; Spaepen, M.; Marynen, P. [Univ. of Leuven (Belgium)] [and others

    1994-12-15

    In the present study the HLA-DRB and DPB-1 alleles as well as CD4 and CD3 polymorphisms were tested in 100 Belgian schizophrenic patients and 204 controls. Our results indicate a significant negative association of the DPB1 0101 allele with schizophrenia (relative risk (RR) = 0.27). Furthermore a significant positive and negative association could be noticed for the CD4 A4 allele and CD4 A7/A8 genotype, respectively (RR 1.79 and 0.47, respectively). These findings suggest that some contribution of HLA class II and CD4 genes to an autoimmune-like pathogenesis in schizophrenia might exist. 22 refs., 6 tabs.

  4. Association between 5-HTTLPR genotypes and persisting patterns of anxiety and alcohol use: results from a 10-year longitudinal study of adolescent mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, C A; Byrnes, G B; Lotfi-Miri, M; Collins, V; Williamson, R; Patton, C; Anney, R J L

    2005-09-01

    The serotonin transporter gene (5-HTT) encodes a transmembrane protein that plays an important role in regulating serotonergic neurotransmission and related aspects of mood and behaviour. The short allele of a 44 bp insertion/deletion polymorphism (S-allele) within the promoter region of the 5-HTT gene (5-HTTLPR) confers lower transcriptional activity relative to the long allele (L-allele) and may act to modify the risk of serotonin-mediated outcomes such as anxiety and substance use behaviours. The purpose of this study was to determine whether (or not) 5-HTTLPR genotypes moderate known associations between attachment style and adolescent anxiety and alcohol use outcomes. Participants were drawn from an eight-wave study of the mental and behavioural health of a cohort of young Australians followed from 14 to 24 years of age (Victorian Adolescent Health Cohort Study, 1992 - present). No association was observed within low-risk attachment settings. However, within risk settings for heightened anxiety (ie, insecurely attached young people), the odds of persisting ruminative anxiety (worry) decreased with each additional copy of the S-allele (approximately 30% per allele: OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.62-0.97, P=0.029). Within risk settings for binge drinking (ie, securely attached young people), the odds of reporting persisting high-dose alcohol consumption (bingeing) decreased with each additional copy of the S-allele (approximately 35% per allele: OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.64-0.86, P<0.001). Our data suggest that the S-allele is likely to be important in psychosocial development, particularly in those settings that increase risk of anxiety and alcohol use problems.

  5. Quantifying the underestimation of relative risks from genome-wide association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Spencer

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified hundreds of associated loci across many common diseases. Most risk variants identified by GWAS will merely be tags for as-yet-unknown causal variants. It is therefore possible that identification of the causal variant, by fine mapping, will identify alleles with larger effects on genetic risk than those currently estimated from GWAS replication studies. We show that under plausible assumptions, whilst the majority of the per-allele relative risks (RR estimated from GWAS data will be close to the true risk at the causal variant, some could be considerable underestimates. For example, for an estimated RR in the range 1.2-1.3, there is approximately a 38% chance that it exceeds 1.4 and a 10% chance that it is over 2. We show how these probabilities can vary depending on the true effects associated with low-frequency variants and on the minor allele frequency (MAF of the most associated SNP. We investigate the consequences of the underestimation of effect sizes for predictions of an individual's disease risk and interpret our results for the design of fine mapping experiments. Although these effects mean that the amount of heritability explained by known GWAS loci is expected to be larger than current projections, this increase is likely to explain a relatively small amount of the so-called "missing" heritability.

  6. Analysis and frequency of bovine lymphocyte antigen (BoLA-DRB3) alleles in Iranian Holstein cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassiry, M R; Shahroodi, F Eftekhar; Mosafer, J; Mohammadi, A; Manshad, E; Ghazanfari, S; Mohammad Abadi, M R; Sulimova, G E

    2005-06-01

    The bovine lymphocyte antigen (BoLA-DRB3) gene encodes cell surface glycoproteins that initiate immune response by presenting processed antigenic peptides to CD4 T helper cells. DRB3 is the most polymorphic bovine MHC class II gene which encodes the peptide-binding groove. DRB3 gene has been extensively evaluated as a candidate marker for association with various bovine diseases and immunological traits. This study describes genetic variability in the BoLA-DRB3 in Iranian Holstein cattle. This is the first study of the DNA polymorphism of the BoLA-DRB3 gene in Iranian Holstein cattle. Hemi-nested PCR-RFLP method is used for identification the frequency of BoLA-DRB3 alleles. The BoLA-DRB3 locus is highly polymorphic in the studied herd (26 alleles). Almost 67% of the alleles were accounted for four alleles (BoLA-DRB3.2*8, *24, *11 and *16) in Iranian Holstein cattle. The DRB3.2*8 allele frequency (26.6%) was higher than the others. The frequencies of the DRB3.2*54, *37, *36, *28, *25, *14, *13, *10, *1 alleles were lower than 1%. Significant distinctions have been found between Iranian Holstein cattle and other cattle breeds studied. In Iranian Holstein cattle the alleles (BoLA-DRB3.2*22, *2 and *16) associated with a lower risk of cystic ovarian disease in Holstein cattle are found. The alleles associated with the resistance to mastitis and to bovine leukemia virus infection BoLA-DRB3.2*11 and *23 are detected with the frequencies 10.4% and 4.4%, respectively. Thus in the Iranian Holstein cows studied are found alleles which are associated with resistance to various diseases. The method of DNA-typing of animals can be used in agricultural practice for BoLA-DRB3 allele genotyping of cattle in order to reduce spreading of alleles providing susceptibility to mastitis or leukemia in cattle herds.

  7. PRELIMINARY STUDIES ON ASSOCIATIONS OF IDDM3,IDDM4, IDDM5 AND IDDM8 WITH IDDM IN CHENGDU POPULATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阿周存; 张思仲; 肖翠英

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To study the associations of IDDM3, IDDM4, IDDM5 and IDDM8 with insulin-dependent diabetesmellitus (IDDM). Methods. The polymorphisms of short tandem repeat (STR) loci D15S657, DllS1369, D6S2420 and D6S503, linked to IDDM3, IDDM4, IDDM5 and IDDM8 respectively, were studied by polymerase chain reaction and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PCR-PAGE) followed by direct sequencing of PCR products in 105 normal Chinese Han nationality subjects and 48 patients with IDDM. Resu/ts. The allele frequencies of allele A5 at D15S657 locus, allele As at DllS1369 locus and allele As at D6S2420 locus were increased significantly in patients with IDDM compared to those in the control group. No difference in the allele frequencies at D6S503 locus was observed between IDDM and control group. Conclusion. IDDM3, IDDM4, IDDM5 but not IDDM8 may be associated with IDDM in Chinese Han nationality population.

  8. 'Smoking genes': a genetic association study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoraida Verde

    Full Text Available Some controversy exists on the specific genetic variants that are associated with nicotine dependence and smoking-related phenotypes. The purpose of this study was to analyse the association of smoking status and smoking-related phenotypes (included nicotine dependence with 17 candidate genetic variants: CYP2A6*1×2, CYP2A6*2 (1799T>A [rs1801272], CYP2A6*9 (-48T>G [rs28399433], CYP2A6*12, CYP2A13*2 (3375C>T [rs8192789], CYP2A13*3 (7520C>G, CYP2A13*4 (579G>A, CYP2A13*7 (578C>T [rs72552266], CYP2B6*4 (785A>G, CYP2B6*9 (516G>T, CHRNA3 546C>T [rs578776], CHRNA5 1192G>A [rs16969968], CNR1 3764C>G [rs6928499], DRD2-ANKK1 2137G>A (Taq1A [rs1800497], 5HTT LPR, HTR2A -1438A>G [rs6311] and OPRM1 118A>G [rs1799971]. We studied the genotypes of the aforementioned polymorphisms in a cohort of Spanish smokers (cases, N = 126 and ethnically matched never smokers (controls, N = 80. The results showed significant between-group differences for CYP2A6*2 and CYP2A6*12 (both PA (Taq1A polymorphisms was 3.60 (95%CI: 1.75, 7.44 and 2.63 (95%CI: 1.41, 4.89 respectively. Compared with the wild-type genotype, the OR for being a non-smoker in carriers of the minor CYP2A6*2 allele was 1.80 (95%CI: 1.24, 2.65. We found a significant genotype effect (all P≤0.017 for the following smoking-related phenotypes: (i cigarettes smoked per day and CYP2A13*3; (ii pack years smoked and CYP2A6*2, CYP2A6*1×2, CYP2A13*7, CYP2B6*4 and DRD2-ANKK1 2137G>A (Taq1A; (iii nicotine dependence (assessed with the Fagestrom test and CYP2A6*9. Overall, our results suggest that genetic variants potentially involved in nicotine metabolization (mainly, CYP2A6 polymorphisms are those showing the strongest association with smoking-related phenotypes, as opposed to genetic variants influencing the brain effects of nicotine, e.g., through nicotinic acetylcholine (CHRNA5, serotoninergic (HTR2A, opioid (OPRM1 or cannabinoid receptors (CNR1.

  9. Genome-wide association study meta-analysis identifies seven new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci

    OpenAIRE

    Stahl, Eli A; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Remmers, Elaine F.; Xie, Gang; Eyre, Stephen; Thomson, Brian P.; Li, Yonghong; Kurreeman, Fina A. S.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Hinks, Anne; Guiducci, Candace; Chen, Robert; Alfredsson, Lars; Amos, Christopher I.; Ardlie, Kristin G.

    2010-01-01

    To identify novel genetic risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analysis of 5,539 autoantibody positive RA cases and 20,169 controls of European descent, followed by replication in an independent set of 6,768 RA cases and 8,806 controls. Of 34 SNPs selected for replication, 7 novel RA risk alleles were identified at genome-wide significance (P

  10. Power analysis for case–control association studies of samples with known family histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Biao; Han, Younghun; Amos, Christopher I.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide case–control studies have been widely used to identify genetic variants that predispose to human diseases. Such studies are powerful in detecting common genetic variants with moderate effects, but quickly lose power as allele frequency and genotype relative risk decrease. Because patients with one or more affected relatives are more likely to inherit disease-predisposing alleles of a genetic disease than patients without family histories of the disease, sampling patients with affected relatives almost always increases the frequency of disease predisposing alleles in cases and improves the power of case–control association studies. This paper evaluates the power of case–control studies that select cases and/or controls according to their family histories of disease. Our results showed that this study design can dramatically increase the power of a case–control association study for a wide range of disease types. Because each additional affected relative of a patient reduces the required sample size roughly by a pair of case and control, inclusion of cases with affected relatives can dramatically decrease the required sample size and thus the cost of such studies. PMID:20383776

  11. A genome-wide association study identifies a new ovarian cancer susceptibility locus on 9p22.2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Honglin; Ramus, Susan J; Tyrer, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer has a major heritable component, but the known susceptibility genes explain less than half the excess familial risk. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify common ovarian cancer susceptibility alleles. We evaluated 507,094 SNPs genotyped in 1,817...

  12. Rare exonic minisatellite alleles in MUC2 influence susceptibility to gastric carcinoma.

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    Yun Hee Jeong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mucins are the major components of mucus and their genes share a common, centrally-located region of sequence that encodes tandem repeats. Mucins are well known genes with respect to their specific expression levels; however, their genomic levels are unclear because of complex genomic properties. In this study, we identified eight novel minisatellites from the entire MUC2 region and investigated how allelic variation in these minisatellites may affect susceptibility to gastrointestinal cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: We analyzed genomic DNA from the blood of normal healthy individuals and multi-generational family groups. Six of the eight minisatellites exhibited polymorphism and were transmitted meiotically in seven families, following Mendelian inheritance. Furthermore, a case-control study was performed that compared genomic DNA from 457 cancer-free controls with DNA from individuals with gastric (455, colon (192 and rectal (271 cancers. A statistically significant association was identified between rare exonic MUC2-MS6 alleles and the occurrence of gastric cancer: odds ratio (OR, 2.56; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.31-5.04; and p = 0.0047. We focused on an association between rare alleles and gastric cancer. Rare alleles were divided into short (40, 43 and 44 and long (47, 50 and 54, according to their TR (tandem repeats lengths. Interestingly, short rare alleles were associated with gastric cancer (OR = 5.6, 95% CI: 1.93-16.42; p = 0.00036. Moreover, hypervariable MUC2 minisatellites were analyzed in matched blood and cancer tissue from 28 patients with gastric cancer and in 4 cases of MUC2-MS2, minisatellites were found to have undergone rearrangement. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our observations suggest that the short rare MUC2-MS6 alleles could function as identifiers for risk of gastric cancer. Additionally, we suggest that minisatellite instability might be associated with MUC2 function in cancer cells.

  13. Genome-wide association study of antisocial personality disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautiainen, M-R; Paunio, T; Repo-Tiihonen, E; Virkkunen, M; Ollila, H M; Sulkava, S; Jolanki, O; Palotie, A; Tiihonen, J

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiology of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) remains unclear. Although the most consistent biological finding is reduced grey matter volume in the frontal cortex, about 50% of the total liability to developing ASPD has been attributed to genetic factors. The contributing genes remain largely unknown. Therefore, we sought to study the genetic background of ASPD. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and a replication analysis of Finnish criminal offenders fulfilling DSM-IV criteria for ASPD (N=370, N=5850 for controls, GWAS; N=173, N=3766 for controls and replication sample). The GWAS resulted in suggestive associations of two clusters of single-nucleotide polymorphisms at 6p21.2 and at 6p21.32 at the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region. Imputation of HLA alleles revealed an independent association with DRB1*01:01 (odds ratio (OR)=2.19 (1.53–3.14), P=1.9 × 10-5). Two polymorphisms at 6p21.2 LINC00951–LRFN2 gene region were replicated in a separate data set, and rs4714329 reached genome-wide significance (OR=1.59 (1.37–1.85), P=1.6 × 10−9) in the meta-analysis. The risk allele also associated with antisocial features in the general population conditioned for severe problems in childhood family (β=0.68, P=0.012). Functional analysis in brain tissue in open access GTEx and Braineac databases revealed eQTL associations of rs4714329 with LINC00951 and LRFN2 in cerebellum. In humans, LINC00951 and LRFN2 are both expressed in the brain, especially in the frontal cortex, which is intriguing considering the role of the frontal cortex in behavior and the neuroanatomical findings of reduced gray matter volume in ASPD. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing genome-wide significant and replicable findings on genetic variants associated with any personality disorder. PMID:27598967

  14. Distribution of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel (Nav) Alleles among the Aedes aegypti Populations In Central Java Province and Its Association with Resistance to Pyrethroid Insecticides

    OpenAIRE

    Sayono Sayono; Anggie Puspa Nur Hidayati; Sukmal Fahri; Didik Sumanto; Edi Dharmana; Suharyo Hadisaputro; Puji Budi Setia Asih; Din Syafruddin

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of insecticide resistant Aedes aegypti mosquitoes has hampered dengue control efforts. WHO susceptibility tests, using several pyrethroid compounds, were conducted on Ae. aegypti larvae that were collected and raised to adulthood from Semarang, Surakarta, Kudus and Jepara in Java. The AaNa V gene fragment encompassing kdr polymorphic sites from both susceptible and resistant mosquitoes was amplified, and polymorphisms were associated with the resistant phenotype. The insecticide...

  15. Ovarian dysfunction and FMR1 alleles in a large Italian family with POF and FRAXA disorders: case report

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    D'Urso Michele

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The association between premature ovarian failure (POF and the FMR1 repeat number (41> CGGnFMR1 alleles. Case presentation We describe the coexistence in a large Italian kindred of Fragile X syndrome and familial POF in females with ovarian dysfunctions who carried normal or expanded FMR1 alleles. Genetic analysis of the FMR1 gene in over three generations of females revealed that six carried pre-mutated alleles (61–200, of which two were also affected by POF. However a young woman, who presented a severe ovarian failure with early onset, carried normal FMR1 alleles ( Conclusion Our case study represents a helpful observation and will provide familial cases with heterogeneous etiology that could be further studied when candidate genes in addition to the FMR1 premutation will be available.

  16. Association study between functional polymorphisms in the TNF-alpha gene and obsessive-compulsive disorder

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    Carolina Cappi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD is a prevalent psychiatric disorder of unknown etiology. However, there is some evidence that the immune system may play an important role in its pathogenesis. In the present study, two polymorphisms (rs1800795 and rs361525 in the promoter region of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFA gene were genotyped in 183 OCD patients and in 249 healthy controls. The statistical tests were performed using the PLINK® software. We found that the A allele of the TNFA rs361525 polymorphism was significantly associated with OCD subjects, according to the allelic χ² association test (p=0.007. The presence of genetic markers, such as inflammatory cytokines genes linked to OCD, may represent additional evidence supporting the role of the immune system in its pathogenesis.

  17. SIRT1 gene, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder in the Japanese population: an association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, T; Fukuo, Y; Kitajima, T; Okochi, T; Yamanouchi, Y; Kinoshita, Y; Kawashima, K; Inada, T; Kunugi, H; Kato, T; Yoshikawa, T; Ujike, H; Ozaki, N; Iwata, N

    2011-04-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that alterations in circadian rhythms might be associated with the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (BP). A recent study reported that SIRT1 is a molecule that plays an important role in the circadian clock system. Therefore, to evaluate the association among the SIRT1 gene, schizophrenia and BP, we conducted a case-control study of Japanese population samples (1158 schizophrenia patients, 1008 BP patients and 2127 controls) with four tagging SNPs (rs12778366, rs2273773, rs4746720 and rs10997875) in the SIRT1 gene. Marker-trait association analysis was used to evaluate the allele and the genotype association with the χ(2) test, and haplotype association analysis was evaluated with a likelihood ratio test. We showed an association between rs4746720 in the SIRT1 gene and schizophrenia in the allele and the genotype analysis. However, the significance of these associations did not survive after Bonferroni's correction for multiple testing. On the other hand, the SIRT1 gene was associated with Japanese schizophrenia in a haplotype-wise analysis (global P(all markers) = 4.89 × 10(-15)). Also, four tagging SNPs in the SIRT1 gene were not associated with BP. In conclusion, the SIRT1 gene may play an important role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia in the Japanese population.

  18. Positive Selection of Deleterious Alleles through Interaction with a Sex-Ratio Suppressor Gene in African Buffalo: A Plausible New Mechanism for a High Frequency Anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hooft, Pim; Greyling, Ben J.; Getz, Wayne M.; van Helden, Paul D.; Zwaan, Bas J.; Bastos, Armanda D. S.

    2014-01-01

    Although generally rare, deleterious alleles can become common through genetic drift, hitchhiking or reductions in selective constraints. Here we present a possible new mechanism that explains the attainment of high frequencies of deleterious alleles in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) population of Kruger National Park, through positive selection of these alleles that is ultimately driven by a sex-ratio suppressor. We have previously shown that one in four Kruger buffalo has a Y-chromosome profile that, despite being associated with low body condition, appears to impart a relative reproductive advantage, and which is stably maintained through a sex-ratio suppressor. Apparently, this sex-ratio suppressor prevents fertility reduction that generally accompanies sex-ratio distortion. We hypothesize that this body-condition-associated reproductive advantage increases the fitness of alleles that negatively affect male body condition, causing genome-wide positive selection of these alleles. To investigate this we genotyped 459 buffalo using 17 autosomal microsatellites. By correlating heterozygosity with body condition (heterozygosity-fitness correlations), we found that most microsatellites were associated with one of two gene types: one with elevated frequencies of deleterious alleles that have a negative effect on body condition, irrespective of sex; the other with elevated frequencies of sexually antagonistic alleles that are negative for male body condition but positive for female body condition. Positive selection and a direct association with a Y-chromosomal sex-ratio suppressor are indicated, respectively, by allele clines and by relatively high numbers of homozygous deleterious alleles among sex-ratio suppressor carriers. This study, which employs novel statistical techniques to analyse heterozygosity-fitness correlations, is the first to demonstrate the abundance of sexually-antagonistic genes in a natural mammal population. It also has important

  19. Positive selection of deleterious alleles through interaction with a sex-ratio suppressor gene in African Buffalo: a plausible new mechanism for a high frequency anomaly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pim van Hooft

    Full Text Available Although generally rare, deleterious alleles can become common through genetic drift, hitchhiking or reductions in selective constraints. Here we present a possible new mechanism that explains the attainment of high frequencies of deleterious alleles in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer population of Kruger National Park, through positive selection of these alleles that is ultimately driven by a sex-ratio suppressor. We have previously shown that one in four Kruger buffalo has a Y-chromosome profile that, despite being associated with low body condition, appears to impart a relative reproductive advantage, and which is stably maintained through a sex-ratio suppressor. Apparently, this sex-ratio suppressor prevents fertility reduction that generally accompanies sex-ratio distortion. We hypothesize that this body-condition-associated reproductive advantage increases the fitness of alleles that negatively affect male body condition, causing genome-wide positive selection of these alleles. To investigate this we genotyped 459 buffalo using 17 autosomal microsatellites. By correlating heterozygosity with body condition (heterozygosity-fitness correlations, we found that most microsatellites were associated with one of two gene types: one with elevated frequencies of deleterious alleles that have a negative effect on body condition, irrespective of sex; the other with elevated frequencies of sexually antagonistic alleles that are negative for male body condition but positive for female body condition. Positive selection and a direct association with a Y-chromosomal sex-ratio suppressor are indicated, respectively, by allele clines and by relatively high numbers of homozygous deleterious alleles among sex-ratio suppressor carriers. This study, which employs novel statistical techniques to analyse heterozygosity-fitness correlations, is the first to demonstrate the abundance of sexually-antagonistic genes in a natural mammal population. It also has

  20. Power assessment for genetic association study of human longevity using offspring of long-lived subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Qihua; Zhao, Jing Hua; Li, Shuxia; Kruse, Torben A; Christensen, Kaare

    2010-07-01

    Recently, an indirect genetic association approach that compares genotype frequencies in offspring of long-lived subjects and offspring from random families has been introduced to study gene-longevity associations. Although the indirect genetic association has certain advantages over the direct association approach that compares genotype frequency between centenarians and young controls, the power has been of concern. This paper reports a power study performed on the indirect approach using computer simulation. We perform our simulation study by introducing the current Danish population life table and the proportional hazard model for generating individual lifespan. Family genotype data is generated using a genetic linkage program for given SNP allele frequency. Power is estimated by setting the type I error rate at 0.05 and by calculating the Armitage's chi-squared test statistic for 200 replicate samples for each setting of the specified allele risk and frequency parameters under different modes of inheritance and for different sample sizes. The indirect genetic association analysis is a valid approach for studying gene-longevity association, but the sample size requirement is about 3-4 time larger than the direct approach. It also has low power in detecting non-additive effect genes. Indirect genetic association using offspring from families with both parents as nonagenarians is nearly as powerful as using offspring from families with one centenarian parent. In conclusion, the indirect design can be a good choice for studying longevity in comparison with other alternatives, when relatively large sample size is available.

  1. Association of MMP7 -181A→G Promoter Polymorphism with Gastric Cancer Risk: INFLUENCE OF NICOTINE IN DIFFERENTIAL ALLELE-SPECIFIC TRANSCRIPTION VIA INCREASED PHOSPHORYLATION OF cAMP-RESPONSE ELEMENT-BINDING PROTEIN (CREB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesh, Kousik; Subramanian, Lakshmi; Ghosh, Nillu; Gupta, Vinayak; Gupta, Arnab; Bhattacharya, Samir; Mahapatra, Nitish R; Swarnakar, Snehasikta

    2015-06-05

    Elevated expression of matrix metalloproteinase7 (MMP7) has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in cancer invasion. The -181A→G (rs11568818) polymorphism in the MMP7 promoter modulates gene expression and possibly affects cancer progression. Here, we evaluated the impact of -181A→G polymorphism on MMP7 promoter activity and its association with gastric cancer risk in eastern Indian case-control cohorts (n = 520). The GG genotype as compared with the AA genotype was predisposed (p = 0.02; odds ratio = 1.9, 95% confidence interval = 1.1-3.3) to gastric cancer risk. Stratification analysis showed that tobacco addiction enhanced gastric cancer risk in GG subjects when compared with AA subjects (p = 0.03, odds ratio = 2.46, and 95% confidence interval = 1.07-5.68). Meta-analysis revealed that tobacco enhanced the risk for cancer more markedly in AG and GG carriers. Activity and expression of MMP7 were significantly higher in GG than in AA carriers. In support, MMP7 promoter-reporter assays showed greater transcriptional activity toward A to G transition under basal/nicotine-induced/cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) overexpressed conditions in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. Moreover, nicotine (a major component of tobacco) treatment significantly up-regulated MMP7 expression due to enhanced CREB phosphorylation followed by its nuclear translocation in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed higher binding of phosphorylated CREB with the -181G than the -181A allele. Altogether, specific binding of phosphorylated CREB to the G allele-carrying promoter enhances MMP7 gene expression that is further augmented by nicotine due to increased CREB phosphorylation and thereby increases the risk for gastric cancer.

  2. Susceptibility to chronic mucus hypersecretion, a genome wide association study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akkelies E Dijkstra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH is associated with an increased frequency of respiratory infections, excess lung function decline, and increased hospitalisation and mortality rates in the general population. It is associated with smoking, but it is unknown why only a minority of smokers develops CMH. A plausible explanation for this phenomenon is a predisposing genetic constitution. Therefore, we performed a genome wide association (GWA study of CMH in Caucasian populations. METHODS: GWA analysis was performed in the NELSON-study using the Illumina 610 array, followed by replication and meta-analysis in 11 additional cohorts. In total 2,704 subjects with, and 7,624 subjects without CMH were included, all current or former heavy smokers (≥20 pack-years. Additional studies were performed to test the functional relevance of the most significant single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP. RESULTS: A strong association with CMH, consistent across all cohorts, was observed with rs6577641 (p = 4.25×10(-6, OR = 1.17, located in intron 9 of the special AT-rich sequence-binding protein 1 locus (SATB1 on chromosome 3. The risk allele (G was associated with higher mRNA expression of SATB1 (4.3×10(-9 in lung tissue. Presence of CMH was associated with increased SATB1 mRNA expression in bronchial biopsies from COPD patients. SATB1 expression was induced during differentiation of primary human bronchial epithelial cells in culture. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings, that SNP rs6577641 is associated with CMH in multiple cohorts and is a cis-eQTL for SATB1, together with our additional observation that SATB1 expression increases during epithelial differentiation provide suggestive evidence that SATB1 is a gene that affects CMH.

  3. Susceptibility to Chronic Mucus Hypersecretion, a Genome Wide Association Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Akkelies E.; Smolonska, Joanna; van den Berge, Maarten; Wijmenga, Ciska; Zanen, Pieter; Luinge, Marjan A.; Platteel, Mathieu; Lammers, Jan-Willem; Dahlback, Magnus; Tosh, Kerrie; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Sterk, Peter J.; Spira, Avi; Vestbo, Jorgen; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Benn, Marianne; Nielsen, Sune F.; Dahl, Morten; Verschuren, W. Monique; Picavet, H. Susan J.; Smit, Henriette A.; Owsijewitsch, Michael; Kauczor, Hans U.; de Koning, Harry J.; Nizankowska-Mogilnicka, Eva; Mejza, Filip; Nastalek, Pawel; van Diemen, Cleo C.; Cho, Michael H.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Crapo, James D.; Beaty, Terri H.; Lomas, David A.; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Bossé, Yohan; Obeidat, M. A.; Loth, Daan W.; Lahousse, Lies; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hofman, Andre; Stricker, Bruno H.; Brusselle, Guy G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Brouwer, Uilke; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Vonk, Judith M.; Nawijn, Martijn C.; Groen, Harry J. M.; Timens, Wim; Boezen, H. Marike; Postma, Dirkje S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH) is associated with an increased frequency of respiratory infections, excess lung function decline, and increased hospitalisation and mortality rates in the general population. It is associated with smoking, but it is unknown why only a minority of smokers develops CMH. A plausible explanation for this phenomenon is a predisposing genetic constitution. Therefore, we performed a genome wide association (GWA) study of CMH in Caucasian populations. Methods GWA analysis was performed in the NELSON-study using the Illumina 610 array, followed by replication and meta-analysis in 11 additional cohorts. In total 2,704 subjects with, and 7,624 subjects without CMH were included, all current or former heavy smokers (≥20 pack-years). Additional studies were performed to test the functional relevance of the most significant single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Results A strong association with CMH, consistent across all cohorts, was observed with rs6577641 (p = 4.25×10−6, OR = 1.17), located in intron 9 of the special AT-rich sequence-binding protein 1 locus (SATB1) on chromosome 3. The risk allele (G) was associated with higher mRNA expression of SATB1 (4.3×10−9) in lung tissue. Presence of CMH was associated with increased SATB1 mRNA expression in bronchial biopsies from COPD patients. SATB1 expression was induced during differentiation of primary human bronchial epithelial cells in culture. Conclusions Our findings, that SNP rs6577641 is associated with CMH in multiple cohorts and is a cis-eQTL for SATB1, together with our additional observation that SATB1 expression increases during epithelial differentiation provide suggestive evidence that SATB1 is a gene that affects CMH. PMID:24714607