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Sample records for alleles multivalent pfama1

  1. Immunization with different PfAMA1 alleles in sequence induces clonal imprint humoral responses that are similar to responses induced by the same alleles as a vaccine cocktail in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Alan W

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibodies to key Plasmodium falciparum surface antigens have been shown to be important effectors that mediate clinical immunity to malaria. The cross-strain fraction of anti-malarial antibodies may however be required to achieve strain-transcending immunity. Such antibody responses against Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (PfAMA1, a vaccine target molecule that is expressed in both liver and blood stages of the parasite, can be elicited through immunization with a mixture of allelic variants of the parasite molecule. Cross-strain antibodies are most likely elicited against epitopes that are shared by the allelic antigens in the vaccine cocktail. Methods A standard competition ELISA was used to address whether the antibody response can be further focused on shared epitopes by exclusively boosting these common determinants through immunization of rabbits with different PfAMA1 alleles in sequence. The in vitro parasite growth inhibition assay was used to further evaluate the functional effects of the broadened antibody response that is characteristic of multi-allele vaccine strategies. Results A mixed antigen immunization protocol elicited humoral responses that were functionally similar to those elicited by a sequential immunization protocol (p > 0.05. Sequential exposure to the different PfAMA1 allelic variants induced immunological recall of responses to previous alleles and yielded functional cross-strain antibodies that would be capable of optimal growth inhibition of variant parasites at high enough concentrations. Conclusions These findings may have implications for the current understanding of the natural acquisition of clinical immunity to malaria as well as for rational vaccine design.

  2. Production, Quality Control, Stability and Pharmacotoxicity of a Malaria Vaccine Comprising Three Highly Similar PfAMA1 Protein Molecules to Overcome Antigenic Variation.

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    Bart W Faber

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (PfAMA1 is a leading asexual blood stage vaccine candidate for malaria. In preparation for clinical trials, three Diversity Covering (DiCo PfAMA1 ectodomain proteins, designed to overcome the intrinsic polymorphism that is present in PfAMA1, were produced under Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP in Pichia pastoris. Using identical methodology, the 3 strains were cultivated in 70-L scale fed-batch fermentations and PfAMA1-DiCos were purified by two chromatography steps, an ultrafiltration/diafiltration procedure and size exclusion chromatography, resulting in highly pure (>95% PfAMA1-DiCo1, PfAMA1 DiCo2 and PfAMA1 DiCo3, with final yields of 1.8, 1.9 and 1.3 gram, respectively. N-terminal determinations showed that approximately 50% of each of the proteins lost 12 residues from their N-terminus, in accordance with SDS-PAGE (2 main bands and MS-data. Under reducing conditions a site of limited proteolytic cleavage within a disulphide bonded region became evident. The three proteins quantitatively bound to the mAb 4G2 that recognizes a conformational epitope, suggesting proper folding of the proteins. The lyophilized Drug Product (1:1:1 mixture of PfAMA1-DiCo1, DiCo2, DiCo3 fulfilled all pre-set release criteria (appearance, dissolution rate, identity, purity, protein content, moisture content, sub-visible particles, immuno-potency (after reconstitution with adjuvant, abnormal toxicity, sterility and endotoxin, was stable in accelerated and real-time stability studies at -20°C for over 24 months. When formulated with adjuvants selected for clinical phase I evaluation, the Drug Product did not show adverse effect in a repeated-dose toxicity study in rabbits. The Drug Product has entered a phase Ia/Ib clinical trial.

  3. Multivalency in supramolecular chemistry and nanofabrication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, A.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Reinhoudt, David

    2004-01-01

    Multivalency is a powerful and versatile self-assembly pathway that confers unique thermodynamic and kinetic behavior onto supramolecular complexes. The diversity of the examples of supramolecular multivalent systems discussed in this perspective shows that the concept of multivalency is a general

  4. Certain Admissible Classes of Multivalent Functions

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    M. K. Aouf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate some applications of the differential subordination and the differential superordination of certain admissible classes of multivalent functions in the open unit disk U. Several differential sandwich-type results are also obtained.

  5. Multivalent Fusion DNA Vaccine against Brucella abortus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Leonardo; Llanos, Javiera; Escalona, Emilia; Sáez, Darwin; Álvarez, Francisco; Molina, Raúl; Flores, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    As an alternative brucellosis prevention method, we evaluated the immunogenicity induced by new multivalent DNA vaccines in BALB/c mice. We constructed the vaccines by fusion of BAB1_0273 and/or BAB1_0278 open reading frames (ORFs) from genomic island 3 (GI-3) and the Brucella abortus 2308 sodC gene with a link based on prolines and alanines (pV273-sod, pV278-sod, and pV273-278-sod, resp.). Results show that immunization with all tested multivalent DNA vaccines induced a specific humoral and cellular immune response. These novel multivalent vaccines significantly increased the production of IgM, IgG, and IgG2a antibodies as well as IFN-γ levels and the lymphoproliferative response of splenocytes. Although immunization with these multivalent vaccines induced a typical T-helper 1- (Th1-) dominated immune response, such immunogenicity conferred low protection levels in mice challenged with the B. abortus 2308 pathogenic strain. Our results demonstrated that the expression of BAB1_0273 and/or BABl_0278 antigens conjugated to SOD protein can polarize mice immunity to a Th1-type phenotype, conferring low levels of protection. PMID:29082252

  6. Multivalent Fusion DNA Vaccine against Brucella abortus

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    Leonardo Gómez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As an alternative brucellosis prevention method, we evaluated the immunogenicity induced by new multivalent DNA vaccines in BALB/c mice. We constructed the vaccines by fusion of BAB1_0273 and/or BAB1_0278 open reading frames (ORFs from genomic island 3 (GI-3 and the Brucella abortus 2308 sodC gene with a link based on prolines and alanines (pV273-sod, pV278-sod, and pV273-278-sod, resp.. Results show that immunization with all tested multivalent DNA vaccines induced a specific humoral and cellular immune response. These novel multivalent vaccines significantly increased the production of IgM, IgG, and IgG2a antibodies as well as IFN-γ levels and the lymphoproliferative response of splenocytes. Although immunization with these multivalent vaccines induced a typical T-helper 1- (Th1- dominated immune response, such immunogenicity conferred low protection levels in mice challenged with the B. abortus 2308 pathogenic strain. Our results demonstrated that the expression of BAB1_0273 and/or BABl_0278 antigens conjugated to SOD protein can polarize mice immunity to a Th1-type phenotype, conferring low levels of protection.

  7. Multivalent glycoconjugates as anti-pathogenic agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernardi, J.; Jiménez-Barbero, J.; Casnati, A.; Castro, C.; Darbre, T.; Fieschi, F.; Finne, J.; Funken, H.; Jaeger, K.E.; Lahmann, M.; Lindhorst, T.K.; Marradi, M.; Messner, P.; Molinaro, A.; Murphy, P.V.; Nativi, C.; Oscarson, S.; Penadés, S.; Peri, F.; Pieters, R.J.; Renaudet, O.; Reymond, J.L.; Richichi, B.; Rojo, J.; Sansone, F.; Schäffer, C.; Turnbull, W.B.; Velasco-Torrijos, T.; Vidal, S.; Vincent, S.; Wennekes, T.; Zuilhof, H.; Imberty, A.

    2013-01-01

    Multivalency plays a major role in biological processes and particularly in the relationship between pathogenic microorganisms and their host that involves protein-glycan recognition. These interactions occur during the first steps of infection, for specific recognition between host and bacteria,

  8. Predicting hydration energies for multivalent ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Martin Peter; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2014-01-01

    We have predicted the free energy of hydration for 40 monovalent and multivalent cations and anions using density functional theory and the implicit solvent model COnductor like Screening MOdel for Real Solvents (COSMO-RS) at the Becke-Perdew (BP)/Triple zeta valence with polarization functions...... errors. Our results indicate that quantum chemical calculations combined with COSMO-RS solvent treatment is a reliable method for treating multivalent ions in solution, provided one hydration shell of explicit water molecules is included for metal cations. The accuracy is not high enough to allow...... absolute predictions of hydration energies but could be used to investigate trends for several ions, thanks to the low computational cost, in particular for ligand exchange reactions....

  9. Multivalent supramolecular dendrimer-based drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeazzi, Simone; Hermans, Thomas M; Paolino, Marco; Anzini, Maurizio; Mennuni, Laura; Giordani, Antonio; Caselli, Gianfranco; Makovec, Francesco; Meijer, E W; Vomero, Salvatore; Cappelli, Andrea

    2010-01-11

    Supramolecular complexes consisting of a hydrophobic dendrimer host [DAB-dendr-(NHCONH-Ad)(64)] as well as solubilizing and bioactive guest molecules have been synthesized using a noncovalent approach. The guest-host supramolecular assembly is first preassembled in chloroform and transferred via the neat phase to aqueous solution. The bioactive guest molecules can bind to a natural (serotonin 5-HT(3)) receptor with nanomolar affinity as well as to the synthetic dendrimer receptor in aqueous solution, going toward a dynamic multivalent supramolecular construct capable of adapting itself to a multimeric receptor motif.

  10. IMMUNOSTIMULATORY PROPERTIES OF DENDRIMERS MULTIVALENTLY PRESENTING MURAMYLDIPEPTIDE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    antigen-presentation. This project aims at using small PAMP-units to prepare molecularly defined adjuvants for the targeted delivery of antigens in an optimally immunostimulatory manner. Methods: We investigated whether the repetitive structure of PAMPs may be mimicked by multivalent presentation of PAMP......Objectives: Many pathogens will only be efficiently neutralized by the induction of cell-mediated immunity, and with the enhanced use of subunit-vaccine approaches there is a strong need for the development of efficient and safe Th1-biassing adjuvants. Pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs......) are evolutionarily conserved microbial structures, generally composed of repeated molecular units of small size, and recognized by pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs). Binding of PAMPs to certain PRRs induces dendritic cells to express costimulatory molecules and inflammatory cytokines, enabling an inductive...

  11. Synthetic multivalent antifungal peptides effective against fungi.

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    Rajamani Lakshminarayanan

    Full Text Available Taking advantage of the cluster effect observed in multivalent peptides, this work describes antifungal activity and possible mechanism of action of tetravalent peptide (B4010 which carries 4 copies of the sequence RGRKVVRR through a branched lysine core. B4010 displayed better antifungal properties than natamycin and amphotericin B. The peptide retained significant activity in the presence of monovalent/divalent cations, trypsin and serum and tear fluid. Moreover, B4010 is non-haemolytic and non-toxic to mice by intraperitoneal (200 mg/kg or intravenous (100 mg/kg routes. S. cerevisiae mutant strains with altered membrane sterol structures and composition showed hyper senstivity to B4010. The peptide had no affinity for cell wall polysaccharides and caused rapid dissipation of membrane potential and release of vital ions and ATP when treated with C. albicans. We demonstrate that additives which alter the membrane potential or membrane rigidity protect C. albicans from B4010-induced lethality. Calcein release assay and molecular dynamics simulations showed that the peptide preferentially binds to mixed bilayer containing ergosterol over phophotidylcholine-cholesterol bilayers. The studies further suggested that the first arginine is important for mediating peptide-bilayer interactions. Replacing the first arginine led to a 2-4 fold decrease in antifungal activities and reduced membrane disruption properties. The combined in silico and in vitro approach should facilitate rational design of new tetravalent antifungal peptides.

  12. Multivalent interaction based carbohydrate biosensors for signal amplification

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    Wang, Yanyan; Chalagalla, Srinivas; Li, Tiehai; Sun, Xue-long; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Peng; Zeng, Xiangqun

    2010-01-01

    Multivalent interaction between boronic acids immobilized on Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) sensor surface and the carbohydrates modified Au - nanoparticle (AuNP) has been demonstrated for the development of a sensitive carbohydrate biosensor. Briefly, a boronic acid - containing polymer (boropolymer) as multivalent carbohydrate receptor was oriented immobilized on the cysteamine coated electrode through isourea bond formation. Carbohydrates were conjugated to AuNPs to generate a multivalent carbohydrates moiety to amplify the response signal. Thus, the binding of the carbohydrate conjugated AuNPs to the boropolymer surface are multivalent which could simultaneously increase the binding affinity and specificity. We systematically studied the binding between five carbohydrate conjugated AuNPs and the boropolymer. Our studies show that the associate constant (Ka) was in the order of fucose carbohydrate analytes. Furthermore, the multivalent binding between carbohydrates and boronic acids are reversible and allow the regeneration of boropolymer surface by using 1M acetic acid so as to sequentially capture and release the carbohydrate analytes. PMID:20863680

  13. Probing multivalent interactions in a synthetic host-guest complex by dynamic force spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomez Casado, A.; Dam, H.H.; Yilmaz, M.D.; Florea, D.; Florea, Daniel; Jonkheijm, Pascal; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2011-01-01

    Multivalency is present in many biological and synthetic systems. Successful application of multivalency depends on a correct understanding of the thermodynamics and kinetics of this phenomenon. In this Article, we address the stability and strength of multivalent bonds with force spectroscopy

  14. Anomalous Protein-Protein Interactions in Multivalent Salt Solution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pasquier, C.; Vazdar, M.; Forsman, J.; Jungwirth, Pavel; Lund, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 14 (2017), s. 3000-3006 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-01074S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Monte Carlo * molecular dynamics * membranes * proteins * multivalent salts Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 3.177, year: 2016

  15. Glycodendrimers: tools to explore multivalent galectin-1 interactions

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    Jonathan M. Cousin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Four generations of lactose-functionalized polyamidoamine (PAMAM were employed to further the understanding of multivalent galectin-1 mediated interactions. Dynamic light scattering and fluorescence microscopy were used to study the multivalent interaction of galectin-1 with the glycodendrimers in solution, and glycodendrimers were observed to organize galectin-1 into nanoparticles. In the presence of a large excess of galectin-1, glycodendrimers nucleated galectin-1 into nanoparticles that were remarkably homologous in size (400–500 nm. To understand augmentation of oncologic cellular aggregation by galectin-1, glycodendrimers were used in cell-based assays with human prostate carcinoma cells (DU145. The results revealed that glycodendrimers provided competitive binding sites for galectin-1, which diverted galectin-1 from its typical function in cellular aggregation of DU145 cells.

  16. Attraction between DNA molecules mediated by multivalent ions

    OpenAIRE

    Allahyarov, E.; Gompper, G.; Löwen, H.

    2004-01-01

    The effective force between two parallel DNA molecules is calculated as a function of their mutual separation for different valencies of counterion and salt ions and different salt concentrations. Computer simulations of the primitive model are used and the shape of the DNA molecules is accurately modeled using different geometrical shapes. We find that multivalent ions induce a significant attraction between the DNA molecules whose strength can be tuned by the averaged valency of the ions. T...

  17. Secondary batteries with multivalent ions for energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chengjun; Chen, Yanyi; Shi, Shan; Li, Jia; Kang, Feiyu; Su, Dangsheng

    2015-09-14

    The use of electricity generated from clean and renewable sources, such as water, wind, or sunlight, requires efficiently distributed electrical energy storage by high-power and high-energy secondary batteries using abundant, low-cost materials in sustainable processes. American Science Policy Reports state that the next-generation "beyond-lithium" battery chemistry is one feasible solution for such goals. Here we discover new "multivalent ion" battery chemistry beyond lithium battery chemistry. Through theoretic calculation and experiment confirmation, stable thermodynamics and fast kinetics are presented during the storage of multivalent ions (Ni(2+), Zn(2+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Ba(2+), or La(3+) ions) in alpha type manganese dioxide. Apart from zinc ion battery, we further use multivalent Ni(2+) ion to invent another rechargeable battery, named as nickel ion battery for the first time. The nickel ion battery generally uses an alpha type manganese dioxide cathode, an electrolyte containing Ni(2+) ions, and Ni anode. The nickel ion battery delivers a high energy density (340 Wh kg(-1), close to lithium ion batteries), fast charge ability (1 minute), and long cycle life (over 2200 times).

  18. Multivalent weak electrolytes - risky background electrolytes for capillary zone electrophoresis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beckers, J. L.; Boček, Petr

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 12 (2002), s. 1942-1946 ISSN 0173-0835 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/99/0044; GA ČR GA203/02/0023; GA ČR GA203/01/0401; GA AV ČR IAA4031703; GA AV ČR IAA4031103 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4031919 Keywords : background electrolytes * capillary zone electrophoresis * multivalent electrolytes Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.325, year: 2002

  19. Is a multivalent hand, foot, and mouth disease vaccine feasible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Michel; Chong, Pele

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus A infections are the primary cause of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in infants and young children. Although enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CV-A16) are the predominant causes of HFMD epidemics worldwide, EV-A71 has emerged as a major neurovirulent virus responsible for severe neurological complications and fatal outcomes. HFMD is a serious health threat and economic burden across the Asia-Pacific region. Inactivated EV-A71 vaccines have elicited protection against EV-A71 but not against CV-A16 infections in large efficacy trials. The current development of a bivalent inactivated EV-A71/CV-A16 vaccine is the next step toward that of multivalent HFMD vaccines. These vaccines should ultimately include other prevalent pathogenic coxsackieviruses A (CV-A6 and CV-A10), coxsackieviruses B (B3 and B5) and echovirus 30 that often co-circulate during HFMD epidemics and can cause severe HFMD, aseptic meningitis and acute viral myocarditis. The prospect and challenges for the development of such multivalent vaccines are discussed. PMID:26009802

  20. Solid-phase synthesis of multivalent metal phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstant, Z.A.

    1984-01-01

    Some multivalent metals (Mg, Zn, Mn, Co, Ni, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Ce) are used as examples for considering certain general problems (mechanism, phase formation) of solid-phase synthesis of phosphates from metal oxides and ammonium dihydrophosphate (t=200-1500 deg C). It is noted that the observed phenomena, such as parallel reactionS, formation of several modifications of one compound is characteristic of solid-phase synthesis of condensed phosphates when condensation is determined by the metal-phosphorus ratio, potential cation coordination and thermodynamic characteristics of polymers being prepared. The possibility of oxidation-reduction reactions with multiple changes in the valence of elements is also very important. Complex schemes of interactions, phase diagrams of the systems are presented

  1. The Role of Multivalent Counterions in Protein Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fajun

    2012-02-01

    In this talk, I will give an overview of our recent studies on the phase behavior of model globular proteins in solution in the presence of multivalent counterions. We have shown that negatively charged globular proteins at neutral pH in the presence of multivalent counterions undergo a ``reentrant condensation (RC)'' phase behavior [1,2], i.e. a phase-separated regime occurs in between two critical salt concentrations, c* proteins as confirmed by zeta-potential measurements and supported by Monte Carlo simulations [1,2]. Crystallization from the condensed regime follows different mechanisms. Near c*, crystals grow following a classic nucleation and growth mechanism; near c**, the crystallization follows a two-step mechanism, i.e, crystals growth follows a metastable LLPS [3,4]. Nucleation rate is faster from the protein-poor phase than that from the protein-rich phase, which cannot be explained by the recent theories. SAXS measurements demonstrate that protein clusters act as precursors for crystal growth, which reduce the energy barrier of nucleation [4]. X-ray diffraction analyses on the high quality single crystals provide direct evidence of the crystal structure and cation binding sites [3]. The bridging effect of the metal cations explains the cluster formation.[4pt] [1] Zhang, F.; et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2008, 101, 148101.[0pt] [2] Zhang, F.; et al. Proteins 2010, 78, 3450.[0pt] [3] Zhang, F.; et al. J. Appl. Cryst. 2011, 44, 755.[0pt] [4] Zhang, F.; et al. In preparation.

  2. Multivalent nanomaterials: learning from vaccines and progressing to antigen-specific immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwell, Brittany L; Antunez, Lorena; Sullivan, Bradley P; Thati, Sharadvi; Sestak, Joshua O; Berkland, Cory

    2015-02-01

    Continued development of multivalent nanomaterials has provided opportunities for the advancement of antigen-specific immunotherapies. New insights emerge when considering the backdrop of vaccine design, which has long employed multivalent presentation of antigen to more strongly engage and enhance an immunogenic response. Additionally, vaccines traditionally codeliver antigen with adjuvant to amplify a robust antigen-specific response. Multivalent nanomaterials have since evolved for applications where immune tolerance is desired, such as autoimmune diseases or allergies. In particular, soluble, linear polymers may be tailored to direct antigen-specific immunogenicity or tolerance by modulating polymer length, ligand valency (number), and ligand density, in addition to incorporating secondary signals. Codelivery of a secondary signal may direct, amplify, or suppress the response to a given antigen. Although the ability of multivalent nanomaterials to enact an immune response through molecular mechanisms has been established, a transport mechanism for biodistribution must also be considered. Both mechanisms are influenced by ligand display and other physical properties of the nanomaterial. This review highlights multivalent ligand display on linear polymers, the complex interplay of physical parameters in multivalent design, and the ability to direct the immune response by molecular and transport mechanisms. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  3. Quantitative Prediction of Multivalent Ligand-Receptor Binding Affinities for Influenza, Cholera, and Anthrax Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liese, Susanne; Netz, Roland R

    2018-03-05

    Multivalency achieves strong, yet reversible binding by the simultaneous formation of multiple weak bonds. It is a key interaction principle in biology and promising for the synthesis of high-affinity inhibitors of pathogens. We present a molecular model for the binding affinity of synthetic multivalent ligands onto multivalent receptors consisting of n receptor units arranged on a regular polygon. Ligands consist of a geometrically matching rigid polygonal core to which monovalent ligand units are attached via flexible linker polymers, closely mimicking existing experimental designs. The calculated binding affinities quantitatively agree with experimental studies for cholera toxin ( n = 5) and anthrax receptor ( n = 7) and allow to predict optimal core size and optimal linker length. Maximal binding affinity is achieved for a core that matches the receptor size and for linkers that have an equilibrium end-to-end distance that is slightly longer than the geometric separation between ligand core and receptor sites. Linkers that are longer than optimal are greatly preferable compared to shorter linkers. The angular steric restriction between ligand unit and linker polymer is shown to be a key parameter. We construct an enhancement diagram that quantifies the multivalent binding affinity compared to monovalent ligands. We conclude that multivalent ligands against influenza viral hemagglutinin ( n = 3), cholera toxin ( n = 5), and anthrax receptor ( n = 7) can outperform monovalent ligands only for a monovalent ligand affinity that exceeds a core-size dependent threshold value. Thus, multivalent drug design needs to balance core size, linker length, as well as monovalent ligand unit affinity.

  4. Molecular Basis of Allele-Specific Efficacy of a Blood-Stage Malaria Vaccine: Vaccine Development Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouattara, Amed; Takala-Harrison, Shannon; Thera, Mahamadou A.; Coulibaly, Drissa; Niangaly, Amadou; Saye, Renion; Tolo, Youssouf; Dutta, Sheetij; Heppner, D. Gray; Soisson, Lorraine; Diggs, Carter L.; Vekemans, Johan; Cohen, Joe; Blackwelder, William C.; Dube, Tina; Laurens, Matthew B.; Doumbo, Ogobara K.; Plowe, Christopher V.

    2013-01-01

    The disappointing efficacy of blood-stage malaria vaccines may be explained in part by allele-specific immune responses that are directed against polymorphic epitopes on blood-stage antigens. FMP2.1/AS02A, a blood-stage candidate vaccine based on apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) from the 3D7 strain of Plasmodium falciparum, had allele-specific efficacy against clinical malaria in a phase II trial in Malian children. We assessed the cross-protective efficacy of the malaria vaccine and inferred which polymorphic amino acid positions in AMA1 were the targets of protective allele-specific immune responses. FMP2.1/AS02A had the highest efficacy against AMA1 alleles that were identical to the 3D7 vaccine-type allele at 8 highly polymorphic amino acid positions in the cluster 1 loop (c1L) but differed from 3D7 elsewhere in the molecule. Comparison of the incidence of vaccine-type alleles before and after vaccination in the malaria vaccine and control groups and examination of the patterns of allele change at polymorphic positions in consecutive malaria episodes suggest that the highly polymorphic amino acid position 197 in c1L was the most critical determinant of allele-specific efficacy. These results indicate that a multivalent AMA1 vaccine with broad efficacy could include only a limited set of key alleles of this extremely polymorphic antigen. PMID:23204168

  5. Stability of anionic polymers in presence of multivalent cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabbagh, Imad

    1997-01-01

    This research thesis aimed at studying the stability of poly-electrolytes in saline environments, and the interactions between ions and poly-electrolytes of different charge densities. For this purpose, the author more particularly studied specific interactions between anionic poly-electrolytes and multivalent cations. After a recall of properties of neutral polymers and poly-electrolytes in solution, the author evokes interactions between poly-electrolytes and counter-ions, and briefly presents two models of stability of poly-electrolytes in saline solutions. The next part presents various experimental spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques and results of the characterization of the used products. Spectroscopic techniques allow ion-polymer interactions at the atomic scale to be studied, and electrochemical techniques allow the behaviour of small ions to be studied. The author then discusses the main differences of solubility between poly-electrolytes containing sulphonate or sulphate groups and those containing carboxylate groups. A model is then developed to generalise phase diagrams of a poly-electrolyte with respect to the chemical affinity of its functional group with ions of opposite sign. The author then addresses the behaviour of a non charged polyacrylic acid in various saline solutions, and presents a phase diagram model [fr

  6. Stability of anionic polymers in presence of multivalent cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabbagh, Imad

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of this research thesis were to study the stability of poly-electrolytes in saline environments, and the interactions between ions and poly-electrolytes of different charge densities. After a recall of the properties of neutral polymers and of poly-electrolytes in solution, the author evokes the interactions between poly-electrolytes and counter-ions, and briefly presents two models of stability of poly-electrolytes in saline solutions. Then, he presents different experimental techniques (scattering techniques and electrochemical techniques) and the results obtained when characterizing the used compounds. In the next part, the author discusses the basic differences of solubility between poly-electrolytes with sulfonate or sulfate groups and those with carboxylate groups. A simple model, inspired by the electrostatic model, allows poly-electrolyte phase diagram to be generalised with respect to the chemical affinity of its functional group with ions of opposed sign. The author then reports the study of the behaviour of non-charged poly-acrylic acid in various saline solutions, and then checks the behaviour of this acid within an intermediate range of dissociation level. The poly-acrylic acid structure and the distribution of ions before de-mixing are studied by X-ray and neutron scattering. The author finally tries to understand what is going on when multivalent cations are replaced by positively charged nano-metric particles (dendrimers) [fr

  7. Prion inhibition with multivalent PrPSc binding compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Charles E; Joy, Shaon; Li, Lei; Yu, Linghui; Genovesi, Sacha; West, Frederick G; Westaway, David

    2012-10-01

    Quinacrine and related heterocyclic compounds have antiprion activity. Since the infectious pathogen of prion diseases is composed of multimeric PrP(Sc) assemblies, we hypothesized that this antiprion property could be enhanced by attaching multiple quinacrine-derived chloroquinoline or acridine moieties to a scaffold. In addition to exploring Congo red dye and tetraphenylporphyrin tetracarboxylic acid scaffolds, which already possess intrinsic prion-binding ability; trimesic acid was used in this role. In practice, Congo red itself could not be modified with chloroquinoline or acridine units, and a modified dicarboxyl analog was also unreactive. The latter also lacked antiprion activity in infected cultured cells. While addition of chloroquinoline to a tetraphenylporphyrin tetracarboxylic acid scaffold resulted in some reduction of PrP(Sc), moieties attached to a trimesic acid scaffold exhibited sub-micromolar IC(50)'s as well as a toxicity profile superior to quinacrine. Antiprion activity of these molecules was influenced by the length, polarity, and rigidity associated with the variable linear or cyclic polyamine tethers, and in some instances was modulated by host-cell and/or strain type. Unexpectedly, several compounds in our series increased PrP(Sc) levels. Overall, inhibitory and enhancing properties of these multivalent compounds offer new avenues for structure-based investigation of prion biology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical applications of gamma delta T cells with multivalent immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew C Deniger

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Gamma delta T cells hold promise for adoptive immunotherapy because of their reactivity to bacteria, viruses, and tumors. However, these cells represent a small fraction (1-5% of the peripheral T-cell pool and require activation and propagation to achieve clinical benefit. Aminobisphosphonates specifically expand the Vgamma9Vdelta2 subset of gamma delta T cells and have been used in clinical trials of cancer where objective responses were detected. The Vgamma9Vdelta2 TCR heterodimer binds multiple ligands and results in a multivalent attack by a monoclonal T cell population. Alternatively, populations of gamma delta T cells with oligoclonal or polyclonal TCR repertoire could be infused for broad-range specificity. However, this goal has been restricted by a lack of applicable expansion protocols for non-Vgamma9Vdelta2 cells. Recent advances using immobilized antigens, agonistic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs, tumor-derived artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC, or combinations of activating mAbs and aAPC have been successful in expanding gamma delta T cells with oligoclonal or polyclonal TCR repertoires. Immobilized MHC Class-I chain-related A was a stimulus for gamma delta T cells expressing TCRdelta1 isotypes, and plate-bound activating antibodies have expanded Vdelta1 and Vdelta2 cells ex vivo. Clinically-sufficient quantities of TCRdelta1, TCRdelta2, and TCRdelta1negTCRdelta2neg have been produced following co-culture on aAPC, and these subsets displayed differences in memory phenotype and reactivity to tumors in vitro and in vivo. Gamma delta T cells are also amenable to genetic modification as evidenced by introduction of alpha beta TCRs, chimeric antigen receptors (CARs, and drug-resistance genes. This represents a promising future for the clinical application of oligoclonal or polyclonal gamma delta T cells in autologous and allogeneic settings that builds on current trials testing the safety and efficacy of Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells.

  9. Synthetic multivalent V3 glycopeptides display enhanced recognition by glycan-dependent HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hui; Orwenyo, Jared; Guenaga, Javier; Giddens, John; Toonstra, Christian; Wyatt, Richard T; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2017-05-14

    We describe here the synthesis of novel multivalent HIV V3 domain glycopeptides and their binding to broadly neutralizing antibodies PGT128 and 10-1074. Our binding data reveal a distinct mode of antigen recognition by the two antibodies and further suggest that multivalent glycopeptides could mimic the neutralizing epitopes more efficiently than the monomeric glycopeptide.

  10. Families of Meromorphic Multivalent Functions Associated with the Dziok-Raina Operator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Murugusundaramoorthy

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Making use a linear operator, which is defined here by means of the Hadamard product (or convolution, involving the Wright’s generalized hypergeometric function , we introduce two novel subclassesP p(q,s,α1;A,B,λ andP+p(q,s,α1;A,B,λ of meromorphically multivalent functions oforder λ(0 ≤ λ < p in the punctured disc U∗. In this paper we investigate the various important properties and characteristics of these subclasses of meromorphically multivalent functions. We extend the familiar concept of neighborhoods of analytic functions to these subclasses of meromorphically multivalent functions . We also derive many interesting results for the Hadamard products of functions belonging to the classP+p(q,s,α1;A,B,λ.

  11. Tunable Graphitic Carbon Nano-Onions Development in Carbon Nanofibers for Multivalent Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Haiqing L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    We developed a novel porous graphitic carbon nanofiber material using a synthesis strategy combining electrospinning and catalytic graphitization. RF hydrogel was used as carbon precursors, transition metal ions were successfully introduced into the carbon matrix by binding to the carboxylate groups of a resorcinol derivative. Transition metal particles were homogeneously distributed throughout the carbon matrix, which are used as in-situ catalysts to produce graphitic fullerene-like nanostructures surrounding the metals. The success design of graphitic carbons with enlarged interlayer spacing will enable the multivalent ion intercalation for the development of multivalent rechargeable batteries.

  12. 6-Azido hyacinthacine A2 gives a straightforward access to the first multivalent pyrrolizidine architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Adamio, Giampiero; Parmeggiani, Camilla; Goti, Andrea; Moreno-Vargas, Antonio J; Moreno-Clavijo, Elena; Robina, Inmaculada; Cardona, Francesca

    2014-08-28

    The synthesis of the first multivalent pyrrolizidine iminosugars is reported. The key azido intermediates 4 and 31 were prepared after suitable synthetic elaboration of the cycloadduct obtained from 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of D-arabinose derived nitrone to dimethylacrylamide. The key step of the strategy was the stereoselective installation of an azido moiety at C-6 of the pyrrolizidine skeleton. The click reaction with different monovalent and dendrimeric alkyne scaffolds allowed the preparation of a library of new mono- and multivalent pyrrolizidine compounds that were preliminarily assayed as glycosidase inhibitors towards a panel of commercially available glycosyl hydrolases.

  13. Proofreading of Peptide-MHC Complexes through Dynamic Multivalent Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christoph; Tampé, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The adaptive immune system is able to detect and destroy cells that are malignantly transformed or infected by intracellular pathogens. Specific immune responses against these cells are elicited by antigenic peptides that are presented on major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules and recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes at the cell surface. Since these MHC I-presented peptides are generated in the cytosol by proteasomal protein degradation, they can be metaphorically described as a window providing immune cells with insights into the state of the cellular proteome. A crucial element of MHC I antigen presentation is the peptide-loading complex (PLC), a multisubunit machinery, which contains as key constituents the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and the MHC I-specific chaperone tapasin (Tsn). While TAP recognizes and shuttles the cytosolic antigenic peptides into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Tsn samples peptides in the ER for their ability to form stable complexes with MHC I, a process called peptide proofreading or peptide editing. Through its selection of peptides that improve MHC I stability, Tsn contributes to the hierarchy of immunodominant peptide epitopes. Despite the fact that it concerns a key event in adaptive immunity, insights into the catalytic mechanism of peptide proofreading carried out by Tsn have only lately been gained via biochemical, biophysical, and structural studies. Furthermore, a Tsn homolog called TAP-binding protein-related (TAPBPR) has only recently been demonstrated to function as a second MHC I-specific chaperone and peptide proofreader. Although TAPBPR is PLC-independent and has a distinct allomorph specificity, it is likely to share a common catalytic mechanism with Tsn. This review focuses on the current knowledge of the multivalent protein-protein interactions and the concomitant dynamic molecular processes underlying peptide-proofreading catalysis. We do not only derive a model that

  14. Proofreading of Peptide—MHC Complexes through Dynamic Multivalent Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christoph; Tampé, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The adaptive immune system is able to detect and destroy cells that are malignantly transformed or infected by intracellular pathogens. Specific immune responses against these cells are elicited by antigenic peptides that are presented on major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules and recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes at the cell surface. Since these MHC I-presented peptides are generated in the cytosol by proteasomal protein degradation, they can be metaphorically described as a window providing immune cells with insights into the state of the cellular proteome. A crucial element of MHC I antigen presentation is the peptide-loading complex (PLC), a multisubunit machinery, which contains as key constituents the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and the MHC I-specific chaperone tapasin (Tsn). While TAP recognizes and shuttles the cytosolic antigenic peptides into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Tsn samples peptides in the ER for their ability to form stable complexes with MHC I, a process called peptide proofreading or peptide editing. Through its selection of peptides that improve MHC I stability, Tsn contributes to the hierarchy of immunodominant peptide epitopes. Despite the fact that it concerns a key event in adaptive immunity, insights into the catalytic mechanism of peptide proofreading carried out by Tsn have only lately been gained via biochemical, biophysical, and structural studies. Furthermore, a Tsn homolog called TAP-binding protein-related (TAPBPR) has only recently been demonstrated to function as a second MHC I-specific chaperone and peptide proofreader. Although TAPBPR is PLC-independent and has a distinct allomorph specificity, it is likely to share a common catalytic mechanism with Tsn. This review focuses on the current knowledge of the multivalent protein–protein interactions and the concomitant dynamic molecular processes underlying peptide-proofreading catalysis. We do not only derive a model that

  15. Genetically engineered multivalent single chain antibody constructs for cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surinder Batra, Ph D

    2006-02-27

    its tumor: normal tissue ratio for improved therapeutic index, we engineered a variety antibody constructs. These constructs were evaluated using novel approaches like special radionuclides, pretargeting and optimization. Due to the smaller size, the engineered antibody molecules should penetrate better throughout a tumor mass, with less dose heterogeneity, than is the case with intact IgG. Multivalent scFvs with an appropriate radionuclide, therefore, hold promising prospects for cancer therapy and clinical imaging in MAb-based radiopharmaceuticals. In addition, the human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMA) responses in patients against antibody-based therapy are usually directed against the immunoglobulin constant regions; however, anti-idiotypic responses can also be detected. The HAMA responses reduce the efficacy of treatment by removing the circulating antibody molecules, fragments, and possibly scFvs by altering the pharmacokinetic properties of the antibody. HAMA responses against divalent IgG, divalent Ig fragments, and possibly multimeric scFvs could cause immune complex formation with hypersensitivity or allergic reactions that could be harmful to patients. The use of small molecules, such as scFvs (monomeric as well as multimeric), with their shorter biological half-lives and the lack of the constant regions and humanized variable (binding regions) performed in our studies should reduce the development of HAMA. The generation of humanized and fully human scFvs should further reduce the development of HAMA. Specific accomplishments on the project are the production of large amounts of recombinant antibodies as they are required in large amounts for cancer diagnosis and therapy. A variety of single-chain Fv (scFv) constructs were engineered for the desired pharmacokinetic properties. Tetrameric and dimeric scFvs showed a two-fold advantage: (1) there was a considerable gain in avidity as compared to smaller fragments, and (2) the biological half-life was more

  16. Genetically engineered multivalent single chain antibody constructs for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surinder Batra

    2006-01-01

    increase its tumor: normal tissue ratio for improved therapeutic index, we engineered a variety antibody constructs. These constructs were evaluated using novel approaches like special radionuclides, pretargeting and optimization. Due to the smaller size, the engineered antibody molecules should penetrate better throughout a tumor mass, with less dose heterogeneity, than is the case with intact IgG. Multivalent scFvs with an appropriate radionuclide, therefore, hold promising prospects for cancer therapy and clinical imaging in MAb-based radiopharmaceuticals. In addition, the human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMA) responses in patients against antibody-based therapy are usually directed against the immunoglobulin constant regions; however, anti-idiotypic responses can also be detected. The HAMA responses reduce the efficacy of treatment by removing the circulating antibody molecules, fragments, and possibly scFvs by altering the pharmacokinetic properties of the antibody. HAMA responses against divalent IgG, divalent Ig fragments, and possibly multimeric scFvs could cause immune complex formation with hypersensitivity or allergic reactions that could be harmful to patients. The use of small molecules, such as scFvs (monomeric as well as multimeric), with their shorter biological half-lives and the lack of the constant regions and humanized variable (binding regions) performed in our studies should reduce the development of HAMA. The generation of humanized and fully human scFvs should further reduce the development of HAMA. Specific accomplishments on the project are the production of large amounts of recombinant antibodies as they are required in large amounts for cancer diagnosis and therapy. A variety of single-chain Fv (scFv) constructs were engineered for the desired pharmacokinetic properties. Tetrameric and dimeric scFvs showed a two-fold advantage: (1) there was a considerable gain in avidity as compared to smaller fragments, and (2) the biological half-life was more

  17. Partial Molar Liquidus Temperatures of Multivalent Elements in Multicomponent Borosilicate Glass

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrma, P.; Izák, Pavel; Vienna, J. D.; Thomas, M. L.; Irwin, G. M.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 2 (2002), s. 119-127 ISSN 0031-9090 Grant - others:DOE(US) DE/AC06/76RLO1830 Keywords : molar liquids * multivalent elements * glass Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 0.691, year: 2002

  18. The role of multivalency in the association kinetics of patchy particle complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Arthur C; Groenewold, Jan; Kegel, Willem K; Bolhuis, Peter G

    2017-06-21

    Association and dissociation of particles are elementary steps in many natural and technological relevant processes. For many such processes, the presence of multiple binding sites is essential. For instance, protein complexes and regular structures such as virus shells are formed from elementary building blocks with multiple binding sites. Here we address a fundamental question concerning the role of multivalency of binding sites in the association kinetics of such complexes. Using single replica transition interface sampling simulations, we investigate the influence of the multivalency on the binding kinetics and the association mechanism of patchy particles that form polyhedral clusters. When the individual bond strength is fixed, the kinetics naturally is very dependent on the multivalency, with dissociation rate constants exponentially decreasing with the number of bonds. In contrast, we find that when the total bond energy per particle is kept constant, association and dissociation rate constants turn out rather independent of multivalency, although of course still very dependent on the total energy. The association and dissociation mechanisms, however, depend on the presence and nature of the intermediate states. For instance, pathways that visit intermediate states are less prevalent for particles with five binding sites compared to the case of particles with only three bonds. The presence of intermediate states can lead to kinetic trapping and malformed aggregates. We discuss implications for natural forming complexes such as virus shells and for the design of artificial colloidal patchy particles.

  19. Investigation of original multivalent iminosugars as pharmacological chaperones for the treatment of Gaucher disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laigre, Eugénie; Hazelard, Damien; Casas, Josefina; Serra-Vinardell, Jenny; Michelakakis, Helen; Mavridou, Irene; Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.; Delgado, Antonio; Compain, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Multivalent iminosugars conjugated with a morpholine moiety and/or designed as prodrugs have been prepared and evaluated as new classes of pharmacological chaperones for the treatment of Gaucher disease. This study further confirms the interest of the prodrug concept and shows that the addition of a

  20. Allele coding in genomic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christensen Ole F

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic data are used in animal breeding to assist genetic evaluation. Several models to estimate genomic breeding values have been studied. In general, two approaches have been used. One approach estimates the marker effects first and then, genomic breeding values are obtained by summing marker effects. In the second approach, genomic breeding values are estimated directly using an equivalent model with a genomic relationship matrix. Allele coding is the method chosen to assign values to the regression coefficients in the statistical model. A common allele coding is zero for the homozygous genotype of the first allele, one for the heterozygote, and two for the homozygous genotype for the other allele. Another common allele coding changes these regression coefficients by subtracting a value from each marker such that the mean of regression coefficients is zero within each marker. We call this centered allele coding. This study considered effects of different allele coding methods on inference. Both marker-based and equivalent models were considered, and restricted maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods were used in inference. Results Theoretical derivations showed that parameter estimates and estimated marker effects in marker-based models are the same irrespective of the allele coding, provided that the model has a fixed general mean. For the equivalent models, the same results hold, even though different allele coding methods lead to different genomic relationship matrices. Calculated genomic breeding values are independent of allele coding when the estimate of the general mean is included into the values. Reliabilities of estimated genomic breeding values calculated using elements of the inverse of the coefficient matrix depend on the allele coding because different allele coding methods imply different models. Finally, allele coding affects the mixing of Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms, with the centered coding being

  1. Polyelectrolyte Properties in Mono and Multi-Valent Ionic Media: Brushes and Complex Coacervates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Robert M.

    Materials composed of polyelectrolytes have unique and interesting physical properties resulting primarily from their charged monomer segments. Polyelectrolytes, which exist in many different biological and industrial forms, have also been shown to be highly responsive to external environmental changes. Here, two specific polyelectrolyte systems, brushes and complex coacervates, are discussed in regards to how their properties can be tailored by adjusting the surrounding ionic environment with mono and multi-valent ions. End-tethered polyelectrolyte brushes, which constitute an interesting and substantial portion of polyelectrolyte applications, are well known for their ability to provide excellent lubrication and low friction when coated onto surfaces (e.g. articular cartilage and medical devices), as well as for their ability to stabilize colloidal particles in solution (e.g. paint and cosmetic materials). These properties have been extensively studied with brushes in pure mono-valent ionic media. However, polyelectrolyte brush interactions with multi-valent ions in solution are much less understood, although highly relevant considering mono and multi-valent counterions are present in most applications. Even at very low concentrations of multi-valent ions in solution, dramatic polyelectrolyte brush physical property changes can occur, resulting in collapsed chains which also adhere to one another via multi-valent bridging. Here, the strong polyelectrolyte poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) was studied using the Surface Forces Apparatus (SFA) and electrochemistry in order to investigate brush height and intermolecular interactions between two brushes as a function of multi-valent counterion population inside a brush. Complex coacervates are formed when polyanions and polycations are mixed together in proper conditions of an aqueous solution. This mixing results in a phase separation of a polymer-rich, coacervate phase composed of a chain network held together via

  2. Allele coding in genomic evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Standen, Ismo; Christensen, Ole Fredslund

    2011-01-01

    Genomic data are used in animal breeding to assist genetic evaluation. Several models to estimate genomic breeding values have been studied. In general, two approaches have been used. One approach estimates the marker effects first and then, genomic breeding values are obtained by summing marker...... effects. In the second approach, genomic breeding values are estimated directly using an equivalent model with a genomic relationship matrix. Allele coding is the method chosen to assign values to the regression coefficients in the statistical model. A common allele coding is zero for the homozygous...... this centered allele coding. This study considered effects of different allele coding methods on inference. Both marker-based and equivalent models were considered, and restricted maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods were used in inference. \\paragraph*{Results:} Theoretical derivations showed that parameter...

  3. Broadly protective adenovirus-based multivalent vaccines against highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses for pandemic preparedness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai V Vemula

    Full Text Available Recurrent outbreaks of H5, H7 and H9 avian influenza viruses in domestic poultry accompanied by their occasional transmission to humans have highlighted the public health threat posed by these viruses. Newer vaccine approaches for pandemic preparedness against these viruses are needed, given the limitations of vaccines currently approved for H5N1 viruses in terms of their production timelines and the ability to induce protective immune responses in the absence of adjuvants. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of an adenovirus (AdV-based multivalent vaccine approach for pandemic preparedness against H5, H7 and H9 avian influenza viruses in a mouse model. Replication-defective AdV vectors expressing hemagglutinin (HA from different subtypes and nucleoprotein (NP from one subtype induced high levels of humoral and cellular immune responses and conferred protection against virus replication following challenge with H5, H7 and H9 avian influenza virus subtypes. Inclusion of HA from the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus in the vaccine formulation further broadened the vaccine coverage. Significantly high levels of HA stalk-specific antibodies were observed following immunization with the multivalent vaccine. Inclusion of NP into the multivalent HA vaccine formulation resulted in the induction of CD8 T cell responses. These results suggest that a multivalent vaccine strategy may provide reasonable protection in the event of a pandemic caused by H5, H7, or H9 avian influenza virus before a strain-matched vaccine can be produced.

  4. Broadly Protective Adenovirus-Based Multivalent Vaccines against Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses for Pandemic Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemula, Sai V.; Ahi, Yadvinder S.; Swaim, Anne-Marie; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Donis, Ruben; Sambhara, Suryaprakash; Mittal, Suresh K.

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent outbreaks of H5, H7 and H9 avian influenza viruses in domestic poultry accompanied by their occasional transmission to humans have highlighted the public health threat posed by these viruses. Newer vaccine approaches for pandemic preparedness against these viruses are needed, given the limitations of vaccines currently approved for H5N1 viruses in terms of their production timelines and the ability to induce protective immune responses in the absence of adjuvants. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of an adenovirus (AdV)-based multivalent vaccine approach for pandemic preparedness against H5, H7 and H9 avian influenza viruses in a mouse model. Replication-defective AdV vectors expressing hemagglutinin (HA) from different subtypes and nucleoprotein (NP) from one subtype induced high levels of humoral and cellular immune responses and conferred protection against virus replication following challenge with H5, H7 and H9 avian influenza virus subtypes. Inclusion of HA from the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus in the vaccine formulation further broadened the vaccine coverage. Significantly high levels of HA stalk-specific antibodies were observed following immunization with the multivalent vaccine. Inclusion of NP into the multivalent HA vaccine formulation resulted in the induction of CD8 T cell responses. These results suggest that a multivalent vaccine strategy may provide reasonable protection in the event of a pandemic caused by H5, H7, or H9 avian influenza virus before a strain-matched vaccine can be produced. PMID:23638099

  5. Influence of microorganisms on the oxidation state distribution of multivalent actinides under anoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, Donald Timothy; Borkowski, Marian; Lucchini, Jean-Francois; Ams, David; Richmann, M.K.; Khaing, H.; Swanson, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    The fate and potential mobility of multivalent actinides in the subsurface is receiving increased attention as the DOE looks to cleanup the many legacy nuclear waste sites and associated subsurface contamination. Plutonium, uranium and neptunium are the near-surface multivalent contaminants of concern and are also key contaminants for the deep geologic disposal of nuclear waste. Their mobility is highly dependent on their redox distribution at their contamination source as well as along their potential migration pathways. This redox distribution is often controlled, especially in the near-surface where organic/inorganic contaminants often coexist, by the direct and indirect effects of microbial activity. Under anoxic conditions, indirect and direct bioreduction mechanisms exist that promote the prevalence of lower-valent species for multivalent actinides. Oxidation-state-specific biosorption is also an important consideration for long-term migration and can influence oxidation state distribution. Results of ongoing studies to explore and establish the oxidation-state specific interactions of soil bacteria (metal reducers and sulfate reducers) as well as halo-tolerant bacteria and Archaea for uranium, neptunium and plutonium will be presented. Enzymatic reduction is a key process in the bioreduction of plutonium and uranium, but co-enzymatic processes predominate in neptunium systems. Strong sorptive interactions can occur for most actinide oxidation states but are likely a factor in the stabilization of lower-valent species when more than one oxidation state can persist under anaerobic microbiologically-active conditions. These results for microbiologically active systems are interpreted in the context of their overall importance in defining the potential migration of multivalent actinides in the subsurface.

  6. Anti-CD20 multivalent HPMA copolymer-Fab′ conjugates for the direct induction of apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Te-Wei; Yang, Jiyuan; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2012-01-01

    A hybrid biomimetic system comprising high-molecular-weight, linear copolymer of N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) grafted with multiple Fab′ fragments of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb) was synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization followed by attachment of Fab′ fragments via thioether bonds. Exposure of human non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) Raji B cells to the multivalent conjugates resulted in crosslinking of CD20 receptors and commenceme...

  7. Synthesis of giant globular multivalent glycofullerenes as potent inhibitors in a model of Ebola virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Antonio; Sigwalt, David; Illescas, Beatriz M.; Luczkowiak, Joanna; Rodríguez-Pérez, Laura; Nierengarten, Iwona; Holler, Michel; Remy, Jean-Serge; Buffet, Kevin; Vincent, Stéphane P.; Rojo, Javier; Delgado, Rafael; Nierengarten, Jean-François; Martín, Nazario

    2016-01-01

    The use of multivalent carbohydrate compounds to block cell-surface lectin receptors is a promising strategy to inhibit the entry of pathogens into cells and could lead to the discovery of novel antiviral agents. One of the main problems with this approach, however, is that it is difficult to make compounds of an adequate size and multivalency to mimic natural systems such as viruses. Hexakis adducts of [60]fullerene are useful building blocks in this regard because they maintain a globular shape at the same time as allowing control over the size and multivalency. Here we report water-soluble tridecafullerenes decorated with 120 peripheral carbohydrate subunits, so-called ‘superballs’, that can be synthesized efficiently from hexakis adducts of [60]fullerene in one step by using copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition click chemistry. Infection assays show that these superballs are potent inhibitors of cell infection by an artificial Ebola virus with half-maximum inhibitory concentrations in the subnanomolar range.

  8. Novel Approach to Prepare {sup 99m}Tc-Based Multivalent RGD Peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuang Liu

    2012-10-24

    This project presents a novel approach to prepare the {sup 99m}Tc-bridged multivalent RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartate) peptides. This project will focus on fundamentals of {sup 99m}Tc radiochemistry. The main objective of this project is to demonstrate the proof-of-principle for the proposed radiotracers. Once a kit formulation is developed for preparation of the {sup 99m}Tc-bridged multivalent RGD peptides, various tumor-bearing animal models will be used to evaluate their potential for SPECT (single photon-emission computed tomography) imaging of cancer. We have demonstrated that (1) multimerization of cyclic RGD peptides enhances the integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} bonding affinity and radiotracer tumor uptake; (2) addition of G{sub 3} or PEG{sub 4} linkers makes it possible for two RGD motifs in 3P-RGD{sub 2} and 3G-RGD{sub 2} to achieve simultaneous integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} binding; and (3) multimers are actually bivalent (not multivalent), the presence of extra RGD motifs can enhance the tumor retention time of the radiotracer.

  9. Multivalent Polymers for Drug Delivery and Imaging: The Challenges of Conjugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Multivalent polymers offer a powerful opportunity to develop theranostic materials on the size scale of proteins that can provide targeting, imaging, and therapeutic functionality. Achieving this goal requires the presence of multiple targeting molecules, dyes, and/or drugs on the polymer scaffold. This critical review examines the synthetic, analytical, and functional challenges associated with the heterogeneity introduced by conjugation reactions as well as polymer scaffold design. First, approaches to making multivalent polymer conjugations are discussed followed by an analysis of materials that have shown particular promise biologically. Challenges in characterizing the mixed ligand distributions and the impact of these distributions on biological applications are then discussed. Where possible, molecular-level interpretations are provided for the structures that give rise to the functional ligand and molecular weight distributions present in the polymer scaffolds. Lastly, recent strategies employed for overcoming or minimizing the presence of ligand distributions are discussed. This review focuses on multivalent polymer scaffolds where average stoichiometry and/or the distribution of products have been characterized by at least one experimental technique. Key illustrative examples are provided for scaffolds that have been carried forward to in vitro and in vivo testing with significant biological results. PMID:25120091

  10. Evaluation of monovalent and multivalent iminosugars to modulate Candida albicans β-1,2-mannosyltransferase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtaux, Thomas; Sfihi-Loualia, Ghenima; Brissonnet, Yoan; Bouckaert, Julie; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Sendid, Boualem; Delplace, Florence; Fabre, Emeline; Gouin, Sébastien G; Guérardel, Yann

    2016-06-24

    β-1,2-Linked oligomannosides substitute the cell wall of numerous yeast species. Several of those including Candida albicans may cause severe infections associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, especially in immunocompromised patients. β-1,2-Mannosides are known to be involved in the pathogenic process and to elicit an immune response from the host. In C. albicans, the synthesis of β-mannosides is under the control of a family of nine genes coding for putative β-mannosyltransferases. Two of them, CaBmt1 and CaBmt3, have been shown to initiate and prime the elongation of the β-mannosides on the cell-wall mannan core. In the present study, we have assessed the modulating activities of monovalent and multivalent iminosugar analogs on these enzymes in order to control the enzymatic bio-synthesis of β-mannosides. We have identified a monovalent deoxynojirimycin (DNJ) derivative that inhibits the CaBmt1-catalyzed initiating activity, and mono-, tetra- and polyvalent deoxymannojirimycin (DMJ) that modulate the CaBmt1 activity toward the formation of a single major product. Analysis of the aggregating properties of the multivalent iminosugars showed their ability to elicit clusterization of both CaBmt1 and CaBmt3, without affecting their activity. These results suggest promising roles for multivalent iminosugars as controlling agents for the biosynthesis of β-1,2 mannosides and for monovalent DNJ derivative as a first target for the design of future β-mannosyltransferase inhibitors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Hetero-multivalent binding of cholera toxin subunit B with glycolipid mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Pratik; Singla, Akshi; Lee, Chin-An; Weatherston, Joshua D; Worstell, Nolan C; Wu, Hung-Jen

    2017-12-01

    GM 1 has generally been considered as the major receptor that binds to cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) due to its low dissociation constant. However, using a unique nanocube sensor technology, we have shown that CTB can also bind to other glycolipid receptors, fucosyl-GM 1 and GD 1 b. Additionally, we have demonstrated that GM 2 can contribute to CTB binding if present in a glycolipid mixture with a strongly binding receptor (GM 1 /fucosyl-GM 1 /GD 1 b). This hetero-multivalent binding result was unintuitive because the interaction between CTB and pure GM 2 is negligible. We hypothesized that the reduced dimensionality of CTB-GM 2 binding events is a major cause of the observed CTB binding enhancement. Once CTB has attached to a strong receptor, subsequent binding events are confined to a 2D membrane surface. Therefore, even a weak GM 2 receptor could now participate in second or higher binding events because its surface reaction rate can be up to 10 4 times higher than the bulk reaction rate. To test this hypothesis, we altered the surface reaction rate by modulating the fluidity and heterogeneity of the model membrane. Decreasing membrane fluidity reduced the binding cooperativity between GM 2 and a strong receptor. Our findings indicated a new protein-receptor binding assay, that can mimic complex cell membrane environment more accurately, is required to explore the inherent hetero-multivalency of the cell membrane. We have thus developed a new membrane perturbation protocol to efficiently screen receptor candidates involved in hetero-multivalent protein binding. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Avidity Modulation of Folate-Targeted Multivalent Dendrimers for Evaluating Biophysical Models of Cancer Targeting Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silpe, Justin E.; Sumit, Madhuresh; Thomas, Thommey P.; Huang, Baohua; Kotlyar, Alina; van Dongen, Mallory A.; Banaszak Holl, Mark M.; Orr, Bradford G.; Choi, Seok Ki

    2013-01-01

    We investigated two types of generation 5 polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers, each conjugated stochastically with a mean number of five or ten methotrexate (MTX) ligands per dendrimer (G5-MTX5, G5-MTX10), for their binding to surface-immobilized folate binding protein (FBP) as a function of receptor density. The binding study was performed under flow by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Two multivalent models were examined to simulate binding of the dendrimer to the receptor surface, showing that at relatively high receptor density, both dendrimer conjugates exhibit high avidity. However, upon reducing the receptor density by a factor of three and thirteen relative to the high density level, the avidity of the lower-valent G5-MTX5 decreases by up to several orders of magnitude (KD = nM to μM), whereas the avidity of G5-MTX10 remains largely unaffected regardless of the density variation. Notably, on the 13-fold reduced FBP surface, G5-MTX5 displays binding kinetics similar to that of monovalent methotrexate, which is patently different from the still tight binding of the higher-valent G5-MTX10. Thus, the binding analysis demonstrates that avidity displayed by multivalent MTX conjugates varies in response to the receptor density, and it can be modulated for achieving tighter, more specific binding to the higher receptor density by modulation of ligand valency. We believe this study provides experimental evidence supportive of the mechanistic hypothesis of multivalent NP uptake to a cancer cell over a healthy cell where the diseased cell expresses the folate receptor at higher density. PMID:23855478

  13. Design, synthesis, and testing of multivalent compounds targeted to melanocortin receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehigaspitiya, Dilani Chathurika

    Our focus is on developing non-invasive molecular imaging reagents, which target human cancers that presently are difficult to detect, such as melanoma. We wish to apply the multivalency concept to differentiate between healthy cells and melanoma cells. Melanoma cells are known to over-express alpha melanocyte stimulating hormone receptors. A successful multivalent construct should show greater avidity towards melanoma cells than healthy cells due to the synergistic effects arising from multivalency. Both oligomeric and shorter linear constructs bearing the minimum active sequence of melanocyte stimulating hormone, His-DPhe-Arg-Trp-NH2(MSH4), which binds with low micromolar affinity to alpha melanocyte stimulating hormone receptors, were synthesized. Binding affinities of these constructs were evaluated in a competitive binding assay by competing with labeled ligands, Eu-DTPA-PEGO-MSH7 and/or Eu-DTPA-PEGO-NDP-alpha-MSH on the engineered cell line HEK293 CCK2R/hMC4R, which is genetically modified to over-express both the cholecystokinin 2 receptor (CCK2R) and human melanocortin 4 receptor (hMC4R). The oligomers were rapidly assembled using microwave-assisted copper catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition between a dialkyne derivative of MSH4 and a diazide derivative of (Pro-Gly)3 as co-monomers. Three oligomer mixtures were further analyzed based on their degree of oligomerization and the route by which the MSH4 monomers were oligomerized, protected vs deprotected. Completive binding assay against Eu-DTPA-PEGO-MSH7 showed only a statistical enhancement of binding when calculated based on the total MSH4 concentration. However, when the calculation of avidity is based on an estimation of the particles numbers, there was a seven times enhancement of binding compared to a monovalent MSH4 control. The shorter linear multivalent MSH4 constructs were synthesized using ethylene glycol, glycerol, and mannitol as core scaffolds with maximum inter-ligand distances ranging from 27

  14. Nonlinearly Additive Forces in Multivalent Ligand Binding to a Single Protein Revealed with Force Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratto, T V; Rudd, R E; Langry, K C; Balhorn, R L; McElfresh, M W

    2005-07-15

    We present evidence of multivalent interactions between a single protein molecule and multiple carbohydrates at a pH where the protein can bind four ligands. The evidence is based not only on measurements of the force required to rupture the bonds formed between ConcanavalinA (ConA) and {alpha}-D-mannose, but also on an analysis of the polymer-extension force curves to infer the polymer architecture that binds the protein to the cantilever and the ligands to the substrate. We find that although the rupture forces for multiple carbohydrate connections to a single protein are larger than the rupture force for a single connection, they do not scale additively with increasing number. Specifically, the most common rupture forces are approximately 46, 66, and 85 pN, which we argue corresponds to 1, 2, and 3 ligands being pulled simultaneously from a single protein as corroborated by an analysis of the linkage architecture. As in our previous work polymer tethers allow us to discriminate between specific and non-specific binding. We analyze the binding configuration (i.e. serial versus parallel connections) through fitting the polymer stretching data with modified Worm-Like Chain (WLC) models that predict how the effective stiffness of the tethers is affected by multiple connections. This analysis establishes that the forces we measure are due to single proteins interacting with multiple ligands, the first force spectroscopy study that establishes single-molecule multivalent binding unambiguously.

  15. Optical absorption and multivalent characteristics of ferrotitanate semiconductor FeNaTi3O8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Huidong; Yang, Rong; Gao, Wei

    2018-04-01

    A new titanate semiconductor FeNaTi3O8 was prepared by facile solid-state reaction. The Rietveld refinements were conducted in the titanium dioxide sodium Na0.2TiO2 which is isostructural with FeNaTi3O8. The framework of FeNaTi3O8 keeps the two-dimensional layered structure with one-dimensional channels. The direct allowed band gap (2.12 eV) shows the characteristic charge-transfer transitions of (O2p + Fe3d)→(Ti/Fe)3d. The DMSO-d6 allowed transitions in FeO6 octahedral have a vital contribution to the narrow band-gap. FeNaTi3O8 can efficiently harvest visible light. The multivalent characteristics for Fe and Ti ions were confirmed by the bond valence sum calculations and XPS measurements. The optical properties of FeNaTi3O8 could be ascribed to the layered structure and multivalent ions of Ti4+/3+ and Fe3+/2+.

  16. Exploring monovalent and multivalent peptides for the inhibition of FBP21-tWW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Maria Henning

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The coupling of peptides to polyglycerol carriers represents an important route towards the multivalent display of protein ligands. In particular, the inhibition of low affinity intracellular protein–protein interactions can be addressed by this design. We have applied this strategy to develop binding partners for FBP21, a protein which is important for the splicing of pre-mRNA in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Firstly, by using phage display the optimized sequence WPPPPRVPR was derived which binds with KDs of 80 μM and 150 µM to the individual WW domains and with a KD of 150 μM to the tandem-WW1–WW2 construct. Secondly, this sequence was coupled to a hyperbranched polyglycerol (hPG that allowed for the multivalent display on the surface of the dendritic polymer. This novel multifunctional hPG-peptide conjugate displayed a KD of 17.6 µM which demonstrates that the new carrier provides a venue for the future inhibition of proline-rich sequence recognition by FBP21 during assembly of the spliceosome.

  17. Thioether-Polyglycidol as Multivalent and Multifunctional Coating System for Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feineis, Susanne; Lutz, Johanna; Heffele, Lora; Endl, Elmar; Albrecht, Krystyna; Groll, Jürgen

    2018-02-01

    Thiofunctional polymers are the established standard for the coating and biofunctionalization of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). However, the nucleophilic and oxidative character of thiols provokes polymeric crosslinking and significantly limits the chemical possibilities to introduce biological functions. Thioethers represent a chemically more stable potential alternative to thiols that would offer easier functionalization, yet a few studies in the literature report inconclusive data regarding the efficacy of thioethers to stabilize AuNPs in comparison to thiols. A systematic comparison is presented of mono- versus multivalent thiol- and thioether-functional polymers, poly(ethylene glycol) versus side chain functional poly(glycidol) (PG) and it is shown that coating of AuNPs with multivalent thioether-functional PG leads to superior colloidal stability, even under physiological conditions and after freeze-drying and resuspension, as compared to thiol analogs at comparable polymer surface coverages. In addition, it is shown that a wide range of functional groups can be introduced in these polymers. Using diazirine functionalization as example, it is demonstrated that proteins can be covalently immobilized, and that conjugation of antibodies via this strategy enables efficient targeting and laser-irradiation induced killing of cells. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. EV71 vaccines: a first step towards multivalent hand, foot and mouth disease vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Michel H

    2015-03-01

    Enterovirus A infections are the primary cause of hand, foot and mouth disease in infants and young children. Enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16 have emerged as neurotropic viruses responsible for severe neurological complications and a serious public health threat across the Asia-Pacific region. Formalin-inactivated EV71 vaccines have elicited protection against EV71 but not against coxsackievirus A16 infections. The development of a bivalent formalin-inactivated EV71/FI coxsackievirus A16 vaccine should be the next step towards that of multivalent hand, foot and mouth disease vaccines which should ultimately include other prevalent pathogenic coxsackieviruses and echovirus 30. This editorial summarizes the major challenges faced by the development of hand, foot and mouth disease vaccines.

  19. Multivalent polyglycerol supported imidazolidin-4-one organocatalysts for enantioselective Friedel–Crafts alkylations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Pecchioli

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The first immobilization of a MacMillan’s first generation organocatalyst onto dendritic support is described. A modified tyrosine-based imidazolidin-4-one was grafted to a soluble high-loading hyperbranched polyglycerol via a copper-catalyzed alkyne–azide cycloaddition (CuAAC reaction and readily purified by dialysis. The efficiency of differently functionalized multivalent organocatalysts 4a–c was tested in the asymmetric Friedel–Crafts alkylation of N-methylpyrrole with α,β-unsaturated aldehydes. A variety of substituted enals was investigated to explore the activity of the catalytic system which was also compared with monovalent analogues. The catalyst 4b showed excellent turnover rates and no loss of activity due to immobilization, albeit moderate enantioselectivities were observed. Moreover, easy recovery by selective precipitation allowed the reuse of the catalyst for three cycles.

  20. Orthogonal dual-modification of proteins for the engineering of multivalent protein scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Mühlberg

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available To add new tools to the repertoire of protein-based multivalent scaffold design, we have developed a novel dual-labeling strategy for proteins that combines residue-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids with chemical oxidative aldehyde formation at the N-terminus of a protein. Our approach relies on the selective introduction of two different functional moieties in a protein by mutually orthogonal copper-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC and oxime ligation. This method was applied to the conjugation of biotin and β-linked galactose residues to yield an enzymatically active thermophilic lipase, which revealed specific binding to Erythrina cristagalli lectin by SPR binding studies.

  1. Multivalent Peptidomimetic Conjugates as Inhibitors of Androgen Receptor Function in Therapy-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    1 4. Impact…………………………………..………………………..4 5. Changes /Problems…………………………………..……..4 6. Products…………………………………..……………………..4 7. Participants & Other...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0590 TITLE: Multivalent Peptidomimetic Conjugates as Inhibitors of Androgen Receptor Function in Therapy- Resistant ...in Therapy- Resistant Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0590 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Michael Garabedian, PhD 5d

  2. Facilitated Unbinding via Multivalency-Enabled Ternary Complexes: New Paradigm for Protein-DNA Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tai-Yen; Cheng, Yu-Shan; Huang, Pei-San; Chen, Peng

    2018-01-25

    free CueR proteins can facilitate the unbinding of the incumbent one on DNA through either assisted dissociation or direct substitution. Greene's group studied the unbinding of RPAs from single-stranded DNA using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and DNA curtain techniques. The fluorescence intensity versus time traces show faster decay with higher wild-type RPA concentrations, indicating that DNA-bound RPAs can undergo a concentration-facilitated exchange when encountering excess free RPA. van Oijen's group investigated the leading/lagging-strand polymerase exchange events in the bacteriophage T7 and E. coli replication systems using a combination of single-molecule fluorescence microscopy and DNA-flow-stretching assay. The processivity was observed to have larger decrease when the concentration of the Y526F polymerase mutant increases, indicating that the unbinding of the polymerase is also concentration-dependent. Using stroboscopic imaging and single-molecule tracking, Chen's group further advanced their study into living bacterial cells. They found CueR, as well as its homologue ZntR, shows concentration-enhanced unbinding from its DNA-binding site in vivo. Mechanistic consensus has emerged from these in vitro and in vivo single-molecule studies that encompass a range of proteins with distinct biological functions. It involves multivalent contacts between protein and DNA. The multivalency enables the formation of ternary complexes as intermediates, which subsequently give rise to concentration-enhanced protein unbinding. As multivalent contacts are ubiquitous among DNA-interacting proteins, this multivalency-enabled facilitated unbinding mechanism thus provides a potentially general mechanistic paradigm in regulating protein-DNA interactions.

  3. Overcharging below the nanoscale: Multivalent cations reverse the ion selectivity of a biological channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Giménez, Elena; Alcaraz, Antonio; Aguilella, Vicente M.

    2010-02-01

    We report charge inversion within a nanoscopic biological protein ion channel in salts of multivalent ions. The presence of positive divalent and trivalent counterions reverses the cationic selectivity of the OmpF channel, a general diffusion porin located in the outer membrane of E. coli. We discuss the conditions under which charge inversion can be inferred from the change in sign of the measured quantity, the channel zero current potential. By comparing experimental results in protein channels whose charge has been modified after site-directed mutagenesis, the predictions of current theories of charge inversion are critically examined. It is emphasized that charge inversion does not necessarily increase with the bare surface charge density of the interface and that even this concept of surface charge density may become meaningless in some biological ion channels. Thus, any theory based on electrostatic correlations or chemical binding should explicitly take into account the particular structure of the charged interface.

  4. Mechanism of Cooperativity and Nonlinear Release Kinetics in Multivalent Dendrimer-Atropine Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Jhindan; Wong, Pamela T; Tang, Shengzhuang; Gam, Kristina; Coulter, Alexa; Baker, James R; Choi, Seok Ki

    2015-12-07

    Despite extensive studies on drug delivery using multivalent complexation systems, the biophysical basis for release kinetics remains poorly defined. The present study addresses this aspect involved in the complexation of a fifth generation poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer with atropine, an essential antidote used for treating organophosphate poisoning. First, we designed (1)H NMR titration studies for determining the molecular basis of the drug complexation with a glutarate-modified anionic dendrimer. These provide evidence pointing to a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions as the driving forces for dendrimer complexation with the alkaloid drug molecule. Second, using LC-MS/MS spectrometry, we determined the dissociation constants (KD) at steady state and also measured the drug release kinetics of atropine complexes with four negatively charged dendrimer types. Each of these dendrimers has a high payload capacity for up to ∼ 100 atropine molecules. However, the affinity of the atropine to the carrier was highly dependent on the drug to dendrimer ratio. Thus, a complex made at a lower loading ratio (≤ 0.1) displayed greater atropine affinity (KD ≈ μM) than other complexes prepared at higher ratios (>10), which showed only mM affinity. This negative cooperative variation in affinity is tightly associated with the nonlinear release kinetics observed for each complex in which drug release occurs more slowly at the later time phase at a lower loading ratio. In summary, the present study provides novel insights on the cooperativity as the mechanistic basis for nonlinear release kinetics observed in multivalent carrier systems.

  5. Mannosylcalix[n]arenes as multivalent ligands for DC-SIGN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbioli, Ilaria; Porkolab, Vanessa; Magini, Andrea; Casnati, Alessandro; Fieschi, Franck; Sansone, Francesco

    2017-12-01

    DC-SIGN is a receptor protruded from the membrane of immature dendritic cells (DCs) that participates in the activation of the immune response through the recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). On the other hand, HIV exploits the interaction between high-mannose structures of its envelope glycoprotein gp120 and DC-SIGN to be transported towards and infect T-cells. DC-SIGN is involved in the recognition process in the form of a tetramer and the multiple exposition of carbohydrate recognition sites (CRSs) is amplified by the formation on the DCs membrane of patches of tetramers. DC-SIGN is then considered an interesting target to fight the virus and multivalent systems exposing multiple copies of ligating units for its CRSs are becoming valuable tools to reach this goal. We herein prepared four mannosylated calix[n]arenes (1a-d) and tested them by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) competition assays as inhibitors of the binding between DC-SIGN and a mannosylated BSA used as model of HIV gp120. IC 50 s in the μM range were found evidencing in particular for compound 1a that, although rather moderate, a multivalent effect is taking place in the inhibition activity of this cluster. A relative potency (rp/n) around 4, respect to the monovalent methyl α-mannoside and normalized for the number of monosaccharide on the scaffold, was observed. This result, compared with previously reported data relative to dendrimers with the same valency, indicates the calixarene as a promising scaffold to build efficient inhibitors for DC-SIGN and, in perspective, for HIV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dexamethasone treatment differentially alters viral shedding and the antibody and acute phase protein response after multivalent respiratory vaccination in beef steers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our objective was to examine immunosuppression induced by dexamethasone (DEX) administration in cattle upon immunological responses to a multivalent respiratory vaccine containing replicating and non-replicating agents. Steers ( n = 32; 209 +/- 8 kg) seronegative to infectious bovine rhinotracheitis...

  7. Design of different strategies of multivalent DNA-based vaccination against rabies and canine distemper in mice and dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touihri Leila

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the vaccination campaigns, puppies younger than 3 months old are not targeted and remain unvaccinated for at least the first year of their lives. Almost half of the reported rabid dogs are 6 months or younger. Hence, we should recommend the vaccination against rabies of young puppies. Unfortunately, owing to the exposure of puppies to infections with either canine parvovirus (CPV or distemper virus (CDV after the intervention of the vaccinators, owners are reluctant to vaccinate puppies against rabies. Therefore, it is necessary to include the CPV and CDV valences in the vaccine against rabies. Multivalent DNA-based vaccination in dogs, including rabies and distemper valences, could help in raising vaccine coverage. Methods We have designed monovalent and multivalent DNA-based vaccine candidates for in vitro and in vivo assays. These plasmids encode to the rabies virus glycoprotein and/or the canine distemper virus hemagglutinin. The first strategy of multivalent DNA-based vaccination is by mixing plasmids encoding to a single antigen each. The second is by simply fusing the genes of the antigens together. The third is by adding the foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV 2A oligopeptide gene into the antigen genes. The last strategy is by the design and use of a bicistronic plasmid with an “Internal Ribosome Entry Site” (IRES domain. Results The monovalent construct against canine distemper was efficiently validated by inducing higher humoral immune responses compared to cell-culture-derived vaccine both in mice and dogs. All multivalent plasmids efficiently expressed both valences after in vitro transfection of BHK-21 cells. In BALB/c mice, the bicistronic IRES-dependant construct was the most efficient inducer of virus-neutralizing antibodies against both valences. It was able to induce better humoral immune responses compared to the administration of either cell-culture-derived vaccines or monovalent plasmids. The

  8. Design of different strategies of multivalent DNA-based vaccination against rabies and canine distemper in mice and dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background During the vaccination campaigns, puppies younger than 3 months old are not targeted and remain unvaccinated for at least the first year of their lives. Almost half of the reported rabid dogs are 6 months or younger. Hence, we should recommend the vaccination against rabies of young puppies. Unfortunately, owing to the exposure of puppies to infections with either canine parvovirus (CPV) or distemper virus (CDV) after the intervention of the vaccinators, owners are reluctant to vaccinate puppies against rabies. Therefore, it is necessary to include the CPV and CDV valences in the vaccine against rabies. Multivalent DNA-based vaccination in dogs, including rabies and distemper valences, could help in raising vaccine coverage. Methods We have designed monovalent and multivalent DNA-based vaccine candidates for in vitro and in vivo assays. These plasmids encode to the rabies virus glycoprotein and/or the canine distemper virus hemagglutinin. The first strategy of multivalent DNA-based vaccination is by mixing plasmids encoding to a single antigen each. The second is by simply fusing the genes of the antigens together. The third is by adding the foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) 2A oligopeptide gene into the antigen genes. The last strategy is by the design and use of a bicistronic plasmid with an “Internal Ribosome Entry Site” (IRES) domain. Results The monovalent construct against canine distemper was efficiently validated by inducing higher humoral immune responses compared to cell-culture-derived vaccine both in mice and dogs. All multivalent plasmids efficiently expressed both valences after in vitro transfection of BHK-21 cells. In BALB/c mice, the bicistronic IRES-dependant construct was the most efficient inducer of virus-neutralizing antibodies against both valences. It was able to induce better humoral immune responses compared to the administration of either cell-culture-derived vaccines or monovalent plasmids. The FMDV 2A was also efficient

  9. Helical cylinders or multicompartment cylinders through the solution assembly of charged block copolymers with multivalent organic counterions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochan, Darrin; Zhong, Sheng; Cui, Honggang; Chen, Zhiyun; Wooley, Karen

    2008-03-01

    By manipulating the interaction of charged block copolymer hydrophilic corona blocks with multivalent organic counterions, and controlling the kinetics of block copolymer solution self-assembly, desired micelle geometries can be formed. Specifically, polyacrylic acid-b-polymethylacrylate-b-polystyrene amphiphilic triblock copolymers were studied in water/THF solvent mixtures with organic multiamines as counterions. By manipulating block copolymer and solvent composition, different micelle geometries were formed. However, by altering the chemical structure and/or concentration of the multiamine counterions, as well as the kinetic pathway through which the molecules are assembled, complex nanostructures were formed. An example of nanostructure from kinetic control includes spherical micelles that can be controllably assembled into 1-d multicompartment cylinders. Examples of nanostructure from control of the type and amount of multivalent organic counterion added are helical cylinder superstructures many micrometers in length. The system has been investigated by means of cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and small angle neutron scattering (SANS).

  10. Donor doping process and white light generation in CaMoO4 powders with multivalence Pr codoping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Fang; Xiao Zhisong; Zhang Feng; Yan Lu; Huang Anping

    2011-01-01

    Both trivalent praseodymium (Pr 3+ ) and quadrivalent praseodymium (Pr 4+ ) were doped in molybdate powders. Visible emission from matrix was enhanced by multivalent Pr codoping. It was proposed that Pr 3+ ions was donor and supplied quasi-free electron when Pr 3+ took place the Pr 4+ sites. The result showed that multivalence codoping would be an effective way to enhance emission of CaMoO 4 . White light can be generated from Ca 0.98 Pr 0.02 MoO 4 powder via combination of broadband emissions originated from CaMoO 4 matrix and radiative transition of Pr 3+ . It showed warm white light with T c of 3450 K that implies promising application in white light emitting diodes (LEDs).

  11. Multivalent binding and biomimetic cell rolling improves the sensitivity and specificity of circulating tumor cell capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Ja Hye; Eblan, Michael J; Caster, Joseph M; Park, Sinjung; Poellmann, Michael J; Wang, Kyle; Tepper, Joel E; Tam, Kevin A; Miller, Seth M; Shen, Colette; Chen, Ronald C; Zhang, Tian; Chera, Bhishamjit; Wang, Andrew Z; Hong, Seungpyo

    2018-03-15

    We aimed to examine the effects of multivalent binding and biomimetic cell rolling on the sensitivity and specificity of circulating tumor cell (CTC) capture. We also investigated the clinical significance of CTCs and their kinetic profiles in cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT) treatment. Patients with histologically confirmed primary carcinoma undergoing RT, with or without chemotherapy, were eligible for enrollment. Peripheral blood was collected prospectively at up to 5 time points, including prior to RT, at the first week, mid-point and final week of treatment, as well as 4 to 12 weeks after completion of RT. CTC capture was accomplished using a nanotechnology-based assay (CapioCyte) functionalized with aEpCAM, aHER-2, and aEGFR. CapioCyte was able to detect CTCs in all 24 cancer patients enrolled. Multivalent binding via poly(amidoamine) dendrimers further improved capture sensitivity. We also showed that cell rolling effect can improve CTC capture specificity (% of captured cells that are CK+/CD45-/DAPI+) up to 38%. Among the 18 patients with sequential CTC measurements, the median CTC decreased from 113 CTCs/mL before RT to 32 CTCs/mL at completion of RT (p = 0.001). CTCs declined throughout RT in patients with complete clinical and/or radiographic response, in contrast to an elevation in CTCs at mid or post-RT in the 2 patients with known pathologic residual disease. Our study demonstrated that multivalent binding and cell rolling can improve the sensitivity and specificity of CTC capture compared to multivalent binding alone, allowing reliable monitoring of CTC changes during and after treatment. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Multivalent system for therapy of non-Hod king lymphomas based on Anti-CD20 conjugated to gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda O, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    In recent publications has been reported that gold nanoparticles have an effect in reducing the expression of the oncogene Bcl -2 and have a high biocompatibility , this is the importance for using gold nanoparticles for this work. The antibody CD20 is an antibody that specifically binds to that over expressed CD20 antigen on the cell membrane of B lymphoma cell non- Hodgkin (cell line Raji) behold the importance of combining this bio molecule to gold nanoparticles since they have a high specificity with CD20 positive cells , also to carry out the antigen- antibody immunological reactions triggered mediating cell lysis, possibly by cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Therefore, this system must have characteristics of both components to eliminate B cell non- Hodgkin lymphoma.In this work it was studied a multivalent system composed of gold nanoparticles and anti-CD20 antibody, the term multi valency refers to the number of biomolecules attached to the surface of the gold nanoparticle. The synthesis and characterization of the gold nanoparticles and the multivalent system was performed and the effect of the multivalent system on the expression of oncogene Bcl-2 (group of proteins associated with the apoptotic pathway) was evaluated. Characterization of raw materials and the multivalent system was performed using spectroscopic and microscopic techniques, this to verify structural changes in raw materials and thus confirm the formation of CD20 binding to the surface of the nanoparticle gold by the bond between gold and sulfur in the cysteines of CD20. Taking advantage that the metal nanoparticles have the optical property of surface plasmon resonance, the absorption of gold nanoparticles was measured on the UV-Vis as it is affected by the surface molecules bind to it, showing a bathochromic displacement effected. The hydrodynamic diameter of the gold nanoparticles was measured to verify that the antibody is bound to the surface; this evidence was complemented by micrographs

  13. Hypermethylated SUPERMAN epigenetic alleles in arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, S E; Meyerowitz, E M

    1997-08-22

    Mutations in the SUPERMAN gene affect flower development in Arabidopsis. Seven heritable but unstable sup epi-alleles (the clark kent alleles) are associated with nearly identical patterns of excess cytosine methylation within the SUP gene and a decreased level of SUP RNA. Revertants of these alleles are largely demethylated at the SUP locus and have restored levels of SUP RNA. A transgenic Arabidopsis line carrying an antisense methyltransferase gene, which shows an overall decrease in genomic cytosine methylation, also contains a hypermethylated sup allele. Thus, disruption of methylation systems may yield more complex outcomes than expected and can result in methylation defects at known genes. The clark kent alleles differ from the antisense line because they do not show a general decrease in genomic methylation.

  14. Sustained release of antibiotic complexed by multivalent ion: in vitro and in vivo study for the treatment of peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Seung Yeon; Oh, Se Heang; Kim, Tae Ho; Yoon, Jin A; Lee, In Soo; Lee, Jin Ho

    2014-12-10

    The main aims of this study are (i) the development of an antibiotic complexed with multivalent ion, which can allow sustained release of the antibiotic without any additional matrix or difficult process and (ii) the feasibility study of the ion-complexed antibiotic as a therapeutic technique for peritonitis treatment. An ion-complexed antibiotic is prepared by simple mixing of two aqueous solutions containing an ionized (water-soluble) drug (tetracycline) and a multivalent counter ionic compound. The ion-complexed antibiotic shows a continuous release of the antibiotic up to 21 days, and thus prolonged anti-bacterial effect by gradual ionic exchange between the multivalent ions in the complex and same-charged monovalent ions in surrounding medium. From the in vivo animal study using a cecum perforated peritonitis mouse model, the ion-complexed antibiotic group shows sufficient anti-bacterial effect and thus effectively treat the peritonitis because of the extermination of the contaminated enteric bacteria in the peritoneum during wound healing of injury cecum (by the sustained release of antibiotic from the ion complex). These results suggest that the ion-complexed antibiotic system may be promising for the effective treatment of the peritonitis caused by frequent gastrointestinal defect in clinical fields. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. FLOTAC: new multivalent techniques for qualitative and quantitative copromicroscopic diagnosis of parasites in animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cringoli, Giuseppe; Rinaldi, Laura; Maurelli, Maria Paola; Utzinger, Jürg

    2010-03-01

    Accurate diagnosis of parasitic infections is of pivotal importance for both individual patient management and population-based studies, such as drug efficacy trials and surveillance of parasitic disease control and elimination programs, in both human and veterinary public health. In this study, we present protocols for the FLOTAC basic, dual and double techniques, which are promising new multivalent, sensitive, accurate and precise methods for qualitative and quantitative copromicroscopic analysis. These various methods make use of the FLOTAC apparatus, a cylindrical device with two 5-ml flotation chambers, which allows up to 1 g of stool to be prepared for microscopic analysis. Compared with currently more widely used diagnostic methods for parasite detection in animals (e.g., McMaster and Wisconsin techniques) and humans (e.g., Kato-Katz and ether-based concentration techniques), the FLOTAC techniques show higher sensitivity and accuracy. All FLOTAC techniques can be performed on fresh fecal material as well as preserved stool samples, and require approximately 12-15 min of preparation time before microscopic analysis.

  16. The Multivalent Adhesion Molecule SSO1327 plays a key role in Shigella sonnei pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Rasha Y; Stones, Daniel Henry; Li, Wenqin; Emara, Mohamed; El-Domany, Ramadan A; Wang, Depu; Wang, Yili; Krachler, Anne Marie; Yu, Jun

    2016-02-01

    Shigella sonnei is a bacterial pathogen and causative agent of bacillary dysentery. It deploys a type III secretion system to inject effector proteins into host epithelial cells and macrophages, an essential step for tissue invasion and immune evasion. Although the arsenal of bacterial effectors and their cellular targets have been studied extensively, little is known about the prerequisites for deployment of type III secreted proteins during infection. Here, we describe a novel S. sonnei adhesin, SSO1327 which is a multivalent adhesion molecule (MAM) required for invasion of epithelial cells and macrophages and for infection in vivo. The S. sonnei MAM mediates intimate attachment to host cells, which is required for efficient translocation of type III effectors into host cells. SSO1327 is non-redundant to IcsA; its activity is independent of type III secretion. In contrast to the up-regulation of IcsA-dependent and independent attachment and invasion by deoxycholate in Shigella flexneri, deoxycholate negatively regulates IcsA and MAM in S. sonnei resulting in reduction in attachment and invasion and virulence attenuation in vivo. A strain deficient for SSO1327 is avirulent in vivo, but still elicits a host immune response. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Multivalent Interactions by the Set8 Histone Methyltransferase With Its Nucleosome Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girish, Taverekere S; McGinty, Robert K; Tan, Song

    2016-04-24

    Set8 is the only mammalian monomethyltransferase responsible for H4K20me1, a methyl mark critical for genomic integrity of eukaryotic cells. We present here a structural model for how Set8 uses multivalent interactions to bind and methylate the nucleosome based on crystallographic and solution studies of the Set8/nucleosome complex. Our studies indicate that Set8 employs its i-SET and c-SET domains to engage nucleosomal DNA 1 to 1.5 turns from the nucleosomal dyad and in doing so, it positions the SET domain for catalysis with H4 Lys20. Surprisingly, we find that a basic N-terminal extension to the SET domain plays an even more prominent role in nucleosome binding, possibly by making an arginine anchor interaction with the nucleosome H2A/H2B acidic patch. We further show that proliferating cell nuclear antigen and the nucleosome compete for binding to Set8 through this basic extension, suggesting a mechanism for how nucleosome binding protects Set8 from proliferating cell nuclear antigen-dependent degradation during the cell cycle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Reverse genetics of measles virus and resulting multivalent recombinant vaccines: applications of recombinant measles viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billeter, M A; Naim, H Y; Udem, S A

    2009-01-01

    An overview is given on the development of technologies to allow reverse genetics of RNA viruses, i.e., the rescue of viruses from cDNA, with emphasis on nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses (Mononegavirales), as exemplified for measles virus (MV). Primarily, these technologies allowed site-directed mutagenesis, enabling important insights into a variety of aspects of the biology of these viruses. Concomitantly, foreign coding sequences were inserted to (a) allow localization of virus replication in vivo through marker gene expression, (b) develop candidate multivalent vaccines against measles and other pathogens, and (c) create candidate oncolytic viruses. The vector use of these viruses was experimentally encouraged by the pronounced genetic stability of the recombinants unexpected for RNA viruses, and by the high load of insertable genetic material, in excess of 6 kb. The known assets, such as the small genome size of the vector in comparison to DNA viruses proposed as vectors, the extensive clinical experience of attenuated MV as vaccine with a proven record of high safety and efficacy, and the low production cost per vaccination dose are thus favorably complemented.

  19. Structure-based design of chimeric antigens for multivalent protein vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingshead, S; Jongerius, I; Exley, R M; Johnson, S; Lea, S M; Tang, C M

    2018-03-13

    There is an urgent need to develop vaccines against pathogenic bacteria. However, this is often hindered by antigenic diversity and difficulties encountered manufacturing membrane proteins. Here we show how to use structure-based design to develop chimeric antigens (ChAs) for subunit vaccines. ChAs are generated against serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis (MenB), the predominant cause of meningococcal disease in wealthy countries. MenB ChAs exploit factor H binding protein (fHbp) as a molecular scaffold to display the immunogenic VR2 epitope from the integral membrane protein PorA. Structural analyses demonstrate fHbp is correctly folded and the PorA VR2 epitope adopts an immunogenic conformation. In mice, immunisation with ChAs generates fHbp and PorA antibodies that recognise the antigens expressed by clinical MenB isolates; these antibody responses correlate with protection against meningococcal disease. Application of ChAs is therefore a potentially powerful approach to develop multivalent subunit vaccines, which can be tailored to circumvent pathogen diversity.

  20. Modeling multivalent ligand-receptor interactions with steric constraints on configurations of cell surface receptor aggregates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monine, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Posner, Richard [TRANSLATION GENOMICS RESAEARCH INSTITUTE; Savage, Paul [BYU; Faeder, James [UNIV OF PITTSBURGH; Hlavacek, William S [UNM

    2008-01-01

    Signal transduction generally involves multivalent protein-protein interactions, which can produce various protein complexes and post-translational modifications. The reaction networks that characterize these interactions tend to be so large as to challenge conventional simulation procedures. To address this challenge, a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) method has been developed that can take advantage of a model specification in terms of reaction rules for molecular interactions. A set of rules implicitly defines the reactions that can occur as a result of the interactions represented by the rules. With the rule-based KMC method, explicit generation of the underlying chemical reaction network implied by rules is avoided. Here, we apply and extend this method to characterize the interactions of a trivalent ligand with a bivalent cell-surface receptor. This system is also studied experimentally. We consider the following kinetic models: an equivalent-site model, an extension of this model, which takes into account steric constraints on the configurations of receptor aggregates, and finally, a model that accounts for cyclic receptor aggregates. Simulation results for the equivalent-site model are consistent with an equilibrium continuum model. Using these models, we investigate the effects of steric constraints and the formation of cyclic aggregates on the kinetics and equilibria of small and large aggregate formation and the percolation phase transition that occurs in this system.

  1. Reaction enthalpy from the binding of multivalent cations to anionic polyelectrolytes in dilute solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansch, Markus; Kaub, Hans Peter; Deck, Sascha; Carl, Nico; Huber, Klaus

    2018-03-01

    Dilute solutions of sodium poly(styrene sulfonate) (NaPSS) in the presence of Al3+, Ca2+, and Ba2+ were analysed by means of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) in order to investigate the heat effect of bond formation between those cations and the anionic SO3- residues of NaPSS. The selection of the cations was guided by the solution behavior of the corresponding PSS salts from a preceding study [M. Hansch et al., J. Chem. Phys. 148(1), 014901 (2018)], where bonds between Ba2+ and anionic PSS showed an increasing solubility with decreasing temperature and Al3+ exhibited the inverse trend. Unlike to Al3+ and Ba2+, Ca2+ is expected to behave as a purely electrostatically interacting bivalent cation and was thus included in the present study. Results from ITC satisfactorily succeeded to explain the temperature-dependent solution behavior of the salts with Al3+ and Ba2+ and confirmed the non-specific behavior of Ca2+. Additional ITC experiments with salts of Ca2+ and Ba2+ and sodium poly(acrylate) complemented the results on PSS by data from a chemically different polyanion. Availability of these joint sets of polyanion-cation combinations not only offers the chance to identify common features and subtle differences in the solution behavior of polyelectrolytes in the presence of multi-valent cations but also points to a new class of responsive materials.

  2. Substituent Effects in Multivalent Halogen Bonding Complexes: A Combined Theoretical and Crystallographic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Bauzá

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this manuscript, we combined ab initio calculations (RI-MP2/def2-TZVPD level of theory and a search in the CSD (Cambridge Structural Database to analyze the influence of aromatic substitution in charge-assisted multivalent halogen bonding complexes. We used a series of benzene substituted iodine derivatives C6H4(IF4Y (Y = H, NH2, OCH3, F, CN, and CF3 as Lewis acids and used Cl− as electron rich interacting atoms. We have represented the Hammett’s plot and observed a good regression coefficient (interaction energies vs. Hammett’s σ parameter. Additionally, we demonstrated the direct correlation between the Hammett’s σ parameter and the value of molecular electrostatic potential measured at the I atom on the extension of the C–I bond. Furthermore, we have carried out AIM (atoms in molecules and NBO (natural bonding orbital analyses to further describe and characterize the interactions described herein. Finally, we have carried out a search in the CSD (Cambridge Structural Database and found several X-ray structures where these interactions are present, thus giving reliability to the results derived from the calculations.

  3. Influence of metallocene substitution on the antibacterial activity of multivalent peptide conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffknecht, Barbara C; Prochnow, Pascal; Bandow, Julia E; Metzler-Nolte, Nils

    2016-07-01

    Peptide dendrimers and derivatisation of peptides with metallocenes showed promising results in the search for new antibacterial agents. The two concepts are combined in this work leading to multivalent, metallocene-containing peptide derivates. These new peptides were synthesised utilising microwave assisted, copper(I) catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition (CuAAC, "click" chemistry). Twelve new peptide conjugates, containing either a ferrocenoyl group or a ruthenocenoyl group on so-called ultrashort (i.e. < 5 amino acids) peptides, and ranging from monovalent to trivalent conjugates, were synthesised and their antibacterial activity was investigated by minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays on five different bacterial strains. The antibacterial activity was compared to the same peptide conjugates without metallocenes. The resulting MIC values showed a significant enhancement of the antibacterial activity of these peptide conjugates against Gram-positive bacteria by the metallocenoyl groups. Additionally, the compounds with two metallocenoyl groups presented the best antibacterial activities overall. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Approaching rational epitope vaccine design for hepatitis C virus with meta-server and multivalent scaffolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Linling; Cheng, Yushao; Kong, Leopold; Azadnia, Parisa; Giang, Erick; Kim, Justin; Wood, Malcolm R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Law, Mansun; Zhu, Jiang

    2015-08-01

    Development of a prophylactic vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been hampered by the extraordinary viral diversity and the poor host immune response. Scaffolding, by grafting an epitope onto a heterologous protein scaffold, offers a possible solution to epitope vaccine design. In this study, we designed and characterized epitope vaccine antigens for the antigenic sites of HCV envelope glycoproteins E1 (residues 314-324) and E2 (residues 412-423), for which neutralizing antibody-bound structures are available. We first combined six structural alignment algorithms in a “scaffolding meta-server” to search for diverse scaffolds that can structurally accommodate the HCV epitopes. For each antigenic site, ten scaffolds were selected for computational design, and the resulting epitope scaffolds were analyzed using structure-scoring functions and molecular dynamics simulation. We experimentally confirmed that three E1 and five E2 epitope scaffolds bound to their respective neutralizing antibodies, but with different kinetics. We then investigated a “multivalent scaffolding” approach by displaying 24 copies of an epitope scaffold on a self-assembling nanoparticle, which markedly increased the avidity of antibody binding. Our study thus demonstrates the utility of a multi-scale scaffolding strategy in epitope vaccine design and provides promising HCV immunogens for further assessment in vivo.

  5. Design and In vitro Validation of Multivalent Dendrimer Methotrexates as a Folate-targeting Anticancer Therapeutic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Thommey P.; Joice, Melvin; Sumit, Madhuresh; Silpe, Justin E.; Kotlyar, Alina; Bharathi, Sophia; Kukowska-Latallo, Jolanta; Baker, James R.; Choi, Seok Ki

    2013-01-01

    Design of cancer-targeting nanotherapeutics relies on a pair of two functionally orthogonal molecules, one serving as a cancer cell-specific targeting ligand, and the other as a therapeutic cytotoxic agent. The present study investigates the validity of an alternative simplified strategy where a dual-acting molecule which bears both targeting and cytotoxic activity is conjugated to the nanoparticle as cancer-targeting nanotherapeutics. Herein we demonstrate that methotrexate is applicable for this dual-acting strategy due to its reasonable affinity to folic acid receptor (FAR) as a tumor biomarker, and cytotoxic inhibitory activity of cytosolic dihydrofolate reductase. This article describes design of new methotrexate-conjugated poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers, each carrying multiple copies of methotrexate attached through a stable amide linker. We evaluated their dual biological activities by performing surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, a cell-free enzyme assay and cell-based experiments in FAR-overexpressing cells. This study identifies the combination of an optimal linker framework and multivalency as the two key design elements that contribute to achieving potent dual activity. PMID:23621534

  6. Multivalent anchoring and cross-linking of mussel-inspired antifouling surface coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qiang; Becherer, Tobias; Mutihac, Radu-Cristian; Noeske, Paul-Ludwig Michael; Paulus, Florian; Haag, Rainer; Grunwald, Ingo

    2014-08-11

    In this work, we combine nature's amazing bioadhesive catechol with the excellent bioinert synthetic macromolecule hyperbranched polyglycerol (hPG) to prepare antifouling surfaces. hPG can be functionalized by different amounts of catechol groups for multivalent anchoring and cross-linking because of its highly branched architecture. The catecholic hPGs can be immobilized on various surfaces including metal oxides, noble metals, ceramics, and polymers via simple incubation procedures. The effect of the catechol amount on the immobilization, surface morphology, stability, and antifouling performance of the coatings was studied. Both anchoring and cross-linking interactions provided by catechols can enhance the stability of the coatings. When the catechol groups on the hPG are underrepresented, the tethering of the coating is not effective; while an overrepresentation of catechol groups leads to protein adsorption and cell adhesion. Thus, only a well-balanced amount of catechols as optimized and described in this work can supply the coatings with both good stability and antifouling ability.

  7. Novel alleles of 31-bp VNTR polymorphism in the human ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We report here for the first time, the detection of allele 20, which was absent in Caucasian and Indo–Caucasoid populations, as a common allele present in Singaporean Chinese (6.25%), Indians (11.7%), and Malays (11.5%). Hence, allele 20 might be a specific allele for Asian populations. A relatively common allele 19 ...

  8. Nucleotide variation and identification of novel blast resistance alleles of Pib by allele mining strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramkumar, G; Madhav, M S; Devi, S J S Rama; Prasad, M S; Babu, V Ravindra

    2015-04-01

    Pib is one of significant rice blast resistant genes, which provides resistance to wide range of isolates of rice blast pathogen, Magnaporthe oryzae. Identification and isolation of novel and beneficial alleles help in crop enhancement. Allele mining is one of the best strategies for dissecting the allelic variations at candidate gene and identification of novel alleles. Hence, in the present study, Pib was analyzed by allele mining strategy, and coding and non-coding (upstream and intron) regions were examined to identify novel Pib alleles. Allelic sequences comparison revealed that nucleotide polymorphisms at coding regions affected the amino acid sequences, while the polymorphism at upstream (non-coding) region affected the motifs arrangements. Pib alleles from resistant landraces, Sercher and Krengosa showed better resistance than Pib donor variety, might be due to acquired mutations, especially at LRR region. The evolutionary distance, Ka/Ks and phylogenetic analyzes also supported these results. Transcription factor binding motif analysis revealed that Pib (Sr) had a unique motif (DPBFCOREDCDC3), while five different motifs differentiated the resistance and susceptible Pib alleles. As the Pib is an inducible gene, the identified differential motifs helps to understand the Pib expression mechanism. The identified novel Pib resistant alleles, which showed high resistance to the rice blast, can be used directly in blast resistance breeding program as alternative Pib resistant sources.

  9. Comparison of HLA allelic imputation programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason H Karnes

    Full Text Available Imputation of human leukocyte antigen (HLA alleles from SNP-level data is attractive due to importance of HLA alleles in human disease, widespread availability of genome-wide association study (GWAS data, and expertise required for HLA sequencing. However, comprehensive evaluations of HLA imputations programs are limited. We compared HLA imputation results of HIBAG, SNP2HLA, and HLA*IMP:02 to sequenced HLA alleles in 3,265 samples from BioVU, a de-identified electronic health record database coupled to a DNA biorepository. We performed four-digit HLA sequencing for HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DPB1, and -DQB1 using long-read 454 FLX sequencing. All samples were genotyped using both the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip platform and a GWAS platform. Call rates and concordance rates were compared by platform, frequency of allele, and race/ethnicity. Overall concordance rates were similar between programs in European Americans (EA (0.975 [SNP2HLA]; 0.939 [HLA*IMP:02]; 0.976 [HIBAG]. SNP2HLA provided a significant advantage in terms of call rate and the number of alleles imputed. Concordance rates were lower overall for African Americans (AAs. These observations were consistent when accuracy was compared across HLA loci. All imputation programs performed similarly for low frequency HLA alleles. Higher concordance rates were observed when HLA alleles were imputed from GWAS platforms versus the HumanExome BeadChip, suggesting that high genomic coverage is preferred as input for HLA allelic imputation. These findings provide guidance on the best use of HLA imputation methods and elucidate their limitations.

  10. Local Adaptation by Alleles of Small Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeaman, Sam

    2015-10-01

    Population genetic models predict that alleles with small selection coefficients may be swamped by migration and will not contribute to local adaptation. But if most alleles contributing to standing variation are of small effect, how does local adaptation proceed? Here I review predictions of population and quantitative genetic models and use individual-based simulations to illustrate how the architecture of local adaptation depends on the genetic redundancy of the trait, the maintenance of standing genetic variation (V(G)), and the susceptibility of alleles to swamping. Even when population genetic models predict swamping for individual alleles, considerable local adaptation can evolve at the phenotypic level if there is sufficient V(G). However, in such cases the underlying architecture of divergence is transient: F(ST) is low across all loci, and no locus makes an important contribution for very long. Because this kind of local adaptation is mainly due to transient frequency changes and allelic covariances, these architectures will be difficult--if not impossible--to detect using current approaches to studying the genomic basis of adaptation. Even when alleles are large and resistant to swamping, architectures can be highly transient if genetic redundancy and mutation rates are high. These results suggest that drift can play a critical role in shaping the architecture of local adaptation, both through eroding V(G) and affecting the rate of turnover of polymorphisms with redundant phenotypic effects.

  11. Allele Workbench: transcriptome pipeline and interactive graphics for allele-specific expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol A Soderlund

    Full Text Available Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor, where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense, and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available

  12. Protection Efficacy of Multivalent Egg Yolk Immunoglobulin against Eimeria Tenella Infection in Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JJ Xu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: To control avian coccidiosis with drug-independent strategy effec­tively and safely, multivalent hyperimmune egg yolk immunoglobulin (IgY was prepared and its ability to protect against Eimeria tenella infection was evaluated.Methods: Hens were orally immunized with live oocysts of 5 species of Eimeria for six times, antibody titers in serum and yolk were monitored by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The specific IgY was isolated, purified and lyophi­lized. IgY powder was orally administrated as dietary supplement in newly hatched chicks at various dosages. Birds were orally challenged with 10000 sporulated oo­cysts of E. tenella at 10 days of age, weighed and killed at 8 days post challenge, and the protective effect was assessed.Results: The averge yeid of IgY was 9.2 mg/ml yolk, the antibody titer of IgY reached to 1:163840 per mg with the purity up to 98%. Chickens fed IgY resulted in reduced mortality, increased body weight gain (BWG, reduced oocyst shedding, reduced caecal lesion score and increased anti-coccidial index. In terms of BWG and caecal lesion, IgY significantly enhanced the resistance of bird at ≥ 0.05% of IgY in the diet when compared with the challenged control group (P0.05.Conclusion: Supplementing newly hatched chicks with Eimeria-specific IgY represents a promising strategy to prevent avian coccidiosis.

  13. Multivalent benzoboroxole functionalized polymers as gp120 glycan targeted microbicide entry inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Julie I; Lai, Bonnie E; Myszka, David G; Mahalingam, Alamelu; Langheinrich, Kris; Katz, David F; Kiser, Patrick F

    2010-02-01

    Microbicides are women-controlled prophylactics for sexually transmitted infections. The most important class of microbicides target HIV-1 and contain antiviral agents formulated for topical vaginal delivery. Identification of new viral entry inhibitors that target the HIV-1 envelope is important because they can inactivate HIV-1 in the vaginal lumen before virions can come in contact with CD4+ cells in the vaginal mucosa. Carbohydrate binding agents (CBAs) demonstrate the ability to act as entry inhibitors due to their ability to bind to glycans and prevent gp120 binding to CD4+ cells. However, as proteins they present significant challenges in regard to economical production and formulation for resource-poor environments. We have synthesized water-soluble polymer CBAs that contain multiple benzoboroxole moieties. A benzoboroxole-functionalized monomer was synthesized and incorporated into linear oligomers with 2-hydroxypropylmethacrylamide (HPMAm) at different feed ratios using free radical polymerization. The benzoboroxole small molecule analogue demonstrated weak affinity for HIV-1BaL gp120 by SPR; however, the 25 mol % functionalized benzoboroxole oligomer demonstrated a 10-fold decrease in the K(D) for gp120, suggesting an increased avidity for the multivalent polymer construct. High molecular weight polymers functionalized with 25, 50, and 75 mol % benzoboroxole were synthesized and tested for their ability to neutralize HIV-1 entry for two HIV-1 clades and both R5 and X4 coreceptor tropism. All three polymers demonstrated activity against all viral strains tested with EC(50)s that decrease from 15000 nM (1500 microg mL(-1)) for the 25 mol % functionalized polymers to 11 nM (1 microg mL(-1)) for the 75 mol % benzoboroxole-functionalized polymers. These polymers exhibited minimal cytotoxicity after 24 h exposure to a human vaginal cell line.

  14. Construction of Multivalent Homo- and Heterofunctional ABO Blood Group Glycoconjugates Using a Trifunctional Linker Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daskhan, Gour Chand; Tran, Hanh-Thuc Ton; Meloncelli, Peter J; Lowary, Todd L; West, Lori J; Cairo, Christopher W

    2018-02-21

    The design and synthesis of multivalent ligands displaying complex oligosaccharides is necessary for the development of therapeutics, diagnostics, and research tools. Here, we report an efficient conjugation strategy to prepare complex glycoconjugates with 4 copies of 1 or 2 separate glycan epitopes, providing 4-8 carbohydrate residues on a tetravalent poly(ethylene glycol) scaffold. This strategy provides complex glycoconjugates that approach the size of glycoproteins (15-18 kDa) while remaining well-defined. The synthetic strategy makes use of three orthogonal functional groups, including a reactive N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS)-ester moiety on the linker to install the first carbohydrate epitope via reaction with an amine. A masked amine functionality on the linker is revealed after the removal of a fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl (Fmoc)-protecting group, allowing the attachment to the NHS-activated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) scaffold. An azide group in the linker was then used to incorporate the second carbohydrate epitope via catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition. Using a known tetravalent PEG scaffold (PDI, 1.025), we prepared homofunctional glycoconjugates that display four copies of lactose and the A-type II or the B-type II human blood group antigens. Using our trifunctional linker, we expanded this strategy to produce heterofunctional conjugates with four copies of two separate glycan epitopes. These heterofunctional conjugates included Neu5Ac, 3'-sialyllactose, or 6'-sialyllactose as a second antigen. Using an alternative strategy, we generated heterofunctional conjugates with three copies of the glycan epitope and one fluorescent group (on average) using a sequential dual-amine coupling strategy. These conjugation strategies should be easily generalized for conjugation of other complex glycans. We demonstrate that the glycan epitopes of heterofunctional conjugates engage and cluster target B-cell receptors and CD22 receptors on B cells, supporting the

  15. A multivalent Mannheimia-Bibersteinia vaccine protects bighorn sheep against Mannheimia haemolytica challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Renuka; Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Bavananthasivam, Jegarubee; Kugadas, Abirami; Potter, Kathleen A; Foreyt, William J; Hodgins, Douglas C; Shewen, Patricia E; Barrington, George M; Knowles, Donald P; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2011-10-01

    Bighorn sheep (BHS) are more susceptible than domestic sheep (DS) to Mannheimia haemolytica pneumonia. Although both species carry M. haemolytica as a commensal bacterium in the nasopharynx, DS carry mostly leukotoxin (Lkt)-positive strains while BHS carry Lkt-negative strains. Consequently, antibodies to surface antigens and Lkt are present at much higher titers in DS than in BHS. The objective of this study was to determine whether repeated immunization of BHS with multivalent Mannheimia-Bibersteinia vaccine will protect them upon M. haemolytica challenge. Four BHS were vaccinated with a culture supernatant vaccine prepared from M. haemolytica serotypes A1 and A2 and Bibersteinia trehalosi serotype T10 on days 0, 21, 35, 49, and 77. Four other BHS were used as nonvaccinated controls. On the day of challenge, 12 days after the last immunization, the mean serum titers of Lkt-neutralizing antibodies and antibodies to surface antigens against M. haemolytica were 1:160 and 1:4,000, respectively. Following intranasal challenge with M. haemolytica A2 (1 × 10(5) CFU), all four control BHS died within 48 h. Necropsy revealed acute fibrinonecrotic pneumonia characteristic of M. haemolytica infection. None of the vaccinated BHS died during the 8 weeks postchallenge observation period. Radiography at 3 weeks postchallenge revealed no lung lesions in two vaccinated BHS and mild lesions in the other two, which resolved by 8 weeks postchallenge. These results indicate that if BHS can be induced to develop high titers of Lkt-neutralizing antibodies and antibodies to surface antigens, they are likely to survive M. haemolytica challenge which is likely to reduce the BHS population decline due to pneumonia.

  16. A Multivalent Mannheimia-Bibersteinia Vaccine Protects Bighorn Sheep against Mannheimia haemolytica Challenge ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Renuka; Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Bavananthasivam, Jegarubee; Kugadas, Abirami; Potter, Kathleen A.; Foreyt, William J.; Hodgins, Douglas C.; Shewen, Patricia E.; Barrington, George M.; Knowles, Donald P.; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2011-01-01

    Bighorn sheep (BHS) are more susceptible than domestic sheep (DS) to Mannheimia haemolytica pneumonia. Although both species carry M. haemolytica as a commensal bacterium in the nasopharynx, DS carry mostly leukotoxin (Lkt)-positive strains while BHS carry Lkt-negative strains. Consequently, antibodies to surface antigens and Lkt are present at much higher titers in DS than in BHS. The objective of this study was to determine whether repeated immunization of BHS with multivalent Mannheimia-Bibersteinia vaccine will protect them upon M. haemolytica challenge. Four BHS were vaccinated with a culture supernatant vaccine prepared from M. haemolytica serotypes A1 and A2 and Bibersteinia trehalosi serotype T10 on days 0, 21, 35, 49, and 77. Four other BHS were used as nonvaccinated controls. On the day of challenge, 12 days after the last immunization, the mean serum titers of Lkt-neutralizing antibodies and antibodies to surface antigens against M. haemolytica were 1:160 and 1:4,000, respectively. Following intranasal challenge with M. haemolytica A2 (1 × 105 CFU), all four control BHS died within 48 h. Necropsy revealed acute fibrinonecrotic pneumonia characteristic of M. haemolytica infection. None of the vaccinated BHS died during the 8 weeks postchallenge observation period. Radiography at 3 weeks postchallenge revealed no lung lesions in two vaccinated BHS and mild lesions in the other two, which resolved by 8 weeks postchallenge. These results indicate that if BHS can be induced to develop high titers of Lkt-neutralizing antibodies and antibodies to surface antigens, they are likely to survive M. haemolytica challenge which is likely to reduce the BHS population decline due to pneumonia. PMID:21832104

  17. Design of lipid nanocapsule delivery vehicles for multivalent display of recombinant Env trimers in HIV vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejawar-Gaddy, Sharmila; Kovacs, James M; Barouch, Dan H; Chen, Bing; Irvine, Darrell J

    2014-08-20

    Immunization strategies that elicit antibodies capable of neutralizing diverse virus strains will likely be an important part of a successful vaccine against HIV. However, strategies to promote robust humoral responses against the native intact HIV envelope trimer structure are lacking. We recently developed chemically cross-linked lipid nanocapsules as carriers of molecular adjuvants and encapsulated or surface-displayed antigens, which promoted follicular helper T-cell responses and elicited high-avidity, durable antibody responses to a candidate malaria antigen. To apply this system to the delivery of HIV antigens, Env gp140 trimers with terminal his-tags (gp140T-his) were anchored to the surface of lipid nanocapsules via Ni-NTA-functionalized lipids. Initial experiments revealed that the large (409 kDa), heavily glycosylated trimers were capable of extracting fluid phase lipids from the membranes of nanocapsules. Thus, liquid-ordered and/or gel-phase lipid compositions were required to stably anchor trimers to the particle membranes. Trimer-loaded nanocapsules combined with the clinically relevant adjuvant monophosphoryl lipid A primed high-titer antibody responses in mice at antigen doses ranging from 5 μg to as low as 100 ng, whereas titers dropped more than 50-fold over the same dose range when soluble trimer was mixed with a strong oil-in-water adjuvant comparator. Nanocapsule immunization also broadened the number of distinct epitopes on the HIV trimer recognized by the antibody response. These results suggest that nanocapsules displaying HIV trimers in an oriented, multivalent presentation can promote key aspects of the humoral response against Env immunogens.

  18. Low energy cyclotron production of multivalent transition metals for PET imaging and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Rodriguez, Miguel Angel

    Recent advances in high-resolution tomographs for small animals require the production of nonconventional long-lived positron emitters to label novel radiopharmaceuticals for PET-based molecular imaging. Radioisotopes with an appropriate half life to match the kinetics of slow biological processes will allow to researchers to study the phamacokinetics of PET ligands over several hours, or even days, on the same animal, with the injection of a single dose. In addition, radionuclides with a suitable half life can potentially be distributed from a central production site making them available in PET facilities that lack an in-house cyclotron. In the last few years there has been a growing interest in the use of PET ligands labeled with radiometals, particularly isotopes of copper, yttrium and zirconium. Future clinical applications of these tracers will require them to be produced reliably and efficiently. This thesis work deals with implementing and optimizing the production of the multivalent transition metals 61,64Cu, 86Y and 89Zr for molecular PET imaging and therapy. Our findings in the production of these radionuclides at high specific activity on an 11 MeV proton-only cyclotron are presented. Local applications of these tracers, including Cu-ATSM for in vivo quantification of hypoxia, synthesis of targeted radiopharmaceuticals using activated esters of DOTA, and a novel development of positron emitting resin microspheres, are also be discussed. As a result of this thesis work, metallic radionuclides are now efficiently produced on a weekly basis in sufficient quality and quantity for collaborating scientists at UW-Madison and external users in other Universities across the country.

  19. Evaluation of the impact of multivalent metal ions on the permeation behavior of Dolutegravir sodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grießinger, Julia Anita; Hauptstein, Sabine; Laffleur, Flavia; Netsomboon, Kesinee; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) and polyvalent cations are an important factor within drug absorption in the gastrointestinal tract. Dolutegravir sodium, as a second-generation integrase stand transfer inhibitor for the treatment of HIV was investigated regarding chelation with Al(3+), Ca(2+), Fe(3+), Mg(2+ )and Zn(2+) ions at three different molar ratios. Furthermore, the influence of drug-ion chelates on the permeability of the drug across two intestinal membrane models was analyzed. For this purpose, Caco-2 monolayer model and Ussing chamber technique utilizing freshly excited rat intestinal mucosa were chosen and a buffer system without additional Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) ions was tested regarding cell detachment. The addition of polyvalent cations in an equal molar ratio to the drug solution decreased the dissolved drug by at least 11%. An increased multivalent cation concentration in a ratio of 1:10 afforded an API drop in the solution of at least 88% with the exception of Mg(2+). In particular, Dolutegravir sodium was chelated with iron ions to nearly 100%. Overall, the higher the amount of metal ions in the solution, the lower was the detected amount of the drug. The permeation experiments across the Caco-2 monolayer and the rat intestinal mucosa pointed out that the addition of AlCl3, CaCl2 and ZnCl2 in a molar ratio of 10:1 to the drug led to significantly decreased drug permeation. According to these results the co-administration of Al(3+), Ca(2+ )or Zn(2+ )as well as of supplementary medications containing these polyvalent ions is in case of oral Dolutegravir delivery not recommended.

  20. Synthetic multivalent DNAzymes for enhanced hydrogen peroxide catalysis and sensitive colorimetric glucose detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Deng-Kai; Kuo, Chia-Jung; Chen, Lin-Chi

    2015-01-26

    A peroxidase-mimic DNAzyme is a G-quadruplex (G4) DNA-hemin complex, in which the G4-DNA resembles an apoenzyme, and hemin is the cofactor for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) catalysis. Twenty-one-mer CatG4 is a well-proven G4-DNA as well as a hemin-binding aptamer for constituting a DNAzyme. This work studied if a multivalent DNAzyme with accelerated catalysis could be constructed using a multimeric CatG4 with hemin. We compared CatG4 monomer, dimer, trimer, and tetramer, which were prepared by custom oligo synthesis, for G4 structure formation. According to circular dichroism (CD) analysis, we found that a CatG4 multimer exhibited more active G4 conformation than the sum effect of equal-number CatG4 monomers. However, the DNAzyme kinetics was not improved monotonically along with the subunit number of a multimeric CatG4. It was the trivalent DNAzyme, trimeric CatG4:hemin, resulting in the rapidest H2O2 catalysis instead of a tetravalent one. We discovered that the trivalent DNAzyme's highest catalytic rate was correlated to its most stable hemin-binding G4 structure, evidenced by CD melting temperature analysis. Finally, a trivalent DNAzyme-based colorimetric glucose assay with a detection limit as low as 10 μM was demonstrated, and this assay did not need adenosine 5'-tri-phosphate disodium salt hydrate (ATP) as a DNAzyme boosting agent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Microfluidic biofunctionalisation protocols to form multi-valent interactions for cell rolling and phenotype modification investigations

    KAUST Repository

    Perozziello, Gerardo

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we propose a fast, simple method to biofunctionalise microfluidic systems for cellomic investigations based on micro-fluidic protocols. Many available processes either require expensive and time-consuming protocols or are incompatible with the fabrication of microfluidic systems. Our method differs from the existing since it is applicable to an assembled system, uses few microlitres of reagents and it is based on the use of microbeads. The microbeads have specific surface moieties to link the biomolecules and couple cell receptors. Furthermore, the microbeads serve as arm spacer and offer the benefit of the multi-valent interaction. Microfluidics was adapted together with topology and biochemistry surface modifications to offer the microenvironment for cellomic studies. Based on this principle, we exploit the streptavidin-biotin interaction to couple antibodies to the biofunctionalised microfluidic environment within 5 h using 200 μL of reagents and biomolecules. We selected the antibodies able to form complexes with the MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules present on the cell membrane and involved in the immune surveillance. To test the microfluidic system, tumour cell lines (RMA) were rolled across the coupled antibodies to recognise and strip MHC-I molecules. As result, we show that cell rolling performed inside a microfluidic chamber functionalised with beads and the opportune antibody facilitate the removal of MHC class I molecules. We showed that the level of median fluorescent intensity of the MHC-I molecules is 300 for cells treated in a not biofunctionalised surface. It decreased to 275 for cells treated in a flat biofunctionalised surface and to 250 for cells treated on a surface where biofunctionalised microbeads were immobilised. The cells with reduced expression of MHC-I molecules showed, after cytotoxicity tests, susceptibility 3.5 times higher than normal cells. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Divalent and Multivalent Activation in Phosphate Triesters: A Versatile Method for the Synthesis of Advanced Polyol Synthons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christopher D; McParland, James P; Hanson, Paul R

    2009-11-01

    The construction of mono- and bicyclic phosphate trimesters possessing divalent and multivalent activation and their subsequent use in the production of advanced polyol synthons is presented. The method highlights efforts to employ phosphate tethers as removable, functionally active tethers capable of multipositional activation and their subsequent role as leaving groups in selective cleavage reactions. The development of phosphate tethers represents an integrated platform for a new and versatile tether for natural product synthesis and sheds light on new approaches to the facile construction of small molecules.

  3. A prophylactic multivalent vaccine against different filovirus species is immunogenic and provides protection from lethal infections with Ebolavirus and Marburgvirus species in non-human primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Callendret

    Full Text Available The search for a universal filovirus vaccine that provides protection against multiple filovirus species has been prompted by sporadic but highly lethal outbreaks of Ebolavirus and Marburgvirus infections. A good prophylactic vaccine should be able to provide protection to all known filovirus species and as an upside potentially protect from newly emerging virus strains. We investigated the immunogenicity and protection elicited by multivalent vaccines expressing glycoproteins (GP from Ebola virus (EBOV, Sudan virus (SUDV, Taï Forest virus (TAFV and Marburg virus (MARV. Immune responses against filovirus GP have been associated with protection from disease. The GP antigens were expressed by adenovirus serotypes 26 and 35 (Ad26 and Ad35 and modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA vectors, all selected for their strong immunogenicity and good safety profile. Using fully lethal NHP intramuscular challenge models, we assessed different vaccination regimens for immunogenicity and protection from filovirus disease. Heterologous multivalent Ad26-Ad35 prime-boost vaccination regimens could give full protection against MARV (range 75%-100% protection and EBOV (range 50% to 100% challenge, and partial protection (75% against SUDV challenge. Heterologous multivalent Ad26-MVA prime-boost immunization gave full protection against EBOV challenge in a small cohort study. The use of such multivalent vaccines did not show overt immune interference in comparison with monovalent vaccines. Multivalent vaccines induced GP-specific antibody responses and cellular IFNγ responses to each GP expressed by the vaccine, and cross-reactivity to TAFV GP was detected in a trivalent vaccine expressing GP from EBOV, SUDV and MARV. In the EBOV challenge studies, higher humoral EBOV GP-specific immune responses (p = 0.0004 were associated with survival from EBOV challenge and less so for cellular immune responses (p = 0.0320. These results demonstrate that it is feasible to

  4. Host microsatellite alleles in malaria predisposition?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trivedi Rajni

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is a serious, sometimes fatal, disease caused by Plasmodium infection of human red blood cells. The host-parasite co-evolutionary processes are well understood by the association of coding variations such as G6PD, Duffy blood group receptor, HLA, and beta-globin gene variants with malaria resistance. The profound genetic diversity in host is attributed to polymorphic microsatellites loci. The microsatellite alleles in bacterial species are known to have aided their survival in fatal environmental conditions. The fascinating question is whether microsatellites are genomic cushion in the human genome to combat disease stress and has cause-effect relationships with infections. Presentation of the hypothesis It is hypothesized that repeat units or alleles of microsatellites TH01 and D5S818, located in close proximity to beta-globin gene and immune regulatory region in human play a role in malaria predisposition. Association of alleles at aforesaid microsatellites with malaria infection was analysed. To overrule the false association in unrecognized population stratification, structure analysis and AMOVA were performed among the sampled groups. Testing of hypothesis Associations of microsatellite alleles with malaria infection were verified using recombination rate, Chi-square, and powerful likelihood tests. Further investigation of population genetic structure, and AMOVA was done to rule out the confounding effects of population stratification in interpretation of association studies. Implication of the hypothesis Lower recombination rate (θ between microsatellites and genes implicated in host fitness; positive association between alleles -13 (D5S818, 9 (TH01 and strong susceptibility to Plasmodium falciparum; and alleles-12 (D5S818 and 6 (TH01 rendering resistance to human host were evident. The interesting fact emerging from the study was that while predisposition to malaria was a prehistoric attribute, among TH01

  5. Multiple phosphoglucomutase alleles in Toxorhynchites splendens (Diptera: Culcidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, H S; Chan, K L; Dhaliwal, S S; Burton, J J; Cheong, W H; Mak, J W

    1980-09-15

    Multiple phosphoglucomutase (E.C. 2.7.5.1) alleles are found in the mosquito Toxorhynchites splendens. The sample studied reveals 3 Pgm alleles whose frequencies are in good accord with Hardy-Weinberg expectations. The most frequent allele is that controlling a phenotype with an intermediate electrophoretic mobility. Each Pgm allele determines a two-band electrophoretic pattern.

  6. Expression of human PTPN22 alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C; Barington, T; Husby, S

    2007-01-01

    Considering the female predominance in most of the autoimmune disorders that associate with the PTPN22 Trp620 variant and the complexity by which this variant influences immunologic tolerance, the objective of this study was to ascertain if the allele-specific expression of the disease...... and 72 h of activation, respectively, the expression of PTPN22 1858C- and T-alleles increased to the same extent (P=0.64). The present result essentially excludes such phenomena as a partial explanation for the female predominance in most of the autoimmune disorders that associate with the PTPN22 Trp620...

  7. Multivalent nanoparticle networks enable point-of-care detection of human phospholipase-A2 in serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Robert; Lin, Yiyang; Burnapp, Mark; Bentham, Andrew; Hillier, David; Zabron, Abigail; Khan, Shahid; Tyreman, Matthew; Stevens, Molly M

    2015-03-24

    A rapid and highly sensitive point-of-care (PoC) lateral flow assay for phospholipase A2 (PLA2) is demonstrated in serum through the enzyme-triggered release of a new class of biotinylated multiarmed polymers from a liposome substrate. Signal from the enzyme activity is generated by the adhesion of polystreptavidin-coated gold nanoparticle networks to the lateral flow device, which leads to the appearance of a red test line due to the localized surface plasmon resonance effect of the gold. The use of a liposome as the enzyme substrate and multivalent linkers to link the nanoparticles leads to amplification of the signal, as the cleavage of a small amount of lipids is able to release a large amount of polymer linker and adhesion of an even larger amount of gold nanoparticles. By optimizing the molecular weight and multivalency of these biotinylated polymer linkers, the sensitivity of the device can be tuned to enable naked-eye detection of 1 nM human PLA2 in serum within 10 min. This high sensitivity enabled the correct diagnosis of pancreatitis in diseased clinical samples against a set of healthy controls using PLA2 activity in a point-of-care device for the first time.

  8. Multivalent adhesion molecule 7 clusters act as signaling platform for host cellular GTPase activation and facilitate epithelial barrier dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenson Lim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an emerging bacterial pathogen which colonizes the gastrointestinal tract and can cause severe enteritis and bacteraemia. During infection, V. parahaemolyticus primarily attaches to the small intestine, where it causes extensive tissue damage and compromises epithelial barrier integrity. We have previously described that Multivalent Adhesion Molecule (MAM 7 contributes to initial attachment of V. parahaemolyticus to epithelial cells. Here we show that the bacterial adhesin, through multivalent interactions between surface-induced adhesin clusters and phosphatidic acid lipids in the host cell membrane, induces activation of the small GTPase RhoA and actin rearrangements in host cells. In infection studies with V. parahaemolyticus we further demonstrate that adhesin-triggered activation of the ROCK/LIMK signaling axis is sufficient to redistribute tight junction proteins, leading to a loss of epithelial barrier function. Taken together, these findings show an unprecedented mechanism by which an adhesin acts as assembly platform for a host cellular signaling pathway, which ultimately facilitates breaching of the epithelial barrier by a bacterial pathogen.

  9. Enzymatic Synthesis of N-Acetyllactosamine (LacNAc Type 1 Oligomers and Characterization as Multivalent Galectin Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Fischöder

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Repeats of the disaccharide unit N-acetyllactosamine (LacNAc occur as type 1 (Galβ1, 3GlcNAc and type 2 (Galβ1, 4GlcNAc glycosylation motifs on glycoproteins and glycolipids. The LacNAc motif acts as binding ligand for lectins and is involved in many biological recognition events. To the best of our knowledge, we present, for the first time, the synthesis of LacNAc type 1 oligomers using recombinant β1,3-galactosyltransferase from Escherichia coli and β1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltranferase from Helicobacter pylori. Tetrasaccharide glycans presenting LacNAc type 1 repeats or LacNAc type 1 at the reducing or non-reducing end, respectively, were conjugated to bovine serum albumin as a protein scaffold by squarate linker chemistry. The resulting multivalent LacNAc type 1 presenting neo-glycoproteins were further studied for specific binding of the tumor-associated human galectin 3 (Gal-3 and its truncated counterpart Gal-3∆ in an enzyme-linked lectin assay (ELLA. We observed a significantly increased affinity of Gal-3∆ towards the multivalent neo-glycoprotein presenting LacNAc type 1 repeating units. This is the first evidence for differences in glycan selectivity of Gal-3∆ and Gal-3 and may be further utilized for tracing Gal-3∆ during tumor progression and therapy.

  10. Multivalency-Driven Formation of Te-Based Monolayer Materials: A Combined First-Principles and Experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhili; Cai, Xiaolin; Yi, Seho; Chen, Jinglei; Dai, Yawei; Niu, Chunyao; Guo, Zhengxiao; Xie, Maohai; Liu, Feng; Cho, Jun-Hyung; Jia, Yu; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2017-09-08

    Contemporary science is witnessing a rapid expansion of the two-dimensional (2D) materials family, each member possessing intriguing emergent properties of fundamental and practical importance. Using the particle-swarm optimization method in combination with first-principles density functional theory calculations, here we predict a new category of 2D monolayers named tellurene, composed of the metalloid element Te, with stable 1T-MoS_{2}-like (α-Te), and metastable tetragonal (β-Te) and 2H-MoS_{2}-like (γ-Te) structures. The underlying formation mechanism is inherently rooted in the multivalent nature of Te, with the central-layer Te behaving more metal-like (e.g., Mo), and the two outer layers more semiconductorlike (e.g., S). We also show that the α-Te phase can be spontaneously obtained from the magic thicknesses divisible by three layers truncated along the [001] direction of the trigonal structure of bulk Te, and both the α- and β-Te phases possess electron and hole mobilities much higher than MoS_{2}. Furthermore, we present preliminary but convincing experimental evidence for the layering behavior of Te on HOPG substrates, and predict the importance of multivalency in the layering behavior of Se. These findings effectively extend the realm of 2D materials to group-VI elements.

  11. Multivalent dendrimeric compounds containing carbohydrates expressed on immune cells inhibit infection by primary isolates of HIV-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa Borges, Andrew; Wieczorek, Lindsay; Johnson, Benitra; Benesi, Alan J.; Brown, Bruce K.; Kensinger, Richard D.; Krebs, Fred C.; Wigdahl, Brian; Blumenthal, Robert; Puri, Anu; McCutchan, Francine E.; Birx, Deborah L.; Polonis, Victoria R.; Schengrund, Cara-Lynne

    2010-01-01

    Specific glycosphingolipids (GSL), found on the surface of target immune cells, are recognized as alternate cell surface receptors by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) external envelope glycoprotein. In this study, the globotriose and 3'-sialyllactose carbohydrate head groups found on two GSL were covalently attached to a dendrimer core to produce two types of unique multivalent carbohydrates (MVC). These MVC inhibited HIV-1 infection of T cell lines and primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by T cell line-adapted viruses or primary isolates, with IC 50 s ranging from 0.1 to 7.4 μg/ml. Inhibition of Env-mediated membrane fusion by MVC was also observed using a dye-transfer assay. These carbohydrate compounds warrant further investigation as a potential new class of HIV-1 entry inhibitors. The data presented also shed light on the role of carbohydrate moieties in HIV-1 virus-host cell interactions. -- Research Highlights: →Multivalent carbohydrates (MVCs) inhibited infection of PBMCs by HIV-1. →MVCs inhibited infection by T cell line-adapted viruses. →MVCs inhibited infection by primary isolates of HIV-1. →MVCs inhibited Env-mediated membrane fusion.

  12. Neutralization of Human Interleukin 23 by Multivalent Nanobodies Explained by the Structure of Cytokine-Nanobody Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmyter, Aline; Spinelli, Silvia; Boutton, Carlo; Saunders, Michael; Blachetot, Christophe; de Haard, Hans; Denecker, Geertrui; Van Roy, Maarten; Cambillau, Christian; Rommelaere, Heidi

    2017-01-01

    The heterodimeric cytokine interleukin (IL) 23 comprises the IL12-shared p40 subunit and an IL23-specific subunit, p19. Together with IL12 and IL27, IL23 sits at the apex of the regulatory mechanisms shaping adaptive immune responses. IL23, together with IL17, plays an important role in the development of chronic inflammation and autoimmune inflammatory diseases. In this context, we generated monovalent antihuman IL23 variable heavy chain domain of llama heavy chain antibody (V HH ) domains (Nanobodies ® ) with low nanomolar affinity for human interleukin (hIL) 23. The crystal structure of a quaternary complex assembling hIL23 and several nanobodies against p19 and p40 subunits allowed identification of distinct epitopes and enabled rational design of a multivalent IL23-specific blocking nanobody. Taking advantage of the ease of nanobody formatting, multivalent IL23 nanobodies were assembled with properly designed linkers flanking an antihuman serum albumin nanobody, with improved hIL23 neutralization capacity in vitro and in vivo , as compared to the monovalent nanobodies. These constructs with long exposure time are excellent candidates for further developments targeting Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriasis.

  13. Neutralization of Human Interleukin 23 by Multivalent Nanobodies Explained by the Structure of Cytokine–Nanobody Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Desmyter

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The heterodimeric cytokine interleukin (IL 23 comprises the IL12-shared p40 subunit and an IL23-specific subunit, p19. Together with IL12 and IL27, IL23 sits at the apex of the regulatory mechanisms shaping adaptive immune responses. IL23, together with IL17, plays an important role in the development of chronic inflammation and autoimmune inflammatory diseases. In this context, we generated monovalent antihuman IL23 variable heavy chain domain of llama heavy chain antibody (VHH domains (Nanobodies® with low nanomolar affinity for human interleukin (hIL 23. The crystal structure of a quaternary complex assembling hIL23 and several nanobodies against p19 and p40 subunits allowed identification of distinct epitopes and enabled rational design of a multivalent IL23-specific blocking nanobody. Taking advantage of the ease of nanobody formatting, multivalent IL23 nanobodies were assembled with properly designed linkers flanking an antihuman serum albumin nanobody, with improved hIL23 neutralization capacity in vitro and in vivo, as compared to the monovalent nanobodies. These constructs with long exposure time are excellent candidates for further developments targeting Crohn’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriasis.

  14. Neutralization of Human Interleukin 23 by Multivalent Nanobodies Explained by the Structure of Cytokine–Nanobody Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmyter, Aline; Spinelli, Silvia; Boutton, Carlo; Saunders, Michael; Blachetot, Christophe; de Haard, Hans; Denecker, Geertrui; Van Roy, Maarten; Cambillau, Christian; Rommelaere, Heidi

    2017-01-01

    The heterodimeric cytokine interleukin (IL) 23 comprises the IL12-shared p40 subunit and an IL23-specific subunit, p19. Together with IL12 and IL27, IL23 sits at the apex of the regulatory mechanisms shaping adaptive immune responses. IL23, together with IL17, plays an important role in the development of chronic inflammation and autoimmune inflammatory diseases. In this context, we generated monovalent antihuman IL23 variable heavy chain domain of llama heavy chain antibody (VHH) domains (Nanobodies®) with low nanomolar affinity for human interleukin (hIL) 23. The crystal structure of a quaternary complex assembling hIL23 and several nanobodies against p19 and p40 subunits allowed identification of distinct epitopes and enabled rational design of a multivalent IL23-specific blocking nanobody. Taking advantage of the ease of nanobody formatting, multivalent IL23 nanobodies were assembled with properly designed linkers flanking an antihuman serum albumin nanobody, with improved hIL23 neutralization capacity in vitro and in vivo, as compared to the monovalent nanobodies. These constructs with long exposure time are excellent candidates for further developments targeting Crohn’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriasis. PMID:28871249

  15. Optimized Solid Phase-Assisted Synthesis of Dendrons Applicable as Scaffolds for Radiolabeled Bioactive Multivalent Compounds Intended for Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Fischer

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic structures, being highly homogeneous and symmetric, represent ideal scaffolds for the multimerization of bioactive molecules and thus enable the synthesis of compounds of high valency which are e.g., applicable in radiolabeled form as multivalent radiotracers for in vivo imaging. As the commonly applied solution phase synthesis of dendritic scaffolds is cumbersome and time-consuming, a synthesis strategy was developed that allows for the efficient assembly of acid amide bond-based highly modular dendrons on solid support via standard Fmoc solid phase peptide synthesis protocols. The obtained dendritic structures comprised up to 16 maleimide functionalities and were derivatized on solid support with the chelating agent DOTA. The functionalized dendrons furthermore could be efficiently reacted with structurally variable model thiol-bearing bioactive molecules via click chemistry and finally radiolabeled with 68Ga. Thus, this solid phase-assisted dendron synthesis approach enables the fast and straightforward assembly of bioactive multivalent constructs for example applicable as radiotracers for in vivo imaging with Positron Emission Tomography (PET.

  16. Standardized SSR allele naming and binning among projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deemer, Dennis L; Nelson, C Dana

    2010-11-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) have proven to be extremely valuable DNA markers for genetic mapping and population genetic analyses. However, data collected across laboratories or even within laboratories are difficult to combine due to challenges in standardizing allele names, especially for nonmodel systems. Here we provide a new approach for standardizing SSR allele names that combines several previously recognized components for standardization, including reference samples/alleles, cumulative binsets, static between-allele spacing, and interval allele naming.

  17. RHD alleles in the Tunisian population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchari, Mouna; Jemni-Yaacoub, Saloua; Chakroun, Taher; Abdelkefi, Saida; Houissa, Batoul; Hmida, Slama

    2013-01-01

    Background: A comprehensive survey of RHD alleles in Tunisia population was lacking. The aim of this study was to use a multiplex RHD typing assay for simultaneous detection of partial D especially with RHD/RHCE deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequence exchange mechanism and some weak D alleles. Materials and Methods: Six RHD specific primer sets were designed to amplify RHD exons 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 9. DNA from 2000 blood donors (1777 D+ and 223 D-) from several regions was selected for RHD genotyping using a PCR multiplex assay. Further molecular investigations were done to characterize the RHD variants that were identified by the PCR multiplex assay. Results: In the 1777 D+ samples, only 10 individuals showed the absence of amplification of exons 4 and 5 that were subsequently identified by PCR-SSP as weak D type 4 variants. No hybrid allele was detected. In the 223 D-, RHD amplification of some exons was observed only in 5 samples: 4 individuals expressed only RHD exon 9, and one subject lacking exons 4 and 5. These samples were then screened by PCR-SSPs on d(C) ces and weak D type 4, respectively. Conclusion: The weak D type 4 appears to be the most common D variant allele. We have not found any partial D variant. Findings also indicated that RHD gene deletion is the most prevalent cause of the D- phenotype in the Tunisian population. PMID:24014941

  18. RHD alleles in the Tunisian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouna Ouchari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A comprehensive survey of RHD alleles in Tunisia population was lacking. The aim of this study was to use a multiplex RHD typing assay for simultaneous detection of partial D especially with RHD/RHCE deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA sequence exchange mechanism and some weak D alleles. Materials and Methods: Six RHD specific primer sets were designed to amplify RHD exons 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 9. DNA from 2000 blood donors (1777 D+ and 223 D- from several regions was selected for RHD genotyping using a PCR multiplex assay. Further molecular investigations were done to characterize the RHD variants that were identified by the PCR multiplex assay. Results: In the 1777 D+ samples, only 10 individuals showed the absence of amplification of exons 4 and 5 that were subsequently identified by PCR-SSP as weak D type 4 variants. No hybrid allele was detected. In the 223 D-, RHD amplification of some exons was observed only in 5 samples: 4 individuals expressed only RHD exon 9, and one subject lacking exons 4 and 5. These samples were then screened by PCR-SSPs on d(C ce s and weak D type 4, respectively. Conclusion: The weak D type 4 appears to be the most common D variant allele. We have not found any partial D variant. Findings also indicated that RHD gene deletion is the most prevalent cause of the D- phenotype in the Tunisian population.

  19. Diversity of Lactase Persistence Alleles in Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, BL; Raga, TO; Liebert, Anke

    2013-01-01

    The persistent expression of lactase into adulthood in humans is a recent genetic adaptation that allows the consumption of milk from other mammals after weaning. In Europe, a single allele (−13910∗T, rs4988235) in an upstream region that acts as an enhancer to the expression of the lactase gene ...

  20. Microangiopathic complications related to different alleles of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microangiopathic complications related to different alleles of manganese superoxide dismutase gene in diabetes mellitus type 1. TM EL Masry, MA Abou Zahra, Kh. A Soliman, M El-Taweel. Abstract. No Abstract. The Egyptian Journal of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Vol. 23(2) 2005: 155-167. Full Text: EMAIL FULL ...

  1. Estimating the probability of allelic drop-out of STR alleles in forensic genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Mogensen, Helle Smidt

    2009-01-01

    In crime cases with available DNA evidence, the amount of DNA is often sparse due to the setting of the crime. In such cases, allelic drop-out of one or more true alleles in STR typing is possible. We present a statistical model for estimating the per locus and overall probability of allelic drop......-out using the results of all STR loci in the case sample as reference. The methodology of logistic regression is appropriate for this analysis, and we demonstrate how to incorporate this in a forensic genetic framework....

  2. Molecular recognition of carboxylates in the protein leucine zipper by a multivalent supramolecular ligand: residue-specific, sensitive and label-free probing by UV resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakeri, B; Niebling, S; Martinéz, A G; Sokkar, P; Sanchez-Garcia, E; Schmuck, C; Schlücker, S

    2018-01-17

    Ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy is a selective, sensitive and label-free vibrational spectroscopic technique. Here, we demonstrate as proof of concept that UVRR can be used for probing the recognition between a multivalent supramolecular ligand and acidic residues in leucine zipper, an α-helical structural motif of many proteins.

  3. Spatial proximity of homologous alleles and long noncoding RNAs regulate a switch in allelic gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratigi, Kalliopi; Kapsetaki, Manouela; Aivaliotis, Michalis; Town, Terrence; Flavell, Richard A; Spilianakis, Charalampos G

    2015-03-31

    Physiological processes rely on the regulation of total mRNA levels in a cell. In diploid organisms, the transcriptional activation of one or both alleles of a gene may involve trans-allelic interactions that provide a tight spatial and temporal level of gene expression regulation. The mechanisms underlying such interactions still remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that lipopolysaccharide stimulation of murine macrophages rapidly resulted in the actin-mediated and transient homologous spatial proximity of Tnfα alleles, which was necessary for the mono- to biallelic switch in gene expression. We identified two new complementary long noncoding RNAs transcribed from the TNFα locus and showed that their knockdown had opposite effects in Tnfα spatial proximity and allelic expression. Moreover, the observed spatial proximity of Tnfα alleles depended on pyruvate kinase muscle isoform 2 (PKM2) and T-helper-inducing POZ-Krüppel-like factor (ThPOK). This study suggests a role for lncRNAs in the regulation of somatic homologous spatial proximity and allelic expression control necessary for fine-tuning mammalian immune responses.

  4. Use of allele scores as instrumental variables for Mendelian randomization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Stephen; Thompson, Simon G

    2013-08-01

    An allele score is a single variable summarizing multiple genetic variants associated with a risk factor. It is calculated as the total number of risk factor-increasing alleles for an individual (unweighted score), or the sum of weights for each allele corresponding to estimated genetic effect sizes (weighted score). An allele score can be used in a Mendelian randomization analysis to estimate the causal effect of the risk factor on an outcome. Data were simulated to investigate the use of allele scores in Mendelian randomization where conventional instrumental variable techniques using multiple genetic variants demonstrate 'weak instrument' bias. The robustness of estimates using the allele score to misspecification (for example non-linearity, effect modification) and to violations of the instrumental variable assumptions was assessed. Causal estimates using a correctly specified allele score were unbiased with appropriate coverage levels. The estimates were generally robust to misspecification of the allele score, but not to instrumental variable violations, even if the majority of variants in the allele score were valid instruments. Using a weighted rather than an unweighted allele score increased power, but the increase was small when genetic variants had similar effect sizes. Naive use of the data under analysis to choose which variants to include in an allele score, or for deriving weights, resulted in substantial biases. Allele scores enable valid causal estimates with large numbers of genetic variants. The stringency of criteria for genetic variants in Mendelian randomization should be maintained for all variants in an allele score.

  5. Self-adjuvanting influenza candidate vaccine presenting epitopes for cell-mediated immunity on a proteinaceous multivalent nanoplatform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szurgot, Inga; Szolajska, Ewa; Laurin, David; Lambrecht, Benedicte; Chaperot, Laurence; Schoehn, Guy; Chroboczek, Jadwiga

    2013-09-13

    We exploit the features of a virus-like particle, adenoviral dodecahedron (Ad Dd), for engineering a multivalent vaccination platform carrying influenza epitopes for cell-mediated immunity. The delivery platform, Ad Dd, is a proteinaceous, polyvalent, and biodegradable nanoparticle endowed with remarkable endocytosis activity that can be engineered to carry 60 copies of a peptide. Influenza M1 is the most abundant influenza internal protein with the conserved primary structure. Two different M1 immunodominant epitopes were separately inserted in Dd external positions without destroying the particles' dodecahedric structure. Both kinds of DdFluM1 obtained through expression in baculovirus system were properly presented by human dendritic cells triggering efficient activation of antigen-specific T cells responses. Importantly, the candidate vaccine was able to induce cellular immunity in vivo in chickens. These results warrant further investigation of Dd as a platform for candidate vaccine, able to stimulate cellular immune responses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Multivalent dendrimeric compounds containing carbohydrates expressed on immune cells inhibit infection by primary isolates of HIV-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Andrew Rosa; Wieczorek, Lindsay; Johnson, Benitra; Benesi, Alan J.; Brown, Bruce K.; Kensinger, Richard D.; Krebs, Fred C.; Wigdahl, Brian; Blumenthal, Robert; Puri, Anu; McCutchan, Francine E.; Birx, Deborah L.; Polonis, Victoria R.; Schengrund, Cara-Lynne

    2010-01-01

    Specific glycosphingolipids (GSL), found on the surface of target immune cells, are recognized as alternate cell surface receptors by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) external envelope glycoprotein. In this study, the globotriose and 3’-sialyllactose carbohydrate head groups found on two GSL were covalently attached to a dendrimer core to produce two types of unique multivalent carbohydrates (MVC). These MVC inhibited HIV-1 infection of T cell lines and primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by T cell line-adapted viruses or primary isolates, with IC50s ranging from 0.1 – 7.4 µg/ml. Inhibition of Env-mediated membrane fusion by MVC was also observed using a dye-transfer assay. These carbohydrate compounds warrant further investigation as a potential new class of HIV-1 entry inhibitors. The data presented also shed light on the role of carbohydrate moieties in HIV-1 virus-host cell interactions. PMID:20880566

  7. An Endogenous Vaccine Based on Fluorophores and Multivalent Immunoadjuvants Regulates Tumor Micro-Environment for Synergistic Photothermal and Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Yang, Suleixin; Song, Linjiang; Zeng, Yan; He, Tao; Wang, Ning; Yu, Chuan; Yin, Tao; Liu, Li; Wei, Xiawei; Wu, Qinjie; Wei, Yuquan; Yang, Li; Gong, Changyang

    2018-01-01

    Recently, near-infrared (NIR) light-based photothermal therapy (PTT) has been widely applied in cancer treatment. However, in most cases, the tissue penetration depth of NIR light is not sufficient and thus photothermal therapy is unable to completely eradicate deep, seated tumors inevitably leading to recurrence of the tumor. Due to this significant limitation of NIR, improved therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. Methods: We developed an endogenous vaccine based on a novel nanoparticle platform for combinatorial photothermal ablation and immunotherapy. The design was based on fluorophore-loaded liposomes (IR-7-lipo) coated with a multivalent immunoadjuvant (HA-CpG). In vitro PTT potency was assessed in cells by LIVE/DEAD and Annexin V-FITC/PI assays. The effect on bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC) maturation and antigen presentation was evaluated by flow cytometry (FCM) with specific antibodies. After treatment, the immune cell populations in tumor micro-environment and the cytokines in the serum were detected by FCM and Elisa assay, respectively. Finally, the therapeutic outcome was investigated in an animal model. Results: Upon irradiation with 808 nm laser, IR-7-lipo induced tumor cell necrosis and released tumor-associated antigens, while the multivalent immunoadjuvant improved the expression of co-stimulatory molecules on BMDC and promoted antigen presentation. The combination therapy of PTT and immunotherapy regulated the tumor micro-environment, decreased immunosuppression, and potentiated host antitumor immunity. Most significantly, due to an enhanced antitumor immune response, combined photothermal immunotherapy was effective in eradicating tumors in mice and inhibiting tumor metastasis. Conclusion: This endogenous vaccination strategy based on synergistic photothermal and immunotherapy may provide a potentially effective approach for treatment of cancers, especially those difficult to be surgically removed.

  8. Characterisation of immune responses in healthy foals when a multivalent vaccine protocol was initiated at age 90 or 180 days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, E G; Bello, N M; Bryan, A J; Hankins, K; Wilkerson, M

    2015-11-01

    Protection from infectious disease requires antigen-specific immunity. In foals, most vaccine protocols are delayed until 6 months to avoid maternal antibody interference. Susceptibility to disease may exist prior to administration of vaccination at age 4-6 months. The aim of this investigation was to characterise immune activation among healthy foals in response to a multivalent vaccine protocol and compare immune responses when foals were vaccinated at age either 90 or 180 days. Randomised block design. Twelve healthy foals with colostral transfer were blocked for age and randomly assigned to vaccination at age 90 days (treatment) or at age 180 days (control). Vaccination protocols included a 3-dose series and booster vaccine administered at age 11 months. Immune response following vaccination at age 90 or 180 days was comparable for several measures of cellular immunity. Antigen specific CD4+ and CD8+ expression of interleukin-4, interferon-γ and granzyme B to eastern equine encephalomyelitis, western equine encephalomyelitis, West Nile virus, tetanus toxoid, equine influenza and equine herpesvirus-1/4 antigens were evident for both groups 30 days after initial vaccine and at age 344 days. Both groups showed a significant increase in antigen-specific immunoglobulin G expression following booster vaccine at age 11 months, thereby indicating memory immune responses. The data presented in this report demonstrate that young foals are capable of immune activation following a 3-dose series with a multivalent vaccine, despite presence of maternal antibodies. Although immune activation does not automatically confer protection, several of the immune indicators measured showed comparable expression in foals vaccinated at 3 months relative to control foals vaccinated at age 6 months. In high-risk situations where immunity may be required earlier than following a conventional vaccine series, our data provide evidence that foals respond to immunisation initiated at 3 months

  9. EV-A71 vaccine licensure: a first step for multivalent enterovirus vaccine to control HFMD and other severe diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Qunying; Wang, Yiping; Bian, Lianlian; Xu, Miao; Liang, Zhenglun

    2016-07-20

    Enteroviruses (EVs) are the most common viral agents in humans. Although most infections are mild or asymptomatic, there is a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations that may be caused by EV infections with varying degrees of severity. Among these viruses, EV-A71 and coxsackievirus (CV) CV-A16 from group A EVs attract the most attention because they are responsible for hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Other EV-A viruses such as CV-A6 and CV-A10 were also reported to cause HFMD outbreaks in several countries or regions. Group B EVs such as CV-B3, CV-B5 and echovirus 30 were reported to be the main pathogens responsible for myocarditis and encephalitis epidemics and were also detected in HFMD patients. Vaccines are the best tools to control infectious diseases. In December 2015, China's Food and Drug Administration approved two inactivated EV-A71 vaccines for preventing severe HFMD.The CV-A16 vaccine and the EV-A71-CV-A16 bivalent vaccine showed substantial efficacy against HFMD in pre-clinical animal models. Previously, research on EV-B group vaccines was mainly focused on CV-B3 vaccine development. Because the HFMD pathogen spectrum has changed, and the threat from EV-B virus-associated severe diseases has gradually increased, it is necessary to develop multivalent HFMD vaccines. This study summarizes the clinical symptoms of diseases caused by EVs, such as HFMD, myocarditis and encephalitis, and the related EV vaccine development progress. In conclusion, developing multivalent EV vaccines should be strongly recommended to prevent HFMD, myocarditis, encephalitis and other severe diseases.

  10. Allele specific expression and methylation in the bumblebee, Bombus terrestris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoë Lonsdale

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The social hymenoptera are emerging as models for epigenetics. DNA methylation, the addition of a methyl group, is a common epigenetic marker. In mammals and flowering plants methylation affects allele specific expression. There is contradictory evidence for the role of methylation on allele specific expression in social insects. The aim of this paper is to investigate allele specific expression and monoallelic methylation in the bumblebee, Bombus terrestris. We found nineteen genes that were both monoallelically methylated and monoallelically expressed in a single bee. Fourteen of these genes express the hypermethylated allele, while the other five express the hypomethylated allele. We also searched for allele specific expression in twenty-nine published RNA-seq libraries. We found 555 loci with allele-specific expression. We discuss our results with reference to the functional role of methylation in gene expression in insects and in the as yet unquantified role of genetic cis effects in insect allele specific methylation and expression.

  11. Estimated allele substitution effects underlying genomic evaluation models depend on the scaling of allele counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwman, Aniek C; Hayes, Ben J; Calus, Mario P L

    2017-10-30

    Genomic evaluation is used to predict direct genomic values (DGV) for selection candidates in breeding programs, but also to estimate allele substitution effects (ASE) of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Scaling of allele counts influences the estimated ASE, because scaling of allele counts results in less shrinkage towards the mean for low minor allele frequency (MAF) variants. Scaling may become relevant for estimating ASE as more low MAF variants will be used in genomic evaluations. We show the impact of scaling on estimates of ASE using real data and a theoretical framework, and in terms of power, model fit and predictive performance. In a dairy cattle dataset with 630 K SNP genotypes, the correlation between DGV for stature from a random regression model using centered allele counts (RRc) and centered and scaled allele counts (RRcs) was 0.9988, whereas the overall correlation between ASE using RRc and RRcs was 0.27. The main difference in ASE between both methods was found for SNPs with a MAF lower than 0.01. Both the ratio (ASE from RRcs/ASE from RRc) and the regression coefficient (regression of ASE from RRcs on ASE from RRc) were much higher than 1 for low MAF SNPs. Derived equations showed that scenarios with a high heritability, a large number of individuals and a small number of variants have lower ratios between ASE from RRc and RRcs. We also investigated the optimal scaling parameter [from - 1 (RRcs) to 0 (RRc) in steps of 0.1] in the bovine stature dataset. We found that the log-likelihood was maximized with a scaling parameter of - 0.8, while the mean squared error of prediction was minimized with a scaling parameter of - 1, i.e., RRcs. Large differences in estimated ASE were observed for low MAF SNPs when allele counts were scaled or not scaled because there is less shrinkage towards the mean for scaled allele counts. We derived a theoretical framework that shows that the difference in ASE due to shrinkage is heavily influenced by the

  12. Alleles versus mutations: Understanding the evolution of genetic architecture requires a molecular perspective on allelic origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, David L

    2015-12-01

    Perspectives on the role of large-effect quantitative trait loci (QTL) in the evolution of complex traits have shifted back and forth over the past few decades. Different sets of studies have produced contradictory insights on the evolution of genetic architecture. I argue that much of the confusion results from a failure to distinguish mutational and allelic effects, a limitation of using the Fisherian model of adaptive evolution as the lens through which the evolution of adaptive variation is examined. A molecular-based perspective reveals that allelic differences can involve the cumulative effects of many mutations plus intragenic recombination, a model that is supported by extensive empirical evidence. I discuss how different selection regimes could produce very different architectures of allelic effects under a molecular-based model, which may explain conflicting insights on genetic architecture from studies of variation within populations versus between divergently selected populations. I address shortcomings of genome-wide association study (GWAS) practices in light of more suitable models of allelic evolution, and suggest alternate GWAS strategies to generate more valid inferences about genetic architecture. Finally, I discuss how adopting more suitable models of allelic evolution could help redirect research on complex trait evolution toward addressing more meaningful questions in evolutionary biology. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  13. Update on allele nomenclature for human cytochromes P450 and the Human Cytochrome P450 Allele (CYP-allele) Nomenclature Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Sarah C; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Interindividual variability in xenobiotic metabolism and drug response is extensive and genetic factors play an important role in this variation. A majority of clinically used drugs are substrates for the cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme system and interindividual variability in expression and function of these enzymes is a major factor for explaining individual susceptibility for adverse drug reactions and drug response. Because of the existence of many polymorphic CYP genes, for many of which the number of allelic variants is continually increasing, a universal and official nomenclature system is important. Since 1999, all functionally relevant polymorphic CYP alleles are named and published on the Human Cytochrome P450 Allele (CYP-allele) Nomenclature Web site (http://www.cypalleles.ki.se). Currently, the database covers nomenclature of more than 660 alleles in a total of 30 genes that includes 29 CYPs as well as the cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR) gene. On the CYP-allele Web site, each gene has its own Webpage, which lists the alleles with their nucleotide changes, their functional consequences, and links to publications identifying or characterizing the alleles. CYP2D6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP3A4 are the most important CYPs in terms of drug metabolism, which is also reflected in their corresponding highest number of Webpage hits at the CYP-allele Web site.The main advantage of the CYP-allele database is that it offers a rapid online publication of CYP-alleles and their effects and provides an overview of peer-reviewed data to the scientific community. Here, we provide an update of the CYP-allele database and the associated nomenclature.

  14. [An allelism test for quantitative trait genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiriaev, A V

    2011-04-01

    Analytical modeling has been used to test assumptions on the mode of inheritance of a quantitative trait in the course of diallel crossing between pure strains that are sufficient for adequacy of a simple regression model. This model frequently proved to be adequate in analysis of numerous data on diallel crossings of wheat and maize. An allelism test for quantitative trait genes has been suggested. Computer simulation has been used to estimate the effect of random experimental errors and deviations from the suggested model.

  15. Allelic genealogies in sporophytic self-incompatibility systems in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierup, M H; Vekemans, X; Christiansen, F B

    1998-01-01

    Expectations for the time scale and structure of allelic genealogies in finite populations are formed under three models of sporophytic self-incompatibility. The models differ in the dominance interactions among the alleles that determine the self-incompatibility phenotype: In the SSIcod model...... action, and the most recessive extant allele is likely to be the most recent common ancestor. Despite these asymmetries, the expected shape of the allele genealogies does not deviate markedly from the shape of a neutral gene genealogy. The application of the results to sequence surveys of alleles...

  16. Allele-specific KRT1 expression is a complex trait.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Tao

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The differential expression of alleles occurs commonly in humans and is likely an important genetic factor underlying heritable differences in phenotypic traits. Understanding the molecular basis of allelic expression differences is thus an important challenge. Although many genes have been shown to display differential allelic expression, this is the first study to examine in detail the cumulative effects of multiple cis-regulatory polymorphisms responsible for allele-specific expression differences. We have used a variety of experimental approaches to identify and characterize cis-regulatory polymorphisms responsible for the extreme allele-specific expression differences of keratin-1 (KRT1 in human white blood cells. The combined data from our analyses provide strong evidence that the KRT1 allelic expression differences result from the haplotypic combinations and interactions of five cis-regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs whose alleles differ in their affinity to bind transcription factors and modulate KRT1 promoter activity. Two of these cis-regulatory SNPs bind transcriptional activators with the alleles on the high-expressing KRT1 haplotype pattern having a higher affinity than the alleles on the low-expressing haplotype pattern. In contrast, the other three cis-regulatory SNPs bind transcriptional inhibitors with the alleles on the low-expressing haplotype pattern having a higher affinity than the alleles on the high-expressing haplotype pattern. Our study provides important new insights into the degree of complexity that the cis-regulatory sequences responsible for allele-specific transcriptional regulation have. These data suggest that allelic expression differences result from the cumulative contribution of multiple DNA sequence polymorphisms, with each having a small effect, and that allele-specific expression can thus be viewed as a complex trait.

  17. Demography can favour female-advantageous alleles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harts, Anna M. F.; Schwanz, Lisa E.; Kokko, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    When female fecundity is relatively independent of male abundance, while male reproduction is proportional to female abundance, females have a larger effect on population dynamics than males (i.e. female demographic dominance). This population dynamic phenomenon might not appear to influence evolution, because male and female genomes still contribute equally much to the next generation. However, here we examine two evolutionary scenarios to provide a proof of principle that spatial structure can make female demographic dominance matter. Our two simulation models combine dispersal evolution with local adaptation subjected to intralocus sexual conflict and environmentally driven sex ratio biases, respectively. Both models have equilibria where one environment (without being intrinsically poorer) has so few reproductive females that trait evolution becomes disproportionately determined by those environments where females survive better (intralocus sexual conflict model), or where daughters are overproduced (environmental sex determination model). Surprisingly, however, the two facts that selection favours alleles that benefit females, and population growth is improved when female fitness is high, together do not imply that all measures of population performance are improved. The sex-specificity of the source–sink dynamics predicts that populations can evolve to fail to persist in habitats where alleles do poorly when expressed in females. PMID:25056617

  18. Exquisite allele discrimination by toehold hairpin primers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrom, Michelle; Bhadra, Sanchita; Jiang, Yu Sherry; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to detect and monitor single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in biological samples is an enabling research and clinical tool. We have developed a surprising, inexpensive primer design method that provides exquisite discrimination between SNPs. The field of DNA computation is largely reliant on using so-called toeholds to initiate strand displacement reactions, leading to the execution of kinetically trapped circuits. We have now similarly found that the short toehold sequence to a target of interest can initiate both strand displacement within the hairpin and extension of the primer by a polymerase, both of which will further stabilize the primer:template complex. However, if the short toehold does not bind, neither of these events can readily occur and thus amplification should not occur. Toehold hairpin primers were used to detect drug resistance alleles in two genes, rpoB and katG, in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome, and ten alleles in the Escherichia coli genome. During real-time PCR, the primers discriminate between mismatched templates with Cq delays that are frequently so large that the presence or absence of mismatches is essentially a ‘yes/no’ answer. PMID:24990378

  19. Plasminogen alleles influence susceptibility to invasive aspergillosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee K Zaas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis (IA is a common and life-threatening infection in immunocompromised individuals. A number of environmental and epidemiologic risk factors for developing IA have been identified. However, genetic factors that affect risk for developing IA have not been clearly identified. We report that host genetic differences influence outcome following establishment of pulmonary aspergillosis in an exogenously immune suppressed mouse model. Computational haplotype-based genetic analysis indicated that genetic variation within the biologically plausible positional candidate gene plasminogen (Plg; Gene ID 18855 correlated with murine outcome. There was a single nonsynonymous coding change (Gly110Ser where the minor allele was found in all of the susceptible strains, but not in the resistant strains. A nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (Asp472Asn was also identified in the human homolog (PLG; Gene ID 5340. An association study within a cohort of 236 allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT recipients revealed that alleles at this SNP significantly affected the risk of developing IA after HSCT. Furthermore, we demonstrated that plasminogen directly binds to Aspergillus fumigatus. We propose that genetic variation within the plasminogen pathway influences the pathogenesis of this invasive fungal infection.

  20. Brazilian quilombos: A repository of Amerindian alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontijo, Carolina Carvalho; Guerra Amorim, Carlos Eduardo; Godinho, Neide Maria Oliveira; Toledo, Rafaela Cesare Parmezan; Nunes, Adriana; Silva, Wellington; Da Fonseca Moura, Maria Manuela; De Oliveira, José Carlos Coutinho; Pagotto, Rubiani C; Klautau-Guimarães, Maria De Nazaré; De Oliveira, Silviene Fabiana

    2014-01-01

    As a consequence of colonization of the Americas and decimation of the native population, an important portion of autochthonous genetic variation has been lost. However, some alleles have been incorporated into the growing populations of admixed mestizos. In this study, we evaluated the potential of African-derived communities in Brazil to be repositories of Amerindian alleles and, by extension, a source of information on American prehistory. In this study, we describe the genetic variation of 15 ancestry informative markers (AIMs) of autosomal origin in two quilombos, Brazilian populations mainly of African descent, Santo Antônio do Guaporé (SAG; N = 31), and Santiago do Iguape (STI; N = 37). We compared the AIMs from these populations to those of other African-Brazilian populations, and to the Distrito Federal (N = 168), an urban population representative of Brazilian genetic diversity. By admixture analysis, we found that the SAG and STI communities have a much higher proportion (over 40%) of Amerindian contribution to their gene pools than other admixed Brazilian populations, in addition to marked African contributions. These results identify two living African-Brazilian populations that carry unique and important genetic information regarding Amerindian history. These populations will be extremely valuable in future investigations into American pre-history and Native American evolutionary dynamics. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. DQB1*06:02 allele-specific expression varies by allelic dosage, not narcolepsy status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiner Lachmi, Karin; Lin, Ling; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek

    2012-01-01

    The association of narcolepsy-cataplexy, a sleep disorder caused by the loss of hypocretin/orexin neurons in the hypothalamus, with DQA1*01:02-DQB1*06:02 is one of the tightest known single-allele human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations. In this study, we explored genome-wide expression...

  2. An allelic variant of congenital Salih myopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Belenikin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the steps and problems of diagnosing congenital myopathy with early respiratory disorders. While differentially diagnosing, the authors consider congenital myopathies, in which early cardiac involvement is encountered. Since the course of the disease in an observed female patient differed from that of such nosological entities and appeared as not only muscle weakness, but also as early respiratory disorders, we could not identify what nosological entity the disease belonged to in view of its clinical presentation and the results of muscle histological examination and we decided to perform exome sequencing. Molecular genetic testing could find heterozygous mutations in the titin (TTN gene. The findings are suggestive of congenital proximal myopathy with early respiratory failure, which is an allelic variant of Salih myopathy. This case is the first and so far only description of this disease in Russia. 

  3. Allelic diversity of S-RNase alleles in diploid potato species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzidzienyo, Daniel K; Bryan, Glenn J; Wilde, Gail; Robbins, Timothy P

    2016-10-01

    The S-ribonuclease sequences of 16 S-alleles derived from diploid types of Solanum are presented. A phylogenetic analysis and partial phenotypic analysis support the conclusion that these are functional S-alleles. S-Ribonucleases (S-RNases) control the pistil specificity of the self-incompatibility (SI) response in the genus Solanum and several other members of the Solanaceae. The nucleotide sequences of S-RNases corresponding to a large number of S-alleles or S-haplotypes have been characterised. However, surprisingly, few S-RNase sequences are available for potato species. The identification of new S-alleles in diploid potato species is desirable as these stocks are important sources of traits such as biotic and abiotic resistance. S-RNase sequences are reported here from three distinct diploid types of potato: cultivated Solanum tuberosum Group Phureja, S. tuberosum Group Stenotomum, and the wild species Solanum okadae. Partial S-RNase sequences were obtained from pistil RNA by RT-PCR or 3'RACE (Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends) using a degenerate primer. Full-length sequences were obtained for two alleles by 5'RACE. Database searches with these sequences identified 16 S-RNases in total, all of which are novel. The sequence analysis revealed all the expected features of functional S-RNases. Phylogenetic analysis with selected published S-RNase and S-like-RNase sequences from the Solanaceae revealed extensive trans-generic evolution of the S-RNases and a clear distinction from S-like-RNases. Pollination tests were used to confirm the self-incompatibility status and cross-compatibility relationships of the S. okadae accessions. All the S. okadae accessions were found to be self-incompatible as expected with crosses amongst them exhibiting both cross-compatibility and semi-compatibility consistent with the S-genotypes determined from the S-RNase sequence data. The progeny analysis of four semi-compatible crosses examined by allele-specific PCR provided further

  4. In vitro characterization of multivalent adhesion molecule 7-based inhibition of multidrug-resistant bacteria isolated from wounded military personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krachler, Anne Marie; Mende, Katrin; Murray, Clinton; Orth, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of wounded military personnel at military medical centers is often complicated by colonization and infection of wounds with pathogenic bacteria. These include nosocomially transmitted, often multidrug-resistant pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticus complex, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. We analyzed the efficacy of multivalent adhesion molecule (MAM) 7-based anti-adhesion treatment of host cells against aforementioned pathogens in a tissue culture infection model. Herein, we observed that a correlation between two important hallmarks of virulence, attachment and cytotoxicity, could serve as a useful predictor for the success of MAM7-based inhibition against bacterial infections. Initially, we characterized 20 patient isolates (five from each pathogen mentioned above) in terms of genotypic diversity, antimicrobial susceptibility and important hallmarks of pathogenicity (biofilm formation, attachment to and cytotoxicity toward cultured host cells). All isolates displayed a high degree of genotypic diversity, which was also reflected by large strain-to-strain variability in terms of biofilm formation, attachment and cytotoxicity within each group of pathogen. Using non-pathogenic bacteria expressing MAM7 or latex beads coated with recombinant MAM7 for anti-adhesion treatment, we showed a decrease in cytotoxicity, indicating that MAM7 has potential as a prophylactic agent to attenuate infection by multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:22722243

  5. A multivalent adsorption apparatus explains the broad host range of phage phi92: a comprehensive genomic and structural analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzer, David; Buettner, Falk F R; Browning, Christopher; Nazarov, Sergey; Rabsch, Wolfgang; Bethe, Andrea; Oberbeck, Astrid; Bowman, Valorie D; Stummeyer, Katharina; Mühlenhoff, Martina; Leiman, Petr G; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita

    2012-10-01

    Bacteriophage phi92 is a large, lytic myovirus isolated in 1983 from pathogenic Escherichia coli strains that carry a polysialic acid capsule. Here we report the genome organization of phi92, the cryoelectron microscopy reconstruction of its virion, and the reinvestigation of its host specificity. The genome consists of a linear, double-stranded 148,612-bp DNA sequence containing 248 potential open reading frames and 11 putative tRNA genes. Orthologs were found for 130 of the predicted proteins. Most of the virion proteins showed significant sequence similarities to proteins of myoviruses rv5 and PVP-SE1, indicating that phi92 is a new member of the novel genus of rv5-like phages. Reinvestigation of phi92 host specificity showed that the host range is not limited to polysialic acid-encapsulated Escherichia coli but includes most laboratory strains of Escherichia coli and many Salmonella strains. Structure analysis of the phi92 virion demonstrated the presence of four different types of tail fibers and/or tailspikes, which enable the phage to use attachment sites on encapsulated and nonencapsulated bacteria. With this report, we provide the first detailed description of a multivalent, multispecies phage armed with a host cell adsorption apparatus resembling a nanosized Swiss army knife. The genome, structure, and, in particular, the organization of the baseplate of phi92 demonstrate how a bacteriophage can evolve into a multi-pathogen-killing agent.

  6. Multivalency as a key factor for high activity of selective supported organocatalysts for the Baylis-Hillman reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goren, Kerem; Karabline-Kuks, Jeny; Shiloni, Yael; Barak-Kulbak, Einav; Miller, Scott J; Portnoy, Moshe

    2015-01-12

    The polystyrene-supported N-alkylimidazole-based dendritic catalysts for the Baylis-Hillman reaction exhibit one of the strongest beneficial effects of multivalent architecture ever reported for an organocatalyst. The yields in the model reaction of methyl vinyl ketone with p-nitrobenzaldehyde are more than tripled when a non-dendritic catalyst is replaced by a second- or third-generation analogue. Moreover, the reaction of the less active substrates will not occur with the non-dendritic catalyst and will proceed to a significant extent only with the analogous catalysts of higher generations. A substantial additional enhancement of the reaction yield could be achieved by increasing the content of water in the reaction solvent. The plausible cause of the dendritic effect is the assistance of the second, nearby imidazole moiety in the presumably rate-determining proton transfer in the intermediate adduct, after the first imidazole unit induced the formation of the new carbon-carbon bond. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Force Spectroscopy of Metal-Crown Ether Multivalency: Effect of Local Environments on Energy Landscape and Sensing Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ting-Yang; Tseng, Wei-Hsiang; Chen, Chun-hsien

    2015-08-03

    Sandwich complexation involving alkali or alkaline-earth metals, multivalency, and effects associated with local environments is widely encountered in biological and synthetic systems yet the mechanic properties remain unexplored. Herein, AFM (atomic force microscopy)-based single-molecule force spectroscopy is employed to investigate a classical model of M(n+)[15C5]2, a metal cation hosted jointly by two 15-crown-5 moieties immobilized on both the substrate and the AFM tip. Factors reportedly promoting the recognition performance are examined. The rupture force required to break apart M(n+)[15C5]2 is found to be in the order of tens of pico-Newton, e.g., f(β)=31 pN for K(+)[15C5]2. The presence of a second functional group, carboxylate, confers K(+)[15C5]2 with a longer lifetime (from 13 to 16 ms), faster association (from 0.4 to 1.3×10(6) M(-1) s(-1)), and slower dissociation (from 77 to 62 s(-1)). The effect of local environments is significant on association yet less critical on dissociation pathways. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Multivalent cations-triggered rapid shape memory sodium carboxymethyl cellulose/polyacrylamide hydrogels with tunable mechanical strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Chen, Guangxue; Chen, Wei; Huang, Jiahe; Tian, Junfei; Wan, Xiaofang; He, Minghui; Zhang, Hongfang

    2017-12-15

    A novel multivalent cations-triggered shape memory hydrogels were synthesized in a one-pot method, and interpenetrating double network was formed by chemically cross-linked polyacrylamide (PAM) network and physically cross-linked sodium carboxymethyl cellulose network. The temporary shape was fixed by complexation between a native biopolymer, sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), and transition metal ions, specifically Fe 3+ , Ag + , Al 3+ , Cu 2+ , Ni 2+ , and Mg 2+ . In particular, CMC-Fe 3+ hydrogel exhibits excellent shape fixity ratio (95%). Therefore, we chose PAM/CMC 1.0 -Fe 3+ hydrogel as the model material and further investigated its shape recovery process. It was found that a wide range of molecules and anions could be applied to break off the temporary cross-links between CMC and Fe 3+ . The PAM/CMC composite hydrogels also exhibited excellent tunable mechanical properties. The mechanical properties of the composite hydrogel can be adjusted by changing the cross-linking densities. The presented strategy could enrich the construction as well as application of biopolymers based shape memory hydrogels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Allele Frequency - JSNP | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nd 39 SNPs are assayed in three (POP_*) and two (RIKEN_japanese_*) panels, respectively. Derived from Flat f... assay (JBIC-allele and RIKEN_japanese_*), TaqMan assay (RIKEN-allele) or direct sequencing / allelic discri...unteers under informed consent RIKEN_japanese_normal_weight - 711 unrelated japanese normal weight volunteer...s ( body mass index RIKEN_japanese_obese - 796 unrelated japanese obese patients

  10. ABO locus O1 allele and risk of myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Beckerath, Nicolas; Koch, Werner; Mehilli, Julinda; Gorchakova, Olga; Braun, Siegmund; Schömig, Albert; Kastrati, Adnan

    2004-01-01

    An association between ABO blood group and myocardial infarction (MI) has been described. One probable mechanism underlying this association is the influence of ABO blood group on plasma von Willebrand factor (vWF) levels. We conducted this genetic study to test whether the ABO O1 allele is associated with low vWF plasma levels and with a reduced risk of MI. Cases consisted of 793 consecutive, angiographically examined patients with either acute or prior MI. As controls served 340 angiographically examined patients with neither coronary artery disease nor signs of MI. ABO1 locus alleles (A1, A2, B, O1, O2) were identified with polymerase chain reaction and fluorogenic probes. The distribution of O1 alleles in the MI group versus the control group was: no O1 allele (15.4%/10.0%), one O1 allele (49.7%/50.0%) and two O1 alleles (34.9%/40.0%) (P = 0.035). O1 allele carriage was associated with a 39% reduction in the risk of MI unadjusted odds ratio, 0.61; 95% confidence interval, 0.41-0.91). The significant association was maintained after adjustment for other cardiovascular risk factors. vWF antigen levels correlated with the number of O1 alleles (P = 0.00003) in a separate control group (n = 164). Carriage of the O1 allele is associated with a decreased risk of myocardial infarction, with homozygosity providing the greatest protection. Copyright 2004 Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

  11. A novel HLA-A allele: A*0257.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ortiz, J E; Cox, S T; Sandoval-Ramirez, L; Little, A M; Marsh, S G E; Madrigal, J A; Argüello, J R

    2004-01-01

    A novel human leucocyte antigen-A*02 (HLA-A*02) allele was detected by reference strand-mediated conformation analysis (RSCA) of a DNA sample from a Tarahumara individual. Direct sequencing of HLA-A locus polymerase chain reaction products identified a mutation in one of the alleles. Cloning and sequencing confirmed the presence of a new allele, A*0257 which differed from A*0206 by two nucleotides at positions 355 and 362, inducing changes in residues 95 and 97, respectively, within the peptide-binding site. Those changes suggest that allele A*0257 may have resulted from an intralocus recombination event.

  12. Identification of the third/extra allele for forensic application in cases with TPOX tri-allelic pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picanço, Juliane Bentes; Raimann, Paulo Eduardo; Motta, Carlos Henrique Ares Silveira da; Rodenbusch, Rodrigo; Gusmão, Leonor; Alho, Clarice Sampaio

    2015-05-01

    Genotyping of polymorphic short tandem repeats (STRs) loci is widely used in forensic DNA analysis. STR loci eventually present tri-allelic pattern as a genotyping irregularity and, in that situation, the doubt about the tri-allele locus frequency calculation can reduce the analysis strength. In the TPOX human STR locus, tri-allelic genotypes have been reported with a widely varied frequency among human populations. We investigate whether there is a single extra allele (the third allele) in the TPOX tri-allelic pattern, what it is, and where it is, aiming to understand its genomic anatomy and to propose the knowledge of this TPOX extra allele from genetic profile, thus preserving the two standard TPOX alleles in forensic analyses. We looked for TPOX tri-allelic subjects in 75,113 Brazilian families. Considering only the parental generation (mother+father) we had 150,226 unrelated subjects evaluated. From this total, we found 88 unrelated subjects with tri-allelic pattern in the TPOX locus (0.06%; 88/150,226). Seventy three of these 88 subjects (73/88; 83%) had the Clayton's original Type 2 tri-allelic pattern (three peaks of even intensity). The remaining 17% (15/88) show a new Type 2 derived category with heterozygote peak imbalance (one double dose peak plus one regular sized peak). In this paper we present detailed data from 66 trios (mother+father+child) with true biological relationships. In 39 of these families (39/66; 59%) the extra TPOX allele was transmitted either from the mother or from the father to the child. Evidences indicated the allele 10 as the extra TPOX allele, and it is on the X chromosome. The present data, which support the previous Lane hypothesis, improve the knowledge about tri-allelic pattern of TPOX CODIS' locus allowing the use of TPOX profile in forensic analyses even when with tri-allelic pattern. This evaluation is now available for different forensic applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. (GHRH Alleles in Iranian Sarabi Cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mehdi khosravi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Selection based on molecular markers is one of the new methods that may improve progress and accuracy of selection in animal breeding programs. The GHRH gene (Growth Hormone-releasing Hormone is a candidate gene for marker-assisted selection strategies. Polymorphs of GHRH gene are reported to be significantly associated with milk production and constituent traits. In order to study the polymorphism of GHRH gene, blood samples were collected from 112 Sarabi cows. Genomic DNA was extracted and a fragment of 297 bp in size was amplified using polymerase chain reaction. The amplified fragments were subjected to restriction digestion with HaeIII endonuclease enzyme and the resultant digested products were run on 2% Agarose gel. The results revealed the existence of two alleles of GHRH A and GHRH B for the examined locus with frequencies of 0.19 and 0.81 respectively. Three different genotypic variants including GHRH A GHRH A, GHRH A GHRH B and GHRH B GHRH B were identified with genotypic frequencies of 0.0357, 0.3037 and 0.6607 respectively. The χ2 test showed that population is in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P

  14. Comparative frequency and allelic distribution of ABO and Rh (D ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Allelic distribution of major blood groups (ABO and rhesus) has not been defined in Bangladeshi population. Determinants of blood group frequency in this region have not been studied properly. Aim: To determine ABO and rhesus blood group frequency and allelic distribution in a multiethnic area of ...

  15. Silvicultural management and the manipulation of rare alleles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul G. Schaberg; Gary J. Hawley; Donald H. DeHayes; Samuel E. Nijensohn

    2004-01-01

    Because rare alleles provide a means for adaptation to environmental change they are often considered important to long-term forest health. Through the selective removal of trees (and genes), silvicultural management may alter the genetic structure of forests, with rare alleles perhaps being uniquely vulnerable to manipulation due to their low frequencies or...

  16. Allelic genealogies in sporophytic self-incompatibility systems in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierup, Mikkel Heide; Vekemans, Xavier; Christiansen, Freddy Bugge

    1998-01-01

    Expectations for the time scale and structure of allelic genealogies in finite populations are formed under three models of sporophytic self-incompatibility. The models differ in the dominance interactions among the alleles that determine the self-incompatibility phenotype: In the SSIcod model...

  17. Evolutionary dynamics of sporophytic self-incompatibility alleles in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierup, Mikkel Heide; Vekemans, Xavier; Christiansen, Freddy Bugge

    1997-01-01

    codominantly in both pollen and style (SSIcod), in the second, alleles form a dominance hierarchy in pollen and style (SSIdom). In the third model, alleles interact codominantly in the style and form a dominance hierarchy in the pollen (SSIdomcod). The SSIcod model behaves similarly to the model...

  18. Comparative frequency and allelic distribution of ABO and Rh (D ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gourab Dewan

    2015-02-18

    Feb 18, 2015 ... Abstract Background: Allelic distribution of major blood groups (ABO and rhesus) has not been defined in Bangladeshi population. Determinants of blood group frequency in this region have not been studied properly. Aim: To determine ABO and rhesus blood group frequency and allelic distribution in a.

  19. Novel alleles of 31-bp VNTR polymorphism in the human ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-12-06

    Dec 6, 2010 ... with age at onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Allele 19 is related to a three-fold increased risk for developing AD at 75 years of age or older, while allele 21 is related to an almost two-fold increased risk for developing AD before 64 years of age (Beyer et al. 2004, 2005). Keywords. cystathionine β-synthase ...

  20. Estimating and testing the effect of allelic recombination on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-01-21

    Jan 21, 2011 ... The significance of the correlation coefficient as well as the fitted regression model was obtained using. Analysis of Variance method. Key words: Allele, genotype, regression, correlation, F-ratio, analysis of variance. INTRODUCTION .... while if the allelic replacement is being made on an Aa individual the ...

  1. Observations Suggesting Allelism of the Achondroplasia and Hypochondroplasia Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKusick, Victor A.; Kelly, Thaddeus E.; Dorst, John P.

    1973-01-01

    It is argued that there are at least two alleles at the achondroplasia locus: one responsible for classic achondroplasia and one responsible for hypochondroplasia. Homozygosity for the achondroplasia gene produces a lethal skeletal dysplasia; homozygosity for hypochondroplasia has not been described. We report here a child considered to be a genetic compound for the achondroplasia and hypochondroplasia alleles. Images PMID:4697848

  2. Human minisatellite alleles detectable only after PCR amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, J A; Crosier, M; Jeffreys, A J

    1992-01-01

    We present evidence that a proportion of alleles at two human minisatellite loci is undetected by standard Southern blot hybridization. In each case the missing allele(s) can be identified after PCR amplification and correspond to tandem arrays too short to detect by hybridization. At one locus, there is only one undetected allele (population frequency 0.3), which contains just three repeat units. At the second locus, there are at least five undetected alleles (total population frequency 0.9) containing 60-120 repeats; they are not detected because these tandem repeats give very poor signals when used as a probe in standard Southern blot hybridization, and also cross-hybridize with other sequences in the genome. Under these circumstances only signals from the longest tandemly repeated alleles are detectable above the nonspecific background. The structures of these loci have been compared in human and primate DNA, and at one locus the short human allele containing three repeat units is shown to be an intermediate state in the expansion of a monomeric precursor allele in primates to high copy number in the longer human arrays. We discuss the implications of such loci for studies of human populations, minisatellite isolation by cloning, and the evolution of highly variable tandem arrays.

  3. Estimation of allelic frequencies for ABO and Rh blood groups

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mostafa Saadat

    2015-02-18

    Feb 18, 2015 ... Estimation of allelic frequencies for ABO and Rh blood groups. Dear Editor. Estimation of the allelic frequencies for genetic markers is very important in genetic studies. Also investigation of the concordance between observed and expected value based on the Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) is strongly ...

  4. Apolipoprotein E4 allele does not influence serum triglyceride ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated how the APOε4 allele affects the serum triglyceride response after a fatmeal in apparently healthy black South African young adults. Sixty students were successfully screened for APOE genotype using Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) and were divided into four groups; the ε2 allele ...

  5. Assigning breed origin to alleles in crossbred animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenplas, Jérémie; Calus, Mario P L; Sevillano, Claudia A; Windig, Jack J; Bastiaansen, John W M

    2016-08-22

    For some species, animal production systems are based on the use of crossbreeding to take advantage of the increased performance of crossbred compared to purebred animals. Effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may differ between purebred and crossbred animals for several reasons: (1) differences in linkage disequilibrium between SNP alleles and a quantitative trait locus; (2) differences in genetic backgrounds (e.g., dominance and epistatic interactions); and (3) differences in environmental conditions, which result in genotype-by-environment interactions. Thus, SNP effects may be breed-specific, which has led to the development of genomic evaluations for crossbred performance that take such effects into account. However, to estimate breed-specific effects, it is necessary to know breed origin of alleles in crossbred animals. Therefore, our aim was to develop an approach for assigning breed origin to alleles of crossbred animals (termed BOA) without information on pedigree and to study its accuracy by considering various factors, including distance between breeds. The BOA approach consists of: (1) phasing genotypes of purebred and crossbred animals; (2) assigning breed origin to phased haplotypes; and (3) assigning breed origin to alleles of crossbred animals based on a library of assigned haplotypes, the breed composition of crossbred animals, and their SNP genotypes. The accuracy of allele assignments was determined for simulated datasets that include crosses between closely-related, distantly-related and unrelated breeds. Across these scenarios, the percentage of alleles of a crossbred animal that were correctly assigned to their breed origin was greater than 90 %, and increased with increasing distance between breeds, while the percentage of incorrectly assigned alleles was always less than 2 %. For the remaining alleles, i.e. 0 to 10 % of all alleles of a crossbred animal, breed origin could not be assigned. The BOA approach accurately assigns

  6. Effect of injectable trace minerals on the humoral immune response to multivalent vaccine administration in beef calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthington, J D; Havenga, L J

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this experiment was to investigate the effects of injectable trace minerals on humoral responses of calves receiving a viral vaccination. Beef steer calves (n = 99; average BW = 316 ± 4.2 kg), seronegative for bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) and bovine viral diarrhea virus, genotypes 1 and 2 (BVDV-1 and BVDV-2), were sourced from 2 locations. All calves, except 15 non-vaccinated (sentinel) calves, received a single dose of a multivalent modified live vaccine (Titanium 5; AgriLabs, St. Joseph, MO) containing BHV-1, BVDV-1, BVDV-2, bovine parainfluenza virus type 3, and bovine respiratory syncytial virus. Among the vaccinated calves, 2 treatments were concurrently and randomly applied on the basis of initial serum Se status and BW, including 1) injectable trace mineral supplement (ITM; n = 42; 7 mL subcutaneous.; MultiMin, Fort Collins, CO) containing 15, 40, 10, and 5 mg/mL of Cu, Zn, Mn (all as disodium EDTA salts), and Se (as Na selenite) or 2) saline-injected control (Control; n = 42). As a measure of humoral immunity, neutralizing antibody titers were measured on d 0, 14, 30, 60, and 90, relative to vaccine administration. All calves were seronegative for each of the 3 viruses on d 0, and sentinel calves remained seronegative throughout the study. Serum mineral concentrations were evaluated on d 0 and 14. No differences (P ≥ 0.30) in serum Cu, Zn, Mn, or Se were observed between treatments on d 0. Control steers experienced a decrease (P mineral formulation evaluated in this study, administered concurrently to viral vaccination, does not impair humoral immune responses in beef calves. Further, concurrent administration of ITM and BHV-1 vaccine may enhance the production of neutralizing antibodies to BHV-1 in previously naïve beef calves.

  7. A multivalent clade C HIV-1 Env trimer cocktail elicits a higher magnitude of neutralizing antibodies than any individual component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricault, Christine A; Kovacs, James M; Nkolola, Joseph P; Yusim, Karina; Giorgi, Elena E; Shields, Jennifer L; Perry, James; Lavine, Christy L; Cheung, Ann; Ellingson-Strouss, Katharine; Rademeyer, Cecelia; Gray, Glenda E; Williamson, Carolyn; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Seaman, Michael S; Korber, Bette T; Chen, Bing; Barouch, Dan H

    2015-03-01

    The sequence diversity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) presents a formidable challenge to the generation of an HIV-1 vaccine. One strategy to address such sequence diversity and to improve the magnitude of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) is to utilize multivalent mixtures of HIV-1 envelope (Env) immunogens. Here we report the generation and characterization of three novel, acute clade C HIV-1 Env gp140 trimers (459C, 405C, and 939C), each with unique antigenic properties. Among the single trimers tested, 459C elicited the most potent NAb responses in vaccinated guinea pigs. We evaluated the immunogenicity of various mixtures of clade C Env trimers and found that a quadrivalent cocktail of clade C trimers elicited a greater magnitude of NAbs against a panel of tier 1A and 1B viruses than any single clade C trimer alone, demonstrating that the mixture had an advantage over all individual components of the cocktail. These data suggest that vaccination with a mixture of clade C Env trimers represents a promising strategy to augment vaccine-elicited NAb responses. It is currently not known how to generate potent NAbs to the diverse circulating HIV-1 Envs by vaccination. One strategy to address this diversity is to utilize mixtures of different soluble HIV-1 envelope proteins. In this study, we generated and characterized three distinct, novel, acute clade C soluble trimers. We vaccinated guinea pigs with single trimers as well as mixtures of trimers, and we found that a mixture of four trimers elicited a greater magnitude of NAbs than any single trimer within the mixture. The results of this study suggest that further development of Env trimer cocktails is warranted. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Llama-derived single domain antibodies to build multivalent, superpotent and broadened neutralizing anti-viral molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Hultberg

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available For efficient prevention of viral infections and cross protection, simultaneous targeting of multiple viral epitopes is a powerful strategy. Llama heavy chain antibody fragments (VHH against the trimeric envelope proteins of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (Fusion protein, Rabies virus (Glycoprotein and H5N1 Influenza (Hemagglutinin 5 were selected from llama derived immune libraries by phage display. Neutralizing VHH recognizing different epitopes in the receptor binding sites on the spikes with affinities in the low nanomolar range were identified for all the three viruses by viral neutralization assays. By fusion of VHH with variable linker lengths, multimeric constructs were made that improved neutralization potencies up to 4,000-fold for RSV, 1,500-fold for Rabies virus and 75-fold for Influenza H5N1. The potencies of the VHH constructs were similar or better than best performing monoclonal antibodies. The cross protection capacity against different viral strains was also improved for all three viruses, both by multivalent (two or three identical VHH and biparatopic (two different VHH constructs. By combining a VHH neutralizing RSV subtype A, but not subtype B with a poorly neutralizing VHH with high affinity for subtype B, a biparatopic construct was made with low nanomolar neutralizing potency against both subtypes. Trivalent anti-H5N1 VHH neutralized both Influenza H5N1 clade1 and 2 in a pseudotype assay and was very potent in neutralizing the NIBRG-14 Influenza H5N1 strain with IC(50 of 9 picomolar. Bivalent and biparatopic constructs against Rabies virus cross neutralized both 10 different Genotype 1 strains and Genotype 5.The results show that multimerization of VHH fragments targeting multiple epitopes on a viral trimeric spike protein is a powerful tool for anti-viral therapy to achieve "best-in-class" and broader neutralization capacity.

  9. ADF/cofilin binds phosphoinositides in a multivalent manner to act as a PIP(2)-density sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongxia; Hakala, Markku; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2010-05-19

    Actin-depolymerizing-factor (ADF)/cofilins have emerged as key regulators of cytoskeletal dynamics in cell motility, morphogenesis, endocytosis, and cytokinesis. The activities of ADF/cofilins are regulated by membrane phospholipid PI(4,5)P(2) in vitro and in cells, but the mechanism of the ADF/cofilin-PI(4,5)P(2) interaction has remained controversial. Recent studies suggested that ADF/cofilins interact with PI(4,5)P(2) through a specific binding pocket, and that this interaction is dependent on pH. Here, we combined systematic mutagenesis with biochemical and spectroscopic methods to elucidate the phosphoinositide-binding mechanism of ADF/cofilins. Our analysis revealed that cofilin does not harbor a specific PI(4,5)P(2)-binding pocket, but instead interacts with PI(4,5)P(2) through a large, positively charged surface of the molecule. Cofilin interacts simultaneously with multiple PI(4,5)P(2) headgroups in a cooperative manner. Consequently, interactions of cofilin with membranes and actin exhibit sharp sensitivity to PI(4,5)P(2) density. Finally, we show that cofilin binding to PI(4,5)P(2) is not sensitive to changes in the pH at physiological salt concentration, although the PI(4,5)P(2)-clustering activity of cofilin is moderately inhibited at elevated pH. Collectively, our data demonstrate that ADF/cofilins bind PI(4,5)P(2) headgroups through a multivalent, cooperative mechanism, and suggest that the actin filament disassembly activity of ADF/cofilin can be accurately regulated by small changes in the PI(4,5)P(2) density at cellular membranes. Copyright 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. ADF/Cofilin Binds Phosphoinositides in a Multivalent Manner to Act as a PIP2-Density Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongxia; Hakala, Markku; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Actin-depolymerizing-factor (ADF)/cofilins have emerged as key regulators of cytoskeletal dynamics in cell motility, morphogenesis, endocytosis, and cytokinesis. The activities of ADF/cofilins are regulated by membrane phospholipid PI(4,5)P2 in vitro and in cells, but the mechanism of the ADF/cofilin-PI(4,5)P2 interaction has remained controversial. Recent studies suggested that ADF/cofilins interact with PI(4,5)P2 through a specific binding pocket, and that this interaction is dependent on pH. Here, we combined systematic mutagenesis with biochemical and spectroscopic methods to elucidate the phosphoinositide-binding mechanism of ADF/cofilins. Our analysis revealed that cofilin does not harbor a specific PI(4,5)P2-binding pocket, but instead interacts with PI(4,5)P2 through a large, positively charged surface of the molecule. Cofilin interacts simultaneously with multiple PI(4,5)P2 headgroups in a cooperative manner. Consequently, interactions of cofilin with membranes and actin exhibit sharp sensitivity to PI(4,5)P2 density. Finally, we show that cofilin binding to PI(4,5)P2 is not sensitive to changes in the pH at physiological salt concentration, although the PI(4,5)P2-clustering activity of cofilin is moderately inhibited at elevated pH. Collectively, our data demonstrate that ADF/cofilins bind PI(4,5)P2 headgroups through a multivalent, cooperative mechanism, and suggest that the actin filament disassembly activity of ADF/cofilin can be accurately regulated by small changes in the PI(4,5)P2 density at cellular membranes. PMID:20483342

  11. A risk allele for nicotine dependence in CHRNA5 is a protective allele for cocaine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grucza, Richard A; Wang, Jen C; Stitzel, Jerry A; Hinrichs, Anthony L; Saccone, Scott F; Saccone, Nancy L; Bucholz, Kathleen K; Cloninger, C Robert; Neuman, Rosalind J; Budde, John P; Fox, Louis; Bertelsen, Sarah; Kramer, John; Hesselbrock, Victor; Tischfield, Jay; Nurnberger, John I; Almasy, Laura; Porjesz, Bernice; Kuperman, Samuel; Schuckit, Marc A; Edenberg, Howard J; Rice, John P; Goate, Alison M; Bierut, Laura J

    2008-12-01

    A nonsynonymous coding polymorphism, rs16969968, of the CHRNA5 gene that encodes the alpha-5 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been found to be associated with nicotine dependence. The goal of this study was to examine the association of this variant with cocaine dependence. Genetic association analysis was performed in two independent samples of unrelated case and control subjects: 1) 504 European Americans participating in the Family Study on Cocaine Dependence (FSCD) and 2) 814 European Americans participating in the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA). In the FSCD, there was a significant association between the CHRNA5 variant and cocaine dependence (odds ratio = .67 per allele, p = .0045, assuming an additive genetic model), but in the reverse direction compared with that previously observed for nicotine dependence. In multivariate analyses that controlled for the effects of nicotine dependence, both the protective effect for cocaine dependence and the previously documented risk effect for nicotine dependence were statistically significant. The protective effect for cocaine dependence was replicated in the COGA sample. In COGA, effect sizes for habitual smoking, a proxy phenotype for nicotine dependence, were consistent with those observed in FSCD. The minor (A) allele of rs16969968, relative to the major G allele, appears to be both a risk factor for nicotine dependence and a protective factor for cocaine dependence. The biological plausibility of such a bidirectional association stems from the involvement of nAChRs with both excitatory and inhibitory modulation of dopamine-mediated reward pathways.

  12. Ethical guideposts for allelic variation databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoppers, B M; Laberge, C M

    2000-01-01

    Basically, a mutation database (MDB) is a repository where allelic variations are described and assigned within a specific gene locus. The purposes of an MDB may vary greatly and have different content and structure. The curator of an electronic and computer-based MDB will provide expert feedback (clinical and research). This requires ethical guideposts. Going to direct on-line public access for the content of an MDB or to interactive communication also raises other considerations. Currently, HUGO's MDI (Mutation Database Initiative) is the only integrated effort supporting and guiding the coordinated deployment of MDBs devoted to genetic diversity. Thus, HUGO's ethical "Statements" are applicable. Among the ethical principles, the obligation of preserving the confidentiality of information transferred by a collaborator to the curator is particularly important. Thus, anonymization of such data prior to transmission is essential. The 1997 Universal Declaration on the Human Genome and Human Rights of UNESCO addresses the participation of vulnerable persons. Researchers in charge of MDBs should ensure that information received on the testing of children or incompetent adults is subject to ethical review and approval in the country of origin. Caution should be taken against the involuntary consequences of public disclosure of results without complete explanation. Clear and enforceable regulations must be developed to protect the public against misuse of genetic databanks. Interaction with a databank could be seen as creating a "virtual" physician-patient relationship. However, interactive public MDBs should not give medical advice. We have identified new social ethical principles to govern different levels of complexity of genetic information. They are: reciprocity, mutuality, solidarity, and universality. Finally, precaution and prudence at this early stage of the MDI may not only avoid ethically inextricable conundrums but also provide for the respect for the rights

  13. Drop-out probabilities of IrisPlex SNP alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jeppe Dyrberg; Tvedebrink, Torben; Mogensen, Helle Smidt

    2013-01-01

    In certain crime cases, information about a perpetrator's phenotype, including eye colour, may be a valuable tool if no DNA profile of any suspect or individual in the DNA database matches the DNA profile found at the crime scene. Often, the available DNA material is sparse and allelic drop......-out when the amount of DNA was greater than 125 pg for 29 cycles of PCR and greater than 62 pg for 30 cycles of PCR. With the use of a logistic regression model, we estimated the allele specific probability of drop-out in heterozygote systems based on the signal strength of the observed allele...

  14. AllelicImbalance: An R/ bioconductor package for detecting, managing, and visualizing allele expression imbalance data from RNA sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gådin, Jesper R.; van't Hooft, Ferdinand M.; Eriksson, Per

    2015-01-01

    the possible biases. Results: We present AllelicImblance, a software program that is designed to detect, manage, and visualize allelic imbalances comprehensively. The purpose of this software is to allow users to pose genetic questions in any RNA sequencing experiment quickly, enhancing the general utility......Background: One aspect in which RNA sequencing is more valuable than microarray-based methods is the ability to examine the allelic imbalance of the expression of a gene. This process is often a complex task that entails quality control, alignment, and the counting of reads over heterozygous single...

  15. Efficient Gene Delivery Mediated by a Helical Polypeptide: Controlling the Membrane Activity via Multivalency and Light-Assisted Photochemical Internalization (PCI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Li, Yongjuan; Liang, Qiujun; Song, Ziyuan; Li, Fangfang; He, Hua; Wang, Jinhui; Zhu, Lipeng; Lin, Zhifeng; Yin, Lichen

    2018-01-10

    The development of robust and nontoxic membrane-penetrating materials is highly demanded for nonviral gene delivery. Herein, a photosensitizer (PS)-embedded, star-shaped helical polypeptide was developed, which combines the advantages of multivalency-enhanced intracellular DNA uptake and light-strengthened endosomal escape to enable highly efficient gene delivery with low toxicity. 5,10,15,20-Tetrakis-(4-aminophenyl) porphyrin as a selected PS initiated ring-opening polymerization of N-carboxyanhydride and yielded a star-shaped helical polypeptide after side-chain functionalization with guanidine groups. The star polypeptide afforded a notably higher transfection efficiency and lower cytotoxicity than those of its linear analogue. Light irradiation caused almost complete (∼90%) endosomal release of the DNA cargo via the photochemical internalization (PCI) mechanism and further led to a 6-8-fold increment of the transfection efficiency in HeLa, B16F10, and RAW 264.7 cells, outperforming commercial reagent 25k PEI by up to 3 orders of magnitude. Because the PS and DNA cargoes were compartmentalized distantly in the core and polypeptide layers, respectively, the generated reactive oxygen species caused minimal damage to DNA molecules to preserve their transfection potency. Such multivalency- and PCI-potentiated gene delivery efficiency was also demonstrated in vivo in melanoma-bearing mice. This study thus provides a promising strategy to overcome the multiple membrane barriers against nonviral gene delivery.

  16. Multivalent Fcγ-receptor engagement by a hexameric Fc-fusion protein triggers Fcγ-receptor internalisation and modulation of Fcγ-receptor functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, O S; Rowley, T F; Junker, F; Peters, S J; Crilly, S; Compson, J; Eddleston, A; Björkelund, H; Greenslade, K; Parkinson, M; Davies, N L; Griffin, R; Pither, T L; Cain, K; Christodoulou, L; Staelens, L; Ward, E; Tibbitts, J; Kiessling, A; Smith, B; Brennan, F R; Malmqvist, M; Fallah-Arani, F; Humphreys, D P

    2017-12-06

    Engagement of Fcγ-receptors triggers a range of downstream signalling events resulting in a diverse array of immune functions. As a result, blockade of Fc-mediated function is an important strategy for the control of several autoimmune and inflammatory conditions. We have generated a hexameric-Fc fusion protein (hexameric-Fc) and tested the consequences of multi-valent Fcγ-receptor engagement in in vitro and in vivo systems. In vitro engagement of hexameric-Fc with FcγRs showed complex binding interactions that altered with receptor density and triggered the internalisation and degradation of Fcγ-receptors. This caused a disruption of Fc-binding and phagocytosis. In vivo, in a mouse ITP model we observed a short half-life of hexameric-Fc but were nevertheless able to observe inhibition of platelet phagocytosis several days after hexameric-Fc dosing. In cynomolgus monkeys, we again observed a short half-life, but were able to demonstrate effective FcγR blockade. These findings demonstrate the ability of multi-valent Fc-based therapeutics to interfere with FcγR function and a potential mechanism through which they could have a sustained effect; the internalisation and degradation of FcγRs.

  17. Experiments to Demonstrate Change in Allelic Frequency by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    /fulltext/reso/014/11/1110-1118. Keywords. Population genetics; genetic drift; allele frequency. Author Affiliations. N B Ramachandra1 M S Ranjini1. Unit on Evolution and Genetics DOS in Zoology Manasagangotri University of Mysore, India.

  18. Marker-assisted selection of high molecular weight glutenin alleles ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-08-08

    Triticum aestivum L.), while their allelic variation explains ... Glutamine-rich repetitive sequences that comprise the central part of the. HMW subunits are actually responsible for the elastic prop- erties due to extensive arrays of ...

  19. Multivalent rotavirus vaccine and wild-type rotavirus strain shedding in Australian infants: a birth cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Suifang; Whiley, David M; Ware, Robert S; Kirkwood, Carl D; Lambert, Stephen B; Grimwood, Keith

    2017-11-15

    Rotavirus vaccines have reduced moderate-to-severe gastroenteritis episodes in infants and young children. Nevertheless, knowledge gaps exist concerning rotavirus vaccine shedding and vaccine impact upon mild and asymptomatic wild-type infections. Our primary objective was to investigate vaccine shedding in Australian infants where the multivalent human-bovine reassortant rotavirus vaccine, RotaTeq®, was part of the routine vaccination schedule. The Observational Research in Childhood Infectious Diseases (ORChID) birth cohort study was conducted in Brisbane, Australia, from September 2010 to October 2014. Newborn infants were enrolled progressively and followed until their second birthday. Parents recorded daily symptoms and mailed weekly stool swab samples from their infants to the laboratory where reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) testing was performed, and rotavirus-positive samples underwent genotyping to distinguish between vaccine and wild-type strains. Rotavirus was detected in 1,068/11,139 (9.6%) stool swabs from 158 infants, and 994 (93.1%) were genotyped. RotaTeq® vaccine strains accounted for 951/994 (95.7%) of typed rotavirus-positive swabs. Proportions of infants shedding RotaTeq® after the first, second and third vaccine doses were 87.0%, 57.4% and 47.3% respectively and median (interquartile range) shedding duration after vaccine doses 1-3 was 3 (1-8), 1.5 (1-3) and 1 (1-2) weeks respectively. In contrast, the incidence rate of wild-type rotavirus episodes was 10.3 (95% confidence interval 6.8-15.6) per 100 child-years of observation. RotaTeq® vaccine virus was detected in stool samples from 47-87% of infants after each vaccine dose. Genotyping is an essential tool for differentiating between rotavirus vaccine and wild-type strains and monitoring vaccine impact in children. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e

  20. DRD4 dopamine receptor allelic diversity in various primate species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, M.; Higley, D. [NIAAA, Rockville, MD (United States); O`Brien, S. [NCI, Frederick, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The DRD4 dopamine receptor is uniquely characterized by a 48 bp repeating segment within the coding region, located in exon III. Different DRD4 alleles are produced by the presence of additional 48 bp repeats, each of which adds 16 amino acids to the length of the 3rd intracytoplasmic loop of the receptor. The DRD4 receptor is therefore an intriguing candidate gene for behaviors which are influenced by dopamine function. In several human populations, DRD4 alleles with 2-8 and 10 repeats have previously been identified, and the 4 and 7 repeat alleles are the most abundant. We have determined DRD4 genotypes in the following nonhuman primate species: chimpanzee N=2, pygmy chimpanzee N=2, gorilla N=4, siamang N=2, Gelada baboon N=1, gibbon N=1, orangutan (Bornean and Sumatran) N=62, spider monkey N=4, owl monkey N=1, Colobus monkey N=1, Patas monkey N=1, ruffed lemur N=1, rhesus macaque N=8, and vervet monkey N=28. The degree of DRD4 polymorphism and which DRD4 alleles were present both showed considerable variation across primate species. In contrast to the human, rhesus macaque monkeys were monomorphic. The 4 and 7 repeat allels, highly abundant in the human, may not be present in certain other primates. For example, the four spider monkeys we studied showed the 7, 8 and 9 repeat length alleles and the only gibbon we analyzed was homozygous for the 9 repeat allele (thus far not observed in the human). Genotyping of other primate species and sequencing of the individual DRD4 repeat alleles in different species may help us determine the ancestral DRD4 repeat length and identify connections between DRD4 genotype and phenotype.

  1. SSR allelic variation in almond (Prunus dulcis Mill.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hua; Sui, Yi; Chang, Feng-Qi; Xu, Yong; Ma, Rong-Cai

    2006-01-01

    Sixteen SSR markers including eight EST-SSR and eight genomic SSRs were used for genetic diversity analysis of 23 Chinese and 15 international almond cultivars. EST- and genomic SSR markers previously reported in species of Prunus, mainly peach, proved to be useful for almond genetic analysis. DNA sequences of 117 alleles of six of the 16 SSR loci were analysed to reveal sequence variation among the 38 almond accessions. For the four SSR loci with AG/CT repeats, no insertions or deletions were observed in the flanking regions of the 98 alleles sequenced. Allelic size variation of these loci resulted exclusively from differences in the structures of repeat motifs, which involved interruptions or occurrences of new motif repeats in addition to varying number of AG/CT repeats. Some alleles had a high number of uninterrupted repeat motifs, indicating that SSR mutational patterns differ among alleles at a given SSR locus within the almond species. Allelic homoplasy was observed in the SSR loci because of base substitutions, interruptions or compound repeat motifs. Substitutions in the repeat regions were found at two SSR loci, suggesting that point mutations operate on SSRs and hinder the further SSR expansion by introducing repeat interruptions to stabilize SSR loci. Furthermore, it was shown that some potential point mutations in the flanking regions are linked with new SSR repeat motif variation in almond and peach.

  2. Origin of allelic diversity in antirrhinum S locus RNases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Y; Carpenter, R; Dickinson, H G; Coen, E S

    1996-01-01

    In many plant species, self-incompatibility (SI) is genetically controlled by a single multiallelic S locus. Previous analysis of S alleles in the Solanaceae, in which S locus ribonucleases (S RNases) are responsible for stylar expression of SI, has demonstrated that allelic diversity predated speciation within this family. To understand how allelic diversity has evolved, we investigated the molecular basis of gametophytic SI in Antirrhinum, a member of the Scrophulariaceae, which is closely related to the Solanaceae. We have characterized three Antirrhinum cDNAs encoding polypeptides homologous to S RNases and shown that they are encoded by genes at the S locus. RNA in situ hybridization revealed that the Antirrhinum S RNase are primarily expressed in the stylar transmitting tissue. This expression is consistent with their proposed role in arresting the growth of self-pollen tubes. S alleles from the Scrophulariaceae form a separate group from those of the Solanaceae, indicating that new S alleles have been generated since these families separated (approximately 40 million years). We propose that the recruitment of an ancestral RNase gene into SI occurred during an early stage of angiosperm evolution and that, since that time, new alleles subsequently have arisen at a low rate. PMID:8672882

  3. Shared peptide binding of HLA Class I and II alleles associate with cutaneous nevirapine hypersensitivity and identify novel risk alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavlos, Rebecca; McKinnon, Elizabeth J.; Ostrov, David A.

    2017-01-01

    specificities and binding pocket structure. We demonstrate that primary predisposition to cutaneous NVP HSR, seen across ancestral groups, can be attributed to a cluster of HLA-C alleles sharing a common binding groove F pocket with HLA-C*04:01. An independent association with a group of class II alleles which......Genes of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system encode cell-surface proteins involved in regulation of immune responses, and the way drugs interact with the HLA peptide binding groove is important in the immunopathogenesis of T-cell mediated drug hypersensitivity syndromes. Nevirapine (NVP......), is an HIV-1 antiretroviral with treatment-limiting hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) associated with multiple class I and II HLA alleles. Here we utilize a novel analytical approach to explore these multi-allelic associations by systematically examining HLA molecules for similarities in peptide binding...

  4. Mannose-binding lectin variant alleles and HLA-DR4 alleles are associated with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Soren; Baslund, Bo; Madsen, Hans O.

    2002-01-01

    /GCA, MBL variant alleles were associated with signs of increased inflammatory activity and clinical signs of arteritic manifestations. This was not found for HLA-DR4 alleles. These findings indicate that HLA-DR4 and MBL are contributing to the pathophysiology of GCA at different levels in the disease......OBJECTIVE: To determine whether variant alleles of the mannose-binding lectin (MBL) gene causing low serum concentrations of MBL and/or polymorphisms of HLA-DRB1 are associated with increased susceptibility to polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) and giant cell arteritis (GCA) or particular clinical...... phenotypes of PMR/GCA. METHODS: MBL and HLA-DRB1 alleles were determined by polymerase chain reaction in 102 Danish patients with PMR (n = 37) or GCA (n = 65). Two hundred fifty and 193 healthy individuals served as controls for MBL and HLA genotyping, respectively. RESULTS: The prevalence of MBL variant...

  5. The administration of a single dose of a multivalent (DHPPiL4R vaccine prevents clinical signs and mortality following virulent challenge with canine distemper virus, canine adenovirus or canine parvovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Wilson

    2014-01-01

    In conclusion, we demonstrated that a single administration of a minimum titre, multivalent vaccine to dogs of six weeks of age is efficacious and prevents clinical signs and mortality caused by CAV-1 and CDV; prevents clinical signs and significantly reduces virus shedding caused by CAV-2; and prevents clinical signs, leucopoenia and viral excretion caused by CPV.

  6. Multivalent ion conducting solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imanaka, N. [Osaka Univ., Suita, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry

    2008-07-01

    Solid electrolytes possess important characteristics for industrial applications. Only a single ionic species can macroscopically migrate in these solids. This paper described a the new NASICON (M-Zr-Nb-P-O) type system, exhibiting an exceptionally high level of trivalent M3+ ion conductivity on polycrystalline solids. The partial substitution of the smaller higher valent Nb5+ ion for Zr4+ stabilized the NASICON phase and realized the M3+ ion conduction in the NASICON structure. It was concluded that the conductivities of the series are comparable to those of the practically applied solid electrolytes of oxide anion conductors of YSZ and CSZ. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Nanocomposite hydrogels stabilized by self-assembled multivalent bisphosphonate-magnesium nanoparticles mediate sustained release of magnesium ion and promote in-situ bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kunyu; Lin, Sien; Feng, Qian; Dong, Chaoqun; Yang, Yanhua; Li, Gang; Bian, Liming

    2017-12-01

    Hydrogels are appealing biomaterials for applications in regenerative medicine due to their tunable physical and bioactive properties. Meanwhile, therapeutic metal ions, such as magnesium ion (Mg 2+ ), not only regulate the cellular behaviors but also stimulate local bone formation and healing. However, the effective delivery and tailored release of Mg 2+ remains a challenge, with few reports on hydrogels being used for Mg 2+ delivery. Bisphosphonate exhibits a variety of specific bioactivities and excellent binding affinity to multivalent cations such as Mg 2+ . Herein, we describe a nanocomposite hydrogel based on hyaluronic acid and self-assembled bisphosphonate-magnesium (BP-Mg) nanoparticles. These nanoparticles bearing acrylate groups on the surface not only function as effective multivalent crosslinkers to strengthen the hydrogel network structure, but also promote the mineralization of hydrogels and mediate sustained release of Mg 2+ . The released Mg 2+ ions facilitate stem cell adhesion and spreading on the hydrogel substrates in the absence of cell adhesion ligands, and promote osteogenesis of the seeded hMSCs in vitro. Furthermore, the acellular porous hydrogels alone can support in situ bone regeneration without using exogenous cells and inductive agents, thereby greatly simplifying the approaches of bone regeneration therapy. In this study, we developed a novel bioactive nanocomposite hydrogel based on hyaluronic acid and self-assembled bisphosphonate-magnesium (BP-Mg) nanoparticles. Such hydrogels are stabilized by the multivalent crosslinking domains formed by the aggregation of Ac-BP-Mg NPs, and therefore show enhanced mechanical properties, improved capacity for mineralization, and controlled release kinetics of Mg 2+ . Moreover, the released Mg 2+ can enhance cell adhesion and spreading, and further promote the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. Owing to these unique properties, these acellular hydrogels alone can well facilitate the in vivo

  8. Implication of HLA-DMA Alleles in Corsican IDDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Cucchi-Mouillot

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The HLA-DM molecule catalyses the CLIP/antigen peptide exchange in the classical class II peptide-binding groove. As such, DM is an antigen presentation regulator and may be linked to autoimmune diseases. Using PCR derived methods, a relationship was revealed between DM gene polymorphism and IDDM, in a Corsican population. The DMA*0101 allele was observed to confer a significant predisposition to this autoimmune disease while the DMA*0102 allele protected significantly. Experiments examining polymorphism of the HLA-DRB1 gene established that these relationships are not a consequence of linkage disequilibrium with HLA-DRB1 alleles implicated in this pathology. The study of the DMA gene could therefore be an additional tool for early IDDM diagnosis in the Corsican population.

  9. Common breast cancer risk alleles and risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Näslund-Koch, C; Nordestgaard, B G; Bojesen, S E

    2017-01-01

    mammography in Denmark, the average 5-year breast cancer risk was 1.5%, overall and 1.1%, 1.4%, 1.6%, 1.7%, 2.1%, for the 1(st) through 5(th) quintile, respectively. Based on age, nulliparity, familial history, and allele sum, 25% of women aged 50-69, and 94% of women aged 40-49, had absolute 5-year breast...... cancer risks ≤ 1.5%. Using polygenic risk score led to similar results. CONCLUSION: Common breast cancer risk alleles are associated with incidence and mortality of breast cancer in the general population, but not with other cancers. After including breast cancer allele sum in risk assessment, 25...

  10. Allele-sharing statistics using information on family history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callegaro, A; Meulenbelt, I; Kloppenburg, M; Slagboom, P E; Houwing-Duistermaat, J J

    2010-11-01

    When conducting genetic studies for complex traits, large samples are commonly required to detect new genetic factors. A possible strategy to decrease the sample size is to reduce heterogeneity using available information. In this paper we propose a new class of model-free linkage analysis statistics which takes into account the information given by the ungenotyped affected relatives (positive family history). This information is included into the scoring function of classical allele-sharing statistics. We studied pedigrees of affected sibling pairs with one ungenotyped affected relative. We show that, for rare allele common complex diseases, the proposed method increases the expected power to detect linkage. Allele-sharing methods were applied to the symptomatic osteoarthritis GARP study where taking into account the family-history increased considerably the evidence of linkage in the region of the DIO2 susceptibility locus. © 2010 The Authors Annals of Human Genetics © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/University College London.

  11. An update on HLA alleles associated with adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke-Galindo, Ingrid; LLerena, Adrián; López-López, Marisol

    2017-05-24

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are considered as an important cause of morbidity and mortality. The hypersensitivity reactions are immune-mediated ADRs, which are dose-independent, unpredictable and have been associated with several HLA alleles. The present review aimed to describe HLA alleles that have been associated with different ADRs in populations worldwide, the recommendations of regulatory agencies and pharmacoeconomic information and databases for the study of HLA alleles in pharmacogenetics. A systematic search was performed in June 2016 of articles relevant to this issue in indexed journals and in scientific databases (PubMed and PharmGKB). The information of 95 association studies found was summarized. Several HLA alleles and haplotypes have been associated with ADRs induced mainly by carbamazepine, allopurinol, abacavir and nevirapine, among other drugs. Years with the highest numbers of publications were 2013 and 2014. The majority of the reports have been performed on Asians and Caucasians, and carbamazepine was the most studied ADR drug inducer. Two HLA alleles' databases are described, as well as the recommendations of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the European Medicine Agency and the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium. Pharmacoeconomic studies on this issue are also mentioned. The strongest associations remain for HLA-B*58:01, HLA-B*57:01, HLA-B*15:02 and HLA-A*31:01 but only in certain populations; therefore, studies on different ethnic groups would be useful. Due to the improvement of drug therapy and the economic benefit that HLA screening represents, investigations on HLA alleles associated with ADR should continue.

  12. Reduced Height (Rht) Alleles Affect Wheat Grain Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casebow, Richard; Hadley, Caroline; Uppal, Rajneet; Addisu, Molla; Loddo, Stefano; Kowalski, Ania; Griffiths, Simon; Gooding, Mike

    2016-01-01

    The effects of dwarfing alleles (reduced height, Rht) in near isogenic lines on wheat grain quality are characterised in field experiments and related to effects on crop height, grain yield and GA-sensitivity. Alleles included those that conferred GA-insensitivity (Rht-B1b, Rht-B1c, Rht-D1b, Rht-D1c) as well as those that retained GA-sensitivity (rht(tall), Rht8, Rht8 + Ppd-D1a, Rht12). Full characterisation was facilitated by including factors with which the effects of Rht alleles are known to interact for grain yield (i.e. system, [conventional or organic]; tillage intensity [plough-based, minimum or zero]; nitrogen fertilizer level [0-450 kg N/ha]; and genetic backgrounds varying in height [cvs Maris Huntsman, Maris Widgeon, and Mercia]. Allele effects on mean grain weight and grain specific weight were positively associated with final crop height: dwarfing reduced these quality criteria irrespective of crop management or GA-sensitivity. In all but two experiments the effects of dwarfing alleles on grain nitrogen and sulphur concentrations were closely and negatively related to effects on grain yield, e.g. a quadratic relationship between grain yield and crop height manipulated by the GA-insensitive alleles was mirrored by quadratic relationships for nitrogen and sulphur concentrations: the highest yields and most dilute concentrations occurred around 80cm. In one of the two exceptional experiments the GA-insensitive Rht-B1b and Rht-B1c significantly (Pdirect pleiotropic effect of GA-insensitivity, rather than an effect consequential to yield and/or height.

  13. Distribution of a pseudodeficiency allele among Tay-Sachs carriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomczak, J.; Grebner, E.E. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)); Boogen, C. (Univ. of Essen Medical School (Germany))

    1993-08-01

    Recently Triggs-Raine et al. (1992) identified a new mutation in the gene coding for the [alpha]-subunit of [beta]-hexosaminidase A (hex A), the enzyme whose deficiency causes Tay-Sachs disease. This mutation, a C[sub 739]-to-T transition in exon 7, results in an altered enzyme that is active (albeit at reduced levels) in cells but that has essentially no activity in serum. This so-called pseudodeficient allele was first detected in compound heterozygotes who also carried a Tay-Sachs disease allele and therefore had no detectable hex A in their serum but who were in good health. Carriers of this apparently benign mutation are generally indistinguishable from carriers of a lethal mutation by means of routine enzyme-based screening tests, because the product of the pseudodeficient allele is not detectable in serum and has decreased activity in cells. This suggests that some individuals who have been classified as Tay-Sachs carriers are actually carriers of the pseudodeficient allele and are not at risk to have a child affected with Tay-Sachs disease. The pseudodeficient allele may also be responsible for some inconclusive diagnoses, where leukocyte values fall below the normal range but are still above the carrier range. The fact that there are now two mutant alleles (the psuedodeficient and the adult) that are indistinguishable from the lethal infantile mutations by means of enzyme assay yet that are phenotypically very different and that together may account for as much as 12% of enzyme-defined carriers on the basis of the data here suggests that DNA analysis should be part of a comprehensive screening program. It will be particularly useful to identify the mutations in couples at risk, before they undergo prenatal diagnosis. DNA analysis will also resolve some inconclusive diagnoses.

  14. Simultaneous inference of haplotypes and alleles at a causal gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice eLarribe

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a new methodology which jointly infers haplotypes and the causal alleles at a gene influencing a given trait. Often in human genetic studies, the available data consists of genotypes (series of genetic markers along the chromosomes and a phenotype. However, for many genetic analyses, one needs haplotypes instead of genotypes. Our methodology is not only able to estimate haplotypes conditionally on the disease status, but is also able to infer the alleles at the unknown disease locus. Some applications of our methodology are in genetic mapping and in genetic counselling.

  15. A common allele on chromosome 9 associated with coronary heartdisease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McPherson, Ruth; Pertsemlidis, Alexander; Kavaslar, Nihan; Stewart, Alexandre; Roberts, Robert; Cox, David R.; Hinds, David; Pennachio, Len; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Folsom, Aaron R.; Boerwinkle,Eric; Hobbs, Helen H.; Cohen, Jonathan C.

    2007-03-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major cause of death in Western countries. Here we used genome-wide association scanning to identify a 58 kb interval on chromosome 9 that was consistently associated with CHD in six independent samples. The interval contains no annotated genes and is not associated with established CHD risk factors such as plasma lipoproteins, hypertension or diabetes. Homozygotes for the risk allele comprise 20-25% of Caucasians and have a {approx}30-40% increased risk of CHD. These data indicate that the susceptibility allele acts through a novel mechanism to increase CHD risk in a large fraction of the population.

  16. Reduced Height (Rht Alleles Affect Wheat Grain Quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Casebow

    Full Text Available The effects of dwarfing alleles (reduced height, Rht in near isogenic lines on wheat grain quality are characterised in field experiments and related to effects on crop height, grain yield and GA-sensitivity. Alleles included those that conferred GA-insensitivity (Rht-B1b, Rht-B1c, Rht-D1b, Rht-D1c as well as those that retained GA-sensitivity (rht(tall, Rht8, Rht8 + Ppd-D1a, Rht12. Full characterisation was facilitated by including factors with which the effects of Rht alleles are known to interact for grain yield (i.e. system, [conventional or organic]; tillage intensity [plough-based, minimum or zero]; nitrogen fertilizer level [0-450 kg N/ha]; and genetic backgrounds varying in height [cvs Maris Huntsman, Maris Widgeon, and Mercia]. Allele effects on mean grain weight and grain specific weight were positively associated with final crop height: dwarfing reduced these quality criteria irrespective of crop management or GA-sensitivity. In all but two experiments the effects of dwarfing alleles on grain nitrogen and sulphur concentrations were closely and negatively related to effects on grain yield, e.g. a quadratic relationship between grain yield and crop height manipulated by the GA-insensitive alleles was mirrored by quadratic relationships for nitrogen and sulphur concentrations: the highest yields and most dilute concentrations occurred around 80cm. In one of the two exceptional experiments the GA-insensitive Rht-B1b and Rht-B1c significantly (P<0.05 reduced grain nitrogen concentration in the absence of an effect on yield, and in the remaining experiment the GA-sensitive Rht8 significantly reduced both grain yield and grain nitrogen concentration simultaneously. When Rht alleles diluted grain nitrogen concentration, N:S ratios and SDS-sedimentation volumes were often improved. Hagberg falling number (HFN was negatively related to crop height but benefits from dwarfing were only seen for GA-insensitive alleles. For HFN, therefore, there

  17. An Allele Real-Coded Quantum Evolutionary Algorithm Based on Hybrid Updating Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yu-Xian; Qian, Xiao-Yi; Peng, Hui-Deng; Wang, Jian-Hui

    2016-01-01

    For improving convergence rate and preventing prematurity in quantum evolutionary algorithm, an allele real-coded quantum evolutionary algorithm based on hybrid updating strategy is presented. The real variables are coded with probability superposition of allele. A hybrid updating strategy balancing the global search and local search is presented in which the superior allele is defined. On the basis of superior allele and inferior allele, a guided evolutionary process as well as updating alle...

  18. Determining the frequencies of B1, B2, B3 and E alleles of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The allelic frequencies of the B1, B2, B3 and E alleles were 0.927, 0.073, 0.390, and 0.272, respectively. B1 and B2 alleles did not affect milk yield and composition. B3 allele had significant effects on protein, fat, total solid (TS), solid not fat (SNF), casein and lactose percentages, but not on lactose yield. E allele significantly ...

  19. Experiments to Demonstrate Change in Allelic Frequency by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    a number of factors such as migration from or to other populations, mutation, selection and random ... beneficial, neutral, or detrimental to reproductive success. The statistical effect of sampling error ... original population, and through the random sampling of alleles during reproduction of sub- sequent generations, continue ...

  20. Estimating and testing the effect of allelic recombination on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-01-21

    Jan 21, 2011 ... The significance of the correlation coefficient as well as the fitted regression model was obtained using. Analysis of Variance method. Key words: Allele, genotype, regression, correlation, F-ratio, analysis of variance. INTRODUCTION. Genetic recombination is an effective means of combining one individual ...

  1. Haplotype allelic classes for detecting ongoing positive selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lefebvre Jean-François

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natural selection eliminates detrimental and favors advantageous phenotypes. This process leaves characteristic signatures in underlying genomic segments that can be recognized through deviations in allelic or haplotypic frequency spectra. To provide an identifiable signature of recent positive selection that can be detected by comparison with the background distribution, we introduced a new way of looking at genomic polymorphisms: haplotype allelic classes. Results The model combines segregating sites and haplotypic information in order to reveal useful data characteristics. We developed a summary statistic, Svd, to compare the distribution of the haplotypes carrying the selected allele with the distribution of the remaining ones. Coalescence simulations are used to study the distributions under standard population models assuming neutrality, demographic scenarios and selection models. To test, in practice, haplotype allelic class performance and the derived statistic in capturing deviation from neutrality due to positive selection, we analyzed haplotypic variation in detail in the locus of lactase persistence in the three HapMap Phase II populations. Conclusions We showed that the Svd statistic is less sensitive than other tests to confounding factors such as demography or recombination. Our approach succeeds in identifying candidate loci, such as the lactase-persistence locus, as targets of strong positive selection and provides a new tool complementary to other tests to study natural selection in genomic data.

  2. MHC class II DR allelic diversity in bighorn sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    We hypothesized that decreased diversity and/or unique polymorphisms in MHC class II alleles of bighorn sheep (BHS, Ovis canadensis) are responsible for lower titer of antibodies against Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin, in comparison to domestic sheep (DS, Ovis aries). To test this hypothesis, DRA...

  3. Distribution of forensic marker allelic frequencies in Pernambuco, Northestern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, S M; Souza, C A; Rabelo, K C N; Souza, P R E; Moura, R R; Oliveira, T C; Crovella, S

    2015-04-30

    Pernambuco is one of the 27 federal units of Brazil, ranking seventh in the number of inhabitants. We examined the allele frequencies of 13 short tandem repeat loci (CFS1PO, D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D8S1179, D13S317, D16S539, D18S51, D21S11, FGA, TH01, vWA, and TPOX), the minimum recommended by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and commonly used in forensic genetics laboratories in Brazil, in a sample of 609 unrelated individuals from all geographic regions of Pernambuco. The allele frequencies ranged from 5 to 47.2%. No significant differences for any loci analyzed were observed compared with other publications in other various regions of Brazil. Most of the markers observed were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The occurrence of the allele 47.2 (locus FGA) and alleles 35.1 and 39 (locus D21S11), also described in a single study of the Brazilian population, was observed. The other forensic parameters analyzed (matching probability, power of discrimination, polymorphic information content, paternity exclusion, complement factor I, observed heterozygosity, expected heterozygosity) indicated that the studied markers are very informative for human forensic identification purposes in the Pernambuco population.

  4. Molecular monitoring of resistant dhfr and dhps allelic haplotypes in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The present study assesses the frequency of resistant dhfr and dhps alleles in Morogoro-Mvomero district in south eastern Tanzania and contrast their rate of change during 17 years of SP second line use against five years of SP first line use. Methodology: Cross sectional surveys of asymptomatic infections were ...

  5. Comparison of bovine lymphocyte antigen DRB3.2 allele ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-08-04

    Aug 4, 2008 ... polymorphic bovine MHC class II gene which encodes the peptide-binding groove. Since different ... patibility Complex (MHC) of cattle is known as Bovine .... Table 1. Frequencies of BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles detected by polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP).

  6. Allelic variations of functional markers for polyphenol oxidase (PPO)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Allelic variations of functional markers for polyphenol oxidase (PPO) genes in Indian bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars. Rajender Singh, Umesh Goutam, R. K. Gupta, G. C. Pandey, Jag Shoran and Ratan Tiwari. J. Genet. 88, 325–329. Figure 1. Phenol colour reaction of kernels. Kernels without treatment by ...

  7. Allelic variation of HMW glutenin subunits of Ethiopian bread wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There were highly significant differences between genotypes and banding patterns for the SDS-sedimentation test, mixograph development time, alveograph strength and loaf volume; but not for protein content. The frequency of subunits 5+10 among genotypes was 73%. The accumulation of high scoring alleles in our ...

  8. Allelic reůationships of Pea Nodulation Mutants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, Karel

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 2 (2003), s. 191-193 ISSN 0022-1503 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/00/0937 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : allelic * relationships * pea Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.707, year: 2003

  9. Distribution of HIV-1 resistance-conferring polymorphic alleles SDF ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... number of mutant alleles (for the three loci together) carried by each individual varies from 0.475 (in Vizag Brahmins) to 0.959 (in Bohra Muslims). The estimated relative hazard values for the populations, computed from the three-locus genotype data, are comparable to those from Africa and Southeast Asia, where AIDS is ...

  10. Comparison of bovine lymphocyte antigen DRB3.2 allele ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The bovine lymphocyte antigen (BoLA-DRB3) gene encodes cell surface glycoproteins that initiate immune responses by presenting processed antigenic peptides to CD4 T helper cells. DRB3 is the most polymorphic bovine MHC class II gene which encodes the peptide-binding groove. Since different alleles favor the ...

  11. Novel HLA Class I Alleles Associated with Indian Leprosy Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Shankarkumar

    2003-01-01

    A*0101, Cw*04011, and Cw*0602 leprosy patients was observed when compared to the controls. Further haplotype A*1102-B*4006-Cw*1502 was significantly increased among the lepromatous leprosy patients when compared to the controls. It seems that HLA class I alleles play vital roles in disease association/pathogenesis with leprosy among Indians.

  12. The 'rare allele phenomenon' in a ribosomal spacer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schilthuizen, M.; Hoekstra, R.F.; Gittenberger, E.

    2001-01-01

    We describe the increased frequency of a particular length variant of the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS-1) of the ribosomal DNA in a hybrid zone of the land snail Albinaria hippolyti. The phenomenon that normally rare alleles or other markers can increase in frequency in the centre of hybrid

  13. Allelic drop-out probabilities estimated by logistic regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Asplund, Maria

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the model for estimating drop-out probabilities presented by Tvedebrink et al. [7] and the concerns, that have been raised. The criticism of the model has demonstrated that the model is not perfect. However, the model is very useful for advanced forensic genetic work, where allelic dro...

  14. Allele frequency analysis of Chinese chestnut ( Castanea mollissima ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to establish a method for allele frequency detection in bulk samples. The abundance of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products in bulk leaf samples was detected using fluorescent labeled Simple sequence repeat (SSR) primers and an Applied biosystems (AB) automatic DNA analyzer.

  15. weight glutenin subunits and waxy alleles on dough-mix

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    weight glutenin subunits and waxy alleles on dough-mixing properties in common wheat. Zhiying Deng, Shuna Hu, Feifei Zheng, Junnan Chen, Xinye Zhang, Jiansheng Chen, Cailing Sun,. Yongxiang Zhang, Shouyi Wang and Jichun Tian. J. Genet. 92, 69–79. Table 1. The data of the mixing properties of the RIL population ...

  16. Multifragment alleles in DNA fingerprints of the parrot, Amazona ventralis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, M.K.; White, B.N.

    1991-01-01

    Human DNA probes that identify variable numbers of tandem repeat loci are being used to generate DNA fingerprints in many animal and plant species. In most species the majority of the sc rable autoradiographic bands of the DNA fingerprint represent alleles from numerous unlinked loci. This study was initiated to use DNA fingerprints to determine the amount of band-sharing among captive Hispaniolan parrots (Amazona ventralis) with known genetic relationships. This would form the data base to examine DNA fingerprints of the closely related and endangered Puerto Rican parrot (A. vittata) and to estimate the degree of inbreeding in the relic population. We found by segregation analysis of the bands scored in the DNA fingerprints of the Hispaniolan parrots that there may be as few as two to five loci identified by the human 33.15 probe. Furthermore, at one locus we identified seven alleles, one of which is represented by as many as 19 cosegregating bands. It is unknown how common multiband alleles might be in natural populations, and their existence will cause problems in the assessment of relatedness by band-sharing analysis. We believe, therefore, that a pedigree analysis should be included in all DNA fingerprinting studies, where possible, in order to estimate the number of loci identified by a minisatellite DNA probe and to examine the nature of their alleles.

  17. HLA-A alleles differentially associate with severity to Plasmodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA), particularly HLA-B and class II alleles have been differentially associated with disease outcomes in different populations following infection with the malaria Plasmodium falciparum. However, the effect of HLA-A on malaria infection and/or disease is not fully understood. Recently, HLA-A ...

  18. Introgression of Crop Alleles into Wild or Weedy Populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellstrand, N.C.; Meirmans, P.; Rong, J.; Bartsch, D.; Ghosh, A.; de Jong, T.J.; Haccou, P.; Lu, B-R.; Snow, A.A.; Stewart, C.N.; Strasburg, J.L.; van Tienderen, P.H.; Vrieling, K; Hooftman, D.A.P.

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionary significance of introgression has been discussed for decades. Questions about potential impacts of transgene flow into wild and weedy populations brought renewed attention to the introgression of crop alleles into those populations. In the past two decades, the field has advanced

  19. Allelic Frequency Analysis of Chinese Chestnut (Castanea mollissima)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chengxiang Ai

    The aim of this study was to establish a method for allele frequency detection in bulk samples. The abundance of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products in bulk leaf samples was detected using fluorescent labeled Simple sequence repeat (SSR) primers and an Applied biosystems (AB) automatic. DNA analyzer.

  20. Bipolar disorder risk alleles in children with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmelmann, B G; Hinney, A; Scherag, A; Pütter, C; Pechlivanis, S; Cichon, S; Jöckel, K-H; Schreiber, S; Wichmann, H E; Albayrak, Ö; Dauvermann, M; Konrad, K; Wilhelm, C; Herpertz-Dahlmann, B; Lehmkuhl, G; Sinzig, J; Renner, T J; Romanos, M; Warnke, A; Lesch, K P; Reif, A; Hebebrand, J

    2013-11-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may share common genetic risk factors as indicated by the high co-morbidity of BD and ADHD, their phenotypic overlap especially in pediatric populations, the high heritability of both disorders, and the co-occurrence in families. We therefore examined whether known polygenic BD risk alleles are associated with ADHD. We chose the eight best SNPs of the recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) of BD patients of German ancestry and the nine SNPs from international GWAS meeting a 'genome-wide significance' level of α = 5 × 10(-8). A GWAS was performed in 495 ADHD children and 1,300 population-based controls using HumanHap550v3 and Human660 W-Quadv1 BeadArrays. We found no significant association of childhood ADHD with single BD risk alleles surviving adjustment for multiple testing. Yet, risk alleles for BD and ADHD were directionally consistent at eight of nine loci with the strongest support for three SNPs in or near NCAN, BRE, and LMAN2L. The polygene analysis for the BP risk alleles at all 14 loci indicated a higher probability of being a BD risk allele carrier in the ADHD cases as compared to the controls. At a moderate power to detect association with ADHD, if true effects were close to estimates from GWAS for BD, our results suggest that the possible contribution of BD risk variants to childhood ADHD risk is considerably lower than for BD. Yet, our findings should encourage researchers to search for common genetic risk factors in BD and childhood ADHD in future studies.

  1. Design and synthesis of multifunctional poly(ethylene glycol)s using enzymatic catalysis for multivalent cancer drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Kwang Su

    The objective of this research was to design and synthesize multifunctional poly(ethylene glycol)s (PEG)s using enzyme-catalyzed reactions for multivalent targeted drug delivery. Based on computer simulation for optimum folate binding, a four-arm PEG star topology with Mn = 1000 g/mol was proposed. First, a four-functional core based on tetraethylene glycol (TEG) was designed and synthesized using transesterification and Michael addition reactions in the presence of Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) as a biocatalyst. The four-functional core (HO)2-TEG-(OH)2 core was successfully prepared by the CALB-catalyzed transesterification of vinyl acrylate (VA) with TEG and then Michael addition of diethanolamine to the resulting TEG diacrylate with/without the use of solvent. The functional PEG arms with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and folic acid (FA) were prepared using both traditional organic chemistry and enzyme-catalyzed reactions. FITC was reacted with the amine group of H2N-PEG-OH in the presence of triethylamine via nucleophilic addition onto the isothiocyanate group. Then, divinyl adipate (DVA) was transesterified with the FITC-PEG-OH product in the presence of CALB to produce the FITC-PEG vinyl ester that will be attached to the four-functional core via CALC-catalyzed transesterification. For the synthesis of FA-PEG vinyl ester arm, DVA was first reacted with PEG-monobenzyl ether (BzPEG-OH) in bulk in the presence of CALB. The BzPEG vinyl ester was then transesterified with 12-bromo-1-dodecanol in the presence of CALB. Finally, BzPEG-Br was attached to FA exclusively in the gamma position using a new method. The thesis also discusses fundamental studies that were carried out in order to get better understanding of enzyme catalyzed transesterification and Michael addition reactions. First, in an effort to investigate the effects of reagent and enzyme concentrations in transesterification, vinyl methacrylate (VMA) was reacted with 2-(hydroxyethyl) acrylate (2

  2. Mannose-binding lectin variant alleles and HLA-DR4 alleles are associated with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Soren; Baslund, Bo; Madsen, Hans O.

    2002-01-01

    phenotypes of PMR/GCA. METHODS: MBL and HLA-DRB1 alleles were determined by polymerase chain reaction in 102 Danish patients with PMR (n = 37) or GCA (n = 65). Two hundred fifty and 193 healthy individuals served as controls for MBL and HLA genotyping, respectively. RESULTS: The prevalence of MBL variant...

  3. KIR2DL2/2DL3-E35 alleles are functionally stronger than -Q35 alleles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, Rafijul; Thapa, Rajoo; Bao, Ju; Li, Ying; Zheng, Jie; Leung, Wing

    2016-03-01

    KIR2DL2 and KIR2DL3 segregate as alleles of a single locus in the centromeric motif of the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene family. Although KIR2DL2/L3 polymorphism is known to be associated with many human diseases and is an important factor for donor selection in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the molecular determinant of functional diversity among various alleles is unclear. In this study we found that KIR2DL2/L3 with glutamic acid at position 35 (E35) are functionally stronger than those with glutamine at the same position (Q35). Cytotoxicity assay showed that NK cells from HLA-C1 positive donors with KIR2DL2/L3-E35 could kill more target cells lacking their ligands than NK cells with the weaker -Q35 alleles, indicating better licensing of KIR2DL2/L3+ NK cells with the stronger alleles. Molecular modeling analysis reveals that the glutamic acid, which is negatively charged, interacts with positively charged histidine located at position 55, thereby stabilizing KIR2DL2/L3 dimer and reducing entropy loss when KIR2DL2/3 binds to HLA-C ligand. The results of this study will be important for future studies of KIR2DL2/L3-associated diseases as well as for donor selection in allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

  4. Tri-allelic pattern at the TPOX locus: a familial study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picanço, Juliane Bentes; Raimann, Paulo Eduardo; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano; Alvarez, Luís; Amorim, António; Batista Dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel; Alho, Clarice Sampaio

    2014-02-10

    Alleles at the TPOX STR locus have 6-14 different numbers of a four-nucleotide (AATG) repeat motif arranged in tandem. Although tri-allelic genotypes are generally rare, the TPOX tri-allelic pattern has a higher frequency, varying widely among populations. Despite this, there are few accurate reports to disclose the nature of the TPOX third allele. In this work we present data obtained from 45 individuals belonging to the same pedigree, in which there are cases of tri-allelic TPOX genotypes. The subjects were apparently healthy with a normal biological development. We noticed six tri-allelic cases in this family, and all of them were women. Karyotype analysis showed no occurrence of partial 2p trisomy. All the tri-allelic cases had the genotype 8-10-11, probably due to three copies of the TPOX STR sequence in all cells (Type 2 tri-allelic pattern). Based on previous data we assumed the allele 10 as the TPOX third allele. The pedigree analyses show evidences that the TPOX extra-allele was the allele10, it is placed far from the main TPOX locus, and that there is a potential linkage of the TPOX extra-allele-10 with Xq. This was the first study that included a large pedigree analysis in order to understand the nature TPOX tri-allelic pattern. © 2013.

  5. ASElux: An Ultra-Fast and Accurate Allelic Reads Counter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Zong; Alvarez, Marcus; Pajukanta, Päivi; Ko, Arthur

    2017-11-23

    Mapping bias causes preferential alignment to the reference allele, forming a major obstacle in allele-specific expression (ASE) analysis. The existing methods, such as simulation and SNP-aware alignment, are either inaccurate or relatively slow. To fast and accurately count allelic reads for ASE analysis, we developed a novel approach, ASElux, which utilizes the personal SNP information and counts allelic reads directly from unmapped RNA-sequence (RNA-seq) data. ASElux significantly reduces runtime by disregarding reads outside single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) during the alignment. When compared to other tools on simulated and experimental data, ASElux achieves a higher accuracy on ASE estimation than non-SNP-aware aligners and requires a much shorter time than the benchmark SNP-aware aligner, GSNAP with just a slight loss in performance. ASElux can process 40 million read-pairs from an RNA-sequence (RNA-seq) sample and count allelic reads within 10 minutes, which is comparable to directly counting the allelic reads from alignments based on other tools. Furthermore, processing an RNA-seq sample using ASElux in conjunction with a general aligner, such as STAR, is more accurate and still ∼4X faster than STAR+WASP, and ∼33X faster than the lead SNP-aware aligner, GSNAP, making ASElux ideal for ASE analysis of large-scale transcriptomic studies. We applied ASElux to 273 lung RNA-seq samples from GTEx and identified a splice-QTL rs11078928 in lung which explains the mechanism underlying an asthma GWAS SNP rs11078927. Thus, our analysis demonstrated ASE as a highly powerful complementary tool to cis-expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis. The software can be downloaded from https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B7E7HSjQ-SumQmlPc1Z0aUR5Sk0. a5ko@ucla.edu (Arthur Ko), zmiao@ucla.edu (Zong Miao). Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions

  6. Multivalent system for therapy of non-Hod king lymphomas based on Anti-CD20 conjugated to gold nanoparticles; Sistema multivalente para terapia de linfomas no-Hodking basado en Anti-CD20 conjugado a nanoparticulas de oro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda O, R. M.

    2014-07-01

    In recent publications has been reported that gold nanoparticles have an effect in reducing the expression of the oncogene Bcl -2 and have a high biocompatibility , this is the importance for using gold nanoparticles for this work. The antibody CD20 is an antibody that specifically binds to that over expressed CD20 antigen on the cell membrane of B lymphoma cell non- Hodgkin (cell line Raji) behold the importance of combining this bio molecule to gold nanoparticles since they have a high specificity with CD20 positive cells , also to carry out the antigen- antibody immunological reactions triggered mediating cell lysis, possibly by cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Therefore, this system must have characteristics of both components to eliminate B cell non- Hodgkin lymphoma.In this work it was studied a multivalent system composed of gold nanoparticles and anti-CD20 antibody, the term multi valency refers to the number of biomolecules attached to the surface of the gold nanoparticle. The synthesis and characterization of the gold nanoparticles and the multivalent system was performed and the effect of the multivalent system on the expression of oncogene Bcl-2 (group of proteins associated with the apoptotic pathway) was evaluated. Characterization of raw materials and the multivalent system was performed using spectroscopic and microscopic techniques, this to verify structural changes in raw materials and thus confirm the formation of CD20 binding to the surface of the nanoparticle gold by the bond between gold and sulfur in the cysteines of CD20. Taking advantage that the metal nanoparticles have the optical property of surface plasmon resonance, the absorption of gold nanoparticles was measured on the UV-Vis as it is affected by the surface molecules bind to it, showing a bathochromic displacement effected. The hydrodynamic diameter of the gold nanoparticles was measured to verify that the antibody is bound to the surface; this evidence was complemented by micrographs

  7. Detection of complex alleles by direct analysis of DNA heteroduplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, R; Iannicola, C; Costanzi, S; Chersi, A; Tosi, R

    1991-01-01

    DNA molecules derived from three alleles of the HLA-DRB3 locus and differing from each other at several nucleotide sites were denatured and cross-hybridized. Each allelic combination was found to generate a pair of heteroduplexes of different mobility. Their retardation as compared to homoduplexes was proportional to the number of mismatches. In each heteroduplexes pair the component possessing the highest number of Pyr-Pyr oppositions was the most retarded. The results are those predicted by a theoretical model implying a correlation between base-pair opening and bending of the DNA double helix. These observations introduce a new HLA typing method at the genomic level and indicate an experimental approach to the analysis of the superhelical DNA conformation as related to different types of base oppositions.

  8. Determination of allele frequencies in nine short tandem repeat loci ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determination of allele frequencies in nine short tandem repeat loci of five human sub-populations in Botswana. ... use in individual identification. ... Targeted regions of DNA (vWA, FGA, D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D8S1179, D13S317, D18S51, D21S11 and the sex determining locus Amelogenin) were amplified using ...

  9. Multimer Formation Explains Allelic Suppression of PRDM9 Recombination Hotspots

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Baker, C.L.; Petkova, P.; Walker, M.; Flachs, Petr; Mihola, Ondřej; Trachtulec, Zdeněk; Petkov, P.M.; Paigen, K.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 9 (2015), e1005512-e1005512 ISSN 1553-7390 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/10/1931; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-20728S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : recombination * PRDM9 * allelic competition Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.528, year: 2014

  10. ABO genotyping in leukemia patients reveals new ABO variant alleles

    OpenAIRE

    NOVARETTI, M. C. Z.; DOMINGUES, A. E.; MANHANI, R.; PINTO, E. M.; DORLHIAC-LLACER, P. E.; CHAMONE, D. A. F.

    2008-01-01

    The ABO blood group is the most important blood group system in transfusion medicine and organ transplantation. To date, more than 160 ABO alleles have been identified by molecular investigation. Almost all ABO genotyping studies have been performed in blood donors and families and for investigation of ABO subgroups detected serologically. The aim of the present study was to perform ABO genotyping in patients with leukemia. Blood samples were collected from 108 Brazilian patients with chronic...

  11. HLA- DR Alleles in Pakistani Patients of Pemphigus Vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sara Waqar; Iftikhar, Nadia; Ahmed, Tahir Aziz; Bashir, Mukarram

    2015-04-01

    To determine frequency of HLA-DR alleles in Pakistani patients of pemphigus vulgaris in comparison with local healthy controls. Cross-sectional, comparative study. Department of Immunology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP), Rawalpindi, from January 2011 to January 2014. Twenty eight patients with biopsy proven diagnosis of pemphigus vulgaris referred from Department of Dermatology, Military Hospital, Rawalpindi were included. Patients were compared with a group of 150 unrelated local healthy subjects. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood collected in Tri-potassium EDTA. HLA-DRB1 typing was carried out on allele level (DRB1*01--DRB1*16) using SSP (sequence specific primers). HLA type was determined by agarose gel electrophoresis and results recorded. Phenotype frequency of various alleles among patient group and control group was calculated by direct counting and significance of their association was determined by Fisher's exact test/ Chi square test. A total of 12 male and 16 female patients, with age ranging from 21 to 34 (mean 23.4 years) were genotyped for HLA-DRB1 loci. A statistically significant association of the disease with HLA-DRB1*04 was observed (50% versus 20.7% in controls, p pemphigus vulgaris in Pakistani population.

  12. HLA- DR Alleles in Pakistani Patients of Pemphigus Vulgaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S. W.; Ahmad, T. A.; Bashir, M.; Iftikhar, N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine frequency of HLA-DR alleles in Pakistani patients of pemphigus vulgaris in comparison with local healthy controls. Study Design: Cross-sectional, comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Immunology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP), Rawalpindi, from January 2011 to January 2014. Methodology: Twenty eight patients with biopsy proven diagnosis of pemphigus vulgaris referred from Department of Dermatology, Military Hospital, Rawalpindi were included. Patients were compared with a group of 150 unrelated local healthy subjects. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood collected in Tri-potassium EDTA. HLA-DRB1 typing was carried out on allele level (DRB1*01 - DRB1*16) using SSP (sequence specific primers). HLA type was determined by agarose gel electrophoresis and results recorded. Phenotype frequency of various alleles among patient group and control group was calculated by direct counting and significance of their association was determined by Fisher's exact test/ Chi square test. Results: A total of 12 male and 16 female patients, with age ranging from 21 to 34 (mean 23.4 years) were genotype for HLA-DRB1 loci. A statistically significant association of the disease with HLA-DRB1*04 was observed (50% versus 20.7% in controls, p < 0.05). Conclusion: There is a strong association of HLA-DRB1*04 with pemphigus vulgaris in Pakistani population. (author)

  13. The protease inhibitor PI*S allele and COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersh, C P; Ly, N P; Berkey, C S

    2005-01-01

    In many countries, the protease inhibitor (SERPINA1) PI*S allele is more common than PI*Z, the allele responsible for most cases of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) due to severe alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency. However, the risk of COPD due to the PI*S allele is not clear. The current...... authors located studies that addressed the risk of COPD or measured lung function in individuals with the PI SZ, PI MS and PI SS genotypes. A separate meta-analysis for each genotype was performed. Aggregating data from six studies, the odds ratio (OR) for COPD in PI SZ compound heterozygotes compared...... with PI MM (normal) individuals was significantly increased at 3.26 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.24-8.57). In 17 cross-sectional and case-control studies, the OR for COPD in PI MS heterozygotes was 1.19 (95%CI: 1.02-1.38). However, PI MS genotype was not associated with COPD risk after correcting...

  14. Design and pre-clinical profiling of a Plasmodium falciparum MSP-3 derived component for a multi-valent virosomal malaria vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boato Francesca

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical profiling of two components for a synthetic peptide-based virosomal malaria vaccine has yielded promising results, encouraging the search for additional components for inclusion in a final multi-valent vaccine formulation. This report describes the immunological characterization of linear and cyclized synthetic peptides comprising amino acids 211-237 of Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein (MSP-3. Methods These peptides were coupled to phosphatidylethanolamine (PE; the conjugates were intercalated into immunopotentiating reconstituted influenza virosomes (IRIVs and then used for immunizations in mice to evaluate their capacity to elicit P. falciparum cross-reactive antibodies. Results While all MSP-3-derived peptides were able to elicit parasite-binding antibodies, stabilization of turn structures by cyclization had no immune-enhancing effect. Therefore, further pre-clinical profiling was focused on FB-12, a PE conjugate of the linear peptide. Consistent with the immunological results obtained in mice, all FB-12 immunized rabbits tested seroconverted and consistently elicited antibodies that interacted with blood stage parasites. It was observed that a dose of 50 μg was superior to a dose of 10 μg and that influenza pre-existing immunity improved the immunogenicity of FB-12 in rabbits. FB-12 production was successfully up-scaled and the immunogenicity of a vaccine formulation, produced according to the rules of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP, was tested in mice and rabbits. All animals tested developed parasite-binding antibodies. Comparison of ELISA and IFA titers as well as the characterization of a panel of anti-FB-12 monoclonal antibodies indicated that at least the majority of antibodies specific for the virosomally formulated synthetic peptide were parasite cross-reactive. Conclusion These results reconfirm the suitability of IRIVs as a carrier/adjuvant system for the induction of strong humoral

  15. Novel Insect-Specific Eilat Virus-Based Chimeric Vaccine Candidates Provide Durable, Mono- and Multivalent, Single-Dose Protection against Lethal Alphavirus Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erasmus, Jesse H; Seymour, Robert L; Kaelber, Jason T; Kim, Dal Y; Leal, Grace; Sherman, Michael B; Frolov, Ilya; Chiu, Wah; Weaver, Scott C; Nasar, Farooq

    2018-02-15

    Most alphaviruses are mosquito borne and exhibit a broad host range, infecting many different vertebrates, including birds, rodents, equids, humans, and nonhuman primates. Recently, a host-restricted, mosquito-borne alphavirus, Eilat virus (EILV), was described with an inability to infect vertebrate cells based on defective attachment and/or entry, as well as a lack of genomic RNA replication. We investigated the utilization of EILV recombinant technology as a vaccine platform against eastern (EEEV) and Venezuelan equine encephalitis viruses (VEEV), two important pathogens of humans and domesticated animals. EILV chimeras containing structural proteins of EEEV or VEEV were engineered and successfully rescued in Aedes albopictus cells. Cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions at 8 and 11 Å of EILV/VEEV and EILV/EEEV, respectively, showed virion and glycoprotein spike structures similar to those of VEEV-TC83 and other alphaviruses. The chimeras were unable to replicate in vertebrate cell lines or in brains of newborn mice when injected intracranially. Histopathologic examinations of the brain tissues showed no evidence of pathological lesions and were indistinguishable from those of mock-infected animals. A single-dose immunization of either monovalent or multivalent EILV chimera(s) generated neutralizing antibody responses and protected animals against lethal challenge 70 days later. Lastly, a single dose of monovalent EILV chimeras generated protective responses as early as day 1 postvaccination and partial or complete protection by day 6. These data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of novel insect-specific EILV-based chimeras as potential EEEV and VEEV vaccines. IMPORTANCE Mostly in the last decade, insect-specific viruses have been discovered in several arbovirus families. However, most of these viruses are not well studied and largely have been ignored. We explored the use of the mosquito-specific alphavirus EILV as an alphavirus vaccine

  16. Novel method for analysis of allele specific expression in triploid Oryzias latipes reveals consistent pattern of allele exclusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzintzuni I Garcia

    Full Text Available Assessing allele-specific gene expression (ASE on a large scale continues to be a technically challenging problem. Certain biological phenomena, such as X chromosome inactivation and parental imprinting, affect ASE most drastically by completely shutting down the expression of a whole set of alleles. Other more subtle effects on ASE are likely to be much more complex and dependent on the genetic environment and are perhaps more important to understand since they may be responsible for a significant amount of biological diversity. Tools to assess ASE in a diploid biological system are becoming more reliable. Non-diploid systems are, however, not uncommon. In humans full or partial polyploid states are regularly found in both healthy (meiotic cells, polynucleated cell types and diseased tissues (trisomies, non-disjunction events, cancerous tissues. In this work we have studied ASE in the medaka fish model system. We have developed a method for determining ASE in polyploid organisms from RNAseq data and we have implemented this method in a software tool set. As a biological model system we have used nuclear transplantation to experimentally produce artificial triploid medaka composed of three different haplomes. We measured ASE in RNA isolated from the livers of two adult, triploid medaka fish that showed a high degree of similarity. The majority of genes examined (82% shared expression more or less evenly among the three alleles in both triploids. The rest of the genes (18% displayed a wide range of ASE levels. Interestingly the majority of genes (78% displayed generally consistent ASE levels in both triploid individuals. A large contingent of these genes had the same allele entirely suppressed in both triploids. When viewed in a chromosomal context, it is revealed that these genes are from large sections of 4 chromosomes and may be indicative of some broad scale suppression of gene expression.

  17. HLA Dr beta 1 alleles in Pakistani patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqi, N.; Ahmed, T.A.; Bashir, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine frequencies of HLA DR beta 1 alleles in rheumatoid arthritis in Pakistani patients. Study Design: Cross sectional / analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Immunology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi in collaboration with Rheumatology departments of Military Hospital, Rawalpindi and Fauji Foundation Hospital, Rawalpindi, from January 2009 to January 2010. Methodology: HLA DR beta 1 genotyping of one hundred Pakistani patients, diagnosed as having RA as per American College of Rheumatology revised criteria 1987, was done. HLA DR beta 1 genotyping was carried out at allele group level (DR beta 1*01-DR beta 1*16) by sequence specific primers in RA patients. Comparison of HLA DR beta 1 allele frequencies between patients and control groups was made using Pearson's chi-square test to find possible association of HLA DR?1 alleles with RA in Pakistani rheumatoid patients. Results: HLA DR beta 1*04 was expressed with significantly increased frequency in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (p <0.05). HLA DR?1*11 was expressed statistically significantly more in control group as compared to rheumatoid patients indicating a possible protective effect. There was no statistically significant difference observed in frequencies of HLA DR beta 1 allele *01, DR beta 1 allele *03, DR beta 1 allele *07, DR beta 1 allele *08, DR beta 1 allele *09, DR beta 1 allele *10, DR beta 1 allele *12, DR beta 1 allele *13, DR beta 1 allele *14, DR?1 allele *15 and DR beta 1 allele *16 between patients and control groups. Conclusion: The identification of susceptible HLA DR beta 1 alleles in Pakistani RA patients may help physicians to make early decisions regarding initiation of early intensive therapy with disease modifying anti rheumatic medicines and biological agents decreasing disability in RA patients. (author)

  18. Haplotypic Background of a Private Allele at High Frequency in the Americas

    OpenAIRE

    Schroeder, Kari B.; Jakobsson, Mattias; Crawford, Michael H.; Schurr, Theodore G.; Boca, Simina M.; Conrad, Donald F.; Tito, Raul Y.; Osipova, Ludmilla P.; Tarskaia, Larissa A.; Zhadanov, Sergey I.; Wall, Jeffrey D.; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Malhi, Ripan S.; Smith, David G.; Rosenberg, Noah A.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, the observation of a high-frequency private allele, the 9-repeat allele at microsatellite D9S1120, in all sampled Native American and Western Beringian populations has been interpreted as evidence that all modern Native Americans descend primarily from a single founding population. However, this inference assumed that all copies of the 9-repeat allele were identical by descent and that the geographic distribution of this allele had not been influenced by natural selection. To invest...

  19. A high-throughput method for genotyping S-RNase alleles in apple

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bjarne; Ørgaard, Marian; Toldam-Andersen, Torben Bo

    2016-01-01

    We present a new efficient screening tool for detection of S-alleles in apple. The protocol using general and multiplexed primers for PCR reaction and fragment detection on an automatized capillary DNA sequencer exposed a higher number of alleles than any previous studies. Analysis of alleles...

  20. A single molecule assay to probe monovalent and multivalent bonds between hyaluronan and its key leukocyte receptor CD44 under force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bano, Fouzia; Banerji, Suneale; Howarth, Mark; Jackson, David G.; Richter, Ralf P.

    2016-09-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), a category of linear, anionic polysaccharides, are ubiquitous in the extracellular space, and important extrinsic regulators of cell function. Despite the recognized significance of mechanical stimuli in cellular communication, however, only few single molecule methods are currently available to study how monovalent and multivalent GAG·protein bonds respond to directed mechanical forces. Here, we have devised such a method, by combining purpose-designed surfaces that afford immobilization of GAGs and receptors at controlled nanoscale organizations with single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). We apply the method to study the interaction of the GAG polymer hyaluronan (HA) with CD44, its receptor in vascular endothelium. Individual bonds between HA and CD44 are remarkably resistant to rupture under force in comparison to their low binding affinity. Multiple bonds along a single HA chain rupture sequentially and independently under load. We also demonstrate how strong non-covalent bonds, which are versatile for controlled protein and GAG immobilization, can be effectively used as molecular anchors in SMFS. We thus establish a versatile method for analyzing the nanomechanics of GAG·protein interactions at the level of single GAG chains, which provides new molecular-level insight into the role of mechanical forces in the assembly and function of GAG-rich extracellular matrices.

  1. Dengue Virus Infection Is through a Cooperative Interaction between a Mannose Receptor and CLEC5A on Macrophage as a Multivalent Hetero-Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Jia-Huei; Hsiao, Michael; Hsu, Tsui-Ling; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever is a mosquito-borne viral pandemic disease that is widespread in the tropical and subtropical areas. Dengue virus uses human mannose-binding receptor (MR) and DC-SIGN on macrophages as primary receptors, and CLEC5A as signaling receptor to sense the dengue virus invasion and then to signal and stimulate macrophages to secrete cytokines. But the interplay between MR/DC-SIGN and CLEC5A is unknown. Here we demonstrate a plausible mechanism for the interaction, i.e. MR/DC-SIGN first attracts the virus with high avidity, and the virus concurrently interacts with CLEC5A in close proximity to form a multivalent hetero-complex and facilitate CLEC5A-mediated signal transduction. Our study suggests that the cooperation between a high-avidity lectin-virus interaction and a nearby low-avidity signaling receptor provides a necessary connection between binding and signaling. Understanding this mechanism may lead to the development of a new antiviral strategy. PMID:27832191

  2. Single Particle Tracking Confirms That Multivalent Tat Protein Transduction Domain-induced Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycan Cross-linkage Activates Rac1 for Internalization*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Junji; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Gonda, Kohsuke; Roy, Chandra Nath; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Ohuchi, Noriaki; Higuchi, Hideo

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism by which HIV-1-Tat protein transduction domain (TatP) enters the cell remains unclear because of an insufficient understanding of the initial kinetics of peptide entry. Here, we report the successful visualization and tracking of TatP molecular kinetics on the cell surface with 7-nm spatial precision using quantum dots. Strong cell binding was only observed with a TatP valence of ≥8, whereas monovalent TatP binding was negligible. The requirement of the cell-surface heparan sulfate (HS) chains of HS proteoglycans (HSPGs) for TatP binding and intracellular transport was demonstrated by the enzymatic removal of HS and simultaneous observation of two individual particles. Multivalent TatP induces HSPG cross-linking, recruiting activated Rac1 to adjacent lipid rafts and thereby enhancing the recruitment of TatP/HSPG to actin-associated microdomains and its internalization by macropinocytosis. These findings clarify the initial binding mechanism of TatP to the cell surface and demonstrate the importance of TatP valence for strong surface binding and signal transduction. Our data also shed light on the ability of TatP to exploit the machinery of living cells, using HSPG signaling to activate Rac1 and alter TatP mobility and internalization. This work should guide the future design of TatP-based peptides as therapeutic nanocarriers with efficient transduction. PMID:21199870

  3. Single particle tracking confirms that multivalent Tat protein transduction domain-induced heparan sulfate proteoglycan cross-linkage activates Rac1 for internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Junji; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Gonda, Kohsuke; Roy, Chandra Nath; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Ohuchi, Noriaki; Higuchi, Hideo

    2011-03-25

    The mechanism by which HIV-1-Tat protein transduction domain (TatP) enters the cell remains unclear because of an insufficient understanding of the initial kinetics of peptide entry. Here, we report the successful visualization and tracking of TatP molecular kinetics on the cell surface with 7-nm spatial precision using quantum dots. Strong cell binding was only observed with a TatP valence of ≥8, whereas monovalent TatP binding was negligible. The requirement of the cell-surface heparan sulfate (HS) chains of HS proteoglycans (HSPGs) for TatP binding and intracellular transport was demonstrated by the enzymatic removal of HS and simultaneous observation of two individual particles. Multivalent TatP induces HSPG cross-linking, recruiting activated Rac1 to adjacent lipid rafts and thereby enhancing the recruitment of TatP/HSPG to actin-associated microdomains and its internalization by macropinocytosis. These findings clarify the initial binding mechanism of TatP to the cell surface and demonstrate the importance of TatP valence for strong surface binding and signal transduction. Our data also shed light on the ability of TatP to exploit the machinery of living cells, using HSPG signaling to activate Rac1 and alter TatP mobility and internalization. This work should guide the future design of TatP-based peptides as therapeutic nanocarriers with efficient transduction.

  4. Single quantum dot tracking reveals that an individual multivalent HIV-1 Tat protein transduction domain can activate machinery for lateral transport and endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Roy, Chandra Nath; Promjunyakul, Warunya; Hatakeyama, Hiroyasu; Gonda, Kohsuke; Imamura, Junji; Vasudevanpillai, Biju; Ohuchi, Noriaki; Kanzaki, Makoto; Higuchi, Hideo; Kaku, Mitsuo

    2013-08-01

    The mechanisms underlying the cellular entry of the HIV-1 Tat protein transduction domain (TatP) and the molecular information necessary to improve the transduction efficiency of TatP remain unclear due to the technical limitations for direct visualization of TatP's behavior in cells. Using confocal microscopy, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, and four-dimensional microscopy, we developed a single-molecule tracking assay for TatP labeled with quantum dots (QDs) to examine the kinetics of TatP initially and immediately before, at the beginning of, and immediately after entry into living cells. We report that even when the number of multivalent TatP (mTatP)-QDs bound to a cell was low, each single mTatP-QD first locally induced the cell's lateral transport machinery to move the mTatP-QD toward the center of the cell body upon cross-linking of heparan sulfate proteoglycans. The centripetal and lateral movements were linked to the integrity and flow of actomyosin and microtubules. Individual mTatP underwent lipid raft-mediated temporal confinement, followed by complete immobilization, which ultimately led to endocytotic internalization. However, bivalent TatP did not sufficiently promote either cell surface movement or internalization. Together, these findings provide clues regarding the mechanisms of TatP cell entry and indicate that increasing the valence of TatP on nanoparticles allows them to behave as cargo delivery nanomachines.

  5. Expression and loss of alleles in cultured mouse embryonic fibroblasts and stem cells carrying allelic fluorescent protein genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stringer Saundra L

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Loss of heterozygosity (LOH contributes to many cancers, but the rate at which these events occur in normal cells of the body is not clear. LOH would be detectable in diverse cell types in the body if this event were to confer an obvious cellular phenotype. Mice that carry two different fluorescent protein genes as alleles of a locus would seem to be a useful tool for addressing this issue because LOH would change a cell's phenotype from dichromatic to monochromatic. In addition, LOH caused by mitotic crossing over might be discernable in tissues because this event produces a pair of neighboring monochromatic cells that are different colors. Results As a step in assessing the utility of this approach, we derived primary embryonic fibroblast populations and embryonic stem cell lines from mice that carried two different fluorescent protein genes as alleles at the chromosome 6 locus, ROSA26. Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS showed that the vast majority of cells in each line expressed the two marker proteins at similar levels, and that populations exhibited expression noise similar to that seen in bacteria and yeast. Cells with a monochromatic phenotype were present at frequencies on the order of 10-4 and appeared to be produced at a rate of approximately 10-5 variant cells per mitosis. 45 of 45 stably monochromatic ES cell clones exhibited loss of the expected allele at the ROSA26 locus. More than half of these clones retained heterozygosity at a locus between ROSA26 and the centromere. Other clones exhibited LOH near the centromere, but were disomic for chromosome 6. Conclusion Allelic fluorescent markers allowed LOH at the ROSA26 locus to be detected by FACS. LOH at this locus was usually not accompanied by LOH near the centromere, suggesting that mitotic recombination was the major cause of ROSA26 LOH. Dichromatic mouse embryonic cells provide a novel system for studying genetic/karyotypic stability and factors

  6. The Rh allele frequencies in Gaza city in Palestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skaik Younis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Rh blood group system is the second most clinically significant blood group system. It includes 49 antigens, but only five (D, C, E, c and e are the most routinely identified due to their unique relation to hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN and transfusion reactions. Frequency of the Rh alleles showed variation, with regard to race and ethnic. Objectives: The purpose of the study was to document the Rh alleles′ frequencies amongst males (M and females (F in Gaza city in Palestine. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and thirty-two blood samples (110 M and 122 F were tested against monoclonal IgM anti-C,anti-c, anti-E, anti-e and a blend of monoclonal/polyclonal IgM/IgG anti-D. The expected Rh phenotypes were calculated using gene counting method. Results: The most frequent Rh antigen in the total sample was e, while the least frequent was E.The order of the combined Rh allele frequencies in both M and F was CDe > cDe > cde > CdE > cDE > Cde > CDE. A significant difference was reported between M and F regarding the phenotypic frequencies (P < 0.05. However, no significance (P > 0.05 was reported with reference to the observed and expected Rh phenotypic frequencies in either M or F students. Conclusion: It was concluded that the Rh antigens, alleles and phenotypes in Gaza city have unique frequencies, which may be of importance to the Blood Transfusion Center in Gaza city and anthropology.

  7. Autoimmune disease classification by inverse association with SNP alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Sirota

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available With multiple genome-wide association studies (GWAS performed across autoimmune diseases, there is a great opportunity to study the homogeneity of genetic architectures across autoimmune disease. Previous approaches have been limited in the scope of their analysis and have failed to properly incorporate the direction of allele-specific disease associations for SNPs. In this work, we refine the notion of a genetic variation profile for a given disease to capture strength of association with multiple SNPs in an allele-specific fashion. We apply this method to compare genetic variation profiles of six autoimmune diseases: multiple sclerosis (MS, ankylosing spondylitis (AS, autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD, rheumatoid arthritis (RA, Crohn's disease (CD, and type 1 diabetes (T1D, as well as five non-autoimmune diseases. We quantify pair-wise relationships between these diseases and find two broad clusters of autoimmune disease where SNPs that make an individual susceptible to one class of autoimmune disease also protect from diseases in the other autoimmune class. We find that RA and AS form one such class, and MS and ATD another. We identify specific SNPs and genes with opposite risk profiles for these two classes. We furthermore explore individual SNPs that play an important role in defining similarities and differences between disease pairs. We present a novel, systematic, cross-platform approach to identify allele-specific relationships between disease pairs based on genetic variation as well as the individual SNPs which drive the relationships. While recognizing similarities between diseases might lead to identifying novel treatment options, detecting differences between diseases previously thought to be similar may point to key novel disease-specific genes and pathways.

  8. Clinical manifestations of intermediate allele carriers in Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubo, Esther; Ramos-Arroyo, María A; Martinez-Horta, Saul; Martínez-Descalls, Asunción; Calvo, Sara; Gil-Polo, Cecilia

    2016-08-09

    There is controversy about the clinical consequences of intermediate alleles (IAs) in Huntington disease (HD). The main objective of this study was to establish the clinical manifestations of IA carriers for a prospective, international, European HD registry. We assessed a cohort of participants at risk with Huntington's Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS) motor, cognitive, and behavior domains, Total Functional Capacity (TFC), and quality of life (Short Form-36 [SF-36]). This cohort was subdivided into IA carriers (27-35 CAG) and controls (genetic status, IAs might confer a late-onset abnormal motor and cognitive phenotype. These results might have important implications for genetic counseling. NCT01590589. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  9. AB0 blood subgroup allele frequencies in the Turkish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbas, Fahri; Aydin, Müge; Cenani, Asim

    2003-09-01

    We determined the AB0 blood group system with a PCR based technique termed APLP (Amplified Product Length Polymorphism) in the Turkish population. The method includes ten different allele specific primers and permits identification of the major AB0 genotypes and its suballeles (A1-A2-B-0A-02-0G-AG). The suballeles were amplified in a single tube reaction. We have determined AB0 phenotypes in 129 Turkish individuals. No significant deviation from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was observed.

  10. Identification and characterization of two CD4 alleles in Microminipigs

    OpenAIRE

    Matsubara, Tatsuya; Nishii, Naohito; Takashima, Satoshi; Takasu, Masaki; Imaeda, Noriaki; Aiki-Oshimo, Kayo; Yamazoe, Kazuaki; Kakisaka, Michinori; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Aida, Yoko; Kametani, Yoshie; Kulski, Jerzy K.; Ando, Asako; Kitagawa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Background We previously identified two phenotypes of CD4+ cells with and without reactions to anti-pig CD4 monoclonal antibodies by flow cytometry in a herd of Microminipigs. In this study, we analyzed the coding sequences of CD4 and certified the expression of CD4 molecules in order to identify the genetic sequence variants responsible for the positive and negative PBMCs reactivity to anti-pig CD4 monoclonal antibodies. Results We identified two CD4 alleles, CD4.A and CD4.B, corresponding t...

  11. An extensive polymerase chain reaction-allele-specific polymorphism strategy for clinical ABO blood group genotyping that avoids potential errors caused by null, subgroup, and hybrid alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini-Maaf, Bahram; Hellberg, Asa; Chester, M Alan; Olsson, Martin L

    2007-11-01

    ABO genotyping is complicated by the remarkable diversity at the ABO locus. Recombination or gene conversion between common alleles may lead to hybrids resulting in unexpected ABO phenotypes. Furthermore, numerous mutations associated with weak subgroups and nondeletional null alleles should be considered. All known ABO genotyping methods, however, risk incorrect phenotype predictions if any such alleles are present. An extensive set of allele-specific primers was designed to accomplish hybrid-proof multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of DNA fragments for detection of ABO alleles. Results were compared with serologic findings and ABO genotypes defined by previously published PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism/PCR-allele-specific polymorphism (ASP) methods or DNA sequencing. Phenotypically well-characterized samples from blood donors with common blood groups and rare-subgroup families were analyzed. In addition to the commonly encountered alleles (A1, A1(467C>T), A2, B, O1, O1v, and O2), the new method can detect hybrid alleles thanks to long-range amplification across intron 6. Four of 12 PCR-ASP procedures are used to screen for multiple infrequent subgroup and null alleles. This concept allows for a low-resolution typing format in which the presence of, for example, a weak subgroup or cis-AB/B(A) is indicated but not further defined. In an optional high-resolution step, more detailed genotype information is obtained. A new genotyping approach has been developed and evaluated that can correctly identify ABO alleles including nondeletional null alleles, subgroups, and hybrids resulting from recombinational crossing-over events between exons 6 and 7. This approach is clinically applicable and decreases the risk for erroneous ABO phenotype prediction compared to previously published methods.

  12. Allelic Diversity of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II DRB Gene in Indian Cattle and Buffalo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachinandan De

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to study the diversity of MHC-DRB3 alleles in Indian cattle and buffalo breeds. Previously reported BoLA-DRB exon 2 alleles of Indian Zebu cattle, Bos taurus cattle, buffalo, sheep, and goats were analyzed for the identities and divergence among various allele sequences. Comparison of predicted amino acid residues of DRB3 exon 2 alleles with similar alleles from other ruminants revealed considerable congruence in amino acid substitution pattern. These alleles showed a high degree of nucleotide and amino acid polymorphism at positions forming peptide-binding regions. A higher rate of nonsynonymous substitution was detected at the peptide-binding regions, indicating that BoLA-DRB3 allelic sequence evolution was driven by positive selection.

  13. Low frequency of the scrapile resistance-associated allele and presence of lysine-171 allele of the prion protein gene in Italian Biellese ovine breed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acutis, P.L.; Sbaiz, L.; Verburg, F.J.; Riina, M.V.; Ru, G.; Moda, G.; Caramelli, M.; Bossers, A.

    2004-01-01

    Frequencies of polymorphisms at codons 136, 154 and 171 of the prion protein (PrP) gene were studied in 1207 pure-bred and cross-bred Italian Biellese rams, a small ovine breed of about 65 000 head in Italy. Aside from the five most common alleles (VRQ, ARQ, ARR, AHQ and ARH), the rare ARK allele

  14. Diversity of MHC class I alleles in Spheniscus humboldti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikkawa, Eri; Tanaka, Masafumi; Naruse, Taeko K; Tsuda, Tomi T; Tsuda, Michio; Murata, Koichi; Kimura, Akinori

    2017-02-01

    The major histocompatibility complex locus (MHC) is a gene region related to immune response and exhibits a remarkably great diversity. We deduced that polymorphisms in MHC genes would help to solve several issues on penguins, including classification, phylogenetic relationship, and conservation. This study aimed to elucidate the structure and diversity of the so far unknown MHC class I gene in a penguin species. The structure of an MHC class I gene from the Humboldt penguin (Spheniscus humboldti) was determined by using an inverse PCR method. We designed PCR primers to directly determine nucleotide sequences of PCR products from the MHC class I gene and to obtain recombinant clones for investigating the diversity of the MHC class I gene in Humboldt penguins. A total of 24 MHC class I allele sequences were obtained from 40 individuals. Polymorphisms were mainly found in exons 2 and 3, as expected from the nature of MHC class I genes in vertebrate species including birds and mammals. Phylogenetic analyses of MHC class I alleles have revealed that the Humboldt penguin is closely related to the Red Knot (Calidris canutus) belonging to Charadriiformes.

  15. Inbreeding and PKU allele frequency: Estimating by microsatellite approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Luciana L; da Fonseca, Cleusa G; Vaintraub, Marco T; Vaintraub, Patricia; Januário, José N; de Aguiar, Marcos J B; Raquel Santos Carvalho, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Estimates of allele frequencies for recessive diseases are generally based on the frequency of affected individuals (q(2)). However, these estimates can be strongly biased due to inbreeding in the population. The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of how inbreeding in the Minas Gerais State population affects phenylketonuria (PKU) incidence in the state and to determine the inbreeding coefficient based on microsatellites. Inbreeding coefficients of samples of 104 controls and 76 patients with PKU were estimated through a microsatellite approach. Besides, the amount and distribution of genetic variation within and among patients with PKU and control samples were characterized. No genetic differentiation was observed between the samples. However, the Fis value found for samples of patients with PKU (0.042) was almost 15 times higher than that found among controls (0.003). When corrected by the inbreeding coefficient found among the controls, the PKU allele frequency decreased to 0.0057. The results enables us to infer that at least 35% of the PKU recessive homozygotes from the Minas Gerais population could be due to consanguineous marriages and suggest that microsatellites can be an useful approach to estimate inbreeding coefficients. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. An allele of the crm gene blocks cyanobacterial circadian rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Joseph S; Bordowitz, Juliana R; Bree, Anna C; Golden, Susan S

    2013-08-20

    The SasA-RpaA two-component system constitutes a key output pathway of the cyanobacterial Kai circadian oscillator. To date, rhythm of phycobilisome associated (rpaA) is the only gene other than kaiA, kaiB, and kaiC, which encode the oscillator itself, whose mutation causes completely arrhythmic gene expression. Here we report a unique transposon insertion allele in a small ORF located immediately upstream of rpaA in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 termed crm (for circadian rhythmicity modulator), which results in arrhythmic promoter activity but does not affect steady-state levels of RpaA. The crm ORF complements the defect when expressed in trans, but only if it can be translated, suggesting that crm encodes a small protein. The crm1 insertion allele phenotypes are distinct from those of an rpaA null; crm1 mutants are able to grow in a light:dark cycle and have no detectable oscillations of KaiC phosphorylation, whereas low-amplitude KaiC phosphorylation rhythms persist in the absence of RpaA. Levels of phosphorylated RpaA in vivo measured over time are significantly altered compared with WT in the crm1 mutant as well as in the absence of KaiC. Taken together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that the Crm polypeptide modulates a circadian-specific activity of RpaA.

  17. A genetic model of melanoma tumorigenesis based on allelic losses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayward, N.K.; Palmer, J.M.; Walters, M.K. [Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Herston (Australia)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Previous karyotypic studies have indicated a possible series of non-random chromosomal events involved in the progression of melanoma. We sought to define a model of melanocyte tumorigenesis by studying allelic deletions of polymorphic simple tandem repeat markers mapping to chromosome 1, 6q, 7, 9p, 10, 11, 17, and 21 in thirty matched pairs of melanoma and constitutional DNAs. The most frequent and earliest deletions were found on 9p (57%) and 10q (32%) and with the exception of one case, no sample has loss of markers on another chromosome without concomitant loss of markers on 9p and/or 10q. Losses on 6q were also a frequent (32%) event that sometimes occurred in primary melanomas, whereas losses of loci on distal 1p (26%) or 11q (26%) occurred only in metastic melanomas. A background rate (0-17%) of allele loss was seen on chromosomes 7, 17, and 21. Homozygous deletions in a panel of 31 melanoma cell lines were only detected for markers on 9p (4 cases). These data strongly support the previous model of melanoma tumorigenesis based primarily on karyotypic findings in melanocytic lesions. However, we have been able to further augment the model by delimiting the regions of loss on 10q to a region distal to D10S254, and on 1p, to between D1S243 and D1S160.

  18. Characterization of ROP18 alleles in human toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Víctor; de-la-Torre, Alejandra; Gómez-Marín, Jorge Enrique

    2014-04-01

    The role of the virulent gene ROP18 polymorphisms is not known in human toxoplasmosis. A total of 320 clinical samples were analyzed. In samples positive for ROP18 gene, we determined by an allele specific PCR, if patients got the upstream insertion positive ROP18 sequence Toxoplasma strain (mouse avirulent strain) or the upstream insertion negative ROP18 sequence Toxoplasma strain (mouse virulent strain). We designed an ELISA assay for antibodies against ROP18 derived peptides from the three major clonal lineages of Toxoplasma. 20 clinical samples were of quality for ROP18 allele analysis. In patients with ocular toxoplasmosis, a higher inflammatory reaction on eye was associated to a PCR negative result for the upstream region of ROP18. 23.3%, 33% and 16.6% of serums from individuals with ocular toxoplasmosis were positive for type I, type II and type III ROP18 derived peptides, respectively but this assay was affected by cross reaction. The absence of Toxoplasma ROP18 promoter insertion sequence in ocular toxoplasmosis was correlated with severe ocular inflammatory response. Determination of antibodies against ROP18 protein was not useful for serotyping in human toxoplasmosis. © 2013.

  19. Searching for alleles associated with complicated outcomes after burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Robert C; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Purdue, Gary F

    2007-01-01

    Sepsis is a serious and growing health problem among patients admitted to intensive care units. When accompanied by organ failure, sepsis carries a 30-50% case-fatality rate. Although our understanding of burn pathophysiology has grown in recent years, we are still unable to identify accurately patients who are at increased risk for infectious complications and death. Genetic predisposition is likely to explain a portion of this variation. Understanding which genes and allelic variants contribute to disease risk would increase our ability to predict who is at increased risk and intervene accordingly, as well as identify molecular targets for novel and individualized therapies. Several obstacles exist to identification of which specific alleles and loci contribute to patient risk, including achievement of sufficient statistical power, population admixture and epistatic interaction among multiple genes and environmental factors. Although increasing sample size will resolve most, if not all, of these issues, slow patient accrual often makes this solution impractical for a single institution within a reasonable timeframe. This situation is complicated by the fact that traditional analysis methods perform poorly in the face of data sparseness. Identification of risk factors for severe sepsis and death after burn injury will likely require collaborative patient enrollment as well as development of advanced analytical methodologies. While overcoming these obstacles may prove difficult, the effort is warranted, as the ultimate benefit to patients is considerable.

  20. Null allele, allelic dropouts or rare sex detection in clonal organisms: simulations and application to real data sets of pathogenic microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séré, Modou; Kaboré, Jacques; Jamonneau, Vincent; Belem, Adrien Marie Gaston; Ayala, Francisco J; De Meeûs, Thierry

    2014-07-15

    Pathogens and their vectors are organisms whose ecology is often only accessible through population genetics tools based on spatio-temporal variability of molecular markers. However, molecular tools may present technical difficulties due to the masking of some alleles (allelic dropouts and/or null alleles), which tends to bias the estimation of heterozygosity and thus the inferences concerning the breeding system of the organism under study. This is especially critical in clonal organisms in which deviation from panmixia, as measured by Wright's FIS, can, in principle, be used to infer both the extent of clonality and structure in a given population. In particular, null alleles and allelic dropouts are locus specific and likely produce high variance of Wright's FIS across loci, as rare sex is expected to do. In this paper we propose a tool enabling to discriminate between consequences of these technical problems and those of rare sex. We have performed various simulations of clonal and partially clonal populations. We introduce allelic dropouts and null alleles in clonal data sets and compare the results with those that exhibit increasing rates of sexual recombination. We use the narrow relationship that links Wright's FIS to genetic diversity in purely clonal populations as assessment criterion, since this relationship disappears faster with sexual recombination than with amplification problems of certain alleles. We show that the relevance of our criterion for detecting poorly amplified alleles depends partly on the population structure, the level of homoplasy and/or mutation rate. However, the interpretation of data becomes difficult when the number of poorly amplified alleles is above 50%. The application of this method to reinterpret published data sets of pathogenic clonal microbes (yeast and trypanosomes) confirms its usefulness and allows refining previous estimates concerning important pathogenic agents. Our criterion of superimposing between the FIS

  1. Multivalent Soluble Antigen Arrays Exhibit High Avidity Binding and Modulation of B Cell Receptor-Mediated Signaling to Drive Efficacy against Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwell, Brittany L; Pickens, Chad J; Leon, Martin; Berkland, Cory

    2017-06-12

    A pressing need exists for antigen-specific immunotherapies (ASIT) that induce selective tolerance in autoimmune disease while avoiding deleterious global immunosuppression. Multivalent soluble antigen arrays (SAgA PLP:LABL ), consisting of a hyaluronic acid (HA) linear polymer backbone cografted with multiple copies of autoantigen (PLP) and cell adhesion inhibitor (LABL) peptides, are designed to induce tolerance to a specific multiple sclerosis (MS) autoantigen. Previous studies established that hydrolyzable SAgA PLP:LABL , employing a degradable linker to codeliver PLP and LABL, was therapeutic in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in vivo and exhibited antigen-specific binding with B cells, targeted the B cell receptor (BCR), and dampened BCR-mediated signaling in vitro. Our results pointed to sustained BCR engagement as the SAgA PLP:LABL therapeutic mechanism, so we developed a new version of the SAgA molecule using nonhydrolyzable conjugation chemistry, hypothesizing it would enhance and maintain the molecule's action at the cell surface to improve efficacy. "Click SAgA" (cSAgA PLP:LABL ) uses hydrolytically stable covalent conjugation chemistry (Copper-catalyzed Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition (CuAAC)) rather than a hydrolyzable oxime bond to attach PLP and LABL to HA. We explored cSAgA PLP:LABL B cell engagement and modulation of BCR-mediated signaling in vitro through flow cytometry binding and calcium flux signaling assays. Indeed, cSAgA PLP:LABL exhibited higher avidity B cell binding and greater dampening of BCR-mediated signaling than hydrolyzable SAgA PLP:LABL . Furthermore, cSAgA PLP:LABL exhibited significantly enhanced in vivo efficacy compared to hydrolyzable SAgA PLP:LABL , achieving equivalent efficacy at one-quarter of the dose. These results indicate that nonhydrolyzable conjugation increased the avidity of cSAgA PLP:LABL to drive in vivo efficacy through modulated BCR-mediated signaling.

  2. A new analysis tool for individual-level allele frequency for genomic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hsin-Chou; Lin, Hsin-Chi; Huang, Mei-Chu; Li, Ling-Hui; Pan, Wen-Harn; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Chen, Yuan-Tsong

    2010-07-05

    Allele frequency is one of the most important population indices and has been broadly applied to genetic/genomic studies. Estimation of allele frequency using genotypes is convenient but may lose data information and be sensitive to genotyping errors. This study utilizes a unified intensity-measuring approach to estimating individual-level allele frequencies for 1,104 and 1,270 samples genotyped with the single-nucleotide-polymorphism arrays of the Affymetrix Human Mapping 100K and 500K Sets, respectively. Allele frequencies of all samples are estimated and adjusted by coefficients of preferential amplification/hybridization (CPA), and large ethnicity-specific and cross-ethnicity databases of CPA and allele frequency are established. The results show that using the CPA significantly improves the accuracy of allele frequency estimates; moreover, this paramount factor is insensitive to the time of data acquisition, effect of laboratory site, type of gene chip, and phenotypic status. Based on accurate allele frequency estimates, analytic methods based on individual-level allele frequencies are developed and successfully applied to discover genomic patterns of allele frequencies, detect chromosomal abnormalities, classify sample groups, identify outlier samples, and estimate the purity of tumor samples. The methods are packaged into a new analysis tool, ALOHA (Allele-frequency/Loss-of-heterozygosity/Allele-imbalance). This is the first time that these important genetic/genomic applications have been simultaneously conducted by the analyses of individual-level allele frequencies estimated by a unified intensity-measuring approach. We expect that additional practical applications for allele frequency analysis will be found. The developed databases and tools provide useful resources for human genome analysis via high-throughput single-nucleotide-polymorphism arrays. The ALOHA software was written in R and R GUI and can be downloaded at http://www.stat.sinica.edu.tw/hsinchou/genetics/aloha/ALOHA.htm.

  3. A new analysis tool for individual-level allele frequency for genomic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Wen-Harn

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allele frequency is one of the most important population indices and has been broadly applied to genetic/genomic studies. Estimation of allele frequency using genotypes is convenient but may lose data information and be sensitive to genotyping errors. Results This study utilizes a unified intensity-measuring approach to estimating individual-level allele frequencies for 1,104 and 1,270 samples genotyped with the single-nucleotide-polymorphism arrays of the Affymetrix Human Mapping 100K and 500K Sets, respectively. Allele frequencies of all samples are estimated and adjusted by coefficients of preferential amplification/hybridization (CPA, and large ethnicity-specific and cross-ethnicity databases of CPA and allele frequency are established. The results show that using the CPA significantly improves the accuracy of allele frequency estimates; moreover, this paramount factor is insensitive to the time of data acquisition, effect of laboratory site, type of gene chip, and phenotypic status. Based on accurate allele frequency estimates, analytic methods based on individual-level allele frequencies are developed and successfully applied to discover genomic patterns of allele frequencies, detect chromosomal abnormalities, classify sample groups, identify outlier samples, and estimate the purity of tumor samples. The methods are packaged into a new analysis tool, ALOHA (Allele-frequency/Loss-of-heterozygosity/Allele-imbalance. Conclusions This is the first time that these important genetic/genomic applications have been simultaneously conducted by the analyses of individual-level allele frequencies estimated by a unified intensity-measuring approach. We expect that additional practical applications for allele frequency analysis will be found. The developed databases and tools provide useful resources for human genome analysis via high-throughput single-nucleotide-polymorphism arrays. The ALOHA software was written in R and R GUI and

  4. ALADYN - a spatially explicit, allelic model for simulating adaptive dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffers, Katja H; Travis, Justin Mj

    2014-12-01

    ALADYN is a freely available cross-platform C++ modeling framework for stochastic simulation of joint allelic and demographic dynamics of spatially-structured populations. Juvenile survival is linked to the degree of match between an individual's phenotype and the local phenotypic optimum. There is considerable flexibility provided for the demography of the considered species and the genetic architecture of the traits under selection. ALADYN facilitates the investigation of adaptive processes to spatially and/or temporally changing conditions and the resulting niche and range dynamics. To our knowledge ALADYN is so far the only model that allows a continuous resolution of individuals' locations in a spatially explicit landscape together with the associated patterns of selection.

  5. Clinical manifestations of intermediate allele carriers in Huntington disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cubo, Esther; Ramos-Arroyo, María A; Martinez-Horta, Saul

    2016-01-01

    into IA carriers (27-35 CAG) and controls (IA carriers and controls were compared for sociodemographic, environmental, and outcome measures. We used regression analysis to estimate the association of age and CAG repeats on the UHDRS scores. RESULTS: Of 12......OBJECTIVE: There is controversy about the clinical consequences of intermediate alleles (IAs) in Huntington disease (HD). The main objective of this study was to establish the clinical manifestations of IA carriers for a prospective, international, European HD registry. METHODS: We assessed......,190 participants, 657 (5.38%) with IA carriers (11.56%) and 581 controls (88.44%). After correcting for multiple comparisons, at baseline, we found no significant differences between IA carriers and controls for total UHDRS motor, SF-36, behavioral, cognitive, or TFC scores...

  6. Oral Immunization with a Multivalent Epitope-Based Vaccine, Based on NAP, Urease, HSP60, and HpaA, Provides Therapeutic Effect on H. pylori Infection in Mongolian gerbils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Guo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Epitope-based vaccine is a promising strategy for therapeutic vaccination against Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection. A multivalent subunit vaccine containing various antigens from H. pylori is superior to a univalent subunit vaccine. However, whether a multivalent epitope-based vaccine is superior to a univalent epitope-based vaccine in therapeutic vaccination against H. pylori, remains unclear. In this study, a multivalent epitope-based vaccine named CWAE against H. pylori urease, neutrophil-activating protein (NAP, heat shock protein 60 (HSP60 and H. pylori adhesin A (HpaA was constructed based on mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin B subunit (CTB, Th1-type adjuvant NAP, multiple copies of selected B and Th cell epitopes (UreA27–53, UreA183–203, HpaA132–141, and HSP60189–203, and also the epitope-rich regions of urease B subunit (UreB158–251 and UreB321–385 predicted by bioinformatics. Immunological properties of CWAE vaccine were characterized in BALB/c mice model. Its therapeutic effect was evaluated in H. pylori-infected Mongolian gerbil model by comparing with a univalent epitope-based vaccine CTB-UE against H. pylori urease that was constructed in our previous studies. Both CWAE and CTB-UE could induce similar levels of specific antibodies against H. pylori urease, and had similar inhibition effect of H. pylori urease activity. However, only CWAE could induce high levels of specific antibodies to NAP, HSP60, HpaA, and also the synthetic peptides epitopes (UreB158–172, UreB181–195, UreB211–225, UreB349–363, HpaA132–141, and HSP60189–203. In addition, oral therapeutic immunization with CWAE significantly reduced the number of H. pylori colonies in the stomach of Mongolian gerbils, compared with oral immunization using CTB-UE or H. pylori urease. The protection of CWAE was associated with higher levels of mixed CD4+ T cell (Th cell response, IgG, and secretory IgA (sIgA antibodies to H. pylori. These results indic

  7. Oral Immunization with a Multivalent Epitope-Based Vaccine, Based on NAP, Urease, HSP60, and HpaA, Provides Therapeutic Effect onH. pyloriInfection in Mongolian gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Le; Yang, Hua; Tang, Feng; Yin, Runting; Liu, Hongpeng; Gong, Xiaojuan; Wei, Jun; Zhang, Ying; Xu, Guangxian; Liu, Kunmei

    2017-01-01

    Epitope-based vaccine is a promising strategy for therapeutic vaccination against Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) infection. A multivalent subunit vaccine containing various antigens from H. pylori is superior to a univalent subunit vaccine. However, whether a multivalent epitope-based vaccine is superior to a univalent epitope-based vaccine in therapeutic vaccination against H. pylori , remains unclear. In this study, a multivalent epitope-based vaccine named CWAE against H. pylori urease, neutrophil-activating protein (NAP), heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) and H. pylori adhesin A (HpaA) was constructed based on mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), Th1-type adjuvant NAP, multiple copies of selected B and Th cell epitopes (UreA 27-53 , UreA 183-203 , HpaA 132-141 , and HSP60 189-203 ), and also the epitope-rich regions of urease B subunit (UreB 158-251 and UreB 321-385 ) predicted by bioinformatics. Immunological properties of CWAE vaccine were characterized in BALB/c mice model. Its therapeutic effect was evaluated in H. pylori -infected Mongolian gerbil model by comparing with a univalent epitope-based vaccine CTB-UE against H. pylori urease that was constructed in our previous studies. Both CWAE and CTB-UE could induce similar levels of specific antibodies against H. pylori urease, and had similar inhibition effect of H. pylori urease activity. However, only CWAE could induce high levels of specific antibodies to NAP, HSP60, HpaA, and also the synthetic peptides epitopes (UreB 158-172 , UreB 181-195 , UreB 211-225 , UreB 349-363 , HpaA 132-141 , and HSP60 189-203 ). In addition, oral therapeutic immunization with CWAE significantly reduced the number of H. pylori colonies in the stomach of Mongolian gerbils, compared with oral immunization using CTB-UE or H. pylori urease. The protection of CWAE was associated with higher levels of mixed CD4 + T cell (Th cell) response, IgG, and secretory IgA (sIgA) antibodies to H. pylori . These results indic ate

  8. Introgressive hybridization: brown bears as vectors for polar bear alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailer, Frank

    2015-03-01

    The dynamics and consequences of introgression can inform about numerous evolutionary processes. Biologists have therefore long been interested in hybridization. One challenge, however, lies in the identification of nonadmixed genotypes that can serve as a baseline for accurate quantification of admixture. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Cahill et al. (2015) analyse a genomic data set of 28 polar bears, eight brown bears and one American black bear. Polar bear alleles are found to be introgressed into brown bears not only near a previously identified admixture zone on the Alaskan Admiralty, Baranof and Chichagof (ABC) Islands, but also far into the North American mainland. Elegantly contrasting admixture levels at autosomal and X chromosomal markers, Cahill and colleagues infer that male-biased dispersal has spread these introgressed alleles away from the Late Pleistocene contact zone. Compared to a previous study on the ABC Island population in which an Alaskan brown bear served as a putatively admixture-free reference, Cahill et al. (2015) utilize a newly sequenced Swedish brown bear as admixture baseline. This approach reveals that brown bears have been impacted by introgression from polar bears to a larger extent (up to 8.8% of their genome), than previously known, including the bear that had previously served as admixture baseline. No evidence for introgression of brown bear into polar bear is found, which the authors argue could be a consequence of selection. Besides adding new exciting pieces to the puzzle of polar/brown bear evolutionary history, the study by Cahill and colleagues highlights that wildlife genomics is moving from analysing single genomes towards a landscape genomics approach. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The microcephalin ancestral allele in a Neanderthal individual.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Lari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The high frequency (around 0.70 worldwide and the relatively young age (between 14,000 and 62,000 years of a derived group of haplotypes, haplogroup D, at the microcephalin (MCPH1 locus led to the proposal that haplogroup D originated in a human lineage that separated from modern humans >1 million years ago, evolved under strong positive selection, and passed into the human gene pool by an episode of admixture circa 37,000 years ago. The geographic distribution of haplogroup D, with marked differences between Africa and Eurasia, suggested that the archaic human form admixing with anatomically modern humans might have been Neanderthal. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report the first PCR amplification and high-throughput sequencing of nuclear DNA at the microcephalin (MCPH1 locus from Neanderthal individual from Mezzena Rockshelter (Monti Lessini, Italy. We show that a well-preserved Neanderthal fossil dated at approximately 50,000 years B.P., was homozygous for the ancestral, non-D, allele. The high yield of Neanderthal mtDNA sequences of the studied specimen, the pattern of nucleotide misincorporation among sequences consistent with post-mortem DNA damage and an accurate control of the MCPH1 alleles in all personnel that manipulated the sample, make it extremely unlikely that this result might reflect modern DNA contamination. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The MCPH1 genotype of the Monti Lessini (MLS Neanderthal does not prove that there was no interbreeding between anatomically archaic and modern humans in Europe, but certainly shows that speculations on a possible Neanderthal origin of what is now the most common MCPH1 haplogroup are not supported by empirical evidence from ancient DNA.

  10. An Allele Real-Coded Quantum Evolutionary Algorithm Based on Hybrid Updating Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Xian Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For improving convergence rate and preventing prematurity in quantum evolutionary algorithm, an allele real-coded quantum evolutionary algorithm based on hybrid updating strategy is presented. The real variables are coded with probability superposition of allele. A hybrid updating strategy balancing the global search and local search is presented in which the superior allele is defined. On the basis of superior allele and inferior allele, a guided evolutionary process as well as updating allele with variable scale contraction is adopted. And Hε gate is introduced to prevent prematurity. Furthermore, the global convergence of proposed algorithm is proved by Markov chain. Finally, the proposed algorithm is compared with genetic algorithm, quantum evolutionary algorithm, and double chains quantum genetic algorithm in solving continuous optimization problem, and the experimental results verify the advantages on convergence rate and search accuracy.

  11. Enhancement of allele discrimination by introduction of nucleotide mismatches into siRNA in allele-specific gene silencing by RNAi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Ohnishi

    Full Text Available Allele-specific gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi is therapeutically useful for specifically inhibiting the expression of disease-associated alleles without suppressing the expression of corresponding wild-type alleles. To realize such allele-specific RNAi (ASP-RNAi, the design and assessment of small interfering RNA (siRNA duplexes conferring ASP-RNAi is vital; however, it is also difficult. In a previous study, we developed an assay system to assess ASP-RNAi with mutant and wild-type reporter alleles encoding the Photinus and Renilla luciferase genes. In line with experiments using the system, we realized that it is necessary and important to enhance allele discrimination between mutant and corresponding wild-type alleles. Here, we describe the improvement of ASP-RNAi against mutant alleles carrying single nucleotide variations by introducing base substitutions into siRNA sequences, where original variations are present in the central position. Artificially mismatched siRNAs or short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs against mutant alleles of the human Prion Protein (PRNP gene, which appear to be associated with susceptibility to prion diseases, were examined using this assessment system. The data indicates that introduction of a one-base mismatch into the siRNAs and shRNAs was able to enhance discrimination between the mutant and wild-type alleles. Interestingly, the introduced mismatches that conferred marked improvement in ASP-RNAi, appeared to be largely present in the guide siRNA elements, corresponding to the 'seed region' of microRNAs. Due to the essential role of the 'seed region' of microRNAs in their association with target RNAs, it is conceivable that disruption of the base-pairing interactions in the corresponding seed region, as well as the central position (involved in cleavage of target RNAs, of guide siRNA elements could influence allele discrimination. In addition, we also suggest that nucleotide mismatches at the 3'-ends of sense

  12. A new analysis tool for individual-level allele frequency for genomic studies

    OpenAIRE

    Pan Wen-Harn; Li Ling-Hui; Huang Mei-Chu; Lin Hsin-Chi; Yang Hsin-Chou; Wu Jer-Yuarn; Chen Yuan-Tsong

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Allele frequency is one of the most important population indices and has been broadly applied to genetic/genomic studies. Estimation of allele frequency using genotypes is convenient but may lose data information and be sensitive to genotyping errors. Results This study utilizes a unified intensity-measuring approach to estimating individual-level allele frequencies for 1,104 and 1,270 samples genotyped with the single-nucleotide-polymorphism arrays of the Affymetrix Human...

  13. Association of apolipoprotein E allele {epsilon}4 with late-onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucotte, G.; David, F.; Berriche, S. [Regional Center of Neurogenetics, Reims (France)] [and others

    1994-09-15

    Apolipoprotein E, type {epsilon}4 allele (ApoE {epsilon}4), is associated with late-onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease (AD) in French patients. The association is highly significant (0.45 AD versus 0.12 controls for {epsilon}4 allele frequencies). These data support the involvement of ApoE {epsilon}4 allele as a very important risk factor for the clinical expression of AD. 22 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  14. AGG interruptions and maternal age affect FMR1 CGG repeat allele stability during transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Yrigollen, Carolyn M; Martorell, Loreto; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Naudo, Montserrat; Genoves, Jordi; Murgia, Alessandra; Polli, Roberta; Zhou, Lili; Barbouth, Deborah; Rupchock, Abigail; Finucane, Brenda; Latham, Gary J; Hadd, Andrew; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Tassone, Flora

    2014-01-01

    Background The presence of AGG interruptions in the CGG repeat locus of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene decreases the instability of the allele during transmission from parent to child, and decreases the risk of expansion of a premutation allele to a full mutation allele (the predominant cause of fragile X syndrome) during maternal transmission. Methods To strengthen recent findings on the utility of AGG interruptions in predicting instability or expansion to a full mutation of...

  15. Association between the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele and late onset of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Timm, Sally; Wang, August G

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The 32-bp deletion allele in chemokine receptor CCR5 has been associated with several immune-mediated diseases and might be implicated in schizophrenia as well. METHOD: The authors genotyped DNA samples from 268 schizophrenia patients and 323 healthy subjects. Age at first admission...... of the deletion allele in the latter subgroup of patients. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele is a susceptibility factor for schizophrenia with late onset. Alternatively, the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele may act as a modifier by delaying the onset of schizophrenia without...

  16. Allele-specific enzymatic amplification of. beta. -globin genomic DNA for diagnosis of sickle cell anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, D.Y.; Ugozzoli, L.; Pal, B.K.; Wallace, B. (Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope, Duarte, CA (USA))

    1989-04-01

    A rapid nonradioactive approach to the diagnosis of sickle cell anemia is described based on an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (ASPCR). This method allows direct detection of the normal or the sickle cell {beta}-globin allele in genomic DNA without additional steps of probe hybridization, ligation, or restriction enzyme cleavage. Two allele-specific oligonucleotide primers, one specific for the sickle cell allele and one specific for the normal allele, together with another primer complementary to both alleles were used in the polymerase chain reaction with genomic DNA templates. The allele-specific primers differed from each other in their terminal 3{prime} nucleotide. Under the proper annealing temperature and polymerase chain reaction conditions, these primers only directed amplification on their complementary allele. In a single blind study of DNA samples from 12 individuals, this method correctly and unambiguously allowed for the determination of the genotypes with no false negatives or positives. If ASPCR is able to discriminate all allelic variation (both transition and transversion mutations), this method has the potential to be a powerful approach for genetic disease diagnosis, carrier screening, HLA typing, human gene mapping, forensics, and paternity testing.

  17. Allele specific expression in worker reproduction genes in the bumblebee Bombus terrestris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harindra E. Amarasinghe

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Methylation has previously been associated with allele specific expression in ants. Recently, we found methylation is important in worker reproduction in the bumblebee Bombus terrestris. Here we searched for allele specific expression in twelve genes associated with worker reproduction in bees. We found allele specific expression in Ecdysone 20 monooxygenase and IMP-L2-like. Although we were unable to confirm a genetic or epigenetic cause for this allele specific expression, the expression patterns of the two genes match those predicted for imprinted genes.

  18. Physical properties of VNTR data, and their impact on a test of allelic independence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlin, B.; Risch, N. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States))

    1993-08-01

    In this article the authors describe the physical properties of VNTR data, as well as their effects on the two-dimensional distribution of fragment pairs. Tests of independence of alleles at a locus may confound those physical properties with allele independence. A recently proposed test by Geisser and Johnson is an example. The authors show that alleles can be strictly independent, yet the proposed test suggests large violations of allele independence because it is sensitive to well-known electrophoretic phenomena. 7 refs., 4 tabs.

  19. Clip binds to HLA class II using methionine-based, allele-dependent motifs as well as allele-independent supermotifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geluk, A; Van Meijgaarden, K E; Drijfhout, J W; Ottenhoff, T H

    1995-09-01

    The invariant chain (Ii) region that interacts with class II and inhibits premature peptide binding has been mapped to amino acids 82-107, known as CLIP. It is unclear whether CLIP binds directly to the class II peptide binding groove and thus competitively blocks binding of other peptides, or whether it binds to conserved class II sites and indirectly inhibits peptide binding by inducing conformational changes in class II. Here we show evidence that strongly suggests that CLIP binds within the peptide binding groove, as CLIP binds to various HLA-DR alleles using allele-dependent as well as allele-independent, methionine-based binding motifs. First, a core sequence of 12 amino acids was identified within CLIP which is required for optimal binding to DR1, DR2, DR3(17) and DR7. This sequence is composed of CLIP p88-99 (SKMRMATPLLMQ). By substitution analysis, all three methionine residues appeared to control CLIP binding to HLA-DR. However, whereas M90 controlled binding to all four alleles, M92 and M98 were of different importance for the various alleles: M92 is involved in CLIP binding to DR1 and DR3(17) but not to DR2 or DR7, and M98 controls CLIP binding to DR2, DR3(17) and DR7 but not DR1. Also, CLIP competes with known immunogenic peptides for class II binding in a manner indistinguishable from regular, class II binding competitor peptides. Finally, the dissociation rates of CLIP-class II complexed are similar to those of antigenic peptide-class II complexes. Thus, CLIP most likely binds to the class II peptide binding groove, since most allelic class II differences are clustered here. CLIP uses unconventional methionine anchor residues representing an allele-independent supermotif (M90) as well as allele-dependent motifs (M92 and M98).

  20. Open-Structured V 2 O 5 · n H 2 O Nanoflakes as Highly Reversible Cathode Material for Monovalent and Multivalent Intercalation Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huali [Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmental Science and Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 China; Bi, Xuanxuan [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue Lemont IL 60439 USA; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ohio State University, 100 West 18th Avenue Columbus OH 43210 USA; Bai, Ying [Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmental Science and Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 China; Wu, Chuan [Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmental Science and Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 China; Collaborative Innovation Center of Electric Vehicles in Beijing, Beijing 100081 China; Gu, Sichen [Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmental Science and Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 China; Chen, Shi [Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmental Science and Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 China; Collaborative Innovation Center of Electric Vehicles in Beijing, Beijing 100081 China; Wu, Feng [Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmental Science and Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 China; Collaborative Innovation Center of Electric Vehicles in Beijing, Beijing 100081 China; Amine, Khalil [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue Lemont IL 60439 USA; Lu, Jun [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue Lemont IL 60439 USA

    2017-04-21

    The high-capacity cathode material V2O5·nH2O has attracted considerable attention for metal ion batteries due to the multielectron redox reaction during electrochemical processes. It has an expanded layer structure, which can host large ions or multivalent ions. However, structural instability and poor electronic and ionic conductivities greatly handicap its application. Here, in cell tests, self-assembly V2O5·nH2O nanoflakes shows excellent electrochemical performance with either monovalent or multivalent cation intercalation. They are directly grown on a 3D conductive stainless steel mesh substrate via a simple and green hydrothermal method. Well-layered nanoflakes are obtained after heat treatment at 300 °C (V2O5·0.3H2O). Nanoflakes with ultrathin flower petals deliver a stable capacity of 250 mA h g-1 in a Li-ion cell, 110 mA h g-1 in a Na-ion cell, and 80 mA h g-1 in an Al-ion cell in their respective potential ranges (2.0–4.0 V for Li and Na-ion batteries and 0.1–2.5 V for Al-ion battery) after 100 cycles.

  1. Type 2 Diabetes Risk Alleles Demonstrate Extreme Directional Differentiation among Human Populations, Compared to Other Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong; Corona, Erik; Sikora, Martin; Dudley, Joel T.; Morgan, Alex A.; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Nilsen, Geoffrey B.; Ruau, David; Lincoln, Stephen E.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Butte, Atul J.

    2012-01-01

    Many disease-susceptible SNPs exhibit significant disparity in ancestral and derived allele frequencies across worldwide populations. While previous studies have examined population differentiation of alleles at specific SNPs, global ethnic patterns of ensembles of disease risk alleles across human diseases are unexamined. To examine these patterns, we manually curated ethnic disease association data from 5,065 papers on human genetic studies representing 1,495 diseases, recording the precise risk alleles and their measured population frequencies and estimated effect sizes. We systematically compared the population frequencies of cross-ethnic risk alleles for each disease across 1,397 individuals from 11 HapMap populations, 1,064 individuals from 53 HGDP populations, and 49 individuals with whole-genome sequences from 10 populations. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) demonstrated extreme directional differentiation of risk allele frequencies across human populations, compared with null distributions of European-frequency matched control genomic alleles and risk alleles for other diseases. Most T2D risk alleles share a consistent pattern of decreasing frequencies along human migration into East Asia. Furthermore, we show that these patterns contribute to disparities in predicted genetic risk across 1,397 HapMap individuals, T2D genetic risk being consistently higher for individuals in the African populations and lower in the Asian populations, irrespective of the ethnicity considered in the initial discovery of risk alleles. We observed a similar pattern in the distribution of T2D Genetic Risk Scores, which are associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes in the Diabetes Prevention Program cohort, for the same individuals. This disparity may be attributable to the promotion of energy storage and usage appropriate to environments and inconsistent energy intake. Our results indicate that the differential frequencies of T2D risk alleles may contribute to the observed

  2. Type 2 diabetes risk alleles demonstrate extreme directional differentiation among human populations, compared to other diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Chen

    Full Text Available Many disease-susceptible SNPs exhibit significant disparity in ancestral and derived allele frequencies across worldwide populations. While previous studies have examined population differentiation of alleles at specific SNPs, global ethnic patterns of ensembles of disease risk alleles across human diseases are unexamined. To examine these patterns, we manually curated ethnic disease association data from 5,065 papers on human genetic studies representing 1,495 diseases, recording the precise risk alleles and their measured population frequencies and estimated effect sizes. We systematically compared the population frequencies of cross-ethnic risk alleles for each disease across 1,397 individuals from 11 HapMap populations, 1,064 individuals from 53 HGDP populations, and 49 individuals with whole-genome sequences from 10 populations. Type 2 diabetes (T2D demonstrated extreme directional differentiation of risk allele frequencies across human populations, compared with null distributions of European-frequency matched control genomic alleles and risk alleles for other diseases. Most T2D risk alleles share a consistent pattern of decreasing frequencies along human migration into East Asia. Furthermore, we show that these patterns contribute to disparities in predicted genetic risk across 1,397 HapMap individuals, T2D genetic risk being consistently higher for individuals in the African populations and lower in the Asian populations, irrespective of the ethnicity considered in the initial discovery of risk alleles. We observed a similar pattern in the distribution of T2D Genetic Risk Scores, which are associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes in the Diabetes Prevention Program cohort, for the same individuals. This disparity may be attributable to the promotion of energy storage and usage appropriate to environments and inconsistent energy intake. Our results indicate that the differential frequencies of T2D risk alleles may

  3. Population based allele frequencies of disease associated polymorphisms in the Personalized Medicine Research Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Deanna S; Ivacic, Lynn C; Stefanski, Elisha L; McCarty, Catherine A

    2010-06-17

    There is a lack of knowledge regarding the frequency of disease associated polymorphisms in populations and population attributable risk for many populations remains unknown. Factors that could affect the association of the allele with disease, either positively or negatively, such as race, ethnicity, and gender, may not be possible to determine without population based allele frequencies.Here we used a panel of 51 polymorphisms previously associated with at least one disease and determined the allele frequencies within the entire Personalized Medicine Research Project population based cohort. We compared these allele frequencies to those in dbSNP and other data sources stratified by race. Differences in allele frequencies between self reported race, region of origin, and sex were determined. There were 19544 individuals who self reported a single racial category, 19027 or (97.4%) self reported white Caucasian, and 11205 (57.3%) individuals were female. Of the 11,208 (57%) individuals with an identifiable region of origin 8337 or (74.4%) were German.41 polymorphisms were significantly different between self reported race at the 0.05 level. Stratification of our Caucasian population by self reported region of origin revealed 19 polymorphisms that were significantly different (p = 0.05) between individuals of different origins. Further stratification of the population by gender revealed few significant differences in allele frequencies between the genders. This represents one of the largest population based allele frequency studies to date. Stratification by self reported race and region of origin revealed wide differences in allele frequencies not only by race but also by region of origin within a single racial group. We report allele frequencies for our Asian/Hmong and American Indian populations; these two minority groups are not typically selected for population allele frequency detection. Population wide allele frequencies are important for the design and

  4. Immunoglobulin light chain allelic inclusion in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Louise D; Zhao, Yuan; Lutalo, Pamela M K; D'Cruz, David P; Cason, John; Silva, Joselli S; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K; Nayar, Saba; Cope, Andrew P; Spencer, Jo

    2015-08-01

    The principles of allelic exclusion state that each B cell expresses a single light and heavy chain pair. Here, we show that B cells with both kappa and lambda light chains (Igκ and Igλ) are enriched in some patients with the systemic autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but not in the systemic autoimmune disease control granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Detection of dual Igκ and Igλ expression by flow cytometry could not be abolished by acid washing or by DNAse treatment to remove any bound polyclonal antibody or complexes, and was retained after two days in culture. Both surface and intracytoplasmic dual light chain expression was evident by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. We observed reduced frequency of rearrangements of the kappa-deleting element (KDE) in SLE and an inverse correlation between the frequency of KDE rearrangement and the frequency of dual light chain expressing B cells. We propose that dual expression of Igκ and Igλ by a single B cell may occur in some patients with SLE when this may be a consequence of reduced activity of the KDE. © 2015 The Authors. European Journal of Immunology published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Naturally occurring allele diversity allows potato cultivation in northern latitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloosterman, Bjorn; Abelenda, José A; Gomez, María del Mar Carretero; Oortwijn, Marian; de Boer, Jan M; Kowitwanich, Krissana; Horvath, Beatrix M; van Eck, Herman J; Smaczniak, Cezary; Prat, Salomé; Visser, Richard G F; Bachem, Christian W B

    2013-03-14

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) originates from the Andes and evolved short-day-dependent tuber formation as a vegetative propagation strategy. Here we describe the identification of a central regulator underlying a major-effect quantitative trait locus for plant maturity and initiation of tuber development. We show that this gene belongs to the family of DOF (DNA-binding with one finger) transcription factors and regulates tuberization and plant life cycle length, by acting as a mediator between the circadian clock and the StSP6A mobile tuberization signal. We also show that natural allelic variants evade post-translational light regulation, allowing cultivation outside the geographical centre of origin of potato. Potato is a member of the Solanaceae family and is one of the world's most important food crops. This annual plant originates from the Andean regions of South America. Potato develops tubers from underground stems called stolons. Its equatorial origin makes potato essentially short-day dependent for tuberization and potato will not make tubers in the long-day conditions of spring and summer in the northern latitudes. When introduced in temperate zones, wild material will form tubers in the course of the autumnal shortening of day-length. Thus, one of the first selected traits in potato leading to a European potato type is likely to have been long-day acclimation for tuberization. Potato breeders can exploit the naturally occurring variation in tuberization onset and life cycle length, allowing varietal breeding for different latitudes, harvest times and markets.

  6. FINDbase: a worldwide database for genetic variation allele frequencies updated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgitsi, Marianthi; Viennas, Emmanouil; Antoniou, Dimitris I; Gkantouna, Vassiliki; van Baal, Sjozef; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Poulas, Konstantinos; Tzimas, Giannis; Patrinos, George P

    2011-01-01

    Frequency of INherited Disorders database (FIND base; http://www.findbase.org) records frequencies of causative genetic variations worldwide. Database records include the population and ethnic group or geographical region, the disorder name and the related gene, accompanied by links to any related external resources and the genetic variation together with its frequency in that population. In addition to the regular data content updates, we report the following significant advances: (i) the systematic collection and thorough documentation of population/ethnic group-specific pharmacogenomic markers allele frequencies for 144 markers in 14 genes of pharmacogenomic interest from different classes of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters, representing 150 populations and ethnic groups worldwide; (ii) the development of new data querying and visualization tools in the expanded FINDbase data collection, built around Microsoft's PivotViewer software (http://www.getpivot.com), based on Microsoft Silverlight technology (http://www.silverlight.net) that facilitates querying of large data sets and visualizing the results; and (iii) the establishment of the first database journal, by affiliating FINDbase with Human Genomics and Proteomics, a new open-access scientific journal, which would serve as a prime example of a non-profit model for sustainable database funding.

  7. Population genetic structure and natural selection of Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen-1 in Myanmar isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung-Mi; Lee, Jinyoung; Moe, Mya; Jun, Hojong; Lê, Hương Giang; Kim, Tae Im; Thái, Thị Lam; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Myint, Moe Kyaw; Lin, Khin; Shin, Ho-Joon; Kim, Tong-Soo; Na, Byoung-Kuk

    2018-02-07

    Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen-1 (PfAMA-1) is one of leading blood stage malaria vaccine candidates. However, genetic variation and antigenic diversity identified in global PfAMA-1 are major hurdles in the development of an effective vaccine based on this antigen. In this study, genetic structure and the effect of natural selection of PfAMA-1 among Myanmar P. falciparum isolates were analysed. Blood samples were collected from 58 Myanmar patients with falciparum malaria. Full-length PfAMA-1 gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and cloned into a TA cloning vector. PfAMA-1 sequence of each isolate was sequenced. Polymorphic characteristics and effect of natural selection were analysed with using DNASTAR, MEGA4, and DnaSP programs. Polymorphic nature and natural selection in 459 global PfAMA-1 were also analysed. Thirty-seven different haplotypes of PfAMA-1 were identified in 58 Myanmar P. falciparum isolates. Most amino acid changes identified in Myanmar PfAMA-1 were found in domains I and III. Overall patterns of amino acid changes in Myanmar PfAMA-1 were similar to those in global PfAMA-1. However, frequencies of amino acid changes differed by country. Novel amino acid changes in Myanmar PfAMA-1 were also identified. Evidences for natural selection and recombination event were observed in global PfAMA-1. Among 51 commonly identified amino acid changes in global PfAMA-1 sequences, 43 were found in predicted RBC-binding sites, B-cell epitopes, or IUR regions. Myanmar PfAMA-1 showed similar patterns of nucleotide diversity and amino acid polymorphisms compared to those of global PfAMA-1. Balancing natural selection and intragenic recombination across PfAMA-1 are likely to play major roles in generating genetic diversity in global PfAMA-1. Most common amino acid changes in global PfAMA-1 were located in predicted B-cell epitopes where high levels of nucleotide diversity and balancing natural selection were found. These results highlight the strong selective pressure of host immunity on the PfAMA-1 gene. These results have significant implications in understanding the nature of Myanmar PfAMA-1 along with global PfAMA-1. They also provide useful information for the development of effective malaria vaccine based on this antigen.

  8. The effect of wild card designations and rare alleles in forensic DNA database searches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Bright, Jo-Anne; Buckleton, John S; Curran, James M; Morling, Niels

    2015-05-01

    Forensic DNA databases are powerful tools used for the identification of persons of interest in criminal investigations. Typically, they consist of two parts: (1) a database containing DNA profiles of known individuals and (2) a database of DNA profiles associated with crime scenes. The risk of adventitious or chance matches between crimes and innocent people increases as the number of profiles within a database grows and more data is shared between various forensic DNA databases, e.g. from different jurisdictions. The DNA profiles obtained from crime scenes are often partial because crime samples may be compromised in quantity or quality. When an individual's profile cannot be resolved from a DNA mixture, ambiguity is introduced. A wild card, F, may be used in place of an allele that has dropped out or when an ambiguous profile is resolved from a DNA mixture. Variant alleles that do not correspond to any marker in the allelic ladder or appear above or below the extent of the allelic ladder range are assigned the allele designation R for rare allele. R alleles are position specific with respect to the observed/unambiguous allele. The F and R designations are made when the exact genotype has not been determined. The F and R designation are treated as wild cards for searching, which results in increased chance of adventitious matches. We investigated the probability of adventitious matches given these two types of wild cards. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A new mutation for Huntington disease following maternal transmission of an intermediate allele

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Semaka, Alicia; Kay, Chris; Belfroid, René D. M.; Bijlsma, Emilia K.; Losekoot, Monique; van Langen, Irene M.; van Maarle, Merel C.; Oosterloo, Mayke; Hayden, Michael R.; van Belzen, Martine J.

    2015-01-01

    New mutations for Huntington disease (HD) originate from CAG repeat expansion of intermediate alleles (27-35 CAG). Expansions of such alleles into the pathological range (≥ 36 CAG) have been exclusively observed in paternal transmission. We report the occurrence of a new mutation that defies the

  10. A new mutation for Huntington disease following maternal transmission of an intermediate allele

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Semaka, Alicia; Kay, Chris; Belfroid, Rene D. M.; Bijlsma, Emilia K.; Losekoot, Monique; van Langen, Irene M.; van Maarle, Merel C.; Oosterloo, Mayke; Hayden, Michael R.; van Belzen, Martine J.

    New mutations for Huntington disease (HD) originate from CAG repeat expansion of intermediate alleles (27-35 CAG). Expansions of such alleles into the pathological range (>= 36 CAG) have been exclusively observed in paternal transmission. We report the occurrence of a new mutation that defies the

  11. Allelic structure and distribution of 103 STR loci in a Southern ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 83; Issue 1. Allelic structure and distribution of 103 STR loci in a Southern Tunisian population. Abdellatif ... This demonstrated that in spite of a high inbreeding level in the population, few markers showed evidence for a different pattern of allelic distribution compared to CEPH.

  12. A four-element based transposon system for allele specific tagging ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    genetics of crop-specific alleles that confer resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Molecular analysis of such al- leles could be of tremendous significance for stabilization breeding of crop species. Of particular interest are alleles that have been transferred from alien relatives to crop spe- cies (Jiang et al 1994). In many ...

  13. Allelic structure and distribution of 103 STR loci in a Southern ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    In particular, the use of DNA typing systems in forensic identification has been criticized, in part, on the grounds that the calculations used for asses- sing likelihood of matches were allele frequency depen- dent, which raised the question of what constituted a proper reference population for determining allele frequencies.

  14. Models of frequency-dependent selection with mutation from parental alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, Meredith V; Spencer, Hamish G

    2013-09-01

    Frequency-dependent selection (FDS) remains a common heuristic explanation for the maintenance of genetic variation in natural populations. The pairwise-interaction model (PIM) is a well-studied general model of frequency-dependent selection, which assumes that a genotype's fitness is a function of within-population intergenotypic interactions. Previous theoretical work indicated that this type of model is able to sustain large numbers of alleles at a single locus when it incorporates recurrent mutation. These studies, however, have ignored the impact of the distribution of fitness effects of new mutations on the dynamics and end results of polymorphism construction. We suggest that a natural way to model mutation would be to assume mutant fitness is related to the fitness of the parental allele, i.e., the existing allele from which the mutant arose. Here we examine the numbers and distributions of fitnesses and alleles produced by construction under the PIM with mutation from parental alleles and the impacts on such measures due to different methods of generating mutant fitnesses. We find that, in comparison with previous results, generating mutants from existing alleles lowers the average number of alleles likely to be observed in a system subject to FDS, but produces polymorphisms that are highly stable and have realistic allele-frequency distributions.

  15. Mannose-binding lectin variant alleles and the risk of arterial thrombosis in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øhlenschlaeger, Tommy; Garred, Peter; Madsen, Hans O

    2004-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is an important complication in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Variant alleles of the mannose-binding lectin gene are associated with SLE as well as with severe atherosclerosis. We determined whether mannose-binding lectin variant alleles were associated ...

  16. Overdispersion in allelic counts and θ-correction in forensic genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben

    2010-01-01

    We present a statistical model for incorporating the extra variability in allelic counts due to subpopulation structures. In forensic genetics, this effect is modelled by the identical-by-descent parameter θ, which measures the relationship between pairs of alleles within a population relative...

  17. Allele frequency present within the DYS635, DYS437, DYS448 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ejiro

    2015-03-11

    Mar 11, 2015 ... science and criminology and to let evaluate and present the DNA weight evidences in Iraq medico-legal institute and courts of .... Standard error (SE). The standard error (SE) of allele frequencies was calculated as: Where, pi denotes the frequency of the ith allele at any given locus and N equals the total ...

  18. Allelic variations in Glu-1 and Glu-3 loci of historical and modern ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The inheritance of glutenin subunits follows Mendelian genetics with multiple alleles in each locus. Identification of the banding patterns of glutenin subunits could be used as an estimate for screening high quality wheat germplasm. Here, by means of a two-step 1D-SDS-PAGE procedure, we identified the allelic variations ...

  19. Allelic analysis of low molecular weight glutenin subunits using 2-DGE in Korean wheat cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE) was used to determine the allelic compositions of LMW-GS in 32 Korean wheat cultivars. Protein patterns generated by 2-DGE from each cultivar were compared to patterns from standard wheat cultivars for each allele. At the Glu-A3 locus, thirteen c, twelve ...

  20. Mannose-binding lectin variant alleles and the risk of arterial thrombosis in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øhlenschlaeger, Tommy; Garred, Peter; Madsen, Hans O

    2004-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is an important complication in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Variant alleles of the mannose-binding lectin gene are associated with SLE as well as with severe atherosclerosis. We determined whether mannose-binding lectin variant alleles were associated...... with an increased risk of arterial thrombosis among patients with SLE....

  1. Use of allele-specific sequencing primers is an efficient alternative to PCR subcloning of low-copy nuclear genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, Anne-Cathrine; Pfeil, Bernard E; Petri, Anna; Heidari, Nahid; Nylinder, Stephan; Oxelman, Bengt

    2012-01-01

    Direct Sanger sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified nuclear genes leads to polymorphic sequences when allelic variation is present. To overcome this problem, most researchers subclone the PCR products to separate alleles. An alternative is to directly sequence the separate alleles using allele-specific primers. We tested two methods to enhance the specificity of allele-specific primers for use in direct sequencing: using short primers and amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) technique. By shortening the allele-specific primer to 15-13 nucleotides, the single mismatch in the ultimate base of the primer is enough to hinder the amplification of the nontarget allele in direct sequencing and recover only the targeted allele at high accuracy. The deliberate addition of a second mismatch, as implemented in the ARMS technique, was less successful and seems better suited for allele-specific amplification in regular PCR rather than in direct sequencing. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. The number of self-incompatibility alleles in a finite, subdivided population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierup, M H

    1998-01-01

    The actual and effective number of gametophytic self-incompatibility alleles maintained at mutation-drift-selection equilibrium in a finite population subdivided as in the island model is investigated by stochastic simulations. The existing theory founded by Wright predicts that for a given...... population size the number of alleles maintained increases monotonically with decreasing migration as is the case for neutral alleles. The simulation results here show that this is not true. At migration rates above Nm = 0.01-0.1, the actual and effective number of alleles is lower than for an undivided...... population with the same number of individuals, and, contrary to Wright's theoretical expectation, the number of alleles is not much higher than for an undivided population unless Nm

  3. HLA Class I Allele Frequencies in Southern Iranian Women with Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razmkhah, Mahboobeh; Ghaderi, Abbas

    2013-02-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in women worldwide. It has been revealed that elevated risk for malignancy may be associated with certain HLA alleles. This study was performed to assess the association of HLA class I alleles with breast cancer in women in Southern Iran. Eighty nine patients included for analyzing the HLA class I alleles frequency using complement dependent cytotoxicity microassay and results were compared to 86 gender-matched healthy volunteers. There were significantly more patients with A24(9) allele than those of healthy individuals (38.2% versus 16.3%) (P-value=0.002). In contrast, HLA-A1 had significantly much less expression in the patient group compared to the controls (P- value=0.04). A24(9) allele appears to be one of the factors increasing an individual's the susceptibility to breast cancer in our population but further investigation might be required.

  4. Association between the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele and late onset of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, H.B.; Timm, S.; Wang, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The 32-bp deletion allele in chemokine receptor CCR5 has been associated with several immune-mediated diseases and might be implicated in schizophrenia as well. METHOD: The authors genotyped DNA samples from 268 schizophrenia patients and 323 healthy subjects. Age at first admission...... to a psychiatric hospital department served as a measure of disease onset. RESULTS: Patients and comparison subjects differed marginally in their genotype distribution, with a slightly higher frequency of the deletion allele seen in the patients. The authors found the deletion allele to be associated with higher......-onset schizophrenia) and healthy subjects differed significantly. This was reflected in an increased frequency of the deletion allele in the patient subgroup. Patients with ages at first admission below and above 40 years significantly differed in distribution of genotypes and alleles, with an overrepresentation...

  5. Allelic expression changes in Medaka (Oryzias latipes hybrids between inbred strains derived from genetically distant populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiko Murata

    Full Text Available Variations in allele expressions between genetically distant populations are one of the most important factors which affects their morphological and physiological variations. These variations are caused by natural mutations accumulated in their habitats. It has been reported that allelic expression differences in the hybrids of genetically distant populations are different from parental strains. In that case, there is a possibility that allelic expression changes lead to novel phenotypes in hybrids. Based on genomic information of the genetically distant populations, quantification and comparison of allelic expression changes make importance of regulatory sequences (cis-acting factors or upstream regulatory factors (trans-acting modulators for these changes clearer. In this study, we focused on two Medaka inbred strains, Hd-rR and HNI, derived from genetically distant populations and their hybrids. They are highly polymorphic and we can utilize whole-genome information. To analyze allelic expression changes, we established a method to quantify and compare allele-specific expressions of 11 genes between the parental strains and their reciprocal hybrids. In intestines of reciprocal hybrids, allelic expression was either similar or different in comparison with the parental strains. Total expressions in Hd-rR and HNI were tissue-dependent in the case of HPRT1, with high up-regulation of Hd-rR allele expression in liver. The proportion of genes with differential allelic expression in Medaka hybrids seems to be the same as that in other animals, despite the high SNP rate in the genomes of the two inbred strains. It is suggested that each tissue of the strain difference in trans-acting modulators is more important than polymorphisms in cis-regulatory sequences in producing the allelic expression changes in reciprocal hybrids.

  6. Thirty allele-level haplotypes centered around KIR2DL5 define the diversity in an African American population

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, LiHua; Chen, Minghua; Jiang, Bo; Wu, DongYing; Ng, Jennifer; Hurley, Carolyn Katovich

    2010-01-01

    KIR2DL5 alleles were physically linked to alleles at adjacent KIR loci to define this region of KIR haplotypes in 55 gene positive random African Americans. The majority carried KIR2DL5B. Three KIR2DL5A and six KIR2DL5B alleles that have been previously described and 11 novel KIR2DL5 alleles were identified by DNA sequencing. Novel alleles included variation that may impact promoter activity; two alleles carried nonsynonymous coding region variation. Based on linkage with KIR2DS1, KIR2DS3, KI...

  7. Unique Allelic eQTL Clusters in Human MHC Haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Tze Hau; Shen, Meixin; Tay, Matthew Zirui; Ren, Ee Chee

    2017-08-07

    The control of gene regulation within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) remains poorly understood, despite several expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) studies revealing an association of MHC gene expression with independent tag-single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). MHC haplotype variation may exert a greater effect on gene expression phenotype than specific single variants. To explore the effect of MHC haplotype sequence diversity on gene expression phenotypes across the MHC, we examined the MHC transcriptomic landscape at haplotype-specific resolution for three prominent MHC haplotypes (A2-B46-DR9, A33-B58-DR3, and A1-B8-DR3) derived from MHC-homozygous B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (B-LCLs). We demonstrate that MHC-wide gene expression patterns are dictated by underlying haplotypes, and identify 36 differentially expressed genes. By mapping these haplotype sequence variations to known eQTL, we provide evidence that unique allelic combinations of eQTL, embedded within haplotypes, are correlated with the level of expression of 17 genes. Interestingly, the influence of haplotype sequence on gene expression is not homogenous across the MHC. We show that haplotype sequence polymorphisms within or proximate to HLA-A, HLA-C, C4A, and HLA-DRB regions exert haplotype-specific gene regulatory effects, whereas the expression of genes in other parts of the MHC region are not affected by the haplotype sequence. Overall, we demonstrate that MHC haplotype sequence diversity can impact phenotypic outcome via the alteration of transcriptional variability, indicating that a haplotype-based approach is fundamental for the assessment of trait associations in the MHC. Copyright © 2017 Lam et al.

  8. Deep resequencing reveals allelic variation in Sesamum indicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linhai; Han, Xuelian; Zhang, Yanxin; Li, Donghua; Wei, Xin; Ding, Xia; Zhang, Xiurong

    2014-08-20

    Characterization of genome-wide patterns of allelic variation and linkage disequilibrium can be used to detect reliable phenotype-genotype associations and signatures of molecular selection. However, the use of Sesamum indicum germplasm for breeding is limited by the lack of polymorphism data. Here we describe the massively parallel resequencing of 29 sesame strains from 12 countries at a depth of ≥ 13-fold coverage for each of the samples tested. We detected an average of 127,347 SNPs, 17,961 small InDels, and 9,266 structural variants per sample. The population SNP rate, population diversity (π) and Watterson's estimator of segregating sites (θw) were estimated at 8.6 × 10⁻³, 2.5 × 10⁻³ and 3.0 × 10⁻³ bp⁻¹, respectively. Of these SNPs, 23.2% were located within coding regions. Polymorphism patterns were nonrandom among gene families, with genes mediating interactions with the biotic or abiotic environment exhibiting high levels of polymorphism. The linkage disequilibrium (LD) decay distance was estimated at 150 kb, with no distinct structure observed in the population. Phylogenetic relationships between each of the 29 sesame strains were consistent with the hypothesis of sesame originating on the Indian subcontinent. In addition, we proposed novel roles for adenylate isopentenyltransferase (ITP) genes in determining the number of flowers per leaf axil of sesame by mediating zeatin biosynthesis. This study represents the first report of genome-wide patterns of genetic variation in sesame. The high LD distance and abundant polymorphisms described here increase our understanding of the forces shaping population-wide sequence variation in sesame and will be a valuable resource for future gene-phenotype and genome-wide association studies (GWAS).

  9. Enzymatic glycosylation of multivalent scaffolds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bojarová, Pavla; Rosencrantz, R. R.; Elling, L.; Křen, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 11 (2013), s. 4774-4797 ISSN 0306-0012 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13042; GA ČR GAP207/10/0321 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : N-ACETYLGLUCOSAMINYLTRANSFERASE-III * MUCIN TANDEM REPEAT * NEIGHBORING RESIDUE GLYCOSYLATION Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 30.425, year: 2013

  10. Allelic heterogeneity of G6PD deficiency in West Africa and severe malaria susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Taane G; Fry, Andrew E; Auburn, Sarah; Campino, Susana; Diakite, Mahamadou; Green, Angela; Richardson, Anna; Teo, Yik Y; Small, Kerrin; Wilson, Jonathan; Jallow, Muminatou; Sisay-Joof, Fatou; Pinder, Margaret; Sabeti, Pardis; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P; Rockett, Kirk A

    2009-08-01

    Several lines of evidence link glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency to protection from severe malaria. Early reports suggested most G6PD deficiency in sub-Saharan Africa was because of the 202A/376G G6PD A- allele, and recent association studies of G6PD deficiency have employed genotyping as a convenient way to determine enzyme status. However, further work has suggested that other G6PD deficiency alleles are relatively common in some regions of West Africa. To investigate the consequences of unrecognized allelic heterogeneity on association studies, in particular studies of G6PD deficiency and malaria, we carried out a case-control analysis of 2488 Gambian children with severe malaria and 3875 controls. No significant association was found between severe malaria and the 202A/376G G6PD A- allele when analyzed alone, but pooling 202A/376G with other deficiency alleles revealed the signal of protection (male odds ratio (OR) 0.77, 95% CI 0.62-0.95, P=0.016; female OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.56-0.89, P=0.004). We have identified the 968C mutation as the most common G6PD A- allele in The Gambia. Our results highlight some of the consequences of allelic heterogeneity, particularly the increased type I error. They also suggest that G6PD-deficient male hemizygotes and female heterozygotes are protected from severe malaria.

  11. Asynchronous replication, mono-allelic expression, and long range Cis-effects of ASAR6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donley, Nathan; Stoffregen, Eric P; Smith, Leslie; Montagna, Christina; Thayer, Mathew J

    2013-04-01

    Mammalian chromosomes initiate DNA replication at multiple sites along their length during each S phase following a temporal replication program. The majority of genes on homologous chromosomes replicate synchronously. However, mono-allelically expressed genes such as imprinted genes, allelically excluded genes, and genes on female X chromosomes replicate asynchronously. We have identified a cis-acting locus on human chromosome 6 that controls this replication-timing program. This locus encodes a large intergenic non-coding RNA gene named Asynchronous replication and Autosomal RNA on chromosome 6, or ASAR6. Disruption of ASAR6 results in delayed replication, delayed mitotic chromosome condensation, and activation of the previously silent alleles of mono-allelic genes on chromosome 6. The ASAR6 gene resides within an ∼1.2 megabase domain of asynchronously replicating DNA that is coordinated with other random asynchronously replicating loci along chromosome 6. In contrast to other nearby mono-allelic genes, ASAR6 RNA is expressed from the later-replicating allele. ASAR6 RNA is synthesized by RNA Polymerase II, is not polyadenlyated, is restricted to the nucleus, and is subject to random mono-allelic expression. Disruption of ASAR6 leads to the formation of bridged chromosomes, micronuclei, and structural instability of chromosome 6. Finally, ectopic integration of cloned genomic DNA containing ASAR6 causes delayed replication of entire mouse chromosomes.

  12. Asynchronous replication, mono-allelic expression, and long range Cis-effects of ASAR6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Donley

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian chromosomes initiate DNA replication at multiple sites along their length during each S phase following a temporal replication program. The majority of genes on homologous chromosomes replicate synchronously. However, mono-allelically expressed genes such as imprinted genes, allelically excluded genes, and genes on female X chromosomes replicate asynchronously. We have identified a cis-acting locus on human chromosome 6 that controls this replication-timing program. This locus encodes a large intergenic non-coding RNA gene named Asynchronous replication and Autosomal RNA on chromosome 6, or ASAR6. Disruption of ASAR6 results in delayed replication, delayed mitotic chromosome condensation, and activation of the previously silent alleles of mono-allelic genes on chromosome 6. The ASAR6 gene resides within an ∼1.2 megabase domain of asynchronously replicating DNA that is coordinated with other random asynchronously replicating loci along chromosome 6. In contrast to other nearby mono-allelic genes, ASAR6 RNA is expressed from the later-replicating allele. ASAR6 RNA is synthesized by RNA Polymerase II, is not polyadenlyated, is restricted to the nucleus, and is subject to random mono-allelic expression. Disruption of ASAR6 leads to the formation of bridged chromosomes, micronuclei, and structural instability of chromosome 6. Finally, ectopic integration of cloned genomic DNA containing ASAR6 causes delayed replication of entire mouse chromosomes.

  13. HLA-DQA1/B1 alleles as putative susceptibility markers in congenital toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokawa, Paulo Tadashi; Targa, Lília Spaleta; Yamamoto, Lidia; Rodrigues, Jonatas Cristian; Kanunfre, Kelly Aparecida; Okay, Thelma Suely

    2016-05-18

    Host and parasite genotypes are among the factors associated with congenital toxoplasmosis pathogenesis. As HLA class II molecules play a key role in the immune system regulation, the aim of this study was to investigate whether HLA-DQA1/B1 alleles are associated with susceptibility or protection to congenital toxoplasmosis. One hundred and twenty-two fetuses with and 103 without toxoplasmosis were studied. The two study groups were comparable according to a number of socio-demographic and genetic variables. HLA alleles were typed by PCR-SSP. In the HLA-DQA1 region, the allele frequencies showed that *01:03 and *03:02 alleles could confer susceptibility (OR= 3.06, p = 0.0002 and OR= 9.60, p= 0.0001, respectively) as they were more frequent among infected fetuses. Regarding the HLA-DQB1 region, the *05:04 allele could confer susceptibility (OR = 6.95, p HLA-DQA1 susceptibility alleles. In the present study, a discriminatory potential of HLA-DQA1/B1 alleles to identify susceptibility to congenital toxoplasmosis and the most severe cases has been shown.

  14. Genetic dissection of the Drosophila melanogaster female head transcriptome reveals widespread allelic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Elizabeth G; Sanderson, Brian J; McNeil, Casey L; Long, Anthony D; Macdonald, Stuart J

    2014-05-01

    Modern genetic mapping is plagued by the "missing heritability" problem, which refers to the discordance between the estimated heritabilities of quantitative traits and the variance accounted for by mapped causative variants. One major potential explanation for the missing heritability is allelic heterogeneity, in which there are multiple causative variants at each causative gene with only a fraction having been identified. The majority of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) implicitly assume that a single SNP can explain all the variance for a causative locus. However, if allelic heterogeneity is prevalent, a substantial amount of genetic variance will remain unexplained. In this paper, we take a haplotype-based mapping approach and quantify the number of alleles segregating at each locus using a large set of 7922 eQTL contributing to regulatory variation in the Drosophila melanogaster female head. Not only does this study provide a comprehensive eQTL map for a major community genetic resource, the Drosophila Synthetic Population Resource, but it also provides a direct test of the allelic heterogeneity hypothesis. We find that 95% of cis-eQTLs and 78% of trans-eQTLs are due to multiple alleles, demonstrating that allelic heterogeneity is widespread in Drosophila eQTL. Allelic heterogeneity likely contributes significantly to the missing heritability problem common in GWAS studies.

  15. Genetic dissection of the Drosophila melanogaster female head transcriptome reveals widespread allelic heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth G King

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Modern genetic mapping is plagued by the "missing heritability" problem, which refers to the discordance between the estimated heritabilities of quantitative traits and the variance accounted for by mapped causative variants. One major potential explanation for the missing heritability is allelic heterogeneity, in which there are multiple causative variants at each causative gene with only a fraction having been identified. The majority of genome-wide association studies (GWAS implicitly assume that a single SNP can explain all the variance for a causative locus. However, if allelic heterogeneity is prevalent, a substantial amount of genetic variance will remain unexplained. In this paper, we take a haplotype-based mapping approach and quantify the number of alleles segregating at each locus using a large set of 7922 eQTL contributing to regulatory variation in the Drosophila melanogaster female head. Not only does this study provide a comprehensive eQTL map for a major community genetic resource, the Drosophila Synthetic Population Resource, but it also provides a direct test of the allelic heterogeneity hypothesis. We find that 95% of cis-eQTLs and 78% of trans-eQTLs are due to multiple alleles, demonstrating that allelic heterogeneity is widespread in Drosophila eQTL. Allelic heterogeneity likely contributes significantly to the missing heritability problem common in GWAS studies.

  16. MICB Allele Genotyping on Microarrays by Improving the Specificity of Extension Primers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Cheol Baek

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I chain-related gene B (MICB encodes a ligand for activating NKG2D that expressed in natural killer cells, γδ T cells, and αβ CD8+ T cells, which is associated with autoimmune diseases, cancer, and infectious diseases. Here, we have established a system for genotyping MICB alleles using allele-specific primer extension (ASPE on microarrays. Thirty-six high quality, allele-specific extension primers were evaluated using strict and reliable cut-off values using mean fluorescence intensity (MFI, whereby an MFI >30,000 represented a positive signal and an MFI <10,000 represented a negative signal. Eight allele-specific extension primers were found to be false positives, five of which were improved by adjusting their length, and three of which were optimized by refractory modification. The MICB alleles (*002:01, *003, *005:02/*010, *005:03, *008, *009N, *018, and *024 present in the quality control panel could be exactly defined by 22 allele-specific extension primers. MICB genotypes that were identified by ASPE on microarrays were in full concordance with those identified by PCR-sequence-based typing. In conclusion, we have developed a method for genotyping MICB alleles using ASPE on microarrays; which can be applicable for large-scale single nucleotide polymorphism typing studies of population and disease associations.

  17. The ACE deletion allele is associated with Israeli elite endurance athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Offer; Amir, Ruthie; Yamin, Chen; Attias, Eric; Eynon, Nir; Sagiv, Moran; Sagiv, Michael; Meckel, Yoav

    2007-09-01

    An Alu insertion (I)/deletion (D) polymorphism in the angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) gene has been associated with ACE activity. Opposing effects on elite athletic performance have been proposed for the I and D alleles; while the D allele favours improved endurance ability, the I allele promotes more power-orientated events. We tested this hypothesis by determining the frequency of ACE ID alleles amongst 121 Israeli top-level athletes classified by their sporting discipline (marathon runners or sprinters). Genotyping for ACE ID was performed using polymerase chain reaction on DNA from leucocytes. The ACE genotype and allele frequencies were compared with those of 247 healthy individuals. Allele and genotype frequencies differed significantly between the groups. The frequency of the D allele was 0.77 in the marathon runners, 0.66 in the control subjects (P = 0.01) and 0.57 in the sprinters (P = 0.002). The ACE DD genotype was more prevalent among the endurance athletes (0.62) than among the control subjects (0.43, P = 0.004) and the power athletes (0.34, P = 0.004). In the group of elite athletes, the odds ratio of ACE DD genotype being an endurance athlete was 3.26 (95% confidence interval 1.49-7.11), and of ACE II genotype was 0.41 (95% confidence interval 0.14-1.19). We conclude that in Israeli elite marathon runners the frequency of the ACE D allele and ACE DD genotype seems to be higher than in sprinters, suggesting a positive association between the D allele and the likelihood of being an elite endurance athlete in some ethnic groups.

  18. Comprehensive identification of MHC class II alleles in a cohort of Chinese rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huiling; Deng, Qing; Jin, Yabin; Liu, Beilei; Zhuo, Min; Ling, Fei

    2014-10-01

    Rhesus macaque is a very important animal model for various human diseases, especially for AIDS and vaccine research. The susceptibility and/or resistance to some of these diseases are related to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). To gain insight into the MHC background and to facilitate the experimental use of Chinese rhesus macaques, Mamu-DPB1, Mamu-DQB1, and Mamu-DRB alleles were investigated in 30 Chinese rhesus macaques through gene cloning and sequencing. A total of 66 alleles were identified in this study, including 14 Mamu-DPB1, 20 Mamu-DQB1, and 30 Mamu-DRB alleles as well as 2 high-frequency Mamu-DPB1 alleles. Interestingly, one of the high-frequency Mamu-DPB1 alleles had been undocumented in earlier studies. Eleven of the other alleles, including four Mamu-DPB1, three Mamu-DQB1, and four Mamu-DRB alleles were also novel. Importantly, like MHC-DRB, more than two Mamu-DPB1 sequences per animal were detected in 13 monkeys, which suggested that they might represent gene duplication. Our data also indicated quite a few differences in the distribution of MHC class II alleles between the Chinese rhesus macaques and the previously reported Indian rhesus macaques. To our knowledge, our results revealed comprehensively the combination of MHC II alleles. This information will not only promote the understanding of Chinese rhesus macaque MHC polymorphism but will also facilitate the use of Chinese rhesus macaques in studies of human disease.

  19. Lack of polymorphism at MC1R wild-type allele and evidence of domestic allele introgression across European wild boar populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canu, Antonio; Vilaça, Sibelle T.; Iacolina, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Domestication promotes the emergence of novel phenotypic and behavioural traits in domesticated animals compared to their wild ancestors. We analysed variation at the melanocortin receptor I (MC1R) and nuclear receptor subfamily 6, group A, member 1 (NR6A1) genes in European wild boar populations......, two loci which have been under strong artificial selection during domestication. These loci influence coat colour and number of vertebrae, respectively. A total of 145 wild boars were sampled throughout Europe, to evaluate frequency and spatial distribution of domestic alleles and patterns...... of hybridization between wild and domestic forms. Most of the wild boars (94%) were homozygous for the European wild-type (E+) MC1R allele. We did not observe any synonymous substitution in the European E+ allele, confirming its monomorphism even in areas known to be hotspots of wild boar genetic diversity...

  20. Suspension Array for Multiplex Detection of Eight Fungicide-Resistance Related Alleles in Botrytis cinerea

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xin; Xie, Fei; Lv, Baobei; Zhao, Pengxiang; Ma, Xuemei

    2016-01-01

    A simple and high-throughput assay to detect fungicide resistance is required for large-scale monitoring of the emergence of resistant strains of Botrytis cinerea. Using suspension array technology performed on a Bio-Plex 200 System, we developed a single-tube allele-specific primer extension (ASPE) assay that can simultaneously detect eight alleles in one reaction. These eight alleles include E198 and 198A of the β-Tubulin gene (BenA), H272 and 272Y of the Succinate dehydrogenase iron–sulfur...

  1. Allele frequencies of 15 autosomal STR loci in the Caymanian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, Jonathan S; Tanzillo-Swarts, Angela

    2015-05-01

    Allele frequency distributions in the Caymanian population were determined using the AmpFlSTR® Identifiler® PCR amplification kit. Little evidence of departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium or the association of alleles of different loci was detected. Comparison with relevant population groups supports the Caymanian population having a distinct allelic distribution. The 15 Identifiler® loci provide combined power of discrimination and exclusion values of 0.999999999999999995 and 0.9999992, respectively, proving suitable for the forensic and paternity testing requirements of the Cayman Islands.

  2. Graphical classification of DNA sequences of HLA alleles by deep learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Jun; Kaneshita, Yuhei; Asatani, Satoshi; Tagawa, Seiichi; Niioka, Hirohiko; Hirano, Takashi

    2018-04-01

    Alleles of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A DNAs are classified and expressed graphically by using artificial intelligence "Deep Learning (Stacked autoencoder)". Nucleotide sequence data corresponding to the length of 822 bp, collected from the Immuno Polymorphism Database, were compressed to 2-dimensional representation and were plotted. Profiles of the two-dimensional plots indicate that the alleles can be classified as clusters are formed. The two-dimensional plot of HLA-A DNAs gives a clear outlook for characterizing the various alleles.

  3. Suppression among alleles encoding nucleotide-binding-leucine-rich repeat resistance proteins interferes with resistance in F1 hybrid and allele-pyramided wheat plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirnweis, Daniel; Milani, Samira D; Brunner, Susanne; Herren, Gerhard; Buchmann, Gabriele; Peditto, David; Jordan, Tina; Keller, Beat

    2014-09-01

    The development of high-yielding varieties with broad-spectrum durable disease resistance is the ultimate goal of crop breeding. In plants, immune receptors of the nucleotide-binding-leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) class mediate race-specific resistance against pathogen attack. When employed in agriculture this type of resistance is often rapidly overcome by newly adapted pathogen races. The stacking of different resistance genes or alleles in F1 hybrids or in pyramided lines is a promising strategy for achieving more durable resistance. Here, we identify a molecular mechanism which can negatively interfere with the allele-pyramiding approach. We show that pairwise combinations of different alleles of the powdery mildew resistance gene Pm3 in F1 hybrids and stacked transgenic wheat lines can result in suppression of Pm3-based resistance. This effect is independent of the genetic background and solely dependent on the Pm3 alleles. Suppression occurs at the post-translational level, as levels of RNA and protein in the suppressed alleles are unaffected. Using a transient expression system in Nicotiana benthamiana, the LRR domain was identified as the domain conferring suppression. The results of this study suggest that the expression of closely related NB-LRR resistance genes or alleles in the same genotype can lead to dominant-negative interactions. These findings provide a molecular explanation for the frequently observed ineffectiveness of resistance genes introduced from the secondary gene pool into polyploid crop species and mark an important step in overcoming this limitation. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Ambiguous allele combinations in HLA Class I and Class II sequence-based typing: when precise nucleotide sequencing leads to imprecise allele identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larsen Paula

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sequence-based typing (SBT is one of the most comprehensive methods utilized for HLA typing. However, one of the inherent problems with this typing method is the interpretation of ambiguous allele combinations which occur when two or more different allele combinations produce identical sequences. The purpose of this study is to investigate the probability of this occurrence. We performed HLA-A,-B SBT for Exons 2 and 3 on 676 donors. Samples were analyzed with a capillary sequencer. The racial distribution of the donors was as follows: 615-Caucasian, 13-Asian, 23-African American, 17-Hispanic and 8-Unknown. 672 donors were analyzed for HLA-A locus ambiguities and 666 donors were analyzed for HLA-B locus ambiguities. At the HLA-A locus a total of 548 total ambiguous allele combinations were identified (548/1344 = 41%. Most (278/548 = 51% of these ambiguities were due to the fact that Exon 4 analysis was not performed. At the HLA-B locus 322 total ambiguous allele combinations were found (322/1332 = 24%. The HLA-B*07/08/15/27/35/44 antigens, common in Caucasians, produced a large portion of the ambiguities (279/322 = 87%. A large portion of HLA-A and B ambiguous allele combinations can be addressed by utilizing a group-specific primary amplification approach to produce an unambiguous homozygous sequence. Therefore, although the prevalence of ambiguous allele combinations is high, if the resolution of these ambiguities is clinically warranted, methods exist to compensate for this problem.

  5. Differences in the ability to suppress interferon β production between allele A and allele B NS1 proteins from H10 influenza A viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohari Siamak

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In our previous study concerning the genetic relationship among H10 avian influenza viruses with different pathogenicity in mink (Mustela vison, we found that these differences were related to amino acid variations in the NS1 protein. In this study, we extend our previous work to further investigate the effect of the NS1 from different gene pools on type I IFN promoter activity, the production of IFN-β, as well as the expression of the IFN-β mRNA in response to poly I:C. Results Using a model system, we first demonstrated that NS1 from A/mink/Sweden/84 (H10N4 (allele A could suppress an interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE reporter system to about 85%. The other NS1 (allele B, from A/chicken/Germany/N/49 (H10N7, was also able to suppress the reporter system, but only to about 20%. The differences in the abilities of the two NS1s from different alleles to suppress the ISRE reporter system were clearly reflected by the protein and mRNA expressions of IFN-β as shown by ELISA and RT-PCR assays. Conclusions These studies reveal that different non-structural protein 1 (NS1 of influenza viruses, one from allele A and another from allele B, show different abilities to suppress the type I interferon β expression. It has been hypothesised that some of the differences in the different abilities of the alleles to suppress ISRE were because of the interactions and inhibitions at later stages from the IFN receptor, such as the JAK/STAT pathway. This might reflect the additional effects of the immune evasion potential of different NS1s.

  6. FRAXA and FRAXE: Evidence against segregation distortion and for an effect of intermediate alleles on learning disability

    OpenAIRE

    Teague, J. W.; Morton, N. E.; Dennis, N. R.; Curtis, G.; McKechnie, N.; Macpherson, J. N.; Murray, A.; Pound, M. C.; Sharrock, A. J.; Youings, S. A.; Jacobs, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    There have been several claims of segregation distortion (meiotic drive) for loci associated with diseases caused by trinucleotide repeats, leading us to test for this phenomenon in a large study of the X-linked loci FRAXA and FRAXE. We found no evidence of meiotic drive in females and no convincing evidence in males, where the limitation of risk to daughters creates a testing bias for alleles of interest. Alleles for pre- and full mutation, intermediate alleles, and common alleles were analy...

  7. Distribution of apolipoprotein E alleles in coras and huicholes from Nayarit and Nahuas and Mestizos from Veracruz, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Fuentes, Carlos S; González-Sobrino, Blanca Zoila; Gómez-Sanchez, Ariadna; Martínez Rueda, Hortencia; Chávez-Eakle, Rosa Aurora; Serrano Sánchez, Carlos

    2005-12-01

    We report allele frequencies for the most common polymorphism of the APOE gene in Mexican individuals from two regions not previously described: Coras and Huicholes from Nayarit, and Nahuas and mestizos from Veracruz. We also report APOE allele frequencies for inhabitants of Mexico City. These descriptive data underscore the allelic heterogeneity for this particular locus in Mexico.

  8. MULTIPRED2: A computational system for large-scale identification of peptides predicted to bind to HLA supertypes and alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Guang Lan; DeLuca, David S.; Keskin, Derin B.

    2011-01-01

    MULTIPRED2 is a computational system for facile prediction of peptide binding to multiple alleles belonging to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II DR molecules. It enables prediction of peptide binding to products of individual HLA alleles, combination of alleles, or HLA supertypes...

  9. Detecting low frequent loss-of-function alleles in genome wide association studies with red hair color as example

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Liu (Fan); M.V. Struchalin (Maksim); K. van Duijn (Kate); A. Hofman (Albert); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractMultiple loss-of-function (LOF) alleles at the same gene may influence a phenotype not only in the homozygote state when alleles are considered individually, but also in the compound heterozygote (CH) state. Such LOF alleles typically have low frequencies and moderate to large effects.

  10. Population estimators or progeny tests: what is the best method to assess null allele frequencies at SSR loci?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oddou-Muratorio, S.; Vendramin, G.G.; Buiteveld, J.; Fady, B.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear SSRs are notorious for having relatively high frequencies of null alleles, i.e. alleles that fail to amplify and are thus recessive and undetected in heterozygotes. In this paper, we compare two kinds of approaches for estimating null allele frequencies at seven nuclear microsatellite

  11. Safety and immunogenicity of multi-antigen AMA1-based vaccines formulated with CoVaccine HT™ and Montanide ISA 51 in rhesus macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walraven Vanessa

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing the breadth of the functional antibody response through immunization with Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (PfAMA1 multi-allele vaccine formulations has been demonstrated in several rodent and rabbit studies. This study assesses the safety and immunogenicity of three PfAMA1 Diversity-Covering (DiCo vaccine candidates formulated as an equimolar mixture (DiCo mix in CoVaccine HT™ or Montanide ISA 51, as well as that of a PfAMA1-MSP119 fusion protein formulated in Montanide ISA 51. Methods Vaccine safety in rhesus macaques was monitored by animal behaviour observation and assessment of organ and systemic functions through clinical chemistry and haematology measurements. The immunogenicity of vaccine formulations was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and in vitro parasite growth inhibition assays with three culture-adapted P. falciparum strains. Results These data show that both adjuvants were well tolerated with only transient changes in a few of the chemical and haematological parameters measured. DiCo mix formulated in CoVaccine HT™ proved immunologically and functionally superior to the same candidate formulated in Montanide ISA 51. Immunological data from the fusion protein candidate was however difficult to interpret as four out of six immunized animals were non-responsive for unknown reasons. Conclusions The study highlights the safety and immunological benefits of DiCo mix as a potential human vaccine against blood stage malaria, especially when formulated in CoVaccine HT™, and adds to the accumulating data on the specificity broadening effects of DiCo mix.

  12. Using multi-locus allelic sequence data to estimate genetic divergence among four Lilium (Liliaceae) cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahin, Arwa; Smulders, Marinus J. M.; van Tuyl, Jaap M.; Arens, Paul; Bakker, Freek T.

    2014-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) may enable estimating relationships among genotypes using allelic variation of multiple nuclear genes simultaneously. We explored the potential and caveats of this strategy in four genetically distant Lilium cultivars to estimate their genetic divergence from transcriptome sequences using three approaches: POFAD (Phylogeny of Organisms from Allelic Data, uses allelic information of sequence data), RAxML (Randomized Accelerated Maximum Likelihood, tree building based on concatenated consensus sequences) and Consensus Network (constructing a network summarizing among gene tree conflicts). Twenty six gene contigs were chosen based on the presence of orthologous sequences in all cultivars, seven of which also had an orthologous sequence in Tulipa, used as out-group. The three approaches generated the same topology. Although the resolution offered by these approaches is high, in this case there was no extra benefit in using allelic information. We conclude that these 26 genes can be widely applied to construct a species tree for the genus Lilium. PMID:25368628

  13. Frequent Unanticipated Alleles of lethal giant larvae in Drosophila Second Chromosome Stocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roegiers, Fabrice; Kavaler, Joshua; Tolwinski, Nicholas; Chou, Yu-Ting; Duan, Hong; Bejarano, Fernando; Zitserman, Diana; Lai, Eric C.

    2009-01-01

    Forty years ago, a high frequency of lethal giant larvae (lgl) alleles in wild populations of Drosophila melanogaster was reported. This locus has been intensively studied for its roles in epithelial polarity, asymmetric neural divisions, and restriction of tissue proliferation. Here, we identify a high frequency of lgl alleles in the Bloomington second chromosome deficiency kit and the University of California at Los Angeles Bruinfly FRT40A-lethal P collection. These unrecognized aberrations confound the use of these workhorse collections for phenotypic screening or genetic mapping. In addition, we determined that independent alleles of insensitive, reported to affect asymmetric cell divisions during sensory organ development, carry lgl deletions that are responsible for the observed phenotypes. Taken together, these results encourage the routine testing of second chromosome stocks for second-site alleles of lgl. PMID:19279324

  14. Association of HLA-DQA1 and DQB1 alleles with keloids in Chinese Hans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wen-Sheng; Wang, Jian-Feng; Yang, Sen; Xiao, Feng-Li; Quan, Cheng; Cheng, Hui; Wang, Pei-Guang; Zhang, An-Ping; Cai, Li-Qiong; Zhang, Xue-Jun

    2008-11-01

    Some studies have suggested that human HLA status might potentiate development of keloids phenotype, and exists ethnic differences. No report has been published about HLA-DQA1 and DQB1 alleles associated with keloids in Chinese Hans. To investigate whether HLA-DQA1 and DQB1 alleles are associated with genetic susceptibility to keloids in Chinese Hans. Polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP) method was used to analyze the distribution of HLA-DQA1 and DQB1 alleles among 192 patients with keloids and 273 healthy controls in Chinese Hans. (1) The frequencies of HLA-DQA1*0104, DQB1*0501 and DQB1*0503 (OR = 2.13, P(c) = 0.0063; OR = 14.42, P(c) HLA-DQA1 and DQB1 alleles and haplotypes with keloids.

  15. Using multi-locus allelic sequence data to estimate genetic divergence among four Lilium (Liliaceae cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arwa eShahin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Next Generation Sequencing (NGS may enable estimating relationships among genotypes using allelic variation of multiple nuclear genes simultaneously. We explored the potential and caveats of this strategy in four genetically distant Lilium cultivars to estimate their genetic divergence from transcriptome sequences using three approaches: POFAD (Phylogeny of Organisms from Allelic Data, uses allelic information of sequence data, RAxML (Randomized Accelerated Maximum Likelihood, tree building based on concatenated consensus sequences and Consensus Network (constructing a network summarizing among gene tree conflicts. Twenty six gene contigs were chosen based on the presence of orthologous sequences in all cultivars, seven of which also had an orthologous sequence in Tulipa, used as out-group. The three approaches generated the same topology. Although the resolution offered by these approaches is high, in this case there was no extra benefit in using allelic information. We conclude that these 26 genes can be widely applied to construct a species tree for the genus Lilium.

  16. Haptoglobin genotyping of Vietnamese: global distribution of HP del, complete deletion allele of the HP gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soejima, Mikiko; Agusa, Tetsuro; Iwata, Hisato; Fujihara, Junko; Kunito, Takashi; Takeshita, Haruo; Lan, Vi Thi Mai; Minh, Tu Binh; Takahashi, Shin; Trang, Pham Thi Kim; Viet, Pham Hung; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Koda, Yoshiro

    2015-01-01

    The haptoglobin (HP) gene deletion allele (HP(del)) is responsible for anhaptoglobinemia and a genetic risk factor for anaphylaxis reaction after transfusion due to production of the anti-HP antibody. The distribution of this allele has been explored by several groups including ours. Here, we studied the frequency of HP(del) in addition to the distribution of common HP genotypes in 293 Vietnamese. The HP(del) was encountered with the frequency of 0.020. The present result suggested that this deletion allele is restricted to East and Southeast Asians. Thus, this allele seems to be a potential ancestry informative marker for these populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Precision-engineering the Pseudomonas aeruginosa genome with two-step allelic exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hmelo, Laura R; Borlee, Bradley R; Almblad, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Allelic exchange is an efficient method of bacterial genome engineering. This protocol describes the use of this technique to make gene knockouts and knock-ins, as well as single-nucleotide insertions, deletions and substitutions, in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Unlike other approaches to allelic...... exchange, this protocol does not require heterologous recombinases to insert or excise selective markers from the target chromosome. Rather, positive and negative selections are enabled solely by suicide vector-encoded functions and host cell proteins. Here, mutant alleles, which are flanked by regions...... of homology to the recipient chromosome, are synthesized in vitro and then cloned into allelic exchange vectors using standard procedures. These suicide vectors are then introduced into recipient cells by conjugation. Homologous recombination then results in antibiotic-resistant single-crossover mutants...

  18. Filaggrin null alleles are not associated with hand eczema or contact allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørkov, Anne Lerbæk; Bisgaard, H; Agner, T

    2007-01-01

    association with hand eczema or contact allergy are unexplored. OBJECTIVES: To explore associations between the variant alleles, hand eczema, contact allergy and atopic dermatitis. METHODS: In total, 183 adult individuals participated in a clinical examination of the hands, patch testing and filaggrin...... genotyping. Children without any evidence of atopic dermatitis from the Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC) study were used as controls. The chi(2) test was used for comparison of allele frequencies. RESULTS: The majority (73%) had hand eczema, 25% had contact allergy and 14% had...... a diagnosis of atopic dermatitis. The association between atopic dermatitis and the filaggrin variant alleles was confirmed (odds ratio 3.5, P = 0.015). Allele frequencies in individuals with hand eczema or contact allergy were not statistically significantly increased. CONCLUSION: There is no association...

  19. Laboratory techniques in plant molecular biology taught with UniformMu insertion alleles of maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    An undergraduate course - Laboratory Techniques in Plant Molecular Biology - was organized around our research application of UniformMu insertion alleles to investigate mitochondrial functions in plant reproduction. The course objectives were to develop students’ laboratory, record keeping, bioinfor...

  20. Analysis of FBN1 allele expression by dermal fibroblasts from Marfan syndrome patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putman, E.A.; Cao, S.N.; Milewicz, D.M. [Univ. of Texas Medical School, Houston, TX (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Screening for mutations in the FBN1 cDNA from Marfan patient cell strains has detected mutations in only 10-15% of patients. In an attempt to explain this poor detection rate, we examined FBN1 allele expression and fibrillin synthesis by 26 cell strains from Marfan patients. DNA from the patients and 10 controls was assessed for the presence of a polymorphic Rsa I restriction site in the 3{prime} untranslated region of the FBN1 gene. Twelve of 26 patient and 5 of 10 control DNAs were heterozygous. Fibroblast RNA from the heterozygous cell strains was reverse-transcribed and subsequently PCR amplified using a [{sup 32}P]-labelled primer, digested with Rsa I and analyzed. Although 3 samples showed no transcript from one allele by ethidium bromide staining, a Betagen scanner detected low levels (10-15%) of that allele. In addition, there was unequal expression of the two alleles in three other patients; for example, only 30% expression from one allele. The remaining patients and the controls had equal expression of each allele. Fibrillin protein synthesis by fibroblasts from these heterozygous patients was also examined. After a 30 minute pulse with [{sup 35}S]-cysteine, cell lysates were collected and proteins analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The amount of fibrillin produced relative to a reference protein was determined using a Betagen scanner. Fibrillin protein synthesis was reduced in 2 of the 3 patients with very low RNA production from one of the FBN1 alleles. All other Marfan and control cell strains showed normal amounts of fibrillin synthesized. The low expression levels from one allele may contribute to, but not fully account for, the low detection rate of FBN1 mutations. Interestingly, protein synthesis levels were not affected in 4 of 6 cell strains demonstrating low levels of RNA expression.

  1. Asynchronous Replication, Mono-Allelic Expression, and Long Range Cis-Effects of ASAR6

    OpenAIRE

    Donley, Nathan; Stoffregen, Eric P.; Smith, Leslie; Montagna, Christina; Thayer, Mathew J.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian chromosomes initiate DNA replication at multiple sites along their length during each S phase following a temporal replication program. The majority of genes on homologous chromosomes replicate synchronously. However, mono-allelically expressed genes such as imprinted genes, allelically excluded genes, and genes on female X chromosomes replicate asynchronously. We have identified a cis-acting locus on human chromosome 6 that controls this replication-timing program. This locus encod...

  2. Semiparametric Allelic Tests for Mapping Multiple Phenotypes: Binomial Regression and Mahalanobis Distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Arunabha; Witte, John S; Ghosh, Saurabh

    2015-12-01

    Binary phenotypes commonly arise due to multiple underlying quantitative precursors and genetic variants may impact multiple traits in a pleiotropic manner. Hence, simultaneously analyzing such correlated traits may be more powerful than analyzing individual traits. Various genotype-level methods, e.g., MultiPhen (O'Reilly et al. []), have been developed to identify genetic factors underlying a multivariate phenotype. For univariate phenotypes, the usefulness and applicability of allele-level tests have been investigated. The test of allele frequency difference among cases and controls is commonly used for mapping case-control association. However, allelic methods for multivariate association mapping have not been studied much. In this article, we explore two allelic tests of multivariate association: one using a Binomial regression model based on inverted regression of genotype on phenotype (Binomial regression-based Association of Multivariate Phenotypes [BAMP]), and the other employing the Mahalanobis distance between two sample means of the multivariate phenotype vector for two alleles at a single-nucleotide polymorphism (Distance-based Association of Multivariate Phenotypes [DAMP]). These methods can incorporate both discrete and continuous phenotypes. Some theoretical properties for BAMP are studied. Using simulations, the power of the methods for detecting multivariate association is compared with the genotype-level test MultiPhen's. The allelic tests yield marginally higher power than MultiPhen for multivariate phenotypes. For one/two binary traits under recessive mode of inheritance, allelic tests are found to be substantially more powerful. All three tests are applied to two different real data and the results offer some support for the simulation study. We propose a hybrid approach for testing multivariate association that implements MultiPhen when Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) is violated and BAMP otherwise, because the allelic approaches assume HWE

  3. No evidence for allelic association between bipolar disorder and monoamine oxidase A gene polymorphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craddock, N.; Daniels, J.; Roberts, E. [Univ. of Wales, College of Medicine, Cardiff (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-08-14

    We have tested the hypothesis that DNA markers in the MAOA gene show allelic association with bipolar affective disorder. Eighty-four unrelated Caucasian patients with DSM III-R bipolar disorder and 84 Caucasian controls were typed for three markers in MAOA: a dinucleotide repeat in intron 2, a VNTR in intron 1, and an Fnu4HI RFLP in exon 8. No evidence for allelic association was observed between any of the markers and bipolar disorder. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  4. SIMPLIFYING CELIAC DISEASE PREDISPOSING HLA-DQ ALLELES DETERMINATION BY THE REAL TIME PCR METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole SELLESKI

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Celiac disease is an autoimmune enteropathy triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. Genetic susceptibility is associated with two sets of alleles, DQA1*05 - DQB1*02 and DQA1*03 - DQB1*03:02, which code for class II MHC DQ2 and DQ8 molecules, respectively. Approximately 90%-95% of celiac patients are HLA-DQ2 positive, and half of the remaining patients are HLA-DQ8 positive. In fact, during a celiac disease diagnostic workup, the absence of these specific DQA and DQB alleles has a near perfect negative predictive value. Objective Improve the detection of celiac disease predisposing alleles by combining the simplicity and sensitivity of real-time PCR (qPCR and melting curve analysis with the specificity of sequence-specific primers (SSP. Methods Amplifications of sequence-specific primers for DQA1*05 (DQ2, DQB1*02 (DQ2, and DQA1*03 (DQ8 were performed by the real time PCR method to determine the presence of each allele in independent reactions. Primers for Human Growth Hormone were used as an internal control. A parallel PCR-SSP protocol was used as a reference method to validate our results. Results Both techniques yielded equal results. From a total of 329 samples the presence of HLA predisposing alleles was determined in 187 (56.8%. One hundred fourteen samples (61% were positive for a single allele, 68 (36.3% for two alleles, and only 5 (2.7% for three alleles. Conclusion Results obtained by qPCR technique were highly reliable with no discordant results when compared with those obtained using PCR-SSP.

  5. Self-incompatibility of Prunus tenella and evidence that reproductively isolated species of Prunus have different SFB alleles coupled with an identical S-RNase allele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surbanovski, Nada; Tobutt, Kenneth R; Konstantinović, Miroslav; Maksimović, Vesna; Sargent, Daniel J; Stevanović, Vladimir; Bosković, Radovan I

    2007-05-01

    Many species of Prunus display an S-RNase-based gametophytic self-incompatibility (SI), controlled by a single highly polymorphic multigene complex termed the S-locus. This comprises tightly linked stylar- and pollen-expressed genes that determine the specificity of the SI response. We investigated SI of Prunus tenella, a wild species found in small, isolated populations on the Balkan peninsula, initially by pollination experiments and identifying stylar-expressed RNase alleles. Nine P. tenella S-RNase alleles (S(1)-S(9)) were cloned; their sequence analysis showed a very high ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous nucleotide substitutions (K(a)/K(s)) and revealed that S-RNase alleles of P. tenella, unlike those of Prunus dulcis, show positive selection in all regions except the conserved regions and that between C2 and RHV. Remarkably, S(8)-RNase, was found to be identical to S(1)-RNase from Prunus avium, a species that does not interbreed with P. tenella and, except for just one amino acid, to S(11) of P. dulcis. However, the corresponding introns and S-RNase-SFB intergenic regions showed considerable differences. Moreover, protein sequences of the pollen-expressed SFB alleles were not identical, harbouring 12 amino-acid replacements between those of P. tenella SFB(8) and P. avium SFB(1). Implications of this finding for hypotheses about the evolution of new S-specificities are discussed.

  6. Simultaneous analysis of multiple PCR amplicons enhances capillary SSCP discrimination of MHC alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaide, Miguel; López, Lidia; Tanferna, Alessandro; Blas, Julio; Sergio, Fabrizio; Hiraldo, Fernando

    2010-04-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genotyping still remains one of the most challenging issues for evolutionary ecologists. To date, none of the proposed methods have proven to be perfect, and all provide both important pros and cons. Although denaturing capillary electrophoresis has become a popular alternative, allele identification commonly relies upon conformational polymorphisms of two single-stranded DNA molecules at the most. Using the MHC class II (beta chain, exon 2) of the black kite (Aves: Accipitridae) as our model system, we show that the simultaneous analysis of overlapping PCR amplicons from the same target region substantially enhances allele discrimination. To cover this aim, we designed a multiplex PCR capable to generate four differentially sized and labeled amplicons from the same allele. Informative peaks to assist allele calling then fourfold those generated by the analysis of single PCR amplicons. Our approach proved successful to differentiate all the alleles (N=13) isolated from eight unrelated birds at a single optimal run temperature and electrophoretic conditions. In particular, we emphasize that this approach may constitute a straightforward and cost-effective alternative for the genotyping of single or duplicated MHC genes displaying low to moderate sets of divergent alleles.

  7. Mutation intolerant genes and targets of FMRP are enriched for nonsynonymous alleles in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonenko, Ganna; Richards, Alexander L; Walters, James T; Pocklington, Andrew; Chambert, Kimberly; Al Eissa, Mariam M; Sharp, Sally I; O'Brien, Niamh L; Curtis, David; Bass, Nicholas J; McQuillin, Andrew; Hultman, Christina; Moran, Jennifer L; McCarroll, Steven A; Sklar, Pamela; Neale, Benjamin M; Holmans, Peter A; Owen, Michael J; Sullivan, Patrick F; O'Donovan, Michael C

    2017-10-01

    Risk of schizophrenia is conferred by alleles occurring across the full spectrum of frequencies from common SNPs of weak effect through to ultra rare alleles, some of which may be moderately to highly penetrant. Previous studies have suggested that some of the risk of schizophrenia is attributable to uncommon alleles represented on Illumina exome arrays. Here, we present the largest study of exomic variation in schizophrenia to date, using samples from the United Kingdom and Sweden (10,011 schizophrenia cases and 13,791 controls). Single variants, genes, and gene sets were analyzed for association with schizophrenia. No single variant or gene reached genome-wide significance. Among candidate gene sets, we found significant enrichment for rare alleles (minor allele frequency [MAF] schizophrenia by excluding a role for uncommon exomic variants (0.01 ≤ MAF ≥ 0.001) that confer a relatively large effect (odds ratio [OR] > 4). We also show risk alleles within this frequency range exist, but confer smaller effects and should be identified by larger studies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Prevalence of Huntington's disease gene CAG trinucleotide repeat alleles in patients with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Eliana Marisa; Gillis, Tammy; Mysore, Jayalakshmi S; Lee, Jong-Min; Alonso, Isabel; Gusella, James F; Smoller, Jordan W; Sklar, Pamela; MacDonald, Marcy E; Perlis, Roy H

    2015-06-01

    Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor, cognitive, and psychiatric symptoms that are caused by huntingtin gene (HTT) CAG trinucleotide repeat alleles of 36 or more units. A greater than expected prevalence of incompletely penetrant HTT CAG repeat alleles observed among individuals diagnosed with major depressive disorder raises the possibility that another mood disorder, bipolar disorder, could likewise be associated with Huntington's disease. We assessed the distribution of HTT CAG repeat alleles in a cohort of individuals with bipolar disorder. HTT CAG allele sizes from 2,229 Caucasian individuals diagnosed with DSM-IV bipolar disorder were compared to allele sizes in 1,828 control individuals from multiple cohorts. We found that HTT CAG repeat alleles > 35 units were observed in only one of 4,458 chromosomes from individuals with bipolar disorder, compared to three of 3,656 chromosomes from control subjects. These findings do not support an association between bipolar disorder and Huntington's disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Allelic variation of bile salt hydrolase genes in Lactobacillus salivarius does not determine bile resistance levels.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fang, Fang

    2009-09-01

    Commensal lactobacilli frequently produce bile salt hydrolase (Bsh) enzymes whose roles in intestinal survival are unclear. Twenty-six Lactobacillus salivarius strains from different sources all harbored a bsh1 allele on their respective megaplasmids. This allele was related to the plasmid-borne bsh1 gene of the probiotic strain UCC118. A second locus (bsh2) was found in the chromosomes of two strains that had higher bile resistance levels. Four Bsh1-encoding allele groups were identified, defined by truncations or deletions involving a conserved residue. In vitro analyses showed that this allelic variation was correlated with widely varying bile deconjugation phenotypes. Despite very low activity of the UCC118 Bsh1 enzyme, a mutant lacking this protein had significantly lower bile resistance, both in vitro and during intestinal transit in mice. However, the overall bile resistance phenotype of this and other strains was independent of the bsh1 allele type. Analysis of the L. salivarius transcriptome upon exposure to bile and cholate identified a multiplicity of stress response proteins and putative efflux proteins that appear to broadly compensate for, or mask, the effects of allelic variation of bsh genes. Bsh enzymes with different bile-degrading kinetics, though apparently not the primary determinants of bile resistance in L. salivarius, may have additional biological importance because of varying effects upon bile as a signaling molecule in the host.

  10. DNA Methylation Maintains Allele-specific KIR Gene Expression in Human Natural Killer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Huei-Wei; Kurago, Zoya B.; Stewart, C. Andrew; Wilson, Michael J.; Martin, Maureen P.; Mace, Brian E.; Carrington, Mary; Trowsdale, John; Lutz, Charles T.

    2003-01-01

    Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) bind self–major histocompatibility complex class I molecules, allowing natural killer (NK) cells to recognize aberrant cells that have down-regulated class I. NK cells express variable numbers and combinations of highly homologous clonally restricted KIR genes, but uniformly express KIR2DL4. We show that NK clones express both 2DL4 alleles and either one or both alleles of the clonally restricted KIR 3DL1 and 3DL2 genes. Despite allele-independent expression, 3DL1 alleles differed in the core promoter by only one or two nucleotides. Allele-specific 3DL1 gene expression correlated with promoter and 5′ gene DNA hypomethylation in NK cells in vitro and in vivo. The DNA methylase inhibitor, 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, induced KIR DNA hypomethylation and heterogeneous expression of multiple KIR genes. Thus, NK cells use DNA methylation to maintain clonally restricted expression of highly homologous KIR genes and alleles. PMID:12538663

  11. Haplotype-based allele mining in the Japan-MAGIC rice population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Eiji; Ohtani, Toshikazu; Kanno, Noriko; Tsunematsu, Hiroshi; Nonoue, Yasunori; Yano, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Toshio; Yonemaru, Jun-Ichi

    2018-03-12

    Multi-parent advanced generation inter-cross (MAGIC) lines have broader genetic variation than bi-parental recombinant inbred lines. Genome-wide association study (GWAS) using high number of DNA polymorphisms such as single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is a popular tool for allele mining in MAGIC populations, in which the associations of phenotypes with SNPs are investigated; however, the effects of haplotypes from multiple founders on phenotypes are not considered. Here, we describe an improved method of allele mining using the newly developed Japan-MAGIC (JAM) population, which is derived from eight high-yielding rice cultivars in Japan. To obtain information on the haplotypes in the JAM lines, we predicted the haplotype blocks in the whole chromosomes using 16,345 SNPs identified via genotyping-by-sequencing analysis. Using haplotype-based GWAS, we clearly detected the loci controlling the glutinous endosperm and culm length traits. Information on the alleles of the eight founders, which was based on the effects of mutations revealed by the analysis of next-generation sequencing data, was used to narrow down the candidate genes and reveal the associations between alleles and phenotypes. The haplotype-based allele mining (HAM) proposed in this study is a promising approach to the detection of allelic variation in genes controlling agronomic traits in MAGIC populations.

  12. Human leukocyte antigen class II susceptibility conferring alleles among non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tipu, H.N.; Ahmed, T.A.; Bashir, M.M.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the frequency of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class II susceptibility conferring alleles among type 2 Diabetes mellitus patients, in comparison with healthy controls. Cross-sectional comparative study. Patients with non-insulin dependent Diabetes mellitus meeting World Health Organization criteria were studied. These were compared with age and gender matched healthy control subjects. For each subject (patients as well as controls), DNA was extracted from ethylene diamine tetra-acetate sample and HLA class II DRB1 typing was carried out at allele group level (DRB1*01-DRB1*16) by sequence specific primers. Human leukocyte antigen DRB1 type was determined by agarose gel electrophoresis and results were recorded. Frequencies were determined as number of an allele divided by total number of alleles per group; p-value was computed using Pearson's chi-square test. Among the 100 patients, there were 63 males and 37 females with 68 controls. A total of 13 different HLA DRB1 alleles were detected, with DRB1*15 being the commonest in both the groups. The allele DRB1*13 had statistically significant higher frequency in patient group as compared to controls (p 0.005). HLA DRB1*13 was found with a significantly increased frequency in non-insulin dependent Diabetes mellitus. (author)

  13. A pseudodeficiency allele common in non-Jewish Tay-Sachs carriers: Implications for carrier screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triggs-Raine, B. L.; Mules, E. H.; Kaback, M. M.; Lim-Steele, J. S. T.; Dowling, C. E.; Akerman, B. R.; Natowicz, M. R.; Grebner, E. E.; Navon, R.; Welch, J. P.; Greenberg, C. R.; Thomas, G. H.; Gravel, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    Deficiency of β-hexosaminidase A (Hex A) activity typically results in Tay-Sachs disease. However, healthy subjects found to be deficient in Hex A activity (i.e., pseudodeficient) by means of in vitro biochemical tests have been described. We analyzed the HEXA gene of one pseudodeficient subject and identified both a C739-to-T substitution that changes Arg247→Trp on one allele and a previously identified Tay-Sachs disease mutation on the second allele. Six additional pseudodeficient subjects were found to have the C739-to-T mutation. This allele accounted for 32% (20/62) of non-Jewish enzyme-defined Tay-Sachs disease carriers but for none of 36 Jewish enzyme-defined carriers who did not have one of three known mutations common to this group. The C739-to-T allele, together with a “true” Tay-Sachs disease allele, causes Hex A pseudodeficiency. Given both the large proportion of non-Jewish carriers with this allele and that standard biochemical screening cannot differentiate between heterozygotes for the C739-to-T mutations and Tay-Sachs disease carriers, DNA testing for this mutation in at-risk couples is essential. This could prevent unnecessary or incorrect prenatal diagnoses. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:1384323

  14. Association studies using family pools of outcrossing crops based on allele-frequency estimates from DNA sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashraf, Bilal; Jensen, Just; Asp, Torben

    2014-01-01

    from sequence read-counts for mapping. We show that, under additivity assumptions, there is a linear relationship between the family phenotype and family allele frequency, and that a regression of family phenotype on family allele frequency will estimate twice the allele substitution effect at a locus....... However, medium-to-low sequencing depth causes underestimation of the true allele substitution effect. An expression for this underestimation is derived for the case that parents are diploid, such that F2 families have up to four dosages of every allele. Using simulation studies, estimation of the allele...... effect from F2-family pools was verified and it was shown that the underestimation of the allele effect is correctly described. The optimal design for an association study when sequencing budget would be fixed is obtained using large sample size and lower sequence depth, and using higher SNP density...

  15. Dual redundant sequencing strategy: Full-length gene characterisation of 1056 novel and confirmatory HLA alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, V; Zweiniger, C; Surendranath, V; Lang, K; Schöfl, G; Dahl, A; Winkler, S; Lange, V; Böhme, I; Schmidt, A H

    2017-08-01

    The high-throughput department of DKMS Life Science Lab encounters novel human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles on a daily basis. To characterise these alleles, we have developed a system to sequence the whole gene from 5'- to 3'-UTR for the HLA loci A, B, C, DQB1 and DPB1 for submission to the European Molecular Biology Laboratory - European Nucleotide Archive (EMBL-ENA) and the IPD-IMGT/HLA Database. Our workflow is based on a dual redundant sequencing strategy. Using shotgun sequencing on an Illumina MiSeq instrument and single molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing on a PacBio RS II instrument, we are able to achieve highly accurate HLA full-length consensus sequences. Remaining conflicts are resolved using the R package DR2S (Dual Redundant Reference Sequencing). Given the relatively high throughput of this strategy, we have developed the semi-automated web service TypeLoader, to aid in the submission of sequences to the EMBL-ENA and the IPD-IMGT/HLA Database. In the IPD-IMGT/HLA Database release 3.24.0 (April 2016; prior to the submission of the sequences described here), only 5.2% of all known HLA alleles have been fully characterised together with intronic and UTR sequences. So far, we have applied our strategy to characterise and submit 1056 HLA alleles, thereby more than doubling the number of fully characterised alleles. Given the increasing application of next generation sequencing (NGS) for full gene characterisation in clinical practice, extending the HLA database concomitantly is highly desirable. Therefore, we propose this dual redundant sequencing strategy as a workflow for submission of novel full-length alleles and characterisation of sequences that are as yet incomplete. This would help to mitigate the predominance of partially known alleles in the database. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Allele-biased expression in differentiating human neurons: implications for neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyan Lin

    Full Text Available Stochastic processes and imprinting, along with genetic factors, lead to monoallelic or allele-biased gene expression. Stochastic monoallelic expression fine-tunes information processing in immune cells and the olfactory system, and imprinting plays an important role in development. Recent studies suggest that both stochastic events and imprinting may be more widespread than previously considered. We are interested in allele-biased gene expression occurring in the brain because parent-of-origin effects suggestive of imprinting appear to play a role in the transmission of schizophrenia (SZ and autism spectrum disorders (ASD in some families. In addition, allele-biased expression could help explain monozygotic (MZ twin discordance and reduced penetrance. The ability to study allele-biased expression in human neurons has been transformed with the advent of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC technology and next generation sequencing. Using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq we identified 801 genes in differentiating neurons that were expressed in an allele-biased manner. These included a number of putative SZ and ASD candidates, such as A2BP1 (RBFOX1, ERBB4, NLGN4X, NRG1, NRG3, NRXN1, and NLGN1. Overall, there was a modest enrichment for SZ and ASD candidate genes among those that showed evidence for allele-biased expression (chi-square, p = 0.02. In addition to helping explain MZ twin discordance and reduced penetrance, the capacity to group many candidate genes affecting a variety of molecular and cellular pathways under a common regulatory process - allele-biased expression - could have therapeutic implications.

  17. Fine mapping of dominant X-linked incompatibility alleles in Drosophila hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matute, Daniel R; Gavin-Smyth, Jackie

    2014-04-01

    Sex chromosomes have a large effect on reproductive isolation and play an important role in hybrid inviability. In Drosophila hybrids, X-linked genes have pronounced deleterious effects on fitness in male hybrids, which have only one X chromosome. Several studies have succeeded at locating and identifying recessive X-linked alleles involved in hybrid inviability. Nonetheless, the density of dominant X-linked alleles involved in interspecific hybrid viability remains largely unknown. In this report, we study the effects of a panel of small fragments of the D. melanogaster X-chromosome carried on the D. melanogaster Y-chromosome in three kinds of hybrid males: D. melanogaster/D. santomea, D. melanogaster/D. simulans and D. melanogaster/D. mauritiana. D. santomea and D. melanogaster diverged over 10 million years ago, while D. simulans (and D. mauritiana) diverged from D. melanogaster over 3 million years ago. We find that the X-chromosome from D. melanogaster carries dominant alleles that are lethal in mel/san, mel/sim, and mel/mau hybrids, and more of these alleles are revealed in the most divergent cross. We then compare these effects on hybrid viability with two D. melanogaster intraspecific crosses. Unlike the interspecific crosses, we found no X-linked alleles that cause lethality in intraspecific crosses. Our results reveal the existence of dominant alleles on the X-chromosome of D. melanogaster which cause lethality in three different interspecific hybrids. These alleles only cause inviability in hybrid males, yet have little effect in hybrid females. This suggests that X-linked elements that cause hybrid inviability in males might not do so in hybrid females due to differing sex chromosome interactions.

  18. Computational analysis of whole-genome differential allelic expression data in human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R Wagner

    Full Text Available Allelic imbalance (AI is a phenomenon where the two alleles of a given gene are expressed at different levels in a given cell, either because of epigenetic inactivation of one of the two alleles, or because of genetic variation in regulatory regions. Recently, Bing et al. have described the use of genotyping arrays to assay AI at a high resolution (approximately 750,000 SNPs across the autosomes. In this paper, we investigate computational approaches to analyze this data and identify genomic regions with AI in an unbiased and robust statistical manner. We propose two families of approaches: (i a statistical approach based on z-score computations, and (ii a family of machine learning approaches based on Hidden Markov Models. Each method is evaluated using previously published experimental data sets as well as with permutation testing. When applied to whole genome data from 53 HapMap samples, our approaches reveal that allelic imbalance is widespread (most expressed genes show evidence of AI in at least one of our 53 samples and that most AI regions in a given individual are also found in at least a few other individuals. While many AI regions identified in the genome correspond to known protein-coding transcripts, others overlap with recently discovered long non-coding RNAs. We also observe that genomic regions with AI not only include complete transcripts with consistent differential expression levels, but also more complex patterns of allelic expression such as alternative promoters and alternative 3' end. The approaches developed not only shed light on the incidence and mechanisms of allelic expression, but will also help towards mapping the genetic causes of allelic expression and identify cases where this variation may be linked to diseases.

  19. Association Between PAH Mutations and VNTR Alleles in the West Azerbaijani PKU Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Morteza; Rad, Isa Abdi; Jazani, Nima Hosseini; Zarrin, Rasoul; Ghazavi, Ahad

    2014-09-01

    We report the frequency of IVS10nt546, R261Q, S67P, R252W, and R408W mutations linked to PAH VNTR alleles in the west Azerbaijani PKU patients. VNTR alleles and IVS10nt546, R261Q, S67P, R252W, R408W mutations were studied in a total of 20 PKU patients by PCR and RFLP-PCR. Our analysis showed that 95% of cases were homozygote for an allele containing eight-repeat VNTR (VNTR8); while 5% were homozygote for an allele containing three-repeat VNTR (VNTR3). The IVS10nt546, R252W, and R261Q mutations were associated with VNTR8 allele, and also, R252W and S67P mutations were associated with VNTR3 allele. VNTR8 was common among mutant alleles as were IVS10nt546-VNTR8 (50%), R252W-VNTR8 (2.5%), and R261Q-VNTR8 (22.5%). The association of VNTR3 was found as R252W-VNTR3 (2.5%) and S67P-VNTR3 (2.5%) among studied cases. The frequency of IVS10nt546-VNTR8/IVS10nt546-VNTR8, IVS10nt546-VNTR8/ND-VNTR8, IVS10nt546-VNTR8/R252W-VNTR8, R261Q-VNTR8/R261Q-VNTR8, R261Q-VNTR8/ND-VNTR8, and S67P-VNTR3/ R252W-VNTR3 were 30%, 35%, 5%, 20%, 5%, and 5%, respectively. R408W mutation was not found in this study. The present report is the first in its own kind in the west Azerbaijani population (Iran) and implies that the most common PKU mutation in this population, IVS10nt546, is exclusively associated with VNTR8 allele, and IVS10nt546-VNTR8 alleles testing should be considered for routine carrier screening and prenatal diagnostic setting.

  20. Cytochrome P450 2D6 variants in a Caucasian population: Allele frequencies and phenotypic consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachse, C.; Brockmoeller, J.; Bauer, S.; Roots, I. [Humboldt Univ., Berlin (Germany)

    1997-02-01

    Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) metabolizes many important drugs. CYP2D6 activity ranges from complete deficiency to ultrafast metabolism, depending on at least 16 different known alleles. Their frequencies were determined in 589 unrelated German volunteers and correlated with enzyme activity measured by phenotyping with dextromethorphan or debrisoquine. For genotyping, nested PCR-RFLP tests from a PCR amplificate of the entire CYP2D6 gene were developed. The frequency of the CYP2D6*1 allele coding for extensive metabolizer (EM) phenotype was .364. The alleles coding for slightly (CYP2D6*2) or moderately (*9 and *10) reduced activity (intermediate metabolizer phenotype [IM]) showed frequencies of .324, .018, and .015, respectively. By use of novel PCR tests for discrimination, CYP2D6 gene duplication alleles were found with frequencies of.005 (*1 x 2), .013 (* 2 x 2), and .001 (*4 x 2). Frequencies of alleles with complete deficiency (poor metabolizer phenotype [PM]) were .207 (*4), .020 (*3 and *5), .009 (*6), and .001 (*7, *15, and *16). The defective CYP2D6 alleles *8, *11, *12, *13, and *14 were not found. All 41 PMs (7.0%) in this sample were explained by five mutations detected by four PCR-RFLP tests, which may suffice, together with the gene duplication test, for clinical prediction of CYP2D6 capacity. Three novel variants of known CYP2D6 alleles were discovered: *1C (T{sub 1957}C), *2B (additional C{sub 2558}T), and *4E (additional C{sub 2938}T). Analysis of variance showed significant differences in enzymatic activity measured by the dextromethorphan metabolic ratio (MR) between carriers of EN/PM (mean MR = .006) and IM/PM (mean MR = .014) alleles and between carriers of one (mean MR = .009) and two (mean MR = .003) functional alleles. The results of this study provide a solid basis for prediction of CYP2D6 capacity, as required in drug research and routine drug treatment. 35 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Structure of allelic variants of subtype 5 of histone H1 in pea Pisum sativum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanova, V S; Lester, D R; Berdnikov, V A; Andersson, I

    2005-06-01

    The pea genome contains seven histone H1 genes encoding different subtypes. Previously, the DNA sequence of only one gene, His1, coding for the subtype H1-1, had been identified. We isolated a histone H1 allele from a pea genomic DNA library. Data from the electrophoretic mobility of the pea H1 subtypes and their N-bromosuccinimide cleavage products indicated that the newly isolated gene corresponded to the H1-5 subtype encoded by His5. We confirmed this result by sequencing the gene from three pea lines with H1-5 allelic variants of altered electrophoretic mobility. The allele of the slow H1-5 variant differed from the standard allele by a nucleotide substitution that caused the replacement of the positively charged lysine with asparagine in the DNA-interacting domain of the histone molecule. A temperature-related occurrence had previously been demonstrated for this H1-5 variant in a study on a worldwide collection of pea germplasm. The variant tended to occur at higher frequencies in geographic regions with a cold climate. The fast allelic variant of H1-5 displayed a deletion resulting in the loss of a duplicated pentapeptide in the C-terminal domain.

  2. Osteogensis imperfecta type I is commonly due to a COLIAI null allel of type I collagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willing, M.C.; Pruchno, C.J. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)); Atkinson, M.; Byers, P.H. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States))

    1992-09-01

    Dermal fibroblasts from most individuals with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I produce about half the normal amount of type I procollagen, as a result of decreased synthesis of one of its constituent chains, pro[alpha](I). To test the hypothesis that decreased synthesis of pro[alpha](I) chains results from mutations in the COL1A1 gene, the authors used primer extension with nucleotide-specific chain termination to measure the contribution of individual COL1A1 alleles to the mRNA pool in fibroblasts from affected individuals. A polymorphic Mn/I restriction endonuclease site in the 3'-untranslated region of COL1A1 was used to distinguish the transcripts of the two alleles in heterozygous individuals. Twenty-three individuals from 21 unrelated families were studied. In each case there was marked diminution in steady-state mRNA levels from one COL1A2 allele. Loss of an allele through deletion or rearrangement was not the cause of the diminished COL1A1 mRNA levels. Primer extension with nucleotide-specific chain termination allows identification of the mutant COL1A1 allele in cell strains that are heterozygous for an expressed polymorphism. It is applicable to sporadic cases, to small families, and to large families in whom key individuals are uninformative at the polymorphic sites used in linkage analysis, making it a useful adjunct to the biochemical screening of collagenous proteins for OI. 40 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Distinct neural correlates of episodic memory among apolipoprotein E alleles in cognitively normal elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Hao; Shi, Yongmei; Chen, Gang; Wang, Zan; Liu, Duan; Yue, Chunxian; Ward, B Douglas; Li, Wenjun; Xu, Zhan; Chen, Guangyu; Guo, Qi-Hao; Xu, Jun; Li, Shi-Jiang; Zhang, Zhijun

    2018-02-02

    The apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 and ε2 alleles are acknowledged genetic factors modulating Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk and episodic memory (EM) deterioration in an opposite manner. Mounting neuroimaging studies describe EM-related brain activity differences among APOE alleles but remain limited in elucidating the underlying mechanism. Here, we hypothesized that the APOE ε2, ε3, and ε4 alleles have distinct EM neural substrates, as a manifestation of degeneracy, underlying their modulations on EM-related brain activity and AD susceptibility. To test the hypothesis, we identified neural correlates of EM function by correlating intrinsic hippocampal functional connectivity networks with neuropsychological EM performances in a voxelwise manner, with 129 cognitively normal elderly subjects (36 ε2 carriers, 44 ε3 homozygotes, and 49 ε4 carriers). We demonstrated significantly different EM neural correlates among the three APOE allele groups. Specifically, in the ε3 homozygotes, positive EM neural correlates were characterized in the Papez circuit regions; in the ε4 carriers, positive EM neural correlates involved the lateral temporal cortex, premotor cortex/sensorimotor cortex/superior parietal lobule, and cuneus; and in the ε2 carriers, negative EM neural correlates appeared in the bilateral frontopolar, posteromedial, and sensorimotor cortex. Further, in the ε4 carriers, the interaction between age and EM function occurred in the temporoparietal junction and prefrontal cortex. Our findings suggest that the underlying mechanism of APOE polymorphism modulations on EM function and AD susceptibility is genetically related to the neural degeneracy of EM function across APOE alleles.

  4. Functional Analysis of the Aurora Kinase A Ile31 Allelic Variant in Human Prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Matarasso

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of the centrosome-associated serine/ threonine kinase Aurora Kinase A (AURKA has been demonstrated in both advanced prostate cancer and high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia lesions. The single-nucleotide polymorphism T91A (Phe3lile has been implicated in AURKA overexpression and has been suggested as a low-penetrance susceptibility allele in multiple human cancers, including prostate cancer. We studied the transcriptional consequences of the AURKA Ile31 allele in 28 commercial normal prostate tissue RNA samples (median age, 27 years. Significant overexpression of AURKA was demonstrated in homozygous and heterozygous AURKA Ile31 prostate RNA (2.07-fold and 1.93-fold, respectively; P < .05. Expression levels of 1509 genes differentiated between samples homozygous for Phe31 alleles and samples homozygous for Ile31 alleles (P = .05. Gene Ontology classification revealed overrepresentation of cell cycle arrest, ubiquitin cycle, antiapoptosis, angiogenesisrelated genes. When these hypothesis-generating results were subjected to more stringent statistical criteria, overexpression of a novel transcript of the natural killer tumor recognition sequence (NKTR gene was revealed and validated in homozygous Ile31 samples (2.6-fold; P < .05. In summary, our data suggest an association between the AURKA Ile31 allele and an altered transcriptome in normal non-neopasic prostates.

  5. ACNE: a summarization method to estimate allele-specific copy numbers for Affymetrix SNP arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Estevez, Maria; Bengtsson, Henrik; Rubio, Angel

    2010-08-01

    Current algorithms for estimating DNA copy numbers (CNs) borrow concepts from gene expression analysis methods. However, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays have special characteristics that, if taken into account, can improve the overall performance. For example, cross hybridization between alleles occurs in SNP probe pairs. In addition, most of the current CN methods are focused on total CNs, while it has been shown that allele-specific CNs are of paramount importance for some studies. Therefore, we have developed a summarization method that estimates high-quality allele-specific CNs. The proposed method estimates the allele-specific DNA CNs for all Affymetrix SNP arrays dealing directly with the cross hybridization between probes within SNP probesets. This algorithm outperforms (or at least it performs as well as) other state-of-the-art algorithms for computing DNA CNs. It better discerns an aberration from a normal state and it also gives more precise allele-specific CNs. The method is available in the open-source R package ACNE, which also includes an add on to the aroma.affymetrix framework (http://www.aroma-project.org/).

  6. Allelic imbalance of multiple sclerosis susceptibility genes IKZF3 and IQGAP1 in human peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshari, Pankaj K; Harbo, Hanne F; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Aarseth, Jan H; Bos, Steffan D; Berge, Tone

    2016-04-14

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Recent genome-wide studies have revealed more than 110 single nucleotide polymorphisms as associated with susceptibility to multiple sclerosis, but their functional contribution to disease development is mostly unknown. Consistent allelic imbalance was observed for rs907091 in IKZF3 and rs11609 in IQGAP1, which are in strong linkage disequilibrium with the multiple sclerosis associated single nucleotide polymorphisms rs12946510 and rs8042861, respectively. Using multiple sclerosis patients and healthy controls heterozygous for rs907091 and rs11609, we showed that the multiple sclerosis risk alleles at IKZF3 and IQGAP1 are expressed at higher levels as compared to the protective allele. Furthermore, individuals homozygous for the multiple sclerosis risk allele at IQGAP1 had a significantly higher total expression of IQGAP1 compared to individuals homozygous for the protective allele. Our data indicate a possible regulatory role for the multiple sclerosis-associated IKZF3 and IQGAP1 variants. We suggest that such cis-acting mechanisms may contribute to the multiple sclerosis association of single nucleotide polymorphisms at IKZF3 and IQGAP1.

  7. Parent of origin effect and differential allelic expression of BDNF Val66Met in suicidal behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luca, Vincenzo; Souza, Renan P; Zai, Clement C; Panariello, Fabio; Javaid, Naima; Strauss, John; Kennedy, James L; Tallerico, Teresa; Wong, Albert H

    2011-02-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in the pathophysiology of mood disorders and may also be involved in suicidal behaviour since BDNF levels are decreased in brain and plasma of suicide victims. Because the differential allelic expression of Val66Met BDNF gene on suicidal behaviour has not been investigated, we analyzed the parent-of-origin effect (POE) in suicide attempters and the differential expression of BDNF Val66Met alleles in suicide victims. We performed a family-based association study and ETDT analyses of the Val66Met polymorphism in nuclear families with at least one subject affected by major psychosis with suicidal behaviour, and compared allele-specific mRNA levels in post-mortem brain samples from suicide and non-suicide victims. The subjects included in this study have diagnosis of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder type I and type II. Allele 3 in the GT repeat polymorphism was transmitted significantly more often to patients who attempted suicide (maternal transmissions: 46/22, P = 0.003; paternal transmissions: 55/30, P = 0.006). There was no significant difference between maternal and paternal transmission ratios. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in the ratio of Val/Met-specific mRNA expression between suicide victims and controls. These data do not support a role for allelic imbalance or POE of BDNF for suicidal behaviour in major psychoses.

  8. A pseudodeficiency allele common in non-Jewish Tay-Sachs carriers: Implications for carrier screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triggs-Raine, B.L.; Akerman, B.R.; Gravel, R.A. (McGill Univ.-Montreal Children' s Hospital Research Institute, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)); Mules, E.H.; Thomas, G.H.; Dowling, C.E. (Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Kaback, M.M.; Lim-Steele, J.S.T. (Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)); Natowicz, M.R. (Eunice Kennedy Shriver Center for Mental Retardation, Waltham, MA (United States)); Grebner, E.E. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)); Navon, R.R. (Tel-Aviv Univ., Kfar-Sava (Israel)); Welch, J.P. (Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, Nova, Scotia (Canada)); Greenberg, C.R. (Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg (Canada))

    1992-10-01

    Deficiency of [beta]-hexosaminidase A (Hex A) activity typically results in Tay-Sachs disease. However, healthy subjects found to be deficient in Hex A activity (i.e., pseudodeficient) by means of in vitro biochemical tests have been described. The authors analyzed the HEXA gene of one pseudodeficient subject and identified both a C[sub 739]-to-T substitution that changes Arg[sub 247][yields]Trp on one allele and a previously identified Tay-Sachs disease mutation of the second allele. Six additional pseudodeficient subjects were found to have the C[sub 739]-to-T but for none of 36 Jewish enzyme-defined carries who did not have one of three known mutations common to this group. The C[sub 739]-to-T allele, together with a [open quotes]true[close quotes] Tay-Sachs disease allele, causes Hex A pseudodeficiency. Given both the large proportion of non-Jewish carriers with this allele and that standard biochemical screening cannot differentiate between heterozygotes for the C[sub 739]-to-T mutations and Tay-Sachs disease carriers, DNA testing for this mutation in at-risk couples is essential. This could prevent unnecessary or incorrect prenatal diagnoses. 40 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Identification of 32 major histocompatibility complex class I alleles in African green monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y; Li, A; Li, L; Yan, X; Fa, Y; Zeng, L; Fan, J; Liu, B; Sun, Z

    2014-09-01

    The African green monkey may be an ideal replacement for the rhesus monkey in biomedical research, but relatively little is known about the genetic background of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. In analysis of 12 African green monkeys, 13 Chae-A and 19 Chae-B alleles were identified. Among these alleles, 12 Chae-A and 9 Chae-B were new lineages. The full amino acid length deduced for Chae-A genes is 365 amino acids, but for Chae-B genes, the lengths are 365, 362, 361, and 359 amino acids, respectively. There were 1-3 Chae-A alleles and 2-5 Chae-B alleles in each animal. In African green monkeys, rhesus monkeys, and cynomolgus monkeys, the MHC-A and MHC-B alleles display trans-species polymorphism, rather than being clustered in a species-specific fashion. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Development of a high resolution melting method for genotyping of risk HLA-DQA1 and PLA2R1 alleles and ethnic distribution of these risk alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Guanglin; Zhang, Lina; Xu, Yujun; Cianflone, Katherine; Ding, Hu; Wang, Dao Wen

    2013-02-10

    Recent studies have demonstrated that alleles at single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs2187668 and rs4664308 within genes HLA-DQA1 and PLA2R1, respectively, had a significant impact on the susceptibility to idiopathic membranous nephropathy (IMN). Analysis of the two genomic loci could identify alleles for individuals at risk for IMN. Conventional methods for genotyping are labor intensive, expensive or time consuming. High resolution melting (HRM) is a new technique for genotyping and has the advantages of simplicity, speed, high sensitivity and low cost. Here, we describe genotyping of SNPs rs2187668 and rs4664308 using HRM. In this study, we identified polymorphisms of rs2187668 and rs4664308 in 480 healthy unrelated Chinese volunteers of two ethnic groups from three different geographical areas in China. The two genomic loci were genotyped by HRM using a saturating fluorescent dye SYTO® 9 on 7900 HT and RG 6000 instruments, and were further confirmed by direct DNA sequencing. Three different SNP genotypes were sufficiently distinguished by HRM with mean sensitivity of 98.8% and mean error rate of 1.9%. In addition, the allele frequencies varied greatly based on ethnic or geographic origins. In conclusion, HRM is a rapid, cost efficient, sensitive, suitable technique for genotyping, and simple enough to be readily implemented in a diagnostic laboratory. We believe this will be a valuable technique for determining the genotype of rs2187668 and rs4664308 and for assessing individual susceptibility to IMN. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Genetic analysis of allelic variants, single-step mutations, three allelic variants of the 15 STR loci in the population of Northeast Bosnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadžiavdić Vesna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diversity of nuclear DNA microsatellite markers were analyzed in a reference sample of the population of northeast Bosnia. 437 samples taken from unrelated individuals were processed and three samples of paternity proof were shown. Detection effectiveness profile of the research, points to a valid choice of method of extraction, amplification and genotyping STR loci with PowerPlextm16. Genetic analysis of allelic variants of the 15 STR loci detected 17 samples determined as microvariants. Samples were divided into 15 different allelic variants at 7 different loci, and are: in locus D7S820, D16S539, D3S1358, D18S51, PENTA D, PENTA E and in locus vWA. Genetic analysis of mutations in cases of paternity determined three examples of single-step mutations in the loci FGA, Penta D and D3S1358. Genetic analysis of observed STR loci detected three allelic variant of genotype combination 7/10/11.3 in locus D7S820 Type II.

  12. Identification of repeat sequence heterogeneity at the polymorphic short tandem repeat locus HUMTH01[AATG]n and reassignment of alleles in population analysis by using a locus-specific allelic ladder.

    OpenAIRE

    Puers, C; Hammond, H A; Jin, L; Caskey, C T; Schumm, J W

    1993-01-01

    An allelic ladder containing amplified sequences of seven alleles of the polymorphic human tyrosine hydroxylase locus, HUMTH01, was constructed and employed as a standard marker. Sequence analysis of each ladder component indicates that fragments differ by integral multiples of the AATG core repeat sequence characteristic of this locus. Individual alleles are designated "5" through "11," according to the number of complete reiterations of the core repeat contained within them. Comparison of t...

  13. Maternal and fetal human leukocyte antigen class Ia and II alleles in severe preeclampsia and eclampsia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emmery, J.; Hachmon, R.; Pyo, C. W.

    2016-01-01

    and -DPB1) alleles and the risk of developing severe preeclampsia/eclampsia were investigated in a detailed and large-scale study. In total, 259 women diagnosed with severe preeclampsia or eclampsia and 260 matched control women with no preeclampsia, together with their neonates, were included in the study....... HLA genotyping for mothers and neonates was performed using next-generation sequencing. The HLA-DPB1*04:01:01G allele was significantly more frequent (Pc=0.044) among women diagnosed with severe preeclampsia/eclampsia compared with controls, and the DQA1*01:02:01G allele frequency was significantly...... lower (Pc=0.042) among newborns born by women with severe preeclampsia/eclampsia compared with controls. In mothers with severe preeclampsia/eclampsia, homozygosity was significantly more common compared with controls at the HLA-DPB1 locus (Pc=0.0028). Although the current large study shows some...

  14. Statistical model for degraded DNA samples and adjusted probabilities for allelic drop-out

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Mogensen, Helle Smidt

    2012-01-01

    Abstract DNA samples found at a scene of crime or obtained from the debris of a mass disaster accident are often subject to degradation. When using the STR DNA technology, the DNA profile is observed via a so-called electropherogram (EPG), where the alleles are identified as signal peaks above...... a certain level or above a signal to noise threshold. Degradation implies that these peak intensities decrease in strength for longer short tandem repeat (STR) sequences. Consequently, long STR loci may fail to produce peak heights above the limit of detection resulting in allelic or locus drop......-outs. In this paper, we present a method for measuring the degree of degradation of a sample and demonstrate how to incorporate this in estimating the probability of allelic drop-out. This is done by extending an existing method derived for non-degraded samples. The performance of the methodology is evaluated using...

  15. Statistical model for degraded DNA samples and adjusted probabilities for allelic drop-out

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Mogensen, Helle Smidt

    2012-01-01

    DNA samples found at a scene of crime or obtained from the debris of a mass disaster accident are often subject to degradation. When using the STR DNA technology, the DNA profile is observed via a so-called electropherogram (EPG), where the alleles are identified as signal peaks above a certain...... level or above a signal to noise threshold. Degradation implies that these peak intensities decrease in strength for longer short tandem repeat (STR) sequences. Consequently, long STR loci may fail to produce peak heights above the limit of detection resulting in allelic or locus drop......-outs. In this paper, we present a method for measuring the degree of degradation of a sample and demonstrate how to incorporate this in estimating the probability of allelic drop-out. This is done by extending an existing method derived for non-degraded samples. The performance of the methodology is evaluated using...

  16. How allele frequency and study design affect association test statistics with misrepresentation errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escott-Price, Valentina; Ghodsi, Mansoureh; Schmidt, Karl Michael

    2014-04-01

    We evaluate the effect of genotyping errors on the type-I error of a general association test based on genotypes, showing that, in the presence of errors in the case and control samples, the test statistic asymptotically follows a scaled non-central $\\chi ^2$ distribution. We give explicit formulae for the scaling factor and non-centrality parameter for the symmetric allele-based genotyping error model and for additive and recessive disease models. They show how genotyping errors can lead to a significantly higher false-positive rate, growing with sample size, compared with the nominal significance levels. The strength of this effect depends very strongly on the population distribution of the genotype, with a pronounced effect in the case of rare alleles, and a great robustness against error in the case of large minor allele frequency. We also show how these results can be used to correct $p$-values.

  17. The effect of subdivision on variation at multi-allelic loci under balancing selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierup, M H; Vekemans, X; Charlesworth, D

    2000-01-01

    Simulations are used to investigate the expected pattern of variation at loci under different forms of multi-allelic balancing selection in a finite island model of a subdivided population. The objective is to evaluate the effect of restricted migration among demes on the distribution of polymorp......Simulations are used to investigate the expected pattern of variation at loci under different forms of multi-allelic balancing selection in a finite island model of a subdivided population. The objective is to evaluate the effect of restricted migration among demes on the distribution......, and to the possibility of inferring ancient population genetic events and processes. In addition, it is shown that, for sporophytic self-incompatibility systems, it is not necessarily true in a subdivided population that recessive alleles are more frequent than dominant ones. Udgivelsesdato: 2000-Aug...

  18. Differential allelic expression of a fibrillin gene (FBNI) in patients with Marfan syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hewett, D.; Lynch, J.; Sykes, B. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Firth, H. [Churchill Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom); Child, A. [St. George`s Hospital Medical School, London (United Kingdom)

    1994-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a connective-tissue disorder affecting cardiovascular, skeletal, and ocular systems. The major Marfan locus has been identified as the FBN1 gene on chromosome 15; this codes for the extracellular-matrix protein fibrillin, a 350-kD constituent of the 8-10-nm elastin-associated microfibrils. The authors identified five MFS patients who were heterozygous for an RsaI restriction-site dimorphism in the 3{prime} UTR of the FBN1 gene. This expressed variation was used to distinguish the mRNA output from each of the two FBN1 alleles in fibroblast cultures from these five patients. Three of the patients were shown to produce <5% of the normal level of FBN1 transcripts from one of their alleles. This null-allele phenotype was not observed in 10 nonmarfanoid fibroblast cell lines. 26 refs., 4 figs.

  19. A novel JK null allele associated with typing discrepancies among African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingsley, Katrina L; Posadas, Jeff B; Moulds, Joann M; Gaur, Lakshmi K

    2013-01-01

    The Jknun (Jk-3) phenotype, attributable to null or silenced alleles, has predominantly been found in persons of Polynesian descent. With the increased use of molecular genotyping, many new silencing mutations have been identified in persons of other ethnic backgrounds. To date, only two JK null alleles have been reported in African Americans, JK*01N.04 and JK*OlN.OS.A comparative study was undertaken to determine whether JK mutations were present in the regional African American population. Results of donor genotyping were compared with previously recorded results of serologic tests, and discrepant results were investigated. Although the two previously identified polymorphisms were not detected in the discrepant samples, a novel allele (191G>A) was identified and was assigned the ISBT number JK*02N.09. This study illustrates a limitation of using single-nucleotide polymorphisms for prediction of blood group antigens.

  20. JK null alleles identified from Japanese individuals with Jk(a−b−) phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onodera, T; Sasaki, K; Tsuneyama, H; Isa, K; Ogasawara, K; Satake, M; Tadokoro, K; Uchikawa, M

    2014-05-01

    The Kidd blood group system consists of three common phenotypes: Jk(a+b−), Jk(a−b+) and Jk(a+b+), and one rare phenotype, Jk(a−b−). Jka/Jkb polymorphism is associated with c.838G>A (p.Asp280Asn) in exon 9 of the JK (SLC14A1) gene, and the corresponding alleles are named JK*01 and JK*02. The rare phenotype Jk(a−b−) was first found in a Filipina of Spanish and Chinese ancestry, and to date, several JK null alleles responsible for the Jk(a−b−) phenotype have been reported. We report seven novel JK null alleles, 4 with a JK*01 background and 3 with a JK*02 background, identified from Jk(a−b−) Japanese.

  1. HLA-DR and -DQ alleles in Italian patients with melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lulli, P; Grammatico, P; Brioli, G; Catricalà, C; Morellini, M; Roccella, M; Mariani, B; Pennesi, G; Roccella, F; Cappellacci, S; Trabace, S

    1998-03-01

    Controversial data have been reported about HLA alleles and susceptibility to melanoma. Our investigation was undertaken to analyze the relationship between HLA alleles distribution in patients with melanoma and susceptibility to the tumor, in order to study the possible correlation between HLA class II DQA1, DQB1 and DRB1 genes involved in immune recognition, and melanoma, usually considered a highly immunogenic tumor. We therefore typed by means of PCR-SSP (sequence-specific primers) 53 Italian patients and 53 healthy random controls coming from the same geographic area. We observed a decrease of all haplotypes bearing DQB1*0301, DQB1*0302 and DQB1*0303 alleles but not of haplotype DRB1*11;DQA1*0501;DQB1*0301. Our results seem to support the hypothesis of a protective role of some DQ3-bearing haplotypic combinations in melanoma.

  2. Adverse effect of the CCR5 promoter -2459A allele on HIV-1 disease progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, T B; Kristiansen, T B; Katzenstein, T L

    2001-01-01

    HIV positive individuals heterozygous for a 32 basepair deletion in the CCR5 encoding gene (CCR5 Delta32) have a reduced number of CCR5 receptors on the cell surface and a slower progression towards AIDS and death. Other human polymorphisms, such as the CCR2 64I and the CCR5 promoter -2459 A....... Genotypes were determined in 119 individuals enrolled in the Copenhagen AIDS Cohort. When including the concurrent effects of the CCR5 Delta32 and CCR2 64I mutations, homozygous carriers of the CCR5 promoter -2459A allele had a significantly faster progression towards death than heterozygous A/G individuals...... (P = 0.03), whereas this adverse effect was not significant when comparing A/A and G/G individuals. However, independent analysis revealed a significant adverse effect of the CCR5 promoter -2459A allele. Homozygous carriers of the -2459A allele that lack the protective effects of the CCR5 Delta32...

  3. Loss of RNA expression and allele-specific expression associated with congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean, David M.; Homsy, Jason; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Patel, Neil; Gorham, Joshua; DePalma, Steven R.; Ware, James S.; Zaidi, Samir; Ma, Wenji; Patel, Nihir; Lifton, Richard P.; Chung, Wendy K.; Kim, Richard; Shen, Yufeng; Brueckner, Martina; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Sharp, Andrew J.; Seidman, Christine E.; Gelb, Bruce D.; Seidman, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD), a prevalent birth defect occurring in 1% of newborns, likely results from aberrant expression of cardiac developmental genes. Mutations in a variety of cardiac transcription factors, developmental signalling molecules and molecules that modify chromatin cause at least 20% of disease, but most CHD remains unexplained. We employ RNAseq analyses to assess allele-specific expression (ASE) and biallelic loss-of-expression (LOE) in 172 tissue samples from 144 surgically repaired CHD subjects. Here we show that only 5% of known imprinted genes with paternal allele silencing are monoallelic versus 56% with paternal allele expression—this cardiac-specific phenomenon seems unrelated to CHD. Further, compared with control subjects, CHD subjects have a significant burden of both LOE genes and ASE events associated with altered gene expression. These studies identify FGFBP2, LBH, RBFOX2, SGSM1 and ZBTB16 as candidate CHD genes because of significantly altered transcriptional expression. PMID:27670201

  4. TTC21B contributes both causal and modifying alleles across the ciliopathy spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Erica E.; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Qin; Diplas, Bill H.; Davey, Lisa M.; Hartley, Jane; Stoetzel, Corinne; Szymanska, Katarzyna; Ramaswami, Gokul; Logan, Clare V.; Muzny, Donna M.; Young, Alice C.; Wheeler, David A.; Cruz, Pedro; Morgan, Margaret; Lewis, Lora R.; Cherukuri, Praveen; Maskeri, Baishali; Hansen, Nancy F.; Mullikin, James C.; Blakesley, Robert W.; Bouffard, Gerard G.; Gyapay, Gabor; Reiger, Susanne; Tönshoff, Burkhard; Kern, Ilse; Soliman, Neveen A.; Neuhaus, Thomas J.; Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Kayserili, Hulya; Gallagher, Tomas E.; Lewis, Richard A.; Bergmann, Carsten; Otto, Edgar A.; Saunier, Sophie; Scambler, Peter J.; Beales, Philip L.; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Maher, Eamonn R.; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Dollfus, Hélène; Johnson, Colin A.; Green, Eric D.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Pierce, Eric A.; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    Ciliary dysfunction leads to a broad range of overlapping phenotypes, termed collectively as ciliopathies. This grouping is underscored by genetic overlap, where causal genes can also contribute modifying alleles to clinically distinct disorders. Here we show that mutations in TTC21B/IFT139, encoding a retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) protein, cause both isolated nephronophthisis (NPHP) and syndromic Jeune Asphyxiating Thoracic Dystrophy (JATD). Moreover, although systematic medical resequencing of a large, clinically diverse ciliopathy cohort and matched controls showed a similar frequency of rare changes, in vivo and in vitro evaluations unmasked a significant enrichment of pathogenic alleles in cases, suggesting that TTC21B contributes pathogenic alleles to ∼5% of ciliopathy patients. Our data illustrate how genetic lesions can be both causally associated with diverse ciliopathies, as well as interact in trans with other disease-causing genes, and highlight how saturated resequencing followed by functional analysis of all variants informs the genetic architecture of disorders. PMID:21258341

  5. HLA alleles associated with slow progression to AIDS truly prefer to present HIV-1 p24

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghans, José A M; Mølgaard, Anne; de Boer, Rob J

    2007-01-01

    affinity of the best-binding p24 epitopes and the relative hazard of HIV-1 disease progression for a large number of HLA molecules. When the epitopes targeted by protective HLA alleles were mapped to the known p24 structure, we found that mutations in these epitopes are likely to disturb the p24 dimer......BACKGROUND: The mechanism behind the association between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules and the rate of HIV-1 disease progression is still poorly understood. Recent data suggest that "protective" HLA molecules, i.e. those associated with a low HIV-1 viral load and relatively slow disease...... and effect, we predicted HIV-1 epitopes from the whole genome of HIV-1, and found that protective HLA alleles have a true preference for the p24 Gag protein, while non-protective HLA alleles preferentially target HIV-1 Nef. In line with this, we found a significant negative correlation between the predicted...

  6. HLA Alleles Associated with Slow Progression to AIDS Truly Prefer to Present HIV-1 p24

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghans, J. A.; Molgaard, A.; Boer, R. J. de

    2007-01-01

    affinity of the best-binding p24 epitopes and the relative hazard of HIV-1 disease progression for a large number of HLA molecules. When the epitopes targeted by protective HLA alleles were mapped to the known p24 structure, we found that mutations in these epitopes are likely to disturb the p24 dimer......BACKGROUND: The mechanism behind the association between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules and the rate of HIV-1 disease progression is still poorly understood. Recent data suggest that "protective" HLA molecules, i.e. those associated with a low HIV-1 viral load and relatively slow disease...... and effect, we predicted HIV-1 epitopes from the whole genome of HIV-1, and found that protective HLA alleles have a true preference for the p24 Gag protein, while non-protective HLA alleles preferentially target HIV-1 Nef. In line with this, we found a significant negative correlation between the predicted...

  7. An unusual occurrence of repeated single allele variation on Y-STR locus DYS458

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Shrivastava

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Six brothers were accused of gagging and raping a woman. A single male Y-STR profile was obtained from vaginal smear swab and clothes of the victim, which did not match with the DNA profile of the accused brothers. As a reference point, the blood sample of their father (aged 87 years was also analyzed with the same kit. The Y-STR haplotype of all six brothers was found to be the same as that of their father except at locus DYS458. At this locus, while the eldest, second and fourth siblings share allele 18 with their father, a loss of one repeat (allele 17 instead of 18 is observed in the third son while fifth and sixth siblings have allele 19 representing a gain of one repeat. Thus, two changes viz. a gain (twice and loss of one repeat at this locus in one generation is both interesting and unusual.

  8. Mono-allelic retrotransposon insertion addresses epigenetic transcriptional repression in human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Hyang-Min; Heo, Kyu; Mitchell, Kasey J; Yang, Allen S

    2012-02-02

    Retrotransposons have been extensively studied in plants and animals and have been shown to have an impact on human genome dynamics and evolution. Their ability to move within genomes gives retrotransposons to affect genome instability. we examined the polymorphic inserted AluYa5, evolutionary young Alu, in the progesterone receptor gene to determine the effects of Alu insertion on molecular environment. We used mono-allelic inserted cell lines which carry both Alu-present and Alu-absent alleles. To determine the epigenetic change and gene expression, we performed restriction enzyme digestion, Pyrosequencing, and Chromatin Immunoprecipitation. We observed that the polymorphic insertion of evolutionally young Alu causes increasing levels of DNA methylation in the surrounding genomic area and generates inactive histone tail modifications. Consequently the Alu insertion deleteriously inactivates the neighboring gene expression. The mono-allelic Alu insertion cell line clearly showed that polymorphic inserted repetitive elements cause the inactivation of neighboring gene expression, bringing aberrant epigenetic changes.

  9. Microsatellite D21D210 (GT-12) allele frequencies in sporadic Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lannfelt, L.; Lilius, L.; Viitanen, M.; Winblad, B.; Basun, H.; Houlden, H.; Rossor, M.; Hardy, J.

    1995-01-01

    Four disease-causing mutations have so far been described in the amyloid precursor protein gene on chromosome 21 in familial early-onset Alzheimer's disease. Linkage analysis with a fourteen-allele microsatellite at D21S210 named GT-12 has proven useful in the elucidation of amyloid presursor protein gene involvement in Alzheimer's disease families, as it is closely linked to the gene. Most cases of Alzheimer's disease are thought to be sporadic and not familial. However, evidence from earlier studies suggests an important genetic contribution also in sporadic cases, where gene-environment interaction may contribute to the disease. We have determined frequencies of the GT-12 alleles in 78 Swedish and 49 British sporadic Alzheimer's disease cases and 104 healthy elderly control subjects, to investigate if the disease associates with a particular genotype in GT-12. However, no differences in allele frequencies were observed between any of the groups. (au) (26 refs.)

  10. Huntington disease reduced penetrance alleles occur at high frequency in the general population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Chris; Collins, Jennifer A.; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Madore, Steven J.; Gordon, Erynn S.; Gerry, Norman; Davidson, Mark; Slama, Ramy A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To directly estimate the frequency and penetrance of CAG repeat alleles associated with Huntington disease (HD) in the general population. Methods: CAG repeat length was evaluated in 7,315 individuals from 3 population-based cohorts from British Columbia, the United States, and Scotland. The frequency of ≥36 CAG alleles was assessed out of a total of 14,630 alleles. The general population frequency of reduced penetrance alleles (36–39 CAG) was compared to the prevalence of patients with HD with genetically confirmed 36–39 CAG from a multisource clinical ascertainment in British Columbia, Canada. The penetrance of 36–38 CAG repeat alleles for HD was estimated for individuals ≥65 years of age and compared against previously reported clinical penetrance estimates. Results: A total of 18 of 7,315 individuals had ≥36 CAG, revealing that approximately 1 in 400 individuals from the general population have an expanded CAG repeat associated with HD (0.246%). Individuals with CAG 36–37 genotypes are the most common (36, 0.096%; 37, 0.082%; 38, 0.027%; 39, 0.000%; ≥40, 0.041%). General population CAG 36–38 penetrance rates are lower than penetrance rates extrapolated from clinical cohorts. Conclusion: HD alleles with a CAG repeat length of 36–38 occur at high frequency in the general population. The infrequent diagnosis of HD at this CAG length is likely due to low penetrance. Another important contributing factor may be reduced ascertainment of HD in those of older age. PMID:27335115

  11. Susceptible and Protective Associations of HLA Alleles and Haplotypes with Cervical Cancer in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathika, Chinniah; Murali, Vijayan; Dhivakar, Mani; Kamaraj, Raju; Malini, Ravi Padma; Ramgopal, Sivanadham; Balakrishnan, Karuppiah

    2016-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes have been implicated in cervical cancer in several populations. To study the predispositions of HLA alleles/haplotypes with cervical cancer. Clinically diagnosed and PAP smear confirmed cervical cancer patients (n 48) and age matched controls (n 47) were genotyped for HLA-A,-B,-DRB1* and DQB1* alleles by PCR-SSP methods. The frequencies of alleles DRB1*04 (OR=2.57), DRB1*15 (OR=2.04), DQB1*0301 (OR=4.91), DQB1*0601 (OR=2.21), B*15 (OR=13.03) and B*07 (OR=6.23) were higher in cervical cancer patients than in the controls. The frequencies of alleles DRB1*10 (OR=0.22) and B*35 (OR=0.19) were decreased. Strong disease associations were observed for haplotypes DRB1*15-DQB1*0601 (OR=6.56; HLA-C* typing of 8 patients who possessed a unique three locus haplotype 'A*11-B*07-DRB1*04' (8/48; 16.66%; OR=6.51; cancer. Strong susceptible associations were documented for HLA alleles B*15, B*07, DRB1*04, DRB1*15, DQB1*0301, DQB1*0601 and haplotypes DRB1*15-DQB1*0601 and DRB1*14-DQB1*0501. Further, protective associations were evidenced for alleles B*35 and DRB1*10 and haplotypes A*11-B*35 and DRB1*10-DQB1*0501 with cervical cancer in South India.

  12. Correlation between carboxylesterase alleles and insecticide resistance in Culex pipiens complex from China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yangyang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In China, large amounts of chemical insecticides are applied in fields or indoors every year, directly or indirectly bringing selection pressure on vector mosquitoes. Culex pipiens complex has evolved to be resistant to all types of chemical insecticides, especially organophosphates, through carboxylesterases. Six resistant carboxylesterase alleles (Ester were recorded previously and sometimes co-existed in one field population, representing a complex situation for the evolution of Ester genes. Results In order to explore the evolutionary scenario, we analyzed the data from an historical record in 2003 and a recent investigation on five Culex pipiens pallens populations sampled from north China in 2010. Insecticide bioassays showed that these five populations had high resistance to pyrethroids, medium resistance to organophosphates, and low resistance to carbamates. Six types of Ester alleles, EsterB1, Ester2, Ester8, Ester9, EsterB10, and Ester11 were identified, and the overall pattern of their frequencies in geographic distribution was consistent with the report seven years prior to this study. Statistical correlation analysis indicated that Ester8 and Ester9 positively correlated with resistance to four insecticides, and EsterB10 to one insecticide. The occurrences of these three alleles were positively correlated, while the occurrence of EsterB1 was negatively correlated with Ester8, indicating an allelic competition. Conclusion Our analysis suggests that one insecticide can select multiple Ester alleles and one Ester allele can work on multiple insecticides. The evolutionary scenario of carboxylesterases under insecticide selection is possibly "one to many".

  13. Genetic exchange of fimbrial alleles exemplifies the adaptive virulence strategy of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E Kerr

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is a gram-negative anaerobic bacterium, a member of the human oral microbiome, and a proposed "keystone" pathogen in the development of chronic periodontitis, an inflammatory disease of the gingiva. P. gingivalis is a genetically diverse species, and is able to exchange chromosomal DNA between strains by natural competence and conjugation. In this study, we investigate the role of horizontal DNA transfer as an adaptive process to modify behavior, using the major fimbriae as our model system, due to their critical role in mediating interactions with the host environment. We show that P. gingivalis is able to exchange fimbrial allele types I and IV into four distinct strain backgrounds via natural competence. In all recombinants, we detected a complete exchange of the entire fimA allele, and the rate of exchange varies between the different strain backgrounds. In addition, gene exchange within other regions of the fimbrial genetic locus was identified. To measure the biological implications of these allele swaps we compared three genotypes of fimA in an isogenic background, strain ATCC 33277. We demonstrate that exchange of fimbrial allele type results in profound phenotypic changes, including the quantity of fimbriae elaborated, membrane blebbing, auto-aggregation and other virulence-associated phenotypes. Replacement of the type I allele with either the type III or IV allele resulted in increased invasion of gingival fibroblast cells relative to the isogenic parent strain. While genetic variability is known to impact host-microbiome interactions, this is the first study to quantitatively assess the adaptive effect of exchanging genes within the pan genome cloud. This is significant as it presents a potential mechanism by which opportunistic pathogens may acquire the traits necessary to modify host-microbial interactions.

  14. Estimation of allele frequency and association mapping using next-generation sequencing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersen Gitte

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estimation of allele frequency is of fundamental importance in population genetic analyses and in association mapping. In most studies using next-generation sequencing, a cost effective approach is to use medium or low-coverage data (e.g., X. However, SNP calling and allele frequency estimation in such studies is associated with substantial statistical uncertainty because of varying coverage and high error rates. Results We evaluate a new maximum likelihood method for estimating allele frequencies in low and medium coverage next-generation sequencing data. The method is based on integrating over uncertainty in the data for each individual rather than first calling genotypes. This method can be applied to directly test for associations in case/control studies. We use simulations to compare the likelihood method to methods based on genotype calling, and show that the likelihood method outperforms the genotype calling methods in terms of: (1 accuracy of allele frequency estimation, (2 accuracy of the estimation of the distribution of allele frequencies across neutrally evolving sites, and (3 statistical power in association mapping studies. Using real re-sequencing data from 200 individuals obtained from an exon-capture experiment, we show that the patterns observed in the simulations are also found in real data. Conclusions Overall, our results suggest that association mapping and estimation of allele frequencies should not be based on genotype calling in low to medium coverage data. Furthermore, if genotype calling methods are used, it is usually better not to filter genotypes based on the call confidence score.

  15. Imputation of TPMT defective alleles for the identification of patients with high-risk phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta eAlmoguera

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The activity of thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT is subject to genetic variation. Loss-of-function alleles are associated with various degrees of myelosuppression after treatment with thiopurine drugs, thus genotype-based dosing recommendations currently exist. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential utility of leveraging genomic data from large biorepositories in the identification of individuals with TPMT defective alleles. Material and methods: TPMT variants were imputed using the 1,000 Genomes Project reference panel in 87,979 samples from the biobank at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Population ancestry was determined by principal component analysis using HapMap3 samples as reference. Frequencies of the TPMT imputed alleles, genotypes and the associated phenotype were determined across the different populations. A sample of 630 subjects with genotype data from Sanger sequencing (N=59 and direct genotyping (N=583 (12 samples overlapping in the two groups was used to check the concordance between the imputed and observed genotypes, as well as the sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values of the imputation. Results: Two SNPs (rs1800460 and rs1142345 that represent three TPMT alleles (*3A, *3B, and *3C were imputed with adequate quality. Frequency for the associated enzyme activity varied across populations and 89.36-94.58% were predicted to have normal TPMT activity, 5.3-10.31% intermediate and 0.12-0.34% poor activities. Overall, 98.88% of individuals (623/630 were correctly imputed into carrying no risk alleles (553/553, heterozygous (45/46 and homozygous (25/31. Sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of imputation were over 90% in all cases except for the sensitivity of imputing homozygous subjects that was 80.64%. Conclusion: Imputation of TPMT alleles from existing genomic data can be used as a first step in the screening of individuals at risk of developing serious

  16. A PP2C-1 Allele Underlying a Quantitative Trait Locus Enhances Soybean 100-Seed Weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiang; Xiong, Qing; Cheng, Tong; Li, Qing-Tian; Liu, Xin-Lei; Bi, Ying-Dong; Li, Wei; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Ma, Biao; Lai, Yong-Cai; Du, Wei-Guang; Man, Wei-Qun; Chen, Shou-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2017-05-01

    Cultivated soybeans may lose some useful genetic loci during domestication. Introgression of genes from wild soybeans could broaden the genetic background and improve soybean agronomic traits. In this study, through whole-genome sequencing of a recombinant inbred line population derived from a cross between a wild soybean ZYD7 and a cultivated soybean HN44, and mapping of quantitative trait loci for seed weight, we discovered that a phosphatase 2C-1 (PP2C-1) allele from wild soybean ZYD7 contributes to the increase in seed weight/size. PP2C-1 may achieve this function by enhancing cell size of integument and activating a subset of seed trait-related genes. We found that PP2C-1 is associated with GmBZR1, a soybean ortholog of Arabidopsis BZR1, one of key transcription factors in brassinosteroid (BR) signaling, and facilitate accumulation of dephosphorylated GmBZR1. In contrast, the PP2C-2 allele with variations of a few amino acids at the N-terminus did not exhibit this function. Moreover, we showed that GmBZR1 could promote seed weight/size in transgenic plants. Through analysis of cultivated soybean accessions, we found that 40% of the examined accessions do not have the PP2C-1 allele, suggesting that these accessions can be improved by introduction of this allele. Taken together, our study identifies an elite allele PP2C-1, which can enhance seed weight and/or size in soybean, and pinpoints that manipulation of this allele by molecular-assisted breeding may increase production in soybean and other legumes/crops. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Existence of the rdl mutant alleles among the anopheles malaria vector in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asih, Puji Bs; Syahrani, Lepa; Rozi, Ismail Ep; Pratama, Nandha R; Marantina, Sylvia S; Arsyad, Dian S; Mangunwardoyo, Wibowo; Hawley, William; Laihad, Ferdinand; Shinta; Sukowati, Supratman; Lobo, Neil F; Syafruddin, Din

    2012-02-25

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor-chloride channel complex is known to be the target site of dieldrin, a cyclodiene insecticide. GABA-receptors, with a naturally occurring amino acid substitution, A302S/G in the putative ion-channel lining region, confer resistance to cyclodiene insecticides that includes aldrin, chlordane, dieldrin, heptachlor, endrin and endosulphan. A total of 154 mosquito samples from 10 provinces of malaria-endemic areas across Indonesia (Aceh, North Sumatra, Bangka Belitung, Lampung, Central Java, East Nusa Tenggara, West Nusa Tenggara, West Sulawesi, Molucca and North Molucca) were obtained and identified by species, using morphological characteristic. The DNA was individually extracted using chelex-ion exchanger and the DNA obtained was used for analyses using sequencing method. Molecular analysis indicated 11% of the total 154 Anopheles samples examined, carried Rdl mutant alleles. All of the alleles were found in homozygous form. Rdl 302S allele was observed in Anopheles vagus (from Central Java, Lampung, and West Nusa Tenggara), Anopheles aconitus (from Central Java), Anopheles barbirostris (from Central Java and Lampung), Anopheles sundaicus (from North Sumatra and Lampung), Anopheles nigerrimus (from North Sumatra), whereas the 302 G allele was only found in Anopheles farauti from Molucca. The existence of the Rdl mutant allele indicates that, either insecticide pressure on the Anopheles population in these areas might still be ongoing (though not directly associated with the malaria control programme) or that the mutant form of the Rdl allele is relatively stable in the absence of insecticide. Nonetheless, the finding suggests that integrated pest management is warranted in malaria-endemic areas where insecticides are widely used for other purposes.

  18. Existence of the rdl mutant alleles among the anopheles malaria vector in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asih Puji BS

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA receptor-chloride channel complex is known to be the target site of dieldrin, a cyclodiene insecticide. GABA-receptors, with a naturally occurring amino acid substitution, A302S/G in the putative ion-channel lining region, confer resistance to cyclodiene insecticides that includes aldrin, chlordane, dieldrin, heptachlor, endrin and endosulphan. Methods A total of 154 mosquito samples from 10 provinces of malaria-endemic areas across Indonesia (Aceh, North Sumatra, Bangka Belitung, Lampung, Central Java, East Nusa Tenggara, West Nusa Tenggara, West Sulawesi, Molucca and North Molucca were obtained and identified by species, using morphological characteristic. The DNA was individually extracted using chelex-ion exchanger and the DNA obtained was used for analyses using sequencing method. Results Molecular analysis indicated 11% of the total 154 Anopheles samples examined, carried Rdl mutant alleles. All of the alleles were found in homozygous form. Rdl 302S allele was observed in Anopheles vagus (from Central Java, Lampung, and West Nusa Tenggara, Anopheles aconitus (from Central Java, Anopheles barbirostris (from Central Java and Lampung, Anopheles sundaicus (from North Sumatra and Lampung, Anopheles nigerrimus (from North Sumatra, whereas the 302 G allele was only found in Anopheles farauti from Molucca. Conclusion The existence of the Rdl mutant allele indicates that, either insecticide pressure on the Anopheles population in these areas might still be ongoing (though not directly associated with the malaria control programme or that the mutant form of the Rdl allele is relatively stable in the absence of insecticide. Nonetheless, the finding suggests that integrated pest management is warranted in malaria-endemic areas where insecticides are widely used for other purposes.

  19. Recombinational micro-evolution of functionally different metallothionein promoter alleles from Orchesella cincta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Straalen Nico M

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metallothionein (mt transcription is elevated in heavy metal tolerant field populations of Orchesella cincta (Collembola. This suggests that natural selection acts on transcriptional regulation of mt in springtails at sites where cadmium (Cd levels in soil reach toxic values This study investigates the nature and the evolutionary origin of polymorphisms in the metallothionein promoter (pmt and their functional significance for mt expression. Results We sequenced approximately 1600 bp upstream the mt coding region by genome walking. Nine pmt alleles were discovered in NW-European populations. They differ in the number of some indels, consensus transcription factor binding sites and core promoter elements. Extensive recombination events between some of the alleles can be inferred from the alignment. A deviation from neutral expectations was detected in a cadmium tolerant population, pointing towards balancing selection on some promoter stretches. Luciferase constructs were made from the most abundant alleles, and responses to Cd, paraquat (oxidative stress inducer and moulting hormone were studied in cell lines. By using paraquat we were able to dissect the effect of oxidative stress from the Cd specific effect, and extensive differences in mt induction levels between these two stressors were observed. Conclusion The pmt alleles evolved by a number of recombination events, and exhibited differential inducibilities by Cd, paraquat and molting hormone. In a tolerant population from a metal contaminated site, promoter allele frequencies differed significantly from a reference site and nucleotide polymorphisms in some promoter stretches deviated from neutral expectations, revealing a signature of balancing selection. Our results suggest that the structural differences in the Orchesella cincta metallothionein promoter alleles contribute to the metallothionein -over-expresser phenotype in cadmium tolerant populations.

  20. Allelic variation in a willow warbler genomic region is associated with climate clines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith W Larson

    Full Text Available Local adaptation is an important process contributing to population differentiation which can occur in continuous or isolated populations connected by various amounts of gene flow. The willow warbler (Phylloscopus trochilus is one of the most common songbirds in Fennoscandia. It has a continuous breeding distribution where it is found in all forested habitats from sea level to the tree line and therefore constitutes an ideal species for the study of locally adapted genes associated with environmental gradients. Previous studies in this species identified a genetic marker (AFLP-WW1 that showed a steep north-south cline in central Sweden with one allele associated with coastal lowland habitats and the other with mountainous habitats. It was further demonstrated that this marker is embedded in a highly differentiated chromosome region that spans several megabases. In the present study, we sampled 2,355 individuals at 128 sites across all of Fennoscandia to study the geographic and climatic variables associated with the allele frequency distributions of WW1. Our results demonstrate that 1 allele frequency patterns significantly differ between mountain and lowland populations, 2 these allele differences coincide with extreme temperature conditions and the short growing season in the mountains, and milder conditions in coastal areas, and 3 the northern-allele or "altitude variant" of WW1 occurs in willow warblers that occupy mountainous habitat regardless of subspecies. Finally these results suggest that climate may exert selection on the genomic region associated with these alleles and would allow us to develop testable predictions for the distribution of the genetic marker based on climate change scenarios.

  1. Allele frequencies of AVPR1A and MAOA in the Afrikaner population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Christoff Erasmus

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Afrikaner population was founded mainly by European immigrants that arrived in South Africa from 1652. However, female slaves from Asia and Africa and local KhoeSan women may have contributed as much as 7% to this population’s genes. We quantified variation at two tandem repeats to see if this historical founder effect and/or admixture could be detected. The two loci were chosen because they are in the promoters of genes of neurotransmitters that are known to be correlated with social behaviour. Specifically, arginine vasopressin receptor 1A’s (AVPR1A RS3 locus has been shown to correlate with age of sexual onset and happiness in monogamous relationships while the tandem repeat in the promoter of the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA gene correlates with reactive aggression. The Afrikaner population contained more AVPR1A RS3 alleles than other Caucasoid populations, potentially reflecting a history of admixture. Even though Afrikaners have one of the lowest recorded non-paternity rates in the world, the population did not differ at AVPR1A RS3 locus form other European populations, suggesting a non-genetic explanation, presumably religion, for the low non-paternity rate. By comparing population allele-frequency spectra it was found that different studies have confused AVPR1A RS3 alleles and we make some suggestions to rectify these mistakes in future studies. While MAOA allele frequencies differed between racial groups, the Afrikaner population showed no evidence of admixture. In fact, Afrikaners had more 4-repeat alleles than other populations of European origin, not fewer. The 4-repeat allele may have been selected for during colonisation.

  2. Investigation of MGMT and DAPK1 methylation patterns in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma using allelic MSP-pyrosequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lasse Sommer; Treppendahl, Marianne Bach; Asmar, Fazila

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor genes MGMT and DAPK1 become methylated in several cancers including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). However, allelic methylation patterns have not been investigated in DLBCL. We developed a fast and cost-efficient method for the analysis of allelic methylation based...... on pyrosequencing of methylation specific PCR (MSP) products including a SNP. Allelic methylation patterns were reliably analyzed in standards of known allelic methylation status even when diluted in unmethylated DNA to below 1% methylation. When studying 148 DLBCL patients MGMT and DAPK1 methylation was observed...... in 19% and 89%, respectively, and among methylated and heterozygous patients 29% and 55%, respectively, were biallelically methylated. An association between the T-allele of the rs16906252 SNP and MGMT methylation was observed (p-value=0.04), and DAPK1 methylation of the A-allele was associated...

  3. The effect of wild card designations and rare alleles in forensic DNA database searches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Bright, Jo-Anne; Buckleton, John S

    2015-01-01

    may be compromised in quantity or quality. When an individual's profile cannot be resolved from a DNA mixture, ambiguity is introduced. A wild card, F, may be used in place of an allele that has dropped out or when an ambiguous profile is resolved from a DNA mixture. Variant alleles that do...... not been determined. The F and R designation are treated as wild cards for searching, which results in increased chance of adventitious matches. We investigated the probability of adventitious matches given these two types of wild cards....

  4. Characterization of Tn6238 with a New Allele of aac(6′)-Ib-cr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, María P.; Orman, Betina; Errecalde, Laura; Kaufman, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report that the genetic structure of Tn1331 remained conserved in Argentina from 1989 to 2013 (72 of 73 isolates), with the exception being the plasmid-borne Tn1331-like transposon Tn6238 containing a new aac(6′)-Ib-cr allele recovered from a colistin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolate. A bioinformatic analysis of aac(6′)-Ib-like gene cassettes suggests that this new aac(6′)-Ib-cr allele emerged through mutation or homologous recombination in the Tn1331 genetic platform. Tn6238 is a novel platform for the dissemination of aminoglycoside and fluoroquinolone resistance determinants. PMID:25691640

  5. Prevalence of HLA DQB1*0602 allele in patients with migraine

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho, Fernando Morgadinho Santos; Pradella-Hallinan, Márcia; Abud, Paulo Corrêa; Predazzoli Neto, Mario; Moreira, Fabio; Bittencourt, Lia Rita Azeredo; Peres, Mario Fernandes Pietro; Tufik, Sérgio

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have shown a high prevalence of migraine among narcoleptic patients. HLA-DQB1*0602 and HLA DRB1 alleles are closely associated with narcolepsy. An increase in the HLA-DRB1 allele frequency in patients with visual aura has raised greater awareness of the genetic background in migraine. PURPOSE: Since the regions DR and DQ of the HLA are in tightly linkage desiquilibrium we hypothesize that HLA-DQB1*0602 might be associated to the pathophysiology of migraine. METHOD: We anal...

  6. Prevalence of HLA-DQA1 alleles and haplotypes in blood donors resident in Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemin, A J; Darke, C

    2014-12-01

    Two hundred and fifty-four normal blood donors, from a largely UK European population, were sequence-based typed for HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1. The fit to Hardy-Weinberg expectations was good for all loci (all P values >0.5). Fifteen DQA1 alleles were identified to the second field. DQA1 carriage, allele and DQA1-DQB1 and DRB1-DQA1-DQB1 haplotype frequencies, linkage disequilibria and related values are presented. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Genomic analyses of RH alleles to improve transfusion therapy in patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Marion E; Halter Hipsky, Christine; Hue-Roye, Kim; Hoppe, Carolyn

    2014-04-01

    Red cell (RBC) blood group alloimmunization remains a major problem in transfusion medicine. Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) are at particularly high risk for developing alloantibodies to RBC antigens compared to other multiply transfused patient populations. Hemagglutination is the classical method used to test for blood group antigens, but depending on the typing methods and reagents used may result in discrepancies that preclude interpretation based on serologic reactivity alone. Molecular methods, including customized DNA microarrays, are increasingly used to complement serologic methods in predicting blood type. The purpose of this study was to determine the diversity and frequency of RH alleles in African Americans and to assess the performance of a DNA microarray for RH allele determination. Two sets of samples were tested: (i) individuals with known variant Rh types and (ii) randomly selected African American donors and patients with SCD. Standard hemagglutination tests were used to establish the Rh phenotype, and cDNA- and gDNA-based analyses (sequencing, PCR-RFLP, and customized RHD and RHCE microarrays were used to predict the genotype). In a total of 829 samples (1658 alleles), 72 different alleles (40 RHD and 32 RHCE) were identified, 22 of which are novel. DNA microarrays detected all nucleotides probed, allowing for characterization of over 900 alleles. High-throughput DNA testing platforms provide a means to test a relatively large number of donors and potentially prevent immunization by changing the way antigen-negative blood is provided to patients. Because of the high RH allelic diversity found in the African American population, determination of an accurate Rh phenotype often requires DNA testing, in conjunction with serologic testing. Allele-specific microarrays offer a means to perform high-throughput donor Rh typing and serve as a valuable adjunct to serologic methods to predict Rh type. Because DNA microarrays test for only a fixed

  8. Object-oriented Bayesian networks for paternity cases with allelic dependencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler, Amanda B; Weir, Bruce S

    2008-06-01

    This study extends the current use of Bayesian networks by incorporating the effects of allelic dependencies in paternity calculations. The use of object-oriented networks greatly simplify the process of building and interpreting forensic identification models, allowing researchers to solve new, more complex problems. We explore two paternity examples: the most common scenario where DNA evidence is available from the alleged father, the mother and the child; a more complex casewhere DNA is not available from the alleged father, but is available from the alleged father's brother. Object-oriented networks are built, using HUGIN, for each example which incorporate the effects of allelic dependence caused by evolutionary relatedness.

  9. Testing Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium on allelic data from VNTR loci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisser, S. (Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)); Johnson, W. (Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States))

    1992-11-01

    Several methods for testing independence of pairs of alleles in a population that are obtained from a VNTR locus are presented. The authors assume an exchangeable quasi-continuous distribution of the fragment lengths used to measure the allelic pairs. Bivariate-estimated quantiles computed from the quantiles of the entire data set are then utilized for testing independence. These methods have the advantage of being minimally susceptible to the criticism of (a) the inability of a technology to measure to a few small-sized or rather large-sized fragments and (b) inadequate estimation of the homozygotic proportion. 6 refs., 3 tabs.

  10. Association of HLA class II alleles and CTLA-4 polymorphism with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana J EI Wafai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is a progressive complex autoimmune disease in which combinations of environmental as well as genetic factors contribute to T-cell mediated destruction of insulin-secreting β-cells of the pancreas. HLA class II alleles on chromosome 6p21 [insulin dependent diabetes mellitus 1 (IDDM1], especially DR and DQ, show strong association with T1DM. In addition, several studies have suggested that polymorphisms in the CTLA-4 gene (IDDM12 on chromosome 2q33 form part of the genetic susceptibility for type 1 diabetes. The aim of this study was to analyze HLA alleles of the DQB1 and DRB1 genes using polymerase chain reaction using sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP technique and to investigate the asso-ciation of the A49G CTLA-4 polymorphism using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP analysis in Lebanese T1DM patients. The study was conduc-ted on 39 Lebanese T1DM patients. Results of HLA typing showed an increased frequency of the HLA-DQB1FNx010201, HLA-DQB1FNx010302, HLA-DRB1FNx010301 and HLA-DRB1FNx010401 alleles, sugges-ting risk association and thus can be considered as susceptibility alleles. On the other hand, strong protection against the disease was conferred by the HLA-DRB1FNx01110101, HLA-DQB1FNx010301 and HLADQB1FNx010601 alleles. RFLP analysis of the A49G polymorphism showed a significant increase in the G allele and GG genotype frequencies in patients, suggesting that CTLA-4 may be considered as a susceptibility gene for the development of T1DM in the Lebanese population. Analysis of the two polymorphisms showed no detectable association between the two genes. However, a significant negative association of the G allele with the DQB1FNx010201 allele was ob-served. This might indicate that the two genetic risk factors, namely HLA and CTLA-4, act independently of each other with no additive effect.

  11. Identification of transcriptome SNPs for assessing allele-specific gene expression in a super-hybrid rice Xieyou9308.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongrong Zhai

    Full Text Available Hybridization, a common process in nature, can give rise to a vast reservoir of allelic variants. Combination of these allelic variants may result in novel patterns of gene action and is thought to contribute to heterosis. In this study, we analyzed genome-wide allele-specific gene expression (ASGE in the super-hybrid rice variety Xieyou9308 using RNA sequencing technology (RNA-Seq. We identified 9325 reliable single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs distributed throughout the genome. Nearly 68% of the identified polymorphisms were CT and GA SNPs between R9308 and Xieqingzao B, suggesting the existence of DNA methylation, a heritable epigenetic mark, in the parents and their F1 hybrid. Of 2793 identified transcripts with consistent allelic biases, only 480 (17% showed significant allelic biases during tillering and/or heading stages, implying that trans effects may mediate most transcriptional differences in hybrid offspring. Approximately 67% and 62% of the 480 transcripts showed R9308 allelic expression biases at tillering and heading stages, respectively. Transcripts with higher levels of gene expression in R9308 also exhibited R9308 allelic biases in the hybrid. In addition, 125 transcripts were identified with significant allelic expression biases at both stages, of which 74% showed R9308 allelic expression biases. R9308 alleles may tend to preserve their characteristic states of activity in the hybrid and may play important roles in hybrid vigor at both stages. The allelic expression of 355 transcripts was highly stage-specific, with divergent allelic expression patterns observed at different developmental stages. Many transcripts associated with stress resistance were differently regulated in the F1 hybrid. The results of this study may provide valuable insights into molecular mechanisms of heterosis.

  12. FRAXA and FRAXE: evidence against segregation distortion and for an effect of intermediate alleles on learning disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teague, J W; Morton, N E; Dennis, N R; Curtis, G; McKechnie, N; Macpherson, J N; Murray, A; Pound, M C; Sharrock, A J; Youings, S A; Jacobs, P A

    1998-01-20

    There have been several claims of segregation distortion (meiotic drive) for loci associated with diseases caused by trinucleotide repeats, leading us to test for this phenomenon in a large study of the X-linked loci FRAXA and FRAXE. We found no evidence of meiotic drive in females and no convincing evidence in males, where the limitation of risk to daughters creates a testing bias for alleles of interest. Alleles for pre- and full mutation, intermediate alleles, and common alleles were analyzed separately, with the same negative results that are extended in the discussion to claims of meiotic drive for other diseases. On the other hand, an excess risk of learning difficulties was confirmed for intermediate FRAXA alleles (relative risk, 2.58 +/- .74) and suggested for intermediate FRAXE alleles. The penetrance of learning difficulty is low, the risk being estimated as .039 for FRAXA common alleles and .101 for intermediate alleles. Because of their lower gene frequency, full mutations are a less frequent cause of learning difficulty than intermediate alleles, which contribute .0020 to total prevalence and .0012 to attributable prevalence of learning difficulty.

  13. Identification of 400 novel alleles at the HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DQB1 loci from China Marrow Donor Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, X; Zhang, H; Yang, X; Yang, F; Liu, N

    2017-09-01

    Four hundred novel human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles were identified in Chinese individuals: 100 HLA-A alleles, 100 HLA-B alleles, 101 HLA-C alleles, 28 HLA-DRB1 alleles and 71 HLA-DQB1 alleles. Comparing novel alleles with their most homologous allele, we found 72.73% non-synonymous nucleotide substitutions, 21.13% silent mutations, 3.90% nonsense mutations and 3.25% frameshift mutation. 352 (88%) of the 400 novel alleles are single nucleotide substitution variants when compared with their most homologous alleles and other novel alleles differ from their most similar allele by more than 1 nucleotide substitutions, such as 2, 3, 5, 6, 8 and so on. Some of the novel alleles are characterized by long deletions or insertions, for example there is 23 bp deletion in the B*58:31N allele when compared to its most homologous allele B*58:01:01:01. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Allele frequencies of ten short tandem repeats loci in the central ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-04-03

    Apr 3, 2009 ... c Indian Academy of Sciences. RESEARCH NOTE. Allele frequencies of ten short tandem ... Statistical parameters of forensic importance, the power of discrimination (PD), observed and expected ... rameters indicated the usefulness of the loci in forensic per- sonal identification and paternity testing among ...

  15. Derived immune and ancestral pigmentation alleles in a 7,000-year-old Mesolithic European

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olalde, Inigo; Allentoft, Morten E.; Sanchez-Quinto, Federico

    2014-01-01

    to the Mesolithic. The La Brana individual carries ancestral alleles in several skin pigmentation genes, suggesting that the light skin of modern Europeans was not yet ubiquitous in Mesolithic times. Moreover, we provide evidence that a significant number of derived, putatively adaptive variants associated...

  16. Allele frequency present within the DYS635, DYS437, DYS448 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ejiro

    2015-03-11

    Mar 11, 2015 ... institute and courts of law. Key words: Allele ... individual identification and relatedness testing polymor- phic (Yamamoto et al. ... haplogroup an individual matches, STR analysis typically provides a person haplotype. Most tests on the Y chromosome examine between 12 and 67 STR markers. (Jobling et al.

  17. The power and statistical behaviour of allele-sharing statistics when ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    that the statistic S-#alleles gives good performance for recessive models (Sobel and Lange 1996), and Srob dom ... are segregating and evaluate the performance of several different nonparametric linkage (NPL) statistics imple- ..... (ed. I. H. Pawlowitzki, J. H. Edwards and E. A. Thompson). Academic Press, San Diego.

  18. ADHD and DAT1: Further evidence of paternal over-transmission of risk alleles and haplotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hawi, Z.; Kent, L.; Hill, M.; Anney, R.J.; Brookes, K. J.; Barry, E.; Franke, B.; Banaschewski, T.; Buitelaar, J.; Ebstein, R.; Miranda, A.; Oades, R.D.; Roeyers, H.; Rothenberger, A.; Sergeant, J.A.; Sonuga-Barke, E.; Steinhausen, H.C.; Faraone, S.V.; Asherson, P.; Gill, M.

    2009-01-01

    We [Hawi et al. (2005); Am J Hum Genet 77:958-965] reported paternal over-transmission of risk alleles in some ADHD-associated genes. This was particularly clear in the case of the DAT1 30-UTR VNTR. In the current investigation, we analyzed three new sample comprising of 1,248 ADHD nuclear families

  19. ADHD and DAT1: further evidence of paternal over-transmission of risk alleles and haplotype.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hawi, Z.; Kent, L.; Hill, M.; Anney, R.J.; Brookes, K.J.; Barry, E.; Franke, B.; Banaschewski, T.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Ebstein, R.; Miranda, A.; Oades, R.D.; Roeyers, H.; Rothenberger, A.; Sergeant, J.A.; Sonuga-Barke, E.J.S.; Steinhausen, H.C.; Faraone, S.V.; Asherson, P.; Gill, M.

    2010-01-01

    We [Hawi et al. (2005); Am J Hum Genet 77:958-965] reported paternal over-transmission of risk alleles in some ADHD-associated genes. This was particularly clear in the case of the DAT1 3'-UTR VNTR. In the current investigation, we analyzed three new sample comprising of 1,248 ADHD nuclear families

  20. Possible phenotypic dosage effect in patients compound heterozygous for FSHD-sized 4q35 alleles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wohlgemuth, M.; Lemmers, R.J.L.F.; Kooi, E.L. van der; Wielen, M.J.R. van der; Overveld, P.G; Dauwerse, H.G.; Bakker, E.; Frants, R.R.; Padberg, G.W.A.M.; Maarel, S.M. van der

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Autosomal dominant facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is associated with a contraction of the D4Z4 repeat array on chromosome 4. So far, homozygosity or compound heterozygosity for FSHD alleles has not been described, and it has been debated whether the absence of such subjects

  1. Limited efficacy of hydroxyurea in lowering of the JAK2 V617F allele burden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Thomas Stauffer; Pallisgaard, Niels; de Stricker, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Besides being an invaluable marker of clonal disease in chronic myeloproliferative disorders (CMPDs), the JAK2 V617F mutation and the mutated allele burden have an impact on disease phenotype and may provide information on prognosis. Recently, hydroxyurea (HU) has been shown to induce a rapid dec...

  2. Allelic Dropout in the ENG Gene, Affecting the Results of Genetic Testing in Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Pernille M; Kjeldsen, A.D.; Ousager, L.B.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal-dominant vascular disorder with three disease-causing genes identified to date: ENG, ACVRL1, and SMAD4. We report an HHT patient with allelic dropout that on routine sequence analysis for a known mutation in the family (c.817...

  3. Allele mining across DREB1A and DREB1B in diverse rice ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Allele mining across DREB1A and DREB1B in diverse rice genotypes suggest a highly conserved pathway inducible by low temperature. Clarissa Challam, Tapu Ghosh, Mayank Rai and Wricha Tyagi. J. Genet. 94, 231–238. Table 1. Low temperature screening scores for rice genotypes used in the present study. Relative.

  4. HLA-DQA1 allele typing by nonisotopic PCR-LIS-SSCP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abba M.C.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we used a simple and reliable method for HLA-DQA1 allele typing based on the single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP properties of DNA molecules obtained by PCR. The technique consists of PCR amplification of a DNA fragment comprising the second exon of the HLA-DQA1 gene, amplicon denaturation using a low ionic strength solution (LIS, and electrophoresis on a small native polyacrylamide gel, followed by a rapid silver staining procedure. In order to validate the technique and to obtain the allele patterns for the DQA1 gene, 50 cervical samples were typed using this methodology and the commercial Amplitype® HLA DQA1 Amplification and Typing kit. All the alleles detected with the kit were characterized by the LIS-SSCP approach. This procedure proved to be useful for population screening and typing of the DQA1 gene as well as for detecting new alleles or mutations in the donor-recipient molecular matching of HLA class II genes.

  5. Correlation in chicken between the marker LEI0258 alleles and Major Histocompatibility Complex sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chazara, Olympe; Juul-Madsen, Helle Risdahl; Chang, Chi-Seng

    Background The LEI0258 marker is located within the B region of the chicken Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC), and is surprisingly well associated with serology. Therefore, the correlation between the LEI0258 alleles and the MHC class I and the class II alleles at the level of sequences...... is worth investigating in chickens. Here we describe to which extent the LEI0258 alleles are associated with alleles of classical class I genes and non-classical class II genes, in reference animals as well as local breeds with unknown MHC haplotypes. Methods For the class I region, in an exploratory...... project, we studied 10 animals from 3 breeds: Rhode Island Red, White Leghorn and Fayoumi chickens, by cloning and sequencing B-F1 and B-F2 cDNA from exon 1 to 3’UTR. For the class II region, we reconstructed haplotypes of the 8.8 kb genomic region encompassing three non-classical class II genes: B-DMA, B...

  6. Determining the frequencies of B1, B2, B3 and E alleles of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ada

    2016-06-04

    Jun 4, 2016 ... AN, and AF) in Alpine, Saanen and Toggenburg goats (Vázquez-Flores et al., 2012). Despite the number of studies that determined the frequency of CSN1S1 alleles, investigations into the effects of the CSN1S1 gene on milk yield and composition are limited. Furthermore, there is no published information ...

  7. Statistical model for degraded DNA samples and adjusted probabilities for allelic drop-out

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Mogensen, Helle Smidt

    2012-01-01

    Abstract DNA samples found at a scene of crime or obtained from the debris of a mass disaster accident are often subject to degradation. When using the STR DNA technology, the DNA profile is observed via a so-called electropherogram (EPG), where the alleles are identified as signal peaks above...

  8. Association of polymorphous alleles of class II HLA genes with Graves' disease (GD in Tuvinian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I V Osokina

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to consider association of polymorphous alleles of class II HLA genes with Graves’ disease (GD in Tuvinian population. Methods. HLAgenotyping was accomplished in 40 GD patients and 164 volunteers randomly selected in Tuvinian population (native Siberian population, Mongoloids. GD was diagnosed accordind to the clinical and laboratory criteria. HLAgenotyping for 14 DRB1 alleles, 8 DQA1 alleles and 13 DQB1 alleles was performed by polymerase chain reaction sequencespecific primers (DNATechnology, Russia. Statistical analysis was performed using the Excoffer, Schneider and Kuffer package. RR have been calculated using Woolf method. Results. We found the HLAmarkers of predisposition to GD in Tuvinians: HLA DQA1*0501( RR = 1.76; p < 0.05 and DQB1*0301 (RR = 1.44; p < 0.05. Analysis of the HLA haplotypes showed, that DRB1*13DQA1*0501 DQB1*0301 was associated with an increased risk of GD (RR = 3.53. The protective were DRB1*0302 (RR = 0.19 and haplotype DRB1*04DQA1*0301DQB1*0302 (RR = 0.02. Conclusions. This molecular genetic study has been shown that HLA DQA1*0501, DQB1*0301 and haplotype DRB1*13DQA1*0501DQB1*0301 associated with Graves’ disease in Tuvinian population.

  9. Phenotypic Effects of an Allele Causing Obligate Parthenogenesis in a Rotifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuerl, Thomas; Riss, Simone

    2011-01-01

    Transitions to obligate asexuality have been documented in almost all metazoan taxa, yet the conditions favoring such transitions remained largely unexplored. We address this problem in the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus. In this species, a polymorphism at a single locus, op, can result in transitions to obligate parthenogenesis. Homozygotes for the op allele reproduce strictly by asexual reproduction, whereas heterozygous clones (+/op) and wild-type clones (+/+) are cyclical parthenogens that undergo sexual reproduction at high population densities. Here, we examine dosage effects of the op allele by analyzing various life-history characteristics and population traits in 10 clones for each of the 3 possible genotypes (op/op, +/op, and +/+). For most traits, we found that op/op clones differed significantly (P < 0.05) from the 2 cyclical parthenogenetic genotypes (+/+ and +/op). By contrast, the 2 cyclical parthenogenetic genotypes were almost indistinguishable, except that heterozygote individuals were slightly but significantly smaller in body size compared with wild-type individuals. Overall, this indicates that the op allele is selectively neutral in the heterozygous state. Thus, selective sweeps of this allele in natural populations would first require conditions favoring the generation of homozygotes. This may be given by inbreeding in very small populations or by double mutants in very large populations. PMID:21576287

  10. Phenotypic effects of an allele causing obligate parthenogenesis in a rotifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuerl, Thomas; Riss, Simone; Stelzer, Claus-Peter

    2011-01-01

    Transitions to obligate asexuality have been documented in almost all metazoan taxa, yet the conditions favoring such transitions remained largely unexplored. We address this problem in the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus. In this species, a polymorphism at a single locus, op, can result in transitions to obligate parthenogenesis. Homozygotes for the op allele reproduce strictly by asexual reproduction, whereas heterozygous clones (+/op) and wild-type clones (+/+) are cyclical parthenogens that undergo sexual reproduction at high population densities. Here, we examine dosage effects of the op allele by analyzing various life-history characteristics and population traits in 10 clones for each of the 3 possible genotypes (op/op, +/op, and +/+). For most traits, we found that op/op clones differed significantly (P < 0.05) from the 2 cyclical parthenogenetic genotypes (+/+ and +/op). By contrast, the 2 cyclical parthenogenetic genotypes were almost indistinguishable, except that heterozygote individuals were slightly but significantly smaller in body size compared with wild-type individuals. Overall, this indicates that the op allele is selectively neutral in the heterozygous state. Thus, selective sweeps of this allele in natural populations would first require conditions favoring the generation of homozygotes. This may be given by inbreeding in very small populations or by double mutants in very large populations.

  11. AlleleCoder: a PERL script for coding codominant polymorphism data for PCA analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    A useful biological interpretation of diploid heterozygotes is in terms of the dose of the common allele (0, 1 or 2 copies). We have developed a PERL script that converts FASTA files into coded spreadsheets suitable for Principal Component Analysis (PCA). In combination with R and R Commander, two- ...

  12. Severe complications in a child with achondroplasia and two FGFR3 mutations on the same allele

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rump, P; Letteboer, TGW; Gille, JJP; Torringa, MJL; Baerts, W; van Gestel, JPJ; Verheij, JBGM; van Essen, AJ

    2006-01-01

    We describe a unique case of achondroplasia with associated complications, including severe respiratory problems. Molecular analysis of the fibroblast growth factor receptor type 3 (FGFR3) gene in this patient showed the common p.G380R mutation and a second novel p.L377R Mutation. An allele-specific

  13. Apolipoprotein E epsilon4 allele and outcomes of traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Amitabh; Lammertse, Daniel P; Coll, Joseph R; Charlifue, Susan; Coughlin, Christopher T; Whiteneck, Gale G; Worley, Gordon

    2008-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that apolipoprotein E (APOE) polymorphisms are associated with outcomes after spinal cord injury (SCI). Retrospective cohort study, from rehabilitation admission to discharge. Convenience sample of 89 persons with cervical SCI (C3-C8) treated from 1995 through 2003. Median age was 30 years (range 14-70); 67 were male (75%) and 83 were white (93%). American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) motor and sensory scores, ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS), time from injury to rehabilitation admission, and length of stay (LOS) in rehabilitation. Subjects with an APOE epsilon4 allele (n = 15; 17%) had significantly less motor recovery during rehabilitation than did individuals without an epsilon4 allele (median 3.0 vs 5.5; P rehabilitation LOS (median 106 vs 89 days; P = 0.04), but better sensory-pinprick recovery (median 5.0 vs 2.0; P= 0.03). There were no significant differences by APOE epsilon4 allele status in sensory-light touch recovery, likelihood of improving AIS Grade, or time from injury to rehabilitation admission. APOE epsilon4 allele was associated with differences in neurological recovery and longer rehabilitation LOS. Genetic factors may be among the determinants of outcome after SCI and warrant further study.

  14. HLA-class II alleles in patients with drug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis in Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuranov, A B; Kozhamkulov, U A; Vavilov, M N; Belova, E S; Bismilda, V L; Alenova, A H; Ismailov, S S; Momynaliev, K T

    2014-02-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system has a major role in the regulation of the immune response as it is involved in the defense against pathogens. Some studies have reported that HLA class II genes play a strong role in severe cases of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in several populations. Thus the aim of the study was to compare the HLA-class II alleles of patients with drug resistant tuberculosis with those of healthy controls from the same ethnic group in Kazakhstan. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the correlation of HLA-class II alleles by patients with drug resistant tuberculosis and the healthy controls of the same ethnic group in Kazakhstan. The HLA-class II alleles of 76 patients with tuberculosis (TB) and 157 healthy volunteers were investigated using sequence-based typing (SBT)-method. HLA-DQA1*03:02 HLA-DRB1*08:01 and DRB1*08:03 occurred more frequently (P = 0.05) in patients with drug resistant tuberculosis than in controls. We observed a possible association between certain HLA alleles and TB that are specific for the Kazakh population. Further studies are needed to confirm our findings using a larger number of patients with drug resistant tuberculosis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Genetic Analysis of Teosinte Alleles for Kernel Composition Traits in Maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Karn

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Teosinte (Zea mays ssp. parviglumis is the wild ancestor of modern maize (Zea mays ssp. mays. Teosinte contains greater genetic diversity compared with maize inbreds and landraces, but its use is limited by insufficient genetic resources to evaluate its value. A population of teosinte near isogenic lines (NILs was previously developed to broaden the resources for genetic diversity of maize, and to discover novel alleles for agronomic and domestication traits. The 961 teosinte NILs were developed by backcrossing 10 geographically diverse parviglumis accessions into the B73 (reference genome inbred background. The NILs were grown in two replications in 2009 and 2010 in Columbia, MO and Aurora, NY, respectively, and near infrared reflectance spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance calibrations were developed and used to rapidly predict total kernel starch, protein, and oil content on a dry matter basis in bulk whole grains of teosinte NILs. Our joint-linkage quantitative trait locus (QTL mapping analysis identified two starch, three protein, and six oil QTL, which collectively explained 18, 23, and 45% of the total variation, respectively. A range of strong additive allelic effects for kernel starch, protein, and oil content were identified relative to the B73 allele. Our results support our hypothesis that teosinte harbors stronger alleles for kernel composition traits than maize, and that teosinte can be exploited for the improvement of kernel composition traits in modern maize germplasm.

  16. Allele- and temperature-dependency of in vitro HLA class I assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chersi, A; Garzillo, C; Butler, R H; Tanigaki, N

    2001-08-01

    Allelic variations of in vitro HLA class I assembly have been investigated in both the absence and the presence of binding peptides by flow cytometry using human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I alpha chains isolated by alkali treatment from cultured HLA homozygous B cells and polystyrene beads coated with anti-HLA class I alpha chain antibodies specific to the C-terminal segment (anti-HLA class I beads). The specificity of assembly was temperature dependent, while the stability of the assembled complex depended on the bound peptide. The efficiency of assembly was allele dependent and primarily ruled by the binding affinity of alpha chains with beta(2)m. Thus, an allele hierarchy could be defined for the binding of HLA-B alpha chain with beta(2)-microglobulin: B7, B18 > B35, B62 > B27, B51. Allele and temperature dependency was found in HLA class I reassembly on acid treated B cells. The HLA class I proteins, reassembled with specific single peptides, could be efficiently transferred to anti-HLA class I beads. These findings would be used to produce microspheres coupled at high surface density with oriented single-peptide loaded HLA class I molecules and also to improve the preparation efficiency of HLA class I tetramers by the use of site-specific biotinylation.

  17. Narcolepsy-Associated HLA Class I Alleles Implicate Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tafti, M.; Lammers, G.J.; Dauvilliers, Y.; Overeem, S.; Mayer, G.; Nowak, J.; Pfister, C.; Dubois, V.; Eliaou, J.F.; Eberhard, H.P.; Liblau, R.; Wierzbicka, A.; Geisler, P.; Bassetti, C.L.; Mathis, J.; Lecendreux, M.; Khatami, R.; Heinzer, R.; Haba-Rubio, J.; Feketeova, E.; Baumann, C.R.; Kutalik, Z.; Tiercy, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: Narcolepsy with cataplexy is tightly associated with the HLA class II allele DQB1*06:02. Evidence indicates a complex contribution of HLA class II genes to narcolepsy susceptibility with a recent independent association with HLA-DPB1. The cause of narcolepsy is supposed be an

  18. Fitness differences due to allelic variation at Esterase-4 locus in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    KAVITA KRISHNAMOORTI

    2017-08-31

    Aug 31, 2017 ... higher in Esterase-4 active larval haemolymph as well as in mature flies' homogenate than that of Esterase-4 null. Thus, Esterase-4 locus of D. ananassae has its role in fecundity, fertility and productivity of female, life span control and lipid metabolism. Keywords. esterases; null allele; reproductive fitness; ...

  19. allele of the noncoding hsrω gene of Drosophila melanogaster is not ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Drosophila melanogaster is not responsible for male sterility as reported earlier ... gene, the pl alleles were brought in trans with hsrω05241 or with the ... The progeny hsrω05241/ry. − females were crossed with TM3/TM6B males (for details of the var- ious mutant genes and balancer chromosomes, see Lindslay and Zimm ...

  20. Allele-specific gene expression is widespread across the genome and biological processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Palacios

    Full Text Available Allelic specific gene expression (ASGE appears to be an important factor in human phenotypic variability and as a consequence, for the development of complex traits and diseases. In order to study ASGE across the human genome, we have performed a study in which genotyping was coupled with an analysis of ASGE by screening 11,500 SNPs using the Mapping 10 K Array to identify differential allelic expression. We found that from the 5,133 SNPs that were suitable for analysis (heterozygous in our sample and expressed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, 2,934 (57% SNPs had differential allelic expression. Such SNPs were equally distributed along human chromosomes and biological processes. We validated the presence or absence of ASGE in 18 out 20 SNPs (90% randomly selected by real time PCR in 48 human subjects. In addition, we observed that SNPs close to -but not included in- segmental duplications had increased levels of ASGE. Finally, we found that transcripts of unknown function or non-coding RNAs, also display ASGE: from a total of 2,308 intronic SNPs, 1510 (65% SNPs underwent differential allelic expression. In summary, ASGE is a widespread mechanism in the human genome whose regulation seems to be far more complex than expected.

  1. Predominance of N-acetyl transferase 2 slow acetylator alleles in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Student

    The human N-acetyltransferase II (NAT2) gene may vary between individuals resulting in variability in the incidence of adverse drug reactions. We set out in this adhoc analysis to determine the distribution of allele frequencies of NAT2 gene variants among children less than ten years treated with artemisinin-based.

  2. Natural allelic variations of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes affect sexual dimorphism in Oryzias latipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsumura, Takafumi; Oda, Shoji; Nakagome, Shigeki; Hanihara, Tsunehiko; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Mitani, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Shoji; Oota, Hiroki

    2014-12-22

    Sexual dimorphisms, which are phenotypic differences between males and females, are driven by sexual selection. Interestingly, sexually selected traits show geographical variations within species despite strong directional selective pressures. This paradox has eluded many evolutionary biologists for some time, and several models have been proposed (e.g. 'indicator model' and 'trade-off model'). However, disentangling which of these theories explains empirical patterns remains difficult, because genetic polymorphisms that cause variation in sexual differences are still unknown. In this study, we show that polymorphisms in cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1B1, which encodes a xenobiotic-metabolizing enzyme, are associated with geographical differences in sexual dimorphism in the anal fin morphology of medaka fish (Oryzias latipes). Biochemical assays and genetic cross experiments show that high- and low-activity CYP1B1 alleles enhanced and declined sex differences in anal fin shapes, respectively. Behavioural and phylogenetic analyses suggest maintenance of the high-activity allele by sexual selection, whereas the low-activity allele possibly has experienced positive selection due to by-product effects of CYP1B1 in inferred ancestral populations. The present data can elucidate evolutionary mechanisms behind genetic variations in sexual dimorphism and indicate trade-off interactions between two distinct mechanisms acting on the two alleles with pleiotropic effects of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Incomplete dominance of deleterious alleles contributes substantially to trait variation and heterosis in maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleterious alleles have long been proposed to play an important role in patterning phenotypic variation and are central to commonly held ideas explaining the hybrid vigor observed in the offspring by crossing two inbred parents. We test these ideas using evolutionary measures of sequence conservati...

  4. Predominance of N-acetyl transferase 2 slow acetylator alleles in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood was spotted on filter paper prior to drug administration for DNA extraction by chelex method. Standard nested PCR followed by restriction enzyme analysis with KpnI, TaqI, and BamHI for detection of polymorphisms in the NAT2 was performed. Allelic frequencies and acetylator phenotypes were compared between ...

  5. SNP calling, genotype calling, and sample allele frequency estimation from new-generation sequencing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus; Korneliussen, Thorfinn Sand; Albrechtsen, Anders

    2012-01-01

    is calculated using a dynamic programming algorithm and numerically optimized using analytical derivatives. We then use a bayesian method for estimating the sample allele frequency in a single site, and show how the method can be used for genotype calling and SNP calling. We also show how the method can...

  6. Rh E/e genotyping by allele-specific primer amplification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faas, B. H.; Simsek, S.; Bleeker, P. M.; Overbeeke, M. A.; Cuijpers, H. T.; von dem Borne, A. E.; van der Schoot, C. E.

    1995-01-01

    It has been shown that the Rhesus (Rh) blood group antigens are encoded by two homologous genes: the Rh D gene and the Rh CcEe gene. The Rh CcEe gene encodes different peptides: the Rh C, c, E, and e polypeptides. Only one nucleotide difference has been found between the alleles encoding the Rh E

  7. Gene frequencies of ABO and Rh(D) blood group alleles in Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subjects and methods: This study investigated the gene frequencies for the ABO and Rh(D) alleles in a population consisting of different ages in Lagos, Nigeria, over a period spanning 12 years (1998–2009). The 23,832 and 23,764 individuals were typed for ABO and Rh blood groups, respectively. We analyzed the ...

  8. HLA class I allelic sequence and conformation regulate leukocyte Ig-like receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Des C; Kosmoliaptsis, Vasilis; Apps, Richard; Lapaque, Nicolas; Smith, Isobel; Kono, Azumi; Chang, Chiwen; Boyle, Louise H; Taylor, Craig J; Trowsdale, John; Allen, Rachel L

    2011-03-01

    Leukocyte Ig-like receptors (LILRs) are a family of innate immune receptors predominantly expressed by myeloid cells that can alter the Ag presentation properties of macrophages and dendritic cells. Several LILRs bind HLA class I. Altered LILR recognition due to HLA allelic variation could be a contributing factor in disease. We comprehensively assessed LILR binding to >90 HLA class I alleles. The inhibitory receptors LILRB1 and LILRB2 varied in their level of binding to different HLA alleles, correlating in some cases with specific amino acid motifs. LILRB2 displayed the weakest binding to HLA-B*2705, an allele genetically associated with several autoimmune conditions and delayed progression of HIV infection. We also assessed the effect of HLA class I conformation on LILR binding. LILRB1 exclusively bound folded β(2)-microglobulin-associated class I, whereas LILRB2 bound both folded and free H chain forms. In contrast, the activating receptor LILRA1 and the soluble LILRA3 protein displayed a preference for binding to HLA-C free H chain. To our knowledge, this is the first study to identify the ligand of LILRA3. These findings support the hypothesis that LILR-mediated detection of unfolded versus folded MHC modulates immune responses during infection or inflammation.

  9. Allelic drop-out probabilities estimated by logistic regression--Further considerations and practical implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Asplund, Maria

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the model for estimating drop-out probabilities presented by Tvedebrink et al. [7] and the concerns, that have been raised. The criticism of the model has demonstrated that the model is not perfect. However, the model is very useful for advanced forensic genetic work, where allelic dro...

  10. Specific alleles of bitter receptor genes influence human sensitivity to the bitterness of aloin and saccharin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronin, Alexey N; Xu, Hong; Tang, Huixian; Zhang, Lan; Li, Qing; Li, Xiaodong

    2007-08-21

    Variation in human taste is a well-known phenomenon. However, little is known about the molecular basis for it. Bitter taste in humans is believed to be mediated by a family of 25 G protein-coupled receptors (hT2Rs, or TAS2Rs). Despite recent progress in the functional expression of hT2Rs in vitro, up until now, hT2R38, a receptor for phenylthiocarbamide (PTC), was the only gene directly linked to variations in human bitter taste. Here we report that polymorphism in two hT2R genes results in different receptor activities and different taste sensitivities to three bitter molecules. The hT2R43 gene allele, which encodes a protein with tryptophan in position 35, makes people very sensitive to the bitterness of the natural plant compounds aloin and aristolochic acid. People who do not possess this allele do not taste these compounds at low concentrations. The same hT2R43 gene allele makes people more sensitive to the bitterness of an artificial sweetener, saccharin. In addition, a closely related gene's (hT2R44's) allele also makes people more sensitive to the bitterness of saccharin. We also demonstrated that some people do not possess certain hT2R genes, contributing to taste variation between individuals. Our findings thus reveal new examples of variations in human taste and provide a molecular basis for them.

  11. Transient expression analysis of allelic variants of a VNTR in the dopamine transporter gene (DAT1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Souza Ursula M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 10-repeat allele of a variable number tandem repeat (VNTR polymorphism in the 3'-untranslated region of the dopamine transporter gene (DAT1 has been associated with a range of psychiatric phenotypes, most notably attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. The mechanism for this association is not yet understood, although several lines of evidence implicate variation in gene expression. In this study we have characterised the genomic structure of the 9- and 10-repeat VNTR alleles, and directly examined the role of the polymorphism in mediating gene expression by measuring comparative in vitro cellular expression using a reporter-gene assay system. Results Differences in the sequence of the 9- and 10- repeat alleles were confirmed but no polymorphic differences were observed between individuals. There was no difference in expression of reporter gene constructs containing the two alleles. Conclusions Our data suggests that this VNTR polymorphism may not have a direct effect on DAT1 expression and that the associations observed with psychiatric phenotypes may be mediated via linkage disequilibrium with other functional polymorphisms.

  12. Analysis of average standardized SSR allele size supports domestication of soybean along the Yellow River

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.H.; Zhang, C.; Smulders, M.J.M.; Li, W.; Ma, Y.S.; Xu, Qu; Chang, R.Z.; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2013-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) was domesticated in China from its wild progenitor G. soja. The geographic region of domestication is, however, not exactly known. Here we employed the directional evolution of SSR (microsatellite) repeats (which mutate preferentially into longer alleles) to analyze the

  13. Certain HLA alleles are associated with stress-triggered Graves' disease and influence its course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vita, Roberto; Lapa, Daniela; Trimarchi, Francesco; Vita, Giuseppe; Fallahi, Poupak; Antonelli, Alessandro; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    There are no studies on HLA analysis in patients in whom Graves' disease (GD) hyperthyroidism has been preceded by ≥1 stressful event. The aim of the present study was to identify predisposing or protecting HLA alleles and their effects on the course of GD in this subset of patients. We performed serological HLA typing in 58 Caucasian patients with stress-related GD and in 130 matched healthy controls (HC). We also performed genomic HLA typing in 20/58 patients and in all HC. Five HLA alleles and three loci were more frequent in patients compared to HC: B8, Cw7, C*07, C*17, DR3, DR4, DRB1*04, and DQ2. In contrast, B14 was less frequent in patients than in HC. Depending on outcome after ATD withdrawal (remission, exacerbation on-ATD, relapse off-ATD), in patients, some alleles/loci were over-represented, while others were under-represented. Age, FT3, and FT4 fold increase over the upper normal limit at onset were different depending on the allele/locus carried. In GD patients with stress-triggered hyperthyroidism, HLA typing may be helpful in predicting the outcome of the disease after ATD withdrawal.

  14. Allele mining across DREB1A and DREB1B in diverse rice ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    data concerning the physiological role and regulation of DREB1 in different genetic background are very limited; it is to be expected that they will be studied extensively in the near future. [Challam C., Ghosh T., Rai M. and Tyagi W. 2015 Allele mining across DREB1A and DREB1B in diverse rice genotypes suggest a highly.

  15. The association of eba-175 alleles with the outcome of malaria in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The association of eba-175 alleles with the outcome of malaria in Nigerian children. OK Amodu, SA Olaniyan, OO Omotade. Abstract. Malaria remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Nigeria. Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte binding antigen-175, eba-175, plays an important role in the invasion of host cells ...

  16. Selection on alleles affecting human longevity and late-life disease: the example of apolipoprotein E.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fotios Drenos

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available It is often claimed that genes affecting health in old age, such as cardiovascular and Alzheimer diseases, are beyond the reach of natural selection. We show in a simulation study based on known genetic (apolipoprotein E and non-genetic risk factors (gender, diet, smoking, alcohol, exercise that, because there is a statistical distribution of ages at which these genes exert their influence on morbidity and mortality, the effects of selection are in fact non-negligible. A gradual increase with each generation of the epsilon2 and epsilon3 alleles of the gene at the expense of the epsilon4 allele was predicted from the model. The epsilon2 allele frequency was found to increase slightly more rapidly than that for epsilon3, although there was no statistically significant difference between the two. Our result may explain the recent evolutionary history of the epsilon 2, 3 and 4 alleles of the apolipoprotein E gene and has wider relevance for genes affecting human longevity.

  17. Predictable allele frequency changes due to habitat fragmentation in the Glanville fritillary butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountain, Toby; Nieminen, Marko; Sirén, Jukka; Wong, Swee Chong; Lehtonen, Rainer; Hanski, Ilkka

    2016-03-08

    Describing the evolutionary dynamics of now extinct populations is challenging, as their genetic composition before extinction is generally unknown. The Glanville fritillary butterfly has a large extant metapopulation in the Åland Islands in Finland, but declined to extinction in the nearby fragmented southwestern (SW) Finnish archipelago in the 20th century. We genotyped museum samples for 222 SNPs across the genome, including SNPs from candidate genes and neutral regions. SW Finnish populations had significantly reduced genetic diversity before extinction, and their allele frequencies gradually diverged from those in contemporary Åland populations over 80 y. We identified 15 outlier loci among candidate SNPs, mostly related to flight, in which allele frequencies have changed more than the neutral expectation. At outlier loci, allele frequencies in SW Finland shifted in the same direction as newly established populations deviated from old local populations in contemporary Åland. Moreover, outlier allele frequencies in SW Finland resemble those in fragmented landscapes as opposed to continuous landscapes in the Baltic region. These results indicate selection for genotypes associated with good colonization capacity in the highly fragmented landscape before the extinction of the populations. Evolutionary response to habitat fragmentation may have enhanced the viability of the populations, but it did not save the species from regional extinction in the face of severe habitat loss and fragmentation. These results highlight a potentially common situation in changing environments: evolutionary changes are not strong enough to fully compensate for the direct adverse effects of environmental change and thereby rescue populations from extinction.

  18. [Allele polymorphism of microsatellite loci in pea Pisum sativum L. lines, varieties, and mutants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dribnokhodova, O P; Gostimskiĭ, S A

    2009-07-01

    Interlinear polymorphism at 23 microsatellite loci was studied in 40 Pisum sativum lines, varieties, and mutants and proved to be high, 61.6% on average. Varieties bred for different end uses substantially differed in the extent of polymorphism and allele composition. Polymorphism of microsatellite loci was shown to be suitable for developing passports of industrial pea varieties.

  19. The frequency of allelic lethals and complementation maps in natural populations of drosophila melanogaster from Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salceda Victor M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Departing from a previous study on the genetic loads affecting the second chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster in four natural populations, 171 lethal chromosomes were recovered and maintained as a balanced stocks in the condition Cy L / 1 (l=lethal; of those lethais 24 correspond to population A, 50 to populations B and C and 47 to population D. later on an intra-population allelism test for the four populations was performed for each one. A total of 3807 inter lethal crosses were done yielding a total of i 10 allelic combinations, from them the respective percentage of allelism for each population was calculated and they are as follow: 3.98 % for population A, 1.80 % for population B, 3.67 % for population C and 2.96 % for population D. the observed values for the frequency of allelism in these populations are not significantly different from those reported by other authors in similar studies in natural and/or experimental populations. Beside these values the frequency for singles, doubles, triplets and even quadruplets present in each population were determined, they shown the presence of various complementation maps due to the clustering of few different lethals: also a large complementation map formed by a large cluster involving the presence of 26 different lethals found in population D all of them combined constituting a single unit was found.

  20. Genotyping of vacA alleles of Helicobacter pylori strains recovered ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genotyping of vacA alleles of Helicobacter pylori strains recovered from some Iranian food items. ... Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... Conclusion: The presence of similar genotypes in H. pylori strains of foods and those of human clinical samples suggest that contaminated foods may be the source of bacteria ...

  1. Overdispersion in allelic counts and θ-correction in forensic genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben

    2009-01-01

    A statistical model for incorporating the extra variability in allelic counts due to subpopulation structures is presented. In forensic genetics, this effect is modelled by the identical-by-decent-parameter, θ . It is shown, that θ may be defined as an overdispersion parameter capturing the extra...

  2. Identification of variant alleles at AmpFlSTR SGM Plus STR loci in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-20

    Oct 20, 2008 ... It is therefore important that forensic science community shares information on the occurrence of these variants and reduces complications during STR typing. In this study, we report 5 variant alleles at AmpFlSTR SGM. Plus loci in a sample population of Bangladesh. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Samples ...

  3. CHEK2 1100delC is a susceptibility allele for HNPCC-related colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wasielewski, Marijke; Vasen, Hans; Wijnen, Juul; Hooning, Maartje; Dooijes, Dennis; Tops, Carli; Klijn, Jan G. M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Schutte, Mieke

    2008-01-01

    The pathogenic CHEK2 1100delC variant is firmly established as a breast cancer susceptibility allele. Dutch CHEK2 1100delC breast cancer families frequently also include colorectal cancer cases, and the variant is particularly prevalent among breast cancer families with hereditary breast and

  4. Mining the Human Phenome Using Allelic Scores That Index Biological Intermediates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evans, David M; Brion, Marie Jo A; Paternoster, Lavinia

    2013-01-01

    aetiology. However, single genetic variants typically explain small amounts of disease risk. Our idea is to construct allelic scores that explain greater proportions of the variance in biological intermediates, and subsequently use these scores to data mine GWAS. To investigate the approach's properties, we...

  5. Simultaneous purifying selection on the ancestral MC1R allele and positive selection on the melanoma-risk allele V60L in south Europeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Cadenas, Conrado; López, Saioa; Ribas, Gloria; Flores, Carlos; García, Oscar; Sevilla, Arrate; Smith-Zubiaga, Isabel; Ibarrola-Villaba, Maider; Pino-Yanes, Maria del Mar; Gardeazabal, Jesús; Boyano, Dolores; García de Galdeano, Alicia; Izagirre, Neskuts; de la Rúa, Concepción; Alonso, Santos

    2013-12-01

    In humans, the geographical apportionment of the coding diversity of the pigmentary locus melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) is, unusually, higher in Eurasians than in Africans. This atypical observation has been interpreted as the result of purifying selection due to functional constraint on MC1R in high UV-B radiation environments. By analyzing 3,142 human MC1R alleles from different regions of Spain in the context of additional haplotypic information from the 1000 Genomes (1000G) Project data, we show that purifying selection is also strong in southern Europe, but not so in northern Europe. Furthermore, we show that purifying and positive selection act simultaneously on MC1R. Thus, at least in Spain, regions at opposite ends of the incident UV-B radiation distribution show significantly different frequencies for the melanoma-risk allele V60L (a mutation also associated to red hair and fair skin and even blonde hair), with higher frequency of V60L at those regions of lower incident UV-B radiation. Besides, using the 1000G south European data, we show that the V60L haplogroup is also characterized by an extended haplotype homozygosity (EHH) pattern indicative of positive selection. We, thus, provide evidence for an adaptive value of human skin depigmentation in Europe and illustrate how an adaptive process can simultaneously help to maintain a disease-risk allele. In addition, our data support the hypothesis proposed by Jablonski and Chaplin (Human skin pigmentation as an adaptation to UVB radiation. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010;107:8962-8968), which posits that habitation of middle latitudes involved the evolution of partially depigmented phenotypes that are still capable of suitable tanning.

  6. Microsatellite variation and rare alleles in a bottlenecked Hawaiian Islands endemic: implications for reintroductions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Michelle H.; Pearce, John M.; Lavretsky, Philip; Seixas, Pedro P.; Courtot, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Conservation of genetic biodiversity in endangered wildlife populations is an important challenge to address since the loss of alleles and genetic drift may influence future adaptability. Reintroduction aims to re-establish species to restored or protected ecosystems; however, moving a subset of individuals may result in loss of gene variants during the management-induced bottleneck (i.e. translocation). The endangered Laysan teal Anas laysanensis was once widespread across the Hawaiian archipelago, but became isolated on Laysan Island (415 ha) from the mid-1800s until 2004 when a translocation to Midway Atoll (596 ha) was undertaken to reduce extinction risks. We compared genetic diversity and quantified variation at microsatellite loci sampled from 230 individuals from the wild populations at Laysan (1999 to 2009) and Midway (2007 to 2010; n = 133 Laysan, n = 96 Midway birds). We identified polymorphic markers by screening nuclear microsatellites (N = 83). Low nuclear variation was detected, consistent with the species’ insular isolation and historical bottleneck. Six of 83 microsatellites were polymorphic. We found limited but similar estimates of allelic richness (2.58 alleles per locus) and heterozygosity within populations. However, 2 rare alleles found in the Laysan source population were not present in Midway’s reintroduced population, and a unique allele was discovered in an individual on Midway. Differentiation between island populations was low (FST = 0.6%), but statistically significant. Our results indicate that genetic drift had little effect on offspring generations 3 to 6 yr post-release and demonstrate the utility of using known founder events to help quantify genetic capture during translocations and to inform management decisions.

  7. Simultaneous SNP identification and assessment of allele-specific bias from ChIP-seq data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Yunyun

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs have been associated with many aspects of human development and disease, and many non-coding SNPs associated with disease risk are presumed to affect gene regulation. We have previously shown that SNPs within transcription factor binding sites can affect transcription factor binding in an allele-specific and heritable manner. However, such analysis has relied on prior whole-genome genotypes provided by large external projects such as HapMap and the 1000 Genomes Project. This requirement limits the study of allele-specific effects of SNPs in primary patient samples from diseases of interest, where complete genotypes are not readily available. Results In this study, we show that we are able to identify SNPs de novo and accurately from ChIP-seq data generated in the ENCODE Project. Our de novo identified SNPs from ChIP-seq data are highly concordant with published genotypes. Independent experimental verification of more than 100 sites estimates our false discovery rate at less than 5%. Analysis of transcription factor binding at de novo identified SNPs revealed widespread heritable allele-specific binding, confirming previous observations. SNPs identified from ChIP-seq datasets were significantly enriched for disease-associated variants, and we identified dozens of allele-specific binding events in non-coding regions that could distinguish between disease and normal haplotypes. Conclusions Our approach combines SNP discovery, genotyping and allele-specific analysis, but is selectively focused on functional regulatory elements occupied by transcription factors or epigenetic marks, and will therefore be valuable for identifying the functional regulatory consequences of non-coding SNPs in primary disease samples.

  8. Induction of Terpene Biosynthesis in Berries of Microvine Transformed with VvDXS1 Alleles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenza Dalla Costa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Terpenoids, especially monoterpenes, are major aroma-impact compounds in grape and wine. Previous studies highlighted a key regulatory role for grapevine 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase 1 (VvDXS1, the first enzyme of the methylerythritol phosphate pathway for isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis. Here, the parallel analysis of VvDXS1 genotype and terpene concentration in a germplasm collection demonstrated that VvDXS1 sequence has a very high predictive value for the accumulation of monoterpenes and also has an influence on sesquiterpene levels. A metabolic engineering approach was applied by expressing distinct VvDXS1 alleles in the grapevine model system “microvine” and assessing the effects on downstream pathways at transcriptional and metabolic level in different organs and fruit developmental stages. The underlying goal was to investigate two potential perturbation mechanisms, the former based on a significant over-expression of the wild-type (neutral VvDXS1 allele and the latter on the ex-novo expression of an enzyme with increased catalytic efficiency from the mutated (muscat VvDXS1 allele. The integration of the two VvDXS1 alleles in distinct microvine lines was found to alter the expression of several terpenoid biosynthetic genes, as assayed through an ad hoc developed TaqMan array based on cDNA libraries of four aromatic cultivars. In particular, enhanced transcription of monoterpene, sesquiterpene and carotenoid pathway genes was observed. The accumulation of monoterpenes in ripe berries was higher in the transformed microvines compared to control plants. This effect is predominantly attributed to the improved activity of the VvDXS1 enzyme coded by the muscat allele, whereas the up-regulation of VvDXS1 plays a secondary role in the increase of monoterpenes.

  9. Genes of the unfolded protein response pathway harbor risk alleles for primary open angle glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Anna Carbone

    Full Text Available The statistical power of genome-wide association (GWA studies to detect risk alleles for human diseases is limited by the unfavorable ratio of SNPs to study subjects. This multiple testing problem can be surmounted with very large population sizes when common alleles of large effects give rise to disease status. However, GWA approaches fall short when many rare alleles may give rise to a common disease, or when the number of subjects that can be recruited is limited. Here, we demonstrate that this multiple testing problem can be overcome by a comparative genomics approach in which an initial genome-wide screen in a genetically amenable model organism is used to identify human orthologues that may harbor risk alleles for adult-onset primary open angle glaucoma (POAG. Glaucoma is a major cause of blindness, which affects over 60 million people worldwide. Several genes have been associated with juvenile onset glaucoma, but genetic factors that predispose to adult onset primary open angle glaucoma (POAG remain largely unknown. Previous genome-wide analysis in a Drosophila ocular hypertension model identified transcripts with altered regulation and showed induction of the unfolded protein response (UPR upon overexpression of transgenic human glaucoma-associated myocilin (MYOC. We selected 16 orthologous genes with 62 polymorphic markers and identified in two independent human populations two genes of the UPR that harbor POAG risk alleles, BIRC6 and PDIA5. Thus, effectiveness of the UPR in response to accumulation of misfolded or aggregated proteins may contribute to the pathogenesis of POAG and provide targets for early therapeutic intervention.

  10. Genes of the unfolded protein response pathway harbor risk alleles for primary open angle glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Mary Anna; Chen, Yuhong; Hughes, Guy A; Weinreb, Robert N; Zabriskie, Norman A; Zhang, Kang; Anholt, Robert R H

    2011-01-01

    The statistical power of genome-wide association (GWA) studies to detect risk alleles for human diseases is limited by the unfavorable ratio of SNPs to study subjects. This multiple testing problem can be surmounted with very large population sizes when common alleles of large effects give rise to disease status. However, GWA approaches fall short when many rare alleles may give rise to a common disease, or when the number of subjects that can be recruited is limited. Here, we demonstrate that this multiple testing problem can be overcome by a comparative genomics approach in which an initial genome-wide screen in a genetically amenable model organism is used to identify human orthologues that may harbor risk alleles for adult-onset primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). Glaucoma is a major cause of blindness, which affects over 60 million people worldwide. Several genes have been associated with juvenile onset glaucoma, but genetic factors that predispose to adult onset primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) remain largely unknown. Previous genome-wide analysis in a Drosophila ocular hypertension model identified transcripts with altered regulation and showed induction of the unfolded protein response (UPR) upon overexpression of transgenic human glaucoma-associated myocilin (MYOC). We selected 16 orthologous genes with 62 polymorphic markers and identified in two independent human populations two genes of the UPR that harbor POAG risk alleles, BIRC6 and PDIA5. Thus, effectiveness of the UPR in response to accumulation of misfolded or aggregated proteins may contribute to the pathogenesis of POAG and provide targets for early therapeutic intervention.

  11. Specific human leukocyte antigen class I and II alleles associated with hepatitis C virus viremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuniholm, Mark H; Kovacs, Andrea; Gao, Xiaojiang; Xue, Xiaonan; Marti, Darlene; Thio, Chloe L; Peters, Marion G; Terrault, Norah A; Greenblatt, Ruth M; Goedert, James J; Cohen, Mardge H; Minkoff, Howard; Gange, Stephen J; Anastos, Kathryn; Fazzari, Melissa; Harris, Tiffany G; Young, Mary A; Strickler, Howard D; Carrington, Mary

    2010-05-01

    Studies of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and their relation with hepatitis C virus (HCV) viremia have had conflicting results. However, these studies have varied in size and methods, and few large studies assessed HLA class I alleles. Only one study conducted high-resolution class I genotyping. The current investigation therefore involved high-resolution HLA class I and II genotyping of a large multiracial cohort of U.S. women with a high prevalence of HCV and HIV. Our primary analyses evaluated associations between 12 HLA alleles identified through a critical review of the literature and HCV viremia in 758 HCV-seropositive women. Other alleles with >5% prevalence were also assessed; previously unreported associations were corrected for multiple comparisons. DRB1*0101 (prevalence ratio [PR] = 1.7; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.1-2.6), B*5701 (PR=2.0; 95% CI = 1.0-3.1), B*5703 (PR = 1.7; 95% CI = 1.0-2.5), and Cw*0102 (PR = 1.9; 95% CI = 1.0-3.0) were associated with the absence of HCV RNA (i.e., HCV clearance), whereas DRB1*0301 (PR = 0.4; 95% CI = 0.2-0.7) was associated with HCV RNA positivity. DQB1*0301 was also associated with the absence of HCV RNA but only among HIV-seronegative women (PR = 3.4; 95% CI = 1.2-11.8). Each of these associations was among those predicted. We additionally studied the relation of HLA alleles with HCV infection (serostatus) in women at high risk of HCV from injection drug use (N = 838), but no significant relationships were observed. HLA genotype influences the host capacity to clear HCV viremia. The specific HLA associations observed in the current study are unlikely to be due to chance because they were a priori hypothesized.

  12. Association of gliadin antibodies, HLA alleles, and schizophrenia in Cuban population patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Galván

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several lines of evidence have suggested an interesting link between gluten ingestion and schizophrenia. For example, increased levels of gliadin and transglutaminase antibodies have been observed in patients with schizophrenia. Methods: To verify these observations we compared the prevalence of gliadin and transglutaminse antibodies, as well as the presence of the HLA alleles, HLA DQA1*0501-DQB1*02 (DQ2 and HLA-DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302 (DQ8, among patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. A total of 108 patients with schizophrenia and 60 healthy controls were evaluated. Gliadin antibodies were determined by a visual semiquantitative assay and tissue transglutaminase antibodies were determined both by one-step immunochromatografic assay and ELISA. HLA typing was performed by PCR amplification using sequence-specific primers for each allele. Results: We found a strong association between the presence of gliadin antibodies and schizophrenia (OR 3.488; 95% CI, 1.43-8.44. However, tissue transglutaminase antibodies were not detected in either group neither by immunochromatograpic or ELISA. No significant association was found for the DQ2 or DQ8 heterodimer and the disease, but a significant positive association between schizophrenia and HLA alleles DQA1*0301 and DQB1*02 was present (OR = 2.80; 95% CI, 1.27-6.17, and OR = 2.37, 95% CI, 1.24-4.53, respectively. Conclusions: The present study showed that the presence of gliadin antibodies was not correlated with the presence of HLA DQA1*0301 or DQB1*02 alleles within the group of patients with schizophrenia. Our study replicates the findings that anti-gliadin antibodies are associated with schizophrenia but also suggests that the presence of these antibodies and the HLA alleles DQB1*02 and DQA1*0301 are independently associated with susceptibility to schizophrenia.

  13. Detection of ancestry informative HLA alleles confirms the admixed origins of Japanese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirofumi Nakaoka

    Full Text Available The polymorphisms in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA region are powerful tool for studying human evolutionary processes. We investigated genetic structure of Japanese by using five-locus HLA genotypes (HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, and -DPB1 of 2,005 individuals from 10 regions of Japan. We found a significant level of population substructure in Japanese; particularly the differentiation between Okinawa Island and mainland Japanese. By using a plot of the principal component scores, we identified ancestry informative alleles associated with the underlying population substructure. We examined extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD between pairs of HLA alleles on the haplotypes that were differentiated among regions. The LDs were strong and weak for pairs of HLA alleles characterized by low and high frequencies in Okinawa Island, respectively. The five-locus haplotypes whose alleles exhibit strong LD were unique to Japanese and South Korean, suggesting that these haplotypes had been recently derived from the Korean Peninsula. The alleles characterized by high frequency in Japanese compared to South Korean formed segmented three-locus haplotype that was commonly found in Aleuts, Eskimos, and North- and Meso-Americans but not observed in Korean and Chinese. The serologically equivalent haplotype was found in Orchid Island in Taiwan, Mongol, Siberia, and Arctic regions. It suggests that early Japanese who existed prior to the migration wave from the Korean Peninsula shared ancestry with northern Asian who moved to the New World via the Bering Strait land bridge. These results may support the admixture model for peopling of Japanese Archipelago.

  14. An informational view of accession rarity and allele specificity in germplasm banks for management and conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Valdés, M Humberto; Burgueño, Juan; Singh, Sukhwinder; Martínez, Octavio; Sansaloni, Carolina Paola

    2018-01-01

    Germplasm banks are growing in their importance, number of accessions and amount of characterization data, with a large emphasis on molecular genetic markers. In this work, we offer an integrated view of accessions and marker data in an information theory framework. The basis of this development is the mutual information between accessions and allele frequencies for molecular marker loci, which can be decomposed in allele specificities, as well as in rarity and divergence of accessions. In this way, formulas are provided to calculate the specificity of the different marker alleles with reference to their distribution across accessions, accession rarity, defined as the weighted average of the specificity of its alleles, and divergence, defined by the Kullback-Leibler formula. Albeit being different measures, it is demonstrated that average rarity and divergence are equal for any collection. These parameters can contribute to the knowledge of the structure of a germplasm collection and to make decisions about the preservation of rare variants. The concepts herein developed served as the basis for a strategy for core subset selection called HCore, implemented in a publicly available R script. As a proof of concept, the mathematical view and tools developed in this research were applied to a large collection of Mexican wheat accessions, widely characterized by SNP markers. The most specific alleles were found to be private of a single accession, and the distribution of this parameter had its highest frequencies at low levels of specificity. Accession rarity and divergence had largely symmetrical distributions, and had a positive, albeit non-strictly linear relationship. Comparison of the HCore approach for core subset selection, with three state-of-the-art methods, showed it to be superior for average divergence and rarity, mean genetic distance and diversity. The proposed approach can be used for knowledge extraction and decision making in germplasm collections of

  15. High-resolution analysis of parent-of-origin allelic expression in the Arabidopsis Endosperm.

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    Philip Wolff

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon leading to parent-of-origin specific differential expression of maternally and paternally inherited alleles. In plants, genomic imprinting has mainly been observed in the endosperm, an ephemeral triploid tissue derived after fertilization of the diploid central cell with a haploid sperm cell. In an effort to identify novel imprinted genes in Arabidopsis thaliana, we generated deep sequencing RNA profiles of F1 hybrid seeds derived after reciprocal crosses of Arabidopsis Col-0 and Bur-0 accessions. Using polymorphic sites to quantify allele-specific expression levels, we could identify more than 60 genes with potential parent-of-origin specific expression. By analyzing the distribution of DNA methylation and epigenetic marks established by Polycomb group (PcG proteins using publicly available datasets, we suggest that for maternally expressed genes (MEGs repression of the paternally inherited alleles largely depends on DNA methylation or PcG-mediated repression, whereas repression of the maternal alleles of paternally expressed genes (PEGs predominantly depends on PcG proteins. While maternal alleles of MEGs are also targeted by PcG proteins, such targeting does not cause complete repression. Candidate MEGs and PEGs are enriched for cis-proximal transposons, suggesting that transposons might be a driving force for the evolution of imprinted genes in Arabidopsis. In addition, we find that MEGs and PEGs are significantly faster evolving when compared to other genes in the genome. In contrast to the predominant location of mammalian imprinted genes in clusters, cluster formation was only detected for few MEGs and PEGs, suggesting that clustering is not a major requirement for imprinted gene regulation in Arabidopsis.

  16. Variant RH alleles and Rh immunisation in patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sippert, Emilia; Fujita, Claudia R; Machado, Debora; Guelsin, Glaucia; Gaspardi, Ane C; Pellegrino, Jordão; Gilli, Simone; Saad, Sara S T O; Castilho, Lilian

    2015-01-01

    Alloimmunisation is a major complication in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) receiving red blood cell (RBC) transfusions and despite provision of Rh phenotyped RBC units, Rh antibodies still occur. These antibodies in patients positive for the corresponding Rh antigen are considered autoantibodies in many cases but variant RH alleles found in SCD patients can also contribute to Rh alloimmunisation. In this study, we characterised variant RH alleles in 31 SCD patients who made antibodies to Rh antigens despite antigen-positive status and evaluated the clinical significance of the antibodies produced. RHD and RHCE BeadChip™ from BioArray Solutions and/or amplification and sequencing of exons were used to identify the RH variants. The serological features of all Rh antibodies in antigen-positive patients were analysed and the clinical significance of the antibodies was evaluated by retrospective analysis of the haemoglobin (Hb) levels before and after transfusion; the change from baseline pre-transfusion Hb and the percentage of HbS were also determined. We identified variant RH alleles in 31/48 (65%) of SCD patients with Rh antibodies. Molecular analyses revealed the presence of partial RHD alleles and variant RHCE alleles associated with altered C and e antigens. Five patients were compound heterozygotes for RHD and RHCE variants. Retrospective analysis showed that 42% of antibodies produced by the patients with RH variants were involved in delayed haemolytic transfusion reactions or decreased survival of transfused RBC. In this study, we found that Rh antibodies in SCD patients with RH variants can be clinically significant and, therefore, matching patients based on RH variants should be considered.

  17. Frequency of CCR5Δ32 allele in healthy Bosniak population.

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    Grażyna Adler

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence has demonstrated the role of CCR5Δ32 in a variety of human diseases: from infectious and inflammatory diseases to cancer. Several studies have confirmed that genetic variants in chemokine receptor CCR5 gene are correlated with susceptibility and resistance to HIV infection. A 32-nucleotide deletion within the CCR5 reading frame is associated with decreased susceptibility to HIV acquisition and a slower progression to AIDS. Mean frequency of CCR5Δ32 allele in Europe is approximately 10%. The highest allele frequency is observed among Nordic populations (about 12% and lower in the regions of Southeast Mediterranean (about 5%. Although the frequency of CCR5Δ32 was determined in numerous European populations, there is a lack of studies on this variant in the Bosnia and Hercegovina population. Therefore, the aim of our study was to assess the frequency of CCR5Δ32 allele in the cohort of Bosniaks and compare the results with European reports. CCR5Δ32 was detected by sequence-specific PCR in a sample of 100 healthy subjects from Bosnia and Herzegovina (DNA collected 2011-2013.  Mean age of the cohort being 58.8 (±10.7 years, with 82% of women. We identified 17 heterozygotes and one mutant homozygote in study group, with mean ∆32 allele frequency of 9.5%. CCR5∆32 allele frequency among Bosniaks is comparable to that found in Caucasian populations and follows the pattern of the north-southern gradient observed for Europe. Further studies on larger cohorts with adequate female-to-male ratio are necessary. 

  18. Allelic determinants of vitamin d insufficiency, bone mineral density, and bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trummer, Olivia; Schwetz, Verena; Walter-Finell, Daniela; Lerchbaum, Elisabeth; Renner, Wilfried; Gugatschka, Markus; Dobnig, Harald; Pieber, Thomas R; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara

    2012-07-01

    Low 25-hydroxycholecalciferol [25(OH) vitamin D] status is known to play an important role in many diseases with focus on bone health. Based on recently reported genetic determinants of vitamin D insufficiency, we aimed to analyze genetic variants of group-specific component (GC), 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR7), and cytochrome P450IIR-1 (CYP2R1) for association with vitamin D levels, bone mineral density (BMD), and bone fractures. We conducted a cross-sectional BMD and fracture study and a prospective cohort study. The cross-sectional study comprised participants of a BMD screening study, and the prospective cohort study comprised nursing home subjects. The cross-sectional study included 342 subjects (mean age, 55.3 ± 12.0 yr), and the prospective study included 1093 subjects (mean age, 84.0 ± 6.0 yr). Patients were stratified by GC, DHCR7, and CYP2R1 genotypes. For each gene, the allele associated with lower 25(OH) vitamin D levels was designated as "risk allele." The potential role of these risk alleles in fracture risk was analyzed by logistic regression analysis including age and sex as confounders. We measured BMD and fractures. GC genotypes were significantly associated with lower mean 25(OH) vitamin D levels in both cohorts (P = 0.001 and P = 0.048, respectively). There was no significant association of BMD with any of the genotypes. None of the alleles was associated with past fractures, whereas the DHCR7 G-allele was significantly associated with prospective fractures (odds ratio, 0.68; 95% confidence interval, 0.51-0.92; P = 0.011). The DHCR7 gene polymorphism may be a predictor for fracture risk.

  19. Gene expression allelic imbalance in ovine brown adipose tissue impacts energy homeostasis.

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    Shila Ghazanfar

    Full Text Available Heritable trait variation within a population of organisms is largely governed by DNA variations that impact gene transcription and protein function. Identifying genetic variants that affect complex functional traits is a primary aim of population genetics studies, especially in the context of human disease and agricultural production traits. The identification of alleles directly altering mRNA expression and thereby biological function is challenging due to difficulty in isolating direct effects of cis-acting genetic variations from indirect trans-acting genetic effects. Allele specific gene expression or allelic imbalance in gene expression (AI occurring at heterozygous loci provides an opportunity to identify genes directly impacted by cis-acting genetic variants as indirect trans-acting effects equally impact the expression of both alleles. However, the identification of genes showing AI in the context of the expression of all genes remains a challenge due to a variety of technical and statistical issues. The current study focuses on the discovery of genes showing AI using single nucleotide polymorphisms as allelic reporters. By developing a computational and statistical process that addressed multiple analytical challenges, we ranked 5,809 genes for evidence of AI using RNA-Seq data derived from brown adipose tissue samples from a cohort of late gestation fetal lambs and then identified a conservative subgroup of 1,293 genes. Thus, AI was extensive, representing approximately 25% of the tested genes. Genes associated with AI were enriched for multiple Gene Ontology (GO terms relating to lipid metabolism, mitochondrial function and the extracellular matrix. These functions suggest that cis-acting genetic variations causing AI in the population are preferentially impacting genes involved in energy homeostasis and tissue remodelling. These functions may contribute to production traits likely to be under genetic selection in the population.

  20. Allelic Variation at the Rht8 Locus in a 19th Century Wheat Collection

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    Linnéa Asplund

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Wheat breeding during the 20th century has put large efforts into reducing straw length and increasing harvest index. In the 1920s an allele of Rht8 with dwarfing effects, found in the Japanese cultivar “Akakomugi,” was bred into European cultivars and subsequently spread over the world. Rht8 has not been cloned, but the microsatellite marker WMS261 has been shown to be closely linked to it and is commonly used for genotyping Rht8. The “Akakomugi” allele is strongly associated with WMS261-192bp. Numerous screens of wheat cultivars with different geographical origin have been performed to study the spread and influence of the WMS261-192bp during 20th century plant breeding. However, the allelic diversity of WMS261 in wheat cultivars before modern plant breeding and introduction of the Japanese dwarfing genes is largely unknown. Here, we report a study of WMS261 allelic diversity in a historical wheat collection from 1865 representing worldwide major wheats at the time. The majority carried the previously reported 164 bp or 174 bp allele, but with little geographical correlation. In a few lines, a rare 182 bp fragment was found. Although straw length was recognized as an important character already in the 19th century, Rht8 probably played a minor role for height variation. The use of WMS261 and other functional markers for analyses of historical specimens and characterization of historic crop traits is discussed.

  1. Global phylogeography of the avian malaria pathogen Plasmodium relictum based on MSP1 allelic diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellgren, Olof; Atkinson, Carter T.; Bensch, Staffan; Albayrak, Tamer; Dimitrov, Dimitar; Ewen, John G.; Kim, Kyeong Soon; Lima, Marcos R.; Martin, Lynn; Palinauskas, Vaidas; Ricklefs, Robert; Sehgal, Ravinder N. M.; Gediminas, Valkiunas; Tsuda, Yoshio; Marzal, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Knowing the genetic variation that occurs in pathogen populations and how it is distributed across geographical areas is essential to understand parasite epidemiology, local patterns of virulence, and evolution of host-resistance. In addition, it is important to identify populations of pathogens that are evolutionarily independent and thus ‘free’ to adapt to hosts and environments. Here, we investigated genetic variation in the globally distributed, highly invasive avian malaria parasite Plasmodium relictum, which has several distinctive mitochondrial haplotyps (cyt b lineages, SGS1, GRW11 and GRW4). The phylogeography of P. relictum was accessed using the highly variable nuclear gene merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1), a gene linked to the invasion biology of the parasite. We show that the lineage GRW4 is evolutionarily independent of GRW11 and SGS1 whereas GRW11 and SGS1 share MSP1 alleles and thus suggesting the presence of two distinct species (GRW4 versus SGS1 and GRW11). Further, there were significant differences in the global distribution of MSP1 alleles with differences between GRW4 alleles in the New and the Old World. For SGS1, a lineage formerly believed to have both tropical and temperate transmission, there were clear differences in MSP1 alleles transmitted in tropical Africa compared to the temperate regions of Europe and Asia. Further, we highlight the occurrence of multiple MSP1 alleles in GRW4 isolates from the Hawaiian Islands, where the parasite has contributed to declines and extinctions of endemic forest birds since it was introduced. This study stresses the importance of multiple independent loci for understanding patterns of transmission and evolutionary independence across avian malaria parasites.

  2. Characterization of genetic polymorphism of novel MHC B-LB II alleles in Chinese indigenous chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rifu; Li, Kui; Chen, Guohong; Xu, Hui; Qiang, Bayangzong; Li, Changchun; Liu, Bang

    2007-02-01

    Genetic polymorphism of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) B-LB II gene was studied by amplification of exon 2 using PCR, followed by cloning and DNA sequencing in eight indigenous Chinese chicken populations. To reveal the genetic variation of the B-LB II gene, 37 types of patterns detected by PCR-SSCP were investigated first, which would be used to screen novel B-LB II sequences within the breeds. The types of PCR-SSCP patterns and final sequencing allowed for the identification of 31 novel MHC B-LB II alleles from 30 unrelated individuals of Chinese chickens that were sampled. These are the first designators for the alleles of chicken MHC B-LB II gene based on the rule of assignment for novel mammalian alleles. Sequence alignment of the 31 B-LB II alleles revealed a total of 68 variable sites in the fragment of exon 2, of which 51 parsimony informative and 17 singleton variable sites were observed. Among the polymorphic sites, the nucleotide substitutions in the first and second positions of the codons accounted for 36.76% and 35.29%, respectively. The sequence similarities between the alleles were estimated to be 90.6%-99.5%. The relative frequencies of synonymous and nonsynonymous nucleotide substitutions within the region were 2.92%+/-0.94% and 14.64%+/-2.67%, respectively. These results indicated that the genetic variation within exon 2 appeared to have largely arisen by gene recombination and balancing selection. Alignment of the deduced amino acid sequences of the beta1 domain coded by exon 2 revealed 6 synonymous mutations and 27 nonsynonymous substitutions at the 33 disparate sites. In particular, the nonsynonymous substitutions at the putative peptide-binding sites are considered to be associated with immunological specificity of MHC B-LB II molecule in Chinese native chickens. These results can provide a molecular biological basis for the study of disease resistance in chicken breeding.

  3. Always look on both sides: phylogenetic information conveyed by simple sequence repeat allele sequences.

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    Stéphanie Barthe

    Full Text Available Simple sequence repeat (SSR markers are widely used tools for inferences about genetic diversity, phylogeography and spatial genetic structure. Their applications assume that variation among alleles is essentially caused by an expansion or contraction of the number of repeats and that, accessorily, mutations in the target sequences follow the stepwise mutation model (SMM. Generally speaking, PCR amplicon sizes are used as direct indicators of the number of SSR repeats composing an allele with the data analysis either ignoring the extent of allele size differences or assuming that there is a direct correlation between differences in amplicon size and evolutionary distance. However, without precisely knowing the kind and distribution of polymorphism within an allele (SSR and the associated flanking region (FR sequences, it is hard to say what kind of evolutionary message is conveyed by such a synthetic descriptor of polymorphism as DNA amplicon size. In this study, we sequenced several SSR alleles in multiple populations of three divergent tree genera and disentangled the types of polymorphisms contained in each portion of the DNA amplicon containing an SSR. The patterns of diversity provided by amplicon size variation, SSR variation itself, insertions/deletions (indels, and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs observed in the FRs were compared. Amplicon size variation largely reflected SSR repeat number. The amount of variation was as large in FRs as in the SSR itself. The former contributed significantly to the phylogenetic information and sometimes was the main source of differentiation among individuals and populations contained by FR and SSR regions of SSR markers. The presence of mutations occurring at different rates within a marker's sequence offers the opportunity to analyse evolutionary events occurring on various timescales, but at the same time calls for caution in the interpretation of SSR marker data when the distribution of within

  4. Detection of ancestry informative HLA alleles confirms the admixed origins of Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Mitsunaga, Shigeki; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Shyh-Yuh, Liou; Sawamoto, Taiji; Fujiwara, Tsutomu; Tsutsui, Naohisa; Suematsu, Koji; Shinagawa, Akira; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Ituro

    2013-01-01

    The polymorphisms in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region are powerful tool for studying human evolutionary processes. We investigated genetic structure of Japanese by using five-locus HLA genotypes (HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, and -DPB1) of 2,005 individuals from 10 regions of Japan. We found a significant level of population substructure in Japanese; particularly the differentiation between Okinawa Island and mainland Japanese. By using a plot of the principal component scores, we identified ancestry informative alleles associated with the underlying population substructure. We examined extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD) between pairs of HLA alleles on the haplotypes that were differentiated among regions. The LDs were strong and weak for pairs of HLA alleles characterized by low and high frequencies in Okinawa Island, respectively. The five-locus haplotypes whose alleles exhibit strong LD were unique to Japanese and South Korean, suggesting that these haplotypes had been recently derived from the Korean Peninsula. The alleles characterized by high frequency in Japanese compared to South Korean formed segmented three-locus haplotype that was commonly found in Aleuts, Eskimos, and North- and Meso-Americans but not observed in Korean and Chinese. The serologically equivalent haplotype was found in Orchid Island in Taiwan, Mongol, Siberia, and Arctic regions. It suggests that early Japanese who existed prior to the migration wave from the Korean Peninsula shared ancestry with northern Asian who moved to the New World via the Bering Strait land bridge. These results may support the admixture model for peopling of Japanese Archipelago.

  5. Simultaneous SNP identification and assessment of allele-specific bias from ChIP-seq data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been associated with many aspects of human development and disease, and many non-coding SNPs associated with disease risk are presumed to affect gene regulation. We have previously shown that SNPs within transcription factor binding sites can affect transcription factor binding in an allele-specific and heritable manner. However, such analysis has relied on prior whole-genome genotypes provided by large external projects such as HapMap and the 1000 Genomes Project. This requirement limits the study of allele-specific effects of SNPs in primary patient samples from diseases of interest, where complete genotypes are not readily available. Results In this study, we show that we are able to identify SNPs de novo and accurately from ChIP-seq data generated in the ENCODE Project. Our de novo identified SNPs from ChIP-seq data are highly concordant with published genotypes. Independent experimental verification of more than 100 sites estimates our false discovery rate at less than 5%. Analysis of transcription factor binding at de novo identified SNPs revealed widespread heritable allele-specific binding, confirming previous observations. SNPs identified from ChIP-seq datasets were significantly enriched for disease-associated variants, and we identified dozens of allele-specific binding events in non-coding regions that could distinguish between disease and normal haplotypes. Conclusions Our approach combines SNP discovery, genotyping and allele-specific analysis, but is selectively focused on functional regulatory elements occupied by transcription factors or epigenetic marks, and will therefore be valuable for identifying the functional regulatory consequences of non-coding SNPs in primary disease samples. PMID:22950704

  6. MHC Class II alleles in ulcerative colitis-associated colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrity-Park, M M; Loftus, E V; Sandborn, W J; Bryant, S C; Smyrk, T C

    2009-09-01

    Patients with ulcerative colitis are at risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). Although prior studies have shown a link between HLA genotypes and ulcerative colitis (UC) susceptibility, none have investigated HLA genotypes and UC-CRC. We therefore investigated HLA-DR/DQ alleles in UC-CRC cases and UC-controls. Furthermore, since methylation of the Class II transactivator (CIITA) gene may silence HLA expression in tumours, we correlated HLA allele frequencies with CIITA gene methylation and HLA-DR expression. Cases and controls were matched for duration/extent of ulcerative colitis, age, ethnicity and gender, but not for primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). DNA was extracted from archived tissue blocks from 114 UC-CRC cases and 114 UC-controls. HLA-DR/DQ genotyping was performed using sequence-specific-oligonucleotide polymerase chain reaction (SSO-PCR). CIITA methylation was determined using methylation-specific PCR. HLA-DR immunohistochemistry was done following standard protocols. UC-CRC cases were more likely than UC-controls to carry the DR17 or DR13 alleles (passociated with CIITA methylation (p = 0.04 and 0.02, respectively). UC-controls more frequently carried the DR7, DR1 or DQ5 alleles (p = 0.002, 0.05 or 0.01, respectively). After adjusting for PSC, DR17 remained significantly associated with an increased risk for UC-CRC while DR7 and DQ5 remained protective. We report a significant association between specific HLA alleles and either the risk for (DR17) or protection from (DR7, DQ5) UC-CRC. This suggests a possible genetic predisposition for increased UC-CRC risk. In addition, DQ2 and DR17 were associated with CIITA methylation.

  7. Rapid evolution of the MH class I locus results in different allelic compositions in recently diverged populations of Atlantic salmon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Consuegra, S.; Megens, H.J.W.C.; Schaschl, H.; Leon, K.M.; Stet, R.J.M.; Jordan, W.C.

    2005-01-01

    We compared major histocompatibility class I allelic diversity in two currently reproductively isolated Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) populations (Irish and Norwegian) with a common postglacial origin in order to test for among-population differences in allelic composition and patterns of

  8. A Theoretical Framework for Association Studies in F2 Family Pools Using Allele Frequencies from Genotyping-By-Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janss, Luc L; Ashraf, Bilal H; Greve-Pedersen, Morten

    a sequencing approach to obtain Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) frequencies is considered here. In this work we develop the theoretical framework to perform association studies using allele frequencies from such F2 family pools. We show that expected allele frequencies in the F2 families will have...

  9. Geographically Distinct and Domain-Specific Sequence Variations in the Alleles of Rice Blast Resistance Gene Pib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Kumar; Vera Cruz, Casiana M; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast is caused by Magnaporthe oryzae, which is the most destructive fungal pathogen affecting rice growing regions worldwide. The rice blast resistance gene Pib confers broad-spectrum resistance against Southeast Asian M. oryzae races. We investigated the allelic diversity of Pib in rice germplasm originating from 12 major rice growing countries. Twenty-five new Pib alleles were identified that have unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertions and/or deletions, in addition to the polymorphic nucleotides that are shared between the different alleles. These partially or completely shared polymorphic nucleotides indicate frequent sequence exchange events between the Pib alleles. In some of the new Pib alleles, nucleotide diversity is high in the LRR domain, whereas, in others it is distributed among the NB-ARC and LRR domains. Most of the polymorphic amino acids in LRR and NB-ARC2 domains are predicted as solvent-exposed. Several of the alleles and the unique SNPs are country specific, suggesting a diversifying selection of alleles in various geographical locations in response to the locally prevalent M. oryzae population. Together, the new Pib alleles are an important genetic resource for rice blast resistance breeding programs and provide new information on rice-M. oryzae interactions at the molecular level.

  10. Genetic structure, diversity, and allelic richness in composite collection and reference set in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.

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    Gowda Cholenahalli LL

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant genetic resources (PGR are the basic raw materials for future genetic progress and an insurance against unforeseen threats to agricultural production. An extensive characterization of PGR provides an opportunity to dissect structure, mine allelic variations, and identify diverse accessions for crop improvement. The Generation Challenge Program http://www.generationcp.org conceptualized the development of "composite collections" and extraction of "reference sets" from these for more efficient tapping of global crop-related genetic resources. In this study, we report the genetic structure, diversity and allelic richness in a composite collection of chickpea using SSR markers, and formation of a reference set of 300 accessions. Results The 48 SSR markers detected 1683 alleles in 2915 accessions, of which, 935 were considered rare, 720 common and 28 most frequent. The alleles per locus ranged from 14 to 67, averaged 35, and the polymorphic information content was from 0.467 to 0.974, averaged 0.854. Marker polymorphism varied between groups of accessions in the composite collection and reference set. A number of group-specific alleles were detected: 104 in Kabuli, 297 in desi, and 69 in wild Cicer; 114 each in Mediterranean and West Asia (WA, 117 in South and South East Asia (SSEA, and 10 in African region accessions. Desi and kabuli shared 436 alleles, while wild Cicer shared 17 and 16 alleles with desi and kabuli, respectively. The accessions from SSEA and WA shared 74 alleles, while those from Mediterranean 38 and 33 alleles with WA and SSEA, respectively. Desi chickpea contained a higher proportion of rare alleles (53% than kabuli (46%, while wild Cicer accessions were devoid of rare alleles. A genotype-based reference set captured 1315 (78% of the 1683 composite collection alleles of which 463 were rare, 826 common, and 26 the most frequent alleles. The neighbour-joining tree diagram of this reference set represents

  11. Chinese white Rongchang pig does not have the dominant white allele of KIT but has the dominant black allele of MC1R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Fenju; Ren, Jun; Ai, Huashui; Ding, Nengshui; Ma, Junwu; Zeng, Daiqin; Chen, Congyin; Guo, Yuanmei; Huang, Lusheng

    2007-01-01

    The mast/stem cell growth factor receptor (KIT) and melanocortin receptor 1 (MC1R) mutations are responsible for coat color phenotypes in domestic pigs. Rongchang is a Chinese indigenous pig breed with a white coat color phenotype. To investigate the genetic variability of the KIT and MC1R genes and their possible association with the coat color phenotype in this breed, a gene duplication and splice mutation of KIT were diagnosed in a sample of 93 unrelated Rongchang animals. The results show that Rongchang pigs have a single copy of KIT without the splice mutation at the first nucleotide of intron 17, indicating that the dominant white I allele of KIT is not responsible for their white phenotype. The KIT mRNA and MC1R coding sequences were also determined in this breed. Three putative amino acid substitutions were found in the KIT gene between Rongchang and Western white pigs, their association with the Rongchang white phenotype remains unknown. For the MC1R gene, Rongchang pigs were demonstrated to have the same dominant black allele (E(D1)) as other Chinese breeds, supporting the previous conclusion that Chinese and Western pigs have independent domestication origin. We also clarified that the Rongchang white phenotype was recessive to nonwhite color phenotypes. Our results provide a good starting point for the identification of the mutations underlying the white coat color in Rongchang pigs.

  12. Allelic Variation of Cytochrome P450s Drives Resistance to Bednet Insecticides in a Major Malaria Vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman S Ibrahim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Scale up of Long Lasting Insecticide Nets (LLINs has massively contributed to reduce malaria mortality across Africa. However, resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in malaria vectors threatens its continued effectiveness. Deciphering the detailed molecular basis of such resistance and designing diagnostic tools is critical to implement suitable resistance management strategies. Here, we demonstrated that allelic variation in two cytochrome P450 genes is the most important driver of pyrethroid resistance in the major African malaria vector Anopheles funestus and detected key mutations controlling this resistance. An Africa-wide polymorphism analysis of the duplicated genes CYP6P9a and CYP6P9b revealed that both genes are directionally selected with alleles segregating according to resistance phenotypes. Modelling and docking simulations predicted that resistant alleles were better metabolizers of pyrethroids than susceptible alleles. Metabolism assays performed with recombinant enzymes of various alleles confirmed that alleles from resistant mosquitoes had significantly higher activities toward pyrethroids. Additionally, transgenic expression in Drosophila showed that flies expressing resistant alleles of both genes were significantly more resistant to pyrethroids compared with those expressing the susceptible alleles, indicating that allelic variation is the key resistance mechanism. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis and functional analyses demonstrated that three amino acid changes (Val109Ile, Asp335Glu and Asn384Ser from the resistant allele of CYP6P9b were key pyrethroid resistance mutations inducing high metabolic efficiency. The detection of these first DNA markers of metabolic resistance to pyrethroids allows the design of DNA-based diagnostic tools to detect and track resistance associated with bednets scale up, which will improve the design of evidence-based resistance management strategies.

  13. Lab mice in the field: unorthodox daily activity and effects of a dysfunctional circadian clock allele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daan, Serge; Spoelstra, Kamiel; Albrecht, Urs; Schmutz, Isabelle; Daan, Moritz; Daan, Berte; Rienks, Froukje; Poletaeva, Inga; Dell'Omo, Giacomo; Vyssotski, Alexei; Lipp, Hans-Peter

    2011-04-01

    Daily patterns of animal behavior are potentially of vast functional importance. Fitness benefits have been identified in nature by the association between individual timing and survival or by the fate of individuals after experimental deletion of their circadian pacemaker. The recent advances in unraveling the molecular basis of circadian timing enable new approaches to natural selection on timing. The investigators report on the effect and fate of the mutant Per2(Brdm1) allele in 4 replicate populations of house mice in a seminatural outside environment over 2 years. This allele is known to compromise circadian organization and entrainment and to cause multiple physiological disturbances. Mice (N=250) bred from Per2(Brdm1) heterozygotes were implanted subcutaneously with transponders and released in approximately Mendelian ratios in four 400 m(2) pens. An electronic system stored the times of all visits to feeders of each individual. The study first demonstrates that mice are not explicitly nocturnal in this natural environment. Feeding activity was predominantly and sometimes exclusively diurnal and spread nearly equally over day and night under the protective snow cover in winter. The effect of Per2(Brdm1) on activity timing is negligible compared to seasonal changes in all genotypes. Second, the Per2(Brdm1) allele did not have persistent negative effects on fitness. In the first year, the allele gradually became less frequent by reducing survival. New cohorts captured had the same Per2(Brdm1) frequency as the survivors from previous cohorts, consistent with an absence of an effect on reproduction. In the second year, the allele recovered to about its initial frequency (0.54). These changes in selective advantage were primarily due to female mice, as females lived longer and the sex ratio dropped to about 25% males in the population. While it is unknown which selective advantage led to the recovery, the results caution against inferences from laboratory

  14. Common alleles in candidate susceptibility genes associated with risk and development of epithelial ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notaridou, Maria; Quaye, Lydia; Dafou, Dimitra; Jones, Chris; Song, Honglin; Høgdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Christensen, Lise; Høgdall, Claus; Blaakaer, Jan; McGuire, Valerie; Wu, Anna H.; Van Den Berg, David J.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Wozniak, Eva; Sher, Tanya; Jacobs, Ian J.; Tyrer, Jonathan; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Moorman, Patricia G.; Iversen, Edwin S.; Jakubowska, Anna; Mędrek, Krzysztof; Lubiński, Jan; Ness, Roberta B.; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Lurie, Galina; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Carney, Michael E.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Rossing, Mary Anne; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Thiel, Falk C.; Ekici, Arif B.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Gronwald, Jacek; Fasching, Peter A.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Goodman, Marc T.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Berchuck, Andrew; Pearce, C. Leigh; Whittemore, Alice S.; Menon, Usha; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Gayther, Simon A.; Ramus, Susan J.

    2011-01-01

    Common germline genetic variation in the population is associated with susceptibility to epithelial ovarian cancer. Microcell-mediated chromosome transfer and expression microarray analysis identified nine genes associated with functional suppression of tumorogenicity in ovarian cancer cell lines; AIFM2, AKTIP, AXIN2, CASP5, FILIP1L, RBBP8, RGC32, RUVBL1 and STAG3. Sixty-three tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs) in these genes were genotyped in 1,799 invasive ovarian cancer cases and 3,045 controls to look for associations with disease risk. Two SNPs in RUVBL1, rs13063604 and rs7650365, were associated with increased risk of serous ovarian cancer [HetOR = 1.42 (1.15–1.74) and the HomOR = 1.63 (1.10–1.42), p-trend = 0.0002] and [HetOR = 0.97 (0.80–1.17), HomOR = 0.74 (0.58–0.93), p-trend = 0.009], respectively. We genotyped rs13063604 and rs7650365 in an additional 4,590 cases and 6,031 controls from ten sites from the United States, Europe and Australia; however, neither SNP was significant in Stage 2. We also evaluated the potential role of tSNPs in these nine genes in ovarian cancer development by testing for allele-specific loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in 286 primary ovarian tumours. We found frequent LOH for tSNPs in AXIN2, AKTIP and RGC32 (64, 46 and 34%, respectively) and one SNP, rs1637001, in STAG3 showed significant allele-specific LOH with loss of the common allele in 94% of informative tumours (p = 0.015). Array comparative genomic hybridisation indicated that this nonrandom allelic imbalance was due to amplification of the rare allele. In conclusion, we show evidence for the involvement of a common allele of STAG3 in the development of epithelial ovarian cancer. PMID:20635389

  15. Composition and functional analysis of low-molecular-weight glutenin alleles with Aroona near-isogenic lines of bread wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xiaofei

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (LMW-GS strongly influence the bread-making quality of bread wheat. These proteins are encoded by a multi-gene family located at the Glu-A3, Glu-B3 and Glu-D3 loci on the short arms of homoeologous group 1 chromosomes, and show high allelic variation. To characterize the genetic and protein compositions of LMW-GS alleles, we investigated 16 Aroona near-isogenic lines (NILs using SDS-PAGE, 2D-PAGE and the LMW-GS gene marker system. Moreover, the composition of glutenin macro-polymers, dough properties and pan bread quality parameters were determined for functional analysis of LMW-GS alleles in the NILs. Results Using the LMW-GS gene marker system, 14–20 LMW-GS genes were identified in individual NILs. At the Glu-A3 locus, two m-type and 2–4 i-type genes were identified and their allelic variants showed high polymorphisms in length and nucleotide sequences. The Glu-A3d allele possessed three active genes, the highest number among Glu-A3 alleles. At the Glu-B3 locus, 2–3 m-type and 1–3 s-type genes were identified from individual NILs. Based on the different compositions of s-type genes, Glu-B3 alleles were divided into two groups, one containing Glu-B3a, B3b, B3f and B3g, and the other comprising Glu-B3c, B3d, B3h and B3i. Eight conserved genes were identified among Glu-D3 alleles, except for Glu-D3f. The protein products of the unique active genes in each NIL were detected using protein electrophoresis. Among Glu-3 alleles, the Glu-A3e genotype without i-type LMW-GS performed worst in almost all quality properties. Glu-B3b, B3g and B3i showed better quality parameters than the other Glu-B3 alleles, whereas the Glu-B3c allele containing s-type genes with low expression levels had an inferior effect on bread-making quality. Due to the conserved genes at Glu-D3 locus, Glu-D3 alleles showed no significant differences in effects on all quality parameters. Conclusions This work

  16. Allele frequency changes due to hitch-hiking in genomic selection programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Huiming; Sørensen, Anders Christian; Meuwissen, Theo H E

    2014-01-01

    animals for 25 consecutive generations. Six genetic models were considered with different heritabilities and numbers of QTL (quantitative trait loci) affecting the trait. Four selection criteria were used, including selection on own phenotype and on estimated breeding values (EBV) derived using phenotype......-BLUP, Genomic BLUP and Bayesian Lasso. Changes in allele frequencies at QTL, markers and linked neutral loci were investigated for the different selection criteria and different scenarios, along with the loss of favourable alleles and the rate of inbreeding measured by pedigree and runs of homozygosity. Results......Background Genomic selection makes it possible to reduce pedigree-based inbreeding over best linear unbiased prediction (BLUP) by increasing emphasis on own rather than family information. However, pedigree inbreeding might not accurately reflect the loss of genetic variation and the true level...

  17. ACTN3 allele frequency in humans covaries with global latitudinal gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M Friedlander

    Full Text Available A premature stop codon in ACTN3 resulting in α-actinin-3 deficiency (the ACTN3 577XX genotype is common in humans and reduces strength, muscle mass, and fast-twitch fiber diameter, but increases the metabolic efficiency of skeletal muscle. Linkage disequilibrium data suggest that the ACTN3 R577X allele has undergone positive selection during human evolution. The allele has been hypothesized to be adaptive in environments with scarce resources where efficient muscle metabolism would be selected. Here we test this hypothesis by using recently developed comparative methods that account for evolutionary relatedness and gene flow among populations. We find evidence that the ACTN3 577XX genotype evolved in association with the global latitudinal gradient. Our results suggest that environmental variables related to latitudinal variation, such as species richness and mean annual temperature, may have influenced the adaptive evolution of ACTN3 577XX during recent human history.

  18. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Adoue, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    There are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are functional....../or mechanisms. Thereafter, using data from a genome-wide map of allelic expression associated SNPs, 313 genetic variants were selected and their association with breast cancer risk was then evaluated in 46,451 breast cancer cases and 42,599 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 41 studies participating...... in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The associations were evaluated with overall breast cancer risk and with estrogen receptor negative and positive disease. One novel breast cancer susceptibility locus on 4q21 (rs11099601) was identified (OR = 1.05, P = 5.6x10-6). rs11099601 lies in a 135 kb linkage...

  19. Allelic deletions of cell growth regulators during progression of bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primdahl, H; von der Maase, H; Christensen, M

    2000-01-01

    Cell growth regulators include proteins of the p53 pathway encoded by the genes CDKN2A (p16, p14arf), MDM2, TP53, and CDKN1A (p21) as well as proteins encoded by genes like RB1, E2F, and MYCL. In the present study we investigated allelic deletions of all these genes in each recurrent bladder tumor...... difference in the numbers of gene loci hit by deletions muscle-invasive versus noninvasive tumors (P = 0.0000002), with the genes most often hit by deletions in muscle-invasive tumors being TP53, RB1, and MYCL. A number of novel findings were made. Losses of MYCL and RB1 alleles were more pronounced...... that a characteristic difference between recurrent noninvasive and recurrent progressing bladder tumors is loss of cell cycle-regulatory genes in the latter group....

  20. Risk of autoimmune diabetes in APECED: association with short alleles of the 5'insulin VNTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, J; Varin, D S E; Hamelin, C E; Hallgren, A; Kämpe, O; Carel, J-C; Perheentupa, J; Deal, C L

    2010-10-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) is a rare autoimmune disease causing a wide spectrum of autoimmune dysfunction potentially including diabetes of an autoimmune etiology. We have previously described a pair of discordant APECED siblings and pointed to a possible role of 5'insulin variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) locus IDDM2 in the appearance of diabetes within this disease. In vitro studies have previously suggested that class I VNTR alleles were associated with decreased fetal thymic insulin expression. We genotyped the 5'INS VNTR locus and several flanking 11p15.5 markers in 50 Finnish APECED subjects and explored the possible contribution of IDDM2 in the development of diabetes. The shorter 5'INS VNTR class I alleles (APECED subjects than in non-diabetic APECED subjects. Logistic regression analysis revealed that having 1 short (APECED.