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Sample records for allele copynumber determination

  1. Performance of Molecular Inversion Probes (MIP) in Allele CopyNumber Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuker; Moorhead, Martin; Karlin-Neumann, George; Wang,Nicolas J.; Ireland, James; Lin, Steven; Chen, Chunnuan; Heiser, LauraM.; Chin, Koei; Esserman, Laura; Gray, Joe W.; Spellman, Paul T.; Faham,Malek

    2007-05-14

    We have developed a new protocol for using MolecularInversion Probes (MIP) to accurately and specifically measure allele copynumber (ACN). The new protocol provides for significant improvementsincluding the reduction of input DNA (from 2?g) by more than 25 fold (to75ng total genomic DNA), higher overall precision resulting in one orderof magnitude lower false positive rate, and greater dynamic range withaccurate absolute copy number up to 60 copies.

  2. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium revisited for inferences on genotypes featuring allele and copy-number variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recke, Andreas; Recke, Klaus-Günther; Ibrahim, Saleh; Möller, Steffen; Vonthein, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Copy number variations represent a substantial source of genetic variation and are associated with a plethora of physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Joint copy number and allelic variations (CNAVs) are difficult to analyze and require new strategies to unravel the properties of genotype distributions. We developed a Bayesian hidden Markov model (HMM) approach that allows dissecting intrinsic properties and metastructures of the distribution of CNAVs within populations, in particular haplotype phases of genes with varying copy numbers. As a key feature, this approach incorporates an extension of the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, allowing both a comprehensive and parsimonious model design. We demonstrate the quality of performance and applicability of the HMM approach with a real data set describing the Fcγ receptor (FcγR) gene region. Our concept, using a dynamic process to analyze a static distribution, establishes the basis for a novel understanding of complex genomic data sets. PMID:25765626

  3. Determination of DQB1 alleles using PCR amplification and allele-specific primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepage, V; Ivanova, R; Loste, M N; Mallet, C; Douay, C; Naoumova, E; Charron, D

    1995-10-01

    Molecular genotyping of HLA class II genes is commonly carried out using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in combination with sequence-specific oligotyping (PCR-SSO) or a combination of the PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism methods (PCR-RFLP). However, the identification of the DQB1 type by PCR-SSO and PCR-RFLP is very time-consuming which is disadvantageous for the typing of cadaveric organ donors. We have developed a DQB1 typing method using PCR in combination with allele-specific amplification (PCR-ASA), which allows the identification of the 17 most frequent alleles in one step using seven amplification mixtures. PCR allele-specific amplification HLA-DQB1 typing is easy to perform, and the results are easy to interpret in routine clinical practice. The PCR-ASA method is therefore better suited to DQB1 typing for organ transplantation than other methods.

  4. Modification of an HLA-B PCR-SSOP typing system leading to improved allele determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, D; Williams, F; Cullen, C; Mallon, E

    1995-04-01

    Modifications have been introduced to a previously reported HLA-B PCR-SSOP typing system. This has enabled further definition of alleles, determination of the probe pattern of some alleles not previously examined and identification of patterns of possible new alleles. However there are still some alleles that cannot be differentiated and there are several alleles which when present as a homozygote have the same pattern as in combination with another allele. When the method was applied to the typing of 66 consecutive cadaveric donors there were three donors whose type differed from the serological type.

  5. Genetic tests for alleles of complementary-sex-determiner to support honeybee breeding programmes

    OpenAIRE

    Hyink, Otto; Laas, Frans; Dearden, Peter

    2013-01-01

    International audience The honeybee haplodiploid sex determination system depends on genetic variation at the complementary sex-determiner (csd) locus. In closed populations of honeybees, especially those undergoing selective breeding, the number of csd alleles can drop such that brood viability is affected. Here we present two polymerase chain reaction tests that allow the discrimination of csd alleles. Such tests should find utility in bee breeding programmes allowing the tracking and ma...

  6. SIMPLIFYING CELIAC DISEASE PREDISPOSING HLA-DQ ALLELES DETERMINATION BY THE REAL TIME PCR METHOD

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    Nicole SELLESKI

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Celiac disease is an autoimmune enteropathy triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. Genetic susceptibility is associated with two sets of alleles, DQA1*05 - DQB1*02 and DQA1*03 - DQB1*03:02, which code for class II MHC DQ2 and DQ8 molecules, respectively. Approximately 90%-95% of celiac patients are HLA-DQ2 positive, and half of the remaining patients are HLA-DQ8 positive. In fact, during a celiac disease diagnostic workup, the absence of these specific DQA and DQB alleles has a near perfect negative predictive value. Objective Improve the detection of celiac disease predisposing alleles by combining the simplicity and sensitivity of real-time PCR (qPCR and melting curve analysis with the specificity of sequence-specific primers (SSP. Methods Amplifications of sequence-specific primers for DQA1*05 (DQ2, DQB1*02 (DQ2, and DQA1*03 (DQ8 were performed by the real time PCR method to determine the presence of each allele in independent reactions. Primers for Human Growth Hormone were used as an internal control. A parallel PCR-SSP protocol was used as a reference method to validate our results. Results Both techniques yielded equal results. From a total of 329 samples the presence of HLA predisposing alleles was determined in 187 (56.8%. One hundred fourteen samples (61% were positive for a single allele, 68 (36.3% for two alleles, and only 5 (2.7% for three alleles. Conclusion Results obtained by qPCR technique were highly reliable with no discordant results when compared with those obtained using PCR-SSP.

  7. Allelic variation of bile salt hydrolase genes in Lactobacillus salivarius does not determine bile resistance levels.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fang, Fang

    2009-09-01

    Commensal lactobacilli frequently produce bile salt hydrolase (Bsh) enzymes whose roles in intestinal survival are unclear. Twenty-six Lactobacillus salivarius strains from different sources all harbored a bsh1 allele on their respective megaplasmids. This allele was related to the plasmid-borne bsh1 gene of the probiotic strain UCC118. A second locus (bsh2) was found in the chromosomes of two strains that had higher bile resistance levels. Four Bsh1-encoding allele groups were identified, defined by truncations or deletions involving a conserved residue. In vitro analyses showed that this allelic variation was correlated with widely varying bile deconjugation phenotypes. Despite very low activity of the UCC118 Bsh1 enzyme, a mutant lacking this protein had significantly lower bile resistance, both in vitro and during intestinal transit in mice. However, the overall bile resistance phenotype of this and other strains was independent of the bsh1 allele type. Analysis of the L. salivarius transcriptome upon exposure to bile and cholate identified a multiplicity of stress response proteins and putative efflux proteins that appear to broadly compensate for, or mask, the effects of allelic variation of bsh genes. Bsh enzymes with different bile-degrading kinetics, though apparently not the primary determinants of bile resistance in L. salivarius, may have additional biological importance because of varying effects upon bile as a signaling molecule in the host.

  8. A novel simple method for determining CYP2D6 gene copy number and identifying allele(s with duplication/multiplication.

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    Taimour Langaee

    Full Text Available Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6 gene duplication and multiplication can result in ultrarapid drug metabolism and therapeutic failure or excessive response in patients. Long range polymerase chain reaction (PCR, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP and sequencing are usually used for genotyping CYP2D6 duplication/multiplications and identification, but are labor intensive, time consuming, and costly.We developed a simple allele quantification-based Pyrosequencing genotyping method that facilitates CYP2D6 copy number variation (CNV genotyping while also identifying allele-specific CYP2D6 CNV in heterozygous samples. Most routine assays do not identify the allele containing a CNV. A total of 237 clinical and Coriell DNA samples with different known CYP2D6 gene copy numbers were genotyped for CYP2D6 *2, *3, *4, *6, *10, *17, *41 polymorphisms and CNV determination.The CYP2D6 gene allele quantification/identification were determined simultaneously with CYP2D6*2, *3, *4, *6, *10, *17, *41 genotyping. We determined the exact CYP2D6 gene copy number, identified which allele had the duplication or multiplication, and assigned the correct phenotype and activity score for all samples.Our method can efficiently identify the duplicated CYP2D6 allele in heterozygous samples, determine its copy number in a fraction of time compared to conventional methods and prevent incorrect ultrarapid phenotype calls. It also greatly reduces the cost, effort and time associated with CYP2D6 CNV genotyping.

  9. Parallel Evolution of Copy-Number Variation across Continents in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrider, Daniel R; Hahn, Matthew W; Begun, David J

    2016-05-01

    Genetic differentiation across populations that is maintained in the presence of gene flow is a hallmark of spatially varying selection. In Drosophila melanogaster, the latitudinal clines across the eastern coasts of Australia and North America appear to be examples of this type of selection, with recent studies showing that a substantial portion of the D. melanogaster genome exhibits allele frequency differentiation with respect to latitude on both continents. As of yet there has been no genome-wide examination of differentiated copy-number variants (CNVs) in these geographic regions, despite their potential importance for phenotypic variation in Drosophila and other taxa. Here, we present an analysis of geographic variation in CNVs in D. melanogaster. We also present the first genomic analysis of geographic variation for copy-number variation in the sister species, D. simulans, in order to investigate patterns of parallel evolution in these close relatives. In D. melanogaster we find hundreds of CNVs, many of which show parallel patterns of geographic variation on both continents, lending support to the idea that they are influenced by spatially varying selection. These findings support the idea that polymorphic CNVs contribute to local adaptation in D. melanogaster In contrast, we find very few CNVs in D. simulans that are geographically differentiated in parallel on both continents, consistent with earlier work suggesting that clinal patterns are weaker in this species. PMID:26809315

  10. An improved assay for the determination of Huntington`s disease allele size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, C.; Klinger, K.; Miller, G. [Intergrated Genetics, Framingham, MA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The hallmark of Huntington`s disease (HD) is the expansion of a polymorphic (CAG)n repeat. Several methods have been published describing PCR amplification of this region. Most of these assays require a complex PCR reaction mixture to amplify this GC-rich region. A consistent problem with trinucleotide repeat PCR amplification is the presence of a number of {open_quotes}stutter bands{close_quotes} which may be caused by primer or amplicon slippage during amplification or insufficient polymerase processivity. Most assays for HD arbitrarily select a particular band for diagnostic purposes. Without a clear choice for band selection such an arbitrary selection may result in inconsistent intra- or inter-laboratory findings. We present an improved protocol for the amplification of the HD trinucleotide repeat region. This method simplifies the PCR reaction buffer and results in a set of easily identifiable bands from which to determine allele size. HD alleles were identified by selecting bands of clearly greater signal intensity. Stutter banding was much reduced thus permitting easy identification of the most relevant PCR product. A second set of primers internal to the CCG polymorphism was used in selected samples to confirm allele size. The mechanism of action of N,N,N trimethylglycine in the PCR reaction is not clear. It may be possible that the minimal isostabilizing effect of N,N,N trimethylglycine at 2.5 M is significant enough to affect primer specificity. The use of N,N,N trimethylglycine in the PCR reaction facilitated identification of HD alleles and may be appropriate for use in other assays of this type.

  11. Copy-number variants in neurodevelopmental disorders: promises and challenges.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Merikangas, Alison K

    2012-02-01

    Copy-number variation (CNV) is the most prevalent type of structural variation in the human genome. There is emerging evidence that copy-number variants (CNVs) provide a new vista on understanding susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disorders. Some challenges in the interpretation of current CNV studies include the use of overlapping samples, differing phenotypic definitions, an absence of population norms for CNVs and a lack of consensus in methods for CNV detection and analysis. Here, we review current CNV association study methods and results in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and schizophrenia, and provide suggestions for design approaches to future studies that might maximize the translation of this work to etiological understanding.

  12. A highly sensitive quantitative real-time pcr assay for determination of mutant jak2 exon 12 allele burden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, L.; Riley, C.H.; Westman, M.;

    2012-01-01

    present a highly sensitive real-time quantitative PCR assay for determination of the mutant allele burden of JAK2 exon 12 mutations. In combination with high resolution melting analysis and sequencing the assay identified six patients carrying previously described JAK2 exon 12 mutations and one novel...... tool for quantitative monitoring of the mutant allele burden and accordingly also for determining the impact of treatment with interferon-α-2, shown to induce molecular remission in JAK2V617F-positive patients, which may be a future treatment option for JAK2 exon 12-positive patients as well. © 2012...

  13. Use of allele-specific FAIRE to determine functional regulatory polymorphism using large-scale genotyping arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew J P; Howard, Philip; Shah, Sonia; Eriksson, Per; Stender, Stefan; Giambartolomei, Claudia; Folkersen, Lasse; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Kumari, Meena; Palmen, Jutta; Hingorani, Aroon D; Talmud, Philippa J; Humphries, Steve E

    2012-01-01

    Following the widespread use of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), focus is turning towards identification of causal variants rather than simply genetic markers of diseases and traits. As a step towards a high-throughput method to identify genome-wide, non-coding, functional regulatory variants, we describe the technique of allele-specific FAIRE, utilising large-scale genotyping technology (FAIRE-gen) to determine allelic effects on chromatin accessibility and regulatory potential. FAIRE-gen was explored using lymphoblastoid cells and the 50,000 SNP Illumina CVD BeadChip. The technique identified an allele-specific regulatory polymorphism within NR1H3 (coding for LXR-α), rs7120118, coinciding with a previously GWAS-identified SNP for HDL-C levels. This finding was confirmed using FAIRE-gen with the 200,000 SNP Illumina Metabochip and verified with the established method of TaqMan allelic discrimination. Examination of this SNP in two prospective Caucasian cohorts comprising 15,000 individuals confirmed the association with HDL-C levels (combined beta = 0.016; p = 0.0006), and analysis of gene expression identified an allelic association with LXR-α expression in heart tissue. Using increasingly comprehensive genotyping chips and distinct tissues for examination, FAIRE-gen has the potential to aid the identification of many causal SNPs associated with disease from GWAS. PMID:22916038

  14. Use of allele-specific FAIRE to determine functional regulatory polymorphism using large-scale genotyping arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J P Smith

    Full Text Available Following the widespread use of genome-wide association studies (GWAS, focus is turning towards identification of causal variants rather than simply genetic markers of diseases and traits. As a step towards a high-throughput method to identify genome-wide, non-coding, functional regulatory variants, we describe the technique of allele-specific FAIRE, utilising large-scale genotyping technology (FAIRE-gen to determine allelic effects on chromatin accessibility and regulatory potential. FAIRE-gen was explored using lymphoblastoid cells and the 50,000 SNP Illumina CVD BeadChip. The technique identified an allele-specific regulatory polymorphism within NR1H3 (coding for LXR-α, rs7120118, coinciding with a previously GWAS-identified SNP for HDL-C levels. This finding was confirmed using FAIRE-gen with the 200,000 SNP Illumina Metabochip and verified with the established method of TaqMan allelic discrimination. Examination of this SNP in two prospective Caucasian cohorts comprising 15,000 individuals confirmed the association with HDL-C levels (combined beta = 0.016; p = 0.0006, and analysis of gene expression identified an allelic association with LXR-α expression in heart tissue. Using increasingly comprehensive genotyping chips and distinct tissues for examination, FAIRE-gen has the potential to aid the identification of many causal SNPs associated with disease from GWAS.

  15. High-resolution copy-number variation map reflects human olfactory receptor diversity and evolution.

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    Yehudit Hasin

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory receptors (ORs, which are involved in odorant recognition, form the largest mammalian protein superfamily. The genomic content of OR genes is considerably reduced in humans, as reflected by the relatively small repertoire size and the high fraction ( approximately 55% of human pseudogenes. Since several recent low-resolution surveys suggested that OR genomic loci are frequently affected by copy-number variants (CNVs, we hypothesized that CNVs may play an important role in the evolution of the human olfactory repertoire. We used high-resolution oligonucleotide tiling microarrays to detect CNVs across 851 OR gene and pseudogene loci. Examining genomic DNA from 25 individuals with ancestry from three populations, we identified 93 OR gene loci and 151 pseudogene loci affected by CNVs, generating a mosaic of OR dosages across persons. Our data suggest that approximately 50% of the CNVs involve more than one OR, with the largest CNV spanning 11 loci. In contrast to earlier reports, we observe that CNVs are more frequent among OR pseudogenes than among intact genes, presumably due to both selective constraints and CNV formation biases. Furthermore, our results show an enrichment of CNVs among ORs with a close human paralog or lacking a one-to-one ortholog in chimpanzee. Interestingly, among the latter we observed an enrichment in CNV losses over gains, a finding potentially related to the known diminution of the human OR repertoire. Quantitative PCR experiments performed for 122 sampled ORs agreed well with the microarray results and uncovered 23 additional CNVs. Importantly, these experiments allowed us to uncover nine common deletion alleles that affect 15 OR genes and five pseudogenes. Comparison to the chimpanzee reference genome revealed that all of the deletion alleles are human derived, therefore indicating a profound effect of human-specific deletions on the individual OR gene content. Furthermore, these deletion alleles may be used

  16. Detection of Clonal and Subclonal Copy-Number Variants in Cell-Free DNA from Patients with Breast Cancer Using a Massively Multiplexed PCR Methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Eser Kirkizlar; Bernhard Zimmermann; Tudor Constantin; Ryan Swenerton; Bin Hoang; Nicholas Wayham; Babiarz, Joshua E.; Zachary Demko; Robert J Pelham; Stephanie Kareht; Alexander L. Simon; Kristine N. Jinnett; Matthew Rabinowitz; Styrmir Sigurjonsson; Matthew Hill

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate proof-of-concept for the use of massively multiplexed PCR and next-generation sequencing (mmPCR-NGS) to identify both clonal and subclonal copy-number variants (CNVs) in circulating tumor DNA. This is the first report of a targeted methodology for detection of CNVs in plasma. Using an in vitro model of cell-free DNA, we show that mmPCR-NGS can accurately detect CNVs with average allelic imbalances as low as 0.5%, an improvement over previously reported whole-genome sequencing a...

  17. Toward fully automated genotyping: Allele assignment, pedigree construction, phase determination, and recombination detection in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlin, M.W.; Burks, M.B. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Hoop, R.C.; Hoffman, E.P. [Univ. of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Human genetic maps have made quantum leaps in the past few years, because of the characterization of >2,000 CA dinucleotide repeat loci: these PCR-based markers offer extraordinarily high PIC, and within the next year their density is expected to reach intervals of a few centimorgans per marker. These new genetic maps open new avenues for disease gene research, including large-scale genotyping for both simple and complex disease loci. However, the allele patterns of many dinucleotide repeat loci can be complex and difficult to interpret, with genotyping errors a recognized problem. Furthermore, the possibility of genotyping individuals at hundreds or thousands of polymorphic loci requires improvements in data handling and analysis. The automation of genotyping and analysis of computer-derived haplotypes would remove many of the barriers preventing optimal use of dense and informative dinucleotide genetic maps. Toward this end, we have automated the allele identification, genotyping, phase determinations, and inheritance consistency checks generated by four CA repeats within the 2.5-Mbp, 10-cM X-linked dystrophin gene, using fluorescein-labeled multiplexed PCR products analyzed on automated sequencers. The described algorithms can deconvolute and resolve closely spaced alleles, despite interfering stutter noise; set phase in females; propagate the phase through the family; and identify recombination events. We show the implementation of these algorithms for the completely automated interpretation of allele data and risk assessment for five Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy families. The described approach can be scaled up to perform genome-based analyses with hundreds or thousands of CA-repeat loci, using multiple fluorophors on automated sequencers. 16 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Extensive Copy-Number Variation of the Human Olfactory Receptor Gene Family

    OpenAIRE

    Janet M Young; Endicott, RaeLynn M.; Parghi, Sean S; Walker, Megan; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Trask, Barbara J.

    2008-01-01

    As much as a quarter of the human genome has been reported to vary in copy number between individuals, including regions containing about half of the members of the olfactory receptor (OR) gene family. We have undertaken a detailed study of copy-number variation of ORs to elucidate the selective and mechanistic forces acting on this gene family and the true impact of copy-number variation on human OR repertoires. We argue that the properties of copy-number variants (CNVs) and other sets of la...

  19. Bias of selection on human copy-number variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Although large-scale copy-number variation is an important contributor to conspecific genomic diversity, whether these variants frequently contribute to human phenotype differences remains unknown. If they have few functional consequences, then copy-number variants (CNVs might be expected both to be distributed uniformly throughout the human genome and to encode genes that are characteristic of the genome as a whole. We find that human CNVs are significantly overrepresented close to telomeres and centromeres and in simple tandem repeat sequences. Additionally, human CNVs were observed to be unusually enriched in those protein-coding genes that have experienced significantly elevated synonymous and nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution rates, estimated between single human and mouse orthologues. CNV genes encode disproportionately large numbers of secreted, olfactory, and immunity proteins, although they contain fewer than expected genes associated with Mendelian disease. Despite mouse CNVs also exhibiting a significant elevation in synonymous substitution rates, in most other respects they do not differ significantly from the genomic background. Nevertheless, they encode proteins that are depleted in olfactory function, and they exhibit significantly decreased amino acid sequence divergence. Natural selection appears to have acted discriminately among human CNV genes. The significant overabundance, within human CNVs, of genes associated with olfaction, immunity, protein secretion, and elevated coding sequence divergence, indicates that a subset may have been retained in the human population due to the adaptive benefit of increased gene dosage. By contrast, the functional characteristics of mouse CNVs either suggest that advantageous gene copies have been depleted during recent selective breeding of laboratory mouse strains or suggest that they were preferentially fixed as a consequence of the larger effective population size of wild mice. It

  20. Genome-wide association study identifies a maternal copy-number deletion in PSG11 enriched among preeclampsia patients

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    Zhao Linlu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Specific genetic contributions for preeclampsia (PE are currently unknown. This genome-wide association study (GWAS aims to identify maternal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and copy-number variants (CNVs involved in the etiology of PE. Methods A genome-wide scan was performed on 177 PE cases (diagnosed according to National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute guidelines and 116 normotensive controls. White female study subjects from Iowa were genotyped on Affymetrix SNP 6.0 microarrays. CNV calls made using a combination of four detection algorithms (Birdseye, Canary, PennCNV, and QuantiSNP were merged using CNVision and screened with stringent prioritization criteria. Due to limited DNA quantities and the deleterious nature of copy-number deletions, it was decided a priori that only deletions would be selected for assay on the entire case-control dataset using quantitative real-time PCR. Results The top four SNP candidates had an allelic or genotypic p-value between 10-5 and 10-6, however, none surpassed the Bonferroni-corrected significance threshold. Three recurrent rare deletions meeting prioritization criteria detected in multiple cases were selected for targeted genotyping. A locus of particular interest was found showing an enrichment of case deletions in 19q13.31 (5/169 cases and 1/114 controls, which encompasses the PSG11 gene contiguous to a highly plastic genomic region. All algorithm calls for these regions were assay confirmed. Conclusions CNVs may confer risk for PE and represent interesting regions that warrant further investigation. Top SNP candidates identified from the GWAS, although not genome-wide significant, may be useful to inform future studies in PE genetics.

  1. Development of allele-specific multiplex PCR to determine the length of poly-T in intron 8 of CFTR

    OpenAIRE

    Neng Chen; Prada, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation analysis has been implemented for Cystic Fibrosis (CF) carrier screening, and molecular diagnosis of CF and congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD). Although poly-T allele analysis in intron 8 of CFTR is required when a patient is positive for R117H, it is not recommended for routine carrier screening. Therefore, commercial kits for CFTR mutation analysis were designed either to mask the poly-T allele re...

  2. Copy-number variations in Y-chromosomal azoospermia factor regions identified by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kazuki; Miyado, Mami; Kobori, Yoshitomo; Tanaka, Yoko; Ishikawa, Hiromichi; Yoshida, Atsumi; Katsumi, Momori; Saito, Hidekazu; Kubota, Toshiro; Okada, Hiroshi; Ogata, Tsutomu; Fukami, Maki

    2015-03-01

    Although copy-number variations (CNVs) in Y-chromosomal azoospermia factor (AZF) regions have been associated with the risk of spermatogenic failure (SF), the precise frequency, genomic basis and clinical consequences of these CNVs remain unclear. Here we performed multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis of 56 Japanese SF patients and 65 control individuals. We compared the results of MLPA with those of conventional sequence-tagged site PCR analyses. Eleven simple and complex CNVs, including three hitherto unreported variations, were identified by MLPA. Seven of the 11 CNVs were undetectable by conventional analyses. CNVs were widely distributed in AZF regions and shared by ~60% of the patients and ~40% of the controls. Most breakpoints resided within locus-specific repeats. The majority of CNVs, including the most common gr/gr deletion, were identified in the patient and control groups at similar frequencies, whereas simple duplications were observed exclusively in the patient group. The results imply that AZF-linked CNVs are more frequent and heterogeneous than previously reported. Non-allelic homologous recombination likely underlies these CNVs. Our data confirm the functional neutrality of the gr/gr deletion in the Japanese population. We also found a possible association between AZF-linked simple duplications and SF, which needs to be evaluated in future studies.

  3. Genomic pathology of SLE-associated copy-number variation at the FCGR2C/FCGR3B/FCGR2B locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Michael; Barros, Paula; Witherden, Abigail S; Roberts, Amy L; Zhang, Zhou; Schaschl, Helmut; Yu, Chack-Yung; Hurles, Matthew E; Schaffner, Catherine; Floto, R Andres; Game, Laurence; Steinberg, Karyn Meltz; Wilson, Richard K; Graves, Tina A; Eichler, Evan E; Cook, H Terence; Vyse, Timothy J; Aitman, Timothy J

    2013-01-10

    Reduced FCGR3B copy number is associated with increased risk of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The five FCGR2/FCGR3 genes are arranged across two highly paralogous genomic segments on chromosome 1q23. Previous studies have suggested mechanisms for structural rearrangements at the FCGR2/FCGR3 locus and have proposed mechanisms whereby altered FCGR3B copy number predisposes to autoimmunity, but the high degree of sequence similarity between paralogous segments has prevented precise definition of the molecular events and their functional consequences. To pursue the genomic pathology associated with FCGR3B copy-number variation, we integrated sequencing data from fosmid and bacterial artificial chromosome clones and sequence-captured DNA from FCGR3B-deleted genomes to establish a detailed map of allelic and paralogous sequence variation across the FCGR2/FCGR3 locus. This analysis identified two highly paralogous 24.5 kb blocks within the FCGR2C/FCGR3B/FCGR2B locus that are devoid of nonpolymorphic paralogous sequence variations and that define the limits of the genomic regions in which nonallelic homologous recombination leads to FCGR2C/FCGR3B copy-number variation. Further, the data showed evidence of swapping of haplotype blocks between these highly paralogous blocks that most likely arose from sequential ancestral recombination events across the region. Functionally, we found by flow cytometry, immunoblotting and cDNA sequencing that individuals with FCGR3B-deleted alleles show ectopic presence of FcγRIIb on natural killer (NK) cells. We conclude that FCGR3B deletion juxtaposes the 5'-regulatory sequences of FCGR2C with the coding sequence of FCGR2B, creating a chimeric gene that results in an ectopic accumulation of FcγRIIb on NK cells and provides an explanation for SLE risk associated with reduced FCGR3B gene copy number. PMID:23261299

  4. Use of allele-specific FAIRE to determine functional regulatory polymorphism using large-scale genotyping arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Frank Andrew; Howard, Philip; Shah, Sonia;

    2012-01-01

    Following the widespread use of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), focus is turning towards identification of causal variants rather than simply genetic markers of diseases and traits. As a step towards a high-throughput method to identify genome-wide, non-coding, functional regulatory...... identified an allele-specific regulatory polymorphism within NR1H3 (coding for LXR-α), rs7120118, coinciding with a previously GWAS-identified SNP for HDL-C levels. This finding was confirmed using FAIRE-gen with the 200,000 SNP Illumina Metabochip and verified with the established method of TaqMan allelic...

  5. Development of allele-specific multiplex PCR to determine the length of poly-T in intron 8 of CFTR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neng Chen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene mutation analysis has been implemented for Cystic Fibrosis (CF carrier screening, and molecular diagnosis of CF and congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD. Although poly-T allele analysis in intron 8 of CFTR is required when a patient is positive for R117H, it is not recommended for routine carrier screening. Therefore, commercial kits for CFTR mutation analysis were designed either to mask the poly-T allele results, unless a patient is R117H positive, or to have the poly-T analysis as a standalone reflex test using the same commercial platform. There are other standalone assays developed to detect poly-T alleles, such as heteroduplex analysis, High Resolution Melting (HRM curve analysis, allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR and Sanger sequencing. In this report, we developed a simple and easy-to-implement multiplex AS-PCR assay using unlabeled standard length primers, which can be used as a reflex or standalone test for CFTR poly-T track analysis. Out of 115 human gDNA samples tested, results from our new AS-PCR matched to the previous known poly-T results or results from Sanger sequencing.

  6. The molecular determination of HLA-Cw alleles in the Mandenka (West Africa) reveals a close genetic relationship between Africans and Europeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Mazas, A; Steiner, Q G; Grundschober, C; Tiercy, J M

    2000-10-01

    HLA-Cw alleles were determined by high-resolution polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe (PCR-SSOP) oligotyping in a sample of 165 Mandenka, a population from Eastern Senegal previously analysed for A/B and DRB/DQB polymorphisms. A total of 18 Cw alleles were identified, with Cw*0401/5 and 1601 accounting for a combined frequency of 36%. A comparison of Cw allele frequencies among several populations of different origins, Mandenka, Swiss, English, Ashkenazi Jews from the UK and Japanese, reveals a high genetic heterogeneity among them, but also a much closer relationship between Mandenka, Europeans and Ashkenazi than between any of these populations and Japanese. Cw*0501, Cw*0701 and Cw*1601, among others, appear to be restricted to the European and African populations. Many B-Cw haplotypes exhibit a significant linkage disequilibrium in the Mandenka, among which B*3501-Cw*0401 and B*7801-Cw*1601, formed by the most frequent B and Cw alleles, and B*5201-Cw*1601, B*5702-Cw*18 and B*4410-Cw*0401, not yet observed in other populations. B*3501-Cw*0401 is found with similar frequencies in Europeans. The results possibly support a close historical relationship between Africans and Europeans as compared to East Asiatics. However, the HLA-Cw frequency distributions are characterised by an excess of heterozygotes, indicating that balancing selection may have played a role in the evolution of this polymorphism.

  7. The landscape of somatic copy-number alteration across human cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Beroukhim, Rameen; Mermel, Craig H.; Porter, Dale; Wei, Guo; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Donovan, Jerry; Barretina, Jordi; Boehm, Jesse S.; Dobson, Jennifer; Urashima, Mitsuyoshi; Mc Henry, Kevin T.; Pinchback, Reid M.; Ligon, Azra H.; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Haery, Leila

    2010-01-01

    A powerful way to discover key genes playing causal roles in oncogenesis is to identify genomic regions that undergo frequent alteration in human cancers. Here, we report high-resolution analyses of somatic copy-number alterations (SCNAs) from 3131 cancer specimens, belonging largely to 26 histological types. We identify 158 regions of focal SCNA that are altered at significant frequency across multiple cancer types, of which 122 cannot be explained by the presence of a known cancer target ge...

  8. A Comprehensive Analysis of Common Copy-Number Variations in the Human Genome

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Kendy K. ; deLeeuw, Ronald J. ; Dosanjh, Nirpjit S. ; Kimm, Lindsey R. ; Cheng, Ze ; Horsman, Douglas E. ; MacAulay, Calum ; Ng, Raymond T. ; Brown, Carolyn J. ; Eichler, Evan E. ; Lam, Wan L. 

    2006-01-01

    Segmental copy-number variations (CNVs) in the human genome are associated with developmental disorders and susceptibility to diseases. More importantly, CNVs may represent a major genetic component of our phenotypic diversity. In this study, using a whole-genome array comparative genomic hybridization assay, we identified 3,654 autosomal segmental CNVs, 800 of which appeared at a frequency of at least 3%. Of these frequent CNVs, 77% are novel. In the 95 individuals analyzed, the two most div...

  9. Isolation of S-locus F-box alleles in Prunus avium and their application in a novel method to determine self-incompatibility genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, S P; Russell, K; Sargent, D J; Tobutt, K R

    2006-03-01

    This study characterises a series of 12 S-locus haplotype-specific F-box protein genes (SFB) in cherry (Prunus avium) that are likely candidates for the pollen component of gametophytic self-incompatibility in this species. Primers were designed to amplify 12 SFB alleles,including the introns present in the 50 untranslated region;sequences representing the S-alleles S1, S2, S3, S4, S40, S5,S6, S7, S10, S12, S13 and S16 were cloned and characterized. [The nucleotide sequences reported in this paper have been submitted to the EMBL/GenBank database under the following accession numbers: PaSFB1(AY805048), PaSFB2 (AY805049), PaSFB3 (AY805057),PaSFB4 (AY649872), PaSFB40 (AY649873), PaSFB5(AY805050), PaSFB6 (AY805051), PaSFB7 (AY805052),PaSFB10 (AY805053), PaSFB12 (AY805054), PaSFB13(AY805055), PaSFB16 (AY805056).] Though the coding regions of six of these alleles have been reported previously,the intron sequence has previously been reported only for S6. Analysis of the introns revealed sequence and length polymorphisms. A novel, PCR-based method to genotype cultivars and wild accessions was developed which combines fluorescently labelled primers amplifying the intron of SFB with similar primers for the first intron of S-RNase alleles. Intron length polymorphisms were then ascertained using a semi-automated sequencer. The convenience and reliability of this method for the determination of the self-incompatibility (SI) genotype was demonstrated both in sweet cherry cultivars representing alleles S1 to S16 and in individuals from a wild population encompassing S-alleles S17 to S22. This method will greatly expedite SI characterisation in sweet cherry and also facilitate large-scale studies of self-incompatibility in wild cherry and other Prunus populations.

  10. Detection of clinically relevant exonic copy-number changes by array CGH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Philip M; Bacino, Carlos A; Shaw, Chad A; Eng, Patricia A; Hixson, Patricia M; Pursley, Amber N; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Yang, Yaping; Wiszniewska, Joanna; Nowakowska, Beata A; del Gaudio, Daniela; Xia, Zhilian; Simpson-Patel, Gayle; Immken, LaDonna L; Gibson, James B; Tsai, Anne C-H; Bowers, Jennifer A; Reimschisel, Tyler E; Schaaf, Christian P; Potocki, Lorraine; Scaglia, Fernando; Gambin, Tomasz; Sykulski, Maciej; Bartnik, Magdalena; Derwinska, Katarzyna; Wisniowiecka-Kowalnik, Barbara; Lalani, Seema R; Probst, Frank J; Bi, Weimin; Beaudet, Arthur L; Patel, Ankita; Lupski, James R; Cheung, Sau Wai; Stankiewicz, Pawel

    2010-12-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) is a powerful tool for the molecular elucidation and diagnosis of disorders resulting from genomic copy-number variation (CNV). However, intragenic deletions or duplications--those including genomic intervals of a size smaller than a gene--have remained beyond the detection limit of most clinical aCGH analyses. Increasing array probe number improves genomic resolution, although higher cost may limit implementation, and enhanced detection of benign CNV can confound clinical interpretation. We designed an array with exonic coverage of selected disease and candidate genes and used it clinically to identify losses or gains throughout the genome involving at least one exon and as small as several hundred base pairs in size. In some patients, the detected copy-number change occurs within a gene known to be causative of the observed clinical phenotype, demonstrating the ability of this array to detect clinically relevant CNVs with subkilobase resolution. In summary, we demonstrate the utility of a custom-designed, exon-targeted oligonucleotide array to detect intragenic copy-number changes in patients with various clinical phenotypes.

  11. Alu-mediated diverse and complex pathogenic copy-number variants within human chromosome 17 at p13.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shen; Yuan, Bo; Campbell, Ian M; Beck, Christine R; Carvalho, Claudia M B; Nagamani, Sandesh C S; Erez, Ayelet; Patel, Ankita; Bacino, Carlos A; Shaw, Chad A; Stankiewicz, Paweł; Cheung, Sau Wai; Bi, Weimin; Lupski, James R

    2015-07-15

    Alu repetitive elements are known to be major contributors to genome instability by generating Alu-mediated copy-number variants (CNVs). Most of the reported Alu-mediated CNVs are simple deletions and duplications, and the mechanism underlying Alu-Alu-mediated rearrangement has been attributed to non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR). Chromosome 17 at the p13.3 genomic region lacks extensive low-copy repeat architecture; however, it is highly enriched for Alu repetitive elements, with a fraction of 30% of total sequence annotated in the human reference genome, compared with the 10% genome-wide and 18% on chromosome 17. We conducted mechanistic studies of the 17p13.3 CNVs by performing high-density oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization, specifically interrogating the 17p13.3 region with ∼150 bp per probe density; CNV breakpoint junctions were mapped to nucleotide resolution by polymerase chain reaction and Sanger sequencing. Studied rearrangements include 5 interstitial deletions, 14 tandem duplications, 7 terminal deletions and 13 complex genomic rearrangements (CGRs). Within the 17p13.3 region, Alu-Alu-mediated rearrangements were identified in 80% of the interstitial deletions, 46% of the tandem duplications and 50% of the CGRs, indicating that this mechanism was a major contributor for formation of breakpoint junctions. Our studies suggest that Alu repetitive elements facilitate formation of non-recurrent CNVs, CGRs and other structural aberrations of chromosome 17 at p13.3. The common observation of Alu-mediated rearrangement in CGRs and breakpoint junction sequences analysis further demonstrates that this type of mechanism is unlikely attributed to NAHR, but rather may be due to a recombination-coupled DNA replicative repair process.

  12. Partitioning of copy-number genotypes in pedigrees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andelfinger Gregor U

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Copy number variations (CNVs and polymorphisms (CNPs have only recently gained the genetic community's attention. Conservative estimates have shown that CNVs and CNPs might affect more than 10% of the genome and that they may be at least as important as single nucleotide polymorphisms in assessing human variability. Widely used tools for CNP analysis have been implemented in Birdsuite and PLINK for the purpose of conducting genetic association studies based on the unpartitioned total number of CNP copies provided by the intensities from Affymetrix's Genome-Wide Human SNP Array. Here, we are interested in partitioning copy number variations and polymorphisms in extended pedigrees for the purpose of linkage analysis on familial data. Results We have developed CNGen, a new software for the partitioning of copy number polymorphism using the integrated genotypes from Birdsuite with the Affymetrix platform. The algorithm applied to familial trios or extended pedigrees can produce partitioned copy number genotypes with distinct parental alleles. We have validated the algorithm using simulations on a complex pedigree structure using frequencies calculated from a real dataset of 300 genotyped samples from 42 pedigrees segregating a congenital heart defect phenotype. Conclusions CNGen is the first published software for the partitioning of copy number genotypes in pedigrees, making possible the use CNPs and CNVs for linkage analysis. It was implemented with the Python interpreter version 2.5.2. It was successfully tested on current Linux, Windows and Mac OS workstations.

  13. Copy-number gains of HUWE1 due to replication- and recombination-based rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froyen, Guy; Belet, Stefanie; Martinez, Francisco; Santos-Rebouças, Cíntia Barros; Declercq, Matthias; Verbeeck, Jelle; Donckers, Lene; Berland, Siren; Mayo, Sonia; Rosello, Monica; Pimentel, Márcia Mattos Gonçalves; Fintelman-Rodrigues, Natalia; Hovland, Randi; Rodrigues dos Santos, Suely; Raymond, F Lucy; Bose, Tulika; Corbett, Mark A; Sheffield, Leslie; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M A; Dijkhuizen, Trijnie; Coutton, Charles; Satre, Veronique; Siu, Victoria; Marynen, Peter

    2012-08-10

    We previously reported on nonrecurrent overlapping duplications at Xp11.22 in individuals with nonsyndromic intellectual disability (ID) harboring HSD17B10, HUWE1, and the microRNAs miR-98 and let-7f-2 in the smallest region of overlap. Here, we describe six additional individuals with nonsyndromic ID and overlapping microduplications that segregate in the families. High-resolution mapping of the 12 copy-number gains reduced the minimal duplicated region to the HUWE1 locus only. Consequently, increased mRNA levels were detected for HUWE1, but not HSD17B10. Marker and SNP analysis, together with identification of two de novo events, suggested a paternally derived intrachromosomal duplication event. In four independent families, we report on a polymorphic 70 kb recurrent copy-number gain, which harbors part of HUWE1 (exon 28 to 3' untranslated region), including miR-98 and let-7f-2. Our findings thus demonstrate that HUWE1 is the only remaining dosage-sensitive gene associated with the ID phenotype. Junction and in silico analysis of breakpoint regions demonstrated simple microhomology-mediated rearrangements suggestive of replication-based duplication events. Intriguingly, in a single family, the duplication was generated through nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) with the use of HUWE1-flanking imperfect low-copy repeats, which drive this infrequent NAHR event. The recurrent partial HUWE1 copy-number gain was also generated through NAHR, but here, the homologous sequences used were identified as TcMAR-Tigger DNA elements, a template that has not yet been reported for NAHR. In summary, we showed that an increased dosage of HUWE1 causes nonsyndromic ID and demonstrated that the Xp11.22 region is prone to recombination- and replication-based rearrangements.

  14. Detection of Clonal and Subclonal Copy-Number Variants in Cell-Free DNA from Patients with Breast Cancer Using a Massively Multiplexed PCR Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkizlar, Eser; Zimmermann, Bernhard; Constantin, Tudor; Swenerton, Ryan; Hoang, Bin; Wayham, Nicholas; Babiarz, Joshua E.; Demko, Zachary; Pelham, Robert J.; Kareht, Stephanie; Simon, Alexander L.; Jinnett, Kristine N.; Rabinowitz, Matthew; Sigurjonsson, Styrmir; Hill, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate proof-of-concept for the use of massively multiplexed PCR and next-generation sequencing (mmPCR-NGS) to identify both clonal and subclonal copy-number variants (CNVs) in circulating tumor DNA. This is the first report of a targeted methodology for detection of CNVs in plasma. Using an in vitro model of cell-free DNA, we show that mmPCR-NGS can accurately detect CNVs with average allelic imbalances as low as 0.5%, an improvement over previously reported whole-genome sequencing approaches. Our method revealed differences in the spectrum of CNVs detected in tumor tissue subsections and matching plasma samples from 11 patients with stage II breast cancer. Moreover, we showed that liquid biopsies are able to detect subclonal mutations that may be missed in tumor tissue biopsies. We anticipate that this mmPCR-NGS methodology will have broad applicability for the characterization, diagnosis, and therapeutic monitoring of CNV-enriched cancers, such as breast, ovarian, and lung cancer. PMID:26500031

  15. Determining fertility in a bovine subject comprises detecting in a sample from the bovine subject the presence or absence of genetic marker alleles associated with a trait indicative of fertility of the bovine subject and/or off-spring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    for determining fertility in a bovine subject; and selecting bovine subjects for breeding purposes (all claimed). DETAILED DESCRIPTION - Determining fertility in a bovine subject comprises detecting in a sample from the bovine subject the presence or absence of two or more genetic marker alleles......NOVELTY - Determining fertility in a bovine subject comprises detecting in a sample from the bovine subject the presence or absence of two or more genetic marker alleles that are associated with a trait indicative of fertility of the bovine subject and/or off-spring. USE - The methods are useful...... that are associated with a trait indicative of fertility of the bovine subject and/or off-spring, where the two or more genetic marker alleles are single nucleotide polymorphisms selected from Hapmap60827-rs29019866, ARS-BFGL-NGS-40979, Hapmap47854-BTA-119090, ARS-BFGL-NGS-114679, Hapmap43841-BTA-34601, Hapmap43407...

  16. HLA-A and HLA-B allele frequencies in a mestizo population from Guadalajara, Mexico, determined by sequence-based typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, C A; Mendoza-Carrera, F; Rivas, F; Rodriguez-Reynoso, S; Portilla-de Buen, E

    2005-12-01

    HLA-A and HLA-B genes were typed by DNA sequencing in a mestizo population from Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. Thirty-seven HLA-A and 51 HLA-B alleles were observed in 103 samples. The common typical Amerindian alleles (>5%) and haplotypes (>or=2.0%) found were A*02010101, *24020101, *310102, B*350101, and *4002, and A*310102-B*4002, A*240201-B*350101, and the typical European alleles were A*010101, *29010101, B*1402, B*180101, and A*020101-B*1402, A*020101-B*510101, and A*3002-B*180101. This reflects the blending of the two main parental populations of mestizos: Amerindian and Iberian. Mexicans were found to be relatively closer to the Portuguese than to Spaniards. This proximity may indicate a larger Portuguese influence in Mexicans than previously considered. Present data contribute to the understanding of the genetic structure in Mexico.

  17. The probability to initiate X chromosome inactivation is determined by the X to autosomal ratio and X chromosome specific allelic properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Monkhorst

    Full Text Available In female mammalian cells, random X chromosome inactivation (XCI equalizes the dosage of X-encoded gene products to that in male cells. XCI is a stochastic process, in which each X chromosome has a probability to be inactivated. To obtain more insight in the factors setting up this probability, we studied the role of the X to autosome (X ratio A ratio in initiation of XCI, and have used the experimental data in a computer simulation model to study the cellular population dynamics of XCI.To obtain more insight in the role of the XratioA ratio in initiation of XCI, we generated triploid mouse ES cells by fusion of haploid round spermatids with diploid female and male ES cells. These fusion experiments resulted in only XXY triploid ES cells. XYY and XXX ES lines were absent, suggesting cell death related either to insufficient X-chromosomal gene dosage (XYY or to inheritance of an epigenetically modified X chromosome (XXX. Analysis of active (Xa and inactive (Xi X chromosomes in the obtained triploid XXY lines indicated that the initiation frequency of XCI is low, resulting in a mixed population of XaXiY and XaXaY cells, in which the XaXiY cells have a small proliferative advantage. This result, and findings on XCI in diploid and tetraploid ES cell lines with different X ratio A ratios, provides evidence that the X ratio A ratio determines the probability for a given X chromosome to be inactivated. Furthermore, we found that the kinetics of the XCI process can be simulated using a probability for an X chromosome to be inactivated that is proportional to the X ratio A ratio. These simulation studies re-emphasize our hypothesis that the probability is a function of the concentration of an X-encoded activator of XCI, and of X chromosome specific allelic properties determining the threshold for this activator.The present findings reveal that the probability for an X chromosome to be inactivated is proportional to the X ratio A ratio. This finding

  18. Allele Workbench: transcriptome pipeline and interactive graphics for allele-specific expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol A Soderlund

    Full Text Available Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor, where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense, and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available

  19. Initial invasion of gametophytic self-incompatibility alleles in the absence of tight linkage between pollen and pistil S alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Satoki; Wakoh, Haluka

    2014-08-01

    In homomorphic self-incompatibility (SI) systems of plants, the loci controlling the pollen and pistil types are tightly linked, and this prevents the generation of compatible combinations of alleles expressing pollen and pistil types, which would result in self-fertilization. We modeled the initial invasion of the first pollen and pistil alleles in gametophytic SI to determine whether these alleles can stably coexist in a population without tight linkage. We assume pollen and pistil loci each carry an incompatibility allele S and an allele without an incompatibility function N. We assume that pollen with an S allele are incompatible with pistils carrying S alleles, whereas other crosses are compatible. Ovules in pistils carrying an S allele suffer viability costs because recognition consumes resources. We found that the cost of carrying a pistil S allele allows pollen and pistil S alleles to coexist in a stable equilibrium if linkage is partial. This occurs because parents that carry pistil S alleles but are homozygous for pollen N alleles cannot avoid self-fertilization; however, they suffer viability costs. Hence, pollen N alleles are selected again. When pollen and pistil S alleles can coexist in a polymorphic equilibrium, selection will favor tighter linkage.

  20. Association studies of the copy-number variable ß-defensin cluster on 8p23.1 in adenocarcinoma and chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taudien Stefan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human ß-defensins are a family of antimicrobial peptides located at the mucosal surface. Both sequence multi-site variations (MSV and copy-number variants (CNV of the defensin-encoding genes are associated with increased risk for various diseases, including cancer and inflammatory conditions such as psoriasis and acute pancreatitis. In a case–control study, we investigated the association between MSV in DEFB104 as well as defensin gene (DEF cluster copy number (CN, and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC and chronic pancreatitis (CP. Results Two groups of PDAC (N=70 and CP (N=60 patients were compared to matched healthy control groups CARLA1 (N=232 and CARLA2 (N=160, respectively. Four DEFB104 MSV were haplotyped by PCR, cloning and sequencing. DEF cluster CN was determined by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Neither the PDAC nor the CP cohorts show significant differences in the DEFB104 haplotype distribution compared to the respective control groups CARLA1 and CARLA2, respectively. The diploid DEF cluster CN exhibit a significantly different distribution between PDAC and CARLA1 (Fisher’s exact test P=0.027, but not between CP and CARLA2 (P=0.867. Conclusion Different DEF cluster b CN distribution between PDAC patients and healthy controls indicate a potential protective effect of higher CNs against the disease.

  1. Flexible and accurate detection of genomic copy-number changes from aCGH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar M Rueda

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Genomic DNA copy-number alterations (CNAs are associated with complex diseases, including cancer: CNAs are indeed related to tumoral grade, metastasis, and patient survival. CNAs discovered from array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH data have been instrumental in identifying disease-related genes and potential therapeutic targets. To be immediately useful in both clinical and basic research scenarios, aCGH data analysis requires accurate methods that do not impose unrealistic biological assumptions and that provide direct answers to the key question, "What is the probability that this gene/region has CNAs?" Current approaches fail, however, to meet these requirements. Here, we introduce reversible jump aCGH (RJaCGH, a new method for identifying CNAs from aCGH; we use a nonhomogeneous hidden Markov model fitted via reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo; and we incorporate model uncertainty through Bayesian model averaging. RJaCGH provides an estimate of the probability that a gene/region has CNAs while incorporating interprobe distance and the capability to analyze data on a chromosome or genome-wide basis. RJaCGH outperforms alternative methods, and the performance difference is even larger with noisy data and highly variable interprobe distance, both commonly found features in aCGH data. Furthermore, our probabilistic method allows us to identify minimal common regions of CNAs among samples and can be extended to incorporate expression data. In summary, we provide a rigorous statistical framework for locating genes and chromosomal regions with CNAs with potential applications to cancer and other complex human diseases.

  2. Genomic DNA copy-number alterations of the let-7 family in human cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanling Wang

    Full Text Available In human cancer, expression of the let-7 family is significantly reduced, and this is associated with shorter survival times in patients. However, the mechanisms leading to let-7 downregulation in cancer are still largely unclear. Since an alteration in copy-number is one of the causes of gene deregulation in cancer, we examined copy number alterations of the let-7 family in 2,969 cancer specimens from a high-resolution SNP array dataset. We found that there was a reduction in the copy number of let-7 genes in a cancer-type specific manner. Importantly, focal deletion of four let-7 family members was found in three cancer types: medulloblastoma (let-7a-2 and let-7e, breast cancer (let-7a-2, and ovarian cancer (let-7a-3/let-7b. For example, the genomic locus harboring let-7a-3/let-7b was deleted in 44% of the specimens from ovarian cancer patients. We also found a positive correlation between the copy number of let-7b and mature let-7b expression in ovarian cancer. Finally, we showed that restoration of let-7b expression dramatically reduced ovarian tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. Our results indicate that copy number deletion is an important mechanism leading to the downregulation of expression of specific let-7 family members in medulloblastoma, breast, and ovarian cancers. Restoration of let-7 expression in tumor cells could provide a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer.

  3. Screening for copy-number alterations and loss of heterozygosity in chronic lymphocytic leukemia--a comparative study of four differently designed, high resolution microarray platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, R.; Staaf, J.; Jansson, M.;

    2008-01-01

    Screening for gene copy-number alterations (CNAs) has improved by applying genome-wide microarrays, where SNP arrays also allow analysis of loss of heterozygozity (LOH). We here analyzed 10 chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) samples using four different high-resolution platforms: BAC arrays (32K...... of 32 additional regions present in 2-3 platforms illustrated a discrepancy in detection of small CNAs, which often involved reported copy-number variations. LOH analysis using dChip revealed concordance of mainly large regions, but showed numerous, small nonoverlapping regions and LOH escaping...... detection. Evaluation of baseline variation and copy-number ratio response showed the best performance for the Agilent platform and confirmed the robustness of BAC arrays. Accordingly, these platforms demonstrated a higher degree of platform-specific CNAs. The SNP arrays displayed higher technical variation...

  4. Screening for copy-number alterations and loss of heterozygosity in chronic lymphocytic leukemia--a comparative study of four differently designed, high resolution microarray platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    Screening for gene copy-number alterations (CNAs) has improved by applying genome-wide microarrays, where SNP arrays also allow analysis of loss of heterozygozity (LOH). We here analyzed 10 chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) samples using four different high-resolution platforms: BAC arrays (32K)...

  5. Dosage-dependent severity of the phenotype in patients with mental retardation due to a recurrent copy-number gain at Xq28 mediated by an unusual recombination.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walle, J. van de; Esch, H. van; Govaerts, K.; Verbeeck, J.; Zweier, C.; Madrigal, I.; Mila, M.; Pijkels, E.; Fernandez, I.; Kohlhase, J.; Spaich, C.; Rauch, A.; Fryns, J.P.; Marynen, P.; Froyen, G.

    2009-01-01

    We report on the identification of a 0.3 Mb inherited recurrent but variable copy-number gain at Xq28 in affected males of four unrelated families with X-linked mental retardation (MR). All aberrations segregate with the disease in the families, and the carrier mothers show nonrandom X chromosome in

  6. SCRIB and PUF60 are primary drivers of the multisystemic phenotypes of the 8q24.3 copy-number variant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dauber, Andrew; Golzio, Christelle; Guenot, Cécile;

    2013-01-01

    Copy-number variants (CNVs) represent a significant interpretative challenge, given that each CNV typically affects the dosage of multiple genes. Here we report on five individuals with coloboma, microcephaly, developmental delay, short stature, and craniofacial, cardiac, and renal defects who...

  7. What phylogeny and gene genealogy analyses reveal about homoplasy in citrus microsatellite alleles

    OpenAIRE

    Barkley, Noelle A.; Krueger, Robert R.; Federici, Claire T.; Roose, Mikeal L

    2009-01-01

    Sixty-five microsatellite alleles amplified from ancestral citrus accessions classified in three separate genera were evaluated for sequence polymorphism to establish the basis of inter- and intra-allelic genetic variation, evaluate the extent of size homoplasy, and determine an appropriate model (stepwise or infinite allele) for analysis of citrus microsatellite alleles. Sequences for each locus were aligned and subsequently used to determine relationships between alleles of different taxa v...

  8. Quantitative Sequencing for the Determination of Kdr-type Resistance Allele (V419L, L925I, I936F) Frequencies in Common Bed Bug (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) Populations Collected from Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palenchar, Daniel J; Gellatly, Kyle J; Yoon, Kyong Sup; Mumcuoglu, Kosta Y; Shalom, Uri; Clark, J Marshall

    2015-09-01

    Human bed bug infestations have dramatically increased worldwide since the mid-1990s. A similar phenomenon was also observed in Israel since 2005, when infestations were reported from all over the country. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (V419L and L925I) in the bed bug voltage-sensitive sodium channel confer kdr-type resistance to pyrethroids. Using quantitative sequencing (QS), the resistance allele frequencies of Israeli bed bug populations from across the country were determined. Genomic DNA was extracted from samples of 12 populations of bed bugs collected from Israel and DNA fragments containing the V419L or L925I and I936F mutations sites were PCR amplified. The PCR products were analyzed by QS and the nucleotide signal ratios calculated and used to predict the resistance allele frequencies of the unknown populations. Results of the genetic analysis show that resistant nucleotide signals are highly correlated to resistance allele frequencies for both mutations. Ten of the 12 tested populations had 100% of the L925I mutation and 0% of the V419L mutation. One population was heterogeneous for the L925I mutation and had 0% of the V419L mutation and another population was heterogeneous for the V419L mutation and had 100% of the L925I mutation. I936F occurred only at low levels. These results indicate that bed bugs in Israel are genetically resistant to pyrethroids. Thus, pyrethroids should only be used for bed bug management with caution using effective application and careful monitoring procedures. Additionally, new and novel-acting insecticides and nonchemical means of controlling bed bugs should be explored. PMID:26336243

  9. Allele coding in genomic evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Standen, Ismo; Christensen, Ole Fredslund

    2011-01-01

    coding methods imply different models. Finally, allele coding affects the mixing of Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms, with the centered coding being the best. \\paragraph*{Conclusions:} Different allele coding methods lead to the same inference in the marker-based and equivalent models when a fixed...... effects. In the second approach, genomic breeding values are estimated directly using an equivalent model with a genomic relationship matrix. Allele coding is the method chosen to assign values to the regression coefficients in the statistical model. A common allele coding is zero for the homozygous...... genotype of the first allele, one for the heterozygote, and two for the homozygous genotype for the other allele. Another common allele coding changes these regression coefficients by subtracting a value from each marker such that the mean of regression coefficients is zero within each marker. We call...

  10. Microarray-based maps of copy-number variant regions in European and sub-Saharan populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Vogler

    Full Text Available The genetic basis of phenotypic variation can be partially explained by the presence of copy-number variations (CNVs. Currently available methods for CNV assessment include high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP microarrays that have become an indispensable tool in genome-wide association studies (GWAS. However, insufficient concordance rates between different CNV assessment methods call for cautious interpretation of results from CNV-based genetic association studies. Here we provide a cross-population, microarray-based map of copy-number variant regions (CNVRs to enable reliable interpretation of CNV association findings. We used the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 to scan the genomes of 1167 individuals from two ethnically distinct populations (Europe, N=717; Rwanda, N=450. Three different CNV-finding algorithms were tested and compared for sensitivity, specificity, and feasibility. Two algorithms were subsequently used to construct CNVR maps, which were also validated by processing subsamples with additional microarray platforms (Illumina 1M-Duo BeadChip, Nimblegen 385K aCGH array and by comparing our data with publicly available information. Both algorithms detected a total of 42669 CNVs, 74% of which clustered in 385 CNVRs of a cross-population map. These CNVRs overlap with 862 annotated genes and account for approximately 3.3% of the haploid human genome.We created comprehensive cross-populational CNVR-maps. They represent an extendable framework that can leverage the detection of common CNVs and additionally assist in interpreting CNV-based association studies.

  11. Microarray-based maps of copy-number variant regions in European and sub-Saharan populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Christian; Gschwind, Leo; Röthlisberger, Benno; Huber, Andreas; Filges, Isabel; Miny, Peter; Auschra, Bianca; Stetak, Attila; Demougin, Philippe; Vukojevic, Vanja; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Elbert, Thomas; de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas

    2010-12-16

    The genetic basis of phenotypic variation can be partially explained by the presence of copy-number variations (CNVs). Currently available methods for CNV assessment include high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarrays that have become an indispensable tool in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, insufficient concordance rates between different CNV assessment methods call for cautious interpretation of results from CNV-based genetic association studies. Here we provide a cross-population, microarray-based map of copy-number variant regions (CNVRs) to enable reliable interpretation of CNV association findings. We used the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 to scan the genomes of 1167 individuals from two ethnically distinct populations (Europe, N=717; Rwanda, N=450). Three different CNV-finding algorithms were tested and compared for sensitivity, specificity, and feasibility. Two algorithms were subsequently used to construct CNVR maps, which were also validated by processing subsamples with additional microarray platforms (Illumina 1M-Duo BeadChip, Nimblegen 385K aCGH array) and by comparing our data with publicly available information. Both algorithms detected a total of 42669 CNVs, 74% of which clustered in 385 CNVRs of a cross-population map. These CNVRs overlap with 862 annotated genes and account for approximately 3.3% of the haploid human genome.We created comprehensive cross-populational CNVR-maps. They represent an extendable framework that can leverage the detection of common CNVs and additionally assist in interpreting CNV-based association studies.

  12. Escherichia coli MW005: lambda Red-mediated recombineering and copy-number induction of oriV-equipped constructs in a single host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hope Ian A

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli strain EL350 contains chromosomally integrated phage lambda Red recombinase genes enabling this strain to be used for modifying the sequence of resident clones via recombineering. BAC and fosmid clones are highly suitable for modification by recombineering but, because they are present at low (1-2 copies per cell, the DNA is difficult to isolate in high yield and purity. To overcome this limitation vectors, e.g. pCC1FOS, have been constructed that contain the additional replication origin, oriV, which permits copy-number to be induced transiently when propagated in a suitable host strain, e.g. EPI300, that supplies the cognate trans-replication protein TrfA. Previously, we used EL350 and EPI300 sequentially to recombineer oriV-equipped fosmid genomic clones and, subsequently, to induce copy-number of the resulting recombinant clone. To eliminate these intervening DNA isolation and transformation steps we retrofitted EL350 with a PBAD-driven trfA gene generating strain MW005 that supports, independently, both recombineering and copy-number induction. Results The PBAD-driven copy of cre in EL350 was replaced seamlessly with a copy of trfA, PCR-amplified from EPI300 chromosomal DNA, to generate MW005. This new strain has been used to both generate, via recombineering, a number of reporter gene fusions directly from pCC1FOS-based Caenorhabditis elegans genomic clones and to transiently induce copy-number of fosmid and BAC clones prior to DNA preparation. Conclusions By retrofitting EL350, an established 'recombineering' E. coli strain, with a tightly regulated copy of trfA we have produced a new strain, MW005, which combines recombineering capacity with the useful ability to transiently induce copy-number of oriV-equipped clones. By coupling these two steps in a single strain, use of MW005 will enable the more rapid recombineering-mediated production of recombinant clones in the yield and quality necessary for

  13. Single-Cell, Genome-wide Sequencing Identifies Clonal Somatic Copy-Number Variation in the Human Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuyu Cai

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available De novo copy-number variants (CNVs can cause neuropsychiatric disease, but the degree to which they occur somatically, and during development, is unknown. Single-cell whole-genome sequencing (WGS in >200 single cells, including >160 neurons from three normal and two pathological human brains, sensitively identified germline trisomy of chromosome 18 but found most (≥95% neurons in normal brain tissue to be euploid. Analysis of a patient with hemimegalencephaly (HMG due to a somatic CNV of chromosome 1q found unexpected tetrasomy 1q in ∼20% of neurons, suggesting that CNVs in a minority of cells can cause widespread brain dysfunction. Single-cell analysis identified large (>1 Mb clonal CNVs in lymphoblasts and in single neurons from normal human brain tissue, suggesting that some CNVs occur during neurogenesis. Many neurons contained one or more large candidate private CNVs, including one at chromosome 15q13.2-13.3, a site of duplication in neuropsychiatric conditions. Large private and clonal somatic CNVs occur in normal and diseased human brains.

  14. NAHR-mediated copy-number variants in a clinical population: mechanistic insights into both genomic disorders and Mendelizing traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittwald, Piotr; Gambin, Tomasz; Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Li, Jian; Amato, Stephen; Divon, Michael Y; Rodríguez Rojas, Lisa Ximena; Elton, Lindsay E; Scott, Daryl A; Schaaf, Christian P; Torres-Martinez, Wilfredo; Stevens, Abby K; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Agadi, Satish; Francis, David; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Breman, Amy; Lalani, Seema R; Bacino, Carlos A; Bi, Weimin; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Beaudet, Arthur L; Patel, Ankita; Shaw, Chad A; Lupski, James R; Gambin, Anna; Cheung, Sau Wai; Stankiewicz, Pawel

    2013-09-01

    We delineated and analyzed directly oriented paralogous low-copy repeats (DP-LCRs) in the most recent version of the human haploid reference genome. The computationally defined DP-LCRs were cross-referenced with our chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) database of 25,144 patients subjected to genome-wide assays. This computationally guided approach to the empirically derived large data set allowed us to investigate genomic rearrangement relative frequencies and identify new loci for recurrent nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR)-mediated copy-number variants (CNVs). The most commonly observed recurrent CNVs were NPHP1 duplications (233), CHRNA7 duplications (175), and 22q11.21 deletions (DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndrome, 166). In the ∼25% of CMA cases for which parental studies were available, we identified 190 de novo recurrent CNVs. In this group, the most frequently observed events were deletions of 22q11.21 (48), 16p11.2 (autism, 34), and 7q11.23 (Williams-Beuren syndrome, 11). Several features of DP-LCRs, including length, distance between NAHR substrate elements, DNA sequence identity (fraction matching), GC content, and concentration of the homologous recombination (HR) hot spot motif 5'-CCNCCNTNNCCNC-3', correlate with the frequencies of the recurrent CNVs events. Four novel adjacent DP-LCR-flanked and NAHR-prone regions, involving 2q12.2q13, were elucidated in association with novel genomic disorders. Our study quantitates genome architectural features responsible for NAHR-mediated genomic instability and further elucidates the role of NAHR in human disease.

  15. Dosage-dependent severity of the phenotype in patients with mental retardation due to a recurrent copy-number gain at Xq28 mediated by an unusual recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandewalle, Joke; Van Esch, Hilde; Govaerts, Karen; Verbeeck, Jelle; Zweier, Christiane; Madrigal, Irene; Mila, Montserrat; Pijkels, Elly; Fernandez, Isabel; Kohlhase, Jürgen; Spaich, Christiane; Rauch, Anita; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Marynen, Peter; Froyen, Guy

    2009-12-01

    We report on the identification of a 0.3 Mb inherited recurrent but variable copy-number gain at Xq28 in affected males of four unrelated families with X-linked mental retardation (MR). All aberrations segregate with the disease in the families, and the carrier mothers show nonrandom X chromosome inactivation. Tiling Xq28-region-specific oligo array revealed that all aberrations start at the beginning of the low copy repeat LCR-K1, at position 153.20 Mb, and end just distal to LCR-L2, at 153.54 Mb. The copy-number gain always includes 18 annotated genes, of which RPL10, ATP6AP1 and GDI1 are highly expressed in brain. From these, GDI1 is the most likely candidate gene. Its copy number correlates with the severity of clinical features, because it is duplicated in one family with nonsyndromic moderate MR, is triplicated in males from two families with mild MR and additional features, and is present in five copies in a fourth family with a severe syndromic form of MR. Moreover, expression analysis revealed copy-number-dependent increased mRNA levels in affected patients compared to control individuals. Interestingly, analysis of the breakpoint regions suggests a recombination mechanism that involves two adjacent but different sets of low copy repeats. Taken together, our data strongly suggest that an increased expression of GDI1 results in impaired cognition in a dosage-dependent manner. Moreover, these data also imply that a copy-number gain of an individual gene present in the larger genomic aberration that leads to the severe MECP2 duplication syndrome can of itself result in a clinical phenotype as well.

  16. Multilocus Inherited Neoplasia Alleles Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whitworth, James; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Sunde, Lone;

    2016-01-01

    as multilocus inherited neoplasia alleles syndrome [MINAS]) in patients with unusual inherited cancer syndrome phenotypes. To facilitate the clinical management of novel cases of MINAS, we have established a database to collect information on what is likely to be an increasingly recognized cohort...

  17. DRD4 dopamine receptor allelic diversity in various primate species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, M.; Higley, D. [NIAAA, Rockville, MD (United States); O`Brien, S. [NCI, Frederick, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The DRD4 dopamine receptor is uniquely characterized by a 48 bp repeating segment within the coding region, located in exon III. Different DRD4 alleles are produced by the presence of additional 48 bp repeats, each of which adds 16 amino acids to the length of the 3rd intracytoplasmic loop of the receptor. The DRD4 receptor is therefore an intriguing candidate gene for behaviors which are influenced by dopamine function. In several human populations, DRD4 alleles with 2-8 and 10 repeats have previously been identified, and the 4 and 7 repeat alleles are the most abundant. We have determined DRD4 genotypes in the following nonhuman primate species: chimpanzee N=2, pygmy chimpanzee N=2, gorilla N=4, siamang N=2, Gelada baboon N=1, gibbon N=1, orangutan (Bornean and Sumatran) N=62, spider monkey N=4, owl monkey N=1, Colobus monkey N=1, Patas monkey N=1, ruffed lemur N=1, rhesus macaque N=8, and vervet monkey N=28. The degree of DRD4 polymorphism and which DRD4 alleles were present both showed considerable variation across primate species. In contrast to the human, rhesus macaque monkeys were monomorphic. The 4 and 7 repeat allels, highly abundant in the human, may not be present in certain other primates. For example, the four spider monkeys we studied showed the 7, 8 and 9 repeat length alleles and the only gibbon we analyzed was homozygous for the 9 repeat allele (thus far not observed in the human). Genotyping of other primate species and sequencing of the individual DRD4 repeat alleles in different species may help us determine the ancestral DRD4 repeat length and identify connections between DRD4 genotype and phenotype.

  18. Invasive Allele Spread under Preemptive Competition

    OpenAIRE

    Yasi, J. A.; Korniss, G.; Caraco, T.

    2005-01-01

    We study a discrete spatial model for invasive allele spread in which two alleles compete preemptively, initially only the "residents" (weaker competitors) being present. We find that the spread of the advantageous mutation is well described by homogeneous nucleation; in particular, in large systems the time-dependent global density of the resident allele is well approximated by Avrami's law.

  19. GSVD comparison of patient-matched normal and tumor aCGH profiles reveals global copy-number alterations predicting glioblastoma multiforme survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng H Lee

    Full Text Available Despite recent large-scale profiling efforts, the best prognostic predictor of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM remains the patient's age at diagnosis. We describe a global pattern of tumor-exclusive co-occurring copy-number alterations (CNAs that is correlated, possibly coordinated with GBM patients' survival and response to chemotherapy. The pattern is revealed by GSVD comparison of patient-matched but probe-independent GBM and normal aCGH datasets from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA. We find that, first, the GSVD, formulated as a framework for comparatively modeling two composite datasets, removes from the pattern copy-number variations (CNVs that occur in the normal human genome (e.g., female-specific X chromosome amplification and experimental variations (e.g., in tissue batch, genomic center, hybridization date and scanner, without a-priori knowledge of these variations. Second, the pattern includes most known GBM-associated changes in chromosome numbers and focal CNAs, as well as several previously unreported CNAs in >3% of the patients. These include the biochemically putative drug target, cell cycle-regulated serine/threonine kinase-encoding TLK2, the cyclin E1-encoding CCNE1, and the Rb-binding histone demethylase-encoding KDM5A. Third, the pattern provides a better prognostic predictor than the chromosome numbers or any one focal CNA that it identifies, suggesting that the GBM survival phenotype is an outcome of its global genotype. The pattern is independent of age, and combined with age, makes a better predictor than age alone. GSVD comparison of matched profiles of a larger set of TCGA patients, inclusive of the initial set, confirms the global pattern. GSVD classification of the GBM profiles of an independent set of patients validates the prognostic contribution of the pattern.

  20. Mannose-binding lectin variant alleles and HLA-DR4 alleles are associated with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Soren; Baslund, Bo; Madsen, Hans Ole;

    2002-01-01

    To determine whether variant alleles of the mannose-binding lectin (MBL) gene causing low serum concentrations of MBL and/or polymorphisms of HLA-DRB1 are associated with increased susceptibility to polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) and giant cell arteritis (GCA) or particular clinical phenotypes of PMR/GCA....

  1. Novel SLC19A3 Promoter Deletion and Allelic Silencing in Biotin-Thiamine-Responsive Basal Ganglia Encephalopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Flønes

    Full Text Available Biotin-thiamine responsive basal ganglia disease is a severe, but potentially treatable disorder caused by mutations in the SLC19A3 gene. Although the disease is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, patients with typical phenotypes carrying single heterozygous mutations have been reported. This makes the diagnosis uncertain and may delay treatment.In two siblings with early-onset encephalopathy dystonia and epilepsy, whole-exome sequencing revealed a novel single heterozygous SLC19A3 mutation (c.337T>C. Although Sanger-sequencing and copy-number analysis revealed no other aberrations, RNA-sequencing in brain tissue suggested the second allele was silenced. Whole-genome sequencing resolved the genetic defect by revealing a novel 45,049 bp deletion in the 5'-UTR region of the gene abolishing the promoter. High dose thiamine and biotin therapy was started in the surviving sibling who remains stable. In another patient two novel compound heterozygous SLC19A3 mutations were found. He improved substantially on thiamine and biotin therapy.We show that large genomic deletions occur in the regulatory region of SLC19A3 and should be considered in genetic testing. Moreover, our study highlights the power of whole-genome sequencing as a diagnostic tool for rare genetic disorders across a wide spectrum of mutations including non-coding large genomic rearrangements.

  2. Mannose-binding lectin variant alleles and the risk of arterial thrombosis in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øhlenschlaeger, Tommy; Garred, Peter; Madsen, Hans O;

    2004-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is an important complication in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Variant alleles of the mannose-binding lectin gene are associated with SLE as well as with severe atherosclerosis. We determined whether mannose-binding lectin variant alleles were associated...

  3. A common mutation associated with the Duarte galactosemia allele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsas, L.J.; Dembure, P.P.; Langley, S.; Paulk, E.M.; Hjelm, L.N.; Fridovich-Keil, J. (Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States))

    1994-06-01

    The human cDNA and gene for galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) have been cloned and sequenced. A prevalant mutation (Q188R) is known to cause classic galactosemia (G/G). G/G galactosemia has an incidence of 1/38,886 in 1,396,766 Georgia live-born infants, but a more common variant of galactosemia, Duarte, has an unknown incidence. The proposed Duarte biochemical phenotypes of GALT are as follows: D/N, D/D, and D/G, which have [approximately]75%, 50%, and 25% of normal GALT activity, respectively. In addition, the D allele has isoforms of its enzyme that have more acidic pI than normal. Here the authors systematically determine (a) the prevalence of an A-to-G transition at base pair 2744 of exon 10 in the GALT gene, a transition that produces a codon change converting asparagine to aspartic acid at position 314 (N314D), and (b) the association of this mutation with the Duarte biochemical phenotype. The 2744G nucleotide change adds an AvaII (SinI) cut site, which was identified in PCR-amplified DNA. In 111 biochemically unphenotyped controls with no history of galactosemia, 13 N314D alleles were identified (prevalence 5.9%). In a prospective study, 40 D alleles were biochemically phenotyped, and 40 N314D alleles were found. By contrast, in 36 individuals known not to have the Duarte biochemical phenotype, no N314D alleles were found. The authors conclude that the N314D mutation is a common allele that probably causes the Duarte GALT biochemical phenotype and occurs in a predominantly Caucasian, nongalactosemic population, with a prevalence of 5.9%. 36 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. A strategy to discover genes that carry multi-allelic or mono-allelic risk for common diseases: A cohort allelic sums test (CAST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is described to discover if a gene carries one or more allelic mutations that confer risk for any specified common disease. The method does not depend upon genetic linkage of risk-conferring mutations to high frequency genetic markers such as single nucleotide polymorphisms. Instead, the sums of allelic mutation frequencies in case and control cohorts are determined and a statistical test is applied to discover if the difference in these sums is greater than would be expected by chance. A statistical model is presented that defines the ability of such tests to detect significant gene-disease relationships as a function of case and control cohort sizes and key confounding variables: zygosity and genicity, environmental risk factors, errors in diagnosis, limits to mutant detection, linkage of neutral and risk-conferring mutations, ethnic diversity in the general population and the expectation that among all exonic mutants in the human genome greater than 90% will be neutral with regard to any effect on disease risk. Means to test the null hypothesis for, and determine the statistical power of, each test are provided. For this 'cohort allelic sums test' or 'CAST', the statistical model and test are provided as an Excel (TM) program, CASTAT (C) at http://epidemiology.mit.edu. Based on genetics, technology and statistics, a strategy of enumerating the mutant alleles carried in the exons and splice sites of the estimated ∼25,000 human genes in case cohort samples of 10,000 persons for each of 100 common diseases is proposed and evaluated: A wide range of possible conditions of multi-allelic or mono-allelic and monogenic, multigenic or polygenic (including epistatic) risk are found to be detectable using the statistical criteria of 1 or 10 ''false positive'' gene associations per 25,000 gene-disease pair-wise trials and a statistical power of >0.8. Using estimates of the distribution of both neutral and gene-inactivating nondeleterious mutations in humans and

  5. MYC, TP53, and Chromosome 17 Copy-Number Alterations in Multiple Gastric Cancer Cell Lines and in Their Parental Primary Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Ferreira Leal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated whether MYC, TP53, and chromosome 17 copy-number alterations occur in ACP02, ACP03, and AGP01 gastric cancer cell lines and in their tumor counterpart. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for MYC and TP53 genes and for chromosome 17 was applied in the 6th, 12th, 60th, and 85th passages of the cell lines and in their parental primary tumors. We observed that three and four MYC signals were the most common alterations in gastric cell lines and tumors. ACP02 presented cells with two copies of chr17 and loss of one copy of TP53 more frequently than ACP03 and AGP01. Only ACP03 and AGP01 presented clonal chr17 trisomy with three or two TP53 copies. The frequency of MYC gain, TP53 loss, and chromosome 17 trisomy seems to increase in gastric cell lines compared to their parental tumors. Our findings reveal that these cell lines retain, in vitro, the genetic alterations presented in their parental primary tumors.

  6. Short mucin 6 alleles are associated with H pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thai V Nguyen; Marcel JR Janssen; Paulien Gritters; René HM te Morsche; Joost PH Drenth; Henri van Asten; Robert JF Laheij; Jan BMJ Jansen

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between mucin 6(MUC6) VNTR length and H pylori infection.METHODS: Blood samples were collected from patients visiting the Can Tho General Hospital for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. DNA was isolated from whole blood, the repeated section was cut out using a restriction enzyme (Pvu Ⅱ) and the length of the allele fragments was determined by Southern blotting. H pylori infection was diagnosed by 14C urea breath test. For analysis, MUC6 allele fragment length was dichotomized as being either long (> 13.5 kbp) or short (≤ 13.5 kbp)and patients were classified according to genotype [long-long (LL), long-short (LS), short-short (SS)].RESULTS: 160 patients were studied (mean age 43years, 36% were males, 58% H pylori positive). MUC6Pvu Ⅱ-restricted allele fragment lengths ranged from 7 to 19 kbp. Of the patients with the LL, LS, SS MUC6genotype, 43% (24/56), 57% (25/58) and 76% (11/46)were infected with H pylori, respectively (P = 0.003).CONCLUSION: Short MUC6 alleles are associated with H pylori infection.

  7. KIR2DL2/2DL3-E35 alleles are functionally stronger than -Q35 alleles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, Rafijul; Thapa, Rajoo; Bao, Ju; Li, Ying; Zheng, Jie; Leung, Wing

    2016-03-01

    KIR2DL2 and KIR2DL3 segregate as alleles of a single locus in the centromeric motif of the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene family. Although KIR2DL2/L3 polymorphism is known to be associated with many human diseases and is an important factor for donor selection in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the molecular determinant of functional diversity among various alleles is unclear. In this study we found that KIR2DL2/L3 with glutamic acid at position 35 (E35) are functionally stronger than those with glutamine at the same position (Q35). Cytotoxicity assay showed that NK cells from HLA-C1 positive donors with KIR2DL2/L3-E35 could kill more target cells lacking their ligands than NK cells with the weaker -Q35 alleles, indicating better licensing of KIR2DL2/L3+ NK cells with the stronger alleles. Molecular modeling analysis reveals that the glutamic acid, which is negatively charged, interacts with positively charged histidine located at position 55, thereby stabilizing KIR2DL2/L3 dimer and reducing entropy loss when KIR2DL2/3 binds to HLA-C ligand. The results of this study will be important for future studies of KIR2DL2/L3-associated diseases as well as for donor selection in allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

  8. Segregation of male-sterility alleles across a species boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, S G; Sakai, A K; Culley, T M; Duong, L; Danielson, R E

    2014-02-01

    Hybrid zones may serve as bridges permitting gene flow between species, including alleles influencing the evolution of breeding systems. Using greenhouse crosses, we assessed the likelihood that a hybrid zone could serve as a conduit for transfer of nuclear male-sterility alleles between a gynodioecious species and a hermaphroditic species with very rare females in some populations. Segregation patterns in progeny of crosses between rare females of hermaphroditic Schiedea menziesii and hermaphroditic plants of gynodioecious Schiedea salicaria heterozygous at the male-sterility locus, and between female S. salicaria and hermaphroditic plants from the hybrid zone, were used to determine whether male-sterility was controlled at the same locus in the parental species and the hybrid zone. Segregations of females and hermaphrodites in approximately equal ratios from many of the crosses indicate that the same nuclear male-sterility allele occurs in the parent species and the hybrid zone. These rare male-sterility alleles in S. menziesii may result from gene flow from S. salicaria through the hybrid zone, presumably facilitated by wind pollination in S. salicaria. Alternatively, rare male-sterility alleles might result from a reversal from gynodioecy to hermaphroditism in S. menziesii, or possibly de novo evolution of male sterility. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that some species of Schiedea have probably evolved separate sexes independently, but not in the lineage containing S. salicaria and S. menziesii. High levels of selfing and expression of strong inbreeding depression in S. menziesii, which together should favour females in populations, argue against a reversal from gynodioecy to hermaphroditism in S. menziesii.

  9. Frequency and characterization of known and novel RHD variant alleles in 37 782 Dutch D-negative pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegmann, Tamara C; Veldhuisen, Barbera; Bijman, Renate; Thurik, Florentine F; Bossers, Bernadette; Cheroutre, Goedele; Jonkers, Remco; Ligthart, Peter; de Haas, Masja; Haer-Wigman, Lonneke; van der Schoot, C Ellen

    2016-05-01

    To guide anti-D prophylaxis, Dutch D- pregnant women are offered a quantitative fetal-RHD-genotyping assay to determine the RHD status of their fetus. This allowed us to determine the frequency of different maternal RHD variants in 37 782 serologically D- pregnant women. A variant allele is present in at least 0·96% of Dutch D- pregnant women The D- serology could be confirmed after further serological testing in only 54% of these women, which emphasizes the potential relevance of genotyping of blood donors. 43 different RHD variant alleles were detected, including 15 novel alleles (11 null-, 2 partial D- and 2 DEL-alleles). Of those novel null alleles, one allele contained a single missense mutation (RHD*443C>G) and one allele had a single amino acid deletion (RHD*424_426del). The D- phenotype was confirmed by transduction of human D- erythroblasts, consolidating that, for the first time, a single amino acid change or deletion causes the D- phenotype. Transduction also confirmed the phenotypes for the two new variant DEL-alleles (RHD*721A>C and RHD*884T>C) and the novel partial RHD*492C>A allele. Notably, in three additional cases the DEL phenotype was observed but sequencing of the coding sequence, flanking introns and promoter region revealed an apparently wild-type RHD allele without mutations. PMID:27018217

  10. Maximizing allele detection: Effects of analytical threshold and DNA levels on rates of allele and locus drop-out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakay, Christine A; Bregu, Joli; Grgicak, Catherine M

    2012-12-01

    Interpretation of DNA evidence depends upon the ability of the analyst to accurately compare the DNA profile obtained from an item of evidence and the DNA profile of a standard. This interpretation becomes progressively more difficult as the number of 'drop-out' and 'drop-in' events increase. Analytical thresholds (AT) are typically selected to ensure the false detection of noise is minimized. However, there exists a tradeoff between the erroneous labeling of noise as alleles and the false non-detection of alleles (i.e. drop-out). In this study, the effect ATs had on both types of error was characterized. Various ATs were tested, where three relied upon the analysis of baseline signals obtained from 31 negative samples. The fourth AT was determined by utilizing the relationship between RFU signal and DNA input. The other ATs were the commonly employed 50, 150 and 200 RFU thresholds. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) plots showed that although high ATs completely negated the false labeling of noise, DNA analyzed with ATs derived using analysis of the baseline signal exhibited the lowest rates of drop-out and the lowest total error rates. In another experiment, the effect small changes in ATs had on drop-out was examined. This study showed that as the AT increased from ∼10 to 60 RFU, the number of heterozygous loci exhibiting the loss of one allele increased. Between ATs of 60 and 150 RFU, the frequency of allelic drop-out remained constant at 0.27 (±0.02) and began to decrease when ATs of 150 RFU or greater were utilized. In contrast, the frequency of heterozygous loci exhibiting the loss of both alleles consistently increased with AT. In summary, for samples amplified with less than 0.5ng of DNA, ATs derived from baseline analysis of negatives were shown to decrease the frequency of drop-out by a factor of 100 without significantly increasing rates of erroneous noise detection.

  11. THE USE OF NEW REAGENT KITS FOR DETECTION AND DESCRIPTION OF ADDITIONAL ALLELES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Loginova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available During the screening typing of recruited volunteers with Volga Federal District for unrelated hematopoietic stem cell registry on the loci (HLA-A, B, DRB1, DRB345 in sample No 1758 identified a new allele at locus A. The use of basic kit AlleleSEQR HLA-A Sequencing in combination with HARP – A2F98A allowed to determine the genotype of this sample – А*30:01:01, a new allele А*25, В*13, 44, DRB1*03, 09, DRB3*02, DRB4*01. 

  12. Major histocompatibility complex class I chain related (MIC) A gene, TNFa microsatellite alleles and TNFB alleles in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients from Latvia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitina Zake, Liene; Cimdina, Ija; Rumba, Ingrida; Dabadghao, Preethi; Sanjeevi, Carani B

    2002-05-01

    In order to analyze involvement of major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA) and tumor necrosis factor a (TNFa) microsatellite polymorphisms as well as TNFB gene in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), we studied 128 patients divided into groups according to clinical features [monoarthritis (n = 14), oligoarthritis (n = 58), polyarthritis (n = 50), and systemic (n = 6)], and 114 age- and sex-matched healthy controls from Latvia. DNA samples were amplified with specific primers and used for genotyping of MICA and TNFa microsatellite. Typing for a biallelic NcoI polymerase chain reaction RFLP polymorphism located at the first intron of TNFB gene was done as follows: restriction digests generated fragments of 555bp and 185bp for TNFB*1 allele, and 740bp for TNFB*2 allele. The results were compared between cases and controls. We found significant increase of MICA allele A4 (p = 0.009; odds ratio [OR] = 2.3) and allele TNFa2 (p = 0.0001; OR = 4.4) in patients compared with controls. The frequency of allele TNFa9 was significantly decreased (p = 0.0001; OR = 0.1) in patients with JIA. No significant differences of TNFB allele frequency were found. Our data suggest that MICA and TNFa microsatellite polymorphisms may be used as markers for determination of susceptibility and protection from JIA.

  13. Evolutionary dynamics of sporophytic self-incompatibility alleles in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierup, M H; Vekemans, X; Christiansen, F B

    1997-01-01

    The stationary frequency distribution and allelic dynamics in finite populations are analyzed through stochastic simulations in three models of single-locus, multi-allelic sporophytic self-incompatibility. The models differ in the dominance relationships among alleles. In one model, alleles act c...

  14. Three allele combinations associated with Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulakova Olga G

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple sclerosis (MS is an immune-mediated disease of polygenic etiology. Dissection of its genetic background is a complex problem, because of the combinatorial possibilities of gene-gene interactions. As genotyping methods improve throughput, approaches that can explore multigene interactions appropriately should lead to improved understanding of MS. Methods 286 unrelated patients with definite MS and 362 unrelated healthy controls of Russian descent were genotyped at polymorphic loci (including SNPs, repeat polymorphisms, and an insertion/deletion of the DRB1, TNF, LT, TGFβ1, CCR5 and CTLA4 genes and TNFa and TNFb microsatellites. Each allele carriership in patients and controls was compared by Fisher's exact test, and disease-associated combinations of alleles in the data set were sought using a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo-based method recently developed by our group. Results We identified two previously unknown MS-associated tri-allelic combinations: -509TGFβ1*C, DRB1*18(3, CTLA4*G and -238TNF*B1,-308TNF*A2, CTLA4*G, which perfectly separate MS cases from controls, at least in the present sample. The previously described DRB1*15(2 allele, the microsatellite TNFa9 allele and the biallelic combination CCR5Δ32, DRB1*04 were also reidentified as MS-associated. Conclusion These results represent an independent validation of MS association with DRB1*15(2 and TNFa9 in Russians and are the first to find the interplay of three loci in conferring susceptibility to MS. They demonstrate the efficacy of our approach for the identification of complex-disease-associated combinations of alleles.

  15. Allelic discrimination in naturalized ovine from Pantanal Sul-Matogrossense by means of microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crispim Bruno do Amaral

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The molecular biology techniques that are used in allelic discrimination for individual and sheep breeds characterization are important tools in breeding programs and conservation of genetic resources. The use of microsatellite markers allows allelic differentiation, which in turn allows us to infer the genetic variability of sample populations. The study aimed to test the sensitivity and efficiency of fluorescent capillary electrophoresis, using microsatellite primers, for allelic discrimination of the Crioulo breed from Pantanal sul-matogrossense, as well as verify the possibility of using the products of sequencing in genetic variability analysis. For this test, were used blood samples from Pantaneira breed sheep. The allelic discrimination of eight microsatellites was determined by capillary electrophoresis in automatic sequencer and the results analyses were performed on the programs CERVUS and Dendro-UPGMA. The results indicated the possibility of using this technique for the individual genotyping of all loci tested in electrophoretic analysis and its potential to allelic discrimination even in case of difference between two pairs of bases between the alleles. The resulting dendrogram based on the distance matrix by the UPGMA assembly method, indicated medium similarity coefficient of 0.72 in the group of animals. It was concluded that there is the viability and efficiency of the microsatellite molecular markers technique using capillary electrophoresis for allelic discrimination and the utility of results for studies of genetic variability, paternity diagnosis and characterization of the Crioulo sheep herd from Pantanal sul-matogrossense.

  16. Human leukocyte antigen class II susceptibility conferring alleles among non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the frequency of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class II susceptibility conferring alleles among type 2 Diabetes mellitus patients, in comparison with healthy controls. Cross-sectional comparative study. Patients with non-insulin dependent Diabetes mellitus meeting World Health Organization criteria were studied. These were compared with age and gender matched healthy control subjects. For each subject (patients as well as controls), DNA was extracted from ethylene diamine tetra-acetate sample and HLA class II DRB1 typing was carried out at allele group level (DRB1*01-DRB1*16) by sequence specific primers. Human leukocyte antigen DRB1 type was determined by agarose gel electrophoresis and results were recorded. Frequencies were determined as number of an allele divided by total number of alleles per group; p-value was computed using Pearson's chi-square test. Among the 100 patients, there were 63 males and 37 females with 68 controls. A total of 13 different HLA DRB1 alleles were detected, with DRB1*15 being the commonest in both the groups. The allele DRB1*13 had statistically significant higher frequency in patient group as compared to controls (p 0.005). HLA DRB1*13 was found with a significantly increased frequency in non-insulin dependent Diabetes mellitus. (author)

  17. Genome-wide association study of preeclampsia detects novel maternal single nucleotide polymorphisms and copy-number variants in subsets of the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) study cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Linlu; Bracken, Michael B.; DeWan, Andrew T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A genome-wide association study was undertaken to identify maternal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and copy-number variants (CNVs) associated with preeclampsia. Case-control analysis was performed on 1070 Afro-Caribbean (n=21 cases and 1049 controls) and 723 Hispanic (n=62 cases and 661 controls) mothers and 1257 mothers of European ancestry (n=50 cases and 1207 controls) from the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) study. European ancestry subjects were genotyped on Illumina Human610-Quad and Afro-Caribbean and Hispanic subjects were genotyped on Illumina Human1M-Duo BeadChip microarrays. Genome-wide SNP data were analyzed using PLINK. CNVs were called using three detection algorithms (GNOSIS, PennCNV, and QuantiSNP), merged using CNVision, and then screened using stringent criteria. SNP and CNV findings were compared to those of the Study of Pregnancy Hypertension in Iowa (SOPHIA), an independent preeclampsia case-control dataset of Caucasian mothers (n=177 cases and 116 controls). A list of top SNPs were identified for each of the HAPO ethnic groups, but none reached Bonferroni-corrected significance. Novel candidate CNVs showing enrichment among preeclampsia cases were also identified in each of the three ethnic groups. Several variants were suggestively replicated in SOPHIA. The discovered SNPs and copy-number variable regions present interesting candidate genetic variants for preeclampsia that warrant further replication and investigation. PMID:23551011

  18. Multiple origins of Plasmodium falciparum dihydropteroate synthetase mutant alleles associated with sulfadoxine resistance in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumb, Vanshika; Das, Manoj K; Singh, Neeru; Dev, Vas; Khan, Wajihullah; Sharma, Yagya D

    2011-06-01

    With the spread of chloroquine (CQ)-resistant malaria in India, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) alone or in combination with artesunate is used as an alternative antimalarial drug. Due to continuous drug pressure, the Plasmodium falciparum parasite is exhibiting resistance to antifolates because of mutations in candidate genes dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) and dihydropteroate synthetase (dhps). Our earlier study on flanking microsatellite markers of dhfr mutant alleles from India had shown a single origin of the pyrimethamine resistance and some minor haplotypes which shared haplotypes with Southeast Asian (Thailand) strains. In the present study, we have analyzed 193 of these Indian P. falciparum isolates for 15 microsatellite loci around dhps to investigate the genetic lineages of the mutant dhps alleles in different parts of the country. Eighty-one of these samples had mutant dhps alleles, of which 62 were from Andaman and Nicobar Islands and the remaining 19 were from mainland India. Of 112 isolates with a wild-type dhps allele, 109 were from mainland India and only 3 were from Andaman and Nicobar Islands. Consistent with the model of selection, the mean expected heterozygosity (H(e)) around mutant dhps alleles (H(e) = 0.55; n = 81) associated with sulfadoxine resistance was lower (P ≤ 0.05) than the mean H(e) around the wild-type dhps allele (H(e) = 0.80; n = 112). There was more genetic diversity in flanking microsatellites of dhps than dhfr among these isolates, which confirms the assertion that dhps mutations are at a very early stage of fixation in the parasite population. Microsatellite haplotypes around various mutant dhps alleles suggest that the resistant dhps alleles have multiple independent origins in India, especially in Andaman and Nicobar Islands. Determining the genetic lineages of the resistant dhps alleles on Andaman and Nicobar Islands and mainland India is significant, given the role of Asia in the intercontinental spread of chloroquine

  19. Novel method for analysis of allele specific expression in triploid Oryzias latipes reveals consistent pattern of allele exclusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzintzuni I Garcia

    Full Text Available Assessing allele-specific gene expression (ASE on a large scale continues to be a technically challenging problem. Certain biological phenomena, such as X chromosome inactivation and parental imprinting, affect ASE most drastically by completely shutting down the expression of a whole set of alleles. Other more subtle effects on ASE are likely to be much more complex and dependent on the genetic environment and are perhaps more important to understand since they may be responsible for a significant amount of biological diversity. Tools to assess ASE in a diploid biological system are becoming more reliable. Non-diploid systems are, however, not uncommon. In humans full or partial polyploid states are regularly found in both healthy (meiotic cells, polynucleated cell types and diseased tissues (trisomies, non-disjunction events, cancerous tissues. In this work we have studied ASE in the medaka fish model system. We have developed a method for determining ASE in polyploid organisms from RNAseq data and we have implemented this method in a software tool set. As a biological model system we have used nuclear transplantation to experimentally produce artificial triploid medaka composed of three different haplomes. We measured ASE in RNA isolated from the livers of two adult, triploid medaka fish that showed a high degree of similarity. The majority of genes examined (82% shared expression more or less evenly among the three alleles in both triploids. The rest of the genes (18% displayed a wide range of ASE levels. Interestingly the majority of genes (78% displayed generally consistent ASE levels in both triploid individuals. A large contingent of these genes had the same allele entirely suppressed in both triploids. When viewed in a chromosomal context, it is revealed that these genes are from large sections of 4 chromosomes and may be indicative of some broad scale suppression of gene expression.

  20. Quantification of Allele Dosage in tetraploid Roses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vukosavljev, M.; Guardo, Di M.; Weg, van de W.E.; Arens, P.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Many important crops (wheat, potato, strawberry, rose, etc.) are polyploid. This complicates genetic analyses, as the same locus can be present on multiple homologous or homoeologous chromosomes. SSR markers are suitable for mapping in segregating populations of polyploids as they are multi-allelic,

  1. Diversity of Lactase Persistence Alleles in Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, BL; Raga, TO; Liebert, Anke;

    2013-01-01

    The persistent expression of lactase into adulthood in humans is a recent genetic adaptation that allows the consumption of milk from other mammals after weaning. In Europe, a single allele (−13910∗T, rs4988235) in an upstream region that acts as an enhancer to the expression of the lactase gene ...

  2. Diversity of Lactase Persistence Alleles in Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, BL; Raga, TO; Liebert, Anke;

    2013-01-01

    The persistent expression of lactase into adulthood in humans is a recent genetic adaptation that allows the consumption of milk from other mammals after weaning. In Europe, a single allele (−13910∗T, rs4988235) in an upstream region that acts as an enhancer to the expression of the lactase gene...

  3. Expression of human PTPN22 alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C; Barington, T; Husby, S;

    2007-01-01

    Considering the female predominance in most of the autoimmune disorders that associate with the PTPN22 Trp620 variant and the complexity by which this variant influences immunologic tolerance, the objective of this study was to ascertain if the allele-specific expression of the disease-associated...... variant Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Mar...

  4. Estimating the probability of allelic drop-out of STR alleles in forensic genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Mogensen, Helle Smidt;

    2009-01-01

    In crime cases with available DNA evidence, the amount of DNA is often sparse due to the setting of the crime. In such cases, allelic drop-out of one or more true alleles in STR typing is possible. We present a statistical model for estimating the per locus and overall probability of allelic drop......-out using the results of all STR loci in the case sample as reference. The methodology of logistic regression is appropriate for this analysis, and we demonstrate how to incorporate this in a forensic genetic framework....

  5. HLA-B27 allele frequency in Sri Lankan patients with spondyloarthritides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidnapillai, S; Sirisena, N D; Dissanayake, V H

    2016-06-01

    This preliminary study aims to describe the HLA-B27 allele frequency in Sri Lankan patients with spondyloarthritides (SA). An anonymised database of 373 Sri Lankan patients with SA referred for HLA-B27 testing was retrospectively analysed. Eighty five (22.8%) patients were positive for the HLA-B27 allele. A male preponderance was observed among the positives. The HLA-B27 allele frequency in this sample of patients with SA was relatively low compared to published studies in other populations. Further research is needed to identify the predominant subtypes of the allele to determine which subtypes are the most prevalent in a larger sample of Sri Lankan patients with SA, and to define their association with the specific types of SA. PMID:27423748

  6. Evidence for a genetic association between alleles of monoamine oxidase A gene and bipolar affective disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, L.C.C.; Sham, P.; Castle, D. [Institute of Psychiatry, London (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-08-14

    We present evidence of a genetic association between bipolar disorder and alleles at 3 monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) markers, but not with alleles of a monoamine oxidase B (MAOB) polymorphism. The 3 MAOA markers, including one associated with low MAOA activity, show strong allelic association with each other but surprisingly not with MAOB. Our results are significantly only for females, though the number of males in our sample is too small to draw any definite conclusions. Our data is consistent with recent reports of reduced MAOA activity in patients with abnormal behavioral phenotypes. The strength of the association is weak, but significant, which suggests that alleles at the MAOA locus contribute to susceptibility to bipolar disorder rather than being a major determinant. 58 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  7. Genetic heterogeneity within electrophoretic "alleles" of xanthine dehydrogenase in Drosophila pseudoobscura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R S; Lewontin, R C; Felton, A A

    1976-11-01

    An experimental plan for an exhaustive determination of genic variation at structural gene loci is presented. In the initial steps of this program, 146 isochromosomal lines from 12 geographic populations of D. pseudoobscura were examined for allelic variation of xanthine dehydrogenase by the serial use of 4 different electrophoretic conditions and a head stability test. The 5 criteria revealed a total of 37 allelic classes out of the 146 genomes examined where only 6 had been previously revealed by the usual method of gel electrophoresis. This immense increase in genic variation also showed previously unsuspected population differences between the main part of the species distribution and the isolated population of Bogotá population. The average heterozygosity at the Xdh locus is at least 72% in natural populations. This result, together with the very large number of alleles segregating and the pattern of allelic frequencies, has implications for theories of genetic polymorphism which are discussed.

  8. Allelic variations in Glu-1 and Glu-3 loci of historical and modern Iranian bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ali Izadi-Darbandi; Bahman Yazdi-Samadi; Ali-Akbar Su-Boushehri; Mohsen Mohammadi

    2010-08-01

    Proline and glutamine-rich wheat seed endosperm proteins are collectively referred to as prolamins. They are comprised of HMW-GSs, LMW-GSs and gliadins. HMW-GSs are major determinants of gluten elasticity and LMW-GSs considerably affect dough extensibility and maximum dough resistance. The inheritance of glutenin subunits follows Mendelian genetics with multiple alleles in each locus. Identification of the banding patterns of glutenin subunits could be used as an estimate for screening high quality wheat germplasm. Here, by means of a two-step 1D-SDS-PAGE procedure, we identified the allelic variations in high and low-molecular-weight glutenin subunits in 65 hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars representing a historical trend in the cultivars introduced or released in Iran from the years 1940 to 1990. Distinct alleles 17 and 19 were detected for Glu-1 and Glu-3 loci, respectively. The allelic frequencies at the Glu-1 loci demonstrated unimodal distributions. At Glu-A1, Glu-B1 and Glu-D1, we found that the most frequent alleles were the null, 7 + 8, 2 + 12 alleles, respectively, in Iranian wheat cultivars. In contrast, Glu-3 loci showed bimodal or trimodal distributions. At Glu-A3, the most frequent alleles were c and e. At Glu-B3 the most frequent alleles were a, b and c. At Glu-D3 locus, the alleles b and a, were the most and the second most frequent alleles in Iranian wheat cultivars. This led to a significantly higher Nei coefficient of genetic variations in Glu-3 loci (0.756) as compared to Glu-1 loci (0.547). At Glu-3 loci, we observed relatively high quality alleles in Glu-A3 and Glu-D3 loci and low quality alleles at Glu-B3 locus.

  9. Allelic Diversity of MSP1 Gene in Plasmodium falciparum from Rural and Urban Areas of Gabon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawili-Mboumba, Denise Patricia; Mbondoukwe, Noé; Adande, Elvire; Bouyou-Akotet, Marielle Karine

    2015-08-01

    The present study determined and compared the genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum strains infecting children living in 2 areas from Gabon with different malaria endemicity. Blood samples were collected from febrile children from 2008 to 2009 in 2 health centres from rural (Oyem) and urban (Owendo) areas. Genetic diversity was determined in P. falciparum isolates by analyzing the merozoite surface protein-1 (msp1) gene polymorphism using nested-PCR. Overall, 168 children with mild falciparum malaria were included. K1, Ro33, and Mad20 alleles were found in 110 (65.5%), 94 (55.9%), and 35 (20.8%) isolates, respectively, without difference according to the site (P>0.05). Allelic families' frequencies were comparable between children less than 5 years old from the 2 sites; while among the older children the proportions of Ro33 and Mad20 alleles were 1.7 to 2.0 fold higher at Oyem. Thirty-three different alleles were detected, 16 (48.5%) were common to both sites, and 10 out of the 17 specific alleles were found at Oyem. Furthermore, multiple infection carriers were frequent at Oyem (57.7% vs 42.2% at Owendo; P=0.04) where the complexity of infection was of 1.88 (±0.95) higher compared to that found at Owendo (1.55±0.75). Extended genetic diversity of P. falciparum strains infecting Gabonese symptomatic children and high multiplicity of infections were observed in rural area. Alleles common to the 2 sites were frequent; the site-specific alleles predominated in the rural area. Such distribution of the alleles should be taken into accounts when designing MSP1 or MSP2 malaria vaccine.

  10. The impact of library preparation protocols on the consistency of allele frequency estimates in Pool-Seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofler, Robert; Nolte, Viola; Schlötterer, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing pools of individuals (Pool-Seq) is a cost-effective method to determine genome-wide allele frequency estimates. Given the importance of meta-analyses combining data sets, we determined the influence of different genomic library preparation protocols on the consistency of allele frequency estimates. We found that typically no more than 1% of the variation in allele frequency estimates could be attributed to differences in library preparation. Also read length had only a minor effect on the consistency of allele frequency estimates. By far, the most pronounced influence could be attributed to sequence coverage. Increasing the coverage from 30- to 50-fold improved the consistency of allele frequency estimates by at least 27%. We conclude that Pool-Seq data can be easily combined across different library preparation methods, but sufficient sequence coverage is key to reliable results.

  11. Microsatellite allele frequencies in humans and chimpanzees, with implications for constraints on allele size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, J C; Slatkin, M; Freimer, N B

    1995-07-01

    The distributions of allele sizes at eight simple-sequence repeat (SSR) or microsatellite loci in chimpanzees are found and compared with the distributions previously obtained from several human populations. At several loci, the differences in average allele size between chimpanzees and humans are sufficiently small that there might be a constraint on the evolution of average allele size. Furthermore, a model that allows for a bias in the mutation process shows that for some loci a weak bias can account for the observations. Several alleles at one of the loci (Mfd 59) were sequenced. Differences between alleles of different lengths were found to be more complex than previously assumed. An 8-base-pair deletion was present in the nonvariable region of the chimpanzee locus. This locus contains a previously unrecognized repeated region, which is imperfect in humans and perfect in chimpanzees. The apparently greater opportunity for mutation conferred by the two perfect repeat regions in chimpanzees is reflected in the higher variance in repeat number at Mfd 59 in chimpanzees than in humans. These data indicate that interspecific differences in allele length are not always attributable to simple changes in the number of repeats. PMID:7659015

  12. Estimation of allele frequencies for VNTR loci.

    OpenAIRE

    Devlin, B; Risch, N; Roeder, K

    1991-01-01

    VNTR loci provide valuable information for a number of fields of study involving human genetics, ranging from forensics (DNA fingerprinting and paternity testing) to linkage analysis and population genetics. Alleles of a VNTR locus are simply fragments obtained from a particular portion of the DNA molecule and are defined in terms of their length. The essential element of a VNTR fragment is the repeat, which is a short sequence of basepairs. The core of the fragment is composed of a variable ...

  13. Tumor transcriptome sequencing reveals allelic expression imbalances associated with copy number alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuch, Brian B; Laborde, Rebecca R; Xu, Xing; Gu, Jian; Chung, Christina B; Monighetti, Cinna K; Stanley, Sarah J; Olsen, Kerry D; Kasperbauer, Jan L; Moore, Eric J; Broomer, Adam J; Tan, Ruoying; Brzoska, Pius M; Muller, Matthew W; Siddiqui, Asim S; Asmann, Yan W; Sun, Yongming; Kuersten, Scott; Barker, Melissa A; De La Vega, Francisco M; Smith, David I

    2010-02-19

    Due to growing throughput and shrinking cost, massively parallel sequencing is rapidly becoming an attractive alternative to microarrays for the genome-wide study of gene expression and copy number alterations in primary tumors. The sequencing of transcripts (RNA-Seq) should offer several advantages over microarray-based methods, including the ability to detect somatic mutations and accurately measure allele-specific expression. To investigate these advantages we have applied a novel, strand-specific RNA-Seq method to tumors and matched normal tissue from three patients with oral squamous cell carcinomas. Additionally, to better understand the genomic determinants of the gene expression changes observed, we have sequenced the tumor and normal genomes of one of these patients. We demonstrate here that our RNA-Seq method accurately measures allelic imbalance and that measurement on the genome-wide scale yields novel insights into cancer etiology. As expected, the set of genes differentially expressed in the tumors is enriched for cell adhesion and differentiation functions, but, unexpectedly, the set of allelically imbalanced genes is also enriched for these same cancer-related functions. By comparing the transcriptomic perturbations observed in one patient to his underlying normal and tumor genomes, we find that allelic imbalance in the tumor is associated with copy number mutations and that copy number mutations are, in turn, strongly associated with changes in transcript abundance. These results support a model in which allele-specific deletions and duplications drive allele-specific changes in gene expression in the developing tumor.

  14. Analysis of FBN1 allele expression by dermal fibroblasts from Marfan syndrome patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putman, E.A.; Cao, S.N.; Milewicz, D.M. [Univ. of Texas Medical School, Houston, TX (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Screening for mutations in the FBN1 cDNA from Marfan patient cell strains has detected mutations in only 10-15% of patients. In an attempt to explain this poor detection rate, we examined FBN1 allele expression and fibrillin synthesis by 26 cell strains from Marfan patients. DNA from the patients and 10 controls was assessed for the presence of a polymorphic Rsa I restriction site in the 3{prime} untranslated region of the FBN1 gene. Twelve of 26 patient and 5 of 10 control DNAs were heterozygous. Fibroblast RNA from the heterozygous cell strains was reverse-transcribed and subsequently PCR amplified using a [{sup 32}P]-labelled primer, digested with Rsa I and analyzed. Although 3 samples showed no transcript from one allele by ethidium bromide staining, a Betagen scanner detected low levels (10-15%) of that allele. In addition, there was unequal expression of the two alleles in three other patients; for example, only 30% expression from one allele. The remaining patients and the controls had equal expression of each allele. Fibrillin protein synthesis by fibroblasts from these heterozygous patients was also examined. After a 30 minute pulse with [{sup 35}S]-cysteine, cell lysates were collected and proteins analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The amount of fibrillin produced relative to a reference protein was determined using a Betagen scanner. Fibrillin protein synthesis was reduced in 2 of the 3 patients with very low RNA production from one of the FBN1 alleles. All other Marfan and control cell strains showed normal amounts of fibrillin synthesized. The low expression levels from one allele may contribute to, but not fully account for, the low detection rate of FBN1 mutations. Interestingly, protein synthesis levels were not affected in 4 of 6 cell strains demonstrating low levels of RNA expression.

  15. A Novel Frequent BRCA1 Allele in Chinese Patients with Breast Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Dongxian; XIONG Wen; XU Hongxan; SHAO Chaopeng

    2006-01-01

    The whole length of exon 11 of BRCA1 was sequenced (total 3427 bp) in 59 patients and 10 healthy female blood donors. To allow a rapid determination of the different BRCA1 alleles, a sequence-specific primer PCR method (PCR-SSP) was established and was applied to 57 additional female donors. Finally, the full-length coding region of BRCA1 was analyzed through reversed-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) and cDNA sequencing (total 5554 bp) in one donor with wild-type allele and 2 patients with one or two mutated alleles. By genomic DNA sequencing, 5 homozygous polymorphisms were observed in 18 patients: 2201C>T, 2430T>C, 2731C>T, 3232A>G and 3667A>G. All of them were previously observed in Caucasians, Malay and Chinese, but for the first time the mutations were found in one allele (GenBank AY304547). Twenty-six patients and 4donors were heterozygous at these 5 nucleotide positions. The remaining 15 patients and 6 donors showed a sequence identical with the standard BRCA1 gene. Combined the PCR-SSP results and in a summary, 6 of 67 (9.0 %) healthy individuals were homozygous for the mutated allele, whereas 18 of 59 (30.5 %) breast cancer patients were homozygous. A Chi-square test showed a significant correlation between homozygous mutated BRCA1 allele and breast cancer. The cDNA sequencing showed that 2 additional mutations, 4427T>C in exon 13 and 4956A>G in exon 16, were found. A new BRCA1 allele, which is BRCA1-2201T/2430C/2731T/3232G/3667G/4427C/4956G (GenBank AY751490), was found in Chinese. And the homozygote of this mutated allele may implicate a disease-association in Chinese.

  16. Detection of allelic variations of human gene expression by polymerase colonies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikkilineni Venugopal

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantification of variations of human gene expression is complicated by the small differences between different alleles. Recent work has shown that variations do exist in the relative allelic expression levels in certain genes of heterozygous individuals. Herein, we describe the application of an immobilized polymerase chain reaction technique as an alternative approach to measure relative allelic differential expression. Results Herein, we report a novel assay, based on immobilized polymerase colonies, that accurately quantifies the relative expression levels of two alleles in a given sample. Mechanistically, this was accomplished by PCR amplifying a gene in a cDNA library in a thin polyacrylamide gel. By immobilizing the PCR, it is ensured that each transcript gives rise to only a single immobilized PCR colony, or "polony". Once polony amplified, the two alleles of the gene were differentially labeled by performing in situ sequencing with fluorescently labeled nucleotides. For these sets of experiments, silent single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were used to discriminate the two alleles. Finally, a simple count was then performed on the differentially labeled polonies in order to determine the relative expression levels of the two alleles. To validate this technique, the relative expression levels of PKD2 in a family of heterozygous patients bearing the 4208G/A SNP were examined and compared to the literature. Conclusions We were able to reproduce the results of allelic variation in gene expression using an accurate technology known as polymerase colonies. Therefore, we have demonstrated the utility of this method in human gene expression analysis.

  17. The protease inhibitor PI*S allele and COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersh, C P; Ly, N P; Berkey, C S;

    2005-01-01

    In many countries, the protease inhibitor (SERPINA1) PI*S allele is more common than PI*Z, the allele responsible for most cases of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) due to severe alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency. However, the risk of COPD due to the PI*S allele is not clear. The current...

  18. Dideoxy single allele-specific PCR - DSASP new method to discrimination allelic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonidas Moura Lima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer (GC is a multifactorial disease with a high mortality rate in Brazil and worldwide. This work aimed to evaluate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP rs1695, in the Glutathione S-Transferase Pi (GSTP1 gene in GC samples by comparative analysis Specific PCR - ASP and Dideoxy Single Allele-Specific PCR - DSASP methods. The DSASP is the proposed new method for allelic discrimination. This work analyzed 60 GC samples, 26 diffuse and 34 intestinal types. The SNP rs1695 of the GSTP1 gene was significantly associated with GC analyzed by DSASP method (χ2 = 9.7, P 0.05. These results suggest that the SNP rs1695 of the GSTP1 gene was a risk factor associated with gastric carcinogens is and the DSASP method was a new successfully low-cost strategy to study allelic discrimination.

  19. Borrowed alleles and convergence in serpentine adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Brian J; Lahner, Brett; DaCosta, Jeffrey M; Weisman, Caroline M; Hollister, Jesse D; Salt, David E; Bomblies, Kirsten; Yant, Levi

    2016-07-19

    Serpentine barrens represent extreme hazards for plant colonists. These sites are characterized by high porosity leading to drought, lack of essential mineral nutrients, and phytotoxic levels of metals. Nevertheless, nature forged populations adapted to these challenges. Here, we use a population-based evolutionary genomic approach coupled with elemental profiling to assess how autotetraploid Arabidopsis arenosa adapted to a multichallenge serpentine habitat in the Austrian Alps. We first demonstrate that serpentine-adapted plants exhibit dramatically altered elemental accumulation levels in common conditions, and then resequence 24 autotetraploid individuals from three populations to perform a genome scan. We find evidence for highly localized selective sweeps that point to a polygenic, multitrait basis for serpentine adaptation. Comparing our results to a previous study of independent serpentine colonizations in the closely related diploid Arabidopsis lyrata in the United Kingdom and United States, we find the highest levels of differentiation in 11 of the same loci, providing candidate alleles for mediating convergent evolution. This overlap between independent colonizations in different species suggests that a limited number of evolutionary strategies are suited to overcome the multiple challenges of serpentine adaptation. Interestingly, we detect footprints of selection in A. arenosa in the context of substantial gene flow from nearby off-serpentine populations of A. arenosa, as well as from A. lyrata In several cases, quantitative tests of introgression indicate that some alleles exhibiting strong selective sweep signatures appear to have been introgressed from A. lyrata This finding suggests that migrant alleles may have facilitated adaptation of A. arenosa to this multihazard environment. PMID:27357660

  20. Evidence that intragenic recombination contributes to allelic diversity of the S-RNase gene at the self-incompatibility (S) locus in Petunia inflata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Hughes, A L; Tsukamoto, T; Ando, T; Kao, T

    2001-02-01

    For Solanaceae type self-incompatibility, discrimination between self and nonself pollen by the pistil is controlled by the highly polymorphic S-RNase gene. To date, the mechanism generating the allelic diversity of this gene is largely unknown. Natural populations offer a good opportunity to address this question because they likely contain different alleles that share recent common progenitors. We identified 19 S haplotypes from a natural population of Petunia inflata in Argentina, used reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction to obtain cDNAs for 15 alleles of the S-RNase gene, and sequenced all the cDNAs. Phylogenetic studies revealed that five of these alleles and two previously identified alleles form a major clade, and that the 5' region of S(19) allele was derived from an ancestor allele closely related to S(2), whereas its 3' region was derived from an ancestor allele closely related to S(8). A similar evolutionary relationship was found among S(3), S(12), and S(15) alleles. These findings suggest that intragenic recombination contributed to the generation of the allelic diversity of the S-RNase gene. Two additional findings emerged from the sequence comparisons. First, the nucleotide sequence of the S(1) allele identified in this work is completely identical to that of the previously identified S(1) allele of a different origin. Second, in the two hypervariable regions HVa and HVb, thought to be involved in determining S allele specificity, S(6) and S(9) alleles differ only by four nucleotides, all in HVb, resulting in two amino acid differences. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:11161057

  1. Rapid detection of the CYP2A6*12 hybrid allele by Pyrosequencing® technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallagher Margaret L

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of CYP2A6 alleles associated with reduced enzyme activity is important in the study of inter-individual differences in drug metabolism. CYP2A6*12 is a hybrid allele that results from unequal crossover between CYP2A6 and CYP2A7 genes. The 5' regulatory region and exons 1–2 are derived from CYP2A7, and exons 3–9 are derived from CYP2A6. Conventional methods for detection of CYP2A6*12 consist of two-step PCR protocols that are laborious and unsuitable for high-throughput genotyping. We developed a rapid and accurate method to detect the CYP2A6*12 allele by Pyrosequencing technology. Methods A single set of PCR primers was designed to specifically amplify both the CYP2A6*1 wild-type allele and the CYP2A6*12 hybrid allele. An internal Pyrosequencing primer was used to generate allele-specific sequence information, which detected homozygous wild-type, heterozygous hybrid, and homozygous hybrid alleles. We first validated the assay on 104 DNA samples that were also genotyped by conventional two-step PCR and by cycle sequencing. CYP2A6*12 allele frequencies were then determined using the Pyrosequencing assay on 181 multi-ethnic DNA samples from subjects of African American, European Caucasian, Pacific Rim, and Hispanic descent. Finally, we streamlined the Pyrosequencing assay by integrating liquid handling robotics into the workflow. Results Pyrosequencing results demonstrated 100% concordance with conventional two-step PCR and cycle sequencing methods. Allele frequency data showed slightly higher prevalence of the CYP2A6*12 allele in European Caucasians and Hispanics. Conclusion This Pyrosequencing assay proved to be a simple, rapid, and accurate alternative to conventional methods, which can be easily adapted to the needs of higher-throughput studies.

  2. DQB1*06:02 allele-specific expression varies by allelic dosage, not narcolepsy status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiner Lachmi, Karin; Lin, Ling; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek;

    2012-01-01

    The association of narcolepsy-cataplexy, a sleep disorder caused by the loss of hypocretin/orexin neurons in the hypothalamus, with DQA1*01:02-DQB1*06:02 is one of the tightest known single-allele human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations. In this study, we explored genome-wide expression in per...

  3. HLA B27 allele types in homogeneous groups of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients in Latvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guseinova Dinara

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is a heterogeneous condition and therapeutic strategies vary in different JIA types. The routinely accepted practice to start with Sulphasalazine (SS as the first line treatment in patients with HLA B27 positive JIA proves to be ineffective in a large proportion of children. Objective to investigate HLA B27 positive JIA patients clinical characteristics, determined HLA B27 allele types and their connection with antirheumatic treatment in homogenous patient groups. Materials and methods 56 patients diagnosed with JIA and observed over the period 2006 to 2009 included in the study. HLAB27 allele types were determined using PCR method. Results In HLA B27 positive JIA patients mean disease onset was 12.34 ± 3.3 years. Most common (44% JIA type was enthesitis related arthritis. Positive response to the treatment with SS was found in 32% of patients, Methotrexate (MTX - in 43%, combined treatment - SS with MTX was effective in 12.5%. 12.5% of patients required combination MTX with Enbrel. Eight HLA B27 allele types were found in JIA patients in Latvia: *2702, *2703, *2704, *2705, *2710, *2715, *2717, *2728. The most common was *2705 - in 55% of cases. Among all the patients enthesitis related arthritis most commonly occurred in patients with HLAB*2705 allele (OR = 2.01, p Conclusions There are 8 different HLA B27 alleles in JIA patients in Latvia and the most common is *2705, but in order to assert them to be disease associated alleles, more extensive studies are needed, including control group of HLA B27 positive healthy individuals. Standard treatment approach with SS proves to be unsatisfactory in the majority of JIA patients. To improve children's quality of life achieving rapid disease control, the first line treatment in HLA B27 positive patients should be MTX. In order to start with the most appropriate drug it is necessary to determine HLAB 27 type at the onset of disease.

  4. Accounting for genotype uncertainty in the estimation of allele frequencies in autopolyploids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blischak, Paul D; Kubatko, Laura S; Wolfe, Andrea D

    2016-05-01

    Despite the increasing opportunity to collect large-scale data sets for population genomic analyses, the use of high-throughput sequencing to study populations of polyploids has seen little application. This is due in large part to problems associated with determining allele copy number in the genotypes of polyploid individuals (allelic dosage uncertainty-ADU), which complicates the calculation of important quantities such as allele frequencies. Here, we describe a statistical model to estimate biallelic SNP frequencies in a population of autopolyploids using high-throughput sequencing data in the form of read counts. We bridge the gap from data collection (using restriction enzyme based techniques [e.g. GBS, RADseq]) to allele frequency estimation in a unified inferential framework using a hierarchical Bayesian model to sum over genotype uncertainty. Simulated data sets were generated under various conditions for tetraploid, hexaploid and octoploid populations to evaluate the model's performance and to help guide the collection of empirical data. We also provide an implementation of our model in the R package polyfreqs and demonstrate its use with two example analyses that investigate (i) levels of expected and observed heterozygosity and (ii) model adequacy. Our simulations show that the number of individuals sampled from a population has a greater impact on estimation error than sequencing coverage. The example analyses also show that our model and software can be used to make inferences beyond the estimation of allele frequencies for autopolyploids by providing assessments of model adequacy and estimates of heterozygosity.

  5. Allele-specific copy number profiling by next-generation DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Bell, John M; Zavala, Nicolas A; Ji, Hanlee P; Zhang, Nancy R

    2015-02-27

    The progression and clonal development of tumors often involve amplifications and deletions of genomic DNA. Estimation of allele-specific copy number, which quantifies the number of copies of each allele at each variant loci rather than the total number of chromosome copies, is an important step in the characterization of tumor genomes and the inference of their clonal history. We describe a new method, falcon, for finding somatic allele-specific copy number changes by next generation sequencing of tumors with matched normals. falcon is based on a change-point model on a bivariate mixed Binomial process, which explicitly models the copy numbers of the two chromosome haplotypes and corrects for local allele-specific coverage biases. By using the Binomial distribution rather than a normal approximation, falcon more effectively pools evidence from sites with low coverage. A modified Bayesian information criterion is used to guide model selection for determining the number of copy number events. Falcon is evaluated on in silico spike-in data and applied to the analysis of a pre-malignant colon tumor sample and late-stage colorectal adenocarcinoma from the same individual. The allele-specific copy number estimates obtained by falcon allows us to draw detailed conclusions regarding the clonal history of the individual's colon cancer. PMID:25477383

  6. GENETIC STRUCTURE AND ALLEL DIVERSITY OF THREE BALINESE GENERATIONS BASED ON FIVE AUTOSOMAL MICROSATELLITE DNA LOCI

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    Ayu Saka Laksmita

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This research was aimed to find out the genetic structures of three generations of Balinese population, in order to determine the best loci used for paternity testing among this population, and observed the mutation rate of these loci. The DNA samples were taken from the epithelium cell of 25 families which were collected from the children, father, mother, grandfather and grandmother of the children, from both mother and father sides (family with three generations. The DNA was extracted in Phenol-Chloroform method with modifications. DNA amplification was conducted in PCR method using pairs of primer 5, namely: FGA, D18S51, D2S1338, TPOX, and D16S539, and its products were electrophoresed and visualized in 10% of PAGE, stained in silver nitrate. The genetic structures of the three family generations showed 30 variants with different frequencies in each locus. The highest heterozygosity value was detected in FGA (8 alleles, then followed by D18S51 (7 alleles, TPOX (6 alleles, D16S539 (5 alleles, and the lowest was in D2S1338 (4 alleles. The highest value of heterozigosity and Power of Discrimination were found in FGA, followed by TPOX, D18S51, D2S1338, and the lowest was in D16S539. Therefore, it can be concluded that out of five loci tested, 4 of them can be recommended to be used for paternity testing of Balinese population, except D16S539

  7. SNPsplit: Allele-specific splitting of alignments between genomes with known SNP genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Felix; Andrews, Simon R

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing reads overlapping polymorphic sites in diploid mammalian genomes may be assigned to one allele or the other. This holds the potential to detect gene expression, chromatin modifications, DNA methylation or nuclear interactions in an allele-specific fashion. SNPsplit is an allele-specific alignment sorter designed to read files in SAM/BAM format and determine the allelic origin of reads or read-pairs that cover known single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP) positions. For this to work libraries must have been aligned to a genome in which all known SNP positions were masked with the ambiguity base 'N' and aligned using a suitable mapping program such as Bowtie2, TopHat, STAR, HISAT2, HiCUP or Bismark. SNPsplit also provides an automated solution to generate N-masked reference genomes for hybrid mouse strains based on the variant call information provided by the Mouse Genomes Project. The unique ability of SNPsplit to work with various different kinds of sequencing data including RNA-Seq, ChIP-Seq, Bisulfite-Seq or Hi-C opens new avenues for the integrative exploration of allele-specific data. PMID:27429743

  8. Composition and functional analysis of low-molecular-weight glutenin alleles with Aroona near-isogenic lines of bread wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xiaofei

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (LMW-GS strongly influence the bread-making quality of bread wheat. These proteins are encoded by a multi-gene family located at the Glu-A3, Glu-B3 and Glu-D3 loci on the short arms of homoeologous group 1 chromosomes, and show high allelic variation. To characterize the genetic and protein compositions of LMW-GS alleles, we investigated 16 Aroona near-isogenic lines (NILs using SDS-PAGE, 2D-PAGE and the LMW-GS gene marker system. Moreover, the composition of glutenin macro-polymers, dough properties and pan bread quality parameters were determined for functional analysis of LMW-GS alleles in the NILs. Results Using the LMW-GS gene marker system, 14–20 LMW-GS genes were identified in individual NILs. At the Glu-A3 locus, two m-type and 2–4 i-type genes were identified and their allelic variants showed high polymorphisms in length and nucleotide sequences. The Glu-A3d allele possessed three active genes, the highest number among Glu-A3 alleles. At the Glu-B3 locus, 2–3 m-type and 1–3 s-type genes were identified from individual NILs. Based on the different compositions of s-type genes, Glu-B3 alleles were divided into two groups, one containing Glu-B3a, B3b, B3f and B3g, and the other comprising Glu-B3c, B3d, B3h and B3i. Eight conserved genes were identified among Glu-D3 alleles, except for Glu-D3f. The protein products of the unique active genes in each NIL were detected using protein electrophoresis. Among Glu-3 alleles, the Glu-A3e genotype without i-type LMW-GS performed worst in almost all quality properties. Glu-B3b, B3g and B3i showed better quality parameters than the other Glu-B3 alleles, whereas the Glu-B3c allele containing s-type genes with low expression levels had an inferior effect on bread-making quality. Due to the conserved genes at Glu-D3 locus, Glu-D3 alleles showed no significant differences in effects on all quality parameters. Conclusions This work

  9. Substrate specificity of allelic variants of the TAP peptide transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heemels, M T; Ploegh, H L

    1994-12-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) translocates peptides from the cytosol into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). An important determinant for the specificity of translocation is the identity of the C-terminal residue of the peptide substrate. In the rat, a suitable C terminus is necessary but not always sufficient for a peptide to be selected for translocation. Here we show that sequence constraints within a peptide of optimal length (9 residues) may interfere with transport; that the transporter selectively translocates shorter derivatives of a 16-mer peptide rather than the 16-mer itself; and that the transporter cimb allele, which is most selective in the C termini it will tolerate, is more relaxed in peptide length preference than is the clma variant.

  10. Substrate specificity of allelic variants of the TAP peptide transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heemels, M T; Ploegh, H L

    1994-12-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) translocates peptides from the cytosol into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). An important determinant for the specificity of translocation is the identity of the C-terminal residue of the peptide substrate. In the rat, a suitable C terminus is necessary but not always sufficient for a peptide to be selected for translocation. Here we show that sequence constraints within a peptide of optimal length (9 residues) may interfere with transport; that the transporter selectively translocates shorter derivatives of a 16-mer peptide rather than the 16-mer itself; and that the transporter cimb allele, which is most selective in the C termini it will tolerate, is more relaxed in peptide length preference than is the clma variant. PMID:7895166

  11. Microsatellite D21D210 (GT-12) allele frequencies in sporadic Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four disease-causing mutations have so far been described in the amyloid precursor protein gene on chromosome 21 in familial early-onset Alzheimer's disease. Linkage analysis with a fourteen-allele microsatellite at D21S210 named GT-12 has proven useful in the elucidation of amyloid presursor protein gene involvement in Alzheimer's disease families, as it is closely linked to the gene. Most cases of Alzheimer's disease are thought to be sporadic and not familial. However, evidence from earlier studies suggests an important genetic contribution also in sporadic cases, where gene-environment interaction may contribute to the disease. We have determined frequencies of the GT-12 alleles in 78 Swedish and 49 British sporadic Alzheimer's disease cases and 104 healthy elderly control subjects, to investigate if the disease associates with a particular genotype in GT-12. However, no differences in allele frequencies were observed between any of the groups. (au) (26 refs.)

  12. SNP GENOTYPING BY TAQMAN ALLELE DISCRIMINATION TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian Negura

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most frequent neoplasm in women worldwide and the principal cause of deaths by cancer, the majority being by metastatic disease. About half of breast tumors are hormone dependent, and in post-menopause women the preferred first line treatment uses third generation aromatase inhibitors. Aromatase is encoded by CYP19 gene on 15q21.1, and there is strong evidence that mutations in this gene affect its expression, with directconsequences on cancer phenotype and response to treatment. Several single nucleotide polymorphisms have beenstudied on CYP19A1 transcription variant, notably rs727479, rs10046, rs4646 and rs700518. We implemented a Taqman-based allele discrimination assay for the rapid investigation of the 4 SNPs in CYP19A1. We genotyped 22 metastaticbreast cancer patients by the technique described.

  13. The effect of wild card designations and rare alleles in forensic DNA database searches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Bright, Jo-Anne; Buckleton, John S;

    2015-01-01

    not correspond to any marker in the allelic ladder or appear above or below the extent of the allelic ladder range are assigned the allele designation R for rare allele. R alleles are position specific with respect to the observed/unambiguous allele. The F and R designations are made when the exact genotype has...

  14. Cytochrome P450 2D6 variants in a Caucasian population: Allele frequencies and phenotypic consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachse, C.; Brockmoeller, J.; Bauer, S.; Roots, I. [Humboldt Univ., Berlin (Germany)

    1997-02-01

    Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) metabolizes many important drugs. CYP2D6 activity ranges from complete deficiency to ultrafast metabolism, depending on at least 16 different known alleles. Their frequencies were determined in 589 unrelated German volunteers and correlated with enzyme activity measured by phenotyping with dextromethorphan or debrisoquine. For genotyping, nested PCR-RFLP tests from a PCR amplificate of the entire CYP2D6 gene were developed. The frequency of the CYP2D6*1 allele coding for extensive metabolizer (EM) phenotype was .364. The alleles coding for slightly (CYP2D6*2) or moderately (*9 and *10) reduced activity (intermediate metabolizer phenotype [IM]) showed frequencies of .324, .018, and .015, respectively. By use of novel PCR tests for discrimination, CYP2D6 gene duplication alleles were found with frequencies of.005 (*1 x 2), .013 (* 2 x 2), and .001 (*4 x 2). Frequencies of alleles with complete deficiency (poor metabolizer phenotype [PM]) were .207 (*4), .020 (*3 and *5), .009 (*6), and .001 (*7, *15, and *16). The defective CYP2D6 alleles *8, *11, *12, *13, and *14 were not found. All 41 PMs (7.0%) in this sample were explained by five mutations detected by four PCR-RFLP tests, which may suffice, together with the gene duplication test, for clinical prediction of CYP2D6 capacity. Three novel variants of known CYP2D6 alleles were discovered: *1C (T{sub 1957}C), *2B (additional C{sub 2558}T), and *4E (additional C{sub 2938}T). Analysis of variance showed significant differences in enzymatic activity measured by the dextromethorphan metabolic ratio (MR) between carriers of EN/PM (mean MR = .006) and IM/PM (mean MR = .014) alleles and between carriers of one (mean MR = .009) and two (mean MR = .003) functional alleles. The results of this study provide a solid basis for prediction of CYP2D6 capacity, as required in drug research and routine drug treatment. 35 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Nomenclature for human CYP2D6 alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, A K; Brockmöller, J; Broly, F; Eichelbaum, M; Evans, W E; Gonzalez, F J; Huang, J D; Idle, J R; Ingelman-Sundberg, M; Ishizaki, T; Jacqz-Aigrain, E; Meyer, U A; Nebert, D W; Steen, V M; Wolf, C R; Zanger, U M

    1996-06-01

    To standardize CYP2D6 allele nomenclature, and to conform with international human gene nomenclature guidelines, an alternative to the current arbitrary system is described. Based on recommendations for human genome nomenclature, we propose that alleles be designated by CYP2D6 followed by an asterisk and a combination of roman letters and arabic numerals distinct for each allele with the number specifying the key mutation and, where appropriate, a letter specifying additional mutations. Criteria for classification as a separate allele and protein nomenclature are also presented. PMID:8807658

  16. SEQUENCE OF THE STRUCTURAL GENE FOR GRANULE-BOUND STARCH SYNTHASE OF POTATO (SOLANUM-TUBEROSUM L) AND EVIDENCE FOR A SINGLE POINT DELETION IN THE AMF ALLELE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Leij, Feike R.; VISSER, RGF; Ponstein, Anne S.; Jacobsen, Evert; Feenstra, Willem

    1991-01-01

    The genomic sequence of the potato gene for starch granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS; "waxy protein") has been determined for the wild-type allele of a monoploid genotype from which an amylose-free (amf) mutant was derived, and for the mutant part of the amf allele. Comparison of the wild-type seq

  17. Identification of Multiple Alleles at the Wx Locus and Development of Single Segment Substitution Lines for the Alleles in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Rui-zhen; ZHANG Ze-min; HE Feng-hua; XI Zhang-ying; Akshay TALUKDAR; SHI Jun-qiong; QIN Li-jun; HUANG Chao-feng; ZHANG Gui-quan

    2006-01-01

    The microsatellite markers 484/485 and 484/W2R were used to identify the multiple alleles at the Wx locus in rice germplasm. Fifteen alleles were identified in 278 accessions by using microsatellite class and G-T polymorphism. Among these alleles, (CT)12-G, (CT)15-G, (CT)16-G, (CT)17-G, (CT)18-G and (CT)21-G have not been reported. Seventy-two single-segment substitution lines (SSSLs) carrying different alleles at the Wx locus were developed by using Huajingxian 74 with the (CT)11-G allele as a recipient and 20 accessions containing 12 different alleles at the Wx locus as donors. The estimated length of the substituted segments ranged from 2.2 to 77.3 cM with an average of 17.4 cM.

  18. Detection of Clonal and Subclonal Copy-Number Variants in Cell-Free DNA from Patients with Breast Cancer Using a Massively Multiplexed PCR Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eser Kirkizlar

    2015-10-01

    Using an in vitro model of cell-free DNA, we show that mmPCR-NGS can accurately detect CNVs with average allelic imbalances as low as 0.5%, an improvement over previously reported whole-genome sequencing approaches. Our method revealed differences in the spectrum of CNVs detected in tumor tissue subsections and matching plasma samples from 11 patients with stage II breast cancer. Moreover, we showed that liquid biopsies are able to detect subclonal mutations that may be missed in tumor tissue biopsies. We anticipate that this mmPCR-NGS methodology will have broad applicability for the characterization, diagnosis, and therapeutic monitoring of CNV-enriched cancers, such as breast, ovarian, and lung cancer.

  19. Characterization of new allele influencing flowering time in bread wheat introgressed from Triticum militinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivaničová, Zuzana; Jakobson, Irena; Reis, Diana; Šafář, Jan; Milec, Zbyněk; Abrouk, Michael; Doležel, Jaroslav; Järve, Kadri; Valárik, Miroslav

    2016-09-25

    Flowering time variation was identified within a mapping population of doubled haploid lines developed from a cross between the introgressive line 8.1 and spring bread wheat cv. Tähti. The line 8.1 carried introgressions from tetraploid Triticum militinae in the cv. Tähti genetic background on chromosomes 1A, 2A, 4A, 5A, 7A, 1B and 5B. The most significant QTL for the flowering time variation was identified within the introgressed region on chromosome 5A and its largest effect was associated with the VRN-A1 locus, accounting for up to 70% of phenotypic variance. The allele of T. militinae origin was designated as VRN-A1f-like. The effect of the VRN-A1f-like allele was verified in two other mapping populations. QTL analysis identified that in cv. Tähti and cv. Mooni genetic background, VRN-A1f-like allele incurred a delay of 1.9-18.6 days in flowering time, depending on growing conditions. Sequence comparison of the VRN-A1f-like and VRN-A1a alleles from the parental lines of the mapping populations revealed major mutations in the promoter region as well as in the first intron, including insertion of a MITE element and a large deletion. The sequence variation allowed construction of specific diagnostic PCR markers for VRN-A1f-like allele determination. Identification and quantification of the effect of the VRN-A1f-like allele offers a useful tool for wheat breeding and for studying fine-scale regulation of flowering pathways in wheat. PMID:26899284

  20. RANTES In1.1C allele polymorphisms in 13 Chinese ethnic populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Yuan; SUN Hao; CHU Jia-you

    2009-01-01

    Background The In1.1C single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) allele results in reduced RANTES transcription, which is associated with increased frequency of HIV-1 infection, and rapid progression to AIDS among HIV-1-infected individuals. This study aimed to study the mutant frequency and polymorphism of RANTES in Chinese populations.Methods The genotypes of RANTES In1.1C were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) with the digestion of restriction endonuclease Mbo Ⅱ.Results Of the 617 individuals, 290 (47%) were carriers of the RANTES In1.1C allele, 52 of whom were homozygotes,whereas 238 were heterozygotes. The frequency of the RANTES In1.1C allele in those tested individuals was 0.2840.The frequencies of Inl.lC allele vaded from 0.07-0.27 in most of the populations in South-west China except for the two Lisu populations, while the frequencies of In1.1C spans from 0.35 to 0.45 in North-west China. The prevalence of the allele varied substantially between the South-west groups and North-west groups (X2=7.838, P=0.006).Conclusions The prevalence of the RANTES In1.1C allele varies substantially between the South-west groups and North-west groups. There is no significant difference between the groups with different languages, which suggests that language relationship is not consistent with the genetic relationship. These results have important implications for the design, assessment, and implementation of HIV-1 vaccines.

  1. Tumor transcriptome sequencing reveals allelic expression imbalances associated with copy number alterations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian B Tuch

    Full Text Available Due to growing throughput and shrinking cost, massively parallel sequencing is rapidly becoming an attractive alternative to microarrays for the genome-wide study of gene expression and copy number alterations in primary tumors. The sequencing of transcripts (RNA-Seq should offer several advantages over microarray-based methods, including the ability to detect somatic mutations and accurately measure allele-specific expression. To investigate these advantages we have applied a novel, strand-specific RNA-Seq method to tumors and matched normal tissue from three patients with oral squamous cell carcinomas. Additionally, to better understand the genomic determinants of the gene expression changes observed, we have sequenced the tumor and normal genomes of one of these patients. We demonstrate here that our RNA-Seq method accurately measures allelic imbalance and that measurement on the genome-wide scale yields novel insights into cancer etiology. As expected, the set of genes differentially expressed in the tumors is enriched for cell adhesion and differentiation functions, but, unexpectedly, the set of allelically imbalanced genes is also enriched for these same cancer-related functions. By comparing the transcriptomic perturbations observed in one patient to his underlying normal and tumor genomes, we find that allelic imbalance in the tumor is associated with copy number mutations and that copy number mutations are, in turn, strongly associated with changes in transcript abundance. These results support a model in which allele-specific deletions and duplications drive allele-specific changes in gene expression in the developing tumor.

  2. Allelic differences in a vacuolar invertase affect Arabidopsis growth at early plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leskow, Carla Coluccio; Kamenetzky, Laura; Dominguez, Pia Guadalupe; Díaz Zirpolo, José Antonio; Obata, Toshihiro; Costa, Hernán; Martí, Marcelo; Taboga, Oscar; Keurentjes, Joost; Sulpice, Ronan; Ishihara, Hirofumi; Stitt, Mark; Fernie, Alisdair Robert; Carrari, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    Improving carbon fixation in order to enhance crop yield is a major goal in plant sciences. By quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping, it has been demonstrated that a vacuolar invertase (vac-Inv) plays a key role in determining the radical length in Arabidopsis. In this model, variation in vac-Inv activity was detected in a near isogenic line (NIL) population derived from a cross between two divergent accessions: Landsberg erecta (Ler) and Cape Verde Island (CVI), with the CVI allele conferring both higher Inv activity and longer radicles. The aim of the current work is to understand the mechanism(s) underlying this QTL by analyzing structural and functional differences of vac-Inv from both accessions. Relative transcript abundance analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) showed similar expression patterns in both accessions; however, DNA sequence analyses revealed several polymorphisms that lead to changes in the corresponding protein sequence. Moreover, activity assays revealed higher vac-Inv activity in genotypes carrying the CVI allele than in those carrying the Ler allele. Analyses of purified recombinant proteins showed a similar K m for both alleles and a slightly higher V max for that of Ler. Treatment of plant extracts with foaming to release possible interacting Inv inhibitory protein(s) led to a large increase in activity for the Ler allele, but no changes for genotypes carrying the CVI allele. qRT-PCR analyses of two vac-Inv inhibitors in seedlings from parental and NIL genotypes revealed different expression patterns. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the vac-Inv QTL affects root biomass accumulation and also carbon partitioning through a differential regulation of vac-Inv inhibitors at the mRNA level. PMID:27194734

  3. HIV-1 disease-influencing effects associated with ZNRD1, HCP5 and HLA-C alleles are attributable mainly to either HLA-A10 or HLA-B*57 alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Catano

    specifically demonstrate that the influence of ZNRD1 alleles on disease progression rates are attributable to HLA-A10, help clarify the relationship between the HCP5, HLA-C and HLA-B*57 alleles, and reaffirm a critical role of HLA-B*57 alleles in HIV disease. Furthermore, as the protective B*57-containing genotypes convey striking salutary effects independent of their strong impact on viral control, it is conceivable that T cell-based therapeutic vaccine strategies aimed at reducing viral loads may be inadequate for limiting AIDS progression, raising the potential need for complementary strategies that target viral load-independent determinants of pathogenesis.

  4. Tensor GSVD of patient- and platform-matched tumor and normal DNA copy-number profiles uncovers chromosome arm-wide patterns of tumor-exclusive platform-consistent alterations encoding for cell transformation and predicting ovarian cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, Preethi; Schomay, Theodore E; Aiello, Katherine A; Alter, Orly

    2015-01-01

    The number of large-scale high-dimensional datasets recording different aspects of a single disease is growing, accompanied by a need for frameworks that can create one coherent model from multiple tensors of matched columns, e.g., patients and platforms, but independent rows, e.g., probes. We define and prove the mathematical properties of a novel tensor generalized singular value decomposition (GSVD), which can simultaneously find the similarities and dissimilarities, i.e., patterns of varying relative significance, between any two such tensors. We demonstrate the tensor GSVD in comparative modeling of patient- and platform-matched but probe-independent ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma (OV) tumor, mostly high-grade, and normal DNA copy-number profiles, across each chromosome arm, and combination of two arms, separately. The modeling uncovers previously unrecognized patterns of tumor-exclusive platform-consistent co-occurring copy-number alterations (CNAs). We find, first, and validate that each of the patterns across only 7p and Xq, and the combination of 6p+12p, is correlated with a patient's prognosis, is independent of the tumor's stage, the best predictor of OV survival to date, and together with stage makes a better predictor than stage alone. Second, these patterns include most known OV-associated CNAs that map to these chromosome arms, as well as several previously unreported, yet frequent focal CNAs. Third, differential mRNA, microRNA, and protein expression consistently map to the DNA CNAs. A coherent picture emerges for each pattern, suggesting roles for the CNAs in OV pathogenesis and personalized therapy. In 6p+12p, deletion of the p21-encoding CDKN1A and p38-encoding MAPK14 and amplification of RAD51AP1 and KRAS encode for human cell transformation, and are correlated with a cell's immortality, and a patient's shorter survival time. In 7p, RPA3 deletion and POLD2 amplification are correlated with DNA stability, and a longer survival. In Xq, PABPC5

  5. Tensor GSVD of patient- and platform-matched tumor and normal DNA copy-number profiles uncovers chromosome arm-wide patterns of tumor-exclusive platform-consistent alterations encoding for cell transformation and predicting ovarian cancer survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preethi Sankaranarayanan

    Full Text Available The number of large-scale high-dimensional datasets recording different aspects of a single disease is growing, accompanied by a need for frameworks that can create one coherent model from multiple tensors of matched columns, e.g., patients and platforms, but independent rows, e.g., probes. We define and prove the mathematical properties of a novel tensor generalized singular value decomposition (GSVD, which can simultaneously find the similarities and dissimilarities, i.e., patterns of varying relative significance, between any two such tensors. We demonstrate the tensor GSVD in comparative modeling of patient- and platform-matched but probe-independent ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma (OV tumor, mostly high-grade, and normal DNA copy-number profiles, across each chromosome arm, and combination of two arms, separately. The modeling uncovers previously unrecognized patterns of tumor-exclusive platform-consistent co-occurring copy-number alterations (CNAs. We find, first, and validate that each of the patterns across only 7p and Xq, and the combination of 6p+12p, is correlated with a patient's prognosis, is independent of the tumor's stage, the best predictor of OV survival to date, and together with stage makes a better predictor than stage alone. Second, these patterns include most known OV-associated CNAs that map to these chromosome arms, as well as several previously unreported, yet frequent focal CNAs. Third, differential mRNA, microRNA, and protein expression consistently map to the DNA CNAs. A coherent picture emerges for each pattern, suggesting roles for the CNAs in OV pathogenesis and personalized therapy. In 6p+12p, deletion of the p21-encoding CDKN1A and p38-encoding MAPK14 and amplification of RAD51AP1 and KRAS encode for human cell transformation, and are correlated with a cell's immortality, and a patient's shorter survival time. In 7p, RPA3 deletion and POLD2 amplification are correlated with DNA stability, and a longer survival

  6. Tensor GSVD of Patient- and Platform-Matched Tumor and Normal DNA Copy-Number Profiles Uncovers Chromosome Arm-Wide Patterns of Tumor-Exclusive Platform-Consistent Alterations Encoding for Cell Transformation and Predicting Ovarian Cancer Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, Preethi; Schomay, Theodore E.; Aiello, Katherine A.; Alter, Orly

    2015-01-01

    The number of large-scale high-dimensional datasets recording different aspects of a single disease is growing, accompanied by a need for frameworks that can create one coherent model from multiple tensors of matched columns, e.g., patients and platforms, but independent rows, e.g., probes. We define and prove the mathematical properties of a novel tensor generalized singular value decomposition (GSVD), which can simultaneously find the similarities and dissimilarities, i.e., patterns of varying relative significance, between any two such tensors. We demonstrate the tensor GSVD in comparative modeling of patient- and platform-matched but probe-independent ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma (OV) tumor, mostly high-grade, and normal DNA copy-number profiles, across each chromosome arm, and combination of two arms, separately. The modeling uncovers previously unrecognized patterns of tumor-exclusive platform-consistent co-occurring copy-number alterations (CNAs). We find, first, and validate that each of the patterns across only 7p and Xq, and the combination of 6p+12p, is correlated with a patient’s prognosis, is independent of the tumor’s stage, the best predictor of OV survival to date, and together with stage makes a better predictor than stage alone. Second, these patterns include most known OV-associated CNAs that map to these chromosome arms, as well as several previously unreported, yet frequent focal CNAs. Third, differential mRNA, microRNA, and protein expression consistently map to the DNA CNAs. A coherent picture emerges for each pattern, suggesting roles for the CNAs in OV pathogenesis and personalized therapy. In 6p+12p, deletion of the p21-encoding CDKN1A and p38-encoding MAPK14 and amplification of RAD51AP1 and KRAS encode for human cell transformation, and are correlated with a cell’s immortality, and a patient’s shorter survival time. In 7p, RPA3 deletion and POLD2 amplification are correlated with DNA stability, and a longer survival. In Xq

  7. Rescue of progeria in trichothiodystrophy by homozygous lethal Xpd alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaan-Olle Andressoo

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Although compound heterozygosity, or the presence of two different mutant alleles of the same gene, is common in human recessive disease, its potential to impact disease outcome has not been well documented. This is most likely because of the inherent difficulty in distinguishing specific biallelic effects from differences in environment or genetic background. We addressed the potential of different recessive alleles to contribute to the enigmatic pleiotropy associated with XPD recessive disorders in compound heterozygous mouse models. Alterations in this essential helicase, with functions in both DNA repair and basal transcription, result in diverse pathologies ranging from elevated UV sensitivity and cancer predisposition to accelerated segmental progeria. We report a variety of biallelic effects on organismal phenotype attributable to combinations of recessive Xpd alleles, including the following: (i the ability of homozygous lethal Xpd alleles to ameliorate a variety of disease symptoms when their essential basal transcription function is supplied by a different disease-causing allele, (ii differential developmental and tissue-specific functions of distinct Xpd allele products, and (iii interallelic complementation, a phenomenon rarely reported at clinically relevant loci in mammals. Our data suggest a re-evaluation of the contribution of "null" alleles to XPD disorders and highlight the potential of combinations of recessive alleles to affect both normal and pathological phenotypic plasticity in mammals.

  8. Drop-out probabilities of IrisPlex SNP alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jeppe Dyrberg; Tvedebrink, Torben; Mogensen, Helle Smidt;

    2013-01-01

    -out of true alleles is possible. As part of the validation of the IrisPlex assay in our ISO17025 accredited, forensic genetic laboratory, we estimated the probability of drop-out of specific SNP alleles using 29 and 30 PCR cycles and 25, 50 and 100 Single Base Extension (SBE) cycles. We observed no drop...

  9. To be or not to be the odd one out - Allele-specific transcription in pentaploid dogroses (Rosa L. sect. Caninae (DC. Ser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theißen Günter

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple hybridization events gave rise to pentaploid dogroses which can reproduce sexually despite their uneven ploidy level by the unique canina meiosis. Two homologous chromosome sets are involved in bivalent formation and are transmitted by the haploid pollen grains and the tetraploid egg cells. In addition the egg cells contain three sets of univalent chromosomes which are excluded from recombination. In this study we investigated whether differential behavior of chromosomes as bivalents or univalents is reflected by sequence divergence or transcription intensity between homeologous alleles of two single copy genes (LEAFY, cGAPDH and one ribosomal DNA locus (nrITS. Results We detected a maximum number of four different alleles of all investigated loci in pentaploid dogroses and identified the respective allele with two copies, which is presumably located on bivalent forming chromosomes. For the alleles of the ribosomal DNA locus and cGAPDH only slight, if any, differential transcription was determined, whereas the LEAFY alleles with one copy were found to be significantly stronger expressed than the LEAFY allele with two copies. Moreover, we found for the three marker genes that all alleles have been under similar regimes of purifying selection. Conclusions Analyses of both molecular sequence evolution and expression patterns did not support the hypothesis that unique alleles probably located on non-recombining chromosomes are less functional than duplicate alleles presumably located on recombining chromosomes.

  10. AllelicImbalance: An R/ bioconductor package for detecting, managing, and visualizing allele expression imbalance data from RNA sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gådin, Jesper R.; van't Hooft, Ferdinand M.; Eriksson, Per;

    2015-01-01

    the possible biases. Results: We present AllelicImblance, a software program that is designed to detect, manage, and visualize allelic imbalances comprehensively. The purpose of this software is to allow users to pose genetic questions in any RNA sequencing experiment quickly, enhancing the general utility...

  11. Association of gliadin antibodies, HLA alleles, and schizophrenia in Cuban population patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Galván

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several lines of evidence have suggested an interesting link between gluten ingestion and schizophrenia. For example, increased levels of gliadin and transglutaminase antibodies have been observed in patients with schizophrenia. Methods: To verify these observations we compared the prevalence of gliadin and transglutaminse antibodies, as well as the presence of the HLA alleles, HLA DQA1*0501-DQB1*02 (DQ2 and HLA-DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302 (DQ8, among patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. A total of 108 patients with schizophrenia and 60 healthy controls were evaluated. Gliadin antibodies were determined by a visual semiquantitative assay and tissue transglutaminase antibodies were determined both by one-step immunochromatografic assay and ELISA. HLA typing was performed by PCR amplification using sequence-specific primers for each allele. Results: We found a strong association between the presence of gliadin antibodies and schizophrenia (OR 3.488; 95% CI, 1.43-8.44. However, tissue transglutaminase antibodies were not detected in either group neither by immunochromatograpic or ELISA. No significant association was found for the DQ2 or DQ8 heterodimer and the disease, but a significant positive association between schizophrenia and HLA alleles DQA1*0301 and DQB1*02 was present (OR = 2.80; 95% CI, 1.27-6.17, and OR = 2.37, 95% CI, 1.24-4.53, respectively. Conclusions: The present study showed that the presence of gliadin antibodies was not correlated with the presence of HLA DQA1*0301 or DQB1*02 alleles within the group of patients with schizophrenia. Our study replicates the findings that anti-gliadin antibodies are associated with schizophrenia but also suggests that the presence of these antibodies and the HLA alleles DQB1*02 and DQA1*0301 are independently associated with susceptibility to schizophrenia.

  12. Assignment of SNP allelic configuration in polyploids using competitive allele-specific PCR: application to citrus triploid progeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, José; Aleza, Pablo; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Background Polyploidy is a major component of eukaryote evolution. Estimation of allele copy numbers for molecular markers has long been considered a challenge for polyploid species, while this process is essential for most genetic research. With the increasing availability and whole-genome coverage of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, it is essential to implement a versatile SNP genotyping method to assign allelic configuration efficiently in polyploids. Scope This work evaluates the usefulness of the KASPar method, based on competitive allele-specific PCR, for the assignment of SNP allelic configuration. Citrus was chosen as a model because of its economic importance, the ongoing worldwide polyploidy manipulation projects for cultivar and rootstock breeding, and the increasing availability of SNP markers. Conclusions Fifteen SNP markers were successfully designed that produced clear allele signals that were in agreement with previous genotyping results at the diploid level. The analysis of DNA mixes between two haploid lines (Clementine and pummelo) at 13 different ratios revealed a very high correlation (average = 0·9796; s.d. = 0·0094) between the allele ratio and two parameters [θ angle = tan−1 (y/x) and y′ = y/(x + y)] derived from the two normalized allele signals (x and y) provided by KASPar. Separated cluster analysis and analysis of variance (ANOVA) from mixed DNA simulating triploid and tetraploid hybrids provided 99·71 % correct allelic configuration. Moreover, triploid populations arising from 2n gametes and interploid crosses were easily genotyped and provided useful genetic information. This work demonstrates that the KASPar SNP genotyping technique is an efficient way to assign heterozygous allelic configurations within polyploid populations. This method is accurate, simple and cost-effective. Moreover, it may be useful for quantitative studies, such as relative allele-specific expression analysis and bulk segregant analysis

  13. Prevalence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DRB1 alleles in Kuwaiti children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaeid, Khaled; Haider, M Z; Kamal, H; Srivastva, B S; Ayoub, E M

    2002-02-01

    The prevalence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DR alleles has been determined in 69 Kuwaiti Arab children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) and compared to that in 212 ethnically matched normal healthy controls using a PCR-sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP) method. A very high incidence of DR3 was detected in JRA patients compared to the controls (P JRA patients was accounted for mainly by an excess of DRB1*0307 (P JRA were analysed separately; 73% compared to 58% for the whole JRA patient group. The frequency of DR1 was also higher in the JRA group compared to controls (P = 0.019, RR = 3.585). Although the incidence of some alleles was higher in the control group (DR13 and DR7), none reached a statistically significant level. All the patients with iridocyclitis had either a DR1 or DR3 allele, except for one child. The frequency of DRB1*03 was found to be much higher in the polyarticular subtype of Kuwaiti JRA cases compared to the oligoarticular subgroup and the controls. Also, a non-significant increase in the frequency of the DRB1*04, *11 and *15 alleles was detected in the polyarticular subtype of the Kuwaiti JRA cases compared to the controls.

  14. HLA alleles associated with the adaptive immune response to smallpox vaccine: a replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Pankratz, V Shane; Salk, Hannah M; Kennedy, Richard B; Poland, Gregory A

    2014-09-01

    We previously reported HLA allelic associations with vaccinia virus (VACV)-induced adaptive immune responses in a cohort of healthy individuals (n = 1,071 subjects) after a single dose of the licensed smallpox (Dryvax) vaccine. This study demonstrated that specific HLA alleles were significantly associated with VACV-induced neutralizing antibody (NA) titers (HLA-B*13:02, *38:02, *44:03, *48:01, and HLA-DQB1*03:02, *06:04) and cytokine (HLA-DRB1*01:03, *03:01, *10:01, *13:01, *15:01) immune responses. We undertook an independent study of 1,053 healthy individuals and examined associations between HLA alleles and measures of adaptive immunity after a single dose of Dryvax-derived ACAM2000 vaccine to evaluate previously discovered HLA allelic associations from the Dryvax study and determine if these associations are replicated with ACAM2000. Females had significantly higher NA titers than male subjects in both study cohorts [median ID50 discovery cohort 159 (93, 256) vs. 125 (75, 186), p smallpox vaccine-induced adaptive immune responses are significantly influenced by HLA gene polymorphisms. These data provide information for functional studies and design of novel candidate smallpox vaccines.

  15. Short aggrecan gene repetitive alleles associated with lumbar degenerative disc disease in Turkish patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eser, O; Eser, B; Cosar, M; Erdogan, M O; Aslan, A; Yıldız, H; Solak, M; Haktanır, A

    2011-01-01

    We investigated a possible association between aggrecan gene polymorphism and lumbar degenerative disc disease in Turkish patients. One hundred 20-30-year-old patients with or without low back pain were selected for the study. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging was performed on all patients. The patient group had low back pain clinically and degenerative disc disease radiographically. The control group included patients with and without low back pain: all were negative radiographically for degenerative disc disease. Genomic DNA was extracted from all participants. A PCR assay were used to evaluate variable number of tandem repeat polymorphism of aggrecan gene alleles to determine if there was any correlation with degenerative disc disease. Significant associations were found between short repeated alleles of the aggrecan gene and severe disc degeneration. A significant association was also found between short repeated alleles of the aggrecan gene and multilevel disc herniation as well as extrusion and sequestration types of disc herniation. In Turkish population, short repeated alleles of the aggrecan gene are associated with increased disc degeneration and disc herniation. PMID:21948754

  16. Common alleles contribute to schizophrenia in CNV carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansey, K E; Rees, E; Linden, D E; Ripke, S; Chambert, K D; Moran, J L; McCarroll, S A; Holmans, P; Kirov, G; Walters, J; Owen, M J; O'Donovan, M C

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of schizophrenia is complex, involving risk alleles ranging from common alleles of weak effect to rare alleles of large effect, the best exemplar of the latter being large copy number variants (CNVs). It is currently unknown whether pathophysiology in those with defined rare mutations overlaps with that in other individuals with the disorder who do not share the same rare mutation. Under an extreme heterogeneity model, carriers of specific high-penetrance mutations form distinct subgroups. In contrast, under a polygenic threshold model, high-penetrance rare allele carriers possess many risk factors, of which the rare allele is the only one, albeit an important, factor. Under the latter model, cases with rare mutations can be expected to share some common risk alleles, and therefore pathophysiological mechanisms, with cases without the same mutation. Here we show that, compared with controls, individuals with schizophrenia who have known pathogenic CNVs carry an excess burden of common risk alleles (P=2.25 × 10−17) defined from a genome-wide association study largely based on individuals without known CNVs. Our finding is not consistent with an extreme heterogeneity model for CNV carriers, but does offer support for the polygenic threshold model of schizophrenia. That this is so provides support for the notion that studies aiming to model the effects of rare variation may uncover pathophysiological mechanisms of relevance to those with the disorder more widely. PMID:26390827

  17. HLA-E(⁎)01:03 Allele in Lung Transplant Recipients Correlates with Higher Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction Occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cristofaro, Julie; Pelardy, Mathieu; Loundou, Anderson; Basire, Agnès; Gomez, Carine; Chiaroni, Jacques; Thomas, Pascal; Reynaud-Gaubert, Martine; Picard, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is a valid therapeutic option for selected patients with end-stage lung disease. HLA-E seems to play a major role in the immune response to different viral infections and to affect transplantation outcome, in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, for example. Two nonsynonymous alleles, HLA-E(⁎)01:01 and HLA-E(⁎)01:03, have functional differences, involving relative peptide affinity, cell surface expression, and potential lytic activity of NK cells. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the impact of these two alleles for LTx recipients on anti-HLA alloimmunization risk, overall survival, and chronic rejection (CLAD). HLA-E was genotyped in 119 recipients who underwent LTx from 1998 to 2010 in a single transplantation center. In univariate analysis, both HLA-E homozygous states were associated with impaired overall survival compared to heterozygous HLA-E alleles (p = 0.01). In multivariate analysis, HLA-E(⁎)01:03 allele showed increased CLAD occurrence when compared to homozygous HLA-E(⁎)01:01 status (HR: 3.563 (CI 95%, 1.016-12), p = 0.047). HLA-E allele did not affect pathogen infection or the production of de novo DSA. This retrospective study shows an uninvestigated, deleterious association of HLA-E alleles with LTx and requires verification using a larger cohort. PMID:27493971

  18. HLA-E⁎01:03 Allele in Lung Transplant Recipients Correlates with Higher Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction Occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Di Cristofaro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung transplantation (LTx is a valid therapeutic option for selected patients with end-stage lung disease. HLA-E seems to play a major role in the immune response to different viral infections and to affect transplantation outcome, in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, for example. Two nonsynonymous alleles, HLA-E⁎01:01 and HLA-E⁎01:03, have functional differences, involving relative peptide affinity, cell surface expression, and potential lytic activity of NK cells. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the impact of these two alleles for LTx recipients on anti-HLA alloimmunization risk, overall survival, and chronic rejection (CLAD. HLA-E was genotyped in 119 recipients who underwent LTx from 1998 to 2010 in a single transplantation center. In univariate analysis, both HLA-E homozygous states were associated with impaired overall survival compared to heterozygous HLA-E alleles (p=0.01. In multivariate analysis, HLA-E⁎01:03 allele showed increased CLAD occurrence when compared to homozygous HLA-E⁎01:01 status (HR: 3.563 (CI 95%, 1.016–12, p=0.047. HLA-E allele did not affect pathogen infection or the production of de novo DSA. This retrospective study shows an uninvestigated, deleterious association of HLA-E alleles with LTx and requires verification using a larger cohort.

  19. Avaliação da concentração de alfa 1-antitripsina e da presença dos alelos S e Z em uma população de indivíduos sintomáticos respiratórios crônicos Determination of alpha 1-antitrypsin levels and of the presence of S and Z alleles in a population of patients with chronic respiratory symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heliane Guerra Serra

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a concentração de alfa 1-antitripsina (AAT e a prevalência dos alelos S e Z em indivíduos sintomáticos respiratórios crônicos. MÉTODOS: Pacientes com tosse crônica e dispnéia foram submetidos à avaliação clínica, espirometria, tomografia computadorizada de tórax, dosagem de AAT por nefelometria e pesquisa das mutações S e Z por reação em cadeia da polimerase. Foram consideradas como variáveis dependentes a concentração de AAT e o tabagismo. RESULTADOS: Dos 89 pacientes incluídos no estudo (44 mulheres; idade média, 51,3 ± 18,2 anos, os alelos S e Z foram detectados em 33,3% e 5,7%, respectivamente, com freqüência gênica dos alelos S e Z de 0,16 e 0,028. Dois pacientes tinham genótipo SZ (AAT 141 mg/dL (normal, Grupo 2, n = 57. A freqüência de fumantes foi igual nos dois grupos, com carga tabágica maior no Grupo 2. O alelo S estava presente em 13 e 14 pacientes dos Grupos 1 e 2, respectivamente, enquanto que o alelo Z estava presente em 2 e 1 paciente dos mesmos grupos. Não houve diferença nos testes de função pulmonar, nem na freqüência de bronquiectasias ou enfisema entre os dois grupos. Os valores espirométricos e as concentrações de AAT foram similares entre fumantes e não-fumantes. Bronquiectasias foram mais freqüentes entre os não fumantes, e enfisema foi mais freqüente entre os fumantes. CONCLUSÕES: Trinta pacientes apresentaram níveis de AAT abaixo da média esperada para os genótipos MM e MS, e este fato não pode ser explicado por uma freqüência maior dos alelos S e Z.OBJECTIVE: To determine the levels of alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT and the presence of S and Z alleles in patients with chronic respiratory symptoms. METHODS: Patients with chronic cough and dyspnea were submitted to clinical evaluation, pulmonary function tests, high-resolution computed tomography, nephelometric determination of AAT and determination of S and Z alleles by polymerase chain reaction. Smoking

  20. HLA B27 allele types in homogeneous groups of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients in Latvia

    OpenAIRE

    Guseinova Dinara; Lazareva Arina; Sochnevs Arturs; Zavadska Dace; Eglite Jelena; Stanevicha Valda; Shantere Ruta; Gardovska Dace

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a heterogeneous condition and therapeutic strategies vary in different JIA types. The routinely accepted practice to start with Sulphasalazine (SS) as the first line treatment in patients with HLA B27 positive JIA proves to be ineffective in a large proportion of children. Objective to investigate HLA B27 positive JIA patients clinical characteristics, determined HLA B27 allele types and their connection with antirheumatic treatment in homogenou...

  1. High-speed droplet-allele-specific polymerase chain reaction for genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Honda, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Single nucleotide alternations such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or single nucleotide mutations are useful genetic markers for molecular diagnosis, prognosis, drug response, and predisposition to diseases. Rapid identification of SNPs or mutations is clinically important, especially for determining drug responses and selection of molecular-targeted therapy. Here, we describe a rapid genotyping assay based on the allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) by using our droplet-PCR machine (droplet-AS-PCR).

  2. Apolipoprotein E-epsilon 4 allele and familial risk in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G; Silverman, J M; Altstiel, L D; Haroutunian, V; Perl, D P; Purohit, D; Birstein, S; Lantz, M; Mohs, R C; Davis, K L

    1996-01-01

    Recent studies have found an association between presence of apolipoprotein E (APOE) epsilon 4 allele and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The present study compared the cumulative risk of primary progressive dementia (PPD) in relatives of AD probands carrying at least one copy of the epsilon 4 allele with the relatives of AD probands not carrying epsilon 4 and with relatives of non-demented controls. Our aim was to determine whether the familial aggregation of PPD in relatives of AD probands is primarily due to those carrying epsilon 4. Seventy-seven neuropathologically diagnosed AD patients were obtained as probands through our Alzheimer's Disease Research Center Brain Bank. AD probands were genotyped for APOE. As a comparison group, 198 non-demented probands were also included. Through family informants, demographic and diagnostic data were collected on 382 first-degree relatives (age > or = 45 years) of AD probands and 848 relatives of the controls. We found that the cumulative risk of PPD in both relatives of AD probands with and without the epsilon 4 allele was significantly higher than that in the relatives of non-demented controls. However, the increased risk in the relatives of AD probands with the epsilon 4 allele was marginally, but not significantly, lower than the risk in the relatives of probands without epsilon 4. A greater likelihood of death by heart diseases over developing PPD in relatives of AD probands with epsilon 4 (3.1-fold increase) was found compared to relatives of probands without epsilon 4 (1.7-fold increase), especially prior to age 70, although the difference was not statistically significant. The increased familial risk for PPD in the relatives of AD probands with the APOE-epsilon 4 allele relative to controls suggests that familial factors in addition to APOE-epsilon 4 are risk factors for AD. Differential censorship from increased mortality of heart diseases may have prevented a higher incidence of PPD among the relatives of probands with

  3. Distribution of CYP2D6 Alleles and Phenotypes in the Brazilian Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sortica, Vinicius A.; Suarez-Kurtz, Guilherme; de Moraes, Maria Elizabete; Pena, Sergio D. J.; dos Santos, Ândrea K. Ribeiro; Romano-Silva, Marco A.; Hutz, Mara H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The CYP2D6 enzyme is one of the most important members of the cytochrome P450 superfamily. This enzyme metabolizes approximately 25% of currently prescribed medications. The CYP2D6 gene presents a high allele heterogeneity that determines great inter-individual variation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the variability of CYP2D6 alleles, genotypes and predicted phenotypes in Brazilians. Eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms and CYP2D6 duplications/multiplications were genotyped by TaqMan assays in 1020 individuals from North, Northeast, South, and Southeast Brazil. Eighteen CYP2D6 alleles were identified in the Brazilian population. The CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*2 alleles were the most frequent and widely distributed in different geographical regions of Brazil. The highest number of CYPD6 alleles observed was six and the frequency of individuals with more than two copies ranged from 6.3% (in Southern Brazil) to 10.2% (Northern Brazil). The analysis of molecular variance showed that CYP2D6 is homogeneously distributed across different Brazilian regions and most of the differences can be attributed to inter-individual differences. The most frequent predicted metabolic status was EM (83.5%). Overall 2.5% and 3.7% of Brazilians were PMs and UMs respectively. Genomic ancestry proportions differ only in the prevalence of intermediate metabolizers. The IM predicted phenotype is associated with a higher proportion of African ancestry and a lower proportion of European ancestry in Brazilians. PM and UM classes did not vary among regions and/or ancestry proportions therefore unique CYP2D6 testing guidelines for Brazilians are possible and could potentially avoid ineffective or adverse events outcomes due to drug prescriptions. PMID:25329392

  4. Distribution of CYP2D6 alleles and phenotypes in the Brazilian population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deise C Friedrich

    Full Text Available The CYP2D6 enzyme is one of the most important members of the cytochrome P450 superfamily. This enzyme metabolizes approximately 25% of currently prescribed medications. The CYP2D6 gene presents a high allele heterogeneity that determines great inter-individual variation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the variability of CYP2D6 alleles, genotypes and predicted phenotypes in Brazilians. Eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms and CYP2D6 duplications/multiplications were genotyped by TaqMan assays in 1020 individuals from North, Northeast, South, and Southeast Brazil. Eighteen CYP2D6 alleles were identified in the Brazilian population. The CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*2 alleles were the most frequent and widely distributed in different geographical regions of Brazil. The highest number of CYPD6 alleles observed was six and the frequency of individuals with more than two copies ranged from 6.3% (in Southern Brazil to 10.2% (Northern Brazil. The analysis of molecular variance showed that CYP2D6 is homogeneously distributed across different Brazilian regions and most of the differences can be attributed to inter-individual differences. The most frequent predicted metabolic status was EM (83.5%. Overall 2.5% and 3.7% of Brazilians were PMs and UMs respectively. Genomic ancestry proportions differ only in the prevalence of intermediate metabolizers. The IM predicted phenotype is associated with a higher proportion of African ancestry and a lower proportion of European ancestry in Brazilians. PM and UM classes did not vary among regions and/or ancestry proportions therefore unique CYP2D6 testing guidelines for Brazilians are possible and could potentially avoid ineffective or adverse events outcomes due to drug prescriptions.

  5. Evaluation of a DLA-79 allele associated with multiple immune-mediated diseases in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedenberg, Steven G; Buhrman, Greg; Chdid, Lhoucine; Olby, Natasha J; Olivry, Thierry; Guillaumin, Julien; O'Toole, Theresa; Goggs, Robert; Kennedy, Lorna J; Rose, Robert B; Meurs, Kathryn M

    2016-03-01

    Immune-mediated diseases are common and life-threatening disorders in dogs. Many canine immune-mediated diseases have strong breed predispositions and are believed to be inherited. However, the genetic mutations that cause these diseases are mostly unknown. As many immune-mediated diseases in humans share polymorphisms among a common set of genes, we conducted a candidate gene study of 15 of these genes across four immune-mediated diseases (immune-mediated hemolytic anemia, immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, immune-mediated polyarthritis (IMPA), and atopic dermatitis) in 195 affected and 206 unaffected dogs to assess whether causative or predictive polymorphisms might exist in similar genes in dogs. We demonstrate a strong association (Fisher's exact p = 0.0004 for allelic association, p = 0.0035 for genotypic association) between two polymorphic positions (10 bp apart) in exon 2 of one allele in DLA-79, DLA-79*001:02, and multiple immune-mediated diseases. The frequency of this allele was significantly higher in dogs with immune-mediated disease than in control dogs (0.21 vs. 0.12) and ranged from 0.28 in dogs with IMPA to 0.15 in dogs with atopic dermatitis. This allele has two non-synonymous substitutions (compared with the reference allele, DLA-79*001:01), resulting in F33L and N37D amino acid changes. These mutations occur in the peptide-binding pocket of the protein, and based upon our computational modeling studies, are likely to affect critical interactions with the peptide N-terminus. Further studies are warranted to confirm these findings more broadly and to determine the specific mechanism by which the identified variants alter canine immune system function.

  6. Frequency of CCR5Δ32 allele in healthy Bosniak population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Adler

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence has demonstrated the role of CCR5Δ32 in a variety of human diseases: from infectious and inflammatory diseases to cancer. Several studies have confirmed that genetic variants in chemokine receptor CCR5 gene are correlated with susceptibility and resistance to HIV infection. A 32-nucleotide deletion within the CCR5 reading frame is associated with decreased susceptibility to HIV acquisition and a slower progression to AIDS. Mean frequency of CCR5Δ32 allele in Europe is approximately 10%. The highest allele frequency is observed among Nordic populations (about 12% and lower in the regions of Southeast Mediterranean (about 5%. Although the frequency of CCR5Δ32 was determined in numerous European populations, there is a lack of studies on this variant in the Bosnia and Hercegovina population. Therefore, the aim of our study was to assess the frequency of CCR5Δ32 allele in the cohort of Bosniaks and compare the results with European reports. CCR5Δ32 was detected by sequence-specific PCR in a sample of 100 healthy subjects from Bosnia and Herzegovina (DNA collected 2011-2013.  Mean age of the cohort being 58.8 (±10.7 years, with 82% of women. We identified 17 heterozygotes and one mutant homozygote in study group, with mean ∆32 allele frequency of 9.5%. CCR5∆32 allele frequency among Bosniaks is comparable to that found in Caucasian populations and follows the pattern of the north-southern gradient observed for Europe. Further studies on larger cohorts with adequate female-to-male ratio are necessary. 

  7. Allelic exclusion of immunoglobulin genes: models and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vettermann, Christian; Schlissel, Mark S

    2010-09-01

    The allelic exclusion of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes is one of the most evolutionarily conserved features of the adaptive immune system and underlies the monospecificity of B cells. While much has been learned about how Ig allelic exclusion is established during B-cell development, the relevance of monospecificity to B-cell function remains enigmatic. Here, we review the theoretical models that have been proposed to explain the establishment of Ig allelic exclusion and focus on the molecular mechanisms utilized by developing B cells to ensure the monoallelic expression of Ig kappa and Ig lambda light chain genes. We also discuss the physiological consequences of Ig allelic exclusion and speculate on the importance of monospecificity of B cells for immune recognition.

  8. Distribution of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles in Lak population of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varzi, Ali Mohammad; Shahsavar, Farhad; Tarrahi, Mohammad Javad

    2016-07-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes are the most polymorphic loci in the human genome and encode the highly polymorphic molecules critically involved in immune responses. Anthropological studies based on highly polymorphic HLA genes provide useful information for bone marrow donor registry, forensic medicine, disease association studies, as well as designing peptide vaccines against tumors, and infectious or autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 allele frequencies in 100 unrelated Lak individuals from Lorestan province of Iran. Finally, we compared the results with those previously described in four other Iranian populations. Commercial HLA-Type kits were used for determination of the HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 allele frequencies. Differences between populations in the distribution of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles were estimated by χ2 test with Yate's correction and Fisher's exact test. The most frequent HLA-DRB1 alleles were (*)1103=4 (23%), (*)1502 (9.5%), (*)0701 (9%), (*)0301 (8.5%), (*)1101 (7.5%) and (*)1501 (6%) while HLA-DQB1(*)0301 (40%), (*)0201 (15%), (*)0502 (10.5%), (*)0303 (10%), (*)0602=3 (9.5%), and (*)0501 (7.5%) were the most frequent alleles in Lak population. HLA-DRB1(*)0409, (*)0804, (*)1102, (*)1112, (*)1405, and HLA-DQB1(*)0503, (*)0604 were the least observed frequencies in Lak population. Our results based on HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 allele frequencies showed that the Lak population possesses the previously reported general features of the Lur and Kurd populations but still with unique, decreased or increased frequencies of several alleles. In other words, the Lak population is close to Lurs Khorramabadi and Kurd but far from Lurs Kohkiloyeh/Boyerahmad and Bakhtiari. PMID:27189628

  9. A loss-of-function allele of OsHMA3 associated with high cadmium accumulation in shoots and grain of Japonica rice cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jiali; Wang, Peitong; Wang, Peng; Yang, Meng; Lian, Xingming; Tang, Zhong; Huang, Chao-Feng; Salt, David E; Zhao, Fang Jie

    2016-09-01

    Excessive cadmium (Cd) accumulation in rice poses a risk to food safety. OsHMA3 plays an important role in restricting Cd translocation from roots to shoots. A non-functional allele of OsHMA3 has been reported in some Indica rice cultivars with high Cd accumulation, but it is not known if OsHMA3 allelic variation is associated with Cd accumulation in Japonica cultivars. In this study, we identified a Japonica cultivar with consistently high Cd accumulation in shoots and grain in both field and greenhouse experiments. The cultivar possesses an OsHMA3 allele with a predicted amino acid mutation at the 380(th) position from Ser to Arg. The haplotype had no Cd transport activity when the gene was expressed in yeast, and the allele did not complement a known nonfunctional allele of OsHMA3 in F1 test. The allele is present only in temperate Japonica cultivars among diversity panels of 1483 rice cultivars. Different cultivars possessing this allele showed greatly increased root-to-shoot Cd translocation and a shift in root Cd speciation from Cd-S to Cd-O bonding determined by synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study has identified a new loss-of-function allele of OsHMA3 in Japonica rice cultivars leading to high Cd accumulation in shoots and grain. PMID:27038090

  10. Identification of incompatibility alleles in the tetraploid species sour cherry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobutt, K R; Bosković, R; Cerović, R; Sonneveld, T; Ruzić, D

    2004-03-01

    The incompatibility genetics of sour cherry ( Prunus cerasus), an allotetraploid species thought to be derived from sweet cherry (diploid) and ground cherry (tetraploid), were investigated by test crossing and by analysis of stylar ribonucleases which are known to be the products of incompatibility alleles in sweet cherry. Stylar extracts of 36 accessions of sour cherry were separated electrophoretically and stained for ribonuclease activity. The zymograms of most accessions showed three bands, some two or four. Of the ten bands seen, six co-migrated with bands that in sweet cherry are attributed to the incompatibility alleles S(1), S(3), S(4), S(6, ) S(9) and S(13). 'Cacanski Rubin', 'Erdi Botermo B', 'Koros' and 'Ujfehertoi Furtos', which showed bands apparently corresponding to S(1) and S(4), were test pollinated with the sweet cherry 'Merton Late' ( S(1) S(4)). Monitoring pollen tube growth, and, in one case, fruit set, showed that these crosses were incompatible and that the four sour cherries indeed have the alleles S(1) and S(4). Likewise, test pollination of 'Marasca Piemonte', 'Marasca Savena' and 'Morello, Dutch' with 'Noble' ( S(6) S(13)) showed that these three sour cherries have the alleles S(6) and S(13). S(13) was very frequent in sour cherry cultivars, but is rare in sweet cherry cultivars, whereas with S(3) the situation is reversed. It was suggested that the other four bands are derived from ground cherry and one of these, provisionally attributed to S(B), occurred frequently in a small set of ground cherry accessions surveyed. Analysing some progenies from sour by sweet crosses by S allele-specific PCR and monitoring the success of some sweet by sour crosses were informative. They indicated mostly disomic inheritance, with sweet cherry S alleles belonging to one locus and, presumably, the ground cherry alleles to the other, and helped clarify the genomic arrangement of the alleles and the interactions in heteroallelic pollen. PMID:14689184

  11. ALLELIC POLYMORPHISM OF IFNγ GENE IN PATIENTS WITH PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS

    OpenAIRE

    E. L. Nikulina; I. O. Naslednikova; Urazova, O. I.; O. V. Voronkova; V. V. Novitsky; E. V. Nekrasov; O. V. Filiniuk; E. G. Churina; K. O. Mikheyeva; R. R. Hasanova; V. A. Serebryakova; N. A. Sukhalentseva

    2014-01-01

    In present work, some immunogenetic aspects of pulmonary tuberculosis were studied, using modern techniques from molecular genetics and immunology. It is shown that carriage of Т allele and homozygous TT genotype in +874А/Т IFNγ gene polymorphism comprise a immunogenetic factor which correlated with a protective effect, regarding a susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis. Predisposition for tuberculosis infection is associated with A allele of this gene, as well as with АА and АТ genotypes o...

  12. Apolipoprotein E Alleles, Dyslipidemia,and Coronary Heart Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To describe the association between apolipoprotein E alleles, dyslipidemia, and coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), we studied the apolipoprotein E genotypes in 142 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and 131 age-matched healthy subjects, as well as the association between apolipoprotein, plasma lipids, and CHD. Results Compared with the E3 allele, the E4 allele was associated with elevated total cholesterol (TC) values (average increase about 0.32-0.58 mmol/L), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) values, and apolipoprotein B (APOB). The E2 allele has opposite effects (average decrease about 0.34-0.61 mmol/L at TC). Both in cases and controls, the allelic frequency of E3/3 was highest, reaching 67.8% of whole volume, hemozygote of apo E3 was moderate, and homozygote E4/4 was low, E2/2 and E4/2 were rare. The frequencies of E3/4 and E4/4 were significantly higher in patients with CAD compared with controls (P<0.001).Conclusion Apolipoprotein E alleles are important genetic markers for dyslipidemia and CHD.The carrier of E4 gene was the risk factor of CHD.

  13. Alleles of Ppd-D1 gene in the collection of Aegilops tauschii accessions and bread wheat varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babenko D. O.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Light period significantly influences on the growth and development of plants. One of the major genes of photoperiod sensitivity is Ppd-D1, located on the chromosome 2D. The aim of the work was to determine the alleles and molecular structure of Ppd-D1 gene in samples from the collection of Ae. tauschii accessions, which have different flowering periods, and in 29 Ukrainian wheat varieties. Methods. We used methods of allele-specific PCR with primers to the Ppd-D1 gene, sequencing and Blast-analysis. Results. The collection of Ae. tauschii accessions and several varieties of winter and spring wheat was studied. The molecular structure of the allelic variants (414, 429 and 453 b. p. of Ppd-D1b gene was determined in the collection of Aegilops. tauschii accessions. Conclusions. The Ppd-D1a allele was present in all studied varieties of winter wheat. 60 % of spring wheat is characterized by Ppd-D1b allele (size of amplification products 414 b. p.. Blast-analysis of the sequence data banks on the basis of the reference sequence of sample k-1322 from the collection of Ae. tauschii accessions has shown a high homology (80 to 100 % between the nucleotide sequences of PRR genes, that characterize the A and D genomes of representatives of the genera Triticum and Aegilops.

  14. Association of HLA-DRB1 Alleles in Juvenile-onset Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE in Iranian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Farivar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE is a complex autoimmune and inflammatory disease. Many studies show HLA alleles can be associated with SLE. The aim of this study was to determine the association of HLA-DRB1 alleles with juvenile- onset in Iranian children. Materials and Methods At a case – control study, 31 children with systemic lupus erythematosus (case group who referred to Mofid Children’s Hospital, Shahid Behehsti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, and 56 healthy children (control group were participant.  Genomic  DNA  was  extracted  and  HLA  typing  was performed by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR with Sequence - Specific Primers (SSP technique. Results HLA- DRB1*01, HLA- DRB1*04, HLA- DRB1*11 and HLA- DRB1*13 were detected to as most frequent alleles associated with SLE in Iranian children. The frequency of HLA DRB1*08 was not significantly different in both groups (P>0.05(.  HLA- DRB1*07 had a higher rate of repetition in the control group than patients with SLE. Conclusion There was a significant difference in the frequency of some alleles between patients and controls group, which could be related to susceptibility to SLE. These differences between frequencies of some alleles in both groups may help to determine the onset of lupus in children.

  15. Allelic imbalance analysis by high-density single-nucleotide polymorphic allele (SNP) array with whole genome amplified DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Tsang, Yvonne T.M.; Shen, Jianhe; Cheng, Rita S.; Chang, Yi-Mieng; Man, Tsz-Kwong; Lau, Ching C.

    2004-01-01

    Besides their use in mRNA expression profiling, oligonucleotide microarrays have also been applied to single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) or allelic imbalance studies. In this report, we evaluate the reliability of using whole genome amplified DNA for analysis with an oligonucleotide microarray containing 11 560 SNPs to detect allelic imbalance and chromosomal copy number abnormalities. Whole genome SNP analyses were performed with DNA extracted from osteosar...

  16. Impriniting of human H19: Allele-specific CpG methylation, loss of the active allele in Wilms tumor, and potential for somatic allele switching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.; Shields, T.; Crenshaw, T.; Hao, Y.; Moulton, T.; Tycko, B. (Columbia Univ., New York (United States))

    1993-07-01

    Genomic imprinting and monoallelic gene expression appear to play a role in human genetic disease and tumorigenesis. The human H19 gene, at chromosome 11p15, has previously been shown to be monoallelically expressed. Since CpG methylation has been implicated in imprinting, the authors analyzed methylation of H19 DNA. In fetal and adult organs the transcriptionally silent H19 allele was extensively hypermethylated through the entire gene and its promoter, and, consistent with a functional role for DNA methylation, expression of an H19 promoter-reporter construct was inhibited by in vitro methylation. Gynogenetic ovarian teratomas were found to contain only hypomethylated H19 DNA, suggesting that the expressed H19 allele might be maternal. This was confirmed by analysis of 11p15 polymorphisms in a patient with Wilms tumor. The tumor had lost the maternal 11p15, and H19 expression in the normal kidney was exclusively from this allele. Imprinting of human H19 appears to be susceptible to tissue-specific modulation in somatic development; in one individual, cerebellar cells were found to express only the otherwise silent allele. Implications of these findings for the role of DNA methylation in imprinting and for H19 as a candidate imprinted tumor-suppressor gene are discussed. 57 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Allele-Specific Reduction of the Mutant Huntingtin Allele Using Transcription Activator-Like Effectors in Human Huntington's Disease Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Kyle D; Deng, Peter; Gutierrez, Josh; Anderson, Joseph S; Torrest, Audrey; Komarla, Anvita; Kalomoiris, Stefanos; Cary, Whitney; Anderson, Johnathon D; Gruenloh, William; Duffy, Alexandra; Tempkin, Teresa; Annett, Geralyn; Wheelock, Vicki; Segal, David J; Nolta, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by an abnormal expansion of CAG repeats. Although pathogenesis has been attributed to this polyglutamine expansion, the underlying mechanisms through which the huntingtin protein functions have yet to be elucidated. It has been suggested that postnatal reduction of mutant huntingtin through protein interference or conditional gene knockout could prove to be an effective therapy for patients suffering from HD. For allele-specific targeting, transcription activator-like effectors (TALE) were designed to target single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the mutant allele and packaged into a vector backbone containing KRAB to promote transcriptional repression of the disease-associated allele. Additional TALEs were packaged into a vector backbone containing heterodimeric FokI and were designed to be used as nucleases (TALEN) to cause a CAG-collapse in the mutant allele. Human HD fibroblasts were treated with each TALE-SNP or TALEN. Allele-expression was measured using a SNP-genotyping assay and mutant protein aggregation was quantified with Western blots for anti-ubiquitin. The TALE-SNP and TALEN significantly reduced mutant allele expression (p TALE proteins, and provides a foundation for targeted treatment for individuals suffering from Huntington's or other genetically linked diseases. PMID:26850319

  18. Noninvasive fetal genotyping of paternally inherited alleles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, P.G.

    2012-01-01

    The results presented in this thesis indicate that cell-free fetal DNA is a reliably analyte for prenatal genetic diagnosis in everyday clinical practice. Already, invasive procedures solely to determine the fetal sex or red cell antigen status belong to the past. Large-scale nation-wide prenatal sc

  19. Mono-allelic retrotransposon insertion addresses epigenetic transcriptional repression in human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byun Hyang-Min

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retrotransposons have been extensively studied in plants and animals and have been shown to have an impact on human genome dynamics and evolution. Their ability to move within genomes gives retrotransposons to affect genome instability. Methods we examined the polymorphic inserted AluYa5, evolutionary young Alu, in the progesterone receptor gene to determine the effects of Alu insertion on molecular environment. We used mono-allelic inserted cell lines which carry both Alu-present and Alu-absent alleles. To determine the epigenetic change and gene expression, we performed restriction enzyme digestion, Pyrosequencing, and Chromatin Immunoprecipitation. Results We observed that the polymorphic insertion of evolutionally young Alu causes increasing levels of DNA methylation in the surrounding genomic area and generates inactive histone tail modifications. Consequently the Alu insertion deleteriously inactivates the neighboring gene expression. Conclusion The mono-allelic Alu insertion cell line clearly showed that polymorphic inserted repetitive elements cause the inactivation of neighboring gene expression, bringing aberrant epigenetic changes.

  20. Inheritance of microsatellite alleles in pedigrees of Latvian barley varieties and related European ancestors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjakste, T G; Rashal, I; Röder, M S

    2003-02-01

    Genetic diversity and inheritance of 65 microsatellite (SSR) loci were studied in a set of 37 barley varieties involved in the pedigrees of seven Latvian barley varieties: Abava, Agra, Balga, Imula, Linga, Priekulu 1 and Stendes. Cluster analysis divided all the varieties into two large groups according to their geographic distribution. Moravian, Swedish and Danish varieties clustered separately from varieties from Norway and Finland. The pattern of subgroups of both European and Latvian varieties was in accordance with their pedigree information. Graphical genotypes of microsatellite alleles of all seven barley chromosomes were determined for all the 37 varieties studied. Parental inheritance and transmission of microsatellite alleles through the generations of the pedigrees were analysed. The results confirmed the importance and informative value of microsatellite markers for genetic studies in barley and their utility for barley breeding and other applications in fundamental and applied barley genetics. PMID:12589555

  1. Telomeric Allelic Imbalance Indicates Defective DNA Repair and Sensitivity to DNA-Damaging Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkbak, Nicolai J.; Wang, Zhigang C.; Kim, Ji-Young;

    2012-01-01

    DNA repair competency is one determinant of sensitivity to certain chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin. Cancer cells with intact DNA repair can avoid the accumulation of genome damage during growth and also can repair platinum-induced DNA damage. We sought genomic signatures indicative...... of defective DNA repair in cell lines and tumors and correlated these signatures to platinum sensitivity. The number of subchromosomal regions with allelic imbalance extending to the telomere (NtAI) predicted cisplatin sensitivity in vitro and pathologic response to preoperative cisplatin treatment in patients....... Thus, accumulation of telomeric allelic imbalance is a marker of platinum sensitivity and suggests impaired DNA repair. SIGNIFICANCE: Mutations in BRCA genes cause defects in DNA repair that predict sensitivity to DNA damaging agents, including platinum; however, some patients without BRCA mutations...

  2. Allelic Interaction between CRELD1 and VEGFA in the Pathogenesis of Cardiac Atrioventricular Septal Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redig, Jennifer K.; Fouad, Gameil T.; Babcock, Darcie; Reshey, Benjamin; Feingold, Eleanor; Reeves, Roger H.; Maslen, Cheryl L.

    2014-01-01

    Atrioventricular septal defects (AVSD) are highly heritable, clinically significant congenital heart malformations. Genetic and environmental modifiers of risk are thought to work in unknown combinations to cause AVSD. Approximately 5–10% of simplex AVSD cases carry a missense mutation in CRELD1. However, CRELD1 mutations are not fully penetrant and require interactions with other risk factors to result in AVSD. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGFA) is a well-characterized modulator of heart valve development. A functional VEGFA polymorphism, VEGFA c.–634C, which causes constitutively increased VEGFA expression, has been associated with cardiac septal defects suggesting it may be a genetic risk factor. To determine if there is an allelic association with AVSD we genotyped the VEGFA c.–634 SNP in a simplex AVSD study cohort. Over-representation of the c.–634C allele in the AVSD group suggested that this genotype may increase risk. Correlation of CRELD1 and VEGFA genotypes revealed that potentially pathogenic missense mutations in CRELD1 were always accompanied by the VEGFA c.–634C allele in individuals with AVSD suggesting a potentially pathogenic allelic interaction. We used a Creld1 knockout mouse model to determine the effect of deficiency of Creld1 combined with increased VEGFA on atrioventricular canal development. Morphogenic response to VEGFA was abnormal in Creld1-deficient embryonic hearts, indicating that interaction between CRELD1 and VEGFA has the potential to alter atrioventricular canal morphogenesis. This supports our hypothesis that an additive effect between missense mutations in CRELD1 and a functional SNP in VEGFA contributes to the pathogenesis of AVSD. PMID:25328912

  3. Allelic Interaction between CRELD1 and VEGFA in the Pathogenesis of Cardiac Atrioventricular Septal Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer K. Redig

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Atrioventricular septal defects (AVSD are highly heritable, clinically significant congenital heart malformations. Genetic and environmental modifiers of risk are thought to work in unknown combinations to cause AVSD. Approximately 5–10% of simplex AVSD cases carry a missense mutation in CRELD1. However, CRELD1 mutations are not fully penetrant and require interactions with other risk factors to result in AVSD. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGFA is a well-characterized modulator of heart valve development. A functional VEGFA polymorphism, VEGFA c.-634C, which causes constitutively increased VEGFA expression, has been associated with cardiac septal defects suggesting it may be a genetic risk factor. To determine if there is an allelic association with AVSD we genotyped the VEGFA c.-634 SNP in a simplex AVSD study cohort. Over-representation of the c.-634C allele in the AVSD group suggested that this genotype may increase risk. Correlation of CRELD1 and VEGFA genotypes revealed that potentially pathogenic missense mutations in CRELD1 were always accompanied by the VEGFA c.-634C allele in individuals with AVSD suggesting a potentially pathogenic allelic interaction. We used a Creld1 knockout mouse model to determine the effect of deficiency of Creld1 combined with increased VEGFA on atrioventricular canal development. Morphogenic response to VEGFA was abnormal in Creld1-deficient embryonic hearts, indicating that interaction between CRELD1 and VEGFA has the potential to alter atrioventricular canal morphogenesis. This supports our hypothesis that an additive effect between missense mutations in CRELD1 and a functional SNP in VEGFA contributes to the pathogenesis of AVSD.

  4. A simple PCR-RFLP test for direct identification of Melanocortin Receptor 1 (MC1R alleles causing red coat colour in Holstein cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Valentini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A direct test to determine the presence of the recessive alleles causing red colour in Holstein cattle at DNA level is proposed.Digestions with two restriction enzymes were used to detect individuals carrying recessive alleles of MelanocortinReceptor 1 (MC1R gene, responsible for coat coloration. Direct sequencing of the PCR products confirmed the identifiedgenotypes. Compared to previously described methods this is an effective, relatively economic and quick method. Thistest could be employed not only to facilitate the detection of polymorphisms in populations but also to exclude animalscarrying alleles resulting in an undesired coat colour from breeding schemes.

  5. Identification and characterization of variant alleles at CODIS STR loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allor, Catherine; Einum, David D; Scarpetta, Marco

    2005-09-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) profiles from 32,671 individuals generated by the ABI Profiler Plus and Cofiler systems were screened for variant alleles not represented within manufacturer-provided allelic ladders. A total of 85 distinct variants were identified at 12 of the 13 CODIS loci, most of which involve a truncated tetranucleotide repeat unit. Twelve novel alleles, identified at D3S1358, FGA, D18S51, D5S818, D7S820 and TPOX, were confirmed by nucleotide sequence analysis and include both insertions and deletions involving the repeat units themselves as well as DNA flanking the repeat regions. Population genetic data were collected for all variants and frequencies range from 0.0003 (many single observations) to 0.0042 (D7S820 '10.3' in North American Hispanics). In total, the variant alleles identified in this study are carried by 1.6% of the estimated 1 million individuals tested annually in the U.S. for the purposes of parentage resolution. A paternity case involving a recombination event of paternal origin is presented and demonstrates how variant alleles can significantly strengthen the genetic evidence in troublesome cases. In such instances, increased costs and turnaround time associated with additional testing may be eliminated.

  6. A Platform for Interrogating Cancer-Associated p53 Alleles

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Brot, Alejandro; Kurtz, Paula; Regan, Erin; Jakubowski, Brandon; Abrams, John M

    2016-01-01

    p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancer. Compelling evidence argues that full transformation involves loss of growth suppression encoded by wild-type p53 together with poorly understood oncogenic activity encoded by missense mutations. Furthermore, distinguishing disease alleles from natural polymorphisms is an important clinical challenge. To interrogate the genetic activity of human p53 variants, we leveraged the Drosophila model as an in vivo platform. We engineered strains that replace the fly p53 gene with human alleles, producing a collection of stocks that are, in effect, ‘humanized’ for p53 variants. Like the fly counterpart, human p53 transcriptionally activated a biosensor and induced apoptosis after DNA damage. However, all humanized strains representing common alleles found in cancer patients failed to complement in these assays. Surprisingly, stimulus-dependent activation of hp53 occurred without stabilization, demonstrating that these two processes can be uncoupled. Like its fly counterpart, hp53 formed prominent nuclear foci in germline cells but cancer-associated p53 variants did not. Moreover, these same mutant alleles disrupted hp53 foci and inhibited biosensor activity, suggesting that these properties are functionally linked. Together these findings establish a functional platform for interrogating human p53 alleles and suggest that simple phenotypes could be used to stratify disease variants. PMID:26996664

  7. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori vacuolating cytotoxin and its allelic mosaicism as a predictive marker for Iranian dyspeptic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammadi, M; Oghalaie, A; Mohajerani, N;

    2003-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects the majority of the population in the developing countries. However, the rate of gastrointestinal complications such as peptic ulcers and gastric malignancies has no parallel with the infection. In order to determine whether cytotoxin (vacA) and its allelic polymorphism...... can serve as screening markers for such a population, H. pylori strains were isolated from one hundred and thirty two dyspeptic patients. H. pylori genomic DNA was extracted and underwent PCR-amplification for the cytotoxin alleles. Genotyping of the signal sequence region of the vacA gene identified...

  8. SNPsplit: Allele-specific splitting of alignments between genomes with known SNP genotypes [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Krueger

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sequencing reads overlapping polymorphic sites in diploid mammalian genomes may be assigned to one allele or the other. This holds the potential to detect gene expression, chromatin modifications, DNA methylation or nuclear interactions in an allele-specific fashion. SNPsplit is an allele-specific alignment sorter designed to read files in SAM/BAM format and determine the allelic origin of reads or read-pairs that cover known single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP positions. For this to work libraries must have been aligned to a genome in which all known SNP positions were masked with the ambiguity base ’N’ and aligned using a suitable mapping program such as Bowtie2, TopHat, STAR, HISAT2, HiCUP or Bismark. SNPsplit also provides an automated solution to generate N-masked reference genomes for hybrid mouse strains based on the variant call information provided by the Mouse Genomes Project. The unique ability of SNPsplit to work with various different kinds of sequencing data including RNA-Seq, ChIP-Seq, Bisulfite-Seq or Hi-C opens new avenues for the integrative exploration of allele-specific data.

  9. SNPsplit: Allele-specific splitting of alignments between genomes with known SNP genotypes [version 2; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Krueger

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Sequencing reads overlapping polymorphic sites in diploid mammalian genomes may be assigned to one allele or the other. This holds the potential to detect gene expression, chromatin modifications, DNA methylation or nuclear interactions in an allele-specific fashion. SNPsplit is an allele-specific alignment sorter designed to read files in SAM/BAM format and determine the allelic origin of reads or read-pairs that cover known single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP positions. For this to work libraries must have been aligned to a genome in which all known SNP positions were masked with the ambiguity base 'N' and aligned using a suitable mapping program such as Bowtie2, TopHat, STAR, HISAT2, HiCUP or Bismark. SNPsplit also provides an automated solution to generate N-masked reference genomes for hybrid mouse strains based on the variant call information provided by the Mouse Genomes Project. The unique ability of SNPsplit to work with various different kinds of sequencing data including RNA-Seq, ChIP-Seq, Bisulfite-Seq or Hi-C opens new avenues for the integrative exploration of allele-specific data.

  10. Implication of HLA-DMA Alleles in Corsican IDDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Cucchi-Mouillot

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The HLA-DM molecule catalyses the CLIP/antigen peptide exchange in the classical class II peptide-binding groove. As such, DM is an antigen presentation regulator and may be linked to autoimmune diseases. Using PCR derived methods, a relationship was revealed between DM gene polymorphism and IDDM, in a Corsican population. The DMA*0101 allele was observed to confer a significant predisposition to this autoimmune disease while the DMA*0102 allele protected significantly. Experiments examining polymorphism of the HLA-DRB1 gene established that these relationships are not a consequence of linkage disequilibrium with HLA-DRB1 alleles implicated in this pathology. The study of the DMA gene could therefore be an additional tool for early IDDM diagnosis in the Corsican population.

  11. Genetic Diversity Based on Allozyme Alleles of Chinese Cultivated Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Sheng-xiang; WEI Xing-hua; JIANG Yun-zhu; D S Brar; G S Khush

    2007-01-01

    Genetic diversity was analyzed with 6 632 core rice cultivars selected from 60 282 Chinese rice accessions on the basis of 12 allozyme loci, Pgil, Pgi2, Ampl, Amp2, Amp3, Amp4, Sdh1, Adh1, Est1, Est2, Est5 and Est9, by starch gel electrophoresis. Among the materials examined, 52 alleles at 12 polymorphic loci were identified, which occupied 96.3% of 54 alleles found in cultivated germplasm of O.sativa L. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 7 with an average of 4.33. The gene diversity (He) each locus varied considerably from 0.017 for Amp4 to 0.583 for Est2 with an average gene diversity (Ht) 0.271, and Shannon-Wiener index from 0.055 to 0.946 with an average of 0.468. The degree of polymorphism (DP) was in a range from 0.9 to 46.9% with an average of 21.4%. It was found that the genetic diversity in japonica (Keng) subspecies was lower in terms of allele's number, Ht and S-W index, being 91.8, 66.2 and 75.7% of indica (Hsien) one, respectively. Significant genetic differentiation between indica and japonica rice has been appeared in the loci Pgil, Amp2, Pgi2, and Est2, with higher average coefficient of genetic differentiation (Gst) 0.635, 0.626, 0.322 and 0.282, respectively. Except less allele number per locus (3.33) for modern cultivars, being 76.9% of landraces, the Ht and S-W index showed in similar between the modern cultivars and the landraces detected. In terms of allozyme, the rice cultivars in the Southwest Plateau and Central China have richer genetic diversity. The present study reveals again that Chinese cultivated rice germplasm has rich genetic diversity, showed by the allozyme allele variation.

  12. Allele-specific DNA methylation reinforces PEAR1 enhancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzi, Benedetta; Pistoni, Mariaelena; Cludts, Katrien; Akkor, Pinar; Lambrechts, Diether; Verfaillie, Catherine; Verhamme, Peter; Freson, Kathleen; Hoylaerts, Marc F

    2016-08-18

    Genetic variation in the PEAR1 locus is linked to platelet reactivity and cardiovascular disease. The major G allele of rs12041331, an intronic cytosine guanine dinucleotide-single-nucleotide polymorphism (CpG-SNP), is associated with higher PEAR1 expression in platelets and endothelial cells than the minor A allele. The molecular mechanism underlying this difference remains elusive. We have characterized the histone modification profiles of the intronic region surrounding rs12041331 and identified H3K4Me1 enhancer-specific enrichment for the region that covers the CpG-SNP. Interestingly, methylation studies revealed that the CpG site is fully methylated in leukocytes of GG carriers. Nuclear protein extracts from megakaryocytes, endothelial cells, vs control HEK-293 cells show a 3-fold higher affinity for the methylated G allele compared with nonmethylated G or A alleles in a gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay. To understand the positive relationship between methylation and gene expression, we studied DNA methylation at 4 different loci of PEAR1 during in vitro megakaryopoiesis. During differentiation, the CpG-SNP remained fully methylated, while we observed rapid methylation increases at the CpG-island overlapping the first 5'-untranslated region exon, paralleling the increased PEAR1 expression. In the same region, A-allele carriers of rs12041331 showed significantly lower DNA methylation at CGI1 compared with GG homozygote. This CpG-island contains binding sites for the methylation-sensitive transcription factor CTCF, whose binding is known to play a role in enhancer activation and/or repression. In conclusion, we report the molecular characterization of the first platelet function-related CpG-SNP, a genetic predisposition that reinforces PEAR1 enhancer activity through allele-specific DNA methylation. PMID:27313330

  13. Distribution of a pseudodeficiency allele among Tay-Sachs carriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomczak, J.; Grebner, E.E. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)); Boogen, C. (Univ. of Essen Medical School (Germany))

    1993-08-01

    Recently Triggs-Raine et al. (1992) identified a new mutation in the gene coding for the [alpha]-subunit of [beta]-hexosaminidase A (hex A), the enzyme whose deficiency causes Tay-Sachs disease. This mutation, a C[sub 739]-to-T transition in exon 7, results in an altered enzyme that is active (albeit at reduced levels) in cells but that has essentially no activity in serum. This so-called pseudodeficient allele was first detected in compound heterozygotes who also carried a Tay-Sachs disease allele and therefore had no detectable hex A in their serum but who were in good health. Carriers of this apparently benign mutation are generally indistinguishable from carriers of a lethal mutation by means of routine enzyme-based screening tests, because the product of the pseudodeficient allele is not detectable in serum and has decreased activity in cells. This suggests that some individuals who have been classified as Tay-Sachs carriers are actually carriers of the pseudodeficient allele and are not at risk to have a child affected with Tay-Sachs disease. The pseudodeficient allele may also be responsible for some inconclusive diagnoses, where leukocyte values fall below the normal range but are still above the carrier range. The fact that there are now two mutant alleles (the psuedodeficient and the adult) that are indistinguishable from the lethal infantile mutations by means of enzyme assay yet that are phenotypically very different and that together may account for as much as 12% of enzyme-defined carriers on the basis of the data here suggests that DNA analysis should be part of a comprehensive screening program. It will be particularly useful to identify the mutations in couples at risk, before they undergo prenatal diagnosis. DNA analysis will also resolve some inconclusive diagnoses.

  14. The inheritance of resistance alleles in multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreeram V Ramagopalan

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a complex trait in which alleles at or near the class II loci HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 contribute significantly to genetic risk. HLA-DRB1*15 and HLA-DRB1*17-bearing haplotypes and interactions at the HLA-DRB1 locus increase risk of MS but it has taken large samples to identify resistance HLA-DRB1 alleles. In this investigation of 7,093 individuals from 1,432 MS families, we have assessed the validity, mode of inheritance, associated genotypes, and the interactions of HLA-DRB1 resistance alleles. HLA-DRB1*14-, HLA-DRB1*11-, HLA-DRB1*01-, and HLA-DRB1*10-bearing haplotypes are protective overall but they appear to operate by different mechanisms. The first type of resistance allele is characterised by HLA-DRB1*14 and HLA-DRB1*11. Each shows a multiplicative mode of inheritance indicating a broadly acting suppression of risk, but a different degree of protection. In contrast, a second type is exemplified by HLA-DRB1*10 and HLA-DRB1*01. These alleles are significantly protective when they interact specifically in trans with HLA-DRB1*15-bearing haplotypes. HLA-DRB1*01 and HLA-DRB1*10 do not interact with HLA-DRB1*17, implying that several mechanisms may be operative in major histocompatibility complex-associated MS susceptibility, perhaps analogous to the resistance alleles. There are major practical implications for risk and for the exploration of mechanisms in animal models. Restriction of antigen presentation by HLA-DRB1*15 seems an improbably simple mechanism of major histocompatibility complex-associated susceptibility.

  15. A common allele on chromosome 9 associated with coronary heartdisease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McPherson, Ruth; Pertsemlidis, Alexander; Kavaslar, Nihan; Stewart, Alexandre; Roberts, Robert; Cox, David R.; Hinds, David; Pennachio, Len; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Folsom, Aaron R.; Boerwinkle,Eric; Hobbs, Helen H.; Cohen, Jonathan C.

    2007-03-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major cause of death in Western countries. Here we used genome-wide association scanning to identify a 58 kb interval on chromosome 9 that was consistently associated with CHD in six independent samples. The interval contains no annotated genes and is not associated with established CHD risk factors such as plasma lipoproteins, hypertension or diabetes. Homozygotes for the risk allele comprise 20-25% of Caucasians and have a {approx}30-40% increased risk of CHD. These data indicate that the susceptibility allele acts through a novel mechanism to increase CHD risk in a large fraction of the population.

  16. Discrimination of HLA null and low expression alleles by cytokine-induced secretion of recombinant soluble HLA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, Jan; Figueiredo, Constança; Hirv, Kaimo; Mytilineos, Joannis; Blasczyk, Rainer; Horn, Peter A; Eiz-Vesper, Britta

    2009-04-01

    The disruption of disulfide bridges can decrease or abolish the cell surface expression of HLA class I molecules. Such disulfide bridges are formed by cysteine residues between amino acid (aa) positions 101/164 (alpha(2) domain) and 203/259 (alpha(3) domain). Sequence alterations in codons 101, 164, 203 and 259 have been observed in eleven HLA-A molecules. All of these variants except of A*3014L and A*3211Q have been reported to result in null expression alleles. In the case of HLA-A*3014L, a transversion at nucleotide position 563 replaces cysteine by serine at position 164 of the mature polypeptide. HLA-A*3014L is not detectable by standard microlymphocytotoxicity assay. To verify low or non-expression of this allele, we cloned soluble HLA-A*3014L and the reference allele HLA-A*3001 into a eukaryotic expression vector and transfected K562, C1R and HEK293 cells. Expression of soluble HLA-A*3014L and HLA-A*3001 was measured in the supernatants of transfected and untransfected cells incubated with or without IFN-gamma and/or TNF-alpha using a W6/32 and anti-beta(2)-microglobulin-based sandwich ELISA. Expression of mRNA transcripts of both alleles was determined by real-time RT-PCR. HLA-A*3014L was not detected in the supernatant of unstimulated transfectants. Stimulation with IFN-gamma and/or TNF-alpha led to an increase of HLA-A*3014L secretion to a detectable level and increased HLA-A*3001 expression up to 8-fold, but did not show any difference in the increase of mRNA levels between HLA-A*3014L and A*3001. Because of this lack of any difference in the mRNA transcription, the protein expression defect is most likely caused by the missing disulfide bond formation in the alpha2 domain. Thus, exposing the cells to cytokine stress allows to distinguish between low- and non-expressed alleles and to classify alleles with a questionable expression pattern (Q alleles). Classifying HLA alleles in expressed and non-expressed variants is essential for matching assessments

  17. Triglyceride associated polymorphisms of the APOA5 gene have very different allele frequencies in Pune, India compared to Europeans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandak Giriraj R

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The APOA5 gene variants, -1131T>C and S19W, are associated with altered triglyceride concentrations in studies of subjects of Caucasian and East Asian descent. There are few studies of these variants in South Asians. We investigated whether the two APOA5 variants also show similar association with various lipid parameters in Indian population as in the UK white subjects. Methods We genotyped 557 Indian adults from Pune, India, and 237 UK white adults for -1131T>C and S19W variants in the APOA5 gene, compared their allelic and genotype frequency and determined their association with fasting serum triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL and LDL cholesterol levels using univariate general linear analysis. APOC3 SstI polymorphism was also analyzed in 175 Pune Indian subjects for analysis of linkage disequilibrium with the APOA5 variants. Results The APOA5 -1131C allele was more prevalent in Indians from Pune (Pune Indians compared to UK white subjects (allele frequency 20% vs. 4%, p = 0.00001, whereas the 19W allele was less prevalent (3% vs. 6% p = 0.0015. Patterns of linkage disequilibrium between the two variants were similar between the two populations and confirmed that they occur on two different haplotypes. In Pune Indians, the presence of -1131C allele and the 19W allele was associated with a 19% and 15% increase respectively in triglyceride concentrations although only -1131C was significant (p = 0.0003. This effect size was similar to that seen in the UK white subjects. Analysis of the APOC3 SstI polymorphism in 175 Pune Indian subjects showed that this variant is not in appreciable linkage disequilibrium with the APOA5 -1131T>C variant (r2 = 0.07. Conclusion This is the first study to look at the role of APOA5 in Asian Indian subjects that reside in India. The -1131C allele is more prevalent and the 19W allele is less prevalent in Pune Indians compared to UK Caucasians. We confirm that the APOA5 variants are associated

  18. Allele-specific gene silencing in two mouse models of autosomal dominant skeletal myopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan E Loy

    Full Text Available We explored the potential of mutant allele-specific gene silencing (ASGS in providing therapeutic benefit in two established mouse models of the autosomal dominantly-inherited muscle disorders, Malignant Hyperthermia (MH and Central Core Disease (CCD. Candidate ASGS siRNAs were designed and validated for efficacy and specificity on ryanodine receptor (RyR1 cDNA mini-constructs expressed in HEK293 cells using RT-PCR- and confocal microscopy-based assays. In vivo delivery of the most efficacious identified siRNAs into flexor digitorum brevis (FDB muscles was achieved by injection/electroporation of footpads of 4-6 month old heterozygous Ryr1(Y524S/+ (YS/+ and Ryr1(I4895T/+ (IT/+ knock-in mice, established mouse models of MH with cores and CCD, respectively. Treatment of IT/+ mice resulted in a modest rescue of deficits in the maximum rate (∼38% rescue and magnitude (∼78% of ligand-induced Ca(2+ release that occurred in the absence of a change in the magnitude of electrically-evoked Ca(2+ release. Compared to the difference between the caffeine sensitivity of Ca(2+ release in FDB fibers from YS/+ and WT mice treated with SCR siRNA (EC(50: 1.1 mM versus 4.4 mM, respectively, caffeine sensitivity was normalized in FDB fibers from YS/+ mice following 2 (EC(50: 2.8 mM and 4 week (EC(50: 6.6 mM treatment with YS allele-specific siRNA. Moreover, the temperature-dependent increase in resting Ca(2+ observed in FDB fibers from YS/+ mice was normalized to WT levels after 2 weeks of treatment with YS allele-specific siRNA. As determined by quantitative real time PCR, the degree of functional rescue in YS/+ and IT/+ mice correlated well with the relative increase in fractional WT allele expression.

  19. Population studies of the human V kappa A18 gene polymorphism in Caucasians, blacks and Eskimos. New functional alleles and evidence for evolutionary selection of a more restricted antibody repertoire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, L; Hougs, L; Andersen, V;

    1997-01-01

    and sequenced four apparently functional alleles and determined the gene frequencies in three well-defined populations: Danish Caucasians, eastern Greenland Eskimos and Mozambican blacks. The A18b allele that was recently described in Native American Navajos by Atkinson et al. was found in all three populations...

  20. Ploidy mosaicism and allele-specific gene expression differences in the allopolyploid Squalius alburnoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matos Isa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Squalius alburnoides is an Iberian cyprinid fish resulting from an interspecific hybridisation between Squalius pyrenaicus females (P genome and males of an unknown Anaecypris hispanica-like species (A genome. S. alburnoides is an allopolyploid hybridogenetic complex, which makes it a likely candidate for ploidy mosaicism occurrence, and is also an interesting model to address questions about gene expression regulation and genomic interactions. Indeed, it was previously suggested that in S. alburnoides triploids (PAA composition silencing of one of the three alleles (mainly of the P allele occurs. However, not a whole haplome is inactivated but a more or less random inactivation of alleles varying between individuals and even between organs of the same fish was seen. In this work we intended to correlate expression differences between individuals and/or between organs to the occurrence of mosaicism, evaluating if mosaics could explain previous observations and its impact on the assessment of gene expression patterns. Results To achieve our goal, we developed flow cytometry and cell sorting protocols for this system generating more homogenous cellular and transcriptional samples. With this set-up we detected 10% ploidy mosaicism within the S. alburnoides complex, and determined the allelic expression profiles of ubiquitously expressed genes (rpl8; gapdh and β-actin in cells from liver and kidney of mosaic and non-mosaic individuals coming from different rivers over a wide geographic range. Conclusions Ploidy mosaicism occurs sporadically within the S. alburnoides complex, but in a frequency significantly higher than reported for other organisms. Moreover, we could exclude the influence of this phenomenon on the detection of variable allelic expression profiles of ubiquitously expressed genes (rpl8; gapdh and β-actin in cells from liver and kidney of triploid individuals. Finally, we determined that the expression patterns

  1. Allele-specific expression of the low density lipoprotein receptor gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minnich, A.; Lussier-Cacan, S.; Roy, M. [Clincial Research Institute of Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    Approximately 60% of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) in French Canadians is due to a > 10 kb deletion of the promoter region of the gene encoding the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDL-R), allowing determination of the influence of a single LDL-R allele on phenotypic expression of FH. Normal allele haplotypes of approximately 250 heterozygotes were determined with 7 RFLPs. In vitro maximal LDL-R activity of blood lymphocytes from a subset of approximately 150 heterozygotes, measured by immunocytofluorometry, was significantly higher (20 to 30%) in subjects with LDL-R normal allele haplotype G (n=11), and O (n=7) compared to the most frequent haplotype F (n=43), while no differences were observed among F, E (n=11), and the 2 other most prevalent haplotypes (n=43). LDL-R mRNA in these lymphocytes was significantly elevated 2.3-, 1.7-, and 1.8- fold, in G, O, and E, respectively, compared to F, while no significant differences were apparent between F and the other two most frequent haplotyes. Large interindividual variability in lymphocyte LDL-R mRNA levels and activity was observed even among subjects with the same LDL-R normal allele haplotype. However, maximally induced lymphocyte LDL-R mRNA levels correlated poorly with levels measured in freshly isolated cells (n=14). Relative to haplotype F (n=47 women (W), 39 men (M)), mean plasma LDL cholesterol levels adjusted for age and apolipoprotein E genotype were 5-10% lower in men and women with haplotypes G (n=16 W, 12 M) and O (n=8 W, 6 M), and 20% lower in 7 W with haplotype E. These results suggest that (1) normal LDL-R allele haplotype G and O may contain sequence variations which confer relatively high gene expression and (2) environmental and genetic influences other than the LDL-R gene contribute substantially to variability in LDL-R expression and plasma LDL cholesterol levels in French Canadian FH heterozygotes.

  2. Impact of autoimmune risk alleles on the immune system

    OpenAIRE

    Ray, John P.; Hacohen, Nir

    2015-01-01

    Genetic analyses of autoimmune diseases have revealed hundreds of disease-associated DNA variants, but the identity and function of the causal variants are understudied and warrant deeper mechanistic studies. Here, we highlight methods for deciphering how alleles that are associated with autoimmune disease alter the human immune system, and suggest strategies for future autoimmune genetic research.

  3. Disease-Causing Allele-Specific Silencing by RNA Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirohiko Hohjoh

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Small double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs of approximately 21-nucleotides in size, referred to as small interfering RNA (siRNA duplexes, can induce sequence-specific posttranscriptional gene silencing, or RNA interference (RNAi. Since chemically synthesized siRNA duplexes were found to induce RNAi in mammalian cells, RNAi has become a powerful reverse genetic tool for suppressing the expression of a gene of interest in mammals, including human, and its application has been expanding to various fields. Recent studies further suggest that synthetic siRNA duplexes have the potential for specifically inhibiting the expression of an allele of interest without suppressing the expression of other alleles, i.e., siRNA duplexes likely confer allele-specific silencing. Such gene silencing by RNAi is an advanced technique with very promising applications. In this review, I would like to discuss the potential utility of allele-specific silencing by RNAi as a therapeutic method for dominantly inherited diseases, and describe possible improvements in siRNA duplexes for enhancing their efficacy.

  4. Distribution of forensic marker allelic frequencies in Pernambuco, Northestern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, S M; Souza, C A; Rabelo, K C N; Souza, P R E; Moura, R R; Oliveira, T C; Crovella, S

    2015-01-01

    Pernambuco is one of the 27 federal units of Brazil, ranking seventh in the number of inhabitants. We examined the allele frequencies of 13 short tandem repeat loci (CFS1PO, D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D8S1179, D13S317, D16S539, D18S51, D21S11, FGA, TH01, vWA, and TPOX), the minimum recommended by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and commonly used in forensic genetics laboratories in Brazil, in a sample of 609 unrelated individuals from all geographic regions of Pernambuco. The allele frequencies ranged from 5 to 47.2%. No significant differences for any loci analyzed were observed compared with other publications in other various regions of Brazil. Most of the markers observed were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The occurrence of the allele 47.2 (locus FGA) and alleles 35.1 and 39 (locus D21S11), also described in a single study of the Brazilian population, was observed. The other forensic parameters analyzed (matching probability, power of discrimination, polymorphic information content, paternity exclusion, complement factor I, observed heterozygosity, expected heterozygosity) indicated that the studied markers are very informative for human forensic identification purposes in the Pernambuco population. PMID:25966202

  5. Estimating the age of alleles by use of intraallelic variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slatkin, M.; Rannala, B. [Univ of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    A method is presented for estimating the age of an allele by use of its frequency and the extent of variation among different copies. The method uses the joint distribution of the number of copies in a population sample and the coalescence times of the intraallelic gene genealogy conditioned on the number of copies. The linear birth-death process is used to approximate the dynamics of a rare allele in a finite population. A maximum-likelihood estimate of the age of the allele is obtained by Monte Carlo integration over the coalescence times. The method is applied to two alleles at the cystic fibrosis (CFTR) locus, {Delta}F508 and G542X, for which intraallelic variability at three intronic microsatellite loci has been examined. Our results indicate that G542X is somewhat older than {Delta}F508. Although absolute estimates depend on the mutation rates at the microsatellite loci, our results support the hypothesis that {Delta}F508 arose <500 generations ({approx}10,000 years) ago. 32 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Cloning and characterization of genomic DNA sequences of four self-incompatibility alleles in sweet cherry ( Prunus avium L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wünsch, A; Hormaza, J I

    2004-01-01

    Gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) in sweet cherry is determined by a locus S with multiple alleles. In the style, the S-locus codifies for an allele-specific ribonuclease ( S-RNase) that is involved in the rejection of pollen that carries the same S allele. In this work we report the cloning and genomic DNA sequence analysis including the 5' flanking regions of four S-RNases of sweet cherry ( Prunus avium L., Rosaceae). DNA from the cultivars Ferrovia, Pico Colorado, Taleguera Brillante and Vittoria was amplified through PCR using primers designed in the conserved sequences of sweet cherry S-RNases. Two alleles were amplified for each cultivar and three of them correspond to three new S-alleles named S23, S24 and S25 present in 'Pico Colorado', 'Vittoria' and 'Taleguera Brillante' respectively. To confirm the identity of the amplified fragments, the genomic DNA of these three putative S-RNases and the allele S12 amplified in the cultivar Ferrovia were cloned and sequenced. The nucleotide and deduced amino-acid sequences obtained contained the structural features of rosaceous S-RNases. The isolation of the 5'-flanking sequences of these four S-RNases revealed a conserved putative TATA box and high similarity among them downstream from that sequence. However, similarity was low compared with the 5'-flanking regions of S-RNases from the Maloideae. S6- and S24-RNase sequences are highly similar, and most amino-acid substitutions among these two RNases occur outside the rosaceous hypervariable region (RHV), but within another highly variable region. The confirmation of the different specificity of these two S-RNases would help elucidate which regions of the S-RNase sequences play a role in S-pollen specific recognition.

  7. Oncogene mutations, copy number gains and mutant allele specific imbalance (MASI frequently occur together in tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junichi Soh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Activating mutations in one allele of an oncogene (heterozygous mutations are widely believed to be sufficient for tumorigenesis. However, mutant allele specific imbalance (MASI has been observed in tumors and cell lines harboring mutations of oncogenes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We determined 1 mutational status, 2 copy number gains (CNGs and 3 relative ratio between mutant and wild type alleles of KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA and EGFR genes by direct sequencing and quantitative PCR assay in over 400 human tumors, cell lines, and xenografts of lung, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers. Examination of a public database indicated that homozygous mutations of five oncogenes were frequent (20% in 833 cell lines of 12 tumor types. Our data indicated two major forms of MASI: 1 MASI with CNG, either complete or partial; and 2 MASI without CNG (uniparental disomy; UPD, due to complete loss of wild type allele. MASI was a frequent event in mutant EGFR (75% and was due mainly to CNGs, while MASI, also frequent in mutant KRAS (58%, was mainly due to UPD. Mutant: wild type allelic ratios at the genomic level were precisely maintained after transcription. KRAS mutations or CNGs were significantly associated with increased ras GTPase activity, as measured by ELISA, and the two molecular changes were synergistic. Of 237 lung adenocarcinoma tumors, the small number with both KRAS mutation and CNG were associated with shortened survival. CONCLUSIONS: MASI is frequently present in mutant EGFR and KRAS tumor cells, and is associated with increased mutant allele transcription and gene activity. The frequent finding of mutations, CNGs and MASI occurring together in tumor cells indicates that these three genetic alterations, acting together, may have a greater role in the development or maintenance of the malignant phenotype than any individual alteration.

  8. Normal ATXN3 allele but not CHIP polymorphisms modulates age at onset in Machado-Joseph Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcondes C. França Jr

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Age at onset (AO in Machado-Joseph disease (MJD is closely associated with the length of the CAG repeat at the mutant ATXN3 allele, but there are other intervening factors. Experimental evidence indicates that the normal ATXN3 allele and the C-terminal heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP may be genetic modifiers of AO in MJD. Methods: To investigate this hypothesis, we determined the length of normal and expanded CAG repeats at the ATXN3 gene in 210 unrelated patients with MJD. In addition, we genotyped five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within the CHIP gene. We first compared the frequencies of the different genotypes in two subgroups of patients who were highly discordant for AO after correction for the length of the expanded CAG allele. The possible modifier effect of each gene was then evaluated in a stepwise multiple linear regression model. Results: AO was associated with the length of the expanded CAG allele (r2 = 0.596, p<0.001. Frequencies of the normal CAG repeats at the ATXN3 gene and of CHIP polymorphisms did not differ significantly between groups with highly discordant ages at onset. However, addition of the normal allele improved the model fit for prediction of AO (r2 = 0.604, p=0.014. Indeed, we found that the normal CAG allele at ATXN3 had a positive independent effect on AO. Conclusion: The normal CAG repeat at the ATXN3 gene has a small but significant influence on AO of MJD.

  9. Sex Determination in Papaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sex determination is an intriguing system in trioecious papaya. Over the past seven decades various hypotheses, based on the knowledge and information available at the time, have been proposed to explain the genetics of the papaya's sex determination. These include a single gene with three alleles...

  10. The NQO1 allelic frequency in hindu population of central India varies from that of other Asian populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parihar Sher

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The enzymes encoded by the polymorphic genes NAD (P H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1 play an important role in the activation and inactivation of xenobiotics. This enzyme has been associated with xenobiotic related diseases, such as cancer, therapeutic failure and abnormal effects of drugs. Aim: The aim of the present study was to determine the allelic and genotypic frequencies of NQO Hinf I polymorphisms in a Hindu population of Central India. Settings and Design: Polymorphisms of NQO1 were determined in 311 unrelated Hindu individuals. Materials and Methods: Polymerase chain reaction- Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP analysis in peripheral blood DNA for NQO1 Hinf I polymorphism was used in 311 unrelated Hindu individuals. Statistical Analysis: Allele frequencies were calculated by direct counting. Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium was evaluated using a Chi-square goodness of fit test. Results: The observed allelic frequency was 81% for C (wild and 19% for T (mutant in the total sample. Conclusions: The allelic frequency of "C" was higher than in other Asians (57%, but similar to Caucasians (81%. The genotype distributions for Hinf I polymorphisms were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium.

  11. DNA TYPING SYSTEM FOR HLA-A2 ALLELES BY POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION WITH SEQUENCE-SPECIFIC PRIMERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张庆瑞; 翟宁; 耿龙; 宋芳吉

    2001-01-01

    Objectivs. To establish a PCR-SSP method for discriminating as many HLA-A+02 alleles, which could easilybe introduced into a routine laboratory. Methods. In this study we typed HLA-A+02 polymorphisms by a sequence-specific primer (SSP) method,which involved round 1 and round 2 PCR reactions to detect 17 HLA-A+02 alleles (they are HLA-A+0201- 0217 alleles) covering exon 2 and exon 3. Results. We have fmmd that DNA sample concentration and purity were the most important variables in determin-ing the quality of the results. For identiffing correct band size, the size marker used was important. We noticed that different PCR machines pedormed differently. By this method, we detected 20 HLA-A+02 positive genomic DNA samples and found 4 kinds of HLA-A +02 alleles. They were HLA-A +0201, 0203, 0206 and 0210. Condusion. The HLA-A +02 PCR-SSP method was proven to be a reliable and easily applicable typing method. Our results suggest that the SSP described here provides an optimal HLA-A +02 typing technique that may be useful in selecting donor-recipient pairs in bone marrow transplantation between unrelated individuals.

  12. High frequency of the apolipoprotein E *4 allele in African pygmies and most of the African populations in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekraoui, L; Lagarde, J P; Raisonnier, A; Gérard, N; Aouizérate, A; Lucotte, G

    1997-08-01

    Apolipoprotein E genotypes (alleles *2, *3, and *4) have been determined in 70 Aka Pygmies and 470 unrelated African sub-Saharan subjects. Allele frequencies for Pygmies are 5.7% for APOE*2, 53.6% for APOE*3, and 40.7% for APOE*4, and the global proportions for sub-Saharan subjects are 11.6% for APOE*2, 70.6% for APOE*3, and 17.8% for APOE*4. The frequencies in some ethnic groups are statistically different from the overall mean in the Afar and the Isa, the Ewe (Togo), the Malinke (Guinea), and the Mossi; three ethnic groups have a higher allele frequency of APOE*4 (Fon, 29.4%; Zairians, 33.3%; Tutsi, 38.5%). The APOE*4 allele is considered the ancestral form because of its high frequency in African Pygmies and other aboriginal populations.

  13. Association of HLA-B Alleles With Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection in the Yi Ethnic Group in Sichuan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MING-YAN XU; YI-MING SHAO; KUN-XUE HONG; XIAO-LING DENG; JUN LI; HONG PENG; YU-HUA RUAN; GUAN-MING QIN; HUI XING; XIAO-HU XU

    2004-01-01

    Objective To determine the distribution of HLA-B alleles in the Chinese Yi ethnic group and its association with HIV infection. Methods One hundred and six unrelated healthy HIV negative and 73 HIV positive Chinese Yi ethnic individuals were typed by PCR-SSP. Results The frequency of alleles B*07, B*35, and B*46 were increased in HIV-1-positive subjects, whereas the alleles B*55, B*44 and B*78 were absent in the HIV-infected persons studied. The B*46 allele was present in a significantly higher gene frequency among HIV-1-positive individuals (P=0.02, OR=3.32, 95% CI=1.13-9.78) compared with control subjects. Conclusion HLA-B*46 may be associated with its susceptibility to HIV-1 infections.

  14. Allelic divergence and cultivar-specific SSR alleles revealed by capillary electrophoresis using fluorescence-labeled SSR markers in sugarcane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Though sugarcane cultivars (Saccharum spp. hybrids) are complex aneu-polyploid hybrids, genetic evaluation and tracking of clone- or cultivar-specific alleles become possible due to capillary electrophoregrams (CE) using fluorescence-labeled SSR primer pairs. Twenty-four sugarcane cultivars, 12 each...

  15. No severe bottleneck during human evolution: evidence from two apolipoprotein C-II deficiency alleles.

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, W J; Li, W. H.; Posner, I; Yamamura, T.; Yamamoto, A.; Gotto, A M; Chan, L

    1991-01-01

    The DNA sequences of a Japanese and a Venezuelan apolipoprotein (apo) C-II deficiency allele, of a normal Japanese apo C-II gene, and of a chimpanzee apo C-II gene were amplified by PCR, and their nucleotide sequences were determined on multiple clones of the PCR products. The normal Japanese sequence is identical to--and the chimpanzee sequence differs by only three nucleotides from--a previously published normal Caucasian sequence. In contrast, the two human mutant sequences each differ fro...

  16. Association between high expression macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) alleles and West Nile virus encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rituparna; Loughran, Kerry; Murchison, Charles; Qian, Feng; Leng, Lin; Song, Yan; Montgomery, Ruth R; Loeb, Mark; Bucala, Richard

    2016-02-01

    Infection with mosquito-borne West Nile virus (WNV) is usually asymptomatic but can lead to severe WNV encephalitis. The innate cytokine, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), is elevated in patients with WNV encephalitis and promotes viral neuroinvasion and mortality in animal models. In a case-control study, we examined functional polymorphisms in the MIF locus in a cohort of 454 North American patients with neuroinvasive WNV disease and found patients homozygous for high-expression MIF alleles to be >20-fold (p=0.008) more likely to have WNV encephalitis. These data indicate that MIF is an important determinant of severity of WNV neuropathogenesis and may be a therapeutic target.

  17. HLA-G allele and haplotype frequencies in a healthy population of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroshli, Zahra; Gourabi, Hamid; Bazrgar, Masoud; Sanati, Mohammad Hossein; Bahraminejad, Elmira; Anisi, Khadije

    2014-06-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G molecule is expressed in cytotrophoblast cells, adult thymic epithelial cells, erythroblasts, pancreatic islets and mesenchymal stem cells. Although, HLA-G expression in allotransplanted patients is correlated with a better allograft acceptance, it is associated with an advanced grade of the tumor in cancer. In addition to the role on the immune system, HLA-G is also involved in successful pregnancy through the embryo implantation, fetal survival and the initial steps of hematopoiesis and angiogenesis. The aim of this study was determination of HLA-G allele frequencies in a healthy population of Iran. In this research, we selected 100 samples from healthy Iranian individuals and henceforth, we used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by sequencing technique for exon 2, 3, 4 and intron 2 of the gene for evaluating the HLA-G alleles frequencies. Investigation of intronic (intron 2) variation is the novelty of our study. The obtained results indicated thirteen alleles of HLA-G in Iranian individuals including G*01:01:01:01, G*01:06, G*01:01:01:06, G*01:01:02, G*01:01:03, G*01:01:05, G*01:01:06, G*01:01:07, G*01:01:08, G*01:03, G*01:04:01, G*01:04:03, and G*01:04:04. According to this study, the most prevalent alleles in the Iranian population were G*01:01:01:01 (52.5%), G*01:01:02 (16%) and G*01:04:03 (14.5%) and also the lowest alleles regarding the frequency were G*01:01:01:06 (0.5%) and G*01:03 (0.5%). The results of G*01:01:01:01 and G*01:04:01 frequencies showed some similarities with the polish population. Our results were similar to the north Indian population for the frequencies of G*01:06 and G*01:01:02. PMID:24659125

  18. Ethnic differences in allelic distribution of IFN-g in South African women but no link with cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williamson Anna-Lise

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The failure of specific types of human papillomaviruses (HPV to raise effective immune responses may be important in the pathogenesis of cervical cancer, the second most common cancer in South African women. Polymorphisms of a number of cytokine genes have been implicated in inducing susceptibility or resistance to cancers caused by infectious agents owing to their role in determining host immune response. Polymorphisms of IL-10 and IFN-γ genes are believed to influence the expression and/or secretion levels of their respective cytokines. Methods and Results In this study, women with histologically proven cancer of the cervix (n = 458 and hospital-based controls (n = 587 were investigated for bi-allelic -1082 (A/G polymorphisms of IL-10 and the bi-allelic +874(A/T polymorphisms of IFN-γ. In addition, the distributions of the allelic frequencies were stratified in both the African and mixed race population groups of South Africa. We found striking differences in the allele distribution of IFN-γ (X2 = 0.02 among the two ethnic groups. A significant increase in the allele distribution of the IFN-γ AA genotype was found in the African group compared to the mixed population group (OR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.2–1.0. For IL-10 there were no significant allelic differences between the two South African ethnic groups. Furthermore, when the ethnic groups were combined the IL-10 allelic frequencies in the combined South African data were similar to those observed in an Oriental population from Southern China and in an Italian population. However, the allele frequencies of the IFN-γ genotype among the two South African ethnic groups were different when compared to an Italian Caucasoid group. While crude analysis of these data showed both statistically significantly increased and diminished risks of cervical cancer among high producers of INF-γ and low producers of IL-10 respectively, these associations were no longer significant when the

  19. Allele-specific amplification in cancer revealed by SNP array analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas LaFramboise

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Amplification, deletion, and loss of heterozygosity of genomic DNA are hallmarks of cancer. In recent years a variety of studies have emerged measuring total chromosomal copy number at increasingly high resolution. Similarly, loss-of-heterozygosity events have been finely mapped using high-throughput genotyping technologies. We have developed a probe-level allele-specific quantitation procedure that extracts both copy number and allelotype information from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array data to arrive at allele-specific copy number across the genome. Our approach applies an expectation-maximization algorithm to a model derived from a novel classification of SNP array probes. This method is the first to our knowledge that is able to (a determine the generalized genotype of aberrant samples at each SNP site (e.g., CCCCT at an amplified site, and (b infer the copy number of each parental chromosome across the genome. With this method, we are able to determine not just where amplifications and deletions occur, but also the haplotype of the region being amplified or deleted. The merit of our model and general approach is demonstrated by very precise genotyping of normal samples, and our allele-specific copy number inferences are validated using PCR experiments. Applying our method to a collection of lung cancer samples, we are able to conclude that amplification is essentially monoallelic, as would be expected under the mechanisms currently believed responsible for gene amplification. This suggests that a specific parental chromosome may be targeted for amplification, whether because of germ line or somatic variation. An R software package containing the methods described in this paper is freely available at http://genome.dfci.harvard.edu/~tlaframb/PLASQ.

  20. Allele-selective inhibition of trinucleotide repeat genes

    OpenAIRE

    Matsui, Masayuki; Corey, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Expanded trinucleotide repeats cause Huntington’s disease (HD) and many other neurodegenerative disorders. There are no cures for these devastating illnesses and treatments are urgently needed. Each trinucleotide repeat disorder is the result of the mutation of just one gene, and agents that block expression of the mutant gene offer a promising option for treatment. Therapies that block expression of both mutant and wild-type alleles can have adverse effects, challenging researchers to develo...

  1. Allele-Specific DNA Methylation Detection by Pyrosequencing®

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer Kristensen, Lasse; Johansen, Jens Vilstrup; Grønbæk, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that plays important roles in healthy as well as diseased cells, by influencing the transcription of genes. In spite the fact that human somatic cells are diploid, most of the currently available methods for the study of DNA methylation do not provide......-effective protocol for allele-specific DNA methylation detection based on Pyrosequencing(®) of methylation-specific PCR (MSP) products including a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) within the amplicon....

  2. Multiplex allele-specific target amplification based on PCR suppression

    OpenAIRE

    Broude, Natalia E.; Zhang, Lingang; Woodward, Karen; Englert, David; Cantor, Charles R.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a strategy for multiplex PCR based on PCR suppression. PCR suppression allows DNA target amplification with only one sequence-specific primer per target and a second primer that is common for all targets. Therefore, an n-plex PCR would require only n + 1 primers. We have demonstrated uniform, efficient amplification of targeted sequences in 14-plex PCR. The high specificity of suppression PCR also provides multiplexed amplification with allele specifi...

  3. Effect of wheat puroindoline alleles on functional properties of starch

    OpenAIRE

    Brites, Carla Moita; Santos, Carla Alexandra Lourenço; Bagulho, Ana Sofia; Beirão-da-Costa, Maria Luisa

    2008-01-01

    Puroindoline a and b (Pina, Pinb) form the molecular basis of bread wheat grain hardness. Varieties with a softer endosperm and a wild genotype, in which both Pina and Pinb were present, seemed to produce less damaged starch Xour than hard varieties, where Pin mutations occurred and changed the starch rheological properties. The functional property of starch samples extracted from wheat varieties with diVerent Pin alleles was evaluated. Starch morphology was characteri...

  4. Generating Novel Allelic Variation Through Activator Insertional Mutagenesis in Maize

    OpenAIRE

    Bai, Ling; Singh, Manjit; Pitt, Lauren; Sweeney, Meredith; Brutnell, Thomas P.

    2007-01-01

    The maize transposable element Activator (Ac) has been exploited as an insertional mutagen to disrupt, clone, and characterize genes in a number of plant species. To develop an Ac-based mutagenesis platform for maize, a large-scale mutagenesis was conducted targeting the pink scutellum1 locus. We selected 1092 Ac transposition events from a closely linked donor Ac, resulting in the recovery of 17 novel ps1 alleles. Multiple phenotypic classes were identified corresponding to Ac insertions in ...

  5. Gene identification and allele-specific marker development for two allelic low phytic acid mutations in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phytic acid (PA, myo-inositol 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate) is an important anti-nutritional component in cereal and legume grains. PA forms of phosphorus (P) and its salts with micronutrient cations, such as iron and zinc, are indigestible in humans and non-ruminant animals, and hence could affect food/feed nutritional value and cause P pollution of ground water from animal waste. We previously developed a set of low phytic acid (LPA) rice mutants with the aim to increase their nutritional quality. Among them, one line, i.e., Os-lpa -XQZ-1 (hereafter lpa 1-2), was identified to have a mutation allelic to the KBNT lpa 1-1 mutation (hereafter lpa 1-1), which was already delimited to a 47-kb region on chromosome 2. In this study, we searched the candidate gene for these two allelic LPA mutations using T-DNA insertion mutants, mutation detection by CEL I facilitated mismatch cleavage, and gene sequencing. The TIGR locus LOCOs02g57400 was revealed as the candidate gene hosting these two mutations. Sequence analysis showed that the lpa 1-1 is a single base pair substitution mutation, while lpa 1-2 involves a 1,475-bp fragment deletion. A CAPS marker (LPA1CAPS) was developed for distinguishing the lpa 1-1 allele from lpa 1-2 and WT alleles, and InDel marker (LPA1InDel) was developed for differentiating the lpa 1-2 allele from lpa 1-1 and WT ones. Analysis of two populations derived from the two mutants with wild-type varieties confirmed the complete co-segregation of these two markers and LPA phenotype. The LOCOs02g57400 is predicted to encode, through alternative splicing, four possible proteins that are homologous to the 2-phosphoglycerate kinase reported in hyperthermophilic and thermophilic bacteria. The identification of the LPA gene and development of allele-specific markers are of importance not only for breeding LPA varieties, but also for advancing genetics and genomics of phytic acid biosynthesis in rice and other plant species. (author)

  6. Characterization of opsin gene alleles affecting color vision in a wild population of titi monkeys (Callicebus brunneus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunce, John A; Isbell, Lynne A; Neitz, Maureen; Bonci, Daniela; Surridge, Alison K; Jacobs, Gerald H; Smith, David Glenn

    2011-02-01

    The color vision of most platyrrhine primates is determined by alleles at the polymorphic X-linked locus coding for the opsin responsible for the middle- to long-wavelength (M/L) cone photopigment. Females who are heterozygous at the locus have trichromatic vision, whereas homozygous females and all males are dichromatic. This study characterized the opsin alleles in a wild population of the socially monogamous platyrrhine monkey Callicebus brunneus (the brown titi monkey), a primate that an earlier study suggests may possess an unusual number of alleles at this locus and thus may be a subject of special interest in the study of primate color vision. Direct sequencing of regions of the M/L opsin gene using feces-, blood-, and saliva-derived DNA obtained from 14 individuals yielded evidence for the presence of three functionally distinct alleles, corresponding to the most common M/L photopigment variants inferred from a physiological study of cone spectral sensitivity in captive Callicebus. PMID:20938927

  7. DNA TYPING SYSTEM FOR HLA-A2 ALLELES BY POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION WITH SEQUENCE-SPECIFIC PRIMERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张庆瑞; 翟宁; 耿龙; 宋芳吉

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To establish a PCR-SSP method for discriminating as many HLA-A* 02 alleles, which could easily be introduced into a rourine laboratory.``Methods. In this study we typed HLA-A*02 polymorphisms by a sequence-specific primer (SSP) method,which involved round 1 and round 2 PCR reactions to detect 17 HLA-A*02 alleles (they are HLA-A*0201- 0217alleles) covering exon 2 and exon 3.``Results. We have found that DNA sample concentration and purity were the most important variables in determining the quality of the results. For identifying correct band size, the size marker used was important. We noticed that different PCR machines performed differently. By this method, we detected 20 HLA-A* 02 positive genomic DNA samples and found 4 kinds of HLA-A*02 alleles. They were HLA-A*0201, 0203, 0206 and 0210.``Conclusior. The HLA-A* 02 PCR-SSP method was proven to be a reliable and easily applicable typing method. Our results suggest that the SSP described here provides an optimal HLA-A* 02 typing technique that may be useful in selecting donor-recipient pairs in bone marrow transplantation between unrelated individuals.

  8. Distribution of photoperiod-insensitive allele Ppd-A1a and its effect on heading time in Japanese wheat cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Masako; Chono, Makiko; Nishimura, Tsutomu; Sato, Mikako; Yoshimura, Yasuhiro; Matsunaka, Hitoshi; Fujita, Masaya; Oda, Shunsuke; Kubo, Katashi; Kiribuchi-Otobe, Chikako; Kojima, Hisayo; Nishida, Hidetaka; Kato, Kenji

    2013-09-01

    The Ppd-A1 genotype of 240 Japanese wheat cultivars and 40 foreign cultivars was determined using a PCR-based method. Among Japanese cultivars, only 12 cultivars, all of which were Hokkaido winter wheat, carried the Ppd-A1a allele, while this allele was not found in Hokkaido spring wheat cultivars or Tohoku-Kyushu cultivars. Cultivars with a photoperiod-insensitive allele headed 6.9-9.8 days earlier in Kanto and 2.5 days earlier in Hokkaido than photoperiod-sensitive cultivars. The lower effect of photoperiod-insensitive alleles observed in Hokkaido could be due to the longer day-length at the spike formation stage compared with that in Kanto. Pedigree analysis showed that 'Purple Straw' and 'Tohoku 118' were donors of Ppd-A1a and Ppd-D1a in Hokkaido wheat cultivars, respectively. Wheat cultivars recently developed in Hokkaido carry photoperiod-insensitive alleles at a high frequency. For efficient utilization of Ppd-1 alleles in the Hokkaido wheat-breeding program, the effect of Ppd-1 on growth pattern and grain yield should be investigated. Ppd-A1a may be useful as a unique gene source for fine tuning the heading time in the Tohoku-Kyushu region since the effect of Ppd-A1a on photoperiod insensitivity appears to differ from the effect of Ppd-B1a and Ppd-D1a.

  9. Higher FKBP5, COMT, CHRNA5, and CRHR1 allele burdens are associated with PTSD and interact with trauma exposure: implications for neuropsychiatric research and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boscarino JA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Joseph A Boscarino1,2, Porat M Erlich1,3, Stuart N Hoffman4, Xiaopeng Zhang51Center for Health Research, Geisinger Clinic, Danville, PA, 2Department of Psychiatry, 3Department of Medicine, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, 4Department of Neurology, 5Department of Anesthesiology, Geisinger Clinic, Danville, PA, USAObjective: The study aim was to assess the cumulative burden of polymorphisms located within four genetic loci previously associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD among outpatients at risk for PTSD.Methods: Diagnostic interviews were completed and DNA samples collected among 412 pain patients to determine if FKBP5 (rs9470080, COMT (rs4680, CHRNA5 (rs16969968, and CRHR1 (rs110402 single nucleotide polymorphisms were cumulatively associated with increased risk for PTSD.Results: In bivariate analyses, it was found that a count of specific PTSD risk alleles located within FKBP5, COMT, CHRNA5, and CRHR1 genetic loci (allele range = 0–6, mean count = 2.92, standard deviation = 1.36 was associated with lifetime (t [409] = 3.430, P = 0.001 and early onset PTSD (t [409] = 4.239, P = 0.000028. In logistic regression, controlling for demographic factors, personality traits, and trauma exposures, this risk allele count remained associated with both lifetime (odds ratio = 1.49, P = 0.00158 and early onset PTSD (odds ratio = 2.36, P = 0.000093. Interaction effects were also detected, whereby individuals with higher risk allele counts and higher trauma exposures had an increased risk of lifetime PTSD (allele count × high trauma, P = 0.026 and early onset PTSD (allele count × high trauma, P = 0.016 in these logistic regressions. Those with no or few risk alleles appeared resilient to PTSD, regardless of exposure history.Conclusion: A cumulative risk allele count involving four single nucleotide polymorphisms located within the FKBP5, COMT, CHRNA5, and CRHR1 genes are associated with PTSD. Level of trauma exposure

  10. Power of IRT in GWAS: successful QTL mapping of sum score phenotypes depends on interplay between risk allele frequency, variance explained by the risk allele, and test characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Stéphanie M; Service, Susan K

    2012-12-01

    As data from sequencing studies in humans accumulate, rare genetic variants influencing liability to disease and disorders are expected to be identified. Three simulation studies show that characteristics and properties of diagnostic instruments interact with risk allele frequency to affect the power to detect a quantitative trait locus (QTL) based on a test score derived from symptom counts or questionnaire items. Clinical tests, that is, tests that show a positively skewed phenotypic sum score distribution in the general population, are optimal to find rare risk alleles of large effect. Tests that show a negatively skewed sum score distribution are optimal to find rare protective alleles of large effect. For alleles of small effect, tests with normally distributed item parameters give best power for a wide range of allele frequencies. The item-response theory framework can help understand why an existing measurement instrument has more power to detect risk alleles with either low or high frequency, or both kinds.

  11. A WIDE DISTRIBUTION OF A NEW VRN-B1c ALLELE OF WHEAT TRITICUM AESTIVUM L. IN RUSSIA, UKRAINE AND ADJACENT REGIONS: A LINK WITH THE HEADING TIME AND ADAPTIVE POTENTIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shcherban A.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The adaptation of common wheat (T. aestivum L. to diverse environmental conditions is greatly under the control of genes involved in determination of vernalization response (Vrn-1 genes. It was found that the variation in common wheat heading time is affected not only by combination of Vrn-1 homoeoalleles but also by multiple alleles at a separate Vrn-1 locus. Previously, we described the Vrn-B1c allele from T.aestivum cv. 'Saratovskaya 29' and found significant differences in the structure of the first (1st intron of this allele when compared to another highly abundant Vrn-B1a allele, specifically, the deletion of 0.8 kb coupled with the duplication of 0.4 kb. We suggested that the changes in the intron 1 of Vrn-B1c allele caused earlier ear emergence in the near-isogenic line and cultivars, carrying this allele. In this study we investigate the distribution of the Vrn-B1c allele in a wide set of spring wheat cultivars from Russia, Ukraine and adjacent regions. The analysis revealed that 40% of Russian and 53% of Ukranian spring wheat cultivars contain the Vrn-B1c allele. The high distribution of the Vrn-B1c allele can be explained by a frequent using of 'Saratovskaya 29' in the breeding process inside the studied area. From the other hand, the predominance of the Vrn-B1c allele among cultivars cultivated in West Siberia and Kazakhstan may be due to the selective advantage of this allele for the region where there is a high risk of early fall frosts.

  12. Copy-number variations of SHANK3 and related clinical phenotypes in children with autism%中国儿童孤独症SHANK3拷贝数变异及其临床表型特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈碧媛; 邹小兵; 章钧; 邓红珠; 李建英; 李丽英; 唐春; 邹园园

    2011-01-01

    目的 检测典型孤独症患儿SHANK3基因拷贝数变异(CNVs)发生率并描述其临床表型特征,并探讨临床应用多重连接依赖探针扩增技术(MLPA)进行孤独症病因学诊断的可行性.方法 收集本院确诊为典型孤独症的患儿及其直系亲属的基因组DNA,采用MRC P343-C1 AUTISM-1MLPA试剂盒进行CNVs筛查.结果 共收集来自102个家系的109例典型孤独症患儿,男女比例为4.45:1.发现2例患儿出现SHANK3微缺失,检出率约为2%(2/109).结论 SHANK3基因的CNVs可能解释约2%的典型孤独症病例,是孤独症的一个重要遗传学变异基础;阳性病例倾向于出现严重的三大核心症状及智力缺损的表型;MLPA作为快速、准确的CNVs检测方法,有助于临床开展孤独症的病因学研究.%Objective To explore possible relationship between copy-number variations (CNVs) in 15q11-13,16p11 and SHANK3 gene by using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and the phenotypes in children with autism and to further explore the clinical application of MLPA to make an etiological diagnosis of Autism. Methods The diagnosed of autism was made according to the criteria of the ICD-10 and DSM-Ⅳ, with typical cluster of symptoms comprise social disability, communication impairments and repetitious behaviors. MLPA KIT P343-C1 AUTISM-1 was used to detect and describe the incidence of CNVs in these three domains. Results Among 109 cases collected from 102 autistic pedigrees, 2 individuals had SHANK3 microdeletion, accounting for approximately 2% (2/109) of cases,suggesting the proportion of SHANK3 microdeletion might contribute to typical autism. The phenotypic traits of patients with SHANK3 microdeletions showed homogenicity in severe core symptoms and mental retardation. Conclusions SHANK3 microdeletion is an important genetics component for autism, which may explain 2% typical autism cases. SHANK3 microdeletion might explain autistic core symptoms and mental

  13. H pylori iceA alleles are disease-specific virulence factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vildan Caner; Mustafa Yilmaz; Nadir Yonetci; Sevil Zencir; Nedim Karagenc; Ilknur Kaleli; Huseyin Bagci

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To characterize and compare genotype profiles of H pylori strains isolated from patients with chronic gastritis and duodenal ulcer in western part of Turkey.METHODS: A total of 46 patients [30 chronic gastritis (CG) and 16 duodenal ulcer (DU)] who had undergone endoscopy because of dyspeptic complaints were studied. The antral biopsy specimens were evaluated for the presence of H pylori by rapid urease test and culture,and the genotype profiles were determined by real-time PCR.RESULTS: The cagA gene was observed in 43 (93.5%)isolates. The vacA s1m2 genotype was the predominant subtype, found in 63.3% and 68.7% of isolates in patients with CG and DU, respectively. Twenty (66.6%)isolates from patients with CG were iceA2 positive while the iceA1 was predominant in those with DU (68.8%).In terms of the association of the iceA alleles to other genes, both alleles were significantly associated with the cagA vacA s1m2 genotype.CONCLUSION: The prevalent circulating genotypes in CG and DU were cagA vacA s1m2 iceA2 and cagA vacA s1m2 iceA1 genotype, respectively. It was found that cagA vacA s1m2 genotype seems to be common virulence factors in both CG and DU while iceA alleles show specificity for gastroduodenal pathologies in this study.

  14. Cellular adhesion gene SELP is associated with rheumatoid arthritis and displays differential allelic expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Burkhardt

    Full Text Available In rheumatoid arthritis (RA, a key event is infiltration of inflammatory immune cells into the synovial lining, possibly aggravated by dysregulation of cellular adhesion molecules. Therefore, single nucleotide polymorphisms of 14 genes involved in cellular adhesion processes (CAST, ITGA4, ITGB1, ITGB2, PECAM1, PTEN, PTPN11, PTPRC, PXN, SELE, SELP, SRC, TYK2, and VCAM1 were analyzed for association with RA. Association analysis was performed consecutively in three European RA family sample groups (Nfamilies = 407. Additionally, we investigated differential allelic expression, a possible functional consequence of genetic variants. SELP (selectin P, CD62P SNP-allele rs6136-T was associated with risk for RA in two RA family sample groups as well as in global analysis of all three groups (ptotal = 0.003. This allele was also expressed preferentially (p<10-6 with a two- fold average increase in regulated samples. Differential expression is supported by data from Genevar MuTHER (p1 = 0.004; p2 = 0.0177. Evidence for influence of rs6136 on transcription factor binding was also found in silico and in public datasets reporting in vitro data. In summary, we found SELP rs6136-T to be associated with RA and with increased expression of SELP mRNA. SELP is located on the surface of endothelial cells and crucial for recruitment, adhesion, and migration of inflammatory cells into the joint. Genetically determined increased SELP expression levels might thus be a novel additional risk factor for RA.

  15. Inheritance and interactions of incompatibility alleles in the tetraploid sour cherry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosković, R I; Wolfram, B; Tobutt, K R; Cerović, R; Sonneveld, T

    2006-01-01

    Three progenies of sour cherry (Prunus cerasus) were analysed to correlate self-(in)compatibility status with S-RNase phenotype in this allotetraploid hybrid of sweet and ground cherry. Self-(in)compatibility was assessed in the field and by monitoring pollen tube growth after selfing. The S-RNase phenotypes were determined by isoelectric focusing of stylar proteins and staining for RNase activity and, for the parents, confirmed by PCR. Seedling phenotypes were generally consistent with disomic segregation of S-RNase alleles. The genetic arrangements of the parents were deduced to be 'Köröser' (self-incompatible) S1S4.S(B) S(D), 'Schattenmorelle' (self-compatible) S6S13.S(B)S(B), and clone 43.87 (self-compatible) S4S13.S(B)S(B), where "." separates the two homologous genomes. The presence of S4 and S6 alleles at the same locus led to self-incompatibility, whereas S13 and S(B) at homologous loci led to self-compatibility. The failure of certain heteroallelic genotypes in the three crosses or in the self-incompatible seedlings indicates that S4 and S6 are dominant to S(B). However, the success of S13S(B) pollen on styles expressing corresponding S-RNases indicates competitive interaction or lack of pollen-S components. In general, the universal compatibility of S13S(B) pollen may explain the frequent occurrence of S13 and S(B) together in sour cherry cultivars. Alleles S(B) and S(D), that are presumed to derive from ground cherry, and S13, presumably from sweet cherry, were sequenced. Our findings contribute to an understanding of inheritance of self-(in)compatibility, facilitate screening of progenies for self-compatibility and provide a basis for studying molecular interactions in heteroallelic pollen. PMID:16307228

  16. A high-throughput method for genotyping S-RNase alleles in apple

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bjarne; Ørgaard, Marian; Toldam-Andersen, Torben Bo;

    2016-01-01

    We present a new efficient screening tool for detection of S-alleles in apple. The protocol using general and multiplexed primers for PCR reaction and fragment detection on an automatized capillary DNA sequencer exposed a higher number of alleles than any previous studies. Analysis of alleles...

  17. Allele walking: a new and highly accurate approach to HLA-DRB1 typing. Application to DRB1*04 alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, A; Tobes, R; Martín, J; Pareja, E

    1997-02-01

    We have developed a typing method, which can be used even in small laboratories, to produce a highly accurate and reliable allele assignment in any homozygous or heterozygous situation. We have called the method allele walking (AW) and it consists of sequential rounds of PCR-RFLP. After digestion, electrophoresis separates alleles positive for the mutation from the negative alleles; the cleaved fragment is then recovered from the gel and analyzed for mutations at another codon. In this way, AW is able to positively ascertain which mutations are in the same chromosome (cis-linkage) and assigns alleles independently from each other. Artificial sites are created in the PCR step in order to positively detect substitutions not naturally recognized by any of the existing or convenient enzymes. We report the application of AW for typing the 22 DRB1*04 alleles. The first PCR-RFLP round groups DRB1*04 alleles. Subsequently, the mutations at codons 86, 74, 71, 57 and 37 can be analyzed for the unambiguous assignment of the majority of the alleles. Additional polymorphisms at different codons can be assayed to resolve any undetermined alleles. The viability of all the restriction sites used as well as the feasibility of AW were successfully tested. PMID:9062970

  18. Allele-specific marker development and selection efficiencies for both flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase and flavonoid 3',5'-hydroxylase genes in soybean subgenus soja.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yong; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2013-06-01

    Color is one of the phenotypic markers mostly used to study soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) genetic, molecular and biochemical processes. Two P450-dependent mono-oxygenases, flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H; EC1.14.3.21) and flavonoid 3',5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H, EC1.14.13.88), both catalyzing the hydroxylation of the B-ring in flavonoids, play an important role in coloration. Previous studies showed that the T locus was a gene encoding F3'H and the W1 locus co-segregated with a gene encoding F3'5'H in soybean. These two genetic loci have identified to control seed coat, flower and pubescence colors. However, the allelic distributions of both F3'H and F3'5'H genes in soybean were unknown. In this study, three novel alleles were identified (two of four alleles for GmF3'H and one of three alleles for GmF3'5'H). A set of gene-tagged markers was developed and verified based on the sequence diversity of all seven alleles. Furthermore, the markers were used to analyze soybean accessions including 170 cultivated soybeans (G. max) from a mini core collection and 102 wild soybeans (G. soja). For both F3'H and F3'5'H, the marker selection efficiencies for pubescence color and flower color were determined. The results showed that one GmF3'H allele explained 92.2 % of the variation in tawny and two gmf3'h alleles explained 63.8 % of the variation in gray pubescence colors. In addition, two GmF3'5'H alleles and one gmF3'5'h allele explained 94.0 % of the variation in purple and 75.3 % in white flowers, respectively. By the combination of the two loci, seed coat color was determined. In total, 90.9 % of accessions possessing both the gmf3'h-b and gmf3'5'h alleles had yellow seed coats. Therefore, seed coat colors are controlled by more than two loci.

  19. TrueAllele casework on Virginia DNA mixture evidence: computer and manual interpretation in 72 reported criminal cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W Perlin

    Full Text Available Mixtures are a commonly encountered form of biological evidence that contain DNA from two or more contributors. Laboratory analysis of mixtures produces data signals that usually cannot be separated into distinct contributor genotypes. Computer modeling can resolve the genotypes up to probability, reflecting the uncertainty inherent in the data. Human analysts address the problem by simplifying the quantitative data in a threshold process that discards considerable identification information. Elevated stochastic threshold levels potentially discard more information. This study examines three different mixture interpretation methods. In 72 criminal cases, 111 genotype comparisons were made between 92 mixture items and relevant reference samples. TrueAllele computer modeling was done on all the evidence samples, and documented in DNA match reports that were provided as evidence for each case. Threshold-based Combined Probability of Inclusion (CPI and stochastically modified CPI (mCPI analyses were performed as well. TrueAllele's identification information in 101 positive matches was used to assess the reliability of its modeling approach. Comparison was made with 81 CPI and 53 mCPI DNA match statistics that were manually derived from the same data. There were statistically significant differences between the DNA interpretation methods. TrueAllele gave an average match statistic of 113 billion, CPI averaged 6.68 million, and mCPI averaged 140. The computer was highly specific, with a false positive rate under 0.005%. The modeling approach was precise, having a factor of two within-group standard deviation. TrueAllele accuracy was indicated by having uniformly distributed match statistics over the data set. The computer could make genotype comparisons that were impossible or impractical using manual methods. TrueAllele computer interpretation of DNA mixture evidence is sensitive, specific, precise, accurate and more informative than manual

  20. HLA-DRB, DQA and DQB allele frequencies in Iranian patients with chronic hepatitis B by PCR-SSP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baniaghil S

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The outcome of acute hepatitis B infection may be influenced by host genetic factors like human leukocyte antigen (HLA. To investigate the association between the HLA-DRB, DQA1 and DQB1 alleles and chronic hepatitis B infection, 50 patients with chronic hepatitis B (based on 6 months positive of HBsAg and HBc antibody and HBeAg and antibody by serological test, were selected from Turkman population in north east of Iran .Allele frequency in patients were compared with a 65 aged and sex match control group from healthy blood donor of that ethnic population. Methods: HLA DRB, DQA1 and DQB1 alleles were determined using polymerase chain reaction based on sequence specific primer (PCR-SSP method. Allele frequencies in patients and control subjects were compared by Epi-info statistical soft-wear. Results: There was a significant increase and positive association in HLA-DRB1*0301, DQA1*0501 and DQB1*0604 allele frequency in patients group while the frequency of HLA-DRB1*1301, 1501 and DQB1*0401 and DQA1*0401, 0102 were lower in patients than control group and shows negative association. Conclusion: In Iranian Torkman population, HLA DRB1*0301, DQA1*0501 and DQB1*0604 have an important role in susceptibility to chronic hepatitis B infection and HLA DRB1*1301, 1501, DQB1*0401 are associated with protection to chronic hepatitis B infection. Larger case control studies may be helpful to confirm our investigation.

  1. TrueAllele casework on Virginia DNA mixture evidence: computer and manual interpretation in 72 reported criminal cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlin, Mark W; Dormer, Kiersten; Hornyak, Jennifer; Schiermeier-Wood, Lisa; Greenspoon, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Mixtures are a commonly encountered form of biological evidence that contain DNA from two or more contributors. Laboratory analysis of mixtures produces data signals that usually cannot be separated into distinct contributor genotypes. Computer modeling can resolve the genotypes up to probability, reflecting the uncertainty inherent in the data. Human analysts address the problem by simplifying the quantitative data in a threshold process that discards considerable identification information. Elevated stochastic threshold levels potentially discard more information. This study examines three different mixture interpretation methods. In 72 criminal cases, 111 genotype comparisons were made between 92 mixture items and relevant reference samples. TrueAllele computer modeling was done on all the evidence samples, and documented in DNA match reports that were provided as evidence for each case. Threshold-based Combined Probability of Inclusion (CPI) and stochastically modified CPI (mCPI) analyses were performed as well. TrueAllele's identification information in 101 positive matches was used to assess the reliability of its modeling approach. Comparison was made with 81 CPI and 53 mCPI DNA match statistics that were manually derived from the same data. There were statistically significant differences between the DNA interpretation methods. TrueAllele gave an average match statistic of 113 billion, CPI averaged 6.68 million, and mCPI averaged 140. The computer was highly specific, with a false positive rate under 0.005%. The modeling approach was precise, having a factor of two within-group standard deviation. TrueAllele accuracy was indicated by having uniformly distributed match statistics over the data set. The computer could make genotype comparisons that were impossible or impractical using manual methods. TrueAllele computer interpretation of DNA mixture evidence is sensitive, specific, precise, accurate and more informative than manual interpretation alternatives

  2. Identification of the Er1 resistence gene and RNase S-alleles in Malus prunifolia var. ringo rootstock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Zanon Agapito-Tenfen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Woolly apple aphid (WAA; Eriosoma lanigerum Hausm. is a major insect pest that has significant economic impact on apple growers worldwide. Modern breeding technologies rely on several molecular tools to help breeders select genetic determinants for traits of interest. Consequently, there is a need for specific markers linked to the genes of interest. Apple scions and rootstocks have an additional barrier to the introduction of pest resistance genes due to the presence of self-incompatibility S-RNase alleles. The genetic characterization and early identification of these alleles can amplify the contribution of a breeding program to the selection of resistant genitors that are as compatible as possible. In this study, we identified the Er1 gene involved in the resistance to WAA in Malus prunifolia var. ringo, also known as ‘Maruba Kaido’ rootstock, and we analyzed the inheritance pattern of the WAA resistance Er1 gene in a segregant population derived from Malus pumila ‘M.9’ and ‘Maruba Kaido’ rootstocks. The self-incompatibility of S-RNase alleles S6S26 of ‘Maruba Kaido’ were also identified along with their inheritance pattern. We also confirmed the identification of the S1S3 alleles in the ‘M.9’ rootstock. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to characterize WAA resistance and RNase S-alleles in ‘Maruba Kaido’. Furthermore, we discuss the potential use of the genetic markers for these genes and their potential impact on apple breeding programs.

  3. Infrequent detection of germline allele-specific expression of TGFBR1 in lymphoblasts and tissues of colon cancer patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Guda, Kishore

    2009-06-15

    Recently, germline allele-specific expression (ASE) of the gene encoding for transforming growth factor-beta type I receptor (TGFBR1) has been proposed to be a major risk factor for cancer predisposition in the colon. Germline ASE results in a lowered expression of one of the TGFBR1 alleles (>1.5-fold), and was shown to occur in approximately 20% of informative familial and sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) cases. In the present study, using the highly quantitative pyrosequencing technique, we estimated the frequency of ASE in TGFBR1 in a cohort of affected individuals from familial clusters of advanced colon neoplasias (cancers and adenomas with high-grade dysplasia), and also from a cohort of individuals with sporadic CRCs. Cases were considered positive for the presence of ASE if demonstrating an allelic expression ratio <0.67 or >1.5. Using RNA derived from lymphoblastoid cell lines, we find that of 46 informative Caucasian advanced colon neoplasia cases with a family history, only 2 individuals display a modest ASE, with allelic ratios of 1.65 and 1.73, respectively. Given that ASE of TGFBR1, if present, would likely be more pronounced in the colon compared with other tissues, we additionally determined the allele ratios of TGFBR1 in the RNA derived from normal-appearing colonic mucosa of sporadic CRC cases. We, however, found no evidence of ASE in any of 44 informative sporadic cases analyzed. Taken together, we find that germline ASE of TGFBR1, as assayed in lymphoblastoid and colon epithelial cells of colon cancer patients, is a relatively rare event.

  4. Significance of TGFBR3 allelic loss in the deregulation of TGFβ signaling in primary human endometrial carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewski, Piotr K; Nowacka-Zawisza, Maria; Semczuk, Andrzej; Rechberger, Tomasz; Gałczyński, Krzysztof; Krajewska, Wanda M

    2016-02-01

    Downregulation of betaglycan (β-glycan) [transforming growth factor β receptor type III (TGFβR3)], which belongs to co-receptors of the TGFβ pathway, occurs in a broad spectrum of primary human malignancies. However, in the case of endometrial cancer (EC), the mechanisms responsible for genetic alterations are still unknown. Therefore, we investigated allelic imbalance at the TGFBR3 locus (1p33‑p32) in the context of β-glycan mRNA and protein expression, as a possible genetic event determining β-glycan deregulation in EC patients. Study of β-glycan allelic imbalance in 48 primary human ECs was performed with the use of three different microsatellite markers, spanned within or in direct proximity to the TGFBR3 locus. Real‑time PCR and western blotting were used for β-glycan mRNA and protein quantification methods, respectively. Altogether, 25 of 39 (64%) informative cases and 25 of 48 (52%) of all specimens showed allelic imbalance in at least one microsatellite marker, concomitantly with decrease at both the β-glycan transcript and protein levels. Interestingly, 54% (15/28), 36% (8/22) and 35% (7/20) of informative ECs displayed allelic loss in D1S188, D1S435 and D1S1588 microsatellite markers, respectively. It is worth pointing out that 5 out of 39 (13%) informative cases showed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at two microsatellite markers. Microsatellite instability (MSI) was found in two markers, but to a very strictly limited extent. None of the clinicoprognostic features was found to be of significance. Our results suggest that LOH in the TGFBR3 locus may be one of the mechanisms responsible for loss of β-glycan expression. No correlation of LOH at the TGFBR3 locus with clinicopathological parameters suggests that allelic imbalance may be an early genetic event during neoplastic transformation of human endometrium. PMID:26548418

  5. Expression and loss of alleles in cultured mouse embryonic fibroblasts and stem cells carrying allelic fluorescent protein genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stringer Saundra L

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Loss of heterozygosity (LOH contributes to many cancers, but the rate at which these events occur in normal cells of the body is not clear. LOH would be detectable in diverse cell types in the body if this event were to confer an obvious cellular phenotype. Mice that carry two different fluorescent protein genes as alleles of a locus would seem to be a useful tool for addressing this issue because LOH would change a cell's phenotype from dichromatic to monochromatic. In addition, LOH caused by mitotic crossing over might be discernable in tissues because this event produces a pair of neighboring monochromatic cells that are different colors. Results As a step in assessing the utility of this approach, we derived primary embryonic fibroblast populations and embryonic stem cell lines from mice that carried two different fluorescent protein genes as alleles at the chromosome 6 locus, ROSA26. Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS showed that the vast majority of cells in each line expressed the two marker proteins at similar levels, and that populations exhibited expression noise similar to that seen in bacteria and yeast. Cells with a monochromatic phenotype were present at frequencies on the order of 10-4 and appeared to be produced at a rate of approximately 10-5 variant cells per mitosis. 45 of 45 stably monochromatic ES cell clones exhibited loss of the expected allele at the ROSA26 locus. More than half of these clones retained heterozygosity at a locus between ROSA26 and the centromere. Other clones exhibited LOH near the centromere, but were disomic for chromosome 6. Conclusion Allelic fluorescent markers allowed LOH at the ROSA26 locus to be detected by FACS. LOH at this locus was usually not accompanied by LOH near the centromere, suggesting that mitotic recombination was the major cause of ROSA26 LOH. Dichromatic mouse embryonic cells provide a novel system for studying genetic/karyotypic stability and factors

  6. Sporophytic self-incompatibility in Senecio squalidus (Asteraceae): S allele dominance interactions and modifiers of cross-compatibility and selfing rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, A C; Tabah, D A; Harris, S A; Hiscock, S J

    2011-01-01

    Understanding genetic mechanisms of self-incompatibility (SI) and how they evolve is central to understanding the mating behaviour of most outbreeding angiosperms. Sporophytic SI (SSI) is controlled by a single multi-allelic locus, S, which is expressed in the diploid (sporophyte) plant to determine the SI phenotype of its haploid (gametophyte) pollen. This allows complex patterns of independent S allele dominance interactions in male (pollen) and female (pistil) reproductive tissues. Senecio squalidus is a useful model for studying the genetic regulation and evolution of SSI because of its population history as an alien invasive species in the UK. S. squalidus maintains a small number of S alleles (7-11) with a high frequency of dominance interactions. Some S. squalidus individuals also show partial selfing and/or greater levels of cross-compatibility than expected under SSI. We previously speculated that these might be adaptations to invasiveness. Here we describe a detailed characterization of the regulation of SSI in S. squalidus. Controlled crosses were used to determine the S allele dominance hierarchy of six S alleles and effects of modifiers on cross-compatibility and partial selfing. Complex dominance interactions among S alleles were found with at least three levels of dominance and tissue-specific codominance. Evidence for S gene modifiers that increase selfing and/or cross-compatibility was also found. These empirical findings are discussed in the context of theoretical predictions for maintenance of S allele dominance interactions, and the role of modifier loci in the evolution of SI. PMID:20372180

  7. Identifying neutral allele Sb at pollen-sterility loci in cultivated rice with Oryza rufipogon origin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI LeiGang; LIU XiangDong; LIU Bo; ZHAO XingJuan; WANG Lan; LI JinQuan; LU YongGen

    2009-01-01

    Pollen sterility is commonly found in the intra-specific hybrids of indica and japonica rice, which is one of the main constrains for the utilization of heterosis between indica and japonica. Six loci controlling the pollen sterility of F1 between indica and japonica have been identified from previous studies. Neu-tral alleles at each locus are potential to overcome the F1 pollen sterility associated with the locus. Therefore, exploitation and utilization of neutral alleles are of significant importance. The present re-search was based on fine mapping of the F_1 pollen-sterility gene Sb and the abundant genetic diversity of Oryza rufipogon Griff. indigenous to Gaozhou, Guangdong Province (referred to as Gaozhou wild rice). Crosses were made using Taichung65 (with the genotype of S_b~jS_b~j and referred to as E_1) and its near-isogenic line of F_1 pollen sterility gene Sb(with the genotype of S_b~iS_b~i, E_2) as female parents, and 12 different accessions of Gaozhou wild rice as male parents. F_1 pollen fertility was examined to identify the materials having the neutral alleles at the F_1 pollen-sterility locus. Segregation of 4 molecular markers tightly linked with the Sb locus was analyzed in the F_2 populations derived from the F_1s car-rying the neutral gene. The pollen fertility related to the 3 genotypes of the molecular markers was also checked by statistical test to determine whether it was consistent with the hypothesis. The results showed that the pollen fertility of two F_1s from one accession of Gaozhou wild rice (GZW099) with E_1 and E_2 was (89.22±1.07)% and (85.65±1.05)%, respectively. Both of them were fertile and showed no significant difference by t-test. Segregation of the 3 genotypes of the 4 molecular markers followed the expected Mendelian ratio (1:2:1) in the F_2 populations. There was no significant difference for the av-eraged pollen fertility of the plants related to the 3 genotypes, suggesting that no interaction exists between the

  8. Autoimmune disease classification by inverse association with SNP alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Sirota

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available With multiple genome-wide association studies (GWAS performed across autoimmune diseases, there is a great opportunity to study the homogeneity of genetic architectures across autoimmune disease. Previous approaches have been limited in the scope of their analysis and have failed to properly incorporate the direction of allele-specific disease associations for SNPs. In this work, we refine the notion of a genetic variation profile for a given disease to capture strength of association with multiple SNPs in an allele-specific fashion. We apply this method to compare genetic variation profiles of six autoimmune diseases: multiple sclerosis (MS, ankylosing spondylitis (AS, autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD, rheumatoid arthritis (RA, Crohn's disease (CD, and type 1 diabetes (T1D, as well as five non-autoimmune diseases. We quantify pair-wise relationships between these diseases and find two broad clusters of autoimmune disease where SNPs that make an individual susceptible to one class of autoimmune disease also protect from diseases in the other autoimmune class. We find that RA and AS form one such class, and MS and ATD another. We identify specific SNPs and genes with opposite risk profiles for these two classes. We furthermore explore individual SNPs that play an important role in defining similarities and differences between disease pairs. We present a novel, systematic, cross-platform approach to identify allele-specific relationships between disease pairs based on genetic variation as well as the individual SNPs which drive the relationships. While recognizing similarities between diseases might lead to identifying novel treatment options, detecting differences between diseases previously thought to be similar may point to key novel disease-specific genes and pathways.

  9. Modulation of allele leakiness and adaptive mutability in Escherichia coli

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Jayaraman

    2000-08-01

    It is shown that partial phenotypic suppression of two ochre mutations (argE3 and lacZU118) and an amber mutation (in argE) by sublethal concentrations of streptomycin in an rpsL+ (streptomycin-sensitive) derivative of the Escherichia coli strain AB1157 greatly enhances their adaptive mutability under selection. Streptomycin also increases adaptive mutability brought about by the ppm mutation described earlier. Inactivation of recA affects neither phenotypic suppression by streptomycin nor replication-associated mutagenesis but abolishes adaptive mutagenesis. These results indicate a causal relationship between allele leakiness and adaptive mutability.

  10. Allelic drop-out probabilities estimated by logistic regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Asplund, Maria;

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the model for estimating drop-out probabilities presented by Tvedebrink et al. [7] and the concerns, that have been raised. The criticism of the model has demonstrated that the model is not perfect. However, the model is very useful for advanced forensic genetic work, where allelic drop......-out is occurring. With this discussion, we hope to improve the drop-out model, so that it can be used for practical forensic genetics and stimulate further discussions. We discuss how to estimate drop-out probabilities when using a varying number of PCR cycles and other experimental conditions....

  11. [Male reproductive behavior in Drosophila melanogaster strains with different alleles of the flamenco gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subocheva, E A; Romanova, N I; Karpova, N N; Iuneva, A O; Kim, A I

    2003-05-01

    The allelic state of gene flamenco has been determined in a number of Drosophila melanogaster strains using the ovoD test. The presence of an active copy of gypsy in these strains was detected by restriction analysis. Then male reproduction behavior was studied in the strains carrying a mutation in gene flamenco. In these experiments mating success has been experimentally estimated in groups of flies. It has been demonstrated that the presence of mutant allele flamMS decreases male mating activity irrespective of the presence or absence of mutation white. The active copy of gypsy does not affect mating activity in the absence of the mutation in gene flamenco. Individual analysis has demonstrated that that mutation flamMS results in characteristic changes in courtship: flamMS males exhibit a delay in the transition from the orientation stage to the vibration stage (the so-called vibration delay). The role of locus flamenco in the formation of male mating behavior in Drosophila is discussed. PMID:12838614

  12. Allelic structure and distribution of 103 STR loci in a Southern Tunisian population

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abdellatif Maalej; Ahmed Rebai; Adnen Ayadi; Jomaa Jouida; Hafedh Makni; Hammadi Ayadi

    2004-04-01

    Genotypes of 103 short tandem repeat (STR) markers distributed at an average of 40 cM intervals throughout the genome were determined for 40 individuals from the village of BirEl Hfai (BEH). This village of approximately 31.000 individuals is localized in the south-west of Tunisia. The allele frequency distributions in BEH were compared with those obtained for individuals in the CEPH (Centre d’Etude du Polymorphisme Humain) data using a Kolmogorov–Smirnov two-sample test. Fourteen out of the 103 markers (13.2%) showed significant differences ($P\\lt 0.05$) in distribution between the two populations. Population heterogeneity in BEH was indicated by an excess of observed homozygosity deviations from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium at 3 loci ($P\\lt 0.0005$). No evidence for genotypic disequilibrium was found for any of the marker pairs. This demonstrated that in spite of a high inbreeding level in the population, few markers showed evidence for a different pattern of allelic distribution compared to CEPH.

  13. Analysis of the distribution of HLA-A alleles in populations from five continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, D; Williams, F; Meenagh, A; Daar, A S; Gorodezky, C; Hammond, M; Nascimento, E; Briceno, I; Perez, M P

    2000-10-01

    The variation and frequency of HLA-A genotypes were established by PCR-SSOP typing in diverse geographically distributed populations: Brazilian, Colombian Kogui, Cuban, Mexican, Omani, Singapore Chinese, and South African Zulu. HLA-A allelic families with only one allele were identified for HLA-A*01, -A*23, -A*25, -A*31, -A*32, -A*36, -A*43, -A*69, -A*80; and with two alleles for HLA-A*03, -A*11, -A*26, -A*29, -A*33, -A*34, and -A*66. Greater variation was detected for HLA-A*02, -A*24, and -A*68 allele families. Colombian Kogui and Mexican Seris showed the least diversity with respect to HLA-A alleles, albeit with small numbers tested, with only four and five HLA-A alleles identified, respectively. It would appear by their presence in all populations studied, either rural or indigenous, that certain alleles are very important in pathogen peptide presentation. PMID:11082518

  14. Allelic Diversity of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II DRB Gene in Indian Cattle and Buffalo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachinandan De

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to study the diversity of MHC-DRB3 alleles in Indian cattle and buffalo breeds. Previously reported BoLA-DRB exon 2 alleles of Indian Zebu cattle, Bos taurus cattle, buffalo, sheep, and goats were analyzed for the identities and divergence among various allele sequences. Comparison of predicted amino acid residues of DRB3 exon 2 alleles with similar alleles from other ruminants revealed considerable congruence in amino acid substitution pattern. These alleles showed a high degree of nucleotide and amino acid polymorphism at positions forming peptide-binding regions. A higher rate of nonsynonymous substitution was detected at the peptide-binding regions, indicating that BoLA-DRB3 allelic sequence evolution was driven by positive selection.

  15. Effects of the APOE ε2 Allele on Mortality and Cognitive Function in the Oldest Old

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindahl-Jacobsen, Rune; Tan, Qihua; Mengel-From, Jonas;

    2013-01-01

    . We did not find a protective effect of the APOE ε2 allele on mortality among the oldest old, but in agreement with our previous findings, we found a 22% increased mortality risk for APOE ε4 carriers. The APOE ε2 allele may be protective on cognitive decline among the oldest old.......Some studies indicate that the APOE ε2 allele may have a protective effect on mortality and mental health among the elderly adults. We investigated the effect of the APOE ε2 allele on cognitive function and mortality in 1651 members of the virtually extinct Danish 1905 birth cohort. We found...... no protective effect of the APOE ε2 allele on mortality compared with the APOE ε3 allele. The point estimates indicated an increased protection against cognitive decline over time for persons with the APOE ε2 allele. Cognitive score did not significantly modify the mortality risk of the various APOE genotypes...

  16. Low frequency of the scrapile resistance-associated allele and presence of lysine-171 allele of the prion protein gene in Italian Biellese ovine breed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acutis, P.L.; Sbaiz, L.; Verburg, F.J.; Riina, M.V.; Ru, G.; Moda, G.; Caramelli, M.; Bossers, A.

    2004-01-01

    Frequencies of polymorphisms at codons 136, 154 and 171 of the prion protein (PrP) gene were studied in 1207 pure-bred and cross-bred Italian Biellese rams, a small ovine breed of about 65 000 head in Italy. Aside from the five most common alleles (VRQ, ARQ, ARR, AHQ and ARH), the rare ARK allele wa

  17. Allele mining and enhanced genetic recombination for rice breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Hei; Raghavan, Chitra; Zhou, Bo; Oliva, Ricardo; Choi, Il Ryong; Lacorte, Vanica; Jubay, Mona Liza; Cruz, Casiana Vera; Gregorio, Glenn; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Ulat, Victor Jun; Borja, Frances Nikki; Mauleon, Ramil; Alexandrov, Nickolai N; McNally, Kenneth L; Sackville Hamilton, Ruaraidh

    2015-12-01

    Traditional rice varieties harbour a large store of genetic diversity with potential to accelerate rice improvement. For a long time, this diversity maintained in the International Rice Genebank has not been fully used because of a lack of genome information. The publication of the first reference genome of Nipponbare by the International Rice Genome Sequencing Project (IRGSP) marked the beginning of a systematic exploration and use of rice diversity for genetic research and breeding. Since then, the Nipponbare genome has served as the reference for the assembly of many additional genomes. The recently completed 3000 Rice Genomes Project together with the public database (SNP-Seek) provides a new genomic and data resource that enables the identification of useful accessions for breeding. Using disease resistance traits as case studies, we demonstrated the power of allele mining in the 3,000 genomes for extracting accessions from the GeneBank for targeted phenotyping. Although potentially useful landraces can now be identified, their use in breeding is often hindered by unfavourable linkages. Efficient breeding designs are much needed to transfer the useful diversity to breeding. Multi-parent Advanced Generation InterCross (MAGIC) is a breeding design to produce highly recombined populations. The MAGIC approach can be used to generate pre-breeding populations with increased genotypic diversity and reduced linkage drag. Allele mining combined with a multi-parent breeding design can help convert useful diversity into breeding-ready genetic resources. PMID:26606925

  18. Allele frequency of CODIS 13 in Indonesian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untoro, Evi; Atmadja, Djaja Surya; Pu, Chang-En; Wu, Fang-Chi

    2009-04-01

    Since the first application of DNA technology in 1985 in forensic cases, and the acceptance of this technology in 1988 at court, the DNA typing is widely used in personal identification, parentage cases and tracing the source of biological samples found in the crime scene. The FBI on 1990 had recommended the forensic labs to used 13 loci of Short Tandem Repeats (STR), known as CODIS 13, as the loci of choice for forensic use. The research on the population DNA database on these loci is extremely important for calculating the Paternity Index as well as Matching Probability for forensic application of DNA technology. As many as 402 unrelated persons, consisted of 322 from western part of Indonesia and 80 from eastern part of Indonesia, were chosen as the respondents of this research, after signing the informed consent. The peripheral blood sample was taken using sterile lancets and dropped onto FTA classic cards. The DNA was extracted by FTA purification solution (3x) and TE(-1) (2x), and amplified by PCR mix, either Cofiler or Profiler Plus (Perkin Elmers), followed by sequencing using ABI Prism type 3100 Avant Genetic Analyzer. The analysis showed that the alleles frequencies of Indonesian is specific, different with the other Asian populations with some specific alleles and microvariant were found. PMID:19261522

  19. Allele frequency of CODIS 13 in Indonesian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untoro, Evi; Atmadja, Djaja Surya; Pu, Chang-En; Wu, Fang-Chi

    2009-04-01

    Since the first application of DNA technology in 1985 in forensic cases, and the acceptance of this technology in 1988 at court, the DNA typing is widely used in personal identification, parentage cases and tracing the source of biological samples found in the crime scene. The FBI on 1990 had recommended the forensic labs to used 13 loci of Short Tandem Repeats (STR), known as CODIS 13, as the loci of choice for forensic use. The research on the population DNA database on these loci is extremely important for calculating the Paternity Index as well as Matching Probability for forensic application of DNA technology. As many as 402 unrelated persons, consisted of 322 from western part of Indonesia and 80 from eastern part of Indonesia, were chosen as the respondents of this research, after signing the informed consent. The peripheral blood sample was taken using sterile lancets and dropped onto FTA classic cards. The DNA was extracted by FTA purification solution (3x) and TE(-1) (2x), and amplified by PCR mix, either Cofiler or Profiler Plus (Perkin Elmers), followed by sequencing using ABI Prism type 3100 Avant Genetic Analyzer. The analysis showed that the alleles frequencies of Indonesian is specific, different with the other Asian populations with some specific alleles and microvariant were found.

  20. Allelic variations of glut-1 deficiency syndrome: the chinese experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanyan; Bao, Xinhua; Wang, Dong; Fu, Na; Zhang, Xiaoying; Cao, Guangna; Song, Fuying; Wang, Shuang; Zhang, Yuehua; Qin, Jiong; Yang, Hong; Engelstad, Kristin; De Vivo, Darryl C; Wu, Xiru

    2012-07-01

    Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome is characterized by infantile onset seizures, development delay, movement disorders, and acquired microcephaly. The phenotype includes allelic variants such as intermittent ataxia, choreoathetosis, dystonia, and alternating hemiplegia of childhood with or without epilepsy. Dystonias involve allelic variants of glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome. Three Chinese patients presented with paroxysmal behavioral disturbance, weakness, ataxia (especially after fasting), and exercise intolerance. Electroencephalogram findings did not correlate with clinical manifestations. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging produced normal results or mild hypomyelination. Hypoglycorrhachia was evident in all cases. Cerebrospinal fluid glucose ranged from 1.63-2.45 mmol/L. Erythrocyte 3-O-methyl-d-glucose uptake was decreased to 58% in patient 1. Three SLC2A1 disease-causing mutations (761delA, P383H, and R400C) were observed. No patient tolerated ketogenic diets. Two patients responded to frequent meals with snacks. Cerebrospinal fluid evaluation constitutes the diagnostic testing permitting early treatment of glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome. Early diagnosis and treatment improve prognoses. PMID:22704013

  1. An allele of the crm gene blocks cyanobacterial circadian rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Joseph S; Bordowitz, Juliana R; Bree, Anna C; Golden, Susan S

    2013-08-20

    The SasA-RpaA two-component system constitutes a key output pathway of the cyanobacterial Kai circadian oscillator. To date, rhythm of phycobilisome associated (rpaA) is the only gene other than kaiA, kaiB, and kaiC, which encode the oscillator itself, whose mutation causes completely arrhythmic gene expression. Here we report a unique transposon insertion allele in a small ORF located immediately upstream of rpaA in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 termed crm (for circadian rhythmicity modulator), which results in arrhythmic promoter activity but does not affect steady-state levels of RpaA. The crm ORF complements the defect when expressed in trans, but only if it can be translated, suggesting that crm encodes a small protein. The crm1 insertion allele phenotypes are distinct from those of an rpaA null; crm1 mutants are able to grow in a light:dark cycle and have no detectable oscillations of KaiC phosphorylation, whereas low-amplitude KaiC phosphorylation rhythms persist in the absence of RpaA. Levels of phosphorylated RpaA in vivo measured over time are significantly altered compared with WT in the crm1 mutant as well as in the absence of KaiC. Taken together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that the Crm polypeptide modulates a circadian-specific activity of RpaA.

  2. Detection of newly antibody-defined epitopes on HLA class I alleles reacting with antibodies induced during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquesnoy, R J; Hönger, G; Hösli, I; Marrari, M; Schaub, S

    2016-08-01

    The determination of HLA mismatch acceptability at the epitope level can be best performed with epitopes that have been verified experimentally with informative antibodies. The website-based International Registry of HLA Epitopes (http://www.epregistry.com.br) has a list of 81 antibody-verified HLA-ABC epitopes but more epitopes need to be added. Pregnancy offers an attractive model to study antibody responses to mismatched HLA epitopes which can be readily determined from the HLA types of child and mother. This report describes a HLAMatchmaker-based analysis of 16 postpregnancy sera tested in single HLA-ABC allele binding assays. Most sera reacted with alleles carrying epitopes that have been antibody-verified, and this study focused on the reactivity of additional alleles that share other epitopes corresponding to eplets and other amino acid residue configurations. This analysis led in the identification of 16 newly antibody-defined epitopes, seven are equivalent to eplets and nine correspond to combinations of eplets in combination with other nearby residue configurations. These epitopes will be added to the repertoire of antibody-verified epitopes in the HLA Epitope Registry. PMID:27312793

  3. Identification of Allele Frequency of Factor XI Deficiency (FXID in Holstein Cows Reared in Thrace Region of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozet AVANUS

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Factor XI (FXI is a protein that plays a key role in plasma coagulation. Factor XI Deficiency (FXID is an autosomal recessive disease caused by an insertion into exon 12 of FXI gene. The aim of this study is to determine the allele frequency of Factor XI Deficiency (FXID in Holstein cows reared in Thrace region of Turkey. Blood samples of 287 Holstein cows were used for DNA isolation. Amplification of FXI gene was followed by the evaluation of PCR products with visualization on 2% agarose gel electrophoresis. FXID mutant allele was not observed in any of the samples used in this study. In conclusion, none of the Holstein cows were neither affected nor carriers for FXID among all analysed Holstein cows reared in Thrace region of Turkey.

  4. Interaction analysis between HLA-DRB1 shared epitope alleles and MHC class II transactivator CIITA gene with regard to risk of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Ronninger

    Full Text Available HLA-DRB1 shared epitope (SE alleles are the strongest genetic determinants for autoantibody positive rheumatoid arthritis (RA. One of the key regulators in expression of HLA class II receptors is MHC class II transactivator (CIITA. A variant of the CIITA gene has been found to associate with inflammatory diseases.We wanted to explore whether the risk variant rs3087456 in the CIITA gene interacts with the HLA-DRB1 SE alleles regarding the risk of developing RA. We tested this hypothesis in a case-control study with 11767 individuals from four European Caucasian populations (6649 RA cases and 5118 controls.We found no significant additive interaction for risk alleles among Swedish Caucasians with RA (n = 3869, attributable proportion due to interaction (AP = 0.2, 95%CI: -0.2-0.5 or when stratifying for anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA presence (ACPA positive disease: n = 2945, AP = 0.3, 95%CI: -0.05-0.6, ACPA negative: n = 2268, AP = -0.2, 95%CI: -1.0-0.6. We further found no significant interaction between the main subgroups of SE alleles (DRB1*01, DRB1*04 or DRB1*10 and CIITA. Similar analysis of three independent RA cohorts from British, Dutch and Norwegian populations also indicated an absence of significant interaction between genetic variants in CIITA and SE alleles with regard to RA risk.Our data suggest that risk from the CIITA locus is independent of the major risk for RA from HLA-DRB1 SE alleles, given that no significant interaction between rs3087456 and SE alleles was observed. Since a biological link between products of these genes is evident, the genetic contribution from CIITA and class II antigens in the autoimmune process may involve additional unidentified factors.

  5. Closing the gap: discrimination of the expression profile of HLA questionable alleles by a cytokine-induced secretion approach using HLA-A*32:11Q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Föll, D; Hinrichs, J; Tischer, S; Battermann, A; Schambach, A; Figueiredo, C; Immenschuh, S; Blasczyk, R; Eiz-Vesper, B

    2012-05-01

    Matching of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles between donors and recipients plays a major role in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Null or questionably expressed HLA allelic variants are a major issue in HLA matching, because the aberrant expression of such alleles can have a major impact on the outcome of HSCT and/or its complications such as graft-versus-host disease. The goal of this study was to investigate the potential of a recently developed cytokine-induced secretion assay to differentiate the expression levels of HLA-A*32:11Q (questionable) into a null (N) or low (L) expression variant. An amino acid mutation at position 164 of HLA-A*32:11Q disrupts the disulfide bridge in the α2 domain. HLA-A*32:11Q is not detectable by standard microlymphocytotoxicity assay. To this end, we cloned soluble HLA-A*32:11Q and a reference allele (HLA-A*32:01) into expression vectors and transfected/transduced HEK293 and K562 cells. Allele-expressing K562 cells were simultaneously transfected/transduced with a β2-microglobulin (B2M)-encoding vector to ensure the intact HLA structure with B2M. After treatment with proinflammatory cytokines, secreted soluble HLA molecules were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in the supernatant and intracellular accumulation of the recombinant proteins by flow cytometry. HLA-A*32:11Q was nearly undetectable in untreated transfectants. Cytokine treatment increased the secretion of HLA-A*32:11Q to detectable levels and resulted in intracellular accumulation of the allele. There was no difference in mRNA transcription between the A*32 alleles. On the basis of these results, we recommend reclassification of HLA-A*32:11Q as a low expression (L) variant.

  6. Tetra-allelic SNPs: Informative forensic markers compiled from public whole-genome sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, C; Amigo, J; Carracedo, Á; Lareu, M V

    2015-11-01

    Multiple-allele single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are potentially useful for forensic DNA analysis as they can provide more discrimination power than normal binary SNPs. In addition, the presence in a profile of more than two alleles per marker provides a clearer indication of mixed DNA than assessments of imbalanced signals in the peak pairs of binary SNPs. Using the 1000 Genomes Phase III human variant data release of 2014 as the starting point, this study collated 961 tetra-allelic SNPs that pass minimum sequence quality thresholds and where four separate nucleotide substitution alleles were detected. Although most of these loci had three of the four alleles in combined frequencies of 2% or less, 160 had high heterozygosities with 50 exceeding those of 'ideal' 0.5:0.5 binary SNPs. From this set of most polymorphic tetra-allelic SNPs, we identified markers most informative for forensic purposes and explored these loci in detail. Subsets of the most polymorphic tetra-allelic SNPs will make useful additions to current panels of forensic identification SNPs and ancestry-informative SNPs. The 24 most discriminatory tetra-allelic SNPs were estimated to detect more than two alleles in at least one marker per profile in 99.9% of mixtures of African contributors. In European contributor mixtures 99.4% of profiles would show multiple allele patterns, but this drops to 92.6% of East Asian contributor mixtures due to reduced levels of polymorphism for the 24 SNPs in this population group. PMID:26209763

  7. Increased Risk of Psoriasis due to combined effect of HLA-Cw6 and LCE3 risk alleles in Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Aditi; Lahiri, Anirudhya; Senapati, Swapan; Basu, Baidehi; Ghosh, Saurabh; Mukhopadhyay, Indranil; Behra, Akhilesh; Sarkar, Somenath; Chatterjee, Gobinda; Chatterjee, Raghunath

    2016-01-01

    HLA-Cw6 is one of the most associated alleles in psoriasis. Recently, Late Cornified Envelop 3 (LCE3) genes were identified as a susceptibility factor for psoriasis. Some population showed epistatic interaction of LCE3 risk variants with HLA-Cw6, while some population failed to show any association. We determined the associations of a 32.2 kb deletion comprising LCE3C-3B genes and three SNPs (rs1886734, rs4112788; rs7516108) at the LCE3 gene cluster among the psoriasis patients in India. All three SNPs at the LCE3 gene cluster failed to show any association. In contrary, for patients with HLA-Cw6 allele, all three SNPs and the LCE3C-3B deletion showed significant associations. While, all five LCE3 genes were upregulated in psoriatic skin, only LCE3A showed significant overexpression with homozygous risk genotype compared to the non-risk genotype. LCE3B also showed significant overexpression in patients with HLA-Cw6 allele. Moreover, LCE3A showed significantly higher expression in patients bearing homozygous risk genotype in presence of HLA-Cw6 allele but not in those having non-risk genotype, demonstrating the combined effect of HLA-Cw6 allele and risk associated genotype near LCE3A gene. Integration of genetic and gene expression data thus allowed us to identify the actual disease variants at the LCE3 cluster among the psoriasis patients in India. PMID:27048876

  8. Arthritogenic peptide binding to DRB1*01 alleles correlates with susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roark, Christina L; Anderson, Kirsten M; Aubrey, Michael T; Rosloniec, Edward F; Freed, Brian M

    2016-08-01

    Genetic susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is often defined by the presence of a shared epitope (QKRAA, QRRAA, or RRRAA) at positions 70-74 in HLA-DRβ1. However, DRβ1*01:01 and 01:02 contain the same QRRAA epitope, but differ considerably in their susceptibility to RA. The purpose of this study was to determine if this difference could be explained by their ability to bind three arthritogenic peptides that we have previously shown to bind to the archetypal RA-susceptible allele, DRβ1*04:01, but not to the resistant DRβ1*08:01 allele. Binding of type II collagen(258-272), citrullinated and native vimentin(66-78), and citrullinated and native α-enolase(11-25) were measured on cell lines expressing either DRβ1*01:01, *01:02 or *01:03 in association with DRα1*01:01. DRβ1*01:01 and *01:02 both exhibited a 6.5-fold preference for citrullinated vimentin(66-78) compared to native vimentin. However, DRβ1*01:01 also exhibited a 1.7-fold preference for citrullinated α-enolase(11-25) and bound collagen(258-272), while DRβ1*01:02 bound neither of these peptides. Consistent with its known resistance to RA, DRβ1*01:03 preferentially bound native vimentin(66-78) and α-enolase(11-25) over the citrullinated forms of these peptides, and also failed to bind collagen(258-272). Site-directed mutagenesis was performed to determine which amino acid residues were responsible for the differences between these alleles. Mutating position 86 in DRβ1*01:01 from glycine to the valine residue found in DRβ1*01:02 eliminated binding of both citrullinated α-enolase(11-25) and collagen(258-272), thereby recapitulating the peptide-binding profile of DRβ1*01:02. The difference in susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis between DRβ1*01:01 and *01:02 thus correlates with the effect of position 86 on the binding of these arthritogenic peptides. Consistent with their association with RA resistance, positions I67, D70 and E71 all contributed to the inability of DRβ1*01:03 to bind

  9. New York State TrueAllele ® casework validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlin, Mark W; Belrose, Jamie L; Duceman, Barry W

    2013-11-01

    DNA evidence can pose interpretation challenges, particularly with low-level or mixed samples. It would be desirable to make full use of the quantitative data, consider every genotype possibility, and objectively produce accurate and reproducible DNA match results. Probabilistic genotype computing is designed to achieve these goals. This validation study assessed TrueAllele(®) probabilistic computer interpretation on 368 evidence items in 41 test cases and compared the results with human review of the same data. Whenever there was a human result, the computer's genotype was concordant. Further, the computer produced a match statistic on 81 mixture items (for 87 inferred matching genotypes) in the test cases, while human review reported a statistic on 25 of these items (30.9%). Using match statistics to quantify information, probabilistic genotyping was shown to be sensitive, specific, and reproducible. These results demonstrate that objective probabilistic genotyping of biological evidence can reliably preserve DNA identification information.

  10. Introgressive hybridization: brown bears as vectors for polar bear alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailer, Frank

    2015-03-01

    The dynamics and consequences of introgression can inform about numerous evolutionary processes. Biologists have therefore long been interested in hybridization. One challenge, however, lies in the identification of nonadmixed genotypes that can serve as a baseline for accurate quantification of admixture. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Cahill et al. (2015) analyse a genomic data set of 28 polar bears, eight brown bears and one American black bear. Polar bear alleles are found to be introgressed into brown bears not only near a previously identified admixture zone on the Alaskan Admiralty, Baranof and Chichagof (ABC) Islands, but also far into the North American mainland. Elegantly contrasting admixture levels at autosomal and X chromosomal markers, Cahill and colleagues infer that male-biased dispersal has spread these introgressed alleles away from the Late Pleistocene contact zone. Compared to a previous study on the ABC Island population in which an Alaskan brown bear served as a putatively admixture-free reference, Cahill et al. (2015) utilize a newly sequenced Swedish brown bear as admixture baseline. This approach reveals that brown bears have been impacted by introgression from polar bears to a larger extent (up to 8.8% of their genome), than previously known, including the bear that had previously served as admixture baseline. No evidence for introgression of brown bear into polar bear is found, which the authors argue could be a consequence of selection. Besides adding new exciting pieces to the puzzle of polar/brown bear evolutionary history, the study by Cahill and colleagues highlights that wildlife genomics is moving from analysing single genomes towards a landscape genomics approach. PMID:25775930

  11. Generation of humoral immune responses to multi-allele PfAMA1 vaccines; effect of adjuvant and number of component alleles on the breadth of response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwadwo A Kusi

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in multi-allele vaccines to overcome strain-specificity against polymorphic vaccine targets such as Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1. These have been shown to induce broad inhibitory antibodies in vitro and formed the basis for the design of three Diversity-Covering (DiCo proteins with similar immunological effects. The antibodies produced are to epitopes that are shared between vaccine alleles and theoretically, increasing the number of component AMA1 alleles is expected to broaden the antibody response. A plateau effect could however impose a limit on the number of alleles needed to achieve the broadest specificity. Moreover, production cost and the vaccine formulation process would limit the number of component alleles. In this paper, we compare rabbit antibody responses elicited with multi-allele vaccines incorporating seven (three DiCos and four natural AMA1 alleles and three (DiCo mix antigens for gains in broadened specificity. We also investigate the effect of three adjuvant platforms on antigen specificity and antibody functionality. Our data confirms a broadened response after immunisation with DiCo mix in all three adjuvants. Higher antibody titres were elicited with either CoVaccine HT™ or Montanide ISA 51, resulting in similar in vitro inhibition (65-82% of five out of six culture-adapted P. falciparum strains. The antigen binding specificities of elicited antibodies were also similar and independent of the adjuvant used or the number of vaccine component alleles. Thus neither the four extra antigens nor adjuvant had any observable benefits with respect to specificity broadening, although adjuvant choice influenced the absolute antibody levels and thus the extent of parasite inhibition. Our data confirms the feasibility and potential of multi-allele PfAMA1 formulations, and highlights the need for adjuvants with improved antibody potentiation properties for AMA1-based vaccines.

  12. Microsatellite allele A5.1 of MHC class I chain-related gene A is associated with latent autoimmune diabetes in adults in Latvia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzina, L; Shtauvere-Brameus, A; Rumba, I; Sanjeevi, C B

    2002-04-01

    NIDDM is one of the most common forms of diabetes. The diagnosis is based on WHO classification, which is a clinical classification and misses the autoimmune diabetes in adults. Therefore, among the clinically diagnosed NIDDM cases, there can be a certain number of patients with latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA). The MICA gene is located in the MHC class I region and is expressed by monocytes, keratinocytes, and endothelial cells. Sequence determination of the MICA gene identifies trinucleotide repeat (GCT) microsatellite polymorphism, which identifies 5 alleles with 4, 5, 6, and 9 repetitions of GCT (A4, A5, A6, and A9) or 5 repetitions of GCT with 1 additional G insertion for allele A5.1. From our previous studies, we have shown that microsatellite allele A5 of MICA is associated with IDDM. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that certain MICA alleles are associated with LADA among clinically diagnosed NIDDM. Out of 100 clinically diagnosed NIDDM patients, 49 tested positive for GAD65 and IA-2 antibodies by use of 35S RIA. Samples from these 49 patients and 96 healthy controls were analyzed for MICA by PCR amplification, and fragment sizes were determined in an ABI prism DNA sequencer. Our results show that MICA allele A5.1 is significantly increased in antibody-positive (GAD65 or IA-2) NIDDM patients [35/49 (72%)] when compared to healthy controls [22/96 (23%)] (OR = 8.4; P < 0.0001). However, we do not see any association with each of the antibodies separately. From our study, we conclude that (a) MICA allele A5.1 is associated with LADA and (b) MICA may play an important role in the etiopathogenesis of LADA.

  13. Human leukocyte antigen class Ⅱ DQB1*0301, DRB1*1101 alleles and spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C virus infection: A meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Hong; Rong-Bin Yu; Nan-Xiong Sun; Bin Wang; Yao-Chu Xu; Guan-Ling Wu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To assess the associations of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class Ⅱ DQB1*0301 and/or DRB1*1101 allele with spontaneous hepatitis C virus (HCV) clearance by meta-analysis of individual dataset from all studies published till date.METHODS: To clarify the impact of HLA class Ⅱ polymorphisms on viral clearance, we performed a metaanalysis of the published data from 11 studies comparing the frequencies of DQB1*0301 and DRB1*1101 alleles in individuals with spontaneous resolution to those with persistent infection. As we identified the heterogeneity between studies, summary statistical data were calculated based on a random-effect model.RESULTS: Meta-analyses yielded summary estimatesodds ratio (OR) of 2.36 [95%CI (1.62, 3.43), P<0.00001]and 2.02 [95%CI (1.56, 2.62), P<0.00001] for the effects of DQB1*0301 and DRB1*1101 alleles on spontaneous clearance of HCV, respectively.CONCLUSION: These results support the hypothesis that specific HLA class Ⅱ alleles might influence the susceptibility or resistance to persistent HCV infection.Both DQB1*0301 and DRB1*1101 are protective alleles and present HCV epitopes more effectively to CD4+T lymphocytes than others, and subjects with these two alleles are at a lower risk of developing chronic HCV infection. Large, multi-ethnic confirmatory and welldesigned studies are needed to determine the host genetic determinants of HCV infection.

  14. An Allele Real-Coded Quantum Evolutionary Algorithm Based on Hybrid Updating Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Xian Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For improving convergence rate and preventing prematurity in quantum evolutionary algorithm, an allele real-coded quantum evolutionary algorithm based on hybrid updating strategy is presented. The real variables are coded with probability superposition of allele. A hybrid updating strategy balancing the global search and local search is presented in which the superior allele is defined. On the basis of superior allele and inferior allele, a guided evolutionary process as well as updating allele with variable scale contraction is adopted. And Hε gate is introduced to prevent prematurity. Furthermore, the global convergence of proposed algorithm is proved by Markov chain. Finally, the proposed algorithm is compared with genetic algorithm, quantum evolutionary algorithm, and double chains quantum genetic algorithm in solving continuous optimization problem, and the experimental results verify the advantages on convergence rate and search accuracy.

  15. An Allele Real-Coded Quantum Evolutionary Algorithm Based on Hybrid Updating Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Xian; Qian, Xiao-Yi; Peng, Hui-Deng; Wang, Jian-Hui

    2016-01-01

    For improving convergence rate and preventing prematurity in quantum evolutionary algorithm, an allele real-coded quantum evolutionary algorithm based on hybrid updating strategy is presented. The real variables are coded with probability superposition of allele. A hybrid updating strategy balancing the global search and local search is presented in which the superior allele is defined. On the basis of superior allele and inferior allele, a guided evolutionary process as well as updating allele with variable scale contraction is adopted. And H ε gate is introduced to prevent prematurity. Furthermore, the global convergence of proposed algorithm is proved by Markov chain. Finally, the proposed algorithm is compared with genetic algorithm, quantum evolutionary algorithm, and double chains quantum genetic algorithm in solving continuous optimization problem, and the experimental results verify the advantages on convergence rate and search accuracy. PMID:27057159

  16. ApoE allele frequencies in Italian sporadic and familial Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbi, S; Nacmias, B; Forleo, P; Latorraca, S; Gobbini, I; Bracco, L; Piacentini, S; Amaducci, L

    1994-08-15

    Recent studies have provided evidence of association of apolipoprotein E (ApoE) epsilon 4 allele and late onset familial and sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). Epidemiological studies have established allelic variation at the ApoE locus. We have analyzed the ApoE gene polymorphism in a sample of 446 Italian subjects. Our data confirm a significant association between epsilon 4 allele and sporadic AD. The frequency of epsilon 4 allele in early onset familial AD patients was comparable to control values suggesting that epsilon 4 allele does not represent a risk factor for early onset familial AD (EOFAD). Moreover, we found a not previously reported association between ApoE epsilon 2 allele and sporadic AD and EOFAD. PMID:7824157

  17. Allelic diversity and molecular characterization of puroindoline genes in five diploid species of the Aegilops genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, Susana; Guzmán, Carlos; Alvarez, Juan B

    2013-11-01

    Grain hardness is an important quality trait in wheat. This trait is related to the variation in, and the presence of, puroindolines (PINA and PINB). This variation can be increased by the allelic polymorphism present in the Aegilops species that are related to wheat. This study evaluated allelic Pina and Pinb gene variability in five diploid species of the Aegilops genus, along with the molecular characterization of the main allelic variants found in each species. This polymorphism resulted in 16 alleles for the Pina gene and 24 alleles for the Pinb gene, of which 10 and 17, respectively, were novel. Diverse mutations were detected in the deduced mature proteins of these alleles, which could influence the hardness characteristics of these proteins. This study shows that the diploid species of the Aegilops genus could be a good source of genetic variability for both Pina and Pinb genes, which could be used in breeding programmes to extend the range of different textures in wheat.

  18. Association between the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele and late onset of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Timm, Sally; Wang, August G;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The 32-bp deletion allele in chemokine receptor CCR5 has been associated with several immune-mediated diseases and might be implicated in schizophrenia as well. METHOD: The authors genotyped DNA samples from 268 schizophrenia patients and 323 healthy subjects. Age at first admission......-onset schizophrenia) and healthy subjects differed significantly. This was reflected in an increased frequency of the deletion allele in the patient subgroup. Patients with ages at first admission below and above 40 years significantly differed in distribution of genotypes and alleles, with an overrepresentation...... of the deletion allele in the latter subgroup of patients. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele is a susceptibility factor for schizophrenia with late onset. Alternatively, the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele may act as a modifier by delaying the onset of schizophrenia without...

  19. Long-Range (17.7 kb) Allele-Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction Method for Direct Haplotyping of R117H and IVS-8 Mutations of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Pont-Kingdon, Genevieve; Jama, Mohamed; Miller, Christine; Millson, Alison; Lyon, Elaine

    2004-01-01

    Genotyping of genetic polymorphisms is widely used in clinical molecular laboratories to confirm or predict diseases due to single locus mutations. In contrast, very few molecular methods determine the phase or haplotype of two or more mutations that are kilobases apart. In this report, we describe a new method for haplotyping based on long-range allele-specific PCR. Reaction conditions were established to circumvent the incompatibility of using allele-specific primers and a polymerase with p...

  20. Enhancement of allele discrimination by introduction of nucleotide mismatches into siRNA in allele-specific gene silencing by RNAi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Ohnishi

    Full Text Available Allele-specific gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi is therapeutically useful for specifically inhibiting the expression of disease-associated alleles without suppressing the expression of corresponding wild-type alleles. To realize such allele-specific RNAi (ASP-RNAi, the design and assessment of small interfering RNA (siRNA duplexes conferring ASP-RNAi is vital; however, it is also difficult. In a previous study, we developed an assay system to assess ASP-RNAi with mutant and wild-type reporter alleles encoding the Photinus and Renilla luciferase genes. In line with experiments using the system, we realized that it is necessary and important to enhance allele discrimination between mutant and corresponding wild-type alleles. Here, we describe the improvement of ASP-RNAi against mutant alleles carrying single nucleotide variations by introducing base substitutions into siRNA sequences, where original variations are present in the central position. Artificially mismatched siRNAs or short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs against mutant alleles of the human Prion Protein (PRNP gene, which appear to be associated with susceptibility to prion diseases, were examined using this assessment system. The data indicates that introduction of a one-base mismatch into the siRNAs and shRNAs was able to enhance discrimination between the mutant and wild-type alleles. Interestingly, the introduced mismatches that conferred marked improvement in ASP-RNAi, appeared to be largely present in the guide siRNA elements, corresponding to the 'seed region' of microRNAs. Due to the essential role of the 'seed region' of microRNAs in their association with target RNAs, it is conceivable that disruption of the base-pairing interactions in the corresponding seed region, as well as the central position (involved in cleavage of target RNAs, of guide siRNA elements could influence allele discrimination. In addition, we also suggest that nucleotide mismatches at the 3'-ends of sense

  1. Interleukin-6 Gene Promoter-572 C Allele May Play a Role in Rate of Disease Progression in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith M. Greer

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is an inflammatory demyelinating disease affecting the central nervous system. Although the exact pathogenesis of MS is unknown, it is generally considered to be an autoimmune disease, with numerous genetic and environmental factors determining disease susceptibility and severity. One important mediator of immune responses and inflammation is interleukin-6 (IL-6. Previously, elevated levels of IL-6 in mononuclear cells in blood and in brain tissue from MS patients have been reported. Various polymorphisms in the promoter region of the IL6 gene have also been linked with IL-6 protein levels. In MS, several small studies have investigated whether two IL6 promoter polymorphisms (−597 G>A and −174 G>C correlate with MS susceptibility, but with varying results. In the present study, we analyzed these polymorphisms, together with an additional polymorphism (−572 G>C in 279 healthy controls and 509 patients with MS. We found no significant differences between MS patients and healthy controls for the different −597 or −174 IL6 promoter alleles or genotypes. There was a slight reduction in the percentage of individuals with MS who carried a C allele at position −572, although this was not significant after correction for multiple comparisons. Interestingly, however, the −572 C allele showed a significant correlation with the MS severity score, suggesting a possible role in disease progression.

  2. Ribosomal protein genes are highly enriched among genes with allele-specific expression in the interspecific F1 hybrid catfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ailu; Wang, Ruijia; Liu, Shikai; Peatman, Eric; Sun, Luyang; Bao, Lisui; Jiang, Chen; Li, Chao; Li, Yun; Zeng, Qifan; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2016-06-01

    Interspecific hybrids provide a rich source for the analysis of allele-specific expression (ASE). In this work, we analyzed ASE in F1 hybrid catfish using RNA-Seq datasets. While the vast majority of genes were expressed with both alleles, 7-8 % SNPs exhibited significant differences in allele ratios of expression. Of the 66,251 and 177,841 SNPs identified from the datasets of the liver and gill, 5420 (8.2 %) and 13,390 (7.5 %) SNPs were identified as significant ASE-SNPs, respectively. With these SNPs, a total of 1519 and 3075 ASE-genes were identified. Gene Ontology analysis revealed that genes encoding cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (RP) were highly enriched among ASE genes. Parent-of-origin was determined for 27 and 30 ASE RP genes in the liver and gill, respectively. The results indicated that genes from both channel catfish and blue catfish were involved in ASE. However, each RP gene appeared to be almost exclusively expressed from only one parent, indicating that ribosomes in the hybrid catfish were in the "hybrid" form. Overall representation of RP transcripts among the transcriptome appeared lower in the F1 hybrid catfish than in channel catfish or blue catfish, suggesting that the "hybrid" ribosomes may work more efficiently for translation in the F1 hybrid catfish. PMID:26747053

  3. Upstream Transcription Factor 1 (USF1) allelic variants regulate lipoprotein metabolism in women and USF1 expression in atherosclerotic plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yue-Mei; Hernesniemi, Jussi; Oksala, Niku; Levula, Mari; Raitoharju, Emma; Collings, Auni; Hutri-Kähönen, Nina; Juonala, Markus; Marniemi, Jukka; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Seppälä, Ilkka; Mennander, Ari; Tarkka, Matti; Kangas, Antti J.; Soininen, Pasi; Salenius, Juha Pekka; Klopp, Norman; Illig, Thomas; Laitinen, Tomi; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Laaksonen, Reijo; Viikari, Jorma; Kähönen, Mika; Raitakari, Olli T.; Lehtimäki, Terho

    2014-01-01

    Upstream transcription factor 1 (USF1) allelic variants significantly influence future risk of cardiovascular disease and overall mortality in females. We investigated sex-specific effects of USF1 gene allelic variants on serum indices of lipoprotein metabolism, early markers of asymptomatic atherosclerosis and their changes during six years of follow-up. In addition, we investigated the cis-regulatory role of these USF1 variants in artery wall tissues in Caucasians. In the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study, 1,608 participants (56% women, aged 31.9 ± 4.9) with lipids and cIMT data were included. For functional study, whole genome mRNA expression profiling was performed in 91 histologically classified atherosclerotic samples. In females, serum total, LDL cholesterol and apoB levels increased gradually according to USF1 rs2516839 genotypes TT < CT < CC and rs1556259 AA < AG < GG as well as according to USF1 H3 (GCCCGG) copy number 0 < 1 < 2. Furthermore, the carriers of minor alleles of rs2516839 (C) and rs1556259 (G) of USF1 gene had decreased USF1 expression in atherosclerotic plaques (P = 0.028 and 0.08, respectively) as compared to non-carriers. The genetic variation in USF1 influence USF1 transcript expression in advanced atherosclerosis and regulates levels and metabolism of circulating apoB and apoB-containing lipoprotein particles in sex-dependent manner, but is not a major determinant of early markers of atherosclerosis. PMID:24722012

  4. Humoral immune responses to a single allele PfAMA1 vaccine in healthy malaria-naive adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmond J Remarque

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum: apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1 is a candidate malaria vaccine antigen expressed on merozoites and sporozoites. The polymorphic nature of AMA1 may compromise vaccine induced protection. The humoral response induced by two dosages (10 and 50 µg of a single allele AMA1 antigen (FVO formulated with Alhydrogel, Montanide ISA 720 or AS02 was investigated in 47 malaria-naïve adult volunteers. Volunteers were vaccinated 3 times at 4 weekly intervals and serum samples obtained four weeks after the third immunization were analysed for (i Antibody responses to various allelic variants, (ii Domain specificity, (iii Avidity, (iv IgG subclass levels, by ELISA and (v functionality of antibody responses by Growth Inhibition Assay (GIA. About half of the antibodies induced by vaccination cross reacted with heterologous AMA1 alleles. The choice of adjuvant determined the magnitude of the antibody response, but had only a marginal influence on specificity, avidity, domain recognition or subclass responses. The highest antibody responses were observed for AMA1 formulated with AS02. The Growth Inhibition Assay activity of the antibodies was proportional to the amount of antigen specific IgG and the functional capacity of the antibodies was similar for heterologous AMA1-expressing laboratory strains.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00730782.

  5. Allelic Dimorphism of the Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Binding Antigen-175 (EBA-175 Gene in the South-east of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Jelinek

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: The erythrocyte binding antigen 175 kDa (EBA-175 gene is located on chromosome 7. It encodes protein that binds to specific receptor glycophorin A on the erythrocyte surface during inva­sion. It has a dimorphic nature (FCR3 and CAMP. This study was designed to determine the distribu­tion of EBA-175 alleles of Plasmodium falciparum in the southeast of Iran"nMethods: We used the nested PCR method with specific primers, which improves the two fragments of the EBA-175 gene. Sixty eight microscopically positive blood samples were collected from the in­fected falciparum malaria subjects in the southeast of Iran."nResults: In this study which marks  the first one in Iran, CAMP strains (714 bp and FCR-3 strains (795 bp were found in 14 (37.8% and 23 (62.2%  in the originally Iranian subjects and in 10 (32.3% and 19 (61.3% Pakistani infected migrants respectively. Two migrant cases (6.4% had mix CAMP/FCR-3 infection."nConclusion: The two fragments of dimorphic EBA-175 gene were observed and the FCR-3 allele was more prevalent in Iran. There was no significant correlation between one of the EBA-175 alleles and the subject group in the mentioned region. This distributional pattern should be considered in design­ing to control P.  falciparum malaria in the region.

  6. Genetic mapping, marker assisted selection and allelic relationships for the Pu 6 gene conferring rust resistance in sunflower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulos, Mariano; Vergani, Pablo Nicolas; Altieri, Emiliano

    2014-09-01

    Rust resistance in the sunflower line P386 is controlled by Pu 6 , a gene which was reported to segregate independently from other rust resistant genes, such as R 4 . The objectives of this work were to map Pu 6 , to provide and validate molecular tools for its identification, and to determine the linkage relationship of Pu 6 and R 4 . Genetic mapping of Pu 6 with six markers covered 24.8 cM of genetic distance on the lower end of linkage Group 13 of the sunflower consensus map. The marker most closely linked to Pu 6 was ORS316 at 2.5 cM in the distal position. ORS316 presented five alleles when was assayed with a representative set of resistant and susceptible lines. Allelism test between Pu 6 and R 4 indicated that both genes are linked at a genetic distance of 6.25 cM. This is the first confirmation based on an allelism test that at least two members of the R adv /R 4 /R 11 / R 13a /R 13b /Pu 6 cluster of genes are at different loci. A fine elucidation of the architecture of this complex locus will allow designing and constructing completely new genomic regions combining genes from different resistant sources and the elimination of the linkage drag around each resistant gene.

  7. Age of an allele and gene genealogies of nested subsamples for populations admitting large offspring numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Eldon, Bjarki

    2012-01-01

    Coalescent processes, including mutation, are derived from Moran type population models admitting large offspring numbers. Including mutation in the coalescent process allows for quantifying the turnover of alleles by computing the distribution of the number of original alleles still segregating in the population at a given time in the past. The turnover of alleles is considered for specific classes of the Moran model admitting large offspring numbers. Versions of the Kingman coalescent are a...

  8. Origins, distribution and expression of the Duarte-2 (D2) allele of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase

    OpenAIRE

    Carney, Amanda E.; Rebecca D Sanders; Garza, Kerry R.; McGaha, Lee Anne; Bean, Lora J. H.; Coffee, Bradford W.; Thomas, James W; Cutler, David J.; Kurtkaya, Natalie L.; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L.

    2009-01-01

    Duarte galactosemia is a mild to asymptomatic condition that results from partial impairment of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT). Patients with Duarte galactosemia demonstrate reduced GALT activity and carry one profoundly impaired GALT allele (G) along with a second, partially impaired GALT allele (Duarte-2, D2). Molecular studies reveal at least five sequence changes on D2 alleles: a p.N314D missense substitution, three intronic base changes and a 4 bp deletion in the 5′ pro...

  9. Identification of resistant carboxylesterase alleles in Culex pipiens complex via PCR-RFLP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Hanying

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carboxylesterase overproduction is a frequently observed resistance mechanism of insects to organophosphate insecticides. As a major transmitter of human diseases, mosquitoes in the Culex pipiens complex have evolved 13 carboxylesterase alleles (Ester that confer organophosphate resistance. Six alleles, EsterB1, Ester2, Ester8, Ester9, EsterB10, and Ester11, have been observed in field populations in China, sometimes co-existing in one population. To differentiate the carboxylesterase alleles found in these field populations, PCR-RFLP was designed for use in resistance monitoring. Results Based on the DNA sequences of resistant and nonresistant carboxylesterase alleles, Ester B alleles were first amplified with PCR-specific primers and then digested with the restriction enzyme DraI. In this step, Ester2 and Ester11 were differentiated from the other Ester alleles. When the other Ester B alleles were digested with the restriction enzyme XbaI, EsterB1 and the susceptible C. p. pallens Ester were screened out. Ester8 and Ester9 were differentiated from EsterB10 and the susceptible C. p. quinquefasciatus esterase allele, respectively, by amplifying and digesting the Ester A alleles with the restriction enzyme ApaLI. The effectiveness of the custom-designed PCR-RFLP was verified in two field mosquito populations. Conclusions A PCR-RFLP based approach was developed to differentiate carboxylesterase alleles in Culex pipiens complex mosquitoes. These processes may be useful in monitoring the evolutionary dynamics of known carboxylesterase alleles as well as in the identification of new alleles in field populations.

  10. HLA class II alleles and the presence of circulating Epstein-Barr virus DNA in greek patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) represents a seldom malignancy in most developed countries. Nevertheless, NPC receives an endemic form in concrete racial entities. The aims of this study were to detect the presence of Epstein-Barr virus DNA (EBV-DNA) in peripheral blood of NPC patients, to molecularly define human leukocyte antigens (HLA) DRB1*, DQA1* and DQB1* allele frequencies, and, finally, to determine whether the genetic predisposition of an individual to NPC depends on the liability to EBV infection. Patients and methods: a total of 101 patients of Hellenic origin and nationality, with histologically proven NPC, participated in this study. EBV-DNA detection was also applied in 66 patients with EBV-related malignancies (Hodgkin's [HL] and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma [NHL]) and infectious mononucleosis (IM), as well as in 80 healthy EBV-seropositive controls. Results: 81% of the NPC patients, 77.8% with HL, 72.2% with NHL, and 66.7% with IM were EBV-DNA positive, whereas the EBV genome was detected only in 15% of the healthy controls. These differences were statistically significant in all cases. Analysis of HLA class II antigens showed decreased frequency of the DRB1*07 (p 0.003), DQA1*0103 (p = 0.002), and DQA1*0201 (p = 0.003) alleles among NPC patients. A significant association between the HLA-DR/DQ alleles and the presence of EBV-DNA in peripheral whole blood was not established. Conclusion: circulating EBV-DNA and specific HLA class II alleles may predispose to or protect from NPC. However, the results of this study suggest that the genetic predisposition of an individual to NPC is independent of the liability to EBV infection. (orig.)

  11. HLA class II alleles and the presence of circulating Epstein-Barr virus DNA in greek patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karanikiotis, C. [424 Army General Hospital, Thessaloniki (Greece); Daniilidis, M.; Karyotis, N.; Nikolaou, A. [AHEPA Hospital, Aristotle Univ. of Thessaloniki School of Medicine (Greece); Bakogiannis, C. [Hygeia Hospital, Athens (Greece); Economopoulos, T. [' Attikon' Univ. Hospital, Athens (Greece); Murray, S. [Metropolitan Hospital, Athens (Greece); Papamichael, D. [Bank of Cyprus Oncology Center, Nicosia, Cyprus (Greece); Samantas, E. [' Agii Anargiri' Cancer Hospital, Athens (Greece); Skoura, L. [' Hippokration' Hospital, Thessaloniki (Greece); Tselis, N.; Zamboglou, N. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Offenbach Hospital (Germany); Fountzilas, G. [' Papageorgiou' Hospital, Aristotle Univ. of Thessaloniki School of Medicine (Greece)

    2008-06-15

    Background and purpose: nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) represents a seldom malignancy in most developed countries. Nevertheless, NPC receives an endemic form in concrete racial entities. The aims of this study were to detect the presence of Epstein-Barr virus DNA (EBV-DNA) in peripheral blood of NPC patients, to molecularly define human leukocyte antigens (HLA) DRB1*, DQA1* and DQB1* allele frequencies, and, finally, to determine whether the genetic predisposition of an individual to NPC depends on the liability to EBV infection. Patients and methods: a total of 101 patients of Hellenic origin and nationality, with histologically proven NPC, participated in this study. EBV-DNA detection was also applied in 66 patients with EBV-related malignancies (Hodgkin's [HL] and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma [NHL]) and infectious mononucleosis (IM), as well as in 80 healthy EBV-seropositive controls. Results: 81% of the NPC patients, 77.8% with HL, 72.2% with NHL, and 66.7% with IM were EBV-DNA positive, whereas the EBV genome was detected only in 15% of the healthy controls. These differences were statistically significant in all cases. Analysis of HLA class II antigens showed decreased frequency of the DRB1*07 (p = 0.003), DQA1*0103 (p = 0.002), and DQA1*0201 (p = 0.003) alleles among NPC patients. A significant association between the HLA-DR/DQ alleles and the presence of EBV-DNA in peripheral whole blood was not established. Conclusion: circulating EBV-DNA and specific HLA class II alleles may predispose to or protect from NPC. However, the results of this study suggest that the genetic predisposition of an individual to NPC is independent of the liability to EBV infection. (orig.)

  12. Persistence of the common Hartnup disease D173N allele in populations of European origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmanov, Dimitar N; Rodgers, Helen; Auray-Blais, Christiane; Giguère, Robert; Bailey, Charles; Bröer, Stefan; Rasko, John E J; Cavanaugh, Juleen A

    2007-11-01

    Hartnup disorder is an aminoaciduria that results from mutations in the recently described gene SLC6A19 on chromosome 5p15.33. The disease is inherited in a simple recessive manner and ten different mutations have been described to date. One mutation, the D173N allele, is present in 42% of Hartnup chromosomes from apparently unrelated families from both Australia and North America. We report an investigation of the origins of the D173N allele using a unique combination of variants including SNPs, microsatellites, and a VNTR across 211 Kb spanning the SLC6A19 locus. All individuals who carry the mutant allele share an identical core haplotype suggesting a single common ancestor, indicating that the elevated frequency of the D173N allele is not a result of recurrent mutation. Analyses of these data indicate that the allele is more than 1000 years old. We compare the reasons for survival of this allele with other major alleles in some other common autosomal recessive diseases occurring in European Caucasians. We postulate that survival of this allele may be a consequence of failure of the allele to completely inactivate the transport of neutral amino acids. PMID:17555458

  13. Sequence analysis of two de novo mutation alleles at the DXS10011 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Akiyoshi; Iwata, Misa; Takase, Izumi; Miyazaki, Tokiko; Matsui, Kiyoshi; Nishio, Hajime; Suzuki, Koichi

    2003-09-01

    We have detected two unusual alleles at the DXS10011 locus in two paternity trio cases. In one case, one allele of the daughter was found not to have been derived from the mother but the other allele was shared with the father. In the other case, the mother and the son shared no bands. Paternity in both cases was established using conventional polymorphic markers in addition to DNA markers (probabilities: >0.999999). Sequencing showed that the two de novo alleles of the children acquired a single unit (GAAA).

  14. Association between the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele and late onset of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, H.B.; Timm, S.; Wang, A.G.;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The 32-bp deletion allele in chemokine receptor CCR5 has been associated with several immune-mediated diseases and might be implicated in schizophrenia as well. METHOD: The authors genotyped DNA samples from 268 schizophrenia patients and 323 healthy subjects. Age at first admission...... of the deletion allele in the latter subgroup of patients. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele is a susceptibility factor for schizophrenia with late onset. Alternatively, the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele may act as a modifier by delaying the onset of schizophrenia without...

  15. Allele-specific enzymatic amplification of beta-globin genomic DNA for diagnosis of sickle cell anemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, D Y; Ugozzoli, L; B..K. Pal; Wallace, R B

    1989-01-01

    A rapid nonradioactive approach to the diagnosis of sickle cell anemia is described based on an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (ASPCR). This method allows direct detection of the normal or the sickle cell beta-globin allele in genomic DNA without additional steps of probe hybridization, ligation, or restriction enzyme cleavage. Two allele-specific oligonucleotide primers, one specific for the sickle cell allele and one specific for the normal allele, together with another primer co...

  16. Current status and prospects of studies on human genetic alleles associated with hepatitis B virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu-Sheng Wang

    2003-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection can cause a broad spectrum diseases, including from asymptomatic HBV carriers or cryptic hepatitis, to acute hepatitis, chronic hepatitis, Liver cirrhosis and primary hepatocellular carcinoma. The variable pattern and clinical outcome of the infection were mainly determined by virological itself factors, host immunological factors and genetic factors as well as the experimental factors. Among the human genetic factors, major candidate or identified genes involved in the process of HBV infection fall into the following categories: (1) genes that mediate the processes of viral entry into hepatocytes, induding genes involved in viral binding, fusion with cellular membrane and transportation in target cells; (2) genes that modulate or control the immune response to HBV infection; (3) genes that participate in the pathological alterations in liver tissue;(4) genes involved in the development of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma associated with chronic HBV infection, including genes related to mother-to-infant transmission of HBV infection; and (5) those that contribute to resistance to antiviral therapies. Most of the reports of human genes associated with HBV infection have currently focused on HLA associations. For example, some investigators reported the association of the HLA class Ⅱ alleles such as DRB1*1302 or HLA-DR13 or DQA1*0501-DQB1*0301-DQB1*1102 haplotypes with acute and/or chronic hepatitis B virus infection, respectively. Several pro-inflammatory cytokines such as Th1 cytokines (including IL-2 and IFN-γ)and TNF-α have been identified to participate the process of viral clearance and host immune response to HBV. In contrast, the Th2 cytokine IL-10 serves as a potent inhibitor of Th1 effector cells in HBV diseases. The MBP polymorphisms in its encoding region were found to be involved in chronic infection. Thus, reports from various laboratories have shown some inconsistencies with regard to the

  17. Phenotypic and allelic distribution of the ABO and Rhesus (D) blood groups in the Cameroonian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndoula, S T; Noubiap, J J N; Nansseu, J R N; Wonkam, A

    2014-06-01

    Data on blood group phenotypes are important for blood transfusion programs, for disease association and population genetics studies. This study aimed at reporting the phenotypic and allelic distribution of ABO and Rhesus (Rh) groups in various ethnolinguistic groups in the Cameroonians. We obtained ABO and Rhesus blood groups and self-identified ethnicity from 14,546 Cameroonian students. Ethnicity was classified in seven major ethnolinguistic groups: Afro-Asiatic, Nilo-Saharan, Niger-Kordofanian/West Atlantic, Niger-Kordofanian/Adamawa-Ubangui, Niger-Kordofanian/Benue-Congo/Bantu/Grassfield, Niger-Kordofanian/Benue-Congo/Bantu/Mbam and Niger-Kordofanian/Benue-Congo/Bantu/Equatorial. ABO allelic frequencies were determined using the Bernstein method. Differences in phenotypic distribution of blood groups were assessed using the chi-square test; a P value blood groups O, A, B and AB were 48.62%, 25.07%, 21.86% and 4.45%, respectively. Rhesus-positive was 96.32%. The allelic frequencies of O, A and B genes were 0.6978, 0.1605 and 0.1416, respectively. Phenotypic frequencies of the blood groups in the general study population and in the different ethnolinguistic groups were in agreement with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations (P > 0.05). The frequencies of O, A, and B blood phenotypes were significantly lower, respectively, in the Nilo-Saharan group (P = 0.009), the Niger-Kordofanian/Benue-Congo/Bantu groups (P = 0.021) and the Niger-Kordofanian/West-Atlantic group. AB blood group was most frequent in the Niger-Kordofanian/Adamawa-Ubangui group (P = 0.024). Our study provides the first data on ethnic distribution of ABO and Rhesus blood groups in the Cameroonian population and suggests that its general profile is similar to those of several sub-Saharan African populations. We found some significant differences in phenotypic distribution amongst major ethnolinguistic groups. These data may be important for blood donor recruitment policy and blood transfusion

  18. Allelic distributions of CYP2D6 gene copy number variation in the Eastern Han Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-hui SHENG; Yun-lan DU; Jian SUN; Hua-sheng XIAO; Ai-ping ZENG; Wen-xiang ZHU; Ren-fang ZHU; Hong-mei LI; Zhi-dong ZHU; Ying QIN; Wei JIN; Yan LIU

    2007-01-01

    Aim: The human cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) gene copy number variation, involving CYP2D6 gene deletion (CYP2D6*5) and duplication or multiduplication (CYP2D6*×N), can result in reduced or increased metabolism of many clinically used drugs. The identification of CYP2D6*5 and CYP2D6*×N and the investigation of their allelic distributions in ethnic populations can be important in deter-mining the right drug and dosage for each patient. Methods: The CYP2D6*5 andCYP2D6 genes, and CYP2D6 gene duplication were identified by 2 modified long PCR, respectively. To determine duplicated alleles, a novel long PCR was developed to amplify the entire duplicated CYP2D6 gene which was used as template for subsequent PCR amplification. A total of 363 unrelated Eastern Han Chinese individuals were analyzed for CYP2D6 gene copy number variation. Results: The frequency of CYP2D6*5 and CYP2D6*×N were 4.82% (n=35) and 0.69% (n=5) in the Eastern Han Chinese population, respectively. Of the 5 duplicated alleles, 3were CYP2D6*1×N and 2 were CYP2D6*10×N. One individual was a carrier of both CYP2D6*5 and CYP2D6*1×N. Taken together, the CYP2D6 gene rear-rangements were present in 10.74% of subjects. Conclusion: Allelic distributions of the CYP2D6 gene copy number variation differ among Chinese from different regions, indicating ethnic variety in Chinese. Long PCR are convenient, cost effective, specific and semiquantitative for the detection of the CYP2D6 gene copy number variation, and amplification of the entire duplicated CYP2D6 gene is necessary for the accurate identification of duplicated alleles.

  19. Disagreement in genotyping results of drug resistance alleles of the Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) gene by allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) assays and Sanger sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Divya; Lather, Manila; Dykes, Cherry L; Dang, Amita S; Adak, Tridibes; Singh, Om P

    2016-01-01

    The rapid spread of antimalarial drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum over the past few decades has necessitated intensive monitoring of such resistance for an effective malaria control strategy. P. falciparum dihydropteroate synthase (Pfdhps) and P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) genes act as molecular markers for resistance against the antimalarial drugs sulphadoxine and pyrimethamine, respectively. Resistance to pyrimethamine which is used as a partner drug in artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) is associated with several mutations in the Pfdhfr gene, namely A16V, N51I, C59R, S108N/T and I164L. Therefore, routine monitoring of Pfdhfr-drug-resistant alleles in a population may help in effective drug resistance management. Allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) is one of the commonly used methods for molecular genotyping of these alleles. In this study, we genotyped 55 samples of P. falciparum for allele discrimination at four codons of Pfdhfr (N51, C59, S108 and I164) by ASPCR using published methods and by Sanger's DNA sequencing method. We found that the ASPCR identified a significantly higher number of mutant alleles as compared to the DNA sequencing method. Such discrepancies arise due to the non-specificity of some of the allele-specific primer sets and due to the lack of sensitivity of Sanger's DNA sequencing method to detect minor alleles present in multiple clone infections. This study reveals the need of a highly specific and sensitive method for genotyping and detecting minor drug-resistant alleles present in multiple clonal infections.

  20. A study of allelic polymorphism of four short tandem repeats in the population of northwestern Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aseev, M.V.; Skakun, V.N.; Baranov, V.S. [Ott Institute of Obstetrics and Gynecology, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1995-06-01

    Characteristics of the allelic polymorphisms of the trimeric AGC repeat of the androgen receptor gene (Xq11-12), exon 1 (AR); the tetrameric ATCT repeat of the von Willebrand factor gene (12p12), intron 40 (vWF); the AGAT repeat of the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene (Xq26) (HPRT); and the AGAT repeat of anonymous DNA sequences of the short arm of chromosome X (STRX1) were studied in 160 DNA samples from unrelated inhabitants of northwestern Russia using the method of polymerase chain reaction. Seventeen, ten, eight, and nine alleles were revealed electrophoretically for short tandem repeats of AR, vWF, HPRT, and STRX1, respectively. The heterozygosity indices for these repeats were 0.80, 0.70, 0.54, and 0.58, respectively. The values for AR and vWF correlated with those expected according to the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, whereas the values for HPRT and STRX1 differed significantly from those theoretically expected. The individualization potentials were 0.045, 0.135, 0.095, and 0.061 for the short tandem repeats of AR, vWF, HPRT, and STRX1, respectively. The distribution of genotypes for the set of these four loci in the population studied was determined. The possibilities of using the studied polymorphic marker systems in molecular diagnosis of the corresponding monogenic diseases - spinal and bulbar muscle atrophy (AR), Lesch-Nyhan disease (HPRT), and von Willebrand disease (vWF) - as well as in population human genetics, testing of personal identity, and molecular approaches to the estimation of mutagenic activity are discussed. 17 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Utilizing ethnic-specific differences in minor allele frequency to recategorize reported pathogenic deafness variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, A Eliot; Eppsteiner, Robert W; Booth, Kevin T; Ephraim, Sean S; Gurrola, José; Simpson, Allen; Black-Ziegelbein, E Ann; Joshi, Swati; Ravi, Harini; Giuffre, Angelica C; Happe, Scott; Hildebrand, Michael S; Azaiez, Hela; Bayazit, Yildirim A; Erdal, Mehmet Emin; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A; Gazquez, Irene; Tamayo, Marta L; Gelvez, Nancy Y; Leal, Greizy Lopez; Jalas, Chaim; Ekstein, Josef; Yang, Tao; Usami, Shin-ichi; Kahrizi, Kimia; Bazazzadegan, Niloofar; Najmabadi, Hossein; Scheetz, Todd E; Braun, Terry A; Casavant, Thomas L; LeProust, Emily M; Smith, Richard J H

    2014-10-01

    Ethnic-specific differences in minor allele frequency impact variant categorization for genetic screening of nonsyndromic hearing loss (NSHL) and other genetic disorders. We sought to evaluate all previously reported pathogenic NSHL variants in the context of a large number of controls from ethnically distinct populations sequenced with orthogonal massively parallel sequencing methods. We used HGMD, ClinVar, and dbSNP to generate a comprehensive list of reported pathogenic NSHL variants and re-evaluated these variants in the context of 8,595 individuals from 12 populations and 6 ethnically distinct major human evolutionary phylogenetic groups from three sources (Exome Variant Server, 1000 Genomes project, and a control set of individuals created for this study, the OtoDB). Of the 2,197 reported pathogenic deafness variants, 325 (14.8%) were present in at least one of the 8,595 controls, indicating a minor allele frequency (MAF) > 0.00006. MAFs ranged as high as 0.72, a level incompatible with pathogenicity for a fully penetrant disease like NSHL. Based on these data, we established MAF thresholds of 0.005 for autosomal-recessive variants (excluding specific variants in GJB2) and 0.0005 for autosomal-dominant variants. Using these thresholds, we recategorized 93 (4.2%) of reported pathogenic variants as benign. Our data show that evaluation of reported pathogenic deafness variants using variant MAFs from multiple distinct ethnicities and sequenced by orthogonal methods provides a powerful filter for determining pathogenicity. The proposed MAF thresholds will facilitate clinical interpretation of variants identified in genetic testing for NSHL. All data are publicly available to facilitate interpretation of genetic variants causing deafness. PMID:25262649

  2. Apolipoprotein E alleles in Alzheimer`s and Parkinson`s patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poduslo, S.E. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Schwankhaus, J.D. [Department of Veterans Affairs, Lubbock, TX (United States)

    1994-09-01

    A number of investigators have found an association between the apolipoprotein E4 allele and Alzheimer`s disease. The E4 allele appears at a higher frequency in late onset familial Alzheimer`s patients. In our studies we obtained blood samples from early and late onset familial and sporadic Alzheimer`s patients and spouses, as well as from Parkinson`s patients. The patients were diagnosed as probable Alzheimer`s patients after a neurological examination, extensive blood work, and a CAT scan. The diagnosis was made according to the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria. The apolipoprotein E4 polymorphism was detected after PCR amplification of genomic DNA, restriction enzyme digestion with Hhal, and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Ethidium bromide-stained bands at 91 bp were designated as allele 3, at 83 bp as allele 2, and at 72 bp as allele 4. Of the 84 probable Alzheimer`s patients (all of whom were Caucasian), 47 were heterozygous and 13 were homozygous for the E4 allele. There were 26 early onset patients; 13 were heterozygous and 7 homozygous for the E4 allele. The frequencies for the E4 allele for late onset familial patients was 0.45 and for sporadic patients was 0.37. We analyzed 77 spouses with an average age of 71.9 {plus_minus} 7.4 years as controls, and 15 were heterozygous for the E4 allele for an E4 frequency of 0.097. Of the 53 Parkinson`s patients, 11 had the E4 allele for a frequency of 0.113. Thus our findings support the association of the ApoE4 allele with Alzheimer`s disease.

  3. Protective effect of the AT137RQ and ARQK176 PrP alleles against classical scrapie in Sarda breed sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccari, Gabriele; Scavia, Gaia; Sala, Marcello; Cosseddu, Gianmario; Chiappini, Barbara; Conte, Michela; Esposito, Elena; Lorenzetti, Raniero; Perfetti, Gabriella; Marconi, Paola; Scholl, Francesco; Barbaro, Katia; Bella, Antonino; Nonno, Romolo; Agrimi, Umberto

    2009-01-01

    The susceptibility of sheep to scrapie is under the control of the host’s prion protein (PrP) gene and is also influenced by the strain of the agent. PrP polymorphisms at codons 136 (A/V), 154 (R/H) and 171 (Q/R/H) are the main determinants of susceptibility/resistance of sheep to classical scrapie. They are combined in four main variants of the wild-type ARQ allele: VRQ, AHQ, ARH and ARR. Breeding programmes have been undertaken on this basis in the European Union and the USA to increase the frequency of the resistant ARR allele in sheep populations. Herein, we report the results of a multi-flock study showing the protective effect of polymorphisms other than those at codons 136, 154 and 171 in Sarda breed sheep. All ARQ/ARQ affected sheep (n = 154) and 378 negative ARQ/ARQ controls from four scrapie outbreaks were submitted to sequencing of the PrP gene. The distribution of variations other than those at the standard three codons, between scrapie cases and negative controls, was statistically different in all flocks. In particular, the AT137RQ and ARQK176 alleles showed a clear protective effect. This is the first study demonstrating a protective influence of alleles other than ARR under field conditions. If further investigations in other sheep breeds and with other scrapie sources confirm these findings, the availability of various protective alleles in breeding programmes of sheep for scrapie resistance could be useful in breeds with a low frequency of the ARR allele and would allow maintaining a wider variability of the PrP gene. PMID:19171116

  4. Salmonella Typhi shdA: pseudogene or allelic variant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, I M; Fuentes, J A; Valenzuela, L M; Ortega, A P; Hidalgo, A A; Mora, G C

    2014-08-01

    ShdA from Salmonella Typhimurium (ShdASTm) is a large outer membrane protein that specifically recognizes and binds to fibronectin. ShdASTm is involved in the colonization of the cecum and the Peyer's patches of terminal ileum in mice. On the other hand, shdA gene from Salmonella Typhi (shdASTy) has been considered a pseudogene (i.e. a nonfunctional sequence of genomic DNA) due to the presence of deletions and mutations that gave rise to premature stop codons. In this work we show that, despite the deletions and mutations, shdASTy is fully functional. S. Typhi ΔshdA mutants presented an impaired adherence and invasion of HEp-2 pre-treated with TGF-β1, an inducer of fibronectin production. Moreover, shdA from S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium seem to be equivalent since shdASTm restored the adherence and invasion of S. Typhi ΔshdA mutant to wild type levels. In addition, anti-FLAG mAbs interfered with the adherence and invasion of the S. Typhi shdA-3xFLAG strain. Finally, shdASTy encodes a detectable protein when heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli DH5α. The data presented here show that shdASTy is not a pseudogene, but a different functional allele compared with shdASTm. PMID:24859062

  5. Microsatellite allele dose and configuration establishment (MADCE): an integrated approach for genetic studies in allopolyploids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van T.; Noordijk, Y.; Dubos, T.; Bink, M.C.A.M.; Visser, R.G.F.; Weg, van de W.E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genetic studies in allopolyploid plants are challenging because of the presence of similar sub-genomes, which leads to multiple alleles and complex segregation ratios. In this study, we describe a novel method for establishing the exact dose and configuration of microsatellite alleles fo

  6. An Updated Collection of Sequence Barcoded Temperature-Sensitive Alleles of Yeast Essential Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofoed, Megan; Milbury, Karissa L; Chiang, Jennifer H; Sinha, Sunita; Ben-Aroya, Shay; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Hieter, Philip; Stirling, Peter C

    2015-09-01

    Systematic analyses of essential gene function using mutant collections in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been conducted using collections of heterozygous diploids, promoter shut-off alleles, through alleles with destabilized mRNA, destabilized protein, or bearing mutations that lead to a temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotype. We previously described a method for construction of barcoded ts alleles in a systematic fashion. Here we report the completion of this collection of alleles covering 600 essential yeast genes. This resource covers a larger gene repertoire than previous collections and provides a complementary set of strains suitable for single gene and genomic analyses. We use deep sequencing to characterize the amino acid changes leading to the ts phenotype in half of the alleles. We also use high-throughput approaches to describe the relative ts behavior of the alleles. Finally, we demonstrate the experimental usefulness of the collection in a high-content, functional genomic screen for ts alleles that increase spontaneous P-body formation. By increasing the number of alleles and improving the annotation, this ts collection will serve as a community resource for probing new aspects of biology for essential yeast genes. PMID:26175450

  7. Revealing the Genetic Variation and Allele Heterozygote Javanese and Arab Families in Malang East Java Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nila Kartika Sari

    2014-02-01

    Results: Our result showed that the genetic variability and heterozygote allele increasing by using the 13 CODIS markers from the first generation to the next generation with paternity testing from each family were matched. Conclusion: We can conclude that in a Javanese-Arab family ethnic seems stimulate the increasing genetic variation and allele heterozygote.

  8. Identification of novel alleles of the rice blast resistance gene Pi54

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Kumar; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K.

    2015-10-01

    Rice blast is one of the most devastating rice diseases and continuous resistance breeding is required to control the disease. The rice blast resistance gene Pi54 initially identified in an Indian cultivar confers broad-spectrum resistance in India. We explored the allelic diversity of the Pi54 gene among 885 Indian rice genotypes that were found resistant in our screening against field mixture of naturally existing M. oryzae strains as well as against five unique strains. These genotypes are also annotated as rice blast resistant in the International Rice Genebank database. Sequence-based allele mining was used to amplify and clone the Pi54 allelic variants. Nine new alleles of Pi54 were identified based on the nucleotide sequence comparison to the Pi54 reference sequence as well as to already known Pi54 alleles. DNA sequence analysis of the newly identified Pi54 alleles revealed several single polymorphic sites, three double deletions and an eight base pair deletion. A SNP-rich region was found between a tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site and the nucleotide binding site (NBS) domain. Together, the newly identified Pi54 alleles expand the allelic series and are candidates for rice blast resistance breeding programs.

  9. Correlation in chicken between the marker LEI0258 alleles and Major Histocompatibility Complex sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chazara, Olympe; Juul-Madsen, Helle Risdahl; Chang, Chi-Seng;

    Background The LEI0258 marker is located within the B region of the chicken Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC), and is surprisingly well associated with serology. Therefore, the correlation between the LEI0258 alleles and the MHC class I and the class II alleles at the level of sequences is w...

  10. Overdispersion in allelic counts and θ-correction in forensic genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben

    2010-01-01

    We present a statistical model for incorporating the extra variability in allelic counts due to subpopulation structures. In forensic genetics, this effect is modelled by the identical-by-descent parameter θ, which measures the relationship between pairs of alleles within a population relative...

  11. HLA-DRB1 allele polymorphisms in genetic susceptibility to esophageal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Lin; Chang-Sheng Deng; Jie Sun; Xian-Gong Zheng; Xing Huang; Yan Zhou; Ping Xiong; Ya-Ping Wang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To probe into the genetic susceptibility of HLA-DRB1 alleles to esophageal carcinoma in Han Chinese in Hubei Province.METHODS: HLA-DRB1 allele polymorphisms were typed by polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) in 42 unrelated patients with esophageal cancer and 136 unrelated normal control subjects and the associated HLA-DRB1 allele was measured by nucleotide sequence analysis with PCR.SAS software was used in statistics.RESULTS: Allele frequency (AF) of HLA-DRB1·0901 was significantly higher in esophageal carcinoma patients than that in the normal controls (0.2500 vs0.1397, P=0.028, the odds ratio 2.053, etiologic fraction 0.1282). After analyzed the allele nucleotide sequence of HLA-DRB1·0901 which approachs to the corresponded exon 2 sequence of the allele in genebank. There was no association between patients and controls in the rested HLA-DRB1 alleles.CONCLUSION: HLA-DRB1·0901 allele is more common in the patients with esophageal carcinoma than in the healthy controls, which is positively associated with the patients of Hubei Han Chinese. Individuals carrying HLA-DRB1·0901may be susceptible to esophageal carcinoma.

  12. RNA-Seq Using Two Populations Reveals Genes and Alleles Controlling Wood Traits and Growth in Eucalyptus nitens

    OpenAIRE

    Thavamanikumar, Saravanan; Southerton, Simon; Thumma, Bala

    2014-01-01

    Eucalyptus nitens is a perennial forest tree species grown mainly for kraft pulp production in many parts of the world. Kraft pulp yield (KPY) is a key determinant of plantation profitability and increasing the KPY of trees grown in plantations is a major breeding objective. To speed up the breeding process, molecular markers that can predict KPY are desirable. To achieve this goal, we carried out RNA-Seq studies on trees at extremes of KPY in two different trials to identify genes and allele...

  13. Impact of pre-existing MSP142-allele specific immunity on potency of an erythrocytic Plasmodium falciparum vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergmann-Leitner Elke S

    2012-09-01

    hindered by clonally imprinted p33 responses mainly restricted at the T cell level. In this study, the homology of the p33 sequence between the clonally imprinted response and the vaccine allele determines the magnitude of vaccine induced responses.

  14. The number of self-incompatibility alleles in a finite, subdivided population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierup, M H

    1998-01-01

    The actual and effective number of gametophytic self-incompatibility alleles maintained at mutation-drift-selection equilibrium in a finite population subdivided as in the island model is investigated by stochastic simulations. The existing theory founded by Wright predicts that for a given...... population size the number of alleles maintained increases monotonically with decreasing migration as is the case for neutral alleles. The simulation results here show that this is not true. At migration rates above Nm = 0.01-0.1, the actual and effective number of alleles is lower than for an undivided...... population with the same number of individuals, and, contrary to Wright's theoretical expectation, the number of alleles is not much higher than for an undivided population unless Nm

  15. The functional importance of sequence versus expression variability of MHC alleles in parasite resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axtner, Jan; Sommer, Simone

    2012-12-01

    Understanding selection processes driving the pronounced allelic polymorphism of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes and its functional associations to parasite load have been the focus of many recent wildlife studies. Two main selection scenarios are currently debated which explain the susceptibility or resistance to parasite infections either by the effects of (1) specific MHC alleles which are selected frequency-dependent in space and time or (2) a heterozygote or divergent allele advantage. So far, most studies have focused only on structural variance in co-evolutionary processes although this might not be the only trait subject to natural selection. In the present study, we analysed structural variance stretching from exon1 through exon3 of MHC class II DRB genes as well as genotypic expression variance in relation to the gastrointestinal helminth prevalence and infection intensity in wild yellow-necked mice (Apodemus flavicollis). We found support for the functional importance of specific alleles both on the sequence and expression level. By resampling a previously investigated study population we identified specific MHC alleles affected by temporal shifts in parasite pressure and recorded associated changes in allele frequencies. The allele Apfl-DRB*23 was associated with resistance to infections by the oxyurid nematode Syphacia stroma and at the same time with susceptibility to cestode infection intensity. In line with our expectation, MHC mRNA transcript levels tended to be higher in cestode-infected animals carrying the allele Apfl-DRB*23. However, no support for a heterozygote or divergent allele advantage on the sequence or expression level was detected. The individual amino acid distance of genotypes did not explain individual differences in parasite loads and the genetic distance had no effect on MHC genotype expression. For ongoing studies on the functional importance of expression variance in parasite resistance, allele

  16. Effect of metallothionein 2A gene polymorphism on allele-specific gene expression and metal content in prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krześlak, Anna; Forma, Ewa [Department of Cytobiochemistry, University of Łódź, Pomorska 141/143, 90-236 Łódź (Poland); Chwatko, Grażyna [Department of Environmental Chemistry, University of Łódź, Pomorska 163, 90-236 Łódź (Poland); Jóźwiak, Paweł; Szymczyk, Agnieszka [Department of Cytobiochemistry, University of Łódź, Pomorska 141/143, 90-236 Łódź (Poland); Wilkosz, Jacek; Różański, Waldemar [2nd Department of Urology, Medical University of Łódź, Pabianicka 62, 93-513 Łódź (Poland); Bryś, Magdalena, E-mail: zreg@biol.uni.lodz.pl [Department of Cytobiochemistry, University of Łódź, Pomorska 141/143, 90-236 Łódź (Poland)

    2013-05-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are highly conserved, small molecular weight, cysteine rich proteins. The major physiological functions of metallothioneins include homeostasis of essential metals Zn and Cu and protection against cytotoxicity of heavy metals. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is an association between the − 5 A/G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs28366003) in core promoter region and expression of metallothionein 2A (MT2A) gene and metal concentration in prostate cancer tissues. MT2A polymorphism was determined by the polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism technique (PCR–RFLP) using 412 prostate cancer tissue samples. MT2A gene expression analysis was performed by real-time RT-PCR method. A significant association between rs28366003 genotype and MT2A expression level was found. The average mRNA level was found to be lower among minor allele carriers (the risk allele) than average expression among homozygotes for the major allele. Metal levels were analyzed by flamed atomic absorption spectrometer system. Highly statistically significant associations were detected between the SNP and Cd, Zn, Cu and Pb levels. The results of Spearman's rank correlation showed that the expressions of MT2A and Cu, Pb and Ni concentrations were negatively correlated. On the basis of the results obtained in this study, we suggest that SNP polymorphism may affect the MT2A gene expression in prostate and this is associated with some metal accumulation. - Highlights: • MT2A gene expression and metal content in prostate cancer tissues • Association between SNP (rs28366003) and expression of MT2A • Significant associations between the SNP and Cd, Zn, Cu and Pb levels • Negative correlation between MT2A gene expression and Cu, Pb and Ni levels.

  17. Knockdown resistance, Rdl alleles, and the annual entomological Inoculation rate of wild mosquito populations from Lower Moshi, Northern Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneth M Mahande

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Understanding vector behavioral response due to ecological factors is important in the control of disease vectors. This study was conducted to determine the knockdown resistance (kdr alleles, dieldrin resistance alleles, and entomological inoculation rates (EIRs of malaria vectors in lower Moshi irrigation schemes for the mitigation of disease transmission. Materials and Methods: The study was longitudinal design conducted for 14 months. Mosquitoes were collected fortnightly by using a CDC miniature light trap in 20 houses. Mosquitoes were identified morphologically in the field, of which 10% of this population was identified to species level by using molecular techniques. Samples from this study population were taken for kdr and resistance to dieldrin (rdl genes detection. Results: A total of 6220 mosquitoes were collected by using a light trap, of which 86.0% (n=5350 were Anopheles gambiae sensu lato and 14.0% (n=870 were Culex quinquefasciatus. Ten percent of the An. gambiae s.l. (n=535 collected were taken for species identification, of which 99.8% (n=534 were identified as An. arabiensis while 0.2% (n=1 were An. gambiae sensu stricto. Of the selected mosquitoes, 3.5% (n=19 were sporozoite positive. None of the mosquitoes tested had the kdr gene. The rdl resistant allele was detected at a frequency of 0.48 throughout the year. EIR was determined to be 0.54 ib/trap/year. Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest that the homozygous and the heterozygous resistance present in rdl genes demonstrated the effect of pesticide residues on resistance selection pressure in mosquitoes. A better insecticide usage protocol needs to be developed for farmers to use in order to avoid excessive use of pesticides. Key words: An. arabiensis, EIR, Knockdown mutation, Moshi, rdl locus, Tanzania

  18. Imprinted chromosomal domains revealed by allele-specific replication timing of the GABRB3 and GABRA5 genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaSalle, J.; Flint, A.; Lalande, M. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The GABRB3 and GABRA5 genes are organized as a cluster in chromosome 15q11-q13. The genes are separated by around 100 kb and arranged in opposite transcriptional orientations. The GABA{sub A} receptor cluster lies near the Angelman and Prader-Willi loci and displays asynchronous DNA replication, suggesting that this region is subject to parental imprinting. In order to further study the association between DNA replication and imprinting, allele-specific replication was assayed by fluorescence in situ hybridization with {lambda}-phage probes from the GABRB3/A5 region and a D15Z1 satellite probe to identify the parental origin of each chromosome. The replication kinetics of each allele was determined by using a flow sorter to fractionate mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes on the basis of cell cycle progression prior to FISH analysis. These kinetic studies reveal a 50-150 kb chromosomal domain extending from the middle of the GABRB3/A5 intergenic region into the GABRA5 5{prime}-UTR which displays maternal replication in early S with paternal replication delayed until the end of S. In contrast, genomic regions on either side of this maternal early replication domain exhibit the opposite pattern with paternal before maternal replication and both alleles replicating in the latter half of S. These results indicate that the GABRB3/A5 region is divided into domains in which replication timing is determined by parental origin. In addition to a loss of asynchronous replication, organization into replication timing domains is also lost in lymphocytes from maternal and paternal uniparental disomy 15 patients suggesting that a chromosome contribution from both parents is required for the establishment of the imprinted replication domains.

  19. Demographic history and rare allele sharing among human populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravel, Simon; Henn, Brenna M.; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.; Indap, Amit R.; Marth, Gabor T.; Clark, Andrew G.; Yu, Fuli; Gibbs, Richard A.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Altshuler, David L.; Durbin, Richard M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Bentley, David R.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Clark, Andrew G.; Collins, Francis S.; De La Vega, Francisco M.; Donnelly, Peter; Egholm, Michael; Flicek, Paul; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Knoppers, Bartha M.; Lander, Eric S.; Lehrach, Hans; Mardis, Elaine R.; McVean, Gil A.; Nickerson, Debbie A.; Peltonen, Leena; Schafer, Alan J.; Sherry, Stephen T.; Wang, Jun; Wilson, Richard K.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Deiros, David; Metzker, Mike; Muzny, Donna; Reid, Jeff; Wheeler, David; Wang, Jun; Li, Jingxiang; Jian, Min; Li, Guoqing; Li, Ruiqiang; Liang, Huiqing; Tian, Geng; Wang, Bo; Wang, Jian; Wang, Wei; Yang, Huanming; Zhang, Xiuqing; Zheng, Huisong; Lander, Eric S.; Altshuler, David L.; Ambrogio, Lauren; Bloom, Toby; Cibulskis, Kristian; Fennell, Tim J.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Jaffe, David B.; Shefler, Erica; Sougnez, Carrie L.; Bentley, David R.; Gormley, Niall; Humphray, Sean; Kingsbury, Zoya; Koko-Gonzales, Paula; Stone, Jennifer; McKernan, Kevin J.; Costa, Gina L.; Ichikawa, Jeffry K.; Lee, Clarence C.; Sudbrak, Ralf; Lehrach, Hans; Borodina, Tatiana A.; Dahl, Andreas; Davydov, Alexey N.; Marquardt, Peter; Mertes, Florian; Nietfeld, Wilfiried; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schreiber, Stefan; Soldatov, Aleksey V.; Timmermann, Bernd; Tolzmann, Marius; Egholm, Michael; Affourtit, Jason; Ashworth, Dana; Attiya, Said; Bachorski, Melissa; Buglione, Eli; Burke, Adam; Caprio, Amanda; Celone, Christopher; Clark, Shauna; Conners, David; Desany, Brian; Gu, Lisa; Guccione, Lorri; Kao, Kalvin; Kebbel, Andrew; Knowlton, Jennifer; Labrecque, Matthew; McDade, Louise; Mealmaker, Craig; Minderman, Melissa; Nawrocki, Anne; Niazi, Faheem; Pareja, Kristen; Ramenani, Ravi; Riches, David; Song, Wanmin; Turcotte, Cynthia; Wang, Shally; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Dooling, David; Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Robert; Weinstock, George; Durbin, Richard M.; Burton, John; Carter, David M.; Churcher, Carol; Coffey, Alison; Cox, Anthony; Palotie, Aarno; Quail, Michael; Skelly, Tom; Stalker, James; Swerdlow, Harold P.; Turner, Daniel; De Witte, Anniek; Giles, Shane; Gibbs, Richard A.; Wheeler, David; Bainbridge, Matthew; Challis, Danny; Sabo, Aniko; Yu, Fuli; Yu, Jin; Wang, Jun; Fang, Xiaodong; Guo, Xiaosen; Li, Ruiqiang; Li, Yingrui; Luo, Ruibang; Tai, Shuaishuai; Wu, Honglong; Zheng, Hancheng; Zheng, Xiaole; Zhou, Yan; Li, Guoqing; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Marth, Gabor T.; Garrison, Erik P.; Huang, Weichun; Indap, Amit; Kural, Deniz; Lee, Wan-Ping; Leong, Wen Fung; Quinlan, Aaron R.; Stewart, Chip; Stromberg, Michael P.; Ward, Alistair N.; Wu, Jiantao; Lee, Charles; Mills, Ryan E.; Shi, Xinghua; Daly, Mark J.; DePristo, Mark A.; Altshuler, David L.; Ball, Aaron D.; Banks, Eric; Bloom, Toby; Browning, Brian L.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Fennell, Tim J.; Garimella, Kiran V.; Grossman, Sharon R.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Hanna, Matt; Hartl, Chris; Jaffe, David B.; Kernytsky, Andrew M.; Korn, Joshua M.; Li, Heng; Maguire, Jared R.; McCarroll, Steven A.; McKenna, Aaron; Nemesh, James C.; Philippakis, Anthony A.; Poplin, Ryan E.; Price, Alkes; Rivas, Manuel A.; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Schaffner, Stephen F.; Shefler, Erica; Shlyakhter, Ilya A.; Cooper, David N.; Ball, Edward V.; Mort, Matthew; Phillips, Andrew D.; Stenson, Peter D.; Sebat, Jonathan; Makarov, Vladimir; Ye, Kenny; Yoon, Seungtai C.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Clark, Andrew G.; Boyko, Adam; Degenhardt, Jeremiah; Gravel, Simon; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.; Kaganovich, Mark; Keinan, Alon; Lacroute, Phil; Ma, Xin; Reynolds, Andy; Clarke, Laura; Flicek, Paul; Cunningham, Fiona; Herrero, Javier; Keenen, Stephen; Kulesha, Eugene; Leinonen, Rasko; McLaren, William M.; Radhakrishnan, Rajesh; Smith, Richard E.; Zalunin, Vadim; Zheng-Bradley, Xiangqun; Korbel, Jan O.; Stütz, Adrian M.; Humphray, Sean; Bauer, Markus; Cheetham, R. Keira; Cox, Tony; Eberle, Michael; James, Terena; Kahn, Scott; Murray, Lisa; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Ye, Kai; De La Vega, Francisco M.; Fu, Yutao; Hyland, Fiona C. L.; Manning, Jonathan M.; McLaughlin, Stephen F.; Peckham, Heather E.; Sakarya, Onur; Sun, Yongming A.; Tsung, Eric F.; Batzer, Mark A.; Konkel, Miriam K.; Walker, Jerilyn A.; Sudbrak, Ralf; Albrecht, Marcus W.; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav S.; Herwig, Ralf; Parkhomchuk, Dimitri V.; Sherry, Stephen T.; Agarwala, Richa; Khouri, Hoda M.; Morgulis, Aleksandr O.; Paschall, Justin E.; Phan, Lon D.; Rotmistrovsky, Kirill E.; Sanders, Robert D.; Shumway, Martin F.; Xiao, Chunlin; McVean, Gil A.; Auton, Adam; Iqbal, Zamin; Lunter, Gerton; Marchini, Jonathan L.; Moutsianas, Loukas; Myers, Simon; Tumian, Afidalina; Desany, Brian; Knight, James; Winer, Roger; Craig, David W.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Steve M.; Christoforides, Alexis; Kurdoglu, Ahmet A.; Pearson, John V.; Sinari, Shripad A.; Tembe, Waibhav D.; Haussler, David; Hinrichs, Angie S.; Katzman, Sol J.; Kern, Andrew; Kuhn, Robert M.; Przeworski, Molly; Hernandez, Ryan D.; Howie, Bryan; Kelley, Joanna L.; Melton, S. Cord; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Li, Yun; Anderson, Paul; Blackwell, Tom; Chen, Wei; Cookson, William O.; Ding, Jun; Kang, Hyun Min; Lathrop, Mark; Liang, Liming; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Scheet, Paul; Sidore, Carlo; Snyder, Matthew; Zhan, Xiaowei; Zöllner, Sebastian; Awadalla, Philip; Casals, Ferran; Idaghdour, Youssef; Keebler, John; Stone, Eric A.; Zilversmit, Martine; Jorde, Lynn; Xing, Jinchuan; Eichler, Evan E.; Aksay, Gozde; Alkan, Can; Hajirasouliha, Iman; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Sahinalp, S. Cenk; Sudmant, Peter H.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Chen, Ken; Chinwalla, Asif; Ding, Li; Koboldt, Daniel C.; McLellan, Mike D.; Dooling, David; Weinstock, George; Wallis, John W.; Wendl, Michael C.; Zhang, Qunyuan; Durbin, Richard M.; Albers, Cornelis A.; Ayub, Qasim; Balasubramaniam, Senduran; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Carter, David M.; Chen, Yuan; Conrad, Donald F.; Danecek, Petr; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Hu, Min; Huang, Ni; Hurles, Matt E.; Jin, Hanjun; Jostins, Luke; Keane, Thomas M.; Le, Si Quang; Lindsay, Sarah; Long, Quan; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Parts, Leopold; Stalker, James; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Walter, Klaudia; Zhang, Yujun; Gerstein, Mark B.; Snyder, Michael; Abyzov, Alexej; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Bjornson, Robert; Du, Jiang; Grubert, Fabian; Habegger, Lukas; Haraksingh, Rajini; Jee, Justin; Khurana, Ekta; Lam, Hugo Y. K.; Leng, Jing; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Urban, Alexander E.; Zhang, Zhengdong; Li, Yingrui; Luo, Ruibang; Marth, Gabor T.; Garrison, Erik P.; Kural, Deniz; Quinlan, Aaron R.; Stewart, Chip; Stromberg, Michael P.; Ward, Alistair N.; Wu, Jiantao; Lee, Charles; Mills, Ryan E.; Shi, Xinghua; McCarroll, Steven A.; Banks, Eric; DePristo, Mark A.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Hartl, Chris; Korn, Joshua M.; Li, Heng; Nemesh, James C.; Sebat, Jonathan; Makarov, Vladimir; Ye, Kenny; Yoon, Seungtai C.; Degenhardt, Jeremiah; Kaganovich, Mark; Clarke, Laura; Smith, Richard E.; Zheng-Bradley, Xiangqun; Korbel, Jan O.; Humphray, Sean; Cheetham, R. Keira; Eberle, Michael; Kahn, Scott; Murray, Lisa; Ye, Kai; De La Vega, Francisco M.; Fu, Yutao; Peckham, Heather E.; Sun, Yongming A.; Batzer, Mark A.; Konkel, Miriam K.; Walker, Jerilyn A.; Xiao, Chunlin; Iqbal, Zamin; Desany, Brian; Blackwell, Tom; Snyder, Matthew; Xing, Jinchuan; Eichler, Evan E.; Aksay, Gozde; Alkan, Can; Hajirasouliha, Iman; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Chen, Ken; Chinwalla, Asif; Ding, Li; McLellan, Mike D.; Wallis, John W.; Hurles, Matt E.; Conrad, Donald F.; Walter, Klaudia; Zhang, Yujun; Gerstein, Mark B.; Snyder, Michael; Abyzov, Alexej; Du, Jiang; Grubert, Fabian; Haraksingh, Rajini; Jee, Justin; Khurana, Ekta; Lam, Hugo Y. K.; Leng, Jing; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Urban, Alexander E.; Zhang, Zhengdong; Gibbs, Richard A.; Bainbridge, Matthew; Challis, Danny; Coafra, Cristian; Dinh, Huyen; Kovar, Christie; Lee, Sandy; Muzny, Donna; Nazareth, Lynne; Reid, Jeff; Sabo, Aniko; Yu, Fuli; Yu, Jin; Marth, Gabor T.; Garrison, Erik P.; Indap, Amit; Leong, Wen Fung; Quinlan, Aaron R.; Stewart, Chip; Ward, Alistair N.; Wu, Jiantao; Cibulskis, Kristian; Fennell, Tim J.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Garimella, Kiran V.; Hartl, Chris; Shefler, Erica; Sougnez, Carrie L.; Wilkinson, Jane; Clark, Andrew G.; Gravel, Simon; Grubert, Fabian; Clarke, Laura; Flicek, Paul; Smith, Richard E.; Zheng-Bradley, Xiangqun; Sherry, Stephen T.; Khouri, Hoda M.; Paschall, Justin E.; Shumway, Martin F.; Xiao, Chunlin; McVean, Gil A.; Katzman, Sol J.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Blackwell, Tom; Mardis, Elaine R.; Dooling, David; Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Robert; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Durbin, Richard M.; Balasubramaniam, Senduran; Coffey, Allison; Keane, Thomas M.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Palotie, Aarno; Scott, Carol; Stalker, James; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Gerstein, Mark B.; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Knoppers, Bartha M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Gharani, Neda; Gibbs, Richard A.; Jorde, Lynn; Kaye, Jane S.; Kent, Alastair; Li, Taosha; McGuire, Amy L.; McVean, Gil A.; Ossorio, Pilar N.; Rotimi, Charles N.; Su, Yeyang; Toji, Lorraine H.; TylerSmith, Chris; Brooks, Lisa D.; Felsenfeld, Adam L.; McEwen, Jean E.; Abdallah, Assya; Juenger, Christopher R.; Clemm, Nicholas C.; Collins, Francis S.; Duncanson, Audrey; Green, Eric D.; Guyer, Mark S.; Peterson, Jane L.; Schafer, Alan J.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Altshuler, David L.; Auton, Adam; Brooks, Lisa D.; Durbin, Richard M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Hurles, Matt E.; McVean, Gil A.

    2011-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing technology enables population-level surveys of human genomic variation. Here, we examine the joint allele frequency distributions across continental human populations and present an approach for combining complementary aspects of whole-genome, low-coverage data and targeted high-coverage data. We apply this approach to data generated by the pilot phase of the Thousand Genomes Project, including whole-genome 2–4× coverage data for 179 samples from HapMap European, Asian, and African panels as well as high-coverage target sequencing of the exons of 800 genes from 697 individuals in seven populations. We use the site frequency spectra obtained from these data to infer demographic parameters for an Out-of-Africa model for populations of African, European, and Asian descent and to predict, by a jackknife-based approach, the amount of genetic diversity that will be discovered as sample sizes are increased. We predict that the number of discovered nonsynonymous coding variants will reach 100,000 in each population after ∼1,000 sequenced chromosomes per population, whereas ∼2,500 chromosomes will be needed for the same number of synonymous variants. Beyond this point, the number of segregating sites in the European and Asian panel populations is expected to overcome that of the African panel because of faster recent population growth. Overall, we find that the majority of human genomic variable sites are rare and exhibit little sharing among diverged populations. Our results emphasize that replication of disease association for specific rare genetic variants across diverged populations must overcome both reduced statistical power because of rarity and higher population divergence. PMID:21730125

  20. Naturally occurring allele diversity allows potato cultivation in northern latitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloosterman, Bjorn; Abelenda, José A; Gomez, María del Mar Carretero; Oortwijn, Marian; de Boer, Jan M; Kowitwanich, Krissana; Horvath, Beatrix M; van Eck, Herman J; Smaczniak, Cezary; Prat, Salomé; Visser, Richard G F; Bachem, Christian W B

    2013-03-14

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) originates from the Andes and evolved short-day-dependent tuber formation as a vegetative propagation strategy. Here we describe the identification of a central regulator underlying a major-effect quantitative trait locus for plant maturity and initiation of tuber development. We show that this gene belongs to the family of DOF (DNA-binding with one finger) transcription factors and regulates tuberization and plant life cycle length, by acting as a mediator between the circadian clock and the StSP6A mobile tuberization signal. We also show that natural allelic variants evade post-translational light regulation, allowing cultivation outside the geographical centre of origin of potato. Potato is a member of the Solanaceae family and is one of the world's most important food crops. This annual plant originates from the Andean regions of South America. Potato develops tubers from underground stems called stolons. Its equatorial origin makes potato essentially short-day dependent for tuberization and potato will not make tubers in the long-day conditions of spring and summer in the northern latitudes. When introduced in temperate zones, wild material will form tubers in the course of the autumnal shortening of day-length. Thus, one of the first selected traits in potato leading to a European potato type is likely to have been long-day acclimation for tuberization. Potato breeders can exploit the naturally occurring variation in tuberization onset and life cycle length, allowing varietal breeding for different latitudes, harvest times and markets. PMID:23467094

  1. Diversity of HLA-B17 alleles and haplotypes in East Asians and a novel Cw6 allele (Cw*0604) associated with B*5701.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, T; Ogawa, A; Tokunaga, K; Ishikawa, Y; Kashiwase, K; Tanaka, H; Park, M H; Jia, G J; Chimge, N O; Sideltseva, E W; Akaza, T; Tadokoro, K; Takahashi, T; Juji, T

    1999-06-01

    The distribution of HLA-B17 alleles and their association with HLA-A, -C and -DRB1 alleles were investigated in seven East Asian populations Japanese, South Korean, Chinese-Korean, Man, Northern Han, Mongolian and Buryat populations). The B17 alleles were identified from genomic DNA using group-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by hybridization with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes (SSOP). In all of these East Asian populations, except Japanese and Chinese-Koreans, B*5701 was detected and strongly associated with A*0101, Cw*0602 and DRB1*0701. In contrast, B*5801 was detected in all the seven populations and strongly associated with A*3303, Cw*0302, DRB1*0301 and DRB1*1302. The A*3303-Cw*0302-B*5801-DRB1*1302 haplotype was observed in South Korean, Chinese-Korean, Buryat and Japanese populations, while A*3303-Cw*0302-B*5801-DRB1*0301 was predominantly observed in the Mongolian population. A similar haplotype, A*0101-Cw*0302-B*5801-DRB1*1302, was observed in the Buryat population. A novel Cw6 allele, Cw*0604, was identified in the Man population. This Cw allele was observed on the haplotype A*0101-B*5701-DRB1*0701. Thus, we confirmed, at the sequence level, that the common haplotypes carrying B*5701 and B*5801 have been conserved and shared in East Asian populations.

  2. Real-time PCR genotyping assay for canine progressive rod-cone degeneration and mutant allele frequency in Toy Poodles, Chihuahuas and Miniature Dachshunds in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohyama, Moeko; Tada, Naomi; Mitsui, Hiroko; Tomioka, Hitomi; Tsutsui, Toshihiko; Yabuki, Akira; Rahman, Mohammad Mahbubur; Kushida, Kazuya; Mizukami, Keijiro; Yamato, Osamu

    2016-04-01

    Canine progressive rod-cone degeneration (PRCD) is a middle- to late-onset, autosomal recessive, inherited retinal disorder caused by a substitution (c.5G>A) in the canine PRCD gene that has been identified in 29 or more purebred dogs. In the present study, a TaqMan probe-based real-time PCR assay was developed and evaluated for rapid genotyping and large-scale screening of the mutation. Furthermore, a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of the three most popular breeds in Japan (Toy Poodles, Chihuahuas and Miniature Dachshunds) to determine the current mutant allele frequency. The assay separated all the genotypes of canine PRCD rapidly, indicating its suitability for large-scale surveys. The results of the survey showed that the mutant allele frequency in Toy Poodles was high enough (approximately 0.09) to allow the establishment of measures for the prevention and control of this disorder in breeding kennels. The mutant allele was detected in Chihuahuas for the first time, but the frequency was lower (approximately 0.02) than that in Toy Poodles. The mutant allele was not detected in Miniature Dachshunds. This assay will allow the selective breeding of dogs from the two most popular breeds (Toy Poodle and Chihuahua) in Japan and effective prevention or control of the disorder. PMID:26549343

  3. Microsatellite allele 5 of MHC class I chain-related gene a increases the risk for insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in latvians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtauvere-Brameus, A; Ghaderi, M; Rumba, I; Sanjeevi, C B

    2002-04-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is one of the most common chronic diseases. It is an autoimmune, polygenic disease, associated with several genes on different chromosomes. The most important gene is human leukocyte antigen (HLA), also known as major histocompatibility complex (MHC), which is located on chromosome 6p21.3. HLA-DQ8/DR4 and DQ2/DR3 are positively associated with IDDM and DQ6 is negatively associated with IDDM in most Caucasian populations. The MICA gene is located in the MHC class I region and is expressed by monocytes, keratinocytes, and endothelial cells. Sequence determination of the MICA gene identifies 5 alleles with 4, 5, 6, and 9 repetitions of GCT or 5 repetitions of GCT with 1 additional insertion (GGCT), and the alleles are referred to as A4, A5, A5.1, A6, and A9. Analysis of allele distribution among 93 Latvian IDDM patients and 108 healthy controls showed that allele A5 of MICA is significantly increased in IDDM patients [33/93 (35%)] compared to healthy controls [22/108 (20%)] (OR = 2.15; P = 0.016). In conclusion, we believe that MICA may play an important role in the etiopathogenesis of IDDM.

  4. The rs10993994 risk allele for prostate cancer results in clinically relevant changes in microseminoprotein-beta expression in tissue and urine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayley C Whitaker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microseminoprotein-beta (MSMB regulates apoptosis and using genome-wide association studies the rs10993994 single nucleotide polymorphism in the MSMB promoter has been linked to an increased risk of developing prostate cancer. The promoter location of the risk allele, and its ability to reduce promoter activity, suggested that the rs10993994 risk allele could result in lowered MSMB in benign tissue leading to increased prostate cancer risk. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MSMB expression in benign and malignant prostate tissue was examined using immunohistochemistry and compared with the rs10993994 genotype. Urinary MSMB concentrations were determined by ELISA and correlated with urinary PSA, the presence or absence of cancer, rs10993994 genotype and age of onset. MSMB levels in prostate tissue and urine were greatly reduced with tumourigenesis. Urinary MSMB was better than urinary PSA at differentiating men with prostate cancer at all Gleason grades. The high risk allele was associated with heterogeneity of MSMB staining and loss of MSMB in both tissue and urine in benign prostate. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that some high risk alleles discovered using genome-wide association studies produce phenotypic effects with potential clinical utility. We provide the first link between a low penetrance polymorphism for prostate cancer and a potential test in human tissue and bodily fluids. There is potential to develop tissue and urinary MSMB for a biomarker of prostate cancer risk, diagnosis and disease monitoring.

  5. The miR9863 family regulates distinct Mla alleles in barley to attenuate NLR receptor-triggered disease resistance and cell-death signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Liu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. Mla alleles encode coiled-coil (CC, nucleotide binding, leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR receptors that trigger isolate-specific immune responses against the powdery mildew fungus, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh. How Mla or NB-LRR genes in grass species are regulated at post-transcriptional level is not clear. The microRNA family, miR9863, comprises four members that differentially regulate distinct Mla alleles in barley. We show that miR9863 members guide the cleavage of Mla1 transcripts in barley, and block or reduce the accumulation of MLA1 protein in the heterologous Nicotiana benthamiana expression system. Regulation specificity is determined by variation in a unique single-nucleotide-polymorphism (SNP in mature miR9863 family members and two SNPs in the Mla miR9863-binding site that separates these alleles into three groups. Further, we demonstrate that 22-nt miR9863s trigger the biogenesis of 21-nt phased siRNAs (phasiRNAs and together these sRNAs form a feed-forward regulation network for repressing the expression of group I Mla alleles. Overexpression of miR9863 members specifically attenuates MLA1, but not MLA10-triggered disease resistance and cell-death signaling. We propose a key role of the miR9863 family in dampening immune response signaling triggered by a group of MLA immune receptors in barley.

  6. Molecular cloning of a full-length cDNA for dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy and regional expressions of the expanded alleles in the CNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onodera, Osamu; Oyake, Mutsuo; Takano, Hiroki [Niigata Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by genetic anticipation and variable combinations of symptoms including myoclonus, epilepsy, cerebellar ataxia, choreoathetosis, and dementia. Recently, we discovered that DRPLA is caused by unstable expansion of a CAG repeat of a gene on the short arm of chromosome 12. We determined the consensus DRPLA cDNA sequence containing the complete coding region for 1,185 amino acids. The CAG repeat, which is expanded in DRPLA, is located 1,462 bp downstream from the putative methionine initiation codon and encodes a poly-glutamine tract. Although poly-serine and proline tracts exist near the CAG repeats, these poly-serine or proline tracts did not show any polymorphisms, which is in strong contrast to the high heterogeneity in the length of the CAG repeat. Northern blot analysis revealed a 4.7-kb transcript that is widely expressed in various tissues including heart, lung, kidney, placenta, skeletal muscle, and brain. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that the expanded alleles are transcribed to levels comparable to those of normal alleles. These results indicate that there is no difference in transcriptional efficiency between expanded and normal alleles. Furthermore, mRNA from cerebellar hemispheres of DRPLA patients showed smaller sizes of CAG repeats compared with other regions of the brain, which reflects somatic mosaicism of the expanded alleles of the DRPLA gene. 49 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Correlation of DNA fragment sizes within loci in the presence of non-detectable alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, R; Li, Z

    1995-01-01

    At present most forensic databases of DNA profiling of individuals consist of DNA fragment sizes measured from Southern blot restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Statistical studies of these databases have revealed that, when fragment sizes are measured from RFLP analysis, some of the single-band patterns of individuals may actually be due to heterozygosity of alleles in which fragment size resulting from one allele remains undetected. In this work, we evaluate the effect of such allelic non-detectability on correlation of fragment sizes within individuals at a locus, and its impact on the inference of independence of fragment sizes within loci. We show that when non-detectable alleles are present in a population at a locus, positive correlations of fragment sizes are expected, which increase with the proportion of non-detectable alleles at the locus. Therefore, a non-zero positive correlation is not a proof of allelic dependence within individuals. Applications of this theory to the current forensic RFLP databases within the US show that there is virtually no evidence of significant allelic dependence within any of the loci. Therefore, the assumption that DNA fragment sizes within loci are independent is valid, and hence, the population genetic principles of computing DNA profile frequencies by multiplying binned frequencies of fragment sizes are most likely to be appropriate for forensic applications of DNA typing data.

  8. Allelic variation in the squirrel monkey x-linked color vision gene: biogeographical and behavioral correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropp, Susan; Boinski, Sue; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2002-06-01

    Most Neotropical primate species possess a polymorphic X-linked and a monomorphic autosomal color vision gene. Consequently, populations are composed of both dichromatics and trichromatics. Most theories on the maintenance of this genetic system revolve around possible advantages for foraging ecology. To examine the issue from a different angle, we compared the numbers and relative frequencies of alleles at the X-linked locus among three species of Saimiri representing a wide range of geographical and behavioral variation in the genus. Exons 3, 4, and 5 of the X-linked opsin gene were sequenced for a large number of X chromosomes for all three species. Several synonymous mutations were detected in exons 4 and 5 for the originally reported alleles but only a single nonsynonymous change was detected. Two alleles were found that appeared to be the result of recombination events. The low occurrence of recombinant alleles and absence of mutations in the amino acids critical for spectral tuning indicates that stabilizing selection acts to maintain the combinations of critical sites specific to each allele. Allele frequencies were approximately the same for all Saimiri species, with a slight but significant difference between S. boliviensis and S. oerstedii. No apparent correlation exists between allele frequencies and behavioral or biogeographical differences between species, casting doubt on the speculation that the spectral sensitivities of the alleles have been maintained because they are specifically well-tuned to Saimiri visual ecology. Rather, the spectral tuning peaks might have been maintained because they are as widely spaced as possible within the limited range of middlewave to longwave spectra useful to all primates. This arrangement creates a balance between maximizing the distance between spectral tuning peaks (allowing the color opponency of the visual system to distinguish between peaks) and maximizing the number of alleles within a limited range (yielding

  9. The Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein-1 19 KD antibody response in the Peruvian Amazon predominantly targets the non-allele specific, shared sites of this antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum re-emerged in Iquitos, Peru in 1994 and is now hypoendemic (P. falciparum infections can be followed using this population dynamic. Previous work demonstrated a strong association between this population's antibody response to PfMSP1-19KD and protection against febrile illness and parasitaemia. Therefore, some selection for PfMSP1-19KD allelic diversity would be expected if the protection is to allele-specific sites of PfMSP1-19KD. Here, the potential for allele-specific polymorphisms in this population is investigated, and the allele-specificity of antibody responses to PfMSP1-19KD are determined. Methods The 42KD region in PfMSP1 was genotyped from 160 individual infections collected between 2003 and 2007. Additionally, the polymorphic block 2 region of Pfmsp1 (Pfmsp1-B2 was genotyped in 781 infection-months to provide a baseline for population-level diversity. To test whether PfMSP1-19KD genetic diversity had any impact on antibody responses, ELISAs testing IgG antibody response were performed on individuals using all four allele-types of PfMSP1-19KD. An antibody depletion ELISA was used to test the ability of antibodies to cross-react between allele-types. Results Despite increased diversity in Pfmsp1-B2, limited diversity within Pfmsp1-42KD was observed. All 160 infections genotyped were Mad20-like at the Pfmsp1-33KD locus. In the Pfmsp1-19KD locus, 159 (99.4% were the Q-KSNG-F haplotype and 1 (0.6% was the E-KSNG-L haplotype. Antibody responses in 105 individuals showed that Q-KNG and Q-TSR alleles generated the strongest immune responses, while Q-KNG and E-KNG responses were more concordant with each other than with those from Q-TSR and E-TSR, and vice versa. The immuno-depletion ELISAs showed all samples responded to the antigenic sites shared amongst all allelic forms of PfMSP1-19KD. Conclusions A non-allele specific antibody response in PfMSP1-19KD may explain why other allelic forms have not

  10. Identification of 2127 new HLA class I alleles in potential stem cell donors from Germany, the United States and Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Frederick, C J; Giani, A S; Cereb, N; Sauter, J; Silva-González, R; Pingel, J; Schmidt, A H; Ehninger, G; Yang, S Y

    2014-03-01

    We describe 2127 new human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I alleles found in registered stem cell donors. These alleles represent 28.9% of the currently known class I alleles. Comparing new allele sequences to homologous sequences, we found 68.1% nonsynonymous nucleotide substitutions, 28.9% silent mutations and 3.0% nonsense mutations. Many substitutions occurred at positions that have not been known to be polymorphic before. A large number of HLA alleles and nucleotide variations underline the extreme diversity of the HLA system. Strikingly, 156 new alleles were found not only multiple times, but also in carriers of various parentage, suggesting that some new alleles are not necessarily rare. Moreover, new alleles were found especially often in minority donors. This emphasizes the benefits of specifically recruiting such groups of individuals.

  11. csd alleles in the red dwarf honey bee (Apis florea,Hymenoptera: Apidae) show exceptionally high nucleotide diversity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Yong Liu; Zi-Long Wang; Xiao-Bo Wu; Wei-Yu Yan; Zhi-Jiang Zeng

    2011-01-01

    The single locus complementary sex determination (sl-csd) gene is the primary gene determining the gender of honey bees (Apis spp.).While the csd gene has been well studied in the Western honey bee (Apis mellifera),and comparable data exist in both the Eastern honey bee (Apis cerana) and the giant honey bee (Apis dorsata),no studies have been conducted in the red dwarf honey bee,Apisflorea.In this study we cloned the genomic region 3 of the A.florea csd gene from 60 workers,and identified 12 csd alleles.Analysis showed that similar to A.mellifera,region 3 of the csd gene contains a RS domain at the N terminal,a proline-rich domain at the C terminal,and a hypervariable region in the middle.However,the A.florea csd gene possessed a much higher level of nucleotide diversity,compared to A.mellifera,A.cerana and Apis dorsata.We also show that similar to the other three Apis species,in A.florea,nonsynonymous mutations in the csd gene are selectively favored in young alleles.

  12. Allelic polymorphism of GSTM1 and NAT2 genes modifies dietary-induced DNA damage in colorectal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, I; Sándor, J; Ember, I

    2000-12-01

    Typically, cancer is caused by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. In colorectal carcinogenesis, diet and nutritional habits are the most important external risk determinants. Allelic polymorphisms of certain metabolizing enzymes may have an influence on cancer risk by modifying the concentration of active carcinogenic compounds in the body. In the present study we investigated the interaction between nutritional and genetic susceptibility factors in human colon carcinogenesis. Healthy volunteers were divided into four groups, based on allelic polymorphisms of N-acetyltransferase 2 and glutathione-S-transferase M1 enzymes. Comet assay was used to determine the level of DNA strand breaks in exfoliated colorectal mucosal cells, following a 2-day vegetarian diet, and after switching to a 2-day 'high-meat' diet. The 'high-meat' diet statistically significantly increased the amount of single-strand breaks in rapid acetylators and among individuals with a GSMT1 + genotype, while it caused only a slight and not significant increase in the other groups. Our study emphasizes the importance of using susceptibility markers in cancer epidemiology, since environmental effects are strongly modified by these genetic factors. PMID:11201682

  13. Analysis of a Larger SNP Dataset from the HapMap Project Confirmed That the Modern Human A Allele of the ABO Blood Group Genes Is a Descendant of a Recombinant between B and O Alleles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaya Itou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The human ABO blood group gene consists of three main alleles (A, B, and O that encode a glycosyltransferase. The A and B alleles differ by two critical amino acids in exon 7, and the major O allele has a single nucleotide deletion (Δ261 in exon 6. Previous evolutionary studies have revealed that the A allele is the most ancient, B allele diverged from the A allele with two critical amino acid substitutions in exon 7, and the major O allele diverged from the A allele with Δ261 in exon 6. However, a recent phylogenetic network analysis study showed that the A allele of humans emerged through a recombination between the B and O alleles. In the previous study, a restricted dataset from only two populations was used. In this study, therefore, we used a large single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP dataset from the HapMap Project. The results indicated that the A101-A201-O09 haplogroup was a recombinant lineage between the B and O haplotypes, containing the intact exon 6 from the B allele and the two critical A type sites in exon 7 from the major O allele. Its recombination point was assumed to be located just behind Δ261 in exon 6.

  14. Microsatellite polymorphism within pfcrt provides evidence of continuing evolution of chloroquine-resistant alleles in Papua New Guinea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Yagya D

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphism in the pfcrt gene underlies Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance (CQR, as sensitive strains consistently carry lysine (K, while CQR strains carry threonine (T at the codon 76. Previous studies have shown that microsatellite (MS haplotype variation can be used to study the evolution of CQR polymorphism and to characterize intra- and inter-population dispersal of CQR in Papua New Guinea (PNG. Methods Here, following identification of new polymorphic MS in introns 2 and 3 within the pfcrt gene (msint2 and msint3, respectively, locus-by-locus and haplotype heterozygosity (H analyses were performed to determine the distribution of this intronic polymorphism among pfcrt chloroquine-sensitive and CQR alleles. Results For MS flanking the pfcrt CQR allele, H ranged from 0.07 (B5M77, -18 kb to 0.094 (9B12, +2 kb suggesting that CQ selection pressure was responsible for strong homogenisation of this gene locus. In a survey of 206 pfcrt-SVMNT allele-containing field samples from malaria-endemic regions of PNG, H for msint2 was 0.201. This observation suggests that pfcrt msint2 exhibits a higher level of diversity than what is expected from the analyses of pfcrt flanking MS. Further analyses showed that one of the three haplotypes present in the early 1980's samples has become the predominant haplotype (frequency = 0.901 in CQR parasite populations collected after 1995 from three PNG sites, when CQR had spread throughout malaria-endemic regions of PNG. Apparent localized diversification of pfcrt haplotypes at each site was also observed among samples collected after 1995, where minor CQR-associated haplotypes were found to be unique to each site. Conclusion In this study, a higher level of diversity at MS loci within the pfcrt gene was observed when compared with the level of diversity at pfcrt flanking MS. While pfcrt (K76T and its immediate flanking region indicate homogenisation in PNG CQR parasite populations

  15. Clarifying the Relationship between Average Excesses and Average Effects of Allele Substitutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Castro, José M; Yang, Rong-Cai

    2012-01-01

    Fisher's concepts of average effects and average excesses are at the core of the quantitative genetics theory. Their meaning and relationship have regularly been discussed and clarified. Here we develop a generalized set of one locus two-allele orthogonal contrasts for average excesses and average effects, based on the concept of the effective gene content of alleles. Our developments help understand the average excesses of alleles for the biallelic case. We dissect how average excesses relate to the average effects and to the decomposition of the genetic variance. PMID:22509178

  16. Clarifying the relationship between average excesses and average effects of allele substitutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M eÁlvarez-Castro

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Fisher’s concepts of average effects and average excesses are at the core of the quantitative genetics theory. Their meaning and relationship have regularly been discussed and clarified. Here we develop a generalized set of one-locus two-allele orthogonal contrasts for average excesses and average effects, based on the concept of the effective gene content of alleles. Our developments help understand the average excesses of alleles for the biallelic case. We dissect how average excesses relate to the average effects and to the decomposition of the genetic variance.

  17. Precision-engineering the Pseudomonas aeruginosa genome with two-step allelic exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hmelo, Laura R; Borlee, Bradley R; Almblad, Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    Allelic exchange is an efficient method of bacterial genome engineering. This protocol describes the use of this technique to make gene knockouts and knock-ins, as well as single-nucleotide insertions, deletions and substitutions, in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Unlike other approaches to allelic...... exchange, this protocol does not require heterologous recombinases to insert or excise selective markers from the target chromosome. Rather, positive and negative selections are enabled solely by suicide vector-encoded functions and host cell proteins. Here, mutant alleles, which are flanked by regions...

  18. Estimation of the frequency of hexosaminidase a variant alleles in the American Jewish population.

    OpenAIRE

    Greenberg, D A; Kaback, M M

    1982-01-01

    There appear to be several alleles of the hexosaminidase A (HEX A) gene that lead to different clinical syndromes. In addition to the infantile-onset Tay-Sachs disease (TSD), there is a juvenile-onset and an adult-onset form, which are also characterized by low HEX A levels. There are also apparently healthy adults with low HEX A activity. Based primarily on data from population screening for TSD carrier status, we estimate the allele frequency of the combined variant alleles for which data a...

  19. Systematic Functional Interrogation of Rare Cancer Variants Identifies Oncogenic Alleles | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer genome characterization efforts now provide an initial view of the somatic alterations in primary tumors. However, most point mutations occur at low frequency, and the function of these alleles remains undefined. We have developed a scalable systematic approach to interrogate the function of cancer-associated gene variants. We subjected 474 mutant alleles curated from 5,338 tumors to pooled in vivo tumor formation assays and gene expression profiling. We identified 12 transforming alleles, including two in genes (PIK3CB, POT1) that have not been shown to be tumorigenic.

  20. Differences in the ability to suppress interferon β production between allele A and allele B NS1 proteins from H10 influenza A viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohari Siamak

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In our previous study concerning the genetic relationship among H10 avian influenza viruses with different pathogenicity in mink (Mustela vison, we found that these differences were related to amino acid variations in the NS1 protein. In this study, we extend our previous work to further investigate the effect of the NS1 from different gene pools on type I IFN promoter activity, the production of IFN-β, as well as the expression of the IFN-β mRNA in response to poly I:C. Results Using a model system, we first demonstrated that NS1 from A/mink/Sweden/84 (H10N4 (allele A could suppress an interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE reporter system to about 85%. The other NS1 (allele B, from A/chicken/Germany/N/49 (H10N7, was also able to suppress the reporter system, but only to about 20%. The differences in the abilities of the two NS1s from different alleles to suppress the ISRE reporter system were clearly reflected by the protein and mRNA expressions of IFN-β as shown by ELISA and RT-PCR assays. Conclusions These studies reveal that different non-structural protein 1 (NS1 of influenza viruses, one from allele A and another from allele B, show different abilities to suppress the type I interferon β expression. It has been hypothesised that some of the differences in the different abilities of the alleles to suppress ISRE were because of the interactions and inhibitions at later stages from the IFN receptor, such as the JAK/STAT pathway. This might reflect the additional effects of the immune evasion potential of different NS1s.

  1. Ambiguous allele combinations in HLA Class I and Class II sequence-based typing: when precise nucleotide sequencing leads to imprecise allele identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larsen Paula

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sequence-based typing (SBT is one of the most comprehensive methods utilized for HLA typing. However, one of the inherent problems with this typing method is the interpretation of ambiguous allele combinations which occur when two or more different allele combinations produce identical sequences. The purpose of this study is to investigate the probability of this occurrence. We performed HLA-A,-B SBT for Exons 2 and 3 on 676 donors. Samples were analyzed with a capillary sequencer. The racial distribution of the donors was as follows: 615-Caucasian, 13-Asian, 23-African American, 17-Hispanic and 8-Unknown. 672 donors were analyzed for HLA-A locus ambiguities and 666 donors were analyzed for HLA-B locus ambiguities. At the HLA-A locus a total of 548 total ambiguous allele combinations were identified (548/1344 = 41%. Most (278/548 = 51% of these ambiguities were due to the fact that Exon 4 analysis was not performed. At the HLA-B locus 322 total ambiguous allele combinations were found (322/1332 = 24%. The HLA-B*07/08/15/27/35/44 antigens, common in Caucasians, produced a large portion of the ambiguities (279/322 = 87%. A large portion of HLA-A and B ambiguous allele combinations can be addressed by utilizing a group-specific primary amplification approach to produce an unambiguous homozygous sequence. Therefore, although the prevalence of ambiguous allele combinations is high, if the resolution of these ambiguities is clinically warranted, methods exist to compensate for this problem.

  2. The HLA-DRB1 allele polymorphisms and nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huimin; Yu, Kaihui; Zhang, Ruoheng; Li, Jiatong; Wei, Xiaomou; Zhang, Yuening; Zhang, Chengdong; Xiao, Feifan; Zhao, Dong; Lin, Xuandong; Wu, Huayu; Yang, Xiaoli

    2016-06-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1 has been reported to influence individual's susceptibility to nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) by many studies in recent years; however, these studies provided controversial results. The meta-analysis was thus conducted here to estimate the relationship between HLA-DRB1 polymorphisms and NPC. After an extensive review of journals from various databases (PubMed, the Web of Science, Embase, China National Knowledge Internet (CNKI), and Wanfang Database), 8 out of 69 case-control studies, including 778 cases and 1148 controls, were extracted. The results showed that 4 of 13 polymorphisms allele are statistically significantly associated with NPC, among them, HLA-DRB1*3, HLA-DRB1*9, and HLA-DRB1*10 may increase the risk of NPC while HLA-DRB1*01 has the opposite effect. The pooled odds ratio and 95 % confidence interval (CI) were 1.702 [95 % CI (1.047, 2.765)], 1.363 [95 % CI (1.029, 1.806)], 1.989 [95 % CI (1.042, 3.799)], and 0.461 [95 % CI (0.315, 0.676)], respectively. In a further ethnicity-based subgroup analysis, HLA-DRB1*08, HLA-DRB1*11, and HLA-DRB1*16 were found to be linked with NPC in Asian, Tunisian, and Caucasian, respectively. In Asian, HLA-DRB1*03, 08, and 10 may elevate the risk whereas HLA-DRB1*09 could lower it. In Tunisian, HLA-DRB1*01 and 11 are the protective factors while HLA-DRB1*03 is the only risk factor. In Caucasian, HLA-DRB1*01 and 03 increase the risk and HLA-DRB1*16 lowers it. The most frequent statistically associated gene is found to be HLA-DRB1*03 which has protective influence on Asian and Tunisian. In conclusion, HLA-DRB1*01, DRB1*03, DRB1*09, and DRB1*10 are related with NPC susceptibility, and the association of HLA-DRB1*08, DRB1*11, and DRB1*16 with NPC risk are significantly different in different ethnicities. PMID:27059731

  3. Dominance variation across six herbicides of the Arabidopsis thaliana csr1-1 and csr1-2 resistance alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Fabrice; Matéjicek, Annick; Gasquez, Jacques; Reboud, Xavier

    2005-11-01

    Dominance of a resistance trait can be defined as a measure of the relative position of the phenotype of the heterozygote RS compared with the phenotype of the two corresponding homozygotes, SS and RR. This parameter has been shown to have primary importance in the dynamics of pesticide resistance evolution. Literature on insecticide resistance suggests that dominance levels in the presence of insecticide vary greatly from completely recessive to completely dominant. With insecticides, both the chemical applied and the dosages used have been demonstrated to affect the dominance. By contrast, almost all herbicide resistances have been found to be inherited as partially to totally dominant traits. This discrepancy between weeds and insects may partly result from the methodologies applied to measure the dominance, ie a single dose for herbicide versus several doses for insecticide. Using two well-known resistances (csr1-1 and csr1-2) to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors in Arabidopsis thaliana (L) Heynh (mouse-ear cress), we used several herbicide doses to determine the dominance level to six ALS-inhibiting herbicides. The dominance level in the presence of herbicide varied from completely dominant to completely recessive, depending on the resistance allele and the herbicide tested. The dominance of the csr1-1 and csr1-2 resistance alleles ranged from 0 (completely recessive) to 1.1 (dominant) and from 0 to 0.3 (partially dominant), respectively. The recessivity of some resistance alleles in the presence of herbicide could lead to the development of improved resistance management in order to delay or avoid herbicide resistance evolution, especially in the control of outcrossing weed species. PMID:16007690

  4. Population estimators or progeny tests: what is the best method to assess null allele frequencies at SSR loci?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oddou-Muratorio, S.; Vendramin, G.G.; Buiteveld, J.; Fady, B.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear SSRs are notorious for having relatively high frequencies of null alleles, i.e. alleles that fail to amplify and are thus recessive and undetected in heterozygotes. In this paper, we compare two kinds of approaches for estimating null allele frequencies at seven nuclear microsatellite marker

  5. Distribution of apolipoprotein E alleles in coras and huicholes from Nayarit and Nahuas and Mestizos from Veracruz, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Fuentes, Carlos S; González-Sobrino, Blanca Zoila; Gómez-Sanchez, Ariadna; Martínez Rueda, Hortencia; Chávez-Eakle, Rosa Aurora; Serrano Sánchez, Carlos

    2005-12-01

    We report allele frequencies for the most common polymorphism of the APOE gene in Mexican individuals from two regions not previously described: Coras and Huicholes from Nayarit, and Nahuas and mestizos from Veracruz. We also report APOE allele frequencies for inhabitants of Mexico City. These descriptive data underscore the allelic heterogeneity for this particular locus in Mexico.

  6. JAK2V617F allele burden in polycythemia vera correlates with grade of myelofibrosis, but is not substantially affected by therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Silver, Richard T.; Vandris, Katherine; Wang, Y Lynn; Adriano, Fernando; Jones, Amy V; Christos, Paul J.; Nicholas C P Cross

    2010-01-01

    In a series of 105 patients with polycythemia vera, we retrospectively determined whether the JAK2V617F mutation correlated with severity of disease phenotype. Higher JAK2V617F allele burden correlated with more advanced myelofibrosis, greater splenomegaly, and higher white blood cell count, but not with age, gender, hematocrit level, or frequency of phlebotomy prior to cytoreductive therapy. Although a subgroup at increased risk for thrombosis was not clearly defined, there was a suggestion ...

  7. Allele-specific gene expression patterns in primary leukemic cells reveal regulation of gene expression by CpG site methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milani, Lili; Lundmark, Anders; Nordlund, Jessica;

    2008-01-01

    To identify genes that are regulated by cis-acting functional elements in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) we determined the allele-specific expression (ASE) levels of 2, 529 genes by genotyping a genome-wide panel of single nucleotide polymorphisms in RNA and DNA from bone marrow and blood sam...... of these sites. Our results demonstrate that CpG site methylation is one of the factors that regulates gene expression in ALL cells....

  8. HLA-B*40 Allele Plays a Role in the Development of Acute Leukemia in Mexican Population: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Fernández-Torres

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Among oncohematological diseases, acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL and acute myeloid leukemia (AML are characterized by the uncontrolled production and accumulation of blasts that can lead to death. Although the physiopathology of these diseases is multifactorial, a genetic factor seems to be at play. Several studies worldwide have shown association of ALL and AML with several alleles of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC. Objective. To determine gene frequencies of HLA-B alleles in Mexicans (individuals with Native American genetic background admixed with European descent with ALL and AML. Methods. We compared the HLA-B alleles in 213 patients with ALL and 85 patients with AML to those present in 731 umbilical cord blood (UCB samples as a control group; this was done by means of the PCR-SSP technique. Results. We found an increased frequency of the HLA-B*40 allele in ALL patients as compared to the control group (14.5% versus 9.84%, P=0.003, OR = 1.67; this was particularly evident in a subgroup of young (less than 18 years old ALL patients (P=0.002, OR = 1.76; likewise, a decreased frequency of HLA-B*40 allele in AML patients was observed as compared to the control group (4.70% versus 9.84%, P=0.02, OR = 0.42. Conclusions. These results might suggest opposing effects of the HLA-B*40 in the genetic susceptibility to develop ALL or AML and offer the possibility to study further the molecular mechanisms of cell differentiation within the bone marrow lineage.

  9. [Allelic polymorphism of kappa-casein gene (CSN3) in Russian cattle breeds and its informative value as a genetic marker].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulimova, G E; Abani Azari, M; Rostamzadeh, J; Mohammad Abani, M R; Lazebnyĭ, O E

    2007-01-01

    The frequencies of the kappa-casein gene (CSN3) alleles and genotypes have been determined in five Russian cattle breeds (Bestuzhev, Kalmyk, Russian Black Pied, Yaroslavl, and Yakut breeds) by means of PCR-RFLP analysis using two independent restriction nucleases (HinfI and TaqI) and by allele-specific PCR. Typing alleles A and B of CSN3 is of practical importance, because allele B is correlated with commercially valuable parameters of milk productivity (protein content and milk yield) and improves the cheese yielding capacity. The frequencies of the B allele of CSN3 in the breeds studied vary from 0.16 to 0.50; and those of the AB and BB genotypes, from 0.27 to 0.60 and from 0.02 to 0.23, respectively. The Yaroslavl breed had the highest frequencies of CSN3 allele B and genotype BB (0.50 and 0.23, respectively). The frequencies of the B allele and BB genotype in other breeds studied varied from 0.25 to 0.32 and from 0.03 to 0.09, respectively. In none of the breeds studied have the observed and expected heterozygosities been found to differ from each other significantly. However, the observed genotype distributions significantly differ from the expected one in some herds (in most such cases, an excess of heterozygotes is observed). Two herds of the Yaroslavl breed dramatically differ from each other in the heterozygosity level: a deficit (D = -0.14) and an excess (D = 0.20) of heterozygotes have been observed at the Mikhailovskoe and Gorshikha farms, respectively. In general, however, the heterozygosity of the Yaroslavl breed corresponds to the expected level (D = 0.04). Analysis of breeds for homogeneity with the use of Kulback's test has shown that all cattle breeds studied are heterogeneous, the CSN3 diversity within breeds being higher than that among different breeds, which is confirmed by low Fst values (0.0025-0.0431). Thus, a DNA marker based on CSN3 gene polymorphism is extremely important for breeding practice as a marker of milk quality; however, it is

  10. Using multi-locus allelic sequence data to estimate genetic divergence among four Lilium (Liliaceae cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arwa eShahin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Next Generation Sequencing (NGS may enable estimating relationships among genotypes using allelic variation of multiple nuclear genes simultaneously. We explored the potential and caveats of this strategy in four genetically distant Lilium cultivars to estimate their genetic divergence from transcriptome sequences using three approaches: POFAD (Phylogeny of Organisms from Allelic Data, uses allelic information of sequence data, RAxML (Randomized Accelerated Maximum Likelihood, tree building based on concatenated consensus sequences and Consensus Network (constructing a network summarizing among gene tree conflicts. Twenty six gene contigs were chosen based on the presence of orthologous sequences in all cultivars, seven of which also had an orthologous sequence in Tulipa, used as out-group. The three approaches generated the same topology. Although the resolution offered by these approaches is high, in this case there was no extra benefit in using allelic information. We conclude that these 26 genes can be widely applied to construct a species tree for the genus Lilium.

  11. Polymorphic allele of human IRGM1 is associated with susceptibility to tuberculosis in African Americans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Y King

    Full Text Available An ancestral polymorphic allele of the human autophagy-related gene IRGM1 is associated with altered gene expression and a genetic risk for Crohn's Disease (CD. We used the single nucleotide polymorphism rs10065172C/T as a marker of this polymorphic allele and genotyped 370 African American and 177 Caucasian tuberculosis (TB cases and 180 African American and 110 Caucasian controls. Among African Americans, the TB cases were more likely to carry the CD-related T allele of rs10065172 (odds ratio of 1.54; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-2.02; P<0.01 compared to controls. Our finding suggests that this CD-related IRGM1 polymorphic allele is also associated with human susceptibility to TB disease among African Americans.

  12. Adaptation of Drosophila to a novel laboratory environment reveals temporally heterogeneous trajectories of selected alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-terWengel, Pablo; Kapun, Martin; Nolte, Viola; Kofler, Robert; Flatt, Thomas; Schlötterer, Christian

    2012-10-01

    The genomic basis of adaptation to novel environments is a fundamental problem in evolutionary biology that has gained additional importance in the light of the recent global change discussion. Here, we combined laboratory natural selection (experimental evolution) in Drosophila melanogaster with genome-wide next generation sequencing of DNA pools (Pool-Seq) to identify alleles that are favourable in a novel laboratory environment and traced their trajectories during the adaptive process. Already after 15 generations, we identified a pronounced genomic response to selection, with almost 5000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP; genome-wide false discovery rates heterogeneous, with the alleles falling into two distinct classes: (i) alleles that continuously rise in frequency; and (ii) alleles that at first increase rapidly but whose frequencies then reach a plateau. Our data thus suggest that the genomic response to selection can involve a large number of selected SNPs that show unexpectedly complex evolutionary trajectories, possibly due to nonadditive effects.

  13. HLA-DRB1 ALLELES GENOTYPING IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS IN CHINESE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵岩; 董怡; 朱席林; 邱长春

    1996-01-01

    Objective. To explore the role of HLA-DRB1 genes in the development of rheumatoid arthritis(RA) and the correlations between HLA-DR alleles and clinical manifestations of patients with RA.Methods. 86 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 106 race matched controls were studied in whom HLA-DR typing was perfomed by the method of DNA amplification with sequence-specific primers(PCR-SSP). The subtypes of HLA-DR4 were determined by the method of hybridization of PCR products with sequence-specific oligonucletides(PCR SSO). The absence or presence of the patients.Results.Compared with controls,an increased gene frequency of HLA-DR4(48.8% vs 17.9%,P<0.001) and a decreased frequency of HLA-DR7(16.3% vs 27.4%,P=0.06) were found.The DRB1 0405 account for 61.9% of DR4+RA patients with respect to age,sex,duration of disease,rheumatoid factor(RF),extra-articular manifestations including secondary Sjogren's syndrome.According to the wrisr X-ray stage,the patlents of DR4+were more severe than that of DR4-P(P<0.05).Conclusion.HLA-DR4 and DR4 subtype of DRB1 0405 are related to the development of RA in Chinese.HLA-DR4 can be a useful prognosric marker in the patients with RA.

  14. Hypomorphic variant of the slow allele of C3 associated with hypocomplementemia and hematuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, R H; Bryan, R K; Winkelstein, J

    1985-05-01

    This report describes the first instance of a hypomorphic variant (C3*s) of the most common C3 allele, C3 Slow, which was detected in a four-year-old Caucasian boy with hematuria. Analysis of C3 phenotypes, as determined by agarose electrophoresis, showed a hypomorphic C3 Slow in the patient and a maternal aunt. Serum C3 concentration was significantly reduced in the patient and his mother (610 and 750 micrograms/ml; normal +/- 1 SD = 1,240 +/- 240 micrograms/ml) and was at the lower limits of normal in the affected aunt (770 micrograms/ml). The mother's phenotype was C3 S (? Ss) and she was the presumed carrier, since the father (C3 FS) had neither an abnormal C3 S band nor a low C3 concentration (980 micrograms/ml). Total hemolytic complement was significantly reduced only in the patient (19 units/ml; normal = 38 +/- 16). Hypomorphic C3 variants should be considered in the evaluation of decreased serum C3 levels. PMID:3993666

  15. Clinical characteristics and HLA alleles of a family with simultaneously occurring alopecia areata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emre, Selma; Metin, Ahmet; Caykoylu, Ali; Akoglu, Gulsen; Ceylan, Gülay G; Oztekin, Aynure; Col, Esra S

    2016-06-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease resulting in partial or total noncicatricial hair loss. HLA class II antigens are the most important markers that constitute genetic predisposition to AA. Various life events and intense psychological stress may play an important role in triggering AA attacks. We report an unusual case series of 4 family members who had simultaneously occurring active AA lesions. Our aim was to evaluate the clinical and psychiatric features of 4 cases of active AA lesions occurring simultaneously in a family and determine HLA alleles. The clinical and psychological features of all patients were examined. HLA antigen DNA typing was performed by polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers. All patients had typical AA lesions over the scalp and/or beard area. Psychological examinations revealed obsessive-compulsive personality disorder in the proband's parents as well as anxiety and lack of self-confidence in both the proband and his sister. HLA antigen types were not commonly shared with family members. These findings suggest that AA presenting concurrently in members of the same family was not associated with genetic predisposition. Shared psychological disorders and stressful life events might be the major key points in the concurrent presentation of these familial AA cases and development of resistance against treatments.

  16. Fine mapping and cloning of MT1,a novel allele of D10

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Zhou; Jinyan Zhu; Zhengyi Li; Fei Gu; Honggen Zhang; Shuzhu Tang; Minghong Gu; Guohua Liang

    2009-01-01

    Rice tillering is an important determinant for grain production.To investigate the mechanism of tillering,we characterized a multiple tillering mutant (mt1) identified from the japonica variety,Zhonghua 11,treated with EMS.This mutant exhibits advanced tillering development and dwarfed compared with wild-type plants.Genetic analysis and fine gene mapping indicated that the mt1 mutant was controlled by a recessive gene,residing on a 29-kb window on AP003376 of chromosome 1.One putative gene in this region,encoding a carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 8 (CCD8),was allelic to D10.The mt1 mutant phenotype was complemented by introduction of wild-type MT1,and knockdown of MT1 in wild-type rice mimicked the mutant phenotype.Real-time PCR analysis indicated that the MT1 gene is expressed highly in stems and at a low level in axillary buds,panicles,leaves,and roots.In addition,MT1 expression is clearly under feedback regulation.

  17. DNA TYPING FOR HLA - DR ALLELES BY PCR - AMPLIFICATION WITH SEQUENCE- SPECIFIC PRIMERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭建明; 谢桐; 徐琴君

    1999-01-01

    Ohjective To establish a rapid genetyping for HLA- DR alleles by polymerase chain reaction wiht sequence - specifie primers (PCR - SSP) for clinical application. Material and Methods The subjects of study included 69 recipients, 43 unrelated donors and 5 cell lines, Genomic DNA was prepared from peripheral blood leukoeytes by a salting- out method, Thirty primers designed according to the HLA- DRB nucleotide sequences, and synthesized on a 391 DNN synthesizer,Twenty separate PCR reactions were perfomed for each sample, The amplification was accomplished by 34 cycles consisting of denaturation at 94℃ for 30 seconds, annealing at 60℃ for 50 seconds and extension at 72℃ for 40 seconds The specificity of matching was determined by standard DNAs and Southem hybeidization using DIG labeling probes. Results All 112 samples and 5 cell lines were able to be typed by PCR-SSP,No false positive or false negative typing results were obtained. The reproducibility was 100 %,The size of the .specific product was in cnoccrdance with the size of the designed primers. The overall time for genotyping was 4 bours. The typing results were confirned by Southem hybridization.Conelusions Genotyping for HLA- DR by PCR- SSP is a rapid and accurate matching technique suited for clinical application.

  18. Allelic variants of ADH, ALDH and the five factor model of personality in alcohol dependence syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K Salujha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The etiology of alcohol dependence is a complex interplay of biopsychosocial factors. The genes for alcohol-metabolizing enzymes: Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH2 and ADH3 and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2 exhibit functional polymorphisms. Vulnerability of alcohol dependence may also be in part due to heritable personality traits. Aim: To determine whether any association exists between polymorphisms of ADH2, ADH3 and ALDH2 and alcohol dependence syndrome in a group of Asian Indians. In addition, the personality of these patients was assessed to identify traits predisposing to alcoholism. Materials and Methods: In this study, 100 consecutive males with alcohol dependence syndrome attending the psychiatric outpatient department of a tertiary care service hospital and an equal number of matched healthy controls were included with their consent. Blood samples of all the study cases and controls were collected and genotyped for the ADH2, ADH3 and ALDH2 loci. Personality was evaluated using the neuroticism, extraversion, openness (NEO personality inventory and sensation seeking scale. Results: Allele frequencies of ADH2FNx012 (0.50, ADH3FNx011 (0.67 and ALSH2FNx012 (0.09 were significantly low in the alcohol dependent subjects. Personality traits of NEO personality inventory and sensation seeking were significantly higher when compared to controls. Conclusions: The functional polymorphisms of genes coding for alcohol metabolizing enzymes and personality traits of NEO and sensation seeking may affect the propensity to develop dependence.

  19. Clinical characteristics and HLA alleles of a family with simultaneously occurring alopecia areata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emre, Selma; Metin, Ahmet; Caykoylu, Ali; Akoglu, Gulsen; Ceylan, Gülay G; Oztekin, Aynure; Col, Esra S

    2016-06-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease resulting in partial or total noncicatricial hair loss. HLA class II antigens are the most important markers that constitute genetic predisposition to AA. Various life events and intense psychological stress may play an important role in triggering AA attacks. We report an unusual case series of 4 family members who had simultaneously occurring active AA lesions. Our aim was to evaluate the clinical and psychiatric features of 4 cases of active AA lesions occurring simultaneously in a family and determine HLA alleles. The clinical and psychological features of all patients were examined. HLA antigen DNA typing was performed by polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers. All patients had typical AA lesions over the scalp and/or beard area. Psychological examinations revealed obsessive-compulsive personality disorder in the proband's parents as well as anxiety and lack of self-confidence in both the proband and his sister. HLA antigen types were not commonly shared with family members. These findings suggest that AA presenting concurrently in members of the same family was not associated with genetic predisposition. Shared psychological disorders and stressful life events might be the major key points in the concurrent presentation of these familial AA cases and development of resistance against treatments. PMID:27416096

  20. Evidence for multiple alleles effecting muscling and fatness at the Ovine GDF8 locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oddy V Hutton

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The current investigation surveyed genetic polymorphism at the ovine GDF8 locus and determined its contribution to variation in muscling and fatness in sheep. Results Re-sequencing 2988 bp from a panel of 15 sires revealed a total of six SNP, none of which were located within exons of the gene. One of the identified SNP, g+6723G>A, is known to increase muscularity within the Belgian Texel. A genetic survey of 326 animals revealed that the mutation is near fixation within Australian Texels and present in additional breeds including White Suffolk, Poll Dorset and Lincoln. Using a resource population comprising 15 sires and 1191 half-sib progeny with genotypic data, the effect of this and other SNP was tested against a set of 50 traits describing growth, muscling, fatness, yield, meat and eating quality. The loss of function allele (g+6723A showed significant effects on slaughter measurements of muscling and fatness. No effect was detected on objectively assessed meat quality however evidence was found for an association between g+6723G>A, decreased intramuscular fat and reduced eating quality. Haplotype analysis using flanking microsatellites was performed to search for evidence of currently unidentified mutations which might affect production traits. Four haplotypes were identified that do not carry g+6723A but which showed significant associations with muscling and fatness. Conclusion The finding that g+6723G>A is present within Australian sheep facilitated an independent evaluation into its phenotypic consequence. Testing was conducted using a separate genetic background and animals raised in different environments to the Belgian Texel in which it was first identified. The observation that the direction and size of effects for g+6723A is approximately consistent represented a robust validation of the effects of the mutation. Based on observed allele frequencies within breeds, selection for g+6723A will have the largest

  1. Interrogation of allelic chromatin states in human cells by high-density ChIP-genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Nicholas; Adoue, Véronique; Ge, Bing; Chen, Shu-Huang; Kwan, Tony; Pastinen, Tomi

    2014-09-01

    Allele-specific (AS) assessment of chromatin has the potential to elucidate specific cis-regulatory mechanisms, which are predicted to underlie the majority of the known genetic associations to complex disease. However, development of chromatin landscapes at allelic resolution has been challenging since sites of variable signal strength require substantial read depths not commonly applied in sequencing based approaches. In this study, we addressed this by performing parallel analyses of input DNA and chromatin immunoprecipitates (ChIP) on high-density Illumina genotyping arrays. Allele-specificity for the histone modifications H3K4me1, H3K4me3, H3K27ac, H3K27me3, and H3K36me3 was assessed using ChIP samples generated from 14 lymphoblast and 6 fibroblast cell lines. AS-ChIP SNPs were combined into domains and validated using high-confidence ChIP-seq sites. We observed characteristic patterns of allelic-imbalance for each histone-modification around allele-specifically expressed transcripts. Notably, we found H3K4me1 to be significantly anti-correlated with allelic expression (AE) at transcription start sites, indicating H3K4me1 allelic imbalance as a marker of AE. We also found that allelic chromatin domains exhibit population and cell-type specificity as well as heritability within trios. Finally, we observed that a subset of allelic chromatin domains is regulated by DNase I-sensitive quantitative trait loci and that these domains are significantly enriched for genome-wide association studies hits, with autoimmune disease associated SNPs specifically enriched in lymphoblasts. This study provides the first genome-wide maps of allelic-imbalance for five histone marks. Our results provide new insights into the role of chromatin in cis-regulation and highlight the need for high-depth sequencing in ChIP-seq studies along with the need to improve allele-specificity of ChIP-enrichment.

  2. HLA Class II Allele and Haplotype Frequencies in Iranian Patients with Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Khosravi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies demonstrated significant differences in a number of HLA allele frequencies in leukemia patients and normal subjects. In this study, we have analyzed HLA class II alleles and haplotypes in 110 leukemia patients (60 acute myelogenous leukemia "AML", 50 chronic myelogenous leukemia"CML" and 180 unrelated normal subjects. Blood samples were collected from all of the patients and control subjects. DNA was extracted by salting out method and HLA typing was performed using PCR-SSP method. Significant positive association with AML was obtained for HLA-DRB1*11allele (35% vs. 24.7%, P=0.033. Two alleles including HLA-DRB4 and -DQB1*0303 were significantly less frequent in AML patients than in controls. HLA-DQB1*0303 allele was never observed in CML patients compared with allele frequency in controls (4.2%. According to haplotype analysis, HLA-DRB1*0101/DQA1*0104/-DQB1*0501 frequencies were significantly higher and -DRB1*16/-DQA1*01021/-DQB1*0501 frequencies were significantly lower in CML patients than in controls .In conclusion it is suggested that HLA-DRB1*16 allele and HLA-DRB1*15/-DQA1*0103/-DQB1*06011 and -DRB1*16/-DQA1*01021/-DQB1*0501 haplotypes predispose individuals to AML and HLA-DRB4 allele predispose to CML. Future studies are needed to confirm these results and establish the role of these associations in AML and CML.

  3. Semi-parametric Allelic Tests For Mapping Multiple Phenotypes: Binomial Regression And Mahalanobis Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Arunabha; Witte, John S.; Ghosh, Saurabh

    2016-01-01

    Binary phenotypes commonly arise due to multiple underlying quantitative precursors. Genetic variants may impact multiple traits in a pleiotropic manner. Hence, simultaneously analyzing such correlated traits may be more powerful than analyzing individual traits. Various genotype-level methods, e.g. MultiPhen [O'Reilly et al., 2012], have been developed to identify genetic factors underlying a multivariate phenotype. For univariate phenotypes, the usefulness and applicability of allele-level tests have been investigated. The test of allele frequency difference among cases and controls is commonly used for mapping case-control association. However, allelic methods for multivariate association mapping have not been studied much. We explore two allelic tests of multivariate association: one using a Binomial regression model based on inverted regression of genotype on phenotype (BAMP), and the other employing the Mahalanobis distance between two sample means of the multivariate phenotype vector for two alleles at a SNP (DAMP). These methods can incorporate both discrete and continuous phenotypes. Some theoretical properties for BAMP are studied. Using simulations, the power of the methods for detecting multivariate association are compared with the genotype-level test MultiPhen. The allelic tests yield marginally higher power than MultiPhen for multivariate phenotypes. For one/two binary traits under recessive mode of inheritance, allelic tests are found substantially more powerful. All three tests are applied to two real data and the results offer some support for the simulation study. Since the allelic approaches assume Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE), we propose a hybrid approach for testing multivariate association that implements MultiPhen when HWE is violated and BAMP otherwise. PMID:26493781

  4. The lipoprotein lipase gene in combined hyperlipidemia: evidence of a protective allele depletion

    OpenAIRE

    Malloy Mary J; Pullinger Clive R; Kulkarni Medha V; Wung Shu-Fen; Kane John P; Aouizerat Bradley E

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Lipoprotein Lipase (LPL), a key enzyme in lipid metabolism, catalyzes the hydrolysis of triglycerides (TG) from TG-rich lipoproteins, and serves a bridging function that enhances the cellular uptake of lipoproteins. Abnormalities in LPL function are associated with pathophysiological conditions, including familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCH). Whereas two LPL susceptibility alleles were found to co-segregate in a few FCH kindred, a role for common, protective alleles rema...

  5. No evidence for allelic association between bipolar disorder and monoamine oxidase A gene polymorphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craddock, N.; Daniels, J.; Roberts, E. [Univ. of Wales, College of Medicine, Cardiff (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-08-14

    We have tested the hypothesis that DNA markers in the MAOA gene show allelic association with bipolar affective disorder. Eighty-four unrelated Caucasian patients with DSM III-R bipolar disorder and 84 Caucasian controls were typed for three markers in MAOA: a dinucleotide repeat in intron 2, a VNTR in intron 1, and an Fnu4HI RFLP in exon 8. No evidence for allelic association was observed between any of the markers and bipolar disorder. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  6. Allelic sequence variation of the HLA-DQ loci: relationship to serology and to insulin-dependent diabetes susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, G T; Bugawan, T L; Long, C M; Erlich, H A

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of sequence variation in the polymorphic second exon of the major histocompatibility complex genes HLA-DQ alpha and -DQ beta has revealed 8 allelic variants at the alpha locus and 13 variants at the beta locus. Correlation of sequence variation with serologic typing suggests that the DQw2, DQw3, and DQ(blank) types are determined by the DQ beta subunit, while the DQw1 specificity is determined by DQ alpha. The nature of the amino acid at position 57 in the DQ beta subunit is correlated with susceptibility to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. This region of the DQ beta chain contains shared peptides with Epstein-Barr virus and rubella virus. PMID:2842756

  7. Power laws for heavy-tailed distributions: modeling allele and haplotype diversity for the national marrow donor program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Slater

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Measures of allele and haplotype diversity, which are fundamental properties in population genetics, often follow heavy tailed distributions. These measures are of particular interest in the field of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT. Donor/Recipient suitability for HSCT is determined by Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA similarity. Match predictions rely upon a precise description of HLA diversity, yet classical estimates are inaccurate given the heavy-tailed nature of the distribution. This directly affects HSCT matching and diversity measures in broader fields such as species richness. We, therefore, have developed a power-law based estimator to measure allele and haplotype diversity that accommodates heavy tails using the concepts of regular variation and occupancy distributions. Application of our estimator to 6.59 million donors in the Be The Match Registry revealed that haplotypes follow a heavy tail distribution across all ethnicities: for example, 44.65% of the European American haplotypes are represented by only 1 individual. Indeed, our discovery rate of all U.S. European American haplotypes is estimated at 23.45% based upon sampling 3.97% of the population, leaving a large number of unobserved haplotypes. Population coverage, however, is much higher at 99.4% given that 90% of European Americans carry one of the 4.5% most frequent haplotypes. Alleles were found to be less diverse suggesting the current registry represents most alleles in the population. Thus, for HSCT registries, haplotype discovery will remain high with continued recruitment to a very deep level of sampling, but population coverage will not. Finally, we compared the convergence of our power-law versus classical diversity estimators such as Capture recapture, Chao, ACE and Jackknife methods. When fit to the haplotype data, our estimator displayed favorable properties in terms of convergence (with respect to sampling depth and accuracy (with respect to diversity

  8. Discovery of a Novel er1 Allele Conferring Powdery Mildew Resistance in Chinese Pea (Pisum sativum L.) Landraces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Suli; Fu, Haining; Wang, Zhongyi; Duan, Canxing; Zong, Xuxiao; Zhu, Zhendong

    2016-01-01

    Pea powdery mildew, caused by Erysiphe pisi D.C., is an important disease worldwide. Deployment of resistant varieties is the main way to control this disease. This study aimed to screen Chinese pea (Pisum sativum L.) landraces resistant to E. pisi, and to characterize the resistance gene(s) at the er1 locus in the resistant landraces, and to develop functional marker(s) specific to the novel er1 allele. The 322 landraces showed different resistance levels. Among them, 12 (3.73%), 4 (1.24%) and 17 (5.28%) landraces showed immunity, high resistance and resistance to E. pisi, respectively. The other landraces appeared susceptible or highly susceptible to E. pisi. Most of the immune and highly resistant landraces were collected from Yunnan province. To characterize the resistance gene at the er1 locus, cDNA sequences of PsMLO1 gene were determined in 12 immune and four highly resistant accessions. The cDNAs of PsMLO1 from the immune landrace G0005576 produced three distinct transcripts, characterized by a 129-bp deletion, and 155-bp and 220-bp insertions, which were consistent with those of er1-2 allele. The PsMLO1 cDNAs in the other 15 resistant landraces produced identical transcripts, which had a new point mutation (T→C) at position 1121 of PsMLO1, indicating a novel er1 allele, designated as er1-6. This mutation caused a leucine to proline change in the amino acid sequence. Subsequently, the resistance allele er1-6 in landrace G0001778 was confirmed by resistance inheritance analysis and genetic mapping on the region of the er1 locus using populations derived from G0001778 × Bawan 6. Finally, a functional marker specific to er1-6, SNP1121, was developed using the high-resolution melting technique, which could be used in pea breeding via marker-assisted selection. The results described here provide valuable genetic information for Chinese pea landraces and a powerful tool for pea breeders. PMID:26809053

  9. The HLA class II Allele DRB1*1501 is over-represented in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmin Xue

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is a progressive and medically refractory lung disease with a grim prognosis. Although the etiology of IPF remains perplexing, abnormal adaptive immune responses are evident in many afflicted patients. We hypothesized that perturbations of human leukocyte antigen (HLA allele frequencies, which are often seen among patients with immunologic diseases, may also be present in IPF patients.HLA alleles were determined in subpopulations of IPF and normal subjects using molecular typing methods. HLA-DRB1*15 was over-represented in a discovery cohort of 79 Caucasian IPF subjects who had lung transplantations at the University of Pittsburgh (36.7% compared to normal reference populations. These findings were prospectively replicated in a validation cohort of 196 additional IPF subjects from four other U.S. medical centers that included both ambulatory patients and lung transplantation recipients. High-resolution typing was used to further define specific HLA-DRB1*15 alleles. DRB1*1501 prevalence in IPF subjects was similar among the 143 ambulatory patients and 132 transplant recipients (31.5% and 34.8%, respectively, p = 0.55. The aggregate prevalence of DRB1*1501 in IPF patients was significantly greater than among 285 healthy controls (33.1% vs. 20.0%, respectively, OR 2.0; 95%CI 1.3-2.9, p = 0.0004. IPF patients with DRB1*1501 (n = 91 tended to have decreased diffusing capacities for carbon monoxide (DL(CO compared to the 184 disease subjects who lacked this allele (37.8±1.7% vs. 42.8±1.4%, p = 0.036.DRB1*1501 is more prevalent among IPF patients than normal subjects, and may be associated with greater impairment of gas exchange. These data are novel evidence that immunogenetic processes can play a role in the susceptibility to and/or manifestations of IPF. Findings here of a disease association at the HLA-DR locus have broad pathogenic implications, illustrate a specific chromosomal area for

  10. Discovery of a Novel er1 Allele Conferring Powdery Mildew Resistance in Chinese Pea (Pisum sativum L.) Landraces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Suli; Fu, Haining; Wang, Zhongyi; Duan, Canxing; Zong, Xuxiao; Zhu, Zhendong

    2016-01-01

    Pea powdery mildew, caused by Erysiphe pisi D.C., is an important disease worldwide. Deployment of resistant varieties is the main way to control this disease. This study aimed to screen Chinese pea (Pisum sativum L.) landraces resistant to E. pisi, and to characterize the resistance gene(s) at the er1 locus in the resistant landraces, and to develop functional marker(s) specific to the novel er1 allele. The 322 landraces showed different resistance levels. Among them, 12 (3.73%), 4 (1.24%) and 17 (5.28%) landraces showed immunity, high resistance and resistance to E. pisi, respectively. The other landraces appeared susceptible or highly susceptible to E. pisi. Most of the immune and highly resistant landraces were collected from Yunnan province. To characterize the resistance gene at the er1 locus, cDNA sequences of PsMLO1 gene were determined in 12 immune and four highly resistant accessions. The cDNAs of PsMLO1 from the immune landrace G0005576 produced three distinct transcripts, characterized by a 129-bp deletion, and 155-bp and 220-bp insertions, which were consistent with those of er1-2 allele. The PsMLO1 cDNAs in the other 15 resistant landraces produced identical transcripts, which had a new point mutation (T→C) at position 1121 of PsMLO1, indicating a novel er1 allele, designated as er1-6. This mutation caused a leucine to proline change in the amino acid sequence. Subsequently, the resistance allele er1-6 in landrace G0001778 was confirmed by resistance inheritance analysis and genetic mapping on the region of the er1 locus using populations derived from G0001778 × Bawan 6. Finally, a functional marker specific to er1-6, SNP1121, was developed using the high-resolution melting technique, which could be used in pea breeding via marker-assisted selection. The results described here provide valuable genetic information for Chinese pea landraces and a powerful tool for pea breeders.

  11. HLA allele distribution distinguishes sporadic inclusion body myositis from hereditary inclusion body myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffman, B M; Sivakumar, K; Simonis, T; Stroncek, D; Dalakas, M C

    1998-04-15

    We studied the HLA class II associations in patients with sporadic inclusion body myositis (s-IBM) and hereditary inclusion body myopathies (h-IBM) and attempted to distinguish these myopathies on the basis of HLA allele assignments. Forty-five patients, 30 with s-IBM and 15 with h-IBM, underwent HLA class II allele-specific typing using polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific primers for 71 alleles contained in the DRbeta1, DRbeta3-5, and DQbeta1 loci. In s-IBM, we found a high (up to 77%) frequency of DRbeta1*0301, DRbeta3*0101 (or DRbeta3*0202) and DQbeta1*0201 alleles. No significant association with alleles in the DR and DQ haplotypes was found among the 15 h-IBM patients. The strong association of prominent alleles with s-IBM, but not h-IBM, suggests that s-IBM is a distinct disorder with an immunogenetic background that differs from h-IBM.

  12. The lipoprotein lipase gene in combined hyperlipidemia: evidence of a protective allele depletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malloy Mary J

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipoprotein Lipase (LPL, a key enzyme in lipid metabolism, catalyzes the hydrolysis of triglycerides (TG from TG-rich lipoproteins, and serves a bridging function that enhances the cellular uptake of lipoproteins. Abnormalities in LPL function are associated with pathophysiological conditions, including familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCH. Whereas two LPL susceptibility alleles were found to co-segregate in a few FCH kindred, a role for common, protective alleles remains unexplored. The LPL Ser447Stop (S447X allele is associated with anti-atherogenic lipid profiles and a modest reduction in risk for coronary disease. We hypothesize that significant depletion of the 447X allele exists in combined hyperlipidemia cases versus controls. A case-control design was employed. The polymorphism was assessed by restriction assay in 212 cases and 161 controls. Genotypic, allelic, and phenotypic associations were examined. Results We found evidence of significant allelic (447Xcontrol: 0.130 vs. 447Xcase: 0.031, χ2 = 29.085; 1df; p 2 = 26.09; 1df; p Conclusion These findings suggest a role for the S447X polymorphism in combined hyperlipidemia and demonstrate the importance of evaluating both susceptibility and protective genetic risk factors.

  13. Lack of polymorphism at MC1R wild-type allele and evidence of domestic allele introgression across European wild boar populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canu, Antonio; Vilaça, Sibelle T.; Iacolina, Laura;

    2016-01-01

    , two loci which have been under strong artificial selection during domestication. These loci influence coat colour and number of vertebrae, respectively. A total of 145 wild boars were sampled throughout Europe, to evaluate frequency and spatial distribution of domestic alleles and patterns...

  14. The same allele of translation initiation factor 4E mediates resistance against two Potyvirus spp. in Pisum sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruun-Rasmussen, M; Møller, I S; Tulinius, G; Hansen, J K R; Lund, O S; Johansen, I E

    2007-09-01

    Pathogenicity of two sequenced isolates of Bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV) was established on genotypes of Pisum sativum L. reported to carry resistance genes to BYMV and other potyviruses. Resistance to the white lupin strain of BYMV (BYMV-W) is inherited as a recessive gene named wlv that maps to linkage group VI together with other Potyvirus resistances. One of these, sbm1, confers resistance to strains of Pea seedborne mosaic virus and previously has been identified as a mutant allele of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E gene (eIF4E). Sequence comparison of eIF4E from BYMV-W-susceptible and -resistant P. sativum genotypes revealed a polymorphism correlating with the resistance profile. Expression of eIF4E from susceptible plants in resistant plants facilitated BYMV-W infection in inoculated leaves. When cDNA of BYMV-W was agroinoculated, resistance mediated by the wlv gene frequently was overcome, and virus from these plants had a codon change causing an Arg to His change at position 116 of the predicted viral genome-linked protein (VPg). Accordingly, plants carrying the wlv resistance gene were infected upon inoculation with BYMV-W derived from cDNA with a His codon at position 116 of the VPg coding region. These results suggested that VPg determined pathogenicity on plants carrying the wlv resistance gene and that wlv corresponded to the sbm1 allele of eIF4E. PMID:17849710

  15. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and the reduced risk of Alzheimer's disease in the absence of apolipoprotein E4 allele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wei Qiao; Mwamburi, Mkaya; Besser, Lilah M; Zhu, Haihao; Li, Huajie; Wallack, Max; Phillips, Leslie; Qiao, Liyan; Budson, Andrew E; Stern, Robert; Kowall, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Our cross-sectional study showed that the interaction between apolipoprotein E4 (ApoE4) and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors was associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aim of this longitudinal study was to differentiate whether ACE inhibitors accelerate or reduce the risk of AD in the context of ApoE alleles. Using the longitudinal data from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center (NACC) with ApoE genotyping and documentation of ACE inhibitors use, we found that in the absence of ApoE4, subjects who had been taking central ACE inhibitor use (χ2 test: 21% versus 27%, p = 0.0002) or peripheral ACE inhibitor use (χ2 test: 13% versus 27%, p ApoE4, there was no such association between ACE inhibitor use and the risk of AD. After adjusting for the confounders, central ACE inhibitor use (OR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.55, 0.83, p = 0.0002) or peripheral ACE inhibitor use (OR = 0.33, 95% CI = 0.33, 0.68, p ApoE4 non-carriers. In conclusion, ACE inhibitors, especially peripherally acting ones, were associated with a reduced risk of AD in the absence of ApoE4, but had no such effect in those carrying the ApoE4 allele. A double-blind clinical trial should be considered to determine the effect of ACE inhibitors on prevention of AD in the context of ApoE genotype.

  16. Organ-specific gene expression in maize: The P-wr allele. Final report, August 15, 1993--August 14, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, T.A.

    1997-06-01

    The ultimate aim of our work is to understand how a regulatory gene produces a specific pattern of gene expression during plant development. Our model is the P-wr gene of maize, which produces a distinctive pattern of pigmentation of maize floral organs. We are investigating this system using a combination of classical genetic and molecular approaches. Mechanisms of organ-specific gene expression are a subject of intense research interest, as it is the operation of these mechanisms during eukaryotic development which determine the characteristics of each organism Allele-specific expression has been characterized in only a few other plant genes. In maize, organ-specific pigmentation regulated by the R, B, and Pl genes is achieved by differential transcription of functionally conserved protein coding sequences. Our studies point to a strikingly different mechanism of organ-specific gene expression, involving post-transcriptional regulation of the regulatory P gene. The novel pigmentation pattern of the P-wr allele is associated with differences in the encoded protein. Furthermore, the P-wr gene itself is present as a unique tandemly amplified structure, which may affect its transcriptional regulation.

  17. A distinct alleles and genetic recombination of pmrCAB operon in species of Acinetobacter baumannii complex isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Hun; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2015-07-01

    To investigate pmrCAB sequence divergence in 5 species of Acinetobacter baumannii complex, a total of 80 isolates from a Korean hospital were explored. We evaluated nucleotide and amino acid polymorphisms of pmrCAB operon, and phylogenetic trees were constructed for each gene of prmCAB operon. Colistin and polymyxin B susceptibility was determined for all isolates, and multilocus sequence typing was also performed for A. baumannii isolates. Our results showed that each species of A. baumannii complex has divergent pmrCAB operon sequences. We identified a distinct pmrCAB allele allied with Acinetobacter nosocomialis in gene trees. Different grouping in each gene tree suggests sporadic recombination or emergence of pmrCAB genes among Acinetobacter species. Sequence polymorphisms among Acinetobacter species might not be associated with colistin resistance. We revealed that a distinct pmrCAB allele may be widespread across the continents such as North America and Asia and that sporadic genetic recombination or emergence of pmrCAB genes might occur.

  18. LAPTM4B allele *2 is a marker of poor prognosis following hepatic tumor resection for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lysosomal protein transmembrane 4 beta (LAPTM4B is a gene related to hepatocellular carcinoma that has two alleles designated LAPTM4B*1 and LAPTM4B*2. This study aimed to investigate the correlation of LAPTM4B genotype with prognosis and clinicopathologic features in patients who have undergone resection for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The LAPTM4B genotype was analyzed by PCR in 68 patients who had undergone curative hepatic resection for hepatocellular carcinoma. The correlation of LAPTM4B genotype with clinicopathologic parameters was assessed with the Chi-squared test. Differences in patient survival were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate analysis of prognostic factors was carried out with Cox regression analysis. Patients with LAPTM4B *2 had both significantly shorter overall survival (OS and shorter disease-free survival (DFS (both P<0.001. Multivariate analysis showed that LAPTM4B genotype is an independent prognostic factor for OS and DFS (both P<0.001. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Allele *2 of LAPTM4B is a risk factor associated with poor prognosis in patients with resected HCC. LAPTM4B status may be useful preoperatively as an adjunct in evaluation of the operability of HCC.

  19. Expanding the repertoire of gene tools for precise manipulation of the Clostridium difficile genome: allelic exchange using pyrE alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen Kuan Ng

    Full Text Available Sophisticated genetic tools to modify essential biological processes at the molecular level are pivotal in elucidating the molecular pathogenesis of Clostridium difficile, a major cause of healthcare associated disease. Here we have developed an efficient procedure for making precise alterations to the C. difficile genome by pyrE-based allelic exchange. The robustness and reliability of the method was demonstrated through the creation of in-frame deletions in three genes (spo0A, cwp84, and mtlD in the non-epidemic strain 630Δerm and two genes (spo0A and cwp84 in the epidemic PCR Ribotype 027 strain, R20291. The system is reliant on the initial creation of a pyrE deletion mutant, using Allele Coupled Exchange (ACE, that is auxotrophic for uracil and resistant to fluoroorotic acid (FOA. This enables the subsequent modification of target genes by allelic exchange using a heterologous pyrE allele from Clostridium sporogenes as a counter-/negative-selection marker in the presence of FOA. Following modification of the target gene, the strain created is rapidly returned to uracil prototrophy using ACE, allowing mutant phenotypes to be characterised in a PyrE proficient background. Crucially, wild-type copies of the inactivated gene may be introduced into the genome using ACE concomitant with correction of the pyrE allele. This allows complementation studies to be undertaken at an appropriate gene dosage, as opposed to the use of multicopy autonomous plasmids. The rapidity of the 'correction' method (5-7 days makes pyrE(- strains attractive hosts for mutagenesis studies.

  20. The Burden of JAK2V617F Mutated Allele in Turkish Patients With Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonal-Hindilerden, Ipek; Daglar-Aday, Aynur; Akadam-Teker, Basak; Yilmaz, Ceylan; Nalcaci, Meliha; Yavuz, Akif Selim; Sargin, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies regarding the impact of JAK2V617F allele burden on phenotypic properties and clinical course in Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (Ph-negative MPNs) have reported variable results. We aimed to analyze the association of mutated JAK2V617F allele burden with laboratory characteristics and clinical phenotype in Turkish patients (107 essential thrombocythemia (ET) and 77 primary myelofibrosis (PMF)). Methods Peripheral blood samples of 184 patients with Ph-negative MPNs were analyzed for JAK2V617F allele status and burden. JAK2 MutaScreen assay (Ipsogen, Luminy Biotech, Marseille, France) was used to detect the JAK2V617F status and quantitative JAK2V617F allele burdens in genomic DNA using TaqMan allelic discrimination. Results Frequency of JAK2V617F-positive patients with high mutation load (allele burden > 50%) was higher in PMF compared to ET (23.4% and 4.7%, respectively; P = 0.001). We found significant association between ET patients with high JAK2V617F allele burden and lower hemoglobin (Hgb) and hematocrit (Hct), higher LDH levels and more prevalent massive splenomegaly (P = 0.001, P = 0.001, P = 0.012 and P = 0.015, respectively). ET patients with high mutation load displayed higher prevalence of bleeding compared to low mutation load and wild-type mutational status (P = 0.003). Rate of DVT was significantly higher in ET patients with mutant allele burden in upper half compared to lower half and wild-type (P = 0.029). We observed significant association between PMF patients with high JAK2V617F allele burden and higher Hgb, Hct levels and leukocyte counts (P = 0.003, P = 0.021 and P = 0.001, respectively). Conclusions Our study demonstrated JAK2V617F allele burden correlates with clinical features in ET and PMF. We conclude quantification of JAK2V617F mutation contributes to the workup of Ph-negative MPNs. PMID:25584101

  1. Simple allele-discriminating PCR for cost-effective and rapid genotyping and mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bui Minh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are widely observed between individuals, ecotypes, and species, serving as an invaluable molecular marker for genetic, genomic, ecological and evolutionary studies. Although, a large number of SNP-discriminating methods are currently available, few are suited for low-throughput and low-cost applications. Here, we describe a genotyping method named Simple Allele-discriminating PCR (SAP, which is ideally suited for the small-scale genotyping and gene mapping routinely performed in small to medium research or teaching laboratories. Results We demonstrate the feasibility and application of SAP to discriminate wild type alleles from their respective mutant alleles in Arabidopsis thaliana. Although the design principle was previously described, it is unclear if the method is technically robust, reliable, and applicable. Three primers were designed for each individual SNP or allele with two allele-discriminating forward primers (one for wild type and one for the mutant allele and a common reverse primer. The two allele-discriminating forward primers are designed so that each incorporates one additional mismatch at the adjacent (penultimate site from the SNP, resulting in two mismatches between the primer and its non-target template and one mismatch between the primer and its target template. The presence or absence of the wild type or the mutant allele correlates with the presence or absence of respective PCR product. The presence of both wild type-specific and mutant-specific PCR products would indicate heterozygosity. SAP is shown here to discriminate three mutant alleles (lug-3, lug-16, and luh-1 from their respective wild type alleles. In addition, the SAP principle is shown to work in conjunction with fluorophore-labeled primers, demonstrating the feasibility of applying SAP to high throughput SNP analyses. Conclusion SAP offers an excellent alternative to existing SNP

  2. Mixed allele malaria vaccines: Host protection and within-host selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Victoria C.; Chan, Brian H.K.; Anders, Robin F.; Read, Andrew F.

    2008-01-01

    Malaria parasites are frequently polymorphic at the antigenic targets of many candidate vaccines, presumably as a consequence of selection pressure from protective immune responses. Conventional wisdom is therefore that vaccines directed against a single variant could select for non-target variants, rendering the vaccine useless. Many people have argued that a solution is to develop vaccines containing the products of more than one variant of the target. However, we are unaware of any evidence that multi-allele vaccines better protect hosts against parasites or morbidity. Moreover, selection of antigen-variants is not the only evolution that could occur in response to vaccination. Increased virulence could also be favored if more aggressive strains are less well controlled by vaccine-induced immunity. Virulence and antigenic identity have been confounded in all studies so far, and so we do not know formally from any animal or human studies whether vaccine failure has been due to evasion of protective responses by variants at target epitopes, or whether vaccines are just less good at protecting against more aggressive strains. Using the rodent malaria model Plasmodium chabaudi and recombinant apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1), we tested whether a bi-allelic vaccine afforded greater protection from parasite infection and morbidity than did vaccination with the component alleles alone. We also tested the effect of mono- and bi-allelic vaccination on within-host selection of mixed P. chabaudi infections, and whether parasite virulence mediates pathogen titres in immunized hosts. We found that vaccination with the bi-allelic AMA-1 formulation did not afford the host greater protection from parasite infection or morbidity than did mono-allelic AMA-1 immunization. Mono-allelic immunization increased the frequency of heterologous clones in mixed clone infections. There was no evidence that any type of immunization regime favored virulence. A single AMA-1 variant is a

  3. Variant mannose-binding lectin alleles are not associated with susceptibility to or outcome of invasive pneumococcal infection in randomly included patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Gitte; Madsen, Hans O; Pedersen, Svend S;

    2002-01-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease is a serious infection that primarily affects very young children and elderly or immunocompromised individuals but also affects previously healthy people. Variant mannose-binding lectin (MBL) alleles are associated with recurrent infections and may be a risk factor for...... pneumococcal infections. To assess the influence of MBL genotypes on the course and outcome of invasive pneumococcal disease, clinical data for 141 adult patients were collected prospectively and their genotypes were determined. All patients included had positive blood cultures for Streptococcus pneumoniae....... The distribution of variant MBL alleles related to low MBL serum concentrations was similar among the patients and healthy individuals, and MBL genotype was not associated with infection outcome. Thus, in a random adult population with invasive pneumococcal infection, MBL does not seem to play a role...

  4. Dynamic reprogramming of DNA methylation at an epigenetically sensitive allele in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marnie E Blewitt

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence in both plants and animals that epigenetic marks are not always cleared between generations. Incomplete erasure at genes associated with a measurable phenotype results in unusual patterns of inheritance from one generation to the next, termed transgenerational epigenetic inheritance. The Agouti viable yellow (A(vy allele is the best-studied example of this phenomenon in mice. The A(vy allele is the result of a retrotransposon insertion upstream of the Agouti gene. Expression at this locus is controlled by the long terminal repeat (LTR of the retrotransposon, and expression results in a yellow coat and correlates with hypomethylation of the LTR. Isogenic mice display variable expressivity, resulting in mice with a range of coat colours, from yellow through to agouti. Agouti mice have a methylated LTR. The locus displays epigenetic inheritance following maternal but not paternal transmission; yellow mothers produce more yellow offspring than agouti mothers. We have analysed the DNA methylation in mature gametes, zygotes, and blastocysts and found that the paternally and maternally inherited alleles are treated differently. The paternally inherited allele is demethylated rapidly, and the maternal allele is demethylated more slowly, in a manner similar to that of nonimprinted single-copy genes. Interestingly, following maternal transmission of the allele, there is no DNA methylation in the blastocyst, suggesting that DNA methylation is not the inherited mark. We have independent support for this conclusion from studies that do not involve direct analysis of DNA methylation. Haplo-insufficiency for Mel18, a polycomb group protein, introduces epigenetic inheritance at a paternally derived A(vy allele, and the pedigrees reveal that this occurs after zygotic genome activation and, therefore, despite the rapid demethylation of the locus.

  5. Allelic associations of two polymorphic microsatellites in intron 40 of the human von Willebrand factor gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, S.D.J.; De Souza, K.T. (Nucleo de Genetica Medica de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil)); De Andrade, M.; Chakraborty, R. (Univ. of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX (United States))

    1994-01-18

    At intron 40 of the von Willebrand factor (vWF) gene, two GATA-repeat polymorphic sites exist that are physically separated by 212 bp. At the first site (vWF1 locus), seven segregating repeat alleles were observed in a Brazilian Caucasian population, and at the second (vWF2 locus) there were eight alleles, detected through PCR amplifications of this DNA region. Haplotype analysis of individuals revealed 36 different haplotypes in a sample of 338 chromosomes examined. Allele frequencies between generations and gender at each locus were not significantly different, and the genotype frequencies were consistent with their Hardy-Weinberg expectations. Linkage disequilibrium between loci is highly significant with positive allele size association; that is, large alleles at the loci tend to occur together, and so do the same alleles. Variability at each locus appeared to have arisen in a stepwise fashion, suggesting replication slippage as a possible mechanism of production of new alleles. However, the authors observed an increased number of haplotypes, in contrast with the predictions of a stepwise production of variation in the entire region, suggesting some form of cooperative changes between loci that could be due to either gene conversion, or a common control mechanism of production of new variation at these repeat polymorphism sites. The high degree of polymorphism (gene diversity values of 72% and 78% at vWF1 and vWF2, respectively, and of 93% at the haplotype level) makes these markers informative for paternity testing, genetic counseling, and individual-identification purposes.

  6. Allele-Specific Quantitative PCR for Accurate, Rapid, and Cost-Effective Genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han B; Schwab, Tanya L; Koleilat, Alaa; Ata, Hirotaka; Daby, Camden L; Cervera, Roberto Lopez; McNulty, Melissa S; Bostwick, Hannah S; Clark, Karl J

    2016-06-01

    Customizable endonucleases such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) enable rapid generation of mutant strains at genomic loci of interest in animal models and cell lines. With the accelerated pace of generating mutant alleles, genotyping has become a rate-limiting step to understanding the effects of genetic perturbation. Unless mutated alleles result in distinct morphological phenotypes, mutant strains need to be genotyped using standard methods in molecular biology. Classic restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) or sequencing is labor-intensive and expensive. Although simpler than RFLP, current versions of allele-specific PCR may still require post-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) handling such as sequencing, or they are more expensive if allele-specific fluorescent probes are used. Commercial genotyping solutions can take weeks from assay design to result, and are often more expensive than assembling reactions in-house. Key components of commercial assay systems are often proprietary, which limits further customization. Therefore, we developed a one-step open-source genotyping method based on quantitative PCR. The allele-specific qPCR (ASQ) does not require post-PCR processing and can genotype germline mutants through either threshold cycle (Ct) or end-point fluorescence reading. ASQ utilizes allele-specific primers, a locus-specific reverse primer, universal fluorescent probes and quenchers, and hot start DNA polymerase. Individual laboratories can further optimize this open-source system as we completely disclose the sequences, reagents, and thermal cycling protocol. We have tested the ASQ protocol to genotype alleles in five different genes. ASQ showed a 98-100% concordance in genotype scoring with RFLP or Sanger sequencing outcomes. ASQ is time-saving because a single qPCR without post-PCR handling suffices to score

  7. Prediction of HLA class II alleles using SNPs in an African population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fasil Tekola Ayele

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA gene locus in research and clinical practice, direct HLA typing is laborious and expensive. Furthermore, the analysis requires specialized software and expertise which are unavailable in most developing country settings. Recently, in silico methods have been developed for predicting HLA alleles using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. However, the utility of these methods in African populations has not been systematically evaluated.In the present study, we investigate prediction of HLA class II (HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles using SNPs in the Wolaita population, southern Ethiopia. The subjects comprised 297 Ethiopians with genome-wide SNP data, of whom 188 had also been HLA typed and were used for training and testing the model. The 109 subjects with SNP data alone were used for empirical prediction using the multi-allelic gene prediction method. We evaluated accuracy of the prediction, agreement between predicted and HLA typed alleles, and discriminative ability of the prediction probability supplied by the model. We found that the model predicted intermediate (two-digit resolution for HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles at accuracy levels of 96% and 87%, respectively. All measures of performance showed high accuracy and reliability for prediction. The distribution of the majority of HLA alleles in the study was similar to that previously reported for the Oromo and Amhara ethnic groups from Ethiopia.We demonstrate that HLA class II alleles can be predicted from SNP genotype data with a high level of accuracy at intermediate (two-digit resolution in an African population. This finding offers new opportunities for HLA studies of disease epidemiology and population genetics in developing countries.

  8. Allelic analysis of sheath blight resistance with association mapping in rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limeng Jia

    Full Text Available Sheath blight (ShB caused by the soil-borne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most devastating diseases in rice world-wide. Global attention has focused on examining individual mapping populations for quantitative trait loci (QTLs for ShB resistance, but to date no study has taken advantage of association mapping to examine hundreds of lines for potentially novel QTLs. Our objective was to identify ShB QTLs via association mapping in rice using 217 sub-core entries from the USDA rice core collection, which were phenotyped with a micro-chamber screening method and genotyped with 155 genome-wide markers. Structure analysis divided the mapping panel into five groups, and model comparison revealed that PCA5 with genomic control was the best model for association mapping of ShB. Ten marker loci on seven chromosomes were significantly associated with response to the ShB pathogen. Among multiple alleles in each identified loci, the allele contributing the greatest effect to ShB resistance was named the putative resistant allele. Among 217 entries, entry GSOR 310389 contained the most putative resistant alleles, eight out of ten. The number of putative resistant alleles presented in an entry was highly and significantly correlated with the decrease of ShB rating (r = -0.535 or the increase of ShB resistance. Majority of the resistant entries that contained a large number of the putative resistant alleles belonged to indica, which is consistent with a general observation that most ShB resistant accessions are of indica origin. These findings demonstrate the potential to improve breeding efficiency by using marker-assisted selection to pyramid putative resistant alleles from various loci in a cultivar for enhanced ShB resistance in rice.

  9. Polymorphisms in the glucocerebrosidase gene and pseudogene urge caution in clinical analysis of Gaucher disease allele c.1448T>C (L444P

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lahey Cora

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gaucher disease is a potentially severe lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the human glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA. We have developed a multiplexed genetic assay for eight diseases prevalent in the Ashkenazi population: Tay-Sachs, Gaucher type I, Niemann-Pick types A and B, mucolipidosis type IV, familial dysautonomia, Canavan, Bloom syndrome, and Fanconi anemia type C. This assay includes an allelic determination for GBA allele c.1448T>C (L444P. The goal of this study was to clinically evaluate this assay. Methods Biotinylated, multiplex PCR products were directly hybridized to capture probes immobilized on fluorescently addressed microspheres. After incubation with streptavidin-conjugated fluorophore, the reactions were analyzed by Luminex IS100. Clinical evaluations were conducted using de-identified patient DNA samples. Results We evaluated a multiplexed suspension array assay that includes wild-type and mutant genetic determinations for Gaucher disease allele c.1448T>C. Two percent of samples reported to be wild-type by conventional methods were observed to be c.1448T>C heterozygous using our assay. Sequence analysis suggested that this phenomenon was due to co-amplification of the functional gene and a paralogous pseudogene (ΨGBA due to a polymorphism in the primer-binding site of the latter. Primers for the amplification of this allele were then repositioned to span an upstream deletion in the pseudogene, yielding a much longer amplicon. Although it is widely reported that long amplicons negatively impact amplification or detection efficiency in recently adopted multiplex techniques, this assay design functioned properly and resolved the occurrence of false heterozygosity. Conclusion Although previously available sequence information suggested GBA gene/pseudogene discrimination capabilities with a short amplified product, we identified common single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the pseudogene that

  10. Ageing: Cognitive change and the APOEe4 allele

    OpenAIRE

    Deary, Ian J; Whiteman, Martha C; Pattie, Alison; Starr, John M; Hayward, Caroline; Wright, Alan F.; Carothers, Andrew; Lawrence J Whalley

    2002-01-01

    There is a marked variation in whether people retain sufficient cognitive function to maintain their quality of life and independence in old age, even among those without dementia, so it would be valuable to identify the determinants of normal age-related cognitive change (1,2). We have retested non-demented 80-year-olds who were participants in the Scottish Mental Survey of 1932, and find that the variation in their non-pathological cognitive change from age ...

  11. Automated analysis of sequence polymorphism in STR alleles by PCR and direct electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planz, John V; Sannes-Lowery, Kristen A; Duncan, David D; Manalili, Sheri; Budowle, Bruce; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Hofstadler, Steven A; Hall, Thomas A

    2012-09-01

    Short tandem repeats (STRs) are the primary genetic markers used for the analysis of biological samples in forensic and human identity testing. The discrimination power of a combination of STRs is sufficient in many human identity testing comparisons unless the evidence is substantially compromised and/or there are insufficient relatives or a potential mutation may have arisen in kinship analyses. An automated STR assay system that is based on electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) has been developed that can increase the discrimination power of some of the CODIS core STR loci and thus provide more information in typical and challenged samples and cases. Data from the ESI-MS STR system is fully backwards compatible with existing STR typing results generated by capillary electrophoresis. In contrast, however, the ESI-MS analytical system also reveals nucleotide polymorphisms residing within the STR alleles. The presence of these polymorphisms expands the number of alleles at a locus. Population studies were performed on the 13 core CODIS STR loci from African Americans, Caucasians and Hispanics capturing both the length of the allele, as well as nucleotide variations contained within repeat motifs or flanking regions. Such additional polymorphisms were identified in 11 of the 13 loci examined whereby several nominal length alleles were subdivided. A substantial increase in heterozygosity was observed, with close to or greater than 5% of samples analyzed being heterozygous with equal-length alleles in at least one of five of the core CODIS loci. This additional polymorphism increases discrimination power significantly, whereby the seven most polymorphic STR loci have a discrimination power equivalent to the 10 most discriminating of the CODIS core loci. An analysis of substructure among the three population groups revealed a higher θ than would be observed compared with using alleles designated by nominal length, i.e., repeats solely. Two loci, D3S1358

  12. Three cadherin alleles associated with resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis in pink bollworm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Shai; Biggs, Robert W.; Sisterson, Mark S.; Shriver, Laura; Ellers-Kirk, Christa; Higginson, Dawn; Holley, Daniel; Gahan, Linda J.; Heckel, David G.; Carrière, Yves; Dennehy, Timothy J.; Brown, Judith K.; Tabashnik, Bruce E.

    2003-01-01

    Evolution of resistance by pests is the main threat to long-term insect control by transgenic crops that produce Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins. Because inheritance of resistance to the Bt toxins in transgenic crops is typically recessive, DNA-based screening for resistance alleles in heterozygotes is potentially much more efficient than detection of resistant homozygotes with bioassays. Such screening, however, requires knowledge of the resistance alleles in field populations of pests that are associated with survival on Bt crops. Here we report that field populations of pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella), a major cotton pest, harbored three mutant alleles of a cadherin-encoding gene linked with resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac and survival on transgenic Bt cotton. Each of the three resistance alleles has a deletion expected to eliminate at least eight amino acids upstream of the putative toxin-binding region of the cadherin protein. Larvae with two resistance alleles in any combination were resistant, whereas those with one or none were susceptible to Cry1Ac. Together with previous evidence, the results reported here identify the cadherin gene as a leading target for DNA-based screening of resistance to Bt crops in lepidopteran pests. PMID:12695565

  13. Genome Destabilizing Mutator Alleles Drive Specific Mutational Trajectories in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirling, Peter C.; Shen, Yaoqing; Corbett, Richard; Jones, Steven J. M.; Hieter, Philip

    2014-01-01

    In addition to environmental factors and intrinsic variations in base substitution rates, specific genome-destabilizing mutations can shape the mutational trajectory of genomes. How specific alleles influence the nature and position of accumulated mutations in a genomic context is largely unknown. Understanding the impact of genome-destabilizing alleles is particularly relevant to cancer genomes where biased mutational signatures are identifiable. We first created a more complete picture of cellular pathways that impact mutation rate using a primary screen to identify essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene mutations that cause mutator phenotypes. Drawing primarily on new alleles identified in this resource, we measure the impact of diverse mutator alleles on mutation patterns directly by whole-genome sequencing of 68 mutation-accumulation strains derived from wild-type and 11 parental mutator genotypes. The accumulated mutations differ across mutator strains, displaying base-substitution biases, allele-specific mutation hotspots, and break-associated mutation clustering. For example, in mutants of POLα and the Cdc13–Stn1–Ten1 complex, we find a distinct subtelomeric bias for mutations that we show is independent of the target sequence. Together our data suggest that specific genome-instability mutations are sufficient to drive discrete mutational signatures, some of which share properties with mutation patterns seen in tumors. Thus, in a population of cells, genome-instability mutations could influence clonal evolution by establishing discrete mutational trajectories for genomes. PMID:24336748

  14. A pseudodeficiency allele common in non-Jewish Tay-Sachs carriers: Implications for carrier screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triggs-Raine, B.L.; Akerman, B.R.; Gravel, R.A. (McGill Univ.-Montreal Children' s Hospital Research Institute, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)); Mules, E.H.; Thomas, G.H.; Dowling, C.E. (Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Kaback, M.M.; Lim-Steele, J.S.T. (Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)); Natowicz, M.R. (Eunice Kennedy Shriver Center for Mental Retardation, Waltham, MA (United States)); Grebner, E.E. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)); Navon, R.R. (Tel-Aviv Univ., Kfar-Sava (Israel)); Welch, J.P. (Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, Nova, Scotia (Canada)); Greenberg, C.R. (Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg (Canada))

    1992-10-01

    Deficiency of [beta]-hexosaminidase A (Hex A) activity typically results in Tay-Sachs disease. However, healthy subjects found to be deficient in Hex A activity (i.e., pseudodeficient) by means of in vitro biochemical tests have been described. The authors analyzed the HEXA gene of one pseudodeficient subject and identified both a C[sub 739]-to-T substitution that changes Arg[sub 247][yields]Trp on one allele and a previously identified Tay-Sachs disease mutation of the second allele. Six additional pseudodeficient subjects were found to have the C[sub 739]-to-T but for none of 36 Jewish enzyme-defined carries who did not have one of three known mutations common to this group. The C[sub 739]-to-T allele, together with a [open quotes]true[close quotes] Tay-Sachs disease allele, causes Hex A pseudodeficiency. Given both the large proportion of non-Jewish carriers with this allele and that standard biochemical screening cannot differentiate between heterozygotes for the C[sub 739]-to-T mutations and Tay-Sachs disease carriers, DNA testing for this mutation in at-risk couples is essential. This could prevent unnecessary or incorrect prenatal diagnoses. 40 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Allele-Independent Turnover of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class Ia Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevosto, Claudia; Usmani, M Farooq; McDonald, Sarah; Gumienny, Aleksandra M; Key, Tim; Goodman, Reyna S; Gaston, J S Hill; Deery, Michael J; Busch, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) glycoproteins present cytosolic peptides to CD8+ T cells and regulate NK cell activity. Their heavy chains (HC) are expressed from up to three MHC gene loci (human leukocyte antigen [HLA]-A, -B, and -C in humans), whose extensive polymorphism maps predominantly to the antigen-binding groove, diversifying the bound peptide repertoire. Codominant expression of MHCI alleles is thus functionally critical, but how it is regulated is not fully understood. Here, we have examined the effect of polymorphism on the turnover rates of MHCI molecules in cell lines with functional MHCI peptide loading pathways and in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs). Proteins were labeled biosynthetically with heavy water (2H2O), folded MHCI molecules immunoprecipitated, and tryptic digests analysed by mass spectrometry. MHCI-derived peptides were assigned to specific alleles and isotypes, and turnover rates quantified by 2H incorporation, after correcting for cell growth. MHCI turnover half-lives ranged from undetectable to a few hours, depending on cell type, activation state, donor, and MHCI isotype. However, in all settings, the turnover half-lives of alleles of the same isotype were similar. Thus, MHCI protein turnover rates appear to be allele-independent in normal human cells. We propose that this is an important feature enabling the normal function and codominant expression of MHCI alleles. PMID:27529174

  16. Adaptation of Drosophila to a novel laboratory environment reveals temporally heterogeneous trajectories of selected alleles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-terWengel, Pablo; Kapun, Martin; Nolte, Viola; Kofler, Robert; Flatt, Thomas; Schlötterer, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The genomic basis of adaptation to novel environments is a fundamental problem in evolutionary biology that has gained additional importance in the light of the recent global change discussion. Here, we combined laboratory natural selection (experimental evolution) in Drosophila melanogaster with genome-wide next generation sequencing of DNA pools (Pool-Seq) to identify alleles that are favourable in a novel laboratory environment and traced their trajectories during the adaptive process. Already after 15 generations, we identified a pronounced genomic response to selection, with almost 5000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP; genome-wide false discovery rates < 0.005%) deviating from neutral expectation. Importantly, the evolutionary trajectories of the selected alleles were heterogeneous, with the alleles falling into two distinct classes: (i) alleles that continuously rise in frequency; and (ii) alleles that at first increase rapidly but whose frequencies then reach a plateau. Our data thus suggest that the genomic response to selection can involve a large number of selected SNPs that show unexpectedly complex evolutionary trajectories, possibly due to nonadditive effects. PMID:22726122

  17. Genetic interactions between diverged alleles of Early heading date 1 (Ehd1) and Heading date 3a (Hd3a)/ RICE FLOWERING LOCUS T1 (RFT1) control differential heading and contribute to regional adaptation in rice (Oryza sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Chen, Hongyi; Ren, Ding; Tang, Huiwu; Qiu, Rong; Feng, Jinglei; Long, Yunming; Niu, Baixiao; Chen, Danping; Zhong, Tianyu; Liu, Yao-Guang; Guo, Jingxin

    2015-11-01

    Initiation of flowering, also called heading, in rice (Oryza sativa) is determined by the florigens encoded by Heading date 3a (Hd3a) and RICE FLOWERING LOCUS T1 (RFT1). Early heading date 1 (Ehd1) regulates Hd3a and RFT1. However, different rice varieties have diverged alleles of Ehd1 and Hd3a/RFT1 and their genetic interactions remain largely unclear. Here we generated three segregating populations for different combinations of diverged Ehd1 and Hd3a/RFT1 alleles, and analyzed their genetic interactions between these alleles. We demonstrated that, in an ehd1 mutant background, Hd3a was silenced, but RFT1 was expressed (although at lower levels than in plants with a functional Ehd1) under short-day (SD) and long-day (LD) conditions. We identified a nonfunctional RFT1 allele (rft1); the lines carrying homozygous ehd1 and Hd3a/rft1 failed to induce the floral transition under SD and LD conditions. Like Hd3a, RFT1 also interacted with 14-3-3 proteins, the florigen receptors, but a nonfunctional RFT1 with a crucial E105K mutation failed to interact with 14-3-3 proteins. Furthermore, analyses of sequence variation and geographic distribution suggested that functional RFT1 alleles were selected during rice adaptation to high-latitude regions. Our results demonstrate the important roles of RFT1 in rice flowering and regional adaptation.

  18. ApolipoproteinE ε4 allelic variant, cognitive decline and psychosis in Alzheimer disease: a review of the literature and suggestions for upcoming studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Spoletini

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein E (ApoE ε4 allele represents a well known vascular risk factor for developing Alzheimer disease (AD and differences in ApoE genotypes may explain a part of the variability in AD phenotypes. In fact, ApoE ε4 allele possession seems to be associated with a more precocious age of onset, greater episodic memory impairment, and psychotic symptoms. The first question we discuss regards the role of ApoE ε4 on cognitive progression of AD. In fact, while a general agreement exists about the role played by ApoE ε4 on the precocious onset of AD, cognitive decline has been differently associated with ApoE ε4 allele possession in AD patients in a continuum of faster decline, no effect, and slower decline. An attemptable interpretation is that the biological processes leading to the onset of AD are different from those involved in determining its clinical course. The second question regards the possible relationship between the presence of the degenerative pathological hallmarks of the disease in specific cerebral areas and different cognitive or behavioural symptoms. In fact, there is evidence that degenerative pathology in hippocampal formation and frontal cortex reflects the progression of cognitive deficits in brain aging and AD and that hypometabolism in right frontal lobe and greater frontal neuropsychological deficits occur in AD patients with psychosis in comparison to those without. The third question regards, specifically, the relationship between ApoE ε4 variant and behavioural symptoms. In fact, there is evidence supporting the link between being carriers of ApoE ε4 allele and severity of delusions, mostly at the early stage of the illness. In an interpretative challenge, we suggest that the link between being carriers of ApoE ε4 allele and suffering from delusions in AD may be explained by frontal lobe dysfunctions. Finally, we hypothesize that the most precocious onset of AD illness, described in carriers of ApoE ε4

  19. The T-allele of TCF7L2 rs7903146 associates with a reduced compensation of insulin secretion for insulin resistance induced by 9 days of bed rest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alibegovic, Amra C; Sonne, Mette P; Højbjerre, Lise;

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine whether the type 2 diabetes-associated T-allele of transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) rs7903146 associates with impaired insulin secretion to compensate for insulin resistance induced by bed rest. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 38....... The genetic analyses were done assuming a dominant model of inheritance. RESULTS: The first-phase insulin response (FPIR) was significantly lower in carriers of the T-allele compared with carriers of the CC genotype before bed rest, with and without correction for insulin resistance. The incremental rise...... as induced by bed rest. Reduced paracrine glucagon stimulation may contribute to the impairment of beta-cell function in the carriers TCF7L2 rs7903146 T-allele associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes....

  20. Association of polymorphic alleles of CTLA4 with inflammatory bowel disease in the Japanese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haruhisa Machida; Ikuo Murata; Shigeru Kohno; Kazuhiro Tsukamoto; Chun-Yang Wen; Yukiko Narumi; Saburou Shikuwa; Hajime Isomoto; Fuminao Takeshima; Yohei Mizuta; Norio Niikawa

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To examine an association between the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA4) gene that plays a role in downregulation of T-cell activation and inflammatory bowel disease consisting of ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) in the Japanese.METHODS: We studied 108 patients with UC, 79 patients with CD, and 200 sex-matched healthy controls, with respect to three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)in CTLA4, such as C-318T in the promoter region, A+49G in exon 1 and G+6230A in the 3' untranslated region (3'-UTR) by a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism method, and to an (AT)n repeat polymorphism in 3'-UTR by fragment analysis with fluorescence-labeling on denaturing sequence gels. Frequency of alleles and genotypes and their distribution were compared statistically between patients and controls and among subgroups of patients, using χ2 and Fisher exact tests.RESULTS: The frequency of "A/A" genotype at the G+6230A SNP site was statistically lower in UC patients than in controls (3.7% vs 11.0%, P= 0.047, odds ratio (OR) = 0.311). Moreover, the frequency of"G/G" genotype at the A+49G SNP site was significantly higher in CD patients with fistula (48.6%) than those without it (26.2%)(P = 0.0388, OR=2.67).CONCLUSION: The results suggest that CTLA4 located at 2q33 is a determinant of UC and responsible for fistula formation in CD in the Japanese.

  1. A dominantly acting murine allele of Mcm4 causes chromosomal abnormalities and promotes tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce N Bagley

    Full Text Available Here we report the isolation of a murine model for heritable T cell lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (T-ALL called Spontaneous dominant leukemia (Sdl. Sdl heterozygous mice develop disease with a short latency and high penetrance, while mice homozygous for the mutation die early during embryonic development. Sdl mice exhibit an increase in the frequency of micronucleated reticulocytes, and T-ALLs from Sdl mice harbor small amplifications and deletions, including activating deletions at the Notch1 locus. Using exome sequencing it was determined that Sdl mice harbor a spontaneously acquired mutation in Mcm4 (Mcm4(D573H. MCM4 is part of the heterohexameric complex of MCM2-7 that is important for licensing of DNA origins prior to S phase and also serves as the core of the replicative helicase that unwinds DNA at replication forks. Previous studies in murine models have discovered that genetic reductions of MCM complex levels promote tumor formation by causing genomic instability. However, Sdl mice possess normal levels of Mcms, and there is no evidence for loss-of-heterozygosity at the Mcm4 locus in Sdl leukemias. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae indicate that the Sdl mutation produces a biologically inactive helicase. Together, these data support a model in which chromosomal abnormalities in Sdl mice result from the ability of MCM4(D573H to incorporate into MCM complexes and render them inactive. Our studies indicate that dominantly acting alleles of MCMs can be compatible with viability but have dramatic oncogenic consequences by causing chromosomal abnormalities.

  2. Mechanisms for dominance: Adh heterodimer formation in heterozygotes between ENU or x-ray induced null alleles and normal alleles in drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, J.C.; Lee, W.R.; Chang, S.H.; Silverman, H. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (United States))

    1992-01-01

    To study mechanisms for dominance of phenotype, eight ENU- and four x-ray-induced mutations at the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) locus were analyzed for partial dominance in their interaction with normal alleles. All ENU and one of the x-ray mutations were single base substitutions; the other three x-ray mutations were 9-21 base deletions. All but one of the 12 mutant alleles were selected for this study because they produced detectable mutant polypeptides, but seven of the 11 producing a peptide could not form dimers with the normal peptide and the enzyme activity of heterozygotes was about half that of normal homozygotes. Four mutations formed dimers with a decreased catalytic efficiency and two of these were near the limit of detectability; these two also inhibited the formation of normal homodimers. The mutant alleles therefore show multiple mechanisms leading to partial enzyme expression in heterozygotes and a wide range of dominance ranging from almost complete recessive to nearly dominant. All amino acid changes in mutant peptides that form dimers are located between amino acids 182 and 194, so this region is not critical for dimerization. It may, however, be an important surface domain for catalyzation. 34 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Differential allelic expression of a fibrillin gene (FBNI) in patients with Marfan syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hewett, D.; Lynch, J.; Sykes, B. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Firth, H. [Churchill Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom); Child, A. [St. George`s Hospital Medical School, London (United Kingdom)

    1994-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a connective-tissue disorder affecting cardiovascular, skeletal, and ocular systems. The major Marfan locus has been identified as the FBN1 gene on chromosome 15; this codes for the extracellular-matrix protein fibrillin, a 350-kD constituent of the 8-10-nm elastin-associated microfibrils. The authors identified five MFS patients who were heterozygous for an RsaI restriction-site dimorphism in the 3{prime} UTR of the FBN1 gene. This expressed variation was used to distinguish the mRNA output from each of the two FBN1 alleles in fibroblast cultures from these five patients. Three of the patients were shown to produce <5% of the normal level of FBN1 transcripts from one of their alleles. This null-allele phenotype was not observed in 10 nonmarfanoid fibroblast cell lines. 26 refs., 4 figs.

  4. The effect of subdivision on variation at multi-allelic loci under balancing selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierup, M H; Vekemans, X; Charlesworth, D

    2000-01-01

    Simulations are used to investigate the expected pattern of variation at loci under different forms of multi-allelic balancing selection in a finite island model of a subdivided population. The objective is to evaluate the effect of restricted migration among demes on the distribution of polymorp......Simulations are used to investigate the expected pattern of variation at loci under different forms of multi-allelic balancing selection in a finite island model of a subdivided population. The objective is to evaluate the effect of restricted migration among demes on the distribution......, and to the possibility of inferring ancient population genetic events and processes. In addition, it is shown that, for sporophytic self-incompatibility systems, it is not necessarily true in a subdivided population that recessive alleles are more frequent than dominant ones. Udgivelsesdato: 2000-Aug...

  5. JK null alleles identified from Japanese individuals with Jk(a−b−) phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onodera, T; Sasaki, K; Tsuneyama, H; Isa, K; Ogasawara, K; Satake, M; Tadokoro, K; Uchikawa, M

    2014-05-01

    The Kidd blood group system consists of three common phenotypes: Jk(a+b−), Jk(a−b+) and Jk(a+b+), and one rare phenotype, Jk(a−b−). Jka/Jkb polymorphism is associated with c.838G>A (p.Asp280Asn) in exon 9 of the JK (SLC14A1) gene, and the corresponding alleles are named JK*01 and JK*02. The rare phenotype Jk(a−b−) was first found in a Filipina of Spanish and Chinese ancestry, and to date, several JK null alleles responsible for the Jk(a−b−) phenotype have been reported. We report seven novel JK null alleles, 4 with a JK*01 background and 3 with a JK*02 background, identified from Jk(a−b−) Japanese. PMID:24877238

  6. HLA alleles associated with slow progression to AIDS truly prefer to present HIV-1 p24

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghans, José A M; Mølgaard, Anne; de Boer, Rob J;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The mechanism behind the association between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules and the rate of HIV-1 disease progression is still poorly understood. Recent data suggest that "protective" HLA molecules, i.e. those associated with a low HIV-1 viral load and relatively slow disease...... effect, we predicted HIV-1 epitopes from the whole genome of HIV-1, and found that protective HLA alleles have a true preference for the p24 Gag protein, while non-protective HLA alleles preferentially target HIV-1 Nef. In line with this, we found a significant negative correlation between the predicted...... affinity of the best-binding p24 epitopes and the relative hazard of HIV-1 disease progression for a large number of HLA molecules. When the epitopes targeted by protective HLA alleles were mapped to the known p24 structure, we found that mutations in these epitopes are likely to disturb the p24 dimer...

  7. Genome Wide Allele Frequency Fingerprints (GWAFFs) of populations via genotyping by sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byrne, Stephen; Czaban, Adrian; Studer, Bruno;

    2013-01-01

    is an outbreeding species, and breeding programs are based upon selection on populations. We tested two restriction enzymes for their efficiency in complexity reduction of the perennial ryegrass genome. The resulting profiles have been termed Genome Wide Allele Frequency Fingerprints (GWAFFs), and we have shown how......-wide scale would be very powerful, examples include the breeding of outbreeding species, varietal protection in outbreeding species, monitoring changes in population allele frequencies. This motivated us to test the potential to use GBS to evaluate allele frequencies within populations. Perennial ryegrass...... these fingerprints can be used to distinguish between plant populations. Even at current costs and throughput, using sequencing to directly evaluate populations on a genome-wide scale is viable. GWAFFs should find many applications, from varietal development in outbreeding species right through to playing a role...

  8. The acylphosphatase (Acyp) alleles associate with male hybrid sterility in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalak, Pawel; Ma, Daina

    2008-06-15

    Hybrid defects are believed to result from genetic incompatibilities between genes that have evolved in separate parental lineages. These genetic dysfunctions on the hybrid genomic background, also known as Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities, can be an incipient signature of speciation, and as such - a subject of active research. Here we present evidence that Acyp locus (CG16870) that encodes acylphosphatase, a small enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of acylphosphates and participates in ion transport across biological membranes, is involved in genetic incompatibilities leading to male sterility in hybrids between Drosophila simulans and D. mauritiana. There is a strong association between Acyp alleles (genotype) and the sterility/fertility pattern (phenotype), as well as between the phenotype, the genotype and its transcriptional activity. Allele-specific expression in hybrids heterozygous for Acyp suggests a cis-type regulation of this gene, where an allele from one of the parental species (D. simulans) is consistently overexpressed.

  9. HLA Alleles Associated with Slow Progression to AIDS Truly Prefer to Present HIV-1 p24

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghans, J. A.; Molgaard, A.; Boer, R. J. de;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The mechanism behind the association between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules and the rate of HIV-1 disease progression is still poorly understood. Recent data suggest that "protective" HLA molecules, i.e. those associated with a low HIV-1 viral load and relatively slow disease...... and effect, we predicted HIV-1 epitopes from the whole genome of HIV-1, and found that protective HLA alleles have a true preference for the p24 Gag protein, while non-protective HLA alleles preferentially target HIV-1 Nef. In line with this, we found a significant negative correlation between the predicted...... affinity of the best-binding p24 epitopes and the relative hazard of HIV-1 disease progression for a large number of HLA molecules. When the epitopes targeted by protective HLA alleles were mapped to the known p24 structure, we found that mutations in these epitopes are likely to disturb the p24 dimer...

  10. Independent Emergence of the Plasmodium falciparum Kelch Propeller Domain Mutant Allele C580Y in Guyana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenet, Stella M; Akinyi Okoth, Sheila; Huber, Curtis S; Chandrabose, Javin; Lucchi, Naomi W; Talundzic, Eldin; Krishnalall, Karanchand; Ceron, Nicolas; Musset, Lise; Macedo de Oliveira, Alexandre; Venkatesan, Meera; Rahman, Reyaud; Barnwell, John W; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2016-05-01

    Suspected artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum can be explored by examining polymorphisms in the Kelch (PfK13) propeller domain. Sequencing of PfK13 and other gene resistance markers was performed on 98 samples from Guyana. Five of these samples carried the C580Y allele in the PfK13 propeller domain, with flanking microsatellite profiles different from those observed in Southeast Asia. These molecular data demonstrate independent emergence of the C580Y K13 mutant allele in Guyana, where resistance alleles to previously used drugs are fixed. Therefore, in Guyana and neighboring countries, continued molecular surveillance and periodic assessment of the therapeutic efficacy of artemisinin-based combination therapy are warranted. PMID:26690347

  11. Independent Emergence of the Plasmodium falciparum Kelch Propeller Domain Mutant Allele C580Y in Guyana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenet, Stella M; Akinyi Okoth, Sheila; Huber, Curtis S; Chandrabose, Javin; Lucchi, Naomi W; Talundzic, Eldin; Krishnalall, Karanchand; Ceron, Nicolas; Musset, Lise; Macedo de Oliveira, Alexandre; Venkatesan, Meera; Rahman, Reyaud; Barnwell, John W; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2016-05-01

    Suspected artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum can be explored by examining polymorphisms in the Kelch (PfK13) propeller domain. Sequencing of PfK13 and other gene resistance markers was performed on 98 samples from Guyana. Five of these samples carried the C580Y allele in the PfK13 propeller domain, with flanking microsatellite profiles different from those observed in Southeast Asia. These molecular data demonstrate independent emergence of the C580Y K13 mutant allele in Guyana, where resistance alleles to previously used drugs are fixed. Therefore, in Guyana and neighboring countries, continued molecular surveillance and periodic assessment of the therapeutic efficacy of artemisinin-based combination therapy are warranted.

  12. Type 2 Diabetes Risk Alleles Near BCAR1 and in ANK1 Associate With Decreased ß-Cell Function Whereas Risk Alleles Near ANKRD55 and GRB14 Associate With Decreased Insulin Sensitivity in the Danish Inter99 Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Marie N; Ribel-Madsen, Rasmus; Justesen, Johanne M;

    2013-01-01

    insulinogenic, disposition, BIGTT, and Matsuda indexes.Results:We confirmed associations of ZMIZ1, KLHDC5, CILP2, HMG20A, ANK1, ANKRD55, and BCAR1 with T2D. The risk T allele of BCAR1 rs7202877 associated with decreased disposition index (P = .02). The C allele of ANK1 rs516946 associated with decreased...... insulinogenic (P = .005) and disposition (P = .002) indexes. The G allele of ANKRD55 rs459193 associated with decreased Matsuda index (P = .02) adjusted for waist circumference. The C allele of GRB14 rs13389219 associated with both increased insulinogenic (P = .04) and decreased Matsuda (P = .05) indexes. All...

  13. Type 2 Diabetes Risk Alleles Near BCAR1 and in ANK1 Associate With Decreased β-Cell Function Whereas Risk Alleles Near ANKRD55 and GRB14 Associate With Decreased Insulin Sensitivity in the Danish Inter99 Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Marie Neergaard; Ribel-Madsen, Rasmus; Justesen, Johanne Marie;

    2013-01-01

    insulinogenic, disposition, BIGTT, and Matsuda indexes.Results:We confirmed associations of ZMIZ1, KLHDC5, CILP2, HMG20A, ANK1, ANKRD55, and BCAR1 with T2D. The risk T allele of BCAR1 rs7202877 associated with decreased disposition index (P = .02). The C allele of ANK1 rs516946 associated with decreased...... insulinogenic (P = .005) and disposition (P = .002) indexes. The G allele of ANKRD55 rs459193 associated with decreased Matsuda index (P = .02) adjusted for waist circumference. The C allele of GRB14 rs13389219 associated with both increased insulinogenic (P = .04) and decreased Matsuda (P = .05) indexes. All...

  14. Typing for HLA-DPB1*03 and HLA-DPB1*06 using allele-specific DNA in vitro amplification and allele-specific oligonucleotide probes. Detection of "new" DPB1*06 variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugger, L; Morling, N; Ryder, L P;

    1989-01-01

    DP gene typing using in vitro DNA amplification combined with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes has recently been reported. The resulting DNA amplification was specific for the HLA-DPB locus. Typing for the individual DPB alleles was exclusively dependent on the hybridizations of the probes...... but hampered by close sequence homology between different DP alleles yielding complex patterns of reactivity with a panel of probes. We report the combined use of allele-specific DNA in vitro amplification and allele-specific oligonucleotides in typing for DPB1*03 and DPB1*06. Complete concordance with PLT...

  15. Estimation of allele frequency and association mapping using next-generation sequencing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersen Gitte

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estimation of allele frequency is of fundamental importance in population genetic analyses and in association mapping. In most studies using next-generation sequencing, a cost effective approach is to use medium or low-coverage data (e.g., X. However, SNP calling and allele frequency estimation in such studies is associated with substantial statistical uncertainty because of varying coverage and high error rates. Results We evaluate a new maximum likelihood method for estimating allele frequencies in low and medium coverage next-generation sequencing data. The method is based on integrating over uncertainty in the data for each individual rather than first calling genotypes. This method can be applied to directly test for associations in case/control studies. We use simulations to compare the likelihood method to methods based on genotype calling, and show that the likelihood method outperforms the genotype calling methods in terms of: (1 accuracy of allele frequency estimation, (2 accuracy of the estimation of the distribution of allele frequencies across neutrally evolving sites, and (3 statistical power in association mapping studies. Using real re-sequencing data from 200 individuals obtained from an exon-capture experiment, we show that the patterns observed in the simulations are also found in real data. Conclusions Overall, our results suggest that association mapping and estimation of allele frequencies should not be based on genotype calling in low to medium coverage data. Furthermore, if genotype calling methods are used, it is usually better not to filter genotypes based on the call confidence score.

  16. Mining the human phenome using allelic scores that index biological intermediates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Evans

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available It is common practice in genome-wide association studies (GWAS to focus on the relationship between disease risk and genetic variants one marker at a time. When relevant genes are identified it is often possible to implicate biological intermediates and pathways likely to be involved in disease aetiology. However, single genetic variants typically explain small amounts of disease risk. Our idea is to construct allelic scores that explain greater proportions of the variance in biological intermediates, and subsequently use these scores to data mine GWAS. To investigate the approach's properties, we indexed three biological intermediates where the results of large GWAS meta-analyses were available: body mass index, C-reactive protein and low density lipoprotein levels. We generated allelic scores in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, and in publicly available data from the first Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. We compared the explanatory ability of allelic scores in terms of their capacity to proxy for the intermediate of interest, and the extent to which they associated with disease. We found that allelic scores derived from known variants and allelic scores derived from hundreds of thousands of genetic markers explained significant portions of the variance in biological intermediates of interest, and many of these scores showed expected correlations with disease. Genome-wide allelic scores however tended to lack specificity suggesting that they should be used with caution and perhaps only to proxy biological intermediates for which there are no known individual variants. Power calculations confirm the feasibility of extending our strategy to the analysis of tens of thousands of molecular phenotypes in large genome-wide meta-analyses. We conclude that our method represents a simple way in which potentially tens of thousands of molecular phenotypes could be screened for causal relationships with disease without having to

  17. Recombinational micro-evolution of functionally different metallothionein promoter alleles from Orchesella cincta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Straalen Nico M

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metallothionein (mt transcription is elevated in heavy metal tolerant field populations of Orchesella cincta (Collembola. This suggests that natural selection acts on transcriptional regulation of mt in springtails at sites where cadmium (Cd levels in soil reach toxic values This study investigates the nature and the evolutionary origin of polymorphisms in the metallothionein promoter (pmt and their functional significance for mt expression. Results We sequenced approximately 1600 bp upstream the mt coding region by genome walking. Nine pmt alleles were discovered in NW-European populations. They differ in the number of some indels, consensus transcription factor binding sites and core promoter elements. Extensive recombination events between some of the alleles can be inferred from the alignment. A deviation from neutral expectations was detected in a cadmium tolerant population, pointing towards balancing selection on some promoter stretches. Luciferase constructs were made from the most abundant alleles, and responses to Cd, paraquat (oxidative stress inducer and moulting hormone were studied in cell lines. By using paraquat we were able to dissect the effect of oxidative stress from the Cd specific effect, and extensive differences in mt induction levels between these two stressors were observed. Conclusion The pmt alleles evolved by a number of recombination events, and exhibited differential inducibilities by Cd, paraquat and molting hormone. In a tolerant population from a metal contaminated site, promoter allele frequencies differed significantly from a reference site and nucleotide polymorphisms in some promoter stretches deviated from neutral expectations, revealing a signature of balancing selection. Our results suggest that the structural differences in the Orchesella cincta metallothionein promoter alleles contribute to the metallothionein -over-expresser phenotype in cadmium tolerant populations.

  18. Correlation between carboxylesterase alleles and insecticide resistance in Culex pipiens complex from China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yangyang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In China, large amounts of chemical insecticides are applied in fields or indoors every year, directly or indirectly bringing selection pressure on vector mosquitoes. Culex pipiens complex has evolved to be resistant to all types of chemical insecticides, especially organophosphates, through carboxylesterases. Six resistant carboxylesterase alleles (Ester were recorded previously and sometimes co-existed in one field population, representing a complex situation for the evolution of Ester genes. Results In order to explore the evolutionary scenario, we analyzed the data from an historical record in 2003 and a recent investigation on five Culex pipiens pallens populations sampled from north China in 2010. Insecticide bioassays showed that these five populations had high resistance to pyrethroids, medium resistance to organophosphates, and low resistance to carbamates. Six types of Ester alleles, EsterB1, Ester2, Ester8, Ester9, EsterB10, and Ester11 were identified, and the overall pattern of their frequencies in geographic distribution was consistent with the report seven years prior to this study. Statistical correlation analysis indicated that Ester8 and Ester9 positively correlated with resistance to four insecticides, and EsterB10 to one insecticide. The occurrences of these three alleles were positively correlated, while the occurrence of EsterB1 was negatively correlated with Ester8, indicating an allelic competition. Conclusion Our analysis suggests that one insecticide can select multiple Ester alleles and one Ester allele can work on multiple insecticides. The evolutionary scenario of carboxylesterases under insecticide selection is possibly "one to many".

  19. Apolipoprotein E4 allele and the risk of left ventricular dysfunction in thalassemia major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Bazrgar

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Left ventricular (LV failure is the main cause of death in thalassemia. Iron overload in thesepatients leads to formation of oxygen free radicals. Apolipoprotein (ApoE E4 allele is the least efficient inoxidative stress condition compared with apoE2 and apoE3 alleles. This study was performed to determinethe association of three different ApoE alleles with LV dysfunction in thalassemia major patients in southernIran.Methods: The present study comprised 202 patients with thalassemia major divided into three groups accordingto echocardiographic findings: Group 1 (n=135 had no cardiac impairment; Group 2 (n=38 exhibitedLV dilatation but normal LV systolic function and Group 3 (n=29 showed LV systolic dysfunction.DNA was obtained from all patients and 198 healthy control subjects for ApoE genotyping.Results: Frequency of both apoE3/E4 genotype and apoE4 allele in Group 3 were higher than the controlgroup with corresponding values of P<0.05, Odds Ratio=2.97, 1.06<8.32 and P<0.01, OR=3.01,1.15<7.69, respectively and confidence Interval of 95%. There were no differences observed betweencontrols and patient groups in relation to other genotype and allele frequencies. Interventricular septumthickness and LV end diastolic diameter in apoE4/- patients were more than those of apoE3/E3 patients.Conclusion: ApoE4 allele increases the risk of LV impairment in thalassemia major.

  20. Allelic variation in a willow warbler genomic region is associated with climate clines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith W Larson

    Full Text Available Local adaptation is an important process contributing to population differentiation which can occur in continuous or isolated populations connected by various amounts of gene flow. The willow warbler (Phylloscopus trochilus is one of the most common songbirds in Fennoscandia. It has a continuous breeding distribution where it is found in all forested habitats from sea level to the tree line and therefore constitutes an ideal species for the study of locally adapted genes associated with environmental gradients. Previous studies in this species identified a genetic marker (AFLP-WW1 that showed a steep north-south cline in central Sweden with one allele associated with coastal lowland habitats and the other with mountainous habitats. It was further demonstrated that this marker is embedded in a highly differentiated chromosome region that spans several megabases. In the present study, we sampled 2,355 individuals at 128 sites across all of Fennoscandia to study the geographic and climatic variables associated with the allele frequency distributions of WW1. Our results demonstrate that 1 allele frequency patterns significantly differ between mountain and lowland populations, 2 these allele differences coincide with extreme temperature conditions and the short growing season in the mountains, and milder conditions in coastal areas, and 3 the northern-allele or "altitude variant" of WW1 occurs in willow warblers that occupy mountainous habitat regardless of subspecies. Finally these results suggest that climate may exert selection on the genomic region associated with these alleles and would allow us to develop testable predictions for the distribution of the genetic marker based on climate change scenarios.

  1. Genetic exchange of fimbrial alleles exemplifies the adaptive virulence strategy of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E Kerr

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is a gram-negative anaerobic bacterium, a member of the human oral microbiome, and a proposed "keystone" pathogen in the development of chronic periodontitis, an inflammatory disease of the gingiva. P. gingivalis is a genetically diverse species, and is able to exchange chromosomal DNA between strains by natural competence and conjugation. In this study, we investigate the role of horizontal DNA transfer as an adaptive process to modify behavior, using the major fimbriae as our model system, due to their critical role in mediating interactions with the host environment. We show that P. gingivalis is able to exchange fimbrial allele types I and IV into four distinct strain backgrounds via natural competence. In all recombinants, we detected a complete exchange of the entire fimA allele, and the rate of exchange varies between the different strain backgrounds. In addition, gene exchange within other regions of the fimbrial genetic locus was identified. To measure the biological implications of these allele swaps we compared three genotypes of fimA in an isogenic background, strain ATCC 33277. We demonstrate that exchange of fimbrial allele type results in profound phenotypic changes, including the quantity of fimbriae elaborated, membrane blebbing, auto-aggregation and other virulence-associated phenotypes. Replacement of the type I allele with either the type III or IV allele resulted in increased invasion of gingival fibroblast cells relative to the isogenic parent strain. While genetic variability is known to impact host-microbiome interactions, this is the first study to quantitatively assess the adaptive effect of exchanging genes within the pan genome cloud. This is significant as it presents a potential mechanism by which opportunistic pathogens may acquire the traits necessary to modify host-microbial interactions.

  2. HLA alleles and type 1 diabetes mellitus in low disease incidence populations of Southern Europe: a comparison of Greeks and Albanians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschou, Peristera; Bozas, Evangelos; Dokopoulou, Maria; Havarani, Beatrice; Malamitsi-Puchner, Ariadne; Ylli, Agron; Ylli, Zamira; Thymelli, Ioanna; Gerasimidi-Vazeou, Andriani; Bartsocas, Christos S

    2004-02-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) is caused by environmental factors acting on genetically susceptible individuals. HLA-DQA1 and -DQB1 are major genetic determinants of the disease. Greece and Albania represent the low DM1 incidence countries of South-Eastern Europe. The HLA-DQA1 and -DQB1 associations with DM1 were investigated in these two groups, as reference for comparisons to the high-risk populations of Northern Europe. One hundred and thirty Greeks and 64 Albanians with DM1 were studied; 1,842 Greeks and 186 Albanians were analysed as controls. The samples were typed for six HLA-DQB1 alleles, using time-resolved fluorometry to detect the hybridisation of lanthanide labelled oligonucleotides with PCR products. Individuals positive for DQB1*0201 were selectively typed for three DQA1 alleles. In both populations DQB1*0201 increased the risk for DM1 while DQB1*0301 was protective. DQB1*0302 was associated with lower risk than *0201, while *0602 and *0603 were protective in Greeks but not in Albanians. It was also shown that DQA1 has a modifying effect, altering the risk conferred by the susceptible DQB1*0201. The low incidence of DM1 in these two countries correlates with the high frequency of the protective allele DQB1*0301 and the low impact of the susceptible DQB1*0302.

  3. A Multiplex Allele Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction (MAS-PCR) for the Detection of Factor V Leiden and Prothrombin G20210A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Morteza; Rad, Isa Abdi

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: In order to determine the frequencies of factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A point mutations in the Iranian population with Azeri Turkish origin. Material and methods: 120 unrelated individuals from general population randomly selected and were examined for factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A mutations using a multiplex allele specific polymerase chain reaction (MAS-PCR) assay Outcomes: The frequency of prothrombin G20210A mutation was 2.08%, which means 5 chromosomes out of 240 chromosomes had prothrombin G20210A mutation. The distribution of prothrombin 20210 GG, GA, AA genotypes and prothrombin 20210A allele were 37(92.5%), 3(7.5%), 0(0%) and 3(3.75%) in males and 78(97.5%), 2(2.5%), 0(0%) and 2(1.25%) in females, respectively. Factor V Leiden was not found in our tested group (zero chromosomes out of 240 chromosomes). Analysis of the observed frequencies in the studied groups indicates that there is no statistically significant difference between females and males, regarding prothrombin G20210A mutation (p value>0.05). Conclusions: This is the first study in its own kind in this population and implies that the frequency of Factor V Leiden G1691A (R506Q, FV-Leiden) allele is extremely low but the prothrombin G20210A mutation is more frequent in the tested group. PMID:21977183

  4. Recommendations of the DNA Commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG) on quality control of autosomal Short Tandem Repeat allele frequency databasing (STRidER).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodner, Martin; Bastisch, Ingo; Butler, John M; Fimmers, Rolf; Gill, Peter; Gusmão, Leonor; Morling, Niels; Phillips, Christopher; Prinz, Mechthild; Schneider, Peter M; Parson, Walther

    2016-09-01

    The statistical evaluation of autosomal Short Tandem Repeat (STR) genotypes is based on allele frequencies. These are empirically determined from sets of randomly selected human samples, compiled into STR databases that have been established in the course of population genetic studies. There is currently no agreed procedure of performing quality control of STR allele frequency databases, and the reliability and accuracy of the data are largely based on the responsibility of the individual contributing research groups. It has been demonstrated with databases of haploid markers (EMPOP for mitochondrial mtDNA, and YHRD for Y-chromosomal loci) that centralized quality control and data curation is essential to minimize error. The concepts employed for quality control involve software-aided likelihood-of-genotype, phylogenetic, and population genetic checks that allow the researchers to compare novel data to established datasets and, thus, maintain the high quality required in forensic genetics. Here, we present STRidER (http://strider.online), a publicly available, centrally curated online allele frequency database and quality control platform for autosomal STRs. STRidER expands on the previously established ENFSI DNA WG STRbASE and applies standard concepts established for haploid and autosomal markers as well as novel tools to reduce error and increase the quality of autosomal STR data. The platform constitutes a significant improvement and innovation for the scientific community, offering autosomal STR data quality control and reliable STR genotype estimates. PMID:27352221

  5. Rapid genotyping assays for the 4-base pair deletion of canine MDR1/ABCB1 gene and low frequency of the mutant allele in Border Collie dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Keijiro; Chang, Hye-Sook; Yabuki, Akira; Kawamichi, Takuji; Hossain, Mohammad A; Rahman, Mohammad M; Uddin, Mohammad M; Yamato, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    P-glycoprotein, encoded by the MDR1 or ABCB1 gene, is an integral component of the blood-brain barrier as an efflux pump for xenobiotics crucial in limiting drug uptake into the central nervous system. Dogs homozygous for a 4-base pair deletion of the canine MDR1 gene show altered expression or function of P-glycoprotein, resulting in neurotoxicosis after administration of the substrate drugs. In the present study, the usefulness of microchip electrophoresis for genotyping assays detecting this deletion mutation was evaluated. Mutagenically separated polymerase chain reaction (MS-PCR) and real-time PCR assays were newly developed and evaluated. Furthermore, a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of Border Collies dogs in Japan to determine the allele frequency in this breed. Microchip electrophoresis showed advantages in detection sensitivity and time saving over other modes of electrophoresis. The MS-PCR assay clearly discriminated all genotypes. Real-time PCR assay was most suitable for a large-scale survey due to its high throughput and rapidity. The genotyping survey demonstrated that the carrier and mutant allele frequencies were 0.49% and 0.25%, respectively, suggesting that the mutant allele frequency in Border Collies is markedly low compared to that in the susceptible dog breeds such as rough and smooth Collies. PMID:22362942

  6. Coding variants at hexa-allelic amino acid 13 of HLA-DRB1 explain independent SNP associations with follicular lymphoma risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Jia Nee; Smedby, Karin E; Akers, Nicholas K; Berglund, Mattias; Irwan, Ishak D; Jia, Xiaoming; Li, Yi; Conde, Lucia; Darabi, Hatef; Bracci, Paige M; Melbye, Mads; Adami, Hans-Olov; Glimelius, Bengt; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Padyukov, Leonid; Humphreys, Keith; Enblad, Gunilla; Skibola, Christine F; de Bakker, Paul I W; Liu, Jianjun

    2013-07-11

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma represents a diverse group of blood malignancies, of which follicular lymphoma (FL) is a common subtype. Previous genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II region multiple independent SNPs that are significantly associated with FL risk. To dissect these signals and determine whether coding variants in HLA genes are responsible for the associations, we conducted imputation, HLA typing, and sequencing in three independent populations for a total of 689 cases and 2,446 controls. We identified a hexa-allelic amino acid polymorphism at position 13 of the HLA-DR beta chain that showed the strongest association with FL within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region (multiallelic p = 2.3 × 10⁻¹⁵). Out of six possible amino acids that occurred at that position within the population, we classified two as high risk (Tyr and Phe), two as low risk (Ser and Arg), and two as moderate risk (His and Gly). There was a 4.2-fold difference in risk (95% confidence interval = 2.9-6.1) between subjects carrying two alleles encoding high-risk amino acids and those carrying two alleles encoding low-risk amino acids (p = 1.01 × 10⁻¹⁴). This coding variant might explain the complex SNP associations identified by GWASs and suggests a common HLA-DR antigen-driven mechanism for the pathogenesis of FL and rheumatoid arthritis.

  7. Short rare hTERT-VNTR2-2nd alleles are associated with prostate cancer susceptibility and influence gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase) gene contains five variable number tandem repeats (VNTR) and previous studies have described polymorphisms for hTERT-VNTR2-2nd. We investigated how allelic variation in hTERT-VNTR2-2nd may affect susceptibility to prostate cancer. A case-control study was performed using DNA from 421 cancer-free male controls and 329 patients with prostate cancer. In addition, to determine whether the VNTR polymorphisms have a functional consequence, we examined the transcriptional levels of a reporter gene linked to these VNTRs and driven by the hTERT promoter in cell lines. Three new rare alleles were detected from this study, two of which were identified only in cancer subjects. A statistically significant association between rare hTERT-VNTR2-2nd alleles and risk of prostate cancer was observed [OR, 5.17; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09-24.43; P = 0.021]. Furthermore, the results indicated that these VNTRs inserted in the enhancer region could influence the expression of hTERT in prostate cancer cell lines. This is the first study to report that rare hTERT VNTRs are associated with prostate cancer predisposition and that the VNTRs can induce enhanced levels of hTERT promoter activity in prostate cancer cell lines. Thus, the hTERT-VNTR2-2nd locus may function as a modifier of prostate cancer risk by affecting gene expression

  8. Efficient allele-specific targeting of LRRK2 R1441 mutations mediated by RNAi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura de Yñigo-Mojado

    Full Text Available Since RNA interference (RNAi has the potential to discriminate between single nucleotide changes, there is growing interest in the use of RNAi as a promising therapeutical approach to target dominant disease-associated alleles. Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 gene have been linked to dominantly inherited Parkinson's disease (PD. We focused on three LRRK2 mutations (R1441G/C and the more prevalent G2109S hoping to identify shRNAs that would both recognize and efficiently silence the mutated alleles preferentially over the wild-type alleles. Using a luciferase-based reporter system, we identified shRNAs that were able to specifically target the R1441G and R1441C alleles with 80% silencing efficiency. The same shRNAs were able to silence specifically mRNAs encoding either partial or full-length mutant LRRK2 fusion proteins, while having a minimal effect on endogenous wild-type LRRK2 expression when transfected in 293FT cells. Shifting of the mutant recognition site (MRS from position 11 to other sites (4 and 16, within the 19-mer window of our shRNA design reduced specificity and overall silencing efficiency. Developing an allele-specific RNAi of G2019S was problematic. Placement of the MRS at position 10 resulted in efficient silencing of reporters (75-80%, but failed to discriminate between mutant and wild-type alleles. Shifting of the MRS to positions 4, 5, 15, 16 increased the specificity of the shRNAs, but reduced the overall silencing efficiency. Consistent with previous reports, these data confirm that MRS placement influences both allele-specificity and silencing strength of shRNAs, while further modification to hairpin design or MRS position may lead to the development of effective G2019S shRNAs. In summary, the effective shRNA against LRRK2 R1441 alleles described herein suggests that RNAi-based therapy of inherited Parkinson's disease is a viable approach towards developing effective therapeutic interventions for

  9. Characterization of a novel MICA allele, MICA*012:05, by cloning and sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W Y; Tian, W; Wang, F; Zhu, F M; Li, L X

    2016-08-01

    A new MICA allelic variant, MICA*012:05, has been identified in a Chinese Mongolian population. Following polymerase chain reaction-sequence-based typing (PCR-SBT), this new allele was further confirmed by cloning and sequencing. MICA*012:05 was linked to an HLA-A*24-C*01-B*55:02-DRB1*09 haplotype. MICA*012:05 differs from MICA*012:01 by a single synonymous C to T substitution at nucleotide position 269 in exon 3.

  10. Epidemiological survey of Theileria parasite infection of cattle in Northeast China by allele-specific PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Longzheng; Zhang, Shoufa; Liang, Wanfeng; Jin, Chunmei; Jia, Lijun; Luo, Yuzi; Li, Yan; Cao, Shinuo; Yamagishi, Junya; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Kawano, Suguru; Fujisaki, Kozo; Xuan, Xuenan

    2011-11-01

    An epidemiological survey on a Theileria parasite infection of cattle in Northeast China was carried out using allele-specific PCR and DNA sequence analysis of the major piroplasm surface protein (MPSP) gene. The results showed that 14 of 104 blood samples were positive for Theileria by PCR. Among the positive cases, co-infection with various combinations of C- and I-type parasites was detected in 12 samples; no B- and Thai-type parasites were detected by allele-specific PCR. Phylogenetic analysis based on the MPSP gene sequences revealed that Theileria parasites with the MPSP types 1, 2, and 4 were distributed in Northeast China.

  11. Detection of cis-acting regulatory SNPs using allelic expression data

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Rui; Scott, Laura J.

    2011-01-01

    Allelic expression (AE) imbalance between the two alleles of a gene can be used to detect cis-acting regulatory SNPs (rSNPs) in individuals heterozygous for a transcribed SNP (tSNP). In this paper, we propose three tests for AE analysis focusing on phase-unknown data and any degree of linkage disequilibrium (LD) between the rSNP and tSNP: a test based on the minimum p-value of a one-sided F and two-sided t tests proposed previously for phase-unknown data, a test that combines these two p-valu...

  12. Unusual association of three rare alleles and a mismatch in a case of paternity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchi, Chiara; Pesaresi, Mauro; Alessandrini, Federica; Onofri, Valerio; Arseni, Alessia; Tagliabracci, Adriano

    2004-03-01

    This study reports a paternity case analyzed by the AmpFlSTR Identifiler Kit (AB) in which father and daughter shared three rare alleles for D19S433, D18S51 and TH01 microsatellites. The case also showed an apparent exclusion, due to a mutation at the D3S 1358 microsatellite. Sequencing analysis was performed to assess the size of the rare alleles and to establish their structure, which revealed some molecular variations in regions flanking the motif repeats.

  13. Association of HLA class II alleles and CTLA-4 polymorphism with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana J EI Wafai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is a progressive complex autoimmune disease in which combinations of environmental as well as genetic factors contribute to T-cell mediated destruction of insulin-secreting β-cells of the pancreas. HLA class II alleles on chromosome 6p21 [insulin dependent diabetes mellitus 1 (IDDM1], especially DR and DQ, show strong association with T1DM. In addition, several studies have suggested that polymorphisms in the CTLA-4 gene (IDDM12 on chromosome 2q33 form part of the genetic susceptibility for type 1 diabetes. The aim of this study was to analyze HLA alleles of the DQB1 and DRB1 genes using polymerase chain reaction using sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP technique and to investigate the asso-ciation of the A49G CTLA-4 polymorphism using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP analysis in Lebanese T1DM patients. The study was conduc-ted on 39 Lebanese T1DM patients. Results of HLA typing showed an increased frequency of the HLA-DQB1FNx010201, HLA-DQB1FNx010302, HLA-DRB1FNx010301 and HLA-DRB1FNx010401 alleles, sugges-ting risk association and thus can be considered as susceptibility alleles. On the other hand, strong protection against the disease was conferred by the HLA-DRB1FNx01110101, HLA-DQB1FNx010301 and HLADQB1FNx010601 alleles. RFLP analysis of the A49G polymorphism showed a significant increase in the G allele and GG genotype frequencies in patients, suggesting that CTLA-4 may be considered as a susceptibility gene for the development of T1DM in the Lebanese population. Analysis of the two polymorphisms showed no detectable association between the two genes. However, a significant negative association of the G allele with the DQB1FNx010201 allele was ob-served. This might indicate that the two genetic risk factors, namely HLA and CTLA-4, act independently of each other with no additive effect.

  14. A pseudodeficiency allele common in non-Jewish Tay-Sachs carriers: Implications for carrier screening

    OpenAIRE

    Triggs-Raine, B L; Mules, E H; Kaback, M M; Lim-Steele, J. S. T.; Dowling, C E; Akerman, B R; Natowicz, M R; Grebner, E E; Navon, R; Welch, J. P.; Greenberg, C.R.; Thomas, G H; Gravel, R A

    1992-01-01

    Deficiency of β-hexosaminidase A (Hex A) activity typically results in Tay-Sachs disease. However, healthy subjects found to be deficient in Hex A activity (i.e., pseudodeficient) by means of in vitro biochemical tests have been described. We analyzed the HEXA gene of one pseudodeficient subject and identified both a C739-to-T substitution that changes Arg247→Trp on one allele and a previously identified Tay-Sachs disease mutation on the second allele. Six additional pseudodeficient subjects ...

  15. Geographical distribution of GmTfl1 alleles in Chinese soybean varieties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guifeng; Liu; Lin; Zhao; Benjamin; J.Averitt; Ying; Liu; Bo; Zhang; Ruzhen; Chang; Yansong; Ma; Xiaoyan; Luan; Rongxia; Guan; Lijuan; Qiu

    2015-01-01

    Stem growth habit is an important agronomic trait in soybean and is subject to artificial selection. This study aimed to provide a theory for genotypic selection of stem growth habit for breeding purposes by analyzing the alleles of Gm Tfl1 gene in Chinese soybean varieties and establishing a database of Gm Tfl1 variation. Using knowledge of insertion and deletion(Indel) in the non-coding region and four single-nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs) in the coding sequences of the Gm Tfl1 gene, four CAPS and one Indel markers were developed and used to test 1120 Chinese soybean varieties. We found that the dominant Gm Tfl1 allele was prevalent in accessions from the Northern ecoregion, whereas the recessive allele, Gmtfl1, was more common in the Southern ecoregion, and the proportions of Gm Tfl1 and recessive alleles were respectively 40.1% and 59.9% in the Huang-Huai ecoregion. The proportion of Gm Tfl1 decreased and that of Gmtfl1 increased, gradually from north to south. Allele Gm Tfl1-a was present in higher proportions in the Huang-Huai spring, Huang-Huai summer, and Northern spring sub-ecoregions than that in the other sub-ecoregions. Gm Tfl1-b was common in the Northeast spring, Northern spring and Southern summer sub-ecoregions. Gmtfl1-ta was found mainly in the Huang-Huai spring,Huang-Huai summer and Southern spring sub-ecoregions. The Gmtfl1-ab allele was distributed in all six soybean sub-ecoregions. The Gmtfl1-bb allele was distributed mainly in the Huang-Huai spring and summer and Southern spring and summer sub-ecoregions,but the Gmtfl1-tb allele was detected only in the Huang-Huai summer sub-ecoregion. The distributions of Gm Tfl1 and Gmtfl1 have shown no large changes in nearly 60 years of breeding, but the frequency of the recessive genotype Gmtfl1 has shown a rising trend in the last 20 years. This study provides a theoretical foundation for breeding new soybean varieties for different ecoregions.

  16. Nucleotide sequences of chimpanzee MHC class I alleles: evidence for trans-species mode of evolution.

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, W.E.; Jonker, M; Klein, D; Ivanyi, P; van Seventer, G; Klein, J.

    1988-01-01

    To obtain an insight into the evolutionary origin of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I polymorphism, a cDNA library was prepared from a heterozygous chimpanzee cell line expressing MHC class I molecules crossreacting with allele-specific HLA-A11 antibodies. The library was screened with human class I locus-specific DNA probes, and clones encoding both alleles at the A and B loci have been identified and sequenced. In addition, the sequences of two HLA-A11 subtypes differing b...

  17. MULTIPRED2: A computational system for large-scale identification of peptides predicted to bind to HLA supertypes and alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Guang Lan; DeLuca, David S.; Keskin, Derin B.;

    2011-01-01

    MULTIPRED2 is a computational system for facile prediction of peptide binding to multiple alleles belonging to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II DR molecules. It enables prediction of peptide binding to products of individual HLA alleles, combination of alleles, or HLA supertypes...... groups in North America. MULTIPRED2 is an important tool to complement wet-lab experimental methods for identification of T-cell epitopes. It is available at http://cvc.dfci.harvard.edu/multipred2/....

  18. Fine Mapping Seronegative and Seropositive Rheumatoid Arthritis to Shared and Distinct HLA Alleles by Adjusting for the Effects of Heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Buhm; Diogo, Dorothée; Eyre, Steve; Kallberg, Henrik; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Bowes, John; Padyukov, Leonid; Okada, Yukinori; González-Gay, Miguel A.; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Martin, Javier; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Plenge, Robert M.; Worthington, Jane; Gregersen, Peter K.

    2014-01-01

    Despite progress in defining human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles for anti-citrullinated-protein-autoantibody-positive (ACPA+) rheumatoid arthritis (RA), identifying HLA alleles for ACPA-negative (ACPA−) RA has been challenging because of clinical heterogeneity within clinical cohorts. We imputed 8,961 classical HLA alleles, amino acids, and SNPs from Immunochip data in a discovery set of 2,406 ACPA− RA case and 13,930 control individuals. We developed a statistical approach to identify and ...

  19. Prognostic significance of ASXL1, JAK2V617F mutations and JAK2V617F allele burden in Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonal-Hindilerden, Ipek; Daglar-Aday, Aynur; Akadam-Teker, Basak; Yilmaz, Ceylan; Nalcaci, Meliha; Yavuz, Akif Selim; Sargin, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite insights into the genetic basis of Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (Ph-negative MPNs), a significant proportion of essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF) patients present with no known MPN disease alleles. There were no previous studies investigating the impact of ASXL1 mutations in Ph-negative MPNs in Turkey. In the current study, we investigated the prognostic significance of ASXL1 mutations in Turkish MPN patients. We also aimed to determine the prognostic significance of JAK2V617F allele burden and the relationship of JAK2V617F mutation with ASXL1 mutations in Ph-negative MPNs. Methods About 184 patients from a single center diagnosed with Ph-negative MPNs were screened for ASXL1, JAK2V617F mutations, and JAK2V617F allele burden: 107 ET and 77 PMF. Results A total of 29 ASXL1 mutations were detected in 24.7% of PMF and 8.4% of ET patients. ASXL1-mutated ET patients showed a trend toward an increase in the incidence of cerebrovascular events and higher total leukocyte counts. ASXL1-mutation in PMF was associated with older age and a higher prevalence of bleeding complications. In univariate analysis, overall survival (OS) was significantly reduced in ASXL1-mutated PMF patients. In multivariate analysis, Dynamic International Prognostic Scoring System-plus high-risk category and ASXL1 mutation status were independently associated with shorter survival in PMF. In PMF, mutational status and allele burden of JAK2V617F showed no difference in terms of OS and leukemia-free survival. Conclusion We conclude that ASXL1 mutations are molecular predictors of short OS in PMF. PMID:26082670

  20. Isolation and characterization of new alleles of the cyclin-dependent kinase gene CDC28 with cyclin-specific functional and biochemical defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, K; Oehlen, L J; Cross, F R

    1998-01-01

    The G1 cyclin Cln2 negatively regulates the mating-factor pathway. In a genetic screen to identify factors required for this regulation, we identified an allele of CDC28 (cdc28-csr1) that blocked this function of Cln2. Cln2 immunoprecipitated from cdc28-csr1 cells was completely defective in histone H1 kinase activity, due to defects in Cdc28 binding and activation by Cln2. In contrast, Clb2-associated H1 kinase and Cdc28 binding was normal in immunoprecipitates from these cells. cdc28-csr1 was significantly deficient in other aspects of genetic interaction with Cln2. The cdc28-csr1 mutation was determined to be Q188P, in the T loop distal to most of the probable Cdk-cyclin interaction regions. We performed random mutagenesis of CDC28 to identify additional alleles incapable of causing CLN2-dependent mating-factor resistance but capable of complementing cdc28 temperature-sensitive and null alleles. Two such mutants had highly defective Cln2-associated kinase, but, surprisingly, two other mutants had levels of Cln2-associated kinase near to wild-type levels. We performed a complementary screen for CDC28 mutants that could cause efficient Cln2-dependent mating-factor resistance but not complement a cdc28 null allele. Most such mutants were found to alter residues essential for kinase activity; the proteins had little or no associated kinase activity in bulk or in association with Cln2. Several of these mutants also functioned in another assay for CLN2-dependent function not involving the mating-factor pathway, complementing the temperature sensitivity of a cln1 cln3 cdc28-csr1 strain. These results could indicate that Cln2-Cdc28 kinase activity is not directly relevant to some CLN2-mediated functions. Mutants of this sort should be useful in differentiating the function of Cdc28 complexed with different cyclin regulatory subunits. PMID:9418876

  1. Development of a Melting Curve-Based Allele-Specific PCR of Apolipoprotein E (APOE) Genotyping Method for Genomic DNA, Guthrie Blood Spot, and Whole Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of apolipoprotein E (APOE) are associated with various health conditions and diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, etc. Hence, genotyping of APOE has broad applications in biomedical research and clinical settings, particularly in the era of precision medicine. The study aimed to develop a convenient and accurate method with flexible throughput to genotype the APOE polymorphisms. A melting curve-based allele-specific PCR method was developed to genotype two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of APOE, i.e. rs429358 at codon 112 and rs7412 at codon 158. These two SNPs determine the genotype of APOE2, E3, and E4. PCR-based Sanger sequencing was used as the reference method for APOE genotyping. A 100% concordance rate was obtained in 300 subjects between the melting curve-based allele-specific PCR method and the Sanger sequencing method. This method was applied to a genetic association analysis of APOE and schizophrenia consisting of 711 patients with schizophrenia and 665 control subjects from Taiwan. However, no significant differences in the allele and genotype frequencies were detected between these two groups. Further experiments showed that DNA dissolved from blood collected on Guthrie filter paper and total blood cell lysate without DNA extraction can be used in the melting curve-based allele-specific PCR method. Thus, we suggest that this is a fast, accurate and robust APOE genotyping method with a flexible throughput and suitable for DNA template from different preparations. This convenient method shall meet the different needs of various research and clinical laboratories. PMID:27078154

  2. Who's behind that mask and cape? The Asian leopard cat's Agouti (ASIP) allele likely affects coat colour phenotype in the Bengal cat breed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershony, L C; Penedo, M C T; Davis, B W; Murphy, W J; Helps, C R; Lyons, L A

    2014-12-01

    Coat colours and patterns are highly variable in cats and are determined mainly by several genes with Mendelian inheritance. A 2-bp deletion in agouti signalling protein (ASIP) is associated with melanism in domestic cats. Bengal cats are hybrids between domestic cats and Asian leopard cats (Prionailurus bengalensis), and the charcoal coat colouration/pattern in Bengals presents as a possible incomplete melanism. The complete coding region of ASIP was directly sequenced in Asian leopard, domestic and Bengal cats. Twenty-seven variants were identified between domestic and leopard cats and were investigated in Bengals and Savannahs, a hybrid with servals (Leptailurus serval). The leopard cat ASIP haplotype was distinguished from domestic cat by four synonymous and four non-synonymous exonic SNPs, as well as 19 intronic variants, including a 42-bp deletion in intron 4. Fifty-six of 64 reported charcoal cats were compound heterozygotes at ASIP, with leopard cat agouti (A(P) (be) ) and domestic cat non-agouti (a) haplotypes. Twenty-four Bengals had an additional unique haplotype (A2) for exon 2 that was not identified in leopard cats, servals or jungle cats (Felis chaus). The compound heterozygote state suggests the leopard cat allele, in combination with the recessive non-agouti allele, influences Bengal markings, producing a darker, yet not completely melanistic coat. This is the first validation of a leopard cat allele segregating in the Bengal breed and likely affecting their overall pelage phenotype. Genetic testing services need to be aware of the possible segregation of wild felid alleles in all assays performed on hybrid cats. PMID:25143047

  3. Association of the HLA-DRB1*0701 allele with perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmatic antibodies in Mexican patients with severe ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jesus K Yamamoto-Furusho; Luis Uscanga-Domínguez; Alondra Lopez-Martinez; Julio Granados

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine the association between the HLA-DRB1 alleles and perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmatic antibodies (p-ANCA) positive in Mexican patients with ulcerative colitis (UC).METHODS: Ninety Mexican mestizo patients (45 females) with UC, confirmed by biopsy, were studied. High resolution HLA typing was performed by PCR-SSO reverse dot blot and PCR-SSP. Molecular typing techniques were applied to define HLA-DRB1 alleles. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunofluorescence techniques were used to detect p-ANCA.RESULTS: Forty-eight (53%) UC patients were positive for p-ANCA by ELISA and IF. We found that p-ANCA-positive UC patients had a significantly increased frequency of HLA-DR7 compared with p-ANCA-negative controls (22% vs 5.1%; pC=0.02, OR=5.2, CI 95%:1.06-37.82). Disease activity was scored as severe in 20 patients, moderate in 8, mild in 14 and no activity in the remaining 38 patients according to the Truelove and Witts criteria. Subgroup analysis showed a significantly increased frequency of the HLA-DRB1*07 allele in 15 of 20 UC patients with severe activity of UC and p-ANCA positivity [100% vs 0%; pC=0.0000001; OR=35]. No significant differences were found between p-ANCA positive patients, HLA-DR alleles and other clinical features such as extraintestinal manifestations, proctocolectomy and extension.CONCLUSION: The HLA-DRB1*07 is associated with p-ANCA positive UC Mexican patients.

  4. Prevalence of bovine dermatophilosis and disease-associated alleles in zebu Goudali cattle and their Italian Simmental crosses ranching in the western highland plateau savannah of Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojong, Bessong Willington; Saccà, Elena; Bessong, Pascal; Piasentier, Edi

    2016-10-01

    Abundance of native pastures makes Cameroon's western highland savannah (WHS) a hotspot for low-input beef-type cattle. Dumbo Ranch is central to cattle seed stock multiplication in WHS and holds that Dermatophilus congolensis infection undermines production. The bovine BoLA-DRB3 has been variously demonstrated as the principal gene of the major histocompatibility locus associated with immunity and resistance to dermatophilosis in cattle. We studied the profile of dermatophilosis prevalence in zebu Goudali (G) and its Simmental composite, SimGoud (SG), at Dumbo Ranch and determined the distribution of a dermatophilosis-associated susceptibility allele of the BoLA-DRB3 gene by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We recorded a 42 % prevalence of dermatophilosis in the studied cohort (337 animals). Dermatophilosis was more common in older cattle than in cattle ≤36 months (p ≤ 0.05). G was more affected compared to SG, because of the prevalence of the disease in the oldest animals and the age distribution of the experimental subjects. No susceptible homozygote was observed. About 85 and 15 % of the cohort carried the homozygous resistant and heterozygous condition, respectively. This genotype distribution was not affected by cattle type. The study confirms the presence of dermatophilosis among G and SG cattle in WHS. However, there was no correlation between the presence of the disease-associated susceptible allele considered and clinical manifestation. Screening for this dermatophilosis resistance-associated allele of BoLA-DRB3 gene appeared not useful for selection of G and SG in WHS.

  5. Who's behind that mask and cape? The Asian leopard cat's Agouti (ASIP) allele likely affects coat colour phenotype in the Bengal cat breed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershony, L C; Penedo, M C T; Davis, B W; Murphy, W J; Helps, C R; Lyons, L A

    2014-12-01

    Coat colours and patterns are highly variable in cats and are determined mainly by several genes with Mendelian inheritance. A 2-bp deletion in agouti signalling protein (ASIP) is associated with melanism in domestic cats. Bengal cats are hybrids between domestic cats and Asian leopard cats (Prionailurus bengalensis), and the charcoal coat colouration/pattern in Bengals presents as a possible incomplete melanism. The complete coding region of ASIP was directly sequenced in Asian leopard, domestic and Bengal cats. Twenty-seven variants were identified between domestic and leopard cats and were investigated in Bengals and Savannahs, a hybrid with servals (Leptailurus serval). The leopard cat ASIP haplotype was distinguished from domestic cat by four synonymous and four non-synonymous exonic SNPs, as well as 19 intronic variants, including a 42-bp deletion in intron 4. Fifty-six of 64 reported charcoal cats were compound heterozygotes at ASIP, with leopard cat agouti (A(P) (be) ) and domestic cat non-agouti (a) haplotypes. Twenty-four Bengals had an additional unique haplotype (A2) for exon 2 that was not identified in leopard cats, servals or jungle cats (Felis chaus). The compound heterozygote state suggests the leopard cat allele, in combination with the recessive non-agouti allele, influences Bengal markings, producing a darker, yet not completely melanistic coat. This is the first validation of a leopard cat allele segregating in the Bengal breed and likely affecting their overall pelage phenotype. Genetic testing services need to be aware of the possible segregation of wild felid alleles in all assays performed on hybrid cats.

  6. DNA Repair Dependence of Somatic Mutagenesis of Transposon-Caused WHITE Alleles in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER after Treatment with Alkylating Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Fujikawa, Kazuo; Kondo, Sohei

    1986-01-01

    DNA repair-defective alleles of the mei-9, mei-41, mus-104 and mus-101 loci of Drosophila melanogaster were introduced into stocks bearing the UZ and SZ marker sets. Males with the UZ marker set, z1 (zeste allele) and w+(TE) (genetically unstable white allele presumably caused by a transposable element), or the SZ marker set, z1 and w+R (semistable white allele caused by partial duplication of the w+ locus plus transposon insert), were exposed to EMS at the first instar. After emergence, a...

  7. Paradoxical expression of INK4c in proliferative multiple myeloma tumors: bi-allelic deletion vs increased expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanamura Ichiro

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A high proliferative capacity of tumor cells usually is associated with shortened patient survival. Disruption of the RB pathway, which is critically involved in regulating the G1 to S cell cycle transition, is a frequent target of oncogenic events that are thought to contribute to increased proliferation during tumor progression. Previously, we determined that p18INK4c, an essential gene for normal plasma cell differentiation, was bi-allelically deleted in five of sixteen multiple myeloma (MM cell lines. The present study was undertaken to investigate a possible role of p18INK4c in increased proliferation of myeloma tumors as they progress. Results Thirteen of 40 (33% human myeloma cell lines do not express normal p18INK4c, with bi-allelic deletion of p18 in twelve, and expression of a mutated p18 fragment in one. Bi-allelic deletion of p18, which appears to be a late progression event, has a prevalence of about 2% in 261 multiple myeloma (MM tumors, but the prevalence is 6 to10% in the 50 tumors with a high expression-based proliferation index. Paradoxically, 24 of 40 (60% MM cell lines, and 30 of 50 (60% MM tumors with a high proliferation index express an increased level of p18 RNA compared to normal bone marrow plasma cells, whereas this occurs in only five of the 151 (3% MM tumors with a low proliferation index. Tumor progression is often accompanied by increased p18 expression and an increased proliferation index. Retroviral-mediated expression of exogenous p18 results in marked growth inhibition in three MM cell lines that express little or no endogenous p18, but has no effect in another MM cell line that already expresses a high level of p18. Conclusion Paradoxically, although loss of p18 appears to contribute to increased proliferation of nearly 10% of MM tumors, most MM cell lines and proliferative MM tumors have increased expression of p18. Apart from a small fraction of cell lines and tumors that have inactivated

  8. CAG repeat expansion in Huntington disease determines age at onset in a fully dominant fashion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.-M.; Ramos, E.M.; Lee, J.-H.; Gillis, T.; Mysore, J.S.; Hayden, M.R.; Warby, S.C.; Morrison, P.; Nance, M.; Ross, C.A.; Margolis, R.L.; Squitieri, F.; Orobello, S.; Di Donato, S.; Gomez-Tortosa, E.; Ayuso, C.; Suchowersky, O.; Trent, R.J.A.; McCusker, E.; Novelletto, A.; Frontali, M.; Jones, R.; Ashizawa, T.; Frank, S.; Saint-Hilaire, M.H.; Hersch, S.M.; Rosas, H.D.; Lucente, D.; Harrison, M.B.; Zanko, A.; Abramson, R.K.; Marder, K.; Sequeiros, J.; Paulsen, J.S.; Landwehrmeyer, G.B.; Myers, R.H.; MacDonald, M.E.; Durr, Alexandra; Rosenblatt, Adam; Frati, Luigi; Perlman, Susan; Conneally, Patrick M.; Klimek, Mary Lou; Diggin, Melissa; Hadzi, Tiffany; Duckett, Ayana; Ahmed, Anwar; Allen, Paul; Ames, David; Anderson, Christine; Anderson, Karla; Anderson, Karen; Andrews, Thomasin; Ashburner, John; Axelson, Eric; Aylward, Elizabeth; Barker, Roger A.; Barth, Katrin; Barton, Stacey; Baynes, Kathleen; Bea, Alexandra; Beall, Erik; Beg, Mirza Faisal; Beglinger, Leigh J.; Biglan, Kevin; Bjork, Kristine; Blanchard, Steve; Bockholt, Jeremy; Bommu, Sudharshan Reddy; Brossman, Bradley; Burrows, Maggie; Calhoun, Vince; Carlozzi, Noelle; Chesire, Amy; Chiu, Edmond; Chua, Phyllis; Connell, R.J.; Connor, Carmela; Corey-Bloom, Jody; Craufurd, David; Cross, Stephen; Cysique, Lucette; Santos, Rachelle Dar; Davis, Jennifer; Decolongon, Joji; DiPietro, Anna; Doucette, Nicholas; Downing, Nancy; Dudler, Ann; Dunn, Steve; Ecker, Daniel; Epping, Eric A.; Erickson, Diane; Erwin, Cheryl; Evans, Ken; Factor, Stewart A.; Farias, Sarah; Fatas, Marta; Fiedorowicz, Jess; Fullam, Ruth; Furtado, Sarah; Garde, Monica Bascunana; Gehl, Carissa; Geschwind, Michael D.; Goh, Anita; Gooblar, Jon; Goodman, Anna; Griffith, Jane; Groves, Mark; Guttman, Mark; Hamilton, Joanne; Harrington, Deborah; Harris, Greg; Heaton, Robert K.; Helmer, Karl; Henneberry, Machelle; Hershey, Tamara; Herwig, Kelly; Howard, Elizabeth; Hunter, Christine; Jankovic, Joseph; Johnson, Hans; Johnson, Arik; Jones, Kathy; Juhl, Andrew; Kim, Eun Young; Kimble, Mycah; King, Pamela; Klimek, Mary Lou; Klöppel, Stefan; Koenig, Katherine; Komiti, Angela; Kumar, Rajeev; Langbehn, Douglas; Leavitt, Blair; Leserman, Anne; Lim, Kelvin; Lipe, Hillary; Lowe, Mark; Magnotta, Vincent A.; Mallonee, William M.; Mans, Nicole; Marietta, Jacquie; Marshall, Frederick; Martin, Wayne; Mason, Sarah; Matheson, Kirsty; Matson, Wayne; Mazzoni, Pietro; McDowell, William; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Miller, Michael; Mills, James; Miracle, Dawn; Montross, Kelsey; Moore, David; Mori, Sasumu; Moser, David J.; Moskowitz, Carol; Newman, Emily; Nopoulos, Peg; Novak, Marianne; O'Rourke, Justin; Oakes, David; Ondo, William; Orth, Michael; Panegyres, Peter; Pease, Karen; Perlman, Susan; Perlmutter, Joel; Peterson, Asa; Phillips, Michael; Pierson, Ron; Potkin, Steve; Preston, Joy; Quaid, Kimberly; Radtke, Dawn; Rae, Daniela; Rao, Stephen; Raymond, Lynn; Reading, Sarah; Ready, Rebecca; Reece, Christine; Reilmann, Ralf; Reynolds, Norm; Richardson, Kylie; Rickards, Hugh; Ro, Eunyoe; Robinson, Robert; Rodnitzky, Robert; Rogers, Ben; Rosenblatt, Adam; Rosser, Elisabeth; Rosser, Anne; Price, Kathy; Price, Kathy; Ryan, Pat; Salmon, David; Samii, Ali; Schumacher, Jamy; Schumacher, Jessica; Sendon, Jose Luis Lópenz; Shear, Paula; Sheinberg, Alanna; Shpritz, Barnett; Siedlecki, Karen; Simpson, Sheila A.; Singer, Adam; Smith, Jim; Smith, Megan; Smith, Glenn; Snyder, Pete; Song, Allen; Sran, Satwinder; Stephan, Klaas; Stober, Janice; Sü?muth, Sigurd; Suter, Greg; Tabrizi, Sarah; Tempkin, Terry; Testa, Claudia; Thompson, Sean; Thomsen, Teri; Thumma, Kelli; Toga, Arthur; Trautmann, Sonja; Tremont, Geoff; Turner, Jessica; Uc, Ergun; Vaccarino, Anthony; van Duijn, Eric; Van Walsem, Marleen; Vik, Stacie; Vonsattel, Jean Paul; Vuletich, Elizabeth; Warner, Tom; Wasserman, Paula; Wassink, Thomas; Waterman, Elijah; Weaver, Kurt; Weir, David; Welsh, Claire; Werling-Witkoske, Chris; Wesson, Melissa; Westervelt, Holly; Weydt, Patrick; Wheelock, Vicki; Williams, Kent; Williams, Janet; Wodarski, Mary; Wojcieszek, Joanne; Wood, Jessica; Wood-Siverio, Cathy; Wu, Shuhua; Yastrubetskaya, Olga; de Yebenes, Justo Garcia; Zhao, Yong Qiang; Zimbelman, Janice; Zschiegner, Roland; Aaserud, Olaf; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Andrews, Thomasin; Andrich, Jurgin; Antczak, Jakub; Arran, Natalie; Artiga, Maria J. Saiz; Bachoud-Lévi, Anne-Catherine; Banaszkiewicz, Krysztof; di Poggio, Monica Bandettini; Bandmann, Oliver; Barbera, Miguel A.; Barker, Roger A.; Barrero, Francisco; Barth, Katrin; Bas, Jordi; Beister, Antoine; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Bertini, Elisabetta; Biunno, Ida; Bjørgo, Kathrine; Bjørnevoll, Inga; Bohlen, Stefan; Bonelli, Raphael M.; Bos, Reineke; Bourne, Colin; Bradbury, Alyson; Brockie, Peter; Brown, Felicity; Bruno, Stefania; Bryl, Anna; Buck, Andrea; Burg, Sabrina; Burgunder, Jean-Marc; Burns, Peter; Burrows, Liz; Busquets, Nuria; Busse, Monica; Calopa, Matilde; Carruesco, Gemma T.; Casado, Ana Gonzalez; Catena, Judit López; Chu, Carol; Ciesielska, Anna; Clapton, Jackie; Clayton, Carole; Clenaghan, Catherine; Coelho, Miguel; Connemann, Julia; Craufurd, David; Crooks, Jenny; Cubillo, Patricia Trigo; Cubo, Esther; Curtis, Adrienne; De Michele, Giuseppe; De Nicola, A.; de Souza, Jenny; de Weert, A. Marit; de Yébenes, Justo Garcia; Dekker, M.; Descals, A. Martínez; Di Maio, Luigi; Di Pietro, Anna; Dipple, Heather; Dose, Matthias; Dumas, Eve M.; Dunnett, Stephen; Ecker, Daniel; Elifani, F.; Ellison-Rose, Lynda; Elorza, Marina D.; Eschenbach, Carolin; Evans, Carole; Fairtlough, Helen; Fannemel, Madelein; Fasano, Alfonso; Fenollar, Maria; Ferrandes, Giovanna; Ferreira, Jaoquim J.; Fillingham, Kay; Finisterra, Ana Maria; Fisher, K.; Fletcher, Amy; Foster, Jillian; Foustanos, Isabella; Frech, Fernando A.; Fullam, Robert; Fullham, Ruth; Gago, Miguel; García, RocioGarcía-Ramos; García, Socorro S.; Garrett, Carolina; Gellera, Cinzia; Gill, Paul; Ginestroni, Andrea; Golding, Charlotte; Goodman, Anna; Gørvell, Per; Grant, Janet; Griguoli, A.; Gross, Diana; Guedes, Leonor; BascuñanaGuerra, Monica; Guerra, Maria Rosalia; Guerrero, Rosa; Guia, Dolores B.; Guidubaldi, Arianna; Hallam, Caroline; Hamer, Stephanie; Hammer, Kathrin; Handley, Olivia J.; Harding, Alison; Hasholt, Lis; Hedge, Reikha; Heiberg, Arvid; Heinicke, Walburgis; Held, Christine; Hernanz, Laura Casas; Herranhof, Briggitte; Herrera, Carmen Durán; Hidding, Ute; Hiivola, Heli; Hill, Susan; Hjermind, Lena. E.; Hobson, Emma; Hoffmann, Rainer; Holl, Anna Hödl; Howard, Liz; Hunt, Sarah; Huson, Susan; Ialongo, Tamara; Idiago, Jesus Miguel R.; Illmann, Torsten; Jachinska, Katarzyna; Jacopini, Gioia; Jakobsen, Oda; Jamieson, Stuart; Jamrozik, Zygmunt; Janik, Piotr; Johns, Nicola; Jones, Lesley; Jones, Una; Jurgens, Caroline K.; Kaelin, Alain; Kalbarczyk, Anna; Kershaw, Ann; Khalil, Hanan; Kieni, Janina; Klimberg, Aneta; Koivisto, Susana P.; Koppers, Kerstin; Kosinski, Christoph Michael; Krawczyk, Malgorzata; Kremer, Berry; Krysa, Wioletta; Kwiecinski, Hubert; Lahiri, Nayana; Lambeck, Johann; Lange, Herwig; Laver, Fiona; Leenders, K.L.; Levey, Jamie; Leythaeuser, Gabriele; Lezius, Franziska; Llesoy, Joan Roig; Löhle, Matthias; López, Cristobal Diez-Aja; Lorenza, Fortuna; Loria, Giovanna; Magnet, Markus; Mandich, Paola; Marchese, Roberta; Marcinkowski, Jerzy; Mariotti, Caterina; Mariscal, Natividad; Markova, Ivana; Marquard, Ralf; Martikainen, Kirsti; Martínez, Isabel Haro; Martínez-Descals, Asuncion; Martino, T.; Mason, Sarah; McKenzie, Sue; Mechi, Claudia; Mendes, Tiago; Mestre, Tiago; Middleton, Julia; Milkereit, Eva; Miller, Joanne; Miller, Julie; Minster, Sara; Möller, Jens Carsten; Monza, Daniela; Morales, Blas; Moreau, Laura V.; Moreno, Jose L. López-Sendón; Münchau, Alexander; Murch, Ann; Nielsen, Jørgen E.; Niess, Anke; Nørremølle, Anne; Novak, Marianne; O'Donovan, Kristy; Orth, Michael; Otti, Daniela; Owen, Michael; Padieu, Helene; Paganini, Marco; Painold, Annamaria; Päivärinta, Markku; Partington-Jones, Lucy; Paterski, Laurent; Paterson, Nicole; Patino, Dawn; Patton, Michael; Peinemann, Alexander; Peppa, Nadia; Perea, Maria Fuensanta Noguera; Peterson, Maria; Piacentini, Silvia; Piano, Carla; Càrdenas, Regina Pons i; Prehn, Christian; Price, Kathleen; Probst, Daniela; Quarrell, Oliver; Quiroga, Purificacion Pin; Raab, Tina; Rakowicz, Maryla; Raman, Ashok; Raymond, Lucy; Reilmann, Ralf; Reinante, Gema; Reisinger, Karin; Retterstol, Lars; Ribaï, Pascale; Riballo, Antonio V.; Ribas, Guillermo G.; Richter, Sven; Rickards, Hugh; Rinaldi, Carlo; Rissling, Ida; Ritchie, Stuart; Rivera, Susana Vázquez; Robert, Misericordia Floriach; Roca, Elvira; Romano, Silvia; Romoli, Anna Maria; Roos, Raymond A.C.; Røren, Niini; Rose, Sarah; Rosser, Elisabeth; Rosser, Anne; Rossi, Fabiana; Rothery, Jean; Rudzinska, Monika; Ruíz, Pedro J. García; Ruíz, Belan Garzon; Russo, Cinzia Valeria; Ryglewicz, Danuta; Saft, Carston; Salvatore, Elena; Sánchez, Vicenta; Sando, Sigrid Botne; Šašinková, Pavla; Sass, Christian; Scheibl, Monika; Schiefer, Johannes; Schlangen, Christiane; Schmidt, Simone; Schöggl, Helmut; Schrenk, Caroline; Schüpbach, Michael; Schuierer, Michele; Sebastián, Ana Rojo; Selimbegovic-Turkovic, Amina; Sempolowicz, Justyna; Silva, Mark; Sitek, Emilia; Slawek, Jaroslaw; Snowden, Julie; Soleti, Francesco; Soliveri, Paola; Sollom, Andrea; Soltan, Witold; Sorbi, Sandro; Sorensen, Sven Asger; Spadaro, Maria; Städtler, Michael; Stamm, Christiane; Steiner, Tanja; Stokholm, Jette; Stokke, Bodil; Stopford, Cheryl; Storch, Alexander; Straßburger, Katrin; Stubbe, Lars; Sulek, Anna; Szczudlik, Andrzej; Tabrizi, Sarah; Taylor, Rachel; Terol, Santiago Duran-Sindreu; Thomas, Gareth; Thompson, Jennifer; Thomson, Aileen; Tidswell, Katherine; Torres, Maria M. Antequera; Toscano, Jean; Townhill, Jenny; Trautmann, Sonja; Tucci, Tecla; Tuuha, Katri; Uhrova, Tereza; Valadas, Anabela; van Hout, Monique S.E.; van Oostrom, J.C.H.; van Vugt, Jeroen P.P.; vanm, Walsem Marleen R.; Vandenberghe, Wim; Verellen-Dumoulin, Christine; Vergara, Mar Ruiz; Verstappen, C.C.P.; Verstraelen, Nichola; Viladrich, Celia Mareca; Villanueva, Clara; Wahlström, Jan; Warner, Thomas; Wehus, Raghild; Weindl, Adolf; Werner, Cornelius J.; Westmoreland, Leann; Weydt, Patrick; Wiedemann, Alexandra; Wild, Edward; Wild, Sue; Witjes-Ané, Marie-Noelle; Witkowski, Grzegorz; Wójcik, Magdalena; Wolz, Martin; Wolz, Annett; Wright, Jan; Yardumian, Pam; Yates, Shona; Yudina, Elizaveta; Zaremba, Jacek; Zaugg, Sabine W.; Zdzienicka, Elzbieta; Zielonka, Daniel; Zielonka, Euginiusz; Zinzi, Paola; Zittel, Simone; Zucker, Birgrit; Adams, John; Agarwal, Pinky; Antonijevic, Irina; Beck, Christopher; Chiu, Edmond; Churchyard, Andrew; Colcher, Amy; Corey-Bloom, Jody; Dorsey, Ray; Drazinic, Carolyn; Dubinsky, Richard; Duff, Kevin; Factor, Stewart; Foroud, Tatiana; Furtado, Sarah; Giuliano, Joe; Greenamyre, Timothy; Higgins, Don; Jankovic, Joseph; Jennings, Dana; Kang, Un Jung; Kostyk, Sandra; Kumar, Rajeev; Leavitt, Blair; LeDoux, Mark; Mallonee, William; Marshall, Frederick; Mohlo, Eric; Morgan, John; Oakes, David; Panegyres, Peter; Panisset, Michel; Perlman, Susan; Perlmutter, Joel; Quaid, Kimberly; Raymond, Lynn; Revilla, Fredy; Robertson, Suzanne; Robottom, Bradley; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan; Scott, Burton; Shannon, Kathleen; Shoulson, Ira; Singer, Carlos; Tabbal, Samer; Testa, Claudia; van, Kammen Dan; Vetter, Louise; Walker, Francis; Warner, John; Weiner, illiam; Wheelock, Vicki; Yastrubetskaya, Olga; Barton, Stacey; Broyles, Janice; Clouse, Ronda; Coleman, Allison; Davis, Robert; Decolongon, Joji; DeLaRosa, Jeanene; Deuel, Lisa; Dietrich, Susan; Dubinsky, Hilary; Eaton, Ken; Erickson, Diane; Fitzpatrick, Mary Jane; Frucht, Steven; Gartner, Maureen; Goldstein, Jody; Griffith, Jane; Hickey, Charlyne; Hunt, Victoria; Jaglin, Jeana; Klimek, Mary Lou; Lindsay, Pat; Louis, Elan; Loy, Clemet; Lucarelli, Nancy; Malarick, Keith; Martin, Amanda; McInnis, Robert; Moskowitz, Carol; Muratori, Lisa; Nucifora, Frederick; O'Neill, Christine; Palao, Alicia; Peavy, Guerry; Quesada, Monica; Schmidt, Amy; Segro, Vicki; Sperin, Elaine; Suter, Greg; Tanev, Kalo; Tempkin, Teresa; Thiede, Curtis; Wasserman, Paula; Welsh, Claire; Wesson, Melissa; Zauber, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Age at onset of diagnostic motor manifestations in Huntington disease (HD) is strongly correlated with an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat. The length of the normal CAG repeat allele has been reported also to influence age at onset, in interaction with the expanded allele. Due to profound implications for disease mechanism and modification, we tested whether the normal allele, interaction between the expanded and normal alleles, or presence of a second expanded allele affects age at onset of HD motor signs. Methods: We modeled natural log-transformed age at onset as a function of CAG repeat lengths of expanded and normal alleles and their interaction by linear regression. Results: An apparently significant effect of interaction on age at motor onset among 4,068 subjects was dependent on a single outlier data point. A rigorous statistical analysis with a well-behaved dataset that conformed to the fundamental assumptions of linear regression (e.g., constant variance and normally distributed error) revealed significance only for the expanded CAG repeat, with no effect of the normal CAG repeat. Ten subjects with 2 expanded alleles showed an age at motor onset consistent with the length of the larger expanded allele. Conclusions: Normal allele CAG length, interaction between expanded and normal alleles, and presence of a second expanded allele do not influence age at onset of motor manifestations, indicating that the rate of HD pathogenesis leading to motor diagnosis is determined by a completely dominant action of the longest expanded allele and as yet unidentified genetic or environmental factors. Neurology® 2012;78:690–695 PMID:22323755

  9. Approximate sampling formulas for general finite-alleles models of mutation

    CERN Document Server

    Bhaskar, Anand; Song, Yun S

    2011-01-01

    Many applications in genetic analyses utilize sampling distributions, which describe the probability of observing a sample of DNA sequences randomly drawn from a population. In the one-locus case with special models of mutation such as the infinite-alleles model or the finite-alleles parent-independent mutation model, closed-form sampling distributions under the coalescent have been known for many decades. However, no exact formula is currently known for more general models of mutation that are of biological interest. Models with finitely-many alleles are considered in this paper, and approximate closed-form sampling formulas are derived for an arbitrary recurrent mutation model or for a reversible recurrent mutation model, depending on whether the number of distinct observed allele types is at most three or four, respectively. Two different approaches---one based on perturbation expansion and the other on an urn construction related to the coalescent---are developed here. Computation in the former approach i...

  10. Statistical model for degraded DNA samples and adjusted probabilities for allelic drop-out

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Mogensen, Helle Smidt;

    2012-01-01

    Abstract DNA samples found at a scene of crime or obtained from the debris of a mass disaster accident are often subject to degradation. When using the STR DNA technology, the DNA profile is observed via a so-called electropherogram (EPG), where the alleles are identified as signal peaks above...

  11. Statistical model for degraded DNA samples and adjusted probabilities for allelic drop-out

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Mogensen, Helle Smidt;

    2012-01-01

    DNA samples found at a scene of crime or obtained from the debris of a mass disaster accident are often subject to degradation. When using the STR DNA technology, the DNA profile is observed via a so-called electropherogram (EPG), where the alleles are identified as signal peaks above a certain...

  12. Allele frequencies of the third component of complement (C3) in MS patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Bulman, D E; Armstrong, H; Ebers, G C

    1991-01-01

    No difference was found in the allele frequency of C3 (third component of complement) in 129 multiple sclerosis (MS) patients compared with both 69 controls or with similar reported controls from the published literature. An association cannot be confirmed between C3 and MS.

  13. Low-risk susceptibility alleles in 40 human breast cancer cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Riaz (Muhammad); F. Elstrodt (Fons); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); A. Dehghan (Abbas); J.G.M. Klijn (Jan); M. Schutte (Mieke)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Low-risk breast cancer susceptibility alleles or SNPs confer only modest breast cancer risks ranging from just over 1.0 to 1.3 fold. Yet, they are common among most populations and therefore are involved in the development of essentially all breast cancers. The mechanism by w

  14. The Met-allele of the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism enhances task switching in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewski, Patrick D; Hengstler, Jan G; Golka, Klaus; Falkenstein, Michael; Beste, Christian

    2011-12-01

    In this study we examined the relevance of the functional brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphism as a modulator of task-switching performance in healthy elderly by using behavioral and event-related potential (ERP) measures. Task switching was examined in a cue-based and a memory-based paradigm. Val/Val carriers were generally slower, showed enhanced reaction time variability and higher error rates, particularly during memory-based task switching than the Met-allele individuals. On a neurophysiological level these dissociative effects were reflected by variations in the N2 and P3 ERP components. The task switch-related N2 was increased while the P3 was decreased in Met-allele carriers, while the Val/Val genotype group revealed the opposite pattern of results. In cue-based task-switching no behavioral and ERP differences were seen between the genotypes. These data suggest that superior memory-based task-switching performance in elderly Met-allele carriers may emerge due to more efficient response selection processes. The results implicate that under special circumstances the Met-allele renders cognitive processes more efficient than the Val/Val genotype in healthy elderly, corroborating recent findings in young subjects.

  15. Allelic association studies of genome wide association data can reveal errors in marker position assignments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis David

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome wide association (GWA studies provide the opportunity to develop new kinds of analysis. Analysing pairs of markers from separate regions might lead to the detection of allelic association which might indicate an interaction between nearby genes. Methods 396,591 markers typed in 541 subjects were studied. 7.8*1010 pairs of markers were screened and those showing initial evidence for allelic association were subjected to more thorough investigation along with 10 flanking markers on either side. Results No evidence was detected for interaction. However 6 markers appeared to have an incorrect map position according to NCBI Build 35. One of these was corrected in Build 36 and 2 were dropped. The remaining 3 were left with map positions inconsistent with their allelic association relationships. Discussion Although no interaction effects were detected the method was successful in identifying markers with probably incorrect map positions. Conclusion The study of allelic association can supplement other methods for assigning markers to particular map positions. Analyses of this type may usefully be applied to data from future GWA studies.

  16. Limited efficacy of hydroxyurea in lowering of the JAK2 V617F allele burden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Thomas Stauffer; Pallisgaard, Niels; de Stricker, Karin;

    2009-01-01

    Besides being an invaluable marker of clonal disease in chronic myeloproliferative disorders (CMPDs), the JAK2 V617F mutation and the mutated allele burden have an impact on disease phenotype and may provide information on prognosis. Recently, hydroxyurea (HU) has been shown to induce a rapid dec...

  17. Pedigree genotyping: a new pedigree-based approach of QTL identification and allele mining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weg, van de W.E.; Voorrips, R.E.; Finkers, H.J.; Kodde, L.P.; Jansen, J.; Bink, M.C.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    To date, molecular markers are available for many economically important traits. Unfortunately, lack of knowledge of the allelic variation of the related genes hampers their full exploitation in commercial breeding programs. These markers have usually been identified in one single cross. Consequentl

  18. Allelic variants of melanocortin 3 receptor gene (MC3R) and weight loss in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    L. Santos, José; De la Cruz, Rolando; Holst, Claus;

    2011-01-01

    receptor gene (MC3R) have been associated with childhood obesity, higher BMI Z-score and elevated body fat percentage compared to non-carriers. The aim of this study is to assess the association in adults between allelic variants of MC3R with weight loss induced by energy-restricted diets....

  19. HLA-DRB1 alleles genotyping in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in Chinese.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To explore the role of HLA-DRB1 genes in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the correlations between HLA-DR alleles and clinical manifestations of patients with RA. Methods: 86 patients and 106 race matched controls in whom HLADR typing was performed by the method of DNA amplification with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP)

  20. Heterologous expression of the Arabidopsis etr1-1 allele inhibits the senescence of carnation flowers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bovy, A.G.; Angenent, G.C.; Dons, H.J.M.; Altvorst, van A.

    1999-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana etr1-1 allele, capable of conferring ethylene insensitivity in a heterologous host, was introduced into transgenic carnation plants. This gene was expressed under control of either its own promoter, the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter or the flower-specific petunia FBP1 promo

  1. Autosomal STR allele frequencies for the CODIS system from a large random population sample in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Ismael A; Villouta, Pamela; Herrera, Sandra; Melo, Francisco

    2012-05-01

    The thirteen autosomal STR loci of the CODIS system were typed from DNA of 732 unrelated male individuals sampled from different locations in Chile. This is the first report of allele frequencies for the thirteen STRs loci defined in the CODIS system from the Chilean population.

  2. A Pid3 allele from rice cultivar Gumei2 confers resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Chen; Yongfeng Shi; Wenzheng Liu; Rongyao Chai; Yaping Fu; Jieyun Zhuang; Jianli Wu

    2011-01-01

    Rice blast, caused by Magnaporthe oryzae, is one of the most devastating diseases. Using map-based strategy and in silico approach we isolated a new rice (Oryza sativa L.) blast resistance allele of Pid3, designated Pi25, from a stable blast resistance cultivar Gumei2. Overexpression analysis and complementation test showed that Pi25 conferred blast resistance to M. oryzae isolate js001-20. Sequence analysis showed that Pi25 was an intronless gene of 2772 nucleotides with single nucleotide substitution in comparison to Pid3 at the nucleotide position 459 and predicatively encoded a typical coiled coil-nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (CC--NBS--LRR) protein of 924 amino acid residuals with 100% identity to Pid3 putative protein. The susceptible allele pi25 in Nipponbare contained a nonsense mutation at the nucleotide position 2209 resulting in a truncated protein with 736 amino acid residuals. In addition, 14 nucleotide substitutions resulting in 10 amino acid substitutions were identified between Pi25 and pi25 upstream the premature stop codon in the susceptible allele. Although the mechanism of Pi25/Pid3-mediated resistance needs to be further investigated, the isolation of the allele would facilitate the utilization of Pi25/Pid3 in rice blast resistance breeding program via transgenic approach and marker assisted selection.

  3. The distribution of Tap2 alleles among laboratory rat RT1 haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, E; Deverson, E V; Coadwell, J W; Günther, E; Howard, J C; Butcher, G W

    1994-01-01

    We are reporting the cDNA sequences of Tap2 from two cima and two cimb rat strains. Comparison of the cDNA sequences shows that these alleles fall into two groups, which we refer to as Tap2-A and Tap2-B. We found that alleles from the Tap2-B group are more closely related to the mouse homologue than are Tap2-A alleles, and among the 48 nucleotides which differ between the Tap2-A and Tap2-B cDNAs, three affect restriction sites. We defined pairs of oligonucleotides which allow amplification of the regions bearing these restriction sites from genomic DNA or cDNA, and this technique has been successful for the genotyping of all of the 56 laboratory strains of Rattus norvegicus tested and for five cell lines tested so far. All 14 known RT1 standard haplotypes were tested, and 7 found to belong to the Tap2-B group, and 7 to Tap2-A. We also found that intron sizes among the alleles of the Tap2-B group fall into two subgroups, providing further insight into the phylogeny of these various haplotypes.

  4. Naturally occurring ERAP1 haplotypes encode functionally distinct alleles with fine substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Emma; Edwards, Christopher J; Elliott, Tim; James, Edward

    2013-07-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) trims peptides for MHC class I presentation, influencing the degree and specificity of CD8(+) T cell responses. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms within the exons encoding ERAP1 are associated with autoimmune diseases and cervical carcinoma, but it is not known whether they act independently or as disease-associated haplotypes. We sequenced ERAP1 from 20 individuals and show that single-nucleotide polymorphisms occur as distinct haplotypes in the human population and that these haplotypes encode functionally distinct ERAP1 alleles. Using a wide range of substrates, we are able to demonstrate that for any given substrate distinct ERAP1 alleles can be "normal," "hypofunctional," or "hyperfunctional" and that each allele has a trend bias toward one of these three activities. Thus, the repertoire of peptides presented at the cell surface for recognition by CTL is likely to depend on the precise combination of both MHC class I and ERAP1 alleles expressed within an individual, and has important implications for predisposition to disease. PMID:23733883

  5. The distribution of Tap2 alleles among laboratory rat RT1 haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, E; Deverson, E V; Coadwell, J W; Günther, E; Howard, J C; Butcher, G W

    1994-01-01

    We are reporting the cDNA sequences of Tap2 from two cima and two cimb rat strains. Comparison of the cDNA sequences shows that these alleles fall into two groups, which we refer to as Tap2-A and Tap2-B. We found that alleles from the Tap2-B group are more closely related to the mouse homologue than are Tap2-A alleles, and among the 48 nucleotides which differ between the Tap2-A and Tap2-B cDNAs, three affect restriction sites. We defined pairs of oligonucleotides which allow amplification of the regions bearing these restriction sites from genomic DNA or cDNA, and this technique has been successful for the genotyping of all of the 56 laboratory strains of Rattus norvegicus tested and for five cell lines tested so far. All 14 known RT1 standard haplotypes were tested, and 7 found to belong to the Tap2-B group, and 7 to Tap2-A. We also found that intron sizes among the alleles of the Tap2-B group fall into two subgroups, providing further insight into the phylogeny of these various haplotypes. PMID:8206525

  6. SNP calling, genotype calling, and sample allele frequency estimation from new-generation sequencing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus; Korneliussen, Thorfinn Sand; Albrechtsen, Anders;

    2012-01-01

    calculated using a dynamic programming algorithm and numerically optimized using analytical derivatives. We then use a bayesian method for estimating the sample allele frequency in a single site, and show how the method can be used for genotype calling and SNP calling. We also show how the method can be...

  7. Association of the Apolipoprotein E 2 Allele with Concurrent Occurrence of Endometrial Hyperplasia and Endometrial Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana I. Ivanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Genes encoding proteins with antioxidant properties may influence susceptibility to endometrial hyperplasia (EH and endometrial carcinoma (ECa. Patients with EH (n = 89, EH concurrent with ECa (n = 76, ECa (n = 186, and healthy controls (n = 1110 were genotyped for five polymorphic variants in the genes involved in metabolism of lipoproteins (APOE Cys112Arg and Arg158Cys, iron (HFE Cys282Tyr and His63Asp, and catecholamines (COMT Val158Met. Patients and controls were matched by ethnicity (all Caucasians, age, body mass index (BMI, and incidence of hypertension and diabetes. The frequency of the APOE E 2 allele (158Cys was higher in patients with EH + ECa than in controls (P = 0.0012, PBonferroni = 0.018, OR = 2.58, 95% CI 1.49–4.45. The APOE E 4 allele (112Arg was more frequently found in patients with EH than in controls and HFE minor allele G (63Asp had a protective effect in the ECa group, though these results appeared to be nonsignificant after correction for multiple comparisons. The results of the study indicate that E 2 allele might be associated with concurrent occurrence of EH and ECa.

  8. Human-specific derived alleles of CD33 and other genes protect against postreproductive cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Flavio; Springer, Stevan A; Altheide, Tasha K; Varki, Nissi M; Gagneux, Pascal; Varki, Ajit

    2016-01-01

    The individuals of most vertebrate species die when they can no longer reproduce. Humans are a rare exception, having evolved a prolonged postreproductive lifespan. Elders contribute to cooperative offspring care, assist in foraging, and communicate important ecological and cultural knowledge, increasing the survival of younger individuals. Age-related deterioration of cognitive capacity in humans compromises these benefits and also burdens the group with socially costly members. We investigated the contribution of the immunoregulatory receptor CD33 to a uniquely human postreproductive disease, Alzheimer's dementia. Surprisingly, even though selection at advanced age is expected to be weak, a CD33 allele protective against Alzheimer's disease is derived and unique to humans and favors a functional molecular state of CD33 resembling that of the chimpanzee. Thus, derived alleles may be compensatory and restore interactions altered as a consequence of human-specific brain evolution. We found several other examples of derived alleles at other human loci that protect against age-related cognitive deterioration arising from neurodegenerative disease or cerebrovascular insufficiency. Selection by inclusive fitness may be strong enough to favor alleles protecting specifically against cognitive decline in postreproductive humans. Such selection would operate by maximizing the contributions of postreproductive individuals to the fitness of younger kin. PMID:26621708

  9. Overdispersion in allelic counts and θ-correction in forensic genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben

    2009-01-01

    A statistical model for incorporating the extra variability in allelic counts due to subpopulation structures is presented. In forensic genetics, this effect is modelled by the identical-by-decent-parameter, θ . It is shown, that θ may be defined as an overdispersion parameter capturing the extra...

  10. Allelic Dropout in the ENG Gene, Affecting the Results of Genetic Testing in Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Pernille M; Kjeldsen, A.D.; Ousager, L.B.;

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal-dominant vascular disorder with three disease-causing genes identified to date: ENG, ACVRL1, and SMAD4. We report an HHT patient with allelic dropout that on routine sequence analysis for a known mutation in the family (c.817...

  11. Predictable allele frequency changes due to habitat fragmentation in the Glanville fritillary butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountain, Toby; Nieminen, Marko; Sirén, Jukka; Wong, Swee Chong; Hanski, Ilkka

    2016-03-01

    Describing the evolutionary dynamics of now extinct populations is challenging, as their genetic composition before extinction is generally unknown. The Glanville fritillary butterfly has a large extant metapopulation in the Åland Islands in Finland, but declined to extinction in the nearby fragmented southwestern (SW) Finnish archipelago in the 20th century. We genotyped museum samples for 222 SNPs across the genome, including SNPs from candidate genes and neutral regions. SW Finnish populations had significantly reduced genetic diversity before extinction, and their allele frequencies gradually diverged from those in contemporary Åland populations over 80 y. We identified 15 outlier loci among candidate SNPs, mostly related to flight, in which allele frequencies have changed more than the neutral expectation. At outlier loci, allele frequencies in SW Finland shifted in the same direction as newly established populations deviated from old local populations in contemporary Åland. Moreover, outlier allele frequencies in SW Finland resemble those in fragmented landscapes as opposed to continuous landscapes in the Baltic region. These results indicate selection for genotypes associated with good colonization capacity in the highly fragmented landscape before the extinction of the populations. Evolutionary response to habitat fragmentation may have enhanced the viability of the populations, but it did not save the species from regional extinction in the face of severe habitat loss and fragmentation. These results highlight a potentially common situation in changing environments: evolutionary changes are not strong enough to fully compensate for the direct adverse effects of environmental change and thereby rescue populations from extinction.

  12. A dominant allele controls development into female mimic male and diminutive female ruffs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lank, D.B.; Farrel, L.L.; Burke, T.; Piersma, T.; McRae, S.B.

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining polymorphisms for genes with effects of ecological significance may involve conflicting selection in males and females. We present data from a captive population of ruffs (Philomachus pugnax) showing that a dominant allele controls development into both small, ‘female mimic’ males (‘faed

  13. Origins and relatedness of human leukocyte antigen class I allele supertypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naugler, Christopher

    2010-09-01

    Class I human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles can be classified into supertypes based on the epitope specificity of their peptide binding grooves. The evolutionary origin of these supertypes has been the topic of prior research and remains an important question because of the increasing interest in HLA supertypes in the contexts of infection and cancer epidemiology and vaccine development. Here I re-examine the origins of HLA class I supertypes using the nucleotide sequences of 88 HLA-A alleles and 117 HLA-B alleles. Phylogenetic trees with ancestral character state reconstruction show that the HLA-A02, A03, and A24 supertypes largely form clades with a single ancestral origin while HLA-A01 shows multiple independent origins all from HLA-A03 ancestors. HLA-B supertypes show multiple origins for the B07, B08, and B27 supertypes, while the B44, B58, and B62 supertypes largely form clades with a single ancestor. Supertypes arising multiple times show different amino acid substitutions in each clade. These findings suggest that convergent evolution has occurred in only a few HLA allele supertypes and may indicate different evolutionary pressures shaping certain supertypes.

  14. Identification and Molecular Analysis of Four New Alleles at the W1 Locus Associated with Flower Color in Soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaramoorthy, Jagadeesh; Park, Gyu Tae; Chang, Jeong Ho; Lee, Jeong-Dong; Kim, Jeong Hoe; Seo, Hak Soo; Chung, Gyuhwa; Song, Jong Tae

    2016-01-01

    In soybean, flavonoid 3′5′-hydroxylase (F3′5′H) and dihydroflavonol-4-reductase (DFR) play a crucial role in the production of anthocyanin pigments. Loss-of-function of the W1 locus, which encodes the former, or W3 and W4, which encode the latter, always produces white flowers. In this study, we searched for new genetic components responsible for the production of white flowers in soybean and isolated four white-flowered mutant lines, i.e., two Glycine soja accessions (CW12700 and CW13381) and two EMS-induced mutants of Glycine max (PE1837 and PE636). F3′5′H expression in CW12700, PE1837, and PE636 was normal, whereas that in CW13381 was aberrant and missing the third exon. Sequence analysis of F3′5′H of CW13381 revealed the presence of an indel (~90-bp AT-repeat) in the second intron. In addition, the F3′5′H of CW12700, PE1837, and PE636 harbored unique single-nucleotide substitutions. The single nucleotide polymorphisms resulted in substitutions of amino acid residues located in or near the SRS4 domain of F3′5′H, which is essential for substrate recognition. 3D structure modeling of F3′5′H indicated that the substitutions could interfere with an interaction between the substrate and heme group and compromise the conformation of the active site of F3′5′H. Recombination analysis revealed a tight correlation between all of the mutant alleles at the W1 locus and white flower color. On the basis of the characterization of the new mutant alleles, we discussed the biological implications of F3′5′H and DFR in the determination of flower colors in soybean. PMID:27442124

  15. Novel SLA-DR alleles of three Chinese pig strains and the related function in human T cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fuxiang; Xie, Jin; Zhou, Yun; Li, Ningli; Chou, Kuang-Yen

    2004-06-01

    To elucidate the structures of SLA-DR (swine leukocyte antigen DR) genes of three Chinese pig strains (Gz, Bm and Yn), the SLA-DRA and SLA-DRB cDNA were amplified by RT-PCR and subjected to determine the sequences. The whole structures of SLA-DRA alleles are identical among three strains, consisting of 759 nucleotides including an open reading frame (ORF), and are shared with those reported from NIH minipigs SLA-DRA(c) and SLA-DRA(d). The same length of the ORF-containing SLA-DRB genes of three Chinese pig strains was also identified. They are composed of 801 nucleotides encoding a xenogeneic antigen molecule of 266 amino acid residues. The nucleotide sequences of the SLA-DRB genes, however, are different when compared either among the three strains or with the published data of SLA-DRB sequences, which allowed our novel SLA-DRB alleles receiving their accession numbers AY102479, AY102480 and AY102481 from the GenBank. This study further reveals that the phylogenic homologies of MHC DR or DR-like genes in structures of nucleotides and deduced amino acids between Chinese pigs (SLA) and human (HLA-DRB1*0901) are better than those between pigs and mice (H-2(b)Ebeta). High similarities were also found for DRalpha-DRbeta heterodimers between Chinese pigs and human in terms of amino acids sequences critical for binding with human CD4 coreceptor molecule, which are better than those between SLA-DR and H-2 I-E molecules. A functional test indicated that, by cotransfection with Bm-DRA and Bm-DRB genes, the Bm-DR molecule-expressed L929 cells could stimulate human T cells quite well in a xenogeneic reaction in presence of human APCs.

  16. Novel SLA-DR Alleles of Three Chinese Pig Strains and the Related Function in Human T Cell Response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FuxiangChen; JinXie; YunZhou; NingliLi; Kuang-YenChou

    2004-01-01

    To elucidate the structures of SLA-DR (swine leukocyte antigen DR) genes of three Chinese pig strains (Gz, Bm and Yn), the SLA-DRA and SLA-DRB cDNA were amplified by RT-PCR and subjected to determine the sequences. The whole structures of SLA-DRA alleles are identical among three strains, consisting of 759 nucleotides including an open reading frame (ORF), and are shared with those reported from NIH minipigs SLA-DRAc and SLA-DRAd. The same length of the ORF-containing SLA-DRB genes of three Chinese pig strains was also identified. They are composed of 801 nucleotides encoding a xenogeneic antigen molecule of 266 amino acid residues. The nucleotide sequences of the SLA-DRB genes, however, are different when compared either among the three strains or with the published data of SLA-DRB sequences, which allowed our novel SLA-DRB alleles receiving their accession numbers AY102479, AY102480 and AY102481 from the GenBank. This study further reveals that the phylogenic homologies of MHC DR or DR-like genes in structures of nucleotides and deduced amino acids between Chinese pigs (SLA) and human (HLA-DRBI*0901) are better than those between pigs and mice (H-2b Eβ). High similarities were also found for DRα-DRβ heterodimers between Chinese pigs and human in terms of amino acids sequences critical for binding with human CD4 coreceptor molecule, which are better than those between SLA-DR and H-2 I-E molecules. A functional test indicated that, by cotransfection with Bm-DRA and Bm-DRB genes, the Bm-DR molecule-expressed L929 cells could stimulate human T cells quite well in a xenogeneic reaction in presence of human APCs.

  17. Novel SLA-DR Alleles of Three Chinese Pig Strains and the Related Function in Human T Cell Response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fuxiang Chen; Jin Xie; Yun Zhou; Ningli Li; Kuang-Yen Chou

    2004-01-01

    To elucidate the structures of SLA-DR (swine leukocyte antigen DR) genes of three Chinese pig strains (Gz, Bm and Yn), the SLA-DRA and SLA-DRB cDNA were amplified by RT-PCR and subjected to determine the sequences. The whole structures of SLA-DRA alleles are identical among three strains, consisting of 759 nucleotides including an open reading frame (ORF), and are shared with those reported from NIH minipigs SLA-DRAc and SLA-DRAd. The same length of the ORF-containing SLA-DRB genes of three Chinese pig strains was also identified. They are composed of 801 nucleotides encoding a xenogeneic antigen molecule of 266 amino acid residues. The nucleotide sequences of the SLA-DRB genes, however, are different when compared either among the three strains or with the published data of SLA-DRB sequences, which allowed our novel SLA-DRB alleles receiving their accession numbers AY102479, AY102480 and AY102481 from the GenBank. This study further reveals that the phylogenic homologies of MHC DR or DR-like genes in structures of nucleotides and deduced amino acids between Chinese pigs (SLA) and human (HLA-DRB1*0901) are better than those between pigs and mice (H-2b Eβ). High similarities were also found for DRα-DRβ heterodimers between Chinese pigs and human in terms of amino acids sequences critical for binding with human CD4 coreceptor molecule, which are better than those between SLA-DR and H-2 I-E molecules. A functional test indicated that, by cotransfection with Bm-DRA and Bm-DRB genes, the Bm-DR molecule-expressed L929 cells could stimulate human T cells quite well in a xenogeneic reaction in presence of human APCs.

  18. Allelic expression analysis of the osteoarthritis susceptibility locus that maps to MICAL3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratnayake Madhushika

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A genome-wide association scan with subsequent replication study that involved over 67,000 individuals of European ancestry has produced evidence of association of single nucleotide polymorphism rs2277831 to primary osteoarthritis (OA with a P-value of 2.9 × 10-5. rs2277831, an A/G transition, is located in an intron of MICAL3. This gene is located on chromosome 22q11.21 and the association signal encompasses two additional genes, BCL2L13 and BID. It is becoming increasingly apparent that many common complex traits are mediated by cis-acting regulatory polymorphisms that influence, in a tissue-specific manner, gene expression or transcript stability. Methods We used total and allelic expression analysis to assess whether the OA association to rs2277831 is mediated by an influence on MICAL3, BCL2L13 or BID expression. Using RNA extracted from joint tissues of 60 patients who had undergone elective joint replacement surgery, we assessed whether rs2277831 correlated with allelic expression of either of the three genes by: 1 measuring the expression of each gene by quantitative PCR and then stratifying the data by genotype at rs2277831 and 2 accurately discriminating and quantifying the mRNA synthesised from the alleles of OA patients using allelic-quantitative PCR. Results We found no evidence for a correlation between gene expression and genotype at rs2277831, with P-values of 0.09 for BCL2L13, 0.07 for BID and 0.33 for MICAL3. In the allelic expression analysis we observed several examples of significant (p BCL2L13 (P = 0.004, 2.09 at BID (P = 0.001 and the most extreme case being at MICAL3, with an allelic expression ratio of 5.47 (P = 0.001. However, there was no correlation observed between the pattern of allelic expression and the genotype at rs2277831. Conclusions In the tissues that we have studied, our data do not support our hypothesis that the association between rs2277831 and OA is due to the effect this SNP has on

  19. Always look on both sides: phylogenetic information conveyed by simple sequence repeat allele sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Barthe

    Full Text Available Simple sequence repeat (SSR markers are widely used tools for inferences about genetic diversity, phylogeography and spatial genetic structure. Their applications assume that variation among alleles is essentially caused by an expansion or contraction of the number of repeats and that, accessorily, mutations in the target sequences follow the stepwise mutation model (SMM. Generally speaking, PCR amplicon sizes are used as direct indicators of the number of SSR repeats composing an allele with the data analysis either ignoring the extent of allele size differences or assuming that there is a direct correlation between differences in amplicon size and evolutionary distance. However, without precisely knowing the kind and distribution of polymorphism within an allele (SSR and the associated flanking region (FR sequences, it is hard to say what kind of evolutionary message is conveyed by such a synthetic descriptor of polymorphism as DNA amplicon size. In this study, we sequenced several SSR alleles in multiple populations of three divergent tree genera and disentangled the types of polymorphisms contained in each portion of the DNA amplicon containing an SSR. The patterns of diversity provided by amplicon size variation, SSR variation itself, insertions/deletions (indels, and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs observed in the FRs were compared. Amplicon size variation largely reflected SSR repeat number. The amount of variation was as large in FRs as in the SSR itself. The former contributed significantly to the phylogenetic information and sometimes was the main source of differentiation among individuals and populations contained by FR and SSR regions of SSR markers. The presence of mutations occurring at different rates within a marker's sequence offers the opportunity to analyse evolutionary events occurring on various timescales, but at the same time calls for caution in the interpretation of SSR marker data when the distribution of within

  20. High-resolution analysis of parent-of-origin allelic expression in the Arabidopsis Endosperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Wolff

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon leading to parent-of-origin specific differential expression of maternally and paternally inherited alleles. In plants, genomic imprinting has mainly been observed in the endosperm, an ephemeral triploid tissue derived after fertilization of the diploid central cell with a haploid sperm cell. In an effort to identify novel imprinted genes in Arabidopsis thaliana, we generated deep sequencing RNA profiles of F1 hybrid seeds derived after reciprocal crosses of Arabidopsis Col-0 and Bur-0 accessions. Using polymorphic sites to quantify allele-specific expression levels, we could identify more than 60 genes with potential parent-of-origin specific expression. By analyzing the distribution of DNA methylation and epigenetic marks established by Polycomb group (PcG proteins using publicly available datasets, we suggest that for maternally expressed genes (MEGs repression of the paternally inherited alleles largely depends on DNA methylation or PcG-mediated repression, whereas repression of the maternal alleles of paternally expressed genes (PEGs predominantly depends on PcG proteins. While maternal alleles of MEGs are also targeted by PcG proteins, such targeting does not cause complete repression. Candidate MEGs and PEGs are enriched for cis-proximal transposons, suggesting that transposons might be a driving force for the evolution of imprinted genes in Arabidopsis. In addition, we find that MEGs and PEGs are significantly faster evolving when compared to other genes in the genome. In contrast to the predominant location of mammalian imprinted genes in clusters, cluster formation was only detected for few MEGs and PEGs, suggesting that clustering is not a major requirement for imprinted gene regulation in Arabidopsis.

  1. Allelic variation in CRHR1 predisposes to panic disorder: evidence for biased fear processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, H; Richter, J; Straube, B; Lueken, U; Domschke, K; Schartner, C; Klauke, B; Baumann, C; Pané-Farré, C; Jacob, C P; Scholz, C-J; Zwanzger, P; Lang, T; Fehm, L; Jansen, A; Konrad, C; Fydrich, T; Wittmann, A; Pfleiderer, B; Ströhle, A; Gerlach, A L; Alpers, G W; Arolt, V; Pauli, P; Wittchen, H-U; Kent, L; Hamm, A; Kircher, T; Deckert, J; Reif, A

    2016-06-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is a major regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Binding to its receptor CRHR1 triggers the downstream release of the stress response-regulating hormone cortisol. Biochemical, behavioral and genetic studies revealed CRHR1 as a possible candidate gene for mood and anxiety disorders. Here we aimed to evaluate CRHR1 as a risk factor for panic disorder (PD). Allelic variation of CRHR1 was captured by 9 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which were genotyped in 531 matched case/control pairs. Four SNPs were found to be associated with PD, in at least one sub-sample. The minor allele of rs17689918 was found to significantly increase risk for PD in females after Bonferroni correction and furthermore decreased CRHR1 mRNA expression in human forebrains and amygdalae. When investigating neural correlates underlying this association in patients with PD using functional magnetic resonance imaging, risk allele carriers of rs17689918 showed aberrant differential conditioning predominantly in the bilateral prefrontal cortex and safety signal processing in the amygdalae, arguing for predominant generalization of fear and hence anxious apprehension. Additionally, the risk allele of rs17689918 led to less flight behavior during fear-provoking situations but rather increased anxious apprehension and went along with increased anxiety sensitivity. Thus reduced gene expression driven by CRHR1 risk allele leads to a phenotype characterized by fear sensitization and hence sustained fear. These results strengthen the role of CRHR1 in PD and clarify the mechanisms by which genetic variation in CRHR1 is linked to this disorder.

  2. Allelic Variation at the Rht8 Locus in a 19th Century Wheat Collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linnéa Asplund

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Wheat breeding during the 20th century has put large efforts into reducing straw length and increasing harvest index. In the 1920s an allele of Rht8 with dwarfing effects, found in the Japanese cultivar “Akakomugi,” was bred into European cultivars and subsequently spread over the world. Rht8 has not been cloned, but the microsatellite marker WMS261 has been shown to be closely linked to it and is commonly used for genotyping Rht8. The “Akakomugi” allele is strongly associated with WMS261-192bp. Numerous screens of wheat cultivars with different geographical origin have been performed to study the spread and influence of the WMS261-192bp during 20th century plant breeding. However, the allelic diversity of WMS261 in wheat cultivars before modern plant breeding and introduction of the Japanese dwarfing genes is largely unknown. Here, we report a study of WMS261 allelic diversity in a historical wheat collection from 1865 representing worldwide major wheats at the time. The majority carried the previously reported 164 bp or 174 bp allele, but with little geographical correlation. In a few lines, a rare 182 bp fragment was found. Although straw length was recognized as an important character already in the 19th century, Rht8 probably played a minor role for height variation. The use of WMS261 and other functional markers for analyses of historical specimens and characterization of historic crop traits is discussed.

  3. Novel Natural Allelic Variations at the Rht-1 Loci in Wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aixia Li; HongQing Ling; Aimin Zhang; Wenlong Yang; Xueyuan Lou; Dongcheng Liu; Jiazhu Sun; Xiaoli Guo; Jing Wang; Yiwen Li; Kehui Zhan

    2013-01-01

    Plant height is an important agronomic trait. Dramatic increase in wheat yield during the“green revolution”is mainly due to the widespread utilization of the Reduced height (Rht)-1 gene. We analyzed the natural allelic variations of three homoeologous loci Rht-A1, Rht-B1, and Rht-D1 in Chinese wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) micro-core collections and the Rht-B1/D1 genotypes in over 1,500 bred cultivars and germplasms using a modified EcoTILLING. We identified six new Rht-A1 allelic variations (Rht-A1b-g), eight new Rht-B1 allelic variations (Rht-B1h-o), and six new Rht-D1 allelic variations (Rht-D1e-j). These allelic variations contain single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or small insertions and deletions in the coding or uncoding regions, involving two frame-shift mutations and 15 missenses. Of which, Rht-D1e and Rht-D1h resulted in the loss of interactions of GID1-DELLA-GID2, Rht-B1i could increase plant height. We found that the Rht-B1h contains the same SNPs and 197 bp fragment insertion as reported in Rht-B1c. Further detection of Rht-B1h in Tibet wheat germplasms and wheat relatives indicated that Rht-B1c may originate from Rht-B1h. These results suggest rich genetic diversity at the Rht-1 loci and provide new resources for wheat breeding.

  4. Detection of ancestry informative HLA alleles confirms the admixed origins of Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Mitsunaga, Shigeki; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Shyh-Yuh, Liou; Sawamoto, Taiji; Fujiwara, Tsutomu; Tsutsui, Naohisa; Suematsu, Koji; Shinagawa, Akira; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Ituro

    2013-01-01

    The polymorphisms in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region are powerful tool for studying human evolutionary processes. We investigated genetic structure of Japanese by using five-locus HLA genotypes (HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, and -DPB1) of 2,005 individuals from 10 regions of Japan. We found a significant level of population substructure in Japanese; particularly the differentiation between Okinawa Island and mainland Japanese. By using a plot of the principal component scores, we identified ancestry informative alleles associated with the underlying population substructure. We examined extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD) between pairs of HLA alleles on the haplotypes that were differentiated among regions. The LDs were strong and weak for pairs of HLA alleles characterized by low and high frequencies in Okinawa Island, respectively. The five-locus haplotypes whose alleles exhibit strong LD were unique to Japanese and South Korean, suggesting that these haplotypes had been recently derived from the Korean Peninsula. The alleles characterized by high frequency in Japanese compared to South Korean formed segmented three-locus haplotype that was commonly found in Aleuts, Eskimos, and North- and Meso-Americans but not observed in Korean and Chinese. The serologically equivalent haplotype was found in Orchid Island in Taiwan, Mongol, Siberia, and Arctic regions. It suggests that early Japanese who existed prior to the migration wave from the Korean Peninsula shared ancestry with northern Asian who moved to the New World via the Bering Strait land bridge. These results may support the admixture model for peopling of Japanese Archipelago. PMID:23577161

  5. Detection of ancestry informative HLA alleles confirms the admixed origins of Japanese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirofumi Nakaoka

    Full Text Available The polymorphisms in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA region are powerful tool for studying human evolutionary processes. We investigated genetic structure of Japanese by using five-locus HLA genotypes (HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, and -DPB1 of 2,005 individuals from 10 regions of Japan. We found a significant level of population substructure in Japanese; particularly the differentiation between Okinawa Island and mainland Japanese. By using a plot of the principal component scores, we identified ancestry informative alleles associated with the underlying population substructure. We examined extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD between pairs of HLA alleles on the haplotypes that were differentiated among regions. The LDs were strong and weak for pairs of HLA alleles characterized by low and high frequencies in Okinawa Island, respectively. The five-locus haplotypes whose alleles exhibit strong LD were unique to Japanese and South Korean, suggesting that these haplotypes had been recently derived from the Korean Peninsula. The alleles characterized by high frequency in Japanese compared to South Korean formed segmented three-locus haplotype that was commonly found in Aleuts, Eskimos, and North- and Meso-Americans but not observed in Korean and Chinese. The serologically equivalent haplotype was found in Orchid Island in Taiwan, Mongol, Siberia, and Arctic regions. It suggests that early Japanese who existed prior to the migration wave from the Korean Peninsula shared ancestry with northern Asian who moved to the New World via the Bering Strait land bridge. These results may support the admixture model for peopling of Japanese Archipelago.

  6. Application of a novel strategy of engineering conditional alleles to a single exon gene, Sox2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Mandalos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Conditional by Inversion (COIN method for engineering conditional alleles relies on an invertible optimized gene trap-like element, the COIN module, for imparting conditionality. The COIN module contains an optimized 3' splice site-polyadenylation signal pair, but is inserted antisense to the target gene and therefore does not alter transcription, until it is inverted by Cre recombinase. In order to make COIN applicable to all protein-coding genes, the COIN module has been engineered within an artificial intron, enabling insertion into an exon. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Therefore, theoretically, the COIN method should be applicable to single exon genes, and to test this idea we engineered a COIN allele of Sox2. This single exon gene presents additional design challenges, in that its proximal promoter and coding region are entirely contained within a CpG island, and are also spanned by an overlapping transcript, Sox2Ot, which contains mmu-miR1897. Here, we show that despite disruption of the CpG island by the COIN module intron, the COIN allele of Sox2 (Sox2(COIN is phenotypically wild type, and also does not interfere with expression of Sox2Ot and miR1897. Furthermore, the inverted COIN allele of Sox2, Sox2(INV is functionally null, as homozygotes recapitulate the phenotype of Sox2(βgeo/βgeo mice, a well-characterized Sox2 null. Lastly, the benefit of the eGFP marker embedded in the COIN allele is demonstrated as it mirrors the expression pattern of Sox2. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate the applicability of the COIN technology as a method of choice for targeting single exon genes.

  7. Starch phosphorylation in potato tubers is influenced by allelic variation in the genes encoding glucan water dikinase, starch branching enzymes I and II, and starch synthase III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Ann Carpenter

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Starch phosphorylation is an important aspect of plant metabolism due to its role in starch degradation. Moreover, the degree of phosphorylation of starch determines its physicochemical properties and is therefore relevant for industrial uses of starch. Currently, starch is chemically phosphorylated to increase viscosity and paste stability. Potato cultivars with elevated starch phosphorylation would make this process unnecessary, thereby bestowing economic and environmental benefits. Starch phosphorylation is a complex trait which has been previously shown by antisense gene repression to be influenced by a number of genes including those involved in starch synthesis and degradation. We have used an association mapping approach to discover genetic markers associated with the degree of starch phosphorylation. A diverse collection of 193 potato lines was grown in replicated field trials, and the levels of starch phosphorylation at the C6 and C3 positions of the glucosyl residues were determined by mass spectrometry of hydrolyzed starch from tubers. In addition, the potato lines were genotyped by amplicon sequencing and microsatellite analysis, focusing on candidate genes known to be involved in starch synthesis. As potato is an autotetraploid, genotyping included determination of allele dosage. Significant associations (p<0.001 were found with SNPs in the glucan water dikinase (GWD, starch branching enzyme I (SBEI and the starch synthase III (SSIII genes, and with a SSR allele in the SBEII gene. SNPs in the GWD gene were associated with C6 phosphorylation, whereas polymorphisms in the SBEI and SBEII genes were associated with both C6 and C3 phosphorylation and the SNP in the SSIII gene was associated with C3 phosphorylation. These allelic variants have potential as genetic markers for starch phosphorylation in potato.

  8. Studies on African pygmies. V. Red cell acid phosphatase polymorphism in Babinga pygmies: high frequency of ACPR allele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santachiara-Benerecetti, A S; Ranzani, G N; Antonini, G

    1977-11-01

    A group of Babinga Pygmies from the Central African Republic have been analyzed for the acid phosphatase polymorphism with special reference to the ACPR allele. The frequency of this allele (17%) is one of the highest observed in Africa and is comparable only with those reported for the Khoikhoi and the San.

  9. Independent introduction of two lactase-persistence alleles into human populations reflects different history of adaptation to milk culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enattah, Nabil Sabri; Jensen, Tine G K; Boyd, Mette;

    2008-01-01

    the same history, probably related to the same cattle domestication event. In contrast, the compound Arab allele shows a different, highly divergent ancestral haplotype, suggesting that these two major global LP alleles have arisen independently, the latter perhaps in response to camel milk consumption...

  10. Fine Mapping Seronegative and Seropositive Rheumatoid Arthritis to Shared and Distinct HLA Alleles by Adjusting for the Effects of Heterogeneity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, Buhm; Diogo, Dorothee; Eyre, Steve; Kallberg, Henrik; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Bowes, John; Padyukov, Leonid; Okada, Yukinori; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Rantapaa-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Martin, Javier; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Plenge, Robert M.; Worthington, Jane; Gregersen, Peter K.; Klareskog, Lars; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2014-01-01

    Despite progress in defining human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles for anti-citrullinated-protein-autoantibody-positive (ACPA(+)) rheumatoid arthritis (RA), identifying HLA alleles for ACPA-negative (ACPA(-)) RA has been challenging because of clinical heterogeneity within clinical cohorts. We imput

  11. Investigation of MGMT and DAPK1 methylation patterns in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma using allelic MSP-pyrosequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lasse Sommer; Treppendahl, Marianne Bach; Asmar, Fazila;

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor genes MGMT and DAPK1 become methylated in several cancers including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). However, allelic methylation patterns have not been investigated in DLBCL. We developed a fast and cost-efficient method for the analysis of allelic methylation based on...

  12. Geographically Distinct and Domain-Specific Sequence Variations in the Alleles of Rice Blast Resistance Gene Pib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Kumar; Vera Cruz, Casiana M; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast is caused by Magnaporthe oryzae, which is the most destructive fungal pathogen affecting rice growing regions worldwide. The rice blast resistance gene Pib confers broad-spectrum resistance against Southeast Asian M. oryzae races. We investigated the allelic diversity of Pib in rice germplasm originating from 12 major rice growing countries. Twenty-five new Pib alleles were identified that have unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertions and/or deletions, in addition to the polymorphic nucleotides that are shared between the different alleles. These partially or completely shared polymorphic nucleotides indicate frequent sequence exchange events between the Pib alleles. In some of the new Pib alleles, nucleotide diversity is high in the LRR domain, whereas, in others it is distributed among the NB-ARC and LRR domains. Most of the polymorphic amino acids in LRR and NB-ARC2 domains are predicted as solvent-exposed. Several of the alleles and the unique SNPs are country specific, suggesting a diversifying selection of alleles in various geographical locations in response to the locally prevalent M. oryzae population. Together, the new Pib alleles are an important genetic resource for rice blast resistance breeding programs and provide new information on rice-M. oryzae interactions at the molecular level. PMID:27446145

  13. Effective marker alleles associated with type II resistance of wheat to Fusarium head blight infection in fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molecular markers associated with known quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for type 2 resistance to Fusarium head blight (FHB) in bi-parental mapping populations usually have more than two alleles in breeding populations. Therefore, understanding the association of each allele with FHB response is parti...

  14. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumour subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J; Barrowdale, Daniel;

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtype...

  15. A Theoretical Framework for Association Studies in F2 Family Pools Using Allele Frequencies from Genotyping-By-Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janss, Luc L; Ashraf, Bilal H; Greve-Pedersen, Morten;

    a sequencing approach to obtain Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) frequencies is considered here. In this work we develop the theoretical framework to perform association studies using allele frequencies from such F2 family pools. We show that expected allele frequencies in the F2 families will have...

  16. Linkage map positions and allelic diversity of two Mal d 3 (non-specific lipid transfer protein) genes in the cultivated apple (Malus domestica)

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Z. S.; Weg, van de, H; Schaart, J.G.; Meer, van der, D; Kodde, L.P.; Laimer, M; Breiteneder, H; K. Hoffmann-Sommergruber; Gilissen, L.J.W.J.

    2005-01-01

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) of Rosaceae fruits, such as peach, apricot, cherry, plum and apple, represent major allergens for Mediterranean atopic populations. As a first step in elucidating the genetics of nsLTPs, we directed the research reported here towards identifying the number and location of nsLTP (Mal d 3) genes in the apple genome and determining their allelic diversity. PCR cloning was initially performed on two cultivars, Prima and Fiesta, parents of a core apple...

  17. Prognostic significance of ASXL1, JAK2V617F mutations and JAK2V617F allele burden in Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms

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    Yonal-Hindilerden I

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ipek Yonal-Hindilerden, Aynur Daglar-Aday, Basak Akadam-Teker, Ceylan Yilmaz, Meliha Nalcaci, Akif Selim Yavuz, Deniz SarginDivision of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Fatih-Istanbul, Turkey Background: Despite insights into the genetic basis of Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (Ph-negative MPNs, a significant proportion of essential thrombocythemia (ET and primary myelofibrosis (PMF patients present with no known MPN disease alleles. There were no previous studies investigating the impact of ASXL1 mutations in Ph-negative MPNs in Turkey. In the current study, we investigated the prognostic significance of ASXL1 mutations in Turkish MPN patients. We also aimed to determine the prognostic significance of JAK2V617F allele burden and the relationship of JAK2V617F mutation with ASXL1 mutations in Ph-negative MPNs. Methods: About 184 patients from a single center diagnosed with Ph-negative MPNs were screened for ASXL1, JAK2V617F mutations, and JAK2V617F allele burden: 107 ET and 77 PMF. Results: A total of 29 ASXL1 mutations were detected in 24.7% of PMF and 8.4% of ET patients. ASXL1-mutated ET patients showed a trend toward an increase in the incidence of cerebrovascular events and higher total leukocyte counts. ASXL1-mutation in PMF was associated with older age and a higher prevalence of bleeding complications. In univariate analysis, overall survival (OS was significantly reduced in ASXL1-mutated PMF patients. In multivariate analysis, Dynamic International Prognostic Scoring System-plus high-risk category and ASXL1 mutation status were independently associated with shorter survival in PMF. In PMF, mutational status and allele burden of JAK2V617F showed no difference in terms of OS and leukemia-free survival. Conclusion: We conclude that ASXL1 mutations are molecular predictors of short OS in PMF. Keywords: Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (Ph

  18. Genetic structure, diversity, and allelic richness in composite collection and reference set in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gowda Cholenahalli LL

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant genetic resources (PGR are the basic raw materials for future genetic progress and an insurance against unforeseen threats to agricultural production. An extensive characterization of PGR provides an opportunity to dissect structure, mine allelic variations, and identify diverse accessions for crop improvement. The Generation Challenge Program http://www.generationcp.org conceptualized the development of "composite collections" and extraction of "reference sets" from these for more efficient tapping of global crop-related genetic resources. In this study, we report the genetic structure, diversity and allelic richness in a composite collection of chickpea using SSR markers, and formation of a reference set of 300 accessions. Results The 48 SSR markers detected 1683 alleles in 2915 accessions, of which, 935 were considered rare, 720 common and 28 most frequent. The alleles per locus ranged from 14 to 67, averaged 35, and the polymorphic information content was from 0.467 to 0.974, averaged 0.854. Marker polymorphism varied between groups of accessions in the composite collection and reference set. A number of group-specific alleles were detected: 104 in Kabuli, 297 in desi, and 69 in wild Cicer; 114 each in Mediterranean and West Asia (WA, 117 in South and South East Asia (SSEA, and 10 in African region accessions. Desi and kabuli shared 436 alleles, while wild Cicer shared 17 and 16 alleles with desi and kabuli, respectively. The accessions from SSEA and WA shared 74 alleles, while those from Mediterranean 38 and 33 alleles with WA and SSEA, respectively. Desi chickpea contained a higher proportion of rare alleles (53% than kabuli (46%, while wild Cicer accessions were devoid of rare alleles. A genotype-based reference set captured 1315 (78% of the 1683 composite collection alleles of which 463 were rare, 826 common, and 26 the most frequent alleles. The neighbour-joining tree diagram of this reference set represents

  19. Restrictive flamenco alleles are maintained in Drosophila melanogaster population cages, despite the absence of their endogenous gypsy retroviral targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pélisson, Alain; Payen-Groschêne, Geneviève; Terzian, Christophe; Bucheton, Alain

    2007-02-01

    The flamenco (flam) locus, located at 20A1-3 in the centromeric heterochromatin of the Drosophila melanogaster X chromosome, is a major regulator of the gypsy/mdg4 endogenous retrovirus. In restrictive strains, functional flam alleles maintain gypsy proviruses in a repressed state. By contrast, in permissive strains, proviral amplification results from infection of the female germ line and subsequent insertions into the chromosomes of the progeny. A restrictive/permissive polymorphism prevails in natural and laboratory populations. This polymorphism was assumed to be maintained by the interplay of opposite selective forces; on one hand, the increase of genetic load caused by proviral insertions would favor restrictive flam alleles because they make flies resistant to these gypsy replicative transpositions and, on the other, a hypothetical resistance cost would select against such alleles in the absence of the retrovirus. However, the population cage data presented in this paper do not fit with this simple resistance cost hypothesis because restrictive alleles were not eliminated in the absence of functional gypsy proviruses; on the contrary, using 2 independent flam allelic pairs, the restrictive frequency rose to about 90% in every experimental population, whatever the pair of alleles and the allelic proportions in the initial inoculum. These data suggest that the flam polymorphism is maintained by some strong balancing selection, which would act either on flam itself, independently of the deleterious effect of gypsy, or on a hypothetical flanking gene, in linkage disequilibrium with flam. Alternatively, restrictive flam alleles might also be resistant to some other retroelements that would be still present in the cage populations, causing a positive selection for these alleles. Whatever selective forces that maintain high levels of restrictive alleles independently of gypsy, this unknown mechanism can set up an interesting kind of antiviral innate immunity, at

  20. Novel alleles of 31-bp VNTR polymorphism in the human cystathionine -synthase (CBS) gene were detected in healthy Asians

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yik-Yuen Gan; Chuan-Fei Chen

    2010-12-01

    A 31-bp variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) polymorphism of the cystathionine -synthase (CBS) gene was earlier reported in Caucasians of predominantly European descent and Indo–Caucasoid populations.We report here for the first time, the detection of allele 20, which was absent in Caucasian and Indo–Caucasoid populations, as a common allele present in Singaporean Chinese (6.25%), Indians (11.7%), and Malays (11.5%). Hence, allele 20 might be a specific allele for Asian populations. A relatively common allele 19 found in the Caucasian and Indo–Caucasoid populations (10.4%–10.6%) was absent in the Asian samples of this study. Therefore, allele 19 might be a specific allele for the Caucasian populations. A novel and rare allele 13, which was not reported before in the Caucasian and Indo–Caucasoid populations, was found in 0.5% of Singaporean Chinese as genotype 13/17 heterozygotes. The presence of alleles 13 and 20 were verified by DNA sequencing. There were five new genotypes (13/17, 16/20, 17/20, 18/20 and 20/20) not reported before in the Caucasian and Indo–Caucasoid populations, detected in this study. Nine genotypes (15/18, 16/18, 16/21, 17/19, 18/19, 18/21, 19/19, 19/21 and 21/21) which were present in the Caucasian and/or Indo–Caucasoid populations were absent in this study. Our results showed that CBS 31-bp VNTR polymorphism has a distinct genetic difference in allele and genotype frequencies between the European Caucasians, Indo–Caucasoid and Asian populations.

  1. Genome-wide survey of allele-specific splicing in humans

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    Scheffler Konrad

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate mRNA splicing depends on multiple regulatory signals encoded in the transcribed RNA sequence. Many examples of mutations within human splice regulatory regions that alter splicing qualitatively or quantitatively have been reported and allelic differences in mRNA splicing are likely to be a common and important source of phenotypic diversity at the molecular level, in addition to their contribution to genetic disease susceptibility. However, because the effect of a mutation on the efficiency of mRNA splicing is often difficult to predict, many mutations that cause disease through an effect on splicing are likely to remain undiscovered. Results We have combined a genome-wide scan for sequence polymorphisms likely to affect mRNA splicing with analysis of publicly available Expressed Sequence Tag (EST and exon array data. The genome-wide scan uses published tools and identified 30,977 SNPs located within donor and acceptor splice sites, branch points and exonic splicing enhancer elements. For 1,185 candidate splicing polymorphisms the difference in splicing between alternative alleles was corroborated by publicly available exon array data from 166 lymphoblastoid cell lines. We developed a novel probabilistic method to infer allele-specific splicing from EST data. The method uses SNPs and alternative mRNA isoforms mapped to EST sequences and models both regulated alternative splicing as well as allele-specific splicing. We have also estimated heritability of splicing and report that a greater proportion of genes show evidence of splicing heritability than show heritability of overall gene expression level. Our results provide an extensive resource that can be used to assess the possible effect on splicing of human polymorphisms in putative splice-regulatory sites. Conclusion We report a set of genes showing evidence of allele-specific splicing from an integrated analysis of genomic polymorphisms, EST data and exon array

  2. Allelic variant in the anti-Mullerian hormone gene leads to autosomal and temperature-dependent sex reversal in a selected Nile tilapia line.

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    Stephan Wessels

    Full Text Available Owing to the demand for sustainable sex-control protocols in aquaculture, research in tilapia sex determination is gaining momentum. The mutual influence of environmental and genetic factors hampers disentangling the complex sex determination mechanism in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus. Previous linkage analyses have demonstrated quantitative trait loci for the phenotypic sex on linkage groups 1, 3, and 23. Quantitative trait loci for temperature-dependent sex reversal similarly reside on linkage group 23. The anti-Müllerian hormone gene (amh, located in this genomic region, is important for sexual fate in higher vertebrates, and shows sexually dimorphic expression in Nile tilapia. Therefore this study aimed at detecting allelic variants and marker-sex associations in the amh gene. Sequencing identified six allelic variants. A significant effect on the phenotypic sex for SNP ss831884014 (p<0.0017 was found by stepwise logistic regression. The remaining variants were not significantly associated. Functional annotation of SNP ss831884014 revealed a non-synonymous amino acid substitution in the amh protein. Consequently, a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET based genotyping assay was developed and validated with a representative sample of fish. A logistic linear model confirmed a highly significant effect of the treatment and genotype on the phenotypic sex, but not for the interaction term (treatment: p<0.0001; genotype: p<0.0025. An additive genetic model proved a linear allele substitution effect of 12% in individuals from controls and groups treated at high temperature, respectively. Moreover, the effect of the genotype on the male proportion was significantly higher in groups treated at high temperature, giving 31% more males on average of the three genotypes. In addition, the groups treated at high temperature showed a positive dominance deviation (+11.4% males. In summary, marker-assisted selection for amh variant ss831884014

  3. The importance of HLA DRB1 gene allele to clinical features and disability in patients with multiple sclerosis in Lithuania

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The association of HLA DRB1 alleles with susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS) has been consistently reported although its effect on the clinical features and disability is still unclear probably due to diversity in ethnicity and geographic location of the studied populations. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of HLA DRB1 alleles on the clinical features and disability of the patients with MS in Lithuania. Methods This was a prospective study of 120 patients with MS. HLA DRB1 alleles were genotyped using the polymerase chain reaction. Results The first symptoms of MS in patients with HLA DRB1*15 allele manifested at younger age than in those without this allele (28.32 +/− 5.49 yrs vs. 30.94 +/− 8.43 yrs, respectively, p = 0.043). HLA DRB1*08 allele was more prevalent among relapsing-remitting (RR) MS patients than among patients with progressive course of MS (25.0% vs. 8.3%, respectively, chi^2 = 6.000, p = 0.05). MS patients with this allele had lower relapse rate than those without this allele (1.00 +/− 0.97 and 1.44 +/− 0.85, respectively, p = 0.043). Degree of disability during the last visit was lower among the patients with HLA DRB1*08 allele (EDSS score 3.15 +/− 1.95 vs. 4.49 +/− 1.96, p = 0.006), and higher among those with HLA DRB1*15 allele (EDSS score 4.60 +/− 2.10 vs.4.05 +/− 1.94, p = 0.047) compared to patients without these alleles but there were no significant associations between these alleles and the duration of the disease to disability. HLA DRB1*08 allele (OR = 0.18, 95% CI 0,039-0,8, p = 0.029) was demonstradet to be independent factor to take a longer time to reach an EDSS of 6, while HLA DRB1*01 allele (OR = 5.92, 95% CI 1,30-26,8, p = 0.021) was related in a shorter time to reach and EDSS of 6. Patients with HLA DRB1*08 allele had lower IgG index compared to patients without this allele (0.58 +/− 0.17 and 0.73 +/− 0.31, respectively, p

  4. The power and statistical behaviour of allele-sharing statistics when applied to models with two disease loci

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yin Y. Shugart; Bing-Jian Feng; Andrew Collins

    2002-11-01

    We have evaluated the power for detecting a common trait determined by two loci, using seven statistics, of which five are implemented in the computer program SimWalk2, and two are implemented in GENEHUNTER. Unlike most previous reports which involve evaluations of the power of allele-sharing statistics for a single disease locus, we have used a simulated data set of general pedigrees in which a two-locus disease is segregating and evaluated several non-parametric linkage statistics implemented in the two programs. We found that the power for detecting linkage using the $S_{\\text{all}}$ statistic in GENEHUNTER (GH, version 2.1), implemented as statistic in SimWalk2 (version 2.82), is different in the two. The values associated with statistic output by SimWalk2 are consistently more conservative than those from GENEHUNTER except when the underlying model includes heterogeneity at a level of 50% where the values output are very comparable. On the other hand, when the thresholds are determined empirically under the null hypothesis, $S_{\\text{all}}$ in GENEHUNTER and statistic have similar power.

  5. k-Casein, b-lactoglobulin and growth hormone allele frequencies and genetic distances in Nelore, Gyr, Guzerá, Caracu, Charolais, Canchim and Santa Gertrudis cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Augusta Kemenes

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The genotypes for k-casein (k-CN, b-lactoglobulin (b-LG and growth hormone (GH were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and restriction enzyme digestion in seven breeds of cattle (Nelore, Gyr, Guzerá, Caracu, Charolais, Canchim and Santa Gertrudis. k-Casein had two alleles with the A allele occurring at a higher frequency in Bos indicus breeds (0.93, 0.92 and 0.91% for Gyr, Guzerá and Nelore, respectively. The b-lactoglobulin locus had two alleles in all of the breeds. European breeds had a higher frequency of the b-LG A allele than Zebu breeds. The GH locus had two alleles (L and V in Bos taurus and was monomorphic (L allele only in all of the Bos indicus breeds evaluated. The highest frequency for the V allele was observed in Charolais cattle. The markers used revealed a considerable similarity among breeds, with two main groups being discernible. One group consisted of Zebu and Santa Gertrudis breeds and the other consisted of European and Canchim breeds.Os genótipos de k-caseína (k-CN, b-lactoglobulina (b-LG e hormônio de crescimento foram determinados por reação em cadeia de polimerase (PCR e digestão com enzima de restrição em sete raças de bovinos (Nelore, Gir, Guzerá, Caracu, Charolesa, Canchim and Santa Gertrudis. A k-caseína apresentou dois alelos e as freqüências mais elevadas para o alelo A foram observadas em Bos indicus (0,93, 0,92 e 0,91% para as raças Gir, Guzerá e Nelore, respectivamente. A b-lactoglobulina apresentou dois alelos em todas as raças estudadas, sendo a freqüência do alelo A mais elevada nas raças européias. O loco de hormônio de crescimento apresentou dois alelos em Bos taurus e foi monomórfico (alelo L em todas as raças zebuínas. A maior freqüência para o alelo V foi observado na raça Charolesa. Os marcadores investigados revelaram alta similaridade entre as raças, com a formação de dois grupos principais: um composto de raças zebuínas e a raça Santa Gertrudis e outro

  6. Frequency of the CCRdelta32 allele in Brazilians: a study in colorectal cancer and in HTLV-I infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinaldo W. Pereira

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The identification of a 32-bp deletion in the cc-chemokine receptor-5 gene (CCR5delta32 allele that renders homozygous individuals highly resistant to HIV infection has prompted worldwide investigations of the frequency of the CCR5delta32 allele in regional populations. It is important to ascertain if CCR5delta32 is a factor to be considered in the overall epidemiology of HIV in individual populations. With this in mind we determined the CCR5delta32 allele frequency in a large sample (907 individuals of the southeastern Brazilian urban population, stratified as follows: 322 healthy unrelated individuals, 354 unselected colorectal cancer patients, and 229 blood donors. The three groups displayed essentially identical allelic frequencies of CCR5delta32 and pairwise comparisons did not show significant differences. Thus, our results can be pooled to provide a reliable estimate of the CCR5delta32 allele frequency in the southeastern Brazil of 0.053 ± 0.005. The blood donors comprised 50 HTLV-I serologically negative individuals, 115 non-symptomatic individuals HTLV-I positive by ELISA but with indeterminate Western blot results, 49 healthy blood donors HTLV-I positive both at ELISA and Western blot and 15 patients with clinical spinal cord disease (HAM. A suggestive trend was observed, with the CCR5delta32 frequencies decreasing progressively in these four categories. However, when we applied Fischer's exact test no significant differences emerged. We believe that further studies in larger cohorts should be performed to ascertain whether the CCR5delta32 allele influences the chance of becoming infected or developing clinical symptoms of HTLV-I infection.A observação de que indivíduos homozigotos para uma deleção de 32 pares de base no gene que codifica para o receptor 5 de cc-quimiocinas apresentam um menor risco de contrair a infecção por HIV-1 levou à investigação da freqüência deste polimorfismo em várias populações mundiais.

  7. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 17: Report of a family with reduced penetrance of an unstable Gln49 TBP allele, haplotype analysis supporting a founder effect for unstable alleles and comparative analysis of SCA17 genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwinger Eberhard

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinocerebellar ataxia type 17 (SCA17, a neurodegenerative disorder in man, is caused by an expanded polymorphic polyglutamine-encoding trinucleotide repeat in the gene for TATA-box binding protein (TBP, a main transcription factor. Observed pathogenic expansions ranged from 43 – 63 glutamine (Gln codons (Gln43–63. Reduced penetrance is known for Gln43–48 alleles. In the vast majority of families with SCA17 an expanded CAG repeat interrupted by a CAA CAG CAA element is inherited stably. Results Here, we report the first pedigree with a Gln49 allele that is a not interrupted, b unstable upon transmission, and c associated with reduced penetrance or very late age of onset. The 76-year-old father of two SCA17 patients carries the Gln49 TBP allele but presents without obvious neurological symptoms. His children with Gln53 and Gln52 developed ataxia at the age of 41 and 50. Haplotype analysis of this and a second family both with uninterrupted expanded and unstable pathological SCA17 alleles revealed a common core genotype not present in the interrupted expansion of an unrelated SCA17 patient. Review of the literature did not present instability in SCA17 families with expanded alleles interrupted by the CAA CAG CAA element. Conclusion The presence of a Gln49 SCA17 allele in an asymptomatic 76-year-old male reams the discussion of reduced penetrance and genotypes producing very late disease onset. In SCA17, uninterrupted expanded alleles of TBP are associated with repeat instability and a common founder haplotype. This suggests for uninterrupted expanded