WorldWideScience

Sample records for all-sky solar irradiance

  1. Fast All-Sky Radiation Model for Solar applications (FARMS): Algorithm and Performance Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yu; Sengupta, Manajit; Dudhia, Jimy

    2016-10-01

    Radiative transfer (RT) models simulating broadband solar radiation have been widely used by atmospheric scientists to model solar resources for various energy applications such as operational forecasting. Due to the complexity of solving the RT equation, the computation under cloudy conditions can be extremely time-consuming, though many approximations (e.g., two-stream approach and delta-M truncation scheme) have been utilized. Thus, a more efficient RT model is crucial for model developers as a new option for approximating solar radiation at the land surface with minimal loss of accuracy. In this study, we developed a fast all-sky radiation model for solar applications (FARMS) using the simplified clear-sky RT model, REST2, and simulated cloud transmittances and reflectances from the Rapid Radiation Transfer Model (RRTM) with a 16-stream Discrete Ordinates Radiative Transfer (DISORT). Simulated lookup tables (LUTs) of cloud transmittances and reflectances are created by varying cloud optical thicknesses, cloud particle sizes, and solar zenith angles. Equations with optimized parameters are fitted to the cloud transmittances and reflectances to develop the model. The all-sky solar irradiance at the land surface can then be computed rapidly by combining REST2 with the cloud transmittances and reflectances. This new RT model is more than 1,000 times faster than those currently utilized in solar resource assessment and forecasting because it does not explicitly solve the RT equation for each individual cloud condition. Our results indicate that the accuracy of the fast radiative transfer model is comparable to or better than two-stream approximation in term of computing cloud transmittance and solar radiation.

  2. A fast all-sky radiative transfer model and its implications for solar energy research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Y.; Sengupta, M.

    2015-12-01

    Radiative transfer models simulating broadband solar radiation, e.g. Rapid Radiation Transfer Model (RRTM) and its GCM applications, have been widely used by atmospheric scientists to model solar resource for various energy applications such as operational forecasting. Due to the complexity of solving the radiative transfer equation, simulating solar radiation under cloudy conditions can be extremely time consuming though many approximations, e.g. two-stream approach and delta-M truncation scheme, have been utilized. To provide a new option to approximate solar radiation, we developed a Fast All-sky Radiation Model for Solar applications (FARMS) using simulated cloud transmittance and reflectance from 16-stream RRTM model runs. The solar irradiances at the land surface were simulated by combining parameterized cloud properties with a fast clear-sky radiative transfer model. Using solar radiation measurements from the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) central facility in Oklahoma as a benchmark against the model simulations, we were able to demonstrate that the accuracy of FARMS was comparable to the two-stream approach. However, FARMS is much more efficient since it does not explicitly solve the radiative transfer equation for each individual cloud condition. We further explored the use of FARMS to promote solar resource assessment and forecasting research through the increased ability to accommodate higher spatial and temporal resolution calculations for the next generation of satellite and numerical weather prediction (NWP) models.

  3. Solar radiation forecasting in the short- and medium-term under all sky conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meteorological conditions are decisive in solar plant management and electricity generation. Any increases or decreases in solar radiation mean a plant has to adapt its operation method to the climatological phenomena. An unexpected atmospheric change can provoke a range of problems related to various solar plant components affecting the electricity generation system and, in consequence, causing alterations in the electricity grid. Therefore, predicting atmospheric features is key to managing solar plants and is therefore necessary for correct electrical grid management. Accordingly, a solar radiation forecast model is presented, where the three solar components (beam, diffuse and global) are predicted over the short- and medium-term (up to three hours) for all sky conditions, demonstrating its potential as a useful application in decision-making processes at solar power plants. - Highlights: • A solar radiation forecasting has been proposed over the short- and medium-term. • The three radiation components have been predicted under all sky conditions. • Cloud motion and the Heliosat-2 model are combined for predicting solar radiation. • Results have been presented for cloudless, partially-cloudy and overcast conditions. • For beam and global radiation, the nRMSE value is lower than 10% under clear skies

  4. Fast All-Sky Radiation Model for Solar Applications (FARMS): A Brief Overview of Mechanisms, Performance, and Applications: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yu; Sengupta, Manajit

    2016-06-01

    Solar radiation can be computed using radiative transfer models, such as the Rapid Radiation Transfer Model (RRTM) and its general circulation model applications, and used for various energy applications. Due to the complexity of computing radiation fields in aerosol and cloudy atmospheres, simulating solar radiation can be extremely time-consuming, but many approximations--e.g., the two-stream approach and the delta-M truncation scheme--can be utilized. To provide a new fast option for computing solar radiation, we developed the Fast All-sky Radiation Model for Solar applications (FARMS) by parameterizing the simulated diffuse horizontal irradiance and direct normal irradiance for cloudy conditions from the RRTM runs using a 16-stream discrete ordinates radiative transfer method. The solar irradiance at the surface was simulated by combining the cloud irradiance parameterizations with a fast clear-sky model, REST2. To understand the accuracy and efficiency of the newly developed fast model, we analyzed FARMS runs using cloud optical and microphysical properties retrieved using GOES data from 2009-2012. The global horizontal irradiance for cloudy conditions was simulated using FARMS and RRTM for global circulation modeling with a two-stream approximation and compared to measurements taken from the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains site. Our results indicate that the accuracy of FARMS is comparable to or better than the two-stream approach; however, FARMS is approximately 400 times more efficient because it does not explicitly solve the radiative transfer equation for each individual cloud condition. Radiative transfer model runs are computationally expensive, but this model is promising for broad applications in solar resource assessment and forecasting. It is currently being used in the National Solar Radiation Database, which is publicly available from the National Renewable Energy

  5. Solar Wind Charge Exchange Contribution to the ROSAT All Sky Survey Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uprety, Y.; Chiao, M.; Collier, M. R.; Cravens, T.; Galeazzi, M.; Koutroumpa, D.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lallement, R.; Lepri, S. T.; Liu, W.; McCammon, D.; Morgan, K.; Porter, F. S.; Prasai, K.; Snowden, S. L.; Thomas, N. E.; Ursino, E.; Walsh, B. M.

    2016-10-01

    DXL (Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local Galaxy) is a sounding rocket mission designed to estimate the contribution of solar wind charge eXchange (SWCX) to the diffuse X-ray background and to help determine the properties of the Local Hot Bubble. The detectors are large area thin-window proportional counters with a spectral response that is similar to that of the PSPC used in the ROSAT All Sky Survey (RASS). A direct comparison of DXL and RASS data for the same part of the sky viewed from quite different vantage points in the solar system, and the assumption of approximate isotropy for the solar wind, allowed us to quantify the SWCX contribution to all six RASS bands (R1-R7, excluding R3). We find that the SWCX contribution at l=140^\\circ ,b=0^\\circ , where the DXL path crosses the Galactic plane, is 33 % +/- 6 % ({statistical})+/- 12 % ({systematic}) for R1, 44 % +/- 6 % +/- 5 % for R2, 18 % +/- 12 % +/- 11 % for R4, 14 % +/- 11 % +/- 9 % for R5, and negligible for the R6 and R7 bands. Reliable models for the distribution of neutral H and He in the solar system permit estimation of the contribution of interplanetary SWCX emission over the the whole sky and correction of the RASS maps. We find that the average SWCX contribution in the whole sky is 26 % +/- 6 % +/- 13 % for R1, 30 % +/- 4 % +/- 4 % for R2, 8 % +/- 5 % +/- 5 % for R4, 6 % +/- 4 % +/- 4 % for R5, and negligible for R6 and R7.

  6. Solar Wind Charge Exchange contribution to the ROSAT All Sky Survey Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Uprety, Y; Collier, M R; Cravens, T; Galeazzi, M; Koutroumpa, D; Kuntz, K D; Lallement, R; Lepri, S T; Liu, W; McCammon, D; Morgan, K; Porter, F S; Prasai, K; Snowden, S L; Thomas, N E; Ursino, E; Walsh, B M

    2016-01-01

    DXL (Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local Galaxy) is a sounding rocket mission designed to quantify and characterize the contribution of Solar Wind Charge eXchange (SWCX) to the Diffuse X-ray Background (DXB) and study the properties of the Local Hot Bubble (LHB). The detectors are large-area thin-window proportional counters with a spectral response similar to that of the PSPC used in the ROSAT All Sky Survey (RASS). A direct comparison of DXL and RASS data for the same part of the sky allowed us to quantify the SWCX contribution to all 6 RASS bands (R1-R7). We find that the SWCX contribution at l=140 deg, b=0 deg, where the DXL path crosses the Galactic plane is 32%+-12% (statistical)+-5%(systematic) for R1, 45%+-8%+-5% for R2, 22%+-11%+-4% for R4, 14%+-12%+-4% for R5, and negligible for R6 and R7 bands. We can also estimate the contribution to the whole sky. We find that the average SWCX contribution in the whole sky is 25%+-10%+-7% for R1, 30%+-6%+-6% for R2, 9%+-5%+-2% for R4, 7%+-5%+-1% for R5, and neg...

  7. A serendipitous all sky survey for bright objects in the outer solar system

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, M E; Schmidt, B P; Drake, A J; Djorgovski, S G; Graham, M J; Mahabal, A; Donalek, C; Larson, S; Christensen, E; Beshore, E; McNaught, R

    2015-01-01

    We use seven year's worth of observations from the Catalina Sky Survey and the Siding Spring Survey covering most of the northern and southern hemisphere at galactic latitudes higher than 20 degrees to search for serendipitously imaged moving objects in the outer solar system. These slowly moving objects would appear as stationary transients in these fast cadence asteroids surveys, so we develop methods to discover objects in the outer solar system using individual observations spaced by months, rather than spaced by hours, as is typically done. While we independently discover 8 known bright objects in the outer solar system, the faintest having $V=19.8\\pm0.1$, no new objects are discovered. We find that the survey is nearly 100% efficient at detecting objects beyond 25 AU for $V\\lesssim 19.1$ ($V\\lesssim18.6$ in the southern hemisphere) and that the probability that there is one or more remaining outer solar system object of this brightness left to be discovered in the unsurveyed regions of the galactic plan...

  8. A serendipitous all sky survey for bright objects in the outer solar system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M. E.; Drake, A. J.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Graham, M. J.; Mahabal, A.; Donalek, C. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Bannister, M. T. [University of Victoria, Victoria, BC (Canada); Schmidt, B. P.; McNaught, R. [The Australian National University, Canberra (Australia); Larson, S.; Christensen, E.; Beshore, E. [The University of Arizona, Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We use seven year's worth of observations from the Catalina Sky Survey and the Siding Spring Survey covering most of the northern and southern hemisphere at galactic latitudes higher than 20° to search for serendipitously imaged moving objects in the outer solar system. These slowly moving objects would appear as stationary transients in these fast cadence asteroids surveys, so we develop methods to discover objects in the outer solar system using individual observations spaced by months, rather than spaced by hours, as is typically done. While we independently discover eight known bright objects in the outer solar system, the faintest having V=19.8±0.1, no new objects are discovered. We find that the survey is nearly 100% efficient at detecting objects beyond 25 AU for V≲19.1 (V≲18.6 in the southern hemisphere) and that the probability that there is one or more remaining outer solar system object of this brightness left to be discovered in the unsurveyed regions of the galactic plane is approximately 32%.

  9. Time-resolved hard X-Ray hardness variation of solar flares observed by Suzaku Wide-band All-sky monitor

    OpenAIRE

    遠藤, 輝; Endo, Akira; 守上, 浩市; Morigami, Kouichi; 田代, 信; Tashiro, Makoto; 寺田, 幸功; Terada, Yukikatsu; 山岡, 和貴; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; 園田 絵里; Sonoda, Eri; 簑島, 敬; Minoshima, Takashi; Krucker, Sam

    2010-01-01

    Results of solar flare observations in the hard X-ray band with the Suzaku Wide-band All-sky Monitor (WAM) are reported. On June 2009, 108 solar flares (GOES class X:16, M:29, C:46, B:17) have been detected with the WAM since the launch. One of the brightest flares WAM detected was the event occurring on 2006 December 13. It lasted for more than 700 seconds even in above 500 keV. This event was simultaneously observed by the solar missions Hinode and RHESSI in soft and hard X-ray region respe...

  10. Inferences of all-sky solar irradiance using Terra and Aqua MODIS satellite data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houborg, Rasmus Møller; Søgaard, Henrik; Emmerich, W.;

    2007-01-01

    contrasting climates and cloud environments. Information on the atmospheric state was provided by MODIS data products and verifications against AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) data demonstrated usefulness of MODIS aerosol optical depth and total precipitable water vapour retrievals for the delineation......) and 26.6% (72 W m-2) for Southern Arizona and the Island of Zealand, respectively. For both regions, hourly satellite estimates were shown to be more reliable than pyranometer measurements from ground stations only 15 km away from the point of interest, which is comparable to the accuracy level...

  11. The ADS All Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Alyssa

    We will create the first interactive sky map of astronomers' understanding of the Universe over time. We will accomplish this goal by turning the NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS), widely known for its unrivaled value as a literature resource, into a data resource. GIS and GPS systems have made it commonplace to see and explore information about goings-on on Earth in the context of maps and timelines. Our proposal shows an example of a program that lets a user explore which countries have been mentioned in the New York Times, on what dates, and in what kinds of articles. By analogy, the goal of our project is to enable this kind of exploration-on the sky-for the full corpus of astrophysical literature available through ADS. Our group's expertise and collaborations uniquely position us to create this interactive sky map of the literature, which we call the "ADS All-Sky Survey." To create this survey, here are the principal steps we need to follow. First, by analogy to "geotagging," we will "astrotag," the ADS literature. Many "astrotags" effectively already exist, thanks to curation efforts at both CDS and NED. These efforts have created links to "source" positions on the sky associated with each of the millions of articles in the ADS. Our collaboration with ADS and CDS will let us automatically extract astrotags for all existing and future ADS holdings. The new ADS Labs, which our group helps to develop, includes the ability for researchers to filter article search results using a variety of "facets" (e.g. sources, keywords, authors, observatories, etc.). Using only extracted astrotags and facets, we can create functionality like what is described in the Times example above: we can offer a map of the density of positions' "mentions" on the sky, filterable by the properties of those mentions. Using this map, researchers will be able to interactively, visually, discover what regions have been studied for what reasons, at what times, and by whom. Second, where

  12. Detection of dimming/brightening in Italy from homogenized all-sky and clear-sky surface solar radiation records and underlying causes (1959–2013)

    OpenAIRE

    Manara, Veronica; Brunetti, Michele; Celozzi, Angela; Maugeri, Maurizio; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo; Wild, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A dataset of 54 daily Italian downward surface solar radiation (SSR) records has been set up collecting data for the 1959–2013 period. Particular emphasis is placed upon the quality control and the homogenization of the records in order to ensure the reliability of the resulting trends. This step has been shown as necessary due to the large differences obtained between the raw and homogenized dataset, especially during the first decades of the study period. In addition, SSR series under...

  13. Proton Irradiation Experiment for the X-ray Charge-Coupled Devices of the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image mission onboard the International Space Station I. Experimental Setup and Measurement of the Charge Transfer Inefficiency

    CERN Document Server

    Miyata, E; Kouno, H; Mihara, M; Matsuta, K; Tsunemi, H; Tanaka, K; Minamisono, T; Tomida, H; Miyaguchi, K

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the radiation damage effects on a CCD to be employed in the Japanese X-ray astronomy mission including the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) onboard the International Space Station (ISS). Since low energy protons release their energy mainly at the charge transfer channel, resulting a decrease of the charge transfer efficiency, we thus focused on the low energy protons in our experiments. A 171 keV to 3.91 MeV proton beam was irradiated to a given device. We measured the degradation of the charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) as a function of incremental fluence. A 292 keV proton beam degraded the CTI most seriously. Taking into account the proton energy dependence of the CTI, we confirmed that the transfer channel has the lowest radiation tolerance. We have also developed the different device architectures to reduce the radiation damage in orbit. Among them, the ``notch'' CCD, in which the buried channel implant concentration is increased, resulting in a deeper potential well than outsi...

  14. Solar Indices - Solar Irradiance

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  15. Proton irradiation experiment for X-ray charge-coupled devices of the monitor of all-sky X-ray image mission onboard the international space station. 1. Experimental setup and measurement of the charge transfer inefficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the radiation damage effects on a charge-coupled device (CCD) to be employed in the Japanese X-ray astronomy mission including the monitor of all-sky X-ray image (MAXI) onboard the international space station (ISS). Since low-energy protons release their energy mainly at the charge transfer channel, resulting in a decrease of the charge transfer efficiency, we focused on low-energy protons in our experiments. A 171 keV to 3.91 MeV proton beam was irradiated onto a given device. We measured the degradation of the charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) as a function of incremental fluence. A 292 keV proton beam degraded the CTI critically. Taking into account the proton energy dependence of the CTI, we confirmed that the transfer channel has the lowest radiation tolerance. We have also developed different device architectures to reduce the radiation damage in orbit. Among them, the 'notch' CCD, in which the buried channel implant concentration is increased, resulting in a potential well deeper than outside, has a three times higher radiation tolerance than that of the normal CCD. We then estimated the CTI of the CCD in the orbit of the ISS, considering the proton energy spectrum. The CTI value is estimated to be 1.1x10-5 per transfer after two years of mission life in the worst case analysis if the highest radiation tolerant device is employed. This value is well within the acceptable limit and we have confirmed the high radiation-tolerance of CCDs for the MAXI mission. (author)

  16. Proton irradiation experiment for x-ray charge-coupled devices of the monitor of all-sky x-ray image mission onboard the international space station. 2. Degradation of dark current and identification of electron trap level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the radiation damage effects on a charge-coupled device (CCD) to be used for the Japanese X-ray mission, the monitor of all-sky X-ray image (MAXI), onboard the international space station (ISS). A temperature dependence of the dark current as a function of incremental dose is studied. We found that the protons having energy of >292 keV seriously increased the dark current of the devices. In order to improve the radiation tolerance of the devices, we have developed various device architectures to minimize the radiation damage in orbit. Among them, nitride oxide enables us to reduce the dark current significantly and therefore we adopted nitride oxide for the flight devices. We also compared the dark current of a device in operation and that out of operation during the proton irradiation. The dark current of the device in operation became twofold that out of operation, and we thus determined that devices would be turned off during the passage of the radiation belt. The temperature dependence of the dark current enables us to determine the electron trap level that generates the dark current. We fitted dark current as a function of temperature by the theoretical models and found that the dark current increase after proton irradiations is caused by, at least, two kinds of electron trap levels. The shallow trap level (Ec - Et c and Et are the energy at the bottom of the conduction band and the energy level of electron trap) might be associated with oxygen which is dominant at the operating temperature of >210 K. On the other hand, another trap level is located roughly at the center of the silicon bandgap which might be associated with divacancies or P-V traps. We finally investigated the spatial distribution of the low-energy protons in the orbit of the ISS. Their density has a peak around l - 20deg and b - 55deg independent of the altitude. The peak value is roughly two orders of magnitude higher than that at the South Atlantic Anomaly. (author)

  17. Solar Irradiance Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Solanki, Sami K

    2012-01-01

    The Sun has long been considered a constant star, to the extent that its total irradiance was termed the solar constant. It required radiometers in space to detect the small variations in solar irradiance on timescales of the solar rotation and the solar cycle. A part of the difficulty is that there are no other constant natural daytime sources to which the Sun's brightness can be compared. The discovery of solar irradiance variability rekindled a long-running discussion on how strongly the Sun affects our climate. A non-negligible influence is suggested by correlation studies between solar variability and climate indicators. The mechanism for solar irradiance variations that fits the observations best is that magnetic features at the solar surface, i.e. sunspots, faculae and the magnetic network, are responsible for almost all variations (although on short timescales convection and p-mode oscillations also contribute). In spite of significant progress important questions are still open. Thus there is a debat...

  18. All Sky Survey Mission Observing Scenario Strategy

    CERN Document Server

    Spangelo, Sara C; Unwin, Stephen C; Bock, Jamie J

    2014-01-01

    This paper develops a general observing strategy for missions performing all-sky surveys, where a single spacecraft maps the celestial sphere subject to realistic constraints. The strategy is flexible such that targeted observations and variable coverage requirements can be achieved. This paper focuses on missions operating in Low Earth Orbit, where the thermal and stray-light constraints due to the Sun, Earth, and Moon result in interacting and dynamic constraints. The approach is applicable to broader mission classes, such as those that operate in different orbits or that survey the Earth. First, the instrument and spacecraft configuration is optimized to enable visibility of the targeted observations throughout the year. Second, a constraint-based high-level strategy is presented for scheduling throughout the year subject to a simplified subset of the constraints. Third, a heuristic-based scheduling algorithm is developed to assign the all-sky observations over short planning horizons. The constraint-based...

  19. HHEBBES! All sky camera system: status update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettonvil, F.

    2015-01-01

    A status update is given of the HHEBBES! All sky camera system. HHEBBES!, an automatic camera for capturing bright meteor trails, is based on a DSLR camera and a Liquid Crystal chopper for measuring the angular velocity. Purpose of the system is to a) recover meteorites; b) identify origin/parental bodies. In 2015, two new cameras were rolled out: BINGO! -alike HHEBBES! also in The Netherlands-, and POgLED, in Serbia. BINGO! is a first camera equipped with a longer focal length fisheye lens, to further increase the accuracy. Several minor improvements have been done and the data reduction pipeline was used for processing two prominent Dutch fireballs.

  20. Validation of the surface downwelling solar irradiance estimates of the HelioClim-3 database in Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Yehia Eissa; Mohamed Korany; Youva Aoun; Mohamed Boraiy; Magdy M. Abdel Wahab; Alfaro, Stephane C.; Philippe Blanc; Mossad El-Metwally; Hosni Ghedira; Katja Hungershoefer; Lucien Wald

    2015-01-01

    International audience HelioClim-3 (HC3) is a database providing time series of the surface downwelling solar irradiance that are computed from images of the Meteosat satellites. This paper presents the validation results of the hourly global horizontal irradiance (GHI) and direct normal irradiance (DNI), i.e., beam irradiance at normal incidence, of versions four and five of HC3 at seven Egyptian sites. The validation is performed for all-sky conditions, as well as cloud-free conditions. ...

  1. Cosmology with all-sky surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Bilicki, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Various aspects of cosmology require comprehensive all-sky mapping of the cosmic web to considerable depths. In order to probe the whole extragalactic sky beyond 100 Mpc, one must draw on multiwavelength datasets and state-of-the-art photometric redshift techniques. Here I summarize our dedicated program that employs the largest photometric all-sky surveys -- 2MASS, WISE and SuperCOSMOS -- to obtain accurate redshift estimates of millions of galaxies. The first outcome of these efforts -- the 2MASS Photometric Redshift catalog (2MPZ) -- was publicly released in 2013 and includes almost 1 million galaxies with a median redshift of z~0.1. I discuss how this catalog was constructed and how it is being used for various cosmological tests. I also present how combining the WISE mid-infrared survey with SuperCOSMOS optical data allowed us to push to depths over 1 Gpc on unprecedented angular scales. These photometric redshift samples, with about 20 million sources in total, provide access to volumes large enough to ...

  2. SPHEREx: An All-Sky Spectral Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, James; SPHEREx Science Team

    2016-01-01

    SPHEREx, a mission in NASA's Small Explorer (SMEX) program that was selected for Phase A in July 2015, is an all-sky survey satellite designed to address all three science goals in NASA's astrophysics division, in a single survey, with a single instrument. We will probe the physics of inflation by measuring non-Gaussianity by studying large-scale structure, surveying a large cosmological volume at low redshifts, complementing high-z surveys optimized to constrain dark energy. The origin of water and biogenic molecules will be investigated in all phases of planetary system formation - from molecular clouds to young stellar systems with protoplanetary disks - by measuring ice absorption spectra. We will chart the origin and history of galaxy formation through a deep survey mapping large-scale spatial power. Finally, SPHEREx will be the first all-sky near-infrared spectral survey, creating a legacy archive of spectra (0.75 - 4.8 um at R = 41.5 and 150) with high sensitivity using a cooled telescope with large mapping speed.SPHEREx will observe from a sun-synchronous low-earth orbit, covering the entire sky in a manner similar to IRAS, COBE and WISE. During its two-year mission, SPHEREx will produce four complete all-sky maps for constraining the physics of inflation. These same maps contain numerous high signal-to-noise absorption spectra to study water and biogenic ices. The orbit naturally covers two deep regions at the celestial poles, which we use for studying galaxy evolution. All aspects of the SPHEREx instrument and spacecraft have high heritage. SPHEREx requires no new technologies and carries large technical and resource margins on every aspect of the design. The projected instrument sensitivity, based on conservative performance estimates, meets the driving point source sensitivity requirement with 300 % margin.SPHEREx is a partnership between Caltech and JPL, following the successful management structure of the NuSTAR and GALEX SMEX missions. The spacecraft

  3. SPHEREx: An All-Sky Spectral Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Doré, Olivier; Capak, Peter; de Putter, Roland; Eifler, Tim; Hirata, Chris; Korngut, Phil; Krause, Elisabeth; Masters, Daniel; Raccanelli, Alvise; Zemcov, Mike; Cooray, Asantha; Flagey, Nicolas; Gong, Yan; Katti, Raj; Melnick, Gary; Mennesson, Bertrand; Unwin, Steve; Viero, Marco; Werner, Mike; Ashby, Matthew; Habib, Salman; Heitmann, Katrin; Lee, Dae-Hee; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Mauskopf, Phil; Nguyen, Hien; Öberg, Karin; Smith, Roger; Song, Yong-Seon; Tolls, Volker; Venumadhav, Tejaswi

    2014-01-01

    SPHEREx (Spectro-Photometer for the History of the Universe, Epoch of Reionization, and Ices Explorer) is a proposed all-sky spectroscopic survey satellite designed to address all three science goals in NASA's Astrophysics Division: probe the origin and destiny of our Universe; explore whether planets around other stars could harbor life; and explore the origin and evolution of galaxies. SPHEREx will scan a series of Linear Variable Filters systematically across the entire sky. The SPHEREx data-set will contain R=40 spectra spanning the near infrared (0.75$\\mu$m$<\\lambda<$ 4.83$\\mu$m) for every 6.2 arcsecond pixel over the the entire-sky. In this paper, we detail the extra-galactic and cosmological studies SPHEREx will enable and present detailed systematic effect evaluations.

  4. The SCUBA-2 "All-Sky" Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, M A; Jenness, T; Scott, D; Ashdown, M; Brunt, C; Butner, H; Chapin, E; Chrysostomou, A C; Clark, J S; Clements, D; Collett, J L; Coppin, K; Coulson, I M; Dent, W R F; Economou, F; Evans, A; Friberg, P; Fuller, G A; Gibb, A G; Greaves, J; Hatchell, J; Holland, W S; Hudson, M; Ivison, R J; Jaffe, A; Joncas, G; Jones, H R A; Knapen, J H; Leech, J; Mann, R; Matthews, H E; Moore, T J T; Mortier, A; Negrello, M; Nutter, D; Pestalozzi, M P; Pope, A; Richer, J; Shipman, R; Urquhart, J S; Vaccari, M; Van Waerbeke, L; Viti, S; Weferling, B; White, G J; Wouterloot, J; Zhu, M

    2007-01-01

    The sub-millimetre wavelength regime is perhaps the most poorly explored over large areas of the sky, despite the considerable effort that has been expended in making deep maps over small regions. As a consequence the properties of the sub-millimetre sky as a whole, and of rare bright objects in particular, remains largely unknown. Here we describe a forthcoming survey (the SCUBA-2 ``All-Sky'' Survey, or SASSy) designed to address this issue by making a large-area map of approximately one-fifth of the sky visible from the JCMT (4800 square degrees) down to a 1 sigma noise level of 30 mJy/beam. This map forms the pilot for a much larger survey, which will potentially map the remaining sky visible from the JCMT, with the region also visible to ALMA as a priority. SASSy has been awarded 500 hours for the 4800 square degree pilot phase and will commence after the commissioning of SCUBA-2, expected in early 2008.

  5. The SPHEREx All-Sky Spectroscopic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Stephen C.; SPHEREx Science Team, SPHEREx Project Team

    2016-06-01

    SPHEREx is a mission to conduct an optical-near-IR survey of the entire sky with a spectrum at every pixel location. It was selected by NASA for a Phase A study in its Small Explorer Program; if selected, development would begin in 2016, and the observatory would start a 2-year prime mission in 2020. An all-sky spectroscopic survey can be used to tackle a wide range of science questions. The SPHEREx science team is focusing on three: (1) Probing the physics of inflation through measuring non-Gaussianity from the study of large-scale structure; (2) Studying the origin of water and biogenic molecules in a wide range of physical and chemical environments via ice absorption spectra; (3) Charting the history of star formation in the universe through intensity mapping of the large-scale spatial power. The instrument is a small wide-field telescope operating in the range of 0.75 - 4.8 µm at a spectral resolution of 41.5 in the optical and 150 at the long-wavelength end. It observes in a sun-sync low-earth orbit, covering the sky like WISE and COBE. SPHEREx is a simple instrument that requires no new technology. The Phase A design has substantial technical and resource margins and can be built with low risk. It is a partnership between Caltech and JPL, with Ball Aerospace and the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute as major partners. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. © 2016 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  6. The SPHEREx All-Sky Spectroscopic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Stephen C.; SPHEREx Science Team, SPHEREx Project Team

    2016-06-01

    SPHEREx is a mission to conduct an optical-near-IR survey of the entire sky with a spectrum at every pixel location. It was selected by NASA for a Phase A study in its Small Explorer Program; if selected, development would begin in 2016, and the observatory would start a 2-year prime mission in 2020. An all-sky spectroscopic survey can be used to tackle a wide range of science questions. The SPHEREx science team is focusing on three: (1) Probing the physics of inflation through measuring non-Gaussianity from the study of large-scale structure; (2) Studying the origin of water and biogenic molecules in a wide range of physical and chemical environments via ice absorption spectra; (3) Charting the history of star formation in the universe through intensity mapping of the large-scale spatial power. The instrument is a small wide-field telescope operating in the range of 0.75 - 4.8 µm at a spectral resolution of 41.5 in the optical and 150 at the long-wavelength end. It observes in a sun-sync low-earth orbit, covering the sky like WISE and COBE. SPHEREx is a simple instrument that requires no new technology. The Phase A design has substantial technical and resource margins and can be built with low risk. It is a partnership between Caltech and JPL, with Ball Aerospace and the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute as major partners. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  7. GOALS: The Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Armus, L; Evans, A S; Surace, J A; Sanders, D B; Iwasawa, K; Frayer, D T; Howell, J H; Chan, B; Petric, A O; Vavilkin, T; Kim, D C; Haan, S; Inami, H; Murphy, E J; Appleton, P N; Barnes, J E; Bothun, G; Bridge, C R; Charmandaris, V; Jensen, J B; Kewley, L J; Lord, S; Madore, B F; Marshall, J A; Melbourne, J E; Rich, J; Satyapal, S; Schulz, B; Spoon, H W W; Sturm, E; U, V; Veilleux, S; Xu, K

    2009-01-01

    The Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) combines data from NASA's Spitzer, Chandra, Hubble and GALEX observatories, together with ground-based data into a comprehensive imaging and spectroscopic survey of over 200 low redshift Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs). The LIRGs are a complete subset of the IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample (RBGS). The LIRGs targeted in GOALS span the full range of nuclear spectral types defined via traditional optical line-ratio diagrams as well as interaction stages. They provide an unbiased picture of the processes responsible for enhanced infrared emission in galaxies in the local Universe. As an example of the analytic power of the multi-wavelength GOALS dataset, we present data for the interacting system VV 340 (IRAS F14547+2449). Between 80-95% of the total far-infrared emission (or about 5E11 solar luminosities) originates in VV 340 North. While the IRAC colors of VV 340 North and South are consistent with star-forming galaxies, both the Spitzer IRS and Chandra A...

  8. The Synoptic All-Sky Infrared (SASIR) Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Bloom, Joshua S; Lee, William; González, J Jesús; Ramírez-Ruiz, Enrico; Bolte, Michael; Franco, José; Guichard, José; Carramiñana, Alberto; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Bernstein, Rebecca; Bigelow, Bruce; Brodwin, Mark; Burgasser, Adam; Butler, Nat; Chávez, Miguel; Cobb, Bethany; Cook, Kem; Cruz-González, Irene; de Diego, José Antonio; Farah, Alejandro; Georgiev, Leonid; Girard, Julien; Hernández-Toledo, Hector; Jiménez-Bailón, Elena; Krongold, Yair; Mayya, Divakara; Meza, Juan; Miyaji, Takamitsu; Mújica, Raúl; Nugent, Peter; Porras, Alicia; Poznanski, Dovi; Raga, Alejandro; Richer, Michael; Rodríguez, Lino; Rosa, Daniel; Stanford, Adam; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Thomas, Rollin; Valenzuela, Octavio; Watson, Alan M

    2009-01-01

    We are proposing to conduct a multicolor, synoptic infrared (IR) imaging survey of the Northern sky with a new, dedicated 6.5-meter telescope at San Pedro M\\'artir (SPM) Observatory. This initiative is being developed in partnership with astronomy institutions in Mexico and the University of California. The 4-year, dedicated survey, planned to begin in 2017, will reach more than 100 times deeper than 2MASS. The Synoptic All-Sky Infrared (SASIR) Survey will reveal the missing sample of faint red dwarf stars in the local solar neighborhood, and the unprecedented sensitivity over such a wide field will result in the discovery of thousands of z ~ 7 quasars (and reaching to z > 10), allowing detailed study (in concert with JWST and Giant Segmented Mirror Telescopes) of the timing and the origin(s) of reionization. As a time-domain survey, SASIR will reveal the dynamic infrared universe, opening new phase space for discovery. Synoptic observations of over 10^6 supernovae and variable stars will provide better dista...

  9. Feasibility of polarized all-sky imaging for aerosol characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuter, A.; Blumthaler, M.

    2012-12-01

    Polarized all-sky distribution measurements contain radiative information about aerosol properties. We investigate the method of all-sky imaging for aerosol property retrieval and propose a technical frame work for image processing and analysis. Using Zernike polynomials, we decompose the relative Stokes parameter distributions, which efficiently captures the information content. The resulting feature vector is well suited for all-sky imaging, independent of calibration and robust against noise. It can be directly used in existing algorithms or alternative types of retrieval methods of aerosol optical properties in the future. By modeling possible aerosol scenarios we investigate the influence of different aerosol types in terms of the first two principal components describing the maximal variances. In this representation we show that the feature vector from a polarized all-sky imager is suitable for aerosol classification with respect to size and single scatter albedo.

  10. Feasibility of polarized all-sky imaging for aerosol characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kreuter

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Polarized all-sky distribution measurements contain radiative information about aerosol properties. We investigate the method of all-sky imaging for aerosol property retrieval and propose a technical frame work for image processing and analysis. Using Zernike polynomials, we decompose the relative Stokes parameter distributions, which efficiently captures the information content. The resulting feature vector is well suited for all-sky imaging, independent of calibration and robust against noise. It can be directly used in existing algorithms or alternative types of retrieval methods of aerosol optical properties in the future. By modeling possible aerosol scenarios we investigate the influence of different aerosol types in terms of the first two principal components describing the maximal variances. In this representation we show that the feature vector from a polarized all-sky imager is suitable for aerosol classification with respect to size and single scatter albedo.

  11. Gamma-Ray All Sky Imaging with BATSE

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, A. B.; Barlow, E. J.; Bird, A. J.; Dean, A.J.; Ferguson, C.; Shaw, S. E.; Westmore, M. J.; Willis, D. R.

    2004-01-01

    The BATSE mission aboard CGRO observed the whole sky for 9 years in the 20 keV - 2 MeV energy band. Flat-fielding of the temporal variations in the background present in the data set has been accomplished through a GEANT3 Monte-Carlo simulation - the BATSE Mass Model (BAMM). The Earth Occultation technique (EOT) is used together with a maximum-likelihood imaging approach to construct all-sky maps with ~mCrab sensitivity. Additionally, a non-linear CLEAN algorithm is applied to the all-sky map...

  12. Models of Solar Irradiance Variations: Current Status

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Natalie A. Krivova; Sami K. Solanki

    2008-03-01

    Regular monitoring of solar irradiance has been carried out since 1978 to show that solar total and spectral irradiance varies at different time scales. Whereas variations on time scales of minutes to hours are due to solar oscillations and granulation, variations on longer time scales are driven by the evolution of the solar surface magnetic field. Here the most recent advances in modelling of solar irradiance variations on time scales longer than a day are briefly reviewed.

  13. All Sky Cloud Coverage Monitoring for SONG-China Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, J. F.; Deng, L. C.; Yan, Z. Z.; Wang, K.; Wu, Y.

    2016-05-01

    In order to monitor the cloud distributions at Qinghai station, a site selected for SONG (Stellar Observations Network Group)-China node, the design of the proto-type of all sky camera (ASC) applied in Xinglong station is adopted. Both hardware and software improvements have been made in order to be more precise and deliver quantitative measurements. The ARM (Advanced Reduced Instruction Set Computer Machine) MCU (Microcontroller Unit) instead of PC is used to control the upgraded version of ASC. A much higher reliability has been realized in the current scheme. Independent of the positions of the Sun and Moon, the weather conditions are constantly changing, therefore it is difficult to get proper exposure parameters using only the temporal information of the major light sources. A realistic exposure parameters for the ASC can actually be defined using a real-time sky brightness monitor that is also installed at the same site. The night sky brightness value is a very sensitive function of the cloud coverage, and can be accurately measured by the sky quality monitor. We study the correlation between the exposure parameter and night sky brightness value, and give the mathematical relation. The images of the all sky camera are inserted into database directly. All sky quality images are archived in FITS format which can be used for further analysis.

  14. The $AKARI$ Far-Infrared All-Sky Survey Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Doi, Yasuo; Ootsubo, Takafumi; Arimatsu, Ko; Tanaka, Masahiro; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Matsuura, Shuji; Nakagawa, Takao; Morishima, Takahiro; Hattori, Makoto; Komugi, Shinya; White, Glenn J; Ikeda, Norio; Kato, Daisuke; Chinone, Yuji; Etxaluze, Mireya; Figueredo, Elysandra

    2015-01-01

    We present a far-infrared all-sky atlas from a sensitive all-sky survey using the Japanese $AKARI$ satellite. The survey covers $> 99$% of the sky in four photometric bands centred at 65 $\\mu$m, 90 $\\mu$m, 140 $\\mu$m, and 160 $\\mu$m with spatial resolutions ranging from 1 to 1.5 arcmin. These data provide crucial information for the investigation and characterisation of the properties of dusty material in the Interstellar Medium (ISM), since significant portion of its energy is emitted between $\\sim$50 and 200 $\\mu$m. The large-scale distribution of interstellar clouds, their thermal dust temperatures and column densities, can be investigated with the improved spatial resolution compared to earlier all-sky survey observations. In addition to the point source distribution, the large-scale distribution of ISM cirrus emission, and its filamentary structure, are well traced. We have made the first public release of the full-sky data to provide a legacy data set for use by the astronomical community.

  15. The AKARI far-infrared all-sky survey maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Yasuo; Takita, Satoshi; Ootsubo, Takafumi; Arimatsu, Ko; Tanaka, Masahiro; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Matsuura, Shuji; Nakagawa, Takao; Morishima, Takahiro; Hattori, Makoto; Komugi, Shinya; White, Glenn J.; Ikeda, Norio; Kato, Daisuke; Chinone, Yuji; Etxaluze, Mireya; Cypriano, Elysandra F.

    2015-06-01

    We present a far-infrared all-sky atlas from a sensitive all-sky survey using the Japanese AKARI satellite. The survey covers > 99% of the sky in four photometric bands centred at 65 μm, 90 μm, 140 μm, and 160 μm, with spatial resolutions ranging from 1' to 1{^''.}5. These data provide crucial information on the investigation and characterisation of the properties of dusty material in the interstellar medium (ISM), since a significant portion of its energy is emitted between ˜ 50 and 200 μm. The large-scale distribution of interstellar clouds, their thermal dust temperatures, and their column densities can be investigated with the improved spatial resolution compared to earlier all-sky survey observations. In addition to the point source distribution, the large-scale distribution of ISM cirrus emission, and its filamentary structure, are well traced. We have made the first public release of the full-sky data to provide a legacy data set for use in the astronomical community.

  16. AKARI Far-Infrared All-Sky Survey Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Doi, Yasuo; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Takita, Satoshi; Arimatsu, Ko; Ikeda, Norio; Kato, Daisuke; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Nakagawa, Takao; Ootsubo, Takafumi; Morishima, Takahiro; Hattori, Makoto; Tanaka, Masahiro; White, Glenn J; Etxaluze, Mireya; Shibai, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Far-infrared observations provide crucial data for the investigation and characterisation of the properties of dusty material in the Interstellar Medium (ISM), since most of its energy is emitted between ~100 and 200 um. We present the first all-sky image from a sensitive all-sky survey using the Japanese AKARI satellite, in the wavelength range 50 -- 180 um. Covering >99% of the sky in four photometric bands with four filters centred at 65 um, 90 um, 140 um, and 160 um wavelengths, this achieved spatial resolutions from 1 to 2 arcmin and a detection limit of <10 MJy sr-1, with absolute and relative photometric accuracies of <20%. All-sky images of the Galactic dust continuum emission enable astronomers to map the large-scale distribution of the diffuse ISM cirrus, to study its thermal dust temperature, emissivity and column density, and to measure the interaction of the Galactic radiation field and embedded objects with the surrounding ISM. In addition to the point source population of stars, protostar...

  17. Irradiance Variations During This Solar Cycle Minimum

    OpenAIRE

    Woods, Thomas N.

    2010-01-01

    The current cycle minimum appears to be deeper and broader than recent cycle minima, and this minimum appears similar to the minima in the early 1900s. With the best-ever solar irradiance measurements from several different satellite instruments, this minimum offers a unique opportunity to advance our understanding of secular (long-term) changes in the solar irradiance. Comparisons of the 2007-2009 irradiance results to the irradiance levels during the previous minimum in 1996 suggest that th...

  18. The SuperCOSMOS all-sky galaxy catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, J. A.; Hambly, N. C.; Bilicki, M.; MacGillivray, H. T.; Miller, L.; Read, M. A.; Tritton, S. B.

    2016-10-01

    We describe the construction of an all-sky galaxy catalogue, using SuperCOSMOS scans of Schmidt photographic plates from the UK Schmidt Telescope and Second Palomar Observatory Sky Survey. The photographic photometry is calibrated using Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, with results that are linear to 2 per cent or better. All-sky photometric uniformity is achieved by matching plate overlaps and also by requiring homogeneity in optical-to-2MASS colours, yielding zero-points that are uniform to 0.03 mag or better. The typical AB depths achieved are BJ < 21, RF < 19.5 and IN < 18.5, with little difference between hemispheres. In practice, the IN plates are shallower than the BJ and RF plates, so for most purposes we advocate the use of a catalogue selected in these two latter bands. At high Galactic latitudes, this catalogue is approximately 90 per cent complete with 5 per cent stellar contamination; we quantify how the quality degrades towards the Galactic plane. At low latitudes, there are many spurious galaxy candidates resulting from stellar blends: these approximately match the surface density of true galaxies at |b| = 30°. Above this latitude, the catalogue limited in BJ and RF contains in total about 20 million galaxy candidates, of which 75 per cent are real. This contamination can be removed, and the sky coverage extended, by matching with additional data sets. This SuperCOSMOS catalogue has been matched with 2MASS and with WISE, yielding quasi-all-sky samples of respectively 1.5 million and 18.5 million galaxies, to median redshifts of 0.08 and 0.20. This legacy data set thus continues to offer a valuable resource for large-angle cosmological investigations.

  19. Solar spectral irradiance model validation using Solar Spectral Irradiance and Solar Radius measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuillier, Gérard; Zhu, Ping; Shapiro, Alexander; Sofia, Sabatino; Tagirov, Rinat; Van Ruymbeke, Michel; Schmutz, Werner

    2016-04-01

    The importance of the reliable solar spectral irradiance (SSI) data for solar and climate physics is now well acknowledged. In particular, the irradiance time series are necessary for most of the current studies concerning climate evolution. However, space instruments are vulnerable to the degradation due to the environment while ground based measurements are limited in wavelength range and need atmospheric effects corrections. This is why SSI modeling is necessary to understand the mechanism of the solar irradiance variability and to provide long and uninterrupted irradiance records to climate and Earth atmosphere scientists. Here we present COSI (COde for Solar Irradiance) model of the SSI variability. The COSI model is based on the Non local thermodynamic Equilibrium Spectral SYnthesis Code (NESSY). We validate NESSY by two independent datasets: - The SSI at solar minimum occurring in 2008, - The radius variation with wavelength and absolute values determined from PREMOS and BOS instruments onboard the PICARD spacecraft. Comparisons between modeling and measured SSI will be shown. However, since SSI measurements have an accuracy estimated between 2 to 3%, the comparison with the solar radius data provides a very important additional constrains on model. For that, 17 partial solar occultations by the Moon are used providing solar radii clearly showing the dependence of the solar radius with wavelength. These results are compared with the NESSY predictions. The agreement between NESSY and observations is within the model and measurements accuracy.

  20. The All Sky Young Association (ASYA): a new young association

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, C A O; Montes, D

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the SACY (Search for Associations Containing Young stars) survey we developed a method to find young associations and to define their high probability members. These bona fide members enable to obtain the kinematical and the physical properties of each association in a proper way. Recently we noted a concentration in the UV plane and we found a new association we are calling ASYA (All Sky Young Association) for its overall distribution in the sky with a total of 38 bonafide members and an estimated age of 110 Myr, the oldest young association found in the SACY survey. We present here its kinematical, space and Li distributions and its HR diagram.

  1. The WATCH All-Sky Monitor for the Granat Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, Niels; Rao, A. R.

    1990-01-01

    The Watch X-ray all-sky monitor, which is designed to localize strong X-ray sources and follow their development, is examined, focusing on the addition of four Watch units to the Granat satellite project. The components of the Watch instrument are described and the capabilities and potential...... scientific returns of the Granat project are discussed. The applications of the Watch monitor are given, including the study of time variations of known sources and the detection and localization of new, transient sources....

  2. The Einstein All-Sky IPC slew survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvis, Martin; Plummer, David; Fabbiano, G.

    1989-01-01

    The construction of the Einstein All-Sky Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) slew survey is considered. It contains approximately 1000 sources between 10(exp -12) and 10(exp -10) erg/sq cm/s with a concentration toward the ecliptic poles and away from the galactic plane. Several sizable samples of bright soft X-ray selected objects for follow-up ROSAT and ASTRO-D observations and statistical study are presented. The survey source list is expected to be available by late 1989. Both paper and remote access online data base versions are to be available. An identification program is considered.

  3. Hexapod Design For All-Sky Sidereal Tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Pál, András; Jaskó, Attila; Mező, György; Csépány, Gergely; Vida, Krisztián; Oláh, Katalin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we describe a hexapod-based telescope mount system intended to provide sidereal tracking for the Fly's Eye Camera project -- an upcoming moderate, 21"/pixel resolution all-sky survey. By exploiting such a kind of meter-sized telescope mount, we get a device which is both capable of compensating for the apparent rotation of the celestial sphere and the same design can be used independently from the actual geographical location. Our construction is the sole currently operating hexapod telescope mount performing dedicated optical imaging survey with a sub-arcsecond tracking precision.

  4. SORCE Level 3 Total Solar Irradiance Daily Average V016

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) data set SOR3TSID contains the total solar irradiance (a.k.a solar constant) data collected by the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM)...

  5. Results from BASS, the BANYAN All-Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Gagné, Jonathan; Doyon, René; Faherty, Jacqueline K; Malo, Lison; Artigau, Étienne

    2014-01-01

    We present results from the BANYAN All-Sky Survey (BASS), a systematic all-sky survey for brown dwarf candidates in young moving groups. We describe a cross-match of the 2MASS and AllWISE catalogs that provides a list of 98 970 potential nearby dwarfs with spectral types later than M5 with measurements of proper motion at precisions typically better than 15 mas yr$^{-1}$, as well as the Bayesian Analysis for Nearby Young AssociatioNs II tool (BANYAN II) which we use to build the BASS catalog from this 2MASS-AllWISE cross-match, consisting of more than 300 candidate members of young moving groups. We present the first results of a spectroscopic follow-up of those candidates, which allowed us to identify several new low-mass stars and brown dwarfs displaying signs of low gravity. We use the BASS catalog to show tentative evidence for mass segregation in AB Doradus and Argus, and reveal a new $\\sim$ 13 M$_{Jup}$ co-moving companion to a young low-mass star in BASS. We obtain a moderate-resolution near-infrared s...

  6. Second ROSAT all-sky survey (2RXS) source catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Boller, Th; Truemper, J; Haberl, F; Voges, W; Nandra, K

    2016-01-01

    We present the second ROSAT all-sky survey source catalogue, hereafter referred to as the 2RXS catalogue. This is the second publicly released ROSAT catalogue of point-like sources obtained from the ROSAT all-sky survey (RASS) observations performed with the PSPC between June 1990 and August 1991, and is an extended and revised version of the bright and faint source catalogues. We used the latest version of the RASS processing to produce overlapping X-ray images of 6.4x6.4 degrees sky regions. To create a source catalogue, a likelihood-based detection algorithm was applied to these, which accounts for the PSF across the PSPC field of view. Improvements in the background determination compared to 1RXS were also implemented. We obtained about 135,000 X-ray detections in the 0.1-2.4 keV energy band down to a likelihood threshold of 6.5. Our simulations show that the expected spurious content of the catalogue is a strong function of detection likelihood, and the full catalogue is expected to contain about 30% spu...

  7. MAXI: all-sky observation from the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Mihara, Tatehiro; Matsuoka, Masaru; Tomida, Hiroshi; Ueno, Shiro; Negoro, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Atsumasa; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Motoki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Yamauchi, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) is mounted on the International Space Station (ISS). Since 2009 it has been scanning the whole sky in every 92 minutes with ISS rotation. Due to high particle background at high latitude regions the carbon anodes of three GSC cameras were broken. We limit the GSC operation to low-latitude region around equator. GSC is suffering a double high background from Gamma-ray altimeter of Soyuz spacecraft. MAXI issued the 37-month catalog with 500 sources above ~0.6 mCrab in 4-10 keV. MAXI issued 133 to Astronomers Telegram and 44 to Gammaray burst Coordinated Network so far. One GSC camera had a small gas leak by a micrometeorite. Since 2013 June, the 1.4 atm Xe pressure went down to 0.6 atm in 2014 May 23. By gradually reducing the high voltage we keep using the proportional counter. SSC with X-ray CCD has detected diffuse soft X-rays in the all-sky, such as Cygnus super bubble and north polar spur, as well as it found a fast soft X-ray nova MAXI J0158-744. Although we operate C...

  8. The SuperCOSMOS all-sky galaxy catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Peacock, J A; Bilicki, M; MacGillivray, H T; Miller, L; Read, M A; Tritton, S B

    2016-01-01

    We describe the construction of an all-sky galaxy catalogue, using SuperCOSMOS scans of Schmidt photographic plates from the UKST and POSS2 surveys. The photographic photometry is calibrated using SDSS data, with results that are linear to 2% or better. All-sky photometric uniformity is achieved by matching plate overlaps and also by requiring homogeneity in optical-to-2MASS colours, yielding zero points that are uniform to 0.03 mag. or better. The typical AB depths achieved are B_J<21, R_F<19.5 and I_N<18.5, with little difference between hemispheres. In practice, the I_N plates are shallower than the B_J & R_F plates, so for most purposes we advocate the use of a catalogue selected in these two latter bands. At high Galactic latitudes, this catalogue is approximately 90% complete with 5% stellar contamination; we quantify how the quality degrades towards the Galactic plane. At low latitudes, there are many spurious galaxy candidates resulting from stellar blends: these approximately match the s...

  9. The ROSAT All-Sky Survey Bright Source Catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Voges, W; Boller, T; Bräuninger, H; Briel, U G; Burkert, W K A; Dennerl, K; Englhauser, J; Gruber, R; Haberl, F; Hartner, G; Hasinger, G; Pfeffermann, E; Pietsch, W; Predehl, P; Rosso, C; Schmitt, J H M M; Trümper, J E; Zimmermann, H U; Voges, Wolfgang; Aschenbach, Bernd; Boller, Thomas; Braeuninger, Heinrich; Briel, Ulrich; Burkert, Wolfgang; Dennerl, Konrad; Englhauser, Jakob; Gruber, Rainer; Haberl, Frank; Hartner, Gisela; Hasinger, Guenther; Pfeffermann, Elmar; Pietsch, Wolfgang; Predehl, Peter; Rosso, Cristina; Schmitt, Juergen H.M.M.; Truemper, Joachim; Zimmermann, Hans-Ulrich

    1999-01-01

    We present the ROSAT All-Sky Survey Bright Source Catalogue (RASS-BSC, revision 1RXS) derived from the all-sky survey performed during the first half year (1990/91) of the ROSAT mission. 18,811 sources are catalogued (i) down to a limiting ROSAT PSPC count-rate of 0.05 cts/s in the 0.1-2.4 keV energy band, (ii) with a detection likelihood of at least 15 and (iii) at least 15 source counts. The 18,811 sources underwent both an automatic validation and an interactive visual verification process in which for 94% of the sources the results of the standard processing were confirmed. The remaining 6% have been analyzed using interactive methods and these sources have been flagged. Flags are given for (i) nearby sources; (ii) sources with positional errors; (iii) extended sources; (iv) sources showing complex emission structures; and (v) sources which are missed by the standard analysis software. Broad band (0.1-2.4 keV) images are available for sources flagged by (ii), (iii) and (iv). For each source the ROSAT name...

  10. All-sky homogeneity of precipitable water vapour over Paranal

    CERN Document Server

    Querel, Richard R

    2014-01-01

    A Low Humidity and Temperature Profiling (LHATPRO) microwave radiometer, manufactured by Radiometer Physics GmbH (RPG), is used to monitor sky conditions over ESO's Paranal observatory in support of VLT science operations. The unit measures several channels across the strong water vapour emission line at 183 GHz, necessary for resolving the low levels of precipitable water vapour (PWV) that are prevalent on Paranal (median ~2.4 mm). The instrument consists of a humidity profiler (183-191 GHz), a temperature profiler (51-58 GHz), and an infrared camera (~10 {\\mu}m) for cloud detection. We present, for the first time, a statistical analysis of the homogeneity of all-sky PWV using 21 months of periodic (every 6 hours) all-sky scans from the radiometer. These data provide unique insight into the spatial and temporal variation of atmospheric conditions relevant for astronomical observations, particularly in the infrared. We find the PWV over Paranal to be remarkably homogeneous across the sky down to 27.5{\\deg} el...

  11. GAME: Grb and All-sky Monitor Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Amati, L; Frontera, F; Labanti, C; Feroci, M; Hudec, R; Gomboc, A; Ruffini, R; Santangelo, A; Vacchi, A; Campana, R; Evangelista, Y; Fuschino, F; Salvaterra, R; Stratta, G; Tagliaferri, G; Guidorzi, C; Rosati, P; Titarchuk, L; Penacchioni, A; Izzo, L; Zampa, N; Rodic, T

    2014-01-01

    We describe the GRB and All-sky Monitor Experiment (GAME) mission submitted by a large international collaboration (Italy, Germany, Czech Repubblic, Slovenia, Brazil) in response to the 2012 ESA call for a small mission opportunity for a launch in 2017 and presently under further investigation for subsequent opportunities. The general scientific objective is to perform measurements of key importance for GRB science and to provide the wide astrophysical community of an advanced X-ray all-sky monitoring system. The proposed payload was based on silicon drift detectors (~1-50 keV), CdZnTe (CZT) detectors (~15-200 keV) and crystal scintillators in phoswich (NaI/CsI) configuration (~20 keV-20 MeV), three well established technologies, for a total weight of ~250 kg and a required power of ~240 W. Such instrumentation allows a unique, unprecedented and very powerful combination of large field of view (3-4 sr), a broad energy energy band extending from ~1 keV up to ~20 MeV, an energy resolution as good as ~300 eV in ...

  12. Downscaling of global solar irradiation in R

    OpenAIRE

    Antoñanzas Torres, Fernando; Martínez de Pisón, F. Javier; Antoñanzas, Javier; Perpiñan Lamigueiro, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    A methodology for downscaling solar irradiation from satellite-derived databases is described using R software. Different packages such as raster, parallel, solaR, gstat, sp and rasterVis are considered in this study for improving solar resource estimation in areas with complex topography, in which downscaling is a very useful tool for reducing inherent deviations in satellite-derived irradiation databases, which lack of high global spatial resolution. A topographical analysis of horizon bloc...

  13. The AARTFAAC All Sky Monitor: System Design and Implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Prasad, Peeyush; Kooistra, Eric; van der Schuur, Daniel; Gunst, Andre; Romein, John; Kuiack, Mark; Molenaar, Gijs; Rowlinson, Antonia; Swinbank, John D; Wijers, Ralph A M J

    2016-01-01

    The Amsterdam-ASTRON Radio Transients Facility And Analysis Center (AARTFAAC) all sky monitor is a sensitive, real time transient detector based on the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR). It generates images of the low frequency radio sky with spatial resolution of 10s of arcmin, MHz bandwidths, and a time cadence of a few seconds, while simultaneously but independently observing with LOFAR. The image timeseries is then monitored for short and bright radio transients. On detection of a transient, a low latency trigger will be generated for LOFAR, which can interrupt its schedule to carry out follow-up observations of the trigger location at high sensitivity and resolutions. In this paper, we describe our heterogeneous, hierarchical design to manage the 240 Gbps raw data rate, and large scale computing to produce real-time images with minimum latency. We discuss the implementation of the instrumentation, its performance, and scalability.

  14. All-sky reconstruction of the primordial scalar potential & implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Sebastian; Greiner, Maksim; Ensslin, Torsten A.

    2015-08-01

    An essential quantity required to understand the physics of the early Universe is the primordial scalar potential and its statistics. We present an inexpensive all-sky reconstruction of the potential from CMB temperature data as well as an extension including polarization data. This has been achieved by applying a fully parallelized Bayesian inference method that separates the whole inverse problem into many, each of them solved by an optimal linear filter. Once explicitly having the potential, its statistics and underlying physics can be directly obtained avoiding expensive CMB analyses. This reconstruction, for instance, allows to infer the spatial structure of magnetic fields within the recombination epoch, the potential seeds of large-scale magnetic fields nowadays.

  15. All-Sky Interferometry with Spherical Harmonic Transit Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, J Richard; Pen, Ue-Li; Stebbins, Albert; Sitwell, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe the spherical harmonic transit telescope, a novel formalism for the analysis of transit radio telescopes. This all-sky approach bypasses the curved sky complications of traditional interferometry and so is particularly well suited to the analysis of wide-field radio interferometers. It enables compact and computationally efficient representations of the data and its statistics that allow new ways of approaching important problems like map-making and foreground removal. In particular, we show how it enables the use of the Karhunen-Loeve transform as a highly effective foreground filter, suppressing realistic foreground residuals for our fiducial example by at least a factor twenty below the 21cm signal even in highly contaminated regions of the sky. This is despite the presence of the angle-frequency mode mixing inherent in real-world instruments with frequency-dependent beams. We show, using Fisher forecasting, that foreground cleaning has little effect on power spectrum constraints ...

  16. A-STAR: The All-Sky Transient Astrophysics Reporter

    CERN Document Server

    Osborne, J P; Evans, P; Fraser, G W; Martindale, A; Atteia, J -L; Cordier, B; Mereghetti, S

    2013-01-01

    The small mission A-STAR (All-Sky Transient Astrophysics Reporter) aims to locate the X-ray counterparts to ALIGO and other gravitational wave detector sources, to study the poorly-understood low luminosity gamma-ray bursts, and to find a wide variety of transient high-energy source types, A-STAR will survey the entire available sky twice per 24 hours. The payload consists of a coded mask instrument, Owl, operating in the novel low energy band 4-150 keV, and a sensitive wide-field focussing soft X-ray instrument, Lobster, working over 0.15-5 keV. A-STAR will trigger on ~100 GRBs/yr, rapidly distributing their locations.

  17. Game: GRB and All-Sky Monitor Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amati, Lorenzo; Campana, Riccardo; Evangelista, Yuri; Feroci, Marco; Fuschino, Fabio; Labanti, Claudio; Salvaterra, Ruben; Stratta, Giulia; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Frontera, Filippo; Guidorzi, Cristiano; Rosati, Piero; Titarchuk, Lev; Braga, João Penacchioni, Ana; Ruffini, Remo; Izzo, Luca; Zampa, Nicola; Vacchi, Andrea; Santangelo, Andrea; Hudec, Rene; Gomboc, Andreja; Rodic, Tomaz

    2015-01-01

    We describe the GRB and All-sky Monitor Experiment (GAME) mission submitted by a large international collaboration (Italy, Germany, Czech Repubblic, Slovenia, Brazil) in response to the 2012 ESA call for a small mission opportunity for a launch in 2017 and presently under further investigation for subsequent opportunities. The general scientific objective is to perform measurements of key importance for GRB science and to provide the wide astrophysical community of an advanced X-ray all-sky monitoring system. The proposed payload was based on silicon drift detectors (~1-50 keV), CdZnTe (CZT) detectors (~15-200 keV) and crystal scintillators in phoswich (NaI/CsI) configuration (~20 keV-20 MeV), three well established technologies, for a total weight of ~250 kg and a required power of ~240 W. Such instrumentation allows a unique, unprecedented and very powerful combination of large field of view (3-4 sr), a broad energy energy band extending from ˜1 keV up to ˜20 MeV, an energy resolution as good as ~250 eV in the 1-30 keV energy range, a source location accuracy of ~1 arcmin. The mission profile included a launch (e.g., by Vega) into a low Earth orbit, a baseline sky scanning mode plus pointed observations of regions of particular interest, data transmission to ground via X-band (4.8 Gb/orbit, Alcantara and Malindi ground stations), and prompt transmission of GRB / transient triggers.

  18. MAXI: all-sky observation from the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihara, Tatehiro; Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Matsuoka, Masaru; Tomida, Hiroshi; Ueno, Shiro; Negoro, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Atsumasa; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Motoki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Yamauchi, Makoto

    2014-07-01

    Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) is mounted on the International Space Station (ISS). Since 2009 it has been scanning the whole sky in every 92 minutes with ISS rotation. Due to high particle background at high latitude regions the carbon anodes of three GSC cameras were broken. We limit the GSC operation to low-latitude region around equator. GSC is suffering a double high background from Gamma-ray altimeter of Soyuz spacecraft. MAXI issued the 37-month catalog with 500 sources above ~0.6 mCrab in 4-10 keV. MAXI issued 133 to Astronomers Telegram and 44 to Gammaray burst Coordinated Network so far. One GSC camera had a small gas leak by a micrometeorite. Since 2013 June, the 1.4 atm Xe pressure went down to 0.6 atm in 2014 May 23. By gradually reducing the high voltage we keep using the proportional counter. SSC with X-ray CCD has detected diffuse soft X-rays in the all-sky, such as Cygnus super bubble and north polar spur, as well as it found a fast soft X-ray nova MAXI J0158-744. Although we operate CCD with charge-injection, the energy resolution is degrading. In the 4.5 years of operation MAXI discovered 6 of 12 new black holes. The long-term behaviors of these sources can be classified into two types of the outbursts, 3 Fast Rise Exponential Decay (FRED) and 3 Fast Rise and Flat Top (FRFT). The cause of types is still unknown.

  19. Equatorial All Sky Imager Images from the Seychelles during the March 17th, 2015 geomagnetic storm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, B.

    2015-12-01

    An all sky imager was installed in the Seychelles earlier this year. The Seychelles islands are located northeast of Madagascar and east of Somalia in the equatorial Indian Ocean. The all sky imager is located on the island of Mahe (4.6667°S, 55.4667°E geographic), (10.55°S, 127.07°E geomagnetic), with filters of 557.7, 620.0, 630.0, 765.0 and 777.4 nm. Images with a 90 second exposure from Seychelles in 777.4nm and 630.0nm from the night before and night of the March 17th geomagnetic storm are discussed in comparison to solar wind measurements at ACE and the disturbance storm time (Dst) index. These images show line-of-sight intensities of photons received dependent on each filters wavelength. A time series of these images sometimes will show the movement of relatively dark areas, or depletions, in each emission. The depletion regions are known to cause scintillation in GPS signals. The direction and speed of movement of these depletions are related to changes observed in the solar wind.

  20. First observations from a CCD all-sky spectrograph at Barentsburg (Spitsbergen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Chernouss

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A digital CCD all-sky spectrograph was made by the Polar Geophysical Institute (PGI to support IPY activity in auroral research. The device was tested at the Barentsburg observatory of PGI during the winter season of 2005–2006. The spectrograph is based on a cooled CCD and a transmission grating. The main features of this spectrograph are: a wide field of view (~180°, a wide spectral range (380–740 nm, a spectral resolution of 0.6 nm, a background level of about 100 R at 1-min exposure time. Several thousand spectra of nightglow and aurora were recorded during the observation season. It was possible to register both the strong auroral emissions, as well as weak ones. Spectra of aurora, including nitrogen and oxygen molecular and atomic emissions, as well as OH emissions of the nightglow are shown. A comparison has been conducted of auroral spectra obtained by the film all-sky spectral camera C-180-S at Spitsbergen during IGY, with spectra obtained at Barentsburg during the last winter season. The relationship between the red (630.0 nm and green (557.7 nm auroral emissions shows that the green emission is dominant near the minimum of the solar cycle activity (2005–2006. The opposite situation is observed during 1958–1959, with a maximum solar cycle activity.

  1. Second ROSAT all-sky survey (2RXS) source catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boller, Th.; Freyberg, M. J.; Trümper, J.; Haberl, F.; Voges, W.; Nandra, K.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We present the second ROSAT all-sky survey source catalogue, hereafter referred to as the 2RXS catalogue. This is the second publicly released ROSAT catalogue of point-like sources obtained from the ROSAT all-sky survey (RASS) observations performed with the position-sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) between June 1990 and August 1991, and is an extended and revised version of the bright and faint source catalogues. Methods: We used the latest version of the RASS processing to produce overlapping X-ray images of 6.4° × 6.4° sky regions. To create a source catalogue, a likelihood-based detection algorithm was applied to these, which accounts for the variable point-spread function (PSF) across the PSPC field of view. Improvements in the background determination compared to 1RXS were also implemented. X-ray control images showing the source and background extraction regions were generated, which were visually inspected. Simulations were performed to assess the spurious source content of the 2RXS catalogue. X-ray spectra and light curves were extracted for the 2RXS sources, with spectral and variability parameters derived from these products. Results: We obtained about 135 000 X-ray detections in the 0.1-2.4 keV energy band down to a likelihood threshold of 6.5, as adopted in the 1RXS faint source catalogue. Our simulations show that the expected spurious content of the catalogue is a strong function of detection likelihood, and the full catalogue is expected to contain about 30% spurious detections. A more conservative likelihood threshold of 9, on the other hand, yields about 71 000 detections with a 5% spurious fraction. We recommend thresholds appropriate to the scientific application. X-ray images and overlaid X-ray contour lines provide an additional user product to evaluate the detections visually, and we performed our own visual inspections to flag uncertain detections. Intra-day variability in the X-ray light curves was quantified based on the

  2. All-sky homogeneity of precipitable water vapour over Paranal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querel, Richard R.; Kerber, Florian

    2014-08-01

    A Low Humidity and Temperature Profiling (LHATPRO) microwave radiometer, manufactured by Radiometer Physics GmbH (RPG), is used to monitor sky conditions over ESO's Paranal observatory in support of VLT science operations. The unit measures several channels across the strong water vapour emission line at 183 GHz, necessary for resolving the low levels of precipitable water vapour (PWV) that are prevalent on Paranal (median ~2.4 mm). The instrument consists of a humidity profiler (183-191 GHz), a temperature profiler (51-58 GHz), and an infrared camera (~10 μm) for cloud detection. We present, for the first time, a statistical analysis of the homogeneity of all-sky PWV using 21 months of periodic (every 6 hours) all-sky scans from the radiometer. These data provide unique insight into the spatial and temporal variation of atmospheric conditions relevant for astronomical observations, particularly in the infrared. We find the PWV over Paranal to be remarkably homogeneous across the sky down to 27.5° elevation with a median variation of 0.32 mm (peak to valley) or 0.07 mm (rms). The homogeneity is a function of the absolute PWV but the relative variation is fairly constant at 10-15% (peak to valley) and 3% (rms). Such variations will not be a significant issue for analysis of astronomical data. Users at ESO can specify PWV - measured at zenith - as an ambient constraint in service mode to enable, for instance, very demanding observations in the infrared that can only be conducted during periods of very good atmospheric transmission and hence low PWV. We conclude that in general it will not be necessary to add another observing constraint for PWV homogeneity to ensure integrity of observations. For demanding observations requiring very low PWV, where the relative variation is higher, the optimum support could be provided by observing with the LHATPRO in the same line-of-sight simultaneously. Such a mode of operations has already been tested but will have to be

  3. Variability of Solar Irradiances Using Wavelet Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesnell, William D.

    2007-01-01

    We have used wavelets to analyze the sunspot number, F10.7 (the solar irradiance at a wavelength of approx.10.7 cm), and Ap (a geomagnetic activity index). Three different wavelets are compared, showing how each selects either temporal or scale resolution. Our goal is an envelope of solar activity that better bounds the large amplitude fluctuations form solar minimum to maximum. We show how the 11-year cycle does not disappear at solar minimum, that minimum is only the other part of the solar cycle. Power in the fluctuations of solar-activity-related indices may peak during solar maximum but the solar cycle itself is always present. The Ap index has a peak after solar maximum that appears to be better correlated with the current solar cycle than with the following cycle.

  4. C-BASS: The C-Band All Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Timothy J.; C-BASS Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    The C-Band All Sky Survey (C-BASS) is a project to image the whole sky at a wavelength of 6 cm (frequency 5 GHz), measuring both the brightness and the polarization of the sky. Correlation polarimeters are mounted on two separate telescopes, one at the Owens Valley Observatory (OVRO) in California and another in South Africa, allowing C-BASS to map the whole sky. The OVRO instrument has completed observations for the northern part of the survey. We are working on final calibration of intensity and polarization. The southern instrument has recently started observations for the southern part of the survey from its site at Klerefontein near Carnarvon in South Africa. The principal aim of C-BASS is to allow the subtraction of polarized Galactic synchrotron emission from the data produced by CMB polarization experiments, such as WMAP, Planck, and dedicated B-mode polarization experiments. In addition it will contribute to studies of: (1) the local (NASA) in the USA, the Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory (supported by the Square Kilometre Array project) in South Africa, and the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) in Saudi Arabia.

  5. Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies in the AKARI All Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Eser, E Kilerci; Doi, Y

    2014-01-01

    We present a new catalog of 118 Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) and one Hyperluminous Infrared Galaxy (HLIRG) by crossmatching AKARI all-sky survey with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10 (SDSS DR10) and the Final Data Release of the Two-Degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS). 40 of the ULIRGs and one HLIRG are new identifications. We find that ULIRGs are interacting pair galaxies or ongoing/post mergers. This is consistent with the widely accepted view: ULIRGs are major mergers of disk galaxies. We confirm the previously known positive trend between the AGN fraction and IR luminosity. We show that ULIRGs have a large off-set from the 'main sequence' up to z~1; their off-set from the z~2 'main sequence' is relatively smaller. We find a consistent result with the previous studies showing that compared to local star forming SDSS galaxies of similar mass, local ULIRGs have lower oxygen abundances. We for the first time demonstrate that ULIRGs follow the fundamental metallicity relation (...

  6. Progress on the Low Frequency All Sky Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, James; Jenet, Fredrick; Craig, Joseph; Creighton, Teviet David; Percy Dartez, Louis; Ford, Anthony J.; Hernandez, Andrés; Hicks, Brian; Hinojosa, Jesus; Jaramillo, Ricardo; Kassim, Namir E.; Lazio, Joseph; Lunsford, Grady; Miller, Rossina B.; Ray, Paul S.; Rivera, Jesus; Taylor, Gregory B.; Teitelbaum, Lawrence; CenterAdvanced Radio Astronomy, University of Texas at Brownsville, University of New Mexico, Naval Research Laboratory, Jet Propulsion Laborator

    2015-01-01

    The Low Frequency All Sky Monitor (LoFASM) is a system of geographically separated radio arrays dedicated to the study of radio transients. LoFASM consists of four stations, each comprised of 12 cross-dipole antennas designed to operate between 10-88MHz. The antennas and front end electronics for LoFASM were designed by the Naval Research Laboratory for the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) project (cf. Hicks et al. PASP 124, 1090 (2012)). All four stations are currently operational and in the commissioning stage . Over the last 3 years, undergraduate and graduate students from the University of Texas at Brownsville's Center for Advanced Radio Astronomy have been establishing these stations around the continental US, consisting of sites located in Port Mansfield, Texas, the LWA North Arm site of the LWA1 Radio Observatory in New Mexico, adjacent to the North Arm of the Very Large Array, the Green Bank Radio Observatory, West Virginia, and the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex, California. In combination with the establishment of these sites was the development of the analog hardware, which consists of custom RF splitter/combiners and a custom amplifier and filter chain designed at Center for Advanced Radio Astronomy (CARA). This poster will expound on progress in site installation and the development of the analog signal chain, specifically the redesigned analog receiving system.

  7. Ultraluminous infrared galaxies in the AKARI all-sky survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilerci Eser, E., E-mail: ecekilerci@dark-cosmology.dk [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); Goto, T. [National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Doi, Y., E-mail: tomo@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: doi@ea.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The University of Tokyo, Komaba 3-8-1, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)

    2014-12-10

    We present a new catalog of 118 ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and one hyperluminous infrared galaxy (HLIRG) by cross-matching the AKARI all-sky survey with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10 (SDSS DR10) and the final data release of the Two-Degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey. Forty of the ULIRGs and one HLIRG are new identifications. We find that ULIRGs are interacting pair galaxies or ongoing or postmergers. This is consistent with the widely accepted view: ULIRGs are major mergers of disk galaxies. We confirm the previously known positive trend between the active galactic nucleus fraction and infrared luminosity. We show that ULIRGs have a large offset from the main sequence up to z ∼ 1; their offset from the z ∼ 2 'main sequence' is relatively smaller. We find a result consistent with the previous studies showing that, compared to local star-forming SDSS galaxies of similar mass, local ULIRGs have lower oxygen abundances. We demonstrate for the first time that ULIRGs follow the fundamental metallicity relation (FMR). The scatter of ULIRGs around the FMR (0.09 dex-0.5 dex) is comparable to the scatter of z ∼ 2-3 galaxies. We provide the largest local (0.050

  8. Analysis and modeling of solar irradiance variations

    CERN Document Server

    Yeo, K L

    2014-01-01

    A prominent manifestation of the solar dynamo is the 11-year activity cycle, evident in indicators of solar activity, including solar irradiance. Although a relationship between solar activity and the brightness of the Sun had long been suspected, it was only directly observed after regular satellite measurements became available with the launch of Nimbus-7 in 1978. The measurement of solar irradiance from space is accompanied by the development of models aimed at describing the apparent variability by the intensity excess/deficit effected by magnetic structures in the photosphere. The more sophisticated models, termed semi-empirical, rely on the intensity spectra of photospheric magnetic structures generated with radiative transfer codes from semi-empirical model atmospheres. An established example of such models is SATIRE-S (Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction for the Satellite era). One key limitation of current semi-empirical models is the fact that the radiant properties of network and faculae a...

  9. An All-Sky Sample of Intermediate-Mass Star-Forming Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Lundquist, Michael J; Alexander, Michael J; Kerton, Charles R; Arvidsson, Kim

    2014-01-01

    We present an all-sky sample of 984 candidate intermediate-mass Galactic star-forming regions color-selected from the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) Point Source Catalog and morphologically classify each object using mid-infrared Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) images. Of the 984 candidates, 616 are probable star-forming regions (62.6%), 128 are filamentary structures (13.0%), 39 are point-like objects of unknown nature (4.0%), and 201 are galaxies (20.4%). We conduct a study of four of these regions, IRAS 00259+5625, IRAS 00420+5530, IRAS 01080+5717, and IRAS 05380+2020, at Galactic latitudes |b| > 5 degrees using optical spectroscopy from the Wyoming Infrared Observatory along with near-infrared photometry from the Two-Micron All Sky Survey to investigate their stellar content. New optical spectra, color-magnitude diagrams, and color-color diagrams reveal their extinctions, spectrophotometric distances, and the presence of small stellar clusters containing 20-78 solar masses of stars. The...

  10. A Solar Irradiance Climate Data Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coddington, O.; Lean, J. L.; Pilewskie, P.; Snow, M.; Lindholm, D.

    2016-08-01

    We present a new climate data record for total solar irradiance and solar spectral irradiance between 1610 and the present day with associated wavelength and time-dependent uncertainties and quarterly updates. The data record, which is part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Climate Data Record (CDR) program, provides a robust, sustainable, and scientifically defensible record of solar irradiance that is of sufficient length, consistency, and continuity for use in studies of climate variability and climate change on multiple time scales and for user groups spanning climate modeling, remote sensing, and natural resource and renewable energy industries. The data record, jointly developed by the University of Colorado’s Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), is constructed from solar irradiance models that determine the changes with respect to quiet sun conditions when facular brightening and sunspot darkening features are present on the solar disk where the magnitude of the changes in irradiance are determined from the linear regression of a proxy magnesium (Mg) II index and sunspot area indices against the approximately decade-long solar irradiance measurements of the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE). To promote long-term data usage and sharing for a broad range of users, the source code, the dataset itself, and supporting documentation are archived at NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). In the future, the dataset will also be available through the LASP Interactive Solar Irradiance Data Center (LISIRD) for user-specified time periods and spectral ranges of interest.

  11. The AGN Content of the Micron all Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutri, R. M.

    2000-01-01

    The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) began routine operations from its northern facility on Mt. Hopkins, AZ in June of 1997, and from its southern facility on Cerro Tololo, Chile in March of 1998. At each site, highly automated 1.3 m telescopes equipped with identical 3-channel cameras, are systematically imaging the sky in three near infrared wavelength bands, J (1.25 um), H (1.65 um) and K-s (2.17 um). The Survey will ultimately produce an Image Atlas containing nearly two million 512 x 1024 pixel images (1 arcsec/pix) in the three colors, a highly complete and reliable catalog containing approx. 300 million point sources having SNR greater than 10 photometry at J less or = 15.8, H less or = 15.1 and K-s less or = 14.3 mag. and an astrometric accuracy greater than 0.511 RMS, and a catalog of 1-2 million resolved sources, primarily galaxies, having SNR greater than 10 photometric accuracy at J less than or = 15.5, H less than or = 14.8 and K-s less than or = 13.5 mag. The 2MASS Sampler, an introductory set of data, was released to the community in December of 1998 (see http://www.ipac.caltech.edu/2mass/). We review the near IR and optical/IR properties of "conventional" QSOs from UV and optical samples, and estimate the number that will be detected by 2MASS. We also discuss 2MASS's ability to test for for new populations of extremely red AGN that have been missed by UV and Visual surveys, as suggested by from IRAS and radio studies. Results of spectroscopic follow-up of 2MASS-selected new AGN candidates will also be presented.

  12. The LASP Interactive Solar IRradiance Datacenter (LISIRD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, M.; Woods, T. N.; Eparvier, F. G.; Fontenla, J.; Harder, J.; McClintock, W. E.; Pankratz, C.; Richard, E.; Windnagel, A.; Woodraska, D.

    2005-12-01

    LASP has created an online resource for combined solar irradiance datasets from the SORCE, TIMED, UARS, and SME missions. The LASP Interactive Solar IRradiance Datacenter (LISIRD) not only provides unified access to the individual datasets, but also combines them for ease of use by scientists, educators, and the general public. In particular, LISIRD makes available composite spectra and time series. The TIMED SEE, SORCE SOLSTICE, and SORCE SIM instruments produce spectra that together cover the solar spectrum from 1 to 2700 nm. Through the LISIRD interface, the user can get data that bridges the various missions in both wavelength and time. LISIRD also hosts data products of interest to the space weather community. They have slightly different needs than the atmospheric modelers that are the typical users of irradiance data. For space weather applications, high time cadence and near real-time data delivery are key. For these users, we make our observations available shortly after spacecraft contact, and append the observations to a single data file which they can retrieve using anonymous ftp every few hours. The third component of LISIRD is the Solar Physical Radiation Model (SPRM) results of Fontenla et al. It provides a model of current solar activity, the synthetic spectral irradiance, and tools that permit one to model the solar activity source of the spectral irradiance variations.

  13. Validation of the Surface Downwelling Solar Irradiance Estimates of the HelioClim-3 Database in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yehia Eissa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available HelioClim-3 (HC3 is a database providing time series of the surface downwelling solar irradiance that are computed from images of the Meteosat satellites. This paper presents the validation results of the hourly global horizontal irradiance (GHI and direct normal irradiance (DNI, i.e., beam irradiance at normal incidence, of versions four and five of HC3 at seven Egyptian sites. The validation is performed for all-sky conditions, as well as cloud-free conditions. Both versions of HC3 provide similar performances whatever the conditions. Another comparison is made with the estimates provided by the McClear database that is restricted to cloud-free conditions. All databases capture well the temporal variability of the GHI in all conditions, McClear being superior for cloud-free cases. In cloud-free conditions for the GHI, the relative root mean square error (RMSE are fairly similar, ranging from 6% to 15%; both HC3 databases exhibit a smaller bias than McClear. McClear offers an overall better performance for the cloud-free DNI estimates. For all-sky conditions, the relative RMSE for GHI ranges from 10% to 22%, except one station, while, for the DNI, the results are not so good for the two stations with DNI measurements.

  14. Design principles and field performance of a solar spectral irradiance meter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatsiankou, V.; Hinzer, K.; Haysom, J.; Schriemer, H.; Emery, K.; Beal, R.

    2016-08-01

    A solar spectral irradiance meter (SSIM), designed for measuring the direct normal irradiance (DNI) in six wavelength bands, has been combined with models to determine key atmospheric transmittances and the resulting spectral irradiance distribution of DNI under all sky conditions. The design principles of the SSIM, implementation of a parameterized transmittance model, and field performance comparisons of modeled solar spectra with reference radiometer measurements are presented. Two SSIMs were tested and calibrated at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) against four spectroradiometers and an absolute cavity radiometer. The SSIMs' DNI was on average within 1% of the DNI values reported by one of NREL's primary absolute cavity radiometers. An additional SSIM was installed at the SUNLAB Outdoor Test Facility in September 2014, with ongoing collection of environmental and spectral data. The SSIM's performance in Ottawa was compared against a commercial pyrheliometer and a spectroradiometer over an eight month study. The difference in integrated daily spectral irradiance between the SSIM and the ASD spectroradiometer was found to be less than 1%. The cumulative energy density collected by the SSIM over this duration agreed with that measured by an Eppley model NIP pyrheliometer to within 0.5%. No degradation was observed.

  15. Reconstruction of solar spectral irradiance since the Maunder minimum

    OpenAIRE

    Krivova, N. A.; Vieira, L. E. A.; S. K. Solanki

    2010-01-01

    International audience [1] Solar irradiance is the main external driver of the Earth's climate. Whereas the total solar irradiance is the main source of energy input into the climate system, solar UV irradiance exerts control over chemical and physical processes in the Earth's upper atmosphere. The time series of accurate irradiance measurements are, however, relatively short and limit the assessment of the solar contribution to the climate change. Here we reconstruct solar total and spect...

  16. Nanostructured Solar Irradiation Control Materials for Solar Energy Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jinho; Marshall, I. A.; Torrico, M. N.; Taylor, C. R.; Ely, Jeffry; Henderson, Angel Z.; Kim, J.-W.; Sauti, G.; Gibbons, L. J.; Park, C.; Lowther, S. E.; Lillehei, P. T.; Bryant, R. G.

    2012-01-01

    Tailoring the solar absorptivity (alpha(sub s)) and thermal emissivity (epsilon(sub T)) of materials constitutes an innovative approach to solar energy control and energy conversion. Numerous ceramic and metallic materials are currently available for solar absorbance/thermal emittance control. However, conventional metal oxides and dielectric/metal/dielectric multi-coatings have limited utility due to residual shear stresses resulting from the different coefficient of thermal expansion of the layered materials. This research presents an alternate approach based on nanoparticle-filled polymers to afford mechanically durable solar-absorptive and thermally-emissive polymer nanocomposites. The alpha(sub s) and epsilon(sub T) were measured with various nano inclusions, such as carbon nanophase particles (CNPs), at different concentrations. Research has shown that adding only 5 wt% CNPs increased the alpha(sub s) and epsilon(sub T) by a factor of about 47 and 2, respectively, compared to the pristine polymer. The effect of solar irradiation control of the nanocomposite on solar energy conversion was studied. The solar irradiation control coatings increased the power generation of solar thermoelectric cells by more than 380% compared to that of a control power cell without solar irradiation control coatings.

  17. Solar rotational modulations of spectral irradiance and correlations with the variability of total solar irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae N.; Cahalan, Robert F.; Wu, Dong L.

    2016-09-01

    Aims: We characterize the solar rotational modulations of spectral solar irradiance (SSI) and compare them with the corresponding changes of total solar irradiance (TSI). Solar rotational modulations of TSI and SSI at wavelengths between 120 and 1600 nm are identified over one hundred Carrington rotational cycles during 2003-2013. Methods: The SORCE (Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment) and TIMED (Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics)/SEE (Solar EUV Experiment) measured and SATIRE-S modeled solar irradiances are analyzed using the EEMD (Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition) method to determine the phase and amplitude of 27-day solar rotational variation in TSI and SSI. Results: The mode decomposition clearly identifies 27-day solar rotational variations in SSI between 120 and 1600 nm, and there is a robust wavelength dependence in the phase of the rotational mode relative to that of TSI. The rotational modes of visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) are in phase with the mode of TSI, but the phase of the rotational mode of ultraviolet (UV) exhibits differences from that of TSI. While it is questionable that the VIS to NIR portion of the solar spectrum has yet been observed with sufficient accuracy and precision to determine the 11-year solar cycle variations, the temporal variations over one hundred cycles of 27-day solar rotation, independent of the two solar cycles in which they are embedded, show distinct solar rotational modulations at each wavelength.

  18. Electron irradiation of modern solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Miyahira, T. F.

    1977-01-01

    A number of modern solar cell types representing 1976 technology (as well as some older types) were irradiated with 1 MeV electrons (and a limited number with 2 MeV electrons and 10 MeV protons). After irradiation, the cells were annealed, with I-V curves measured under AMO at 30 C. The purpose was to provide data to be incorporated in the revision of the solar cell radiation handbook. Cell resistivities ranged from 2 to 20 ohm-cm, and cell thickness from 0.05 to 0.46 mm. Cell types examined were conventional, shallow junction, back surface field (BSF), textured, and textured with BSF.

  19. SOLAR/SOLSPEC ultraviolet solar spectral irradiance variability since 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damé, Luc; Bolsee, David; Hauchecorne, Alain; Meftah, Mustapha; Bekki, Slimane; Pereira, Nuno

    2016-07-01

    The SOLAR/SOLSPEC experiment measures the Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) from the Space Station since April 2008. Measurements are carried between 166 nm and 3088 nm by three double-monochromators. SSI, particularly in the ultraviolet, is a key input to determine the dynamics and coupling of Earth's atmosphere in response to solar and terrestrial inputs. In-flight operations and performances of the instrument, including corrections, will be presented for the 8 years of the mission. After an accurate calibration following recent special on-orbit new operations, we present the variability measured in the UV by SOLAR/SOLSPEC. The accuracy of these measurements will be discussed.

  20. Solar Irradiance and Thermospheric Airglow Rocket Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Stanley C.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes work done in support of the Solar Irradiance and Thermospheric Air-glow Rocket Experiments at the University of Colorado for NASA grant NAG5-5021 under the direction of Dr. Stanley C. Solomon. (The overall rocket program is directed by Dr. Thomas N. Woods, formerly at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and now also at the University of Colorado, for NASA grant NAG5-5141.) Grant NAG5-5021 provided assistance to the overall program through analysis of airglow and solar data, support of two graduate students, laboratory technical services, and field support. The general goals of the rocket program were to measure the solar extreme ultraviolet spectral irradiance, measure the terrestrial far-ultraviolet airglow, and analyze their relationship at various levels of solar activity, including near solar minimum. These have been met, as shown below. In addition, we have used the attenuation of solar radiation as the rocket descends through the thermosphere to measure density changes. This work demonstrates the maturity of the observational and modeling methods connecting energetic solar photon fluxes and airglow emissions through the processes of photoionization and photoelectron production and loss. Without a simultaneous photoelectron measurement, some aspects of this relationship remain obscure, and there are still questions pertaining to cascade contributions to molecular and atomic airglow emissions. However, by removing the solar irradiance as an "adjustable parameter" in the analysis, significant progress has been made toward understanding the relationship of far-ultraviolet airglow emissions to the solar and atmospheric conditions that control them.

  1. Monitoring Cloud Motion in Cyprus for Solar Irradiance Prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Tapakis, Rogiros D.; Charalambides, Alexandros G.

    2013-01-01

    Solar Energy is the feedstock for various applications of renewable energy sources; thus, the knowledge of the intensity of the incident solar irradiance is essential for monitoring the performance of such systems. The major unpredictable factor in defining the solar irradiance and the performance of solar systems is the presence of clouds in the sky. So far, various researchers proposed several models to correlate solar irradiance to cloud coverage and cloud type. The present work describes ...

  2. Transiting Planet Simulations from the All Sky Extrasolar Planets Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Kane, S R; Kane, Stephen R.; Ge, Jian

    2006-01-01

    Many of the planets discovered via the radial velocity technique are hot Jupiters in 3-5 day orbits with ~10$% chance of transiting their parent star. However, radial velocity surveys for extra-solar planets generally require substantial amounts of large telescope time in order to monitor a sufficient number of stars due to the single-object capabilities of the spectrograph. A multi-object Doppler survey instrument has been developed which is based on the dispersed fixed-delay interferometer design. We present simulations of the expected results from the Sloan Doppler survey based on calculated noise models and sensitivity for the instrument and the known distribution of exoplanetary system parameters. We have developed code for automatically sifting and fitting the planet candidates produced by the survey to allow for fast follow-up observations to be conducted. A transit ephemeris is automatically calculated by the code for each candidate and updated when new data becomes available. The techniques presented...

  3. Modeled soft X-ray solar irradiances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W. Kent

    1994-01-01

    Solar soft X-rays have historically been inaccurately modeled in both relative variations and absolute magnitudes by empirical solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance models. This is a result of the use of a limited number of rocket data sets which were primarily associated with the calibration of the AE-E satellite EUV data set. In this work, the EUV91 solar EUV irradiance model has been upgraded to improve the accuracy of the 3.0 to 5.0 nm relative irradiance variations. The absolute magnitude estimate of the flux in this wavelength range has also been revised upwards. The upgrade was accomplished by first digitizing the SOLRAD 11 satellite 4.4 to 6.0 nm measured energy flux data set, then extracting and extrapolating a derived 3.0 to 5.0 nm photon flux from these data, and finally by performing a correlation between these derived data and the daily and 81-day mean 10.7 cm radio flux emission using a multiple linear regression technique. A correlation coefficient of greater than 0.9 was obtained between the dependent and independent data sets. The derived and modeled 3.0 to 5.0 nm flux varies by more than an order of magnitude over a solar cycle, ranging from a flux below 1 x 10(exp 8) to a flux greater than 1 x 10(exp 9) photons per sq cm per sec. Solar rotational (27-day) variations in the flux magnitude are a factor of 2. The derived and modeled irradiance absolute values are an order of magnitude greater than previous values from rocket data sets related to the calibration of the AE-E satellite.

  4. Development of a Stochastic Hourly Solar Irradiation Model

    OpenAIRE

    Kristijan Brecl; Marko Topič

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a new solar irradiation model and implemented it in the SunIrradiance photovoltaic cell/module simulator. This model uses stochastic methods to generate the hourly distribution of solar irradiation on a horizontal or inclined surface from monthly irradiation values on the horizontal surface of a selected location and was verified with the measured irradiance data in Ljubljana, located in Central Europe. The new model shows better simulation results with regard to the share o...

  5. Spatially Resolved Images and Solar Irradiance Variability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Kariyappa

    2008-03-01

    The Sun is the primary source of energy that governs both the terrestrial climate and near-earth space environment. Variations in UV irradiances seen at earth are the sum of global (solar dynamo) to regional (active region, plage, network, bright points and background) solar magnetic activities that can be identified through spatially resolved photospheric, chromospheric and coronal features. In this research, the images of CaII K-line (NSO/Sac Peak) have been analysed to segregate the various chromospheric features.We derived the different indices and estimated their contribution from the time series data to total CaII K emission flux and UV irradiance variability. A part of the important results from this research is discussed in this paper.

  6. Electron irradiation of tandem junction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Miyahira, T. F.; Scott-Monck, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The electrical behavior of 100 micron thick tandem junction solar cells manufactured by Texas Instruments was studied as a function of 1 MeV electron fluence, photon irradiation, and 60 C annealing. These cells are found to degrade rapidly with radiation, the most serious loss occurring in the blue end of the cell's spectral response. No photon degradation was found to occur, but the cells did anneal a small amount at 60 C.

  7. Parameterization of atmospheric longwave emissivity in a mountainous site for all sky conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Herrero

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Longwave radiation is an important component of the energy balance of the Earth's surface. The downward component, emitted by the clouds and aerosols in the atmosphere, is rarely measured, and is still not well understood. In mountainous areas, direct observations are even scarcer and the fitting of existing models is often subjected to local parameterization in order to surplus the particular physics of the atmospheric profiles. The influence of clouds makes it even harder to estimate for all sky conditions. This work presents a long-time continuous dataset of high-resolution longwave radiation measured in a weather station at a height of 2500 m a.s.l. in Sierra Nevada, Spain, together with the parameterization of the apparent atmospheric emissivity for clear and cloudy skies resulting from three different schemes. We evaluate the schemes of Brutsaert, and Crawford and Duchon with locally adjusted coefficients and compare them with a completely parametric expression adjusted for these data that takes into account three possible significant atmospheric states related to the cloud cover: clear, completely covered, and partly covered skies. All the parametric expressions are related to the screen-level values of temperature, relative humidity and solar radiation, which can be frequently found in standard weather stations. Unobserved cloudiness measurements needed for Brutsaert scheme for cloudy sky are also parameterized from screen-level measurements. The calibration performed for a 6-yr period at the study site resulted in satisfactory estimations of emissivity for all the analyzed schemes thanks to the local fitting of the parameterizations, with the best achievement found for the completely parametric expression. Further validation of the expressions in two alternative sites showed that the greater accuracy of the latter can also be found in very close sites, while a better performance of the Brutsaert scheme, with a more physical background

  8. Solar flare irradiation records in Antarctic meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, J. N.

    1981-01-01

    The observation of tracks from solar flare heavy nuclei in Antarctic meteorite samples is reported. In an analysis of nuclear track densities in eight L and H chondrites of low metamorphic grade, it was found that two interior specimens of sample 77216, an L-3 chondrite, contain olivine grains with track densities much higher than the average track densities, indicating precompaction irradiation by solar flares in different shielding conditions. Preliminary data from mass spectroscopic analyses show a large excess of noble gases, with a Ne-20/Ne-22 ratio of greater than or equal to 10, indicating the presence of solar-type noble gas. Results of track density measurements in the other Antarctic meteorites range from 10,000 to 4,000,000/sq cm, which is within the range observed in non-Antarctic L-group meteorites

  9. All-sky Relative Opacity Mapping Using Night Time Panoramic Images

    OpenAIRE

    Shamir, Lior; Nemiroff, Roberj J.

    2005-01-01

    An all-sky cloud monitoring system that generates relative opacity maps over many of the world's premier astronomical observatories is described. Photometric measurements of numerous background stars are combined with simultaneous sky brightness measurements to differentiate thin clouds from sky glow sources such as air glow and zodiacal light. The system takes a continuous pipeline of all-sky images, and compares them to canonical images taken on other nights at the same sidereal time. Data ...

  10. Spectral solar irradiance and its entropic effect on Earth's climate

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, W.; Liu, Y; Wen, G

    2011-01-01

    The high-resolution measurements of the spectral solar irradiance at the top of the Earth's atmosphere by the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) satellite suggest significant deviation of solar radiation from the commonly assumed blackbody radiation. Here, we use these spectral irradiance measurements to estimate the Earth's incident solar radiation entropy flux, and examine the importance of a proper estimation approach. The Earth's incident solar radiation entropy flux estimated...

  11. Photometric quantities for solar irradiance modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preminger, D. G.; Walton, S. R.; Chapman, G. A.

    2002-11-01

    We analyze photometric quantities for the modeling of the total solar irradiance, S. These quantities are derived from full-disk solar images taken at the San Fernando Observatory. We introduce a new quantity, the photometric sum, Σ, which is the sum over an entire image of each pixel's contribution to the irradiance in that image. Σ combines both bright and dark features; and because the sum is over the entire image, it will include low contrast features that cannot be identified directly. Specifically, we examine Σr, Σb, and ΣK, the photometric sums over broadband red, broadband blue, and 1-nm bandpass Ca II K images, respectively. Σr and Σb measure the effects of solar features on the variability in S at two different continuum wavelengths. ΣK measures the variability in spectral lines due to solar features. We find that Σr and Σb have no long-term trend. ΣK, however, varies in phase with the solar cycle. We carry out several multiple linear regressions on the value of S from cycle 22; the best fit uses Σr and ΣK and reproduces the observed composite S with a multiple regression coefficient R = 0.96. We conclude that the long-term change in S over the solar cycle can be accounted for by the variability in the spectral lines as measured by ΣK, assuming no change in the quiet Sun; the contribution of the continuum to the variations in S is only on active region timescales.

  12. Solar spectral irradiance changes during cycle 24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchenko, S. V.; DeLand, M. T. [Also at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA. (United States)

    2014-07-10

    We use solar spectra obtained by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on board the Aura satellite to detect and follow long-term (years) and short-term (weeks) changes in the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) in the 265-500 nm spectral range. During solar Cycle 24, in the relatively line-free regions the SSI changed by ∼0.6% ± 0.2% around 265 nm. These changes gradually diminish to 0.15% ± 0.20% at 500 nm. All strong spectral lines and blends, with the notable exception of the upper Balmer lines, vary in unison with the solar 'continuum'. Besides the lines with strong chromospheric components, the most involved species include Fe I blends and all prominent CH, NH, and CN spectral bands. Following the general trend seen in the solar 'continuum', the variability of spectral lines also decreases toward longer wavelengths. The long-term solar cycle SSI changes are closely, to within the quoted 0.1%-0.2% uncertainties, matched by the appropriately adjusted short-term SSI variations derived from the 27 day rotational modulation cycles. This further strengthens and broadens the prevailing notion about the general scalability of the UV SSI variability to the emissivity changes in the Mg II 280 nm doublet on timescales from weeks to years. We also detect subtle deviations from this general rule: the prominent spectral lines and blends at λ ≳ 350 nm show slightly more pronounced 27 day SSI changes when compared to the long-term (years) trends. We merge the solar data from Cycle 21 with the current Cycle 24 OMI and GOME-2 observations and provide normalized SSI variations for the 170-795 nm spectral region.

  13. A new observational solar irradiance composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoell, Micha; Dudok de Wit, Thierry; Haberreiter, Margit; Kretzschmar, Matthieu; Misios, Stergios; Tourpali, Klairie; Schmutz, Werner

    2016-04-01

    Variations of the spectral solar irradiance (SSI) are an important driver for the chemistry, temperature and dynamics of the Earth's atmosphere and ultimately the Earth's climate. Due to the sparce and scattered SSI data sets it is important to establish tools to derive a consistent SSI dataset, including realistic uncertainties. We present the a new SSI composite based on the face values of SSI observations and applying a probabilistic method that takes into account the uncertainty of the data set scale-wise. We will present the data set and discuss its effects on the Earth's atmosphere in relation to SSI reconstruction models.

  14. Variation of solar irradiance and mode frequencies during Maunder minimum

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatnagar, A; Jain, Kiran; Tripathy, S.C.

    2002-01-01

    Using the sunspot numbers reported during the Maunder minimum and the empirical relations between the mode frequencies and solar activity indices, the variations in the total solar irradiance and 10.7 cm radio flux for the period 1645 to 1715 is estimated. We find that the total solar irradiance and radio flux during the Maunder minimum decreased by 0.19% and 52% respectively, as compared to the values for solar cycle 22.

  15. NLTE solar irradiance modeling with the COSI code

    OpenAIRE

    Shapiro, A. I.; Schmutz, W.; Schoell, M.; Haberreiter, M.; Rozanov, E.

    2010-01-01

    Context. The solar irradiance is known to change on time scales of minutes to decades, and it is suspected that its substantial fluctua- tions are partially responsible for climate variations. Aims. We are developing a solar atmosphere code that allows the physical modeling of the entire solar spectrum composed of quiet Sun and active regions. This code is a tool for modeling the variability of the solar irradiance and understanding its influence on Earth. Methods. We exploit further developm...

  16. Weather and atmosphere observation with the ATOM all-sky camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jankowsky Felix

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Automatic Telescope for Optical Monitoring (ATOM for H.E.S.S. is an 75 cm optical telescope which operates fully automated. As there is no observer present during observation, an auxiliary all-sky camera serves as weather monitoring system. This device takes an all-sky image of the whole sky every three minutes. The gathered data then undergoes live-analysis by performing astrometric comparison with a theoretical night sky model, interpreting the absence of stars as cloud coverage. The sky monitor also serves as tool for a meteorological analysis of the observation site of the the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array. This overview covers design and benefits of the all-sky camera and additionally gives an introduction into current efforts to integrate the device into the atmosphere analysis programme of H.E.S.S.

  17. Coherently combining short data segments for all-sky semi-coherent continuous gravitational wave searches

    CERN Document Server

    Goetz, Evan

    2015-01-01

    We present a method for coherently combining short data segments from gravitational-wave detectors to improve the sensitivity of semi-coherent searches for continuous gravitational waves. All-sky searches for continuous gravitational waves from unknown sources are computationally limited. The semi-coherent approach reduces the computational cost by dividing the entire observation timespan into short segments to be analyzed coherently, then combined together incoherently. Semi-coherent analyses that attempt to improve sensitivity by coherently combining data from multiple detectors face a computational challenge in accounting for uncertainties in signal parameters. In this article, we lay out a technique to meet this challenge using summed Fourier transform coefficients. Applying this technique to one all-sky search algorithm called TwoSpect, we confirm that the sensitivity of all-sky, semi-coherent searches can be improved by coherently combining the short data segments. For misaligned detectors, however, thi...

  18. Modeling of the Zodiacal Emission for the AKARI/IRC Mid-infrared All-sky Diffuse Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Toru; Ishihara, Daisuke; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Nakamichi, Keichiro; Takaba, Sachi; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Ootsubo, Takafumi; Pyo, Jeonghyun; Onaka, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    The zodiacal emission, which is the thermal infrared (IR) emission from the interplanetary dust (IPD) in our solar system, has been studied for a long time. Nevertheless, accurate modeling of the zodiacal emission has not been successful to reproduce the all-sky spatial distribution of the zodiacal emission, especially in the mid-IR where the zodiacal emission peaks. Therefore, we aim to improve the IPD cloud model based on Kelsall et al., using the AKARI 9 and 18 μm all-sky diffuse maps. By adopting a new fitting method based on the total brightness, we have succeeded in reducing the residual levels after subtraction of the zodiacal emission from the AKARI data and thus in improving the modeling of the zodiacal emission. Comparing the AKARI and the COBE data, we confirm that the changes from the previous model to our new model are mostly due to model improvements, but not temporal variations between the AKARI and the COBE epoch, except for the position of the Earth-trailing blob. Our results suggest that the size of the smooth cloud, a dominant component in the model, is about 10% more compact than previously thought, and that the dust sizes are not large enough to emit blackbody radiation in the mid-IR. Furthermore, we detect a significant isotropically distributed IPD component, owing to an accurate baseline measurement with AKARI.

  19. MODELING OF THE ZODIACAL EMISSION FOR THE AKARI/IRC MID-INFRARED ALL-SKY DIFFUSE MAPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, Toru; Ishihara, Daisuke; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Nakamichi, Keichiro; Takaba, Sachi; Kobayashi, Hiroshi [Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Ootsubo, Takafumi [Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Pyo, Jeonghyun [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Onaka, Takashi, E-mail: kondo@u.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp, E-mail: ishihara@u.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    The zodiacal emission, which is the thermal infrared (IR) emission from the interplanetary dust (IPD) in our solar system, has been studied for a long time. Nevertheless, accurate modeling of the zodiacal emission has not been successful to reproduce the all-sky spatial distribution of the zodiacal emission, especially in the mid-IR where the zodiacal emission peaks. Therefore, we aim to improve the IPD cloud model based on Kelsall et al., using the AKARI 9 and 18 μm all-sky diffuse maps. By adopting a new fitting method based on the total brightness, we have succeeded in reducing the residual levels after subtraction of the zodiacal emission from the AKARI data and thus in improving the modeling of the zodiacal emission. Comparing the AKARI and the COBE data, we confirm that the changes from the previous model to our new model are mostly due to model improvements, but not temporal variations between the AKARI and the COBE epoch, except for the position of the Earth-trailing blob. Our results suggest that the size of the smooth cloud, a dominant component in the model, is about 10% more compact than previously thought, and that the dust sizes are not large enough to emit blackbody radiation in the mid-IR. Furthermore, we detect a significant isotropically distributed IPD component, owing to an accurate baseline measurement with AKARI.

  20. Modeling of the zodiacal emission for the AKARI/IRC mid-infrared all-sky diffuse maps

    CERN Document Server

    Kondo, T; Kaneda, H; Nakamichi, K; Takaba, S; Kobayashi, H; Ootsubo, T; Pyo, J; Onaka, T

    2016-01-01

    The zodiacal emission, which is the thermal infrared (IR) emission from the interplanetary dust (IPD) in our Solar System, has been studied for a long time. Nevertheless, accurate modeling of the zodiacal emission has not been successful to reproduce the all-sky spatial distribution of the zodiacal emission, especially in the mid-IR where the zodiacal emission peaks. We therefore aim to improve the IPD cloud model based on Kelsall et al. 1998, using the AKARI 9 and 18 micron all-sky diffuse maps. By adopting a new fitting method based on the total brightness, we have succeeded in reducing the residual levels after subtraction of the zodiacal emission from the AKARI data and thus in improving the modeling of the zodiacal emission. Comparing the AKARI and the COBE data, we confirm that the changes from the previous model to our new model are mostly due to model improvements, but not temporal variations between the AKARI and the COBE epoch, except for the position of the Earth-trailing blob. Our results suggest ...

  1. SORCE Level 3 Total Solar Irradiance 6-Hour Average V016

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) data set SOR3TSI6 contains the total solar irradiance (a.k.a solar constant) data collected by the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM)...

  2. Planck 2013 results. XI. All-sky model of thermal dust emission

    OpenAIRE

    Planck Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an all-sky model of dust emission from the Planck 353, 545, and 857 GHz, and IRAS 100 mu m data. Using a modified blackbody fit to the data we present all-sky maps of the dust optical depth, temperature, and spectral index over the 353-3000 GHz range. This model is a good representation of the IRAS and Planck data at 5 0 between 353 and 3000 GHz (850 and 100 mu m). It shows variations of the order of 30% compared with the widely-used model of Finkbeiner, Davis, and Schlege...

  3. How the inclination of Earth's orbit affects incoming solar irradiance

    OpenAIRE

    Vieira, L. E. A.; Norton, A; Dudok de Wit, T.; M. Kretzschmar; Schmidt, G. A.; Cheung, M.C.M.

    2012-01-01

    International audience [1] The variability in solar irradiance, the main external energy source of the Earth's system, must be critically studied in order to place the effects of human-driven climate change into perspective and allow plausible predictions of the evolution of climate. Accurate measurements of total solar irradiance (TSI) variability by instruments onboard space platforms during the last three solar cycles indicate changes of approximately 0.1% over the sunspot cycle. Physic...

  4. Planck early results. VIII. The all-sky early Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucher, M.; Delabrouille, J.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.;

    2011-01-01

    We present the first all-sky sample of galaxy clusters detected blindly by the Planck satellite through the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect from its six highest frequencies. This early SZ (ESZ) sample is comprised of 189 candidates, which have a high signal-to-noise ratio ranging from 6 to 29. Its ...

  5. Remote and automatic small-scale observatories: experience with an all-sky fireball patrol camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettonvil, Felix C. M.

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes the design of a remote, automatic all-sky camera for capturing bright meteor trails based on a DSLR camera combined with Liquid Crystal shutter technology for angular velocity measurement. Design, performance and first results are discussed, as well the up scaling towards a large autonomous network for accurate fireball orbit determination and meteorite recovery.

  6. Coherently combining data between detectors for all-sky semi-coherent continuous gravitational wave searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, E.; Riles, K.

    2016-04-01

    We present a method for coherently combining short data segments from gravitational-wave detectors to improve the sensitivity of semi-coherent searches for continuous gravitational waves. All-sky searches for continuous gravitational waves from unknown sources are computationally limited. The semi-coherent approach reduces the computational cost by dividing the entire observation timespan into short segments to be analyzed coherently, then combined together incoherently. Semi-coherent analyses that attempt to improve sensitivity by coherently combining data from multiple detectors face a computational challenge in accounting for uncertainties in signal parameters. In this article, we lay out a technique to meet this challenge using summed Fourier transform coefficients. Applying this technique to one all-sky search algorithm called TwoSpect, we confirm that the sensitivity of all-sky, semi-coherent searches can be improved by coherently combining the short data segments, e.g., by up to 42% over a single detector for an all-sky search. For misaligned detectors, however, this improvement requires careful attention when marginalizing over unknown polarization parameters. In addition, care must be taken in correcting for differential detector velocity due to the Earth’s rotation for high signal frequencies and widely separated detectors.

  7. Magnitudes and Timescales of Total Solar Irradiance Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Kopp, Greg

    2016-01-01

    The Sun's net radiative output varies on timescales of minutes to gigayears. Direct measurements of the total solar irradiance (TSI) show changes in the spatially- and spectrally-integrated radiant energy on timescales as short as minutes to as long as a solar cycle. Variations of ~0.01 % over a few minutes are caused by the ever-present superposition of convection and oscillations with very large solar flares on rare occasion causing slightly-larger measureable signals. On timescales of days to weeks, changing photospheric magnetic activity affects solar brightness at the ~0.1 % level. The 11-year solar cycle shows variations of comparable magnitude with irradiances peaking near solar maximum. Secular variations are more difficult to discern, being limited by instrument stability and the relatively short duration of the space-borne record. Historical reconstructions of the Sun's irradiance based on indicators of solar-surface magnetic activity, such as sunspots, faculae, and cosmogenic isotope records, sugge...

  8. Photometric indicators of visual night sky quality derived from all-sky brightness maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duriscoe, Dan M.

    2016-09-01

    Wide angle or fisheye cameras provide a high resolution record of artificial sky glow, which results from the scattering of escaped anthropogenic light by the atmosphere, over the sky vault in the moonless nocturnal environment. Analysis of this record yields important indicators of the extent and severity of light pollution. The following indicators were derived through numerical analysis of all-sky brightness maps: zenithal, average all-sky, median, brightest, and darkest sky brightness. In addition, horizontal and vertical illuminance, resulting from sky brightness were computed. A natural reference condition to which the anthropogenic component may be compared is proposed for each indicator, based upon an iterative analysis of a high resolution natural sky model. All-sky brightness data, calibrated in the V band by photometry of standard stars and converted to luminance, from 406 separate data sets were included in an exploratory analysis. Of these, six locations representing a wide range of severity of impact from artificial sky brightness were selected as examples and examined in detail. All-sky average brightness is the most unbiased indicator of impact to the environment, and is more sensitive and accurate in areas of slight to moderate light pollution impact than zenith brightness. Maximum vertical illuminance provides an excellent indicator of impacts to wilderness character, as does measures of the brightest portions of the sky. Zenith brightness, the workhorse of field campaigns, is compared to the other indicators and found to correlate well with horizontal illuminance, especially at relatively bright sites. The median sky brightness describes a brightness threshold for the upper half of the sky, of importance to telescopic optical astronomy. Numeric indicators, in concert with all-sky brightness maps, provide a complete assessment of visual sky quality at a site.

  9. Solar irradiance dictates settlement timing and intensity of marine mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Santos, Isabel; Labarta, Uxío; Álvarez-Salgado, X. Antón; Fernández-Reiriz, Mª José

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the environmental factors driving larval settlement processes is crucial to understand the population dynamics of marine invertebrates. This work aims to go a step ahead and predict larval presence and intensity. For this purpose we consider the influence of solar irradiance, wind regime and continental runoff on the settlement processes. For the first time, we conducted a 5-years weekly monitoring of Mytilus galloprovincialis settlement on artificial suspended substrates, which allowed us to search for interannual variability in the settlement patterns. Comparison between the seasonal pattern of larval settlement and solar irradiance, as well as the well-known effect of solar irradiance on water temperature and food availability, suggest that solar irradiance indirectly influences the settlement process, and support the use of this meteorological variable to predict settlement occurrence. Our results show that solar irradiance allows predicting the beginning and end of the settlement cycle a month in advance: Particularly we have observed that solar irradiance during late winter indirectly drives the timing and intensity of the settlement onset, Finally, a functional generalise additive model, which considers the influence of solar irradiance and continental runoff on the settlement process, provides an accurate prediction of settlement intensity a fortnight in advance. PMID:27384527

  10. Proton irradiation effects of amorphous silicon solar cell for solar power satellite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Yousuke; Oshima, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Sasaki, Susumu; Kuroda, Hideo; Ushirokawa, Akio

    1997-03-01

    Flexible amorphous silicon(fa-Si) solar cell module, a thin film type, is regarded as a realistic power generator for solar power satellite. The radiation resistance of fa-Si cells was investigated by the irradiations of 3,4 and 10 MeV protons. The hydrogen gas treatment of the irradiated fa-Si cells was also studied. The fa-Si cell shows high radiation resistance for proton irradiations, compared with a crystalline silicon solar cell. (author)

  11. Magnitudes and timescales of total solar irradiance variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Greg

    2016-07-01

    The Sun's net radiative output varies on timescales of minutes to gigayears. Direct measurements of the total solar irradiance (TSI) show changes in the spatially- and spectrally-integrated radiant energy on timescales as short as minutes to as long as a solar cycle. Variations of ~0.01% over a few minutes are caused by the ever-present superposition of convection and oscillations with very large solar flares on rare occasion causing slightly-larger measurable signals. On timescales of days to weeks, changing photospheric magnetic activity affects solar brightness at the ~0.1% level. The 11-year solar cycle shows variations of comparable magnitude with irradiances peaking near solar maximum. Secular variations are more difficult to discern, being limited by instrument stability and the relatively short duration of the space-borne record. Historical reconstructions of the Sun's irradiance based on indicators of solar-surface magnetic activity, such as sunspots, faculae, and cosmogenic isotope records, suggest solar brightness changes over decades to millennia, although the magnitudes of these variations have high uncertainties due to the indirect historical records on which they rely. Stellar evolution affects yet longer timescales and is responsible for the greatest solar variabilities. In this manuscript I summarize the Sun's variability magnitudes over different temporal regimes and discuss the irradiance record's relevance for solar and climate studies as well as for detections of exo-solar planets transiting Sun-like stars.

  12. Satellite solar meteorology: operational use of the Meteosat system to compute solar irradiance

    OpenAIRE

    Guillard, Hervé; Monget, Jean-Marie; Wald, Lucien

    1985-01-01

    Solar radiation is a parameter of large importance in a wide range of human activities. This communication discusses the potentials of the new satellite Meteosat for operational mapping of solar irradiance at ground level.

  13. Validation of spectral sky radiance derived from all-sky camera images – a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tohsing

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spectral sky radiance (380–760 nm is derived from measurements with a Hemispherical Sky Imager (HSI system. The HSI consists of a commercial compact CCD (charge coupled device camera equipped with a fish-eye lens and provides hemispherical sky images in three reference bands such as red, green and blue. To obtain the spectral sky radiance from these images non-linear regression functions for various sky conditions have been derived. The camera-based spectral sky radiance was validated by spectral sky radiance measured with a CCD spectroradiometer. The spectral sky radiance for complete distribution over the hemisphere between both instruments deviates by less than 20% at 500 nm for all sky conditions and for zenith angles less than 80°. The reconstructed spectra of the wavelength 380 nm to 760 nm between both instruments at various directions deviate by less then 20% for all sky conditions.

  14. Validation of spectral sky radiance derived from all-sky camera images – a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tohsing

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Spectral sky radiance (380–760 nm is derived from measurements with a hemispherical sky imager (HSI system. The HSI consists of a commercial compact CCD (charge coupled device camera equipped with a fish-eye lens and provides hemispherical sky images in three reference bands such as red, green and blue. To obtain the spectral sky radiance from these images, non-linear regression functions for various sky conditions have been derived. The camera-based spectral sky radiance was validated using spectral sky radiance measured with a CCD spectroradiometer. The spectral sky radiance for complete distribution over the hemisphere between both instruments deviates by less than 20% at 500 nm for all sky conditions and for zenith angles less than 80°. The reconstructed spectra of the wavelengths 380–760 nm between both instruments at various directions deviate by less than 20% for all sky conditions.

  15. Derivation of sky quality indicators from photometrically calibrated all-sky image mosaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duriscoe, Dan M.; Moore, Chadwick A.; Luginbuhl, Christian B.

    2015-08-01

    A large database of high resolution all-sky measurements of V-band night sky brightness at sites in U.S. National Parks and astronomical observatories is utilized to describe sky quality over a wide geographic area. Mosaics of photometrically calibrated V-band imagery are processed with a semi-automated procedure to reveal the effects of artificial sky glow through graphical presentation and numeric indicators of artificial sky brightness. Comparison with simpler methods such as the use of the Unihedron SQM and naked eye limiting magnitude reveal that areas near the horizon, which are not typically captured with single-channel measurements, contribute significantly to the indicators maximum vertical illuminance, maximum sky luminance, and average all-sky luminance. Distant sources of sky glow may represent future threats to areas of the sky nearer the zenith. Timely identification and quantification of these threats may allow mitigating strategies to be implemented.

  16. All-sky Relative Opacity Mapping Using Night Time Panoramic Images

    CERN Document Server

    Shamir, L; Shamir, Lior; Nemiroff, Roberj J.

    2005-01-01

    An all-sky cloud monitoring system that generates relative opacity maps over many of the world's premier astronomical observatories is described. Photometric measurements of numerous background stars are combined with simultaneous sky brightness measurements to differentiate thin clouds from sky glow sources such as air glow and zodiacal light. The system takes a continuous pipeline of all-sky images, and compares them to canonical images taken on other nights at the same sidereal time. Data interpolation then yields transmission maps covering almost the entire sky. An implementation of this system is currently operating through the Night Sky Live network of CONCAM3s located at Cerro Pachon (Chile), Mauna Kea (Hawaii), Haleakala (Hawaii), SALT (South Africa) and the Canary Islands (Northwestern Africa).

  17. The GRB All-sky Spectrometer Experiment III: Upgrades and Commissioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Zachary; Martinot, Zachary; Voigt, Elana; Pober, Jonathan; Morales, Miguel F.

    2015-01-01

    The GRB All-sky Spectrometer Experiment (GASE) is designed to detect low frequency radio emission following a gamma ray burst. GASE currently uses 8 dipole antennas to detect these emissions. This poster will discuss the commissioning and associated troubleshooting of setting up these antennas. This will include the challenges presented by having the instrument located here in Seattle such as water damage, corrosion, and RFI.

  18. The ROSAT All-Sky Survey view of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, W.; Denner, K.; Kahabka, P.; Pakull, M.; Schaeidt, S.

    1996-01-01

    During the Rosat all sky survey, centered on the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), 516 X-ray sources were detected. The field was covered from July 1990 to January 1991. The X-ray parameters of the sources, involving position, count rates, hardness ratios, extent, and time variability during the observations, are discussed. Identifications with objects from optical, radio and infrared wavelength allow the LMC candidates to be separated from the foreground stars and the background objects.

  19. Microquasar Jet Irradiation of the Proto-Solar Nebula?

    CERN Document Server

    Butt, Y; Butt, Yousaf; Prantzos, Nikos

    2006-01-01

    We explore the possibility that a now-extinct microquasar may have irradiated the proto-solar neighborhood, causing the 'anomalously' high local 11B/10B isotopic ratio, and comment on some observational tests of the scenario.

  20. Shuttle SBUV (SSBUV) Solar Spectral Irradiance V008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Shuttle Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SSBUV) level-2 irradiance data are available for eight space shuttle missions flown between 1989 and 1996. SSBUV, a...

  1. Atmosphere, Ocean, Land, and Solar Irradiance Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James; Ahmad, Suraiya

    2003-01-01

    The report present the atmosphere, ocean color, land and solar irradiation data sets. The data presented: total ozone, aerosol, cloud optical and physical parameters, temperature and humidity profiles, radiances, rain fall, drop size distribution.

  2. Planck 2013 results. XI. All-sky model of thermal dust emission

    CERN Document Server

    Abergel, A; Aghanim, N; Alina, D; Alves, M I R; Armitage-Caplan, C; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bobin, J; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bridges, M; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, H C; Chiang, L -Y; Christensen, P R; Church, S; Clemens, M; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Grenier, I A; Gruppuso, A; Guillet, V; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jewell, J; Joncas, G; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; León-Tavares, J; Lesgourgues, J; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Massardi, M; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Osborne, S; Oxborrow, C A; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Roudier, G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savini, G; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Starck, J -L; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sureau, F; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Türler, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Welikala, N; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an all-sky model of dust emission from the Planck 857, 545 and 353 GHz, and IRAS 100 micron data. Using a modified black-body fit to the data we present all-sky maps of the dust optical depth, temperature, and spectral index over the 353-3000 GHz range. This model is a tight representation of the data at 5 arcmin. It shows variations of the order of 30 % compared with the widely-used model of Finkbeiner, Davis, and Schlegel. The Planck data allow us to estimate the dust temperature uniformly over the whole sky, providing an improved estimate of the dust optical depth compared to previous all-sky dust model, especially in high-contrast molecular regions. An increase of the dust opacity at 353 GHz, tau_353/N_H, from the diffuse to the denser interstellar medium (ISM) is reported. It is associated with a decrease in the observed dust temperature, T_obs, that could be due at least in part to the increased dust opacity. We also report an excess of dust emission at HI column densities lower than...

  3. Alaskan Auroral All-Sky Images on the World Wide Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.

    1997-01-01

    In response to a 1995 NASA SPDS announcement of support for preservation and distribution of important data sets online, the Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska, proposed to provide World Wide Web access to the Poker Flat Auroral All-sky Camera images in real time. The Poker auroral all-sky camera is located in the Davis Science Operation Center at Poker Flat Rocket Range about 30 miles north-east of Fairbanks, Alaska, and is connected, through a microwave link, with the Geophysical Institute where we maintain the data base linked to the Web. To protect the low light-level all-sky TV camera from damage due to excessive light, we only operate during the winter season when the moon is down. The camera and data acquisition is now fully computer controlled. Digital images are transmitted each minute to the Web linked data base where the data are available in a number of different presentations: (1) Individual JPEG compressed images (1 minute resolution); (2) Time lapse MPEG movie of the stored images; and (3) A meridional plot of the entire night activity.

  4. Monitoring the Sky with the Prototype All-Sky Imager on the LWA1

    CERN Document Server

    Obenberger, K S; Hartman, J M; Clarke, T E; Dowell, J; Dubois, A; Dubois, D; Henning, P A; Lazio, J; Michalak, S; Schinzel, F K

    2015-01-01

    We present a description of the Prototype All-Sky Imager (PASI), a backend correlator and imager of the first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1). PASI cross-correlates a live stream of 260 dual-polarization dipole antennas of the LWA1, creates all-sky images, and uploads them to the LWA-TV website in near real-time. PASI has recorded over 13,000 hours of all-sky images at frequencies between 10 and 88 MHz creating opportunities for new research and discoveries. We also report rate density and pulse energy density limits on transients at 38, 52, and 74 MHz, for pulse widths of 5 s. We limit transients at those frequencies with pulse energy densities of $>2.7\\times 10^{-23}$, $>1.1\\times 10^{-23}$, and $>2.8\\times 10^{-23}$ J m$^{-2}$ Hz$^{-1}$ to have rate densities $<1.2\\times10^{-4}$, $<5.6\\times10^{-4}$, and $<7.2\\times10^{-4}$ yr$^{-1}$ deg$^{-2}$

  5. The satellite total solar irradiance database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, R. C.

    2009-12-01

    A precise knowledge of the total solar irradiance (TSI) over time is essential to understanding the physics of solar luminosity variation and its impact on the Earth in the form of climate change. A National Research Council study found that sustained trends as small as 0.25% per century were the most likely forcing for ‘little ice age’ climate minima during the 12th - 19th centuries. Recent phenomenological analyses of TSI observations and proxies indicate that TSI variation is an important climate change forcing on many timescales including the industrial era. The profound sociological and economic implications of understanding the relative climate change contributions of natural and anthropogenic forcings makes it essential that the satellite TSI database be precisely sustained into the foreseeable future. There are currently three satellite TSI monitoring experiments in operation: SOHO/VIRGO, ACRIMSAT/ACRIM3 and SORCE/TIM, in order of deployment (1996, 2000 and 2003, resp.). Results reported on their ‘native scales show the same basic variations in TSI over time, yet some smaller variations detected by ACRIM3 are less well defined or absent in the results of VIRGO and TIM. There is also a scale difference issue: TIM results are 0.35% lower than those of ACRIM3 and VIRGO, outside the ± 0.1% uncertainty bounds predicted for ACRIM3 and VIRGO, and well outside TIM’s ± 0.01% uncertainty design goal. TIM’s failure to achieve 0.01% uncertainty in flight demonstrates that the TSI monitoring paradigm shift of relying on measurement accuracy rather than a redundant/overlap strategy to provide long term traceability cannot be realized with current ‘ambient temperature’ technology. The only viable monitoring approach for the foreseeable future continues to be the redundant/overlap strategy that has provided the 31 year satellite TSI database to date with useful traceability. Intercomparisons of flight experiments at their levels of mutual precision can

  6. Open Surface Solar Irradiance Observations - A Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, Lionel; Nüst, Daniel; Jirka, Simon; Maso, Joan; Ranchin, Thierry; Wald, Lucien

    2015-04-01

    The newly started project ConnectinGEO funded by the European Commission aims at improving the understanding on which environmental observations are currently available in Europe and subsequently providing an informational basis to close gaps in diverse observation networks. The project complements supporting actions and networking activities with practical challenges to test and improve the procedures and methods for identifying observation data gaps, and to ensure viability in real world scenarios. We present a challenge on future concepts for building a data sharing portal for the solar energy industry as well as the state of the art in the domain. Decision makers and project developers of solar power plants have identified the Surface Solar Irradiance (SSI) and its components as an important factor for their business development. SSI observations are crucial in the process of selecting suitable locations for building new plants. Since in-situ pyranometric stations form a sparse network, the search for locations starts with global satellite data and is followed by the deployment of in-situ sensors in selected areas for at least one year. To form a convincing picture, answers must be sought in the conjunction of these EO systems, and although companies collecting SSI observations are willing to share this information, the means to exchange in-situ measurements across companies and between stakeholders in the market are still missing. We present a solution for interoperable exchange of SSI data comprising in-situ time-series observations as well as sensor descriptions based on practical experiences from other domains. More concretely, we will apply concepts and implementations of the Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) framework of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). The work is based on an existing spatial data infrastructure (SDI), which currently comprises metadata, maps and coverage data, but no in-situ observations yet. This catalogue is already registered in the

  7. A new reconstruction of total solar irradiance since 1832

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaquero, J.M. [Departamento de Fisica, Escuela Politecnica, Universidad de Extremadura, Caceres (Spain); Gallego, M.C. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Extremadura, Badajoz (Spain); Trigo, R.M. [Centro de Geofisica da Universidade de Lisboa, Departamento de Engenharias, Lisboa (Portugal); Sanchez-Bajo, F [Escuela de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Extremadura, Badajoz (Spain); Cancillo, M.L.; Garcia, J.A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Extremadura, Badajoz (Spain)

    2006-10-15

    Variations of solar irradiance (total and spectral) are quantities purported to have an influence on climate. The aim of this paper is to reconstruct the total solar irradiance from 1832 to the present. The contributions of active regions and the quiet sun are modelled separately using the method developed by Solanki and Fligge (1999). The areas of sunspots observed since 1832 are used to compute the contribution of active regions to the irradiance changes. [Spanish] Diferentes autores han propuesto que las variaciones de la irradiancia solar total y espectral son magnitudes que pueden influir en el clima. El objetivo de este articulo es reconstruir la irradiancia solar total desde 1832 hasta el presente. Las contribuciones de las regiones activas y del 'sol quieto' se modelan separadamente usando el metodo de Solanki y Fligge (1999). El area de las manchas solares desde 1832 es utilizada para calcular la contribucion de las regiones activas a los cambios en la irradiancia.

  8. Spectral solar irradiance and its entropic effect on Earth's climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Wu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The high-resolution measurements of the spectral solar irradiance at the top of the Earth's atmosphere by the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE satellite suggest significant deviation of solar radiation from the commonly assumed blackbody radiation. Here, we use these spectral irradiance measurements to estimate the Earth's incident solar radiation entropy flux, and examine the importance of a proper estimation approach. The Earth's incident solar radiation entropy flux estimated by directly applying the observed spectral solar irradiance into the most accurate Planck expression is compared with that estimated with a conventional approach that uses the Sun's brightness temperature under the assumption of a blackbody Sun. The globally averaged non-blackbody incident solar radiation entropy flux at the top of the Earth's atmosphere equals 0.31 W m−2 K−1. This value is about 4 times larger than that estimated from the conventional blackbody approach, with the difference comparable to the typical value of the entropy production rate associated with atmospheric latent heat process. Further analysis reveals that the decrease of spectral solar radiation entropy flux with radiation traveling distance, unlike the decrease of spectral solar radiation energy flux with radiation traveling distance, is wavelength dependent, and that the difference between the two estimates can be attributed to the fact that the conventional approach ignores the influence of radiation traveling distance on the spectral solar radiation entropy flux. Moreover, sensitivity study further shows that the distribution of top-of-atmosphere spectral solar irradiance could significantly impact the magnitude of the estimated Earth's incident solar radiation entropy flux. These results together suggest that the spectral distribution of incident solar radiation is critical for determining the Earth's incident solar radiation entropy flux, and thus the

  9. UV Irradiance Enhancements by Scattering of Solar Radiation from Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Feister

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Scattering of solar radiation by clouds can reduce or enhance solar global irradiance compared to cloudless-sky irradiance at the Earth’s surface. Cloud effects to global irradiance can be described by Cloud Modification Factors (CMF. Depending on strength and duration, irradiance enhancements affect the energy balance of the surface and gain of solar power for electric energy generation. In the ultraviolet region, they increase the risk for damage to living organisms. Wavelength-dependent CMFs have been shown to reach 1.5 even in the UV-B region at low altitudes. Ground-based solar radiation measurements in the high Andes region at altitudes up to 5917 m a.s.l showed cloud-induced irradiance enhancements. While UV-A enhancements were explained by cloud scattering, both radiation scattering from clouds and Negative Ozone Anomalies (NOA have been discussed to have caused short-time enhancement of UV-B irradiance. Based on scenarios using published CMF and additional spectroradiometric measurements at a low-altitude site, the contribution of cloud scattering to the UV-B irradiance enhancement in the Andes region has been estimated. The range of UV index estimates converted from measured UV-B and UV-A irradiance and modeled cloudless-sky ratios UV-B/erythemal UV is compatible with an earlier estimate of an extreme UV index value of 43 derived for the high Andes.

  10. Vacuum-ultraviolet instrumentation for solar irradiance and thermospheric airglow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, T.N.; Rottman, G.J. (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States). High Altitude Observatory); Bailey, S.M.; Solomon, S.C. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Lab. for Atmospheric and Space Physics)

    1994-02-01

    A NASA sounding rocket experiment was developed to study the solar extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) spectral irradiance and its effect on the upper atmosphere. Both the solar flux and the terrestrial molecular nitrogen via the Lyman-Birge-Hopfield bands in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) region were measured remotely from a sounding rocket on October 27, 1992. The rocket experiments also includes EUV instruments from Boston University, but only the National Center for Atmospheric Research's (NCAR)/University of Colorado's (CU) four solar instruments and one airglow instrument are discussed. The primary solar EUV instrument is a 0.25-m Rowland circle EUV spectrograph that has flown on three rockets since 1988 measuring the solar spectral irradiance from 30 to 110 nm with 0.2-nm resolution. Another solar irradiance instrument is an array of six silicon soft x-ray (XUV) photodiodes, each having different metallic filters coated directly on the photodiodes. The other solar irradiance instrument is a silicon avalanche photodiode coupled with pulse height analyzer electronics. The fourth solar instrument is a XUV imager that images the sun at 17.5 nm with a spatial resolution of 20 arc sec. The airglow spectrograph measures the terrestrial FUV airglow emissions along the horizon from 125 to 160 nm with 0.2-nm spectral resolution.

  11. Vacuum-ultraviolet instrumentation for solar irradiance and thermospheric airglow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A NASA sounding rocket experiment was developed to study the solar extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) spectral irradiance and its effect on the upper atmosphere. Both the solar flux and the terrestrial molecular nitrogen via the Lyman-Birge-Hopfield bands in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) region were measured remotely from a sounding rocket on October 27, 1992. The rocket experiments also includes EUV instruments from Boston University, but only the National Center for Atmospheric Research's (NCAR)/University of Colorado's (CU) four solar instruments and one airglow instrument are discussed. The primary solar EUV instrument is a 0.25-m Rowland circle EUV spectrograph that has flown on three rockets since 1988 measuring the solar spectral irradiance from 30 to 110 nm with 0.2-nm resolution. Another solar irradiance instrument is an array of six silicon soft x-ray (XUV) photodiodes, each having different metallic filters coated directly on the photodiodes. The other solar irradiance instrument is a silicon avalanche photodiode coupled with pulse height analyzer electronics. The fourth solar instrument is a XUV imager that images the sun at 17.5 nm with a spatial resolution of 20 arc sec. The airglow spectrograph measures the terrestrial FUV airglow emissions along the horizon from 125 to 160 nm with 0.2-nm spectral resolution

  12. Solar Spectral Irradiance Variability in Cycle 24: Observations and Models

    CERN Document Server

    Marchenko, S V; Lean, J L

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing the excellent stability of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), we characterize both short-term (solar rotation) and long-term (solar cycle) changes of the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) between 265-500 nm during the on-going Cycle 24. We supplement the OMI data with concurrent observations from the GOME-2 and SORCE instruments and find fair-to-excellent, depending on wavelength, agreement among the observations and predictions of the NRLSSI2 and SATIRE-S models.

  13. Long-term solar irradiance variability: knowns and unknowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivova, Natalie; Solanki, Sami K.; Dasi Espuig, Maria; Leng Yeo, Kok; Wu, Chi-Ju

    2016-07-01

    Long-term reconstructions of solar irradiance variability are crucial to our understanding of solar influence on climate. They are only possible with the help of suitable models, which in turn require a thorough understanding of the mechanisms of this variability. With the advance of such models, also the past reconstructions are becoming more reliable. Nevertheless, the remaining uncertainties spread out when extrapolating back over long periods of time, amplified by the increasingly poorer quality and reliability of the available data that bear information on past solar activity. We will discuss the progress and the reliability of irradiance reconstructions on time scales of decades to millennia.

  14. Computation of glint, glare, and solar irradiance distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Khalsa, Siri Sahib Singh

    2015-08-11

    Described herein are technologies pertaining to computing the solar irradiance distribution on a surface of a receiver in a concentrating solar power system or glint/glare emitted from a reflective entity. At least one camera captures images of the Sun and the entity of interest, wherein the images have pluralities of pixels having respective pluralities of intensity values. Based upon the intensity values of the pixels in the respective images, the solar irradiance distribution on the surface of the entity or glint/glare corresponding to the entity is computed.

  15. Solar Spectral Irradiance Observations from the PICARD/PREMOS Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cessateur, G.; Schöll, M.; Schmutz, W. K.; Wehrli, C.; Groebner, J.; Haberreiter, M.; Kretzschmar, M.; Shapiro, A.; Thuillier, G. O.; Finsterle, W.; Fox, N.; Hochedez, J. F.; Koller, S.; Meftah, M.; Nyeki, S.; Pfiffner, D.; Roth, H.; Rouze, M.; Spescha, M.; Tagirov, R.; Werner, L.; Wyss, J.

    2015-12-01

    Space weather and space climate studies require accurate Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) observations. The PREcision Monitoring Sensor (PREMOS) instrument aboard the PICARD satellite acquired solar irradiance measurements in specific spectral windows in the UV, visible and near infrared from October 2010 to March 2014. This contribution aims at presenting the Level 3 data, corrected for non solar features as well as for degradation. These level 3 data has been tested over different scientific cases, such as observations during the Venus transit and the presence of the p-mode signature within high-cadence data. The PREMOS Level 3 data have also been compared to others data sets, namely the SOLSTICE and SIM instruments aboard SORCE, for nearly 3 and half years. An excellent correlation has been found for the UV spectral ranges. We have also found a rather good correlation for visible and near-infrared observations for short-term variations, for which an error of about 200 ppm has been estimated within PREMOS visible and near-infrared observations. The PREMOS data could also be used to address several scientific topics, i.e. for validating semi-empirical models of the solar irradiance. We will emphasize about our new irradiance model, COSIR for Code of Solar Irradiance Reconstruction, which is successful at reproducing the solar modulation as seen in the PREMOS, SoHO/Virgo and SORCE data.

  16. All-Sky Observational Evidence for An Inverse Correlation Between Dust Temperature and Emissivity Spectral Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Z.; Fixsen, D. J.; Gold, B.

    2012-01-01

    We show that a one-component variable-emissivity-spectral-index model (the free- model) provides more physically motivated estimates of dust temperature at the Galactic polar caps than one- or two-component fixed-emissivity-spectral-index models (fixed- models) for interstellar dust thermal emission at far-infrared and millimeter wavelengths. For the comparison we have fit all-sky one-component dust models with fixed or variable emissivity spectral index to a new and improved version of the 210-channel dust spectra from the COBE-FIRAS, the 100-240 micrometer maps from the COBE-DIRBE and the 94 GHz dust map from the WMAP. The best model, the free-alpha model, is well constrained by data at 60-3000 GHz over 86 per cent of the total sky area. It predicts dust temperature (T(sub dust)) to be 13.7-22.7 (plus or minus 1.3) K, the emissivity spectral index (alpha) to be 1.2-3.1 (plus or minus 0.3) and the optical depth (tau) to range 0.6-46 x 10(exp -5) with a 23 per cent uncertainty. Using these estimates, we present all-sky evidence for an inverse correlation between the emissivity spectral index and dust temperature, which fits the relation alpha = 1/(delta + omega (raised dot) T(sub dust) with delta = -.0.510 plus or minus 0.011 and omega = 0.059 plus or minus 0.001. This best model will be useful to cosmic microwave background experiments for removing foreground dust contamination and it can serve as an all-sky extended-frequency reference for future higher resolution dust models.

  17. WATCHDOG: A COMPREHENSIVE ALL-SKY DATABASE OF GALACTIC BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tetarenko, B. E.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Heinke, C. O.; Gladstone, J. C., E-mail: btetaren@ualberta.ca [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, CCIS 4-181, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1 (Canada)

    2016-02-15

    With the advent of more sensitive all-sky instruments, the transient universe is being probed in greater depth than ever before. Taking advantage of available resources, we have established a comprehensive database of black hole (and black hole candidate) X-ray binary (BHXB) activity between 1996 and 2015 as revealed by all-sky instruments, scanning surveys, and select narrow-field X-ray instruments on board the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory, Monitor of All-Sky X-ray Image, Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, and Swift telescopes; the Whole-sky Alberta Time-resolved Comprehensive black-Hole Database Of the Galaxy or WATCHDOG. Over the past two decades, we have detected 132 transient outbursts, tracked and classified behavior occurring in 47 transient and 10 persistently accreting BHs, and performed a statistical study on a number of outburst properties across the Galactic population. We find that outbursts undergone by BHXBs that do not reach the thermally dominant accretion state make up a substantial fraction (∼40%) of the Galactic transient BHXB outburst sample over the past ∼20 years. Our findings suggest that this “hard-only” behavior, observed in transient and persistently accreting BHXBs, is neither a rare nor recent phenomenon and may be indicative of an underlying physical process, relatively common among binary BHs, involving the mass-transfer rate onto the BH remaining at a low level rather than increasing as the outburst evolves. We discuss how the larger number of these “hard-only” outbursts and detected outbursts in general have significant implications for both the luminosity function and mass-transfer history of the Galactic BHXB population.

  18. Star-galaxy separation strategies for WISE-2MASS all-sky infrared galaxy catalogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, András; Szapudi, István

    2015-04-01

    We combine photometric information of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) all-sky infrared data bases, and demonstrate how to produce clean and complete galaxy catalogues for future analyses. Adding 2MASS colours to WISE photometry improves star-galaxy separation efficiency substantially at the expense of losing a small fraction of the galaxies. We find that 93 per cent of the WISE objects within W1 data set. We constructed a training set from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey PhotoObj table with known star-galaxy separation, and determined redshift distribution of our sample from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly spectroscopic survey. Varying the combination of photometric parameters input into our algorithm we show that W1WISE - J2MASS is a simple and effective star-galaxy separator, capable of producing results comparable to the multidimensional SVM classification. We present a detailed description of our star-galaxy separation methods, and characterize the robustness of our tools in terms of contamination, completeness, and accuracy. We explore systematics of the full sky WISE-2MASS galaxy map, such as contamination from moon glow. We show that the homogeneity of the full sky galaxy map is improved by an additional J2MASS < 16.5 mag flux limit. The all-sky galaxy catalogue we present in this paper covers 21 200 deg2 with dusty regions masked out, and has an estimated stellar contamination of 1.2 per cent and completeness of 70.1 per cent among 2.4 million galaxies with zmed ≈ 0.14. WISE-2MASS galaxy maps with well controlled stellar contamination will be useful for spatial statistical analyses, including cross-correlations with other cosmological random fields, such as the cosmic microwave background. The same techniques also yield a statistically controlled sample of stars as well.

  19. The Steepness Ratio Technique: A New Method to analyze ROSAT All-Sky Survey Extended Sources

    OpenAIRE

    S. De Grandi; Molendi, S.; Böhringer, H.; Chincarini, G.; Voges, W.

    1997-01-01

    In this first paper of a series we develop a new technique to analyze clusters of galaxies observed during the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS). We call this method the Steepness Ratio Technique (SRT). The SRT uses the convolution between the real RASS point-spread function and the cluster emission profile assumed to be a beta-model with the beta parameter fixed to the value of 2/3. From the convolved source emission profile the SRT extracts total flux and extension (i.e., core radius) for each cl...

  20. Total infrared luminosity estimation from local galaxies in AKARI all sky survey

    CERN Document Server

    Solarz, A; Pollo, A

    2016-01-01

    We aim to use the a new and improved version of AKARI all sky survey catalogue of far-infrared sources to recalibrate the formula to derive the total infrared luminosity. We cross-match the faint source catalogue (FSC) of IRAS with the new AKARI-FIS and obtained a sample of 2430 objects. Then we calculate the total infrared (TIR) luminosity $L_{\\textrm{TIR}}$ from the Sanders at al. (1996) formula and compare it with total infrared luminosity from AKARI FIS bands to obtain new coefficients for the general relation to convert FIR luminosity from AKARI bands to the TIR luminosity.

  1. Spectral Classification of Optical Counterparts to ROSAT All-Sky Survey X-ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Dragomir, D; Rutledge, R E; Dragomir, Diana; Roy, Philippe; Rutledge, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    Previous work statistically identified 5492 optical counterparts, with approximately 90% confidence, from among the approximately 18,000 X-ray sources appearing in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey Bright Source Catalog (RASS/BSC). Using low resolution spectra in the wavelength range 3700-7900 angstroms, we present spectroscopic classifications for 195 of these counterparts which have not previously been classified. Of these 195, we find 168 individual stars of F, G, K or M type, 6 individual stars of unknown type, 6 double stars, 6 AGN or galaxies and 7 unclassifiable objects; the spectra of the 2 remaining objects were saturated.

  2. Status of GRB Observations with the Suzaku Wideband All-sky Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Tashiro, M S; Urata, Y; Onda, K; Kodaka, N; Endo, A; Suzuki, M; Morigami, K; Yamaoka, K; Nakagawa, Y E; Sugita, S; Fukazawa, Y; Ohno, M; Takahashi, T; Kira, C; Uehara, T; Tamagawa, T; Enoto, T; Miyawaki, R; Nakazawa, K; Makishima, K; Sonoda, E; Yamauchi, M; Maeno, S; Tanaka, H; Hara, R; Suzuki, M; Kokubun, M; Takahashi, T; Hong, S J; Murakami, T; Tajima, H

    2008-01-01

    The Wide-band All-sky Monitor (WAM) is a function of the large lateral BGO shield of the Hard X-ray Detector (HXD) onboard Suzaku. Its large geometrical area of 800 cm^2 per side, the large stopping power for the hard X-rays and the wide-field of view make the WAM an ideal detector for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observations in the energy range of 50-5000 keV. In fact, the WAM has observed 288 GRBs confirmed by other satellites, till the end of May 2007.

  3. Optical Identification of Four Hard X-ray Sources from the Swift All-Sky Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Lutovinov, A.; Burenin, R.; Revnivtsev, M.; Sazonov, S; Sholukhova, O.; Valeev, A.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of our optical identifications of four hard X-ray sources from the Swift all-sky survey. We obtained optical spectra for each of the program objects with the 6-m BTA telescope (Special Astrophysical Observatory, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhnii Arkhyz), which allowed their nature to be established. Two sources (SWIFT J2237.2+6324} and SWIFT J2341.0+7645) are shown to belong to the class of cataclysmic variables (suspected polars or intermediate polars). The measured...

  4. An all-sky catalog of solar-type dwarfs for exoplanetary transit surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Nascimbeni, V; Ortolani, S; Giuffrida, G; Marrese, P M; Magrin, D; Ragazzoni, R; Pagano, I; Rauer, H; Cabrera, J; Pollacco, D; Heras, A M; Deleuil, M; Gizon, L; Granata, V

    2016-01-01

    Most future surveys designed to discover transiting exoplanets, including TESS and PLATO, will target bright (V3.0 subgiants. The relatively low amount of contamination (defined as the fraction of false positives; <30%) also makes UCAC4-RPM a useful tool for the past and ongoing ground-based transit surveys, which need to discard candidate signals originating from early-type or giant stars. As an application, we show how UCAC4-RPM may support the preparation of the TESS (that will map almost the entire sky) input catalog and the input catalog of PLATO, planned to survey more than half of the whole sky with exquisite photometric precision.

  5. Total Solar Irradiance Variability and the Solar Activity Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Raychaudhuri, Probhas

    2006-01-01

    It is suggested that the solar variability is due to the perturbed nature of the solar core and this variability is provided by the variability of the solar neutrino flux from the solar neutrino detectors i.e., Homestake, Superkamiokande, SAGE and GALLEX-GNO. The solar neutrino flux in the standard solar model (SSM) was calculated on the assumption of L_nu (neutrino luminosity) = L_gamma (optical luminosity) which implies that if there is a change in optical luminosity then solar neutrino flu...

  6. Comprehensive All-sky Search for Periodic Gravitational Waves in the Sixth Science Run LIGO Data

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Aiello, L; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Altin, P A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Arun, K G; Ascenzi, S; Ashton, G; Ast, M; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Bacon, P; Bader, M K M; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barta, D; Bartlett, J; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Bazzan, M; Bejger, M; Bell, A S; Berger, B K; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birney, R; Biscans, S; Bisht, A; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blair, C D; Blair, D G; Blair, R M; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bohe, A; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonnand, R; Boom, B A; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bouffanais, Y; Bozzi, A; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Broida, J E; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Brunett, S; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cabero, M; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cahillane, C; Bustillo, J Calder'on; Callister, T; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Diaz, J Casanueva; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavagli`a, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C B; Baiardi, L Cerboni; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chan, M; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Cheeseboro, B D; Chen, H Y; Chen, Y; Cheng, C; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conti, L; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Cortese, S; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Cowan, E E; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Canton, T Dal; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Darman, N S; Dasgupta, A; Costa, C F Da Silva; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; De, S; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Del'eglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Devine, R C; Dhurandhar, S; D'iaz, M C; Di Fiore, L; Di Giovanni, M; Di Girolamo, T; Di Lieto, A; Di Pace, S; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dolique, V; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H -B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Engels, W; Essick, R C; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Everett, R; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fair, H; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Fenyvesi, E; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Fiorucci, D; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fletcher, M; Fournier, J -D; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Frey, V; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H A G; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S G; Garufi, F; Gaur, G; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Geng, P; Genin, E; Gennai, A; George, J; Gergely, L; Germain, V; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, K; Glaefke, A; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; Gonz'alez, G; Castro, J M Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A; Gordon, N A; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S E; Gosselin, M; Gouaty, R; Grado, A; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Green, A C; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guo, X; Gupta, A; Gupta, M K; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J J; Hall, B R; Hall, E D; Hammond, G; Haney, M; Hanke, M M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M J; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Hennig, J; Henry, J; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hofman, D; Holt, K; Holz, D E; Hopkins, P; Hough, J; Houston, E A; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huang, S; Huerta, E A; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isa, H N; Isac, J -M; Isi, M; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacqmin, T; Jang, H; Jani, K; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Jian, L; Jim'enez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalaghatgi, C V; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kapadia, S J; Karki, S; Karvinen, K S; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; K'ef'elian, F; Kehl, M S; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Kennedy, R; Key, J S; Khalili, F Y; Khan, I; Khan, S; Khan, Z; Khazanov, E A; Kijbunchoo, N; Kim, Chi-Woong; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, W; Kim, Y -M; Kimbrell, S J; King, E J; King, P J; Kissel, J S; Klein, B; Kleybolte, L; Klimenko, S; Koehlenbeck, S M; Koley, S; Kondrashov, V; Kontos, A; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Kr'olak, A; Krueger, C; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Lackey, B D; Landry, M; Lange, J; Lantz, B; Lasky, P D; Laxen, M; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, K; Lenon, A; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Lewis, J B; Li, T G F; Libson, A; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Lombardi, A L; London, L T; Lord, J E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; L"uck, H; Lundgren, A P; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magana-Sandoval, F; Zertuche, L Magana; Magee, R M; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mansell, G L; Manske, M; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; M'arka, S; M'arka, Z; Markosyan, A S; Maros, E; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martynov, D V; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Masso-Reid, M; Mastrogiovanni, S; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McManus, D J; McRae, T; McWilliams, S T; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Meidam, J; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Merilh, E L; Merzougui, M; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Messick, C; Metzdorff, R; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, A L; Miller, A; Miller, B B; Miller, J; Millhouse, M; Minenkov, Y; Ming, J; Mirshekari, S; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Montani, M; Moore, B C; Moore, C J; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, G; Muir, A W; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D; Mukherjee, S; Mukund, N; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D J; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Nedkova, K; Nelemans, G; Nelson, T J N; Neri, M; Neunzert, A; Newton, G; Nguyen, T T; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Oberling, J; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oliver, M; Oppermann, P; Oram, Richard J; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ott, C D; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pai, A; Pai, S A; Palamos, J R; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pal-Singh, A; Pan, H; Pankow, C; Pannarale, F; Pant, B C; Paoletti, F; Paoli, A; Papa, M A; Paris, H R; Parker, W; Pascucci, D; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patricelli, B; Patrick, Z; Pearlstone, B L; Pedraza, M; Pedurand, R; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Perri, L M; Phelps, M; Piccinni, O J; Pichot, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poe, M; Poggiani, R; Popolizio, P; Post, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; P"urrer, M; Qi, H; Qin, J; Qiu, S; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E A; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rajan, C; Rakhmanov, M; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Read, J; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Rew, H; Reyes, S D; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Rizzo, M; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V J; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosi'nska, D; Rowan, S; R"udiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; Sadeghian, L; Sakellariadou, M; Salconi, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Samajdar, A; Sammut, L; Sanchez, E J; Sandberg, V; Sandeen, B; Sanders, J R; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Sauter, O E S; Savage, R L; Sawadsky, A; Schale, P; Schilling, R; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Sch"onbeck, A; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Setyawati, Y; Shaddock, D A; Shaffer, T; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Sheperd, A; Shoemaker, D H; Shoemaker, D M; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sieniawska, M; Sigg, D; Silva, A D; Singer, A; Singer, L P; Singh, A; Singh, R; Singhal, A; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Smith, J R; Smith, N D; Smith, R J E; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Sorrentino, F; Souradeep, T; Srivastava, A K; Staley, A; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stephens, B C; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Stratta, G; Strauss, N A; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, L; Sunil, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szczepa'nczyk, M J; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; T'apai, M; Tarabrin, S P; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Theeg, T; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, E G; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thrane, E; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Toland, K; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Tornasi, Z; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; T"oyr"a, D; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trifir`o, D; Tringali, M C; Trozzo, L; Tse, M; Turconi, M; Tuyenbayev, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; Vander-Hyde, D C; van der Schaaf, L; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Vass, S; Vas'uth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Vicer'e, A; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Voss, D V; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Wen, L; Wessels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Woehler, J; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, D S; Wu, G; Yablon, J; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yu, H; Yvert, M; zny, A Zadro; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zevin, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S E; Zweizig, J

    2016-01-01

    We report on a comprehensive all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency band 100-1500 Hz and with a frequency time derivative in the range of $[-1.18, +1.00]\\times 10^{-8}$ Hz/s. Such a signal could be produced by a nearby spinning and slightly non-axisymmetric isolated neutron star in our galaxy. This search uses the data from the Initial LIGO sixth science run and covers a larger parameter space with respect to any past search. A Loosely Coherent detection pipeline was applied to follow up weak outliers in both Gaussian (95% recovery rate) and non-Gaussian (75% recovery rate) bands. No gravitational wave signals were observed, and upper limits were placed on their strength. Our smallest upper limit on worst-case (linearly polarized) strain amplitude $h_0$ is ${9.7}\\times 10^{-25}$ near 169 Hz, while at the high end of our frequency range we achieve a worst-case upper limit of ${5.5}\\times 10^{-24}$. Both cases refer to all sky locations and entire range of frequency derivative values.

  7. Sharp Chandra View of ROSAT All-Sky Survey Bright Sources: I. Improvement of Positional Accuracy

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Shuang; Liu, Jifeng

    2016-01-01

    The ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) represents one of the most complete and sensitive soft X-ray all-sky surveys to date. However, the deficient positional accuracy of the RASS Bright Source Catalog (BSC) and subsequent lack of firm optical identifications affect the multi-wavelength studies of X-ray sources. The widely used positional errors $\\sigma_{pos}$ based on the Tycho Stars Catalog (Tycho-1) have previously been applied for identifying objects in the optical band. The considerably sharper Chandra view covers a fraction of RASS sources, whose $\\sigma_{pos}$ could be improved by utilizing the sub-arcsec positional accuracy of Chandra observations. We cross-match X-ray objects between the BSC and \\emph{Chandra} sources extracted from the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) archival observations. A combined counterparts list (BSCxACIS) with \\emph{Chandra} spatial positions weighted by the X-ray flux of multi-counterparts is employed to evaluate and improve the former identifications of BSC with the other...

  8. An improved source-subtracted and destriped 408 MHz all-sky map

    CERN Document Server

    Remazeilles, M; Banday, A J; Bigot-Sazy, M -A; Ghosh, T

    2014-01-01

    The all-sky 408 MHz map of Haslam et al. is one the most important total-power radio surveys. It has been widely used to study diffuse synchrotron radiation from our Galaxy and as a template to remove foregrounds in cosmic microwave background data. However, there are a number of issues associated with it that must be dealt with, including large-scale striations and contamination from extragalactic radio sources. We have re-evaluated and re-processed the rawest data available to produce a new and improved 408 MHz all-sky map. We first quantify the positional accuracy ($\\approx 7$ arcmin) and effective beam ($56.0\\pm1.0$ arcmin) of the four individual surveys from which it was assembled. Large-scale striations associated with $1/f$ noise in the scan direction are reduced to a level $\\ll 1$ K using a Fourier-based filtering technique. The most important improvement results from the removal of extragalactic sources. We have used an iterative combination of two techniques -- two-dimensional Gaussian fitting and m...

  9. All-sky Search for Periodic Gravitational Waves in the Full S5 LIGO Data

    CERN Document Server

    Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G S; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Amin, R S; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Belletoile, A; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brummit, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Burmeister, O; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cain, J; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Dorsher, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endrőczi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Farr, W; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Ganija, M R; Garcia, J; Garofoli, J A; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gemme, G; Geng, R; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, N; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, T; Hage, B; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kamaretsos, I; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B; Kim, C; Kim, D; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, P J; Kinsey, M; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lang, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Lee, C H; Lee, H M

    2011-01-01

    We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency band 50-800 Hz and with the frequency time derivative in the range of 0 through -6e-9 Hz/s. Such a signal could be produced by a nearby spinning and slightly non-axisymmetric isolated neutron star in our galaxy. After recent improvements in the search program that yielded a 10x increase in computational efficiency, we have searched in two years of data collected during LIGO's fifth science run and have obtained the most sensitive all-sky upper limits on gravitational wave strain to date. Near 150 Hz our upper limit on worst-case linearly polarized strain amplitude $h_0$ is 1e-24, while at the high end of our frequency range we achieve a worst-case upper limit of 3.8e-24 for all polarizations and sky locations. These results constitute a factor of two improvement upon previously published data. A new detection pipeline utilizing a Loosely Coherent algorithm was able to follow up weaker outliers, increasing the volume of space wher...

  10. Planck intermediate results XXIX. All-sky dust modelling with Planck, IRAS, and WISE observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.;

    2016-01-01

    in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The DL A(V) estimates are larger than those determined towards QSOs by a factor of about 2, which depends on U-min. The DL fitting parameter U-min, effectively determined by the wavelength where the SED peaks, appears to trace variations in the far-IR opacity of the dust...... for the systematic differences found with QSO observations. This renormalization, made to match the A(V) estimates towards QSOs, also brings into agreement the DL A(V) estimates with those derived for molecular clouds from the near-IR colours of stars in the 2 micron all sky survey (2MASS). The DL model and the QSOs......We present all-sky modelling of the high resolution Planck, IRAS, andWISE infrared (IR) observations using the physical dust model presented by Draine & Li in 2007 (DL, ApJ, 657, 810). We study the performance and results of this model, and discuss implications for future dust modelling...

  11. Comprehensive all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the sixth science run LIGO data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fenyvesi, E.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Geng, P.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jian, L.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chi-Woong; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.-M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Lewis, J. B.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magaña Zertuche, L.; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    We report on a comprehensive all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency band 100-1500 Hz and with a frequency time derivative in the range of [-1.18 ,+1.00 ] ×1 0-8 Hz /s . Such a signal could be produced by a nearby spinning and slightly nonaxisymmetric isolated neutron star in our galaxy. This search uses the data from the initial LIGO sixth science run and covers a larger parameter space with respect to any past search. A Loosely Coherent detection pipeline was applied to follow up weak outliers in both Gaussian (95% recovery rate) and non-Gaussian (75% recovery rate) bands. No gravitational wave signals were observed, and upper limits were placed on their strength. Our smallest upper limit on worst-case (linearly polarized) strain amplitude h0 is 9.7 ×1 0-25 near 169 Hz, while at the high end of our frequency range we achieve a worst-case upper limit of 5.5 ×1 0-24 . Both cases refer to all sky locations and entire range of frequency derivative values.

  12. Measurement and Models of Solar Irradiance

    OpenAIRE

    Lysko, Meena Devi

    2006-01-01

    Solar radiation is the main driving force for the Earth’s weather and climate. It is also the prime source for renewable energy technologies.Solar energy technologies can satisfy the current energy demand and at the same time reduce anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. It follows from scientific and engineering research within the field that accurate terrestrial solar radiation data and derived models can improve the detection of longterm climate change, the validation of Earth radiation b...

  13. Probabilistic Forecasts of Solar Irradiance by Stochastic Differential Equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Jan Emil Banning; Morales González, Juan Miguel; Møller, Jan Kloppenborg;

    2014-01-01

    Probabilistic forecasts of renewable energy production provide users with valuable information about the uncertainty associated with the expected generation. Current state-of-the-art forecasts for solar irradiance have focused on producing reliable point forecasts. The additional information...... included in probabilistic forecasts may be paramount for decision makers to efficiently make use of this uncertain and variable generation. In this paper, a stochastic differential equation framework for modeling the uncertainty associated with the solar irradiance point forecast is proposed. This modeling...... approach allows for characterizing both the interdependence structure of prediction errors of short-term solar irradiance and their predictive distribution. Three different stochastic differential equation models are first fitted to a training data set and subsequently evaluated on a one-year test set...

  14. Vacuum-ultraviolet instrumentation for solar irradiance and thermospheric airglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Rottman, Gary J.; Bailey, Scott M.; Solomon, Stanley C.

    1994-02-01

    A NASA sounding rocket experiment was developed to study the solar extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) spectral irradiance and its effect on the upper atmosphere. Both the solar flux and the terrestrial molecular nitrogen via the Lyman-Birge-Hopfield bands in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) region were measured remotely from a sounding rocket on October 27, 1992. The rocket experiment also includes EUV instruments from Boston University, but only the National Center for Atmospheric Research's (NCAR)/University of Colorado's (CU) four solar instruments and one airglow instrument are discussed. The primary solar EUV instrument is a 0.25-m Rowland circle EUV spectrograph that has flown on three rockets since 1988 measuring the solar spectral irradiance from 30 to 110 nm with 0.2-nm resolution. Another solar irradiance instrument is an array of six silicon soft x-ray (XUV) photodiodes, each having different metallic filters coated directly on the photodiodes. This photodiode system provides a spectral coverage from 0.1 to 80 nm with approximately 15-nm resolution. The other solar irradiance instrument is a silicon avalanche photodiode coupled with pulse height analyzer electronics. This avalanche photodiode package measures the XUV photon energy, providing a solar spectrum from 50 to 12,400 eV (25 to 0.1 nm) with an energy resolution of about 50 eV. The fourth solar instrument is an XUV imager that images the sun at 17.5 nm with a spatial resolution of 20 arc sec. The airglow spectrograph measures the terrestrial FUV airglow emissions along the horizon from 125 to 160 nm with 0.2-nm spectral resolution. The photon-counting CODACON detectors are used for three of these instruments and consist of coded arrays of anodes behind microchannel plates.

  15. Measuring Broadband IR Irradiance in the Direct Solar Beam (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reda, I.

    2015-03-01

    Solar and atmospheric science radiometers, e.g. pyranometers, pyrheliometers, and photovoltaic cells are calibrated with traceability to a consensus reference, which is maintained by Absolute Cavity Radiometers (ACRs). The ACR is an open cavity with no window, developed to measure extended broadband direct solar irradiance beyond the ultraviolet and infrared bands below and above 0.2 um and 50 um, respectively. On the other hand, pyranometers and pyrheliometers are developed to measure broadband shortwave irradiance from approximately 0.3 um to 3 um, while the present photovoltaic cells are limited to approximately 0.3 um to 1 um. The broadband mismatch of ACR versus such radiometers causes discrepancy in radiometers' calibration methods that has not been discussed or addressed in the solar and atmospheric science literature. Pyrgeometers are also used for solar and atmospheric science applications and are calibrated with traceability to consensus reference, yet are calibrated during nighttime only, because no consensus reference has yet been established for the daytime longwave irradiance. This poster shows a method to measure the broadband IR irradiance in the direct solar beam from 3 um to 50 um, as a first step that might be used to help develop calibration methods to address the mismatch between broadband ACR and shortwave radiometers, and the lack of a daytime reference for pyrgeometers. The irradiance was measured from sunrise to sunset for 5 days when the sun disk was cloudless; the irradiance varied from approximately 1 Wm-2 to 16 Wm-2 for solar zenith angle from 80 degrees to 16 degrees respectively; estimated uncertainty is 1.5 Wm-2.

  16. Measuring Broadband IR Irradiance in the Direct Solar Beam (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reda, I.; Konings, J.; Xie, Y.; Dooraghi, M.; Sengupta, M.

    2015-03-01

    Solar and atmospheric science radiometers, e.g. pyranometers, pyrheliometers, and photovoltaic cells are calibrated with traceability to a consensus reference, which is maintained by Absolute Cavity Radiometers (ACRs). The ACR is an open cavity with no window, developed to measure extended broadband direct solar irradiance beyond the ultraviolet and infrared bands below and above 0.2 micrometers and 50 micrometers, respectively. On the other hand, pyranometers and pyrheliometers are developed to measure broadband shortwave irradiance from approximately 0.3 micrometers to 3 micrcometers, while the present photovoltaic cells are limited to approximately 0.3 micrometers to 1 micrometers. The broadband mismatch of ACR versus such radiometers causes discrepancy in radiometers' calibration methods that has not been discussed or addressed in the solar and atmospheric science literature. Pyrgeometers are also used for solar and atmospheric science applications and calibrated with traceability to consensus reference, yet calibrated during nighttime only, because no consensus reference has yet been established for the daytime longwave irradiance. This poster shows a method to measure the broadband IR irradiance in the direct solar beam from 3 micrometers to 50 micrometers, as first step that might be used to help develop calibration methods to address the mismatch between broadband ACR and shortwave radiometers, and the lack of a daytime reference for pyrgeometers. The irradiance was measured from sunrise to sunset for 5 days when the sun disk was cloudless; the irradiance varied from approximately 1 Wm-2 to 16 Wm-2 for solar zenith angle from 80 degres to 16 degrees respectively; estimated uncertainty is 1.5 Wm-2.

  17. Concept of a small satellite for sub-MeV and MeV all sky survey: the CAST mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Ichinohe, Yuto; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Takashima, Takeshi; Tashiro, Makoto; Tamagawa, Toru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Nomachi, Masaharu; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Makishima, Kazuo; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mitani, Takefumi; Yoshimitsu, Tetsuo; Watanabe, Shin

    2012-09-01

    MeV and sub-MeV energy band from ~200 keV to ~2 MeV contains rich information of high-energy phenomena in the universe. The CAST (Compton Telescope for Astro and Solar Terrestrial) mission is planned to be launched at the end of 2010s, and aims at providing all-sky map in this energy-band for the first time. It is made of a semiconductor Compton telescope utilizing Si as a scatterer and CdTe as an absorber. CAST provides allsky sub-MeV polarization map for the first time, as well. The Compton telescope technology is based on the design used in the Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) onboard ASTRO-H, characterized by its tightly stacked semiconductor layers to obtain high Compton reconstruction efficiency. The CAST mission is currently planned as a candidate for the small scientific satellite series in ISAS/JAXA, weighting about 500 kg in total. Scalable detector design enables us to consider other options as well. Scientific outcome of CAST is wide. It will provide new information from high-energy sources, such as AGN and/or its jets, supernova remnants, magnetors, blackhole and neutron-star binaries and others. Polarization map will tell us about activities of jets and reflections in these sources, as well. In addition, CAST will simultaneously observe the Sun, and depending on its attitude, the Earth.

  18. The total solar irradiance, UV emission and magnetic flux during the last solar cycle minimum

    OpenAIRE

    Benevolenskaya, E. E.; Kostuchenko, I. G.

    2013-01-01

    We have analyzed the total solar irradiance (TSI) and the spectral solar irradiance as ultraviolet emission (UV) in the wavelength range 115-180 nm, observed with the instruments TIM and SOLSTICE within the framework of SORCE (The Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment) during the long solar minimum between the 23rd and 24th cycles. The wavelet analysis reveals an increase in the magnetic flux in the latitudinal zone of the sunspot activity, accompanied with an increase in the TSI and UV on t...

  19. An assessment of the solar irradiance record for climate studies

    OpenAIRE

    Kopp Greg

    2014-01-01

    Total solar irradiance, the spatially and spectrally integrated radiant output from the Sun at a mean Sun-Earth distance of 1 astronomical unit, provides nearly all the energy driving the Earth’s climate system. Variations in this energy, particularly over long time scales, contribute to changes in Earth’s climate and have been linked to historical glaciation and inter-glacial periods as well as having a small effect on more recent global warming. Accurate measurements of solar irradiances re...

  20. The MAXI Mission on the ISS: Science and Instruments for Monitoring All Sky X-Ray Images

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuoka, Masaru; Ueno, Shiro; Tomida, Hiroshi; Kohama, Mitsuhiro; Suzuki, Motoko; Adachi, Yasuki; Ishikawa, Masaki; Mihara, Tatehiro; Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Isobe, Naoki; Nakagawa, Yujin; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Miyata, Emi; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kataoka, Jun; Morii, Mikio; Yoshida, Atsumasa; Negoro, Hitoshi; Nakajima, Motoki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Chujo, Hirotaka; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yamazaki, Osamu; Nakahira, Satoshi; You, Tetsuya; Ishiwata, Ryoji; Miyoshi, Sho; Eguchi, Satoshi; Hiroi, Kazuo; Katayama, Haruyoshi; Ebisawa, Ken

    2009-01-01

    The MAXI (Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image) mission is the first astronomical payload to be installed on the Japanese Experiment Module-Exposed Facility (JEM-EF) on the ISS. It is scheduled for launch in the middle of 2009 to monitor all-sky X-ray objects on every ISS orbit. MAXI will be more powerful than any previous X-ray All Sky Monitor (ASM) payloads, being able to monitor hundreds of AGN. MAXI will provide all sky images of X-ray sources of about 20 mCrab in the energy band of 2-30 keV from observation on one ISS orbit (90 min), about 4.5 mCrab for one day, and about 1 mCrab for one month. A final detectability of MAXI could be 0.2 mCrab for 2 year observations.

  1. First low frequency all-sky search for continuous gravitational wave signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D. V.; Andersen, M.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Ashton, G.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Branco, V.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Celerier, C.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Colombini, M.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Canton, T. Dal; Damjanic, M. D.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J. M.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gleason, J. R.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez, J.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hoelscher-Obermaier, J.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Islas, G.; Isler, J. C.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M. B.; Jang, H.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Ji, Y.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Karlen, J. L.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kerrigan, J.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N. G.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J. T.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, J. P.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Lewis, J. B.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Lodhia, D.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macarthur, J.; Macdonald, E. P.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Madden-Fong, D. X.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mangini, N. M.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meidam, J.; Meinders, M.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, A.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nagy, M. F.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, M.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Okounkova, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R.; O'Reilly, B.; Ortega, W. E.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C. T.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patrick, Z.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J. H.; Poggiani, R.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rodger, A. S.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffery, P.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Steplewski, S.; Stevenson, S. P.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; van den Broeck, C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Heijningen, J.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, M.; Wade, L. E.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, K. J.; Williams, L.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present the results of the first low frequency all-sky search of continuous gravitational wave signals conducted on Virgo VSR2 and VSR4 data. The search covered the full sky, a frequency range between 20 and 128 Hz with a range of spin-down between -1.0 ×10-10 and +1.5 ×10-11 Hz /s , and was based on a hierarchical approach. The starting point was a set of short fast Fourier transforms, of length 8192 s, built from the calibrated strain data. Aggressive data cleaning, in both the time and frequency domains, has been done in order to remove, as much as possible, the effect of disturbances of instrumental origin. On each data set a number of candidates has been selected, using the FrequencyHough transform in an incoherent step. Only coincident candidates among VSR2 and VSR4 have been examined in order to strongly reduce the false alarm probability, and the most significant candidates have been selected. The criteria we have used for candidate selection and for the coincidence step greatly reduce the harmful effect of large instrumental artifacts. Selected candidates have been subject to a follow-up by constructing a new set of longer fast Fourier transforms followed by a further incoherent analysis, still based on the FrequencyHough transform. No evidence for continuous gravitational wave signals was found, and therefore we have set a population-based joint VSR2-VSR4 90% confidence level upper limit on the dimensionless gravitational wave strain in the frequency range between 20 and 128 Hz. This is the first all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves conducted, on data of ground-based interferometric detectors, at frequencies below 50 Hz. We set upper limits in the range between about 1 0-24 and 2 ×10-23 at most frequencies. Our upper limits on signal strain show an improvement of up to a factor of ˜2 with respect to the results of previous all-sky searches at frequencies below 80 Hz.

  2. Quality assessment of solar UV irradiance measured with array spectroradiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, Luca; Gröbner, Julian; Hülsen, Gregor; Bachmann, Luciano; Blumthaler, Mario; Dubard, Jimmy; Khazova, Marina; Kift, Richard; Hoogendijk, Kees; Serrano, Antonio; Smedley, Andrew; Vilaplana, José-Manuel

    2016-04-01

    The reliable quantification of ultraviolet (UV) radiation at the earth's surface requires accurate measurements of spectral global solar UV irradiance in order to determine the UV exposure to human skin and to understand long-term trends in this parameter. Array spectroradiometers (ASRMs) are small, light, robust and cost-effective instruments, and are increasingly used for spectral irradiance measurements. Within the European EMRP ENV03 project "Solar UV", new devices, guidelines and characterization methods have been developed to improve solar UV measurements with ASRMs, and support to the end user community has been provided. In order to assess the quality of 14 end user ASRMs, a solar UV intercomparison was held on the measurement platform of the World Radiation Center (PMOD/WRC) in Davos, Switzerland, from 10 to 17 July 2014. The results of the blind intercomparison revealed that ASRMs, currently used for solar UV measurements, show a large variation in the quality of their solar UV measurements. Most of the instruments overestimate the erythema-weighted UV index - in particular at large solar zenith angles - due to stray light contribution in the UV-B range. The spectral analysis of global solar UV irradiance further supported the finding that the uncertainties in the UV-B range are very large due to stray light contribution in this wavelength range. In summary, the UV index may be detected by some commercially available ASRMs within 5 % compared to the world reference spectroradiometer, if well characterized and calibrated, but only for a limited range of solar zenith angles. Generally, the tested instruments are not yet suitable for solar UV measurements for the entire range between 290 and 400 nm under all atmospheric conditions.

  3. Lyman alpha solar spectral irradiance line profile observations and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Martin; Machol, Janet; Quemerais, Eric; Curdt, Werner; Kretschmar, Matthieu; Haberreiter, Margit

    2016-04-01

    Solar lyman alpha solar spectral irradiance measurements are available on a daily basis, but only the 1-nm integrated flux is typically published. The International Space Science Institute (ISSI) in Bern, Switzerland has sponsored a team to make higher spectral resolution data available to the community. Using a combination of SORCE/SOLSTICE and SOHO/SUMER observations plus empirical and semi-empirical modeling, we will produce a dataset of the line profile. Our poster will describe progress towards this goal.

  4. The Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey I. Source selection and observations

    CERN Document Server

    Myers, S T; Browne, I W A; De Bruyn, A G; Pearson, T J; Readhead, A C S; Wilkinson, P N; Biggs, A D; Blandford, R D; Fassnacht, C D; Koopmans, L V E; Marlow, D R; McKean, J P; Norbury, M A; Phillips, P M; Rusin, D; Shepherd, M C; Sykes, C M

    2002-01-01

    The Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey (CLASS) is an international collaborative program which has obtained high-resolution radio images of over 10000 flat-spectrum radio sources in order to create the largest and best studied statistical sample of radio-loud gravitationally lensed systems. With this survey, combined with detailed studies of the lenses found therein, constraints can be placed on the expansion rate, matter density, and dark energy (e.g. cosmological constant, quintessence) content of the Universe that are complementary to and independent of those obtained through other methods. CLASS is aimed at identifying lenses where multiple images are formed from compact flat-spectrum radio sources, which should be easily identifiable in the radio maps. Because CLASS is radio-based, dust obscuration in lensing galaxies is not a factor, and the relative insensitivity of the instrument to environmental conditions leads to nearly uniform sensitivity and resolution over the entire survey. In four observing seasons fr...

  5. All Sky Search for Gravitational-Wave Bursts in the Second Joint LIGO-Virgo Run

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Ceron, E. Amador; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M. C.; Aylott, B. E.; Blackburn, L.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.

    2012-01-01

    We present results from a search for gravitational-wave bursts in the data collected by the LIGO and Virgo detectors between July 7, 2009 and October 20, 2010: data are analyzed when at least two of the three LIGO-Virgo detectors are in coincident operation, with a total observation time of 207 days. The analysis searches for transients of duration approx. standard-candle sources. As in the previous joint run, typical sensitivities of the search in terms of the root-sum-squared strain amplitude for these waveforms lie in the range approx 5 x 10(exp -22 Hz(exp-1/2) approx 1 X 10(exp -20) Hz(exp -1/2) . The combination of the two joint runs entails the most sensitive all-sky search for generic gravitational-wave bursts and synthesizes the results achieved by the initial generation of interferometric detectors.

  6. All-sky sensitivity of HAWC to Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2015-01-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is a ground-based TeV gamma-ray observatory in the state of Puebla, Mexico at an altitude of 4100 m. Its 22,000 m$^2$ instrumented area, wide field of view ($\\sim$2 sr), and >95% uptime make it an ideal instrument for discovering gamma-ray burst (GRB) emission at $\\sim$100 GeV. Such a discovery would provide key information about the origins of prompt GRB emission as well as constraints on extra-galactic background light (EBL) models and the violation of Lorentz invariance. We will present prospects for discovering GRB emission at $\\sim$100 GeV with a simple, all-sky search algorithm using HAWC data that is most sensitive to short GRBs. The search algorithm presented here can also be used to detect other short transients with timescales and fluxes similar to short GRBs.

  7. The effect of radiation on the IRAS all-sky survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    The Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) is in a sun synchronous, 'near' polar orbit at an altitude of 900 km. The primary objective of IRAS is related to the conduction of an all-sky survey in the wavelength range from 8 microns to 120 microns. The present investigation is concerned with three components of the radiation environment encountered by IRAS, taking into account the high energy protons in the South Atlantic Anomaly, high energy electrons in the horns of the Van Allen belts, and cosmic rays. The effect of radiation on the returned data stream is studied, and attention is given to the steps which were taken to minimize the impact of radiation on the completeness of the survey.

  8. Imaging science at Amazon rainforest, Brazil, using an all-sky imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderaro, G. L.; Pimenta, A. A.; Manzi, A. O.

    2015-12-01

    Near-simultaneous all-sky (160 degrees field of view) observations of the OI 630.0 nm, OI777.4 nm, OI557.7 nm and 589 nm nightglow emissions are being carried out on a routine basis at ZF-2 Cuireiras Biological Reserve (2.59 degrees S, 60.22 degrees W, altitude 87 m), Amazonas state, Brazil, since July 2015. In the thermosphere-ionosphere, three types of phenomena are studied using 630.0 nm and 777.4 nm observations: (1) brightness waves (BW) associated with the midnight temperature maximum (MTM), (2) electron density enhancement associated with plasma blobs and MSTID with characteristics matching a Perkins-instability. In the mesosphere we study gravity waves events, probably generated by lower atmospheric due to treetops of the Amazon rainforest.

  9. Estimating all-sky night brightness maps from finite sets of SQM measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilve Rúa, V.; Ling, J. F.; Bará, S.; Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Nievas, M.; Zamorano, J.

    2015-05-01

    The all-sky night brightness distributions recorded at observing sites with moderate to high levels of light pollution can be efficiently described by polynomial series or relatively low order. This opens the way for estimating these continuous distributions from discrete sets of measurements made in different directions of the sky with photometric detectors of low spatial resolution as, e.g. the Sky Quality Meter, SQM^{TM} (10° HWHM). Modal estimations of the night sky brightness can be obtained by expanding their equal-area projection maps as a series of orthonormal functions, in particular Zernike polynomials, and fitting the unknown modal coefficients to the measurements provided by the detector. Least squares and minimum variance estimators can be easily developed once the linear functional relationship between the measurements and the actual sky brightness distribution is established.

  10. A Radiometric All-Sky Infrared Camera (RASICAM) for DES/CTIO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Peter M.; Rogers, Howard; Schindler, Rafe H.; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    A novel radiometric all-sky infrared camera [RASICAM] has been constructed to allow automated real-time quantitative assessment of night sky conditions for the Dark Energy Camera [DECam] located on the Blanco Telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. The camera is optimized to detect the position, motion and optical depth of thin, high (8-10km) cirrus clouds and contrails by measuring their apparent temperature above the night sky background. The camera system utilizes a novel wide-field equiresolution catadioptic mirror system that provides sky coverage of 2{pi} azimuth and 14-90{sup o} from zenith. Several new technological and design innovations allow the RASICAM system to provide unprecedented cloud detection and IR-based photometricity quantification. The design of the RASICAM system is presented.

  11. All-sky reconstruction of the primordial scalar potential from WMAP temperature data

    CERN Document Server

    Dorn, Sebastian; Enßlin, Torsten A

    2014-01-01

    An essential quantity required to understand the physics of the early Universe, in particular the inflationary epoch, is the primordial scalar potential $\\Phi$ and its statistics. We present for the first time an all-sky reconstruction of $\\Phi$ with corresponding $1\\sigma$-uncertainty from WMAP's cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature data - a map of the very early Universe right after the inflationary epoch. This has been achieved by applying a Bayesian inference method that separates the whole inverse problem of the reconstruction into many independent ones, each of them solved by an optimal linear filter (Wiener filter). In this way, the three-dimensional potential $\\Phi$ gets reconstructed slice by slice resulting in a thick shell of nested spheres around the comoving distance to the last scattering surface. Each slice represents the primordial scalar potential $\\Phi$ projected onto a sphere with corresponding distance. Furthermore, we present an advanced method for inferring $\\Phi$ and its power ...

  12. All-sky signals from recombination to reionization with the SKA

    CERN Document Server

    Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Pritchard, Jonathan; Vedantham, Harish K

    2015-01-01

    Cosmic evolution in the hydrogen content of the Universe through recombination and up to the end of reionization is expected to be revealed as subtle spectral features in the uniform extragalactic cosmic radio background. The redshift evolution in the excitation temperature of the 21-cm spin flip transition of neutral hydrogen appears as redshifted emission and absorption against the cosmic microwave background. The precise signature of the spectral trace from cosmic dawn and the epoch of reionization are dependent on the spectral radiance, abundance and distribution of the first bound systems of stars and early galaxies, which govern the evolution in the spin-flip level populations. Redshifted 21 cm from these epochs when the spin temperature deviates from the temperature of the ambient relic cosmic microwave background results in an all-sky spectral structure in the 40-200 MHz range, almost wholly within the band of SKA-Low. Another spectral structure from gas evolution is redshifted recombination lines fro...

  13. Noctilucent Cloud Particle Size Determination based on Multi-Wavelength All-Sky Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Ugolnikov, Oleg S; Pilgaev, Sergey V; Roldugin, Alexey V

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with the analysis of color distribution in noctilucent clouds (NLC) in the sky based on multi-wavelength (RGB) CCD-photometry provided with the all-sky camera in Lovozero in the north of Russia (68.0 deg N, 35.1 deg E) during the bright expanded NLC performance in the night of August 12, 2016. Insignificant changes in the NLC color across the sky are interpreted as the atmospheric extinction effect combined with the difference in the Mie scattering functions of NLC particles for the three color channels of the camera. The method described in this paper is used to find the effective radius of particles about 56 nm. The result of these simple and cost-effective measurements is in good agreement with previous estimations of comparable accuracy. Non-spherical particles and lognormal distribution of the particle size are also considered.

  14. GASS: The Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey. I. Survey Description, Goals, and Initial Data Release

    CERN Document Server

    McClure-Griffiths, N M; Calabretta, M R; Ford, H A; Lockman, F J; Staveley-Smith, L; Kalberla, P M W; Bailin, J; Dedes, L; Janowiecki, S; Gibson, B K; Murphy, T; Nakanishi, H; Newton-McGee, K

    2009-01-01

    The Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey (GASS) is a survey of Galactic atomic hydrogen (HI) emission in the Southern sky covering declinations $\\delta \\leq 1^{\\circ}$ using the Parkes Radio Telescope. The survey covers $2\\pi$ steradians with an effective angular resolution of ~16', at a velocity resolution of 1.0 km/s, and with an rms brightness temperature noise of 57 mK. GASS is the most sensitive, highest angular resolution survey of Galactic HI emission ever made in the Southern sky. In this paper we outline the survey goals, describe the observations and data analysis, and present the first-stage data release. The data product is a single cube at full resolution, not corrected for stray radiation. Spectra from the survey and other data products are publicly available online.

  15. A Uniformly Selected, All-Sky Optical AGN catalog, for UHECR Correlation

    CERN Document Server

    Zaw, Ingyin; Farrar, Glennys R

    2015-01-01

    Studies discerning whether there is a significant correlation between UHECR arrival directions and optical AGN are hampered by the lack of a uniformly selected and complete all-sky optical AGN catalog. To remedy this, we are preparing such a catalog based on the 2MASS Redshift Survey (2MRS), a spectroscopic sample of $\\sim 44,500$ galaxies complete to a K magnitude of 11.75 over 91% of the sky. We have analyzed the available optical spectra of these 2MRS galaxies ($\\sim 80$% of the galaxies), in order to identify the AGN amongst them with uniform criteria. We present a first-stage release of the AGN catalog for the southern sky, based on spectra from the 6dF Galaxy survey and CTIO telescope. Providing a comparably uniform and complete catalog for the northern sky is more challenging because the spectra for the northern galaxies were taken with different instruments.

  16. Predicting Downward Longwave Radiation for Various Land Use in All-Sky Condition: Northeast Florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Han Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate estimate of the surface longwave radiation is important for the surface radiation budget, which in turn controls evaporation and sensible heat fluxes. Regional land use changes can impact local weather conditions; for example, heterogeneous land use patterns and temporal changes in atmospheric circulation patterns would affect air temperature and water vapor pressure, which are more commonly used as inputs in existing models for estimating downward longwave radiation (LWd. In this study, first, we analyzed the cloud cover and land use covers impacts on LWd. Next, LWd on all-sky conditions were developed by using the existing land use-adapted model and cloud cover data from the region of Saint Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD, FL. The results show that factors, such as, seasonal effects, cloud cover, and land use, are of importance in the estimation of LWd and they cannot be ignored when developing a model for LWd prediction. The all-sky land use-adapted model with all factors taken into account performs better than other existing models statistically. The results of the statistical analyses indicated that the BIAS, RMSE, MAE, and PMRE are −0.18 Wm−2, 10.81 Wm−2, 8.00 Wm−2, and 2.30%; −2.61 Wm−2, 14.45 Wm−2, 10.64 Wm−2, and 3.19%; −0.07 Wm−2, 10.53 Wm−2, 8.03 Wm−2, and 2.27%; and −0.62 Wm−2, 13.97 Wm−2, 9.76 Wm−2, and 2.87% for urban, rangeland, agricultural, and wetland areas, respectively.

  17. Calibration of an all-sky camera for obtaining sky radiance at three wavelengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Román

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a method to obtain spectral sky radiances, at three wavelengths (464, 534 and 626 nm, from hemispherical sky images. Images are registered with an All-Sky Imager installed at the Andalusian Center for Environmental Research (CEAMA in Granada (Spain. The methodology followed in this work for the absolute calibration in radiance of this instrument is based on the comparison of its output measurements with modelled sky radiances derived from the Libradtran/UVSPEC radiative transfer code under cloud-free conditions. Previously, in order to check the goodness of the simulated radiances, these are compared with experimental values recorded by a CIMEL sunphotometer. In general, modelled radiances are in agreement with experimental data, showing mean differences lower than 15% except for the pixels located next to the sun position that show larger errors.

    The comparison between the output signal of the All-Sky Imager and the modelled sky radiances provides a calibration matrix for each image. The variability of the matrix coefficients is analyzed, showing no significant changes along a period of 5 months. Therefore, a unique calibration matrix per channel is obtained for all selected images (a total of 705 images per channel. Camera radiances are compared with CIMEL radiances, finding mean absolute differences between 2% and 15% except for pixels near to the Sun and high zenith angles. We apply these calibration matrices to three images in order to study the sky radiance distributions for three different sky conditions: cloudless, overcast and partially cloudy. Horizon brightening under cloudless conditions has been observed together with the enhancement effect of individual clouds on sky radiance.

  18. How the inclination of Earth's orbit affects incoming solar irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, L. E. A.; Norton, A.; Dudok de Wit, T.; Kretzschmar, M.; Schmidt, G. A.; Cheung, M. C. M.

    2012-08-01

    The variability in solar irradiance, the main external energy source of the Earth's system, must be critically studied in order to place the effects of human-driven climate change into perspective and allow plausible predictions of the evolution of climate. Accurate measurements of total solar irradiance (TSI) variability by instruments onboard space platforms during the last three solar cycles indicate changes of approximately 0.1% over the sunspot cycle. Physics-based models also suggest variations of the same magnitude on centennial to millennia time-scales. Additionally, long-term changes in Earth's orbit modulate the solar irradiance reaching the top of the atmosphere. Variations of orbital inclination in relation to the Sun's equator could potentially impact incoming solar irradiance as a result of the anisotropy of the distribution of active regions. Due to a lack of quantitative estimates, this effect has never been assessed. Here, we show that although observers with different orbital inclinations experience various levels of irradiance, modulations in TSI are not sufficient to drive observed 100 kyr climate variations. Based on our model we find that, due to orbital inclination alone, the maximum change in the average TSI over timescales of kyrs is ˜0.003 Wm-2, much smaller than the ˜1.5 Wm-2 annually integrated change related to orbital eccentricity variations, or the 1-8 Wm-2 variability due to solar magnetic activity. Here, we stress that out-of-ecliptic measurements are needed in order to constrain models for the long-term evolution of TSI and its impact on climate.

  19. UV solar irradiance in observations and the NRLSSI and SATIRE-S models

    CERN Document Server

    Yeo, K L; Krivova, N A; Solanki, S K; Unruh, Y C; Morrill, J

    2015-01-01

    Total solar irradiance and UV spectral solar irradiance have been monitored since 1978 through a succession of space missions. This is accompanied by the development of models aimed at replicating solar irradiance by relating the variability to solar magnetic activity. The NRLSSI and SATIRE-S models provide the most comprehensive reconstructions of total and spectral solar irradiance over the period of satellite observation currently available. There is persistent controversy between the various measurements and models in terms of the wavelength dependence of the variation over the solar cycle, with repercussions on our understanding of the influence of UV solar irradiance variability on the stratosphere. We review the measurement and modelling of UV solar irradiance variability over the period of satellite observation. The SATIRE-S reconstruction is consistent with spectral solar irradiance observations where they are reliable. It is also supported by an independent, empirical reconstruction of UV spectral s...

  20. Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) Project Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, Candace; Wedge, Ronnice; Wu, Dong; Stello, Harry; Robinson, Renee

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of the Total and Spectral solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) is to acquire measurements to determine the direct and indirect effects of solar radiation on climate. TSIS total solar irradiance measurements will extend a 37-year long uninterrupted measurement record of incoming solar radiation, the dominant energy source driving the Earths climate and the most precise indicator of changes in the Suns energy output. TSIS solar spectral irradiance measurements will determine the regions of the Earths multi-layered atmosphere that are affected by solar variability, from which the solar forcing mechanisms causing changes in climate can be quantified. TSIS includes two instruments: the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) and the Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM), integrated into a single payload. The TSIS TIM and SIM instruments are upgraded versions of the two instruments that are flying on the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) mission launched in January 2003. TSIS was originally planned for the nadir-pointing National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) spacecraft. The TSIS instrument passed a Critical Design Review (CDR) for NPOESS in December 2009. In 2010, TSIS was re-planned for the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Polar Free Flyer (PFF). The TSIS TIM, SIM, and associated electronics were built, tested, and successfully completed pre-ship review as of December 2013.In early 2014, NOAA and NASA agreed to fly TSIS on the International Space Station (ISS). In the FY16 Presidents Budget, NASA assumes responsibility for the TSIS mission on ISS. The TSIS project includes requirements, interface, design, build and test of the TSIS payload, including an updated pointing system, for accommodation on the ISS. It takes advantage of the prior development of the TSIS sensors and electronics. The International Space Station (ISS) program contributions include launch services and robotic installation of the TSIS payload

  1. Determinants of skin sensitivity to solar irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekmans, W.M.R.; Vink, A.A.; Boelsma, E.; Klöpping-Ketelaars, W.A.A.; Tijburg, L.B.M.; Veer, P. van 't; Poppel, G. van; Kardinaal, A.F.M.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Acute effects of UV irradiation include UV-induced erythema. Sunlight plays an important role in the development of skin cancer. Several predictive factors of UV-induced erythema could also be predictive for skin cancer. Objective: Our objective was to quantitatively assess phenotypical

  2. Solar Spectral Proxy Irradiance from GOES (SSPRING: a model for solar EUV irradiance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suess Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several currently operating instruments are able to measure the full EUV spectrum at sufficient wavelength resolution for use in upper-atmosphere modeling, the effects of space weather, and modeling satellite drag. However, no missions are planned at present to succeed the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED and Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO missions, which currently provide these data sources. To develop a suitable replacement for these measurements, we use two broadband EUV channels on the NOAA GOES satellites, the magnesium core-to-wing ratio (Mg II index from the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE as well as EUV and Mg II time averages to model the EUV spectrum from 0.1 to 105 nm at 5-nm spectral resolution and daily time resolution. A Levenberg-Marquardt least squares fitting algorithm is used to determine a coefficient matrix that best reproduces a reference data set when multiplied by input data. The coefficient matrix is then applied to model data outside of the fitting interval. Three different fitting intervals are tested, with a variable fitting interval utilizing all days of data before the prediction date producing the best results. The correlation between the model results and the observed spectrum is found to be above 95% for the 0.1–50 nm range, and between 74% and 95% for the 50–105 nm range. We also find a favorable comparison between our results and the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM. These results provide a promising potential source for an empirical EUV spectral model after direct EUV measurements are no longer available, and utilize a similar EUV modeling technique as the upcoming GOES-R satellites.

  3. Estimating Total Solar Irradiance during the 21st century

    OpenAIRE

    Herrera, Victor Manuel Velasco; Mendoza, Blanca; Herrera, Graciela Velasco

    2011-01-01

    The reconstruction and prediction of solar activity is one of the current problems in dynamo theory and global climate modeling. We estimate the Total Solar Irradiance for the next hundred years based on the Least Square Support Vector Machine. We found that the next secular solar minimum will occur between the years 2003 and 2063 with an average of 1365.4W/m2 close to the Dalton or Modern minima. We calculate the radiative forcing between the modern maximum and the 21st century minimum to be...

  4. Estimating Total Solar Irradiance during the 21st century

    CERN Document Server

    Herrera, Victor Manuel Velasco; Herrera, Graciela Velasco

    2011-01-01

    The reconstruction and prediction of solar activity is one of the current problems in dynamo theory and global climate modeling. We estimate the Total Solar Irradiance for the next hundred years based on the Least Square Support Vector Machine. We found that the next secular solar minimum will occur between the years 2003 and 2063 with an average of 1365.4W/m2 close to the Dalton or Modern minima. We calculate the radiative forcing between the modern maximum and the 21st century minimum to be -0.1W/m2.

  5. Preliminary Low Temperature Electron Irradiation of Triple Junction Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Paul M.; Mueller, Robert L.; Scrivner, Roy L.; Helizon, Roger S.

    2007-01-01

    For many years extending solar power missions far from the sun has been a challenge not only due to the rapid falloff in solar intensity (intensity varies as inverse square of solar distance) but also because some of the solar cells in an array may exhibit a LILT (low intensity low temperature) degradation that reduces array performance. Recent LILT tests performed on commercial triple junction solar cells have shown that high performance can be obtained at solar distances as great as approx. 5 AU1. As a result, their use for missions going far from the sun has become very attractive. One additional question that remains is whether the radiation damage experienced by solar cells under low temperature conditions will be more severe than when measured during room temperature radiation tests where thermal annealing may take place. This is especially pertinent to missions such as the New Frontiers mission Juno, which will experience cell irradiation from the trapped electron environment at Jupiter. Recent testing2 has shown that low temperature proton irradiation (10 MeV) produces cell degradation results similar to room temperature irradiations and that thermal annealing does not play a factor. Although it is suggestive to propose the same would be observed for low temperature electron irradiations, this has not been verified. JPL has routinely performed radiation testing on commercial solar cells and has also performed LILT testing to characterize cell performance under far sun operating conditions. This research activity was intended to combine the features of both capabilities to investigate the possibility of any room temperature annealing that might influence the measured radiation damage. Although it was not possible to maintain the test cells at a constant low temperature between irradiation and electrical measurements, it was possible to obtain measurements with the cell temperature kept well below room temperature. A fluence of 1E15 1MeV electrons was

  6. Modeling monthly mean variation of the solar global irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vindel, J. M.; Polo, J.; Zarzalejo, L. F.

    2015-01-01

    The monthly mean variation of the solar global reaching the Earth's surface has been characterized at a global level by a regression model. This model considers the monthly variation itself (to different horizons and even the maximum annual variation) as the study variable, and it is applied without using data corresponding to measured meteorological variable. Two explicative variables have been used, the variation of the extraterrestrial irradiation and the variation of the clear sky global horizontal irradiation. The work has been carried out from datasets including average global daily solar irradiation for each month of the year measured on the ground. The model quality has been proven to be very dependent of the temporal variation considered, in such a way that higher variations, that is to say, higher distances between months, lead to an improvement in the model outcomes.

  7. Rocket measurements of the solar spectral irradiance during solar minimum, 1972-1977

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottman, G. J.

    1981-01-01

    Five sounding rocket experiments conducted between December 1972 and March 1977, a period spanning solar minimum between cycles 20 and 21, provide full disc solar irradiance data in the spectral range 120-190 nm. The five measurements have been combined to give a solar minimum reference table. This spectrum is compared with other measurements obtained during the same time period. A table of intensities for the strong emission lines at wavelengths between 120 and 190 nm is presented.

  8. Anthropogenic changes in the surface all-sky UV-B radiation through 1850–2005 simulated by an Earth system model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Yokohata

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The historical anthropogenic change in the surface all-sky UV-B (solar ultraviolet: 280–315 nm radiation through 1850–2005 is evaluated using an Earth system model. Responses of UV-B dose to anthropogenic changes in ozone and aerosols are separately evaluated using a series of historical simulations including/excluding these changes. Increases in these air pollutants cause reductions in UV-B transmittance, which occur gradually/rapidly before/after 1950 in and downwind of industrial and deforestation regions. Furthermore, changes in ozone transport in the lower stratosphere, which is induced by increasing greenhouse gas concentrations, increase ozone concentration in the extratropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. These transient changes work to decrease the amount of UV-B reaching the Earth's surface, counteracting the well-known effect increasing UV-B due to stratospheric ozone depletion, which developed rapidly after ca. 1980. As a consequence, the surface all-sky UV-B radiation change between 1850 and 2000 is negative in the tropics and NH extratropics and positive in the SH extratropics. Comparing the contributions of ozone and aerosol changes to the UV-B change, the transient change in ozone absorption of UV-B mainly determines the total change in the surface all-sky UV-B radiation at most locations. On the other hand, the aerosol direct and indirect effects on UV-B play an equally important role to that of ozone in the NH mid-latitudes and tropics. A typical example is East Asia (25° N–60° N and 120° E–150° E, where the effect of aerosols (ca. 70% dominates the total UV-B change.

  9. Uncertainties of parameterized surface downward clear-sky shortwave and all-sky longwave radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gubler

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available As many environmental models rely on simulating the energy balance at the Earth's surface based on parameterized radiative fluxes, knowledge of the inherent model uncertainties is important. In this study we evaluate one parameterization of clear-sky direct, diffuse and global shortwave downward radiation (SDR and diverse parameterizations of clear-sky and all-sky longwave downward radiation (LDR. In a first step, SDR is estimated based on measured input variables and estimated atmospheric parameters for hourly time steps during the years 1996 to 2008. Model behaviour is validated using the high quality measurements of six Alpine Surface Radiation Budget (ASRB stations in Switzerland covering different elevations, and measurements of the Swiss Alpine Climate Radiation Monitoring network (SACRaM in Payerne. In a next step, twelve clear-sky LDR parameterizations are calibrated using the ASRB measurements. One of the best performing parameterizations is elected to estimate all-sky LDR, where cloud transmissivity is estimated using measured and modeled global SDR during daytime. In a last step, the performance of several interpolation methods is evaluated to determine the cloud transmissivity in the night.

    We show that clear-sky direct, diffuse and global SDR is adequately represented by the model when using measurements of the atmospheric parameters precipitable water and aerosol content at Payerne. If the atmospheric parameters are estimated and used as a fix value, the relative mean bias deviance (MBD and the relative root mean squared deviance (RMSD of the clear-sky global SDR scatter between between −2 and 5%, and 7 and 13% within the six locations. The small errors in clear-sky global SDR can be attributed to compensating effects of modeled direct and diffuse SDR since an overestimation of aerosol content in the atmosphere results in underestimating the direct, but overestimating the diffuse SDR. Calibration of LDR parameterizations

  10. The AKARI/IRC mid-infrared all-sky survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, D.; Onaka, T.; Kataza, H.; Salama, A.; Alfageme, C.; Cassatella, A.; Cox, N.; García-Lario, P.; Stephenson, C.; Cohen, M.; Fujishiro, N.; Fujiwara, H.; Hasegawa, S.; Ita, Y.; Kim, W.; Matsuhara, H.; Murakami, H.; Müller, T. G.; Nakagawa, T.; Ohyama, Y.; Oyabu, S.; Pyo, J.; Sakon, I.; Shibai, H.; Takita, S.; Tanabé, T.; Uemizu, K.; Ueno, M.; Usui, F.; Wada, T.; Watarai, H.; Yamamura, I.; Yamauchi, C.

    2010-05-01

    Context. AKARI is the first Japanese astronomical satellite dedicated to infrared astronomy. One of the main purposes of AKARI is the all-sky survey performed with six infrared bands between 9 μm and 200 μm during the period from 2006 May 6 to 2007 August 28. In this paper, we present the mid-infrared part (9 μm and 18 μm bands) of the survey carried out with one of the on-board instruments, the infrared camera (IRC). Aims: We present unprecedented observational results of the 9 μm and 18 μm AKARI all-sky survey and detail the operation and data processing leading to the point source detection and measurements. Methods: The raw data are processed to produce small images for every scan, and the point sources candidates are derived above the 5σ noise level per single scan. The celestial coordinates and fluxes of the events are determined statistically and the reliability of their detections is secured through multiple detections of the same source within milli-seconds, hours, and months from each other. Results: The sky coverage is more than 90% for both bands. A total of 877 091 sources (851 189 for 9 μm, 195 893 for 18 μm) are confirmed and included in the current release of the point source catalog. The detection limit for point sources is 50 mJy and 90 mJy for the 9 μm and 18 μm bands, respectively. The position accuracy is estimated to be better than 2''. Uncertainties in the in-flight absolute flux calibration are estimated to be 3% for the 9 μm band and 4% for the 18 μm band. The coordinates and fluxes of detected sources in this survey are also compared with those of the IRAS survey and are found to be statistically consistent. Catalog is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/514/A1

  11. Testing an inversion method for estimating electron energy fluxes from all-sky camera images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Partamies

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available An inversion method for reconstructing the precipitating electron energy flux from a set of multi-wavelength digital all-sky camera (ASC images has recently been developed by tomografia. Preliminary tests suggested that the inversion is able to reconstruct the position and energy characteristics of the aurora with reasonable accuracy. This study carries out a thorough testing of the method and a few improvements for its emission physics equations.

    We compared the precipitating electron energy fluxes as estimated by the inversion method to the energy flux data recorded by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP satellites during four passes over auroral structures. When the aurorae appear very close to the local zenith, the fluxes inverted from the blue (427.8nm filtered ASC images or blue and green line (557.7nm images together give the best agreement with the measured flux values. The fluxes inverted from green line images alone are clearly larger than the measured ones. Closer to the horizon the quality of the inversion results from blue images deteriorate to the level of the ones from green images. In addition to the satellite data, the precipitating electron energy fluxes were estimated from the electron density measurements by the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR. These energy flux values were compared to the ones of the inversion method applied to over 100 ASC images recorded at the nearby ASC station in Longyearbyen. The energy fluxes deduced from these two types of data are in general of the same order of magnitude. In 35% of all of the blue and green image inversions the relative errors were less than 50% and in 90% of the blue and green image inversions less than 100%.

    This kind of systematic testing of the inversion method is the first step toward using all-sky camera images in the way in which global UV images have recently been used to estimate the energy fluxes. The

  12. Planck intermediate results. XXIX. All-sky dust modelling with Planck, IRAS, and WISE observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Aniano, G.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Draine, B. T.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Holmes, W. A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Ysard, N.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-02-01

    We present all-sky modelling of the high resolution Planck, IRAS, and WISE infrared (IR) observations using the physical dust model presented by Draine & Li in 2007 (DL, ApJ, 657, 810). We study the performance and results of this model, and discuss implications for future dust modelling. The present work extends the DL dust modelling carried out on nearby galaxies using Herschel and Spitzer data to Galactic dust emission. We employ the DL dust model to generate maps of the dust mass surface density ΣMd, the dust optical extinction AV, and the starlight intensity heating the bulk of the dust, parametrized by Umin. The DL model reproduces the observed spectral energy distribution (SED) satisfactorily over most of the sky, with small deviations in the inner Galactic disk and in low ecliptic latitude areas, presumably due to zodiacal light contamination. In the Andromeda galaxy (M31), the present dust mass estimates agree remarkably well (within 10%) with DL estimates based on independent Spitzer and Herschel data. We compare the DL optical extinction AV for the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) with optical estimates for approximately 2 × 105 quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) observed inthe Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The DL AV estimates are larger than those determined towards QSOs by a factor of about 2, which depends on Umin. The DL fitting parameter Umin, effectively determined by the wavelength where the SED peaks, appears to trace variations in the far-IR opacity of the dust grains per unit AV, and not only in the starlight intensity. These results show that some of the physical assumptions of the DL model will need to be revised. To circumvent the model deficiency, we propose an empirical renormalization of the DL AV estimate, dependent of Umin, which compensates for the systematic differences found with QSO observations. This renormalization, made to match the AV estimates towards QSOs, also brings into agreement the DL AV estimates with those derived for

  13. Annealing characteristics of irradiated hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payson, J. S.; Abdulaziz, S.; Li, Y.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    It was shown that 1 MeV proton irradiation with fluences of 1.25E14 and 1.25E15/sq cm reduces the normalized I(sub SC) of a-Si:H solar cell. Solar cells recently fabricated showed superior radiation tolerance compared with cells fabricated four years ago; the improvement is probably due to the fact that the new cells are thinner and fabricated from improved materials. Room temperature annealing was observed for the first time in both new and old cells. New cells anneal at a faster rate than old cells for the same fluence. From the annealing work it is apparent that there are at least two types of defects and/or annealing mechanisms. One cell had improved I-V characteristics following irradiation as compared to the virgin cell. The work shows that the photothermal deflection spectroscopy (PDS) and annealing measurements may be used to predict the qualitative behavior of a-Si:H solar cells. It was anticipated that the modeling work will quantitatively link thin film measurements with solar cell properties. Quantitative predictions of the operation of a-Si:H solar cells in a space environment will require a knowledge of the defect creation mechanisms, defect structures, role of defects on degradation, and defect passivation and annealing mechanisms. The engineering data and knowledge base for justifying space flight testing of a-Si:H alloy based solar cells is being developed.

  14. Evaluation of broadband surface solar irradiance derived from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, P.; Sneep, M.; Veefkind, J.P.; Stammes, P.; Levelt, P.F.

    2014-01-01

    Surface solar irradiance (SSI) data are important for planning and estimating the production of solar power plants. Long-term high quality surface solar radiation data are needed for monitoring climate change. This paper presents a new surface solar irradiance dataset, the broadband (0.2–4 μm) surfa

  15. Solar Cycle Spectral Irradiance Variation and Stratospheric Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolarski, R. S.; Swartz, W. H.; Jackman, C. H.; Fleming, E. L.

    2011-12-01

    Recent measurements from the SIM instrument on the SORCE satellite have been interpreted by Harder et al (Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L07801, doi:10.1029/2008GL036797, 2009) as implying a different spectral irradiance variation over the solar cycle than that put forward by Lean (Geophys. Res. Lett., 27, 2425-2428, 2000). When we inserted this new wavelength dependent solar cycle variation into our 3D CCM we found a different solar cycle dependence of the ozone concentration as a function of altitude from that we derived using the traditional Lean wavelength dependence. Examination of these results led us to realize that the main issue is the solar cycle variation of radiation at wavelengths less than 240 nm versus the solar cycle variation of radiation at wavelengths between 240 nm and 300 nm. The impact of wavelengths less than 240 nm occurs through photodissociation of O2 leading to the production of ozone. The impact of wavelengths between 240 nm and 300 nm occurs through photodissociation of O3 leading to an increase in O atoms and enhanced ozone destruction. Thus one wavelength region gives an in-phase relationship of ozone with the solar cycle while the other wavelength region gives an out-of-phase relationship of ozone with the solar cycle. We have used the Goddard two-dimensional (2D) photochemistry transport model to examine this relationship in more detail. We calculate the altitude and latitude sensitivity of ozone to changes in the solar UV irradiance as a function of wavelength. These results can be used to construct the ozone response to arbitrary wavelength dependencies of solar UV variation.

  16. The Measurement of the Solar Spectral Irradiance Variability during the Solar Cycle 24 using SOLAR/SOLSPEC on ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolsée, David; Pereira, Nuno; Pandey, Praveen; Cessateur, Gaël; Gillotay, Didier; Foujols, Thomas; Hauchecorne, Alain; Bekki, Slimane; Marchand, Marion; Damé, Luc; Meftah, Mustapha; Bureau, Jerôme

    2016-04-01

    Since April 2008, SOLAR/SOLSPEC measures the Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) from 166 nm to 3088 nm. The instrument is a part of the Solar Monitoring Observatory (SOLAR) payload, externally mounted on the Columbus module of the International Space Station. As the SSI is a key input for the validation of solar physics models, together with playing a role in the climate system and photochemistry of the Earth atmosphere, SOLAR/SOLSPEC spectral measurements becomes important. In this study, the in-flight operations and performances of the instrument -including the engineering corrections- will be presented for seven years of the SOLAR mission. Following an accurate absolute calibration, the SSI variability in the UV as measured by SOLAR/SOLSPEC in the course of the solar cycle 24 will be presented and compared to other instruments. The accuracy of these measurements will be also discussed here.

  17. New AGN classifications in the Swift/BAT All-Sky Hard X-ray Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Parisi, Pietro

    2011-01-01

    Through an optical campaign performed at the San Pedro Martir (Mexico) Telescope and using the 6dF archive (http://www.aao.gov.au/local/www/6df, Jones et al. 2004), we determine or give a better classification for 8 newly discovered Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) in the Swift/BAT 22-months All-sky Hard X-ray Survey (Baumgartner et al. 2008, Tueller et al. 2010). All these objects have observations taken with Swift/XRT or Chandra or XMM archival data which allowed us to pinpoint their optical counterpart thanks to the precise (better than a few arcsec) soft X-ray positions afforded by these observatories. This information enabled us to obtain optical spectra of all these counterparts, since only three spectra are available on-line, but not flux calibrated, allowing us to reveal their real nature (Baumgartner et al. 2008 give only a tentative classification based upon their X-ray properties). Here we present the spectra, along with the corresponding finding charts obtained from the DSS-II red survey, of these 8 s...

  18. A Two Micron All Sky Survey Analysis of the Stability of Southern Bok Globules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racca, Germán A.; Vilas-Boas, José W. S.; de la Reza, Ramiro

    2009-10-01

    We used near-infrared Two Micron All Sky Survey data to construct visual extinction maps of a sample of Southern Bok globules utilizing the NICE method. We derived radial extinction profiles of dense cores identified in the globules and analyzed their stability against gravitational collapse with isothermal Bonnor-Ebert spheres. The frequency distribution of the stability parameter (ξmax) of these cores shows that a large number of them are located in stable states, followed by an abrupt decrease of cores in unstable states. This decrease is steeper for globules with associated IRAS point sources than for starless globules. Moreover, globules in stable states have a Bonnor-Ebert temperature of T = 15 ± 6 K, while the group of critical plus unstable globules has a different temperature of T = 10 ± 3 K. Distances were estimated to all the globules studied in this work and the spectral class of the IRAS sources was calculated. No variations were found in the stability parameters of the cores and the spectral class of their associated IRAS sources. On the basis of 13CO J = 1 - 0 molecular line observations, we identified and modeled a blue-asymmetric line profile toward a globule of the sample, obtaining an upper limit infall speed of 0.25 km s-1. Based on a Ph.D. thesis made at Observatório Nacional, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

  19. The AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared All-Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Ishihara, Daisuke; Kataza, Hirokazu; Salama, Alberto; Alfageme, Carlos; Cassatella, Angelo; Cox, Nick; Garcia-Lario, Pedro; Stephenson, Craig; Cohen, Martin; Fujishiro, Naofumi; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ita, Yoshifusa; Kim, Woojung; Matsuhara, Hideo; Murakami, Hiroshi; Muller, Thomas G; Nakagawa, Takao; Ohyama, Youichi; Oyabu, Shinki; Pyo, Jeonghyun; Sakon, Itsuki; Shibai, Hiroshi; Takita, Satoshi; Tanabe, Toshihiko; Uemizu, Kazunori; Ueno, Munetaka; Usui, Fumihiko; Wada, Takehiko; Watarai, Hiden ori; Yamamura, Issei; Yamauchi, Chisato

    2010-01-01

    Context : AKARI is the first Japanese astronomical satellite dedicated to infrar ed astronomy. One of the main purposes of AKARI is the all-sky survey performed with six infrared bands between 9 and 200um during the period from 2006 May 6 to 2007 August 28. In this paper, we present the mid-infrared part (9um and 18um b ands) of the survey carried out with one of the on-board instruments, the Infrar ed Camera (IRC). Aims : We present unprecedented observational results of the 9 and 18um AKARI al l-sky survey and detail the operation and data processing leading to the point s ource detection and measurements. Methods : The raw data are processed to produce small images for every scan and point sources candidates, above the 5-sigma noise level per single scan, are der ived. The celestial coordinates and fluxes of the events are determined statisti cally and the reliability of their detections is secured through multiple detect ions of the same source within milli-seconds, hours, and months from each other. Resu...

  20. An all-sky search for long-duration gravitational wave transients with LIGO

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D V; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Arun, K G; Ashton, G; Ast, M; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barta, D; Bartlett, J; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Bazzan, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C J; Berger, B K; Bergman, J; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birney, R; Biscans, S; Bisht, A; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blair, C D; Blair, D; Blair, R M; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bohe, A; Bojtos, P; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bozzi, A; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cahillane, C; Bustillo, J Calderón; Callister, T; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Diaz, J Casanueva; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Baiardi, L Cerboni; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chan, M; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, H Y; Chen, Y; Cheng, C; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conti, L; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Cortese, S; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Canton, T Dal; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Darman, N S; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Daveloza, H P; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; De Rosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M C; Di Fiore, L; Di Giovanni, M; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dojcinoski, G; Dolique, V; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H -B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J M; Eikenberry, S S; Engels, W; Essick, R C; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Everett, R; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fair, H; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fletcher, M; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Frey, V; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H A G; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S G; Garufi, F; Gatto, A; Gaur, G; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; George, J; Gergely, L; Germain, V; Ghosh, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, K; Glaefke, A; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Castro, J M Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A; Gordon, N A; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S E; Gosselin, M; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Green, A C; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guo, X; Gupta, A; Gupta, M K; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J J; Hall, B R; Hall, E D; Hammond, G; Haney, M; Hanke, M M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M J; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Hennig, J; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hofman, D; Hollitt, S E; Holt, K; Holz, D E; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Houston, E A; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huang, S; Huerta, E A; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isa, H N; Isac, J -M; Isi, M; Islas, G; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacqmin, T; Jang, H; Jani, K; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalaghatgi, C V; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karki, S; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Kehl, M S; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Kennedy, R; Key, J S; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khan, S; Khan, Z; Khazanov, E A; Kijbunchoo, N; Kim, C; Kim, J; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Kleybolte, L; Klimenko, S; Koehlenbeck, S M; Kokeyama, K; Koley, S; Kondrashov, V; Kontos, A; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Krueger, C; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Lackey, B D; Landry, M; Lange, J; Lantz, B; Lasky, P D; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, K; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B M; Li, T G F; Libson, A; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lord, J E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J D; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Luo, J; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; na-Sandoval, F Maga\\; Magee, R M; Mageswaran, M; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mansell, G L; Manske, M; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A S; Maros, E; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martynov, D V; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Masso-Reid, M; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McWilliams, S T; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Meidam, J; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mendoza-Gandara, D; Mercer, R A; Merzougui, M; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Messick, C; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, J; Millhouse, M; Minenkov, Y; Ming, J; Mirshekari, S; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moggi, A; Mohapatra, S R P; Montani, M; Moore, B C; Moore, C J; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Muir, A W; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D J; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nedkova, K; Nelemans, G; Neri, M; Neunzert, A; Newton, G; Nguyen, T T; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Oberling, J; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oliver, M; Oppermann, P; Oram, Richard J; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ott, C D; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pai, A; Pai, S A; Palamos, J R; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pal-Singh, A; Pan, H; Pankow, C; Pannarale, F; Pant, B C; Paoletti, F; Paoli, A; Papa, M A; Paris, H R; Parker, W; Pascucci, D; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patrick, Z; Pearlstone, B L; Pedraza, M; Pedurand, R; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Pereira, R; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Piccinni, O; Pichot, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poggiani, R; Post, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Premachandra, S S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Pürrer, M; Qi, H; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E A; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rakhmanov, M; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Read, J; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Rew, H; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V J; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; Sadeghian, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Samajdar, A; Sammut, L; Sanchez, E J; Sandberg, V; Sandeen, B; Sanders, J R; Sassolas, B; Saulson, P R; Sauter, O; Savage, R; Sawadsky, A; Schale, P; 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Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Töyrä, D; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trifirò, D; Tringali, M C; Trozzo, L; Tse, M; Turconi, M; Tuyenbayev, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C van den; van der Schaaf, L; van der Sluys, M V; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vinciguerra, S; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Weßels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, G; Yablon, J; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yu, H; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zevin, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S E; Zweizig, J

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of a search for long-duration gravitational wave transients in two sets of data collected by the LIGO Hanford and LIGO Livingston detectors between November 5, 2005 and September 30, 2007, and July 7, 2009 and October 20, 2010, with a total observational time of 283.0 days and 132.9 days, respectively. The search targets gravitational wave transients of duration 10 - 500 seconds in a frequency band of 40 - 1000 Hz, with minimal assumptions about the signal waveform, polarization, source direction, or time of occurrence. All candidate triggers were consistent with the expected background; as a result we set 90% confidence upper limits on the rate of long-duration gravitational wave transients for different types of gravitational wave signals. We also report upper limits on the source rate density per year per Mpc^3 for specific signal models. These are the first results from an all-sky search for unmodeled long-duration transient gravitational waves.

  1. First low frequency all-sky search for continuous gravitational wave signals

    CERN Document Server

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Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trifirò, D; Tringali, M C; Tse, M; Turconi, M; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C van den; van der Schaaf, L; van der Sluys, M V; van Heijningen, J; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, M; Wade, L E; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Weßels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Williams, K J; Williams, L; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S E; Zweizig, J

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of the first low frequency all-sky search of continuous gravitational wave signals conducted on Virgo VSR2 and VSR4 data. The search covered the full sky, a frequency range between 20 Hz and 128 Hz with a range of spin-down between $-1.0 \\times 10^{-10}$ Hz/s and $+1.5 \\times 10^{-11}$ Hz/s, and was based on a hierarchical approach. The starting point was a set of short Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT), of length 8192 seconds, built from the calibrated strain data. Aggressive data cleaning, both in the time and frequency domains, has been done in order to remove, as much as possible, the effect of disturbances of instrumental origin. On each dataset a number of candidates has been selected, using the FrequencyHough transform in an incoherent step. Only coincident candidates among VSR2 and VSR4 have been examined in order to strongly reduce the false alarm probability, and the most significant candidates have been selected. The criteria we have used for candidate selection and...

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: AAVSO Photometric All Sky Survey (APASS) DR9 (Henden+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henden, A. A.; Templeton, M.; Terrell, D.; Smith, T. C.; Levine, S.; Welch, D.

    2016-01-01

    The AAVSO Photometric All Sky Survey (APASS) project is designed to bridge the gap between the shallow Tycho2 two-bandpass photometric catalog that is complete to V=11 and the deeper, but less spatially-complete catalogs like SDSS or PanSTARRS. It can be used for calibration of a specific field; for obtaining spectral information about single sources, determining reddening in a small area of the sky; or even obtaining current-epoch astrometry for rapidly moving objects. The survey is being performed at two locations: near Weed, New Mexico in the Northern Hemisphere; and at CTIO in the Southern Hemisphere. Each site consists of dual bore-sighted 20cm telescopes on a single mount, designed to obtain two bandpasses of information simultaneously. Each telescope covers 9 square degrees of sky with 2.5arcsec pixels, with the main survey taken with B,V,g',r',i' filters and covering the magnitude range 10Sciences Fund, with a follow-on grant from the National Science Foundation. (1 data file).

  3. An all-sky Support Vector Machine selection of WISE YSO Candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Marton, Gábor; Paladini, Roberta; Kun, Mária; Zahorecz, Sarolta; McGehee, Peregrine; Kiss, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    We explored the AllWISE catalogue of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer mission and identified Young Stellar Object candidates. Reliable 2MASS and WISE photometric data combined with Planck dust opacity values were used to build our dataset and to find the best classification scheme. A sophisticated statistical method, the Support Vector Machine (SVM) is used to analyse the multi-dimensional data space and to remove source types identified as contaminants (extragalactic sources, main sequence stars, evolved stars and sources related to the interstellar medium). Objects listed in the SIMBAD database are used to identify the already known sources and to train our method. A new all-sky selection of 133,980 Class I/II YSO candidates is presented. The estimated contamination was found to be well below 1% based on comparison with our SIMBAD training set. We also compare our results to that of existing methods and catalogues. The SVM selection process successfully identified >90% of the Class I/II YSOs based on...

  4. WISE-2MASS all-sky infrared galaxy catalog for large scale structure

    CERN Document Server

    Kovács, András

    2014-01-01

    We combine photometric information of the WISE and 2MASS infrared all-sky surveys to produce a clean galaxy sample for large-scale structure research. Adding 2MASS colors improves star-galaxy separation substantially at the expense of loosing a small fraction of the galaxies: 93% of the WISE objects within the W1<15.2 mag limit have 2MASS observation as well. We use a class of supervised machine learning algorithms, Support Vector Machines (SVM), to classify objects in our large data set. We used SDSS PhotoObj table with known star-galaxy separation for a training set on classification, and the GAMA spectroscopic survey for determining the redshift distribution of our sample. Varying the combination of photometric parameters input into our algorithm revealed that W1-J is a simple and effective star-galaxy separator, capable of producing results comparable to the multi-dimensional SVM classification. The final catalog has an estimated ~2% stellar contamination among 5 million galaxies with median redshift o...

  5. Planck intermediate results. XXIX. All-sky dust modelling with Planck, IRAS, and WISE observations

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Alves, M I R; Aniano, G; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoit-Levy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Couchot, F; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Dore, O; Douspis, M; Draine, B T; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Ensslin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Gjerlow, E; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J; Gorski, K M; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Guillet, V; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D L; Henrot-Versille, S; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Holmes, W A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Keihanen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vornle, M; Lopez-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macias-Perez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martinez-Gonzalez, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Miville-Deschenes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Natoli, P; Norgaard-Nielsen, H U; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oxborrow, C A; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Roudier, G; Rubio-Martin, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Scott, D; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Wehus, I K; Ysard, N; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    We present all-sky dust modelling of the high resolution Planck, IRAS and WISE infrared (IR) observations using the physical dust model presented by Draine & Li in 2007 (DL). We study the performance of this model and present implications for future dust modelling. The present work extends to the full sky the dust modelling carried out on nearby galaxies using Herschel and Spitzer data. We employ the DL dust model to generate maps of the dust mass surface density, the dust optical extinction AV, and the starlight intensity heating the bulk of the dust, parametrized by Umin. We test the model by comparing these maps with independent estimates of the dust optical extinction AV . In molecular clouds, we compare the DL AV estimates with maps generated from stellar optical observations from the 2MASS survey. The DL AV estimates are a factor of about 3 larger than values estimated from 2MASS observations. In the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) we compare the DL optical extinction AV estimates with optical est...

  6. Planck 2013 results. XXI. All-sky Compton parameter power spectrum and high-order statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P.A.R.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Bartlett, J.G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J.P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J.J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R.C.; Cardoso, J.F.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, L.Y.; Chiang, H.C.; Christensen, P.R.; Church, S.; Clements, D.L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B.P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; Davis, R.J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.M.; Desert, F.X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J.M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Ensslin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Genova-Santos, R.T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K.M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T.R.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Keihanen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Lamarre, J.M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R.J.; Lawrence, C.R.; Leahy, J.P.; Leonardi, R.; Leon-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vornle, M.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P.M.; Macias-Perez, J.F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D.J.; Martin, P.G.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschenes, M.A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C.B.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C.A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G.W.; Prezeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.L.; Rachen, J.P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubino-Martin, J.A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M.D.; Shellard, E.P.S.; Spencer, L.D.; Starck, J.L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.S.; Sygnet, J.F.; Tauber, J.A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; White, S.D.M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-01-01

    We have constructed the first all-sky map of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect by applying specifically tailored component separation algorithms to the 100 to 857 GHz frequency channel maps from the Planck survey. These maps show an obvious galaxy cluster tSZ signal that is well matched with blindly detected clusters in the Planck SZ catalogue. To characterize the signal in the tSZ map we have computed its angular power spectrum. At large angular scales ($\\ell 500$) the clustered Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) and residual point sources are the major contaminants. These foregrounds are carefully modelled and subtracted. We measure the tSZ power spectrum in angular scales, $0.17^{\\circ} \\lesssim \\theta \\lesssim 3.0^{\\circ}$, that were previously unexplored. The measured tSZ power spectrum is consistent with that expected from the Planck catalogue of SZ sources, with additional clear evidence of signal from unresolved clusters and, potentially, diffuse warm baryons. We use the tSZ power spectrum to ...

  7. First all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown sources in binary systems

    CERN Document Server

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corpuz, A; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Donath, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dossa, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endr\\Hoczi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hooper, S; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Huerta, E; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karlen, J; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, N G; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kremin, A; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, A; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Kwee, P; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Larson, S; Lasky, P D; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C -H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, J; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Roux, A Le; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B; Lewis, J; Li, T G F; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lin, A C; Littenberg, T B; Litvine, V; Lockerbie, N A; Lockett, V; Lodhia, D; Loew, K; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J; Lubinski, M J; Lück, H; Luijten, E; Lundgren, A P; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; Macarthur, J; Macdonald, E P; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magana-Sandoval, F; Mageswaran, M; Maglione, C; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Manca, G M; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mangini, N; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A; Maros, E; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martinelli, L; Martynov, D; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R A; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McLin, K; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Mehmet, M; Meidam, J; Meinders, M; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyers, P; Miao, H; Michel, C; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Milde, S; Miller, J; Minenkov, Y; Mingarelli, C M F; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moe, B; Moesta, P; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morgado, N; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nagy, M F; Kumar, D Nanda; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nelemans, G; Neri, I; Neri, M; Newton, G; Nguyen, T; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oppermann, P; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Osthelder, C; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Padilla, C; Pai, A; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pan, H; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Paoletti, F; Paoletti, R; Papa, M A; Paris, H; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poeld, J; Poggiani, R; Poteomkin, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Premachandra, S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E; Quiroga, G; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Rácz, I; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rajalakshmi, G; Rakhmanov, M; Ramet, C; Ramirez, K; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Re, V; Read, J; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Rhoades, E; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rodruck, M; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Salemi, F; Sammut, L; Sandberg, V; Sanders, J R; Sannibale, V; Santiago-Prieto, I; Saracco, E; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Scheuer, J; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Shaddock, D; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sidery, T L; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L; Singh, R; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M; Smith, R J E; Smith-Lefebvre, N D; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Souradeep, T; Sperandio, L; Staley, A; Stebbins, J; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Stephens, B C; Steplewski, S; Stevenson, S; Stone, R; Stops, D; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Susmithan, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, R; ter Braack, A P M; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Toncelli, A; Tonelli, M; Torre, O; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Tse, M; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; van der Putten, S; van der Sluys, M V; van Heijningen, J; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Verma, S S; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vincent-Finley, R; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vousden, W D; Vyachanin, S P; Wade, A; Wade, L; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Wang, M; Wang, X; Ward, R L; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wiesner, K; Wilkinson, C; Williams, K; Williams, L; Williams, R; Williams, T; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yang, H; Yang, Z; Yoshida, S; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S; Zweizig, J

    2014-01-01

    We present the first results of an all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown spinning neutron stars in binary systems using LIGO and Virgo data. Using a specially developed analysis program, the TwoSpect algorithm, the search was carried out on data from the sixth LIGO Science Run and the second and third Virgo Science Runs. The search covers a range of frequencies from 20 Hz to 520 Hz, a range of orbital periods from 2 to ~2,254 h and a frequency- and period-dependent range of frequency modulation depths from 0.277 to 100 mHz. This corresponds to a range of projected semi-major axes of the orbit from ~0.6e-3 ls to ~6,500 ls assuming the orbit of the binary is circular. While no plausible candidate gravitational wave events survive the pipeline, upper limits are set on the analyzed data. The most sensitive 95% confidence upper limit obtained on gravitational wave strain is 2.3e-24 at 217 Hz, assuming the source waves are circularly polarized. Although this search has been optimized for ci...

  8. AKARI-CAS --- Online Service for AKARI All-Sky Catalogues

    CERN Document Server

    Yamauchi, C; Ikeda, N; Inada, K; Katano, M; Kataza, H; Makiuti, S; Matsuzaki, K; Takita, S; Yamamoto, Y; Yamamura, I; 10.1086/660926

    2011-01-01

    The AKARI All-Sky Catalogues are an important infrared astronomical database for next-generation astronomy that take over the IRAS catalog. We have developed an online service, AKARI Catalogue Archive Server (AKARI-CAS), for astronomers. The service includes useful and attractive search tools and visual tools. One of the new features of AKARI-CAS is cached SIMBAD/NED entries, which can match AKARI catalogs with other catalogs stored in SIMBAD or NED. To allow advanced queries to the databases, direct input of SQL is also supported. In those queries, fast dynamic cross-identification between registered catalogs is a remarkable feature. In addition, multiwavelength quick-look images are displayed in the visualization tools, which will increase the value of the service. In the construction of our service, we considered a wide variety of astronomers' requirements. As a result of our discussion, we concluded that supporting users' SQL submissions is the best solution for the requirements. Therefore, we implemented...

  9. The 60-month all-sky BAT Survey of AGN and the Anisotropy of Nearby AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Ajello, M; Greiner, J; Madejski, G M; Gehrels, N; Burlon, D

    2012-01-01

    Surveys above 10 keV represent one of the the best resources to provide an unbiased census of the population of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). We present the results of 60 months of observation of the hard X-ray sky with Swift/BAT. In this timeframe, BAT detected (in the 15--55 keV band) 720 sources in an all-sky survey of which 428 are associated with AGN, most of which are nearby. Our sample has negligible incompleteness and statistics a factor of \\sim2 larger over similarly complete sets of AGN. Our sample contains (at least) 15 bona-fide Compton-thick AGN and 3 likely candidates. Compton-thick AGN represent a ~5% of AGN samples detected above 15 keV. We use the BAT dataset to refine the determination of the LogN--LogS of AGN which is extremely important, now that NuSTAR prepares for launch, towards assessing the AGN contribution to the cosmic X-ray background. We show that the LogN--LogS of AGN selected above 10 keV is now established to a ~10% precision. We derive the luminosity function of Compton-thick ...

  10. THE DIFFUSE SOFT EXCESS EMISSION IN THE COMA CLUSTER FROM THE ROSAT ALL-SKY SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) data near the North Galactic Pole was analyzed in order to study the large-scale distribution of soft X-ray emission from the Coma cluster. These ROSAT data constitute the only available X-ray observations of Coma that feature an in situ-temporally and spatially contiguous-background, with unlimited and continuous radial coverage. These unique characteristics of the RASS data are used to deliver a final assessment on whether the soft excess previously detected in the Coma cluster is due to background subtraction errors, or not. This paper confirms the presence of soft X-ray excess associated with Coma, and reports the detection of 1/4 keV band excess out to 5 Mpc from the cluster center, the largest soft excess halo discovered to date. We propose that the emission is related to filaments that converge toward Coma, and generated either by nonthermal radiation caused by accretion shocks, or by thermal emission from the filaments themselves.

  11. The Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey: Comparison of Ultraviolet and Far-Infrared Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Howell, Justin H; Mazzarella, Joseph M; Evans, Aaron S; Surace, Jason A; Sanders, David B; Petric, Andreea; Appleton, Phil; Bothun, Greg; Bridge, Carrie; Chan, Ben H P; Charmandaris, Vassilis; Frayer, David T; Haan, Sebastian; Inami, Hanae; Kim, Dong-Chan; Lord, Steven; Madore, Barry F; Melbourne, Jason; Schulz, Bernhard; U, Vivian; Vavilkin, Tatjana; Veilleux, Sylvain; Xu, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    The Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) consists of a complete sample of 202 Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) selected from the IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample (RBGS). The galaxies span the full range of interaction stages, from isolated galaxies to interacting pairs to late stage mergers. We present a comparison of the UV and infrared properties of 135 galaxies in GOALS observed by GALEX and Spitzer. For interacting galaxies with separations greater than the resolution of GALEX and Spitzer (2-6"), we assess the UV and IR properties of each galaxy individually. The contribution of the FUV to the measured SFR ranges from 0.2% to 17.9%, with a median of 2.8% and a mean of 4.0 +/- 0.4%. The specific star formation rate of the GOALS sample is extremely high, with a median value (3.9*10^{-10} yr^{-1}) that is comparable to the highest specific star formation rates seen in the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey sample. We examine the position of each galaxy on the IR excess-UV slope (IRX-beta) ...

  12. Planck Early Results: The all-sky Early Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster sample

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Balbi, A; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartelmann, M; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Battye, R; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bhatia, R; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Brown, M L; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Cabella, P; Cantalupo, C M; Cardoso, J -F; Carvalho, P; Catalano, A; Cayón, L; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, L -Y; Chiang, C; Chon, G; Christensen, P R; Churazov, E; Clements, D L; Colafrancesco, S; Colombi, S; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Cuttaia, F; Da Silva, A; Dahle, H; Danese, L; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Gasperis, G; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Dörl, U; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Eisenhardt, P; En\\sslin, T A; Feroz, F; Finelli, F; Flores, I; Forni, O; Fosalba, P; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Fromenteau, S; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; González-Riestra, R; Górski, K M; Grainge, K J B; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Harrison, D; Heinämäki, P; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hovest, W; Hoyland, R J; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Hurley-Walker, N; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knox, L; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Jeune, M Le; Leach, S; Leonardi, R; Li, C; Liddle, A; Lilje, P B; Linden-V\\ornle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; MacTavish, C J; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mann, R; Maris, M; Marleau, F; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; Mei, S; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Melin, J -B; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; N\\orgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Olamie, M; Osborne, S; Pajot, F; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Piffaretti, R; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rubi\; Rusholme, B; Saar, E; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Saunders, R D E; Savini, G; Schaefer, B M; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, P; Smoot, G F; Stanford, A; Starck, J -L; Stivoli, F; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Sygnet, J -F; Taburet, N; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Torre, J -P; Tristram, M; Tuovinen, J; Valenziano, L; Vibert, L; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Weller, J; White, S D M; White, M; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2011-01-01

    We present the first all-sky sample of galaxy clusters detected blindly by the Planck satellite through the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect from its six highest frequencies. This Early SZ (ESZ) sample of 189 candidates comprises high signal-to-noise clusters, from 6 to 29. Its high reliability (purity above 95%) is further insured by an extensive validation process based on Planck-internal quality assessments and external cross-identification and follow-up observations. Planck provides the first measured SZ signal for about 80% of the 169 ESZ known clusters. Planck further releases 30 new cluster candidates among which 20 are within the ESZ signal-to-noise selection criterion. Eleven of these 20 ESZ candidates are confirmed using XMM-Newton snapshot observations as new clusters, most of them with disturbed morphologies and low luminosities. The ESZ clusters are mostly at moderate redshifts (86% with z below 0.3) and span over a decade in mass, up to the rarest and most massive clusters with masses above 10^15 M...

  13. An all-sky census of Galactic high-latitude molecular intermediate-velocity clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Röhser, T; Lenz, D; Winkel, B

    2016-01-01

    The HI halo clouds of the Milky Way and in particular the intermediate-velocity clouds (IVCs) are thought to be connected to Galactic fountain processes. Observations of fountain clouds are important for understanding the role of matter recycling and accretion onto the Galactic disk and subsequent star formation. Here, we quantify the amount of molecular gas in the Galactic halo. We focus on the rare class of molecular IVCs (MIVCs) and search for new objects. The HI-FIR correlation is studied across the entire northern and southern Galactic hemispheres at Galactic latitudes $|b|>20^\\circ$ in order to determine the amount and distribution of molecular gas in IVCs. We use the most recent large-scale HI and FIR data, the Effelsberg Bonn-HI Survey, the Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey, and the Planck FIR surveys. We present a catalogue of 239 MIVC candidates on the northern and southern Galactic hemispheres. Among these candidates all previously known MIVCs are recovered except for a single one only. The frequency ...

  14. All-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S4 data

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Agresti, J; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arain, M; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Aston, S; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Ballmer, S; Bantilan, H; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Belczynski, K; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Biswas, R; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Bogenstahl, J; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brinkmann, M; Brooks, A; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burmeister, O; Busby, D; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cantley, C A; Cao, J; Cardenas, L; Casey, M M; Castaldi, G; Cepeda, C; Chalkey, E; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chiadini, F; Chin, D; Chin, E; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Clark, J; Cochrane, P; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C N; Coldwell, R; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coward, D; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Croce, R P; Crooks, D R M; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Dalrymple, J; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; De Bra, D; Degallaix, J; Degree, M; Demma, T; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Daz, M; Dickson, J; Di Credico, A; Diederichs, G; Dietz, A; Doomes, E E; Drever, R W P; Dumas, J C; Dupuis, R J; Dwyer, J G; Ehrens, P; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Fazi, D; Fejer, M M; Finn, L S; Fiumara, V; Fotopoulos, N; Franzen, A; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Galdi, V; Garofoli, J; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Goda, K; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gossler, S; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, a C; Gray, M; Greenhalgh, J; Gretarsson, A M; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hammer, D; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G; Harstad, E; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hosken, D; Hough, J; Howell, E; Hoyland, D; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D; Innerhofer, E; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jackrel, D; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, Peter Ignaz Paul; Kalogera, V; Kasprzyk, D; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalili, F Ya; Kim, C; King, P; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R K; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lee, B; Lei, M; Leiner, J; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Lockerbie, N A; Longo, M; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Malec, M; Mandic, V; Marano, S; Marka, S; Markowitz, J; Maros, E; Martin, I; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Matone, L; Matta, V; Mavalvala, a N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McHugh, M; McKenzie, K; McNabb, J W C; McWilliams, S; Meier, T; Melissinos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C J; Meyers, D; Mikhailov, E; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mow Lowry, C; Moylan, A; Mudge, D; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Muller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P; Myers, E; Myers, J; Nash, T; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Numata, K; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pierro, V; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H; Plissi, M V; Postiglione, F; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Rabeling, D; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rainer, N; Rakhmanov, M; Ramsunder, M; Rawlins, K; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ribichini, L; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Roddy, S; Rodríguez, A; Rogan, A M; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Route, R; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Samidi, M; Sancho de la Jordana, L; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Saraf, S; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Savov, P; Schediwy, S; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Sidles, J A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sinha, S; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Somiya, K; Strain, K A; Strom, D M; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, K X; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Takahashi, H; Tanner, D B; Tarallo, M; Taylor, R; Taylor, R; Thacker, J; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thüring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D; Ungarelli, C; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vallisneri, M; Van Den Broeck, C; Varvella, M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Veitch, P; Villar, A; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Waldman, S J; Wallace, L; Ward, H; Ward, R; Watts, K; Webber, D; Weidner, A; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Wen, S; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitbeck, D M; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, L; Willke, B; Wilmut, I; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wise, S; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Woods, D; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Wu, W; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yan, Z; Yoshida, S; Yunes, N; Zanolin, M; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zotov, N; Zucker, M; Zur Muhlen, H; Zweizig, J

    2007-01-01

    We report on an all-sky search with the LIGO detectors for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range 50-1000 Hz and with the frequency's time derivative in the range -1.0E-8 Hz/s to zero. Data from the fourth LIGO science run (S4) have been used in this search. Three different semi-coherent methods of transforming and summing strain power from Short Fourier Transforms (SFTs) of the calibrated data have been used. The first, known as "StackSlide", averages normalized power from each SFT. A "weighted Hough" scheme is also developed and used, and which also allows for a multi-interferometer search. The third method, known as "PowerFlux", is a variant of the StackSlide method in which the power is weighted before summing. In both the weighted Hough and PowerFlux methods, the weights are chosen according to the noise and detector antenna-pattern to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. The respective advantages and disadvantages of these methods are discussed. Observing no evidence of periodic gravitationa...

  15. HAWC: A Next Generation All-Sky VHE Gamma-Ray Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Sinnis, G; McEnery, J E

    2004-01-01

    The study of the universe at energies above 100 GeV is a relatively new and exciting field. The current generation of pointed instruments have detected TeV gamma rays from at least 10 sources and the next generation of detectors promises a large increase in sensitivity. We have also seen the development of a new type of all-sky monitor in this energy regime based on water Cherenkov technology (Milagro). To fully understand the universe at these extreme energies requires a highly sensitive detector capable of continuously monitoring the entire overhead sky. Such an instrument could observe prompt emission from gamma-ray bursts and probe the limits of Lorentz invariance at high energies. With sufficient sensitivity it could detect short transients ($\\sim$15 minutes) from active galaxies and study the time structure of flares at energies unattainable to space-based instruments. Unlike pointed instruments a wide-field instrument can make an unbiased study of all active galaxies and enable many multi-wavelength ca...

  16. The MICE Grand Challenge Lightcone Simulation III: Galaxy lensing mocks from all-sky lensing maps

    CERN Document Server

    Fosalba, P; Castander, F J; Crocce, M

    2013-01-01

    In paper I of this series (Fosalba et al. 2013), we presented a new N-body lightcone simulation from the MICE collaboration, the MICE Grand Challenge (MICE-GC), containing about 70 billion dark-matter particles in a (3 Gpc)^3 comoving volume, from which we built halo and galaxy catalogues using a Halo Occupation Distribution and Halo Abundance Matching technique, as presented in the companion Paper II (Crocce et al. 2013). Given its large volume and fine mass resolution, the MICE-GC simulation also allows an accurate modeling of the lensing observables from upcoming wide and deep galaxy surveys. In the last paper of this series (Paper III), we describe the construction of all-sky lensing maps, following the "Onion Universe" approach (Fosalba et al. 2008), and discuss their properties in the lightcone up to z=1.4 with sub-arcmin spatial resolution. By comparing the convergence power spectrum in the MICE-GC to lower mass-resolution (i.e., particle mass ~ 10^11 Msun) simulations, we find that resolution effects ...

  17. New active galactic nuclei detected in ROSAT All Sky Survey galaxies - The complete dataset

    CERN Document Server

    Kollatschny, W; Pietsch, W; Bischoff, K; Zetzl, M

    2008-01-01

    The ROSAT ALL Sky Survey Bright Source Catalogue (RASS-BSC) has been correlated with the Catalogue of Principal Galaxies (PGC) to identify new extragalactic counterparts. 550 reliable optical counterparts have been detected. We took optical spectra of 176 X-ray candidates and companions at ESO, Calar Alto observatory and McDonald observatory. We discuss the redshift-, linewidth-, as well as optical and X-ray luminosity distribution of our ROSAT selected sample. 139 galaxies of our 166 X-ray counterparts have been identified as AGN with 93 being Seyfert 1 galaxies (61%). Eighteen of them (20%) are Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies. 34 X-ray candidates (21%) are LINERs and only eight candidates (5%) are Seyfert 2. The ratio of the number of Seyfert 1 galaxies to Seyfert 2 galaxies is about 11/1. Optical surveys result in ratios of 1/1.4. The high fraction of detected Seyfert 1 galaxies is explained by the sensitivity of the ROSAT to soft X-rays which are heavily absorbed in type 2 AGN. Two X-ray candidates are HII...

  18. Point Source Detection using the Spherical Mexican Hat Wavelet on simulated all-sky Planck maps

    CERN Document Server

    Vielva, P; Gallegos, J E; Toffolatti, L; Sanz, J L

    2003-01-01

    We present an estimation of the point source (PS) catalogue that could be extracted from the forthcoming ESA Planck mission data. We have applied the Spherical Mexican Hat Wavelet in simulated all-sky maps that include CMB, Galactic emission, thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect and PS emission, as well as instrumental white noise. We have developed an algorithm focused on a fast optimal scale determination, that is crucial to achieve a PS catologue with a large number of detections and a low flux limit. An important effort has been also done to reduce the CPU time processor for spherical harmonic trans formation, in order to perform the PS detection in a reasonable time. The presented algorithm is able to provide a PS catalogue above fluxes: 1.39 Jy (857 GHz), 0.84 Jy (545 GHz), 0.30 Jy (353 GHz), 0.16 Jy (217 GHz), 0.17 Jy (143 GHz), 0.19 Jy (100 GHz HFI), 0.22 Jy (100 GHz LFI), 0.28 Jy (70 GHz), 0.33 Jy (44 GHz) and 0.37 Jy (30 GHz). We detect around 36700 PS at the highest frequency Planck channel and 2200 a...

  19. Timeline analysis and wavelet multiscale analysis of the AKARI All-Sky Survey at 90 micron

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lingyu; Yamamura, Issei; Shibai, Hiroshi; Savage, Rich; Oliver, Seb; Thomson, Matthew; Rahman, Nurur; Clements, Dave; Figueredo, Elysandra; Goto, Tomotsugu; Hasegawa, Sunao; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Matsuura, Shuji; Muller, Thomas G; Nakagawa, Takao; Pearson, Chris P; Serjeant, Stephen; Shirahata, Mai; White, Glenn J

    2008-01-01

    We present a careful analysis of the point source detection limit of the AKARI All-Sky Survey in the WIDE-S 90 $\\mu$m band near the North Ecliptic Pole (NEP). Timeline Analysis is used to detect IRAS sources and then a conversion factor is derived to transform the peak timeline signal to the interpolated 90 $\\mu$m flux of a source. Combined with a robust noise measurement, the point source flux detection limit at S/N $>5$ for a single detector row is $1.1\\pm0.1$ Jy which corresponds to a point source detection limit of the survey of $\\sim$0.4 Jy. Wavelet transform offers a multiscale representation of the Time Series Data (TSD). We calculate the continuous wavelet transform of the TSD and then search for significant wavelet coefficients considered as potential source detections. To discriminate real sources from spurious or moving objects, only sources with confirmation are selected. In our multiscale analysis, IRAS sources selected above $4\\sigma$ can be identified as the only real sources at the Point Sourc...

  20. An all-sky support vector machine selection of WISE YSO candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marton, G.; Tóth, L. V.; Paladini, R.; Kun, M.; Zahorecz, S.; McGehee, P.; Kiss, Cs.

    2016-06-01

    We explored the AllWISE catalogue of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission and identified Young Stellar Object (YSO) candidates. Reliable 2MASS and WISE photometric data combined with Planck dust opacity values were used to build our data set and to find the best classification scheme. A sophisticated statistical method, the support vector machine (SVM) is used to analyse the multidimensional data space and to remove source types identified as contaminants (extragalactic sources, main-sequence stars, evolved stars and sources related to the interstellar medium). Objects listed in the SIMBAD data base are used to identify the already known sources and to train our method. A new all-sky selection of 133 980 Class I/II YSO candidates is presented. The estimated contamination was found to be well below 1 per cent based on comparison with our SIMBAD training set. We also compare our results to that of existing methods and catalogues. The SVM selection process successfully identified >90 per cent of the Class I/II YSOs based on comparison with photometric and spectroscopic YSO catalogues. Our conclusion is that by using the SVM, our classification is able to identify more known YSOs of the training sample than other methods based on colour-colour and magnitude-colour selection. The distribution of the YSO candidates well correlates with that of the Planck Galactic Cold Clumps in the Taurus-Auriga-Perseus-California region.

  1. Mapping the Cosmic Web with the largest all-sky surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Bilicki, Maciej; Jarrett, Thomas H; Cluver, Michelle E; Steward, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Our view of the low-redshift Cosmic Web has been revolutionized by galaxy redshift surveys such as 6dFGS, SDSS and 2MRS. However, the trade-off between depth and angular coverage limits a systematic three-dimensional account of the entire sky beyond the Local Volume (z<0.05). In order to reliably map the Universe to cosmologically significant depths over the full celestial sphere, one must draw on multiwavelength datasets and state-of-the-art photometric redshift techniques. We have undertaken a dedicated program of cross-matching the largest photometric all-sky surveys -- 2MASS, WISE and SuperCOSMOS -- to obtain accurate redshift estimates of millions of galaxies. The first outcome of these efforts -- the 2MASS Photometric Redshift catalog (2MPZ, Bilicki et al. 2014a) -- has been publicly released and includes almost 1 million galaxies with a mean redshift of z=0.08. Here we summarize how this catalog was constructed and how using the WISE mid-infrared sample together with SuperCOSMOS optical data allows ...

  2. Machine-learning identification of galaxies in the WISExSuperCOSMOS all-sky catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Krakowski, T; Bilicki, M; Pollo, A; Krupa, M; Kurcz, A

    2016-01-01

    The two currently largest all-sky photometric datasets, WISE and SuperCOSMOS, were cross-matched by Bilicki et al. (2016) (B16) to construct a novel photometric redshift catalogue on 70% of the sky. Galaxies were therein separated from stars and quasars through colour cuts, which may leave imperfections because of mixing different source types which overlap in colour space. The aim of the present work is to identify galaxies in the WISExSuperCOSMOS catalogue through an alternative approach of machine learning. This allows us to define more complex separations in the multi-colour space than possible with simple colour cuts, and should provide more reliable source classification. For the automatised classification we use the support vector machines learning algorithm, employing SDSS spectroscopic sources cross-matched with WISExSuperCOSMOS as the training and verification set. We perform a number of tests to examine the behaviour of the classifier (completeness, purity and accuracy) as a function of source appa...

  3. Extragalactic Transients Discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jonathan; Warren-Son Holoien, Thomas; ASAS-SN

    2016-01-01

    Even in the modern era, only human eyes can scan the entire optical sky for the violent, variable, and transient events that shape our universe. The "All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae" (ASAS-SN or "Assassin") is changing this by monitoring the extra-galactic sky down to V~17 mag every 2-3 days using multiple telescopes, hosted by Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, in the northern and southern hemispheres. The primary goal of ASAS-SN is to discover bright, nearby supernovae (SNe), we are discovering more than 60% of supernovae with V<17. Since June 2013, we have discovered 224 supernovae, 133 in 2015 alone (as of September 30, 2015). ASAS-SN has also discovered many other interesting extragalactic transients, including the three closest tidal disruption events (TDEs) ever discovered at optical wavelengths. The nearby nature of ASASSN discoveries allows detailed follow-up across a wide wavelength coverage; here we present some of these data on recent ASAS-SN extragalactic transients.

  4. C-Band All-Sky Survey: A First Look at the Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Irfan, M O; Davies, R D; Copley, C; Davis, R J; Ferreira, P G; Holler, C M; Jonas, J L; Jones, Michael E; King, O G; Leahy, J P; Leech, J; Leitch, E M; Muchovej, S J C; Pearson, T J; Peel, M W; Readhead, A C S; Stevenson, M A; Sutton, D; Taylor, Angela C; Zuntz, J

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of the diffuse emission at 5 GHz in the first quadrant of the Galactic plane using two months of preliminary intensity data taken with the C-Band All Sky Survey (C-BASS) northern instrument at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory, California. Combining C-BASS maps with ancillary data to make temperature-temperature plots we find synchrotron spectral indices of $\\beta = -2.65 \\pm 0.05$ between 0.408 GHz and 5 GHz and $ \\beta = -2.72 \\pm 0.09$ between 1.420 GHz and 5 GHz for $-10^{\\circ} < |b| < -4^{\\circ}$, $20^{\\circ} < l < 40^{\\circ}$. Through the subtraction of a radio recombination line (RRL) free-free template we determine the synchrotron spectral index in the Galactic plane ($ |b| < 4^{\\circ}$) to be $\\beta = -2.56 \\pm 0.07$ between 0.408 GHz and 5 GHz, with a contribution of $53 \\pm 8$ per cent from free-free emission at 5\\,GHz. These results are consistent with previous low frequency measurements in the Galactic plane. By including C-BASS data in spectral fits we dem...

  5. Einstein@Home all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S5 data

    CERN Document Server

    Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Bao, Y; Barayoga, J C B; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dorsher, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endrőczi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Farr, B F; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M A; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gelencser, G; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner}, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufman, K; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kurdyumov, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Langley, A; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Leong, J R; Leonor, I; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Lhuillier, V; Li, J; Li, T G F; Lindquist, P E; Litvine, V; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lockerbie, N A; Lodhia, D; Logue, J; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J; Lubinski, M; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Macarthur, J; Macdonald, E; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A; Maros, E; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R A; Mavalvala, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; Meadors, G D; Mehmet, M; Meier, T; Melatos, A; Melissinos, A C; Mendell, G; Menéndez, D F; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyer, M S; Miao, H; Michel, C; Milano, L; Miller, J; Minenkov, Y; Mingarelli, C M F; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moe, B; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morgado, N; Morgia, A; Mori, T; Morriss, S R; Mosca, S; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow--Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Müller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murphy, D; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nash, T; Naticchioni, L; Necula, V; Nelson, J; Neri, I; Newton, G; Nguyen, T; Nishizawa, A; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E; Nuttall, L; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Oldenberg, R G; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Osthelder, C; Ott, C D; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Page, A; Palladino, L; Palomba, C; Pan, Y; Paoletti, F; Paoletti, R; Papa, M A; Parisi, M; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Persichetti, G; Phelps, M; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pihlaja, M; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H J; Plissi, M V; Poggiani, R; Pöld, J; Postiglione, F; Poux, C; Prato, M; Predoi, V; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L G; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Quetschke, V; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Rácz, I; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Rakhmanov, M; Ramet, C; Rankins, B; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Re, V; Reed, C M; Reed, T; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ricci, F; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Roberts, M; Robertson, N A; Robinet, F; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Rocchi, A; Roddy, S; Rodriguez, C; Rodruck, M; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Röver, C; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Salemi, F; Sammut, L; Sandberg, V; Sankar, S; Sannibale, V; Santamaría, L; Santiago-Prieto, I; Santostasi, G; Saracco, E; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R L; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schulz, B; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sentenac, D; Sergeev, A; Shaddock, D A; Shaltev, M; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sidery, T L; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L; Sintes, A M; Skelton, G R; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, R J E; Smith-Lefebvre, N D; Somiya, K; Sorazu, B; Speirits, F C; Sperandio, L; Stefszky, M; Steinert, E; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steplewski, S; Stochino, A; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Strigin, S E; Stroeer, A S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sung, M; Susmithan, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B; Szeifert, G; Tacca, M; Taffarello, L; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, R; ter Braack, A P M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Thüring, A; Titsler, C; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Toncelli, A; Tonelli, M; Torre, O; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Tournefier, E; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Tse, M; Ugolini, D; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; van der Putten, S; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vasuth, M; Vaulin, R; Vavoulidis, M; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Villar, A E; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A; Wade, L; Wade, M; Waldman, S J; Wallace, L; Wan, Y; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wanner, A; Ward, R L; Was, M; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wiesner, K; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, L; Williams, R; Willke, B; Wimmer, M; Winkelmann, L; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yamamoto, K; Yancey, C C; Yang, H; Yeaton-Massey, D; Yoshida, S; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zotov, N; Zucker, M E; Zweizig, J; Anderson, D P

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents results of an all-sky searches for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range [50, 1190] Hz and with frequency derivative ranges of [-2 \\times 10^-9, 1.1 \\times 10^-10] Hz/s for the fifth LIGO science run (S5). The novelty of the search lies in the use of a non-coherent technique based on the Hough-transform to combine the information from coherent searches on timescales of about one day. Because these searches are very computationally intensive, they have been deployed on the Einstein@Home distributed computing project infrastructure. The search presented here is about a factor 3 more sensitive than the previous Einstein@Home search in early S5 LIGO data. The post-processing has left us with eight surviving candidates. We show that deeper follow-up studies rule each of them out. Hence, since no statistically significant gravitational wave signals have been detected, we report upper limits on the intrinsic gravitational wave amplitude h0. For example, in the 0.5 Hz-wide band at 15...

  6. Vacuum ultraviolet instrumentation for solar irradiance and thermospheric airglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Rottman, Gary J.; Bailey, Scott M.; Solomon, Stanley C.

    1993-08-01

    A NASA sounding rocket experiment was developed to study the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral irradiance and its effect on the upper atmosphere. Both the solar flux and the terrestrial molecular nitrogen via the Lyman-Birge-Hopfield bands in the far ultraviolet (FUV) were measured remotely from a sounding rocket on October 27, 1992. The rocket experiment also includes EUV instruments from Boston University (Supriya Chakrabarti), but only the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)/University of Colorado (CU) four solar instruments and one airglow instrument are discussed here. The primary solar EUV instrument is a 1/4 meter Rowland circle EUV spectrograph which has flown on three rockets since 1988 measuring the solar spectral irradiance from 30 to 110 nm with 0.2 nm resolution. Another solar irradiance instrument is an array of six silicon XUV photodiodes, each having different metallic filters coated directly on the photodiodes. This photodiode system provides a spectral coverage from 0.1 to 80 nm with about 15 nm resolution. The other solar irradiance instrument is a silicon avalanche photodiode coupled with pulse height analyzer electronics. This avalanche photodiode package measures the XUV photon energy providing a solar spectrum from 50 to 12,400 eV (25 to 0.1 nm) with an energy resolution of about 50 eV. The fourth solar instrument is an XUV imager that images the sun at 17.5 nm with a spatial resolution of 20 arc-seconds. The airglow spectrograph measures the terrestrial FUV airglow emissions along the horizon from 125 to 160 nm with 0.2 nm spectral resolution. The photon-counting CODACON detectors are used for three of these instruments and consist of coded arrays of anodes behind microchannel plates. The one-dimensional and two-dimensional CODACON detectors were developed at CU by Dr. George Lawrence. The pre-flight and post-flight photometric calibrations were performed at our calibration laboratory and at the Synchrotron Ultraviolet

  7. The Total Solar Irradiance, UV Emission and Magnetic Flux during the Last Solar Cycle Minimum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Benevolenskaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have analyzed the total solar irradiance (TSI and the spectral solar irradiance as ultraviolet emission (UV in the wavelength range 115–180 nm, observed with the instruments TIM and SOLSTICE within the framework of SORCE (the solar radiation and climate experiment during the long solar minimum between the 23rd and 24th cycles. The wavelet analysis reveals an increase in the magnetic flux in the latitudinal zone of the sunspot activity, accompanied with an increase in the TSI and UV on the surface rotation timescales of solar activity complexes. In-phase coherent structures between the midlatitude magnetic flux and TSI/UV appear when the long-lived complexes of the solar activity are present. These complexes, which are related to long-lived sources of magnetic fields under the photosphere, are maintained by magnetic fluxes reappearing in the same longitudinal regions. During the deep solar minimum (the period of the absence of sunspots, a coherent structure has been found, in which the phase between the integrated midlatitude magnetic flux is ahead of the total solar irradiance on the timescales of the surface rotation.

  8. Analysis of Global Solar Irradiance over Climatic Zones in Nigeria for Solar Energy Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adekunle Ayodotun Osinowo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Satellite derived solar irradiance over 25 locations in the 5 climatic zones of Nigeria (tropical rainforest TRF, Guinea savannah GS, Sahel savannah SHS, Sudan savannah SUS, and Mangrove swamp forest MSF was analyzed. To justify its use, the satellite data was tested for goodness of agreement with ground measured solar radiation data using 26-year mean monthly and daily data over 16 locations in the 5 climatic zones. The well-known R2, RMSE, MBE, and MPE statistical tests were used and good agreement was found. The 25 locations were grouped into the 5 climatic zones. Frequency distribution of global solar irradiance was done for each of the climatic zones. This showed that 46.88%, and 40.6% of the number of days (9794 over TRF and MSF, respectively, had irradiation within the range of 15.01–20.01 MJ/m2/day. For the GS, SHS, and SUS, 46.19%, 55.84% and 58.53% of the days had total irradiation within the range of 20.01–25.01 MJ/m2/day, respectively. Generally, in all the climatic zones, coefficients of variation of solar radiation were high and mean values were low in July and August. Contour maps showed that high and low values of global solar irradiance and clearness index were observed in the Northern and Southern locations of Nigeria, respectively.

  9. The Missing Solar Irradiance Spectrum: 1 to 7 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, J. J.; Lewis, M.; David, M.; Schunk, R. W.; Woods, T. N.; Eparvier, F. G.; Warren, H. P.

    2015-12-01

    During large X-class flares the Earth's upper atmospheric E-region responds immediately to solar photons in the 1 to 7 nm range. The response can change the E-region density by factors approaching 10, create large changes in conductivity, and plague HF communications. GOES-XRS provide 0.1 to 0.8 nm and a 0.05 to 0.4 nm integral channels; SOHO-SEM provided a 0 to 50 nm irradiance; TIMED and SORCE-XPS diode measurements also integrated down to 0.1 nm; and most recently SDO-EVE provided a 0.1 to 7 nm irradiance. For atmospheric response to solar flares the cadence is also crucial. Both GOES and SDO provided integral measurements at 10 seconds or better. Unfortunately these measurements have failed to capture the 1 to 7 nm spectral changes that occur during flares. It is these spectral changes that create the major impact since the ionization cross-section of the dominant atmospheric species, N2 and O2, both contain step function changes in the cross-sections. Models of the solar irradiance over this critical wavelength regime have suffered from the need to model the spectral variability based on incomplete measurements. The most sophisticated empirical model FISM [Chamberlin et al., 2008] used 1 nm spectral binning and various implementations of the above integral measurements to describe the 1 to 7 nm irradiance. Since excellent solar observations exist at other wavelengths it is possible to construct an empirical model of the solar atmosphere and then use this model to infer the spectral distribution at wavelengths below 5 nm. This differential emission measure approach has been used successfully in other contexts [e.g., Warren, 2005, Chamberlin et al., 2009]. This paper contrasts the broadband versus spectrally resolved descriptions of the incoming irradiance that affects the upper atmospheric E-layer. The results provide a prescription of what wavelength resolution would be needed to adequately measure the incoming solar irradiance in the 1 to 7 nm range.

  10. Properties of solar gravity mode signals in total irradiance observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Further evidence has been found that a significant fraction of the gravity mode power density in the total irradiance observations appears in sidebands of classified eigenfrequencies. These sidebands whose amplitudes vary from year to year are interpreted as harmonics of the rotational frequencies of the nonuniform solar surface. These findings are for non axisymmetric modes and corroborate the findings of Kroll, Hill and Chen for axisymmetric modes. It is demonstrated the the generation of the sidebands lifts the usual restriction on the parity of the eigenfunctions for modes detectable in total irradiance observations. 14 refs

  11. Effect of solar irradiation on extracellular enzymes of Aeromonas proteolytica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, B. G.

    1973-01-01

    The bacterium Aeromonas proteolytica was selected for studying the effects of solar irradiation on extracellular enzymes because it produces an endopeptidase that is capable of degrading proteins and a hemolysin that is active in lysing human erythrocytes. Possible alterations in the rate of enzyme production in response to the test conditions are currently underway and are not available for this preliminary report. Completed viability studies are indicative that little difference exists among the survival curves derived for cells exposed to various components of ultraviolet irradiation in space.

  12. Electron irradiation effects in epitaxial InP solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearsall, N. M.; Robson, N.; Sambell, A. J.; Anspaugh, B.; Cross, T. A.

    1991-01-01

    Performance data for InP-based solar cells after irradiation with 1-MeV electrons up to a fluence of 1 x 1016 e/cm2 are presented. Three InP cell structures are considered. Two of these have epitaxially grown active regions, these being a homojunction design and in ITO/InP structure. These are compared with ITO/InP cells without the epitaxial base region. The cell parameter variations, the influence of illumination during irradiation, and the effect on cell spectral response and capacitance measurements are discussed. Substantial performance recovery after thermal annealing at 90 C is reported.

  13. NLTE solar irradiance modeling with the COSI code

    CERN Document Server

    Shapiro, A I; Schoell, M; Haberreiter, M; Rozanov, E

    2010-01-01

    Context. The solar irradiance is known to change on time scales of minutes to decades, and it is suspected that its substantial fluctua- tions are partially responsible for climate variations. Aims. We are developing a solar atmosphere code that allows the physical modeling of the entire solar spectrum composed of quiet Sun and active regions. This code is a tool for modeling the variability of the solar irradiance and understanding its influence on Earth. Methods. We exploit further development of the radiative transfer code COSI that now incorporates the calculation of molecular lines. We validated COSI under the conditions of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) against the synthetic spectra calculated with the ATLAS code. The synthetic solar spectra were also calculated in non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) and compared to the available measured spectra. In doing so we have defined the main problems of the modeling, e.g., the lack of opacity in the UV part of the spectrum and the inconsistency in...

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Second ROSAT all-sky survey (2RXS) source catalog (Boller+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boller, T.; Freyberg, M. J.; Truemper, J.; Haberl, F.; Voges, W.; Nandra, K.

    2016-03-01

    We have re-analysed the photon event files from the ROSAT all-sky survey. The main goal was to create a catalogue of point-like sources, which is referred to as the 2RXS source catalogue. We improved the reliability of detections by an advanced detection algorithm and a complete screening process. New data products were created to allow timing and spectral analysis. Photon event files with corrected astrometry and Moon rejection (RASS-3.1 processing) were made available in FITS format. The 2RXS catalogue will serve as the basic X-ray all-sky survey catalogue until eROSITA data become available. (2 data files).

  15. Accessing Solar Irradiance Data via LISIRD, the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics Interactive Solar Irradiance Datacenter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankratz, C. K.; Wilson, A.; Snow, M. A.; Lindholm, D. M.; Woods, T. N.; Traver, T.; Woodraska, D.

    2015-12-01

    The LASP Interactive Solar Irradiance Datacenter, LISIRD, http://lasp.colorado.edu/lisird, allows the science community and the public to explore and access solar irradiance and related data sets using convenient, interactive or scriptable, standards-based interfaces. LISIRD's interactive plotting allows users to investigate and download irradiance data sets from a variety of sources, including space missions, ground observatories, and modeling efforts. LISIRD's programmatic interfaces allow software-level data retrievals and facilitate automation. This presentation will describe the current state of LISIRD, provide details of the data sets it serves, outline data access methods, identify key technologies in-use, and address other related aspects of serving spectral and other time series data. We continue to improve LISIRD by integrating new data sets, and also by advancing its data management and presentation capabilities to meet evolving best practices and community needs. LISIRD is hosted and operated by the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, LASP, which has been a leader in Atmospheric and Heliophysics science for over 60 years. LASP makes a variety of space-based measurements of solar irradiance, which provide crucial input for research and modeling in solar-terrestrial interactions, space physics, planetary, atmospheric, and climate sciences. These data sets consist of fundamental measurements, composite data sets, solar indices, space weather products, and models. Current data sets available through LISIRD originate from the SORCE, SDO (EVE), UARS (SOLSTICE), TIMED (SEE), and SME space missions, as well as several other space and ground-based projects. LISIRD leverages several technologies to provide flexible and standards-based access to the data holdings available through LISIRD. This includes internet-accessible interfaces that permit data access in a variety of formats, data subsetting, as well as program-level access from data analysis

  16. Was UV spectral solar irradiance lower during the recent low sunspot minimum?

    OpenAIRE

    Lockwood, Mike

    2011-01-01

    A detailed analysis is presented of solar UV spectral irradiance for the period between May 2003 and August 2005, when data are available from both the Solar Ultraviolet pectral Irradiance Monitor (SUSIM) instrument (on board the pper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) spacecraft) and the Solar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) instrument (on board the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) satellite). The ultimate aim is to develop a data composite that can be use...

  17. Reconstruction of spectral solar irradiance since 1700 from simulated magnetograms

    CERN Document Server

    Dasi-Espuig, M; Krivova, N A; Solanki, S K; Unruh, Y C; Yeo, K L

    2016-01-01

    We present a reconstruction of the spectral solar irradiance since 1700 using the SATIRE-T2 (Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstructions for the Telescope era version 2) model. This model uses as input magnetograms simulated with a surface flux transport model fed with semi-synthetic records of emerging sunspot groups. We used statistical relationships between the properties of sunspot group emergence, such as the latitude, area, and tilt angle, and the sunspot cycle strength and phase to produce semi-synthetic sunspot group records starting in the year 1700. The semisynthetic records are fed into a surface flux transport model to obtain daily simulated magnetograms that map the distribution of the magnetic flux in active regions (sunspots and faculae) and their decay products on the solar surface. The magnetic flux emerging in ephemeral regions is accounted for separately based on the concept of extended cycles whose length and amplitude are linked to those of the sunspot cycles through the sunspot number....

  18. Total solar irradiance measurements with PREMOS/PICARD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmutz, Werner; Fehlmann, André; Finsterle, Wolfgang; Kopp, Greg; Thuillier, Gerard

    2013-05-01

    PREMOS on the French satellite PICARD is the first spaceborne absolute radiometer measuring Total Solar Irradiance that has been irradiance-calibrated in vacuum with SI-traceability. The measurements of PREMOS at first light on July 27, 2010, yield a TSI value of 1360.9±0.4 W/m2 (k=1). This value agrees with the absolute TSI value measured by TIM/SORCE for this date within their combined uncertainties, and it differs by more than ten sigma from the absolute value of other space experiments, e.g. VIRGO/SOHO. The PREMOS measurements thus establish SI-traceability to a solar constant value of 1361 W/m2.

  19. Photoluminescence in large fluence radiation irradiated space silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hisamatsu, Tadashi; Kawasaki, Osamu; Matsuda, Sumio [National Space Development Agency of Japan, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Tsukuba Space Center; Tsukamoto, Kazuyoshi

    1997-03-01

    Photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements were carried out for silicon 50{mu}m BSFR space solar cells irradiated with 1MeV electrons with a fluence exceeding 1 x 10{sup 16} e/cm{sup 2} and 10MeV protons with a fluence exceeding 1 x 10{sup 13} p/cm{sup 2}. The results were compared with the previous result performed in a relative low fluence region, and the radiation-induced defects which cause anomalous degradation of the cell performance in such large fluence regions were discussed. As far as we know, this is the first report which presents the PL measurement results at 4.2K of the large fluence radiation irradiated silicon solar cells. (author)

  20. Influence of solar UVA on erythemal irradiances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, A V; Turnbull, D J; Kimlin, M G

    2006-06-21

    Many materials in everyday use such as window glass in homes and offices, glass in sunrooms and greenhouses, vehicle glass and some brands of sunscreens act as a barrier to the shorter UVB wavelengths while transmitting some of the longer UVA wavelengths. This paper reports on the erythemal exposures due to the UVA waveband encountered over a 12-month period for a solar zenith angle (SZA) range of 4 degrees to 80 degrees and the resulting times required for an erythemal exposure of one standard erythemal dose (SED) due to the erythemal exposures to the UVA wavelengths. The minimum time for an exposure of one SED due to the UVA wavelengths in winter is approximately double that what it is in summer. The time period of 40 to 60 min was the most frequent length of time for an exposure of one SED with 60 to 80 min the next frequent length of time required for a one SED exposure. PMID:16757874

  1. Influence of solar UVA on erythemal irradiances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parisi, A V [Centre for Rural and Remote Area Health, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba 4350 (Australia); Turnbull, D J [Centre for Rural and Remote Area Health, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba 4350 (Australia); Kimlin, M G [Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Qld (Australia)

    2006-06-21

    Many materials in everyday use such as window glass in homes and offices, glass in sunrooms and greenhouses, vehicle glass and some brands of sunscreens act as a barrier to the shorter UVB wavelengths while transmitting some of the longer UVA wavelengths. This paper reports on the erythemal exposures due to the UVA waveband encountered over a 12-month period for a solar zenith angle (SZA) range of 4{sup 0} to 80{sup 0} and the resulting times required for an erythemal exposure of one standard erythemal dose (SED) due to the erythemal exposures to the UVA wavelengths. The minimum time for an exposure of one SED due to the UVA wavelengths in winter is approximately double that what it is in summer. The time period of 40 to 60 min was the most frequent length of time for an exposure of one SED with 60 to 80 min the next frequent length of time required for a one SED exposure.

  2. Variability in solar irradiance observed at two contrasting Antarctic sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkov, Boyan H.; Láska, Kamil; Vitale, Vito; Lanconelli, Christian; Lupi, Angelo; Mazzola, Mauro; Budíková, Marie

    2016-05-01

    The features of erythemally weighted (EW) and short-wave downwelling (SWD) solar irradiances, observed during the spring-summer months of 2007-2011 at Johann Gregor Mendel (63°48‧S, 57°53‧W, 7 m a.s.l.) and Dome Concordia (75°06‧S, 123°21‧E, 3233 m a.s.l.) stations, placed at the Antarctic coastal region and on the interior plateau respectively, have been analysed and compared to each other. The EW and SWD spectral components have been presented by the corresponding daily integrated values and were examined taking into account the different geographic positions and different environmental conditions at both sites. The results indicate that at Mendel station the surface solar irradiance is strongly affected by the changes in the cloud cover, aerosols and albedo that cause a decrease in EW between 20% and 35%, and from 0% to 50% in SWD component, which contributions are slightly lower than the seasonal SWD variations evaluated to be about 71%. On the contrary, the changes in the cloud cover features at Concordia station produce only a 5% reduction of the solar irradiance, whilst the seasonal oscillations of 94% turn out to be the predominant mode. The present analysis leads to the conclusion that the variations in the ozone column cause an average decrease of about 46% in EW irradiance with respect to the value found in the case of minimum ozone content at each of the stations. In addition, the ratio between EW and SWD spectral components can be used to achieve a realistic assessment of the radiation amplification factor that quantifies the relationship between the atmospheric ozone and the surface UV irradiance.

  3. Surface solar irradiance from SCIAMACHY measurements: algorithm and validation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, P.; P. Stammes; Mueller, R.

    2011-01-01

    Broadband surface solar irradiances (SSI) are, for the first time, derived from SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CartograpHY) satellite measurements. The retrieval algorithm, called FRESCO (Fast REtrieval Scheme for Clouds from Oxygen A band) SSI, is similar to the Heliosat method. In contrast to the standard Heliosat method, the cloud index is replaced by the effective cloud fraction derived from the FRESCO cloud algorithm. The MAGIC (Mesoscale Atmospheric ...

  4. WHAT CAUSES THE INTER-SOLAR-CYCLE VARIATION OF TOTAL SOLAR IRRADIANCE?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, N. B.; Kong, D. F., E-mail: nanbin@ynao.ac.cn [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Observatory, CAS, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2015-12-15

    The Physikalisch Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos total solar irradiance (TSI), Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitoring TSI, and Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium TSI are three typical TSI composites. Magnetic Plage Strength Index (MPSI) and Mount Wilson Sunspot Index (MWSI) should indicate the weak and strong magnetic field activity on the solar full disk, respectively. Cross-correlation (CC) analysis of MWSI with three TSI composites shows that TSI should be weakly correlated with MWSI, and not be in phase with MWSI at timescales of solar cycles. The wavelet coherence (WTC) and partial wavelet coherence (PWC) of TSI with MWSI indicate that the inter-solar-cycle variation of TSI is also not related to solar strong magnetic field activity, which is represented by MWSI. However, CC analysis of MPSI with three TSI composites indicates that TSI should be moderately correlated and accurately in phase with MPSI at timescales of solar cycles, and that the statistical significance test indicates that the correlation coefficient of three TSI composites with MPSI is statistically significantly higher than that of three TSI composites with MWSI. Furthermore, the cross wavelet transform (XWT) and WTC of TSI with MPSI show that the TSI is highly related and actually in phase with MPSI at a timescale of a solar cycle as well. Consequently, the CC analysis, XWT, and WTC indicate that the solar weak magnetic activity on the full disk, which is represented by MPSI, dominates the inter-solar-cycle variation of TSI.

  5. Data Analysis for Continuous Gravitational Waves: Deepest All-Sky Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletsch, Holger J.

    2009-11-01

    Direct detection of gravitational waves would not only validate Einstein's theory of General Relativity but also constitute an important new astronomical tool. Continuous gravitational-wave (CW) signals are expected for instance from rapidly rotating neutron stars. Most such stars are estimated to be electromagnetically invisible, but might be detected and studied via gravitational waves. This dissertation is concerned with the development, study and application of data- analysis techniques to detect CW signals from previously unknown sources through all-sky surveys over broadest possible ranges of putative source frequencies and frequency time-derivatives. An all-sky CW search is presented using 510 hours of data from the fourth science run (S4) of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), covering frequencies of 50 to 1500 Hz and linear drifts in frequency. The main computational work of the search is distributed over hundreds of thousands of computers via the public volunteer computing project "Einstein@Home". This enormous computing capacity allows the exploration of a wide parameter space, despite of using comparably long coherent integration times of 30 hours, subdividing the 510 hours of data into 17 segments. To enhance the sensitivity of the search, in a post-processing stage the coherent-analysis results from the 17 data segments are combined through a highly efficient coincidence scheme. Moreover, the sensitivity of the search is estimated, along with the fraction of parameter space vetoed because of contamination by instrumental artifacts. In a further Einstein@Home CW search the previous S4 analysis is extended to use 840 hours of early fifth-science-run (S5) LIGO data, which are examined in 28 coherent segments of 30 hours. The major part of the post-processing is again related to efficiently combining the 28 coherently-analyzed segments. Despite probing a slightly larger parameter space, this analysis achieves 3 times better

  6. Planck's dusty GEMS: The brightest gravitationally lensed galaxies discovered with the Planck all-sky survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañameras, R.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Guery, D.; McKenzie, T.; König, S.; Petitpas, G.; Dole, H.; Frye, B.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Montier, L.; Negrello, M.; Beelen, A.; Boone, F.; Dicken, D.; Lagache, G.; Le Floc'h, E.; Altieri, B.; Béthermin, M.; Chary, R.; de Zotti, G.; Giard, M.; Kneissl, R.; Krips, M.; Malhotra, S.; Martinache, C.; Omont, A.; Pointecouteau, E.; Puget, J.-L.; Scott, D.; Soucail, G.; Valtchanov, I.; Welikala, N.; Yan, L.

    2015-09-01

    We present an analysis of CO spectroscopy and infrared-to-millimetre dust photometry of 11 exceptionally bright far-infrared (FIR) and sub-mm sources discovered through a combination of the Planck all-sky survey and follow-up Herschel-SPIRE imaging - "Planck's Dusty Gravitationally Enhanced subMillimetre Sources". Each source has a secure spectroscopic redshift z = 2.2-3.6 from multiple lines obtained through a blind redshift search with EMIR at the IRAM 30-m telescope. Interferometry was obtained at IRAM and the SMA, and along with optical/near-infrared imaging obtained at the CFHT and the VLT reveal morphologies consistent with strongly gravitationally lensed sources, including several giant arcs. Additional photometry was obtained with JCMT/SCUBA-2 and IRAM/GISMO at 850 μm and 2 mm, respectively. The SEDs of our sources peak near either the 350 μm or 500 μm bands of SPIRE with peak flux densities between 0.35 and 1.14 Jy. All objects are extremely bright isolated point sources in the 18'' beam of SPIREat 250 μm, with apparent FIR luminosities of up to 3 × 1014 L⊙ (not correcting for the lensing effect). Their morphologies, sizes, CO line widths, CO luminosities, dust temperatures, and FIR luminosities provide additional empirical evidence that these are amongst the brightest strongly gravitationally lensed high-redshift galaxies on the sub-mm sky. Our programme extends the successful wide-area searches for strongly gravitationally lensed high-redshift galaxies (carried out with the South Pole Telescope and Herschel) towards even brighter sources, which are so rare that their systematic identification requires a genuine all-sky survey like Planck. Six sources are above the ≃600 mJy 90% completeness limit of the Planck catalogue of compact sources (PCCS) at 545 and 857 GHz, which implies that these must literally be amongst the brightest high-redshift FIR and sub-mm sources on the extragalactic sky. We discuss their dust masses and temperatures, and use

  7. The 60-month all-sky BAT Survey of AGN and the Anisotropy of Nearby AGN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajello, M.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Alexander, D.M.; /Durham U.; Greiner, J.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE; Madejski, G.M.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Gehrels, N.; /NASA, Goddard; Burlon, D.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE

    2012-04-02

    Surveys above 10 keV represent one of the the best resources to provide an unbiased census of the population of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). We present the results of 60 months of observation of the hard X-ray sky with Swift/BAT. In this timeframe, BAT detected (in the 15-55 keV band) 720 sources in an all-sky survey of which 428 are associated with AGN, most of which are nearby. Our sample has negligible incompleteness and statistics a factor of {approx}2 larger over similarly complete sets of AGN. Our sample contains (at least) 15 bona-fide Compton-thick AGN and 3 likely candidates. Compton-thick AGN represent a {approx}5% of AGN samples detected above 15 keV. We use the BAT dataset to refine the determination of the LogN-LogS of AGN which is extremely important, now that NuSTAR prepares for launch, towards assessing the AGN contribution to the cosmic X-ray background. We show that the LogN-LogS of AGN selected above 10 keV is now established to a {approx}10% precision. We derive the luminosity function of Compton-thick AGN and measure a space density of 7.9{sub -2.9}{sup +4.1} x 10{sup -5} Mpc{sup -3} for objects with a de-absorbed luminosity larger than 2 x 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. As the BAT AGN are all mostly local, they allow us to investigate the spatial distribution of AGN in the nearby Universe regardless of absorption. We find concentrations of AGN that coincide spatially with the largest congregations of matter in the local ({le} 85 Mpc) Universe. There is some evidence that the fraction of Seyfert 2 objects is larger than average in the direction of these dense regions.

  8. Thermospheric winds and temperatures above Mawson, Antarctica, observed with an all-sky imaging, Fabry-Perot spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Anderson

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A new all-sky imaging Fabry-Perot spectrometer has been installed at Mawson station (67°36' S, 62°52' E, Antarctica. This instrument is capable of recording independent spectra from many tens of locations across the sky simultaneously. Useful operation began in March 2007, with spectra recorded on a total of 186 nights. Initial analysis has focused on the large-scale daily and average behavior of winds and temperatures derived from observations of the 630.0 nm airglow line of atomic oxygen, originating from a broad layer centered around 240 km altitude, in the ionospheric F-region.

    The 1993 Horizontal Wind Model (HWM93, NRLMSISE-00 atmospheric model, and the Coupled Thermosphere/Ionosphere Plasmasphere (CTIP model were used for comparison. During the geomagnetically quiet period studied, observed winds and temperatures were generally well modelled, although temperatures were consistently higher than NRLMSISE-00 predicted, by up to 100 K. CTIP temperatures better matched our data, particularly later in the night, but predicted zonal winds which were offset from those observed by 70–180 ms−1 westward. During periods of increased activity both winds and temperatures showed much greater variability over time-scales of less than an hour. For the active night presented here, a period of 45 min saw wind speeds decrease by around 180 ms−1, and temperatures increase by approximately 100 K. Active-period winds were poorly modelled by HWM93 and CTIP, although observed median temperatures were in better agreement with NRLMSISE-00 during such periods.

    Average behavior was found to be generally consistent with previous studies of thermospheric winds above Mawson. The collected data set was representative of quiet geomagnetic and solar conditions. Geographic eastward winds in the afternoon/evening generally continued until around local midnight, when winds turned equatorward. Geographic meridional and

  9. Regression Model to Predict Global Solar Irradiance in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hairuniza Ahmed Kutty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel regression model is developed to estimate the monthly global solar irradiance in Malaysia. The model is developed based on different available meteorological parameters, including temperature, cloud cover, rain precipitate, relative humidity, wind speed, pressure, and gust speed, by implementing regression analysis. This paper reports on the details of the analysis of the effect of each prediction parameter to identify the parameters that are relevant to estimating global solar irradiance. In addition, the proposed model is compared in terms of the root mean square error (RMSE, mean bias error (MBE, and the coefficient of determination (R2 with other models available from literature studies. Seven models based on single parameters (PM1 to PM7 and five multiple-parameter models (PM7 to PM12 are proposed. The new models perform well, with RMSE ranging from 0.429% to 1.774%, R2 ranging from 0.942 to 0.992, and MBE ranging from −0.1571% to 0.6025%. In general, cloud cover significantly affects the estimation of global solar irradiance. However, cloud cover in Malaysia lacks sufficient influence when included into multiple-parameter models although it performs fairly well in single-parameter prediction models.

  10. Measurements and Modeling of Total Solar Irradiance in X-Class Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Christopher Samuel; Hock, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    The Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) from NASA's SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) can detect changes in the Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) to a precision of 2 ppm, allowing observations of variations due to the largest X-Class solar ares for the first time. Presented here is a robust algorithm for determining the radiative output in the TIM TSI measurements, in both the impulsive and gradual phases, for the four solar ares presented in Woods et al. (2006), as well as an additional are measured on 2006 December 6. The radiative outputs for both phases of these five ares are then compared to the Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) irradiance output from the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) in order to derive an empirical relationship between the FISM VUV model and the TIM TSI data output to estimate the TSI radiative output for eight other X-Class ares. This model provides the basis for the bolometric energy estimates for the solar ares analyzed in the Emslie et al. (2012) study.

  11. On the Relation between Solar Activity and Clear-Sky Terrestrial Irradiance

    CERN Document Server

    Feulner, Georg

    2012-01-01

    The Mauna Loa Observatory record of direct-beam solar irradiance measurements for the years 1958-2010 is analysed to investigate the variation of clear-sky terrestrial insolation with solar activity over more than four solar cycles. The raw irradiance data exhibit a marked seasonal cycle, extended periods of lower irradiance due to emissions of volcanic aerosols, and a long-term decrease in atmospheric transmission independent of solar activity. After correcting for these effects, it is found that clear-sky terrestrial irradiance typically varies by about 0.2 +/- 0.1% over the course of the solar cycle, a change of the same order of magnitude as the variations of the total solar irradiance above the atmosphere. An investigation of changes in the clear-sky atmospheric transmission fails to find a significant trend with sunspot number. Hence there is no evidence for a yet unknown effect amplifying variations of clear-sky irradiance with solar activity.

  12. Solar irradiance models and measurements: a comparison in the 220 nm to 240 nm wavelength band

    CERN Document Server

    Unruh, Yvonne C; Krivova, Natalie A

    2011-01-01

    Solar irradiance models that assume solar irradiance variations to be due to changes in the solar surface magnetic flux have been successfully used to reconstruct total solar irradiance on rotational as well as cyclical and secular time scales. Modelling spectral solar irradiance is not yet as advanced, and also suffers from a lack of comparison data, in particular on solar-cycle time scales. Here we compare solar irradiance in the 220 nm to 240 nm band as modelled with SATIRE-S and measured by different instruments on the UARS and SORCE satellites. We find good agreement between the model and measurements on rotational time scales. The long-term trends, however, show significant differences. Both SORCE instruments, in particular, show a much steeper gradient over the decaying part of cycle 23 than the modelled irradiance or that measured by UARS/SUSIM.

  13. Reconstructed Total Solar Irradiance as a precursor for long-term solar activity predictions: a nonlinear dynamics approach

    OpenAIRE

    Sello, S.

    2012-01-01

    Total solar irradiance variations, about 0.1% between solar activity maximum and minimum, are available from accurate satellite measurements since 1978 and thus do not provide useful information on longer-term secular trends. Recently, Krivova et al., 2007 reconstructed, using suitable models, the total solar irradiance from the end of the Maunder minimum to the present, based on variations of the surface distribution of the solar magnetic field. The latter is calculated from the long histori...

  14. Spectral irradiance curve calculations for any type of solar eclipse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple procedure is described for calculating the eclipse function (EF), alpha, and hence the spectral irradiance curve (SIC), (1-alpha), for any type of solar eclipse: namely, the occultation (partial/total) eclipse and the transit (partial/annular) eclipse. The SIC (or the EF) gives the variation of the amount (or the loss) of solar radiation of a given wavelength reaching a distant observer for various positions of the moon across the sun. The scheme is based on the theory of light curves of eclipsing binaries, the results of which are tabulated in Merrill's Tables, and is valid for all wavelengths for which the solar limb-darkening obeys the cosine law: J = /sub c/(1 - X + X cost gamma). As an example of computing the SIC for an occultation eclipse which may be total, the calculations for the March 7, 1970, eclipse are described in detail. (U.S.)

  15. Short-term forecast of the total and spectral solar irradiance

    CERN Document Server

    Vieira, Luis Eduardo A; Kretzschmar, Matthieu

    2011-01-01

    Among several heliophysical and geophysical quantities, the accurate evolution of the solar irradiance is fundamental to forecast the evolution of the neutral and ionized components of the Earth's atmosphere.We developed an artificial neural network model to compute the evolution of the solar irradiance in near-real time. The model is based on the assumption that that great part of the solar irradiance variability is due to the evolution of the structure of the solar magnetic field. We employ a Layer-Recurrent Network (LRN) to model the complex relationships between the evolution of the bipolar magnetic structures (input) and the solar irradiance (output). The evolution of the bipolar magnetic structures is obtained from near-real time solar disk magnetograms and intensity images. The magnetic structures are identify and classified according to the area of the solar disk covered. We constrained the model by comparing the output of the model and observations of the solar irradiance made by instruments onboard ...

  16. Surface solar irradiance from SCIAMACHY measurements: algorithm and validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Wang

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Broadband surface solar irradiances (SSI are, for the first time, derived from SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CartograpHY satellite measurements. The retrieval algorithm, called FRESCO (Fast REtrieval Scheme for Clouds from the Oxygen A band SSI, is similar to the Heliosat method. In contrast to the standard Heliosat method, the cloud index is replaced by the effective cloud fraction derived from the FRESCO cloud algorithm. The MAGIC (Mesoscale Atmospheric Global Irradiance Code algorithm is used to calculate clear-sky SSI. The SCIAMACHY SSI product is validated against globally distributed BSRN (Baseline Surface Radiation Network measurements and compared with ISCCP-FD (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project Flux Dataset surface shortwave downwelling fluxes (SDF. For one year of data in 2008, the mean difference between the instantaneous SCIAMACHY SSI and the hourly mean BSRN global irradiances is −4 W m−2 (−1 % with a standard deviation of 101 W m−2 (20 %. The mean difference between the globally monthly mean SCIAMACHY SSI and ISCCP-FD SDF is less than −12 W m−2 (−2 % for every month in 2006 and the standard deviation is 62 W m−2 (12 %. The correlation coefficient is 0.93 between SCIAMACHY SSI and BSRN global irradiances and is greater than 0.96 between SCIAMACHY SSI and ISCCP-FD SDF. The evaluation results suggest that the SCIAMACHY SSI product achieves similar mean bias error and root mean square error as the surface solar irradiances derived from polar orbiting satellites with higher spatial resolution.

  17. Analysis of Cumulus Solar Irradiance Reflectance (CSIR) Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, John L.; Harshvardham

    1996-01-01

    Clouds are extremely important with regard to the transfer of solar radiation at the earth's surface. This study investigates Cumulus Solar Irradiance Reflection (CSIR) using ground-based pyranometers. CSIR events are short-term increases in solar radiation observed at the surface as a result of reflection off the sides of convective clouds. When sun-cloud observer geometry is favorable, these occurrences produce characteristic spikes in the pyranometer traces and solar irradiance values may exceed expected clear-sky values. Ultraviolet CSIR events were investigated during the summer of 1995 using Yankee Environmental Systems UVA-1 and UVB-1 pyranometers. Observed data were compared to clear-sky curves which were generated using a third degree polynomial best-fit line technique. Periods during which the observed data exceeded this clear-sky curve were identified as CSIR events. The magnitude of a CSIR event was determined by two different quantitative calculations. The MAC (magnitude above clear-sky) is an absolute measure of the difference between the observed and clear-sky irradiances. Maximum MAC values of 3.4 Wm(exp -2) and 0.069 Wm(exp -2) were observed at the UV-A and UV-B wavelengths, respectively. The second calculation determined the percentage above clear-sky (PAC) which indicated the relative magnitude of a CSIR event. Maximum UV-A and UV-B PAC magnitudes of 10.1% and 7.8%, respectively, were observed during the study. Also of interest was the duration of the CSIR events which is a function of sun-cloud-sensor geometry and the speed of cloud propagation over the measuring site. In both the UV-A and UV-B wavelengths, significant CSIR durations of up to 30 minutes were observed.

  18. Analysis of cumulus solar irradiance reflectance (CSIR) events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, John L.; Harshvardhan

    Clouds are extremely important with regard to the transfer of solar radiation at Earth's surface. This study investigates Cumulus Solar Irradiance Reflection (CSIR) using ground-based pyranometers. CSIR events are short-term increases in solar radiation observed at the surface as a result of reflection off the sides of convective clouds. When Sun-cloud observer geometry is favorable, these occurrences produce characteristic spikes in the pyranometer traces and solar irradiance values may exceed expected clear-sky values. Ultraviolet CSIR events were investigated during the summer of 1995 using UVA and UVB pyranometers. Observed data were compared to clear-sky curves which were generated using a third degree polynomial best-fit line technique. Periods during which the observed data exceeded this clear-sky curve were identified as CSIR events. The magnitude of a CSIR event was determined by two different quantitative calculations. The MAC (magnitude above clear-sky) is an absolute measure of the difference between the observed and clear-sky irradiances. Maximum MAC values of 3.4 Win -2 and 0.0169 Wm -2 were observed at the UV-A and UV-B wavelengths, respectively. The second calculation determined the percentage above clear-sky (PAC) which indicated the relative magnitude of a CSIR event. Maximum UV-A and UV-B PAC magnitudes of 10.1% and 7.8%, respectively, were observed during the study. Also of interest was the duration of the CSIR events which is a function of Sun-cloud-sensor geometry and the speed of cloud propagation over the measuring site. In both the UV-A and UV-B wavelengths, significant CSIR durations of up to 30 minutes were observed. C 1997 Elsevier Science B.V.

  19. Simultaneous measurement of the total solar irradiance and solar diameter by the PICARD mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuillier, Gérard; Dewitte, Steven; Schmutz, Werner; Picard Team

    2006-01-01

    A mission dedicated to simultaneous measurements of the solar diameter, spectral, and total solar irradiance is presently in development for launch end of the year 2008 on board of a microsatellite under the responsibility of Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales. The payload will consist of an imaging telescope, three filter radiometers with in total twelve channels, and two independent absolute radiometers. The scientific aims are presented as well as the concepts and properties of the instrumentation. This mission is named PICARD after the pioneering work of Jean Picard (1620-1682) who precisely determined the solar diameter during the Maunder minimum.

  20. Development, Production and Validation of the NOAA Solar Irradiance Climate Data Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coddington, O.; Lean, J.; Pilewskie, P.; Snow, M. A.; Lindholm, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    A new climate data record of Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) and Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI), including source code and supporting documentation is now publicly available as part of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) Climate Data Record (CDR) Program. Daily and monthly averaged values of TSI and SSI, with associated time and wavelength dependent uncertainties, are estimated from 1882 to the present with yearly averaged values since 1610, updated quarterly for the foreseeable future. The new Solar Irradiance Climate Data Record, jointly developed by the University of Colorado at Boulder's Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), is constructed from solar irradiance models that determine the changes from quiet Sun conditions when bright faculae and dark sunspots are present on the solar disk. The magnitudes of the irradiance changes that these features produce are determined from linear regression of the proxy Mg II index and sunspot area indices against the approximately decade-long solar irradiance measurements made by instruments on the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) spacecraft. We describe the model formulation, uncertainty estimates, operational implementation and validation approach. Future efforts to improve the uncertainty estimates of the Solar Irradiance CDR arising from model assumptions, and augmentation of the solar irradiance reconstructions with direct measurements from the Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS: launch date, July 2017) are also discussed.

  1. The total solar irradiance, UV emission and magnetic flux during the last solar cycle minimum

    CERN Document Server

    Benevolenskaya, E E

    2013-01-01

    We have analyzed the total solar irradiance (TSI) and the spectral solar irradiance as ultraviolet emission (UV) in the wavelength range 115-180 nm, observed with the instruments TIM and SOLSTICE within the framework of SORCE (The Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment) during the long solar minimum between the 23rd and 24th cycles. The wavelet analysis reveals an increase in the magnetic flux in the latitudinal zone of the sunspot activity, accompanied with an increase in the TSI and UV on the surface rotation timescales of solar activity complexes. In-phase coherent structures between the mid-latitude magnetic flux and TSI/UV appear when the long-lived complexes of the solar activity are present. These complexes, which are related to long- lived sources of magnetic fields under the photosphere, are maintained by magnetic fluxes reappearing in the same longitudinal regions. During the deep solar minimum (the period of the absence of sunspots) a coherent structure has been found, in which the phase between th...

  2. Solar irradiance forcing of centennial climate variability during the Holocene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, S.L.; Schrier, G. van der [Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), PO Box 201, 3730 AE De Bilt (Netherlands); Crowley, T.J. [Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2004-05-01

    Centennial climate variability during the Holocene has been simulated in two 10,000 year experiments using the intermediate-complexity ECBilt model. ECBilt contains a dynamic atmosphere, a global 3-D ocean model and a thermodynamic sea-ice model. One experiment uses orbital forcing and solar irradiance forcing, which is based on the Stuiver et al. residual {sup 14}C record spliced into the Lean et al. reconstruction. The other experiment uses orbital forcing alone. A glacier model is coupled off-line to the climate model. A time scale analysis shows that the response in atmospheric parameters to the irradiance forcing can be characterised as the direct response of a system with a large thermal inertia. This is evident in parameters like surface air temperature, monsoon precipitation and glacier length, which show a stronger response for longer time scales. The oceanic response, on the other hand, is strongly modified by internal feedback processes. The solar irradiance forcing excites a (damped) mode of the thermohaline circulation (THC) in the North Atlantic Ocean, similar to the loop-oscillator modes associated with random-noise freshwater forcing. This results in a significant peak (at time scales 200-250 year) in the THC spectrum which is absent in the reference run. The THC response diminishes the sea surface temperature response at high latitudes, while it gives rise to a signal in the sea surface salinity. A comparison of the model results with observations shows a number of encouraging similarities. (orig.)

  3. Forecast Method of Solar Irradiance with Just-In-Time Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takanobu; Goto, Yusuke; Terazono, Takahiro; Wakao, Shinji; Oozeki, Takashi

    PV power output mainly depends on the solar irradiance which is affected by various meteorological factors. So, it is required to predict solar irradiance in the future for the efficient operation of PV systems. In this paper, we develop a novel approach for solar irradiance forecast, in which we introduce to combine the black-box model (JIT Modeling) with the physical model (GPV data). We investigate the predictive accuracy of solar irradiance over wide controlled-area of each electric power company by utilizing the measured data on the 44 observation points throughout Japan offered by JMA and the 64 points around Kanto by NEDO. Finally, we propose the application forecast method of solar irradiance to the point which is difficulty in compiling the database. And we consider the influence of different GPV default time on solar irradiance prediction.

  4. New observation strategies for the solar UV spectral irradiance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kretzschmar Matthieu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Many applications in space weather and in space situational awareness require continuous solar spectral irradiance measurements in the UV, and to a lesser degree in the visible band. Most space-borne solar radiometers are made out of two different parts: (i a front filter that selects the passband and (ii a detector that is usually based on silicon technology. Both are prone to degradation, which may be caused either by the degradation of the filter coating due to local deposition or to structural changes, or by the degradation of the silicon detector by solar radiative and energetic particle fluxes. In this study, we provide a theoretical analysis of the filter degradation that is caused by structural changes such as pinholes; contamination-induced degradation will not be considered. We then propose a new instrumental concept, which is expected to overcome, at least partially, these problems. We show how most of the solar UV spectrum can be reconstructed from the measurement of only five spectral bands. This instrumental concept outperforms present spectrometers in terms of degradation. This new concept in addition overcomes the need for silicon-based detectors, which are replaced by wide band gap material detectors. Front filters, which can contribute to in-flight degradation, therefore are not required, except for the extreme-UV (EUV range. With a small weight and a low telemetry, this concept may also have applications in solar physics, in astrophysics and in planetology.

  5. Estimating Solar Irradiation Absorbed by Photovoltaic Panels with Low Concentration Located in Craiova, Romania

    OpenAIRE

    Ionel L. Alboteanu; Cornelia A. Bulucea; Sonia Degeratu

    2015-01-01

    Solar irradiation is one of the important parameters that should be taken into consideration for the design and utilization of a photovoltaic system. Usually, the input parameters of a photovoltaic system are solar irradiation, the ambient environment temperature and the wind speed, and as a consequence most photovoltaic systems are equipped with sensors for measuring these parameters. This paper presents several mathematical models for solar irradiation assessment. The starting point is repr...

  6. Study of statistical probability of solar irradiation energy levels in Zagreb and their application

    OpenAIRE

    Penzar, Ivan; Žic, Mario

    1987-01-01

    In order to obtain a more accurate evaluation of efficiency of the solar system the measurements of global irradiation by Moll-Gorczynski solarigraph were analysed with respect to levels of energy instead to arithmetic means of irradiation. The time variation of irradiation levels in daily and yearly course is considered. The structure of global irradiation energy presented on the tilted plane and put in the mathematical model improved the simulation of work of the entire solar installation

  7. Thermal effects investigation on electrical properties of silicon solar cells treated by laser irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Pourakbar Saffar; Bahman Deldadeh Barani

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we were investigated electrical properties of monocrystalline and polycrystalline silicon solar cells due to laser irradiation with 650 nm wavelength in two states, proximate irradiation and via optics setup. Thermal effect on the cell surface due to laser irradiation was investigated on electrical properties too. Electrical parameters investigation of solar cells illustrates cell excitement via laser irradiation and efficiency decreases due to cell surface temperature increase...

  8. Isotopic anomalies and proton irradiation in the early solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, D. D.; Dwek, E.; Woosley, S. E.

    1977-01-01

    Nuclear cross sections relevant to the various isotopic-abundance anomalies found in solar-system objects are evaluated in an attempt to set constraints on the hypothesized mechanism of irradiation of forming planetesimals by energetic protons from the young sun. A power-law proton spectrum is adopted, attention is restricted to proton energies less than about 20 MeV, and average cross sections are calculated for several reactions that might be expected to lead to the observed anomalies. The following specific anomalies are examined in detail: Al-26, Na-22, Xe-126, I-129, Kr-80, V-50, Nb-92, La-138, Ta-180, Hg-196, K-40, Ar-36, O-17, O-18, N-15, C-13, Li, Be, and B. It is suggested that the picture of presolar-grain carriers accounts for the facts more naturally than do irradiation models.

  9. Estimating Solar Irradiation Absorbed by Photovoltaic Panels with Low Concentration Located in Craiova, Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionel L. Alboteanu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Solar irradiation is one of the important parameters that should be taken into consideration for the design and utilization of a photovoltaic system. Usually, the input parameters of a photovoltaic system are solar irradiation, the ambient environment temperature and the wind speed, and as a consequence most photovoltaic systems are equipped with sensors for measuring these parameters. This paper presents several mathematical models for solar irradiation assessment. The starting point is represented by the mathematical model of extraterrestrial irradiation, and resulting finally in the model for solar irradiation, absorbed by a low concentration photovoltaic panel. These estimating models of solar irradiation have been particularized for the Craiova, Romania, and have been verified through numerical simulation. Regarding terrestrial solar irradiation, four mathematical models have been adopted, namely Adnot, Haurwitz, Kasten and Empirical (EIM. Of these, the most appropriate for the Craiova location were the models Adnot and Empirical. Consequently, for the calculation of the solar irradiation absorbed by the photovoltaic (PV panels with low concentration, these models have been taken into consideration. In this study, a comparative analysis was also carried out with respect to the solar irradiation absorbed by the PV panels without concentration and those with collectedness of the solar radiation. This analysis was based on the results of numerical simulation and experimental tests.

  10. Reconstruction of spectral solar irradiance since 1700 from simulated magnetograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasi-Espuig, M.; Jiang, J.; Krivova, N. A.; Solanki, S. K.; Unruh, Y. C.; Yeo, K. L.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: We present a reconstruction of the spectral solar irradiance since 1700 using the SATIRE-T2 (Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstructions for the Telescope era version 2) model. This model uses as input magnetograms simulated with a surface flux transport model fed with semi-synthetic records of emerging sunspot groups. Methods: The record of sunspot group areas and positions from the Royal Greenwich Observatory (RGO) is only available since 1874. We used statistical relationships between the properties of sunspot group emergence, such as the latitude, area, and tilt angle, and the sunspot cycle strength and phase to produce semi-synthetic sunspot group records starting in the year 1700. The semi-synthetic records are fed into a surface flux transport model to obtain daily simulated magnetograms that map the distribution of the magnetic flux in active regions (sunspots and faculae) and their decay products on the solar surface. The magnetic flux emerging in ephemeral regions is accounted for separately based on the concept of extended cycles whose length and amplitude are linked to those of the sunspot cycles through the sunspot number. The magnetic flux in each surface component (sunspots, faculae and network, and ephemeral regions) was used to compute the spectral and total solar irradiance (TSI) between the years 1700 and 2009. This reconstruction is aimed at timescales of months or longer although the model returns daily values. Results: We found that SATIRE-T2, besides reproducing other relevant observations such as the total magnetic flux, reconstructs the TSI on timescales of months or longer in good agreement with the PMOD composite of observations, as well as with the reconstruction starting in 1878 based on the RGO-SOON data. The model predicts an increase in the TSI of 1.2+0.2-0.3 Wm-2 between 1700 and the present. The spectral irradiance reconstruction is in good agreement with the UARS/SUSIM measurements as well as the Lyman-α composite. The

  11. Solar spectral irradiance and summary outputs using excel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffey, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The development of an Excel spreadsheet is described that calculates solar spectral irradiance between 290-3000 nm on an unshaded, horizontal surface under a cloudless sky at sea level, together with summary outputs such as global UV index, illuminance and percentage of energy in different wavebands. A deliberate goal of the project was to adopt the principle of Ockham's razor and to develop a model that is as simple as it can be commensurate with delivering results of adequate accuracy. Consequently, just four inputs are required-geographical latitude, month, day of month and time of day-resulting in a spreadsheet that is easily usable by anyone with an interest in sunlight and solar power irrespective of their background. The accuracy of the calculated data is sufficient for many applications where knowledge of the ultraviolet, visible and infrared levels in sunlight is of interest.

  12. Extreme ultraviolet solar irradiance during the rising phase of solar cycle 24 observed by PROBA2/LYRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zender Joe

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The Large-Yield Radiometer (LYRA is a radiometer that has monitored the solar irradiance at high cadence and in four pass bands since January 2010. Both the instrument and its spacecraft, PROBA2 (Project for OnBoard Autonomy, have several innovative features for space instrumentation, which makes the data reduction necessary to retrieve the long-term variations of solar irradiance more complex than for a fully optimized solar physics mission. In this paper, we describe how we compute the long-term time series of the two extreme ultraviolet irradiance channels of LYRA and compare the results with those of SDO/EVE. We find that the solar EUV irradiance has increased by a factor of 2 since the last solar minimum (between solar cycles 23 and 24, which agrees reasonably well with the EVE observations.

  13. The new climate data record of total and spectral solar irradiance: Current progress and future steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coddington, Odele; Lean, Judith; Rottman, Gary; Pilewskie, Peter; Snow, Martin; Lindholm, Doug

    2016-04-01

    We present a climate data record of Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) and Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI), with associated time and wavelength dependent uncertainties, from 1610 to the present. The data record was developed jointly by the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) at the University of Colorado Boulder and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) as part of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) Climate Data Record (CDR) Program, where the data record, source code, and supporting documentation are archived. TSI and SSI are constructed from models that determine the changes from quiet Sun conditions arising from bright faculae and dark sunspots on the solar disk using linear regression of proxies of solar magnetic activity with observations from the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM), Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM), and SOlar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE). We show that TSI can be separately modeled to within TIM's measurement accuracy from solar rotational to solar cycle time scales and we assume that SSI measurements are reliable on solar rotational time scales. We discuss the model formulation, uncertainty estimates, and operational implementation and present comparisons of the modeled TSI and SSI with the measurement record and with other solar irradiance models. We also discuss ongoing work to assess the sensitivity of the modeled irradiances to model assumptions, namely, the scaling of solar variability from rotational-to-cycle time scales and the representation of the sunspot darkening index.

  14. The SKA Mid-frequency All-sky Continuum Survey: Discovering the unexpected and transforming radio-astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Norris, Ray P; Brown, Michael; Carretti, Ettore; Kapinska, Anna D; Prandoni, Isabella; Rudnick, Lawrence; Seymour, Nick

    2014-01-01

    We show that, in addition to specific science goals, there is a strong case for conducting an all-sky (i.e. the visible 3-pi steradians) SKA continuum survey which does not fit neatly into conventional science cases. History shows that the greatest scientific impact of most major telescopes (e.g., HST, VLA) lies beyond the original goals used to justify the telescope. The design of the telescope therefore needs to maximise the ultimate scientific productivity, in addition to achieving the specific science goals. In this chapter, we show that an all-sky continuum survey is likely to achieve transformational science in two specific respects: (1) Discovering the unexpected (2) Transforming radio-astronomy from niche to mainstream

  15. GASS: The Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey. Update: improved correction for instrumental effects and new data release

    OpenAIRE

    Kalberla, Peter M. W.; Haud, Urmas

    2015-01-01

    The Galactic All-Sky Survey is a survey of Galactic atomic hydrogen emission in the southern sky observed with the Parkes 64-m Radio Telescope. The first data release (GASS I) concerned survey goals and observing techniques, the second release (GASS II) focused on stray radiation and instrumental corrections. We seek to remove the remaining instrumental effects and present a third data release. We use the HEALPix tessellation concept to grid the data on the sphere. Individual telescope record...

  16. The Mg 280-nm doublet as a monitor of changes in solar ultraviolet irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, D. F.; Schlesinger, B. M.

    1986-01-01

    Solar irradiance data gathered with the Nimbus 7 spacecraft from 1978-1985 are compared with atmospheric MG 289-nm doublet emission line data to evaluate the possibility of using the rotational line data to calculate the total solar UV input. The satellite instrumentation is described, including the calibration equipment and procedures. The spacecraft records solar irradiance once per day and the remainder of the time records irradiance scattered by the atmosphere. The measured irradiances are converted to equivalent brightness temperatures, which can be interpolated for specific layers of the atmosphere. Sample daily data are provided to illustrate the correlation between variations in the Mg-II core radiation and the soalr UV irradiance. Techniques are defined for correcting for periodic variations in instrument performance to quantify long-term solar UV radiance variations. Using the atmospheric Mg-II doublet radiation for measuring soalr UV irradiance is concluded of value for characterizing the effects of solar radiation on the atmosphere.

  17. A Limit on the Number of Isolated Neutron Stars Detected in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey Bright Source Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, Monica L; Letcavage, Ryan; Shevchuk, Andrew S H; Fox, Derek B

    2010-01-01

    Using new and archival observations made with the Swift satellite and other facilities, we examine 147 X-ray sources selected from the ROSAT All-Sky-Survey Bright Source Catalog (RASS/BSC) to produce a new limit on the number of isolated neutron stars (INSs) in the RASS/BSC, the most constraining such limit to-date. Independent of X-ray spectrum and variability, the number of INSs is <=48 (90% confidence). Restricting attention to soft (having an effective temperature of < 200 eV), non-variable X-ray sources -- as in a previous study -- yields an all-sky limit of <=31 INSs. In the course of our analysis, we identify five new high-quality INS candidates for targeted follow-up observations. A future all-sky X-ray survey with eROSITA, or another mission with similar capabilities, can be expected to increase the detected population of X-ray-discovered INSs from the 8 to 50 in the BSC, to (for a disk population) 240 to 1500, which will enable a more detailed study of neutron star population models.

  18. GASS: The Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey. II. Stray-Radiation Correction and Second Data Release

    CERN Document Server

    Kalberla, P M W; Pisano, D J; Calabretta, M R; Ford, H Alyson; Lockman, Felix J; Staveley-Smith, L; Kerp, J; Winkel, B; Murphy, T; Newton-McGee, K

    2010-01-01

    The Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey (GASS) is a survey of Galactic atomic hydrogen (HI) emission in the southern sky observed with the Parkes 64-m Radio Telescope. The first data release was published by McClure-Griffiths et al. (2009). We remove instrumental effects that affect the GASS and present the second data release. We calculate the stray-radiation by convolving the all-sky response of the Parkes antenna with the brightness temperature distribution from the Leiden/Argentine/Bonn (LAB) all sky 21-cm line survey, with major contributions from the 30-m dish of the Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomia (IAR) in the southern sky. Remaining instrumental baselines are corrected using the LAB data for a first guess of emission-free baseline regions. Radio frequency interference is removed by median filtering. After applying these corrections to the GASS we find an excellent agreement with the Leiden/Argentine/Bonn (LAB) survey. The GASS is the highest spatial resolution, most sensitive, and is currently the m...

  19. A free real-time hourly tilted solar irradiation data Website for Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Leloux, Jonathan; Narvarte Fernández, Luis; González Bonilla, Loreto

    2014-01-01

    The engineering of solar power applications, such as photovoltaic energy (PV) or thermal solar energy requires the knowledge of the solar resource available for the solar energy system. This solar resource is generally obtained from datasets, and is either measured by ground-stations, through the use of pyranometers, or by satellites. The solar irradiation data are generally not free, and their cost can be high, in particular if high temporal resolution is required, such as hourly data. In th...

  20. An evaluation of the correlation between open solar flux and total solar irradiance

    OpenAIRE

    Lockwood, Mike

    2002-01-01

    The correlation between the coronal source flux F_{S} and the total solar irradiance I_{TS} is re-evaluated in the light of an additional 5 years' data from the rising phase of solar cycle 23 and also by using cosmic ray fluxes detected at Earth. Tests on monthly averages show that the correlation with F_{S} deduced from the interplanetary magnetic field (correlation coefficient, r = 0.62) is highly significant (99.999%), but that there is insufficient data for the higher correlation with ann...

  1. Solar Irradiance and Pan Evaporation Estimation from Meteorological Satellite Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Ren Syu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge about spatial and temporal variations in surface global solar radiation (GSR and evaporative water loss from the ground are important issues to many researches and applications. In this study empirical relationships suitable for Taiwan were established for GSR retrieval from geostationary satellite images using the Heliosat method for the period from 2011 - 2013. The derived GSR data has been used to generate consecutive maps of 10-day averaged pan evaporation (Epan as the basis to produce regional ET estimation using a strategy that does not require remote sensed land surface temperatures (LST. The retrieved daily GSR and the derived 10-day averaged Epan were validated against pyranometer and class-A pan measurements at selected Central Weather Bureau (CWB stations spread across various climatic regions in Taiwan. Compared with the CWB observed data the overall relative mean bias deviations (MBD% and root mean square differences (RMSD% in daily solar irradiance retrieval were about 5 and 15%, respectively. Seasonally, the largest MBD% and RMSD% of retrieved daily solar irradiance occur in spring (9.5 and 21.3% on average, while the least MBD% (-0.3% on average and RMSD% (9.7% on average occur in autumn and winter, respectively. For 10-day averaged Epan estimation, the mean MBD% and RMSD% for stations located in the coastal plain areas were 0.1 and 16.9%, respectively. However, in mountainous areas the mean MBD% and RMSD% increased to 30.2 and 34.5%, respectively. This overestimation was due mainly to the large differences in surrounding micro-environments between the mountainous and plain areas.

  2. Short-term solar irradiation forecasting based on Dynamic Harmonic Regression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar power generation is a crucial research area for countries that have high dependency on fossil energy sources and is gaining prominence with the current shift to renewable sources of energy. In order to integrate the electricity generated by solar energy into the grid, solar irradiation must be reasonably well forecasted, where deviations of the forecasted value from the actual measured value involve significant costs. The present paper proposes a univariate Dynamic Harmonic Regression model set up in a State Space framework for short-term (1–24 h) solar irradiation forecasting. Time series hourly aggregated as the Global Horizontal Irradiation and the Direct Normal Irradiation will be used to illustrate the proposed approach. This method provides a fast automatic identification and estimation procedure based on the frequency domain. Furthermore, the recursive algorithms applied offer adaptive predictions. The good forecasting performance is illustrated with solar irradiance measurements collected from ground-based weather stations located in Spain. The results show that the Dynamic Harmonic Regression achieves the lowest relative Root Mean Squared Error; about 30% and 47% for the Global and Direct irradiation components, respectively, for a forecast horizon of 24 h ahead. - Highlights: • Solar irradiation forecasts at short-term are required to operate solar power plants. • This paper assesses the Dynamic Harmonic Regression to forecast solar irradiation. • Models are evaluated using hourly GHI and DNI data collected in Spain. • The results show that forecasting accuracy is improved by using the model proposed

  3. Characteristics of merging at the magnetopause inferred from dayside 557.7-nm all-sky images: IMF drivers of poleward moving auroral forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Maynard

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available We combine in situ measurements from Cluster with high-resolution 557.7 nm all-sky images from South Pole to investigate the spatial and temporal evolution of merging on the dayside magnetopause. Variations of 557.7 nm emissions were observed at a 6 s cadence at South Pole on 29 April 2003 while significant changes in the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF clock angle were reaching the magnetopause. Electrons energized at merging sites are the probable sources for 557.7 nm cusp emissions. At the same time Cluster was crossing the pre-noon cusp in the Northern Hemisphere. The combined observations confirm results of a previous study that merging events can occur at multiple sites simultaneously and vary asynchronously on time scales of 10 s to 3 min (Maynard et al., 2004. The intensity of the emissions and the merging rate appear to vary with changes in the IMF clock angle, IMF BX and the dynamic pressure of the solar wind. Most poleward moving auroral forms (PMAFs reflect responses to changes in interplanetary medium rather than to local processes. The changes in magnetopause position required by increases in dynamic pressure are mediated by merging and result in the generation of PMAFs. Small (15–20% variations in dynamic pressure of the solar wind are sufficient to launch PMAFs. Changes in IMF BX create magnetic flux compressions and rarefactions in the solar wind. Increases (decreases in IMF BX strengthens |B| near northern (southern hemisphere merging sites thereby enhancing merging rates and triggering PMAFs. When correlating responses in the two hemispheres, the presence of significant IMF BX also requires that different lag-times be applied to ACE measurements acquired ~0.1 AU upstream of Earth. Cluster observations set lag times for merging at Northern Hemisphere sites; post-noon optical emissions set times of Southern Hemisphere merging. All-sky images and

  4. Reconstructed Total Solar Irradiance as a precursor for long-term solar activity predictions: a nonlinear dynamics approach

    CERN Document Server

    Sello, S

    2012-01-01

    Total solar irradiance variations, about 0.1% between solar activity maximum and minimum, are available from accurate satellite measurements since 1978 and thus do not provide useful information on longer-term secular trends. Recently, Krivova et al., 2007 reconstructed, using suitable models, the total solar irradiance from the end of the Maunder minimum to the present, based on variations of the surface distribution of the solar magnetic field. The latter is calculated from the long historical record of the sunspot numbers using a simple but consistent physical model. There are many classes of proposed prediction methods for solar cycles behavior, based on different direct solar activity indices or on various valuable proxies. In particular, the precursor based methods, utilize a given proxy index to predict the future evolution of solar activity. Long-term time series of sunspot numbers, allow us to reliably predict the behavior of the next solar cycle, few years in advance. In previous papers we predicted...

  5. Thermal effects investigation on electrical properties of silicon solar cells treated by laser irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Pourakbar Saffar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we were investigated electrical properties of monocrystalline and polycrystalline silicon solar cells due to laser irradiation with 650 nm wavelength in two states, proximate irradiation and via optics setup. Thermal effect on the cell surface due to laser irradiation was investigated on electrical properties too. Electrical parameters investigation of solar cells illustrates cell excitement via laser irradiation and efficiency decreases due to cell surface temperature increase. Monocrystalline parameters change with uniform shape due to thermal effect and laser irradiation toward polycrystalline cells.

  6. Reference solar irradiance spectra and consequences of their disparities in remote sensing of the ocean colour

    OpenAIRE

    P. Shanmugam; Ahn, Y. H.

    2007-01-01

    Satellite ocean colour missions require a standard extraterrestrial solar irradiance spectrum in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) for use in the process of radiometric calibration, atmospheric correction and normalization of water-leaving radiances from in-situ measurements. There are numerous solar irradiance spectra (or models) currently in use within the ocean colour community and related domains. However, these irradiance spectra, constructed from single and/or multiple measurements se...

  7. All-Sky Earth Occultation Observations with the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A; Bhat, P N; Briggs, M S; Chaplin, V; Connaughton, V; Camero-Arranz, A; Case, G; Cherry, M; Rodi, J; Finger, M H; Jenke, P; Haynes, R H

    2009-01-01

    Using the Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on-board Fermi, we are monitoring the hard X-ray/soft gamma ray sky using the Earth occultation technique. Each time a source in our catalog enters or exits occultation by the Earth, we measure its flux using the change in count rates due to the occultation. Currently we are using CTIME data with 8 energy channels spanning 8 keV to 1 MeV for the GBM NaI detectors and spanning 150 keV to 40 MeV for the GBM BGO detectors. Our preliminary catalog consists of galactic X-ray binaries, the Crab Nebula, and active galactic nuclei. In addition, to Earth occultations, we have observed numerous occultations with Fermi's solar panels. We will present early results. Regularly updated results can be found on our website http://gammaray.nsstc.nasa.gov/gbm/science/occultation

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: WATCHDOG: an all-sky database of Galactic BHXBs (Tetarenko+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetarenko, B. E.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Heinke, C. O.; Gladstone, J. C.

    2016-03-01

    With the advent of more sensitive all-sky instruments, the transient universe is being probed in greater depth than ever before. Taking advantage of available resources, we have established a comprehensive database of black hole (and black hole candidate) X-ray binary (BHXB) activity between 1996 and 2015 as revealed by all-sky instruments, scanning surveys, and select narrow-field X-ray instruments on board the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL), Monitor of All-Sky X-ray Image (MAXI), Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), and Swift telescopes; the Whole-sky Alberta Time-resolved Comprehensive black-Hole Database Of the Galaxy or WATCHDOG. Over the past two decades, we have detected 132 transient outbursts, tracked and classified behavior occurring in 47 transient and 10 persistently accreting BHs, and performed a statistical study on a number of outburst properties across the Galactic population. We find that outbursts undergone by BHXBs that do not reach the thermally dominant accretion state make up a substantial fraction (~40%) of the Galactic transient BHXB outburst sample over the past ~20 years. Our findings suggest that this "hard-only" behavior, observed in transient and persistently accreting BHXBs, is neither a rare nor recent phenomenon and may be indicative of an underlying physical process, relatively common among binary BHs, involving the mass-transfer rate onto the BH remaining at a low level rather than increasing as the outburst evolves. We discuss how the larger number of these "hard-only" outbursts and detected outbursts in general have significant implications for both the luminosity function and mass-transfer history of the Galactic BHXB population. (9 data files).

  9. A New Climate Data Record of Solar Spectral Irradiance from 1610 to Present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coddington, O.; Lean, J.; Pilewskie, P.; Snow, M. A.; Lindholm, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    We present a climate data record of Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI), with associated time and wavelength dependent uncertainties, from 1610 to the present. The data record was developed jointly by the University of Colorado at Boulder's Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) as part of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) Climate Data Record (CDR) Program, where the data record, source code, and supporting documentation are archived. SSI is constructed from models that determine the changes from quiet Sun conditions arising from bright faculae and dark sunspots on the solar disk using linear regression of proxies of solar magnetic activity with observations from the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM); the measurements are assumed to be reliable on solar rotational time scales. We extend the SSI record to longer time scales by reproducing the integral of the SSI with independent measurements of Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) measurements made by the SORCE Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM); TSI can be separately modeled to within TIM's measurement accuracy from solar rotational to solar cycle time scales. We discuss the model formulation, uncertainty estimates, and operational implementation and present comparisons of the modeled SSI with the measurement record and with other solar irradiance models. We also discuss future work to improve the Solar Irradiance Climate Data Record with new measurements from the Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS), different proxy representations of sunspot darkening and facular brightening, including the improved composite record of Mg II index being developed as part of the European-led SOlar Irradiance Data exploitation (SOLID) project, and to expand the uncertainty estimates to include model assumptions.

  10. Detectability of active triangulation range finder: a solar irradiance approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huizhe; Gao, Jason; Bui, Viet Phuong; Liu, Zhengtong; Lee, Kenneth Eng Kian; Peh, Li-Shiuan; Png, Ching Eng

    2016-06-27

    Active triangulation range finders are widely used in a variety of applications such as robotics and assistive technologies. The power of the laser source should be carefully selected in order to satisfy detectability and still remain eye-safe. In this paper, we present a systematic approach to assess the detectability of an active triangulation range finder in an outdoor environment. For the first time, we accurately quantify the background noise of a laser system due to solar irradiance by coupling the Perez all-weather sky model and ray tracing techniques. The model is validated with measurements with a modeling error of less than 14.0%. Being highly generic and sufficiently flexible, the proposed model serves as a guide to define a laser system for any geographical location and microclimate.

  11. Retrieval of Garstang's emission function from all-sky camera images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocifaj, Miroslav; Solano Lamphar, Héctor Antonio; Kundracik, František

    2015-10-01

    The emission function from ground-based light sources predetermines the skyglow features to a large extent, while most mathematical models that are used to predict the night sky brightness require the information on this function. The radiant intensity distribution on a clear sky is experimentally determined as a function of zenith angle using the theoretical approach published only recently in MNRAS, 439, 3405-3413. We have made the experiments in two localities in Slovakia and Mexico by means of two digital single lens reflex professional cameras operating with different lenses that limit the system's field-of-view to either 180º or 167º. The purpose of using two cameras was to identify variances between two different apertures. Images are taken at different distances from an artificial light source (a city) with intention to determine the ratio of zenith radiance relative to horizontal irradiance. Subsequently, the information on the fraction of the light radiated directly into the upward hemisphere (F) is extracted. The results show that inexpensive devices can properly identify the upward emissions with adequate reliability as long as the clear sky radiance distribution is dominated by a largest ground-based light source. Highly unstable turbidity conditions can also make the parameter F difficult to find or even impossible to retrieve. The measurements at low elevation angles should be avoided due to a potentially parasitic effect of direct light emissions from luminaires surrounding the measuring site.

  12. Medium-Scale Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances and Plasma Bubbles Observed by an All-Sky Airglow Imager at Yonaguni, Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Tadahiko Ogawa; Yuichi Otsuka; Kazuo Shiokawa; Takuya Tsugawa; Akinori Saito; Kazuaki Hoshinoo; Keisuke Matunaga; Minoru Kubota; and Mamoru Ishii

    2009-01-01

    We report on night time air glow imaging observations of the low latitude ionosphere by means of a 630-m all-sky imager in stalled in March 2006 at Yonaguni, Japan _ _ _ geomagnetic), about 100 km east of Taiwan. The imager detected medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs) for about 7 hours on the night of 26 May 2006. A dense GPS net work in Japan also ob served the same MSTID event on this night. The imager and GEONET data indicate that most of the MSTIDs prop a gated south ...

  13. All-sky LIGO search for periodic gravitational waves in the early fifth-science-run data.

    OpenAIRE

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G; Amin, R.; Anderson, S.; Anderson, W.; Arain, M; Araya, M.; Armandula, H; Armor, P.; Aso, Y.; Aston, S

    2009-01-01

    We report on an all-sky search with the LIGO detectors for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range 50--1100 Hz and with the frequency's time derivative in the range -5.0E-9 Hz/s to zero. Data from the first eight months of the fifth LIGO science run (S5) have been used in this search, which is based on a semi-coherent method (PowerFlux) of summing strain power. Observing no evidence of periodic gravitational radiation, we report 95% confidence-level upper limits on radiation emitt...

  14. Planck 2013 results. XXI. Power spectrum and high-order statistics of the Planck all-sky Compton parameter map

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.;

    2014-01-01

    We have constructed the first all-sky map of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect by applying specifically tailored component separation algorithms to the 100 to 857 GHz frequency channel maps from the Planck survey. This map shows an obvious galaxy cluster tSZ signal that is well matched....... The measured tSZ power spectrum is consistent with that expected from the Planck catalogue of SZ sources, with clear evidence of additional signal from unresolved clusters and, potentially, diffuse warm baryons. Marginalized band-powers of the Planck tSZ power spectrum and the best-fit model are given. The non...

  15. A long-term observation of 4U 1700-37 by the granat/watch all-sky monitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sazonov, S.; Lapshov, I.; Sunyaev, R.;

    1995-01-01

    We present the results of the observations of the X-ray source 4U 1700-37 by the WATCH all-sky monitor on GRANAT during the period 1991 to 1992. We have reconstructed light curves of 4U 1700-37 in two energy bands which prove the strong variability of the source's intensity on various time scales....... The light curve having been folded with the orbital period clearly reveals a dependence of the source's intensity upon the orbital phase. This dependence can be explained by scattering and absorption of photons in the stellar wind of the massive optical companion. We interpret the X-ray light curves...

  16. Solar Spectral Irradiance as observed by LYRA/PROBA2 and PREMOS/PICARD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cessateur, G.; Shapiro, A. I.; Dominique, M.; Kretzschmar, M.; Krivova, N.; Shapiro, A. V.; Schmutz, W.; Schoell, M.; Solanki, S.; Tagirov, R.; Thuillier, G.; Wehrli, C.; Yeo, K. L.

    2012-04-01

    Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance are key input parameters to atmospheric/oceanic and space weather models. Both vary on time-scales ranging from days to millennia, although a complete picture of the solar irradiance variability is still missing. The recent launch of two European missions PROBA-2 with LYRA radiometer onboard and PICARD with PREMOS package onboard provides therefore valuable information and nourishes theoretical models. Both instruments covers the solar spectrum from the EUV to near-infrared. Here we present spectral solar irradiance data from these two recent missions. After a proper correction of the degradation and non-solar signatures, we compare these data with those from the VIRGO/SOHO and SOLSTICE+SIM/SORCE experiments. Both LYRA and PREMOS have also observed several solar eclipses, which allows us to accurately retrieve the center-to-limb variations (CLVs) of the quiet Sun's brightness at the wavelengths of the corresponding channels. CLVs play indeed an important role in modelling of the solar irradiance variability. We show that calculations with the published COde for Solar Irradiance (COSI) yield CLVs that are in good agreement with measurements. Finally we use COSI to model the variability of the irradiance, assuming that the latter is determined by the evolution of the solar surface magnetic field as seen with SDO/HMI data. These theoretical results are compared to PREMOS and LYRA measurements.

  17. An algorithm to evaluate solar irradiance and effective dose rates using spectral UV irradiance at four selected wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper shows a semi-analytical method for environmental and dosimetric applications to evaluate, in clear sky conditions, the solar irradiance and the effective dose rates for some action spectra using only four spectral irradiance values at selected wavelengths in the UV-B and UV-A regions (305, 320, 340 and 380 nm). The method, named WL4UV, is based on the reconstruction of an approximated spectral irradiance that can be integrated, to obtain the solar irradiance, or convoluted with an action spectrum to obtain an effective dose rate. The parameters required in the algorithm are deduced from archived solar spectral irradiance data. This database contains measurements carried out by some Brewer spectrophotometers located in various geographical positions, at similar altitudes, with very different environmental characteristics: Rome (Italy), Ny Aalesund (Svalbard Islands (Norway)) and Ushuaia (Tierra del Fuego (Argentina)). To evaluate the precision of the method, a double test was performed with data not used in developing the model. Archived Brewer measurement data, in clear sky conditions, from Rome and from the National Science Foundation UV data set in San Diego (CA, USA) and Ushuaia, where SUV 100 spectro-radiometers operate, were drawn randomly. The comparison of measured and computed irradiance has a relative deviation of about ±2%. The effective dose rates for action spectra of Erythema, DNA and non-Melanoma skin cancer have a relative deviation of less than ∼20% for solar zenith angles <50 deg.. (authors)

  18. An algorithm to evaluate solar irradiance and effective dose rates using spectral UV irradiance at four selected wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anav, A; Rafanelli, C; Di Menno, I; Di Menno, M

    2004-01-01

    The paper shows a semi-analytical method for environmental and dosimetric applications to evaluate, in clear sky conditions, the solar irradiance and the effective dose rates for some action spectra using only four spectral irradiance values at selected wavelengths in the UV-B and UV-A regions (305, 320, 340 and 380 nm). The method, named WL4UV, is based on the reconstruction of an approximated spectral irradiance that can be integrated, to obtain the solar irradiance, or convoluted with an action spectrum to obtain an effective dose rate. The parameters required in the algorithm are deduced from archived solar spectral irradiance data. This database contains measurements carried out by some Brewer spectrophotometers located in various geographical positions, at similar altitudes, with very different environmental characteristics: Rome (Italy), Ny Alesund (Svalbard Islands, Norway) and Ushuaia (Tierra del Fuego, Argentina). To evaluate the precision of the method, a double test was performed with data not used in developing the model. Archived Brewer measurement data, in clear sky conditions, from Rome and from the National Science Foundation UV data set in San Diego (CA, USA) and Ushuaia, where SUV 100 spectroradiometers operate, were drawn randomly. The comparison of measured and computed irradiance has a relative deviation of about +/-2%. The effective dose rates for action spectra of Erythema, DNA and non-Melanoma skin cancer have a relative deviation of less than approximately 20% for solar zenith angles <50 degrees . PMID:15266087

  19. The BANYAN All-Sky Survey for Brown Dwarf Members of Young Moving Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Gagné, Jonathan; Doyon, René; Faherty, Jacqueline K; Malo, Lison; Cruz, Kelle L; Artigau, Étienne; Burgasser, Adam J; Naud, Marie-Eve; Bouchard, Sandie; Gizis, John E; Albert, Loïc

    2015-01-01

    We describe in this work the BASS survey for brown dwarfs in young moving groups of the solar neighborhood, and summarize the results that it generated. These include the discovery of the 2MASS J01033563-5515561 (AB)b and 2MASS J02192210-3925225 B young companions near the deuterium-burning limit as well as 44 new low-mass stars and 69 new brown dwarfs with a spectroscopically confirmed low gravity. Among those, ~20 have estimated masses within the planetary regime, one is a new L4 $\\gamma$ bona fide member of AB Doradus, three are TW Hydrae candidates with later spectral types (L1-L4) than all of its previously known members and six are among the first contenders to low-gravity $\\geq$ L5 $\\beta$/$\\gamma$ brown dwarfs, reminiscent of WISEP J004701.06+680352.1, PSO J318.5338-22.8603 and VHS J125601.92-125723.9 b. Finally, we describe a future version of this survey, BASS-Ultracool, that will specifically target $\\geq$ L5 candidate members of young moving groups. First experimentations in designing the survey h...

  20. Parameterization of atmospheric long-wave emissivity in a mountainous site for all sky conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Herrero

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Long-wave radiation is an important component of the energy balance of the Earth's surface. The downward component, emitted by the clouds and aerosols in the atmosphere, is rarely measured, and is still not well understood. In mountainous areas, the models existing for its estimation through the emissivity of the atmosphere do not give good results, and worse still in the presence of clouds. In order to estimate this emissivity for any atmospheric state and in a mountainous site, we related it to the screen-level values of temperature, relative humidity and solar radiation. This permitted the obtaining of: (1 a new set of parametric equations and (2 the modification of the Brutsaert's equation for cloudy skies through the calibration of C factor to 0.34 and the parameterization of the cloud index N. Both fitted to the surface data measured at a weather station at a height of 2500 m a.s.l. in Sierra Nevada, Spain. This study analyzes separately three significant atmospheric states related to cloud cover, which were also deduced from the screen-level meteorological data. Clear and totally overcast skies are accurately represented by the new parametric expressions, while the intermediate situations corresponding to partly clouded skies, concentrate most of the dispersion in the measurements and, hence, the error in the simulation. Thus, the modeling of atmospheric emissivity is greatly improved thanks to the use of different equations for each atmospheric state.

  1. An All Sky Extrasolar Planet Survey with new generation multiple object Doppler instruments at Sloan telescope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Ge

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available La Exploración de Planetas Extrasolares de Todo el Cielo (ASEPS utilizara el telescopio Sloan de 2.5-m de campo amplio y la nueva generación de instrumentos Doppler de objetos múltiples de alto rendimiento con el fin de emprender una exploración Doppler a gran escala en las bandas del visibles e IR cercano de hasta 250,000 estrellas relativamente brillantes (V < 13 y J < 11 y para planetas extrasolares entre 2008-2013. Una exploración continuada hasta 2020 podrá explorar 250,000 estrellas adicionales y obtener información sobre planetas de periodo largo, posiblemente detectando muchos análogos solares. El objetivo de ASEPS es el de incrementar el número de planetas extrasolares en casi dos órdenes de magnitud (hasta 10,000 planetas durante 12 años utilizando todas las noches despejadas. Este incremento tan dramático en el número de planetas conocidos permitirá estudiar mejor las correlaciones entre las diversas propiedades de planetas extrasolares. Además, el gran número de descubrimientos de planetas permitirá detectar planetas raros que pudieron haber quedado fuera de búsquedas previas, así como también planetas en tránsito, y sistemas de planetas múltiples que interactúan entre sí.

  2. Reconstruction of total solar irradiance 1974-2009

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, W T; Krivova, N A; Solanki, S; Wenzler, T; Mortlock, D J; Jaffe, A H

    2012-01-01

    Context: The study of variations in total solar irradiance (TSI) is important for understanding how the Sun affects the Earth's climate. Aims: Full-disk continuum images and magnetograms are now available for three full solar cycles. We investigate how modelled TSI compares with direct observations by building a consistent modelled TSI dataset. The model, based only on changes in the photospheric magnetic flux can then be tested on rotational, cyclical and secular timescales. Methods: We use Kitt Peak and SoHO/MDI continuum images and magnetograms in the SATIRE-S model to reconstruct TSI over cycles 21-23. To maximise independence from TSI composites, SORCE/TIM TSI data are used to fix the one free parameter of the model. We compare and combine the separate data sources for the model to estimate an uncertainty on the reconstruction and prevent any additional free parameters entering the model. Results: The reconstruction supports the PMOD composite as being the best historical record of TSI observations, alth...

  3. Automatic fault detection on BIPV systems without solar irradiation data

    CERN Document Server

    Leloux, Jonathan; Luna, Alberto; Desportes, Adrien

    2014-01-01

    BIPV systems are small PV generation units spread out over the territory, and whose characteristics are very diverse. This makes difficult a cost-effective procedure for monitoring, fault detection, performance analyses, operation and maintenance. As a result, many problems affecting BIPV systems go undetected. In order to carry out effective automatic fault detection procedures, we need a performance indicator that is reliable and that can be applied on many PV systems at a very low cost. The existing approaches for analyzing the performance of PV systems are often based on the Performance Ratio (PR), whose accuracy depends on good solar irradiation data, which in turn can be very difficult to obtain or cost-prohibitive for the BIPV owner. We present an alternative fault detection procedure based on a performance indicator that can be constructed on the sole basis of the energy production data measured at the BIPV systems. This procedure does not require the input of operating conditions data, such as solar ...

  4. Numerical modeling of solar irradiance on earth's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mera, E.; Gutierez, L.; Da Silva, L.; Miranda, E.

    2016-05-01

    Modeling studies and estimation of solar radiation in base area, touch from the problems of estimating equation of time, distance equation solar space, solar declination, calculation of surface irradiance, considering that there are a lot of studies you reported the inability of these theoretical equations to be accurate estimates of radiation, many authors have proceeded to make corrections through calibrations with Pyranometers field (solarimeters) or the use of satellites, this being very poor technique last because there a differentiation between radiation and radiant kinetic effects. Because of the above and considering that there is a weather station properly calibrated ground in the Susques Salar in the Jujuy Province, Republic of Argentina, proceeded to make the following modeling of the variable in question, it proceeded to perform the following process: 1. Theoretical Modeling, 2. graphic study of the theoretical and actual data, 3. Adjust primary calibration data through data segmentation on an hourly basis, through horizontal and adding asymptotic constant, 4. Analysis of scatter plot and contrast series. Based on the above steps, the modeling data obtained: Step One: Theoretical data were generated, Step Two: The theoretical data moved 5 hours, Step Three: an asymptote of all negative emissivity values applied, Solve Excel algorithm was applied to least squares minimization between actual and modeled values, obtaining new values of asymptotes with the corresponding theoretical reformulation of data. Add a constant value by month, over time range set (4:00 pm to 6:00 pm). Step Four: The modeling equation coefficients had monthly correlation between actual and theoretical data ranging from 0.7 to 0.9.

  5. A study on proton irradiation effects of home-made solar cell for space use

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Rong; Zhang Xin Hui; Guo Zeng Liang; Zhai Zuo Xu

    2001-01-01

    The proton irradiation effects of Si solar cell and GaAs/Ge solar cell for space use are studied. The cells are irradiated by protons with an energy of 10 MeV at fluences ranging from 1 x 10 sup 9 to 5 x 10 sup 1 sup 3 cm sup - sup 2 , and then photovoltaic properties are measured at AMO. It is shown that the degradation of electric performances of two kinds of solar cells is different as proton irradiation fluence increases. The electric parameters I sub s sub c and P sub m sub a sub x of GaAs/Ge solar cell degrade slower than that of Si solar cell under 3 x 10 sup 1 sup 2 cm sup - sup 2 , but degrade rapidly above 3 x 10 sup 1 sup 2 cm sup - sup 2 , and the irradiation tolerance of GaAs/Ge solar cell is better than that of Si solar cell. The degradation of the performance is related to proton irradiation-induced defects E sub c -0.41 eV in irradiated GaAs/Ge cell, and E sub v + 0.14 eV and E sub v + 0.43 eV in irradiated Si cell

  6. Stereoscopic determination of all-sky altitude map of aurora using two ground-based Nikon DSLR cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kataoka

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A new stereoscopic measurement technique is developed to obtain an all-sky altitude map of aurora using two ground-based digital single-lens reflex (DSLR cameras. Two identical full-color all-sky cameras were set with an 8 km separation across the Chatanika area in Alaska (Poker Flat Research Range and Aurora Borealis Lodge to find localized emission height with the maximum correlation of the apparent patterns in the localized pixels applying a method of the geographical coordinate transform. It is found that a typical ray structure of discrete aurora shows the broad altitude distribution above 100 km, while a typical patchy structure of pulsating aurora shows the narrow altitude distribution of less than 100 km. Because of its portability and low cost of the DSLR camera systems, the new technique may open a unique opportunity not only for scientists but also for night-sky photographers to complementarily attend the aurora science to potentially form a dense observation network.

  7. Seed germination of Stenocereus thurberi (Cactaceae) under different solar irradiation levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germination of Stenocereus thurberi seeds was evaluated under different conditions of solar irradiation and humidity. Seed germination increased under higher humidity and low solar irradiation which provided cooler temperatures and higher water availability. Seedlings were also greener and more turgid under these conditions. Increased solar irradiation reduced seed germination and decreased seedling size and water content. The results of this study support the importance of natural shelter systems in the arid zones in providing better conditions for S. thurberi seeds germination and seedling establishment, particularly in the desert of Baja California. (author)

  8. Theoretical Study of the Influence of Irradiation on a Silicon Solar Cell Under Multispectral Illumination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Ould El Moujtaba

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to demonstrate the effects of particles irradiation on the silicon solar cell properties. A theoretical study of a silicon solar cell under multispectral illumination and particles (electrons, protons… irradiationis presented. The relative density is presented and we show that the space charge region width depend on the irradiation parameters (energy and nature especially. We also pointed out the influence of the irradiation on the following parameters: the photocurrent density, the open circuit voltage, the fill factor, the conversion efficiency, the shunt and series resistances and the diffusion capacitance of the solar cell.

  9. Probabilistic forecasting of the solar irradiance with recursive ARMA and GARCH models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    David, M.; Ramahatana, F.; Trombe, Pierre-Julien;

    2016-01-01

    of the grid-connected storage systems. If numerous methods for forecasting the mean of the solar irradiance were recently developed, there are only few works dedicated to the evaluation of prediction intervals associated to these point forecasts. Time series of solar irradiance and more specifically of clear...... sky index show some similarities with that of financial time series. The aim of this paper is to assess the performances of a commonly used combination of two linear models (ARMA and GARCH) in econometrics in order to provide probabilistic forecasts of solar irradiance. In addition, a recursive...

  10. First observations of SBAS/WAAS scintillations: Using collocated scintillation measurements and all-sky images to study equatorial plasma bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledvina, B. M.; Makela, J. J.

    2005-07-01

    The first observations of amplitude scintillations on a Space Based Augmentation System (SBAS) satellite signal are presented. The scintillations occurred on the signal transmitted by a Wide Area Augmentation Satellite (WAAS) on 8-9 September 2004 from 2250-0045 LT. The GPS receiver that measured the scintillations is located on Haleakala, Hawaii (geomagnetic: 21.3°N, 271.4°E). With a maximum S4 = 0.35, corresponding to a peak-to-peak SNR variation of 8 dB, the scintillations are relatively weak, which is to be expected for a site poleward of the equatorial anomaly during declining solar conditions. Using a collocated all-sky imager, features of the irregularity structuring in the equatorial plasma bubbles are resolved. The satellite signals scintillate when the ray path intersects the three main bubbles. The scintillation intensity tends to peak near the walls, and decreases slightly in the interior of the bubbles. In this case, the bubbles' leading (east) walls contain smaller-scale-size irregularities than the trailing (west) walls.

  11. A new approach to the long-term reconstruction of the solar irradiance leads to large historical solar forcing

    OpenAIRE

    Shapiro, A. I.; Schmutz, W.; Rozanov, E.; Schoell, M.; Haberreiter, M.; Shapiro, A. V.; Nyeki, S.

    2011-01-01

    The variable Sun is the most likely candidate for natural forcing of past climate change on time scales of 50 to 1000 years. Evidence for this understanding is that the terrestrial climate correlates positively with solar activity. During the past 10,000 years, the Sun has experienced substantial variations in activity and there have been numerous attempts to reconstruct solar irradiance. While there is general agreement on how solar forcing varied during the last several hundred years --- al...

  12. Solar EUV irradiance derived from a sounding rocket experiment on November 10, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, T.N.; Rottman, G.J. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder (United States))

    1990-05-01

    The solar EUV irradiance from 30 to 100 nm was obtained from a sounding rocket experiment launched from the White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, on November 10, 1988. This measurement will be used to cross calibrate the Airglow-Solar Spectrometer Instrument on the San Marco D/L satellite. The solar EUV spectrograph had pre- and post-flight photometric calibrations with an average uncertainty of 6% at the Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The observed solar EUV irradiance is about 20% less than the solar EUV flux from a proxy model based on the daily 10.7-cm solar flux (F{sub 10.7}) and its 81-day mean () and the AE-E solar EUV data taken in the 1970's. This measurement was obtained during the ascending phase of the solar cycle 22, while the AE-E data were obtained during the ascending phase of solar cycle 21. Measurements of the solar Lyman {alpha} irradiance at 121.6 nm were also obtained with an nitric oxide ionization cell. The derived Lyman {alpha} flux is 3.30 {plus minus} 0.5 ({times} 10{sup 11} photons s{sup {minus}1} cm{sup {minus}2}) as compared to 3.35 {plus minus} 0.3 derived from the Solar Mesospheric Explorer solar data on November 10, 1988.

  13. Solar irradiance at the earth's surface: long-term behavior observed at the South Pole

    OpenAIRE

    J. E. Frederick; A. L. Hodge

    2011-01-01

    This research examines a 17-year database of UV-A (320–400 nm) and visible (400–600 nm) solar irradiance obtained by a scanning spectroradiometer located at the South Pole. The goal is to define the variability in solar irradiance reaching the polar surface, with emphasis on the influence of cloudiness and on identifying systematic trends and possible links to the solar cycle. To eliminate changes associated with the varying solar elevation, the analysis focuses on data averaged over 30–35 da...

  14. Banks of templates for all-sky narrow-band searches of gravitational waves from spinning neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Pisarski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    We construct efficient banks of templates suitable for all-sky narrow-band searches of almost monochromatic gravitational waves originating from spinning neutron stars in our Galaxy in data collected by interferometric detectors. We thus assume that both the position of the gravitational-wave source in the sky and the wave's frequency together with spindown parameters are unknown. In the construction we employ simplified model of the signal with constant amplitude and phase which is a linear function of unknown parameters. All our template banks enable usage of the fast Fourier transform algorithm in the computation of the maximum-likelihood $\\mathcal{F}$-statistic for nodes of the grids defining the bank and fulfill an additional constraint needed to resample the data to barycentric time efficiently. Our template banks are suitable for larger range of search parameters than the banks previously proposed and compared to them they have smaller thicknesses for certain values of search parameters.

  15. Probing the Dark Ages at Z~20: The SCI-HI 21 cm All-Sky Spectrum Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Voytek, Tabitha C; Jauregui-Garcia, Jose Miguel; Peterson, Jeffrey B; Lopez-Cruz, Omar

    2013-01-01

    We present first results from the SCI-HI experiment, which we used to measure the all-sky-averaged \\cm brightness temperature in the redshift range 14.8

  16. GASS: The Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey. Update: improved correction for instrumental effects and new data release

    CERN Document Server

    Kalberla, Peter M W

    2015-01-01

    The Galactic All-Sky Survey is a survey of Galactic atomic hydrogen emission in the southern sky observed with the Parkes 64-m Radio Telescope. The first data release (GASS I) concerned survey goals and observing techniques, the second release (GASS II) focused on stray radiation and instrumental corrections. We seek to remove the remaining instrumental effects and present a third data release. We use the HEALPix tessellation concept to grid the data on the sphere. Individual telescope records are compared with averages on the nearest grid position for significant deviations. All averages are also decomposed into Gaussian components with the aim of segregating unacceptable solutions. Improved priors are used for an iterative baseline fitting and cleaning. In the last step we generate 3-D FITS data cubes and examine them for remaining problems. We have removed weak, but systematic baseline offsets with an improved baseline fitting algorithm. We have unraveled correlator failures that cause time dependent oscil...

  17. First all-sky upper limits from LIGO on the strength of periodic gravitational waves using the Hough transform

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Ageev, A; Agresti, J; Allen, B; Allen, J; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Asiri, F; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Balasubramanian, R; Ballmer, S; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barnes, M; Barr, B; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Beausoleil, R; Belczynski, K; Bennett, R; Berukoff, S J; Betzwieser, J; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Bland, B; Bochner, B; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burgess, R; Busby, D; Butler, W E; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cantley, C A; Cardenas, L; Carter, K; Casey, M M; Castiglione, J; Chandler, A; Chapsky, J; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chickarmane, V; Chin, D; Christensen, N; Churches, D; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C; Coldwell, R; Coles, M; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crooks, D R M; Csatorday, P; Cusack, B J; Cutler, C; Dalrymple, J; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; Daw, E; De Bra, D; Delker, T; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S V; Di Credico, A; Díaz, M; Ding, H; Drever, R W P; Dupuis, R J; Edlund, J A; Ehrens, P; Elliffe, E J; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fallnich, C; Farnham, D; Fejer, M M; Findley, T; Fine, M; Finn, L S; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Ganezer, K S; Garofoli, J; Giaime, J A; Gillespie, A; Goda, K; Goggin, L; González, G; Gossler, S; Grandclément, P; Grant, A; Gray, C; Gretarsson, A M; Grimmett, D; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, E; Gustafson, R; Hamilton, W O; Hammond, M; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Harms, J; Harry, G; Hartunian, A; Heefner, J; Hefetz, Y; Heinzel, G; Heng, I S; Hennessy, M; Hepler, N; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hindman, N; Hoang, P; Hough, J; Hrynevych, M; Hua, W; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jennrich, O; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Johnston, W R; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, L; Jungwirth, D; Kalogera, V; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kells, W; Kern, J; Khan, A; Killbourn, S; Killow, C J; Kim, C; King, C; King, P; Klimenko, S; Koranda, S; Kotter, K; Kovalik, Yu; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Landry, M; Langdale, J; Lantz, B; Lawrence, R; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lindquist, P; Liu, S; Logan, J; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Luna, M; Lyons, T T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majid, W; Malec, M; Mandic, V; Mann, F; Marin, A; Marka, S; Maros, E; Mason, J; Mason, K; Matherny, O; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McHugh, M; McNabb, J W C; Melissinos, A C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C; Mikhailov, E; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Miyoki, S; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Murray, P; Myers, E; Myers, J; Nagano, S; Nash, T; Nayak, R; Newton, G; Nocera, F; Noel, J S; Nutzman, P; Olson, T; O'Reilly, B; Ottaway, D J; Ottewill, A; Ouimette, D A; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Parameswaran, A J; Parameswariah, C; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pitkin, M; Plissi, M; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rakhmanov, M; Rao, S R; Rawlins, K; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Redding, D; Regehr, M W; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reilly, K T; Reithmaier, K; Reitze, D H; Richman, S; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Rizzi, A; Robertson, D I; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robison, L; Roddy, S; Rodríguez, A; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Rong, H; Rose, D; Rotthoff, E; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Salzman, I; Sandberg, V; Sanders, G H; Sannibale, V; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sazonov, A; Schilling, R; Schlaufman, K; Schmidt, V; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Seader, S E; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seel, S; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shapiro, C A; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Shu, Q Z; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sievers, L; Sigg, D; Sintes, A M; Smith, J R; Smith, M; Smith, M R; Sneddon, P H; Spero, R; Spjeld, O; Stapfer, G; Steussy, D; Strain, K A; Strom, D; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T; Sumner, M C; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Sylvestre, J; Takamori, A; Tanner, D B; Tariq, H; Taylor, I; Taylor, R; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Tibbits, M; Tilav, S; Tinto, M; Tokmakov,K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Ungarelli, C; Vallisneri, M; Van Putten, M H P M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Wallace, L; Walther, H; Ward, H; Ward, R; Ware, B; Watts, K; Webber, D; Weidner, A; Weiland, U; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Welling, H; Wen, L; Wen, S; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wiley, S; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, P R; Williams, R; Willke, B; Wilson, A; Winjum, B J; Winkler, W; Wise, S; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Woods, D; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Wu, W; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yoshida, S; Zaleski, K D; Zanolin, M; Zawischa, I; Zhang, L; Zhu, R; Zotov, N P; Zucker, M; Zweizig, J

    2005-01-01

    We perform a wide parameter space search for continuous gravitational waves over the whole sky and over a large range of values of the frequency and the first spin-down parameter. Our search method is based on the Hough transform, which is a semi-coherent, computationally efficient, and robust pattern recognition technique. We apply this technique to data from the second science run of the LIGO detectors and our final results are all-sky upper limits on the strength of gravitational waves emitted by unknown isolated spinning neutron stars on a set of narrow frequency bands in the range 200-$400 $Hz. The best upper limit on the gravitational wave strain amplitude that we obtain in this frequency range is $4.43\\times 10^{-23}$.

  18. SORCE SIM Level 3 Solar Spectral Irradiance Daily Means V020

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SORCE SIM Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) data product SOR3SIMD is constructed using measurements from the SIM instruments, which are combined into merged daily...

  19. SORCE SOLSTICE FUV Level 3 Solar Spectral Irradiance Daily Means V013

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SORCE SOLSTICE Far-UV Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) data product SOR3SOLFUVD is constructed using measurements from the SOLSTICE FUV instrument, which are...

  20. SORCE SOLSTICE MUV Level 3 Solar Spectral Irradiance Daily Means V013

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SORCE SOLSTICE Mid-UV Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) data product SOR3SOLMUVD is constructed using measurements from the SOLSTICE MUV instrument, which are...

  1. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Total Solar Irradiance (TSI), NRLTSI Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Climate Data Record (CDR) contains total solar irradiance (TSI) as a function of time created with the Naval Research Laboratory model for spectral and total...

  2. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI), NRLSSI Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Climate Data Record (CDR) contains solar spectral irradiance (SSI) as a function of time and wavelength created with the Naval Research Laboratory model for...

  3. SORCE SOLSTICE FUV Level 3 Solar Spectral Irradiance Daily Means V012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SORCE SOLSTICE Far-UV Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) data product SOR3SOLFUVD is constructed using measurements from the SOLSTICE FUV instrument, which are...

  4. SORCE SIM Level 3 Solar Spectral Irradiance Daily Means V019

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SORCE SIM Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) data product SOR3SIMD is constructed using measurements from the SIM instruments, which are combined into merged daily...

  5. SORCE SOLSTICE MUV Level 3 Solar Spectral Irradiance Daily Means V012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SORCE SOLSTICE Mid-UV Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) data product SOR3SOLMUVD is constructed using measurements from the SOLSTICE MUV instrument, which are...

  6. Statistical Comparison of Gravity Wave Characteristics Obtained from Airglow All-Sky Observation at Mt. Bohyun, Korea and Shigaraki, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tae-Yong; Kwak, Young-Sil; Kim, Yong-Ha

    2015-12-01

    Previously, all-sky airglow images observed at Shigaraki (34.9° N, 136.1° E), Japan, during 2004 and 2005 were analyzed in relation to those observed at Mt. Bohyun (36.2° N, 128.9° E) for a comparison of their gravity wave characteristics (Kim et al. 2010). By applying the same selection criteria of waves and cloud coverages as in the case of Mt. Bohyun all-sky images, we derived apparent wavelengths, periods, phase velocities, and monthly occurrence rates of gravity waves at Shigaraki in this study. The distributions of wavelengths, periods, and speeds derived for Shigaraki were found to be roughly similar to those for Mt. Bohyun. However, the overall occurrence rates of gravity waves at Shigaraki were 36% and 34% for OI 557.7 nm and OH Meinel band airglow layers, respectively, which were significantly higher than those at Mt. Bohyun. The monthly occurrence rates did not show minima near equinox months, unlike those for Mt. Bohyun. Furthermore, the seasonal preferential directions that were clearly apparent for Mt. Bohyun were not seen in the wave propagation trends for Shigaraki. These differences between the two sites imply different origins of the gravity waves near the Korean peninsula and the Japanese islands. The gravity waves over the Japanese islands may originate from sources at various altitudes; therefore, wind filtering may not be effective in causing any seasonal preferential directions in the waves in the airglow layers. Our analysis of the Shigaraki data supports recent theoretical studies, according to which gravity waves can be generated from in situ sources, such as mesosphere wind shear or secondary wave formation, in the mesosphere.

  7. The Variability of Solar Spectral Irradiance and Solar Surface Indices Through the Solar Activity Cycles 21-23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniz Goker, Umit

    2016-07-01

    A study of variations of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) in the wavelength ranges 121.5 nm-300.5 nm for the period 1981-2009 is presented. We used various data for ultraviolet (UV) spectral lines and international sunspot number (ISSN) from interactive data centers as SME (NSSDC), UARS (GDAAC), SORCE (LISIRD) and SIDC, respectively. We developed a special software for extracting the data and reduced this data by using the MATLAB. In this respect, we revealed negative correlations of intensities of UV (289.5 nm-300.5 nm) emission lines originating in the solar chromosphere with the ISSN index during the unusually prolonged minimum between the solar cycles (SCs) 23 and 24. We also compared our results with the ground-based telescopes as Solar Irradiance Platform, Stanford Data (SFO), Kodaikanal Data (KKL) and NGDC Homepage (Rome and Learmonth Solar Observatories). We studied the variations of total solar irradiance (TSI), magnetic field, sunspots/sunspot groups, Ca II K-flux, faculae and plage areas data with these ground-based telescopes, respectively. We reduced the selected data using the Phyton programming language and plot with the IDL programme. Therefore, we found that there was a decrease in the area of bright faculae and chromospheric plages while the percentage of dark faculae and plage decrease, as well. However, these decreases mainly occurred in small sunspots, contrary to this, these terms in large sunspot groups were comparable to previous SCs or even larger. Nevertheless, negative correlations between ISSN and SSI data indicate that these emissions are in close connection with the classes of sunspots/sunspot groups and "PLAGE" regions. Finally, we applied the time series of the chemical elements correspond to the wavelengths 121.5 nm-300.5 nm and compared with the ISSN data. We found an unexpected increasing in the 298.5 nm for the Fe II element. The variability of Fe II (298.5 nm) is in close connection with the plage regions and the sizes of the

  8. Solar EUV irradiance from the San Marco ASSI - A reference spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtke, Gerhard; Woods, Thomas N.; Worden, John; Rottman, Gary J.; Doll, Harry; Wita, Claus; Solomon, Stanley C.

    1992-11-01

    The only satellite measurement of the solar EUV irradiance during solar cycle 22 has been obtained with the Airglow Solar Spectrometer Instrument (ASSI) aboard the San Marco 5 satellite flown in 1988. The ASSI in-flight calibration parameters are established by using the internal capabilities of ASSI and by comparing ASSI results to the results from other space-based experiments on the ASSI calibration rocket and the Solar Mesospheric Explorer (SME). A solar EUV irradiance spectrum derived from ASSI observations on November 10, 1988 is presented as a reference spectrum for moderate solar activity for the aeronomy community. This ASSI spectrum should be considered as a refinement and extension of the solar EUV spectrum published for the same day by Woods and Rottman (1990).

  9. Compact Flyeye concentrator with improved irradiance uniformity on solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Zhenfeng; Yu, Feihong

    2013-08-01

    A Flyeye concentrator with improved irradiance distribution on the solar cell in a concentrator photovoltaic system is proposed. This Flyeye concentrator is composed of four surfaces: a refractive surface, mirror surface, freeform surface, and transmissive surface. Based on the principles of geometrical optics, the contours of the proposed Flyeye concentrator are calculated according to Fermat's principle, the edge-ray principle, and the ray reversibility principle without solving partial differential equations or using an optimization algorithm, therefore a slope angle control method is used to construct the freeform surface. The solid model is established by applying a symmetry of revolution around the optical axis. Additionally, the optical performance for the Flyeye concentrator is simulated and analyzed by Monte-Carlo method. Results show that the Flyeye concentrator optical efficiency of >96.2% is achievable with 1333× concentration ratio and ±1.3 deg acceptance angle, and 1.3 low aspect ratio (average thickness to entry aperture diameter ratio). Moreover, comparing the Flyeye concentrator specification to that of the Köhler concentrator and the traditional Fresnel-type concentrator, results indicate that this concentrator has the advantages of improved uniformity, reduced thickness, and increased tolerance to the incident sunlight.

  10. Response of the Upper Atmosphere to Variations in the Solar Soft X-Ray Irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Scott Martin

    1995-11-01

    Terrestrial Far Ultraviolet (FUV) airglow emissions have been suggested as a means for remote sensing the structure of the upper atmosphere. The energy which leads to the excitation of FUV airglow emissions is solar irradiance at Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray wavelengths. Solar irradiance at these wavelengths is known to be highly variable; studies of Nitric Oxide (NO) in the lower thermosphere have suggested a variability of more than an order of magnitude in the solar soft x-ray irradiance. To properly interpret the FUV airglow, the magnitude of the solar energy deposition must be known. Previous analyses have used the electron impact excited Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) bands of N _2 to infer the flux of photoelectrons in the atmosphere and thus to infer the magnitude of the solar irradiance. This dissertation presents the first simultaneous measurements of the FUV airglow, the major atmospheric constituent densities, and the solar EUV and soft x-ray irradiances. The measurements were made on three flights of an identical sounding rocket payload at different levels of solar activity. The linear response in brightness of the LBH bands to variations in solar irradiance is demonstrated. In addition to the N_2 LBH bands, atomic oxygen lines at 135.6 and 130.4 nm are also studied. Unlike the LBH bands, these emissions undergo radiative transfer effects in the atmosphere. The OI emission at 135.6 nm is found to be well modeled using a radiative transfer calculation and the known excitation processes. Unfortunately, the assumed processes leading to OI 130.4 nm excitation are found to be insufficient to reproduce the observed variability of this emission. Production of NO in the thermosphere is examined; it is shown that a lower than previously reported variability in the solar soft x-ray irradiance is required to explain the variability of NO.

  11. On the influence of total solar irradiance on global land temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using statistical analysis, correlation between the variations of the total solar irradiance and of the annual-mean land temperatures was found. An unknown time lag between both data sets was expected to be present due to the complexity of the Earth’s climate system leading to a delayed response to changes in influencing factors. We found the best correlation with coefficient over 90% for a 14-year shift of the annual mean land temperature record ahead with data until 1970, while the same comparison with data until 2006 yields 61% correlation. These results show substantially higher influence of total solar irradiance on global land temperatures until 1970. The decline of this influence during the last 40 years could be attributed to the increasing concentration of anthropogenic greenhouse gases in the Earth’s atmosphere. Key words: total solar irradiance, solar variations, solar forcing, climate change

  12. Inactivation of fungi caused by solar irradiation in the living environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inada, Chika; Yoshizumi, Kunio [Kyoritsu Women' s Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Takatori, Kosuke [National Inst. of Health Sciences, Tokyo (Japan); Hedge, A. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2002-10-01

    We studied the inactivation of Penicillium and Cladosporium exposed to solar irradiation with regard to actual radiation energy conditions in the living environment. UVA and UVB solar radiation energy was simultaneously measured. A UVB fluorescent lamp was also used to irradiate the fungal samples under measured levels of solar radiation energy. After the exposure to light, fungal spread plates were cultivated for one week at 25 deg C and 80%RH. Viable fungal colonies were counted. As results, the following findings were obtained: solar UVA irradiation was observed to reach the maximum level of about 50 W/m{sup 2} at noon in August. The maximum level of UVB irradiation was about 1.3 W/m{sup 2} also at noon in August. The characteristic curves were observed in a sharper form due to the effect of absorption of solar radiation in the atmosphere. Inactivation of all Penicillium spores by UVB solar radiation was observed at 1.5 kJ/m{sup 2}. On the other hand, irradiation with a UVB fluorescent lamp resulted in inactivation of all Penicillium spores at about 3 kJ/m{sup 2}. The consistency between these results was considered to be acceptable. This is a piece of evidence to show that the UVB radiation is the most effective in fungal inactivation. As for Cladosporium, similar results were found with respect to inactivation caused by light irradiation. (author)

  13. Implications of solar irradiance variability upon long-term changes in the Earth's atmospheric temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Robert B., III

    1992-01-01

    From 1979 through 1987, it is believed that variability in the incoming solar energy played a significant role in changing the Earth's climate. Using high-precision spacecraft radiometric measurements, the incoming total solar irradiance (total amount of solar power per unit area) and the Earth's mean, global atmospheric temperatures were found to vary in phase with each other. The observed irradiance and temperature changes appeared to be correlated with the 11-year cycle of solar magnetic activity. During the period from 1979 through 1985, both the irradiance and temperature decreased. From 1985 to 1987, they increased. The irradiance changed approximately 0.1 percent, while the temperature varied as much as 0.6 C. During the 1979-1987 period, the temperatures were forecasted to rise linearly because of the anthropogenic build-up of carbon dioxide and the hypothesized 'global warming', 'greenhouse effect', scenarios. Contrary to these scenarios, the temperatures were found to vary in a periodic manner in phase with the solar irradiance changes. The observed correlations between irradiance and temperature variabilily suggest that the mean, global temperature of the Earth may decline between 1990 and 1997 as solar magnetic activity decreases.

  14. Global solar irradiation in function of the insolation reason; Irradiacao solar global em funcao da razao de insolacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Recieri, Reinaldo Prandini; Ferruzzi, Yuri; Silva, Suedemio de Lima [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana (UNIOESTE), Marechal Candido Rondon, PR (Brazil). Fac. de Agronomia; Quallio, Silvana [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana (UNIOESTE), PR (Brazil). Fac. de Biologia; Batista, Vitor Roberto Lourenco [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana (UNIOESTE), PR (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Eletrica

    2004-07-01

    The present work shows the reason (K{sub t}=R{sub G}/R{sub o}) of global solar irradiation for the irradiation in the top of the atmosphere in the horizontal incidence in function of the insolation reason (n/N), objectifying itself to find an equation esteem the daily global solar irradiation in the region of Cascavel/PR. The experimental data had been gotten in Station Agrometeorological of the IAPAR (Agronomic Institute of the Parana) mounted in the Coodetec/Cascavel-PR (Latitude 24,89 deg S, Longitude 53,40 deg O and altitude of 682m). The component of global the solar irradiation was monitored by an actinograph and the hour of solar brightness (n) through a heliograph (R. FUESS Berlin-stegutz) in a period of 17 years, of which four had been used in the validation of the model. The distribution of the daily values (K{sub t} x n/N), related through simple linear regression, supplied an equation of R{sub G}/R{sub o}=0,16+0,40n/N estimate with raised determination coefficient (R{sup 2} = 88.89%), in the validation of the model got a -9,76% shunting line varying 11,44% with average error in the 0,84% order, these statistical values shows that global the solar irradiation, in the region of Rattlesnake, can be esteem with good precision. (author)

  15. On the effective solar zenith and azimuth angles to use with measurements of hourly irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Blanc, P.; Wald, L.

    2016-01-01

    Several common practices are tested for assessing the effective solar zenith angle that can be associated to each measurement in time-series of in situ or satellite-derived measurements of hourly irradiation on horizontal surface. High quality 1 min measurements of direct irradiation collected by the BSRN stations in Carpentras in France and Payerne in Switzerland, are aggregated to yield time series of hourly direct irradiation on both horizontal and normal planes. Time ser...

  16. On the effective solar zenith and azimuth angles to use with measurements of hourly irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Blanc, Philippe; Wald, Lucien

    2016-01-01

    International audience Several common practices are tested for assessing the effective solar zenith angle that can be associated to each measurement in time-series of in situ or satellite-derived measurements of hourly irradiation on horizontal surface. High quality 1 min measurements of direct irradiation collected by the BSRN stations in Carpentras in France and Payerne in Switzerland, are aggregated to yield time series of hourly direct irradiation on both horizontal and normal planes. ...

  17. Solar irradiance at the earth's surface: long-term behavior observed at the South Pole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Frederick

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This research examines a 17-year database of UV-A (320–400 nm and visible (400–600 nm solar irradiance obtained by a scanning spectroradiometer located at the South Pole. The goal is to define the variability in solar irradiance reaching the polar surface, with emphasis on the influence of cloudiness and on identifying systematic trends and possible links to the solar cycle. To eliminate changes associated with the varying solar elevation, the analysis focuses on data averaged over 30–35 day periods centered on each year's austral summer solstice. The long-term average effect of South Polar clouds is a small attenuation, with the mean measured irradiances being about 5–6% less than the clear-sky values, although at any specific time clouds may reduce or enhance the signal that reaches the sensor. The instantaneous fractional attenuation or enhancement is wavelength dependent, where the percent deviation from the clear-sky irradiance at 400–600 nm is typically 2.5 times that at 320–340 nm. When averaged over the period near each year's summer solstice, significant correlations appear between irradiances at all wavelengths and the solar cycle as measured by the 10.7 cm solar radio flux. An approximate 1.8 ± 1.0% decrease in ground-level irradiance occurs from solar maximum to solar minimum for the wavelength band 320–400 nm. The corresponding decrease for 400–600 nm is 2.4 ± 1.9%. The best-estimate declines appear too large to originate in the sun. If the correlations have a geophysical origin, they suggest a small variation in atmospheric attenuation with the solar cycle over the period of observation, with the greatest attenuation occurring at solar minimum.

  18. Elimination of disinfection byproduct formation potential in reclaimed water during solar light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian-Yuan, Wu; Chao, Li; Ye, Du; Wen-Long, Wang; Huang, Huang; Hong-Ying, Hu

    2016-05-15

    Ecological storage of reclaimed water in ponds and lakes is widely applied in water reuse. During reclaimed water storage, solar light can degrade pollutants and improve water quality. This study investigated the effects of solar light irradiation on the disinfection byproduct formation potential in reclaimed water, including haloacetonitriles (HANs), trichloronitromethane (TCNM), trihalomethanes (THMs), haloketones (HKs) and chloral hydrate (CH). Natural solar light significantly decreased the formation potential of HANs, TCNM, and HKs in reclaimed water, but had a limited effect on the formation potential of THMs and CH. Ultraviolet (UV) light in solar radiation played a dominant role in the decrease of the formation potential of HANs, TCNM and HKs. Among the disinfection byproducts, the removal kinetic constant of dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) with irradiation dose was much larger than those for dichloropropanone (1,1-DCP), trichloropropanone (1,1,1-TCP) and TCNM. During solar irradiation, fluorescence spectra intensities of reclaimed water also decreased significantly. The removal of tyrosine (Tyr)-like and tryptophan (Trp)-like protein fluorescence spectra intensity volumes was correlated to the decrease in DCAN formation potential. Solar irradiation was demonstrated to degrade Trp, Tyr and their DCAN formation potential. The photolysis products of Trp after solar irradiation were detected as kynurenine and tryptamine, which had chloroform, CH and DCAN formation potential lower than those of Trp. PMID:27010786

  19. Solar Spectral Irradiance at 782 nm as Measured by the SES Sensor Onboard Picard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meftah, M.; Hauchecorne, A.; Irbah, A.; Cessateur, G.; Bekki, S.; Damé, L.; Bolsée, D.; Pereira, N.

    2016-04-01

    Picard is a satellite dedicated to the simultaneous measurement of the total and solar spectral irradiance, the solar diameter, the solar shape, and to the Sun's interior through the methods of helioseismology. The satellite was launched on June 15, 2010, and pursued its data acquisitions until March 2014. A Sun Ecartometry Sensor (SES) was developed to provide the stringent pointing requirements of the satellite. The SES sensor produced an image of the Sun at 782 ± 2.5 nm. From the SES data, we obtained a new time series of the solar spectral irradiance at 782 nm from 2010 to 2014. During this period of Solar Cycle 24, the amplitude of the changes has been of the order of ± 0.08 %, corresponding to a range of about 2× 10^{-3} W m^{-2} nm^{-1}. SES observations provided a qualitatively consistent evolution of the solar spectral irradiance variability at 782 nm. SES data show similar amplitude variations with the semi-empirical model Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction for the Satellite era (SATIRE-S), whereas the Spectral Irradiance Monitor instrument (SIM) onboard the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment satellite (SORCE) highlights higher amplitudes.

  20. The Total Solar Irradiance Record and Its Continuity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, R. C.

    2007-12-01

    Continuous time series of total solar irradiance (TSI) observations have been constructed from the set of redundant, overlapping TSI measurements made by satellite experiments during the past 29 Years. One, the ACRIM composite [Willson & Mordvinov, 2003], displays a significant upward trend in TSI of 0.04 percent per decade during solar cycles 21-23. Another, the PMOD composite [Frohlich & Lean, 1998], displays no significant trend using different combinations of TSI data sets, computational philosophy and assumptions. The potential significance of solar variability as a climate forcing makes it important to determine which TSI composites best represents the measurement database. Two types of experiments have provided TSI satellite data: self-calibrating, precision TSI monitors and Earth radiation budget (ERB) experiments. TSI monitors provide much higher accuracy and precision and are capable of self-calibrating the degradation of their sensors, providing enhanced data traceability. The ERB experiments are designed to provide less accurate and precise TSI 'boundary value' results for ERB modeling and cannot self-calibrate sensor degradation. The optimum composite TSI time series utilizes TSI monitor results where available. However, a two year gap in the TSI monitoring record between the ACRIM1 and ACRIM2 experiments (1989 - 1991) would have prevented compilation of a continuous record over the 29 years of satellite observations were it not for the availability of ERB results during the gap. The relationship between ACRIM1 and ACRIM2 results across the ACRIM gap can be derived using the overlapping ERB data sets: the Nimbus7/ERB and/or the ERBS/ERBE. These two choices are embodied in the construction of ACRIM and PMOD composites, respectively. The ACRIM composite uses the results for its constituent databases published by the experiment science teams and relates ACRIM1 and ACRIM2 using overlapping Nimbus7/ERB comparisons. The PMOD composite uses a different subset

  1. AMSR2 all-sky radiance assimilation and its impact on the analysis and forecast of Hurricane Sandy with a limited-area data assimilation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Yang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A method to assimilate all-sky radiances from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2 was developed within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model's data assimilation (WRFDA system. The four essential elements are: (1 extending the community radiative transform model's (CRTM interface to include hydrometeor profiles; (2 using total water Qt as the moisture control variable; (3 using a warm-rain physics scheme for partitioning the Qt increment into individual increments of water vapour, cloud liquid water and rain; and (4 adopting a symmetric observation error model for all-sky radiance assimilation.Compared to a benchmark experiment with no AMSR2 data, the impact of assimilating clear-sky or all-sky AMSR2 radiances on the analysis and forecast of Hurricane Sandy (2012 was assessed through analysis/forecast cycling experiments using WRF and WRFDA's three-dimensional variational (3DVAR data assimilation scheme. With more cloud/precipitation-affected data being assimilated around tropical cyclone (TC core areas in the all-sky AMSR2 assimilation experiment, better analyses were obtained in terms of the TC's central sea level pressure (CSLP, warm-core structure and cloud distribution. Substantial (>20 % error reduction in track and CSLP forecasts was achieved from both clear-sky and all-sky AMSR2 assimilation experiments, and this improvement was consistent from the analysis time to 72-h forecasts. Moreover, the all-sky assimilation experiment consistently yielded better track and CSLP forecasts than the clear-sky did for all forecast lead times, due to a better analysis in the TC core areas. Positive forecast impact from assimilating AMSR2 radiances is also seen when verified against the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF analysis and the Stage IV precipitation analysis, with an overall larger positive impact from the all-sky assimilation experiment.

  2. Description and primary results of Total Solar Irradiance Monitor, a solar-pointing instrument on an Earth observing satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongrui; Fang, Wei; Li, Huiduan

    2015-04-01

    Solar driving mechanism for Earth climate has been a controversial problem for centuries. Long-time data of solar activity is required by the investigations of the solar driving mechanism, such as Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) record. Three Total Solar Irradiance Monitors (TSIM) have been developed by Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics for China Meteorological Administration to maintain continuities of TSI data series which lasted for nearly 4 decades.The newest TSIM has recorded TSI daily with accurate solar pointing on the FY-3C meteorological satellite since Oct 2013. TSIM/FY-3C has a pointing system for automatic solar tracking, onboard the satellite designed mainly for Earth observing. Most payloads of FY-3C are developed for observation of land, ocean and atmosphere. Consequently, the FY-3C satellite is a nadir-pointing spacecraft with its z axis to be pointed at the center of the Earth. Previous TSIMs onboard the FY-3A and FY-3B satellites had no pointing system, solar observations were only performed when the sun swept through field-of-view of the instruments. And TSI measurements are influenced inevitably by the solar pointing errors. Corrections of the solar pointing errors were complex. The problem is now removed by TSIM/FY-3C.TSIM/FY-3C follows the sun accurately by itself using its pointing system based on scheme of visual servo control. The pointing system is consisted of a radiometer package, two motors for solar tracking, a sun sensor and etc. TSIM/FY-3C has made daily observations of TSI for more than one year, with nearly zero solar pointing errors. Short time-scale variations in TSI detected by TSIM/FY-3C are nearly the same with VIRGO/SOHO and TIM/SORCE.Instrument details, primary results of solar pointing control, solar observations and etc will be given in the presentation.

  3. Irradiation-induced degradation of amorphous silicon solar cells in space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaver, A.

    2007-01-01

    Solar cells are the prime power supply for satellites in space. Space is, however, a hostile environment for electronic devices, such as solar cells: in space the devices are subjected to large temperature cycles, atomic oxygen, space dust, meteorites, and high-energy charged-particle irradiation. I

  4. Proton irradiation of conventional and lithium solar cells - 11-37 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Carter, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Conventional n/p and lithium solar cells were irradiated with 11- to 37-MeV protons. The energy dependence of the solar cell degradation, calculated from electrical parameters and lifetime measurements, is shown to be very slight. Damage coefficients for the n/p cells are calculated. Annealing characteristics of both the lithium cells and the n/p cells are presented.

  5. Temporal Variability of Surface Solar Irradiance as a Function of Satellite-retrieved Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkelman, L. M.; Sengupta, M.; Habte, A.

    2014-12-01

    Studies of the impact of renewables on the electrical transmission grid are needed as power production from renewable energy resources increases. These studies require estimates of high temporal and spatial resolution power output under various scenarios. Satellite-based solar resource estimates are the best source of long-term irradiance data but are generally of lower temporal and spatial resolution than needed and thus require downscaling. Likewise, weather forecast models cannot provide high spatial or temporal irradiance predictions. Downscaling requires information about solar irradiance variability in both space and time, which is primarily a function of cloud properties. In this study, we analyze the relationships between the temporal variability of surface solar irradiance and satellite-based cloud properties. One-minute resolution surface solar irradiance data were obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Surface Radiation (SURFRAD) network. These sites are distributed across the United States to cover a range of meteorological conditions. Cloud information at a nominal 4 km resolution and half hour intervals was retrieved from NOAA's Geostationary Operation Environmental Satellites (GOES). The retrieved cloud properties were then used to select and composite irradiance data from the measurement sites in order to identify the cloud properties that exert the strongest control over short-term irradiance variability. The irradiance variability was characterized using statistics of both the irradiances themselves and of irradiance differences computed for short time scales (minutes). The relationships derived using this method will be presented, comparing and contrasting the statistics computed for the different cloud properties. The implications for downscaling irradiance from satellites or forecast models will also be discussed.

  6. Thin film silicon solar cells for space applications: Study of proton irradiation and thermal annealing effects on the characteristics of solar cells and individual layers

    OpenAIRE

    Kuendig, J.; Goetz, M.; Shah, Arvind; Gerlach, L.; Fernandez, E

    2008-01-01

    The paper reports on the effects of a proton irradiation campaign on a series of thin-film silicon solar cells (single- and double-junction). The effect of subsequent thermal annealing on solar cells degraded by proton irradiation is investigated. A low-temperature annealing behaviour can be observed (at temperatures around 100 to 160°C) for microcrystalline silicon solar cells. To further explore this effect, a second proton irradiation campaign has been carried out, but this time on microcr...

  7. Soft X-ray irradiance measured by the Solar Aspect Monitor on the Solar Dynamic Observatory Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, C Y; Jones, A; Woodraska, D; Caspi, A; Woods, T N; Eparvier, F G; Wieman, S R; Didkovsky, L V

    2016-01-01

    The Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM) is a pinhole camera on the Extreme-ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). SAM projects the solar disk onto the CCD through a metallic filter designed to allow only solar photons shortward of 7 nm to pass. Contamination from energetic particles and out-of-band irradiance is, however, significant in the SAM observations. We present a technique for isolating the 0.01--7 nm integrated irradiance from the SAM signal to produce the first results of broadband irradiance for the time period from May 2010 to May 2014. The results of this analysis agree with a similar data product from EVE's EUV SpectroPhotometer (ESP) to within 25%. We compare our results with measurements from the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) Solar X-ray Photometer (SXP) and the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) Solar EUV Experiment (SEE) at similar levels of solar activity. We show that the full-disk SAM broadband results compare we...

  8. Long-term measurements of solar spectral irradiance variability: toward the establishment of a climate record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Erik; Harder, Jerald; Pilewskie, Peter; Fontenla, Juan; Woods, Thomas; Brown, Steven; Lykke, Keith

    Knowledge of the top of the atmosphere (TOA) solar spectral irradiance (SSI) is crucial in interpreting the spectrally dependent radiative processes throughout Earth's climate system. Where this energy is deposited into the atmosphere and surface, how the climate responds to solar variability, and the mechanisms of climate response, are highly dependent on how the incident solar radiation is distributed with wavelength. In order to advance understanding of how natural and anthropogenic process affect Earth's climate system there is a strong scientific imperative to maintain accurate, long-term records of climate forcing and response. The contin-uation of SSI measurements provides a unique opportunity to characterize poorly understood wavelength dependent climate processes. Coupled chemistry-climate models require realistic assessments of the magnitudes and long-term trends in SSI for the interpretation and quantifi-cation of solar forcing in climate change scenarios. This places stringent requirements on the absolute calibration of the instrument (tied directly to international standards) and the ability to maintain that calibration on-orbit (long-term stability). The Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) is a solar spectral radiometer that continuously monitors the SSI from 200 nm -2400 nm, a wavelength region encompassing 96% of the total solar irradiance. The SIM instrument is included as part of the Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) to continue the mea-surement of SSI, which began with the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE), launched in 2003. SORCE SIM measurements have characterized SSI variability during the descending phase of Solar Cycle (SC) 23, but the determination of multi-solar cycle dependen-cies remains a key climatic uncertainty. Analysis of the measured spectral irradiance variability during the SORCE mission has resulted in a number of instrument design refinements central to maintaining, on-orbit, the long-term absolute

  9. Hydrogen and the First Stars: First Results from the SCI-HI 21-cm all-sky spectrum experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voytek, Tabitha; Peterson, Jeffrey; Lopez-Cruz, Omar; Jauregui-Garcia, Jose-Miguel; SCI-HI Experiment Team

    2015-01-01

    The 'Sonda Cosmologica de las Islas para la Deteccion de Hidrogeno Neutro' (SCI-HI) experiment is an all-sky 21-cm brightness temperature spectrum experiment studying the cosmic dawn (z~15-35). The experiment is a collaboration between Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) and Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica (INAOE) in Mexico. Initial deployment of the SCI-HI experiment occurred in June 2013 on Guadalupe; a small island about 250 km off of the Pacific coast of Baja California in Mexico. Preliminary measurements from this deployment have placed the first observational constraints on the 21-cm all-sky spectrum around 70 MHz (z~20), see Voytek et al (2014).Neutral Hydrogen (HI) is found throughout the universe in the cold gas that makes up the intergalactic medium (IGM). HI can be observed through the spectral line at 21 cm (1.4 GHz) due to hyperfine structure. Expansion of the universe causes the wavelength of this spectral line to stretch at a rate defined by the redshift z, leading to a signal which can be followed through time.Now the strength of the 21-cm signal in the IGM is dependent only on a small number of variables; the temperature and density of the IGM, the amount of HI in the IGM, the UV energy density in the IGM, and the redshift. This means that 21-cm measurements teach us about the history and structure of the IGM. The SCI-HI experiment focuses on the spatially averaged 21-cm spectrum, looking at the temporal evolution of the IGM during the cosmic dawn before reionization.Although the SCI-HI experiment placed first constraints with preliminary data, this data was limited to a narrow frequency regime around 60-85 MHz. This limitation was caused by instrumental difficulties and the presence of residual radio frequency interference (RFI) in the FM radio band (~88-108 MHz). The SCI-HI experiment is currently undergoing improvements and we plan to have another deployment soon. This deployment would be to Socorro and Clarion, two

  10. Modelling solar irradiance variability on time scales from minutes to months

    CERN Document Server

    Seleznyov, Andrey D; Krivova, Natalie A; 10.1051/0004-6361/200811138

    2013-01-01

    We analyze and model total solar irradiance variability on time scales from minutes to months, excluding variations due to p-mode oscillations, using a combination of convective and magnetic components. These include granulation, the magnetic network, faculae and sunspots. Analysis of VIRGO data shows that on periods of a day or longer solar variability depends on magnetic activity, but is nearly independent at shorter periods. We assume that only granulation affects the solar irradiance variability on time scales from minutes to hours. Granulation is described as a large sample of bright cells and dark lanes that evolve according to rules deduced from observations and radiation hydrodynamic simulations. Comparison of this model combined with a high time resolution magnetic-field based irradiance reconstruction, with solar data reveals a good correspondence except at periods of 10 to 30 hours. This suggests that the model is missing some power at these periods, which may be due to the absence of supergranulat...

  11. HIGH-ENERGY PROTON IRRADIATION EFFECTS ON GaAs/Ge SPACE SOLAR CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R. Wang; S.D. Yao

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the high-energy proton irradiation effects on GaAs/Ge space solarcells. The solar cells were irradiated by protons with energy of 5-20Me V at fluenceranging from 1 × 109 to 7× 1013 cra-2, and then their electric parameters were measuredat AM0. It was shown that the Isc, Voc and Pmax degrade as the fiuence increasingrespectively, but the degradation rates of Isc, Voc and Pmax decrease as the protonenergy increasing, and the degradation is relative to proton irradiation-induced defectwith a level of Ec -0. 41eV in irradiated GaAs/Ge cells.

  12. Reference solar irradiance spectra and consequences of their disparities in remote sensing of the ocean colour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Shanmugam

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Satellite ocean colour missions require a standard extraterrestrial solar irradiance spectrum in the visible and near-infrared (NIR for use in the process of radiometric calibration, atmospheric correction and normalization of water-leaving radiances from in-situ measurements. There are numerous solar irradiance spectra (or models currently in use within the ocean colour community and related domains. However, these irradiance spectra, constructed from single and/or multiple measurements sets or models, have noticeable differences – ranging from about ±1% in the NIR to ±6% in the short wavelength region (ultraviolet and blue – caused primarily by the variation in the solar activity and uncertainties in experimental data from different instruments. Such differences between the applied solar irradiance spectra may have quite important consequences in reconciliation, comparison and validation of the products resulting from different ocean colour instruments. Thus, it is prudent to examine the model-to-model differences and ascertain an appropriate solar irradiance spectrum for use in future ocean colour research and validation purposes. This study first describes the processes which generally require the application of a solar irradiance spectrum, and then investigates the eight solar irradiance spectra (widely in use within the remote sensing community selected on the basis of the following criteria: minimum spectral range of 350–1200 nm with adequate spectral resolution, completely or mostly based on direct measurements, minimal error range, intercomparison with other experiments and update of data. The differences in these spectra in absolute terms and in the SeaWiFS and MERIS in-band irradiances and their consequences on the retrieval algorithms of chlorophyll and suspended sediment are analyzed. Based on these detailed analyses, this study puts forward the solar irradiance spectrum most appropriate for all aspects of research

  13. Quantifying solar spectral irradiance in aquatic habitats for the assessment of photoenhanced toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, M.G.; Little, E.E.; Calfee, R.; Diamond, S.

    2000-01-01

    The spectra and intensity of solar radiation (solar spectral irradiance [SSI]) was quantified in selected aquatic habitats in the vicinity of an oil field on the California coast. Solar spectral irradiance measurements consisted of spectral scans (280-700 rim) and radiometric measurements of ultraviolet (UV): UVB (280-320 nm) and UVA (320-400 nm). Solar spectral irradiance measurements were taken at the surface and at various depths in two marsh ponds, a shallow wetland, an estuary lagoon, and the intertidal area of a high-energy sandy beach. Daily fluctuation in SSI showed a general parabolic relationship with time; maximum structure-activity relationship (SAR) was observed at approximate solar noon. Solar spectral irradiance measurements taken at 10-cm depth at approximate solar noon in multiple aquatic habitats exhibited only a twofold variation in visible light and UVA and a 4.5-fold variation in UVB. Visible light ranged from 11,000 to 19,000 ??W/cm2, UVA ranged from 460 to 1,100 ??W/cm2, and UVB ranged from 8.4 to 38 ??W/cm2. In each habitat, the attenuation of light intensity with increasing water depth was differentially affected over specific wavelengths of SSI. The study results allowed the development of environmentally realistic light regimes necessary for photoenhanced toxicity studies.

  14. Improved radiation resistant properties of electron irradiated c-Si solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Khuram; Khan, Sohail A.; MatJafri, M. Z.

    2016-08-01

    This work investigates the radiation tolerance of c-Si solar cells under electron energy of 9 MeV with fluence of 5.09×1016 cm-2. The solar cells were fabricated and characterized before and after electron irradiation through current-voltage (I-V), capacitance-voltage (C-V), and frequency dependent conductance (Gp) measurements. The results revealed that all the output parameters such as short circuit current (Isc), open circuit voltage (Voc), series resistance (Rs), and efficiency (η) were degraded after electron irradiation. Capacitance-Voltage measurements show that there is a slight decrease in the base carrier concentration (ND), while a small increase in depletion layer width (WD) was due to an increase in the base carrier concentration. Enhancements in the density of interface states (Nss), and trap time constant (τ) have been observed after electron irradiation. The results has revealed that back surface field (BSF) solar cell with front surface passivation (FSP) presented lowest efficiency degradation ratio of 11.3% as compared to 15.3% of the solar cell without FSP. The subsequent annealing of irradiated Si solar cell devices revealed that the Si solar cell with FSP demonstrated high efficiency recovery ratio of 94% as compared to non-FSP solar cell.

  15. Anthropogenic changes in the surface all-sky UV-B radiation through 1850–2005 simulated by an Earth system model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Watanabe

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The historical anthropogenic change in the surface all-sky UV-B (solar ultraviolet: 280–315 nm radiation through 1850–2005 is evaluated using an Earth system model. Responses of UV-B dose to anthropogenic changes in ozone and aerosols are separately evaluated using a series of historical simulations including/excluding these changes. Increases in these air pollutants cause reductions in UV-B transmittance, which occur gradually/rapidly before/after 1950 in and downwind of industrial and deforestation regions. Furthermore, changes in ozone transport in the lower stratosphere, which is induced by increasing greenhouse gas concentrations, increase ozone concentration in the extratropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. These transient changes work to decrease the amount of UV-B reaching the Earth's surface, counteracting the well-known effect increasing UV-B due to stratospheric ozone depletion, which developed rapidly after ca. 1980. As a consequence, the surface UV-B radiation change between 1850 and 2000 is negative in the tropics and NH extratropics and positive in the SH extratropics. Comparing the contributions of ozone and aerosol changes to the UV-B change, the transient change in ozone absorption of UV-B mainly determines the total change in the surface UV-B radiation at most locations. On the other hand, the aerosol direct and indirect effects on UV-B play an equally important role to that of ozone in the NH mid-latitudes and tropics. A typical example is East Asia (25° N–60° N and 120° E–150° E, where the effect of aerosols (ca. 70% dominates the total UV-B change.

  16. Variation in spectral irradiance of the SES solar simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcnutt, A. E.

    1971-01-01

    A test to determine the spectral characteristics of the solar simulation produced by the solar environment simulator (SES) comprised a statistical analysis to determine the spectral variance, and its effect on the average absorptivity of surface coatings.

  17. MEPSOCON project: Calibration of Radiometers for High Solar Irradiance; Proyecto MEPSOCON: Calibracion de Radiometros de Alta Irradiancia Solar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballestrin, J.; Rodriguez-Alonso, M.

    2006-07-01

    The development of central receiver solar plants is a currently emerging field into renewable energies. For several years various receiver prototypes have been evaluated at the Plataforma Solar de Almeria (PSA). The measurement of the incident solar power on the receiver aperture is fundamental to the estimation of its efficiency. Many factors interfere with this measurement and consequently accuracy is very low. This uncertainty is transmitted to the design of the final solar plant and thereby to its price. The sensors used for this measurement are of small size in comparison with the receiver apertures, therefore different systems are necessary to obtain the incident solar power on the receiver aperture from the individual radiometer measurements. This report presents calibration procedures for the sensor used on the measurement of high solar irradiance and the analysis of the different factors affecting the incident power measurement to significantly reduce its uncertainty. (Author) 16 refs.

  18. Survey on Machine Learning Approaches for Solar Irradiation Prediction

    OpenAIRE

    U.Divya*; Dr.Chitra Pasupathi

    2014-01-01

    Renewable energy technologies are clean sources of energy that have a much lower environmental impact than conventional energy generation methods. Researches focusing on different energy generation techniques are gaining much importance worldwide, to manage exponential increase in the energy requirements. Solar energy is used in various applications like solar charged sensor nodes, solar charged vehicles, agriculture, electricity production etc. This solar energy can be harnes...

  19. Solar UV Irradiances and Associated Issues for the Atmosphere and Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W.

    Several new solar proxies have been developed in the past year as the beginning of a second generation solar UV modeling and forecasting capability. These proxies help characterize the energy input into operational space physics models that provide information content on the neutral thermosphere and ionosphere. Between 1999-2000, a full solar spectrum was developed (SOLAR2000) for use in numerical atmospheric and ionospheric models relevant to climatological studies and the E10.7 index was produced for empirical thermospheric and ionospheric model applications. In 20012002, new proxies have been derived including a sunspot number, Rsn, for use by operational HF radio ray-trace algorithms and the Qeuv thermospheric heating rate for use by the aeronomy community to compare airglow-derived versus solar-derived upper atmosphere heating. The Peuv heat production term has also been developed as an index for comparing solar heating to joule heating on a global scale. The S(t) index is the integrated solar spectrum used for solar radiation pressure calculations related to spacecraft attitude control. Finally, the Tinf is the exospheric temperature that is provided for long-term climate change studies. Second generation modeling and forecasting is in development and includes higher cadence solar input information beyond daily flux values where solar flare characterization will soon become reality. The second generation forecasting is also incorporating improved algorithms ranging from wavelet transforms to solar dynamo theory in order to specify solar variability on seven time scales from nowcast and 72-hour forecast to 5 solar cycle estimation. These new proxies are derivatives of the SOLAR2000 model whose solar irradiance specification is compliant with the developing ISO draft standard WD 21348 for Determining Solar Irradiances.

  20. A New Display Format Relating Azimuth-Scanning Radar Data and All-Sky Images in 3-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Wesley E.; Seker, Ilgin; Mathews, John D.; Aponte, Nestor

    2010-01-01

    Here we correlate features in a sequence of all-sky images of 630 nm airglow with the three-dimensional (3-D) structure of electron densities in the F region above Arecibo. Pairs of 180 azimuth scans (using the Gregorian and line feeds) of the two-beam incoherent scatter radar (ISR) have been plotted in cone pictorials of the line-of-sight electron densities. The plots include projections of the 630 nm airglow onto the ground using the same spatial scaling as for the ISR data. Selected sequential images from the night of 16-17 June 2004 correlate ionospheric plasma features with scales comparable to the ISR density-cone diameter. The entire set of over 100 images spanning about eight hours is available as a movie. The correlation between the airglow and the electron densities is not unexpected, but the new display format shows the 3-D structures better than separate 2-D plots in latitude and longitude for the airglow and in height and time for the electron densities. Furthermore, the animations help separate the bands of airglow from obscuring clouds and the star field.

  1. GaLactic and Extragalactic All-sky Murchison Widefield Array (GLEAM) survey I: A low-frequency extragalactic catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Hurley-Walker, Natasha; Hancock, Paul J; Franzen, Thomas M O; Hindson, Luke; Kapinska, Anna D; Morgan, John; Offringa, Andre R; Wayth, Randall B; Wu, Chen; Zheng, Q; Murphy, Tara; Bell, Martin E; Dwarakanath, K S; For, Bi-Qing; Gaensler, Bryan M; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie; Lenc, Emil; Procopio, Pietro; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Ekers, Ron; Bowman, Judd D; Briggs, Frank; Cappallo, R J; Deshpande, Avinash A; Greenhill, Lincoln; Hazelton, Brynah J; Kaplan, David L; Lonsdale, Colin J; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, Daniel A; Morales, Miguel F; Morgan, Edward; Oberoi, Divya; Ord, Stephen M; Prabu, T; Shankar, N Udaya; Srivani, K S; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Tingay, Steven J; Webster, Rachel L; Williams, Andrew; Williams, Christopher L

    2016-01-01

    Using the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), the low-frequency Square Kilometre Array (SKA1 LOW) precursor located in Western Australia, we have completed the GaLactic and Extragalactic All-sky MWA (GLEAM) survey, and present the resulting extragalactic catalogue, utilising the first year of observations. The catalogue covers 24,831 square degrees, over declinations south of $+30^\\circ$ and Galactic latitudes outside $10^\\circ$ of the Galactic plane, excluding some areas such as the Magellanic Clouds. It contains 307,455 radio sources with 20 separate flux density measurements across 72--231MHz, selected from a time- and frequency- integrated image centred at 200MHz, with a resolution of $\\approx 2$'. Over the catalogued region, we estimate that the catalogue is 90% complete at 170mJy, and 50% complete at 55mJy, and large areas are complete at even lower flux density levels. Its reliability is 99.97% above the detection threshold of $5\\sigma$, which itself is typically 50mJy. These observations constitute the w...

  2. Cloud Screening and Quality Control Algorithm for Star Photometer Data: Assessment with Lidar Measurements and with All-sky Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Daniel Perez; Lyamani, H.; Olmo, F. J.; Whiteman, D. N.; Navas-Guzman, F.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the development and set up of a cloud screening and data quality control algorithm for a star photometer based on CCD camera as detector. These algorithms are necessary for passive remote sensing techniques to retrieve the columnar aerosol optical depth, delta Ae(lambda), and precipitable water vapor content, W, at nighttime. This cloud screening procedure consists of calculating moving averages of delta Ae() and W under different time-windows combined with a procedure for detecting outliers. Additionally, to avoid undesirable Ae(lambda) and W fluctuations caused by the atmospheric turbulence, the data are averaged on 30 min. The algorithm is applied to the star photometer deployed in the city of Granada (37.16 N, 3.60 W, 680 ma.s.l.; South-East of Spain) for the measurements acquired between March 2007 and September 2009. The algorithm is evaluated with correlative measurements registered by a lidar system and also with all-sky images obtained at the sunset and sunrise of the previous and following days. Promising results are obtained detecting cloud-affected data. Additionally, the cloud screening algorithm has been evaluated under different aerosol conditions including Saharan dust intrusion, biomass burning and pollution events.

  3. Medium-Scale Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances and Plasma Bubbles Observed by an All-Sky Airglow Imager at Yonaguni, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadahiko Ogawa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on night time air glow imaging observations of the low latitude ionosphere by means of a 630-m all-sky imager in stalled in March 2006 at Yonaguni, Japan _ _ _ geomagnetic, about 100 km east of Taiwan. The imager detected medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs for about 7 hours on the night of 26 May 2006. A dense GPS net work in Japan also ob served the same MSTID event on this night. The imager and GEONET data indicate that most of the MSTIDs prop a gated south west ward from the north of Japan to the south of Yonaguni and Taiwan over 4000 km, with a southern limit of _ (geomagnetic latitude _ or lower. On the night of 10 November 2006, the imager observed two weak emission bands that were embedded on the F-region anomaly crest to the south of Yonaguni. The simultaneous electron density profiles from the FORMOSAT-3/COS MIC mission demonstrate that the weak emission bands are due to density depletions in equatorial plasma bubbles. These case studies suggest that the Yonaguni imager in collaboration with other instruments is very suit able for the study of ionospheric disturbances in and around the northern F-region anomaly crest.

  4. The Spatial Clustering of ROSAT All-Sky Survey AGNs II. Halo Occupation Distribution Modeling of the Cross Correlation Function

    CERN Document Server

    Miyaji, Takamitsu; Coil, Alison L; Aceves, Hector

    2010-01-01

    This is the second paper of a series that reports on our investigation of the clustering properties of AGNs in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) through cross-correlation functions (CCFs) with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies. In this paper, we apply the Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) model to the CCFs between the RASS Broad-line AGNs with SDSS Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) in the redshift range 0.16

  5. Implementation of an F-statistic all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves in Virgo VSR1 data

    CERN Document Server

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Borkowski, K; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corpuz, A; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Donath, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dorosh, O; Dossa, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endrőczi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hooper, S; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karlen, J; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, N G; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kremin, A; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, A; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Kwee, P; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Larson, S; Lasky, P D; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C -H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, J; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Roux, A Le; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B; Lewis, J; Li, T G F; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lin, A C; Littenberg, T B; Litvine, V; Lockerbie, N A; Lockett, V; Lodhia, D; Loew, K; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J; Lubinski, M J; Lück, H; Luijten, E; Lundgren, A P; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; Macarthur, J; Macdonald, E P; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magana-Sandoval, F; Mageswaran, M; Maglione, C; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Manca, G M; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mangini, N; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A; Maros, E; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martinelli, L; Martynov, D; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R A; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McLin, K; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Mehmet, M; Meidam, J; Meinders, M; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyers, P; Miao, H; Michel, C; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Milde, S; Miller, J; Minenkov, Y; Mingarelli, C M F; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moe, B; Moesta, P; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morgado, N; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nagy, M F; Kumar, D Nanda; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nelemans, G; Neri, I; Neri, M; Newton, G; Nguyen, T; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oppermann, P; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Osthelder, C; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Padilla, C; Pai, A; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pan, H; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Paoletti, F; Paoletti, R; Papa, M A; Paris, H; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pietka, M; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poeld, J; Poggiani, R; Poteomkin, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Premachandra, S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Privitera, S; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E; Quiroga, G; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Rácz, I; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rajalakshmi, G; Rakhmanov, M; Ramet, C; Ramirez, K; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Re, V; Read, J; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Rhoades, E; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rodruck, M; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Salemi, F; Sammut, L; Sandberg, V; Sanders, J R; Sannibale, V; Santiago-Prieto, I; Saracco, E; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Scheuer, J; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Shaddock, D; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sidery, T L; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L; Singh, R; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M; Smith, R J E; Smith-Lefebvre, N D; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Souradeep, T; Sperandio, L; Staley, A; Stebbins, J; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Stephens, B C; Steplewski, S; Stevenson, S; Stone, R; Stops, D; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Susmithan, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, R; ter Braack, A P M; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Toncelli, A; Tonelli, M; Torre, O; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Tse, M; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; van der Putten, S; van der Sluys, M V; van Heijningen, J; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Verma, S S; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vincent-Finley, R; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vousden, W D; Vyachanin, S P; Wade, A; Wade, L; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Wang, M; Wang, X; Ward, R L; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wiesner, K; Wilkinson, C; Williams, K; Williams, L; Williams, R; Williams, T; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yang, H; Yang, Z; Yoshida, S; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S; Zweizig, J

    2014-01-01

    We present an implementation of the $\\mathcal{F}$-statistic to carry out the first search in data from the Virgo laser interferometric gravitational wave detector for periodic gravitational waves from a priori unknown, isolated rotating neutron stars. We searched a frequency $f_0$ range from 100 Hz to 1 kHz and the frequency dependent spindown $f_1$ range from $-1.6\\,(f_0/100\\,{\\rm Hz}) \\times 10^{-9}\\,$ Hz/s to zero. A large part of this frequency - spindown space was unexplored by any of the all-sky searches published so far. Our method consisted of a coherent search over two-day periods using the $\\mathcal{F}$-statistic, followed by a search for coincidences among the candidates from the two-day segments. We have introduced a number of novel techniques and algorithms that allow the use of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithm in the coherent part of the search resulting in a fifty-fold speed-up in computation of the $\\mathcal{F}$-statistic with respect to the algorithm used in the other pipelines. No ...

  6. GMOSS: All-sky model of spectral radio brightness based on physical components and associated radiative processes

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, Mayuri Sathyanarayana; Shankar, N Udaya; Chluba, Jens

    2016-01-01

    We present Global MOdel for the radio Sky Spectrum (GMOSS) -- a novel, physically motivated model of the low-frequency radio sky from 22 MHz to 23 GHz. GMOSS invokes different physical components and associated radiative processes to describe the sky spectrum over 3072 pixels of $5^{\\circ}$ resolution. The spectra are allowed to be convex, concave or of more complex form with contributions from synchrotron emission, thermal emission and free-free absorption included. Physical parameters that describe the model are optimized to best fit four all-sky maps at 150 MHz, 408 MHz, 1420 MHz and 23 GHz and two maps at 22 MHz and 45 MHz generated using the Global Sky Model of de Oliveira-Costa et al. (2008). The fractional deviation of model to data has a median value of $6\\%$ and is less than $17\\%$ for $99\\%$ of the pixels. Though aimed at modeling of foregrounds for the global signal arising from the redshifted 21-cm line of Hydrogen during Cosmic Dawn and Epoch of Reionization (EoR) - over redshifts $150\\lesssim z ...

  7. GALACTIC ALL-SKY SURVEY HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS IN THE REGION OF THE MAGELLANIC LEADING ARM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    For, Bi-Qing; Staveley-Smith, Lister [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); McClure-Griffiths, N. M., E-mail: biqing.for@uwa.edu.au [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, PO Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

    2013-02-10

    We present a catalog of high-velocity clouds in the region of the Magellanic Leading Arm. The catalog is based on neutral hydrogen (H I) observations from the Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey. Excellent spectral resolution allows clouds with narrow-line components to be resolved. The total number of detected clouds is 419. We describe the method of cataloging and present the basic parameters of the clouds. We discuss the general distribution of the high-velocity clouds and classify the clouds based on their morphological type. The presence of a significant number of head-tail clouds and their distribution in the region is discussed in the context of Magellanic System simulations. We suggest that ram-pressure stripping is a more important factor than tidal forces for the morphology and formation of the Magellanic Leading Arm and that different environmental conditions might explain the morphological difference between the Magellanic Leading Arm and Magellanic Stream. We also discuss a newly identified population of clouds that forms the LA IV and a new diffuse bridge-like feature connecting the LA II and III complexes.

  8. GALACTIC ALL-SKY SURVEY HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS IN THE REGION OF THE MAGELLANIC LEADING ARM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a catalog of high-velocity clouds in the region of the Magellanic Leading Arm. The catalog is based on neutral hydrogen (H I) observations from the Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey. Excellent spectral resolution allows clouds with narrow-line components to be resolved. The total number of detected clouds is 419. We describe the method of cataloging and present the basic parameters of the clouds. We discuss the general distribution of the high-velocity clouds and classify the clouds based on their morphological type. The presence of a significant number of head-tail clouds and their distribution in the region is discussed in the context of Magellanic System simulations. We suggest that ram-pressure stripping is a more important factor than tidal forces for the morphology and formation of the Magellanic Leading Arm and that different environmental conditions might explain the morphological difference between the Magellanic Leading Arm and Magellanic Stream. We also discuss a newly identified population of clouds that forms the LA IV and a new diffuse bridge-like feature connecting the LA II and III complexes.

  9. Statistical characteristics of gravity waves observed by an all-sky airglow imager at Maui, HI and Cerro Pachon, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Bing; Liu, Alan Z.

    2016-07-01

    Many long-term observations, such as airglow imaging, have shown that gravity waves exist in the mesopause region most of the time. These waves deposit momentum and energy into the background atmosphere when dissipating, and thus exert strong influence to the atmosphere. In this study, we focus on (1) the climatology of gravity waves characteristics, (2) the intermittency of gravity wave momentum flux and (3) the duration/lifespan of gravity wave events. These properties have important implications for gravity wave parameterizations. This study is based on multi-year all sky OH airglow observations obtained at Maui, HI (20.7° N, 156.3° W) and the Andes Lidar Observatory in Chile (30.3° S, 70.7° W). The statistical distribution of intrinsic wave parameters and the momentum flux are analyzed. The probability density functions of gravity wave momentum flux and duration can be described by simple functions and are related to the gravity wave intermittency. The probability distributions of the two sites have some similarity but with noticeable differences, indicating different effects of the background flow and wave source on the gravity wave intermittency in the mesopause region.

  10. STRUCTURAL PARAMETERS OF STELLAR DISKS FROM TWO MICRON ALL SKY SURVEY IMAGES OF EDGE-ON GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present results of an analysis of the J, H, and Ks Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) images of 139 spiral edge-on galaxies selected from the Revised Flat Galaxies Catalog. The basic structural parameters scale length (h), scale height (z 0), and central surface brightness of the stellar disks (μ0) are determined for all selected galaxies in the near-infrared (NIR) bands. The mean relative ratios of the scale heights of the thin stellar disks in the J:H:Ks bands are 1.16:1.08:1.00, respectively. Comparing the scale heights obtained from the NIR bands for the same objects, we estimate the scale heights of the thin stellar disks corrected for the internal extinction. We find that the extinction-corrected scale height is, on average, 11% smaller than that in the K band. Using the extinction-corrected structural parameters, we find that the dark-to-luminous mass ratio is, on average, 1.3 for the galaxies in our sample within the framework of a simplified galactic model. The relative thicknesses of the stellar disks z 0/h correlates with their face-on central surface brightnesses obtained from the 2MASS images. We also find that the scale height of the stellar disks shows no systematic growth with radius in most of our galaxies.

  11. Cloud screening and quality control algorithm for star photometer data: assessment with lidar measurements and with all-sky images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pérez-Ramírez

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development and set up of a cloud screening and data quality control algorithm for a star photometer based on CCD camera as detector. These algorithms are necessary for passive remote sensing techniques to retrieve the columnar aerosol optical depth, δAe(λ, and precipitable water vapor content, W, at nighttime. This cloud screening procedure consists of calculating moving averages of δAe(λ and W under different time-windows combined with a procedure for detecting outliers. Additionally, to avoid undesirable δAe(λ and W fluctuations caused by the atmospheric turbulence, the data are averaged on 30 min. The algorithm is applied to the star photometer deployed in the city of Granada (37.16° N, 3.60° W, 680 m a.s.l.; South-East of Spain for the measurements acquired between March 2007 and September 2009. The algorithm is evaluated with correlative measurements registered by a lidar system and also with all-sky images obtained at the sunset and sunrise of the previous and following days. Promising results are obtained detecting cloud-affected data. Additionally, the cloud screening algorithm has been evaluated under different aerosol conditions including Saharan dust intrusion, biomass burning and pollution events.

  12. Cloud screening and quality control algorithm for star photometer data: assessment with lidar measurements and with all-sky-images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pérez-Ramírez

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper present the development and set up of a cloud screening and data quality control algorithm for a star photometer based on CCD camera as detector. This kind of algorithms is necessary for passive remote sensing techniques to retrieve the columnar aerosol optical depth, δAe(λ, and precipitable water vapor content, W, at night-time. This cloud screening procedure consists of calculating moving averages of δAe(λ and W under different time-windows combined with a procedure for detecting outliers. Additionally, to avoid undesirable δAe(λ and W fluctuations caused by the atmospheric turbulence, the data are averaged on 30 min. The algorithm is applied to the star photometer deployed in the city of Granada (37.16° N, 3.60° W, 680 m a.s.l.; South-East of Spain for the measurements acquired between March 2007 and September 2009. The algorithm is evaluated with correlative measurements registered by a lidar system and also with all-sky images obtained at the sunset and sunrise of the previous and following days. Promising results are obtained detecting cloud-affected data. Additionally, the cloud screening algorithm has been evaluated under different aerosol conditions including Saharan dust intrusion, biomass burning and pollution events.

  13. The C-Band All-Sky Survey (C-BASS): Design and implementation of the northern receiver

    CERN Document Server

    King, O G; Blackhurst, E J; Copley, C; Davis, R J; Dickinson, C; Holler, C M; Irfan, M O; John, J J; Leahy, J P; Leech, J; Muchovej, S J C; Pearson, T J; Stevenson, M A; Taylor, Angela C

    2013-01-01

    The C-Band All-Sky Survey (C-BASS) is a project to map the full sky in total intensity and linear polarization at 5 GHz. The northern component of the survey uses a broadband single-frequency analogue receiver fitted to a 6.1-m telescope at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory in California, USA. The receiver architecture combines a continuous-comparison radiometer and a correlation polarimeter in a single receiver for stable simultaneous measurement of both total intensity and linear polarization, using custom-designed analogue receiver components. The continuous-comparison radiometer measures the temperature difference between the sky and temperature-stabilized cold electrical reference loads. A cryogenic front-end is used to minimize receiver noise, with a system temperature of $\\approx 30$ K in both linear polarization and total intensity. Custom cryogenic notch filters are used to counteract man-made radio frequency interference. The radiometer $1/f$ noise is dominated by atmospheric fluctuations, while th...

  14. All-sky LIGO search for periodic gravitational waves in the early fifth-science-run data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Adhikari, R; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G; Amin, R S; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arain, M A; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Armor, P; Aso, Y; Aston, S; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballmer, S; Bantilan, H; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barsotti, L; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Behnke, B; Benacquista, M; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Biswas, R; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Bodiya, T P; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brinkmann, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brunet, G; Bullington, A; Buonanno, A; Burmeister, O; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Cardenas, L; Cardoso, V; Caride, S; Casebolt, T; Castaldi, G; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cepeda, C; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Christensen, N; Clark, D; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cokelaer, T; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R C; Cornish, N; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cutler, R M; Danzmann, K; Daudert, B; Davies, G; Debra, D; Degallaix, J; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; Desalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Dickson, J; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doomes, E E; Drever, R W P; Duke, I; Dumas, J-C; Dwyer, J; Echols, C; Edgar, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Ely, G; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Faltas, Y; Fan, Y; Fazi, D; Fejer, M M; Finn, L S; Flasch, K; Foley, S; Forrest, C; Fotopoulos, N; Franzen, A; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Garofoli, J A; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Goda, K; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gossler, S; Gouaty, R; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, M; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Grimaldi, F; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guenther, M; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hallam, J M; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harstad, E D; Haughian, E; Hayama, K; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Holt, K; Hosken, D; Hough, J; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D; Ito, M; Ivanov, A; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kamat, S; Kanner, J; Kasprzyk, D; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Ya; Khan, R; Khazanov, E; King, P; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kocsis, B; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R; Koranda, S; Kozak, D; Kozhevatov, I; Krishnan, B; Kwee, P; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leonor, I; Li, C; Lin, H; Lindquist, P E; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Lodhia, D; Lormand, M; Lu, P; Lubinski, M; Lucianetti, A; Lück, H; Machenschalk, B; Macinnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A; Markowitz, J; Maros, E; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McHugh, M; McIntyre, G; McKechan, D; McKenzie, K; Mehmet, M; Melissinos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C J; Meyers, D; Miller, A; Miller, J; Minelli, J; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Moe, B; Mohanty, S D; Moreno, G; Mors, K; Mossavi, K; Mowlowry, C; Mueller, G; Muhammad, D; Mukherjee, S; Mukhopadhyay, H; Mullavey, A; Müller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P G; Myers, E; Myers, J; Nash, T; Nelson, J; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Numata, K; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Ogin, G; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Perraca, A; Petrie, T; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H J; Plissi, M V; Postiglione, F; Principe, M; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Rainer, N; Rakhmanov, M; Ramsunder, M; Reed, T; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Roddy, S; Rogan, A M; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J H; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Sancho de la Jordana, L; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Santamaria, L; Saraf, S; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Savov, P; Scanlan, M; Schediwy, S W; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sergeev, A; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sinha, S; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, N D; Somiya, K; Sorazu, B; Stein, L C; Strain, K A; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, K-X; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Takahashi, H

    2009-03-20

    We report on an all-sky search with the LIGO detectors for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range 50-1100 Hz and with the frequency's time derivative in the range -5 x 10{-9}-0 Hz s{-1}. Data from the first eight months of the fifth LIGO science run (S5) have been used in this search, which is based on a semicoherent method (PowerFlux) of summing strain power. Observing no evidence of periodic gravitational radiation, we report 95% confidence-level upper limits on radiation emitted by any unknown isolated rotating neutron stars within the search range. Strain limits below 10{-24} are obtained over a 200-Hz band, and the sensitivity improvement over previous searches increases the spatial volume sampled by an average factor of about 100 over the entire search band. For a neutron star with nominal equatorial ellipticity of 10{-6}, the search is sensitive to distances as great as 500 pc.

  15. All Sky Camera, LIDAR and Electric Field Meter: Auxiliary instruments for the ASTRI SST-2M prototype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leto Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ASTRI SST-2M is the end-to-end prototype telescope of the Italian National Institute of Astrophysics, INAF, designed to investigate the 10–100 TeV band in the framework of the Cherenkov Telescope Array, CTA. The ASTRI SST-2M telescope has been installed in Italy in September 2014, at the INAF observing station located at Serra La Nave on Mount Etna. The telescope is foreseen to be completed and fully operative in spring 2015 including auxiliary instrumentation needed to support both operations and data analysis. In this contribution we present the current status of a sub-set of the auxiliary instruments that are being used at the Serra La Nave site, namely an All Sky Camera, an Electric Field Meter and a Raman Lidar devoted, together with further instrumentation, to the monitoring of the atmospheric and environmental conditions. The data analysis techniques under development for these instruments could be applied at the CTA sites, where similar auxiliary instrumentation will be installed.

  16. All Sky Camera, LIDAR and Electric Field Meter: auxiliary instruments for the ASTRI SST-2M prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Leto, Giuseppe; Bellassai, Giancarlo; Bruno, Pietro; Maccarone, Maria Concetta; Martinetti, Eugenio

    2015-01-01

    ASTRI SST-2M is the end-to-end prototype telescope of the Italian National Institute of Astro- physics, INAF, designed to investigate the 10-100 TeV band in the framework of the Cherenkov Telescope Array, CTA. The ASTRI SST-2M telescope has been installed in Italy in September 2014, at the INAF ob- serving station located at Serra La Nave on Mount Etna. The telescope is foreseen to be completed and fully operative in spring 2015 including auxiliary instrumentation needed to support both operations and data anal- ysis. In this contribution we present the current status of a sub-set of the auxiliary instruments that are being used at the Serra La Nave site, namely an All Sky Camera, an Electric Field Meter and a Raman Lidar devoted, together with further instrumentation, to the monitoring of the atmospheric and environmental conditions. The data analysis techniques under development for these instruments could be applied at the CTA sites, where similar auxiliary instrumentation will be installed.

  17. AGN and QSOs in the eROSITA All-Sky Survey -- Part II: Studies of large-scale structure

    CERN Document Server

    Kolodzig, Alexander; Hütsi, Gert; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    The four year X-ray all-sky survey (eRASS) of eROSITA telescope aboard the Spektrum-Roentgen-Gamma satellite will detect ~3 million AGN with a median redshift of z~1 and typical luminosity of L_{0.5-2.0keV} ~ 10^{44} erg/s. We show that this unprecedented AGN sample, complemented with redshift information, will supply us with outstanding opportunities for large-scale structure research. For the first time, detailed redshift and luminosity resolved studies of the bias factor for X-ray selected AGN will become possible. The eRASS AGN sample will not only improve the redshift and luminosity resolution of these studies but will also expand their luminosity range beyond L_{0.5-2.0 keV} ~ 10^{44} erg/s, thus making possible direct comparison of clustering properties of luminous X-ray AGN and optical quasars. These studies will dramatically improve our understanding of AGN environment, triggering mechanisms, growth of super-massive black holes and their co-evolution with dark matter halos. The eROSITA AGN sample wil...

  18. Mid- and far-infrared properties of Spitzer Galactic bubbles revealed by the AKARI all-sky surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Hattori, Yasuki; Ishihara, Daisuke; Fukui, Yasuo; Torii, Kazufumi; Hanaoka, Misaki; Kokusho, Takuma; Kondo, Akino; Shichi, Kazuyuki; Ukai, Sota; Yamagishi, Mitsuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Yuta

    2016-01-01

    We have carried out a statistical study on the mid- and far-infrared (IR) properties of Galactic IR bubbles observed by Spitzer. Using the Spitzer 8 ${\\mu}{\\rm m}$ images, we estimated the radii and covering fractions of their shells, and categorized them into closed, broken and unclassified bubbles with our data analysis method. Then, using the AKARI all-sky images at wavelengths of 9, 18, 65, 90, 140 and 160 ${\\mu}{\\rm m}$, we obtained the spatial distributions and the luminosities of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), warm and cold dust components by decomposing 6-band spectral energy distributions with model fitting. As a result, 180 sample bubbles show a wide range of the total IR luminosities corresponding to the bolometric luminosities of a single B-type star to many O-type stars. For all the bubbles, we investigated relationships between the radius, luminosities and luminosity ratios, and found that there are overall similarities in the IR properties among the bubbles regardless of their morpholog...

  19. Mid- and far-infrared properties of Spitzer Galactic bubbles revealed by the AKARI all-sky surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Yasuki; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Ishihara, Daisuke; Fukui, Yasuo; Torii, Kazufumi; Hanaoka, Misaki; Kokusho, Takuma; Kondo, Akino; Shichi, Kazuyuki; Ukai, Sota; Yamagishi, Mitsuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Yuta

    2016-06-01

    We have carried out a statistical study on the mid- and far-infrared (IR) properties of Galactic IR bubbles observed by Spitzer. Using the Spitzer 8 μm images, we estimated the radii and covering fractions of their shells, and categorized them into closed, broken, and unclassified bubbles with our data analysis method. Then, using the AKARI all-sky images at wavelengths of 9, 18, 65, 90, 140, and 160 μm, we obtained the spatial distributions and the luminosities of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), warm, and cold dust components by decomposing six-band spectral energy distributions with model fitting. As a result, 180 sample bubbles show a wide range of total IR luminosities corresponding to the bolometric luminosities of a single B-type star to many O-type stars. For all the bubbles, we investigated relationships between the radius, luminosities, and luminosity ratios, and found that there are overall similarities in the IR properties among the bubbles regardless of their morphological types. In particular, they follow a power-law relation with an index of ˜3 between the total IR luminosity and radius, as expected from the conventional picture of the Strömgren sphere. The exceptions are large broken bubbles; they indicate higher total IR luminosities, lower fractional luminosities of the PAH emission, and dust heating sources located nearer to the shells. We discuss the implications of those differences for a massive star-formation scenario.

  20. Albedo Properties of Main Belt Asteroids Based on the Infrared All-Sky Survey of the Astronomical Satellite AKARI

    CERN Document Server

    Usui, Fumihiko; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; Kuroda, Daisuke; Mueller, Thomas G; Ootsubo, Takafumi; Matsuhara, Hideo

    2012-01-01

    We present an analysis of the albedo properties of main belt asteroids detected by the All-Sky Survey of the infrared satellite AKARI. The characteristics of 5120 asteroids detected by the survey, including their sizes and albedos, were cataloged in the Asteroid Catalog Using AKARI (AcuA). Size and albedo measurements were based on the Standard Thermal Model, using inputs of infrared fluxes and absolute magnitudes. Main belt asteroids, which account for 4722 of the 5120 AcuA asteroids, have semimajor axes of 2.06 to 3.27 AU. AcuA provides a complete data set of all main belt asteroids brighter than the absolute magnitude of H 20 km. We confirmed that the albedo distribution of the main belt asteroids is strongly bimodal as was already known from the past observations, and that the bimodal distribution occurs not only in the total population, but also within inner, middle, and outer regions of the main belt. We found that the small asteroids have much more variety in albedo than the large asteroids. In spite ...

  1. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of fish scale loaded TiO2 composites under solar light irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Ngee Ho; Soon-An Ong; Hakimah Osman; Fong-Mun Chong

    2012-01-01

    Fish scale (FS) loaded TiO2 composites were investigated as photocatalysts in degradation of Methyl Orange under solar light irradiation.Composites were prepared through sol-gel method by varying mass ratio of TiO2/FS at 90:10,70:30 and 50:50,respectively.The catalysts prepared in this study were characterized by using XRD,SEM,FT-IR and nitrogen sorption.The effects of solar irradiation,mass ratio of TiO2/FS composites,irradiation time and catalyst loadings were studied.Synergistic effect was found in TiO2/FS of 90:10 composite which performed higher photocatalytic degradation than synthesized TiO2 under solar light irradiation.However,further increasing fish scale content in the composites reduced the photocatalytic activity drastically.Under solar light irradiation,all the catalysts in this study exhibited photocatalytic activity,except TiO2/FS of 50:50 composite that only acted as a weak biosorbent without performing any photocatalytic property.Photocatalytic degradation increased with increasing catalyst loading and irradiation time but decreased with increased of initial dye concentration.

  2. Influence of spatiotemporally distributed irradiance data input on temperature evolution in parabolic trough solar field simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubolz, K.; Schenk, H.; Hirsch, T.

    2016-05-01

    Concentrating solar field operation is affected by shadowing through cloud movement. For line focusing systems the impact of varying irradiance has been studied before by several authors with simulations of relevant thermodynamics assuming spatially homogeneous irradiance or using artificial test signals. While today's simulation capabilities allow more and more a higher spatiotemporal resolution of plant processes there are only few studies on influence of spatially distributed irradiance due to lack of available data. Based on recent work on generating real irradiance maps with high spatial resolution this paper demonstrates their influence on solar field thermodynamics. For a case study an irradiance time series is chosen. One solar field section with several loops and collecting header is modeled for simulation purpose of parabolic trough collectors and oil as heat transfer medium. Assuming homogeneous mass flow distribution among all loops we observe spatially varying temperature characteristics. They are analysed without and with mass flow control and their impact on solar field control design is discussed. Finally, the potential of distributed irradiance data is outlined.

  3. Forecasting solar irradiation using WRF model and refining statistics for Northeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, E. B.; Lima, F. J. L.; Martins, F. R.

    2015-12-01

    Solar energy is referred to as variable generation sources because their electricity production varies based on the availability of sun irradiance. To accommodate this variability, electricity grid operators use a variety of tools to maintain a reliable electricity supply, one of them is to forecast solar irradiation, and to adjust other electricity sources as needed. This work reports an approach to forecast solar irradiation in the Brazilian Northeastern region (NEB) by using statistically post-processing data from mesoscale model outputs. The method assimilates the diversity of climate characteristics occurring in the region presenting the largest solar energy potentials in Brazil. Untreated solar irradiance forecasts for 24h in advance were obtained using the WRF model runs. Cluster analysis technique was employed to find out areas presenting similar climate characteristics and to reduce uncertainties. Comparison analysis between WRF model outputs and site-specific measured data were performed to evaluate the model skill in forecasting the surface solar irradiation. After that, post-processing of WRF outputs using artificial neural networks (ANNs) and multiple regression methods refined the short-term solar irradiation forecasts. A set of pre-selected variables of the WRF model outputs representing the forecasted atmospheric conditions were used as predictors by the ANNs. Several predictors were tested in the adjustment and simulation of the ANNs. We found the best ANNs architecture and a group of 10 predictors, with which more in-depth analyzes were carried out, including performance evaluation for fall and spring of 2011 (rainy and dry season in NEB). The site-specific measured solar radiation data came from 110 stations distributed throughout the NEB. Data for the rainy season were acquired from March to May, and for the dry season from September to November. We concluded that the untreated numerical forecasts of solar irradiation provided by WRF exhibited a

  4. Toward Improved Solar Irradiance Forecasts: Derivation of Downwelling Surface Shortwave Radiation in Arizona from Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang Ki; Holmgren, William F.; Stovern, Michael; Betterton, Eric A.

    2016-07-01

    Over the past few decades, substantial progress has been made in the retrieval of surface shortwave radiation from satellite measurements for the Earth's energy budget as well as solar energy applications. We present a new algorithm to derive the downwelling surface shortwave radiation for the Southwestern US using geostationary satellite products. A look-up table generated by the Goddard Space Flight Center Radiative Transfer Model is employed to derive the shortwave radiation at the ground by comparing observed and modeled top of atmosphere shortwave albedo. The algorithm was compared to ground observation stations at three locations, such as the University of Arizona, the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and Desert Rock, NV. For all sky conditions, the average values of root-mean-square error between the instantaneous estimates and in situ measurements ranged from 84.2 to 89.4 W m-2 and were 30 W m-2 when evaluated on daily time scales. The error statistics were considerably better for clear sky than for cloudy sky. The average values of instantaneous root-mean-square error for the clear-sky conditions range from 39.4 to 43.7 W m-2, while average root-mean-square error for the cloudy-sky conditions is between 137.0 and 141.2 W m-2.

  5. Improved sky imaging for studies of enhanced UV irradiance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Sabburg

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A recent World Meteorological Organisation report discussed the importance of continued study of the effect of clouds on the solar UV radiation reaching the earth's surface. The report mentions that the use of all-sky imagery offers the potential to understand and quantify cloud effects more accurately. There are an increasing number of studies investigating the enhancement of surface solar, UV irradiance, and UV actinic flux, using automated CCD and sky imagers. This paper describes new algorithms applicable to a commercially available all-sky imager (TSI-440, for research investigating cloud enhanced spectral UV irradiance. Specifically, these include three new algorithms relating to cloud amount at different spatial positions from 1 zenith and 2 from the solar position and 3 the visible brightness of clouds surrounding the sun. A possible relationship between UV enhancement and the occurrence of near-sun cloud brightness is reported based on this preliminary data. It is found that a range of wavelength dependent intensities, from 306 to 400 nm, can occur in one day for UV enhancements. Evidence for a possible decreasing variation of intensity with longer wavelengths is also presented.

  6. Improved broadband solar irradiance from the multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalsky, J.J.; Augustine, J.A. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Earth System Research Laboratory, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Kiedron, P.W. [Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Approximations to total and diffuse horizontal and direct normal, broadband solar irradiance (280-4000 nm) can be obtained from the multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) using the unfiltered silicon channel of this seven-channel instrument. However, the unfiltered silicon channel only responds to wavelengths between 300 and 1100 nm and does not have a uniform spectral response. In contrast, the best, more expensive, first-class, thermopile-based radiometers respond fairly uniformly to all solar wavelengths. While the total horizontal and direct normal solar irradiance measurements made with the MFRSR unfiltered silicon channel are reasonable if carefully calibrated with a thermopile radiometer, the diffuse horizontal irradiance calibrated in this way has a large bias. These issues are common to all inexpensive, silicon-cell, solar pyranometers. In this paper we use a multivariate, linear regression technique for approximating the thermopile-measured total, diffuse, and direct broadband solar irradiances using the six, narrowband filters and the open-channel of an MFRSR. The calibration of the MFRSR for broadband solar by comparing various combinations of MFRSR channels to first-class thermopile instruments is illustrated, and methods to track the instrument response during field deployments are investigated. We also suggest an approach to calibrate the open-channel for all three components that could improve measurements that are made using typical, commercial, silicon-cell pyranometers. (author)

  7. Wavelength Dependence of Solar Flare Irradiation and its Influence on the Thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanshi; Richmond, Arthur D.; Deng, Yue; Qian, L.; Solomon, S.; Chamberlin, P.

    2012-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of solar flare enhancement is one of the important factors determining how the Thermosphere-Ionosphere (T-I) system response to flares. To investigate the wavelength dependence of solar flare, the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) has been run for 34 X-class flares. The results show that the percentage increases of solar irradiance at flare peak comparing to pre-flare condition have a clear wavelength dependence. In the wavelength range between 0 - 195 nm, it can vary from 1% to 10000%. The solar irradiance enhancement is largest ( 1000%) in the XUV range (0 - 25 nm), and is about 100% in EUV range (25 - 120 nm). The influence of different wavebands on the T-I system during the October 28th, 2003 flare (X17.2-class) has also been examined using the latest version of National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Thermosphere- Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIE-GCM). While the globally integrated solar energy deposition is largest in the 0 - 14 nm waveband, the impact of solar irradiance enhancement on the thermosphere at 400 km is largest for 25 - 105 nm waveband. The effect of 122 - 195 nm is small in magnitude, but it decays slowly.

  8. The UV-A and visible solar irradiance spectrum: inter-comparison of absolutely calibrated, spectrally medium resolution solar irradiance spectra from balloon- and satellite-borne measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Gurlit

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of the ENVISAT/-SCIAMACHY satellite validation, solar irradiance spectra are absolutely measured at moderate resolution in the UV/visible spectral range (in the UV from 316.7–418 nm and the visible from 400–652 nm at a full width half maximum resolution of 0.55 nm and 1.48 nm, respectively from aboard the azimuth-controlled LPMA/DOAS balloon gondola at around 32 km balloon float altitude. After accounting for the atmospheric extinction due to Rayleigh scattering and gaseous absorption (O3, and NO2, the measured solar spectra are compared with previous observations. Our solar irradiance is +1.6% larger than the re-calibrated Kurucz et al. (1984 solar spectrum (Fontenla et al., 1999, called MODTRAN 3.5 in the visible spectral range (435–650 nm, +1.5% larger in the (370–415 nm wavelength interval, but −4% smaller in the UV spectral range (316.7–370 nm, when the Kurucz spectrum is convolved to the spectral resolution of our instrument. The same comparison with the SOLSPEC solar spectrum (Thuillier et al., 1997, 1998a, b confirms the somewhat larger solar irradiance (+1.7% measured by the balloon instrument from 435–500 nm, but not from 500–650 nm, where the SOLSPEC is −1.3% lower than MODTRAN 3.5. Comparison of the SCIAMACHY solar spectrum from channels 1 to 4 (– re-calibrated by the University of Bremen – with MODTRAN 3.5 indicates an agreement of +0.2% in the visible spectral range (435–585 nm. With this calibration, the SCIAMACHY solar spectrum is congruent with the balloon observations (−1% in the 316.7–370 nm wavelength range, but both are up to −5%/−3% smaller than MODTRAN 3.5 and SOLSPEC, respectively. In agreement with findings of Skupin et al. (2002 our study emphasizes that the present ESA SCIAMACHY level 1 calibration is systematically +15% larger in the considered wavelength intervals when compared to all available other solar irradiance measurements.

  9. Solar Irradiance Reference Spectra (SIRS) for the 2008 Whole Heliosphere Interval (WHI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Harder, Jerald W.; Hock, Rachel A.; Snow, Martin; Eparvier, Francis G.; Fontenla, Juan; McClintock, William E.; Richard, Erik C.

    2009-01-01

    The IHY2007 Whole Heliosphere Interval (WHI) for solar Carrington Rotation 2068 (20 March to 16 April 2008) has been very successful in obtaining a wide variety of solar, heliospheric, and planetary observations during times of solar cycle minimum conditions. One of these efforts is the generation of solar irradiance reference spectra (SIRS) from 0.1 nm to 2400 nm using a combination of satellite and sounding rocket observations. These reference spectra include daily satellite observations from TIMED Solar Extreme ultraviolet Experiment (SEE) and Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) instruments. The extreme ultraviolet range is also improved with higher spectral resolution observations using the prototype SDO Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) aboard a sounding rocket launched on 14 April 2008. The SIRS result is an important accomplishment in that it is the first data set to have simultaneous measurements over the full spectral coverage up to 2400 nm during solar cycle minimum conditions.

  10. A new approach to long-term reconstruction of the solar irradiance leads to large historical solar forcing

    CERN Document Server

    Shapiro, A I; Rozanov, E; Schoell, M; Haberreiter, M; Shapiro, A V; Nyeki, S

    2011-01-01

    The variable Sun is the most likely candidate for natural forcing of past climate change on time scales of 50 to 1000 years. Evidence for this understanding is that the terrestrial climate correlates positively with solar activity. During the past 10,000 years, the Sun has experienced substantial variations in activity and there have been numerous attempts to reconstruct solar irradiance. While there is general agreement on how solar forcing varied during the last several hundred years --- all reconstructions are proportional to the solar activity --- there is scientific controversy on the magnitude of solar forcing. We present a reconstruction of the Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance covering 130 nm--10 $\\mu$m from 1610 to the present with annual resolution and for the Holocene with 22-year resolution. We assume that the minimum state of the quiet Sun in time corresponds to the observed quietest area on the present Sun. Then we use available long-term proxies of the solar activity, which are $^{10}$Be isot...

  11. Temporal and spectral variations of the photoelectron flux and solar irradiance during an X class solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, W. K.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Woods, T. N.; Richards, P. G.

    2008-06-01

    Photoelectrons are the main energy source of airglow used to diagnose the state of the ionosphere-thermosphere system. Because of measurement uncertainties and substantial gaps in the historical record, parameterized models of the EUV irradiance and photoelectron flux are generally used to estimate airglow intensities. This paper compares observed and modeled photoelectron spectra from an X3 class flare that occurred on July 15, 2002. The photoelectron data were obtained from the FAST satellite. Model photoelectron spectra were obtained from the Field Line Inter-hemispheric Plasma (FLIP) model using 10 s cadence solar spectra at 1 nm resolution from the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM). The observed and modeled spectra agree well temporally and spectrally within the uncertainties of the models and data. Systematic differences found between observed and modeled photoelectron spectra suggest that the solar irradiance from FISM could be improved at wavelengths shortward of 17 nm.

  12. Suzaku Wide-band All-sky Monitor measurements of duration distributions of gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmori, Norisuke; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Ohno, Masanori; Sugita, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Ryuuji; Nishioka, Yusuke; Hurley, Kevin; Hanabata, Yoshitaka; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Enomoto, Junichi; Fujinuma, Takeshi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Iwakiri, Wataru; Kawano, Takafumi; Kokubun, Motohide; Makishima, Kazuo; Matsuoka, Shunsuke; Nagayoshi, Tsutomu; Nakagawa, Yujin E.; Nakaya, Souhei; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Takeda, Sawako; Terada, Yukikatsu; Urata, Yuji; Yabe, Seiya; Yasuda, Tetsuya; Yamauchi, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    We report on the T90 and T50 duration distributions and their relations with spectral hardness using 1464 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which were observed by the Suzaku Wide-band All-sky Monitor (WAM) from 2005 August 4 to 2010 December 29. The duration distribution is clearly bimodal in three energy ranges (50-120, 120-250, and 250-550 keV), but is unclear in the 550-5000 keV range, probably because of the limited sample size. The WAM durations decrease with energy according to a power-law index of -0.058(-0.034, +0.033). The hardness-duration relation reveals the presence of short-hard and long-soft GRBs. The short:long event ratio tends to be higher with increasing energy. We compared the WAM distribution with ones measured by eight other GRB instruments. The WAM T90 distribution is very similar to those of INTEGRAL/SPI-ACS and Granat/PHEBUS, and least likely to match the Swift/BAT distribution. The WAM short:long event ratio (0.25:0.75) is much different from Swift/BAT (0.08:0.92), but is almost the same as CGRO/BATSE (0.25:0.75). To explain this difference for BAT, we examined three effects: BAT trigger types, energy dependence of the duration, and detection sensitivity differences between BAT and WAM. As a result, we found that the ratio difference could be explained mainly by energy dependence including soft extended emissions for short GRBs and much better sensitivity for BAT which can detect weak/long GRBs. The reason for the same short:long event ratio for BATSE and WAM was confirmed by calculation using the trigger efficiency curve.

  13. The 60 Month All-Sky Burst Alert Telescope Survey of Active Galactic Nucleus and the Anisotropy of Nearby AGNs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajello, M.; Alexander, D. M.; Greiner, J.; Madejeski, G. M.; Gehrels, N.; Burlon, D.

    2014-01-01

    Surveys above 10 keV represent one of the best resources to provide an unbiased census of the population of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We present the results of 60 months of observation of the hard X-ray sky with Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). In this time frame, BAT-detected (in the 15-55 keV band) 720 sources in an all-sky survey of which 428 are associated with AGNs, most of which are nearby. Our sample has negligible incompleteness and statistics a factor of approx. 2 larger over similarly complete sets of AGNs. Our sample contains (at least) 15 bona fide Compton-thick AGNs and 3 likely candidates. Compton-thick AGNs represent approx. 5% of AGN samples detected above 15 keV. We use the BAT data set to refine the determination of the log N-log S of AGNs which is extremely important, now that NuSTAR prepares for launch, toward assessing the AGN contribution to the cosmic X-ray background. We show that the log N-log S of AGNs selected above 10 keV is now established to approx. 10% precision. We derive the luminosity function of Compton-thick AGNs and measure a space density of 7.9(+4.1/-2.9)× 10(exp -5)/cubic Mpc for objects with a de-absorbed luminosity larger than 2 × 10(exp 42) erg / s. As the BAT AGNs are all mostly local, they allow us to investigate the spatial distribution of AGNs in the nearby universe regardless of absorption. We find concentrations of AGNs that coincide spatially with the largest congregations of matter in the local (much < 85 Mpc) universe. There is some evidence that the fraction of Seyfert 2 objects is larger than average in the direction of these dense regions..

  14. GASS: The Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey. Update: improved correction for instrumental effects and new data release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalberla, P. M. W.; Haud, U.

    2015-06-01

    Context. The Galactic All-Sky Survey (GASS) is a survey of Galactic atomic hydrogen (H i) emission in the southern sky observed with the Parkes 64-m Radio Telescope. The first data release (GASS I) concerned survey goals and observing techniques, the second release (GASS II) focused on stray radiation and instrumental corrections. Aims: We seek to remove the remaining instrumental effects and present a third data release. Methods: We use the HEALPix tessellation concept to grid the data on the sphere. Individual telescope records are compared with averages on the nearest grid position for significant deviations. All averages are also decomposed into Gaussian components with the aim of segregating unacceptable solutions. Improved priors are used for an iterative baseline fitting and cleaning. In the last step we generate 3D FITS data cubes and examine them for remaining problems. Results: We have removed weak, but systematic baseline offsets with an improved baseline fitting algorithm. We have unraveled correlator failures that cause time dependent oscillations; errors cause stripes in the scanning direction. The remaining problems from radio frequency interference (RFI) are spotted. Classifying the severeness of instrumental errors for each individual telescope record (dump) allows us to exclude bad data from averages. We derive parameters that allow us to discard dumps without compromising the noise of the resulting data products too much. All steps are reiterated several times: in each case, we check the Gaussian parameters for remaining problems and inspect 3D FITS data cubes visually. We find that in total ~1.5% of the telescope dumps need to be discarded in addition to ~0.5% of the spectral channels that were excluded in GASS II. Conclusions: The new data release (GASS III) facilitates data products with improved quality. A new web interface, compatible with the previous version, is available for download of GASS III FITS cubes and spectra.

  15. CONSTRUCTION OF A CALIBRATED PROBABILISTIC CLASSIFICATION CATALOG: APPLICATION TO 50k VARIABLE SOURCES IN THE ALL-SKY AUTOMATED SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With growing data volumes from synoptic surveys, astronomers necessarily must become more abstracted from the discovery and introspection processes. Given the scarcity of follow-up resources, there is a particularly sharp onus on the frameworks that replace these human roles to provide accurate and well-calibrated probabilistic classification catalogs. Such catalogs inform the subsequent follow-up, allowing consumers to optimize the selection of specific sources for further study and permitting rigorous treatment of classification purities and efficiencies for population studies. Here, we describe a process to produce a probabilistic classification catalog of variability with machine learning from a multi-epoch photometric survey. In addition to producing accurate classifications, we show how to estimate calibrated class probabilities and motivate the importance of probability calibration. We also introduce a methodology for feature-based anomaly detection, which allows discovery of objects in the survey that do not fit within the predefined class taxonomy. Finally, we apply these methods to sources observed by the All-Sky Automated Survey (ASAS), and release the Machine-learned ASAS Classification Catalog (MACC), a 28 class probabilistic classification catalog of 50,124 ASAS sources in the ASAS Catalog of Variable Stars. We estimate that MACC achieves a sub-20% classification error rate and demonstrate that the class posterior probabilities are reasonably calibrated. MACC classifications compare favorably to the classifications of several previous domain-specific ASAS papers and to the ASAS Catalog of Variable Stars, which had classified only 24% of those sources into one of 12 science classes.

  16. CONSTRUCTION OF A CALIBRATED PROBABILISTIC CLASSIFICATION CATALOG: APPLICATION TO 50k VARIABLE SOURCES IN THE ALL-SKY AUTOMATED SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, Joseph W.; Starr, Dan L.; Miller, Adam A.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Brink, Henrik; Crellin-Quick, Arien [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Butler, Nathaniel R., E-mail: jwrichar@stat.berkeley.edu [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    With growing data volumes from synoptic surveys, astronomers necessarily must become more abstracted from the discovery and introspection processes. Given the scarcity of follow-up resources, there is a particularly sharp onus on the frameworks that replace these human roles to provide accurate and well-calibrated probabilistic classification catalogs. Such catalogs inform the subsequent follow-up, allowing consumers to optimize the selection of specific sources for further study and permitting rigorous treatment of classification purities and efficiencies for population studies. Here, we describe a process to produce a probabilistic classification catalog of variability with machine learning from a multi-epoch photometric survey. In addition to producing accurate classifications, we show how to estimate calibrated class probabilities and motivate the importance of probability calibration. We also introduce a methodology for feature-based anomaly detection, which allows discovery of objects in the survey that do not fit within the predefined class taxonomy. Finally, we apply these methods to sources observed by the All-Sky Automated Survey (ASAS), and release the Machine-learned ASAS Classification Catalog (MACC), a 28 class probabilistic classification catalog of 50,124 ASAS sources in the ASAS Catalog of Variable Stars. We estimate that MACC achieves a sub-20% classification error rate and demonstrate that the class posterior probabilities are reasonably calibrated. MACC classifications compare favorably to the classifications of several previous domain-specific ASAS papers and to the ASAS Catalog of Variable Stars, which had classified only 24% of those sources into one of 12 science classes.

  17. Simulation Study of Effects of Solar Irradiance and Sea Surface Temperature on Monsoons and Global Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G. K.; Mehta, V.; Lau, W. K.-M.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A recent version of the GEOS 2 GCM was used to isolate the roles of the annual cycles of solar irradiation and/or sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) on the simulated circulation and rainfall. Four 4-year long integrations were generated with the GCM. The first integration, called Control Case, used daily-interpolated SSTs from a 30 year monthly SST climatology that was obtained from the analyzed SST-data, while the solar irradiation at the top of the atmosphere was calculated normally at hourly intervals. The next two cases prescribed the SSTs or the incoming solar irradiance at the top of the atmosphere at their annual mean values, respectively while everything else was kept the same as in the Control Case. In this way the influence of the annual cycles of both external forcings was isolated.

  18. Protosolar Irradiation in the Early Solar System: Clues from Lithium and Boron Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ming-Chang; Alexander, Conel M O'D; Lee, Typhoon

    2011-01-01

    We report Li and B isotopic compositions of 10 Spinel-HIBonite spherules (SHIBs) separated from the Murchison meteorite, in order to understand their irradiation history in the early Solar System. The extremely low Be concentrations in SHIBs preclude detection of extinct 10Be, but instead allow for a search of the original Li and B isotopic ratios of the grains, as these isotopes are sensitive indicators for irradiation. We found that some of the SHIBs carried sub-chondritic 7Li/6Li and supra-chondritic 10B/11B ratios. Considering two possible irradiation scenarios that could have occurred in the early Solar System, irradiation of hibonite solids followed by addition of isotopically normal Li and B seems to be the most plausible explanation for the observed Li and B isotope ratios.

  19. A local proton irradiation model for isotopic anomalies in the solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T.

    1978-01-01

    An attempt is made to explain the O-16 and Al-26 anomalies observed in solar-system bodies in the framework of a local irradiation model wherein a small amount of solar system matter of normal isotopic composition was irradiated by energetic protons from the primeval sun. Several isotopic constraints are summarized with which the model should be consistent, and a proton energy distribution and fluence and a target elemental composition are chosen such that the extraordinary component produced by irradiation satisfies the constraints. Detailed attention is given to the relevant oxygen reactions, Al-26 production, and effects of proton irradiation on isotopes of Mg, Ca, and Ba. A scenario is outlined which satisfies all the constraints. Consequences of the model are discussed with respect to the isotopic anomalies observed in Allende inclusions.

  20. The sun as a variable star: solar and stellar irradiance variations. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pap, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    The main objective of this Colloquium was to review the most recent results on the observations, theoretical interpretations, empirical and physical models of the variations observed in solar and stellar irradiances, as well as on Sun-climate connections. The Colloquium was divided into six sessions as defined by the key topics. Included for each session were the 36 invited talks and 110 contributed poster papers. A special session of the Solar Electromagnetic Radiation Study for Solar Cycle 22 (SOLERS22) was held on June 25, 1993, where the five working groups discussed their progress and future plans on measuring the absolute value of solar total and spectral irradiances and studying their temporal variations. Papers on both theoretical models and solar irradiance observations have shown that the solar energy output changes on different time scales: the short-term (from minutes to months) variations are related to surface modulations mainly caused by the evolution of active regions, the solar cycle related long-term variations are directly linked with the evolution of magnetic fields over the activity cycle, while the secular variations over centuries are associated with long-term modulations.

  1. The origin of Total Solar Irradiance variability on timescales less than a day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Alexander; Krivova, Natalie; Schmutz, Werner; Solanki, Sami K.; Leng Yeo, Kok; Cameron, Robert; Beeck, Benjamin

    2016-07-01

    Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) varies on timescales from minutes to decades. It is generally accepted that variability on timescales of a day and longer is dominated by solar surface magnetic fields. For shorter time scales, several additional sources of variability have been proposed, including convection and oscillation. However, available simplified and highly parameterised models could not accurately explain the observed variability in high-cadence TSI records. We employed the high-cadence solar imagery from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the SATIRE (Spectral And Total Irradiance Reconstruction) model of solar irradiance variability to recreate the magnetic component of TSI variability. The recent 3D simulations of solar near-surface convection with MURAM code have been used to calculate the TSI variability caused by convection. This allowed us to determine the threshold timescale between TSI variability caused by the magnetic field and convection. Our model successfully replicates the TSI measurements by the PICARD/PREMOS radiometer which span the period of July 2010 to February 2014 at 2-minute cadence. Hence, we demonstrate that solar magnetism and convection can account for TSI variability at all timescale it has ever been measured (sans the 5-minute component from p-modes).

  2. Solar Electromagnetic Radiation Study for Solar Cycle 22: Solar Ultraviolet Irradiance, 120 to 300 NM: Report of Working Groups 2 and 3 of SOLERS 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottman, G. J.; Cebula, R. P.; Gillotay, D.; Simon, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of Working Group 2 and Working Group 3 of the SOLax Electromagnetic Radiation Study for Solar Cycle 22 (SOLERS22) Program. The international (SOLERS22) is Project 1.2 of the Solar-Terrestrial Energy Program (STEP) sponsored by SCOSTEP, a committee of the International Council of Scientific Unions). SOLERS22 is comprised of five Working Groups, each concentrating on a specific wave-length range: WG-1 - visible and infrared, WG-2 - mid-ultraviolet (200 solar irradiance values in the specified wavelength ranges, 2) consider the evolving solar structures as the cause of temporal variations, and 3) understand the underlying physical processes driving these changes.

  3. Temperature and 8 MeV electron irradiation effects on GaAs solar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Asha Rao; Sheeja Krishnan; Ganesh Sajeev; K Siddappa

    2010-06-01

    GaAs solar cells hold the record for the highest single band-gap cell efficiency. Successful application of these cells in advanced space-borne systems demand characterization of cell properties like dark current under different ambient conditions and the stability of the cells against particle irradiation in space. In this paper, the results of the studies carried out on the effect of 8 MeV electron irradiation on the electrical properties of GaAs solar cells are presented. The – (current–voltage) characteristics of the cells under dark and AM1.5 illumination condition are studied and 8 MeV electron irradiation was carried out on the cells where they were exposed to graded doses of electrons from 1 to 100 kGy. The devices were also characterized using capacitance measurements at various frequencies before and after irradiation. The effect of electron irradiation on the solar cell parameters was studied. It is found that only small changes were observed in the GaAs solar cell parameters up to an electron dose of 100 kGy, exhibiting good tolerance for electrons of 8 MeV energy.

  4. Solar irradiance observed at Summit, Greenland: Possible links to magnetic activity on short timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, John E.

    2016-09-01

    Measurements of ground-level visible sunlight (400-600 nm) from Summit, Greenland over the period August 2004 through October 2014 define the attenuation provided by cloudiness, including its dependence on solar elevation and season. The long-term mean cloud-attenuation increases with increasing solar zenith angle, consistent with radiative transfer calculations which treat a cloud as a plane parallel layer with a strong bias toward forward scattering and an albedo for diffuse radiation near 0.1. The ratio of measured irradiance to clear-sky irradiance for solar zenith angles greater than 66° has a small, but statistically significant, positive correlation with the previous day's magnetic activity as measured by the daily Ap index, but no clear relationship exists between the irradiance ratio and daily changes in the ground-level neutron flux measured at Thule over the time frame considered. A high value of Ap on one day tends to be followed by a day whose ground-level solar irradiance is slightly greater than would occur otherwise. In an average sense, the visible irradiance following a day with Ap>16 exceeds that following a day with Ap≤16 by 1.2-1.3% with a 95% confidence range of approximately ±1.0%. The results are broadly compatible with small changes in atmospheric scattering following magnetic disturbances.

  5. Mechanism of degradation of electrolyte solutions for dye-sensitized solar cells under ultraviolet light irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Shohei; Katoh, Ryuzi

    2015-01-01

    We studied the mechanism of the degradation of I-/I3--containing electrolyte solutions for dye-sensitized solar cells under UV light irradiation. The yellow electrolyte solutions underwent achromatization during irradiation, indicating the reduction of I3-. We propose a mechanism involving the production of holes in TiO2, reaction of the holes with solvent molecules, and subsequent reduction of I3- by electrons remaining in the TiO2. Although the quantum yield of the photodegradation reaction is estimated to be low (3 × 10-3), this reaction can nevertheless be expected to affect the long-term stability of dye-sensitized solar cell devices.

  6. Towards the automatic identification of cloudiness condition by means of solar global irradiance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, G.; Serrano, A.; Cancillo, M. L.

    2010-09-01

    This study focuses on the design of an automatic algorithm for classification of the cloudiness condition based only on global irradiance measurements. Clouds are a major modulating factor for the Earth radiation budget. They attenuate the solar radiation and control the terrestrial radiation participating in the energy balance. Generally, cloudiness is a limiting factor for the solar radiation reaching the ground, highly contributing to the Earth albedo. Additionally it is the main responsible for the high variability shown by the downward irradiance measured at ground level. Being a major source for the attenuation and high-frequency variability of the solar radiation available for energy purposes in solar power plants, the characterization of the cloudiness condition is of great interest. This importance is even higher in Southern Europe, where very high irradiation values are reached during long periods within the year. Thus, several indexes have been proposed in the literature for the characterization of the cloudiness condition of the sky. Among these indexes, those exclusively involving global irradiance are of special interest since this variable is the most widely available measurement in most radiometric stations. Taking this into account, this study proposes an automatic algorithm for classifying the cloudiness condition of the sky into three categories: cloud-free, partially cloudy and overcast. For that aim, solar global irradiance was measured by Kipp&Zonen CMP11 pyranometer installed on the terrace of the Physics building in the Campus of Badajoz (Spain) of the University of Extremadura. Measurements were recorded at one-minute basis for a period of study extending from 23 November 2009 to 31 March 2010. The algorithm is based on the clearness index kt, which is calculated as the ratio between the solar global downward irradiance measured at ground and the solar downward irradiance at the top of the atmosphere. Since partially cloudy conditions

  7. Solar irradiance in the stratosphere - Implications for the Herzberg continuum absorption of O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, J. E.; Mentall, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    A set of solar irradiance observations is analyzed that were performed from the third Solar Absorption Balloon Experiment (SABE-3) as the payload ascended through the stratosphere from 32 to 39 km. Comparison of these data with calculations of the attenuated irradiance based on simultaneous ozone and pressure measurements made from the payload suggests a refinement of the cross section values used in photochemical models. More ultraviolet radiation in the 200-210 nm spectral region reaches the middle stratosphere than is predicted by the absorption data presently available. It is suggested that significantly smaller values for the Herzberg continuum of O2 be used in future models.

  8. Annealing of GaAs solar cells damaged by electron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, G. H.; Conway, E. J.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of thermal annealing of GaAlAs/GaAs solar cells damaged by 1 MeV electron irradiation are reported, and the magnitude of the short-circuit current recovery is discussed. The damaged cells are annealed in a vacuum at 200 C. A cell irradiated at 10 to the 13th power electrons per sq cm recovers all its lost short-circuit current after 15 hours of annealing. Possible application of the annealing process to solar cells in space is also considered.

  9. Total solar irradiance satellite composites and their phenomenological effect on climate

    CERN Document Server

    Scafetta, Nicola

    2009-01-01

    Herein I discuss and propose updated satellite composites of the total solar irradiance covering the period 1978-2008. The composites are compiled from measurements made with the three ACRIM experiments. Measurements from the NIMBUS7/ERB and the ERBS/ERBE satellite experiments are used to fill the gap from June 1989 to October 1991 between ACRIM1 and ACRIM2 experiments. The climate implications of the alternative satellite composites are discussed by using a phenomenological climate model for reconstructing the total solar irradiance signature on climate during the last four centuries.

  10. Calculating spectral direct solar irradiance, diffuse and global in Heredia, Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spectral model under conditions of clear skies has described the flow of solar irradiation and is verified experimentally in Heredia, Costa Rica. A description of the model is presented by comparing its results with experimental measurements. The model has calculated the spectral flows of the global solar irradiation, direct and diffuse incident on a horizontal surface. Necessary input data include latitude, altitude, surface albedo as characteristics of a locality, and atmospheric characteristics: turbidity, precipitable water vapor, total ozone content and the optical thickness of a particular subject. The results show satisfactory values. (author)

  11. Solar ultraviolet irradiance observed from southern Argentina: September 1990 to March 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederick, J.E.; Soulen, P.F. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)); Daiz, S.B.; Smolskaia, I. (Centro Austral de Investigaciones Cientificas, Tierra del Fuego (Argentina)); Booth, C.R.; Lucas, T.; Neuschuler, D. (Biospherical Instruments, Incorporated, San Diego, CA (United States))

    1993-05-20

    The authors report on data which measures the solar ultraviolet irradiance between 300 and 310nm at Ushuaia, Argentina over the period Sept 1990 to Mar 1991. Ushuaia is 10[degrees] or more north of the Antarctic ozone hole, though it may or may not be in the fringe of the polar vortex. Over the Antarctic there has been an observed enhancement in solar ultraviolet irradiance on the surface of the Earth, though it has little relevance due to the sparse population density. In the northern hemisphere there has been observed an overall decrease in column ozone, but no recorded change in spectral irradiance, though there are several possible explanations for this observation. In the southern hemisphere the question of whether polar air masses could migrate north following the collapse of the polar vortex, and produce regions of depleted ozone, with consequent ultraviolet irradiance increase is looked at in this paper. Substantial increases in ultraviolet irradiance are observed from this observation period, but because of the limited data set it is difficult to say for sure that such an air mass migration was the origin. However, the net effect is still a substantial increase in solar ultraviolet irradiance, with possible biological consequences.

  12. Solar irradiance variability: A six-year comparison between SORCE observations and the SATIRE model

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, Will T; Krivova, Natalie A; Solanki, Sami; Harder, Jerald W

    2011-01-01

    Aims: We investigate how well modeled solar irradiances agree with measurements from the SORCE satellite, both for total solar irradiance and broken down into spectral regions on timescales of several years. Methods: We use the SATIRE model and compare modeled total solar irradiance (TSI) with TSI measurements between 2003 and 2009. Spectral solar irradiance over 200-1630nm is compared with the SIM instrument on SORCE between 2004 and 2009 during a period of decline from moderate activity to the recent solar minimum in 10 nm bands and for three spectral regions of significant interest: the UV integrated over 200-300nm, the visible over 400-691nm and the IR between 972-1630 nm. Results: The model captures 97% of observed TSI variation. In the spectral comparison, rotational variability is well reproduced, especially between 400 and 1200 nm. The magnitude of change in the long-term trends is many times larger in SIM at almost all wavelengths while trends in SIM oppose SATIRE in the visible between 500 and 700nm...

  13. A Different View of Solar Spectral Irradiance Variations: Modeling Total Energy over Six-Month Intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Snow, Martin; Harder, Jerald; Chapman, Gary; Cookson, Angela

    2015-10-01

    A different approach to studying solar spectral irradiance (SSI) variations, without the need for long-term (multi-year) instrument degradation corrections, is examining the total energy of the irradiance variation during 6-month periods. This duration is selected because a solar active region typically appears suddenly and then takes 5 to 7 months to decay and disperse back into the quiet-Sun network. The solar outburst energy, which is defined as the irradiance integrated over the 6-month period and thus includes the energy from all phases of active region evolution, could be considered the primary cause for the irradiance variations. Because solar cycle variation is the consequence of multiple active region outbursts, understanding the energy spectral variation may provide a reasonable estimate of the variations for the 11-year solar activity cycle. The moderate-term (6-month) variations from the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) instruments can be decomposed into positive (in-phase with solar cycle) and negative (out-of-phase) contributions by modeling the variations using the San Fernando Observatory (SFO) facular excess and sunspot deficit proxies, respectively. These excess and deficit variations are fit over 6-month intervals every 2 months over the mission, and these fitted variations are then integrated over time for the 6-month energy. The dominant component indicates which wavelengths are in-phase and which are out-of-phase with solar activity. The results from this study indicate out-of-phase variations for the 1400 - 1600 nm range, with all other wavelengths having in-phase variations.

  14. Irradiation Effects of 22 and 240 MeV Protons on Several Transistors and Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulten, W. C.; Honaker, W. C.; Patterson, John L.

    1961-01-01

    The work covered in this report has been directed toward the investigation of the irradiation effects of 22 and 240 MeV protons on several transistors, solar cells, resistors, and condensers to be used in the space radiation environment. The experimental data indicated definite detrimental effects on transistors and solar cells but no apparent effects on the types of resistors and condensers tested. The detrimental effects are of two distinct types: transient and permanent.

  15. 520 MeV proton irradiation effects on GaAs/Ge space solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Rong; Guo Zeng Liang; Zhang Xin; Zhai Zuo Xu

    2002-01-01

    High-energy proton irradiation effects on GaAs/Ge solar cells for space use are studied. The cells are irradiated by protons with an energy of 5-20 MeV up to a fluence ranging from 1 x 10 sup 9 to 7 x 10 sup 1 sup 3 cm sup - sup 2 , and then the change of the photovoltaic performances is measured at AMO. It is shown that the performances of the cells keep no change under 1 x 10 sup 9 cm sup - sup 2 irradiation. Above 1 x 10 sup 9 cm sup - sup 2 irradiation, I sub s sub c , V sub o sub c and P sub m sub a sub x degrade, as proton irradiation fluence increases. But the higher the proton energy, the less the degradation of I sub s sub c , V sub o sub c and P sub m sub a sub x

  16. Middle atmosphere response to the solar cycle in irradiance and ionizing particle precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Semeniuk

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The impact of NOx and HOx production by three types of energetic particle precipitation (EPP, aurora, solar proton events and galactic cosmic rays is examined using a chemistry climate model. Ensemble simulations forced by transient EPP derived from observations with one-year repeating sea surface temperatures and fixed chemical boundary conditions were conducted for cases with and without solar cycle in irradiance. Our model results show a wintertime polar stratosphere ozone reduction of between 3 and 10% in agreement with previous studies. EPP is found to modulate the radiative solar cycle effect in the middle atmosphere in a significant way, bringing temperature and ozone variations closer to observed patterns. The Southern Hemisphere polar vortex undergoes an intensification from solar minimum to solar maximum instead of a weakening. This changes the solar cycle variation of the Brewer-Dobson circulation, with a weakening during solar maxima compared to solar minima. In response, the tropical tropopause temperature manifests a statistically significant solar cycle variation resulting in about 4% more water vapour transported into the lower tropical stratosphere during solar maxima compared to solar minima. This has implications for surface temperature variation due to the associated change in radiative forcing.

  17. ALBEDO PROPERTIES OF MAIN BELT ASTEROIDS BASED ON THE ALL-SKY SURVEY OF THE INFRARED ASTRONOMICAL SATELLITE AKARI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an analysis of the albedo properties of main belt asteroids (MBAs) detected by the All-Sky Survey of the infrared astronomical satellite AKARI. The characteristics of 5120 asteroids detected by the survey, including their sizes and albedos, were cataloged in the Asteroid Catalog Using AKARI (AcuA). Size and albedo measurements were based on the standard thermal model, using inputs of infrared fluxes and absolute magnitudes measured at optical wavelengths. MBAs, which account for 4722 of the 5120 AcuA asteroids, have semimajor axes of 2.06-3.27 AU, except for the near-Earth asteroids. AcuA provides a complete data set of all MBAs brighter than the absolute magnitude of H 20 km. We confirmed that the albedo distribution of the MBAs is strongly bimodal as was already known from the past observations, and that the bimodal distribution occurs not only in the total population, but also within inner, middle, and outer regions of the main belt. The bimodal distribution in each group consists of low-albedo components in C-type asteroids and high-albedo components in S-type asteroids. We found that the small asteroids have much more variety in albedo than the large asteroids. In spite of the albedo transition process like space weathering, the heliocentric distribution of the mean albedo of asteroids in each taxonomic type is nearly flat. The mean albedo of the total, on the other hand, gradually decreases with an increase in semimajor axis. This can be explained by the compositional ratio of taxonomic types; that is, the proportion of dark asteroids such as C- and D-types increases, while that of bright asteroids such as S-type decreases, with increasing heliocentric distance. The heliocentric distributions of X-subclasses: E-, M-, and P-types, which can be divided based on albedo values, are also examined. P-types, which are the major component in X-types, are distributed throughout the main belt regions, and the abundance of P-types increases beyond 3 AU. This

  18. Temporal-spatial structure of magnetic merging at the magnetopause inferred from 557.7-nm all-sky images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Maynard

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate that high-resolution 557.7-nm all-sky images are useful tools for investigating the spatial and temporal evolution of merging on the dayside magnetopause. Analysis of ground and satellite measurements leads us to conclude that high-latitude merging events can occur at multiple sites simultaneously and vary asynchronously on time scales of 30s to 3min. Variations of 557.7nm emissions were observed at a 10s cadence at Ny-Ålesund on 19 December 2001, while significant changes in the IMF clock angle were reaching the magnetopause. The optical patterns are consistent with a scenario in which merging occurs around the rim of the high-latitude cusp at positions dictated by the IMF clock angle. Electrons energized at merging sites represent plausible sources for 557.7nm emissions in the cusp. Polar observations at the magnetopause have directly linked enhanced fluxes of ≥0.5keV electrons with merging. Spectra of electrons responsible for some of the emissions, measured during a DMSP F15 overflight, exhibit "inverted-V" features, indicating further acceleration above the ionosphere. SuperDARN spectral width boundaries, characteristic of open-closed field line transitions, are located at the equatorward edge of the 557.7nm emissions. Optical data suggest that with IMF BY>0, the Northern Hemisphere cusp divides into three source regions. When the IMF clock angle was ~150° structured 557.7-nm emissions came from east of the 13:00 MLT meridian. At larger clock angles the emissions appeared between 12:00 and 13:00 MLT. No significant 557.7-nm emissions were detected in the prenoon MLT sector. MHD simulations corroborate our scenario, showing that with the observed large dipole-tilt and IMF clock angles, merging sites develop near the front and eastern portions of the high-altitude cusp rim in the Northern Hemisphere and near the western part of the cusp rim in the Southern Hemisphere.

  19. AGN and Starbursts in Dusty Galaxy Mergers: Insights from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzarella, Joseph M.

    2014-07-01

    The Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) is combining imaging and spectroscopic data from the Herschel, Spitzer, Hubble, GALEX, Chandra, and XMM-Newton space telescopes augmented with extensive ground-based observations in a multiwavelength study of approximately 180 Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) and 20 Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) that comprise a statistically complete subset of the 60μm-selected IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample. The objects span the full range of galaxy environments (giant isolated spirals, wide and close pairs, minor and major mergers, merger remnants) and nuclear activity types (Seyfert 1, Seyfert 2, LINER, starburst/HII), with proportions that depend strongly on the total infrared luminosity. I will review the science motivations and present highlights of recent results selected from over 25 peer-reviewed journal articles published recently by the GOALS Team. Statistical investigations include detection of high-ionization Fe K emission indicative of deeply embedded AGN, comparison of UV and far-IR properties, investigations of the fraction of extended emission as a function of wavelength derived from mid-IR spectroscopy, mid-IR spectral diagnostics and spectral energy distributions revealing the relative contributions of AGN and starbursts to powering the bolometric luminosity, and quantitative structure analyses that delineate the evolution of stellar bars and nuclear stellar cusps during the merger process. Multiwavelength dissections of individual systems have unveiled large populations of young star clusters and heavily obscured AGN in early-stage (II Zw 96), intermediate-stage (Mrk 266, Mrk 273), and late-stage (NGC 2623, IC 883) mergers. A recently published study that matches numerical simulations to the observed morphology and gas kinematics in mergers has placed four systems on a timeline spanning 175-260 million years after their first passages, and modeling of additional (U)LIRGs is underway. A very

  20. Vertical winds and momentum fluxes due to equatorial planetary scale waves using all-sky meteor radar over Brazilian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egito, F.; Andrioli, V. F.; Batista, P. P.

    2016-11-01

    In the equatorial region planetary scale waves play an important role transporting significant amount of energy and momentum through atmosphere. Quantifying the momentum transported by these waves and its effects on the mean flow is rather important. Direct estimates of the momentum flux transported by waves require horizontal and vertical wind measurements. Ground-based meteor radars have provided continuous and reliable measurements of the horizontal wind components in the Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere (MLT) region and have contributed to improve our knowledge of the dynamics of this region. However, instrumental limitations hinder its use for measuring vertical winds and momentum fluxes. On the other hand, according to Babu et al (2012), all- sky meteor radars are able to infer tridimensional winds when using a large number of meteor echoes centered at the meteor ablation peak. Following this approach, we have used measurements performed by a Meteor Radar installed at São João do Cariri, Brazil (7.4°S; 36.5°W) in order to measure vertical winds and calculate the momentum flux transported by equatorial planetary scale waves. In order to evaluate the accuracy of vertical wind values we have performed several tests based on a simple model considering real meteor distributions and theoretical equations for the MLT winds motion. From our tests, we inferred that Brazilian meteor radar data can be used for this purpose with an accuracy of ~ 1.8 m/s. The results show that the vertical wind presents magnitudes of a few meters per second and occasionally reaches magnitudes around 10 m/s. Below 92 km the vertical wind is predominantly upward during the whole year and above exhibits a semi-annual oscillation with downward phase during the equinoxes. Variations associated to planetary scale waves in the vertical wind are also observed and some of them appear simultaneously in the zonal and meridional wind as well. Largest wave induced amplitudes in the vertical wind

  1. Solar ultraviolet irradiance measurements, instrumentation, intercomparisons and interpretations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorseth, Trond Morten

    2000-07-01

    The thesis reports studies of stabile instruments that are capable of detecting small alterations in ultraviolet irradiation over a long period. A central theme in the work has been to improve the measuring systems for continuous research based monitoring of natural variations in the ultraviolet irradiation from the sun. Methods for controlling the stability and continually secure the quality of the collected data. The causes of measuring errors are mapped and methods for the correction of collected data are developed. The methods and measuring systems for collecting the data have been adapted to the Norwegian climate and geography. The work has lead to an increased understanding of the natural variation in the ultraviolet radiation from the sun and what factors in the atmosphere that influences the process. The collected data and the developed methods for the quality control have increased the understanding of the ultraviolet irradiation climate in Europe.

  2. Development of local atmospheric model for estimating solar irradiance in Peninsular Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incoming solar irradiance covers a wide range of wavelengths with different intensities which drives almost every biological and physical cycle on earth at a selective wavelength. Estimation of the intensities of each wavelength for the solar irradiance on the earth surface provides a better way to understand and predict the radiance energy. It requires that the atmospheric and geometric input and the availability of atmospheric parameter is always the main concern in estimating solar irradiance. In this study, a local static atmospheric model for Peninsular Malaysia was built to provide the atmospheric parameters in the estimation of solar irradiance. Ten years of monthly Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) average data (water vapor, temperature, humidity and pressure profile) of the Peninsular Malaysia was used for the building of the atmospheric model and the atmospheric model were assessed based on the measured meteorological data with RMSE of 4.7% and 0.7k for both humidity and temperature respectively. The atmospheric model were applied on a well-established radiative transfer model namely SMARTS2. Some modifications are required in order to include the atmospheric model into the radiative transfer model. The solar irradiance results were then assessed with measured irradiance data and the results show that both the radiative transfer model and atmospheric model were reliable with RMSE value of 0.5 Wm−2. The atmospheric model was further validated based on the measured meteorological data (temperature and humidity) provided by the Department of Meteorology, Malaysia and high coefficient of determination with R2 value of 0.99 (RMSE value = 4.7%) and 0.90 (RMSE value = 0.7k) were found for both temperature and humidity respectively

  3. Development of local atmospheric model for estimating solar irradiance in Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeap, E. C.; Lau, A. M. S.; Busu, I.; Kanniah, K. D.; Rasib, A. W.; Kadir, W. H. W.

    2014-02-01

    Incoming solar irradiance covers a wide range of wavelengths with different intensities which drives almost every biological and physical cycle on earth at a selective wavelength. Estimation of the intensities of each wavelength for the solar irradiance on the earth surface provides a better way to understand and predict the radiance energy. It requires that the atmospheric and geometric input and the availability of atmospheric parameter is always the main concern in estimating solar irradiance. In this study, a local static atmospheric model for Peninsular Malaysia was built to provide the atmospheric parameters in the estimation of solar irradiance. Ten years of monthly Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) average data (water vapor, temperature, humidity and pressure profile) of the Peninsular Malaysia was used for the building of the atmospheric model and the atmospheric model were assessed based on the measured meteorological data with RMSE of 4.7% and 0.7k for both humidity and temperature respectively. The atmospheric model were applied on a well-established radiative transfer model namely SMARTS2. Some modifications are required in order to include the atmospheric model into the radiative transfer model. The solar irradiance results were then assessed with measured irradiance data and the results show that both the radiative transfer model and atmospheric model were reliable with RMSE value of 0.5 Wm-2. The atmospheric model was further validated based on the measured meteorological data (temperature and humidity) provided by the Department of Meteorology, Malaysia and high coefficient of determination with R2 value of 0.99 (RMSE value = 4.7%) and 0.90 (RMSE value = 0.7k) were found for both temperature and humidity respectively.

  4. Disinfection of contaminated water by using solar irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caslake, Laurie F; Connolly, Daniel J; Menon, Vilas; Duncanson, Catriona M; Rojas, Ricardo; Tavakoli, Javad

    2004-02-01

    Contaminated water causes an estimated 6 to 60 billion cases of gastrointestinal illness annually. The majority of these cases occur in rural areas of developing nations where the water supply remains polluted and adequate sanitation is unavailable. A portable, low-cost, and low-maintenance solar unit to disinfect unpotable water has been designed and tested. The solar disinfection unit was tested with both river water and partially processed water from two wastewater treatment plants. In less than 30 min in midday sunlight, the unit eradicated more than 4 log10 U (99.99%) of bacteria contained in highly contaminated water samples. The solar disinfection unit has been field tested by Centro Panamericano de Ingenieria Sanitaria y Ciencias del Ambiente in Lima, Peru. At moderate light intensity, the solar disinfection unit was capable of reducing the bacterial load in a controlled contaminated water sample by 4 log10 U and disinfected approximately 1 liter of water in 30 min.

  5. The Impact of Different Absolute Solar Irradiance Values on Current Climate Model Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rind, David H.; Lean, Judith L.; Jonas, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Simulations of the preindustrial and doubled CO2 climates are made with the GISS Global Climate Middle Atmosphere Model 3 using two different estimates of the absolute solar irradiance value: a higher value measured by solar radiometers in the 1990s and a lower value measured recently by the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment. Each of the model simulations is adjusted to achieve global energy balance; without this adjustment the difference in irradiance produces a global temperature change of 0.48C, comparable to the cooling estimated for the Maunder Minimum. The results indicate that by altering cloud cover the model properly compensates for the different absolute solar irradiance values on a global level when simulating both preindustrial and doubled CO2 climates. On a regional level, the preindustrial climate simulations and the patterns of change with doubled CO2 concentrations are again remarkably similar, but there are some differences. Using a higher absolute solar irradiance value and the requisite cloud cover affects the model's depictions of high-latitude surface air temperature, sea level pressure, and stratospheric ozone, as well as tropical precipitation. In the climate change experiments it leads to an underestimation of North Atlantic warming, reduced precipitation in the tropical western Pacific, and smaller total ozone growth at high northern latitudes. Although significant, these differences are typically modest compared with the magnitude of the regional changes expected for doubled greenhouse gas concentrations. Nevertheless, the model simulations demonstrate that achieving the highest possible fidelity when simulating regional climate change requires that climate models use as input the most accurate (lower) solar irradiance value.

  6. A Preliminary Analysis of Solar Irradiance Measurements at TNB Solar Research Centre for Optimal Orientation of Fixed Solar Panels installed in Selangor Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The well established rule for orienting fixed solar devices is to face south for places in the northern hemisphere and northwards for the southern hemisphere. However for regions near the equator such as in Selangor Malaysia, the position of the sun at solar noon is always near zenith both to the north and south depending on location and month of year. This paper reports an analysis of global solar radiation data taken at TNB Solar Research Centre, Malaysia. The solar radiation is measured using both shaded and exposed pyranometers together with a pyrheliometer which is mounted on a sun-tracker. The analysis on the solar measurements show that a near regular solar irradiation pattern had occurred often enough during the year to recommend an optimum azimuth orientation of installing the fixed solar panels tilted facing towards east. Even though all the solar measurements were done at a single location in TNBR Solar Research Centre at Bangi, for locations near the equator with similar weather pattern, the recommended azimuth direction of installing fixed solar panels and collectors tilted eastward will also be generally valid.

  7. Pollen chemistry as a tool for reconstructing past solar and ultraviolet irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, Phillip; Fraser, Wesley; Lomax, Barry; Gosling, William

    2016-04-01

    Despite the importance of solar irradiance as a dominant control on Earth's energy budget, no proxy has been developed that can provide records on timescales of over 10 000 years. No independent empirical record of solar irradiance therefore exists prior to the Holocene, limiting our understanding of the relationships between solar energy inputs, global climate and biotic change over longer timescales. Here, we present a novel proxy based on the chemical composition of sporopollenin, the primary component of the outer walls of pollen and spores (sporomorphs). Sporopollenin chemistry is responsive to levels of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation exposure, via a concomitant change in the concentration of phenolic compounds. This relationship offers the possibility of using fossil sporomorph chemistry as a proxy for past UV-B flux, and by extension total solar irradiance (TSI). Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy provides an efficient, economical and non-destructive method for measuring phenolic compound concentration on small sample sizes (≤30 sporomorphs/sample). The high preservation potential of sporomorphs in the geologic record, and the conserved nature of sporopollenin chemistry and UV-B response across the Embryophyta, means that this new proxy has the potential to reconstruct UV-B and TSI flux over much longer timescales than has previously been possible. We demonstrate the utility of this proxy with two chemopalynological datasets. Orbital cyclicity is reconstructed using grass pollen from a 150 000 year long sediment record from Lake Bosumtwi in Ghana, and changes in solar output over the last 600 years are reconstructed using pine pollen from Nar Lake in Turkey. This proxy provides a new approach for quantifying and understanding the relationship between UV-B flux, solar insolation and past climate. The unpicking of this information offers the tantalising potential to determine how changes in solar irradiance have driven long-term changes in

  8. The Solar Spectral Irradiance Measured on Board the International Space Station and the Picard Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuillier, G. O.; Bolsee, D.; Schmidtke, G.; Schmutz, W. K.

    2011-12-01

    On board the International Space Station, the spectrometers SOL-ACES and SOLSPEC measure the solar spectrum irradiance from 17 to 150 nm and 170 to 2900 nm, respectively. On board PICARD launched on 15 June 2010, the PREMOS instrument consists in a radiometer and several sunphotometers operated at several fixed wavelengths. We shall present spectra at different solar activity levels as well as their quoted accuracy. Comparison with similar data from other missions presently running in space will be shown incorporating the PREMOS measurements. Some special solar events will be also presented and interpreted.

  9. Properties of Flux Tubes and the Relation with Solar Irradiance Variability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Μ. Fligge; S. K. Solanki

    2000-09-01

    At the solar surface the magnetic field is bundled into discrete elements of concentrated flux, often referred to as magnetic flux tubes, which cover only a small fraction of the solar surface. Flux tubes span a whole spectrum of sizes, ranging from sunspots to features well below the best currently obtainable spatial resolution. Whereas sunspots have been well studied, our knowledge of the true brightness of small-scale magnetic features is hampered by the insufficient spatial resolution of the observations. A better understanding of the thermal and magnetic properties of these small-scale features, however, is crucial for an understanding of (climate-relevant) long-term solar irradiance variations.

  10. Estimation of real-sky daily solar irradiation case study: Braşov, Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Eftimie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study presented by this paper is intended to estimate the daily solar irradiation under real-sky condition for Braşov (Romania area. To this end, it is presented the methodology that was led to determine the estimation regressions of daily solar irradiation and the results of meteorological data sets processing. It is also performed an analysis of the variation of some climatic parameters specific to the analyzed area as, the sunshine fraction, the sky ratio and the Perez’s clearness index, in order to identify the possible sources of error and to assess their impact on accuracy of estimation models for daily solar irradiation. Special attention has been given to the analysis of statistical indicators that were the basis for performance analysis of the obtained models; focusing on optimizing the Pearson's coefficient, this paper presents the monthly regressions for two estimation models of daily global irradiance and corresponding to these, four estimation models of daily diffuse irradiation.

  11. Stratospheric ozone response to a solar irradiance reduction in a quadrupled CO2 environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Fleming, Eric L.

    2014-07-01

    We used the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) global two-dimensional (2D) atmospheric model to investigate the stratospheric ozone response to a proposed geoengineering activity wherein a reduced top-of-atmosphere (TOA) solar irradiance is imposed to help counteract a quadrupled CO2 atmosphere. This study is similar to the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) Experiment G1. Three primary simulations were completed with the GSFC 2D model to examine this possibility: (A) a pre-industrial atmosphere with a boundary condition of 285 ppmv CO2 (piControl); (B) a base future atmosphere with 1140 ppmv CO2 (abrupt4xCO2); and (C) a perturbed future atmosphere with 1140 ppmv CO2 and a 4% reduction in the TOA total solar irradiance (G1). We found huge ozone enhancements throughout most of the stratosphere (up to 40%) as a result of a large computed temperature decrease (up to 18 K) when CO2 was quadrupled (compare simulation abrupt4xCO2 to piControl). Further, we found that ozone will additionally increase (up to 5%) throughout most of the stratosphere with total ozone increases of 1-2.5% as a result of a reduction in TOA total solar irradiance (compare simulation G1 to abrupt4xCO2). Decreases of atomic oxygen and temperature are the main drivers of this computed ozone enhancement from a reduction in TOA total solar irradiance.

  12. Degradation of pharmaceuticals in wastewater using immobilized TiO2 photocatalysis under simulated solar irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, Y.; Sutton, N.B.; Rijnaarts, H.; Langenhoff, A.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) are not efficiently removed in wastewater treatment plants and are released into surface waters resulting in toxin accumulation. The aims of this study were to investigate the effect of solar irradiation on PhACs in wastewater using immobilized TiO2 present

  13. Reconstruction of the solar EUV irradiance from 1996 to 2010 based on SOHO/EIT images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haberreiter Margit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The solar Extreme UltraViolet (EUV spectrum has important effects on the Earth’s upper atmosphere. For a detailed investigation of these effects it is important to have a consistent data series of the EUV spectral irradiance available. We present a reconstruction of the solar EUV irradiance based on SOHO/EIT images, along with synthetic spectra calculated using different coronal features which represent the brightness variation of the solar atmosphere. The EIT images are segmented with the SPoCA2 tool which separates the features based on a fixed brightness classification scheme. With the SOLMOD code we then calculate intensity spectra for the 10–100 nm wavelength range and each of the coronal features. Weighting the intensity spectra with the area covered by each of the features yields the temporal variation of the EUV spectrum. The reconstructed spectrum is then validated against the spectral irradiance as observed with SOHO/SEM. Our approach leads to good agreement between the reconstructed and the observed spectral irradiance. This study is an important step toward understanding variations in the solar EUV spectrum and ultimately its effect on the Earth’s upper atmosphere.

  14. Are re-analyses from ERA or MERRA suitable to assess surface solar irradiance in solar energy applications?

    OpenAIRE

    Boilley, Alexandre; Wald, Lucien

    2013-01-01

    Meteorological re-analyses such as the ERA-Interim and the MERRA ones provide surface solar irradiance (SSI) for long periods of time. This capability is appealing in solar energy as it may help in determining the potential of a given site in any part of the world. The present study presents a comparison made between ground measurements of daily means of the SSI with the same quantity extracted from the ERA-Interim and the MERRA respectively for the period 1985 to 2009. 40 stations with no ma...

  15. ACRIM total solar irradiance satellite composite validation versus TSI proxy models

    CERN Document Server

    Scafetta, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    The satellite total solar irradiance (TSI) database provides a valuable record for investigating models of solar variation used to interpret climate changes. The 35-year ACRIM TSI satellite composite was updated using corrections to ACRIMSAT/ACRIM3 results derived from recent testing at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics/Total solar irradiance Radiometer Facility (LASP/TRF). The corrections lower the ACRIM3 scale by ~5000 ppm, in close agreement with the scale of SORCE/TIM results (solar constant ~1361 W/m^2). Relative variations and trends are not changed. Differences between the ACRIM and PMOD TSI composites, e.g. the decadal trending during solar cycles 21-22, are tested against a set of solar proxy models, including analysis of Nimbus7/ERB and ERBS/ERBE results available to bridge the ACRIM Gap (1989-1992). Our findings confirm: (1) The validity of the TSI peak in the originally published ERB results in early 1979 during solar cycle 21; (2) The correctness of originally published ACRIM1 resu...

  16. The Measurement of the Solar Spectral Irradiance Variability at 782 nm during the Solar Cycle 24 using the SES on-board PICARD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meftah, Mustapha; Hauchecorne, Alain; Irbah, Abdanour; Bekki, Slimane

    2016-04-01

    A Sun Ecartometry Sensor (SES) was developed to provide the stringent pointing requirements of the PICARD satellite. The SES sensor produced an image of the Sun at 782+/-5 nm. From the SES data, we obtained a new time series of the solar spectral irradiance at 782nm from 2010 to 2014. SES observations provided a qualitatively consistent evolution of the solar spectral irradiance variability at 782 nm during the solar cycle 24. Comparisons will be made with Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction for the Satellite era (SATIRE-S) semi-empirical model and with the Spectral Irradiance Monitor instrument (SIM) on-board the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment satellite (SORCE). These data will help to improve the representation of the solar forcing in the IPSL Global Circulation Model.

  17. Modeling of the Solar Spectral Irradiance as observed by LYRA/PROBA2 and PREMOS/PICARD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, A.; Cessateur, G.; Dominique, M.; Krivova, N. A.; Lachat, D.; Rozanov, E.; Schmutz, W. K.; Shapiro, A. V.; Tagirov, R. V.; Thuillier, G. O.; Wehrli, C.

    2011-12-01

    Measurements and modeling of the solar irradiance have gained an increased attention during the last few decades. Nevertheless a complete picture of the solar variability is still missing. Therefore a launch of every new space mission devoted to the measurements of the spectral solar irradiance provides a crucial piece of complementary information and nourishes the theoretical models. We present here spectral solar irradiance data from the recent European missions PROBA-2 (launched on November 2, 2009) and PICARD (launched on June 15, 2010) and their theoretical interpretation. The PREMOS package onboard PICARD comprises two experiments, one observing solar irradiance in five (two UV, one visible and two near infrared) spectral channels with filter radiometers the other measuring TSI with absolute radiometers. LYRA is a solar VUV radiometer onboard PROBA-2, which is a technologically oriented ESA micro-mission, and is observing the solar irradiance in two UV and two EUV spectral channels. The passbands of the UV channels in the both experiments were selected on the ground of relevance for the terrestrial ozone concentration. The PREMOS and LYRA measurements were carefully corrected for the degradation and cleaned for non-solar signatures. We provide a comparison with the VIRGO/SOHO and SOLSTICE+SIM/SORCE data. Both LYRA and PREMOS have observed several solar eclipses. The analysis of these observations allows us to accurately retrieve the center-to-limb variations (CLV) of the solar brightness, which play an important role in the modeling of the solar irradiance variability on the time scale of the solar rotation. We show that the calculations with the recently developed and published COde for Solar Irradiance (COSI) yield the CLV which are in a good agreement with the measurements. The irradiance in all channels shows a clear variability on time-scale of the solar rotation. The amplitude and the profile of the variability strongly depend on the wavelength. We use

  18. Are non-magnetic mechanisms such as temporal solar diameter variations conceivable for an irradiance variability?

    CERN Document Server

    Rozelot, J P; Pireaux, S; Ajabshirizadeh, A

    2004-01-01

    Irradiance variability has been monitored from space for more than two decades. Even if data are coming from different sources, it is well established that a temporal variability exists which can be set to as approximately 0.1%, in phase with the solar cycle. Today, one of the best explanation for such an irradiance variability is provided by the evolution of the solar surface magnetic fields. But if some 90 to 95% can be reproduced, what would be the origin of the 10 to 5% left? Non magnetic effects are conceivable. In this paper we will consider temporal variations of the diameter of the Sun as a possible contributor for the remaining part. Such an approach imposes strong constraints on the solar radius variability. We will show that over a solar cycle, variations of no more than 20 mas of amplitude can be considered. Such a variability (far from what is reported by observers conducting measurements by means of ground-based solar astrolabes) may explain a little part of the irradiance changes not explained ...

  19. A methodology for calculating percentile values of annual direct normal solar irradiation series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peruchena, Carlos M. Fernández; Ramírez, Lourdes; Silva, Manuel; Lara, Vicente; Bermejo, Diego; Gastón, Martín; Moreno, Sara; Pulgar, Jesús; Liria, Juan; Macías, Sergio; Gonzalez, Rocio; Bernardos, Ana; Castillo, Nuria; Bolinaga, Beatriz; Valenzuela, Rita X.; Zarzalejo, Luis

    2016-05-01

    A detailed knowledge of the solar resource is a critical point in the performance of an economic feasibility analysis of solar thermal electricity plants. In particular, the Direct Normal solar Irradiance (DNI) is the most determining variable in its final energy yield. Inter-annual variations of DNI can be large and seriously compromise the viability of solar energy projects. In this work, a methodology for evaluating the statistical properties of annual DNI series is presented for generating inputs to risk assessments in an economic feasibility analysis of a solar power plant. The methodology relies on the construction of a cumulative distribution function of annual DNI values, which allows for the evaluation of both mean and extreme climate characterization at a particular location in the long term.

  20. Solar Irradiances Measured using SPN1 Radiometers: Uncertainties and Clues for Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badosa, Jordi; Wood, John; Blanc, Philippe; Long, Charles N.; Vuilleumier, Laurent; Demengel, Dominique; Haeffelin, Martial

    2014-12-08

    The fast development of solar radiation and energy applications, such as photovoltaic and solar thermodynamic systems, has increased the need for solar radiation measurement and monitoring, not only for the global component but also the diffuse and direct. End users look for the best compromise between getting close to state-of-the-art measurements and keeping capital, maintenance and operating costs to a minimum. Among the existing commercial options, SPN1 is a relatively low cost solar radiometer that estimates global and diffuse solar irradiances from seven thermopile sensors under a shading mask and without moving parts. This work presents a comprehensive study of SPN1 accuracy and sources of uncertainty, which results from laboratory experiments, numerical modeling and comparison studies between measurements from this sensor and state-of-the art instruments for six diverse sites. Several clues are provided for improving the SPN1 accuracy and agreement with state-of-the-art measurements.

  1. A New Algorithm for the Satellite-Based Retrieval of Solar Surface Irradiance in Spectral Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Hammer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Accurate solar surface irradiance data is a prerequisite for an efficient planning and operation of solar energy systems. Further, it is essential for climate monitoring and analysis. Recently, the demand on information about spectrally resolved solar surface irradiance has grown. As surface measurements are rare, satellite derived information with high accuracy might fill this gap. This paper describes a new approach for the retrieval of spectrally resolved solar surface irradiance from satellite data. The method combines a eigenvector-hybrid look-up table approach for the clear sky case with satellite derived cloud transmission (Heliosat method. The eigenvector LUT approach is already used to retrieve the broadband solar surface irradiance of data sets provided by the Climate Monitoring Satellite Application Facility (CM-SAF. This paper describes the extension of this approach to wavelength bands and the combination with spectrally resolved cloud transmission values derived with radiative transfer corrections of the broadband cloud transmission. Thus, the new approach is based on radiative transfer modeling and enables the use of extended information about the atmospheric state, among others, to resolve the effect of water vapor and ozone absorption bands. The method is validated with spectrally resolved measurements from two sites in Europe and by comparison with radiative transfer calculations. The validation results demonstrate the ability of the method to retrieve accurate spectrally resolved irradiance from satellites. The accuracy is in the range of the uncertainty of surface measurements, with exception of the UV and NIR ( ≥ 1200 nm part of the spectrum, where higher deviations occur.

  2. Intercomparison Of Spectroradiometers For Solar Spectral Irradiance Measurements. Preliminary Results.

    OpenAIRE

    Galleano, Roberto; ZAAIMAN Willem; MORABITO Paolo; Minuto, Alessandro; Spena, Angelo; Bartocci, Simona; Fucci, Raffaele; Leanza, Gianni; PAVANELLO Diego; VIRTUANI Alessandro; FASANARO Daniela; CATENA Mario; NORTON Matthew

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the preliminary results of an intercomparison of spectroradiometers for direct (DNI) and global normal incidence (GNI) irradiance in the visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) region. Seven institutions and six spectroradiometers, representing different technologies and manufacturers were involved. All instruments were able to measure GNI; a restricted sub-group of four instruments had the possibility to also measure DNI when equipped with proper collimators. P...

  3. Solar Irradiance Sensor on the ExoMars 2016 Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruego, I.; Apéstigue, V.; Martínez, J.; Jiménez, J. J.; Rivas, J.; González, M.; Álvarez, J.; Azcue, J.; Martín, I.; Canchal, R.

    2015-10-01

    DREAMS-SIS is a radiometer designed to provide in-situ measurements of the Sun irradiance on Mars surface, as well as to estimate the opacity of the Mars atmosphere, due to the suspended dust. It will be included in the DREAMS package (Dust characterization, Risk assessment and Environment Analyzer on the Martian Surface), payload of the EDM (Entry and Descend Module) for the EXOMARS 2016 ESA mission [1]. We report on the development and characteristics of this miniature sensor.

  4. Annealing results on low-energy proton-irradiated GaAs solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachare, R.; Anspaugh, B. E.; O'Meara, L.

    1988-01-01

    AlGaAs/GaAs solar cells with an approximately 0.5-micron-thick Al(0.85)Ga(0.15)As window layer were irradiated using normal and isotropic incident protons having energies between 50 and 500 keV with fluence up to 1 x 10 to the 12th protons/sq cm. The irradiated cells were annealed at temperatures between 150 and 300 C in nitrogen ambient. The annealing results reveal that significant recovery in spectral response at longer wavelengths occurred. However, the short-wavelength spectral response showed negligible annealing, irrespective of the irradiation energy and annealing conditions. This indicates that the damage produced near the AlGaAs/GaAs interface and the space-charge region anneals differently than damage produced in the bulk. This is explained by using a model in which the as-grown dislocations interact with irradiation-induced point defects to produce thermally stable defects.

  5. Solar ultraviolet irradiance observed from Southern Argentina; September 1990 to March 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, J. E.; Soulen, P. F.; Diaz, S. B.; Smolskaia, I.; Booth, C. R.; Lucas, T.; Neuschuler, D.

    1993-05-01

    A nearly continuous data set of solar ultraviolet spectra irradiance exists for Ushuaia, Argentina, latitude 54°59' S, over the period from mid-September 1990 to mid-March 1991. This includes a season of prolonged depletion in column ozone over Antarctica, 10° or more in latitude poleward of Ushuaia. Cloudiness provides a major source of variance in the measurements. When this influence is removed, the irradiances at wavelengths between 300 and 310 nm are enhanced relative to clear sky calculations based on a 10-year ozone climatology. During December the average noontime irradiance at 306.5 nm, which is a good proxy for erythemal irradiance, is 45% larger than the zonal mean climatological prediction. The largest noontime radiation levels observed at Ushuaia are equivalent to moving 20° in latitude closer to the equator at the summer solstice.

  6. Irradiation and measurements of fluorinated ethylene-propylene-A on silicon solar cells in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsik, S. J.; Broder, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    Silicon monoxide (SiO) coated silicon solar cells covered with fluorinated ethylene-propylene-A (FEP-A) were irradiated by 1-MeV electrons in vacuum. The effect of irradiation on the light transmittance of FEP-A was checked by measuring the short-circuit current of the cells while in vacuum after each dose increment, immediately after the irradiation, and again after a minimum elapsed time of 16 hr. The results indicated no apparent loss in transmission due to irradiation of FEP-A and no delamination from the SiO surface while the cells were in vacuum, but embrittlement of FEP-A occurred at the accumulated dose.

  7. Gravity wave activity observed in the mesosphere and ionosphere on September 16th 2015 by an all-sky imager and dTEC maps over Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrasse, Cristiano M.; Gobbi, Delano; Buriti, Ricardo; Bageston, José Valentin; Medeiros, Amauri; Paulino, Igo; Cosme Alexandre Figueiredo, M.; Takahashi, Hisao; Azambuja, Rodrigo

    2016-07-01

    All-sky imager was used to observe the wave activity in the mesosphere and a ground network of GPS receivers were used to make detrended Total Electron Content (dTEC) maps to monitor the ionosphere. The wave activity was observed on September 16th 2015 over the southeast region in Brazil. The gravity wave characteristics and the atmospheric conditions for wave propagation will be presented and discussed. The gravity wave source was associated with strong tropospheric convection.

  8. Eclipses observed by LYRA - a sensitive tool to test the models for the solar irradiance

    CERN Document Server

    Shapiro, A I; Dominique, M; Shapiro, A V

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the light curves of the recent solar eclipses measured by the Herzberg channel (200-220 nm) of the Large Yield RAdiometer (LYRA) onboard PROBA-2. The measurements allow us to accurately retrieve the center- to-limb variations (CLV) of the solar brightness. The formation height of the radiation depends on the observing angle so the examination of the CLV provide information about a broad range of heights in the solar atmosphere. We employ the 1D NLTE radiative transfer COde for Solar Irradiance (COSI) to model the measured light curves and corresponding CLV dependencies. The modeling is used to test and constrain the existing 1D models of the solar atmosphere, e.g. the temperature structure of the photosphere and the treatment of the pseudo- continuum opacities in the Herzberg continuum range. We show that COSI can accurately reproduce not only the irradiance from the entire solar disk, but also the measured CLV. It hence can be used as a reliable tool for modeling the variability of the spectral so...

  9. Global and diffuse solar irradiances in urban and rural areas in southeast Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codato, G.; Oliveira, A. P.; Soares, J.; Escobedo, J. F.; Gomes, E. N.; Pai, A. D.

    2008-06-01

    The seasonal evolution of daily and hourly values of global and diffuse solar radiation at the surface are compared for the cities of São Paulo and Botucatu, both located in Southeast Brazil and representative of urban and rural areas, respectively. The comparisons are based on measurements of global and diffuse solar irradiance carried out at the surface during a six year simultaneous period in these two cities. Despite the similar latitude and altitude, the seasonal evolution of daily values indicate that São Paulo receives, during clear sky days, 7.8% less global irradiance in August and 5.1% less in June than Botucatu. On the other hand, São Paulo receives, during clear sky days, 3.6% more diffuse irradiance in August and 15.6% more in June than Botucatu. The seasonal variation of the diurnal cycle confirms these differences and indicates that they are more pronounced during the afternoon. The regional differences are related to the distance from the Atlantic Ocean, systematic penetration of the sea breeze and daytime evolution of the particulate matter in São Paulo. An important mechanism controlling the spatial distribution of solar radiation, on a regional scale, is the sea breeze penetration in São Paulo, bringing moisture and maritime aerosol that in turn further increases the solar radiation scattering due to pollution and further reduces the intensity of the direct component of solar radiation at the surface. Surprisingly, under clear sky conditions the atmospheric attenuation of solar radiation in Botucatu during winter the biomass burning period due to the sugar cane harvest is equivalent to that at São Paulo City, indicating that the contamination during sugar cane harvest in Southeast Brazil has a large impact in the solar radiation field at the surface.

  10. Preliminary Wrf-Arw Model Analysis of Global Solar Irradiation Forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isvoranu Dragos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is focused on the evaluation of short term global solar irradiation forecasting performance in order to assess the outcome of photovoltaic power stations. The paper presents a comparative analysis between the predicted irradiation obtained by numerical simulation and measurements. The simulation data is obtained from WRF-ARW model (Weather Research Forecasting-Advanced Research WRF, whose initial and boundary conditions are provided by the global forecasting model GFS. Taking into account the complexity of options for the physics models provided with WRF, we embarked upon a parametric analysis of the simulated solar irradiance. This complex task provides a better insight among the coupling of various physics options and enables us to find the best fit with the measured data for a specified site and time period. The present preliminary analysis shows that the accuracy of the computed global solar irradiance can be improved by choosing the appropriate built-in physics models. A combination of physics models providing the best results has been identified.

  11. Spectral signature of ultraviolet solar irradiance in Zacatecas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinedo V, J. L; Mireles G, F; Rios M, C; Quirino T, L. L; Davila R, J. I [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Zacatecas, Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2006-10-15

    This study presents an analysis of the global ultraviolet spectral irradiance (290-400 nm) registered in Zacatecas, a city near the Tropic of Cancer, located at 2500 m above sea level, latitude of 22 degrees N and longitude of 102 degrees W. The spectra have been measured using a Bentham radiometer with a 0.5 nm step in wavelength. The measurements show relatively high levels of ultraviolet irradiance (UV), which may be characteristic of areas close to the Tropic of Cancer. Faced with an increase of the incidence of skin cancer among the population of Zacatecas, these measurements highlight that a damage prevention plan is required. [Spanish] En este trabajo se presenta un analisis de la radiacion espectral global ultravioleta (290-400 nm) registrada en Zacatecas, una ciudad vecina al tropico de cancer, situada a 2500 m sobre el nivel del mar, latitud de 22 grados N y longitud de 102 grados O. Los espectros correspondientes han sido medidos mediante un espectroradiometro Bentham con un paso de 0.5 nm de longitud de onda. Las mediciones muestran niveles de radiacion ultravioleta (UV) relativamente elevados, que pueden ser caracteristicos de las zonas vecinas al tropico de cancer. Frente al aumento de incidencia de cancer en la piel en la poblacion del estado de Zacatecas, estas mediciones ponen en relieve la necesidad de formular un plan preventivo de danos.

  12. Short-Term Solar Irradiance Forecasting Model Based on Artificial Neural Network Using Statistical Feature Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongshan Zhao

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Short-term solar irradiance forecasting (STSIF is of great significance for the optimal operation and power predication of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV plants. However, STSIF is very complex to handle due to the random and nonlinear characteristics of solar irradiance under changeable weather conditions. Artificial Neural Network (ANN is suitable for STSIF modeling and many research works on this topic are presented, but the conciseness and robustness of the existing models still need to be improved. After discussing the relation between weather variations and irradiance, the characteristics of the statistical feature parameters of irradiance under different weather conditions are figured out. A novel ANN model using statistical feature parameters (ANN-SFP for STSIF is proposed in this paper. The input vector is reconstructed with several statistical feature parameters of irradiance and ambient temperature. Thus sufficient information can be effectively extracted from relatively few inputs and the model complexity is reduced. The model structure is determined by cross-validation (CV, and the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA is used for the network training. Simulations are carried out to validate and compare the proposed model with the conventional ANN model using historical data series (ANN-HDS, and the results indicated that the forecast accuracy is obviously improved under variable weather conditions.

  13. Making of a solar spectral irradiance dataset I: observations, uncertainties, and methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schöll Micha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context. Changes in the spectral solar irradiance (SSI are a key driver of the variability of the Earth’s environment, strongly affecting the upper atmosphere, but also impacting climate. However, its measurements have been sparse and of different quality. The “First European Comprehensive Solar Irradiance Data Exploitation project” (SOLID aims at merging the complete set of European irradiance data, complemented by archive data that include data from non-European missions. Aims. As part of SOLID, we present all available space-based SSI measurements, reference spectra, and relevant proxies in a unified format with regular temporal re-gridding, interpolation, gap-filling as well as associated uncertainty estimations. Methods. We apply a coherent methodology to all available SSI datasets. Our pipeline approach consists of the pre-processing of the data, the interpolation of missing data by utilizing the spectral coherency of SSI, the temporal re-gridding of the data, an instrumental outlier detection routine, and a proxy-based interpolation for missing and flagged values. In particular, to detect instrumental outliers, we combine an autoregressive model with proxy data. We independently estimate the precision and stability of each individual dataset and flag all changes due to processing in an accompanying quality mask. Results. We present a unified database of solar activity records with accompanying meta-data and uncertainties. Conclusions. This dataset can be used for further investigations of the long-term trend of solar activity and the construction of a homogeneous SSI record.

  14. Making of a solar spectral irradiance dataset I: observations, uncertainties, and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöll, Micha; Dudok de Wit, Thierry; Kretzschmar, Matthieu; Haberreiter, Margit

    2016-03-01

    Context. Changes in the spectral solar irradiance (SSI) are a key driver of the variability of the Earth's environment, strongly affecting the upper atmosphere, but also impacting climate. However, its measurements have been sparse and of different quality. The "First European Comprehensive Solar Irradiance Data Exploitation project" (SOLID) aims at merging the complete set of European irradiance data, complemented by archive data that include data from non-European missions. Aims: As part of SOLID, we present all available space-based SSI measurements, reference spectra, and relevant proxies in a unified format with regular temporal re-gridding, interpolation, gap-filling as well as associated uncertainty estimations. Methods: We apply a coherent methodology to all available SSI datasets. Our pipeline approach consists of the pre-processing of the data, the interpolation of missing data by utilizing the spectral coherency of SSI, the temporal re-gridding of the data, an instrumental outlier detection routine, and a proxy-based interpolation for missing and flagged values. In particular, to detect instrumental outliers, we combine an autoregressive model with proxy data. We independently estimate the precision and stability of each individual dataset and flag all changes due to processing in an accompanying quality mask. Results: We present a unified database of solar activity records with accompanying meta-data and uncertainties. Conclusions: This dataset can be used for further investigations of the long-term trend of solar activity and the construction of a homogeneous SSI record.

  15. Capacitance and conductance studies on silicon solar cells subjected to 8 MeV electron irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The space grade silicon solar cells were irradiated with 8 MeV electrons with doses ranging from 5–100 k Gy. Capacitance and conductance measurements were carried out in order to investigate the anomalous degradation of the cells in the radiation harsh environments and the results are presented in this paper. Detailed and systematic analysis of the frequency-dependent capacitance and conductance measurements were performed to extract the information about the interface trap states. The small increase in density of interface states was observed from the conductance–frequency measurements. The reduction in carrier concentration upon electron irradiation is due to the trapping of charge carriers by the radiation induced trap centres. The Drive Level Capacitance Profiling (DLCP) technique has been applied to study the properties of defects in silicon solar cells. A small variation in responding state densities with measuring frequency was observed and the defect densities are in the range 1015 –1016 cm−3. - Highlights: • Space grade Si solar cells were subjected to 8 MeV electron radiation. • Capacitance and conductance measurements were done before and after irradiation. • Density of interface states and the interface trap time constant is found to increase with increasing electron dose. • The displacement damage formed due to electron is not uniform throughout the active region of c-Si solar cell

  16. Solar Irradiance Variability and Its Impacts on the Earth Climate System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, J. W.; Woods, T. N.

    The Sun plays a vital role in the evolution of the climates of terrestrial planets. Observations of the solar spectrum are now routinely made that span the wavelength range from the X-ray portion of the spectrum (5 nm) into the infrared to about 2400 nm. Over this very broad wavelength range, accounting for about 97% of the total solar irradiance, the intensity varies by more than 6 orders of magnitude, requiring a suite of very different and innovative instruments to determine both the spectral irradiance and its variability. The origins of solar variability are strongly linked to surface magnetic field changes, and analysis of solar images and magnetograms show that the intensity of emitted radiation from solar surface features in active regions has a very strong wavelength and magnetic field strength dependence. These magnetic fields produce observable solar surface features such as sunspots, faculae, and network structures that contribute in different ways to the radiated output. Semi-empirical models of solar spectral irradiance are able to capture much of the Sun's output, but this topic remains an active area of research. Studies of solar structures in both high spectral and spatial resolution are refining this understanding. Advances in Earth observation systems and high-quality three-dimensional chemical climate models provide a sound methodology to study the mechanisms of the interaction between Earth's atmosphere and the incoming solar radiation. Energetic photons have a profound effect on the chemistry and dynamics of the thermosphere and ionosphere, and these processes are now well represented in upper atmospheric models. In the middle and lower atmosphere the effects of solar variability enter the climate system through two nonexclusive pathways referred to as the top-down and bottom-up mechanisms. The top-down mechanism proceeds through the alteration of the photochemical rates that establish the middle atmospheric temperature structure and

  17. EUV Irradiance Observations from SDO/EVE as a Diagnostic of Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Milligan, Ryan O

    2016-01-01

    For the past six years, the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory has been monitoring changes in the Sun's extreme ultraviolet output over a range of timescales. Its primary function is to provide measurements of the solar spectral irradiance that is responsible for driving fluctuations in Earth's ionosphere and thermosphere. However, despite its modest spectral resolution and lack of spatial information, the EVE spectral range contains many lines and continua that have become invaluable for diagnosing the response of the lower solar atmosphere itself to an injection of energy, particularly during a flare's impulsive phase. In addition, high temperature emission lines can also be used to track changes in temperature and density of flaring plasma in the corona. The high precision of EVE observations are therefore crucial in helping us understand particle acceleration and energy transport mechanisms during solar flares, as well as the origins of the Sun's most geoeffective emis...

  18. The Impact of the Revised Sunspot Record on Solar Irradiance Reconstructions

    CERN Document Server

    Kopp, G; Lean, J; Wu, C J

    2016-01-01

    Reliable historical records of total solar irradiance (TSI) are needed for climate change attribution and research to assess the extent to which long-term variations in the Sun's radiant energy incident on the Earth may exacerbate (or mitigate) the more dominant warming in recent centuries due to increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases. We investigate potential impacts of the new Sunspot Index and Long-term Solar Observations (SILSO) sunspot-number time series on model reconstructions of TSI. In contemporary TSI records, variations on time scales longer than about a day are dominated by the opposing effects of sunspot darkening and facular brightening. These two surface magnetic features, retrieved either from direct observations or from solar activity proxies, are combined in TSI models to reproduce the current TSI observational record. Indices that manifest solar-surface magnetic activity, in particular the sunspot-number record, then enable the reconstruction of historical TSI. Revisions to the sunsp...

  19. Recovery of shallow junction GaAs solar cells damaged by electron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, G. H.; Conway, E. J.

    1978-01-01

    Solar cells operated in space are subject to degradation from electron and proton radiation damage. It has been found that for deep junction p-GaAlAs/p-GaAs solar cells some of the electron radiation damage is removed by annealing the cells at 200 C. The reported investigation shows that shallow junction p-GaAlAs/p-GaAs/n-GaAs heteroface solar cells irradiated with 1 MeV electrons show a more complete recovery of short-circuit current than do the deep junction cells. The heteroface p-GaAlAs/p-GaAs/n-GaAs solar cells studied were fabricated using the etch-back epitaxy process.

  20. Recent variability of the solar spectral irradiance and its impact on climate modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermolli, I.; Matthes, K.; Dudok de Wit, T.; Krivova, N. A.; Tourpali, K.; Weber, M.; Unruh, Y. C.; Gray, L.; Langematz, U.; Pilewskie, P.; Rozanov, E.; Schmutz, W.; Shapiro, A.; Solanki, S. K.; Woods, T. N.

    2013-04-01

    The lack of long and reliable time series of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) measurements makes an accurate quantification of solar contributions to recent climate change difficult. Whereas earlier SSI observations and models provided a qualitatively consistent picture of the SSI variability, recent measurements by the SORCE (SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment) satellite suggest a significantly stronger variability in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral range and changes in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) bands in anti-phase with the solar cycle. A number of recent chemistry-climate model (CCM) simulations have shown that this might have significant implications on the Earth's atmosphere. Motivated by these results, we summarize here our current knowledge of SSI variability and its impact on Earth's climate. We present a detailed overview of existing SSI measurements and provide thorough comparison of models available to date. SSI changes influence the Earth's atmosphere, both directly, through changes in shortwave (SW) heating and therefore, temperature and ozone distributions in the stratosphere, and indirectly, through dynamical feedbacks. We investigate these direct and indirect effects using several state-of-the art CCM simulations forced with measured and modelled SSI changes. A unique asset of this study is the use of a common comprehensive approach for an issue that is usually addressed separately by different communities. We show that the SORCE measurements are difficult to reconcile with earlier observations and with SSI models. Of the five SSI models discussed here, specifically NRLSSI (Naval Research Laboratory Solar Spectral Irradiance), SATIRE-S (Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstructions for the Satellite era), COSI (COde for Solar Irradiance), SRPM (Solar Radiation Physical Modelling), and OAR (Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma), only one shows a behaviour of the UV and visible irradiance qualitatively resembling that of the recent SORCE

  1. The Extreme Ultraviolet Contributions to the Solar Irradiance Reference Spectrum (SIRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, P. C.; Woods, T. N.; Harder, J. W.; Hock, R. A.; Snow, M.

    2008-12-01

    The Whole Heliosphere Interval (WHI) was a coordinated effort with inputs from over 50 models and observatories, both satellite and ground based, to characterize the Sun and heliosphere during solar minimum conditions. The time period selected for this quiet Sun WHI campaign was April 10-16, 2008. One of the goals of the solar minimum WHI was to produce a definitive Solar Irradiance Reference Spectrum (SIRS) for quiet Sun conditions ranging in wavelength from 0.1 nm up to 2400 nm. During this WHI campaign on April 14, 2008, a sounding rocket was launched from White Sands Missile Range that observed the solar spectral irradiance in these solar minimum conditions in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelength range from 0.1-106 nm as well as the bright hydrogen Lyman alpha emission at 121.6 nm. The rocket observations from 6.0-106.0 nm and at 0.1 nm spectral resolution are the EUV input for the SIRS. These rocket EUV measurements are discussed following a brief introduction to the entire SIRS spectrum developed for the WHI campaign.

  2. Long-term drift of the coronal source magnetic flux and the total solar irradiance

    OpenAIRE

    Lockwood, Mike; Stamper, R

    1999-01-01

    We test the method of Lockwood et al. [1999] for deriving the coronal source flux from the geomagnetic aa index and show it to be accurate to within 12% for annual means and 4.5% for averages over a sunspot cycle. Using data from four solar constant monitors during 1981-1995, we find a linear relationship between this magnetic flux and the total solar irradiance. From this correlation, we show that the 131% rise in the mean coronal source field over the interval 1901-1995 corresponds to a ris...

  3. Interannual variability in solar ultraviolet irradiance over decadal time scales at latitude 55 degrees south.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, J E; Manner, V W; Booth, C R

    2001-12-01

    Ground-based measurements of solar UV spectral irradiance made from Ushuaia, Argentina at latitude 55 degrees S reveal a large degree of variability among corresponding months of different years over the period from September 1990 through April 1998. The magnitude and wavelength dependence of year-to-year changes in monthly spectral UV-B irradiation are consistent with expectations based on the behavior of column ozone and cloudiness. When combined with satellite measurements of column ozone, a regression model fit to the ground-based data set allows estimates of monthly UV-B irradiation over a time frame of two decades, 1978-1998, during several months of the year. Results show a general increase in ground-level irradiation at 305.0 nm from the end of the 1970s to the early 1990s during calendar months from September through December. This is followed by generally smaller irradiances through the middle to late 1990s for all months except November, where the increase continues through the end of the data record. The long-term variability in monthly irradiation over the time period studied is more complicated than can be described by a simple linear trend. PMID:11783932

  4. Solar irradiance changes and photobiological effects at Earth's surface following astrophysical ionizing radiation events

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Brian C; Snyder, Brock R

    2015-01-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth, primarily through depletion of stratospheric ozone and subsequent increase in surface-level solar ultraviolet radiation. Simulations of the atmospheric effects of a variety of events (such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events) have been previously published, along with estimates of biological damage at Earth's surface. In this work, we employed the TUV radiative transfer model to expand and improve calculations of surface-level irradiance and biological impacts following an ionizing radiation event. We considered changes in surface-level UVB, UVA, and photosynthetically active radiation (visible light) for clear-sky conditions and fixed aerosol parameter values. We also considered a wide range of biological effects on organisms ranging from humans to phytoplankton. We found that past work overestimated UVB irradiance, but that relative estimates for increase in exposure to DNA damaging radi...

  5. The observation of damage regions produced by neutron irradiation in lithium-doped silicon solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, S.; Sargent, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Study regions of lattice disorder produced in lithium-doped float-zone melted n/p-type silicon solar cells by irradiation with monoenergetic neutrons at doses between 10 to the 10th and 10 to the 13th per cu cm. The defect regions were revealed by chemically etching the surface of the solar cells and by observing carbon replicas in an electron microscope. It was found that the defect density increased with increasing irradiation dose and increased lithium content, whereas the average defect diameter was found to decrease. From thermal annealing experiments it was found that in the lithium-doped material the defect structure was stable at temperatures between 300 and 1200 K. This was found to be in contrast to the undoped material where at the lowest doses considerable annealing was observed to occur. These results are discussed in terms of the theoretical predictions and models of defect clusters proposed by Gossick (1959) and Crawford and Cleland (1959).

  6. Capacitance and conductance studies on silicon solar cells subjected to 8 MeV electron irradiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyanarayana Bhat, P.; Rao, Asha; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Usha, G.; Priya, G. Krishna; Sankaran, M.; Puthanveettil, Suresh E.

    2015-06-01

    The space grade silicon solar cells were irradiated with 8 MeV electrons with doses ranging from 5-100 k Gy. Capacitance and conductance measurements were carried out in order to investigate the anomalous degradation of the cells in the radiation harsh environments and the results are presented in this paper. Detailed and systematic analysis of the frequency-dependent capacitance and conductance measurements were performed to extract the information about the interface trap states. The small increase in density of interface states was observed from the conductance-frequency measurements. The reduction in carrier concentration upon electron irradiation is due to the trapping of charge carriers by the radiation induced trap centres. The Drive Level Capacitance Profiling (DLCP) technique has been applied to study the properties of defects in silicon solar cells. A small variation in responding state densities with measuring frequency was observed and the defect densities are in the range 1015 -1016 cm-3.

  7. Properties and Photocatalytic Activity of β-Ga2O3 Nanorods under Simulated Solar Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinzhen Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available β-Ga2O3 nanorods are prepared by hydrothermal method and characterized by X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and photoluminescence spectra. The results reveal that high crystallinity, monoclinic phase of β-Ga2O3 nanorods were prepared with a diameter of about 60 nm and length of 500 nm. Photoluminescence study indicates that the β-Ga2O3 nanorods exhibit a broad blue light emission at room temperature. The β-Ga2O3 nanorods displayed high photocatalytic activity under simulated solar irradiation; after 2 h irradiation, over 95% of methylene blue solution and over 90% of methyl orange solution were decolorized. Since this process does not require additional hydrogen peroxide and uses solar light, it can be developed as an economically feasible and environmentally friendly method to treat dye effluent.

  8. High intensity solar irradiation testing of UV optics. [OSO-8 instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greyerbiehl, J. M.; Oberright, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    The Orbiting Solar Observatory-I (OSO-8 in orbit) incorporates two high resolution solar pointing spectrometers operating from 1000 A to 4000 A. Energy from the sun enters a Cassegrainian telescope and is focused on a slit while the solar disk is scanned to one arc-second resolution. The stability of the secondary mirrors reflectance was of concern since they would be exposed to intense focused solar energy up to 27 suns. A test program was initiated to simulate this energy input on sample UV mirrors of the MgF2 and LiF types and to evaluate their performance after irradiation. Tests were conducted to simulate the solar spectrum at high intensities (25 suns) and at a single wavelength near Lyman-alpha, but with twenty times the solar intensity at Lyman-alpha. Post-test measurements after every exposure were made at wavelengths from 1025 A to 1849 A. After 75 simulated 'orbits', reflectance changes due to temperature effects were noted to be less than 10%. Reductions in reflectance under high intensity solar radiation were generally greater than 10%. Polymerization of surface contaminations on the LiF mirrors reduced reflectances at short wavelengths by 40%.

  9. Solar Irradiance Reference Spectra (SIRS) for IHY2007 Whole Heliosphere Interval (WHI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, T.; Chamberlin, P.; Snow, M.; Harder, J.

    2008-12-01

    The IHY2007 Whole Heliosphere Interval (WHI) for solar Carrington Rotation 2068 (20 March to 16 April 2008) has been very successful in obtaining a wide variety of solar, heliospheric, and planetary observations during times of solar cycle minimum conditions. One of these efforts is the generation of solar irradiance reference spectra (SIRS) from 0.1 nm to 2400 nm using a combination of satellite and sounding rocket observations. These reference spectra include daily satellite observations from TIMED Solar EUV Experiment (SEE) from 0.1 nm to 116 nm and from Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) instruments from 116 nm to 2400 nm. The EUV range is also improved with higher spectral resolution observations from 6 nm to 105 nm using the prototype SDO EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) aboard a sounding rocket launched on 14 April 2008. The SIRS result is an important accomplishment in that it is the first time in having simultaneous measurements over the full spectral coverage up to 2400 nm and during solar cycle minimum conditions. The SIRS data from 0.1 nm to 2400 nm and in 0.1-nm intervals (on 0.05 nm centers) are available from http://ihy2007.org/WHI/.

  10. Far ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet rocket instrumentation for measuring the solar spectral irradiance and terrestrial airglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Bailey, Scott M.; Solomon, Stanley C.; Rottman, Gary J.

    1992-06-01

    A sounding-rocket experiment is being developed for the study of EUV spectral irradiance and its effects on the upper atmosphere, using three solar EUV instruments devised by the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics. These include a 25-cm Rowland circle EUV spectrograph, an array of Si X-UV photodiodes, and an X-UV imager with 20 arcsec resolution of the sun.

  11. The functional role of tabular structures for large reef fishes: avoiding predators or solar irradiance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerry, J. T.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2015-06-01

    Large reef fishes may often be seen sheltering under tabular structures on coral reefs. There are two principle explanations for this behaviour: avoidance of predation or avoidance of solar irradiance. This study sought supporting evidence to distinguish betwee