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Sample records for alkylative dna damage

  1. SERIES: Genomic instability in cancer Balancing repair and tolerance of DNA damage caused by alkylating agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Dragony; Calvo, Jennifer A.; Samson, Leona D

    2013-01-01

    Alkylating agents comprise a major class of frontline chemotherapeutic drugs that inflict cytotoxic DNA damage as their main mode of action, in addition to collateral mutagenic damage. Numerous cellular pathways, including direct DNA damage reversal, base excision repair (BER), and mismatch repair (MMR) respond to alkylation damage to defend against alkylation-induced cell death or mutation. However, maintaining a proper balance of activity both within and between these pathways is crucial for an organism's favorable response to alkylating agents. Furthermore, an individual's response to alkylating agents can vary considerably from tissue to tissue and from person to person, pointing to genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that modulate alkylating agent toxicity. PMID:22237395

  2. DNA Damage Induced by Alkylating Agents and Repair Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Natsuko; Takahashi, Akihisa; Ono, Koji; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2010-01-01

    The cytotoxic effects of alkylating agents are strongly attenuated by cellular DNA repair processes, necessitating a clear understanding of the repair mechanisms. Simple methylating agents form adducts at N- and O-atoms. N-methylations are removed by base excision repair, AlkB homologues, or nucleotide excision repair (NER). O6-methylguanine (MeG), which can eventually become cytotoxic and mutagenic, is repaired by O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, and O6MeG:T mispairs are recognized by the mismatch repair system (MMR). MMR cannot repair the O6MeG/T mispairs, which eventually lead to double-strand breaks. Bifunctional alkylating agents form interstrand cross-links (ICLs) which are more complex and highly cytotoxic. ICLs are repaired by complex of NER factors (e.g., endnuclease xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group F-excision repair cross-complementing rodent repair deficiency complementation group 1), Fanconi anemia repair, and homologous recombination. A detailed understanding of how cells cope with DNA damage caused by alkylating agents is therefore potentially useful in clinical medicine. PMID:21113301

  3. Balancing repair and tolerance of DNA damage caused by alkylating agents

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Dragony; Calvo, Jennifer A.; Samson, Leona D.

    2012-01-01

    Alkylating agents constitute a major class of frontline chemotherapeutic drugs that inflict cytotoxic DNA damage as their main mode of action, in addition to collateral mutagenic damage. Numerous cellular pathways, including direct DNA damage reversal, base excision repair (BER) and mismatch repair (MMR), respond to alkylation damage to defend against alkylation-induced cell death or mutation. However, maintaining a proper balance of activity both within and between these pathways is crucial ...

  4. SERIES: Genomic instability in cancer Balancing repair and tolerance of DNA damage caused by alkylating agents

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Dragony; Calvo, Jennifer A.; Samson, Leona D

    2012-01-01

    Alkylating agents comprise a major class of frontline chemotherapeutic drugs that inflict cytotoxic DNA damage as their main mode of action, in addition to collateral mutagenic damage. Numerous cellular pathways, including direct DNA damage reversal, base excision repair (BER), and mismatch repair (MMR) respond to alkylation damage to defend against alkylation-induced cell death or mutation. However, maintaining a proper balance of activity both within and between these pathways is crucial fo...

  5. Regulation of DNA Alkylation Damage Repair: Lessons and Therapeutic Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soll, Jennifer M; Sobol, Robert W; Mosammaparast, Nima

    2017-03-01

    Alkylation chemotherapy is one of the most widely used systemic therapies for cancer. While somewhat effective, clinical responses and toxicities of these agents are highly variable. A major contributing factor for this variability is the numerous distinct lesions that are created upon alkylation damage. These adducts activate multiple repair pathways. There is mounting evidence that the individual pathways function cooperatively, suggesting that coordinated regulation of alkylation repair is critical to prevent toxicity. Furthermore, some alkylating agents produce adducts that overlap with newly discovered methylation marks, making it difficult to distinguish between bona fide damaged bases and so-called 'epigenetic' adducts. Here, we discuss new efforts aimed at deciphering the mechanisms that regulate these repair pathways, emphasizing their implications for cancer chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Balancing repair and tolerance of DNA damage caused by alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Dragony; Calvo, Jennifer A; Samson, Leona D

    2012-01-12

    Alkylating agents constitute a major class of frontline chemotherapeutic drugs that inflict cytotoxic DNA damage as their main mode of action, in addition to collateral mutagenic damage. Numerous cellular pathways, including direct DNA damage reversal, base excision repair (BER) and mismatch repair (MMR), respond to alkylation damage to defend against alkylation-induced cell death or mutation. However, maintaining a proper balance of activity both within and between these pathways is crucial for a favourable response of an organism to alkylating agents. Furthermore, the response of an individual to alkylating agents can vary considerably from tissue to tissue and from person to person, pointing to genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that modulate alkylating agent toxicity.

  7. DNA alkylation damage as a sensor of nitrosative stress in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Durbach, S I; Springer, B; Machowski, E E; North, R J; Papavinasasundaram, K G; Colston, M J; Böttger, E C; Mizrahi, V

    2003-01-01

    One of the cellular consequences of nitrosative stress is alkylation damage to DNA. To assess whether nitrosative stress is registered on the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, mutants lacking an alkylation damage repair and reversal operon were constructed. Although hypersensitive to the genotoxic effects of N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine in vitro, the mutants displayed no phenotype in vivo, suggesting that permeation of nitrosative stress to the level of cytotoxic DNA damage is res...

  8. DNA Damage Induced by Alkylating Agents and Repair Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Natsuko Kondo; Akihisa Takahashi; Koji Ono; Takeo Ohnishi

    2010-01-01

    The cytotoxic effects of alkylating agents are strongly attenuated by cellular DNA repair processes, necessitating a clear understanding of the repair mechanisms. Simple methylating agents form adducts at N- and O-atoms. N-methylations are removed by base excision repair, AlkB homologues, or nucleotide excision repair (NER). O 6-methylguanine (MeG), which can eventually become cytotoxic and mutagenic, is repaired by O 6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, and O 6MeG:T mispairs are recognized...

  9. Glutamine deficiency induces DNA alkylation damage and sensitizes cancer cells to alkylating agents through inhibition of ALKBH enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thai Q; Ishak Gabra, Mari B; Lowman, Xazmin H; Yang, Ying; Reid, Michael A; Pan, Min; O'Connor, Timothy R; Kong, Mei

    2017-11-01

    Driven by oncogenic signaling, glutamine addiction exhibited by cancer cells often leads to severe glutamine depletion in solid tumors. Despite this nutritional environment that tumor cells often experience, the effect of glutamine deficiency on cellular responses to DNA damage and chemotherapeutic treatment remains unclear. Here, we show that glutamine deficiency, through the reduction of alpha-ketoglutarate, inhibits the AlkB homolog (ALKBH) enzymes activity and induces DNA alkylation damage. As a result, glutamine deprivation or glutaminase inhibitor treatment triggers DNA damage accumulation independent of cell death. In addition, low glutamine-induced DNA damage is abolished in ALKBH deficient cells. Importantly, we show that glutaminase inhibitors, 6-Diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON) or CB-839, hypersensitize cancer cells to alkylating agents both in vitro and in vivo. Together, the crosstalk between glutamine metabolism and the DNA repair pathway identified in this study highlights a potential role of metabolic stress in genomic instability and therapeutic response in cancer.

  10. Aag DNA glycosylase promotes alkylation-induced tissue damage mediated by Parp1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Jennifer A; Moroski-Erkul, Catherine A; Lake, Annabelle; Eichinger, Lindsey W; Shah, Dharini; Jhun, Iny; Limsirichai, Prajit; Bronson, Roderick T; Christiani, David C; Meira, Lisiane B; Samson, Leona D

    2013-04-01

    Alkylating agents comprise a major class of front-line cancer chemotherapeutic compounds, and while these agents effectively kill tumor cells, they also damage healthy tissues. Although base excision repair (BER) is essential in repairing DNA alkylation damage, under certain conditions, initiation of BER can be detrimental. Here we illustrate that the alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) mediates alkylation-induced tissue damage and whole-animal lethality following exposure to alkylating agents. Aag-dependent tissue damage, as observed in cerebellar granule cells, splenocytes, thymocytes, bone marrow cells, pancreatic β-cells, and retinal photoreceptor cells, was detected in wild-type mice, exacerbated in Aag transgenic mice, and completely suppressed in Aag⁻/⁻ mice. Additional genetic experiments dissected the effects of modulating both BER and Parp1 on alkylation sensitivity in mice and determined that Aag acts upstream of Parp1 in alkylation-induced tissue damage; in fact, cytotoxicity in WT and Aag transgenic mice was abrogated in the absence of Parp1. These results provide in vivo evidence that Aag-initiated BER may play a critical role in determining the side-effects of alkylating agent chemotherapies and that Parp1 plays a crucial role in Aag-mediated tissue damage.

  11. Aag DNA glycosylase promotes alkylation-induced tissue damage mediated by Parp1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Calvo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Alkylating agents comprise a major class of front-line cancer chemotherapeutic compounds, and while these agents effectively kill tumor cells, they also damage healthy tissues. Although base excision repair (BER is essential in repairing DNA alkylation damage, under certain conditions, initiation of BER can be detrimental. Here we illustrate that the alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG mediates alkylation-induced tissue damage and whole-animal lethality following exposure to alkylating agents. Aag-dependent tissue damage, as observed in cerebellar granule cells, splenocytes, thymocytes, bone marrow cells, pancreatic β-cells, and retinal photoreceptor cells, was detected in wild-type mice, exacerbated in Aag transgenic mice, and completely suppressed in Aag⁻/⁻ mice. Additional genetic experiments dissected the effects of modulating both BER and Parp1 on alkylation sensitivity in mice and determined that Aag acts upstream of Parp1 in alkylation-induced tissue damage; in fact, cytotoxicity in WT and Aag transgenic mice was abrogated in the absence of Parp1. These results provide in vivo evidence that Aag-initiated BER may play a critical role in determining the side-effects of alkylating agent chemotherapies and that Parp1 plays a crucial role in Aag-mediated tissue damage.

  12. Repair of Alkylation Damage in Eukaryotic Chromatin Depends on Searching Ability of Alkyladenine DNA Glycosylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaru; O'Brien, Patrick J

    2015-11-20

    Human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) initiates the base excision repair pathway by excising alkylated and deaminated purine lesions. In vitro biochemical experiments demonstrate that AAG uses facilitated diffusion to efficiently search DNA to find rare sites of damage and suggest that electrostatic interactions are critical to the searching process. However, it remains an open question whether DNA searching limits the rate of DNA repair in vivo. We constructed AAG mutants with altered searching ability and measured their ability to protect yeast from alkylation damage in order to address this question. Each of the conserved arginine and lysine residues that are near the DNA binding interface were mutated, and the functional impacts were evaluated using kinetic and thermodynamic analysis. These mutations do not perturb catalysis of N-glycosidic bond cleavage, but they decrease the ability to capture rare lesion sites. Nonspecific and specific DNA binding properties are closely correlated, suggesting that the electrostatic interactions observed in the specific recognition complex are similarly important for DNA searching complexes. The ability of the mutant proteins to complement repair-deficient yeast cells is positively correlated with the ability of the proteins to search DNA in vitro, suggesting that cellular resistance to DNA alkylation is governed by the ability to find and efficiently capture cytotoxic lesions. It appears that chromosomal access is not restricted and toxic sites of alkylation damage are readily accessible to a searching protein.

  13. Glutamine deficiency induces DNA alkylation damage and sensitizes cancer cells to alkylating agents through inhibition of ALKBH enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thai Q Tran

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Driven by oncogenic signaling, glutamine addiction exhibited by cancer cells often leads to severe glutamine depletion in solid tumors. Despite this nutritional environment that tumor cells often experience, the effect of glutamine deficiency on cellular responses to DNA damage and chemotherapeutic treatment remains unclear. Here, we show that glutamine deficiency, through the reduction of alpha-ketoglutarate, inhibits the AlkB homolog (ALKBH enzymes activity and induces DNA alkylation damage. As a result, glutamine deprivation or glutaminase inhibitor treatment triggers DNA damage accumulation independent of cell death. In addition, low glutamine-induced DNA damage is abolished in ALKBH deficient cells. Importantly, we show that glutaminase inhibitors, 6-Diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON or CB-839, hypersensitize cancer cells to alkylating agents both in vitro and in vivo. Together, the crosstalk between glutamine metabolism and the DNA repair pathway identified in this study highlights a potential role of metabolic stress in genomic instability and therapeutic response in cancer.

  14. Alkylation damage in DNA and RNA--repair mechanisms and medical significance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drabløs, Finn; Feyzi, Emadoldin; Aas, Per Arne

    2004-01-01

    Alkylation lesions in DNA and RNA result from endogenous compounds, environmental agents and alkylating drugs. Simple methylating agents, e.g. methylnitrosourea, tobacco-specific nitrosamines and drugs like temozolomide or streptozotocin, form adducts at N- and O-atoms in DNA bases. These lesions...... are mainly repaired by direct base repair, base excision repair, and to some extent by nucleotide excision repair (NER). The identified carcinogenicity of O(6)-methylguanine (O(6)-meG) is largely caused by its miscoding properties. Mutations from this lesion are prevented by O(6)-alkylG-DNA alkyltransferase......, inactivation of the MMR system in an AGT-defective background causes resistance to the killing effects of O(6)-alkylating agents, but not to the mutagenic effect. Bifunctional alkylating agents, such as chlorambucil or carmustine (BCNU), are commonly used anti-cancer drugs. DNA lesions caused by these agents...

  15. Structure-function relationships governing activity and stability of a DNA alkylation damage repair thermostable protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perugino, Giuseppe; Miggiano, Riccardo; Serpe, Mario; Vettone, Antonella; Valenti, Anna; Lahiri, Samarpita; Rossi, Franca; Rossi, Mosè; Rizzi, Menico; Ciaramella, Maria

    2015-10-15

    Alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferases repair alkylated DNA bases, which are among the most common DNA lesions, and are evolutionary conserved, from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes. The human ortholog, hAGT, is involved in resistance to alkylating chemotherapy drugs. We report here on the alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferase, SsOGT, from an archaeal species living at high temperature, a condition that enhances the harmful effect of DNA alkylation. The exceptionally high stability of SsOGT gave us the unique opportunity to perform structural and biochemical analysis of a protein of this class in its post-reaction form. This analysis, along with those performed on SsOGT in its ligand-free and DNA-bound forms, provides insights in the structure-function relationships of the protein before, during and after DNA repair, suggesting a molecular basis for DNA recognition, catalytic activity and protein post-reaction fate, and giving hints on the mechanism of alkylation-induced inactivation of this class of proteins. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. DNA Polymerases ImuC and DinB Are Involved in DNA Alkylation Damage Tolerance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatsenko, Tatjana; Sidorenko, Julia; Saumaa, Signe; Kivisaar, Maia

    2017-01-01

    Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), facilitated by low-fidelity polymerases, is an important DNA damage tolerance mechanism. Here, we investigated the role and biological function of TLS polymerase ImuC (former DnaE2), generally present in bacteria lacking DNA polymerase V, and TLS polymerase DinB in response to DNA alkylation damage in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and P. putida. We found that TLS DNA polymerases ImuC and DinB ensured a protective role against N- and O-methylation induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) in both P. aeruginosa and P. putida. DinB also appeared to be important for the survival of P. aeruginosa and rapidly growing P. putida cells in the presence of methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). The role of ImuC in protection against MMS-induced damage was uncovered under DinB-deficient conditions. Apart from this, both ImuC and DinB were critical for the survival of bacteria with impaired base excision repair (BER) functions upon alkylation damage, lacking DNA glycosylases AlkA and/or Tag. Here, the increased sensitivity of imuCdinB double deficient strains in comparison to single mutants suggested that the specificity of alkylated DNA lesion bypass of DinB and ImuC might also be different. Moreover, our results demonstrated that mutagenesis induced by MMS in pseudomonads was largely ImuC-dependent. Unexpectedly, we discovered that the growth temperature of bacteria affected the efficiency of DinB and ImuC in ensuring cell survival upon alkylation damage. Taken together, the results of our study disclosed the involvement of ImuC in DNA alkylation damage tolerance, especially at low temperatures, and its possible contribution to the adaptation of pseudomonads upon DNA alkylation damage via increased mutagenesis.

  17. The ada operon of Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes two DNA methyltransferases for inducible repair of DNA alkylation damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingyi; Aamodt, Randi M; Dalhus, Bjørn; Balasingham, Seetha; Helle, Ina; Andersen, Pernille; Tønjum, Tone; Alseth, Ingrun; Rognes, Torbjørn; Bjørås, Magnar

    2011-06-10

    The ada operon of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which encodes a composite protein of AdaA and AlkA and a separate AdaB/Ogt protein, was characterized. M. tuberculosis treated with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine induced transcription of the adaA-alkA and adaB genes, suggesting that M. tuberculosis mount an inducible response to methylating agents. Survival assays of the methyltransferase defective Escherichia coli mutant KT233 (ada ogt), showed that expression of the adaB gene rescued the alkylation sensitivity. Further, adaB but not adaA-alkA complemented the hypermutator phenotype of KT233. Purified AdaA-AlkA and AdaB possessed methyltransferase activity. These data suggested that AdaB counteract the cytotoxic and mutagenic effect of O(6)-methylguanine, while AdaA-AlkA most likely transfers methyl groups from innocuous methylphosphotriesters. AdaA-AlkA did not possess alkylbase DNA glycosylase activity nor rescue the alkylation sensitivity of the E. coli mutant BK2118 (tag alkA). We propose that AdaA-AlkA is a positive regulator of the adaptive response in M. tuberculosis. It thus appears that the ada operon of M. tuberculosis suppresses the mutagenic effect of alkylation but not the cytotoxic effect of lesions such as 3-methylpurines. Collectively, these data indicate that M. tuberculosis hypermutator strains with defective adaptive response genes might sustain robustness to cytotoxic alkylation DNA damage and confer a selective advantage contributing to host adaptation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Contributions of DNA repair and damage response pathways to the non-linear genotoxic responses of alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapacz, Joanna; Pottenger, Lynn H; Engelward, Bevin P; Heinen, Christopher D; Johnson, George E; Clewell, Rebecca A; Carmichael, Paul L; Adeleye, Yeyejide; Andersen, Melvin E

    2016-01-01

    From a risk assessment perspective, DNA-reactive agents are conventionally assumed to have genotoxic risks at all exposure levels, thus applying a linear extrapolation for low-dose responses. New approaches discussed here, including more diverse and sensitive methods for assessing DNA damage and DNA repair, strongly support the existence of measurable regions where genotoxic responses with increasing doses are insignificant relative to control. Model monofunctional alkylating agents have in vitro and in vivo datasets amenable to determination of points of departure (PoDs) for genotoxic effects. A session at the 2013 Society of Toxicology meeting provided an opportunity to survey the progress in understanding the biological basis of empirically-observed PoDs for DNA alkylating agents. Together with the literature published since, this review discusses cellular pathways activated by endogenous and exogenous alkylation DNA damage. Cells have evolved conserved processes that monitor and counteract a spontaneous steady-state level of DNA damage. The ubiquitous network of DNA repair pathways serves as the first line of defense for clearing of the DNA damage and preventing mutation. Other biological pathways discussed here that are activated by genotoxic stress include post-translational activation of cell cycle networks and transcriptional networks for apoptosis/cell death. The interactions of various DNA repair and DNA damage response pathways provide biological bases for the observed PoD behaviors seen with genotoxic compounds. Thus, after formation of DNA adducts, the activation of cellular pathways can lead to the avoidance of a mutagenic outcome. The understanding of the cellular mechanisms acting within the low-dose region will serve to better characterize risks from exposures to DNA-reactive agents at environmentally-relevant concentrations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Contributions of DNA repair and damage response pathways to the non-linear genotoxic responses of alkylating agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapacz, Joanna; Pottenger, Lynn H.; Engelward, Bevin P.; Heinen, Christopher D.; Johnson, George E.; Clewell, Rebecca A.; Carmichael, Paul L.; Adeleye, Yeyejide; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2016-01-01

    From a risk assessment perspective, DNA-reactive agents are conventionally assumed to have genotoxic risks at all exposure levels, thus applying a linear extrapolation for low-dose responses. New approaches discussed here, including more diverse and sensitive methods for assessing DNA damage and DNA repair, strongly support the existence of measurable regions where genotoxic responses with increasing doses are insignificant relative to control. Model monofunctional alkylating agents have in vitro and in vivo datasets amenable to determination of points of departure (PoDs) for genotoxic effects. A session at the 2013 Society of Toxicology meeting provided an opportunity to survey the progress in understanding the biological basis of empirically-observed PoDs for DNA alkylating agents. Together with the literature published since, this review discusses cellular pathways activated by endogenous and exogenous alkylation DNA damage. Cells have evolved conserved processes that monitor and counteract a spontaneous steady-state level of DNA damage. The ubiquitous network of DNA repair pathways serves as the first line of defense for clearing of the DNA damage and preventing mutation. Other biological pathways discussed here that are activated by genotoxic stress include post-translational activation of cell cycle networks and transcriptional networks for apoptosis/cell death. The interactions of various DNA repair and DNA damage response pathways provide biological bases for the observed PoD behaviors seen with genotoxic compounds. Thus, after formation of DNA adducts, the activation of cellular pathways can lead to the avoidance a mutagenic outcome. The understanding of the cellular mechanisms acting within the low-dose region will serve to better characterize risks from exposures to DNA-reactive agents at environmentally-relevant concentrations. PMID:27036068

  20. Slx4 becomes phosphorylated after DNA damage in a Mec1/Tel1-dependent manner and is required for repair of DNA alkylation damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flott, Sonja; Rouse, John

    2005-01-01

    Members of the RecQ family of DNA helicases, mutated in several syndromes associated with cancer predisposition, are key regulators of genome stability. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae SLX4 gene is required for cell viability in the absence of Sgs1, the only yeast RecQ helicase. SLX4 encodes one subunit of the heterodimeric Slx1–Slx4 endonuclease, although its cellular function is not clear. Slx1–Slx4 was reported to preferentially cleave replication fork-like structures in vitro, and cells lacking SLX4 are hypersensitive to DNA alkylation damage. Here we report that Slx4 becomes phosphorylated in cells exposed to a wide range of genotoxins. Even though it has been proposed that the role of Slx4 is restricted to S-phase, Slx4 phosphorylation is observed in cells arrested in G1 or G2 phases of the cell cycle, but not during an unperturbed cell cycle. Slx4 phosphorylation is completely abolished in cells lacking the Mec1 and Tel1 protein kinases, critical regulators of genome stability, but is barely affected in the absence of both Rad53 and Chk1 kinases. Finally we show that, whereas both Slx1 and Slx4 are dispensable for activation of cell-cycle checkpoints, Slx4, but not Slx1, is required for repair of DNA alkylation damage in both aynchronously growing cells and in G2-phase-arrested cells. These results reveal Slx4 as a new target of the Mec1/Tel1 kinases, with a crucial role in DNA repair that is not restricted to the processing of stalled replisomes. PMID:15975089

  1. Targeting neddylation induces DNA damage and checkpoint activation and sensitizes chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, C; Godbersen, J C; Berger, A; Brown, J R; Danilov, A V

    2015-07-09

    Microenvironment-mediated upregulation of the B-cell receptor (BCR) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling in CLL cells resident in the lymph node and bone marrow promotes apoptosis evasion and clonal expansion. We recently reported that MLN4924 (pevonedistat), an investigational agent that inhibits the NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE), abrogates stromal-mediated NF-κB pathway activity and CLL cell survival. However, the NAE pathway also assists degradation of multiple other substrates. MLN4924 has been shown to induce DNA damage and cell cycle arrest, but the importance of this mechanism in primary neoplastic B cells has not been studied. Here we mimicked the lymph node microenvironment using CD40 ligand (CD40L)-expressing stroma and interleukin-21 (IL-21) to find that inducing proliferation of the primary CLL cells conferred enhanced sensitivity to NAE inhibition. Treatment of the CD40-stimulated CLL cells with MLN4924 resulted in deregulation of Cdt1, a DNA replication licensing factor, and cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p27. This led to DNA damage, checkpoint activation and G2 arrest. Alkylating agents bendamustine and chlorambucil enhanced MLN4924-mediated DNA damage and apoptosis. These events were more prominent in cells stimulated with IL-21 compared with CD40L alone, indicating that, following NAE inhibition, the culture conditions were able to direct CLL cell fate from an NF-κB inhibition to a Cdt1 induction program. Our data provide insight into the biological consequences of targeting NAE in CLL and serves as further rationale for studying the clinical activity of MLN4924 in CLL, particularly in combination with alkylating agents.

  2. Protection of hematopoietic cells from O(6)-alkylation damage by O(6)-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase gene transfer: studies with different O(6)-alkylating agents and retroviral backbones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, M; Bardenheuer, W; Sorg, U R; Seeber, S; Flasshove, M; Moritz, T

    2001-07-01

    Overexpression of O(6)-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) can protect hematopoietic cells from O(6)-alkylation damage. To identify possible clinical applications of this technology we compared the effect of MGMT gene transfer on the hematotoxicity induced by different O(6)-alkylating agents in clinical use: the chloroethylnitrosoureas ACNU, BCNU, CCNU and the tetrazine derivative temozolomide. In addition, various retroviral vectors expressing the MGMT-cDNA were investigated to identify optimal viral backbones for hematoprotection by MGMT expression. Protection from ACNU, BCNU, CCNU or temozolomide toxicity was evaluated utilizing a Moloney murine leukemia virus-based retroviral vector (N2/Zip-PGK-MGMT) to transduce primary murine bone marrow cells. Increased resistance in murine colony-forming units (CFU) was demonstrated for all four drugs. In comparison to mock-transduced controls, after transduction with N2/Zip-PGK-MGMT the IC50 for CFU increased on average 4.7-fold for ACNU, 2.5-fold for BCNU, 6.3-fold for CCNU and 1.5-fold for temozolomide. To study the effect of the retroviral backbone on hematoprotection various vectors expressing the human MGMT-cDNA from a murine embryonic sarcoma virus LTR (MSCV-MGMT) or a hybrid spleen focus-forming/murine embryonic sarcoma virus LTR (SF1-MGMT) were compared with the N2/Zip-PGK-MGMT vector. While all vectors increased resistance of transduced human CFU to ACNU, the SF1-MGMT construct was most efficient especially at high ACNU concentrations (8-12 microg/ml). Similar results were obtained for protection of murine high-proliferative-potential colony-forming cells. These data may help to optimize treatment design and retroviral constructs in future clinical studies aiming at hematoprotection by MGMT gene transfer.

  3. DNA Polymerase α (swi7) and the Flap Endonuclease Fen1 (rad2) Act Together in the S-Phase Alkylation Damage Response in S. pombe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulintchenko, Milana; Vengrova, Sonya; Eydmann, Trevor; Arumugam, Prakash; Dalgaard, Jacob Z.

    2012-01-01

    Polymerase α is an essential enzyme mainly mediating Okazaki fragment synthesis during lagging strand replication. A specific point mutation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe polymerase α named swi7-1, abolishes imprinting required for mating-type switching. Here we investigate whether this mutation confers any genome-wide defects. We show that the swi7-1 mutation renders cells hypersensitive to the DNA damaging agents methyl methansulfonate (MMS), hydroxyurea (HU) and UV and incapacitates activation of the intra-S checkpoint in response to DNA damage. In addition we show that, in the swi7-1 background, cells are characterized by an elevated level of repair foci and recombination, indicative of increased genetic instability. Furthermore, we detect novel Swi1-, -Swi3- and Pol α- dependent alkylation damage repair intermediates with mobility on 2D-gel that suggests presence of single-stranded regions. Genetic interaction studies showed that the flap endonuclease Fen1 works in the same pathway as Pol α in terms of alkylation damage response. Fen1 was also required for formation of alkylation- damage specific repair intermediates. We propose a model to explain how Pol α, Swi1, Swi3 and Fen1 might act together to detect and repair alkylation damage during S-phase. PMID:23071723

  4. DNA modification by alkylating compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruglyakova, E.E.

    1985-09-01

    Results are given for research on the physico-chemical properties of alkylating compounds - nitroso alkyl ureas (NAU) which possess a broad spectrum of biological activity, such as mutagenic, carcinogenic, and anti-tumor action that is due to the alkylation and carbamoylation of DNA as well as other cellular components. Identified chemical products of NAU interaction with DNA and its components are cited. Structural conversions of a DNA macromolecule resulting from its chemical modification are examined. NAU are used to discuss possible biological consequences of DNA modification. 148 references.

  5. Base excision repair of chemotherapeutically-induced alkylated DNA damage predominantly causes contractions of expanded GAA repeats associated with Friedreich's ataxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhao Lai

    Full Text Available Expansion of GAA·TTC repeats within the first intron of the frataxin gene is the cause of Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA, an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder. However, no effective treatment for the disease has been developed as yet. In this study, we explored a possibility of shortening expanded GAA repeats associated with FRDA through chemotherapeutically-induced DNA base lesions and subsequent base excision repair (BER. We provide the first evidence that alkylated DNA damage induced by temozolomide, a chemotherapeutic DNA damaging agent can induce massive GAA repeat contractions/deletions, but only limited expansions in FRDA patient lymphoblasts. We showed that temozolomide-induced GAA repeat instability was mediated by BER. Further characterization of BER of an abasic site in the context of (GAA20 repeats indicates that the lesion mainly resulted in a large deletion of 8 repeats along with small expansions. This was because temozolomide-induced single-stranded breaks initially led to DNA slippage and the formation of a small GAA repeat loop in the upstream region of the damaged strand and a small TTC loop on the template strand. This allowed limited pol β DNA synthesis and the formation of a short 5'-GAA repeat flap that was cleaved by FEN1, thereby leading to small repeat expansions. At a later stage of BER, the small template loop expanded into a large template loop that resulted in the formation of a long 5'-GAA repeat flap. Pol β then performed limited DNA synthesis to bypass the loop, and FEN1 removed the long repeat flap ultimately causing a large repeat deletion. Our study indicates that chemotherapeutically-induced alkylated DNA damage can induce large contractions/deletions of expanded GAA repeats through BER in FRDA patient cells. This further suggests the potential of developing chemotherapeutic alkylating agents to shorten expanded GAA repeats for treatment of FRDA.

  6. Synergy of irofulven in combination with other DNA damaging agents: synergistic interaction with altretamine, alkylating, and platinum-derived agents in the MV522 lung tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelner, Michael J; McMorris, Trevor C; Rojas, Rafael J; Estes, Leita A; Suthipinijtham, Pharnuk

    2008-12-01

    Irofulven (MGI 114, NSC 683863) is a semisynthetic derivative of illudin S, a natural product present in the Omphalotus illudins (Jack O'Lantern) mushroom. This novel agent produces DNA damage, that in contrast to other agents, is predominately ignored by the global genome repair pathway of the nucleotide excision repair (NER)(2) system. The aim of this study was to determine the antitumor activity of irofulven when administered in combination with 44 different DNA damaging agents, whose damage is in general detected and repaired by the genome repair pathway. The human lung carcinoma MV522 cell line and its corresponding xenograft model were used to evaluate the activity of irofulven in combination with different DNA damaging agents. Two main classes of DNA damaging agents, platinum-derived agents, and select bifunctional alkylating agents, demonstrated in vivo synergistic or super-additive interaction with irofulven. DNA helicase inhibiting agents also demonstrated synergy in vitro, but an enhanced interaction with irofulven could not be demonstrated in vivo. There was no detectable synergistic activity between irofulven and agents capable of inducing DNA cleavage or intercalating into DNA. These results indicate that the antitumor activity of irofulven is enhanced when combined with platinum-derived agents, altretamine, and select alkylating agents such as melphalan or chlorambucil. A common factor between these agents appears to be the production of intrastrand DNA crosslinks. The synergistic interaction between irofulven and other agents may stem from the nucleotide excision repair system being selectively overwhelmed at two distinct points in the pathway, resulting in prolonged stalling of transcription forks, and subsequent initiation of apoptosis.

  7. Differences in the regulation by poly(ADP-ribose) of repair of DNA damage from alkylating agents and ultraviolet light according to cell type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleaver, J.E.; Bodell, W.J.; Morgan, W.F.; Zelle, B.

    1983-08-10

    Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis by 3-aminobenzamide in various human and hamster cells influenced the responses to DNA damage from methyl methanesulfonate, but not from ultraviolet light. After exposure to methyl methanesulfonate, 3-aminobenzamide increased the strand break frequency in all cell types studied, but only stimulated repair replication in lymphoid and HeLa cells, suggesting these are independent effects. 3-Aminobenzamide also inhibited the pathway for de novo synthesis of DNA purines, suggesting that some of its effects may be due to disturbance of precursor pathways and irrelevant to the role of poly(ADP-ribose) in repair. Previous claims that 3-aminobenzamide stimulates repair synthesis after exposure to UV light are probably artifacts, because the stimulations are only observed in lymphocytes in the presence of a high concentration of hydroxyurea that itself inhibits repair. The initial inhibition of semiconservative DNA synthesis and the excision of the major alkylation products and pyrimidine dimers were unaffected by 3-aminobenzamide. In general poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis appears to be uniquely involved in regulating the ligation stage of repair of alkylation damage but not ultraviolet damage. By regulating the ligation efficiency, poly(ADP-ribosylation) modulates the dynamic balance between incision and ligation, so as to minimize the frequency of DNA breaks. The ligation stage of repair of UV damage appears different and is not regulated by poly(ADP-ribosylation).

  8. DNA minor groove alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, W A

    2001-04-01

    Recent work on a number of different classes of anticancer agents that alkylate DNA in the minor groove is reviewed. There has been much work with nitrogen mustards, where attachment of the mustard unit to carrier molecules can change the normal patterns of both regio- and sequence-selectivity, from reaction primarily at most guanine N7 sites in the major groove to a few adenine N3 sites at the 3'-end of poly(A/T) sequences in the minor groove. Carrier molecules discussed for mustards are intercalators, polypyrroles, polyimidazoles, bis(benzimidazoles), polybenzamides and anilinoquinolinium salts. In contrast, similar targeting of pyrrolizidine alkylators by a variety of carriers has little effect of their patterns of alkylation (at the 2-amino group of guanine). Recent work on the pyrrolobenzodiazepine and cyclopropaindolone classes of natural product minor groove binders is also reviewed.

  9. Sensitization of melanoma cells to alkylating agent-induced DNA damage and cell death via orchestrating oxidative stress and IKKβ inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Anfernee Kai-Wing; Chen, Ying-Jie; Fu, Xiu-Qiong; Su, Tao; Li, Ting; Guo, Hui; Zhu, Pei-Li; Kwan, Hiu-Yee; Cheng, Brian Chi-Yan; Cao, Hui-Hui; Lee, Sally Kin-Wah; Fong, Wang-Fun; Yu, Zhi-Ling

    2017-04-01

    Nitrosourea represents one of the most active classes of chemotherapeutic alkylating agents for metastatic melanoma. Treatment with nitrosoureas caused severe systemic side effects which hamper its clinical use. Here, we provide pharmacological evidence that reactive oxygen species (ROS) induction and IKKβ inhibition cooperatively enhance nitrosourea-induced cytotoxicity in melanoma cells. We identified SC-514 as a ROS-inducing IKKβ inhibitor which enhanced the function of nitrosoureas. Elevated ROS level results in increased DNA crosslink efficiency triggered by nitrosoureas and IKKβ inhibition enhances DNA damage signals and sensitizes nitrosourea-induced cell death. Using xenograft mouse model, we confirm that ROS-inducing IKKβ inhibitor cooperates with nitrosourea to reduce tumor size and malignancy in vivo. Taken together, our results illustrate a new direction in nitrosourea treatment, and reveal that the combination of ROS-inducing IKKβ inhibitors with nitrosoureas can be potentially exploited for melanoma therapy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Sensitization of melanoma cells to alkylating agent-induced DNA damage and cell death via orchestrating oxidative stress and IKKβ inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anfernee Kai-Wing Tse

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nitrosourea represents one of the most active classes of chemotherapeutic alkylating agents for metastatic melanoma. Treatment with nitrosoureas caused severe systemic side effects which hamper its clinical use. Here, we provide pharmacological evidence that reactive oxygen species (ROS induction and IKKβ inhibition cooperatively enhance nitrosourea-induced cytotoxicity in melanoma cells. We identified SC-514 as a ROS-inducing IKKβ inhibitor which enhanced the function of nitrosoureas. Elevated ROS level results in increased DNA crosslink efficiency triggered by nitrosoureas and IKKβ inhibition enhances DNA damage signals and sensitizes nitrosourea-induced cell death. Using xenograft mouse model, we confirm that ROS-inducing IKKβ inhibitor cooperates with nitrosourea to reduce tumor size and malignancy in vivo. Taken together, our results illustrate a new direction in nitrosourea treatment, and reveal that the combination of ROS-inducing IKKβ inhibitors with nitrosoureas can be potentially exploited for melanoma therapy.

  11. Alkyltransferase-like proteins: brokers dealing with alkylated DNA bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schärer, Orlando D

    2012-07-13

    A new pathway for the repair of DNA alkylation damage is described in this issue of Molecular Cell (Latypov et al., 2012). Alkyltransferase-like enzymes mark O(6)-alkylguanine lesions and, depending on adduct size, channel them into global genome or transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair pathways. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The role of the HCR system in the repair of lethal lesions of Bacillus subtilis phages and their transfecting DNA damaged by radiation and alkylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizdalova, M.; Janovska, E.; Zhestyanikov, V.D.

    1980-01-01

    The role of the HCR system in the repair of prelethal lesions induced by UV light, γ radiation and alkylating agents was studied in the Bacillus subtilis SPP1 phage, its heat sensitive mutants (N3, N73 nad ts 1 ) and corresponding infectious DNA. The survival of phages and their transfecting DNA after treatment with UV light is substantially higher in hcr + cells than in hcr cells, the differences being more striking in intact phages than in their transfecting DNA's. Repair inhibitors reduce survival in hcr + cells: caffeine lowers the survival of UV-irradiated phage SPP1 in exponentially growing hcr + cells but has no effect on its survival in competent hcr + cells; acriflavin and ethidium bromide decrease the survival of the UV-irradiated SPP1 phage in both exponentially growing and competent hcr + cells to the level of survival observed in hcr cells; moreover, ethidium bromide lowers the number of infective centres in hcr + cells of the UV-irradiated DNA of the SPP1 phage. Repair inhibitors do not lower the survival of the UV-irradiated phages or their DNA in hcr cells. The repair mechanism under study also effectively repairs lesions induced by polyfunctional alkylating agents in the transfecting DNA's of B. subtilis phages but is not functional with lesions induced by these agents in free phages and lesions caused in the phages and their DNA by ethyl methanesulphonate or γ radiation. (author)

  13. Molecular design of sequence specific DNA alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoshima, Masafumi; Bando, Toshikazu; Shinohara, Ken-ichi; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Sequence-specific DNA alkylating agents have great interest for novel approach to cancer chemotherapy. We designed the conjugates between pyrrole (Py)-imidazole (Im) polyamides and DNA alkylating chlorambucil moiety possessing at different positions. The sequence-specific DNA alkylation by conjugates was investigated by using high-resolution denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The results showed that polyamide chlorambucil conjugates alkylate DNA at flanking adenines in recognition sequences of Py-Im polyamides, however, the reactivities and alkylation sites were influenced by the positions of conjugation. In addition, we synthesized conjugate between Py-Im polyamide and another alkylating agent, 1-(chloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-1,2-dihydro-3H-benz[e]indole (seco-CBI). DNA alkylation reactivies by both alkylating polyamides were almost comparable. In contrast, cytotoxicities against cell lines differed greatly. These comparative studies would promote development of appropriate sequence-specific DNA alkylating polyamides against specific cancer cells.

  14. L-β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) nitrosation generates a cytotoxic DNA damaging alkylating agent: An unexplored mechanism for neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potjewyd, G; Day, P J; Shangula, S; Margison, G P; Povey, A C

    2017-03-01

    L-β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) is a non-proteinic amino acid, that is neurotoxic in vitro and in animals, and is implicated in the causation of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and parkinsonism-dementia complex (ALS-PDC) on Guam. Given that natural amino acids can be N-nitrosated to form toxic alkylating agents and the structural similarity of BMAA to other amino acids, our hypothesis was that N-nitrosation of BMAA might result in a toxic alkylating agent, providing a novel mechanistic hypothesis for BMAA action. We have chemically nitrosated BMAA with sodium nitrite to produce nitrosated BMAA (N-BMAA) which was shown to react with the alkyl-trapping agent, 4-(p-nitrobenzyl)pyridine, cause DNA strand breaks in vitro and was toxic to the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y under conditions in which BMAA itself was minimally toxic. Our results indicate that N-BMAA is an alkylating agent and toxin suggesting a plausible and previously unrecognised mechanism for the neurotoxic effects of BMAA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Decreased stability of DNA in cells treated with alkylating agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankfurt, O.S. (Cedars Medical Center, Miami, FL (United States))

    1990-12-01

    A modified highly sensitive procedure for the evaluation of DNA damage in individual cells treated with alkylating agents is reported. The new methodology is based on the amplification of single-strandedness in alkylated DNA by heating in the presence of Mg{sup 2+}. Human ovarian carcinoma cells A2780 were treated with nitrogen mustard (HN2), fixed in methanol, and stained with monoclonal antibody (MOAB) F7-26 generated against HN2-treated DNA. Binding of MOAB was measured by flow cytometry with indirect immunofluorescence. Intensive binding of MOAB to control and drug-treated cells was observed after heating in Tris buffer supplemented with MgCl{sub 2}. Thus, the presence of phosphates and MgCl{sub 2} during heating was necessary for the detection of HN2-induced changes in DNA stability. Fluorescence of HN2-treated cells decreased to background levels after treatment with single-strand-specific S{sub 1} nuclease. MOAB F7-26 interacted with single-stranded regions in DNA and did not bind to dsDNA or other cellular antigens. It is suggested that alkylation of guanines decreased the stability of the DNA molecule and increased the access of MOAB F7-26 to deoxycytidines on the opposite DNA strand.

  16. Alkylation damage by lipid electrophiles targets functional protein systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codreanu, Simona G; Ullery, Jody C; Zhu, Jing; Tallman, Keri A; Beavers, William N; Porter, Ned A; Marnett, Lawrence J; Zhang, Bing; Liebler, Daniel C

    2014-03-01

    Protein alkylation by reactive electrophiles contributes to chemical toxicities and oxidative stress, but the functional impact of alkylation damage across proteomes is poorly understood. We used Click chemistry and shotgun proteomics to profile the accumulation of proteome damage in human cells treated with lipid electrophile probes. Protein target profiles revealed three damage susceptibility classes, as well as proteins that were highly resistant to alkylation. Damage occurred selectively across functional protein interaction networks, with the most highly alkylation-susceptible proteins mapping to networks involved in cytoskeletal regulation. Proteins with lower damage susceptibility mapped to networks involved in protein synthesis and turnover and were alkylated only at electrophile concentrations that caused significant toxicity. Hierarchical susceptibility of proteome systems to alkylation may allow cells to survive sublethal damage while protecting critical cell functions.

  17. Alkylation Damage by Lipid Electrophiles Targets Functional Protein Systems*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codreanu, Simona G.; Ullery, Jody C.; Zhu, Jing; Tallman, Keri A.; Beavers, William N.; Porter, Ned A.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Zhang, Bing; Liebler, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    Protein alkylation by reactive electrophiles contributes to chemical toxicities and oxidative stress, but the functional impact of alkylation damage across proteomes is poorly understood. We used Click chemistry and shotgun proteomics to profile the accumulation of proteome damage in human cells treated with lipid electrophile probes. Protein target profiles revealed three damage susceptibility classes, as well as proteins that were highly resistant to alkylation. Damage occurred selectively across functional protein interaction networks, with the most highly alkylation-susceptible proteins mapping to networks involved in cytoskeletal regulation. Proteins with lower damage susceptibility mapped to networks involved in protein synthesis and turnover and were alkylated only at electrophile concentrations that caused significant toxicity. Hierarchical susceptibility of proteome systems to alkylation may allow cells to survive sublethal damage while protecting critical cell functions. PMID:24429493

  18. Synthesis and evaluation of sequence-specific DNA alkylating agents: effect of alkylation subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Tatsuhiko; Sasaki, Shunta; Minoshima, Masafumi; Shinohara, Ken-ichi; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    We have demonstrated that hairpin pyrrole (Py)- imidazole (Im) polyamide-CBI conjugates selectively alkylate predetermined sequences. In this study, we investigated the effect of alkylation subunits, for example conjugates 1-4 with three types of DNA alkylating units, and Py-Im polyamides with indole linker. Conjugate 3 and 4 selectively alkylated the predetermined sequences as described previously, while conjugates 1 and 2 alkylate at mismatched sites.

  19. Effect O6-Guanine Alkylation on DNA Flexibility Studied by Comparative Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kara, M.; Dršata, Tomáš; Lankaš, Filip; Zacharias, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 1 (2015), s. 23-32 ISSN 0006-3525 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-21893S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : DNA damage * DNA alkylation * DNA repair * molecular simulation * molecular dynamics simulation Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.248, year: 2015

  20. Pseudomonas putida AlkA and AlkB proteins comprise different defense systems for the repair of alkylation damage to DNA - in vivo, in vitro, and in silico studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Mielecki

    Full Text Available Alkylating agents introduce cytotoxic and/or mutagenic lesions to DNA bases leading to induction of adaptive (Ada response, a mechanism protecting cells against deleterious effects of environmental chemicals. In Escherichia coli, the Ada response involves expression of four genes: ada, alkA, alkB, and aidB. In Pseudomonas putida, the organization of Ada regulon is different, raising questions regarding regulation of Ada gene expression. The aim of the presented studies was to analyze the role of AlkA glycosylase and AlkB dioxygenase in protecting P. putida cells against damage to DNA caused by alkylating agents. The results of bioinformatic analysis, of survival and mutagenesis of methyl methanesulfonate (MMS or N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG treated P. putida mutants in ada, alkA and alkB genes as well as assay of promoter activity revealed diverse roles of Ada, AlkA and AlkB proteins in protecting cellular DNA against alkylating agents. We found AlkA protein crucial to abolish the cytotoxic but not the mutagenic effects of alkylans since: (i the mutation in the alkA gene was the most deleterious for MMS/MNNG treated P. putida cells, (ii the activity of the alkA promoter was Ada-dependent and the highest among the tested genes. P. putida AlkB (PpAlkB, characterized by optimal conditions for in vitro repair of specific substrates, complementation assay, and M13/MS2 survival test, allowed to establish conservation of enzymatic function of P. putida and E. coli AlkB protein. We found that the organization of P. putida Ada regulon differs from that of E. coli. AlkA protein induced within the Ada response is crucial for protecting P. putida against cytotoxicity, whereas Ada prevents the mutagenic action of alkylating agents. In contrast to E. coli AlkB (EcAlkB, PpAlkB remains beyond the Ada regulon and is expressed constitutively. It probably creates a backup system that protects P. putida strains defective in other DNA repair systems

  1. Pseudomonas putida AlkA and AlkB Proteins Comprise Different Defense Systems for the Repair of Alkylation Damage to DNA – In Vivo, In Vitro, and In Silico Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielecki, Damian; Saumaa, Signe; Wrzesiński, Michał; Maciejewska, Agnieszka M.; Żuchniewicz, Karolina; Sikora, Anna; Piwowarski, Jan; Nieminuszczy, Jadwiga; Kivisaar, Maia; Grzesiuk, Elżbieta

    2013-01-01

    Alkylating agents introduce cytotoxic and/or mutagenic lesions to DNA bases leading to induction of adaptive (Ada) response, a mechanism protecting cells against deleterious effects of environmental chemicals. In Escherichia coli, the Ada response involves expression of four genes: ada, alkA, alkB, and aidB. In Pseudomonas putida, the organization of Ada regulon is different, raising questions regarding regulation of Ada gene expression. The aim of the presented studies was to analyze the role of AlkA glycosylase and AlkB dioxygenase in protecting P. putida cells against damage to DNA caused by alkylating agents. The results of bioinformatic analysis, of survival and mutagenesis of methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) or N-methyl-N’-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treated P. putida mutants in ada, alkA and alkB genes as well as assay of promoter activity revealed diverse roles of Ada, AlkA and AlkB proteins in protecting cellular DNA against alkylating agents. We found AlkA protein crucial to abolish the cytotoxic but not the mutagenic effects of alkylans since: (i) the mutation in the alkA gene was the most deleterious for MMS/MNNG treated P. putida cells, (ii) the activity of the alkA promoter was Ada-dependent and the highest among the tested genes. P. putida AlkB (PpAlkB), characterized by optimal conditions for in vitro repair of specific substrates, complementation assay, and M13/MS2 survival test, allowed to establish conservation of enzymatic function of P. putida and E. coli AlkB protein. We found that the organization of P. putida Ada regulon differs from that of E. coli. AlkA protein induced within the Ada response is crucial for protecting P. putida against cytotoxicity, whereas Ada prevents the mutagenic action of alkylating agents. In contrast to E. coli AlkB (EcAlkB), PpAlkB remains beyond the Ada regulon and is expressed constitutively. It probably creates a backup system that protects P. putida strains defective in other DNA repair systems against

  2. DNA damage and autophagy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely; Panayiotidis, Mihalis I.; Franco, Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    Both exogenous and endogenous agents are a threat to DNA integrity. Exogenous environmental agents such as ultraviolet (UV) and ionizing radiation, genotoxic chemicals and endogenous byproducts of metabolism including reactive oxygen species can cause alterations in DNA structure (DNA damage). Unrepaired DNA damage has been linked to a variety of human disorders including cancer and neurodegenerative disease. Thus, efficient mechanisms to detect DNA lesions, signal their presence and promote their repair have been evolved in cells. If DNA is effectively repaired, DNA damage response is inactivated and normal cell functioning resumes. In contrast, when DNA lesions cannot be removed, chronic DNA damage triggers specific cell responses such as cell death and senescence. Recently, DNA damage has been shown to induce autophagy, a cellular catabolic process that maintains a balance between synthesis, degradation, and recycling of cellular components. But the exact mechanisms by which DNA damage triggers autophagy are unclear. More importantly, the role of autophagy in the DNA damage response and cellular fate is unknown. In this review we analyze evidence that supports a role for autophagy as an integral part of the DNA damage response.

  3. Noncanonical regulation of alkylation damage resistance by the OTUD4 deubiquitinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu; Majid, Mona C; Soll, Jennifer M; Brickner, Joshua R; Dango, Sebastian; Mosammaparast, Nima

    2015-06-12

    Repair of DNA alkylation damage is critical for genomic stability and involves multiple conserved enzymatic pathways. Alkylation damage resistance, which is critical in cancer chemotherapy, depends on the overexpression of alkylation repair proteins. However, the mechanisms responsible for this upregulation are unknown. Here, we show that an OTU domain deubiquitinase, OTUD4, is a positive regulator of ALKBH2 and ALKBH3, two DNA demethylases critical for alkylation repair. Remarkably, we find that OTUD4 catalytic activity is completely dispensable for this function. Rather, OTUD4 is a scaffold for USP7 and USP9X, two deubiquitinases that act directly on the AlkB proteins. Moreover, we show that loss of OTUD4, USP7, or USP9X in tumor cells makes them significantly more sensitive to alkylating agents. Taken together, this work reveals a novel, noncanonical mechanism by which an OTU family deubiquitinase regulates its substrates, and provides multiple new targets for alkylation chemotherapy sensitization of tumors. © 2015 The Authors.

  4. Immunoassay of DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparro, F.P.; Santella, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    The direct photomodification of DNA by ultraviolet light or the photo-induced addition of exogenous compounds to DNA components results in alterations of DNA structure ranging from subtle to profound. There are two consequences of these conformational changes. First, cells in which the DNA has been damaged are capable of executing repair steps. Second, the DNA which is usually of very low immunogenicity now becomes highly antigenic. This latter property has allowed the production of a series of monoclonal antibodies that recognize photo-induced DNA damage. Monoclonal antibodies have been generated that recognize the 4',5'-monoadduct and the crosslink of 8-methoxypsoralen in DNA. In addition, another antibody has been prepared which recognizes the furan-side monoadduct of 6,4,4'-trimethylangelicin in DNA. These monoclonal antibodies have been characterized as to sensitivity and specificity using non-competitive and competitive enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assays (ELISA). (author)

  5. Immunoassay of DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasparro, F P; Santella, R M

    1988-09-01

    The direct photomodification of DNA by ultraviolet light or the photo-induced addition of exogenous compounds to DNA components results in alterations of DNA structure ranging from subtle to profound. There are two consequences of these conformational changes. First, cells in which the DNA has been damaged are capable of executing repair steps. Second, the DNA which is usually of very low immunogenicity now becomes highly antigenic. This latter property has allowed the production of a series of monoclonal antibodies that recognize photo-induced DNA damage. Monoclonal antibodies have been generated that recognize the 4',5'-monoadduct and the crosslink of 8-methoxypsoralen in DNA. In addition, another antibody has been prepared which recognizes the furan-side monoadduct of 6,4,4'-trimethylangelicin in DNA. These monoclonal antibodies have been characterized as to sensitivity and specificity using non-competitive and competitive enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assays (ELISA).

  6. DNA damage and polyploidization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Jeremy; Poon, Randy Y C

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that polyploidization triggers chromosomal instability and contributes to tumorigenesis. DNA damage is increasingly being recognized for its roles in promoting polyploidization. Although elegant mechanisms known as the DNA damage checkpoints are responsible for halting the cell cycle after DNA damage, agents that uncouple the checkpoints can induce unscheduled entry into mitosis. Likewise, defects of the checkpoints in several disorders permit mitotic entry even in the presence of DNA damage. Forcing cells with damaged DNA into mitosis causes severe chromosome segregation defects, including lagging chromosomes, chromosomal fragments and chromosomal bridges. The presence of these lesions in the cleavage plane is believed to abort cytokinesis. It is postulated that if cytokinesis failure is coupled with defects of the p53-dependent postmitotic checkpoint pathway, cells can enter S phase and become polyploids. Progress in the past several years has unraveled some of the underlying principles of these pathways and underscored the important role of DNA damage in polyploidization. Furthermore, polyploidization per se may also be an important determinant of sensitivity to DNA damage, thereby may offer an opportunity for novel therapies.

  7. Atorvastatin Downregulates In Vitro Methyl Methanesulfonate and Cyclophosphamide Alkylation-Mediated Cellular and DNA Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos F. Araujo-Lima

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, and this class of drugs has been studied as protective agents against DNA damages. Alkylating agents (AAs are able to induce alkylation in macromolecules, causing DNA damage, as DNA methylation. Our objective was to evaluate atorvastatin (AVA antimutagenic, cytoprotective, and antigenotoxic potentials against DNA lesions caused by AA. AVA chemopreventive ability was evaluated using antimutagenicity assays (Salmonella/microsome assay, cytotoxicity, cell cycle, and genotoxicity assays in HepG2 cells. The cells were cotreated with AVA and the AA methyl methanesulfonate (MMS or cyclophosphamide (CPA. Our datum showed that AVA reduces the alkylation-mediated DNA damage in different in vitro experimental models. Cytoprotection of AVA at low doses (0.1–1.0 μM was observed after 24 h of cotreatment with MMS or CPA at their LC50, causing an increase in HepG2 survival rates. After all, AVA at 10 μM and 25 μM had decreased effect in micronucleus formation in HepG2 cells and restored cell cycle alterations induced by MMS and CPA. This study supports the hypothesis that statins can be chemopreventive agents, acting as antimutagenic, antigenotoxic, and cytoprotective components, specifically against alkylating agents of DNA.

  8. Embryotoxicity induced by alkylating agents. Some methodological aspects of DNA alkylation studies in murine embryos using ethylmethanesulfonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platzek, T; Bochert, G; Rahm, U; Neubert, D

    1987-05-01

    Synthesis and spectroscopic analysis of some alkylated DNA purine bases are described. HPLC separation methods are developed for the determination of DNA alkylation rates in mammalian embryonic tissues. Following treatment of pregnant mice with the ethylating agent ethylmethanesulfonate (EMS), an appreciable amount of alkylation (ethylation and methylation) was found in the nuclear DNA of the embryos during organogenesis. The results are discussed in context of our thesis that a certain amount of DNA alkylation in the embryos is correlated to the teratogenic potential of alkylating agents.

  9. Sensitization of melanoma cells to alkylating agent-induced DNA damage and cell death via orchestrating oxidative stress and IKK? inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Tse, Anfernee Kai-Wing; Chen, Ying-Jie; Fu, Xiu-Qiong; Su, Tao; Li, Ting; Guo, Hui; Zhu, Pei-Li; Kwan, Hiu-Yee; Cheng, Brian Chi-Yan; Cao, Hui-Hui; Lee, Sally Kin-Wah; Fong, Wang-Fun; Yu, Zhi-Ling

    2017-01-01

    Nitrosourea represents one of the most active classes of chemotherapeutic alkylating agents for metastatic melanoma. Treatment with nitrosoureas caused severe systemic side effects which hamper its clinical use. Here, we provide pharmacological evidence that reactive oxygen species (ROS) induction and IKKβ inhibition cooperatively enhance nitrosourea-induced cytotoxicity in melanoma cells. We identified SC-514 as a ROS-inducing IKKβ inhibitor which enhanced the function of nitrosoureas. Eleva...

  10. Damages to DNA that result in neoplastic transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlow, R.B.

    1975-01-01

    Some topics discussed are: correlation between carcinogens and mutagens; defective DNA repair in uv-damaged xeroderma pigmentosum cells; analysis of nucleotide damage to DNA following exposure to chemicals or radiations; photoreactivation in uv-irradiated Escherichia coli; tumor development in fish; excision repair as an aid in identifying damage; detection of excision repair; role of endonucleases in repair of uv damage; and alkylation products and tumors

  11. Mechanisms of action of quinone-containing alkylating agents: DNA alkylation by aziridinylquinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, R H; Hartley, J A; Butler, J

    2000-11-01

    Aziridinyl quinones can be activated by cellular reductases eg. DT-diaphorase and cytochrome P450 reductase to form highly reactive DNA alkylating agents. The mechanisms by which this activation and alkylation take place are many and varied. Using clinically relevant and experimental agents this review will describe many of these mechanisms. The agents discussed are Mitomycin C, EO9 and analogues, diaziridinylbenzoquinones and the pyrrolo[1, 2-alpha]benzimidazolequinones.

  12. Radiation damage in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafleur, V.

    1978-01-01

    A number of experiments are described with the purpose to obtain a better insight in the chemical nature and the biological significance of radiation-induced damage in DNA, with some emphasis on the significance of alkali-labile sites. It is shown that not only reactions of OH radicals but also of H radicals introduce breaks and other inactivating damage in single-standed phiX174 DNA. It is found that phosphate buffer is very suitable for the study of the reactions of H radicals with DNA, as the H 2 PO 4 - ions convert the hydrated electrons into H radicals. The hydrated electron, which does react with DNA, does not cause a detectable inactivation. (Auth.)

  13. The human cyclin B1 protein modulates sensitivity of DNA mismatch repair deficient prostate cancer cell lines to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, L J; Rasmussen, M; Lützen, A; Bisgaard, H C; Singh, K K

    2000-05-25

    DNA damage caused by alkylating agents results in a G2 checkpoint arrest. DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficient cells are resistant to killing by alkylating agents and are unable to arrest the cell cycle in G2 phase after alkylation damage. We investigated the response of two MMR-deficient prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and LNCaP to the alkylating agent MNNG. Our studies reveal that DU145 cancer cells are more sensitive to killing by MNNG than LNCaP. Investigation of the underlying reasons for lower resistance revealed that the DU145 cells contain low endogenous levels of cyclin B1. We provide direct evidence that the endogenous level of cyclin B1 modulates the sensitivity of MMR-deficient prostate cancer cells to alkylating agents.

  14. Combined Gene Expression and RNAi Screening to Identify Alkylation Damage Survival Pathways from Fly to Human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanotto-Filho, Alfeu; Dashnamoorthy, Ravi; Loranc, Eva; de Souza, Luis H T; Moreira, José C F; Suresh, Uthra; Chen, Yidong; Bishop, Alexander J R

    2016-01-01

    Alkylating agents are a key component of cancer chemotherapy. Several cellular mechanisms are known to be important for its survival, particularly DNA repair and xenobiotic detoxification, yet genomic screens indicate that additional cellular components may be involved. Elucidating these components has value in either identifying key processes that can be modulated to improve chemotherapeutic efficacy or may be altered in some cancers to confer chemoresistance. We therefore set out to reevaluate our prior Drosophila RNAi screening data by comparison to gene expression arrays in order to determine if we could identify any novel processes in alkylation damage survival. We noted a consistent conservation of alkylation survival pathways across platforms and species when the analysis was conducted on a pathway/process level rather than at an individual gene level. Better results were obtained when combining gene lists from two datasets (RNAi screen plus microarray) prior to analysis. In addition to previously identified DNA damage responses (p53 signaling and Nucleotide Excision Repair), DNA-mRNA-protein metabolism (transcription/translation) and proteasome machinery, we also noted a highly conserved cross-species requirement for NRF2, glutathione (GSH)-mediated drug detoxification and Endoplasmic Reticulum stress (ER stress)/Unfolded Protein Responses (UPR) in cells exposed to alkylation. The requirement for GSH, NRF2 and UPR in alkylation survival was validated by metabolomics, protein studies and functional cell assays. From this we conclude that RNAi/gene expression fusion is a valid strategy to rapidly identify key processes that may be extendable to other contexts beyond damage survival.

  15. Combined Gene Expression and RNAi Screening to Identify Alkylation Damage Survival Pathways from Fly to Human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfeu Zanotto-Filho

    Full Text Available Alkylating agents are a key component of cancer chemotherapy. Several cellular mechanisms are known to be important for its survival, particularly DNA repair and xenobiotic detoxification, yet genomic screens indicate that additional cellular components may be involved. Elucidating these components has value in either identifying key processes that can be modulated to improve chemotherapeutic efficacy or may be altered in some cancers to confer chemoresistance. We therefore set out to reevaluate our prior Drosophila RNAi screening data by comparison to gene expression arrays in order to determine if we could identify any novel processes in alkylation damage survival. We noted a consistent conservation of alkylation survival pathways across platforms and species when the analysis was conducted on a pathway/process level rather than at an individual gene level. Better results were obtained when combining gene lists from two datasets (RNAi screen plus microarray prior to analysis. In addition to previously identified DNA damage responses (p53 signaling and Nucleotide Excision Repair, DNA-mRNA-protein metabolism (transcription/translation and proteasome machinery, we also noted a highly conserved cross-species requirement for NRF2, glutathione (GSH-mediated drug detoxification and Endoplasmic Reticulum stress (ER stress/Unfolded Protein Responses (UPR in cells exposed to alkylation. The requirement for GSH, NRF2 and UPR in alkylation survival was validated by metabolomics, protein studies and functional cell assays. From this we conclude that RNAi/gene expression fusion is a valid strategy to rapidly identify key processes that may be extendable to other contexts beyond damage survival.

  16. Quantitative estimation of the extent of alkylation of DNA following treatment of mammalian cells with non-radioactive alkylating agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, R.D. (Univ. of Tennessee, Oak Ridge); Regan, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    Alkaline sucrose sedimentation has been used to quantitate phosphotriester formation following treatment of human cells with the monofunctional alkylating agents methyl and ethyl methanesulfonate. These persistent alkaline-labile lesions are not repaired during short-term culture conditions and thus serve as a useful and precise index of the total alkylation of the DNA.Estimates of alkylation by this procedure compare favorably with direct estimates by use of labeled alkylating agents.

  17. ATM regulates 3-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase and promotes therapeutic resistance to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotri, Sameer; Burrell, Kelly; Buczkowicz, Pawel; Remke, Marc; Golbourn, Brian; Chornenkyy, Yevgen; Gajadhar, Aaron; Fernandez, Nestor A; Clarke, Ian D; Barszczyk, Mark S; Pajovic, Sanja; Ternamian, Christian; Head, Renee; Sabha, Nesrin; Sobol, Robert W; Taylor, Michael D; Rutka, James T; Jones, Chris; Dirks, Peter B; Zadeh, Gelareh; Hawkins, Cynthia

    2014-10-01

    Alkylating agents are a first-line therapy for the treatment of several aggressive cancers, including pediatric glioblastoma, a lethal tumor in children. Unfortunately, many tumors are resistant to this therapy. We sought to identify ways of sensitizing tumor cells to alkylating agents while leaving normal cells unharmed, increasing therapeutic response while minimizing toxicity. Using an siRNA screen targeting over 240 DNA damage response genes, we identified novel sensitizers to alkylating agents. In particular, the base excision repair (BER) pathway, including 3-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (MPG), as well as ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), were identified in our screen. Interestingly, we identified MPG as a direct novel substrate of ATM. ATM-mediated phosphorylation of MPG was required for enhanced MPG function. Importantly, combined inhibition or loss of MPG and ATM resulted in increased alkylating agent-induced cytotoxicity in vitro and prolonged survival in vivo. The discovery of the ATM-MPG axis will lead to improved treatment of alkylating agent-resistant tumors. Inhibition of ATM and MPG-mediated BER cooperate to sensitize tumor cells to alkylating agents, impairing tumor growth in vitro and in vivo with no toxicity to normal cells, providing an ideal therapeutic window. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Molecular dosimetry of DNA damage caused by alkylation. I. Single-strand breaks induced by ethylating agents in cultured mammalian cells in relation to survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbondandolo, A.; Dogliotti, E.; Lohman, P.H.M.; Berends, F.

    1982-01-01

    Cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells were treated with ethylating agents. DNA lesions giving rise to single-strand breaks (ssb) or alkali-labile sites were measured by centrifugation in alkaline sucrose gradients after lysis in alkali. 4 agents with different tendencies to ethylate preferentially

  19. DNA-directed alkylating ligands as potential antitumor agents: sequence specificity of alkylation by intercalating aniline mustards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, A S; Denny, W A; Gourdie, T A; Valu, K K; Woodgate, P D; Wakelin, L P

    1990-10-23

    The sequence preferences for alkylation of a series of novel parasubstituted aniline mustards linked to the DNA-intercalating chromophore 9-aminoacridine by an alkyl chain of variable length were studied by using procedures analogous to Maxam-Gilbert reactions. The compounds alkylate DNA at both guanine and adenine sites. For mustards linked to the acridine by a short alkyl chain through a para O- or S-link group, 5'-GT sequences are the most preferred sites at which N7-guanine alkylation occurs. For analogues with longer chain lengths, the preference of 5'-GT sequences diminishes in favor of N7-adenine alkylation at the complementary 5'-AC sequence. Magnesium ions are shown to selectively inhibit alkylation at the N7 of adenine (in the major groove) by these compounds but not the alkylation at the N3 of adenine (in the minor groove) by the antitumor antibiotic CC-1065. Effects of chromophore variation were also studied by using aniline mustards linked to quinazoline and sterically hindered tert-butyl-9-aminoacridine chromophores. The results demonstrate that in this series of DNA-directed mustards the noncovalent interactions of the carrier chromophores with DNA significantly modify the sequence selectivity of alkylation by the mustard. Relationships between the DNA alkylation patterns of these compounds and their biological activities are discussed.

  20. Design of novel antitumor DNA alkylating agents: the benzacronycine series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David-Cordonnier, Marie-Hélène; Laine, William; Gaslonde, Thomas; Michel, Sylvie; Tillequin, Francois; Koch, Michel; Léonce, Stéphane; Pierré, Alain; Bailly, Christian

    2004-03-01

    Acronycine, a natural alkaloid originally extracted from the bark of the Australian ash scrub Acronychia baueri, has shown a significant antitumor activity in animal models. Acronycine has been tested against human cancers in the early 1980s, but the clinical trials showed modest therapeutic effects and its development was rapidly discontinued. In order to optimize the antineoplastic effect, different benzoacronycine derivatives were synthesized. Among those, the di-acetate compound S23906-1 was recently identified as a promising anticancer drug candidate and a novel alkylating agent specifically reacting with the exocylic 2-NH2 group of guanines in DNA. The study of DNA bonding capacity of acronycine derivatives leads to the identification of the structural requirements for DNA alkylation. In nearly all cases, the potent alkylating agents, such as S23906-1, were found to be much more cytotoxic than the unreactive analogs such as acronycine itself or diol derivatives. Alkylation of DNA by the monoacetate derivative S28687-1, which is a highly reactive hydrolysis metabolite of S23906-1, occurs with a marked preference for the N2 position of guanine. Other bionucleophiles can react with S23906-1. The benzacronycine derivatives, which efficiently alkylate DNA, also covalently bind to the tripeptide glutathione (GSH) but not to the oxidized product glutathione disulfide. Here we review the reactivity of S23906-1 and some derivatives toward DNA and GSH. The structure-activity relationships in the benzacronycine series validate the reaction mechanism implicating DNA as the main molecular target. S23906-1 stands as the most promising lead of a medicinal chemistry program aimed at discovering novel antitumor drugs based on the acronycine skeleton.

  1. DNA minor groove targeted alkylating agents based on bisbenzimidazole carriers: synthesis, cytotoxicity and sequence-specificity of DNA alkylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaill, J B; Fan, J Y; Denny, W A

    1998-12-01

    A series of bisbenzimidazoles bearing a variety of alkylating agents [ortho- and meta-mustards, imidazolebis(hydroxymethyl), imidazolebis(methylcarbamate) and pyrrolebis(hydroxymethyl)], appended by a propyl linker chain, were prepared and investigated for sequence-specificity of DNA alkylation and their cytotoxicity. Previous work has shown that, for para-aniline mustards, a propyl linker is optimal for cytotoxicity. Alkaline cleavage assays using a variety of different labelled oligonucleotides showed that the preferred sequences for adenine alkylation were 5'-TTTANANAANN and 5'-ATTANANAANN (underlined bases show the drug alkylation sites), with AT-rich sequences required on both the 5' and 3' sides of the alkylated adenine. The different aniline mustards showed little variation in alkylation pattern and similar efficiencies of DNA cross-link formation despite the changes in orientation and positioning of the mustard, suggesting that the propyl linker has some flexibility. The imidazole- and pyrrolebis(hydroxymethyl) alkylators showed no DNA strand cleavage following base treatment, indicating that no guanine or adenine N3 or N7 adducts were formed. Using the PCR-based polymerase stop assay, these alkylators showed PCR blocks at 5'-C*G sites (the * nucleotide indicates the blocked site), particularly at 5'-TAC*GA 5'-AGC*GGA, and 5'-AGCC*GGT sequences, caused by guanine 2-NH2 lesions on the opposite strand. Only the (more reactive) imidazolebis(methylcarbamoyl) and pyrrolebis(hydroxymethyl) alkylators demonstrated interstrand cross-linking ability. All of the bifunctional mustards showed large (approximately 100-fold) increases in cytotoxicity over chlorambucil, with the corresponding monofunctional mustards being 20- to 60-fold less cytotoxic. These results suggest that in the mustards the propyl linker provides sufficient flexibility to achieve delivery of the alkylator to favoured (adenine N3) sites in the minor groove, regardless of its exact geometry with

  2. DNA alkylation lesions and their repair in human cells: modification of the comet assay with 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase (AlkD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hašplová, Katarína; Hudecová, Alexandra; Magdolénová, Zuzana; Bjøras, Magnar; Gálová, Eliška; Miadoková, Eva; Dušinská, Mária

    2012-01-05

    3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase (AlkD) belongs to a new family of DNA glycosylases; it initiates repair of cytotoxic and promutagenic alkylated bases (its main substrates being 3-methyladenine and 7-methylguanine). The modification of the comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis) using AlkD enzyme thus allows assessment of specific DNA alkylation lesions. The resulting baseless sugars are alkali-labile, and under the conditions of the alkaline comet assay they appear as DNA strand breaks. The alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) was used to induce alkylation lesions and to optimize conditions for the modified comet assay method with AlkD on human lymphoblastoid (TK6) cells. We also studied cellular and in vitro DNA repair of alkylated bases in DNA in TK6 cells after treatment with MMS. Results from cellular repair indicate that 50% of DNA alkylation is repaired in the first 60 min. The in vitro repair assay shows that while AlkD recognises most alkylation lesions after 60 min, a cell extract from TK6 cells recognises most of the MMS-induced DNA adducts already in the first 15 min of incubation, with maximum detection of lesions after 60 min' incubation. Additionally, we tested the in vitro repair capacity of human lymphocyte extracts from 5 individuals and found them to be able to incise DNA alkylations in the same range as AlkD. The modification of the comet assay with AlkD can be useful for in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity studies to detect alkylation damage and repair and also for human biomonitoring and molecular epidemiology studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Role of DNA mismatch repair and p53 in signaling induction of apoptosis by alkylating agents

    OpenAIRE

    Hickman, Mark J.; Samson, Leona D.

    1999-01-01

    All cells are unavoidably exposed to chemicals that can alkylate DNA to form genotoxic damage. Among the various DNA lesions formed, O6-alkylguanine lesions can be highly cytotoxic, and we recently demonstrated that O6-methylguanine (O6MeG) and O6-chloroethylguanine (O6CEG) specifically initiate apoptosis in hamster cells. Here we show, in both hamster and human cells, that the MutSα branch of the DNA mismatch repair pathway (but not the MutSβ branch) is absolutely required for signaling the ...

  4. Effect O6-guanine alkylation on DNA flexibility studied by comparative molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Mahmut; Drsata, Tomas; Lankas, Filip; Zacharias, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Alkylation of guanine at the O6 atom is a highly mutagenic DNA lesion because it alters the coding specificity of the base causing G:C to A:T transversion mutations. Specific DNA repair enzymes, e.g. O(6)-alkylguanin-DNA-Transferases (AGT), recognize and repair such damage after looping out the damaged base to transfer it into the enzyme active site. The exact mechanism how the repair enzyme identifies a damaged site within a large surplus of undamaged DNA is not fully understood. The O(6)-alkylation of guanine may change the deformability of DNA which may facilitate the initial binding of a repair enzyme at the damaged site. In order to characterize the effect of O(6)-methyl-guanine (O(6)-MeG) containing base pairs on the DNA deformability extensive comparative molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on duplex DNA with central G:C, O(6)-MeG:C or O(6)-MeG:T base pairs were performed. The simulations indicate significant differences in the helical deformability due to the presence of O(6)-MeG compared to regular undamaged DNA. This includes enhanced base pair opening, shear and stagger motions and alterations in the backbone fine structure caused in part by transient rupture of the base pairing at the damaged site and transient insertion of water molecules. It is likely that the increased opening motions of O(6)-MeG:C or O(6)-MeG:T base pairs play a decisive role for the induced fit recognition or for the looping out of the damaged base by repair enzymes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Histone H3 lysine 36 methyltransferase mobilizes NER factors to regulate tolerance against alkylation damage in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kim Kiat; Nguyen, Thi Thuy Trang; Li, Adelicia Yongling; Yeo, Yee Phan; Chen, Ee Sin

    2018-04-09

    The Set2 methyltransferase and its target, histone H3 lysine 36 (H3K36), affect chromatin architecture during the transcription and repair of DNA double-stranded breaks. Set2 also confers resistance against the alkylating agent, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), through an unknown mechanism. Here, we show that Schizosaccharomyces pombe (S. pombe) exhibit MMS hypersensitivity when expressing a set2 mutant lacking the catalytic histone methyltransferase domain or a H3K36R mutant (reminiscent of a set2-null mutant). Set2 acts synergistically with base excision repair factors but epistatically with nucleotide excision repair (NER) factors, and determines the timely nuclear accumulation of the NER initiator, Rhp23, in response to MMS. Set2 facilitates Rhp23 recruitment to chromatin at the brc1+ locus, presumably to repair alkylating damage and regulate the expression of brc1+ in response to MMS. Set2 also show epistasis with DNA damage checkpoint proteins; regulates the activation of Chk1, a DNA damage response effector kinase; and acts in a similar functional group as proteins involved in homologous recombination. Consistently, Set2 and H3K36 ensure the dynamicity of Rhp54 in DNA repair foci formation after MMS treatment. Overall, our results indicate a novel role for Set2/H3K36me in coordinating the recruitment of DNA repair machineries to timely manage alkylating damage.

  6. DNA damage in neurodegenerative diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppedè, Fabio, E-mail: fabio.coppede@med.unipi.it; Migliore, Lucia, E-mail: lucia.migliore@med.unipi.it

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Oxidative DNA damage is one of the earliest detectable events in the neurodegenerative process. • The mitochondrial DNA is more vulnerable to oxidative attack than the nuclear DNA. • Cytogenetic damage has been largely documented in Alzheimer's disease patients. • The question of whether DNA damage is cause or consequence of neurodegeneration is still open. • Increasing evidence links DNA damage and repair with epigenetic phenomena. - Abstract: Following the observation of increased oxidative DNA damage in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA extracted from post-mortem brain regions of patients affected by neurodegenerative diseases, the last years of the previous century and the first decade of the present one have been largely dedicated to the search of markers of DNA damage in neuronal samples and peripheral tissues of patients in early, intermediate or late stages of neurodegeneration. Those studies allowed to demonstrate that oxidative DNA damage is one of the earliest detectable events in neurodegeneration, but also revealed cytogenetic damage in neurodegenerative conditions, such as for example a tendency towards chromosome 21 malsegregation in Alzheimer's disease. As it happens for many neurodegenerative risk factors the question of whether DNA damage is cause or consequence of the neurodegenerative process is still open, and probably both is true. The research interest in markers of oxidative stress was shifted, in recent years, towards the search of epigenetic biomarkers of neurodegenerative disorders, following the accumulating evidence of a substantial contribution of epigenetic mechanisms to learning, memory processes, behavioural disorders and neurodegeneration. Increasing evidence is however linking DNA damage and repair with epigenetic phenomena, thereby opening the way to a very attractive and timely research topic in neurodegenerative diseases. We will address those issues in the context of Alzheimer's disease

  7. DNA damage in neurodegenerative diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppedè, Fabio; Migliore, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Oxidative DNA damage is one of the earliest detectable events in the neurodegenerative process. • The mitochondrial DNA is more vulnerable to oxidative attack than the nuclear DNA. • Cytogenetic damage has been largely documented in Alzheimer's disease patients. • The question of whether DNA damage is cause or consequence of neurodegeneration is still open. • Increasing evidence links DNA damage and repair with epigenetic phenomena. - Abstract: Following the observation of increased oxidative DNA damage in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA extracted from post-mortem brain regions of patients affected by neurodegenerative diseases, the last years of the previous century and the first decade of the present one have been largely dedicated to the search of markers of DNA damage in neuronal samples and peripheral tissues of patients in early, intermediate or late stages of neurodegeneration. Those studies allowed to demonstrate that oxidative DNA damage is one of the earliest detectable events in neurodegeneration, but also revealed cytogenetic damage in neurodegenerative conditions, such as for example a tendency towards chromosome 21 malsegregation in Alzheimer's disease. As it happens for many neurodegenerative risk factors the question of whether DNA damage is cause or consequence of the neurodegenerative process is still open, and probably both is true. The research interest in markers of oxidative stress was shifted, in recent years, towards the search of epigenetic biomarkers of neurodegenerative disorders, following the accumulating evidence of a substantial contribution of epigenetic mechanisms to learning, memory processes, behavioural disorders and neurodegeneration. Increasing evidence is however linking DNA damage and repair with epigenetic phenomena, thereby opening the way to a very attractive and timely research topic in neurodegenerative diseases. We will address those issues in the context of Alzheimer's disease

  8. Synthesis and evaluation of novel caged DNA alkylating agents bearing 3,4-epoxypiperidine structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Yuji; Kodama, Tetsuya; Miyashita, Kazuyuki; Imanishi, Takeshi; Obika, Satoshi

    2012-07-14

    Previously, we reported that the 3,4-epoxypiperidine structure, whose design was based on the active site of DNA alkylating antitumor antibiotics, azinomycins A and B, possesses prominent DNA cleavage activity. In this report, novel caged DNA alkylating agents, which were designed to be activated by UV irradiation, were synthesized by the introduction of four photo-labile protecting groups to a 3,4-epoxypiperidine derivative. The DNA cleavage activity and cytotoxicity of the caged DNA alkylating agents were examined under UV irradiation. Four caged DNA alkylating agents showed various degrees of bioactivity depending on the photosensitivity of the protecting groups.

  9. Histone H2AX is a critical factor for cellular protection against DNA alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meador, J A; Zhao, M; Su, Y; Narayan, G; Geard, C R; Balajee, A S

    2008-09-25

    Histone H2A variant H2AX is a dose-dependent suppressor of oncogenic chromosome translocations. H2AX participates in DNA double-strand break repair, but its role in other DNA repair pathways is not known. In this study, role of H2AX in cellular response to alkylation DNA damage was investigated. Cellular sensitivity to two monofunctional alkylating agents (methyl methane sulfonate and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)) was dependent on H2AX dosage, and H2AX null cells were more sensitive than heterozygous cells. In contrast to wild-type cells, H2AX-deficient cells displayed extensive apoptotic death due to a lack of cell-cycle arrest at G(2)/M phase. Lack of G(2)/M checkpoint in H2AX null cells correlated well with increased mitotic irregularities involving anaphase bridges and gross chromosomal instability. Observation of elevated poly(ADP) ribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1) cleavage suggests that MNNG-induced apoptosis occurs by PARP-1-dependent manner in H2AX-deficient cells. Consistent with this, increased activities of PARP and poly(ADP) ribose (PAR) polymer synthesis were detected in both H2AX heterozygous and null cells. Further, we demonstrate that the increased PAR synthesis and apoptotic death induced by MNNG in H2AX-deficient cells are due to impaired activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Collectively, our novel study demonstrates that H2AX, similar to PARP-1, confers cellular protection against alkylation-induced DNA damage. Therefore, targeting either PARP-1 or histone H2AX may provide an effective way of maximizing the chemotherapeutic value of alkylating agents for cancer treatment.

  10. Oxidants and not alkylating agents induce rapid mtDNA loss and mitochondrial dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furda, Amy M.; Marrangoni, Adele M.; Lokshin, Anna; Van Houten, Bennett

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is essential for proper mitochondrial function and encodes 22 tRNAs, 2 rRNAs and 13 polypeptides that make up subunits of complex I, III, IV, in the electron transport chain and complex V, the ATP synthase. Although mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in processes such as premature aging, neurodegeneration, and cancer, it has not been shown whether persistent mtDNA damage causes a loss of oxidative phosphorylation. We addressed this question by treating mouse embryonic fibroblasts with either hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and measuring several endpoints, including mtDNA damage and repair rates using QPCR, levels of mitochondrial- and nuclear-encoded proteins using antibody analysis, and a pharmacologic profile of mitochondria using the Seahorse Extracellular Flux Analyzer. We show that a 60 min treatment with H2O2 causes persistent mtDNA lesions, mtDNA loss, decreased levels of a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial subunit, a loss of ATP-linked oxidative phosphorylation and a loss of total reserve capacity. Conversely, a 60 min treatment with 2 mM MMS causes persistent mtDNA lesions but no mtDNA loss, no decrease in levels of a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial subunit, and no mitochondrial dysfunction. These results suggest that persistent mtDNA damage is not sufficient to cause mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:22766155

  11. DNA damage-inducible transcripts in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornace, A.J. Jr.; Alamo, I. Jr.; Hollander, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    Hybridization subtraction at low ratios of RNA to cDNA was used to enrich for the cDNA of transcripts increased in Chinese hamster cells after UV irradiation. Forty-nine different cDNA clones were isolated. Most coded for nonabundant transcripts rapidly induced 2- to 10-fold after UV irradiation. Only 2 of the 20 cDNA clones sequenced matched known sequences (metallothionein I and II). The predicted amino acid sequence of one cDNA had two localized areas of homology with the rat helix-destabilizing protein. These areas of homology were at the two DNA-binding sites of this nucleic acid single-strand-binding protein. The induced transcripts were separated into two general classes. Class I transcripts were induced by UV radiation and not by the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate. Class II transcripts were induced by UV radiation and by methyl methanesulfonate. Many class II transcripts were induced also by H2O2 and various alkylating agents but not by heat shock, phorbol 12-tetradecanoate 13-acetate, or DNA-damaging agents which do not produce high levels of base damage. Since many of the cDNA clones coded for transcripts which were induced rapidly and only by certain types of DNA-damaging agents, their induction is likely a specific response to such damage rather than a general response to cell injury

  12. DNA unwinding by ASCC3 helicase is coupled to ALKBH3 dependent DNA alkylation repair and cancer cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dango, Sebastian; Mosammaparast, Nima; Sowa, Mathew E.; Xiong, Li-Jun; Wu, Feizhen; Park, Keyjung; Rubin, Mark; Gygi, Steve; Harper, J. Wade; Shi, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Summary Demethylation by the AlkB dioxygenases represents an important mechanism for repair of N-alkylated nucleotides. However, little is known about their functions in mammalian cells. We report the purification of the ALKBH3 complex and demonstrate its association with the Activating Signal Co-integrator Complex (ASCC). ALKBH3 is overexpressed in various cancers, and both ALKBH3 and ASCC are important for alkylation damage resistance in these tumor cell lines. ASCC3, the largest subunit of ASCC, encodes a 3′-5′ DNA helicase, whose activity is crucial for the generation of single-stranded DNA upon which ALKBH3 preferentially functions for dealkylation. In cell lines that are dependent on ALKBH3 and ASCC3 for alkylation damage resistance, loss of ALKBH3 or ASCC3 leads to increased 3-methylcytosine and reduced cell proliferation, which correlates with pH2A.X and 53BP1 foci formation. Our data provide a molecular mechanism by which ALKBH3 collaborates with ASCC to maintain genomic integrity in a cell type specific manner. PMID:22055184

  13. Immunological detection of O6-methylguanine in alkylated DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briscoe, W.T.; Spizizen, J.; Tan, E.M.

    1978-01-01

    Antibodies to O 6 -methyldeoxyguanosine were produced in rabbits and utilized in a radioimmunoassay to detect this nucleoside at picomole levels. The specificity of the antibodies was demonstrated by the use of nucleoside analogues as inhibitors in the radioimmunoassay. The antibodies cross-reacted with O 6 -methylguanosine, O 6 -methylguanine, and O 6 -ethylguanosine. There was 10 4 to 10 6 times less sensitivity to inhibition by deoxyadenosine, deoxyguanosine, and guanosine than by O 6 -methyldeoxyguanosine. The radioimmunoassay also detected O 6 -methylguanine in DNA alkylated by agents known to produce O 6 -methylguanine, such as N'-methyl-N-nitrosourea. DNA alkylated with dimethyl sulfate, which does not produce O 6 -methylguanine in DNA, cross-reacted with the antibodies to a very limited extent. Such an assay system for modified nucleic acid components would be very useful in following the production, persistence, and repair of these lesions in a variety of cells and tissues treated with a broad spectrum of carcinogens and suspected carcinogens

  14. DNA Damage, Mutagenesis and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashis K. Basu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A large number of chemicals and several physical agents, such as UV light and γ-radiation, have been associated with the etiology of human cancer. Generation of DNA damage (also known as DNA adducts or lesions induced by these agents is an important first step in the process of carcinogenesis. Evolutionary processes gave rise to DNA repair tools that are efficient in repairing damaged DNA; yet replication of damaged DNA may take place prior to repair, particularly when they are induced at a high frequency. Damaged DNA replication may lead to gene mutations, which in turn may give rise to altered proteins. Mutations in an oncogene, a tumor-suppressor gene, or a gene that controls the cell cycle can generate a clonal cell population with a distinct advantage in proliferation. Many such events, broadly divided into the stages of initiation, promotion, and progression, which may occur over a long period of time and transpire in the context of chronic exposure to carcinogens, can lead to the induction of human cancer. This is exemplified in the long-term use of tobacco being responsible for an increased risk of lung cancer. This mini-review attempts to summarize this wide area that centers on DNA damage as it relates to the development of human cancer.

  15. DNA damage by Auger emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.F.; d'Cunha, Glenn; Gibbs, Richard; Murray, Vincent; Pardee, Marshall; Allen, B.J.

    1988-01-01

    125 I atoms can be introduced at specific locations along a defined DNA target molecule, either by site-directed incorporation of an 125 I-labelled deoxynucleotide or by binding of an 125 I-labelled sequence-selective DNA ligand. After allowing accumulation of 125 I decay-induced damage to the DNA, application of DNA sequencing techniques enables positions of strand breaks to be located relative to the site of decay, at a resolution corresponding to the distance between adjacent nucleotides [0.34 nm]. Thus, DNA provides a molecular framework to analyse the extent of damage following [averaged] individual decay events. Results can be compared with energy deposition data generated by computer-simulation methods developed by Charlton et al. The DNA sequencing technique also provides information about the chemical nature of the termini of the DNA chains produced following Auger decay-induced damage. In addition to reviewing the application of this approach to the analysis of 125 I decay induced DNA damage, some more recent results obtained by using 67 Ga are also presented. (author)

  16. The AlkB Family of Fe(II)/α-Ketoglutarate-dependent Dioxygenases: Repairing Nucleic Acid Alkylation Damage and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedeles, Bogdan I; Singh, Vipender; Delaney, James C; Li, Deyu; Essigmann, John M

    2015-08-21

    The AlkB family of Fe(II)- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases is a class of ubiquitous direct reversal DNA repair enzymes that remove alkyl adducts from nucleobases by oxidative dealkylation. The prototypical and homonymous family member is an Escherichia coli "adaptive response" protein that protects the bacterial genome against alkylation damage. AlkB has a wide variety of substrates, including monoalkyl and exocyclic bridged adducts. Nine mammalian AlkB homologs exist (ALKBH1-8, FTO), but only a subset functions as DNA/RNA repair enzymes. This minireview presents an overview of the AlkB proteins including recent data on homologs, structural features, substrate specificities, and experimental strategies for studying DNA repair by AlkB family proteins. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. DNA damage and carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stelow, R.B.

    1980-01-01

    Although cancer may arise as a result of many different types of molecular changes, there is little reason to doubt that changes to DNA are one of the more important ones in cancer initiation. Although DNA repair mechanisms seem able to eliminate a very large fraction of deleterious changes to DNA, we not only have little insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in such repair, but have a negligible amount of information to permit us to estimate the shape of dose response relations at low doses. The case of skin cancer is a special one, in that the average population is exposed to sufficient solar uv so that the effects of small increments in uv dose may be estimated. An approximate 85% reduction in DNA repair increases skin cancer incidence 10 4 fold

  18. Concerted bis-alkylating reactivity of clerocidin towards unpaired cytosine residues in DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Sara N.; Menegazzo, Ileana; Fabris, Daniele; Palumbo, Manlio

    2004-01-01

    Clerocidin (CL) is a topoisomerase II poison, which cleaves DNA irreversibly at guanines (G) and reversibly at cytosines (C). Furthermore, the drug can induce enzyme-independent strand breaks at the G and C level. It has been previously shown that G-damage is induced by alkylation of the guanine N7, followed by spontaneous depurination and nucleic acid cleavage, whereas scission at C is obtained only after treatment with hot alkali, and no information is available to explain the nature of this damage. We present here a systematic study on the reactivity of CL towards C both in the DNA environment and in solution. Selected synthetic derivatives were employed to evaluate the role of each chemical group of the drug. The structure of CL–dC adduct was then characterized by tandem mass spectrometry and NMR: the adduct is a stable condensed ring system resulting from a concerted electrophilic attack of the adjacent carbonyl and epoxide groups of CL towards the exposed NH2 and N3, respectively. This reaction mechanism, shown here for the first time, is characterized by faster kinetic rates than alkylation at G, due to the fact that the rate-determining step, alkylation at the epoxide, is an intramolecular process, provided a Schiff base linking CL and C can rapidly form, whereas the corresponding reaction of G N7 is intermolecular. These results provide helpful hints to explain the reversible/irreversible nature of topoisomerase II mediated DNA damage produced by CL at C/G steps. PMID:15494453

  19. Determination of alkylation of bacterial DNA as a rapid test for toxicological evaluation of alkylating xenobiotic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botzenhart, K.; Waldner-Sander, S.; Schweinsberg, F.

    1986-05-01

    Alkylated purine bases from hydrolized DNA can be separated by HPLC and quantified with a fluorescence detector. We applied this method to bacterial DNA. 7-methylguanine was detected after treatment of Serratia marcescens with iodoacetamide, dimethyl sulfate and with polluted air.

  20. Role of DNA mismatch repair and p53 in signaling induction of apoptosis by alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, M J; Samson, L D

    1999-09-14

    All cells are unavoidably exposed to chemicals that can alkylate DNA to form genotoxic damage. Among the various DNA lesions formed, O(6)-alkylguanine lesions can be highly cytotoxic, and we recently demonstrated that O(6)-methylguanine (O(6)MeG) and O(6)-chloroethylguanine (O(6)CEG) specifically initiate apoptosis in hamster cells. Here we show, in both hamster and human cells, that the MutSalpha branch of the DNA mismatch repair pathway (but not the MutSbeta branch) is absolutely required for signaling the initiation of apoptosis in response to O(6)MeGs and is partially required for signaling apoptosis in response to O(6)CEGs. Further, O(6)MeG lesions signal the stabilization of the p53 tumor suppressor, and such signaling is also MutSalpha-dependent. Despite this, MutSalpha-dependent apoptosis can be executed in a p53-independent manner. DNA mismatch repair status did not influence the response of cells to other inducers of p53 and apoptosis. Thus, it appears that mismatch repair status, rather than p53 status, is a strong indicator of the susceptibility of cells to alkylation-induced apoptosis. This experimental system will allow dissection of the signal transduction events that couple a specific type of DNA base lesion with the final outcome of apoptotic cell death.

  1. Alkylation damage causes MMR-dependent chromosomal instability in vertebrate embryos.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feitsma, H.; Akay, A.; Cuppen, E.

    2008-01-01

    S(N)1-type alkylating agents, like N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) and N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), are potent mutagens. Exposure to alkylating agents gives rise to O(6)-alkylguanine, a modified base that is recognized by DNA mismatch repair (MMR) proteins but is not repairable, resulting in

  2. Autophagy in DNA Damage Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Czarny

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage response (DDR involves DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis, but autophagy is also suggested to play a role in DDR. Autophagy can be activated in response to DNA-damaging agents, but the exact mechanism underlying this activation is not fully understood, although it is suggested that it involves the inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1. mTORC1 represses autophagy via phosphorylation of the ULK1/2–Atg13–FIP200 complex thus preventing maturation of pre-autophagosomal structures. When DNA damage occurs, it is recognized by some proteins or their complexes, such as poly(ADPribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1, Mre11–Rad50–Nbs1 (MRN complex or FOXO3, which activate repressors of mTORC1. SQSTM1/p62 is one of the proteins whose levels are regulated via autophagic degradation. Inhibition of autophagy by knockout of FIP200 results in upregulation of SQSTM1/p62, enhanced DNA damage and less efficient damage repair. Mitophagy, one form of autophagy involved in the selective degradation of mitochondria, may also play role in DDR. It degrades abnormal mitochondria and can either repress or activate apoptosis, but the exact mechanism remains unknown. There is a need to clarify the role of autophagy in DDR, as this process may possess several important biomedical applications, involving also cancer therapy.

  3. DNA Repair Modulates The Vulnerability of The Developing Brain to Alkylating Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisby, G.E.; Olivas, A.; Park, T.; Churchwell, M.; Doerge, D.; Samson, L. D.; Gerson, S.L.; Turker, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    Neurons of the developing brain are especially vulnerable to environmental agents that damage DNA (i.e., genotoxicants), but the mechanism is poorly understood. The focus of the present study is to demonstrate that DNA damage plays a key role in disrupting neurodevelopment. To examine this hypothesis, we compared the cytotoxic and DNA damaging properties of the methylating agents methylazoxymethanol (MAM) and dimethyl sulfate (DMS) and the mono- and bifunctional alkylating agents chloroethylamine (CEA) and nitrogen mustard (HN2), in granule cell neurons derived from the cerebellum of neonatal wild type mice and three transgenic DNA repair strains. Wild type cerebellar neurons were significantly more sensitive to the alkylating agents DMS and HN2 than neuronal cultures treated with MAM or the half-mustard CEA. Parallel studies with neuronal cultures from mice deficient in alkylguanine DNA glycosylase (Aag-/-) or O6-methylguanine methyltransferase (Mgmt-/-), revealed significant differences in the sensitivity of neurons to all four genotoxicants. Mgmt-/- neurons were more sensitive to MAM and HN2 than the other genotoxicants and wild type neurons treated with either alkylating agent. In contrast, Aag-/- neurons were for the most part significantly less sensitive than wild type or Mgmt-/- neurons to MAM and HN2. Aag-/- neurons were also significantly less sensitive than wild type neurons treated with either DMS or CEA. Granule cell development and motor function were also more severely disturbed by MAM and HN2 in Mgmt-/- mice than in comparably treated wild type mice. In contrast, cerebellar development and motor function were well preserved in MAM treated Aag-/- or MGMT overexpressing (MgmtTg+) mice, even as compared with wild type mice suggesting that AAG protein increases MAM toxicity, whereas MGMT protein decreases toxicity. Surprisingly, neuronal development and motor function were severely disturbed in MgmtTg+ mice treated with HN2. Collectively, these in vitro

  4. Role of gene 59 of bacteriophage T4 in repair of uv-irradiated and alkylated DNA in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, R.; Wu, J.L.; Yeh, Y.C.

    1975-01-01

    Nonsense mutants in gene 59 (amC5, am HL628) were used to study the role of this gene in the repair of uv-damaged and alkylated DNA of bacteriophage T4 in vivo. The higher sensitivity to uv irradiation and alkylation of gene 59 mutants after exposure to these agents was established by a comparison of the survival fractions with wild type. Zonal centrifugal analysis of both parental and nascent mutant intracellular DNA molecules after uv irradiation showed that immediately after exposure the size of single-stranded DNA fragments was the same as the wild-type intracellular DNA. However, the capability of rejoining fragmented intracellular DNA was greatly reduced in the mutant. In contrast, the wild-type-infected cells under the same condition resumed DNA replication and repaired its DNA to normal size. Methyl methanesulfonate induced more randomly fragmented intracellular DNA, when compared to uv irradiation. The rate of rejoining under these conditions as judged from their sedimentation profiles was also greatly reduced in mutant-infected cells. Further evidence is presented that uv repair is not a simple consequence of arrested DNA replication, which is a phenotype of the mutant when infected in a nonpermissive host, Escherichia coli B(su - ), but rather that the DNA repair function of gene 59 is independent of the replication function. These and other data presented indicate that a product(s) of gene 59 is essential for both repair of uv lesions and repair of alkylation damage of DNA in vivo. It is suggested that gene 59 may have two functions during viral development: DNA replication and replication repair of DNA molecules

  5. Direct-acting DNA alkylating agents present in aqueous extracts of areca nut and its products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chiung-Wen; Chao, Mu-Rong

    2012-11-19

    Areca nut is a carcinogen to humans and has been strongly associated with oral premalignant and malignant diseases. Previous studies speculated the presence of unknown direct-acting mutagens present in aqueous extracts of areca nut. We hypothesized whether any direct-acting alkylating agents are present in areca nut and its commercial products. In this study, calf thymus DNA was treated with four different aqueous extracts obtained from unripe and ripe areca nuts or their commercial products, namely, pan masala (without tobacco) and gutkha (with tobacco). Three N-alkylated purines including N7-methylguanine (N7-MeG), N3-methyladenine (N3-MeA), and N7-ethylguanine (N7-EtG) were detected using sensitive and specific isotope-dilution liquid chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods. The results showed that four types of aqueous extracts significantly induced the formation of N7-MeG and N3-MeA in a linear dose-response manner. Extracts from unripe areca nut exhibited higher methylating potency than those of ripe areca nut, while gutkha had higher methylating potency than pan masala. Meanwhile, gutkha made with areca nut and tobacco, was the only extract found to induce the formation of N7-EtG. Overall, this study first demonstrated that the presence of direct-acting alkylating agents in areca nut and its commercial products exist at a level that is able to cause significant DNA damage. Our findings may provide another mechanistic rationale for areca nut-mediated oral carcinogenesis and also highlight the importance and necessity of the identification of these direct-acting alkylating agents.

  6. VP-16 and alkylating agents activate a common metabolic pathway for suppression of DNA replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.K.; Berger, N.A.

    1986-01-01

    The cytotoxic effects of etoposide (VP-16) are mediated by topoisomerase II production of protein crosslinked DNA strand breaks. Previous studies have shown that alkylating agent induced DNA damage results in expansion of dTTP pools and reduction of dCTP pools and DNA replication. Studies were conducted with V79 cells to determine whether the metabolic consequences of VP-16 treatment were similar to those induced by alkylating agents. Treatment with 0.5μM VP-16 prolonged the doubling time of V79 cells from 12 to 18 hrs and caused cell volume to increase from 1.1 to 1.6 x 10 -12 l. 2mM caffeine completely blocked the volume increase and substantially prevented the prolongation of doubling time. 5μM VP-16 reduced the rate of [ 3 H]TdR incorporation by 70%, whereas in the presence of 2mM caffeine, VP-16 caused only a 10% decrease in the rate of [ 3 H]TdR incorporation. 4 hr treatment with 5.0μM VP-16 increased dTTP levels from 65 +/- 10 pmol/10 6 cells to 80 +/- 13 pmol/10 6 cells and caused dCTP level to decline from 113 +/- 23 pmol/10 6 cells to 92 +/- 17 pmol/10 6 cells. These results indicate that the metabolic consequences of VP-16 treatment are similar to alkylating agent treatment and that an increase in dTTP pools with a subsequent effect on ribonucleotide reductase may be a final common pathway by which many cytotoxic agents suppress DNA synthesis

  7. DNA Damage and Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Meloche, Jolyane; Paulin, Roxane; Boucherat, Olivier; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure over 25 mmHg at rest and is diagnosed by right heart catheterization. Among the different groups of PH, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by a progressive obstruction of distal pulmonary arteries, related to endothelial cell dysfunction and vascular cell proliferation, which leads to an increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy, and right heart failure. Although the primary trigger of PAH remains unknown, oxidative stress and inflammation have been shown to play a key role in the development and progression of vascular remodeling. These factors are known to increase DNA damage that might favor the emergence of the proliferative and apoptosis-resistant phenotype observed in PAH vascular cells. High levels of DNA damage were reported to occur in PAH lungs and remodeled arteries as well as in animal models of PH. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated that impaired DNA-response mechanisms may lead to an increased mutagen sensitivity in PAH patients. Finally, PAH was linked with decreased breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA1) and DNA topoisomerase 2-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) expression, both involved in maintaining genome integrity. This review aims to provide an overview of recent evidence of DNA damage and DNA repair deficiency and their implication in PAH pathogenesis. PMID:27338373

  8. Role of O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase in the resistance of mouse spermatogenic cells to O6-alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M J; Abdul-Rahman, S; Baker, T G; Rafferty, J A; Margison, G P; Bibby, M C

    2000-07-01

    The O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase inactivator O(6)-benzylguanine was administered to BALB/c mice either alone or before exposure to 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea to study the role of the DNA repair protein O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase in the protection of the testis against anti-cancer O(6)-alkylating agents. Exposure of the mice to 1, 3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea or O(6)-benzylguanine alone did not produce any marked testicular toxicity at the times studied. Testicular O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase concentrations were assayed between 0 and 240 min after O(6)-benzylguanine treatment and were shown to be > 95% depleted 15 min after treatment with O(6)-benzylguanine and remained at > 95% at all the times assayed. Histological examination, the reduction in testicular mass and the induction of spermatogenic cell apoptosis showed that this depletion significantly potentiated 1, 3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea-induced testicular damage after treatment. Major histological damage was apparent 42 days after treatment, demonstrating that the stem spermatogonia were significantly affected by the combination. These results demonstrate that O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase plays a significant role in protecting the spermatogenic cells from damage caused by DNA alkylation and indicate that the observed toxicity may result from damage to stem spermatogonia.

  9. Mitochondrial targeting of human O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase protects against cell killing by chemotherapeutic alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shanbao; Xu, Yi; Cooper, Ryan J; Ferkowicz, Michael J; Hartwell, Jennifer R; Pollok, Karen E; Kelley, Mark R

    2005-04-15

    DNA repair capacity of eukaryotic cells has been studied extensively in recent years. Mammalian cells have been engineered to overexpress recombinant nuclear DNA repair proteins from ectopic genes to assess the impact of increased DNA repair capacity on genome stability. This approach has been used in this study to specifically target O(6)-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) to the mitochondria and examine its impact on cell survival after exposure to DNA alkylating agents. Survival of human hematopoietic cell lines and primary hematopoietic CD34(+) committed progenitor cells was monitored because the baseline repair capacity for alkylation-induced DNA damage is typically low due to insufficient expression of MGMT. Increased DNA repair capacity was observed when K562 cells were transfected with nuclear-targeted MGMT (nucl-MGMT) or mitochondrial-targeted MGMT (mito-MGMT). Furthermore, overexpression of mito-MGMT provided greater resistance to cell killing by 1,3-bis (2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) than overexpression of nucl-MGMT. Simultaneous overexpression of mito-MGMT and nucl-MGMT did not enhance the resistance provided by mito-MGMT alone. Overexpression of either mito-MGMT or nucl-MGMT also conferred a similar level of resistance to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and temozolomide (TMZ) but simultaneous overexpression in both cellular compartments was neither additive nor synergistic. When human CD34(+) cells were infected with oncoretroviral vectors that targeted O(6)-benzylguanine (6BG)-resistant MGMT (MGMT(P140K)) to the nucleus or the mitochondria, committed progenitors derived from infected cells were resistant to 6BG/BCNU or 6BG/TMZ. These studies indicate that mitochondrial or nuclear targeting of MGMT protects hematopoietic cells against cell killing by BCNU, TMZ, and MMS, which is consistent with the possibility that mitochondrial DNA damage and nuclear DNA damage contribute equally to alkylating agent-induced cell killing during chemotherapy.

  10. Oncometabolite D-2-Hydroxyglutarate Inhibits ALKBH DNA Repair Enzymes and Sensitizes IDH Mutant Cells to Alkylating Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pu; Wu, Jing; Ma, Shenghong; Zhang, Lei; Yao, Jun; Hoadley, Katherine A; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Perou, Charles M; Guan, Kun-Liang; Ye, Dan; Xiong, Yue

    2015-12-22

    Chemotherapy of a combination of DNA alkylating agents, procarbazine and lomustine (CCNU), and a microtubule poison, vincristine, offers a significant benefit to a subset of glioma patients. The benefit of this regimen, known as PCV, was recently linked to IDH mutation that occurs frequently in glioma and produces D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2-HG), a competitive inhibitor of α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). We report here that D-2-HG inhibits the α-KG-dependent alkB homolog (ALKBH) DNA repair enzymes. Cells expressing mutant IDH display reduced repair kinetics, accumulate more DNA damages, and are sensitized to alkylating agents. The observed sensitization to alkylating agents requires the catalytic activity of mutant IDH to produce D-2-HG and can be reversed by the deletion of mutant IDH allele or overexpression of ALKBH2 or AKLBH3. Our results suggest that impairment of DNA repair may contribute to tumorigenesis driven by IDH mutations and that alkylating agents may merit exploration for treating IDH-mutated cancer patients. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantitative assessment of the dose-response of alkylating agents in DNA repair proficient and deficient ames tester strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Leilei; Guérard, Melanie; Zeller, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Mutagenic and clastogenic effects of some DNA damaging agents such as methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) have been demonstrated to exhibit a nonlinear or even "thresholded" dose-response in vitro and in vivo. DNA repair seems to be mainly responsible for these thresholds. To this end, we assessed several mutagenic alkylators in the Ames test with four different strains of Salmonella typhimurium: the alkyl transferases proficient strain TA1535 (Ogt+/Ada+), as well as the alkyl transferases deficient strains YG7100 (Ogt+/Ada-), YG7104 (Ogt-/Ada+) and YG7108 (Ogt-/Ada-). The known genotoxins EMS, MMS, temozolomide (TMZ), ethylnitrosourea (ENU) and methylnitrosourea (MNU) were tested in as many as 22 concentration levels. Dose-response curves were statistically fitted by the PROAST benchmark dose model and the Lutz-Lutz "hockeystick" model. These dose-response curves suggest efficient DNA-repair for lesions inflicted by all agents in strain TA1535. In the absence of Ogt, Ada is predominantly repairing methylations but not ethylations. It is concluded that the capacity of alkyl-transferases to successfully repair DNA lesions up to certain dose levels contributes to genotoxicity thresholds. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. DNA-adducts in fish exposed to alkylating carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giam, C.S.; Holliday, T.L.; Williams, J.L.; Bahnson, A.; Weller, R.; Hinton, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    There are limited studies on DNA-adduct formation following exposure of fish or fish cells to carcinogens. It will be essential to determine if procarcinogens and carcinogens form the same DNA-adducts in different liver cells and how these compare to those reported in mammalian livers. They are also interested in the influence of different alkylating agents on the type and quantity of DNA-adduct formation and repair in fish. While eggs or small fish are ideal for routine screening, large fish such as trout (Salmo gairdneri) is needed initially for the development of analytical procedures for the isolation, quantitation and identification of various adducts. Trout (Salmo gairdneri) weighing approximately 250 grams were acclimatized at 13 degree C before being given i.p. injection of diethylnitrosoamine (DEN). The exposure period varied, though most animals were sacrificed after 24 hours. Their livers were excised and DNA was isolated mainly according the procedure of Croy et al. The neutral thermal hydrolysate and the acid hydrolysate were analyzed by HPLC-Fluorescent detector for 7-ethylguanine and O 6 -ethylguanine, respectively. O 6 -ethylguanine was detected, 7-ethylguanine was not detected. Attempts are being made to improve the detection of the latter compound. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) was used to establish nanogram quantities of the ethylated bases. Laser desorption FT-IC-MS is particularly useful for characterizing thermally-labile and involatile nucleosides or nucleotides. Excretion of DEN was rapid and high. Exposure of trout (and other fish) to various ethylating agents will be discussed

  13. Genome-wide maps of alkylation damage, repair, and mutagenesis in yeast reveal mechanisms of mutational heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Peng; Brown, Alexander J; Malc, Ewa P; Mieczkowski, Piotr A; Smerdon, Michael J; Roberts, Steven A; Wyrick, John J

    2017-10-01

    DNA base damage is an important contributor to genome instability, but how the formation and repair of these lesions is affected by the genomic landscape and contributes to mutagenesis is unknown. Here, we describe genome-wide maps of DNA base damage, repair, and mutagenesis at single nucleotide resolution in yeast treated with the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Analysis of these maps revealed that base excision repair (BER) of alkylation damage is significantly modulated by chromatin, with faster repair in nucleosome-depleted regions, and slower repair and higher mutation density within strongly positioned nucleosomes. Both the translational and rotational settings of lesions within nucleosomes significantly influence BER efficiency; moreover, this effect is asymmetric relative to the nucleosome dyad axis and is regulated by histone modifications. Our data also indicate that MMS-induced mutations at adenine nucleotides are significantly enriched on the nontranscribed strand (NTS) of yeast genes, particularly in BER-deficient strains, due to higher damage formation on the NTS and transcription-coupled repair of the transcribed strand (TS). These findings reveal the influence of chromatin on repair and mutagenesis of base lesions on a genome-wide scale and suggest a novel mechanism for transcription-associated mutation asymmetry, which is frequently observed in human cancers. © 2017 Mao et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  14. Defective DNA cross-link removal in Chinese hamster cell mutants hypersensitive to bifunctional alkylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoy, C.A.; Thompson, L.H.; Mooney, C.L.; Salazar, E.P.

    1985-01-01

    DNA repair-deficient mutants from five genetic complementation groups isolated previously from Chinese hamster cells were assayed for survival after exposure to the bifunctional alkylating agents mitomycin C or diepoxybutane. Groups 1, 3, and 5 exhibited 1.6- to 3-fold hypersensitivity compared to the wild-type cells, whereas Groups 2 and 4 exhibited extraordinary hypersensitivity. Mutants from Groups 1 and 2 were exposed to 22 other bifunctional alkylating agents in a rapid assay that compared cytotoxicity of the mutants to the wild-type parental strain, AA8. With all but two of the compounds, the Group 2 mutant (UV4) was 15- to 60-fold more sensitive than AA8 or the Group 1 mutant (UV5). UV4 showed only 6-fold hypersensitivity to quinacrine mustard. Alkaline elution measurements showed that this compound produced few DNA interstrand cross-links but numerous strand breaks. Therefore, the extreme hypersensitivity of mutants from Groups 2 and 4 appeared specific for compounds the main cytotoxic lesions of which were DNA cross-links. Mutant UV5 was only 1- to 4-fold hypersensitive to all the compounds. Although the initial number of cross-links was similar for the three cell lines, the efficiency of removal of cross-links was lowest in UV4 and intermediate in UV5. These results suggest that the different levels of sensitivity are specifically related to different efficiencies of DNA cross-link removal. The phenotype of hypersensitivity to both UV radiation and cross-link damage exhibited by the mutants in Groups 2 and 4 appears to differ from those of the known human DNA repair syndromes

  15. Selective alkylation of T–T mismatched DNA using vinyldiaminotriazine–acridine conjugate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onizuka, Kazumitsu; Usami, Akira; Yamaoki, Yudai; Kobayashi, Tomohito; Hazemi, Madoka E; Chikuni, Tomoko; Sato, Norihiro; Sasaki, Kaname; Katahira, Masato

    2018-01-01

    Abstract The alkylation of the specific higher-order nucleic acid structures is of great significance in order to control its function and gene expression. In this report, we have described the T–T mismatch selective alkylation with a vinyldiaminotriazine (VDAT)–acridine conjugate. The alkylation selectively proceeded at the N3 position of thymidine on the T–T mismatch. Interestingly, the alkylated thymidine induced base flipping of the complementary base in the duplex. In a model experiment for the alkylation of the CTG repeats DNA which causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), the observed reaction rate for one alkylation increased in proportion to the number of T–T mismatches. In addition, we showed that primer extension reactions with DNA polymerase and transcription with RNA polymerase were stopped by the alkylation. The alkylation of the repeat DNA will efficiently work for the inhibition of replication and transcription reactions. These functions of the VDAT–acridine conjugate would be useful as a new biochemical tool for the study of CTG repeats and may provide a new strategy for the molecular therapy of DM1. PMID:29309639

  16. Selective alkylation of T-T mismatched DNA using vinyldiaminotriazine-acridine conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onizuka, Kazumitsu; Usami, Akira; Yamaoki, Yudai; Kobayashi, Tomohito; Hazemi, Madoka E; Chikuni, Tomoko; Sato, Norihiro; Sasaki, Kaname; Katahira, Masato; Nagatsugi, Fumi

    2018-02-16

    The alkylation of the specific higher-order nucleic acid structures is of great significance in order to control its function and gene expression. In this report, we have described the T-T mismatch selective alkylation with a vinyldiaminotriazine (VDAT)-acridine conjugate. The alkylation selectively proceeded at the N3 position of thymidine on the T-T mismatch. Interestingly, the alkylated thymidine induced base flipping of the complementary base in the duplex. In a model experiment for the alkylation of the CTG repeats DNA which causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), the observed reaction rate for one alkylation increased in proportion to the number of T-T mismatches. In addition, we showed that primer extension reactions with DNA polymerase and transcription with RNA polymerase were stopped by the alkylation. The alkylation of the repeat DNA will efficiently work for the inhibition of replication and transcription reactions. These functions of the VDAT-acridine conjugate would be useful as a new biochemical tool for the study of CTG repeats and may provide a new strategy for the molecular therapy of DM1.

  17. Radiation damage to DNA constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergene, R.

    1977-01-01

    The molecular changes of the DNA molecule, in various systems exposed to inoizing radiation, have been the subject of a great number of studies. In the present work electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) has been applied to irradiated crystalline systems, in particular single crystals of DNA subunits and their derivatives. The main conclusions about the molecular damage are based on this technique in combination with molecular orbital calculations. It should be emphasized that the ESR technique is restricted to damage containing unpaired electrons. These unstable intermediates called free radicals seem, however, to be involved in all molecular models describing the action of radiation on DNA. One of the premises for a detailed theory of the radiation induced reactions at the physico-chemical level seems to involve exact knowledge of the induced free radicals as well as the modes of their formation and fate. For DNA, as such, it is hardly possible to arrive at such a level of knowledge since the molecular complexity prevents selective studies of the many different radiation induced products. One possible approach is to study the free radicals formed in the constituents of DNA. In the present work three lines of approach should be mentioned. The first is based on the observation that radical formation in general causes only minor structural alterations to the molecule in question. The use of isotopes with different spin and magnetic moment (in particular deuterium) may also serve a source of information. Deuteration leads to a number of protons, mainly NH - and OH, becoming substituted, and if any of these are involved in interactions with unpaired protons the resonance pattern is influeneed. The third source of information is molecular orbital calculation. The electron spin density distribution is a function in the three dimensional space based on the system's electronic wave functions. This constitutes the basis for the idea that ESR data can be correlated with

  18. [Alkylating agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourquier, Philippe

    2011-11-01

    With the approval of mechlorethamine by the FDA in 1949 for the treatment of hematologic malignancies, alkylating agents are the oldest class of anticancer agents. Even though their clinical use is far beyond the use of new targeted therapies, they still occupy a major place in specific indications and sometimes represent the unique option for the treatment of refractory diseases. Here, we are reviewing the major classes of alkylating agents and their mechanism of action, with a particular emphasis for the new generations of alkylating agents. As for most of the chemotherapeutic agents used in the clinic, these compounds are derived from natural sources. With a complex but original mechanism of action, they represent new interesting alternatives for the clinicians, especially for tumors that are resistant to conventional DNA damaging agents. We also briefly describe the different strategies that have been or are currently developed to potentiate the use of classical alkylating agents, especially the inhibition of pathways that are involved in the repair of DNA lesions induced by these agents. In this line, the development of PARP inhibitors is a striking example of the recent regain of interest towards the "old" alkylating agents.

  19. Time course evaluation of N-nitrosodialkylamines-induced DNA alkylation and oxidation in liver of mosquito fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, M.-R.; Chang, Y.-Z.; Wong, R.-H.; Hu, C.-W.

    2009-01-01

    Here we simultaneously measured N7-alkylguanines and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in liver of small fish, respectively, to assess the time course of the formation and removal of alkylation and oxidative damage to DNA caused by N-nitrosodialkylamines. Mosquito fish (Gambusia affinis) were killed at various times during (4 days) and post-exposure (16 days) to N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) alone or their combination with concentrations of 10 and 50 mg/l. The modified guanine adducts were sensitively and selectively quantitated by isotope-dilution LC-MS/MS methods. During exposure, N7-methylguanine (N7-MeG) and N7-ethylguanine (N7-EtG) in liver DNA increased with the duration and dose of N-nitrosodialkylamine exposure, while 8-oxodG was dose-dependently induced within 1 day. It was found that NDMA formed substantially more N7-alkylated guanines and 8-oxodG than NDEA on the basis of adducts formed per micromolar concentration, suggesting that NDMA can be more easily bioactivated than NDEA to form reactive alkylating agents with the concomitant formation of oxygen radicals. After cessation of exposure, N7-alkylguanines remained elevated for 1 day and then gradually decreased over time but still higher than the background levels, even at day 16 (half-lives of 7-8 days). However, 8-oxodG was excised quickly from liver DNA and returned to the background level within 4 days post-exposure (half-lives less than 2 days). Taken together, this study firstly demonstrated that in addition to alkylation, N-nitrosodialkylamines can concurrently cause oxidative damage to DNA in vivo

  20. Time course evaluation of N-nitrosodialkylamines-induced DNA alkylation and oxidation in liver of mosquito fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, M -R [Department of Occupational Safety and Health, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Institute of Medical and Molecular Toxicology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Chang, Y -Z [Institute of Medical and Molecular Toxicology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Wong, R -H [Department of Public Health, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Hu, C.-W. [Department of Public Health, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: windyhu@csmu.edu.tw

    2009-01-15

    Here we simultaneously measured N7-alkylguanines and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in liver of small fish, respectively, to assess the time course of the formation and removal of alkylation and oxidative damage to DNA caused by N-nitrosodialkylamines. Mosquito fish (Gambusia affinis) were killed at various times during (4 days) and post-exposure (16 days) to N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) alone or their combination with concentrations of 10 and 50 mg/l. The modified guanine adducts were sensitively and selectively quantitated by isotope-dilution LC-MS/MS methods. During exposure, N7-methylguanine (N7-MeG) and N7-ethylguanine (N7-EtG) in liver DNA increased with the duration and dose of N-nitrosodialkylamine exposure, while 8-oxodG was dose-dependently induced within 1 day. It was found that NDMA formed substantially more N7-alkylated guanines and 8-oxodG than NDEA on the basis of adducts formed per micromolar concentration, suggesting that NDMA can be more easily bioactivated than NDEA to form reactive alkylating agents with the concomitant formation of oxygen radicals. After cessation of exposure, N7-alkylguanines remained elevated for 1 day and then gradually decreased over time but still higher than the background levels, even at day 16 (half-lives of 7-8 days). However, 8-oxodG was excised quickly from liver DNA and returned to the background level within 4 days post-exposure (half-lives less than 2 days). Taken together, this study firstly demonstrated that in addition to alkylation, N-nitrosodialkylamines can concurrently cause oxidative damage to DNA in vivo.

  1. Time course evaluation of N-nitrosodialkylamines-induced DNA alkylation and oxidation in liver of mosquito fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, M.-R. [Department of Occupational Safety and Health, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Institute of Medical and Molecular Toxicology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Chang, Y.-Z. [Institute of Medical and Molecular Toxicology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Wong, R.-H. [Department of Public Health, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Hu, C.-W. [Department of Public Health, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: windyhu@csmu.edu.tw

    2009-01-15

    Here we simultaneously measured N7-alkylguanines and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in liver of small fish, respectively, to assess the time course of the formation and removal of alkylation and oxidative damage to DNA caused by N-nitrosodialkylamines. Mosquito fish (Gambusia affinis) were killed at various times during (4 days) and post-exposure (16 days) to N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) alone or their combination with concentrations of 10 and 50 mg/l. The modified guanine adducts were sensitively and selectively quantitated by isotope-dilution LC-MS/MS methods. During exposure, N7-methylguanine (N7-MeG) and N7-ethylguanine (N7-EtG) in liver DNA increased with the duration and dose of N-nitrosodialkylamine exposure, while 8-oxodG was dose-dependently induced within 1 day. It was found that NDMA formed substantially more N7-alkylated guanines and 8-oxodG than NDEA on the basis of adducts formed per micromolar concentration, suggesting that NDMA can be more easily bioactivated than NDEA to form reactive alkylating agents with the concomitant formation of oxygen radicals. After cessation of exposure, N7-alkylguanines remained elevated for 1 day and then gradually decreased over time but still higher than the background levels, even at day 16 (half-lives of 7-8 days). However, 8-oxodG was excised quickly from liver DNA and returned to the background level within 4 days post-exposure (half-lives less than 2 days). Taken together, this study firstly demonstrated that in addition to alkylation, N-nitrosodialkylamines can concurrently cause oxidative damage to DNA in vivo.

  2. Bifunctional rhodium intercalator conjugates as mismatch-directing DNA alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatzschneider, Ulrich; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2004-07-21

    A conjugate of a DNA mismatch-specific rhodium intercalator, containing the bulky chrysenediimine ligand, and an aniline mustard has been prepared, and targeting of mismatches in DNA by this conjugate has been examined. The preferential alkylation of mismatched over fully matched DNA is found by a mobility shift assay at concentrations where untethered organic mustards show little reaction. The binding site of the Rh intercalator was determined by DNA photocleavage, and the position of covalent modification was established on the basis of the enhanced depurination associated with N-alkylation. The site-selective alkylation at mismatched DNA renders these conjugates useful tools for the covalent tagging of DNA base pair mismatches and new chemotherapeutic design.

  3. Comparison of alkylating agent and radiation carcinogenesis: some aspects of the possible involvement of effects on DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawley, P.D.

    1976-01-01

    A series of alkylating agents was classified in terms of increasing relative ability to react at O-atom sites in DNA, MMS 6 -alkylguanines are directly miscoding bases. This series of agents was also used in a study of comparative carcinogenicity with respect to induction of thymic lymphoma in mice, a system in which x-irradiation yields tumors. A positive correlation between ability of agents to alkylate O-6 of guanine in DNA of thymus and carcinogenic potency was found. Although MMS was not active in this system, it was noted that it can induce tumors in other systems. The relationship between repair of alkylation and radiation induced damage in DNA was briefly discussed. The methylating agents induce single-strand breaks in DNA, and the principal repair system appears to fall into the category of short repair as denoted by Regan and Setlow (1974). These single-strand breaks may result from spontaneous hydrolytic depurinations of 3- and 7-methylpurines, or from enzymatic depurinations, e.g., of 3-alkyladenine and O 6 -alkylguanine. Aralkylating agents, which are also carcinogens, can evoke an alternative repair response of the uvr type

  4. Iminium ion chemistry of mitosene DNA alkylating agents. Enriched 13C NMR and isolation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, A; Skibo, E B

    2000-05-16

    Described herein is a study of the reductive alkylation chemistry of mitosene antitumor agents. We employed a 13C-enriched electrophilic center to probe the fate of the iminium ion resulting from reductive activation. The 13C-labeled center permitted the identification of complex products resulting from alkylation reactions. In the case of DNA reductive alkylation, the type and number of alkylation sites were readily assessed by 13C NMR. Although there has been much excellent work done in the area of mitosene chemistry and biochemistry, the present study provides a number of new findings: (1) The major fate of the iminium ion is head-to-tail polymerization, even in dilute solutions. (2) Dithionite reductive activation results in the formation of mitosene sulfite esters as well as the previously observed sulfonate adducts. (3) The mitosene iminium ion alkylates the adenosine 6-amino group as well as the guanosine 2-amino group. The identification of the latter adduct was greatly facilitated by the 13C-label at the electrophilic center. (4) The mitosene iminium ion alkylates DNA at both nitrogen and oxygen centers without any apparent base selectivity. The complexity of mitosene reductive alkylation of DNA will require continued adduct isolation studies.

  5. The current state of eukaryotic DNA base damage and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Nicholas C; Corbett, Anita H; Doetsch, Paul W

    2015-12-02

    DNA damage is a natural hazard of life. The most common DNA lesions are base, sugar, and single-strand break damage resulting from oxidation, alkylation, deamination, and spontaneous hydrolysis. If left unrepaired, such lesions can become fixed in the genome as permanent mutations. Thus, evolution has led to the creation of several highly conserved, partially redundant pathways to repair or mitigate the effects of DNA base damage. The biochemical mechanisms of these pathways have been well characterized and the impact of this work was recently highlighted by the selection of Tomas Lindahl, Aziz Sancar and Paul Modrich as the recipients of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their seminal work in defining DNA repair pathways. However, how these repair pathways are regulated and interconnected is still being elucidated. This review focuses on the classical base excision repair and strand incision pathways in eukaryotes, considering both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and humans, and extends to some important questions and challenges facing the field of DNA base damage repair. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. The DNA damage response during mitosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijink, Anne Margriet; Krajewska, Malgorzata; van Vugt, Marcel A. T. M.

    2013-01-01

    Cells are equipped with a cell-intrinsic signaling network called the DNA damage response (DDR). This signaling network recognizes DNA lesions and initiates various downstream pathways to coordinate a cell cycle arrest with the repair of the damaged DNA. Alternatively, the DDR can mediate clearance

  7. Effect of 3-aminobenzamide on the rate of ligation during repair of alkylated DNA in human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.F.; Cleaver, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    3-Aminobenzamide, an inhibitor of polyadenosine diphosphoribose polymerase, produced rapid reversible changes in single-strand break frequencies in DNA from primary human fibroblasts damaged by alkylating agents, but it did not cause such changes in the DNA of cells damaged by ultraviolet light. The increase in single-strand peak frequencies was not due to an accumulation of blocked repair sites, such as occurs with DNA polymerase inhibitors, but to a delay in the rejoining of induced breaks. 3-Aminobenzamide increases the net break frequency that results from a dynamic balance between excision and ligation. This balance appears to be regulated at the ligation step by adenosine diphosphate ribosylation, which is rapidly altered by addition or removal of 3-aminobenzamide. The rapidity with which strand break frequencies change in the presence of 3-aminobenzamide implies that individual strand breaks resulting from excision at any time after exposure have a lifetime of no more than about 30 min in the cell

  8. Bifunctional alkylating agent-mediated MGMT-DNA cross-linking and its proteolytic cleavage in 16HBE cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Jin; Ye, Feng; Dan, Guorong; Zhao, Yuanpeng; Wang, Bin; Zhao, Jiqing; Sai, Yan; Zou, Zhongmin

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen mustard (NM), a bifunctional alkylating agent (BAA), contains two alkyl arms and can act as a cross-linking bridge between DNA and protein to form a DNA-protein cross-link (DPC). O 6 -methylguanine–DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a DNA repair enzyme for alkyl adducts removal, is found to enhance cell sensitivity to BAAs and to promote damage, possibly due to its stable covalent cross-linking with DNA mediated by BAAs. To investigate MGMT-DNA cross-link (mDPC) formation and its possible dual roles in NM exposure, human bronchial epithelial cell line 16HBE was subjected to different concentrations of HN2, a kind of NM, and we found mDPC was induced by HN2 in a concentration-dependent manner, but the mRNA and total protein of MGMT were suppressed. As early as 1 h after HN2 treatment, high mDPC was achieved and the level maintained for up to 24 h. Quick total DPC (tDPC) and γ-H2AX accumulation were observed. To evaluate the effect of newly predicted protease DVC1 on DPC cleavage, we applied siRNA of MGMT and DVC1, MG132 (proteasome inhibitor), and NMS-873 (p97 inhibitor) and found that proteolysis plays a role. DVC1 was proven to be more important in the cleavage of mDPC than tDPC in a p97-dependent manner. HN2 exposure induced DVC1 upregulation, which was at least partially contributed to MGMT cleavage by proteolysis because HN2-induced mDPC level and DNA damage was closely related with DVC1 expression. Homologous recombination (HR) was also activated. Our findings demonstrated that MGMT might turn into a DNA damage promoter by forming DPC when exposed to HN2. Proteolysis, especially DVC1, plays a crucial role in mDPC repair. - Highlights: • Nitrogen mustard-induced MGMT-DNA cross-linking was detected in a living cell. • Concentration- and time-dependent manners of MGMT-DNA cross-linking were revealed. • Proteolysis played an important role in protein (MGMT)-DNA cross-linking repair. • DVC1 acts as a proteolytic enzyme in cross-linking repair in a p

  9. Bifunctional Rhodium Intercalator Conjugates as Mismatch-Directing DNA Alkylating Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Schatzschneider, Ulrich; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2004-01-01

    A conjugate of a DNA mismatch-specific rhodium intercalator, containing the bulky chrysenediimine ligand, and an aniline mustard has been prepared, and targeting of mismatches in DNA by this conjugate has been examined. The preferential alkylation of mismatched over fully matched DNA is found by a mobility shift assay at concentrations where untethered organic mustards show little reaction. The binding site of the Rh intercalator was determined by DNA photocleavage, and the position of covale...

  10. DNA Damage, Repair, and Cancer Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgeon, Marc-Olivier; Perry, Nicholas J. S.; Poulogiannis, George

    2018-01-01

    Although there has been a renewed interest in the field of cancer metabolism in the last decade, the link between metabolism and DNA damage/DNA repair in cancer has yet to be appreciably explored. In this review, we examine the evidence connecting DNA damage and repair mechanisms with cell metabolism through three principal links. (1) Regulation of methyl- and acetyl-group donors through different metabolic pathways can impact DNA folding and remodeling, an essential part of accurate double strand break repair. (2) Glutamine, aspartate, and other nutrients are essential for de novo nucleotide synthesis, which dictates the availability of the nucleotide pool, and thereby influences DNA repair and replication. (3) Reactive oxygen species, which can increase oxidative DNA damage and hence the load of the DNA-repair machinery, are regulated through different metabolic pathways. Interestingly, while metabolism affects DNA repair, DNA damage can also induce metabolic rewiring. Activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) triggers an increase in nucleotide synthesis and anabolic glucose metabolism, while also reducing glutamine anaplerosis. Furthermore, mutations in genes involved in the DDR and DNA repair also lead to metabolic rewiring. Links between cancer metabolism and DNA damage/DNA repair are increasingly apparent, yielding opportunities to investigate the mechanistic basis behind potential metabolic vulnerabilities of a substantial fraction of tumors. PMID:29459886

  11. DNA damage in plant herbarium tissue.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staats, M.; Cuenca, A.; Richardson, J.E.; Ginkel, R.V.; Petersen, G.; Seberg, O.; Bakker, F.T.

    2011-01-01

    Dried plant herbarium specimens are potentially a valuable source of DNA. Efforts to obtain genetic information from this source are often hindered by an inability to obtain amplifiable DNA as herbarium DNA is typically highly degraded. DNA post-mortem damage may not only reduce the number of

  12. DNA damage and repair in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britt, A.B.

    1996-01-01

    The biological impact of any DNA damaging agent is a combined function of the chemical nature of the induced lesions and the efficiency and accuracy of their repair. Although much has been learned frommicrobes and mammals about both the repair of DNA damage and the biological effects of the persistence of these lesions, much remains to be learned about the mechanism and tissue-specificity of repair in plants. This review focuses on recent work on the induction and repair of DNA damage in higher plants, with special emphasis on UV-induced DNA damage products. (author)

  13. S - and N-alkylating agents diminish the fluorescence of fluorescent dye-stained DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesche, Robert; John, Harald; Kehe, Kai; Schmidt, Annette; Popp, Tanja; Balzuweit, Frank; Thiermann, Horst; Gudermann, Thomas; Steinritz, Dirk

    2017-01-25

    Sulfur mustard (SM), a chemical warfare agent, causes DNA alkylation, which is believed to be the main cause of its toxicity. SM DNA adducts are commonly used to verify exposure to this vesicant. However, the required analytical state-of-the-art mass-spectrometry methods are complex, use delicate instruments, are not mobile, and require laboratory infrastructure that is most likely not available in conflict zones. Attempts have thus been made to develop rapid detection methods that can be used in the field. The analysis of SM DNA adducts (HETE-G) by immunodetection is a convenient and suitable method. For a diagnostic assessment, HETE-G levels must be determined in relation to the total DNA in the sample. Total DNA can be easily visualized by the use of fluorescent DNA dyes. This study examines whether SM and related compounds affect total DNA staining, an issue that has not been investigated before. After pure DNA was extracted from human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells), DNA was exposed to different S- and N-alkylating agents. Our experiments revealed a significant, dose-dependent decrease in the fluorescence signal of fluorescent dye-stained DNA after exposure to alkylating agents. After mass spectrometry and additional fluorescence measurements ruled out covalent modifications of ethidium bromide (EthBr) by SM, we assumed that DNA crosslinks caused DNA condensation and thereby impaired access of the fluorescent dyes to the DNA. DNA digestion by restriction enzymes restored fluorescence, a fact that strengthened our hypothesis. However, monofunctional agents, which are unable to crosslink DNA, also decreased the fluorescence signal. In subsequent experiments, we demonstrated that protons produced during DNA alkylation caused a pH decrease that was found responsible for the reduction in fluorescence. The use of an appropriate buffer system eliminated the adverse effect of alkylating agents on DNA staining with fluorescent dyes. An appropriate buffer system is thus

  14. DNA damage repair and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Norio

    2003-01-01

    Tailored treatment is not new in radiotherapy; it has been the major subject for the last 20-30 years. Radiation responses and RBE (relative biological effectiveness) depend on assay systems, endpoints, type of tissues and tumors, radiation quality, dose rate, dose fractionation, physiological and environmental factors etc, Latent times to develop damages also differ among tissues and endpoints depending on doses and radiation quality. Recent progress in clarification of radiation induced cell death, especially of apoptotic cell death, is quite important for understanding radiosensitivity of tumor cure process as well as of tumorigenesis. Apoptotic cell death as well as dormant cells had been unaccounted and missed into a part of reproductive cell death. Another area of major progress has been made in clarifying repair mechanisms of radiation damage, i.e., non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombinational repair (HRR). New approaches and developments such as cDNA or protein micro arrays and so called informatics in addition to basic molecular biological analysis are expected to aid identifying molecules and their roles in signal transduction pathways, which are multi-factorial and interactive each other being involved in radiation responses. (authors)

  15. Sequence-specific DNA alkylation by tandem Py-Im polyamide conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rhys Dylan; Kawamoto, Yusuke; Hashiya, Kaori; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    Tandem N-methylpyrrole-N-methylimidazole (Py-Im) polyamides with good sequence-specific DNA-alkylating activities have been designed and synthesized. Three alkylating tandem Py-Im polyamides with different linkers, which each contained the same moiety for the recognition of a 10 bp DNA sequence, were evaluated for their reactivity and selectivity by DNA alkylation, using high-resolution denaturing gel electrophoresis. All three conjugates displayed high reactivities for the target sequence. In particular, polyamide 1, which contained a β-alanine linker, displayed the most-selective sequence-specific alkylation towards the target 10 bp DNA sequence. The tandem Py-Im polyamide conjugates displayed greater sequence-specific DNA alkylation than conventional hairpin Py-Im polyamide conjugates (4 and 5). For further research, the design of tandem Py-Im polyamide conjugates could play an important role in targeting specific gene sequences. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. A biochemical defect in the repair of alkylated DNA in cells from an immunodeficient patient (46BR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teo, I.A.; Broughton, B.C.; Day, R.S.; James, M.R.; Karran, P.; Mayne, L.V.; Lehmann, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    The fibroblast cell strain 46BR, derived from an immunodeficient individual, is hypersensitive to the lethal effects of a variety of DNA-damaging agents, this effect being particularly marked for monofunctional methylating agents. After U.V. irradiation 46BR cells show normal unscheduled DNA synthesis, daughter strand repair, and recovery of DNA and RNA synthesis. The inhibition of DNA replicative synthesis by U.V. is slightly less than that of normal cells. After gamma-irradiation the rejoining of strand breaks is normal as are the kinetics of replicative DNA synthesis. Following treatment with dimethylsulphate, replicative DNA synthesis is affected in a similar way to normal cells, unscheduled DNA synthesis may be increased relative to normal cells, but more strand breaks persist in 46BR than in normal cells. In addition 46BR cells are hypersensitive to the toxic effects of 3-aminobenzamide, an inhibitor of ADP-ribosyl transferase. This enzyme is involved in the ligation step of repair of alkylation damage. A hypothesis is presented suggesting that 46BR may be defective in DNA ligase I

  17. Oxidative DNA damage & repair: An introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadet, Jean; Davies, Kelvin J A

    2017-06-01

    This introductory article should be viewed as a prologue to the Free Radical Biology & Medicine Special Issue devoted to the important topic of Oxidatively Damaged DNA and its Repair. This special issue is dedicated to Professor Tomas Lindahl, co-winner of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his seminal discoveries in the area repair of oxidatively damaged DNA. In the past several years it has become abundantly clear that DNA oxidation is a major consequence of life in an oxygen-rich environment. Concomitantly, survival in the presence of oxygen, with the constant threat of deleterious DNA mutations and deletions, has largely been made possible through the evolution of a vast array of DNA repair enzymes. The articles in this Oxidatively Damaged DNA & Repair special issue detail the reactions by which intracellular DNA is oxidatively damaged, and the enzymatic reactions and pathways by which living organisms survive such assaults by repair processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1985-07-01

    Radiation damage to DNA results from the direct interaction of radiation with DNA where positive ions, electrons and excited states are formed in the DNA, and the indirect effect where radical species formed in the surrounding medium by the radiation attack the DNA. The primary mechanism proposed for radiation damage, by the direct effect, is that positive and negative ions formed within the DNA strand migrate through the stacked DNA bases. The ions can then recombine, react with the DNA bases most likely to react by protonation of the anion and deprotonation or hydroxylation of the cation or transfer out of the DNA chain to the surrounding histone protein. This work as aimed at understanding the possible reactions of the DNA base ion radicals, as well as their initial distribution in the DNA strand. 31 refs

  19. Cellular responses to environmental DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the conference entitled Cellular Responses to Environmental DNA Damage held in Banff,Alberta December 1--6, 1991. The conference addresses various aspects of DNA repair in sessions titled DNA repair; Basic Mechanisms; Lesions; Systems; Inducible Responses; Mutagenesis; Human Population Response Heterogeneity; Intragenomic DNA Repair Heterogeneity; DNA Repair Gene Cloning; Aging; Human Genetic Disease; and Carcinogenesis. Individual papers are represented as abstracts of about one page in length.

  20. uv photobiology: DNA damage and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, B.M.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: targets that determine the fate of the cell when uv light interacts with a cell; comparison of action spectrum for a given biological effect with the absorption spectrum of different biological macromolecules; biological effects of damage to DNA; measurement of mutations; chemical damage to DNA; photoreactivation; role of pyrimidine dimers in induction of skin cancer by uv

  1. DNA damage in plant herbarium tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, Martijn; Cuenca, Argelia; Richardson, James E; Vrielink-van Ginkel, Ria; Petersen, Gitte; Seberg, Ole; Bakker, Freek T

    2011-01-01

    Dried plant herbarium specimens are potentially a valuable source of DNA. Efforts to obtain genetic information from this source are often hindered by an inability to obtain amplifiable DNA as herbarium DNA is typically highly degraded. DNA post-mortem damage may not only reduce the number of amplifiable template molecules, but may also lead to the generation of erroneous sequence information. A qualitative and quantitative assessment of DNA post-mortem damage is essential to determine the accuracy of molecular data from herbarium specimens. In this study we present an assessment of DNA damage as miscoding lesions in herbarium specimens using 454-sequencing of amplicons derived from plastid, mitochondrial, and nuclear DNA. In addition, we assess DNA degradation as a result of strand breaks and other types of polymerase non-bypassable damage by quantitative real-time PCR. Comparing four pairs of fresh and herbarium specimens of the same individuals we quantitatively assess post-mortem DNA damage, directly after specimen preparation, as well as after long-term herbarium storage. After specimen preparation we estimate the proportion of gene copy numbers of plastid, mitochondrial, and nuclear DNA to be 2.4-3.8% of fresh control DNA and 1.0-1.3% after long-term herbarium storage, indicating that nearly all DNA damage occurs on specimen preparation. In addition, there is no evidence of preferential degradation of organelle versus nuclear genomes. Increased levels of C→T/G→A transitions were observed in old herbarium plastid DNA, representing 21.8% of observed miscoding lesions. We interpret this type of post-mortem DNA damage-derived modification to have arisen from the hydrolytic deamination of cytosine during long-term herbarium storage. Our results suggest that reliable sequence data can be obtained from herbarium specimens.

  2. Damage-induced DNA repair processes in Escherichia coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slezarikova, V.

    1986-01-01

    The existing knowledge is summed up of the response of Escherichia coli cells to DNA damage due to various factors including ultraviolet radiation. So far, three inducible mechanisms caused by DNA damage are known, viz., SOS induction, adaptation and thermal shock induction. Greatest attention is devoted to SOS induction. Its mechanism is described and the importance of the lexA recA proteins is shown. In addition, direct or indirect role is played by other proteins, such as the ssb protein binding the single-strand DNA sections. The results are reported of a study of induced repair processes in Escherichia coli cells repeatedly irradiated with UV radiation. A model of induction by repeated cell irradiation discovered a new role of induced proteins, i.e., the elimination of alkali-labile points in the daughter DNA synthetized on a damaged model. The nature of the alkali-labile points has so far been unclear. In the adaptation process, regulation proteins are synthetized whose production is induced by the presence of alkylation agents. In the thermal shock induction, new proteins synthetize in cells, whose function has not yet been clarified. (E.S.)

  3. DNA Damage Signals and Space Radiation Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Space radiation is comprised of high-energy and charge (HZE) nuclei and protons. The initial DNA damage from HZE nuclei is qualitatively different from X-rays or gamma rays due to the clustering of damage sites which increases their complexity. Clustering of DNA damage occurs on several scales. First there is clustering of single strand breaks (SSB), double strand breaks (DSB), and base damage within a few to several hundred base pairs (bp). A second form of damage clustering occurs on the scale of a few kbp where several DSB?s may be induced by single HZE nuclei. These forms of damage clusters do not occur at low to moderate doses of X-rays or gamma rays thus presenting new challenges to DNA repair systems. We review current knowledge of differences that occur in DNA repair pathways for different types of radiation and possible relationships to mutations, chromosomal aberrations and cancer risks.

  4. SIRT participates at DNA damage response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Mi Yong; Joeng, Jae Min; Lee, Kee Ho [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Gil Hong [College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Sir2 maintains genomic stability in multiple ways in yeast. As a NAD{sup +}-dependent histone deacetylase, Sir2 has been reported to control chromatin silencing. In both budding yeast and Drosophila, overexpression of Sir2 extends life span. Previous reports have also demonstrated that Sir2 participate at DNA damage repair. A protein complex containing Sir2 has been reported to translocate to DNA double-strand breaks. Following DNA damage response, SIRT1 deacetylates p53 protein and attenuates its ability as a transcription factor. Consequently, SIRT1 over-expression increases cell survival under DNA damage inducing conditions. These previous observations mean a possibility that signals generated during the process of DNA repair are delivered through SIRT1 to acetylated p53. We present herein functional evidence for the involvement of SIRT1 in DNA repair response to radiation. In addition, this modulation of DNA repair activity may be connected to deacetylation of MRN proteins.

  5. Induction of innate immune gene expression following methyl methanesulfonate-induced DNA damage in sea urchins

    OpenAIRE

    Reinardy, H. C.; Chapman, J.; Bodnar, A. G.

    2016-01-01

    Sea urchins are noted for the absence of neoplastic disease and represent a novel model to investigate cellular and systemic cancer protection mechanisms. Following intracoelomic injection of the DNA alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate, DNA damage was detected in sea urchin cells and tissues (coelomocytes, muscle, oesophagus, ampullae and gonad) by the alkaline unwinding, fast micromethod. Gene expression analyses of the coelomocytes indicated upregulation of innate immune markers, inclu...

  6. Repair of DNA damage in Deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    The repair of DNA lesions in Deinococcus radiodurans was examined with particular reference to DNA excision repair of ultraviolet light (UV) induced pyrimidine dimers. The characteristics of excision repair via UV endonucleases α and β in vivo varied with respect to (a) the substrate range of the enzymes, (b) the rate of repair of DNA damage (c) the requirement for a protein synthesised in response to DNA damage to attenuate exonuclease action at repairing regions. UV endonuclease α is postulated to incise DNA in a different manner from UV endonuclease β thus defining the method of subsequent repair. Several DNA damage specific endonuclease activities independent of α and β are described. Mutations of the uvsA, uvsF and uvsG genes resulted in an increase in single-strand breaks in response to DNA damage producing uncontrolled DNA degradation. Evidence is presented that these genes have a role in limiting the access of UV endonuclease β to DNA lesions. uvsF and uvsG are also shown to be linked to the mtoA gene. Mutation of uvsH and reo-1 produces further distinct phenotypes which are discussed. An overall model of excision repair of DNA damage in Deinococcus radiodurans is presented. (author)

  7. Ada response - a strategy for repair of alkylated DNA in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielecki, Damian; Grzesiuk, Elżbieta

    2014-06-01

    Alkylating agents are widespread in the environment and also occur endogenously. They can be cytotoxic or mutagenic to the cells introducing alkylated bases to DNA or RNA. All organisms have evolved multiple DNA repair mechanisms to counteract the effects of DNA alkylation: the most cytotoxic lesion, N(3)-methyladenine (3meA), is excised by AlkA glycosylase initiating base excision repair (BER); toxic N(1)-methyladenine (1meA) and N(3)-methylcytosine (3meC), induced in DNA and RNA, are removed by AlkB dioxygenase; and mutagenic and cytotoxic O(6)-methylguanine (O(6) meG) is repaired by Ada methyltransferase. In Escherichia coli, Ada response involves the expression of four genes, ada, alkA, alkB, and aidB, encoding respective proteins Ada, AlkA, AlkB, and AidB. The Ada response is conserved among many bacterial species; however, it can be organized differently, with diverse substrate specificity of the particular proteins. Here, an overview of the organization of the Ada regulon and function of individual proteins is presented. We put special effort into the characterization of AlkB dioxygenases, their substrate specificity, and function in the repair of alkylation lesions in DNA/RNA. © 2014 The Authors. FEMS Microbiology Letters published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  8. Ada response – a strategy for repair of alkylated DNA in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielecki, Damian; Grzesiuk, Elżbieta

    2014-01-01

    Alkylating agents are widespread in the environment and also occur endogenously. They can be cytotoxic or mutagenic to the cells introducing alkylated bases to DNA or RNA. All organisms have evolved multiple DNA repair mechanisms to counteract the effects of DNA alkylation: the most cytotoxic lesion, N3-methyladenine (3meA), is excised by AlkA glycosylase initiating base excision repair (BER); toxic N1-methyladenine (1meA) and N3-methylcytosine (3meC), induced in DNA and RNA, are removed by AlkB dioxygenase; and mutagenic and cytotoxic O6-methylguanine (O6meG) is repaired by Ada methyltransferase. In Escherichia coli, Ada response involves the expression of four genes, ada, alkA, alkB, and aidB, encoding respective proteins Ada, AlkA, AlkB, and AidB. The Ada response is conserved among many bacterial species; however, it can be organized differently, with diverse substrate specificity of the particular proteins. Here, an overview of the organization of the Ada regulon and function of individual proteins is presented. We put special effort into the characterization of AlkB dioxygenases, their substrate specificity, and function in the repair of alkylation lesions in DNA/RNA. PMID:24810496

  9. The DNA damage response in mammalian oocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John eCarroll

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage is one of the most common insults that challenge all cells. To cope, an elaborate molecular and cellular response has evolved to sense, respond to and correct the damage. This allows the maintenance of DNA fidelity essential for normal cell viability and the prevention of genomic instability that can lead to tumour formation. In the context of oocytes, the impact of DNA damage is not one of tumour formation but of the maintenance of fertility. Mammalian oocytes are particularly vulnerable to DNA damage because physiologically they may lie dormant in the ovary for many years (>40 in humans until they receive the stimulus to grow and acquire the competence to become fertilized. The implication of this is that in some organisms, such as humans, oocytes face the danger of cumulative genetic damage for decades. Thus, the ability to detect and repair DNA damage is essential to maintain the supply of oocytes necessary for reproduction. Therefore, failure to confront DNA damage in oocytes could cause serious anomalies in the embryo that may be propagated in the form of mutations to the next generation allowing the appearance of hereditary disease. Despite the potential impact of DNA damage on reproductive capacity and genetic fidelity of embryos, the mechanisms available to the oocyte for monitoring and repairing such insults have remained largely unexplored until recently. Here, we review the different aspects of the response to DNA damage in mammalian oocytes. Specifically, we address the oocyte DNA damage response from embryonic life to adulthood and throughout oocyte development.

  10. The DNA damage response during mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heijink, Anne Margriet; Krajewska, Małgorzata; Vugt, Marcel A.T.M. van

    2013-01-01

    Cells are equipped with a cell-intrinsic signaling network called the DNA damage response (DDR). This signaling network recognizes DNA lesions and initiates various downstream pathways to coordinate a cell cycle arrest with the repair of the damaged DNA. Alternatively, the DDR can mediate clearance of affected cells that are beyond repair through apoptosis or senescence. The DDR can be activated in response to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle, although the extent of DDR signaling is different in each cell cycle phase. Especially in response to DNA double strand breaks, only a very marginal response was observed during mitosis. Early on it was recognized that cells which are irradiated during mitosis continued division without repairing broken chromosomes. Although these initial observations indicated diminished DNA repair and lack of an acute DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, insight into the mechanistic re-wiring of DDR signaling during mitosis was only recently provided. Different mechanisms appear to be at play to inactivate specific signaling axes of the DDR network in mitosis. Importantly, mitotic cells not simply inactivate the entire DDR, but appear to mark their DNA damage for repair after mitotic exit. Since the treatment of cancer frequently involves agents that induce DNA damage as well as agents that block mitotic progression, it is clinically relevant to obtain a better understanding of how cancer cells deal with DNA damage during interphase versus mitosis. In this review, the molecular details concerning DDR signaling during mitosis as well as the consequences of encountering DNA damage during mitosis for cellular fate are discussed

  11. The DNA damage response during mitosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijink, Anne Margriet; Krajewska, Małgorzata; Vugt, Marcel A.T.M. van, E-mail: m.vugt@umcg.nl

    2013-10-15

    Cells are equipped with a cell-intrinsic signaling network called the DNA damage response (DDR). This signaling network recognizes DNA lesions and initiates various downstream pathways to coordinate a cell cycle arrest with the repair of the damaged DNA. Alternatively, the DDR can mediate clearance of affected cells that are beyond repair through apoptosis or senescence. The DDR can be activated in response to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle, although the extent of DDR signaling is different in each cell cycle phase. Especially in response to DNA double strand breaks, only a very marginal response was observed during mitosis. Early on it was recognized that cells which are irradiated during mitosis continued division without repairing broken chromosomes. Although these initial observations indicated diminished DNA repair and lack of an acute DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, insight into the mechanistic re-wiring of DDR signaling during mitosis was only recently provided. Different mechanisms appear to be at play to inactivate specific signaling axes of the DDR network in mitosis. Importantly, mitotic cells not simply inactivate the entire DDR, but appear to mark their DNA damage for repair after mitotic exit. Since the treatment of cancer frequently involves agents that induce DNA damage as well as agents that block mitotic progression, it is clinically relevant to obtain a better understanding of how cancer cells deal with DNA damage during interphase versus mitosis. In this review, the molecular details concerning DDR signaling during mitosis as well as the consequences of encountering DNA damage during mitosis for cellular fate are discussed.

  12. The DNA damage response during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijink, Anne Margriet; Krajewska, Małgorzata; van Vugt, Marcel A T M

    2013-10-01

    Cells are equipped with a cell-intrinsic signaling network called the DNA damage response (DDR). This signaling network recognizes DNA lesions and initiates various downstream pathways to coordinate a cell cycle arrest with the repair of the damaged DNA. Alternatively, the DDR can mediate clearance of affected cells that are beyond repair through apoptosis or senescence. The DDR can be activated in response to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle, although the extent of DDR signaling is different in each cell cycle phase. Especially in response to DNA double strand breaks, only a very marginal response was observed during mitosis. Early on it was recognized that cells which are irradiated during mitosis continued division without repairing broken chromosomes. Although these initial observations indicated diminished DNA repair and lack of an acute DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, insight into the mechanistic re-wiring of DDR signaling during mitosis was only recently provided. Different mechanisms appear to be at play to inactivate specific signaling axes of the DDR network in mitosis. Importantly, mitotic cells not simply inactivate the entire DDR, but appear to mark their DNA damage for repair after mitotic exit. Since the treatment of cancer frequently involves agents that induce DNA damage as well as agents that block mitotic progression, it is clinically relevant to obtain a better understanding of how cancer cells deal with DNA damage during interphase versus mitosis. In this review, the molecular details concerning DDR signaling during mitosis as well as the consequences of encountering DNA damage during mitosis for cellular fate are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Processing of free radical damaged DNA bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, S.

    2003-01-01

    Free radicals produced during the radiolysis of water gives rise to a plethora of DNA damages including single strand breaks, sites of base loss and a wide variety of purine and pyrimidine base lesions. All these damages are processed in cells by base excision repair. The oxidative DNA glycosylases which catalyze the first step in the removal of a base damage during base excision repair evolved primarily to protect the cells from the deleterious mutagenic effects of single free radical-induced DNA lesions arising during oxidative metabolism. This is evidenced by the high spontaneous mutation rate in bacterial mutants lacking the oxidative DNA glycosylases. However, when a low LET photon transverses the DNA molecule, a burst of free radicals is produced during the radiolysis of water that leads to the formation of clustered damages in the DNA molecule, that are recognized by the oxidative DNA glycosylases. When substrates containing two closely opposed sugar damages or base and sugar damages are incubated with the oxidative DNA glycosylases in vitro, one strand is readily incised by the lyase activity of the DNA glycosylase. Whether or not the second strand is incised depends on the distance between the strand break resulting from the incised first strand and the remaining DNA lesion on the other strand. If the lesions are more than two or three base pairs apart, the second strand is readily cleaved by the DNA glycosylase, giving rise to a double strand break. Even if the entire base excision repair system is reconstituted in vitro, whether or not a double strand break ensues depends solely upon the ability of the DNA glycosylase to cleave the second strand. These data predicted that cells deficient in the oxidative DNA glycosylases would be radioresistant while those that overproduce an oxidative DNA glycosylase would be radiosensitive. This prediction was indeed borne in Escherichia coli that is, mutants lacking the oxidative DNA glycosylases are radioresistant

  14. Inhibition of RecBCD enzyme by antineoplastic DNA alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziegielewska, Barbara; Beerman, Terry A; Bianco, Piero R

    2006-09-01

    To understand how bulky adducts might perturb DNA helicase function, three distinct DNA-binding agents were used to determine the effects of DNA alkylation on a DNA helicase. Adozelesin, ecteinascidin 743 (Et743) and hedamycin each possess unique structures and sequence selectivity. They bind to double-stranded DNA and alkylate one strand of the duplex in cis, adding adducts that alter the structure of DNA significantly. The results show that Et743 was the most potent inhibitor of DNA unwinding, followed by adozelesin and hedamycin. Et743 significantly inhibited unwinding, enhanced degradation of DNA, and completely eliminated the ability of the translocating RecBCD enzyme to recognize and respond to the recombination hotspot chi. Unwinding of adozelesin-modified DNA was accompanied by the appearance of unwinding intermediates, consistent with enzyme entrapment or stalling. Further, adozelesin also induced "apparent" chi fragment formation. The combination of enzyme sequestering and pseudo-chi modification of RecBCD, results in biphasic time-courses of DNA unwinding. Hedamycin also reduced RecBCD activity, albeit at increased concentrations of drug relative to either adozelesin or Et743. Remarkably, the hedamycin modification resulted in constitutive activation of the bottom-strand nuclease activity of the enzyme, while leaving the ability of the translocating enzyme to recognize and respond to chi largely intact. Finally, the results show that DNA alkylation does not significantly perturb the allosteric interaction that activates the enzyme for ATP hydrolysis, as the efficiency of ATP utilization for DNA unwinding is affected only marginally. These results taken together present a unique response of RecBCD enzyme to bulky DNA adducts. We correlate these effects with the recently determined crystal structure of the RecBCD holoenzyme bound to DNA.

  15. Molecular mechanisms in radiation damage to DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this work are to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for radiation-induced DNA damage. The overall goal is to understand the relationship between the chemical and structural changes produced by ionizing radiation in DNA and the resulting impairment of biological function expressed as carcinogenesis or cell death. The studies are based on theoretical explorations of possible mechanisms that link initial radiation damage in the form of base and sugar damage to conformational changes in DNA. These mechanistic explorations should lead to the formulation of testable hypothesis regarding the processes of impairment of regulation of gene expression, alternation in DNA repair, and damage to DNA structure involved in cell death or cancer

  16. Biologically important radiation damage in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    Most DNA damage by the hydroxyl radical is confined to the bases, and this base damage represents an important component of locally multiply demanded sites (LMOS). The yields of the major damaged bases have been determined by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. For our propose, it was necessary to convert a known fraction of these damaged bases to strand breaks and then assay these labile sites as the increase in strand break yield over the normally observed level. Three potential agents by which this strategy of conversion of base damage to strand break could be implemented were identified in the original application: 1, Sl nuclease; 2, piperidine; and 3, base damage specific enzymes

  17. A powerful selection assay for mixture libraries of DNA alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Young-Wan; Boger, Dale L

    2004-08-04

    A simple and powerful selection assay that permits the separation (rpHPLC), quantitation (ELSD), and identification (ESI-MS) of thermally released adenine adducts derived from duocarmycin analogues is detailed that can establish the most effective DNA alkylating agents in synthetic combinatorial mixtures.

  18. Sequence-selective single-molecule alkylation with a pyrrole-imidazole polyamide visualized in a DNA nanoscaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshidome, Tomofumi; Endo, Masayuki; Kashiwazaki, Gengo; Hidaka, Kumi; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2012-03-14

    We demonstrate a novel strategy for visualizing sequence-selective alkylation of target double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) using a synthetic pyrrole-imidazole (PI) polyamide in a designed DNA origami scaffold. Doubly functionalized PI polyamide was designed by introduction of an alkylating agent 1-(chloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-1,2-dihydro-3H-benz[e]indole (seco-CBI) and biotin for sequence-selective alkylation at the target sequence and subsequent streptavidin labeling, respectively. Selective alkylation of the target site in the substrate DNA was observed by analysis using sequencing gel electrophoresis. For the single-molecule observation of the alkylation by functionalized PI polyamide using atomic force microscopy (AFM), the target position in the dsDNA (∼200 base pairs) was alkylated and then visualized by labeling with streptavidin. Newly designed DNA origami scaffold named "five-well DNA frame" carrying five different dsDNA sequences in its cavities was used for the detailed analysis of the sequence-selectivity and alkylation. The 64-mer dsDNAs were introduced to five individual wells, in which target sequence AGTXCCA/TGGYACT (XY = AT, TA, GC, CG) was employed as fully matched (X = G) and one-base mismatched (X = A, T, C) sequences. The fully matched sequence was alkylated with 88% selectivity over other mismatched sequences. In addition, the PI polyamide failed to attach to the target sequence lacking the alkylation site after washing and streptavidin treatment. Therefore, the PI polyamide discriminated the one mismatched nucleotide at the single-molecule level, and alkylation anchored the PI polyamide to the target dsDNA.

  19. DNA damage induced by radionuclide internal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Fengmei; Zhao Jingyong; Hong Chengjiao; Lao Qinhua; Wang Liuyi; Yang Shuqin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the DNA damage of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) in rats exposed to radionuclide internal irradiation. Methods: The radionuclides were injected into the rats and single cell get electrophoresis (SCGE) was performed to detect the length of DNA migration in the rat PBMC. Results: DNA migration in the rat PBMC increased with accumulative dose or dose-rate. It showed good relationship of dose vs. response and of dose-rate vs. response, both relationship could be described as linear models. Conclusion: Radionuclide internal irradiation could cause DNA damage in rat PBMC. (authors)

  20. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1993-12-01

    In this project the author has proposed several mechanisms for radiation damage to DNA and its constituents, and has detailed a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectroscopy, HPLC, GC-mass spectroscopy and ab initio molecular orbital calculations to test the proposed mechanisms. In this years work he has completed several experiments on the role of hydration water on DNA radiation damage, continued the investigation of the localization of the initial charges and their reactions on DNA, investigated protonation reactions in DNA base anions, and employed ab initio molecular orbital theory to gain insight into the initial events of radiation damage to DNA. Ab initio calculations have provided an understanding of the energetics evolved in anion and cation formation, ion radical transfer in DNA as well as proton transfer with DNA base pair radical ions. This has been extended in this years work to a consideration of ionization energies of various components of the DNA deoxyribose backbone and resulting neutral sugar radicals. This information has aided the formation of new radiation models for the effect of radiation on DNA. During this fiscal year four articles have been published, four are in press, one is submitted and several more are in preparation. Four papers have been presented at scientific meetings. This years effort will include another review article on the open-quotes Electron Spin Resonance of Radiation Damage to DNAclose quotes

  1. DNA damage in the oocytes SACs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macůrek, Libor

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 4 (2016), s. 491-492 ISSN 1538-4101 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : DNA damage response * oocyte * meiosis * checkpoint Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.530, year: 2016

  2. Early models of DNA damage formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Śmiałek, Małgorzata A

    2012-01-01

    Quantification of DNA damage, induced by various types of incident radiation as well as chemical agents, has been the subject of many theoretical and experimental studies, supporting the development of modern cancer therapy. The primary observations showed that many factors can lead to damage of DNA molecules. It became clear that the development of experimental techniques for exploring this phenomenon is required. Another problem was simultaneously dealt with, anticipating on how the damage is distributed within the double helix of the DNA molecule and how the single strand break formation and accumulation can influence the lethal double strand break formation. In this work the most important probabilistic models for DNA strand breakage and damage propagation are summarized and compared.

  3. Chronic ethanol consumption inhibits repair of dimethylnitrosamine-induced DNA alkylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mufti, S.I.; Salvagnini, M.; Lieber, C.S.; Garro, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    Chronic ethanol consumption causes a DNA repair deficiency. This was demonstrated in Sprague-Dawley rats injected with 14 C-labeled dimethylnitrosamine after being pair-fed isocaloric, ethanol, or carbohydrate control diets for 4 weeks. Hepatic DNA was isolated from rats killed at intervals over a 36 hour period after administration of the nitrosamine and concentrations of alkylated guanine derivatives were measured. While N7-methylguanine was lost at equivalent rates from the DNA of both diet groups, 06methylguanine, a promutagenic lesion, persisted at higher levels for longer periods of time in the DNA from the alcohol-fed animals

  4. Photo-triggered fluorescent theranostic prodrugs as DNA alkylating agents for mechlorethamine release and spatiotemporal monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yanting; Pan, Rong; Xuan, Weimin; Wei, Yongyi; Liu, Kejian; Zhou, Jiahong; Wang, Wei

    2015-06-28

    We describe a new theranostic strategy for selective delivery and spatiotemporal monitoring of mechlorethamine, a DNA alkylating agent. A photo-responsive prodrug is designed and composed of a photolabile o-nitrophenylethyl group, a DNA alkylating mechlorethamine drug and a coumarin fluorophore. Masking of the "N" in mechlorethamine in a positively charged state in the prodrug renders it inactive, non-toxic, selective and non-fluorescent. Indeed, the stable prodrug shows negligible cytotoxicity towards normal cells with and without UV activation and is completely non-fluorescent. However, upon photo-irradiation, the active mechlorethamine is released and induces efficient DNA cross-links, accompanied by a strong fluorescence enhancement (152 fold). Furthermore, DNA cross-linking activity from the release can be transformed into anticancer activity observed in in vitro studies of tumor cells. Importantly, the drug release progress and the movement can be conveniently monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy. The mechanistic study proves that the DNA cross-linking activity is mainly due to the release of DNA alkylating mechlorethamine. Altogether, the studies show the power of the theranostic strategy for efficient therapy in cancer treatment.

  5. Immunological detection and quantification of DNA components structurally modified by alkylating carcinogens, mutagens and chemotherapeutic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajewsky, M.F.

    1983-01-01

    The detection and quantification of defined reaction products of chemical mutagens and carcinogens (and of many cancer chemotherapeutic agents) with DNA require highly sensitive analytical techniques. The exceptional capability of immunoglobulins to recognize subtle alterations of molecular structure (especially when monoclonal antibodies are used to maximize specificity), outstanding sensitivity of immunoanalysis by high-affinity antibodies, and the fact that radioactively-labelled agents are not required suggest the utility of a radioimmunoassay to recognize and quantitate alkylated DNA products. We have recently developed a set of high-affinity monoclonal antibodies (secreted by mouse x mouse as well as by rat x rat hybridomas; antibody affinity constants, 10 9 to > 10 10 lmol) specifically directed against several DNA alkylation products with possible relevance in relation to both mutagenesis and malignant transformation of mammalian cells. These alkylation products include 0 6 -N-butyldeoxyguanosine, and 0 4 -ethyldeoxythymidine. When used in a radioimmunassay, an antibody specific for 0 6 -ethyldeoxyguanosine, for example, will detect this product at an 0 6 -ethyldeoxyguanosine/deoxyguanosine molar ratio of approx. 3 x 10 -7 in a hydrolysate of 100 ug of DNA. The limit of detection can be lowered further if the respective alkyldeoxynucleosides are separated by HPLC from the DNA hydrolysate prior to the RIA. The anti-alkyldeoxynucleoside monoclonal antibodies can also be used to visualize, by immunostaining and fluorescence microscopy combined with electronic image intensification, specific alkylation products in the nuclear DNA of individual cells, and to localize structurally modified bases in double-stranded DNA molecules by transmission electron microscopy

  6. Transcriptional blockages in a cell-free system by sequence-selective DNA alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, L R; Liu, A P; Denny, W A; Cullinane, C; Talarico, T; Phillips, D R

    2000-04-14

    There is considerable interest in DNA sequence-selective DNA-binding drugs as potential inhibitors of gene expression. Five compounds with distinctly different base pair specificities were compared in their effects on the formation and elongation of the transcription complex from the lac UV5 promoter in a cell-free system. All were tested at drug levels which killed 90% of cells in a clonogenic survival assay. Cisplatin, a selective alkylator at purine residues, inhibited transcription, decreasing the full-length transcript, and causing blockage at a number of GG or AG sequences, making it probable that intrastrand crosslinks are the blocking lesions. A cyclopropylindoline known to be an A-specific alkylator also inhibited transcription, with blocks at adenines. The aniline mustard chlorambucil, that targets primarily G but also A sequences, was also effective in blocking the formation of full-length transcripts. It produced transcription blocks either at, or one base prior to, AA or GG sequences, suggesting that intrastrand crosslinks could again be involved. The non-alkylating DNA minor groove binder Hoechst 33342 (a bisbenzimidazole) blocked formation of the full-length transcript, but without creating specific blockage sites. A bisbenzimidazole-linked aniline mustard analogue was a more effective transcription inhibitor than either chlorambucil or Hoechst 33342, with different blockage sites occurring immediately as compared with 2 h after incubation. The blockages were either immediately prior to AA or GG residues, or four to five base pairs prior to such sites, a pattern not predicted from in vitro DNA-binding studies. Minor groove DNA-binding ligands are of particular interest as inhibitors of gene expression, since they have the potential ability to bind selectively to long sequences of DNA. The results suggest that the bisbenzimidazole-linked mustard does cause alkylation and transcription blockage at novel DNA sites. in addition to sites characteristic of

  7. Alkylation Induced DNA Repair and Mutagenesis in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-23

    unrepaired 3-methyladenine in DNA 29 2.4.1 Cytotoxic effects of persisting m3A in DNA 30 2.4.2 Mutagenic bypass synthesis of depurinat ,d DNA 30 3 CONCLUDING...induced by a single exposure to the ca’rcinogen N- methyl-N- nitrosourea (MNU) due to activation of the malignant Ha-ras-i locus. Analysis of the induced...ing CO:A uolymerase I for repair synthesis . Since DNA polymerase I would be required to complete repair after the in~uial activity of TagII, we tested

  8. DNA DAMAGE QUANTITATION BY ALKALINE GEL ELECTROPHORESIS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUTHERLAND,B.M.; BENNETT,P.V.; SUTHERLAND, J.C.

    2004-03-24

    Physical and chemical agents in the environment, those used in clinical applications, or encountered during recreational exposures to sunlight, induce damages in DNA. Understanding the biological impact of these agents requires quantitation of the levels of such damages in laboratory test systems as well as in field or clinical samples. Alkaline gel electrophoresis provides a sensitive (down to {approx} a few lesions/5Mb), rapid method of direct quantitation of a wide variety of DNA damages in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNAs from laboratory, field, or clinical specimens, including higher plants and animals. This method stems from velocity sedimentation studies of DNA populations, and from the simple methods of agarose gel electrophoresis. Our laboratories have developed quantitative agarose gel methods, analytical descriptions of DNA migration during electrophoresis on agarose gels (1-6), and electronic imaging for accurate determinations of DNA mass (7-9). Although all these components improve sensitivity and throughput of large numbers of samples (7,8,10), a simple version using only standard molecular biology equipment allows routine analysis of DNA damages at moderate frequencies. We present here a description of the methods, as well as a brief description of the underlying principles, required for a simplified approach to quantitation of DNA damages by alkaline gel electrophoresis.

  9. Comparison of checkpoint responses triggered by DNA polymerase inhibition versus DNA damaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.-S.; Kuo, S.-R.; Melendy, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    To better understand the different cellular responses to replication fork pausing versus blockage, early DNA damage response markers were compared after treatment of cultured mammalian cells with agents that either inhibit DNA polymerase activity (hydroxyurea (HU) or aphidicolin) or selectively induce S-phase DNA damage responses (the DNA alkylating agents, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and adozelesin). These agents were compared for their relative abilities to induce phosphorylation of Chk1, H2AX, and replication protein A (RPA), and intra-nuclear focalization of γ-H2AX and RPA. Treatment by aphidicolin and HU resulted in phosphorylation of Chk1, while HU, but not aphidicolin, induced focalization of γ-H2AX and RPA. Surprisingly, pre-treatment with aphidicolin to stop replication fork progression, did not abrogate HU-induced γ-H2AX and RPA focalization. This suggests that HU may act on the replication fork machinery directly, such that fork progression is not required to trigger these responses. The DNA-damaging fork-blocking agents, adozelesin and MMS, both induced phosphorylation and focalization of H2AX and RPA. Unlike adozelesin and HU, the pattern of MMS-induced RPA focalization did not match the BUdR incorporation pattern and was not blocked by aphidicolin, suggesting that MMS-induced damage is not replication fork-dependent. In support of this, MMS was the only reagent used that did not induce phosphorylation of Chk1. These results indicate that induction of DNA damage checkpoint responses due to adozelesin is both replication fork and fork progression dependent, induction by HU is replication fork dependent but progression independent, while induction by MMS is independent of both replication forks and fork progression

  10. Comparison of checkpoint responses triggered by DNA polymerase inhibition versus DNA damaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J.-S.; Kuo, S.-R.; Melendy, Thomas

    2003-11-27

    To better understand the different cellular responses to replication fork pausing versus blockage, early DNA damage response markers were compared after treatment of cultured mammalian cells with agents that either inhibit DNA polymerase activity (hydroxyurea (HU) or aphidicolin) or selectively induce S-phase DNA damage responses (the DNA alkylating agents, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and adozelesin). These agents were compared for their relative abilities to induce phosphorylation of Chk1, H2AX, and replication protein A (RPA), and intra-nuclear focalization of {gamma}-H2AX and RPA. Treatment by aphidicolin and HU resulted in phosphorylation of Chk1, while HU, but not aphidicolin, induced focalization of {gamma}-H2AX and RPA. Surprisingly, pre-treatment with aphidicolin to stop replication fork progression, did not abrogate HU-induced {gamma}-H2AX and RPA focalization. This suggests that HU may act on the replication fork machinery directly, such that fork progression is not required to trigger these responses. The DNA-damaging fork-blocking agents, adozelesin and MMS, both induced phosphorylation and focalization of H2AX and RPA. Unlike adozelesin and HU, the pattern of MMS-induced RPA focalization did not match the BUdR incorporation pattern and was not blocked by aphidicolin, suggesting that MMS-induced damage is not replication fork-dependent. In support of this, MMS was the only reagent used that did not induce phosphorylation of Chk1. These results indicate that induction of DNA damage checkpoint responses due to adozelesin is both replication fork and fork progression dependent, induction by HU is replication fork dependent but progression independent, while induction by MMS is independent of both replication forks and fork progression.

  11. Profiling DNA damage response following mitotic perturbations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ronni Sølvhøi; Karemore, Gopal; Gudjonsson, Thorkell

    2016-01-01

    that a broad spectrum of mitotic errors correlates with increased DNA breakage in daughter cells. Unexpectedly, we find that only a subset of these correlations are functionally linked. We identify the genuine mitosis-born DNA damage events and sub-classify them according to penetrance of the observed...

  12. (UVB)-induced DNA damage

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-17

    dependent cytogenetic lesions were assessed by the micronucleus test (MNT). It was found that POE effectively reduced the extent of DNA breakages and cytogenetic lesions upon exposure to UVB (erythemal ultraviolet (EUV);.

  13. DNA damage induction of ribonucleotide reductase.

    OpenAIRE

    Elledge, S J; Davis, R W

    1989-01-01

    RNR2 encodes the small subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, the enzyme that catalyzes the first step in the pathway for the production of deoxyribonucleotides needed for DNA synthesis. RNR2 is a member of a group of genes whose activities are cell cycle regulated and that are transcriptionally induced in response to the stress of DNA damage. An RNR2-lacZ fusion was used to further characterize the regulation of RNR2 and the pathway responsible for its response to DNA damage. beta-Galactosidas...

  14. Carcinogen-induced damage to DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, B.; Altamirano, M.; Bose, K.; Sklar, R.; Tatsumi, K.

    1979-01-01

    Human cells respond to carcinogen-induced damage in their DNA in at least two ways. The first response, excision repair, proceeds by at least three variations, depending on the nature of the damage. Nucleotide excision results in relatively large repair patches but few free DNA breaks, since the endonuclease step is limiting. Apurinic repair is characterized by the appearance of numerous breaks in the DNA and by short repair patches. The pathways behave as though they function independently. Lymphoic cells derived from a xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C patient are deficient in their ability to perform nucleotide excision and also to excise 6 methoxyguanine adducts, but they are apurinic repair competent. Organisms may bypass damage in their DNA. Lymphoblastoid cells, including those derived from xeroderma pigmentosum treated with 3 H-anti-BPDE, can replicate their DNA at low doses of carcinogen. Unexcised 3 H is found in the light or parental strand of the resulting hybrid DNA when replication occurs in medium with BrdUrd. This observation indicates a bypass reaction occurring by a mechanism involving branch migration at DNA growing points. Branch migration in DNA preparations have been observed, but the evidence is that most occurs in BrdUrd-containing DNA during cell lysis. The measurement of the bifilarly substituted DNA resulting from branch migration is a convenient method of estimating the proportion of new synthesis remaining in the vicinity of the DNA growing point. Treatment with carcinogens or caffeine results in accumulation of DNA growing points accompanied by the synthesis of shortened pieces of daughter DNA

  15. Light of DNA-alkylating agents in castration-resistant prostate cancer cells: a novel mixed EGFR/DNA targeting combi-molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Guan-Can; Zheng, Hao-Feng; Chen, Yan-Xiong; Li, Teng-Cheng; Liu, Wei; Fang, You-Qiang

    2017-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the therapeutic effects of combi-molecule JDF12 on prostate cancer (PCa) DU145 cells remains still unclear. This study aimed to investigate the proteomic profile after JDF12 treatment in DU145 cells by comparing with that in Iressa treated cells and untreated cells. MTT was used to evaluate drug cytotoxicity, DAPI staining was done to assess apoptosis of cells, and flow cytometry was used to analyze cell cycle. iTRAQ and qPCR were employed to obtain the proteomic profiles of JDF12 treated, Iressa treated, and untreated DU145 cells, and validate the expression of selected differentially expressed proteins, respectively. JDF12 could significantly inhibit the proliferation and increase the apoptosis of DU145 cells when compared with Iressa or blank group. In total, 5071 proteins were obtained, out of which, 42, including 21 up-regulated and 21 down-regulated proteins, were differentially expressed in JDF12 group when compared with Iressa and blank groups. The up-regulated proteins were mainly involved in DNA damage/repair and energy metabolism; while the down-regulated proteins were mainly associated with cell apoptosis. qPCR confirmed the expression of several biologically important proteins in DU145 cells after JDF12 treatment. The molecular mechanisms of DNA alkylating agents on PCa therapy that with the assistant of EGFR-blocker were revealed on proteomic level, which may increase the possible applications of DNA alkylating agents and JDF12 on PCa therapy.

  16. Parvovirus infection-induced DNA damage response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yong; Qiu, Jianming

    2014-01-01

    Parvoviruses are a group of small DNA viruses with ssDNA genomes flanked by two inverted terminal structures. Due to a limited genetic resource they require host cellular factors and sometimes a helper virus for efficient viral replication. Recent studies have shown that parvoviruses interact with the DNA damage machinery, which has a significant impact on the life cycle of the virus as well as the fate of infected cells. In addition, due to special DNA structures of the viral genomes, parvoviruses are useful tools for the study of the molecular mechanisms underlying viral infection-induced DNA damage response (DDR). This review aims to summarize recent advances in parvovirus-induced DDR, with a focus on the diverse DDR pathways triggered by different parvoviruses and the consequences of DDR on the viral life cycle as well as the fate of infected cells. PMID:25429305

  17. Chemotherapeutic Drugs: DNA Damage and Repair in Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annovazzi, Laura; Mellai, Marta; Schiffer, Davide

    2017-05-26

    Despite improvements in therapeutic strategies, glioblastoma (GB) remains one of the most lethal cancers. The presence of the blood-brain barrier, the infiltrative nature of the tumor and several resistance mechanisms account for the failure of current treatments. Distinct DNA repair pathways can neutralize the cytotoxicity of chemo- and radio-therapeutic agents, driving resistance and tumor relapse. It seems that a subpopulation of stem-like cells, indicated as glioma stem cells (GSCs), is responsible for tumor initiation, maintenance and recurrence and they appear to be more resistant owing to their enhanced DNA repair capacity. Recently, attention has been focused on the pivotal role of the DNA damage response (DDR) in tumorigenesis and in the modulation of therapeutic treatment effects. In this review, we try to summarize the knowledge concerning the main molecular mechanisms involved in the removal of genotoxic lesions caused by alkylating agents, emphasizing the role of GSCs. Beside their increased DNA repair capacity in comparison with non-stem tumor cells, GSCs show a constitutive checkpoint expression that enables them to survive to treatments in a quiescent, non-proliferative state. The targeted inhibition of checkpoint/repair factors of DDR can contribute to eradicate the GSC population and can have a great potential therapeutic impact aiming at sensitizing malignant gliomas to treatments, improving the overall survival of patients.

  18. Radiation damage of DNA. Model for direct ionization of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Kazuo; Tagawa, Seiichi

    2004-01-01

    Current aspects of radiation damage of DNA, particularly induced by the direct effect of radiation, and author's method of pulse radiolysis are described in relation to behavior of ions formed by radiation and active principles to induce the strand break. In irradiation of DNA solution in water, the direct effect of radiation is derived from ionization of DNA itself and indirect one, from the reaction between DNA and radicals generated from water molecules and the former direct one has been scarcely investigated due to difficulty of experimental approach. Radicals generated in sugar moiety of DNA are shown important in the strand break by recent studies on crystalline DNA irradiated by X-ray, DNA solution by electron and photon beams, hydrated DNA by γ-ray and by high linear energy transfer (LET) ion. Author's pulse radiolysis studies have revealed behaviors of guanine and adenine radical cations in dynamics of DNA oxidation. Since reactions described are the model, the experimental approach is thought necessary for elucidation of the actually occurring DNA damage in living cells. (N.I.)

  19. Radiation damage to DNA-binding proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culard, G.; Eon, S.; DeVuyst, G.; Charlier, M.; Spotheim-Maurizot, M.

    2003-01-01

    The DNA-binding properties of proteins are strongly affected upon irradiation. The tetrameric lactose repressor (a dimer of dimers) losses its ability to bind operator DNA as soon as at least two damages per protomer of each dimer occur. The monomeric MC1 protein losses its ability to bind DNA in two steps : i) at low doses only the specific binding is abolished, whereas the non-specific one is still possible; ii) at high doses all binding vanishes. Moreover, the DNA bending induced by MC1 binding is less pronounced for a protein that underwent the low dose irradiation. When the entire DNA-protein complexes are irradiated, the observed disruption of the complexes is mainly due to the damage of the proteins and not to that of DNA. The doses necessary for complex disruption are higher than those inactivating the free protein. This difference, larger for MC1 than for lactose repressor, is due to the protection of the protein by the bound DNA. The oxidation of the protein side chains that are accessible to the radiation-induced hydroxyl radicals seems to represent the inactivating damage

  20. Mono- and Di-Alkylation Processes of DNA Bases by Nitrogen Mustard Mechlorethamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrañaga, Olatz; de Cózar, Abel; Cossío, Fernando P

    2017-12-06

    The reactivity of nitrogen mustard mechlorethamine (mec) with purine bases towards formation of mono- (G-mec and A-mec) and dialkylated (AA-mec, GG-mec and AG-mec) adducts has been studied using density functional theory (DFT). To gain a complete overview of DNA-alkylation processes, direct chloride substitution and formation through activated aziridinium species were considered as possible reaction paths for adduct formation. Our results confirm that DNA alkylation by mec occurs via aziridine intermediates instead of direct substitution. Consideration of explicit water molecules in conjunction with polarizable continuum model (PCM) was shown as an adequate computational method for a proper representation of the system. Moreover, Runge-Kutta numerical kinetic simulations including the possible bisadducts have been performed. These simulations predicted a product ratio of 83:17 of GG-mec and AG-mec diadducts, respectively. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of DNA minor groove binding alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Prema; Srinivasan, Ajay; Singh, Sreelekha K; Mascara, Gerard P; Zayitova, Sevara; Sidone, Brian; Fouquerel, Elise; Svilar, David; Sobol, Robert W; Bobola, Michael S; Silber, John R; Gold, Barry

    2013-01-18

    Derivatives of methyl 3-(1-methyl-5-(1-methyl-5-(propylcarbamoyl)-1H-pyrrol-3-ylcarbamoyl)-1H-pyrrol-3-ylamino)-3-oxopropane-1-sulfonate (1), a peptide-based DNA minor groove binding methylating agent, were synthesized and characterized. In all cases, the N-terminus was appended with an O-methyl sulfonate ester, while the C-terminus group was varied with nonpolar and polar side chains. In addition, the number of pyrrole rings was varied from 2 (dipeptide) to 3 (tripeptide). The ability of the different analogues to efficiently generate N3-methyladenine was demonstrated as was their selectivity for minor groove (N3-methyladenine) versus major groove (N7-methylguanine) methylation. Induced circular dichroism studies were used to measure the DNA equilibrium binding properties of the stable sulfone analogues; the tripeptide binds with affinity that is >10-fold higher than that of the dipeptide. The toxicities of the compounds were evaluated in alkA/tag glycosylase mutant E. coli and in human WT glioma cells and in cells overexpressing and under-expressing N-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase, which excises N3-methyladenine from DNA. The results show that equilibrium binding correlates with the levels of N3-methyladenine produced and cellular toxicity. The toxicity of 1 was inversely related to the expression of MPG in both the bacterial and mammalian cell lines. The enhanced toxicity parallels the reduced activation of PARP and the diminished rate of formation of aldehyde reactive sites observed in the MPG knockdown cells. It is proposed that unrepaired N3-methyladenine is toxic due to its ability to directly block DNA polymerization.

  2. Carboxymethyl chitin-glucan (CM-CG) protects human HepG2 and HeLa cells against oxidative DNA lesions and stimulates DNA repair of lesions induced by alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slamenová, Darina; Kováciková, Ines; Horváthová, Eva; Wsólová, Ladislava; Navarová, Jana

    2010-10-01

    A large number of functional foods, including those that contain β-d-glucans, have been shown to prevent human DNA against genotoxic effects and associated development of cancer and other chronic diseases. In this paper, carboxymethyl chitin-glucan (CM-CG) isolated from Aspergillus niger was investigated from two standpoints: (1) DNA-protective effects against oxidative DNA damage induced by H(2)O(2) and alkylating DNA damage induced by MMS and MNNG, and (2) a potential effect on rejoining of MMS- and MNNG-induced single strand DNA breaks. The results obtained by the comet assay in human cells cultured in vitro showed that CM-CG reduced significantly the level of oxidative DNA lesions induced by H(2)O(2) but did not change the level of alkylating DNA lesions induced by MMS or MNNG. On the other side, the efficiency of DNA-rejoining of single strand DNA breaks induced by MMS and MNNG was significantly higher in HepG2 cells pre-treated with CM-CG. The antioxidative activity of carboxymethyl chitin-glucan was confirmed by the DPPH assay. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular models for DNA damaged by photoreaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearlman, D.A.; Holbrook, S.R.; Pirkle, D.H.; Kim, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    Structural models of a DNA molecule containing a radiation-induced psoralen cross-link and of a DNA containing a thymine photodimer were constructed by applying energy-minimization techniques and model-building procedures to data from x-ray crystallographic studies. The helical axes of the models show substantial kinking and unwinding at the sites of the damage, which may have long-range as well as local effects arising from the concomitant changes in the supercoiling and overall structure of the DNA. The damaged areas may also serve as recognition sites for repair enzymes. These results should help in understanding the biologic effects of radiation-induced damage on cells

  4. Delayed chromosomal instability induced by DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.F.; Marder, B.A.; Day, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    Cellular exposure to DNA damaging agents rapidly results in a dose dependent increase in chromosomal breakage and gross structural chromosomal rearrangements. Over recent years, evidence has been accumulating indicating genomic instability can manifest multiple generations after cellular exposure to physical and chemical DNA damaging agents. Genomic instability manifests in the progeny of surviving cells, and has been implicated in mutation, gene application, cellular transformation, and cell killing. To investigate chromosome instability following DNA damage, we have used fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect chromosomal rearrangements in a human/hamster somatic hybrid cell line following exposure to ionizing radiation. Delayed chromosomal instability was detected when multiple populations of uniquely arranged metaphases were observed in clonal isolates raised from single cells surviving X-irradiation many generations after exposure. At higher radiation doses, chromosomal instability was observed in a relatively high frequency of surviving clones and, in general, those clones showed delayed chromosome instability also showed reduced survival as measured by colony forming ability

  5. Sensitization to radiation and alkylating agents by inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase is enhanced in cells deficient in DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löser, Dana A; Shibata, Atsushi; Shibata, Akiko K; Woodbine, Lisa J; Jeggo, Penny A; Chalmers, Anthony J

    2010-06-01

    As single agents, chemical inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) are nontoxic and have clinical efficacy against BRCA1- and BRCA2-deficient tumors. PARP inhibitors also enhance the cytotoxicity of ionizing radiation and alkylating agents but will only improve clinical outcomes if tumor sensitization exceeds effects on normal tissues. It is unclear how tumor DNA repair proficiency affects the degree of sensitization. We have previously shown that the radiosensitizing effect of PARP inhibition requires DNA replication and will therefore affect rapidly proliferating tumors more than normal tissues. Because many tumors exhibit defective DNA repair, we investigated the impact of double-strand break (DSB) repair integrity on the sensitizing effects of the PARP inhibitor olaparib. Sensitization to ionizing radiation and the alkylating agent methylmethane sulfonate was enhanced in DSB repair-deficient cells. In Artemis(-/-) and ATM(-/-) mouse embryo fibroblasts, sensitization was replication dependent and associated with defective repair of replication-associated damage. Radiosensitization of Ligase IV(-/-) mouse embryo fibroblasts was independent of DNA replication and is explained by inhibition of "alternative" end joining. After methylmethane sulfonate treatment, PARP inhibition promoted replication-independent accumulation of DSB, repair of which required Ligase IV. Our findings predict that the sensitizing effects of PARP inhibitors will be more pronounced in rapidly dividing and/or DNA repair defective tumors than normal tissues and show their potential to enhance the therapeutic ratio achieved by conventional DNA-damaging agents.

  6. Vitamin C for DNA damage prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sram, Radim J.; Binkova, Blanka; Rossner, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    The ability of vitamin C to affect genetic damage was reviewed in human studies that used molecular epidemiology methods, including analysis of DNA adducts, DNA strand breakage (using the Comet assay), oxidative damage measured as levels of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), cytogenetic analysis of chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei, and the induction of DNA repair proteins. The protective effect of vitamin C was observed at plasma levels > 50 μmol/l. Vitamin C supplementation decreased the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in groups with insufficient dietary intake who were occupationally exposed to mutagens, and also decreased the sensitivity to mutagens as assessed using the bleomycin assay. High vitamin C levels in plasma decreased the frequency of genomic translocations in groups exposed to ionizing radiation or c-PAHs in polluted air. The frequency of micronuclei was decreased by vitamin C supplementation in smokers challenged with γ-irradiation, and higher vitamin C levels in plasma counteracted the damage induced by air pollution. The prevalence of DNA adducts inversely correlated with vitamin C levels in groups environmentally exposed to high concentrations of c-PAHs. Increased vitamin C levels decreased DNA strand breakage induced by air pollution. Oxidative damage (8-oxodG levels) was decreased by vitamin C supplementation in groups with plasma levels > 50 μmol/l exposed to PM2.5 and c-PAHs. Modulation of DNA repair by vitamin C supplementation was observed both in poorly nourished subjects and in groups with vitamin C plasma levels > 50 μmol/l exposed to higher concentrations of c-PAHs. It is possible that the impact of vitamin C on DNA damage depends both on background values of vitamin C in the individual as well as on the level of exposure to xenobiotics or oxidative stress.

  7. Vitamin C for DNA damage prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sram, Radim J., E-mail: sram@biomed.cas.cz [Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 14220 Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Binkova, Blanka; Rossner, Pavel [Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 14220 Prague 4 (Czech Republic)

    2012-05-01

    The ability of vitamin C to affect genetic damage was reviewed in human studies that used molecular epidemiology methods, including analysis of DNA adducts, DNA strand breakage (using the Comet assay), oxidative damage measured as levels of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroxy-2 Prime -deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), cytogenetic analysis of chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei, and the induction of DNA repair proteins. The protective effect of vitamin C was observed at plasma levels > 50 {mu}mol/l. Vitamin C supplementation decreased the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in groups with insufficient dietary intake who were occupationally exposed to mutagens, and also decreased the sensitivity to mutagens as assessed using the bleomycin assay. High vitamin C levels in plasma decreased the frequency of genomic translocations in groups exposed to ionizing radiation or c-PAHs in polluted air. The frequency of micronuclei was decreased by vitamin C supplementation in smokers challenged with {gamma}-irradiation, and higher vitamin C levels in plasma counteracted the damage induced by air pollution. The prevalence of DNA adducts inversely correlated with vitamin C levels in groups environmentally exposed to high concentrations of c-PAHs. Increased vitamin C levels decreased DNA strand breakage induced by air pollution. Oxidative damage (8-oxodG levels) was decreased by vitamin C supplementation in groups with plasma levels > 50 {mu}mol/l exposed to PM2.5 and c-PAHs. Modulation of DNA repair by vitamin C supplementation was observed both in poorly nourished subjects and in groups with vitamin C plasma levels > 50 {mu}mol/l exposed to higher concentrations of c-PAHs. It is possible that the impact of vitamin C on DNA damage depends both on background values of vitamin C in the individual as well as on the level of exposure to xenobiotics or oxidative stress.

  8. Quantitative PCR analysis of diepoxybutane and epihalohydrin damage to nuclear versus mitochondrial DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaRiviere, Frederick J. [Department of Chemistry, Washington and Lee University, Lexington, VA 24450 (United States); Newman, Adam G.; Watts, Megan L.; Bradley, Sharonda Q.; Juskewitch, Justin E. [Department of Chemistry, Colby College, 5757 Mayflower Hill Drive, Waterville, ME 04901 (United States); Greenwood, Paul G. [Department of Biology, Colby College, Waterville, ME 04901 (United States); Millard, Julie T., E-mail: jtmillar@colby.edu [Department of Chemistry, Colby College, 5757 Mayflower Hill Drive, Waterville, ME 04901 (United States)

    2009-05-12

    The bifunctional alkylating agents diepoxybutane (DEB) and epichlorohydrin (ECH) are linked to the elevated incidence of certain cancers among workers in the synthetic polymer industry. Both compounds form interstrand cross-links within duplex DNA, an activity suggested to contribute to their cytotoxicity. To assess the DNA targeting of these compounds in vivo, we assayed for damage within chicken erythro-progenitor cells at three different sites: one within mitochondrial DNA, one within expressed nuclear DNA, and one within unexpressed nuclear DNA. We determined the degree of damage at each site via a quantitative polymerase chain reaction, which compares amplification of control, untreated DNA to that from cells exposed to the agent in question. We found that ECH and the related compound epibromohydrin preferentially target nuclear DNA relative to mitochondrial DNA, whereas DEB reacts similarly with the two genomes. Decreased reactivity of the mitochondrial genome could contribute to the reduced apoptotic potential of ECH relative to DEB. Additionally, formation of lesions by all agents occurred at comparable levels for unexpressed and expressed nuclear loci, suggesting that alkylation is unaffected by the degree of chromatin condensation.

  9. Quantitative PCR analysis of diepoxybutane and epihalohydrin damage to nuclear versus mitochondrial DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaRiviere, Frederick J.; Newman, Adam G.; Watts, Megan L.; Bradley, Sharonda Q.; Juskewitch, Justin E.; Greenwood, Paul G.; Millard, Julie T.

    2009-01-01

    The bifunctional alkylating agents diepoxybutane (DEB) and epichlorohydrin (ECH) are linked to the elevated incidence of certain cancers among workers in the synthetic polymer industry. Both compounds form interstrand cross-links within duplex DNA, an activity suggested to contribute to their cytotoxicity. To assess the DNA targeting of these compounds in vivo, we assayed for damage within chicken erythro-progenitor cells at three different sites: one within mitochondrial DNA, one within expressed nuclear DNA, and one within unexpressed nuclear DNA. We determined the degree of damage at each site via a quantitative polymerase chain reaction, which compares amplification of control, untreated DNA to that from cells exposed to the agent in question. We found that ECH and the related compound epibromohydrin preferentially target nuclear DNA relative to mitochondrial DNA, whereas DEB reacts similarly with the two genomes. Decreased reactivity of the mitochondrial genome could contribute to the reduced apoptotic potential of ECH relative to DEB. Additionally, formation of lesions by all agents occurred at comparable levels for unexpressed and expressed nuclear loci, suggesting that alkylation is unaffected by the degree of chromatin condensation.

  10. Synthesis and DNA cleavage activity of Bis-3-chloropiperidines as alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuravka, Ivonne; Roesmann, Rolf; Sosic, Alice; Wende, Wolfgang; Pingoud, Alfred; Gatto, Barbara; Göttlich, Richard

    2014-09-01

    Nitrogen mustards are an important class of bifunctional alkylating agents routinely used in chemotherapy. They react with DNA as electrophiles through the formation of highly reactive aziridinium ion intermediates. The antibiotic 593A, with potential antitumor activity, can be considered a naturally occurring piperidine mustard containing a unique 3-chloropiperidine ring. However, the total synthesis of this antibiotic proved to be rather challenging. With the aim of designing simplified analogues of this natural product, we developed an efficient bidirectional synthetic route to bis-3-chloropiperidines joined by flexible, conformationally restricted, or rigid diamine linkers. The key step involves an iodide-catalyzed double cyclization of unsaturated bis-N-chloroamines to simultaneously generate both piperidine rings. Herein we describe the synthesis and subsequent evaluation of a series of novel nitrogen-bridged bis-3-chloropiperidines, enabling the study of the impact of the linker structure on DNA alkylation properties. Our studies reveal that the synthesized compounds possess DNA alkylating abilities and induce strand cleavage, with a strong preference for guanine residues. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Increased susceptibility to chemotherapeutic alkylating agents of mice deficient in DNA repair methyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, A; Sakumi, K; Sekiguchi, M

    2000-10-01

    O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase plays vital roles in preventing induction of mutations and cancer as well as cell death related to alkylating agents. Mice defective in the MGMT: gene, encoding the methyltransferase, were used to evaluate cell death-inducing and tumorigenic activities of therapeutic agents which have alkylation potential. MGMT(-/-) mice were considerably more sensitive to dacarbazine, a monofunctional triazene, than were wild-type mice, in terms of survival. When dacarbazine was administered i.p. to 6-week-old mice and survival at 30 days was enumerated, LD(50) values of MGMT(-/-) and MGMT(+/+) mice were 20 and 450 mg/kg body wt, respectively. Increased sensitivity of MGMT(-/-) mice to 1-(4-amino-2-methyl-5-pyrimidinyl)methyl-3-(2-chloroethyl)-3-nitrosou rea (ACNU), a bifunctional nitrosourea, was also noted. On the other hand, there was no difference in survival of MGMT(+/+) and MGMT(-/-) mice exposed to cyclophosphamide, a bifunctional nitrogen mustard. It appears that dacarbazine and ACNU produce O(6)-alkylguanine as a major toxic lesion, while cyclophosphamide yields other types of modifications in DNA which are not subjected to the action of the methyltransferase. MGMT(-/-) mice seem to be less refractory to the tumor-inducing effect of dacarbazine than are MGMT(+/+) mice. Thus, the level of O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase activity is an important factor when determining susceptibility to drugs with the potential for alkylation.

  12. DNA damage response during mouse oocyte maturation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mayer, Alexandra; Baran, Vladimír; Sakakibara, Y.; Brzáková, Adéla; Ferencová, Ivana; Motlík, Jan; Kitajima, T.; Schultz, R. M.; Šolc, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 4 (2016), s. 546-558 ISSN 1538-4101 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12057; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : double strand DNA breaks * DNA damage * MRE11 * meiotic maturation * mouse oocytes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.530, year: 2016

  13. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    Several mechanisms are proposed for radiation damage to DNA and its constituents, and a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectrometry have been used to test the proposed mechanisms. In the past we have concentrated chiefly on investigating irradiated systems of DNA constituents. In this year's effort we have concentrated on radiation effects on DNA itself. In addition studies of radiation effects on lipids and model compounds have been performed which shed light on the only other proposed site for cell kill, the membrane

  14. Damage and repair of ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, David; Willerslev, Eske; Hansen, Anders

    2005-01-01

    degradation, these studies are limited to species that lived within the past 10(4)-10(5) years (Late Pleistocene), although DNA sequences from 10(6) years have been reported. Ancient DNA (aDNA) has been used to study phylogenetic relationships of protists, fungi, algae, plants, and higher eukaryotes...... such as extinct horses, cave bears, the marsupial wolf, the moa, and Neanderthal. In the past few years, this technology has been extended to the study of infectious disease in ancient Egyptian and South American mummies, the dietary habits of ancient animals, and agricultural practices and population dynamics......, and extensive degradation. In the course of this review, we will discuss the current aDNA literature describing the importance of aDNA studies as they relate to important biological questions and the difficulties associated with extracting useful information from highly degraded and damaged substrates derived...

  15. FIBER OPTIC BIOSENSOR FOR DNA DAMAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper describes a fiber optic biosensor for the rapid and sensitive detection of radiation-induced or chemically-induced oxidative DNA damage. The assay is based on the hybridization and temperature-induced dissociation (melting curves) of synthetic oligonucleotides. The...

  16. Experimental study of oxidative DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Steffen; Deng, Xin-Sheng; Tuo, Jingsheng

    1998-01-01

    Animal experiments allow the study of oxidative DNA damage in target organs and the elucidation of dose-response relationships of carcinogenic and other harmful chemicals and conditions as well as the study of interactions of several factors. So far the effects of more than 50 different chemical ...

  17. The Intertwined Roles of DNA Damage and Transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Di Palo, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage and transcription are two interconnected events. Transcription can induce damage and scheduled DNA damage can be required for transcription. Here, we analyzed genome-wide distribution of 8oxodG-marked oxidative DNA damage obtained by OxiDIP-Seq, and we found a correlation with transcription of protein coding genes.

  18. Sequence selectivity of azinomycin B in DNA alkylation and cross-linking: a QM/MM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilnathan, Dhurairajan; Kalaiselvan, Anbarasan; Venuvanalingam, Ponnambalam

    2013-01-01

    Azinomycin B--a well-known antitumor drug--forms cross-links with DNA through alkylation of purine bases and blocks tumor cell growth. This reaction has been modeled using the ONIOM (B3LYP/6-31+g(d):UFF) method to understand the mechanism and sequence selectivity. ONIOM results have been checked for reliability by comparing them with full quantum mechanics calculations for selected paths. Calculations reveal that, among the purine bases, guanine is more reactive and is alkylated by aziridine ring through the C10 position, followed by alkylation of the epoxide ring through the C21 position of Azinomycin B. While the mono alkylation is controlled kinetically, bis-alkylation is controlled thermodynamically. Solvent effects were included using polarized-continuum-model calculations and no significant change from gas phase results was observed.

  19. Bacterial mutagenicity and mammalian cell DNA damage by several substituted anilines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, D; Mazurek, J; Petzold, G; Bhuyan, B K

    1980-04-01

    Several substituted alkyl- and haloanilines were tested for their ability to mutate Salmonella typhimurium and to damage the DNA of mammalian (V79) cells. These results were correlated with their reported carcinogenicity. Of 9 suspected carcinogens, 4 were bacterial mutagens and 4 (out of 7 tested) damaged DNA of V79 cells. The following compounds were weakly mutagenic (less than 150 revertants/mumole): 4-fluoroaniline, 2,3-, 2,4-, 2,5- and 3,4-dimethylaniline, and 2-methyl-4-fluoroaniline. The following compounds were strong mutagens: 2,4,5-trimethylaniline, 2-methyl-4-chloro-, and 2-methyl-4-bromo-, 4-methyl-2-chloro-, 4-methyl-2-bromo- and 2-ethyl-4-chloroaniline. The compounds which damaged DNA in V79 cells were: 2 methyl-4-chloroaniline, 2-methyl-4-bromoaniline, 2,4,5- and 2,4,6-trimethylaniline.

  20. Progress on clustered DNA damage in radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Li'na; Zhang Hong; Di Cuixia; Zhang Qiuning; Wang Xiaohu

    2012-01-01

    Clustered DNA damage which caused by high LET heavy ion radiation can lead to mutation, tumorigenesis and apoptosis. Promoting apoptosis of cancer cells is always the basis of cancer treatment. Clustered DNA damage has been the hot topic in radiobiology. The detect method is diversity, but there is not a detail and complete protocol to analyze clustered DNA damage. In order to provide reference for clustered DNA damage in the radiotherapy study, the clustered DNA damage characteristics, the latest progresses on clustered DNA damage and the detecting methods are reviewed and discussed in detail in this paper. (authors)

  1. Non-random alkylation of DNA sequences induced in vivo by chemical mutagens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durante, M.; Geri, C.; Bonatti, S.; Parenti, R. (Universita di Pisa (Italy))

    1989-08-01

    Previous studies of the interaction of alkylating agents on the eukaryotic genome support the idea that induction of DNA adducts is at specific genomic sites. Here we show molecular and cytological evidence that alkylation is rather specific. Mammalian cell cultures were exposed to different doses of mutagens and the DNA was analyzed by density gradient ultracentrifugation, hydroxylapatite fractionation, and by restriction enzyme analysis. Studies with the labelled mutagens N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine show that there is a non-random distribution of the adducts. The adducts are found more frequently in A-T, G-C rich satellite DNA and highly repetitive sequences. Analysis with restriction enzymes shows that both methyl and ethyl groups influence the restriction patterns of the enzymes HpaII and MspI that recognize specific endogenous DNA methylation. These data suggest, as a subsequent mechanism, a modification in the pattern of the normal endogenous methylation of 5-methylcytosine.

  2. DNA damage and repair in mouse embryos following treatment transplacentally with methylnitrosourea and methylmethanesulfonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jirakulsomchok, S.; Yielding, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    Mouse embryos were labeled in vivo at 10 1/2-12 1/2 days of gestation with [ 3 H]-thymidine and subjected to DNA damage using x-ray, methylmethanesulfonate, or methylnitrosourea. DNA damage and its repair were assessed in specific cell preparations from embryos isolated at intervals thereafter using the highly sensitive method of nucleoid sedimentation, which evaluates the supercoiled state of the DNA. Repair of x-ray damage was demonstrated using trypsin-dispersed cells from whole embryos and from homogenized embryonic liver to show the validity of the analytical approach. The effects of the highly teratogenic methylnitrosourea and the much less teratogenic methylmethanesulfonate were compared in the targeted limb buds using equitoxic doses of the two alkylating agents. DNA supercoiling was fully restored after 24 hr in limb bud cells damaged with methylmethanesulfonate, while as much as 48 hr were required for full repair of methylnitrosourea damage. These results demonstrated the feasibility of studying DNA repair in embryonic tissues after damage in vivo and suggest that the potency of methylnitrosourea as a teratogen may be correlated with a prolonged period required for complete repair of DNA

  3. ALKBH7 drives a tissue and sex-specific necrotic cell death response following alkylation-induced damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jennifer J; Chhim, Sophea; Margulies, Carrie M; Allocca, Mariacarmela; Bronson, Roderick T; Klungland, Arne; Samson, Leona D; Fu, Dragony

    2017-01-01

    Regulated necrosis has emerged as a major cell death mechanism in response to different forms of physiological and pharmacological stress. The AlkB homolog 7 (ALKBH7) protein is required for regulated cellular necrosis in response to chemotherapeutic alkylating agents but its role within a whole organism is unknown. Here, we show that ALKBH7 modulates alkylation-induced cellular death through a tissue and sex-specific mechanism. At the whole-animal level, we find that ALKBH7 deficiency confers increased resistance to MMS-induced toxicity in male but not female mice. Moreover, ALKBH7-deficient mice exhibit protection against alkylation-mediated cytotoxicity in retinal photoreceptor and cerebellar granule cells, two cell types that undergo necrotic death through the initiation of the base excision repair pathway and hyperactivation of the PARP1/ARTD1 enzyme. Notably, the protection against alkylation-induced cerebellar degeneration is specific to ALKBH7-deficient male but not female mice. Our results uncover an in vivo role for ALKBH7 in mediating a sexually dimorphic tissue response to alkylation damage that could influence individual responses to chemotherapies based upon alkylating agents. PMID:28726787

  4. Protein Recognition in Drug-Induced DNA Alkylation: When the Moonlight Protein GAPDH Meets S23906-1/DNA Minor Groove Adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savreux-Lenglet, Gaëlle; Depauw, Sabine; David-Cordonnier, Marie-Hélène

    2015-11-05

    DNA alkylating drugs have been used in clinics for more than seventy years. The diversity of their mechanism of action (major/minor groove; mono-/bis-alkylation; intra-/inter-strand crosslinks; DNA stabilization/destabilization, etc.) has undoubtedly major consequences on the cellular response to treatment. The aim of this review is to highlight the variety of established protein recognition of DNA adducts to then particularly focus on glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) function in DNA adduct interaction with illustration using original experiments performed with S23906-1/DNA adduct. The introduction of this review is a state of the art of protein/DNA adducts recognition, depending on the major or minor groove orientation of the DNA bonding as well as on the molecular consequences in terms of double-stranded DNA maintenance. It reviews the implication of proteins from both DNA repair, transcription, replication and chromatin maintenance in selective DNA adduct recognition. The main section of the manuscript is focusing on the implication of the moonlighting protein GAPDH in DNA adduct recognition with the model of the peculiar DNA minor groove alkylating and destabilizing drug S23906-1. The mechanism of action of S23906-1 alkylating drug and the large variety of GAPDH cellular functions are presented prior to focus on GAPDH direct binding to S23906-1 adducts.

  5. N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase inhibits p53-mediated cell cycle arrest and coordinates with p53 to determine sensitivity to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shanshan; Xing, Guichun; Yuan, Lin; Wang, Jian; Wang, Shan; Yin, Yuxin; Tian, Chunyan; He, Fuchu; Zhang, Lingqiang

    2012-08-01

    Alkylating agents induce genome-wide base damage, which is repaired mainly by N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase (MPG). An elevated expression of MPG in certain types of tumor cells confers higher sensitivity to alkylation agents because MPG-induced apurinic/apyrimidic (AP) sites trigger more strand breaks. However, the determinant of drug sensitivity or insensitivity still remains unclear. Here, we report that the p53 status coordinates with MPG to play a pivotal role in such process. MPG expression is positive in breast, lung and colon cancers (38.7%, 43.4% and 25.3%, respectively) but negative in all adjacent normal tissues. MPG directly binds to the tumor suppressor p53 and represses p53 activity in unstressed cells. The overexpression of MPG reduced, whereas depletion of MPG increased, the expression levels of pro-arrest gene downstream of p53 including p21, 14-3-3σ and Gadd45 but not proapoptotic ones. The N-terminal region of MPG was specifically required for the interaction with the DNA binding domain of p53. Upon DNA alkylation stress, in p53 wild-type tumor cells, p53 dissociated from MPG and induced cell growth arrest. Then, AP sites were repaired efficiently, which led to insensitivity to alkylating agents. By contrast, in p53-mutated cells, the AP sites were repaired with low efficacy. To our knowledge, this is the first direct evidence to show that a DNA repair enzyme functions as a selective regulator of p53, and these findings provide new insights into the functional linkage between MPG and p53 in cancer therapy.

  6. DNA damage, homology-directed repair, and DNA methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concetta Cuozzo

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available To explore the link between DNA damage and gene silencing, we induced a DNA double-strand break in the genome of Hela or mouse embryonic stem (ES cells using I-SceI restriction endonuclease. The I-SceI site lies within one copy of two inactivated tandem repeated green fluorescent protein (GFP genes (DR-GFP. A total of 2%-4% of the cells generated a functional GFP by homology-directed repair (HR and gene conversion. However, approximately 50% of these recombinants expressed GFP poorly. Silencing was rapid and associated with HR and DNA methylation of the recombinant gene, since it was prevented in Hela cells by 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. ES cells deficient in DNA methyl transferase 1 yielded as many recombinants as wild-type cells, but most of these recombinants expressed GFP robustly. Half of the HR DNA molecules were de novo methylated, principally downstream to the double-strand break, and half were undermethylated relative to the uncut DNA. Methylation of the repaired gene was independent of the methylation status of the converting template. The methylation pattern of recombinant molecules derived from pools of cells carrying DR-GFP at different loci, or from an individual clone carrying DR-GFP at a single locus, was comparable. ClustalW analysis of the sequenced GFP molecules in Hela and ES cells distinguished recombinant and nonrecombinant DNA solely on the basis of their methylation profile and indicated that HR superimposed novel methylation profiles on top of the old patterns. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and RNA analysis revealed that DNA methyl transferase 1 was bound specifically to HR GFP DNA and that methylation of the repaired segment contributed to the silencing of GFP expression. Taken together, our data support a mechanistic link between HR and DNA methylation and suggest that DNA methylation in eukaryotes marks homologous recombined segments.

  7. Complementarily addressed modification and cleavage of a single-stranded fragment of DNA with the aid of alkylating derivatives of oligonucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brosalina, E.B.; Vlasov, V.V.; Kutyavin, I.V.; Mamaev, S.V.; Pletnev, A.G.; Podyminogin, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    The chemical modification of a 303-nucleotide single-stranded fragment of DNA by alkylating oligonucleotide derivatives bearing 4-[N-methyl-N-(2-chloroethyl)amino]benzyl groups in the 5'-terminal phosphate of the 3'-terminal ribose residue has been investigated. It has been shown that under the conditions of the formation of a complex with the DNA fragment both types of derivatives specifically alkylate nucleotides of the DNA fragments that are located directly adjacent to the sections complementary to the oligonucleotides bearing the reactive groups. Alkylation takes place with a high efficiency, and the DNA fragment can be cleaved specifically at the position of the alkylated nucleotides

  8. Mutagenesis by alkylating agents: coding properties for DNA polymerase of poly (dC) template containing 3-methylcytosine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boiteux, S.; Laval, J. (Institut Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France))

    After treatment of poly(dC) by the simple alkylating agent (/sup 3/H)dimethylsulfate, 90 percent of the radioactivity cochromatographed with 3-methylcytosine and 10 percent with 5-methylcytosine which is the normally occurring methylated base. In order to study the influence of 3-methylcytosine on DNA replication, untreated and MDS-treated poly(dC) were used as templates for E. coli DNA polymerase I. The alkylation of poly(dC) inhibits DNA chain elongation, and does not induce any mispairing under high fidelity conditions. The alteration of DNA polymerase I fidelity by manganese ions allows some replication of 3-methylcytosine which mispairs with either dAMP or dTMP. Our results suggest that 3-methylcytosine could be responsible, at least partially, for killing and the mutagenesis observed after cell treatment by alkylating agents.

  9. Effect of ionic strength and cationic DNA affinity binders on the DNA sequence selective alkylation of guanine N7-positions by nitrogen mustards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, J.A.; Forrow, S.M.; Souhami, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    Large variations in alkylation intensities exist among guanines in a DNA sequence following treatment with chemotherapeutic alkylating agents such as nitrogen mustards, and the substituent attached to the reactive group can impose a distinct sequence preference for reaction. In order to understand further the structural and electrostatic factors which determine the sequence selectivity of alkylation reactions, the effect of increase ionic strength, the intercalator ethidium bromide, AT-specific minor groove binders distamycin A and netropsin, and the polyamine spermine on guanine N7-alkylation by L-phenylalanine mustard (L-Pam), uracil mustard (UM), and quinacrine mustard (QM) was investigated with a modification of the guanine-specific chemical cleavage technique for DNA sequencing. The result differed with both the nitrogen mustard and the cationic agent used. The effect, which resulted in both enhancement and suppression of alkylation sites, was most striking in the case of netropsin and distamycin A, which differed from each other. DNA footprinting indicated that selective binding to AT sequences in the minor groove of DNA can have long-range effects on the alkylation pattern of DNA in the major groove

  10. A Short Review on the Synthetic Strategies of Duocarmycin Analogs that are Powerful DNA Alkylating Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Pravin C; Satam, Vijay; Lee, Moses

    2015-01-01

    The duocarmycins and CC-1065 are members of a class of DNA minor groove, AT-sequence selective, and adenine-N3 alkylating agents, isolated from Streptomyces sp. that exhibit extremely potent cytotoxicity against the growth of cancer cells grown in culture. Initial synthesis and structural modification of the cyclopropa[c] pyrrolo[3,2-e]indole (CPI) DNA-alkylating motif as well as the indole non-covalent binding region in the 1980s have led to several compounds that entered clinical trials as potential anticancer drugs. However, due to significant systemic toxicity none of the analogs have passed clinical evaluation. As a result, the intensity in the design, synthesis, and development of novel analogs of the duocarmycins has continued. Accordingly, in this review, which covers a period from the 1990s through the present time, the design and synthesis of duocarmycin SA are described along with the synthesis of novel and highly cytotoxic analogs that lack the chiral center. Examples of achiral analogs of duocarmycin SA described in this review include seco-DUMSA (39 and 40), seco-amino-CBI-TMI (13, Centanamycin), and seco-hydroxy-CBI-TMI (14). In addition, another novel class of biologically active duocarmycin SA analogs that contained the seco-iso-cyclopropylfurano[2,3-e]indoline (seco-iso-CFI) and seco-cyclopropyltetrahydrofurano[2,3-f]quinoline (seco-CFQ) DNA alkylating submit was also designed and synthesized. The synthesis of seco-iso-CFI-TMI (10, Tafuramycin A) and seco-CFQ-TMI (11, Tafuramycin B) is included in this review.

  11. Inducible Alkylation of DNA by a Quinone Methide-Peptide Nucleic Acid Conjugate†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Rokita, Steven E.

    2012-01-01

    The reversibility of alkylation by a quinone methide intermediate (QM) avoids the irreversible consumption that plagues most reagents based on covalent chemistry and allows for site specific reaction that is controlled by the thermodynamics rather than kinetics of target association. This characteristic was originally examined with an oligonucleotide QM conjugate but broad application depends on alternative derivatives that are compatible with a cellular environment. Now, a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) derivative has been constructed and shown to exhibit an equivalent ability to delivery the reactive QM in a controlled manner. This new conjugate demonstrates high selectivity for a complementary sequence of DNA even when challenged with an alternative sequence containing a single T/T mismatch. Alkylation of non-complementary sequences is only possible when a template strand is present to co-localize the conjugate and its target. For efficient alkylation in this example, a single-stranded region of the target is required adjacent to the QM conjugate. Most importantly, the intrastrand self adducts formed between the PNA and its attached QM remained active and reversible over more than eight days in aqueous solution prior to reaction with a chosen target added subsequently. PMID:22243337

  12. Immunochemical detection of oxidatively damaged DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rössner ml., Pavel; Šrám, Radim

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 4 (2012), s. 492-522 ISSN 1071-5762 R&D Projects: GA MŽP(CZ) SP/1B3/50/07; GA MŠk 2B08005; GA ČR GAP503/11/0084 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : oxidative DNA damage * ELISA * immunohistochemistry Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 3.279, year: 2012

  13. DNA repair by MGMT, but not AAG, causes a threshold in alkylation-induced colorectal carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrer, Jörg; Frisch, Janina; Nagel, Georg; Kraus, Alexander; Dörsam, Bastian; Thomas, Adam D; Reißig, Sonja; Waisman, Ari; Kaina, Bernd

    2015-10-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that N-nitroso compounds (NOC) are causally linked to colorectal cancer (CRC). NOC induce DNA alkylations, including O (6)-methylguanine (O (6)-MeG) and N-methylated purines, which are repaired by O (6)-MeG-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and N-alkyladenine-DNA glycosylase (AAG)-initiated base excision repair, respectively. In view of recent evidence of nonlinear mutagenicity for NOC-like compounds, the question arises as to the existence of threshold doses in CRC formation. Here, we set out to determine the impact of DNA repair on the dose-response of alkylation-induced CRC. DNA repair proficient (WT) and deficient (Mgmt (-/-), Aag (-/-) and Mgmt (-/-)/Aag (-/-)) mice were treated with azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sodium sulfate to trigger CRC. Tumors were quantified by non-invasive mini-endoscopy. A non-linear increase in CRC formation was observed in WT and Aag (-/-) mice. In contrast, a linear dose-dependent increase in tumor frequency was found in Mgmt (-/-) and Mgmt (-/-)/Aag (-/-) mice. The data were corroborated by hockey stick modeling, yielding similar carcinogenic thresholds for WT and Aag (-/-) and no threshold for MGMT lacking mice. O (6)-MeG levels and depletion of MGMT correlated well with the observed dose-response in CRC formation. AOM induced dose-dependently DNA double-strand breaks in colon crypts including Lgr5-positive colon stem cells, which coincided with ATR-Chk1-p53 signaling. Intriguingly, Mgmt (-/-) mice displayed significantly enhanced levels of γ-H2AX, suggesting the usefulness of γ-H2AX as an early genotoxicity marker in the colorectum. This study demonstrates for the first time a non-linear dose-response for alkylation-induced colorectal carcinogenesis and reveals DNA repair by MGMT, but not AAG, as a key node in determining a carcinogenic threshold. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Sequence-specific DNA alkylation targeting for Kras codon 13 mutation by pyrrole-imidazole polyamide seco-CBI conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rhys Dylan; Asamitsu, Sefan; Takenaka, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Makoto; Hashiya, Kaori; Kawamoto, Yusuke; Bando, Toshikazu; Nagase, Hiroki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-01-27

    Hairpin N-methylpyrrole-N-methylimidazole polyamide seco-CBI conjugates 2-6 were designed for synthesis by Fmoc solid-phase synthesis, and their DNA-alkylating activities against the Kras codon 13 mutation were compared by high-resolution denaturing gel electrophoresis with 225 base pair (bp) DNA fragments. Conjugate 5 had high reactivity towards the Kras codon 13 mutation site, with alkylation occurring at the A of the sequence 5'-ACGTCACCA-3' (site 2), including minor 1 bp-mismatch alkylation against wild type 5'-ACGCCACCA-3' (site 3). Conjugate 6, which differs from conjugate 5 by exchanging one Py unit with a β unit, showed high selectivity but only weakly alkylated the A of 5'-ACGTCACCA-3' (site 2). The hairpin polyamide seco-CBI conjugate 5 thus alkylates according to Dervan's pairing rule with the pairing recognition which β/β pair targets T-A and A-T pairs. SPR and a computer-minimized model suggest that 5 binds to the target sequence with high affinity in a hairpin conformation, allowing for efficient DNA alkylation. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. DNA damages induced by Ar F laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapel, C.; Rose, S.; Chevrier, L.; Cordier, E.; Courant, D. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Dept. de Radiobiologie et de Radiopathologie

    2006-07-01

    The photo ablation process used in corneal refractive surgery by the Argon Fluoride (Ar F) laser emitting in ultraviolet C at 193 nm, exposes viable cells round the irradiated zone to sub ablative doses (< 400 joules.m -2). Despite that DNA absorption is higher at 193 nm than 254 nm, cytotoxicity of 193 nm laser radiation is lower than radiation emitted by 254 nm UV-C lamps. In situ, DNA could be protected of laser radiation by cellular components. Consequently, some authors consider that this radiation does not induce genotoxic effect whereas others suspect it to be mutagenic. These lasers are used for fifteen years but many questions remain concerning the long term effects on adjacent cells to irradiated area. The purpose of this study is to describe the effect of 193 nm laser radiation on DNA of stromal keratocytes which are responsible of the corneal structure. The 193 nm laser irradiation induces directly DNA breakage in keratocytes as it has been shown by the comet assay under alkaline conditions. Two hours post irradiation, damages caused by the highest exposure (150 J.m-2) are not repaired as it has been measured with the Olive Tail Moment (product of tail length and tail DNA content). They give partly evidence of induction of an apoptotic process in cells where DNA could be too damaged. In order to characterize specifically double strand breaks, a comparative analysis by immunofluorescence of the H2 Ax histone phosphorylation (H2 Ax) has been performed on irradiated keratocytes and unirradiated keratocytes. Results show a dose dependent increase of the number of H2 Ax positive cells. Consequences of unrepaired DNA lesions could be observed by the generation of micronuclei in cells. Results show again an increase of micronuclei in laser irradiated cells. Chromosomal aberrations have been pointed out by cytogenetic methods 30 mn after irradiation. These aberrations are dose dependent (from 10 to 150 J.m-2). The number of breakage decreases in the long run

  16. Crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase protein clusters assembled on to damaged DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miggiano, Riccardo; Perugino, Giuseppe; Ciaramella, Maria; Serpe, Mario; Rejman, Dominik; Páv, Ondřej; Pohl, Radek; Garavaglia, Silvia; Lahiri, Samarpita; Rizzi, Menico; Rossi, Franca

    2016-01-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MtOGT) contributes to protect the bacterial GC-rich genome against the pro-mutagenic potential of O(6)-methylated guanine in DNA. Several strains of M. tuberculosis found worldwide encode a point-mutated O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (OGT) variant (MtOGT-R37L), which displays an arginine-to-leucine substitution at position 37 of the poorly functionally characterized N-terminal domain of the protein. Although the impact of this mutation on the MtOGT activity has not yet been proved in vivo, we previously demonstrated that a recombinant MtOGT-R37L variant performs a suboptimal alkylated-DNA repair in vitro, suggesting a direct role for the Arg(37)-bearing region in catalysis. The crystal structure of MtOGT complexed with modified DNA solved in the present study reveals details of the protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions occurring during alkylated-DNA binding, and the protein capability also to host unmodified bases inside the active site, in a fully extrahelical conformation. Our data provide the first experimental picture at the atomic level of a possible mode of assembling three adjacent MtOGT monomers on the same monoalkylated dsDNA molecule, and disclose the conformational flexibility of discrete regions of MtOGT, including the Arg(37)-bearing random coil. This peculiar structural plasticity of MtOGT could be instrumental to proper protein clustering at damaged DNA sites, as well as to protein-DNA complexes disassembling on repair. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  17. Mechanisms of dealing with DNA damage in terminally differentiated cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortini, P. [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Dogliotti, E., E-mail: eugenia.dogliotti@iss.it [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy)

    2010-03-01

    To protect genomic integrity living cells that are continuously exposed to DNA-damaging insults are equipped with an efficient defence mechanism termed the DNA damage response. Its function is to eliminate DNA damage through DNA repair and to remove damaged cells by apoptosis. The DNA damage response has been investigated mainly in proliferating cells, in which the cell cycle machinery is integrated with the DNA damage signalling. The current knowledge of the mechanisms of DNA repair, DNA damage signalling and cell death of post-mitotic cells that have undergone irreversible cell cycle withdrawal will be reviewed. Evidence will be provided that the protection of the genome integrity in terminally differentiated cells is achieved by different strategies than in proliferating cells.

  18. Mechanisms of dealing with DNA damage in terminally differentiated cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortini, P.; Dogliotti, E.

    2010-01-01

    To protect genomic integrity living cells that are continuously exposed to DNA-damaging insults are equipped with an efficient defence mechanism termed the DNA damage response. Its function is to eliminate DNA damage through DNA repair and to remove damaged cells by apoptosis. The DNA damage response has been investigated mainly in proliferating cells, in which the cell cycle machinery is integrated with the DNA damage signalling. The current knowledge of the mechanisms of DNA repair, DNA damage signalling and cell death of post-mitotic cells that have undergone irreversible cell cycle withdrawal will be reviewed. Evidence will be provided that the protection of the genome integrity in terminally differentiated cells is achieved by different strategies than in proliferating cells.

  19. Chromatin remodeling in the UV-induced DNA damage response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ö.Z. Aydin (Özge)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ DNA damage interferes with transcription and replication, causing cell death, chromosomal aberrations or mutations, eventually leading to aging and tumorigenesis (Hoeijmakers, 2009). The integrity of DNA is protected by a network of DNA repair and associated

  20. CC-1065 and the duocarmycins: unraveling the keys to a new class of naturally derived DNA alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boger, D L; Johnson, D S

    1995-01-01

    Key studies defining the DNA alkylation properties and selectivity of a new class of exceptionally potent, naturally occurring antitumor antibiotics including CC-1065, duocarmycin A, and duocarmycin SA are reviewed. Recent studies conducted with synthetic agents containing deep-seated structural changes and the unnatural enantiomers of the natural products and related analogs have defined the structural basis for the sequence-selective alkylation of duplex DNA and fundamental relationships between chemical structure, functional reactivity, and biological properties. The agents undergo a reversible, stereoelectronically controlled adenine-N3 addition to the least substituted carbon of the activated cyclopropane within selected AT-rich sites. The preferential AT-rich non-covalent binding selectivity of the agents within the narrower, deeper AT-rich minor groove and the steric accessibility to the alkylation site that accompanies deep AT-rich minor groove penetration control the sequence-selective DNA alkylation reaction and stabilize the resulting adduct. For the agents that possess sufficient reactivity to alkylate DNA, a direct relationship between chemical or functional stability and biological potency has been defined. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7731958

  1. Profiling the nucleobase and structure selectivity of anticancer drugs and other DNA alkylating agents by RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillingham, Dennis; Sauter, Basilius

    2018-05-06

    Drugs that covalently modify DNA are components of most chemotherapy regimens, often serving as first-line treatments. Classically the chemical reactivity of DNA alkylators has been determined in vitro with short oligonucleotides. Here we use next generation RNA sequencing to report on the chemoselectivity of alkylating agents. We develop the method with the well-known clinically used DNA modifiying drugs streptozotocin and temozolomide, and then apply the technique to profile RNA modification with uncharacterized alkylation reactions such as with powerful electrophiles like trimethylsilyldiazomethane. The multiplexed and massively parallel format of NGS offers analyses of chemical reactivity in nucleic acids to be accomplished in less time with greater statistical power. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Overexpression of the DNA mismatch repair factor, PMS2, confers hypermutability and DNA damage tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Shannon L; Narayanan, Latha; Hegan, Denise Campisi; Buermeyer, Andrew B; Liskay, R Michael; Glazer, Peter M

    2006-12-08

    Inherited defects in genes associated with DNA mismatch repair (MMR) have been linked to familial colorectal cancer. Cells deficient in MMR are genetically unstable and demonstrate a tolerance phenotype in response to certain classes of DNA damage. Some sporadic human cancers also show abnormalities in MMR gene function, typically due to diminished expression of one of the MutL homologs, MLH1. Here, we report that overexpression of the MutL homolog, human PMS2, can also cause a disruption of the MMR pathway in mammalian cells, resulting in hypermutability and DNA damage tolerance. A mouse fibroblast cell line carrying a recoverable lambda phage shuttle vector for mutation detection was transfected with either a vector designed to express hPMS2 or with an empty vector control. Cells overexpressing hPMS2 were found to have elevated spontaneous mutation frequencies at the cII reporter gene locus. They also showed an increase in the level of mutations induced by the alkylating agent, methynitrosourea (MNU). Clonogenic survival assays demonstrated increased survival of the PMS2-overexpressing cells following exposure to MNU, consistent with the induction of a damage tolerance phenotype. Similar results were seen in cells expressing a mutant PMS2 gene, containing a premature stop codon at position 134 and representing a variant found in an individual with familial colon cancer. These results show that dysregulation of PMS2 gene expression can disrupt MMR function in mammalian cells and establish an additional carcinogenic mechanism by which cells can develop genetic instability and acquire resistance to cytotoxic cancer therapies.

  3. Antibody Drug Conjugates Differentiate Uptake and DNA Alkylation of Pyrrolobenzodiazepines in Tumors from Organs of Xenograft Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yong; Khojasteh, S Cyrus; Hop, Cornelis E C A; Erickson, Hans K; Polson, Andrew; Pillow, Thomas H; Yu, Shang-Fan; Wang, Hong; Dragovich, Peter S; Zhang, Donglu

    2016-12-01

    Pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD)-dimer is a DNA minor groove alkylator, and its CD22 THIOMAB antibody drug conjugate (ADC) demonstrated, through a disulfide linker, an efficacy in tumor reduction for more than 7 weeks with minimal body weight loss in xenograft mice after a single 0.5-1 mg/kg i.v. dose. The DNA alkylation was investigated here in tumors and healthy organs of mice to understand the sustained efficacy and tolerability. The experimental procedures included the collection of tumors and organ tissues of xenograft mice treated with the ADC followed by DNA isolation/hydrolysis/quantitation and payload recovery from reversible DNA alkylation. PBD-dimer formed a considerable amount of adducts with tissue DNA, representing approximately 98% (at 24 hours), and 99% (at 96 hours) of the total PBD-dimer in tumors, and 78-89% in liver and lung tissues, suggesting highly efficient covalent binding of the released PBD-dimer to tissue DNA. The amount of PBD-DNA adducts in tumor tissues was approximately 24-fold (at 24 hours) and 70-fold (at 96 hours) greater than the corresponding amount of adducts in liver and lung tissues. In addition, the DNA alkylation levels increased 3-fold to 4-fold from 24 to 96 hours in tumors [41/10 6 base pairs (bp) at 96 hours] but remained at the same level (1/10 6 bp) in livers and lungs. These results support the typical target-mediated cumulative uptake of ADC into tumors and payload release that offers an explanation for its sustained antitumor efficacy. In addition, the low level of DNA alkylation in normal tissues is consistent with the tolerability observed in mice. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  4. Poly (ADP-ribose) catabolism in mammalian cells exposed to DNA-damaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez-Gonzalez, R.; Althaus, F.R.

    1989-01-01

    DNA damage inflicted by the alkylating agens N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoquanidine, or by UV stimulated the catabolism of protein-bound poly (ADP-ribose) in the chromatin of cultured hepatocytes. The stimulation was highest at the largest doses of DNA-damaging treatment. As a consequence, the half-life of ADP-ribosyl polymers may drop to less than 41 s. This rapid turnover contrasts with the slow catabolism of a constitutive fraction of polymers exhibiting a half-life of 7.7 h. These data suggest that post-incisional stimulation of poly (ADP-ribose) biosynthesis in DNA-excision repair is coupled with an adaptation of poly (ADP-ribose) catabolism in mammalian cells. (Author). 37 refs.; 3 figs

  5. Inflammation, oxidative DNA damage, and carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, J.G.; Adams, D.O.

    1987-01-01

    Inflammation has long been associated with carcinogenesis, especially in the promotion phase. The mechanism of action of the potent inflammatory agent and skin promoter 12-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) is unknown. It is though that TPA selectively enhances the growth of initiated cells, and during this process, initiated cells progress to the preneoplastic state and eventually to the malignant phenotype. The authors and others have proposed that TPA may work, in part, by inciting inflammation and stimulating inflammatory cells to release powerful oxidants which then induce DNA damage in epidermal cells. Macrophages cocultured with target cells and TPA induce oxidized thymine bases in the target cells. This process is inhibited by both catalase and inhibitors of lipoxygenases, suggesting the involvement of both H 2 O 2 and oxidized lipid products. In vivo studies demonstrated that SENCAR mice, which are sensitive to promotion by TPA, have a more intense inflammatory reaction in skin that C57LB/6 mice, which are resistant to promotion by TPA. In addition, macrophages from SENCAR mice release more H 2 O 2 and metabolites of AA, and induce more oxidative DNA damage in cocultured cells than macrophages from C57LB/6 mice. These data support the hypothesis that inflammation and the release of genotoxic oxidants may be one mechanism whereby initiated cells receive further genetic insults. They also further complicate risk assessment by suggesting that some environmental agents may work indirectly by subverting host systems to induce damage rather than maintaining homeostasis

  6. Epigenetic and genetic factors in the cellular response to radiations and DNA-damaging chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.R.; D'Arpa, P.

    1981-01-01

    DNA-damaging agents are widely used as therapeutic tools for a variety of disease states. Many such agents are considered to produce detrimental side effects. Thus, it is important to evaluate both therapeutic efficacy and potential risk. DNA-damaging agents can be so evaluated by comparison to agents whose therapeutic benefit and potential hazards are better known. We propose a framework for such comparison, demonstrating that a simple transformation of cytotoxicity-dose response patterns permits a facile comparison of variation between cells exposed to a single DNA-damaging agent or to different cytotoxic agents. Further, by transforming data from experiments which compare responses of 2 cell populations to an effects ratio, different patterns for the changes in cytotoxicity produced by epigenetic and genetic factors were compared. Using these transformations, we found that there is a wide variation (a factor of 4) between laboratories for a single agent (UVC) and only a slightly larger variation (factor of 6) between normal cell response for different types of DNA-damaging agents (x-ray, UVC, alkylating agents, crosslinking agents). Epigenetic factors such as repair and recovery appear to be a factor only at higher dose levels. Comparison in the cytotoxic effect of a spectrum of DNA-damaging agents in xeroderma pigmentosum, ataxia telangiectasia, and Fanconi's anemia cells indicates significantly different patterns, implying that the effect, and perhaps the nature, of these genetic conditions are quite different

  7. Radiation damage to DNA in DNA-protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spotheim-Maurizot, M; Davídková, M

    2011-06-03

    The most aggressive product of water radiolysis, the hydroxyl (OH) radical, is responsible for the indirect effect of ionizing radiations on DNA in solution and aerobic conditions. According to radiolytic footprinting experiments, the resulting strand breaks and base modifications are inhomogeneously distributed along the DNA molecule irradiated free or bound to ligands (polyamines, thiols, proteins). A Monte-Carlo based model of simulation of the reaction of OH radicals with the macromolecules, called RADACK, allows calculating the relative probability of damage of each nucleotide of DNA irradiated alone or in complexes with proteins. RADACK calculations require the knowledge of the three dimensional structure of DNA and its complexes (determined by X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy or molecular modeling). The confrontation of the calculated values with the results of the radiolytic footprinting experiments together with molecular modeling calculations show that: (1) the extent and location of the lesions are strongly dependent on the structure of DNA, which in turns is modulated by the base sequence and by the binding of proteins and (2) the regions in contact with the protein can be protected against the attack by the hydroxyl radicals via masking of the binding site and by scavenging of the radicals. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Probing Conformational Changes in Human DNA Topoisomerase IIα by Pulsed Alkylation Mass Spectrometry*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-tsung; Collins, Tammy R. L.; Guan, Ziqiang; Chen, Vincent B.; Hsieh, Tao-Shih

    2012-01-01

    Type II topoisomerases are essential enzymes for solving DNA topological problems by passing one segment of DNA duplex through a transient double-strand break in a second segment. The reaction requires the enzyme to precisely control DNA cleavage and gate opening coupled with ATP hydrolysis. Using pulsed alkylation mass spectrometry, we were able to monitor the solvent accessibilities around 13 cysteines distributed throughout human topoisomerase IIα by measuring the thiol reactivities with monobromobimane. Most of the measured reactivities are in accordance with the predicted ones based on a homology structural model generated from available crystal structures. However, these results reveal new information for both the residues not covered in the structural model and potential differences between the modeled and solution holoenzyme structures. Furthermore, on the basis of the reactivity changes of several cysteines located at the N-gate and DNA gate, we could monitor the movement of topoisomerase II in the presence of cofactors and detect differences in the DNA gate between two closed clamp enzyme conformations locked by either 5′-adenylyl β,γ-imidodiphosphate or the anticancer drug ICRF-193. PMID:22679013

  9. Solar radiation and mitochondrial DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, H.Z.; Locitzer, J.; Nassrin, E.; Ogbonnaya, A.; Hubbard, K.

    2003-01-01

    The 16.6 kB human mitochondrial DNA contains two homologous 13 base pair direct repeats separated by about 5 kB. During asynchronous mitochondrial DNA replication, the distant repeat sequences are thought to anneal, resulting in the looping out of a portion of the non-template strand which is subsequently deleted as a result of interaction with reactive oxygen species (ROS). A normal daughter and a deleted daughter mitochondrion result from such insults. This deletion has been termed the common deletion as it is the most frequent of the known mitochondrial DNA deletions. The common deletion is present in high frequency in several mitochondrial disorders, accumulates with age in slow turnover tissues and is increased in sun-exposed skin. Berneburg, et al. (Photochem. Photobiol. 66: 271, 1997) induced the common deletion in normal human fibroblasts after repeated exposures to UVA. In this study, the common deletion has been shown to be induced by repeated non-lethal exposures to FS20 sunlamp irradiation. Increases in the common deletion were demonstrated using nested PCR which produced a 303 bp product that was compared to a 324 bp product that required the presence of the undeleted 5 kB region. The cells were exposed to 10 repeated doses ranging from 0.5 (UVB) - 0.24 (UVA) J/sq m to 14.4 (UVB) - 5.8 J/sq m (UVA) measured using a UVX digital radiometer and UVB and UVA detectors respectively. Comparison with the earlier study by Berneberg, et al. suggests that this type of simulated solar damage is considerably more effective in fewer exposures than UVA radiation alone. The common deletion provides a cytoplasmic end-point for ROS damage produced by low dose chronic irradiations and other low level toxic exposures and should prove useful in evaluating cytoplasmic damage produced by ionizing radiation as well

  10. DNA methylation in human fibroblasts following DNA damage and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastan, M.B.

    1984-01-01

    Methylation of deoxycytidine (dCyd) incorporated by DNA excision repair synthesis in human diploid fibroblasts following damage with ultraviolet radiation (UV), N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, or N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene was studied utilizing [6- 3 H]dCyd to label repaired DNA specifically and high performance liquid chromatographic analysis to quantify the percentage of deoxycytidine converted to 5-methyldeoxycytidine (m 5 dCyd). In confluent, nondividing cells, methylation in repair patches induced by all three agents is slow and incomplete. Whereas after DNA replication a level of 3.4% m 5 dCyd is reached in less than 2 hours, following UV-stimulated repair synthesis in confluent cells it takes about 3 days to reach a level of approx.2.0% m 5 dCyd in the repair patch. This undermethylation of repair patches occurs throughout the genome. In cells from cultures in logarithmic-phase growth, m 5 dCyd formation in UV-induced repair patches occurs faster and to a greater extent, reaching a level of approx.2.7% in 10-20 hours. Pre-existing hypomethylated repair patches in confluent cells are methylated further when the cells are stimulated to divide; however, the repair patch may still not be fully methylated before cell division occurs. Thus DNA damage and repair may lead to heritable loss of methylation at some sites. The distribution within chromatin of m 5 dCyd in repair patches was also investigated. Over a wide range of extents of digestion by staphylococcal nuclease or deoxyribonuclease I, the level of hypomethylation in repaired DNA in nuclease sensitive and resistant regions of chromatin was constant relative to the genomic level of methylation in these regions. Similar conclusions were reached in experiments with isolated mononucleosomes

  11. Protection of DNA damage by radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Ho; Kim, In Gyu; Lee, Kang Suk; Kim, Kug Chan; Oh, Tae Jung

    1998-12-01

    The SOS response of Escherichia coli is positively regulated by RecA. To examine the effects of polyamines on The SOS response of E. Coli, we investigated the expression of recA gene in polyamine-deficient mutant and wild type carrying recA'::lacZ fusion gene. As a result, recA expression by mitomycin C is higher in wild type than that of polyamine-deficient mutant, but recA expression by UV radiation is higher in wild type than of mutant. We also found that exogenous polyamines restored the recA expression in the polyamine-deficient mutant to the wild type level. These results proposed that polyamines play an important role in mechanism of intracellular DNA protection by DNA damaging agents.

  12. Protection of DNA damage by radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Ho; Kim, In Gyu; Lee, Kang Suk; Kim, Kug Chan; Oh, Tae Jung

    1998-12-01

    The SOS response of Escherichia coli is positively regulated by RecA. To examine the effects of polyamines on The SOS response of E. Coli, we investigated the expression of recA gene in polyamine-deficient mutant and wild type carrying recA'::lacZ fusion gene. As a result, recA expression by mitomycin C is higher in wild type than that of polyamine-deficient mutant, but recA expression by UV radiation is higher in wild type than of mutant. We also found that exogenous polyamines restored the recA expression in the polyamine-deficient mutant to the wild type level. These results proposed that polyamines play an important role in mechanism of intracellular DNA protection by DNA damaging agents

  13. Protection of DNA damage by radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Ho; Kim, In Gyu; Lee, Kang Suk; Kim, Kug Chan; Oh, Tae Jung

    1998-12-01

    The SOS response of Escherichia coli is positively regulated by RecA. To examine the effects of polyamines on The SOS response of E. Coli, we investigated the expression of recA gene in polyamine-deficient mutant and wild type carrying recA'::lacZ fusion gene. As a result, recA expression by mitomycin C is higher in wild type than that of polyamine-deficient mutant, but recA expression by UV radiation is higher in wild type than of mutant. We also found that exogenous polyamines restored the recA expression in the polyamine-deficient mutant to the wild type level. These results proposed that polyamines play an important role in mechanism of intracellular DNA protection by DNA damaging agents.

  14. DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachs, R.K.; Peili Chen; Hahnfeldt, P.J.; Klatky, L.R.

    1992-01-01

    A survey is given of continuous-time Markov chain models for ionizing radiation damage to the genome of mammalian cells. In such models, immediate damage induced by the radiation is regarded as a batch-Poisson arrival process of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Enzymatic modification of the immediate damage is modeled as a Markov process similar to those described by the master equation of stochastic chemical kinetics. An illustrative example is the restitution/complete-exchange model. The model postulates that, after being induced by radiation, DSBs subsequently either undergo enzymatically mediated restitution (repair) or participate pairwise in chromosome exchanges. Some of the exchanges make irremediable lesions such as dicentric chromosome aberrations. One may have rapid irradiation followed by enzymatic DSB processing or have prolonged irradiation with both DSB arrival and enzymatic DSB processing continuing throughout the irradiation period. Methods for analyzing the Markov chains include using an approximate model for expected values, the discrete-time Markov chain embedded at transitions, partial differential equations for generating functions, normal perturbation theory, singular perturbation theory with scaling, numerical computations, and certain matrix methods that combine Perron-Frobenius theory with variational estimates. Applications to experimental results on expected values, variances, and statistical distributions of DNA lesions are briefly outlined. Continuous-time Markov chains are the most systematic of those radiation damage models that treat DSB-DSB interactions within the cell nucleus as homogeneous (e.g., ignore diffusion limitations). They contain virtually all other relevant homogeneous models and semiempirical summaries as special cases, limiting cases, or approximations. However, the Markov models do not seem to be well suited for studying spatial dependence of DSB interactions. 51 refs., 5 figs

  15. Repair of Clustered Damage and DNA Polymerase Iota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belousova, E A; Lavrik, O I

    2015-08-01

    Multiple DNA lesions occurring within one or two turns of the DNA helix known as clustered damage are a source of double-stranded DNA breaks, which represent a serious threat to the cells. Repair of clustered lesions is accomplished in several steps. If a clustered lesion contains oxidized bases, an individual DNA lesion is repaired by the base excision repair (BER) mechanism involving a specialized DNA polymerase after excising DNA damage. Here, we investigated DNA synthesis catalyzed by DNA polymerase iota using damaged DNA templates. Two types of DNA substrates were used as model DNAs: partial DNA duplexes containing breaks of different length, and DNA duplexes containing 5-formyluracil (5-foU) and uracil as a precursor of apurinic/apyrimidinic sites (AP) in opposite DNA strands. For the first time, we showed that DNA polymerase iota is able to catalyze DNA synthesis using partial DNA duplexes having breaks of different length as substrates. In addition, we found that DNA polymerase iota could catalyze DNA synthesis during repair of clustered damage via the BER system by using both undamaged and 5-foU-containing templates. We found that hPCNA (human proliferating cell nuclear antigen) increased efficacy of DNA synthesis catalyzed by DNA polymerase iota.

  16. Alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) localizes to mitochondria and interacts with mitochondrial single-stranded binding protein (mtSSB)

    OpenAIRE

    van Loon, Barbara; Samson, Leona D.

    2013-01-01

    Due to a harsh environment mitochondrial genomes accumulate high levels of DNA damage, in particular oxidation, hydrolytic deamination, and alkylation adducts. While repair of alkylated bases in nuclear DNA has been explored in detail, much less is known about the repair of DNA alkylation damage in mitochondria. Alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) recognizes and removes numerous alkylated bases, but to date AAG has only been detected in the nucleus, even though mammalian mitochondria are known...

  17. Synthetic Routes to N-9 Alkylated 8-Oxoguanines; Weak Inhibitors of the Human DNA Glycosylase OGG1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar R. Mahajan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase OGG1 is involved in base excision repair (BER, one of several DNA repair mechanisms that may counteract the effects of chemo- and radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer. We envisage that potent inhibitors of OGG1 may be found among the 9-alkyl-8-oxoguanines. Thus we explored synthetic routes to 8-oxoguanines and examined these as OGG1 inhibitors. The best reaction sequence started from 6-chloroguanine and involved N-9 alkylation, C-8 bromination, and finally simultaneous hydrolysis of both halides. Bromination before N-alkylation should only be considered when the N-substituent is not compatible with bromination conditions. The 8-oxoguanines were found to be weak inhibitors of OGG1. 6-Chloro-8-oxopurines, byproducts in the hydrolysis of 2,6-halopurines, turned out to be slightly better inhibitors than the corresponding 8-oxoguanines.

  18. DNA Damage Response and Immune Defence: Links and Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Schumacher

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage plays a causal role in numerous human pathologies including cancer, premature aging and chronic inflammatory conditions. In response to genotoxic insults, the DNA damage response (DDR orchestrates DNA damage checkpoint activation and facilitates the removal of DNA lesions. The DDR can also arouse the immune system by for example inducing the expression of antimicrobial peptides as well as ligands for receptors found on immune cells. The activation of immune signalling is triggered by different components of the DDR including DNA damage sensors, transducer kinases, and effectors. In this review, we describe recent advances on the understanding of the role of DDR in activating immune signalling. We highlight evidence gained into (i which molecular and cellular pathways of DDR activate immune signalling, (ii how DNA damage drives chronic inflammation, and (iii how chronic inflammation causes DNA damage and pathology in humans.

  19. Chloroethylating nitrosoureas in cancer therapy: DNA damage, repair and cell death signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolova, Teodora; Roos, Wynand P; Krämer, Oliver H; Strik, Herwig M; Kaina, Bernd

    2017-08-01

    Chloroethylating nitrosoureas (CNU), such as lomustine, nimustine, semustine, carmustine and fotemustine are used for the treatment of malignant gliomas, brain metastases of different origin, melanomas and Hodgkin disease. They alkylate the DNA bases and give rise to the formation of monoadducts and subsequently interstrand crosslinks (ICL). ICL are critical cytotoxic DNA lesions that link the DNA strands covalently and block DNA replication and transcription. As a result, S phase progression is inhibited and cells are triggered to undergo apoptosis and necrosis, which both contribute to the effectiveness of CNU-based cancer therapy. However, tumor cells resist chemotherapy through the repair of CNU-induced DNA damage. The suicide enzyme O 6 -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) removes the precursor DNA lesion O 6 -chloroethylguanine prior to its conversion into ICL. In cells lacking MGMT, the formed ICL evoke complex enzymatic networks to accomplish their removal. Here we discuss the mechanism of ICL repair as a survival strategy of healthy and cancer cells and DNA damage signaling as a mechanism contributing to CNU-induced cell death. We also discuss therapeutic implications and strategies based on sequential and simultaneous treatment with CNU and the methylating drug temozolomide. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase mediates cellular responses to DNA damage and aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitanovic, Ana; Woelfl, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Response to DNA damage, lack of nutrients and other stress conditions is an essential property of living systems. The coordinate response includes DNA damage repair, activation of alternate biochemical pathways, adjustment of cellular proliferation and cell cycle progression as well as drastic measures like cellular suicide which prevents proliferation of severely damaged cells. Investigating the transcriptional response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to low doses of the alkylating agent methylmethane sulfonate (MMS) we observed induction of genes involved in glucose metabolism. RT-PCR analysis showed that the expression of the key enzyme in gluconeogenesis fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBP1) was clearly up-regulated by MMS in glucose-rich medium. Interestingly, deletion of FBP1 led to reduced sensitivity to MMS, but not to other DNA-damaging agents, such as 4-NQO or phleomycin. Reintroduction of FBP1 in the knockout restored the wild-type phenotype while overexpression increased MMS sensitivity of wild-type, shortened life span and increased induction of RNR2 after treatment with MMS. Deletion of FBP1 reduced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in response to MMS treatment and in untreated aged cells, and increased the amount of cells able to propagate and to form colonies, but had no influence on the genotoxic effect of MMS. Our results indicate that FBP1 influences the connection between DNA damage, aging and oxidative stress through either direct signalling or an intricate adaptation in energy metabolism

  1. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase mediates cellular responses to DNA damage and aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitanovic, Ana [Institut fuer Pharmazie und Molekulare Biotechnologie, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 364, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Woelfl, Stefan [Institut fuer Pharmazie und Molekulare Biotechnologie, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 364, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)]. E-mail: wolfl@uni-hd.de

    2006-02-22

    Response to DNA damage, lack of nutrients and other stress conditions is an essential property of living systems. The coordinate response includes DNA damage repair, activation of alternate biochemical pathways, adjustment of cellular proliferation and cell cycle progression as well as drastic measures like cellular suicide which prevents proliferation of severely damaged cells. Investigating the transcriptional response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to low doses of the alkylating agent methylmethane sulfonate (MMS) we observed induction of genes involved in glucose metabolism. RT-PCR analysis showed that the expression of the key enzyme in gluconeogenesis fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBP1) was clearly up-regulated by MMS in glucose-rich medium. Interestingly, deletion of FBP1 led to reduced sensitivity to MMS, but not to other DNA-damaging agents, such as 4-NQO or phleomycin. Reintroduction of FBP1 in the knockout restored the wild-type phenotype while overexpression increased MMS sensitivity of wild-type, shortened life span and increased induction of RNR2 after treatment with MMS. Deletion of FBP1 reduced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in response to MMS treatment and in untreated aged cells, and increased the amount of cells able to propagate and to form colonies, but had no influence on the genotoxic effect of MMS. Our results indicate that FBP1 influences the connection between DNA damage, aging and oxidative stress through either direct signalling or an intricate adaptation in energy metabolism.0.

  2. MicroRNAs, the DNA damage response and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wouters, Maikel D.; Gent, Dik C. van; Hoeijmakers, Jan H.J.; Pothof, Joris

    2011-01-01

    Many carcinogenic agents such as ultra-violet light from the sun and various natural and man-made chemicals act by damaging the DNA. To deal with these potentially detrimental effects of DNA damage, cells induce a complex DNA damage response (DDR) that includes DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoints, damage tolerance systems and apoptosis. This DDR is a potent barrier against carcinogenesis and defects within this response are observed in many, if not all, human tumors. DDR defects fuel the evolution of precancerous cells to malignant tumors, but can also induce sensitivity to DNA damaging agents in cancer cells, which can be therapeutically exploited by the use of DNA damaging treatment modalities. Regulation of and coordination between sub-pathways within the DDR is important for maintaining genome stability. Although regulation of the DDR has been extensively studied at the transcriptional and post-translational level, less is known about post-transcriptional gene regulation by microRNAs, the topic of this review. More specifically, we highlight current knowledge about DNA damage responsive microRNAs and microRNAs that regulate DNA damage response genes. We end by discussing the role of DNA damage response microRNAs in cancer etiology and sensitivity to ionizing radiation and other DNA damaging therapeutic agents.

  3. Molecular mechanisms in radiation damage to DNA: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, R.

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of this work were to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that were responsible for radiation-induced DNA damage. The studies were based on theoretical explorations of possible mechanisms that link initial radiation damage in the form of base and sugar damage to conformational changes in DNA

  4. DNA damage-induced inflammation and nuclear architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratigi, Kalliopi; Chatzidoukaki, Ourania; Garinis, George A

    2017-07-01

    Nuclear architecture and the chromatin state affect most-if not all- DNA-dependent transactions, including the ability of cells to sense DNA lesions and restore damaged DNA back to its native form. Recent evidence points to functional links between DNA damage sensors, DNA repair mechanisms and the innate immune responses. The latter raises the question of how such seemingly disparate processes operate within the intrinsically complex nuclear landscape and the chromatin environment. Here, we discuss how DNA damage-induced immune responses operate within chromatin and the distinct sub-nuclear compartments highlighting their relevance to chronic inflammation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Photogeneration and reactivity of naphthoquinone methides as purine selective DNA alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verga, Daniela; Nadai, Matteo; Doria, Filippo; Percivalle, Claudia; Di Antonio, Marco; Palumbo, Manlio; Richter, Sara N; Freccero, Mauro

    2010-10-20

    A one-step protecting-group-free synthesis of both 6-hydroxy-naphthalene-2-carbaldehyde and the bifunctional binaphthalenyl derivative afforded 6-hydroxymethylnaphthalen-2-ol, 6-methylaminomethyl-naphthalen-2-ol, [(2-hydroxy-3-naphthyl)methyl]trimethyl ammonium iodide, and a small library of bifunctional binol analogues in good yields. Irradiation of naphthol quaternary ammonium salt and binol-derivatives (X = OH, NHR, NMe(3)(+), OCOCH(3), and L-proline) at 310 and 360 nm resulted in the photogeneration of the 2,6-naphthoquinone-6-methide (NQM) and binol quinone methide analogues (BQMs) by a water-mediated excited-state proton transfer (ESPT). The hydration, the mono- and bis-alkylation reactions of morpholine and 2-ethanethiol, as N and S prototype nucleophiles, by the transient NQM (λ(max) 310, 330 nm) and BQMs (λ(max) 360 nm) were investigated in water by product distribution analysis and laser flash photolysis (LFP). Both the photogeneration and the reactivity of NQM and BQMs exhibited striking differences. BQMs were at least 2 orders of magnitude more reactive than NQM, and they were generated much more efficiently from a greater variety of photoprecursors including the hydroxymethyl, quaternary ammonium salt and several binol-amino acids. On the contrary, the only efficient precursor of NQM was the quaternary ammonium salt. All water-soluble BQM precursors were further investigated for their ability to alkylate and cross-link plasmid DNA and oligonucleotides by gel electrophoresis: the BQMs were more efficient than the isomeric o-BQM (binol quinone methide analogue of 2,3-naphthoquinone-3-methide). Sequence analysis by gel electrophoresis, HPLC, and MS showed that the alkylation occurred at purines, with a preference for guanine. In particular, a BQM was able to alkylate N7 of guanines resulting in depurination at the oligonucleotide level, and ribose loss at the nucleotide level. The photoreactivity of BQM precursors translated into photocytotoxic and

  6. Application of the CometChip platform to assess DNA damage in field-collected blood samples from turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykora, Peter; Chiari, Ylenia; Heaton, Andrew; Moreno, Nickolas; Glaberman, Scott; Sobol, Robert W

    2018-05-01

    DNA damage has been linked to genomic instability and the progressive breakdown of cellular and organismal homeostasis, leading to the onset of disease and reduced longevity. Insults to DNA from endogenous sources include base deamination, base hydrolysis, base alkylation, and metabolism-induced oxidative damage that can lead to single-strand and double-strand DNA breaks. Alternatively, exposure to environmental pollutants, radiation or ultra-violet light, can also contribute to exogenously derived DNA damage. We previously validated a novel, high through-put approach to measure levels of DNA damage in cultured mammalian cells. This new CometChip Platform builds on the classical single cell gel electrophoresis or comet methodology used extensively in environmental toxicology and molecular biology. We asked whether the CometChip Platform could be used to measure DNA damage in samples derived from environmental field studies. To this end, we determined that nucleated erythrocytes from multiple species of turtle could be successfully evaluated in the CometChip Platform to quantify levels of DNA damage. In total, we compared levels of DNA damage in 40 animals from two species: the box turtle (Terrapene carolina) and the red-eared slider (Trachemys scripta elegans). Endogenous levels of DNA damage were identical between the two species, yet we did discover some sex-linked differences and changes in DNA damage accumulation. Based on these results, we confirm that the CometChip Platform allows for the measurement of DNA damage in a large number of samples quickly and accurately, and is particularly adaptable to environmental studies using field-collected samples. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 59:322-333, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Melanogenesis: a photoprotective response to DNA damage?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agar, Nita; Young, Antony R.

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to ultra violet radiation (UVR) is associated with significant long-term deleterious effects such as skin cancer. A well-recognised short-term consequence of UVR is increased skin pigmentation. Pigmentation, whether constitutive or facultative, has widely been viewed as photoprotective, largely because darkly pigmented skin is at a lower risk of photocarcinogenesis than fair skin. Research is increasingly suggesting that the relationship between pigmentation and photoprotection may be far more complex than previously assumed. For example, photoprotection against erythema and DNA damage has been shown to be independent of level of induced pigmentation in human white skin types. Growing evidence now suggests that UVR induced DNA photodamage, and its repair is one of the signals that stimulates melanogenesis and studies suggest that repeated exposure in skin type IV results in faster DNA repair in comparison to skin type II. These findings suggest that tanning may be a measure of inducible DNA repair capacity, and it is this rather than pigment per se which results in the lower incidence skin cancer observed in darker skinned individuals. This evokes the notion that epidermal pigmentation may in fact be the mammalian equivalent of a bacterial SOS response. Skin colour is one of most conspicuous ways in which humans vary yet the function of melanin remains controversial. Greater understanding of the role of pigmentation in skin is vital if one is to be able to give accurate advice to the general public about both the population at risk of skin carcinogenesis and also public perceptions of a tan as being healthy

  8. Melanogenesis: a photoprotective response to DNA damage?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agar, Nita [St. John' s Institute of Dermatology, Guy' s, Kings and St. Thomas' School of Medicine, Kings College London, London (United Kingdom); Young, Antony R. [St. John' s Institute of Dermatology, Guy' s, Kings and St. Thomas' School of Medicine, Kings College London, London (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: antony.r.young@kcl.ac.uk

    2005-04-01

    Exposure to ultra violet radiation (UVR) is associated with significant long-term deleterious effects such as skin cancer. A well-recognised short-term consequence of UVR is increased skin pigmentation. Pigmentation, whether constitutive or facultative, has widely been viewed as photoprotective, largely because darkly pigmented skin is at a lower risk of photocarcinogenesis than fair skin. Research is increasingly suggesting that the relationship between pigmentation and photoprotection may be far more complex than previously assumed. For example, photoprotection against erythema and DNA damage has been shown to be independent of level of induced pigmentation in human white skin types. Growing evidence now suggests that UVR induced DNA photodamage, and its repair is one of the signals that stimulates melanogenesis and studies suggest that repeated exposure in skin type IV results in faster DNA repair in comparison to skin type II. These findings suggest that tanning may be a measure of inducible DNA repair capacity, and it is this rather than pigment per se which results in the lower incidence skin cancer observed in darker skinned individuals. This evokes the notion that epidermal pigmentation may in fact be the mammalian equivalent of a bacterial SOS response. Skin colour is one of most conspicuous ways in which humans vary yet the function of melanin remains controversial. Greater understanding of the role of pigmentation in skin is vital if one is to be able to give accurate advice to the general public about both the population at risk of skin carcinogenesis and also public perceptions of a tan as being healthy.

  9. Molecular mechanisms of adaptive response to alkylating agents in Escherichia coli and some remarks on O(6)-methylguanine DNA-methyltransferase in other organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleibl, Karol

    2002-09-01

    Alkylating agents are environmental genotoxic agents with mutagenic and carcinogenic potential, however, their properties are also exploited in the treatment of malignant diseases. O(6)-Methylguanine is an important adduct formed by methylating agents that, if not repaired, can lead to mutations and death. Its repair is carried out by O(6)-methylguanine DNA-methyltransferase (MTase) in an unique reaction in which methyl groups are transferred to the cysteine acceptor site of the protein itself. Exposure of Escherichia coli cells to sublethal concentrations of methylating agents triggers the expression of a set of genes, which allows the cells to tolerate DNA lesions, and this kind of inducible repair is called the adaptive response. The MTase of E. coli, encoded by the ada gene was the first MTase to be discovered and one of best characterised. Its repair and regulatory mechanisms are understood in considerable detail and this bacterial protein played a key role in identification of its counterparts in other living organisms. This review summarises the nature of alkylation damage in DNA and our current knowledge about the adaptive response in E. coli. I also include a brief mention of MTases from other organisms with the emphasis on the human MTase, which could play a crucial role in both cancer prevention and cancer treatment.

  10. DNA alkylating agents alleviate silencing of class II transactivator gene expression in L1210 lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Shawn P; Holtz, Renae; Lewandowski, Nicole; Tomasi, Thomas B; Fuji, Hiroshi

    2002-09-15

    MHC class II (Ia) Ag expression is inversely correlated with tumorigenicity and directly correlated with immunogenicity in clones of the mouse L1210 lymphoma (1 ). Understanding the mechanisms by which class II Ag expression is regulated in L1210 lymphoma may facilitate the development of immunotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of some types of lymphoma and leukemia. This study demonstrates that the variation in MHC class II Ag expression among clones of L1210 lymphoma is due to differences in the expression of the class II transactivator (CIITA). Analysis of stable hybrids suggests that CIITA expression is repressed by a dominant mechanism in class II-negative L1210 clones. DNA-alkylating agents such as ethyl methanesulfonate and the chemotherapeutic drug melphalan activate CIITA and class II expression in class II negative L1210 cells, and this effect appears to be restricted to transformed cell lines derived from the early stages of B cell ontogeny. Transient transfection assays demonstrated that the CIITA type III promoter is active in class II(-) L1210 cells, despite the fact that the endogenous gene is not expressed, which suggests that these cells have all of the transacting factors necessary for CIITA transcription. An inverse correlation between methylation of the CIITA transcriptional regulatory region and CIITA expression was observed among L1210 clones. Furthermore, 5-azacytidine treatment activated CIITA expression in class II-negative L1210 cells. Collectively, our results suggest that 1) CIITA gene expression is repressed in class II(-) L1210 cells by methylation of the CIITA upstream regulatory region, and 2) treatment with DNA-alkylating agents overcomes methylation-based silencing of the CIITA gene in L1210 cells.

  11. Chimeric proteins for detection and quantitation of DNA mutations, DNA sequence variations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric proteins having both DNA mutation binding activity and nuclease activity are synthesized by recombinant technology. The proteins are of the general formula A-L-B and B-L-A where A is a peptide having DNA mutation binding activity, L is a linker and B is a peptide having nuclease activity. The chimeric proteins are useful for detection and identification of DNA sequence variations including DNA mutations (including DNA damage and mismatches) by binding to the DNA mutation and cutting the DNA once the DNA mutation is detected.

  12. DNA damage response pathway in radioadaptive response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Masao S; Ejima, Yosuke; Tachibana, Akira; Yamada, Toshiko; Ishizaki, Kanji; Shimizu, Takashi; Nomura, Taisei

    2002-07-25

    Radioadaptive response is a biological defense mechanism in which low-dose ionizing irradiation elicits cellular resistance to the genotoxic effects of subsequent irradiation. However, its molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. We previously demonstrated that the dose recognition and adaptive response could be mediated by a feedback signaling pathway involving protein kinase C (PKC), p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) and phospholipase C (PLC). Further, to elucidate the downstream effector pathway, we studied the X-ray-induced adaptive response in cultured mouse and human cells with different genetic background relevant to the DNA damage response pathway, such as deficiencies in TP53, DNA-PKcs, ATM and FANCA genes. The results showed that p53 protein played a key role in the adaptive response while DNA-PKcs, ATM and FANCA were not responsible. Wortmannin, a specific inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), mimicked the priming irradiation in that the inhibitor alone rendered the cells resistant against the induction of chromosome aberrations and apoptosis by the subsequent X-ray irradiation. The adaptive response, whether it was afforded by low-dose X-rays or wortmannin, occurred in parallel with the reduction of apoptotic cell death by challenging doses. The inhibitor of p38MAPK which blocks the adaptive response did not suppress apoptosis. These observations indicate that the adaptive response and apoptotic cell death constitute a complementary defense system via life-or-death decisions. The p53 has a pivotal role in channeling the radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) into an adaptive legitimate repair pathway, where the signals are integrated into p53 by a circuitous PKC-p38MAPK-PLC damage sensing pathway, and hence turning off the signals to an alternative pathway to illegitimate repair and apoptosis. A possible molecular mechanism of adaptive response to low-dose ionizing irradiation has been discussed in relation to

  13. Bisphenol a promotes cell survival following oxidative DNA damage in mouse fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie R Gassman

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA is a biologically active industrial chemical used in production of consumer products. BPA has become a target of intense public scrutiny following concerns about its association with human diseases such as obesity, diabetes, reproductive disorders, and cancer. Recent studies link BPA with the generation of reactive oxygen species, and base excision repair (BER is responsible for removing oxidatively induced DNA lesions. Yet, the relationship between BPA and BER has yet to be examined. Further, the ubiquitous nature of BPA allows continuous exposure of the human genome concurrent with the normal endogenous and exogenous insults to the genome, and this co-exposure may impact the DNA damage response and repair. To determine the effect of BPA exposure on base excision repair of oxidatively induced DNA damage, cells compromised in double-strand break repair were treated with BPA alone or co-exposed with either potassium bromate (KBrO3 or laser irradiation as oxidative damaging agents. In experiments with KBrO3, co-treatment with BPA partially reversed the KBrO3-induced cytotoxicity observed in these cells, and this was coincident with an increase in guanine base lesions in genomic DNA. The improvement in cell survival and the increase in oxidatively induced DNA base lesions were reminiscent of previous results with alkyl adenine DNA glycosylase-deficient cells, suggesting that BPA may prevent initiation of repair of oxidized base lesions. With laser irradiation-induced DNA damage, treatment with BPA suppressed DNA repair as revealed by several indicators. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that BPA can induce a suppression of oxidized base lesion DNA repair by the base excision repair pathway.

  14. Short communication Sperm DNA damage in relation to lipid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leyland Fraser

    Short communication. Sperm DNA ... (Received 21 January 2017; Accepted 28 February2017; First published online 8 March 2017) ... This study investigated the relationships between lipid peroxidation (LPO) and sperm DNA damage.

  15. Single Molecule Scanning of DNA Radiation Oxidative Damage, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal will develop an assay to map genomic DNA, at the single molecule level and in a nanodevice, for oxidative DNA damage arising from radiation exposure;...

  16. Aging and oxidatively damaged nuclear DNA in animal organs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Peter; Løhr, Mille; Folkmann, Janne K

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered to contribute to aging and is associated with the generation of oxidatively damaged DNA, including 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine. We have identified 69 studies that have measured the level of oxidatively damaged DNA in organs of animals at various ages. In general, organs...... with limited cell proliferation, i.e., liver, kidney, brain, heart, pancreas, and muscle, tended to show accumulation of DNA damage with age, whereas organs with highly proliferating cells, such as intestine, spleen, and testis, showed more equivocal or no effect of age. A restricted analysis of studies...... evidence for aging-associated accumulation of oxidatively damaged DNA in organs with limited cell proliferation....

  17. Development of laser-induced fluorescence detection to assay DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, M.; Freund, H.G.

    1991-01-01

    A precolumn derivation method has been developed for high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analysis of DNA damage using fluorescence detection. The modified nucleotide, having excised enzymatically from the exposed DNA, is enriched from the normal nucleotides and labeled with a fluorescent reagent. The labeling procedure involves phosphoramidation of the nucleotide with ethylenediamine (EDA) followed by conjugation of the free amino end of the phosphoramidate with 5-dimethylaminonaphthalene 1-sulfonyl chloride, commonly known as Dansyl chloride. The dansylated nucleotide can be analyzed with a sub-picomole limit of detection (LOD) by conventional HPLC using a conventional fluorescence detector. By combining microbore HPLC with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection, the authors present the development of an analytical system that has sub-femtomole LOD for real-time analysis of the dansylated nucleotide. In this paper the application of the developed system in fluorescence postlabeling assay of a small alkyl-modified nucleotide (5-methyl CMP) in calf-thymus DNA is discussed

  18. Oxidative DNA damage during night shift work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Parveen; Mirick, Dana K; Randolph, Timothy W; Gong, Jicheng; Buchanan, Diana Taibi; Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Davis, Scott

    2017-09-01

    We previously reported that compared with night sleep, day sleep among shift workers was associated with reduced urinary excretion of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG), potentially reflecting a reduced ability to repair 8-OH-dG lesions in DNA. We identified the absence of melatonin during day sleep as the likely causative factor. We now investigate whether night work is also associated with reduced urinary excretion of 8-OH-dG. For this cross-sectional study, 50 shift workers with the largest negative differences in night work versus night sleep circulating melatonin levels (measured as 6-sulfatoxymelatonin in urine) were selected from among the 223 shift workers included in our previous study. 8-OH-dG concentrations were measured in stored urine samples using high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Mixed effects models were used to compare night work versus night sleep 8-OH-dG levels. Circulating melatonin levels during night work (mean=17.1 ng/mg creatinine/mg creatinine) were much lower than during night sleep (mean=51.7 ng/mg creatinine). In adjusted analyses, average urinary 8-OH-dG levels during the night work period were only 20% of those observed during the night sleep period (95% CI 10% to 30%; psleep, is associated with reduced repair of 8-OH-dG lesions in DNA and that the effect is likely driven by melatonin suppression occurring during night work relative to night sleep. If confirmed, future studies should evaluate melatonin supplementation as a means to restore oxidative DNA damage repair capacity among shift workers. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Assessment of DNA damage in ceramic workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anlar, Hatice Gul; Taner, Gokce; Bacanli, Merve; Iritas, Servet; Kurt, Turker; Tutkun, Engin; Yilmaz, Omer Hinc; Basaran, Nursen

    2018-02-24

    It is known that ceramic workers are potentially exposed to complex mixture of chemicals such as silica, inorganic lead, lime, beryllium and aluminum that can be associated with an increased risk of several diseases. All operations in the ceramic industries such as mixing, moulding, casting, shaking out and finishing jobs, have been associated with the higher exposure levels and in most of the silica-related industries, average overall exposure exceeded permissible exposure levels for respirable crystalline silica. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible genotoxic damage in ceramic workers exposed to complex mixture of chemicals mainly crystalline silica. For this purpose, the blood and buccal epithelial cell samples were taken from the ceramic workers (n = 99) and their controls (n = 81). The genotoxicity was assessed by the alkaline comet assay in isolated lymphocytes and whole blood. Micronucleus (MN), binucleated (BN), pyknotic (PYC), condensed chromatin (CC), karyolytic (KYL), karyorrhectic (KHC) and nuclear bud (NBUD) frequencies in buccal epithelial cells and plasma 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) levels were also evaluated. In the study, 38 workers were diagnosed with silicosis, 9 workers were suspected to have silicosis, whereas 52 workers were found to be healthy. DNA damage in blood and lymphocytes; MN, CC + KHC, PYC frequencies in buccal epithelial cells and 8-oxodG levels in plasma were increased in workers compared to their controls. These results showed that occupational chemical mixture exposure in ceramic industry may cause genotoxic damage that can lead to important health problems in the workers.

  20. UV and ionizing radiations induced DNA damage, differences and similarities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Douki, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    Both UV and ionizing radiations damage DNA. Two main mechanisms, so-called direct and indirect pathways, are involved in the degradation of DNA induced by ionizing radiations. The direct effect of radiation corresponds to direct ionization of DNA (one electron ejection) whereas indirect effects are produced by reactive oxygen species generated through water radiolysis, including the highly reactive hydroxyl radicals, which damage DNA. UV (and visible) light damages DNA by again two distinct mechanisms. UVC and to a lesser extend UVB photons are directly absorbed by DNA bases, generating their excited states that are at the origin of the formation of pyrimidine dimers. UVA (and visible) light by interaction with endogenous or exogenous photosensitizers induce the formation of DNA damage through photosensitization reactions. The excited photosensitizer is able to induce either a one-electron oxidation of DNA (type I) or to produce singlet oxygen (type II) that reacts with DNA. In addition, through an energy transfer from the excited photosensitizer to DNA bases (sometime called type III mechanism) formation of pyrimidine dimers could be produced. Interestingly it has been shown recently that pyrimidine dimers are also produced by direct absorption of UVA light by DNA, even if absorption of DNA bases at these wavelengths is very low. It should be stressed that some excited photosensitizers (such as psoralens) could add directly to DNA bases to generate adducts. The review will described the differences and similarities in terms of damage formation (structure and mechanisms) between these two physical genotoxic agents.

  1. Role of DNA repair in repair of cytogenetic damages. Slowly repaired DNA injuries involved in cytogenetic damages repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaichkina, S.I.; Rozanova, O.M.; Aptikaev, G.F.; Ganassi, E.Eh.

    1989-01-01

    Caffeine was used to study the kinetics of cytogenetic damages repair in Chinese hamster fibroblasts. Its half-time (90 min) was shown to correlate with that of repair of slowly repaired DNA damages. The caffeine-induced increase in the number of irreparable DNA damages, attributed to inhibition of double-strand break repair, is in a quantitative correlation with the effect of the cytogenetic damage modification

  2. Acetylation dynamics of human nuclear proteins during the ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennetzen, Martin; Andersen, J.S.; Lasen, D.H.

    2013-01-01

    Genotoxic insults, such as ionizing radiation (IR), cause DNA damage that evokes a multifaceted cellular DNA damage response (DDR). DNA damage signaling events that control protein activity, subcellular localization, DNA binding, protein-protein interactions, etc. rely heavily on time...

  3. Cellular radiosensitivity and DNA damage in primary human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurm, R.; Burnet, N.G.; Duggal, N.

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between radiation-induced cell survival and DNA damage in primary human fibroblasts to decide whether the initial or residual DNA damage levels are more predictive of normal tissue cellular radiosensitivity. Five primary human nonsyndromic and two primary ataxia telangiectasia fibroblast strains grown in monolayer were studied. Cell survival was assessed by clonogenic assay. Irradiation was given at high dose rate (HDR) 1-2 Gy/min. DNA damage was measured in stationary phase cells and expressed as fraction released from the well by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). For initial damage, cells were embedded in agarose and irradiated at HDR on ice. Residual DNA damage was measured in monolayer by allowing a 4-h repair period after HDR irradiation. Following HDR irradiation, cell survival varied between SF 2 0.025 to 0.23. Measurement of initial DNA damage demonstrated linear induction up to 30 Gy, with small differences in the slope of the dose-response curve between strains. No correlation between cell survival and initial damage was found. Residual damage increased linearly up to 80 Gy with a variation in slope by a factor of 3.2. Cell survival correlated with the slope of the dose-response curves for residual damage of the different strains (p = 0.003). The relationship between radiation-induced cell survival and DNA damage in primary human fibroblasts of differing radiosensitivity is closest with the amount of DNA damage remaining after repair. If assays of DNA damage are to be used as predictors of normal tissue response to radiation, residual DNA damage provides the most likely correlation with cell survival. 52 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Mutational specificity of alkylating agents and the influence of DNA repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsfall, M.J.; Gordon, A.J.; Burns, P.A.; Zielenska, M.; van der Vliet, G.M.; Glickman, B.W. (York Univ., Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1990-01-01

    Alkylating treatments predominantly induce G:C = greater than A:T transitions, consistent with the predicted significance of the miscoding potential of the O6-alG lesion. However, the frequency and distribution of these events induced by any one compound may be diagnostic. SN1 agents that act via an alkyldiazonium cation, such as the N-nitroso compounds, preferentially generate G:C = greater than A:T transitions at 5'-RG-3' sites, while the more SN2 alkylsulfates and alkylalkane-sulfonates do not. The precise nature of this site bias and the possibility of strand bias are target dependent. The extent of this site bias and the contribution of other base substitutions are substituent size dependent. A similar 5'-RT-3' effect is seen for A:T = greater than G:C transitions, presumably directed by O4-alT lesions. The 5'-RG-3' effect, at least, likely reflects a deposition specificity arising from some aspect of helix geometry, although it may be further exaggerated by alkylation-specific repair. Excision repair appears to preferentially reduce the occurrence of ethylation-induced G:C = greater than A:T and A:T = greater than G:C transitions at sites flanked by A:T base pairs. This may be due to an enhancement of the helical distortion imposed by damage at such positions. A similar effect is not seen for methylation-induced mutations and in the case of propyl adducts, the influence of excision repair on the ultimate distribution of mutation cannot be as easily defined with respect to neighbouring sequence. 199 references.

  5. DNA damage assessment by visualization and quantification of DNA damage response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Shun; Matsuda, Tomonari; Ikura, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    DNA damage response (DDR) carries out signal transduction for DNA repair, activation of cell cycle checkpoint, and apoptosis to maintain genome integrity, in response to DNA damage. Many proteins and their post-translational modifications participate in the process. Especially, S139-phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX), which is formed by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), is an important factor to bring and retain other DDR proteins to DSB sites, Thus, γH2AX is used as a good indicator of DSBs in clinical study and pharmacology for efficacy evaluation of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, detection of precancerous regions, and others. In regulatory science, γH2AX is also a useful biomarker of genotoxicity of chemicals, since a wide range of genotoxic chemicals induce γH2AX. However, conventional detection methods of γH2AX absolutely require anti-γH2AX antibody whose staining is burdensome and time-consuming, and some of these methods are not so superior in quantitativity. In this review, we introduce two new methods to overcome these limitations, involving an easy-to-use genotoxicity assay using DDR-visualizing cells and an absolute quantification method of γH2AX using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). (author)

  6. Quantification of DNA damage by single-cell electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Takaji

    1990-01-01

    A simple technique of micro-agarose gel electrophoresis has been developed to quantify DNA damage in individual cells. Cells are embedded in agarose gel on microscope slides, lysed by detergents and then electrophoresed for a short time under neutral or alkaline condition. In irradiated cells, DNA migrates from the nucleus toward the anode, displaying commet-like pattern by staining with DNA-specific fluorescence dye. DNA damage is evaluated by measuring the distance of DNA migration. The technique was applied for measuring DNA damage in single cells exposed to 60 Co γ-rays, or to KUR radiation in the presence or absence of 10 B-enriched boric acid. The enhanced production of double-stranded DNA breaks by 10 B(n,α) 7 Li reaction was demonstrated here. The significant increase in the length of DNA migration was observed in single cells exposed to such a low dose as 20 cGy after alkaline micro electrophoresis. (author)

  7. Chromatin modifications and the DNA damage response to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Singh, Mayank; Gupta, Arun; Misra, Hari S.; Albuquerque, Kevin; Hunt, Clayton R.; Pandita, Tej K.

    2013-01-01

    In order to survive, cells have evolved highly effective repair mechanisms to deal with the potentially lethal DNA damage produced by exposure to endogenous as well as exogenous agents. Ionizing radiation exposure induces highly lethal DNA damage, especially DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), that is sensed by the cellular machinery and then subsequently repaired by either of two different DSB repair mechanisms: (1) non-homologous end joining, which re-ligates the broken ends of the DNA and (2) homologous recombination, that employs an undamaged identical DNA sequence as a template, to maintain the fidelity of DNA repair. Repair of DSBs must occur within the natural context of the cellular DNA which, along with specific proteins, is organized to form chromatin, the overall structure of which can impede DNA damage site access by repair proteins. The chromatin complex is a dynamic structure and is known to change as required for ongoing cellular processes such as gene transcription or DNA replication. Similarly, during the process of DNA damage sensing and repair, chromatin needs to undergo several changes in order to facilitate accessibility of the repair machinery. Cells utilize several factors to modify the chromatin in order to locally open up the structure to reveal the underlying DNA sequence but post-translational modification of the histone components is one of the primary mechanisms. In this review, we will summarize chromatin modifications by the respective chromatin modifying factors that occur during the DNA damage response.

  8. Selective base excision repair of DNA damage by the non-base-flipping DNA glycosylase AlkC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Rongxin; Mullins, Elwood A.; Shen, Xing; #8208; Xing; Lay, Kori T.; Yuen, Philip K.; David, Sheila S.; Rokas, Antonis; Eichman, Brandt F. (UCD); (Vanderbilt)

    2017-10-20

    DNA glycosylases preserve genome integrity and define the specificity of the base excision repair pathway for discreet, detrimental modifications, and thus, the mechanisms by which glycosylases locate DNA damage are of particular interest. Bacterial AlkC and AlkD are specific for cationic alkylated nucleobases and have a distinctive HEAT-like repeat (HLR) fold. AlkD uses a unique non-base-flipping mechanism that enables excision of bulky lesions more commonly associated with nucleotide excision repair. In contrast, AlkC has a much narrower specificity for small lesions, principally N3-methyladenine (3mA). Here, we describe how AlkC selects for and excises 3mA using a non-base-flipping strategy distinct from that of AlkD. A crystal structure resembling a catalytic intermediate complex shows how AlkC uses unique HLR and immunoglobulin-like domains to induce a sharp kink in the DNA, exposing the damaged nucleobase to active site residues that project into the DNA. This active site can accommodate and excise N3-methylcytosine (3mC) and N1-methyladenine (1mA), which are also repaired by AlkB-catalyzed oxidative demethylation, providing a potential alternative mechanism for repair of these lesions in bacteria.

  9. Down-regulation of DNA mismatch repair proteins in human and murine tumor spheroids: implications for multicellular resistance to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Giulio; Green, Shane K; Bocci, Guido; Man, Shan; Emmenegger, Urban; Ebos, John M L; Weinerman, Adina; Shaked, Yuval; Kerbel, Robert S

    2005-10-01

    Similar to other anticancer agents, intrinsic or acquired resistance to DNA-damaging chemotherapeutics is a major obstacle for cancer therapy. Current strategies aimed at overcoming this problem are mostly based on the premise that tumor cells acquire heritable genetic mutations that contribute to drug resistance. Here, we present evidence for an epigenetic, tumor cell adhesion-mediated, and reversible form of drug resistance that is associated with a reduction of DNA mismatch repair proteins PMS2 and/or MLH1 as well as other members of this DNA repair process. Growth of human breast cancer, human melanoma, and murine EMT-6 breast cancer cell lines as multicellular spheroids in vitro, which is associated with increased resistance to many chemotherapeutic drugs, including alkylating agents, is shown to lead to a reproducible down-regulation of PMS2, MLH1, or, in some cases, both as well as MHS6, MSH3, and MSH2. The observed down-regulation is in part reversible by treatment of tumor spheroids with the DNA-demethylating agent, 5-azacytidine. Thus, treatment of EMT-6 mouse mammary carcinoma spheroids with 5-azacytidine resulted in reduced and/or disrupted cell-cell adhesion, which in turn sensitized tumor spheroids to cisplatin-mediated killing in vitro. Our results suggest that antiadhesive agents might sensitize tumor spheroids to alkylating agents in part by reversing or preventing reduced DNA mismatch repair activity and that the chemosensitization properties of 5-azacytidine may conceivably reflect its role as a potential antiadhesive agent as well as reversal agent for MLH1 gene silencing in human tumors.

  10. Ultraviolet induced DNA damage and hereditary skin cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regan, J.D.; Carrier, W.L.; Francis, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    Clearly, cells from normal individuals possess the ability to repair a variety of damage to DNA. Numerous studies indicate that defects in DNA repair may increase an individual's susceptibility to cancer. It is hoped that continued studies of the exact structural changes produced in the DNA by environmental insults, and the correlation of specific DNA changes with particulr cellular events, such as DNA repair, will lead to a better understanding of cell-killing, mutagenesis and carbinogenesis. 1 figure, 2 tables

  11. DNA damage protection and 5-lipoxygenase inhibiting activity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DNA damage caused by free radical is associated with mutation-based health impairment. The protective effect on DNA damage mediated by hydroxyl radical and peroxynitrite radical, and the inhibiting activity on 5-lipoxygenase of areca inflorescence extracts were studied in vitro. The results show that the boiling water ...

  12. Sperm DNA damage in relation to lipid peroxidation following ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the relationships between lipid peroxidation (LPO) and sperm DNA damage following freezing-thawing of boar semen in different extenders. The comet assay was used to measure the extent of sperm DNA damage in a cryoprotectant-free extender or in cryoprotectant-based extenders after single ...

  13. Assessment of DNA damage by panmasala, gutkha chewing and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present study the comet assay was performed in buccal epithelial cells to evaluate DNA damage among pan masala or gutkha chewers and smokers. The assay is a rapid, suitable and sensitive method for detecting various forms of DNA damage at individual cell level. The study comprises 300 individuals of which 50 ...

  14. Sensitization of human carcinoma cells to alkylating agents by small interfering RNA suppression of 3-alkyladenine-DNA glycosylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Johanna; Duncan, Tod; Lindahl, Tomas; Sedgwick, Barbara

    2005-11-15

    One of the major cytotoxic lesions generated by alkylating agents is DNA 3-alkyladenine, which can be excised by 3-alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG). Inhibition of AAG may therefore result in increased cellular sensitivity to chemotherapeutic alkylating agents. To investigate this possibility, we have examined the role of AAG in protecting human tumor cells against such agents. Plasmids that express small interfering RNAs targeted to two different regions of AAG mRNA were transfected into HeLa cervical carcinoma cells and A2780-SCA ovarian carcinoma cells. Stable derivatives of both cell types with low AAG protein levels were sensitized to alkylating agents. Two HeLa cell lines with AAG protein levels reduced by at least 80% to 90% displayed a 5- to 10-fold increase in sensitivity to methyl methanesulfonate, N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, and the chemotherapeutic drugs temozolomide and 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea. These cells showed no increase in sensitivity to UV light or ionizing radiation. After treatment with methyl methanesulfonate, AAG knockdown HeLa cells were delayed in S phase but accumulated in G2-M. Our data support the hypothesis that ablation of AAG activity in human tumor cells may provide a useful strategy to enhance the efficacy of current chemotherapeutic regimens that include alkylating agents.

  15. Transcription and DNA Damage: Holding Hands or Crossing Swords?

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Giuseppina; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2017-10-27

    Transcription has classically been considered a potential threat to genome integrity. Collision between transcription and DNA replication machinery, and retention of DNA:RNA hybrids, may result in genome instability. On the other hand, it has been proposed that active genes repair faster and preferentially via homologous recombination. Moreover, while canonical transcription is inhibited in the proximity of DNA double-strand breaks, a growing body of evidence supports active non-canonical transcription at DNA damage sites. Small non-coding RNAs accumulate at DNA double-strand break sites in mammals and other organisms, and are involved in DNA damage signaling and repair. Furthermore, RNA binding proteins are recruited to DNA damage sites and participate in the DNA damage response. Here, we discuss the impact of transcription on genome stability, the role of RNA binding proteins at DNA damage sites, and the function of small non-coding RNAs generated upon damage in the signaling and repair of DNA lesions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. DNA Damage among Wood Workers Assessed with the Comet Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschweiler, Evin Danisman; Wild, Pascal; Huynh, Cong Khanh; Savova-Bianchi, Dessislava; Danuser, Brigitta; Hopf, Nancy B.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to wood dust, a human carcinogen, is common in wood-related industries, and millions of workers are occupationally exposed to wood dust worldwide. The comet assay is a rapid, simple, and sensitive method for determining DNA damage. The objective of this study was to investigate the DNA damage associated with occupational exposure to wood dust using the comet assay (peripheral blood samples) among nonsmoking wood workers (n = 31, furniture and construction workers) and controls (n = 19). DNA damage was greater in the group exposed to composite wood products compared to the group exposed to natural woods and controls (P < 0.001). No difference in DNA damage was observed between workers exposed to natural woods and controls (P = 0.13). Duration of exposure and current dust concentrations had no effect on DNA damage. In future studies, workers’ exposures should include cumulative dust concentrations and exposures originating from the binders used in composite wood products. PMID:27398027

  17. Sunlight-induced DNA damage in human mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Peter; Wallin, Hakan; Holst, Erik

    2002-01-01

    of sunlight was comparable to the interindividual variation, indicating that sunlight exposure and the individual's background were the two most important determinants for the basal level of DNA damage. Influence of other lifestyle factors such as exercise, intake of foods, infections, and age could......In this study of 301 blood samples from 21 subjects, we found markedly higher levels of DNA damage (nonpyrimidine dimer types) in the summer than in the winter detected by single-cell gel electrophoresis. The level of DNA damage was influenced by the average daily influx of sunlight ... to blood sampling. The 3 and 6 day periods before sampling influenced DNA damage the most. The importance of sunlight was further emphasized by a positive association of the DNA damage level to the amount of time the subjects had spent in the sun over a 3 day period prior to the sampling. The effect...

  18. Damage of DNA by radiation and it's recovery, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Noboru; Matsuura, Tomio; Sato, Hiroyuki.

    1974-01-01

    The damage and recovery of DNA was investigated by the incorporation of thymine derivatives (DHT, I trans, II trans, cis and glycol) into exponentially growing Tetrahymena cells. The strain employed was Tetrahymena pyriformis, Variety I, mating type IV. It is well known that these thymine derivatives are induced in vivo by radiation. The in vivo damage of DNA induced by radiation, and its recovery, were confirmed experimentally by means of gradient separation of sucrose density and by analytical ultra centrifugation (UVC). The recovery of DNA, its excision repair and its recombinational repair were compared with the recovery of Bacillus subtilis whose recovery kinetics were already known. 1) The damage of DNA was more sensitive to glycol than to II trans and cis. On the other hand, DHT is not sensitive for breaking DNA strand. 2) In its recovery damaged DNA was no more sensitive to glycol than to hhp as was true for Bacillus subtilis. (author)

  19. Evaluating In Vitro DNA Damage Using Comet Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yanxin; Liu, Yang; Yang, Chunzhang

    2017-10-11

    DNA damage is a common phenomenon for each cell during its lifespan, and is defined as an alteration of the chemical structure of genomic DNA. Cancer therapies, such as radio- and chemotherapy, introduce enormous amount of additional DNA damage, leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis to limit cancer progression. Quantitative assessment of DNA damage during experimental cancer therapy is a key step to justify the effectiveness of a genotoxic agent. In this study, we focus on a single cell electrophoresis assay, also known as the comet assay, which can quantify single and double-strand DNA breaks in vitro. The comet assay is a DNA damage quantification method that is efficient and easy to perform, and has low time/budget demands and high reproducibility. Here, we highlight the utility of the comet assay for a preclinical study by evaluating the genotoxic effect of olaparib/temozolomide combination therapy to U251 glioma cells.

  20. Cellular Responses to Cisplatin-Induced DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alakananda Basu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is one of the most effective anticancer agents widely used in the treatment of solid tumors. It is generally considered as a cytotoxic drug which kills cancer cells by damaging DNA and inhibiting DNA synthesis. How cells respond to cisplatin-induced DNA damage plays a critical role in deciding cisplatin sensitivity. Cisplatin-induced DNA damage activates various signaling pathways to prevent or promote cell death. This paper summarizes our current understandings regarding the mechanisms by which cisplatin induces cell death and the bases of cisplatin resistance. We have discussed various steps, including the entry of cisplatin inside cells, DNA repair, drug detoxification, DNA damage response, and regulation of cisplatin-induced apoptosis by protein kinases. An understanding of how various signaling pathways regulate cisplatin-induced cell death should aid in the development of more effective therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancer.

  1. Abnormal sensitivity of skin fibroblasts from familial polyposis patients to DNA alkylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barfknecht, T.R.; Little, J.B.

    1982-01-01

    Fibroblast cell strains derived from different patients all afflicted with genetic predisposing to the development of intestinal polyposis and cancer were tested for their sensitivity to the lethal effects of the DNA alkylating agents methylmethanesulfonate (MMS), ethyl methanesulfonate, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, and 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide. The genetic syndromes studied were: (a) adenomatosis of the colon and rectum only, an autosomal dominant trait; (b) Turcot's syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive polyposis syndrome also characterized by central nervous system tumors; and (c) Gardner's syndrome, an autosomal dominant syndrome which, in addition to intestinal polyposis, is also clinically characterized by osteomas and soft tissue tumors. Fibroblasts from a patient with Turcot's syndrome were hypersensitive to MMS, having a D0 value of 0.24 mM (p less than 0.01) versus the normal average D0 of 0.36 mM and a D10 value of 0.95 mM (p less than 0.01) compared with the normal average value of 1.3 mM. Fibroblasts from the Gardner's syndrome proband were moderately sensitive to MMS, ethyl methanesulfonate, and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine due to significant differences of D10 values of 0.60 mM (p less than 0.01), 15 mM (p less than 0.01), and 4.8 microM (p less than 0.025), respectively, versus the normal average values of 1.3 mM, 28 mM, and 9.4 microM. Fibroblasts from the clinically affected Gardner's syndrome daughter of the proband were significantly more sensitive to MMS treatment, D0 of 0.22 mM (p less than 0.01) versus the normal average D0 of 0.36 mM and a D10 of 0.97 mM (p less than 0.01) versus the normal average. This differential sensitivity to the several DNA alkylating agents suggests that different mechanisms of hypersensitivity to these chemicals may be associated with fibroblasts from the various forms of familial polyposis

  2. Plasmid DNA damage induced by helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xu; Cantrell, William A.; Escobar, Erika E.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2014-03-01

    A helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is applied to induce damage to aqueous plasmid DNA. The resulting fractions of the DNA conformers, which indicate intact molecules or DNA with single- or double-strand breaks, are determined using agarose gel electrophoresis. The DNA strand breaks increase with a decrease in the distance between the APPJ and DNA samples under two working conditions of the plasma source with different parameters of applied electric pulses. The damage level induced in the plasmid DNA is also enhanced with increased plasma irradiation time. The reactive species generated in the APPJ are characterized by optical emission spectra, and their roles in possible DNA damage processes occurring in an aqueous environment are also discussed.

  3. Primary DNA Damage in Dry Cleaners with Perchlorethylene Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Azimi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Perchloroethylene is a halogenated solvent widely used in dry cleaning. International agency of research on cancer classified this chemical as a probable human carcinogen. Objective: To evaluate the extent of primary DNA damage in dry cleaner workers who were exposed to perchloroethylene as compared to non-exposed subjects. The effect of exposure modifying factors such as use of personal protective equipment, perceived risk, and reported safe behaviors on observed DNA damage were also studied. Methods: 59 exposed and non-exposed workers were selected from Yazd, Iran. All the 33 exposed workers had work history at least 3 months in the dry cleaning shops. Peripheral blood sampling was performed. Microscope examination was performed under fluorescent microscope (400×. Open comet software was used for image analysis. All biological analysis was performed in one laboratory. Results: Primary DNA damage to leukocytes in dry cleaners was relatively high. The median tail length, %DNA in tail, and tail moment in exposed group were significantly higher than those in non-exposed group. There was no significant difference between smokers and nonsmokers in terms of tail length, tail moment, and %DNA in tail. There was no significant correlation between duration of employment in dry cleaning and observed DNA damage in terms of tail length, tail moment and %DNA in tail. Stratified analysis based on exposed and nonexposed category showed no significant relationship between age and observed DNA damage. Conclusion: Occupationally exposure to perchloroethylene can cause early DNA damage in dry cleaners.

  4. UV-B induces DNA damage and DNA synthesis delay in the marine diatom Cyclotella sp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buma, A.G.J.; Van Hannen, E.J.; Veldhuis, M.; Gieskes, W.W.C.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of UV-B on the occurrence of DNA damage and consequences for the cell cycle were studied in the marine diatom Cyclotella sp. DNA damage was quantified by immunofluorescent detection of thymine dimers in nuclear DNA of single cells using flow cytometry. A total UV-B dose (biologically

  5. UV-B induces DNA damage and DNA synthesis delay in the marine diatom Cyclotella sp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buma, A.G.J.; van Hannen, E.J; Veldhuis, M.J W; Gieskes, W.W C

    The effect of UV-B on the occurrence of DNA damage and consequences for the cell cycle were studied in the marine diatom Cyclotella sp. DNA damage was quantified by immunofluorescent detection of thymine dimers in nuclear DNA of single cells using flow cytometry. A total UV-B dose (biologically

  6. Recent Advancements in DNA Damage-Transcription Crosstalk and High-Resolution Mapping of DNA Breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitelli, Valerio; Galbiati, Alessandro; Iannelli, Fabio; Pessina, Fabio; Sharma, Sheetal; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2017-08-31

    Until recently, DNA damage arising from physiological DNA metabolism was considered a detrimental by-product for cells. However, an increasing amount of evidence has shown that DNA damage could have a positive role in transcription activation. In particular, DNA damage has been detected in transcriptional elements following different stimuli. These physiological DNA breaks are thought to be instrumental for the correct expression of genomic loci through different mechanisms. In this regard, although a plethora of methods are available to precisely map transcribed regions and transcription start sites, commonly used techniques for mapping DNA breaks lack sufficient resolution and sensitivity to draw a robust correlation between DNA damage generation and transcription. Recently, however, several methods have been developed to map DNA damage at single-nucleotide resolution, thus providing a new set of tools to correlate DNA damage and transcription. Here, we review how DNA damage can positively regulate transcription initiation, the current techniques for mapping DNA breaks at high resolution, and how these techniques can benefit future studies of DNA damage and transcription.

  7. Research on DNA methylation of human osteosarcoma cell MGMT and its relationship with cell resistance to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jun; Cui, Qiu; Jiang, WeiHao; Liu, Cheng; Li, DingFeng; Zeng, Yanjun

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene methylation status and its protein expression, as well as the effects of demethylating agent 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-CdR) on MGMT gene expression and its resistance to alkylating agents, and to elucidate MGMT expression mechanism and significance in osteosarcoma. The human osteosarcoma cell lines Saos-2 and MG-63 were collected and treated with 5-Aza-CdR for 6 days. The cells not treated with 5-Aza-CdR were set as a negative control. The genomic DNA was extracted from the Saos-2 and MG-63 cells using methylation-specific PCR to detect the promoter CpG island methylation status of the MGMT gene. Cell sensitivity to alkylating agents before and after drug administration was detected by the MTT method. The variation in MGMT gene mRNA and protein was detected by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blotting. The MGMT promoter gene of normal Saos-2 cells was methylated, with reduced MGMT mRNA and protein expression; the MGMT mRNA and protein expression of Saos-2 cells treated with 5-Aza-CdR was obviously enhanced, and its sensitivity to alkylating agents was reversed. Meanwhile, with promoter CpG island unmethylation of the MGMT gene, MGMT protein was expressed in the normal MG-63 cells and the MG-63 cells treated with 5-Aza-CdR, and both showed resistance to alkylating agents. The methylation status of the MGMT gene promoter in human osteosarcoma cells reflected the cells' ability to induce MGMT protein expression and can be used as a molecular marker to project the sensitivity of cancer tissues to alkylating agent drugs.

  8. An active site aromatic triad in Escherichia coli DNA Pol IV coordinates cell survival and mutagenesis in different DNA damaging agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan W Benson

    Full Text Available DinB (DNA Pol IV is a translesion (TLS DNA polymerase, which inserts a nucleotide opposite an otherwise replication-stalling N(2-dG lesion in vitro, and confers resistance to nitrofurazone (NFZ, a compound that forms these lesions in vivo. DinB is also known to be part of the cellular response to alkylation DNA damage. Yet it is not known if DinB active site residues, in addition to aminoacids involved in DNA synthesis, are critical in alkylation lesion bypass. It is also unclear which active site aminoacids, if any, might modulate DinB's bypass fidelity of distinct lesions. Here we report that along with the classical catalytic residues, an active site "aromatic triad", namely residues F12, F13, and Y79, is critical for cell survival in the presence of the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS. Strains expressing dinB alleles with single point mutations in the aromatic triad survive poorly in MMS. Remarkably, these strains show fewer MMS- than NFZ-induced mutants, suggesting that the aromatic triad, in addition to its role in TLS, modulates DinB's accuracy in bypassing distinct lesions. The high bypass fidelity of prevalent alkylation lesions is evident even when the DinB active site performs error-prone NFZ-induced lesion bypass. The analyses carried out with the active site aromatic triad suggest that the DinB active site residues are poised to proficiently bypass distinctive DNA lesions, yet they are also malleable so that the accuracy of the bypass is lesion-dependent.

  9. Inactivation of the DNA-repair gene MGMT and the clinical response of gliomas to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteller, M; Garcia-Foncillas, J; Andion, E; Goodman, S N; Hidalgo, O F; Vanaclocha, V; Baylin, S B; Herman, J G

    2000-11-09

    The DNA-repair enzyme O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) inhibits the killing of tumor cells by alkylating agents. MGMT activity is controlled by a promoter; methylation of the promoter silences the gene in cancer, and the cells no longer produce MGMT. We examined gliomas to determine whether methylation of the MGMT promoter is related to the responsiveness of the tumor to alkylating agents. We analyzed the MGMT promoter in tumor DNA by a methylation-specific polymerase-chain-reaction assay. The gliomas were obtained from patients who had been treated with carmustine (1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea, or BCNU). The molecular data were correlated with the clinical outcome. The MGMT promoter was methylated in gliomas from 19 of 47 patients (40 percent). This finding was associated with regression of the tumor and prolonged overall and disease-free survival. It was an independent and stronger prognostic factor than age, stage, tumor grade, or performance status. Methylation of the MGMT promoter in gliomas is a useful predictor of the responsiveness of the tumors to alkylating agents.

  10. Chemical determination of free radical-induced damage to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizdaroglu, M

    1991-01-01

    Free radical-induced damage to DNA in vivo can result in deleterious biological consequences such as the initiation and promotion of cancer. Chemical characterization and quantitation of such DNA damage is essential for an understanding of its biological consequences and cellular repair. Methodologies incorporating the technique of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) have been developed in recent years for measurement of free radical-induced DNA damage. The use of GC/MS with selected-ion monitoring (SIM) facilitates unequivocal identification and quantitation of a large number of products of all four DNA bases produced in DNA by reactions with hydroxyl radical, hydrated electron, and H atom. Hydroxyl radical-induced DNA-protein cross-links in mammalian chromatin, and products of the sugar moiety in DNA are also unequivocally identified and quantitated. The sensitivity and selectivity of the GC/MS-SIM technique enables the measurement of DNA base products even in isolated mammalian chromatin without the necessity of first isolating DNA, and despite the presence of histones. Recent results reviewed in this article demonstrate the usefulness of the GC/MS technique for chemical determination of free radical-induced DNA damage in DNA as well as in mammalian chromatin under a vast variety of conditions of free radical production.

  11. Alkaline Comet Assay for Assessing DNA Damage in Individual Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Xinzhu; Wang, Zemin; Klaunig, James E

    2015-08-06

    Single-cell gel electrophoresis, commonly called a comet assay, is a simple and sensitive method for assessing DNA damage at the single-cell level. It is an important technique in genetic toxicological studies. The comet assay performed under alkaline conditions (pH >13) is considered the optimal version for identifying agents with genotoxic activity. The alkaline comet assay is capable of detecting DNA double-strand breaks, single-strand breaks, alkali-labile sites, DNA-DNA/DNA-protein cross-linking, and incomplete excision repair sites. The inclusion of digestion of lesion-specific DNA repair enzymes in the procedure allows the detection of various DNA base alterations, such as oxidative base damage. This unit describes alkaline comet assay procedures for assessing DNA strand breaks and oxidative base alterations. These methods can be applied in a variety of cells from in vitro and in vivo experiments, as well as human studies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. Endogenous DNA Damage and Repair Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Klungland

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Tomas Lindahl completed his medical studies at Karolinska Institute in 1970. Yet, his work has always been dedicated to unraveling fundamental mechanisms of DNA decay and DNA repair. His research is characterized with groundbreaking discoveries on the instability of our genome, the identification of novel DNA repair activities, the characterization of DNA repair pathways, and the association to diseases, throughout his 40 years of scientific career.

  13. Molecular mechanisms in radiation damage to DNA. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, R.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this work are to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for radiation-induced DNA damage. The overall goal is to understand the relationship between the chemical and structural changes produced by ionizing radiation in DNA and the resulting impairment of biological function expressed as carcinogenesis or cell death. The studies are based on theoretical explorations of possible mechanisms that link initial radiation damage in the form of base and sugar damage to conformational changes in DNA. These mechanistic explorations should lead to the formulation of testable hypotheses regarding the processes of impairment of regulation of gene expression, alteration in DNA repair, and damage to DNA structure involved in cell death or cancer

  14. Aging of hematopoietic stem cells: DNA damage and mutations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehrle, Bettina M; Geiger, Hartmut

    2016-10-01

    Aging in the hematopoietic system and the stem cell niche contributes to aging-associated phenotypes of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), including leukemia and aging-associated immune remodeling. Among others, the DNA damage theory of aging of HSCs is well established, based on the detection of a significantly larger amount of γH2AX foci and a higher tail moment in the comet assay, both initially thought to be associated with DNA damage in aged HSCs compared with young cells, and bone marrow failure in animals devoid of DNA repair factors. Novel data on the increase in and nature of DNA mutations in the hematopoietic system with age, the quality of the DNA damage response in aged HSCs, and the nature of γH2AX foci question a direct link between DNA damage and the DNA damage response and aging of HSCs, and rather favor changes in epigenetics, splicing-factors or three-dimensional architecture of the cell as major cell intrinsic factors of HSCs aging. Aging of HSCs is also driven by a strong contribution of aging of the niche. This review discusses the DNA damage theory of HSC aging in the light of these novel mechanisms of aging of HSCs. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Imaging the DNA damage response with PET and SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, James C.; Koustoulidou, Sofia; Cornelissen, Bart [University of Oxford, CR-UK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2017-06-15

    DNA integrity is constantly challenged by endogenous and exogenous factors that can alter the DNA sequence, leading to mutagenesis, aberrant transcriptional activity, and cytotoxicity. Left unrepaired, damaged DNA can ultimately lead to the development of cancer. To overcome this threat, a series of complex mechanisms collectively known as the DNA damage response (DDR) are able to detect the various types of DNA damage that can occur and stimulate the appropriate repair process. Each DNA damage repair pathway leads to the recruitment, upregulation, or activation of specific proteins within the nucleus, which, in some cases, can represent attractive targets for molecular imaging. Given the well-established involvement of DDR during tumorigenesis and cancer therapy, the ability to monitor these repair processes non-invasively using nuclear imaging techniques may facilitate the earlier detection of cancer and may also assist in monitoring response to DNA damaging treatment. This review article aims to provide an overview of recent efforts to develop PET and SPECT radiotracers for imaging of DNA damage repair proteins. (orig.)

  16. Complex responses to alkylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samson, L.D.

    2003-01-01

    Using Affymetrix oligonucleotide GeneChip analysis, we previously found that, upon exposure to the simple alkylating agent methylmethane sulfonate, the transcript levels for about one third of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome (∼2,000 transcripts) are induced or repressed during the first hour or two after exposure. In order to determine whether the responsiveness of these genes has any relevance to the protection of cells against alkylating agents we have undertaken several follow-up studies. First, we explored the specificity of this global transcriptional response to MMS by measuring the global response of S. cerevisiae to a broad range of agents that are known to induce DNA damage. We found that each agent produced a very different mRNA transcript profile, even though the exposure doses produced similar levels of toxicity. We also found that the selection of genes that respond to MMS is highly dependent upon what cell cycle phase the cells are in at the time of exposure. Computational clustering analysis of the dataset derived from a large number of exposures identified several promoter motifs that are likely to control some of the regulons that comprise this large set of genes that are responsive to DNA damaging agents. However, it should be noted that these agents damage cellular components other than DNA, and that the responsiveness of each gene need not be in response to DNA damage per se. We have also begun to study the response of other organisms to alkylating agents, and these include E. coli, cultured mouse and human cells, and mice. Finally, we have developed a high throughput phenotypic screening method to interrogate the role of all non-essential S. cerevisiae genes (about 4,800) in protecting S. cerevisiae against the deleterious effects of alkylating agents; we have termed this analysis 'genomic phenotyping'. This study has uncovered a plethora of new pathways that play a role in the recovery of eukaryotic cells after exposure to toxic

  17. Role of the Checkpoint Clamp in DNA Damage Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihoko Kai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage occurs during DNA replication, spontaneous chemical reactions, and assaults by external or metabolism-derived agents. Therefore, all living cells must constantly contend with DNA damage. Cells protect themselves from these genotoxic stresses by activating the DNA damage checkpoint and DNA repair pathways. Coordination of these pathways requires tight regulation in order to prevent genomic instability. The checkpoint clamp complex consists of Rad9, Rad1 and Hus1 proteins, and is often called the 9-1-1 complex. This PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen-like donut-shaped protein complex is a checkpoint sensor protein that is recruited to DNA damage sites during the early stage of the response, and is required for checkpoint activation. As PCNA is required for multiple pathways of DNA metabolism, the checkpoint clamp has also been implicated in direct roles in DNA repair, as well as in coordination of the pathways. Here we discuss roles of the checkpoint clamp in DNA damage response (DDR.

  18. Conformational change in human DNA repair enzyme O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase upon alkylation of its active site by SN1 (indirect-acting) and SN2 (direct-acting) alkylating agents: breaking a "salt-link".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, H K; Teo, A K; Ali, R B; Lim, A; Ayi, T C; Yarosh, D B; Li, B F

    1996-09-24

    Human O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) repairs DNA by transferring alkyl (R-) adducts from O6-alkylguanine (6RG) in DNA to its own cysteine residue at codon 145 (formation of R-MGMT). We show here that R-MGMT in cell extracts, which is sensitive to protease V8 cleavage at the glutamic acid residues at codons 30 (E30) and 172 (E172), can be specifically immunoprecipitated with an MGMT monoclonal antibody, Mab.3C7. This Mab recognizes an epitope of human MGMT including the lysine 107 (K107) which is within the most basic region that is highly conserved among mammalian MGMTs. Surprisingly, the K107L mutant protein is repair-deficient and readily cleaved by protease V8 similar to R-MGMT. We propose that R-MGMT adopted an altered conformation which exposed the Mab.3C7 epitope and rendered that protein sensitive to protease V8 attack. This proposal could be explained by the disruption of a structural "salt-link" within the molecule based on the available structural and biochemical data. The specific binding of Mab.3C7 to R-MGMT has been compared with the protease V8 method in the detection of R-MGMT in extracts of cells treated with low dosages of methyliodide (SN2) and O6-benzylguanine. Their identical behaviors in producing protease V8 sensitive R-MGMT and Mab.3C7 immunoprecipitates suggest that probably methyl iodide (an ineffective agent in producing 6RG in DNA) can directly alkylate the active site of cellular MGMT similar to O6-benzylguanine. The effectiveness of MeI in producing R-MGMT, i.e., inactivation of cellular MGMT, indicates that this agent can increase the effectiveness of environmental and endogenously produced alkylating carcinogens in producing the mutagenic O6-alkylguanine residues in DNA in vivo.

  19. Studying the synergistic damage effects induced by 1.8 GHz radiofrequency field radiation (RFR) with four chemical mutagens on human lymphocyte DNA using comet assay in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Baohong; He Jiliang; Jin Lifen; Lu Deqiang; Zheng Wei; Lou Jianlin; Deng Hongping

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to study the synergistic DNA damage effects in human lymphocytes induced by 1.8 GHz radiofrequency field radiation (RFR, SAR of 3 W/kg) with four chemical mutagens, i.e. mitomycin C (MMC, DNA crosslinker), bleomycin (BLM, radiomimetic agent), methyl methanesulfonate (MMS, alkylating agent), and 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO, UV-mimetic agent). The DNA damage of lymphocytes exposed to RFR and/or with chemical mutagens was detected at two incubation time (0 or 21 h) after treatment with comet assay in vitro. Three combinative exposure ways were used. Cells were exposed to RFR and chemical mutagens for 2 and 3 h, respectively. Tail length (TL) and tail moment (TM) were utilized as DNA damage indexes. The results showed no difference of DNA damage indexes between RFR group and control group at 0 and 21 h incubation after exposure (P > 0.05). There were significant difference of DNA damage indexes between MMC group and RFR + MMC co-exposure group at 0 and 21 h incubation after treatment (P 0.05). The experimental results indicated 1.8 GHz RFR (SAR, 3 W/kg) for 2 h did not induce the human lymphocyte DNA damage effects in vitro, but could enhance the human lymphocyte DNA damage effects induced by MMC and 4NQO. The synergistic DNA damage effects of 1.8 GHz RFR with BLM or MMS were not obvious

  20. Visualization of complex DNA damage along accelerated ions tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikova, Elena; Boreyko, Alla; Bulanova, Tatiana; Ježková, Lucie; Zadneprianetc, Mariia; Smirnova, Elena

    2018-04-01

    The most deleterious DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation are clustered DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). Clustered or complex DNA damage is a combination of a few simple lesions (single-strand breaks, base damage etc.) within one or two DNA helix turns. It is known that yield of complex DNA lesions increases with increasing linear energy transfer (LET) of radiation. For investigation of the induction and repair of complex DNA lesions, human fibroblasts were irradiated with high-LET 15N ions (LET = 183.3 keV/μm, E = 13MeV/n) and low-LET 60Co γ-rays (LET ≈ 0.3 keV/μm) radiation. DNA DSBs (γH2AX and 53BP1) and base damage (OGG1) markers were visualized by immunofluorecence staining and high-resolution microscopy. The obtained results showed slower repair kinetics of induced DSBs in cells irradiated with accelerated ions compared to 60Co γ-rays, indicating induction of more complex DNA damage. Confirming previous assumptions, detailed 3D analysis of γH2AX/53BP1 foci in 15N ions tracks revealed more complicated structure of the foci in contrast to γ-rays. It was shown that proteins 53BP1 and OGG1 involved in repair of DNA DSBs and modified bases, respectively, were colocalized in tracks of 15N ions and thus represented clustered DNA DSBs.

  1. Mechanisms of mutagenesis: DNA replication in the presence of DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Binyan; Xue, Qizhen; Tang, Yong; Cao, Jia; Guengerich, F Peter; Zhang, Huidong

    2016-01-01

    Environmental mutagens cause DNA damage that disturbs replication and produces mutations, leading to cancer and other diseases. We discuss mechanisms of mutagenesis resulting from DNA damage, from the level of DNA replication by a single polymerase to the complex DNA replisome of some typical model organisms (including bacteriophage T7, T4, Sulfolobus solfataricus, Escherichia coli, yeast and human). For a single DNA polymerase, DNA damage can affect replication in three major ways: reducing replication fidelity, causing frameshift mutations, and blocking replication. For the DNA replisome, protein interactions and the functions of accessory proteins can yield rather different results even with a single DNA polymerase. The mechanism of mutation during replication performed by the DNA replisome is a long-standing question. Using new methods and techniques, the replisomes of certain organisms and human cell extracts can now be investigated with regard to the bypass of DNA damage. In this review, we consider the molecular mechanism of mutagenesis resulting from DNA damage in replication at the levels of single DNA polymerases and complex DNA replisomes, including translesion DNA synthesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Persistence of DNA adducts, hypermutation and acquisition of cellular resistance to alkylating agents in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, R J; Fay, M F; Cosgrove, L; Y C Fung, K; Rundle-Thiele, D; Martin, J H

    2017-12-02

    Glioblastoma is a lethal form of brain tumour usually treated by surgical resection followed by radiotherapy and an alkylating chemotherapeutic agent. Key to the success of this multimodal approach is maintaining apoptotic sensitivity of tumour cells to the alkylating agent. This initial treatment likely establishes conditions contributing to development of drug resistance as alkylating agents form the O 6 -methylguanine adduct. This activates the mismatch repair (MMR) process inducing apoptosis and mutagenesis. This review describes key juxtaposed drivers in the balance between alkylation induced mutagenesis and apoptosis. Mutations in MMR genes are the probable drivers for alkylation based drug resistance. Critical to this interaction are the dose-response and temporal interactions between adduct formation and MMR mutations. The precision in dose interval, dose-responses and temporal relationships dictate a role for alkylating agents in either promoting experimental tumour formation or inducing tumour cell death with chemotherapy. Importantly, this resultant loss of chemotherapeutic selective pressure provides opportunity to explore novel therapeutics and appropriate combinations to minimise alkylation based drug resistance and tumour relapse.

  3. Epigenetic telomere protection by Drosophila DNA damage response pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikemus, Sarah R; Queiroz-Machado, Joana; Lai, KuanJu; McGinnis, Nadine; Sunkel, Claudio; Brodsky, Michael H

    2006-05-01

    Analysis of terminal deletion chromosomes indicates that a sequence-independent mechanism regulates protection of Drosophila telomeres. Mutations in Drosophila DNA damage response genes such as atm/tefu, mre11, or rad50 disrupt telomere protection and localization of the telomere-associated proteins HP1 and HOAP, suggesting that recognition of chromosome ends contributes to telomere protection. However, the partial telomere protection phenotype of these mutations limits the ability to test if they act in the epigenetic telomere protection mechanism. We examined the roles of the Drosophila atm and atr-atrip DNA damage response pathways and the nbs homolog in DNA damage responses and telomere protection. As in other organisms, the atm and atr-atrip pathways act in parallel to promote telomere protection. Cells lacking both pathways exhibit severe defects in telomere protection and fail to localize the protection protein HOAP to telomeres. Drosophila nbs is required for both atm- and atr-dependent DNA damage responses and acts in these pathways during DNA repair. The telomere fusion phenotype of nbs is consistent with defects in each of these activities. Cells defective in both the atm and atr pathways were used to examine if DNA damage response pathways regulate telomere protection without affecting telomere specific sequences. In these cells, chromosome fusion sites retain telomere-specific sequences, demonstrating that loss of these sequences is not responsible for loss of protection. Furthermore, terminally deleted chromosomes also fuse in these cells, directly implicating DNA damage response pathways in the epigenetic protection of telomeres. We propose that recognition of chromosome ends and recruitment of HP1 and HOAP by DNA damage response proteins is essential for the epigenetic protection of Drosophila telomeres. Given the conserved roles of DNA damage response proteins in telomere function, related mechanisms may act at the telomeres of other organisms.

  4. Global chromatin fibre compaction in response to DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, Charlotte; Hayward, Richard L.; Gilbert, Nick

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Robust KAP1 phosphorylation in response to DNA damage in HCT116 cells. ► DNA repair foci are found in soluble chromatin. ► Biophysical analysis reveals global chromatin fibre compaction after DNA damage. ► DNA damage is accompanied by rapid linker histone dephosphorylation. -- Abstract: DNA is protected by packaging it into higher order chromatin fibres, but this can impede nuclear processes like DNA repair. Despite considerable research into the factors required for signalling and repairing DNA damage, it is unclear if there are concomitant changes in global chromatin fibre structure. In human cells DNA double strand break (DSB) formation triggers a signalling cascade resulting in H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX), the rapid recruitment of chromatin associated proteins and the subsequent repair of damaged sites. KAP1 is a transcriptional corepressor and in HCT116 cells we found that after DSB formation by chemicals or ionising radiation there was a wave of, predominantly ATM dependent, KAP1 phosphorylation. Both KAP1 and phosphorylated KAP1 were readily extracted from cells indicating they do not have a structural role and γH2AX was extracted in soluble chromatin indicating that sites of damage are not attached to an underlying structural matrix. After DSB formation we did not find a concomitant change in the sensitivity of chromatin fibres to micrococcal nuclease digestion. Therefore to directly investigate higher order chromatin fibre structures we used a biophysical sedimentation technique based on sucrose gradient centrifugation to compare the conformation of chromatin fibres isolated from cells before and after DNA DSB formation. After damage we found global chromatin fibre compaction, accompanied by rapid linker histone dephosphorylation, consistent with fibres being more regularly folded or fibre deformation being stabilized by linker histones. We suggest that following DSB formation, although there is localised chromatin unfolding to

  5. Radiation-induced DNA damage as a function of DNA hydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swarts, S.G.; Miao, L.; Wheeler, K.T.; Sevilla, M.D.; Becker, D.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation-induced DNA damage is produced from the sum of the radicals generated by the direct ionization of the DNA (direct effect) and by the reactions of the DNA with free radicals formed in the surrounding environment (indirect effect). The indirect effect has been believed to be the predominant contributor to radiation-induced intracellular DNA damage, mainly as the result of reactions of bulk water radicals (e.g., OH·) with DNA. However, recent evidence suggests that DNA damage, derived from the irradiation of water molecules that are tightly bound in the hydration layer, may occur as the result of the transfer of electron-loss centers (e.g. holes) and electrons from these water molecules to the DNA. Since this mechanism for damaging DNA more closely parallels that of the direct effect, the irradiation of these tightly bound water molecules may contribute to a quasi-direct effect. These water molecules comprise a large fraction of the water surrounding intracellular DNA and could account for a significant proportion of intracellular radiation-induced DNA damage. Consequently, the authors have attempted to characterize this quasi-direct effect to determine: (1) the extent of the DNA hydration layer that is involved with this effect, and (2) what influence this effect has on the types and quantities of radiation-induced DNA damage

  6. Protection of cisplatin-induced spermatotoxicity, DNA damage and chromatin abnormality by selenium nano-particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezvanfar, Mohammad Amin; Rezvanfar, Mohammad Ali [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza [Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Biotechnology Research Centre, Faculty of Pharmacy, TUMS, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ahmadi, Abbas [Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Urmia University, Urmia (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Baeeri, Maryam; Mohammadirad, Azadeh [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdollahi, Mohammad, E-mail: mohammad.abdollahi@utoronto.ca [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-02-01

    Cisplatin (CIS), an anticancer alkylating agent, induces DNA adducts and effectively cross links the DNA strands and so affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. The present study investigated the cellular/biochemical mechanisms underlying possible protective effect of selenium nano-particles (Nano-Se) as an established strong antioxidant with more bioavailability and less toxicity, on reproductive toxicity of CIS by assessment of sperm characteristics, sperm DNA integrity, chromatin quality and spermatogenic disorders. To determine the role of oxidative stress (OS) in the pathogenesis of CIS gonadotoxicity, the level of lipid peroxidation (LPO), antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and peroxynitrite (ONOO) as a marker of nitrosative stress (NS) and testosterone (T) concentration as a biomarker of testicular function were measured in the blood and testes. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were equally divided into four groups. A single IP dose of CIS (7 mg/kg) and protective dose of Nano-Se (2 mg/kg/day) were administered alone or in combination. The CIS-exposed rats showed a significant increase in testicular and serum LPO and ONOO level, along with a significant decrease in enzymatic antioxidants levels, diminished serum T concentration and abnormal histologic findings with impaired sperm quality associated with increased DNA damage and decreased chromatin quality. Coadministration of Nano-Se significantly improved the serum T, sperm quality, and spermatogenesis and reduced CIS-induced free radical toxic stress and spermatic DNA damage. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that Nano-Se may be useful to prevent CIS-induced gonadotoxicity through its antioxidant potential. Highlights: ► Cisplatin (CIS) affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. ► Effect of Nano-Se on CIS-induced spermatotoxicity was investigated. ► CIS-exposure induces oxidative sperm DNA damage

  7. The Fanconi anemia pathway sensitizes to DNA alkylating agents by inducing JNK-p53-dependent mitochondrial apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lin; Li, Yanlin; He, Miao; Song, Zhiguo; Lin, Shu; Yu, Zhaojin; Bai, Xuefeng; Wang, Enhua; Wei, Minjie

    2014-07-01

    The Fanconi anemia/BRCA (FA/BRCA) DNA damage repair pathway plays a pivotal role in the cellular response to DNA alkylating agents and greatly influences drug response in cancer treatment. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the FA/BRCA pathway reversed resistance have received limited attention. In the present study, we investigated the effect of Fanconi anemia complementation group F protein (FANCF), a critical factor of the FA/BRCA pathway, on cancer cell apoptosis induced by DNA alkylating agents such as mitomycin c (MMC). We found that FANCF shRNA potentiated MMC-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. At a mechanistic level, FANCF shRNA downregulated the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and upregulated the pro-apoptotic protein Bax, accompanied by release of cyt-c and smac into the cytosol in MMC-treated cells. Furthermore, activation of caspase-3 and -9, other than caspase-8, cleavage of poly(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP), and a decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) indicated that involvement of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in FANCF silencing of MMC-treated breast cancer cells. A decrease in IAP family proteins XIAP and survivin were also observed following FANCF silencing in MMC-treated breast cancer cells. Notably, FANCF shRNA was able to increase p53 levels through activation of the JNK pathway in MMC-treated breast cancer cells. Furthermore, p53 inhibition using pifithrin-α abolished the induction of caspase-3 and PARP by FANCF shRNA and MMC, indicating that MMC-induced apoptosis is substantially enhanced by FANCF shRNA via p53-dependent mechanisms. To our knowledge, we provide new evidence for the potential application of FANCF as a chemosensitizer in breast cancer therapy.

  8. DNA damage caused by UV- and near UV-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Takeo

    1986-01-01

    Much work with mutants deficient in DNA repair has been performed concerning UV-induced DNA damage under the condition where there is no artificial stimulation. In an attempt to infer the effects of solar wavelengths, the outcome of the work is discussed in terms of cellular radiation sensitivity, unscheduled DNA synthesis, and mutation induction, leading to the conclusion that some DNA damage occurs even by irradiation of the shorter wavelength light (270 - 315 nm) and is repaired by excision repair. It has been thought to date that pyrimidine dimer (PD) plays the most important role in UV-induced DNA damage, followed by (6 - 4) photoproducts. As for DNA damage induced by near UV irradiation, the yield of DNA single-strand breaks and of DNA-protein crosslinking, other than PD, is considered. The DNA-protein crosslinking has proved to be induced by irradiation at any wavelength of UV ranging from 260 to 425 nm. Near UV irradiation causes the inhibition of cell proliferation to take place. (Namekawa, K.)

  9. DNA Damage, Fruits and Vegetables and Breast Cancer Prevention

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thompson, Henry

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to evaluate the effect(s) of increasing fruit and vegetable intake on oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation in a population of women at elevated risk for breast cancer...

  10. DNA Damage, Fruits and Vegetables and Breast Cancer Prevention

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thompson, Henry

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to evaluate the effect(s) of increasing fruit and vegetable intake on oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation in a population of women at elevated risk for breast cancer...

  11. DNA Damage, Fruits and Vegetables and Breast Cancer Prevention

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thompson, Henry

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to evaluate the effect(s) of increasing fruit and vegetable intake on oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation in a population of women at elevated risk for breast cancer...

  12. DNA Damage, Fruits and Vegetables and Breast Cancer Prevention

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thompson, Henry

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to evaluate the effect(s) of increasing fruit and vegetable intake on oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation in a population of women at elevated risk for breast cancer...

  13. DNA damage and plasma homocysteine levels are associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-01-18

    Jan 18, 2010 ... (Fluitest Glu, Biocon Solutions Pte Ltd, Singapore). Cholesterol, ... migration in the comet tail was taken as an estimate of DNA damage and is ..... fever, and dietary energy intake on weight gain in rural Bangladeshi children.

  14. Noncovalent DNA Binding Drives DNA Alkylation by Leinamycin. Evidence That the Z,E-5-(Thiazol-4-yl)-penta-2,4-dienone Moiety of the Natural Product Serves As An Atypical DNA Intercalator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekry, Mostafa I.; Szekely, Jozsef; Dutta, Sanjay; Breydo, Leonid; Zang, Hong; Gates, Kent S.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular recognition and chemical modification of DNA are important in medicinal chemistry, toxicology, and biotechnology. Historically, natural products have revealed many interesting and unexpected mechanisms for noncovalent DNA binding and covalent DNA modification. The studies reported here characterize the molecular mechanisms underlying the efficient alkylation of duplex DNA by the Streptomyces-derived natural product leinamycin. Previous studies suggested that alkylation of duplex DNA by activated leinamycin (2) is driven by noncovalent association of the natural product with the double helix. This is striking because leinamycin does not contain a classical noncovalent DNA-binding motif such as an intercalating unit, a groove binder, or a polycation. The experiments described here provide evidence that leinamycin is an atypical DNA-intercalating agent. A competition binding assay involving daunomycin-mediated inhibition of DNA alkylation by leinamycin provided evidence that activated leinamycin binds to duplex DNA with an apparent binding constant of approximately 4.3 ± 0.4 × 103 M−1. Activated leinamycin caused duplex unwinding and hydrodynamic changes in DNA-containing solutions that are indicative of DNA intercalation. Characterization of the reaction of activated leinamycin with palindromic duplexes containing 5'-CG and 5'-GC target sites, bulge-containing duplexes, and 5-methylcytosine-containing duplexes provided evidence regarding the orientation of leinamycin with respect to target guanine residues. The data allows construction of a model for the leinamycin-DNA complex suggesting how a modest DNA-binding constant combines with proper positioning of the natural product to drive efficient alkylation of guanine residues in the major groove of duplex DNA. PMID:21954957

  15. Clustered DNA damage induced by proton and heavy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidkova, M.; Pachnerova Brabcova, K; Stepan, V.; Vysin, L.; Sihver, L.; Incerti, S.

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces in DNA strand breaks, damaged bases and modified sugars, which accumulate with increasing density of ionizations in charged particle tracks. Compared to isolated DNA damage sites, the biological toxicity of damage clusters can be for living cells more severe. We investigated the clustered DNA damage induced by protons (30 MeV) and high LET radiation (C 290 MeV/u and Fe 500 MeV/u) in pBR322 plasmid DNA. To distinguish between direct and indirect pathways of radiation damage, the plasmid was irradiated in pure water or in aqueous solution of one of the three scavengers (coumarin-3-carboxylic acid, dimethylsulfoxide, and glycylglycine). The goal of the contribution is the analysis of determined types of DNA damage in dependence on radiation quality and related contribution of direct and indirect radiation effects. The yield of double strand breaks (DSB) induced in the DNA plasmid-scavenger system by heavy ion radiation was found to decrease with increasing scavenging capacity due to reaction with hydroxyl radical, linearly with high correlation coefficients. The yield of non-DSB clusters was found to occur twice as much as the DSB. Their decrease with increasing scavenging capacity had lower linear correlation coefficients. This indicates that the yield of non-DSB clusters depends on more factors, which are likely connected to the chemical properties of individual scavengers. (authors)

  16. The nucleosome: orchestrating DNA damage signaling and repair within chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Poonam; Miller, Kyle M

    2016-10-01

    DNA damage occurs within the chromatin environment, which ultimately participates in regulating DNA damage response (DDR) pathways and repair of the lesion. DNA damage activates a cascade of signaling events that extensively modulates chromatin structure and organization to coordinate DDR factor recruitment to the break and repair, whilst also promoting the maintenance of normal chromatin functions within the damaged region. For example, DDR pathways must avoid conflicts between other DNA-based processes that function within the context of chromatin, including transcription and replication. The molecular mechanisms governing the recognition, target specificity, and recruitment of DDR factors and enzymes to the fundamental repeating unit of chromatin, i.e., the nucleosome, are poorly understood. Here we present our current view of how chromatin recognition by DDR factors is achieved at the level of the nucleosome. Emerging evidence suggests that the nucleosome surface, including the nucleosome acidic patch, promotes the binding and activity of several DNA damage factors on chromatin. Thus, in addition to interactions with damaged DNA and histone modifications, nucleosome recognition by DDR factors plays a key role in orchestrating the requisite chromatin response to maintain both genome and epigenome integrity.

  17. MDM2 Antagonists Counteract Drug-Induced DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna E. Vilgelm

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Antagonists of MDM2-p53 interaction are emerging anti-cancer drugs utilized in clinical trials for malignancies that rarely mutate p53, including melanoma. We discovered that MDM2-p53 antagonists protect DNA from drug-induced damage in melanoma cells and patient-derived xenografts. Among the tested DNA damaging drugs were various inhibitors of Aurora and Polo-like mitotic kinases, as well as traditional chemotherapy. Mitotic kinase inhibition causes mitotic slippage, DNA re-replication, and polyploidy. Here we show that re-replication of the polyploid genome generates replicative stress which leads to DNA damage. MDM2-p53 antagonists relieve replicative stress via the p53-dependent activation of p21 which inhibits DNA replication. Loss of p21 promoted drug-induced DNA damage in melanoma cells and enhanced anti-tumor activity of therapy combining MDM2 antagonist with mitotic kinase inhibitor in mice. In summary, MDM2 antagonists may reduce DNA damaging effects of anti-cancer drugs if they are administered together, while targeting p21 can improve the efficacy of such combinations.

  18. Preterm newborns show slower repair of oxidative damage and paternal smoking associated DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Loock, Kim; Ciardelli, Roberta; Decordier, Ilse; Plas, Gina; Haumont, Dominique; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline

    2012-09-01

    Newborns have to cope with hypoxia during delivery and a sudden increase in oxygen at birth. Oxygen will partly be released as reactive oxygen species having the potential to cause damage to DNA and proteins. In utero, increase of most (non)-enzymatic antioxidants occurs during last weeks of gestation, making preterm neonates probably more sensitive to oxidative stress. Moreover, it has been hypothesized that oxidative stress might be the common etiological factor for certain neonatal diseases in preterm infants. The aim of this study was to assess background DNA damage; in vitro H(2)O(2) induced oxidative DNA damage and repair capacity (residual DNA damage) in peripheral blood mononucleated cells from 25 preterm newborns and their mothers. In addition, demographic data were taken into account and repair capacity of preterm was compared with full-term newborns. Multivariate linear regression analysis revealed that preterm infants from smoking fathers have higher background DNA damage levels than those from non-smoking fathers, emphasizing the risk of paternal smoking behaviour for the progeny. Significantly higher residual DNA damage found after 15-min repair in preterm children compared to their mothers and higher residual DNA damage after 2 h compared to full-term newborns suggest a slower DNA repair capacity in preterm children. In comparison with preterm infants born by caesarean delivery, preterm infants born by vaginal delivery do repair more slowly the in vitro induced oxidative DNA damage. Final impact of passive smoking and of the slower DNA repair activity of preterm infants need to be confirmed in a larger study population combining transgenerational genetic and/or epigenetic effects, antioxidant levels, genotypes, repair enzyme efficiency/levels and infant morbidity.

  19. Radiation damage to DNA: the effect of LET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, J F; Milligan, J R [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). School of Medicine

    1997-03-01

    Mechanisms whereby ionizing radiation induced damage are introduced into cellular DNA are discussed. The types of lesions induced are summarized and the rationale is presented which supports the statement that radiation induced singly damaged sites are biologically unimportant. The conclusion that multiply damaged sites are critical is discussed and the mechanisms whereby such lesions are formed are presented. Structures of multiply damaged sites are summarized and problems which they present to cellular repair systems are discussed. Lastly the effects of linear energy transfer on the complexity of multiply damaged sites are surveyed and the consequences of this increased complexity are considered in terms of cell survival and mutation. (author)

  20. The complexity of DNA damage: relevance to biological consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    Ionizing radiation causes both singly and multiply damaged sites in DNA when the range of radical migration is limited by the presence of hydroxyl radical scavengers (e.g. within cells). Multiply damaged sites are considered to be more biologically relevant because of the challenges they present to cellular repair mechanisms. These sites occur in the form of DNA double-strand breaks (dsb) but also as other multiple damages that can be converted to dsb during attempted repair. The presence of a dsb can lead to loss of base sequence information and/or can permit the two ends of a break to separate and rejoin with the wrong partner. (Multiply damaged sites may also be the biologically relevant type of damage caused by other agents, such as UVA, B and/or C light, and some antitumour antibiotics). The quantitative data available from radiation studies of DNA are shown to support the proposed mechanisms for the production of complex damage in cellular DNA, i.e. via scavengable and non-scavengable mechanisms. The yields of complex damages can in turn be used to support the conclusion that cellular mutations are a consequence of the presence of these damages within a gene. (Author)

  1. DNA-Directed alkylating agents. 7. Synthesis, DNA interaction, and antitumor activity of bis(hydroxymethyl)- and bis(carbamate)-substituted pyrrolizines and imidazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwell, G J; Fan, J Y; Tan, K; Denny, W A

    1998-11-19

    A series of bis(hydroxymethyl)-substituted imidazoles, thioimidazoles, and pyrrolizines and related bis(carbamates), linked to either 9-anilinoacridine (intercalating) or 4-(4-quinolinylamino)benzamide (minor groove binding) carriers, were synthesized and evaluated for sequence-specific DNA alkylation and cytotoxicity. The imidazole and thioimidazole analogues were prepared by initial synthesis of [(4-aminophenyl)alkyl]imidazole-, thioimidazole-, or pyrrolizine dicarboxylates, coupling of these with the desired carrier, and reduction to give the required bis(hydroxymethyl) alkylating moiety. The pyrrolizines were the most reactive alkylators, followed by the thioimidazoles, while the imidazoles were unreactive. The pyrrolizines and some of the thioimidazoles cross-linked DNA, as measured by agarose gel electrophoresis. Strand cleavage assays showed that none of the compounds reacted at purine N7 or N3 sites in the gpt region of the plasmid gpt2Eco, but the polymerase stop assay showed patterns of G-alkylation in C-rich regions. The corresponding thioimidazole bis(carbamates) were more selective than the bis(hydroxymethyl) pyrrolizines, with high-intensity bands at 5'-NCCN, 5'-NGCN and 5'-NCGN sequences in the PCR stopping assay ( indicates block sites). The data suggest that these targeted compounds, like the known thioimidazole bis(carbamate) carmethizole, alkylate exclusively at guanine residues via the 2-amino group, with little or no alkylation at N3 and N7 guanine or adenine sites. The cytotoxicities of the compounds correlated broadly with their reactivities, with the bis(hydroxymethyl)imidazoles being the least cytotoxic (IC50s >1 microM; P388 leukemia) and with the intercalator-linked analogues being more cytotoxic than the corresponding minor-groove-targeted ones. This was true also for the more reactive thioimidazole bis(carbamates) (IC50s 0.8 and 11 microM, respectively), but both were more active than the analogous "untargeted" carmethizole (IC50 20

  2. Activation of ATM by DNA Damaging Agents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kurz, Ebba U; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2004-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that acts as a master switch controlling the cell cycle in response to ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs...

  3. Activation of ATM by DNA Damaging Agents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kurz, Ebba U; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2005-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that acts as a master switch controlling the cell cycle in response to ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs...

  4. Choreography of the DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, Michael; Barlow, Jacqueline H; Burgess, Rebecca C

    2004-01-01

    DNA repair is an essential process for preserving genome integrity in all organisms. In eukaryotes, recombinational repair is choreographed by multiprotein complexes that are organized into centers (foci). Here, we analyze the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and replication...... stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Mre11 nuclease and the ATM-related Tel1 kinase are the first proteins detected at DSBs. Next, the Rfa1 single-strand DNA binding protein relocalizes to the break and recruits other key checkpoint proteins. Later and only in S and G2 phase, the homologous...... recombination machinery assembles at the site. Unlike the response to DSBs, Mre11 and recombination proteins are not recruited to hydroxyurea-stalled replication forks unless the forks collapse. The cellular response to DSBs and DNA replication stress is likely directed by the Mre11 complex detecting...

  5. DNA damage in internal organs after cutaneous exposure to sulphur mustard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batal, Mohamed; Boudry, Isabelle; Mouret, Stéphane; Cléry-Barraud, Cécile; Wartelle, Julien; Bérard, Izabel; Douki, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Sulphur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent that attacks mainly skin, eye and lungs. Due to its lipophilic properties, SM is also able to diffuse through the skin and reach internal organs. DNA represents one of the most critical molecular targets of this powerful alkylating agent which modifies DNA structure by forming monoadducts and biadducts. These DNA lesions are involved in the acute toxicity of SM as well as its long-term carcinogenicity. In the present work we studied the formation and persistence of guanine and adenine monoadducts and guanine biadducts in the DNA of brain, lungs, kidneys, spleen, and liver of SKH-1 mice cutaneously exposed to 2, 6 and 60 mg/kg of SM. SM-DNA adducts were detected in all studied organs, except in liver at the two lowest doses. Brain and lungs were the organs with the highest level of SM-DNA adducts, followed by kidney, spleen and liver. Monitoring the level of adducts for three weeks after cutaneous exposure showed that the lifetime of adducts were not the same in all organs, lungs being the organ with the longest persistence. Diffusion from skin to internal organs was much more efficient at the highest compared to the lowest dose investigated as the result of the loss of the skin barrier function. These data provide novel information on the distribution of SM in tissues following cutaneous exposures and indicate that brain is an important target. - Highlights: • Sulphur mustard reaches internal organs after skin exposure • Adducts are detected in the DNA of internal organs • Brain is the organ with the highest level of DNA damage • The barrier function of skin is lost at high dose of sulphur mustard • DNA adducts persist in organs for 2 or 3 weeks

  6. DNA damage in internal organs after cutaneous exposure to sulphur mustard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batal, Mohamed [Laboratoire « Lésions des Acides Nucléiques », Université Joseph Fourier – Grenoble 1/CEA/Institut Nanoscience et Cryogénie/SCIB, UMR-E3, Grenoble (France); Département de Toxicologie et Risques Chimiques, Unité de Brûlure Chimique, Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des Armées, Antenne de La Tronche, BP87, F-38702 La Tronche Cedex (France); Boudry, Isabelle; Mouret, Stéphane; Cléry-Barraud, Cécile; Wartelle, Julien [Département de Toxicologie et Risques Chimiques, Unité de Brûlure Chimique, Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des Armées, Antenne de La Tronche, BP87, F-38702 La Tronche Cedex (France); Bérard, Izabel [Laboratoire « Lésions des Acides Nucléiques », Université Joseph Fourier – Grenoble 1/CEA/Institut Nanoscience et Cryogénie/SCIB, UMR-E3, Grenoble (France); Douki, Thierry, E-mail: thierry.douki@cea.fr [Laboratoire « Lésions des Acides Nucléiques », Université Joseph Fourier – Grenoble 1/CEA/Institut Nanoscience et Cryogénie/SCIB, UMR-E3, Grenoble (France)

    2014-07-01

    Sulphur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent that attacks mainly skin, eye and lungs. Due to its lipophilic properties, SM is also able to diffuse through the skin and reach internal organs. DNA represents one of the most critical molecular targets of this powerful alkylating agent which modifies DNA structure by forming monoadducts and biadducts. These DNA lesions are involved in the acute toxicity of SM as well as its long-term carcinogenicity. In the present work we studied the formation and persistence of guanine and adenine monoadducts and guanine biadducts in the DNA of brain, lungs, kidneys, spleen, and liver of SKH-1 mice cutaneously exposed to 2, 6 and 60 mg/kg of SM. SM-DNA adducts were detected in all studied organs, except in liver at the two lowest doses. Brain and lungs were the organs with the highest level of SM-DNA adducts, followed by kidney, spleen and liver. Monitoring the level of adducts for three weeks after cutaneous exposure showed that the lifetime of adducts were not the same in all organs, lungs being the organ with the longest persistence. Diffusion from skin to internal organs was much more efficient at the highest compared to the lowest dose investigated as the result of the loss of the skin barrier function. These data provide novel information on the distribution of SM in tissues following cutaneous exposures and indicate that brain is an important target. - Highlights: • Sulphur mustard reaches internal organs after skin exposure • Adducts are detected in the DNA of internal organs • Brain is the organ with the highest level of DNA damage • The barrier function of skin is lost at high dose of sulphur mustard • DNA adducts persist in organs for 2 or 3 weeks.

  7. Mutations at the mei-41, mus(1)101, mus(1)103, mus(2)205 and mus(3)310 loci of Drosophila exhibit differential UDS responses with different DNA-damaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dusenbery, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    5 mutagen-sensitive mutants of Drosophila melanogaster, reported to perform normal or only slightly reduced excision repair of UV damage, were examined by an unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) assay. 2 mutants, classified as completely or partially proficient for both excision and postreplication repair of UV damage, mus(1)103 and mus(2)205, were found to give positive UDS responses only for UV damage. These mutants exhibit no measurable UDS activity following DNA damage by several different alkylating agents and X-rays. 3 mutants, classified as having no defect in excision repair, but measurable defects in postreplication repair of UV damage, exhibit 3 different response patterns. The mutant mei-41 exhibits a highly positive UDS response following damage by all agents, consistent with its prior classification as excision-repair-proficient, but postreplication-repair-deficient for UV damage. The mutant mus(1)101, however, exhibits a strong positive UDS response following only UV damage and appears to be blocked in the excision repair of damage produced by both alkylating agents and X-irradiation. Finally, mus(3)310 exhibits no UDS response to alkylation, X-ray or UV damage. This is not consistent with its previous classification. Results obtained w0272the qualitative in vitro UDS assay are entirely consistent with the results from two separate in vivo measures of excision repair deficiency followign DNA damage, larval hypersensitivity to killing and hypermutability in the sex-linked recessive lethal test. (Auth.)

  8. Bacterial natural transformation by highly fragmented and damaged DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overballe-Petersen, Søren; Harms, Klaus; Orlando, Ludovic Antoine Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    for microbes, but not as potential substrate for bacterial evolution. Here, we show that fragmented DNA molecules (≥20 bp) that additionally may contain abasic sites, cross-links, or miscoding lesions are acquired by the environmental bacterium Acinetobacter baylyi through natural transformation. With uptake......DNA molecules are continuously released through decomposition of organic matter and are ubiquitous in most environments. Such DNA becomes fragmented and damaged (often DNA is recognized as nutrient source...... of DNA from a 43,000-y-old woolly mammoth bone, we further demonstrate that such natural transformation events include ancient DNA molecules. We find that the DNA recombination is RecA recombinase independent and is directly linked to DNA replication. We show that the adjacent nucleotide variations...

  9. Vitamin C for DNA damage prevention

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šrám, Radim; Binková, B.; Rössner ml., Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 733, 1-2 (2012), s. 39-49 ISSN 0027-5107 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B08005; GA MŽP(CZ) SP/1B3/50/07 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : Chromosomal aberrations * DNA adducts * DNA repair Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 3.902, year: 2012

  10. Role of oxidative DNA damage in genome instability and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bignami, M.; Kunkel, T.

    2009-01-01

    Inactivation of mismatch repair (MMR) is associated with a dramatic genomic instability that is observed experimentally as a mutator phenotype and micro satellite instability (MSI). It has been implicit that the massive genetic instability in MMR defective cells simply reflects the accumulation of spontaneous DNA polymerase errors during DNA replication. We recently identified oxidation damage, a common threat to DNA integrity to which purines are very susceptible, as an important cofactor in this genetic instability

  11. Visualization of DNA clustered damage induced by heavy ion exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, M.; Yatagai, F.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most lethal damage induced by ionizing radiations. Accelerated heavy-ions have been shown to induce DNA clustered damage, which is two or more DNA lesions induced within a few helical turns. Higher biological effectiveness of heavy-ions could be provided predominantly by induction of complex DNA clustered damage, which leads to non-repairable DSBs. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is composed of catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and DNA-binding heterodimer (Ku70 and Ku86). DNA-PK acts as a sensor of DSB during non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), since DNA-PK is activated to bind to the ends of double-stranded DNA. On the other hand, NBS1 and histone H2AX are essential for DSB repair by homologous recombination (HR) in higher vertebrate cells. Here we report that phosphorylated H2AX at Ser139 (named γ-H2AX) and NBS1 form large undissolvable foci after exposure to accelerated Fe ions, while DNA-PKcs does not recognize DNA clustered damage. NBS1 and γ-H2AX colocalized with forming discrete foci after exposure to X-rays. At 0.5 h after Fe ion irradiation, NBS1 and γ-H2AX also formed discrete foci. However, at 3-8 h after Fe ion irradiation, highly localized large foci turned up, while small discrete foci disappeared. Large NBS1 and γ-H2AX foci were remained even 16 h after irradiation. DNA-PKcs recognized Ku-binding DSB and formed foci shortly after exposure to X-rays. DNA-PKcs foci were observed 0.5 h after 5 Gy of Fe ion irradiation and were almost completely disappeared up to 8 h. These results suggest that NBS1 and γ-H2AX can be utilized as molecular marker of DNA clustered damage, while DNA-PK selectively recognizes repairable DSBs by NHEJ

  12. Cross-sensitivity of X-ray-hypersensitive cells derived from LEC strain rats to DNA-damaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okui, T.; Endoh, D.; Arai, S.; Isogai, E.; Hayashi, M.

    1996-01-01

    The cross-sensitivity of X-ray-hypersensitive lung fibroblasts from LEC strain (LEC) rats to other DNA-damaging agents was examined. The LEC cells were 2- to 3-fold more sensitive to bleomycin (BLM) that induces DNA double-strand breaks, and to a cross-linking agent, mitomycin C, than the cells from WKAH strain (WKAH) rats, while they were slightly sensitive to alkylating agents, ethyl nitrosourea and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, but not to UV-irradiation. Although no difference was observed in the initial yields of DNA double-strand breaks induced by BLM between LEC and WKAH cells, the repair process of DNA double-strand breaks was significantly slower in LEC cells than in WKAH cells

  13. The intersection between DNA damage response and cell death pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowsheen, S; Yang, E S

    2012-10-01

    Apoptosis is a finely regulated process that serves to determine the fate of cells in response to various stresses. One such stress is DNA damage, which not only can signal repair processes but is also intimately involved in regulating cell fate. In this review we examine the relationship between the DNA damage/repair response in cell survival and apoptosis following insults to the DNA. Elucidating these pathways and the crosstalk between them is of great importance, as they eventually contribute to the etiology of human disease such as cancer and may play key roles in determining therapeutic response. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Apoptosis: Four Decades Later".

  14. Endogenous melatonin and oxidatively damaged guanine in DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davanipour, Zoreh; Poulsen, Henrik E; Weimann, Allan

    2009-01-01

    overnight guanine DNA damage. 8-oxodG and 8-oxoGua were measured using a high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry assay. The mother, father, and oldest sampled daughter were used for these analyses. Comparisons between the mothers, fathers, and daughters were...... attack and increase the rate of repair of that damage. This paper reports the results of a study relating the level of overnight melatonin production to the overnight excretion of the two primary urinary metabolites of the repair of oxidatively damaged guanine in DNA. METHODS: Mother...

  15. DNA damage and repair in age-related macular degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szaflik, Jacek P. [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Warsaw and Samodzielny Publiczny Szpital Okulistyczny, Sierakowskiego 13, 03-710 Warsaw (Poland); Janik-Papis, Katarzyna; Synowiec, Ewelina; Ksiazek, Dominika [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland); Zaras, Magdalena [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Warsaw and Samodzielny Publiczny Szpital Okulistyczny, Sierakowskiego 13, 03-710 Warsaw (Poland); Wozniak, Katarzyna [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland); Szaflik, Jerzy [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Warsaw and Samodzielny Publiczny Szpital Okulistyczny, Sierakowskiego 13, 03-710 Warsaw (Poland); Blasiak, Janusz, E-mail: januszb@biol.uni.lodz.pl [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland)

    2009-10-02

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a retinal degenerative disease that is the main cause of vision loss in individuals over the age of 55 in the Western world. Clinically relevant AMD results from damage to the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells thought to be mainly caused by oxidative stress. The stress also affects the DNA of RPE cells, which promotes genome instability in these cells. These effects may coincide with the decrease in the efficacy of DNA repair with age. Therefore individuals with DNA repair impaired more than average for a given age may be more susceptible to AMD if oxidative stress affects their RPE cells. This may be helpful in AMD risk assessment. In the present work we determined the level of basal (measured in the alkaline comet assay) endogenous and endogenous oxidative DNA damage, the susceptibility to exogenous mutagens and the efficacy of DNA repair in lymphocytes of 100 AMD patients and 110 age-matched individuals without visual disturbances. The cells taken from AMD patients displayed a higher extent of basal endogenous DNA damage without differences between patients of dry and wet forms of the disease. DNA double-strand breaks did not contribute to the observed DNA damage as checked by the neutral comet assay and pulsed field gel electrophoresis. The extent of oxidative modification to DNA bases was grater in AMD patients than in the controls, as probed by DNA repair enzymes NTH1 and Fpg. Lymphocytes from AMD patients displayed a higher sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and UV radiation and repaired lesions induced by these factors less effectively than the cells from the control individuals. We postulate that the impaired efficacy of DNA repair may combine with enhanced sensitivity of RPE cells to blue and UV lights, contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD.

  16. DNA damage and repair in age-related macular degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szaflik, Jacek P.; Janik-Papis, Katarzyna; Synowiec, Ewelina; Ksiazek, Dominika; Zaras, Magdalena; Wozniak, Katarzyna; Szaflik, Jerzy; Blasiak, Janusz

    2009-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a retinal degenerative disease that is the main cause of vision loss in individuals over the age of 55 in the Western world. Clinically relevant AMD results from damage to the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells thought to be mainly caused by oxidative stress. The stress also affects the DNA of RPE cells, which promotes genome instability in these cells. These effects may coincide with the decrease in the efficacy of DNA repair with age. Therefore individuals with DNA repair impaired more than average for a given age may be more susceptible to AMD if oxidative stress affects their RPE cells. This may be helpful in AMD risk assessment. In the present work we determined the level of basal (measured in the alkaline comet assay) endogenous and endogenous oxidative DNA damage, the susceptibility to exogenous mutagens and the efficacy of DNA repair in lymphocytes of 100 AMD patients and 110 age-matched individuals without visual disturbances. The cells taken from AMD patients displayed a higher extent of basal endogenous DNA damage without differences between patients of dry and wet forms of the disease. DNA double-strand breaks did not contribute to the observed DNA damage as checked by the neutral comet assay and pulsed field gel electrophoresis. The extent of oxidative modification to DNA bases was grater in AMD patients than in the controls, as probed by DNA repair enzymes NTH1 and Fpg. Lymphocytes from AMD patients displayed a higher sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and UV radiation and repaired lesions induced by these factors less effectively than the cells from the control individuals. We postulate that the impaired efficacy of DNA repair may combine with enhanced sensitivity of RPE cells to blue and UV lights, contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD.

  17. Mechanisms of free radical-induced damage to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizdaroglu, Miral; Jaruga, Pawel

    2012-04-01

    Endogenous and exogenous sources cause free radical-induced DNA damage in living organisms by a variety of mechanisms. The highly reactive hydroxyl radical reacts with the heterocyclic DNA bases and the sugar moiety near or at diffusion-controlled rates. Hydrated electron and H atom also add to the heterocyclic bases. These reactions lead to adduct radicals, further reactions of which yield numerous products. These include DNA base and sugar products, single- and double-strand breaks, 8,5'-cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleosides, tandem lesions, clustered sites and DNA-protein cross-links. Reaction conditions and the presence or absence of oxygen profoundly affect the types and yields of the products. There is mounting evidence for an important role of free radical-induced DNA damage in the etiology of numerous diseases including cancer. Further understanding of mechanisms of free radical-induced DNA damage, and cellular repair and biological consequences of DNA damage products will be of outmost importance for disease prevention and treatment.

  18. Study on DNA damages induced by UV radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doan Hong Van; Dinh Ba Tuan; Tran Tuan Anh; Nguyen Thuy Ngan; Ta Bich Thuan; Vo Thi Thuong Lan; Tran Minh Quynh; Nguyen Thi Thom

    2015-01-01

    DNA damages in Escherichia coli (E. coli) exposed to UV radiation have been investigated. After 30 min of exposure to UV radiation of 5 mJ/cm"2, the growth of E. coli in LB broth medium was about only 10% in compared with non-irradiated one. This results suggested that the UV radiation caused the damages for E. coli genome resulted in reduction in its growth and survival, and those lesions can be somewhat recovered. For both solutions of plasmid DNAs and E. coli cells containing plasmid DNA, this dose also caused the breakage on single and double strands of DNA, shifted the morphology of DNA plasmid from supercoiled to circular and linear forms. The formation of pyrimidine dimers upon UV radiation significantly reduced when the DNA was irradiated in the presence of Ganoderma lucidum extract. Thus, studies on UV-induced DNA damage at molecular level are very essential to determine the UV radiation doses corresponding to the DNA damages, especially for creation and selection of useful radiation-induced mutants, as well as elucidation the protective effects of the specific compounds against UV light. (author)

  19. Cells Lacking mtDNA Display Increased dNTP Pools upon DNA Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Tine; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Munch-Petersen, Birgitte

    Imbalanced dNTP pools are highly mutagenic due to a deleterious effect on DNA polymerase fidelity. Mitochondrial DNA defects, including mutations and deletions, are commonly found in a wide variety of different cancer types. In order to further study the interconnection between dNTP pools...... and mitochondrial function we have examined the effect of DNA damage on dNTP pools in cells deficient of mtDNA. We show that DNA damage induced by UV irradiation, in a dose corresponding to LD50, induces an S phase delay in different human osteosarcoma cell lines. The UV pulse also has a destabilizing effect...... shows that normal mitochondrial function is prerequisite for retaining stable dNTP pools upon DNA damage. Therefore it is likely that mitochondrial deficiency defects may cause an increase in DNA mutations by disrupting dNTP pool balance....

  20. Oxidative DNA damage during sleep periods among nightshift workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Parveen; Mirick, Dana K; Randolph, Timothy W; Gong, Jicheng; Buchanan, Diana Taibi; Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Davis, Scott

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative DNA damage may be increased among nightshift workers because of suppression of melatonin, a cellular antioxidant, and/or inflammation related to sleep disruption. However, oxidative DNA damage has received limited attention in previous studies of nightshift work. From two previous cross-sectional studies, urine samples collected during a night sleep period for 217 dayshift workers and during day and night sleep (on their first day off) periods for 223 nightshift workers were assayed for 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG), a marker of oxidative DNA damage, using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Urinary measures of 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s), a marker of circulating melatonin levels, and actigraphy-based sleep quality data were also available. Nightshift workers during their day sleep periods excreted 83% (p=0.2) and 77% (p=0.03) of the 8-OH-dG that dayshift workers and they themselves, respectively, excreted during their night sleep periods. Among nightshift workers, higher aMT6s levels were associated with higher urinary 8-OH-dG levels, and an inverse U-shaped trend was observed between 8-OH-dG levels and sleep efficiency and sleep duration. Reduced excretion of 8-OH-dG among nightshift workers during day sleep may reflect reduced functioning of DNA repair machinery, which could potentially lead to increased cellular levels of oxidative DNA damage. Melatonin disruption among nightshift workers may be responsible for the observed effect, as melatonin is known to enhance repair of oxidative DNA damage. Quality of sleep may similarly impact DNA repair. Cellular levels of DNA damage will need to be evaluated in future studies to help interpret these findings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. Histone modifications in response to DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altaf, Mohammed; Saksouk, Nehme; Cote, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    The packaging of the eukaryotic genome into highly condensed chromatin makes it inaccessible to the factors required for gene transcription, DNA replication, recombination and repair. Eukaryotes have developed intricate mechanisms to overcome this repressive barrier imposed by chromatin. Histone modifying enzymes and ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes play key roles here as they regulate many nuclear processes by altering the chromatin structure. Significantly, these activities are integral to the process of DNA repair where histone modifications act as signals and landing platforms for various repair proteins. This review summarizes the recent developments in our understanding of histone modifications and their role in the maintenance of genome integrity

  2. Recognition of double-stranded DNA using energetically activated duplexes with interstrand zippers of 1-, 2-or 4-pyrenyl-functionalized O2 '-alkylated RNA monomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karmakar, Saswata; Madsen, Andreas Stahl; Guenther, Dale C.

    2014-01-01

    '-alkylated uridine monomers X-Z by means of thermal denaturation experiments, optical spectroscopy, force-field simulations and recognition experiments using DNA hairpins as model targets. We demonstrate that Invaders with +1 interstrand zippers of X or Y monomers efficiently recognize mixed-sequence DNA...

  3. Damaging the Integrated HIV Proviral DNA with TALENs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christy L Strong

    Full Text Available HIV-1 integrates its proviral DNA genome into the host genome, presenting barriers for virus eradication. Several new gene-editing technologies have emerged that could potentially be used to damage integrated proviral DNA. In this study, we use transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs to target a highly conserved sequence in the transactivation response element (TAR of the HIV-1 proviral DNA. We demonstrated that TALENs cleave a DNA template with the HIV-1 proviral target site in vitro. A GFP reporter, under control of HIV-1 TAR, was efficiently inactivated by mutations introduced by transfection of TALEN plasmids. When infected cells containing the full-length integrated HIV-1 proviral DNA were transfected with TALENs, the TAR region accumulated indels. When one of these mutants was tested, the mutated HIV-1 proviral DNA was incapable of producing detectable Gag expression. TALEN variants engineered for degenerate recognition of select nucleotide positions also cleaved proviral DNA in vitro and the full-length integrated proviral DNA genome in living cells. These results suggest a possible design strategy for the therapeutic considerations of incomplete target sequence conservation and acquired resistance mutations. We have established a new strategy for damaging integrated HIV proviral DNA that may have future potential for HIV-1 proviral DNA eradication.

  4. Overproduction of the poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase DNA-binding domain blocks alkylation-induced DNA repair synthesis in mammalian cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Molinete; W. Vermeulen (Wim); A. Bürkle; J. Mé nissier-de Murcia; J.H. Küpper; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); G. de Murcia

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe zinc-finger DNA-binding domain (DBD) of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP, EC 2.4.2.30) specifically recognizes DNA strand breaks induced by various DNA-damaging agents in eukaryotes. This, in turn, triggers the synthesis of polymers of ADP-ribose linked to nuclear proteins during

  5. DNA damage, repair and tanning acceleration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, A.A.; Berg, P.T.M. van den; Roza, L.

    1999-01-01

    Exposure of the skin to solar ultraviolet radiation (UV) leads to various adverse effects, such as the induction of cellular damage and mutations, suppression of the skin's immune system, and the induction of skin cancer. These effects are the consequence of various molecular alterations in the skin

  6. Inhibition of autophagy enhances DNA damage-induced apoptosis by disrupting CHK1-dependent S phase arrest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liou, Jong-Shian; Wu, Yi-Chen; Yen, Wen-Yen; Tang, Yu-Shuan [Institute of Cellular and Organismic Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China); Kakadiya, Rajesh B.; Su, Tsann-Long [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China); Yih, Ling-Huei, E-mail: lhyih@gate.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Cellular and Organismic Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2014-08-01

    DNA damage has been shown to induce autophagy, but the role of autophagy in the DNA damage response and cell fate is not fully understood. BO-1012, a bifunctional alkylating derivative of 3a-aza-cyclopenta[a]indene, is a potent DNA interstrand cross-linking agent with anticancer activity. In this study, BO-1012 was found to reduce DNA synthesis, inhibit S phase progression, and induce phosphorylation of histone H2AX on serine 139 (γH2AX) exclusively in S phase cells. Both CHK1 and CHK2 were phosphorylated in response to BO-1012 treatment, but only depletion of CHK1, but not CHK2, impaired BO-1012-induced S phase arrest and facilitated the entry of γH2AX-positive cells into G2 phase. CHK1 depletion also significantly enhanced BO-1012-induced cell death and apoptosis. These results indicate that BO-1012-induced S phase arrest is a CHK1-dependent pro-survival response. BO-1012 also resulted in marked induction of acidic vesicular organelle (AVO) formation and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) processing and redistribution, features characteristic of autophagy. Depletion of ATG7 or co-treatment of cells with BO-1012 and either 3-methyladenine or bafilomycin A1, two inhibitors of autophagy, not only reduced CHK1 phosphorylation and disrupted S phase arrest, but also increased cleavage of caspase-9 and PARP, and cell death. These results suggest that cells initiate S phase arrest and autophagy as pro-survival responses to BO-1012-induced DNA damage, and that suppression of autophagy enhances BO-1012-induced apoptosis via disruption of CHK1-dependent S phase arrest. - Highlights: • Autophagy inhibitors enhanced the cytotoxicity of a DNA alkylating agent, BO-1012. • BO-1012-induced S phase arrest was a CHK1-dependent pro-survival response. • Autophagy inhibition enhanced BO-1012 cytotoxicity via disrupting the S phase arrest.

  7. In vitro sensitivity of normal and hereditary retinoblastoma fibroblasts to DNA-damaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, W.G.; Byrne, T.D.

    1986-01-01

    We investigated the ability of nine fibroblast cell strains from patients with the hereditary form of retinoblastoma (RB) to handle various types of DNA-damaging agents and compared the results with those obtained in nine normal strains. Cell strains were exposed to gamma-radiation, which causes DNA scission; actinomycin D, a DNA-intercalating agent; and mitomycin C, a bifunctional alkylating agent leading to DNA-DNA cross-linking. Cell strains were studied for their ability to survive in a cytotoxicity assay. Nine normal strains exhibited a mean D0 (inverse of the slope of the straight line portion of the survival curve) of 134-178 cGy after radiation exposure, compared to a range of 119-186 cGy in the nine RB strains (P = 0.33). Similarly, exposure to actinomycin D led to D0 values of 0.024-0.069 microgram/ml in the nine normal strains and D0 values of 0.016-0.067 microgram/ml in the RB strains (P = 0.64). The nine RB strains did exhibit a small overall increase in sensitivity after exposure to mitomycin C, with D0 values ranging from 0.14-0.32 microgram/ml versus 0.19-0.66 microgram/ml in the nine normal strains (P = 0.002); however, when the two most resistant normal strains were excluded from analysis, results were similar. Three RB cell strains derived from individuals who had either developed second cancers or who had a family history of additional sarcomas consistently exhibited increases in sensitivity to all three DNA-damaging agents studied compared with other hereditary RB cell strains as well as normal strains. The results suggest that normal human fibroblast cell strains exhibit a wide response to DNA-damaging agents, especially chemical agents. Most hereditary RB strains exhibit sensitivity well within the normal range; however, strains from RB patients predisposed to second cancers exhibit increases in sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents

  8. Fanconi anemia: a disorder defective in the DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitao, Hiroyuki; Takata, Minoru

    2011-04-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a cancer predisposition disorder characterized by progressive bone marrow failure, congenital developmental defects, chromosomal abnormalities, and cellular hypersensitivity to DNA interstrand crosslink (ICL) agents. So far mutations in 14 FANC genes were identified in FA or FA-like patients. These gene products constitute a common ubiquitin-phosphorylation network called the "FA pathway" and cooperate with other proteins involved in DNA repair and cell cycle control to repair ICL lesions and to maintain genome stability. In this review, we summarize recent exciting discoveries that have expanded our view of the molecular mechanisms operating in DNA repair and DNA damage signaling.

  9. Repair of damaged DNA in vivo: Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanawalt, P.C.

    1987-09-01

    This contract was initiated in 1962 with the US Atomic Energy Commission to carry out basic research on the effects of radiation on the process of DNA replication in bacteria. Within the first contract year we discovered repair replication at the same time that Setlow and Carrier discovered pyrimidine dimer excision. These discoveries led to the elucidation of the process of excision-repair, one of the most important mechanisms by which living systems, including humans, respond to structural damage in their genetic material. We improved methodology for distinguishing repair replication from semiconservative replication and instructed others in these techniques. Painter then was the first to demonstrate repair replication in ultraviolet irradiated human cells. He, in turn, instructed James Cleaver who discovered that skin fibroblasts from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum were defective in excision-repair. People with this genetic defect are extremely sensitive to sunlight and they develop carcinomas and melanomas of the skin with high frequency. The existence of this hereditary disease attests to the importance of DNA repair in man. We certainly could not survive in the normal ultraviolet flux from the sun if our DNA were not continuously monitored for damage and repaired. Other hereditary diseases such as ataxia telangiectasia, Cockayne's syndrome, Blooms syndrome and Fanconi's anemia also involve deficiencies in DNA damage processing. The field of DNA repair has developed rapidly as we have learned that most environmental chemical carcinogens as well as radiation produce repairable damage in DNA. 251 refs

  10. Evaluation of DNA damage using microwave dielectric absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirayama, Makoto; Matuo, Youichrou; Izumi, Yoshinobu [Research Institute of Nuclear Engineering, University of Fukui, Fukui (Japan); Sunagawa, Takeyoshi [Fukui University of Technology, Fukui (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    Evaluation of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-strand break is important to elucidate the biological effect of ionizing radiations. The conventional methods for DNA-strand break evaluation have been achieved by Agarose gel electrophoresis and others using an electrical property of DNAs. Such kinds of DNA-strand break evaluation systems can estimate DNA-strand break, according to a molecular weight of DNAs. However, the conventional method needs pre-treatment of the sample and a relatively long period for analysis. They do not have enough sensitivity to detect the strand break products in the low-dose region. The sample is water, methanol and plasmid DNA solution. The plasmid DNA pUC118 was multiplied by using Escherichia coli JM109 competent cells. The resonance frequency and Q-value were measured by means of microwave dielectric absorption spectroscopy. When a sample is located at a center of the electric field, resonance curve of the frequency that existed as a standing wave is disturbed. As a result, the perturbation effect to perform a resonance with different frequency is adopted. The resonance frequency shifted to higher frequency with an increase in a concentration of methanol as the model of the biological material, and the Q-value decreased. The absorption peak in microwave power spectrum of the double-strand break plasmid DNA shifted from the non-damaged plasmid DNA. Moreover, the sharpness of absorption peak changed resulting in change in Q-value. We confirmed that a resonance frequency shifted to higher frequency with an increase in concentration of the plasmid DNA. We developed a new technique for an evaluation of DNA damage. In this paper, we report the evaluation method of DNA damage using microwave dielectric absorption spectroscopy.

  11. Evaluation of DNA damage using microwave dielectric absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, Makoto; Matuo, Youichrou; Izumi, Yoshinobu; Sunagawa, Takeyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-strand break is important to elucidate the biological effect of ionizing radiations. The conventional methods for DNA-strand break evaluation have been achieved by Agarose gel electrophoresis and others using an electrical property of DNAs. Such kinds of DNA-strand break evaluation systems can estimate DNA-strand break, according to a molecular weight of DNAs. However, the conventional method needs pre-treatment of the sample and a relatively long period for analysis. They do not have enough sensitivity to detect the strand break products in the low-dose region. The sample is water, methanol and plasmid DNA solution. The plasmid DNA pUC118 was multiplied by using Escherichia coli JM109 competent cells. The resonance frequency and Q-value were measured by means of microwave dielectric absorption spectroscopy. When a sample is located at a center of the electric field, resonance curve of the frequency that existed as a standing wave is disturbed. As a result, the perturbation effect to perform a resonance with different frequency is adopted. The resonance frequency shifted to higher frequency with an increase in a concentration of methanol as the model of the biological material, and the Q-value decreased. The absorption peak in microwave power spectrum of the double-strand break plasmid DNA shifted from the non-damaged plasmid DNA. Moreover, the sharpness of absorption peak changed resulting in change in Q-value. We confirmed that a resonance frequency shifted to higher frequency with an increase in concentration of the plasmid DNA. We developed a new technique for an evaluation of DNA damage. In this paper, we report the evaluation method of DNA damage using microwave dielectric absorption spectroscopy

  12. Electron spin resonance studies of the mechanism of radiation damage to DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullis, P.M.; Symons, M.C.R.

    1986-01-01

    Electron spin resonance spectroscopy has only been used successfully on dry DNA at room temperature or on aqueous DNA at low temperatures. Under these conditions the direct damage results in electron-loss, which initially is indiscriminate, but rapidly ends up as G dot + , which is stable up to ca. 210 0 K. Electrons are trapped at T, giving T dot - anions, which are converted into dot TH in the 130 to 208 0 K range. Above these temperatures, both centers decay without the clear appearance of other intermediate radicals. Arguments are given against the concept that holes and/or electrons are extensively mobile within DNA molecules, and also against the concept that the ionic species studied by ESR spectroscopy recombine to give G and T to a major extent. In the presence of oxygen, O 2 - ions were detected and the primary yield of T dot - was reduced. However, both primry centers were lost at relatively low temperatures, with the concomitant formation of RO 2 dot radicals. The fate of these and the O 2 dot - anions could not be determined by ESR spectroscopy. In the presence of hydrogen peroxide or iodoacetamide, electrons were effectively scavenged, giving dot OH and H 2 C dot ONH 2 radicals and a reduced yield of T dot - . These active radicals were rapidly converted into new alkyl-type radicals, thought to be primarily formed by hydrogen atom abstraction. The ESR signals due to these radicals were lost at temperatures below those characteristic of the primary centers. This shows that these may well have been converted into such alkyl radical centers by hydrogen atom transfer despite our inability to detect them. 17 refs., 7 figs

  13. Increased oxidative DNA damage in mononuclear leukocytes in vitiligo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovannelli, Lisa [Department of Preclinical and Clinical Pharmacology, University of Florence, Viale Pieraccini 6, 50139 Florence (Italy)]. E-mail: lisag@pharm.unifi.it; Bellandi, Serena [Department of Dermatological Sciences, University of Florence, Viale Pieraccini 6, 50139 Florence (Italy); Pitozzi, Vanessa [Department of Preclinical and Clinical Pharmacology, University of Florence, Viale Pieraccini 6, 50139 Florence (Italy); Fabbri, Paolo [Department of Dermatological Sciences, University of Florence, Viale Pieraccini 6, 50139 Florence (Italy); Dolara, Piero [Department of Preclinical and Clinical Pharmacology, University of Florence, Viale Pieraccini 6, 50139 Florence (Italy); Moretti, Silvia [Department of Dermatological Sciences, University of Florence, Viale Pieraccini 6, 50139 Florence (Italy)

    2004-11-22

    Vitiligo is an acquired pigmentary disorder of the skin of unknown aetiology. The autocytotoxic hypothesis suggests that melanocyte impairment could be related to increased oxidative stress. Evidences have been reported that in vitiligo oxidative stress might also be present systemically. We used the comet assay (single cell alkaline gel electrophoresis) to evaluate DNA strand breaks and DNA base oxidation, measured as formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG)-sensitive sites, in peripheral blood cells from patients with active vitiligo and healthy controls. The basal level of oxidative DNA damage in mononuclear leukocytes was increased in vitiligo compared to normal subjects, whereas DNA strand breaks (SBs) were not changed. This alteration was not accompanied by a different capability to respond to in vitro oxidative challenge. No differences in the basal levels of DNA damage in polymorphonuclear leukocytes were found between patients and healthy subjects. Thus, this study supports the hypothesis that in vitiligo a systemic oxidative stress exists, and demonstrates for the first time the presence of oxidative alterations at the nuclear level. The increase in oxidative DNA damage shown in the mononuclear component of peripheral blood leukocytes from vitiligo patients was not particularly severe. However, these findings support an adjuvant role of antioxidant treatment in vitiligo.

  14. Increased oxidative DNA damage in mononuclear leukocytes in vitiligo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovannelli, Lisa; Bellandi, Serena; Pitozzi, Vanessa; Fabbri, Paolo; Dolara, Piero; Moretti, Silvia

    2004-01-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired pigmentary disorder of the skin of unknown aetiology. The autocytotoxic hypothesis suggests that melanocyte impairment could be related to increased oxidative stress. Evidences have been reported that in vitiligo oxidative stress might also be present systemically. We used the comet assay (single cell alkaline gel electrophoresis) to evaluate DNA strand breaks and DNA base oxidation, measured as formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG)-sensitive sites, in peripheral blood cells from patients with active vitiligo and healthy controls. The basal level of oxidative DNA damage in mononuclear leukocytes was increased in vitiligo compared to normal subjects, whereas DNA strand breaks (SBs) were not changed. This alteration was not accompanied by a different capability to respond to in vitro oxidative challenge. No differences in the basal levels of DNA damage in polymorphonuclear leukocytes were found between patients and healthy subjects. Thus, this study supports the hypothesis that in vitiligo a systemic oxidative stress exists, and demonstrates for the first time the presence of oxidative alterations at the nuclear level. The increase in oxidative DNA damage shown in the mononuclear component of peripheral blood leukocytes from vitiligo patients was not particularly severe. However, these findings support an adjuvant role of antioxidant treatment in vitiligo

  15. Alkylating agent (MNU)-induced mutation in space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, T.; Takahashi, A.; Ohnishi, K.; Takahashi, S.; Masukawa, M.; Sekikawa, K.; Amano, T.; Nakano, T.; Nagaoka, S.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, some contradictory data about the effects of microgravity on radiation-induced biological responses in space experiments have been reported. We prepared a damaged template DNA produced with an alkylating agent (N-methyl-N-nitroso urea; MNU) to measure incorrect base-incorporation during DNA replication in microgravity. We examined whether mutation frequency is affected by microgravity during DNA replication for a DNA template damaged by an alkylating agent. Using an in vitro enzymatic reaction system, DNA synthesis by Taq polymerase or polymerase III was done during a US space shuttle mission (Discovery, STS-91). After the flight, DNA replication and mutation frequencies were measured. We found that there was almost no effect of microgravity on DNA replication and mutation frequency. It is suggested that microgravity might not affect at the stage of substrate incorporation in induced-mutation frequency.

  16. DNA Repair Mechanisms and the Bypass of DNA Damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiteux, Serge; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2013-01-01

    DNA repair mechanisms are critical for maintaining the integrity of genomic DNA, and their loss is associated with cancer predisposition syndromes. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have played a central role in elucidating the highly conserved mechanisms that promote eukaryotic genome stability. This review will focus on repair mechanisms that involve excision of a single strand from duplex DNA with the intact, complementary strand serving as a template to fill the resulting gap. These mechanisms are of two general types: those that remove damage from DNA and those that repair errors made during DNA synthesis. The major DNA-damage repair pathways are base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair, which, in the most simple terms, are distinguished by the extent of single-strand DNA removed together with the lesion. Mistakes made by DNA polymerases are corrected by the mismatch repair pathway, which also corrects mismatches generated when single strands of non-identical duplexes are exchanged during homologous recombination. In addition to the true repair pathways, the postreplication repair pathway allows lesions or structural aberrations that block replicative DNA polymerases to be tolerated. There are two bypass mechanisms: an error-free mechanism that involves a switch to an undamaged template for synthesis past the lesion and an error-prone mechanism that utilizes specialized translesion synthesis DNA polymerases to directly synthesize DNA across the lesion. A high level of functional redundancy exists among the pathways that deal with lesions, which minimizes the detrimental effects of endogenous and exogenous DNA damage. PMID:23547164

  17. UDP-glucuronosyltransferase-dependent bioactivation of clofibric acid to a DNA-damaging intermediate in mouse hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaoui, Roula; Sallustio, Benedetta C; Burcham, Philip C; Fontaine, Frank R

    2003-05-06

    Glucuronidation of a number of carboxyl-containing drugs generates reactive acyl glucuronide metabolites. These electrophilic species alkylate cell proteins and may be implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of toxic syndromes seen in patients receiving the parent aglycones. Whether acyl glucuronides also attack nuclear DNA is unknown, although the acyl glucuronide formed from clofibric acid was recently found to decrease the transfection efficiency of phage DNA and generate strand breaks in plasmid DNA in vitro. To determine if such a DNA damage occurs within a cellular environment, the comet assay (i.e. single-cell gel electrophoresis) was used to detect DNA lesions in the nuclear genome of isolated mouse hepatocytes cultured with clofibric acid. Overnight exposure to 50 microM and higher concentrations of clofibric acid produced concentration-dependent increases in the comet areas of hepatocyte nuclei, with 1 mM clofibrate producing a 3.6-fold elevation over controls. These effects closely coincided with culture medium concentrations of the glucuronide metabolite formed from clofibric acid, 1-O-beta-clofibryl glucuronide. Consistent with a role for glucuronidation in the DNA damage observed, the glucuronidation inhibitor borneol diminished glucuronide formation from 100 microM clofibrate by 98% and returned comet areas to baseline levels. Collectively, these results suggest that the acyl glucuronide formed from clofibric acid is capable of migrating from its site of formation within the endoplasmic reticulum to generate strand nicks in nuclear DNA.

  18. Radiation damage to DNA-protein complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Spotheim-Maurizot, M.; Davídková, Marie

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 261, zima (2011), s. 1-10 ISSN 1742-6588. [COST Chemistry CM0603-MELUSYN Joint Meeting Damages Induced in Biomolecules by Low and High Energy Radiations. Paříž, 09.03.2010-12.03.2010] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1048103; GA AV ČR KJB4048401; GA MŠk 1P05OC085; GA MŠk OC09012; GA AV ČR IAB1048901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : radiolysis * molecular-dynamics simulation * hydroxyl radical attack * induced strand breakage Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  19. DNA damage response in monozygotic twins discordant for smoking habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, Francesca; Carotti, Daniela; Andreoli, Cristina; Siniscalchi, Ester; Leopardi, Paola; Caiola, Stefania; Biffoni, Mauro; Zijno, Andrea; Medda, Emanuela; Nisticò, Lorenza; Rossi, Sabrina; Crebelli, Riccardo

    2013-03-01

    Previous studies in twins indicate that non-shared environment, beyond genetic factors, contributes substantially to individual variation in mutagen sensitivity; however, the role of specific causative factors (e.g. tobacco smoke, diet) was not elucidated. In this investigation, a population of 22 couples of monozygotic twins with discordant smoking habits was selected with the aim of evaluating the influence of tobacco smoke on individual response to DNA damage. The study design virtually eliminated the contribution of genetic heterogeneity to the intra-pair variation in DNA damage response, and thus any difference in the end-points investigated could directly be attributed to the non-shared environment experienced by co-twins, which included as main factor cigarette smoke exposure. Peripheral lymphocytes of study subjects were challenged ex vivo with γ-rays, and the induction, processing, fixation of DNA damage evaluated through multiple approaches. Folate status of study subjects was considered significant covariate since it is affected by smoking habits and can influence radiosensitivity. Similar responses were elicited by γ-rays in co-twins for all the end-points analysed, despite their discordant smoking habits. Folate status did not modify DNA damage response, even though a combined effect of smoking habits, low-plasma folic acid level, and ionising radiation was observed on apoptosis. A possible modulation of DNA damage response by duration and intensity of tobacco smoke exposure was suggested by Comet assay and micronucleus data, but the effect was quantitatively limited. Overall, the results obtained indicate that differences in smoking habits do not contribute to a large extent to inter-individual variability in the response to radiation-induced DNA damage observed in healthy human populations.

  20. O6-Methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase status in neuroendocrine tumours: prognostic relevance and association with response to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, T; van Brakel, B; Vercherat, C; Hervieu, V; Forestier, J; Chayvialle, J-A; Molin, Y; Lombard-Bohas, C; Joly, M-O; Scoazec, J-Y

    2015-02-03

    O(6)-Methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) loss of expression has been suggested to be predictive of response to temozolomide in neuroendocrine tumours (NETs), but so far, only limited data are available. We evaluated the prognostic and predictive value of MGMT status, assessed by two molecular methods and immunohistochemistry, in a large series of NETs of different origins. A total of 107 patients, including 53 treated by alkylants (temozolomide, dacarbazine or streptozotocin), were retrospectively studied. In each case, we used methyl-specific PCR (MS-PCR) and pyrosequencing for evaluation of promoter methylation and immunohistochemistry for evaluation of protein status. MGMT promoter methylation was detected in 12 out of 99 (12%) interpretable cases by MS-PCR and in 24 out of 99 (24%) by pyrosequencing. O(6)-Methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase loss of expression was observed in 29 out of 89 (33%) interpretable cases. Status of MGMT was not correlated with overall survival (OS) from diagnosis. Progression-free survival and OS from first alkylant use (temozolomide, dacarbazine and streptozotocin) were higher in patients with MGMT protein loss (respectively, 20.2 vs 7.6 months, Palkylant-based chemotherapy in NETs.

  1. An extended sequence specificity for UV-induced DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Long H; Murray, Vincent

    2018-01-01

    The sequence specificity of UV-induced DNA damage was determined with a higher precision and accuracy than previously reported. UV light induces two major damage adducts: cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photoproducts (6-4PPs). Employing capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence and taking advantages of the distinct properties of the CPDs and 6-4PPs, we studied the sequence specificity of UV-induced DNA damage in a purified DNA sequence using two approaches: end-labelling and a polymerase stop/linear amplification assay. A mitochondrial DNA sequence that contained a random nucleotide composition was employed as the target DNA sequence. With previous methodology, the UV sequence specificity was determined at a dinucleotide or trinucleotide level; however, in this paper, we have extended the UV sequence specificity to a hexanucleotide level. With the end-labelling technique (for 6-4PPs), the consensus sequence was found to be 5'-GCTC*AC (where C* is the breakage site); while with the linear amplification procedure, it was 5'-TCTT*AC. With end-labelling, the dinucleotide frequency of occurrence was highest for 5'-TC*, 5'-TT* and 5'-CC*; whereas it was 5'-TT* for linear amplification. The influence of neighbouring nucleotides on the degree of UV-induced DNA damage was also examined. The core sequences consisted of pyrimidine nucleotides 5'-CTC* and 5'-CTT* while an A at position "1" and C at position "2" enhanced UV-induced DNA damage. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Oxidative DNA damage causes mitochondrial genomic instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doudican, Nicole A; Song, Binwei; Shadel, Gerald S; Doetsch, Paul W

    2005-06-01

    Mitochondria contain their own genome, the integrity of which is required for normal cellular energy metabolism. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by normal mitochondrial respiration can damage cellular macromolecules, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and have been implicated in degenerative diseases, cancer, and aging. We developed strategies to elevate mitochondrial oxidative stress by exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2) or utilizing mutants lacking mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (sod2Delta). Experiments were conducted with strains compromised in mitochondrial base excision repair (ntg1Delta) and oxidative damage resistance (pif1Delta) in order to delineate the relationship between these pathways. We observed enhanced ROS production, resulting in a direct increase in oxidative mtDNA damage and mutagenesis. Repair-deficient mutants exposed to oxidative stress conditions exhibited profound genomic instability. Elimination of Ntg1p and Pif1p resulted in a synergistic corruption of respiratory competency upon exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2). Mitochondrial genomic integrity was substantially compromised in ntg1Delta pif1Delta sod2Delta strains, since these cells exhibit a total loss of mtDNA. A stable respiration-defective strain, possessing a normal complement of mtDNA damage resistance pathways, exhibited a complete loss of mtDNA upon exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2). This loss was preventable by Sod2p overexpression. These results provide direct evidence that oxidative mtDNA damage can be a major contributor to mitochondrial genomic instability and demonstrate cooperation of Ntg1p and Pif1p to resist the introduction of lesions into the mitochondrial genome.

  3. Tyrosine 370 phosphorylation of ATM positively regulates DNA damage response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong-Jen; Lan, Li; Peng, Guang; Chang, Wei-Chao; Hsu, Ming-Chuan; Wang, Ying-Nai; Cheng, Chien-Chia; Wei, Leizhen; Nakajima, Satoshi; Chang, Shih-Shin; Liao, Hsin-Wei; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Lavin, Martin; Ang, K Kian; Lin, Shiaw-Yih; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) mediates DNA damage response by controling irradiation-induced foci formation, cell cycle checkpoint, and apoptosis. However, how upstream signaling regulates ATM is not completely understood. Here, we show that upon irradiation stimulation, ATM associates with and is phosphorylated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) at Tyr370 (Y370) at the site of DNA double-strand breaks. Depletion of endogenous EGFR impairs ATM-mediated foci formation, homologous recombination, and DNA repair. Moreover, pretreatment with an EGFR kinase inhibitor, gefitinib, blocks EGFR and ATM association, hinders CHK2 activation and subsequent foci formation, and increases radiosensitivity. Thus, we reveal a critical mechanism by which EGFR directly regulates ATM activation in DNA damage response, and our results suggest that the status of ATM Y370 phosphorylation has the potential to serve as a biomarker to stratify patients for either radiotherapy alone or in combination with EGFR inhibition. PMID:25601159

  4. DNA damage response in nephrotoxic and ischemic kidney injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Mingjuan; Tang, Chengyuan [Department of Nephrology, The Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410011 (China); Ma, Zhengwei [Department of Cellular Biology & Anatomy, Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University and Charlie Norwood VA Medical Center, Augusta, GA 30912 (United States); Huang, Shuang [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Dong, Zheng, E-mail: zdong@augusta.edu [Department of Nephrology, The Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410011 (China); Department of Cellular Biology & Anatomy, Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University and Charlie Norwood VA Medical Center, Augusta, GA 30912 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    DNA damage activates specific cell signaling cascades for DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, senescence, and/or cell death. Recent studies have demonstrated DNA damage response (DDR) in experimental models of acute kidney injury (AKI). In cisplatin-induced AKI or nephrotoxicity, the DDR pathway of ATR/Chk2/p53 is activated and contributes to renal tubular cell apoptosis. In ischemic AKI, DDR seems more complex and involves at least the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), a member of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase (PIKK) family, and p53; however, while ATM may promote DNA repair, p53 may trigger cell death. Targeting DDR for kidney protection in AKI therefore relies on a thorough elucidation of the DDR pathways in various forms of AKI.

  5. Are glutathione S transferases involved in DNA damage signalling? Interactions with DNA damage and repair revealed from molecular epidemiology studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dusinska, Maria, E-mail: Maria.DUSINSKA@nilu.no [CEE-Health Effects Group, NILU - Norwegian Institute for Air Research, Kjeller (Norway); Staruchova, Marta; Horska, Alexandra [Department of Experimental and Applied Genetics, Slovak Medical University, Bratislava (Slovakia); Smolkova, Bozena [Laboratory of Cancer Genetics, Cancer Research Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava (Slovakia); Collins, Andrew [Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo (Norway); Bonassi, Stefano [Unit of Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology, IRCCS San Raffaele Pisana, Rome (Italy); Volkovova, Katarina [Department of Experimental and Applied Genetics, Slovak Medical University, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2012-08-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are members of a multigene family of isoenzymes that are important in the control of oxidative stress and in phase II metabolism. Acting non-enzymically, GSTs can modulate signalling pathways of cell proliferation, cell differentiation and apoptosis. Using a molecular epidemiology approach, we have investigated a potential involvement of GSTs in DNA damage processing, specifically the modulation of DNA repair in a group of 388 healthy adult volunteers; 239 with at least 5 years of occupational exposure to asbestos, stone wool or glass fibre, and 149 reference subjects. We measured DNA damage in lymphocytes using the comet assay (alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis): strand breaks (SBs) and alkali-labile sites, oxidised pyrimidines with endonuclease III, and oxidised purines with formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. We also measured GST activity in erythrocytes, and the capacity for base excision repair (BER) in a lymphocyte extract. Polymorphisms in genes encoding three GST isoenzymes were determined, namely deletion of GSTM1 and GSTT1 and single nucleotide polymorphism Ile105Val in GSTP1. Consumption of vegetables and wine correlated negatively with DNA damage and modulated BER. GST activity correlated with oxidised bases and with BER capacity, and differed depending on polymorphisms in GSTP1, GSTT1 and GSTM1. A significantly lower BER rate was associated with the homozygous GSTT1 deletion in all asbestos site subjects and in the corresponding reference group. Multifactorial analysis revealed effects of sex and exposure in GSTP1 Ile/Val heterozygotes but not in Ile/Ile homozygotes. These variants affected also SBs levels, mainly by interactions of GSTP1 genotype with exposure, with sex, and with smoking habit; and by an interaction between sex and smoking. Our results show that GST polymorphisms and GST activity can apparently influence DNA stability and repair of oxidised bases, suggesting a potential new role for these

  6. Are glutathione S transferases involved in DNA damage signalling? Interactions with DNA damage and repair revealed from molecular epidemiology studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dusinska, Maria; Staruchova, Marta; Horska, Alexandra; Smolkova, Bozena; Collins, Andrew; Bonassi, Stefano; Volkovova, Katarina

    2012-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are members of a multigene family of isoenzymes that are important in the control of oxidative stress and in phase II metabolism. Acting non-enzymically, GSTs can modulate signalling pathways of cell proliferation, cell differentiation and apoptosis. Using a molecular epidemiology approach, we have investigated a potential involvement of GSTs in DNA damage processing, specifically the modulation of DNA repair in a group of 388 healthy adult volunteers; 239 with at least 5 years of occupational exposure to asbestos, stone wool or glass fibre, and 149 reference subjects. We measured DNA damage in lymphocytes using the comet assay (alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis): strand breaks (SBs) and alkali-labile sites, oxidised pyrimidines with endonuclease III, and oxidised purines with formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. We also measured GST activity in erythrocytes, and the capacity for base excision repair (BER) in a lymphocyte extract. Polymorphisms in genes encoding three GST isoenzymes were determined, namely deletion of GSTM1 and GSTT1 and single nucleotide polymorphism Ile105Val in GSTP1. Consumption of vegetables and wine correlated negatively with DNA damage and modulated BER. GST activity correlated with oxidised bases and with BER capacity, and differed depending on polymorphisms in GSTP1, GSTT1 and GSTM1. A significantly lower BER rate was associated with the homozygous GSTT1 deletion in all asbestos site subjects and in the corresponding reference group. Multifactorial analysis revealed effects of sex and exposure in GSTP1 Ile/Val heterozygotes but not in Ile/Ile homozygotes. These variants affected also SBs levels, mainly by interactions of GSTP1 genotype with exposure, with sex, and with smoking habit; and by an interaction between sex and smoking. Our results show that GST polymorphisms and GST activity can apparently influence DNA stability and repair of oxidised bases, suggesting a potential new role for these

  7. DNA damage mediated transcription arrest: Step back to go forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullenders, Leon

    2015-12-01

    The disturbance of DNA helix conformation by bulky DNA damage poses hindrance to transcription elongating due to stalling of RNA polymerase at transcription blocking lesions. Stalling of RNA polymerase provokes the formation of R-loops, i.e. the formation of a DNA-RNA hybrid and a displaced single stranded DNA strand as well as displacement of spliceosomes. R-loops are processed into DNA single and double strand breaks by NER factors depending on TC-NER factors leading to genome instability. Moreover, stalling of RNA polymerase induces a strong signal for cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. These toxic and mutagenic effects are counteracted by a rapid recruitment of DNA repair proteins to perform transcription coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) to remove the blocking DNA lesions and to restore transcription. Recent studies have highlighted the role of backtracking of RNA polymerase to facilitate TC-NER and identified novel factors that play key roles in TC-NER and in restoration of transcription. On the molecular level these factors facilitate stability of the repair complex by promotion and regulation of various post-translational modifications of NER factors and chromatin substrate. In addition, the continuous flow of new factors that emerge from screening assays hints to several regulatory levels to safeguard the integrity of transcription elongation after disturbance by DNA damage that have yet to be explored. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Linking abnormal mitosis to the acquisition of DNA damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellman, David

    2012-01-01

    Cellular defects that impair the fidelity of mitosis promote chromosome missegregation and aneuploidy. Increasing evidence reveals that errors in mitosis can also promote the direct and indirect acquisition of DNA damage and chromosome breaks. Consequently, deregulated cell division can devastate the integrity of the normal genome and unleash a variety of oncogenic stimuli that may promote transformation. Recent work has shed light on the mechanisms that link abnormal mitosis with the development of DNA damage, how cells respond to such affronts, and the potential impact on tumorigenesis. PMID:23229895

  9. DNA damage and repair in human skin in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, B.M.; Gange, R.W.; Freeman, S.E.; Sutherland, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    Understanding the molecular and cellular origins of sunlight-induced skin cancers in man requires knowledge of the damages inflicted on human skin during sunlight exposure, as well as the ability of cells in skin to repair or circumvent such damage. Although repair has been studied extensively in procaryotic and eucaryotic cells - including human cells in culture - there are important differences between repair by human skin cells in culture and human skin in situ: quantitative differences in rates of repair, as well as qualitative differences, including the presence or absence of repair mechanisms. Quantitation of DNA damage and repair in human skin required the development of new approaches for measuring damage at low levels in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNA. The method allows for analysis of multiple samples and the resulting data should be related to behavior of the DNA molecules by analytic expressions. Furthermore, it should be possible to assay a variety of lesions using the same methodology. The development of new analysis methods, new technology, and new biochemical probes for the study of DNA damage and repair are described. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  10. DNA damage and repair in human skin in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, B.M.; Gange, R.W.; Freeman, S.E.; Sutherland, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    Understanding the molecular and cellular origins of sunlight-induced skin cancers in man requires knowledge of the damages inflicted on human skin during sunlight exposure, as well as the ability of cells in skin to repair or circumvent such damage. Although repair has been studied extensively in procaryotic and eucaryotic cells - including human cells in culture - there are important differences between repair by human skin cells in culture and human skin in situ: quantitative differences in rates of repair, as well as qualitative differences, including the presence or absence of repair mechanisms. Quantitation of DNA damage and repair in human skin required the development of new approaches for measuring damage at low levels in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNA. The method allows for analysis of multiple samples and the resulting data should be related to behavior of the DNA molecules by analytic expressions. Furthermore, it should be possible to assay a variety of lesions using the same methodology. The development of new analysis methods, new technology, and new biochemical probes for the study of DNA damage and repair are described. 28 refs., 4 figs

  11. Effects of inhibitors of DNA repair on the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations induced by x-rays or alkylating agents in cultured human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kihlman, B.A.; Andersson, H.C.

    1986-01-01

    In the first part of this presentation the authors give examples of the synergistic enhancements that are obtained with various inhibitor combinations in G/sub 2/. The second part of the presentation deals with the effects of two agents, also well known for their capacity to potentiate the frequency of chromosomal aberrations induced by physical and chemical agents, but with a different mechanism of action. These agents are caffeine and 3-aminobenzamide (3AB). Caffeine has for decades been used as an inhibitor of DNA repair although its mechanism of action has not been fully understood. 3AB has more recently come into focus as an efficient inhibitor of the synthesis of poly-(ADP-ribose), a substance believed to be of importance in connection with the repair of certain types of DNA damage. The results presented do not quite fit in with the general idea about the mode of action of these agents. All experiments were carried out with whole-blood cultures of human lymphocytes. When inhibitors were used as post-treatments, chromosomal aberrations were induced by X-rays or by the alkylating agents thiotepa (TT) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). X-rays were generated by a Siemens Stabilipan 200 apparatus, at a dose rate of 0.5 Gy/min. The tube (TR 200f) was operated at 180 kV, 10 mA and the radiation filtered through 4 mm Al

  12. DNA damage induced in mouse peritoneal exudate cells after in vivo administration of chemical and physical agents as determined by alkaline elution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Yoshisuke; Miyanaga, Kumiko; Sato, Sei-ichi; Inui, Naomichi

    1990-01-01

    The alkaline elution technique for detecting DNA strand breaks has been applied to the study of DNA damage in mouse peritoneal exudate cells resulting from the in vivo administration of chemical and physical agents. The direct methylating agents methyl methanesulphonate and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea induced extensive breakage in samples taken 2 h after administration. The direct ethylating agents ethyl methanesulphonate and N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea also induced DNA strand breaks, but to a lesser extent than the methylating agents. The indirect methylating agent dimethylnitrosamine showed hardly any effect in this system. A weak but positive response was observed upon treatment with the anti-neoplastic alkylating agent procarbazine hydrochloride. The whole-body irradiation of mice with 60 Co γ-rays also induced DNA strand breaks. The elution profiles for γ-ray irradiation were different from those of alkylating agents, and indicate that alkylating agents produce many more secondary lesions leading to DNA strand breaks than γ-rays. N-methyl-N-nitrosourea produced slightly more DNA strand breaks in mutagen-sensitive mice, which are derived from the CD-1 strain, than in ICR mice. (Author)

  13. DNA damage induced in mouse peritoneal exudate cells after in vivo administration of chemical and physical agents as determined by alkaline elution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishi, Yoshisuke (Japan Tobacco Inc., Yokohama (Japan). Central Research Inst.); Miyanaga, Kumiko; Sato, Sei-ichi (Japan Tobacco Inc., Hatano, Kanagawa (Japan). Toxicology Research Lab.); Inui, Naomichi (Japan Tobacco Inc., Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan). Pharmaceutical Research Labs.)

    1990-01-01

    The alkaline elution technique for detecting DNA strand breaks has been applied to the study of DNA damage in mouse peritoneal exudate cells resulting from the in vivo administration of chemical and physical agents. The direct methylating agents methyl methanesulphonate and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea induced extensive breakage in samples taken 2 h after administration. The direct ethylating agents ethyl methanesulphonate and N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea also induced DNA strand breaks, but to a lesser extent than the methylating agents. The indirect methylating agent dimethylnitrosamine showed hardly any effect in this system. A weak but positive response was observed upon treatment with the anti-neoplastic alkylating agent procarbazine hydrochloride. The whole-body irradiation of mice with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays also induced DNA strand breaks. The elution profiles for {gamma}-ray irradiation were different from those of alkylating agents, and indicate that alkylating agents produce many more secondary lesions leading to DNA strand breaks than {gamma}-rays. N-methyl-N-nitrosourea produced slightly more DNA strand breaks in mutagen-sensitive mice, which are derived from the CD-1 strain, than in ICR mice. (Author).

  14. Diagnosis of Lung Cancer by Fractal Analysis of Damaged DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Namazi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer starts when cells in a part of the body start to grow out of control. In fact cells become cancer cells because of DNA damage. A DNA walk of a genome represents how the frequency of each nucleotide of a pairing nucleotide couple changes locally. In this research in order to study the cancer genes, DNA walk plots of genomes of patients with lung cancer were generated using a program written in MATLAB language. The data so obtained was checked for fractal property by computing the fractal dimension using a program written in MATLAB. Also, the correlation of damaged DNA was studied using the Hurst exponent measure. We have found that the damaged DNA sequences are exhibiting higher degree of fractality and less correlation compared with normal DNA sequences. So we confirmed this method can be used for early detection of lung cancer. The method introduced in this research not only is useful for diagnosis of lung cancer but also can be applied for detection and growth analysis of different types of cancers.

  15. Dietary Berries and Ellagic Acid Prevent Oxidative DNA Damage and Modulate Expression of DNA Repair Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh C. Gupta

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage is a pre-requisite for the initiation of cancer and agents that reduce this damage are useful in cancer prevention. In this study, we evaluated the ability of whole berries and berry phytochemical, ellagic acid to reduce endogenous oxidative DNA damage. Ellagic acid was selected based on > 95% inhibition of 8-oxodeoxyguosine (8-oxodG and other unidentified oxidative DNA adducts induced by 4-hydroxy-17B;-estradiol and CuCl2 in vitro. Inhibition of the latter occurred at lower concentrations (10 u(microM than that for 8-oxodG (100 u(microM. In the in vivo study, female CD-1 mice (n=6 were fed either a control diet or diet supplemented with ellagic acid (400 ppm and dehydrated berries (5% w/w with varying ellagic acid contents -- blueberry (low, strawberry (medium and red raspberry (high, for 3 weeks. Blueberry and strawberry diets showed moderate reductions in endogenous DNA adducts (25%. However, both red raspberry and ellagic acid diets showed a significant reduction of 59% (p < 0.001 and 48% (p < 0.01, respectively. Both diets also resulted in a 3-8 fold over-expression of genes involved in DNA repair such as xeroderma pigmentosum group A complementing protein (XPA, DNA excision repair protein (ERCC5 and DNA ligase III (DNL3. These results suggest that red raspberry and ellagic acid reduce endogenous oxidative DNA damage by mechanisms which may involve increase in DNA repair.

  16. ZRBA1, a Mixed EGFR/DNA Targeting Molecule, Potentiates Radiation Response Through Delayed DNA Damage Repair Process in a Triple Negative Breast Cancer Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heravi, Mitra [Department of Human Genetics, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Segal Cancer Center, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal (Canada); Kumala, Slawomir [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Segal Cancer Center, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal (Canada); Rachid, Zakaria; Jean-Claude, Bertrand J. [Cancer Drug Research Laboratory, McGill University Health Center, Montreal (Canada); Radzioch, Danuta [Department of Human Genetics, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Muanza, Thierry M., E-mail: tmuanza@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Segal Cancer Center, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal (Canada)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: ZRBA1 is a combi-molecule designed to induce DNA alkylating lesions and to block epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) TK domain. Inasmuch as ZRBA1 downregulates the EGFR TK-mediated antisurvival signaling and induces DNA damage, we postulated that it might be a radiosensitizer. The aim of this study was to further investigate the potentiating effect of ZRBA1 in combination with radiation and to elucidate the possible mechanisms of interaction between these 2 treatment modalities. Methods and Materials: The triple negative human breast MDA-MB-468 cancer cell line and mouse mammary cancer 4T1 cell line were used in this study. Clonogenic assay, Western blot analysis, and DNA damage analysis were performed at multiple time points after treatment. To confirm our in vitro findings, in vivo tumor growth delay assay was performed. Results: Our results show that a combination of ZRBA1 and radiation increases the radiation sensitivity of both cell lines significantly with a dose enhancement factor of 1.56, induces significant numbers of DNA strand breaks, prolongs higher DNA damage up to 24 hours after treatment, and significantly increases tumor growth delay in a syngeneic mouse model. Conclusions: Our data suggest that the higher efficacy of this combination could be partially due to increased DNA damage and delayed DNA repair process and to the inhibition of EGFR. The encouraging results of this combination demonstrated a significant improvement in treatment efficiency and therefore could be applicable in early clinical trial settings.

  17. DNA Mismatch Repair and Oxidative DNA Damage: Implications for Cancer Biology and Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridge, Gemma; Rashid, Sukaina; Martin, Sarah A.

    2014-01-01

    Many components of the cell, including lipids, proteins and both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, are vulnerable to deleterious modifications caused by reactive oxygen species. If not repaired, oxidative DNA damage can lead to disease-causing mutations, such as in cancer. Base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair are the two DNA repair pathways believed to orchestrate the removal of oxidative lesions. However, recent findings suggest that the mismatch repair pathway may also be important for the response to oxidative DNA damage. This is particularly relevant in cancer where mismatch repair genes are frequently mutated or epigenetically silenced. In this review we explore how the regulation of oxidative DNA damage by mismatch repair proteins may impact on carcinogenesis. We discuss recent studies that identify potential new treatments for mismatch repair deficient tumours, which exploit this non-canonical role of mismatch repair using synthetic lethal targeting

  18. DNA Mismatch Repair and Oxidative DNA Damage: Implications for Cancer Biology and Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridge, Gemma; Rashid, Sukaina; Martin, Sarah A., E-mail: sarah.martin@qmul.ac.uk [Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-05

    Many components of the cell, including lipids, proteins and both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, are vulnerable to deleterious modifications caused by reactive oxygen species. If not repaired, oxidative DNA damage can lead to disease-causing mutations, such as in cancer. Base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair are the two DNA repair pathways believed to orchestrate the removal of oxidative lesions. However, recent findings suggest that the mismatch repair pathway may also be important for the response to oxidative DNA damage. This is particularly relevant in cancer where mismatch repair genes are frequently mutated or epigenetically silenced. In this review we explore how the regulation of oxidative DNA damage by mismatch repair proteins may impact on carcinogenesis. We discuss recent studies that identify potential new treatments for mismatch repair deficient tumours, which exploit this non-canonical role of mismatch repair using synthetic lethal targeting.

  19. Repair of DNA damage in light sensitive human skin diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horkay, I.; Varga, L.; Tam' asi P., Gundy, S.

    1978-12-01

    Repair of uv-light induced DNA damage and changes in the semiconservative DNA synthesis were studied by in vitro autoradiography in the skin of patients with lightdermatoses (polymorphous light eruption, porphyria cutanea tarda, erythropoietic protoporphyria) and xeroderma pigmentosum as well as in that of healthy controls. In polymorphous light eruption the semiconservative DNA replication rate was more intensive in the area of the skin lesions and in the repeated phototest site, the excision repair synthesis appeared to be unaltered. In cutaneous prophyrias a decreased rate of the repair incorporation could be detected. Xeroderma pigmentosum was characterized by a strongly reduced repair synthesis.

  20. Natural transformation of bacteria by fragmented, damaged and ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overballe-Petersen, Søren

    with fullgenome comparisons that the process has general relevance in extant bacteria. Our findings reveal that the large environmental reservoir of short and damaged DNA retains capacity for natural transformation, even after thousands of years. This describes for the first time a process by which cells can...... transfer playing an important role early in the evolution of life. The published article explains the chemical structure behind an observed degradation difference between the two purine-nucleotides guanosine and adenosine in ancient DNA. We also point at new uses for high-through-put DNA sequencing...

  1. ATM signaling and genomic stability in response to DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavin, Martin F.; Birrell, Geoff; Chen, Philip; Kozlov, Sergei; Scott, Shaun; Gueven, Nuri

    2005-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks represent the most threatening lesion to the integrity of the genome in cells exposed to ionizing radiation and radiomimetic chemicals. Those breaks are recognized, signaled to cell cycle checkpoints and repaired by protein complexes. The product of the gene (ATM) mutated in the human genetic disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) plays a central role in the recognition and signaling of DNA damage. ATM is one of an ever growing number of proteins which when mutated compromise the stability of the genome and predispose to tumour development. Mechanisms for recognising double strand breaks in DNA, maintaining genome stability and minimizing risk of cancer are discussed

  2. DNA damage in synchronized hela cells irradiated with ultraviolet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downes, C.S.; Collins, A.R.S.; Johnson, R.T.

    1979-01-01

    The lethal effect of uv radiation on HeLa cells is least in mitosis and greatest in late G 1 -early S. Photochemical damage to HeLa DNA, as measured by thymine-containing dimer formation and by alkaline sucrose sedimentation, also increases from mitosis towards early S phase. Computer simulations of uv absorption by an idealized HeLa cell at different stages of the cell cycle indicate that changes in damage could be due solely to changes in chromatin geometry. But survival is not exclusively a function of damage

  3. DNA damage by carbonyl stress in human skin cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, Michael J.; Wondrak, Georg T.; Laurean, Daniel Cervantes; Jacobson, Myron K.; Jacobson, Elaine L.

    2003-01-01

    Reactive carbonyl species (RCS) are potent mediators of cellular carbonyl stress originating from endogenous chemical processes such as lipid peroxidation and glycation. Skin deterioration as observed in photoaging and diabetes has been linked to accumulative protein damage from glycation, but the effects of carbonyl stress on skin cell genomic integrity are ill defined. In this study, the genotoxic effects of acute carbonyl stress on HaCaT keratinocytes and CF3 fibroblasts were assessed. Administration of the α-dicarbonyl compounds glyoxal and methylglyoxal as physiologically relevant RCS inhibited skin cell proliferation, led to intra-cellular protein glycation as evidenced by the accumulation of N ε -(carboxymethyl)-L-lysine (CML) in histones, and caused extensive DNA strand cleavage as assessed by the comet assay. These effects were prevented by treatment with the carbonyl scavenger D-penicillamine. Both glyoxal and methylglyoxal damaged DNA in intact cells. Glyoxal caused DNA strand breaks while methylglyoxal produced extensive DNA-protein cross-linking as evidenced by pronounced nuclear condensation and total suppression of comet formation. Glycation by glyoxal and methylglyoxal resulted in histone cross-linking in vitro and induced oxygen-dependent cleavage of plasmid DNA, which was partly suppressed by the hydroxyl scavenger mannitol. We suggest that a chemical mechanism of cellular DNA damage by carbonyl stress occurs in which histone glycoxidation is followed by reactive oxygen induced DNA stand breaks. The genotoxic potential of RCS in cultured skin cells and its suppression by a carbonyl scavenger as described in this study have implications for skin damage and carcinogenesis and its prevention by agents selective for carbonyl stress

  4. DNA damage by carbonyl stress in human skin cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Michael J.; Wondrak, Georg T.; Laurean, Daniel Cervantes; Jacobson, Myron K.; Jacobson, Elaine L

    2003-01-28

    Reactive carbonyl species (RCS) are potent mediators of cellular carbonyl stress originating from endogenous chemical processes such as lipid peroxidation and glycation. Skin deterioration as observed in photoaging and diabetes has been linked to accumulative protein damage from glycation, but the effects of carbonyl stress on skin cell genomic integrity are ill defined. In this study, the genotoxic effects of acute carbonyl stress on HaCaT keratinocytes and CF3 fibroblasts were assessed. Administration of the {alpha}-dicarbonyl compounds glyoxal and methylglyoxal as physiologically relevant RCS inhibited skin cell proliferation, led to intra-cellular protein glycation as evidenced by the accumulation of N{sup {epsilon}}-(carboxymethyl)-L-lysine (CML) in histones, and caused extensive DNA strand cleavage as assessed by the comet assay. These effects were prevented by treatment with the carbonyl scavenger D-penicillamine. Both glyoxal and methylglyoxal damaged DNA in intact cells. Glyoxal caused DNA strand breaks while methylglyoxal produced extensive DNA-protein cross-linking as evidenced by pronounced nuclear condensation and total suppression of comet formation. Glycation by glyoxal and methylglyoxal resulted in histone cross-linking in vitro and induced oxygen-dependent cleavage of plasmid DNA, which was partly suppressed by the hydroxyl scavenger mannitol. We suggest that a chemical mechanism of cellular DNA damage by carbonyl stress occurs in which histone glycoxidation is followed by reactive oxygen induced DNA stand breaks. The genotoxic potential of RCS in cultured skin cells and its suppression by a carbonyl scavenger as described in this study have implications for skin damage and carcinogenesis and its prevention by agents selective for carbonyl stress.

  5. Activation of DNA damage repair pathways by murine polyomavirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiser, Katie; Nicholas, Catherine; Garcea, Robert L., E-mail: Robert.Garcea@Colorado.edu

    2016-10-15

    Nuclear replication of DNA viruses activates DNA damage repair (DDR) pathways, which are thought to detect and inhibit viral replication. However, many DNA viruses also depend on these pathways in order to optimally replicate their genomes. We investigated the relationship between murine polyomavirus (MuPyV) and components of DDR signaling pathways including CHK1, CHK2, H2AX, ATR, and DNAPK. We found that recruitment and retention of DDR proteins at viral replication centers was independent of H2AX, as well as the viral small and middle T-antigens. Additionally, infectious virus production required ATR kinase activity, but was independent of CHK1, CHK2, or DNAPK signaling. ATR inhibition did not reduce the total amount of viral DNA accumulated, but affected the amount of virus produced, indicating a defect in virus assembly. These results suggest that MuPyV may utilize a subset of DDR proteins or non-canonical DDR signaling pathways in order to efficiently replicate and assemble. -- Highlights: •Murine polyomavirus activates and recruits DNA damage repair (DDR) proteins to replication centers. •Large T-antigen mediates recruitment of DDR proteins to viral replication centers. •Inhibition or knockout of CHK1, CHK2, DNA-PK or H2AX do not affect viral titers. •Inhibition of ATR activity reduces viral titers, but not viral DNA accumulation.

  6. Mechanisms of chemoresistance to alkylating agents in malignant glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkaria, Jann N; Kitange, Gaspar J; James, C David; Plummer, Ruth; Calvert, Hilary; Weller, Michael; Wick, Wolfgang

    2008-05-15

    Intrinsic or acquired chemoresistance to alkylating agents is a major cause of treatment failure in patients with malignant brain tumors. Alkylating agents, the mainstay of treatment for brain tumors, damage the DNA and induce apoptosis, but the cytotoxic activity of these agents is dependent on DNA repair pathways. For example, O6-methylguanine DNA adducts can cause double-strand breaks, but this is dependent on a functional mismatch repair pathway. Thus, tumor cell lines deficient in mismatch repair are resistant to alkylating agents. Perhaps the most important mechanism of resistance to alkylating agents is the DNA repair enzyme O6-methylguanine methyltransferase, which can eliminate the cytotoxic O6-methylguanine DNA adduct before it causes harm. Another mechanism of resistance to alkylating agents is the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Consequently, efforts are ongoing to develop effective inhibitors of BER. Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase plays a pivotal role in BER and is an important therapeutic target. Developing effective strategies to overcome chemoresistance requires the identification of reliable preclinical models that recapitulate human disease and which can be used to facilitate drug development. This article describes the diverse mechanisms of chemoresistance operating in malignant glioma and efforts to develop reliable preclinical models and novel pharmacologic approaches to overcome resistance to alkylating agents.

  7. Detecting DNA damage with a silver solid amalgam electrode

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuchaříková, Kateřina; Novotný, Ladislav; Josypčuk, Bohdan; Fojta, Miroslav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 5 (2004), s. 410-414 ISSN 1040-0397 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4004108; GA AV ČR IBS5004355 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : DNA damage * silver solid amalgam electrode * HMDE Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.038, year: 2004

  8. Biomarkers of oxidative damage to DNA and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Steffen; Høgh Danielsen, Pernille; Mikkelsen, Lone

    2008-01-01

    environmental factors, including particulate air pollution, cause oxidative damage to DNA, whereas diets rich in fruit and vegetables or antioxidant supplements may reduce the levels and enhance repair. Urinary excretion of 8-oxodG, genotype and expression of OGG1 have been associated with risk of cancer...

  9. Cancer risk and oxidative DNA damage in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, S; Poulsen, H E

    1996-01-01

    with a mechanistically based increased risk of cancer, including Fanconi anemia, chronic hepatitis, cystic fibrosis, and various autoimmune diseases, the biomarker studies indicate an increased rate of oxidative DNA damage or in some instances deficient repair. Human studies support the experimentally based notion...

  10. DNA Damage Signaling Instructs Polyploid Macrophage Fate in Granulomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrtwich, Laura; Nanda, Indrajit; Evangelou, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    to a chronic stimulus, though critical for disease outcome, have not been defined. Here, we delineate a macrophage differentiation pathway by which a persistent Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 signal instructs polyploid macrophage fate by inducing replication stress and activating the DNA damage response. Polyploid...

  11. DNA damage and plasma homocysteine levels are associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study describes the association between levels of DNA damage and homocysteine (Hcy) in persistent diarrheic (PD) patients and correlates them with serum biochemical metabolites and mineral components. PD patients (n = 36) age 4 - 6 years from Faisalabad hospitals were examined for anthropometric factors, ...

  12. Function of ZFAND3 in the DNA Damage Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Cantor SB, Naka- tani Y, Livingston DM. 2006. Multifactorial contribu- tions to an acute DNA damage response by BRCA1/ BARD1-containing complexes. Genes...Cutaneous T Cell Lymphoma. PLoS ONE 8(7): e68915. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0068915 Editor: Sue Cotterill, St. Georges University of London, United

  13. SUMO boosts the DNA damage response barrier against cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartek, Jiří; Hodný, Zdeněk

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 1 (2010), s. 9-11 ISSN 1535-6108 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/08/0353 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : DNA damage response * ubiquitylation * sumoylation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 26.925, year: 2010

  14. DNA damage by reactive species: Mechanisms, mutation and repair

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-06-25

    Jun 25, 2012 ... crosslinks can also affect the structure of DNA significantly. ... H2O2 by converting it into water, reaction of H2O2 with ..... Damaged nucleotide flipping by (a) AGT due to intercalation of an amino acid (Arg128) (pdb 1t38) and ...

  15. DNA damage and decrease of cellular oxidase activity in piglet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DNA damage and decrease of cellular oxidase activity in piglet sertoli cells exposed to gossypol. Ming Zhang, Hui Yuan, Zuping He, Liyun Yuan, Jine Yi, Sijun Deng, Li Zhu, Chengzhi Guo, Yin Lu, Jing Wu, Lixin Wen, Qiang Wei, Liqun Xue ...

  16. DETECTION OF DNA DAMAGE USING A FIBEROPTIC BIOSENSOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rapid and sensitive fiber optic biosensor assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. For this assay, a biotin-labeled capture oligonucleotide (38 mer) was immobilized to an avidin-coated quartz fiber. Hybridization of a dye-labeled complementary sequence was observed...

  17. The DNA-damage response in human biology and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Stephen P; Bartek, Jiri

    2009-01-01

    , signal its presence and mediate its repair. Such responses, which have an impact on a wide range of cellular events, are biologically significant because they prevent diverse human diseases. Our improving understanding of DNA-damage responses is providing new avenues for disease management....

  18. Both genetic and dietary factors underlie individual differences in DNA damage levels and DNA repair capacity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slyšková, Jana; Lorenzo, Y.; Karlsen, A.; Carlsen, M. H.; Novosadová, Vendula; Blomhoff, R.; Vodička, Pavel; Collins, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 16, APR 2014 (2014), s. 66-73 ISSN 1568-7864 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/12/1585 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 ; RVO:86652036 Keywords : DNA damage * DNA repair capacity * diet Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology; EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics (BTO-N) Impact factor: 3.111, year: 2014

  19. Role of DNA repair in repair of cytogenetic damages. Contribution of repair of single-strand DNA breaks to cytogenetic damages repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozanova, O.M.; Zaichkina, S.I.; Aptikaev, G.F.; Ganassi, E.Eh.

    1989-01-01

    The comparison was made between the results of the effect of poly(ADP-ribosylation) ingibitors (e.g. nicotinamide and 3-aminobenzamide) and a chromatin proteinase ingibitor, phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride, on the cytogenetic damages repair, by a micronuclear test, and DNA repair in Chinese hamster fibroblasts. The values of the repair half-periods (5-7 min for the cytogenetic damages and 5 min for the rapidly repaired DNA damages) and a similar modyfying effect with regard to radiation cytogenetic damages and kynetics of DNA damages repair were found to be close. This confirms the contribution of repair of DNA single-strand breaks in the initiation of structural damages to chromosomes

  20. Detection of DNA damage based on metal-mediated molecular beacon and DNA strands displacement reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yanxiang; Wei, Min; Wei, Wei; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu; Liu, Songqin

    2014-01-01

    DNA hairpin structure probes are usually designed by forming intra-molecular duplex based on Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. In this paper, a molecular beacon based on silver ions-mediated cytosine-Ag+-cytosine base pairs was used to detect DNA. The inherent characteristic of the metal ligation facilitated the design of functional probe and the adjustment of its binding strength compared to traditional DNA hairpin structure probes, which make it be used to detect DNA in a simple, rapid and easy way with the help of DNA strands displacement reaction. The method was sensitive and also possesses the good specificity to differentiate the single base mismatched DNA from the complementary DNA. It was also successfully applied to study the damage effect of classic genotoxicity chemicals such as styrene oxide and sodium arsenite on DNA, which was significant in food science, environmental science and pharmaceutical science.

  1. Oxidatively generated DNA/RNA damage in psychological stress states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    age-related somatic disorders. The overall aim of the PhD project was to investigate the relation between psychopathology, psychological stress, stress hormone secretion and oxidatively generated DNA and RNA damage, as measured by the urinary excretion of markers of whole-body DNA/RNA oxidation (8...... between the 24 h urinary cortisol excretion and the excretion of 8-oxodG/8-oxoGuo, determined in the same samples. Collectively, the studies could not confirm an association between psychological stress and oxidative stress on nucleic acids. Systemic oxidatively generated DNA/RNA damage was increased......Both non-pathological psychological stress states and mental disorders are associated with molecular, cellular and epidemiological signs of accelerated aging. Oxidative stress on nucleic acids is a critical component of cellular and organismal aging, and a suggested pathogenic mechanism in several...

  2. Radiation damage to DNA: The importance of track structure

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, M A

    1999-01-01

    A wide variety of biological effects are induced by ionizing radiation, from cell death to mutations and carcinogenesis. The biological effectiveness is found to vary not only with the absorbed dose but also with the type of radiation and its energy, i.e., with the nature of radiation tracks. An overview is presented of some of the biological experiments using different qualities of radiation, which when compared with Monte Carlo track structure studies, have highlighted the importance of the localized spatial properties of stochastic energy deposition on the nanometer scale at or near DNA. The track structure leads to clustering of damage which may include DNA breaks, base damage etc., the complexity of the cluster and therefore its biological repairability varying with radiation type. The ability of individual tracks to produce clustered damage, and the subsequent biological response are important in the assessment of the risk associated with low-level human exposure. Recent experiments have also shown that...

  3. Sorbate-nitrite interactions: acetonitrile oxide as an alkylating agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Prior, M Teresa; Gómez-Bombarelli, Rafael; González-Pérez, Marina; Manso, José A; García-Santos, M Pilar; Calle, Emilio; Casado, Julio

    2009-07-01

    Because chemical species with DNA-damaging and mutagenic activity are formed in sorbate-nitrite mixtures and because sorbic acid sometimes coexists with nitrite occurring naturally or incorporated as a food additive, the study of sorbate-nitrite interactions is important. Here, the alkylating potential of the products resulting from such interactions was investigated. Drawn were the following conclusions: (i) Acetonitrile oxide (ACNO) is the compound responsible for the alkylating capacity of sorbate-nitrite mixtures; (ii) ACNO alkylates 4-(p-nitrobenzyl)pyridine (NBP), a trap for alkylating agents with nucleophilic characteristics similar to those of DNA bases, forming an adduct (AD; epsilon = 1.4 x 10(4) M(-1) cm(-1); lambda = 519 nm); (iii) the NBP alkylation reaction complies with the rate equation, r = d[AD]/dt = k(alk)(ACNO)[ACNO][NBP]-k(hyd)(AD)[AD], k(alk)(ACNO) being the NBP alkylation rate constant for ACNO and k(hyd)(AD) the rate constant for the adduct hydrolysis reaction; (iv) the small fraction of ACNO forming the adduct with NBP, as well as the small magnitude of the quotient (k(alk) (ACNO)/k(hyd)(ACNO)) as compared with those reported for other alkylating agents, such as some lactones and N-alkyl-N-nitrosoureas, reveals the ACNO effective alkylating capacity to be less significant; (v) the low value of the NBP-ACNO adduct life (defined as the total amount of adduct present along the progression of the NBP alkylation per unit of alkylating agent concentration) points to the high instability of this adduct; and (vi) the obtained results are in accordance with the low carcinogenicity of ACNO.

  4. Targeting Ongoing DNA Damage in Multiple Myeloma: Effects of DNA Damage Response Inhibitors on Plasma Cell Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Belén Herrero

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Human myeloma cell lines (HMCLs and a subset of myeloma patients with poor prognosis exhibit high levels of replication stress (RS, leading to DNA damage. In this study, we confirmed the presence of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs in several HMCLs by measuring γH2AX and RAD51 foci and analyzed the effect of various inhibitors of the DNA damage response on MM cell survival. Inhibition of ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein (ATR, the main kinase mediating the response to RS, using the specific inhibitor VE-821 induced more cell death in HMCLs than in control lymphoblastoid cells and U266, an HMCL with a low level of DNA damage. The absence of ATR was partially compensated by ataxia telangiectasia-mutated protein (ATM, since chemical inhibition of both kinases using VE-821 and KU-55933 significantly increased the death of MM cells with DNA damage. We found that ATM and ATR are involved in DSB repair by homologous recombination (HR in MM. Inhibition of both kinases resulted in a stronger inhibition that may underlie cell death induction, since abolition of HR using two different inhibitors severely reduced survival of HMCLs that exhibit DNA damage. On the other hand, inhibition of the other route involved in DSB repair, non-homologous end joining (NHEJ, using the DNA-PK inhibitor NU7441, did not affect MM cell viability. Interestingly, we found that NHEJ inhibition did not increase cell death when HR was simultaneously inhibited with the RAD51 inhibitor B02, but it clearly increased the level of cell death when HR was inhibited with the MRE11 inhibitor mirin, which interferes with recombination before DNA resection takes place. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that MM cells with ongoing DNA damage rely on an intact HR pathway, which thereby suggests therapeutic opportunities. We also show that inhibition of HR after the initial step of end resection might be more appropriate for inducing MM cell death, since it

  5. Interactions and Localization of Escherichia coli Error-Prone DNA Polymerase IV after DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Sarita; Popodi, Ellen M; Hanson, Andrew J; Foster, Patricia L

    2015-09-01

    Escherichia coli's DNA polymerase IV (Pol IV/DinB), a member of the Y family of error-prone polymerases, is induced during the SOS response to DNA damage and is responsible for translesion bypass and adaptive (stress-induced) mutation. In this study, the localization of Pol IV after DNA damage was followed using fluorescent fusions. After exposure of E. coli to DNA-damaging agents, fluorescently tagged Pol IV localized to the nucleoid as foci. Stepwise photobleaching indicated ∼60% of the foci consisted of three Pol IV molecules, while ∼40% consisted of six Pol IV molecules. Fluorescently tagged Rep, a replication accessory DNA helicase, was recruited to the Pol IV foci after DNA damage, suggesting that the in vitro interaction between Rep and Pol IV reported previously also occurs in vivo. Fluorescently tagged RecA also formed foci after DNA damage, and Pol IV localized to them. To investigate if Pol IV localizes to double-strand breaks (DSBs), an I-SceI endonuclease-mediated DSB was introduced close to a fluorescently labeled LacO array on the chromosome. After DSB induction, Pol IV localized to the DSB site in ∼70% of SOS-induced cells. RecA also formed foci at the DSB sites, and Pol IV localized to the RecA foci. These results suggest that Pol IV interacts with RecA in vivo and is recruited to sites of DSBs to aid in the restoration of DNA replication. DNA polymerase IV (Pol IV/DinB) is an error-prone DNA polymerase capable of bypassing DNA lesions and aiding in the restart of stalled replication forks. In this work, we demonstrate in vivo localization of fluorescently tagged Pol IV to the nucleoid after DNA damage and to DNA double-strand breaks. We show colocalization of Pol IV with two proteins: Rep DNA helicase, which participates in replication, and RecA, which catalyzes recombinational repair of stalled replication forks. Time course experiments suggest that Pol IV recruits Rep and that RecA recruits Pol IV. These findings provide in vivo evidence

  6. In cellulo phosphorylation of XRCC4 Ser320 by DNA-PK induced by DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Imamichi, Shoji; Fukuchi, Mikoto; Samarth, Ravindra Mahadeo; Tomita, Masanori; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    XRCC4 is a protein associated with DNA Ligase IV, which is thought to join two DNA ends at the final step of DNA double-strand break repair through non-homologous end joining. In response to treatment with ionizing radiation or DNA damaging agents, XRCC4 undergoes DNA-PK-dependent phosphorylation. Furthermore, Ser260 and Ser320 (or Ser318 in alternatively spliced form) of XRCC4 were identified as the major phosphorylation sites by purified DNA-PK in vitro through mass spectrometry. However, it has not been clear whether these sites are phosphorylated in vivo in response to DNA damage. In the present study, we generated an antibody that reacts with XRCC4 phosphorylated at Ser320 and examined in cellulo phosphorylation status of XRCC4 Ser320. The phosphorylation of XRCC4 Ser320 was induced by γ-ray irradiation and treatment with Zeocin. The phosphorylation of XRCC4 Ser320 was detected even after 1 Gy irradiation and increased in a manner dependent on radiation dose. The phosphorylation was observed immediately after irradiation and remained mostly unchanged for up to 4 h. The phosphorylation was inhibited by DNA-PK inhibitor NU7441 and was undetectable in DNA-PKcs-deficient cells, indicating that the phosphorylation was mainly mediated by DNA-PK. These results suggested potential usefulness of the phosphorylation status of XRCC4 Ser320 as an indicator of DNA-PK functionality in living cells

  7. Oxidative damage of DNA in subjects occupationally exposed to lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlas, Natalia; Olewińska, Elżbieta; Markiewicz-Górka, Iwona; Kozłowska, Agnieszka; Januszewska, Lidia; Lundh, Thomas; Januszewska, Ewa; Pawlas, Krystyna

    2017-09-01

    Exposure to lead (Pb) in environmental and occupational settings continues to be a serious public health problem and may pose an elevated risk of genetic damage. The aim of this study was to assess the level of oxidative stress and DNA damage in subjects occupationally exposed to lead. We studied a population of 78 male workers exposed to lead in a lead and zinc smelter and battery recycling plant and 38 men from a control group. Blood lead levels were detected by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry and plasma lead levels by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The following assays were performed to assess the DNA damage and oxidative stress: comet assay, determination of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), lipid peroxidation and total antioxidant status (TAS). The mean concentration of lead in the blood of the exposed group was 392 ± 103 μg/L and was significantly higher than in the control group (30.3 ± 29.4 μg/L, p lead exposure [lead in blood, lead in plasma, zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP)] and urine concentration of 8-OHdG. The level of oxidative damage of DNA was positively correlated with the level of lipid peroxidation (TBARS) and negatively with total anti-oxidative status (TAS). Our study suggests that occupational exposure causes an increase in oxidative damage to DNA, even in subjects with relatively short length of service (average length of about 10 years). 8-OHdG concentration in the urine proved to be a sensitive and non-invasive marker of lead induced genotoxic damage.

  8. PARP inhibitors protect against sex- and AAG-dependent alkylation-induced neural degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allocca, Mariacarmela; Corrigan, Joshua J; Fake, Kimberly R; Calvo, Jennifer A; Samson, Leona D

    2017-09-15

    Alkylating agents are commonly used to treat cancer. Although base excision repair (BER) is a major pathway for repairing DNA alkylation damage, under certain conditions, the initiation of BER produces toxic repair intermediates that damage healthy tissues. The initiation of BER by the alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG, a.k.a. MPG) can mediate alkylation-induced cytotoxicity in specific cells in the retina and cerebellum of male mice. Cytotoxicity in both wild-type and Aag -transgenic ( AagTg ) mice is abrogated in the absence of Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1). Here, we tested whether PARP inhibitors can also prevent alkylation-induced retinal and cerebellar degeneration in male and female WT and AagTg mice. Importantly, we found that WT mice display sex-dependent alkylation-induced retinal damage (but not cerebellar damage), with WT males being more sensitive than females. Accordingly, estradiol treatment protects males against alkylation-induced retinal degeneration. In AagTg male and female mice, the alkylation-induced tissue damage in both the retina and cerebellum is exacerbated and the sex difference in the retina is abolished. PARP inhibitors, much like Parp1 gene deletion, protect against alkylation-induced AAG-dependent neuronal degeneration in WT and AagTg mice, regardless of the gender, but their efficacy in preventing alkylation-induced neuronal degeneration depends on PARP inhibitor characteristics and doses. The recent surge in the use of PARP inhibitors in combination with cancer chemotherapeutic alkylating agents might represent a powerful tool for obtaining increased therapeutic efficacy while avoiding the collateral effects of alkylating agents in healthy tissues.

  9. Mechanistic Studies with DNA Polymerases Reveal Complex Outcomes following Bypass of DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Eoff

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA is a chemically reactive molecule that is subject to many different covalent modifications from sources that are both endogenous and exogenous in origin. The inherent instability of DNA is a major obstacle to genomic maintenance and contributes in varying degrees to cellular dysfunction and disease in multi-cellular organisms. Investigations into the chemical and biological aspects of DNA damage have identified multi-tiered and overlapping cellular systems that have evolved as a means of stabilizing the genome. One of these pathways supports DNA replication events by in a sense adopting the mantra that one must “make the best of a bad situation” and tolerating covalent modification to DNA through less accurate copying of the damaged region. Part of this so-called DNA damage tolerance pathway involves the recruitment of specialized DNA polymerases to sites of stalled or collapsed replication forks. These enzymes have unique structural and functional attributes that often allow bypass of adducted template DNA and successful completion of genomic replication. What follows is a selective description of the salient structural features and bypass properties of specialized DNA polymerases with an emphasis on Y-family members.

  10. DNA alkylation and tumor induction in regenerating rat liver after cell cycle-related continuous N-nitrosodimethylamine infusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabes, H.M.; Kerler, R.; Wilhelm, R.

    1983-01-01

    Synchronized regenerating rat liver after partial hepatectomy was used to study cell cycle-related DNA base alkylation and liver carcinogenesis. A continuous iv infusion of (/sup 14/C)N-nitrosodimethylamine (DMN) at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg/hour was given to inbred male Wistar Af/Han rats over a period of 8 hours either during the G1 phase, hydroxyurea-synchronized DNA synthesis, or the G2+M-phase of regenerating liver or to untreated rats (G0-phase liver--carcinogen dose, 1.5 mg/kg/hour). Two hours after the end of the infusion, the amount of 7-methylguanine was highest in the G0-phase liver, with a decrease in the G1 phase, the S-phase, and the G2+M-phase. After continuous DMN exposure, the O/sub 6/-methylguanine:7-methylguanine ratio was lower in the S-phase and G2+M-phase livers than in the G0-phase and G1-phase livers, indicating an increased O/sub 6/-methylguanine repair during DNA synthesis and the G2+M-phase. Liver tumors in rats treated by continuous DMN infusion either during the G0 phase or the S-phase developed only after carcinogen exposure during DNA synthesis.

  11. Taking a Bad Turn: Compromised DNA Damage Response in Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Nilles

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Genomic integrity is of outmost importance for the survival at the cellular and the organismal level and key to human health. To ensure the integrity of their DNA, cells have evolved maintenance programs collectively known as the DNA damage response. Particularly challenging for genome integrity are DNA double-strand breaks (DSB and defects in their repair are often associated with human disease, including leukemia. Defective DSB repair may not only be disease-causing, but further contribute to poor treatment outcome and poor prognosis in leukemia. Here, we review current insight into altered DSB repair mechanisms identified in leukemia. While DSB repair is somewhat compromised in all leukemic subtypes, certain key players of DSB repair are particularly targeted: DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK and Ku70/80 in the non-homologous end-joining pathway, as well as Rad51 and breast cancer 1/2 (BRCA1/2, key players in homologous recombination. Defects in leukemia-related DSB repair may not only arise from dysfunctional repair components, but also indirectly from mutations in key regulators of gene expression and/or chromatin structure, such as p53, the Kirsten ras oncogene (K-RAS, and isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2. A detailed understanding of the basis for defective DNA damage response (DDR mechanisms for each leukemia subtype may allow to further develop new treatment methods to improve treatment outcome and prognosis for patients.

  12. Crosstalk between the nucleolus and the DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, L M; Baserga, S J

    2017-02-28

    Nucleolar function and the cellular response to DNA damage have long been studied as distinct disciplines. New research and a new appreciation for proteins holding multiple functional roles, however, is beginning to change the way we think about the crosstalk among distinct cellular processes. Here, we focus on the crosstalk between the DNA damage response and the nucleolus, including a comprehensive review of the literature that reveals a role for conventional DNA repair proteins in ribosome biogenesis, and conversely, ribosome biogenesis proteins in DNA repair. Furthermore, with recent advances in nucleolar proteomics and a growing list of proteins that localize to the nucleolus, it is likely that we will continue to identify new DNA repair proteins with a nucleolar-specific role. Given the importance of ribosome biogenesis and DNA repair in essential cellular processes and the role that they play in diverse pathologies, continued elucidation of the overlap between these two disciplines will be essential to the advancement of both fields and to the development of novel therapeutics.

  13. DNA repair and the evolution of transformation in Bacillus subtilis. 3. Sex with damaged DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoelzer, M.A.; Michod, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Natural genetic transformation in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis provides an experimental system for studying the evolutionary function of sexual recombination. The repair hypothesis proposes that during transformation the exogenous DNA taken up by cells is used as template for recombinational repair of damages in the recipient cell's genome. Earlier results demonstrated that the population density of transformed cells (i.e., sexual cells) increases, relative to nontransformed cells (primarily asexual cells), with increasing dosage of ultraviolet irradiation, provided that the cells are transformed with undamaged homologous DNA after they have become damaged. In nature, however, donor DNA for transformation is likely to come from cells that are as damaged as the recipient cells. In order to better simulate the effects of transformation in natural populations we conducted similar experiments as those just described using damaged donor DNA. The authors document in this report that transformants continue to increase in relative density even if they are transformed with damaged donor DNA. These results suggest that sites of transformation are often damaged sites in the recipient cell's genome

  14. Un-repairable DNA damage in cell due to irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Giichi

    1992-01-01

    Radiation-induced cell reproductive deactivation is caused by damage to DNA. In a cell, cellular DNA radical reacts with diffusion controlled rate and generates DNA peroxide radical. The chemical repair of DNA radical with hydrogen donation by thiol competes with the reaction of oxygen with same radicals in the DNA molecules. From the point reaction rates, the prolongation of radical life time is not as great as expected from the reduction in the glutathione content of the cell. This indicates that further reducting compounds (protein bound thiol) are present in the cell. The residual radicals are altered to strand breaks, base damages and so on. The effective lesions for a number of endpoints is un-repaired double strand break, which has been discovered in a cluster. This event gives risk to high LET radiation or to a track end of X-rays. For X- or electron irradiations the strand breaks are frequently induced by the interactions between sublesions on two strands in DNA. A single strand break followed by radical action may be unstable excited state, because of remaining sugar radical action and of having negative charged phosphates, in which strands breaks will be rejoined in a short time to stable state. On the same time, a break in the double helix will be immediately produced if two breaks are on either or approximately opposite locations. The formation of a double strand break in the helix depends on the ion strength of the cell. The potassium ions are largely released from polyanionic strand during irradiation, which results in the induction of denatured region. Double strand break with the denatured region seems to be un-repairable DNA damage. (author)

  15. Endogenous melatonin and oxidatively damaged guanine in DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poulsen Henrik E

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A significant body of literature indicates that melatonin, a hormone primarily produced nocturnally by the pineal gland, is an important scavenger of hydroxyl radicals and other reactive oxygen species. Melatonin may also lower the rate of DNA base damage resulting from hydroxyl radical attack and increase the rate of repair of that damage. This paper reports the results of a study relating the level of overnight melatonin production to the overnight excretion of the two primary urinary metabolites of the repair of oxidatively damaged guanine in DNA. Methods Mother-father-daughter(s families (n = 55 were recruited and provided complete overnight urine samples. Total overnight creatinine-adjusted 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s/Cr has been shown to be highly correlated with total overnight melatonin production. Urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-guanine (8-oxoGua results from the repair of DNA or RNA guanine via the nucleobase excision repair pathway, while urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG may possibly result from the repair of DNA guanine via the nucleotide excision repair pathway. Total overnight urinary levels of 8-oxodG and 8-oxoGua are therefore a measure of total overnight guanine DNA damage. 8-oxodG and 8-oxoGua were measured using a high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry assay. The mother, father, and oldest sampled daughter were used for these analyses. Comparisons between the mothers, fathers, and daughters were calculated for aMT6s/Cr, 8-oxodG, and 8-oxoGua. Regression analyses of 8-oxodG and 8-oxoGua on aMT6s/Cr were conducted for mothers, fathers, and daughters separately, adjusting for age and BMI (or weight. Results Among the mothers, age range 42-80, lower melatonin production (as measured by aMT6s/CR was associated with significantly higher levels of 8-oxodG (p Conclusion Low levels of endogenous melatonin production among older individuals may lead to

  16. Cellular responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciesla, Z.; Sledziewska-Gojska, E.; Nowicka, A.; Mieczkowski, P.; Fikus, M.U.; Koprowski, P.

    1998-01-01

    Full text. Several experimental strategies have been used to study responses of S. cerevisiae cells to DNA damage. One approach was based on the isolation of novel genes, the expression of which is induced by lesions in DNA. One of these genes, DIN7, was cloned and partially characterized previously. The product of DIN7 belongs to a large family of proteins involved in DNA repair and mutagenesis. This family includes Rad2, Rad27 and ExoI proteins of S. cerevisiae and their respective human homologues, all of which are endowed with DNA nuclease activity. To study cellular function of Din7 we constructed the pPK3 plasmid carrying DIN7 fused to the GAL1 promoter. Effects of DIN7 overproduction on the phenotypes of wild-type cells and of rad27 and exoI mutants were examined. Overproduction of Din7 does not seem to affect the proficiency of wild-type S. cerevisiae cells in recombination and mutagenesis. Also, overexpression of DIN7 does not suppress the deficiency of the EXOI gene product, the closest homologue of Din7, both in recombination and in controlling the fidelity of DNA replication. Unexpectedly, we found that elevated levels of Din7 result in a very high frequency of mitochondrial rho - mutants. A high frequency of production of rho - mutants wa s also observed in strains defective in the functioning of the Dun1 protein kinase involved in signal transmission in cells exposed to DNA damaging agents. Interestingly, deficiency of Dun1 results also in a significant derepression of the DIN7 gene. Experiments are under way to distinguish whether a high cellular level of Din7 specifically decreases stability of mitochondrial DNA or affects stability of chromosomal DNA as well. Analysis of previously constructed S. cerevisiae strains carrying random geno mic fusions with reporter lacZ gene, allowed us to identify the reading frame YBR173c, on chromosome II as a novel damage inducible gene - DIN8. We have shown that DIN8-lacZ fusion is induced in yeast cells treated

  17. Repair of DNA damage in the human metallothionein gene family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leadon, S.A.; Snowden, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    In order to distinguish enhanced repair of a sequence due to its transcriptional activity from enhanced repair due to chromatin alterations brought about by integration of a sequence into the genome, we have investigated the repair of damage both in endogenous genes and in cell lines that contain an integrated gene with an inducible promoter. The endogenous genes we are studying are the metallothioneins (MTs), a multigene family in man consisting of about 10-12 members. Cultured cells were exposed to 10-J/m 2 uv light and allowed to repair in the presence of bromodeoxyuridine. The DNA was then isolated, digested with Eco RI, and fully hybrid density DNA made by semiconservative synthesis was separated from unreplicated DNA by centrifugation in CsCl density gradients. Unreplicated, parental-density DNA was then reacted with a monoclonal antibody against bromouracil. 1 ref., 1 fig., 1 tab

  18. DNA damage and repair in Stylonychia lemnae (Ciliata, Protozoa)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammermann, D.

    1988-01-01

    Irradiation with X rays, UV irradiation after incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BU) into the DNA, and cis-platinum (cis-Pt) treatment each cause the loss of micronuclei of Stylonychia lemnae while the macronuclei are not severely affected. The abilities of both nuclei to repair DNA were investigated. Unscheduled DNA synthesis could not be demonstrated after X-ray irradiation, but it was found after treatment with BU/UV and cis-Pt in macro- and micronuclei. The extent of the repair process in the micro- and macronuclei was alike, as indicated by grain counts of [6- 3 H]thymidine-treated cells. One reason for the different sensitivity of both nuclei to DNA-damaging treatment may be the different number of gene copies in the macro- and micronuclei

  19. The AID-induced DNA damage response in chromatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daniel, Jeremy A; Nussenzweig, André

    2013-01-01

    Chemical modifications to the DNA and histone protein components of chromatin can modulate gene expression and genome stability. Understanding the physiological impact of changes in chromatin structure remains an important question in biology. As one example, in order to generate antibody diversity...... with somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination, chromatin must be made accessible for activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID)-mediated deamination of cytosines in DNA. These lesions are recognized and removed by various DNA repair pathways but, if not handled properly, can lead to formation...... of oncogenic chromosomal translocations. In this review, we focus the discussion on how chromatin-modifying activities and -binding proteins contribute to the native chromatin environment in which AID-induced DNA damage is targeted and repaired. Outstanding questions remain regarding the direct roles...

  20. C/EBPα Expression is Partially Regulated by C/EBPβ in Response to DNA Damage and C/EBPα Deficient Fibroblasts Display an Impaired G1 Checkpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Rakesh; Thompson, Elizabeth A.; Yoon, Kyungsil; Smart, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    We observed that C/EBPα is highly inducible in primary fibroblasts by DNA damaging agents that induce strand breaks, alkylate and crosslink DNA as well as those that produce bulky DNA lesions. Fibroblasts deficient in C/EBPα (C/EBPα-/-) display an impaired G1 checkpoint as evidenced by inappropriate entry into S-phase in response to DNA damage and these cells also display an enhanced G1 to S transition in response to mitogens. The induction of C/EBPα by DNA damage in fibroblasts does not require p53. EMSA analysis of nuclear extracts prepared from UVB- and MNNG-treated fibroblasts revealed increased binding of C/EBPβ to a C/EBP consensus sequence and ChIP analysis revealed increased C/EBPβ binding to the C/EBPα promoter. To determine whether C/EBPβ has a role in the regulation of C/EBPα we treated C/EBPβ-/- fibroblasts with UVB or MNNG. We observed C/EBPα induction was impaired in both UVB- and MNNG- treated C/EBPβ-/- fibroblasts. Our study reveals a novel role for C/EBPβ in the regulation of C/EBPα in response to DNA damage and provides definitive genetic evidence that C/EBPα has a critical role in the DNA damage G1 checkpoint. PMID:19581927

  1. Situation-dependent repair of DNA damage in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    von Borstel, R.C.; Hastings, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    The concept of channelling of lesions in DNA into defined repair systems has been used to explain many aspects of induced and spontaneous mutation. The channelling hypothesis states that lesions excluded from one repair process will be taken up by another repair process. This is a simplification. The three known modes of repair of damage induced by radiation are not equivalent modes of repair; they are, instead, different solutions to the problem of replacement of damaged molecules with new molecules which have the same informational content as those that were damaged. The mode of repair that is used is the result of the response to the situation in which the damage takes place. Thus, when the most likely mode of repair does not take place, then the situation changes with respect to the repair of the lesion; the lesion may enter the replication fork and be reparable by another route

  2. High LET radiation and mechanism of DNA damage repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furusawa, Yoshiya

    2004-01-01

    Clarifying the mechanism of repair from radiation damage gives most important information on radiation effects on cells. Approximately 10% of biological experiments groups in Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) cooperative research group has performed the subject. They gave a lot of new findings on the mechanism, and solved some open questions. The reason to show the peak of relative biological effectiveness RBE at around 100-200 keV/μm causes miss-repair of DNA damage. Sub-lethal damage generated by high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation can be repaired fully. Potentially lethal damages by high-LET radiation also repaired, but the efficiency decreased with the LET, and so on. (author)

  3. Regulation of the DNA Damage Response by DNA-PKcs Inhibitory Phosphorylation of ATM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Jiang, Wenxia; Crowe, Jennie L; Zha, Shan; Paull, Tanya T

    2017-01-05

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) regulates the DNA damage response as well as DNA double-strand break repair through homologous recombination. Here we show that ATM is hyperactive when the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) is chemically inhibited or when the DNA-PKcs gene is deleted in human cells. Pre-incubation of ATM protein with active DNA-PKcs also significantly reduces ATM activity in vitro. We characterize several phosphorylation sites in ATM that are targets of DNA-PKcs and show that phospho-mimetic mutations at these residues significantly inhibit ATM activity and impair ATM signaling upon DNA damage. In contrast, phospho-blocking mutations at one cluster of sites increase the frequency of apoptosis during normal cell growth. DNA-PKcs, which is integral to the non-homologous end joining pathway, thus negatively regulates ATM activity through phosphorylation of ATM. These observations illuminate an important regulatory mechanism for ATM that also controls DNA repair pathway choice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mitochondrial DNA damage and oxidative damage in HL-60 cells exposed to 900 MHz radiofrequency fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yulong; Zong, Lin; Gao, Zhen [School of Public Health, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province (China); Zhu, Shunxing [Laboratory Animal Center, Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu Province (China); Tong, Jian [School of Public Health, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province (China); Cao, Yi, E-mail: yicao@suda.edu.cn [School of Public Health, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Increased reactive oxygen species. • Decreased mitochondrial transcription Factor A and polymerase gamma. • Decreased mitochondrial transcripts (ND1 and 16S) and mtDNA copy number. • Increased 8-hydroxy-2′deoxyguanosine. • Decreased adenosine triphosphate. - Abstract: HL-60 cells, derived from human promyelocytic leukemia, were exposed to continuous wave 900 MHz radiofrequency fields (RF) at 120 μW/cm{sup 2} power intensity for 4 h/day for 5 consecutive days to examine whether such exposure is capable damaging the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mediated through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, the effect of RF exposure was examined on 8-hydroxy-2′-dexoyguanosine (8-OHdG) which is a biomarker for oxidative damage and on the mitochondrial synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) which is the energy required for cellular functions. The results indicated a significant increase in ROS and significant decreases in mitochondrial transcription factor A, mtDNA polymerase gamma, mtDNA transcripts and mtDNA copy number in RF-exposed cells compared with those in sham-exposed control cells. In addition, there was a significant increase in 8-OHdG and a significant decrease in ATP in RF-exposed cells. The response in positive control cells exposed to gamma radiation (GR, which is also known to induce ROS) was similar to those in RF-exposed cells. Thus, the overall data indicated that RF exposure was capable of inducing mtDNA damage mediated through ROS pathway which also induced oxidative damage. Prior-treatment of RF- and GR-exposed the cells with melatonin, a well-known free radical scavenger, reversed the effects observed in RF-exposed cells.

  5. DNA Damage Repair System in Plants: A Worldwide Research Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Estela; Manzano-Agugliaro, Francisco

    2017-10-30

    Living organisms are usually exposed to various DNA damaging agents so the mechanisms to detect and repair diverse DNA lesions have developed in all organisms with the result of maintaining genome integrity. Defects in DNA repair machinery contribute to cancer, certain diseases, and aging. Therefore, conserving the genomic sequence in organisms is key for the perpetuation of life. The machinery of DNA damage repair (DDR) in prokaryotes and eukaryotes is similar. Plants also share mechanisms for DNA repair with animals, although they differ in other important details. Plants have, surprisingly, been less investigated than other living organisms in this context, despite the fact that numerous lethal mutations in animals are viable in plants. In this manuscript, a worldwide bibliometric analysis of DDR systems and DDR research in plants was made. A comparison between both subjects was accomplished. The bibliometric analyses prove that the first study about DDR systems in plants (1987) was published thirteen years later than that for other living organisms (1975). Despite the increase in the number of papers about DDR mechanisms in plants in recent decades, nowadays the number of articles published each year about DDR systems in plants only represents 10% of the total number of articles about DDR. The DDR research field was done by 74 countries while the number of countries involved in the DDR & Plant field is 44. This indicates the great influence that DDR research in the plant field currently has, worldwide. As expected, the percentage of studies published about DDR systems in plants has increased in the subject area of agricultural and biological sciences and has diminished in medicine with respect to DDR studies in other living organisms. In short, bibliometric results highlight the current interest in DDR research in plants among DDR studies and can open new perspectives in the research field of DNA damage repair.

  6. 32P-labeling test for DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randerath, K.; Reddy, M.V.; Gupta, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Covalent adducts formed by the reaction of DNA with chemical carcinogens and mutagens may be detected by a 32 P-labeling test. DNA preparations exposed to chemicals known to bind covalently to DNA [N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, dimethyl sulfate, formaldehyde, β-propiolactone, propylene oxide, streptozotocin, nitrogen mustard, and 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea] were digested to a mixture of deoxynucleoside 3'-monophosphates by incubation with micrococcal endonuclease (EC 3.1.31.1) and spleen exonuclease (EC 3.1.16.1). The digests were treated with [γ- 32 P]ATP and T4 polynucleotide kinase (ATP:5'-dephosphopolynucleotide 5'-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.78) to convert the monophosphates to 5'- 32 P-labeled deoxynucleoside 3',5'-bis-phosphates. These compounds were then separated on polyethyl-eneimine-cellulose thin layers in ammonium formate and ammonium sulfate solutions. Autoradiograms of the chromatograms obtained by this high-resolution procedure showed the presence of nucleotides derived from chemically altered, as well as normal, DNA constituents. Maps from DNA exposed to any of the chemicals used exhibited a spot pattern typical for the particular chemical. This method detected a single adduct in 10 5 DNA nucleotides without requiring that the compound under investigation be radioactive and thus provides a useful test to screen chemicals for their capacity to damage DNA by covalent binding

  7. X-Ray induced DNA damage – why use plants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John William Einset

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The comet assay was used to monitor DNA repair after X-ray exposures caused by 0.2-15 Gy. A clear distinction in the time course of DNA repair after 2 Gy was observed with an early ‘rapid phase’, lasting 20-40 minutes, being followed by a ‘slow phase’ which actually consists of a period of negligible repair and then rapid repair during 140-160 minutes. The fact that homozygous mutants for both ATM and BRCA1 fail to repair DNA completely during 3 hours after 2 Gy exposures indicates that repair processes occurring during the ‘slow phase’ involve ds breaks in DNA. Both BRCA1 and Rad51 expression are strongly upregulated by X-rays in Arabidopsis. Rye grass, Norway spruce and Sawara cypress also have ‘slow phase’ repair similar to Arabidopsis, suggesting that the requisite enzymes have to be induced in these plants as well. To look at the effect of genome size in relation to sensitivity to DNA damage, we exposed isolated nuclei from Norway spruce (19.2 Gbp genome, celery (14.1 Gbp, spinach (12.6 Gbp Sawara cypress (8.9 Gbp, lettuce (2.6 Gbp and Arabidopsis (0.135 Gbp to X-rays. After a 1 Gy exposure, a linear relationship was seen between % tails and genome size, confirming the idea that larger genomes are more sensitive to X-ray damage.

  8. Primary DNA damage in chrome-plating workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambelunghe, A; Piccinini, R; Ambrogi, M; Villarini, M; Moretti, M; Marchetti, C; Abbritti, G; Muzi, G

    2003-06-30

    In order to evaluate the primary DNA damage due to occupational exposure to chromium (VI), DNA strand-breaks and apoptosis in peripheral lymphocytes were measured in a group of 19 chrome-plating workers. DNA strand-breaks was assessed by alkaline (pH>13) single-cell microgel electrophoresis ('comet') assay, while apoptosis was measured by flow-cytometry after propidium iodide staining of the cells. Concentrations of chromium in urine, erythrocytes and lymphocytes were investigated as biological indicators of exposure. A group of 18 hospital workers (control group I) and another 20 university personnel (control group II) without exposure to chromium were also studied as controls. The results of the study show that chrome-plating workers have higher levels of chromium in urine, erythrocytes and lymphocytes than unexposed workers. Comet tail moment values, assumed as index of DNA damage, are increased in chromium-exposed workers and results are significantly correlated to chromium lymphocyte concentrations. No difference emerged in the percentage of apoptotic nuclei in exposed and unexposed workers. The study confirms that measurements of chromium in erythrocytes and lymphocytes may provide useful information about recent and past exposure to hexavalent chromium at the workplace. The increase in DNA strand-breaks measured by comet assay suggests this test is valid for the biological monitoring of workers exposed to genotoxic compounds such as chromium (VI).

  9. Melanin photosensitizes ultraviolet light (UVC) DNA damage in pigmented cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huselton, C.A.; Hill, H.Z.

    1990-01-01

    Melanins, pigments of photoprotection and camouflage, are very photoreactive and can both absorb and emit active oxygen species. Nevertheless, black skinned individuals rarely develop skin cancer and melanin is assumed to act as a solar screen. Since DNA is the target for solar carcinogenesis, the effect of melanin on Ultraviolet (UV)-induced thymine lesions was examined in mouse melanoma and carcinoma cells that varied in melanin content. Cells prelabeled with 14C-dThd were irradiated with UVC; DNA was isolated, purified, degraded to bases by acid hydrolysis and analyzed by HPLC. Thymine dimers were detected in all of the extracts of irradiated cells. Melanotic and hypomelanotic but not mammary carcinoma cell DNA from irradiated cells contained hydrophilic thymine derivatives. The quantity of these damaged bases was a function of both the UVC dose and the cellular melanin content. One such derivative was identified by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy as thymine glycol. The other appears to be derived from thymine glycol by further oxidation during acid hydrolysis of the DNA. The finding of oxidative DNA damage in melanin-containing cells suggests that melanin may be implicated in the etiology of caucasian skin cancer, particularly melanoma. Furthermore, the projected decrease in stratospheric ozone could impact in an unanticipated deleterious manner on dark-skinned individuals

  10. SUMO-2 Orchestrates Chromatin Modifiers in Response to DNA Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriks, Ivo A; Treffers, Louise W; Verlaan-de Vries, Matty

    2015-01-01

    dynamically SUMOylated interaction networks of chromatin modifiers, transcription factors, DNA repair factors, and nuclear body components. SUMOylated chromatin modifiers include JARID1B/KDM5B, JARID1C/KDM5C, p300, CBP, PARP1, SetDB1, and MBD1. Whereas SUMOylated JARID1B was ubiquitylated by the SUMO......-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 and degraded by the proteasome in response to DNA damage, JARID1C was SUMOylated and recruited to the chromatin to demethylate histone H3K4....

  11. The sequence specificity of UV-induced DNA damage in a systematically altered DNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoe, Clairine V; Chung, Long H; Murray, Vincent

    2018-06-01

    The sequence specificity of UV-induced DNA damage was investigated in a specifically designed DNA plasmid using two procedures: end-labelling and linear amplification. Absorption of UV photons by DNA leads to dimerisation of pyrimidine bases and produces two major photoproducts, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photoproducts (6-4PPs). A previous study had determined that two hexanucleotide sequences, 5'-GCTC*AC and 5'-TATT*AA, were high intensity UV-induced DNA damage sites. The UV clone plasmid was constructed by systematically altering each nucleotide of these two hexanucleotide sequences. One of the main goals of this study was to determine the influence of single nucleotide alterations on the intensity of UV-induced DNA damage. The sequence 5'-GCTC*AC was designed to examine the sequence specificity of 6-4PPs and the highest intensity 6-4PP damage sites were found at 5'-GTTC*CC nucleotides. The sequence 5'-TATT*AA was devised to investigate the sequence specificity of CPDs and the highest intensity CPD damage sites were found at 5'-TTTT*CG nucleotides. It was proposed that the tetranucleotide DNA sequence, 5'-YTC*Y (where Y is T or C), was the consensus sequence for the highest intensity UV-induced 6-4PP adduct sites; while it was 5'-YTT*C for the highest intensity UV-induced CPD damage sites. These consensus tetranucleotides are composed entirely of consecutive pyrimidines and must have a DNA conformation that is highly productive for the absorption of UV photons. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. DNA repair decline during mouse spermiogenesis results in the accumulation of heritable DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wryobek, Andrew J

    2008-02-21

    The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7- 1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomalaberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

  13. DNA Repair Decline During Mouse Spermiogenesis Results in the Accumulation of Heritable DNA Damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2007-12-01

    The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7-1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomal aberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

  14. DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) and Cancer Gene Therapy: Use of the Human N-mythlpurien DNA Glycosylase (MPG) to Sensitize Breast Cancer Cells to Low Dose Chemotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harvey, Tia

    2003-01-01

    The DNA Base Excision Repair (PER) pathway is responsible for the repair of alkylation and oxidative DNA damage resulting in protection against the deleterious effects of endogenous and exogenous agents encountered on a daily basis...

  15. Endogenous DNA Damage and Risk of Testicular Germ Cell Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, M B; Sigurdson, A J; Jones, I M; Thomas, C B; Graubard, B I; Korde, L; Greene, M H; McGlynn, K A

    2008-01-18

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) are comprised of two histologic groups, seminomas and nonseminomas. We postulated that the possible divergent pathogeneses of these histologies may be partially explained by variable endogenous DNA damage. To assess our hypothesis, we conducted a case-case analysis of seminomas and nonseminomas using the alkaline comet assay to quantify single-strand DNA breaks and alkali-labile sites. The Familial Testicular Cancer study and the U.S. Radiologic Technologists cohort provided 112 TGCT cases (51 seminomas & 61 nonseminomas). A lymphoblastoid cell line was cultured for each patient and the alkaline comet assay was used to determine four parameters: tail DNA, tail length, comet distributed moment (CDM) and Olive tail moment (OTM). Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were estimated using logistic regression. Values for tail length, tail DNA, CDM and OTM were modeled as categorical variables using the 50th and 75th percentiles of the seminoma group. Tail DNA was significantly associated with nonseminoma compared to seminoma (OR{sub 50th percentile} = 3.31, 95%CI: 1.00, 10.98; OR{sub 75th percentile} = 3.71, 95%CI: 1.04, 13.20; p for trend=0.039). OTM exhibited similar, albeit statistically non-significant, risk estimates (OR{sub 50th percentile} = 2.27, 95%CI: 0.75, 6.87; OR{sub 75th percentile} = 2.40, 95%CI: 0.75, 7.71; p for trend=0.12) whereas tail length and CDM showed no association. In conclusion, the results for tail DNA and OTM indicate that endogenous DNA damage levels are higher in patients who develop nonseminoma compared with seminoma. This may partly explain the more aggressive biology and younger age-of-onset of this histologic subgroup compared with the relatively less aggressive, later-onset seminoma.

  16. Ultraviolet radiation-mediated damage to cellular DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadet, Jean; Sage, Evelyne; Douki, Thierry

    2005-01-01

    Emphasis is placed in this review article on recent aspects of the photochemistry of cellular DNA in which both the UVB and UVA components of solar radiation are implicated individually or synergistically. Interestingly, further mechanistic insights into the UV-induced formation of DNA photoproducts were gained from the application of new accurate and sensitive chromatographic and enzymic assays aimed at measuring base damage. Thus, each of the twelve possible dimeric photoproducts that are produced at the four main bipyrimidine sites can now be singled out as dinucleoside monophosphates that are enzymatically released from UV-irradiated DNA. This was achieved using a recently developed high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay (HPLC-MS/MS) assay after DNA extraction and appropriate enzymic digestion. Interestingly, a similar photoproduct distribution pattern is observed in both isolated and cellular DNA upon exposure to low doses of either UVC or UVB radiation. This applies more specifically to the DNA of rodent and human cells, the cis-syn cyclobutadithymine being predominant over the two other main photolesions, namely thymine-cytosine pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone adduct and the related cyclobutyl dimer. UVA-irradiation was found to generate cyclobutane dimers at TT and to a lower extent at TC sites as a likely result of energy transfer mechanism involving still unknown photoexcited chromophore(s). Oxidative damage to DNA is also induced although less efficiently by UVA-mediated photosensitization processes that mostly involved 1 O 2 together with a smaller contribution of hydroxyl radical-mediated reactions through initially generated superoxide radicals

  17. DNA-repair, cell killing and normal tissue damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahm-Daphi, J.; Dikomey, E.; Brammer, I.

    1998-01-01

    Background: Side effects of radiotherapy in normal tissue is determined by a variety of factors of which cellular and genetic contributions are described here. Material and methods: Review. Results: Normal tissue damage after irradiation is largely due to loss of cellular proliferative capacity. This can be due to mitotic cell death, apoptosis, or terminal differentiation. Dead or differentiated cells release cytokines which additionally modulate the tissue response. DNA damage, in particular non-reparable or misrepaired double-strand breaks are considered the basic lesion leading to G1-arrest and ultimately to cell inactivation. Conclusion: Evidence for genetic bases of normal tissue response, cell killing and DNA-repair capacity is presented. However, a direct link of all 3 endpoints has not yet been proved directly. (orig.) [de

  18. Radiation induced DNA damage and repair in mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strniste, G.F.; Chen, D.J.; Okinaka, R.T.

    1987-01-01

    The central theme in cellular radiobiological research has been the mechanisms of radiation action and the physiological response of cells to this action. Considerable effort has been directed toward the characterization of radiation-induced DNA damage and the correlation of this damage to cellular genetic change that is expressed as mutation or initiating events leading to cellular transformation and ultimately carcinogenesis. In addition, there has been a significant advancement in their understanding of the role of DNA repair in the process of mutation leading to genetic change in cells. There is extensive literature concerning studies that address radiation action in both procaryotic and eucaryotic systems. This brief report will make no attempt to summarize this voluminous data but will focus on recent results from their laboratory of experiments in which they have examined, at both the cellular and molecular levels, the process of ionizing radiation-induced mutagenesis in cultured human cells

  19. Unscheduled DNA synthesis and elimination of DNA damage in liver cells of. gamma. -irradiated senescent mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaziev, A.I.; Malakhova, L.V. (AN SSSR, Pushchino-na-Oke. Inst. Biologicheskoj Fiziki)

    1982-10-01

    The level of 'spontaneous' and ..gamma..-radiation-induced DNA synthesis which is not inhibited with hydroxyurea (unscheduled synthesis) is considerably lower in hepatocytes of 18-22-month-old mice than that of 1.5-2-month-old mice. The dose-dependent increase (10-300 Gy) of unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in hepatocytes of senescent mice is higher than in young animals. The elimination of damage in DNA of ..gamma..-irradiated hepatocytes (100 Gy) was examined by using an enzyme system (M. luteus extract and DNA-polymerase I of E. coli). It was found that the rate of elimination of the DNA damage in hepatocytes of 20-month-old mice is lower than that of 2-month-old mice although the activities of DNA-polymerase ..beta.. and apurinic endonuclease remain equal in the liver of both senescent and young mice. However, the nucleoids from ..gamma..-irradiated liver nuclei of 2-month-old mice are relaxed to a greater extent (as judged by the criterion of ethidium-binding capacity) than those of 20-month-old mice. The results suggest that there are limitations in the functioning of repair enzymes and in their access to damaged DNA sites in the chromatin of senescent mouse liver cells.

  20. Radioprotection against DNA damage by an extract of Indian green mussel, Perna viridis (L.)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kumaran, S.P.; Kutty, B.C.; Chatterji, A.; Parameswaran, P.S.; Mishra, K.P.

    -irradiation Prevention of DNA damage both in plasmid and lymphocytes and cell death in lymphocytes appears correlated with reduction of oxidatively generated free radicals It is concluded that protection against radiation-induced cell death and DNA damage by MH...

  1. Measurement of oxidative damage to DNA in nanomaterial exposed cells and animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Peter; Jensen, Ditte Marie; Christophersen, Daniel Vest

    2015-01-01

    -reactivity with other molecules in cells. This review provides an overview of efforts to reliably detect oxidatively damaged DNA and a critical assessment of the published studies on DNA damage levels. Animal studies with high baseline levels of oxidatively damaged DNA are more likely to show positive associations...... of oxidatively damaged DNA in lung tissue. Oral exposure to nanosized carbon black, TiO2 , carbon nanotubes and ZnO is associated with elevated levels of oxidatively damaged DNA in tissues. These observations are supported by cell culture studies showing concentration-dependent associations between ENM exposure...... and oxidatively damaged DNA measured by the comet assay. Cell culture studies show relatively high variation in the ability of ENMs to oxidatively damage DNA; hence, it is currently impossible to group ENMs according to their DNA damaging potential. Environ. Mol. Mutagen., 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  2. O6-Methylguanine DNA Methyltransferase Status Does Not Predict Response or Resistance to Alkylating Agents in Well-Differentiated Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Nitya; Klimstra, David S; Horvat, Natally; Zhang, Liying; Chou, Joanne F; Capanu, Marinela; Basturk, Olca; Do, Richard Kinh Gian; Allen, Peter J; Reidy-Lagunes, Diane

    2017-07-01

    Alkylating agents have activity in well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (WD panNETs). In glioblastoma multiforme, decreased activity of O-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) predicts response; in panNETs, MGMT relevance is unknown. We identified patients with WD panNETs treated with alkylating agents, determined best overall response by Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1, and performed MGMT activity testing. Fifty-six patients were identified; 26 (46%) of the 56 patients experienced partial response, 24 (43%) of 56 experienced stable disease, and 6 (11%) of 56 experienced progression of disease. O-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase status was available for 36 tumors. For tumors with partial response, 10 (67%) of 15 were MGMT deficient, and 5 (33%) of 15 were MGMT intact. For tumors with stable disease, 7 (47%) of 15 were MGMT deficient, and 8 (53%) of 15 were MGMT intact. For tumors with progression of disease, 3 (50%) of 6 were MGMT deficient, and 3 (50%) of 6 were MGMT intact. We observed response and resistance to alkylating agents in MGMT-deficient and MGMT-intact tumors. O-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase status should not guide alkylating agent therapy in WD panNETs.

  3. Proton-induced direct and indirect damage of plasmid DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vyšín, Luděk; Pachnerová Brabcová, Kateřina; Štěpán, V.; Moretto-Capelle, P.; Bugler, B.; Legube, G.; Cafarelli, P.; Casta, R.; Champeaux, J. P.; Sence, M.; Vlk, M.; Wagner, Richard; Štursa, Jan; Zach, Václav; Incerti, S.; Juha, Libor; Davídková, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 3 (2015), s. 343-352 ISSN 0301-634X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-28721S; GA MŠk LD12008; GA MŠk LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : proton radiation * DNA plasmid * direct and indirect effects * clustered damage * repair enzymes Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.923, year: 2015

  4. Metformin (dimethyl-biguanide induced DNA damage in mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubem R. Amador

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metformin (dimethyl-biguanide is an insulin-sensitizing agent that lowers fasting plasma-insulin concentration, wherefore it's wide use for patients with a variety of insulin-resistant and prediabetic states, including impaired glucose tolerance. During pregnancy it is a further resource for reducing first-trimester pregnancy loss in women with the polycystic ovary syndrome. We tested metformin genotoxicity in cells of Chinese hamster ovary, CHO-K1 (chromosome aberrations; comet assays and in mice (micronucleus assays. Concentrations of 114.4 µg/mL and 572 µg/mL were used in in vitro tests, and 95.4 mg/kg, 190.8 mg/kg and 333.9 mg/kg in assaying. Although the in vitro tests revealed no chromosome aberrations in metaphase cells, DNA damage was detected by comet assaying after 24 h of incubation at both concentrations. The frequency of DNA damage was higher at concentrations of 114.4 µg/mL. Furthermore, although mortality was not observed in in vitro tests, the highest dose of metformin suppressed bone marrow cells. However, no statistically significant differences were noted in micronuclei frequencies between treatments. In vitro results indicate that chronic metformin exposure may be potentially genotoxic. Thus, pregnant woman undergoing treatment with metformin should be properly evaluated beforehand, as regards vulnerability to DNA damage.

  5. Repair of oxidative DNA damage by amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, J R; Aguilera, J A; Ly, A; Tran, N Q; Hoang, O; Ward, J F

    2003-11-01

    Guanyl radicals, the product of the removal of a single electron from guanine, are produced in DNA by the direct effect of ionizing radiation. We have produced guanyl radicals in DNA by using the single electron oxidizing agent (SCN)2-, itself derived from the indirect effect of ionizing radiation via thiocyanate scavenging of OH. We have examined the reactivity of guanyl radicals in plasmid DNA with the six most easily oxidized amino acids cysteine, cystine, histidine, methionine, tryptophan and tyrosine and also simple ester and amide derivatives of them. Cystine and histidine derivatives are unreactive. Cysteine, methionine, tyrosine and particularly tryptophan derivatives react to repair guanyl radicals in plasmid DNA with rate constants in the region of approximately 10(5), 10(5), 10(6) and 10(7) dm3 mol(-1) s(-1), respectively. The implication is that amino acid residues in DNA binding proteins such as histones might be able to repair by an electron transfer reaction the DNA damage produced by the direct effect of ionizing radiation or by other oxidative insults.

  6. HSV-I and the cellular DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Samantha; Weller, Sandra K

    2015-04-01

    Peter Wildy first observed genetic recombination between strains of HSV in 1955. At the time, knowledge of DNA repair mechanisms was limited, and it has only been in the last decade that particular DNA damage response (DDR) pathways have been examined in the context of viral infections. One of the first reports addressing the interaction between a cellular DDR protein and HSV-1 was the observation by Lees-Miller et al . that DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit levels were depleted in an ICP0-dependent manner during Herpes simplex virus 1 infection. Since then, there have been numerous reports describing the interactions between HSV infection and cellular DDR pathways. Due to space limitations, this review will focus predominantly on the most recent observations regarding how HSV navigates a potentially hostile environment to replicate its genome.

  7. Repair of uv damaged DNA in systemic lupus erythematosus. [Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beighlie, D J; Teplitz, R L

    1975-06-01

    The NZB NZW hybrid mouse is an animal model of human systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Two breeding schemes were devised using NZB, NZW, B/W, and CBA mice, which permit definitive decisions regarding genetic and/or viral origin of the disease. It is proposed that at least two factors must be involved: a genetic abnormality producing hyper-responsiveness to nucleic acid antigens, and a DNA repair defect which results in liberation of DNA and RNA when cells are lethally injured. Evidence is presented for a DNA repair deficit in human SLE lymphocytes following in vitro irradiation with ultraviolet (uv) light. Lymphocytes from adult New Zealand and control mice were found to lack normal amounts of endonuclease necessary for repairing uv damage.

  8. DNA repair methyltransferase (Mgmt) knockout mice are sensitive to the lethal effects of chemotherapeutic alkylating agents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.J. Glassner (Brian); G. Weeda (Geert); J.M. Allan (James); J.L.M. Broekhof (Jose'); N.H.E. Carls (Nick); I. Donker (Ingrid); B.P. Engelward (Bevin); R.J. Hampson (Richard); R. Hersmus (Remko); M.J. Hickman (Mark); R.B. Roth (Richard); H.B. Warren (Henry); M.M. Wu (Mavis); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); L.D. Samson (Leona)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractWe have generated mice deficient in O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase activity encoded by the murine Mgmt gene using homologous recombination to delete the region encoding the Mgmt active site cysteine. Tissues from Mgmt null mice displayed very low O6-methylguanine DNA

  9. rad-Dependent response of the chk1-encoded protein kinase at the DNA damage checkpoint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walworth, N.C.; Bernards, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    Exposure of eukaryotic cells to agents that generate DNA damage results in transient arrest of progression through the cell cycle. In fission yeast, the DNA damage checkpoint associated with cell cycle arrest before mitosis requires the protein kinase p56chk1. DNA damage induced by ultraviolet

  10. Identification and Characterization of uvrA, a DNA Repair Gene of Deinococcus radiodurans

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    alkylating agents , such as methyl-N-nitro~N~nitrosoguanidine(MNNG), N-methyl-N~ nitrosourea (MNU), and to a lesser extent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS...6,4) Photoproduct 17 c. Thymine Glycols and Cross-links 17 3. Ionizing Radiation Damage " 17 4. Chemical Damage 20 a. Alkylating Agents .20 b. Cross...Examples of base damage induced by ionizing radiation 19 6. Nucleotide centers in DNA that are most reactive to alkylating agents 21 7. Schematic

  11. DNA2—An Important Player in DNA Damage Response or Just Another DNA Maintenance Protein?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzbieta Pawłowska

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The human DNA2 (DNA replication helicase/nuclease 2 protein is expressed in both the nucleus and mitochondria, where it displays ATPase-dependent nuclease and helicase activities. DNA2 plays an important role in the removing of long flaps in DNA replication and long-patch base excision repair (LP-BER, interacting with the replication protein A (RPA and the flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1. DNA2 can promote the restart of arrested replication fork along with Werner syndrome ATP-dependent helicase (WRN and Bloom syndrome protein (BLM. In mitochondria, DNA2 can facilitate primer removal during strand-displacement replication. DNA2 is involved in DNA double strand (DSB repair, in which it is complexed with BLM, RPA and MRN for DNA strand resection required for homologous recombination repair. DNA2 can be a major protein involved in the repair of complex DNA damage containing a DSB and a 5′ adduct resulting from a chemical group bound to DNA 5′ ends, created by ionizing radiation and several anticancer drugs, including etoposide, mitoxantrone and some anthracyclines. The role of DNA2 in telomere end maintenance and cell cycle regulation suggests its more general role in keeping genomic stability, which is impaired in cancer. Therefore DNA2 can be an attractive target in cancer therapy. This is supported by enhanced expression of DNA2 in many cancer cell lines with oncogene activation and premalignant cells. Therefore, DNA2 can be considered as a potential marker, useful in cancer therapy. DNA2, along with PARP1 inhibition, may be considered as a potential target for inducing synthetic lethality, a concept of killing tumor cells by targeting two essential genes.

  12. Increased sensitivity of DNA damage response-deficient cells to stimulated microgravity-induced DNA lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Li

    Full Text Available Microgravity is a major stress factor that astronauts have to face in space. In the past, the effects of microgravity on genomic DNA damage were studied, and it seems that the effect on genomic DNA depends on cell types and the length of exposure time to microgravity or simulated microgravity (SMG. In this study we used mouse embryonic stem (MES and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF cells to assess the effects of SMG on DNA lesions. To acquire the insight into potential mechanisms by which cells resist and/or adapt to SMG, we also included Rad9-deleted MES and Mdc1-deleted MEF cells in addition to wild type cells in this study. We observed significant SMG-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs in Rad9-/- MES and Mdc1-/- MEF cells but not in their corresponding wild type cells. A similar pattern of DNA single strand break or modifications was also observed in Rad9-/- MES. As the exposure to SMG was prolonged, Rad9-/- MES cells adapted to the SMG disturbance by reducing the induced DNA lesions. The induced DNA lesions in Rad9-/- MES were due to SMG-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS. Interestingly, Mdc1-/- MEF cells were only partially adapted to the SMG disturbance. That is, the induced DNA lesions were reduced over time, but did not return to the control level while ROS returned to a control level. In addition, ROS was only partially responsible for the induced DNA lesions in Mdc1-/- MEF cells. Taken together, these data suggest that SMG is a weak genomic DNA stress and can aggravate genomic instability in cells with DNA damage response (DDR defects.

  13. Heavy ion induced damage to plasmid DNA : plateau region vs. spread out Bragg-peak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dang, H.M.; van Goethem, M.J.; van der Graaf, E.R.; Brandenburg, S.; Hoekstra, R.A.; Schlathölter, T.A.

    We have investigated the damage of synthetic plasmid pBR322 DNA in dilute aqueous solutions induced by fast carbon ions. The relative contribution of indirect damage and direct damage to the DNA itself is expected to vary with linear energy transfer along the ion track, with the direct damage

  14. Reconstitution of the cellular response to DNA damage in vitro using damage-activated extracts from mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roper, Katherine; Coverley, Dawn

    2012-01-01

    In proliferating mammalian cells, DNA damage is detected by sensors that elicit a cellular response which arrests the cell cycle and repairs the damage. As part of the DNA damage response, DNA replication is inhibited and, within seconds, histone H2AX is phosphorylated. Here we describe a cell-free system that reconstitutes the cellular response to DNA double strand breaks using damage-activated cell extracts and naïve nuclei. Using this system the effect of damage signalling on nuclei that do not contain DNA lesions can be studied, thereby uncoupling signalling and repair. Soluble extracts from G1/S phase cells that were treated with etoposide before isolation, or pre-incubated with nuclei from etoposide-treated cells during an in vitro activation reaction, restrain both initiation and elongation of DNA replication in naïve nuclei. At the same time, H2AX is phosphorylated in naïve nuclei in a manner that is dependent upon the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like protein kinases. Notably, phosphorylated H2AX is not focal in naïve nuclei, but is evident throughout the nucleus suggesting that in the absence of DNA lesions the signal is not amplified such that discrete foci can be detected. This system offers a novel screening approach for inhibitors of DNA damage response kinases, which we demonstrate using the inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002. -- Highlights: ► A cell free system that reconstitutes the response to DNA damage in the absence of DNA lesions. ► Damage-activated extracts impose the cellular response to DNA damage on naïve nuclei. ► PIKK-dependent response impacts positively and negatively on two separate fluorescent outputs. ► Can be used to screen for inhibitors that impact on the response to damage but not on DNA repair. ► LY294002 and wortmannin demonstrate the system's potential as a pathway focused screening approach.

  15. Acute hypoxia and hypoxic exercise induce DNA strand breaks and oxidative DNA damage in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, P; Loft, S; Lundby, C

    2001-01-01

    ; lymphocytes were isolated for analysis of DNA strand breaks and oxidatively altered nucleotides, detected by endonuclease III and formamidipyridine glycosylase (FPG) enzymes. Urine was collected for 24 h periods for analysis of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), a marker of oxidative DNA damage...... oxygen species, generated by leakage of the mitochondrial respiration or during a hypoxia-induced inflammation. Furthermore, the presence of DNA strand breaks may play an important role in maintaining hypoxia-induced inflammation processes. Hypoxia seems to deplete the antioxidant system of its capacity...

  16. Capturing Snapshots of APE1 Processing DNA Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Beard, William A.; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Dyrkheeva, Nadezhda S.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    DNA apurinic-apyrimidinic (AP) sites are prevalent non-coding threats to genomic stability and are processed by AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 incises the AP-site phosphodiester backbone, generating a DNA repair intermediate that is potentially cytotoxic. The molecular events of the incision reaction remain elusive due in part to limited structural information. We report multiple high-resolution human APE1:DNA structures that divulge novel features of the APE1 reaction, including the metal binding site, nucleophile, and arginine clamps that mediate product release. We also report APE1:DNA structures with a T:G mismatch 5′ to the AP-site, representing a clustered lesion occurring in methylated CpG dinucleotides. These reveal that APE1 molds the T:G mismatch into a unique Watson-Crick like geometry that distorts the active site reducing incision. These snapshots provide mechanistic clarity for APE1, while affording a rational framework to manipulate biological responses to DNA damage. PMID:26458045

  17. Induction of heat-labile sites in DNA of mammalian cells by the antitumor alkylating drug CC-1065

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zsido, T.J.; Woynarowski, J.M.; Baker, R.M.; Gawron, L.S.; Beerman, T.A.

    1991-01-01

    CC-1065 is a very potent antitumor antibiotic capable of covalent and noncovalent binding to the minor groove of naked DNA. Upon thermal treatment, covalent adducts formed between CC-1065 and DNA generate strand break. The authors have shown that this molecular damage can be detected following CC-1065 treatment of mammalian whole cells. Using alkaline sucrose gradient analysis, They observe thermally induced breakage of [ 14 C]thymidine-prelabeled DNA from drug-treated African green monkey kidney BSC-1 cells. Very little damage to cellular DNA by CC-1065 can be detected without first heating the drug-treated samples. CC-1065 can also generate heat-labile sites within DNA during cell lysis and heating, subsequent to the exposure of cells to drug, suggesting that a pool of free and noncovalently bound drug is available for posttreatment adduct formation. This effect was controlled for by mixing [ 3 H]thymidine-labeled untreated cells with the [ 14 C]thymidine-labeled drug-treated samples. The lowest drug dose at which heat-labile sites were detected was 3 nM CC-1065 (3 single-stranded breaks/10 6 base pairs). This concentration reduced survival of BSC-1 cells to 0.1% in cytotoxicity assays. The generation of CC-1065-induced lesions in cellular DNA is time dependent (the frequency of lesions caused by a 60 nM treatment reaching a plateau at 2 h) and is not readily reversible. The results of this study demonstrate that CC-1065 does generate heat-labile sites with the cellular DNA of intact cells and suggest that a mechanism of cytotoxic action of CC-1065 involves formation of covalent adducts to DNA

  18. Nek1 silencing slows down DNA repair and blocks DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelegrini, Alessandra Luíza; Moura, Dinara Jaqueline; Brenner, Bethânia Luise; Ledur, Pitia Flores; Maques, Gabriela Porto; Henriques, João Antônio Pegas; Saffi, Jenifer; Lenz, Guido

    2010-09-01

    Never in mitosis A (NIMA)-related kinases (Nek) are evolutionarily conserved proteins structurally related to the Aspergillus nidulans mitotic regulator NIMA. Nek1 is one of the 11 isoforms of the Neks identified in mammals. Different lines of evidence suggest the participation of Nek1 in response to DNA damage, which is also supported by the interaction of this kinase with proteins involved in DNA repair pathways and cell cycle regulation. In this report, we show that cells with Nek1 knockdown (KD) through stable RNA interference present a delay in DNA repair when treated with methyl-methanesulfonate (MMS), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and cisplatin (CPT). In particular, interstrand cross links induced by CPT take much longer to be resolved in Nek1 KD cells when compared to wild-type (WT) cells. In KD cells, phosphorylation of Chk1 in response to CPT was strongly reduced. While WT cells accumulate in G(2)/M after DNA damage with MMS and H(2)O(2), Nek1 KD cells do not arrest, suggesting that G(2)/M arrest induced by the DNA damage requires Nek1. Surprisingly, CPT-treated Nek1 KD cells arrest with a 4N DNA content similar to WT cells. This deregulation in cell cycle control in Nek1 KD cells leads to an increased sensitivity to genotoxic agents when compared to WT cells. These results suggest that Nek1 is involved in the beginning of the cellular response to genotoxic stress and plays an important role in preventing cell death induced by DNA damage.

  19. DNA damage in leukocytes from fanconi anemia patients and heterozygotes induced by mitomycin C and ionizing radiation as assessed by the comet and comet - FISH assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohseni Meybodi, A.; Mozdarani, H.

    2009-01-01

    Lymphocytes of Fanconi anemia (FA) show an increased sensitivity to the alkylating agents such as mitomycin C (MMC), but their responses to gamma-irradiation is controversial. The extent of DNA damage in leukocytes of FA patients following irradiation and MMC treatment was studied at cellular and single chromosome level. Methods: DNA damage induced by gamma-rays and MMC was measured in leukocytes of FA patients and carriers at whole genome level using the comet assay. Also, at the DNA level of specific chromosome involved in this disease using a modified comet-FISH protocol with whole chromosome painting probes (chromosomes 16 and 13), DNA damage in leukocytes of FA patients and heterozygotes were compared to healthy individuals. Results: Baseline DNA damage in leukocytes of patients and heterozygotes was higher than in controls. Net induced DNA damage by gamma-rays in leukocytes of FA cases was not significantly different from that of healthy donors and heterozygotes. Net induced DNA damage by MMC was statistically higher and significantly different (P<0.05) in patients than other groups. Hybridization of chromosome 16 reveals more signals in the tail but the number of spots in the tail was not significantly higher than the hybridization spots for chromosome 13 in both gamma-irradiated and MMC treated samples. Conclusion: Results indicate that DNA damage induced by MMC could be a better index for diagnosis of FA patients compared to gamma-rays. Results of comet-FISH showed no difference between the sensitivity of chromosome 16 and 13 to MMC and radiation. It may indicate that, although the FA-A gene is located on chromosome 16, this chromosome might have a similar sensitivity as other chromosomes

  20. The repair of damage to DNA in different cell types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karran, P.

    1974-01-01

    DNA single strand breaks induced by either X-ray irradiation or by methyl methanesulphonate (MMS) were studied in different lymphoid cell populations directly taken from the animal and maintained in tissue culture merely for the duration of the experiment. The results obtained from these cell populations were compared with those obtained with L5178Y cells maintained in tissue culture. All cell types studied were found to possess at least one class of enzymes required for repair of DNA damage, namely those enzymes involved in the rejoining of X-ray induced by MMS is different in each cell type. Repair replication was at much reduced levels and the endonucleolytic degradation was at much reduced levels and the endonucleolytic degradation was initiated at lower MMS concentration in the lymphoid cells as compared to L5178Y cells. It is suggested that the overall ''repair capacity'' of a population may be related to the number of cells in a cycle which, moreover, might be the only ones to have the ability to repair damage to DNA induced by MMS (G.G.)

  1. Radiation damage to DNA: The importance of track structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    A wide variety of biological effects are induced by ionizing radiation, from cell death to mutations and carcinogenesis. The biological effectiveness is found to vary not only with the absorbed dose but also with the type of radiation and its energy, i.e., with the nature of radiation tracks. An overview is presented of some of the biological experiments using different qualities of radiation, which when compared with Monte Carlo track structure studies, have highlighted the importance of the localized spatial properties of stochastic energy deposition on the nanometer scale at or near DNA. The track structure leads to clustering of damage which may include DNA breaks, base damage etc., the complexity of the cluster and therefore its biological repairability varying with radiation type. The ability of individual tracks to produce clustered damage, and the subsequent biological response are important in the assessment of the risk associated with low-level human exposure. Recent experiments have also shown that biological response to radiation is not always restricted to the 'hit' cell but can sometimes be induced in 'un-hit' cells near by

  2. Maintaining Genome Stability in Defiance of Mitotic DNA Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Stefano; Gentili, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of decisions affecting cell viability and proliferation is based on prompt detection of the issue to be addressed, formulation and transmission of a correct set of instructions and fidelity in the execution of orders. While the first and the last are purely mechanical processes relying on the faithful functioning of single proteins or macromolecular complexes (sensors and effectors), information is the real cue, with signal amplitude, duration, and frequency ultimately determining the type of response. The cellular response to DNA damage is no exception to the rule. In this review article we focus on DNA damage responses in G2 and Mitosis. First, we set the stage describing mitosis and the machineries in charge of assembling the apparatus responsible for chromosome alignment and segregation as well as the inputs that control its function (checkpoints). Next, we examine the type of issues that a cell approaching mitosis might face, presenting the impact of post-translational modifications (PTMs) on the correct and timely functioning of pathways correcting errors or damage before chromosome segregation. We conclude this essay with a perspective on the current status of mitotic signaling pathway inhibitors and their potential use in cancer therapy. PMID:27493659

  3. Improved DNA condensation, stability, and transfection with alkyl sulfonyl-functionalized PAMAM G2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rata-Aguilar, Azahara, E-mail: azahara@ugr.es; Maldonado-Valderrama, Julia; Jódar-Reyes, Ana Belén; Ortega-Vinuesa, Juan Luis [University of Granada, Biocolloid and Fluid Physics Group, Department of Applied Physics (Spain); Santoyo-Gonzalez, Francisco [University of Granada, Organic Chemistry Department, Institute of Biotechnology (Spain); Martín-Rodríguez, Antonio [University of Granada, Biocolloid and Fluid Physics Group, Department of Applied Physics (Spain)

    2015-04-15

    In this work, we have used a second-generation PAMAM grafted with octadecyl sulfonyl chains to condense plasmid DNA. The influence of this modification at different levels was investigated by comparison with original PAMAM G2. The condensation process and temporal stability of the complexes was studied with DLS, finding that the aliphatic chains influence DNA compaction via hydrophobic forces and markedly improve the formation and temporal stability of a single populated system with a hydrodynamic diameter below 100 nm. Interaction with a cell membrane model was also evaluated with a pendant drop tensiometer, resulting in further incorporation of the C18-PAMAM dendriplexes onto the interface. The improvement observed in transfection with our C18 grafted PAMAM is ascribed to the size, stability, and interfacial behavior of the complexes, which in turn are consequence of the DNA condensation process and the interactions involved.

  4. Chromatin structure influence the sensitivity of DNA to ionizing radiation induced DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin acts as a natural hindrance in DNA-damage recognition, repair and recovery. Histone and their variants undergo differential post-translational modification(s) and regulate chromatin structure to facilitate DNA damage response (DDR). During the presentation we will discuss the importance of chromatin organization and histone modification(s) during IR-induced DNA damage response in human liver cells. Our data shows G1-phase specific decrease of H3 serine10 phosphorylation in response to DNA damage is coupled with chromatin compaction in repair phase of DDR. The loss of H3Ser10P during DNA damage shows an inverse correlation with gain of γH2AX from a same mono-nucleosome in a dose-dependent manner. The loss of H3Ser10P is a universal phenomenon as it is independent of origin of cell lines and nature of genotoxic agents in G1 phase cells. The reversible reduction of H3Ser10P is mediated by opposing activities of phosphatase, MKP1 and kinase, MSK1 of the MAP kinase pathway. The present study suggests distinct reversible histone marks are associated with G1-phase of cell cycle and plays a critical role in chromatin organization which may facilitate differential sensitivity against radiation. Thus, the study raises the possibility of combinatorial modulation of H3Ser10P and histone acetylation with specific inhibitors to target the radio-resistant cancer cells in G1-phase and thus may serve as promising targets for cancer therapy. (author)

  5. Fisetin Protects DNA Against Oxidative Damage and Its Possible Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tingting; Lin, Huajuan; Tu, Qian; Liu, Jingjing; Li, Xican

    2016-06-01

    The paper tries to assess the protective effect of fisetin against •OH-induced DNA damage, then to investigate the possible mechanism. The protective effect was evaluated based on the content of malondialdehyde (MDA). The possible mechanism was analyzed using various antioxidant methods in vitro, including •OH scavenging (deoxyribose degradation), •O2 (-) scavenging (pyrogallol autoxidation), DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•(+) scavenging, and Cu(2+)-reducing power assays. Fisetin increased dose-dependently its protective percentages against •OH-induced DNA damage (IC50 value =1535.00±29.60 µM). It also increased its radical-scavenging percentages in a dose-dependent manner in various antioxidants assays. Its IC50 values in •OH scavenging, •O2(-) scavenging, DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•(+) scavenging, and Cu(2+)-reducing power assays, were 47.41±4.50 µM, 34.05±0.87 µM, 9.69±0.53 µM, 2.43±0.14 µM, and 1.49±0.16 µM, respectively. Fisetin can effectively protect DNA against •OH-induced oxidative damage possibly via reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging approach, which is assumed to be hydrogen atom (H•) and/or single electron (e) donation (HAT/SET) pathways. In the HAT pathway, the 3',4'-dihydroxyl moiety in B ring of fisetin is thought to play an important role, because it can be ultimately oxidized to a stable ortho-benzoquinone form.

  6. PARP-1 modulation of mTOR signaling in response to a DNA alkylating agent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Ethier

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 is widely involved in cell death responses. Depending on the degree of injury and on cell type, PARP activation may lead to autophagy, apoptosis or necrosis. In HEK293 cells exposed to the alkylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N'-nitrosoguanine (MNNG, we show that PARP-1 activation triggers a necrotic cell death response. The massive poly(ADP-ribose (PAR synthesis following PARP-1 activation leads to the modulation of mTORC1 pathway. Shortly after MNNG exposure, NAD⁺ and ATP levels decrease, while AMP levels drastically increase. We characterized at the molecular level the consequences of these altered nucleotide levels. First, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK is activated and the mTORC1 pathway is inhibited by the phosphorylation of Raptor, in an attempt to preserve cellular energy. Phosphorylation of the mTORC1 target S6 is decreased as well as the phosphorylation of the mTORC2 component Rictor on Thr1135. Finally, Akt phosphorylation on Ser473 is lost and then, cell death by necrosis occurs. Inhibition of PARP-1 with the potent PARP inhibitor AG14361 prevents all of these events. Moreover, the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC can also abrogate all the signaling events caused by MNNG exposure suggesting that reactive oxygen species (ROS production is involved in PARP-1 activation and modulation of mTOR signaling. In this study, we show that PARP-1 activation and PAR synthesis affect the energetic status of cells, inhibit the mTORC1 signaling pathway and possibly modulate the mTORC2 complex affecting cell fate. These results provide new evidence that cell death by necrosis is orchestrated by the balance between several signaling pathways, and that PARP-1 and PAR take part in these events.

  7. Voltammetric Detection of Damage to DNA by Arsenic Compounds at a DNA Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wennrich

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available DNA biosensor can serve as a powerfull tool for simple in vitro tests of chemicaltoxicity. In this paper, damage to DNA attached to the surface of screen-printed carbonelectrode by arsenic compounds in solution is described. Using the Co(III complex with1,10-phenanthroline, [Co(phen3]3+ , as an electrochemical DNA marker and the Ru(IIcomplex with bipyridyne, [Ru(bipy3]2+ , as a DNA oxidation catalyst, the portion of originaldsDNA which survives an incubation of the biosensor in the cleavage medium was evaluated.The model cleavage mixture was composed of an arsenic compound at 10-3 mol/Lconcentration corresponding to real contaminated water, 2x10-4 mol/L Fe(II or Cu(II ions asthe redox catalyst, and 1.5x10-2 mol/L hydrogen peroxide. DNA damage by arsenite,dimethylarsinic acid as the metabolic product of inorganic arsenic and widely used herbicide,as well as phenylarsonic acid and p-arsanilic acid as the representatives of feed additives wasfound in difference to arsenate.

  8. Online imaging of initial DNA damages at the PTB microbeam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giesen, U.; Langner, F.; Mielke, C.; Mosconi, M.; Dirks, W. G.

    2011-01-01

    In an inter-disciplinary collaboration of Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures (DSMZ) and Heinrich-Heine Univ., live-cell imaging has been established at the charged-particle microbeam facility of PTB. Candidate genes participating in DNA strand-break repair pathways such as PARP-1, MRE11, MSH2, MDC1 and p53BP1 have been modified to generate fluorescent fusion proteins. Using multi-cistronic expression vectors, stable genomic integration was achieved in HT-1080 fibroblasts. The aim of this study is to characterise and use these highly reliable cell lines for studying initial steps of DNA damage responses and kinetics of repair after microbeam irradiation with high- and low-linear energy transfer (LET) particles in living cells at physiological conditions. (authors)

  9. Personal exposure to ultrafine particles and oxidative DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinzents, Peter S; Møller, Peter; Sørensen, Mette

    2005-01-01

    10), nitrous oxide, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, and/or number concentration of UFPs at urban background or busy street monitoring stations was not a significant predictor of DNA damage, although personal UFP exposure was correlated with urban background concentrations of CO and NO2...... the morning after exposure measurement. Cumulated outdoor and cumulated indoor exposures to UFPs each were independent significant predictors of the level of purine oxidation in DNA but not of strand breaks. Ambient air concentrations of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of ..., particularly during bicycling in traffic. The results indicate that biologic effects of UFPs occur at modest exposure, such as that occurring in traffic, which supports the relationship of UFPs and the adverse health effects of air pollution....

  10. Systemic oxidatively generated DNA/RNA damage in clinical depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Anders; Krogh, Jesper; Miskowiak, Kamilla

    2013-01-01

    oxidatively generated DNA and RNA damage, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine (8-oxoGuo), respectively, were determined in healthy controls (N=28), moderately depressed, non-medicated patients (N=26) and severely depressed patients eligible for electroconvulsive therapy...... for trend=0.004). The 8-oxoGuo excretion was further increased after clinically effective ECT compared with pre-ECT values (P=0.006). There were no differences in 8-oxodG excretion between the groups or pre- vs. post-ECT. LIMITATIONS: Small sample size and the inclusion of both unipolar and bipolar patients...

  11. Human longevity and variation in DNA damage response and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debrabant, Birgit; Soerensen, Mette; Flachsbart, Friederike

    2014-01-01

    others. Data were applied on 592 SNPs from 77 genes involved in nine sub-processes: DNA-damage response, base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, non-homologous end-joining, homologous recombinational repair (HRR), RecQ helicase activities (RECQ), telomere functioning...... in genotyping procedures and investigated SNPs, potentially inducing differences in the coverage of gene regions. Specifically, five genes were not covered at all in the German data. Therefore, investigations in additional study populations are needed before final conclusion can be drawn....

  12. Oxidatively damaged DNA in animals exposed to particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Peter; Danielsen, Pernille Høgh; Jantzen, Kim

    2013-01-01

    on optimal methods. The majority of studies have used single intracavitary administration or inhalation with dose rates exceeding the pulmonary overload threshold, resulting in cytotoxicity and inflammation. It is unclear whether this is relevant for the much lower human exposure levels. Still...... not be equivocally determined. Roles of cytotoxicity or inflammation for oxidatively induced DNA damage could not be documented or refuted. Studies on exposure to particles in the gastrointestinal tract showed consistently increased levels of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine in the liver. Collectively, there is evidence...

  13. Lymphocyte DNA damage in elevator manufacturing workers in Guangzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Tai Hing; Zhu, Chang Qi; Jiang, Chao Qiang

    2002-03-25

    To study the effect of smoking, passive smoking, alcohol drinking, and occupational exposure to low level of benzene on DNA strand breaks in elevator manufacturing workers in Guangzhou, China. Three hundred and fifty-nine workers (252 men and 107 women) of a modern elevator manufacturing factory, 205 were from production departments and 154 from managerial department. Information on the workers' health conditions, smoking, passive smoking, alcohol consumption and occupational exposure history was collected by personal interview. Lymphocyte DNA damage was measured by the Comet assay. None of the women smoked and 20.6% of the men were daily smokers. In non-smokers, the prevalence of passive smoking at work was 25% for men and 11.2% for women, and at home, 37.8 and 48.6%, respectively. Smoking significantly increased tail moment (P<0.001). Daily smokers had the largest tail moment (geometric mean, 95% CI) (0.93 microm (0.81-0.94)), followed by occasional smokers (0.76 microm (0.59-0.95)), ex-smokers (0.70 microm (0.58-0.85)), and never smokers (0.56 microm (0.53-0.60)). Tail moment increased significantly with daily tobacco consumption (cigarettes per day) (r=0.26, P<0.001) after adjusting for age, gender, occupational exposure, passive smoking, and drinking. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) showed that smoking (P<0.001), passive smoking at home (P=0.026), occupational exposure (P<0.001), male gender (P<0.001), and age (P=0.001) had independent effects on tail moment, whereas passive smoking at work and alcohol drinking had no significant effect. Smoking, passive smoking at home, male gender, age and occupational exposure independently increased lymphocyte DNA strand breaks. The presence of excess DNA damage under low level of occupational exposure to benzene or other solvents suggest that the current allowance concentrations may not be safe to prevent genotoxicity.

  14. Self-cytoplasmic DNA upregulates the mutator enzyme APOBEC3A leading to chromosomal DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suspène, Rodolphe; Mussil, Bianka; Laude, Hélène; Caval, Vincent; Berry, Noémie; Bouzidi, Mohamed S; Thiers, Valérie; Wain-Hobson, Simon; Vartanian, Jean-Pierre

    2017-04-07

    Foreign and self-cytoplasmic DNA are recognized by numerous DNA sensor molecules leading to the production of type I interferons. Such DNA agonists should be degraded otherwise cells would be chronically stressed. Most human APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases can initiate catabolism of cytoplasmic mitochondrial DNA. Using the human myeloid cell line THP-1 with an interferon inducible APOBEC3A gene, we show that cytoplasmic DNA triggers interferon α and β production through the RNA polymerase III transcription/RIG-I pathway leading to massive upregulation of APOBEC3A. By catalyzing C→U editing in single stranded DNA fragments, the enzyme prevents them from re-annealing so attenuating the danger signal. The price to pay is chromosomal DNA damage in the form of CG→TA mutations and double stranded DNA breaks which, in the context of chronic inflammation, could drive cells down the path toward cancer. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Oxidative Stress, DNA Damage and DNA Repair in Female Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Type 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemarie Grindel

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM is associated with oxidative stress which in turn can lead to DNA damage. The aim of the present study was to analyze oxidative stress, DNA damage and DNA repair in regard to hyperglycemic state and diabetes duration.Female T2DM patients (n = 146 were enrolled in the MIKRODIAB study and allocated in two groups regarding their glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c level (HbA1c≤7.5%, n = 74; HbA1c>7.5%, n = 72. In addition, tertiles according to diabetes duration (DD were created (DDI = 6.94±3.1 y, n = 49; DDII = 13.35±1.1 y, n = 48; DDIII = 22.90±7.3 y, n = 49. Oxidative stress parameters, including ferric reducing ability potential, malondialdehyde, oxidized and reduced glutathione, reduced thiols, oxidized LDL and F2-Isoprostane as well as the activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase were measured. Damage to DNA was analyzed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and whole blood with single cell gel electrophoresis. DNA base excision repair capacity was tested with the modified comet repair assay. Additionally, mRNA expressions of nine genes related to base excision repair were analyzed in a subset of 46 matched individuals.No significant differences in oxidative stress parameters, antioxidant enzyme activities, damage to DNA and base excision repair capacity, neither between a HbA1c cut off />7.5%, nor between diabetes duration was found. A significant up-regulation in mRNA expression was found for APEX1, LIG3 and XRCC1 in patients with >7.5% HbA1c. Additionally, we observed higher total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, LDL/HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, Framingham risk score, systolic blood pressure, BMI and lower HDL-cholesterol in the hyperglycemic group.BMI, blood pressure and blood lipid status were worse in hyperglycemic individuals. However, no major disparities regarding oxidative stress, damage to DNA and DNA repair were present which might be due to good medical

  16. Replication stress and oxidative damage contribute to aberrant constitutive activation of DNA damage signalling in human gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartkova, J; Hamerlik, P; Stockhausen, Marie

    2010-01-01

    brain and grade II astrocytomas, despite the degree of DDR activation was higher in grade II tumors. Markers indicative of ongoing DNA replication stress (Chk1 activation, Rad17 phosphorylation, replication protein A foci and single-stranded DNA) were present in GBM cells under high- or low...... and indicate that replication stress, rather than oxidative stress, fuels the DNA damage signalling in early stages of astrocytoma development.......Malignant gliomas, the deadliest of brain neoplasms, show rampant genetic instability and resistance to genotoxic therapies, implicating potentially aberrant DNA damage response (DDR) in glioma pathogenesis and treatment failure. Here, we report on gross, aberrant constitutive activation of DNA...

  17. Development of the adverse outcome pathway "alkylation of DNA in male premeiotic germ cells leading to heritable mutations" using the OECD's users' handbook supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yauk, Carole L; Lambert, Iain B; Meek, M E Bette; Douglas, George R; Marchetti, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development's (OECD) Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) programme aims to develop a knowledgebase of all known pathways of toxicity that lead to adverse effects in humans and ecosystems. A Users' Handbook was recently released to provide supplementary guidance on AOP development. This article describes one AOP-alkylation of DNA in male premeiotic germ cells leading to heritable mutations. This outcome is an important regulatory endpoint. The AOP describes the biological plausibility and empirical evidence supporting that compounds capable of alkylating DNA cause germ cell mutations and subsequent mutations in the offspring of exposed males. Alkyl adducts are subject to DNA repair; however, at high doses the repair machinery becomes saturated. Lack of repair leads to replication of alkylated DNA and ensuing mutations in male premeiotic germ cells. Mutations that do not impair spermatogenesis persist and eventually are present in mature sperm. Thus, the mutations are transmitted to the offspring. Although there are some gaps in empirical support and evidence for essentiality of the key events for certain aspects of this AOP, the overall AOP is generally accepted as dogma and applies broadly to any species that produces sperm. The AOP was developed and used in an iterative process to test and refine the Users' Handbook, and is one of the first publicly available AOPs. It is our hope that this AOP will be leveraged to develop other AOPs in this field to advance method development, computational models to predict germ cell effects, and integrated testing strategies. © 2015 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada.

  18. DNA damage preceding dopamine neuron degeneration in A53T human α-synuclein transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Degui; Yu, Tianyu; Liu, Yongqiang; Yan, Jun; Guo, Yingli; Jing, Yuhong; Yang, Xuguang; Song, Yanfeng; Tian, Yingxia

    2016-01-01

    Defective DNA repair has been linked with age-associated neurodegenerative disorders. Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by genetic and environmental factors. Whether damages to nuclear DNA contribute to neurodegeneration of PD still remain obscure. in this study we aim to explore whether nuclear DNA damage induce dopamine neuron degeneration in A53T human α-Synuclein over expressed mouse model. We investigated the effects of X-ray irradiation on A53T-α-Syn MEFs and A53T-α-Syn transgene mice. Our results indicate that A53T-α-Syn MEFs show a prolonged DNA damage repair process and senescense phenotype. DNA damage preceded onset of motor phenotype in A53T-α-Syn transgenic mice and decrease the number of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. Neurons of A53T-α-Syn transgenic mice are more fragile to DNA damages. - Highlights: • This study explore contribution of DNA damage to neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease mice. • A53T-α-Syn MEF cells show a prolonged DNA damage repair process and senescense phenotype. • DNA damage preceded onset of motor phenotype in A53T-α-Syn transgenic mice. • DNA damage decrease the number of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. • Neurons of A53T-α-Syn transgenic mice are more fragile to DNA damages.

  19. Producing standard damaged DNA samples by heating: pitfalls and suggestions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattorini, Paolo; Marrubini, Giorgio; Bonin, Serena; Bertoglio, Barbara; Grignani, Pierangela; Recchia, Elisa; Pitacco, Paola; Procopio, Francesca; Cantoni, Carolina; Pajnič, Irena Zupanič; Sorçaburu-Cigliero, Solange; Previderè, Carlo

    2018-05-15

    Heat-mediated hydrolysis of DNA is a simple and inexpensive method for producing damaged samples in vitro. Despite heat-mediated DNA hydrolysis is being widely used in forensic and clinical validation procedures, the lack of standardized procedures makes it impossible to compare the intra and inter-laboratory outcomes of the damaging treatments. In this work, a systematic approach to heat induced DNA hydrolysis was performed at 70 °C for 0-18 h to test the role both of the hydrolysis buffer and of the experimental conditions. Specifically, a trial DNA sample, resuspended in three different media (ultrapure water, 0.1% DEPC-water and, respectively, TE) was treated both in Eppendorf tubes ("Protocol P") and in Eppendorf tubes provided with screwcaps ("Protocol S"). The results of these comparative tests were assessed by normalization of the qPCR results. DEPC-water increased the degradation of the samples up to about 100 times when compared to the ultrapure water. Conversely, the TE protected the DNA from degradation whose level was about 1700 times lower than in samples treated in ultrapure water. Even the employment of the "Protocol S" affected the level of degradation, by consistently increasing it (up to about 180 times in DEPC-water). Thus, this comparative approach showed that even seemingly apparently trivial and often underestimated parameters modify the degradation level up to 2-3 orders of magnitude. The chemical-physical reasons of these findings are discussed together with the role of potential factors such as enhanced reactivity of CO 2 , ROS, NO x and pressure, which are likely to be involved. Since the intra and inter-laboratory comparison of the outcomes of the hydrolytic procedure is the first step toward its standardization, the normalization of the qPCR data by the UV/qPCR ratio seems to be the simplest and most reliable way to allow this. Finally, the supplying (provided with the commercial qPCR kits) of a DNA sample whose degree of

  20. Alpha-phellandrene-induced DNA damage and affect DNA repair protein expression in WEHI-3 murine leukemia cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jen-Jyh; Wu, Chih-Chung; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Weng, Shu-Wen; Ma, Yi-Shih; Huang, Yi-Ping; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-11-01

    Although there are few reports regarding α-phellandrene (α-PA), a natural compound from Schinus molle L. essential oil, there is no report to show that α-PA induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair associated protein expression. Herein, we investigated the effects of α-PA on DNA damage and repair associated protein expression in murine leukemia cells. Flow cytometric assay was used to measure the effects of α-PA on total cell viability and the results indicated that α-PA induced cell death. Comet assay and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride staining were used for measuring DNA damage and condensation, respectively, and the results indicated that α-PA induced DNA damage and condensation in a concentration-dependent manner. DNA gel electrophoresis was used to examine the DNA damage and the results showed that α-PA induced DNA damage in WEHI-3 cells. Western blotting assay was used to measure the changes of DNA damage and repair associated protein expression and the results indicated that α-PA increased p-p53, p-H2A.X, 14-3-3-σ, and MDC1 protein expression but inhibited the protein of p53, MGMT, DNA-PK, and BRCA-1. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Electrolytic reduction of nitroheterocyclic drugs leads to biologically important damage in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafleur, M.V.M.; Pluijmackers-Westmijze, E.J.; Loman, H.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of electrolytic reduction of nitroimidazole drugs on biologically active DNA was studied. The results show that reduction of the drugs in the presence of DNA affects inactivation for both double-stranded (RF) and single-stranded phiX174 DNA. However, stable reduction products did not make a significant contribution to the lethal damage in DNA. This suggests that probably a short-lived intermediate of reduction of nitro-compounds is responsible for damage to DNA. (author)

  2. Hydroxytyrosol Protects against Oxidative DNA Damage in Human Breast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José J. Gaforio

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Over recent years, several studies have related olive oil ingestion to a low incidence of several diseases, including breast cancer. Hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol are two of the major phenols present in virgin olive oils. Despite the fact that they have been linked to cancer prevention, there is no evidence that clarifies their effect in human breast tumor and non-tumor cells. In the present work, we present hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol’s effects in human breast cell lines. Our results show that hydroxytyrosol acts as a more efficient free radical scavenger than tyrosol, but both fail to affect cell proliferation rates, cell cycle profile or cell apoptosis in human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A or breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7. We found that hydroxytyrosol decreases the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS level in MCF10A cells but not in MCF7 or MDA-MB-231 cells while very high amounts of tyrosol is needed to decrease the ROS level in MCF10A cells. Interestingly, hydroxytyrosol prevents oxidative DNA damage in the three breast cell lines. Therefore, our data suggest that simple phenol hydroxytyrosol could contribute to a lower incidence of breast cancer in populations that consume virgin olive oil due to its antioxidant activity and its protection against oxidative DNA damage in mammary cells.

  3. DNA Damage by Radiation in Tradescantia Leaf Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Min; Hyun, Kyung Man; Ryu, Tae Ho; Kim, Jin Kyu; Nili, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    The comet assay is currently used in different areas of biological sciences to detect DNA damage. The comet assay, due to its simplicity, sensitivity and need of a few cells, is ideal as a short-term genotoxicity test. The comet assay can theoretically be applied to every type of eukaryotic cell, including plant cells. Plants are very useful as monitors of genetic effects caused by pollution in the atmosphere, water and soil. Tradescantia tests are very useful tools for screening the mutagenic potential in the environment. Experiments were conducted to study the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiations on the genome integrity, particularly of Tradescantia. The increasingly frequent use of Tradescantia as a sensitive environmental bioindicator of genotoxic effects. This study was designed to assess the genotoxicity of ionizing radiation using Tradescnatia-comet assay. The development of comet assay has enabled investigators to detect DNA damage at the levels of cells. To adapt this assay to plant cells, nuclei were directly obtained from Tradescantia leaf samples. A significant dose-dependent increase in the average tail moment values over the negative control was observed. Recently the adaptation of this technique to plant cells opens new possibilities for studies in variety area. The future applications of the comet assay could impact some other important areas, certainly, one of the limiting factors to its utility is the imagination of the investigator.

  4. Damage of plasmid DNA by high energy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaelidesova, A.; Pachnerova Brabcova, K.; Davidkova, M.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the degree of direct DNA damage by high-energy ions, which are one of the components of cosmic rays, and therefore the knowledge of the biological effects of these ions is key to long-term space missions with human crew. The pBR322 plasmid containing 4361 base pairs was used in this study. The aqueous solution of plasmid pBR322 was transferred on ice to Japan to the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, the Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy. Just before the experiment, the droplets of solution of known concentration were applied to the slides and the water was allowed to evaporate to produce dry DNA samples. Half of the slides were irradiated with 290 MeV/u of carbon ions and a dose rate of 20 Gy/min. The other half of the slides were irradiated with helium nuclei of 150 MeV/hr and a dose rate of 12.6 Gy/min. Both sets of slides were irradiated with doses of 0-1,400 Gy with a 200 Gy step. After irradiation, the samples were re-dissolved in distilled water, frozen and transported on ice to the Czech Republic for processing. Samples were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The plasmid was evaluated separately to determine the degree of radiation induced lesions and further to incubation with enzymes recognizing basal damage. (authors)

  5. DNA Damage by Radiation in Tradescantia Leaf Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Min; Hyun, Kyung Man; Ryu, Tae Ho; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Nili, Mohammad [Dawnesh Radiation Research Institute, Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-04-15

    The comet assay is currently used in different areas of biological sciences to detect DNA damage. The comet assay, due to its simplicity, sensitivity and need of a few cells, is ideal as a short-term genotoxicity test. The comet assay can theoretically be applied to every type of eukaryotic cell, including plant cells. Plants are very useful as monitors of genetic effects caused by pollution in the atmosphere, water and soil. Tradescantia tests are very useful tools for screening the mutagenic potential in the environment. Experiments were conducted to study the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiations on the genome integrity, particularly of Tradescantia. The increasingly frequent use of Tradescantia as a sensitive environmental bioindicator of genotoxic effects. This study was designed to assess the genotoxicity of ionizing radiation using Tradescnatia-comet assay. The development of comet assay has enabled investigators to detect DNA damage at the levels of cells. To adapt this assay to plant cells, nuclei were directly obtained from Tradescantia leaf samples. A significant dose-dependent increase in the average tail moment values over the negative control was observed. Recently the adaptation of this technique to plant cells opens new possibilities for studies in variety area. The future applications of the comet assay could impact some other important areas, certainly, one of the limiting factors to its utility is the imagination of the investigator.

  6. Detection of DNA damage by using hairpin molecular beacon probes and graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Lu, Qian; Tong, Ying; Wei, Wei; Liu, Songqin

    2012-09-15

    A hairpin molecular beacon tagged with carboxyfluorescein in combination with graphene oxide as a quencher reagent was used to detect the DNA damage by chemical reagents. The fluorescence of molecular beacon was quenched sharply by graphene oxide; while in the presence of its complementary DNA the quenching efficiency decreased because their hybridization prevented the strong adsorbability of molecular beacon on graphene oxide. If the complementary DNA was damaged by a chemical reagent and could not form intact duplex structure with molecular beacon, more molecular beacon would adsorb on graphene oxide increasing the quenching efficiency. Thus, damaged DNA could be detected based on different quenching efficiencies afforded by damaged and intact complementary DNA. The damage effects of chlorpyrifos-methyl and three metabolites of styrene such as mandelieaeids, phenylglyoxylieaeids and epoxystyrene on DNA were studied as models. The method for detection of DNA damage was reliable, rapid and simple compared to the biological methods. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Adaptation to Alkylation Damage in DNA Measured by the comet Assay

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Angelis, Karel; McGuffie, M.; Menke, M.; Schubert, I.

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 36, - (2000), s. 146-150 ISSN 0893-6692 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/98/0682; GA ČR GA204/97/0154 Grant - others:-(XC) P2020702; -(DE) Schu 951/5-1; a-(DE) 436TSE17/7/98 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : abasic (AP) sites * AP-endonuclease Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.278, year: 2000

  8. Alcohols as alkylating agents in heteroarene C-H functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jian; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2015-09-01

    Redox processes and radical intermediates are found in many biochemical processes, including deoxyribonucleotide synthesis and oxidative DNA damage. One of the core principles underlying DNA biosynthesis is the radical-mediated elimination of H2O to deoxygenate ribonucleotides, an example of `spin-centre shift', during which an alcohol C-O bond is cleaved, resulting in a carbon-centred radical intermediate. Although spin-centre shift is a well-understood biochemical process, it is underused by the synthetic organic chemistry community. We wondered whether it would be possible to take advantage of this naturally occurring process to accomplish mild, non-traditional alkylation reactions using alcohols as radical precursors. Because conventional radical-based alkylation methods require the use of stoichiometric oxidants, increased temperatures or peroxides, a mild protocol using simple and abundant alkylating agents would have considerable use in the synthesis of diversely functionalized pharmacophores. Here we describe the development of a dual catalytic alkylation of heteroarenes, using alcohols as mild alkylating reagents. This method represents the first, to our knowledge, broadly applicable use of unactivated alcohols as latent alkylating reagents, achieved via the successful merger of photoredox and hydrogen atom transfer catalysis. The value of this multi-catalytic protocol has been demonstrated through the late-stage functionalization of the medicinal agents, fasudil and milrinone.

  9. Alcohols as alkylating agents in heteroarene C–H functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jian; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2015-01-01

    Redox processes and radical intermediates are found in many biochemical processes, including deoxyribonucleotide synthesis and oxidative DNA damage1. One of the core principles that underlies DNA biosynthesis is the radical-mediated elimnation of H2O to deoxygenate ribonucleotides, an example of ‘spin-center shift’ (SCS)2, during which an alcohol C–O bond is cleaved, resulting in a carbon-centered radical intermediate. While SCS is a well-understood biochemical process, it is underutilized by the synthetic organic chemistry community. We wondered whether it would be possible to take advantage of this naturally occurring process to accomplish mild, non-traditional alkylations using alcohols as radical precursors. Considering traditional radical-based alkylation methods require the use of stoichiometric oxidants, elevated temperatures, or peroxides3–7, the development of a mild protocol using simple and abundant alkylating agents would have significant utility in the synthesis of diversely functionalized pharmacophores. In this manuscript, we describe the successful execution of this idea via the development of a dual catalytic alkylation of heteroarenes using alcohols as mild alkylating reagents. This method represents the first broadly applicable use of unactivated alcohols as latent alkylating reagents, achieved via the successful merger of photoredox and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) catalysis. The utility of this multi-catalytic protocol has been demonstrated through the late-stage functionalization of the medicinal agents, fasudil and milrinone. PMID:26308895

  10. Alcohols as alkylating agents in heteroarene C-H functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jian; MacMillan, David W C

    2015-09-03

    Redox processes and radical intermediates are found in many biochemical processes, including deoxyribonucleotide synthesis and oxidative DNA damage. One of the core principles underlying DNA biosynthesis is the radical-mediated elimination of H2O to deoxygenate ribonucleotides, an example of 'spin-centre shift', during which an alcohol C-O bond is cleaved, resulting in a carbon-cent