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Sample records for alkylation damage repair

  1. Alkylation damage repair in mammalian genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitra, S.; Roy, R.; Kim, N.K. [Texas Univ. Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States). Sealy Center for Molecular Science]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Tano, K. [Banyu Pharmaceutical Co. Research Inst., Tsukuba (Japan)]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ibeanu, G.C. [NIEHS, Research Triangle, NC (United States)]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dunn, W.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Natarajan, A.T. [Leiden Univ. (Netherlands). Sylvius Labs.; Hartenstein, B.; Kaina, B. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Genetik und Toxikologie

    1992-11-01

    The repair of O{sup 6} -alkylguanine in DNA involves only O{sup 6} -methyltransferase (MGMT) while the repair of N-alkylpurines requires multiple proteins including N-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (MPG). While the biochemical properties human and mouse MGMTs are very similar, the mouse MPG removes 7-methylguanine more efficiently than the human protein. An increased level of MGMT, without a change in the level of MPG associated with gene amplification, was observed in a mouse cell line resistant to 2-chloroethyl-N-nitrosourea. In contrast, no correlation was observed between MPG level and resistance to methyl methanesulfonate in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. This result suggests a protein other than MPG limits the repair rate of N-alkylpurine in CHO cells.

  2. Repair of Alkylation Damage in Eukaryotic Chromatin Depends on Searching Ability of Alkyladenine DNA Glycosylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaru; O'Brien, Patrick J

    2015-11-20

    Human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) initiates the base excision repair pathway by excising alkylated and deaminated purine lesions. In vitro biochemical experiments demonstrate that AAG uses facilitated diffusion to efficiently search DNA to find rare sites of damage and suggest that electrostatic interactions are critical to the searching process. However, it remains an open question whether DNA searching limits the rate of DNA repair in vivo. We constructed AAG mutants with altered searching ability and measured their ability to protect yeast from alkylation damage in order to address this question. Each of the conserved arginine and lysine residues that are near the DNA binding interface were mutated, and the functional impacts were evaluated using kinetic and thermodynamic analysis. These mutations do not perturb catalysis of N-glycosidic bond cleavage, but they decrease the ability to capture rare lesion sites. Nonspecific and specific DNA binding properties are closely correlated, suggesting that the electrostatic interactions observed in the specific recognition complex are similarly important for DNA searching complexes. The ability of the mutant proteins to complement repair-deficient yeast cells is positively correlated with the ability of the proteins to search DNA in vitro, suggesting that cellular resistance to DNA alkylation is governed by the ability to find and efficiently capture cytotoxic lesions. It appears that chromosomal access is not restricted and toxic sites of alkylation damage are readily accessible to a searching protein. PMID:26317160

  3. Repair of DNA Alkylation Damage by the Escherichia coli Adaptive Response Protein AlkB as Studied by ESI-TOF Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyu Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA alkylation can cause mutations, epigenetic changes, and even cell death. All living organisms have evolved enzymatic and non-enzymatic strategies for repairing such alkylation damage. AlkB, one of the Escherichia coli adaptive response proteins, uses an α-ketoglutarate/Fe(II-dependent mechanism that, by chemical oxidation, removes a variety of alkyl lesions from DNA, thus affording protection of the genome against alkylation. In an effort to understand the range of acceptable substrates for AlkB, the enzyme was incubated with chemically synthesized oligonucleotides containing alkyl lesions, and the reaction products were analyzed by electrospray ionization time-of-flight (ESI-TOF mass spectrometry. Consistent with the literature, but studied comparatively here for the first time, it was found that 1-methyladenine, 1,N 6-ethenoadenine, 3-methylcytosine, and 3-ethylcytosine were completely transformed by AlkB, while 1-methylguanine and 3-methylthymine were partially repaired. The repair intermediates (epoxide and possibly glycol of 3,N 4-ethenocytosine are reported for the first time. It is also demonstrated that O 6-methylguanine and 5-methylcytosine are refractory to AlkB, lending support to the hypothesis that AlkB repairs only alkyl lesions attached to the nitrogen atoms of the nucleobase. ESI-TOF mass spectrometry is shown to be a sensitive and efficient tool for probing the comparative substrate specificities of DNA repair proteins in vitro.

  4. Alkylation damage in DNA and RNA--repair mechanisms and medical significance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drabløs, Finn; Feyzi, Emadoldin; Aas, Per Arne;

    2004-01-01

    G-DNA alkyltransferase (MGMT or AGT) that repairs the base in one step. However, the genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of O(6)-meG is mainly due to recognition of O(6)-meG/T (or C) mispairs by the mismatch repair system (MMR) and induction of futile repair cycles, eventually resulting in cytotoxic double-strand breaks...

  5. In vivo repair of alkylating and oxidative DNA damage in the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes of wild-type and glycosylase-deficient Caenorhabditis elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter, Senyene E.; Gustafson, Margaret A; Margillo, Kathleen M; Lee, Sean A; Ryde, Ian T.; Meyer, Joel N.

    2012-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is an evolutionarily conserved DNA repair pathway that is critical for repair of many of the most common types of DNA damage generated both by endogenous metabolic pathways and exposure to exogenous stressors such as pollutants. C. elegans is an increasingly important model organism for the study of DNA damage-related processes including DNA repair, genotoxicity, and apoptosis, but BER is not well understood in this organism, and has not previously been measured in ...

  6. African swine fever virus AP endonuclease is a redox-sensitive enzyme that repairs alkylating and oxidative damage to DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; Alexander A Ishchenko; Saparbaev, Murat K.; Salas, María L.; Salas, José

    2009-01-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) encodes an AP endonuclease (pE296R) which is essential for virus growth in swine macrophages. We show here that the DNA repair functions of pE296R (AP endonucleolytic, 3′ → 5′ exonuclease, 3′-diesterase and nucleotide incision repair (NIR) activities) and DNA binding are inhibited by reducing agents. Protein pE296R contains one intramolecular disulfide bond, whose disruption by reducing agents might perturb the interaction of the viral AP endonuclease with the...

  7. Aag DNA glycosylase promotes alkylation-induced tissue damage mediated by Parp1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Calvo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Alkylating agents comprise a major class of front-line cancer chemotherapeutic compounds, and while these agents effectively kill tumor cells, they also damage healthy tissues. Although base excision repair (BER is essential in repairing DNA alkylation damage, under certain conditions, initiation of BER can be detrimental. Here we illustrate that the alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG mediates alkylation-induced tissue damage and whole-animal lethality following exposure to alkylating agents. Aag-dependent tissue damage, as observed in cerebellar granule cells, splenocytes, thymocytes, bone marrow cells, pancreatic β-cells, and retinal photoreceptor cells, was detected in wild-type mice, exacerbated in Aag transgenic mice, and completely suppressed in Aag⁻/⁻ mice. Additional genetic experiments dissected the effects of modulating both BER and Parp1 on alkylation sensitivity in mice and determined that Aag acts upstream of Parp1 in alkylation-induced tissue damage; in fact, cytotoxicity in WT and Aag transgenic mice was abrogated in the absence of Parp1. These results provide in vivo evidence that Aag-initiated BER may play a critical role in determining the side-effects of alkylating agent chemotherapies and that Parp1 plays a crucial role in Aag-mediated tissue damage.

  8. Innovative repair of subsidence damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to improve handling of subsidence damages the Illinois Mine Subsidence Insurance Fund supported the development of novel cost-effective methods of repair. The research in developing the repairs was directed towards the most common and costly damages that had been observed. As a result repair techniques were designed for structurally cracked foundations in the tension zone; structurally cracked foundations in the compression zone; and damaged or undamaged tilted foundations. When appropriate the postulated methods would result in: 1. significant cost savings (over conventional procedures); 2. a structural capacity greater than when the foundation was uncracked; and 3. an aesthetic appeal. All the postulated repair methodologies were laboratory and/or field tested. This paper will summarize the essentials of each technique developed and the test results

  9. ABH2 Couples Regulation of Ribosomal DNA Transcription with DNA Alkylation Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pishun Li

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Transcription has been linked to DNA damage. How the most highly transcribed mammalian ribosomal (rDNA genes maintain genome integrity in the absence of transcription-coupled DNA damage repair is poorly understood. Here, we report that ABH2/ALKBH2, a DNA alkylation repair enzyme, is highly enriched in the nucleolus. ABH2 interacts with DNA repair proteins Ku70 and Ku80 as well as nucleolar proteins nucleolin, nucleophosmin 1, and upstream binding factor (UBF. ABH2 associates with and promotes rDNA transcription through its DNA repair activity. ABH2 knockdown impairs rDNA transcription and leads to increased single-stranded and double-stranded DNA breaks that are more pronounced in the rDNA genes, whereas ABH2 overexpression protects cells from methyl-methanesulfonate-induced DNA damage and inhibition of rDNA transcription. In response to massive alkylation damage, ABH2 rapidly redistributes from the nucleolus to nucleoplasm. Our study thus reveals a critical role of ABH2 in maintaining rDNA gene integrity and transcription and provides insight into the ABH2 DNA repair function.

  10. DNA damage and repair mechanism. [DNA damage and repair mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossman, L.

    1976-01-01

    The ability of cells to survive in an environment specifically damaging to its DNA can be attributed to a variety of inherent repair mechanisms. This is a form of repair in which alterations are directly reversed to their original form. This reversibility is exemplified by the photoreactivation of ultraviolet-induced pyrimidine dimers. This phenomenon is attributable to the action of an enzyme, photolyase (photoreactivating enzyme), which is able to monomerize the uv-induced pyrimidine dimers in the presence of 320 to 370 nm light. Dilution of damage can be effected through a series of sister chromatid exchanges, controlled by recombinational mechanisms as a postreplication event. In this form of repair, replication proceeds to the point of damage, stops and resumes at the point of the next initiation site resulting in a gap in the newly synthesized daughter strand. It is presumed that those strands containing damaged regions exchange with undamaged regions of other DNA, strands, resulting in the eventual dilution of such damage.

  11. DNA damage and repair in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biological impact of any DNA damaging agent is a combined function of the chemical nature of the induced lesions and the efficiency and accuracy of their repair. Although much has been learned frommicrobes and mammals about both the repair of DNA damage and the biological effects of the persistence of these lesions, much remains to be learned about the mechanism and tissue-specificity of repair in plants. This review focuses on recent work on the induction and repair of DNA damage in higher plants, with special emphasis on UV-induced DNA damage products. (author)

  12. Repairing of N-mustard derivative BO-1055 induced DNA damage requires NER, HR, and MGMT-dependent DNA repair mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo, Ching-Ying; Chou, Wen-Cheng; Wu, Chin-Chung; Wong, Teng-Song; Kakadiya, Rajesh; Lee, Te-Chang; Su, Tsann-Long; Wang, Hui-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Alkylating agents are frequently used as first-line chemotherapeutics for various newly diagnosed cancers. Disruption of genome integrity by such agents can lead to cell lethality if DNA lesions are not removed. Several DNA repair mechanisms participate in the recovery of mono- or bi-functional DNA alkylation. Thus, DNA repair capacity is correlated with the therapeutic response. Here, we assessed the function of novel water-soluble N-mustard BO-1055 (ureidomustin) in DNA damage response and ...

  13. DNA Damage and Repair in Vascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uryga, Anna; Gray, Kelly; Bennett, Martin

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage affecting both genomic and mitochondrial DNA is present in a variety of both inherited and acquired vascular diseases. Multiple cell types show persistent DNA damage and a range of lesions. In turn, DNA damage activates a variety of DNA repair mechanisms, many of which are activated in vascular disease. Such DNA repair mechanisms either stall the cell cycle to allow repair to occur or trigger apoptosis or cell senescence to prevent propagation of damaged DNA. Recent evidence has indicated that DNA damage occurs early, is progressive, and is sufficient to impair function of cells composing the vascular wall. The consequences of persistent genomic and mitochondrial DNA damage, including inflammation, cell senescence, and apoptosis, are present in vascular disease. DNA damage can thus directly cause vascular disease, opening up new possibilities for both prevention and treatment. We review the evidence for and the causes, types, and consequences of DNA damage in vascular disease. PMID:26442438

  14. Response to alkylation damage of fibroblast cells from patients with therapy-related myeloid neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Therapy-related myeloid neoplasms (t-MNs) are severe long-term consequences of chemo- and/or radiotherapy for a primary disease. It is generally accepted that genetic predisposition plays a major role in therapy-related leukemogenesis. The hypothesis that cellular response mechanisms to alkylation damage are deregulated in constitutional cells of patients with t-MNs due to predisposing genetic events was tested in this study. It was further examined whether genetic instability would also be a consequence of such a treatment. Therefore primary fibroblast cultures were established from skin biopsies from patients with t-MNs and matched healthy controls. These cultures were treated with the cyclophosphamide derivate phosphoramide mustard (PM), a bifunctional alkylating agent. The cellular response to alkylation damage was assessed with respect to cell viability, cell cycle regulation and chromosomal stability. Increased sensitivity to PM treatment could be demonstrated in 7/13 (54%) patient samples. IC50, IC75 and IC90 values as well as the percentage of viable cells at higher PM concentrations were significantly different when comparing patient and control groups. Both, fibroblast cells from patients and controls, properly induced cell cycle arrest following alkylating injury in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Gross genomic alterations like chromosome and chromatid breaks as well as structural and clonal numerical aberrations could be induced via PM treatment. The extent of induced changes per mitosis, however, was comparable in both, patient and control fibroblast cultures. These data demonstrate for the first time hypersensitivity of constitutional cells from patients with t-MNs to alkylation treatment indicating impaired DNA damage response and/or repair mechanisms. (author)

  15. Repair of radiation damage in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The responses, such as survival, mutation, and carcinogenesis, of mammalian cells and tissues to radiation are dependent not only on the magnitude of the damage to macromolecular structures - DNA, RNA, protein, and membranes - but on the rates of macromolecular syntheses of cells relative to the half-lives of the damages. Cells possess a number of mechanisms for repairing damage to DNA. If the repair systems are rapid and error free, cells can tolerate much larger doses than if repair is slow or error prone. It is important to understand the effects of radiation and the repair of radiation damage because there exist reasonable amounts of epidemiological data that permits the construction of dose-response curves for humans. The shapes of such curves or the magnitude of the response will depend on repair. Radiation damage is emphasized because: (a) radiation dosimetry, with all its uncertainties for populations, is excellent compared to chemical dosimetry; (b) a number of cancer-prone diseases are known in which there are defects in DNA repair and radiation results in more chromosomal damage in cells from such individuals than in cells from normal individuals; (c) in some cases, specific radiation products in DNA have been correlated with biological effects, and (d) many chemical effects seem to mimic radiation effects. A further reason for emphasizing damage to DNA is the wealth of experimental evidence indicating that damages to DNA can be initiating events in carcinogenesis

  16. DNA Repair by Reversal of DNA Damage

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Chengqi; He, Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Endogenous and exogenous factors constantly challenge cellular DNA, generating cytotoxic and/or mutagenic DNA adducts. As a result, organisms have evolved different mechanisms to defend against the deleterious effects of DNA damage. Among these diverse repair pathways, direct DNA-repair systems provide cells with simple yet efficient solutions to reverse covalent DNA adducts. In this review, we focus on recent advances in the field of direct DNA repair, namely, photolyase-, alkyltransferase-,...

  17. Repairing of N-mustard derivative BO-1055 induced DNA damage requires NER, HR, and MGMT-dependent DNA repair mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ching-Ying; Chou, Wen-Cheng; Wu, Chin-Chung; Wong, Teng-Song; Kakadiya, Rajesh; Lee, Te-Chang; Su, Tsann-Long; Wang, Hui-Chun

    2015-09-22

    Alkylating agents are frequently used as first-line chemotherapeutics for various newly diagnosed cancers. Disruption of genome integrity by such agents can lead to cell lethality if DNA lesions are not removed. Several DNA repair mechanisms participate in the recovery of mono- or bi-functional DNA alkylation. Thus, DNA repair capacity is correlated with the therapeutic response. Here, we assessed the function of novel water-soluble N-mustard BO-1055 (ureidomustin) in DNA damage response and repair mechanisms. As expected, BO-1055 induces ATM and ATR-mediated DNA damage response cascades, including downstream Chk1/Chk2 phosphorylation, S/G2 cell-cycle arrest, and cell death. Further investigation revealed that cell survival sensitivity to BO-1055 is comparable to that of mitomycin C. Both compounds require nucleotide excision repair and homologous recombination, but not non-homologous end-joining, to repair conventional cross-linking DNA damage. Interestingly and unlike mitomycin C and melphalan, MGMT activity was also observed in BO-1055 damage repair systems, which reflects the occurrence of O-alkyl DNA lesions. Combined treatment with ATM/ATR kinase inhibitors significantly increases BO-1055 sensitivity. Our study pinpoints that BO-1055 can be used for treating tumors that with deficient NER, HR, and MGMT DNA repair genes, or for synergistic therapy in tumors that DNA damage response have been suppressed. PMID:26208482

  18. 49 CFR 1242.42 - Administration, repair and maintenance, machinery repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Administration, repair and maintenance, machinery repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired property, fringe benefits, other casualties and insurance... maintenance, machinery repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired property, fringe benefits,...

  19. DNA repair and replication fork helicases are differentially affected by alkyl phosphotriester lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhasini, Avvaru N; Sommers, Joshua A; Yu, Stephen; Wu, Yuliang; Xu, Ting; Kelman, Zvi; Kaplan, Daniel L; Brosh, Robert M

    2012-06-01

    DNA helicases are directly responsible for catalytically unwinding duplex DNA in an ATP-dependent and directionally specific manner and play essential roles in cellular nucleic acid metabolism. It has been conventionally thought that DNA helicases are inhibited by bulky covalent DNA adducts in a strand-specific manner. However, the effects of highly stable alkyl phosphotriester (PTE) lesions that are induced by chemical mutagens and refractory to DNA repair have not been previously studied for their effects on helicases. In this study, DNA repair and replication helicases were examined for unwinding a forked duplex DNA substrate harboring a single isopropyl PTE specifically positioned in the helicase-translocating or -nontranslocating strand within the double-stranded region. A comparison of SF2 helicases (RecQ, RECQ1, WRN, BLM, FANCJ, and ChlR1) with a SF1 DNA repair helicase (UvrD) and two replicative helicases (MCM and DnaB) demonstrates unique differences in the effect of the PTE on the DNA unwinding reactions catalyzed by these enzymes. All of the SF2 helicases tested were inhibited by the PTE lesion, whereas UvrD and the replication fork helicases were fully tolerant of the isopropyl backbone modification, irrespective of strand. Sequestration studies demonstrated that RECQ1 helicase was trapped by the PTE lesion only when it resided in the helicase-translocating strand. Our results are discussed in light of the current models for DNA unwinding by helicases that are likely to encounter sugar phosphate backbone damage during biological DNA transactions. PMID:22500020

  20. Radiation damage and its repair in non-sporulating bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is given of radiation damage and its repair in non-sporulating bacteria. The identification and measurement of radiation damage in the DNA of the bacteria after exposure to ultraviolet radiation and ionizing radiation is described. Measuring the extent of DNA repair and ways of isolating repair mutants are also described. The DNA repair mechanisms for UV-induced damage are discussed including photoreactivation repair, excision repair, post-replication recombination repair and induced error-prone repair. The DNA repair mechanisms for ionizing radiation damage are also discussed including the repair of both single and double-strand breaks. Other aspects discussed include the effects of growth, irradiation medium and recovery medium on survival, DNA repair in humans, the commercial use of UV and ionizing radiations and the future of ionizing irradiation as a food treatment process. (U.K.)

  1. A novel alkylating agent Melflufen induces irreversible DNA damage and cytotoxicity in multiple myeloma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Arghya; Ravillah, Durgadevi; Das, Deepika S; Song, Yan; Nordström, Eva; Gullbo, Joachim; Richardson, Paul G; Chauhan, Dharminder; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2016-08-01

    Our prior study utilized both in vitro and in vivo multiple myeloma (MM) xenograft models to show that a novel alkylator melphalan-flufenamide (Melflufen) is a more potent anti-MM agent than melphalan and overcomes conventional drug resistance. Here we examined whether this potent anti-MM activity of melflufen versus melphalan is due to their differential effect on DNA damage and repair signalling pathways via γ-H2AX/ATR/CHK1/Ku80. Melflufen-induced apoptosis was associated with dose- and time-dependent rapid phosphorylation of γ-H2AX. Melflufen induces γ-H2AX, ATR, and CHK1 as early as after 2 h exposure in both melphalan-sensitive and -resistant cells. However, melphalan induces γ-H2AX in melphalan-sensitive cells at 6 h and 24 h; no γ-H2AX induction was observed in melphalan-resistant cells even after 24 h exposure. Similar kinetics was observed for ATR and CHK1 in meflufen- versus melphalan-treated cells. DNA repair is linked to melphalan-resistance; and importantly, we found that melphalan, but not melflufen, upregulates Ku80 that repairs DNA double-strand breaks. Washout experiments showed that a brief (2 h) exposure of MM cells to melflufen is sufficient to initiate an irreversible DNA damage and cytotoxicity. Our data therefore suggest that melflufen triggers a rapid, robust, and an irreversible DNA damage which may account for its ability to overcome melphalan-resistance in MM cells. PMID:27098276

  2. Methyl phosphotriesters in alkylated DNA are repaired by the Ada regulatory protein of E. coli.

    OpenAIRE

    McCarthy, T.V.; Lindahl, T

    1985-01-01

    The E. coli ada+ gene product that controls the adaptive response to alkylating agents has been purified to apparent homogeneity using an overproducing expression vector system. This 39 kDa protein repairs 0(6)-methylguanine and 0(4)-methylthymine residues in alkylated DNA by transfer of the methyl group from the base to a cysteine residue in the protein itself. The Ada protein also corrects one of the stereoisomers of methyl phosphotriesters in DNA by the same mechanism, while the other isom...

  3. DNA repair modulates the vulnerability of the developing brain to alkylating agents

    OpenAIRE

    Kisby, G.E.; Olivas, A.; Park, T.; Churchwell, M.; Doerge, D; Samson, L. D.; Gerson, S L; Turker, M.S.

    2008-01-01

    Neurons of the developing brain are especially vulnerable to environmental agents that damage DNA (i.e., genotoxicants), but the mechanism is poorly understood. The focus of the present study is to demonstrate that DNA damage plays a key role in disrupting neurodevelopment. To examine this hypothesis, we compared the cytotoxic and DNA damaging properties of the methylating agents methylazoxymethanol (MAM) and dimethyl sulfate (DMS) and the mono- and bifunctional alkylating agents chloroethyla...

  4. Repair of DNA damage in mammalian cells after treatment with UV and dimethyl sulphate: discrimination between nucleotide and base excision repair by their temperature dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjertvik, M; Erixon, K; Ahnström, G

    1998-03-01

    Alkylating agents have been reported to give rise to both short and long patches of repair. The reason for the different patch sizes is not known. One possibility is that alkylating agents can trigger both base and nucleotide excision repair. Another possibility is that base excision repair itself can result in different patch sizes. Recognition and incision at lesions is the rate limiting step in excision repair. In order to discriminate between base and nucleotide excision repair it would be desirable to be able to distinguish between different incision activities. In order to accurately measure incision rates, the rejoining of the strand-breaks formed must be inhibited. We have used two inhibitors, aphidicolin and 3-aminobenzamide. Aphidicolin, an inhibitor of DNA polymerases alpha/delta/epsilon. caused accumulation of single-strand breaks both after UV and dimethylsulphate. 3-Aminobenzamide, an inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose)-polymerase caused accumulation of single-strand breaks only after alkylating agents and is thus specific for base excision repair. Enzymatic activities can be characterised by their activation energy. In order to discriminate between base and nucleotide excision repair the temperature dependence of incision activities was determined. When the temperature is decreased, the incision rate is reduced to a larger extent for UV than for DMS-induced repair. Incisions in UV-irradiated cells are practically cut off at temperatures of 15 degrees C and below, whereas DMS-exposed cells still are actively repairing at this temperature. In DMS treated cells the temperature dependence was the same whether aphidicolin or 3-aminobenzamide was used, speaking against an involvement of nucleotide excision repair. In addition, cell lines deficient in nucleotide excision repair responded in the same way to aphidicolin after DMS treatment as normal cells and were able to make incisions at 15 degrees C. This indicates that nucleotide excision repair is not to any

  5. Strengthening and repairing of damaged concrete beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main part in this investigation is concerned with the advanced techniques of retrofitting damaged reinforced concrete (RC) beams. Glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) were employed for this purpose. The aim of this paper is to investigate the advantage of using glass fiber .reinforced plastics (GFRP) to retrofit and repair damaged reinforced concrete beams. In this investigation, concrete beam specimens were preloaded up to the 60%, 70% arid 80% of their ultimate load capacity. The damaged beams were then repaired with one layer of FRP composite wraps and re-tested. Plastic reinforced by glass fibers 20% fiber volume fractions and with various fiber arrangement unidirectional, bi-directional and chopped were also considered. Four points bending test was adopted. The bending tests were performed on fourteen RC beams in addition to a two control, all of them were (225 30 15) cm in dimensions, and with a typical reinforcement details. Test results were indicative of the merit of using GFRP, as the ultimate loads were almost restored and the modes of failure were of ductile nature. Even more an increase in the ultimate bearing capacity was recorded for some of the retrofitted beams. The effects of the previously mentioned parameters on the cracking pattern and failure mode were reported and thoroughly discussed

  6. DNA repair by MGMT, but not AAG, causes a threshold in alkylation-induced colorectal carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrer, Jörg; Frisch, Janina; Nagel, Georg; Kraus, Alexander; Dörsam, Bastian; Thomas, Adam D; Reißig, Sonja; Waisman, Ari; Kaina, Bernd

    2015-10-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that N-nitroso compounds (NOC) are causally linked to colorectal cancer (CRC). NOC induce DNA alkylations, including O (6)-methylguanine (O (6)-MeG) and N-methylated purines, which are repaired by O (6)-MeG-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and N-alkyladenine-DNA glycosylase (AAG)-initiated base excision repair, respectively. In view of recent evidence of nonlinear mutagenicity for NOC-like compounds, the question arises as to the existence of threshold doses in CRC formation. Here, we set out to determine the impact of DNA repair on the dose-response of alkylation-induced CRC. DNA repair proficient (WT) and deficient (Mgmt (-/-), Aag (-/-) and Mgmt (-/-)/Aag (-/-)) mice were treated with azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sodium sulfate to trigger CRC. Tumors were quantified by non-invasive mini-endoscopy. A non-linear increase in CRC formation was observed in WT and Aag (-/-) mice. In contrast, a linear dose-dependent increase in tumor frequency was found in Mgmt (-/-) and Mgmt (-/-)/Aag (-/-) mice. The data were corroborated by hockey stick modeling, yielding similar carcinogenic thresholds for WT and Aag (-/-) and no threshold for MGMT lacking mice. O (6)-MeG levels and depletion of MGMT correlated well with the observed dose-response in CRC formation. AOM induced dose-dependently DNA double-strand breaks in colon crypts including Lgr5-positive colon stem cells, which coincided with ATR-Chk1-p53 signaling. Intriguingly, Mgmt (-/-) mice displayed significantly enhanced levels of γ-H2AX, suggesting the usefulness of γ-H2AX as an early genotoxicity marker in the colorectum. This study demonstrates for the first time a non-linear dose-response for alkylation-induced colorectal carcinogenesis and reveals DNA repair by MGMT, but not AAG, as a key node in determining a carcinogenic threshold. PMID:26243310

  7. Radiation-induced DNA damage and DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although DNA undergoes various types of damage from radiation, active oxygen, and the like, a living body has a plurality of DNA repair mechanisms responding to the types of DNA damage. On the other hand, there are a system that results in cell death if the repair is impossible and a mechanism to lead to concretization if further repair is not accurately made. This paper explains the following items as the basic researches on these types of DNA damage and the repair mechanisms: (1) biological effects of DNA damage, (2) effect of DNA damage on DNA synthesis, and (3) effects of DNA damage on cells. It also explains the effects of radiation on cells with a focus on specific mechanism for (1) DNA damage caused by direct action due to radiation and by indirect action due mainly to active oxygen, and (2) DNA repair mechanism that works on DNA double-strand break (DSB). (A.O.)

  8. Increasing DNA repair methyltransferase levels via bone marrow stem cell transduction rescues mice from the toxic effects of 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea, a chemotherapeutic alkylating agent.

    OpenAIRE

    R. Maze; Carney, J P; Kelley, M R; Glassner, B J; Williams, D.A.; Samson, L

    1996-01-01

    The chloroethylnitrosourea (CNU) alkylating agents are commonly used for cancer chemotherapy, but their usefulness is limited by severe bone marrow toxicity that causes the cumulative depletion of all hematopoietic lineages (pancytopenia). Bone marrow CNU sensitivity is probably due to the inefficient repair of CNU-induced DNA damage; relative to other tissues, bone marrow cells express extremely low levels of the O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) protein that repairs cytotoxic O6...

  9. DDB2 (Damaged DNA binding protein 2) in nucleotide excision repair and DNA damage response

    OpenAIRE

    Stoyanova, Tanya; Roy, Nilotpal; Kopanja, Dragana; Raychaudhuri, Pradip; Bagchi, Srilata

    2009-01-01

    DDB2 was identified as a protein involved in the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER), a major DNA repair mechanism that repairs UV damage to prevent accumulation of mutations and tumorigenesis. However, recent studies indicated additional functions of DDB2 in the DNA damage response pathway. Herein, we discuss the proposed mechanisms by which DDB2 activates NER and programmed cell death upon DNA damage through its E3 ligase activity.

  10. Investigation of DNA damage and repair mechanism using deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deninococcus Radiodurans, formerly known as Micrococcus Radiodurans, is a popular bacterium because of its high resistance to damage by carcinogens such as ionizing radiation (Dean et. al. 1966; Kitayama and Matsuyama 1968) and UV radiation (Gasvon et. al., 1995; Arrange et. al. 1993). In this report, we investigated the high resistance to ionizing radiation by this bacterium. The bacteria had been exposed from I to 5 kGy of gamma radiation and then incubated in TGY medium to study their ability to repair the broken DNA. The repair time was measured by Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) method. The repair time for each dose was determined. Also in order to ensure that the repair was perfect, the bacterium was subjected to a second exposure of ionizing radiation after it has fully repaired. It was found that the 'second' repair characteristic was similar to the first repair. This confirmed that the repair after the exposure to the ionizing radiation was perfect

  11. Repair of damaged DNA in vivo: Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This contract was initiated in 1962 with the US Atomic Energy Commission to carry out basic research on the effects of radiation on the process of DNA replication in bacteria. Within the first contract year we discovered repair replication at the same time that Setlow and Carrier discovered pyrimidine dimer excision. These discoveries led to the elucidation of the process of excision-repair, one of the most important mechanisms by which living systems, including humans, respond to structural damage in their genetic material. We improved methodology for distinguishing repair replication from semiconservative replication and instructed others in these techniques. Painter then was the first to demonstrate repair replication in ultraviolet irradiated human cells. He, in turn, instructed James Cleaver who discovered that skin fibroblasts from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum were defective in excision-repair. People with this genetic defect are extremely sensitive to sunlight and they develop carcinomas and melanomas of the skin with high frequency. The existence of this hereditary disease attests to the importance of DNA repair in man. We certainly could not survive in the normal ultraviolet flux from the sun if our DNA were not continuously monitored for damage and repaired. Other hereditary diseases such as ataxia telangiectasia, Cockayne's syndrome, Blooms syndrome and Fanconi's anemia also involve deficiencies in DNA damage processing. The field of DNA repair has developed rapidly as we have learned that most environmental chemical carcinogens as well as radiation produce repairable damage in DNA. 251 refs

  12. Repair of triplex-directed DNA alkylation by nucleotide excision repair

    OpenAIRE

    Ziemba, Amy; Derosier, L. Chris; Methvin, Russell; Song, Chun-Yan; Clary, Eric; Kahn, Wendy; Milesi, David; Gorn, Vladimir; Reed, Mike; Ebbinghaus, Scot

    2001-01-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) are being investigated as highly specific DNA binding agents to inhibit the expression of clinically relevant genes. So far, they have been shown to inhibit transcription from the HER-2/neu gene in vitro, whereas their use in vivo has been studied to a limited extent. This study uses a TFO–chlorambucil (chl) conjugate capable of forming site-specific covalent guanine adducts within the HER-2/neu promoter. We demonstrate that nucleotide excision repair (...

  13. Repair of ultraviolet irradiation damage in mouse neuroblasts cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was demonstrated, using hydroxyurea inhibition of DNA replication and CsCl density centrifugation, that excision repair occurs both in the differentiated state, and when cells have been restored to growing conditions. since the ability to remove photodamage is present, we postulated that sensitivity was due to failure to remove damage from critical regions of the genome or alternatively a deficiency in another mechanism of repair, such as post replication repair, which has been demonstrated in rodent cells. The first possibility was examined by comparing excision repair in pyrmidine tracts, in which preferential formation of dimers occurs at lower UV doses, and nontract regions. Excision repair was also determined in satellite and main band DNA. The results indicate that in the particular regions of the genome examined no preference for excision repair is detected. Post replication repair (i.e. the ability to elongate DNA which is synthesized in low molecular weight pieces after UV irradiation) was determined in growing and differentiated cells. The results show that postreplication repair is normal in differentiated cells which have entered the first S phase after serum return. since excision repair and postreplication repair appear to be normal it is possible that an additional repair process is involved or that some other cell function is irreversible damage. (author)

  14. Pipeline repair technology damage and repair assessment of pipelines with high residual stresses

    OpenAIRE

    Høie, Øyvind

    2015-01-01

    Today in the offshore industry, there are an increasing number of pipelines that require both maintenance and repair. A wide specter of research in pipeline repair technology is available. Damage to a pipeline could be a quite complex event to analyze, due to the many different combinations of internal pipe stresses and damage types. Standards, such as DNV and ASTM have experimental based assessment methods for evaluating many of these damage combinations, however, there are some of these met...

  15. Repair of gamma radiation-induced damage : Micrococcus radiophilus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gamma radiation survival curve of M. radiophilus exhibits an extensive shoulder followed by exponential kill, indicating the efficiency of this bacterium for repairing gamma radiation induced damage. It differs morphologically, biochemically and genetically from M. radiodurans. Examination of DNA strand breaks using sucrose density gradient revealed the cell's ability to repair double and single strand breaks. Studies with alkaline gradients suggest that the fast repair of single strand scissions in M. radiophilus cellular DNA may be instantaneous. (author)

  16. DNA damage and repair in human skin in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding the molecular and cellular origins of sunlight-induced skin cancers in man requires knowledge of the damages inflicted on human skin during sunlight exposure, as well as the ability of cells in skin to repair or circumvent such damage. Although repair has been studied extensively in procaryotic and eucaryotic cells - including human cells in culture - there are important differences between repair by human skin cells in culture and human skin in situ: quantitative differences in rates of repair, as well as qualitative differences, including the presence or absence of repair mechanisms. Quantitation of DNA damage and repair in human skin required the development of new approaches for measuring damage at low levels in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNA. The method allows for analysis of multiple samples and the resulting data should be related to behavior of the DNA molecules by analytic expressions. Furthermore, it should be possible to assay a variety of lesions using the same methodology. The development of new analysis methods, new technology, and new biochemical probes for the study of DNA damage and repair are described. 28 refs., 4 figs

  17. Immunocosmeceuticals: An emerging trend in repairing human hair damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthika Selvan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hair is one of the most important portions for beauty care and in recent years grooming and cosmetic treatment of hair has drastically risen. Substantially, it may deteriorate and weaken the hair by modification of keratin protein. This makes the hair dry, brittle and split vend occurs due to loss of hair strength and the damage further increases with cosmetic treatments. The various poor ingredients are being used for repairing which have extremely poor compatibility with hair. Now the hair care products can be introduced with an active ingredient comprising a yolk derived anti-hair antibody immunoglobin obtained from egg of chickens immunized with damaged hair as antigen. This immuno-cosmeceuticals can repair the hair damage and imparts flexibility and smoothness to the hair. These effects are not lost by the ordinary shampooing. This article focuses on the characteristic of human hair, its damaging processes and the effects of immuno-cosmeceuticals for repairing the hair damage.

  18. Human longevity and variation in DNA damage response and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debrabant, Birgit; Soerensen, Mette; Flachsbart, Friederike;

    2014-01-01

    others. Data were applied on 592 SNPs from 77 genes involved in nine sub-processes: DNA-damage response, base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, non-homologous end-joining, homologous recombinational repair (HRR), RecQ helicase activities (RECQ), telomere functioning...... and mitochondrial DNA processes. The study population was 1089 long-lived and 736 middle-aged Danes. A self-contained set-based test of all SNPs displayed association with longevity (P-value=9.9 × 10-5), supporting that the overall pathway could affect longevity. Investigation of the nine sub-processes using...

  19. Repair of DNA damage in light sensitive human skin diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horkay, I.; Varga, L.; Tam' asi P., Gundy, S.

    1978-12-01

    Repair of uv-light induced DNA damage and changes in the semiconservative DNA synthesis were studied by in vitro autoradiography in the skin of patients with lightdermatoses (polymorphous light eruption, porphyria cutanea tarda, erythropoietic protoporphyria) and xeroderma pigmentosum as well as in that of healthy controls. In polymorphous light eruption the semiconservative DNA replication rate was more intensive in the area of the skin lesions and in the repeated phototest site, the excision repair synthesis appeared to be unaltered. In cutaneous prophyrias a decreased rate of the repair incorporation could be detected. Xeroderma pigmentosum was characterized by a strongly reduced repair synthesis.

  20. The repair of sub-lethal damage and the stimulated repair of potentially lethal damage in Saintpaulia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenhouts, H P; Sijsma, M J; Litwiniszyn, M; Chadwick, K H

    1981-10-01

    The repair of sublethal and potentially lethal damage in stationary resting epidermal cells of Saintpaulia has been investigated. Fractionation experiments reveal an efficient repair of sublethal damage with a half-life of 1.9 hours. No repair of potentially lethal damage was noted when cultivation of the leaves was delayed for 24 hours after irradiation. At delay times of 2, 3 and 4 days some repair of potentially lethal damage has been found. A small pre-dose given 24 hours before a challenging dose improved the cells' chance to regenerate and the improvement has been shown to be compatible with an improved repair of potentially lethal damage induced by X-rays and fast neutrons. It hs been shown that the stimulated repair process takes 12 to 24 hours to develop, is dependent on the size of the pre-dose, has single-hit dose kinetics, and an r.b.e. of 1 for neutrons. With delayed cultivation of 2 days the stimulated repair process leads to an alteration in the shape of the regeneration (survival)-dose relationship which increases the low dose r.b.e. for neutrons from 10 to 35. PMID:6975252

  1. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage - Repair and Damage Assessment Supporting Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, B. W.; Bodine, J. B.; Dopker, B.; Finn, S. R.; Griess, K. H.; Hanson, C. T.; Harris, C. G.; Nelson, K. M.; Walker, T. H.; Kennedy, T. C.; Nahan, M. F.

    1997-01-01

    Under the NASA-sponsored contracts for Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) and Materials Development Omnibus Contract (MDOC), Boeing is studying the technologies associated with the application of composite materials to commercial transport fuselage structure. Included in the study is the incorporation of maintainability and repairability requirements of composite primary structure into the design. This contractor report describes activities performed to address maintenance issues in composite fuselage applications. A key aspect of the study was the development of a maintenance philosophy which included consideration of maintenance issues early in the design cycle, multiple repair options, and airline participation in design trades. Fuselage design evaluations considered trade-offs between structural weight, damage resistance/tolerance (repair frequency), and inspection burdens. Analysis methods were developed to assess structural residual strength in the presence of damage, and to evaluate repair design concepts. Repair designs were created with a focus on mechanically fastened concepts for skin/stringer structure and bonded concepts for sandwich structure. Both a large crown (skintstringer) and keel (sandwich) panel were repaired. A compression test of the keel panel indicated the demonstrated repairs recovered ultimate load capability. In conjunction with the design and manufacturing developments, inspection methods were investigated for their potential to evaluate damaged structure and verify the integrity of completed repairs.

  2. DNA damage and repair in human cells exposed to sunlight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cultured human cells were treated with direct sunlight under conditions which minimised the hypertonic, hyperthermic and fixative effects of solar radiation. Sunlight produced similar levels of DNA strand breaks as equitoxic 254 nm UV in two fibroblast strains and a melanoma cell line, but DNA repair synthesis and inhibition of semiconservative DNA synthesis and of DNA chain elongation were significantly less for sunlight-exposed cells. DNA breaks induced by sunlight were removed more rapidly. Thus, the repair of solar damage differs considerably from 254 nm UV repair. Glass-filtered sunlight (>320 nm) was not toxic to cells and did not induce repair synthesis but gave a low level of short-lived DNA breaks and some inhibition of DNA chain elongation; thymidine uptake was enhanced. Filtered sunlight slightly enhanced UV-induced repair synthesis and UV toxicity; photoreactivation of UV damage was not found. Attempts to transform human fibroblasts using sunlight, with or without phorbol ester, were unsuccessful. (author)

  3. Connecting the Dots: From DNA Damage and Repair to Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Mei-Ren; Li, Kaiyi; Lin, Shiaw-Yih; Hung, Wen-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian cells evolve a delicate system, the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway, to monitor genomic integrity and to prevent the damage from both endogenous end exogenous insults. Emerging evidence suggests that aberrant DDR and deficient DNA repair are strongly associated with cancer and aging. Our understanding of the core program of DDR has made tremendous progress in the past two decades. However, the long list of the molecules involved in the DDR and DNA repair continues to grow and the roles of the new "dots" are under intensive investigation. Here, we review the connection between DDR and DNA repair and aging and discuss the potential mechanisms by which deficient DNA repair triggers systemic effects to promote physiological or pathological aging. PMID:27164092

  4. Connecting the Dots: From DNA Damage and Repair to Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Ren Pan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian cells evolve a delicate system, the DNA damage response (DDR pathway, to monitor genomic integrity and to prevent the damage from both endogenous end exogenous insults. Emerging evidence suggests that aberrant DDR and deficient DNA repair are strongly associated with cancer and aging. Our understanding of the core program of DDR has made tremendous progress in the past two decades. However, the long list of the molecules involved in the DDR and DNA repair continues to grow and the roles of the new “dots” are under intensive investigation. Here, we review the connection between DDR and DNA repair and aging and discuss the potential mechanisms by which deficient DNA repair triggers systemic effects to promote physiological or pathological aging.

  5. Targeting DNA Damage and Repair by Curcumin

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Zhenyu

    2010-01-01

    Curcumin is a compound with anti-tumor effects in a tolerable dose. A recent paper by Rowe et al described that curcumin induced DNA damage in triple negative breast cancer cells and regulated BRCA1 protein expression and modification.1 Related research and potential use of curcumin will be discussed in this article.

  6. Damage-repair processes in thermal neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiobiological specificity of thermal neutron capture therapy was examined using cultured cell lines of B16 mouse melanoma cells and of V79 Chinese hamster cells, with particular reference to the recovery from sublethal radiation damage (SLD) and potentially lethal radiation damage (PLD). A boron compound used was 10B1-para-boronophenylalanine (10B1-BPA). Cell survival curves of B16 melanoma cells irradiated with thermal neutrons alone had no shoulders. Cells treated with 10B1-BPA followed by thermal neutron irradiation showed remarkably enhanced killing in proportion to the concentration of 10B1-BPA. Neither B16 cells nor V79 cells possessed the ability to repair SLD. The B16 cells possessed little ability to repair 10B1-BPA plus thermal neutrons-induced PLD. Some cells possessed the ability to sequentially repair PLD when caffeine was added to the cell medium during irradiation. B16 cells efficiently repaired x ray-induced slow type PLD, but could not repair thermal neutron-induced PLD or 10B1-BPA plus thermal neutron-induced PLD. V79 cells possessed a greater ability to repair both x ray-induced PLD and thermal neutron-induced PLD than B16 melanoma cells. (Namekawa, K.)

  7. Biomarkers of oxidative damage to DNA and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loft, Steffen; Høgh Danielsen, Pernille; Mikkelsen, Lone; Risom, Lotte; Forchhammer, Lykke; Møller, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Oxidative-stress-induced damage to DNA includes a multitude of lesions, many of which are mutagenic and have multiple roles in cancer and aging. Many lesions have been characterized by MS-based methods after extraction and digestion of DNA. These preparation steps may cause spurious base oxidation, which is less likely to occur with methods such as the comet assay, which are based on nicking of the DNA strand at modified bases, but offer less specificity. The European Standards Committee on Oxidative DNA Damage has concluded that the true levels of the most widely studied lesion, 8-oxodG (8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine), in cellular DNA is between 0.5 and 5 lesions per 10(6) dG bases. Base excision repair of oxidative damage to DNA can be assessed by nicking assays based on oligonucleotides with lesions or the comet assay, by mRNA expression levels or, in the case of, e.g., OGG1 (8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1), responsible for repair of 8-oxodG, by genotyping. Products of repair in DNA or the nucleotide pool, such as 8-oxodG, excreted into the urine can be assessed by MS-based methods and generally reflects the rate of damage. Experimental and population-based studies indicate that many environmental factors, including particulate air pollution, cause oxidative damage to DNA, whereas diets rich in fruit and vegetables or antioxidant supplements may reduce the levels and enhance repair. Urinary excretion of 8-oxodG, genotype and expression of OGG1 have been associated with risk of cancer in cohort settings, whereas altered levels of damage, repair or urinary excretion in case-control settings may be a consequence rather than the cause of the disease. PMID:18793191

  8. p53 in the DNA-Damage-Repair Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ashley B; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    The cells in the human body are continuously challenged by a variety of genotoxic attacks. Erroneous repair of the DNA can lead to mutations and chromosomal aberrations that can alter the functions of tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes, thus causing cancer development. As a central tumor suppressor, p53 guards the genome by orchestrating a variety of DNA-damage-response (DDR) mechanisms. Already early in metazoan evolution, p53 started controlling the apoptotic demise of genomically compromised cells. p53 plays a prominent role as a facilitator of DNA repair by halting the cell cycle to allow time for the repair machineries to restore genome stability. In addition, p53 took on diverse roles to also directly impact the activity of various DNA-repair systems. It thus appears as if p53 is multitasking in providing protection from cancer development by maintaining genome stability. PMID:27048304

  9. Fission yeast mating-type switching: programmed damage and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egel, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Mating-type switching in fission yeast follows similar rules as in budding yeast, but the underlying mechanisms are entirely different. Whilst the initiating double-strand cut in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires recombinational repair for survival, the initial damage in Schizosaccharomyces pombe...

  10. UV Radiation Damage and Bacterial DNA Repair Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zion, Michal; Guy, Daniel; Yarom, Ruth; Slesak, Michaela

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on a simple hands-on laboratory procedure for high school students in studying both radiation damage and DNA repair systems in bacteria. The sensitivity to ultra-violet (UV) radiation of both "Escherichia coli" and "Serratia marcescens" is tested by radiating them for varying time periods. Two growth temperatures are used in…

  11. Repair of DNA damage induced by ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies documenting the depletion of the ozone layer and the resulting increases in UV-B radiation (280-320 nm) at the Earth's surface have served to focus attention on the biological effects of UV light. One obvious target for UVB- induced damage is DNA. Although a11 biological tissues are rich in UV-absorbing agents (largely nucleic acids and proteins) and plants produce additional UV-absorbing pigments, no DNA in superficial tissue can completely avoid UV exposure. Plants, like a11 living organisms, must have some capacity for the repair of UV-induced DNA damage. Because plants are unique in the obligatory nature of their exposure to UV, it is also conceivable that they may have evolved particularly efficient mechanisms for the elimination of UV-induced DNA damage. This review will summarize what we know about DNA repair mechanisms in higher plants. Readers interested in broader aspects of UV-induced damage and UV filters are directed to recent reviews (Middleton and Teramura, 1994; Strid et al., 1994; Fiscus and Booker, 1995). Our knowledge of DNA repair mechanisms in plants lags far behind our understanding of these pathways in animals, and a significant number of questions concerning the basic phenomenology of DNA repair in plants remain to be addressed

  12. DNA damage and repair in age-related macular degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szaflik, Jacek P. [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Warsaw and Samodzielny Publiczny Szpital Okulistyczny, Sierakowskiego 13, 03-710 Warsaw (Poland); Janik-Papis, Katarzyna; Synowiec, Ewelina; Ksiazek, Dominika [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland); Zaras, Magdalena [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Warsaw and Samodzielny Publiczny Szpital Okulistyczny, Sierakowskiego 13, 03-710 Warsaw (Poland); Wozniak, Katarzyna [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland); Szaflik, Jerzy [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Warsaw and Samodzielny Publiczny Szpital Okulistyczny, Sierakowskiego 13, 03-710 Warsaw (Poland); Blasiak, Janusz, E-mail: januszb@biol.uni.lodz.pl [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland)

    2009-10-02

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a retinal degenerative disease that is the main cause of vision loss in individuals over the age of 55 in the Western world. Clinically relevant AMD results from damage to the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells thought to be mainly caused by oxidative stress. The stress also affects the DNA of RPE cells, which promotes genome instability in these cells. These effects may coincide with the decrease in the efficacy of DNA repair with age. Therefore individuals with DNA repair impaired more than average for a given age may be more susceptible to AMD if oxidative stress affects their RPE cells. This may be helpful in AMD risk assessment. In the present work we determined the level of basal (measured in the alkaline comet assay) endogenous and endogenous oxidative DNA damage, the susceptibility to exogenous mutagens and the efficacy of DNA repair in lymphocytes of 100 AMD patients and 110 age-matched individuals without visual disturbances. The cells taken from AMD patients displayed a higher extent of basal endogenous DNA damage without differences between patients of dry and wet forms of the disease. DNA double-strand breaks did not contribute to the observed DNA damage as checked by the neutral comet assay and pulsed field gel electrophoresis. The extent of oxidative modification to DNA bases was grater in AMD patients than in the controls, as probed by DNA repair enzymes NTH1 and Fpg. Lymphocytes from AMD patients displayed a higher sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and UV radiation and repaired lesions induced by these factors less effectively than the cells from the control individuals. We postulate that the impaired efficacy of DNA repair may combine with enhanced sensitivity of RPE cells to blue and UV lights, contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD.

  13. DNA damage and repair in age-related macular degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a retinal degenerative disease that is the main cause of vision loss in individuals over the age of 55 in the Western world. Clinically relevant AMD results from damage to the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells thought to be mainly caused by oxidative stress. The stress also affects the DNA of RPE cells, which promotes genome instability in these cells. These effects may coincide with the decrease in the efficacy of DNA repair with age. Therefore individuals with DNA repair impaired more than average for a given age may be more susceptible to AMD if oxidative stress affects their RPE cells. This may be helpful in AMD risk assessment. In the present work we determined the level of basal (measured in the alkaline comet assay) endogenous and endogenous oxidative DNA damage, the susceptibility to exogenous mutagens and the efficacy of DNA repair in lymphocytes of 100 AMD patients and 110 age-matched individuals without visual disturbances. The cells taken from AMD patients displayed a higher extent of basal endogenous DNA damage without differences between patients of dry and wet forms of the disease. DNA double-strand breaks did not contribute to the observed DNA damage as checked by the neutral comet assay and pulsed field gel electrophoresis. The extent of oxidative modification to DNA bases was grater in AMD patients than in the controls, as probed by DNA repair enzymes NTH1 and Fpg. Lymphocytes from AMD patients displayed a higher sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and UV radiation and repaired lesions induced by these factors less effectively than the cells from the control individuals. We postulate that the impaired efficacy of DNA repair may combine with enhanced sensitivity of RPE cells to blue and UV lights, contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD.

  14. Genetics of repair of radiation damage to DNA in bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this project is to study the consequences to bacterial DNA of damage by radiation and chemical agents. By correlating the extent of physical and biological damage to DNA, as expressed in various mutants defective in specific DNA repair pathways, we hope to determine mechanisms of biological inactivation of DNA and ways in which the damage can be repaired. We have measured physical damage to DNA in Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli by use of alkaline sucrose gradient centrifugation, which indicates the distance between breaks or alkali-labile lesions in single strands of DNA. Biological damage is measured by loss of viability or by loss of transforming activity in treated DNA from B. subtilis, and by the production of sites for DNA repair synthesis by DNA polymerase I (Pol I) in toluene-treated E. coli. We have investigated effects of ultraviolet light (both far-uv and near-uv), ionizing radiation, and selected chemical agents, in the presence or absence of sensitizing or protective agents. A major goal was to characterize DNA repair processes in vivo in B. subtilis. A number of radiation-sensitive mutants were studied, with the result that we have learned a great many details about the repair of DNA in uv-irradiated cells: We have now also studied the induction of methyltransferase in B. subtilis exposed to low concentrations of N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). In collaboration with Sankar Mitra and R.S. Foote (Biology Division), we have shown that the basal level of methyltransferase in B. subtilis is about ten-fold higher than in E. coli and that there is about a ten-fold increase during adaptation. Our future studies will focus on the radioprotective effects of alcohols that act as OH radical scavengers but also react to irradiation by the formation of a radical on the carbon alpha to the hydroxyl

  15. Monitoring damage development in composite repairs using chirped fibre Bragg grating sensors.

    OpenAIRE

    Rito, Rodolfo N.L.

    2015-01-01

    Composite repairs are often used for damaged structures in order to recover the mechanical properties of the original structure. During service, there is the possibility that damage will occur in the repaired region and hence it would be useful to be able to monitor such repairs. This research investigates the use of chirped fibre Bragg grating (CFBG) sensors to monitor the development of fatigue damage initiation and growth in the repaired region of three different repair systems, i.e. glass...

  16. Research progress of DNA damage and repair in Candida albicans%白念珠菌DNA损伤与修复

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李星星; 阎澜; 姜远英

    2011-01-01

    内外环境中各种因素如电离辐射、紫外辐射、氧化剂、烷化荆等都可以造成白念珠菌DNA的损伤.如果DNA的损伤得不到有效的修复,便会造成突变.白念珠菌的突变率很高,但并不是所有DNA受损伤的细胞都会表现出突变型性状,这跟其自身的修复系统有很大关系,主要包括切除修复、错配修复及双链断裂修复等途径,使得绝大多数损伤能够及时修复,从而维持DNA的完整性与稳定性.白念珠菌DNA的损伤修复可能影响其适应性、药物敏感性等表型,从而给临床感染患者的治疗增加难度.本文主要从白念珠菌DNA损伤的产生,损伤信号的传导识别及损伤修复三方面综述目前的研究进展.%There are so many internal and external environmental factors that could cause DNA damage in Candida albicans, such as ionizing radiation, ultraviolet radiation, oxidants, alkylating agent, and so on. It would result in mutations if DNA damages are not repaired effectively. Although the mutation rate is high in C. albicans, not all DNA-damaged cells show the mutant trait, which depends on their own repair system. The repair system, including excision repair, mismatch repair, double strand break repair and other pathways,enables most damages to be repaired in time in order to maintain the integrity and stability of DNA. DNA damage and repair system in C. albicans would affect its adaptability, drug sensitivity and other phenotypes, which increase the difficulty of clinical treatment of infections. This review summarizes the research progress about the cause of DNA damage, identification of the damage signal transduction and damage repairs in C. albicans.

  17. Homologous recombination in DNA repair and DNA damage tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuan Li; Wolf-Dietrich Heyer

    2008-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) comprises a series of interrelated pathways that function in the repair of DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) and interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). In addition, recombination provides critical sup-port for DNA replication in the recovery of stalled or broken replication forks, contributing to tolerance of DNA damage. A central core of proteins, most critically the RecA homolog Rad51, catalyzes the key reactions that typify HR: homology search and DNA strand invasion. The diverse functions of recombination are reflected in the need for context-specific factors that perform supplemental functions in conjunction with the core proteins. The inability to properly repair complex DNA damage and resolve DNA replication stress leads to genomic instability and contributes to cancer etiology. Mutations in the BRCA2 recombination gene cause predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer as well as Fanconi anemia, a cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by a defect in the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks. The cellular functions of recombination are also germane to DNA-based treatment modaUties of cancer, which target replicating cells by the direct or indirect induction of DNA lesions that are substrates for recombination pathways. This review focuses on mechanistic aspects of HR relating to DSB and ICL repair as well as replication fork support.

  18. Characterization of oxidative guanine damage and repair in mammalian telomeres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhilong Wang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG and 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyG are among the most common oxidative DNA lesions and are substrates for 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1-initiated DNA base excision repair (BER. Mammalian telomeres consist of triple guanine repeats and are subject to oxidative guanine damage. Here, we investigated the impact of oxidative guanine damage and its repair by OGG1 on telomere integrity in mice. The mouse cells were analyzed for telomere integrity by telomere quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (telomere-FISH, by chromosome orientation-FISH (CO-FISH, and by indirect immunofluorescence in combination with telomere-FISH and for oxidative base lesions by Fpg-incision/Southern blot assay. In comparison to the wild type, telomere lengthening was observed in Ogg1 null (Ogg1(-/- mouse tissues and primary embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs cultivated in hypoxia condition (3% oxygen, whereas telomere shortening was detected in Ogg1(-/- mouse hematopoietic cells and primary MEFs cultivated in normoxia condition (20% oxygen or in the presence of an oxidant. In addition, telomere length abnormalities were accompanied by altered telomere sister chromatid exchanges, increased telomere single- and double-strand breaks, and preferential telomere lagging- or G-strand losses in Ogg1(-/- mouse cells. Oxidative guanine lesions were increased in telomeres in Ogg1(-/- mice with aging and primary MEFs cultivated in 20% oxygen. Furthermore, oxidative guanine lesions persisted at high level in Ogg1(-/- MEFs after acute exposure to hydrogen peroxide, while they rapidly returned to basal level in wild-type MEFs. These findings indicate that oxidative guanine damage can arise in telomeres where it affects length homeostasis, recombination, DNA replication, and DNA breakage repair. Our studies demonstrate that BER pathway is required in repairing oxidative guanine damage in telomeres and maintaining telomere integrity

  19. Repair and protection of concrete structures damaged by reinforcement corrosion

    OpenAIRE

    Likar, Andrej

    2006-01-01

    The present work is focused on repair of concrete structures damaged by reinforcement corrosion. First part describes properties of primary components in concrete (cement, water, aggregate). Further are described mechanical properties of concrete and reinforcement and their compatibility. Second part introduces kinds of processes which causes corrosion of reinforcement in concrete. There are two emphasized chemical processes which cause corrosion of reinforcement, carbonation and chloride dif...

  20. Staged surgical repair for extensive cardiovascular damage by syphilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Toshiro; Yagi, Takeshi; Murakami, Masanori; Jinbo, Mitsutaka; Saito, Satoshi; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Yamada, Takahiro; Kunichika, Hideki; Gohra, Hidenori

    2011-10-01

    A 45-year-old man had aortic regurgitation with a syphilitic true aneurysm of the ascending to transverse arch aorta and a descending aortic aneurysm from chronic Stanford type B aortic dissection. After antibiotic therapy, two-staged surgical repair was performed and there has been no evidence of recurrence in 12 months since the second stage. We describe the successful management of extensive cardiovascular syphilitic damage. PMID:21958803

  1. Immunocosmeceuticals: An emerging trend in repairing human hair damage

    OpenAIRE

    Karthika Selvan; Sentila Rajan; T Suganya; G Parameshwari; Michael Antonysamy

    2013-01-01

    Hair is one of the most important portions for beauty care and in recent years grooming and cosmetic treatment of hair has drastically risen. Substantially, it may deteriorate and weaken the hair by modification of keratin protein. This makes the hair dry, brittle and split vend occurs due to loss of hair strength and the damage further increases with cosmetic treatments. The various poor ingredients are being used for repairing which have extremely poor compatibility with hair. Now the hair ...

  2. Simulated microgravity influenced the expression of DNA damage repair genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Jiawei, Liu; Wang, Ting

    2016-07-01

    Ionizing radiation and microgravity were considered to be the most important stress factors of space environmental the respective study of the biological effects of the radiation and microgravity carried out earlier, but the interaction of the effects of radiation with microgravity started later, and due to difference of the materials and methods the result of this experiment were not consistent. To further investigate the influence of microgravity on the expression of the radiation damage repair genes, the seed of Arabidopsis (Col) and its gravity-insensitive mutant (PIN2) were exposed to 0.1Gy of the dose of energetic carbon-ion beam radiation (LET = 30KeV / μm), and the germinated seed were than fixed in the 3D random positioning apparatus immediately for a 10-day simulated microgravity. By measuring the deflection angle of root tip and the changes of the expression of Ku70 and RAD51 protein, we investigated the impact of microgravity effect on radiation damage repair systems. The results shown that radiation, microgravity and microgravity with radiation could increase the angle of the root of the Col significantly, but no obvious effect on PIN2 type. The radiation could increase the expression of Ku70 significantly in both Col and PIN2, microgravity does not affect the expression, but the microgravity with radiation could decrease the expression of Ku70. This result shown that the microgravity could influence the radiation damage repair systems in molecular level. Moreover, our findings were important to understand the molecular mechanism of the impact of microgravity effect on radiation damage repair systems in vivo.

  3. Biomarkers of oxidative damage to DNA and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Steffen; Høgh Danielsen, Pernille; Mikkelsen, Lone;

    2008-01-01

    Oxidative-stress-induced damage to DNA includes a multitude of lesions, many of which are mutagenic and have multiple roles in cancer and aging. Many lesions have been characterized by MS-based methods after extraction and digestion of DNA. These preparation steps may cause spurious base oxidation...... environmental factors, including particulate air pollution, cause oxidative damage to DNA, whereas diets rich in fruit and vegetables or antioxidant supplements may reduce the levels and enhance repair. Urinary excretion of 8-oxodG, genotype and expression of OGG1 have been associated with risk of cancer in......, which is less likely to occur with methods such as the comet assay, which are based on nicking of the DNA strand at modified bases, but offer less specificity. The European Standards Committee on Oxidative DNA Damage has concluded that the true levels of the most widely studied lesion, 8-oxodG (8-oxo-7...

  4. DNA polymerase III requirement for repair of DNA damage caused by methyl methanesulfonate and hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pcbA1 mutation allows DNA replication dependent on DNA polymerase I at the restrictive temperature in polC(Ts) strains. Cells which carry pcbA1, a functional DNA polymerase I, and a temperature-sensitive DNA polymerase III gene were used to study the role of DNA polymerase III in DNA repair. At the restrictive temperature for DNA polymerase III, these strains were more sensitive to the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and hydrogen peroxide than normal cells. The same strains showed no increase in sensitivity to bleomycin, UV light, or psoralen at the restrictive temperature. The sensitivity of these strains to MMS and hydrogen peroxide was not due to the pcbAl allele, and normal sensitivity was restored by the introduction of a chromosomal or cloned DNA polymerase III gene, verifying that the sensitivity was due to loss of DNA polymerase III alpha-subunit activity. A functional DNA polymerase III is required for the reformation of high-molecular-weight DNA after treatment of cells with MMS or hydrogen peroxide, as demonstrated by alkaline sucrose sedimentation results. Thus, it appears that a functional DNA polymerase III is required for the optimal repair of DNA damage by MMS or hydrogen peroxide

  5. DNA damage and repair in Stylonychia lemnae (Ciliata, Protozoa)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation with X rays, UV irradiation after incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BU) into the DNA, and cis-platinum (cis-Pt) treatment each cause the loss of micronuclei of Stylonychia lemnae while the macronuclei are not severely affected. The abilities of both nuclei to repair DNA were investigated. Unscheduled DNA synthesis could not be demonstrated after X-ray irradiation, but it was found after treatment with BU/UV and cis-Pt in macro- and micronuclei. The extent of the repair process in the micro- and macronuclei was alike, as indicated by grain counts of [6-3H]thymidine-treated cells. One reason for the different sensitivity of both nuclei to DNA-damaging treatment may be the different number of gene copies in the macro- and micronuclei

  6. Chk2-dependent phosphorylation of XRCC1 in the DNA damage response promotes base excision repair

    OpenAIRE

    Chou, Wen-Cheng; Wang, Hui-Chun; Wong, Fen-Hwa; Ding, Shian-ling; Wu, Pei-Ei; Shieh, Sheau-Yann; Shen, Chen-Yang

    2008-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) has an essential function in maintaining genomic stability. Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)-checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2) and ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR)-Chk1, triggered, respectively, by DNA double-strand breaks and blocked replication forks, are two major DDRs processing structurally complicated DNA damage. In contrast, damage repaired by base excision repair (BER) is structurally simple, but whether, and how, the DDR is involved in repairing this damage is un...

  7. Simulation of Self-Repair Process of Steels Damaged by Creep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toi, Yutaka; Hirose, Satoshi

    The continuum damage mechanics is extended to cover the self-repair process as well as the damage process. The repair variable and its evolution equation are newly introduced to consider the repair process. In the constitutive modeling, the equation of creep based on kinematic/isotropic hardening theory is extended to take the effect of damage into account. The evolution equation of a repair variable is proposed, based on Dyson's equation of creep cavity growth. The validity of the proposed modeling is illustrated through the simulations for the self-repair process of two kinds of steels damaged by creep.

  8. Pathophysiology of Bronchoconstriction: Role of Oxidatively Damaged DNA Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacsi, Attila; Pan, Lang; Ba, Xueqing; Boldogh, Istvan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide an overview on the present understanding of roles of oxidative DNA damage repair in cell signaling underlying bronchoconstriction common to, but not restricted to various forms of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Recent findings Bronchoconstriction is a tightening of smooth muscle surrounding the bronchi and bronchioles with consequent wheezing and shortness of breath. Key stimuli include air pollutants, viral infections, allergens, thermal and osmotic changes, and shear stress of mucosal epithelium, triggering a wide range of cellular, vascular and neural events. Although activation of nerve fibers, the role of G-proteins, protein kinases and Ca++, and molecular interaction within contracting filaments of muscle are well defined, the overarching mechanisms by which a wide range of stimuli initiate these events are not fully understood. Many, if not all, stimuli increase levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are signaling and oxidatively modifying macromolecules, including DNA. The primary ROS target in DNA is guanine, and 8-oxoguanine is one of the most abundant base lesions. It is repaired by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase1 (OGG1) during base excision repair processes. The product, free 8-oxoG base, is bound by OGG1 with high affinity, and the complex then functions as an activator of small GTPases, triggering pathways for inducing gene expression and contraction of intracellular filaments in mast and smooth muscle cells. Summary Oxidative DNA damage repair-mediated cell activation signaling result in gene expression that “primes” the mucosal epithelium and submucosal tissues to generate mediators of airway smooth muscle contractions. PMID:26694039

  9. Extra lethal damage due to residual incompletely repaired sublethal damage in hyperfractionated and continuous radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the conventional linear--quadratic model of single-dose response, the α and β terms reflect lethal damage created during the delivery of a dose, from two different presumed molecular processes, one linear with dose, the other quadratic. With the conventional one-fraction-per-day (or less) regimens, the sublethal damage (SLD), presumably repairing exponentially over time, is essentially completely fixed by the time of the next dose of radiation. If this assumption is true, the effects of subsequent fractions of radiation should be independent, that is, there should be little, if any, reversible damage left from previous fractions, at the time of the next dose. For multiple daily fractions, or for the limiting case, continuous radiation, this simplification may overlook damaged cells that have had insufficient time for repair. A generalized method is presented for accounting for extra lethal damage (ELD) arising from such residual SLD for hyperfractionation and continuous irradiation schemes. It may help to predict differences in toxicity and tumor control, if any, obtained with ''unconventional'' treatment regimens. A key element in the present model is the finite size and the dynamic character of the pool of sublethal damage. Besides creating the usual linear and quadratic components of lethal damage, each new fraction converts a certain fraction of the existing SLD into ELD, and creates some new SLD

  10. Extra lethal damage due to residual incompletely repaired sublethal damage in hyperfractionated and continuous radiation treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.; van de Geijn, J.; Goffman, T. (ROB, DCT, NCI, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (US))

    1991-05-01

    In the conventional linear--quadratic model of single-dose response, the {alpha} and {beta} terms reflect lethal damage created {ital during} the delivery of a dose, from two different presumed molecular processes, one linear with dose, the other quadratic. With the conventional one-fraction-per-day (or less) regimens, the sublethal damage (SLD), presumably repairing exponentially over time, is essentially completely fixed by the time of the next dose of radiation. If this assumption is true, the effects of subsequent fractions of radiation should be independent, that is, there should be little, if any, reversible damage left from previous fractions, at the time of the next dose. For multiple daily fractions, or for the limiting case, continuous radiation, this simplification may overlook damaged cells that have had insufficient time for repair. A generalized method is presented for accounting for extra lethal damage (ELD) arising from such residual SLD for hyperfractionation and continuous irradiation schemes. It may help to predict differences in toxicity and tumor control, if any, obtained with unconventional'' treatment regimens. A key element in the present model is the finite size and the dynamic character of the pool of sublethal damage. Besides creating the usual linear and quadratic components of lethal damage, each new fraction converts a certain fraction of the existing SLD into ELD, and creates some new SLD.

  11. Blade reliability collaborative : collection of defect, damage and repair data.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashwill, Thomas D.; Ogilvie, Alistair B.; Paquette, Joshua A.

    2013-04-01

    The Blade Reliability Collaborative (BRC) was started by the Wind Energy Technologies Department of Sandia National Laboratories and DOE in 2010 with the goal of gaining insight into planned and unplanned O&M issues associated with wind turbine blades. A significant part of BRC is the Blade Defect, Damage and Repair Survey task, which will gather data from blade manufacturers, service companies, operators and prior studies to determine details about the largest sources of blade unreliability. This report summarizes the initial findings from this work.

  12. DNA Mismatch Repair and Oxidative DNA Damage: Implications for Cancer Biology and Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many components of the cell, including lipids, proteins and both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, are vulnerable to deleterious modifications caused by reactive oxygen species. If not repaired, oxidative DNA damage can lead to disease-causing mutations, such as in cancer. Base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair are the two DNA repair pathways believed to orchestrate the removal of oxidative lesions. However, recent findings suggest that the mismatch repair pathway may also be important for the response to oxidative DNA damage. This is particularly relevant in cancer where mismatch repair genes are frequently mutated or epigenetically silenced. In this review we explore how the regulation of oxidative DNA damage by mismatch repair proteins may impact on carcinogenesis. We discuss recent studies that identify potential new treatments for mismatch repair deficient tumours, which exploit this non-canonical role of mismatch repair using synthetic lethal targeting

  13. DNA Mismatch Repair and Oxidative DNA Damage: Implications for Cancer Biology and Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridge, Gemma; Rashid, Sukaina; Martin, Sarah A., E-mail: sarah.martin@qmul.ac.uk [Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-05

    Many components of the cell, including lipids, proteins and both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, are vulnerable to deleterious modifications caused by reactive oxygen species. If not repaired, oxidative DNA damage can lead to disease-causing mutations, such as in cancer. Base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair are the two DNA repair pathways believed to orchestrate the removal of oxidative lesions. However, recent findings suggest that the mismatch repair pathway may also be important for the response to oxidative DNA damage. This is particularly relevant in cancer where mismatch repair genes are frequently mutated or epigenetically silenced. In this review we explore how the regulation of oxidative DNA damage by mismatch repair proteins may impact on carcinogenesis. We discuss recent studies that identify potential new treatments for mismatch repair deficient tumours, which exploit this non-canonical role of mismatch repair using synthetic lethal targeting.

  14. Pattern Learning, Damage and Repair within Biological Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Theodore; Fitzgerald O'Neill, Kate; Shinbrot, Troy

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes damage to neural networks, potentially leading to disability or even death. Nearly one in ten of these patients die, and most of the remainder suffer from symptoms ranging from headaches and nausea to convulsions and paralysis. In vitro studies to develop treatments for TBI have limited in vivo applicability, and in vitro therapies have even proven to worsen the outcome of TBI patients. We propose that this disconnect between in vitro and in vivo outcomes may be associated with the fact that in vitro tests assess indirect measures of neuronal health, but do not investigate the actual function of neuronal networks. Therefore in this talk, we examine both in vitro and in silico neuronal networks that actually perform a function: pattern identification. We allow the networks to execute genetic, Hebbian, learning, and additionally, we examine the effects of damage and subsequent repair within our networks. We show that the length of repaired connections affects the overall pattern learning performance of the network and we propose therapies that may improve function following TBI in clinical settings.

  15. Recombinant human erythropoietin for repair of white matter damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhou; Xiao Rong; Li Tao; Weineng Lu

    2011-01-01

    Erythropoietin has been shown to exhibit neuroprotective effects in animal models. A neonatal rat model of hypoxic-ischemic white matter damage was established via bilateral carotid artery ligation in 4-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were subsequently treated with recombinant human erythropoietin to observe pathological changes in the brain and long-term neurobehavioral functions before and after intervention. Results showed that the number of myelin basic protein-positive cells, which reflected myelin/oligodendrocyte damage, significantly increased, although the number of amyloid precursor protein-positive cells, which reflected axonal injury, significantly decreased in periventricular white matter at 72 hours and 7 days following erythropoietin intervention. The number of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive cells, indicating astrocytic damage, significantly decreased in periventricular white matter of erythropoietin-treated rats at 48 hours, 72 hours, 7 days, and 26 days. Following erythropoietin intervention in the 30-day-old rats, head-turning time in the slope test was shortened and open-field test scores increased. These results suggested that erythropoietin promoted repair of white matter damage, as well as improved neurobehavioral functions in a rat model of hypoxic-ischemic injury.

  16. Repair of UV-damaged incoming plasmid DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A whole-cell transformation assay was used for the repair of UV-damaged plasma DNA in highly-transformable haploid strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae having different repair capabilities. The experiments described demonstrate that three epistasis groups (Friedberg 1988) are involved in the repair of UV-incoming DNA and that the repair processes act less efficiently on incoming DNA than they do on chromosomal DNA. The implications of these findings for UV repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are discussed. (author)

  17. International congress on DNA damage and repair: Book of abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    This document contains the abstracts of 105 papers presented at the Congress. Topics covered include the Escherichia coli nucleotide excision repair system, DNA repair in malignant transformations, defective DNA repair, and gene regulation. (TEM)

  18. International congress on DNA damage and repair: Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains the abstracts of 105 papers presented at the Congress. Topics covered include the Escherichia coli nucleotide excision repair system, DNA repair in malignant transformations, defective DNA repair, and gene regulation

  19. Epitaxial repair and in situ damage assessment for turbine blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinaldi, C.; Antonelli, G.

    2005-02-15

    For single crystal components a technology to repair tips by epitaxial laser cladding was studied, to verify if, with a Nd - YAG laser, improved deposit efficiencies can be obtained with respect to published data relative to a CO{sub 2} laser. A user-friendly software tool was developed to make experiments and process development easier. With the support of this tool deposit efficiencies 1.5-times higher were reached. In the field of non-destructive technologies a frequency scanning eddy current technique named F-SECT was developed by CESI able to assess the damage degree of MCrAlY coatings due to operation. A recent improvement of this technique applicable in situ, on mounted blades in the turbine, will be described. (Author)

  20. Repair of postirradiation damage to colorectum: a progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of 21 operations for repair of rectovaginal fistula and/or stricture secondary to irradiation for pelvic cancer are presented. The operations rely on the use of proximal nonirradiated colon with normal blood supply for effecting the repair. In patients having had a previous colostomy, it is possible to use the proximal end of the bypassed colon for this purpose. There is minimal dissection of the rectal ampulla and the presacral space is never entered. Continuity is established by anastomosis to the anterior rectal wall via an abdominal approach alone, or by a combined abdominovaginal or abdominoperineal approach. It has been found that nonirradiated colon of normal vascularity can be expected to heal to irradiated colon or rectum, thus making the extensive resections associated with correction of these abnormalities unnecessary. The functional result in 18 of 19 patients who underwent this procedure was satisfactory to excellent. One patient had a poor result because of partial rectal incontinence. Two operations out of the 21 were total failures and one of these patients died of complications secondary to irradiation damage to the small intestine. One patient has not yet had final colostomy closure. The results are considered promising enough to warrant continued trial

  1. Damages to DNA that result in neoplastic transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some topics discussed are: correlation between carcinogens and mutagens; defective DNA repair in uv-damaged xeroderma pigmentosum cells; analysis of nucleotide damage to DNA following exposure to chemicals or radiations; photoreactivation in uv-irradiated Escherichia coli; tumor development in fish; excision repair as an aid in identifying damage; detection of excision repair; role of endonucleases in repair of uv damage; and alkylation products and tumors

  2. Overexpression of a Rrp1 transgene reduces the somatic mutation and recombination frequency induced by oxidative DNA damage in Drosophila melanogaster.

    OpenAIRE

    Szakmary, A; S. M. HUANG; Chang, D T; Beachy, P A; Sander, M.

    1996-01-01

    Recombination repair protein 1 (Rrp1) includes a C-terminal region homologous to several DNA repair proteins, including Escherichia coli exonuclease III and human APE, that repair oxidative and alkylation damage to DNA. The nuclease activities of Rrp1 include apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease, 3'-phosphodiesterase, 3'-phosphatase, and 3'-exonuclease. As shown previously, the C-terminal nuclease region of Rrp1 is sufficient to repair oxidative- and alkylation-induced DNA damage in repair-defi...

  3. A radiation damage repair model for normal tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partridge, Mike [Institute of Cancer Research, Downs Road, Sutton, SM2 5PT (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-07

    A cellular Monte Carlo model describing radiation damage and repair in normal epithelial tissues is presented. The deliberately simplified model includes cell cycling, cell motility and radiation damage response (cell cycle arrest and cell death) only. Results demonstrate that the model produces a stable equilibrium system for mean cell cycle times in the range 24-96 h. Simulated irradiation of these stable equilibrium systems produced a range of responses that are shown to be consistent with experimental and clinical observation, including (i) re-epithelialization of radiation-induced lesions by a mixture of cell migration into the wound and repopulation at the periphery; (ii) observed radiosensitivity that is quantitatively consistent with both rate of induction of irreparable DNA lesions and, independently, with the observed acute oral and pharyngeal mucosal reactions to radiotherapy; (iii) an observed time between irradiation and maximum toxicity that is consistent with experimental data for skin; (iv) quantitatively accurate predictions of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity; (v) Gomperzian repopulation for very small lesions ({approx}2000 cells) and (vi) a linear rate of re-epithelialization of 5-10 {mu}m h{sup -1} for large lesions (>15 000 cells)

  4. A radiation damage repair model for normal tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Mike

    2008-07-01

    A cellular Monte Carlo model describing radiation damage and repair in normal epithelial tissues is presented. The deliberately simplified model includes cell cycling, cell motility and radiation damage response (cell cycle arrest and cell death) only. Results demonstrate that the model produces a stable equilibrium system for mean cell cycle times in the range 24-96 h. Simulated irradiation of these stable equilibrium systems produced a range of responses that are shown to be consistent with experimental and clinical observation, including (i) re-epithelialization of radiation-induced lesions by a mixture of cell migration into the wound and repopulation at the periphery; (ii) observed radiosensitivity that is quantitatively consistent with both rate of induction of irreparable DNA lesions and, independently, with the observed acute oral and pharyngeal mucosal reactions to radiotherapy; (iii) an observed time between irradiation and maximum toxicity that is consistent with experimental data for skin; (iv) quantitatively accurate predictions of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity; (v) Gomperzian repopulation for very small lesions (~2000 cells) and (vi) a linear rate of re-epithelialization of 5-10 µm h-1 for large lesions (>15 000 cells).

  5. Study on Repaired Earthquake-Damaged Bridge Piers under Seismic Load

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Deng; Tonghua Liu; Weizhi Xie; Wei Lu

    2015-01-01

    The concrete bridge pier damaged during earthquakes need be repaired to meet the design standards. Steel tube as a traditional material or FRP as a novel material has become popular to repair the damaged reinforced concrete (RC) bridge piers. In this paper, experimental and finite element (FE) studies are employed to analyze the confinement effectiveness of the different repair materials. The FE method was used to calculate the hysteretic behavior of three predamaged circle RC bridge piers re...

  6. Repair of radiation damages to haemopoietic stem cells of mouse embryonal liver: kinetic aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of fractionated irradiation was used to study kinetic aspects of repair of sublethal radiation damages in precursor cells from mouse embryonal liver that form in vivo colonies on 8th and 11th days. It was shown that 11-day CFUs had a lesser ability to repair sublethal radiation damages than 8-day ones at different time-intervals between radiation fractions (from 2 to 6 h). These two CFUs subpopulations differed also in the repair kinetics

  7. Chemical biology of mutagenesis and DNA repair: cellular responses to DNA alkylation

    OpenAIRE

    Shrivastav, Nidhi; Li, Deyu; Essigmann, John M.

    2009-01-01

    The reaction of DNA-damaging agents with the genome results in a plethora of lesions, commonly referred to as adducts. Adducts may cause DNA to mutate, they may represent the chemical precursors of lethal events and they can disrupt expression of genes. Determination of which adduct is responsible for each of these biological endpoints is difficult, but this task has been accomplished for some carcinogenic DNA-damaging agents. Here, we describe the respective contributions of specific DNA les...

  8. Telomeric Allelic Imbalance Indicates Defective DNA Repair and Sensitivity to DNA-Damaging Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkbak, Nicolai J.; Wang, Zhigang C.; Kim, Ji-Young;

    2012-01-01

    DNA repair competency is one determinant of sensitivity to certain chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin. Cancer cells with intact DNA repair can avoid the accumulation of genome damage during growth and also can repair platinum-induced DNA damage. We sought genomic signatures indicative of...... defective DNA repair in cell lines and tumors and correlated these signatures to platinum sensitivity. The number of subchromosomal regions with allelic imbalance extending to the telomere (NtAI) predicted cisplatin sensitivity in vitro and pathologic response to preoperative cisplatin treatment in patients...... mutation. Thus, accumulation of telomeric allelic imbalance is a marker of platinum sensitivity and suggests impaired DNA repair. SIGNIFICANCE: Mutations in BRCA genes cause defects in DNA repair that predict sensitivity to DNA damaging agents, including platinum; however, some patients without BRCA...

  9. Propeller damaged and repair techniques at present; Hakuyo propeller sonsho oyobi sono hoshu gijutsu no genjo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mianakata, J.; Okamoto, Y.; Takaishi, N.; Kawajiri, T

    1998-09-01

    The propeller of ship on sail wind the foreign bodies like floating bodies, submerging wood, chain and so forth and most of them suffer from bent and missing with cracks at blade extreme end to leading edges, and at trailing edges of propeller blade when propeller moves backward. When such kind of damage occurs, depending on the type of damage and place of damage of the blade, and when there is extreme increase in vibration due to the unbalance of Surface (Shaft) Force and Bearing Force, a case where sailing is continued by preliminary measures and permanent repair is carried out at the next dock or the case where the damaged propeller is repaired while in dock by the periodic test or intermediate test of vessel. In general restoration repair of damaged propeller blade is carried out, however, cracks may case at the welding repair portion while the propeller is in operation if the welding repair is carried out by unqualified repairer. In this report, from the propeller repair experience of about 20 years, outlines of damage propeller and its repairing technology are described. 5 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. The repair mechanism for radiation damages by inorganic elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies of the authors showed that the death rate for mice after radiation exposure at a sub-lethal dose was significantly decreased by administration of a large amount of inorganic element such as Zn, Co, Mn, Mg, etc. Here, the cellular metabolism of Co element was investigated to elucidate the mechanism of such repair of radiation damages. The incorporation of 57-Co into the mouse spleen and bone marrow cells in vitro exposed to X-ray was compared to that into both cells from the mouse in vivo exposed to X-ray. The administration of Co carrier into the cells from unexposed mice increased the incorporation of Co into these cells and there were no differences in Co-incorporation between the cells exposed to radiation in vitro and in vivo. The Co-incorporation into the bone marrow cells was dose-dependently increased by either of in vitro and in vivo exposure, suggesting that there exists some cellular defense mechanism. For in vivo exposure, the amount of Co incorporation and also DNA synthesizing activity in spleen and bone marrow cells both decreased as increasing the amount of Co subcutaneously injected, but not given to the culture medium. To clarify cellular distribution of Co incorporated, the cells suspension was homogenized and centrifuged for cell fractionation. About 80% of incorporated Co was found in the cytoplasmic fraction and the other was in the membrane fraction, suggesting that Co element might be incorporated into some cellular components. (M.N.)

  11. DNA damage by reactive species: Mechanisms, mutation and repair

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N R Jena

    2012-07-01

    DNA is continuously attacked by reactive species that can affect its structure and function severely. Structural modifications to DNA mainly arise from modifications in its bases that primarily occur due to their exposure to different reactive species. Apart from this, DNA strand break, inter- and intra-strand crosslinks and DNA–protein crosslinks can also affect the structure of DNA significantly. These structural modifications are involved in mutation, cancer and many other diseases. As it has the least oxidation potential among all the DNA bases, guanine is frequently attacked by reactive species, producing a plethora of lethal lesions. Fortunately, living cells are evolved with intelligent enzymes that continuously protect DNA from such damages. This review provides an overview of different guanine lesions formed due to reactions of guanine with different reactive species. Involvement of these lesions in inter- and intra-strand crosslinks, DNA–protein crosslinks and mutagenesis are discussed. How certain enzymes recognize and repair different guanine lesions in DNA are also presented.

  12. Enhancement of radiosensitivity in human glioblastoma cells by the DNA N-mustard alkylating agent BO-1051 through augmented and sustained DNA damage response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background 1-{4-[Bis(2-chloroethyl)amino]phenyl}-3-[2-methyl-5-(4-methylacridin-9-ylamino)phenyl]urea (BO-1051) is an N-mustard DNA alkylating agent reported to exhibit antitumor activity. Here we further investigate the effects of this compound on radiation responses of human gliomas, which are notorious for the high resistance to radiotherapy. Methods The clonogenic assay was used to determine the IC50 and radiosensitivity of human glioma cell lines (U87MG, U251MG and GBM-3) following BO-1051. DNA histogram and propidium iodide-Annexin V staining were used to determine the cell cycle distribution and the apoptosis, respectively. DNA damage and repair state were determined by γ-H2AX foci, and mitotic catastrophe was measure using nuclear fragmentation. Xenograft tumors were measured with a caliper, and the survival rate was determined using Kaplan-Meier method. Results BO-1051 inhibited growth of human gliomas in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Using the dosage at IC50, BO-1051 significantly enhanced radiosensitivity to different extents [The sensitizer enhancement ratio was between 1.24 and 1.50 at 10% of survival fraction]. The radiosensitive G2/M population was raised by BO-1051, whereas apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe were not affected. γ-H2AX foci was greatly increased and sustained by combined BO-1051 and γ-rays, suggested that DNA damage or repair capacity was impaired during treatment. In vivo studies further demonstrated that BO-1051 enhanced the radiotherapeutic effects on GBM-3-beared xenograft tumors, by which the sensitizer enhancement ratio was 1.97. The survival rate of treated mice was also increased accordingly. Conclusions These results indicate that BO-1051 can effectively enhance glioma cell radiosensitivity in vitro and in vivo. It suggests that BO-1051 is a potent radiosensitizer for treating human glioma cells. PMID:21244709

  13. Enhancement of radiosensitivity in human glioblastoma cells by the DNA N-mustard alkylating agent BO-1051 through augmented and sustained DNA damage response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ming-Teh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 1-{4-[Bis(2-chloroethylamino]phenyl}-3-[2-methyl-5-(4-methylacridin-9-ylaminophenyl]urea (BO-1051 is an N-mustard DNA alkylating agent reported to exhibit antitumor activity. Here we further investigate the effects of this compound on radiation responses of human gliomas, which are notorious for the high resistance to radiotherapy. Methods The clonogenic assay was used to determine the IC50 and radiosensitivity of human glioma cell lines (U87MG, U251MG and GBM-3 following BO-1051. DNA histogram and propidium iodide-Annexin V staining were used to determine the cell cycle distribution and the apoptosis, respectively. DNA damage and repair state were determined by γ-H2AX foci, and mitotic catastrophe was measure using nuclear fragmentation. Xenograft tumors were measured with a caliper, and the survival rate was determined using Kaplan-Meier method. Results BO-1051 inhibited growth of human gliomas in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Using the dosage at IC50, BO-1051 significantly enhanced radiosensitivity to different extents [The sensitizer enhancement ratio was between 1.24 and 1.50 at 10% of survival fraction]. The radiosensitive G2/M population was raised by BO-1051, whereas apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe were not affected. γ-H2AX foci was greatly increased and sustained by combined BO-1051 and γ-rays, suggested that DNA damage or repair capacity was impaired during treatment. In vivo studies further demonstrated that BO-1051 enhanced the radiotherapeutic effects on GBM-3-beared xenograft tumors, by which the sensitizer enhancement ratio was 1.97. The survival rate of treated mice was also increased accordingly. Conclusions These results indicate that BO-1051 can effectively enhance glioma cell radiosensitivity in vitro and in vivo. It suggests that BO-1051 is a potent radiosensitizer for treating human glioma cells.

  14. Enhancement of radiosensitivity in human glioblastoma cells by the DNA N-mustard alkylating agent BO-1051 through augmented and sustained DNA damage response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1-{4-[Bis(2-chloroethyl)amino]phenyl}-3-[2-methyl-5- (4-methylacridin-9-ylamino)phenyl]urea (BO-1051) is an N-mustard DNA alkylating agent reported to exhibit antitumor activity. Here we further investigate the effects of this compound on radiation responses of human gliomas, which are notorious for the high resistance to radiotherapy. The clonogenic assay was used to determine the IC50 and radiosensitivity of human glioma cell lines (U87MG, U251MG and GBM-3) following BO-1051. DNA histogram and propidium iodide-Annexin V staining were used to determine the cell cycle distribution and the apoptosis, respectively. DNA damage and repair state were determined by γ-H2AX foci, and mitotic catastrophe was measure using nuclear fragmentation. Xenograft tumors were measured with a caliper, and the survival rate was determined using Kaplan-Meier method. BO-1051 inhibited growth of human gliomas in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Using the dosage at IC50, BO-1051 significantly enhanced radiosensitivity to different extents [The sensitizer enhancement ratio was between 1.24 and 1.50 at 10% of survival fraction]. The radiosensitive G2/M population was raised by BO-1051, whereas apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe were not affected. γ-H2AX foci was greatly increased and sustained by combined BO-1051 and γ-rays, suggested that DNA damage or repair capacity was impaired during treatment. In vivo studies further demonstrated that BO-1051 enhanced the radiotherapeutic effects on GBM-3-beared xenograft tumors, by which the sensitizer enhancement ratio was 1.97. The survival rate of treated mice was also increased accordingly. These results indicate that BO-1051 can effectively enhance glioma cell radiosensitivity in vitro and in vivo. It suggests that BO-1051 is a potent radiosensitizer for treating human glioma cells

  15. Radioimmunoassay studies on repair of ultraviolet damaged DNA in cultured animal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    UV (ultraviolet) damaged DNA and its repair of various cultured animal cells were observed by radioimmunoassay using anti-serum against the UV irradiation induced heat-degenerated DNA. There is some difference among the cells of used animals according to their DNA repairabilities. The cells were divided into four groups according to the existence or strength of their repairabilities. 1) excision repair type: cells of men and chimpanzees. 2) photoreactivation type: cells derived from Tachydromus tachydromoides and chicks. 3) photoreactivation with excision repair: cells of rats, kangaroos and mosquitos. 4) non-excision repair type: cells of mice, Meriones and rats. Animal cells have plural types of repair. Main types of repair will differ according to the kind of animals. (Ichikawa, K.)

  16. Microvesicle shedding and lysosomal repair fulfill divergent cellular needs during the repair of streptolysin O-induced plasmalemmal damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander P Atanassoff

    Full Text Available Pathogenic bacteria secrete pore-forming toxins that permeabilize the plasma membrane of host cells. Nucleated cells possess protective mechanisms that repair toxin-damaged plasmalemma. Currently two putative repair scenarios are debated: either the isolation of the damaged membrane regions and their subsequent expulsion as microvesicles (shedding or lysosome-dependent repair might allow the cell to rid itself of its toxic cargo and prevent lysis. Here we provide evidence that both mechanisms operate in tandem but fulfill diverse cellular needs. The prevalence of the repair strategy varies between cell types and is guided by the severity and the localization of the initial toxin-induced damage, by the morphology of a cell and, most important, by the incidence of the secondary mechanical damage. The surgically precise action of microvesicle shedding is best suited for the instant elimination of individual toxin pores, whereas lysosomal repair is indispensable for mending of self-inflicted mechanical injuries following initial plasmalemmal permeabilization by bacterial toxins. Our study provides new insights into the functioning of non-immune cellular defenses against bacterial pathogens.

  17. Nicotinamide enhances repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in primary melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Benjamin C; Surjana, Devita; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2014-07-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Nicotinamide is a safe, widely available vitamin that reduces the immune suppressive effects of UV, enhances DNA repair in keratinocytes and has shown promise in the chemoprevention of non-melanoma skin cancer. Here, we report the effect of nicotinamide on DNA damage and repair in primary human melanocytes. Nicotinamide significantly enhanced the repair of oxidative DNA damage (8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine) and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers induced by UV exposure. It also enhanced the repair of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine induced by the culture conditions in unirradiated melanocytes. A significant increase in the percentage of melanocytes undergoing unscheduled but not scheduled DNA synthesis was observed, confirming that nicotinamide enhances DNA repair in human melanocytes. In summary, nicotinamide, by enhancing DNA repair in melanocytes, is a potential agent for the chemoprevention of cutaneous melanoma. PMID:24798949

  18. A eukaryotic gene encoding an endonuclease that specifically repairs DNA damaged by ultraviolet light.

    OpenAIRE

    Yajima, H; Takao, M; Yasuhira, S; Zhao, J. H.; Ishii, C.; Inoue, H; Yasui, A

    1995-01-01

    Many eukaryotic organisms, including humans, remove ultraviolet (UV) damage from their genomes by the nucleotide excision repair pathway, which requires more than 10 separate protein factors. However, no nucleotide excision repair pathway has been found in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. We have isolated a new eukaryotic DNA repair gene from N.crassa by its ability to complement UV-sensitive Escherichia coli cells. The gene is altered in a N.crassa mus-18 mutant and responsible for ...

  19. Influence of the thymus on hemopoietic stem cells capability to repair sublethal radiation damages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the course of irradiation of mice bone marrow (300 rad in vitro + 300 rad in vivo) hemopoietic stem cells injury decreases significantly at the irradiation interval of 5 hrs as compared to 30 min interval at the expence of repairment from sublethal radiation damages (the Elkind repair effect). In case of thymectomized mature mice, the capability of hemopoietic stem cells for the Elkind repair is sharply distorted when 2/2-5 months after operation. Thymus transplantation removes thymectomy effect

  20. Analysis of the chromosome damage and repair kinetics in CHL cells after 6'0Co γ-irradiation by PCC technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of chromosome damage and repair was determined by PCC. Chromosome damage repair was not detectable until 30 min after irradiation and nearly half of chromosome damage was repaired by 6 h. In contrast, significant DNA repair occurred at 5 min after γ-irradiation measured by FADU technique. These results suggest that the early repairing DNA SSBs are not important in the formation of chromosome aberration, the different repair kinetics between DNA and chromosome damages might reflect their different repair mechanism

  1. Defective repair of gamma-ray-induced DNA damage in xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bromouracil-photolysis technique has been used to estimate the sizes of the repaired regions in normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells irradiated by γ-rays aerobically or anoxically. After one and a half hours of incubation, single-strand breaks were repaired and the repaired regions were small - one to two BrUra residues -for cells irradiated aerobically or anoxically. After a 20-hour incubation, the repaired region in normal cells showed a component mimicking U.V.-repair. There were large patches (approximately 30 BrUra residues) in the approximate ratios of one per six chain breaks for aerobic irradiation and one per three chain breaks for anoxic irradiation. XP cells, however, only showed large patches at 20 hours if they had been irradiated aerobically. Such regions could not be detected in XP cells irradiated anoxically. These results indicate (1) that some part of ionizing damage mimics excision of U.V. damage in that the repair patches are large and the repair takes an appreciable time; (2) the types of such damage depend on whether the irradiation is done aerobically or anoxically; and (3) XP cells are defective in repairing a component of anoxic damage. (author)

  2. Rapid repair of potentially lethal damage in normal and ataxia telangiectasia cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) was investigated in two normal and three ataxia telangiectasia (AT) human-skin fibroblast cell lines cultured in vitro. Using plateau-phase cells, time kinetics and repair were measured after irradiation. PLDR depended on both dose and survival level, as previously seen in rodent cells. Human cells differed from rodent cells in PLDR speed and ability to discern two components within the repair response. Fast repair had a t1/2 of approximately 5-7 min; the slow response occurred over hours. AT cells had demonstrable PLDR contrasting previous studies. Quantitatively, the proportion of fast and slow repair was similar for each dose in either normal or AT cells. However, AT cells had lower levels of both types of repair. When analyzing PLDR in human cells, differences in repair rates between human and rodent cells must be considered. (author)

  3. Non-DBS DNA Repair Genes Regulate Radiation-induced Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Casey, Rachael; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in DSB repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been systematically studied. In the present study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by transfection with small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of these selected genes on regulating DSB repair and cell cycle progression , as measured in the micronuclei formation and chromosome aberration. In response to IR, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes: Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway, XPA in the NER pathway, RPA1 in the MMR pathway, and RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, P21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Most of the 11 genes that affected cytogenetic responses are not known to have clear roles influencing DBS repair. Nine of these 11 genes were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate the biological consequences after IR.

  4. Association between age and repair of oxidatively damaged DNA in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løhr, Mille; Jensen, Annie; Eriksen, Louise;

    2015-01-01

    damaged DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We isolated PBMCs from subjects aged 18-83 years, as part of a health survey of the Danish population that focussed on lifestyle factors. The level of DNA repair activity was measured as incisions on potassium bromate-damaged DNA by the comet...... assay. There was an inverse association between age and DNA repair activity with a 0.65% decline in activity per year from age 18 to 83 (95% confidence interval: 0.16-1.14% per year). Univariate regression analysis also indicated inverse associations between DNA repair activity and waist-hip ratio (P...

  5. PARP-1: Friend or Foe of DNA Damage and Repair in Tumorigenesis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swindall, Amanda F.; Stanley, Jennifer A. [Department of Radiation Oncology Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, 176F HSROC Suite 2232B, 1700 6th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35249 (United States); Yang, Eddy S., E-mail: eyang@uab.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, 176F HSROC Suite 2232B, 1700 6th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35249 (United States); Department of Cell, Developmental and Integrative Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35249 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35249 (United States)

    2013-07-26

    Oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species can result in DNA damage within cells and subsequently increase risk for carcinogenesis. This may be averted by repair of DNA damage through the base or nucleotide excision repair (BER/NER) pathways. PARP, a BER protein, is known for its role in DNA-repair. However, multiple lesions can occur within a small range of DNA, known as oxidative clustered DNA lesions (OCDLs), which are difficult to repair and may lead to the more severe DNA double-strand break (DSB). Inefficient DSB repair can then result in increased mutagenesis and neoplastic transformation. OCDLs occur more frequently within a variety of tumor tissues. Interestingly, PARP is highly expressed in several human cancers. Additionally, chronic inflammation may contribute to tumorigenesis through ROS-induced DNA damage. Furthermore, PARP can modulate inflammation through interaction with NFκB and regulating the expression of inflammatory signaling molecules. Thus, the upregulation of PARP may present a double-edged sword. PARP is needed to repair ROS-induced DNA lesions, but PARP expression may lead to increased inflammation via upregulation of NFκB signaling. Here, we discuss the role of PARP in the repair of oxidative damage versus the formation of OCDLs and speculate on the feasibility of PARP inhibition for the treatment and prevention of cancers by exploiting its role in inflammation.

  6. PARP-1: Friend or Foe of DNA Damage and Repair in Tumorigenesis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species can result in DNA damage within cells and subsequently increase risk for carcinogenesis. This may be averted by repair of DNA damage through the base or nucleotide excision repair (BER/NER) pathways. PARP, a BER protein, is known for its role in DNA-repair. However, multiple lesions can occur within a small range of DNA, known as oxidative clustered DNA lesions (OCDLs), which are difficult to repair and may lead to the more severe DNA double-strand break (DSB). Inefficient DSB repair can then result in increased mutagenesis and neoplastic transformation. OCDLs occur more frequently within a variety of tumor tissues. Interestingly, PARP is highly expressed in several human cancers. Additionally, chronic inflammation may contribute to tumorigenesis through ROS-induced DNA damage. Furthermore, PARP can modulate inflammation through interaction with NFκB and regulating the expression of inflammatory signaling molecules. Thus, the upregulation of PARP may present a double-edged sword. PARP is needed to repair ROS-induced DNA lesions, but PARP expression may lead to increased inflammation via upregulation of NFκB signaling. Here, we discuss the role of PARP in the repair of oxidative damage versus the formation of OCDLs and speculate on the feasibility of PARP inhibition for the treatment and prevention of cancers by exploiting its role in inflammation

  7. PARP-1: Friend or Foe of DNA Damage and Repair in Tumorigenesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddy S. Yang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species can result in DNA damage within cells and subsequently increase risk for carcinogenesis. This may be averted by repair of DNA damage through the base or nucleotide excision repair (BER/NER pathways. PARP, a BER protein, is known for its role in DNA-repair. However, multiple lesions can occur within a small range of DNA, known as oxidative clustered DNA lesions (OCDLs, which are difficult to repair and may lead to the more severe DNA double-strand break (DSB. Inefficient DSB repair can then result in increased mutagenesis and neoplastic transformation. OCDLs occur more frequently within a variety of tumor tissues. Interestingly, PARP is highly expressed in several human cancers. Additionally, chronic inflammation may contribute to tumorigenesis through ROS-induced DNA damage. Furthermore, PARP can modulate inflammation through interaction with NFκB and regulating the expression of inflammatory signaling molecules. Thus, the upregulation of PARP may present a double-edged sword. PARP is needed to repair ROS-induced DNA lesions, but PARP expression may lead to increased inflammation via upregulation of NFκB signaling. Here, we discuss the role of PARP in the repair of oxidative damage versus the formation of OCDLs and speculate on the feasibility of PARP inhibition for the treatment and prevention of cancers by exploiting its role in inflammation.

  8. Repair of gamma-ray-induced DNA base damage in xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The repair of DNA damage produced by 137Cs gamma irradiation was measured with a preparation from Micrococcus luteus containing DNA damage-specific endonucleases in combination with alkaline elution. The frequency of these endonuclease sensitive sites (ESS) was determined after 54 or 110 Gy of oxic irradiation in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) fibroblasts from complementation groups A, C, D, and G. Repair was rapid in all cell strains with greater than 50% repair after 1.5 h of repair incubation. At later repair times, 12-17 h, more ESS remained in XP than in normal cells. The frequency of excess ESS in XP cells was approximately 0.04 per 10(9) Da of DNA per Gy which was equivalent to 10% of the initial ESS produced. The removal of ESS was comparable in XP cells with normal radiosensitivity and XP3BR cells which have been reported to be moderately radiosensitive

  9. Repair of ultraviolet-light-induced DNA damage in Vibrio cholerae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repair of ultraviolet-light-induced DNA damage in a highly pathogenic Gram-negative bacterium, Vibrio cholerae, has been examined. All three strains of V. cholerae belonging to two serotypes, Inaba and Ogawa, are very sensitive to ultraviolet irradiation, having inactivation cross-sections ranging from 0.18 to 0.24 m2/J. Although these cells are proficient in repairing the DNA damage by a photoreactivation mechanism, they do not possess efficient dark repair systems. The mild toxinogenic strain 154 of classical Vibrios presumably lacks any excision repair mechanism and studies of irradiated cell DNA indicate that the ultraviolet-induced pyrimidine dimers may not be excised. Ultraviolet-irradiated cells after saturation of dark repair can be further photoreactivated. (Auth.)

  10. Repair of near (365 nm)- and far (254 nm)- UV damage to bacteriophage of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intact bacteriophages were irradiated at 365 nm or 254 nm and then analyzed for DNA photoproducts or injected into their bacterial host to test susceptibility of the damage to both phage and host-cell mediated repair systems. Both thymine dimers and single-strand breaks were induced in the phage DNA by 365 nm radiation. The dimers appeared to be the major lethal lesion in both repair deficient bacteriophage T4 and bacteriophage lambda after 254 nm or 365 nm irradiation. Damage induced in T4 by either wavelength was equally susceptible to x-gene reactivation. v-gene reactivation acted on a larger fraction of the near-UV damage. The host-cell mediated photo-reactivation system was only slightly less effective for near-UV damage but host-cell reactivation (survival of phage lambda on uvr+ and uvr- host) was effective against a far smaller section of near-UV damage than far-UV damage. Weigle-reactivation (far-UV induced) of near-UV damage to phage lambda was not observed. The results suggested that unless the near-UV damaged phage DNA is repaired immediately after injection, the lesions rapidly lose their susceptibility to repair with a consequent loss of activity of the phage particles. (author)

  11. DNA Repair Decline During Mouse Spermiogenesis Results in the Accumulation of Heritable DNA Damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2007-12-01

    The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7-1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomal aberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

  12. DNA repair decline during mouse spermiogenesis results in the accumulation of heritable DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wryobek, Andrew J

    2008-02-21

    The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7- 1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomalaberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

  13. Determination of damage and In vivo DNA repairing through the unicellular in gel electrophoresis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental conditions were standardized for the unicellular in gel electrophoresis technique setting up (EUG) at the Cellular Radiobiology laboratory. Preliminary experiments were realized with human cells and mouse which were exposed to ionizing radiation or hydroxide peroxide (H2O2) to induce DNA damage and to verify the technique performance. It was analysed the In vivo repairing kinetics of induced damage by gamma radiation in mouse leukocytes which were exposed to 137 Cs source and taking samples of peripheric blood of the tail of each mouse at different exposure times and processing them for EUG. In function of the cells proportion with damage in each time it was determined the existence of fast repairing mechanism at the first 15 minutes followed by a slight increase in the damage and a late repairing stage between 30 and 90 minutes. It was analysed this behavior and the potentiality of this In vivo system. (Author)

  14. Repair of radiation-induced DNA damage in nondividing populations of human diploid fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The occurrence of DNA repair in uv- (254 nm) and x-irradiated normal human diploid fibroblasts maintained in a quiescent, nondividing state using low serum (0.5%) medium was ascertained. Techniques that detect different steps of the excision repair process were used so that the extent of completion of repair at single sites could be determined. These included measuring the disappearance of pyrimidine dimers by chromatography, detecting repair synthesis by density-gradient and autoradiographic methods and detecting the rejoining of repaired regions and repair of x-ray-induced single-strand DNA breaks using alkaline sucrose gradients. Results show that dimer excision occurs and the subsequent steps of repair synthesis and ligation are completed. About 50% of the dimers formed by exposure to 20 J/m2 is excised in the initial 24-h post-uv period. DNA repair (unscheduled DNA synthesis) can be detected through a 5-d post-uv period. The fraction of damaged sites eventually repaired is not known. X-ray-induced single-strand DNA breaks are repaired rapidly

  15. Nick translation - a new assay for monitoring DNA damage and repair in cultured human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An in vitro assay has been developed to detect DNA damage and repair following chemical treatment of human diploid fibroblasts. DNA damage is measured by following the Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I-catalyzed incorporation of radiolabeled deoxycytidine triphosphate (dCTP) into the DNA of lysolecithin-permeabilized cells. DNA strand breaks with free 3' OH termini serve as template sites for incorporation, and decrease of this incorporation with time, following removal of the test chemical, indicates loss (repair) of initial damage. Inhibition of the DNA excision repair process by the addition of the repair inhibitors arabinofuranosyl cytosine (ara-C) and hydroxyurea (HU) during the incubation period gives rise to an increased number of template sites, manifesting itself in increased incorporation and indicating the induction of long-patch excision repair. Results presented demonstrate that all 14 direct-acting carcinogens tested and 8 of 14 carcinogens requiring metabolic activation give positive indication of DNA damage, repair, or both. Eleven of 14 noncarcinogens tested were scored as negative, the other 3 having previously been shown to interact with cellular DNA. This assay is shown to have predictive capability at least equal to that of UDS assays but to allow a broader spectrum of genotoxic effects to be analyzed

  16. Vertebrate POLQ and POLβ Cooperate in Base Excision Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshimura, Michio; Kohzaki, Masaoki; Nakamura, Jun; Asagoshi, Kenjiro; Sonoda, Eiichiro; Hou, Esther; Prasad, Rajendra; Wilson, Samuel H.; TANO, KEIZO; Yasui, Akira; Lan, Li; Seki, Mineaki; Wood, Richard D.; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Buerstedde, Jean-Marie

    2006-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) plays an essential role in protecting cells from mutagenic base damage caused by oxidative stress, hydrolysis, and environmental factors. POLQ is a DNA polymerase, which appears to be involved in translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) past base damage. We disrupted POLQ, and its homologs HEL308 and POLN in chicken DT40 cells, and also created polq/hel308 and polq/poln double mutants. We found that POLQ-deficient mutants exhibit hypersensitivity to oxidative base damage ind...

  17. Structural and Mechanical Repair of Diffuse Damage in Cortical Bone in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Seref-Ferlengez, Zeynep; Basta-Pljakic, Jelena; Kennedy, Oran D; Philemon, Claudy J.; Schaffler, Mitchell B.

    2014-01-01

    Physiological wear and tear causes bone microdamage at several hierarchical levels, and these have different biological consequences. Bone remodeling is widely held to be the mechanism by which bone microdamage is repaired. However, recent studies showed that unlike typical linear microcracks, small crack damage, the clusters of submicron-sized matrix cracks also known as diffuse damage (Dif.Dx), does not activate remodeling. Thus, the fate of diffuse damage in vivo is not known. To examine t...

  18. Disulfiram is a direct and potent inhibitor of human O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) in brain tumor cells and mouse brain and markedly increases the alkylating DNA damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivenugopal, Kalkunte S.

    2014-01-01

    The alcohol aversion drug disulfiram (DSF) reacts and conjugates with the protein-bound nucleophilic cysteines and is known to elicit anticancer effects alone or improve the efficacy of many cancer drugs. We investigated the effects of DSF on human O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a DNA repair protein and chemotherapy target that removes the mutagenic O6-akyl groups from guanines, and thus confers resistance to alkylating agents in brain tumors. We used DSF, copper-chelated DSF or CuCl2–DSF combination and found that all treatments inhibited the MGMT activity in two brain tumor cell lines in a rapid and dose-dependent manner. The drug treatments resulted in the loss of MGMT protein from tumor cells through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Evidence showed that Cys145, a reactive cysteine, critical for DNA repair was the sole site of DSF modification in the MGMT protein. DSF was a weaker inhibitor of MGMT, compared with the established O6-benzylguanine; nevertheless, the 24–36h suppression of MGMT activity in cell cultures vastly increased the alkylation-induced DNA interstrand cross-linking, G2/M cell cycle blockade, cytotoxicity and the levels of apoptotic markers. Normal mice treated with DSF showed significantly attenuated levels of MGMT activity and protein in the liver and brain tissues. In nude mice bearing T98 glioblastoma xenografts, there was a preferential inhibition of tumor MGMT. Our studies demonstrate a strong and direct inhibition of MGMT by DSF and support the repurposing of this brain penetrating drug for glioma therapy. The findings also imply an increased risk for alkylation damage in alcoholic patients taking DSF. PMID:24193513

  19. Importance of repair of potentially lethal damage in assays of cytotoxic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most in vitro assays expose growing cells to cytotoxic agents for a fixed period of time. However, these assays fail to account for repair of potentially lethal damage, the enhancement in survival that occurs when cells are maintained under nongrowth conditions after treatment with cytotoxic agents. This study extends previous observations of the repair of potentially lethal damage in human melanoma cells to parallel in vitro and in vivo experiments with the F10 subline of B16 melanoma. An in vivo (in C57BL/6 mice) and in vitro (in plastic plates) radiation dose-response relationship for the F10 subline of B16 melanoma was determined (200 to 1100 rads). Time delay until explant, allowing repair of potentially lethal damage, resulted in a significant and progressive enhancement of survival, five- to sixfold, both in vivo and in vitro. Survival with 700 rads and 24-hour delay was equivalent to that after treatment with 300 rads and no delay. Repair of potentially lethal damage, demonstrated in human cells in vitro and in animal preparations in vitro and in vivo, may account for the lack of clinical efficacy of some cytotoxic agents. Our results suggest that repair of potentially lethal damage should be taken into consideration in the design of in vitro chemotherapy and radiation therapy assays

  20. Repair of ionizing radiation DNA base damage in ataxia-telangiectasia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micrococcus luteus endonuclease sensitive sites were measured by alkaline elution in normal human and ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) fibroblasts after ionizing radiation. Due to the sensitivity of this assay, repair of base damage after 3 to 6 kilorads has been measured after oxic or hypoxic radiation. With 5.5 kilorads of oxic radiation, more than 50% of the base damage was removed after 1.5 h of repair incubation in all cells, including exr+ and exr- AT cells, and approximately 75% was removed by 4 h. After 3 or 4.5 kilorads of hypoxic X-irradiation, repair was equivalent in normal and exr- AT cells. This study included three exr- AT strains which have been reported to be deficient in the removal of gamma-ray base damage at higher doses. Since these strains repaired ionizing radiation base damage normally at lower doses, which are more relevant to survival, it is concluded that the X-ray hypersensitivity of AT cells is probably not related to the repair of base damage

  1. Deficient repair of potentially lethal damage in actively growing ataxia telangiectasia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The repair of potentially lethal damage after X rays was studied in exponentially growing normal and ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) strains of human fibroblasts. X-ray killing of all normal strains from six healthy persons was enhanced when cells were treated with hypertonic phosphate-buffered saline immediately after irradiation. This treatment is not toxic to unirradiated cells and demonstrates that ordinarily these cells repair potentially lethal damage. The potentially lethal damage in normal cells is repaired within 1 hr. In contrast, all A-T strains from four A-T patients were completely deficient in their ability to repair potentially lethal damage. Treatment with a hypertonic solution after X irradiation is known to increase the frequency of chromosomal aberrations and to enhance cell killing, as though hypertonicity had induced the A-T state in normal cells. These results support the inference that the increased radiosensitivity of A-T cells can be attributed to some defect in the repair of DNA damage rather than abnormal DNA synthesis following irradiation

  2. A generalized linear-quadratic model incorporating reciprocal time pattern of radiation damage repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: It has been conventionally assumed that the repair rate for sublethal damage (SLD) remains constant during the entire radiation course. However, increasing evidence from animal studies suggest that this may not the case. Rather, it appears that the repair rate for radiation-induced SLD slows down with increasing time. Such a slowdown in repair would suggest that the exponential repair pattern would not necessarily accurately predict repair process. As a result, the purpose of this study was to investigate a new generalized linear-quadratic (LQ) model incorporating a repair pattern with reciprocal time. The new formulas were tested with published experimental data. Methods: The LQ model has been widely used in radiation therapy, and the parameter G in the surviving fraction represents the repair process of sublethal damage with Tr as the repair half-time. When a reciprocal pattern of repair process was adopted, a closed form of G was derived analytically for arbitrary radiation schemes. The published animal data adopted to test the reciprocal formulas. Results: A generalized LQ model to describe the repair process in a reciprocal pattern was obtained. Subsequently, formulas for special cases were derived from this general form. The reciprocal model showed a better fit to the animal data than the exponential model, particularly for the ED50 data (reduced χ2min of 2.0 vs 4.3, p = 0.11 vs 0.006), with the following gLQ parameters: α/β = 2.6-4.8 Gy, Tr = 3.2-3.9 h for rat feet skin, and α/β = 0.9 Gy, Tr = 1.1 h for rat spinal cord. Conclusions: These results of repair process following a reciprocal time suggest that the generalized LQ model incorporating the reciprocal time of sublethal damage repair shows a better fit than the exponential repair model. These formulas can be used to analyze the experimental and clinical data, where a slowing-down repair process appears during the course of radiation therapy.

  3. DNA damage and nucleotide excision repair capacity in healthy individuals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slyšková, Jana; Naccarati, Alessio; Poláková, Veronika; Pardini, Barbara; Vodičková, Ludmila; Štětina, R.; Schmuczerová, Jana; Šmerhovský, Z.; Lipská, L.; Vodička, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 7 (2011), s. 511-517. ISSN 0893-6692 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/10/1286; GA MŠk 7F10069 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) GAUK124710 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : BPDE-induced DNA repair capacity * comet assay * interindividual variability Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.709, year: 2011

  4. Impact of sperm DNA damage and oocyte-repairing capacity on trout development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Díez, C; González-Rojo, S; Lombó, M; Herráez, M P

    2016-07-01

    Zygotic repair of paternal DNA is essential during embryo development. In spite of the interest devoted to sperm DNA damage, its combined effect with defect-repairing oocytes has not been analyzed. Modification of the breeding season is a common practice in aquaculture. This practice reduces developmental success and could affect the both factors: sperm DNA integrity and oocyte repair capacity. To evaluate the maternal role, we analyzed the progeny outcome after fertilizing in-season trout oocytes with untreated and with UV-irradiated sperm. We also analyzed the offspring obtained out of season with untreated sperm. The analysis of the number of lesions in 4 sperm nuclear genes revealed an increase of 1.22-11.18 lesions/10 kb in out-of-season sperm, similar to that obtained after sperm UV irradiation (400 µW/cm(2)5 min). Gene expression showed in out-of-season oocytes the overexpression of repair genes (ogg1, ung, lig3, rad1) and downregulation of tp53, indicating an enhanced repairing activity and reduced capacity to arrest development upon damage. The analysis of the progeny in out-of-season embryos revealed a similar profile tolerant to DNA damage, leading to a much lower apoptotic activity at organogenesis, lower hatching rates and increased rate of malformations. The effects were milder in descendants from in-season-irradiated sperm, showing an enhanced repairing activity at epibolia. Results point out the importance of the repairing machinery provided by the oocyte and show how susceptible it is to environmental changes. Transcripts related to DNA damage signalization and repair could be used as markers of oocyte quality. PMID:27071918

  5. The 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry The Discovery of Essential Mechanisms that Repair DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Tomas; Modrich, Paul; Sancar, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2015 to Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar for their discoveries in fundamental mechanisms of DNA repair. This pioneering research described three different essential pathways that correct DNA damage, safeguard the integrity of the genetic code to ensure its accurate replication through generations, and allow proper cell division. Working independently of each other, Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar delineated the mechanisms of base excision repair, mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair, respectively. These breakthroughs challenged and dismissed the early view that the DNA molecule was very stable, paving the way for the discovery of human hereditary diseases associated with distinct DNA repair deficiencies and a susceptibility to cancer. It also brought a deeper understanding of cancer as well as neurodegenerative or neurological diseases, and let to novel strategies to treat cancer. PMID:27183258

  6. Role of p53 gene in apoptotic repair of genotoxic tissue damage in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Fumio; Kakihara, Hiroyo; Kunugita, Naoki; Ootsuyama, Akira; Norimura, Toshiyuki [Univ. of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    When DNA is damaged by exposure to a small amount of radiation, it is repaired efficiently by innate mechanisms. However, if cellular damage is more extensive, DNA repair cannot be adequately completed. To clarify the role of the p53 gene in apoptotic tissue repair, the incidence of in-vivo radiation-induced somatic mutation was evaluated by measuring the T cell receptor (TCR) gene expression in p53(+/+) and p53(-/-) mice. After {gamma}-irradiation with 3 Gy,the TCR mutation frequency (MF) was higher in p53(+/+) mice than in the controls. However, when the mice were exposed to 3 Gy at a low dose rate, the TCR MF did not increase in the p53(+/+) mice, whereas it increased and remained elevated in p53(-/-) mice, which are unable to induce apoptosis. In p53(+/+) mice, the TCR MF peaked 9 days after {gamma}-irradiation with 3 Gy at a high dose rate, and then gradually decreased with a half-life of about 13 days. However, in p53(-/-) mice, the peak level of the TCR MF did not decline significantly with time. Hence, complete repair of mutagenic damage in irradiated tissues requires the integration of DNA repair and p53-dependent apoptotic tissue repair. (author)

  7. Role of p53 gene in apoptotic repair of genotoxic tissue damage in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When DNA is damaged by exposure to a small amount of radiation, it is repaired efficiently by innate mechanisms. However, if cellular damage is more extensive, DNA repair cannot be adequately completed. To clarify the role of the p53 gene in apoptotic tissue repair, the incidence of in-vivo radiation-induced somatic mutation was evaluated by measuring the T cell receptor (TCR) gene expression in p53(+/+) and p53(-/-) mice. After γ-irradiation with 3 Gy,the TCR mutation frequency (MF) was higher in p53(+/+) mice than in the controls. However, when the mice were exposed to 3 Gy at a low dose rate, the TCR MF did not increase in the p53(+/+) mice, whereas it increased and remained elevated in p53(-/-) mice, which are unable to induce apoptosis. In p53(+/+) mice, the TCR MF peaked 9 days after γ-irradiation with 3 Gy at a high dose rate, and then gradually decreased with a half-life of about 13 days. However, in p53(-/-) mice, the peak level of the TCR MF did not decline significantly with time. Hence, complete repair of mutagenic damage in irradiated tissues requires the integration of DNA repair and p53-dependent apoptotic tissue repair. (author)

  8. Photodynamic DNA damage induced by phycocyanin and its repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pádula

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we analyzed DNA damage induced by phycocyanin (PHY in the presence of visible light (VL using a set of repair endonucleases purified from Escherichia coli. We demonstrated that the profile of DNA damage induced by PHY is clearly different from that induced by molecules that exert deleterious effects on DNA involving solely singlet oxygen as reactive species. Most of PHY-induced lesions are single strand breaks and, to a lesser extent, base oxidized sites, which are recognized by Nth, Nfo and Fpg enzymes. High pressure liquid chromatography coupled to electrochemical detection revealed that PHY photosensitization did not induce 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo at detectable levels. DNA repair after PHY photosensitization was also investigated. Plasmid DNA damaged by PHY photosensitization was used to transform a series of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA repair mutants. The results revealed that plasmid survival was greatly reduced in rad14 mutants, while the ogg1 mutation did not modify the plasmid survival when compared to that in the wild type. Furthermore, plasmid survival in the ogg1 rad14 double mutant was not different from that in the rad14 single mutant. The results reported here indicate that lethal lesions induced by PHY plus VL are repaired differently by prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Morever, nucleotide excision repair seems to play a major role in the recognition and repair of these lesions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  9. Eco1 is important for DNA damage repair in S. cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Shuai; Goering, Matthew; Gard, Scarlett; Xiong, Bo; McNairn, Adrian J.; Jaspersen, Sue L; Gerton, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    The cohesin network has an essential role in chromosome segregation, but also plays a role in DNA damage repair. Eco1 is an acetyltransferase that targets subunits of the cohesin complex and is involved in both the chromosome segregation and DNA damage repair roles of the network. Using budding yeast as a model system, we find that mutations in Eco1, including a genocopy of a human Roberts syndrome allele, do not cause gross defects in chromosome cohesion. We examined how mitotic and meiotic ...

  10. [Studies on the repair of damaged DNA in bacteriophage, bacterial and mammalian systems]: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study sought to exploit the use of uv radiation as a source of genomic damage. We explored the molecular mechanism of the repair of DNA damage at a number of different levels of biological organization, by investigating bacteriophage, bacterial, yeast and mammalian cells. Not only have observations obtained in one biological system suggested specific experimental approaches in others, but we have also learned that some biochemical pathways for DNA repair are unique to specific organisms. Our studies are summarized in terms of 4 major areas of research activity that span the past 16 years. 86 refs

  11. In vitro sublethal damage repair in tumour subpopulations from a heterogeneous human colon tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The repair of sublethal radiation damage in two asynchronously growing tumour cell subpopulations (clones A and D) obtained from a single human adenocarcinoma biopsy specimen has been studied. The survival data found after generation of complete survival curves from split dose experiments in which exposures were separated by 3, 6, 12, or 24 h were examined. It was found that the method of performing irradiations (e.g. suspension cultures versus monolayer cultures) affected the shape of the single dose response curves, and as a result the interpretation of the amount of sublethal damage repair occurring after split dose irradiation. (author)

  12. Injection technologies for the repair of damaged concrete structures

    CERN Document Server

    Panasyuk, V V; Sylovanyuk, V P

    2014-01-01

    This book analyzes the most important achievements in science and engineering practice concerning operational factors that cause damage to concrete and reinforced concrete structures. It includes methods for assessing their strength and service life, especially those that are based on modern concepts of the fracture mechanics of materials. It also includes basic approaches to the prediction of the remaining service life for long-term operational structures. Much attention is paid to injection technologies for restoring the serviceability of damaged concrete and reinforced concrete structures. In particular, technologies for remedying holes, cracks, corrosion damages etc. The books contains sample cases in which the above technologies have been used to restore structural integrity and extend the reliable service life of concrete and reinforced concrete constructions, especially NPPs, underground railways, bridges, seaports and historical relics.

  13. Glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids, repair the damaged hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Tomotake; Kitagawa, Masaru; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Sogabe, Atsushi; Imura, Tomohiro; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Kitamoto, Dai

    2010-01-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs), are produced from feedstock by the genus Pseudozyma, and are the most promising biosurfactants known due to its versatile interfacial and biochemical actions. In order to broaden the application in cosmetics, the hair care properties of MELs were investigated using damaged hair. On electron microscopic observation, the damaged hair was dramatically recovered with applying MEL-A and MEL-B. The tensile strength of the damaged hair increased by treatment with MEL-A (122.0 +/- 13.5 gf/p), MEL-B (119.4 +/- 7.6 gf/p) and ceramide (100.7 +/- 15.9 gf/p) compared with only lauryl glucoside (96.7 +/- 12.7 gf/p), indicating the advantage of MELs on hair care treatment. In addition, the average friction coefficient of the damaged hair was maintained after treatment with MEL-A (0.108 +/- 0.002), MEL-B (0.107 +/- 0.003) and the ceramide (0.111 +/- 0.003), although lauryl glucoside treatment increased the average friction coefficient (0.126 +/- 0.003). The increase of bending rigidity by treatment with lauryl glucoside (0.204 +/- 0.002) was prevented by treatment with MEL-A (0.129 +/- 0.002), MEL-B (0.176 +/- 0.003) and the ceramide (0.164 +/- 0.002). Consequently, MELs are proposed to be the new hair care ingredient, which are the highly useful agent for not only for the recovery of damaged hair but also for providing the smooth and flexible hair. PMID:20431244

  14. Structural and mechanical repair of diffuse damage in cortical bone in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seref-Ferlengez, Zeynep; Basta-Pljakic, Jelena; Kennedy, Oran D; Philemon, Claudy J; Schaffler, Mitchell B

    2014-12-01

    Physiological wear and tear causes bone microdamage at several hierarchical levels, and these have different biological consequences. Bone remodeling is widely held to be the mechanism by which bone microdamage is repaired. However, recent studies showed that unlike typical linear microcracks, small crack damage, the clusters of submicron-sized matrix cracks also known as diffuse damage (Dif.Dx), does not activate remodeling. Thus, the fate of diffuse damage in vivo is not known. To examine this, we induced selectively Dif.Dx in rat ulnae in vivo by using end-load ulnar bending creep model. Changes in damage content were assessed by histomorphometry and mechanical testing immediately after loading (ie, acute loaded) or at 14 days after damage induction (ie, survival ulnae). Dif.Dx area was markedly reduced over the 14-day survival period after loading (p bone area in survival ulnae. The reduction in whole bone stiffness in acute loaded ulnae was restored to baseline levels in survival ulnae (p > 0.6). Microindentation studies showed that Dif.Dx caused a highly localized reduction in elastic modulus in diffuse damage regions of the ulnar cortex. Moduli in these previously damaged bone areas were restored to control values by 14 days after loading. Our current findings indicate that small crack damage in bone can be repaired without bone remodeling, and they suggest that alternative repair mechanisms exist in bone to deal with submicron-sized matrix cracks. Those mechanisms are currently unknown and further investigations are needed to elucidate the mechanisms by which this direct repair occurs. PMID:25042459

  15. Role of Nicotinamide in DNA Damage, Mutagenesis, and DNA Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devita Surjana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinamide is a water-soluble amide form of niacin (nicotinic acid or vitamin B3. Both niacin and nicotinamide are widely available in plant and animal foods, and niacin can also be endogenously synthesized in the liver from dietary tryptophan. Nicotinamide is also commercially available in vitamin supplements and in a range of cosmetic, hair, and skin preparations. Nicotinamide is the primary precursor of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+, an essential coenzyme in ATP production and the sole substrate of the nuclear enzyme poly-ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1. Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have clearly shown that PARP-1 and NAD+ status influence cellular responses to genotoxicity which can lead to mutagenesis and cancer formation. This paper will examine the role of nicotinamide in the protection from carcinogenesis, DNA repair, and maintenance of genomic stability.

  16. Computational studies of radiation and oxidative damage to DNA and its recognition by repair enzyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is used to study the time evolution of the recognition processes and to construct a model of the specific DNA-repair enzyme' complexes. MD simulations of the following molecules were performed: DNA dodecamer with thymine dimer (TD), DNA 30-mer with thymine glycol (TG), and respective specific repair enzymes T4 Endonuclease V and Endonuclease III. Both DNA lesions are experimentally suggested to be mutagenic and carcinogenic unless properly recognized and repaired by repair enzymes. In the case of TD, there is detected a strong kink around the TD site, that is not observed in native DNA. In addition there is observed a different value of electrostatic energy at the TD site - negative '-9 kcal/mol', in contrast to the nearly neutral value of the native thymine site. These two factors - structural changes and specific electrostatic energy - seem to be important for proper recognition of a TD damaged site and for formation of DNA-enzyme complex. Formation of this complex is the onset of the repair of DNA. In the case of TG damaged DNA the structural characteristics of the TG were calculated (charges, bond lengths, bond angles, etc.). The formed TG was used to replace the native thymine and then submitted to the simulation in the system with a repair enzyme with Endonuclease III for the purpose of the study of the formation of the DNA-enzyme complex. (author)

  17. Low-dose formaldehyde delays DNA damage recognition and DNA excision repair in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Luch

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Formaldehyde is still widely employed as a universal crosslinking agent, preservative and disinfectant, despite its proven carcinogenicity in occupationally exposed workers. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the possible impact of low-dose formaldehyde exposures in the general population. Due to the concomitant occurrence of multiple indoor and outdoor toxicants, we tested how formaldehyde, at micromolar concentrations, interferes with general DNA damage recognition and excision processes that remove some of the most frequently inflicted DNA lesions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The overall mobility of the DNA damage sensors UV-DDB (ultraviolet-damaged DNA-binding and XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum group C was analyzed by assessing real-time protein dynamics in the nucleus of cultured human cells exposed to non-cytotoxic (<100 μM formaldehyde concentrations. The DNA lesion-specific recruitment of these damage sensors was tested by monitoring their accumulation at local irradiation spots. DNA repair activity was determined in host-cell reactivation assays and, more directly, by measuring the excision of DNA lesions from chromosomes. Taken together, these assays demonstrated that formaldehyde obstructs the rapid nuclear trafficking of DNA damage sensors and, consequently, slows down their relocation to DNA damage sites thus delaying the excision repair of target lesions. A concentration-dependent effect relationship established a threshold concentration of as low as 25 micromolar for the inhibition of DNA excision repair. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A main implication of the retarded repair activity is that low-dose formaldehyde may exert an adjuvant role in carcinogenesis by impeding the excision of multiple mutagenic base lesions. In view of this generally disruptive effect on DNA repair, we propose that formaldehyde exposures in the general population should be further decreased to help reducing cancer risks.

  18. Repair studies in vitro of the DNA damage induced in human lymphocytes irradiated by UV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to estimate the repair capacity of DNA damage in UV irradiated human lymphocytes. The estimation of the DNA damage was done with the use of a single cell gel electrophoresis method (SCGE), also known as the Comet assay. In our investigation, previously cryopreserved lymphocytes were irradiated with UV at different doses, and DNA damage was estimated after various times of incubation. To study the biological effects of the dependence on UV exposure we have examined the level of the DNA damage in human lymphocytes after 1 hour of incubation. There was observed almost a linear increase of the DNA damage in the range of doses from 0 to 18 J/m2. To examine an influence of cell cycle (G0 stage or proliferating cells) on the repair efficiency, UV irradiated lymphocytes were incubated with or without the presence of LF-7. Results showed a statistically significant influence of the LF-7 on the repair of DNA damage induced by different doses of UV. (author)

  19. Quantitative aspects of repair of potentially lethal damage in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stationary cultures of Ehrlich ascites tumour cells were irradiated with X-rays and then immediately or after a time interval tsub(rep) plated to measure the survival. The increase in survival observed after delayed plating was interpreted as repair of potentially lethal damage. A cybernetic model was used to analyse these data. Three states of damage were assumed for the cells. In state A the cells could grow to macrocolonies, in state B the cells suffered potentially lethal damage and could grow to macrocolonies only if they were allowed to repair the damage and in state C the cells were lethally damaged. A method of deriving the values of the parameters of the model from the experimental data was given. The dependence of the reaction rate constant of the repair potentially lethal damage on the dose D was used to derive a possible mechanism for the production of the shoulder in the dose effect curve. Finally this model was compared with other models of radiation action in living cells. (author)

  20. Astaxanthin : a putative modulator of DNA damage and repair

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Dietary antioxidants are thought to be beneficial for human health. They can prevent damage to biomolecules such as DNA by removing free radicals and consequently prevent oxidative stress. However, several large scale intervention studies have found no beneficial effects or even harmful effects of antioxidant supplementation. More studies are therefore needed to sort out whether, how or when antioxidants improve health. Astaxanthin is a marine carotenoid synthesised by algae, which gives s...

  1. Self-repairing control for damaged robotic manipulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algorithms have been developed allowing operation of robotic systems under damaged conditions. Specific areas addressed were optimal sensor location, adaptive nonlinear control, fault-tolerant robot design, and dynamic path-planning. A seven-degree-of-freedom, hydraulic manipulator, with fault-tolerant joint design was also constructed and tested. This report completes this project which was funded under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program

  2. Human embryonic stem cells have enhanced repair of multiple forms of DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maynard, Scott; Swistowska, Anna Maria; Lee, Jae Wan;

    2008-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells need to maintain genomic integrity so that they can retain the ability to differentiate into multiple cell types without propagating DNA errors. Previous studies have suggested that mechanisms of genome surveillance, including DNA repair, are superior in mouse embryonic stem...... cells compared with various differentiated murine cells. Using single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) we found that human embryonic stem cells (BG01, I6) have more efficient repair of different types of DNA damage (generated from H2O2, UV-C, ionizing radiation, or psoralen) than human primary...... fibroblasts (WI-38, hs27) and, with the exception of UV-C damage, HeLa cells. Microarray gene expression analysis showed that mRNA levels of several DNA repair genes are elevated in human embryonic stem cells compared with their differentiated forms (embryoid bodies). These data suggest that genomic...

  3. Influence of XRCC1 Genetic Polymorphisms on Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Sterpone

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that ionizing radiation (IR can damage DNA through a direct action, producing single- and double-strand breaks on DNA double helix, as well as an indirect effect by generating oxygen reactive species in the cells. Mammals have evolved several and distinct DNA repair pathways in order to maintain genomic stability and avoid tumour cell transformation. This review reports important data showing a huge interindividual variability on sensitivity to IR and in susceptibility to developing cancer; this variability is principally represented by genetic polymorphisms, that is, DNA repair gene polymorphisms. In particular we have focussed on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of XRCC1, a gene that encodes for a scaffold protein involved basically in Base Excision Repair (BER. In this paper we have reported and presented recent studies that show an influence of XRCC1 variants on DNA repair capacity and susceptibility to breast cancer.

  4. Repair of potentially lethal radiation damage in human squamous carcinoma cells after chronic hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to examine the repair of radiation-induced potentially lethal damage in A431 and CaSki cells after chronic hypoxia. Cells in exponential phase are subjected to hypoxia (4 h of hypoxia. The repair returned to aerobic control level by 3 h of reoxygenation. PLDR of A431 cells reached maximum at about 9 h after irradiation in cells reoxygenated for 10 min after hypoxia. However, the repair is maximum at 6 h in cells reoxygenated for 3 h after hypoxia and in aerobic cells not previously exposed to hypoxia. Reoxygenation after chronic hypoxia did not affect the PLDR capacity and repair kinetics of CaSki cells. The results suggest that radiosensitization by reoxygenation after chronic hypoxia is not related to inhibition of PLDR. 14 refs., 3 figs

  5. Repair in E. coli of transforming plasmid DNA damaged by psoralen plus near-ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment of DNA with psoralen plus near-ultraviolet irradiation gives rise to both monoadducts and cross-links. The authors have examined the repair of plasmid NTP16 DNA treated in this way in vitro and then used to transform E. coli. Monoadducts are found to be potentially lethal, and can be repaired by uvr-dependent and recA-dependent pathways. The presence of a related resident plasmid in the transformed cells can enhance the survival of the incoming damaged NTP16 DNA. This effect is not recA-dependent. Removal of unbound psoralen from the plasmid DNA and exposure to further NUV is known to increase the ratio of cross-links to monoadducts, and the authors demonstrate that such cross-linked plasmid DNA is not readily repaired following transformation. However in the presence of homologous DNA there is evidence for the repair, and hence uptake by the cell, of cross-linked DNA. (Auth.)

  6. A bivariate optimal replacement policy with cumulative repair cost limit under cumulative damage model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MIN-T SAI LAI; SHIH-CHIH CHEN

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a bivariate replacement policy (n, T) for a cumulative shock damage process is presented that included the concept of cumulative repair cost limit. The arrival shocks can be divided into two kinds of shocks. Each type-I shock causes a random amount of damage and these damages are additive. When the total damage exceeds a failure level, the system goes into serious failure. Type-II shock causes the system into minor failure and such a failure can be corrected by minimal repair. When a minor failure occurs, the repaircost will be evaluated and minimal repair is executed if the accumulated repair cost is less than a predetermined limit L. The system is replaced at scheduled time T, at n-th minor failure, or at serious failure. The long-term expected cost per unit time is derived using the expected costs as the optimality criterion. The minimum-cost policy is derived, and existence and uniqueness of the optimal n* and T* are proved. This bivariate optimal replacement policy (n, T) is showed to be better than the optimal T* and the optimal n* policy.

  7. DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND CELL CYCLE CONTROL: A NATURAL BIO-DEFENSE MECHANISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND CELL CYCLE CONTROL: A natural bio-defense mechanismAnuradha Mudipalli.Maintenance of genetic information, including the correct sequence of nucleotides in DNA, is essential for replication, gene expression, and protein synthesis. DNA lesions onto...

  8. Both genetic and dietary factors underlie individual differences in DNA damage levels and DNA repair capacity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slyšková, Jana; Lorenzo, Y.; Karlsen, A.; Carlsen, M. H.; Novosadová, Vendula; Blomhoff, R.; Vodička, Pavel; Collins, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 16, APR 2014 (2014), s. 66-73. ISSN 1568-7864 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/12/1585 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 ; RVO:86652036 Keywords : DNA damage * DNA repair capacity * diet Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology; EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics (BTO-N) Impact factor: 3.111, year: 2014

  9. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 oncoprotein causes a delay in repair of DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Patients with human papillomavirus related (HPV+) head and neck cancers (HNCs) demonstrate improved clinical outcomes compared to traditional HPV negative (HPV−) HNC patients. We have recently shown that HPV+ HNC cells are more sensitive to radiation than HPV− HNC cells. However, roles of HPV oncogenes in regulating the response of DNA damage repair remain unknown. Material and methods: Using immortalized normal oral epithelial cell lines, HPV+ HNC derived cell lines, and HPV16 E7-transgenic mice we assessed the repair of DNA damage using γ-H2AX foci, single and split dose clonogenic survival assays, and immunoblot. The ability of E7 to modulate expression of proteins associated with DNA repair pathways was assessed by immunoblot. Results: HPV16 E7 increased retention of γ-H2AX nuclear foci and significantly decreased sublethal DNA damage repair. While phospho-ATM, phospho-ATR, Ku70, and Ku80 expressions were not altered by E7, Rad51 was induced by E7. Correspondingly, HPV+ HNC cell lines showed retention of Rad51 after γ-radiation. Conclusions: Our findings provide further understanding as to how HPV16 E7 manipulates cellular DNA damage responses that may underlie its oncogenic potential and influence the altered sensitivity to radiation seen in HPV+ HNC as compared to HPV− HNC

  10. 20 CFR 416.1151 - How we treat the repair or replacement of lost, damaged, or stolen resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How we treat the repair or replacement of lost, damaged, or stolen resources. 416.1151 Section 416.1151 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY... treat the repair or replacement of lost, damaged, or stolen resources. (a) General rule. If a...

  11. Mitochondrial and Nuclear DNA Damage and Repair in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Blasiak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging and oxidative stress seem to be the most important factors in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD, a condition affecting many elderly people in the developed world. However, aging is associated with the accumulation of oxidative damage in many biomolecules, including DNA. Furthermore, mitochondria may be especially important in this process because the reactive oxygen species produced in their electron transport chain can damage cellular components. Therefore, the cellular response to DNA damage, expressed mainly through DNA repair, may play an important role in AMD etiology. In several studies the increase in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA damage and mutations, and the decrease in the efficacy of DNA repair have been correlated with the occurrence and the stage of AMD. It has also been shown that mitochondrial DNA accumulates more DNA lesions than nuclear DNA in AMD. However, the DNA damage response in mitochondria is executed by nucleus-encoded proteins, and thus mutagenesis in nuclear DNA (nDNA may affect the ability to respond to mutagenesis in its mitochondrial counterpart. We reported that lymphocytes from AMD patients displayed a higher amount of total endogenous basal and oxidative DNA damage, exhibited a higher sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and UV radiation, and repaired the lesions induced by these factors less effectively than did cells from control individuals. We postulate that poor efficacy of DNA repair (i.e., is impaired above average for a particular age when combined with the enhanced sensitivity of retinal pigment epithelium cells to environmental stress factors, contributes to the pathogenesis of AMD. Collectively, these data suggest that the cellular response to both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA damage may play an important role in AMD pathogenesis.

  12. Are glutathione S transferases involved in DNA damage signalling? Interactions with DNA damage and repair revealed from molecular epidemiology studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dusinska, Maria, E-mail: Maria.DUSINSKA@nilu.no [CEE-Health Effects Group, NILU - Norwegian Institute for Air Research, Kjeller (Norway); Staruchova, Marta; Horska, Alexandra [Department of Experimental and Applied Genetics, Slovak Medical University, Bratislava (Slovakia); Smolkova, Bozena [Laboratory of Cancer Genetics, Cancer Research Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava (Slovakia); Collins, Andrew [Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo (Norway); Bonassi, Stefano [Unit of Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology, IRCCS San Raffaele Pisana, Rome (Italy); Volkovova, Katarina [Department of Experimental and Applied Genetics, Slovak Medical University, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2012-08-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are members of a multigene family of isoenzymes that are important in the control of oxidative stress and in phase II metabolism. Acting non-enzymically, GSTs can modulate signalling pathways of cell proliferation, cell differentiation and apoptosis. Using a molecular epidemiology approach, we have investigated a potential involvement of GSTs in DNA damage processing, specifically the modulation of DNA repair in a group of 388 healthy adult volunteers; 239 with at least 5 years of occupational exposure to asbestos, stone wool or glass fibre, and 149 reference subjects. We measured DNA damage in lymphocytes using the comet assay (alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis): strand breaks (SBs) and alkali-labile sites, oxidised pyrimidines with endonuclease III, and oxidised purines with formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. We also measured GST activity in erythrocytes, and the capacity for base excision repair (BER) in a lymphocyte extract. Polymorphisms in genes encoding three GST isoenzymes were determined, namely deletion of GSTM1 and GSTT1 and single nucleotide polymorphism Ile105Val in GSTP1. Consumption of vegetables and wine correlated negatively with DNA damage and modulated BER. GST activity correlated with oxidised bases and with BER capacity, and differed depending on polymorphisms in GSTP1, GSTT1 and GSTM1. A significantly lower BER rate was associated with the homozygous GSTT1 deletion in all asbestos site subjects and in the corresponding reference group. Multifactorial analysis revealed effects of sex and exposure in GSTP1 Ile/Val heterozygotes but not in Ile/Ile homozygotes. These variants affected also SBs levels, mainly by interactions of GSTP1 genotype with exposure, with sex, and with smoking habit; and by an interaction between sex and smoking. Our results show that GST polymorphisms and GST activity can apparently influence DNA stability and repair of oxidised bases, suggesting a potential new role for these

  13. Are glutathione S transferases involved in DNA damage signalling? Interactions with DNA damage and repair revealed from molecular epidemiology studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are members of a multigene family of isoenzymes that are important in the control of oxidative stress and in phase II metabolism. Acting non-enzymically, GSTs can modulate signalling pathways of cell proliferation, cell differentiation and apoptosis. Using a molecular epidemiology approach, we have investigated a potential involvement of GSTs in DNA damage processing, specifically the modulation of DNA repair in a group of 388 healthy adult volunteers; 239 with at least 5 years of occupational exposure to asbestos, stone wool or glass fibre, and 149 reference subjects. We measured DNA damage in lymphocytes using the comet assay (alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis): strand breaks (SBs) and alkali-labile sites, oxidised pyrimidines with endonuclease III, and oxidised purines with formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. We also measured GST activity in erythrocytes, and the capacity for base excision repair (BER) in a lymphocyte extract. Polymorphisms in genes encoding three GST isoenzymes were determined, namely deletion of GSTM1 and GSTT1 and single nucleotide polymorphism Ile105Val in GSTP1. Consumption of vegetables and wine correlated negatively with DNA damage and modulated BER. GST activity correlated with oxidised bases and with BER capacity, and differed depending on polymorphisms in GSTP1, GSTT1 and GSTM1. A significantly lower BER rate was associated with the homozygous GSTT1 deletion in all asbestos site subjects and in the corresponding reference group. Multifactorial analysis revealed effects of sex and exposure in GSTP1 Ile/Val heterozygotes but not in Ile/Ile homozygotes. These variants affected also SBs levels, mainly by interactions of GSTP1 genotype with exposure, with sex, and with smoking habit; and by an interaction between sex and smoking. Our results show that GST polymorphisms and GST activity can apparently influence DNA stability and repair of oxidised bases, suggesting a potential new role for these

  14. Using redundancy to repair video damaged by network data loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanlin; Claypool, Mark

    1999-12-01

    With rapid progress in both computers and networks, real- time multimedia applications are now possible on the Internet. Sine the Internet was designed to support traditional applications, multimedia applications on the Internet often suffer from unacceptable delay, jitter and data loss. Among these, data loss often has the largest impact on quality. In this paper, we propose a new forward error correction technique for video that compensates for lost packets, while maintaining minimal delay. Our approach transmits a small, low-quality redundant frame after each full-quality primary frame. In the event the primary frame is lost, we display the low-quality frame, rather than display the previous frame or retransmit the primary frame. To evaluate our approach, we simulated the effect of network data loss on MPEG video clips and repaired the data loss by using redundancy frames. We conducted user studies that experimentally measured users' opinions on the quality of the video streams in the presence of data loss, both with and without our redundancy approach. In addition, we analyze the system overhead incurred by the redundancy. We find that video redundancy can greatly improve the perceptual quality of video in the presence of network data loss. The system overhead that redundancy introduces is dependent on the quality of the redundant frames, but a typical redundancy overhead will be approximately 10% that of the original frames.

  15. Transfer of a repair gene from E. coli as a tool in studies on the action of alkylating mutagens in tobacco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Alkylating agents (AA) belong to the most potent mutagens. Nevertheless, the role of individual DNA lesions in the toxic and mutagenic effects of AA in plants are poorly understood. A new tool to study this topic is the transfer of a gene with a specified repair function for a specific DNA lesion. Differences in the responses to AA can be assumed to be caused by changes in the amount of DNA lesion(s) repaired by the introduced gene. Methyl-nitroso urea (MNU) produces 06-methylG and other DNA lesions methylated at O-sites. Taurine-chloroethyl-nitrosourea (TCNH) causes DNA-DNA crosslinks, the formation of which starts with the chloroethylation of G at 06. Both 06-methylG, 04-methylT, O-methylphosphotriesters produced by MNH and 06-chloroethylG produced by TCNH are known to be repaired with AT coded by E. coli ada gene. Transfer of this gene and its expression in tobacco appeared to increase the resistance of the transformed cell to both AA tested. It seems, therefore, likely that the DNA lesions mentioned above are at least partly involved in the production of toxic effects of AA in tobacco. (author)

  16. Oxidative DNA damage background estimated by a system model of base excision repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokhansanj, B A; Wilson, III, D M

    2004-05-13

    Human DNA can be damaged by natural metabolism through free radical production. It has been suggested that the equilibrium between innate damage and cellular DNA repair results in an oxidative DNA damage background that potentially contributes to disease and aging. Efforts to quantitatively characterize the human oxidative DNA damage background level based on measuring 8-oxoguanine lesions as a biomarker have led to estimates varying over 3-4 orders of magnitude, depending on the method of measurement. We applied a previously developed and validated quantitative pathway model of human DNA base excision repair, integrating experimentally determined endogenous damage rates and model parameters from multiple sources. Our estimates of at most 100 8-oxoguanine lesions per cell are consistent with the low end of data from biochemical and cell biology experiments, a result robust to model limitations and parameter variation. Our results show the power of quantitative system modeling to interpret composite experimental data and make biologically and physiologically relevant predictions for complex human DNA repair pathway mechanisms and capacity.

  17. The Nucleotide Excision Repair System of Borrelia burgdorferi Is the Sole Pathway Involved in Repair of DNA Damage by UV Light

    OpenAIRE

    Hardy, Pierre-Olivier; Chaconas, George

    2013-01-01

    To survive and avoid accumulation of mutations caused by DNA damage, the genomes of prokaryotes encode a variety of DNA repair pathways most well characterized in Escherichia coli. Some of these are required for the infectivity of various pathogens. In this study, the importance of 25 DNA repair/recombination genes for Borrelia burgdorferi survival to UV-induced DNA damage was assessed. In contrast to E. coli, where 15 of these genes have an effect on survival of UV irradiation, disruption of...

  18. Cellular and molecular repair of X-ray-induced damage: dependence on oxygen tension and nutritional status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellular and molecular repair was studied at 230C using split-dose recovery and alkaline elution techniques, respectively, as a function of cellular oxygen and nutrient conditions. Hypoxic cells in full medium showed a partial reduction in the level of sublethal damage (SLD) repair relative to aerated cells; the respective repair kinetics were similar with a common repair half-time of 30 min. Similarly, hypoxic cells showed a slight reduction in strand break rejoining capacity compared to aerated cells. Under nutrient deprivation, anoxic cells displayed no SLD repair or strand break repair, while aerated cells exhibited the same level of SLD and strand break repair as for well-fed cells. In addition, nutrient deprived cells at low O2 levels displayed normal SLD and strand break repair capability. These results indicate that both nutrient and O2 deprivation are necessary for complete inhibition of cellular and molecular repair, and low levels of O2 can effectively reverse this inhibition

  19. Continuous lift piers: Damage repair and response during subsidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of test foundations damaged during a longwall mining operation were left with permanent tilt, curvature, and substantial cracking. Two of the foundations were releveled using continuous lift piers. The continuous lift piers removed the tilt and curvature and significantly reduced the width of the foundation cracks. Following the releveling of the foundations, an adjacent longwall panel was mined, resulting in additional subsidence, although of smaller magnitude. The response of the releveled foundations was monitored and compared with the response of a footing that was not releveled. Although the continuous pier system does not strengthen the structure and distortion was observed during the second event, the system permitted the deformations to be removed in a few hours

  20. Mechanisms and biological impact of DNA repair pathways for UV and γ-ray-induced damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nature has equipped all living systems with an intricate network of DNA repair pathways, to cope with damage induced by genotoxic agents (such as UV light, γ-rays and numerous chemicals). These pathways ensure genome stability and prevent carcinogenesis. Examples of multi-step damage repair processes are: nucleotide excision repair (NER, for removal of a wide variety of lesions, including UV) and recombination repair (for elimination of the very genotoxic radiation-induced double strand breaks). The NER pathway is understood in great detail and is associated with three human syndromes characterized by marked sun sensitivity: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), cockayne syndrome (CS) and tricho-thio-dystrophy (TTD), XP patients show an over 1000 x increased risk of skin cancer, in contrast to CS and TTD. At least 25 proteins re involved some are also implicated in other cellular processes, explaining puzzling features associated with defects in these genes. NER-deficient mouse mutants have been generated, that permit evaluation of the biological impact of this process. Recombination repair is much less understood. However, recently a number of genes has been cloned based on sequence homology with yeast genes and mouse mutants are being generated. These will be invaluable to investigate e.g. radioresistance and radiation-induced tumorigenesis and for radiotherapy. (author)

  1. Silibinin enhances the repair of ultraviolet B-induced DNA damage by activating p53-dependent nucleotide excision repair mechanism in human dermal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillermo-Lagae, Ruth; Deep, Gagan; Ting, Harold; Agarwal, Chapla; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2015-11-24

    Ultraviolet radiation B (UVB) is the main cause of DNA damage in epidermal cells; and if not repaired, this DNA damage leads to skin cancer. In earlier studies, we have reported that natural flavonolignan silibinin exerts strong chemopreventive efficacy against UVB-induced skin damage and carcinogenesis; however mechanistic studies are still being actively pursued. Here, we investigated the role of nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway in silibinin's efficacy to repair UVB-induced DNA damage. Normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) were exposed to UVB (1 mJ/cm2) with pre- or post- silibinin (100 μM) treatment, and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) formation/repair was measured. Results showed that post-UVB silibinin treatment accelerates DNA repair via activating the NER pathway including the expression of XPA (xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A), XPB, XPC, and XPG. In UVB exposed fibroblasts, silibinin treatment also increased p53 and GADD45α expression; the key regulators of the NER pathway and DNA repair. Consistently, post-UVB silibinin treatment increased the mRNA transcripts of XPA and GADD45α. Importantly, silibinin showed no effect on UVB-induced DNA damage repair in XPA- and XPB-deficient human dermal fibroblasts suggesting their key role in silibinin-mediated DNA damage repair. Moreover, in the presence of pifithrin-α, an inhibitor of p53, the DNA repair efficacy of silibinin was compromised associated with a reduction in XPA and GADD45α transcripts. Together, these findings suggest that silibinin's efficacy against UVB-induced photodamage is primarily by inhibiting NER and p53; and these findings further support silibinin's usage as a potential inexpensive, effective, and non-toxic agent for skin cancer chemoprevention. PMID:26447614

  2. Gene-specific repair of benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide DNA damage in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gene-specific preferential repair of UV damage has been well documented in a variety of organisms. Less is known about many other types of critical DNA lesions, the data available being not numerous and contradictory. To date, the majority of observations with UV were obtained by using T4 endonuclease V system. Recent report questions the applicability of UvrABC nuclease incision method for detecting gene-specific repair. This has stimulated our search for simple and sensitive approach based on a different principle. We have employed the idea of detection by the Southern hybridization of restriction cleavage inhibition at rare sites and developed a method for the analysis of benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (anti-BPDE) DNA damage in human H-ras proto-oncogene. Damage-dependent induction of individual facultative bands resulting from cleavage inhibition was observed in in vitro modified (4-50 adducts/103kb) p220-ras plasmid DNA digested with EcoRI/NotI, Xhol/Xbal/PstI, and SstI/XbaI/Pst/I. In vivo lesion formation and removal was monitored at several PstI sites distributed along the 6.4 kb single copy ras sequence. Rapid gene-specific repair was seen in primary culture of normal human fibroblasts and in SV40 transformed GM00637 cells. Surprisingly, SV40 transformed XP12BE (complementation group A) GM4429 fibroblasts also repaired anti-BPDE DNA damage at comparable levels. All investigated sites within ras sequence were repaired faster than the genome overall. The results show the utility of the above approach for fine mapping of anti-BPDE DNA lesions. Data suggests that the xeroderma pigmentosum (group A) fibroblasts have a capacity of removing these bulky adducts at least from the active genes

  3. DNA Repair and the Accumulation of Oxidatively Damaged DNA Are Affected by Fruit Intake in Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Croteau, Deborah L; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Harboe, Charlotte;

    2010-01-01

    were fed for 14 weeks a control diet or a diet with 8% peach or nectarine extract. The activities of DNA repair enzymes, the level of DNA damage, and gene expression changes were measured. Our study showed that repair of various oxidative DNA lesions was more efficient in liver extracts derived from...... mice fed fruit-enriched diets. In support of these findings, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed that there was a decrease in the levels of formamidopyrimidines in peach-fed mice compared with the controls. Additionally, microarray analysis revealed that NTH1 was upregulated in peach...

  4. Neuromuscular Damage and Repair after Dry Needling in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ares Domingo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Some dry needling treatments involve repetitive and rapid needle insertions into myofascial trigger points. This type of treatment causes muscle injury and can also damage nerve fibers. The aim of this study is to determine the injury caused by 15 repetitive punctures in the muscle and the intramuscular nerves in healthy mouse muscle and its ulterior regeneration. Methods. We repeatedly needled the levator auris longus muscle of mice, and then the muscles were processed with immunohistochemistry, methylene blue, and electron microscopy techniques. Results. Three hours after the dry needling procedure, the muscle fibers showed some signs of an inflammatory response, which progressed to greater intensity 24 hours after the procedure. Some inflammatory cells could still be seen when the muscle regeneration was almost complete seven days after the treatment. One day after the treatment, some changes in the distribution of receptors could be observed in the denervated postsynaptic component. Reinnervation was complete by the third day after the dry needling procedure. We also saw very fine axonal branches reinnervating all the postsynaptic components and some residual sprouts the same day. Conclusion. Repeated dry needling punctures in muscle do not perturb the different stages of muscle regeneration and reinnervation.

  5. Dietary Berries and Ellagic Acid Prevent Oxidative DNA Damage and Modulate Expression of DNA Repair Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh C. Gupta

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage is a pre-requisite for the initiation of cancer and agents that reduce this damage are useful in cancer prevention. In this study, we evaluated the ability of whole berries and berry phytochemical, ellagic acid to reduce endogenous oxidative DNA damage. Ellagic acid was selected based on > 95% inhibition of 8-oxodeoxyguosine (8-oxodG and other unidentified oxidative DNA adducts induced by 4-hydroxy-17B;-estradiol and CuCl2 in vitro. Inhibition of the latter occurred at lower concentrations (10 u(microM than that for 8-oxodG (100 u(microM. In the in vivo study, female CD-1 mice (n=6 were fed either a control diet or diet supplemented with ellagic acid (400 ppm and dehydrated berries (5% w/w with varying ellagic acid contents -- blueberry (low, strawberry (medium and red raspberry (high, for 3 weeks. Blueberry and strawberry diets showed moderate reductions in endogenous DNA adducts (25%. However, both red raspberry and ellagic acid diets showed a significant reduction of 59% (p < 0.001 and 48% (p < 0.01, respectively. Both diets also resulted in a 3-8 fold over-expression of genes involved in DNA repair such as xeroderma pigmentosum group A complementing protein (XPA, DNA excision repair protein (ERCC5 and DNA ligase III (DNL3. These results suggest that red raspberry and ellagic acid reduce endogenous oxidative DNA damage by mechanisms which may involve increase in DNA repair.

  6. Isoflavones in aglycone solution enhance ultraviolet B-induced DNA damage repair efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovine, B; Garofalo, M; Orefice, M; Giannini, V; Gasparri, F; Monfrecola, G; Bevilacqua, M A

    2014-04-01

    The isoflavones daidzein and genistein are natural compounds which have anti-inflammatory and photoprotective activities, and may be effective in the repair of ultraviolet (UV)-induced photodamage. In this study, an alcoholic solution of aglycone isoflavones with a genistein:daidzein ratio of 1:4 [Rottapharm (RPH)-aglycone] was examined for its effects on the repair of DNA damage induced by a single dose of UVB irradiation (20 mJ/cm(2)). For this purpose, human skin cells were first UVB-irradiated and then treated with RPH-aglycone. Comet assay analysis was used to estimate the UVB-induced DNA damage at different time points after treatment by measuring the tail moment parameter. We found that treatment with 10 μmol/L RPH-aglycone solution resulted in a significantly reduced tail moment at 1h after treatment, and 34-35% enhancement of damage repair at 4 h after treatment. These results suggest that isoflavone aglycones are protective against UVB-induced DNA damage. PMID:24635083

  7. Repair response for DNA double-strand damage through ubiquitylation of chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chromatin modulation (remodeling) via lysine63 (K63)-linked ubiquitin (U) has been found important in the repair response for DNA double-strand damage, and the sequential signaling events at the damage site are explained. As the first step of the repair, MRN (MRE11, RAD50 and nibrin) complex recognizes the damage site and binds to it followed by many linked reactions by recruited and activated enzymes of various protein kinases and phosphatases, which resulting in the enhanced early signaling. As well, gamma-H2AX (phosphorylated histone H2AX) is yielded by the process, to which phosphorylated MDC1 (mediator of DNA-damage checkpoint 1) binds to produce their complex. Then further binding of RNF8-HERC2-UBC13 (ring finger protein 8, hect domain and RCC1 (CHC1)-like domain, and U conjugating enzyme E2N, respectively) occurs for starting the cumulative ubiquitylation of H2AX via K63 as the middle phase response. Signaling in the late phase occurs on the U chain formed at the damage site by binding of RAP (receptor-associated protein) 80 and other recruited 5 proteins like BRCA1 (breast cancer 1, early onset) to repair DNA by the homologous recombination after 53BP1 (tumor protein p53 binding protein) binding followed by methylation of histone H4. In a case of human compound heterozygous RNF168 defect, RIDDLE syndrome (radiosensitivity, immunodeficiency, dysmorphic features and learning difficulties), cells have no and slight abnormality of G2/M and intra-S checkpoint, respectively. Another defecting case with homozygous nonsense mutation has high radiosensitivity, intra-S checkpoint abnormality and others. Abnormality of immuno-globulins observed in both cases is similar to that in the RNF8-knockout mouse. Many tasks in chromatin ubiquitylation in the repair are still remained to be solved for protection and treatment of related diseases. (T.T.)

  8. Incident laser modulation of a repaired damage site with a rim in fused silica rear subsurface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Li; Xiang Xia; Zu Xiao-Tao; Yuan Xiao-Dong; He Shao-Bo; Jiang Xiao-Dong; Zheng Wan-Guo

    2012-01-01

    Local CO2 laser treatment has proved to be an effective method to prevent the 351-nm laser-induced damage sitesin a fused silica surface from exponentially growing,which is responsible for limiting the lifetime of optics in high fluence laser systems.However,the CO2 laser induced ablation crater is often surrounded by a raised rim at the edge,which can also result in the intensification of transmitted ultraviolet light that may damage the downstream optics.In this work,the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method is developed to simulate the distribution of electrical field intensity in the vicinity of the CO2 laser mitigated damage site located in the exit subsurface of fused silica.The simulated results show that the repaired damage sites with raised rims cause more notable modulation to the incident laser than those without rims.Specifically,we present a theoretical model of using dimpled patterning to control the rim structure around the edge of repaired damage sites to avoid damage to downstream optics.The calculated results accord well with previous experimental results and the underlying physical mechanism is analysed in detail.

  9. Delayed repair of radiation induced clustered DNA damage: Friend or foe?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A signature of ionizing radiation exposure is the induction of DNA clustered damaged sites, defined as two or more lesions within one to two helical turns of DNA by passage of a single radiation track. Clustered damage is made up of double strand breaks (DSB) with associated base lesions or abasic (AP) sites, and non-DSB clusters comprised of base lesions, AP sites and single strand breaks. This review will concentrate on the experimental findings of the processing of non-DSB clustered damaged sites. It has been shown that non-DSB clustered damaged sites compromise the base excision repair pathway leading to the lifetime extension of the lesions within the cluster, compared to isolated lesions, thus the likelihood that the lesions persist to replication and induce mutation is increased. In addition certain non-DSB clustered damaged sites are processed within the cell to form additional DSB. The use of E. coli to demonstrate that clustering of DNA lesions is the major cause of the detrimental consequences of ionizing radiation is also discussed. The delayed repair of non-DSB clustered damaged sites in humans can be seen as a 'friend', leading to cell killing in tumour cells or as a 'foe', resulting in the formation of mutations and genetic instability in normal tissue.

  10. DNA repair and the evolution of transformation in Bacillus subtilis. 3. Sex with damaged DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural genetic transformation in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis provides an experimental system for studying the evolutionary function of sexual recombination. The repair hypothesis proposes that during transformation the exogenous DNA taken up by cells is used as template for recombinational repair of damages in the recipient cell's genome. Earlier results demonstrated that the population density of transformed cells (i.e., sexual cells) increases, relative to nontransformed cells (primarily asexual cells), with increasing dosage of ultraviolet irradiation, provided that the cells are transformed with undamaged homologous DNA after they have become damaged. In nature, however, donor DNA for transformation is likely to come from cells that are as damaged as the recipient cells. In order to better simulate the effects of transformation in natural populations we conducted similar experiments as those just described using damaged donor DNA. The authors document in this report that transformants continue to increase in relative density even if they are transformed with damaged donor DNA. These results suggest that sites of transformation are often damaged sites in the recipient cell's genome

  11. Neocarzinostatin-mediated DNA damage and repair in wild-type and repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation and repair of neocarzinostatin (NCS)-mediated DNA damage were examined in two strains of Chinese hamster ovary cells. The response in strain EM9, a mutant line selected for its sensitivity to ethyl methanesulfonate and shown to have a defect in the repair of X-ray-induced DNA breaks, was compared with that observed in the parental strain (AA8). The DNA strand breaks and their subsequent rejoining were measured using the method of elution of DNA from filters under either alkaline (for single-strand breaks), or nondenaturing conditions (for double-strand breaks). Colony survival assays showed that the mutant was more sensitive to the action of NCS than was the parental strain by a factor of approximately 1.5. Elution analyses showed that the DNA from both strains was damaged by NCS; the mutant displayed more damage than the parent under the same treatment conditions. Single-strand breaks were produced with a frequency of about 10 to 15 times the frequency of double-strand breaks. Both strains were able to rejoin both single-strand breaks and double-strand breaks induced by NCS treatment. The strand break data suggest that the difference in NCS-mediated cytotoxicity between EM9 and AA8 cells may be directly related to the enhanced production of DNA strand breaks in EM9. However, the fact that much higher doses of NCS were required in the DNA studies compared to the colony survival assays implies that either a small number of DNA breaks occur in a critical region of the genome, or that lesions other than DNA strand breaks are partly responsible for the observed cytotoxicity

  12. Relationship between the repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and recovery from potentially lethal damage in 9L rat brain tumor cells. [Gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    vanAnkeren, S.C.; Wheeler, K.T.

    1984-03-01

    The kinetics of repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and recovery from radiation-induced potentially lethal damage (PLD) for fed plateau-phase 9L/Ro rat brain tumor cells were compared after single doses of gamma-radiation and after combined treatment with 3 micrograms of 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU)/ml given 16 hr prior to irradiation. DNA damage and repair were assayed using alkaline filter elution, while cell survival was assayed by colony formation. Repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and recovery from radiation-induced PLD followed statistically identical biphasic kinetics; the fast-phase half-times were 4.1 +/- 0.3 (S.D.) min and 4.0 +/- 0.8 min, while the slow-phase half-times were 59.7 +/- 11.2 min and 78.7 +/- 34.1 min, respectively. Treatment with BCNU prior to irradiation resulted in both additional DNA damage and increased cell kill. When DNA damage and cell survival after the combined treatment were corrected for the contribution from BCNU given alone, no inhibition of either repair of radiation-induced DNA damage or of recovery from radiation-induced PLD was observed. However, postirradiation hypertonic treatment inhibited both DNA repair and recovery from radiation-induced PLD. These correlations between the kinetics of the molecular and cellular repair processes support a role for repair of radiation-induced DNA damage in recovery from radiation-induced PLD. The lack of inhibition by BCNU of both repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and of recovery from radiation-induced PLD also demonstrates that these are not the mechanisms by which BCNU enhances radiation-induced cytotoxicity in 9L cells.

  13. DNA glycosylases: in DNA repair and beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobs, Angelika L.; Schär, Primo

    2011-01-01

    The base excision repair machinery protects DNA in cells from the damaging effects of oxidation, alkylation, and deamination; it is specialized to fix single-base damage in the form of small chemical modifications. Base modifications can be mutagenic and/or cytotoxic, depending on how they interfere with the template function of the DNA during replication and transcription. DNA glycosylases play a key role in the elimination of such DNA lesions; they recognize and excise damaged bases, thereb...

  14. DNA damage and repair activity after broccoli intake in young healthy smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riso, Patrizia; Martini, Daniela; Møller, Peter;

    2010-01-01

    compounds, including smokers. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of broccoli intake on biomarkers of DNA damage and repair. Twenty-seven young healthy smokers consumed a portion of steamed broccoli (250 g/day) or a control diet for 10 days each within a crossover design with a washout period...... mRNA expression levels of repair and defence enzymes: 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1), nucleoside diphosphate linked moiety X-type motif 1 (NUDT1) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1). After broccoli consumption, the level of oxidised DNA lesions decreased by 41% (95% confidence interval: 10%, 72%) and...... the resistance to H(2)O(2)-induced DNA strand breaks increased by 23% (95% CI: 13%, 34%). Following broccoli intake, a higher protection was observed in subjects with glutathione S-transferase (GST) M1-null genotype. The expression level and activity of repair enzymes was unaltered. In conclusion...

  15. Granular Effect of Fly Ash Repairs Damage of Recycled Coarse Aggregate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jiu-su; XIAO Han-ning; GONG Jian-qing

    2008-01-01

    Repairing effect of fly ash (FA) on damage of recycled coarse aggregate was evaluated by characteristics of pores and cracks in the vicinity of interracial transition zone (ITZ). The interracial structure between the virgin aggregate and the attached old mortar was investigated and compared with ITZ of recycled aggregate concrete in the presence of FA or ultra-fine FA(UFA) by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM). Diam- eter and plumpness frequency distribution of pores as well as width of the old ITZ, length of contacting points and cracks density were analyzed. The SEM results reveal that the diameter of pores is decreases significantly but pores plumpness increases. A decreased ITZ width and cracks density as well as an increased bonding zone length can also been observed, which indicates that FA or UFA repairs damage of recycled coarse aggregate due to its granular effect.

  16. Increasing Melanoma—Too Many Skin Cell Damages or Too Few Repairs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Örjan Hallberg

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Skin melanoma rates have been increasing for a long time in many Western countries. The object of this study was to apply modern problem-solving theory normally used to clear industrial problems to search for roots and causes of this medical question. Increasing cancer rates can be due to too many cell damage incidents or to too few repairs. So far, it has been assumed that the melanoma epidemic mainly is caused by increasing sun tanning habits. In order to explore this problem in more detail, we used cancer statistics from several countries over time and space. Detailed analysis of data obtained and a model study to evaluate the effects from increased damages or decreased repairs clearly indicate that the main reason behind the melanoma problem is a disturbed immune system. The possibility to introduce efficient corrective actions is apparent.

  17. Triplex technology in studies of DNA damage, DNA repair, and mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Anirban; Vasquez, Karen M

    2011-08-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) can bind to the major groove of homopurine-homopyrimidine stretches of double-stranded DNA in a sequence-specific manner through Hoogsteen hydrogen bonding to form DNA triplexes. TFOs by themselves or conjugated to reactive molecules can be used to direct sequence-specific DNA damage, which in turn results in the induction of several DNA metabolic activities. Triplex technology is highly utilized as a tool to study gene regulation, molecular mechanisms of DNA repair, recombination, and mutagenesis. In addition, TFO targeting of specific genes has been exploited in the development of therapeutic strategies to modulate DNA structure and function. In this review, we discuss advances made in studies of DNA damage, DNA repair, recombination, and mutagenesis by using triplex technology to target specific DNA sequences. PMID:21501652

  18. Evaluation of radioinduced damage and repair capacity in blood lymphocytes of breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.A. Nascimento

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Genetic damage caused by ionizing radiation and repair capacity of blood lymphocytes from 3 breast cancer patients and 3 healthy donors were investigated using the comet assay. The comets were analyzed by two parameters: comet tail length and visual classification. Blood samples from the donors were irradiated in vitro with a 60Co source at a dose rate of 0.722 Gy/min, with a dose range of 0.2 to 4.0 Gy and analyzed immediately after the procedure and 3 and 24 h later. The basal level of damage and the radioinduced damage were higher in lymphocytes from breast cancer patients than in lymphocytes from healthy donors. The radioinduced damage showed that the two groups had a similar response when analyzed immediately after the irradiations. Therefore, while the healthy donors presented a considerable reduction of damage after 3 h, the patients had a higher residual damage even 24 h after exposure. The repair capacity of blood lymphocytes from the patients was slower than that of lymphocytes from healthy donors. The possible influence of age, disease stage and mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are discussed. Both parameters adopted proved to be sensitive and reproducible: the dose-response curves for DNA migration can be used not only for the analysis of cellular response but also for monitoring therapeutic interventions. Lymphocytes from the breast cancer patients presented an initial radiosensitivity similar to that of healthy subjects but a deficient repair mechanism made them more vulnerable to the genotoxic action of ionizing radiation. However, since lymphocytes from only 3 patients and 3 normal subjects were analyzed in the present paper, additional donors will be necessary for a more accurate evaluation.

  19. Optimization and standardization of the ''comet assay'' for analyzing the repair of DNA damage in cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human tumor cells or isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes were analyzed in the experiments. The amount of DNA damage and the effectiveness of DNA repair was measured after X-irradiation using the 'comet assay' technique. Results: In this presentation the influences of different methodological factors like agarose concentration, buffer pH, electrophoresis time, electric field strength on the applicability of the 'comet assay' are described in detail and optimum conditions for 'comet assay' experiments have been evaluated. Additionally the authors will show a comparison of different fluorescent DNA dyes pointing out their advantages or disadvantages for 'comet' analysis. The usefulness of this technique and its capabilities are exemplified by showing DNA repair kinetics of human lymphocytes of different healthy or radiosensitive donors after in-vitro irradiation with 2 Gy X-rays. Conclusions: This paper presents data on the optimization and standardization of the original 'comet assay' leading to an extremely fast and practicable protocol in the field of single cell gel electrophoresis. After irradiation with 0.1 Gy an increase in the amount of DNA damage can be measured with high statistical significance and the DNA repair capacity of individual cells after X-ray doses of 2 Gy can be analyzed with high reproducibility. The results comparing DNA repair capacities of different donors point out that the 'comet assay' may have the potential for the estimation of individual radiosensitivity. (orig./MG)

  20. Rotator Interval Lesion and Damaged Subscapularis Tendon Repair in a High School Baseball Player

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Muto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2013, a 16-year-old baseball pitcher visited Nobuhara Hospital complaining of shoulder pain and limited range of motion in his throwing shoulder. High signal intensity in the rotator interval (RI area (ball sign, injured subscapularis tendon, and damage to both the superior and middle glenohumeral ligaments were identified using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Repair of the RI lesion and partially damaged subscapularis tendon was performed in this pitcher. During surgery, an opened RI and dropping of the subscapularis tendon were observed. The RI was closed in a 90° externally rotated and abducted position. To reconfirm the exact repaired state of the patient, arthroscopic examination was performed from behind. However, suture points were not visible in the >30° externally rotated position, which indicates that the RI could not be correctly repaired with the arthroscopic procedure. One year after surgery, the patient obtained full function of the shoulder and returned to play at a national convention. Surgical repair of the RI lesion should be performed in exactly the correct position of the upper extremity.

  1. Toxicity DNA damage and inhibition of DNA repair synthesis in human melanoma cells by concentrated sunlight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A water lens was used to focus solar radiation, giving an 8-fold concentration of the total spectrum and a cytocidal flux similar to that of laboratory UV sources. Survival curves for human melanoma cells were similar for sunlight and 254 nm UV. An xeroderma pigmentosum lymphoblastoid line was equally sensitive to both agents and human cell lines sensitive to ionizing radiation (lymphoblastoid lines), crosslinking agents or monofunctional alkylating agents (melanoma lines) had the same 254 nm UV and solar survival responses as appropriate control lines. Two melanoma sublines derived separately by 16 cycles of treatment with sunlight or 254 nm UV were crossresistant to both agents. In one melanoma cell line, DNA strand breaks and DNA protein crosslinking were induced in melanoma cells by sunlight but pyrimidine dimers and DNA interstrand crosslinking could not be detected. The solar fluence response of DNA repair synthesis was much less than that from equitoxic 254 nm UV, reaching a maximum near the D0 value and then declining; but semiconservative DNA synthesis remained high. These effects were not due to changes in thymidine pool sizes. Solar exposure did not have a major effect on 254 nm UV-induced repair synthesis. (author)

  2. Break-induced replication repair of damaged forks induces genomic duplications in human cells

    OpenAIRE

    Costantino, L.; Sotiriou, S. K.; Rantala, J. K.; Magin, S.; Mladenov, E.; Helleday, T.; Haber, J E; Iliakis, G.; Kallioniemi, O P; Halazonetis, T D

    2013-01-01

    In budding yeast, one-ended DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and damaged replication forks are repaired by break-induced replication (BIR), a homologous recombination pathway that requires the Pol32 subunit of DNA polymerase delta. DNA replication stress is prevalent in cancer, but BIR has not been characterized in mammals. In a cyclin E overexpression model of DNA replication stress, POLD3, the human ortholog of POL32, was required for cell cycle progression and processive DNA synthesis. Segm...

  3. Immunologic proof of DNS irradiation damages and their repair in stationary yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In rabbits an antiserum was produced by injecting UV-irradiated denaturated calf-thymus DNS; after inhibiting unspecific bindings, a specific serological reaction with UV-induced irradiation damages could be taken as present in this antiserum. By the ammonium sulphate precipitation as immunologic method of detection, after UV-irradiation the genesis of damages at certain sites in the DNS of different yeast lineages and their repair was observed. The elemination of UV-induced DNS damages was observed after an incubation in a nutrien medium, after photo-reactivation and after combining both therapeutic treatments. The following results were obtained: the detected DNS damage (number of induced dimeres/yeast genomes) had the same degree in the four yeast lineages. Apart from the excision-negative mutante 2094 for all yeast lineages a repair efficiency of 60% could be detected. All yeast lineages presented themselves as photographically to be reactivated; however, in all cases a DNS damage of 40 to 50% remained. The examinations for the specificity of antiserum against roentgenologically irradiated DNS led to the conclusion that the antibody population of the serum consisted mainly of immunoglobulines against unchanged DNS areas. A specific immunological reaction of only about 10% could be achieved. (orig./MG)

  4. Influence of LET on repair of DNA damages in Deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inactivation caused by heavy ions was studied in dry cells of radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. All survival curves were characterized by a large shoulder of the curves. No final slopes of the exponential part of survival curves for heavy ion irradiation were steeper than that for 2.0 MeV electron irradiation. The plots of RBE versus LET showed no obvious peaks, suggesting that this bacterium can repair not only DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) but also clustered damage in DNA which may be induced by heavy ions. The genomic DNA of D. radiodurans was cleaved into large fragments with restriction enzyme Not I after post-irradiation incubation and the fragments were separated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). DSBs induction and rejoining process were analyzed by detection of the reappearance of ladder pattern of DNA fragments. The required repair time after heavy ions irradiation was longer than the repair time for electrons at the same dose of irradiation, however, the rate of repair enzyme induction was almost similar to each other between electrons and heavy ions, suggesting that the same repair system is likely to be used after both low and high LET irradiations. (author)

  5. Influence of LET on repair of DNA damages in Deinococcus radiodurans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Y.; Tanaka, A.; Kikuchi, M.; Shimizu, T.; Watanabe, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Cao, J.P.; Taucher-Scholz, G.

    1997-03-01

    Inactivation caused by heavy ions was studied in dry cells of radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. All survival curves were characterized by a large shoulder of the curves. No final slopes of the exponential part of survival curves for heavy ion irradiation were steeper than that for 2.0 MeV electron irradiation. The plots of RBE versus LET showed no obvious peaks, suggesting that this bacterium can repair not only DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) but also clustered damage in DNA which may be induced by heavy ions. The genomic DNA of D. radiodurans was cleaved into large fragments with restriction enzyme Not I after post-irradiation incubation and the fragments were separated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). DSBs induction and rejoining process were analyzed by detection of the reappearance of ladder pattern of DNA fragments. The required repair time after heavy ions irradiation was longer than the repair time for electrons at the same dose of irradiation, however, the rate of repair enzyme induction was almost similar to each other between electrons and heavy ions, suggesting that the same repair system is likely to be used after both low and high LET irradiations. (author)

  6. DNA damage and repair in lymphocytes of normal individuals and cancer patients: studies by the comet assay and micronucleus tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A population study is reported in which the DNA damage induced by γ-radiation (2 Gy) and the kinetics of the subsequent repair were estimated by the comet and micronucleus assays in isolated lymphocytes of 82 healthy donors and patients with head and neck cancer before radiotherapy. The parameters of background and radiation-induced DNA damage, rate of repair, and residual non-repaired damage were measured by comet assay, and the repair kinetics for every donor were computer-fitted to an exponential curve. The level of background DNA damage before irradiation measured by comet assay as well as the level of micronuclei were significantly higher in the head and neck cancer patient group than in the healthy donors, while the parameters of repair were widely scattered in both groups. Cancer patient group contained significantly more individuals, whose irradiated lymphocytes showed high DNA damage, low repair rate and high non-repaired DNA damage level. Lymphocytes of donors belonging to this subgroup showed significantly lower inhibition of cell cycle after irradiation. (author)

  7. Comparative DNA damage and repair in echinoderm coelomocytes exposed to genotoxicants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameena H El-Bibany

    Full Text Available The capacity to withstand and repair DNA damage differs among species and plays a role in determining an organism's resistance to genotoxicity, life history, and susceptibility to disease. Environmental stressors that affect organisms at the genetic level are of particular concern in ecotoxicology due to the potential for chronic effects and trans-generational impacts on populations. Echinoderms are valuable organisms to study the relationship between DNA repair and resistance to genotoxic stress due to their history and use as ecotoxicological models, little evidence of senescence, and few reported cases of neoplasia. Coelomocytes (immune cells have been proposed to serve as sensitive bioindicators of environmental stress and are often used to assess genotoxicity; however, little is known about how coelomocytes from different echinoderm species respond to genotoxic stress. In this study, DNA damage was assessed (by Fast Micromethod in coelomocytes of four echinoderm species (sea urchins Lytechinus variegatus, Echinometra lucunter lucunter, and Tripneustes ventricosus, and a sea cucumber Isostichopus badionotus after acute exposure to H2O2 (0-100 mM and UV-C (0-9999 J/m2, and DNA repair was analyzed over a 24-hour period of recovery. Results show that coelomocytes from all four echinoderm species have the capacity to repair both UV-C and H2O2-induced DNA damage; however, there were differences in repair capacity between species. At 24 hours following exposure to the highest concentration of H2O2 (100 mM and highest dose of UV-C (9999 J/m2 cell viability remained high (>94.6 ± 1.2% but DNA repair ranged from 18.2 ± 9.2% to 70.8 ± 16.0% for H2O2 and 8.4 ± 3.2% to 79.8 ± 9.0% for UV-C exposure. Species-specific differences in genotoxic susceptibility and capacity for DNA repair are important to consider when evaluating ecogenotoxicological model organisms and assessing overall impacts of genotoxicants in the environment.

  8. Comparative DNA Damage and Repair in Echinoderm Coelomocytes Exposed to Genotoxicants

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bibany, Ameena H.; Bodnar, Andrea G.; Reinardy, Helena C.

    2014-01-01

    The capacity to withstand and repair DNA damage differs among species and plays a role in determining an organism's resistance to genotoxicity, life history, and susceptibility to disease. Environmental stressors that affect organisms at the genetic level are of particular concern in ecotoxicology due to the potential for chronic effects and trans-generational impacts on populations. Echinoderms are valuable organisms to study the relationship between DNA repair and resistance to genotoxic stress due to their history and use as ecotoxicological models, little evidence of senescence, and few reported cases of neoplasia. Coelomocytes (immune cells) have been proposed to serve as sensitive bioindicators of environmental stress and are often used to assess genotoxicity; however, little is known about how coelomocytes from different echinoderm species respond to genotoxic stress. In this study, DNA damage was assessed (by Fast Micromethod) in coelomocytes of four echinoderm species (sea urchins Lytechinus variegatus, Echinometra lucunter lucunter, and Tripneustes ventricosus, and a sea cucumber Isostichopus badionotus) after acute exposure to H2O2 (0–100 mM) and UV-C (0–9999 J/m2), and DNA repair was analyzed over a 24-hour period of recovery. Results show that coelomocytes from all four echinoderm species have the capacity to repair both UV-C and H2O2-induced DNA damage; however, there were differences in repair capacity between species. At 24 hours following exposure to the highest concentration of H2O2 (100 mM) and highest dose of UV-C (9999 J/m2) cell viability remained high (>94.6±1.2%) but DNA repair ranged from 18.2±9.2% to 70.8±16.0% for H2O2 and 8.4±3.2% to 79.8±9.0% for UV-C exposure. Species-specific differences in genotoxic susceptibility and capacity for DNA repair are important to consider when evaluating ecogenotoxicological model organisms and assessing overall impacts of genotoxicants in the environment. PMID:25229547

  9. UV-B component of sunlight causes measurable damage in field-grown maize (Zea mays L.): developmental and cellular heterogeneity of damage and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultraviolet radiation has diverse morphogenetic and damaging effects on plants. The end point of damage is reduced plant growth, but in the short term UV radiation damages specific cellular components. We measured cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in maize DNA from plants grown in natural solar radiation. Green maize tissues had detectable DNA damage, roots had less damage, and anthers had much more damage than green leaves. This heterogeneity in damage levels may reflect differences in dose received or in damage repair. The architecture of green tissues had no measurable effects on DNA damage levels, as leaf sheath and leaf blade were equivalent. We observed a slight increase in damage levels in plants sampled at the end of the day, but there was no accumulation of damage over the growing season. We measured photoreactivation, and found substantial levels of this light-dependent repair in both the epidermis and inner cell layers of leaves, and in all organelles that contain DNA – the nucleus, chloroplasts and mitochondria. We conclude that maize has efficient mechanisms for photo repair of daily UV-induced DNA damage that prevent accumulation

  10. Effect O6-Guanine Alkylation on DNA Flexibility Studied by Comparative Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kara, M.; Dršata, Tomáš; Lankaš, Filip; Zacharias, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 1 (2015), s. 23-32. ISSN 0006-3525 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-21893S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : DNA damage * DNA alkylation * DNA repair * molecular simulation * molecular dynamics simulation Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.385, year: 2014

  11. DNA-damage foci to detect and characterize DNA repair alterations in children treated for pediatric malignancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Schuler

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: In children diagnosed with cancer, we evaluated the DNA damage foci approach to identify patients with double-strand break (DSB repair deficiencies, who may overreact to DNA-damaging radio- and chemotherapy. In one patient with Fanconi anemia (FA suffering relapsing squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity we also characterized the repair defect in biopsies of skin, mucosa and tumor. METHODS AND MATERIALS: In children with histologically confirmed tumors or leukemias and healthy control-children DSB repair was investigated by counting γH2AX-, 53BP1- and pATM-foci in blood lymphocytes at defined time points after ex-vivo irradiation. This DSB repair capacity was correlated with treatment-related normal-tissue responses. For the FA patient the defective repair was also characterized in tissue biopsies by analyzing DNA damage response proteins by light and electron microscopy. RESULTS: Between tumor-children and healthy control-children we observed significant differences in mean DSB repair capacity, suggesting that childhood cancer is based on genetic alterations affecting DNA repair. Only 1 out of 4 patients with grade-4 normal-tissue toxicities revealed an impaired DSB repair capacity. The defective DNA repair in FA patient was verified in irradiated blood lymphocytes as well as in non-irradiated mucosa and skin biopsies leading to an excessive accumulation of heterochromatin-associated DSBs in rapidly cycling cells. CONCLUSIONS: Analyzing human tissues we show that DSB repair alterations predispose to cancer formation at younger ages and affect the susceptibility to normal-tissue toxicities. DNA damage foci analysis of blood and tissue samples allows one to detect and characterize DSB repair deficiencies and enables identification of patients at risk for high-grade toxicities. However, not all treatment-associated normal-tissue toxicities can be explained by DSB repair deficiencies.

  12. Repair responses to DNA damage: enzymatic pathways in E coli and human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacteria and eukaryotic cells employ a variety of enzymatic pathways to remove damage from DNA or to lessen its impact upon cellular functions. Most of these processes were discovered in Escherichia coli and have been most extensively analyzed in this organism because suitable mutants have been isolated and characterized. Analogous pathways have been inferred to exist in mammalian cells from the presence of enzyme activities similar to those known to be involved in repair in bacteria, from the analysis of events in cells treated with DNA damaging agents, and from the analysis of the few naturally occurring mutant cell types. Mammalian cells possess an excision repair pathway similar to the constitutive pathway in E coli. Although not as well understood, the incision event is at least as complex, and repair resynthesis produces patches of about the same size as the constitutive short patches. In mammalian cells, no patches comparable in size to those produced by the inducible pathway of E coli are observed. Endonuclease V of bacteriophage T4 incises DNA at pyrimidine dimers by cleaving first the glycosylic bond between deoxyribose and the 5'pyrimidine of the dimer and then the phosphodiester bond between the two pyrimidines. We have cloned the gene (den V) that codes for this enzyme and have demonstrated its expression in uvrA recA and uvrB recA cells of E coli. Because T4 endonuclease V can alleviate the excission repair deficiency of xeroderma pigmentosum when added to permeabilized cells or to isolated nuclei after UV irradiation, the cloned denV gene may ultimately be of value for analyzing DNA repair pathways in cultured human cells

  13. 49 CFR 1242.36 - Machinery repair and equipment damaged (accounts XX-26-40 and XX-26-48).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Machinery repair and equipment damaged (accounts XX-26-40 and XX-26-48). 1242.36 Section 1242.36 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... FOR RAILROADS 1 Operating Expenses-Equipment § 1242.36 Machinery repair and equipment...

  14. SNF2H interacts with XRCC1 and is involved in repair of H2O2-induced DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Yoshiko; Shimizu, Shinji; Yasuhira, Shinji; Horiuchi, Saburo

    2016-07-01

    The protein XRCC1 has no inherent enzymatic activity, and is believed to function in base excision repair as a dedicated scaffold component that coordinates other DNA repair factors. Repair foci clearly represent the recruitment and accumulation of DNA repair factors at sites of damage; however, uncertainties remain regarding their organization in the context of nuclear architecture and their biological significance. Here we identified the chromatin remodeling factor SNF2H/SMARCA5 as a novel binding partner of XRCC1, with their interaction dependent on the casein kinase 2-mediated constitutive phosphorylation of XRCC1. The proficiency of repairing H2O2-induced damage was strongly impaired by SNF2H knock-down, and similar impairment was observed with knock-down of both XRCC1 and SNF2H simultaneously, suggesting their role in a common repair pathway. Most SNF2H exists in the nuclear matrix fraction, forming salt extraction-resistant foci-like structures in unchallenged nuclei. Remarkably, damage-induced formation of both PAR and XRCC1 foci depended on SNF2H, and the PAR and XRCC1 foci co-localized with the SNF2H foci. We propose a model in which a base excision repair complex containing damaged chromatin is recruited to specific locations in the nuclear matrix for repair, with this recruitment mediated by XRCC1-SNF2H interaction. PMID:27268481

  15. A biophysical model of cell evolution after cytotoxic treatments: Damage, repair and cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomezak, M; Abbadie, C; Lartigau, E; Cleri, F

    2016-01-21

    We present a theoretical agent-based model of cell evolution under the action of cytotoxic treatments, such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy. The major features of cell cycle and proliferation, cell damage and repair, and chemical diffusion are included. Cell evolution is based on a discrete Markov chain, with cells stepping along a sequence of discrete internal states from 'normal' to 'inactive'. Probabilistic laws are introduced for each type of event a cell can undergo during its life: duplication, arrest, senescence, damage, reparation, or death. We adjust the model parameters on a series of cell irradiation experiments, carried out in a clinical LINAC, in which the damage and repair kinetics of single- and double-strand breaks are followed. Two showcase applications of the model are then presented. In the first one, we reconstruct the cell survival curves from a number of published low- and high-dose irradiation experiments. We reobtain a very good description of the data without assuming the well-known linear-quadratic model, but instead including a variable DSB repair probability. The repair capability of the model spontaneously saturates to an exponential decay at increasingly high doses. As a second test, we attempt to simulate the two extreme possibilities of the so-called 'bystander' effect in radiotherapy: the 'local' effect versus a 'global' effect, respectively activated by the short-range or long-range diffusion of some factor, presumably secreted by the irradiated cells. Even with an oversimplified simulation, we could demonstrate a sizeable difference in the proliferation rate of non-irradiated cells, the proliferation acceleration being much larger for the global than the local effect, for relatively small fractions of irradiated cells in the colony. PMID:26549470

  16. Oxidative damage to RPA limits the nucleotide excision repair capacity of human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guven, Melisa; Brem, Reto; Macpherson, Peter; Peacock, Matthew; Karran, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) protects against sunlight-induced skin cancer. Defective NER is associated with photosensitivity and a high skin cancer incidence. Some clinical treatments that cause photosensitivity can also increase skin cancer risk. Among these, the immunosuppressant azathioprine and the fluoroquinolone antibiotics ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin, interact with UVA radiation to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that diminish NER capacity by causing protein damage. The RPA DNA binding protein plays a pivotal role in DNA metabolism and is an essential component of NER. The relationship between protein oxidation and NER inhibition was investigated in cultured human cells expressing different levels of RPA. We show here that RPA is limiting for NER and that oxidative damage to RPA compromises NER capability. Our findings reveal that cellular RPA is surprisingly vulnerable to oxidation and we identify oxidized forms of RPA that are associated with impaired NER. The vulnerability of NER to inhibition by oxidation provides a connection between cutaneous photosensitivity, protein damage and increased skin cancer risk. Our findings emphasize that damage to DNA repair proteins, as well as to DNA itself is likely to be an important contributor to skin cancer risk. PMID:26134950

  17. An immunochemical approach to the study of DNA damage and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall objective of this project has been to develop immunochemical methods to quantitate unique DNA base damages in order to facilitate studies on radiation-induced damage production and repair. Specifically, we have been using antibodies raised to damaged bases to quantitate unique lesions in model systems in order to evaluate their potential biological consequences. Our approach has been to synthesize modified nucleotides or nucleosides, conjugate them to protein carriers, and use the conjugates as immunogens in rabbits or to prepare monoclonal antibodies. We have been studying damages that are stable radiolysis products found in X-irradiated DNA and thus of potential biological consequence. Our aim is to build an in vitro and in vivo data base on the interactions between model DNA lesions and such cellular enzymes as DNA polymerases and repair endonucleases. Initial studies have focused on pyrimidine ring saturation products (thymine glycol.and dihydrothymine), products resulting from ring fragmentation or base loss (urea, Β-ureidoisobutyric acid, abasic sites), 7-hydro-8-oxopurines, and more recently, cytosine radiolysis products. These modified bases serve as useful models for examining the potential lethal and/or mutagenic (carcinogenic) effects of the products of DNA radiolysis

  18. Oxidative Damage to RPA Limits the Nucleotide Excision Repair Capacity of Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guven, Melisa; Brem, Reto; Macpherson, Peter; Peacock, Matthew; Karran, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) protects against sunlight-induced skin cancer. Defective NER is associated with photosensitivity and a high skin cancer incidence. Some clinical treatments that cause photosensitivity can also increase skin cancer risk. Among these, the immunosuppressant azathioprine and the fluoroquinolone antibiotics ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin interact with UVA radiation to generate reactive oxygen species that diminish NER capacity by causing protein damage. The replication protein A (RPA) DNA-binding protein has a pivotal role in DNA metabolism and is an essential component of NER. The relationship between protein oxidation and NER inhibition was investigated in cultured human cells expressing different levels of RPA. We show here that RPA is limiting for NER and that oxidative damage to RPA compromises NER capability. Our findings reveal that cellular RPA is surprisingly vulnerable to oxidation, and we identify oxidized forms of RPA that are associated with impaired NER. The vulnerability of NER to inhibition by oxidation provides a connection between cutaneous photosensitivity, protein damage, and increased skin cancer risk. Our findings emphasize that damage to DNA repair proteins, as well as to DNA itself, is likely to be an important contributor to skin cancer risk. PMID:26134950

  19. TDP1 repairs nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage induced by chain-terminating anticancer and antiviral nucleoside analogs

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Shar-yin N.; Murai, Junko; Dalla Rosa, Ilaria; Dexheimer, Thomas S.; Naumova, Alena; Gmeiner, William H.; Pommier, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Chain-terminating nucleoside analogs (CTNAs) that cause stalling or premature termination of DNA replication forks are widely used as anticancer and antiviral drugs. However, it is not well understood how cells repair the DNA damage induced by these drugs. Here, we reveal the importance of tyrosyl–DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1) in the repair of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage induced by CTNAs. On investigating the effects of four CTNAs—acyclovir (ACV), cytarabine (Ara-C), zidovudine (AZT...

  20. The use of recombinant DNA techniques to study radiation-induced damage, repair and genetic change in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief introduction is given to appropriate elements of recombinant DNA techniques and applications to problems in radiobiology are reviewed with illustrative detail. Examples are included of studies with both 254 nm ultraviolet light and ionizing radiation and the review progresses from the molecular analysis of DNA damage in vitro through to the nature of consequent cellular responses. The review is dealt with under the following headings: Molecular distribution of DNA damage, The use of DNA-mediated gene transfer to assess damage and repair, The DNA double strand break: use of restriction endonucleases to model radiation damage, Identification and cloning of DNA repair genes, Analysis of radiation-induced genetic change. (UK)

  1. Genotoxicity of soluble and particulate cadmium compounds: impact on oxidative DNA damage and nucleotide excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerdtle, Tanja; Ebert, Franziska; Thuy, Christina; Richter, Constanze; Mullenders, Leon H F; Hartwig, Andrea

    2010-02-15

    Water-soluble and particulate cadmium compounds are carcinogenic to humans. While direct interactions with DNA are unlikely to account for carcinogenicity, induction of oxidative DNA damage and interference with DNA repair processes might be more relevant underlying modes of action (recently summarized, for example, in Joseph , P. (2009) Tox. Appl. Pharmacol. 238 , 271 - 279). The present study aimed to compare genotoxic effects of particulate CdO and soluble CdCl(2) in cultured human cells (A549, VH10hTert). Both cadmium compounds increased the baseline level of oxidative DNA damage. Even more pronounced, both cadmium compounds inhibited the nucleotide excision repair (NER) of BPDE-induced bulky DNA adducts and UVC-induced photolesions in a dose-dependent manner at noncytotoxic concentrations. Thereby, the uptake of cadmium in the nuclei strongly correlated with the repair inhibition of bulky DNA adducts, indicating that independent of the cadmium compound applied Cd(2+) is the common species responsible for the observed repair inhibition. Regarding the underlying molecular mechanisms in human cells, CdCl(2) (as shown before by Meplan, C., Mann, K. and Hainaut, P. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274 , 31663 - 31670 ) and CdO altered the conformation of the zinc binding domain of the tumor suppressor protein p53. In further studies applying only CdCl(2), cadmium decreased the total nuclear protein level of XPC, which is believed to be the principle initiator of global genome NER. This led to diminished association of XPC to sites of local UVC damage, resulting in decreased recruitment of further NER proteins. Additionally, CdCl(2) strongly disturbed the disassembly of XPC and XPA. In summary, our data indicate a general nucleotide excision repair inhibition by cadmium compounds, which is most likely caused by a diminished assembly and disassembly of the NER machinery. These data reveal new insights into the mechanisms involved in cadmium carcinogenesis and provide further

  2. The nucleotide excision repair system of Borrelia burgdorferi is the sole pathway involved in repair of DNA damage by UV light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Pierre-Olivier; Chaconas, George

    2013-05-01

    To survive and avoid accumulation of mutations caused by DNA damage, the genomes of prokaryotes encode a variety of DNA repair pathways most well characterized in Escherichia coli. Some of these are required for the infectivity of various pathogens. In this study, the importance of 25 DNA repair/recombination genes for Borrelia burgdorferi survival to UV-induced DNA damage was assessed. In contrast to E. coli, where 15 of these genes have an effect on survival of UV irradiation, disruption of recombinational repair, transcription-coupled repair, methyl-directed mismatch correction, and repair of arrested replication fork pathways did not decrease survival of B. burgdorferi exposed to UV light. However, the disruption of the B. burgdorferi nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway (uvrA, uvrB, uvrC, and uvrD) resulted in a 10- to 1,000-fold increase in sensitivity to UV light. A functional NER pathway was also shown to be required for B. burgdorferi resistance to nitrosative damage. Finally, disruption of uvrA, uvrC, and uvrD had only a minor effect upon murine infection by increasing the time required for dissemination. PMID:23475971

  3. Anhydrobiosis-associated nuclear DNA damage and repair in the sleeping chironomid: linkage with radioresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, Oleg; Nakahara, Yuichi; Vanyagina, Veronica; Malutina, Ludmila; Cornette, Richard; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Kikawada, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Okuda, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Anhydrobiotic chironomid larvae can withstand prolonged complete desiccation as well as other external stresses including ionizing radiation. To understand the cross-tolerance mechanism, we have analyzed the structural changes in the nuclear DNA using transmission electron microscopy and DNA comet assays in relation to anhydrobiosis and radiation. We found that dehydration causes alterations in chromatin structure and a severe fragmentation of nuclear DNA in the cells of the larvae despite successful anhydrobiosis. Furthermore, while the larvae had restored physiological activity within an hour following rehydration, nuclear DNA restoration typically took 72 to 96 h. The DNA fragmentation level and the recovery of DNA integrity in the rehydrated larvae after anhydrobiosis were similar to those of hydrated larvae irradiated with 70 Gy of high-linear energy transfer (LET) ions ((4)He). In contrast, low-LET radiation (gamma-rays) of the same dose caused less initial damage to the larvae, and DNA was completely repaired within within 24 h. The expression of genes encoding the DNA repair enzymes occurred upon entering anhydrobiosis and exposure to high- and low-LET radiations, indicative of DNA damage that includes double-strand breaks and their subsequent repair. The expression of antioxidant enzymes-coding genes was also elevated in the anhydrobiotic and the gamma-ray-irradiated larvae that probably functions to reduce the negative effect of reactive oxygen species upon exposure to these stresses. Indeed the mature antioxidant proteins accumulated in the dry larvae and the total activity of antioxidants increased by a 3-4 fold in association with anhydrobiosis. We conclude that one of the factors explaining the relationship between radioresistance and the ability to undergo anhydrobiosis in the sleeping chironomid could be an adaptation to desiccation-inflicted nuclear DNA damage. There were also similarities in the molecular response of the larvae to damage caused by

  4. Manipulation of cellular DNA damage repair machinery facilitates propagation of human papillomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Nicholas A; Galloway, Denise A

    2014-06-01

    In general, the interplay among viruses and DNA damage repair (DDR) pathways can be divided based on whether the interaction promotes or inhibits the viral lifecycle. The propagation of human papillomaviruses is both promoted and inhibited by DDR proteins. As a result, HPV proteins both activate repair pathways, such as the ATM and ATR pathways, and inhibit other pathways, most notably the p53 signaling pathway. Indeed, the role of HPV proteins, with regard to the DDR pathways, can be divided into two broad categories. The first set of viral proteins, HPV E1 and E2 activate a DNA damage response and recruit repair proteins to viral replication centers, where these proteins are likely usurped to replicate the viral genome. Because the activation of the DDR response typically elicits a cell cycle arrest that would impeded the viral lifecycle, the second set of HPV proteins, HPV E6 and E7, prevents the DDR response from pausing cell cycle progression or inducing apoptosis. This review provides a detailed account of the interactions among HPV proteins and DDR proteins that facilitate HPV propagation. PMID:24412279

  5. DNA double strand break damage by radiation and behavioral imaging of DNA repair enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theme in the title is described mainly on authors' studies. Finding of a jellyfish GFP (green fluorescent protein) and its genomic recombination technique with a target protein have made it possible to investigate the behavior of the protein (the repair enzymes in this review) within a cell by fluorescent microscopy. Double strand breaks (DSBs), the most severe damage of DNA leading to cell death and carcinogenesis, are induced by irradiation of ionizing radiation and/or ultraviolet light, and repair mechanisms of non homologous end-joining and homologous recombinant repair are known major in mammalian cells and in lower eukaryotes, respectively. Authors used UVA for inducing DSBs under the presence of benzo[a]pyrene in mammalian cells like Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 and xrs-5, the behaviors of Ku70/80 repair molecules tagged by GFP were imaged by confocal laser microscopy, and one of findings was that Ku80 moved to the level most intensely irradiated. Fluorescent molecular imaging technique will be employed widely in clinical diagnosis and new drug development as well as in basic bioscience. (S.I.)

  6. Repair of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation and benzo[a]pyrene in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biological effects of DNA-damaging agents are codetermined by the structural characteristics of the lesions, the quality and extent of the local distortion of DNA and chromatin structure, and the mode(s) of damage processing used by a given type of cell. Persistent damage (i.e., damage that is not removed before it is reached by DNA replication) may be mostly responsible for mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. To understand the effects of environmental physical and chemical DNA-damaging agents on human health, the mechanisms of damage processing used by human cells have to be elucidated. We report our studies of the excision of gamma-ray products of the 5,6-dihydroxydihydrothymine type (t0/sub 2//sup γ/) in normal human fibroblasts and in fibroblasts from patients with the hereditary diseases Fanconi's anemia (FA) and ataxia telangiectasia (AT). Both diseases are characterized by chromosomal instability and increased susceptibility for the development of cancer. Formation and repair of DNA-benzo[a]pyrene adducts were studied in baby hamster kidney cells, secondary mouse embryo cells, and human lymphoma. The relative persistence of DNA-B[a]P may explain the high mutagenicity of the 7,8-dihydroxy-9,10-epoxy-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene metabolites in rodent cells that has been observed by several investigators

  7. The effects of over-expressing Tip60 on cellular DNA damage repair and cell cycle progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the effects of Tip60 on DNA damage repair, cell cycle and the related mechanism as well, the proliferative activity, DNA double strand break (DSB) repair competency and cell cycle arrest were analyzed in stable Tip60-overexpression U2OS cells established by transfecting with exogenous Tip60 gene. It was found that the overexpression of Tip60 inhibited the proliferative activity but increased the DNA damage repair competency. The radiation-induced G2/M arrest was prolonged in Tip60 over-expressed U2OS cells, which was associated with a decreasing level of cell cycle checkpoint protein Cyclin B/CDC2 complex. (authors)

  8. Correction of the DNA repair defect in xeroderma pigmentosum group E by injection of a DNA damage-binding protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Keeney, S.; Eker, André; Brody, T.; Vermeulen, Wim; Bootsma, Dirk; Hoeijmakers, Jan; Linn, S.(Florida International University, Miami, USA)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractCells from a subset of patients with the DNA-repair-defective disease xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group E (XP-E) are known to lack a DNA damage-binding (DDB) activity. Purified human DDB protein was injected into XP-E cells to test whether the DNA-repair defect in these cells is caused by a defect in DDB activity. Injected DDB protein stimulated DNA repair to normal levels in those strains that lack the DDB activity but did not stimulate repair in cells from other xerode...

  9. Nrf2 facilitates repair of radiation induced DNA damage through homologous recombination repair pathway in a ROS independent manner in cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, Sundarraj; Pal, Debojyoti; Sandur, Santosh K., E-mail: sskumar@barc.gov.in

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Nrf2 inhibition in A549 cells led to attenuated DNA repair and radiosensitization. • Influence of Nrf2 on DNA repair is not linked to its antioxidant function. • Nrf2 influences DNA repair through homologous recombination (HR) repair pathway. • Many genes involved in HR pathway show ARE sequences in their upstream region. - Abstract: Nrf2 is a redox sensitive transcription factor that is involved in the co-ordinated transcription of genes involved in redox homeostasis. But the role of Nrf2 in DNA repair is not investigated in detail. We have employed A549 and MCF7 cells to study the role of Nrf2 on DNA repair by inhibiting Nrf2 using all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) or by knock down approach prior to radiation exposure (4 Gy). DNA damage and repair analysis was studied by γH2AX foci formation and comet assay. Results suggested that the inhibition of Nrf2 in A549 or MCF7 cells led to significant slowdown in DNA repair as compared to respective radiation controls. The persistence of residual DNA damage even in the presence of free radical scavenger N-acetyl cysteine, suggested that the influence of Nrf2 on DNA repair was not linked to its antioxidant functions. Further, its influence on non-homologous end joining repair pathway was studied by inhibiting both Nrf2 and DNA-PK together. This led to synergistic reduction of survival fraction, indicating that Nrf2 may not be influencing the NHEJ pathway. To investigate the role of homologous recombination repair (HR) pathway, RAD51 foci formation was monitored. There was a significant reduction in the foci formation in cells treated with ATRA or shRNA against Nrf2 as compared to their respective radiation controls. Further, Nrf2 inhibition led to significant reduction in mRNA levels of RAD51. BLAST analysis was also performed on upstream regions of DNA repair genes to identify antioxidant response element and found that many repair genes that are involved in HR pathway may be regulated by Nrf2

  10. Nrf2 facilitates repair of radiation induced DNA damage through homologous recombination repair pathway in a ROS independent manner in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Nrf2 inhibition in A549 cells led to attenuated DNA repair and radiosensitization. • Influence of Nrf2 on DNA repair is not linked to its antioxidant function. • Nrf2 influences DNA repair through homologous recombination (HR) repair pathway. • Many genes involved in HR pathway show ARE sequences in their upstream region. - Abstract: Nrf2 is a redox sensitive transcription factor that is involved in the co-ordinated transcription of genes involved in redox homeostasis. But the role of Nrf2 in DNA repair is not investigated in detail. We have employed A549 and MCF7 cells to study the role of Nrf2 on DNA repair by inhibiting Nrf2 using all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) or by knock down approach prior to radiation exposure (4 Gy). DNA damage and repair analysis was studied by γH2AX foci formation and comet assay. Results suggested that the inhibition of Nrf2 in A549 or MCF7 cells led to significant slowdown in DNA repair as compared to respective radiation controls. The persistence of residual DNA damage even in the presence of free radical scavenger N-acetyl cysteine, suggested that the influence of Nrf2 on DNA repair was not linked to its antioxidant functions. Further, its influence on non-homologous end joining repair pathway was studied by inhibiting both Nrf2 and DNA-PK together. This led to synergistic reduction of survival fraction, indicating that Nrf2 may not be influencing the NHEJ pathway. To investigate the role of homologous recombination repair (HR) pathway, RAD51 foci formation was monitored. There was a significant reduction in the foci formation in cells treated with ATRA or shRNA against Nrf2 as compared to their respective radiation controls. Further, Nrf2 inhibition led to significant reduction in mRNA levels of RAD51. BLAST analysis was also performed on upstream regions of DNA repair genes to identify antioxidant response element and found that many repair genes that are involved in HR pathway may be regulated by Nrf2

  11. DNA Repair Dependence of Somatic Mutagenesis of Transposon-Caused WHITE Alleles in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER after Treatment with Alkylating Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Fujikawa, Kazuo; Kondo, Sohei

    1986-01-01

    DNA repair-defective alleles of the mei-9, mei-41, mus-104 and mus-101 loci of Drosophila melanogaster were introduced into stocks bearing the UZ and SZ marker sets. Males with the UZ marker set, z1 (zeste allele) and w+(TE) (genetically unstable white allele presumably caused by a transposable element), or the SZ marker set, z1 and w+R (semistable white allele caused by partial duplication of the w+ locus plus transposon insert), were exposed to EMS at the first instar. After emergence, a...

  12. Variability in the repair of UV induced DNA damage in lymphocytes from unexposed and exposed to pesticides group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper was to study a variation in the individual susceptibility to the induction of the DNA damage by genotoxic agents. Differences in sensitivity of human lymphocytes to UV and variability of the DNA damage repair capacity were investigated by use of the single gel electrophoresis method (SCGE), also known as the Comet assay. Human lymphocytes were isolated from whole blood samples collected from 85 male donors. Among the donors 43 males were treated as reference group (no occupational exposure), the other 42 males were occupationally exposed to pesticides. Previously cryopreserved lymphocytes were defrosted and than irradiated with 6J/m2 of UVC irradiation. Viability of the cells and DNA damage in lymphocytes prior to irradiation was also investigated. In order to evaluate repair capacity of the cells, the DNA damages were estimated immediately after irradiation and after two hours of the incubation in presence or absence of phytohemaglutinin (PHA) cells division-stimulating agent. The same procedures were performed on the samples from people exposed and unexposed to pesticides. Preliminary results revealed no statistically significant difference between exposed and unexposed groups, in the mean values of the DNA damages levels measured neither prior or immediately after irradiation. Our study showed statistically significant (p=0.001) influence of the PHA on 2 hours repair of the DNA damages induced with 6 J/m2 of UV in the lymphocytes from reference and exposed group. Our results showed that DNA damages increases with the time if incubation. In the reference group, after two hours of incubation with PHA 38% of the radiation induced damage was repaired. Similarly, in the exposed group, after two hours of incubation with PHA 43% of the radiation induced damage was repaired. However differences between mean values of percent of the individual repaired DNA damages showed that our results are statistically insignificant. (author)

  13. Repair of ultraviolet light-induced damage in Micrococcus radiophilus, and extremely resistant microorganism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repair of ultraviolet radiation damage was examined in an extremely radioresistant organism, Micrococcus radiophilus. Measurement of the number of thymine-containing dimers formed as a function of ultraviolet dose suggests that the ability of this organism to withstand high doses of ultraviolet radiation (20,000 ergs/mm2) is not related to protective screening by pigments. M. radiophilus carries out a rapid excision of thymine dimers at doses of ultraviolet light up to 10,000 ergs/mm2. Synthesis of deoxyribonucleic acid is reduced after irradiation, but after removal of photodamage the rate approaches that in unirradiated cells. A comparison is drawn with Micrococcus luteus and M. radiodurans. We conclude that the extremely high resistance to ultraviolet irradiation in M. radiophilus is at least partly due to the presence of an efficient excision repair system

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation studies of radiation damaged DNA. Molecules and repair enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular dynamics (MD) studies on several radiation damages to DNA and their recognition by repair enzymes are introduced in order to describe the stepwise description of molecular process observed at radiation lesion sites. MD studies were performed on pyrimidine (thymine dimer, thymine glycol) and purine (8-oxoguanine) lesions using an MD simulation code AMBER 5.0. The force field was modified for each lesion. In all cases the significant structural changes in the DNA double helical structure were observed; a) the breaking of hydrogen bond network between complementary bases and resulting opening of the double helix (8-oxoguanine); b) the sharp bending of the DNA helix centered at the lesion site (thymine dimer, thymine glycol); and c) the flipping-out base on the strand complementary to the lesion (8-oxoguanine). These changes were related to the overall collapsing double helical structure around the lesion and might facilitate the docking of the repair enzyme into the DNA and formation of DNA-enzyme complex. In addition to the structural changes, at lesion sites there were found electrostatic interaction energy values different from those at native sites (thymine dimer -10 kcal/mol, thymine glycol -26 kcal/mol, 8-oxoguanine -48 kcal/mol). These values of electrostatic energy may discriminate lesion from values at native sites (thymine 0 kcal/mol, guanine -37 kcal/mol) and enable a repair enzyme to recognize a lesion during scanning DNA surface. The observed specific structural conformation and energetic properties at the lesions sites are factors that guide a repair enzyme to discriminate lesions from non-damaged native DNA segments. (author)

  15. Molecular mechanisms of DNA damage recognition for mammalian nucleotide excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugasawa, Kaoru

    2016-08-01

    For faithful DNA repair, it is crucial for cells to locate lesions precisely within the vast genome. In the mammalian global genomic nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, this difficult task is accomplished through multiple steps, in which the xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) protein complex plays a central role. XPC senses the presence of oscillating 'normal' bases in the DNA duplex, and its binding properties contribute to the extremely broad substrate specificity of NER. Unlike XPC, which acts as a versatile sensor of DNA helical distortion, the UV-damaged DNA-binding protein (UV-DDB) is more specialized, recognizing UV-induced photolesions and facilitating recruitment of XPC. Recent single-molecule analyses and structural studies have advanced our understanding of how UV-DDB finds its targets, particularly in the context of chromatin. After XPC binds DNA, it is necessary to verify the presence of damage in order to avoid potentially deleterious incisions at damage-free sites. Accumulating evidence suggests that XPA and the helicase activity of transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) cooperate to verify abnormalities in DNA chemistry. This chapter reviews recent findings about the mechanisms underlying the efficiency, versatility, and accuracy of NER. PMID:27264556

  16. Brain-peripheral cell crosstalk in white matter damage and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Kazuhide; Lo, Eng H

    2016-05-01

    White matter damage is an important part of cerebrovascular disease and may be a significant contributing factor in vascular mechanisms of cognitive dysfunction and dementia. It is well accepted that white matter homeostasis involves multifactorial interactions between all cells in the axon-glia-vascular unit. But more recently, it has been proposed that beyond cell-cell signaling within the brain per se, dynamic crosstalk between brain and systemic responses such as circulating immune cells and stem/progenitor cells may also be important. In this review, we explore the hypothesis that peripheral cells contribute to damage and repair after white matter damage. Depending on timing, phenotype and context, monocyte/macrophage can possess both detrimental and beneficial effects on oligodendrogenesis and white matter remodeling. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) can be activated after CNS injury and the response may also influence white matter repair process. These emerging findings support the hypothesis that peripheral-derived cells can be both detrimental or beneficial in white matter pathology in cerebrovascular disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia, edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26277436

  17. Space Transportation System (STS)-117 External Tank (ET)-124 Hail Damage Repair Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Timmy R.; Gentz, Steven J.; Barth, Timothy S.; Minute, Stephen A.; Flowers, Cody P.; Hamilton, David A.; Null, Cynthia H.; Schafer, Charles F.

    2009-01-01

    Severe thunderstorms with associated hail and high winds struck the STS-117 stack on February 26, 2007. Peak winds were recorded at 62 knots with hail sizes ranging from 0.3 inch to 0.8 inch in diameter. As a result of the storm, the North Carolina Foam Institute (NCFI) type 24-124 Thermal Protection System (TPS) foam on the liquid oxygen (LO2) ogive acreage incurred significant impact damage. The NCFI on the ET intertank and the liquid hydrogen (LH2) acreage sustained hail damage. The Polymer Development Laboratory (PDL)-1034 foam of the LO2 ice frost ramps (IFRs) and the Super-Lightweight Ablator (SLA) of the LO2 cable tray also suffered minor damage. NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was asked to assess the technical feasibility of repairing the ET TPS, the reasonableness of conducting those repairs with the vehicle in a vertical, integrated configuration at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Vehicle Assemble Building (VAB), and to address attendant human factors considerations including worker fatigue and the potential for error. The outcome of the assessment is recorded in this document.

  18. DNA repair efficiency in germ cells and early mouse embryos and consequences for radiation-induced transgenerational genomic damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2009-01-18

    Exposure to ionizing radiation and other environmental agents can affect the genomic integrity of germ cells and induce adverse health effects in the progeny. Efficient DNA repair during gametogenesis and the early embryonic cycles after fertilization is critical for preventing transmission of DNA damage to the progeny and relies on maternal factors stored in the egg before fertilization. The ability of the maternal repair machinery to repair DNA damage in both parental genomes in the fertilizing egg is especially crucial for the fertilizing male genome that has not experienced a DNA repair-competent cellular environment for several weeks prior to fertilization. During the DNA repair-deficient period of spermatogenesis, DNA lesions may accumulate in sperm and be carried into the egg where, if not properly repaired, could result in the formation of heritable chromosomal aberrations or mutations and associated birth defects. Studies with female mice deficient in specific DNA repair genes have shown that: (i) cell cycle checkpoints are activated in the fertilized egg by DNA damage carried by the sperm; and (ii) the maternal genotype plays a major role in determining the efficiency of repairing genomic lesions in the fertilizing sperm and directly affect the risk for abnormal reproductive outcomes. There is also growing evidence that implicates DNA damage carried by the fertilizing gamete as a mediator of postfertilization processes that contribute to genomic instability in subsequent generations. Transgenerational genomic instability most likely involves epigenetic mechanisms or error-prone DNA repair processes in the early embryo. Maternal and embryonic DNA repair processes during the early phases of mammalian embryonic development can have far reaching consequences for the genomic integrity and health of subsequent generations.

  19. Differences in repair of radiation induced damage in two human tumor cell lines as measured by cell survival and alkaline DNA unwinding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the relationship between the repair of radiation induced DNA strand breaks and cellular repair kinetics in two human tumor cell lines, NB-100 (neuroblastoma) and HN-1 (squamous cell carcinoma). Damage was quantified using the fluorometric analysis of DNA unwiding (FADU) for DNA damage, and cell survival was assessed using a clonogenic assay. In plateau phase cells repair of sublethal damage was virtually absent in NB-100 after 4 Gy (recovery ratio 1.0), whereas HN-1 cells did show sublethal damage repair (recovery ratio 1.4). Repair of potentially lethal damage was more pronounced in NB-100 cells (recovery ratio 2.3) than in HN-1 cells (recovery ratio 1.7) after 4 Gy. Graded doses of X-rays induced comparable levels of DNA damage in both tumor cell lines. However, in HN-1 cells more DNA strand breaks were repaired after 4 Gy, leaving about 25% of the initial damage unrepaired, whereas in NB-100 about 50% was unrepaired. This higher fraction of unrepaired DNA damage correlated well with the degree of sublethal damage repair which was lower in NB-100 than in HN-1 cell, but it did not correlate with the repair of potentially lethal damage, which was higher in NB-100 than in HN-1. Since the level of damage remaining post-irradiation may be the critical variable for survival, the FADU technique can contribute in elucidating the relationship between radiosensitivity and DNA damage repair capacity. (orig.)

  20. Dictyostelium discoideum, a lower eukaryote model for the study of DNA repair: Implications for the role of DNA-damaging chemicals in the evolution of repair proficient cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deering, R. A.

    1994-10-01

    The evolution of the ability of living cells to cope with stress is crucial for the maintenance of their genetic integrity. Yet low levels of mutation must remain to allow adaptation to environmental changes. The cellular slime mold D. discoideum is a good system for studying molecular aspects of the repair of lethal and mutagenic damage to DNA by radiation and chemicals. The wild-type strains of this soil microorganism are extremely resistant to DNA damaging agents. In nature the amoeboid cells in their replicative stage feed on soil bacteria and are exposed to numerous DNA-damaging chemicals produced by various soil microorganisms. It is probable that the evolution of repair systems in this organism and perhaps in others is a consequence of the necessity to cope with chemical damage which also confers resistance to radiation.

  1. DNA damage and repair in oncogenic transformation by heavy ion radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T. C.; Mei, M.; George, K. A.; Craise, L. M.

    1996-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions are present in galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events. One of the most important late effects in risk assessment is carcinogenesis. We have studied the carcinogenic effects of heavy ions at the cellular and molecular levels and have obtained quantitative data on dose-response curves and on the repair of oncogenic lesions for heavy particles with various charges and energies. Studies with repair inhibitors and restriction endonucleases indicated that for oncogenic transformation DNA is the primary target. Results from heavy ion experiments showed that the cross section increased with LET and reached a maximum value of about 0.02 micrometer2 at about 500 keV/micrometer. This limited size of cross section suggests that only a fraction of cellular genomic DNA is important in radiogenic transformation. Free radical scavengers, such as DMSO, do not give any effect on induction of oncogenic transformation by 600 MeV/u iron particles, suggesting most oncogenic damage induced by high-LET heavy ions is through direct action. Repair studies with stationary phase cells showed that the amount of reparable oncogenic lesions decreased with an increase of LET and that heavy ions with LET greater than 200 keV/micrometer produced only irreparable oncogenic damage. An enhancement effect for oncogenic transformation was observed in cells irradiated by low-dose-rate argon ions (400 MeV/u; 120 keV/micrometer). Chromosomal aberrations, such as translocation and deletion, but not sister chromatid exchange, are essential for heavy-ion-induced oncogenic transformation. The basic mechanism(s) of misrepair of DNA damage, which form oncogenic lesions, is unknown.

  2. DNA with Damage in Both Strands as Affinity Probes and Nucleotide Excision Repair Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukyanchikova, N V; Petruseva, I O; Evdokimov, A N; Silnikov, V N; Lavrik, O I

    2016-03-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a multistep process of recognition and elimination of a wide spectrum of damages that cause significant distortions in DNA structure, such as UV-induced damage and bulky chemical adducts. A series of model DNAs containing new bulky fluoro-azidobenzoyl photoactive lesion dC(FAB) and well-recognized nonnucleoside lesions nFlu and nAnt have been designed and their interaction with repair proteins investigated. We demonstrate that modified DNA duplexes dC(FAB)/dG (probe I), dC(FAB)/nFlu+4 (probe II), and dC(FAB)/nFlu-3 (probe III) have increased (as compared to unmodified DNA, umDNA) structure-dependent affinity for XPC-HR23B (Kdum > KdI > KdII ≈ KdIII) and differentially crosslink to XPC and proteins of NER-competent extracts. The presence of dC(FAB) results in (i) decreased melting temperature (ΔTm = -3°C) and (ii) 12° DNA bending. The extended dC(FAB)/dG-DNA (137 bp) was demonstrated to be an effective NER substrate. Lack of correlation between the affinity to XPC-HR23B and substrate properties of the model DNA suggests a high impact of the verification stage on the overall NER process. In addition, DNAs containing closely positioned, well-recognized lesions in the complementary strands represent hardly repairable (dC(FAB)/nFlu+4, dC(FAB)/nFlu-3) or irreparable (nFlu/nFlu+4, nFlu/nFlu-3, nAnt/nFlu+4, nAnt/nFlu-3) structures. Our data provide evidence that the NER system of higher eukaryotes recognizes and eliminates damaged DNA fragments on a multi-criterion basis. PMID:27262196

  3. BioSentinel: Monitoring DNA Damage Repair Beyond Low Earth Orbit on a 6U Nanosatellite

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Brian; Hanel, Robert; Bhattacharya, Sharmila; Ricco, Antonio; Agasid, Elwood; Reiss-Bubenheim, Debra; Straume, Tore; Parra, Macarena; Boone, Travis; Santa Maria, Sergio; Tan, Ming; Bowman, Robert; Sorgenfrei, Matthew; Nehrenz, Matthew; Gandlin, Marina

    2014-01-01

    We are designing and developing a “6U” nanosatellite as a secondary payload to fly aboard NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) Exploration Mission (EM) 1, scheduled for launch in late 2017. For the first time in over forty years, direct experimental data from biological studies beyond low Earth orbit (LEO) will be obtained during BioSentinel’s 12 to 18-month mission. BioSentinel will measure the damage and repair of DNA in a biological organism and compare that to information from onboard physica...

  4. Modification of radiation response in mammalian cells: the repair and fixation of x-ray induced potentially lethal damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of anisotonic salt treatments, polyamines, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), 5'-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) and hyperthermia on the repair and fixation of X-ray-induced radiation damage were examined in V79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts, Chinese hamster ovary cells, normal and ataxia telangiectasis (AT) human cells. Significant repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD) was observed when cells were held in Earle's balanced salt solutions, or in plateau phase, following exposure to X-radiation; a much greater recovery was observed when cells were incubated at 37 degrees C between irradiation and subsequent exposure to anisotonic salts. Cells exposed to 1 or 2 mol/L DMSO or 10-5 mol/L BrdUrd exhibited PLD repair patterns comparable to control cells. Contrary to the results of others, human AT homozygotes, like normal human cells, did sustain radiation damage that could be fixed or repaired by anisotonic salt treatment. The extent of damage fixation was dose-dependent and was observed at doses as low as 0.25 Gy. A greater degree of PLD was fixed when cells were irradiated at 0 degrees C rather than 37 degrees C, suggesting that repair occurs during irradiation. While heat damage was not susceptible to fixation by anisotonic salt treatment, the synergistic enhancement of X-ray damage due to heat was fixed in a pattern dependent on the heating temperature

  5. Understanding extreme resistance to DNA damage in D. radiodurans: genomic inputs and proteomic insights into extraordinary DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deinococcus radiodurans, a model extremophile, tolerates very high doses of virtually all DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiations, UV, desiccation or mutagenic chemicals. It repairs its damaged DNA, from hundreds of fragments to intact chromosome, with absolute fidelity. Its genome displays acquisition of eukaryotic DNA repair pathways and deletion of universal prokaryotic DNA repair pathways, along with several ORFs that encode proteins with unusual domain combinations, expanded gene families and uncharacterized proteins. Yet, it is one of the most DNA repair efficient organism known today. To understand gamma radiation responsive global modifications in the proteome, respective proteome profiles were resolved by 2D electrophoresis and the gamma radiation responsive differentially expressed proteins were identified by MALDI mass spectrometry. Exposure to gamma irradiation set in immediate growth arrest, a phase during which the organism reassembles its shattered genome and recycles the radiation-damaged biomolecules. A proteomic investigation of this phase revealed highest up-regulation of DNA repair proteins involved in strand annealing, nucleotide excision repair, non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination pathways. Another set of differentially expressed proteins were metabolic enzymes that appeared to modulate metabolism to utilize stored glycogen and slow down amino acid biosynthesis. Oxidative stress alleviation machinery, which was constitutively present in abundance, displayed minor modulation. The gamma radiation responsive proteome modulations emphasize focused multi-factorial DNA repair and metabolic modulations, during post-irradiation recovery. (author)

  6. The Role of Altered Nucleotide Excision Repair and UVB-Induced DNA Damage in Melanomagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Budden

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available UVB radiation is the most mutagenic component of the UV spectrum that reaches the earth’s surface and causes the development of DNA damage in the form of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and 6-4 photoproducts. UV radiation usually results in cellular death, but if left unchecked, it can affect DNA integrity, cell and tissue homeostasis and cause mutations in oncogenes and tumour-suppressor genes. These mutations, if unrepaired, can lead to abnormal cell growth, increasing the risk of cancer development. Epidemiological data strongly associates UV exposure as a major factor in melanoma development, but the exact biological mechanisms involved in this process are yet to be fully elucidated. The nucleotide excision repair (NER pathway is responsible for the repair of UV-induced lesions. Patients with the genetic disorder Xeroderma Pigmentosum have a mutation in one of eight NER genes associated with the XP complementation groups XP-A to XP-G and XP variant (XP-V. XP is characterized by diminished repair capacity, as well as a 1000-fold increase in the incidence of skin cancers, including melanoma. This has suggested a significant role for NER in melanoma development as a result of UVB exposure. This review discusses the current research surrounding UVB radiation and NER capacity and how further investigation of NER could elucidate the role of NER in avoiding UV-induced cellular death resulting in melanomagenesis.

  7. Repair of x-ray induced chromosomal damage in trisomy 2- and normal diploid lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frequency of chromosomal aberrations produced by x-rays is greater in lymphocytes cultured from trisomy 21 patients (Down's syndrome) than from normal diploid donors. This increase, which can be detected by a micronucleus assay for chromosomal damage, was postulated by us to result from a defect in the rejoining system which repairs chromosomal breaks. The postulated defect would result in a longer rejoining time, therapy permitting more movement of broken ends and thus enhancing the frequency of exchanges. To test this possibility, the time required for the rejoining (repair) of chromosome breaks was measured in lymphocytes from five Down's syndrome (four trisomy 21 and one D/G translocation partial trisomy 21) donors, from a monosomy 21 donor, and from five diploid donors. The rejoining time was reduced in the Down's syndrome lymphocytes in comparison to the normal diploid and monosomy 21 lymphocytes. Thus the repair of chromosome breaks, far from being defective as evidenced by a longer rejoining time in Down's syndrome cells, occurred more rapidly than in normal cells

  8. Repair of clustered DNA damage caused by high LET radiation in human fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydberg, B.; Lobrich, M.; Cooper, P. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    It has recently been demonstrated experimentally that DNA damage induced by high LET radiation in mammalian cells is non-randomly distributed along the DNA molecule in the form of clusters of various sizes. The sizes of such clusters range from a few base-pairs to at least 200 kilobase-pairs. The high biological efficiency of high LET radiation for induction of relevant biological endpoints is probably a consequence of this clustering, although the exact mechanisms by which the clustering affects the biological outcome is not known. We discuss here results for induction and repair of base damage, single-strand breaks and double-strand breaks for low and high LET radiations. These results are discussed in the context of clustering. Of particular interest is to determine how clustering at different scales affects overall rejoining and fidelity of rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks. However, existing methods for measuring repair of DNA strand breaks are unable to resolve breaks that are close together in a cluster. This causes problems in interpretation of current results from high LET radiation and will require new methods to be developed.

  9. The Fanconi anemia pathway: Repairing the link between DNA damage and squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare inherited recessive disease caused by mutations in one of fifteen genes known to encode FA pathway components. In response to DNA damage, nuclear FA proteins associate into high molecular weight complexes through a cascade of post-translational modifications and physical interactions, followed by the repair of damaged DNA. Hematopoietic cells are particularly sensitive to the loss of these interactions, and bone marrow failure occurs almost universally in FA patients. FA as a disease is further characterized by cancer susceptibility, which highlights the importance of the FA pathway in tumor suppression, and will be the focus of this review. Acute myeloid leukemia is the most common cancer type, often subsequent to bone marrow failure. However, FA patients are also at an extreme risk of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck and gynecological tract, with an even greater incidence in those individuals who have received a bone marrow transplant and recovered from hematopoietic disease. FA tumor suppression in hematopoietic versus epithelial compartments could be mechanistically similar or distinct. Definition of compartment specific FA activities is now critical to assess the effects of today's bone marrow failure treatments on tomorrow's solid tumor development. It is our hope that current therapies can then be optimized to decrease the risk of malignant transformation in both hematopoietic and epithelial cells. Here we review our current understanding of the mechanisms of action of the Fanconi anemia pathway as it contributes to stress responses, DNA repair and squamous cell carcinoma susceptibility

  10. DNA excision repair in cell extracts from human cell lines exhibiting hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whole cell extracts from human lymphoid cell lines can perform in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids damaged by agents including UV or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP). Extracts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells are defective in repair synthesis. We have now studied in vitro DNA repair synthesis using extracts from lymphoblastoid cell lines representing four human hereditary syndromes with increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Extracts of cell lines from individuals with the sunlight-sensitive disorders dysplastic nevus syndrome or Cockayne's syndrome (complementation groups A and B) showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids with UV photoproducts. This is consistent with in vivo measurements of the overall DNA repair capacity in such cell lines. A number of extracts were prepared from two cell lines representing the variant form of XP (XP-V). Half of the extracts prepared showed normal levels of in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing UV lesions, but the remainder of the extracts from the same cell lines showed deficient repair synthesis, suggesting the possibility of an unusually labile excision repair protein in XP-V. Fanconi's anemia (FA) cells show cellular hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents including cis-DDP. Extracts from cell lines belonging to two different complementation groups of FA showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing cis-DDP or UV adducts. Thus, there does not appear to be an overall excision repair defect in FA, but the data do not exclude a defect in the repair of interstrand DNA cross-links

  11. DNA damage induced by boron neutron capture therapy is partially repaired by DNA ligase IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Natsuko; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Hirota, Yuki; Tanaka, Hiroki; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Narabayashi, Masaru; Kinashi, Yuko; Miyatake, Shin-ichi; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Ohnishi, Takeo; Ono, Koji

    2016-03-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a particle radiation therapy that involves the use of a thermal or epithermal neutron beam in combination with a boron ((10)B)-containing compound that specifically accumulates in tumor. (10)B captures neutrons and the resultant fission reaction produces an alpha ((4)He) particle and a recoiled lithium nucleus ((7)Li). These particles have the characteristics of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation and therefore have marked biological effects. High-LET radiation is a potent inducer of DNA damage, specifically of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The aim of the present study was to clarify the role of DNA ligase IV, a key player in the non-homologous end-joining repair pathway, in the repair of BNCT-induced DSBs. We analyzed the cellular sensitivity of the mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines Lig4-/- p53-/- and Lig4+/+ p53-/- to irradiation using a thermal neutron beam in the presence or absence of (10)B-para-boronophenylalanine (BPA). The Lig4-/- p53-/- cell line had a higher sensitivity than the Lig4+/+ p53-/-cell line to irradiation with the beam alone or the beam in combination with BPA. In BNCT (with BPA), both cell lines exhibited a reduction of the 50 % survival dose (D 50) by a factor of 1.4 compared with gamma-ray and neutron mixed beam (without BPA). Although it was found that (10)B uptake was higher in the Lig4+/+ p53-/- than in the Lig4-/- p53-/- cell line, the latter showed higher sensitivity than the former, even when compared at an equivalent (10)B concentration. These results indicate that BNCT-induced DNA damage is partially repaired using DNA ligase IV. PMID:26573366

  12. ATR suppresses endogenous DNA damage and allows completion of homologous recombination repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Adam D; Sager, Brian W; Gorthi, Aparna; Tonapi, Sonal S; Brown, Eric J; Bishop, Alexander J R

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication fork stalling or collapse that arises from endogenous damage poses a serious threat to genome stability, but cells invoke an intricate signaling cascade referred to as the DNA damage response (DDR) to prevent such damage. The gene product ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) responds primarily to replication stress by regulating cell cycle checkpoint control, yet it's role in DNA repair, particularly homologous recombination (HR), remains unclear. This is of particular interest since HR is one way in which replication restart can occur in the presence of a stalled or collapsed fork. Hypomorphic mutations in human ATR cause the rare autosomal-recessive disease Seckel syndrome, and complete loss of Atr in mice leads to embryonic lethality. We recently adapted the in vivo murine pink-eyed unstable (pun) assay for measuring HR frequency to be able to investigate the role of essential genes on HR using a conditional Cre/loxP system. Our system allows for the unique opportunity to test the effect of ATR loss on HR in somatic cells under physiological conditions. Using this system, we provide evidence that retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells lacking ATR have decreased density with abnormal morphology, a decreased frequency of HR and an increased level of chromosomal damage. PMID:24675793

  13. Fast chemical repair of oxidative damage of DNA by flavonoid antioxidants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Cancer 'chemoprevention' is now an important area of research providing a practical approach to identifying potentially useful inhibitors of cancer development. One such class of compounds, which have emerged from epidemiological studies are constituents of tea, commonly referred to as catechins or flavonols. These compounds have been shown to be highly active antioxidants and anticarcinogens. The flavonols are efficient scavengers of free radicals per se but their measured low concentrations in human serum after ingestion of foods rich in flavanols, even after supplementation, means that it is very unlikely that direct free radical scavenging plays a part in their beneficial effects. We are investigating other free radical mechanisms of the flavanols which may give rise to their beneficial effects. By irradiating dilute aqueous solutions of plasmid DNA under 'constant radical scavenging conditions' with and without added flavonols, we have found that the flavanols afford some protection against strand breaks and base damage induced by OH radical attack. Complementary pulse radiolysis studies indicate that the flavonols can undergo electron transfer or H-atom transfer to oxidative damage sites on the DNA. A trend has emerged in that flavonols which act as good protectors of strand breaks and base damage undergo a higher degree of electron transfer than other compounds. Pulse radiolysis has been used to determine the one electron reduction potentials of the radicals of DNA bases and peroxy-alkyl radicals, which are formed upon one-electron oxidation of DNA by radical anions and OH radicals. Similarly obtained data for the flavonols now allow for a rational approach to understanding the antioxidant reactions between the flavonols and DNA radicals. The relatively long life-times of the DNA radicals allow for the kinetics of electron transfer to be studied by pulse radiolysis and the long lifetimes we believe may partially account for the effectiveness of

  14. BMI1 Is Recruited to DNA Breaks and Contributes to DNA Damage-Induced H2A Ubiquitination and Repair ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Ginjala, Vasudeva; Nacerddine, Karim; Kulkarni, Atul; Oza, Jay; Hill, Sarah J.; Yao, Ming; Citterio, Elisabetta; van Lohuizen, Maarten; Ganesan, Shridar

    2011-01-01

    DNA damage activates signaling pathways that lead to modification of local chromatin and recruitment of DNA repair proteins. Multiple DNA repair proteins having ubiquitin ligase activity are recruited to sites of DNA damage, where they ubiquitinate histones and other substrates. This DNA damage-induced histone ubiquitination is thought to play a critical role in mediating the DNA damage response. We now report that the polycomb protein BMI1 is rapidly recruited to sites of DNA damage, where i...

  15. ZRBA1, a Mixed EGFR/DNA Targeting Molecule, Potentiates Radiation Response Through Delayed DNA Damage Repair Process in a Triple Negative Breast Cancer Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heravi, Mitra [Department of Human Genetics, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Segal Cancer Center, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal (Canada); Kumala, Slawomir [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Segal Cancer Center, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal (Canada); Rachid, Zakaria; Jean-Claude, Bertrand J. [Cancer Drug Research Laboratory, McGill University Health Center, Montreal (Canada); Radzioch, Danuta [Department of Human Genetics, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Muanza, Thierry M., E-mail: tmuanza@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Segal Cancer Center, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal (Canada)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: ZRBA1 is a combi-molecule designed to induce DNA alkylating lesions and to block epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) TK domain. Inasmuch as ZRBA1 downregulates the EGFR TK-mediated antisurvival signaling and induces DNA damage, we postulated that it might be a radiosensitizer. The aim of this study was to further investigate the potentiating effect of ZRBA1 in combination with radiation and to elucidate the possible mechanisms of interaction between these 2 treatment modalities. Methods and Materials: The triple negative human breast MDA-MB-468 cancer cell line and mouse mammary cancer 4T1 cell line were used in this study. Clonogenic assay, Western blot analysis, and DNA damage analysis were performed at multiple time points after treatment. To confirm our in vitro findings, in vivo tumor growth delay assay was performed. Results: Our results show that a combination of ZRBA1 and radiation increases the radiation sensitivity of both cell lines significantly with a dose enhancement factor of 1.56, induces significant numbers of DNA strand breaks, prolongs higher DNA damage up to 24 hours after treatment, and significantly increases tumor growth delay in a syngeneic mouse model. Conclusions: Our data suggest that the higher efficacy of this combination could be partially due to increased DNA damage and delayed DNA repair process and to the inhibition of EGFR. The encouraging results of this combination demonstrated a significant improvement in treatment efficiency and therefore could be applicable in early clinical trial settings.

  16. ZRBA1, a Mixed EGFR/DNA Targeting Molecule, Potentiates Radiation Response Through Delayed DNA Damage Repair Process in a Triple Negative Breast Cancer Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: ZRBA1 is a combi-molecule designed to induce DNA alkylating lesions and to block epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) TK domain. Inasmuch as ZRBA1 downregulates the EGFR TK-mediated antisurvival signaling and induces DNA damage, we postulated that it might be a radiosensitizer. The aim of this study was to further investigate the potentiating effect of ZRBA1 in combination with radiation and to elucidate the possible mechanisms of interaction between these 2 treatment modalities. Methods and Materials: The triple negative human breast MDA-MB-468 cancer cell line and mouse mammary cancer 4T1 cell line were used in this study. Clonogenic assay, Western blot analysis, and DNA damage analysis were performed at multiple time points after treatment. To confirm our in vitro findings, in vivo tumor growth delay assay was performed. Results: Our results show that a combination of ZRBA1 and radiation increases the radiation sensitivity of both cell lines significantly with a dose enhancement factor of 1.56, induces significant numbers of DNA strand breaks, prolongs higher DNA damage up to 24 hours after treatment, and significantly increases tumor growth delay in a syngeneic mouse model. Conclusions: Our data suggest that the higher efficacy of this combination could be partially due to increased DNA damage and delayed DNA repair process and to the inhibition of EGFR. The encouraging results of this combination demonstrated a significant improvement in treatment efficiency and therefore could be applicable in early clinical trial settings

  17. Fundamental study on repairing technique for cracked or damaged parts of structures by cold gas dynamic spray technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study proposes an innovative technique for repairing of cracked or damaged parts of structures, such as nuclear or thermal power plants, by means of cold gas dynamic spray (CS) technique. In the case of generation of cracks etc. in the structure, the cracks can be repaired by welding. However, the welding spends considerable time on repair, and also needs special skills. The CS technique is known as a new technique not only for coatings but also for thick depositions. It has many advantages, i.e. dense deposition, high deposition rate and low oxidation. Therefore, it has a possibility to apply the CS technique instead of welding to repair the cracks etc. In this study, the cold gas dynamic spray technique as a new repairing technique for some structures is introduced. (author)

  18. BMI1 is recruited to DNA breaks and contributes to DNA damage-induced H2A ubiquitination and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginjala, Vasudeva; Nacerddine, Karim; Kulkarni, Atul; Oza, Jay; Hill, Sarah J; Yao, Ming; Citterio, Elisabetta; van Lohuizen, Maarten; Ganesan, Shridar

    2011-05-01

    DNA damage activates signaling pathways that lead to modification of local chromatin and recruitment of DNA repair proteins. Multiple DNA repair proteins having ubiquitin ligase activity are recruited to sites of DNA damage, where they ubiquitinate histones and other substrates. This DNA damage-induced histone ubiquitination is thought to play a critical role in mediating the DNA damage response. We now report that the polycomb protein BMI1 is rapidly recruited to sites of DNA damage, where it persists for more than 8 h. The sustained localization of BMI1 to damage sites is dependent on intact ATM and ATR and requires H2AX phosphorylation and recruitment of RNF8. BMI1 is required for DNA damage-induced ubiquitination of histone H2A at lysine 119. Loss of BMI1 leads to impaired repair of DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination and the accumulation of cells in G(2)/M. These data support a crucial role for BMI1 in the cellular response to DNA damage. PMID:21383063

  19. Radiation-induced DNA damage and repair in radiosensitive and radioresistant human tumour cells measured by field inversion gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced DNA damage induction and repair was measured in two human squamous carcinoma cell lines with differing radiosensitivities. Experiments were carried out with field inversion gel electrophoresis (FIGE), adapted to measure DNA double strand break (DSB) induction and repair in unlabelled cells. The sensitivity of the method was increased by introducing a hybridization membrane into the agarose gel. Damaged DNA accumulated on one spot on the membrane resulting in high local concentrations. This DNA was quantified using radioactively-labelled total human DNA as a probe. Radiosensitivity differences at physiological temperatures could not be explained by differences in either induction or repair of DNA damage as measured by pulsed field gel electrophoresis. (author)

  20. Rapid Repair of Earthquake Damaged RC Interior Beam-wide Column Joints and Beam-wall Joints Using FRP Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bing; LIM Chee Leong

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies the seismic performance of FRP-strengthened RC interior non-seismically detailed beam-wide columns and beam-wall joints after limited seismic damage. Four eccentric and concentric beam-wide column joints and two beam-wall joints, initially damaged in a previous study, were repaired and tested under constant axial loads (0. \\fc'Ag and 0. 35 fc'Ag ) and lateral cyclic loading. The rapid repair technique developed, aimed to restore the original strength and to provide minimum drift capacity. The repair schemes were characterized by the use of; (a) epoxy injections and polymer modified cementitious mortar to seal the cracks and replace spalled concrete; and (b) glass (GFRP) and carbon (CFRP) sheets to enhance the joint performance. The FRP sheets were effectively prevented against possible debonding through the use of fiber anchors. Comparison between responses of specimens before and after repair clearly indicated reasonable restoration in strength, drift capacity, stiffness and cumulative energy dissipation capacity. All specimens failed with delamination of FRP sheets at beam-column joint interfaces. The rapid repair technique developed in this study is recommended for mass upgrading or repair of earthquake damaged beam-column joints.

  1. Structural performance of notch damaged steel beams repaired with composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Taly, Boshra

    2016-03-01

    An experimental program and an analytical model using ANSYS program were employed to estimate the structural performance of repaired damaged steel beams using fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite materials. The beams were artificially notched in the tension flanges at mid-spans and retrofitted by FRP flexible sheets on the tension flanges and the sheets were extended to cover parts of the beams webs with different heights. Eleven box steel beams, including one intact beam, one notch damaged beam and nine notches damaged beam and retrofitted with composite materials, were tested in two-point loading up to failure. The parameters considered were the FRP type (GFRP and CFRP) and number of layers. The results indicated that bonding CFRP sheets to both of the tension steel flange and part of the webs, instead of the tension flange only, enhances the ultimate load of the retrofitted beams, avoids the occurrence of the debonding and increases the beam ductility. Also the numerical models give acceptable results in comparison with the experimental results.

  2. Structural performance of notch damaged steel beams repaired with composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Taly, Boshra

    2016-06-01

    An experimental program and an analytical model using ANSYS program were employed to estimate the structural performance of repaired damaged steel beams using fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite materials. The beams were artificially notched in the tension flanges at mid-spans and retrofitted by FRP flexible sheets on the tension flanges and the sheets were extended to cover parts of the beams webs with different heights. Eleven box steel beams, including one intact beam, one notch damaged beam and nine notches damaged beam and retrofitted with composite materials, were tested in two-point loading up to failure. The parameters considered were the FRP type (GFRP and CFRP) and number of layers. The results indicated that bonding CFRP sheets to both of the tension steel flange and part of the webs, instead of the tension flange only, enhances the ultimate load of the retrofitted beams, avoids the occurrence of the debonding and increases the beam ductility. Also the numerical models give acceptable results in comparison with the experimental results.

  3. Evidence for three types of x-ray damage repair in yeast and sensitivity of totally repair deficient strains to sunlight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutants of yeast that confer sensitivity to x-rays are known to fall into two epistasis groups, called here the RAD51 and RAD18 groups, which are each thought to control a different type of x-ray repair. They examine here the role of genes in a third repair pathways in x-ray repair. RAD1 and RAD3 are known to be important in the repair of pyrimidine dimers after uv-irradiation. They find that these genes can also play an important role in x-ray repair, but that this role is only exposed when both the other pathways of x-ray repair are blocked. Double mutants blocked in the RAD51 and RAD18 pathways are significantly less x-ray sensitive than triple mutants blocked in these pathways but also mutant in either the RAD1 or RAD3 genes. In a related experiment, they tested the importance of DNA repair in nature by determining the sensitivity to natural unfiltered sunlight of a strain lacking all known DNA repair pathways. They constructed a quadruple mutant strain containing RAD1-1, RAD18-2, RAD51-1 and PHR1-1. The latter mutation blocks the cell's ability to photoreactivate uv damage. They found that this strain was so sensitive to sunlight that less than three seconds' exposure would cause an average of one lethal hit per cell, and survival was less than 2% after ten seconds' exposure. Wild type yeast at sea level showed no killing after thirty minutes. the quadruple mutant is approximately one thousand times more sensitive to sunlight than the related wild type

  4. Proceedings of the workshop. Recognition of DNA damage as onset of successful repair. Computational and experimental approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This was held at The Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, on the 18th and 19th of December 2001. The Laboratory of Radiation Risk Analysis of JAERI organized the workshop. The main subject of the workshop was the DNA damage and its repair. Presented works described the leading experimental as well computational approaches, focusing mainly on the formation of DNA damage, its proliferation, enzymatic recognition and repair, and finally imaging and detection of lesions on a DNA molecule. The 19 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  5. XPC is essential for nucleotide excision repair of zidovudine-induced DNA damage in human hepatoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zidovudine (3'-azido-3'-dexoythymidine, AZT), a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, can be incorporated into DNA and cause DNA damage. The mechanisms underlying the repair of AZT-induced DNA damage are unknown. To investigate the pathways involved in the recognition and repair of AZT-induced DNA damage, human hepatoma HepG2 cells were incubated with AZT for 2 weeks and the expression of DNA damage signaling pathways was determined using a pathway-based real-time PCR array. Compared to control cultures, damaged DNA binding and nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathways showed significantly increased gene expression. Further analysis indicated that AZT treatment increased the expression of genes associated with NER, including XPC, XPA, RPA1, GTF2H1, and ERCC1. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the protein levels of XPC and GTF2H1 were also significantly up-regulated. To explore further the function of XPC in the repair of AZT-induced DNA damage, XPC expression was stably knocked down by 71% using short hairpin RNA interference. In the XPC knocked-down cells, 100 μM AZT treatment significantly increased [3H]AZT incorporation into DNA, decreased the total number of viable cells, increased the release of lactate dehydrogenase, induced apoptosis, and caused a more extensive G2/M cell cycle arrest when compared to non-transfected HepG2 cells or HepG2 cells transfected with a scrambled short hairpin RNA sequence. Overall, these data indicate that XPC plays an essential role in the NER repair of AZT-induced DNA damage.

  6. Alpha-phellandrene-induced DNA damage and affect DNA repair protein expression in WEHI-3 murine leukemia cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jen-Jyh; Wu, Chih-Chung; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Weng, Shu-Wen; Ma, Yi-Shih; Huang, Yi-Ping; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-11-01

    Although there are few reports regarding α-phellandrene (α-PA), a natural compound from Schinus molle L. essential oil, there is no report to show that α-PA induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair associated protein expression. Herein, we investigated the effects of α-PA on DNA damage and repair associated protein expression in murine leukemia cells. Flow cytometric assay was used to measure the effects of α-PA on total cell viability and the results indicated that α-PA induced cell death. Comet assay and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride staining were used for measuring DNA damage and condensation, respectively, and the results indicated that α-PA induced DNA damage and condensation in a concentration-dependent manner. DNA gel electrophoresis was used to examine the DNA damage and the results showed that α-PA induced DNA damage in WEHI-3 cells. Western blotting assay was used to measure the changes of DNA damage and repair associated protein expression and the results indicated that α-PA increased p-p53, p-H2A.X, 14-3-3-σ, and MDC1 protein expression but inhibited the protein of p53, MGMT, DNA-PK, and BRCA-1. PMID:24861204

  7. Direct detection and quantification of abasic sites for in vivo studies of DNA damage and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Use of chemotherapeutic agents to induce cytotoxic DNA damage and programmed cell death is a key strategy in cancer treatments. However, the efficacy of DNA-targeted agents such as temozolomide is often compromised by intrinsic cellular responses such as DNA base excision repair (BER). Previous studies have shown that BER pathway resulted in formation of abasic or apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites, and blockage of AP sites led to a significant enhancement of drug sensitivity due to reduction of DNA base excision repair. Since a number of chemotherapeutic agents also induce formation of AP sites, monitoring of these sites as a clinical correlate of drug effect will provide a useful tool in the development of DNA-targeted chemotherapies aimed at blocking abasic sites from repair. Here we report an imaging technique based on positron emission tomography (PET) that allows for direct quantification of AP sites in vivo. For this purpose, positron-emitting carbon-11 has been incorporated into methoxyamine ([11C]MX) that binds covalently to AP sites with high specificity. The binding specificity of [11C]MX for AP sites was demonstrated by in vivo blocking experiments. Using [11C]MX as a radiotracer, animal PET studies have been conducted in melanoma and glioma xenografts for quantification of AP sites. Following induction of AP sites by temozolomide, both tumor models showed significant increase of [11C]MX uptake in tumor regions in terms of radioactivity concentration as a function of time, which correlates well with conventional aldehyde reactive probe (ARP)-based bioassays for AP sites.

  8. Repair of ultraviolet light-induced DNA damage in cholera bacteriophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA repair-proficient and -deficient strains of Vibrio cholerae were used to examine host cell reactivation, Weigle reactivation and photoreactivation of u.v.-irradiated cholera bacteriophages. U.v. light-induced DNA damage in phages of different morphological and serological groups could be efficiently photoreactivated. Host cell reactivation of irradiated phages of different groups was different on the same indicator host. Phage phi149 was the most sensitive, and phi138 the most resistant to u.v. irradiation. While phi138 showed appreciable host cell reactivation, this was minimal for phi149. Attempts to demonstrate Weigle reactivation of u.v.-irradiated cholera phages were not successful, although u.v.-induced filamentation of host cells was observed. (author)

  9. Alpha particle induced DNA damage and repair in normal cultured thyrocytes of different proliferation status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyckesvärd, Madeleine Nordén; Delle, Ulla; Kahu, Helena;

    2014-01-01

    Childhood exposure to ionizing radiation increases the risk of developing thyroid cancer later in life and this is suggested to be due to higher proliferation of the young thyroid. The interest of using high-LET alpha particles from Astatine-211 ((211)At), concentrated in the thyroid by the same...... levels of γH2AX decreased during the first 24h in both cycling and stationary cultures and complete repair was seen in all cultures but cycling cells exposed to (211)At. Compared to stationary cells alpha particles were more harmful for cycling cultures, an effect also seen at the pChk2 levels...... cultures at a modest level of damage, clearly demonstrating that cell cycle status influences the relative effectiveness of alpha particles....

  10. An aromatic sensor with aversion to damaged strands confers versatility to DNA repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Maillard

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available It was not known how xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC protein, the primary initiator of global nucleotide excision repair, achieves its outstanding substrate versatility. Here, we analyzed the molecular pathology of a unique Trp690Ser substitution, which is the only reported missense mutation in xeroderma patients mapping to the evolutionary conserved region of XPC protein. The function of this critical residue and neighboring conserved aromatics was tested by site-directed mutagenesis followed by screening for excision activity and DNA binding. This comparison demonstrated that Trp690 and Phe733 drive the preferential recruitment of XPC protein to repair substrates by mediating an exquisite affinity for single-stranded sites. Such a dual deployment of aromatic side chains is the distinctive feature of functional oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding folds and, indeed, sequence homologies with replication protein A and breast cancer susceptibility 2 protein indicate that XPC displays a monomeric variant of this recurrent interaction motif. An aversion to associate with damaged oligonucleotides implies that XPC protein avoids direct contacts with base adducts. These results reveal for the first time, to our knowledge, an entirely inverted mechanism of substrate recognition that relies on the detection of single-stranded configurations in the undamaged complementary sequence of the double helix.

  11. The Fanconi anemia pathway: Repairing the link between DNA damage and squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romick-Rosendale, Lindsey E. [Division of Oncology, Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States); Lui, Vivian W.Y.; Grandis, Jennifer R. [Department of Otolaryngology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Wells, Susanne I., E-mail: Susanne.Wells@cchmc.org [Division of Oncology, Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare inherited recessive disease caused by mutations in one of fifteen genes known to encode FA pathway components. In response to DNA damage, nuclear FA proteins associate into high molecular weight complexes through a cascade of post-translational modifications and physical interactions, followed by the repair of damaged DNA. Hematopoietic cells are particularly sensitive to the loss of these interactions, and bone marrow failure occurs almost universally in FA patients. FA as a disease is further characterized by cancer susceptibility, which highlights the importance of the FA pathway in tumor suppression, and will be the focus of this review. Acute myeloid leukemia is the most common cancer type, often subsequent to bone marrow failure. However, FA patients are also at an extreme risk of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck and gynecological tract, with an even greater incidence in those individuals who have received a bone marrow transplant and recovered from hematopoietic disease. FA tumor suppression in hematopoietic versus epithelial compartments could be mechanistically similar or distinct. Definition of compartment specific FA activities is now critical to assess the effects of today's bone marrow failure treatments on tomorrow's solid tumor development. It is our hope that current therapies can then be optimized to decrease the risk of malignant transformation in both hematopoietic and epithelial cells. Here we review our current understanding of the mechanisms of action of the Fanconi anemia pathway as it contributes to stress responses, DNA repair and squamous cell carcinoma susceptibility.

  12. Repair of oligodeoxyribonucleotides containing O6-alkylguanine by MGMT variant proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Senthong, Pattama

    2013-01-01

    Alkylating agents are a diverse family of compounds whose toxic, mutagenic and carcinogenic effects in living organisms are due to their ability to damage DNA. Humans are exposed to these agents through lifestyle, diet, occupation and some forms of chemotherapy, but they are also formed endogenously. To protect against these adverse effects, a variety of DNA repair process have evolved. Among these is O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a damage reversal protein that repairs O6-alk...

  13. ShaPINg cell fate upon DNA damage:role of Pin1 isomerase in DNA damage-induced cell death and repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G Hofmann

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase Pin1 acts as a molecular timer in proline-directed Ser/Thr kinase signaling and shapes cellular responses based on recognition of phosphorylation marks and implementing conformational changes in its substrates. Accordingly, Pin1 has been linked to numerous phosphorylation-controlled signaling pathways and cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, proliferation and differentiation. In addition, Pin1 plays a pivotal role in DNA damage-triggered cell fate decisions. Whereas moderate DNA damage is balanced by DNA repair, cells confronted with massive genotoxic stress are eliminated by the induction of programmed cell death or cellular senescence. In this review we summarize and discuss the current knowledge on how Pin1 specifies cell fate through regulating key players of the apoptotic and the repair branch of the DNA damage response.

  14. Mechanistic simulation of radiation damage to DNA and its repair: On the track towards systems radiation biology modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biophysical simulation code PARTRAC enables, by combining track structure calculations with DNA models on diverse genomic scales, prediction of DNA damage yields and patterns for various radiation qualities. To extend its applicability to later endpoints such as mutagenesis or cell killing, a continuative model for repair of radiation-induced double-strand break (DSB) via non-homologous end-joining has complemented the PARTRAC code by about 12 orders of magnitude on a temporal scale. The repair model describes step-by-step by the Monte Carlo method the attachment and dissociation of involved repair enzymes and diffusion motion of DNA ends. The complexity of initial DNA lesion patterns influences the repair kinetics and outcome via additional cleaning steps required for dirty DNA ends. Model parameters have been taken from measured attachment kinetics of repair enzymes and adaptation to DSB rejoining kinetics after gamma irradiation. Application of the DNA repair model to damage patterns following nitrogen ion irradiation and comparison with experimental results reveal the need for further model refinements. Nevertheless, already the present model represents a promising step towards systems modelling of cellular response to radiation. (authors)

  15. A cell-free system for studying a priming factor involved in repair of bleomycin-damaged DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seki,Shuji

    1989-04-01

    Full Text Available A simple cell-free system for studying a priming factor involved in the repair of bleomycin-damaged DNA was established. The template-primer used for the repair DNA synthesis was prepared by treating the closed circular, superhelical form of pUC19 plasmid DNA with 2.2 microM bleomycin and 20 microM ferrous ions. Single-strand breaks were introduced into pUC19 DNA by the bleomycin treatment, and the DNA was consequently converted largely into the open circular form. A system for repair of this bleomycin-damaged DNA was constructed with a priming factor, DNA polymerase (DNA polymerase beta or Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I, ATP, T4 DNA ligase and four deoxynucleoside triphosphates. After incubation, the conformation of the DNA was analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis and electron microscopy. The open circular DNA was largely converted to the closed circular DNA, indicating that the single-strand breaks of DNA were repaired. When the priming factor was omitted, DNA repair did not occur. The present system seemed to be applicable to the study of priming factors involved in the repair of DNA with single-strand breaks caused not only by bleomycin but also by ionizing radiation or active oxygen.

  16. An initial DNA damage and the repair efficiency of UV induces damages estimated by SCGE assay in lymphocytes from occupationally exposed to pesticides and reference group from Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to examine the individual susceptibility to UV-C induced DNA damage in lymphocytes of Greece people occupationally exposed to pesticides and from reference group with reported no occupational exposure. We also analyzed if there are any differences in the cellular repair capacity between both groups. Lymphocytes were isolated from fresh blood samples collected in Greece from 50 persons recognized as non-exposed to pesticides and from 50 farmers at the end of the spraying season. The average age in exposed to pesticide and reference group was 42.08 and 42.19, respectively. Frozen lymphocytes were transported in a dry ice into DREB laboratory for DNA damage analysis. The DNA damage was measured with the application of single cell gel electrophoresis method (SCGE technique). Our results show that there was not any statistically significant difference concerning the level of the DNA damage detected in defrosted lymphocytes between exposed and non-exposed group. The photoproducts excision efficiency after exposure to UV-C (6 Jm2) and difference in repair capacity by incubation in present and absent of PHA were also studied. There were no statistically significant differences detected directly after UV irradiation between both investigated groups (p >0.1). However, for group exposed to pesticide the ratio of DNA damage measured right after exposition and two hours later was higher (32.19) comparing to reference group (28.60). It may suggest that in exposed group photoproducts excision efficiency was higher or the rejoining rates of the breaks was lower. The differences between repair efficiency observed in lymphocytes from group exposed and non-exposed to pesticides (with or without stimulation to division) were also statistically insignificant (for Tail Length, Tail DNA and Tail moment parameters - p >0.1). Statistically significant differences in DNA damage repair capacities were observed (for all analyzed parameters) between lymphocytes

  17. Alpha particle induced DNA damage and repair in normal cultured thyrocytes of different proliferation status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyckesvärd, Madeleine Nordén, E-mail: madeleine.lyckesvard@oncology.gu.se [Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Delle, Ulla; Kahu, Helena [Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Lindegren, Sture [Department of Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Jensen, Holger [The PET and Cyclotron Unit Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet (Denmark); Bäck, Tom [Department of Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Swanpalmer, John [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Elmroth, Kecke [Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • We study DNA damage response to low-LET photons and high-LET alpha particles. • Cycling primary thyrocytes are more sensitive to radiation than stationary cells. • Influence of radiation quality varies due to cell cycle status of normal cells. • High-LET radiation gives rise to a sustained DNA damage response. - Abstract: Childhood exposure to ionizing radiation increases the risk of developing thyroid cancer later in life and this is suggested to be due to higher proliferation of the young thyroid. The interest of using high-LET alpha particles from Astatine-211 ({sup 211}At), concentrated in the thyroid by the same mechanism as {sup 131}I [1], in cancer treatment has increased during recent years because of its high efficiency in inducing biological damage and beneficial dose distribution when compared to low-LET radiation. Most knowledge of the DNA damage response in thyroid is from studies using low-LET irradiation and much less is known of high-LET irradiation. In this paper we investigated the DNA damage response and biological consequences to photons from Cobolt-60 ({sup 60}Co) and alpha particles from {sup 211}At in normal primary thyrocytes of different cell cycle status. For both radiation qualities the intensity levels of γH2AX decreased during the first 24 h in both cycling and stationary cultures and complete repair was seen in all cultures but cycling cells exposed to {sup 211}At. Compared to stationary cells alpha particles were more harmful for cycling cultures, an effect also seen at the pChk2 levels. Increasing ratios of micronuclei per cell nuclei were seen up to 1 Gy {sup 211}At. We found that primary thyrocytes were much more sensitive to alpha particle exposure compared with low-LET photons. Calculations of the relative biological effectiveness yielded higher RBE for cycling cells compared with stationary cultures at a modest level of damage, clearly demonstrating that cell cycle status influences the relative

  18. Function of chromatin structure and dynamics in DNA damage, repair and misrepair: γ-rays and protons in action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to their physical characteristics, protons and ion beams promise a revolution in cancer radiotherapy. Curing protocols however reflect rather the empirical knowledge than experimental data on DNA repair. This especially holds for the spatio-temporal organization of repair processes in the context of higher-order chromatin structure—the problematics addressed in this work. The consequences for the mechanism of chromosomal translocations are compared for gamma rays and proton beams. - Highlights: ► The majority of DSBs are repaired individually close to the sites of their origin. ► Decondensation of damaged chromatin domains can potentiate clustering of lesions. ► DSB clustering might increase the risk of chromatin translocation. ► Distances of lesions and higher-order chromatin structure influence DSB clustering. ► The conclusions seem to hold both for DSB damage caused by γ-radiation and protons

  19. Association Between Polymorphisms of DNA Repair Gene XRCC1 and DNA Damage in Asbestos-Exposed Workers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO-HONG ZHAO; GUANG JIA; YONG-QUAN LIU; SHAO-WEI LIU; LEI YAN; YU JIN; NIAN LIU

    2006-01-01

    Objective To compare the asbestos-induced DNA damage and repair capacities of DNA damage between 104 asbestos exposed workers and 101 control workers in Qingdao City of China and to investigate the possible association between polymorphisms in codon 399 of XRCC1 and susceptibility to asbestosis. Methods DNA damage levels in peripheral bloodlymphocytes were determined by comet assay, and XRCC 1 genetic polymorphisms of DNA samples from 51 asbestosis cases and 53 non-asbestosis workers with a similar asbestos exposure history were analyzed by PCR/RFLP. Results The basal comet scores (3.95±2.95) were significantly higher in asbestos-exposed workers than in control workers (0.10±0.28). After 1 h H2O2 stimulation, DNA damage of lymphocytes exhibited different increases. After a 4 h repair period, the comet scores were 50.98±19.53 in asbestos-exposed workers and 18.32±12.04 in controls. The residual DNA damage (RD) was significantly greater (P<0.01) in asbestos-exposed workers (35.62%) than in controls (27.75%). XRCC1 genetic polymorphism in 104 asbestos-exposed workers was not associated with increased risk of asbestosis. But compared with polymorphisms in the DNA repair gene XRCC1 (polymorphisms in codon 399) and the DNA damage induced by asbestos, the comet scores in asbestosis cases with Gln/Gln, Gln/Arg, and Arg/Arg were 40.26±18.94, 38.03±28.22, and 32.01±11.65, respectively, which were higher than those in non-asbestosis workers with the same genotypes (25.58±11.08, 37.08±14.74, and 29.38±10.15). There were significant differences in the comet scores between asbestosis cases and non-asbestosis workers with Gln/Gln by Student's t-test (P<0.05 or 0.01). The comet scores were higher in asbestosis workers with Gln/Gln than in those with Arg/Arg and in non-asbestosis workers exposed to asbestos, but without statistically significant difference. Conclusions Exposure to asbestos may be related to DNA damage or the capacity of cells to repair H2O2-induced

  20. Influence of thymus on the capacity of stromal cell-precursors for intracellular repair of radiation damages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cells-precursors of haemopoietic microenvironment, as well as osteogenic cells-precursors, indicated with heterotopic transplantation of mouse bone marrow, can repair sublethal radiation damages. Thymectomy of the bone-marrow donors does not influence this capacity of the stromal precursors

  1. Damage repair in CMSX-4 alloy without fatigue life reduction penalty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Masakazu; Ohtera, Issei; Harada, Yoshio

    2004-02-01

    The microstructural changes in a single-crystal Ni-base superalloy, CMSX-4, that might occur during the processes of repair and recoating of hot section components for advanced gas turbines were studied. It is shown that the cellular γ/γ‧ microstructure is formed when the material is subjected to local plastic straining, followed by the reheat treatments during the course of damage recovery. The formation of cellular microstructure in the material led to the remarkably reduced fatigue strength. In order to reduce or prevent the preceding undesirable effect resulting from cellular microstructure, a new method based on applying overlay coating technique was developed. The method is based on an idea that the alloying elements that are depleted in base alloys could be supplemented via the overlay coating. An X alloy, which contains grain boundary strengthening elements, was selected and coated on the CMSX-4 with the cellular microstructure by low-pressure plasma spraying. The fatigue tests on the coated CMSX-4 specimens demonstrated the effectiveness of the method. The observations of the crack initiation site, the fatigue fracture mode, the crack density in the cellular transformed area, and the crack propagation morphologies near the prior interface strongly supported the validity of this approach. The method is expected to build a road to a so-called damage cure (or recovery) coating.

  2. Cell and gene therapy for arrhythmias: Repair of cardiac conduction damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Fu Xiao

    2011-01-01

    Action potentials generated in the sinoatrial node(SAN)dominate the rhythm and rate of a healthy human heart.Subsequently,these action potentials propagate to the whole heart via its conduction system .Abnormalities of impulse generation and/or propagation in a heart can cause arrhythmias.For example,SAN dysfunction or conduction block of the atrioventricular node can lead to serious bradycardia which is currently treated with an implanted electronic pacemaker.On the other hand conduction damage may cause reentrant tachyarrhythmias which are primarily treated pharmacologically or by medical device-based therapies,including defibrillation and tissue ablation.However,drug therapies sometimes may not be effective or are associated with serious side effects.Device-based therapies for cardiac arrhythmias,even with well developed technology,still face inadequacies,limitations,hardware complications,and other challenges.Therefore,scientists are actively seeking other alternatives for antiarrhythmic therapy.In particular,cells and genes used for repairing cardiac conduction damage/defect have been investigated in various studies both in vitro and in vivo.Despite the complexities of the excitation and conduction systems of the heart,cell and gene-based strategies provide novel alternatives for treatment or cure of cardiac anhythmias.This review summarizes some highlights of recent research progress in this field.

  3. Repair of oxidative DNA base damage in the host genome influences the HIV integration site sequence preference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey R Bennett

    Full Text Available Host base excision repair (BER proteins that repair oxidative damage enhance HIV infection. These proteins include the oxidative DNA damage glycosylases 8-oxo-guanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1 and mutY homolog (MYH as well as DNA polymerase beta (Polβ. While deletion of oxidative BER genes leads to decreased HIV infection and integration efficiency, the mechanism remains unknown. One hypothesis is that BER proteins repair the DNA gapped integration intermediate. An alternative hypothesis considers that the most common oxidative DNA base damages occur on guanines. The subtle consensus sequence preference at HIV integration sites includes multiple G:C base pairs surrounding the points of joining. These observations suggest a role for oxidative BER during integration targeting at the nucleotide level. We examined the hypothesis that BER repairs a gapped integration intermediate by measuring HIV infection efficiency in Polβ null cell lines complemented with active site point mutants of Polβ. A DNA synthesis defective mutant, but not a 5'dRP lyase mutant, rescued HIV infection efficiency to wild type levels; this suggested Polβ DNA synthesis activity is not necessary while 5'dRP lyase activity is required for efficient HIV infection. An alternate hypothesis that BER events in the host genome influence HIV integration site selection was examined by sequencing integration sites in OGG1 and MYH null cells. In the absence of these 8-oxo-guanine specific glycosylases the chromatin elements of HIV integration site selection remain the same as in wild type cells. However, the HIV integration site sequence preference at G:C base pairs is altered at several positions in OGG1 and MYH null cells. Inefficient HIV infection in the absence of oxidative BER proteins does not appear related to repair of the gapped integration intermediate; instead oxidative damage repair may participate in HIV integration site preference at the sequence level.

  4. Quantifying clustered DNA damage induction and repair by gel electrophoresis, electronic imaging and number average length analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Betsy M.; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Bennett, Paula V.; Laval, Jacques; Sutherland, John C.; Gewirtz, A. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Assessing DNA damage induction, repair and consequences of such damages requires measurement of specific DNA lesions by methods that are independent of biological responses to such lesions. Lesions affecting one DNA strand (altered bases, abasic sites, single strand breaks (SSB)) as well as damages affecting both strands (clustered damages, double strand breaks) can be quantified by direct measurement of DNA using gel electrophoresis, gel imaging and number average length analysis. Damage frequencies as low as a few sites per gigabase pair (10(9)bp) can be quantified by this approach in about 50ng of non-radioactive DNA, and single molecule methods may allow such measurements in DNA from single cells. This review presents the theoretical basis, biochemical requirements and practical aspects of this approach, and shows examples of their applications in identification and quantitation of complex clustered damages.

  5. Quantifying clustered DNA damage induction and repair by gel electrophoresis, electronic imaging and number average length analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, Betsy M.; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Bennett, Paula V.; Laval, Jacques; Sutherland, John C

    2003-10-29

    Assessing DNA damage induction, repair and consequences of such damages requires measurement of specific DNA lesions by methods that are independent of biological responses to such lesions. Lesions affecting one DNA strand (altered bases, abasic sites, single strand breaks (SSB)) as well as damages affecting both strands (clustered damages, double strand breaks) can be quantified by direct measurement of DNA using gel electrophoresis, gel imaging and number average length analysis. Damage frequencies as low as a few sites per gigabase pair (10{sup 9} bp) can be quantified by this approach in about 50 ng of non-radioactive DNA, and single molecule methods may allow such measurements in DNA from single cells. This review presents the theoretical basis, biochemical requirements and practical aspects of this approach, and shows examples of their applications in identification and quantitation of complex clustered damages.

  6. Ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage and its repair in human cells. Final performance report, July 1992 - June 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The studies of DNA damage in living cells in vitro and in vivo were continued. A variety of systems including cultured mammalian cells, animals, and human tissues were used to conduct these studies. In addition, enzymatic repair of DNA base damage was studied using several DNA glycosylases. To this end, substrate specificities of these enzymes were examined in terms of a large number of base lesions in DNA. In the first phase of the studies, the author sought to introduce improvements to his methodologies for measurement of DNA damage using the technique of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). In particular, the quantitative measurement of DNA base damage and DNA-protein crosslinks was improved by incorporation of isotope-dilution mass spectrometry into the methodologies. This is one of the most accurate techniques for quantification of organic compounds. Having improved the measurement technique, studies of DNA damage in living cells and DNA repair by repair enzymes were pursued. This report provides a summary of these studies with references to the original work

  7. RCC1-dependent activation of Ran accelerates cell cycle and DNA repair, inhibiting DNA damage-induced cell senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekan, Pavol; Hasegawa, Keisuke; Pan, Yu; Tubman, Emily; Odde, David; Chen, Jin-Qiu; Herrmann, Michelle A; Kumar, Sheetal; Kalab, Petr

    2016-04-15

    The coordination of cell cycle progression with the repair of DNA damage supports the genomic integrity of dividing cells. The function of many factors involved in DNA damage response (DDR) and the cell cycle depends on their Ran GTPase-regulated nuclear-cytoplasmic transport (NCT). The loading of Ran with GTP, which is mediated by RCC1, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ran, is critical for NCT activity. However, the role of RCC1 or Ran⋅GTP in promoting cell proliferation or DDR is not clear. We show that RCC1 overexpression in normal cells increased cellular Ran⋅GTP levels and accelerated the cell cycle and DNA damage repair. As a result, normal cells overexpressing RCC1 evaded DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest and senescence, mimicking colorectal carcinoma cells with high endogenous RCC1 levels. The RCC1-induced inhibition of senescence required Ran and exportin 1 and involved the activation of importin β-dependent nuclear import of 53BP1, a large NCT cargo. Our results indicate that changes in the activity of the Ran⋅GTP-regulated NCT modulate the rate of the cell cycle and the efficiency of DNA repair. Through the essential role of RCC1 in regulation of cellular Ran⋅GTP levels and NCT, RCC1 expression enables the proliferation of cells that sustain DNA damage. PMID:26864624

  8. Comparison between X-rays and SR 4233 for cytotoxicity and repair of potentially lethal damage in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors recently described a new class of bioreductive cytotoxic agents, the lead compound of which is SR 4233, (3-amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine 1,4 dioxide). SR 4233 has a high selective toxicity for hypoxic cells in vitro and causes extensive tumor cell death in vivo when combined with radiation. They propose that under hypoxia, SR 4233 undergoes a one-electron reduction to form a free radical intermediate which reacts with DNA by hydrogen abstraction, producing lethal double-strand breaks (dsb) similar to those produced by ionizing radiation. Unlike radiation, SR 4233, at supralethal concentrations, was found to inhibit repair of DNA dsb. In this study, they compared potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) in human cells after exposure to SR 4233 and X-rays. Since PLDR has been shown to be correlated with DNA dsb repair it indirectly assesses whether DNA dsb are repaired in SR 4233-treated cells at survivable drug doses. The data indicate lethal damage produced by SR 4233 and X-rays is repaired in a similar manner. (author)

  9. Potentially lethal damage repair in 9L multicell spheroids and monolayers after x-ray and silicon irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD) was examined in 9L cell monolayers and multicell tumor spheroids (MTS) after irradiation with 150 kVp x-rays and 670 and 320 MeV/amu silicon ions. Survival was assessed by clonogenic assay immediately following the radiation (initial survival) and after a delay in plating of 5-6 hours. The x-ray dose modification factor for MTS at 10% survival is 1.4. Delayed plating of monolayer cells increases survival to the level of MTS cells; however, delayed plating of MTS cells does not further increase survival. The x-ray results indicate that at least part of the difference in initial survival between monolayer and MTS cells is due to repair of PLD. PLD repair in depleted media for monolayers may indicate that the MTS microenvironment is similar to depleted media. Irradiation with 670 MeV silicon generated results similar to the x-ray response. irradiation with 320 MeV silicon produced results opposite to those obtained for x-ray and 670 MeV silicon. PLD repair is seen in MTS cells and not in monolayer cells. These results may indicate that cells in MTS have an increased capacity for repair of high LET potentially lethal damage

  10. Spectroscopic approaches to study DNA damage induced in genome exposed to ionizing radiation and its enzymatic repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent progress on spectroscopic study on physicochemical process of DNA damage induction will be reported. It has been predicted by computer track simulation studies that complex DNA damage, so called clustered DNA damage sites, is produced along the tack particularly of high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) ions. The clustered DNA damage, consisting of two or more isolated lesions such as single strand breaks or nucleobase lesions, is thought to compromise DNA repair enzymes. We have revealed that the nucleobase lesions produced by He2+ ion impact to simple model DNA (plasmid) are hardly processed by base excision repair enzymes (E. coli DNA glycosylases). Using the third generation synchrotron radiation facility (SPring-8), we have studied unpaired electron species or desorbed ions as intermediates of DNA damage using an EPR apparatus or mass spectrometer installed in the soft X-ray beamline in SPring-8. These aspects are compared with the yields of final products of single- and double-strand breaks and base lesions revealed biochemical techniques. Models of complex DNA damage induction will be proposed considering various modification factors of the damage induction, ionization of valence and inner-shell electrons, OH radicals, hydration layer and the impact of secondary electrons. (author)

  11. Heterogeneity in radiation-induced DNA damage and repair in tumor and normal cells measured using the comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for measuring DNA damage to individual cells, based on the technique of microelectrophoresis, was described by Ostling and Johanson in 1984. Cells embedded in agarose are lysed, subjected briefly to an electric field, stained with a fluorescent DNA-binding stain, and viewed using a fluorescence microscope. Broken DNA migrates farther in the electric field, and the cell then resembles a comet with a brightly fluorescent head and a tail region which increases as damage increases. We have used video image analysis to define appropriate features of the comet as a measure of DNA damage, and have quantified damage and repair by ionizing radiation. The assay was optimized for lysing solution, lysing time, electrophoresis time, and propidium iodide concentration using Chinese hamster V79 cells. To assess heterogeneity of response of normal versus malignant cells, damage to both tumor cells and normal cells within mouse SCC-VII tumors was assessed. Tumor cells were separated from macrophages using a cell-sorting method based on differential binding of FITC-conjugated goat anti-mouse IgG. The tail moment, the product of the amount of DNA in the tail and the mean distance of migration in the tail, was the most informative feature of the comet image. Tumor and normal cells showed significant heterogeneity in damage produced by ionizing radiation, although the average amount of damage increased linearly with dose (0-15 Gy) and suggested similar net radiosensitivities for the two cell types. Similarly, DNA repair rate was not significantly different for tumor and normal cells, and most of the cells had repaired the damage by 30 min following exposure to 15 Gy. The heterogeneity in response did not appear to be a result of differences in response through the cell cycle

  12. Effects of different light conditions on repair of UV-B-induced damage in carpospores of Chondrus ocellatus Holm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Qing; Xiao, Hui; Wang, You; Tang, Xuexi

    2015-05-01

    We evaluated the effects of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation and different light conditions on the repair of UV-B-induced damage in carpospores of Chondrus ocellatus Holm (Rhodophyta) in laboratory experiments. Carpospores were treated daily with different doses of UV-B radiation for 48 days, when vertical branches had formed in all treatments; after each daily treatment, the carpospores were subjected to photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), darkness, red light, or blue light during a 2-h repair stage. Carpospore diameters were measured every 4 days. We measured the growth and cellular contents of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), chlorophyll a, phycoerythrin, and UV-B-absorbing mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) in carpospores on Day 48. Low doses of UV-B radiation (36 and 72 J/m2) accelerated the growth of C. ocellatus. However, as the amount of UV-B radiation increased, the growth rate decreased and morphological changes occurred. UV-B radiation significant damaged DNA and photosynthetic pigments and induced three kind of MAAs, palythine, asterina-330, and shinorine. PAR conditions were best for repairing UV-B-induced damage. Darkness promoted the activity of the DNA darkrepair mechanism. Red light enhanced phycoerythrin synthesis but inhibited light repair of DNA. Although blue light, increased the activity of DNA photolyase, greatly improving remediation efficiency, the growth and development of C. ocellatus carpospores were slower than in other light treatments.

  13. NDR1 modulates the UV-induced DNA-damage checkpoint and nucleotide excision repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong-Min; Choi, Ji Ye [Department of Biological Science, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Joo Mi [Research Center, Dongnam Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jin Woong; Leem, Sun-Hee; Koh, Sang Seok [Department of Biological Science, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Tae-Hong, E-mail: thkang@dau.ac.kr [Department of Biological Science, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-05

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the sole mechanism of UV-induced DNA lesion repair in mammals. A single round of NER requires multiple components including seven core NER factors, xeroderma pigmentosum A–G (XPA–XPG), and many auxiliary effector proteins including ATR serine/threonine kinase. The XPA protein helps to verify DNA damage and thus plays a rate-limiting role in NER. Hence, the regulation of XPA is important for the entire NER kinetic. We found that NDR1, a novel XPA-interacting protein, modulates NER by modulating the UV-induced DNA-damage checkpoint. In quiescent cells, NDR1 localized mainly in the cytoplasm. After UV irradiation, NDR1 accumulated in the nucleus. The siRNA knockdown of NDR1 delayed the repair of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in both normal cells and cancer cells. It did not, however, alter the expression levels or the chromatin association levels of the core NER factors following UV irradiation. Instead, the NDR1-depleted cells displayed reduced activity of ATR for some set of its substrates including CHK1 and p53, suggesting that NDR1 modulates NER indirectly via the ATR pathway. - Highlights: • NDR1 is a novel XPA-interacting protein. • NDR1 accumulates in the nucleus in response to UV irradiation. • NDR1 modulates NER (nucleotide excision repair) by modulating the UV-induced DNA-damage checkpoint response.

  14. NDR1 modulates the UV-induced DNA-damage checkpoint and nucleotide excision repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the sole mechanism of UV-induced DNA lesion repair in mammals. A single round of NER requires multiple components including seven core NER factors, xeroderma pigmentosum A–G (XPA–XPG), and many auxiliary effector proteins including ATR serine/threonine kinase. The XPA protein helps to verify DNA damage and thus plays a rate-limiting role in NER. Hence, the regulation of XPA is important for the entire NER kinetic. We found that NDR1, a novel XPA-interacting protein, modulates NER by modulating the UV-induced DNA-damage checkpoint. In quiescent cells, NDR1 localized mainly in the cytoplasm. After UV irradiation, NDR1 accumulated in the nucleus. The siRNA knockdown of NDR1 delayed the repair of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in both normal cells and cancer cells. It did not, however, alter the expression levels or the chromatin association levels of the core NER factors following UV irradiation. Instead, the NDR1-depleted cells displayed reduced activity of ATR for some set of its substrates including CHK1 and p53, suggesting that NDR1 modulates NER indirectly via the ATR pathway. - Highlights: • NDR1 is a novel XPA-interacting protein. • NDR1 accumulates in the nucleus in response to UV irradiation. • NDR1 modulates NER (nucleotide excision repair) by modulating the UV-induced DNA-damage checkpoint response

  15. Effects of motexafin gadolinium on DNA damage and X-ray-induced DNA damage repair, as assessed by the Comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of motexafin gadolinium (MGd) on the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione (GSH), and DNA damage in EMT6 mouse mammary carcinoma cells. The ability of MGd to alter radiosensitivity and to inhibit DNA damage repair after X-ray irradiation was also evaluated. Methods and Materials: Reactive oxygen species and GSH levels were assessed by 2,7-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence flow cytometry and the Tietze method, respectively. Cellular radiosensitivity was assessed by clonogenic assays. Deoxyribonucleic acid damage and DNA damage repair were assessed in plateau-phase EMT6 cells by the Comet assay and clonogenic assays. Results: Cells treated with 100 μmol/L MGd plus equimolar ascorbic acid (AA) had significantly increased levels of ROS and a 58.9% ± 3.4% decrease in GSH levels, relative to controls. Motexafin gadolinium plus AA treatment increased the hypoxic, but not the aerobic, radiosensitivity of EMT6 cells. There were increased levels of single-strand breaks in cells treated with 100 μmol/L MGd plus equimolar AA, as evidenced by changes in the alkaline tail moment (MGd + AA, 6 h: 14.7 ± 1.8; control: 2.8 ± 0.9). The level of single-strand breaks was dependent on the length of treatment. Motexafin gadolinium plus AA did not increase double-strand breaks. The repair of single-strand breaks at 2 h, but not at 4 h and 6 h, after irradiation was altered significantly in cells treated with MGd plus AA (MGd + AA, 2 h: 15.8 ± 3.4; control: 5.8 ± 0.6). Motexafin gadolinium did not alter the repair of double-strand breaks at any time after irradiation with 10 Gy. Conclusions: Motexafin gadolinium plus AA generated ROS, which in turn altered GSH homeostasis and induced DNA strand breaks. The MGd plus AA-mediated alteration of GSH levels increased the hypoxic, but not aerobic, radiosensitivity of EMT6 cells. Motexafin gadolinium altered the kinetics of single-strand break repair soon after irradiation but did not

  16. Determining cysteine oxidation status using differential alkylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Birgit; Yoo, Chris B.; Collins, Christopher J.; Gibson, Bradford W.

    2004-08-01

    Oxidative damage to proteins plays a major role in aging and in the pathology of many degenerative diseases. Under conditions of oxidative stress, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can modify key redox sensitive amino acid side chains leading to altered biological activities or structures of the targeted proteins. This in turn can affect signaling or regulatory control pathways as well as protein turnover and degradation efficiency in the proteasome. Cysteine residues are particularly susceptible to oxidation, primarily through reversible modifications (e.g., thiolation and nitrosylation), although irreversible oxidation can lead to products that cannot be repaired in vivo such as sulfonic acid. This report describes a strategy to determine the overall level of reversible cysteine oxidation using a stable isotope differential alkylation approach in combination with mass spectrometric analysis. This method employs 13C-labeled alkylating reagents, such as N-ethyl-[1,4-13C2]-maleimide, bromo-[1,2-13C2]-acetic acid and their non-labeled counterparts to quantitatively assess the level of cysteine oxidation at specific sites in oxidized proteins. The differential alkylation protocol was evaluated using standard peptides and proteins, and then applied to monitor and determine the level of oxidative damage induced by diamide, a mild oxidant. The formation and mass spectrometric analysis of irreversible cysteine acid modification will also be discussed as several such modifications have been identified in subunits of the mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes. This strategy will hopefully contribute to our understanding of the role that cysteine oxidation plays in such chronic diseases such as Parkinson's disease, where studies in animal and cell models have shown oxidative damage to mitochondrial Complex I to be a specific and early target.

  17. Genetic polymorphisms in homologous recombination repair genes in healthy Slovenian population and their influence on DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homologous recombination (HR) repair is an important mechanism involved in repairing double-strand breaks in DNA and for maintaining genomic stability. Polymorphisms in genes coding for enzymes involved in this pathway may influence the capacity for DNA repair. The aim of this study was to select tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in specific genes involved in HR repair, to determine their allele frequencies in a healthy Slovenian population and their influence on DNA damage detected with comet assay. In total 373 individuals were genotyped for nine tag SNPs in three genes: XRCC3 722C>T, XRCC3 -316A>G, RAD51 -98G>C, RAD51 -61G>T, RAD51 1522T>G, NBS1 553G>C, NBS1 1197A>G, NBS1 37117C>T and NBS1 3474A>C using competitive allele-specific amplification (KASPar assay). Comet assay was performed in a subgroup of 26 individuals to determine the influence of selected SNPs on DNA damage. We observed that age significantly affected genotype frequencies distribution of XRCC3 -316A>G (P = 0.039) in healthy male blood donors. XRCC3 722C>T (P = 0.005), RAD51 -61G>T (P = 0.023) and NBS1 553G>C (P = 0.008) had a statistically significant influence on DNA damage. XRCC3 722C>T, RAD51 -61G>T and NBS1 553G>C polymorphisms significantly affect the repair of damaged DNA and may be of clinical importance as they are common in Slovenian population

  18. Repair of potentially lethal and sublethal damage in unfed plateau phase cultures irradiated at 0.78 Gy/hr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of these studies was to determine if non-proliferating Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells lost the ability to repair sublethal (SLD) and/or potentially lethal (PLD) damage as a function of multiple small doses, and to determine whether culture age affected this process. CHO cells were irradiated at a dose rate of 0.78 Gy per hour. The data show that full repair of PLD and SLD occurs in nonproliferating CHO cells exposed to multiple small doses and that aging in unfed cultures does not affect these processes

  19. Radiation induced bystander signals are independent of DNA damage and DNA repair capacity of the irradiated cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evidence is accumulating that irradiated cells produce signals, which interact with non-exposed cells in the same population. Here, we analysed the mechanism for bystander signal arising in wild-type CHO cells and repair deficient varients, focussing on the relationship between DNA repair capacity and bystander signal arising in irradiated cells. In order to investigate the bystander effect, we carried out medium transfer experiments after X-irradiation where micronuclei were scored in non-targeted DSB repair deficient xrs5 cells. When conditioned medium from irradiated cells was transferred to unirradiated xrs5 cells, the level of induction was independent of whether the medium came from irradiated wild-type, ssb or dsb repair deficient cells. This result suggests that the activation of a bystander signal is independent of the DNA repair capacity of the irradiated cells. Also, pre-treatment of the irradiated cells with 0.5% DMSO, which suppresses micronuclei induction in CHO but not in xrs5 cells, suppressed bystander effects completely in both conditioned media, suggesting that DMSO is effective for suppression of bystander signal arising independently of DNA damage in irradiated cells. Overall the work presented here adds to the understanding that it is the repair phenotype of the cells receiving bystander signals, which determines overall response rather than that of the cell producing the bystander signal

  20. Discrepancies between patterns of potentially lethal damage repair in the RIF-1 tumor system in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD) was studied in the RIF-1 tumor system in several different growth states in vivo. Exponentially growing, fed plateau, and unfed plateau cells in cell culture as well as small and large subcutaneous or intramuscular tumors were investigated. Large single doses of radiation followed by variable repair times as well as graded doses of radiation to generate survival curves immediately after irradiation or after full repair were investigated. All repair-promoting conditions studied in vitro (delayed subculture, exposure of cells to depleted growth medium after irradiation) increased surviving fraction after a single dose. The D0 of the cell survival curve was also increased by these procedures. No PLD repair was observed for any tumors irradiated in vivo and maintained in the animal for varying times prior to assay in vitro. The nearly 100% cell yield obtained when this tumor is prepared as a single-cell suspension for colony formation, the representative cell sample obtained, and the constant cell yield per gram as a function of time postirradiation suggest that this discrepancy is not an artifact of the assay system. The most logical explanation of these data and information on radiocurability of this neoplasm is that PLD repair, which is so frequently demonstrated in vitro, may not be a major factor in the radioresponse of this tumor when left in situ

  1. Discrepancies between patterns of potentially lethal damage repair in the RIF-1 tumor system in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD) was studied in the RIF-1 tumor system in several different growth states in vivo and in vitro. Exponentially growing, fed plateau, and unfed plateau cells in cell culture as well as small and large subcutaneous or intramuscular tumors were investigated. Large single doses of radiation followed by variable repair times as well as graded doses of radiation to generate survival curves immediately after irradiation or after full repair were investigated. All repair-promoting conditions studied in vitro (delayed subculture, exposure of cells to depleted growth medium after irradiation) increased surviving fraction after a single dose. The D0 of the cell survival curve was also increased by these procedures. No PLD repair was observed for any tumors irradiated in vivo and maintained in the animal for varying times prior to assay in vitro. The nearly 100% cell yield obtained when this tumor is prepared as a single-cell suspension for colony formation, the representative cell sample obtained, and the constant cell yield per gram as a function of time postirradiation suggest that this discrepancy is not an artifact of the assay system. The most logical explanation of these data and information on radiocurability of this neoplasm is that PLD repair, which is so frequently demonstrated in vitro, may not be a major factor in the radioresponse of this tumor when left in situ

  2. Activity of organophosphorus insecticides in bacterial tests for mutagenicity and DNA repair--direct alkylation versus metabolic activation and breakdown. II. O,O-dimethyl-O-(1,2-dibromo-2,2-dichloroethyl)-phosphate and two O-ether derivatives of trichlorfon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, R; Schöneich, J; Weissflog, L; Dedek, W

    1983-03-01

    The following organophosphates were tested for their ability to induce DNA damage in a rec-type repair test with Proteus mirabilis strains PG713 (rec- hcr-) and PG273 (wild-type) and point mutations in the his- strain TA100 of Salmonella typhimurium: O,O-dimethyl-O-(1,2-dibromo-2,2-dichloroethyl)-phosphate (NALED); trichlorfon-O-methyl ether (TCP-O-ME), O,O-dimethyl-(1-methoxy-2,2,2-trichlorethyl)-phosphonate; trichlorfon-O-methyl ether vinyl derivative (TCP-O-MEVD), O,O-dimethyl-(1-methoxy-2,2-dichlorovinyl)-phosphonate. All compounds were negative in the repair test but induced base pair substitutions in S. typhimurium. The mutagenicity of NALED is due to the direct alkylating ability of the parental molecule and to mutagenic metabolites generated by enzymatic splitting of the side chain. Glutathion-dependent enzymes in the S9-mix eliminate the mutagenic activity of NALED completely. Mutation induction by TCP-O-ME and TCP-O-MEVD is predominantly caused by the reactive O-methyl ether configuration of the side chain and is resistant to metabolic inactivation by NADPH- or glutathion-dependent enzymatic pathways in the S9-mix of mice. PMID:6337735

  3. Long non-coding RNAs as novel expression signatures modulate DNA damage and repair in cadmium toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhiheng; Liu, Haibai; Wang, Caixia; Lu, Qian; Huang, Qinhai; Zheng, Chanjiao; Lei, Yixiong

    2015-10-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes. Our study was to investigate whether lncRNAs as novel expression signatures are able to modulate DNA damage and repair in cadmium(Cd) toxicity. There were aberrant expression profiles of lncRNAs in 35th Cd-induced cells as compared to untreated 16HBE cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of ENST00000414355 inhibited the growth of DNA-damaged cells and decreased the expressions of DNA-damage related genes (ATM, ATR and ATRIP), while increased the expressions of DNA-repair related genes (DDB1, DDB2, OGG1, ERCC1, MSH2, RAD50, XRCC1 and BARD1). Cadmium increased ENST00000414355 expression in the lung of Cd-exposed rats in a dose-dependent manner. A significant positive correlation was observed between blood ENST00000414355 expression and urinary/blood Cd concentrations, and there were significant correlations of lncRNA-ENST00000414355 expression with the expressions of target genes in the lung of Cd-exposed rats and the blood of Cd exposed workers. These results indicate that some lncRNAs are aberrantly expressed in Cd-treated 16HBE cells. lncRNA-ENST00000414355 may serve as a signature for DNA damage and repair related to the epigenetic mechanisms underlying the cadmium toxicity and become a novel biomarker of cadmium toxicity.

  4. Phosphoramide mustard exposure induces DNA adduct formation and the DNA damage repair response in rat ovarian granulosa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphoramide mustard (PM), the ovotoxic metabolite of the anti-cancer agent cyclophosphamide (CPA), destroys rapidly dividing cells by forming NOR-G-OH, NOR-G and G-NOR-G adducts with DNA, potentially leading to DNA damage. A previous study demonstrated that PM induces ovarian DNA damage in rat ovaries. To investigate whether PM induces DNA adduct formation, DNA damage and induction of the DNA repair response, rat spontaneously immortalized granulosa cells (SIGCs) were treated with vehicle control (1% DMSO) or PM (3 or 6 μM) for 24 or 48 h. Cell viability was reduced (P < 0.05) after 48 h of exposure to 3 or 6 μM PM. The NOR-G-OH DNA adduct was detected after 24 h of 6 μM PM exposure, while the more cytotoxic G-NOR-G DNA adduct was formed after 48 h by exposure to both PM concentrations. Phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX), a marker of DNA double stranded break occurrence, was also increased by PM exposure, coincident with DNA adduct formation. Additionally, induction of genes (Atm, Parp1, Prkdc, Xrcc6, and Brca1) and proteins (ATM, γH2AX, PARP-1, PRKDC, XRCC6, and BRCA1) involved in DNA repair were observed in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. These data support that PM induces DNA adduct formation in ovarian granulosa cells, induces DNA damage and elicits the ovarian DNA repair response. - Highlights: • PM forms ovarian DNA adducts. • DNA damage marker γH2AX increased by PM exposure. • PM induces ovarian DNA double strand break repair

  5. Phosphoramide mustard exposure induces DNA adduct formation and the DNA damage repair response in rat ovarian granulosa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganesan, Shanthi, E-mail: shanthig@iastate.edu; Keating, Aileen F., E-mail: akeating@iastate.edu

    2015-02-01

    Phosphoramide mustard (PM), the ovotoxic metabolite of the anti-cancer agent cyclophosphamide (CPA), destroys rapidly dividing cells by forming NOR-G-OH, NOR-G and G-NOR-G adducts with DNA, potentially leading to DNA damage. A previous study demonstrated that PM induces ovarian DNA damage in rat ovaries. To investigate whether PM induces DNA adduct formation, DNA damage and induction of the DNA repair response, rat spontaneously immortalized granulosa cells (SIGCs) were treated with vehicle control (1% DMSO) or PM (3 or 6 μM) for 24 or 48 h. Cell viability was reduced (P < 0.05) after 48 h of exposure to 3 or 6 μM PM. The NOR-G-OH DNA adduct was detected after 24 h of 6 μM PM exposure, while the more cytotoxic G-NOR-G DNA adduct was formed after 48 h by exposure to both PM concentrations. Phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX), a marker of DNA double stranded break occurrence, was also increased by PM exposure, coincident with DNA adduct formation. Additionally, induction of genes (Atm, Parp1, Prkdc, Xrcc6, and Brca1) and proteins (ATM, γH2AX, PARP-1, PRKDC, XRCC6, and BRCA1) involved in DNA repair were observed in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. These data support that PM induces DNA adduct formation in ovarian granulosa cells, induces DNA damage and elicits the ovarian DNA repair response. - Highlights: • PM forms ovarian DNA adducts. • DNA damage marker γH2AX increased by PM exposure. • PM induces ovarian DNA double strand break repair.

  6. Modulation of DNA Damage and Repair Pathways by Human Tumour Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Hollingworth

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available With between 10% and 15% of human cancers attributable to viral infection, there is great interest, from both a scientific and clinical viewpoint, as to how these pathogens modulate host cell functions. Seven human tumour viruses have been identified as being involved in the development of specific malignancies. It has long been known that the introduction of chromosomal aberrations is a common feature of viral infections. Intensive research over the past two decades has subsequently revealed that viruses specifically interact with cellular mechanisms responsible for the recognition and repair of DNA lesions, collectively known as the DNA damage response (DDR. These interactions can involve activation and deactivation of individual DDR pathways as well as the recruitment of specific proteins to sites of viral replication. Since the DDR has evolved to protect the genome from the accumulation of deleterious mutations, deregulation is inevitably associated with an increased risk of tumour formation. This review summarises the current literature regarding the complex relationship between known human tumour viruses and the DDR and aims to shed light on how these interactions can contribute to genomic instability and ultimately the development of human cancers.

  7. Deoxyadenosine family: improved synthesis, DNA damage and repair, analogs as drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Himadri; Kar, Indrani; Chattopadhyaya, Rajagopal

    2013-08-01

    Improved synthesis of 2'-deoxyadenosine using Escherichia coli overexpressing some enzymes and gram-scale chemical synthesis of 2'-deoxynucleoside 5'-triphosphates reported recently are described in this review. Other topics include DNA damage induced by chromium(VI), Fenton chemistry, photoinduction with lumazine, or by ultrasound in neutral solution; 8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine isomers as potential biomarkers; and a recapitulation of purine 5',8-cyclonucleoside studies. The mutagenicities of some products generated by oxidizing 2'-deoxyadenosine 5'-triphosphate, nucleotide pool sanitization, and translesion synthesis are also reviewed. Characterizing cross-linking between nucleosides in opposite strands of DNA and endonuclease V-mediated deoxyinosine excision repair are discussed. The use of purine nucleoside analogs in the treatment of rarer chronic lymphoid leukemias is reviewed. Some analogs at the C8 position induced delayed polymerization arrest during HIV-1 reverse transcription. The susceptibility of clinically metronidazole-resistant Trichomonas vaginalis to two analogs, toyocamycin and 2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine, were tested in vitro. GS-9148, a dAMP analog, was translocated to the priming site in a complex with reverse transcriptase and double-stranded DNA to gain insight into the mechanism of reverse transcriptase inhibition. PMID:25436589

  8. Modification of potentially lethal damage repair by some intrinsic intra- and extracellular agents: Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of nine intra- and extracellular proteinases and six proteinaseinhibitors on the repair of potentially lethal damage (PLDR) induced by γ-rays in plateau-phase V79 cells were examined, these agents were found to and modify PLDR activity. A stimulatory effect of PLDR was seen with calf liver neutral proteinase, to a lesser extent, with inhibitor pepstatin A. Other proteinases belonging to serine, cysteine and aspartic superfamilies, as well as proteinase inhibitors, inhibited PLDR to different degrees. The effects of some of these agents, present during the PLDR period, on the rate of tritiated thymidine incorporation into the acid-insoluble cell fraction was examined. They can modify DNA synthesis of cells subcultured from plateau phase for colony-forming ability assessment. There is no clear evidence that effects observed are entirely attributed to alteration of cellular proliferative processes. It seems more likely that many serine and cysteine proteinases and their inhibitors can adversely affect the PLDR process by modulating the activity of proteinase(s) and other enzymes involved more directly in PLDR because of interrelationships of the entire intracellular proteinase system. (author)

  9. Replicative bypass repair of ultraviolet damage to DNA of mammalian cells: caffeine sensitive and caffeine resistant mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Replicative bypass repair of UV damage to DNA was studied in a wide variaty of human, mouse and hamster cells in culture. Survival curve analysis revealed that in established cell lines (mouse L, Chinese hamster V79, HeLa S3 and SV40-transformed xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), post-UV caffeine treatment potentiated cell killing by reducing the extrapolation number and mean lethal UV fluence (Do). In the Do reduction as the result of random inactivation by caffeine of sensitive repair there were marked clonal differences among such cell lines, V79 being most sensitive to caffeine potentiation. However, other diploid cell lines (normal human, excision-defective XP and Syrian hamster) exhibited no obvious reduction in Do by caffeine. In parallel, alkaline sucrose sedimentation results showed that the conversion of initially smaller segments of DNA synthesized after irradiation with 10 J/m2 to high-molecular-weight DNA was inhibited by caffeine in transformed XP cells, but not in the diploid human cell lines. Exceptionally, diploid XP variants had a retarded ability of bypass repair which was drastically prevented by caffeine, so that caffeine enhanced the lethal effect of UV. Neutral CsCl study on the bypass repair mechanism by use of bromodeoxyuridine for DNA synthesis on damaged template suggests that the pyrimodine dimer acts as a block to replication and subsequently it is circumvented presumably by a new process involving replicative bypassing following strand displacement, rather than by gap-filling de novo. This mechanism worked similarly in normal and XP cells, whether or not caffeine was present, indicating that excision of dimer is not always necessary. However, replicative bypassing became defective in XP variant and transformed XP cells when caffeine was present. It appears, therefore, that the replicative bypass repair process is either caffeine resistant or sensitive, depending on the cell type used, but not necessarily on the excision repair capability

  10. Repair Effect of Seaweed Polysaccharides with Different Contents of Sulfate Group and Molecular Weights on Damaged HK-2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Bhadja

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The structure–activity relationships and repair mechanism of six low-molecular-weight seaweed polysaccharides (SPSs on oxalate-induced damaged human kidney proximal tubular epithelial cells (HK-2 were investigated. These SPSs included Laminaria japonica polysaccharide, degraded Porphyra yezoensis polysaccharide, degraded Gracilaria lemaneiformis polysaccharide, degraded Sargassum fusiforme polysaccharide, Eucheuma gelatinae polysaccharide, and degraded Undaria pinnatifida polysaccharide. These SPSs have a narrow difference of molecular weight (from 1968 to 4020 Da after degradation by controlling H2O2 concentration. The sulfate group (–SO3H content of the six SPSs was 21.7%, 17.9%, 13.3%, 8.2%, 7.0%, and 5.5%, respectively, and the –COOH contents varied between 1.0% to 1.7%. After degradation, no significant difference was observed in the contents of characteristic –SO3H and –COOH groups of polysaccharides. The repair effect of polysaccharides was determined using cell-viability test by CCK-8 assay and cell-morphology test by hematoxylin-eosin staining. The results revealed that these SPSs within 0.1–100 μg/mL did not express cytotoxicity in HK-2 cells, and each polysaccharide had a repair effect on oxalate-induced damaged HK-2 cells. Simultaneously, the content of polysaccharide –SO3H was positively correlated with repair ability. Furthermore, the low-molecular-weight degraded polysaccharides showed better repair activity on damaged HK-2 cells than their undegraded counterpart. Our results can provide reference for inhibiting the formation of kidney stones and for developing original anti-stone polysaccharide drugs.

  11. Association between DNA damage response and repair genes and risk of invasive serous ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joellen M Schildkraut

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We analyzed the association between 53 genes related to DNA repair and p53-mediated damage response and serous ovarian cancer risk using case-control data from the North Carolina Ovarian Cancer Study (NCOCS, a population-based, case-control study. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The analysis was restricted to 364 invasive serous ovarian cancer cases and 761 controls of white, non-Hispanic race. Statistical analysis was two staged: a screen using marginal Bayes factors (BFs for 484 SNPs and a modeling stage in which we calculated multivariate adjusted posterior probabilities of association for 77 SNPs that passed the screen. These probabilities were conditional on subject age at diagnosis/interview, batch, a DNA quality metric and genotypes of other SNPs and allowed for uncertainty in the genetic parameterizations of the SNPs and number of associated SNPs. Six SNPs had Bayes factors greater than 10 in favor of an association with invasive serous ovarian cancer. These included rs5762746 (median OR(odds ratio(per allele = 0.66; 95% credible interval (CI = 0.44-1.00 and rs6005835 (median OR(per allele = 0.69; 95% CI = 0.53-0.91 in CHEK2, rs2078486 (median OR(per allele = 1.65; 95% CI = 1.21-2.25 and rs12951053 (median OR(per allele = 1.65; 95% CI = 1.20-2.26 in TP53, rs411697 (median OR (rare homozygote = 0.53; 95% CI = 0.35 - 0.79 in BACH1 and rs10131 (median OR( rare homozygote = not estimable in LIG4. The six most highly associated SNPs are either predicted to be functionally significant or are in LD with such a variant. The variants in TP53 were confirmed to be associated in a large follow-up study. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on our findings, further follow-up of the DNA repair and response pathways in a larger dataset is warranted to confirm these results.

  12. The damage repair role of He-Ne laser on plants exposed to different intensities of ultraviolet-B radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhi; Yue, Ming; Han, Rong; Wang, Xun-Ling

    2002-06-01

    Light-grown broad bean (Vicia faba L.) seedlings were subjected to different intensities of UV-B radiation (0, 0.05, 0.15, 0.45, 0.90, 1.45 and 1.98 W m(-2)) for 7 h under photosynthetically active radiation (70 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) and then exposed to He-Ne laser (632.8 nm, 5.43 mW mm(-2)) radiation for 5 min or red light radiation for 4 h without ambient light radiation. When He-Ne laser radiated leaves were treated using lower intensity UV-B, the activities of superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1), ascorbate peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.11) and catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) improved significantly. Moreover, the UV-B-injured plants treated with laser light recovered faster from UV-B treatment because the concentration of malondialdehyde and the rate of electrolyte leakage from leaf disks reached control levels (no UV-B or laser treatment) early compared with those exposed only to ambient light or in dark conditions. Laser treatment, however, had no repair effect on seedling damage induced by higher UV-B radiation (1.45 and 1.98 W m(-2)), even with higher laser flux rates and longer laser treatment. In addition, the red light treatment had no repair effect on UV-B-induced damage. Meanwhile, the long-term physiological effect of He-Ne laser treatment on UV-B damaged plants was presented and evaluated. The results showed that the laser had a long-term positive physiological effect on the growth of UV-B-damaged plants. With the exception of the severe damage caused by higher UV-B radiation, a laser with the proper flux rate and treatment time can repair UV-B-induced damage and shorten the recovery time. PMID:12081332

  13. Single-cell gel electrophoresis applied to the analysis of UV-C damage and its repair in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have adapted procedure of single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) for studying DNA damage and repair induced by UV-C-radiation, using HeLa cells. UV-C itself does not induce DNA breakage, and though cellular repair of UV-C damage produces DNA breaks as intermediates, these are too short-lived to be detected by SCGE. Incubation of UV-C-irradiated cells with the DNA synthesis inhibitor aphidicolin causes accumulation of incomplete repair sites to a level readily detected by SCGE even after doses as low as 0.5 J m-2 and incubation for as little as 5 min. The authors also studied UV-C-dependent incision, repair synthesis and ligation in permeable cells. Finally, key incubated permeable cells, after UV-C-irradiation, with exogenous UV endonuclease, examined consequent breaks both by SCGE and by alkaline unwinding to express results of the electrophoretic method in terms of DNA break frequencies. The sensitivity of the SCGE technique can thus be estimated; as few as 0.1 DNA breaks per 109 daltons are detected. (Author)

  14. Membrane permeability during pressure ulcer formation: A computational model of dynamic competition between cytoskeletal damage and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, N Suhas; Tucker-Kellogg, Lisa

    2016-05-24

    Pressure ulcers are debilitating wounds that arise frequently in people who have lost mobility. Mechanical stress, oxidative stress and ischemia-reperfusion injury are potential sources of damage during pressure ulcer formation, but cross-talk between these sources has rarely been investigated. In vitro experiments with mechanically-induced cell damage previously demonstrated that non-lethal amounts of static cell deformation could induce myoblast membrane permeabilization. Permeabilization, in turn, has the potential to induce oxidative stress via leakage of calcium, myoglobin or alarmins. In this work, we constructed a hypothetical causal network of cellular-scale effects resulting from deformation and permeabilization, and we investigated the theoretical sensitivity of cell death toward various parameters and pathways of the model. Simulations showed that the survival/death outcome was particularly sensitive to the speed of membrane repair. The outcome was also sensitive to whether oxidative stress could decrease the speed of membrane repair. Finally, using the assumption that apoptosis and necrosis would have opposite effects on membrane leakage in dying cells, we showed that promoting apoptosis might under certain conditions have the paradoxical effect of decreasing, rather than increasing, total cell death. Our work illustrates that apoptosis may have hidden benefits at preventing spatial spread of death. More broadly, our work shows the importance of membrane repair dynamics and highlights the need for experiments to measure the effects of ischemia, apoptosis induction, and other co-occurring sources of cell stress toward the speed of membrane repair. PMID:26772800

  15. Oxidative Stress, DNA Damage and Repair in Heart Failure Patients after Implantation of Continuous Flow Left Ventricular Assist Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Mondal, Nandan Kumar; Sorensen, Erik; Hiivala, Nicholas; Feller, Erika; Griffith, Bartley; Wu, Zhongjun Jon

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study the status of oxidative stress and DNA damage repair in circulating blood leukocytes of heart failure patients supported by continuous flow left ventricular assist devices (LVADs). Materials and methods: Ten HF patients implanted with LVAD as bridge to transplant or destination therapy were enrolled in the study and 10 age and sex matched volunteers were recruited as the study control. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) in blood leukocytes and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in eryt...

  16. A possible role of repair proteins BRCA1 and DNA-PK in the processing of oxidative DNA damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandros G Georgakilas

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available BRCA1 and DNA-PK are two significant multifunctional proteins involved primarily in the processing of double strand breaks (DSBs. BRCA1 participates actively in homologous recombination (HR while DNA-PK in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ. In this mini review, we discuss all recent evidence for a possible involvement of these repair proteins also in the processing of oxidatively-induced DNA damage.Keyword: DNA damage, BRCA1, DNA-PKReceived: 6 June 2008, Accepted: 10 August 2008 Published online: 18 August 2008

  17. Comparison of the Tendon Damage Caused by Four Different Anchor Systems Used in Transtendon Rotator Cuff Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Song Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The objective of this study was to compare the damage to the rotator cuff tendons caused by four different anchor systems. Methods. 20 cadaveric human shoulder joints were used for transtendon insertion of four anchor systems. The Healix Peek, Fastin RC, Bio-Corkscrew Suture, and Healix Transtend anchors were inserted through the tendons using standard transtendon procedures. The areas of tendon damage were measured. Results. The areas of tendon damage (mean ± standard deviation, n=7 were 29.1 ± 4.3 mm2 for the Healix Peek anchor, 20.4 ± 2.3 mm2 for the Fastin RC anchor, 23.4 ± 1.2 mm2 for the Bio-Corkscrew Suture anchor, 13.7 ± 3.2 mm2 for the Healix Transtend anchor inserted directly, and 9.1 ± 2.1 mm2 for the Healix Transtend anchor inserted through the Percannula system (P<0.001 or P<0.001, compared to other anchors. Conclusions. In a cadaver transtendon rotator cuff repair model, smaller anchors caused less damage to the tendon tissues. The Healix Transtend implant system caused the least damage to the tendon tissues. Our findings suggest that smaller anchors should be considered when performing transtendon procedures to repair partial rotator cuff tears.

  18. Repair of ultraviolet light damage to the DNA of cultured human epidermal keratinocytes and fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pure cultures of dermal fibroblasts and epidermal keroatinocytes have been obtained from a single biopsy of newborn foreskin. The cells were labeled, exposed to several doses of uv light, and allowed to repair in the dark for 16 h. The number of pyrimidine dimers before and after repair was assessed by measuring the numbers of sites in the DNA sensitive to a specific uv endonuclease. At all doses used, the extent of repair was similar in the cultured keratinocytes and cultured fibroblasts

  19. Mutagenicity associated with O6-methylguanine-DNA damage and mechanism of nucleotide flipping by AGT during repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, N. R.; Bansal, Manju

    2011-08-01

    Methylated guanine damage at O6 position (i.e. O6MG) is dangerous due to its mutagenic and carcinogenic character that often gives rise to G:C-A:T mutation. However, the reason for this mutagenicity is not known precisely and has been a matter of controversy. Further, although it is known that O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) repairs O6MG paired with cytosine in DNA, the complete mechanism of target recognition and repair is not known completely. All these aspects of DNA damage and repair have been addressed here by employing high level density functional theory in gas phase and aqueous medium. It is found that the actual cause of O6MG mediated mutation may arise due to the fact that DNA polymerases incorporate thymine opposite to O6MG, misreading the resulting O6MG:T complex as an A:T base pair due to their analogous binding energies and structural alignments. It is further revealed that AGT mediated nucleotide flipping occurs in two successive steps. The intercalation of the finger residue Arg128 into the DNA double helix and its interaction with the O6MG:C base pair followed by rotation of the O6MG nucleotide are found to be crucial for the damage recognition and nucleotide flipping.

  20. Mutagenicity associated with O6-methylguanine-DNA damage and mechanism of nucleotide flipping by AGT during repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methylated guanine damage at O6 position (i.e. O6MG) is dangerous due to its mutagenic and carcinogenic character that often gives rise to G:C–A:T mutation. However, the reason for this mutagenicity is not known precisely and has been a matter of controversy. Further, although it is known that O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) repairs O6MG paired with cytosine in DNA, the complete mechanism of target recognition and repair is not known completely. All these aspects of DNA damage and repair have been addressed here by employing high level density functional theory in gas phase and aqueous medium. It is found that the actual cause of O6MG mediated mutation may arise due to the fact that DNA polymerases incorporate thymine opposite to O6MG, misreading the resulting O6MG:T complex as an A:T base pair due to their analogous binding energies and structural alignments. It is further revealed that AGT mediated nucleotide flipping occurs in two successive steps. The intercalation of the finger residue Arg128 into the DNA double helix and its interaction with the O6MG:C base pair followed by rotation of the O6MG nucleotide are found to be crucial for the damage recognition and nucleotide flipping

  1. Chromosome damage and repair in children with sickle cell anaemia and long-term hydroxycarbamide exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGann, Patrick T; Howard, Thad A; Flanagan, Jonathan M; Lahti, Jill M; Ware, Russell E

    2011-07-01

    Hydroxycarbamide (hydroxyurea) provides laboratory and clinical benefits for adults and children with sickle cell anaemia (SCA). Given its mechanism of action and prior reports of genotoxicity, concern exists regarding long-term toxicities and possible carcinogenicity. We performed cross-sectional analyses of chromosome stability using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 51 children with SCA and 3-12 years of hydroxycarbamide exposure (mean age 13·2 ± 4·1 years), compared to 28 children before treatment (9·4 ± 4·7 years). Chromosome damage was less for children receiving hydroxycarbamide than untreated patients (0·8 ± 1·2 vs. 1·9 ± 1·5 breaks per 100 cells, P = 0·004). There were no differences in repairing chromosome breaks after in vitro radiation; PBMC from children taking hydroxycarbamide had equivalent 2 Gy-induced chromosome breaks compared to untreated patients (30·8 ± 16·1 vs. 31·7 ± 8·9 per 100 cells, P = not significant). Radiation plus hydroxycarbamide resulted in similar numbers of unrepaired breaks in cells from children on hydroxycarbamide compared to untreated patients (95·8 ± 44·2 vs. 76·1 ± 23·1 per 100 cells, P = 0·08), but no differences were noted with longer exposure (97·9 ± 42·8 breaks per 100 cells for 3-6 years of hydroxycarbamide exposure vs. 91·2 ± 48·4 for 9-12 years of exposure). These observations provide important safety data regarding long-term risks of hydroxycarbamide exposure for children with SCA, and suggest low in vivo mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. PMID:21542824

  2. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers photolyase from extremophilic microalga: Remarkable UVB resistance and efficient DNA damage repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L photolyase gene PHR2 is first cloned and expressed in E. coli. • PHR2 complemented E. coli could efficiently survival from UV radiation. • Expressed PHR2 photolyase has distinct photo-reactivation activity in vitro. - Abstract: Bacteria living in the Antarctic region have developed several adaptive features for growth and survival under extreme conditions. Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-Lis well adapted to high levels of solar UV radiation. A putative photolyase was identified in the Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L transcriptome. The complete cDNA sequence was obtained by RACE-PCR. This PHR encoding includes a polypeptide of 579 amino acids with clear photolyase signatures belonging to class II CPD-photolyases, sharing a high degree of homology with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (68%). Real-time PCR was performed to investigate the potential DNA damage and responses following UVB exposure. CPD photolyase mRNA expression level increased over 50-fold in response to UVB radiation for 6 h. Using photolyase complementation assay, we demonstrated that DNA photolyase increased photo-repair more than 116-fold in Escherichia coli strain SY2 under 100 μw/cm2 UVB radiation. To determine whether photolyase is active in vitro, CPD photolyase was over-expressed. It was shown that pyrimidine dimers were split by the action of PHR2. This study reports the unique structure and high activity of the enzyme. These findings are relevant for further understanding of molecular mechanisms of photo-reactivation, and will accelerate the utilization of photolyase in the medical field

  3. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers photolyase from extremophilic microalga: Remarkable UVB resistance and efficient DNA damage repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chongjie [Key Laboratory of Marine Bioactive Substance, The First Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Qingdao 266061 (China); Ma, Li [Key Laboratory of Biofuels, and Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266101 (China); Mou, Shanli [Yellow Sea Fisheries Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences, Qingdao (China); Wang, Yibin, E-mail: wangyibin@fio.org.cn [Key Laboratory of Marine Bioactive Substance, The First Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Qingdao 266061 (China); Zheng, Zhou; Liu, Fangming; Qi, Xiaoqing; An, Meiling; Chen, Hao [Key Laboratory of Marine Bioactive Substance, The First Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Qingdao 266061 (China); Miao, Jinlai, E-mail: miaojinlai@163.com [Key Laboratory of Marine Bioactive Substance, The First Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Qingdao 266061 (China); State Key Laboratory of Biological Fermentation Engineering of Beer (In Preparation), Qingdao (China)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L photolyase gene PHR2 is first cloned and expressed in E. coli. • PHR2 complemented E. coli could efficiently survival from UV radiation. • Expressed PHR2 photolyase has distinct photo-reactivation activity in vitro. - Abstract: Bacteria living in the Antarctic region have developed several adaptive features for growth and survival under extreme conditions. Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-Lis well adapted to high levels of solar UV radiation. A putative photolyase was identified in the Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L transcriptome. The complete cDNA sequence was obtained by RACE-PCR. This PHR encoding includes a polypeptide of 579 amino acids with clear photolyase signatures belonging to class II CPD-photolyases, sharing a high degree of homology with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (68%). Real-time PCR was performed to investigate the potential DNA damage and responses following UVB exposure. CPD photolyase mRNA expression level increased over 50-fold in response to UVB radiation for 6 h. Using photolyase complementation assay, we demonstrated that DNA photolyase increased photo-repair more than 116-fold in Escherichia coli strain SY2 under 100 μw/cm{sup 2} UVB radiation. To determine whether photolyase is active in vitro, CPD photolyase was over-expressed. It was shown that pyrimidine dimers were split by the action of PHR2. This study reports the unique structure and high activity of the enzyme. These findings are relevant for further understanding of molecular mechanisms of photo-reactivation, and will accelerate the utilization of photolyase in the medical field.

  4. Repair of traumatic plasmalemmal damage to neurons and other eukar yotic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    George D. Bittner; Christopher S. Spaeth§; Andrew D. Poon; Zachary S. Burgess; Christopher H. McGill

    2016-01-01

    The repair (sealing) of plasmalemmal damage, consisting of small holes to complete transections, is criti-cal for cell survival, especially for neurons that rarely regenerate cell bodies. We ifrst describe and evaluate different measures of cell sealing. Some measures, including morphological/ultra-structural observations, membrane potential, and input resistance, provide very ambiguous assessments of plasmalemmal sealing. In contrast, measures of ionic current lfow and dye barriers can, if appropriately used, provide more ac-curate assessments. We describe the effects of various substances (calcium, calpains, cytoskeletal proteins, ESCRT proteins, mUNC-13, NSF, PEG) and biochemical pathways (PKA, PKC, PLC, Epac, cytosolic ox-idation) on plasmalemmal sealing probability, and suggest that substances, pathways, and cellular events associated with plasmalemmal sealing have undergone a very conservative evolution. During sealing, calcium ion inlfux mobilizes vesicles and other membranous structures (lysosomes, mitochondria, etc.) in a continuous fashion to form a vesicular plug that gradually restricts diffusion of increasingly smaller molecules and ions over a period of seconds to minutes. Furthermore, we find no direct evidence that sealing occurs through the collapse and fusion of severed plasmalemmal lealfets, or in a single step involv-ing the fusion of one large wound vesicle with the nearby, undamaged plasmalemma. We describe how increases in perikaryal calcium levels following axonal transection account for observations that cell body survival decreases the closer an axon is transected to the perikaryon. Finally, we speculate on relationships between plasmalemmal sealing, Wallerian degeneration, and the ability of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to seal cell membranes and rejoin severed axonal ends–an important consideration for the future treatment of trauma to peripheral nerves. A better knowledge of biochemical pathways and cytoplasmic structures in-volved in

  5. Base excision repair mechanisms and relevance to cancer susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The base excision repair (BER) pathway is considered the predominant DNA repair system in mammalian cells for eliminating small DNA lesions generated at DNA bases either exogenously by environmental agents or endogenously by normal cellular metabolic processes (e.g. production of oxyradical species, alkylating agents, etc). The main goal of this project is the understanding of the involvement of BER in genome stability and in particular in sporadic cancer development associated with inflammation such as gastric cancer (GC). A major risk factor of GC is the infection by Helicobacter pylori, which causes oxidative stress. Oxidative DNA damage is mainly repaired by BER

  6. Affinity of yeast nucleotide excision repair factor 2, consisting of the Rad4 and Rad23 proteins, for ultraviolet damaged DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad4 and Rad23 proteins are required for the nucleotide excision repair of UV light-damaged DNA. Previous studies have indicated that these two DNA repair proteins are associated in a tight complex, which we refer to as nucleotide excision repair factor 2 (NEF2). In a reconstituted nucleotide excision repair reaction, incision of UV-damaged DNA is dependent on NEF2, indicating a role of NEF2 in an early step of the repair process. NEF2 does not, however, possess an enzymatic activity, and its function in the damage-specific incision reaction has not yet been defined. Here we use a DNA mobility shift assay to demonstrate that NEF2 binds specifically to UV-damaged DNA. Elimination of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers from the UV-damaged DNA by enzymatic photoreactivation has little effect on the affinity of NEF2 for the DNA, suggesting that NEF2 recognizes the 6-(1, 2)-dihydro-2-oxo-4-pyrimidinyl)-5-methyl-2,4-(1H,3H)-pyrimidinedione photoproducts in the damaged DNA. These results highlight the intricacy of the DNA damage-demarcation reaction during nucleotide excision repair in eukaryotes. (author)

  7. The effect of β-elemene combined with irradiation on DNA damage and repair in A549 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study if β-elemene can increase radiation-induced deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage and decrease the damage repair. Methods: Exponentially growing human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549) were exposed to 10 or 20 μg/ml β-elemene for 24 h before irradiation.The effect of β-elemene on the in vitro radiosensitivity of A549 cells was evaluated using clonogenic assay. DNA damage and repair were evaluated using comet assay. Results: Exposure to β-elemene before irradiation increased the radiosensitivity of A549 cells. The SERD0 for 10 μg/ml and 20 μg/ml β-elemene was 1.55 and 1.64, respectively. The SERDq for 10 μg/ml and 20 μg/ml β-elemene was 1.43 and 1.75, respectively. Combined treatment, comparing to irradiation or β-elemene treatment alone, induced higher levels of DNA damage and slower rate of damage repair. A549 cells exposed to 20 μg/ml β-elemene followed by irradiation showed a higher levels of tail moment (TM) than those exposed to irradiation or β-elemene alone at 0 h, 2 h, 6 h and 24 h after irradiation. The TM of the three groups at 0 h, 2 h, 6 h and 24 h after irradiation was 7.16±2.61, 0.95±0.65 and 1.81±1.23 (F=231.24, P<0.01), 3.65±2.06, 0.11±0.07 and 1.58±1.40(F=90.22, P<0.01), 2.09±0.83, 0.1±0.05 and 0.45±0.25 (F=238.44, P<0.01), 1.45±1.37, 0.11±0.08 and 0.60±0.40 (F=38.94, P<0.01), respectively. Conclusions: β-elemene can enhance the radiosensitivity of A549 cells through the enhancement of DNA damage and the inhibition of DNA damage repair. (authors)

  8. Bisphenol A-Induced Ovotoxicity Involves DNA Damage Induction to Which the Ovary Mounts a Protective Response Indicated by Increased Expression of Proteins Involved in DNA Repair and Xenobiotic Biotransformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Shanthi; Keating, Aileen F

    2016-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine disrupting chemical with ubiquitous human exposure. BPA causes primordial follicle loss and DNA damage in germ cells, thus we hypothesized that BPA induces ovarian DNA damage, thereby precipitating follicle loss. We also anticipated that the ovary activates DNA repair and xenobiotic biotransformation to minimize oocyte damage and/or, activate cell death signaling to deplete follicles. Postnatal day 4 F344 rat ovaries were cultured in medium containing vehicle control (1% dimethylsulfoxide [DMSO]) ± BPA (440 µM) for 2-8 days. BPA reduced (P telangiectasia mutated (ATM), markers of DNA double-strand breaks, were increased (P < .05) in abundance prior to observed follicle loss. DNA repair genes (Atm, Prkdc, Xrcc6, Brca1, Mre11a, Rad50, and Smc1a) were increased (P < .05) after 1 day of BPA exposure. mRNA encoding Meh, Gstm, c-kit, Kitlg, and Akt were increased (P < .05), as was MEH, AKT, pAKT, Jun N-terminal kinase, and P53 protein abundance, while GST isoforms pi and Nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 proteins were decreased (P < .05) by BPA exposure. These data demonstrate the dynamic ovarian response to BPA exposure, which indicates that BPA, via biotransformation, may be converted to a DNA alkylating agent, causing ovarian DNA damage, to which the ovary mounts a protective response and further our knowledge on the biological impacts of BPA on the female germline. PMID:27208089

  9. Conjugated linoleic acid inhibiting DNA repair damaged by x-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-homologous end-joining is the most effective repair of DNA double strand break. Epidermal growth factor receptor activates DSB repairs. Integration of EGFR inhibitors with radiation or chemotherapy were used in lung cancer treatment. Radiosensitivity effect of conjugated linoleic acid on tumor cells and reduced metastasis are reported

  10. Alkyl glycosides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wimmer, Zdeněk; Zarevúcka, Marie; Šaman, David

    Venice, 2004. s. 20-21. [Sustainable Green Chemistry and Chemical Technology. Workshop /3./. 20.02.2004-21.02.2004, Venice] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/02/0166; GA MŠk OC D29.001 Keywords : alkyl glycosides Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  11. DNA damage and repair kinetics of the Alternaria mycotoxins alternariol, altertoxin II and stemphyltoxin III in cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Stefanie C; Sauter, Friederike; Pfeiffer, Erika; Metzler, Manfred; Hartwig, Andrea; Köberle, Beate

    2016-03-01

    The Alternaria mycotoxins alternariol (AOH) and altertoxin II (ATX II) have previously been shown to elicit mutagenic and genotoxic effects in bacterial and mammalian cells, although with vastly different activities. For example, ATX II was about 50 times more mutagenic than AOH. We now report that stemphyltoxin III (STTX III) is also highly mutagenic. The more pronounced effects of the perylene quinones ATX II and STTX III at lower concentrations compared to the dibenzo-α-pyrone AOH indicate a marked dependence of the genotoxic potential on the chemical structure and furthermore suggest that the underlying modes of action may be different. We have now further investigated the type of DNA damage induced by AOH, ATX II and STTX III, as well as the repair kinetics and their dependence on the status of nucleotide excision repair (NER). DNA double strand breaks induced by AOH due to poisoning of topoisomerase IIα were completely repaired in less than 2h. Under cell-free conditions, inhibition of topoisomerase IIα could also be measured for ATX II and STTX III at low concentrations, but the perylene quinones were catalytic inhibitors rather than topoisomerase poisons and did not induce DSBs. DNA strand breaks induced by ATX II and STTX III were more persistent and not completely repaired within 24h. A dependence of the repair rate on the NER status could only be demonstrated for STTX III, resulting in an accumulation of DNA damage in NER-deficient cells. Together with the finding that the DNA glycosylase formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg), but not T4 endonuclease V, is able to generate additional DNA strand breaks measurable by the alkaline unwinding assay, we conclude that the genotoxicity of the perylene quinones with an epoxide group is probably caused by the formation of DNA adducts which may be converted to Fpg sensitive sites. PMID:26994491

  12. Damage of the Unit 1 reactor building overhead bridge crane at Onagawa Nuclear Power Station caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake and its repair works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The driving shaft bearings of the Unit 1 overhead bridge crane were damaged by the Great East Japan Earthquake at Onagawa Nuclear Power Station. The situation, investigation and repair works of the bearing failure are introduced in this paper. (author)

  13. Self repair of impacts, higher energy impacts, and earthquake damage in critical targets such as infrastructure components made of polymers and concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dry, Carolyn

    2007-04-01

    The goal of our research has been to develop self-repairing matrices with unique toughness and strength for infrastructure and vehicles. Our revolutionary approach involves the autonomous release of repair chemicals from within the matrix itself. The repair agents are contained in hollow, structural fibers or beads that are embedded within the matrix. Under stress, the matrix senses external environmental factors and reacts by releasing the repair agents from within the hollow vessels. This autonomous response occurs wherever and whenever cracking, debonding or other matrix damage transpires. Superior performance over the life of the matrix is achieved through this self-repairing mechanism. The advantages are safely executed trips, fewer repairs and eventually lighter bridges and vehicles. Research to assess and clarify the impact of the various factors involved in self-repair of matrix materials has been the focus of our work for several years. Our research has addressed the issues by correlating the impact of the various factors, such as 1) delivery vessel, shape/size, coating, chemicals released, release trigger and efficacy and impact on matrix properties 2) influence of end use such as the importance of speed and force of release (airplane skin repair) 3) impact of processing methods that involve heat and pressure on the repair vessels. Our self repairing system can: be processed at temperatures of 350F, repairs in less than 30 seconds, and does not damage the matrix by repair fiber insertion. Unique toughness and strength is developed at damaged areas and material interfaces. Findings are based on testing in compression after impact, compression, fatigue, flexural toughness and flexure modes. The presentation will focus on highlighting the issues that were resolved in creating autonomous, self-repairing structures and vehicles.

  14. Assessment of mutagenic damage by monofunctional alkylating agents and gamma radiation in haploid and diploid frogs, Xenopus laevis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adult male South African clawed frogs, Xenopus laevis, were mutagenized by 3-day immersion in aqueous solutions of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), diethyl nitrosamine (DEN), or ethyl nitrosourea (ENU), or by acute exposure to gamma radiation. They were then spawned repeatedly at 2-week intervals with untreated females, and embryonic survival of the progeny was used to assess genetic damage. Recessive lethal effects were assessed from reduced survival of androgenetic haploid progeny. Neither recessive nor dominant lethal effects were obtained after exposure to 100 mg/liter EMS or 2 g/liter DEN. At 250 mg/liter EMS, peak dominant lethality occurred 3-5 weeks after treatment. Most embryos hatched, but many were abnormal and died shortly after hatching. Haploid survival was significantly reduced over a broader period, from 1 to 13 weeks after mutagenesis. Treatment with 75 mg/liter ENU produced effects similar to the 250-mg/liter EMS mutagenesis. At 400 mg/liter EMS, the frequency and severity of the effects on both diploid and haploid embryos were increased over the lower dose. Gamma irradiation at 1500 R produced effects similar to the 400-mg/liter mutagenesis, except that peak dominant lethality extended from 1 to 7 weeks

  15. Ebselen attenuates oxidative DNA damage and enhances its repair activity in the thalamus after focal cortical infarction in hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Meixia; Xing, Shihui; Yang, Bo; Zhao, Liqun; Hua, Haiying; Liang, Zhijian; Zhou, Wenliang; Zeng, Jinsheng; Pei, Zhong

    2007-11-21

    Oxidative DNA damage has been proposed to be a major contributor to focal cerebral ischemic injury. However, little is known about the role of oxidative DNA damage in remote damage secondary to the primary infarction. In the present study, we investigated oxidative damage within the ventroposterior nucleus (VPN) after distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in hypertensive rats. We also examined the possible protective effect of ebselen, one glutathione peroxidase mimic, on delayed degeneration in the VPN after distal MCAO. Neuronal damage in the ipsilateral VPN was examined by Nissl staining. Oxidative DNA damage and base repair enzyme activity were assessed by analyzing immunoreactivity of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-ohdG) and 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1), respectively. The number of intact neurons in the ipsilateral VPN decreased by 52% compared to the contralateral side in ischemia group 2 weeks after distal cerebral cortical infarction. The immunoreactivity of 8-ohdG significantly increased while OGG1 immunoreactivity significantly decreased in the ipsilateral VPN 2 weeks after distal cortical infarction (all pVPN (all pVPN region following distal MCAO. Furthermore, ebselen protects against the delayed damage in the VPN when given at 24 h following distal MCAO. PMID:17920569

  16. Genetic analysis of repair and damage tolerance mechanisms for DNA-protein cross-links in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Amir M H; Nakano, Toshiaki; Takuwa, Minako; Matoba, Nagisa; Tsuboi, Tomohiro; Terato, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Yamada, Masami; Nohmi, Takehiko; Ide, Hiroshi

    2009-09-01

    DNA-protein cross-links (DPCs) are unique among DNA lesions in their unusually bulky nature. We have recently shown that nucleotide excision repair (NER) and RecBCD-dependent homologous recombination (HR) collaboratively alleviate the lethal effect of DPCs in Escherichia coli. In this study, to gain further insight into the damage-processing mechanism for DPCs, we assessed the sensitivities of a panel of repair-deficient E. coli mutants to DPC-inducing agents, including formaldehyde (FA) and 5-azacytidine (azaC). We show here that the damage tolerance mechanism involving HR and subsequent replication restart (RR) provides the most effective means of cell survival against DPCs. Translesion synthesis does not serve as an alternative damage tolerance mechanism for DPCs in cell survival. Elimination of DPCs from the genome relies primarily on NER, which provides a second and moderately effective means of cell survival against DPCs. Interestingly, Cho rather than UvrC seems to be an effective nuclease for the NER of DPCs. Together with the genes responsible for HR, RR, and NER, the mutation of genes involved in several aspects of DNA repair and transactions, such as recQ, xth nfo, dksA, and topA, rendered cells slightly but significantly sensitive to FA but not azaC, possibly reflecting the complexity of DPCs or cryptic lesions induced by FA. UvrD may have an additional role outside NER, since the uvrD mutation conferred a slight azaC sensitivity on cells. Finally, DNA glycosylases mitigate azaC toxicity, independently of the repair of DPCs, presumably by removing 5-azacytosine or its degradation product from the chromosome. PMID:19617358

  17. Modulation of DNA-induced damage and repair capacity in humans after dietary intervention with lutein-enriched fermented milk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Herrero-Barbudo

    Full Text Available Dietary factors provide protection against several forms of DNA damage. Additionally, consumer demand for natural products favours the development of bioactive food ingredients with health benefits. Lutein is a promising biologically active component in the food industry. The EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies considers that protection from oxidative damage may be a beneficial physiological effect but that a cause and effect relationship has not been established. Thus, our aim was to evaluate the safety and potential functional effect of a lutein-enriched milk product using the Comet Assay in order to analyze the baseline, the induced DNA-damage and the repair capacity in the lymphocytes of 10 healthy donors before and after the intake of the mentioned product. Our data suggest that the regular consumption of lutein-enriched fermented milk results in a significant increase in serum lutein levels and this change is associated with an improvement in the resistance of DNA to damage and the capacity of DNA repair in lymphocytes. Our results also support the lack of a genotoxic effect at the doses supplied as well as the absence of interactions and side effects on other nutritional and biochemicals markers.

  18. Computational study of recognition of DNA damages and their repair. 8-oxoguanine oxidative DNA damage with repair enzyme hOGG1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of DNA mutagenic oxidative lesion - 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), single and complexed with the repair enzyme - human oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (hOGG1) were performed for 1 nanosecond (ns) in order to determine structural changes at the DNA molecule and to describe a dynamical process of DNA-enzyme complex formation. The molecule of 8-oxoG was inserted into central part of B-DNA 15-mer d(GCGTCCA'8-oxoG'GTCTACC)2 replacing the native guanine 8. In the case of simulation of single DNA molecule the broken hydrogen bonds resulting in locally collapsed B-DNA structure were observed at the lesion site. In addition the adenine on the complementary strand (separated from 8-oxoG by 1 base pair) was flipped-out of the DNA double helix. In the case of simulation of DNA and repair enzyme hOGG1, the DNA-enzyme complex was formed after 500 picoseconds of MD that lasted stable until the simulation was terminated at 1 ns. The complex was represented by the overlapping Van der Waals surfaces of DNA and enzyme molecules. The N-terminus of arginine 324 was located close to the phosphodiester bond of nucleotide with 8-oxoG enabling chemical reactions between amino acid and lesion. Phosphodiester bond at C5' of 8-oxoG was at the position close to the N-terminus of arginine 324. The water mediated hydrogen bonds network was formed in each contact area between DNA and enzyme further enhancing the stability of complex. In the background simulation of the identical molecular system with the native DNA, neither the complex nor the water mediated hydrogen bond network were observed. (author)

  19. Molecular mechanism of radioadaptive response: A cross-adaptive response for enhanced repair of DNA damage in adapted cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioadaptive response (RAR) has been attributed to the induction of a repair mechanism by low doses of ionizing radiation, but the molecular nature of the mechanism is not yet elucidated. We have characterized RAR in a series of experiments in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells. A 4-h interval is required for the full expression of RAR, which decays with the progression of cell proliferation. Treatments with inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, protein- or RNA synthesis, and protein kinase C suppress the RAR expression. The RAR cross-reacts on clastogenic lesions induced by other physical and chemical DNA-damaging agents. The presence of newly synthesised proteins has been detected during the expression period. Experiments performed using single-cell gel electrophoresis provided more direct evidence for a faster and enhaced DNA repair rate in adapted cells. Here, using single-cell gel electrophoresis, a cross-adaptive response has been demonstrated for enhanced repair of DNA damage induced by neocarzinostatin in radio-adapted cells. (author)

  20. The studies of effects of 60Co γ-rays on DNA damage and repair in tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of 60Co γ-rays and its combination with hyperthermia on DNA strand breaks and their repair in L5178y cells were studied using alkaline elution technique. When the cells were heated at 43 degree C for 30 min, there was obvious inhibition of repair of DNA damage caused by γ-irradiation. The hyperthermia before irradiation produced better inhibiting effect than that after irradiation. The effects of radiation on DNA strand breaks and its repair in HL-60 cells and HL-60 (VCR) cells were analyzed using technique of hydroxyapatite chromatography and the results sowed that the extent of DNA strand breaks in HL-60 cells and HL-60 (VCR) cells induced by irradiation was not markedly different, but the power of repair of strand breaks and the radioresistance of function of DNA synthesis in HL-60 (VCR) cells were higher than those in HL-60 cells. The difference was obvious. The results suggest that the heterogeneity of radiosensitivity of leukemia cells is correlated with its drug resistance. (10 refs., 3 tabs.)

  1. Organisms posses enzymes that function in the repair of DNA damaged by radiations, chemicals and metabolic events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report briefly describes the studies on the mechanism of in vivo DNA repairing by the author in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto Univ. for the past 30 years. First, the ability of UV radiation to induce transformation was investigated with viral DNA. The formation of thymine-thymine dimer was found harmful to organisms and such dimers were removable by UV-radiation at a low frequency. The mutability was determined in three different E.coli strains with mutator gene, mutT, mutS or mutL. The ability to excise 8-oxoguanin developed in primer DNA was deficient in mutT and miss-pairing left after DNA replication could not be recovered in mutL and mutS strains. Further, DNA repairing mechanism was investigated in other microorganisms; single-strand cleavage caused by exposure to BNCB radiation (boron-neutron-captured beam) could not be repaired in E. coli. Whereas for Deinococcus radiodurans, of which survival rate was not decreased by γ-ray radiation at 5 kGy or less, it was found that its single-strand DNA was damaged by γ-radiation to smaller molecules, but it was mended to the similar size to that in the non-irradiated cells during incubation. In addition, the transformation frequency was also recovered in the actinomycetes. Thus, it was demonstrated that de novo protein synthesis is necessary for the repairing system of recombination. (M.N.)

  2. uv photobiology: excision repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics are discussed: steps in nucleotide excision; damage to DNA by uv-endonuclease; use of complementation to study DNA repair in Escherichia coli and mammalian cells; role of BUDR photolysis in excision repair, relation between DNA repair defect and human disease; base excision repair; and excision repair by removal of damaged region of a base in DNA without excision

  3. Radiation damage and repair in cells and cell components. Final report. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of research into the direct action of ionizing radiation, especially the effect of radiation temperature, primarily upon enzymes, into induced repair, and into S.O.S.-related phenomena, is presented

  4. Radiation damage and repair in cells and cell components. Progress report: third new contract year

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research progress for 1979-1980 is reported. Projects discussed include the process of radiation-induced repair, Weigle-reactivation, induced radioresistance, the induction of the recA gene product, uv mutagenesis, and the induction of lambda

  5. RESTORING A DAMAGED 16-YEAR -OLD INSULATING POLYMER CONCRETE DIKE OVERLAY: REPAIR MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGIES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this program was to design and formulate organic polymer-based material systems suitable for repairing and restoring the overlay panels of insulating lightweight polymer concrete (ILPC) from the concrete floor and slope wall of a dike at KeySpan liquefied natural gas (LNG) facility in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, NY, just over sixteen years ago. It also included undertaking a small-scale field demonstration to ensure that the commercial repairing technologies were applicable to the designed and formulated materials.

  6. Radiation and chemical interactions producing cellular and subcellular damage and their repair. Coordinated programme on improvement in radiotherapy of cancer using modifiers of radiosensitivity of cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a result of biochemical studies on the DNA repair of damages induced by ionizing radiation as well as on the radiosensitization with chemicals containing halogen atoms, it was suggested that inhibition of the post-irradiation repair by chemical factors may be useful in improving the radiotherapy. It was possbile to prepare an in vitro repair system in combination with transforming DNA of Bacillus subtilis as well as human placenta extracts; it was shown that certain radiosensitizers worked actually as repair inhibitors in this in vitro system

  7. Molecular Mechanisms of Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh P. Rastogi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA is one of the prime molecules, and its stability is of utmost importance for proper functioning and existence of all living systems. Genotoxic chemicals and radiations exert adverse effects on genome stability. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR (mainly UV-B: 280–315 nm is one of the powerful agents that can alter the normal state of life by inducing a variety of mutagenic and cytotoxic DNA lesions such as cyclobutane-pyrimidine dimers (CPDs, 6-4 photoproducts (6-4PPs, and their Dewar valence isomers as well as DNA strand breaks by interfering the genome integrity. To counteract these lesions, organisms have developed a number of highly conserved repair mechanisms such as photoreactivation, base excision repair (BER, nucleotide excision repair (NER, and mismatch repair (MMR. Additionally, double-strand break repair (by homologous recombination and nonhomologous end joining, SOS response, cell-cycle checkpoints, and programmed cell death (apoptosis are also operative in various organisms with the expense of specific gene products. This review deals with UV-induced alterations in DNA and its maintenance by various repair mechanisms.

  8. No effect of 600 grams fruit and vegetables per day on oxidative DNA damage and repair in healthy nonsmokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, P.; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Pedersen, A.;

    2003-01-01

    damage. We set up a parallel 24-day dietary placebo-controlled intervention study in which 43 subjects were randomized into three groups receiving an antioxidant-free basal diet and 600 g of fruits and vegetables, or a supplement containing the corresponding amounts of vitamins and minerals, or placebo......In several epidemiological studies, high intakes of fruits and vegetables have been associated with a lower incidence of cancer. Theoretically, intake of antioxidants by consumption of fruits and vegetables should protect against reactive oxygen species and decrease the formation of oxidative DNA......-oxo-2'-deoxyguanine was measured in urine. The expressions of oxoguanine glycosylase I and excision repair cross complementing I DNA repair genes, determined by real-time reverse transcription-PCR of mRNAs, were investigated in leukocytes. Consumption of fruits and vegetables or vitamins and minerals...

  9. UV-induced alkaline labile DNA damage in human adenovirus and its repair after infection of human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    UV-induced alkaline labile viral DNA damage was detected following irradiation of adenovirus type 2 and found to be repaired following the infection of human KB cells. Human adenovirus type 2 was irradiated with various doses of UV and subsequently used to infect human KB cells in tissue culture at approximately 2 x 103 particles per cell. Before, and at various times after infection, the viral DNA was examined on alkaline sucrose gradients. Irradiated free virus DNA showed a dose dependent decrease in molecular weight compared to unirradiated virus DNA, indicating the presence of UV-induced alkaline labile lesions. Furthermore, an increase in the molecular weight of the irradiated virus DNA was found after infection indicating that alkaline labile lesions were removed from the viral DNA by a host mediated repair mechanism. After infection, the molecular weight of the irradiated virus DNA reached a value similar to that of unirradiated virus DNA for all the UV doses studied. (author)

  10. Molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis and DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most organisms including man have evolved ways to handle damage produce in DNA by environmental agents including chemical mutagens and carcinogens. The process of repair of some types of damage is highly regulated in a tissue and cell line-specific fashion and varies from organism to organism. Thus, the ultimate biological effects of the lesions depend not only on the extent of their formation but on the efficiency of their removal as well. The research objectives of this laboratory are to elucidate the mechanism and regulation of repair of damage in DNA produced by simple alkylating mutagens and carcinogens, as well as the mutagenic changes in DNA produced as a result of persistence of unrepaired lesions. Specifically, the current topics of the authors research are (1) to elucidate the enzymatic mechanism of the human repair enzyme, DNA-O6-methylguanine methyltransferase, and to determine the molecular mechanism of its regulation and (2) to study the nature of mutations induced by the presence of alkylated bases and ionizing radiation-damaged bases in DNA using shuttle plasmids that replicate both in human cells and E. coli. The following report on last year's experiments bear upon the first objective

  11. Utilization of isogenic yeast DNA repair mutants and gene expression profiling to elucidate DNA damage response networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to assess the effects of defects in the base excision repair (BER), and/or nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathways on levels of gene expression, the global genome expression patterns of a wild type S. cerevisiae strain, and mutant strains defective in BER, NER, and both BER and NER were compared. Isogenic strains were exposed to equitoxic doses of hydrogen peroxide such that for each strain the same level of cell death occurs. Two doses of hydrogen peroxide were used, a moderate toxicity dose resulting in 50% cell survival and a highly toxic dose resulting in approximately 1% cell survival. We observed a global down regulation of ORFs in the normal (wild type), the BER defective, or the NER defective strains in response to the highly toxic dose. For transcriptional responses at the moderate toxicity dose, the BER defective, and the NER defective strains respond similarly. The normal response differs significantly compared to the BER defective, the NER defective or the combined BER / NER dual pathway defective strain. ORFs, which respond to a moderate toxicity dose of hydrogen peroxide can be grouped into several categories, including DNA repair/tolerance, DNA replication, cell cycle, transcription, signal transduction, general stress response proteins, and protein degradation. These studies differ markedly from other microarray studies which examined mainly stress responses in wild type yeast strains with normal DNA repair capacities. One outcome of our experiments is the identification of responses due to the presence of unrepaired DNA damage which serves as the signal for the observed up- or down-regulation of certain genes. Using this type of approach, such responses can be distinguished from stress responses initiated by signals (e.g. at the membrane or cytoplasmic level) other than DNA damage. We have also gauged spontaneous and induced mutation frequencies and recombination rates, as well as cell cycle and morphological characteristics of these

  12. The Base Excision Repair system of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium counteracts DNA damage by host nitric oxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R Richardson

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular pathogens must withstand nitric oxide (NO. generated by host phagocytes. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium interferes with intracellular trafficking of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and possesses multiple systems to detoxify NO.. Consequently, the level of NO. stress encountered by S. Typhimurium during infection in vivo has been unknown. The Base Excision Repair (BER system recognizes and repairs damaged DNA bases including cytosine and guanine residues modified by reactive nitrogen species. Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP sites generated by BER glycosylases require subsequent processing by AP endonucleases. S. Typhimurium xth nfo mutants lacking AP endonuclease activity exhibit increased NO. sensitivity resulting from chromosomal fragmentation at unprocessed AP sites. BER mutant strains were thus used to probe the nature and extent of nitrosative damage sustained by intracellular bacteria during infection. Here we show that an xth nfo S. Typhimurium mutant is attenuated for virulence in C3H/HeN mice, and virulence can be completely restored by the iNOS inhibitor L-NIL. Inactivation of the ung or fpg glycosylase genes partially restores virulence to xth nfo mutant S. Typhimurium, demonstrating that NO. fluxes in vivo are sufficient to modify cytosine and guanine bases, respectively. Mutants lacking ung or fpg exhibit NO.-dependent hypermutability during infection, underscoring the importance of BER in protecting Salmonella from the genotoxic effects of host NO.. These observations demonstrate that host-derived NO. damages Salmonella DNA in vivo, and the BER system is required to maintain bacterial genomic integrity.

  13. Differentially expressed genes in repairing irradiation-induced damage in mouse intestinal tract by foreign mouse small intestinal RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the differentially expressed genes correlative to irradiation-induced damage in mouse intestinal tract and its repair by foreign mouse small intestinal RNA. Divide 90 mice into 4 groups randomly. For the experimental groups, each mouse was given 40μg foreign mouse small intestinal RNA, and for the control groups, 0.4 mL of 0.9% NaCl. The intestinal specimens were collected form each group 6h, 12h, 24h, 4d and 8d after 60Co γ-rays irradiation respectively. The differentially expressed genes in the tested and control groups were checked and cloned by long-distance PCR based on subtractive hybridization. 165 differential gene clones were obtained, of which 75 named as AXCZI-75 maybe were correlated with the irradiation-induced damage in mouse intestinal tract; and 90 named as XCZ1-90 maybe were correlated with repairing of the damaged mouse intestinal tract by foreign mouse small intestinal RNA

  14. Damage Escape and Repair in Dried Chroococcidiopsis spp. from Hot and Cold Deserts Exposed to Simulated Space and Martian Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billi, Daniela; Viaggiu, Emanuela; Cockell, Charles S.; Rabbow, Elke; Horneck, Gerda; Onofri, Silvano

    2011-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis, overlain by 3mm of Antarctic sandstone, was exposed as dried multilayers to simulated space and martian conditions. Ground-based experiments were conducted in the context of Lichens and Fungi Experiments (EXPOSE-E mission, European Space Agency), which were performed to evaluate, after 1.5 years on the International Space Station, the survival of cyanobacteria (Chroococcidiopsis), lichens, and fungi colonized on Antarctic rock. The survival potential and the role played by protection and repair mechanisms in the response of dried Chroococcidiopsis cells to ground-based experiments were both investigated. Different methods were employed, including evaluation of the colony-forming ability, single-cell analysis of subcellular integrities based on membrane integrity molecular and redox probes, evaluation of the photosynthetic pigment autofluorescence, and assessment of the genomic DNA integrity with a PCR-based assay. Desiccation survivors of strain CCMEE 123 (coastal desert, Chile) were better suited than CCMEE 134 (Beacon Valley, Antarctica) to withstand cellular damage imposed by simulated space and martian conditions. Exposed dried cells of strain CCMEE 123 formed colonies, maintained subcellular integrities, and, depending on the exposure conditions, also escaped DNA damage or repaired the induced damage upon rewetting.

  15. In vitro Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage by Human Nucleotide Excision Repair System: Possible Explanation for Neurodegeneration in Xeroderma Pigmentosum Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Joyce T.; Bessho, Tadayoshi; Kung, Hsiang Chuan; Bolton, Philip H.; Sancar, Aziz

    1997-08-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients fail to remove pyrimidine dimers caused by sunlight and, as a consequence, develop multiple cancers in areas exposed to light. The second most common sign, present in 20-30% of XP patients, is a set of neurological abnormalities caused by neuronal death in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Neural tissue is shielded from sunlight-induced DNA damage, so the cause of neurodegeneration in XP patients remains unexplained. In this study, we show that two major oxidative DNA lesions, 8-oxoguanine and thymine glycol, are excised from DNA in vitro by the same enzyme system responsible for removing pyrimidine dimers and other bulky DNA adducts. Our results suggest that XP neurological disease may be caused by defective repair of lesions that are produced in nerve cells by reactive oxygen species generated as by-products of an active oxidative metabolism.

  16. Repairability during G1 of the inductor leisure of exchanges in the sister chromatid induced by alkylating agents in DNA substituted and no substituted with BUDR, in cells of the salivary gland of mouse In vivo; Reparabilidad durante G1 de las lesiones inductoras de intercambios en las cromatidas hermanas inducidos por agentes alquilantes en ADN sustituido y no sustituido con BrdU, en celulas de la glandula salival de raton In vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez B, F

    2004-07-01

    In this work you determines the repair of the lesions inductoras of Sister chromatid exchange (ICHs) generated in the cells of the salivary gland of mouse, for the treatment with the N-Methyl-N-Nitrosourea (MNU), the N-Ethyl-N-Nitrosourea (ENU), the Methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and the Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) in early and slow G1 of the first one and the second cellular division, that is to say before and after the cells incorporate 5-bromine-2 -Desoxyuridine (BrdU) in the DNA. Groups witness non treaties were included with mutagen. The cells of the salivary gland repaired the generated lesions partially by the MNU, the MMS and the EMS in the 1st division, and only the lesions induced by the ENU and MMS were repaired partially in the 2nd division. The ENU generates injure that they were not repaired in the 1st division and those taken place by the EMS were little repaired in the 2nd division. The methylating agents generated but ICHs that the ethylating. One observes that the BrdU makes to the molecule of the DNA but susceptible to the damage generated by the alkylating agents that induce the formation of the ICHs. This susceptibility was incremented around 150% for the treatment with the MNU, the ENU and the MMS, on the other hand for the EMS it was 3 times minor. It is proposed that the one electronegative atom of this analog of the timine would to work as a nucleophyllic center with which the electrophyllic compounds react. (Author)

  17. Urban seismic risk assessment: statistical repair cost data and probable structural losses based on damage scenario—correlation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleftheriadou, Anastasia K.; Baltzopoulou, Aikaterini D.; Karabinis, Athanasios I.

    2016-06-01

    The current seismic risk assessment is based on two discrete approaches, actual and probable, validating afterwards the produced results. In the first part of this research, the seismic risk is evaluated from the available data regarding the mean statistical repair/strengthening or replacement cost for the total number of damaged structures (180,427 buildings) after the 7/9/1999 Parnitha (Athens) earthquake. The actual evaluated seismic risk is afterwards compared to the estimated probable structural losses, which is presented in the second part of the paper, based on a damage scenario in the referring earthquake. The applied damage scenario is based on recently developed damage probability matrices (DPMs) from Athens (Greece) damage database. The seismic risk estimation refers to 750,085 buildings situated in the extended urban region of Athens. The building exposure is categorized in five typical structural types and represents 18.80 % of the entire building stock in Greece. The last information is provided by the National Statistics Service of Greece (NSSG) according to the 2000-2001 census. The seismic input is characterized by the ratio, a g/ a o, where a g is the regional peak ground acceleration (PGA) which is evaluated from the earlier estimated research macroseismic intensities, and a o is the PGA according to the hazard map of the 2003 Greek Seismic Code. Finally, the collected investigated financial data derived from different National Services responsible for the post-earthquake crisis management concerning the repair/strengthening or replacement costs or other categories of costs for the rehabilitation of earthquake victims (construction and function of settlements for earthquake homeless, rent supports, demolitions, shorings) are used to determine the final total seismic risk factor.

  18. Urban seismic risk assessment: statistical repair cost data and probable structural losses based on damage scenario—correlation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleftheriadou, Anastasia K.; Baltzopoulou, Aikaterini D.; Karabinis, Athanasios I.

    2016-04-01

    The current seismic risk assessment is based on two discrete approaches, actual and probable, validating afterwards the produced results. In the first part of this research, the seismic risk is evaluated from the available data regarding the mean statistical repair/strengthening or replacement cost for the total number of damaged structures (180,427 buildings) after the 7/9/1999 Parnitha (Athens) earthquake. The actual evaluated seismic risk is afterwards compared to the estimated probable structural losses, which is presented in the second part of the paper, based on a damage scenario in the referring earthquake. The applied damage scenario is based on recently developed damage probability matrices (DPMs) from Athens (Greece) damage database. The seismic risk estimation refers to 750,085 buildings situated in the extended urban region of Athens. The building exposure is categorized in five typical structural types and represents 18.80 % of the entire building stock in Greece. The last information is provided by the National Statistics Service of Greece (NSSG) according to the 2000-2001 census. The seismic input is characterized by the ratio, a g/a o, where a g is the regional peak ground acceleration (PGA) which is evaluated from the earlier estimated research macroseismic intensities, and a o is the PGA according to the hazard map of the 2003 Greek Seismic Code. Finally, the collected investigated financial data derived from different National Services responsible for the post-earthquake crisis management concerning the repair/strengthening or replacement costs or other categories of costs for the rehabilitation of earthquake victims (construction and function of settlements for earthquake homeless, rent supports, demolitions, shorings) are used to determine the final total seismic risk factor.

  19. Essential and distinct roles of the F-box and helicase domains of Fbh1 in DNA damage repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinagawa Hideo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are induced by exogenous insults such as ionizing radiation and chemical exposure, and they can also arise as a consequence of stalled or collapsed DNA replication forks. Failure to repair DSBs can lead to genomic instability or cell death and cancer in higher eukaryotes. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe fbh1 gene encodes an F-box DNA helicase previously described to play a role in the Rhp51 (an orthologue of S. cerevisiae RAD51-dependent recombinational repair of DSBs. Fbh1 fused to GFP localizes to discrete nuclear foci following DNA damage. Results To determine the functional roles of the highly conserved F-box and helicase domains, we have characterized fbh1 mutants carrying specific mutations in these domains. We show that the F-box mutation fbh1-fb disturbs the nuclear localization of Fbh1, conferring an fbh1 null-like phenotype. Moreover, nuclear foci do not form in fbh1-fb cells with DNA damage even if Fbh1-fb is targeted to the nucleus by fusion to a nuclear localization signal sequence. In contrast, the helicase mutation fbh1-hl causes the accumulation of Fbh1 foci irrespective of the presence of DNA damage and confers damage sensitivity greater than that conferred by the null allele. Additional mutation of the F-box alleviates the hypermorphic phenotype of the fbh1-hl mutant. Conclusion These results suggest that the F-box and DNA helicase domains play indispensable but distinct roles in Fbh1 function. Assembly of the SCFFbh1 complex is required for both the nuclear localization and DNA damage-induced focus formation of Fbh1 and is therefore prerequisite for the Fbh1 recombination function.

  20. Metastasis suppressor NM23-H1 promotes repair of UV-induced DNA damage and suppresses UV-induced melanomagenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Jarrett, Stuart G; Novak, Marian; Dabernat, Sandrine; Daniel, Jean-Yves; Mellon, Isabel; Zhang, Qingbei; Harris, Nathan; Ciesielski, Michael J.; Fenstermaker, Robert A.; Kovacic, Diane; Slominski, Andrzej; Kaetzel, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Reduced expression of the metastasis suppressor NM23-H1 is associated with aggressive forms of multiple cancers. Here, we establish that NM23-H1 (termed H1 isoform in human, M1 in mouse) and two of its attendant enzymatic activities, the 3′-5′ exonuclease and nucleoside diphosphate kinase, are novel participants in the cellular response to UV radiation (UVR)-induced DNA damage. NM23-H1 deficiency compromised the kinetics of repair for total DNA polymerase-blocking lesions and nucleotide excis...

  1. No effect of 600 grams fruit and vegetables per day on oxidative DNA damage and repair in healthy nonsmokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, P.; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Pedersen, A.; Dragsted, Lars Ove; Sandstrom, B.; Loft, S.

    2003-01-01

    . Blood and urine samples were collected before, once a week, and 4 weeks after the intervention period. The level of strand breaks, endonuclease III sites, formamidopyrimidine sites, and sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide was assessed in mononuclear blood cells by the comet assay. Excretion of 7-hydro-8...... had no effect on oxidative DNA damage measured in mononuclear cell DNA or urine. Hydrogen peroxide sensitivity, detected by the comet assay, did not differ between the groups. Expression of excision repair cross complementing I and oxoguanine glycosylase I in leukocytes was not related to the diet...

  2. REC-2006-A Fractionated Extract of Podophyllum hexandrum Protects Cellular DNA from Radiation-Induced Damage by Reducing the Initial Damage and Enhancing Its Repair In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Pankaj; Shukla, Sandeep Kumar; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Podophyllum hexandrum, a perennial herb commonly known as the Himalayan May Apple, is well known in Indian and Chinese traditional systems of medicine. P. hexandrum has been widely used for the treatment of venereal warts, skin infections, bacterial and viral infections, and different cancers of the brain, lung and bladder. This study aimed at elucidating the effect of REC-2006, a bioactive fractionated extract from the rhizome of P. hexandrum, on the kinetics of induction and repair of radiation-induced DNA damage in murine thymocytes in vivo. We evaluated its effect on non-specific radiation-induced DNA damage by the alkaline halo assay in terms of relative nuclear spreading factor (RNSF) and gene-specific radiation-induced DNA damage via semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Whole body exposure of animals with gamma rays (10 Gy) caused a significant amount of DNA damage in thymocytes (RNSF values 17.7 ± 0.47, 12.96 ± 1.64 and 3.3 ± 0.014) and a reduction in the amplification of β-globin gene to 0, 28 and 43% at 0, 15 and 60 min, respectively. Administrating REC-2006 at a radioprotective concentration (15 mg kg(-1) body weight) 1 h before irradiation resulted in time-dependent reduction of DNA damage evident as a decrease in RNSF values 6.156 ± 0.576, 1.647 ± 0.534 and 0.496 ± 0.012, and an increase in β-globin gene amplification 36, 95 and 99%, at 0, 15 and 60 min, respectively. REC-2006 scavenged radiation-induced hydroxyl radicals in a dose-dependent manner stabilized DPPH free radicals and also inhibited superoxide anions. Various polyphenols and flavonoides present in REC-2006 might contribute to scavenging of radiation-induced free radicals, thereby preventing DNA damage and stimulating its repair. PMID:20008078

  3. Repair of ultraviolet radiation damage in xeroderma pigmentosum cells belonging to complementation group F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA-repair characteristics of xeroderma pigmentosum belonging to complementation group F were investigated. The cells exhibited an intermediate level of repair as measured in terms of (1) disappearance of T4 endonuclease-V-susceptible sites from DNA, (2) formation of ultraviolet-induced strand breaks in DNA, and (3) ultraviolet-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis during post-irradiation incubation. The impaired ability of XP3YO to perform unscheduled DNA synthesis was restored, to half the normal level, by the concomitant treatment with T4 endonuclease V and ultraviolet-inactivated Sendai virus. It is suggested that xeroderma pigmentosum cells of group F may be defective, at least in part, in the incision step of excision repair. (orig.)

  4. Repair of damaged DNA in-vivo. Comprehensive progress report, August 1980-August 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have extended our characterization of long patch excision repair (LPER) and have demonstrated that LPER is not mutagenic (or error-prone); that the recA function is required for LPER, at least for its regulation; that the substrate for LPER is produced as a linear (not an exponential) function of uv (254 nm) dose; and that LPER can occur in uvr- cells treated with N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). We have developed 3 methods for measuring the frequency of interstrand crosslinks in DNA and are now applying these methods to the study of the formation and repair of DNA crosslinks in E.Coli. We have developed a monoclonal antibody specific for thymine glycol in DNA, and are using it to study the repair of thymine glycol in E. coli

  5. Radiation-Induced Survivin Nuclear Accumulation is Linked to DNA Damage Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Increased expression of survivin has been identified as a negative prognostic marker in a variety of human cancers. We have previously shown that survivin is a radiation-resistance factor and that the therapeutic effect of survivin knock-down might result from an impaired DNA repair capacity. In this study, we aimed to elucidate an interrelationship between survivin's cellular localization and DNA double-strand break repair. Methods and Materials: Survivin's cellular distribution and nuclear complex formation were assayed by Western blotting of subcellular fractions, by immunofluorescence staining, and co-immunoprecipitation in SW480 colorectal cancer cells. DNA repair capacity was analyzed by kinetics of γ-H2AX foci formation, and by DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) assays in the presence of survivin-specific or nonspecific control siRNA. Results: Following irradiation, we observed a rapid nuclear accumulation of survivin and subsequent phosphorylation of the protein in the nucleus. Co-immunoprecipitation analyses from nuclear extracts revealed an interaction among survivin, Ku70, γ-H2AX, MDC1, and DNA-PKcs that was confirmed by immunofluorescence co-localization in nuclear foci. Survivin knock down by siRNA resulted in an impaired DNA double strand break repair, as demonstrated by an increased detection of γ-H2AX foci/nucleus at 60 min and a higher amount of residual γ-H2AX foci at 24 hr postirradiation. Furthermore, we detected in survivin-depleted cells a hampered S2056 autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs and a significantly decreased DNA-PKcs kinase activity. Conclusion: These data indicate that nuclear survivin is linked to DNA double-strand break repair by interaction with members of the DNA double-strand breaks repair machinery, thus regulating DNA-PKcs activity.

  6. Double-strand breaks in DNA caused by repair of damage due to ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA DSBs are formed in normal human IMR-90 cells during repair incubation after 100 and 300 J.m-2 of UVL. By contrast, no DSBs are formed after UVL in human XPA cells that are unable to excise pyrimidine dimers. The DSBs are not due to immediate cell death since all the cells excluded trypan blue at the time of assay and because XPA cells, which are much more UVL-sensitive than IMR-90, did not form DSBs after UVL. We suggest that these repair-induced DSBs should be potent lesions that might lead to cytotoxicity, chromosome aberrations, deletion mutations, and perhaps cellular transformation

  7. Repair of ultraviolet light-damaged deoxyribonucleic acid in sbcA strains of Escherichia coli K-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Escherichia coli strain carrying both rec+ and sbcA has been constructed. Repair of ultraviolet light-induced deoxyribonucleic acid damage was examined by measuring survival and thymine-dimer excision in the rec+ sbcA strain as well as rec+ sbcA+ and recB recC sbcA strains. The sbcA mutation restores normal survival in both recB recC uvrB and recB recC uvr+ strains. Excision of thymine-containing dimers does not occur in uvrB mutants, regardless of the rec or sbcA genotype. Survival, after ultraviolet-light damage, of a rec+ sbcA strain is quantitatively similar to rec+ sbcA+ and recB recC sbcA strains

  8. Twist-open mechanism of DNA damage recognition by the Rad4/XPC nucleotide excision repair complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Chen, Xuejing; Slogoff Sevilla, Phillip; Min, Jung-Hyun; Ansari, Anjum

    2016-04-19

    DNA damage repair starts with the recognition of damaged sites from predominantly normal DNA. In eukaryotes, diverse DNA lesions from environmental sources are recognized by the xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) nucleotide excision repair complex. Studies of Rad4 (radiation-sensitive 4; yeast XPC ortholog) showed that Rad4 "opens" up damaged DNA by inserting a β-hairpin into the duplex and flipping out two damage-containing nucleotide pairs. However, this DNA lesion "opening" is slow (˜5-10 ms) compared with typical submillisecond residence times per base pair site reported for various DNA-binding proteins during 1D diffusion on DNA. To address the mystery as to how Rad4 pauses to recognize lesions during diffusional search, we examine conformational dynamics along the lesion recognition trajectory using temperature-jump spectroscopy. Besides identifying the ˜10-ms step as the rate-limiting bottleneck towards opening specific DNA site, we uncover an earlier ˜100- to 500-μs step that we assign to nonspecific deformation (unwinding/"twisting") of DNA by Rad4. The β-hairpin is not required to unwind or to overcome the bottleneck but is essential for full nucleotide-flipping. We propose that Rad4 recognizes lesions in a step-wise "twist-open" mechanism, in which preliminary twisting represents Rad4 interconverting between search and interrogation modes. Through such conformational switches compatible with rapid diffusion on DNA, Rad4 may stall preferentially at a lesion site, offering time to open DNA. This study represents the first direct observation, to our knowledge, of dynamical DNA distortions during search/interrogation beyond base pair breathing. Submillisecond interrogation with preferential stalling at cognate sites may be common to various DNA-binding proteins. PMID:27035942

  9. Radiation-Induced Upregulation of Gene Expression From Adenoviral Vectors Mediated by DNA Damage Repair and Regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In the present study, we evaluated the combination of replication-deficient adenoviruses and radiotherapy in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the mechanism of radiation-mediated upregulation of adenoviral transgene expression. Methods and Materials: Adenoviral transgene expression (luciferase or green fluorescent protein) was studied with and without radiation in three cell lines: breast cancer M4A4-LM3, prostate cancer PC-3MM2, and lung cancer LNM35/enhanced green fluorescent protein. The effect of the radiation dose, modification of the viral capsid, and five different transgene promoters were studied. The cellular responses were studied using mass spectrometry and immunofluorescence analysis. Double strand break repair was modulated by inhibitors of heat shock protein 90, topoisomerase-I, and DNA protein kinase, and transgene expression was measured. Results: We found that a wide range of radiation doses increased adenoviral transgene expression regardless of the cell line, transgene, promoter, or viral capsid modification. Treatment with adenovirus, radiation, and double strand break repair inhibitors resulted in persistence of double strand breaks and subsequent increases in adenovirus transgene expression. Conclusions: Radiation-induced enhancement of adenoviral transgene expression is linked to DNA damage recognition and repair. Radiation induces a global cellular response that results in increased production of RNA and proteins, including adenoviral transgene products. This study provides a mechanistic rationale for combining radiation with adenoviral gene delivery.

  10. Endonuclease IV Is the Main Base Excision Repair Enzyme Involved in DNA Damage Induced by UVA Radiation and Stannous Chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos P. De Mattos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Stannous chloride (SnCl2 and UVA induce DNA lesions through ROS. The aim of this work was to study the toxicity induced by UVA preillumination, followed by SnCl2 treatment. E. coli BER mutants were used to identify genes which could play a role in DNA lesion repair generated by these agents. The survival assays showed (i The nfo mutant was the most sensitive to SnCl2; (ii lethal synergistic effect was observed after UVA pre-illumination, plus SnCl2 incubation, the nfo mutant being the most sensitive; (iii wild type and nfo mutants, transformed with pBW21 plasmid (nfo+ had their survival increased following treatments. The alkaline agarose gel electrophoresis assays pointed that (i UVA induced DNA breaks and fpg mutant was the most sensitive; (ii SnCl2-induced DNA strand breaks were higher than those from UVA and nfo mutant had the slowest repair kinetics; (iii UVA+SnCl2 promoted an increase in DNA breaks than SnCl2 and, again, nfo mutant displayed the slowest repair kinetics. In summary, Nfo protects E. coli cells against damage induced by SnCl2 and UVA+ SnCl2.

  11. Replicon size and excision repair as factors in the inhibition and recovery of DNA synthesis from ultraviolet damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Initiation of DNA replication and chain growth, analyzed by alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation, was interrupted to different extents in different cell types by irradiation with ultraviolet light. Within the first hour of irradiation DNA replication was reduced in a manner that depended on the average number of lesions per replicating unit (replicon). At low numbers of lesions per replicon, inhibition of replicon initiation was the predominant response; at higher numbers of lesions per replicon, blockage of chain growth was also observed. After irradiation with a dose that initially blocked chain growth, the rate at which cells recovered their ability to synthesize increasingly more and larger size DNA was a function both of replicon size and of excision repair capacity. Cells with small replicons recovered more rapidly than cells with large replicons, and excision repair-deficient cells recovered less rapidly than excision-competent cells. These observations indicate that excision repair capacity and replicon size play major roles in the response of DNA replication to ultraviolet damage. (Auth.)

  12. Radiation-Induced Upregulation of Gene Expression From Adenoviral Vectors Mediated by DNA Damage Repair and Regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nokisalmi, Petri; Rajecki, Maria; Pesonen, Sari; Escutenaire, Sophie [Cancer Gene Therapy Group, Molecular Cancer Biology Program, Transplantation Laboratory, Haartman Institute, and Finnish Institute for Molecular Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki and Uusimaa Hospital District Laboratory, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Soliymani, Rabah [Protein Chemistry Unit, Department of Anatomy, Institute of Biomedicine, Biomedicum Helsinki (Finland); Tenhunen, Mikko [Department of Radiation and Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Ahtiainen, Laura [Cancer Gene Therapy Group, Molecular Cancer Biology Program, Transplantation Laboratory, Haartman Institute, and Finnish Institute for Molecular Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki and Uusimaa Hospital District Laboratory, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Hemminki, Akseli, E-mail: akseli.hemminki@helsinki.fi [Cancer Gene Therapy Group, Molecular Cancer Biology Program, Transplantation Laboratory, Haartman Institute, and Finnish Institute for Molecular Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki and Uusimaa Hospital District Laboratory, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: In the present study, we evaluated the combination of replication-deficient adenoviruses and radiotherapy in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the mechanism of radiation-mediated upregulation of adenoviral transgene expression. Methods and Materials: Adenoviral transgene expression (luciferase or green fluorescent protein) was studied with and without radiation in three cell lines: breast cancer M4A4-LM3, prostate cancer PC-3MM2, and lung cancer LNM35/enhanced green fluorescent protein. The effect of the radiation dose, modification of the viral capsid, and five different transgene promoters were studied. The cellular responses were studied using mass spectrometry and immunofluorescence analysis. Double strand break repair was modulated by inhibitors of heat shock protein 90, topoisomerase-I, and DNA protein kinase, and transgene expression was measured. Results: We found that a wide range of radiation doses increased adenoviral transgene expression regardless of the cell line, transgene, promoter, or viral capsid modification. Treatment with adenovirus, radiation, and double strand break repair inhibitors resulted in persistence of double strand breaks and subsequent increases in adenovirus transgene expression. Conclusions: Radiation-induced enhancement of adenoviral transgene expression is linked to DNA damage recognition and repair. Radiation induces a global cellular response that results in increased production of RNA and proteins, including adenoviral transgene products. This study provides a mechanistic rationale for combining radiation with adenoviral gene delivery.

  13. DNA damage induction and/or repair as mammalian cell biomarker for the prediction of cellular radiation response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumstark-Khan, C.

    DNA damage and its repair processes are key factors in cancer induction and also in the treatment of malignancies. Cancer prevention during extended space missions becomes a topic of great importance for space radiobiology. The knowledge of individual responsiveness would allow the protection strategy to be tailored optimally in each case. Radiobiological analysis of cultured cells derived from tissue explants from individuals has shown that measurement of the surviving fraction after 2 Gy (SF2) may be used to predict the individual responsiveness. However, clonogenic assays are timeconsuming, thus alternative assays for the determination of radiore-sponse are being sought. For that reason CHO cell strains having different repair capacities were used for examining whether DNA strand break repair is a suitable experimental design to allow predictive statements. Cellular survival (CFA assay) and DNA strand breaks (total DNA strand breaks: FADU technique; DSBs: non-denaturing elution) were determined in parallel immediately after irradiation as well as after a 24 hour recovery period according to dose. There were no correlations between the dose-response curves of the initial level of DNA strand breaks and parameters that describe clonogenic survival curves (SF2). A good correlation exists between intrinsic cellular radioresistance and the extent of residual DNA strand breaks.

  14. Computational study of hydration at the TD damaged site of DNA in complex with repair enzyme T4 endonuclease V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of the distribution of water around DNA surface focusing on the role of the distribution of water molecules in the proper recognition of damaged site by repair enzyme T4 Endonuclease V was performed. The native DNA dodecamer, dodecamer with the thymine dimer (TD) and complex of DNA and part of repair enzyme T4 Endonuclease V were examined throughout the 500 ps of molecular dynamics simulation. During simulation the number of water molecules close to the DNA atoms and the residence time were calculated. There is an increase in number of water molecules lying in the close vicinity to TD if compared with those lying close to two native thymines (TT). Densely populated area with water molecules around TD is one of the factors detected by enzyme during scanning process. The residence time was found higher for molecule of the complex and the six water molecules were found occupying the stabile positions between the TD and catalytic center close to atoms P, C3' and N3. These molecules originate water mediated hydrogen bond network that contribute to the stability of complex required for the onset of repair process. (author)

  15. Role of isolated and clustered DNA damage and the post-irradiating repair process in the effects of heavy ion beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clustered DNA damage is a specific type of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation. Any type of ionizing radiation traverses the target DNA molecule as a beam, inducing damage along its track. Our previous study showed that clustered DNA damage yields decreased with increased linear energy transfer (LET), leading us to investigate the importance of clustered DNA damage in the biological effects of heavy ion beam radiation. In this study, we analyzed the yield of clustered base damage (comprising multiple base lesions) in cultured cells irradiated with various heavy ion beams, and investigated isolated base damage and the repair process in post-irradiation cultured cells. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were irradiated by carbon, silicon, argon and iron ion beams with LETs of 13, 55, 90 and 200 keV µm-1, respectively. Agarose gel electrophoresis of the cells with enzymatic treatments indicated that clustered base damage yields decreased as the LET increased. The aldehyde reactive probe procedure showed that isolated base damage yields in the irradiated cells followed the same pattern. To analyze the cellular base damage process, clustered DNA damage repair was investigated using DNA repair mutant cells. DNA double-strand breaks accumulated in CHO mutant cells lacking Xrcc1 after irradiation, and the cell viability decreased. On the other hand, mouse embryonic fibroblast (Mef) cells lacking both Nth1 and Ogg1 became more resistant than the wild type Mef. Thus, clustered base damage seems to be involved in the expression of heavy ion beam biological effects via the repair process. (author)

  16. Effects of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor on the repair of vessel intima damaged by balloon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xing-hua; MA Xiao-jing; ZHAO Tong

    2005-01-01

    Background The dysfunction of vascular endothelial cells plays a key role in starting and facilitating restenosis. The acceleration of intima repair and the recovery of endothelial function would reduce the restenosis rate. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on the repair of damaged iliac arteries.Methods Twenty-four male New Zealand white rabbits undergoing primary iliac artery deendothelialization were randomly divided into two groups (GM-CSF group and control group). The GM-CSF group received a subcutaneous injection of GM-CSF (10 μg·kg-1·d-1), and the control group was given a subcutaneous injection of equivalent saline. The iliac arteries of all animals were damaged by balloon after 7 days. The levels of nitric oxide (NO) were detected before, 1 week, 2 weeks and 4 weeks after angioplasty. The repair and hyperplasia of the intima were observed microscopically and the indices of stenosis were evaluated by computerized planimetry after 4 weeks of angioplasty.Results The NO levels of the GM-CSF group were higher than those of the control group 2 weeks and 4 weeks after angioplasty [(91.92±11.57) μmol/L vs. (81.67±12.18) μmol/L; (97.67±10.13) μmol/L vs. (83.16±12.64) μmol/L]. Four weeks after balloon damage, histological examination showed that neointima formation, vascular smooth muscle cells and fibrous tissue of the GM-CSF group were less than those of the control group. The endothelium of the GM-CSF group was more integrated, and stenosis of lumen was slighter than that of the control group. Morphometry showed the lumen area of the GM-CSF group was larger than that of the control group [(1.27±0.31) mm2 vs. (0.92±0.24) mm2], the neointimal area and percent of intima hyperplasia were significantly smaller than those of the control group [(0.85±0.34) mm2 vs. (1.18±0.38) mm2; (40±7)% vs. (55±6)%].Conclusion GM-CSF could facilitate the repair of the intima, reduce neointima

  17. DNA damage and gene therapy of xeroderma pigmentosum, a human DNA repair-deficient disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Full correction of mutation in the XPC gene by engineered nucleases. • Meganucleases and TALENs are inhibited by 5-MeC for inducing double strand breaks. • Gene therapy of XP cells is possible using homologous recombination for DSB repair. - Abstract: Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a genetic disease characterized by hypersensitivity to ultra-violet and a very high risk of skin cancer induction on exposed body sites. This syndrome is caused by germinal mutations on nucleotide excision repair genes. No cure is available for these patients except a complete protection from all types of UV radiations. We reviewed the various techniques to complement or to correct the genetic defect in XP cells. We, particularly, developed the correction of XP-C skin cells using the fidelity of the homologous recombination pathway during repair of double-strand break (DSB) in the presence of XPC wild type sequences. We used engineered nucleases (meganuclease or TALE nuclease) to induce a DSB located at 90 bp of the mutation to be corrected. Expression of specific TALE nuclease in the presence of a repair matrix containing a long stretch of homologous wild type XPC sequences allowed us a successful gene correction of the original TG deletion found in numerous North African XP patients. Some engineered nucleases are sensitive to epigenetic modifications, such as cytosine methylation. In case of methylated sequences to be corrected, modified nucleases or demethylation of the whole genome should be envisaged. Overall, we showed that specifically-designed TALE-nuclease allowed us to correct a 2 bp deletion in the XPC gene leading to patient's cells proficient for DNA repair and showing normal UV-sensitivity. The corrected gene is still in the same position in the human genome and under the regulation of its physiological promoter. This result is a first step toward gene therapy in XP patients

  18. DNA damage and gene therapy of xeroderma pigmentosum, a human DNA repair-deficient disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupuy, Aurélie [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Oncogenesis UMR8200CNRS, Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud, Villejuif (France); Sarasin, Alain, E-mail: alain.sarasin@gustaveroussy.fr [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Oncogenesis UMR8200CNRS, Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud, Villejuif (France); Service de Génétique, Institut Gustave Roussy (France)

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Full correction of mutation in the XPC gene by engineered nucleases. • Meganucleases and TALENs are inhibited by 5-MeC for inducing double strand breaks. • Gene therapy of XP cells is possible using homologous recombination for DSB repair. - Abstract: Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a genetic disease characterized by hypersensitivity to ultra-violet and a very high risk of skin cancer induction on exposed body sites. This syndrome is caused by germinal mutations on nucleotide excision repair genes. No cure is available for these patients except a complete protection from all types of UV radiations. We reviewed the various techniques to complement or to correct the genetic defect in XP cells. We, particularly, developed the correction of XP-C skin cells using the fidelity of the homologous recombination pathway during repair of double-strand break (DSB) in the presence of XPC wild type sequences. We used engineered nucleases (meganuclease or TALE nuclease) to induce a DSB located at 90 bp of the mutation to be corrected. Expression of specific TALE nuclease in the presence of a repair matrix containing a long stretch of homologous wild type XPC sequences allowed us a successful gene correction of the original TG deletion found in numerous North African XP patients. Some engineered nucleases are sensitive to epigenetic modifications, such as cytosine methylation. In case of methylated sequences to be corrected, modified nucleases or demethylation of the whole genome should be envisaged. Overall, we showed that specifically-designed TALE-nuclease allowed us to correct a 2 bp deletion in the XPC gene leading to patient's cells proficient for DNA repair and showing normal UV-sensitivity. The corrected gene is still in the same position in the human genome and under the regulation of its physiological promoter. This result is a first step toward gene therapy in XP patients.

  19. Two New Faces of Amifostine: Protector from DNA Damage in Normal Cells and Inhibitor of DNA Repair in Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Michal; Falk, Martin; Komůrková, Denisa; Falková, Iva; Bačíková, Alena; Klejdus, Bořivoj; Pagáčová, Eva; Štefančíková, Lenka; Weiterová, Lenka; Angelis, Karel J; Kozubek, Stanislav; Dušek, Ladislav; Galbavý, Štefan

    2016-04-14

    Amifostine protects normal cells from DNA damage induction by ionizing radiation or chemotherapeutics, whereas cancer cells typically remain uninfluenced. While confirming this phenomenon, we have revealed by comet assay and currently the most sensitive method of DNA double strand break (DSB) quantification (based on γH2AX/53BP1 high-resolution immunofluorescence microscopy) that amifostine treatment supports DSB repair in γ-irradiated normal NHDF fibroblasts but alters it in MCF7 carcinoma cells. These effects follow from the significantly lower activity of alkaline phosphatase measured in MCF7 cells and their supernatants as compared with NHDF fibroblasts. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry confirmed that the amifostine conversion to WR-1065 was significantly more intensive in normal NHDF cells than in tumor MCF cells. In conclusion, due to common differences between normal and cancer cells in their abilities to convert amifostine to its active metabolite WR-1065, amifostine may not only protect in multiple ways normal cells from radiation-induced DNA damage but also make cancer cells suffer from DSB repair alteration. PMID:26978566

  20. BRCA1 contributes to transcription-coupled repair of DNA damage through polyubiquitination and degradation of cockayne syndrome B protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BRCA1 is an important gene involved in susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancer and its product regulates the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks. Here, we present evidence that BRCA1 also contributes to the transcription-coupled repair (TCR) of ultraviolet (UV) light-induced DNA damage. BRCA1 immediately accumulates at the sites of UV irradiation-mediated damage in cell nuclei in a manner that is fully dependent on both Cockayne syndrome B (CSB) protein and active transcription. Suppression of BRCA1 expression inhibits the TCR of UV lesions and increases the UV sensitivity of cells proficient in TCR. BRCA1 physically interacts with CSB protein. BRCA1 polyubiquitinates CSB and this polyubiquitination and subsequent degradation of CSB occur following UV irradiation, even in the absence of Cockayne syndrome A (CSA) protein. The depletion of BRCA1 expression increases the UV sensitivity of CSA-deficient cells. These results indicate that BRCA1 is involved in TCR and that a BRCA1-dependent polyubiquitination pathway for CSB exists alongside the CSA-dependent pathway to yield more efficient excision repair of lesions on the transcribed DNA strand. (author)

  1. System and method for laser-based, non-evaporative repair of damage sites in the surfaces of fused silica optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, John J.; Bolourchi, Masoud; Bude, Jeffrey D.; Guss, Gabriel M.; Jarboe, Jeffery A.; Matthews, Manyalibo J.; Nostrand, Michael C; Wegner, Paul J.

    2016-09-06

    A method for repairing a damage site on a surface of an optical material is disclosed. The method may involve focusing an Infrared (IR) laser beam having a predetermined wavelength, with a predetermined beam power, to a predetermined full width ("F/W") 1/e.sup.2 diameter spot on the damage site. The focused IR laser beam is maintained on the damage site for a predetermined exposure period corresponding to a predetermined acceptable level of downstream intensification. The focused IR laser beam heats the damage site to a predetermined peak temperature, which melts and reflows material at the damage site of the optical material to create a mitigated site.

  2. Effect of the XRCC1 codon 399 polymorphism on the repair of vinyl chloride metabolite-induced DNA damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yongliang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent epidemiologic evidence suggests that the common polymorphism at amino acid residue 399 of the x-ray cross complementing-1 (XRCC1 protein, a key component of the base excision repair (BER pathway for DNA damage, plays a significant role in the genetic variability of individuals in terms of the mutagenic damage they experience following exposure to the carcinogen vinyl chloride (VC. The aim of this study was to provide support for the biological plausibility of these epidemiologic observations with experimental data derived from cell lines in culture from individuals who were either homozygous wild-type or homozygous variant for this XRCC1 polymorphism following exposure to chloroethylene oxide (CEO, the active metabolite of VC, with measurement of the induced etheno-DNA adducts before and after repair. Materials and Methods: Immortalized lymphoblast cell lines from seven VC workers (four homozygous wild-type and three homozygous variant for the 399 XRCC1 polymorphism were exposed to CEO, and etheno-adenosine (εA adduct levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA pre-exposure and at 0, 4, 8 and 24 h following exposure. Results: The average εA adduct levels were statistically significantly higher in the variant cells compared to the wild-type cells at 8 and 24 h following exposure (P< 0.05 with an overall average repair efficiency of 32% in the variant cells compared to 82% in the wild-type cells. Conclusion: These results are consistent with the epidemiologic findings of the types of VC-induced biomarkers observed in exposed individuals and the mutational spectra found in the resultant tumors as well as the key role that BER, especially XRCC1, plays in this carcinogenic pathway.

  3. Evaluation of the radioinduced damage and DNA repair capacity of breast cancer patients by the comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The genetic damage induced by ionizing radiation and the repair capacity of three breast cancer patients and three health subjects were investigated by comet assay using two parameters: tail length and visual classification. Blood samples were exposed in vitro to 60 Co gamma rays (0.6 Gy.min-1), with 0.2 to 10 Gy and analyzed just after the exposition, 3 and 24 hour after, The basal level of damage was higher in leukocytes of breast cancer patients than in health subjects. Maybe it could be affected by the age, disease stage and repair capacity. Concerning the radioinduced damage, the results showed that both groups presented a similar response when analyzed just after the irradiation. But while the health subjects had a considerable reduction of the damage after 3 hours, the patients had a residual significant damage amount even 24 hours after the exposition. The repair capacity evaluation of health subjects were almost completed within 3 hours, in contrast to the patients who had many lesions not repaired even after 24 hours. The adopted parameters showed to be secure, sensible and reproducible. The dose-response curves obtained for DNA migration can be utilised not only for cellular radiosensitivity studies but also for biological dosimetry purpose. The results allowed to conclude that the breast cancer patients presented a similar initial radiosensitivity to the health subjects, but a less efficient repair mechanism making them more vulnerable to environmental genotoxic agents. (author)

  4. Post-irradiation chemical processing of DNA damage generates double-strand breaks in cells already engaged in repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satyendra K.; Wang, Minli; Staudt, Christian; Iliakis, George

    2011-01-01

    In cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR), double-strand breaks (DSBs) form within clustered-damage sites from lesions disrupting the DNA sugar–phosphate backbone. It is commonly assumed that these DSBs form promptly and are immediately detected and processed by the cellular DNA damage response (DDR) apparatus. This assumption is questioned by the observation that after irradiation of naked DNA, a fraction of DSBs forms minutes to hours after exposure as a result of temperature dependent, chemical processing of labile sugar lesions. Excess DSBs also form when IR-exposed cells are processed at 50°C, but have been hitherto considered method-related artifact. Thus, it remains unknown whether DSBs actually develop in cells after IR exposure from chemically labile damage. Here, we show that irradiation of ‘naked’ or chromatin-organized mammalian DNA produces lesions, which evolve to DSBs and add to those promptly induced, after 8–24 h in vitro incubation at 37°C or 50°C. The conversion is more efficient in chromatin-associated DNA, completed within 1 h in cells and delayed in a reducing environment. We conclude that IR generates sugar lesions within clustered-damage sites contributing to DSB formation only after chemical processing, which occurs efficiently at 37°C. This subset of delayed DSBs may challenge DDR, may affect the perceived repair kinetics and requires further characterization. PMID:21745815

  5. CHO cell death, strand break damage, and repair due to combination radiation and hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous reports have suggested a relationship between the hyperthermia induced changes in nucleoprotein and the hyperthermic enhancement of radiation sensitivity. In this investigation, the level of initial strand break damage, DNA strand rejoining kinetics, DNA/protein ratios, and residual DNA damage were measured following combined hyperthermia and radiation treatments in an attempt to further understand these relationships

  6. ESCRT III repairs nuclear envelope ruptures during cell migration to limit DNA damage and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, M; Gentili, M; de Belly, H; Thiam, H R; Vargas, P; Jimenez, A J; Lautenschlaeger, F; Voituriez, Raphaël; Lennon-Duménil, A M; Manel, N; Piel, M

    2016-04-15

    In eukaryotic cells, the nuclear envelope separates the genomic DNA from the cytoplasmic space and regulates protein trafficking between the two compartments. This barrier is only transiently dissolved during mitosis. Here, we found that it also opened at high frequency in migrating mammalian cells during interphase, which allowed nuclear proteins to leak out and cytoplasmic proteins to leak in. This transient opening was caused by nuclear deformation and was rapidly repaired in an ESCRT (endosomal sorting complexes required for transport)-dependent manner. DNA double-strand breaks coincided with nuclear envelope opening events. As a consequence, survival of cells migrating through confining environments depended on efficient nuclear envelope and DNA repair machineries. Nuclear envelope opening in migrating leukocytes could have potentially important consequences for normal and pathological immune responses. PMID:27013426

  7. Investigations of the effects of UV and X-ray radiation and the repair of radiation damage in the ciliate Stylonychia mytilus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the example of Stylomychia mytilus, the effects of UV-radiation and ionizing X-ray radiation are compared. The effects on cell division and on the repair of radiation damage in DNA are compared. Sensitivity to UV radiation differs between the stages of the cell cycle while the effects of X-ray radiation are independent of phase. There is no difference in repair processes. (AJ) 891 AJ/AJ 892 MKO

  8. Beyond red hair and sunburns: Uncovering the molecular mechanisms of MC1R signaling and repair of UV-induced DNA damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Pamela B.; Abdel-Malek, Zalfa A.; Leachman, Sancy A.

    2015-01-01

    Scientists at the University of Kentucky are unravelling the details of DNA damage repair in the melanocyte, with an eye towards finding druggable targets for melanoma prevention. Jarret et al. report in this issue three new assays that can yield mechanistic information about nucleotide excision repair (NER) stimulated by cAMP-dependent signaling downstream of the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R). PMID:26569585

  9. Repair of non-dimer DNA damages in ICB 2A frog cells exposed to solar-ultraviolet radiation in the UVB (290-320 nm) range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the research described in this dissertation was to investigate the repair and cellular consequences of non-dimer DNA damages induced by solar-UV irradiation of cultured I CR 2A (Rana pipiens) frog cells. Because this cell line is proficient in enzymatic photoreactivation, it was possible to induce a relatively pure population of non-dimer DNA photoproducts by exposure of cells to the Mylar-filtered solar-UV wavelengths produced by a fluorescent sunlamp followed by treatment with photoreactivating light. With a modification of bromodeoxyuridine photolysis assay, it was found that the solar-UV-induced non-dimer DNA damages were repaired by a short-patch repair mechanism in which less than 20 nucleotides were inserted into a repaired region. Similar results were also obtained for γ-irradiated cells. In contrast, excision repair of 254 nm-induced dimers was accomplished by a long-patch process in which an average of about 180 nucleotides were inserted into the repaired sites. A mutant cell line, DRP 36, hypersensitive to non-dimer DNA damages, was isolated from I CR 2A cells. It was found that the DRP 36 cells performed a significantly lower level of excision repair following the induction of non-dimer DNA damages. The results are consistent with the conclusion that the DRP 36 cells are deficient in the repair of at least one type of solar-UV-induced non-dimer DNA lesion. These experiments indicate that solar-UV-induced non-dimer DNA photoproducts behave more like the photoproducts of γ-rays than those of far-UV radiation, which are primarily pyrimidine dimers

  10. Effect of bromodeoxyuridine on radiation-induced DNA damage and repair based on DNA fragment size using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have used biphasic linear ramping pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to understand the effect of incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) on radiation-induced DNA damage and repair. This technique permits a determination of the fragment size distribution produced immediately after irradiation as well as during the repair period. We found that incorporation of BrdUrd increased the induction and decreased the repair of radiation damage. The fragment size distribution was consistent with a random breakage model. When we found that significantly more damage was detected after irradiation of deproteinized DNA compared to intact cells, we studied the effects of BrdUrd incorporation on the radiation response of cells or DNA at various phases of preparation for electrophoresis: cells adherent to the culture dish (A), trypsinized cells (B), agarose-embedded cells (C) and deproteinized DNA (D). Although there was a general tendency to detect more damage when irradiation was performed later in the preparation process, steps B and C were the only successive steps which were significantly different. These findings demonstrate that incorporation of BrdUrd randomly increases the induction of radiation damage and decreases its repair at the level of 200 kbp to 5 Mbp fragments. Furthermore, they confirm that the amount of damage detected depends upon the conditions of the cells or DNA at the time of irradiation. 34 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  11. The Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of Gen1/Yen1 resolvases links DNA damage signaling to DNA double-strand break repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymeric P Bailly

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs can be repaired by homologous recombination (HR, which can involve Holliday junction (HJ intermediates that are ultimately resolved by nucleolytic enzymes. An N-terminal fragment of human GEN1 has recently been shown to act as a Holliday junction resolvase, but little is known about the role of GEN-1 in vivo. Holliday junction resolution signifies the completion of DNA repair, a step that may be coupled to signaling proteins that regulate cell cycle progression in response to DNA damage. Using forward genetic approaches, we identified a Caenorhabditis elegans dual function DNA double-strand break repair and DNA damage signaling protein orthologous to the human GEN1 Holliday junction resolving enzyme. GEN-1 has biochemical activities related to the human enzyme and facilitates repair of DNA double-strand breaks, but is not essential for DNA double-strand break repair during meiotic recombination. Mutational analysis reveals that the DNA damage-signaling function of GEN-1 is separable from its role in DNA repair. GEN-1 promotes germ cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via a pathway that acts in parallel to the canonical DNA damage response pathway mediated by RPA loading, CHK1 activation, and CEP-1/p53-mediated apoptosis induction. Furthermore, GEN-1 acts redundantly with the 9-1-1 complex to ensure genome stability. Our study suggests that GEN-1 might act as a dual function Holliday junction resolvase that may coordinate DNA damage signaling with a late step in DNA double-strand break repair.

  12. BMI1 Is Recruited to DNA Breaks and Contributes to DNA Damage-Induced H2A Ubiquitination and Repair ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginjala, Vasudeva; Nacerddine, Karim; Kulkarni, Atul; Oza, Jay; Hill, Sarah J.; Yao, Ming; Citterio, Elisabetta; van Lohuizen, Maarten; Ganesan, Shridar

    2011-01-01

    DNA damage activates signaling pathways that lead to modification of local chromatin and recruitment of DNA repair proteins. Multiple DNA repair proteins having ubiquitin ligase activity are recruited to sites of DNA damage, where they ubiquitinate histones and other substrates. This DNA damage-induced histone ubiquitination is thought to play a critical role in mediating the DNA damage response. We now report that the polycomb protein BMI1 is rapidly recruited to sites of DNA damage, where it persists for more than 8 h. The sustained localization of BMI1 to damage sites is dependent on intact ATM and ATR and requires H2AX phosphorylation and recruitment of RNF8. BMI1 is required for DNA damage-induced ubiquitination of histone H2A at lysine 119. Loss of BMI1 leads to impaired repair of DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination and the accumulation of cells in G2/M. These data support a crucial role for BMI1 in the cellular response to DNA damage. PMID:21383063

  13. Accelerated repair and reduced mutagenicity of DNA damage induced by cigarette smoke in human bronchial cells transfected with E.coli formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Foresta

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoke (CS is associated to a number of pathologies including lung cancer. Its mutagenic and carcinogenic effects are partially linked to the presence of reactive oxygen species and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH inducing DNA damage. The bacterial DNA repair enzyme formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG repairs both oxidized bases and different types of bulky DNA adducts. We investigated in vitro whether FPG expression may enhance DNA repair of CS-damaged DNA and counteract the mutagenic effects of CS in human lung cells. NCI-H727 non small cell lung carcinoma cells were transfected with a plasmid vector expressing FPG fused to the Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP. Cells expressing the fusion protein EGFP-FPG displayed accelerated repair of adducts and DNA breaks induced by CS condensate. The mutant frequencies induced by low concentrations of CS condensate to the Na(+K(+-ATPase locus (oua(r were significantly reduced in cells expressing EGFP-FPG. Hence, expression of the bacterial DNA repair protein FPG stably protects human lung cells from the mutagenic effects of CS by improving cells' capacity to repair damaged DNA.

  14. Assessment of damage of masonry walls as a function of displacements and repair costs

    OpenAIRE

    Krumpestar, David

    2015-01-01

    An overview of a database of cyclic tests of masonry walls is firstly presented in this thesis. The objective of the analysis of the database was to estimate the relationship between the damage and displacements of the masonry walls. A discussion on the typical failure mechanisms of masonry walls and definition of damage states is then presented in the first part of the thesis which addresses also the issue of rehabilitaiton and strengthening of masonry walls by different techn...

  15. Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone induces oxidative DNA damage and repair responses: The activations of NHEJ, BER and NER via ATM-p53 signaling axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Hui; Shi, Qiong; Song, Xiufang; Fu, Juanli; Hu, Lihua; Xu, Demei; Su, Chuanyang; Xia, Xiaomin; Song, Erqun; Song, Yang, E-mail: songyangwenrong@hotmail.com

    2015-07-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) quinone induced oxidative DNA damage in HepG2 cells. To promote genomic integrity, DNA damage response (DDR) coordinates cell-cycle transitions, DNA repair and apoptosis. PCB quinone-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis have been documented, however, whether PCB quinone insult induce DNA repair signaling is still unknown. In this study, we identified the activation of DDR and corresponding signaling events in HepG2 cells upon the exposure to a synthetic PCB quinone, PCB29-pQ. Our data illustrated that PCB29-pQ induces the phosphorylation of p53, which was mediated by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein kinase. The observed phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) foci and the elevation of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) indicated that DDR was stimulated by PCB29-pQ treatment. Additionally, we found PCB29-pQ activates non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), base excision repair (BER) and nucleotide excision repair (NER) signalings. However, these repair pathways are not error-free processes and aberrant repair of DNA damage may cause the potential risk of carcinogenesis and mutagenesis. - Highlights: • Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone induces oxidative DNA damage in HepG2 cells. • The elevation of γ-H2AX and 8-OHdG indicates the activation of DNA damage response. • ATM-p53 signaling acts as the DNA damage sensor and effector. • Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone activates NHEJ, BER and NER signalings.

  16. Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone induces oxidative DNA damage and repair responses: The activations of NHEJ, BER and NER via ATM-p53 signaling axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our previous studies demonstrated that polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) quinone induced oxidative DNA damage in HepG2 cells. To promote genomic integrity, DNA damage response (DDR) coordinates cell-cycle transitions, DNA repair and apoptosis. PCB quinone-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis have been documented, however, whether PCB quinone insult induce DNA repair signaling is still unknown. In this study, we identified the activation of DDR and corresponding signaling events in HepG2 cells upon the exposure to a synthetic PCB quinone, PCB29-pQ. Our data illustrated that PCB29-pQ induces the phosphorylation of p53, which was mediated by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein kinase. The observed phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) foci and the elevation of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) indicated that DDR was stimulated by PCB29-pQ treatment. Additionally, we found PCB29-pQ activates non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), base excision repair (BER) and nucleotide excision repair (NER) signalings. However, these repair pathways are not error-free processes and aberrant repair of DNA damage may cause the potential risk of carcinogenesis and mutagenesis. - Highlights: • Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone induces oxidative DNA damage in HepG2 cells. • The elevation of γ-H2AX and 8-OHdG indicates the activation of DNA damage response. • ATM-p53 signaling acts as the DNA damage sensor and effector. • Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone activates NHEJ, BER and NER signalings

  17. Detection of possible DNA repair enzymes on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels by protein blotting to damaged DNA-fixed membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel method for detecting possible DNA repair enzymes on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels by blotting them onto a damaged DNA-fixed membrane is presented. To prepare the membrane, highly polymerized calf thymus DNA immobilized on a nylon membrane is damaged chemically. Enzymes, either homogeneous or crude, that are possibly involved in the priming step of DNA repair are fractionated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and are renatured to active form by incubating the gel in an appropriate buffer. The renatured enzyme is then blotted onto the damaged DNA-fixed membrane, a process during which incision and/or excision are introduced to the damaged DNA by the enzymes. The incision and/or excision provide priming sites for repair DNA synthesis in the subsequent step in which the membrane is incubated with DNA polymerase in the presence of alpha-32P-labeled substrate. The site of substrate incorporation on the membrane reflecting the molecular weight of the repair enzyme is finally visualized by autoradiography. The present technique is established using Escherichia coli exonuclease III and a DNA-fixed membrane treated with bleomycin or acid-depurinated. By application of this method, a priming factor (an exonuclease) involved in the initiation of bleomycin-induced DNA repair is detected in the extract of mouse ascites sarcoma cells, and thus the molecular weight of the enzyme is estimated. Some apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases of mammals are also detected by the present procedure

  18. Yeast rad7-rad16 complex, specific for the nucleotide excision repair of the nontranscribed DNA strand, is an ATP-dependent DNA damage sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In eukaryotes, nucleotide excision repair of ultraviolet light-damaged DNA is a highly intricate process that requires a large number of evolutionary conserved protein factors. Genetic studies in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have indicated a specific role of the RAD7 and RAD16 genes in the repair of transcriptionally inactive DNA. Here we show that the RAD7- and RAD16-encoded products exist as a complex of 1:1 stoichiometry, exhibiting an apparent dissociation constant (Kd) of <4 x 10(-10) M. The Rad7-Rad16 complex has been purified to near homogeneity in this study and is shown to bind, in an ATP-dependent manner and with high specificity, to DNA damaged by ultraviolet light. Importantly, inclusion of the Rad7-Rad16 complex in the in vitro nucleotide excision repair system that consists entirely of purified components results in a marked stimulation of damage specific incision. Thus, Rad7-Rad16 complex is the ATP-dependent DNA damage sensor that specifically functions with the ensemble of nucleotide excision repair factor (NEF) 1, NEF2, NEF3, and replication protein A in the repair of transcriptionally inactive DNA. We name this novel complex of Rad7 and Rad16 proteins NEF4. (author)

  19. Genotoxicity of dichlorvos in strains of Drosophila melanogaster defective in DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Manish; Sharma, A; Shukla, A K; Kumar, R; Dwivedi, U N; Kar Chowdhuri, D

    2014-05-15

    Dichlorvos (DDVP), an organophosphate pesticide, is reported to be genotoxic at high concentrations. However, the roles of DNA damage repair pathways in DDVP genotoxicity are not well characterized. To test whether pre- and post-replication pathways are involved, we measured changes in DNA migration (Comet assay) in the midgut cells of Drosophila melanogaster Oregon R+ larvae and in some mutants of pre- (mei-9, mus201, and mus207) and post- (mei-41 and mus209)replication DNA repair pathways. Insects were exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of DDVP (up to 15ng/ml) for 48h. After insect exposure to 0.15ng/ml DDVP, we observed greater DNA damage in pre-replication repair mutants; effects on Oregon R+ and post-replication repair mutants were insignificant. In contrast, significant DNA damage was observed in the post-replication repair mutants after their exposure to 1.5 and 15ng/ml DDVP. The pre-replication repair mutant mus207 showed maximum sensitivity to DDVP, suggestive of alkylation damage to DNA. We also examined mutants (SOD- and urate-null) that are sensitive to oxidative stress and the results indicate that significant oxidative DNA damage occurs in DDVP-exposed mutants. This study suggests involvement of both pre- and post-replication repair pathways against DDVP-induced DNA damage in Drosophila, with oxidative DNA damage leading to genotoxicity. PMID:24614193

  20. Bleomycin - induced DNA damage and DNA repair in chicken embryo cells as compared to X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following in vitro- and in ovo-exposure of chicken embryo cells, the level of bleomycin (BM) - induced damage was evaluated by using DNA synthesis, nucleoid sedimentation (SED), and viscometry of alkaline cell lysates (VISC). This damage was compared to X-irradiation, using 5.9-378 nM BM in vitro, 1.5-116 μg BM/egg in ovo, and 2-32 Gy, respectively, in vitro as well as in ovo. With respect to BM, the most notable result is the increase in DNA synthesis and VISC at the lowest concentrations of the drug. A decrease in both parameters was observed at high BM concentrations and following exposure to X-rays, concomitantly with an increase in SED. Regarding the radiomimetic drug BM and X-rays, different modes of DNA damage and DNA repair are suggested by previous investigations and the present results. Therefore, further evidence is presented, that the chicken embryo can act as a simple, rapid and inexpensive test system to characterize the biological effects of many nucleo- and/or cytotoxic agents. (orig.)

  1. The PARP1/ARTD1-Mediated Poly-ADP-Ribosylation and DNA Damage Repair in B Cell Diversification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackline J.M. Lasola

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ADP-ribosylation is an essential post-translational modification, mediated by a family of proteins named poly-ADP-ribose polymerases/Diphtheria toxin-like ADP-ribosyltransferases (PARPs/ARTDs, that functions to assist in cellular homeostasis through an array of mechanisms. Although the function of PARP1/ARTD1-mediated poly-ADP-ribosylation (PARylation in response to environmental genotoxic stressors has been extensively studied, its role in the regulation and maintenance of cellular events under times of programmed DNA damage and repair remains to be elucidated. In the case of B cell maturation and differentiation, processes such as V(DJ recombination, somatic hypermutation, and class switch recombination, require the induction of DNA strand breaks for the generation of a varied immunoglobulin repertoire and, thus, serve as a model system to explore the function of PARylation in immunological processes. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of ADP-ribosylation and the PARPs/ARTDs family proteins, in particular PARP1/ARTD1-conferred PARylation, in B cells. Following an overview of PARylation in cellular responses to environmental and spontaneous DNA damage, we discuss the emerging function of PARP1/ARTD1 and PARylation in DNA damage-induced nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB signaling and B cell maturation and differentiation. Finally, we conclude by underlining further efforts that are needed to understand how the PARPs/ARTDs family proteins and ADP-ribosylation control the development and function of B cells.

  2. Dose-response relationship of induction kinetics of In vivo DNA damage and repair in mouse leukocytes exposed to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Unicellular electrophoresis in gel technique is a useful tool in the determination of simple ruptures and labile sites to the alkali in DNA of eucariontes cells. The determination of the induction kinetics of damage and repair of DNA can give more information. The objective of this work was to determine whether the analysis of the area under the damage/repair induction kinetics curve in comets percent or the comets frequency in the two peaks of maximum induction is adequate for determining the dose-response relationship. The mice were exposed at the doses of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 Gy. (Author)

  3. The damage and repair of DNA in teleosts after administration of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    14C-MNU, dissolved in a DMSO-citratebuffer solution, was given intraperitoneally to Black Mollies (B.M.) and Poecilia formosa (P.f.). Gills, liver, tailfinmuscles, intestine, gonads and brain were removed from each fish and DNA was isolated by phenol extraction. The DNA was hydrolysed and then the purines were separated using HPLC. Methylation of purines was determined by a liquid scintillation counter. Maximum methylation was formed in the N-7 position of guanine in the DNA from intestine of B.M. The highest content of O6-methyl guanine was found in the DNA of tailfinmuscles of B.M. whereas DNA from brain of B.M. showed the maximum methylation in N-3 position of adenine. The methylation of the purines from B.M. showed the similar pattern as in P.f. but was quantitatively double the amount as that found in P.f. The methylation of O6-position of guanine and N-3 position of adenine occured earlier in P.f. than in B.M. Maximum methylation of purines from each of the organs investigated was found to occur after 1/2 to 8 hours. The amount of methylation as low as 10% of the maximum was observed in a period from 1/2 to 16 hours after the application of 14C-MNU. Excision repair seems to be responsible for removal of N-3 methyl adenine and N-7 methyl guanine whereas O6-methyl guanine seems to be repaired by methyltransferases. Removal of methylgroups from O6-position of guanine and the excision repair known to exist in mammals and bacteria probably play a role in these two species of teleosts as well. (Author)

  4. Stem cells--potential for repairing damaged lungs and growing human lungs for transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Anne E; Rippon, Helen J

    2006-08-01

    Repair or regeneration of defective lung epithelium would be of great therapeutic potential. It is estimated by the British Lung Foundation that 1 in 7 people in the UK is affected by a lung disease and that 1 in 4 admissions to children's wards are as a result of respiratory problems. Potential cellular sources for the regeneration of lung tissue in vivo or lung tissue engineering in vitro include endogenous pulmonary epithelial stem cells, extrapulmonary circulating stem cells and embryonic stem cells. This article discusses the potential role of each of these stem cell types in future approaches to the treatment of lung injury and disease. PMID:16856797

  5. Involvement of Werner syndrome protein in MUTYH-mediated repair of oxidative DNA damage

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kanagaraj, R.; Parasuraman, P.; Mihaljevic, B.; van Loon, B.; Burdová, Kamila; König, C.; Furrer, A.; Bohr, V.A.; Hübscher, U.; Janscak, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 17 (2012), s. 8449-8459. ISSN 0305-1048 Grant ostatní: Swiss National Science Foundation(CH) 31003A-129747/1; Swiss National Science Foundation(CH) 3100-109312/2; Oncosuisse(CH) KLS-02344-02-2009; NIH(US) Z01-AG000726-17 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : DNA repair * oxidative stress * MUTYH * WRN * Pol lambda Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 8.278, year: 2012

  6. The chromatin-remodeling factor CHD4 coordinates signaling and repair after DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Dorthe Helena; Poinsignon, Catherine; Gudjonsson, Thorkell;

    2010-01-01

    In response to ionizing radiation (IR), cells delay cell cycle progression and activate DNA repair. Both processes are vital for genome integrity, but the mechanisms involved in their coordination are not fully understood. In a mass spectrometry screen, we identified the adenosine triphosphate...... extended cell cycle delay. At DNA double-strand breaks, depletion of CHD4 disrupts the chromatin response at the level of the RNF168 ubiquitin ligase, which in turn impairs local ubiquitylation and BRCA1 assembly. These cell cycle and chromatin defects are accompanied by elevated spontaneous and IR...

  7. Inhibition of X-ray-induced potentially lethal damage (PLD) repair in aerobic plateau-phase Chinese hamster cells by misonidazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the 2-nitroimidazole radiosensitizer misonidazole (MISO) and the hydrophilic analog SR-2508 on the repair of X-ray-induced potentially lethal damage (PLD) was studied in plateau-phase Chinese Hamster ovary (HA-1) cells. It was found that although MISO does not radiosensitize aerobic cells, it inhibits the repair of PLD. However, under hypoxic conditions, MISO has no effect on PLD repair. The major portion of the inhibition of PLD repair in aerobic cells requires the presence of MISO only during irradiation; little or no additional inhibition occurs when MISO is present during the postirradiation repair period. Also, treatment of aerobic cells with 5 mM MISO for either 5 or 30 min prior to irradiation is equally inhibitory. This suggests that the presence of MISO in some way modifies the initial lesion under aerobic conditions since it does not increase cell killing as determined by immediate plating but inhibits subsequent repair. The inhibition is concentration dependent; 0.5 mM MISO inhibits PLD repair by one-half while 5-10 mM totally inhibits the repair measured 6 hr postirradiation. This phenomenon suggests that radiosensitization of tissue in vivo by MISO and other 2-nitroimidazoles may not be unequivocal proof of the presence of hypoxic cells

  8. The ovarian DNA damage repair response is induced prior to phosphoramide mustard-induced follicle depletion, and ataxia telangiectasia mutated inhibition prevents PM-induced follicle depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Shanthi; Keating, Aileen F

    2016-02-01

    Phosphoramide mustard (PM) is an ovotoxic metabolite of cyclophosphamide and destroys primordial and primary follicles potentially by DNA damage induction. The temporal pattern by which PM induces DNA damage and initiation of the ovarian response to DNA damage has not yet been well characterized. This study investigated DNA damage initiation, the DNA repair response, as well as induction of follicular demise using a neonatal rat ovarian culture system. Additionally, to delineate specific mechanisms involved in the ovarian response to PM exposure, utility was made of PKC delta (PKCδ) deficient mice as well as an ATM inhibitor (KU 55933; AI). Fisher 344 PND4 rat ovaries were cultured for 12, 24, 48 or 96h in medium containing DMSO ±60μM PM or KU 55933 (48h; 10nM). PM-induced activation of DNA damage repair genes was observed as early as 12h post-exposure. ATM, PARP1, E2F7, P73 and CASP3 abundance were increased but RAD51 and BCL2 protein decreased after 96h of PM exposure. PKCδ deficiency reduced numbers of all follicular stages, but did not have an additive impact on PM-induced ovotoxicity. ATM inhibition protected all follicle stages from PM-induced depletion. In conclusion, the ovarian DNA damage repair response is active post-PM exposure, supporting that DNA damage contributes to PM-induced ovotoxicity. PMID:26708502

  9. A plant gene for photolyase: an enzyme catalyzing the repair of UV-light-induced DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photolyases are thought to be critical components of the defense of plants against damage to DNA by solar ultraviolet light, but nothing is known about their molecular or enzymatic nature. The molecular cloning of a photolyase from mustard (Sinapis alba) described here is intended to increase the knowledge about this important repair mechanism in plant species at a molecular level. The gene encodes a polypeptide of 501 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 57 kDa. There is a strong sequence similarity to bacterial and yeast photolyases, with a close relationship to enzymes with a deazaflavin chromophor. The plant photolyase is shown to be functional in Escherichia coli which also indicates conservation of photolyases during evolution. It is demonstrated that photolyase expression in plants is light induced, thus providing good evidence for the adaptation of plants to their environment in order to diminish the harmful effects of sunlight. (author)

  10. Normal repair of ultraviolet-induced DNA damage in a hypersensitive strain of fibroblasts from a patient with Gardner's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner's syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder that predisposes to cancer of the large intestine and to other tumors. It was previously demonstrated that fibroblasts from a patient with this disease are hypersensitive to the cytotoxic effects of ultraviolet light. In this report the authors have measured several parameters of the repair of ultraviolet light-induced DNA damage in an attempt to identify a defect responsible for the hypersensitivity. They have found the excision rate of pyrimidine dimers, the host cell reactivation of UV-irradiated herpes simplex virus, the induction and rejoining of DNA single strand breaks and the response of semi-conservative DNA replication to UV-irradiation to be in all cases indistinguishable from such phenomena in a variety of normal cells. (Auth.)

  11. Loss of the DNA Damage Repair Kinase ATM Impairs Inflammasome-Dependent Anti-Bacterial Innate Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erttmann, Saskia F; Härtlova, Anetta; Sloniecka, Marta; Raffi, Faizal A M; Hosseinzadeh, Ava; Edgren, Tomas; Rofougaran, Reza; Resch, Ulrike; Fällman, Maria; Ek, Torben; Gekara, Nelson O

    2016-07-19

    The ATM kinase is a central component of the DNA damage repair machinery and redox balance. ATM dysfunction results in the multisystem disease ataxia-telangiectasia (AT). A major cause of mortality in AT is respiratory bacterial infections. Whether ATM deficiency causes innate immune defects that might contribute to bacterial infections is not known. Here we have shown that loss of ATM impairs inflammasome-dependent anti-bacterial innate immunity. Cells from AT patients or Atm(-/-) mice exhibited diminished interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production in response to bacteria. In vivo, Atm(-/-) mice were more susceptible to pulmonary S. pneumoniae infection in a manner consistent with inflammasome defects. Our data indicate that such defects were due to oxidative inhibition of inflammasome complex assembly. This study reveals an unanticipated function of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in negative regulation of inflammasomes and proposes a theory for the notable susceptibility of AT patients to pulmonary bacterial infection. PMID:27421701

  12. TPhP exposure disturbs carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, and the DNA damage repair system in zebrafish liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhongkun; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Guowei; Peng, Jianbiao; Wang, Zunyao; Gao, Shixiang

    2016-02-01

    Triphenyl phosphate is a high production volume organophosphate flame retardant that has been detected in multiple environmental media at increasing concentrations. The environmental and health risks of triphenyl phosphate have drawn attention because of the multiplex toxicity of this chemical compound. However, few studies have paid close attention to the impacts of triphenyl phosphate on liver metabolism. We investigated hepatic histopathological, metabolomic and transcriptomic responses of zebrafish after exposure to 0.050 mg/L and 0.300 mg/L triphenyl phosphate for 7 days. Metabolomic analysis revealed significant changes in the contents of glucose, UDP-glucose, lactate, succinate, fumarate, choline, acetylcarnitine, and several fatty acids. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that related pathways, such as the glycosphingolipid biosynthesis, PPAR signaling pathway and fatty acid elongation, were significantly affected. These results suggest that triphenyl phosphate exposure markedly disturbs hepatic carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in zebrafish. Moreover, DNA replication, the cell cycle, and non-homologous end-joining and base excision repair were strongly affected, thus indicating that triphenyl phosphate hinders the DNA damage repair system in zebrafish liver cells. The present study provides a systematic analysis of the triphenyl phosphate-induced toxic effects in zebrafish liver and demonstrates that low concentrations of triphenyl phosphate affect normal metabolism and cell cycle.

  13. Honey bee (Apis mellifera) drones survive oxidative stress due to increased tolerance instead of avoidance or repair of oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Huang, Ming Hua; Simone-Finstrom, Michael; Strand, Micheline K; Tarpy, David R; Rueppell, Olav

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress can lead to premature aging symptoms and cause acute mortality at higher doses in a range of organisms. Oxidative stress resistance and longevity are mechanistically and phenotypically linked; considerable variation in oxidative stress resistance exists among and within species and typically covaries with life expectancy. However, it is unclear whether stress-resistant, long-lived individuals avoid, repair, or tolerate molecular damage to survive longer than others. The honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) is an emerging model system that is well-suited to address this question. Furthermore, this species is the most economically important pollinator, whose health may be compromised by pesticide exposure, including oxidative stressors. Here, we develop a protocol for inducing oxidative stress in honey bee males (drones) via Paraquat injection. After injection, individuals from different colony sources were kept in common social conditions to monitor their survival compared to saline-injected controls. Oxidative stress was measured in susceptible and resistant individuals. Paraquat drastically reduced survival but individuals varied in their resistance to treatment within and among colony sources. Longer-lived individuals exhibited higher levels of lipid peroxidation than individuals dying early. In contrast, the level of protein carbonylation was not significantly different between the two groups. This first study of oxidative stress in male honey bees suggests that survival of an acute oxidative stressor is due to tolerance, not prevention or repair, of oxidative damage to lipids. It also demonstrates colony differences in oxidative stress resistance that might be useful for breeding stress-resistant honey bees. PMID:27422326

  14. H2O2-mediated DNA damage and repair in the brain cells in the aging rats detected by comet assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suming ZhangM.D., Ph.D; Zongchao Han, M.D.; Siyu Fang, M.D.; Ruan Yang, M.D; Wei Wang, M.D., Ph. D

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To identify the relation between DNA damage susceptibility/ DNA repair capability and aging process after insults, an observation of H2O2_induced DNA damage and the kinetics of DNA repair in senescent murine brain cells with the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE/Comet assay) was made. Methods: The dissociated brain cells harvested in the area of the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, basal gang]ion from 3-month (n=10), 8-month (n=8) and 26-month (n=5) old rats were respectively treated with H2O2 in gradient doses for 10 min, or without H2O2 as controls. The cells embedded in agarose were lysed, helix-untied, electrophoresed, stained with a fluorescence DNA binding stain, viewed under a fluorescence microscope. Individual image was optically recorded. The frequency of the tailed cells and the grade of tails wereused to analyze single strand breaks of DNA and injury intensity. Results: By the cell and DNA image like comets, a linear increase was noticed in vulnerability of DNA both to H2O2 doses and to the age. Regarding the damaged region of the brain, the cortex cells were more vulnerable to the insult than the hippocampus/basal ganglionic cells. Whatever aging or not the cells were, the maximum of ratio of DNA repair was only within 1 hour during the incubation for 0.5-4 hours after the insults. Furthermore, the more aging, the less ratio of DNA repair of sick cells. Conclusion: The DNA damagesusceptibility and the DNA repair capability of individual cells, whatever its age is, can be detected by this brain cell injury model. Comet assay is a sensitive way to find out DNA damage and repair of the cells. It should be more difficult for the cells to cope with an acute and excessive than with a persistent, chronic and mild DNA damage which is more related to an accumulating injury, the aging.

  15. Base excision repair of oxidative DNA damage and association with cancer and aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maynard, Scott; Schurman, Shepherd H; Harboe, Charlotte;

    2009-01-01

    Aging has been associated with damage accumulation in the genome and with increased cancer incidence. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced from endogenous sources, most notably the oxidative metabolism in the mitochondria, and from exogenous sources, such as ionizing radiation. ROS attack D...

  16. Fixation and repair of radiation damage in normal and ataxia-telangiectasia human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post-x-irradiation exposure to anisotonic treatment (.05 or 1.5 mol/l NaCl) of potentially lethal damage occurred in both normal and ataxia-telangiectasia human fibroblasts when treated in plateau or exponential growth phase. (author)

  17. DNA damages induced in human lymphocytes by UV or X-rays and repair capacities of healthy donors and skin cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to compare variation in the individual susceptibility of various donors to the induction of the DNA damage by genotoxic agents and their cellular capabilities to repair induced damage. DNA damages induced by UV or X-rays in lymphocytes and cellular repair capability of healthy donors and persons bearing various categories of skin cancer cells were investigated. Fresh blood was collected by venipuncture from 35 individuals (including nine prior to skin cancer treatment). All cancer patients were nonsmoking males, however 42.3 % of them were former smokers. All healthy donors were also males, an average age was 38.6 y and among them 68% were recent or former smokers. Immediately after collecting samples, lymphocytes were isolated and stored at -70oC for further studies in vitro. Previously cryopreserved lymphocytes were defrosted and viability of the cells was investigated. The single cell gel electrophoresis assay (SCGE), known as a Comet assay, was performed in defrozen lymphocytes to evaluate individual DNA damage levels presented in lymphocytes at the time of sample's collection. To compare individual susceptibility to the induction of DNA damage by UV and ionizing radiation, lymphocytes were exposed to dose of 6 J/m2 of UV or 2 Gy of X-rays and DNA damages were detected again with an application of the Comet assay. Additionally, to study variation in the individuals cellular capability to repair damages induced, prior to the DNA damage analysis an incubation of cells exposed was also done in presence or absence of phytohemagglutinin (cell divisions processes starting agent). Results showed in untreated lymphocytes of skin cancer patients significantly higher than in the reference group levels of the DNA damages. Significantly different responses to UV and significantly lower capabilities to repair UV induced damage in skin cancer patients were observed. On the average, no differences between reference group and skin cancer patients were

  18. DNA binding, nucleotide flipping, and the helix-turn-helix motif in base repair by O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase and its implications for cancer chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Tubbs, Julie L.; Pegg, Anthony E.; Tainer, John A.

    2007-01-01

    O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) is a crucial target both for the prevention of cancer and for chemotherapy, since it repairs mutagenic lesions in DNA, and it limits the effectiveness of alkylating chemotherapies. AGT catalyzes the unique, single-step, direct damage reversal repair of O6-alkylguanines by selectively transferring the O6-alkyl adduct to an internal cysteine residue. Recent crystal structures of human AGT alone and in complex with substrate DNA reveal a two-domain a/β ...

  19. Cadmium Induced Cell Apoptosis, DNA Damage, Decreased DNA Repair Capacity, and Genomic Instability during Malignant Transformation of Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Zhiheng; Wang, Caixia; Liu, Haibai; Huang, Qinhai; Wang, Min; Lei, Yixiong

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium and its compounds are well-known human carcinogens, but the mechanisms underlying the carcinogenesis are not entirely understood. Our study was designed to elucidate the mechanisms of DNA damage in cadmium-induced malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells. We analyzed cell cycle, apoptosis, DNA damage, gene expression, genomic instability, and the sequence of exons in DNA repair genes in several kinds of cells. These cells consisted of untreated control cells, cells...

  20. Nicotinamide Enhances Repair of Arsenic and Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced DNA Damage in HaCaT Keratinocytes and Ex Vivo Human Skin

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Benjamin C.; Halliday, Gary M.; Damian, Diona L.

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic-induced skin cancer is a significant global health burden. In areas with arsenic contamination of water sources, such as China, Pakistan, Myanmar, Cambodia and especially Bangladesh and West Bengal, large populations are at risk of arsenic-induced skin cancer. Arsenic acts as a co-carcinogen with ultraviolet (UV) radiation and affects DNA damage and repair. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) reduces premalignant keratoses in sun-damaged skin, likely by prevention of UV-induced cellular energy ...

  1. A Human Espophageal Epithelial Cell Model for Study of Radiation Induced Cancer and DNA Damage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Janice L.; Patel, Zarana S.; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2008-01-01

    For cancer risk assessment in astronauts and for countermeasure development, it is essential to understand the molecular mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis and how these mechanisms are influenced by exposure to the types of radiation found in space. We are developing an in vitro model system for the study of radiation-induced initiation and progression of esophageal carcinoma, a type of cancer found to have a significant enhancement in incidence in the survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan. Here we present the results of our preliminary characterization of both normal and hTERT immortalized esophageal epithelial cells grown in 2-dimensional culture. We analyzed DNA repair capacity by measuring the kinetics of formation and loss of - H2AX foci following radiation exposure. Additionally, we analyzed induction of chromosomal aberrations using 3-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Data were generated using both low LET (gamma rays) and high LET ions (1000 MeV/nucleon iron).

  2. DNA damage and repair in relation to mammalian cell survival implications for microdosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number and dose dependence of DSBs, measured with greatly improved precision in mammalian cells, are in accord with the Chadwick-Leenhouts model and suggest that approximately one DSB per cell causes reproductive death. The rate and activation energy for SSB repair agree with those measured for the critical sublesion by studies of survival at low dose rate. The data indicate that SSBs may interact in the cell to yield a DSB at up to approximately 250 base pairs separation. These findings may provide a basis for bringing the theory of dual radiation action, the Chadwick-Leenhouts molecular model, and survival and stand break measurements into mutual agreement, a development which may greatly benefit the study of radiobiology, and particularly of microdosimetry

  3. Controlled damaging and repair of self-organized nanostructures by atom manipulation at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of controlled local demolition and repair of the recently discovered self-organized Pt nanowires on Ge(001) surfaces has been explored. These nanowires are composed of Pt dimers, which are found to be rather weakly bound to the underlying substrate. Using this property, we demonstrate the possibility of carrying the constituting dimers of the Pt nanowires from point to point with atomic precision at room temperature. Pt dimers can be picked-up in two configurations: (i) a horizontal configuration at the tip apex, resulting in double tip images and (ii) a configuration where the Pt dimer is attached to the side of the tip apex, resulting in well-defined atomically resolved images

  4. Use of recombinant DNA mollecules to study the repair of DNA damage and radiation mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small recombinant genes, carried on plasmid DNA molecules, can be used in the analysis of radiation responses in mammalian cells. Examples are given to illustrate their use in studies on the repair of DNA strand breakage and on radiation mutagenesis. Some radiation-sensitive mutants, notably cells from patients with the human disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), appear to be normal in their ability to rejoin DNA doublestrand breaks (dsb) when measured with conventional biochemical methods. However, it is the fidelity of the dsb rejoining process that is important to gene function, and this can be measured using transferred recombinant DNA molecules in which 'model' dsb are precisely placed in a selectable gene. This approach has revealed that an A-T line shows a highly significant reduction in dsb rejoin fidelity compared to normal human cells, and a similar defect has been found in a new radiosensitive hamster cell mutant, irs1. In parallel with repair studies, we have developed the use of small recombinant genes as targets for mutation induction in mammalian cells. These genes are transferred into suitable recipient cells and selected for single-copy stable integration. Mutation by X-rays has revealed a variety of types of mutagenic change, provided a selectable marker gene is tagged to the target gene to stop complete deletion of the transferred molecule. We have also been studying a large set of mutants in a gene normally present in mammalian cells, and have found that ionising radiations give approximately 7+% large mutational changes (mostly large deletions), while a chemical mutagen gave exclusively small 'point' mutations

  5. ZTF-8 interacts with the 9-1-1 complex and is required for DNA damage response and double-strand break repair in the C. elegans germline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Min Kim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in DNA repair genes are linked to tumor progression. Furthermore, failure in either activating a DNA damage checkpoint or repairing programmed meiotic double-strand breaks (DSBs can impair chromosome segregation. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis for DNA damage response (DDR and DSB repair (DSBR within the germline is highly important. Here we define ZTF-8, a previously uncharacterized protein conserved from worms to humans, as a novel factor involved in the repair of both mitotic and meiotic DSBs as well as in meiotic DNA damage checkpoint activation in the C. elegans germline. ztf-8 mutants exhibit specific sensitivity to γ-irradiation and hydroxyurea, mitotic nuclear arrest at S-phase accompanied by activation of the ATL-1 and CHK-1 DNA damage checkpoint kinases, as well as accumulation of both mitotic and meiotic recombination intermediates, indicating that ZTF-8 functions in DSBR. However, impaired meiotic DSBR progression partially fails to trigger the CEP-1/p53-dependent DNA damage checkpoint in late pachytene, also supporting a role for ZTF-8 in meiotic DDR. ZTF-8 partially co-localizes with the 9-1-1 DDR complex and interacts with MRT-2/Rad1, a component of this complex. The human RHINO protein rescues the phenotypes observed in ztf-8 mutants, suggesting functional conservation across species. We propose that ZTF-8 is involved in promoting repair at stalled replication forks and meiotic DSBs by transducing DNA damage checkpoint signaling via the 9-1-1 pathway. Our findings define a conserved function for ZTF-8/RHINO in promoting genomic stability in the germline.

  6. Human diseases with genetically altered DNA repair processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA repair of single-strand breaks (produced by ionizing radiation) and of base damage (produced by ultraviolet (UV) light) are two repair mechanisms that most mammalian cells possess. Genetic defects in these repair mechanisms are exemplified by cells from the human premature-aging disease, progeria, which fail to rejoin single-strand breaks, and the skin disease, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), which exhibits high actinic carcinogenesis and involves failure to repair base damage. In terms of the response of XP cells, many chemical carcinogens can be classified as either X-ray-like (i.e., they cause damage that XP cells can repair) or UV-like (i.e., they cause damage that XP cells cannot repair). The first group contains some of the more strongly carcinogenic chemicals (e.g., alkylating agents). XP occurs in at least two clinical forms, and somatic cell hybridization indicates at least three complementation groups. In order to identify cell lines from various different laboratories unambiguously, a modified nomenclature of XP lines is proposed

  7. An immunochemical approach to the study of DNA damage and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall objective of this project is to produce antibodies to unique modified DNA bases and develop immunochemical assays to quantitate these lesions in damaged DNA. During this past year we have developed an antibody and chemical test to quantitate a basic sites in DNA and produced antibodies to the 8-oxopurines. This report discusses the detection of a basic sites in DNA and the preparation of antibodies to 8-hydroxyadenine and 8-hydroxyguanine

  8. Low-Dose Formaldehyde Delays DNA Damage Recognition and DNA Excision Repair in Human Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Luch, Andreas; Frey, Flurina C. Clement; Meier, Regula; Fei, Jia; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2014-01-01

    Objective Formaldehyde is still widely employed as a universal crosslinking agent, preservative and disinfectant, despite its proven carcinogenicity in occupationally exposed workers. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the possible impact of low-dose formaldehyde exposures in the general population. Due to the concomitant occurrence of multiple indoor and outdoor toxicants, we tested how formaldehyde, at micromolar concentrations, interferes with general DNA damage recogni...

  9. Low-dose formaldehyde delays DNA damage recognition and DNA excision repair in human cells

    OpenAIRE

    Luch, Andreas; Frey, Flurina C. Clement; Meier, Regula; Fei, Jia; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Formaldehyde is still widely employed as a universal crosslinking agent, preservative and disinfectant, despite its proven carcinogenicity in occupationally exposed workers. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the possible impact of low-dose formaldehyde exposures in the general population. Due to the concomitant occurrence of multiple indoor and outdoor toxicants, we tested how formaldehyde, at micromolar concentrations, interferes with general DNA damage recogn...

  10. Triplex technology in studies of DNA damage, DNA repair, and mutagenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Anirban; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2011-01-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) can bind to the major groove of homopurine-homopyrimidine stretches of double-stranded DNA in a sequence-specific manner through Hoogsteen hydrogen bonding to form DNA triplexes. TFOs by themselves or conjugated to reactive molecules can be used to direct sequence-specific DNA damage, which in turn results in the induction of several DNA metabolic activities. Triplex technology is highly utilized as a tool to study gene regulation, molecular mechanisms ...

  11. The repair of flood-damaged property: a critical review of the needs of homeowners

    OpenAIRE

    Samwinga, Victor; Proverbs, David

    2003-01-01

    One of the primary reasons why firms fail to meet their customers' needs and expectations is due to their lack of awareness of exactly what those needs and expectations are, i.e. there is a gap between company perceptions of customer expectations and what customers actually expect. With five million people, in two million properties estimated to be living in flood risk areas in England and Wales, flooding and flood damage to property are somewhat inevitable. In fact, the increased frequenc...

  12. Synergistic killing of Escherichia coli by near-UV radiation and hydrogen peroxide: distinction between recA-repairable and recA-nonrepairable damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wild-type cells and six DNA repair-deficient mutants (lexA, recA, recB, recA recB, polA1, and uvrA) of Escherichia coli K-12 were treated with near-ultraviolet radiation plus hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). At low H2O2 concentrations (6 x 10-6 to 6 x 10-4 M), synergistic killing occurred in all strains except those containing a mutation in recA. This RecA-repairable damage was absent from stationary-phase cells but increased in logarithmic cells as a function of growth rate. At higher H2O2 concentrations (above 6 x 10-4 M) plus near-ultraviolet radiation, all strains, including those with a mutation in recA, were synergistically killed; thus, at high H2O2 concentrations, the damage was not RecA repairable

  13. Functions of ubiquitin proteasome system in DNA damage repair%泛素-蛋白酶体系统参与DNA损伤修复

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    耿传营; 陈文明

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitin proteasome system may specifically degradate most of proteins in cells and is involved in a variety of vital biological processes. DNA damage repair is an important pathway to response to stress stimulation and keep genetic material integration and normal physiological function of cells. Many proteins with enzyme activity of ubiquitin proteasome system may almost participate in all of DNA damage repair pathways to regulate DNA damage repair and control physiological function of cells. It may be a new target treating tumors that ubiquitin proteasome system is involved in DNA damage repair.%泛素-蛋白酶体系统特异性降解细胞内绝大多数蛋白质,参与许多重要的生理过程.DNA损伤后修复是细胞对抗外界损伤性刺激、维持细胞遗传物质完整性和正常生理活动的重要途径.泛素蛋白酶体系中的多种酶活性蛋白质几乎可以参与所有DNA损伤修复途径,调控DNA损伤修复,控制细胞生理活动.泛素-蛋白酶体系统参与DNA修复可以作为治疗肿瘤的靶点.

  14. ANALYSIS OF DNA DAMAGE AND REPAIR IN SKIN FIBROBLASTS OF INFANT AND OLDER CHILDREN USING THE IN VITRO ALKALINE COMET ASSAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANALYSIS OF DNA DAMAGE AND REPAIR IN SKIN FIBROBLASTS OF INFANT AND OLDER CHILDREN USING THE IN VITRO ALKALINE COMET ASSAY, Alan H. Tennant1, Geremy W. Knapp1 and Andrew D. Kligerman1, 1Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Lab...

  15. Ghrelin Prevents Cisplatin-Induced Testicular Damage by Facilitating Repair of DNA Double Strand Breaks Through Activation of p53 in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Jose M; Chen, Ji-an; Guillory, Bobby; Donehower, Lawrence A; Smith, Roy G; Lamb, Dolores J

    2015-07-01

    Cisplatin administration induces DNA damage resulting in germ cell apoptosis and subsequent testicular atrophy. Although 50 percent of male cancer patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy develop long-term secondary infertility, medical treatment to prevent spermatogenic failure after chemotherapy is not available. Under normal conditions, testicular p53 promotes cell cycle arrest, which allows time for DNA repair and reshuffling during meiosis. However, its role in the setting of cisplatin-induced infertility has not been studied. Ghrelin administration ameliorates the spermatogenic failure that follows cisplatin administration in mice, but the mechanisms mediating these effects have not been well established. The aim of the current study was to characterize the mechanisms of ghrelin and p53 action in the testis after cisplatin-induced testicular damage. Here we show that cisplatin induces germ cell damage through inhibition of p53-dependent DNA repair mechanisms involving gamma-H2AX and ataxia telangiectasia mutated protein kinase. As a result, testicular weight and sperm count and motility were decreased with an associated increase in sperm DNA damage. Ghrelin administration prevented these sequelae by restoring the normal expression of gamma-H2AX, ataxia telangiectasia mutated, and p53, which in turn allows repair of DNA double stranded breaks. In conclusion, these findings indicate that ghrelin has the potential to prevent or diminish infertility caused by cisplatin and other chemotherapeutic agents by restoring p53-dependent DNA repair mechanisms. PMID:26019260

  16. The involvement of an E. coli multiprotein complex in the complete repair of uv-damaged DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bimodal nature of the E. coli uvrABC catalyzed incision reaction of uv irradiated DNA leads to potential excision of a 12 to 13 base long damaged fragment. However, the oligonucleotide fragment containing the uv-induced pyrimidine dimer is not released under non-denaturing in vitro reaction conditions. The uvrABC proteins, also, are stably bound to the incised DNA and do not turn over following the incision event. In this communication it is shown that damaged fragment release from the parental uvrABC incised DNA is dependent on either chelating conditions or upon the simultaneous addition of the uvrD gene product (helicase II) and the polA gene product (DNA polymerase I) when catalyzing concommitant polymerization of deoxynucleoside triphosphate substrates. The product of this multiprotein catalyzed series of reactions serves as a substrate for polynucleotide ligase which results in the restoration of the integrity of the strands of DNA. The addition of the uvrD protein to the incised DNA-uvrABC complex also results in turnover of only the uvrC protein. It is suggested that the repair processes of incision, excision, resynthesis and ligation are coordinately catalyzed by a protective complex of proteins in a 'repairosome' type of configuration. 33 refs., 3 figs

  17. [Studies of the repair of radiation-induced genetic damage in Drosophila]. Annual progress report, October 1, 1988--June 1, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-12-31

    The primary goal of this study is to achieve a more thorough understanding of the mechanisms employed by higher organisms to repair DNA damage induced by both ionizing and nonionizing radiation. These studies are also contributing to an improved understanding of the processes of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in higher eukaryotes. The studies employ Drosophila as a model organism for investigating repair functions that are common to all higher eukaryotes. Drosophila was chosen in the early phases of this study primarily because of the ease with which one can isolate and characterize repair-deficient mutants in a metazoan organism. The laboratory has gone on to investigate the metabolic defects of such mutants while others have performed complementary genetic and cytogenetic studies which relate DNA repair processes to mutagenesis and chromosome stability. The repair studies have exploited the capacity to introduce mutant Drosophila cells into tissue culture and thereby compare repair defects directly with those of homologous human disorders. Researchers are currently employing recombinant DNA technology to investigate the mechanisms of the DNA repair pathways defined by those mutants.

  18. Repair pathways independent of the Fanconi anemia nuclear core complex play a predominant role in mitigating formaldehyde-induced DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Taichi [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Takahashi, Akihisa [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Kondo, Natsuko [Particle Radiation Oncology Research Center, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Mori, Eiichiro [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Okamoto, Noritomo [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Nakagawa, Yosuke [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Ohnishi, Ken [Department of Biology, Ibaraki Prefectual University of Health Sciences, 4669-2 Ami, Ami-mati, Inasiki-gun, Ibaraki 300-0394 (Japan); Zdzienicka, Malgorzata Z. [Department of Molecular Cell Genetics, Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus-Copernicus-University in Torun, ul. Sklodowskiej-Curie 9, 85-094 Bydgoszcz (Poland); Thompson, Larry H. [Biosciences and Biotechnology Division, L452, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551-0808 (United States); Helleday, Thomas [Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Off Roosevelt Drive, Oxford, OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom); Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Asada, Hideo [Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); and others

    2011-01-07

    The role of the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair pathway for DNA damage induced by formaldehyde was examined in the work described here. The following cell types were used: mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines FANCA{sup -/-}, FANCC{sup -/-}, FANCA{sup -/-}C{sup -/-}, FANCD2{sup -/-} and their parental cells, the Chinese hamster cell lines FANCD1 mutant (mt), FANCGmt, their revertant cells, and the corresponding wild-type (wt) cells. Cell survival rates were determined with colony formation assays after formaldehyde treatment. DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) were detected with an immunocytochemical {gamma}H2AX-staining assay. Although the sensitivity of FANCA{sup -/-}, FANCC{sup -/-} and FANCA{sup -/-}C{sup -/-} cells to formaldehyde was comparable to that of proficient cells, FANCD1mt, FANCGmt and FANCD2{sup -/-} cells were more sensitive to formaldehyde than the corresponding proficient cells. It was found that homologous recombination (HR) repair was induced by formaldehyde. In addition, {gamma}H2AX foci in FANCD1mt cells persisted for longer times than in FANCD1wt cells. These findings suggest that formaldehyde-induced DSBs are repaired by HR through the FA repair pathway which is independent of the FA nuclear core complex. -- Research highlights: {yields} We examined to clarify the repair pathways of formaldehyde-induced DNA damage. Formaldehyde induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). {yields} DSBs are repaired through the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair pathway. {yields} This pathway is independent of the FA nuclear core complex. {yields} We also found that homologous recombination repair was induced by formaldehyde.

  19. XPB and XPD helicases in TFIIH orchestrate DNA duplex opening and damage verification to coordinate repair with transcription and cell cycle via CAK kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuss, Jill O; Tainer, John A

    2011-07-15

    Helicases must unwind DNA at the right place and time to maintain genomic integrity or gene expression. Biologically critical XPB and XPD helicases are key members of the human TFIIH complex; they anchor CAK kinase (cyclinH, MAT1, CDK7) to TFIIH and open DNA for transcription and for repair of duplex distorting damage by nucleotide excision repair (NER). NER is initiated by arrested RNA polymerase or damage recognition by XPC-RAD23B with or without DDB1/DDB2. XP helicases, named for their role in the extreme sun-mediated skin cancer predisposition xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), are then recruited to asymmetrically unwind dsDNA flanking the damage. XPB and XPD genetic defects can also cause premature aging with profound neurological defects without increased cancers: Cockayne syndrome (CS) and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). XP helicase patient phenotypes cannot be predicted from the mutation position along the linear gene sequence and adjacent mutations can cause different diseases. Here we consider the structural biology of DNA damage recognition by XPC-RAD23B, DDB1/DDB2, RNAPII, and ATL, and of helix unwinding by the XPB and XPD helicases plus the bacterial repair helicases UvrB and UvrD in complex with DNA. We then propose unified models for TFIIH assembly and roles in NER. Collective crystal structures with NMR and electron microscopy results reveal functional motifs, domains, and architectural elements that contribute to biological activities: damaged DNA binding, translocation, unwinding, and ATP driven changes plus TFIIH assembly and signaling. Coupled with mapping of patient mutations, these combined structural analyses provide a framework for integrating and unifying the rich biochemical and cellular information that has accumulated over forty years of study. This integration resolves puzzles regarding XP helicase functions and suggests that XP helicase positions and activities within TFIIH detect and verify damage, select the damaged strand for incision, and

  20. Damage tolerance assessment of bonded composite doubler repairs for commercial aircraft applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, D.

    1998-08-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration has sponsored a project at its Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) to validate the use of bonded composite doublers on commercial aircraft. A specific application was chosen in order to provide a proof-of-concept driving force behind this test and analysis project. However, the data stemming from this study serves as a comprehensive evaluation of bonded composite doublers for general use. The associated documentation package provides guidance regarding the design, analysis, installation, damage tolerance, and nondestructive inspection of these doublers. This report describes a series of fatigue and strength tests which were conducted to study the damage tolerance of Boron-Epoxy composite doublers. Tension-tension fatigue and ultimate strength tests attempted to grow engineered flaws in coupons with composite doublers bonded to aluminum skin. An array of design parameters, including various flaw scenarios, the effects of surface impact, and other off-design conditions, were studied. The structural tests were used to: (1) assess the potential for interply delaminations and disbonds between the aluminum and the laminate, and (2) determine the load transfer and crack mitigation capabilities of composite doublers in the presence of severe defects. A series of specimens were subjected to ultimate tension tests in order to determine strength values and failure modes. It was demonstrated that even in the presence of extensive damage in the original structure (cracks, material loss) and in spite of non-optimum installations (adhesive disbonds), the composite doubler allowed the structure to survive more than 144,000 cycles of fatigue loading. Installation flaws in the composite laminate did not propagate over 216,000 fatigue cycles. Furthermore, the added impediments of impact--severe enough to deform the parent aluminum skin--and hot-wet exposure did not effect the doubler`s performance. Since the tests were conducting

  1. Single rod leak detection and repair of leaking or damaged fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In some circumstances, it is necessary to perform rework operations on some fuel assemblies in order to make them reusable in reactors, movable, transportable or consistent with fuel reprocessor specifications, depending on the plant utility policy. These rework operations are of two types: - Those which consist in restoring the leak tightness of the fuel assemblies. They are made after a series of tests allowing the localization of the failed fuel rods: at first, overall leak detection is provided by monitoring primary coolant activity during reactor operation; then, during refuelling, leaking assemblies are identified by subjecting each of the assemblies scheduled for reloading to a sipping test; finally individual leaking fuel rods are singled out before the defective assemblies can be repaired, i.e. failed rods can be replaced. - Those which involve replacement of part of or the whole assembly structure (combined or not with replacement of failed fuel rods). In order to meet these two needs for rework operations, FRAGEMA has developed a full range of test and tooling systems for detecting single leaking rods in irradiated fuel assemblies and for restoring fuel assemblies to be used in PWR nuclear power plants. As an illustration of the means available, two of these systems are described

  2. Development mutants of anabaena doliolum defective in repair of UV-damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrosoguanidine induced 'blue' pigment mutants of the blue-green alga anabaena doliolum were isolated. The blue-mutants on further characterization were grouped into three developmental phenotypes - (i) those forming doli-form blue-spores of heterogenous size i.e., Ad 011, (ii) those forming spheroidal cells in the stationary phase, some of which behave like spores on transfer to fresh medium i.e., Ad 012, and (iii) those showing no sporulation and conditionally producing abnormal cells in the presence of combined nitrogen only i.e., Ad 007. The former two classes of mutants showed the formation of abnormal cells irrespective of the presence or absence of combined nitrogen sources in the medium. The formation of abnormal cells in the filaments of the above mutants were distinguished by their larger size and irregular mode of division leading to true-branch formation. The comparative characterization of these mutant strains with the parental one showed sluggish growth, increased UV-sensitivity, almost unchanged photorepair capacity, a marked change in the pigment composition and relative resistance to nitrosoguanidine. Irregular cell division in both space and time in the mutant strains and their increased sensitivity to ultraviolet irradiation indicate the possible involvement of dark repair system in maintaining the precision of cell cylce in this alga. (orig.) 891 AJ/orig. 892 HIS

  3. Radiation damage and repair in cells and cell components. Progress report, 1980-1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One aim has been to see whether, in E.coli, the various phenomena which were ascribed to the induction of the recA gene produce (p-recA) are really manifestations of one process. It was concluded that this is true for septum inhibition, Weigle-reactivation, induced inhibition of post radiation DNA degradation, and with the additional concept of a premutational lesion, for uv mutagenesis. lambda prophage induction may perhaps be brought into line with p-recA induction with the consideration of the additional secondary aspects of (a) activation of p-recA to make it enzymatically active and (b) the need to have the concentration of activated p-recA high enough to keep up with the rate of production of lambda-repressors. Revertants seem to be in more than one class and two of these can not easily be explained by the idea that p-recA contains an error-prone repair enzyme that makes errors at mutagenic lesions

  4. Damage Detection and Self-Repair in Inflatable/Deployable Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Erik; Studor, George; Banks, DAvid; Curry, Mark; Broccato, Robert; Jackson, Tom; Champaigne, Kevin; Sottos, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Inflatable/deployable structures are under consideration for applications as varied as expansion modules for the International Space Station to destinations for space tourism to habitats for the lunar surface. Monitoring and maintaining the integrity of the physical structure is critical, particularly since these structures rely on non-traditional engineering materials such as fabrics, foams, and elastomeric polymers to provide the primary protection for the human crew. The closely related prior concept of monitoring structural integrity by use of built-in or permanently attached sensors has been applied to structures made of such standard engineering materials as metals, alloys, and rigid composites. To effect monitoring of flexible structures comprised mainly of soft goods, however, it will be necessary to solve a different set of problems - especially those of integrating power and data-transfer cabling that can withstand, and not unduly interfere with, stowage and subsequent deployment of the structures. By incorporating capabilities for self-repair along with capabilities for structural health monitoring, successful implementation of these technologies would be a significant step toward semi-autonomous structures, which need little human intervention to maintain. This would not only increase the safety of these structures, but also reduce the inspection and maintenance costs associated with more conventional structures.

  5. Excision-repair of γ-ray damaged thymine in bacterial and mammalian systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The selective excision of products of the 5,6-dihydroxy-dihydrothymine type (t') for γ-irradiated or OsO4-oxidized DNA or synthetic poly [d(A-T)] was observed with crude extracts of Escherichia coli and isolated nuclei from human carcinoma HeLa S-3 cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells. The results with E. coli extracts allow the following conclusion: The uvrA-gene product is not required for t' excision; radiation-induced strand breakage is not required for product excision; experiments with extracts of E. coli polAexl showed that the 5' → 3' exonuclease associated with polymerase I is responsible for the removal of t'; experiments with extracts of E. coli endo I lig 4 and the ligase inhibitor nicotinamide mononucleotide showed that polynucleotide ligase accomplishes the last strand resealing step in the excision-repair of t'. Isolated nuclei from HeLa and Chinese hamster ovary cells possess the necessary enzymes for the selective excision of t' from γ-irradiated or osmium tetroxide oxidized DNA. Approximately 25 to 35 percent of the products were removed from DNA within 60 min. Unspecific DNA degradation was very low. Radiation-induced strand breakage is not required for product removal

  6. Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Its Repair in Human Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dizdaroglu, Miral

    1999-05-12

    DNA damage in mammalian chromatin in vitro and in cultured mammalian cells including human cells was studied. In the first phase of these studies, a cell culture laboratory was established. Necessary equipment including an incubator, a sterile laminar flow hood and several centrifuges was purchased. We have successfully grown several cell lines such as murine hybridoma cells, V79 cells and human K562 leukemia cells. This was followed by the establishment of a methodology for the isolation of chromatin from cells. This was a very important step, because a routine and successful isolation of chromatin was a prerequisite for the success of the further studies in this project, the aim of which was the measurement of DNA darnage in mammalian chromatin in vitro and in cultured cells. Chromatin isolation was accomplished using a slightly modified procedure of the one described by Mee & Adelstein (1981). For identification and quantitation of DNA damage in cells, analysis of chromatin was preferred over the analysis of "naked DNA" for the following reasons: i. DNA may not be extracted efficiently from nucleoprotein in exposed cells, due to formation of DNA-protein cross-links, ii. the extractability of DNA is well known to decrease with increasing doses of radiation, iii. portions of DNA may not be extracted due to fragmentation, iv. unextracted DNA may contain a significant portion of damaged DNA bases and DNA-protein cross-links. The technique of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), which was used in the present project, permits the identification and quantitation of modified DNA bases in chromatin in the presence of proteins without the necessity of first isolating DNA from chromatin. This has been demonstrated previously by the results from our laboratory and by the results obtained during the course of the present project. The quality of isolated chromatin was tested by measurement of its content of DNA, proteins, and RNA, by analysis of its protein

  7. Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Its Repair in Human Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA damage in mammalian chromatin in vitro and in cultured mammalian cells including human cells was studied. In the first phase of these studies, a cell culture laboratory was established. Necessary equipment including an incubator, a sterile laminar flow hood and several centrifuges was purchased. We have successfully grown several cell lines such as murine hybridoma cells, V79 cells and human K562 leukemia cells. This was followed by the establishment of a methodology for the isolation of chromatin from cells. This was a very important step, because a routine and successful isolation of chromatin was a prerequisite for the success of the further studies in this project, the aim of which was the measurement of DNA darnage in mammalian chromatin in vitro and in cultured cells. Chromatin isolation was accomplished using a slightly modified procedure of the one described by Mee ampersand Adelstein (1981). For identification and quantitation of DNA damage in cells, analysis of chromatin was preferred over the analysis of ''naked DNA'' for the following reasons: i. DNA may not be extracted efficiently from nucleoprotein in exposed cells, due to formation of DNA-protein cross-links, ii. the extractability of DNA is well known to decrease with increasing doses of radiation, iii. portions of DNA may not be extracted due to fragmentation, iv. unextracted DNA may contain a significant portion of damaged DNA bases and DNA-protein cross-links. The technique of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), which was used in the present project, permits the identification and quantitation of modified DNA bases in chromatin in the presence of proteins without the necessity of first isolating DNA from chromatin. This has been demonstrated previously by the results from our laboratory and by the results obtained during the course of the present project. The quality of isolated chromatin was tested by measurement of its content of DNA, proteins, and RNA, by analysis of its protein

  8. A mathematical description of sublethal damage repair and interaction during continuous low dose-rate irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mathematical formalism that calculates survival probabilities for cells exposed to ionising radiation while progressing through the mitotic cycle is described. The formalism, based on the linear quadratic expression -lnS(D) αD + βD2, includes phase specific cellular parameters and recovery constants for sublethal damage, the interaction between sublesions produced at different stages of the cell cycle, and the time spent by cells in each phase of the cycle while being irradiated. Survival curves calculated with this formalism are compared with model calculations where the overall survival probability is obtained (in the authors' view, incorrectly) as a simple product of phase specific probabilities. (Author)

  9. Investigations of DNA damage induction and repair resulting from cellular exposure to high dose-rate pulsed proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renis, M.; Borghesi, M.; Favetta, M.; Malfa, G.; Manti, L.; Romano, F.; Schettino, G.; Tomasello, B.; Cirrone, G. A. P.

    2013-07-01

    following irradiation in a dose-dependent manner. The analysis of repair capability showed that the cells irradiated with 1 and 2 Gy almost completely recovered from the damage, but not, however, 3 Gy treated cells in which DNA damage was not recovered. In addition, the results indicate the importance of the use of an appropriate control in radiobiological in vitro analysis.

  10. Immunochemical approach to the study of DNA damage and repair. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are studying damages that have been shown to be stable radiolysis products found in x-irradiation DNA and thus products that have potential biological consequences. Four thymine ring saturation or fragmentation products were chosen as models for pyrimidine radiolysis products. The first product we synthesized and to which antibodies were elicited was thymine glycol. Thymine glycols are the major stable radiolysis products produced in DNA x-radiation in vitro. Although they retain base pairing characteristics, the stacking properties of thymine glycols are altered due to the saturation of the 5.6 double bond. Thymine glucol is also a useful model because alternative assay proceudres are available and they can selectively be produced in DNA by osmium tetroxide oxidation allowing the development of standards for subsequent measurement of DNA damage in x-irradiated DNA. We have also raised antibodies to dihydrothymine, a major radiolysis product produced in NDA under anaerobic conditions, to 5-hydroxy-5-methylhydantoin, the second most predominant stable radiolysis product producted under aerobic conditions, and to urea, a totally non-instructive DNA fragmentation product of thymine hydroperoxides. 29 refs., 2 figs

  11. Induction of DNA damage by deguelin is mediated through reducing DNA repair genes in human non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cells

    OpenAIRE

    JI, BIN-CHUAN; Chien-chih YU; YANG, SU-TSO; Hsia, Te-Chun; Yang, Jai-Sing; Lai, Kuang-Chi; Ko, Yang-Ching; Lin, Jen-Jyh; Lai, Tung-Yuan; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that deguelin, one of the compounds of rotenoids from flavonoid family, induced cytotoxic effects through induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in many types of human cancer cell lines, but deguelin-affected DNA damage and repair gene expression (mRNA) are not clarified yet. We investigated the effects of deguelin on DNA damage and associated gene expression in human lung cancer NCI-H460 cells in vitro. DNA damage was assayed by using the comet assay and DNA gel elect...

  12. Role of DNA damage and repair as predeterminant factor in the development of radiotherapy induced acute adverse reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy induced normal tissue toxicity is one of the major limitations for the compromised the therapeutic outcome and also worsens the quality of life of survivors. Further, the clinical experience demonstrated inter-individual variability with respect to their normal tissue toxicity. Therefore, the discovery of contributing key factors of variability or predicting the risk of developing acute reactions before the initiation of radiation therapy may serve as a powerful predictive biomarker for individualizing radiotherapy, anticipating increased therapeutic effect. DNA double-strand break (DSB) induction and its repair in lymphocytes of head-and-neck and breast cancer patients undergoing chemoradiation or radiation therapy alone were analyzed by performing γ-H2AX foci, neutral comet and a modified neutral filter elution assays. Treatment induced normal tissue adverse reactions (acute skin reaction, oral mucositis) were assessed by the criteria of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. The residual damage (RD) at 6 hrs of post irradiation was used as parameters to measure cellular radiosensitivity and for its correlation with radiotherapy induced acute reactions in patients stratified as non-over responders (NOR) and over responders (OR). A large inter-individual variation in the radiosensitivity was observed in the cancer individuals with respect to their lymphocyte radiosensitivity and the severity of normal tissue adverse reactions. There was a significant difference in RD (p<0.05) between the NOR and OR in breast cancer radiotherapy. Further, the increased normal tissue toxicity such as oral mucositis and skin reactions was associated with the reduced DSB repair (p<0.05) in head-and-neck cancer patients. The percentile analysis was found to be useful in predicting the OR amongst the head-and-neck cancer patients. Our results suggest that γ-H2AX analysis may have its potential to be developed into a clinically useful predictive assay for identifying the

  13. Retinal pigment epithelial cell multinucleation in the aging eye - a mechanism to repair damage and maintain homoeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei; Rajapakse, Dinusha; Fraczek, Monika; Luo, Chang; Forrester, John V; Xu, Heping

    2016-06-01

    Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells are central to retinal health and homoeostasis. Dysfunction or death of RPE cells underlies many age-related retinal degenerative disorders particularly age-related macular degeneration. During aging RPE cells decline in number, suggesting an age-dependent cell loss. RPE cells are considered to be postmitotic, and how they repair damage during aging remains poorly defined. We show that RPE cells increase in size and become multinucleate during aging in C57BL/6J mice. Multinucleation appeared not to be due to cell fusion, but to incomplete cell division, that is failure of cytokinesis. Interestingly, the phagocytic activity of multinucleate RPE cells was not different from that of mononuclear RPE cells. Furthermore, exposure of RPE cells in vitro to photoreceptor outer segment (POS), particularly oxidized POS, dose-dependently promoted multinucleation and suppressed cell proliferation. Both failure of cytokinesis and suppression of proliferation required contact with POS. Exposure to POS also induced reactive oxygen species and DNA oxidation in RPE cells. We propose that RPE cells have the potential to proliferate in vivo and to repair defects in the monolayer. We further propose that the conventionally accepted 'postmitotic' status of RPE cells is due to a modified form of contact inhibition mediated by POS and that RPE cells are released from this state when contact with POS is lost. This is seen in long-standing rhegmatogenous retinal detachment as overtly proliferating RPE cells (proliferative vitreoretinopathy) and more subtly as multinucleation during normal aging. Age-related oxidative stress may promote failure of cytokinesis and multinucleation in RPE cells. PMID:26875723

  14. Oxidative DNA damage and repair in skeletal muscle of humans exposed to high-altitude hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Carsten; Pilegaard, Henriette; van Hall, Gerrit; Sander, Mikael; Calbet, Jose; Loft, Steffen; Møller, Peter

    Recent research suggests that high-altitude hypoxia may serve as a model for prolonged oxidative stress in healthy humans. In this study, we investigated the consequences of prolonged high-altitude hypoxia on the basal level of oxidative damage to nuclear DNA in muscle cells, a major oxygen...... glycosylase (FPG) protein was unaltered. The expression of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (OGG1), determined by quantitative RT-PCR of mRNA levels did not significantly change during high-altitude hypoxia, although the data could not exclude a minor upregulation. The expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was...... unaltered by prolonged hypoxia, in accordance with the notion that HO-1 is an acute stress response protein. In conclusion, our data indicate high-altitude hypoxia may serve as a good model for oxidative stress and that antioxidant genes are not upregulated in muscle tissue by prolonged hypoxia despite...

  15. DNA damage response and DNA repair – dog as a model?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Companion animals like dogs frequently develop tumors with age and similarly to human malignancies, display interpatient tumoral heterogeneity. Tumors are frequently characterized with regard to their mutation spectra, changes in gene expression or protein levels. Among others, these changes affect proteins involved in the DNA damage response (DDR), which served as a basis for the development of numerous clinically relevant cancer therapies. Even though the effects of different DNA damaging agents, as well as DDR kinetics, have been well characterized in mammalian cells in vitro, very little is so far known about the kinetics of DDR in tumor and normal tissues in vivo. Due to (i) the similarities between human and canine genomes, (ii) the course of spontaneous tumor development, as well as (iii) common exposure to environmental agents, canine tumors are potentially an excellent model to study DDR in vivo. This is further supported by the fact that dogs show approximately the same rate of tumor development with age as humans. Though similarities between human and dog osteosarcoma, as well as mammary tumors have been well established, only few studies using canine tumor samples addressed the importance of affected DDR pathways in tumor progression, thus leaving many questions unanswered. Studies in humans showed that misregulated DDR pathways play an important role during tumor development, as well as in treatment response. Since dogs are proposed to be a good tumor model in many aspects of cancer research, we herein critically investigate the current knowledge of canine DDR and discuss (i) its future potential for studies on the in vivo level, as well as (ii) its possible translation to veterinary and human medicine

  16. Repairing DNA damage by XRCC6/KU70 reverses TLR4-deficiency-worsened HCC development via restoring senescence and autophagic flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziyan; Lin, Heng; Hua, Fang; Hu, Zhuo-wei

    2013-06-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is among the most lethal and prevalent cancers in the human population. The initiation and progression of HCC is closely associated with chronic liver inflammation. Recent research indicates that nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), one of the DNA repair mechanisms, autophagy and senescence are all involved in the pathogenesis of HCC induced by carcinogens or oxidative stress. DNA repair proteins including XRCC6/KU70 and XRCC5/KU80 are the critical NHEJ factors that play pivotal roles in genome-maintenance issues such as DNA replication and repair, telomere maintenance and chromosomal instability. Our studies indicate that a deficiency of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated immune activities results in a decreased expression of XRCC5 and XRCC6 in response to insult by the carcinogen diethylnitrosamine (DEN). This effect causes a failure in DNA repair, and promotes the transformation of precancerous hepatocytes and HCC development. Ectopic expression of XRCC6 protects against HCC initiation and progression by restoring the cellular senescent response and activation of immune networks, which induces an effective autophagic degradation, removes the accumulated reactive oxygen species (ROS), decreases DNA damage, attenuates proliferation, and promotes programmed cell death in TLR4-deficient livers. Our work indicates that repairing DNA damage by XRCC6 reverses TLR4-deficiency-worsened HCC development via restoring immunity to support senescence and autophagy in liver cells. PMID:23518600

  17. Significant accumulation of persistent organic pollutants and dysregulation in multiple DNA damage repair pathways in the electronic-waste-exposed populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Xiaobo; Jing, Yaqing; Wang, Jianhai; Li, Keqiu [Basic Medical College, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Yang, Qiaoyun [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Zhao, Yuxia [Basic Medical College, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Li, Ran [State Key Joint Laboratory for Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering and Center for Environment and Health, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ge, Jie [Department of Breast Surgery, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin 300060 (China); Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin 300060 (China); Qiu, Xinghua, E-mail: xhqiu@pku.edu.cn [State Key Joint Laboratory for Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering and Center for Environment and Health, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, Guang, E-mail: lig@tijmu.edu.cn [Basic Medical College, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Electronic waste (e-waste) has created a worldwide environmental and health problem, by generating a diverse group of hazardous compounds such as persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Our previous studies demonstrated that populations from e-waste exposed region have a significantly higher level of chromosomal aberrancy and incidence of DNA damage. In this study, we further demonstrated that various POPs persisted at a significantly higher concentration in the exposed group than those in the unexposed group. The level of reactive oxygen species and micronucleus rate were also significantly elevated in the exposed group. RNA sequencing analysis revealed 31 genes in DNA damage responses and repair pathways that were differentially expressed between the two groups (Log 2 ratio >1 or <−1). Our data demonstrated that both females and males of the exposed group have activated a series of DNA damage response genes; however many important DNA repair pathways have been dysregulated. Expressions of NEIL1/3 and RPA3, which are critical in initiating base pair and nucleotide excision repairs respectively, have been downregulated in both females and males of the exposed group. In contrast, expression of RNF8, an E3 ligase involved in an error prone non-homologous end joining repair for DNA double strand break, was upregulated in both genders of the exposed group. The other genes appeared to be differentially expressed only when the males or females of the two groups were compared respectively. Importantly, the expression of cell cycle regulatory gene CDC25A that has been implicated in multiple kinds of malignant transformation was significantly upregulated among the exposed males while downregulated among the exposed females. In conclusion, our studies have demonstrated significant correlations between e-waste disposing and POPs accumulation, DNA lesions and dysregulation of multiple DNA damage repair mechanisms in the residents of the e-waste exposed region. - Highlights:

  18. Significant accumulation of persistent organic pollutants and dysregulation in multiple DNA damage repair pathways in the electronic-waste-exposed populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electronic waste (e-waste) has created a worldwide environmental and health problem, by generating a diverse group of hazardous compounds such as persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Our previous studies demonstrated that populations from e-waste exposed region have a significantly higher level of chromosomal aberrancy and incidence of DNA damage. In this study, we further demonstrated that various POPs persisted at a significantly higher concentration in the exposed group than those in the unexposed group. The level of reactive oxygen species and micronucleus rate were also significantly elevated in the exposed group. RNA sequencing analysis revealed 31 genes in DNA damage responses and repair pathways that were differentially expressed between the two groups (Log 2 ratio >1 or <−1). Our data demonstrated that both females and males of the exposed group have activated a series of DNA damage response genes; however many important DNA repair pathways have been dysregulated. Expressions of NEIL1/3 and RPA3, which are critical in initiating base pair and nucleotide excision repairs respectively, have been downregulated in both females and males of the exposed group. In contrast, expression of RNF8, an E3 ligase involved in an error prone non-homologous end joining repair for DNA double strand break, was upregulated in both genders of the exposed group. The other genes appeared to be differentially expressed only when the males or females of the two groups were compared respectively. Importantly, the expression of cell cycle regulatory gene CDC25A that has been implicated in multiple kinds of malignant transformation was significantly upregulated among the exposed males while downregulated among the exposed females. In conclusion, our studies have demonstrated significant correlations between e-waste disposing and POPs accumulation, DNA lesions and dysregulation of multiple DNA damage repair mechanisms in the residents of the e-waste exposed region. - Highlights:

  19. Application of SCGE assay in studies on kinetics of X-ray induced DNA damage repair in lymphocytes of infant born with mediastinal immature teratoma and healthy adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mediastinal teratomas belong to the most frequent mediastinal germ cell tumors. There are some reports suggesting that the expression of the excision repair gene ERCC1 in the teratoma cell line SuSa/DXR10 is markedly lower than in the ovarian carcinoma cell line SKOV-3. In this work we applied the challenging dose of X-rays (as an environmental agent inducing a broad spectrum of DNA damage) and the alkaline version of the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay to study DNA damage in order to estimate the kinetics of the repair process and efficiency in lymphocytes of a 4 month-old child born with teratoma immature (after a surgical thymus removal). Our results show no statistically significant differences between the healthy adult and the infant born with mediastinal immature teratoma. The half-lifetime of the repair process estimated from the kinetics of both donors lymphocytes were in range of 5.0-7.6 min, and was not significantly different from average 5 min, resulted for healthy adults male donors. Results from studies an accuracy of Comet assay with challenging dose of X-rays performed previous on lymphocytes from male donors showed a very high reproducibility in independent electrophoresis in the Comet assay. On the base of presented results, we conclude that the comet assay failed to detect DNA damage repair disorders in a teratoma immature infant. (author)

  20. UvrD Participation in Nucleotide Excision Repair Is Required for the Recovery of DNA Synthesis following UV-Induced Damage in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelley N. Newton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available UvrD is a DNA helicase that participates in nucleotide excision repair and several replication-associated processes, including methyl-directed mismatch repair and recombination. UvrD is capable of displacing oligonucleotides from synthetic forked DNA structures in vitro and is essential for viability in the absence of Rep, a helicase associated with processing replication forks. These observations have led others to propose that UvrD may promote fork regression and facilitate resetting of the replication fork following arrest. However, the molecular activity of UvrD at replication forks in vivo has not been directly examined. In this study, we characterized the role UvrD has in processing and restoring replication forks following arrest by UV-induced DNA damage. We show that UvrD is required for DNA synthesis to recover. However, in the absence of UvrD, the displacement and partial degradation of the nascent DNA at the arrested fork occur normally. In addition, damage-induced replication intermediates persist and accumulate in uvrD mutants in a manner that is similar to that observed in other nucleotide excision repair mutants. These data indicate that, following arrest by DNA damage, UvrD is not required to catalyze fork regression in vivo and suggest that the failure of uvrD mutants to restore DNA synthesis following UV-induced arrest relates to its role in nucleotide excision repair.

  1. UvrD Participation in Nucleotide Excision Repair Is Required for the Recovery of DNA Synthesis following UV-Induced Damage in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Kelley N; Courcelle, Charmain T; Courcelle, Justin

    2012-01-01

    UvrD is a DNA helicase that participates in nucleotide excision repair and several replication-associated processes, including methyl-directed mismatch repair and recombination. UvrD is capable of displacing oligonucleotides from synthetic forked DNA structures in vitro and is essential for viability in the absence of Rep, a helicase associated with processing replication forks. These observations have led others to propose that UvrD may promote fork regression and facilitate resetting of the replication fork following arrest. However, the molecular activity of UvrD at replication forks in vivo has not been directly examined. In this study, we characterized the role UvrD has in processing and restoring replication forks following arrest by UV-induced DNA damage. We show that UvrD is required for DNA synthesis to recover. However, in the absence of UvrD, the displacement and partial degradation of the nascent DNA at the arrested fork occur normally. In addition, damage-induced replication intermediates persist and accumulate in uvrD mutants in a manner that is similar to that observed in other nucleotide excision repair mutants. These data indicate that, following arrest by DNA damage, UvrD is not required to catalyze fork regression in vivo and suggest that the failure of uvrD mutants to restore DNA synthesis following UV-induced arrest relates to its role in nucleotide excision repair. PMID:23056919

  2. DNA damage and repair kinetics after microbeam radiation therapy emulation in living cells using monoenergetic synchrotron X-ray microbeams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular response of mammalian cells to a monoenergetic synchrotron X-ray microbeam which emulated microbeam radiation configurations has been investigated. Very few γH2AX foci were found outside the irradiated zone within 1 h of irradiation, even within a single nucleus. Furthermore, 12 h after radiation there was a large decrease in foci number but many cells still contained γH2AX foci, of which many were outside the directly irradiated regions. A novel synchrotron-based approach, known as microbeam radiation therapy (MRT), currently shows considerable promise in increased tumour control and reduced normal tissue damage compared with conventional radiotherapy. Different microbeam widths and separations were investigated using a controlled cell culture system and monoenergetic (5.35 keV) synchrotron X-rays in order to gain further insight into the underlying cellular response to MRT. DNA damage and repair was measured using fluorescent antibodies against phosphorylated histone H2AX, which also allowed us to verify the exact location of the microbeam path. Beam dimensions that reproduced promising MRT strategies were used to identify useful methods to study the underpinnings of MRT. These studies include the investigation of different spatial configurations on bystander effects. γH2AX foci number were robustly induced in directly hit cells and considerable DNA double-strand break repair occurred by 12 h post-10 Gy irradiation; however, many cells had some γH2AX foci at the 12 h time point. γH2AX foci at later time points did not directly correspond with the targeted regions suggesting cell movement or bystander effects as a potential mechanism for MRT effectiveness. Partial irradiation of single nuclei was also investigated and in most cases γH2AX foci were not observed outside the field of irradiation within 1 h after irradiation indicating very little chromatin movement in this time frame. These studies contribute to the understanding of the

  3. Role of protein synthesis in the repair of sublethal x-ray damage in a mutant Chinese hamster ovary cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yezzi, M.J.

    1985-04-01

    A temperature-sensitive mutant for protein synthesis, CHO-TSH1, has been compared to the wild-type cell, CHO-sC1, in single- and split-radiation-dose schemes. When the exponentially growing TS mutant and the wild-type cells were treated at 40/sub 0/C for up to 2 hrs prior to graded doses of x rays, the survival curves were identical and were the same as those obtained without heat treatment. If the cultures were incubated at 40/sup 0/C for 2 hrs before a first dose and maintained at 40/sup 0/C during a 2 hr dose fractionation interval, repair of radiation damage was reduced in the mutant compared to the wild type. These observations implied that a pool of proteins was involved in the repair of sublethal x-ray damage. However, if repair was measured by the alkaline-unwinding technique under the same time and temperature schemes, no difference in the kientics of DNA strand rejoining was observed. Misrepair processes may permit restoration of DNA strand integrity but not allow functional repair. The effect of diminished repair under conditions of inhibition of protein synthesis was found to be cell-cycle dependent in survival studies with synchronized mutant cell populations. Repair was found to be almost completely eliminated if the temperature sequence described above was applied in the middle of the DNA synthetic phase. Treatment of cell populations in the middle of G/sub 1/-phase yielded repair inhibition comparable to that observed with the asynchronous cells. Splitdose experiments were done using pre-incubation with cycloheximide to chemically inhibit protein synthesis. WT cells and TS cells were treated with cycloheximide at 35/sup 0/C for 2 hrs before a first dose and during a 2 hr dose fractionation interval. 23 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Role of protein synthesis in the repair of sublethal x-ray damage in a mutant Chinese hamster ovary cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A temperature-sensitive mutant for protein synthesis, CHO-TSH1, has been compared to the wild-type cell, CHO-sC1, in single- and split-radiation-dose schemes. When the exponentially growing TS mutant and the wild-type cells were treated at 400C for up to 2 hrs prior to graded doses of x rays, the survival curves were identical and were the same as those obtained without heat treatment. If the cultures were incubated at 400C for 2 hrs before a first dose and maintained at 400C during a 2 hr dose fractionation interval, repair of radiation damage was reduced in the mutant compared to the wild type. These observations implied that a pool of proteins was involved in the repair of sublethal x-ray damage. However, if repair was measured by the alkaline-unwinding technique under the same time and temperature schemes, no difference in the kientics of DNA strand rejoining was observed. Misrepair processes may permit restoration of DNA strand integrity but not allow functional repair. The effect of diminished repair under conditions of inhibition of protein synthesis was found to be cell-cycle dependent in survival studies with synchronized mutant cell populations. Repair was found to be almost completely eliminated if the temperature sequence described above was applied in the middle of the DNA synthetic phase. Treatment of cell populations in the middle of G1-phase yielded repair inhibition comparable to that observed with the asynchronous cells. Splitdose experiments were done using pre-incubation with cycloheximide to chemically inhibit protein synthesis. WT cells and TS cells were treated with cycloheximide at 350C for 2 hrs before a first dose and during a 2 hr dose fractionation interval. 23 figs., 7 tabs

  5. Modelling the Structure of a Protein Domain (N-terminal of XPB) Linked with Protein Synthesis, DNA Damage Repair, Rare Diseases, Cancer Therapeutics, and Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Saha, Mitul

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we develop first near-complete 3D models for NTD-hXPB - the N-terminal protein domain of the human transcription factor XPB. The results are very significant as NTD-hXPB plays a critical role in the synthesis of proteins (specifically transcription) and DNA damage repair (specifically nucleotide excision repair). NTD-hXPB is directly implicated in rare diseases XP-B, XP-CS, and TTD2, whose symptoms include neurodegenerative disorders, premature aging, and decreased fertility. NT...

  6. Genetic Control or Repair and Adaptive Response to Low-Level DNA Damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. E. Haber

    2009-10-05

    Research was focused on how a single double-strand break - a model of low-dose ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage - could be studied in a simple model system, budding yeast. Breaks were induced in several different ways. We used the site-specific HO endonuclease to create a single DSB in all cells of the population so that its fate could be extensively analyzed genetically and molecularly. We also used two heterologous systems, the plant DS element and the Rag1/Rag2 proteins, to generate different types of DSBs, these containing hairpin ends that needed to be cleaved open before end-joining could take place. All three approaches yielded important new findings. We also extended our analysis of the Mre11 protein that plays key roles in both NHEJ and in homologous recombination. Finally we analyzed the poorly understood recombination events that were independent of the key recombination protein, Rad52. This line of inquiry was strongly motivated by the fact that vertebrate cells do not rely strongly on Rad52 for homologous recombination, so that some clues about alternative mechanisms could be gained by understanding how Rad52-independent recombination occurred. We found that the Mre11 complex was the most important element in Rad52-independent recombination.

  7. Variability in the susceptibility to UV induced DNA damage and repair capacity observed in lymphocytes from unexposed and exposed to pesticides Polish donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to find out whether occupational exposure to pesticides may affect the individual susceptibility to the induction of the DNA damage by genotoxic agents. Differences in sensitivity of human lymphocytes to UV and variability of the DNA damage repair capacity were investigated by use of the single cell gel-electrophoresis method (SCGE), also known as the Comet assay. Human lymphocytes were isolated from whole blood samples collected from 100 male donors from Poland. Among the donors 50 males were treated as reference group (no occupational exposure), average age was 38.7, and among them 68 % were recent or former smokers, the other 50 males were occupationally exposed to pesticides, average age was 39.1, and among them 58 % were recent or former smokers. Previously cryopreserved lymphocytes were defrosted and viability of the cells and DNA damage in lymphocytes prior to any in vitro studies was investigated. On the average the DNA damage detected in lymphocytes and expressed as the mean Comet tail moment was significantly higher in the exposed group than in the reference group. In order to evaluate sensitivity of human lymphocytes to UV and variability of the DNA damage repair capacity, defrosted cells were irradiated with 6 J/m2 of UVC radiation and the DNA damages were estimated immediately after exposure to UV and after two hours of the incubation in presence or absence of phytohemoglutinin (PHA) cells division-stimulating agent. The same procedures were performed on the samples from aloud exposed an unexposed to pesticides. Comet assay detectable levels of the DNA damage were increasing during the incubation of cells following UVC exposure. Average levels of damage detected after incubation in presence of PHA of exposed to UV lymphocytes were lower than without PHA. In presence of phytohemoglutinin (PHA) results showed statistically significant (p=0.001) repair of the DNA damage for both reference and exposed group. No difference due to

  8. Complex DNA repair pathways as possible therapeutic targets to overcome temozolomide resistance in glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji eYoshimoto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Many conventional chemotherapeutic drugs exert their cytotoxic function by inducing DNA damage in the tumor cell. Therefore, a cell-inherent DNA repair pathway, which reverses the DNA-damaging effect of the cytotoxic drugs, can mediate therapeutic resistance to chemotherapy. The monofunctional DNA-alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ is a commonly used chemotherapeutic drug and the gold standard treatment for glioblastoma. Although the activity of DNA repair protein O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT has been described as the main modulator to determine the sensitivity of glioblastoma to TMZ, a subset of glioblastoma does not respond despite MGMT inactivation, suggesting that another DNA repair mechanism may also modulate the tolerance to TMZ. Considerable interest has focused on MGMT, mismatch repair (MMR, and the base-excision repair (BER pathway in the mechanism of mediating TMZ resistance, but emerging roles for the DNA strand-break repair pathway have been demonstrated. In the first part of this review article, we briefly review the significant role of MGMT, MMR, and the BER pathway in the tolerance to TMZ; in the last part, we review the recent publications that demonstrate possible roles of DNA strand-break repair pathways, such as single-strand break (SSB repair and double-strand break (DSB repair, as well as the Fanconi anemia pathway in the repair process after alkylating agent-based therapy. It is possible that all of these repair pathways have a potential to modulate the sensitivity to TMZ and aid in overcoming the therapeutic resistance in the clinic.

  9. Rapid assessment of repair of ultraviolet DNA damage with a modified host-cell reactivation assay using a luciferase reporter gene and correlation with polymorphisms of DNA repair genes in normal human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao Yawei; Spitz, Margaret R.; Guo Zhaozheng; Hadeyati, Mohammad; Grossman, Lawrence; Kraemer, Kenneth H.; Wei Qingyi

    2002-11-30

    As DNA repair plays an important role in genetic susceptibility to cancer, assessment of the DNA repair phenotype is critical for molecular epidemiological studies of cancer. In this report, we compared use of the luciferase (luc) reporter gene in a host-cell reactivation (HCR) (LUC) assay of repair of ultraviolet (UV) damage to DNA to use of the chloramphenicol (cat) gene-based HCR (CAT) assay we used previously for case-control studies. We performed both the assays on cryopreserved lymphocytes from 102 healthy non-Hispanic white subjects. There was a close correlation between DNA repair capacity (DRC) as measured by the LUC and CAT assays. Although these two assays had similar variation, the LUC assay was faster and more sensitive. We also analyzed the relationship between DRC and the subjects' previously determined genotypes for four polymorphisms of two nucleotide-excision repair (NER) genes (in intron 9 of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) C and exons 6, 10 and 23 of XPD) and one polymorphism of a base-excision repair gene in exon 10 of X-ray complementing group 1 (XRCC1). The DRC was significantly lower in subjects homozygous for one or more polymorphisms of the two NER genes than in subjects with other genotypes (P=0.010). In contrast, the polymorphic XRCC1 allele had no significant effect on DRC. These results suggest that the post-UV LUC assay measures NER phenotype and that polymorphisms of XPC and XPD genes modulate DRC. For population studies of the DNA repair phenotype, many samples need to be evaluated, and so the LUC assay has several advantages over the CAT assay: the LUC assay was more sensitive, had less variation, was not radioactive, was easier to perform, and required fewer cryopreserved cells. These features make the LUC-based HCR assay suitable for molecular epidemiological studies.

  10. Rapid assessment of repair of ultraviolet DNA damage with a modified host-cell reactivation assay using a luciferase reporter gene and correlation with polymorphisms of DNA repair genes in normal human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As DNA repair plays an important role in genetic susceptibility to cancer, assessment of the DNA repair phenotype is critical for molecular epidemiological studies of cancer. In this report, we compared use of the luciferase (luc) reporter gene in a host-cell reactivation (HCR) (LUC) assay of repair of ultraviolet (UV) damage to DNA to use of the chloramphenicol (cat) gene-based HCR (CAT) assay we used previously for case-control studies. We performed both the assays on cryopreserved lymphocytes from 102 healthy non-Hispanic white subjects. There was a close correlation between DNA repair capacity (DRC) as measured by the LUC and CAT assays. Although these two assays had similar variation, the LUC assay was faster and more sensitive. We also analyzed the relationship between DRC and the subjects' previously determined genotypes for four polymorphisms of two nucleotide-excision repair (NER) genes (in intron 9 of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) C and exons 6, 10 and 23 of XPD) and one polymorphism of a base-excision repair gene in exon 10 of X-ray complementing group 1 (XRCC1). The DRC was significantly lower in subjects homozygous for one or more polymorphisms of the two NER genes than in subjects with other genotypes (P=0.010). In contrast, the polymorphic XRCC1 allele had no significant effect on DRC. These results suggest that the post-UV LUC assay measures NER phenotype and that polymorphisms of XPC and XPD genes modulate DRC. For population studies of the DNA repair phenotype, many samples need to be evaluated, and so the LUC assay has several advantages over the CAT assay: the LUC assay was more sensitive, had less variation, was not radioactive, was easier to perform, and required fewer cryopreserved cells. These features make the LUC-based HCR assay suitable for molecular epidemiological studies

  11. DSB修复过程中的组蛋白修饰作用%Histone Modifications in DNA Double-Strand Breaks Damage Repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾兆君; 伍会健

    2013-01-01

    DNA doubled-strand breaks (DSBs) which is the most serious species in DNA damage can lead to the loss of genetic message or even cell death.To resist DSB damage,the organism has developed a DNA-damage response (DDR) mechanism for DNA damage repair to avoid the transfer of inaccurate genetic message.In this process,histone which is the main structural protein of chromatin is regulated by multi-modifications,such as phosphorylation,methylation,acetylation,ubiquitination and so on.These modifications of histones promote the recruitment of DDR-related protein to the site of DNA damage in the process of DNA damage repair,and change chromatin structure to facilitate repair progress in DDR.%DNA双键断裂(DNA doubled-strand breaks,DSBs)是目前已知DNA损伤中最为严重的一种,会造成遗传信息丢失,甚至细胞死亡.为了应对DSB损伤,生命体进化出DNA损伤应答(DNA-damage response,DDR)机制,进行损伤修复以防止错误遗传信息的传递.在这一过程中,作为染色质主要结构蛋白的组蛋白发生多种修饰,包括磷酸化、甲基化、乙酰化、泛素化等.这些组蛋白修饰促进DDR相关蛋白在DNA损伤处的招募,并改变染色质结构,以促进修复过程顺利进行.

  12. Biological dosimeter for cellular damage and repair by ionizing radiation. Final technical progress report, May 1, 1993--April 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cress, A.E.

    1998-06-30

    The authors have investigated the alteration of chromatin domains in Human T and B cells after ionizing radiation using three DNA specific dyes, Feulgen, Hoechst and 7-amino actinomycin D. Characterization and differentiation of T and B cells was accomplished using only 4 of a possible 32 image features with the CAS and Quaritex QX7 Digital Image Systems. Human B and T cells were irradiated with 1, 5 and 10 Gy and analyzed during a 1.5 hour recovery period. The chosen features detect a dose dependent change in DNA domains which can be observed as early as 1.5 hours after a 1Gv exposure. The results suggest that the ability of DNA specific dyes to stain chromatin can be used as an early sensitive indicator of DNA damage. The observed alteration of chromatin staining suggests that chromatin structure does observably change in a significant manner during a DNA repair interval. Since these alteration can be detected with DNA specific dyes that stain both AT rich, GC rich or total DNA, these data suggest that a global alteration of the chromatin is occurring after exposure to ionizing radiation.

  13. TR4 nuclear receptor functions as a tumor suppressor for prostate tumorigenesis via modulation of DNA damage/repair system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shin-Jen; Lee, Soo Ok; Lee, Yi-Fen; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Yang, Dong-Rong; Li, Gonghui; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-06-01

    Testicular nuclear receptor 4 (TR4), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, plays important roles in metabolism, fertility and aging. The linkage of TR4 functions in cancer progression, however, remains unclear. Using three different mouse models, we found TR4 could prevent or delay prostate cancer (PCa)/prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia development. Knocking down TR4 in human RWPE1 and mouse mPrE normal prostate cells promoted tumorigenesis under carcinogen challenge, suggesting TR4 may play a suppressor role in PCa initiation. Mechanism dissection in both in vitro cell lines and in vivo mice studies found that knocking down TR4 led to increased DNA damage with altered DNA repair system that involved the modulation of ATM expression at the transcriptional level, and addition of ATM partially interrupted the TR4 small interfering RNA-induced tumorigenesis in cell transformation assays. Immunohistochemical staining in human PCa tissue microarrays revealed ATM expression is highly correlated with TR4 expression. Together, these results suggest TR4 may function as a tumor suppressor to prevent or delay prostate tumorigenesis via regulating ATM expression at the transcriptional level. PMID:24583925

  14. DNA double strand break repair is enhanced by P53 following induction by DNA damage and is dependent on the C-terminal domain of P53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The tumor suppressor gene p53 can mediate cell cycle arrest or apoptosis in response to DNA damage. Accumulating evidence suggests that it may also directly or indirectly influence the DNA repair machinery. In the present study, we investigated whether p53, induced by DNA damage, could enhance the rejoining of double-strand DNA breaks. Materials and Methods: DNA double-strand breaks (dsb) were made by restriction enzyme digestion of a plasmid, between a promoter and a 'reporter' gene: luciferase (LUC) or chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase (CAT). Linear or circular plasmid DNA (LUC or CAT) was co-transfected with circular β-Gal plasmid (to normalize for uptake) into mouse embryonic fibroblasts genetically matched to be (+/+) or (-/-) for p53. Their ability to rejoin linearized plasmid was measured by the luciferase or CAT activity detected in rescued plasmids. The activity detected in cells transfected with linear plasmid was scored relative to the activity detected in cells transfected with circular plasmid. Results: Ionizing radiation (IR, 2 Gy) enhanced the dsb repair activity in wild type p53 cells; however, p53 null cells lose this effect, indicating that the enhancement of dsb repair was p53-dependent. REF cells with dominant-negative mutant p53 showed a similar induction compared with the parental REF cells with wild-type p53. This ala-143 mutant p53 prevents cell cycle arrest and transactivation of p21WAF1/cip1) following IR, indicating that the p53-dependent enhancement of DNA repair is distinct from transactivation. Immortalized murine embryonic fibroblasts, 10(1)VasK1 cells, which express p53 cDNA encoding a temperature-sensitive mutant in the DNA sequence specific binding domain (ala135 to val135) with an alternatively spliced C-terminal domain (ASp53: amino-acids 360-381) and, 10(1)Val5 cells, which express the normal spliced p53 (NSp53) with the same temperature-sensitive mutant were compared. It was found that 10(1)VasK1 cells showed no DNA

  15. Role of protein synthesis in the repair of sublethal x-ray damage in a mutant Chinese hamster ovary cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yezzi, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    A temperature-sensitive mutant for protein synthesis, CHO-TSH1, was compared to the wild-type cell, CHO-SC1, in single- and split-radiation-dose schemes. When the cultures were incubated at 40/sup 0/C for 2 hrs before a first dose and maintained at 40/sup 0/C during a 2 hr dose fractionation interval, repair of radiation damage was reduced in the mutant compared to the wild type. These observations implied that a pool of proteins was involved in the repair of sublethal X-ray damage. The effect of diminished repair under conditions of inhibition of protein synthesis was found to be cell-cycle dependent in survival studies with synchronized mutant cell populations. Repair was found to be almost completely eliminated if the temperature sequence described above was applied in the middle of the DNA synthetic phase. Distinct perturbations in the cell-cycle progression were noted following heat alone or heat with radiation. A delay in the progression of synchronized G/sub 1/-phase and S-phase cells was demonstrated autoradiographically after inhibition of protein synthesis. In addition, treated S-phase cells showed a transient increase in the percent labelled cells after the cells were returned to their normal growth temperature of 35/sup 0/C. This observation was suggestive of an unusual pattern of DNA synthesis during the recovery period. Split-dose experiments were done using incubation with cycloheximide to chemically inhibit protein synthesis. Both the chemical and thermal inhibition of protein synthesis substantiate its necessity for the repair of sublethal damage.

  16. Role of protein synthesis in the repair of sublethal x-ray damage in a mutant Chinese hamster ovary cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A temperature-sensitive mutant for protein synthesis, CHO-TSH1, was compared to the wild-type cell, CHO-SC1, in single- and split-radiation-dose schemes. When the cultures were incubated at 400C for 2 hrs before a first dose and maintained at 400C during a 2 hr dose fractionation interval, repair of radiation damage was reduced in the mutant compared to the wild type. These observations implied that a pool of proteins was involved in the repair of sublethal X-ray damage. The effect of diminished repair under conditions of inhibition of protein synthesis was found to be cell-cycle dependent in survival studies with synchronized mutant cell populations. Repair was found to be almost completely eliminated if the temperature sequence described above was applied in the middle of the DNA synthetic phase. Distinct perturbations in the cell-cycle progression were noted following heat alone or heat with radiation. A delay in the progression of synchronized G1-phase and S-phase cells was demonstrated autoradiographically after inhibition of protein synthesis. In addition, treated S-phase cells showed a transient increase in the percent labelled cells after the cells were returned to their normal growth temperature of 350C. This observation was suggestive of an unusual pattern of DNA synthesis during the recovery period. Split-dose experiments were done using incubation with cycloheximide to chemically inhibit protein synthesis. Both the chemical and thermal inhibition of protein synthesis substantiate its necessity for the repair of sublethal damage

  17. Genotoxic Damage in vivo, Susceptibility to UVC and X-Rays, and Repair Efficiency in vitro Lymphocytes from Referent and Occupational Exposed to Mercury Vapours Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For years mercury has been considered to be dangerous for human health. It was shown in vitro studies that mercury ions produce various types of DNA damage: single strand breaks as well as alkali labile lesions. The aim of this study was to compare levels of the DNA damage and cytogenetic damage induced in vivo, DNA's susceptibility to radiation, as well as repair capabilities of DNA damage induced in vitro by UV-exposure or X-rays, in lymphocytes from unexposed donors and from persons occupationally exposed to mercury vapours. In order to estimate cytogenetic damage, the analysis of sister chromatid exchange frequency (SCE) was used, while to detect DNA damage alkaline version of the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) was applied. To analyse in vitro susceptibility of cells to genotoxic factors such as UV-C or X-rays, lymphocytes were exposed to 6 J/m2 of UV or irradiated with 2 Gy of X-rays. After exposure the cells were incubated for 2 hours with or without the presence of phytohemagglutinin (agent stimulating cell divisions). In the present study, results do not show any statistically significant differences between the examined groups, either in the levels of DNA damage of untreated lymphocytes or in the sister chromatid exchanges. Neither the levels of DNA damage detected in lymphocytes after UV exposure and 2 h incubation, without or in the presence of a cell- division stimulating agent, nor the repair efficiencies of the DNA damage induced by UV exposure, differed significantly between the unexposed group and that occupationally exposed to mercury vapours. Statistically significant higher levels of DNA damage measured in X-ray-irradiated lymphocytes, without incubation and after 2 hours of incubation, with or without the presence of phytohemagglutinin, were observed in the group exposed to mercury vapours. So, donors exposed to mercury vapours have shown a statistically lower repair efficiency of X-ray-induced DNA damage both in non- stimulated

  18. Characterisation of Human Keratinocytes by Measuring Cellular Repair Capacity of UVB-Induced DNA Damage and Monitoring of Cytogenetic Changes in Melanoma Cell Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greinert, R.; Breibart, E.W.; Mitchell, D.; Smida, J.; Volkmer, B

    2000-07-01

    The molecular mechanisms for UV-induced photocarcinogenesis are far from being understood in detail, especially in the case of malignant melanoma of the skin. Nevertheless, it is known that deficiencies in cellular repair processes of UV-induced DNA damage (e.g. in the case of Xeroderma pigmentosum) represent important aetiological factors in the multistep development of skin cancer. The repair kinetics have therefore been studied of an established skin cell line (HaCaT), primary human keratinocytes, melanocytes and melanoma cell lines, using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Our data show a high degree of interindividual variability in cellular repair capacity for UV-induced DNA lesions, which might be due to individual differences in the degree of tolerable damage and/or the onsets of saturation of the enzymatic repair system. The cytogenetic analysis of melanoma cell lines, using spectral karyotyping (SKY) furthermore proves that malignant melanoma of the skin are characterised by high numbers of chromosomal aberrations. (author)

  19. Effects of UV-B radiation on tetraspores of Chondrus ocellatus Holm (Rhodophyta), and effects of red and blue light on repair of UV-B-induced damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Qing; Xiao, Hui; Wang, You; Tang, Xuexi

    2015-05-01

    We evaluated the effects of red and blue light on the repair of UV-B radiation-induced damage in tetraspores of Chondrus ocellatus Holm. Tetraspores of C. ocellatus were treated with different UV-B radiation levels (0, 36, 72, 108, 144 and 180 J/m2), and thereafter subjected to PAR, darkness, or red or blue light during a 2-h repair stage, each day for 48 days. The diameters and cellular contents of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimmers (CPDs), chlorophyll a (Chl a), phycoerythrin, and UV-B-absorbing mycosporinelike amino acids (MAAs) contents of the tetraspores were determined. Our results show that low doses of UV-B radiation (36 and 72 J/m2) promoted the growth of C. ocellatus; however, increased UV-B radiation gradually reduced the C. ocellatus growth (greater than 72 J/m2). The MAAs (palythine and asterina-330) in C. ocellatus were detected and analyzed by LC/MS. Our results suggest that moderate red light could induce the growth of this alga in aquaculture. In addition, photorepair was inhibited by red light, so there may be some other DNA repair mechanism activated by red light. Blue light promoted the activity of DNA photolyase, greatly improving remediation efficiency. Red and blue lights were found to reduce the capacity of C. ocellatus to form MAAs. Therefore, PAR, red light, and blue light play different roles during the repair processes for damage induced by UV-B radiation.

  20. Characterisation of Human Keratinocytes by Measuring Cellular Repair Capacity of UVB-Induced DNA Damage and Monitoring of Cytogenetic Changes in Melanoma Cell Lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular mechanisms for UV-induced photocarcinogenesis are far from being understood in detail, especially in the case of malignant melanoma of the skin. Nevertheless, it is known that deficiencies in cellular repair processes of UV-induced DNA damage (e.g. in the case of Xeroderma pigmentosum) represent important aetiological factors in the multistep development of skin cancer. The repair kinetics have therefore been studied of an established skin cell line (HaCaT), primary human keratinocytes, melanocytes and melanoma cell lines, using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Our data show a high degree of interindividual variability in cellular repair capacity for UV-induced DNA lesions, which might be due to individual differences in the degree of tolerable damage and/or the onsets of saturation of the enzymatic repair system. The cytogenetic analysis of melanoma cell lines, using spectral karyotyping (SKY) furthermore proves that malignant melanoma of the skin are characterised by high numbers of chromosomal aberrations. (author)

  1. Nicotinamide enhances repair of arsenic and ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in HaCaT keratinocytes and ex vivo human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin C Thompson

    Full Text Available Arsenic-induced skin cancer is a significant global health burden. In areas with arsenic contamination of water sources, such as China, Pakistan, Myanmar, Cambodia and especially Bangladesh and West Bengal, large populations are at risk of arsenic-induced skin cancer. Arsenic acts as a co-carcinogen with ultraviolet (UV radiation and affects DNA damage and repair. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3 reduces premalignant keratoses in sun-damaged skin, likely by prevention of UV-induced cellular energy depletion and enhancement of DNA repair. We investigated whether nicotinamide modifies DNA repair following exposure to UV radiation and sodium arsenite. HaCaT keratinocytes and ex vivo human skin were exposed to 2μM sodium arsenite and low dose (2J/cm2 solar-simulated UV, with and without nicotinamide supplementation. DNA photolesions in the form of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers were detected by immunofluorescence. Arsenic exposure significantly increased levels of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine in irradiated cells. Nicotinamide reduced both types of photolesions in HaCaT keratinocytes and in ex vivo human skin, likely by enhancing DNA repair. These results demonstrate a reduction of two different photolesions over time in two different models in UV and arsenic exposed cells. Nicotinamide is a nontoxic, inexpensive agent with potential for chemoprevention of arsenic induced skin cancer.

  2. Studies of DNA repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. I. Characterization of a new allele of RAD6. II. Investigation of events in the first cell cycle after DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies in two independent, but related, areas of DNA repair have been carried out in the eucaryotic yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The first is the characterization of a new allele in the RAD6 gene suggesting that the gene is multifunctional. The second is the utilization of photoreactivation as a probe of events occurring during the first cell cycle after DNA damage. Strains carrying the new allele, designated rad6-4, of the RAD6 locus are about as sensitive to uv and ionizing radiation as those carrying rad6-1 or rad6-3. Although rad6-4 may well be a missense mutation, the data suggest that the RAD6 gene is multifunctional. One function is necessary to recover from DNA damage in an error-free manner, and the other is concerned with mutagenic processes and sporulation. The loss of photoreversibility (LOP) of ultraviolet induced mutations to arginine independence in an excision defective strain carrying arg4-17 examines the events occurring in the first cell cycle. The post uv protein synthesis causes pyrimidine dimmers to become inaccessible to the photoreactivating enzyme in some unknown manner. There is no evidence indicating whether the normal function of the protein is involved in excision repair, or in one of the two repair processes believed to be inducible; induced mutagenesis or recombinational repair

  3. Nicotinamide enhances repair of arsenic and ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in HaCaT keratinocytes and ex vivo human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Benjamin C; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic-induced skin cancer is a significant global health burden. In areas with arsenic contamination of water sources, such as China, Pakistan, Myanmar, Cambodia and especially Bangladesh and West Bengal, large populations are at risk of arsenic-induced skin cancer. Arsenic acts as a co-carcinogen with ultraviolet (UV) radiation and affects DNA damage and repair. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) reduces premalignant keratoses in sun-damaged skin, likely by prevention of UV-induced cellular energy depletion and enhancement of DNA repair. We investigated whether nicotinamide modifies DNA repair following exposure to UV radiation and sodium arsenite. HaCaT keratinocytes and ex vivo human skin were exposed to 2μM sodium arsenite and low dose (2J/cm2) solar-simulated UV, with and without nicotinamide supplementation. DNA photolesions in the form of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers were detected by immunofluorescence. Arsenic exposure significantly increased levels of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine in irradiated cells. Nicotinamide reduced both types of photolesions in HaCaT keratinocytes and in ex vivo human skin, likely by enhancing DNA repair. These results demonstrate a reduction of two different photolesions over time in two different models in UV and arsenic exposed cells. Nicotinamide is a nontoxic, inexpensive agent with potential for chemoprevention of arsenic induced skin cancer. PMID:25658450

  4. Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage, Cell-Cycle Regulation and Neuronal Death May Influence the Clinical Manifestation of Alzheimer’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Aderbal R. T.; Ana Cecília Feio Santos; Farfel, Jose M.; Grinberg, Lea T.; Ferretti, Renata E. L.; Antonio Hugo Jose Froes Marques Campos; Isabela Werneck Cunha; Maria Dirlei Begnami; Rocha, Rafael M.; Carraro, Dirce M; Carlos Alberto de Bragança Pereira; Wilson Jacob-Filho; Helena Brentani

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by progressive cognitive decline associated with a featured neuropathology (neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles). Several studies have implicated oxidative damage to DNA, DNA repair, and altered cell-cycle regulation in addition to cell death in AD post-mitotic neurons. However, there is a lack of studies that systematically assess those biological processes in patients with AD neuropathology but with no evidence of cognitive impairment. We e...

  5. DNA Repair Genes: Alternative Transcription and Gene Expression at the Exon Level in Response to the DNA Damaging Agent, Ionizing Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Forrester, Helen B.; Li, Jason; Hovan, Daniel; Ivashkevich, Alesia N.; Sprung, Carl N.

    2012-01-01

    DNA repair is an essential cellular process required to maintain genomic stability. Every cell is subjected to thousands of DNA lesions daily under normal physiological conditions. Ionizing radiation (IR) is a major DNA damaging agent that can be produced by both natural and man-made sources. A common source of radiation exposure is through its use in medical diagnostics or treatments such as for cancer radiotherapy where relatively high doses are received by patients. To understand the detai...

  6. Structural and functional analysis of the Crb2–BRCT2 domain reveals distinct roles in checkpoint signaling and DNA damage repair

    OpenAIRE

    Kilkenny, Mairi L.; Doré, Andrew S.; Roe, S. Mark; Nestoras, Konstantinos; Ho, Jenny C. Y.; Watts, Felicity Z.; Pearl, Laurence H.

    2008-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Crb2 is a checkpoint mediator required for the cellular response to DNA damage. Like human 53BP1 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad9 it contains Tudor2 and BRCT2 domains. Crb2-Tudor2 domain interacts with methylated H4K20 and is required for recruitment to DNA dsDNA breaks. The BRCT2 domain is required for dimerization, but its precise role in DNA damage repair and checkpoint signaling is unclear. The crystal structure of the Crb2–BRCT2 domain, alone and in complex wit...

  7. Seasonal variation of DNA damage and repair in patients with non-melanoma skin cancer and referents with and without psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, P; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Frentz, G;

    1998-01-01

    Quadruples of skin cancer patients with and without psoriasis and referents with and without psoriasis (4 x 20 study persons) were identified and examined for DNA damage by single cell gel electrophoresis (comet-assay) and DNA-repair by UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in mononuclear...... solar radiation. When the comet tail moment data were stratified by sampling period, an interaction between psoriasis and skin cancer was detected, with patients with psoriasis and skin cancer exhibiting more DNA damage. Patients with psoriasis and skin cancer also had lower UDS compared to healthy...

  8. Even low doses of radiation lead to DNA damage accumulation in lung tissue according to the genetically-defined DNA repair capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for thoracic malignancies increases the exposure of healthy lung tissue to low-dose radiation. The biological impact of repetitive low-dose radiation on the radiosensitive lung is unclear. Materials and methods: In the present study, using mouse strains with different genetic DNA repair capacities, we monitored the extent of DNA damage in lung parenchyma after 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks of daily low-dose 100-mGy radiation. Results: Using 53BP1 as a marker for double-strand breaks, we observed DNA damage accumulation during fractionated low-dose radiation with increasing cumulative doses. The amount of radiation-induced 53BP1 varied significantly between bronchiolar and alveolar epithelial cells, suggesting that different cell populations in the lung parenchyma had varying vulnerabilities to ionizing radiation. The genetic background of DNA repair determined the extent of cumulative low-dose radiation damage. Moreover, increased DNA damage during fractionated low-dose radiation affected replication, and apoptosis in the lung parenchyma, which may influence overall lung function. Conclusion: Collectively, our results suggest that low, yet damaging, doses of radiation increase the risk of toxicity to normal lung tissue and the probability of developing secondary malignancies

  9. DNA polymerase X from Deinococcus radiodurans implicated in bacterial tolerance to DNA damage is characterized as a short patch base excision repair polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairnar, Nivedita P; Misra, Hari S

    2009-09-01

    The Deinococcus radiodurans R1 genome encodes an X-family DNA repair polymerase homologous to eukaryotic DNA polymerase beta. The recombinant deinococcal polymerase X (PolX) purified from transgenic Escherichia coli showed deoxynucleotidyltransferase activity. Unlike the Klenow fragment of E. coli, this enzyme showed short patch DNA synthesis activity on heteropolymeric DNA substrate. The recombinant enzyme showed 5'-deoxyribose phosphate (5'-dRP) lyase activity and base excision repair function in vitro, with the help of externally supplied glycosylase and AP endonuclease functions. A polX disruption mutant of D. radiodurans expressing 5'-dRP lyase and a truncated polymerase domain was comparatively less sensitive to gamma-radiation than a polX deletion mutant. Both mutants showed higher sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Excision repair mutants of E. coli expressing this polymerase showed functional complementation of UV sensitivity. These results suggest the involvement of deinococcal polymerase X in DNA-damage tolerance of D. radiodurans, possibly by contributing to DNA double-strand break repair and base excision repair. PMID:19542005

  10. Ionizing radiation damage to the folded chromosome of Escherichia coli K-12: repair of double-strand breaks in deoxyribonucleic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extremely gentle lysis and unfolding procedures that have been developed for the isolation of nucleoid deoxyribonucleic acid yield undamaged, replicating genomes, thus permitting direct measurement of the formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks at biologically significant doses of ionizing radiation. Repair of ionizing radiation damage to folded chromosomes of Escherichia coli K-12 strain AB2497 was observed within 2 to 3 h of post-irradiation incubation in growth medium. Such behavior was not observed after post-irradiation incubation in growth medium of a recA13 strain (strain AB2487). A model based on recombinational repair is proposed to explain the formation of 2,200 to 2,300S material during early stages of incubation and to explain subsequent changes in the gradient profiles. Association of unrepaired DNA with the plasma membrane is proposed to explain the formation of a peak of rapidly sedimenting material (greater than 3,100S) during the later stage of repair. Direct evidence of repair of double-strand breaks during post-irradiation incubation in growth medium was obtained from gradient profiles of DNA from ribonuclease-digested chromosomes. The sedimentation coefficient of broken molecules was restored to the value of unirradiated DNA after 2 to 3 h of incubation, and the fraction of the DNA repaired in this fashion was equal to the fraction of cells that survived at the same dose. An average of 2.7 double-strand breaks per genome per lethal event was observed, suggesting that one to two double-strand breaks per genome are repairable in E. coli K-12 strain AB2497

  11. Effects of radiations on DNA and repair of the damage. Progress report, March 1, 1975--March 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was established that repair of radioinduced double-strand breaks in the DNA of E. coli AB2497 takes place. This repair can be eliminated by growing the cells in poor media so there is only 1+ genome/cell. There is no measurable repair in AB2487 recA- (otherwise isogenic with AB2497) or NH4803 recA- recB- cells. These results strongly suggest that DNA double-strand break repair occurs by a process involving recombination of the broken pieces with a homologous double hexix

  12. Induction of oxygen-dependent lethal damage by monochromatic UVB (313 nm) radiation: strand breakage, repair and cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The action of UV-B (313 nm) radiation in cellular inactivation and induction and repair of DNA strand breaks were studied in a repair proficient strain and three repair deficient strains (polA, recA, uvrA) of Escherichia coli K-12. Although the induction of breaks was linear in purified T4 DNA and the polA strain, simultaneous induction and repair of breaks were observed in the uvrA, recA and repair proficient strains at doses 4 Jm-2. The final rates of induction in these strains were 1 x 10-4, 7.5 x 10-5 and 7.5 x 10-5 breaks/2.5 x 109 daltons/Jm-2, respectively. A highly efficient polA-dependent repair occurring at 00C in minimal buffer and a second slower type of repair occurring at 310C in the polA strain were detected. Oxygen dependence of cellular inactivation was observed for the polA and repair proficient strains irradiated at 313 nm thus providing biological evidence for an oxygen-dependent lesion involved in lethality in the short wavelength range of the solar u.v. The lower hypoxic break induction rates of the polA and the repair proficient strains, indicate oxygen-enhanced DNA breakage by 313 nm radiation. (author)

  13. 肿瘤线粒体DNA损伤修复的研究进展%Research progress on mitochondrial DNA damage repair in tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李鹤佳

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are organelles in mammalian cells, with the only genetic material outside the nucleus mitochondrial DNA(mtDNA). It supported and participated in many important cellular functions. MtDNA vulnera-bled to a variety of factors and cause damage because of special structures and advancement of genetics. When mtDNA damage happened, some mtDNA repair factors, such as: Mitochondrial transcription factor A, mtDNA poly-merase-γ, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase enzymes take part in the damage repairing. The entire repair process were regulated by related factors.%线粒体是哺乳动物细胞中唯一存在于细胞核外又带有遗传物质线粒体DNA(mtDNA)的细胞器.mtDNA支持和参与诸多重要的细胞功能.mtDNA因其特殊的结构和遗传学地位,易受各种因素的损伤.当损伤发生时,线粒体内的DNA损伤修复因子,诸如线粒体转录因子A、mtDNA聚合酶-γ、8-氧鸟嘌呤DNA糖基化酶等参与修复过程,而整个修复过程受到上游相关因子的调控.

  14. Mgm101p is a novel component of the mitochondrial nucleoid that binds DNA and is required for the repair of oxidatively damaged mitochondrial DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maintenance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) during cell division is required for progeny to be respiratory competent. Maintenance involves the replication, repair, assembly, segregation, and partitioning of the mitochondrial nucleoid. MGM101 has been identified as a gene essential for mtDNA maintenance in S. cerevisiae, but its role is unknown. Using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry, we identified Mgm101p as a component of highly enriched nucleoids, suggesting that it plays a nucleoid-specific role in maintenance. Subcellular fractionation, indirect immunofluorescence and GFP tagging show that Mgm101p is exclusively associated with the mitochondrial nucleoid structure in cells. Furthermore, DNA affinity chromatography of nucleoid extracts indicates that Mgm101p binds to DNA, suggesting that its nucleoid localization is in part due to this activity. Phenotypic analysis of cells containing a temperature sensitive mgm101 allele suggests that Mgm101p is not involved in mtDNA packaging, segregation, partitioning or required for ongoing mtDNA replication. We examined Mgm101p's role in mtDNA repair. As compared with wild-type cells, mgm101 cells were more sensitive to mtDNA damage induced by UV irradiation and were hypersensitive to mtDNA damage induced by gamma rays and H2O2 treatment. Thus, we propose that Mgm101p performs an essential function in the repair of oxidatively damaged mtDNA that is required for the maintenance of the mitochondrial genome. (author)

  15. Primary sequence and biological functions of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae O6-methylguanine/O4-methylthymine DNA repair methyltransferase gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, W; Derfler, B; J. Chen; Samson, L

    1991-01-01

    We previously identified and characterized biochemically an O6-methylguanine (O6MeG) DNA repair methyltransferase (MTase) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and showed that it recognizes both O6MeG and O4-methylthymine (O4MeT) in vitro. Here we characterize the cloned S. cerevisiae O6MeG DNA MTase gene (MGT1) and determine its in vivo role in protecting yeast from DNA alkylation damage. We isolated a yeast DNA fragment that suppressed alkylation-induced killing and mutation in Escherichia ...

  16. BioSentinel: Mission Development of a Radiation Biosensor to Gauge DNA Damage and Repair Beyond Low Earth Orbit on a 6U Nanosatellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Hugo; Lewis, Brian; Hanel, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We are designing and developing a 6U (10 x 22 x 34 cm; 14 kg) nanosatellite as a secondary payload to fly aboard NASAs Space Launch System (SLS) Exploration Mission (EM) 1, scheduled for launch in late 2017. For the first time in over forty years, direct experimental data from biological studies beyond low Earth orbit (LEO) will be obtained during BioSentinels 12- to 18-month mission. BioSentinel will measure the damage and repair of DNA in a biological organism and allow us to compare that to information from onboard physical radiation sensors. In order to understand the relative contributions of the space environments two dominant biological perturbations, reduced gravity and ionizing radiation, results from deep space will be directly compared to data obtained in LEO (on ISS) and on Earth. These data points will be available for validation of existing biological radiation damage and repair models, and for extrapolation to humans, to assist in mitigating risks during future long-term exploration missions beyond LEO. The BioSentinel Payload occupies 4U of the spacecraft and will utilize the monocellular eukaryotic organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) to report DNA double-strand-break (DSB) events that result from ambient space radiation. DSB repair exhibits striking conservation of repair proteins from yeast to humans. Yeast was selected because of 1) its similarity to cells in higher organisms, 2) the well-established history of strains engineered to measure DSB repair, 3) its spaceflight heritage, and 4) the wealth of available ground and flight reference data. The S. cerevisiae flight strain will include engineered genetic defects to prevent growth and division until a radiation-induced DSB activates the yeasts DNA repair mechanisms. The triggered culture growth and metabolic activity directly indicate a DSB and its successful repair. The yeast will be carried in the dry state within the 1-atm PL container in 18 separate fluidics cards with each card

  17. DNA损伤监测及修复相关酶与细胞衰老%Cell Senescence and the Enzyme System for Surveillanceand Repair of DNA Damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗瑛; 隋建丽; 铁轶

    2001-01-01

    衰老是细胞的重要生命现象之一,衰老假说之一认为细胞中残留DNA损伤的积累可加速细胞的衰老.因 此,细胞内DNA损伤监测及修复系统的正常运行与细胞衰老调控密切相关,DNA损伤监测及修复相关酶如 PARP、DNA-PK、ATM、p53等在细胞衰老中的调控作用日益受到广泛关注.研究这些蛋白质分子间的相互作 用及其在细胞衰老过程中的调控功能,有利于揭示DNA损伤应激、损伤修复调控与细胞衰老之间的内在联系, 为抗衰老研究及从衰老角度治疗肿瘤提供新的思路.%Senescence is one of the most important phenomena in cells' life. It is hold by one of hypothesis for cell senescence that residue DNA damages of a cell will accelerate its senescence. The normal function of surveillance and repair system for DNA damage is highly related with the senescence regulation of a cell. As a result, research of senescence regulation role of enzymes related for surveillance and repair of DNA damage, such as PARP, DNA-PK, ATM, p53, etc., will discover the inner relation between stress response of cell to DNA damage, regulation of DNA damage repair and cell senescence. That may be helpful for research of anti-aging and treatment of tumor by regulation of senescence of tumor cells.

  18. Prevalence of Germline Mutations in Genes Engaged in DNA Damage Repair by Homologous Recombination in Patients with Triple-Negative and Hereditary Non-Triple-Negative Breast Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Domagala

    Full Text Available This study sought to assess the prevalence of common germline mutations in several genes engaged in the repair of DNA double-strand break by homologous recombination in patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers. Tumors deficient in this type of DNA damage repair are known to be especially sensitive to DNA cross-linking agents (e.g., platinum drugs and to poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors.Genetic testing was performed for 36 common germline mutations in genes engaged in the repair of DNA by homologous recombination, i.e., BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, NBN, ATM, PALB2, BARD1, and RAD51D, in 202 consecutive patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers.Thirty five (22.2% of 158 patients in the triple-negative group carried mutations in genes involved in DNA repair by homologous recombination, while 10 (22.7% of the 44 patients in the hereditary non-triple-negative group carried such mutations. Mutations in BRCA1 were most frequent in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (18.4%, and mutations in CHEK2 were most frequent in patients with hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers (15.9%. In addition, in the triple-negative group, mutations in CHEK2, NBN, and ATM (3.8% combined were found, while mutations in BRCA1, NBN, and PALB2 (6.8% combined were identified in the hereditary non-triple-negative group.Identifying mutations in genes engaged in DNA damage repair by homologous recombination other than BRCA1/2 can substantially increase the proportion of patients with triple-negative breast cancer and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancer who may be eligible for therapy using PARP inhibitors and platinum drugs.

  19. Studies of DNA repair in saccharomyces cerevisiae. I. Characterization of a new allele of RAD6. II. Investigation of events in the first cell cycle after DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies in two independent, but related, areas of DNA repair have been carried out in Saccharomyces cerevisiae; characterization of a new allele in the RAD6 gene which suggests that the gene is multifunctional, and utilization of photoreactivation as a probe of events occurring during the first cell cycle after DNA damage. Strains carrying the new allele, designated rad6-4, are as sensitive to uv and ionizing radiation as those carrying rad6-1 or rad6-3 but, unlike them, are capable of induced mutagenesis and sporulation. Although rad6-4 may well be a missense mutation, the evidence shows that it is unlikely that this phenotype is due to leakiness. Instead, the data suggest that the RAD6 gene is multifunctional. One function is necessary to recover from DNA damage in an error-free manner, and the other is concerned with mutagenic processes and sporulation. Rad6-1 and rad6-3 strains are deficient in both of these functions, while rad6-4 strains are deficient only in the error-free function. The loss of photoreversibility (LOP) of ultraviolet induced mutations to arginine independence in an excision defective strain carrying arg4-17 examines the events occurring in the first cell cycle after DNA damage. LOP is dependent upon de novo protein synthesis. LOP begins immediately after UV irradiation, before semiconservative DNA synthesis takes place, and is complete after four hours in growth medium.There is no evidence indicating whether the normal function of the protein is involved in excision repair, or in one of the two repair processes believed to be inducible; induced mutagenesis or recombinational repair

  20. Is the Oxidative DNA Damage Level of Human Lymphocyte Correlated with the Antioxidant Capacity of Serum or the Base Excision Repair Activity of Lymphocyte?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chih Tsai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A random screening of human blood samples from 24 individuals of nonsmoker was conducted to examine the correlation between the oxidative DNA damage level of lymphocytes and the antioxidant capacity of serum or the base excision repair (BER activity of lymphocytes. The oxidative DNA damage level was measured with comet assay containing Fpg/Endo III cleavage, and the BER activity was estimated with a modified comet assay including nuclear extract of lymphocytes for enzymatic cleavage. Antioxidant capacity was determined with trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity assay. We found that though the endogenous DNA oxidation levels varied among the individuals, each individual level appeared to be steady for at least 1 month. Our results indicate that the oxidative DNA damage level is insignificantly or weakly correlated with antioxidant capacity or BER activity, respectively. However, lymphocytes from carriers of Helicobacter pylori (HP or Hepatitis B virus (HBV tend to give higher levels of oxidative DNA damage (P<0.05. Though sera of this group of individuals show no particular tendency with reduced antioxidant capacity, the respective BER activities of lymphocytes are lower in average (P<0.05. Thus, reduction of repair activity may be associated with the genotoxic effect of HP or HBV infection.

  1. Role of Fapy glycosylase and UvrABC excinuclease in the repair of UVA (320-400 nm)-mediated DNA damage in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In contrast to the damage caused by far-UV, the damage caused by UVA (320-400 nm) is largely oxygen dependent, suggesting near-UV-mediated DNA damage involves reactive oxygen species. The DNA repair enzymes that recognize oxidized bases may, therefore, be an important part of the cell's near-UV defense repertoire. To evaluate the relative importance of Fpg (Fapy) glycosy-lase (an enzyme known to remove oxidized bases) and the DNA damage-inducible UvrABC excinuclease in recovery from near-UV-induced stress, we have constructed fpg- and uvrA-derivatives of Escherichia coli and tested the response (survival) of these strains to both UVA and far-UV radiation. Relative to control strains, the fpg- derivatives were found to be consistently more sensitive to the lethal effects of UVA, but not far-UV radiation. In contrast, uvrA- mutants were more sensitive than control strains to both UVA and far-UV radiation. Thymine dimers, known to be produced by far-UV and corrected by UvrABC, were not generated by the UVA fluences used in this study, suggesting that some other UVA-induced lesion(s) is recognized and repaired by this excinuclease. (Author)

  2. Critical periods during the in situ repair of radiation-induced DNA damage in rat cerebellar neurons and 9L brain tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wierowski, J.V. (Univ. of Rochester Cancer Center, NY); Thomas, R.R.; Ritter, P.; Wheeler, K.T.

    1982-06-01

    The consequences of delivering a second 1250-rad dose at various times during and after the repair of DNA damage produced by an initial 1250-rad dose were assessed in intracerebral 9L tumor cells and rat cerebellar neurons by measuring the sedimentation properties of their DNA through alkaline sucrose gradients in zonal rotors with slow gradient reorienting capabilities.In cerebellar neurons, separating the two doses by 15 min resulted in an accumulation of DNA damage as expressed by an increase in the amount of DNA sedimenting >250 S over that obtained from unirradiated controls. Although not statistically different from unirradiated controls, a slight increase in the amount of fast-sedimenting neuronal DNA also occurred when a 1-hr interval between the two doses was investigated. At intervals of 2 hr or more, no such increase in fast-sedimenting neuronal DNA was observed. None of the periods between doses resulted in an accumulation of DNA damage in intracerebral 9L tumor cells. The accumulation of this type of DNA damage in neurons but not in tumor cells suggests that avoidance of a critical period in neuronal DNA repair may someday be an important concept in the design of brain tumor therapy schedules.

  3. The Mechanism of Radiosensitization by YM155, a Novel Small Molecule Inhibitor of Survivin Expression, is Associated with DNA Damage Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songliu Hu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family, is an attractive target for cancer therapy. We investigated the effects of YM155, a small molecule inhibitor of survivin expression, on the radiosensitivity of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cell lines and elucidated a relationship between the cellular localization of survivin and DNA double-strand break repair. Methods: The cellular distribution of survivin was determined by Western blotting of subcellular fractions and by immunofluorescent staining in A549 NSCLC cells. Radiation-induced DNA damage was evaluated based on histone H2AX phosphorylation and foci formation. The relationship between the cellular localization of survivin and DNA double-strand break repair was analyzed by Western blotting and co-immunoprecipitations. Results: YM155 down-regulated survivin expression in NSCLC cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. An in vitro clonogenic survival assay revealed that YM155 increased the sensitivity of NSCLC cells to radiation. After irradiation, we observed a rapid accumulation of survivin in the nucleus. An immunofluorescent analysis of histone γ-H2AX demonstrated that the inhibition of survivin expression by YM155 resulted in impaired DNA double-strand break repair. Co-immunoprecipitation assays using nuclear extracts revealed an interaction between survivin, Ku70, γ-H2AX, and DNA-PKcs. Furthermore, S2056 autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs was reduced in survivin-depleted cells. Conclusions: These results suggested that YM155 sensitized NSCLC cells to radiation, at least in part by inhibiting DNA repair and enhancing apoptosis via the down-regulation of survivin expression. YM155 pretreatment inhibited DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation at S2056. Nuclear survivin was involved in DNA double-strand break repair via interactions with members of the DNA double-strand break repair machinery.

  4. The ERCC2/XPD Lys751Gln polymorphism affects DNA repair of benzo[a]pyrene induced damage, tested in an in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Sha; Cui, Su; Lu, Xiaobo; Guan, Yangyang; Li, Dandan; Liu, Qiufang; Cai, Yuan; Jin, Cuihong; Yang, Jinghua; Wu, Shengwen; van der Straaten, Tahar

    2016-08-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is an important defense mechanism of the body to exogenous carcinogens and mutagens, such as benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P). Genetic polymorphisms in ERCC2/XPD, a critical element in NER, are thought to be associated with individual's cancer susceptibility. Although ERCC2/XPD Lys751Gln (rs13181) is the most studied polymorphism, the impact of this polymorphism on DNA repair capacity to carcinogen remains unclear. In the present study, cDNA clones carrying different genotypes of ERCC2/XPD (Lys751Gln) were introduced into an ERCC2/XPD deficient cell line (UV5) in a well-controlled biological system. After B[a]P treatment, cell growth inhibition rates and DNA damage levels in all cells were detected respectively. As expected, we found that the DNA repair capacity in UV5 cells was restored to levels similar to wildtype parent AA8 cells upon introduction of the cDNA clone of ERCC2/XPD (Lys751). Interestingly, after B[a]P treatment, transfected cells expressing variant ERCC2/XPD (751Gln) showed an enhanced cellular sensitivity and a diminished DNA repair capacity. The wildtype genotype AA (Lys) was found to be associated with a higher DNA repair capacity as compared to its polymorphic genotype CC (Gln). These data indicate that ERCC2/XPD Lys751Gln polymorphism affects DNA repair capacity after exposure to environmental carcinogens such as B[a]P in this well-controlled in vitro system and could act as a biomarker to increase the predictive value to develop cancer. PMID:27139774

  5. Evaluation of the radioinduced damage, repair capacity and cell death on human tumorigenic (T-47D and MCF-7) and nontumorigenic (MCF-10) cell lines of breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies that account women, representing about one in three of all female neoplasm. Approximately, 90% of cases are considered sporadic, attributed to somatic events and about 10% have a family history and this only 4 - 5 % is due to hereditary factors. In the clinic, ionizing radiation is a major tool utilized in the control of tumour growth, besides surgery and chemotherapy. There is, however, little information concerning cellular response to the action of ionizing radiation in the target cells, i.e., cell lines originating from breast cancer. The present study proposed to analyze the radiosensitivity of the human tumorigenic (T-47D and MCF-7) and non tumorigenic (MCF-10) cell lines, originating from breast and submitted to various doses (0.5 to 30 Gy) of 60Co rays (0.72 - 1.50 Gy/min). For this purpose, DNA radioinduced damage, repair capacity and cell death were utilized as parameters of radiosensitivity by micronucleus, single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay) and cell viability techniques. The data obtained showed that tumorigenic cell lines were more radiosensitive than non tumorigenic breast cells in all assays here utilized. The T-47D cell line was presenting the highest amount of radioinduced damage, a more accelerated proliferation rate and a higher rate of cell death. The three cell lines presented a relatively efficient repair capacity, since one hour after the irradiation all of them showed a considerable reduction of radioinduced damage. The techniques employed showed to be secure, sensitive and reproducible, allowing to quantify and evaluate DNA damage, repair capacity and cell death in the three human breast cell lines. (author)

  6. A molecular biological study on the identification of the molecular species of DNA polymerases for repairing radiation-damaged DNA and the factors modifying the mutation rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiming at prevention and treatment of radiation damages, the authors have been investigating DNA damages by X-ray and its repairing mechanism, however, the molecular species of DNA polymerase which mediate the repairing could not been identified by biochemical methods using various inhibitors because of their low specificity. Therefore, in this study, anti-sense oligonucleotides for DNA polymerase α, δ and ε were obtained by chemical synthesis and transduced into human fibroblast cell, NB1RGB by three methods; endocytotic method, electroporation method and lipofection method. For the first method, the addition of those peptides into the cell culture at 5 μM inhibited the polymerase activity by up to 30% and it was economically difficult to use at higher concentrations than it. For the electroporation method, different conditions were tested in the respects of initial potential, time constant and buffer, but the uptake of thimidine was scarcely decreased in the surviving cells, suggesting that the surviving rate would be short in the cells electroporated with those anti-sense peptides. For the lipofection method, among several cationic lipids tested, lipofectamine significantly enlarged the decrease of thymidine uptake by anti-sense δ, however it was considered that its application to DNA repairing is difficult because lipofectamine is strongly cytotoxic. Therefore, construction of a vector which allows to express anti-sense RNA in those cells is undertaken. (M.N.)

  7. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (lGF-1) inhibit repair of potentially lethal radiation damage and chromosome aberrations and later DNA repair kinetics in plateau-phase A549 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plateau-phase A549 cells exhibit a high capacity for repair of potentially lethal radiation damage (PLD) when allowed to recover in their own spent medium. Addition of either insulin or insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) to the spent medium 60 to 120 min before irradiation significantly inhibits PLD repair. The 9-h recovery factor (survival with holding/survival without holding)is reduced from 10.8 ± 0.7 to 3.4 ±0.3 by insulin and to 3.0 ± 0.4 by IGF-1. Neither growth factor alters the cell age distribution of the plateau-phase cells, increases the rate of incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine into DNA, or alters the extent of radiation-induced mitotic delay in cells subcultured immediately after irradiation. Both insulin and IGF-1 alter the kinetics for rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), slowing the fast component of rejoining significantly. However, these growth factors have no effect on the initial level of DSBs or on the percentage of residual unrejoined breaks at 120 min postirradiation. Both growth factors affect repair of lesions leading to dicentric, but not to acentric, chromosome aberrations significantly. In control cells (treated with phosphate-buffered saline, 90 min prior to irradiation), the half-time for disappearance of dicentrics was 4.1 h (3.4 to 5.1 h), and 47.1 ± 3.7% of the residual damage remained at 24 h postirradiation. Insulin and IGF-1 increased the half-time for disappearance of dicentrics to 5.2 h (3.9 to 7.7 h) and 5.7 h (5.5 to 5.9 h), respectively, and increased residual damage to 56.1 ±5.9% and 60.8 ± 6.0%, respectively. Overall, these data show that insulin and IGF-1 inhibit PLD repair in A54j9 cells by mechanisms which are independent of changes in cell cycle parameters. The data suggest that the growth factors act by inducing changes in chromatin conformation which promote misrepair of radiation-damaged DNA. 49 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  8. Chondrocyte outgrowth into a gelatin scaffold in a single impact load model of damage/repair – effect of BMP-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Thea

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Articular cartilage has little capacity for repair in vivo, however, a small number of studies have shown that, in vitro, a damage/repair response can be induced. Recent work by our group has shown that cartilage can respond to single impact load and culture by producing repair cells on the articular surface. The purpose of this study was to identify whether chondrocyte outgrowth into a 3D scaffold could be observed following single impact load and culture. The effect of bone morphogenic-2 (BMP-2 on this process was investigated. Methods Cartilage explants were single impact loaded, placed within a scaffold and cultured for up to 20 days +/- BMP-2. Cell numbers in the scaffold, on and extruding from the articular surface were quantified and the immunohistochemistry used to identify the cellular phenotype. Results Following single impact load and culture, chondrocytes were observed in a 3D gelatin scaffold under all culture conditions. Chondrocytes were also observed on the articular surface of the cartilage and extruding out of the parent cartilage and on to the cartilage surface. BMP-2 was demonstrated to quantitatively inhibit these events. Conclusion These studies demonstrate that articular chondrocytes can be stimulated to migrate out of parent cartilage following single impact load and culture. The addition of BMP-2 to the culture medium quantitatively reduced the repair response. It may be that the inhibitory effect of BMP-2 in this experimental model provides a clue to the apparent inability of articular cartilage to heal itself following damage in vivo.

  9. Preliminary Studies on Base Substitutions and Repair of DNA Mismatch Damage Stimulated by Low Energy N+ Ion Beam Implantation in Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢传晓; 郭金华; 程备久; 余增亮

    2003-01-01

    Ever since the low energy N+ ion beam has been accepted that the mutation effectsof ionizing radiation are attributed mainly to direct or indirect damage to DNA. Evidences basedon naked DNA irradiation in support of a mutation spectrum appears to be consistent, but directproof of such results in vivo are limited. Using mutS, dam and/or dcm defective Eschericha colimutator strains, an preliminary experimental system on induction of in vivo mutation spectra oflow energy N+ ion beam has been established in this study. It was observed that the mutationrates of rifampicin resistance induced by N+ implantation were quite high, ranging from 9.2 ×10-8 to 4.9 × 10-5 at the dosage of 5.2 × 1014 ions/cm2. Strains all had more than 90-fold highermutation rate than its spontaneous mutation rate determined by this method. It reveals thatbase substitutions involve in induction of mutation of low energy nitrogen ion beam implantation.The mutation rates of mutator strains were nearly 500-fold (GM2929), 400-fold (GM5864) and6-fold larger than that of AB1157. The GM2929 and GM5864 both lose the ability of repair DNAmismatch damage by virtue of both dam and dcm pathways defective (GM2929) or failing toassemble the repair complex (GM5864) respectively. It may explain the both strains had a similarhigher mutation rate than GM124 did. It indicated that DNA cytosine methylase might play animportant role in mismatch repair of DNA damage induced by N+ implantation. The furtherrelated research were also discussed.

  10. Association between Genetic Polymorphisms of DNA Repair Genes and Chromosomal Damage for 1,3-Butadiene-Exposed Workers in a Matched Study in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menglong Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to examine the association between polymorphisms of DNA repair genes and chromosomal damage of 1,3-butadiene- (BD- exposed workers. The study was conducted in 45 pairs of occupationally exposed workers in a BD product workshop and matched control workers in an administrative office and a circulatory water workshop in China. Newly developed biomarkers (micronuclei, MNi; nucleoplasmic bridges, NPBs; nuclear buds, NBUDs in the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CBMN cytome assay were adopted to detect chromosomal damage. PCR and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP are adopted to analyze polymorphisms of DNA repair genes, such as X-ray repair cross-complementing Group 1 (XRCC1, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT, poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerases (ADPRT, and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases (APE1. The BD-exposed workers exhibited increased frequencies of MNi and NPBs when compared to subjects in the control group. The results also show that the BD-exposed workers carrying XRCC1 diplotypes TCGA-CCGG (4.25±2.06‰ (FR=2.10, 95% CI: 1.03–4.28 and TCGG-TCGA (5.80±3.56‰ (FR=2.75, 95% CI: 0.76–2.65 had statistically higher NBUD frequencies than those who carried diplotype TCGG-TCGG (1.89±1.27‰. Our study suggests that polymorphisms of XRCC1 gene may influence chromosomal damage in BD-exposed workers.

  11. Effect of increased intake of dietary animal fat and fat energy on oxidative damage, mutation frequency, DNA adduct level and DNA repair in rat colon and liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Ulla; Daneshvar, Bahram; Autrup, Herman;

    2003-01-01

    The effect of high dietary intake of animal fat and an increased fat energy intake on colon and liver genotoxicity and on markers of oxidative damage and antioxidative defence in colon, liver and plasma was investigated in Big Blue rats. The rats were fed ad libitum with semi-synthetic feed...... DNA-adduct level measured by 32P-postlabelling decreased in both liver and colon with increased fat intake. In liver, this was accompanied by a 2-fold increase of the mRNA level of nucleotide excision repair (NER) gene ERCC1. In colon, a non-statistically significant increase in the ERCC1 mRNA levels...

  12. Detection of DNA single-strand breaks during the repair of UV damage in xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this investigation, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) fibroblasts, XP12BE, were uv-irradiated and then incubated with cytosine arabinoside and hydroxyurea for 4 hr to inhibit the polymerase step of DNA excision repair. By alkaline elution, DNA single-strand breaks (SSB) were detected in XP cells with this regimen with an efficiency of 0.1-0.2 SSB per 109 daltons of DNA per J m-2. There was an approximately linear relation between the SSB frequency and uv dose over a range of 0.2 to 25 J m-2. This effect was approximately two orders of magnitude greater in excision-proficient normal human fibroblasts than in XP cells. These results support the conclusion that a low residual level of DNA excision repair occurs in XP group A cells and that the SSB generated during this repair can be accumulated with this polymerase inhibitor

  13. Interactive effects of ultraviolet-B radiation and pesticide exposure on DNA photo-adduct accumulation and expression of DNA damage and repair genes in Xenopus laevis embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Interactive effects of UVB radiation-pesticide co-exposures were examined in frogs. • Responses included induction of DNA photo-adducts and DNA damage and repair genes. • Elevated DNA adduct levels occurred for co-exposures compared to UVB alone. • One mechanism is that pesticides may alter nuclear excision repair gene expression. - Abstract: Pesticide use and ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation have both been suggested to adversely affect amphibians; however, little is known about their interactive effects. One potential adverse interaction could involve pesticide-induced dysregulation of DNA repair pathways, resulting in greater numbers of DNA photo-adducts from UVB exposure. In the present study, we investigated the interactive effects of UVB radiation and two common pesticides (endosulfan and α-cypermethrin) on induction of DNA photo-adducts and expression of DNA damage and repair related genes in African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) embryos. We examined 13 genes that are, collectively, involved in stress defense, cell cycle arrest, nucleotide excision repair (NER), base excision repair, mismatch repair, DNA repair regulation, and apoptosis. We exposed X. laevis embryos to 0, 25, and 50 μg/L endosulfan or 0, 2.5, and 5.0 μg/L α-cypermethrin for 96 h, with environmentally relevant exposures of UVB radiation during the last 7 h of the 96 h exposure. We measured the amount of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and mRNA abundance of the 13 genes among treatments including control, pesticide only, UVB only, and UVB and pesticide co-exposures. Each of the co-exposure scenarios resulted in elevated CPD levels compared to UVB exposure alone, suggesting an inhibitory effect of endosulfan and α-cypermethrin on CPD repair. This is attributed to results indicating that α-cypermethrin and endosulfan reduced mRNA abundance of XPA and HR23B, respectively, to levels that may affect the initial recognition of DNA lesions. In contrast, both pesticides

  14. Interactive effects of ultraviolet-B radiation and pesticide exposure on DNA photo-adduct accumulation and expression of DNA damage and repair genes in Xenopus laevis embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Shuangying, E-mail: shuangying.yu@ttu.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, 1207 S. Gilbert Dr., Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States); Tang, Song, E-mail: song.tang@usask.ca [Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, 1207 S. Gilbert Dr., Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States); Mayer, Gregory D., E-mail: greg.mayer@ttu.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, 1207 S. Gilbert Dr., Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States); Cobb, George P., E-mail: george_cobb@baylor.edu [Department of Environmental Science, Baylor University, One Bear Place #97266, Waco, TX 76798 (United States); Maul, Jonathan D., E-mail: jonathan.maul@ttu.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, 1207 S. Gilbert Dr., Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Interactive effects of UVB radiation-pesticide co-exposures were examined in frogs. • Responses included induction of DNA photo-adducts and DNA damage and repair genes. • Elevated DNA adduct levels occurred for co-exposures compared to UVB alone. • One mechanism is that pesticides may alter nuclear excision repair gene expression. - Abstract: Pesticide use and ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation have both been suggested to adversely affect amphibians; however, little is known about their interactive effects. One potential adverse interaction could involve pesticide-induced dysregulation of DNA repair pathways, resulting in greater numbers of DNA photo-adducts from UVB exposure. In the present study, we investigated the interactive effects of UVB radiation and two common pesticides (endosulfan and α-cypermethrin) on induction of DNA photo-adducts and expression of DNA damage and repair related genes in African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) embryos. We examined 13 genes that are, collectively, involved in stress defense, cell cycle arrest, nucleotide excision repair (NER), base excision repair, mismatch repair, DNA repair regulation, and apoptosis. We exposed X. laevis embryos to 0, 25, and 50 μg/L endosulfan or 0, 2.5, and 5.0 μg/L α-cypermethrin for 96 h, with environmentally relevant exposures of UVB radiation during the last 7 h of the 96 h exposure. We measured the amount of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and mRNA abundance of the 13 genes among treatments including control, pesticide only, UVB only, and UVB and pesticide co-exposures. Each of the co-exposure scenarios resulted in elevated CPD levels compared to UVB exposure alone, suggesting an inhibitory effect of endosulfan and α-cypermethrin on CPD repair. This is attributed to results indicating that α-cypermethrin and endosulfan reduced mRNA abundance of XPA and HR23B, respectively, to levels that may affect the initial recognition of DNA lesions. In contrast, both pesticides

  15. On-bead fluorescent DNA nanoprobes to analyze base excision repair activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •On magnetic beads fluorescent enzymatic assays. •Simple, easy, non-radioactive and electrophoresis-free functional assay. •Lesion-containing hairpin DNA probes are selective for repair enzymes. •The biosensing platform allows the measurement of DNA repair activities from purified enzymes or within cell free extracts. -- Abstract: DNA integrity is constantly threatened by endogenous and exogenous agents that can modify its physical and chemical structure. Changes in DNA sequence can cause mutations sparked by some genetic diseases or cancers. Organisms have developed efficient defense mechanisms able to specifically repair each kind of lesion (alkylation, oxidation, single or double strand break, mismatch, etc). Here we report the adjustment of an original assay to detect enzymes’ activity of base excision repair (BER), that supports a set of lesions including abasic sites, alkylation, oxidation or deamination products of bases. The biosensor is characterized by a set of fluorescent hairpin-shaped nucleic acid probes supported on magnetic beads, each containing a selective lesion targeting a specific BER enzyme. We have studied the DNA glycosylase alkyl-adenine glycosylase (AAG) and the human AP-endonuclease (APE1) by incorporating within the DNA probe a hypoxanthine lesion or an abasic site analog (tetrahydrofuran), respectively. Enzymatic repair activity induces the formation of a nick in the damaged strand, leading to probe's break, that is detected in the supernatant by fluorescence. The functional assay allows the measurement of DNA repair activities from purified enzymes or in cell-free extracts in a fast, specific, quantitative and sensitive way, using only 1 pmol of probe for a test. We recorded a detection limit of 1 μg mL−1 and 50 μg mL−1 of HeLa nuclear extracts for APE1 and AAG enzymes, respectively. Finally, the on-bead assay should be useful to screen inhibitors of DNA repair activities

  16. Isolation of cDNA clones encoding an enzyme from bovine cells that repairs oxidative DNA damage in vitro: homology with bacterial repair enzymes.

    OpenAIRE

    Robson, C.N.; Milne, A M; Pappin, D J; Hickson, I. D.

    1991-01-01

    Ionizing radiation and radiomimetic compounds, such as hydrogen peroxide and bleomycin, generate DNA strand breaks with fragmented deoxyribose 3' termini via the formation of oxygen-derived free radicals. These fragmented sugars require removal by enzymes with 3' phosphodiesterase activity before DNA synthesis can proceed. An enzyme that reactivates bleomycin-damaged DNA to a substrate for Klenow polymerase has been purified from calf thymus. The enzyme, which has a Mr of 38,000 on SDS-PAGE, ...

  17. Determination of damage and In vivo DNA repairing through the unicellular in gel electrophoresis technique; Determinacion del dano y la reparacion del ADN In vivo mediante la tecnica de electroforesis unicelular en gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendiola C, M.T.; Morales R, P. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    The experimental conditions were standardized for the unicellular in gel electrophoresis technique setting up (EUG) at the Cellular Radiobiology laboratory. Preliminary experiments were realized with human cells and mouse which were exposed to ionizing radiation or hydroxide peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) to induce DNA damage and to verify the technique performance. It was analysed the In vivo repairing kinetics of induced damage by gamma radiation in mouse leukocytes which were exposed to {sup 137} Cs source and taking samples of peripheric blood of the tail of each mouse at different exposure times and processing them for EUG. In function of the cells proportion with damage in each time it was determined the existence of fast repairing mechanism at the first 15 minutes followed by a slight increase in the damage and a late repairing stage between 30 and 90 minutes. It was analysed this behavior and the potentiality of this In vivo system. (Author)