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Sample records for alkaline nitrate solutions

  1. Study of the electroreduction of nitrate on copper in alkaline solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyter, David [INRS Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, 1650 bd. Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Qc (Canada); Departement de Chimie, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, CP 8888, Montreal, Qc (Canada); Belanger, Daniel [Departement de Chimie, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, CP 8888, Montreal, Qc (Canada); Roue, Lionel [INRS Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, 1650 bd. Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Qc (Canada)

    2008-08-20

    The electrocatalytic activity of a Cu electrode for the electroreduction of nitrate in alkaline medium was investigated by linear sweep voltammetry at stationary and rotating disc electrodes. Nitrate-reduction products generated upon prolonged electrolyses at different potentials were quantified. In addition, adsorption phenomena associated with the nitrate electroreduction process were characterized by electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) experiments. This data revealed that nitrate electroreduction process strongly depends on the applied potential. Firstly, at ca. -0.9 V vs. Hg/HgO, the electroreduction of adsorbed nitrate anions to nitrite anions was identified as the rate-determining step of the nitrate electroreduction process. Between -0.9 and -1.1 V, nitrite is reduced to hydroxylamine. However, during long-term electrolyses, hydroxylamine is not detected and presumably because it is rapidly reduced to ammonia. At potential more negative than -1.1 V, nitrite is reduced to ammonia. At ca. -1.45 V, i.e. just before the hydrogen evolution reaction, the abrupt decrease of the cathodic current is due to the electrode poisoning by adsorbed hydrogen. In addition, during the first minutes of nitrate electrolysis, a decrease of the copper electrode activity was observed at the three investigated potentials (-0.9, -1.1 and -1.4 V). From polarization and EQCM measurements, this deactivation was attributed to the adsorption of nitrate-reduction products, blocking the electrode surface and slowing down the nitrate electroreduction rate. However, it was demonstrated that the Cu electrode can be reactivated by the periodic application of a square wave potential pulse at -0.5 V, which causes the desorption of poisoning species. (author)

  2. On the radiolysis of concentrated alkaline and calcium-nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiwi, J.T.; Daniels, M.

    1978-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that more nitrite is produced than can reasonably be accounted for by an indirect radiolysis mechanism based on the radical products of radiolysed water. Further results on the relative roles of indirect effect and direct effect (a chemical transformation in the solute due to its energy absorption) are presented. Major products are nitrite, peroxide and oxygen and yields can be accounted for using the electron fraction model. (author)

  3. Effects of sulfate and nitrate anions on aluminum corrosion in slightly alkaline solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengyi; Church, Benjamin C.

    2018-05-01

    The corrosion mechanisms and kinetics of AA1085 in Li2SO4 and LiNO3 aqueous rechargeable lithium-ion battery electrolytes were investigated at pH 11 using chronoamperometry. The corrosion kinetics of AA1085 is controlled by the electrolyte concentration level and the anodic potentials. AA1085 is susceptible to crystallographic pitting corrosion in Li2SO4 electrolytes. The rates of pit nucleation and pit growth both decreased at higher Li2SO4 concentrations or at lower anodic potentials. AA1085 passivates against pitting corrosion in LiNO3 electrolytes due to the formation of a thick, uniform corrosion product layer. The growth rate of the passive film was slightly enhanced by increasing the electrolyte concentration and anodic potentials. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra showed the formation of a thin sulfate-incorporated passive film on the electrode, which comprises Al2(SO)418H2O, Al(OH)SO4 and Al(OH)3, before the occurrence of pitting growth in 2 M Li2SO4 electrolyte. The thick corrosion product layer formed in 5 M LiNO3 electrolyte was composed of Al(OH)3 and AlOOH. Raman spectroscopy on deionized water, LiOH solution, Li2SO4 and LiNO3 electrolytes depicted changes of solution structure with increasing electrolyte concentration. The influence of extrinsic and intrinsic factors on the corrosion kinetics of AA1085 in Li2SO4 and LiNO3 electrolytes at pH 11 are discussed in detail.

  4. Nitrate removal from alkaline high nitrate effluent by in situ generation of hydrogen using zinc dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajagopal, S.; Chitra, S.; Paul, Biplob

    2016-01-01

    Alkaline radioactive low level waste generated in Nuclear Fuel Cycle contains substantial amount of nitrate and needs to be treated to meet Central Pollution Control Board discharge limits of 90 mg/L in marine coastal area. Several denitrification methods like chemical treatment, electrochemical reduction, biological denitrification, ion exchange, reverse osmosis, photochemical reduction etc are followed for removal of nitrate. In effluent treatment plants where chemical treatment is carried out, chemical denitrification can be easily adapted without any additional set up. Reducing agents like zinc and aluminum are suitable for reducing nitrate in alkaline solution. Study on denitrification with zinc dust was taken up in this work. Not much work has been done with zinc dust on reduction of nitrate to nitrogen in alkaline waste with high nitrate content. In the present work, nitrate is reduced by nascent hydrogen generated in situ, caused by reaction between zinc dust and sodium hydroxide

  5. Evaluation of hydraulic conductivities of bentonite and rock under hyper alkaline and nitrate conditions. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iriya, Keishiro; Fujii, Kensuke; Kubo, Hiroshi

    2003-02-01

    Circumstance of TRU waste repository shows alkaline condition due to leaching of cementitious materials. The waste containing significant soluble nitrate may changes ground water chemistry to high ion strength. Several experimental studies have been carried out in this study in order to assess quantitatively water conductivity of bentonite which is altered by hyper alkaline and nitrate. Modeling for previous results is carried out and several requirements to be defined are proposed. The conclusion of this study is summarized as below. Secondary minerals of bentonite alteration due to hyper alkaline with nitrate: 1) CSH and CAH were observed corresponding to solving montmorillonite in AWN solution. 2) Na 2 O Al 2 O 3 1.68SiO 2 generated from 90 days in batch experiment and it was observed in 360 days. Assessment of swelling and water conductivity changing by hyper alkaline with nitrate: 1) Little changing of water conductivity of bentonite was observed by saturated Ca(OH) 2 solution and hyper alkaline solution. The conductivity significantly increased by penetrating sodium nitrate solution. 2) Water conductivity of ion exchanged bentonite by hyper alkaline solution significantly increased. It increased more by penetrating AWN solution. Modeling of tuff alteration by hyper alkaline solution: 1) Flow through test is proposed since soluble velocity to hyper alkaline solution should be defined. (author)

  6. Decomposition of metal nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.A.; Stines, W.B.

    1982-01-01

    Oxides in powder form are obtained from aqueous solutions of one or more heavy metal nitrates (e.g. U, Pu, Th, Ce) by thermal decomposition at 300 to 800 deg C in the presence of about 50 to 500% molar concentration of ammonium nitrate to total metal. (author)

  7. Evaluation of hydraulic conductivities of bentonite and rock under hyper alkaline and nitrate conditions (3) (Summary)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iriya, Keishiro; Kubo, Hiroshi

    2004-02-01

    This report is the summary of JNC-TJ--8400-2005-002. 1) Circumstance of TRU waste repository shows alkaline condition due to leaching of cementitious materials. The waste containing significant soluble nitrate may changes ground water chemistry to high ion strength. Consolidation test and permeability test are carried out in order to as. exchanged with nitrate. It is noted that permeability of bentonite increased at from 40 to 200 times by cation exchange. 2) Permeability of hyper alkaline solution is almost same to water. Permeability of hyper alkaline solution with nitrates increased corresponding to rising ion strength. 3) The results of batch of column test were simulated. The model can explain clearly the results in short period. This can estimate leaching ratio and secondary minerals. The model can simulate the experimental results by two types of velocity theory on altering bentonite. (author)

  8. Technetium recovery from high alkaline solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, Charles A.

    2016-07-12

    Disclosed are methods for recovering technetium from a highly alkaline solution. The highly alkaline solution can be a liquid waste solution from a nuclear waste processing system. Methods can include combining the solution with a reductant capable of reducing technetium at the high pH of the solution and adding to or forming in the solution an adsorbent capable of adsorbing the precipitated technetium at the high pH of the solution.

  9. Evaluation of hydraulic conductivities of bentonite and rock under hyper alkaline and nitrate conditions (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iriya, Keishiro; Kubo, Hiroshi

    2004-02-01

    Circumstance of TRU waste repository shows alkaline condition due to leaching of cementitious materials. The waste containing significant soluble nitrate may changes ground water chemistry to high ion strength. Consolidation test and permeability test are carried out in order to assess quantitatively permeability of bentonite altered by hyper alkaline and nitrate. Modeling is progressed based on experimental results. The following results are obtained. 1) Consolidation test was carried out in 3 types of bentonite and 30 % sand mixture in which cation exchanged with nitrate. It is noted that permeability of bentonite increased at from 40 to 200 times by cation exchange. 2) Permeability of hyper alkaline solution is almost same to water. Permeability of hyper alkaline solution with nitrates increased corresponding to rising ion strength. 3) The results of batch of column test were simulated. The model can explain clearly the results in short period. This can estimate leaching ratio and secondary minerals. The model can simulate the experimental results by two types of velocity theory on altering bentonite. (author)

  10. EXTRACTION OF URANYL NITRATE FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, N.H.; Mundy, R.J.

    1957-12-10

    An improvement in the process is described for extracting aqueous uranyl nitrate solutions with an organic solvent such as ether. It has been found that the organic phase will extract a larger quantity of uranyl nitrate if the aqueous phase contains in addition to the uranyl nitrate, a quantity of some other soluble nitrate to act as a salting out agent. Mentioned as suitable are the nitrates of lithium, calcium, zinc, bivalent copper, and trivalent iron.

  11. Catalyzed reduction of nitrate in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.A.

    1994-08-01

    Sodium nitrate and other nitrate salts in wastes is a major source of difficulty for permanent disposal. Reduction of nitrate using aluminum metal has been demonstrated, but NH 3 , hydrazine, or organic compounds containing oxygen would be advantageous for reduction of nitrate in sodium nitrate solutions. Objective of this seed money study was to determine minimum conditions for reduction. Proposed procedure was batchwise heating of aqueous solutions in closed vessels with monitoring of temperatures and pressures. A simple, convenient apparatus and procedure were demonstrated for observing formation of gaseous products and collecting samples for analyses. The test conditions were 250 degree C and 1000 psi max. Any useful reduction of sodium nitrate to sodium hydroxide as the primary product was not found. The nitrate present at pHs 3 or NH 4 NO 3 is easily decomposed, and the effect of nitromethane at these low pHs was confirmed. When acetic acid or formic acid was added, 21 to 56% of the nitrate in sodium nitrate solutions was reduced by methanol or formaldehyde. With hydrazine and acetic acid, 73 % of the nitrate was decomposed to convert NaNO 3 to sodium acetate. With hydrazine and formic acid, 36% of the nitrate was decomposed. If these products are more acceptable for final disposal than sodium nitrate, the reagents are cheap and the conversion conditions would be practical for easy use. Ammonium acetate or formate salts did not significantly reduce nitrate in sodium nitrate solutions

  12. Evaluation of hydraulic conductivities of bentonite and rock under hyper alkaline and nitrate conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iriya, K.; Fujii, K.; Kubo, H.

    2002-02-01

    The chemical conditions of TRU waste repository were estimated as alkaline conditions effected by cementitious materials. And, some TRU wastes include soluble nitrate salt, we have to consider the repository conditions might be high ionic strength condition leaching of nitrate salt. In this study, experimental studies were carried out to evaluate hydraulic conductivities of bentonite and rock under hyper alkaline and nitrate conditions. The followings results were obtained for bentonite. 1) In the immersion experiments of bentonite in hyper alkaline fluids with and without nitrate, the disappearance of montmorillonite of bentonite was observed and CSH formation was found after 30 days. In hyper alkaline fluid with nitrate, minerals at θ=37 nm by XRD was identified. 2) Significant effects of hyper alkaline on hydraulic conductivity of compacted bentonite were not observed. However, hydraulic conductivities of hyper alkaline fluid with nitrate and ion exchanged bentonite increased. In hyper alkaline with nitrate, more higher hydraulic conductivities of exchanged bentonite were measured. The followings results were obtained for rock. 1) In the immersion experiments of crushed tuff in hyper alkaline fluids with and without nitrate, CSH and CASH phases were observed. 2) The hydraulic conductivity of tuff in hyper alkaline fluids decreased gradually. Finally, hyper alkaline flow in tuff stopped after 2 months and hyper alkaline flow with nitrate stopped shorter than without nitrate. In the results of analysis of tuff after experiment, we could identified secondary minerals, but we couldn't find the clogging evidence of pores in tuff by secondary minerals. (author)

  13. Comparison of anti-corrosive properties between hot alkaline nitrate blackening and hydrothermal blackening routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fattah-alhosseini, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan 65178-38695 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yazdani Khan, H., E-mail: hamid.yazdanikhan@gmail.com [Department of Materials Engineering, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan 65178-38695 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Heidarpour, A. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Hamedan University of Technology, Hamedan, 65155-579 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    In this study, the oxide films were formed on carbon steel by using hot alkaline nitrate and hydrothermal treatments. A dense and protective oxide film was obtained by hydrothermal method due to application of high pressure and by increasing solution temperature from boiling temperature (155 °C) to 250 °C. Oxide films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and electrochemical tests including potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). These analyses showed that the magnetite film which was formed on carbon steel surface by hydrothermal treatment offers the best resistance in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. Although thicker oxide film could be obtained via hot alkaline nitrate black oxidizing, corrosion resistance was lower as a result of being highly porous and the presence of hematite. - Highlights: • Oxide films have been formed on steel by using of hot alkaline nitrate and hydrothermal treatments. • A dense and protective oxide film was obtained by hydrothermal treatment. • SEM micrographs showed that a dense and protective oxide film was obtained by hydrothermal treatment. • Film formed by hydrothermal treatment could have the best resistance in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution.

  14. Chrono-amperometric studies in melt alkaline nitrates and chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stemmelin, Jean-Claude

    1969-01-01

    This research thesis proposes a large overview of the electrochemical behaviour of a number of metals and alloys in melt alkaline chlorides and nitrates at various temperatures. These salts are generally pure but, in some experiments, contain humidity or gases. The author addresses and discusses all the reactions which may occur at the electrode between the salt decomposition potentials. After having recalled and commented some definitions and fundamental principles of thermodynamics and electrochemical kinetics, presented the methods (polarization curves, measurements and additional analysis), the experimental apparatus and the reference electrodes in melt salts, the author reports the results obtained with the studied melt salts, and proposes an interpretation of Log i/U curves

  15. Denitrification of nitrate waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaels, S.L.; Michel, R.C.; Terpandjian, P.D.; Vora, J.N.

    1976-01-01

    Bacterial denitrification by Pseudomonas Stutzeri has been chosen as the method for removing nitrate from the effluent stream of the Y-12 uranium purification process. A model was developed to predict bacterial growth and carbon and nitrate depletion during the induction period and steady state operation. Modification of analytical procedures and automatic control of the pH in the reactor are recommended to improve agreement between the prediction of the model and experimental data. An initial carbon-to-nitrogen (C/N) mass ratio of 1.4-1.5 insures adequate population growth during the induction period. Further experiments in batch reactors and in steady state flow reactors are recommended to obtain more reliable kinetic rate constants

  16. Photodegradation of Paracetamol in Nitrate Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Cui; Qu, Ruijuan; Liang, Jinyan; Yang, Xi

    2010-11-01

    The photodegradation of paracetamol in nitrate solution under simulated solar irradiation has been investigated. The degradation rates were compared by varying environmental parameters including concentrations of nitrate ion, humic substance and pH values. The quantifications of paracetamol were conducted by HPLC method. The results demonstrate that the photodegradation of paracetamol followed first-order kinetics. The photoproducts and intermediates of paracetamol in the presence of nitrate ions were identified by extensive GC-MS method. The photodegradation pathways involving. OH radicals as reactive species were proposed.

  17. Photodegradation of Paracetamol in Nitrate Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Meng; Ruijuan, Qu; Jinyan, Liang; Xi, Yang [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2010-11-24

    The photodegradation of paracetamol in nitrate solution under simulated solar irradiation has been investigated. The degradation rates were compared by varying environmental parameters including concentrations of nitrate ion, humic substance and pH values. The quantifications of paracetamol were conducted by HPLC method. The results demonstrate that the photodegradation of paracetamol followed first-order kinetics. The photoproducts and intermediates of paracetamol in the presence of nitrate ions were identified by extensive GC-MS method. The photodegradation pathways involving. OH radicals as reactive species were proposed.

  18. Photodegradation of Paracetamol in Nitrate Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Cui; Qu Ruijuan; Liang Jinyan; Yang Xi

    2010-01-01

    The photodegradation of paracetamol in nitrate solution under simulated solar irradiation has been investigated. The degradation rates were compared by varying environmental parameters including concentrations of nitrate ion, humic substance and pH values. The quantifications of paracetamol were conducted by HPLC method. The results demonstrate that the photodegradation of paracetamol followed first-order kinetics. The photoproducts and intermediates of paracetamol in the presence of nitrate ions were identified by extensive GC-MS method. The photodegradation pathways involving. OH radicals as reactive species were proposed.

  19. Radiation-induced nitration of organic compounds in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ershov, B.G.; Gordeev, A.V.; Bykov, G.L.; Moisy, P.

    2012-01-01

    Radiolysis in aqueous nitrate and acetic acid solutions and nitrate/nitric acid and phenol was studied. The radiolysis of these solutes occurs with circle NO 2 radical, which is the active nitrating agent. Accumulation of nitromethane and nitrite was determined during γ-irradiation of aqueous solutions containing acetic and nitrate solutions. Irradiation of aqueous phenol-nitrate/nitric acid solutions results in the formation of 2- and 4-nitrophenols.

  20. Radiation-induced nitration of organic compounds in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ershov, B.G.; Gordeev, A.V.; Bykov, G.L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Frumkin Inst. of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry; Moisy, P. [CEA, Bagnols sur Ceze (France). Nuclear Energy Div.

    2012-07-01

    Radiolysis in aqueous nitrate and acetic acid solutions and nitrate/nitric acid and phenol was studied. The radiolysis of these solutes occurs with {sup circle} NO{sup 2} radical, which is the active nitrating agent. Accumulation of nitromethane and nitrite was determined during {gamma}-irradiation of aqueous solutions containing acetic and nitrate solutions. Irradiation of aqueous phenol-nitrate/nitric acid solutions results in the formation of 2- and 4-nitrophenols.

  1. Preparation of acid deficient solutions of uranyl nitrate and thorium nitrate by steam denitration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagishi, Shigeru; Takahashi, Yoshihisa

    1996-01-01

    Acid deficient heavy metal (HM) nitrate solutions are often required in the internal gelation processes for nuclear fuel fabrication. The stoichiometric HM-nitrate solutions are needed in a sol-gel process for fuel fabrication. A method for preparing such nitrate solutions with a controlled molar ratio of nitrate/metal by denitration of acid-excess nitrate solutions was developed. The denitration was conducted by bubbling a nitrate solution with a mixture of steam+Ar. It was found that steam was more effective for the denitration than Ar. The acid deficient uranyl nitrate solution with nitrate/U=1.55 was yielded by steam bubbling, while not by only Ar bubbling. As for thorium nitrate, acid deficient solutions of nitrate/Th≥3.1 were obtained by steam bubbling. (author)

  2. Denitrification of nitrate waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolami, R.J.; Chao, E.I.; Choi, W.M.; Johnson, B.R.; Varlet, J.L.P.

    1976-01-01

    Growth rates for the denitrifying bacteria Pseudomonas Stutzeri were studied to minimize the time necessary to start up a bacterial denitrification reactor. Batch experiments were performed in nine 250-ml Erlenmeyer flasks, a 7-liter fermentor, and a 67-liter fermentor. All reactors maintained an anaerobic environment. Initial microorganism inoculum concentration was varied over four orders of magnitude. Initial nitrate and substrate carbon concentrations were varied from 200 to 6000 ppm and from 56 to 1596 ppm, respectively, with a carbon-to-nitrogen weight ratio of 1.18. In all experiments, except those with the highest initial substrate-to-bacteria ratio, no growth was observed due to substrate depletion during the lag period. In those experiments which did exhibit an increase in bacterial population, growth also stopped due to substrate depletion. A model simulating microbe growth during the induction period was developed, but insufficient data were available to properly adjust the model constants. Because of this, the model does not accurately predict microbe growth. The metabolism of Pseudomonas Stutzeri was studied in detail. This resulted in a prediction of the denitrification stoichiometry during steady state reactor operation. Iron was found to be an important component for bacterial anabolism

  3. Characterization of alkali-metal and alkaline-earth nitrates by vibrational spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez, S.

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available Infrared spectra of sodium and potassium alkaline-metal nitrates and magnesium and calcium alkali-earth nitrates in solid phase had been recorded in order to assign the fundamental bands. The influence of the dispersal médium (alkaline halide, employed in the solid sample preparation have been discussed. The quantitative measurements of the band in ten sities at 1387 cm-1 (present in the I.R. spectra of the four nitrates in KBr médium allowed us to determine the Lambert-Beer law slopes for each compound. These values are differents (bearing in mind experimental random errors, so we have could to affirm the nonexistence of solid solution between the nitrate and the alkaline halide médium. The L-B law obtained by us can be used for the Identification differentiation and quantitative analysis of these nitrates in solid phase, even if they are present in a very low concentration.

    Se ha realizado la asignación de los espectros infrarrojo (IR de los nitratos alcalinos, sódico y potásico, y de los alcalinotérreos, magnésico y cálcico, en estado sólido. Se ha visto la influencia del medio dispersante (haluro alcalino, utilizado en la preparación de la muestra sólida. El estudio cuantitativo de la absorbencia de la banda a 1.387 cm-1 (presente en los espectros IR de los cuatro nitratos en medio KBr permite determinar las pendientes de la Ley de Lambert-Beer Se comprueba que dichas pendientes son diferentes lo que conduce a poder afirmar que no se produce disolución sólida entre el KBr y el nitrato alcalino o alcalinotérreo. La determinación de la ley de Lambert-Beer permite la identificación y el análisis cualitativo y cuantitativo por espectroscopia IR de estos nitratos cuando están presentes en bajas concentraciones en muestras sólidas.

  4. Progress of research on the influence of alkaline cation and alkaline solution on bentonite properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Weimin; Zheng Zhenji; Chen Bao; Chen Yonggui

    2011-01-01

    Based on the previous laboratory studies and numerical simulation on bentonite in alkaline environments, the effects of alkaline cation and alkaline solution on mineral composition, microstructure, swelling capacity and hydraulic properties of bentonite are emphasized in this paper, temperature, pH values and concentration are discussed as main affecting factors. When bentonite is exposed to alkaline cation or alkaline solution, microstructure of bentonite will be changed due to the dissolution of montmorillonite and the formation of secondary minerals, which results in the decrease of swelling pressure. The amount of the reduction of swelling pressure depends on the concentration of alkaline solution. Temperature, polyvalent cation, salinity and concentration are the main factors affecting hydraulic properties of bentonite under alkaline conditions. Therefore, future research should focus on the mechanism of coupling effects of weak alkaline solutions on the mineral composition, microstructure, swelling capacity and hydraulic properties of bentonite under different temperatures and different pH values. (authors)

  5. Solubility of pllutonium in alkaline salt solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbs, D.T.; Edwards, T.B.

    1993-01-01

    Plutonium solubility data from several studies have been evaluated. For each data set, a predictive model has been developed where appropriate. In addition, a statistical model and corresponding prediction intervals for plutonium solubility as a quadratic function of the hydroxide concentration have been developed. Because of the wide range of solution compositions, the solubility of plutonium can vary by as much as three orders of magnitude for any given hydroxide concentration and still remain within the prediction interval. Any nuclear safety assessments that depend on the maximum amount of plutonium dissolved in alkaline salt solutions should use concentrations at least as great as the upper prediction limits developed in this study. To increase the confidence in the prediction model, it is recommended that additional solubility tests be conducted at low hydroxide concentrations and with all of the other solution components involved. To validate the model for application to actual waste solutions, it is recommended that the plutonium solubilities in actual waste solutions be determined and compared to the values predicted by the quadratic model

  6. Investigation of complexing of trivalent lanthanoids in aqueous nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopyrin, A.A.; Proyaev, V.V.; Edinakova, V.

    1985-01-01

    Complexing of trivalent lanthanoids (Ce, Eu) with nitrate-ions in concentrated solutions of lithium and sodium nitrates has been studied in a wide range of ionic forces (1.0-7.0), using the extractional, densimetric and solubility methods. Nitrate complexes registered by the extraction and solubility methods mainly are of second sphere character. During rare earth extraction from concentrated nitrate solutions in the range of nitrate-ion concentrations <= 5 mol/l second sphere neutral nitrate complexes take part in distribution, at higher values of nitrate-ion concentration formation of intrasphere monoligand complexes of lanthanoids should be taken into account

  7. Electrochemical processing of nitrate waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genders, D.; Weinberg, N.; Hartsough, D.

    1992-01-01

    The second phase of research performed at The Electrosynthesis Co., Inc. has demonstrated the successful removal of nitrite and nitrate from a synthetic effluent stream via a direct electrochemical reduction at a cathode. It was shown that direct reduction occurs at good current efficiencies in 1,000 hour studies. The membrane separation process is not readily achievable for the removal of nitrites and nitrates due to poor current efficiencies and membrane stability problems. A direct reduction process was studied at various cathode materials in a flow cell using the complete synthetic mix. Lead was found to be the cathode material of choice, displaying good current efficiencies and stability in short and long term tests under conditions of high temperature and high current density. Several anode materials were studied in both undivided and divided cell configurations. A divided cell configuration was preferable because it would prevent re-oxidation of nitrite by the anode. The technical objective of eliminating electrode fouling and solids formation was achieved although anode materials which had demonstrated good stability in short term divided cell tests corroded in 1,000 hour experiments. The cause for corrosion is thought to be F - ions from the synthetic mix migrating across the cation exchange membrane and forming HF in the acid anolyte. Other possibilities for anode materials were explored. A membrane separation process was investigated which employs an anion and cation exchange membrane to remove nitrite and nitrate, recovering caustic and nitric acid. Present research has shown poor current efficiencies for nitrite and nitrate transport across the anion exchange membrane due to co-migration of hydroxide anions. Precipitates form within the anion exchange membranes which would eventually result in the failure of the membranes. Electrochemical processing offers a highly promising and viable method for the treatment of nitrate waste solutions

  8. Characterization of aqueous silver nitrate solutions for leakage tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ferreira Costa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the pH over a period of 168 h and the ionic silver content in various concentrations and post-preparation times of aqueous silver nitrate solutions. Also, the possible effects of these factors on microleakage test in adhesive/resin restorations in primary and permanent teeth were evaluated. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A digital pHmeter was used for measuring the pH of the solutions prepared with three types of water (purified, deionized or distilled and three brands of silver nitrate salt (Merck, Synth or Cennabras at 0, 1, 2, 24, 48, 72, 96 and 168 h after preparation, and storage in transparent or dark bottles. Ionic silver was assayed according to the post-preparation times (2, 24, 48, 72, 96, 168 h and concentrations (1, 5, 25, 50% of solutions by atomic emission spectrometry. For each sample of each condition, three readings were obtained for calculating the mean value. Class V cavities were prepared with enamel margins on primary and permanent teeth and restored with the adhesive systems OptiBond FL or OptiBond SOLO Plus SE and the composite resin Filtek Z-250. After nail polish coverage, the permanent teeth were immersed in 25% or 50% AgNO3 solution and the primary teeth in 5% or 50% AgNO3 solutions for microleakage evaluation. ANOVA and the Tukey's test were used for data analyses (α=5%. RESULTS: The mean pH of the solutions ranged from neutral to alkaline (7.9±2.2 to 11.8±0.9. Mean ionic silver content differed depending on the concentration of the solution (4.75±0.5 to 293±15.3 ppm. In the microleakage test, significant difference was only observed for the adhesive system factor (p=0.000. CONCLUSIONS: Under the tested experimental conditions and based on the obtained results, it may be concluded that the aqueous AgNO3 solutions: have neutral/alkaline pH and service life of up to 168 h; the level of ionic silver is proportional to the concentration of the solution; even at 5% concentration, the solutions were

  9. Biotic and surface catalyzed reactivity of nitrates at alkaline pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafrafi, Y.; Erable, B.; Ranaivomanana, H.; Bertron, A.; Albrecht, A.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the reactivity of nitrates in abiotic and biotic conditions at alkaline pH in the context of a repository for long-lived intermediate- level radioactive wastes. The work, carried out under environmental conditions closed to those prevailing in the storage: alkaline pH, no oxygen, solid materials (cement paste, steel), aims to identify the by-products of the nitrate reduction, to evaluate reaction kinetics and to determine the role of organic matter in these reactions with and without the presence of denitrifying microbial activity. This paper demonstrated that in the extreme conditions of pH in nuclear waste storage cells, nitrate reduction is a really possible scenario in the presence of microorganisms. (authors)

  10. The aluminum chemistry and corrosion in alkaline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jinsuo; Klasky, Marc; Letellier, Bruce C.

    2009-01-01

    Aluminum-alkaline solution systems are very common in engineering applications including nuclear engineering. Consequently, a thorough knowledge of the chemistry of aluminum and susceptibility to corrosion in alkaline solutions is reviewed. The aluminum corrosion mechanism and corrosion rate are examined based on current experimental data. A review of the phase transitions with aging time and change of environment is also performed. Particular attention is given to effect of organic and inorganic ions. As an example, the effect of boron is examined in detail because of the application in nuclear reactor power systems. Methods on how to reduce the corrosion rate of aluminum in alkaline solutions are also highlighted

  11. Complexes of pentavalent plutonium in lithium nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mekhail, F.M.; Zaki, M.R.

    1977-01-01

    Pu 0 2 ion can form nitrate complexes in concentrated solution of lithium nitrate of PH 3.5. Spectrophotometric and ion exchange studies revealed the existence of two complexes, presumably the mono-and the dinitro. The rate of adsorption of the dinitrato complex, formed in 4 to 6 M-lithium nitrate solutions, on De-Acidite FF has been investigated and suggested to be diffusion controlled. The adsorption isotherm found to obey satisfactorily Freundlich equation

  12. Chemical denitration of aqueous nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrill, K.A.

    1987-11-01

    The Plant for Active Waste Liquids (PAWL) at CRNL will immobilize in glass the fission products in waste from Mo-99 production. The nitrate ions in the waste can be destroyed by heating, but also by chemical reaction with formic acid (HCOOH). Since chemical denitration has several advantages over thermal denitration it was studied in the course of vitrification process development. Two free radical mechanisms are examined here to explain kinetic data on chemical denitration of nitric acid solutions with formic acid. One mechanism is applicable at > 1 mol/L HNO 3 and involves the formate radical (HCOO . ). The second mechanism holds at 3 and involves the hyponitrous radical (HNO . ). Mass balances for various species were written based on the law of mass action applied to the equations describing the reaction mechanism. Analytical and numerical solutions were obtained and compared. Literature data on batch denitration were used to determine some of the rate constants while others were set arbitrarily. Observed stoichiometry and trends in reactant concentrations are predicted accurately for batch data. There are no literature data to compare with the prediction of negligible induction time

  13. Radiation-induced nitration of organic compounds in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ershov, B.G.; Gordeev, A.V.; Bykov, G.L.

    2009-01-01

    Radiation-induced nitration of organic compounds in aqueous solutions was studied. It was found that γ-irradiation of solutions containing acetic and nitric acid and/or their salts gives nitromethane. Dependences of the product yield on the absorbed dose and the contents of components were established. The mechanism of radiation nitration involving radicals is discussed. (author)

  14. Ruthenium release from thermally overheated nitric acid solution containing ruthenium nitrosyl nitrate and sodium nitrate to solidify

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada, Kayo; Ueda, Yasuyuki; Enokida, Youichi [Nuclear Chemical Engineering Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya 4648603 (Japan)

    2016-07-01

    Radioactive ruthenium (Ru) is one of the dominant elemental species released into the environment from a fuel reprocessing plant in a hypothetical design accident due to its relatively higher fission yield and longer half-life. After the hypothetical accident assuming the loss of all electric power and cooling functions, high-level liquid waste (HLLW) may be overheated by the energetic decays of many fission products in it, and Ru may be oxidized to the volatile tetroxide, RuO{sub 4}, which is released through the off-gas pathway. At a reprocessing plant in Japan, alkaline solution from the solvent scrubbing stream is sometimes mixed with the HLLW followed by vitrification, which can be influenced by the addition of sodium nitrate to a simulated HLLW containing ruthenium nitrosyl nitrate that was experimentally evaluated on a small scale using the overheated nitric acid solution of 2 mol/dm{sup 3}, which was kept at 180 Celsius degrees in a glass evaporator placed in a thermostatic bath. The release fraction of Ru increased by approximately 30% by the addition of sodium nitrate. This may be partially explained by the existence of relatively highly concentrated nitrate ions in the liquid phase that oxidize the ruthenium species to RuO{sub 4} during the drying process. (authors)

  15. Molybdenum solubility in aluminium nitrate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heres, X.; Sans, D.; Bertrand, M.; Eysseric, C. [CEA, Centre de Marcoule, Nuclear Energy Division, DRCP, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Brackx, E.; Domenger, R.; Excoffier, E. [CEA, Centre de Marcoule, Nuclear Energy Division, DTEC, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Valery, J.F. [AREVA-NC, DOR/RDP, Paris - La Defense (France)

    2016-07-01

    For over 60 years, research reactors (RR or RTR for research testing reactors) have been used as neutron sources for research, radioisotope production ({sup 99}Mo/{sup 99m}Tc), nuclear medicine, materials characterization, etc... Currently, over 240 of these reactors are in operation in 56 countries. They are simpler than power reactors and operate at lower temperature (cooled to below 100 C. degrees). The fuel assemblies are typically plates or cylinders of uranium alloy and aluminium (U-Al) coated with pure aluminium. These fuels can be processed in AREVA La Hague plant after batch dissolution in concentrated nitric acid and mixing with UOX fuel streams. The aim of this study is to accurately measure the solubility of molybdenum in nitric acid solution containing high concentrations of aluminium. The higher the molybdenum solubility is, the more flexible reprocessing operations are, especially when the spent fuels contain high amounts of molybdenum. To be most representative of the dissolution process, uranium-molybdenum alloy and molybdenum metal powder were dissolved in solutions of aluminium nitrate at the nominal dissolution temperature. The experiments showed complete dissolution of metallic elements after 30 minutes long stirring, even if molybdenum metal was added in excess. After an induction period, a slow precipitation of molybdic acid occurs for about 15 hours. The data obtained show the molybdenum solubility decreases with increasing aluminium concentration. The solubility law follows an exponential relation around 40 g/L of aluminium with a high determination coefficient. Molybdenum solubility is not impacted by the presence of gadolinium, or by an increasing concentration of uranium. (authors)

  16. Benchmark Evaluation of Plutonium Nitrate Solution Arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, M.A.; Bess, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    In October and November of 1981 thirteen approach-to-critical experiments were performed on a remote split table machine (RSTM) in the Critical Mass Laboratory of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in Richland, Washington, using planar arrays of polyethylene bottles filled with plutonium (Pu) nitrate solution. Arrays of up to sixteen bottles were used to measure the critical number of bottles and critical array spacing with a tight fitting Plexiglas(reg s ign) reflector on all sides of the arrays except the top. Some experiments used Plexiglas shells fitted around each bottles to determine the effect of moderation on criticality. Each bottle contained approximately 2.4 L of Pu(NO3)4 solution with a Pu content of 105 g Pu/L and a free acid molarity H+ of 5.1. The plutonium was of low 240Pu (2.9 wt.%) content. These experiments were performed to fill a gap in experimental data regarding criticality limits for storing and handling arrays of Pu solution in reprocessing facilities. Of the thirteen approach-to-critical experiments eleven resulted in extrapolations to critical configurations. Four of the approaches were extrapolated to the critical number of bottles; these were not evaluated further due to the large uncertainty associated with the modeling of a fraction of a bottle. The remaining seven approaches were extrapolated to critical array spacing of 3-4 and 4-4 arrays; these seven critical configurations were evaluation for inclusion as acceptable benchmark experiments in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbook. Detailed and simple models of these configurations were created and the associated bias of these simplifications was determined to range from 0.00116 and 0.00162 ± 0.00006 ?keff. Monte Carlo analysis of all models was completed using MCNP5 with ENDF/BVII.0 neutron cross section libraries. A thorough uncertainty analysis of all critical, geometric, and material parameters was performed using parameter

  17. Radiolysis studies of uranyl nitrate solution in nitric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siri, Sandra; Mondino, Angel V.

    2005-01-01

    The radiolysis of acidic uranyl nitrate solutions was investigated using Co-60 gamma radiation. Hydrogen peroxide was determined as a function of increasing dose. The UV-vis absorption spectra of the irradiated solutions were measured and the spectral changes were analyzed. The increasing dose increases the absorbance intensities, possibly by an increment in nitrate concentration produced by radiolysis, which can originate the formation of different uranyl complexes in solution. (author)

  18. Method for improved decomposition of metal nitrate solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Paul A.; Stines, William B.

    1983-10-11

    A method for co-conversion of aqueous solutions of one or more heavy metal nitrates wherein thermal decomposition within a temperature range of about 300.degree. to 800.degree. C. is carried out in the presence of about 50 to 500% molar concentration of ammonium nitrate to total metal.

  19. Removal of phosphate and nitrate from aqueous solution using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the present study was the removal of phosphate and nitrate by sodium alginate seagrass (Cymodocea rotundata) beads from aqueous solutions. The adsorption characteristics of phosphate and nitrate on the seagrass beads were optimized under different operational parameters like adsorbent dosage, initial ...

  20. Densities concentrations of aqueous of uranyl nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigo Otero, A.; Rodriguez Hernandez, B.; Fernandez Rodriguez, L.

    1966-01-01

    The ratio density-concentration of aqueous uranyl nitrate solutions expressed as U 3 O 8 grams/liter, U grams/liter and hexahydrate uranyl nitrate weight percent at different temperatures, are established. Experimental values are graphically correlated and compared whit some published data. (Author) 2 refs

  1. Determination of the total nitrate content of thorium nitrate solution with a selective electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirkner, F.M.

    1979-01-01

    The nitrate content of thorium nitrate solutions is determined with a liquid membrane nitrate selective electrode utilizing the known addition method in 0.1 M potassium fluoride medium as ionic strength adjustor. It is studied the influence of pH and the presence of chloride, sulphate, phosphate, meta-silicate, thorium, rare earths, iron, titanium, uranium and zirconium at the same concentrations as for the aqueous feed solutions in the thorium purification process. The method is tested in synthetic samples and in samples proceeding from nitric dissolutions of thorium hidroxide and thorium oxicarbonate utilized as thorium concentrates to be purified [pt

  2. Alkaline solution/binder ratio as a determining factor in the alkaline activation of aluminosilicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Santaquiteria, C., E-mail: ruiz.cs@ietcc.csic.es [Eduardo Torroja Institute (CSIC), c/Serrano Galvache, n Degree-Sign 4, 28033 Madrid (Spain); Skibsted, J. [Instrument Centre for Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy, Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Department of Chemistry, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Fernandez-Jimenez, A.; Palomo, A. [Eduardo Torroja Institute (CSIC), c/Serrano Galvache, n Degree-Sign 4, 28033 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-09-15

    This study investigates the effect of the alkaline solution/binder (S/B) ratio on the composition and nanostructure of the reaction products generated in the alkaline activation of aluminosilicates. The experiments used two mixtures of fly ash and dehydroxylated white clay and for each of these, varying proportions of the solution components. The alkali activator was an 8 M NaOH solution (with and without sodium silicate) used at three S/B ratios: 0.50, 0.75 and 1.25. The {sup 29}Si, {sup 27}Al MAS NMR and XRD characterisation of the reaction products reveal that for ratios nearest the value delivering suitable paste workability, the reaction-product composition and structure depend primarily on the nature and composition of the starting materials and the alkaline activator used. However, when an excess alkaline activator is present in the system, the reaction products tend to exhibit SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratios of approximately 1, irrespective of the composition of the starting binder or the alkaline activator.

  3. Coupled jump rotational dynamics in aqueous nitrate solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Puja; Yashonath, Subramanian; Bagchi, Biman

    2016-12-21

    A nitrate ion (NO 3 - ) with its trigonal planar geometry and charges distributed among nitrogen and oxygen atoms can couple to the extensive hydrogen bond network of water to give rise to unique dynamical characteristics. We carry out detailed atomistic simulations and theoretical analyses to investigate these aspects and report certain interesting findings. We find that the nitrate ions in aqueous potassium nitrate solution exhibit large amplitude rotational jump motions that are coupled to the hydrogen bond rearrangement dynamics of the surrounding water molecules. The jump motion of nitrate ions bears certain similarities to the Laage-Hynes mechanism of rotational jump motions of tagged water molecules in neat liquid water. We perform a detailed atomic-level investigation of hydrogen bond rearrangement dynamics of water in aqueous KNO 3 solution to unearth two distinct mechanisms of hydrogen bond exchange that are instrumental to promote these jump motions of nitrate ions. As observed in an earlier study by Xie et al., in the first mechanism, after breaking a hydrogen bond with nitrate ion, water forms a new hydrogen bond with a water molecule, whereas the second mechanism involves just a switching of hydrogen bond between the two oxygen atoms of the same nitrate ion (W. J. Xie et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 224504 (2015)). The magnitude as well as nature of the reorientational jump of nitrate ion for the two mechanisms is different. In the first mechanism, nitrate ion predominantly undergoes out-of-plane rotation, while in the second mechanism, in-plane reorientation of NO 3 - is favourable. These have been deduced by computing the torque on the nitrate ion during the hydrogen bond switching event. We have defined and computed the time correlation function for coupled reorientational jump of nitrate and water and obtained the associated relaxation time which is also different for the two mechanisms. These results provide insight into the relation between the

  4. Gamma radiolysis of alkaline aqueous solutions of neptunium and plutonium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikaev, A.K.; Gogolev, A.V.; Shilov, V.P.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The paper is a brief review of data obtained by the authors from the study on redox reactions of neptunium and plutonium ions upon γ radiolysis of their aerated alkaline aqueous solutions. It includes the information on radiolytic reduction of Np(V), Np(VI) and Pu(VI) ions under various experimental conditions. It was found that the values of Np(VI) and Pu(VI) reduction yields do not depend on alkali concentration. The values considerably increase in the presence of some organic compounds (EDTA and formate were investigated). The formation of the Np(V) peroxo complex was observed in the γ radiolysis of alkaline aqueous solutions of Np(VI) and Np(V) in the presence of nitrate. The mechanism of radiolytic redox reactions of the ions is discussed in some detail

  5. Removal of uranium from ammonium nitrate solution by nanofiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Runci; Yuan, Zhongwei; Yan, Taihong; Zheng, Weifang [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China). Dept. of Radiochemistry

    2017-07-01

    Two types of nanofiltration membranes were tested to remove uranium dissolved in ammonium nitrate solution, and the influence of operating parameters as transmembrane pressure, tangential velocity and feed temperature was investigated. Experimental results showed NF270 membrane can reject more than 96% uranium and allow most (90% min) ammonium nitrate solution passed by, and with a permeate flux of 60 L/(m{sup 2}.h). Nanofiltration seems to be a promising technology for the removal of uranium and recovery of ammonium nitrate simultaneously.

  6. Removal of Nitrate From Aqueous Solution Using Rice Chaff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehghani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Nitrate is largely dissolved in the surface and ground water, due to its high solubility. Continual uptake of nitrite through drinking water can lead to problems and diseases (such as blue baby for humans, especially children. Objectives The aim of this study was to develop a new and inexpensive method for the removal of nitrate from water. In this regard, the possibility of using chaff for removal of nitrate from aqueous solutions was studied and the optimum operating conditions of nitrate removal was determined. Materials and Methods This is a cross-sectional study conducted in laboratory scale. The UV spectrophotometer at a wavelength of maximum absorbance (220 nm was used to determine the nitrate concentration. The effect of pH, amount of chaff, temperature, and contact time were investigated. Results The result of this study revealed that chaff as an absorbent could remove nitrate from solutions, and the efficiency of adsorption increased as contact time increased from 5 to 30 minutes, amount of chaff increased from 1 to 3 g, temperature increased in a range of 300 - 400°C and the amount of pH decreased from 10 to 3. The maximum adsorption rate was around pH 3 (53.14%. Conclusions It was shown that the removal efficiency of nitrate was directly proportional to the amount of chaff, temperature, and contact time but inversely to the pH. This study showed that nitrate removal by chaff is a promising technique.

  7. Preferential solvation, ion pairing, and dynamics of concentrated aqueous solutions of divalent metal nitrate salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sushma; Chandra, Amalendu

    2017-12-01

    We have investigated the characteristics of preferential solvation of ions, structure of solvation shells, ion pairing, and dynamics of aqueous solutions of divalent alkaline-earth metal nitrate salts at varying concentration by means of molecular dynamics simulations. Hydration shell structures and the extent of preferential solvation of the metal and nitrate ions in the solutions are investigated through calculations of radial distribution functions, tetrahedral ordering, and also spatial distribution functions. The Mg2+ ions are found to form solvent separated ion-pairs while the Ca2+ and Sr2+ ions form contact ion pairs with the nitrate ions. These findings are further corroborated by excess coordination numbers calculated through Kirkwood-Buff G factors for different ion-ion and ion-water pairs. The ion-pairing propensity is found to be in the order of Mg(NO3) 2 lead to the presence of substantial dynamical heterogeneity in these solutions of strongly interacting ions. The current study helps us to understand the molecular details of hydration structure, ion pairing, and dynamics of water in the solvation shells and also of ion diffusion in aqueous solutions of divalent metal nitrate salts.

  8. Potentiodynamic characteristics of cadmium and silver in alkaline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saidman, S.B.; Vilche, J.R.; Arvia, A.J.; Lopes Teijelo, M.

    1984-01-01

    The potentiodynamic and ellipsometric characteristics of cadmium and silver in alkaline solutions are studied. The phenomenology of both electrodes shows some common features which are interpreted in termo of a complex hydrated oxide anodic film structure resulting from simultaneous electrochemical and chemical reactions. The kinetics of film growth fits the predictions of nucleation and growth models. (C.L.B.) [pt

  9. Catalytic combustion of particulate matter Catalysts of alkaline nitrates supported on hydrous zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galdeano, N.F.; Carrascull, A.L.; Ponzi, M.I.; Lick, I.D.; Ponzi, E.N.

    2004-01-01

    In order to explore a method to remove particulate matter, catalysts of different alkaline nitrates (Li, K and Cs) supported on hydrous zirconium were prepared by the method of incipient humidity and tested as catalysts for particulate matter combustion. The catalytic activity was determined by using the temperature programmed oxidation technique (TPO), utilizing two equipments, a thermogravimetric reactor and other of fixed bed. In the first case the particulate matter/catalyst mixture was milled carefully in a mortar (tight contact) while in the second case more realistic operative conditions were used, particulate matter/catalyst mixture was made with a spatula (loose contact). All prepared catalysts showed good activity for the particulate matter combustion. The cesium catalyst was the one that presented higher activity, decreasing the combustion temperature between 200 and 250 deg. C with respect to the combustion without catalyst. The catalyst with lithium nitrate became active at higher temperature than its melting point and the same occurred with the potassium catalyst. This did not occur for the catalyst containing cesium nitrate that melts at 407 deg. C and became active from 350 deg. C

  10. Electrochemical processing of nitrate waste solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genders, D.; Weinberg, N.; Hartsough, D. (Electrosynthesis Co., Inc., Cheektowaga, NY (United States))

    1992-10-07

    The second phase of research performed at The Electrosynthesis Co., Inc. has demonstrated the successful removal of nitrite and nitrate from a synthetic effluent stream via a direct electrochemical reduction at a cathode. It was shown that direct reduction occurs at good current efficiencies in 1,000 hour studies. The membrane separation process is not readily achievable for the removal of nitrites and nitrates due to poor current efficiencies and membrane stability problems. A direct reduction process was studied at various cathode materials in a flow cell using the complete synthetic mix. Lead was found to be the cathode material of choice, displaying good current efficiencies and stability in short and long term tests under conditions of high temperature and high current density. Several anode materials were studied in both undivided and divided cell configurations. A divided cell configuration was preferable because it would prevent re-oxidation of nitrite by the anode. The technical objective of eliminating electrode fouling and solids formation was achieved although anode materials which had demonstrated good stability in short term divided cell tests corroded in 1,000 hour experiments. The cause for corrosion is thought to be F[sup [minus

  11. Preparation of working calibration and test materials: uranyl nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, S.S.; Spraktes, F.W.; Baldwin, J.M.; Hand, R.L.; Lash, R.P.

    1977-05-01

    Reliable working calibration and test materials (WCTMs) are essential to a meaningful analytical measurements quality assurance program. This report describes recommended methods for the preparation of uranyl nitrate solution WCTMs for testing analytical methods, for calibrating methods, and for testing personnel. Uranyl nitrate solution WCTMs can be synthesized from characterized starting materials or prepared from typical plant materials by thorough characterization with reference to primary or secondary reference calibration and test materials (PRCTMs or SRCTMs). Recommended starting materials are described along with detailed procedures for (a) preparing several widely-used types of uranyl nitrate solution WCTMs, (b) packaging the WCTMs, (c) analyzing the WCTMs to establish the reference values or to confirm the synthesis, and (d) statistically evaluating the analytical data to assign reference values and to assess the accuracy of the WCTMs

  12. Treatment of uranyl nitrate and flouride solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigo Otero, A.; Rodrigo Vilaseca, F.; Morales Calvo, G.

    1977-01-01

    A theoretical study on the fluoride complexes contained in uranyl and aluminium solutions has been carried out. Likewise concentration limits and Duhring diagrams for those solutions have been experimentally established. As a result, the optimum operation conditions for concentration by evaporation in the treatment plant, have been deduced. (Author) 12 refs

  13. Nitrate concentrations in soil solutions below Danish forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Ingeborg; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten; Gundersen, Per

    1999-01-01

    leaching in relation to land-use, a national monitoring programme has established sampling routines in a 7x7 km grid including 111 points in forests. During winters of 1986-1993, soil samples were obtained from a depth of 0-25, 25-50, 50-75 and 75-100 cm. Nitrate concentrations in soil solutions were...... species. A few sites deviated radically from the general pattern of low concentrations. The elevated concentrations recorded there were probably caused by high levels of N deposition due to emission from local sources or temporal disruptions of the N cycle. The nitrate concentration in the soil solution...

  14. Determination of plutonium in pure plutonium nitrate solutions - Gravimetric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This International Standard specifies a precise and accurate gravimetric method for determining the concentration of plutonium in pure plutonium nitrate solutions and reference solutions, containing between 100 and 300 g of plutonium per litre, in a nitric acid medium. The weighed portion of the plutonium nitrate is treated with sulfuric acid and evaporated to dryness. The plutonium sulfate is decomposed and formed to oxide by heating in air. The oxide is ignited in air at 1200 to 1250 deg. C and weighed as stoichiometric plutonium dioxide, which is stable and non-hygroscopic

  15. Critical experiment study on uranyl nitrate solution experiment facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Qingfu; Shi Yongqian; Wang Jinrong

    2005-01-01

    The Uranyl Nitrate Solution Experiment Facility was constructed for the research on nuclear criticality safety. In this paper, the configuration of the facility is introduced; a series of critical experiments on uranyl nitrate solution is described later, which were performed for various uranium concentrations under different conditions, i.e. with or without neutron absorbers in the core and with or without water-reflector outside the core. Critical volume and the minimum 235U critical mass for different uranium concentrations are presented. Finally, theoretical analysis is made on the experimental results. (authors)

  16. Characterization of palm fibers modified with alkaline solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sipiao, Bryan L.S.; Goulart, Shane A.G.; Mulinari, Daniella R.; Souza Junior, Fernando G. de

    2011-01-01

    This work had the objective of to study one inexpensive and effective technique that enables the application of natural fibers from the Australian Royal Palm as reinforcement in polymer composites. The fibers treated with alkaline solution were characterized by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and had their data compared with the fiber in nature. Data showed that the treatment made on fibers surface was effective. (author)

  17. A study of precipitation from pure solutions of uranyl nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decrop, J.; Holder, J.; Sauteron, J.

    1961-01-01

    After its purification by extraction of the uranyl nitrate from the organic solvent, uranium has to be converted into solid form again: uranium trioxide (UO 3 ). It can be done either by thermal decomposition of uranyl nitrate or by precipitation of uranium, followed by filtration and calcination. Only the second method has been studied for now at the Bouchet plant. This paper reports the bench-scale and pilot-scale experiments of the studies of the precipitation of pure solutions of uranyl nitrate using ammonia (gaseous or in solution) or ammonium carbonate. These have been carried out at the Bouchet plant. It investigates the chemical aspect (pH, precipitates chemical composition) and the technical aspect of the different ways of precipitation (conditions of precipitation, decantation and filtration of precipitates). (M.P.)

  18. Removal of phosphate and nitrate from aqueous solution using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sunny t

    water, 3.5 g of NaCl were dissolved to obtain 3.5 g/l salinity final solution. When the ... The nitrate adsorption was highly pH dependent, which affects the ... adsorption mechanism that the optimum pH for phosphate removal by .... Biosorption of copper(ii) from aqueous ... Accumulation and detoxification of toxic elements by ...

  19. Research of calcium oxide hydration in calcium nitrate solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Oliynyk

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mineral fertilizers are one of the important factors of agriculture intensification and increasing of food products quantity. The volume of fertilizers production and its domestic consumption in Ukraine indicate that nitrogen fertilizer using only comes nearer to the required number of science-based. One of the most widespread artificial fertilizers is the calcium nitrate. Aim: The aim is to study and theoretically substantiate the processes occurring in the preparation of suspensions of calcium hydroxide Са(ОН2 in solution of calcium nitrate Ca(NО32. Materials and Methods: The technical calcium oxide (quicklime DSTU BV.2.7-90-99, solutions of calcium nitrate of 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40% Ca(NО32 concentrations were used in the work. The content of lime in the preparation of a suspension in the solution changed (in terms of calcium oxide CaO from 150 g/dm3 to the maximum possible. Each of these solutions saturated at 40°С in lime to maximum concentration. Suitable for use in these experiments and in the technology of calcium nitrate obtaining are considered the solutions (suspensions that within 12 hours did not lose their mobility (transportability. Results: The experimental results show that increasing of the concentration of calcium nitrate in solution within the range 15...40%, the amount of lime that you can put into the solution without loss of transportability decreases. Further increasing of lime quantity in solutions concentrations causes to its solidifying, loss of mobility (transportability. Calculations showed that in the presence of calcium nitrate the solubility of Са(ОН2 is reduced nearly by order that can lead to the formation of calcium oxide CaO the solid phase Са(ОН2 on the surface, which also can form hydrogen bonds with the components of the solution. As the probability of formation of hydrogen bonds in solutions is high, there is a possibility of formation of clusters.

  20. Properties of concentrated plutonium nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, J.H.; Swanson, J.L.

    1978-01-01

    Selected properties were measured for solutions containing about 500 and 700 g/l plutonium (IV) in 4--5M nitric acid: density, viscosity, vapor pressure, boiling point, radiolytic gas (H 2 ) evolution rates, and corrosion rate on Ti and 304L stainless steel. Pu solubility was determined to be 550 to 800 g/l in 2.5 to 7M HNO 3 at ambient temperature and 820 to 860 g/l in 3M HNO 3 at 50 0 C

  1. Design of one evaporation system for uranyl nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mancilla Romero, R.J.

    1975-01-01

    The authors propose an instant evaporation system with recirculation of the concentrated solution to raise the concentration from 50 to 1500 g of uranium per litre of solution. The capacity of the plant is to be 14.1 kg of uranium per hour. The main equipment used in the system is as follows: 1. Ring-type heat exchanger, for increasing the temperature of the mixture of fresh and recirculated solution from 80 to 115 0 C; 2. Separation tank, in which instant evaporation is carried out. The absolute pressure inside the tank will be 500 mmHg, with steam separation from a concentrated (78.5 wt.%) uranyl nitrate solution; 3. Desuperheater-condenser of horizontal tubular type for condensing water vapour and recovering any uranyl nitrate that may have been entrained; 4. Storage tank for the concentrate, with a capacity for one day's normal operation, and a heating coil to prevent crystallization of the concentrated solution; 5. Two storage tanks for feed and condensate with capacity for one day's normal operation; 6. Supporting structure for the above components. Virtually all equipment in contact with the uranyl nitrate solution will be made of 304 stainless steel. Saturated steam at 143.3 0 C will be required. The cost of the proposed system is $543 030.00. (author)

  2. Derivation of an empirical formula for determining water content of mixed uranyl nitrate-thorium nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Duck Kee; Choi, Byung Il; Ro, Seung Gy; Eom, Tae Yoon; Kim, Zong Goo

    1986-01-01

    Densities of a large number of mixed uranyl nitrate-thorium nitrate solutions were measured with pycnometer. By the least squares analysis of the experimental result, an empirical formula for determining water content of mixed uranyl nitrate-thorium nitrate solutions as functions of uranium concentration, thorium concentration and nitric acid normality is derived; W=1.0-0.3580 C u -0.4538 C Th -0.0307H + where W, C u , C Th , and H + stand for water content(g/cc), uranium concentration (g/cc), thorium concentration(g/cc), and nitric acid normality, respectively. Water contents of the mixed uranyl nitrate-thorium nitrate solutions are calculated by using the empirical formular, and compared with the values calculated by Bouly's equation in which an additional data, solution density, is required. The two results show good agreements within 2.7%. (Author)

  3. Corrosion performance of several metals in plutonium nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Seiichiro; Nagai, Takayuki; Yasu, Shozo; Koizumi, Tsutomu

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion behavior of several metals exposed in plutonium nitrate solution was studied. Plutonium nitrate solution with the plutonium concentration ranging from 0.01 to 300 g/l was used as a corrosive medium. Specimens tested were type 304 ULC (304 ULC) stainless steel, type 310 Nb (310 Nb) stainless steel, titanium (Ti), titanium-5% tantalum alloy (Ti-5Ta), and zirconium (Zr). Corrosion behavior of these metals in plutonium nitrate solution was evaluated through examining electrochemical characteristics and corrosion rates obtained by weight loss measurement. From the results of the corrosion tests, it was found that the corrosion rate of stainless steels i.e. 304 ULC and 310 Nb, increases by the presence of plutonium in nitric acid solution. The corrosion potential of the stainless steels shifted linearly towards the noble direction as the concentration of plutonium increases. It is thought that the shifts in corrosion potential of the stainless steels to the noble direction results an increase in anodic current and, hence, corrosion rate. Valve metals, i.e. Ti, Ti-5Ta and Zr, showed good corrosion resistance over the whole range of plutonium concentration examined here. (author)

  4. Investigation of aluminum gate CMP in a novel alkaline solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Cuiyue; Liu Yuling; Sun Ming; Zhang Wenqian; Zhang Jin; Wang Shuai

    2016-01-01

    Beyond 45 nm, due to the superior CMP performance requirements with the metal gate of aluminum in the advanced CMOS process, a novel alkaline slurry for an aluminum gate CMP with poly-amine alkali slurry is investigated. The aluminum gate CMP under alkaline conditions has two steps: stock polishing and fine polishing. A controllable removal rate, the uniformity of aluminum gate and low corrosion are the key challenges for the alkaline polishing slurry of the aluminum gate CMP. This work utilizes the complexation-soluble function of FA/O II and the preference adsorption mechanism of FA/O I nonionic surfactant to improve the uniformity of the surface chemistry function with the electrochemical corrosion research, such as OCP-TIME curves, Tafel curves and AC impedance. The result is that the stock polishing slurry (with SiO 2 abrasive) contains 1 wt.% H 2 O 2 ,0.5 wt.% FA/O II and 1.0 wt.% FA/O I nonionic surfactant. For a fine polishing process, 1.5 wt.% H 2 O 2 , 0.4 wt.% FA/O II and 2.0 wt.% FA/O I nonionic surfactant are added. The polishing experiments show that the removal rates are 3000 ± 50 Å/min and 1600 ± 60 Å/min, respectively. The surface roughnesses are 2.05 ± 0.128 nm and 1.59 ± 0.081 nm, respectively. A combination of the functions of FA/O II and FA/O I nonionic surfactant obtains a controllable removal rate and a better surface roughness in alkaline solution. (paper)

  5. Bases for DOT exemption uranyl nitrate solution shipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moyer, R.A.

    1982-07-01

    Uranyl nitrate solutions from a Savannah River Plant reprocessing facility have been transported in cargo tank trailers for more than 20 years without incident during transit. The solution is shipped to Oak Ridge for further processing and returned to SRP in a solid metal form for recycle. This solution, called uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH) solution in Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations, is currently diluted about 2-fold to comply with DOT concentration limits (10% of low specific activity levels) specified for bulk low specific activity (LSA) liquid shipments. Dilution of the process solution increases the number of shipments, the cost of transportation, the cost of shipper preparations, the cost of further reprocessing in the receiving facility to first evaporate the added water, and the total risk to the population along the route of travel. However, the radiological risk remains about the same. Therefore, obtaining an exemption from DOT regulations to permit shipment of undiluted UNH solution, which is normally about two times the present limit, is prudent and more economical. The radiological and nonradiological risks from shipping a unit load of undiluted solution are summarized for the probable route. Data and calculations are presented on a per load or per shipment basis throughout this memorandum to keep it unclassified

  6. Study on removing nitrate from uranium solution by ion-exchange method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Genmao

    2004-01-01

    Nitrate of low concentration can interfere with adsorption of uranyl sulfate anion on anion-exchange resins because the anion-exchange resins have a stronger affinity for nitrate in uranium solution. Nitrate can be adsorbed with a high efficiency resin, then desorbed by sodium hydroxide. The nitrate concentration is about 60 g/L in eluate. The research results show that nitrate can be recovered from uranium solution with N-3 anion-exchange resin

  7. Corrosion of silicon nitride in high temperature alkaline solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Liyan, E-mail: liyan.qiu@cnl.ca; Guzonas, Dave A.; Qian, Jing

    2016-08-01

    The corrosion of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) in alkaline solutions was studied at temperatures from 60 to 300 °C. Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} experienced significant corrosion above 100 °C. The release rates of silicon and nitrogen follow zero order reaction kinetics and increase with increasing temperature. The molar ratio of dissolved silicon and nitrogen species in the high temperature solutions is the same as that in the solid phase (congruent dissolution). The activation energy for silicon and nitrogen release rates is 75 kJ/mol which agrees well with that of silica dissolution. At 300 °C, the release of aluminum is observed and follows first order reaction kinetics while other minor constituents including Ti and Y are highly enriched on the corrosion films due to the low solubility of their oxides.

  8. SEPARATION OF BARIUM VALUES FROM URANYL NITRATE SOLUTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, E.R.

    1959-02-24

    The separation of radioactive barium values from a uranyl nitrate solution of neutron-irradiated uranium is described. The 10 to 20% uranyl nitrate solution is passed through a flrst column of a cation exchange resin under conditions favoring the adsorption of barium and certain other cations. The loaded resin is first washed with dilute sulfuric acid to remove a portion of the other cations, and then wash with a citric acid solution at pH of 5 to 7 to recover the barium along with a lesser amount of the other cations. The PH of the resulting eluate is adjusted to about 2.3 to 3.5 and diluted prior to passing through a smaller second column of exchange resin. The loaded resin is first washed with a citric acid solution at a pH of 3 to elute undesired cations and then with citric acid solution at a pH of 6 to eluts the barium, which is substantially free of undesired cations.

  9. Electrochemical processing of nitrate waste solutions. Phase 2, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genders, D.; Weinberg, N.; Hartsough, D. [Electrosynthesis Co., Inc., Cheektowaga, NY (US)

    1992-10-07

    The second phase of research performed at The Electrosynthesis Co., Inc. has demonstrated the successful removal of nitrite and nitrate from a synthetic effluent stream via a direct electrochemical reduction at a cathode. It was shown that direct reduction occurs at good current efficiencies in 1,000 hour studies. The membrane separation process is not readily achievable for the removal of nitrites and nitrates due to poor current efficiencies and membrane stability problems. A direct reduction process was studied at various cathode materials in a flow cell using the complete synthetic mix. Lead was found to be the cathode material of choice, displaying good current efficiencies and stability in short and long term tests under conditions of high temperature and high current density. Several anode materials were studied in both undivided and divided cell configurations. A divided cell configuration was preferable because it would prevent re-oxidation of nitrite by the anode. The technical objective of eliminating electrode fouling and solids formation was achieved although anode materials which had demonstrated good stability in short term divided cell tests corroded in 1,000 hour experiments. The cause for corrosion is thought to be F{sup {minus}} ions from the synthetic mix migrating across the cation exchange membrane and forming HF in the acid anolyte. Other possibilities for anode materials were explored. A membrane separation process was investigated which employs an anion and cation exchange membrane to remove nitrite and nitrate, recovering caustic and nitric acid. Present research has shown poor current efficiencies for nitrite and nitrate transport across the anion exchange membrane due to co-migration of hydroxide anions. Precipitates form within the anion exchange membranes which would eventually result in the failure of the membranes. Electrochemical processing offers a highly promising and viable method for the treatment of nitrate waste solutions.

  10. Zinc electrodeposition from alkaline zincate solution by pulsating overpotentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MILOS V. SIMICIC

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that smooth zinc deposits cannot be obtained from alkaline zincate using constant overpotential and current rate. During prolonged metal deposition, spongy and dendritic deposits are formed. It has been shown that the deposits are less agglomerated in the case of square-wave pulsating overpotentials regime than the ones obtained in case of constant overpotential regime. This is explained in a semiquantitative way by two phenomena: selective anodic dissolution during overpotentials “off” period and decreasing diffusion control. These effects is more pronounced at higher pause-to-pulse ratio. Increasing the pause-to-pulse ratio causes a reduction of the ratio between diffusion and activation overpotential, resulting in a more compact deposit. Confirmation of the proposed semiquantitative mathematical model was obtained by zinc electrodeposition onto a copper wire from a 0.1 M zincate solution in 1.0 M KOH at room temperature.

  11. Electro-oxidation of methanol on copper in alkaline solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heli, H.; Jafarian, M.; Mahjani, M.G.; Gobal, F.

    2004-01-01

    The electro-oxidation of methanol on copper in alkaline solutions has been studied by the methods of cyclic voltammetry, quasi-steady state polarization and chronoamperometry. It has been found that in the course of an anodic potential sweep the electro-oxidation of methanol follows the formation of Cu III and is catalysed by this species through a mediated electron transfer mechanism. The reaction also continues in the early stages of the reversed cycle until it is stopped by the prohibitively negative potentials. The process is diffusion controlled and the current-time responses follow Cottrellian behavior. The rate constants, turnover frequency, anodic transfer coefficient and the apparent activation energy of the electro-oxidation reaction are reported

  12. Metal Oxide Decomposition In Hydrothermal Alkaline Sodium Phosphate Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.E. Ziemniak

    2003-09-24

    Alkaline hydrothermal solutions of sodium orthophosphate (2.15 < Na/P < 2.75) are shown to decompose transition metal oxides into two families of sodium-metal ion-(hydroxy)phosphate compounds. Equilibria for these reactions are quantified by determining phosphate concentration-temperature thresholds for decomposition of five oxides in the series: Ti(IV), Cr(III), Fe(III, II), Ni(II) and Zn(II). By application of a computational chemistry method General Utility Lattice Program (GULP), it is demonstrated that the unique non-whole-number Na/P molar ratio of sodium ferric hydroxyphosphate is a consequence of its open-cage structure in which the H{sup +} and excess Na{sup +} ions are located.

  13. Arsenic removal from alkaline leaching solution using Fe (III) precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongliang; Lv, Cuicui; Xiao, Li; Fu, Guoyan; Liu, Ya; Ye, Shufeng; Chen, Yunfa

    2018-02-02

    The alkaline leaching solution from arsenic-containing gold concentrate contains a large amount of arsenate ions, which should be removed because it is harmful to the production process and to the environment. In this study, conventional Fe (III) precipitation was used to remove arsenic from the leaching solution. The precipitation reaction was carried out at the normal temperature, and the effects of pH value and Fe/As ratio on the arsenic removal were investigated. The results show that the removal rate of arsenic is distinctive at different pH values, and the effect is best within the pH range of 5.25-5.96. The removal rate can be further increased by increasing the ratio of Fe/As. When the pH = 5.25-5.96 and Fe/As > 1.8, the arsenic in the solution can be reduced to below 5 mg/L. However, the crystallinity of ferric arsenate is poor, and the particle size is small, most of which is about 1 μm. The leaching toxicity test shows the leaching toxicity of precipitates gradually decreased by the increase of Fe/As. The precipitates can be stored safely as the ratio of Fe/As exceeded 2.5.

  14. Preparation standardisation and use of plutonium nitrate reference solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.L.; Drummond, J.L.

    1981-07-01

    A procedure is described for the purification of a plutonium nitrate solution in nitric acid for use as a plutonium master standard. Anion exchange chromatography followed by oxalate precipitation is used to purify the plutonium and the residual cationic impurities are analysed by emission spectroscopy. The plutonium content is accurately and precisely measured by two independent methods, namely by gravimetry as PuO 2 at 1250 0 C and by ceric oxidation, ferrous reduction and dichromate titration. Full details of the purification procedure are given, with recommended methods for storing and using the standard solution. It is concluded that such a solution is the most satisfactory reference material, available for plutonium analysis for reprocessing plants, and is adequately related to other, internationally accepted, standard reference materials. (author)

  15. Critical experiments on low enriched uranyl nitrate solution with STACY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyoshi, Yoshinori

    1996-01-01

    As the STACY started steady operations, systematic criticality data on low enriched uranyl nitrate solution system could be accumulated. Main experimental parameters for the cylindrical tank of 60 cm in diameter were uranium concentration and the reflector condition. Basic data on a simple geometry will be helpful for the validation of the standard criticality safety codes, and for evaluating the safety margin included in the criticality designs. Experiments on the reactivity effects of structural materials such as borated concrete and polyethylene are on schedule next year as the second series of experiments using 10 wt% enriched uranyl solution. Furthermore, neutron interacting experiments with two slab tanks will be performed to investigate the fundamental properties of neutron interaction effects between core tanks. These data will be useful for making more reasonable calculation models and for evaluating the safety margin in the criticality designs for the multiple unit system. (J.P.N.)

  16. Study of accurate volume measurement system for plutonium nitrate solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosoma, T. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works

    1998-12-01

    It is important for effective safeguarding of nuclear materials to establish a technique for accurate volume measurement of plutonium nitrate solution in accountancy tank. The volume of the solution can be estimated by two differential pressures between three dip-tubes, in which the air is purged by an compressor. One of the differential pressure corresponds to the density of the solution, and another corresponds to the surface level of the solution in the tank. The measurement of the differential pressure contains many uncertain errors, such as precision of pressure transducer, fluctuation of back-pressure, generation of bubbles at the front of the dip-tubes, non-uniformity of temperature and density of the solution, pressure drop in the dip-tube, and so on. The various excess pressures at the volume measurement are discussed and corrected by a reasonable method. High precision-differential pressure measurement system is developed with a quartz oscillation type transducer which converts a differential pressure to a digital signal. The developed system is used for inspection by the government and IAEA. (M. Suetake)

  17. Hydrolysis-precipitation studies of aluminum (III) solutions. I. Titration of acidified aluminum nitrate solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, A.C.; Geus, John W.; Stol, R.J.; Bruyn, P.L. de

    Acidified aluminum nitrate solutions were titrated with alkali (NaOH or KOH) over a temperature range of 24°C to 90°C. A homogeneous distribution of added base was achieved by: (i) in situ decomposition of urea (90°C); and (ii) a novel method involving injection through a capillary submerged in the

  18. Process for recovering tungsten from alkaline leaching solution of tungsten ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozaki, S.; Nemoto, S.; Hazeyama, T.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to a process for recovering tungsten from an alkaline leaching solution of tungsten ores. This invention comprises adjusting the pH of an alkaline leaching solution which is obtained by lixiviating ore containing tungsten with an alkaline solution to 7--8 with acid to oxidize molybdic acid ions in the solution, adding a sulfide donor, then precipitating molybdenum sulfide compounds by adjusting the pH value of the solution to 2--3. Tungstic acid ions are recovered as calcium tungstate by the addition of a calcium ion donor after the molybdenum sulfide compounds are separated

  19. Determination of free nitric acid in uranyl nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayankutty, P.C.; Ravi, S.; Nadkarni, M.N.

    1981-01-01

    Potentiometric titration of uranyl nitrate solution with sodium hydroxide exhibits two peaks. The first peak characterises the following reaction, UO 2 (C 2 O 4 )+NaOH Na[UO 2 (C 2 O 4 )(OH)]. This reaction, indicating the partial hydrolysis of uranyl oxalate complex, appears to be complete at pH9. If the titration is carried out to this end-point pH, the total alkali consumed can be equated to the sum of uranium content and the free acidity present in the sample volume. Based on this, a method was standardised to determine the free acidity in uranyl nitrate solution. The sample, taken in a solution of potassium oxalate previously adjusted to pH9, is titrated to this pH with standard sodium hydroxide. The free acidity in the sample can be computed by subtracting the alkali reacted with uranium from the total alkali consumed. Analyses of several synthetic samples containing uranium and nitric acid in a wide range of combinations indicate that the free acidity can be accurately determined by this method, if uranium concentration in the sample is known. The results are compared to those obtained by two other widely used methods, viz., (i) titration of pH7 in the presence of neutral potassium oxalate to suppress hydrolysis and (ii) separation of hydrolyzable ions on a cationic resin and alkali titration of the free acid released. The advantages of and the precision obtained with the present method over the above two methods are discussed. (author)

  20. Terbium nitrate luminescence quenching by eosin in he presence of lithium perchlorate in sulfolane solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostakhov, S.S.; Kolosnitsyn, V.S.; Krasnogorskaya, N.N.; Kazakov, V.P.

    2000-01-01

    Quenching of terbium nitrate luminescence by anionic dye, eosin, in the presence of lithium perchlorate in sulfolane solutions was studied. Temperature dependence of terbium nitrate luminescence in sulfolane solutions in the presence of perchlorate anions were considered. The values of energy required for water molecular substitution in Tb 3+ ion coordination sphere for solvent molecule in electrolyte solution were ascertained [ru

  1. Radiation chemistry of the aqueous aluminium nitrate solution (Preprint no. RC-26)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalkar, C.D.; Date, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    Radiolysis of aqueous aluminium nitrate solution is studied as a function of concentration in the range 10 -4 M to 10 -1 M. The stable radiolytic product of nitrate radiolysis is nitrite. The yield of nitrite linearly increases with absorbed dose. The G(NO 2 ) values are determined at various concentrations of aluminium nitrate. A suitable mechanism is proposed to explain the observed G-value for the reduction of nitrate to nitrite. (author). 6 refs., 1 tab

  2. A radiochemical study of gold electrodeposition kinetics in alkaline cyanide solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poshkus, D.; Agafonovas, G.; Zhebrauskas, A.

    1995-01-01

    Kinetics of gold electrodeposition from alkaline cyanide solutions was investigated by the use of labelled gold 195 atoms. The absorption of cyanide containing species from alkaline cyanide and dicyanoaurate solutions on a gold electrode by the use of labelled carbon atoms was investigated. Polarization curves of anodic dissolution and cathodic deposition of gold in alkaline cyanide solutions were obtained. The values of standard potential, exchange current density, transfer coefficient and standard polarization rate were determined from polarization curves. The errors in current density caused by the nuclear disintegration statistics were evaluated. 28 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs

  3. XPS study of the passive layers formed on lead in aqueous nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Miho; Okuwaki, Akitsugu

    1997-01-01

    The analysis of the lead surface immersed in aqueous nitrate solutions by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shows the formation of passive oxide layer containing nitrogen compound. The oxide layer formed on the lead surface in aqueous ammonium nitrate solution was hydrolyzed and cracked. (author)

  4. The direct effect in the gamma radiolysis of frozen aqueous solutions of nitrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalecinski, J.

    1974-01-01

    The gamma radiolysis of frozen at 77 and 195 K solutions of lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, strontium and silver nitrates was examined. The yields of the direct effect G(NO 2 - ) were shown to depend on the type of the nitrate and to correlate with the free volumes of the solutions. (author)

  5. Extraction with tributyl phosphate (TBP) from ferric nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolarik, Z.; Grudpan, K.

    1985-01-01

    Ferric nitrate acts as a strong salting-out agent in the extraction of thorium(IV), uranyl, europium(III), samarium(III) and zirconium(IV) nitrates as well as of nitric acid with tributyl phosphate in dodecane. Nitric acid, if present in the extraction system together with large amounts of ferric nitrate, markedly suppresses the extraction of thorium(IV) and lanthanides(III) but significantly supports the extraction of zirconium(IV). Separation factors of different metal pairs are presented as functions of the concentrations of ferric nitrate and nitric acid

  6. Chemical perspectives on alkali and earth alkaline nitrate and nitrite salts for concentrated solar power applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordaro, Joseph G. [Sandia National Labsoratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Molten salts have been widely considered as the leading candidate heat transfer fluids (HTF) used in high temperature, concentrated solar power plants. Specifically, nitrate and nitrite based salts have been investigated as a HTF and even deployed in pilot plants generating up to 19.9 MW of electricity at operating temperatures above 500 C. New plant designs requiring higher operating temperatures for better efficiencies are pushing the stability limit of HTF. This paper presents an overview of the thermophysical properties of nitrate and nitrite salts and discusses thermodynamic and kinetic stability limitations as they relate to concentrated solar power generation. (orig.)

  7. Process for denitrating waste solutions containing nitrates and actinides with simultaneous separation of the actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gompper, K.

    1986-01-01

    The invention is intended to reduce the acid and nitrate content of nitrate waste solutions, to reduce the total salt content of the waste solution, to remove the actinides contained in it by precipitation, without any danger of violent reactions or an increase in the volume of the waste solution. The invention achieves this by mixing the waste solution with diethyl oxalate at room temperature and heating the mixture to at least 80 0 C. (orig./PW) [de

  8. Extraction of rare earth metals (3) from aqueous solutions containing thorium and uranyl nitrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyartman, A.K.; Kopyrin, A.A.; Berinskij, A.E.; Keskinov, V.A.

    2000-01-01

    Isotherms of extraction of rare earth metals (3) from aqueous solutions containing thorium and uranyl nitrates by solutions of tributylphosphate (TBP) and diisooctylmethylphosphonate (DIOMP) in kerosene at 298.15 Deg C and pH 1 are presented. Equations for description of interphase distribution of components of the systems considered are suggested. These equations describe distribution of components adequately in the systems of thorium nitrate (uranyl nitrate) - rare earth nitrates - (TBP, DIOMP) in the case of wide variation of phase compositions. Dependences of separation factors on composition of aqueous phase are considered [ru

  9. Extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate from aqueous nitric acid solutions with CMPO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, B.B.

    1995-08-01

    DOE sponsored development of the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for removing actinides from radioactive wastes. The solvent is a mixture of CMPO and TBP. Since the extraction characteristics of CMPO are not as well understood as those of TBP, the extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate with CMPO (dissolved in n-dodecane) were studied. Results indicate that CMPO extracts nitric acid with a 1:1 stoichiometry; equilibrium constant is 2. 660{plus_minus}0.092 at 25 C, and extraction enthalpy is -5. 46{plus_minus}0.46 kcal/mol. Slope analysis indicates that uranyl nitrate extracts with a mixed equilibria of 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries in nearly equal proportion. Equil. constant of the 2: 1 extraction was 1.213 {times} 10{sup 6}{plus_minus}3.56 {times} 10{sup 4} at 25 C; reaction enthalpy was -9.610{plus_minus}0.594 kcal/mol. Nitration complexation constant is 8.412{plus_minus}0.579, with an enthalpy of -10.72{plus_minus}1.87 kcal/mol. Bismuth nitrate also extracts with a mixed equilibria of (perhaps) 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries. A 2:1 extraction equilibrium and a nitrate complexation adequately model the data. Kinetics and enthalpies were also measured.

  10. Extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate from aqueous nitric acid solutions with CMPO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, B.B.

    1995-08-01

    DOE sponsored development of the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for removing actinides from radioactive wastes. The solvent is a mixture of CMPO and TBP. Since the extraction characteristics of CMPO are not as well understood as those of TBP, the extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate with CMPO (dissolved in n-dodecane) were studied. Results indicate that CMPO extracts nitric acid with a 1:1 stoichiometry; equilibrium constant is 2. 660±0.092 at 25 C, and extraction enthalpy is -5. 46±0.46 kcal/mol. Slope analysis indicates that uranyl nitrate extracts with a mixed equilibria of 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries in nearly equal proportion. Equil. constant of the 2: 1 extraction was 1.213 x 10 6 ±3.56 x 10 4 at 25 C; reaction enthalpy was -9.610±0.594 kcal/mol. Nitration complexation constant is 8.412±0.579, with an enthalpy of -10.72±1.87 kcal/mol. Bismuth nitrate also extracts with a mixed equilibria of (perhaps) 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries. A 2:1 extraction equilibrium and a nitrate complexation adequately model the data. Kinetics and enthalpies were also measured

  11. Spectroscopic Characterization of HAN-Based Liquid Gun Propellants and Nitrate Salt Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-15

    spectra were recorded of bubbles of a concentrated aqueous nitrate solution, mineral oil, and an aqueous surfactant solution. Polymethacrylic acid ...FTIR spectra of droplets of a concentrated aqueous nitrate salt based solution (LGP1845), of solid particles cf polymethacrylic acid packing IO, 3... polymethacrylic acid low density packing foam cut to a 3x4 mnn rectangle was levitated with a low acoustic power. The sample was easily I positioned in the

  12. Partitioning high-level waste from alkaline solution: A literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, S.F.

    1993-05-01

    Most chemical partitioning procedures are designed for acidic feed solutions. However, the high-level waste solutions in the underground storage tanks at US Department of Energy defense production sites are alkaline. Effective partitioning procedures for alkaline solutions could decrease the need to acidify these solutions and to dissolve the solids in acid, which would simplify subsequent processing and decrease the generation of secondary waste. The author compiles candidate technologies from his review of the chemical literature, experience, and personal contacts. Several of these are recommended for evaluation

  13. A method for the gravimetric determination of plutonium in pure plutonium nitrate concentrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mair, M.A.; Savage, D.J.

    1986-12-01

    Plutonium nitrate solution is treated with sulphuric acid before being heated and finally ignited. The stoichiometric plutonium dioxide so formed is weighed and hence the plutonium content is calculated. (author)

  14. A study of precipitation from pure solutions of uranyl nitrate; Etude de la precipitaion de solutions pures de nitrate d'uranyle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decrop, J; Holder, J; Sauteron, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Usine du Bouchet, Service des Lab. de Recherches et de Controle, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    After its purification by extraction of the uranyl nitrate from the organic solvent, uranium has to be converted into solid form again: uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}). It can be done either by thermal decomposition of uranyl nitrate or by precipitation of uranium, followed by filtration and calcination. Only the second method has been studied for now at the Bouchet plant. This paper reports the bench-scale and pilot-scale experiments of the studies of the precipitation of pure solutions of uranyl nitrate using ammonia (gaseous or in solution) or ammonium carbonate. These have been carried out at the Bouchet plant. It investigates the chemical aspect (pH, precipitates chemical composition) and the technical aspect of the different ways of precipitation (conditions of precipitation, decantation and filtration of precipitates). (M.P.)

  15. Formation of the second organic phase during uranyl nitrate extraction from aqueous solution by 30% tributylphosphate solution in paraffin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yhrkin, V.G.

    1996-01-01

    For extraction systems aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate-30% solution of tributylphosphate in individual paraffins from C 13 to C 17 the influence of the second organic phase of uranyl nitrate concentration in aqueous and organic phases, the length of hydrocarbon chain of paraffin hydrocarbon and temperature from 25 to 50 deg C on formation conditions has been defected. A special method of achieving the conditions of organic phase stratification from three-phase region, involving definition of equilibrium phases composition by density and refractive index, has been elaborated for more precise definition of organic phase homogeneity region. It has been revealed that without addition of nitric acid to uranyl nitrate solution the organic phase homogeneity limits can be achieved solely on paraffins C 15 , C 16 and C 17 and only under conditions similar to equeous phase saturation in terms of uranyl nitrate. 16 refs., 2 figs

  16. A new method for the determination of the nitrogen content of nitrocellulose based on the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions released after alkaline hydrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alinat, Elodie; Delaunay, Nathalie; Archer, Xavier; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Gareil, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • New insights into the nitrocellulose alkaline denitration mechanism. • Linear correlation for molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions and nitrogen content. • Capillary electrophoresis monitoring of nitrite and nitrate ions. • Applications to explosive and non-explosive nitrocellulose-containing samples. • Improved performances (including safety) over classical methods. - Abstract: A new method was proposed to determine the nitrogen content of nitrocelluloses (NCs). It is based on the finding of a linear relationship between the nitrogen content and the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions released after alkaline hydrolysis. Capillary electrophoresis was used to monitor the concentration of nitrite and nitrate ions. The influences of hydrolysis time and molar mass of NC on the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions were investigated, and new insights into the understanding of the alkaline denitration mechanism of NCs, underlying this analytical strategy is provided. The method was then tested successfully with various explosive and non-explosive NC-containing samples such as various daily products and smokeless gunpowders. Inherently to its principle exploiting a concentration ratio, this method shows very good repeatability in the determination of nitrogen content in real samples with relative standard deviation (n = 3) inferior to 1.5%, and also provides very significant advantages with respect to sample extraction, analysis time (1 h for alkaline hydrolysis, 3 min for electrophoretic separation), which was about 5 times shorter than for the classical Devarda's method, currently used in industry, and safety conditions (no need for preliminary drying NC samples, mild hydrolysis conditions with 1 M sodium hydroxide for 1 h at 60 °C)

  17. A new method for the determination of the nitrogen content of nitrocellulose based on the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions released after alkaline hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alinat, Elodie, E-mail: elodie.alinat@chimie-paristech.fr [PSL Research University, Chimie ParisTech, Laboratory of Physicochemistry of Electrolytes, Colloids and Analytical Sciences (PECSA), 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Central Laboratory of Police Prefecture (LCPP), 39 bis rue de Dantzig, 75015 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7195 PECSA, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, LBM, 4 place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Delaunay, Nathalie, E-mail: nathalie.delaunay@espci.fr [PSL Research University, Chimie ParisTech, Laboratory of Physicochemistry of Electrolytes, Colloids and Analytical Sciences (PECSA), 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7195 PECSA, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, LBM, 4 place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Archer, Xavier, E-mail: xavier.archer@interieur.gouv.fr [Central Laboratory of Police Prefecture (LCPP), 39 bis rue de Dantzig, 75015 Paris (France); Mallet, Jean-Maurice, E-mail: jean-maurice.mallet@es.fr [École Normale Supérieure-PSL Research University, Département de Chimie, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France); Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, LBM, 4 place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7203 LBM, F-75005 Paris (France); Gareil, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.gareil@chimie-paristech.fr [PSL Research University, Chimie ParisTech, Laboratory of Physicochemistry of Electrolytes, Colloids and Analytical Sciences (PECSA), 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7195 PECSA, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, LBM, 4 place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2015-04-09

    Highlights: • New insights into the nitrocellulose alkaline denitration mechanism. • Linear correlation for molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions and nitrogen content. • Capillary electrophoresis monitoring of nitrite and nitrate ions. • Applications to explosive and non-explosive nitrocellulose-containing samples. • Improved performances (including safety) over classical methods. - Abstract: A new method was proposed to determine the nitrogen content of nitrocelluloses (NCs). It is based on the finding of a linear relationship between the nitrogen content and the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions released after alkaline hydrolysis. Capillary electrophoresis was used to monitor the concentration of nitrite and nitrate ions. The influences of hydrolysis time and molar mass of NC on the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions were investigated, and new insights into the understanding of the alkaline denitration mechanism of NCs, underlying this analytical strategy is provided. The method was then tested successfully with various explosive and non-explosive NC-containing samples such as various daily products and smokeless gunpowders. Inherently to its principle exploiting a concentration ratio, this method shows very good repeatability in the determination of nitrogen content in real samples with relative standard deviation (n = 3) inferior to 1.5%, and also provides very significant advantages with respect to sample extraction, analysis time (1 h for alkaline hydrolysis, 3 min for electrophoretic separation), which was about 5 times shorter than for the classical Devarda's method, currently used in industry, and safety conditions (no need for preliminary drying NC samples, mild hydrolysis conditions with 1 M sodium hydroxide for 1 h at 60 °C)

  18. Nitrate Removal from Aqueous Solutions Using Almond Charcoal Activated with Zinc Chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Arbabi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: Nitrate is one of the most important contaminants in aquatic environments that can leached to water resources from various sources such as sewage, fertilizers and decomposition of organic waste. Reduction of nitrate to nitrite in infant’s blood stream can cause “blue baby” disease in infants. The aim of this study was to evaluate the nitrate removal from aqueous solutions using modified almond charcoal with zinc chloride. Materials &Methods: This study is an experimental survey. At the first charcoal almond skins were prepared in 5500C and then modified with ZnCl2. Morphologies and characterization of almond shell charcoal were evaluated by using FTIR, EDX, BET and FESEM. Adsorption experiments were conducted with 500 ml sample in Becker. The nitrate concentration removal, contact time, pH and charcoal dosage were investigated. The central composite design method was used to optimizing the nitrate removal process. The results analyzed with ANOVA test. Results: The best condition founded in 48 min, 1250 ppm, 125 mg/l and 3 for retention time, primary nitrate concentration, charcoal dosage and pH respectively. The results showed that the nitrate removal decreases with increasing pH. Modification of skin charcoal is show increasing of nitrate removal from aquatic solution. Conclusion: In this study, the maximum nitrate removal efficiency for raw charcoal and modified charcoal was determined 15.47% and 62.78%, respectively. The results showed that this method can be used as an effective method for removing nitrate from aqueous solutions.

  19. Physicochemical analysis of cryocrystallization processes of aqueous solutions of yttrium, barium, copper nitrates and their mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulakov, A.B.; Mozhaev, A.P.; Tesker, A.M.; Churagulov, B.R.

    1992-01-01

    Products of fast hardening of aqueous solutions of different concentration of yttrium, barium copper nitrates and their mixtures including mixture of three nitrates with molar ratio equal to 1:2:3 used for synthesis of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x HTSC by cryochemical technique, in liquid nitrogen, are studied using low-temperature, differential thermal and X-ray phase analyses. Aqueous solutions of barium, copper, yttrium nitrates are shown to belong to three different classes which differ in behaviour at fast cooling and subsequent slow heating. Cryogranulate at YBa 2 Cu 2 O 7-x synthesis using cryochemical technique represents mixture of X-ray amorphous Ba(NO 3 ) 2 , crystalline Cu(NO 3 ) 2 ·6H 2 O and ice, as well as, supercooled aqueous solution of yttrium and copper nitrates

  20. Influence of Acidity on Uranyl Nitrate Association in Aqueous Solutions: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Almeida, Valmor F.; Cui, Shengting; Khomami, Bamin; Ye, Xianggui; Smith, Rodney Bryan

    2010-01-01

    Uranyl ion complexation with water and nitrate is a key aspect of the uranium/plutonium extraction process. We have carried out a molecular dynamics simulation study to investigate this complexation process, including the molecular composition of the various complex species, the corresponding structure, and the equilibrium distribution of the complexes. The observed structures of the complexes suggest that in aqueous solution, uranyls are generally hydrated by 5 water molecules in the equatorial plane. When associating with nitrate ions, a water molecule is replaced by a nitrate ion, preserving the five-fold coordination and planar symmetry. Analysis of the pair correlation function between uranyl and nitrate suggests that nitrates bind to uranyl in aqueous solution mainly in a monodentate mode, although a small portion of bidentates occur. Dynamic association and dissociation between uranyls and nitrates take place in aqueous solution with a substantial amount of fluctuation in the number of various uranyl nitrate species. The average number of the uranyl mononitrate complexes shows a dependence on acid concentration consistent with equilibrium-constant analysis, namely, the concentration of [UO2NO3]+ increases with nitric acid concentration.

  1. Electrocnecical behaviour of zirconium during its anodic polarization in nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stabrovskij, A.I.; Karasev, A.F.

    1983-01-01

    Electrochemical behaviour of zirconium during its anodic polarization in nitrate solutions is investigated in detail to find the method of its complete dissolution. A study has been made of the influence of varioUs factors: current density electric potential, composition and temperature of the solution, anodic polarization duration on the Zr anodic polarization in nitric acid, on the maximum permissible current density and on the zirconium yield to the solution. The zirconium polarization decreases with an acid concentration and temperature increase and increases with the current density. Iron nitrate additions to nitric acid decrease, while ammonium fluoride additions increase zirconium yield into the solution

  2. The research of technology and equipment for a microwave denitration process of the uranyl nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Weimin; Wang Xuejun; Ma Xuquan; Shi Miaoyi; Zhang Zhicheng; Bao Zhu Tian.

    1991-01-01

    In order to improve the present process of converting the plutonium nitrate into oxide powder in the nuclear fuel cycle, a new conversion process for the direct denitration using microwave heating has been developed. Microwave denitration is based on intramolecular polarization of a material in electric field and has no need of a process of heat transfer during microwave heating, so that the whole material can be heated quickly and uniformly. The thermal decomposition reactions of Pu, U, Th and RE nitrate have been analyzed and compared. The uranyl nitrate solution was chosen as imitative plutonium nitrate solution. The performance parameters ε r tanδ of U, Th and RE nitrate and oxide in microwave field were measured. The data obtained show that all of them could absorb microwave energy well and cause heating decomposition reactions. The microwave denitration test unit was designed and made. Denitration tests for rare-earths nitrate and uranyl nitrate solutions were performed. It could be completed in one step that the uranyl nitrate solution was evaporated, dryed and denitrated in a vessel. The denitrated products are a porous lump and easy to scrape off from the denitration vessel. The main forms of the products UO 3 ·0.8H 2 O and U 3 O 8 which have excellent powder properties. The capacity of the denitration unit is 1.3 kg UO 3 /h. According to the experimental results the simplicity, feasibility and good repeatability of the process have been fully proved. The unit operates easily and is adaptable to conversion of nitrate in nuclear fuel cycle. (author)

  3. Selective solvation extraction of gold from alkaline cyanide solution by alkyl phosphorus esters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.D.; Wan, R.Y.; Mooiman, M.B.; Sibrell, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    Research efforts have shown that solvation extraction of gold from alkaline cyanide solution is possible by alkyl phosphorus esters. Both tributyl phosphate (TBP) and dibutyl butyl phosphonate (DBBP) appear to be effective extractants for gold and exhibit high loading capacities exceeding 30 gpl. Selective solvation extraction of gold from alkaline cyanide solution can be achieved with selectivity factors relative to other cyanoanions as high as 1000 under certain circumstances. Variables influencing the selectivity such as ionic strength, temperature, and extractant structure, are discussed in terms of the extraction chemistry, which seems to involve the solvation of a M dot, dot, dot Au(CN)2 ion pair.

  4. Methylene blue adsorption of GMZ bentonite and the effect of hyper-alkaline solution erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Bao; Zhang Huixin; Zhu Chunming; Chen Ping

    2012-01-01

    The method of combining the halo method with the spectrometer method, was used to study on the Methylene blue (MB) adsorption of Gaomiaozi (GMZ) bentonite, which had been eroded by hyper-alkaline solution, to investigate the mechanism of the effect of hyper-alkaline pore water on the buffer/backfill properties of GMZ bentonite. Results present, method employed in this article is brief and feasible, and high accuracy; The total specific surface area calculated by the test of MB adsorption is more accurate than the method of ethylene glycol monomethyl ether (EGIVIE). The MB adsorption of samples, which had been eroded by hyper-alkaline solution, decreases with the increase of the concentration of hyper-alkaline solution, and the change law agrees with the variation of the mass percentage of montmorillonite in bentonite tested by X- Ray diffraction (XRD). Therefore, the erosion of hyper-alkaline pore water might dissolve montmorillonite, which is the effective composition of bentonite, and destroy the tetrahedron- octahedron-tetrahedron (T-O-T) structure of montmorillonite, then lead to the decrease of cation exchange capability and the specific surface area of montmorillonite, and the the macroscopic expressions are the decrease of MB adsorption, the swelling potential and the increase of permeability. (authors)

  5. Removal of nitrate from aqueous solution using cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB) modified zeolite as adsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhan Yanhui; Lin Jianwei; Zhu Zhiliang

    2011-01-01

    Surfactant modified zeolites (SMZ) with different coverage types were prepared by loading the cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB) onto the surface of the natural zeolites. The adsorption behavior of nitrate on SMZ was investigated. Natural zeolite and SMZ with monolayer CPB coverage were inefficient for the removal of nitrate from aqueous solution. However, SMZ with patchy bilayer or bilayer CPB coverage was efficient in nitrate removal, and the nitrate adsorption capacity of SMZ increased with its CPB loading. For typical SMZ with bilayer CPB coverage, the nitrate adsorption process was well described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and the experimental isotherm data fitted well with the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Redushkevich isotherm models. Thermodynamic parameters such as Gibbs free energy change, enthalpy change and entropy change were calculated and the results showed that the adsorption of nitrate on SMZ was spontaneous and exothermic in nature. The presence of competing anions such as chloride, sulfate and bicarbonate ions slightly reduced the nitrate adsorption efficiency. Anionic exchange and electrostatic interaction were proven to be the main mechanisms that govern the adsorption of nitrate on SMZ.

  6. Effects of over-winter green cover on soil solution nitrate concentrations beneath tillage land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premrov, Alina; Coxon, Catherine E; Hackett, Richard; Kirwan, Laura; Richards, Karl G

    2014-02-01

    There is a growing need to reduce nitrogen losses from agricultural systems to increase food production while reducing negative environmental impacts. The efficacy of vegetation cover for reducing nitrate leaching in tillage systems during fallow periods has been widely investigated. Nitrate leaching reductions by natural regeneration (i.e. growth of weeds and crop volunteers) have been investigated to a lesser extent than reductions by planted cover crops. This study compares the efficacy of natural regeneration and a sown cover crop (mustard) relative to no vegetative cover under both a reduced tillage system and conventional plough-based system as potential mitigation measures for reducing over-winter soil solution nitrate concentrations. The study was conducted over three winter fallow seasons on well drained soil, highly susceptible to leaching, under temperate maritime climatic conditions. Mustard cover crop under both reduced tillage and conventional ploughing was observed to be an effective measure for significantly reducing nitrate concentrations. Natural regeneration under reduced tillage was found to significantly reduce the soil solution nitrate concentrations. This was not the case for the natural regeneration under conventional ploughing. The improved efficacy of natural regeneration under reduced tillage could be a consequence of potential stimulation of seedling germination by the autumn reduced tillage practices and improved over-winter plant growth. There was no significant effect of tillage practices on nitrate concentrations. This study shows that over winter covers of mustard and natural regeneration, under reduced tillage, are effective measures for reducing nitrate concentrations in free draining temperate soils. © 2013.

  7. Rapid determination of fluoride in uranyl nitrate solution obtained in conversion process of uranium tetrafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, R.; Feldman, R.; Sahar, E.

    1976-01-01

    In uranium production the conversion of impure uranium tetrafluoride by sodium hydroxide was chosen as a current process. A rapid method for determination of fluoride in uranyl-nitrate solution was developed. The method includes precipitation of uranium as diuranate, separation by centrifugation, and subsequent determination of fluoride in supernate by titration with thorium nitrate. Fluoride can be measured over the range 0.15-2.5 gr/gr U, with accuracy of +-5%, within 15 minutes. (author)

  8. Defect structure of cubic solid solutions of alkaline earth and rare earth fluorides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DenHartog, HW

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we will consider the disorder in some cubic solid solutions consisting of one of the alkaline earth fluorides and one of the rare earth fluorides. This is an attractive group of model materials, because these materials have a rather simple overall cubic structure. We will discuss the

  9. Electrochemical Performance of Low-Carbon Steel in Alkaline Model Solutions Containing Hybrid Aggregates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.; Hu, J.; De Wit, J.H.W.; Boshkov, N.; Radeva, T.; Milkova, V.; Van Breugel, K.

    2010-01-01

    This work reports on the electrochemical performance of low-carbon steel electrodes in model alkaline solutions in the presence of 4.9.10-4 g/l hybrid aggregates i.e. cement extract, containing PDADMAC (poly (diallyl, dimethyl ammonium chloride) / PAA (Poly (acrylic acid)/ PDADMAC over a CaO core.

  10. USING CERAMIC MEMBRANES TO RECYCLE TWO NONIONIC ALKALINE METAL-CLEANING SOLUTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    One ZrO2 ultrafilter (0.05 um pore size) and two a-Al2O3 microfilters (0.2 and 0.8 um) were used to remove one synthetic ester oil and two polyalphaolefin-based and two petroleum hydrocarbon-based oils and greases from two nonionic alkaline cleaning solutions (e.g., Turco 4215-NC...

  11. Novel package for inhibition of aluminium corrosion in alkaline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Gaber, A.M.; Khamis, E.; Abo-Eldahab, H.; Adeel, Sh.

    2010-01-01

    Inhibition of aluminium corrosion in 2 M sodium hydroxide solution by a package composed of the cationic surfactant cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and lupine seed extract has been investigated employing different electrochemical techniques and chemical gasometry measurements. Potentiodynamic polarization curve measurements showed that lupine seed extract controls both the anodic dissolution of aluminium and the hydrogen gas evolved at the cathodic sites of aluminium surface. Nyquist plots showed two capacitive semicircles in the high and low frequency regions separated by an inductive loop at intermediate frequencies. The inductive loop may be explained by the occurrence of adsorbed intermediates on the surface. A proposed equivalent circuit was used to analyse the impedance spectra for aluminium in NaOH solutions. The corrosion inhibition data have been analysed using different isotherms. The results showed excellent agreement between the kinetic-thermodynamic model and Flory-Huggins isotherm. Gasometry measurements showed that the Inhibitive effect of the surfactant increases at a composition around its critical micelle concentration (cmc). The presence of both the surfactant and lupine seed extract did not indicate synergistic action between them. The mode of adsorption of the surfactant molecules corresponding to their structure is also discussed.

  12. Novel package for inhibition of aluminium corrosion in alkaline solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Gaber, A.M., E-mail: ashrafmoustafa@yahoo.com [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, Ibrahimia, P.O. Box 426, Alexandria 21321 (Egypt); Khamis, E.; Abo-Eldahab, H.; Adeel, Sh. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, Ibrahimia, P.O. Box 426, Alexandria 21321 (Egypt)

    2010-11-01

    Inhibition of aluminium corrosion in 2 M sodium hydroxide solution by a package composed of the cationic surfactant cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and lupine seed extract has been investigated employing different electrochemical techniques and chemical gasometry measurements. Potentiodynamic polarization curve measurements showed that lupine seed extract controls both the anodic dissolution of aluminium and the hydrogen gas evolved at the cathodic sites of aluminium surface. Nyquist plots showed two capacitive semicircles in the high and low frequency regions separated by an inductive loop at intermediate frequencies. The inductive loop may be explained by the occurrence of adsorbed intermediates on the surface. A proposed equivalent circuit was used to analyse the impedance spectra for aluminium in NaOH solutions. The corrosion inhibition data have been analysed using different isotherms. The results showed excellent agreement between the kinetic-thermodynamic model and Flory-Huggins isotherm. Gasometry measurements showed that the Inhibitive effect of the surfactant increases at a composition around its critical micelle concentration (cmc). The presence of both the surfactant and lupine seed extract did not indicate synergistic action between them. The mode of adsorption of the surfactant molecules corresponding to their structure is also discussed.

  13. Enthalpy of solution of rubidium nitrate in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weintraub, R.; Apelblat, A.; Tamir, A.

    1984-01-01

    Molar enthalpies of solution of RbNO 3 in water at 298.15 K were measured in an LKB calorimeter. The molar enthalpies of solution extrapolated to infinite solution are: (36788 +- 30)J. mol -1 (Alfa) and (36539 +- 52)J.mol -1 (Aldrich). (author)

  14. Passivation behavior of a ferritic stainless steel in concentrated alkaline solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Fattah-alhosseini

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The passivation behavior of AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel was investigated in concentrated alkaline solutions in relation to several test parameters, using electrochemical techniques. Increasing solution pH (varying from 11.5 to 14.0 leads to an increase in the corrosion rate of the alloy. Mott–Schottky analysis revealed that passive films formed on AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel behave as n-type semiconductor and the donor densities increased with pH. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS results showed that the reciprocal capacitance of the passive film is directly proportional to its thickness, which decreases with pH increase. The results revealed that for this ferritic stainless steel in concentrated alkaline solutions, decreasing the solution pH offers better conditions for forming passive films with higher protection behavior, due to the growth of a much thicker and less defective film.

  15. Alteration behavior of bentonite barrier of radioactive waste disposal by alkaline solutions. Part 1. Permeability change of compacted bentonite immersed in alkaline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Shingo; Nakamura, Kunihiko

    2010-01-01

    Permeability tests using the compacted bentonites and alkaline solutions were carried out to estimate of alteration behavior and the change of permeability during the alteration reaction. The permeability tests of the compacted bentonites were carried out at 23degC for one week after they were immersed in alkaline solution at 60degC for four weeks (immersing test). After permeability tests, the compacted bentonites were repeatedly tested as the same procedure (i.e. repetition of permeability test and immersing test) at 11 cycles. The compacted bentonites with initial dry density of 1.6 Mg/m 3 were reacted with the different type of the alkaline solutions (deionized water, NaOH (pH=12 and 14), KOH (pH=12 and 14) and Ca(OH) 2 (pH=12)) in each experiments. In the case of deionized water and alkaline solutions of pH12, the mineral compositions of altered bentonite were similar to original bentonite while the exchangeable cations of altered bentonites were changed. No changes of the mineralogical features of montmorillonite in altered bentonites (i.e. illitization, baideritization and increasing of layer charge) were observed in the case of deionized water, pH12-NaOH and pH12-Ca(OH) 2 . The montmorillonite was changed to the illite/smectite interstratified mineral containing about 40% illite like component during the reaction with pH12-KOH. In the case of alkaline solutions with pH14, the component minerals of bentonite (e.g. montmorillonite, quartz and clinoptilolite) were dissolved, consequently secondly minerals (e.g. analcime and phillipsite) were crystallized during experiments. Furthermore, the mineralogical features of montmorillonite were changed as illitization (pH14-KOH), beidellitization (pH14-NaOH and pH14-KOH) and increasing of layer charge (pH14-NaOH and pH14-KOH). No increasing of permeability were observed during the experiment using pH12-NaOH and pH12-Ca(OH) 2 as well as the case of deionized water. In the case of pH12-KOH, the permeability continually

  16. Volumetric determination of hydroxide, aluminate, and carbonate in alkaline solutions of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, E.W.

    1975-06-01

    An integrated procedure was developed for determining OH - , Al(OH) 4 - , and CO 3 2- in alkaline nuclear waste. The free alkali, the hydroxide released when Al(OH) 3 is complexed with oxalate, and the precipitated BaCO 3 were determined by acidimetric titration. With a 50-μl sample, the relative standard deviations were 1 to 2 percent for nonradioactive test solutions and 2 to 5 percent for radioactive process solutions. (U.S.)

  17. Comparision of Chitosan Function as Adsorbent for Nitrate Removal Using Synthetic Aqueous Solution and Drinking Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Norisepehr

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Nitrate and nitrite compounds pollution of groundwater resources in recent years which recently their mean concentration due to enhancement of different kind of municipal, industrial and agriculture waste water, were increased. The most common source of nitrates entering the water include chemical fertilizers and animal manure in agriculture, septic tank effluent, wastewater, wastewater treatment plants, animal and plant residue analysis on the ground of non-sanitary disposal of solid waste and the use of absorbing wells for sewage disposal. Materials and methods: This experimental study is applied to the nitrate removal using chitosan in laboratory scale at ambient temperature and the design of the system was Batch. Effects of parameters such as pH, contact time, initial concentration and adsorbent concentration of nitrate on nitrate removal from aqueous solution was studied. Results: Function of chitosan in synthetic aqueous solution and drinking water according to the slurry system results, the optimum condition was obtained at pH=4, 20 min contact time and increasing the initial concentration of nitrate enhance the adsorption capacity of chitosan. Also optimum dosage of adsorbent was obtained at 0.5 g/l. The data obtained from the experiments of adsorbent isotherm were analyzed using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The Langmuir equation was found to be the best fitness with the experimental data (R2>0.93. Conclusion: Although efficiency of Nitrate removal in synthetic aqueous solution was better than drinking water, adsorption process using chitosan as an option for the design and selection nitrate removal should be considered in order to achieve environmental standards.

  18. Studies on the reverse osmosis treatment of uranyl nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhakar, S.; Panicker, S.T.; Misra, B.M.; Ramani, P.S.

    1992-01-01

    The aqueous effluent generated in uranium processing, particularly in the nuclear fuel fabrication step, contains mainly uranium nitrate. This requires treatment before discharge into the environment to meet stringent standards. This paper presents the performance of cellulose acetate membranes with regard to rejection of uranium under reverse osmotic conditions for feed concentrations up to 200 mg/l of uranium, which corresponds to the levels normally prevalent in the effluents. The use of additives like the disodium salt of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and sodium sulfate for the improvement of reverse osmosis performance of the above membranes was also investigated. In the light of the experimental results, the suitability of reverse osmosis for the decontamination of uranium effluents is discussed

  19. Microhardness studies on as-grown (111) faces of some alkaline earth nitrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shekar, P.V.R.; Nagaraju, D.; Ganesh, V.; Rao, K.K.

    2009-01-01

    Single crystals of Sr(NO 3 ) 2 , Ba(NO 3 ) 2 and Pb(NO 3 ) 2 are grown from their aqueous solutions at a constant temperature of 35 C by slow evaporation technique. Crystals of size 8 to 10 mm along one edge are obtained in a period of 10 days. Chemical etching technique has been employed to study the dislocations in these crystals. The dislocations are randomly distributed and the dislocation density is about 10 4 to 10 5 /cm 2 . Microhardness studies are made on as-grown (111) faces of these crystals upto a load of 100 g. The hardness of the crystals increases with an increase in load and thereafter it becomes independent of the applied load. These results are discussed on the basis of reverse indentation size effect. Meyer index number n for these crystals is estimated at both low and high load regions. An analysis of hardness data of these crystals as well as some other cubic crystals like alums and alkali halates are discussed using Gilman-Chin parameter H v /C 44 , where H v is the microhardness and C 44 is the shear constant. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Extraction of lanthanide(III) nitrates from water-salt solutions with n.-octanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keskinov, V.A.; Kudrova, A.V.; Valueva, O.V.; Pyartman, A.K.

    2004-01-01

    Extraction of lanthanide(III) nitrates (Ln=La-Nd, Sm-Gd) from aqueous-salt solutions at 298.15 K was studied using solution of n.-octanol, its concentration 6.31 mol/l. It was ascertained that at Ln(NO 3 ) 3 concentration in aqueous phase below 0.6 mol/l, there is actually no extraction. At higher concentrations of nitrates in aqueous phase the content of lanthanides(III) in organic phase increases in the series La-Gd. Isotherms of extraction were ascertained, its phase equilibria being described mathematically. It is shown that extraction of lanthanide(III) nitrates with n.-octanol should be realized from concentrated aqueous solutions [ru

  1. Synthesis of YBa2Cu3O7-y from nitrate solutions with urea additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pershin, V.I.; Naumov, V.S.; Mozhaev, A.P.; Lyashchenko, A.K.; Pobedina, A.B.; Khajlova, E.G.

    1994-01-01

    Solubility of bariun nitrate is studied in the Y(NO 3 ) 3 -Ba(NO 3 ) 2 -Cu(NO 3 )-CO(NH 2 ) 2 -H 2 O system at the ratio Y:B:Cu-1:2:3 and variable concentration of urea in the solution. Mentioned aqua-salt compositions are used in cryochemical synthesis of HTSC. Solutions of yttrium, barium and copper nitrates with urea additions were demonstrated to be recommended to improvements in the process during development of alternative synthesis from aqua-salt compositions. 15 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  2. First start-up of nuclear criticality safety experiment facility for uranyl nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Qingfu; Shi Yongqian; Shen Leisheng; Hu Dingsheng; Zhao Shouzhi; He Tao; Sun Zheng; Lin Shenghuo; Yao Shigui

    2005-01-01

    The uranyl nitrate solution experiment facility for the research on nuclear criticality safety is described. The nuclear fuel loading steps in the first start-up for water-reflected core are presented. During the experiments, the critical volume of uranyl nitrate solution was determined as 20479.62 mL with count rate inverse extrapolation method, reactivity interpolation method, and steady power method. By calculation, critical mass of 235 U was derived as 1579.184 g from experimental data. The worth of control rods was also calibrated in the first start-up of the facility. (authors)

  3. On the influence of molecular structure on the conductivity of electrolyte solutions - sodium nitrate in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Krienke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical calculations of the conductivity of sodium nitrate in water are presented and compared with experimental measurements. The method of direct correlation force in the framework of the interionic theory is used for the calculation of transport properties in connection with the associative mean spherical approximation (AMSA. The effective interactions between ions in solutions are derived with the help of Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics calculations on the Born-Oppenheimer level. This work is based on earlier theoretical and experimental studies of the structure of concentrated aqueous sodium nitrate solutions.

  4. LOW TEMPERATURE PROCESS FOR THE REMOVAL AND RECOVERY OF CHLORIDES AND NITRATES FROM AQUEOUS NITRATE SOLUTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savolainen, J.E.

    1963-01-29

    A method is described for reducing the chloride content of a solution derived from the dissolution of a stainless steel clad nuclear fuel element with an aqua regia dissolution medium. The solutlon is adjusted to a nitric acid concentration in the range 5 to 10 M and is countercurrently contacted at room temperature with a gaseous oxide of nitrogen selected from NO, NO/sub 2/, N/sub 2/ O/sub 3/, and N/sub 2/O/sub 4/. Chlo ride is recovered from the contacted solution as nitrosyl chloride. After reduction of the chloride content, the solution is then contacted with gaseous NO to reduce the nitric acid molarity to a desired level. (AEC)

  5. Biotic and abiotic catalysis of nitrate reduction in alkaline environment of repository storage cell for long-lived intermediate-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertron, A.; Jacquemet, N.; Escadeillas, G.; Erable, B.; Alquier, M.; Kassim, C.; Albasi, C.; Basseguy, R.; Strehaiano, P.; Sablayrolles, C.; Vignoles, M.; Albrecht, A.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the reactivity of nitrates at the bitumen-concrete interface with the aim of determining redox conditions inside a repository storage cell for long-lived intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The first part of the work aimed to identify, under abiotic conditions, the interactions between two components of the system: concrete (introduced as cement pastes in the system) and bitumen (represented by leachates composed of organic acids and nitrates). The second part of the study was conducted under biotic conditions with selected denitrifying heterotrophic bacteria (Pseudomonas stutzeri - Ps and Halomonas desiderata - Hd) and aimed to analyse the microbial reaction of nitrate reduction (kinetics, by-products, role of the organic matter) under neutral to alkaline pH conditions (i.e. imposed by a concrete environment). Results showed that strong interactions occurred between cementitious matrices and acetic and oxalic organic acids, likely reducing the bio-availability of this organic matter (oxalate in particular). Results also confirmed the stability of nitrates under these conditions. Under biotic conditions, nitrates were reduced by both Ps and Hd following an anaerobic denitrification metabolic pathway. Reduction kinetics was higher with Ps but the reaction was inhibited for pH ≥ 9. Hd was capable of denitrification at least up to pH 11. (authors)

  6. Bioprecipitation of uranium from alkaline waste solutions using recombinant Deinococcus radiodurans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, Sayali; Ballal, Anand; Apte, Shree Kumar, E-mail: aptesk@barc.gov.in

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Deinococcus radiodurans was genetically engineered to overexpress alkaline phosphatase (PhoK). • Deino-PhoK bioprecipitated U efficiently over a wide range of input U concentration. • A maximal loading of 10.7 g U/g of biomass at 10 mM input U was observed. • Radioresistance and U precipitation by Deino-PhoK remained unaffected by γ radiation. • Immobilization of Deino-PhoK facilitated easy separation of precipitated U. -- Abstract: Bioremediation of uranium (U) from alkaline waste solutions remains inadequately explored. We engineered the phoK gene (encoding a novel alkaline phosphatase, PhoK) from Sphingomonas sp. for overexpression in the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. The recombinant strain thus obtained (Deino-PhoK) exhibited remarkably high alkaline phosphatase activity as evidenced by zymographic and enzyme activity assays. Deino-PhoK cells could efficiently precipitate uranium over a wide range of input U concentrations. At low uranyl concentrations (1 mM), the strain precipitated >90% of uranium within 2 h while a high loading capacity of around 10.7 g U/g of dry weight of cells was achieved at 10 mM U concentration. Uranium bioprecipitation by Deino-PhoK cells was not affected in the presence of Cs and Sr, commonly present in intermediate and low level liquid radioactive waste, or after exposure to very high doses of ionizing radiation. Transmission electron micrographs revealed the extracellular nature of bioprecipitated U, while X-ray diffraction and fluorescence analysis identified the precipitated uranyl phosphate species as chernikovite. When immobilized into calcium alginate beads, Deino-PhoK cells efficiently removed uranium, which remained trapped in beads, thus accomplishing physical separation of precipitated uranyl phosphate from solutions. The data demonstrate superior ability of Deino-PhoK, over earlier reported strains, in removal of uranium from alkaline solutions and its potential use in

  7. Removal of nitrate from ammonium hydroxide solution containing organics by ion exchange method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venugopal Chetty, K.; Gamare, Jayashree S.; Vaidya, V.N.

    2004-01-01

    Removal of nitrate from ammonium hydroxide solution containing HMTA (hexamethyltetramine) and Urea was studied using indigenously available anion exchange resins. This type of waste is produced during nuclear fuel preparation by internal gelation process. The resins used are Tulsion A-27(MP) and Duolite A. 102D. The time of equilibration and capacity of the resins were determined from distribution ratios obtained by equilibrating resin with nitrate solution. The loading, washing and elution behavior of nitrate on these resins were studied using synthetic mixture having similar composition of the waste produced. Elution studies were carried out using sodium hydroxide, hydrochloric acid and ammonium chloride. The studies were also carried out at higher temperature of around 60 degC. The data was compared with that obtained using Dowex 1x4 for the same purpose. (author)

  8. Potentiometric determination of free nitric-acid in trilaurylamine solutions containing plutonium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, J.J.; Saey, J.C.

    1965-01-01

    A potentiometric method of determination of the free nitric acid in trilaurylamine solutions containing plutonium or thorium nitrates is described. The potentiometric titration is carried out in a mixture of benzene and 1,2-dichloro ethane with a standard solution of trilaurylamine as the titrant. When thorium nitrate is present the metal complex is not dissociated then the titration has a single end-point. In the case of plutonium nitrate the partial dissociation of the plutonium complex corresponds to a second point. The experimental error in duplicate analyses of 50 samples is about 1 per cent for free acid concentrations in the range of 0,03 to 0,1 N and plutonium concentrations between 1 to 5 g/l. (authors) [fr

  9. Characterization of Laboratory Prepared Concrete Pastes Exposed to High Alkaline and High Sodium Salt Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-06-30

    The objective of this study was to identify potential chemical degradation mechanisms for the Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) concretes, which over the performance life of the structures may be exposed to highly alkaline sodium salt solutions containing sulfate, hydroxide, and other potentially corrosive chemicals in salt solution and saltstone flush water, drain water, leachate and / or pore solution. The samples analyzed in this study were cement pastes prepared in the SIMCO Technologies, Inc. concrete laboratory. They were based on the paste fractions of the concretes used to construct the Saltstone Disposal Units (SDUs). SDU 1 and 4 concrete pastes were represented by the PV1 test specimens. The paste in the SDU 2, 3, 5, and 6 concrete was represented by the PV2 test specimens. SIMCO Technologies, Inc. selected the chemicals and proportions in the aggressive solutions to approximate proportions in the saltstone pore solution [2, 3, 5, and 6]. These test specimens were cured for 56 days in curing chamber before being immersed in aggressive solutions. After exposure, the samples were frozen to prevent additional chemical transport and reaction. Selected archived (retrieved from the freezer) samples were sent to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for additional characterization using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. Characterization results are summarized in this report. In addition, a correlation between the oxide composition of the pastes and their chemical durability in the alkaline salt solutions is provided.

  10. MODELING AN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS FOR CESIUM REMOVAL FROM ALKALINE RADIOACTIVE WASTE SOLUTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, F.; Hamm, Luther; Aleman, Sebastian; Michael, Johnston

    2008-01-01

    The performance of spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde ion-exchange resin for the removal of cesium from alkaline radioactive waste solutions has been investigated through computer modeling. Cesium adsorption isotherms were obtained by fitting experimental data using a thermodynamic framework. Results show that ion-exchange is an efficient method for cesium removal from highly alkaline radioactive waste solutions. On average, two 1300 liter columns operating in series are able to treat 690,000 liters of waste with an initial cesium concentration of 0.09 mM in 11 days achieving a decontamination factor of over 50,000. The study also tested the sensitivity of ion-exchange column performance to variations in flow rate, temperature and column dimensions. Modeling results can be used to optimize design of the ion exchange system

  11. Electrochemical investigation of mineral electrodes in phosphate-buffered alkaline solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Erdenechimeg

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic voltammetric methods have been applied to study the electrochemical behavior of the sulfide minerals in phosphate-buffered alkaline solution. The redox process of electrodes of sulfide ores was investigated using silicone-impregnated graphite electrode. The cathodic and anodic reaction products in alkaline solution were determined within the potential range of -2V to +2V (vs. Ag/AgCl. The several successive measurement cycles’ voltammograms leads to the appearance of a new anodic peak at E = 450mV, which is absent in the first cycle and curves, as well as other features that appear in cycling, can probably be explained by secondary electrochemical transformations of the products formed by the oxidation of the original pyrite at the interface between the electrode material.DOI: http://doi.dx.org/10.5564/mjc.v15i0.318 Mongolian Journal of Chemistry 15 (41, 2014, p33-35

  12. Nitrate adsorption from aqueous solution using granular chitosan-Fe{sup 3+} complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Qili [School of Water Resources and Environment, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Beijing, 100083 (China); Key Laboratory of Groundwater Cycle and Environment Evolution,China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Ministry of Education, Beijing, 100083 (China); Chen, Nan, E-mail: chennan@cugb.edu.cn [School of Water Resources and Environment, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Beijing, 100083 (China); Key Laboratory of Groundwater Cycle and Environment Evolution, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Ministry of Education, Beijing, 100083 (China); Feng, Chuanping [School of Water Resources and Environment, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Beijing, 100083 (China); Key Laboratory of Groundwater Cycle and Environment Evolution, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Ministry of Education, Beijing, 100083 (China); Hu, WeiWu [The Journal Center, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Beijing, 100083 (China)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • Granular chitosan-Fe{sup 3+} complex had high performance for nitrate adsorption. • Granular chitosan-Fe{sup 3+} complex had shorter equilibrium time (1.5 h). • Nitrate adsorption was ascribed to ion exchange and electrostatic attraction. • Granular chitosan-Fe{sup 3+} complex could be regenerated using NaCl solution. - Abstract: In the present study, In order to efficiently remove nitrate, granular chitosan-Fe{sup 3+} complex with high chemical stability and good environmental adaptation was synthesized through precipitation method and characterized using SEM, XRD, BET and FTIR. The nitrate adsorption performance was evaluated by batch experiments. The results indicated that granular chitosan-Fe{sup 3+} complex was an amorphous and mesoporous material. The BET specific surface area and average pore size were 8.98 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} and 56.94 Å, respectively. The point of zero charge was obtained at pH 5. The maximum adsorption capacity reached 8.35 mg NO{sub 3}{sup −}-N g{sup −1} based on Langmuir–Freundlich model. Moreover, no significant change in the nitrate removal efficiency was observed in the pH range of 3.0–10.0. The adverse influence of sulphate on nitrate removal was the most significant, followed by bicarbonate and fluoride, whereas chloride had slightly adverse effect. Adsorption process followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and the experimental equilibrium data were fitted well with the Langmuir–Freundlich and D–R isotherm models. Thermodynamic parameters revealed that nitrate adsorption was a spontaneous and exothermic process. Granular chitosan-Fe{sup 3+} complex could be effectively regenerated by NaCl solution.

  13. Modeling of critical experiments employing Raschig rings in uranyl nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    Four critical experiments employing borated glass rings in concentrated uranyl nitrate solution yielded k eff higher by 0. 04 when modeled with a flux-weighted, homogenized cross section set than when modeled with discrete rings. k eff varied by 0.014 for a 10% boron uncertainty and by up to 0.04 for a 10% packing fraction uncertainty

  14. 21 CFR 172.167 - Silver nitrate and hydrogen peroxide solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.167 Silver nitrate and hydrogen peroxide solution... intended to be filtered through a silver-containing water filter. (g) Bottled water must meet the quality...

  15. Nuclear fuel technology - Determination of uranium in uranyl nitrate solutions of nuclear grade quality - Gravimetric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This International Standard specifies a precise and accurate gravimetric method for determining the mass fraction of uranium in uranyl nitrate solutions of nuclear grade quality containing more than 100 g/kg of uranium. Non-volatile impurities influence the accuracy of the method

  16. Electronic spectra of plutonium ions in nitric acid and in lithium nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mekhail, F.M.

    1987-01-01

    The absorption spectra of plutonium ions in nitric acid have been described. There is a characteristic change in the absorption spectra of Pu v in lithium nitrate solutions. In 2 M-lithium nitrate a new peak at 969 nm and high absorption at 1200 nm are noticed. A decrease in the absorption by about 20% and the appearance of a new shoulder at 1120 nm in 6 M-lithium nitrate are found. There is no change in the spectrum in 4 M-lithium nitrate. The absorption spectra of plutonium ions in the spectral range 200 - 400 nm are interesting. All plutonium ions have an intense band in the region 250 - 260 nm as well as a less intense and rather diffuse band at 320 - 330 nm in lithium nitrate solutions the sharp band at 250 - 260 nm has disappeared. This suggests that this band is very sensitive to the environmental field. The band is probably produced by 5 F q → 5 f q-1 6 d transition as well as electron transfer. It is believed that the spectrum of Pu V at pH 6.5 represents the hydrolysis product Pu O 2 (O H). 9 fig., 4 tab

  17. Removal of radioruthenium from alkaline intermediate level radioactive waste solution : a laboratory investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samanta, S.K.; Theyyunni, T.K.

    1994-01-01

    Various methods were investigated in the laboratory for the removal of radioruthenium from alkaline intermediate level radioactive waste solutions of reprocessing plant origin. The methods included batch equilibration with different ion exchangers and sorbents, column testing and chemical precipitation. A column method using zinc-activated carbon mixture and a chemical precipitation method using ferrous salt along with sodium sulphite were found to be promising for plant scale application. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs

  18. Alteration behavior of bentonite barrier of radioactive waste disposal by alkaline solutions. Part 2. Effect of type of alkaline solution on permeability of compacted bentonite-sand mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Shingo; Nakamura, Kunihiko; Tanaka, Yukihisa; Hironaga, Michihiko

    2011-01-01

    Permeability tests were carried out using compacted bentonite-sand mixture with initial dry density of 1.55 Mg/m 3 and alkaline solutions at 50degC for about two years to estimate the alteration behavior and the change in the permeability. Bentonite-sand mixtures which contain bentonites of 15wt% were made using Na-bentonite or Ca-exchanged bentonite. 0.3M-NaOH solution with pH 13.3 and 5mM-Ca(OH) 2 solution with pH 12.0 were used to the permeability tests of Na-bentonite-sand mixture and of Ca-exchanged bentonite-sand mixture, respectively. In the case of the permeability test conducted using NaOH solution, montmorillonite and other associated minerals were dissolved, and consequently, the dry density and effective montmorillonite density of Na-bentonite-sand mixture were decreased. Furthermore, the mineralogical feature of montmorillonite was changed (i.e. beidellitization and an increase in the layer charge). The permeability of Na-bentonite-sand mixture was increased 5.6 times by the end of permeability test as a result of above alteration. In the case of the permeability test conducted using Ca(OH) 2 solution, montmorillonite and other associated minerals were dissolved, and calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) was precipitated. Consequently, the dry density of Ca-exchanged bentonite-sand mixture was increased, while the effective montmorillonite density was decreased. The mineralogical feature of montmorillonite was changed (i.e. beidellitization and an increase in the layer charge). The permeability of Ca-exchange bentonite-sand mixture was decreased by more than two orders of magnitude due to fill the pore of Ca-exchange bentonite-sand mixture by the precipitation of C-S-H. From above results, the type of alkaline solution affects the mineralogical alteration behavior of the compacted bentonite-sand mixture, and consequently, affects the changing trend of permeability. In conclusion, it is important not only to consider the dissolution of montmorillonite, but

  19. Ammonia volatilization from surface-applied nitrogen solution of urea and ammonium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivellin, Paulo Cezar Ocheuze; Stefanutti, Ronaldo; Lima Filho, Oscar Fontvo de; Tziboy, Edgar Alfredo Tzi; Oliveira Junior, Jovo Alberto de; Bendassolli, Jose Albertino

    1996-08-01

    The urea is one of the fertilizers more utilized in modern agriculture. One of the problems in the urea utilization is the ammonium volatilization, resulting in low utilization of N-fertilizers by the plants.The objective of this study it was to evaluate and to compare in laboratories conditions , utilizing the 15 N technic the soil's ammonium lost by volatilization associated a superficial application of nitrogen corresponding doses like urea solution and urea and ammonium nitrates solution

  20. Improvement of INVS Measurement Uncertainty for Pu and U-Pu Nitrate Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Menlove, Howard Olsen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Marlow, Johnna Boulds [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Makino, Risa [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai (Japan); Nakamura, Hironbu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai (Japan)

    2017-04-27

    In the Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP) and the Plutonium Conversion Development Facility (PCDF), a large amount of plutonium nitrate solution which is recovered from light water reactor (LWR) and advanced thermal reactor (ATR), FUGEN are being stored. Since the solution is designated as a direct use material, the periodical inventory verification and flow verification are being conducted by Japan Safeguard Government Office (JSGO) and International Atomic Agency (IAEA).

  1. A bibliographical review on the radiolysis of uranyl nitrate solutions in nitric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siri, Sandra; Mondino, Angel V.

    2004-01-01

    A bibliographical study on the effects of ionizing radiation on uranyl nitrate solutions in nitric acid medium was performed, and the state of knowledge on this subject is presented. The main experimental and theoretical results on water, nitric acid and uranium solutions radiolysis are reviewed and critically evaluated. This paper provides a collection of references as an aid to the development of practical applications, and to stimulate new research on fundamental processes in these systems. (author) [es

  2. Corrosion evaluation of uranyl nitrate solution evaporator and denitrator in Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Kowa; Uchida, Toyomi; Shirato, Yoji; Isozaki, Toshihiko; Nakamura, Yoshinobu

    2011-01-01

    The Tokai reprocessing plant (TRP) adopted the PUREX method in 1977 and has reprocessed spent nuclear fuel of 1140 tHM (tons of heavy metals) since then. The reprocessing equipment suffers from various corrosion phenomena because of high nitric acidity, solution ion concentrations, such as uranium, plutonium, and fission products, and temperature. Therefore, considering corrosion performance in such a severe environment, stainless steels, titanium steel, and so forth were employed as corrosion resistant materials. The severity of the corrosive environment depends on the nitric acid concentration and the temperature of the solution, and uranium in the solution reportedly does not significantly affect the corrosion of stainless steels and controls the corrosion rates of titanium steel. The TRP equipment that handles uranyl nitrate solution operates at a low nitric acid concentration and has not experienced corrosion problems until now. However, there is a report that corrosion rates of some stainless steels increase in proportion to rising uranium concentrations. The equipment that handles the uranyl nitrate solution in the TRP includes the evaporators, which concentrate uranyl nitrate to a maximum concentration of about 1000 gU/L (grams of uranium per liter), and the denitrator, where uranyl nitrate is converted to UO 3 powder at about 320degC. These equipments are therefore required to grasp the degree of the progress of corrosion to handle high-temperature and high-concentration uranyl nitrate. The evaluation of this equipment on the basis of thickness measurement confirmed only minor corrosion and indicated that the equipment would be fully adequate for future operation. (author)

  3. Determination of uranium in uranyl nitrate solutions of nuclear grade quality - Gravimetric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This international Standard specifies a precise and accurate gravimetric method for determining the uranium content in uranyl nitrate product solutions of nuclear grade quality at concentrations above 100 g/l of uranium. Non-volatile impurities influence the accuracy of the method. Uranyl nitrate is converted into uranium octoxide (U 3 O 8 ) by ignition in air to constant mass at 900 deg. C ± 10 deg. C. Calculation of the uranium content in the sample using a gravimetric conversion factor which depends on the isotopic composition of the uranium. The isotopic composition is determined by mass spectrometry

  4. Electrochemical Studies of Lead Telluride Behavior in Acidic Nitrate Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudnik E.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemistry of lead telluride stationary electrode was studied in nitric acid solutions of pH 1.5-3.0. E-pH diagram for Pb-Te-H2O system was calculated. Results of cyclic voltammetry of Pb, Te and PbTe were discussed in correlation with thermodynamic predictions. Anodic dissolution of PbTe electrode at potential approx. -100÷50 mV (SCE resulted in tellurium formation, while above 300 mV TeO2 was mainly produced. The latter could dissolve to HTeO+2 under acidic electrolyte, but it was inhibited by increased pH of the bath.

  5. Study of vapour pressure of lithium nitrate solutions in ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verevkin, Sergey [Abteilung Physikalische Chemie, Institut fuer Chemie, Universitaet Rostock, Hermannstrasse, 14, D-18055 Rostock (Germany); Safarov, Javid [Heat and Refrigeration Techniques, Azerbaijan Technical University, H. Javid Avn. 25, AZ1073 Baku (Azerbaijan)]. E-mail: javids@azdata.net; Bich, Eckard [Abteilung Physikalische Chemie, Institut fuer Chemie, Universitaet Rostock, Hermannstrasse, 14, D-18055 Rostock (Germany); Hassel, Egon [Lehrstuhl fuer Technische Thermodynamik, Fakultaet Maschinenbau und Schiffstechnik, Universitaet Rostock, Albert-Einstein-Str. 2, D-18059 Rostock (Germany); Heintz, Andreas [Abteilung Physikalische Chemie, Institut fuer Chemie, Universitaet Rostock, Hermannstrasse, 14, D-18055 Rostock (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    Vapour pressure p of (LiNO{sub 3} + C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH) solutions at T = (298.15 to 323.15) K were measured, osmotic, activity coefficients ({phi}, {gamma}) and activity of solvent a {sub s} have been evaluated. The experiments were carried out in the molality range m = (0.19125 to 2.21552) mol . kg{sup -1}. The Antoine equation was used for the empirical description of the experimental vapour pressure results and the (Pitzer + Mayorga) model with inclusion of Archer's ionic strength dependence of the third virial coefficient for the calculated osmotic coefficients were used. The parameters of the Archer for the extended Pitzer model was used for the evaluation of activity coefficients.

  6. Adsorptive Removal of Nitrate from Aqueous Solution Using Nitrogen Doped Activated Carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Motoi; Goto, Tatsuru; Amano, Yoshimasa; Iida, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Activated carbon (AC) has been widely applied for adsorptive removal of organic contaminants from aqueous phase, but not for ionic pollutants. In this study, nitrogen doped AC was prepared to increase the adsorption capacity of nitrate from water. AC was oxidized with (NH 4 ) 2 S 2 O 8 solution to maximize oxygen content for the first step, and then NH 3 gas treatment was carried out at 950°C to aim at forming quaternary nitrogen (N-Q) species on AC surface (Ox-9.5AG). Influence of solution pH was examined so as to elucidate the relationship between surface charge and adsorption amounts of nitrate. The results showed that Ox-9.5AG exhibited about twice higher adsorption capacity than non-treatment AC at any initial nitrate concentration and any equilibrium solution pH (pH e ) investigated. The more decrease in pH e value, the more adsorption amount of negatively charged nitrate ion, because the surface charge of AC and Ox-9.5AG could become more positive in acidic solution. The oxidation and consecutive ammonia treatments lead to increase in nitrogen content from 0.35 to 6.4% and decrease in the pH of the point of zero charge (pH pzc ) from 7.1 to 4.0 implying that positively charged N-Q of a Lewis acid was created on the surface of Ox-9.5AG. Based on a Langmuir data analysis, maximum adsorption capacity attained 0.5-0.6 mmol/g of nitrate and adsorption affinity was 3.5-4.0 L/mmol at pH e 2.5 for Ox-9.5AG.

  7. Minimum critical values of uranyl and plutonium nitrate solutions calculated by various routes of the french criticality codes system CRISTAL using the new isopiestic nitrate density law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anno, Jacques; Rouyer, Veronique; Leclaire, Nicolas

    2003-01-01

    This paper provides for various cases of 235 U enrichment or Pu isotopic vectors, and different reflectors, new minimum critical values of uranyl nitrate and plutonium nitrate solutions (H + =0) obtained by the standard IRSN calculation route and the new isopiestic density laws. Comparisons are also made with other more accurate routes showing that the standard one's results are most often conservative and usable for criticality safety assessments. (author)

  8. Coprecipitation of 137Cs and 85Sr microquantities with complex compound [M(18-crown-6)]BPH4 (M=Na+, Cs+) from neutral and alkaline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konovalova, N.A.; Rumer, I.A.; Kulyukhin, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    The paper reports the possibility of joint separation of 137 Cs and 85 Sr from neutral and alkaline aqueous solutions by their coprecipitation with the solid phase of complex compounds [M(18-crown-6)]BPh 4 (M=Na + , Cs + ), as well as to study the coprecipitation of 137 Cs and 85 Sr with the solid phase CsBPh 4 . It is found that complex compounds [M(18-crown-6)]BPh 4 (M=Na + , Cs + ) increased the degree of 85 Sr separation from solutions virtually two- to threefold vs. CsBPh 4 . Chloride and nitrate were found to have hardly any impact on the coprecipitation of 137 Cs and 85 Sr with [M(18-crown-6)]BPh 4 (M = Na + , Cs + ). (orig.)

  9. Optimizing Electrocoagulation Process for the Removal of Nitrate From Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehghani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background High levels of nitrate anion are frequently detected in many groundwater resources in Fars province. Objectives The present study aimed to determine the removal efficiency of nitrate from aqueous solutions by electrocoagulation process using aluminum and iron electrodes. Materials and Methods A laboratory-scale batch reactor was conducted to determine nitrate removal efficiency using the electrocoagulation method. The removal of nitrate was determined at pH levels of 3, 7, and 11, different voltages (15, 20, and 30 V, and operation times of 30, 60, and 75 min, respectively. Data were analyzed using the SPSS software version 16 (Chicago, Illinois, USA and Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used to analyze the relationship between the parameters. Results Results of the present study showed that the removal efficiency was increased from 27% to 86% as pH increased from 3 to 11 at the optimal condition of 30 V and 75 min operation time. Moreover, by increasing the reaction time from 30 V to 75 min the removal efficiency was increased from 63% to 86%, respectively (30 V and pH = 11. Pearson’s correlation analysis showed that there was a significant relationship between removal efficiency and voltage and reaction time as well (P < 0.01. Conclusions In conclusion, the electrocoagulation process can be used for removing nitrate from water resources because of high efficiency, simplicity, and relatively low cost.

  10. A Solution-Based Approach for Mo-99 Production: Considerations for Nitrate versus Sulfate Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J. Youker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum-99 is the parent of Technetium-99m, which is used in nearly 80% of all nuclear medicine procedures. The medical community has been plagued by Mo-99 shortages due to aging reactors, such as the NRU (National Research Universal reactor in Canada. There are currently no US producers of Mo-99, and NRU is scheduled for shutdown in 2016, which means that another Mo-99 shortage is imminent unless a potential domestic Mo-99 producer fills the void. Argonne National Laboratory is assisting two potential domestic suppliers of Mo-99 by examining the effects of a uranyl nitrate versus a uranyl sulfate target solution configuration on Mo-99 production. Uranyl nitrate solutions are easier to prepare and do not generate detectable amounts of peroxide upon irradiation, but a high radiation field can lead to a large increase in pH, which can lead to the precipitation of fission products and uranyl hydroxides. Uranyl sulfate solutions are more difficult to prepare, and enough peroxide is generated during irradiation to cause precipitation of uranyl peroxide, but this can be prevented by adding a catalyst to the solution. A titania sorbent can be used to recover Mo-99 from a highly concentrated uranyl nitrate or uranyl sulfate solution; however, different approaches must be taken to prevent precipitation during Mo-99 production.

  11. Comparative study of polypyrrole films electrosynthesized in alkaline and acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehr, I.L.; Quinzani, O.V.; Saidman, S.B.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of the pH of electropolymerization solutions on the properties of polypyrrole films has been studied using potentiodynamic techniques and faradaic impedance spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), IR and Raman spectroscopies, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were also used for products characterization. Results indicate that, contrary to what happen with the polymer electrogenerated in acid solutions, the films prepared in alkaline media are stable and present good electrochemical activity in basic solutions. Possible explanations for the observed differences are discussed and it is proposed that the pH of electropolymerization medium directly affects chains organization. Electrosynthesis in solutions of increased basicity results in a more compact and closed polymer structure.

  12. Activation of Graphene Oxide with Hydrochloric Acid for Nitrate Removal from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolghasem Alighardashi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Long-term drinking of nitrate-contaminated water poses a serious risk to human health. The present study explores the possibility of enhancing the adsorption capacity of graphene oxide via activation with hydrochloric acid for nitrate removal from aqueous solutions. Experiments were performed in a batch reactor in which such major factors as pH, reaction time, and concentrations of both graphene oxide (GO and activated graphene oxide (AGO were used as variables. Nitrate removal efficiency was investigated using the One-Way ANOVA statistical test and SPSS-16 software. The chemical composition and solid structure of the synthesized AGO were analyzed using FE-SEM coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS. The micropore volumes of the samples were determined using the BET and BJH. The predominant composition (52% of the synthesized AGO was C and its mean pore diameter was 26.896 nm. The maximum adsorption capacity of AGO was estimated at 3333.33 mg/g. Based on the results, the AGO nano-structure may be recomended as a new means for nitrate removal from aqueous solutions.

  13. Evaluating Growth of Zeolites on Fly Ash in Hydro-Thermally Heated Low Alkaline Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Bhagwanjee; Singh, D. N.

    2017-12-01

    Fly ash has been well established materials for synthesis of zeolites, under hydrothermally heated aqueous NaOH solution. Efficacy of such technique is reported to be improved when high molarity of NaOH is used. Consequently, highly alkaline waste solution, as by-product, is generally disposed of in the surrounding, which may contaminate the environment. In this context, less alkaline NaOH solution may become a safer option, which has not been tried in the past as per the literature. With this in view, the present study demonstrates effectiveness of the 0.5 M NaOH solution and critically monitors transition on the fly ash after hydrothermal treatment. As an enhancement over previous researchers, such activation of the fly ash finally results in remarkable morphological and mineralogical growth on the bulk material (the residue), which comprises of new nano-sized crystals (the zeolites Na-P1 and natrolite), after 24 h of activation of the fly ash.

  14. Interaction of cadmium and indium nitrate mixture with sodium tungstate in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belousova, E E; Krivobok, V I; Gruba, A I [Donetskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (Ukrainian SSR)

    1982-01-01

    The interaction of the mixture of cadmium and indium nitrates with sodium tungstate in aqueous solution is studied using the methods of ''residual concentrations'', pH potentiometry and conductometry. Independent of the ratio of components in the initial solution a mixture of coprecipitated normal tungstates of cadmium and indium is formed in the system. Heat treatment of the precipitates at 800 deg C for 50 hrs with subsequent hardening results in the formation of solid solutions on the basis of normal cadmium and indium tungstates.

  15. Calculated k-effectives for light water reactor typical, U + Pu nitrate solution critical experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primm, R.T. III; Mincey, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program has as a goal the design of nuclear fuel reprocessing equipment. In order to validate computer codes used for criticality analyses in the design of such equipment, k-effectives have been calculated for several U + Pu nitrate solution critical experiments. As of January 1981, descriptions of 45 unpoisoned, U + Pu solution experiments were available in the open literature. Twelve of these experiments were performed with solutions which have physical characteristics typical of dissolved, light water reactor fuel. This paper contains a discussion of these twelve experiments, a review of the calculational procedure used to determine k-effectives, and the results of the calculations

  16. Electron spectra and mechanism of complexing of uranyl nitrate in water-acetone solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zazhogin, A.A.; Zazhogin, A.P.; Komyak, A.I.; Serafimovich, A.I.

    2003-01-01

    Based on the analysis of the luminescence and electronic absorption spectra, the processes of complexing in an aqueous solution of UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 ·6H 2 O with small additions of acetone have been studied. In a pure aqueous solution, uranyl exists as the complex UO 2 ·5H 2 O. It is shown that the addition of acetone to the solution leads to the displacement of some water molecules out of the first coordination sphere of uranyl and the formation of the uranyl nitrate dihydrate complexes UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 ·2H 2 O. It has been established that the stability of these complexes is determined by the decrease in the water activity and in the degree of hydration of uranyl and nitrate, which is the result of the local increase in the concentration of acetone molecules (due to their hydrophobicity) in the regions of the solution where uranyl and nitrate ions are found. The experimental facts supported the mechanism proposed are presented. (authors)

  17. Plans and equipment for criticality measurements on plutonium-uranium nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, R.C.; Clayton, E.D.; Durst, B.M.

    1982-01-01

    Data from critical experiments are required on the criticality of plutonium-uranium nitrate solutions to accurately establish criticality control limits for use in processing and handling of breeder type fuels. Since the fuel must be processed both safely and economically, it is necessary that criticality considerations be based on accurate experimental data. Previous experiments have been reported on plutonium-uranium solutions with Pu weight ratios extending up to some 38 wt %. No data have been presented, however, for plutonium-uranium nitrate solutions beyond this Pu weight ratio. The current research emphasis is on the procurement of criticality data for plutonium-uranium mixtures up to 60 wt % Pu that will serve as the basis for handling criticality problems subsequently encountered in the development of technology for the breeder community. Such data also will provide necessary benchmarks for data testing and analysis on integral criticality experiments for verification of the analytical techniques used in support of criticality control. Experiments are currently being performed with plutonium-uranium nitrate solutions in stainless steel cylindrical vessels and an expandable slab tank system. A schematic of the experimental systems is presented

  18. Electrical conductivity of solutions of copper(II) nitrate crystalohydrate in dimethyl sulfoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamyrbekova, Aigul K.; Mamitova, A. D.; Mamyrbekova, Aizhan K.

    2016-06-01

    Conductometry is used to investigate the electric conductivity of Cu(NO3)2 ṡ 3H2O solutions in dimethyl sulfoxide in the 0.01-2.82 M range of concentrations and at temperatures of 288-318 K. The limiting molar conductivity of the electrolyte and the mobility of Cu2+ and NO 3 - ions, the effective coefficients of diffusion of copper(II) ions and nitrate ions, and the degree and constant of electrolytic dissociation are calculated for different temperatures from the experimental results. It is established that solutions containing 0.1-0.6 M copper nitrate trihydrate in DMSO having low viscosity and high electrical conductivity can be used in electrochemical deposition.

  19. Corrosion behavior of 321 stainless steel in low-acidity uranium nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Junsheng; Sun Ying; Zhang Wanglin; Ding Ping; Yang Jiangrong; Wu Lunqiang

    2003-01-01

    Weighing and electrochemical methods have been used to investigate the high-temperature uniform corrosion and electrochemical corrosion behavior of lCr18Ni9Ti (321) stainless steel in uranium nitrate solution at different concentrations and pH values. The uniform corrosion results showed that the corrosion rate of 321 stainless steel was less than 0.04 g/m 2 .h, and the visible change of surface smoothness was not observed through 960 h. It was perfect corrosion-resisting in obtained conditions. The electro-chemical corrosion behavior study has been performed to investigate 321 stainless steel in uranium nitrate solutions of the dissolved and saturated oxygen. The corrosion potential and corrosion current density were obtained. Auger photoelectron spectroscopy for measurement of uranium in specimen was used to indicate that uranium is in corrosion product. The corrosion film was measured by Ar ion gun sputter, and the thickness is 10-15 nm. (authors)

  20. The extraction of lanthanides and americium by benzyldiakylamines and benzyltrialkylammonium nitrates from the nitrate solutions; structure and aggregation of their salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jedinakova, V.; Zilkova, J.; Dvorak, Z.; Vojtiskova, M.

    1982-01-01

    Benzyldialkylamine and benzyltrialkylammonium nitrates were used for the extraction of lanthanides and americium from aqueous nitrate solutions. The dependence of the extraction performance for Ln(III) and Am(III) on the concentration of nitric acid, the kind and concentration of salting-out agents in the aqueous phase, and the kind of solvent were investigated. The extraction of Am(III) is compared with the extraction of lanthanides. The difference in distribution coefficients for lanthanides and americium can be utilized for the separation of lanthanides and americium. Using vapor phase osmometry and cryoscopy the association of these compounds was measured at 5.5deg, 25deg and 37deg C, allowing rough estimates of ΔH and ΔS for the formation of the aggregates, monomers in the case of benzyldiethylamine, benzyldibutylamine, benzyldihexylamine and benzyldioctylamine, tetramers for the benzyldibutylamine nitrate and tetramers for benzyldimethyldodecylammonium nitrate. (author)

  1. THE KINETICS OF SAPONIFICATION OF IODOACETIC ACID BY SODIUM HYDROXIDE AND BY CERTAIN ALKALINE BUFFER SOLUTIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brdicka, R

    1936-07-20

    1. The rate of the saponification of iodoacetic acid in sodium hydroxide and alkaline buffer solutions yielding glycollic acid was measured by means of Heyrovský's polarographic method. 2. From the bimolecular velocity constants, increasing with the ionic strength of the solution, the Brönsted factor, F, which characterizes the primary salt effect, was calculated. 3. In the borate buffer solutions the monomolecular constants of the saponification were determined which, at values above the pH of neutralization of boric acid, show a proportionality to the concentration of hydroxyl anions. Below the pH of neutralization of boric acid, they are proportional to the concentration of borate anions.

  2. An in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroelectrochemical study on ethanol electrooxidation on Pd in alkaline solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Xiang; Wang, Lianqin; Shen, Pei Kang [The State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Cui, Guofeng [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Bianchini, Claudio [Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organometallici (ICCOM-CNR), via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2010-03-01

    The mechanism of ethanol electrooxidation on a palladium electrode in alkaline solution (from 0.01 to 5 M NaOH) has been investigated by cyclic voltammetry and in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroelectrochemistry. The electrode performance has been found to depend on the pH of the fuel solution. The best performance was observed in 1 M NaOH solution (pH = 14), while the electrochemical activity decreased by either increasing or decreasing the NaOH concentration. In situ FTIR spectroscopic measurements showed the main oxidation product to be sodium acetate at NaOH concentrations higher than 0.5 M. The C-C bond cleavage of ethanol, put in evidence by the formation of CO{sub 2}, occurred at pH values {<=}13. In these conditions, however, the catalytic activity for ethanol oxidation was quite low. No CO formation was detected along the oxidation of ethanol by FTIR spectroscopy. (author)

  3. Role of electrodes in ambient electrolytic decomposition of hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN) solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Koh, Kai Seng; Chin, Jitkai; Wahida Ku Chik, Tengku F.

    2013-01-01

    Decomposition of hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN) solution with electrolytic decomposition method has attracted much attention in recent years due to its efficiencies and practicability. However, the phenomenon has not been well-studied till now. By utilizing mathematical model currently available, the effect of water content and power used for decomposition was studied. Experiment data shows that sacrificial material such as copper or aluminum outperforms inert electrodes in the decomposition ...

  4. Grain size effect in corrosion behavior of electrodeposited nanocrystalline Ni coatings in alkaline solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Liping; Zhang Junyan; Gao Yan; Xue Qunji; Hu Litian; Xu Tao

    2006-01-01

    Effects of grain size reduction on the electrochemical corrosion behavior of nanocrystalline Ni produced by pulse electrodeposition were characterized using potentiodynamic polarization testing and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy; X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to confirm the electrochemical measurements and the suggested mechanisms. The corrosion resistance of Ni coatings in alkaline solutions considerably increased as the grain size decreased from microcrystalline to nanocrystalline. The higher corrosion resistance of NC Ni may be due to the more rapid formation of continuous Ni(OH) 2 passive films compared with coarse-grained Ni coatings

  5. Cyclohexanone solvent extraction of 99TcO4 from alkaline nuclear waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, W.W.

    1980-01-01

    Although the 99 Tc cyclohexanone solvent extraction process is still in the bench-scale development stage, the process appears well suited for engineering-scale removal of 99 Tc from alkaline Hanford waste solutions. The most pressing process development need is to resolve the phase disengaging problems encountered during water stripping operations. Stripping tests in pulse columns and/or centrifugal contactors are particularly needed to determine the magnitude of the phase disengaging problem in engineering-scale equipment and to find suitable remedies. 5 figures, 7 tables

  6. Pitting corrosion of friction stir welded aluminum alloy thick plate in alkaline chloride solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Weifeng; Liu Jinhe; Zhu Hongqiang

    2010-01-01

    The pitting corrosion of different positions (Top, Middle and Bottom) of weld nugget zone (WNZ) along thickness plate in friction stir welded 2219-O aluminum alloy in alkaline chloride solution was investigated by using open circuit potential, cyclic polarization, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscope. The results indicate that the material presents significant passivation, the top has highest corrosion potential, pitting potential and re-passivation potential compared with the bottom and base material. With the increase of traverse speed from 60 to 100 mm/min or rotary speed from 500 to 600 rpm, the corrosion resistance decreases.

  7. Investigation into interaction of mixture of zinc and neodymium nitrates with sodium tungstates in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozantsev, G M; Krivobok, V I [Donetskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (Ukrainian SSR)

    1978-09-01

    The methods of residual concentrations, pH-potentiometry, and conductometry have been used for studying interaction between the mixture of zinc and neodymium nitrates with sodium tungstate in aqueous solutions. It has been established that independent of the ratio between the components the reaction product is a mixture of simultaneously precipitated zinc and neodymium orthotungstates. Thermal treatment of such mixtures at 650-700 deg C for 40 h and subsequent hardening yields solid solution of the structure ..cap alpha..-Eu/sub 2/(WO/sub 4/)/sub 3/ within the concentration range 85-100 mol % of Nd/sub 2/(WO/sub 4/)/sub 3/.

  8. Effect of Additional Sulfide and Thiosulfate on Corrosion of Q235 Carbon Steel in Alkaline Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bian Li Quan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the effect of additional sulfide and thiosulfate on Q235 carbon steel corrosion in alkaline solutions. Weight loss method, scanning electron microscopy (SEM equipped with EDS, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and electrochemical measurements were used in this study to show the corrosion behavior and electrochemistry of Q235 carbon steel. Results indicate that the synergistic corrosion rate of Q235 carbon steel in alkaline solution containing sulfide and thiosulfate is larger than that of sulfide and thiosulfate alone, which could be due to redox reaction of sulfide and thiosulfate. The surface cracks and pitting characteristics of the specimens after corrosion were carefully examined and the corrosion products film is flake grains and defective. The main corrosion products of specimen induced by S2− and S2O32- are FeS, FeS2, Fe3O4, and FeOOH. The present study shows that the corrosion mechanism of S2− and S2O32- is different for the corrosion of Q235 carbon steel.

  9. Establishing the traceability of a uranyl nitrate solution to a standard reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, C.H.; Clark, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    A uranyl nitrate solution for use as a Working Calibration and Test Material (WCTM) was characterized, using a statistically designed procedure to document traceability to National Bureau of Standards Reference Material (SPM-960). A Reference Calibration and Test Material (PCTM) was prepared from SRM-960 uranium metal to approximate the acid and uranium concentration of the WCTM. This solution was used in the characterization procedure. Details of preparing, handling, and packaging these solutions are covered. Two outside laboratories, each having measurement expertise using a different analytical method, were selected to measure both solutions according to the procedure for characterizing the WCTM. Two different methods were also used for the in-house characterization work. All analytical results were tested for statistical agreement before the WCTM concentration and limit of error values were calculated. A concentration value was determined with a relative limit of error (RLE) of approximately 0.03% which was better than the target RLE of 0.08%. The use of this working material eliminates the expense of using SRMs to fulfill traceability requirements for uranium measurements on this type material. Several years' supply of uranyl nitrate solution with NBS traceability was produced. The cost of this material was less than 10% of an equal quantity of SRM-960 uranium metal

  10. Electrodeposition of white copper-tin alloys from alkaline cyanide solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purwadaria, H.S.; Zainal Arifin Ahmad

    2007-01-01

    Electrodeposition of white copper-tin alloys (including with mir alloys) has been done onto planar mild steel substrates from alkaline cyanide solutions at 65 degree C. The chemical composition of the coating is influenced by plating bath composition and current density. White mir alloy can be produced from the test solution containing 10 g/l CuCN 2 ,45 g/l Na 2 SnO 3 , 25 g/l NaCN, and 12 g/l NaOH at current density about 5 mA/cm?2. The local compositions of the coating cross section were analyzed using EDX installed in a FESEM operated at an accelerating voltage of 20 kV. The phases formed during co-deposition process were identified using XRD at 25 mA current and 35 kV voltage. (Author)

  11. Direct spectrophotometric analysis of low level Pu (III) in Pu(IV) nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mageswaran, P.; Suresh Kumar, K.; Kumar, T.; Gayen, J.K.; Shreekumar, B.; Dey, P.K.

    2010-01-01

    Among the various methods demonstrated for the conversion of plutonium nitrate to its oxide, the oxalate precipitation process either as Pu (III) or Pu (IV) oxalate gained wide acceptance. Since uranous nitrate is the most successful partitioning agent used in the PUREX process for the separation of Pu from the bulk amount of U, the Pu (III) oxalate precipitation of the purified nitrate solution will not give required decontamination from U. Hence Pu IV oxalate precipitation process is a better option to achieve the end user's specified PuO 2 product. Prior to the precipitation process, ensuring of the Pu (IV) oxidation state is essential. Hence monitoring of the level of Pu oxidation state either Pu (III) or Pu (IV) in the feed solution plays a significant role to establish complete conversion of Pu (III). The method in vogue to estimate Pu(lV) content is extractive radiometry using Theonyl Trifluoro Acetone (TTA). As the the method warrants a sample preparation with respect to acidity, a precise measurement of Pu (IV) without affecting the Pu(III) level in the feed sample is difficult. Present study is focused on the exploration of direct spectrophotometry using an optic fiber probe of path length of 40mm to monitor the low level of Pu(III) after removing the bulk Pu(lV) which interfere in the Pu(III) absorption spectrum, using TTA-TBP synergistic mixture without changing the sample acidity

  12. Plutonium (IV) complexation by nitrate in acid solutions of ionic strengths from 2 to 19 molal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, J.M.; Veirs, D.K.; Vaughn, R.B.; Cisneros, M.A.; Smith, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    Titrations of Pu(IV) with HNO 3 in a series of aqueous HClO 4 solutions ranging in ionic strength from 2 to 19 molal were followed using absorption spectrophotometry. The Pu 5f-5f spectra in the visible and near IR range change with complex formation. At each ionic strength, a series of spectra were obtained by varying nitrate concentration. Each series was deconvoluted into spectra f Pu 4+ (aq), Pu(NO 3 ) 3+ and Pu(NO 3 ) 2 2+ complexes, and simultaneously their formation constants were determined. When corrected for the incomplete dissociation of nitric acid, the ionic strength dependence of each formation constant can be described by two parameters, β 0 and Δ var-epsilon using the formulae of specific ion interaction theory. The difficulties with extending this analysis to higher nitrate coordination numbers are discussed

  13. Effect of nitrate on corrosion of austenitic stainless steel in boiling nitric acid solution containing chromium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Satoshi; Kim, Seong-Yun; Ebina, Tetsunari; Ito, Tatsuya; Nagano, Nobumichi; Hitomi, Keitaro; Ishii, Keizo; Tokuda, Haruaki

    2016-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of chromium and the corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steel in boiling nitric acid solution containing highly concentrated nitrates were investigated using UV-visible spectroscopic measurements, Raman spectral measurements, immersion tests, and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The oxidation rate measurement of chromium from Cr(III) to Cr(VI) was performed by 1 M boiling nitric acid solution containing each highly concentrated nitrates: Al(NO_3)_3, Nd(NO_3)_3, Ca(NO_3)_2, Mg(NO_3)_2, and NaNO_3 as a simulant of uranium nitrate in uranium concentrator in reprocessing plants. As a result, the rate of chromium oxidation was different depending on the added nitrates even at the same nitric acid concentration. In addition, the oxidation rate of chromium was increased with increasing the calculated partial pressure of nitric acid in consideration of the hydration of cation of nitrates. Furthermore, the corrosion rate of type 310 stainless steel was accelerated by the solution having a high chromium oxidation rate containing nitrates. These results indicated that the acceleration of the corrosion rate in the solutions depending on the oxidation rate of chromium, and the rate is affected by the salt-effect of nitrates. (author)

  14. Solidification of nitrate solutions with alkali-activated slag and slag–metakaolin cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakhimova, Nailia R.; Rakhimov, Ravil Z.; Osin, Yury N.; Naumkina, Natalia I.; Gubaidullina, Alfiya M.; Yakovlev, Grigory I.; Shaybadullina, Arina V.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The effectiveness of an AASC matrix for NaNO 3 solution solidification is stated. • XRD, DTA-TG, and X-ray microtomography experiments were performed. • Crystallization of NaNO 3 reduces the shrinkage of hardened AASC-based waste forms. • Metakaolin shortens the setting time and increases the compressive strength of AASC. - Abstract: The solidification of nitrate solutions with alkali-activated slag (AASC) and slag–metakaolin cements (AASMC) and the resulting setting times, compressive strengths, dimensional stability, water resistance, hydration products, microstructures, and macroporous network structures were evaluated. The influences of the alkali activator concentration, mineral composition of metakaolin, ratio of slag to slag + metakaolin, and concentration of NaNO 3 on the cement performance were all evaluated in detail. The compressive strength of cemented nitrate solutions with AASC and AASMC aged for 28 days was from 13.4 to 42 MPa depending on the NaNO 3 concentration. X-ray diffractometer, differential thermal analyzer, and electron microscope analyses suggested that NaNO 3 crystallizes in cementitious matrices without reacting with the hydration products of AASC and AASMC. X-ray microtomography showed that the solidified NaNO 3 solution with a salt concentration of 700 g/l and AASC had a denser microstructure without shrinkage microcracks, a smaller macropore volume, and smaller macropore sizes than hardened AASC-based paste mixed with water

  15. Apparent and partial molal heat capacities of aqueous rare earth nitrate solutions at 250C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spedding, F.H.; Baker, J.L.; Walters, J.P.

    1979-01-01

    Specific heats of aqueous solutions of the trinitrates of La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu were measured from 0.1 m to saturation at 25 0 C. Apparent molal heat capacities, phi/sub cp/, were calculated for these solutions, and empirical polynomial equations were obtained which expressed phi/sub cp/ as a function of m/sup 1/2/ for each salt. The partial molal heat capacities of the solvent, anti C 1 /sub p/, and solute, anti C 2 /sub p/, were calculated from these equations. Unlike chloride and perchlorate data reported earlier, values of anti C 1 /sub p/ for nitrate solutions across the rare earth series did not show a two series effect. Instead, anti C 1 /sub p/ values at lower concentrations (0.5 and 1.0 m) appear correlated with reported first formation constants for rare earth-nitrate complexes. 31 references, 9 figures, 2 tables

  16. Evaluation of natural zeolite clinoptilolite efficiency for the removal of ammonium and nitrate from aquatic solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozhdeh Murkani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surface water and groundwater pollution with various forms of nitrogen such as ammonium and nitrate ions is one of the main environmental risks. The major objectives of this study were to evaluate the capacity of natural zeolite (clinoptilolite to remove NO3– and NH4+ from polluted water under both batch and column conditions. Methods: The laboratory batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the feasibility of clinoptilolite as the adsorbent for removal of nitrate (NO3– and ammonium (NH4+ ions from aqueous solution. The effects of pH, clinoptilolite dosage, contact time, and initial metal ion concentration on NO3– and NH4+ removal were investigated in a batch system. Results: Equilibrium time for NO3– and NH4+ ions exchange was 60 minutes and the optimum adsorbent dosage for their removal was 1 and 2.5 g/L, respectively. The adsorption isotherm of reaction (r> 0.9 and optimum entered concentration of ammonium and nitrate (30 and 6.5 mg/L, respectively were in accordance with Freundlich isotherm model. The ammonium removal rate increased by 98% after increasing the contact time. Conclusion: Our findings confirmed that natural Clinoptilolite can be used as one of effective, suitable, and low-costing adsorbent for removing ammonium from polluted waters.

  17. Seasonal dynamics of nitrate and ammonium ion concentrations in soil solutions collected using MacroRhizon suction cups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabala, Cezary; Karczewska, Anna; Gałka, Bernard; Cuske, Mateusz; Sowiński, Józef

    2017-07-01

    The aims of the study were to analyse the concentration of nitrate and ammonium ions in soil solutions obtained using MacroRhizon miniaturized composite suction cups under field conditions and to determine potential nitrogen leaching from soil fertilized with three types of fertilizers (standard urea, slow-release urea, and ammonium nitrate) at the doses of 90 and 180 kg ha -1 , applied once or divided into two rates. During a 3-year growing experiment with sugar sorghum, the concentration of nitrate and ammonium ions in soil solutions was the highest with standard urea fertilization and the lowest in variants fertilized with slow-release urea for most of the months of the growing season. Higher concentrations of both nitrogen forms were noted at the fertilizer dose of 180 kg ha -1 . One-time fertilization, at both doses, resulted in higher nitrate concentrations in June and July, while dividing the dose into two rates resulted in higher nitrate concentrations between August and November. The highest potential for nitrate leaching during the growing season was in July. The tests confirmed that the miniaturized suction cups MacroRhizon are highly useful for routine monitoring the concentration of nitrate and ammonium ions in soil solutions under field conditions.

  18. Role of electrodes in ambient electrolytic decomposition of hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Seng Koh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Decomposition of hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN solution with electrolytic decomposition method has attracted much attention in recent years due to its efficiencies and practicability. However, the phenomenon has not been well-studied till now. By utilizing mathematical model currently available, the effect of water content and power used for decomposition was studied. Experiment data shows that sacrificial material such as copper or aluminum outperforms inert electrodes in the decomposition of HAN solution. In the case of using copper wire to electrolyse HAN solutions, approximately 10 seconds is required to reach 100 °C regardless of concentration of HAN. In term of power consumption, 100 W–300 W was found to be the range in which decomposition could be triggered effectively using copper wire as electrodes.

  19. Water-Reflected 233U Uranyl Nitrate Solutions in Simple Geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elam, K.R.

    2001-01-01

    A number of critical experiments involving 233 U were performed in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Building 9213 Critical Experiments Facility during the years 1952 and 1953. These experiments, reported in Reference 1, were directed toward determining bounding values for the minimum critical mass, minimum critical volume, and maximum safe pipe size of water-moderated solutions of 233 U. Additional information on the critical experiments was found in the experimental logbooks. Two experiments utilizing uranyl nitrate (UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 ) solutions in simple geometry are evaluated in this report. Experiment 37 is in a 10.4-inch diameter sphere, and Experiment 39 is in a 10-inch diameter cylinder. The 233 U concentration ranges from 49 to 62 g 233 U/l. Both experiments were reflected by at least 6 inches of water in all directions. Paraffin-reflected uranyl nitrate experiments, also reported in Reference 1, are evaluated elsewhere. Experiments with smaller paraffin reflected 5-, 6-, and 7.5-inch diameter cylinders are evaluated in U233-SOL-THERM-004. Experiments with paraffin reflected 8-, 8.5-, 9-, 10-, and 12-inch diameter cylinders are evaluated in U233-SOL-THERM-002. Later experiments with highly-enriched 235 U uranyl fluoride solution in the same 10.4-inch diameter sphere are reported in HEU-SOL-THERM-010. Both experiments were judged acceptable for use as criticality-safety benchmark experiments

  20. Benchmark calculation for water reflected STACY cores containing low enriched uranyl nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyoshi, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Nakamura, Takemi

    2001-01-01

    In order to validate the availability of criticality calculation codes and related nuclear data library, a series of fundamental benchmark experiments on low enriched uranyl nitrate solution have been performed with a Static Experiment Criticality Facility, STACY in JAERI. The basic core composed of a single tank with water reflector was used for accumulating the systematic data with well-known experimental uncertainties. This paper presents the outline of the core configurations of STACY, the standard calculation model, and calculation results with a Monte Carlo code and JENDL 3.2 nuclear data library. (author)

  1. Osmotic coefficients of water for thorium nitrate solutions at 25, 37, and 50oC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemire, R.J.; Sagert, N.H.; Lau, D.W.P.

    1983-01-01

    Vapor pressure osmometry was used to measure osmotic coefficients of water for thorium nitrate solutions at 25, 37, and 50 o C and at molalities up to 0.2 mol·kg -1 . The data were fitted to three- and four-parameter equations containing limiting-law terms for a 4:1 electrolyte. The variation of the osmotic coefficients as a function of temperature was found to be small. The results are compared to published values for the osmotic coefficients. (author)

  2. CRIEPI's research results (2006-2011) and clarified future issues on alteration behavior of bentonite barrier by alkaline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Shingo; Nakamura, Kunihiko; Tanaka, Yukihisa; Hironaga, Michihiko

    2013-01-01

    In radioactive waste disposal facilities, bentonite barrier would be altered by alkaline solutions which arise by leaching of cementitious materials. Consequently suitable properties of the bentonite barrier would be degraded for a long time period. In CRIEPI, the investigation on the alteration of the bentonite under alkaline conditions was started in 2006, and several CRIEPI reports have been published. Specifically, we have investigated the kinetics of montmorillonite dissolution, the mineralogical alteration of compacted bentonite (with high- and low-dry density) and the change of permeability of the compacted bentonite (with high- and low-dry density) during alteration under the alkaline conditions. Furthermore, stability of saponite, which has similar physical properties to the bentonite, under the alkaline conditions was also examined. In this report, we show the outline of those research results, and lay out the clarified future issues extracted from our results. Ten clarified future issues were divided three categories as follows: 1) the estimation of the alteration behavior of the bentonite by alkaline solutions, 2) the elucidation of the mechanism of physical properties (e.g., permeability, swelling properties and mechanistic properties) change of the compacted bentonites during alteration, and 3) the development of the model building and simulation technology concerning the change in physical properties during alteration under alkaline conditions. (author)

  3. Properties of altered soils by alkaline solution: contribution in the performance evaluation of repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calabria, Jaqueline Alves de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    evaluated samples (less than 20% after 10 days of equilibrium), being the best performance one, the nitosoil sample whose K_d values varied from 11.78 to 63.05 mL.g"-"1. In a subsequent step, the clay soil, was submitted to the alkaline solution interaction, in order to investigate possible alterations on the sorption properties and hydraulic conductivity of this soil. Using the sorption parameters, obtained from data fitted isotherms, the retardation factor, R, was estimated for the samples before and after the interaction. It was demonstrated that the alkaline alteration promotes damages to sorption properties of Cs, once the R became significantly smaller (about 1000 times) after the interaction. The hydraulic conductivity in turn increased slightly (3,91x10"-"8 cm.s"-"1 to 5,08 x 10"-"8 cm.s"-"1). It was concluded that these changes were due, mainly, to the dissolution of minerals present in the clay soil (kaolinite and quartz), associated with the incorporation of K and Ca from the alkaline solution, resulting, probably, in the formation of hydrated calcium silicate phases. Additionally, the effects of alkaline solution on the properties of a commercial bentonite were studied. Contrary to the clay soil, it was observed a gain in the sorption characteristics, with K_d (Cs) increasing from 760.05 mL.g"-"1to 1311.80 mL.g"-"1and Q_m_a_x from 36.32 mg.g"-"1to 52.13 mg.g"-"1, with the corresponding increase in the retardation coefficient, R. The dissolution of the clay minerals from the initial sample and the incorporation of Mg, K e Ca coming from the alkaline solution, generating smectite of different kinds, were considered as the main mineralogical changes responsible for the modifications in sorption parameters. The different behavior between the two evaluated samples, soil and bentonite, confirms that the nature and extension of changes observed, when mineral samples interact with alkaline solution, depend on the chemical/mineralogical composition of the solid material

  4. Anodizing of magnesium alloy AZ31 in alkaline solutions with silicate under continuous sparking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai Liyuan; Yu Xia; Yang Zhihui; Wang Yunyan; Okido, Masazumi

    2008-01-01

    Anodization is a useful technique for forming protective films on magnesium alloys and improves its corrosion resistance. Based on the alkaline electrolyte solution with primary oxysalt developed previously, the optimum secondary oxysalt was selected by comparing the anti-corrosion property of anodic film. The structure, component and surface morphology of anodic film and cross-section were analyzed using energy dispersion spectrometer (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The corrosion process was detected by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results showed that secondary oxysalt addition resulted in different anodizing processes, sparking or non-sparking. Sodium silicate was the most favorable additive of electrolyte, in which anodic film with the strongest corrosion resistance was obtained. The effects of process parameters, such as silicate concentration, applied current density and temperature, were also investigated. High temperature did not improve anti-property of anodic film, while applying high current density resulted in more porous surface of film

  5. Another intermediate in the photochemistry and radiation chemistry of alkaline aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telser, T.; Schindewolf, U.

    1985-01-01

    By UV flash photolytic and pulse radiolytic experiments of aqueous alkaline solutions we confirm older experiments of Walker et al. and Hart et al., showing that the decay of hydrated electrons gives rise to another intermediate X which by light absorption revives hydrated electrons again. X is formed by a reaction of 1. order with respect to hydrated electrons, the rate of its formation increases with pH, and it decays by a second order process with a rate constant not exceeding 5 . 10 9 M -1 sec -1 , probably leading to hydrogen (e - ->X; 2X->H 2 ). X has maximum light absorption around 270 nm with an extinction coefficient of about 5000 M -1 cm -1 . We will not speculate about the nature of X. (orig.)

  6. Galvanic Corrosion between Alloy 690 and Magnetite in Alkaline Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soon-Hyeok Jeon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The galvanic corrosion behavior of Alloy 690 coupled with magnetite has been investigated in an alkaline solution at 30 °C and 60 °C using a potentiodynamic polarization method and a zero resistance ammeter. The positive current values were recorded in the galvanic couple and the corrosion potential of Alloy 690 was relatively lower. These results indicate that Alloy 690 behaves as the anode of the pair. The galvanic coupling between Alloy 690 and magnetite increased the corrosion rate of Alloy 690. The temperature increase led to an increase in the extent of galvanic effect and a decrease in the stability of passive film. Galvanic effect between Alloy 690 and magnetite is proposed as an additional factor accelerating the corrosion rate of Alloy 690 steam generator tubing in secondary water.

  7. Oxygen reduction at electrodeposited ZnO layers in alkaline solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prestat, M.; Vucko, F.; Lescop, B.; Rioual, S.; Peltier, F.; Thierry, D.

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) layers were electrodeposited from an aqueous nitrate bath at 62 °C on copper substrates. At −0.9 V (vs. saturated calomel reference electrode), the growth rate is 600 nm min −1 . In the early stages of the deposition, the layers are porous. At longer deposition times, the surface becomes dense and rough. The wurtzite crystalline structure is confirmed by XRD measurements and the chemical composition of the ZnO surface was assessed by EDX and XPS. The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was investigated at room temperature in a 10 −3 M KOH solution with KCl as supporting electrolyte. The ORR onset potential is found to be much larger than that of platinum taken as reference electrocatalyst. Rotating ring-disk electrode experiments evidence a negligible production of hydrogen peroxide as intermediate product of the reaction. The latter follows thus a direct four-electron pathway at pH ∼11.

  8. Contribution to the study of the evaporation of aqueous uranyl nitrate solutions; Contribution a l'etude de l'evaporation des solutions aqueuses de nitrate d'uranyle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billy, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-05-15

    This work was carried out with a view to define the conditions under which is affected the concentration of aqueous uranyl nitrate solutions one of the steps in uranium extraction metallurgy. The first port is devoted to the experimental determination of the physical characteristics of aqueous uranyl nitrate solutions, from dilute to concentrated solutions. The second part of this work is devoted to the isothermal evaporation of solution a west ted-wall column; this chemical engineering study has been more particularly devoted to the definition of the influence of the dynamics of the liquid phase on the exchange of matter between the two phases in contact. (author) [French] La concentration par evaporation des solutions aqueuses de nitrate d'uranyle constitue une etape de la metallurgie de l'uranium dont ce travail a voulu preciser la connaissance. Dans ce but, une premiere partie a ete consacree a la determination experimentale de caracteristiques physiques des solutions aqueuses de nitrate d'uranyle, des solutions diluees aux solutions saturees. Dans une deuxieme partie, ce travail a porte sur l'evaporation isotherme des solutions dans une colonne a paroi mouillee; cette etude de genie chimique a ete plus particulierement orientee de facon a preciser l'influence de la dynamique de la phase liquide sur l'echange de matiere entre les deux phases en contact. (auteur)

  9. A solution for cesium removal from high-salinity acidic or alkaline liquid waste: The crown calix[4]arenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dozol, J.F.; Simon, N.; Lamare, V.; Rouquette, H.; Eymard, S.; Tournois, B.; Marc, D. de; Macias, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    Calix[4]arenes monocrown or biscrown, blocked in 1,3 alternative cone conformation, display an exceptional efficiency for cesium extraction, even from very acid or alkaline media. Moreover, they possess an important selectivity for cesium over sodium that makes possible the extraction of cesium from media containing high sodium nitrate loadings. Another advantage, since the extraction of cesium is reversible, is that the stripping of cesium can be carried out in deionized water, a property which leads to very high concentration factors. 79 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs

  10. Effect of alkaline earth metal and magnesium cations on cadmium extraction from chloride solutions by tributyl phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokuev, V.A.; Belousov, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    At 298 K thermodynamic constants of cadmium (2) extraction from chloride solutions of magnesium, calcium, strontium and barium by tributyl phosphate are calculated. It is established, that logarithm of the thermodynamic extraction constant is in a linear dependence from the change in the cation hydration enthalpy in agqueous solution. It is shown, that activity coefficient of neutral complex CdVCl 2 differs from one, and it is the higher the more stable the complex is in alkaline earth metal chloride solutions

  11. The cathodic reduction of dioxygen on uranium oxide in dilute alkaline aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hocking, W.H.; Betteridge, J.S.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    1991-09-01

    The cathodic reduction of dioxygen on uranium oxide in dilute alkaline aqueous solutions has been investigated within the context of a program to develop a comprehensive model to predict the behaviour of used CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) nuclear fuel under disposal-vault conditions. Two different kinds of ceramic UO 2 were studied: reactor-grade CANDU fuel with normal p-type electrical conductivity and low-resistance material that exhibits n-type photoelectrochemical behaviour. The transport of electroactive species in solution was controlled by varying the rotation rate of rotating disc electrodes (RDE) and rotating ring-disc electrodes (RRDE). Steady-state polarization measurements were made using the current-interrupt method to compensate for the potential drop caused by ohmic resistance. Any release of peroxide to solution from the UO 2 (disc) surface could be monitored by oxidizing it at the Au ring of an RRDE. The existing theory for the cathodic 0 2 -reduction process as applied to RDE and RRDE experiments has been reviewed as a starting point for the interpretation of the results obtained in our work. (37 figs., 2 tabs., 170 refs.)

  12. Addition and elimination kinetics in OH radical induced oxidation of phenol and cresols in acidic and alkaline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roder, M.; Wojnarovits, L.; Foeldiak, G.; Emmi, S.S.; Beggiato, G.; D'Angelantonio, M.

    1999-01-01

    The rates of the two consecutive reactions, OH radical addition and H 2 O/OH - elimination, were studied by pulse radiolysis in highly acidic (pH=1.3-1.9) and alkaline (pH∼11) solutions, respectively, for phenol and for the three cresol isomers. The rate coefficient of the addition as measured by the build-up of phenoxyl radical absorbance and by a competitive method is the same (1.4±0.1)x10 10 mol -1 dm 3 s -1 both in acidic and alkaline solution. The rate coefficient of the H 2 O elimination in acidic solution is (1.6±0.2)x10 6 s -1 , whereas the coefficient of the OH - elimination in alkaline solutions is 6-8 times higher. The kinetics of the phenoxyl radical formation was described by the two-exponential equation of the consecutive reactions: the first exponential is related to the pseudo-first-order addition, while the second to the elimination reaction. No considerable structure dependence was found in the rate coefficients, indicating that the methyl substitutent in these highly acidic or alkaline solutions influences neither the addition nor the elimination rate

  13. Evaluation of nitrate destruction methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, P.A.; Kurath, D.E.; Guenther, R.

    1993-01-01

    A wide variety of high nitrate-concentration aqueous mixed [radioactive and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous] wastes are stored at various US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. These wastes will ultimately be solidified for final disposal, although the waste acceptance criteria for the final waste form is still being determined. Because the nitrates in the wastes will normally increase the volume or reduce the integrity of all of the waste forms under consideration for final disposal, nitrate destruction before solidification of the waste will generally be beneficial. This report describes and evaluates various technologies that could be used to destroy the nitrates in the stored wastes. This work was funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Technology Development, through the Chemical/Physical Technology Support Group of the Mixed Waste Integrated Program. All the nitrate destruction technologies will require further development work before a facility could be designed and built to treat the majority of the stored wastes. Several of the technologies have particularly attractive features: the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process produces an insoluble waste form with a significant volume reduction, electrochemical reduction destroys nitrates without any chemical addition, and the hydrothermal process can simultaneously treat nitrates and organics in both acidic and alkaline wastes. These three technologies have been tested using lab-scale equipment and surrogate solutions. At their current state of development, it is not possible to predict which process will be the most beneficial for a particular waste stream

  14. Sub-critical pulsed neutron experiments with uranyl nitrate solutions in spherical geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurin, Victor N.; Ryazanov, Boris G.; Sviridov, Victor I.; Volnistov, Vladimir V.

    2003-01-01

    The pulse source method is used to study homogeneous solution assemblies. Three sets of sub-critical pulse experiments with spherical tanks filled with water solution of uranyl nitrate (90% enrichment) were carried out at the RF-GS facility, Obninsk, Russia. Seven spherical tanks with the volume within the range of 1.29 L to 19.8 L were used in the experiments. Three uranium concentrations were studied, i.e. 20.7, 29.6 and 37.5 g/L. The sub-critical experiments were analyzed with the MCNP 4A code based on the Monte-Carlo method, and with ENDF/B-V library. (author)

  15. Standard test method for isotopic analysis of hydrolyzed uranium hexafluoride and uranyl nitrate solutions by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This method applies to the determination of isotopic composition in hydrolyzed nuclear grade uranium hexafluoride. It covers isotopic abundance of 235U between 0.1 and 5.0 % mass fraction, abundance of 234U between 0.0055 and 0.05 % mass fraction, and abundance of 236U between 0.0003 and 0.5 % mass fraction. This test method may be applicable to other isotopic abundance providing that corresponding standards are available. 1.2 This test method can apply to uranyl nitrate solutions. This can be achieved either by transforming the uranyl nitrate solution to a uranyl fluoride solution prior to the deposition on the filaments or directly by depositing the uranyl nitrate solution on the filaments. In the latter case, a calibration with uranyl nitrate standards must be performed. 1.3 This test method can also apply to other nuclear grade matrices (for example, uranium oxides) by providing a chemical transformation to uranyl fluoride or uranyl nitrate solution. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address al...

  16. Oxygen reduction at platinum nanoparticles supported on carbon cryogel in alkaline solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. ELEZOVIC

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The oxygen reduction reaction was investigated in 0.1 M NaOH solution, on a porous coated electrode formed of Pt particles supported on carbon cryogel. The Pt/C catalyst was characterized by the X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and cyclic voltammetry techniques. The results demonstrated a successful reduction of Pt to metallic form and homogenous Pt particle size distribution with a mean particle size of about 2.7 nm. The ORR kinetics was investigated by linear sweep polarization at a rotating disc electrode. The results showed the existence of two E – log j regions, usually referred to polycrystalline Pt in acid and alkaline solution. At low current densities (lcd, the Tafel slope was found to be close to –2.3RT/F, while at high current densities (hcd it was found to be close to –2×2.3RT/F. It is proposed that the main path in the ORR mechanism on Pt particles was the direct four-electron process, with the transfer of the first electron as the rate determining step. If the activities are expressed through the specific current densities, a small enhancement of the catalytic activity for Pt/C was observed compared to that of polycrystalline Pt. The effect of the Pt particle size on the electrocatalysis of oxygen reduction was ascribed to the predominant (111 facets of the platinum crystallites.

  17. Development of processes for pilot plant production of purified uranyl nitrate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfredson, P. G.; Charlton, B. G.; Ryan, R. K.; Vilkaitis, V. K.

    1975-01-15

    Nuclear purity uranyl nitrate solutions were produced from Rum Jungle yellow cake by dissolution in nitric acid and purification by solvent extraction with 20 vol. per cent tributyl phosphate in kerosene using pump - mix mixer-settler contactors. The design of the equipment, experimental studies and operating experience are described. Dissolution of yellow cake and recycled uranium oxide materials was readily carried out in a 100 l dissolver to give solutions containing 300 gU l{sup -1} and 0.5 to 4 M nitric acid. Filtration of silica from this solution prior to solvent extraction was not necessary in this work for yellow cake containing 0.25 per cent silica. A low acid flowsheet for uranium purification was developed in which the nitric acid consumption was reduced by 76 per cent and the throughput of the mixer-settler units was increased by 67 per cent compared with the initial design flowsheet. Nine extraction and seven scrubbing stages were used with a feed solution containing 300 gU l{sup -1} and 1.0 M nitric acid and with a portion of the product recycled as scrub solution. The loaded organic phase was stripped in 16 stages with 0.05 M nitric acid heated to 60 deg C to give a 120 gU l{sup -1} product. The uranium concentration in the raffinate was < 0.04 g l{sup -1}, corresponding to approximately 0.01 per cent of the feed. (author)

  18. Establishing the potential dependent equilibrium oxide coverage on platinum in alkaline solution and its influence on the oxygen reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiberg, Gustav; Arenz, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Publication year: 2012 Source:Journal of Power Sources, Volume 217 Gustav K.H. Wiberg, Matthias Arenz The oxidation process of polycrystalline platinum subjected to alkaline solution is re-examined using a combination of cyclic voltammetry and potential hold techniques in Ar, H2 and O2 purged 0.1...

  19. Effect of uranyl nitrate and free acid concentration in feed solution of gelation on UO2 kernel quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masduki, B.; Wardaya; Widarmoko, A.

    1996-01-01

    An investigation on the effect of uranium and free nitric acid concentration of uranyl nitrate as feed of gelation process on quality of UO 2 kernel was done.The investigation is to look for some concentration of uranyl nitrate solutions those are optimum as feed for preparation of gelled UO 3 . Uranyl nitrate solution of various concentration of uranium (450; 500; 550; 600; 650; 700 g/l) and free nitric acid of (0.9; 1.0; 1.1 N) was made into feed solutions by adding urea and HMTA with mole ratio of urea/uranium and HMTA/uranium 2.1 and 2.0. The feed solutions were changed into spherical gelled UO 3 by dropping was done to get the optimum concentrations of uranyl nitrate solutions. The gelled UO 3 was soaked and washed with 2.5% ammonia solution for 17 hours, dried at 70 o C, calcined at 350 o C for 3 hours then reduced at 850 o C for 3 hours. At every step of the steps process the colour and percentage of well product of gelled UO 3 were noticed. The density and O/U ratio of end product (UO 2 kernel) was determined, the percentage of well product of all steps process was also determined. The three factor were used to chose the optimum concentration of uranyl nitrate solution. From this investigation it was concluded that the optimum concentration of uranyl nitrate was 600 g/l uranium with free nitric acid 0,9 - 1,0 N, the percentage of well product was 97% density of 6.12 - 4.8 g/cc and O/U ratio of 2.15 - 2.06. (author)

  20. Effect of diluent on extraction of uranyl nitrate from nitric acid solution by tri-n-octylamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Takashi; Ukon, Toshiaki; Fukutomi, Hiroshi

    1979-01-01

    The distribution ratios in the extraction equilibriums of uranylnitrate from 3 M HNO 3 by tri-n-octylamine (TOA) nitrate salt in nitrobenzene, chlorobenzene, benzene, toluene, cyclohexane, nitrobenzene-benzene and benzene-cylohexane mixtures have been determined in varying the concentrations of uranyl nitrate and TOA nitrate salt. The extraction mechanisms have been discussed in detail based on the law of mass action. It has been concluded that the extractions of uranyl nitrate by TOA nitrate salt in nitrobenzene, 74% nitrobenzene-benzene and 49% nitrobenzene-benzene mixture are represented by the equation TOAHNO 3 (org) + UO 2 2+ (aq) + 2 NO 3 - (aq) = TOAHUO 2 (NO 3 - ) 3 (org), while the extractions of uranyl nitrate by TOA nitrate salt in chlorobenzene, benzene, toluene, cyclohexane, benzene-cyclohexane mixtures and 24% nitrobenzene-benzene mixture are represented by the equation 2 TOAHNO 3 (org) + UO 2 2+ (aq) + 2 NO 3 - (aq) = TOAHUO 2 (NO 3 ) 3 TOAHNO 3 (org). In the latter the extraction equilibrium constants increase in the order of chlorobenzene < benzene < toluene < cyclohexane and with decreasing of the volume fraction of benzene in benzene-cyclohexane mixtures. The effects of diluent have been discussed in detail on the basis of the Hildebrand-Scatchard theory of regular solutions. (author)

  1. Corrosion electrochemical behaviors of silane coating coated magnesium alloy in NaCl solution containing cerium nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, F.; Li, Q.; Zhong, X.K.; Gao, H.; Dai, Y.; Chen, F.N. [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University Chongqing (China)

    2012-02-15

    Sol-gel coatings cannot provide adequate corrosion protection for metal/alloys in the corrosive environments due to their high crack-forming potential. This paper demonstrates the possibility to employ cerium nitrate as inhibitor to decrease the corrosion development of sol-gel-based silane coating on the magnesium alloy in NaCl solution. Cerium nitrate was added into the NaCl solution where the silane coating coated magnesium alloy was immersed. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine surface morphology of the silane coating coated magnesium alloy immersed in NaCl solutions doped and undoped with cerium nitrate. The corrosion electrochemical behaviors were investigated using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests. The results showed that the introduction of cerium nitrate into NaCl solution could effectively inhibit the corrosion of the silane coating coated magnesium alloy. Moreover, the influence of concentration of cerium nitrate on the corrosion inhibition and the possible inhibiting mechanism were also discussed in detail. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Solubility of some phenolic compounds in aqueous alkali metal nitrate solutions from (293.15 to 318.15) K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noubigh, Adel [Laboratoire de Physico-chimie des materiaux, IPEST, BP51, 2070 La MARSA (Tunisia)], E-mail: Adel.anoubigh@ipest.rnu.tn; Cherif, Mourad [IPEIEM, Universite de Tunis-El Manar, BP244. 2096. El Manar II (Tunisia); Provost, Elise [Laboratoire Chimie et procedes, ENSTA, 32 Rue de Boulevard Victor, 75739 Paris, Cedex 15 (France); Abderrabba, Manef [Laboratoire de Physico-chimie des materiaux, IPEST, BP51, 2070 La MARSA (Tunisia)

    2008-11-15

    This paper is continuation of the study concerning the solubility-temperature dependence data for some phenolic compounds (PhC), contained in olive mill wastewater (OMWW), in two nitrate salts (KNO{sub 3} and NaNO{sub 3}) aqueous solutions. The solubilities of PhC were determined in the temperature ranging from (293.15 to 318.15) K. It has been observed that the solubility, in aqueous nitrate solutions, increases with increasing temperature. Results showed that alkali metal nitrate has a salting-out effect on the solubility of PhC. The effect of the anion of the electrolyte on the solubility of PhC is observed by comparing these results with values reported in the previous papers for the effect of LiCl, NaCl and KCl. For each cation, the solubilites of the phenolic compounds are higher with nitrate anion than with chloride anion. Results were interpreted in terms of the salt hydration shells and the ability of the solute to form hydrogen-bond with water. The solubility data were accurately correlated by a semi empirical equation. The standard molar Gibbs free energies of transfer of PhC ({delta}{sub tr}G{sup 0}) from pure water to aqueous solutions of the nitrate salts have been calculated from the solubility data. The decrease in solubility is correlated to the positive {delta}{sub tr}G{sup 0} value which is mainly of enthalpic origin.

  3. Determination of uranium in uranium metal, uranium oxides, and uranyl nitrate solutions by potentiometric titration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, H.L.; McElhaney, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    A simple, fast method for the determination of uranium in uranium metal, uranium oxides, and uranyl nitrate solutions has been adapted from the Davies-Gray volumetric method to meet the needs of Y-12. One-gram duplicate aliquots of uranium metal or uranium oxide are dissolved in 1:1 HNO 3 and concentrated H 2 SO 4 to sulfur trioxide fumes, and then diluted to 100-mL volume. Duplicate aliquots are then weighed for analysis. For uranyl nitrate samples, duplicate aliquots containing between 50 and 150 mg of U are weighed and analyzed directly. The weighed aliquot is transferred to a Berzelius beaker; 1.5 M sulfamic acid is added, followed in order by concentrated phosphoric acid, 1 M ferrous sulfate, and (after a 30-second interval) the oxidizing reagent. After a timed 3-minute waiting period, 100 mL of the 0.1% vanadyl sulfate-sulfuric acid mixture is added. The sample is then titrated past its endpoint with standard potassium dichromate, and the endpoint is determined by second derivative techniques on a mV/weight basis

  4. Impact of an Alkaline Solution on the Chemistry, Mineralogy, and Sorption Properties of a Typic Rhodudult Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Alves de Almeida Calábria

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The preferred option for disposal of short-lived low and intermediate level radioactive wastes is a near surface disposal facility in which soil is one of the barriers that avoid radionuclide migration outside the controlled area. For construction of that kind of facility, concrete is widely used, and its interaction with water induces its degradation, resulting in a high pH solution. The alkaline solution may affect the near-field environment of radioactive waste repositories, including the soil, promoting mineralogical alterations that result in significant changes in key properties of materials, compromising their performance as safety components. In this study, a sample of a Brazilian Typic Rhodudult soil, previously investigated concerning its performance for Cs sorption, was subjected to interaction with the alkaline solution for 24 h and for 7, 14, and 28 days in order to evaluate the impact on its chemical, mineralogical, and sorption properties. X-ray diffraction (XRD, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and electron microprobe analysis were performed before and after each alteration period. Results indicated dissolution of minerals, such as kaolinite and quartz, associated with incorporation of K and Ca from the alkaline solution, likely resulting in the formation of hydrated calcium silicate phases (CSH, which are expected to be worse sorbents for alkaline elements (e.g., Cs than the original minerals. The Kd values for Cs in the altered samples also decreased according to the alteration period, demonstrating that alkaline interaction effectively modifies the soil sorption properties for Cs.

  5. Zinc electrodeposition from flowing alkaline zincate solutions: Role of hydrogen evolution reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundálek, Jan; Šnajdr, Ivo; Libánský, Ondřej; Vrána, Jiří; Pocedič, Jaromír; Mazúr, Petr; Kosek, Juraj

    2017-12-01

    The hydrogen evolution reaction is known as a parasitic reaction during the zinc electrodeposition from alkaline zincate solutions and is thus responsible for current efficiency losses during the electrolysis. Besides that, the rising hydrogen bubbles may cause an extra convection within a diffusion layer, which leads to an enhanced mass transport of zincate ions to an electrode surface. In this work, the mentioned phenomena were studied experimentally in a flow through electrolyzer and the obtained data were subsequently evaluated by mathematical models. The results prove the indisputable influence of the rising hydrogen bubbles on the additional mixing of the diffusion layer, which partially compensates the drop of the current efficiency of the zinc deposition at higher current flows. Moreover, the results show that the current density ratio (i.e., the ratio of an overall current density to a zinc limiting current density) is not suitable for the description of the zinc deposition, because the hydrogen evolution current density is always involved in the overall current density.

  6. Production of ultrafine zinc powder from wastes containing zinc by electrowinning in alkaline solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Youcai

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Production of ultrafine zinc powder from industrial wastes by electrowinning in alkaline solution was studied. Stainless steel and magnesium electrodes were used as anode and cathode, respectively. Morphology, size distribution and composition of the Zn particles were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Laser Particle Size Analyzer, and Inductive Coupled Plasma Emission Spectrometer. The required composition of the electrolyte for ultrafine particles was found to be 25-35 g/L Zn, 200-220 g/L NaOH and 20-40 mg/L Pb. The optimal conditions were a current density of 1000-1200 A/m² and an electrolyte temperature of 30-40 °C. The results indicated that the lead additive exerted a beneficial effect on the refining of the particles, by increasing the cathodic polarization. Through this study, ultrafine zinc powder with a size distribution of around 10 μm could be produced, and considerably high current efficiencies (97-99 % were obtained.

  7. Structural and thermal characterization of hemicelluloses isolated by organic solvents and alkaline solutions from Tamarix austromongolica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yong-Chang; Wen, Jia-Long; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang

    2011-05-01

    Three organosolv and three alkaline hemicellulosic fractions were prepared from lignocellulosic biomass of the fast-growing shrub Tamarix austromongolica (Tamarix Linn.). Sugar analysis revealed that the organosolv-soluble fractions contained a higher content of glucose (33.7-6.5%) and arabinose (14.8-5.6%), and a lower content of xylose (62.2-54.8%) than the hemicellulosic fractions isolated with aqueous alkali solutions. A relatively high concentration of alkali resulted in a decreasing trend of the xylose/4-O-methyl-D-glucuronic acid ratio in the alkali-soluble fractions. The results of NMR analysis supported a major substituted structure based on a linear polymer of β-(1→4)-linked d-xylopyranosyl residues, having ramifications of α-L-arabinofuranose and 4-O-methyl-D-glucuronic acid residues monosubstituted at O-3 and O-2, respectively. Thermogravimetric analysis revealed that one step of major mass loss occurred between 200-400°C, as hemicelluloses devolatilized with total volatile yield of about 55%. It was found that organosolv-soluble fractions are more highly ramified, and showed a higher thermal stability than the alkali-soluble fractions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effective Uranium (VI) Sorption from Alkaline Solutions Using Bi-Functionalized Silica-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, X.; He, L.; Liu, B.; Tang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    High temperature gas reactor is one of generation IV reactors that can adapt the future energy market, of which the preparation of fuel elements will produce a large amount of radioactive wastewater with uranium and high-level ammonia. Sorption treatment is one of the most important method to recover uranium from wastewater. However, there are few report on uranium sorbent that can directly be applied in wastewater with ammonia. Therefore, the development of a sorbent that can recover uranium in basic environment will greatly decrease the cost of fuel element production and the risk of radioactive pollution. In this work, ammonium-phosphonate-bifunctionalized silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles has been developed for effective sorption of uranium from alkaline media, which are not only advantaged in the uranium separation from liquid phase, but also with satisfactory adsorption rate, amount and reusability. The as-prepared sorbent is found to show a maximum uranium sorption capacity of 70.7 mg/g and a fast equilibrium time of 2 h at pH 9.5 under room temperature. Compared with the mono-functionalized (phosphonate alone and ammonium alone) particles, the combination of the bi-functionalized groups gives rise to an excellent ability to remove uranium from basic environment. The sorbent can be used as a promising solid phase candidate for highly-efficient removal of uranium from basic solution. (author)

  9. Study of the Eosin-Y/PAMAM interactions in alkaline aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbeloa, Ernesto M., E-mail: earbeloa@exa.unrc.edu.ar [Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Río Cuarto, 5800 Córdoba (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Previtali, Carlos M. [Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Río Cuarto, 5800 Córdoba (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Bertolotti, Sonia G., E-mail: sbertolotti@exa.unrc.edu.ar [Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Río Cuarto, 5800 Córdoba (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) (Argentina)

    2016-04-15

    The interactions between the xanthene dye Eosin-Y (Eos) and amino-terminated PAMAM dendrimers of low generations (G0–G3) were studied in alkaline water solution. The effect of concentration and generation of the dendrimer on the photophysics of Eos was evaluated by means of absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies. The observed spectral changes were ascribed to the association dye/dendrimer. From these data, the Eos/PAMAM binding constants (K{sub bind}) were determined, which strongly increased with the size of the dendrimer. Stationary fluorescence anisotropy and time-resolved single photon counting were also used to characterize the association process. The restriction in the rotational diffusion of the Eos increased as a function of the concentration and generation of PAMAM, as determined by anisotropy measurements. Biexponential fluorescence decays were obtained in the presence of G3, and the respective lifetimes were ascribed to free and bound Eos species. These results correlate with K{sub bind} values and suggest the formation of host/guest system with larger dendrimers. Therefore, this environmentally-friendly dye/dendrimer system would be appropriate for potential applications in fields such as drugs delivery and photopolymerization.

  10. Study of the Eosin-Y/PAMAM interactions in alkaline aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbeloa, Ernesto M.; Previtali, Carlos M.; Bertolotti, Sonia G.

    2016-01-01

    The interactions between the xanthene dye Eosin-Y (Eos) and amino-terminated PAMAM dendrimers of low generations (G0–G3) were studied in alkaline water solution. The effect of concentration and generation of the dendrimer on the photophysics of Eos was evaluated by means of absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies. The observed spectral changes were ascribed to the association dye/dendrimer. From these data, the Eos/PAMAM binding constants (K bind ) were determined, which strongly increased with the size of the dendrimer. Stationary fluorescence anisotropy and time-resolved single photon counting were also used to characterize the association process. The restriction in the rotational diffusion of the Eos increased as a function of the concentration and generation of PAMAM, as determined by anisotropy measurements. Biexponential fluorescence decays were obtained in the presence of G3, and the respective lifetimes were ascribed to free and bound Eos species. These results correlate with K bind values and suggest the formation of host/guest system with larger dendrimers. Therefore, this environmentally-friendly dye/dendrimer system would be appropriate for potential applications in fields such as drugs delivery and photopolymerization.

  11. Effect of Alkaline Solution with Varying Mix Proportion on Geopolymer Mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppuchamy, K.; Ananthkumar, M.; Raghavapriya, S. M.

    2018-02-01

    Cement production is attributed by emission of carbon dioxide which causes severe environmental impacts. This has led to the invention of special construction materials which can replace cement. On the other hand, these construction materials (like Fly ash, Metakaolin) also need to be inexpensive and should possess all the characteristics of cementitious materials. In this project, the effect of geopolymerization on the properties of the end product were studied with varying distillation of NaOH solution (10M, 12M and 15M) for different mix proportion (1:1, 1:2 and 1:3). Curing was done for 1 day at a temperature of 60°C and 80°C respectively. The densities, compressive strength, alkalinity, co-efficient of absorption were determined. As a result, the experiments showed the effect of factors such as mix proportion, curing temperature and curing day on the physical and mechanical properties such as mix proportion of the geopolymer concrete. Results of NaOH concentration of 12M concentration cured for 24 hours at 80°C and 60°C showed better mechanical performance than the rest of the concentrations.

  12. Estimating soil solution nitrate concentration from dielectric spectra using PLS analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast and reliable methods for in situ monitoring of soil nitrate-nitrogen concentration are vital for reducing nitrate-nitrogen losses to ground and surface waters from agricultural systems. While several studies have been done to indirectly estimate nitrate-nitrogen concentration from time domain s...

  13. Certain laws governing the influence of high molecular polymer additives on specific electrical conductivity and viscosity of zincate alkaline solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dmitrenko, V.Ye.; Toropetsera, T.N.; Zubov, M.S.

    1983-01-01

    A study was made of the influence of polymer additives of different nature: polyelectrolyte, copolymer of ethylene with maleic anhydride, polymethacrylic acid and nonpolyectrolyte copolymer of vinyl alcohol with vinyleneglycol and polyvinyleneglycol on specific electrical conductance and viscosity of the zincate alkaline solution. It is indicated that with an increase in the content of additives, the specific conductance of the solution diminishes according to a linear law, while the viscosity rises. The additives of polyelectrolyte nature reduce more strongly the specific conductance and increase the viscosity than the nonpolyelectrolyte additives. From a comparison of the data on specific conductance and viscosity the following conclusion is drawn: the more the polymer ''structures'' the zincate alkaline solution, the more strongly it reduces its specific electrical conductance.

  14. Antimicrobial Effectiveness of Cellulose based Fabrics treated with Silver Nitrate Solution using Plasma Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Peran

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to obtain antibacterial properties, the possibility of deposition of silver particles from silver nitrate (AgNO3 solutions by plasma deposition process using argon as a carrier gas (PDP-Ar was explored. Hexamethyldisiloxane and acrylic acid were used as precursors and were deposited by plasma enhanced-chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD. The processes were carried out on lyocell and modal fbrics and antimicrobial efficacy was determined on E. coli and S. aureus using time kill assay method. The results of minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC show that higher antimicrobial efficacy on E. coli is exhibited by the solution of (AgNO3 in ethylene-glycol (0.066 μg/ml rather than in absolute ethanol (0.265 μg/ml. For S. aureus, minimal inhibitory concentrations of AgNO3 solutions in both absolute ethanol and ethylene-glycol as solvents are obtained at the same value (0.132 μg/ml. Overall, the best antibacterial eff ect for both modal and lyocell samples has been achieved against E. coli using treatments with precursors (AAC and HMDSO and Ag-NO3 in ethylene-glycol as solvent, with prolonged incubation time.

  15. Nitrate-cancrinite precipitation on quartz sand in simulated Hanford tank solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickmore, B R; Nagy, K L; Young, J S; Drexler, J W

    2001-11-15

    Caustic NaNO3 solutions containing dissolved Al were reacted with quartz sand at 89 degrees C to simulate possible reactions between leaked nuclear waste and primary subsurface minerals at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington. Nitrate-cancrinite began to precipitate onto the quartz after 2-10 days, cementing the grains together. Estimates of the equilibrium constant for the precipitation reaction differ for solutions with 0.1 or 1.0 m OH- (log Keq = 30.4 +/- 0.8 and 36.2 +/- 0.6, respectively). The difference in solubility may be attributable to more perfect crystallinity (i.e., fewer stacking faults) in the higher-pH cancrinite structure. This is supported by electron micrographs of crystal morphology and measured rates of Na volatilization under an electron beam. Precipitate crystallinity may affect radionuclide mobility, because stacking faults in the cancrinite structure can diminish its zeolitic cation exchange properties. The precipitation rate near the onset of nucleation depends on the total Al and Si concentrations in solution. The evolution of experimental Si concentrations was modeled by considering the dependence of quartz dissolution rate on AI(OH)4- activity, cancrinite precipitation, and the reduction of reactive surface area of quartz due to coverage by cancrinite.

  16. Distribution of iron during full loading of amberlite IRC-72 resin with uranium from nitrate solutions at 300C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaffer, J.H.; Greene, C.W.

    1979-01-01

    The integrity of resin-based fuel kernels used in the fabrication of fuel elements for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor will depend, in part, on the concentration of iron incorporated in the resin particles during their loading with uranium. Consequently, assessment of chemical specifications for iron as an impurity in uranyl nitrate solution should be based on its distribution during the resin loading operation. For this purpose, the behavior of iron, as an impurity in uranyl nitrate solutions, was investigated under equilibrium conditions at 30 0 C during full loading of Amberlite IRC-72 cation exchange reaction were derived from calculations based on complex coordination of ferric ion with the resin over the nitrate ion concentration range of approx. 0.5 to 2 N

  17. Chemical effects induced by dissolving γ-irradiated alkali halides in aqueous nitrate, permanganate and chromate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phansalkar, V.K.; Bapat, L.; Ravishankar, D.

    1982-01-01

    Dissolution of γ-irradiated alkali halides in aqueous solutions of sodium nitrate, potassium permanganate and potassium chromate at neutral pH induces chemical changes leading to the formation of NO 2 - in nitrate, Mn(IV) and Cr(III) species in permanganate and chromate solutions, respectively. Further, the studies on nitrate and permanganate systems show that the amount of NO 2 - and Mn(IV) formed grows by increasing the dose of γ-irradiation of the salt and the amount of irradiated salt. Moreover, the extent of chemical changes effected by irradiated chlorides has been found to be more than that of bromides. The mesh size of the irradiated salt and the presence of scavengers like I - and methanol in the system, affects the yield of NO 2 - . (author)

  18. The reactivity of the electron formed in the radiolysis of aerated alkaline aqueous solutions containing tetracycline hydrochloride, at 77 Ksup(+)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedes, S.M.L.; Vasconcellos, M.B.A.

    1986-01-01

    The radiolysis of tetracycline hydrochloride dissolved in aerated alkaline aqueous solutions containing 0.1, 0.5 and 1M NaOH at 77 K, followed by ESR is reported. The rate constants for the reactions between the electron and physical or chemical traps which are present in these solutions are calculated. The reactivity of electrons that are formed in the radiolysis of water decreases in the following proportions: physical traps: chemical traps: molecules of water (4.8x10sup(14) : 6.5x10sup(8) : 1.0). The electrons react preferentially with the solute instead of the solvent. (author)

  19. Electrocatalytic reduction of nitrate at low concentration on coinage and transition-metal electrodes in acid solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dima, G.E.; Vooys, de A.C.A.; Koper, M.T.M.

    2003-01-01

    A comparative study was performed to determine the reactivity of nitrate ions at 0.1 M on eight different polycrystalline electrodes (platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, copper, silver and gold) in acidic solution using cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry and differential

  20. The vapour pressures over saturated aqueous solutions of cadmium chloride, cadmium bromide, cadmium iodide, cadmium nitrate, and cadmium sulphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apelblat, Alexander; Korin, Eli

    2007-01-01

    Vapour pressures of water over saturated solutions of cadmium salts (chloride, bromide, iodide, nitrate, and sulphate) were determined over the temperature range 280 K to 322 K and compared with the literature data. The vapour pressures determined were used to obtain the water activities, osmotic coefficients and the molar enthalpies of vaporization in the (cadmium salt + water) systems

  1. The vapour pressures over saturated aqueous solutions of cadmium chloride, cadmium bromide, cadmium iodide, cadmium nitrate, and cadmium sulphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apelblat, Alexander [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)]. E-mail: apelblat@bgu.ac.il; Korin, Eli [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2007-07-15

    Vapour pressures of water over saturated solutions of cadmium salts (chloride, bromide, iodide, nitrate, and sulphate) were determined over the temperature range 280 K to 322 K and compared with the literature data. The vapour pressures determined were used to obtain the water activities, osmotic coefficients and the molar enthalpies of vaporization in the (cadmium salt + water) systems.

  2. Extraction of uranyl nitrate from aqueous solution by dicyclohexyl-18-crown-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Takashi; Ohno, Fumiaki; Fukutomi, Hiroshi

    1981-01-01

    The extraction of uranyl nitrate from aqueous solution by dicyclohexyl-18-crown-6(DCC) in cyclohexane, toluene, benzene, chlorobenzene and nitrobenzene has been studied in varying the concentrations of DCC and uranyl nitrate. The extraction equilibria have been discussed in detail based on the law of mass action, and it has been found that the extractions in cyclohexane, toluene and benzene are represented by the equation 2 DCC(org) + UO 2 2+ (aq) + 2 NO 3 - (aq) = (DCC) 2 UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 (org), and the extraction in chlorobenzene is described by the equations DCC(org) + UO 2 2+ (aq) + 2NO 3 - (aq) = DCC UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 (org) and 2DCC(org) + UO 2 2+ (aq) + 2NO 3 - (aq) = (DCC) 2 UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 (org), and the extraction in nitrobenzene is expressed by the equations DCC(org) + UO 2 2+ (aq) + 2NO 3 - (aq) = DCC UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 (org), 2DCC(org) + UO 2 2+ (aq) + 2NO 3 - (aq) = (DCC) 2 UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 (org) and DCC UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 (org) = DCC UO 2 NO 3 + (org) + NO 3 - (org). The equilibrium constants of the reaction 2DCC(org) + UO 2 2+ (aq) + 2NO 3 - (aq) = (DCC) 2 UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 (org) increase in the order of cyclohexane < toluene < benzene < chlorobenzene < nitrobenzene. The enthalpy and entropy changes for the extraction reactions into benzene and nitrobenzene were determined from the change of the extraction equilibrium constants with temperature. (author)

  3. EFFECT OF RICE STRAW AND NITRATE LEVELS IN SOIL SOLUTION ON NITROUS OXIDE EMISSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Carlos Cruz Copetti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Among the greenhouse gases, nitrous oxide (N2O is considered important, in view of a global warming potential 296 times greater than that of carbon dioxide (CO2 and its dynamics strongly depend on the availability of C and mineral N in the soil. The understanding of the factors that define emissions is essential to develop mitigation strategies. This study evaluated the dynamics of N2O emissions after the application of different rice straw amounts and nitrate levels in soil solution. Pots containing soil treated with sodium nitrate rates (0, 50 and 100 g kg-1 of NO−3-N and rice straw levels (0, 5 and 10 Mg ha-1, i.e., nine treatments, were subjected to anaerobic conditions. The results showed that N2O emissions were increased by the addition of greater NO−3 amounts and reduced by large straw quantities applied to the soil. On the 1st day after flooding (DAF, significantly different N2O emissions were observed between the treatments with and without NO−3 addition, when straw had no significant influence on N2O levels. Emissions peaked on the 4th DAF in the treatments with highest NO−3-N addition. At this moment, straw application negatively affected N2O emissions, probably due to NO−3 immobilization. There were also alterations in other soil electrochemical characteristics, e.g., higher straw levels raised the Fe, Mn and dissolved C contents. These results indicate that a lowering of NO−3 concentration in the soil and the increase of straw incorporation can decrease N2O emissions.

  4. Roughness comparison of heat cured type of acrylic resin in disinfectant solution immersion (Immersion in a solution of alkaline peroxide and 75% Celery extract (Apium graveolens L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Puspitasari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Acrylic resin denture base has the properties absorbing that affecting physical and mechanical properties. One of the physical properties of acrylic resin is surface roughness. The aim of the study was to find out the roughness effect on heat cured acrylic that was immersed in alkaline peroxide and 75% celery (Apium graveoens L extract as a disinfectant solution. The study was a true experimental and posttest with control group designed with a rectangular shape size 65 x 10 x 3.3 mm based on the ISO standard 1567, six samples were used for alkaline peroxide, celery extract 75% and aquadest group for 5 and 15 days. A Surface Roughness Tester was used for the surface roughness changes observation. The statistical test used One-way ANOVA and post hoc Bonferroni. The results of this study showed the value of roughness on 5 days for alkaline peroxide (1.51 µm is greater than celery extract (0.36µm and aquadest (0.30 µm. The soaking for 15 days in alkaline peroxide (1.52 µm is greater than 75% celery extracts (0.38 µm and aquadest (0.34 µm. Alkaline peroxide caused higher roughness value of heat cured acrylic resin than 75% celery extract.

  5. Presence of nitrate NO 3 a ects animal production, photocalysis is a possible solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba-Molina, Heli; Barba-Ortega, J.; Joya, M. R.

    2016-02-01

    Farmers and ranchers depend on the successful combination of livestock and crops. However, they have lost in the production by nitrate pollution. Nitrate poisoning in cattle is caused by the consumption of an excessive amount of nitrate or nitrite from grazing or water. Both humans and livestock can be affected. It would appear that well fertilised pasture seems to take up nitrogen from the soil and store it as nitrate in the leaf. Climatic conditions, favour the uptake of nitrate. Nitrate poisoning is a noninfectious disease condition that affects domestic ruminants. It is a serious problem, often resulting in the death of many animals. When nitrogen fertilizers are used to enrich soils, nitrates may be carried by rain, irrigation and other surface waters through the soil into ground water. Human and animal wastes can also contribute to nitrate contamination of ground water. A possible method to decontaminate polluted water by nitrates is with methods of fabrication of zero valent iron nanoparticles (FeNps) are found to affect their efficiency in nitrate removal from water.

  6. Fixation and separation of the elements thorium and uranium using anion exchange resins in nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korgaonkar, V.

    1967-10-01

    The exchange of thorium and uranium between a strong base anion resin and a mixed water + ethanol solvent containing nitrate ions is studied. It is assumed that in the resin the thorium and uranium are fixed in the form of the complexes Th(NO 3 ) 6 2- and UO 2 (NO 3 ) 4 2- in solution these elements are present in the form of complexes having the general formula: Th(NO 3 ) 6-n n-2 and UO 2 (NO 3 ) 4-n n-2 It has been possible to deduce a law for the changes in the partition functions of thorium and uranium as a function of the concentrations of the various species in solution and of the complexing ion NO 3 . From this has been deduced the optimum operational conditions for separating a mixture of these two elements. Finally, in these conditions, the influence of a few interfering ions has been studied: Ba, Bi, Ce, La, Mo, Pb, Zr. The method proposed can be used either as a preparation, or for the dosage of thorium by a quantitative separation. (author) [fr

  7. Critical Parameters of Complex Geometries of Intersecting Cylinders Containing Uranyl Nitrate Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. B. Briggs (INEEL POC); R. E. Rothe

    1999-06-14

    About three dozen previously unreported critical configurations are presented for very complex geometries filled with high concentration enriched uranyl nitrate solution. These geometries resemble a tall, thin Central Column (or trunk of a ''tree'') having long, thin arms (or ''branches'') extending up to four directions off the column. Arms are equally spaced from one another in vertical planes, and that spacing ranges from arms in contact to quite wide spacings. Both the Central Column and the many different arms are critically safe by themselves with each, alone, is filled with fissile solution; but, in combination, criticality occurs due to the interactions between arms and the column. Such neutronic interactions formed the principal focus of this study. While these results are fresh to the nuclear criticality safety industry and to those seeking novel experiments against which to validate computer codes, the experiments, themselves, are not recent. Over 100 experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory between September, 1967, and February of the following year.

  8. Critical Parameters of Complex Geometry Intersecting Cylinders Containing Uranyl Nitrate Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothe, Robert Emil; Briggs, Joseph Blair

    1999-06-01

    About three dozen previously unreported critical configurations are presented for very complex geometries filled with high concentration enriched uranyl nitrate solution. These geometries resemble a tall, thin Central Column (or trunk of a "tree") having long, thin arms (or "branches") extending up to four directions off the column. Arms are equally spaced from one another in vertical planes; and that spacing ranges from arms in contact to quite wide spacings. Both the Central Column and the many different arms are critically safe by themselves when each, alone, is filled with fissile solution; but, in combination, criticality occurs due to the interactions between arms and the column. Such neutronic interactions formed the principal focus of this study. While these results are fresh to the nuclear criticality safety industry and to those seeking novel experiments against which to validate computer codes, the experiments, themselves, are not recent. Over 100 experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory between September, 1967, and February of the following year.

  9. Critical Parameters of Complex Geometries of Intersecting Cylinders Containing Uranyl Nitrate Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothe, R. E.

    1999-01-01

    About three dozen previously unreported critical configurations are presented for very complex geometries filled with high concentration enriched uranyl nitrate solution. These geometries resemble a tall, thin Central Column (or trunk of a ''tree'') having long, thin arms (or ''branches'') extending up to four directions off the column. Arms are equally spaced from one another in vertical planes, and that spacing ranges from arms in contact to quite wide spacings. Both the Central Column and the many different arms are critically safe by themselves with each, alone, is filled with fissile solution; but, in combination, criticality occurs due to the interactions between arms and the column. Such neutronic interactions formed the principal focus of this study. While these results are fresh to the nuclear criticality safety industry and to those seeking novel experiments against which to validate computer codes, the experiments, themselves, are not recent. Over 100 experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory between September, 1967, and February of the following year

  10. Subcritical multiplication measurements with a BeO reflected 233U uranyl nitrate solution system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Job, P.K.; Srinivasan, M.; Nargundkar, V.R.; Chandramoleshwar, K.; Pasupathy, C.S.; Das, S.; Mayankutty, P.C.

    1978-01-01

    A series of subcritical multiplication measurements were carried out in PURNIMA with 233 U uranyl nitrate solution contained in all 11 x 11 cm 2 square sectional tank and reflected by 30 cm thickness of BeO on all sides. The objective of these experiments was to determine the 'Minimum critical mass' of the system in rectangular parellelopiped geometry. The rectangular aluminium core tank was attached to the bottom of an alpha tight glove box. BeO reflector was arranged below the glove box outside the core tank. The system multiplication was measured as a function of solution concentration and core volume by means of neutron detectors placed outside the assembly. The extrapolated critical mass was obtained through conventional inverse counts plot. The maximum amount of 233 U used was 120 gms. The rectangular geometry was estimated to be 235 +- 10 gms, in the concentration range of 80 to 120 gms/litre of 233 U. The experimental set up, procedure adopted, method of analysis and the details of the results are described. (author)

  11. Extraction process of U from its ores using solutions of alkaline earth carbonates and bicarbonates in presence of carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floreancig, Antoine; Schuffenecker, Robert.

    1976-01-01

    A process is described for extracting uranium from its ores, either directly in the ore deposit or after such ore bodies have been taken from the ground, comprising an oxidation-leaching stage followed by a recovery stage. The characteristic of this process is that in the leaching process, carbonate and bicarbonate solutions of an alkaline-earth metal are used under a pressure of carbon dioxide between zero and 60 bars and at a temperature of zero to 100 0 C [fr

  12. Effectiveness of the squeezing out and final squeezing out of petroleum of an increased viscosity by alkaline solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begnazarov, T.

    1979-01-01

    The remaining petroleum in the flooded zone is determined by the ratio of viscosity forces to the forces of the surface tension, which are expressed by the coefficient Ka. With this, for each kind of porous medium, there exists a natural cricial value Ka. For the purpose of studying the effect of the given parameters on the value of the remaining petroleum, experiments were carried out on artificial specimens. In the tests, using petroleum of the Mishkin deposit, the surface tension on the boundary of the petroleum with the distilled water and alkaline solutions were respectively equal to 37.1 and 1.33 dynes per centimeter. The experiments showed, that the squeezing out of the petroleum with water or alkaline solutions leads to similar results. This means, that the composite parameter Ka does not affect the value of the remaining petroleum saturation. The effectiveness of the final squeezing out of the petroleum of increased viscosity was also studied. These experiments were carried out in two variations of the injection of the squeezed out agent: in the first variation, the petroleum was squeezed out with water in the first stage, and in the second stage it was squeezed out by an alkaline solution, and in the subsequent stages, a change in the squeezing out agent took place. By finishing the first stage, the attained values of the coefficients of the squeezing out were practically similar (0.72). In the second stage, the final squeezing out of the petroleum with a solution of alkaline, provided a major effect.

  13. Monitoring of DNA breakage in embryonic stages of the African catfish Clarias gariepinus (Burchell, 1822) after exposure to lead nitrate using alkaline comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Alaa G M; Mekkawy, Imam A; Verreth, Johan; Wuertz, Sven; Kloas, Werner; Kirschbaum, Frank

    2008-12-01

    Increasing lead contamination in Egyptian ecosystems and high lead concentrations in food items have raised concern for human health and stimulated studies on monitoring ecotoxicological impact of lead-caused genotoxicity. In this work, the alkaline comet assay was modified for monitoring DNA strand breakage in sensitive early life stages of the African catfish Clarias gariepinus. Following exposure to 100, 300, and 500 microg/L lead nitrate, DNA strand breakage was quantified in embryos at 30, 48, 96, 144, and 168 h post-fertilization (PFS). For quantitative analysis, four commonly used parameters (tail % DNA, %TDNA; head % DNA, %HDNA; tail length, TL; tail moment, TM) were analyzed in 96 nuclei (in triplicates) at each sampling point. The parameter %TDNA revealed highest resolution and lowest variation. A strong correlation between lead concentration, time of exposure, and DNA strand breakage was observed. Here, genotoxicity detected by comet assay preceded the manifested malformations assessed with conventional histology. Qualitative evaluation was carried out using five categories are as follows: undamaged (%TDNA 75%) nuclei confirming a dose and time-dependent shift towards increased frequencies of highly and extremely damaged nuclei. A protective capacity provided by a hardened chorion is a an interesting finding in this study as DNA damage in the prehatching stages 30 h-PFS and 48 h-PFS was low in all treatments (qualitative and quantitative analyses). These results clearly show that the comet assay is a sensitive tool for the detection of genotoxicity in vulnerable early life stages of the African catfish and is a method more sensitive than histological parameters for monitoring genotoxic effects. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Early containment of high-alkaline solution simulating low-level radioactive waste stream in clay-bearing blended cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Olson, R.A.; Tennis, P.D.

    1995-04-01

    Portland cement blended with fly ash and attapulgite clay was mixed with high-alkaline solution simulating low-level radioactive waste stream at a one-to-one weight ratio. Mixtures were adiabatically and isothermally cured at various temperatures and analyzed for phase composition, total alkalinity, pore solution chemistry, and transport properties as measured by impedance spectroscopy. Total alkalinity is characterized by two main drops. The early one corresponds to a rapid removal of phosphorous, aluminum, sodium, and to a lesser extent potassium solution. The second drop from about 10 h to 3 days is mainly associated with the removal of aluminum, silicon, and sodium. Thereafter, the total alkalinity continues descending, but at a lower rate. All pastes display a rapid flow loss that is attributed to an early precipitation of hydrated products. Hemicarbonate appears as early as one hour after mixing and is probably followed by apatite precipitation. However, the former is unstable and decomposes at a rate that is inversely related to the curing temperature. At high temperatures, zeolite appears at about 10 h after mixing. At 30 days, the stabilized crystalline composition Includes zeolite, apatite and other minor amounts of CaCO 3 , quartz, and monosulfate Impedance spectra conform with the chemical and mineralogical data. The normalized conductivity of the pastes shows an early drop, which is followed by a main decrease from about 12 h to three days. At three days, the permeability of the cement-based waste as calculated by Katz-Thompson equation is over three orders of magnitude lower than that of ordinary portland cement paste. However, a further decrease in the calculated permeability is questionable. Chemical stabilization is favorable through incorporation of waste species into apatite and zeolite

  15. Chemically and compositionally modified solid solution disordered multiphase nickel hydroxide positive electrode for alkaline rechargeable electrochemical cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovshinsky, Stanford R.; Corrigan, Dennis; Venkatesan, Srini; Young, Rosa; Fierro, Christian; Fetcenko, Michael A.

    1994-01-01

    A high capacity, long cycle life positive electrode for use in an alkaline rechargeable electrochemical cell comprising: a solid solution nickel hydroxide material having a multiphase structure that comprises at least one polycrystalline .gamma.-phase including a polycrystalline .gamma.-phase unit cell comprising spacedly disposed plates with at least one chemical modifier incorporated around the plates, the plates having a range of stable intersheet distances corresponding to a 2.sup.+ oxidation state and a 3.5.sup.+, or greater, oxidation state; and at least one compositional modifier incorporated into the solid solution nickel hydroxide material to promote the multiphase structure.

  16. One pot synthesis of chitosan grafted quaternized resin for the removal of nitrate and phosphate from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banu, H Thagira; Meenakshi, Sankaran

    2017-11-01

    The present study deals with the synthesis of chitosan quaternized resin for efficient removal of nitrate and phosphate from aqueous solution. The resin was characterized with FTIR, SEM with EDX and XRD. Batch method was carried out to optimize various parameters such as contact time, initial concentration of nitrate and phosphate, dosage, pH, co-anions and temperature on the adsorption capacity of the adsorbent. The adsorption process illustrated that the Freundlich isotherm and the pseudo-second order are the best fitted models for the sorption of both anions. The respective negative values of ΔH° and ΔG° revealed that the adsorption of both the anions were exothermic and spontaneous. The removal efficiency of nitrate and phosphate on chitosan quaternized resin were 78% and 90% respectively with 0.1g of adsorbent and the initial concentration as 100mg/L. Nitrate and phosphate anions adsorbed effectively on chitosan quaternized resin by replacing Cl - ions from quaternary site through electrostatic attraction as well as ion-exchange mechanism. Hydrogen bonding also played important role in adsorption process. Even after 7th regeneration cycle the adsorbent retained its adsorption capacity as 23.7mg/g and 30.4mg/g for both nitrate and phosphate respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Application of composite materials based on various extractants for isolation of lanthanides(III) nitrates from multicomponent aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopyrin, A.A.; Pyartman, A.K.; Kesnikov, V.A.; Pleshkov, M.A.; Exekov, M.H.

    1999-01-01

    In present work we obtained samples of composite materials mentioned containing tributylphosphate (TBP) and trialkylmethylammonium nitrate (TAMAN). Extraction of lanthanides(III) nitrates of cerium group from multicomponent aqueous solutions by means of these materials was studied. Some systems with different concentration of sodium nitrate up to 5 mol/l and the same systems containing additions of sodium chloride or sulfate along with sodium nitrate was investigated, isotherm of extraction being obtained for all cases. Also we compared in identical conditions extraction process when liquid extractants were used and process with composite materials. It was found that traditional extraction systems and systems based on composite extractants demonstrated almost the same extraction properties in respect to lanthanides(III) nitrates. Extraction isotherms observed in identical conditions and being shown in the same coordinates had no difference with taking into account errors of experiment. This fact allow to use the same mathematical model for those systems. For systems studied it was generated mathematical model that is able to describe extraction process when component concentration vary in wide range, with assumption being used that ratio activity coefficients in organic phase stay constant. (authors)

  18. Stability constant determinations for technetium (IV) complexation with selected amino carboxylate ligands in high nitrate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omoto, Trevor; Wall, Nathalie A. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2017-10-01

    The stability constants for Tc(IV) complexation with the ligands IDA, NTA, HEDTA, and DTPA were determined in varied nitrate concentrations using liquid-liquid extraction methods. The determined log β{sub 101} stability constants at 0.5 M NaNO{sub 3} were found to be 9.2±0.3, 10.3±0.3, and 15.3±0.3 for IDA, NTA, and HEDTA, respectively. The log β{sub 111} stability constant for DTPA was determined to be 22.0±0.6. These determined stability constants show a slight decrease in magnitude as a function of increasing NaNO{sub 3} concentration. These stability constants were used to model the total dissolution of Tc(IV) in acidic aqueous solutions in the presence of each ligand. The results of these predictive models indicate that amino carboxylic ligands have a high potential for increasing the aqueous dissolution of Tc(IV); at pH 2.3, 0.01 M ligand yield dissolved Tc(IV) concentrations of 1.42.10{sup -5} M, 1.33.10{sup -5} M, 6.07.10{sup -6} M, 9.65.10{sup -7} M, for DTPA, HEDTA, NTA, and IDA, respectively.

  19. Kinetics and mechanism of sphalerite leaching by sodium nitrate in sulphuric acid solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokić M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interest for application of hydrometallurgical processes in a processing of complex sulphide ores and concentrates has increased in recent years. Their application provides better metal recoveries and reduced emission of gaseous and toxic ageneses in the environment. The kinetics and mechanism of sphalerite leaching from complex sulphide concentrate with sulphuric acid and sodium nitrate solution at standard conditions was presented in this paper. The influences of temperature and time on the leaching degree of zinc were investigated and kinetic analysis of the process was accomplished. With temperature increasing from 60 to 90°C, the zinc leaching increased from 25.23% to 71.66% after 2 hours, i.e. from 59.40% to 99.83% after 4 hours. The selected kinetic model indicated that the diffusion through the product layer was the rate-controlling step during the sphalerite leaching. The activation energy was determined to be 55 kJ/mol in the temperature range 60-90°C. XRD, light microscopy and SEM/EDX analyses of the complex concentrate and leach residue confirmed formation of elemental sulphur and diffusion-controlled leaching mechanism.

  20. Chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The standard covers analytical procedures to determine compliance of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solution to specifications. The following methods are described in detail: uranium by ferrous sulfate reduction-potassium dichromate titrimetry and by ignition gravimetry; specific gravity by pycnometry; free acid by oxalate complexation; thorium by the Arsenazo(III) (photometric) method; chromium by the diphenylcarbazide (photometric) method; molybdenum by the thiocyanate (photometric) method; halogens separation by steam distillation; fluorine by specific ion electrode; halogen distillate analysis: chloride, bromide and iodide by amperometric microtitrimetry; bromine by the fluorescein (photometric) method; sulfate sulfur by (photometric) turbidimetry; phosphorus by the molybdenum blue (photometric) method; silicon by the molybdenum blue (photometric) method; carbon by persulfate oxidation-acid titrimetry; nonvolatile impurities by spectrography; volatile impurities by rotating-disk spark spectrography; boron by emission spectrography; impurity elements by spark source mass spectrography; isotopic composition by multiple filament surface-ionization mass spectrometry; uranium-232 by alpha spectrometry; total alpha activity by direct alpha counting; fission product activity by beta and gamma counting; entrained organic matter by infrared spectrophotometry

  1. Multi-Scale Modeling of the Gamma Radiolysis of Nitrate Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Gregory P; Donoclift, Thomas A; Sims, Howard E; Orr, Robin M; Pimblott, Simon M

    2016-11-17

    A multiscale modeling approach has been developed for the extended time scale long-term radiolysis of aqueous systems. The approach uses a combination of stochastic track structure and track chemistry as well as deterministic homogeneous chemistry techniques and involves four key stages: radiation track structure simulation, the subsequent physicochemical processes, nonhomogeneous diffusion-reaction kinetic evolution, and homogeneous bulk chemistry modeling. The first three components model the physical and chemical evolution of an isolated radiation chemical track and provide radiolysis yields, within the extremely low dose isolated track paradigm, as the input parameters for a bulk deterministic chemistry model. This approach to radiation chemical modeling has been tested by comparison with the experimentally observed yield of nitrite from the gamma radiolysis of sodium nitrate solutions. This is a complex radiation chemical system which is strongly dependent on secondary reaction processes. The concentration of nitrite is not just dependent upon the evolution of radiation track chemistry and the scavenging of the hydrated electron and its precursors but also on the subsequent reactions of the products of these scavenging reactions with other water radiolysis products. Without the inclusion of intratrack chemistry, the deterministic component of the multiscale model is unable to correctly predict experimental data, highlighting the importance of intratrack radiation chemistry in the chemical evolution of the irradiated system.

  2. Calculational study of benchmark critical experiments on high-enriched uranyl nitrate solution systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, I.; Rothe, R.E.

    1978-01-01

    Criticality calculations on minimally reflected, concrete-reflected, and plastic-reflected single tanks and on arrays of cylinders reflected by concrete and plastic have been performed using the KENO-IV code with 16-group Hansen-Roach neutron cross sections. The fissile material was high-enriched (93.17% 235 U) uranyl nitrate [UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 ] solution. Calculated results are compared with those from a benchmark critical experiments program to provide the best possible verification of the calculational technique. The calculated k/sub eff/'s underestimate the critical condition by an average of 1.28% for the minimally reflected single tanks, 1.09% for the concrete-reflected single tanks, 0.60% for the plastic-reflected single tanks, 0.75% for the concrete-reflected arrays of cylinders, and 0.51% for the plastic-reflected arrays of cylinders. More than half of the present comparisons were within 1% of the experimental values, and the worst calculational and experimental discrepancy was 2.3% in k/sub eff/ for the KENO calculations

  3. Investigation on the co-precipitation of transuranium elements from alkaline solutions by the method of appearing reagents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krot, N.; Shilov, V.; Bessonov, A.; Budantseva, N.; Charushnikova, I.; Perminov, V.; Astafurova, L.

    1996-06-01

    Highly alkaline radioactive waste solutions originating from production of plutonium for military purposes are stored in underground tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. The purification of alkaline solutions from neptunium and plutonium is important in the treatment and disposal of these wastes. This report describes scoping tests with sodium hydroxide solutions, where precipitation techniques were investigated to perform the separation. Hydroxides of iron (III), manganese (II), cobalt (II, III), and chromium (III); manganese (IV) oxide, and sodium uranate were investigated as carriers. The report describes the optimum conditions that were identified to precipitate these carriers homogeneously throughout the solution by reductive, hydrolytic, or catalytic decomposition of alkali-soluble precursor compounds by a technique called the Method of Appearing Reagents. The coprecipitation of pentavalent and hexavalent neptunium and plutonium was investigated for the candidate agents under optimum conditions and is described in this report along with the following results. Plutonium coprecipitated well with all tested materials except manganese (IV) oxide. Neptunium only coprecipitated well with uranate. The report presents a hypothesis to explain these behaviors. Further tests with more complex solution matrices must be performed

  4. Investigation on the co-precipitation of transuranium elements from alkaline solutions by the method of appearing reagents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krot, N.; Shilov, V.; Bessonov, A.; Budantseva, N.; Charushnikova, I.; Perminov, V.; Astafurova, L. [Russian Academy of Science (Russian Federation). Inst. of Physical Chemistry

    1996-06-06

    Highly alkaline radioactive waste solutions originating from production of plutonium for military purposes are stored in underground tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. The purification of alkaline solutions from neptunium and plutonium is important in the treatment and disposal of these wastes. This report describes scoping tests with sodium hydroxide solutions, where precipitation techniques were investigated to perform the separation. Hydroxides of iron (III), manganese (II), cobalt (II, III), and chromium (III); manganese (IV) oxide, and sodium uranate were investigated as carriers. The report describes the optimum conditions that were identified to precipitate these carriers homogeneously throughout the solution by reductive, hydrolytic, or catalytic decomposition of alkali-soluble precursor compounds by a technique called the Method of Appearing Reagents. The coprecipitation of pentavalent and hexavalent neptunium and plutonium was investigated for the candidate agents under optimum conditions and is described in this report along with the following results. Plutonium coprecipitated well with all tested materials except manganese (IV) oxide. Neptunium only coprecipitated well with uranate. The report presents a hypothesis to explain these behaviors. Further tests with more complex solution matrices must be performed.

  5. Passivation of chalcopyrite during the leaching with sulphuric acid solution in presence of sodium nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokić Miroslav D.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the process of the chalcopyrite leaching in sulphuric acid solution was investigated. Sodium nitrate was used as oxidant in the leaching process. Chemical reactions of leaching and their thermodynamic possibilities are predicted based on the calculated Gibbs energies and analysis of E−pH diagrams. The negative values of the Gibbs energy show that all chemical reactions are thermodynamically feasible at atmospheric pressure and in a temperature range 25-90°C. At high electrode potential and low pH values, Cu2+, Fe2+ and Fe3+ ions exist in water solutions. The increase of temperature reduces the probability of Fe3+ ion existence in the system. The chalcopyrite concentrate, enriched in the “Rudnik” flotation plant, with 27.08% Cu, 25.12% Fe, 4.15% Zn and 2.28% Pb was used in the work. XRD and DTA analysis of the concentrate reveals that the sample contains mainly the chalcopyrite with small amount of sphalerite. For the description of the reaction of leaching process the leach residuals, obtained at different conditions, were chosen for XRD, TG/DTA and SEM/EDX analyses. The elemental sulphur and chalcopyrite phases identified in leach residuals confirm our prediction that the elemental sulphur is formed during the leaching process. Accordingly, elemental sulphur is the main product of the reaction, while a minor amount of sulphide sulphur is oxidized to sulphate during the leaching. The sulphur formed during the reaction was precipitated at the particle surfaces, and slowed down the leaching rate in the final stage of leaching process. In the initial stage, the reaction rate was controlled by the surface reaction. The mechanism, latter has been changed into a diffusion controlled one.

  6. Radiolytic dimerization of tyrosine in alkaline solutions of poly-L-tyrosine, glycyl-L-tyrosine and tyrosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boguta, G.; Dancewicz, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    Blue fluorescence characteristic of dityrosine appeared in γ-irradiated solutions of tyrosine, glycyl-L-tyrosine or polytyrosine (MW 110,000). The intensity of fluorescence was used for the determination of the dityrosine concentration in hydrolysed samples. The radiation-induced formation of dityrosine depended on pH and on the presence of oxygen during radiolysis carried out with a total dose of the order of 1000 Gy. The presence of oxygen in the system suppressed the formation of dityrosine in solution at low or neutral pH but had no effect on this process in alkaline solutions. Except for the radiolysis of air-saturated poly-L-tyrosine solutions, where G(Dityrosine) = 0.35, the yields of dityrosine at high pH were lower than the yields obtained during radiolysis at low pH and in the absence of oxygen. (author)

  7. Investigation into formation of nanoparticles of tetravalent neptunium in slightly alkaline aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husar, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Considering the worldwide growing discharge of minor actinides and the current need for geological disposal facilities for radioactive waste, this work provides a contribution to the safety case concerning Np transport if it would be released from deep repository sites and moving from alkaline cement conditions (near-field) to more neutral environmental conditions (far-field). The reducing conditions in a nuclear waste repository render neptunium tetravalent, which is assumed to be immobile in aqueous environment due to the low solubility solution of Np(IV). For tetravalent actinide nuclides, the most significant transport should occur via colloidal particles. This work demonstrates the formation of intrinsic neptunium dioxide nanocrystals and amorphous Np(IV) silica colloids under environmentally relevant conditions. The dissociation of the initial soluble Np(IV) complex (i.e. [Np(IV)(CO 3 ) 5 ] 6- ) induces the intrinsic formation of nanocrystalline NpO 2 in the solution phase. The resulting irregularly shaped nanocrystals with an average size of 4 nm exhibit a face-centered cubic (fcc), fluorite-type structure (space group Fm anti 3m). The NCs tend to agglomerate under ambient conditions due to the weakly charged hydrodynamic surface at neutral pH (zetapotential ζ ∝0 mV). The formation of micron-sized agglomerates, composed of nanocrystals of 2-5 nm in size, and the subsequent precipitation cause immobilization of the major amount of Np(IV) in the Np carbonate system. Agglomeration of NpO 2 nanocrystals in dependence on time was indicated by PCS and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy with the changes of baseline characteristics and absorption maximum at 742 nm. Hitherto, unknown polynuclear species as intermediate species of NpO 2 nanocrystal formation were isolated from solution and observed by HR-TEM. These polynuclear Np species appear as dimers, trimers and hexanuclear compounds in analogy with those reported for other actinides. Intrinsic formation of NpO 2

  8. Vapor-liquid equilibria for nitric acid-water and plutonium nitrate-nitric acid-water solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maimoni, A.

    1980-01-01

    The liquid-vapor equilibrium data for nitric acid and nitric acid-plutnonium nitrate-water solutions were examined to develop correlations covering the range of conditions encountered in nuclear fuel reprocessing. The scanty available data for plutonium nitrate solutions are of poor quality but allow an order of magnitude estimate to be made. A formal thermodynamic analysis was attempted initially but was not successful due to the poor quality of the data as well as the complex chemical equilibria involved in the nitric acid and in the plutonium nitrate solutions. Thus, while there was no difficulty in correlating activity coefficients for nitric acid solutions over relatively narrow temperature ranges, attempts to extend the correlations over the range 25 0 C to the boiling point were not successful. The available data were then analyzed using empirical correlations from which normal boiling points and relative volatilities can be obtained over the concentration ranges 0 to 700 g/l Pu, 0 to 13 M nitric acid. Activity coefficients are required, however, if estimates of individual component vapor pressures are needed. The required ternary activity coefficients can be approximated from the correlations

  9. Determination of halogens, silicon, phosphorus, carbon, sulfur, tributyl phosphate and of free acid in uranyl nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu Van Vinh

    2003-01-01

    High-purity uranium compounds are widely used in nuclear field in the form of uranyl nitrate or uranium oxides. In production of uranium material the estimation and the control of products quality is necessary and very important. Halogens was separated from uranium compounds by steam distillation and they were later determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for Cl - , Br - , I - ions. Br - was also determined by spectrophotometric and iodide by the individual pulse polarography. Silicon and phosphorus in uranyl nitrate solutions were determined by the photometric method. Sulfur was determined as sulfate form by the measurement of turbidity by the titrimetry. TBP in kerosene and free acid in aqueous solution were determined by the titration. (author)

  10. Direct determination of beryllium, cadmium, lithium, lead and silver in thorium nitrate solution by electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thulasidas, S.K.; Kulkarni, M.J.; Porwal, N.K.; Page, A.G.; Sastry, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    An electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometric (ET-AAS) method is developed for the direct determination of Ag, Be, Cd, Li and Pb in thorium nitrate solution. The method offers detection of sub-nanogram amounts of these analytes in 100-microgram thorium samples with a precision of around 10%. A number of spiked samples and pre-analyzed ThO 2 samples have been analyzed to evaluate the performance of the analytical methods developed here

  11. Determination of total and extractable hydrogen peroxide in organic and aqueous solutions of uranyl nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodall, Ph.

    1999-01-01

    The development of a spectrophotometric method for the determination of hydrogen peroxide in uranyl nitrate solutions is reported. The method involves the measurement of the absorbance at 520 mm of a vanadyl peroxide species. This species was formed by the addition of a reagent consisting of vanadium (V) (50 mmol x dm -3 ) in dilute sulphuric acid (2 mol x dm -3 H 2 SO 4 ). This reagent, after dilution, was also used as an extractant for organic phase samples. The method is simple and robust and tolerant of nitric acid and U(VI). Specificity and accuracy were improved by the application of solid phase extraction techniques to remove entrained organic solvents and Pu(VI). Reverse phase solid phase extraction was used to clean-up aqueous samples or extracts which were contaminated with entrained solvent. A solid phase extraction system based upon an extraction chromatography system was used to remove Pu(IV). Detection limits of 26 μmol x dm -3 (0.88 μg x cm -3 ) or 7 μmol x dm -3 (0.24 μg x cm -3 ) for, respectively, a 1 and 4 cm path length cell were obtained. Precisions of RSD = 1.4% and 19.5% were obtained at the extremes of the calibration curve (5 mmol x dm -3 and 50 μmol x dm -3 H 2 O 2 , 1 cm cell). The introduction of the extraction and clean-up stages had a negligible effect upon the precision of the determination. The stability of an organic phase sample was tested and no loss of analyte could be discerned over a period of at least 5 days. (author)

  12. CONCENTRATED CALCIUM NITRATE IS AN EFFECTIVE SOLUTION FOR MINERAL NUTRITION OF VEGETABLES GROWN THROUGH PROTECTED CULTIVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Grebennikova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the basis water-soluble fertilizers that are used in greenhouse enterprises is  a Calcium  nitrate,  where  its production  and demand raise. At present time, calcium nitrate is produced  in a granulated and crystaline   form consisted of tetrahydrate, dihydrate and concentrated variants. These forms  are significantly distinguished  by their  chemical  composition.  Besides the  basic  form  of nitrogen – nitrate – there is ammoniacal nitrogen in the composition of Calcium nitrate that is found to be undesirable element, particularly with drip irrigation system in the  greenhouse. The new  product,  calcium  nitrate  has been worked out with minimal content of ammoniacal nitrogen  at  URALCHIM. The study  showed  the  advantages of the product for such characteristics as solubility and time of dissolving. It dissolves 3.4-7 time faster than those of tetrahydrate and dihydrate analogues. At present time, the concentrated  calcium  nitrate is used in many greenhouse  industrial  complexes  and  enterprises,  and has shown its efficiency in practice.

  13. Influence of microstructure on stress corrosion cracking of mild steel in synthetic caustic-nitrate nuclear waste solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarafian, P.G.

    1975-12-01

    The influence of alloy microstructure on stress corrosion cracking of mild steel in caustic-nitrate synthetic nuclear waste solutions was studied. An evaluation was made of the effect of heat treatment on a representative material (ASTM A 516 Grade 70) used in the construction of high activity radioactive waste storage tanks at Savannah River Plant. Several different microstructures were tested for susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. Precracked fracture specimens loaded in either constant load or constant crack opening displacement were exposed to a variety of caustic-nitrate and nitrate solutions. Results were correlated with the mechanical and corrosion properties of the microstructures. Crack velocity and crack arrest stress intensity were found to be related to the yield strength of the steel microstructures. Fractographic evidence indicated pH depletion and corrosive crack tip chemistry conditions even in highly caustic solutions. Experimental results were compatible with crack growth by a strain-assisted anodic dissolution mechanism; however, hydrogen embrittlement also was considered possible

  14. Nitrates of rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komissarova, L.N.; Pushkina, L.Ya.

    1984-01-01

    The systematization of experimental data with account of the last achievements in the field of studying the RE nitrate properties is realized. The methods of production, solubility in aqueous solutions structure, thermodynamic characteristics and thermal stability of nitrate hydrates, RE anhydrous and basic nitrates are considered. The data on RE nirtrate complexing in aqueous solutions are given. Binary nitrates, nitrate solvates and RE nitrate adducts with organic compounds are described. The use of RE nitrates in the course of RE production, in the processes of separation and fine cleaning of RE preparations is considered

  15. Adsorption of nitrate from aqueous solution by magnetic amine-crosslinked biopolymer based corn stalk and its chemical regeneration property

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Wen [Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Recycling (Shandong), School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Gao, Baoyu, E-mail: bygao@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Recycling (Shandong), School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Xu, Xing; Wang, Fang; Xue, Nan; Sun, Shenglei [Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Recycling (Shandong), School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Song, Wuchang; Jia, Ruibao [Jinan Water and Wastewater Monitoring Center, 250033 Jinan (China)

    2016-03-05

    Graphical abstract: Scheme of mechanism for HCl and NaCl regeneration of MAB-CS. - Highlights: • Magnetic amine-crosslinked bio-adsorbent was prepared for nitrate uptake. • The characters of adsorbent were determined by VSM, TGA, XRD, SEM, TEM, FT-IR and XPS. • This novel bio-adsorbent could achieve rapid separation from effluents. • Chemical regeneration of the saturated magnetic bio-adsorbent was conducted. • The adsorption followed the pseudo second order model and Langmuir model. - Abstract: A novel adsorbent of magnetic amine-crosslinked biopolymer based corn stalk (MAB-CS) was synthesized and used for nitrate removal from aqueous solution. The characters and adsorption mechanisms of this bio-adsorbent were determined by using VSM, TGA, XRD, SEM, TEM, FT-IR and XPS, respectively. The results revealed that the saturated magnetization of MAB-CS reached 6.25 emu/g. Meanwhile, the studies of various factors indicated that this novel magnetic bio-adsorbent performed well over a considerable wide pH range of 6.0∼9.0, and the presence of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} would markedly decrease the nitrate removal efficiency. Furthermore, the nitrate adsorption by MAB-CS perfectly fitted the Langmuir isotherm model (R{sup 2} = 0.997–0.999) and pseudo second order kinetic model (R{sup 2} = 0.953–0.995). The calculated nitrate adsorption capacity of MAB-CS was 102.04 mg/g at 318 K by Langmuir model, and thermodynamic study showed that nitrate adsorption is an spontaneous endothermic process. The regeneration experiments indicated its merit of regeneration and stability with the recovery efficient of 118∼147%. By integrating the experimental results, it was found that the removal of nitrate was mainly via electrostatic attraction and ion exchange. And this novel bio-adsorbent prepared in this work could achieve effective removal of nitrate and rapid separation from effluents simultaneously.

  16. Influence of ionic strength and OH(-) ion concentration on the Cu(II) complex formation with EDTA in alkaline solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkus, E; Vaskelis, A; Zakaite, I

    1996-03-01

    D.c. polarographic data show that the complex formation of copper ions with EDTA depends markedly on the ionic strength of the solution at pH 8-10. This is primarily associated with the dependence of the fourth deprotonization constant of EDTA on the solution ionic strength: when it increases from 0.4 to 3.4, the pK(a4) value decreases from 9.5 to 8.2. According to polarographic and spectrophotometric data the degree of Cu(II) complexation increases at pH>10 due to transformation of the complex CuY(2-) to the more stable CuY(OH)(3-) (Y(4-), a fully deprotonized anion of EDTA), but it decreases with increase in alkalinity in a highly alkaline solution (pH>13.5). The latter result could be explained by the decrease in the EDTA anion activity. The calculated values of the activity coefficient are lower than 0.05 at pH>14.

  17. A study on the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in hot alkaline-sulfide solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasse, Kevin Robert

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) generally have superior strength and corrosion resistance as compared to most standard austenitic and ferritic stainless grades owing to a balanced microstructure of austenite and ferrite. As a result of having favorable properties, DSS have been selected for the construction of equipment in pulp and paper, chemical processing, nuclear, oil and gas as well as other industries. The use of DSS has been restricted in some cases because of stress corrosion cracking (SCC), which can initiate and grow in either the ferrite or austenite phase depending on the environment. Thorough understanding of SCC mechanisms of DSS in chloride- and hydrogen sulfide-containing solutions has been useful for material selection in many environments. However, understanding of SCC mechanisms of DSS in sulfide-containing caustic solutions is limited, which has restricted the capacity to optimize process and equipment design in pulp and paper environments. Process environments may contain different concentrations of hydroxide, sulfide, and chloride, altering corrosion and SCC susceptibility of each phase. Crack initiation and growth behavior will also change depending on the relative phase distribution and properties of austenite and ferrite. The role of microstructure and environment on the SCC of standard grade UNS S32205 and lean grade UNS S32101 in hot alkaline-sulfide solution were evaluated in this work using electrochemical, film characterization, mechanical testing, X-ray diffraction, and microscopy techniques. Microstructural aspects, which included residual stress state, phase distribution, phase ratio, and microhardness, were related to the propensity for SCC crack initiation in different simulated alkaline pulping liquors at 170 °C. Other grades of DSS and reference austenitic and superferritic grades of stainless steel were studied using exposure coupons for comparison to understand compositional effects and individual phase susceptibility

  18. Bentonite reactivity in alkaline solutions: results of the Cyprus natural analogue project (CNAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, W.R.; Milodowski, A.E.; Pitty, A.F.; Hardie, S.M.L.; Korkeakoski, P.; Norris, S.; Puigdomenech, I.; Sellin, P.; Rigas, M.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Bentonite is one of the most safety-critical components of the engineered barrier system in the disposal concepts developed for many types of radioactive waste. Bentonite is used due to its favourable properties (including plasticity, swelling capacity, colloid filtration, low hydraulic conductivity, high retardation of key radionuclides) and its stability in relevant geological environments. However, bentonite is unstable under alkaline conditions and, due to the fact that cementitious materials react with groundwater to produce initial leachates with pH >13 (later falling to around pH 12.5), this has driven recent interest in low alkali cements, because the pH of the leachate is somewhat lower than standard OPC (Ordinary Portland Cement), lying around pH 10-11. It is hoped that this lower pH will reduce bentonite reaction, so allowing the use of low alkali cements in close proximity with bentonite. Assuring the long-term stability of bentonite in contact with such alkaline fluids under conditions representative of a deep geological repository requires complementary laboratory, modelling and in situ studies. In particular, to build a robust safety case, it is important to have supporting natural analogue data to confirm understanding - and validate models - of the likely long-term performance of bentonite. As a result of a review of the available literature and recent geological investigations by the authors, several sites in Cyprus were selected as particularly promising for this purpose. All alkaline groundwaters studied so far in Cyprus originate from ophiolite host rocks which are wide-spread across the island. The alkaline pH values (generally between pH 10 and 11, but a maximum of 12 has been observed) reported in the groundwaters are a product of the serpentinization of the ophiolites. The presence of bentonite and other clay-rich rocks in close proximity to the natural alkaline groundwaters permits the

  19. Insight into the electroreduction of nitrate ions at a copper electrode, in neutral solution, after determination of their diffusion coefficient by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aouina, Nizar; Cachet, Hubert [Laboratoire Interfaces et Systemes Electrochimiques - UPR15 du CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie - Paris 6, 4, place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Debiemme-chouvy, Catherine, E-mail: catherine.debiemme-chouvy@upmc.f [Laboratoire Interfaces et Systemes Electrochimiques - UPR15 du CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie - Paris 6, 4, place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Tran, Thi Tuyet Mai [Laboratoire Interfaces et Systemes Electrochimiques - UPR15 du CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie - Paris 6, 4, place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2010-10-01

    The electrochemical reduction of nitrate ions at a copper electrode in an unbuffered neutral aqueous solution is studied. Using a two compartment electrochemical cell, three stationary cathodic waves, noted P1, P2 and P3, were evidenced by cyclic voltammetry at -0.9, -1.2 and -1.3 V/SCE, respectively. By comparing the electrochemical response of nitrate and nitrite containing solutions, P1 was attributed to the reduction of nitrate to nitrite. In order to assign P2 and P3 features by determining the number of electrons involved at the corresponding potential, rotating disk electrode experiments at various rotation speeds, combined with linear sweep voltammetry, were performed. Current data analysis at a given potential was carried out using Koutecky-Levich treatment taking into account water reduction. Confident values of the diffusion coefficient D of nitrate ions were assessed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy for nitrate concentrations of 10{sup -3}, 10{sup -2} and 10{sup -1} M. For a nitrate concentration of 10{sup -2} M, D was found to be 1.31 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1} allowing the number of electrons to be determined as 6 for P2 and 8 for P3, in accordance with nitrate reduction into hydroxylamine and ammonia, respectively. The formation of hydroxylamine was confirmed by the observation of its reoxidation at a Pt microelectrode present at the Cu electrode/nitrate solution interface.

  20. Insight into the electroreduction of nitrate ions at a copper electrode, in neutral solution, after determination of their diffusion coefficient by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aouina, Nizar; Cachet, Hubert; Debiemme-chouvy, Catherine; Tran, Thi Tuyet Mai

    2010-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of nitrate ions at a copper electrode in an unbuffered neutral aqueous solution is studied. Using a two compartment electrochemical cell, three stationary cathodic waves, noted P1, P2 and P3, were evidenced by cyclic voltammetry at -0.9, -1.2 and -1.3 V/SCE, respectively. By comparing the electrochemical response of nitrate and nitrite containing solutions, P1 was attributed to the reduction of nitrate to nitrite. In order to assign P2 and P3 features by determining the number of electrons involved at the corresponding potential, rotating disk electrode experiments at various rotation speeds, combined with linear sweep voltammetry, were performed. Current data analysis at a given potential was carried out using Koutecky-Levich treatment taking into account water reduction. Confident values of the diffusion coefficient D of nitrate ions were assessed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy for nitrate concentrations of 10 -3 , 10 -2 and 10 -1 M. For a nitrate concentration of 10 -2 M, D was found to be 1.31 x 10 -5 cm 2 s -1 allowing the number of electrons to be determined as 6 for P2 and 8 for P3, in accordance with nitrate reduction into hydroxylamine and ammonia, respectively. The formation of hydroxylamine was confirmed by the observation of its reoxidation at a Pt microelectrode present at the Cu electrode/nitrate solution interface.

  1. Adsorption of Nitrite and Nitrate Ions from an Aqueous Solution by Fe-Mg-Type Hydrotalcites at Different Molar Ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Fumihiko; Nagai, Noriaki; Kariya, Yukine; Nagahashi, Eri; Kobayashi, Yuhei; Nakamura, Takehiro; Kawasaki, Naohito

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we prepared Fe-Mg-type hydrotalcites (Fe-HT3.0 and Fe-HT5.0) with different molar ratios and evaluated their adsorption capability for nitrite and nitrate ions from aqueous solution. Fe-HT is a typical hydrotalcite-like layered double hydroxide. Adsorption isotherms, as well as the effects of contact time and pH were investigated, and it was found that Fe-HT can adsorb larger amounts of nitrite and nitrate ions than Al-HT (normal-type hydrotalcite). Adsorption isotherm data were fitted to both Freundlich (correlation coefficient: 0.970-1.000) and Langmuir (correlation coefficient: 0.974-0.999) equations. Elemental analysis and binding energy of Fe-HT surface before and after adsorption indicated that the adsorption mechanism was related to the interaction between the adsorbent surface and anions. In addition, the ion exchange process is related to the adsorption mechanism. The adsorption amount increased with increasing temperature (7-25°C). The experimental data fit the pseudo-second-order model better than the pseudo-first-order model. The effect of pH on adsorption was not significant, which suggested that Fe-HT could be used over a wide pH range (4-12). These results indicate that Fe-HT is a good adsorbent for the removal of nitrite and nitrate ions from aqueous solution.

  2. Inorganic polymers from laterite using activation with phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution: Mechanical and microstructural properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enzo Ferrari, Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy))" data-affiliation=" (Dipartimento di Ingegneria Enzo Ferrari, Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy))" >Lassinantti Gualtieri, Magdalena; Enzo Ferrari, Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy))" data-affiliation=" (Dipartimento di Ingegneria Enzo Ferrari, Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy))" >Romagnoli, Marcello; Pollastri, Simone; Gualtieri, Alessandro F.

    2015-01-01

    Geopolymers from laterite, an iron-rich soil available in developing countries, have great potential as building materials. In this work, laterite from Togo (Africa) was used to prepare geopolymers using both phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution. Microstructural properties were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and mercury porosimetry, whereas thermal properties were evaluated by thermal analyses. The local environment of iron was studied by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XANES region). The mechanical properties were determined. Modulus of Rupture and Young's modulus fell in the ranges 3.3–4.5 MPa and 12–33 GPa, respectively, rendering the materials good candidates for construction purposes. Heating above 900 °C results in weight-gain, presumably due to iron redox reactions. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy data evidence changes in the chemical and structural environments of iron following thermal treatment of geopolymers. These changes indicate interaction between the geopolymer structure and iron during heating, possibly leading to redox properties. -- Highlights: •Geopolymerization of laterite is promising for fabrication of building materials. •Both phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution can be used for activation. •Thermally activated redox properties of the inorganic polymers were observed

  3. Inorganic polymers from laterite using activation with phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution: Mechanical and microstructural properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lassinantti Gualtieri, Magdalena, E-mail: magdalena.gualtieri@unimore.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria " Enzo Ferrari" , Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Romagnoli, Marcello [Dipartimento di Ingegneria " Enzo Ferrari" , Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Pollastri, Simone; Gualtieri, Alessandro F. [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Geologiche, Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via S. Eufemia 19I, I-41121 Modena (Italy)

    2015-01-15

    Geopolymers from laterite, an iron-rich soil available in developing countries, have great potential as building materials. In this work, laterite from Togo (Africa) was used to prepare geopolymers using both phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution. Microstructural properties were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and mercury porosimetry, whereas thermal properties were evaluated by thermal analyses. The local environment of iron was studied by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XANES region). The mechanical properties were determined. Modulus of Rupture and Young's modulus fell in the ranges 3.3–4.5 MPa and 12–33 GPa, respectively, rendering the materials good candidates for construction purposes. Heating above 900 °C results in weight-gain, presumably due to iron redox reactions. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy data evidence changes in the chemical and structural environments of iron following thermal treatment of geopolymers. These changes indicate interaction between the geopolymer structure and iron during heating, possibly leading to redox properties. -- Highlights: •Geopolymerization of laterite is promising for fabrication of building materials. •Both phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution can be used for activation. •Thermally activated redox properties of the inorganic polymers were observed.

  4. Durability of template-free Fe-N-C foams for electrochemical oxygen reduction in alkaline solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mufundirwa, Albert; Harrington, George F.; Smid, Břetislav; Cunning, Benjamin V.; Sasaki, Kazunari; Lyth, Stephen M.

    2018-01-01

    Due to the high cost and limited availability of platinum, the development of non-platinum-group metals (non-PGM) catalysts is of paramount importance. A promising alternative to Pt are Fe-N-C-based materials. Here we present the synthesis, characterization and electrochemistry of a template-free nitrogen-doped carbon foam, impregnated with iron. This low-cost and gram-scale method results in materials with micron-scale pore size and large surface area (1600 m2g-1). When applied as an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalyst in alkaline solution, the Fe-N-C foams display extremely high initial activity, slightly out-performing commercially available non-PGM catalysts (NCP-2000, Pajarito Powder). The load-cycle durability in alkaline solution is investigated, and the performance steadily degrades over 60,000 potential cycles, whilst the commercial catalyst is remarkably stable. The post-operation catalyst microstructure is elucidated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), to provide insight into the degradation processes. The resulting images suggest that potential cycling leads to leaching of atomically dispersed Fe-N2/4 sites in all the catalysts, whereas encapsulated iron nanoparticles are protected.

  5. Study of the alloying additives and alkaline zincate solution effects on the commercial aluminum as galvanic anode for use in alkaline batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashvand avei, M. [Department of Chemistry, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4416, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jafarian, M., E-mail: mjafarian@kntu.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4416, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moghanni Bavil Olyaei, H. [Department of Chemistry, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4416, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gobal, F. [Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-8516, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseini, S.M. [Jahad Organization – Science and Technology Center, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahjani, M.G. [Department of Chemistry, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4416, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-12-16

    The corrosion behavior of different grades of commercial aluminum such as AA1040, AA5083, AA6060 and AA7075 in ZnO-containing 4 M NaOH has been determined by using open circuit potential-time measurements (OCP), galvanostatic and potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive analysis of X-ray (EDAX) reveal that ZnO produces the inhibition effect by the formation of a zinc-containing deposit layer on the surface of aluminum electrodes. Although the influence of zincating on the performance of aluminum alloys and considering the amount of alloying elements such as zinc, magnesium and manganese in AA7075 and AA5083 alloys is much more than AA6060 one, the AA6060 aluminum exhibits negligible corrosion rate. Alloying aluminum with other elements and modifying the composition of the electrolyte is a necessary condition for reducing the self-corrosion of the aluminum anodes, whereas the proportion of the amount of additive elements is sufficient and important condition. As AA6060 with a low amount of Zn and Mg, but the high value of the ratio of (Mg/Zn) content (>400) can serve as a good galvanic anode in the alkaline media. - Highlights: • Decreasing the corrosion rate of tested alloys in 4 M NaOH solution specially AA6060. • Lowering the extent of anodic polarization at a current density of 50 mA cm{sup −2}. • High inhibitor efficiency about 97% for AA6060.

  6. Study of the alloying additives and alkaline zincate solution effects on the commercial aluminum as galvanic anode for use in alkaline batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashvand avei, M.; Jafarian, M.; Moghanni Bavil Olyaei, H.; Gobal, F.; Hosseini, S.M.; Mahjani, M.G.

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of different grades of commercial aluminum such as AA1040, AA5083, AA6060 and AA7075 in ZnO-containing 4 M NaOH has been determined by using open circuit potential-time measurements (OCP), galvanostatic and potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive analysis of X-ray (EDAX) reveal that ZnO produces the inhibition effect by the formation of a zinc-containing deposit layer on the surface of aluminum electrodes. Although the influence of zincating on the performance of aluminum alloys and considering the amount of alloying elements such as zinc, magnesium and manganese in AA7075 and AA5083 alloys is much more than AA6060 one, the AA6060 aluminum exhibits negligible corrosion rate. Alloying aluminum with other elements and modifying the composition of the electrolyte is a necessary condition for reducing the self-corrosion of the aluminum anodes, whereas the proportion of the amount of additive elements is sufficient and important condition. As AA6060 with a low amount of Zn and Mg, but the high value of the ratio of (Mg/Zn) content (>400) can serve as a good galvanic anode in the alkaline media. - Highlights: • Decreasing the corrosion rate of tested alloys in 4 M NaOH solution specially AA6060. • Lowering the extent of anodic polarization at a current density of 50 mA cm −2 . • High inhibitor efficiency about 97% for AA6060

  7. Study of interaction of bismuth, strontium, calcium copper, lead nitrates solutions with sodium oxalate solution with the aim of HTSC synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danilov, V.P.; Krasnobaeva, O.N.; Nosova, T.A.

    1993-01-01

    With the aim of developing a new technique for HTSC oxides synthesis on the base of combined sedimentation of hydroxy salts and their heat treatment is studied interaction of bismuth, strontium, calcium, copper and lead nitrates with alkali solution of sodium oxalate. Conditions for total sedimentation of all five metals from the solution are found. The phase composition of interaction products is determined. It is established that they are high-dispersed homogeneous mixture of three phases of variable composition: twin hydroxalate of copper-bismuth, lead hydroxalate and twin oxalate of strontium-calcium. After heat treatment of the phases are obtained the HTSC oxides

  8. The interaction of Np(V), Pu(VI) and Tc(VII) with metal in alkaline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silin, V.I.; Kareta, A.V.

    1998-01-01

    The interaction of Np(V), Pu(VI) and Tc(VII) with metal reductants Zn, Cr, Sn and their alloys was investigated in 0.5-4 mol l -1 NaOH solutions in static and dynamic conditions (by filtration of solutions through the column filled with grains of metal). In this paper, it was found that the reduction and succeeding precipitation hydroxides of these elements, on the surface of metal grains from 0.5 to 4 mol l -1 NaOH solutions, gives a decontamination factor (DF) from 1.1 to 67. The best result was achieved for Pu (DF=67) on Cr grains after 2.5 h contact at 60 C with 0.5 mol l -1 NaOH solution containing Pu(VI). Increasing the NaOH concentration, and the addition of chromate ions and complex-forming agents to alkaline solution results in a decrease of the decontamination factor (DF). A better result for Np sorption from 1 mol l -1 NaOH solutions was achieved after longer contact, than for Pu, with Cr and Zn grains. The maximum DF=8.9 was achieved for Tc on a column with Zn grains after filtration with a 3.5 mol l -1 NaOH solution containing Tc(VII). Washing out of Np and Pu, sorbed on the Cr grain surfaces, was achieved using an acid solution (1 mol l -1 HNO 3 ). The technetium was desorbed from metal surface by 10% H 2 O 2 solution. (orig.)

  9. Manure Market as a Solution for the Nitrates Directive in Italy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arata, L.; Peerlings, J.H.M.; Sckokai, P.

    2013-01-01

    This research aims at analysing the economic effects of the European Union's Nitrates Directive implementation on some representative dairy farms in Italy, using a mathematical programming model. The representative farms considered are located in Emilia-Romagna and Lombardia, which are potentially

  10. Understanding the nitrate coordination to Eu3+ ions in solution by potential of mean force calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvail, M.; Guilbaud, Ph.

    2011-01-01

    Coordination of nitrate anions with lanthanoid cations (Ln 3+ ) in water, methanol and octanol-1 has been studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations with explicit polarization. Potential of mean force (PMF) profiles have been calculated for a mono-complex of lanthanoid nitrate (Ln(NO 3 ) 2+ ) in these solvents using umbrella-sampling molecular dynamics. In pure water, no difference in the nitrato coordination to lanthanoids (Nd 3+ , Eu 3+ and Dy 3+ ) is observed, i.e. the nitrate anion prefers the monodentate coordination, which promotes the salt dissociation. Then, the influence of the nature of the solvating molecules on the nitrato coordination to Eu 3+ has been investigated. PMF profiles point out that both monodentate and bidentate coordinations are stable in neat methanol, while in neat octanol, only the bidentate one is. MD simulations of Eu(NO 3 ) 3 in water-octanol mixtures with different concentrations of water have been then performed and confirm the importance of the water molecules' presence on the nitrate ion's coordination mode. (authors)

  11. Separation of trace amounts of thorium from cerous nitrate solutions by solvent extraction with tributylphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sozanski, A.

    1977-01-01

    Cerous nitrate containing 3 ) 3 in 40% TBP in n-heptane, the extract was scrubed with 8 n HNO 3 . The process is described by a mathematical model which enables control of product purity under various compositions of aqueous feed. (author)

  12. Re-evaluation of the thermodynamic activity quantities in aqueous alkali metal nitrate solutions at T = 298.15 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partanen, Jaakko I., E-mail: jpartane@lut.f [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, Department of Chemical Technology, Lappeenranta University of Technology, P.O. Box 20, FIN-53851 Lappeenranta (Finland)

    2010-12-15

    The Hueckel equation used in this study to correlate the experimental activities of dilute alkali metal nitrate solutions up to a molality of about 1.5 mol . kg{sup -1} contains two parameters being dependent on the electrolyte: B [that is related closely to the ion-size parameter (a*) in the Debye-Hueckel equation] and b{sub 1} (this parameter is the coefficient of the linear term with respect to the molality and this coefficient is related to hydration numbers of the ions of the electrolyte). In more concentrated solutions up to a molality of 7 mol . kg{sup -1}, an extended Hueckel equation was used, and it contains additionally a quadratic term with respect to the molality and the coefficient of this term is parameter b{sub 2}. All parameter values for the Hueckel equations of LiNO{sub 3}, NaNO{sub 3}, and KNO{sub 3} were determined from the isopiestic data measured by Robinson for solutions of these salts against KCl solutions [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 57 (1935) 1165]. In these estimations, the Hueckel parameters determined recently for KCl solutions [J. Chem. Eng. Data 54 (2009) 208] were used. The Hueckel parameters for RbNO{sub 3} and CsNO{sub 3} were determined from the reported osmotic coefficients of Robinson [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 59 (1937) 84]. The resulting parameter values were tested with the vapour pressure and isopiestic data existing in the literature for alkali metal nitrate solutions. These data support well the recommended Hueckel parameters up to a molality of 7.0 mol . kg{sup -1} for LiNO{sub 3} and NaNO{sub 3}, up to 4.5 mol . kg{sup -1} for RbNO{sub 3}, up to 3.5 mol . kg{sup -1} for KNO{sub 3}, and up to 1.4 mol . kg{sup -1} for CsNO{sub 3} solutions. Reliable activity and osmotic coefficients of alkali metal nitrate solutions can, therefore, be calculated by using the new Hueckel equations, and they have been tabulated at rounded molalities. The activity and osmotic coefficients obtained from these equations were compared to the values suggested by

  13. Titanium Nitride Nanoparticle Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction in Alkaline Solution

    KAUST Repository

    Ohnishi, R.; Katayama, M.; Cha, Dong Kyu; Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Kubota, J.; Domen, K.

    2013-01-01

    Monodispersed TiN nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution (7–23 nm) were synthesized using mesoporous graphitic (mpg)-C3N4 templates with different pore sizes. The nano-materials were examined as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media. The TiN nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), N2 sorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and C-H-N elemental analysis. The ORR current increased as the TiN particle size decreased, and hence the surface area of TiN nanoparticles reactive to ORR increased. Rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) measurements revealed that the ORR on TiN surfaces proceeded mainly via a two-electron pathway, producing H2O2 as the main product. Mechanistic aspects of ORR on TiN surfaces are discussed.

  14. Titanium Nitride Nanoparticle Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction in Alkaline Solution

    KAUST Repository

    Ohnishi, R.

    2013-03-12

    Monodispersed TiN nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution (7–23 nm) were synthesized using mesoporous graphitic (mpg)-C3N4 templates with different pore sizes. The nano-materials were examined as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media. The TiN nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), N2 sorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and C-H-N elemental analysis. The ORR current increased as the TiN particle size decreased, and hence the surface area of TiN nanoparticles reactive to ORR increased. Rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) measurements revealed that the ORR on TiN surfaces proceeded mainly via a two-electron pathway, producing H2O2 as the main product. Mechanistic aspects of ORR on TiN surfaces are discussed.

  15. Evolution of the magnesium incorporated amorphous calcium phosphate to nano-crystallized hydroxyapatite in alkaline solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Juan; Lin, Dong-Yang; Yan, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Xiao-Xiang

    2011-12-01

    A homogeneous amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) coating containing magnesium was achieved on titanium substrates by electrochemical deposition (ECD). Its amorphous structure is confirmed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) together with grazing reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (IR) spectrometer. In the images of high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), the ACP spheres are assembled by nano-particles with the diameter of 5-10 nm. In the alkaline environment, nucleation of hydroxyapatite (HAP) occurs on the surfaces of ACP spheres. By consuming the Ca and PO 4 ions inside the ACP spheres, the HAP nuclei grow outward. Confirmed by TEM, the ACP spheres converse to hollow HAP spheres composed of HAP nano-needles. The coating is finally constructed by the HAP nano-needles, which are themselves aggregated by numerous nano-particles.

  16. Lignocellulosic Composites Prepared Utilizing Aqueous Alkaline/Urea Solutions with Cold Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brent Tisserat

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulosic composites (LCs were fabricated by partially dissolving cotton to create a matrix that was reinforced with osage orange wood (OOW particles and/or blue agave fibers (AF. LCs were composed of 15–35% cotton matrix and 65–85% OWW/AF reinforcement. The matrix was produced by soaking cotton wool in a cold aqueous alkaline/urea solvent and was stirred for 15 minutes at 350 rpm to create a viscous gel. The gel was then reinforced with lignocellulosic components, mixed, and then pressed into a panel mold. LC panels were soaked in water to remove the aqueous solvent and then oven dried to obtain the final LC product. Several factors involved in the preparation of these LCs were examined including reaction temperatures (−5 to −15°C, matrix concentration (15–35% cotton, aqueous solvent volume (45–105 ml/panel, and the effectiveness of employing various aqueous solvent formulations. The mechanical properties of LCs were determined and reported. Conversion of the cotton into a suitable viscous gel was critical in order to obtain LCs that exhibited high mechanical properties. LCs with the highest mechanical properties were obtained when the cotton wools were subjected to a 4.6% LiOH/15% urea solvent at −12.5°C using an aqueous solvent volume of 60 ml/panel. Cotton wool subjected to excessive cold alkaline solvents volumes resulted in irreversible cellulose breakdown and a resultant LC that exhibited poor mechanical properties.

  17. Effects of aging on PuO{sub 2} . xH{sub 2}O particle size in alkaline solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, C.H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Between 1944 and 1989, 54.5 metric tons of the United States' weapons-grade plutonium and an additional 12.9 metric tons of fuels-grade plutonium were produced in and separated from irradiated uranium metal fuel at the Hanford Site. Acidic high-activity wastes containing around 600 kg of plutonium were made alkaline and discharged to underground storage tanks from separations, isolation, and recycle processes to yield average plutonium concentration of about 0.003 g/L (or {proportional_to} 0.0002 wt. %) in the {proportional_to} 200 million liter tank waste volume. The plutonium is largely associated with low-solubility metal hydroxide/oxide sludges where its low concentration and intimate mixture with neutron-absorbing elements (e.g., iron) are credited in nuclear criticality safety. However, concerns have been expressed that plutonium, in the form of hydrated plutonium oxide, PuO{sub 2} . xH{sub 2}O, could undergo sufficient crystal growth through dissolution and reprecipitation in the alkaline tank waste to potentially become separable from neutron absorbing constituents by settling or sedimentation. Thermodynamic considerations and laboratory studies of systems chemically analogous to tank waste show that the plutonium, precipitated in the alkaline tank waste by neutralization from acid solution, probably entered as 2-5-nm PuO{sub 2} . xH{sub 2}O, crystallite particles that, because of the low concentration of the neutral Pu(IV) dissolved species and opposition from radiolytic processes, grow from that point at exceedingly slow rates. (orig.)

  18. Nitrate conversion and supercritical fluid extraction of UO2-CeO2 solid solution prepared by an electrolytic reduction-coprecipitation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, L.Y.; Duan, W.H.; Wen, M.F.; Xu, J.M.; Zhu, Y.J.

    2014-01-01

    A low-waste technology for the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) has been developed recently, which involves the conversion of actinide and lanthanide oxides with liquid N 2 O 4 into their nitrates followed by supercritical fluid extraction of the nitrates. The possibility of the reprocessing of SNF from high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) with nitrate conversion and supercritical fluid extraction is a current area of research in China. Here, a UO 2 -CeO 2 solid solution was prepared as a surrogate for a UO 2 -PuO 2 solid solution, and the recovery of U and Ce from the UO 2 -CeO 2 solid solution with liquid N 2 O 4 and supercritical CO 2 containing tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) was investigated. The UO 2 -CeO 2 solid solution prepared by electrolytic reduction-coprecipitation method had square plate microstructures. The solid solution after heat treatment was completely converted into nitrates with liquid N 2 O 4 . The XRD pattern of the nitrates was similar to that of UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 . 3H 2 O. After 120 min of online extraction at 25 MPa and 50 , 99.98% of the U and 98.74% of the Ce were recovered from the nitrates with supercritical CO 2 containing TBP. The results suggest a promising potential technology for the reprocessing of SNF from HTGRs. (orig.)

  19. Potentiometric determination of free nitric-acid in trilaurylamine solutions containing plutonium nitrate; Dosage potentiometrique de l'acidite nitrique libre dans les solutions organiques de trilaurylamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, J J; Saey, J C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    A potentiometric method of determination of the free nitric acid in trilaurylamine solutions containing plutonium or thorium nitrates is described. The potentiometric titration is carried out in a mixture of benzene and 1,2-dichloro ethane with a standard solution of trilaurylamine as the titrant. When thorium nitrate is present the metal complex is not dissociated then the titration has a single end-point. In the case of plutonium nitrate the partial dissociation of the plutonium complex corresponds to a second point. The experimental error in duplicate analyses of 50 samples is about 1 per cent for free acid concentrations in the range of 0,03 to 0,1 N and plutonium concentrations between 1 to 5 g/l. (authors) [French] Une methode potentiometrique de dosage de l'acidite nitrique libre dans les solutions de trilaurylamine contenant un complexe de plutonium ou de thorium est decrite. La potentiometrie est effectuee en prenant comme base titrante la trilaurylamine et comme milieu de dilution un melange de benzene et de 1,2 dichloroethane. Dans le cas du thorium, le complexe organometallique n'est pas deplace et la courbe de titrage presente un seul point d'inflexion. Dans le cas du plutonium le complexe est partiellement dissocie ce qui correspond a un second saut de potentiel. La moyenne des erreurs experimentales sur 50 echantillons doses a ete d'environ {+-} 1 pour cent sur l'acide libre. Les solutions experimentees contenaient de 0,03 a 0,1 N en acide et de 1 a 5 g/l en plutonium. (auteurs)

  20. Process for recovering uranium using an alkyl pyrophosphoric acid and alkaline stripping solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worthington, R.E.; Magdics, A.

    1987-01-01

    A process is described for stripping uranium for a pregnant organic extractant comprising an alkyl pyrophosphoric acid dissolved in a substantially water-immiscible organic diluent. The organic extractant contains tetravalent uranium and an alcohol or phenol modifier in a quantity sufficient to retain substantially all the unhydrolyzed alkyl pyrophosphoric acid in solution in the diluent during stripping. The process comprises adding an oxidizing agent to the organic extractant and thereby oxidizing the tetravalent uranium to the +6 state in the organic extractant, and contacting the organic extractant containing the uranium in the +6 state with a stripping solution comprising an aqueous solution of an alkali metal or ammonium carbonate or hydroxide thereby stripping uranium from the organic extractant into the stripping solution. The resulting barren organic extractant containing substantially all of the unhydrolyzed alkyl pyrophosphoric acid dissolved in the diluent is separated from the stripping solution containing the stripped uranium, the barren extractant being suitable for recycle

  1. Measuring calcium, potassium, and nitrate in plant nutrient solutions using ion-selective electrodes in hydroponic greenhouse of some vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardar, Gökay; Altıkatoğlu, Melda; Ortaç, Deniz; Cemek, Mustafa; Işıldak, İbrahim

    2015-01-01

    Generally, the life cycle of plants depends on the uptake of essential nutrients in a balanced manner and on toxic elements being under a certain concentration. Lack of control of nutrient levels in nutrient solution can result in reduced plant growth and undesired conditions such as blossom-end rot. In this study, sensitivity and selectivity tests for various polyvinylchloride (PVC)-based ion-selective membranes were conducted to identify those suitable for measuring typical concentration ranges of macronutrients, that is, NO(3-), K(+), and Ca(2+), in hydroponic solutions. The sensitivity and selectivity of PVC-membrane-based ion-selective sensors prepared with tetradodecylammoniumnitrate for NO(3-), valinomycin for K(+), and Ca ionophore IV for Ca(2+) were found to be satisfactory for measuring NO(3-), K(+), and Ca(2+) ions in nutrient solutions over typical ranges of hydroponic concentrations. Potassium, calcium, and nitrate levels that were utilized by cucumber and tomato seedlings in the greenhouse were different. The findings show that tomato plants consumed less amounts of nitrate than cucumber plants over the first 2 months of their growth. We also found that the potassium intake was higher than other nutritional elements tested for all plants. © 2014 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Recent studies of uranium and plutonium chemistry in alkaline radioactive waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, William D.; Wilmarth, William R.; Hobbs, David T.; Edwards, Thomas B.

    2008-01-01

    Solubility studies of uranium and plutonium in a caustic, radioactive Savannah River Site tank waste solution revealed the existence of uranium supersaturation in the as-received sample. Comparison of the results to predictions generated from previously published models for solubility in these waste types revealed that the U model poorly predicts solubility while Pu model predictions are quite consistent with experimental observations. Separate studies using simulated Savannah River Site evaporator feed solution revealed that the known formation of sodium aluminosilicate solids in waste evaporators can promote rapid precipitation of uranium from supersaturated solutions

  3. Carbon-supported cobalt catalyst for hydrogen generation from alkaline sodium borohydride solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Dongyan; Liu, Xinmin; Cao, Changqing; Guo, Qingjie [College of Chemical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China); Dai, Ping [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266061 (China)

    2008-08-01

    Low cost transition metal catalysts with high performance are attractive for the development of on-board hydrogen generation systems by catalytic hydrolysis of sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) in fuel cell fields. In this study, hydrogen production from alkaline NaBH{sub 4} via hydrolysis process over carbon-supported cobalt catalysts was studied. The catalytic activity of the supported cobalt catalyst was found to be highly dependent on the calcination temperatures. The hydrogen generation rate increases with calcination temperatures in the range of 200-400 C, but a high calcination temperature above 500 C led to markedly decreased activity. X-ray diffraction patterns reveal that the catalysts experience phase transition from amorphous Co-B to crystalline cobalt hydroxide with increase in calcination temperatures. The reaction performance is also dependent on the concentration of NaBH{sub 4}, and the hydrogen generation rate increases for lower NaBH{sub 4} concentrations and decreases after reaching a maximum at 10 wt.% of NaBH{sub 4}. (author)

  4. Improved hydrogen generation from alkaline NaBH{sub 4} solution using cobalt catalysts supported on modified activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Dongyan; Guo, Qingjie; Yue, Xuehai [College of Chemical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China); Dai, Ping [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266061 (China)

    2008-12-15

    Hydrogen production from alkaline sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) solution via hydrolysis process over activated carbon supported cobalt catalysts is studied. Activated carbons are used in their original form and after liquid phase oxidation with HNO{sub 3}. The changes in surface functional groups of the activated carbon are detected by FTIR spectroscopy. The effects of HNO{sub 3} oxidation on the properties of the activated carbon and the resulting catalyst performance are investigated. FTIR analysis reveals that the oxidative treatment leads to the formation of various functional groups on the surface of the activated carbon. Cobalt catalysts supported on the modified activated carbon are found to exhibit higher activity and stability. (author)

  5. Hydrophilic cobalt sulfide nanosheets as a bifunctional catalyst for oxygen and hydrogen evolution in electrolysis of alkaline aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mingchao; Zhang, Zhongyi; Zhang, Hu; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Lixue; Wang, Shicai

    2018-01-01

    Hydrophilic medium and precursors were used to synthesize a hydrophilic electro-catalyst for overall water splitting. The cobalt sulfide (Co 3 S 4 ) catalyst exhibits a layered nanosheet structure with a hydrophilic surface, which can facilitate the diffusion of aqueous substrates into the electrode pores and towards the active sites. The Co 3 S 4 catalyst shows excellent bifunctional catalytic activity for both the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in alkaline solution. The assembled water electrolyzer based on Co 3 S 4 exhibits better performance and stability than that of Pt/C-RuO 2 catalyst. Thereforce the hydrophilic Co 3 S 4 is a highly promising bifunctional catalyst for the overall water splitting reaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Separating nano graphene oxide from the residual strong-acid filtrate of the modified Hummers method with alkaline solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Xuebing, E-mail: xuebinghu2010@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Membrane, Jingdezhen Ceramic Institute, Jingdezhen 333001 (China); Key Laboratory of Inorganic Coating Materials, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201800 (China); Yu, Yun, E-mail: yunyush@mail.sic.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Coating Materials, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201800 (China); Wang, Yongqing; Zhou, Jianer [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Membrane, Jingdezhen Ceramic Institute, Jingdezhen 333001 (China); Song, Lixin [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Coating Materials, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2015-02-28

    Graphical abstract: By adding an alkaline (NaOH or KOH) solution, the unprecipitated nano graphene oxide undergoes fast aggregation from the residual strong-acid filtrate of the modified Hummers method and forms the stable floccules when the pH value of the filtrate is about 1.7. The acid–base interaction with the surface functional groups of the carbon layers plays a role in the aggregation of the unprecipitated nano graphene oxide. - Highlights: • The novel and high-efficient method for separating graphene oxide was showed. • Graphene oxide undergoes aggregation and forms the floccules when pH value is ∼1.7. • The acid–base interaction plays a role in the aggregation of graphene oxide. - Abstract: In the modified Hummers method for preparing graphene oxide, the yellow slurry can be obtained. After filtering through a quantitative filter paper, the strong-acid filtrate containing the unprecipitated nano graphene oxide was gained. The corresponding filtrate was added gradually with an alkaline (NaOH or KOH) solution at room temperature. The unprecipitated nano graphene oxide could undergo fast aggregation when the pH value of the filtrate was about 1.7 and formed the stable floccules. X-ray diffraction analysis shows the dominant peak of the floccules is about 11°, which accords to the peak of graphene oxide. Spectra of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirm the presence in the floccules of an abundance of oxygen functional groups and the purified graphene oxide floccules can be obtained. Atomic force microscopy measurement shows the graphene oxide floccules consists of sheet-like objects, mostly containing only a few layers (about 5 layers). Zeta potential analysis demonstrates the surface charge of the graphene oxide is pH-sensitive and its isoelectric point is ∼1.7. The flocculation mechanism of graphene oxide ascribes to the acid–base interaction with the surface functional groups of the carbon layers.

  7. Ammonium, Nitrate, and Phosphate Sorption to and Solute Leaching from Biochars Prepared from Corn Stover ( L.) and Oak Wood ( spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollister, C Colin; Bisogni, James J; Lehmann, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Biochar (BC) was evaluated for nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) removal from aqueous solution to quantify its nutrient pollution mitigation potential in agroecosystems. Sorption isotherms were prepared for solutions of ammonium (NH), nitrate (NO), and phosphate (PO-P) using BC of corn ( L.) and oak ( spp.) feedstock, each pyrolyzed at 350 and 550°C highest treatment temperature (HTT). Sorption experiments were performed on original BC as well as on BC that went through a water extraction pretreatment (denoted WX-BC). Ammonium sorption was observed for WX-Oak-BC and WX-Corn-BC, and Freundlich model linearization showed that a 200°C increase in HTT resulted in a 55% decrease in * values for WX-Oak-BC and a 69% decrease in * for WX-Corn-BC. Nitrate sorption was not observed for any BC. Removing metals by water extraction from WX-Oak-350 and WX-Oak-550 resulted in a 25 to 100% decrease in phosphate removal efficiency relative to original Oak-350 and Oak-550, respectively. No PO-P sorption was observed using any Corn-BC. Calcium (Ca) leached from BC produced at 550°C was 63 and 104% higher than from BC produced at 350°C for corn and oak, respectively. Leaching of P was two orders of magnitude lower in WX-Oak-BC than in WX-Corn-BC, concurrent with similar difference in magnesium (Mg). Nitrate and NH leaching from consecutive water extractions of all tested BCs was mostly below detection limits. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  8. Corrosion of Cu-xZn alloys in slightly alkaline chloride solutions studied by stripping voltammetry and microanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosev, I; Minović, A

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism of corrosion of Cu-xZn alloys (x = 10-40 wt %) in slightly alkaline chloride solutions was investigated by analysing solid reaction products by energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS) and dissolved reaction products by differential anodic pulse stripping (DAPS) voltammetry. The corrosion process was studied under open circuit and under potentiostatic conditions at selected potentials. Pure metals were studied comparatively so that an interacting effect of particular metal components in the alloy could be determined. All four Cu-xZn alloys show an improved behaviour compared to pure metals. Under open-circuit condition both components dissolve simultaneously in the solution. With increasing immersion time the preferential, dissolution of zinc in the solution becomes pronounced. It is the highest for Cu-10Zn and the lowest for Cu-30Zn alloy. Under potentiostatic control the dissolution mechanism depends on the electrode potential and changes from exclusive dissolution of zinc to simultaneous dissolution of both components with preferential dissolution of zinc. The latter decreases, as the electrode potential becomes more positive.

  9. Analysis of the dynamic behavior of porous nickel electrodes in alkaline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Real, Silvia G; Visintin, Arnaldo; Castro, Elida B

    2004-01-01

    The nickel electrode is important for its electrocatalytic properties, when it is used in water electrolysis, and for use as a positive terminal in alkaline nickel-cadmium, nickel-iron, nickel-zinc, nickel-hydrogen and nickel-metal hydride batteries. Since there are many factors related to the functioning of these batteries that have still not been clarified, such as the memory effect associated with the change in structure of the nickel hydroxide and the phenomenon of 'battery sudden death', that produce serious problems mostly in spaces uses, this work discusses the dynamic behavior of the porous nickel hydroxide electrode. This electrode possesses outstanding properties such as high power density, good cyclability and elevated specific energy, which make it unique for the above-mentioned applications. The electrochemical storage of energy in this electrode is based on the reversible characteristics of nickel hydroxide/oxhydroxide redox coupling. The reversibility of the process is an important factor in battery materials. In the case of the Ni oxide, during the electrode discharge H + is inserted and this process inverts during the charging. This work presents the results obtained with the use of impedance spectroscopy for different discharge states of the electrode material in order to correlate its electrochemical properties according to the development of physical chemical models. These models include the charging and discharging processes, the process of proton diffusion in the solid and the porous nature of the material. Knowledge about the functioning of the electrode material is obtained by adjusting the experimental data according to the model and the parametric identification to determine values associated with such variables as area of active material, diffusion coefficient of the H + , conductivity of the solid as a function of the discharge state and kinetic constants of the charge transfer process (CW)

  10. Synthesis of C60(OH)18-20 in aqueous alkaline solution under O2-atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Gustavo Catao; Ladeira, Luiz Orlando; Righi, Ariete; Krambrock, Klaus; Pinheiro, Mauricio Veloso B.; Calado, Hallen Daniel; Gil, Rossimiriam Pereira de Freitas

    2006-01-01

    In this work we report on an alternative synthesis of water-soluble fullerenes known as fullerols, aiming for biomedical applications. The synthesis is based on a process in which polyethylene glycol (PEG400) is used as phase-transfer catalyst between fullerene/benzene and aqueous NaOH solutions. The polyhydroxylation of the fullerenes occurs in the NaOH solution under a continuous flow of O 2 to enhance the reaction yield. The resulting compound was characterized with infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, thermo-gravimetric analysis and optical absorption. The formation of C 60 (OH) 18-20 in high yields was confirmed. (author)

  11. Standard test method for gamma energy emission from fission products in uranium hexafluoride and uranyl nitrate solution

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the measurement of gamma energy emitted from fission products in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranyl nitrate solution. It is intended to provide a method for demonstrating compliance with UF6 specifications C 787 and C 996 and uranyl nitrate specification C 788. 1.2 The lower limit of detection is 5000 MeV Bq/kg (MeV/kg per second) of uranium and is the square root of the sum of the squares of the individual reporting limits of the nuclides to be measured. The limit of detection was determined on a pure, aged natural uranium (ANU) solution. The value is dependent upon detector efficiency and background. 1.3 The nuclides to be measured are106Ru/ 106Rh, 103Ru,137Cs, 144Ce, 144Pr, 141Ce, 95Zr, 95Nb, and 125Sb. Other gamma energy-emitting fission nuclides present in the spectrum at detectable levels should be identified and quantified as required by the data quality objectives. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its us...

  12. Critical experiment program of heterogeneous core composed for LWR fuel rods and low enriched uranyl nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyoshi, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Watanabe, Shouichi; Nakamura, Takemi

    2003-01-01

    In order to stimulate the criticality characteristics of a dissolver in a reprocessing plant, a critical experiment program of heterogeneous cores is under going at a Static Critical Experimental Facility, STACY in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, JAERI. The experimental system is composed of 5w/o enriched PWR-type fuel rod array immersed in 6w/o enriched uranyl nitrate solution. First series of experiments are basic benchmark experiments on fundamental critical data in order to validate criticality calculation codes for 'general-form system' classified in the Japanese Criticality Safety Handbook, JCSHB. Second series of experiments are concerning the neutron absorber effects of fission products related to the burn-up credit Level-2. For demonstrating the reactivity effects of fission products, reactivity effects of natural elements such as Sm, Nd, Eu and 103 Rh, 133 Cs, solved in the nitrate solution are to be measured. The objective of third series of experiments is to validate the effect of gadolinium as a soluble neutron poison. Properties of temperature coefficients and kinetic parameters are also studied, since these parameters are important to evaluate the transient behavior of the criticality accident. (author)

  13. Removal of nitrate, ammonia and phosphate from aqueous solutions in packed bed filter using biochar augmented sand media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Hanandeh Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutrients from wastewater are a major source of pollution because they can cause significant impact on the ecosystem. Accordingly, it is important that the nutrient concentrations are kept to admissible levels to the receiving environment. Often regulatory limits are set on the maximum allowable concentrations in the effluent. Therefore, wastewater must be treated to meet safe levels of discharge. In this study, laboratory investigation of the efficiency of packed bed filters to remove nitrate, ammonium and phosphate from aqueous solutions were conducted. Sand and sand augmented with hydrochloric acid treated biochar (SBC were used as packing media. Synthetic wastewater solution was prepared with PO43−, NO3−, NH4+ concentrations 20, 10, 50 mg/L, respectively. Each experiment ran for a period of five days; samples from the effluent were collected on alternate days. All experiments were duplicated. Over the experiment period, the average removal efficiency of PO43−, NO3−, NH4+ were 99.2%, 72.9%, 96.7% in the sand packed columns and 99.2%, 82.3%, 97.4% in the SBC packed columns, respectively. Although, the presence of biochar in the packing media had little effect on phosphate and ammonium removal, it significantly improved nitrate removal.

  14. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Plutonium by Controlled-Potential Coulometry Plutonium by Amperometric Titration with Iron(II) Plutonium by Diode Array Spectrophotometry Free Acid by Titration in an Oxalate Solution 8 to 15 Free Acid by Iodate Precipitation-Potentiometric Titration Test Method 16 to 22 Uranium by Arsenazo I Spectrophotometric Test Method 23 to 33 Thorium by Thorin Spectrophotometric Test Method 34 to 42 Iron by 1,10-Phenanthroline Spectrophotometric Test Method 43 to 50 Impurities by ICP-AES Chloride by Thiocyanate Spectrophotometric Test Method 51 to 58 Fluoride by Distillation-Spectrophotometric Test Method 59 to 66 Sulfate by Barium Sulfate Turbidimetric Test Method 67 to 74 Isotopic Composition by Mass Spectrom...

  15. Criticality safety benchmark experiment on 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution using a 28-cm-thickness slab core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Miyoshi, Yoshinori; Kikuchi, Tsukasa; Watanabe, Shouichi

    2002-01-01

    The second series of critical experiments with 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution using 28-cm-thick slab core have been performed with the Static Experiment Critical Facility of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Systematic critical data were obtained by changing the uranium concentration of the fuel solution from 464 to 300 gU/l under various reflector conditions. In this paper, the thirteen critical configurations for water-reflected cores and unreflected cores are identified and evaluated. The effects of uncertainties in the experimental data on k eff are quantified by sensitivity studies. Benchmark model specifications that are necessary to construct a calculational model are given. The uncertainties of k eff 's included in the benchmark model specifications are approximately 0.1%Δk eff . The thirteen critical configurations are judged to be acceptable benchmark data. Using the benchmark model specifications, sample calculation results are provided with several sets of standard codes and cross section data. (author)

  16. Recovery of uranium from alkaline ore (Tummalapalle) leach solution using novel precipitating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Sujoy; Rupawate, V.H.; Hareendran, K.N.; Roy, S.B.; Chakravartty, J.K.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of present study is recovery of uranium from such ore leach solution containing 2 O 7 at pH ∼12.5. The average particle size of the MgU 2 O 7 particles was 20 micron and overall uranium recovery was 97%. The composition of final precipitate was characterized using XRD and surface morphology was studied using SEM

  17. Coloring Rate of Phenolphthalein by Reaction with Alkaline Solution Observed by Liquid-Droplet Collision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Yuuka; Kikkawa, Shigenori; Suzuki, Tomoko; Kohno, Jun-ya

    2015-06-11

    Many important chemical reactions are induced by mixing two solutions. This paper presents a new way to measure rates of rapid chemical reactions induced by mixing two reactant solutions using a liquid-droplet collision. The coloring reaction of phenolphthalein (H2PP) by a reaction with NaOH is investigated kinetically. Liquid droplets of H2PP/ethanol and NaOH/H2O solutions are made to collide, which induces a reaction that transforms H2PP into a deprotonated form (PP(2-)). The concentration of PP(2-) is evaluated from the RGB values of pixels in the colored droplet images, and is measured as a function of the elapsed time from the collision. The obtained rate constant is (2.2 ± 0.7) × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1), which is the rate constant for the rate-determining step of the coloring reaction of H2PP. This method was shown to be applicable to determine rate constants of rapid chemical reactions between two solutions.

  18. Effect of Nitrogen Form and pH of Nutrient Solution on the Shoot Concentration of Phosphorus, Nitrate, and Nitrogen of Spinach in Hydroponic Culture

    OpenAIRE

    N. Najafi; M. Parsazadeh

    2010-01-01

    In order to study the effect of nitrogen form and pH of nutrient solution on the shoot concentration of P, nitrate, organic N + inorganic ammonium, and total N of spinach, a factorial experiment was conducted with two factors including pH of nutrient solution in three levels (4.5, 6.5 and 8.0) and nitrate to ammonium ratio of nutrient solution in five levels (100:0, 75:25, 50:50, 25:75 and 0:100). This factorial experiment was carried out in a completely randomized design with four replicatio...

  19. Investigation of electrochemical synthesis of ferrate, Part I: Electrochemical behavior of iron and its several alloys in concentrated alkaline solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čekerevac Milan I.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, considerable attention has been paid to various applications of Fe(VI due to its unique properties such as oxidizing power, selective reactivity, stability of the salt, and non-toxic decomposition by-products of ferric ion. In environmental remediation processes, Fe(VI has been proposed as green oxidant, coagulant, disinfectant, and antifoulant. Therefore, it is considered as a promising multi-purpose water treatment chemical. Fe(VI has also potential applications in electrochemical energy source, as 'green cathode'. The effectiveness of ferrate as a powerful oxidant in the entire pH range, and its use in environmental applications for the removal of wide range of contaminants has been well documented by several researchers. There is scientific evidence that ferrate can effectively remove arsenic, algae, viruses, pharmaceutical waste, and other toxic heavy metals. Although Fe(VI was first discovered in early eighteen century, detailed studies on physical and chemical properties of Fe(VI had to wait until efficient synthetic and analytical methods of Fe(VI were developed by Schreyer et al. in the 1950s. Actually, there have been developed three ways for the preparation of Fe(VI compounds : the wet oxidation of Fe(II and Fe(III compounds, the dry oxidation of the same, and the electrochemistry method, mainly based on the trans passive oxidation of iron. High purity ferrates Fe(VI can be generated when electrode of the pure iron metal or its alloys are anodized in concentrated alkaline solution. It is known that the efficiency of electrochemical process of Fe(VI production depends on many factors such as current density, composition of anode material, types of electrolyte etc. In this paper, the electrochemical synthesis of ferrate(VI solution by the anodic dissolution of iron and its alloys in concentrated water solution of NaOH and KOH is investigated. The process of transpassive dissolution of iron to ferrate(VI was studied by

  20. Coprecipitation of trace amounts of 137Cs and 85Sr with [Na(18-Crown-6]BPh4 from neutral and alkaline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulyukhin, S.A.; Konovalova, N.A.; Rumer, I.A.; Kamenskaya, A.N.; Mikheev, N.B.

    2005-01-01

    Coprecipitation of 137 Cs and 85 Sr with [Na(18-crown-6]BPh 4 solid phase from aqueous, aqueous-ethanolic, and alkaline solutions is studied. 137 C s and 85 Sr co-crystallize with [Na(18-crown-6]BPh 4 from aqueous and aqueous-ethanolic solutions. The cocrystallization coefficients D of 137 Cs and 85 Sr from aqueous solutions are 2.6 ± 0.5 and 3.3 ± 0.3, respectively. For aqueous-ethanolic solutions, the corresponding values are 4.4 ± 0.5 and 3.4 ± 0.4. In the alkaline solutions (0.1 and 1 M NaOH), 54-74% of 137 Cs and 37-51% of 85 Sr pass into the [Na(18-crown-6)]BPh 4 solid phase, depending on the crown ether concentration in the system [ru

  1. Formation of ammonia complexes of alkaline earth elements in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padar, T.G.; Stupko, T.V.; Isaev, I.D.; Pashkov, G.L.; Mironov, V.E.

    1990-01-01

    Coefficients of ammonia distribution between aqueous solutions of calcium, strontium, barium and ammonium perchlorate mixtures at ionic strength - 0.50; 1.0 and 1.5 at 298.2 K and ammonia concentrations 0.2-10 mol/dm 3 are measured. Formation of ammonia complexes of M(NH 3 ) n 2+ composition is shown. Logarithms of stepped stability constants for solutions with zero ionic strength for Ca 2+ are: -0.13; -0.25; -0.52 and -0.77, where n=1-4; for Sr 2+ : -0.04; -0.42 and -0.70, where n=1-3 and for Ba 2+ : -0.11; -0.50 and 0.76, where n=1-3

  2. Monitoring of DNA breakage in embryonic stages of the African catfish Clarias gariepinus (Burchell, 1822) after exposure to lead nitrate using alkaline comet assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osman, A.G.M.; Mekkawy, Imam A.; Verreth, J.A.J.; Wuertz, S.; Kloas, W.; Kirschbaum, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Increasing lead contamination in Egyptian ecosystems and high lead concentrations in food items have raised concern for human health and stimulated studies on monitoring ecotoxicological impact of lead-caused genotoxicity. In this work, the alkaline comet assay was modified for monitoring DNA strand

  3. Preparation and Characterization of Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Hydrogel Electrolyte Using Alkaline Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanobu Chiku

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Organic-inorganic hybrid hydrogel electrolytes were prepared by mixing hydrotalcite, cross-linked potassium poly(acrylate and 6 M KOH solution. The organic-inorganic hybrid hydrogel electrolytes had high ionic conductivity (0.456–0.540 S cm−1 at 30 °C. Moreover, the mechanical strength of the hydrogel electrolytes was high enough to form a 2–3 mm thick freestanding membrane because of the reinforcement with hydrotalcite.

  4. Preparation and Characterization of Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Hydrogel Electrolyte Using Alkaline Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Chiku, Masanobu; Tomita, Shoji; Higuchi, Eiji; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid hydrogel electrolytes were prepared by mixing hydrotalcite, cross-linked potassium poly(acrylate) and 6 M KOH solution. The organic-inorganic hybrid hydrogel electrolytes had high ionic conductivity (0.456–0.540 S cm−1) at 30 °C. Moreover, the mechanical strength of the hydrogel electrolytes was high enough to form a 2–3 mm thick freestanding membrane because of the reinforcement with hydrotalcite.

  5. Determination of contents of carbonate and hydrogen carbonate in solutions for alkaline leading of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radil, V.

    1988-01-01

    The new analytical method is based on the determination of the molar ratio carbonate - hydrogen carbonate using the measured concentration of hydrogen ions, the determination of the dissociation constant of carbonic acid for different values of ionic strength. The concentration of hydrogen ions was measured with a Metrohm 632 pH meter with the use of a combined glass electrode. The content of total carbonate carbon was determined coulometrically and the uranium content was determined by extraction with tributyl phosphate and by spectrometry of the complex of uranyl ions with Arsenazo III. Model solutions were used for the experiments which contained a high concentration of sulfate ions, thiosulfate ions, uranium and various proportions of carbonate and hydrogen carbonate. The composition of the individual samples of the extraction solutions are tabulated. The calibration was made of the glass combined electrode at different ionic strength, the values determined of dissociation constants of carbonic acid for different ionic strength. The mathematical procedure is described for the calculation of molar concentrations of carbonate and hudrogen carbonate and the results are presented of the analysis of model solutions. (E.S.). 5 tabs., 1 fig., 5 refs

  6. Spectroscopic and DFT Study of RhIII Chloro Complex Transformation in Alkaline Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilchenko, Danila B; Berdyugin, Semen N; Korenev, Sergey V; O'Kennedy, Sean; Gerber, Wilhelmus J

    2017-09-05

    The hydrolysis of [RhCl 6 ] 3- in NaOH-water solutions was studied by spectrophotometric methods. The reaction proceeds via successive substitution of chloride with hydroxide to quantitatively form [Rh(OH) 6 ] 3- . Ligand substitution kinetics was studied in an aqueous 0.434-1.085 M NaOH matrix in the temperature range 5.5-15.3 °C. Transformation of [RhCl 6 ] 3- into [RhCl 5 (OH)] 3- was found to be the rate-determining step with activation parameters of ΔH † = 105 ± 4 kJ mol -1 and ΔS † = 59 ± 10 J K -1 mol -1 . The coordinated hydroxo ligand(s) induces rapid ligand substitution to form [Rh(OH) 6 ] 3- . By simulating ligand substitution as a dissociative mechanism, using density functional theory (DFT), we can now explain the relatively fast and slow kinetics of chloride substitution in basic and acidic matrices, respectively. Moreover, the DFT calculated activation energies corroborated experimental data that the kinetic stereochemical sequence of [RhCl 6 ] 3- hydrolysis in an acidic solution proceeds as [RhCl 6 ] 3- → [RhCl 5 (H 2 O)] 2- → cis-[RhCl 4 (H 2 O) 2 ] - . However, DFT calculations predict in a basic solution the trans route of substitution [RhCl 6 ] 3- → [RhCl 5 (OH)] 3- → trans-[RhCl 4 (OH) 2 ] 3- is kinetically favored.

  7. Comparison of the Efficiencies of Zero-Valent Iron Nanoparticles and Stabilized Iron Nanoparticles for Nitrate Reduction from Polluted Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Nooralivand

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of zero-valent iron nanoparticles (ZVIN for the removal of nitrate from aqueous solutions. For this purpose, bare zero-valent iron nanoparticles (bare-ZVIN and CMC-ZVIN were synthesized using the borohydride reduction method and their morphological characteristics were examined via scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and Fourier Transmission Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR. The effects of pH of the aqueous solution, initial nitrate concentration, ZVIN concentration, and contact time on nitrate reduction were investigated as operational parameters and the kinetics of nitrate reduction was studied in batch experiments. The results showed that 93.65% of nitrate was removed by stabilized nanoparticles at pH=6 while non-stabilized nanoparticles at pH=2 were able to remove 85.55% of the nitrate.Furthermore, nitrate reduction was enhanced by increasing ZVIN concentration and contact time while it was decreased as a result of increasing initial nitrate concentration. The major product of nitrate reduction at an acidic pH was found to be ammonium; at an alkaline pH, however, nitrate was converted to nitrogen and nitrite production dropped to less than 2%. Kinetic analysis demonstrated that denitrification of nitrate by the nanoparticles fitted well with first-order and second-order reaction models. The results also demonstrated that the stabilized ZVI nanoparticles were more effective than bare-ZVIN for nitrate reduction in aqueous solutions.

  8. Thermophysical properties of sodium nitrate and sodium chloride solutions and their effects on fluid flow in unsaturated media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    2001-01-01

    Understanding movement of saline sodium nitrate (NaNO 3 ) waste solutions is important for assessing the contaminant migration near leaking waste storage tanks in the unsaturated zone at the Hanford site (Washington, USA). The purpose of this study is to contribute a basic understanding of effects of the thermophysical behavior of NaNO 3 solutions on fluid flow in unsaturated media. We first present mathematical expressions for the dependence of density, viscosity, solubility and vapor pressure of NaNO 3 solutions on both salt concentration and temperature, which were determined by fitting from published measured data. Because the previous studies of thermophysical behavior of sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions can provide a basis for those of NaNO 3 solutions, we also present a comparison of thermophysical properties of both salt solutions. We have implemented the functional thermophysical properties of NaNO 3 solutions into a new TOUGH2 equation-of-state module EWASG-NaNO 3 , which is modified from a previous TOUGH2 equation-of-state module EWASG for NaCl. Using the simulation tool, we have investigated effects of the thermophysical properties on fluid flow in unsaturated media. The effect of density and viscosity of saline solutions has been long recognized. Here we focus our attention on the effect of vapor pressure lowering due to salinity. We present simulations of a one-dimensional problem to study this salinity-driven fluid flow. A number of simulations were performed using different values of thermal conductivity, permeability, and temperature, to illustrate conditions and parameters controlling these processes. Results indicate that heat conduction plays a very important role in this salinity-driven vapor diffusion by maintaining a nearly constant temperature. The smaller the permeability, the more water is transferred into the saline environment. Effects of permeability on water flow are also complicated by effects of capillary pressure and tortuosity. The

  9. Experimental and theoretical investigation on corrosion inhibition of AA5052 aluminium alloy by L-cysteine in alkaline solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Dapeng; Gao, Lixin; Zhang, Daquan; Yang, Dong; Wang, Hongxia; Lin, Tong

    2016-01-01

    The corrosion inhibition of L-cysteine on AA5052 aluminium alloy in 4 mol/L NaOH solution was investigated by hydrogen gas evolution experiment, polarisation curve, galvanostatic discharge, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements and quantum chemical calculations. The adsorption of L-cysteine on aluminium alloy surface obeyed the amended Langmuir's adsorption isotherm. The polarisation curves indicated that L-cysteine acted as a cathodic inhibitor to inhibit cathodic reaction. The inhibition mechanism was dominated by the geometric covering effect. The galvanostatic discharge shows that the additives restrain the hydrogen evolution and increase the anodic utilization rate. Quantum chemical calculations indicated that L-cysteine molecules mainly interacted with on the carboxyl groups on the aluminium alloy surface. A strong hybridization occurred between the s-orbital and p-orbital of reactive sites in the L-cysteine molecule and the sp-orbital of Aluminium. - Highlights: • L-cysteine was used as corrosion inhibitor for Al alloy in alkaline solution. • Adsorption of L-cysteine on Al alloy surface obeyed the amended Langmuir's isotherm. • L-cysteine molecules interacted with the carboxyl groups on the Al alloy surface. • A strong orbital hybridization occurred between the reactive sites in L-cysteine and Al.

  10. Experimental and theoretical investigation on corrosion inhibition of AA5052 aluminium alloy by L-cysteine in alkaline solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dapeng; Gao, Lixin [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai 200090 (China); Zhang, Daquan, E-mail: zhangdaquan@shiep.edu.cn [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai 200090 (China); Yang, Dong [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai 200090 (China); Wang, Hongxia; Lin, Tong [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3216 (Australia)

    2016-02-01

    The corrosion inhibition of L-cysteine on AA5052 aluminium alloy in 4 mol/L NaOH solution was investigated by hydrogen gas evolution experiment, polarisation curve, galvanostatic discharge, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements and quantum chemical calculations. The adsorption of L-cysteine on aluminium alloy surface obeyed the amended Langmuir's adsorption isotherm. The polarisation curves indicated that L-cysteine acted as a cathodic inhibitor to inhibit cathodic reaction. The inhibition mechanism was dominated by the geometric covering effect. The galvanostatic discharge shows that the additives restrain the hydrogen evolution and increase the anodic utilization rate. Quantum chemical calculations indicated that L-cysteine molecules mainly interacted with on the carboxyl groups on the aluminium alloy surface. A strong hybridization occurred between the s-orbital and p-orbital of reactive sites in the L-cysteine molecule and the sp-orbital of Aluminium. - Highlights: • L-cysteine was used as corrosion inhibitor for Al alloy in alkaline solution. • Adsorption of L-cysteine on Al alloy surface obeyed the amended Langmuir's isotherm. • L-cysteine molecules interacted with the carboxyl groups on the Al alloy surface. • A strong orbital hybridization occurred between the reactive sites in L-cysteine and Al.

  11. Solid-phase electrochemical reduction of graphene oxide films in alkaline solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basirun, Wan J.; Sookhakian, Mehran; Baradaran, Saeid; Mahmoudian, Mohammad R.; Ebadi, Mehdi

    2013-09-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) film was evaporated onto graphite and used as an electrode to produce electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) films by electrochemical reduction in 6 M KOH solution through voltammetric cycling. Fourier transformed infrared and Raman spectroscopy confirmed the presence of ERGO. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy characterization of ERGO and GO films in ferrocyanide/ferricyanide redox couple with 0.1 M KCl supporting electrolyte gave results that are in accordance with previous reports. Based on the EIS results, ERGO shows higher capacitance and lower charge transfer resistance compared to GO.

  12. Oxidation of D-glucose and D-fructose with oxygen in aqueous, alkaline solutions. III. Kinetic approach to the product distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wilt, H.G.J.; Kuster, Ben

    1972-01-01

    Based on a previously reported, integral reaction-scheme for the homogeneous oxidation of -glucose and -fructose with oxygen in aqueous, alkaline solutions, a kinetic model covering the product distribution has been developed. The model consists of a repeated set of reactions with constant rate

  13. Investigation of the passive behaviour of AZ31B alloy in alkaline solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fattah-alhosseini

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the passivity of AZ31B alloy in NaOH solutions was studied by potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS and Mott–Schottky analysis. Potentiodynamic polarization results indicated that decreasing NaOH concentration leads to decrease the corrosion rate of this alloy. EIS results showed that the reciprocal capacitance (1/C of the passive film is directly proportional to its thickness which increases with decreasing NaOH concentration. Therefore, it is clear that dilute NaOH solutions offer better conditions for forming the passive films with higher protection behaviour, due to the growth of a much thicker and less defective films. The Mott–Schottky analysis revealed that the passive films displayed n-type semiconductive characteristics, where the oxygen vacancies and interstitials (over the cation vacancies preponderated. Also, Mott–Schottky results showed that the donor densities evaluated from Mott–Schottky plots are in the range of 1020 cm−3 and decreased with decreasing NaOH concentration.

  14. Electrochemiluminescence of fluorescein in alkaline solution at a polycrystalline gold electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Mingjuan; Cui Hua

    2007-01-01

    The electrochemiluminescence (ECL) behavior of fluorescein at a polycrystalline gold electrode was studied under conventional cyclic voltammetric conditions. Five ECL peaks were observed at 0.94 (ECL-1), 1.51 (ECL-2), 1.34 (ECL-3), -0.06 (ECL-4), -0.73 to -1.11 V (ECL-5, a broad weak wave) (vs. SCE), respectively, on the curve of ECL intensity versus potential. These ECL peaks were found to depend on the pH of the solution, supporting electrolyte, potential scan ranges and directions. The emitter of ECL peaks was identified as fluorescein or eosin Y produced on the electrode by analyzing the ECL spectra and fluorescence spectra. The mechanisms for ECL peaks have been proposed due to the reactions of fluorescein and the electro-oxidation product of fluorescein with various oxygen-containing species in the solution or electrogenerated at different applied potentials such as O 2 , O 2 .- , HO 2 - , and BrO - . Singlet molecular oxygen was generated during the reactions and transferred its energy to the ECL emitter such as fluorescein or eosin Y, emitting light

  15. A comparison of the effect of lead nitrate on rat liver chromatin, DNA and histone proteins in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani-Chadegani, Azra; Abdosamadi, Sayeh; Fani, Nesa; Mohammadian, Shayesteh

    2009-06-01

    Although lead is widely recognized as a toxic substance in the environment and directly damage DNA, no studies are available on lead interaction with chromatin and histone proteins. In this work, we have examined the effect of lead nitrate on EDTA-soluble chromatin (SE chromatin), DNA and histones in solution using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, thermal denaturation and gel electrophoresis techniques. The results demonstrate that lead nitrate binds with higher affinity to chromatin than to DNA and produces an insoluble complex as monitored at 400 nm. Binding of lead to DNA decreases its Tm, increases its fluorescence intensity and exhibits hypochromicity at 210 nm which reveal that both DNA bases and the backbone participate in the lead-DNA interaction. Lead also binds strongly to histone proteins in the absence of DNA. The results suggest that although lead destabilizes DNA structure, in the chromatin, the binding of lead introduces some sort of compaction and aggregation, and the histone proteins play a key role in this aspect. This chromatin condensation, upon lead exposure, in turn may decrease fidelity of DNA, and inhibits DNA and RNA synthesis, the process that introduces lead toxicity at the chromatin level.

  16. Recovery of uranium from the Syrian phosphate by solid-liquid method using alkaline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlewit, H.; Alibrahim, M.

    2007-01-01

    Uranium concentrations were analyzed in the Syrian phosphate deposits. Mean concentrations were found between 50 and 110 ppm. As a consequence, an average phosphate dressing of 22 kg/ha phosphate would charge the soil with 5-20 g/ha uranium when added as a mineral fertilizer. Fine grinding phosphate produced at the Syrian mines was used for uranium recovery by carbonate leaching. The formation of the soluble uranyl tricarbonate anion UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 4- permits use of alkali solutions of sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate salts for the nearly selective dissolution of uranium from phosphate. Separation of iron, aluminum, titanium, etc., from the uranium during leaching was carried out. Formation of some small amounts of molybdates, vanadates, phosphates, aluminates, and some complexes metal was investigated. This process could be used before the manufacture of TSP fertilizer, and the final products would contain smaller uranium quantities. (author)

  17. Uranium dissolution in hyper-alkaline TMA-OH solutions: Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cachoir, C.; Salah, S.; Mennecart, T.; Lemmens, K. [Belgian Research Nuclear Centre - SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2016-07-01

    Leaching experiments were performed with depleted UO{sub 2} powders in tetramethylammonium solutions (TMA-OH) at pH 13.5 and 12.5, and at different UO{sub 2} surface area to volume of solution (SA/V) ratio's to determine the solubility and the dissolution kinetics of UO{sub 2} at high pH in absence of cations dominating cementitious waters (Ca, Na, K). The solubility of UO{sub 2} increased from pH 12.5 to 13.5 and by increasing the SA/V ratio up to 100 m{sup -1}. However, no known U secondary-phases were predicted by geochemical calculations to control the measured U-concentrations. We interpreted the UO{sub 2} dissolution process as a 2-step process. For all experiments, we observe a fast initial rate, hydroxo promoted and likely surface controlled. Afterwards the rate is apparently negative at low SA/V over time while it is positive at higher SA/V ratio's. The former is interpreted to be related to a sorption process, while the latter reveals a continuous residual dissolution process. No solubility enhancing effect of U-colloids was observed in the TMA-OH media. However, there is much less uranium colloid formation in TMA-OH tests with low Ca (Na, K) concentration than in previous tests with higher Ca (Na, K) concentrations. This suggests that the colloid formation is promoted by alkali and/or alkali-earth elements.

  18. Catalytic Activity of Urchin-like Ni nanoparticles Prepared by Solvothermal Method for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Alkaline Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, Syed Asad; Iqbal, Muhammad Ibrahim; Kim, Seong-Hoon; Jung, Kwang-Deog

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Urchin-like Ni is prepared in solvothermal reaction. • Urchin-like Ni is formed via Ni(OH) 2 aggregates in ethanol and oleylamine. • Exchange current density of urchin-like Ni is 0.191 mA cm −2 . • Urchin-like Ni exceeds the catalytic performance of commercial Pt/C in HER. - Abstract: Ni nanoparticles with different morphologies were synthesized for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in alkaline solution. Here, Ni(acac) 2 was converted into Ni metal nanoparticles in solvothermal reactions with simple alcohols and oleylamine (OAm). The morphology of the resulting Ni nanoparticles was dependent mainly on the OAm/Ni molar ratio in alcohol solvent. Aggregates of spherical Ni nanoparticles (NiEt-OAm1) were observed at the OAm/Ni molar ratio of 1.0, whereas two echinoid Ni nanoparticles (NiEt-OAm4 and NiEt-OAm6) could be prepared in ethanol at the OAm/Ni molar ratios of 4.0 and 6.0. Ni(OH) 2 formed in ethanol during a reaction time of 5 h was then reduced into echinoid Ni nanoparticles after 8 h. Echinoid Ni nanoparticles were formed by atomic addition on the tops of the multipod Ni particles formed via Ni(OH) 2 /NiO aggregates. Webbed feet-like particles (NiIPA-OAm4) with plate edges were also observed in isopropanol under the same reaction conditions. The catalytic activities of the prepared Ni nanoparticles for the hydrogen evolution reaction were evaluated in alkaline solution. The NiEt-OAm4 with urchin-like morphology was much more active than the NiIPA-OAm4 with webbed feet-like morphology. The exchange current density of Ni catalysts was increased with increasing the OAm/Ni molar ratio. The NiEt-OAm6 exhibited an exchange current of 0.191 mA cm −2 and the NiEt-OAm4 exceeded electrocatalytic performance of a commercial Pt catalysts (40% Pt on Vulcan XC 72) in a stability test for 100 kiloseconds at −1.5 V (vs. Hg/HgO) in 1.0 M NaOH due to its high stability.

  19. The anodic dissolution of SIMFUEL (UO2) in slightly alkaline sodium carbonate/bicarbonate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keech, P.G.; Goldik, J.S.; Qin, Z.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    2011-01-01

    The corrosion of nuclear fuel under waste disposal conditions is likely to be influenced by the bicarbonate/carbonate content of the groundwater since it increases the solubility of the U VI corrosion product, [UO 2 ] 2+ . As one of the half reactions involved in the corrosion process, the anodic dissolution of SIMFUEL (UO 2 ) has been studied in bicarbonate/carbonate solutions (pH 9.8) using voltammetric and potentiostatic techniques and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The reaction proceeds by two consecutive one electron transfer reactions (U IV → U V → U VI ). At low potentials (≤250 mV (vs. SCE) the rate of the first electron transfer reaction is rate determining irrespective of the total carbonate concentration. At potentials >250 mV (vs. SCE) the formation of a U VI O 2 CO 3 surface layer begins to inhibit the dissolution rate and the current becomes independent of potential indicating rate control by the chemical dissolution of this layer.

  20. Copper and brass aged at open circuit potential in slightly alkaline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procaccini, R.; Vazquez, M.; Cere, S.

    2009-01-01

    Surface oxide films were grown on 99.99% copper and brass (copper-zinc alloy, Cu77Zn21Al2) in 0.1 mol L -1 borax solution at open circuit potential and were characterized using various experimental techniques. The composition of the passive films formed in situ on the different materials was studied using differential reflectance spectroscopy. The thickness of the oxide layers on copper and brass was compared by chronopotentiometric curves and potentiodynamic reductions. The electrical properties of each oxide were analyzed by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Their influence on the oxygen reduction reaction was also investigated using voltammetry hydrodynamic tools such as the rotating disk electrode. The results show that the incorporation of Zn to Cu in brass changes the composition and the thickness of the surface film. The films grown on brass tend to be thicker but less resistive and Zn compounds incorporate to the film. This is supported by results from reflectance and impedance spectroscopy. The kinetics of oxygen reduction is strongly inhibited on oxidized electrodes, particularly in the case of brass. The global number of exchanged electrons remains close to four and seems to be independent of the presence of surface oxides.

  1. Investigation on synergism of composite additives for zinc corrosion inhibition in alkaline solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Hebing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Key Laboratory of Electrochemical Technology on Energy Storage and Power Generation of Guangdong Higher Education Institutes, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Engineering Research Center of Materials and Technology for Electrochemical Energy Storage (Ministry of Education), South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Huang Qiming; Liang Man; Lv Dongsheng; Xu Mengqing; Li Hong [Key Laboratory of Electrochemical Technology on Energy Storage and Power Generation of Guangdong Higher Education Institutes, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Engineering Research Center of Materials and Technology for Electrochemical Energy Storage (Ministry of Education), South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Li Weishan, E-mail: liwsh@scnu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Key Laboratory of Electrochemical Technology on Energy Storage and Power Generation of Guangdong Higher Education Institutes, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Engineering Research Center of Materials and Technology for Electrochemical Energy Storage (Ministry of Education), South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: {yields} An kind of environmentally benign organic composite additives is used firstly. {yields} The corrosion of zinc is inhibited used the organic compound as additive. {yields} The rate performance of the battery used the organic compound as additive is improved. {yields} The synergism of composite additives for zinc corrosion inhibition is investigated. - Abstract: The synergism of imidazole (IMZ) and poly(ethylene glycol) 600 (PEG) for zinc corrosion inhibition in 3 mol L{sup -1} KOH solution was investigated using a combination of electrochemical and gravimetric methods, and the surface morphology of the zinc was observed by scanning electron microscopy. It is found that there is a synergistic effect between IMZ and PEG for the zinc corrosion inhibition. The difference in molecular structure, ring for IMZ and chain for PEG, and in binding atoms with zinc, nitrogen in IMZ and oxygen in PEG, contributes to this synergistic effect. IMZ inhibits zinc corrosion by mainly depressing the anodic reaction, whereas PEG by depressing the cathodic reaction. The storage performance of the zinc-manganese dioxide batteries using IMZ and/or PEG as inhibitors was determined by discharge test, with a comparison of the battery using mercury as the inhibitor. The battery containing 0.05% IMZ + 0.05% PEG exhibits better performance than the mercury-containing battery, especially when discharged at high rate.

  2. Evaluation of neutronic characteristics of STACY 80-cm-diameter cylindrical core fueled with 6% enriched uranyl nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Hiroshi; Sono, Hiroki

    2003-06-01

    For the examination of neutronic safety design of forthcoming experimental core configurations in the Static Experiment Critical Facility (STACY), neutronic characteristics of 80-cm-diameter cylindrical cores fueled with 6% enriched uranyl nitrate solution have been evaluated by computational analyses. In the analyses, the latest nuclear data library, JENDL-3.3, was used as neutron cross section data. The neutron diffusion and transport calculations were performed using a diffusion code, CITATION, in the SRAC code system and a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code, MVP. Critical level heights of the cores were obtained using such parameters as uranium concentration (up to 500 gU/l), free nitric acid concentration (up to 8 mol/l), and concentration of soluble neutron poisons, gadolinium and boron. It has been confirmed from the evaluation that all critical cores comply with safety criteria required in the STACY operation concerning excess reactivity, reactivity addition rates and shutdown margins by safety rods. (author)

  3. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solutions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solution to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Determination of Uranium 7 Specific Gravity by Pycnometry 15-20 Free Acid by Oxalate Complexation 21-27 Determination of Thorium 28 Determination of Chromium 29 Determination of Molybdenum 30 Halogens Separation by Steam Distillation 31-35 Fluoride by Specific Ion Electrode 36-42 Halogen Distillate Analysis: Chloride, Bromide, and Iodide by Amperometric Microtitrimetry 43 Determination of Chloride and Bromide 44 Determination of Sulfur by X-Ray Fluorescence 45 Sulfate Sulfur by (Photometric) Turbidimetry 46 Phosphorus by the Molybdenum Blue (Photometric) Method 54-61 Silicon by the Molybdenum Blue (Photometric) Method 62-69 Carbon by Persulfate Oxidation-Acid Titrimetry 70 Conversion to U3O8 71-74 Boron by ...

  4. Direct and indirect photodegradation of estriol in the presence of humic acid, nitrate and iron complexes in water solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yong [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, North Dartmouth, MA 02747 (United States); School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhang, Kai [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, North Dartmouth, MA 02747 (United States); Zuo, Yuegang, E-mail: yzuo@umassd.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, North Dartmouth, MA 02747 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    The photochemical behavior of a natural estrogen estriol (E3) was investigated in the presence of the natural photoreactive constituents including nitrate, iron(III), and humic acid (HA). The direct photodegradation of E3 increased with increasing incident light intensity, decreasing initial concentration of E3 and increasing pH in the range of 6.0 to 10.0. The direct photodegradation of the deprotonated speciation of E3 was much faster than that of its protonated form. The presence of NO{sub 3}{sup −} and iron(III) promoted the photochemical loss of E3 in the aqueous solutions. The quenching experiments verified that hydroxyl radicals were predominantly responsible for the indirect photodegradation of E3. HA could act as photosensitizer, light screening agent and free radical quencher. For the first time, the enhancement or inhibition effect of HA on photodegradation was found to depend on the irradiation light intensity. HA enhanced the photodegradation of E3 under sunlight or weak irradiation of simulated sunlight. In contrast, under high irradiation light intensity, HA inhibited the photodegradation. The hydroxylation photoproducts were identified using GC-MS and the photodegradation pathway of E3 was proposed. - Highlights: • Direct and indirect photodegradation of estriol (E3) were first investigated. • The direct photodegradation of E3 increased with increasing pH of the solutions. • The light intensity affected the photosensitization effect of humic acid. • Nitrate and iron(III) promoted the photodecomposition of estriol in water. • The ·OH oxidation products of E3 was first determined.

  5. Anodic dissolution of UO2 in slightly alkaline sodium perchlorate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunder, S.; Strandlund, L.K.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    1996-04-01

    The anodic dissolution of UO 2 has been studied in aqueous sodium perchlorate solutions at pH ∼ 9.5. Under potentiostatic conditions two distinct regions of oxidation/dissolution behaviour were observed. In the potential (E) range 0.100 V A , Q C respectively) obtained by integration of the anodic current-time plots (Q A ) and cathodic potential scans to reduce accumulated oxidized surface films (Q C ), it was shown that > ∼ 90% of the anodic oxidation current went to produce these films. For E > ∼ 0.350 V, steady-state currents were obtained and measurements of Q A and Q C showed the majority of the current went to produce soluble species. The film blocking anodic dissolution appeared to be either UO 2.27 or, more probably, UO 3 .2H 2 O located primarily at grain boundaries. It is proposed that, at the higher potentials, rapid oxidation and dissolution followed by the hydrolysis of dissolved uranyl species leads to the development of acidic conditions in the grain boundaries. At these lower pH values the UO 3 .2H 2 O is soluble and therefore does not accumulate. Alternatively, if this oxide has been formed by prior oxidation at a lower potential, the formation of protons on oxidizing at E > ∼ 0.350V causes its redissolution, allowing the current to rise to a steady-state value. On the basis of Tafel slopes, an attempt was made to demonstrate that the observed behaviour was consistent with dissolution under acidic conditions. This analysis was only partially successful. (author) 34 refs. 11 figs

  6. Nitrate conversion and supercritical fluid extraction of UO{sub 2}-CeO{sub 2} solid solution prepared by an electrolytic reduction-coprecipitation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, L.Y. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Inst. of Nuclear and New Energy Technology; China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China); Duan, W.H.; Wen, M.F.; Xu, J.M.; Zhu, Y.J. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Inst. of Nuclear and New Energy Technology

    2014-04-01

    A low-waste technology for the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) has been developed recently, which involves the conversion of actinide and lanthanide oxides with liquid N{sub 2}O{sub 4} into their nitrates followed by supercritical fluid extraction of the nitrates. The possibility of the reprocessing of SNF from high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) with nitrate conversion and supercritical fluid extraction is a current area of research in China. Here, a UO{sub 2}-CeO{sub 2} solid solution was prepared as a surrogate for a UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} solid solution, and the recovery of U and Ce from the UO{sub 2}-CeO{sub 2} solid solution with liquid N{sub 2}O{sub 4} and supercritical CO{sub 2} containing tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) was investigated. The UO{sub 2}-CeO{sub 2} solid solution prepared by electrolytic reduction-coprecipitation method had square plate microstructures. The solid solution after heat treatment was completely converted into nitrates with liquid N{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The XRD pattern of the nitrates was similar to that of UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} . 3H{sub 2}O. After 120 min of online extraction at 25 MPa and 50 , 99.98% of the U and 98.74% of the Ce were recovered from the nitrates with supercritical CO{sub 2} containing TBP. The results suggest a promising potential technology for the reprocessing of SNF from HTGRs. (orig.)

  7. Microstructure characteristic of ceramic coatings fabricated on magnesium alloys by micro-arc oxidation in alkaline silicate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, H.F. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)]. E-mail: Guohf@hit.edu.cn; An, M.Z. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)]. E-mail: mzan@hit.edu.cn; Huo, H.B. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Xu, S. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wu, L.J. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2006-09-15

    Micro-arc oxidation (MAO) of AZ31B magnesium alloys was studied in alkaline silicate solutions at constant applied current densities. The microstructure, phase composition and elemental distribution of ceramic coatings were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDX). There are two inflections in the voltage-time response, three regions were identifiable and each of the regions was almost linear. The pores with different shapes distributed all over the coating surface, the number of the pores was decreasing, while the diameter was apparently increasing with prolonged MAO treatment time. There were also cracks on the coating surface, resulting from the rapid solidification of the molten oxide. The ceramic coating was comprised of two layers, an outer loose layer and an inner dense layer. The ceramic coating was mainly composed of forsterite phase Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and MgO; the formation of MgO was similar to conversional anodizing technology, while formation of Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} was attributed to a high temperature phase transformation reaction. Presence of Si and O indicated that the electrolyte components had intensively incorporated into coatings.

  8. Extraction of Zinc and Manganese from Alkaline and Zinc-Carbon Spent Batteries by Citric-Sulphuric Acid Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Ferella

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on the recovery of zinc and manganese from alkaline and zinc-carbon spent batteries. Metals are extracted by sulphuric acid leaching in the presence of citric acid as reducing agent. Leaching tests are carried out according to a 24 full factorial design, and empirical equations for Mn and Zn extraction yields are determined from experimental data as a function of pulp density, sulphuric acid concentration, temperature, and citric acid concentration. The highest values experimentally observed for extraction yields were 97% of manganese and 100% of zinc, under the following operating conditions: temperature 40∘C, pulp density 20%, sulphuric acid concentration 1.8 M, and citric acid 40 g L-1. A second series of leaching tests is also performed to derive other empirical models to predict zinc and manganese extraction. Precipitation tests, aimed both at investigating precipitation of zinc during leaching and at evaluating recovery options of zinc and manganese, show that a quantitative precipitation of zinc can be reached but a coprecipitation of nearly 30% of manganese also takes place. The achieved results allow to propose a battery recycling process based on a countercurrent reducing leaching by citric acid in sulphuric solution.

  9. In situ surface X-ray diffraction study of ultrathin epitaxial Co films on Au(111) in alkaline solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reikowski, Finn; Maroun, Fouad; Di, Nan; Allongue, Philippe; Ruge, Martin; Stettner, Jochim; Magnussen, Olaf M.

    2016-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of ultrathin electrodeposited Co films on Au(111) in alkaline electrolyte was studied using in situ surface X-ray scattering techniques employing synchrotron radiation and complementary optical reflectivity and electrochemical measurements. The films are formed at pH 4 and consist of (001)-oriented hcp Co crystallites that are several nm high, a few ten nm in diameter, and remain largely unchanged after electrolyte exchange to pH 12 solution. In the pre-oxidation peak only minor changes were observed in the diffraction studies, excluding the formation of Co(OH)_2 layers. In the potential regime of Co hydroxide formation a rapid reduction of the amount of Co is observed, while the characteristic height of the islands decreases only slightly. On longer times scales, growth of 3D crystals of Co(OH)_2 occurs as well as irreversible Co dissolution into the electrolyte is found. On the basis of the structural observations oxidation of the Co film is proposed to proceed via fast formation of an ultrathin passivating layer, followed by nucleation and growth of 3D hydroxide crystals at the grain boundaries in the Co deposit.

  10. Porous boron doped diamonds as metal-free catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suo, Ni; Huang, Hao; Wu, Aimin; Cao, Guozhong; Hou, Xiaoduo; Zhang, Guifeng

    2018-05-01

    Porous boron doped diamonds (BDDs) were obtained on foam nickel substrates with a porosity of 80%, 85%, 90% and 95% respectively by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) technology. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals that uniform and compact BDDs with a cauliflower-like morphology have covered the overall frame of the foam nickel substrates. Raman spectroscopy shows that the BDDs have a poor crystallinity due to heavily doping boron. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis effectively demonstrates that boron atoms can be successfully incorporated into the crystal lattice of diamonds. Electrochemical measurements indicate that the oxygen reduction potential is unaffected by the specific surface area (SSA), and both the onset potential and the limiting diffusion current density are enhanced with increasing SSA. It is also found that the durability and methanol tolerance of the boron doped diamond catalysts are attenuated as the increasing of SSA. The SSA of the catalyst is directly proportional to the oxygen reduction activity and inversely to the durability and methanol resistance. These results provide a reference to the application of porous boron doped diamonds as potential cathodic catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline solution by adjusting the SSA.

  11. A fuel-cell reactor for the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide alkaline solutions from H(2) and O(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Ichiro; Onisawa, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Toshikazu; Murayama, Toru

    2011-04-18

    The effects of the type of fuel-cell reactors (undivided or divided by cation- and anion-exchange membranes), alkaline electrolytes (LiOH, NaOH, KOH), vapor-grown carbon fiber (VGCF) cathode components (additives: none, activated carbon, Valcan XC72, Black Pearls 2000, Seast-6, and Ketjen Black), and the flow rates of anolyte (0, 1.5, 12 mL h(-1)) and catholyte (0, 12 mL h(-1)) on the formation of hydrogen peroxide were studied. A divided fuel-cell system, O(2) (g)|VGCF-XC72 cathode|2 M NaOH catholyte|cation-exchange membrane (Nafion-117)|Pt/XC72-VGCF anode|2 M NaOH anolyte at 12 mL h(-1) flow|H(2) (g), was effective for the selective formation of hydrogen peroxide, with 130 mA cm(-2) , a 2 M aqueous solution of H(2)O(2)/NaOH, and a current efficiency of 95 % at atmospheric pressure and 298 K. The current and formation rate gradually decreased over a long period of time. The cause of the slow decrease in electrocatalytic performance was revealed and the decrease was stopped by a flow of catholyte. Cyclic voltammetry studies at the VGCF-XC72 electrode indicated that fast diffusion of O(2) from the gas phase to the electrode, and quick desorption of hydrogen peroxide from the electrode to the electrolyte were essential for the efficient formation of solutions of H(2)O(2)/NaOH. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Experimental evaluation of ammonia adiabatic absorption into ammonia–lithium nitrate solution using a fog jet nozzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacarías, Alejandro; Venegas, María; Lecuona, Antonio; Ventas, Rubén

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental assessment of the adiabatic absorption of ammonia vapour into an ammonia–lithium nitrate solution using a fog jet nozzle. The ammonia mass fraction was kept constant at 46.08% and the absorber pressure was varied in the range 355–411 kPa. The nozzle was located at the top of the absorption chamber, at a height of 205 mm measured from the bottom surface. The diluted solution flow rate was modified between 0.04 and 0.08 kg s −1 and the solution inlet temperature in the range 25.9–30.2 °C. The influence of these variables on the approach to adiabatic equilibrium factor, outlet subcooling, absorption ratio and mass transfer coefficient is analysed. The approach to adiabatic equilibrium factor for the conditions essayed is always between 0.82 and 0.93. Pressure drop of the solution entering the absorption chamber is also evaluated. Correlations for the approach to adiabatic equilibrium factor and the Sherwood number are given. - Highlights: ► Adiabatic absorption of NH 3 vapour into NH 3 –LiNO 3 using fog jet nozzle created spray. ► Pressure drop of the solution entering to the absorption chamber is evaluated. ► Approach to adiabatic equilibrium factor (F) is between 0.82 and 0.93 at 205 mm height. ► Experimental values of mass transfer coefficient and outlet subcooling are presented. ► Correlations for F and Sherwood number are given.

  13. Radiation-chemical behaviour of Rh(4) in perchlorate and nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirova, M.V.; Khalkina, E.V.

    1994-01-01

    Kinetic of rhodium(4) reduction in the process of radiolysis in solutions of perchloric (0.6-3.2 mol/l) and nitric (2-9 mol/l) acids with rhodium (4) concentration (0.4-5)x10 -3 mol/l has been studied. Irradiation of the solutions was carried out using a 60 Co source with dose rate of 3.5 Gy/s in the absorbed dose range up to 10 4 Gy. A mechanism of radiation-chemical reduction of rhodium(4) in perchloric and nitric acid solutions in suggested, the reason for high radiation-chemical yields of reduction is discussed. 7 refs.; 9 figs.; 2 tabs

  14. Corrosion of type 304L stainless steel in boiling dilute neptunium nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motooka, Takafumi; Kiuchi, Kiyoshi

    2003-01-01

    Corrosion of type 304L stainless steel in nitric acid solution containing neptunium was studied under immersion and heat-transfer condition. Corrosion rates of stainless steel were obtained by the weight loss measurement and the quantitative analysis of metallic ions dissolved in solution. The surface morphology was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The corrosion acceleration mechanism was investigated by polarization measurement and spectrophotometry. The corrosion rate in boiling 9M nitric acid was accelerated by addition of neptunium. The corrosion of stainless steel was promoted under heat-transfer condition compared to immersion condition. In polarization measurements, the cathodic current was increased by addition of neptunium. Spectrophotometric measurements showed the oxidization of neptunium in boiling nitric acid. It was suggested that the accelerated corrosion in nitric acid solution containing neptunium was caused by re-oxidation of neptunium. (author)

  15. Electrochemical studies of plutonium(IV) complexes in aqueous nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong-Yun; Asakura, Toshihide; Morita, Yasuji

    2005-01-01

    Electrochemistry has been used to investigate the behavior of plutonium (IV) in 1-7 M HNO 3 solutions. These Pu(IV) complexes were found to be reduced quasi-reversibly to Pu(III) species. The formal redox potentials (E 0 ) for Pu(IV)/Pu(III) couples were determined to be +0.721, +0.712, +0.706, +0.705, +0.704, 0.694, and +0.696 V (vs. Ag/AgCl(SSE)) for Pu(IV) complexes in 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 M HNO 3 solutions, respectively. These results indicate that the reduction product of Pu(IV) is Pu(III), which is considerably stable in HNO 3 solution. (author)

  16. Cementation of nitrate solutions by alkali-activated slag-metakaolin cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakhimova, N.R.; Rakhimov, R.Z.; Naumkina, N.I.; Gubaidullina, A.M.; Yakovlev, G.I.; Shaybadullina, A.V.

    2015-01-01

    This paper considered the feasibility of solidification of liquid salt wastes by NaNO 3 solutions of concentration 100-700 g/l by alkali-activated slag (AASC) and alkali-activated slag-meta-kaolin cements (AASMC). The AASC (activated by 5% Na 2 O) and AASMC (activated by 5% Na 2 O and introduced with 5% of MK) mixed with NaNO 3 solutions were more effective in comparison with Portland cement. The compressive strength of hardened AASC and AASMC pastes was 1.6-12. and 7- 21 MPa in 3-day age and 13.4-31 and 20-37 MPa in 28-day age, respectively, depending on concentration of NaNO 3 solution. The incorporation of 3-5% meta-kaolin in AASC: (i) increased the compressive strength of hardened AASMC pastes up to 50% depending on the type of meta-kaolin, (ii) shortened setting times of fresh AASMC pastes

  17. Interactions between nitrate and chloride in nutrient solutions for substrate grown tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, W.; Sonneveld, C.

    2004-01-01

    In two successive experiments tomato was grown at different Cl and NO3 concentrations in the root environment with rockwool as a sub-strate. The EC value in the nutrient solution was fairly constant, varying between 3.5 and 4.0 dS m-1 in all treatments. The NO3 concentrations in the treatments

  18. Simultaneous high-performance liquid chromatographic determination of nitrate, nitrite, and organic pesticides in soil solution using a multidimensional column with ultraviolet detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nkedi-Kizza, P.; Owusu-Yaw, J.

    1992-01-01

    In many fertilizer trials, the amount of nitrate-nitrogen in soil solution must be quantified frequently because nitrate is easily leached. Because pesticides are generally applied to cropland with fertilizers, quantitative information is needed on the concentration of these chemicals still available in the soil. Information on nitrite, nitrate and pesticide concentrations in food, water and environmental samples is essential because of their toxicity and potential for groundwater and surface water contamination. Most of the methods currently used for nitrate determination also account for nitrite, because nitrite and some organics act as interferences. Some of the existing analytical methods require sample reduction or derivatization, complex solvent mixtures or large sample volumes which make analysis times long. A High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of nitrate, nitrite and organic pesticides in soil solution samples and extracts using a multidimensional separator column with ultraviolet detection at 220 nm. The method is rapid and requires small sample volumes (20 μL). It is a sensitive method which is suitable for routine analyses of up to 100 samples per day. A comparison of this method with standard ion chromatography with conductivity detection showed very good agreement between the two methods for the analysis of NO3- and NO2-

  19. The effect of stocking rate on soil solution nitrate concentrations beneath a free-draining dairy production system in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, J; Delaby, L; Hennessy, D; McCarthy, B; Ryan, W; Pierce, K M; Brennan, A; Horan, B

    2015-06-01

    Economically viable and productive farming systems are required to meet the growing worldwide need for agricultural produce while at the same time reducing environmental impact. Within grazing systems of animal production, increasing concern exists as to the effect of intensive farming on potential N losses to ground and surface waters, which demands an appraisal of N flows within complete grass-based dairy farming systems. A 3-yr (2011 to 2013) whole-farm system study was conducted on a free-draining soil type that is highly susceptible to N loss under temperate maritime conditions. Soil solution concentrations of N from 3 spring-calving, grass-based systems designed to represent 3 alternative whole-farm stocking rate (SR) treatments in a post-milk quota situation in the European Union were compared: low (2.51 cows/ha), medium (2.92 cows/ha), and high SR (3.28 cows/ha). Each SR had its own farmlet containing 18 paddocks and 23 cows. Nitrogen loss from each treatment was measured using ceramic cups installed to a depth of 1m to sample the soil water. The annual and monthly average nitrate, nitrite, ammonia, and total N concentrations in soil solution collected were analyzed for each year using a repeated measures analysis. Subsequently, and based on the biological data collated from each farm system treatment within each year, the efficiency of N use was evaluated using an N balance model. Based on similar N inputs, increasing SR resulted in increased grazing efficiency and milk production per hectare. Stocking rate had no significant effect on soil solution concentrations of nitrate, nitrite, ammonia, or total N (26.0, 0.2, 2.4, and 32.3 mg/L, respectively). An N balance model evaluation of each treatment incorporating input and output data indicated that the increased grass utilization and milk production per hectare at higher SR resulted in a reduction in N surplus and increased N use efficiency. The results highlight the possibility for the sustainable

  20. Experimental assessment of ammonia adiabatic absorption into ammonia-lithium nitrate solution using a flat fan nozzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacarias, A.; Venegas, M.; Ventas, R.; Lecuona, A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental evaluation of the adiabatic absorption of ammonia vapour into ammonia-lithium nitrate solution using a flat fan nozzle and an upstream single-pass subcooler. Data are representative of the working conditions of adiabatic absorbers in absorption chillers. The nozzle was located at the top of the absorption chamber, separated 205 mm from the bottom surface. The diluted solution mass flow rate was modified between 0.04 and 0.08 kg/s and the solution inlet temperature between 24.5 and 29.7 o C. The influence of these variables on the absorption ratio, mass transfer coefficient, outlet subcooling and approach to equilibrium factor is analysed in the present paper. A linear relation between the inlet subcooling and the absorption ratio is observed. The approach to equilibrium factor for the conditions essayed is always between 0.81 and 0.89. Mass transfer coefficients and correlations for the approach to equilibrium factor and the Sherwood number are obtained. Results are compared with other ones reported in the literature. - Highlights: → Adiabatic absorption of NH 3 vapour into NH 3 -LiNO 3 using flat fan nozzle created spray. → A linear relation exists between solution inlet subcooling and absorption ratio. → The approach to equilibrium factor is always between 0.81 and 0.89 at 205 mm height. → Experimental values of mass transfer coefficient and outlet subcooling are presented. → Correlations for the approach to equilibrium factor and the Sherwood number are given.

  1. Hydrogen generation by aluminum corrosion in aqueous alkaline solutions of inorganic promoters: The AlHidrox process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macanas, Jorge; Soler, Lluis; Candela, Angelica Maria; Munoz, Maria; Casado, Juan

    2011-01-01

    The research of alternative processes to obtain clean fuels has become a main issue because of the concerns related to the current energy system, both from economical and environmental points of view. Hydrogen storage and production methods are being investigated for stationary and portable applications. Up to now, a significant part of H 2 production on demand was thought to be fulfilled by using chemical hydrides, but recent studies have proved the limitations of this approach. Conversely, H 2 production based in the corrosion of light metals in water solutions is an interesting alternative. Among all of them, Al is probably the most adequate metal for energetic purposes due to its high electron density and oxidation potential. But concerning H 2 production from Al corrosion in water, a major issue remains unsolved: metal passivation due to the formation of Al(OH) 3 inhibits H 2 evolution. In this work we show the last results obtained for the generation of H 2 from water using Al powder using diverse alkaline solutions. It is confirmed that corrosion is not affected solely by the solution pH but also by the nature of the ionic species found in the aqueous medium. Moreover, we describe the AlHidrox process, which minimizes Al passivation under mild conditions by the addition of different inorganic salts as corrosion promoters, allowing 100% yields and flow rates up to 2.9 L/min per gram of Al. The feasibility of the process has been regarded in terms of stability (by conducting several successive runs) and self-initiation without an external heating. -- Highlights: → The AlHidrox process minimizes Al passivation by the addition of inorganic salts. → Al corrosion to produce H 2 greatly depends on the nature of the dissolved species. → The maximum flow achieved was 2.9 dm 3 H 2 min -1 .per gram of Al using Fe 2 (SO 4 ) 3 . → We found conditions to start up H 2 generation without external energy input.

  2. Method of denitrification and stabilization of radioactive aqueous solutions of radioisotope nitrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecak, V.; Matous, V.

    1983-01-01

    The method is solved of denitrification and of the stabilization of aqueous solutions of radioactive isotopes produced during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel. The aqueous solution is first mixed with the vitreous component, most frequently phosphoric acid, ammonium phosphate or boric acid and if needed with the addition of alkalis, possibly with clarifying or anti-foam components, e.g., arsenic trioxide, antimony or cerium oxide. The mixture is further adjusted with ammonia to pH 5 - 9. The liquid mixture is then thermally and pyrolytically processed, e.g., by calcinator or fluid-bed reactor or by pot melting at temperatures of 3O0 to 900 degC while of a powder product or glass melt is formed in the presence of gaseous emissions composed of nitrous oxide - nitrogen. The resulting product is further processed by containerization or is sealed in a metal matrix. (B.S.)

  3. The system uranyl nitrate-dietyl ether-water. Extraction by water in spray and packed columns from uranyl nitrate-either solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Luina, A.; Gutierrez Jodra, L.

    1960-01-01

    This paper is a continuation of the one published in Chemical Engineering Progress. Symposium Series, 50, n. 12, 127 (1954). New runs for spray columns, are given and other concentrations in uranyl nitrate for the packed columns. New correlations for the overall H.T.U. are also given. The individual H.T.U. have been grapycally calculated and show that the film resistances have similar values, being independent of the concentration of the ether phase. (Author) 24 refs

  4. Three-dimensional iron, nitrogen-doped carbon foams as efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Yanjiao; Wang, Hui; Feng, Hanqing; Ji, Shan; Mao, Xuefeng; Wang, Rongfang

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Three-dimentional Fe, N-doped carbon foams prepared by two steps exhibited comparable catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction to commercial Pt/C due to the unique structure and the synergistic effect of Fe and N atoms. - Highlights: • Three-dimensional Fe, N-doped carbon foam (3D-CF) were prepared. • 3D-CF exhibits comparable catalytic activity to Pt/C for oxygen reduction reaction. • The enhanced activity of 3D-CF results of its unique structure. - Abstract: Three-dimensional (3D) Fe, N-doped carbon foams (3D-CF) as efficient cathode catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline solution are reported. The 3D-CF exhibit interconnected hierarchical pore structure. In addition, Fe, N-doped carbon without porous strucuture (Fe-N-C) and 3D N-doped carbon without Fe (3D-CF’) are prepared to verify the electrocatalytic activity of 3D-CF. The electrocatalytic performance of as-prepared 3D-CF for ORR shows that the onset potential on 3D-CF electrode positively shifts about 41 mV than those of 3D-CF’ and Fe-N-C respectively. In addition, the onset potential on 3D-CF electrode for ORR is about 27 mV more negative than that on commercial Pt/C electrode. 3D-CF also show better methanol tolerance and durability than commercial Pt/C catalyst. These results show that to synthesize 3D hierarchical pores with high specific surface area is an efficient way to improve the ORR performance

  5. Spectrophotometric determination of copper in alkaline solutions and evaluation of some hydroxy-substituted 1,10-phenanthrolines as chromogenic reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, W E; Schilt, A A

    1972-09-01

    Seven new hydroxy-substituted 1,10-phenanthroline derivatives have been evaluated as chromogenic reagents for the determination of copper in strongly alkaline solution. The most sensitive of these, 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-dihydroxy-1,10-phenanthroline, has proven to be highly effective in a simple, rapid procedure for determining trace amounts of copper in sodium hydroxide, potassium carbonate, sodium phosphate or ammonium hydroxide.

  6. Enhanced electrical stability of nitrate ligand-based hexaaqua complexes solution-processed ultrathin a-IGZO transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, C.; Baek, Y.; Lee, B. M.; Kim, K. H.; Rim, Y. S.

    2017-12-01

    We report solution-processed, amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide-based (a-IGZO-based) thin-film transistors (TFTs). Our proposed solution-processed a-IGZO films, using a simple spin-coating method, were formed through nitrate ligand-based metal complexes, and they were annealed at low temperature (250 °C) to achieve high-quality oxide films and devices. We investigated solution-processed a-IGZO TFTs with various thicknesses, ranging from 4 to 16 nm. The 4 nm-thick TFT films had smooth morphology and high-density, and they exhibited excellent performance, i.e. a high saturation mobility of 7.73  ±  0.44 cm2 V-1 s-1, a sub-threshold swing of 0.27 V dec-1, an on/off ratio of ~108, and a low threshold voltage of 3.10  ±  0.30 V. However, the performance of the TFTs degraded as the film thickness was increased. We further performed positive and negative bias stress tests to examine their electrical stability, and it was noted that the operating behavior of the devices was highly stable. Despite a small number of free charges, the high performance of the ultrathin a-IGZO TFTs was attributed to the small effect of the thickness of the channel, low bulk resistance, the quality of the a-IGZO/SiO2 interface, and high film density.

  7. The Influence of Mg(II and Ca(II Ions on Rutin Autoxidation in Weakly Alkaline Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živanović Slavoljub C.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rutin (quercetin-3-O-rutinoside is one of the most abundant bioflavonoids with various biological and pharmacological activities. Considering the ubiquitous presence of Mg(II and Ca(II ions in biological systems we decided to investigate their influence on the autoxidation of rutin in weakly alkaline aqueous solutions. Changes in UV-Vis spectra recorded during the rutin autoxidation in aqueous solution at pH 8.4 revealed that this process was very slow in the absence of metal ions. The presence of Mg(II and, especially Ca(II ion, increased the transformation rate of rutin. UV-Vis spectra recorded after prolonged autoxidation indicated the formation of humic acidlike products in the presence of Mg(II and Ca(II ions. Four new compounds formed during the initial stage of rutin autoxidation in the presence of Mg(II and Ca(II ions were detected by HPLCDAD. Based on the analysis of their DAD UV-Vis spectra and comparison of their retention times with the retention time value for rutin, we concluded that the initial rutin transformation products were formed by the water addition on double bond in ring C and hydroxylation of ring B. A very small decrease of the initial rutin concentration (4% was observed by HPLC-DAD in the absence of metal ions for the period of 90 minutes. However, rutin concentration decrease was much larger in the presence of Mg(II and Ca(II ions (14% and 24%, respectively. The more pronounced effect of Ca(II ion on the rutin autoxidation may be explained by the stronger binding of Mg(II ion to rutin and thus greater stabilizing effect on reaction intermediates caused by its higher ionic potential (charge/ionic radius ratio in comparison to Ca(II ion. The results of this study may contribute to the better understanding of interactions of Mg(II and Ca(II ions with natural phenolic antioxidants which are important for their various biological activities.

  8. Reaction of ammonium triphosphate with gadolinium nitrate in aqueous solution at 273K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodicheva, G.V.; Tananaev, I.V.; Romanova, N.M.

    1982-01-01

    The solubility in the system (NW 4 ) 5 P 3 O 10 -Gd(NO 3 ) 3 - H 2 O (273 K) is studied. Depending on the reagent ratio formation of the compounds Gd 5 (P 3 O 10 ) 3 x22H 2 O, NH 4 Gd 3 (P 3 O 10 ) 2 x12H 2 O and (NH 4 ) 3 Gd 4 (P 3 O 10 ) 3 x14H 2 O is established. Gadolinium triphosphates, separated from solution, are studied using the methods of paper chromatography, X-ray diffractometry, thermography. Simultaneously with thermal dehydration of gadolinium triphosphates the processes of triphosphate decomposition and phosphate anion condensation take place. A mixture of crystalline ortho-phosphate and long- chain polyphosphate of gadolinium is the final product of thermal decomposition (1063 K) of normal and doubl e ammonium- containing gadolinium triphosphates [ru

  9. Chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    These analytical procedures are designed to show whether a given material meets the purchaser's specifications as to plutonium content, effective fissile content, and impurity content. The following procedures are described in detail: plutonium by controlled-potential coulometry; plutonium by amperometric titration with iron(II); free acid by titration in an oxalate solution; free acid by iodate precipitation-potentiometric titration method; uranium by Arsenazo I spectrophotometric method; thorium by thorin spectrophotometric method; iron by 1,10-phenanthroline spectrophotometric method; chloride by thiocyanate spectrophotometric method; fluoride by distillation-spectrophotometric method; sulfate by barium sulfate turbidimetric method; isotopic composition by mass spectrometry; americium-241 by extraction and gamma counting; americium-241 by gamma counting; gamma-emitting fission products, uranium, and thorium by gamma-ray spectroscopy; rare earths by copper spark spectrochemical method; tungsten, niobium (columbium), and tantalum by spectrochemical method; simple preparation by spectrographic analysis for general impurities

  10. Differential nitrate accumulation, nitrate reduction, nitrate reductase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, the effects of potassium nitrate were higher than sodium nitrate, which was due to the positive effects of potassium on the enzyme activity, sugars transport, water and nutrient transport, protein synthesis and carbohydrate metabolism. In conclusion, potassium nitrate has better effect on the nitrate assimilatory ...

  11. The interplay between hydrogen evolution reaction and nitrate reduction on boron-doped diamond in aqueous solution: the effect of alkali cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzo-Robledo, A.; Lévy-Clément, C.; Alonso-Vante, N.

    2014-01-01

    The nitrate ion reduction was studied on boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrodes by real-time on-line differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS) coupled with chronoamperometry in K + , Na + cation-containing electrolyte solutions. It was found, via steady state voltammetry, that the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) was affected by the presence of K + or Na + . A moderate HER occurs in K + -containing electrolyte solution favoring the reaction between NO 3 − and H 2 species, whereas in Na + -containing electrolyte solutions, the HER kinetics was more important leading to a suppression of molecular nitrogen generation. The use of isotope-labeled nitrogen and DEMS confirmed the influence of alkali cations toward the nitrate ion reduction

  12. Re-passivation Potential of Alloy 22 in Chloride plus Nitrate Solutions using the Potentiodynamic-Galvano-static-Potentiostatic Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Kenneth J.; Rebak, Raul B.

    2007-01-01

    In general, the susceptibility of Alloy 22 to suffer crevice corrosion is measured using the Cyclic Potentiodynamic Polarization (CPP) technique. This is a fast technique that gives rather accurate and reproducible values of re-passivation potential (ER1) in most cases. In the fringes of susceptibility, when the environment is not highly aggressive, the values of re-passivation potential using the CPP technique may not be highly reproducible, especially because the technique is fast. To circumvent this, the re-passivation potential of Alloy 22 was measured using a slower method that combines Potentiodynamic-Galvano-static-Potentiostatic steps (called here the Tsujikawa-Hisamatsu Electrochemical or THE method). The THE method applies the charge to the specimen in a more controlled way, which may give more reproducible re-passivation potential values, especially when the environment is not aggressive. The values of re-passivation potential of Alloy 22 in sodium chloride plus potassium nitrate solutions were measured using the THE and CPP methods. Results show that both methods yield similar values of re-passivation potential, especially under aggressive conditions. (authors)

  13. Effect of temperature on the extraction of europium (III) bymixtures of neutral phosphoro-organic extractants from nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milchlin, E.B.; Khmuran, M.A.; Mikhailichenko, A.I.

    1986-01-01

    A study has been made of the distribution of microquantities of europium (III) on extraction with neutral phosphoorganic compounds-tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP), diisooctylmethyl phosphonate (DIOMP),trialkylphosphine oxide with dissimilar radicals (PODR), or mixtures thereof-from a solution of 2 mole/liter NH 4 NO 3 and 0.01 mole/liter HNO 3 , in the temperature range 20-60 0 C. A temperature rise results in a decrease of the distribution coefficients of the europium on extraction by all of the extractants tested and their mixtures, and also in a reduction of the synergistic effect in extraction by mixtures of the extractants. Based on an investigation of the temperature dependences of the distribution constants of europium nitrate upon extraction by TBP, DIOMP, PODR, or their mixtures, values have been determined for the enthalpy, free energy, and entropy of extraction. It is shown that the enthalpy (-ΔH) increases in the order TBP< DIOMP< PODR. In an extraction with mixed extractants, the enthalpy has a value intermediate between those with the individual extractants. The entropy of extraction (-ΔS) increases in the reverse order PODR< DIOMP< TBP

  14. Purification of alkali metal nitrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Gregory, Kevin M.

    1985-05-14

    A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

  15. An investigation to compare the performance of methods for the determination of free acid in highly concentrated solutions of plutonium and uranium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crossley, D.

    1980-08-01

    An investigation has been carried out to compare the performance of the direct titration method and the indirect mass balance method, for the determination of free acid in highly concentrated solutions of uranium nitrate and plutonium nitrate. The direct titration of free acid with alkali is carried out in a fluoride medium to avoid interference from the hydrolysis of uranium or plutonium, while free acid concentration by the mass balance method is obtained by calculation from the metal concentration, metal valency state, and total nitrate concentration in a sample. The Gran plot end-point prediction technique has been used extensively in the investigation to gain information concerning the hydrolysis of uranium and plutonium in fluoride media and in other complexing media. The use of the Gran plot technique has improved the detection of the end-point of the free acid titration which gives an improvement in the precision of the determination. The experimental results obtained show that there is good agreement between the two methods for the determination of free acidity, and that the precision of the direct titration method in a fluoride medium using the Gran plot technique to detect the end-point is 0.75% (coefficient of variation), for a typical separation plant plutonium nitrate solution. The performance of alternative complexing agents in the direct titration method has been studied and is discussed. (author)

  16. Evaluation of layered zinc hydroxide nitrate and zinc/nickel double hydroxide salts in the removal of chromate ions from solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortolaz de Oliveira, Henrique; Wypych, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Layered zinc hydroxide nitrate (ZnHN) and Zn/Ni layered double hydroxide salts were synthesized and used to remove chromate ions from solutions at pH 8.0. The materials were characterized by many instrumental techniques before and after chromate ion removal. ZnHN decomposed after contact with the chromate solution, whereas the layered structure of Zn/Ni hydroxide nitrate (Zn/NiHN) and Zn/Ni hydroxide acetate (Zn/NiHA) remained their layers intact after the topotactic anionic exchange reaction, only changing the basal distances. ZnHN, Zn/NiHN, and Zn/NiHA removed 210.1, 144.8, and 170.1 mg of CrO 4 2− /g of material, respectively. Although the removal values obtained for Zn/NiHN and Zn/NiHA were smaller than the values predicted for the ideal formulas of the solids (194.3 and 192.4 mg of CrO 4 2− /g of material, respectively), the measured capacities were higher than the values achieved with many materials reported in the literature. Kinetic experiments showed the removal reaction was fast. To facilitate the solid/liquid separation process after chromium removal, Zn/Ni layered double hydroxide salts with magnetic supports were also synthesized, and their ability to remove chromate was evaluated. - Highlights: • Zinc hydroxide nitrate and Zn/Ni hydroxide nitrate or acetate were synthesized. • The interlayer anions were replaced by chromate anions at pH=8.0. • Only Zn/Ni hydroxide nitrate or acetate have the structure preserved after exchange. • Fast exchange reaction and high capacity of chromate removal were observed. • Magnetic materials were obtained to facilitate the solids removal the from solutions.

  17. Evaluation of layered zinc hydroxide nitrate and zinc/nickel double hydroxide salts in the removal of chromate ions from solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bortolaz de Oliveira, Henrique; Wypych, Fernando, E-mail: wypych@ufpr.br

    2016-11-15

    Layered zinc hydroxide nitrate (ZnHN) and Zn/Ni layered double hydroxide salts were synthesized and used to remove chromate ions from solutions at pH 8.0. The materials were characterized by many instrumental techniques before and after chromate ion removal. ZnHN decomposed after contact with the chromate solution, whereas the layered structure of Zn/Ni hydroxide nitrate (Zn/NiHN) and Zn/Ni hydroxide acetate (Zn/NiHA) remained their layers intact after the topotactic anionic exchange reaction, only changing the basal distances. ZnHN, Zn/NiHN, and Zn/NiHA removed 210.1, 144.8, and 170.1 mg of CrO{sub 4}{sup 2−}/g of material, respectively. Although the removal values obtained for Zn/NiHN and Zn/NiHA were smaller than the values predicted for the ideal formulas of the solids (194.3 and 192.4 mg of CrO{sub 4}{sup 2−}/g of material, respectively), the measured capacities were higher than the values achieved with many materials reported in the literature. Kinetic experiments showed the removal reaction was fast. To facilitate the solid/liquid separation process after chromium removal, Zn/Ni layered double hydroxide salts with magnetic supports were also synthesized, and their ability to remove chromate was evaluated. - Highlights: • Zinc hydroxide nitrate and Zn/Ni hydroxide nitrate or acetate were synthesized. • The interlayer anions were replaced by chromate anions at pH=8.0. • Only Zn/Ni hydroxide nitrate or acetate have the structure preserved after exchange. • Fast exchange reaction and high capacity of chromate removal were observed. • Magnetic materials were obtained to facilitate the solids removal the from solutions.

  18. Removal of Nitrate from Aqueous Solutions by Starch Stabilized nano Zero-Valent Iron(nZVI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Yaghmaeian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Nitrate is one of the inorganic anions derived as a result of oxidation of elemental nitrogen. Urban and industrial wastewater, animal and vegetable waste products in large cities that have organic nitrogen are excreted along the soil. The primary risk of Nitrate in drinking water occurs when nitrate in the gastrointestinal tract switch to nitrite. Nitrite causes the oxidation of iron in hemoglobin of red blood cells, result in red blood cells could not carry the oxygen, a condition called methemoglobinemia. Therefore, achieving the new technologies for nitrate removal is necessary. Material and Methods: The present study was conducted at laboratory Scale in non-continuous batches. Stabilized adsorbent was produced through reducing Iron sulfate by sodium borohydride (NaBH4 in presence of Starch (0.2W % as a stabilizer. At first, the effect of various parameters such as contact time (10-90min, pH (3-11, adsorbent dose (0.5-3 g/L and initial concentration of arsenate (50-250 mg/L were investigated on process efficiency. Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm model equilibrium constant, were calculated. Residual nitrate were measured by using the DR5000 spectrophotometer. Results: The optimum values based on RSM for pH, absorbent dose, contact time, and initial concentration of nitrate were 5.87, 2.25 g/L, 55.7 min, and 110.35 mg/L respectively. Langmuir isotherm with R2= 0.9932 for nitrate was the best graph for the experimental data. The maximum amount of nitrate adsorption was 138.88mg/g. Conclusion: Stabilized absorbent due to have numerous absorption sites and Fe0 as a reducing agent could have great potential in nitrate removal from water.

  19. Mg-Cu-Al layered double hydroxides based catalysts for the reduction of nitrates in aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vulić Tatjana J.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The secondary waste and bacterial contamination in physico-chemical and biological separation processes used today for nitrate removal from ground water make novel catalytic technologies that convert nitrates to unharmful gaseous nitrogen, very attractive for scientific research. The Mg-Cu-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH based catalysts with different Mg/Al ratio were investigated in water denitrification reaction in the presence of hydrogen and with solely copper as an active phase. Since LDHs have ion exchange properties and their derived mixed oxides possess memory effect (restoration of layered structure after thermal decomposition, their adsorption capacity for nitrates was also measured in the same model system. All studied samples showed nitrate removal from 23% to 62% following the decrease in Al content, as well as the substantial adsorption capacity ranging from 18% to 38%. These results underlie the necessity to take into account the effects of the adsorption in all future investigations.

  20. Electrolytic treatment of liquid waste containing ammonium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komori, R.; Ogawa, N.; Ohtsuka, K.; Ohuchi, J.

    1981-01-01

    A study was made on the safe decomposition of ammonium nitrate, which is the main component of α-liquid waste from plutonium fuel facilities, by means of electrolytic reduction and thermal decomposition. In the first stage, ammonium nitrate is reduced to ammonium nitrite by electrolytic reduction using an electrolyser with a cation exchange membrane as a diaphragm. In the second stage, ammonium nitrite is decomposed to N 2 and H 2 O. The alkaline region and a low temperature are preferable for electrolytic reduction and the acidic region and high temperature for thermal decomposition. A basis was established for an ammonium nitrate treatment system in aqueous solution through the operation of a bench-scale unit, and the operating data obtained was applied to the basic design of a 10-m 3 /a facility. (author)

  1. Synergism between cerium nitrate and sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate on corrosion of AA5052 aluminium alloy in 3 wt.% NaCl solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jie; Wang, Dapeng; Gao, Lixin; Zhang, Daquan, E-mail: zhdq@sh163.net

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Effectively prevent corrosion of AA5052 alloy by using the mixture of cerium nitrate and sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate. • Synergistic mechanism of the combination of cerium nitrate and sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate. • Structure of the complex formed between cerium ions and dodecylbenzenesulfonate. • The optimal adsorption model of dodecylbenzenesulfonate on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CeO{sub 2} surface. - Abstract: The synergistic inhibition effect of rare earth cerium nitrate and sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (DBS) on corrosion of AA5052 aluminium alloy in 3 wt.% NaCl solution was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), potentiodynamic polarization curve, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The results show that the single cerium nitrate or DBS has a limited inhibition effect against corrosion of AA5052 alloy. The combination cerium ions with DBS produced strong synergistic effect on corrosion inhibition for AA5052 alloy and rendered a negaitve shift of the corrosion potential. The formation of the complex of Al(DBS){sub 3} and Ce(DBS){sub 3} stabilized the passive film of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CeO{sub 2}, retarding both the cathodic and anodic processes of AA5052 alloy corrosion reaction significantly.

  2. Fiber degradability of sugar cane bagasse treated by alkaline solutions, through the “in situ” nylon bag technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Carlo Franco Morgulis

    1996-09-01

    treated bagasse (A was higher than in B or C treatments; degradability of B was higher than in C at 72h and 96h of incubation time. NDF degradability at 48 hour incubation time showed the following results: A = 74.0%; B = 41.6% and C = 35.7%. In conclusion, alkaline (NaOH and wood ash treated sugar cane bagasse improves ruminal degradability, and NaOH is better than wood ash.

  3. Distributions of 14 elements on 60 selected absorbers from two simulant solutions (acid-dissolved sludge and alkaline supernate) for Hanford HLW Tank 102-SY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, S.F.; Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M.

    1993-10-01

    Sixty commercially available or experimental absorber materials were evaluated for partitioning high-level radioactive waste. These absorbers included cation and anion exchange resins, inorganic exchangers, composite absorbers, and a series of liquid extractants sorbed on porous support-beads. The distributions of 14 elements onto each absorber were measured from simulated solutions that represent acid-dissolved sludge and alkaline supernate solutions from Hanford high-level waste (HLW) Tank 102-SY. The selected elements, which represent fission products (Ce, Cs, Sr, Tc, and Y); actinides (U, Pu, and Am); and matrix elements (Cr, Co, Fe, Mn, Zn, and Zr), were traced by radionuclides and assayed by gamma spectrometry. Distribution coefficients for each of the 1680 element/absorber/solution combinations were measured for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to provide sorption kinetics information for the specified elements from these complex media. More than 5000 measured distribution coefficients are tabulated

  4. Aluminum anode for aluminum-air battery - Part II: Influence of In addition on the electrochemical characteristics of Al-Zn alloy in alkaline solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In-Jun; Choi, Seok-Ryul; Kim, Jung-Gu

    2017-07-01

    Effects of Zn and In additions on the aluminum anode for Al-air battery in alkaline solution are examined by the self-corrosion rate, cell voltage, current-voltage characteristics, anodic polarization, discharge performance and AC impedance measurements. The passivation behavior of Zn-added anode during anodic polarization decreases the discharge performance of Al-air battery. The addition of In to Al-Zn anode reduces the formation of Zn passivation film by repeated adsorption and desorption behavior of In ion onto anode surface. The attenuated Zn passive layer by In ion attack leads to the improvement of discharge performance of Al-air battery.

  5. Determination of stability constants of K and Cs nitrate complex with dicyclohexyl-18-crown-6 and dibenzo-18-crown-6 in isopropanol aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myasoedova, T.G.; Ponomareva, A.V.; Zagorets, P.A.; Filippov, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    Total stability constants of K and Cs nitrate complexes with dicyclohexyl-18-crown-6 and dibenzo-18-crown-6 in isopropanol aqueous solutions were determined by the method of low-frequency contact conductometry. Clearly defined K/Cs selectivity is observed for the system with dibenzo-18-crown-6. It is shown that lgβ depends on permittivity of the solvent. The decrease of permittivity of isopropanol aqueous solutions results in reduction of K/Cs selectivity of DB18C6

  6. Determination of stability constants of K and Cs nitrate complex with dicyclohexyl-18-crown-6 and dibenzo-18-crown-6 in isopropanol aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myasoedova, T G; Ponomareva, A V; Zagorets, P A; Filippov, E A [Moskovskij Khimiko-Tekhnologicheskij Inst. (USSR)

    1984-08-01

    Total stability constants of K and Cs nitrate complexes with dicyclohexyl-18-crown-6 and dibenzo-18-crown-6 in isopropanol aqueous solutions were determined by the method of low-frequency contact conductometry. Clearly defined K/Cs selectivity is observed for the system with dibenzo-18-crown-6. It is shown that lg..beta.. depends on permittivity of the solvent. The decrease of permittivity of isopropanol aqueous solutions results in reduction of K/Cs selectivity of DB18C6.

  7. Radiolysis of actinides and technetium in alkaline media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, C.H., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-10

    The {gamma}-radiolysis of aerated alkaline aqueous solutions of Np(V), Np(VI), Pu(VI), Tc(IV), Tc(V), and TC(VII) was studied in the absence of additives and in the presence of CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, NO{sub 2}{sup -}, EDTA, formate, and other organic compounds. The radiolytic reduction of Np(V), Np(VI), Pu(VI), and TC(VII) under different experimental conditions was examined in detail. The addition of EDTA, formate, and alcohols was found to considerably increase the radiation-chemical reduction yields. The formation of the Np(V) peroxo complex was observed in the {gamma}-radiolysis of alkaline aqueous solutions of Np (VI) in the presence of nitrate.

  8. Method of cleaning alkaline metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, Yukio; Naito, Kesahiro; Iizawa, Katsuyuki; Nakasuji, Takashi

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent scattering of used sodium and aqueous alkaline solution when cleaning used sodium and metallic sodium adhering to equipment with an aqueous alkaline solution. Method: A sodium treating container is filled with an aqueous alkaline solution, and stainless steel gauze is sunk in the container. Equipment to be cleaned such as equipment with sodium adhering to it are retained under the gauze and are thus cleaned. On the other hand, the surface of the aqueous alkaline solution is covered with a fluid paraffin liquid covering material. Thus, the hydrogen produced by the reaction of the sodium and the aqueous alkaline solution will float up, pass through the liquid covering material and be discharged. The sodium will pass through the gauze and float upwardly while reacting with the aqueous alkaline solution in a partic ulate state to the boundary between the aqueous alkaline solution and up to the covering material, and thus the theratment reaction will continue. Thus, the cover material prevents the sodium and the aqueous alkaline solution from scattering. (Kamimura, M.)

  9. Purification of alkaline solutions and wastes from actinides and technetium by coprecipitation with some carriers using the method of appearing reagents: Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretrukhin, V.F.; Silin, V.I.; Kareta, A.V.; Gelis, A.V.; Shilov, V.P.; German, K.E.; Firsova, E.V.; Maslennikov, A.G.; Trushina, V.E.

    1998-09-01

    The coprecipitation of transuranium elements (TRU) and technetium from alkaline solutions and from simulants of Hanford Site tank wastes has been studied in reducing and oxidizing conditions on uranium(IV,VI) hydroxocompounds, tetraalkylammonium perrhenate and perchlorate, and on hydroxides of Fe(III), Co(III), Mn(II), and Cr(III) using the method of appearing reagents (MAR). Coprecipitations in alkaline solution have been shown to give high decontamination factors (DF) at low content of carrier and in the presence of high salt concentrations. Uranium(IV) hydroxide in concentrations higher than 3 x 10 -3 M coprecipitates Pu and Cm in any oxidation state from 0.2 to 4 M NaOH with DFs of 110 to 1000 and Np and Tc with DFs of 51 to 176. Technetium (VII) coprecipitates with (5 to 8) x 10 -4 M tetrabutylammonium (TBA) perrhenate in 0.01 to 0.02 M TBA hydroxide from 0.5 to 1.5 M NaOH to give DFs of 150 to 200. Coprecipitations of Np and Pu with Co(OH) 3 , Fe(OH) 3 , Cr(OH) 3 , and Mn(OH) 2 obtained by the MAR from precursors in the range from pH 10.5 to 0.4 M NaOH give DFs from 80 to 400

  10. High-pressure densified solid solutions of alkaline earth hexaborides (Ca/Sr, Ca/Ba, Sr/Ba) and their high-temperature thermoelectric properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gürsoy, M.; Takeda, M.; Albert, B.

    2015-01-01

    Solid solutions of alkaline earth hexaborides were synthesized and densified by spark plasma sintering at 100 MPa. The high-temperature thermoelectric properties (Seebeck coefficients, electrical and thermal diffusivities, heat capacities) were measured between room temperature and 1073 K. CaB 6 , SrB 6 , BaB 6 and the ternary hexaborides Ca x Sr 1−x B 6 , Ca x Ba 1−x B 6 , Sr x Ba 1−x B 6 (x = 0.25, 0.5, 0.75) are n-type conducting compounds over the whole compositional and thermal ranges. The values of the figure of merit ZT for CaB 6 (ca. 0.3 at 1073 K) were found to be significantly increased compared to earlier investigations which is attributed to the densification process. - Highlights: • Solid solutions of alkaline earth hexaborides were synthesized. • High-temperature thermoelectric properties of mixed calcium borides are excellent. • Spark plasma source densification results in high ZT values. • Borides are rare-earth free and refractory materials

  11. Elaboration and test of the method of separation of alkaline metals ions with tin phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, G.I.; Chernyak, A.S.; Kostromina, O.N.; Kachur, N.Ya.; Shpeyzer, B.G.

    1986-01-01

    Present work is devoted to elaboration and test of the method of separation of alkaline metals ions with tin phosphate. Thus, the isotherms of sorption of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium ions with amorphous tin phosphate depending on their concentration, ph of solution, sorbent quantity are obtained. The parameters of extraction of potassium microquantities from sodium salts are defined. Ultra pure sodium chloride, sodium iodide, sodium sulphate, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, sodium phosphate are synthesized.

  12. Effect of Sn4+ Additives on the Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of Anodic Coating Formed on AZ31 Magnesium Alloy in Alkaline Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, S. A.; Kuroda, K.; Saito, N.; Okido, M.

    Magnesium is the lightest structural metal with high specific strength and good mechanical properties. However, poor corrosion resistance limits its widespread use in many applications. Magnesium is usually treated with Chromate conversion coatings. However, due to changing environmental regulations and pollution prevention requirements, a significant push exists to find new, alternative for poisonous Cr6+. Therefore, we aim to improve corrosion resistance of anodic coatings on AZ31 alloys using low cost non-chromate electrolyte. Anodizing was carried out in alkaline solutions with tin additives. The effect of tin additives on the coating film was characterized by SEM and XRD. The corrosion resistance was evaluated using anodic and cathodic polarizations and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Corrosion resistance property was improved with tin additives and the best anti-corrosion property was obtained with addition of 0.03 M Na2SnO3.3H2O to anodizing solution.

  13. Comparing and Optimizing Nitrate Adsorption from Aqueous Solution Using Fe/Pt Bimetallic Nanoparticles and Anion Exchange Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Daud

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This research work was carried out for the removal of nitrate from raw water for a drinking water supply. Nitrate is a widespread ground water contaminant. Methodology employed in this study included adsorption on metal based nanoparticles and ion exchange using anionic resins. Fe/Pt bimetallic nanoparticles were prepared in the laboratory, by the reduction of their respective salts using sodium borohydride. Scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectrometry, and X-ray florescence techniques were utilized for characterization of bimetallic Fe/Pt nanoparticles. Optimum dose, pH, temperature, and contact time were determined for NO3- removal through batch tests, both for metal based nanoparticles and anionic exchange resin. Adsorption data fitted well the Langmuir isotherm and conformed to the pseudofirst-order kinetic model. Results indicated 97% reduction in nitrate by 0.25 mg/L of Fe/Pt nanoparticles at pH 7 and 83% reduction in nitrate was observed using 0.50 mg/L anionic exchange resins at pH 4 and contact time of one hour. Overall, Fe/Pt bimetallic nanoparticles demonstrated greater NO3- removal efficiency due to the small particle size, extremely large surface area (627 m2/g, and high adsorption capacity.

  14. Comparing and Optimizing Nitrate Adsorption from Aqueous Solution Using Fe/Pt Bimetallic Nanoparticles and Anion Exchange Resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daud, M.; Khan, Z.; Ashgar, A.; Danish, M. I.; Qazi, I. A.

    2015-01-01

    This research work was carried out for the removal of nitrate from raw water for a drinking water supply. Nitrate is a widespread ground water contaminant. Methodology employed in this study included adsorption on metal based nanoparticles and ion exchange using anionic resins. Fe/Pt bimetallic nanoparticles were prepared in the laboratory, by the reduction of their respective salts using sodium borohydride. Scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectrometry, and X-ray florescence techniques were utilized for characterization of bimetallic Fe/Pt nanoparticles. Optimum dose, ph, temperature, and contact time were determined for removal through batch tests, both for metal based nanoparticles and anionic exchange resin. Adsorption data fitted well the Langmuir isotherm and conformed to the pseudo first-order kinetic model. Results indicated 97% reduction in nitrate by 0.25 mg/L of Fe/Pt nanoparticles at ph 7 and 83% reduction in nitrate was observed using 0.50 mg/L anionic exchange resins at ph 4 and contact time of one hour. Overall, Fe/Pt bimetallic nanoparticles demonstrated greater removal efficiency due to the small particle size, extremely large surface area (627 m 2 /g), and high adsorption capacity.

  15. Evaluation of method for determination of nitrate in drinkable waters for human use: Technology and analytical solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantelli, F.; Sarritzu, G.; Bianchi, A.

    1995-01-01

    A rapid, practical and reliable method for determination of nitrate in drinkable waters by absorbance at 210 nm is discussed. The method can be used for drinkable, mineral, rain and fresh waters in the concentration from 0,1 to 25 mg/l of NO 3

  16. Distributions of 14 elements on 63 absorbers from three simulant solutions (acid-dissolved sludge, acidified supernate, and alkaline supernate) for Hanford HLW Tank 102-SY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, S.F.; Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M.

    1994-08-01

    As part of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System program at Los Alamos, we evaluated 63 commercially available or experimental absorber materials for their ability to remove hazardous components from high-level waste (HLW). These absorbers included cation and anion exchange resins, inorganic exchangers, composite absorbers, and a series of liquid extractants sorbed on porous support-beads. We tested these absorbers with three solutions prepared to simulate acid-dissolved sludge (pH 0.6), acidified supernate (pH 3.5), and alkaline supernate (pH 13.9) from underground storage tank 102-SY at the Hanford Reservation near Richland, Washington. To these simulants we added the appropriate radionuclides and used gamma spectrometry to measure fission products (Ce, Cs, Sr, Tc, and Y), actinides (U, Pu, and Am), and matrix elements (Cr, Co, Fe, Mn, Zn, and Zr). For each of more than 2500 element/absorber/solution combinations, we measured distribution coefficients for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to obtain information about sorption kinetics. Because we measured the sorption of many different elements, the tabulated results indicate those elements most likely to interfere with the sorption of elements of greater interest. On the basis of nearly 7500 measured distribution coefficients, we determined that many of these absorbers appear suitable for processing HLW. This study supersedes the previous version of LA-12654, in which results attributed to a solution identified as an alkaline supernate simulant were misleading because that solution contained insufficient hydroxide

  17. The electrochemical behaviour of stainless steel AISI 304 in alkaline solutions with different pH in the presence of chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire, L.; Carmezim, M.J.; Ferreira, M.G.S.; Montemor, M.F.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The passivation and passivation breakdown of AISI 304 in alkaline solutions with different pH was studied. → The electrochemical behaviour and the corrosion resistance in chloride environments were evaluated using d.c. potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. → The results were modelled using a hierarchically distributed circuit and revealed a more susceptible surface at pH 9. → The passive film characterization was carried out by SEM and EDS analysis, revealing the existence of MnS inclusions and the increase of Cr/Fe ratio in the attacked areas, preferably the vicinity of those inclusions. - Abstract: Nowadays, stainless steel reinforcements appear as an effective solution to increase the durability of reinforced concrete structures exposed to very aggressive environments. AISI 304 is widely used for this purpose. Although the improved durability of reinforcing AISI 304, when compared to carbon steel, there is a high probability of pitting susceptibility in the presence of chlorides. Thus, the present work aims at studying the passivation and passivation breakdown of AISI 304 in alkaline solutions of different pH (pH from 13 to 9), simulating the interstitial concrete electrolyte. These solutions were contaminated with different concentrations of chloride ions (3% and 10%, as NaCl). The electrochemical behaviour was evaluated by d.c. potentiodynamic polarization and by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The morphological features and the changes observed in the surface composition were evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) together with EDS chemical analysis. The results evidence that pH plays an important role in the evolution of the film resistance and charge transfer processes. Moreover, the effect is highly dependent upon the chloride content and immersion time.

  18. Contribution to the characterization of the ideality deviation of concentrated solutions of electrolytes: application to the case plutonium and uranium (IV) nitrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charrin, N.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to establish a base of binary data referring to the plutonium and uranium nitrates (IV) activity coefficients, which will permit to take account the medium effects in the process of liquid-liquid extraction set in action during the reprocessing of irradiated combustibles in a more scrupulous way. The first chapter sticks to establish the problematic of acquisition of actinides binary data at an oxidation state (IV) linked to two characteristics of this type of electrolyte its radioactive properties and its chemical properties. Its chemical properties bring us to define the fictitious binary data and to use an approach based on the thermodynamic concept of simple solutions, on the measurements of water activity of ternary or quaternary mixtures of the actinide, in nitric acid medium and on the binary data of nitric acid. The second chapter intended to propose reliable binary data concerning nitric acid. The validation of acquisition of fictitious binary data method suggested is undertaken. The electrolyte test is the thorium nitrate (IV). The very encouraging results has determined the carrying out of this work of research in that way. The third chapter is based on the experimental acquisition of uranium and plutonium nitrates (IV) binary data. It emphasises the importance given to the preparation of the studied mixtures which characteristics, very high actinide concentrations and low acidities, make them atypical solutions and without any referenced equivalents. The last chapter describes the exploitation which was made of the established binary data. The characteristic parameters of Pu(NO 3 ) 4 and U(NO 3 ) 4 of Pitzer model and of the specific interaction theory has been appraised. Then the application of' the concept of simple solutions to the calculation of the density or quaternary mixtures like Pu(NO 3 ) 4 / UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 /HNO 3 / H 2 O was proposed. (author)

  19. Effect of preparation technique of hydrated zirconium(4) dioxide on sorption of microimpurities of nonferrous metals, iron(3) and thorium(4) from lanthanum(3) nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekrenev, A.V.; Pyartman, A.K.; Belousov, E.A.

    1989-01-01

    A study was made on the effect of peculiarities of hydrated zirconium(4) dioxide (HZD) synthesis on reproducibility of its sorption properties. It is shown that change of zirconium(4) concentration in basic solution within the limits of 0-1.0 mol/dm 3 its HCl acidity from 0 up to 1.0 mol/dm 3 concentration of NaOH solution used for HZD precipitation within the limits of 1.0-10.0 mol/dm 3 the final pH value of HZD gel from 10 up to 14 affects slightly the impurity element sorption from lanthanum nitrate solution. Freezing of HZD leads to increase of capacity and decrease of selectivity of sorbent samples with respect to impurity ions (Ni 2+ , Co 2+ , Bi 3+ , Fe 3+ , Th 4+ ); increase of the time of gel ripening leads to decrease of capacity and growth of selectivity

  20. The nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattus, A.J.; Lee, D.D.

    1993-01-01

    A new low-temperature (50--60 degrees C) process for the reduction of nitrate or nitrite to ammonia gas in a stirred, ethylene glycol led reactor has been developed. The process has nearly completed 2 years of bench-top testing in preparation for a pilot-scale demonstration in the fall of 1994. The nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process utilizes the active metal Al (in powder or shot form) in alkaline solution to convert nitrate to ammonia gas with the liberation of heat. Between 0.8 and 1.6 kg of Al per kilogram of sodium nitrate is required to convert solutions of between 3.1 and 6.2 M nitrate to near zero concentration. Prior to feeding Al to the reactor, 40 μm quartz is added based upon the total sodium content of the waste. Upon adding the Al, a by-product of gibbsite precipitates in the reactor as the ammonia leaves the solution. At the end of the reaction, the alumina-silica-based solids are dewatered, calcined, pressed, and sintered into a hard ceramic. Comparing the volume of the final ceramic product with the volume of the starting waste solution, we obtain an ∼70% volume reduction. This compares with an expected 50% volume increase if the waste were immobilized in cement-based grout. The process is being developed for use at Hanford, where as much as 125,000 tonnes of nitrate salts is stored in 4 million liter tanks. DOE may be able to shred radioactively contaminated scrap aluminum, and use this metal to feed the NAC reactor

  1. Kinetics and selectivity of the oxidation of methylbenzenes in Co(III)-CH3COOH-CF3COOH solutions. Comparison with nitration and hydroxylation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudakov, E.S.; Lobachev, V.L.

    1989-01-01

    Data have been obtained concerning the kinetics, substrate selectivity, and kinetic isotope effect for the first stage in the oxidation of a series of arenes, from benzene to hexamethylbenzene, by Co(III) acetate in CH 3 COOH-CF 3 COOH (1.9 M) solutions at 25 degree C. A similarity was noted between substrate selectivity for reactions of alkylbenzenes with Co(III) and electrophilic nitration reactions, which occur via an electron transfer step. It was also found that substrate selectivity for these reactions differs significantly from that found for electrophilic hydroxylation reactions, which occur via an intermediate slow step involving σ-complex formation

  2. Annual report of STACY operation in F.Y. 1997. 280mm thickness slab core {center_dot} 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onodera, Seiji; Sono, Hiroki; Hirose, Hideyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    1998-06-01

    Fifty-three times critical experiments (run number R0104 to R0156) with STACY in NUCEF, were performed in F.Y. 1997. During these experiments, 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution was used as fuel, and core configuration was 280mm thickness and 1.5m height slab core tank with various rectangular solid reflectors; ordinary or borated concrete, polyethylene and so on, to measure mainly reactivity worth by changes of reflecting material and its thickness. Operation data of STACY in F.Y. 1997 are summarized in this report. (author)

  3. Comparative Study of the Preparation of Reducing Sugars Hydrolyzed from High-Lignin Lignocellulose Pretreated with Ionic Liquid, Alkaline Solution and Their Combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanny F. Sangian

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The ionicliquid [MMIM][DMP] was synthesized from the reactants methyl imidazole [MIM] and trimethylphosphate [TMP] and verified using 1HNMR and FTIR. Coconut coir dust was pretreated with a 1% alkaline solution.Its crystalline structure increased significantly due to the dissolution of lignin and hemicelluloses under alkaline conditions, exposing the cellulose. After NaOH and IL were employed, the XRD showed that peak (002 decreased significantly and peak (101 almost vanished. This significant decrease in crystallinity was related to the alteration of the substrate from the cellulose I structure to the cellulose II structure. The pretreated substrates were hydrolyzed to convert them to reducing sugars by pure cellulase and xylanase,and the reaction was conducted at 60°C, pH 3, for 12 or 48 hours. The yields of sugar hydrolyzed from untreated and NaOH-pretreated substrates were 0.07 and 0.12 g sugar/g lignocellulose, respectively. Pretreatment with IL or the combination of NaOH+IL resulted in yields of reducing sugars of 0.11 and 0.13 g/g, respectively. These findings showed that IL pretreatment of the high-lignin lignocellulose is a new prospect for the economical manufacture of reducing sugars and bioethanol in the coming years.

  4. Thermochemical nitrate reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, J.L.; Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.

    1992-09-01

    A series of preliminary experiments was conducted directed at thermochemically converting nitrate to nitrogen and water. Nitrates are a major constituent of the waste stored in the underground tanks on the Hanford Site, and the characteristics and effects of nitrate compounds on stabilization techniques must be considered before permanent disposal operations begin. For the thermochemical reduction experiments, six reducing agents (ammonia, formate, urea, glucose, methane, and hydrogen) were mixed separately with ∼3 wt% NO 3 - solutions in a buffered aqueous solution at high pH (13); ammonia and formate were also mixed at low pH (4). Reactions were conducted in an aqueous solution in a batch reactor at temperatures of 200 degrees C to 350 degrees C and pressures of 600 to 2800 psig. Both gas and liquid samples were analyzed. The specific components analyzed were nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and ammonia. Results of experimental runs showed the following order of nitrate reduction of the six reducing agents in basic solution: formate > glucose > urea > hydrogen > ammonia ∼ methane. Airnmonia was more effective under acidic conditions than basic conditions. Formate was also effective under acidic conditions. A more thorough, fundamental study appears warranted to provide additional data on the mechanism of nitrate reduction. Furthermore, an expanded data base and engineering feasibility study could be used to evaluate conversion conditions for promising reducing agents in more detail and identify new reducing agents with improved performance characteristics

  5. Summary technical report on the electrochemical treatment of alkaline nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the laboratory studies investigating the electrolytic treatment of alkaline solutions carried out under the direction of the Savannah River Technology Center from 1985-1992. Electrolytic treatment has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale to be feasible for the destruction of nitrate and nitrite and the removal of radioactive species such as 99 Tc and 106 Ru from Savannah River Site (SRS) decontaminated salt solution and other alkaline wastes. The reaction rate and current efficiency for the removal of these species are dependent on cell configuration, electrode material, nature of electrode surface, waste composition, current density, and temperature. Nitrogen, ammonia, and nitrous oxide have been identified as the nitrogen-containing reaction products from the electrochemical reduction of nitrate and nitrite under alkaline conditions. The reaction mechanism for the reduction is very complex. Voltammetric studies indicated that the electrode reactions involve surface phenomena and are not necessarily mass transfer controlled. In an undivided cell, results suggest an electrocatalytic role for oxygen via the generation of the superoxide anion. In general, more efficient reduction of nitrite and nitrate occurs at cathode materials with higher overpotentials for hydrogen evolution. Nitrate and nitrite destruction has also been demonstrated in engineering-scale flow reactors. In flow reactors, the nitrate/nitrite destruction efficiency is improved with an increase in the current density, temperature, and when the cell is operated in a divided cell configuration. Nafion reg-sign cation exchange membranes have exhibited good stability and consistent performance as separators in the divided-cell tests. The membranes were also shown to be unaffected by radiation at doses approximating four years of cell operation in treating decontaminated salt solution

  6. Alkaline earth metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Paul L.; Ekberg, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The beryllium ion has a relatively small ionic radius. As a consequence of this small size, its hydrolysis reactions begin to occur at a relatively low pH. To determine the stability and solubility constants, however, the Gibbs energy of the beryllium ion is required. In aqueous solution calcium, like the other alkaline earth metals, only exists as a divalent cation. The size of the alkaline earth cations increases with increasing atomic number, and the calcium ion is bigger than the magnesium ion. The hydrolysis of barium(II) is weaker than that of strontium(II) and also occurs in quite alkaline pH solutions, and similarly, only the species barium hydroxide has been detected. There is only a single experimental study on the hydrolysis of radium. As with the stability constant trend, it would be expected that the enthalpy of radium would be lower than that of barium due to the larger ionic radius.

  7. Fixation and separation of the elements thorium and uranium using anion exchange resins in nitrate solution; Fixation et separation des elements thorium et uranium par les resines echangeuses d'anions en milieu nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korgaonkar, V. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-10-01

    The exchange of thorium and uranium between a strong base anion resin and a mixed water + ethanol solvent containing nitrate ions is studied. It is assumed that in the resin the thorium and uranium are fixed in the form of the complexes Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 2-} and UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}{sup 2-} in solution these elements are present in the form of complexes having the general formula: Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 6-n}{sup n-2} and UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 4-n}{sup n-2} It has been possible to deduce a law for the changes in the partition functions of thorium and uranium as a function of the concentrations of the various species in solution and of the complexing ion NO{sub 3}. From this has been deduced the optimum operational conditions for separating a mixture of these two elements. Finally, in these conditions, the influence of a few interfering ions has been studied: Ba, Bi, Ce, La, Mo, Pb, Zr. The method proposed can be used either as a preparation, or for the dosage of thorium by a quantitative separation. (author) [French] On etudie l'echange du thorium et de l'uranium entre une resine anion base forte et un solvant mixte eau + ethanol charge en ions nitrates. On a suppose que, dans la resine, le thorium et l'uranium sont fixes sous forme de complexes Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 2-} et UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}{sup 2-} en solution, ces elements sont engages dans des complexes de formule generale: Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 6-n}{sup n-2} and UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 4-n}{sup n-2} On a pu degager une loi de variation des coefficients de partage du thorium et de l'uranium en fonction des concentrations des diverses especes en solution et de l'anion complexant NO{sub 3}{sup -}. On en a deduit les conditions operatoires optimales necessaires pour separer les deux elements a partir de leurs melanges. Enfin, dans ces conditions, on a etudie l'influence de quelques elements genants: Ba, Bi, Ce, La, Mo, Pb, Zr. La methode preconisee peut etre

  8. Properties of altered soils by alkaline solution: contribution in the performance evaluation of repositories; Propriedades de solos alterados por solucao alcalina: contribuicao na avaliacao de desempenho de repositorios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calabria, Jaqueline Alves de Almeida

    2015-07-01

    very low for all evaluated samples (less than 20% after 10 days of equilibrium), being the best performance one, the nitosoil sample whose K{sub d} values varied from 11.78 to 63.05 mL.g{sup -1}. In a subsequent step, the clay soil, was submitted to the alkaline solution interaction, in order to investigate possible alterations on the sorption properties and hydraulic conductivity of this soil. Using the sorption parameters, obtained from data fitted isotherms, the retardation factor, R, was estimated for the samples before and after the interaction. It was demonstrated that the alkaline alteration promotes damages to sorption properties of Cs, once the R became significantly smaller (about 1000 times) after the interaction. The hydraulic conductivity in turn increased slightly (3,91x10{sup -8} cm.s{sup -1} to 5,08 x 10{sup -8} cm.s{sup -1}). It was concluded that these changes were due, mainly, to the dissolution of minerals present in the clay soil (kaolinite and quartz), associated with the incorporation of K and Ca from the alkaline solution, resulting, probably, in the formation of hydrated calcium silicate phases. Additionally, the effects of alkaline solution on the properties of a commercial bentonite were studied. Contrary to the clay soil, it was observed a gain in the sorption characteristics, with K{sub d} (Cs) increasing from 760.05 mL.g{sup -1}to 1311.80 mL.g{sup -1}and Q{sub max} from 36.32 mg.g{sup -1}to 52.13 mg.g{sup -1}, with the corresponding increase in the retardation coefficient, R. The dissolution of the clay minerals from the initial sample and the incorporation of Mg, K e Ca coming from the alkaline solution, generating smectite of different kinds, were considered as the main mineralogical changes responsible for the modifications in sorption parameters. The different behavior between the two evaluated samples, soil and bentonite, confirms that the nature and extension of changes observed, when mineral samples interact with alkaline solution

  9. Mode of corrosion monitoring by electrochemical measurements in alkaline water solutions at 310 degC using a new type of industrial probes with high radiation stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beran, J.

    1977-01-01

    Application of the linear polarization method to Zr-alloys and low-alloy steel was successfully verified by autoclave tests in alkaline water solutions, pH=10.3 max. The new type of industrial probes for electrochemical measurements worked 5500 hours at temperatures within 250 and 310 degC. Contrary to usual practice, the corrosion rate was evaluated applying the criterion T/Rsub(p) instead of criterion 1/Rsub(p). A single calibration curve T/Rsub(p) versus corrosion rate, which is independent of test temperature, was introduced in this way. The probes, developed by SKODA-Works, Nuclear Power Construction Division for electrochemical measurements in nuclear reactor environment, do not contain organic compounds (for sealing, insulation etc.) in order to prevent radiation damage. (author)

  10. The effect of high pH alkaline solutions on the mineral stability of the Boom Clay - Batch experiments at 60 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honty, M.; De Craen, M.; Wang, L.; Madejova, J.; Czimerova, A.; Pentrak, M.; Stricek, I.; Van Geet, M.

    2010-01-01

    Boom Clay is currently viewed as a reference host formation for studies on deep geological disposal of radioactive waste in Belgium. The interactions between bulk rock Boom Clay and 0.1 M KOH, 0.1 M NaOH, 0.1 M Ca(OH) 2 , young cement water and evolved cement water solutions, ranging in pH from 12.5 to 13.2, were examined as static batch experiments at 60 deg. C to simulate alkaline plume perturbations, which are expected to occur in the repository due to the presence of concrete. Both liquids and solids were investigated at specific times between 90 and 510 days in order to control the elemental budget and to search for potential mineralogical alterations. Also, the clay fraction was separated from the whole-rock Boom Clay at the end of each run and characterized for its mineralogical composition. Thereby, the importance of the mineral matrix to buffer the alkaline attack and the role of organic matter to protect clay minerals were also addressed. The results indicate that the degree of geochemical perturbation in Boom Clay is dependent on the initial pH of the applied solution together with the nature of the major cation in the reactant fluids. The higher the initial pH of the media, the stronger its interaction with Boom Clay. No major non-clay mineralogical alteration of the Boom Clay was detected, but dissolution of kaolinite, smectite and illite occurred within the studied experimental conditions. The dissolution of clays is accompanied by the decrease in the layer charge, followed by a decrease in the cation-exchange capacity. The highest TOC values coincide with the highest total elemental concentrations in the leachates, and correspondingly, the highest dissolution degree. However, no quantitative link could be established between the degree of organic matter decomposition and clay dissolution.

  11. Evaluation of layered zinc hydroxide nitrate and zinc/nickel double hydroxide salts in the removal of chromate ions from solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Henrique Bortolaz; Wypych, Fernando

    2016-11-01

    Layered zinc hydroxide nitrate (ZnHN) and Zn/Ni layered double hydroxide salts were synthesized and used to remove chromate ions from solutions at pH 8.0. The materials were characterized by many instrumental techniques before and after chromate ion removal. ZnHN decomposed after contact with the chromate solution, whereas the layered structure of Zn/Ni hydroxide nitrate (Zn/NiHN) and Zn/Ni hydroxide acetate (Zn/NiHA) remained their layers intact after the topotactic anionic exchange reaction, only changing the basal distances. ZnHN, Zn/NiHN, and Zn/NiHA removed 210.1, 144.8, and 170.1 mg of CrO42-/g of material, respectively. Although the removal values obtained for Zn/NiHN and Zn/NiHA were smaller than the values predicted for the ideal formulas of the solids (194.3 and 192.4 mg of CrO42-/g of material, respectively), the measured capacities were higher than the values achieved with many materials reported in the literature. Kinetic experiments showed the removal reaction was fast. To facilitate the solid/liquid separation process after chromium removal, Zn/Ni layered double hydroxide salts with magnetic supports were also synthesized, and their ability to remove chromate was evaluated.

  12. Preparation of CuAlO2 Thin Films by Sol-Gel Method Using Nitrate Solution Dip-Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehara Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available CuAlO2 thin films are prepared by sol-gel dip-coating followed by annealing in nitrogen atmosphere using copper nitrate and aluminum nitrate as metal source materials. X-ray diffraction (XRD patterns show (003, (006 and (009 oriented peaks of CuAlO2 at annealing temperature of 800 – 1000°C. This result indicates that the CuAlO2 films prepared in the present work are c-axis oriented. XRD peak intensity increase with annealing temperature and becomes maximum at 850°C. The CuAlO2 XRD peak decreased at annealing temperature of 900°C with appearance of a peak of CuO, and then increased again with annealing temperature until 1000 °C. The films have bandgap of 3.4 eV at annealing temperature of 850°C in which the transparency becomes the highest. At the annealing temperature of 850°C, scanning electron microscope (SEM observation reveals that the films are consist of amorphous fraction and microcrystalline CuAlO2 fraction.

  13. Apparent molar volumes and viscosity B-coefficients of caffeine in aqueous thorium nitrate solutions at T = (298.15, 308.15, and 318.15) K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Biswajit, E-mail: biswachem@gmail.co [Department of Chemistry, University of North Bengal, Darjeeling 734013 (India); Roy, Pran Kumar; Sarkar, Bipul Kumar; Brahman, Dhiraj [Department of Chemistry, University of North Bengal, Darjeeling 734013 (India); Roy, Mahendra Nath, E-mail: mahendraroy2002@yahoo.co.i [Department of Chemistry, University of North Bengal, Darjeeling 734013 (India)

    2010-03-15

    Apparent molar volumes phi{sub V} and viscosity B-coefficients for caffeine in (0.00, 0.03, 0.05, and 0.07) mol . dm{sup -3} aqueous thorium nitrate, Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}, solutions were determined from solution density and viscosity measurements over the temperature range (298.15 to 318.15) K as function of concentration of caffeine and the relation: phi{sub V}{sup 0}=a{sub 0}+a{sub 1}T+a{sub 2}T{sup 2}, have been used to describe the temperature dependence of the standard partial molar volumes phi{sub V}{sup 0}. These results have been used to deduce the standard volumes of transfer DELTAphi{sub V}{sup 0} and viscosity B-coefficients of transfer DELTAB for caffeine from water to aqueous Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} solutions for rationalizing various interactions in the ternary solutions. The structure-making or breaking ability of caffeine has been discussed in terms of the sign of (delta{sup 2}phi{sub V}{sup 0}/deltaT{sup 2}){sub P}. The Friedman-Krishnan co-sphere model was used to explain the transfer volume of caffeine with increasing Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} molarity. The activation parameters of viscous flow for the ternary solutions were also discussed in terms of transition state theory.

  14. Apparent molar volumes and viscosity B-coefficients of caffeine in aqueous thorium nitrate solutions at T = (298.15, 308.15, and 318.15) K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, Biswajit; Roy, Pran Kumar; Sarkar, Bipul Kumar; Brahman, Dhiraj; Roy, Mahendra Nath

    2010-01-01

    Apparent molar volumes φ V and viscosity B-coefficients for caffeine in (0.00, 0.03, 0.05, and 0.07) mol . dm -3 aqueous thorium nitrate, Th(NO 3 ) 4 , solutions were determined from solution density and viscosity measurements over the temperature range (298.15 to 318.15) K as function of concentration of caffeine and the relation: φ V 0 =a 0 +a 1 T+a 2 T 2 , have been used to describe the temperature dependence of the standard partial molar volumes φ V 0 . These results have been used to deduce the standard volumes of transfer Δφ V 0 and viscosity B-coefficients of transfer ΔB for caffeine from water to aqueous Th(NO 3 ) 4 solutions for rationalizing various interactions in the ternary solutions. The structure-making or breaking ability of caffeine has been discussed in terms of the sign of (δ 2 φ V 0 /δT 2 ) P . The Friedman-Krishnan co-sphere model was used to explain the transfer volume of caffeine with increasing Th(NO 3 ) 4 molarity. The activation parameters of viscous flow for the ternary solutions were also discussed in terms of transition state theory.

  15. Method of producing thin cellulose nitrate film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupica, S.B.

    1975-01-01

    An improved method for forming a thin nitrocellulose film of reproducible thickness is described. The film is a cellulose nitrate film, 10 to 20 microns in thickness, cast from a solution of cellulose nitrate in tetrahydrofuran, said solution containing from 7 to 15 percent, by weight, of dioctyl phthalate, said cellulose nitrate having a nitrogen content of from 10 to 13 percent

  16. Electrocatalytic activity and stability of Ag-MnOx/C composites toward oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Qiumei; Jiang, Luhua; Qi, Luting; Yuan, Lizhi; Wang, Erdong; Sun, Gongquan

    2014-01-01

    Ag-MnO x /C composites were prepared using AgNO 3 and KMnO 4 as the precursors and Vulcan XC-72 as the support. The physical properties of the Ag-MnO x /C composites were investigated via X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The activity and the stability of the series of Ag-MnO x /C composites toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media were investigated through the electrochemical techniques. The results show that the main species MnO 2 and Ag 2 O in the fresh sample convert into Mn 3 O 4 and Ag(0), respectively, after the heat treatment in N 2 at 300 °C (Ag-MnO x /C-300). The Ag-MnO x /C-300 sample shows the highest activity toward the ORR, with the half-wave potential of the ORR shifting negatively only 0.035 V compared to that on the commercial 40 wt. % Pt/C (JM). The electron transfer number during the ORR on the Ag-MnO x /C composite increases with the value close to four after the heat treatment at 300 °C, which is mainly attributed to the formation of Ag(0), rather than Mn 3 O 4 . The heat treatment brings about a better catalytic stability of the composite, and no obviously negative shift takes place for the half-wave potential of the ORR on the Ag-MnO x /C-300 composite after 1000 cycles accelerated aging test. The maximum power density of the zinc-air battery with the Ag-MnO x /C-300 air electrode reaches up to 130 mW cm −2 , higher than those based on the Pd/C and Pt/C cathode catalysts, which shows that the Ag-MnO x /C-300 composite is a promising candidate as the catalyst for the air electrode

  17. Ions generated from uranyl nitrate solutions by electrospray ionization (ESI) and detected with Fourier transform ion-cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasilis, Sofie; Somogyi, Arpád; Herrmann, Kristin; Pemberton, Jeanne E

    2006-02-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) of uranyl nitrate solutions generates a wide variety of positively and negatively charged ions, including complex adducts of uranyl ions with methoxy, hydroxy, and nitrate ligands. In the positive ion mode, ions detected by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry are sensitive to instrumental tuning parameters such as quadrupole operating frequency and trapping time. Positive ions correspond to oligomeric uranyl nitrate species that can be characterized as having a general formula of [(UO(2))(n)(A)(m)(CH(3)OH)(s)](+) or [(UO(2))(n)(O)(A)(m)(CH(3)OH)(s)](+) with n = 1-4, m = 1-7, s = 0 or 1, and A = OH, NO(3), CH(3)O or a combination of these, although the formation of NO(3)-containing species is preferred. In the negative ion mode, complexes of the form [(UO(2))(NO(3))(m)](-) (m = 1-3) are detected, although the formation of the oxo-containing ions [(UO(2))(O)(n)(NO(3))(m)](-) (n = 1-2, m = 1-2) and the hydroxy-containing ions [(UO(2))(OH)(n)(NO(3))(m)](-) (n = 1-2, m = 0-1) are also observed. The extent of coordinative unsaturation of both positive and negative ions can be determined by ligand association/exchange and H/D exchange experiments using D(2)O and CD(3)OD as neutral reaction partners in the gas-phase. Positive ions are of varying stability and reactivity and may fragment extensively upon collision with D(2)O, CD(3)OD and N(2) in sustained off-resonance irradiation/collision-induced dissociation (SORI-CID) experiments. Electron-transfer reactions, presumably occurring during electrospray ionization but also in SORI-CID, can result in reduction of U(VI) to U(V) and perhaps even U(IV).

  18. Synergistic Extraction of Copper from Nitrate Solutions Using β-Hydroxy-Naphthaldoxime and Organophosphorus Compounds into Carbon-Tetrachloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Pulak; Basu, Sukalyan

    2011-12-01

    The extraction behavior of Cu(II) from an aqueous nitrate medium employing β-hydroxy-naphthaldoxime in carbon tetrachloride has been investigated in the presence of several organophosphorus donors like tri-octyl phosphine oxide, tri-butyl phosphine oxide, and tri-butyl phosphate at pH 1.5. The concentration of the metal was measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Synergism was observed when neutral donor was added because of the formation of the adduct [Cu(L)2.(S)] in CCl4 (S denotes neutral donor). The equilibrium constants of the binary system using β-hydroxy-naphthaldoxime and the ternary system involving another addition of an organophosphorus compound were calculated from the extraction date obtained. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of the equilibrium constants was also investigated to evaluate standard enthalpy (Δ H°), entropy (Δ S°), and free energy (Δ G°) of the reactions proposed.

  19. Uranium mobility during interaction of rhyolitic obsidian, perlite and felsite with alkaline carbonate solution: T = 120° C, P = 210 kg/cm2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Robert A.

    1979-01-01

    Well-characterized samples of rhyolitic obsidian, perlite and felsite from a single lava flow are leached of U by alkaline oxidizing solutions under open-system conditions. Pressure, temperature, flow rate and solution composition are held constant in order to evaluate the relative importance of differences in surface area and crystallinity. Under the experimental conditions U removal from crushed glassy samples proceeds by a mechanism of glass dissolution in which U and silica are dissolved in approximately equal weight fractions. The rate of U removal from crushed glassy samples increases with decreasing average grain size (surface area). Initial rapid loss of a small component (≈ 2.5%) of the total U from crushed felsite. followed by much slower U loss, reflects variable rates of attack of numerous uranium sites. The fractions of U removed during the experiment ranged from 3.2% (felsite) to 27% (perlite). An empirical method for evaluating the relative rate of U loss from contemporaneous volcanic rocks is presented which incorporates leaching results and rock permeability data.

  20. Recycling of waste printed circuit boards with simultaneous enrichment of special metals by using alkaline melts: A green and strategically advantageous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhlpfarrer, Philipp; Luidold, Stefan; Antrekowitsch, Helmut

    2016-04-15

    The increasing consumption of electric and electronic equipment has led to a rise in toxic waste. To recover the metal fraction, a separation of the organic components is necessary because harmful substances such as chlorine, fluorine and bromine cause ecological damage, for example in the form of dioxins and furans at temperature above 400°C. Hence, an alternative, environmentally friendly approach was investigated exploiting that a mixture of caustic soda and potassium hydroxide in eutectic composition melts below 200°C, enabling a fast cracking of the long hydrocarbon chains. The trials demonstrate the removal of organic compounds without a loss of copper and precious metals, as well as a suppressed formation of hazardous off-gases. In order to avoid an input of alkaline elements into the furnace and ensuing problems with refractory materials, a washing step generates a sodium and potassium hydroxide solution, in which special metals like indium, gallium and germanium are enriched. Their concentrations facilitate the recovery of these elements, because otherwise they become lost in the typical recycling processes. The aim of this work was to find an environmental solution for the separation of plastics and metals as well as a strategically important answer for the recycling of printed circuit boards and mobile phones. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Recycling of waste printed circuit boards with simultaneous enrichment of special metals by using alkaline melts: A green and strategically advantageous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuhlpfarrer, Philipp, E-mail: philipp-johannes.stuhlpfarrer@stud.unileoben.ac.at; Luidold, Stefan; Antrekowitsch, Helmut

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Removal of plastics. • Enrichment of In, Ga and Ge. • Low temperature. • No dioxines. - Abstract: The increasing consumption of electric and electronic equipment has led to a rise in toxic waste. To recover the metal fraction, a separation of the organic components is necessary because harmful substances such as chlorine, fluorine and bromine cause ecological damage, for example in the form of dioxins and furans at temperature above 400 °C. Hence, an alternative, environmentally friendly approach was investigated exploiting that a mixture of caustic soda and potassium hydroxide in eutectic composition melts below 200 °C, enabling a fast cracking of the long hydrocarbon chains. The trials demonstrate the removal of organic compounds without a loss of copper and precious metals, as well as a suppressed formation of hazardous off-gases. In order to avoid an input of alkaline elements into the furnace and ensuing problems with refractory materials, a washing step generates a sodium and potassium hydroxide solution, in which special metals like indium, gallium and germanium are enriched. Their concentrations facilitate the recovery of these elements, because otherwise they become lost in the typical recycling processes. The aim of this work was to find an environmental solution for the separation of plastics and metals as well as a strategically important answer for the recycling of printed circuit boards and mobile phones.

  2. Recycling of waste printed circuit boards with simultaneous enrichment of special metals by using alkaline melts: A green and strategically advantageous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuhlpfarrer, Philipp; Luidold, Stefan; Antrekowitsch, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Removal of plastics. • Enrichment of In, Ga and Ge. • Low temperature. • No dioxines. - Abstract: The increasing consumption of electric and electronic equipment has led to a rise in toxic waste. To recover the metal fraction, a separation of the organic components is necessary because harmful substances such as chlorine, fluorine and bromine cause ecological damage, for example in the form of dioxins and furans at temperature above 400 °C. Hence, an alternative, environmentally friendly approach was investigated exploiting that a mixture of caustic soda and potassium hydroxide in eutectic composition melts below 200 °C, enabling a fast cracking of the long hydrocarbon chains. The trials demonstrate the removal of organic compounds without a loss of copper and precious metals, as well as a suppressed formation of hazardous off-gases. In order to avoid an input of alkaline elements into the furnace and ensuing problems with refractory materials, a washing step generates a sodium and potassium hydroxide solution, in which special metals like indium, gallium and germanium are enriched. Their concentrations facilitate the recovery of these elements, because otherwise they become lost in the typical recycling processes. The aim of this work was to find an environmental solution for the separation of plastics and metals as well as a strategically important answer for the recycling of printed circuit boards and mobile phones.

  3. Effect of hydrogen charging on the stability of SAE 10B22 steel surface in alkaline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modiano, S.; Carreno, J.A.; Fugivara, C.S.; Benedetti, A.V.; Mattos, O.R.

    2005-01-01

    The influence of hydrogen charging into a quenched and tempered boron steel membrane electrode (SAE 10B22) was studied using borate buffer (pH 8.4) and NaOH solutions (pH 12.7), with or without the addition of 0.01 M EDTA. At the hydrogen input side, hydrogen charging influenced cyclic voltammograms increasing the anodic charge of iron(II) hydroxide formation, and decreasing the donor density of passive films. These results suggest that the hydrogen ingress caused instability of metallic surface, increasing the surface area activity

  4. Modelling the performance parameters of a horizontal falling film absorber with aqueous (lithium, potassium, sodium) nitrate solution using artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Álvarez, María E.; Hernández, José A.; Bourouis, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    An ANN (artificial neural network) model was developed to determine the efficiency parameters of a horizontal falling film absorber at operating conditions of interest for absorption cooling systems. The aqueous nitrate solution LiNO_3 + KNO_3 + NaNO_3 with salt mass percentages of 53%, 28% and 19%, respectively, was used as a working fluid. The authors created the ANN from the database they had compiled with the results of experiments that they had performed in a set-up designed and built for this purpose. The ANN structure consisted of 6 input variables: inlet solution and cooling water temperatures, cooling water and solution mass flow rates, absorber pressure and inlet solution concentration; 4 output variables which facilitated the assessment of the performance of the absorber: heat and mass transfer coefficients, absorption mass flux and the degree of subcooling of the solution leaving the absorber. The hidden layer contained 9 neurons which were determined by training and test procedures. The results showed that the deviation between the experimental data and the estimated values was well adjusted. This indicated that the ANN model was an effective tool for predicting the efficiency parameters of the absorber. The solution flow rate was also observed to be the most significant operating variable which affected the performance of the absorber. - Highlights: • An ANN was developed to predict the efficiency parameters of a falling film absorber. • The ANN was created using a database corresponding to a triple-effect absorption chiller. • The ANN predicts the efficiency parameters of falling film absorbers with r"2 > 0.95. • The solution flow rate is the variable that most affects the performance of the absorber.

  5. A method for the determination of free nitric acid in aqueous plutonium nitrate solutions - potassium fluoride method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mair, M.A.

    1988-06-01

    Plutonium IV and VI, and certain other hydrolysable metals which may be present, are converted to non-interfering species by the addition of the sample to potassium fluoride solution. The free acid is then titrated with standard sodium hydroxide solution using phenolphthalein as an indicator. (author)

  6. Treatment of uranyl nitrate and flouride solutions; Tratamiento de soluciones que contienen nitrato de uranilo y fluoruros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigo Otero, A; Rodrigo Vilaseca, F; Morales Calvo, G

    1977-07-01

    A theoretical study on the fluoride complexes contained in uranyl and aluminium solutions has been carried out. Likewise concentration limits and Duhring diagrams for those solutions have been experimentally established. As a result, the optimum operation conditions for concentration by evaporation in the treatment plant, have been deduced. (Author) 12 refs.

  7. Enhancement of radiation-induced base release from nucleosides in alkaline solution: essential role of the O.- radical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholes, M.L.; Schuchmann, M.N.; Sonntag, C. von

    1992-01-01

    The effect of pH on base release in the γ-radiolysis of N 2 O-saturated solutions of a number of nucleosides (including uridine, 3-methyluridine, 2', 3' -O-isopropylidene-uridine, and adenosine) has been investigated. For all these nucleosides, independent of the base or sugar moiety, base release is very low at pH below 10 (G∼(0.3-0.7) x 10 -7 mol J -1 ), but increases drastically to G∼(3-4) x 10 -7 mol J -1 at pH ≥ 13. It is concluded that the increase in base release at high pH is caused by the increasing participation of O .- , which, unlike . OH, attacks the nucleosides preferentially at their sugar moieties, and is not due to an OH - -induced radical transfer from the base to the sugar moiety. (author)

  8. Assessment of the potential for ammonium nitrate formation and reaction in Tank 241-SY-101

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pederson, L.R.; Bryan, S.A.

    1994-08-01

    Two principal scenarios by which ammonium nitrate may be formed were considered: (a) precipitation of ammonium nitrate in the waste, and (b) ammonium nitrate formation via the gas phase reaction of ammonia and nitrogen dioxide. The first of these can be dismissed because ammonium ions, which are necessary for ammonium nitrate precipitation, can exist only in negligibly small concentrations in strongly alkaline solutions. Gas phase reactions between ammonia, nitrogen dioxide, and water vapor in the gas phase represent the most likely means by which ammonium nitrate aerosols could be formed in Tank 241-SY-101. Predicted ammonium nitrate formation rates are largely controlled by the concentration of nitrogen dioxide. This gas has not been detected among those gases vented from the wastes using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FTIR) or mass spectrometry. While detection limits for nitrogen dioxide have not been established experimentally, the maximum concentration of nitrogen dioxide in the gas phase in Tank 241-SY-101 was estimated at 0.1 ppm based on calculations using the HITRAN data base and on FTIR spectra of gases vented from the wastes. At 50 C and with 100 ppm ammonia also present, less than one gram of ammonium nitrate per year is estimated to be formed in the tank. To date, ammonium nitrate has not been detected on HEPA filters in the ventilation system, so any quantity that has been formed in the tank must be quite small, in good agreement with rate calculations. The potential for runaway exothermic reactions involving ammonium nitrate in Tank 241-SY-101 is minimal. Dilution by non-reacting waste components, particularly water, would prevent hazardous exothermic reactions from occurring within the waste slurry, even if ammonium nitrate were present. 41 refs

  9. Development of a process for co-conversion of Pu-U nitrate mixed solutions to mixed oxide powder using microwave heating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Masumichi; Ohtsuka, Katsuyuki; Ohshima, Hirofumi; Isagawa, Hiroto; Akiyama, Hideo; Todokoro, Akio; Naruki, Kaoru

    1983-01-01

    For the complete nuclear fuel cycle, the development of a process for the co-conversion of Pu-U nitrate mixed solutions to mixed oxide powder has been performed along the line of non-proliferation policy of nuclear materials. A new co-conversion process using a microwave heating method has been developed and successfully demonstrated with good results using the test unit with a capacity of 2 kg MOX/d. Through the experiments and engineering test operations, several important data have been obtained concerning the feasibility of the test unit, powder characteristics and homogeneity of the product, and impurity pickups during denitration process. The results of these experimental operations show that the co-conversion process using a microwave heating method has many excellent advantages, such as good powder characteristics of the product, good homogeneity of Pu-U oxide, simplicity of the process, minimum liquid waste, no possibility of changing the Pu/U ratio and stable operability of the plant. Since August 1979, plutonium nitrate solution transported from the Tokai Reprocessing Plant has been converted to mixed oxide powder which has the Pu/U ratio = 1. The products have been processed to the ATR ''FUGEN'' reloading fuel. Based on the successful development of the co-conversion process, the microwave heating direct denitration facility with a 10 kg MOX/d capacity has been constructed adjacent to the reprocessing plant. This facility will come into hot operation by the fall of this year. For future development of the microwave heating method, a continuous direct denitration, a vitrification of high active liquid waste and a solidification of the plutonium-contaminated waste are investigated in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp. (author)

  10. A time effect in the early stages of a surface oxidation of a Pt(111 plane in alkaline solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. LOVIC

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available A time effect in the early stages of surface oxidation of a Pt(111 plane in 0.1 M NaOH solution was studied by examining the reduction parts of the j/E profile recorded after holding the potential for various times at several values at the end of anodic-going sweeps. The processes associated with the two peaks, which appear in the anodic part of the voltammogram, are assigned to the early stages of a surface oxidation. Two OHad states are suggested based on the existence of reversibly or weakly bound OHad species and irreversibly or strongly bound OHad species. The reversibly bound OHad species are involved in the “normal” structure of the butterfly peak, while the irreversibly adsorbed OHad species can be obtained only by the slow diffusion of a part of the initially electrosorbed OH species from sites with low to sites with higher binding energies. The irreversibly reduced OHad species cannot be completely removed from the surface causing, therefore, some permanent transformation of the initial state of the surface. This kind of species was not detected in the area of the second oxidation peak. The phenomena observed in the reduction part of the j/E profile induced by a time effect in the second peak could be associated with a place-exchange mechanism between oxygen containing species, whatever they are, and the platinum surface.

  11. The anodic dissolution of SIMFUEL (UO{sub 2}) in slightly alkaline sodium carbonate/bicarbonate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keech, P.G.; Goldik, J.S.; Qin, Z. [Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond St, London ON, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Shoesmith, D.W., E-mail: dwshoesm@uwo.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond St, London ON, N6A 5B7 (Canada)

    2011-09-30

    The corrosion of nuclear fuel under waste disposal conditions is likely to be influenced by the bicarbonate/carbonate content of the groundwater since it increases the solubility of the U{sup VI} corrosion product, [UO{sub 2}]{sup 2+}. As one of the half reactions involved in the corrosion process, the anodic dissolution of SIMFUEL (UO{sub 2}) has been studied in bicarbonate/carbonate solutions (pH 9.8) using voltammetric and potentiostatic techniques and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The reaction proceeds by two consecutive one electron transfer reactions (U{sup IV} {yields} U{sup V} {yields} U{sup VI}). At low potentials ({<=}250 mV (vs. SCE) the rate of the first electron transfer reaction is rate determining irrespective of the total carbonate concentration. At potentials >250 mV (vs. SCE) the formation of a U{sup VI}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3} surface layer begins to inhibit the dissolution rate and the current becomes independent of potential indicating rate control by the chemical dissolution of this layer.

  12. Behavior of technetium in alkaline solution: Identification of non-pertechnetate species in high-level nuclear waste tanks at the Hanford reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukens, Wayne W. Jr.; Shuh, David K.; Schroeder, Norman C.; Ashley, Kenneth R.

    2003-01-01

    Technetium is a long-lived (99Tc: 213,000 year half-life) fission product found in nuclear waste and is one of the important isotopes of environmental concern. The known chemistry of technetium suggests that it should be found as pertechnetate, TcO4-, in the extremely basic environment of the nuclear waste tanks at the Hanford site. However, other chemical forms of technetium are present in significant amounts in certain tanks, and these non-pertechnetate species complicate the treatment of the waste. The only spectroscopic characterization of these non-pertechnetate species is a series of X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra of actual tank waste. To better understand the behavior of technetium under these conditions, we have investigated the reduction of pertechnetate in highly alkaline solution in the presence of compounds found in high-level waste. These results and the X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra of these species are compared to the chemical behavior and XANES spectra of the actual non-pertechnetate species. The identity of the nonpertechnetate species is surprising

  13. Anodic oxidation of ammonia in alkaline solutions at Pt/Pt electrodes. Hakkin denkyokujo ni okeru enkisei ammonia yoeki no anodo sanka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takagi, Ryoichiro; Katsuta, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Tamotsu; Kobayashi, Yoshikazu; Asami, Yusaku; Hirano, Katsuhiko (Shibaura Inst. of Tech., Tokyo (Japan))

    1989-01-05

    Anodic oxidation of ammonia in alkaline solutions on Pt/Pt electrode, in which NH {sub 3} is oxidized producing N {sub 2}, is a promising reaction in application to a fuel cell and water treatment. In this study, the relations between electrode potential and adsorbed intermediates, reaction process were elucidated by potentiodynamic method and potential step method. In measurement, a transient memory device and a microprocessor were connected to an electrolysis device as a new method, then measurement of electric potential and current and integral calculation were perfromed at high speed. Active sites of electrode were covered by Pt NH {sub x}. Faradic current corresponds to the N {sub 2} evolution was shown markedly by anodic scanning. The relation between electrode potential and reaction process was revealed by potential step method. It is found that Pt-NH {sub 2} is the active intermediate for the N {sub 2} evolution, and when current shows maximum, its coverage is nearly 0.5. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Surface monitoring for pitting evolution into uniform corrosion on Cu-Ni-Zn ternary alloy in alkaline chloride solution: ex-situ LCM and in-situ SECM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Decheng; Dong, Chaofang; Zheng, Zhaoran; Mao, Feixiong; Xu, Aoni; Ni, Xiaoqing; Man, Cheng; Yao, Jizheng; Xiao, Kui; Li, Xiaogang

    2018-05-01

    The evolution of the corrosion process on Cu-Ni-Zn alloy in alkaline chloride solution was investigated by in-situ scanning electrochemical microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and ex-situ laser confocal microscopy, and the effects of ambient temperature and polarization time were also discussed. The results demonstrated a higher pitting nucleation rate and lower pit growth rate at low temperature. The ratio of pit depth to mouth diameter decreased with increasing pit volume and temperature, indicating that pits preferentially propagate in the horizontal direction rather than the vertical direction owing to the presence of corrosion products and deposited copper. The surface current was uniform and stabilized at approximately 2.2 nA during the passive stage, whereas the current increased after the pits were formed with the maximum approaching 3 nA. Increasing the temperature led to an increase in porous corrosion products (CuO, Zn(OH)2, and Ni(OH)2) and significantly increased the rate of transition from pitting to uniform corrosion. Dezincification corrosion was detected by energy dispersive spectrometry, and a mechanism for pitting transition into uniform corrosion induced by dezincification at the grain boundaries is proposed.

  15. Effect of Low-Temperature Environment on Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of X80 Pipeline Steel in Simulated Alkaline Soil Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fei; Wang, Dan; Wu, Ming; Yu, Chengxiang; Sun, Dongxu; Yang, Xu; Xu, Changhao

    2018-04-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of X80 pipeline steel in simulated alkaline soil solution under different temperatures was investigated by slow-strain-rate testing, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Results showed that the fracture was transgranular and brittle at 273 K to 278 K (0 °C to 5 °C), and the metal surface was dissolved by a large number of chloride ions. Furthermore, hydrogen embrittlement was caused by the hydrogen atom extended to the high-stress region. The fracture process was controlled by hydrogen-induced cracking, and SCC was highly sensitive at this stage. At 288 K to 298 K (15 °C to 25 °C), the fracture morphology was attributed to the mixed mode of ductile and brittle fractures, the fracture process was controlled by the mechanism of hydrogen-induced cracking and anodic dissolution, and the susceptibility to SCC decreased. When the temperature reached 308 K to 318 K (35 °C to 45 °C), the fracture was mainly intergranular and ductile, the fracture process was controlled by anodic dissolution, and SCC sensitivity was the smallest in this temperature range.

  16. The anodic dissolution of zinc and zinc alloys in alkaline solution. II. Al and Zn partial dissolution from 5% Al–Zn coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu, T.N.; Mokaddem, M.; Volovitch, P.; Ogle, K.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: The polarization behavior of a 5 wt% Al–Zn steel coating (Galfan™) has been investigated in alkaline solution using atomic emission spectroelectrochemistry (AESEC). The instantaneous Zn and Al dissolution rates were measured as a function of time during a linear scan and potential step transients. The formation rate of insoluble oxides was determined from the difference between the convoluted total current and the sum of the elemental dissolution currents. It was found that, over a wide potential range, the zinc and aluminum partial currents behaved in a similar way to pure zinc and pure aluminum independently. However, during the period in which zinc was active, aluminum dissolution was inhibited. This is attributed to the inhibitive effect of the first and/or the second states of zinc oxide that are formed during the active potential domain. The third form of zinc oxide, observed at higher potential and responsible for the passivation of zinc dissolution, does not have a measurable effect on the Al dissolution rate.

  17. Assessing submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) and nitrate fluxes in highly heterogeneous coastal karst aquifers: Challenges and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, Daniel; Dimova, Natasha; Andreo, Bartolomé; Prieto, Jorge; García-Orellana, Jordi; Rodellas, Valentí

    2018-02-01

    Groundwater discharge in coastal karst aquifers worldwide represents a substantial part of the water budget and is a main pathway for nutrient transport to the sea. Groundwater discharge to the sea manifests under different forms, making its assessment very challenging particularly in highly heterogeneous coastal systems karst systems. In this study, we present a methodology approach to identify and quantify four forms of groundwater discharge in a mixed lithology system in southern Spain (Maro-Cerro Gordo) that includes an ecologically protected coastal area comprised of karstic marble. We found that groundwater discharge to the sea occurs via: (1) groundwater-fed creeks, (2) coastal springs, (3) diffuse groundwater seepage through seabed sediments, and (4) submarine springs. We used a multi-method approach combining tracer techniques (salinity, 224Ra, and 222Rn) and direct measurements (seepage meters and flowmeters) to evaluate the discharge. Groundwater discharge via submarine springs was the most difficult to assess due to their depth (up to 15 m) and extensive development of the springs conduits. We determined that the total groundwater discharge over the 16 km of shoreline of the study area was at least 11 ± 3 × 103 m3 d-1 for the four types of discharge assessed. Groundwater-derived nitrate (NO3-) fluxes to coastal waters over ∼3 km (or 20%) in a highly populated and farmed section of Maro-Cerro Gordo was 641 ± 166 mol d-1, or ∼75% of the total NO3- loading in the study area. We demonstrate in this study that a multi-method approach must be applied to assess all forms of SGD and derived nutrient fluxes to the sea in highly heterogeneous karst aquifer systems.

  18. Structural characterization of a Cu(II) thin-film aging in a Cu-nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mear, F.O.; Essi, M.; Sistat, P.; Guimon, M.-F.; Gonbeau, D.; Pradel, A.

    2009-01-01

    The response of thin-film copper (II) ion-selective electrodes based on chalcogenide glassy Cu-Sb-Ge-Se is described according to the soaking time in a 10 -4 M copper (II) solution. The chalcogenide membrane/solution interface has been investigated by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in order to understand the sensing properties. During the first month of the soaking, an alteration of the membrane by a chemical change without alteration of the sensor detection performance has been observed.

  19. Structure and reactivity of thiazolium azo dyes: UV-visible, resonance Raman, NMR, and computational studies of the reaction mechanism in alkaline solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Laurence C; Batchelor, Stephen N; Moore, John N

    2013-03-07

    UV-visible absorption, resonance Raman, and (1)H NMR spectroscopy, allied with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, have been used to study the structure, bonding, and alkaline hydrolysis mechanism of the cationic thiazloium azo dye, 2-[2-[4-(diethylamino)phenyl]diazenyl]-3-methyl-thiazolium (1a), along with a series of six related dyes with different 4-dialkylamino groups and/or other phenyl ring substituents (2a-c, 3a-c) and the related isothiazolium azo dye, 5-[2-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]diazenyl]-2-methyl-isothiazolium (4). These diazahemicyanine dyes are calculated to have a similar low-energy structure that is cis, trans at the (iso)thiazolium-azo group, and for which the calculated Raman spectra provide a good match with the experimental data; the calculations on these structures are used to assign and discuss the transitions giving rise to the experimental spectra, and to consider the bonding and its variation between the dyes. UV-visible, Raman, and NMR spectra recorded from minutes to several weeks after raising the pH of an aqueous solution of 1a to ca. 11.5 show that the dominant initial step in the reaction is loss of diethylamine to produce a quinonimine (ca. hours), with subsequent reactions occurring on longer time scales (ca. days to weeks); kinetic analyses give a rate constant of 2.6 × 10(-2) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1) for reaction of 1a with OH(-). UV-visible spectra recorded on raising the pH of the other dyes in solution show similar changes that are attributed to the same general reaction mechanism, but with different rate constants for which the dependence on structure is discussed.

  20. Precipitation of uranium oxide by reduction in alkaline solution; Precipitation d'oxyde d'uranium par reduction en milieu alcalin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pottier, P; Claus, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    In the first part of the report the authors study the reaction mechanism for this reduction which makes it possible to precipitate a hydrated uranium oxide from alkaline uranyl carbonate solutions. The research into the effects of different variables on numerous cycles are then summarized. Optical, X-ray and thermogravimetric examinations then make it possible to predict the properties of this oxide. In the second part the authors carry out calculations for the continuous operation of single cells and cells in series. These calculations give the data required for the construction of 2 cells having capacities of 0.3 and 10 litres. Results obtained from the continuous operation of this latter cell lead to certain conclusions concerning the applicability of this method to the hydrometallurgy of uranium. (authors) [French] Dans une premiere partie, les auteurs etudient le mecanisme de reaction de cette reduction qui permet la precipitation d'un oxyde d'uranium hydrate dans les solutions d'uranyle-carbonates alcalins. Les etudes de diverses variables sur de nombreux cycles sont ensuite resumees. Puis des examens optiques, aux rayons X et par thermogravimetrie, permettent de proposer une hypothese sur les proprietes de l'oxyde obtenu. Dans la deuxieme partie, les auteurs developpent un calcul prevoyant la marche continue de cellules uniques et en cascades. De ces calculs on tire les elements permettant la realisation de deux cellules de 0,3 et 10 litres. Des resultats de marche continue sur cette derniere cellule, on peut conclure a l'applicabilite de cette methode a l'hydrometallurgie de l'uranium. (auteurs)

  1. Effects of nitrogen on temporal and spatial patterns of nitrate in streams and soil solution of a central hardwood forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank S. Gilliam; Mary Beth. Adams

    2011-01-01

    This study examined changes in stream and soil water NO3- and their relationship to temporal and spatial patterns of NO3- in soil solution of watersheds at the Fernow Experimental Forest, West Virginia. Following tenfold increases in stream NO3

  2. Effects of structural and textural grain characteristics on leaching of sulphide minerals from a polymetallic concentrate by sodium nitrate and sulphuric acid solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokić Miroslav D.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the influence of structural and textural characteristics of sulfide minerals on their leaching from a polymetallic concentrate by sulfuric acid and sodium nitrate solution is presented. The starting material was Pb–Zn–Cu sulphide polymetallic concentrate enriched during the flotation of a polymetallic ore in the "Rudnik" flotation plant (Rudnik – Serbia. Leaching experiments were carried out in a closed glass reactor, which provides stable hermetic conditions and allows heating at constant temperature. Chemical, XRD, qualitative and quantitative microscopic and SEM/EDX analyses were used to characterizes samples of the polymetallic concentrate and leach residue. It was determined that chalcopyrite, sphalerite, galena, pyrrhotite and quartz were present in the polymetallic concentrate. The content of sulphide minerals was 69.5%, of which 60.9% occurred as liberated grains: 88.3% of chalcopyrite, 59.3% of sphalerite, 25.1% of galena and 51.6% of pirrhotite. The rest of chalcopyrite, sphalerite, galena and pirrhotite grains were in the forms of inclusions, impregnations, and simple and complex intergrowths. During the leaching process by sodium nitrate and sulphuric acid solution, it was shown previously that the leaching rate of sulphide minerals decreased with time while a part of the sulphide minerals remained in the leach residue. After leaching at 80°C for 120 min, the yields were 69.8, 82.7 and 67.1% for Cu, Zn and Fe, respectively. Lead, in the form of insoluble anglesite, remained in the leach residue. In addition to the anglesite, unleached sulfide minerals and quartz, elemental sulfur was found in the solid residue. The content of sulphide minerals was 35% of which 33.7% minerals occur independently. In specific, 54.7% of chalcopyrite, 31.9% of sphalerite, 8.2% of galena and 37.6% of pyrrhotite appear as separate grains with highly corroded surfaces. Therefore, the structural assembly of sulphide grains in the

  3. Radiolysis of permanganate and its mixtures with bromate and nitrate ions in solution at pH 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedgaonkar, V.G.; Kulkarni, S.A.; Mahajan, C.T.

    1981-01-01

    γ-radiolysis of aqueous solutions of pure permanganate and its binary mixture with nitrite and bromate ions at pH 10 is studied as a function of concentration and dose. In pure system G(-MnO 4 - ) increases with the increase in initial concentration from 0.68 to a maximum of 25. The rise is sharp above 10 -2 M concentration which indicates the occurrence of a chain mechanism. In the presence of bromate or nitrite the G value decreases: the G(-MnO 4 - ) in 10 -3 M permanganate solution is 1.07, with 10 -1 M bromate it is 0.2 and with 10 -2 M nitrite it is 0.7. A mechanism based on the cometitive kinetics is envisaged to explain the observed results. (author)

  4. Volume measurement system for plutonium nitrate solution and its uncertainty to be used for nuclear materials accountancy proved by demonstration over fifteen years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoma, Takashi

    2010-10-01

    An accurate volume measurement system for plutonium nitrate solution stored in an accountability tank with dip-tubes has been developed and demonstrated over fifteen years at the Plutonium Conversion Development Facility of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency. As a result of calibrations during the demonstration, it was proved that measurement uncertainty practically achieved and maintained was less than 0.1% (systematic character) and 0.15% (random) as one sigma which was half of the current target uncertainty admitted internationally. It was also proved that discrepancy between measured density and analytically determined density was less than 0.002 g·cm -3 as one sigma. These uncertainties include effects by long term use of the accountability tank where cumulative plutonium throughput is six tons. The system consists of high precision differential pressure transducers and a dead-weight tester, sequentially controlled valves for periodical zero adjustment, dampers to reduce pressure oscillation and a procedure to correct measurement biases. The sequence was also useful to carry out maintenances safely without contamination. Longevity of the transducer was longer than 15 years. Principles and essentials to determine solution volume and weight of plutonium, measurement biases and corrections, accurate pressure measurement system, maintenances and diagnostics, operational experiences, evaluation of measurement uncertainty are described. (author)

  5. Vapor pressure of heat transfer fluids of absorption refrigeration machines and heat pumps: Binary solutions of lithium nitrate with methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safarov, Javid T.

    2005-01-01

    Vapor pressure p of LiNO 3 + CH 3 OH solutions at T = (298.15 to 323.15) K was reported, osmotic φ and activity coefficients γ; and activity of solvent a s have been evaluated. The experiments were carried out in molality range m = (0.18032 to 5.2369) mol . kg -1 . The Antoine equation was used for the empiric description of experimental vapor pressure results. The Pitzer-Mayorga model with inclusion of Archer's ionic strength dependence of the third virial coefficient was used for the description of calculated osmotic coefficients. The parameters of Archer extended Pitzer model were used for evaluation of activity coefficients

  6. The study of kinetics of uranyl nitrate extraction and reextraction, di-n-butylphosphoric acid reextraction in the flow mixer in the system aqueous solutions - tri-n-butyl phosphate in diluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shchepetil'nikov, N.N.; Timofeev, A.N.; Kharitonov, V.V.

    1992-01-01

    Kinetics of uranyl nitrate and HNO 3 extraction and reextraction in a flow-type mixer for the system 30 vol.% TBP in extractant dearomatized diluent (EDD) was studied. Kinetics of dibutylphosphate acid reextraction was considered and the influence of uranium and zirconium presence on the process was investigated. It is shown that in laboratory mixer of continuous action in case of phase contact duration of 1 min. in system 30 % solution of TBP in EDD extraction sufficiently similar to equilibrium extraction of uranyl nitrate and nitric acid during their extraction and reextraction is achieved

  7. The diffusion behaviour of hydrogen in a low alloyed carbon steel with respect to the deformation level and to the passivation process in alkaline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juilfs, G.G.

    2001-01-01

    The diffusion behaviour of hydrogen in a low alloyed carbon steel with respect to the deformation level and to the passivation process in alkaline solutions. The influence of plastic strain on the diffusion behaviour of hydrogen in a low alloyed structural steel (FeE 690T) was investigated using the electrochemical permeation technique. The plastic deformation was introduced either by cold rolling or by tensile straining. Specially prepared C(T)-specimen enabled the direct determination of the diffusion coefficient in the highly deformed region ahead of a blunting crack. It was shown, that the apparent diffusion coefficient depends on the plastic strain and on the overall hydrogen concentration, whereas the maximum hydrogen flux remained almost unchanged. These observations are interpreted in terms of variations in the dislocation density, which act as 'sinks' for the diffusable hydrogen atoms. The results are compared with model calculations, that describe the hydrogen transport as a function of the trap density. The comparison of the numerical simulation and the experimental data shows a good agreement over the whole range of plastic strain levels, leading to a trap density of 6.1.10 19 /d 3 . Together with the results of a previous study on the fracture toughness of FeE 690T in the presence of hydrogen the permeation data obtained in this work suggest that the observed influence of deformation rates on the fracture mechanism can be attributed to the reduced mobility of hydrogen atoms in the plastic zone. The assumption that the hydrogen transport during monotonic straining is controlled by diffusion was confirmed by investigations concerning the formation of surface films. Using a potentiodynamic method (cyclovoltammetry) a characterisation of the surface reactions involved in permeation experiments was performed. It was shown that the nature of the passive layers forming on the surface depends on the applied potential, affecting mainly the hydrogen absorption

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of the calcite/solution interface as a means to explore surface modifications induced by nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, Sascha; Schmidt, Moritz [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Div. Surface Processes; Spijker, P. [Aalto Univ., Helsinki (Finland). Dept. of Applied Physics; Voitchovsky, K. [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Physics Dept.

    2016-07-01

    The reactivity of calcite, one of the most abundant minerals in the earth's crust, is determined by the molecular details of its interface with the contacting solution. Recently, it has been found that trace concentrations of NaNO{sub 3} severely affect calcite's (104) surface and its reactivity. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations reveal density profiles of different ions near calcite's surface, with NO{sub 3}{sup -} able to reach closer to the surface than CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} and in higher concentrations. Additionally, incorporation of NO{sub 3}{sup -} into the surface significantly disturbs the water structure at the interface.

  9. Determination of free acid in highly concentrated organic and aqueous solutions of plutonium (IV) and uranium (VI) nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, J.F.; Lacour, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Free acidity is an important parameter in the nuclear reprocessing control. The accuracy on the determination of free acidity is not really required in the nuclear reprocessing control itself but is necessary for certain types of analysis such as spectrophotometry (Pu (VI), Am (III),...), density determinations. A new titripotentiometric method for free acidity determination in concentrated U(VI) and Pu(IV) solutions is presented. This method is based on the complexing properties of dipicolinic acid (pyridine 2.6 dicarboxylic acid) and medium effect with H 2 O/DMSO mixture. This method can be used either in organic or aqueous phases with ratio /H + I/ metal ≥ 5.10 -2 and a relative standard deviation of 1%

  10. Vapor pressure of heat transfer fluids of absorption refrigeration machines and heat pumps: Binary solutions of lithium nitrate with methanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safarov, Javid T. [Heat and Refrigeration Techniques, Azerbaijan Technical University, Huseyn Javid Avn. 25, AZ1073 Baku (Azerbaijan)]. E-mail: javids@azdata.net

    2005-12-15

    Vapor pressure p of LiNO{sub 3} + CH{sub 3}OH solutions at T = (298.15 to 323.15) K was reported, osmotic {phi} and activity coefficients {gamma}; and activity of solvent a {sub s} have been evaluated. The experiments were carried out in molality range m = (0.18032 to 5.2369) mol . kg{sup -1}. The Antoine equation was used for the empiric description of experimental vapor pressure results. The Pitzer-Mayorga model with inclusion of Archer's ionic strength dependence of the third virial coefficient was used for the description of calculated osmotic coefficients. The parameters of Archer extended Pitzer model were used for evaluation of activity coefficients.

  11. Nitrate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirilenko, I.A.; Vinogradov, E.E.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental evidence on behaviour of nitrate glasses is reviewed in terms of relationships between the presence of water in vitrescent nitrate systems and the properties of the systems. The glasses considered belong to systems of Mg(NO 3 ) 2 - Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; Hg(NO 3 ) 2 -Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; NaNO 3 -Mg(NO 3 ) 2 -Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; M-Zn(NO 3 ) 3 , where M is a mixture of 20% mass NaNO 3 and 80% mass Mg(NO 3 ) 2 , and Zn is a rare earth ion. Nitrate glass is shown to be a product of dehydration. Vitrification may be regarded as a resusl of formation of molecular complexes in the chain due to hydrogen bonds of two types, i.e. water-water, or water-nicrate group. Chain formation, along with low melting points of the nitrates, hinder crystallization of nitrate melts. Provided there is enough water, this results in vitrification

  12. Influence of alkaline (PH 8.3-12.0) and saline solutions on chemical, mineralogical and physical properties of two different bentonites - batch experiments at 25 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heikola, Tiina; Vuorinen, Ulla; Kumpulainen, Sirpa; Kiviranta, Leena; Korkeakoski, Petri

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Construction of a spent fuel repository deep in the bedrock will need supporting structures using cement materials. A part of them can be removed before closure but still it is estimated that about 1000 tonnes will remain in the host rock. Degradation of cementitious materials produces leachates of high pH. If such an alkaline plume reaches the bentonite buffer, it may induce mineralogical and chemical changes in bentonite over long term, and further affect the safety functions of the buffer. Laboratory experiments were done with the objective to gain data of possible alterations in mineralogical, chemical and physical properties of bentonites contacted with high-pH saline solutions. Two untreated, high grade, Na- and Ca-bentonites, were used in batch experiments, which were carried out in an anaerobic glove-box at 25±1 deg. C for 554 days. Each bentonite sample (20 g) was leached with approximately 3.8 L of leaching solution, which equals 190 mL/g of bentonite. The bentonites were leached with three types of simulated cement waters (pH 9.7, 11.3 and 12.0) and one saline groundwater simulate (pH 8.3) as a reference. The leaching solutions were 0.3 M, and contained NaCl and CaCl 2 , and trace amounts of SiO 2 , K, Br, Mg and SO 4 . Dissolved oxygen and carbon dioxide were removed from leaching solutions before mixing of bentonite in PC bottles. The samples were placed on a platform shaker in order to allow better contact between bentonite and the leaching solution. The evolution of pH in the samples was followed by measuring the pH-value of each sample in the solution phase approximately twice a week and the solution was renewed when values of two to three consecutive measurements did not change. On average, the leaching solution was renewed once a month. For each renewal of the leaching solution the phases were separated, the reacted solution withdrawn, and the chemical composition analysed. Before analysis the

  13. ROW METHOD OF SUGAR BEET (BETA VULGARIS L. FERTILIZATION WITH MULTICOMPONENT FERTILIZER BASED ON UREA-AMMONIUM NITRATE SOLUTION AS A WAY TO INCREASE NITROGEN EFFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław BARŁÓG

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Sugar beet is the main crop commonly cultivated for sugar production in temperate regions of the World. Actual yields in main Central Europe producing countries are much lower, due to many limiting factors. Among them, nutrients supply is of great value, especially referring to efficiency of nitrogen, which is generally low. In the conducted study two methods of nitrogen application were compared (i broadcast of calcium saltpeter and (ii row application of the multicomponent fertilizer based on urea-ammonium-nitrate (UAN solution. The basic amount of the applied N was 75 kg ha-1. The highest yields of both taproots and refined sugar were harvested on the plot receiving 75 kg N-1 as UAN liquid multicomponent fertilizer and 50% of the recommended P and K rates. The positive effects of row application of liquid N fertilizer on taproot and sugar yields were also corroborated by high values of indices of agronomic efficiency for both N as well as P and K. However this method of sugar beets fertilization has some possibilities, as indicated by still high contents of melassogenic substances.

  14. Obtainment of Hg-free Mn/Zn solutions from spent alkaline batteries; Obtencion de soluciones de Mn/Zn libres de Hg provenientes de pilas alcalinas gastadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Nicolas, L.; Espinosa-Ramirez, I. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, UPALM, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: lepeni@hotmail.com; Aguilar, M. [Instituto de Fisica, UNAM, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Palacios-Beas, E. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, UPALM, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-09-15

    As in many other countries, the excessive consumption of alkaline batteries in Mexico has generated highly contaminating wastes, with heavy metal contents such as Mn, Zn, Fe, Hg, Cu and Ni, among others. This has caused a large degree of environmental degradation with repercussions for the health of living beings. Because there are no regulations regarding the disposal of spent batteries, they are thrown out with the rest of the domestic wastes or directly into nature, ending up in open-air landfills or containers where they are incinerated, thereby contaminating the planet's environment, soil and springs. The present work studies the obtainment of solutions of Hg-free Mn and Zn (Mn/Zn {>=} 1) from spent alkaline batteries for use in synthesis of (Mn,Zn)Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite by a wet method. The effect is analyzed of the dissolution medium (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, HCl and HCl/NO{sub 3}) temperature and time on the percentage of dissolution of the metals present in the electrode material, characterized by atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The results of the investigation indicate that the best dissolution conditions are MD=H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, T=50 degrees Celsius and t =30 min, where 94.1 and 90.7 % (w/w) of Mn and Zn are obtained, respectively, with Mn/Zn = 1.51. The mercury content was determined to be 3.91%, higher than that stated by the battery specifications, which is recovered by dissolving with HCl/HNO{sub 3} in the residual solid. [Spanish] En Mexico como en muchos otros paises, el consumo excesivo de pilas alcalinas ha generado desechos altamente contaminantes, con contenidos de metales pesados como Mn, Zn, Fe, Hg, Cu y Ni entre otros, que han provocado un gran deterioro en el medio ambiente repercutiendo en la salud de los seres vivos. Dado que no se tiene una regulacion en cuanto a la disposicion de pilas gastadas, estas se desechan con el resto de las residuos domesticos o directamente

  15. Solubility and hydrolysis of Np(V) in dilute to concentrated alkaline NaCl solutions. Formation of Na-Np(V)-OH solid phases at 22 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, Vladimir G. [Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Dept. of Chemistry; Fellhauer, David; Gaona, Xavier; Dardenne, Kathy; Rothe, Joerg; Altmaier, Marcus [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany). Inst. for Nuclear Waste Disposal; Kalmykov, Stepan N. [Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Dept. of Chemistry; NRC Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-01

    The solubility of Np(V) was investigated at T=22±2 C in alkaline NaCl solutions of different ionic strength (0.1-5.0 M). The solid phases controlling the solubility at different -log{sub 10} m{sub H{sup +}}(pH{sub m}) and NaCl concentration were characterized by XRD, quantitative chemical analysis, SEM-EDS and XAFS (both XANES and EXAFS). Aqueous phases in equilibrium with Np(V) solids were investigated for selected samples within 8.9≤pH{sub m}≤10.3 by UV-vis/NIR absorption spectroscopy. In 0.1 M NaCl, the experimental solubility of the initial greenish NpO{sub 2}OH(am) solid phase is in good agreement with previous results obtained in NaClO{sub 4} solutions, and is consistent with model calculations for fresh NpO{sub 2}OH(am) using the thermodynamic data selection in NEA-TDB. Below pH{sub m}∝11.5 and for all NaCl concentrations studied, Np concentration in equilibrium with the solid phase remained constant during the timeframe of this study (∝2 years). This observation is in contrast to the aging of the initial NpO{sub 2}OH(am) into a more crystalline modification with the same stoichiometry, NpO{sub 2}OH(am, aged), as reported in previous studies for concentrated NaClO{sub 4} and NaCl. Instead, the greenish NpO{sub 2}OH(am) transforms into a white solid phase in those systems with [NaCl]≥1.0 M and pH{sub m}≥11.5, and into two different pinkish phases above pH{sub m}∝13.2. The solid phase transformation is accompanied by a drop in Np solubility of 0.5-2 log{sub 10}-units (depending upon NaCl concentration). XANES analyses of green, white and pink phases confirm the predominance of Np(V) in all cases. Quantitative chemical analysis shows the incorporation of Na{sup +} in the original NpO{sub 2}OH(am) material, with Na:Np ≤ 0.3 for the greenish solids and 0.8 ≤ Na:Np ≤ 1.6 for the white and pinkish phases. XRD data confirms the amorphous character of the greenish phase, whereas white and pink solids show well-defined but discrepant XRD patterns

  16. Study of the influence of radiolysis on the stability of plutonium III. Application to a heterogeneous medium formed by a nitric solution of ferrous ions and an organic solution of trilauryl-ammonium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourmaux, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this research thesis is to study the behaviour of plutonium 238 in media which are commonly used to isolate it from other elements such as neptunium and fission products created during the neutron irradiation of the neptunium 237 isotope. As plutonium 238 purification processes are all based on redox reaction, it is essential to know the influence of radiolysis on the redox behaviour, and on the distribution coefficients of this isotope in solutions used during its separation from the neptunium 237 isotope. Therefore, it is necessary to study the influence of radiolysis on the stability of plutonium with an oxidation III level. As this extraction is performed by an organic solvent (trilauryl-ammonium nitrate), this study addresses the behaviour of plutonium in an emulsion formed by this solvent and the nitric aqueous solution previously adjusted in terms of Fe 2+ ions. After a brief recall of bibliographical generalities related to radiolysis, the author presents and comments the Nernst law in the case of a two-phase system (emulsion), and reports the use of this law to obtain the plutonium potential-distribution coefficient relationship. The last part reports experimental data

  17. Nitrate photolysis in salty snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, D. J.; Morenz, K.; Shi, Q.; Murphy, J. G.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrate photolysis from snow can have a significant impact on the oxidative capacity of the local atmosphere, but the factors affecting the release of gas phase products are not well understood. Here, we report the first systematic study of the amounts of NO, NO2, and total nitrogen oxides (NOy) emitted from illuminated snow samples as a function of both nitrate and total salt (NaCl and Instant Ocean) concentration. We show that the release of nitrogen oxides to the gas phase is directly related to the expected nitrate concentration in the brine at the surface of the snow crystals, increasing to a plateau value with increasing nitrate, and generally decreasing with increasing NaCl or Instant Ocean (I.O.). In frozen mixed nitrate (25 mM) - salt (0-500 mM) solutions, there is an increase in gas phase NO2 seen at low added salt amounts: NO2 production is enhanced by 35% at low prefreezing [NaCl] and by 70% at similar prefreezing [I.O.]. Raman microscopy of frozen nitrate-salt solutions shows evidence of stronger nitrate exclusion to the air interface in the presence of I.O. than with added NaCl. The enhancement in nitrogen oxides emission in the presence of salts may prove to be important to the atmospheric oxidative capacity in polar regions.

  18. Characterization of the deviation of the ideality of concentrated electrolytic solutions: plutonium 4 and uranium 4 nitrate salts study; Contribution a la caracterisation de l'ecart a l'idealite des solutions concentrees d'electrolytes: application aux cas de nitrates de plutonium (4) et d'uranium (4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charrin, N

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to establish a new binary data base by compiling the activity coefficients of plutonium and uranium at oxidation state +IV to better account for media effects in the liquid-liquid extraction operations implemented to reprocess spent nuclear fuel. Chapter 1: first reviews the basic thermodynamic concepts before describing the issues involved in acquiring binary data for the tetravalent actinides. The difficulties arise from two characteristics of this type of electrolyte: its radioactive properties (high specific activity requiring nuclearization of the experimental instrumentation) and its physicochemical properties (strong hydrolysis). After defining the notion of fictive binary data, an approach based on the thermodynamic concept of simple solutions is described in which the activity coefficient of an aqueous phase constituent is dependent on two parameters: the water activity of the system and the total concentration of dissolved constituents. The method of acquiring fictive binary electrolyte data is based on water activity measurements for ternary or quaternary actinide mixtures in nitric acid media, and binary data for nitric acid. The experimental value is then correlated with the characteristics of the fictive binary solution of the relevant electrolyte. Chapter 2: proposes more reliable binary data for nitric acid than the published equivalents, the disparities of which are discussed. The validation of the method described in Chapter 1 for acquiring fictive binary data is then addressed. The test electrolyte, for which binary data are available in the literature, is thorium(IV) nitrate. The method is validated by comparing the published binary data obtained experimentally for binary solutions with the data determined for the ternary Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}/HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O system investigated in this study. The very encouraging results of this comparison led us to undertake further research in this area. Chapter 3 discusses

  19. A low-temperature process for the denitration of Hanford single-shell tank, nitrate-based waste utilizing the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattus, A.J.; Lee, D.D.; Dillow, T.A.; Farr, L.L.; Loghry, S.L.; Pitt, W.W.; Gibson, M.R.

    1994-12-01

    Bench-top feasibility studies with Hanford single-shell tank (SST) simulants, using a new, low-temperature (50 to 60C) process for converting nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC), have conclusively shown that between 85 to 99% of the nitrate can be readily converted. In this process, aluminum powders or shot can be used to convert alkaline, nitrate-based supernate to ammonia and an aluminum oxide-sodium aluminate-based solid which might function as its own waste form. The process may actually be able to utilize already contaminated aluminum scrap metal from various DOE sites to effect the conversion. The final, nearly nitrate-free ceramic-like product can be pressed and sintered like other ceramics. Based upon the starting volumes of 6.2 and 3.1 M sodium nitrate solution, volume reductions of 50 to 55% were obtained for the waste form produced, compared to an expected 35 to 50% volume increase if the Hanford supernate were grouted. Engineering data extracted from bench-top studies indicate that the process will be very economical to operate, and data were used to cost a batch, 1,200-kg NO 3 /h plant for working off Hanford SST waste over 20 years. Their total process cost analysis presented in the appendix, indicates that between $2.01 to 2.66 per kilogram of nitrate converted will be required. Additionally, data on the fate of select radioelements present in solution are presented in this report as well as kinetic, operational, and control data for a number of experiments. Additionally, if the ceramic product functions as its own waste form, it too will offer other cost savings associated with having a smaller volume of waste form as well as eliminating other process steps such as grouting

  20. Perrhenate sorption kinetics in zerovalent iron in high pH and nitrate media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenell, Brian A.; Arai, Yuji

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Ammonium adsorption enhanced ReO 4 − adsorption in ZVI under alkaline conditions (modified from Cho et al., 2015) [39]. - Highlights: • ZVI effectively sorbs Re(VII) at near neutral pH. • Sorption of Re(VII) in ZVI is attributed to the reductive precipitation of Re(IV)O 2 . • The extent of Re(VII) sorption in ZVI decreases with increasing pH from 8 to 10. • The rate of Re(VII) sorption in ZVI increases with increasing nitrate concentration. - Abstract: Technetium(Tc)-99 is one of major risk drivers in low level radioactive liquid waste at the U.S. Department of Energy sites. Cementitious waste technology (CWT) has been considered immobilizing pertechnetate, Tc(VII)O 4 − , in brine and alkaline waste solutions, as Tc(IV) oxides and/or sulfides with the use of reducing agents like slag. In this study, zero valent iron (ZVI) was evaluated as a potential reducing agent in CWT as a function of pH and [nitrate] (0–0.1 M) using perrhenate, Re(VII)O 4 − , as an analogue for Tc(VII)O 4 − . Batch Re(VII)O 4 − sorption experiments in conjunction with X-ray absorption spectroscopic analysis showed that the Re(VII) sorption occurred via the reductive precipitation of Re(IV)O 2 (s) and the extent of sorption decreased with increasing pH from 8 to 10. Interestingly, pseudo 2nd order kinetic rates increased with increasing [nitrate] which was attributed to co-adsorption of NH 4 + (i.e., a reaction product of reduced nitrate by ZVI), facilitating electrostatic attraction towards ReO 4 − under alkaline conditions. Considering the thermodynamically favorable reduction of Tc(VII) over Re(VII), ZVI might have potential for improving the reduction capacity of the current CWT.

  1. Ammonium nitrate-potassium nitrate system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cady, H.H.

    1981-01-01

    A portion of the binary phase diagram for the system ammonium nitrate-potassium nitrate has been determined from -55/sup 0/C to 185/sup 0/C. Results are presented for the ammonium-nitrate-rich end of the system up to 30 wt% potassium nitrate.

  2. Effect of the nature of alkali and alkaline-earth oxides on the structure and crystallization of an alumino-borosilicate glass developed to immobilize highly concentrated nuclear waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintas, A.; Caurant, D.; Majerus, O.; Charpentier, T.; Dussossoy, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    A complex rare-earth rich alumino-borosilicate glass has been proved to be a good candidate for the immobilization of new high level radioactive wastes. A simplified seven-oxides composition of this glass was selected for this study. In this system, sodium and calcium cations were supposed in other works to simulate respectively all the other alkali (R + = Li + , Rb + , Cs + ) and alkaline-earth (R 2+ = Sr 2+ , Ba 2+ ) cations present in the complex glass composition. Moreover, neodymium or lanthanum are used here to simulate all the rare-earths and actinides occurring in waste solutions. In order to study the impact of the nature of R + and R 2+ cations on both glass structure and melt crystallization tendency during cooling, two glass series were prepared by replacing either Na + or Ca 2+ cations in the simplified glass by respectively (Li + , K + , Rb + , Cs + ) or (Mg 2+ , Sr 2+ , Ba 2+ ) cations. From these substitutions, it was established that alkali ions are preferentially involved in the charge compensation of (AlO 4 ) - entities in the glass network comparatively to alkaline-earth ions. The glass compositions containing calcium give way to the crystallization of an apatite silicate phase bearing calcium and rare-earth ions. The melt crystallization tendency during cooling strongly varies with the nature of the alkaline-earth. (authors)

  3. Electrochemical transformations of oxygen and the defect structure of solid solutions on the basis of alkaline earth metal ortho-vanadates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khodos, M.Ya.; Belysheva, G.M.; Brajnina, Kh.Z.

    1986-01-01

    Effect of iso- and heterovalent substitution in the structure of alkaline earth metal ortho-vanadates and synthesis conditions, simulating the definite type of their crystal lattice disordering, on the character of potentiodynamic anodic-cathodic curves has been investigated by the method of cyclic voltammetry. Correlation between signals observed and the defect structure of oxide compounds is refined. Oxygen chemisorption is shown to be determined by concentration of nonequilibrium oxygen vacancies, which formation is accompanied by appearance of quasi-free electrons

  4. The nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process: A newly developed low-temperature technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattus, A.J.; Lee, D.D.

    1993-01-01

    Bench-top feasibility studies with Hanford single-shell tank (SST) simulants, using a new low-temperature (50-60 degrees C) process for converting nitrate to ammonia and ceramic, have conclusively shown that between 90 and 99% of the nitrate at Hanford can be readily converted to ammonia. In this process, aluminum powders or shot can be used to convert alkaline, nitrate-based supernate to ammonia and an alumina-silica-based ceramic solid. The process may actually be able to utilize already contaminated aluminum scrap metal from various US DOE sites to effect the conversion. The final nitrate-free ceramic product can be calcined, pressed, and sintered like any other ceramic. Based upon the starting volumes of 6.2 and 3.1 M sodium nitrate solution (probable supernate concentrations resulting from salt-cake/sludge removal from the Hanford SSTs), volume reductions as high as 70% are currently obtained, compared with an expected 40 to 50% volume increase if the Hanford supernate were grouted. Engineering data extracted from bench-top studies indicate that the process will be very economical. These data were used to cost a batch facility with a production rate of 1200 kilograms of nitrate per hour for processing all the Hanford SST waste over 20 years. Our process cost analysis indicates that between $2.01 and 2.66 will be required to convert each kilogram of nitrate. Based upon 1957 literature, these costs are one-third to one-half of the processing costs quoted for electrolytic and thermal processes

  5. A low-temperature process for the denitration of Hanford single-shell tank, nitrate-based waste utilizing the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) or nitrate to ammonia and glass (NAG) process: Phase 2 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattus, A.J.; Walker, J.F. Jr.; Youngblood, E.L.; Farr, L.L.; Lee, D.D.; Dillow, T.A.; Tiegs, T.N.

    1994-12-01

    Continuing benchtop studies using Hanford single-shell tank (SST) simulants and actual Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) low-level waste (LLW), employing a new denitration process for converting nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC), have conclusively shown that between 85 and 99% of the nitrate can be readily converted to gaseous ammonia. In this process, aluminum powders can be used to convert alkaline, nitrate-based supernate to ammonia and an aluminum oxide-sodium aluminate-based solid. The process may be able to use contaminated aluminum scrap metal from DOE sites to effect the conversion. The final, nitrate-free ceramic product can be pressed and sintered like other ceramics or silica and/or fluxing agents can be added to form a glassy ceramic or a flowable glass product. Based upon the starting volumes of 6.2 and 3.1 M sodium nitrate solution, volume reductions of 50 to 70% were obtained for the waste form produced. Sintered pellets produced from supernate from Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs) have been leached in accordance with the 16.1 leach test for the radioelements 85 Sr and 137 Cs. Despite lengthy counting times, 85 Sr could not be detected in the leachates. 137 Cs was only slightly above background and corresponded to a leach index of 12.2 to 13.7 after 8 months of leaching. Leach testing of unsintered and sintered reactor product spiked with hazardous metals proved that both sintered and unsintered product passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test. Design of the equipment and flowsheet for a pilot demonstration-scale system to prove the nitrate destruction portion of the NAC process and product formation is under way

  6. Aminoethyl nitrate – the novel super nitrate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauersachs, Johann

    2009-01-01

    Long-term use of most organic nitrates is limited by development of tolerance, induction of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. In this issue of the BJP, Schuhmacher et al. characterized a novel class of organic nitrates with amino moieties (aminoalkyl nitrates). Aminoethyl nitrate was identified as a novel organic mononitrate with high potency but devoid of induction of mitochondrial oxidative stress. Cross-tolerance to nitroglycerin or the endothelium-dependent agonist acetylcholine after in vivo treatment was not observed. Like all nitrates, aminoethyl nitrate induced vasorelaxation by activation of soluble guanylate cyclase. Thus, in contrast to the prevailing view, high potency in an organic nitrate is not necessarily accompanied by induction of oxidative stress or endothelial dysfunction. This work from Daiber's group is an important step forward in the understanding of nitrate bioactivation, tolerance phenomena and towards the development of better organic nitrates for clinical use. PMID:19732062

  7. Reaction of alkali nitrates with PuO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, T.; Ohuchi, K.; Takahashi, K.; Fujino, T.

    1990-01-01

    Improvement of solubility of plutonium dioxide (PuO 2 ) in acid solution is important to establish the nuclear fuel reprocessing technique for uranium-plutonium mixed oxide fuels. If insoluble PuO 2 can be converted into any soluble plutonium compounds, problems arising from the fuel dissolution process will be reduced to a great extent. Alkali metal plutonates and alkaline-earth plutonates are known to have enhanced solubility in mineral acids. However, the reaction conditions to form such plutonates and characterization thereof are not well elucidated. Then the reactivity and reaction conditions to form lithium and sodium plutonates from their nitrates and PuO 2 were studied at temperatures between 500 and 900 degree C and alkali metal to plutonium atom ratios between 0.5 and 6 by means of thermogravimetry as well as X-ray diffraction technique. The reaction behavior of alkali plutonates will be discussed in comparison with corresponding alkali uranates

  8. A Revisit to the Corrosion Inhibition of Aluminum in Aqueous Alkaline Solutions by Water-Soluble Alginates and Pectates as Anionic Polyelectrolyte Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Refat Hassan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of aluminum (Al in alkaline media in presence of some natural polymer inhibitors has been reinvestigated. The inhibition action of the tested inhibitors was found to obey both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms models. The inhibition efficiency was found to increase with increasing the inhibitors concentration and decrease with increasing the temperature, suggesting physical adsorption mechanism. Factors such as the concentration and geometrical structure of the inhibitor, concentration of the corrosive medium, and temperature affecting the corrosion rates were examined. The kinetic parameters were evaluated, and a suitable corrosion mechanism consistent with the kinetic results obtained is suggested and discussed.

  9. Effect of Stabilized Zero-Valent Iron Nanoparticles on Nitrate Removal from Sandy Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Nooralivand

    2016-02-01

    method. CMC-NZVI suspensions of nanoparticle in aqueous solution (0.01 M CaCl2 and 0.001MKCl were pumped into the sand column during the injection of nitrate solution. During transport experiment, the flask containing CMC-ZVIN suspension was sonicated using a 50 KH ultrasonicator (DSA100-SK2 to prevent particle agglomeration and ensure homogeneity of the suspensions. In these experiments pore water velocity was 0.16 mms-1. Nitrate and Nitrite concentrations in the samples were measured using UV-VIS.HACH DR 5000 spectrophotometer at wavelengths 220 and 530nm, respectively, and ammonium concentration was measured by Kjeldahl method. All chemicals used in this research were of chemical grades and all solutions were prepared using deionized water (DI. Results and Discussion: Effect of nanoparticles and nitrate concentration on nitrate reduction by stabilized nanoparticle in sand column was investigated. The Results of study indicating at the first of reaction in both cases rate and amount of nitrate reduction was increased gradually. But over time, due to saturation capacity of nanoparticles at higher concentrations of nitrate, reduction speed and amount of reduction was constant approximately. The result showed that increasing dosage of nanoparticles and decreasing the influent nitrate concentration would increase percentage of nitrate reduction. Maximum percentage of reduction (82.56% were observed at nanoparticles concentration=3 gl-1 and high initial nitrate concentration=150 mgl-1 and minimum percentage of reduction (63.94% were observed at nanoparticles concentration=1 gl-1 and high initial nitrate concentration=150 mgl-1. After the end of experiment time, amount of observed ammonium and nitrite was a few in the drainage water of sand column. During the reaction nitrate reduction by nano-particles, H + was used and OH- was produced therefore through reaction, environment pH increased continuously. In conditions of alkaline, ammonium release in the form of N2. Therefore

  10. Transpassive electrodissolution of depleted uranium in alkaline electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisbrod, K.R.; Schake, A.R.; Morgan, A.N.; Purdy, G.M.; Martinez, H.E.; Nelson, T.O.

    1998-03-01

    To aid in removal of oralloy from the nuclear weapons stockpile, scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility are decontaminating oralloy parts by electrodissolution in neutral to alkaline electrolytes composed of sodium nitrate and sodium sulfate. To improve the process, electrodissolution experiments were performed with depleted uranium to understand the effects of various operating parameters. Sufficient precipitate was also produced to evaluate the feasibility of using ultrafiltration to separate the uranium oxide precipitates from the electrolyte before it enters the decontamination fixture. In preparation for the experiments, a potential-pH diagram for uranium was constructed from thermodynamic data for fully hydrated species. Electrodissolution in unstirred solutions showed that uranium dissolution forms two layers, an acidic bottom layer rich in uranium and an alkaline upper layer. Under stirred conditions results are consistent with the formation of a yellow precipitate of composition UO 3 ·2H 2 O, a six electron process. Amperometric experiments showed that current efficiency remained near 100% over a wide range of electrolytes, electrolyte concentrations, pH, and stirring conditions

  11. Chemiluminescence of carbon dots induced by diperiodato-nicklate (IV) in alkaline solution and its application to a quenchometric flow-injection assays of paracetamole, L-cysteine and glutathione

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Yajuan; Su, Ming; Chen, Peiyun; Sun, Hanwen

    2015-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of carbon dots (C-dots) were prepared by microwave-assisted thermal carbonization of poly(ethylene glycol). They were investigated by transmission electron microscopy, absorption and fluorescence spectra. It is shown that diperiodato-nicklate(IV), a strong oxidant, induces the chemiluminescence (CL) of C-dots in strongly alkaline solution without use of an additional reagent. A mechanism for this reaction is suggested. It is also found that the CL of the system is quenched by paracetamole, L-cysteine and glutathione. Under the optimized conditions, the calibration plot is linear with a correlation coefficient (r) of >0.995. The limits of detection are 90, 8, and 60 µg L -1 for paracetamole, L-cysteine, and glutathione, respectively. Spiked urine and serum samples were analyzed and gave recoveries in the range from 84.38 to 116.0 %, with an RSD of 1.2–2.7 %. (author)

  12. Criticality parameters for uranyl nitrate or plutonium nitrate systems in tributyl phosphate/kerosine and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, W.

    1985-01-01

    This report presents the calculated values of smallest critical masses and volumina and neutron physical parameters for uranyl nitrate (3, 4, 5% U-235) or plutonium nitrate (5% Pu-240), each in a 30 per cent solution of tributyl phosphate (TBP)/kerosine. For the corresponding nitrate-water solutions, newly calculated results are presented together with a revised solution density model. A comparison of the data shows to what extent the criticality of nitrate-TBP/kerosine systems can be assessed on the basis of nitrate-water parameters, revealing that such data can be applied to uranyl nitrate/water systems, taking into account that the smallest critical mass of uranyl nitrate-TBP/kerosine systems, up to a 5 p.c. U-235 enrichment, is by 4.5 p.c. at the most smaller than that of UNH-water solutions. Plutonium nitrate (5% Pu-240) in the TBP/kerosine solution will have a smallest critical mass of up to 7 p.c. smaller, as compared with the water data. The suitability of the computing methods and cross-sections used is verified by recalculating experiments carried out to determine the lowest critical enrichment of uranyl nitrate. The calculated results are well in agreement with experimental data. The lowest critical enrichment is calculated to be 2.10 p.c. in the isotope U-235. (orig.) [de

  13. Measurement of bulk etch rates for poly-allyl-diglycol carbonate (PADC) and cellulose nitrate in a broad range of concentration and temperature of NaOH etching solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermsdorf, D.; Hunger, M.; Starke, S.; Weickert, F.

    2007-01-01

    In the present work the dependence of the bulk etch rate v B for solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) on the concentration c and the temperature T of the NaOH etching solution has been studied for material types PADC and cellulose nitrate. As commonly applied exponents of PADC and cellulose nitrate material, the commercial products CR-39 and LR-115 were investigated. The concentration and temperature have been varied in the ranges 0.5moll -1 -1 and 313 -1 and T between 313 and 333K for cellulose nitrate, respectively. The application of a simple Arrhenius-law of chemical reactions fails in the interpretation of the dependence on the concentration. A constant activation energy cannot describe the behaviour of v B (c,T) over the whole range of concentration. To understand the deviation, more qualified models treating the superposition of chemical and physical processes including reaction kinetics and material transport phenomena by diffusion have to be developed and tested

  14. Further study of the reactions of fishes to toxic solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J R.E.

    1948-01-01

    This paper records some further observations on the reactions of fish to toxic solutions. The method of experimentation resembles that described in a previous paper by the writer (Jones, 1947b). In every case the solution is presented as an alternative to the Aberystwyth tap water, which is well aerated, very soft, of pH 6.8. In experiments with sodium sulphide a supply system is arranged in which dilute sodium sulphide solution, brought to pH 6.8 by the addition of sulphuric acid, is automatically made up as it runs into the observation vessel. Gasterosteus aculeatus l. reacts negatively to a 0.001N solution almost immediately; at greater dilution the reaction time lengthens, at 0.00008N is about 47 min. Over the concentration range tested the reaction time is always shorter than the survival time. Gasterosteus is positive to 0.04N lead nitrate. As a positive reaction is also displayed to equivalent concentrations of calcium nitrate, sodium nitrate and sodium chloride it is possible that the osmotic pressure of the solution is its attractive feature. At 0.01N the positive response to lead nitrate disappears and at 0.004N is replaced by a very definite negative reaction which is maintained down to 0.00002N. The minnow (Phoxinus phoxinus l.) is also negative to dilute lead nitrate and will detect and avoid a 0.000004N solution. Gasterosteus will avoid water more acid than pH 5.6 or more alkaline than pH 11.4. Over the range 5.8-11.2 the fish are indifferent or very vaguely positive. Gasterosteus is negative to 0.04 and 0.01N ammonia solution, positive to 0.001 and 0.0001N. The general result with ammonia is thus the converse of that observed with lead nitrate.

  15. Isolation of transplutonium elements on ion exchangers from solutions of high salt concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guseva, L.I.; Tikhomirova, G.S.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1985-01-01

    The behaviour of transplutonium elements (TPE) on cation and anion exchangers in aqueous alcoholic solutions of chlorides and nitrates of some alkali and alkaline earth metals depending on different factors: salt concentration, content of alcohol and of acid in the solution as well as the nature of a cation was studied. The data obtained were used to determine the optimal conditions of concentration of TPE on ion exchangers from solutions containing great quantities of salts. The advantages of the use of aqueous alcoholic solutions of nitric acid in the isolation of TPE are shown. (author)

  16. Reactivity of nitrate and organic acids at the concrete–bitumen interface of a nuclear waste repository cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertron, A., E-mail: bertron@insa-toulouse.fr [Université de Toulouse (France); UPS, INSA (France); LMDC (Laboratoire Matériaux et Durabilité des Constructions), 135, avenue de Rangueil, F-31 077, Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Jacquemet, N. [Université de Toulouse (France); UPS, INSA (France); LMDC (Laboratoire Matériaux et Durabilité des Constructions), 135, avenue de Rangueil, F-31 077, Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Erable, B. [Université de Toulouse (France); INPT, UPS (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Génie Chimique, 4, Allée Emile Monso, F-31030 Toulouse (France); Sablayrolles, C. [Université de Toulouse (France); INP (France); LCA (Laboratoire de Chimie Agro-Industrielle), ENSIACET, 4 allée Emile Monso, BP 44 362, 31432 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); INRA (France); LCA (Laboratoire de Chimie Agro-Industrielle), F-31029 Toulouse (France); Escadeillas, G. [Université de Toulouse (France); UPS, INSA (France); LMDC (Laboratoire Matériaux et Durabilité des Constructions), 135, avenue de Rangueil, F-31 077, Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Albrecht, A. [Andra, 1-7, rue Jean-Monnet, 92298 Châtenay-Malabry (France)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Interactions of cement paste and organic acid–nitrate solutions were investigated. • Cement leaching imposed alkaline pH (>10) very rapidly in the liquid media. • Acetic acid action on cement paste was similar to that of classical leaching. • Oxalic acid attack formed Ca-oxalate salts; organic matter in solution decreased. • Nitrate was stable under abiotic conditions and with organic matter. - Abstract: This study investigates the fate of nitrate and organic acids at the bitumen–concrete interface within repository cell for long-lived, intermediate-level, radioactive wastes. The interface was simulated by a multiphase system in which cementitious matrices (CEM V cement paste specimens) were exposed to bitumen model leachates consisting of nitrates and acetic acid with and without oxalic acid, chemical compounds likely to be released by bitumen. Leaching experiments were conducted with daily renewal of the solutions in order to accelerate reactions. The concentrations of anions (acetate, oxalate, nitrate, and nitrite) and cations (calcium, potassium) and the pH were monitored over time. Mineralogical changes of the cementitious matrices were analysed by XRD. The results confirmed the stability of nitrates in the abiotic conditions of the experiments. The action of acetic acid on the cementitious matrix was similar to that of ordinary leaching in the absence of organic acids (i.e. carried out with water or strong acids); no specific interaction was detected between acetate and cementitious cations. The reaction of oxalic acid with the cementitious phases led to the precipitation of calcium oxalate salts in the outer layer of the matrix. The concentration of oxalate was reduced by 65% inside the leaching medium.

  17. A Cuprous Oxide Thin Film Non-Enzymatic Glucose Sensor Using Differential Pulse Voltammetry and Other Voltammetry Methods and a Comparison to Different Thin Film Electrodes on the Detection of Glucose in an Alkaline Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifan Dai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A cuprous oxide (Cu2O thin layer served as the base for a non-enzymatic glucose sensor in an alkaline medium, 0.1 NaOH solution, with a linear range of 50–200 mg/dL using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV measurement. An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS study confirmed the formation of the cuprous oxide layer on the thin gold film sensor prototype. Quantitative detection of glucose in both phosphate-buffered saline (PBS and undiluted human serum was carried out. Neither ascorbic acid nor uric acid, even at a relatively high concentration level (100 mg/dL in serum, interfered with the glucose detection, demonstrating the excellent selectivity of this non-enzymatic cuprous oxide thin layer-based glucose sensor. Chronoamperometry and single potential amperometric voltammetry were used to verify the measurements obtained by DPV, and the positive results validated that the detection of glucose in a 0.1 M NaOH alkaline medium by DPV measurement was effective. Nickel, platinum, and copper are commonly used metals for non-enzymatic glucose detection. The performance of these metal-based sensors for glucose detection using DPV were also evaluated. The cuprous oxide (Cu2O thin layer-based sensor showed the best sensitivity for glucose detection among the sensors evaluated.

  18. Manurial properties of lead nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, R A

    1924-01-01

    Water culture, pot and field experiments were conducted in order to determine the toxic and stimulating limit of lead nitrate in solution. Oats and rye grass were evaluated for evidence of lead poisoning. Results indicate that except in solutions of fairly high concentration, soil adsorbs the lead and destroys the toxicity of soluble lead salts. There was evidence to show that the addition of lead salts increased the rate of nitrification in soil.

  19. Inactivation of Yersinia enterocolitica by nitrite and nitrate in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Giusti, M; de Vito, E

    1992-01-01

    The antimicrobial effects of sodium nitrite and sodium and potassium nitrate against Yersinia enterocolitica were investigated in solution and in treated pork meat. Potassium nitrate and sodium nitrate showed only feeble antimicrobial activity in cultures; no antimicrobial activity was detected with sodium nitrite. Conversely, all three salts displayed apparent antimicrobial activity in pork meat, possibly due to selective effects on competitive flora.

  20. Sodium nitrate-cerium nitrate-water ternary system at 25 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorenko, T.P.; Onishchenko, M.K.

    1978-01-01

    Solubility isotherm of sodium nitrate-cerium nitrate-water system at 25 deg C consists of three crystallization branches of initial salts and double compound of the composition 2NaNO 3 xCe(NO 3 ) 3 x2H 2 O. Sodium nitrate introduced in the solution strengthens complexing. Physico-chemical characteristics are in a good agreement with solubility curve

  1. Sorption of sulphur dioxide in calcium chloride and nitrate chloride liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trzepierczynska, I.; Gostomczyk, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Flue gas desulphurization via application of suspensions has one inherent disadvantage: fixation of sulphur dioxide is very poor. This should be attributed to the low content of calcium ions which results from the solubility of the sorbing species. The solubility of sparingly soluble salts (CaO, CaCO 3 ) may be increased by decreasing the pH of the solution; yet, there is a serious limitation in this method: the corrosivity of the scrubber. The objective of this paper was to assess the sorbing capacity of two soluble calcium salts, calcium chloride and calcium nitrate, as a function of calcium ion concentration in the range of 20 to 82 kg/m 3 . It has been found that sorbing capacity increases with the increasing calcium ion concentration until the calcium concentration in the calcium chloride solution reaches the level of 60 kg/m 3 which is equivalent to the chloride ion content of ∼ 110 kg/m 3 . Addition of calcium hydroxide to the solutions brings about an increase in the sorbing capacity up to 1.6 kg/m 3 and 2.2 kg/m 3 for calcium chloride and calcium nitrate, respectively, as a result of the increased sorbent alkalinity. The sorption capacity of the solutions is considerably enhanced by supplementing them by acetate ions (2.8 to 13.9 kg/m 3 ). Increase in the sorption capacity of calcium nitrate solutions enriched with calcium acetate was approximately 30% as high as that of the chloride solutions enriched with calcium acetate was approximately 30% as high as that of the chloride solutions supplemented in the same way. (author). 12 refs, 7 refs, 4 tabs

  2. Effects of Interfacial Reaction on the Radial Displacement of Oil by Alkaline Solutions Effets des réactions interfaciales sur le déplacement radial de l'huile par les solutions alcalines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasr-El-Din H. A.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Caustic flooding is frequently used to recover acidic oils in secondary and tertiary recovery modes. This study examines the secondary recovery of an acidic oil by alkaline solutions in a water-wet porous medium using a radial geometry. A model porous medium consisting of sintered glass beads sandwiched between two glass plates was employed to visualize the displacement process. The medium was originally saturated with the oil phase, namely paraffin oil (non-reacting system or paraffin oil doped with 1 wt% linoleic acid (reacting system. The effects of the injection flow rate and the NaOH concentration in the aqueous phase on the displacement pattern were studied experimentally. The volumetric oil recovery at the breakthrough condition was also measured. Dynamic interfacial tension (IFT measurements for the reacting system were measured in a spinning drop tensiometer. A drastic drop in the IFT occurred as a result of the chemical reaction at the interface between the linoleic acid in the oil phase and the NaOH in the aqueous phase. It was also found that the IFT behavior with respect to time was a function of NaOH concentration with a maximum interfacial activity (minimum IFT occurring at 0. 1 w% NaOH. Displacement runs showed a significant change in the displacement patterns during secondary recovery for the reacting system compared with those for the non-reacting one. A significant drop in the breakthrough recovery was obtained for the reacting systems, especially at high injection flow rates. The breakthrough recovery of the reacting system was found to be a function of NaOH concentration in the aqueous phase, with a minimum recovery at NaOH concentration of 0. 1 wt%. On a souvent recours à la submersion par des produits alcalins pour récupérer les acides gras dans les modes secondaire et tertiaire. Dans cette étude, on examine la récupération secondaire d'un acide gras par des solutions alcalines dans un milieu poreux imprégné d

  3. Synthesis of C{sub 60}(OH){sub 18-20} in aqueous alkaline solution under O{sub 2}-atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Gustavo Catao; Ladeira, Luiz Orlando; Righi, Ariete; Krambrock, Klaus; Pinheiro, Mauricio Veloso B. [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Calado, Hallen Daniel; Gil, Rossimiriam Pereira de Freitas [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica]. E-mail: gustavo.catao@terra.com.br

    2006-09-15

    In this work we report on an alternative synthesis of water-soluble fullerenes known as fullerols, aiming for biomedical applications. The synthesis is based on a process in which polyethylene glycol (PEG400) is used as phase-transfer catalyst between fullerene/benzene and aqueous NaOH solutions. The polyhydroxylation of the fullerenes occurs in the NaOH solution under a continuous flow of O{sub 2} to enhance the reaction yield. The resulting compound was characterized with infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, thermo-gravimetric analysis and optical absorption. The formation of C{sub 60}(OH){sub 18-20} in high yields was confirmed. (author)

  4. Magnetic modulation of exciplex fluorescence of pyrene solutions with azacrown-ether excess in the presence of ions of alkali and alkaline earth metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisenko, V.N.; Petrov, N.Kh.; Gromov, S.P.; Alfimov, M.V.

    1997-01-01

    Photoexcitation of polar pyrene solutions with excess of phenylaza-15-crown-5 as a donor results to intermolecular electron transfer with formation of ion-radical pairs, recombination of which produces fluorescent exciplex. Charge exchange between molecules of crown ether and its cation-radicals is practically absent at that. Magnetic effect, observed for fluorescence, decreases, when adding diamagnetic lithium and calcium ions to exiplex pyrene/crown-ether system. This can be explained by formation of paramagnetic complexes. 15 refs., 5 figs

  5. Evolution of the corrosion process of AA 2024-T3 in an alkaline NaCl solution with sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate and lanthanum chloride inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Biner; Wang, Yishan; Zuo, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Inhibition effect of LaCl 3 and SDBS for AA 2024 in NaCl solution (pH 10) was studied. • At the beginning the active polarization behavior of the alloy changed to passivation. • The passive behavior gradually disappeared with time and pitting happened at S-phases. • The compounded inhibitors showed good inhibition but cannot totally inhibit pitting. • The adsorption of SDBS played the key role for inhibition to the corrosion process. - Abstract: The evolution of the corrosion process of AA 2024-T3 in 0.58 g L −1 NaCl solution (pH 10) with sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS) and lanthanum chloride inhibitors was studied with electrochemical and surface analysis methods. With the addition of the compounded LaCl 3 and SDBS inhibitors, in the early stage the polarization behavior of AA 2024-T3 changed from active corrosion to passivation, and both the general corrosion and pitting corrosion were inhibited. However, with the immersion time extended, the passive behavior gradually disappeared and pitting happened at the Cu-rich phases. After 24 h immersion, the compounded inhibitors still showed good inhibition for general corrosion, but the polarization curve again presented the characteristic similar to active polarization. The compounded inhibitors also inhibited the pitting corrosion to some extent. The acting mechanism of the inhibitors SDBS and La 3 Cl on the corrosion process of AA 2024-T3 in the test solution was discussed.

  6. Volatilities of ruthenium, iodine, and technetium on calcining fission product nitrate wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimshaw, S.J.; Case, F.N.

    1980-01-01

    Various high-level nitrate wastes were subjected to formic acid denitration. Formic acid reacts with the nitrate anion to yield noncondensable, inert gases according to the following equation: 4 HCOOH + 2 HNO 3 → N 2 O + 4 CO 2 + 5 H 2 O. These gases can be scrubbed free of 106 Ru, 131 I, and 99 Tc radioactivities prior to elimination from the plant by passage through HEPA filters. The formation of deleterious NO/sub x/ is avoided. Moreover, formic acid reduces ruthenium to a lower valence state with a sharp reduction in RuO 4 volatility during subsequent calcination of the pretreated waste. It is shown that a minimum of 3% of RuO 4 in an off-gas stream reacts with Davison silica gel (Grade 40) to give a fine RuO 2 aerosol having a particle size of 0.5 μ. This RuO 2 aerosol passes through water or weak acid scrub solutions but is trapped by a caustic scrub solution. Iodine volatilizes almost completely on calcining an acidic waste, and the iodine volatility increases with increasing calcination temperature. On calcining an alkaline sodium nitrate waste the iodine volatility is about an order of magnitude lower, with a relatively low iodine volatility of 0.39% at a calcination temperature of 250 0 C and a moderate volatility of 9.5% at 600 0 C. Volatilities of 99 Tc were generally 0 C. Data are presented to indicate that 99 Tc concentrates in the alkaline sodium nitrate supernatant waste, with approx. 10 mg 99 Tc being associated with each curie of 137 Cs present in the waste. It is shown that lutidine (2,4 dimethyl-pyridine) extracts Tc(VII) quantitatively from alkaline supernatant wastes. The distribution coefficient (K/sub D/) for Tc(VII) going into the organic phase in the above system is 102 for a simulated West Valley waste and 191 for a simulated Savannah River Plant (SRP) waste

  7. A scanning tunneling microscopy investigation of the phases formed by the sulfur adsorption on Au(100) from an alkaline solution of 1,4-piperazine(bis)-dithiocarbamate of potassium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez, Javier A. [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Materiales (IMRE), Universidad de La Habana, Zapata y G, El Vedado, Plaza de la Revolución, La Habana 10400 (Cuba); Valenzuela B, José [Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnología (CNyN), Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) , km 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada, BC 22860 (Mexico); Cao Milán, R. [Facultad de Química, Universidad de La Habana, Zapata y G, El Vedado, Plaza de la Revolución, La Habana 10400 (Cuba); Herrera, José [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Materiales (IMRE), Universidad de La Habana, Zapata y G, El Vedado, Plaza de la Revolución, La Habana 10400 (Cuba); Farías, Mario H. [Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnología (CNyN), Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) , km 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada, BC 22860 (Mexico); Hernández, Mayra P., E-mail: mayrap@fisica.uh.cu [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Materiales (IMRE), Universidad de La Habana, Zapata y G, El Vedado, Plaza de la Revolución, La Habana 10400 (Cuba)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • New phases of sulfur on gold: hexamer and (√(2)×√(2)) were observed by STM. • Hexamers and (√(2)×√(2)) structures coexist with well-known octomers. • Formation of sulfur multilayer by K{sub 2}DTC{sub 2}pz hydrolysis under alkaline condition. • Top octomer layer have dynamic behavior while (√(2)×√(2)) and hexamer were static. • A model is presented to explain sulfur multilayer formation on Au(100). - Abstract: Piperazine-dithiocarbamate of potassium (K{sub 2}DTC{sub 2}pz) was used as a new precursor for the spontaneous deposition of sulfur on the Au(100) surface in alkaline solution. Two new sulfur phases were studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). These phases were formed by six sulfur atoms (S{sub 6} phase, hexamer) and by four sulfur atoms (S{sub 4} phase, tetramer with (√(2)×√(2)) structure), and they were observed in coexistence with the well-known quasi-square patterns formed by eight sulfur atoms (S{sub 8} phase, octomer). A model was proposed where sulfur multilayers were formed by a (√(2)×√(2)) phase adsorbed directly on the gold surface while one of the other structures: hexamers or octomers were deposited on top. Sulfur layers were formed on gold terraces, vacancies and islands produced by lifting reconstructed surface. Sequential high-resolution STM images allowed the direct observation of the dynamic of the octomers, while the (√(2)×√(2)) structure remained static. Images also showed the reversible association/dissociation of the octomer.

  8. A scanning tunneling microscopy investigation of the phases formed by the sulfur adsorption on Au(100) from an alkaline solution of 1,4-piperazine(bis)-dithiocarbamate of potassium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez, Javier A.; Valenzuela B, José; Cao Milán, R.; Herrera, José; Farías, Mario H.; Hernández, Mayra P.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • New phases of sulfur on gold: hexamer and (√(2)×√(2)) were observed by STM. • Hexamers and (√(2)×√(2)) structures coexist with well-known octomers. • Formation of sulfur multilayer by K 2 DTC 2 pz hydrolysis under alkaline condition. • Top octomer layer have dynamic behavior while (√(2)×√(2)) and hexamer were static. • A model is presented to explain sulfur multilayer formation on Au(100). - Abstract: Piperazine-dithiocarbamate of potassium (K 2 DTC 2 pz) was used as a new precursor for the spontaneous deposition of sulfur on the Au(100) surface in alkaline solution. Two new sulfur phases were studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). These phases were formed by six sulfur atoms (S 6 phase, hexamer) and by four sulfur atoms (S 4 phase, tetramer with (√(2)×√(2)) structure), and they were observed in coexistence with the well-known quasi-square patterns formed by eight sulfur atoms (S 8 phase, octomer). A model was proposed where sulfur multilayers were formed by a (√(2)×√(2)) phase adsorbed directly on the gold surface while one of the other structures: hexamers or octomers were deposited on top. Sulfur layers were formed on gold terraces, vacancies and islands produced by lifting reconstructed surface. Sequential high-resolution STM images allowed the direct observation of the dynamic of the octomers, while the (√(2)×√(2)) structure remained static. Images also showed the reversible association/dissociation of the octomer

  9. Modeled Wet Nitrate Deposition

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Modeled data on nitrate wet deposition was obtained from Dr. Jeff Grimm at Penn State Univ. Nitrate wet depostion causes acidification and eutrophication of surface...

  10. Isolation of radioactive strontium from natural samples. Separation of strontium from alkaline and alkaline earth elements by means of mixed solvent anion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grahek, Z.; Kosutic, K.; Lulic, S.; Kvastek, K.; Eskinja, I.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the results of studies which led to the procedures for the chromatographic separation of radioactive strontium from alkaline, earth-alkaline and other elements in natural samples, on columns filled with strong base anion exchangers using alcoholic solutions of nitric acid as eluents. It has been shown that potassium, caesium, calcium, barium, yttrium and strontium can be adsorbed on strong base anion exchangers of the Dowex and Amberlite type, which contain the quaternary ammonium group with nitrate as counter-ion, from solutions of nitric acid in alcohol. Adsorption strength increases in the order methanol 3 in methanol, while they are adsorbed from ethanol and propanol. The adsorption strength is influenced by the polarity of alcohol, by the concentration of nitrate and by pH. The strength with which strontium adsorbs on the exchangers increases in the interval from 0 to 0.25M NH 4 NO 3 in methanol, after which it starts to decrease. Strontium adsorbs to the exchangers from the alcoholic solution of ammonium nitrate twice as strongly as from the alcoholic solution of nitric acid, while a fraction of water in pure alcohol exceeding 10% prevents adsorption. In the mixture of alcohol and nitric acid, the adsorption strength for calcium and strontium increases with the increase of the volume fraction of alcohol with a lower dielectric constant. The rate and strength of adsorption of ions on the exchanger also increase in the series 0.25M HNO 3 in methanol 3 in ethanol 3 in 1-propanol for each individual ion, as well as in the Ca 3 in methanol, 0.25M HNO 3 in ethanol and 0.25M HNO 3 in propanol. Separation is also possible from alcohol mixtures. Strontium separation is most difficult from calcium, while the efficiency of separation increases with a decrease of the polarity of the used alcohol or alcohol mixture. The first group elements of the periodic table are not separated from each other in this way, while the elements of the second group are

  11. Disagregation of (U, Pu)O2 fuels in molten sodium nitrate and oxides system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, T.S.

    1976-01-01

    An oxidation process based on the use of an alkali-nitrate melt has been considered as a possible head end step for the reprocessing of FBR spent fuels. The total alkali solubility in the nitrate melt was examined. It is influenced by the temperature. At 500 degC the alkali solubility in the sodium nitrate melt is about 17 mol %. Examining solidified mixture of sodium and nitrate or sodium oxides and nitrite by X-ray diffraction has revealed five unknown lattices. NaNO 3 .xNa 2 O 2 is cubic (a=8.71A), NaNO 2 .xNa 2 O 2 is tetragonal (a=5.939A, c=9.997A), NaNO 2 .xNa 2 O is cubic (a=10.586A). The structure of NaNO 3 .xNa 2 O and NaNO 3 .xNaO 2 could not be determined. The solubility of barium and ruthenium was briefly investigated. The reaction (U,Pu)O 2 with the alkaline sodium nitrate melt proceeds along the grain boundaries of the solid solution. Two steps have been recognized. First (U,Pu)O 2 is oxidized to (U,Pu)Osub(2+x) and in a subsequent step (U,Pu)Osub(2+x) reacts with sodium peroxide to form (U,Pu) 2 O 5 .xNa 2 O 2 . Disaggregation efficiency is a function of temperature, alkali concentration and physical properties of the pellets. High temperature and low alkali concentration lead to high efficiency. The structure of the reaction products (U,Pu)O 2 with alkaline NaNO 3 melt was shown to depend mainly on the alkali concentration. As the alkali concentration is lower than 2 mole % (U,Pu) 2 O 5 . Na 2 O 2 is the dominate phase. (U,Pu) 2 O 5 .3Na 2 O 2 corresponds to 6 mole % and over 11 mole % alkali, (U,Pu) 2 O 5 .xNa 2 O 2 becomes the main product. The solubility of the fuel (U,Pu) in the alkali sodium nitrate melt increases with the alkali concentration up to 6000-8000 ppm for uranium and 1200-1700 ppm for plutonium at 500 degC with only 5 mole % alkali. As a result of high losses of fissile material in the salt bath molten salt process must regarded as uneligible for a general head end step in fuel reprocessing. Nevertheless its application can still be

  12. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate are subject to prior sanctions issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for use as sources of...

  13. Processing Methods of Alkaline Hydrolysate from Rice Husk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga D. Arefieva

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper devoted to finding processing methods of alkaline hydrolysate produced from rice husk pre-extraction, and discusses alkaline hydrolysate processing schemed and disengagement of some products: amorphous silica of various quality, alkaline lignin, and water and alkaline extraction polysaccharides. Silica samples were characterized: crude (air-dried, burnt (no preliminary water treatment, washed in distilled water, and washed in distilled water and burnt. Waste water parameters upon the extraction of solids from alkaline hydrolysate dropped a few dozens or thousand times depending on the applied processing method. Color decreased a few thousand times, turbidity was virtually eliminated, chemical oxygen demanded about 20–136 times; polyphenols content might decrease 50% or be virtually eliminated. The most prospective scheme obtained the two following solid products from rice husk alkaline hydrolysate: amorphous silica and alkaline extraction polysaccharide. Chemical oxygen demand of the remaining waste water decreased about 140 times compared to the silica-free solution.

  14. Nitrate accumulation in spinach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steingröver, Eveliene Geertruda

    1986-01-01

    Leafy vegetables, like spinach, may contain high concentrations of nitrate. In the Netherlands, about 75% of mean daily intake of nitrate orginates from the consumption of vegatables. Hazards to human health are associated with the reduction of nitrate to nitrite. Acute nitrite poisoning causes

  15. Annual report of STACY operation in FY.2000. Experiments on neutron-interacting systems with two slab-shaped core tanks and 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution. 2. Contract research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onodera, Seiji; Hirose, Hideyuki; Izawa, Kazuhiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2001-09-01

    Criticality experiments on neutron-interacting systems have been performed since FY.1999 at STACY (Static Experiment Critical Facility) in NUCEF (Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Engineering Research Facility). In the experiments two slab-shaped core tanks and 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution were used. The dimension of the core tanks is 35 cm in thickness, 70 cm in width and 150 cm in height. In FY.2000, the reactivity effect of neutron-isolating materials, such as polyethylene and concrete, and neutron absorbers made of hafnium and cadmium, which were placed between those two core tanks, was determined by the experiments. This report summarizes the data on the operation and the fuel management for the 57 experiments conducted in FY.2000. (author)

  16. Annual report of STACY operation in FY.1999. Experiments on two unit neutron-interacting system with slab-shaped core tanks and 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution (1). (contract research)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onodera, Seiji; Sono, Hiroki; Hirose, Hideyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2000-11-01

    A new series of experiments on two unit neutron-interacting system started in the last half of FY.1999 at STACY (Static Experiment Critical Facility) in NUCEF (Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Engineering Research Facility). The experiments were conducted with two slab-shaped core tanks and 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution. The dimensions of the core tanks are 35 cm in thickness, 70 cm in width and 150 cm in height. In the experiments, critical level heights were measured varying the distance between the two core tanks under the non-reflected condition in order to evaluate reactivity effects on the neutron interaction between the two core tanks. This report summarizes the data on the operation and the fuel management for the 25 experiments conducted in the last half of FY.1999. (author)

  17. Rapid reagent-less on-line H2O2 quantification in alkaline semiconductor etching solution, Part 2: Nephelometry application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlatev, Roumen; Stoytcheva, Margarita; Valdez, Benjamin

    2018-03-01

    A simple and rapid reagent less nephelometric method for on-line H 2 O 2 quantification in semiconductors etching solutions was developed, optimized, characterized and validated. The intensity of the light scattered by the oxygen gas suspension resulted from H 2 O 2 catalytic decomposition by immobilized MnO 2 was registered as analytical response. The influences of the light wave length, the agitation rate, the temperature and the catalyst surface area on the response amplitude were studied and optimization was done. The achieved linear concentration range from 10 to 150mmolL -1 at 0.9835 calibration curve correlation coefficient, precision from 3.65% to 0.95% and response time from 35 to 20s respectively, at sensitivity of 8.01µAmmol -1 L and LOD of 2.9mmolL -1 completely satisfy the semiconductor industry requirements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Lightweight Heat Resistant Geopolymer-based Materials Synthesized from Red Mud and Rice Husk Ash Using Sodium Silicate Solution as Alkaline Activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoc Thang Nguyen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Geopolymer is an inorganic polymer composite with potentials to replace Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC-based materials in the future because of its lower energy consumption, minimal CO2 emissions and lower production cost as it utilizes industrial waste resources. Hence, geopolymerization and the process to produce geopolymers for various applications like building materials can be considered as green industry. Moreover, in our study, the raw materials we used are red mud and rice husk ash, which are are industrial and agricultural wastes that need to be managed to reduce their impact to the environment. The red mud and rice husk ash combined with sodium silicate (water glass solution were mixed to form geopolymer materials. Moreover, the geopolymer specimens were also tested for heat resistance at a temperature of 1000°C for 2 hours. Results suggest high heat resistance with an increase of compressive strength after exposed at high temperature.

  19. Solvent extraction of Cs(I), Zn(II), Eu(III) and Am(III) by 2-heptyl-2-methyl-nonanoic acid (Ha) from nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadan, A.; Elnaggar, H.A.; Souka, N.; Abdelfattah, A.

    1994-01-01

    The present work is devoted to study the extraction behavior of caesium, zinc, europium and americium radioactive isotopes using a new extractant C H 3 (C H 2 ) 6 . C(C 7 H 1 5) (C H 3 ). COOH (Ha) dissolved in benzene from aqueous nitrate media of constant ionic strength (0.1 M) using HNO 3 -Na NO 3 mixtures. The effect temperature on the extraction of these elements was also investigated to evaluate the thermodynamic functions as well as the equilibrium constant of each reaction. The extraction mechanisms were postulated on the light of the available data and the extracted species were formulated in the proposed stoichiometric equation for the extraction of each element individually and these species were suggested to be Cs (A); Zn OH(A) and Zn(A) 2 ; Eu No 3 (A) 2 and Am(A) 3 and for Cs(I), Zn(II), Eu(III) and Am(III), respectively. The thermodynamic parameters show exothermic enthalpy for all the reactions and negative entropy values reflecting very good ordering extraction mechanisms. 10 figs, 1 tab

  20. Do nitrates differ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, H.-L.

    1992-01-01

    1 The organic nitrates all share a common biochemical and physiological mechanism of action. 2 The organic nitrates differ substantially in their pharmacologic potency and pharmacokinetics. In vitro potency differences appear larger than the corresponding in vivo activities. 3 The duration of action of organic nitrates, after a single immediate-release dose, is governed by the pharmacokinetics of the drug. However, the duration of action of available sustained-release preparations, whatever the nitrate or formulation, is limited to about 12 h, due to the development of pharmacologic tolerance. 4 Nitrates do not appear to differ in their production of undesirable effects. PMID:1633079

  1. Nitrate pollution of groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heaton, T.H.E.

    1986-01-01

    Concern about the possible health risks associated with the consumption of nitrate has led many countries, including South Africa, to propose that 10mg of nitrogen (as nitrate or nitrite) per liter should be the maximum allowable limit for domestic water supplies. Groundwater in certain parts of South Africa and Namibia contains nitrate in concentrations which exceed this limit. The CSIR's Natural Isotope Division has been studying the nitrogen isotope composition of the nitrate as an aid to investigation into the sources of this nitrate contamination

  2. Isotherms of ion exchange on titanates of alkaline metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillina, L.P.; Belinskaya, F.A.

    1986-01-01

    Present article is devoted to isotherms of ion exchange on titanates of alkaline metals. Therefore, finely dispersed hydrated titanates of alkaline metals (lithium, sodium, potassium) with ion exchange properties are obtained by means of alkaline hydrolysis of titanium chloride at high ph rates. Sorption of cations from salts solution of Li 2 SO 4 , NaNO 3 , Ca(NO 3 ) 2 , AgNO 3 by titanates is studied.

  3. Ammonium nitrate explosion hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negovanović Milanka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium nitrate (AN primarily is used as a fertilizer but it is also very important compound in the production of industrial explosives. The application of ammonium nitrate in the production of industrial explosives was related with the early era of Nobel dynamite and widely increased with the appearance of blasting agents such as ANFO and Slurry, in the middle of the last Century. Throughout the world millions of tons of ammonium nitrate are produced annually and handled without incident. Although ammonium nitrate generally is used safely, accidental explosions involving AN have high impact resulting in loss of lives and destruction of property. The paper presents the basic properties of ammonium nitrate as well as hazards in handling of ammonium nitrate in order to prevent accidents. Several accidents with explosions of ammonium nitrate resulted in catastrophic consequences are listed in the paper as examples of non-compliance with prescribed procedures.

  4. Determination of bisphenol A in thermal printing papers treated by alkaline aqueous solution using the combination of single-drop microextraction and HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Leihong; Zou, Jing; Liu, Haihong; Zeng, Jingbin; Wang, Yiru; Chen, Xi

    2013-04-01

    A method for the quantitative determination of bisphenol A in thermal printing paper was developed and validated. Bisphenol A was extracted from the paper samples using 2% NaOH solution, then the extracted analyte was enriched using single-drop microextraction followed by HPLC analysis. Several parameters relating to the single-drop microextraction efficiency including extraction solvent, extraction temperature and time, stirring rate, and pH of donor phase were studied and optimized. Spiked recovery of bisphenol A at 20 and 5 mg/g was found to be 95.8 and 108%, and the method detection limit and method quantification limit was 0.03 and 0.01 mg/g, respectively. Under the optimized conditions, the proposed method was applied to the determination of bisphenol A in seven types of thermal printing paper samples, and the concentration of bisphenol A was found in the range of 0.53-20.9 mg/g. The considerably minimum usage of organic solvents (5 μL 1-octanol) and high enrichment factor (189-197) in the sample preparation are the two highlighted advantages in comparison with previously published works. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Perrhenate sorption kinetics in zerovalent iron in high pH and nitrate media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenell, Brian A.; Arai, Yuji, E-mail: yarai@illinois.edu

    2017-01-05

    Graphical abstract: Ammonium adsorption enhanced ReO{sub 4}{sup −} adsorption in ZVI under alkaline conditions (modified from Cho et al., 2015) [39]. - Highlights: • ZVI effectively sorbs Re(VII) at near neutral pH. • Sorption of Re(VII) in ZVI is attributed to the reductive precipitation of Re(IV)O{sub 2}. • The extent of Re(VII) sorption in ZVI decreases with increasing pH from 8 to 10. • The rate of Re(VII) sorption in ZVI increases with increasing nitrate concentration. - Abstract: Technetium(Tc)-99 is one of major risk drivers in low level radioactive liquid waste at the U.S. Department of Energy sites. Cementitious waste technology (CWT) has been considered immobilizing pertechnetate, Tc(VII)O{sub 4}{sup −}, in brine and alkaline waste solutions, as Tc(IV) oxides and/or sulfides with the use of reducing agents like slag. In this study, zero valent iron (ZVI) was evaluated as a potential reducing agent in CWT as a function of pH and [nitrate] (0–0.1 M) using perrhenate, Re(VII)O{sub 4}{sup −}, as an analogue for Tc(VII)O{sub 4}{sup −}. Batch Re(VII)O{sub 4}{sup −} sorption experiments in conjunction with X-ray absorption spectroscopic analysis showed that the Re(VII) sorption occurred via the reductive precipitation of Re(IV)O{sub 2}(s) and the extent of sorption decreased with increasing pH from 8 to 10. Interestingly, pseudo 2nd order kinetic rates increased with increasing [nitrate] which was attributed to co-adsorption of NH{sub 4}{sup +} (i.e., a reaction product of reduced nitrate by ZVI), facilitating electrostatic attraction towards ReO{sub 4}{sup −} under alkaline conditions. Considering the thermodynamically favorable reduction of Tc(VII) over Re(VII), ZVI might have potential for improving the reduction capacity of the current CWT.

  6. Uranium in alkaline rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, M.; Wollenberg, H.; Strisower, B.; Bowman, H.; Flexser, S.; Carmichael, I.

    1978-04-01

    Geologic and geochemical criteria were developed for the occurrence of economic uranium deposits in alkaline igneous rocks. A literature search, a limited chemical analytical program, and visits to three prominent alkaline-rock localities (Ilimaussaq, Greenland; Pocos de Caldas, Brazil; and Powderhorn, Colorado) were made to establish criteria to determine if a site had some uranium resource potential. From the literature, four alkaline-intrusive occurrences of differing character were identified as type-localities for uranium mineralization, and the important aspects of these localities were described. These characteristics were used to categorize and evaluate U.S. occurrences. The literature search disclosed 69 U.S. sites, encompassing nepheline syenite, alkaline granite, and carbonatite. It was possible to compare two-thirds of these sites to the type localities. A ranking system identified ten of the sites as most likely to have uranium resource potential

  7. Uranium in alkaline rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, M.; Wollenberg, H.; Strisower, B.; Bowman, H.; Flexser, S.; Carmichael, I.

    1978-04-01

    Geologic and geochemical criteria were developed for the occurrence of economic uranium deposits in alkaline igneous rocks. A literature search, a limited chemical analytical program, and visits to three prominent alkaline-rock localities (Ilimaussaq, Greenland; Pocos de Caldas, Brazil; and Powderhorn, Colorado) were made to establish criteria to determine if a site had some uranium resource potential. From the literature, four alkaline-intrusive occurrences of differing character were identified as type-localities for uranium mineralization, and the important aspects of these localities were described. These characteristics were used to categorize and evaluate U.S. occurrences. The literature search disclosed 69 U.S. sites, encompassing nepheline syenite, alkaline granite, and carbonatite. It was possible to compare two-thirds of these sites to the type localities. A ranking system identified ten of the sites as most likely to have uranium resource potential.

  8. Achievement report on research and development in the Sunshine Project in fiscal 1979. Research on fuel cells (Research on aqueous alkaline solution electrolyte fuel cells); 1979 nendo nenryo denchi no kenkyu seika hokokusho. Arukari suiyoeki denkaishitsu nenryo denchi no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1980-03-01

    This paper describes achievements in fiscal 1979 in research on aqueous alkaline solution electrolyte fuel cells. Trial fabrication and tests for an oxygen electrode were performed on a catalytic electrode added with silver using carbonblack and graphites as carriers having excellent corrosion resistance and large surface area. Characteristics not inferior to electrodes using activated carbon as a carrier were obtained in both of the initial characteristics and continuous discharge characteristics. A platinum added electrode also showed the same performance as the silver added electrode. A hydrogen electrode containing Zr and iron among those containing Raney-Ni was found to have high oxidation resistance and stability in terms of life. A platinum added electrode using graphite as a carrier provided satisfactory initial characteristics as a hydrogen electrode. Research on a single cell construction has used and tested eight-cell laminated cells with an area of 1,000 cm{sup 2} using bipolar sheets made of carbon. The test verified appropriate the removal of produced water and heat using mainly the hydrogen circulation, which has been discussed in the summary design. The paper describes heat cycles, for which tests of ten and odds times in total were performed to have demonstrated that they are free of any anomaly. Furthermore, a manifold was attached as a means to improve the volume efficiency. Its function was also tested. (NEDO)

  9. Achievement report on research and development in the Sunshine Project in fiscal 1980. Research on fuel cells (Research on aqueous alkaline solution electrolyte fuel cells); 1980 nendo nenryo denchi no kenkyu seika hokokusho. Arukari suiyoeki denkaishitsu nenryo denchi no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1981-03-01

    This paper describes the achievements in fiscal 1980 in the Sunshine Project on developing aqueous alkaline solution electrolyte fuel cells. The oxygen electrode is a silver catalyst electrode using as carriers carbon lack and graphite powders having good corrosion resistance. A continuous discharge test was performed on the electrode for 3,000 hours. Furnace black having large surface area and naturally colloidal graphite showed stable performance. The hydrogen electrode, which is a catalyst electrode made of Raney-Ni containing third elements was given a 3000-hour continuous discharge test, where Zr addition presented stable performance. Activated carbon was found a good carrier in platinum added electrodes. For electrodes operating under high pressure gases, electrodes attached with sintered nickel film are suitable. With regard to prototype cells, laminated cells with high volume efficiency structured mainly with gasket seals were designed and fabricated. The IV characteristics measurement and continuous discharge test thereon revealed no functional problems. Furthermore, cells having electrode area of 100 cm{sup 2} and using bipolar sheets made of carbon were verified capable of withstanding 2000-hour continuous discharge. A non-conductive resin mold was proposed to prevent electrolytic corrosion of the carbon sheets. Discussions were given also on corrosion resistance of bonding agents. (NEDO)

  10. Changes in EC , pH and in the concentrations of nitrate, ammonium, sodium and chlorine in the drainage solution of a crop of roses on substrates with drainage recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariela Rodríguez

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The rose cultivation system has been changing from soil to substrate on the Plateau of Bogota. The objective of this study was the monitoring of the EC, pH, and the levels of nitrate, ammonium, sodium and chlorine in a drainage solution in a crop of roses with substrates based on burnt rice husk and coconut fiber. The Charlotte rose variety grafted onto ‘Natal Briar’ was planted in a greenhouse located in one of the SENA facilities in Mosquera (Colombia; with a density of 6.5 plants/ m². For this experiment, a split plot design was used arranged in randomized blocks with a three-level recirculating system (0, 50 and 100% on the substrates 100% burnt rice husk; 65% burnt rice husk plus 35% coconut fiber; and 35% burnt rice husk plus 65% coconut fiber, repeated three times. The EC decreased from 2.7 to 1.3 mS cm-1 within weeks 2 and 5 which demonstrated an increase of mineral consumption by the plants. The pH levels dropped from 7.46 to 6.27 within weeks 3 to 8 and then increased to 7.39 within weeks 8 to 12. Nitrate concentrations showed a decreasing trend in recirculation treatments within weeks 2 to 12. A lower ammonium concentration was observed at week 4 in treatments with and without recirculation during the vegetative stage. The levels of sodium and chloride increased in treatments with a recirculation system, without signs of toxicity

  11. Study of the Changes in Composition of Ammonium Diuranate with Progress of Precipitation, and Study of the Properties of Ammonium Diuranate and its Subsequent Products Produced from both Uranyl Nitrate and Uranyl Fluoride Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhankar Manna

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Uranium metal used for fabrication of fuel for research reactors in India is generally produced by magnesio-thermic reduction of UF4. Performance of magnesio-thermic reaction and recovery and quality of uranium largely depends on properties of UF4. As ammonium diuranate (ADU is first product in powder form in the process flow-sheet, properties of UF4 depend on properties of ADU. ADU is generally produced from uranyl nitrate solution (UNS for natural uranium metal production and from uranyl fluoride solution (UFS for low enriched uranium metal production. In present paper, ADU has been produced via both the routes. Variation of uranium recovery and crystal structure and composition of ADU with progress in precipitation reaction has been studied with special attention on first appearance of the precipitate Further, ADU produced by two routes have been calcined to UO3, then reduced to UO2 and hydroflorinated to UF4. Effect of two different process routes of ADU precipitation on the characteristics of ADU, UO3, UO2 and UF4 were studied here.

  12. Study of the changes in composition of ammonium diuranate with progress of precipitation, and study of the properties of ammonium diuranate and its subsequent products produced from both uranyl nitrate and uranyl fluoride solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manna, Subhankar; Kumar, Raj; Satpati, Santosh K.; Roy, Saswati B. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Joshi, Jyeshtharaj B. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Mumbai (India)

    2017-04-15

    Uranium metal used for fabrication of fuel for research reactors in India is generally produced by magnesio-thermic reduction of UF{sub 4}. Performance of magnesio-thermic reaction and recovery and quality of uranium largely depends on properties of UF{sub 4}. As ammonium diuranate (ADU) is first product in powder form in the process flow-sheet, properties of UF{sub 4} depend on properties of ADU. ADU is generally produced from uranyl nitrate solution (UNS) for natural uranium metal production and from uranyl fluoride solution (UFS) for low enriched uranium metal production. In present paper, ADU has been produced via both the routes. Variation of uranium recovery and crystal structure and composition of ADU with progress in precipitation reaction has been studied with special attention on first appearance of the precipitate Further, ADU produced by two routes have been calcined to UO{sub 3}, then reduced to UO{sub 2} and hydroflorinated to UF{sub 4}. Effect of two different process routes of ADU precipitation on the characteristics of ADU, UO{sub 3}, UO{sub 2} and UF{sub 4} were studied here.

  13. Study of the changes in composition of ammonium diuranate with progress of precipitation, and study of the properties of ammonium diuranate and its subsequent products produced from both uranyl nitrate and uranyl fluoride solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manna, Subhankar; Kumar, Raj; Satpati, Santosh K.; Roy, Saswati B.; Joshi, Jyeshtharaj B.

    2017-01-01

    Uranium metal used for fabrication of fuel for research reactors in India is generally produced by magnesio-thermic reduction of UF 4 . Performance of magnesio-thermic reaction and recovery and quality of uranium largely depends on properties of UF 4 . As ammonium diuranate (ADU) is first product in powder form in the process flow-sheet, properties of UF 4 depend on properties of ADU. ADU is generally produced from uranyl nitrate solution (UNS) for natural uranium metal production and from uranyl fluoride solution (UFS) for low enriched uranium metal production. In present paper, ADU has been produced via both the routes. Variation of uranium recovery and crystal structure and composition of ADU with progress in precipitation reaction has been studied with special attention on first appearance of the precipitate Further, ADU produced by two routes have been calcined to UO 3 , then reduced to UO 2 and hydroflorinated to UF 4 . Effect of two different process routes of ADU precipitation on the characteristics of ADU, UO 3 , UO 2 and UF 4 were studied here

  14. Electrochemical behaviour of alkaline copper complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A search for non-cyanide plating baths for copper resulted in the development of alkaline copper complex baths containing trisodium citrate [TSC] and triethanolamine [TEA]. Voltammetric studies were carried out on platinum to understand the electrochemical behaviour of these complexes. In TSC solutions, the.

  15. Estimation of nitrate in aqueous discharge streams in presence of other anionic species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhara, Amrita; Sonar, N.L.; Valsala, T.P.; Vishwaraj, I.

    2017-01-01

    In the PUREX process the spent fuel is dissolved in concentrated nitric acid for the recovery of U and Pu using 30% TBP solvent system. The added nitrates are reporting in the waste streams of reprocessing plant. In view of the environmental concern for nitrate discharges, it is essential to monitor the nitrate content in the radioactive waste streams. An analytical method based on nitration of salicylic acid in acidic medium was studied for its applicability in the estimation of nitrate in radioactive waste containing various other anions. The yellow colored complex formed absorbs at 410 nm in alkaline media. Interference of various anionic species like sulphide, chloride, ferrocyanide, phosphate etc present in different waste streams on the estimation of nitrate was studied. Nitrate could be estimated in radioactive waste in presence of other anionic species within an error of less than 6%. (author)

  16. Concrete reflected cylinders of highly enriched solutions of uranyl nitrate ICSBEP Benchmark: A re-evaluation by means of MCNPX using ENDF/B-VI cross section library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruzate, J.A.; Carelli, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a theoretical re-evaluation of a set of original experiments included in the 2009 issue of the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments, as “Concrete Reflected Cylinders of Highly Enriched Solutions of Uranyl Nitrate” (identification number: HEU-SOL-THERM- 002) [4]. The present evaluation has been made according to benchmark specifications [4], and added data taken out of the original published report [3], but applying a different approach, resulting in a more realistic calculation model. In addition, calculations have been made using the latest version of MCNPX Monte Carlo code, combined with an updated set of cross section data, the continuous-energy ENDF/B-VI library. This has resulted in a comprehensive model for the given experimental situation. Uncertainties analysis has been made based on the evaluation of experimental data presented in the HEU-SOLTHERM-002 report. Resulting calculations with the present improved physical model have been able to reproduce the criticality of configurations within 0.5%, in good agreement with experimental data. Results obtained in the analysis of uncertainties are in general agreement with those at HEU-SOL-THERM-002 benchmark document. Qualitative results from analyses made in the present work can be extended to similar fissile systems: well moderated units of 235 U solutions, reflected with concrete from all directions. Results have confirmed that neutron absorbers, even as impurities, must be taken into account in calculations if at least approximate proportions were known. (authors)

  17. The effectiveness of the biannual application of silver nitrate solution followed by sodium fluoride varnish in arresting early childhood caries in preschool children: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chun-Hung; Gao, Sherry Shiqian; Li, Samantha Ky; Wong, May Cm; Lo, Edward Cm

    2015-09-25

    The application of 38 % silver diamine fluoride (SDF) has been shown to be effective in arresting early childhood caries (ECC). Since SDF is not available in certain countries, some dentists use adjunctive application of 25 % silver nitrate (AgNO3) and 5 % sodium fluoride (NaF) to arrest ECC. This randomised controlled trial will systematically compare the efficacy of a 25 % AgNO3 solution followed by 5 % NaF varnish with that of a 38 % SDF solution in arresting ECC when applied at half-yearly intervals over a 30-month period. This study is a randomised, double-blinded, non-inferiority clinical trial. The hypothesis tested is that adjunctive application of 25 % AgNO3 followed by 5 % NaF is at least not appreciably worse than a 38 % SDF in arresting ECC. Approximately 3100 kindergarten children aged 3-4 years will be screened and at least 1070 children with caries will be recruited. This sample size is sufficient for an appropriate statistical analysis (power at 90 % (β = 0.10) with a 2-sided type-I error of α = 0.05), allowing for an overall 20 % drop-out rate. The children will be randomly allocated into 2 groups to treat their caries over a 30-month period: Group A - biannual adjunctive application of a 25 % AgNO3 solution and a 5 % NaF varnish, and Group B - biannual adjunctive application of a 38 % SDF solution followed by a placebo varnish. Clinical examinations will be conducted at 6-month intervals. Primary outcome measured is the number of active caries surfaces which are arrested. Information on confounding factors such as oral hygiene habits will be collected through a parental questionnaire. We expect that adjunctive application of 25 % AgNO3 solution and 5 % NaF varnish and of 38 % SDF solution can both effectively arrest ECC. Lower concentrations of silver and fluoride are contained in 25 % AgNO3 and 5 % NaF, respectively, than in 38 % SDF; therefore, AgNO3/NaF are more favourable for use in young children. Because its use for caries management is

  18. The Effect of Nitrate Levels and Harvest Times on Fe, Zn, Cu, and K, Concentrations and Nitrate Reductase Activity in Lettuce and Spinach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Gheshlaghi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Leafy vegetables are considered as the main sources of nitrate in the human diet. In order to investigate the effect of nitrate levels and harvest times on nitrate accumulation, nitrate reductase activity, concentrations of Fe, Zn, Cu and K in Lettuce and Spinach and their relation to nitrate accumulation in these leafy vegetables, two harvest times (29 and 46 days after transplanting, two vegetable species of lettuce and spinach and two concentrations of nitrate (10 and 20 mM were used in a hydroponics greenhouse experiment with a completely randomized design and 3 replications. Modified Hoagland and Arnon nutrient solutions were used for the experiment. The results indicated that by increasing nitrate concentration of solution, nitrate accumulation in roots and shoots of lettuce and spinach increased significantly (P ≤ 0.05, and the same trend was observed for the nitrate reductase activity in the shoots of the two species. Increasing the nitrate concentrations of solution, reduced the shoot dry weight and the concentration of Fe and Cu in both species, where as it increased the K and Zn concentrations in the shoots of the two species in each both harvest times, the nitrate accumulation increased, but the nitrate reductase activity decreased in the shoots of the two species over the course of the growth. The Concentration of Fe, Cu and K decreased in the shoots of lettuce and the spinach with the time, despite the increase in Zn concentration in the shoots. The results also indicated that increasing nitrate concentrations of solution to the levels greater than the plant capacity for reduction and net uptake of nitrate, leads to the nitrate accumulation in the plants. Nitrate accumulation in plant tissue led to decreases in fresh shoot yield and Fe and Cu concentrations and nitrate reductase activities in both lettuce and spinach.

  19. Research factors of the electrochemical remediation clay soils from the nitrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korolev, V.A.; Babakina, O.A. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation)

    2001-07-01

    The electrokinetic's methods are prevalent [1, 2], but abilities of the method for remediation nitrates contaminated soils are studied insufficiently. The investigations of effectiveness electrochemical remediation are complicated by processes of reduction nitrates to nitrites (that are more toxic) and then to nitrogen in soil under the constant electric current. Therefore, the objectives of the research was following: - Evaluate mechanism of electrokinetic's removing nitrates from soil; - Evaluate basic value of moisture and alkalinity influence for electrochemical remediation of soil from nitrates; - Determine flow-through regime effect on electrokinetic's treating. (orig.)

  20. Growing patterns to produce 'nitrate-free' lettuce (Lactuca sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croitoru, Mircea Dumitru; Muntean, Daniela-Lucia; Fülöp, Ibolya; Modroiu, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Vegetables can contain significant amounts of nitrate and, therefore, may pose health hazards to consumers by exceeding the accepted daily intake for nitrate. Different hydroponic growing patterns were examined in this work in order to obtain 'nitrate-free lettuces'. Growing lettuces on low nitrate content nutrient solution resulted in a significant decrease in lettuces' nitrate concentrations (1741 versus 39 mg kg(-1)), however the beneficial effect was cancelled out by an increase in the ambient temperature. Nitrate replacement with ammonium was associated with an important decrease of the lettuces' nitrate concentration (from 1896 to 14 mg kg(-1)) and survival rate. An economically feasible method to reduce nitrate concentrations was the removal of all inorganic nitrogen from the nutrient solution before the exponential growth phase. This method led to lettuces almost devoid of nitrate (10 mg kg(-1)). The dried mass and calcinated mass of lettuces, used as markers of lettuces' quality, were not influenced by this treatment, but a small reduction (18%, p < 0.05) in the fresh mass was recorded. The concentrations of nitrite in the lettuces and their modifications are also discussed in the paper. It is possible to obtain 'nitrate-free' lettuces in an economically feasible way.