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Sample records for alkali-transition metal borohydrides

  1. Density functional theory based screening of ternary alkali-transition metal borohydrides: A computational material design project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Jens Strabo; Landis, David; Voss, Johannes;

    2009-01-01

    We present a computational screening study of ternary metal borohydrides for reversible hydrogen storage based on density functional theory. We investigate the stability and decomposition of alloys containing 1 alkali metal atom, Li, Na, or K (M1); and 1 alkali, alkaline earth or 3d/4d transition...... metal atom (M2) plus two to five (BH4)− groups, i.e., M1M2(BH4)2–5, using a number of model structures with trigonal, tetrahedral, octahedral, and free coordination of the metal borohydride complexes. Of the over 700 investigated structures, about 20 were predicted to form potentially stable alloys with...

  2. Ballmilling of metal borohydrides for hydrogen storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Sanna

    2014-01-01

    ’s dehydrogenated state. Specifically, the research undertaken targets CaB6 whose boron is in a octahedral network, or AlB2 whose boron is layered. These compounds were then reactive ball milled with alkali and alkaline earth metal under hydrogen pressure, with the intention of forming metal borohydrides. For CaB6...... investigation is to hydrogenate simple compounds such as metalborides and hydrides with the intention of forming a new and more hydrogen rich borohydride. In contrast to mainstream research, the method of synthesis has been based on reactants that are expected to be found in the metal borohydride...

  3. Metal Borohydrides synthesized from metal borides and metal hydrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Sanna

    2014-01-01

    and Ca(BH4)2, respectively [3,4]. An attempt to synthesize alkali and alkaline earth metal borohydrides from various borides by ball milling under high hydrogen pressure is presented here. MgB2, AlB2 and CaB6 have been milled with MHx (M = Li, Na, Mg, Ca) at p(H2) = 110 bar for 24 hours. All samples......Metal Borohydrides Synthesized from Metal Borides and Metal Hydrides Alexander Fogha, Sanna Sommera, Kasper T. Møllera, T. R. Jensena aCenter for Materials Crystallography (CMC), Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO) and Chemistry Department, Aarhus University, Langelandsgade 140, DK-8000...... Aarhus C, Denmark email: gallafogh@hotmail.com / sanna-sommer@hotmail.com Magnesium boride, MgB2, ball milled with MH (M = Li, Na, Ca) followed by hydrogenation under high hydrogen pressure, readily forms the corresponding metal borohydrides, M(BH4)x (M = Li, Na, Ca) and MgH2 according to reaction scheme...

  4. Model for H-, D- production by hydrogen backscattering from alkali and alkali/transition-metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model for H-, D- production by energetic particles reflecting from metal surfaces is discussed. The model employs the energy and angular distribution data derived from the Marlowe code. The model is applied to particles incident normally upon Cs, Ni, and Cs/Ni surfaces

  5. New Transition metal assisted complex borohydrides for hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High capacity hydrogen storage systems are indeed essential for the on-board vehicular application that leads to the pollution free environment. Apart from the various hydrogen storage systems explored in the past, complex hydrides involving light weight alkali/alkaline metals exhibits promising hydrogenation/ dehydrogenation characteristics. New transition metal assisted complex borohydrides [Zn(BH4)2] have been successfully synthesized by an inexpensive mechano-chemical process. These complex hydrides possesses gravimetric hydrogen storage capacity of ∼8.4 wt.% at around 120 C. We have determined the volumetric hydrogen absorption and desorption of these materials for a number of cycles. Another complex borohydride mixture LiBH4/MgH2 catalyzed with ZnCl2 has been synthesized and characterized using various analytical techniques. (authors)

  6. Complex metal borohydrides: multifunctional materials for energy storage and conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtadi, Rana; Remhof, Arndt; Jena, Puru

    2016-09-01

    With the limited supply of fossil fuels and their adverse effect on the climate and the environment, it has become a global priority to seek alternate sources of energy that are clean, abundant, and sustainable. While sources such as solar, wind, and hydrogen can meet the world's energy demand, considerable challenges remain to find materials that can store and/or convert energy efficiently. This topical review focuses on one such class of materials, namely, multi-functional complex metal borohydrides that not only have the ability to store sufficient amount of hydrogen to meet the needs of the transportation industry, but also can be used for a new generation of metal ion batteries and solar cells. We discuss the material challenges in all these areas and review the progress that has been made to address them, the issues that still need to be resolved and the outlook for the future. PMID:27384871

  7. Recent progress in metal borohydrides for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.-W.; Yan, Y.; Orimo, S.-I. [Tohoku University, Institute for Materials Research (IMR), Sendai (Japan); Zuettel, A. [Department of the Environment, Energy and Mobility (EMPA), Abt. 138 ' Hydrogen and Energy' , Duebendorf (Switzerland); Jensen, C. M. [University of Hawaii, Department of Chemistry, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The prerequisite for widespread use of hydrogen as an energy carrier is the development of new materials that can safely store it at high gravimetric and volumetric densities. Metal borohydrides M(BH{sub 4}){sub n} (n is the valence of metal M), in particular, have high hydrogen density, and are therefore regarded as one such potential hydrogen storage material. For fuel cell vehicles, the goal for on-board storage systems is to achieve reversible store at high density but moderate temperature and hydrogen pressure. To this end, a large amount of effort has been devoted to improvements in their thermodynamic and kinetic aspects. This review provides an overview of recent research activity on various M(BH{sub 4}){sub n}, with a focus on the fundamental dehydrogenation and rehydrogenation properties and on providing guidance for material design in terms of tailoring thermodynamics and promoting kinetics for hydrogen storage. (authors)

  8. Complex metal borohydrides: multifunctional materials for energy storage and conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtadi, Rana; Remhof, Arndt; Jena, Puru

    2016-09-01

    With the limited supply of fossil fuels and their adverse effect on the climate and the environment, it has become a global priority to seek alternate sources of energy that are clean, abundant, and sustainable. While sources such as solar, wind, and hydrogen can meet the world’s energy demand, considerable challenges remain to find materials that can store and/or convert energy efficiently. This topical review focuses on one such class of materials, namely, multi-functional complex metal borohydrides that not only have the ability to store sufficient amount of hydrogen to meet the needs of the transportation industry, but also can be used for a new generation of metal ion batteries and solar cells. We discuss the material challenges in all these areas and review the progress that has been made to address them, the issues that still need to be resolved and the outlook for the future.

  9. Self-Printing on Graphitic Nanosheets with Metal Borohydride Nanodots for Hydrogen Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongtao; Ding, Xiaoli; Zhang, Qingan

    2016-01-01

    Although the synthesis of borohydride nanostructures is sufficiently established for advancement of hydrogen storage, obtaining ultrasmall (sub-10 nm) metal borohydride nanocrystals with excellent dispersibility is extremely challenging because of their high surface energy, exceedingly strong reducibility/hydrophilicity and complicated composition. Here, we demonstrate a mechanical-force-driven self-printing process that enables monodispersed (~6 nm) NaBH4 nanodots to uniformly anchor onto freshly-exfoliated graphitic nanosheets (GNs). Both mechanical-forces and borohydride interaction with GNs stimulate NaBH4 clusters intercalation/absorption into the graphite interlayers acting as a ‘pen’ for writing, which is accomplished by exfoliating GNs with the ‘printed’ borohydrides. These nano-NaBH4@GNs exhibit favorable thermodynamics (decrease in ∆H of ~45%), rapid kinetics (a greater than six-fold increase) and stable de-/re-hydrogenation that retains a high capacity (up to ~5 wt% for NaBH4) compared with those of micro-NaBH4. Our results are helpful in the scalable fabrication of zero-dimensional complex hydrides on two-dimensional supports with enhanced hydrogen storage for potential applications. PMID:27484735

  10. Investigations on the structure and properties of novel mixed-metal borohydrides

    OpenAIRE

    Schouwink, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    This thesis deals with structural topologies of different dimensionalities in novel complex hydrides based on the tetrahydroborate anion. While classical applications of hydrides such as mobile hydrogen storage are discussed, the use of hydrogen-storage incompatible heavy metals, in especial lanthanides, yields new structural features and functionalities in borohydride chemistry. In this context, the photophysical properties as well as extensive structural dynamics provide means of venturing ...

  11. Alkali metal – yttrium borohydrides: The link between coordination of small and large rare-earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The system Li–A–Y–BH4 (A=K, Rb, Cs) is found to contain five new compounds and four further ones known from previous work on the homoleptic borohydrides. Crystal structures have been solved and refined from synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction, thermal stability of new compounds have been investigated and ionic conductivity measured for selected samples. Significant coordination flexibility for Y3+ is revealed, which allows the formation of both octahedral frameworks and tetrahedral complex anions with the tetrahydroborate anion BH4 both as a linker and terminal ligand. Bi- and trimetallic cubic double-perovskites c-A3Y(BH4)6 or c-A2LiY(BH4)6 (A=Rb, Cs) form in all the investigated systems, with the exception of the Li–K–Y system. The compounds with the stoichiometry AY(BH4)4 crystallize in all investigated systems with a great variety of structure types which find their analog amongst metal oxides. In-situ formation of a new borohydride – closo-borane is observed during decomposition of all double perovskites. - Graphical abstract: The system Li–A–Y–BH4 (A=K, Rb, Cs) is found to contain five novel compounds and four further ones previously reported. Significant coordination flexibility of Y3+ is revealed, which can be employed to form both octahedral frameworks and tetrahedral complex anions, very different structural topologies. Versatility is also manifested in three different simultaneously occurring coordination modes of borohydrides for one metal cation, as proposed by DFT optimization of the monoclinic KY(BH4)4 structural model observed by powder diffraction. - Highlights: • The system Li-A-Y-BH4 (A=K, Rb, Cs) contains nine compounds in total. • Y3+ forms octahedral frameworks and tetrahedral complex anions. • Bi- and trimetallic double-perovskites crystallize in most systems. • Various AY(BH4)4 crystallize with structure types analogous to metal oxides. • Double-perovskites decompose and form a novel borohydride-closo-borane

  12. Alkali metal – yttrium borohydrides: The link between coordination of small and large rare-earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadikin, Yolanda [Department of Quantum Matter Physics, Laboratory of Crystallography, University of Geneva, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 24, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Stare, Katarina [Department of Quantum Matter Physics, Laboratory of Crystallography, University of Geneva, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 24, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Aškerjeva 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Schouwink, Pascal [Department of Quantum Matter Physics, Laboratory of Crystallography, University of Geneva, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 24, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Brix Ley, Morten; Jensen, Torben R. [Center for Materials Crystallography (CMC), Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), and Department of Chemistry, Aarhus University, Langelandsgade 140, DK-8000 Århus C (Denmark); Meden, Anton [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Aškerjeva 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Černý, Radovan, E-mail: radovan.cerny@unige.ch [Department of Quantum Matter Physics, Laboratory of Crystallography, University of Geneva, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 24, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland)

    2015-05-15

    The system Li–A–Y–BH{sub 4} (A=K, Rb, Cs) is found to contain five new compounds and four further ones known from previous work on the homoleptic borohydrides. Crystal structures have been solved and refined from synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction, thermal stability of new compounds have been investigated and ionic conductivity measured for selected samples. Significant coordination flexibility for Y{sup 3+} is revealed, which allows the formation of both octahedral frameworks and tetrahedral complex anions with the tetrahydroborate anion BH{sub 4} both as a linker and terminal ligand. Bi- and trimetallic cubic double-perovskites c-A{sub 3}Y(BH{sub 4}){sub 6} or c-A{sub 2}LiY(BH{sub 4}){sub 6} (A=Rb, Cs) form in all the investigated systems, with the exception of the Li–K–Y system. The compounds with the stoichiometry AY(BH{sub 4}){sub 4} crystallize in all investigated systems with a great variety of structure types which find their analog amongst metal oxides. In-situ formation of a new borohydride – closo-borane is observed during decomposition of all double perovskites. - Graphical abstract: The system Li–A–Y–BH{sub 4} (A=K, Rb, Cs) is found to contain five novel compounds and four further ones previously reported. Significant coordination flexibility of Y{sup 3+} is revealed, which can be employed to form both octahedral frameworks and tetrahedral complex anions, very different structural topologies. Versatility is also manifested in three different simultaneously occurring coordination modes of borohydrides for one metal cation, as proposed by DFT optimization of the monoclinic KY(BH{sub 4}){sub 4} structural model observed by powder diffraction. - Highlights: • The system Li-A-Y-BH{sub 4} (A=K, Rb, Cs) contains nine compounds in total. • Y{sup 3+} forms octahedral frameworks and tetrahedral complex anions. • Bi- and trimetallic double-perovskites crystallize in most systems. • Various AY(BH{sub 4}){sub 4} crystallize with

  13. A new route for the synthesis of reduced transition metal oxides using borohydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manthiram, A.; Zhu, Y.T.; Dananjay, A. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Center for Materials Science and Engineering

    1994-12-31

    Reduction of aqueous solutions of tungstates, molybdates or vanadates by aqueous alkali metal borohydrides at ambient-temperature results in a formation of dark colored gel. The gel is amorphous to X-ray diffraction and crystallizes sharply at around 300--500 C to yield reduced transition metal oxides such as the oxide bronzes, Na{sub x}M{sub y}O{sub z}, or the binary oxides, MO{sub 2} (M = V, Mo or W). The nature and composition of the products formed are strongly influenced by the reaction conditions such as the reaction pH as well as the concentration and amount of the reagents. Experimental procedures to obtain the different phases are presented. This novel low-temperature approach has a potential to access new metastable phases.

  14. Rare earth metal oxides as BH4-tolerance cathode electrocatalysts for direct borohydride fuel cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Xuemin; WANG Yadong; GUO Feng; YAO Pei; PAN Mu

    2012-01-01

    Rare earth metal oxides (REMO) as cathode electrocatalysts in direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC) were investigated.The REMO electrocatalysts tested showed favorable activity to the oxygen electro-reduction reaction and strong tolerance to the attack of BH4- in alkaline electrolytes.The simple membraneless DBFCs using REMO as cathode electrocatalyst and using hydrogen storage alloy as anodic electrocatalyst exhibited an open circuit of about 1 V and peak power of above 60 mW/cm2.The DBFC using Sm2O3 as cathode electrocatalyst showed a relatively better performance.The maximal power density of 76.2 mW/cm2 was obtained at the cell voltage of 0.52 V.

  15. Probing molecular dynamics of metal borohydrides on the surface of mesoporous scaffolds by multinuclear high resolution solid state NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Son-Jong, E-mail: Sonjong@cheme.caltech.edu [Division of Chemistry and Chemical Eng., California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Lee, Hyun-Sook [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); To, Magnus [Division of Chemistry and Chemical Eng., California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Lee, Young-Su; Cho, Young Whan [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hyungkeun; Kim, Chul [Department of Chemistry, Hannam University, Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-05

    Graphical abstract: In situ variable temperature multinuclear solid state NMR allows to probe surface wetting, diffusivity, and confinement of metal borohydrides into nanopores. - Abstract: Understanding of surface interactions between borohydride molecules and the surfaces of porous supports have gained growing attention for successful development of nano-confinement engineering. By use of in situ variable temperature (VT) magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR, molecular mobility changes of LiBH{sub 4} crystalline solid has been investigated in the presence of silica based and carbonaceous surfaces. Spin–spin J-coupling of {sup 1}H–{sup 11}B in LiBH{sub 4} was monitored in series of VT NMR spectra to probe translational mobility of LiBH{sub 4} that appeared to be greatly enhanced upon surface contact. Such enhanced diffusivity was found to be effective in the formation of solid solution and co-confinement with other metal borohydrides. Co-confinement of LiBH{sub 4}–Ca(BH{sub 4}){sub 2} mixture was demonstrated at temperature as low as 100 °C, much lower than the reported bulk eutectic melting temperature. The discovery adds a novel property of LiBH{sub 4} that has been proven to be highly versatile in many energy related applications.

  16. Probing molecular dynamics of metal borohydrides on the surface of mesoporous scaffolds by multinuclear high resolution solid state NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: In situ variable temperature multinuclear solid state NMR allows to probe surface wetting, diffusivity, and confinement of metal borohydrides into nanopores. - Abstract: Understanding of surface interactions between borohydride molecules and the surfaces of porous supports have gained growing attention for successful development of nano-confinement engineering. By use of in situ variable temperature (VT) magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR, molecular mobility changes of LiBH4 crystalline solid has been investigated in the presence of silica based and carbonaceous surfaces. Spin–spin J-coupling of 1H–11B in LiBH4 was monitored in series of VT NMR spectra to probe translational mobility of LiBH4 that appeared to be greatly enhanced upon surface contact. Such enhanced diffusivity was found to be effective in the formation of solid solution and co-confinement with other metal borohydrides. Co-confinement of LiBH4–Ca(BH4)2 mixture was demonstrated at temperature as low as 100 °C, much lower than the reported bulk eutectic melting temperature. The discovery adds a novel property of LiBH4 that has been proven to be highly versatile in many energy related applications

  17. Tritium and deuterium labelling studies of alkali metal borohydrides and their application to simple reductions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simple and facile syntheses of highly deuterated and tritiated LiBH4, NaBH4 and KBH4 were achieved by hydrogen isotope exchange with deuterium or tritium gas at elevated temperatures. The exchange products were characterized by boron, proton and deuterium or tritium NMR spectroscopy. The extent of isotope (2H or 3H) incorporation was calculated from the patterns of 11B NMR spectra. Several samples of tritiated NaBH4 were treated with BF3-Et2O to produce tritiated borane-THF complex, which is an electrophilic reducing agent. The utility of both the borohydride reagents and borane-THF complex in labelling reactions was confirmed by exemplary reductions leading to specifically labelled products. The extent and orientation of labelling in the reduction products was assessed by a combination of radio-HPLC analysis, 1H, 2H or 3H NMR and mass spectrometry. (author)

  18. Catalyzed borohydrides for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Ming

    2012-02-28

    A hydrogen storage material and process is provided in which alkali borohydride materials are created which contain effective amounts of catalyst(s) which include transition metal oxides, halides, and chlorides of titanium, zirconium, tin, and combinations of the various catalysts. When the catalysts are added to an alkali borodydride such as a lithium borohydride, the initial hydrogen release point of the resulting mixture is substantially lowered. Additionally, the hydrogen storage material may be rehydrided with weight percent values of hydrogen at least about 9 percent.

  19. BIMETALLIC LITHIUM BOROHYDRIDES TOWARD REVERSIBLE HYDROGEN STORAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Au, M.

    2010-10-21

    Borohydrides such as LiBH{sub 4} have been studied as candidates for hydrogen storage because of their high hydrogen contents (18.4 wt% for LiBH{sub 4}). Limited success has been made in reducing the dehydrogenation temperature by adding reactants such as metals, metal oxides and metal halides. However, full rehydrogenation has not been realized because of multi-step decomposition processes and the stable intermediate species produced. It is suggested that adding second cation in LiBH{sub 4} may reduce the binding energy of B-H. The second cation may also provide the pathway for full rehydrogenation. In this work, several bimetallic borohydrides were synthesized using wet chemistry, high pressure reactive ball milling and sintering processes. The investigation found that the thermodynamic stability was reduced, but the full rehydrogenation is still a challenge. Although our experiments show the partial reversibility of the bimetallic borohydrides, it was not sustainable during dehydriding-rehydriding cycles because of the accumulation of hydrogen inert species.

  20. Manganese borohydride; synthesis and characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Richter, Bo; Ravnsbæk, Dorthe B.; Tumanov, Nikolay; Filinchuk, Yaroslav; Jensen, Torben R.

    2015-01-01

    Solvent-based synthesis and characterization of α-Mn(BH4)2 and a new nanoporous polymorph of manganese borohydride, γ-Mn(BH4)2, via a new solvate precursor, Mn(BH4)2·1/2S(CH3)2, is presented. Manganese chloride is reacted with lithium borohydride in a toluene/dimethylsulfide mixture at room temperature, which yields halide and solvent-free manganese borohydride after extraction with dimethylsulfide (DMS) and subsequent removal of residual solvent. This work constitutes the first example of es...

  1. Modeling of synthesis of borohydride lanthanides with auto initiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of process of synthesis of lanthanide borohydrides interaction of lanthanide chlorides with sodium borohydride was investigated. The formation of dual-lanthanide complex with sodium borohydride was considered. The oscillatory nature of synthesis and initiation role of the lanthanide borohydride was shown. Polynomial for programmed synthesis of lanthanide borohydrides was composed.

  2. Cobalt,a reactive metal in releasing hydrogen from sodium borohydride by hydrolysis:A short review and a research perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DEMIRCI; Umit; B; AKDIM; Ouardia; HANNAUER; Julien; CHAMOUN; Rita; MIELE; Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Cobalt is commonly admitted as being a promising catalyst in accelerating NaBH4 hydrolysis,being as reactive as noble metals and much more cost-effective.This is the topic of the present paper.Herein,we survey(i) the NaBH4-devoted literature while especially focusing on the Co catalysts and(ii) our work on the same topic.Finally,we report(iii) reactivity results of newly developed Co-based catalysts.From both surveys,it mainly stands out that Co has been investigated as catalysts in various forms:namely,as chlorides,reduced nanoparticles(metal Co,Co boride,Co-B alloy),supported over supports and shaped.In doing so the reactivity can be easily varied achieving H2 generation rates from few to >1000 L(H2)/min·g(metal).Nevertheless,our work can be distinguished from the NaBH4 literature.Indeed,we are working on strategies that focus on making alternative Co-based catalysts.One of these strategies is illustrated here as we report new reactivity data of Co-based bimetallic supported catalysts.For example,we show that 20 wt% Co90Y10/γAl2O3-20 wt% Co95Hf5/γAl2O3 > 20 wt% Co99Zr1/γAl2O3 > 20 wt% Co/γAl2O3,the best catalysts showing HGRs of about 245 mL(H2)/min or 123 L(H2) /min·g(metals).

  3. Hydrogen generation from hydrolysis of sodium borohydride using Ru(0) nanoclusters as catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium borohydride is stable in aqueous alkaline solution, however, it hydrolyses in water to hydrogen gas in the presence of suitable catalyst. By this way hydrogen can be generated safely for the fuel cells. Generating H2 catalytically from NaBH4 solutions has many advantages: NaBH4 solutions are nonflammable, reaction products are environmentally benign, rate of H2 generation is easily controlled, the reaction product NaBO2 can be recycled, H2 can be generated even at low temperatures. All of the catalysts that has been used in hydrolysis of sodium borohydride are bulk metals and they act as heterogeneous catalysts. The limited surface area of the heterogeneous catalysts causes lower catalytic activity as the activity of catalyst is directly related to its surface area. Thus, the use of metal nanoparticles with large surface area provides potential route to increase the catalytic activity. Here, we report, for the first time, the use of ruthenium(0) nanoclusters as catalyst in the hydrolysis of sodium borohydride liberating hydrogen gas. The ruthenium nanoparticles are generated from the reduction of ruthenium(III) chloride by sodium borohydride in water and stabilized by specific ligand. The ruthenium(0) nanoclusters are found to be highly active catalyst for the hydrolysis of sodium borohydride

  4. Chloride substitution in sodium borohydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravnsbæk, Dorthe B.; Rude, Line H.; Jensen, Torben R.

    2011-07-01

    The dissolution of sodium chloride and sodium borohydride into each other resulting in formation of solid solutions of composition Na(BH 4) 1- xCl x is studied. The dissolution reaction is facilitated by two methods: ball milling or combination of ball milling and annealing at 300 °C for three days of NaBH 4-NaCl samples in molar ratios of 0.5:0.5 and 0.75:0.25. The degree of dissolution is studied by Rietveld refinement of synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (SR-PXD) data. The results show that dissolution of 10 mol% NaCl into NaBH 4, forming Na(BH 4) 0.9Cl 0.1, takes place during ball milling. A higher degree of dissolution of NaCl in NaBH 4 is obtained by annealing resulting in solid solutions containing up to 57 mol% NaCl, i.e. Na(BH 4) 0.43Cl 0.57. In addition, annealing results in dissolution of 10-20 mol% NaBH 4 into NaCl. The mechanism of the dissolution during annealing and the decomposition pathway of the solid solutions are studied by in situ SR-PXD. Furthermore, the stability upon hydrogen release and uptake were studied by Sieverts measurements.

  5. Synthesis and thermal stability of tetrahydrofuranate of magnesium borohydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present article is devoted to synthesis and thermal stability of tetrahydrofuranate of magnesium borohydride. The thermal stability of tetrahydrofuranate of magnesium borohydride was studied. The character of thermal process passing was defined. The possibility of de solvation of initial sample was considered. The possibility of obtaining of not solvated magnesium borohydride was considered as well.

  6. Modified lithium borohydrides for reversible hydrogen storage (2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Ming; Jurgensen, Arthur; Zeigler, Kristine

    2006-12-28

    This paper reports the results of the effort to destabilize lithium borohydride for reversible hydrogen storage. Various metals, metal hydrides, and metal chlorides were selected and evaluated as destabilization agents for reducing dehydriding temperatures and improving dehydriding/rehydriding reversibility. The most effective material was LiBH4 + 0.2MgCl2 + 0.1TiCl3 which starts desorbing 5 wt % of hydrogen at 60 degrees C and can be rehydrogenated to 4.5 wt % at 600 degrees C and 70 bar. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic analysis show the interaction of LiBH4 with additives and the unusual change of B-H stretching. PMID:17181309

  7. The Concept about the Regeneration of Spent Borohydrides and Used Catalysts from Green Electricity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hong Liu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the Brown-Schlesinger process is still regarded as the most common and mature method for the commercial production of sodium borohydride (NaBH4. However, the metallic sodium, currently produced from the electrolysis of molten NaCl that is mass-produced by evaporation of seawater or brine, is probably the most costly raw material. Recently, several reports have demonstrated the feasibility of utilizing green electricity such as offshore wind power to produce metallic sodium through electrolysis of seawater. Based on this concept, we have made improvements and modified our previously proposed life cycle of sodium borohydride (NaBH4 and ammonia borane (NH3BH3, in order to further reduce costs in the conventional Brown-Schlesinger process. In summary, the revision in the concept combining the regeneration of the spent borohydrides and the used catalysts with the green electricity is reflected in (1 that metallic sodium could be produced from NaCl of high purity obtained from the conversion of the byproduct in the synthesis of NH3BH3 to devoid the complicated purification procedures if produced from seawater; and (2 that the recycling and the regeneration processes of the spent NaBH4 and NH3BH3 as well as the used catalysts could be simultaneously carried out and combined with the proposed life cycle of borohydrides.

  8. Chitosan-supported Borohydride Reducing Agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new chitosan-supported borohydride reducing reagent (CBER) was prepared by treatment of KBH4 with the resin of chitosan derivative, which was first synthesized fiom the reaction of cross-linked chitosan microsphere with glycidyl trimethylammonium chloride. CBER could reduce aromatic carbonyl compound to corresponding alcohol.

  9. Simultaneous desorption behavior of M borohydrides and Mg2FeH6 reactive hydride composites (M = Mg, then Li, Na, K, Ca)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Anna-Lisa; Li, Guanqiao; Matsuo, Motoaki; Orimo, Shin-ichi; Deledda, Stefano; Sørby, Magnus H.; Hauback, Bjørn C.; Pistidda, Claudio; Klassen, Thomas; Dornheim, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Combinations of complex metal borohydrides ball milled with the transition metal complex hydride, Mg2FeH6, are analysed and compared. Initially, the Reactive Hydride Composite (RHC) of Mg2+ cation mixtures of Mg2FeH6 and γ-Mg(BH4)2 is combined in a range of molar ratios and heated to a maximum of 450 °C. For the molar ratio of 6 Mg2FeH6 + Mg(BH4)2, simultaneous desorption of the two hydrides occurred, which resulted in a single event of hydrogen release. This single step desorption occurred at temperatures between those of Mg2FeH6 and γ-Mg(BH4)2. Keeping this anionic ratio constant, the desorption behavior of four other borohydrides, Li-, Na-, K-, and Ca-borohydrides was studied by using materials ball milled with Mg2FeH6 applying the same milling parameters. The mixtures containing Mg-, Li-, and Ca-borohydrides also released hydrogen in a single event. The Mass Spectrometry (MS) results show a double step reaction within a narrow temperature range for both the Na- and K-borohydride mixtures. This phenomenon, observed for the RHC systems at the same anionic ratio with all five light metal borohydride mixtures, can be described as simultaneous hydrogen desorption within a narrow temperature range centered around 300 °C.

  10. Synthesis of Borohydride and Catalytic Dehydrogenation by Hydrogel Based Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynuegri, Tugba Akkas; Karabulut, Ahmet F.; Guru, Metin

    2016-08-01

    This paper deals with the synthesis of calcium borohydride (Ca(BH4)2) as hydrogen storage material. Calcium chloride salt (CaCl2), magnesium hydride (MgH2), and boron oxide (B2O3) were used as reactants in the mechanochemical synthesis of Ca(BH4)2. The mechanochemical reaction was carried out by means of Spex type ball milling without applying high pressure and temperature. Parametric studies have been established at different reaction times and for different amounts of reactants at a constant ball to powder ratio (BPR) 4:1. The best combination was determined by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) analysis. According to the FT-IR analysis, reaction time, the first reaction parameter, was found as 1600 min. After the reaction time was fixed at 1600 min, the difference of the B-H peak areas was dependent on the amount of reactant MgH2 that was investigated. The amount of the reactant (MgH2), the second reaction parameter, was measured to be 2.85 times more than the stoichiometric amount of MgH2. According to our previous studies, BPR was selected as 4:1 for all experiments. Samples were prepared in a glove box under argon atmosphere but the time that elapsed for FT-IR analysis highly affected B-H bonds. B-H peak areas clearly decreased with time because of negative effect of ambient atmosphere. A catalyst was prepared by absorbing cobalt fluoride (CoF2) in poly (acrylamide-co-acrylic acid) hydrogel matrices type and its catalytic dehydrogenation performance that has been characterized by the catalytic reaction of sodium borohydride's known hydrogen capacity in an alkaline medium. The metal amount of hydrogel catalyst was determined as 135.82 mg Co by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). The specific dehydrogenation capacity of the Co active compound in the catalyst thanks to catalytic dehydrogenation of commercial sodium borohydride was measured as 1.66 mL H2/mg Co.

  11. Catalytic polymeric electrodes for direct borohydride fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayatsarmadi, Bita; Peters, Alice; Talemi, Pejman

    2016-08-01

    The direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC) is a new class of fuel cells that produces non-toxic by-products and has a potential for a high voltage and high energy density. A major challenge in developing efficient DBFCs is the development of an efficient, stable, and economic catalyst for the oxidation of borohydride. In this paper, we report the use of conducting polymer Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) as electrocatalysts in DBFC. PEDOT electrodes prepared by vacuum phase polymerization exhibited electrocatalytic behavior towards oxidation of borohydride and reduction of hydrogen peroxide. Spectroscopic analysis of samples showed that PEDOT can act as an interface for electron transfer from borohydride ions. Comparing the polarization curves of DBFCs with PEDOT coated on graphite electrodes and cells with bare graphite electrodes, demonstrated higher voltage, maximum power density, and stability.

  12. Borohydride electro-oxidation on Pt single crystal electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Briega-Martos, Valentín; Herrero, Enrique; Juan M Feliu

    2015-01-01

    The borohydride oxidation reaction on platinum single-crystal electrodes has been studied in sodium hydroxide solution using static and rotating conditions. The results show that borohydride electro-oxidation is a structure sensitive process on Pt surfaces. Significant changes in the measured currents are observed at low potentials. In this region, the Pt(111) electrode exhibits the lowest activity, whereas the highest currents are measured for the Pt(110) electrode. The behavior of the diffe...

  13. Bimetallic nanoparticles of copper and indium by borohydride reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the preparation of copper-indium bimetallic nanoparticles through the borohydride reduction in an alcohol solution for application in ink-coating and sputtering target materials. Copper, indium metal and copper-indium intermetallic materials were synthesized by reacting CuCl2 and InCl3 with NaBH4 in 2-propanol (IPA) and tetraethylene glycol (TEG) at room temperature. The Cu-In samples contained Cu2In and CuIn phases with particle sizes of 10-100 nm and 30-200 nm in both the IPA and TEG solutions, respectively. The nanoparticulate Cu-In precursor layer was coated onto a soda-lime glass through spin-casting, where the Cu-In intermetallic phases of Cu2In and Cu11In9 were produced through heat treatment in Ar gas and a microstructured CuInSe2 layer was produced in a selenium atmosphere. Cu, In, Cu-In intermetallic nanoparticles and the films were characterized using powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray analyses.

  14. Oscillatory instabilities in the electrooxidation of borohydride on platinum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Eduardo G.; Varela, Hamilton, E-mail: varela@iqsc.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica

    2014-03-15

    The borohydride ion has been pointed as a promising alternative fuel. Most of the investigation on its electrochemistry is devoted to the electrocatalytic aspects of its electrooxidation on platinum and gold surfaces. Besides the known kinetic limitations and intricate mechanism, our Group has recently found the occurrence of two regions of bi-stability and autocatalysis in the electrode potential during the open circuit interaction of borohydride and oxidized platinum surfaces. Following this previous contribution, the occurrence of more complicated phenomena is here presented: namely the presence of electrochemical oscillations during the electrooxidation of borohydride on platinum in alkaline media. Current oscillations were found to be associated to two distinct instability windows and characterized in the resistance-potential parameter plane. The dynamic features of such oscillations suggest the existence of distinct mechanisms according to the potential region. Previously published results obtained under non-oscillatory regime were used to give some hints on the surface chemistry behind the observed dynamics. (author)

  15. Methods to Stabilize and Destabilize Ammonium Borohydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Thomas K.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Bowden, Mark E.; Besenbacher, Fleming; Jensen, Torben R.; Autrey, Thomas

    2013-01-21

    Ammonium borohydride, NH4BH4, has a high hydrogen content of ρm = 24.5 wt% H2 and releases 18 wt% H2 below T = 160 °C. However, the half-life of bulk NH4BH4 at ambient temperatures, ~6 h, is insufficient for practical applications. The decomposition of NH4BH4 (ABH2) was studied at variable hydrogen and argon back pressures to investigate possible pressure mediated stabilization effects. The hydrogen release rate from solid ABH2 at ambient temperatures is reduced by ~16 % upon increasing the hydrogen back pressure from 5 to 54 bar. Similar results were obtained using argon pressure and the observed stabilization may be explained by a positive volume of activation in the transition state leading to hydrogen release. Nanoconfinement in mesoporous silica, MCM-41, was investigated as alternative means to stabilize NH4BH4. However, other factors appear to significantly destabilize NH4BH4 and it rapidly decomposes at ambient temperatures into [(NH3)2BH2][BH4] (DADB) in accordance with the bulk reaction scheme. The hydrogen desorption kinetics from nanoconfined [(NH3)2BH2][BH4] is moderately enhanced as evidenced by a reduction in the DSC decomposition peak temperature of ΔT = -13 °C as compared to the bulk material. Finally, we note a surprising result, storage of DADB at temperature < -30 °C transformed, reversibly, the [(NH3)2BH2][BH4] into a new low temperature polymorph as revealed by both XRD and solid state MAS 11B MAS NMR. TA & AK are thankful for support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. A portion of the research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated by Battelle.

  16. The borohydride oxidation reaction on La-Ni-based hydrogen-storage alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschoalino, Waldemir J; Thompson, Stephen J; Russell, Andrea E; Ticianelli, Edson A

    2014-07-21

    This work provides insights into the processes involved in the borohydride oxidation reaction (BOR) in alkaline media on metal hydride alloys formed by LaNi(4.7)Sn(0.2)Cu(0.1) and LaNi(4.78)Al(0.22) with and without deposited Pt, Pd, and Au. The results confirm the occurrence of hydrolysis of the borohydride ions when the materials are exposed to BH(4)(-) and a continuous hydriding of the alloys during BH(4)(-) oxidation measurements at low current densities. The activity for the direct BOR is low in both bare metal hydride alloys, but the rate of the BH(4)(-) hydrolysis and the hydrogen-storage capacity are higher, while the rate of H diffusion is slower for bare LaNi(4.78) Al(0.22). The addition of Pt and Pd to both alloys results in an increase of the BH(4)(-) hydrolysis, but the H(2) formed is rapidly oxidized at the Pt-modified catalysts. In the case of Au modification, a small increase in the BH(4)(-) hydrolysis is observed as compared to the bare alloys. The presence of Au and Pd also leads to a reduction of the rates of alloy hydriding/de-hydriding. PMID:24700670

  17. Ultrafast and stable hydrogen generation from sodium borohydride in methanol and water over Fe-B nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocon, Joey D.; Tuan, Trinh Ngoc; Yi, Youngmi; de Leon, Rizalinda L.; Lee, Jae Kwang; Lee, Jaeyoung

    2013-12-01

    Use of environmentally friendly hydrogen as fuel on a massive scale requires efficient storage and generation systems. Chemical hydrides, such as sodium borohydride (NaBH4), have the capacity to meet these needs as demonstrated by its high hydrogen storage efficiency. Here, we first report the catalytic activity of Fe-B nanoparticles supported on porous Ni foam - synthesized via a simple chemical reduction technique - for hydrogen generation from the mixtures of NaBH4, H2O, and CH3OH. Activation energies of the catalyzed hydrolysis (64.26 kJ mol-1) and methanolysis (7.02 kJ mol-1) are notably lower than other metal-boron catalysts previously reported. Methanol, in combination with a cheap but highly active Fe-B nanocatalysts, provides ultrafast rates of low temperature hydrogen generation from the sodium borohydride solutions.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of atomic motion in borohydride-based materials: Fast anion reorientations and cation diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skripov, A.V., E-mail: skripov@imp.uran.ru; Soloninin, A.V.; Babanova, O.A.; Skoryunov, R.V.

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Solid solutions LiBH{sub 4}–LiI: extremely fast BH{sub 4} reorientations down to low T. • LiLa(BH{sub 4}){sub 3}Cl: Li-ion diffusive jumps and BH{sub 4} reorientations at the same frequency scale. • Dramatic acceleration of B{sub 12}H{sub 12} reorientations in the disordered phase of Na{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12}. • Fast Na-ion diffusion in the disordered phase of Na{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12}. - Abstract: Two basic types of thermally activated atomic jump motion are known to exist in solid borohydrides and the related systems: the reorientations of complex anions ([BH{sub 4}]{sup −}, [B{sub 12}H{sub 12}]{sup 2−}) and the translational diffusion of metal cations or complex anions. This paper reviews recent progress in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of these jump processes in complex hydrides, such as solid solutions of halide anions in borohydrides, bimetallic borohydrides and borohydride–chlorides, borohydride–amides, and B{sub 12}H{sub 12}-based compounds. The emphasis is put on the systems showing fast-ion conductivity. For these systems, we discuss a possible relation between the reorientational motion of complex anions and the translational motion of metal cations.

  19. Barium borohydride chlorides: synthesis, crystal structures and thermal properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grube, Elisabeth; Olesen, Cathrine H; Ravnsbæk, Dorthe B; Jensen, Torben R

    2016-05-10

    Here we report the synthesis, mechanism of formation, characterization and thermal decomposition of new barium borohydride chlorides prepared by mechanochemistry and thermal treatment of MBH4-BaCl2, M = Li, Na or K in ratios 1 : 1 and 1 : 2. Initially, orthorhombic barium chloride, o-BaCl2 transforms into o-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, x ∼ 0.15. Excess LiBH4 leads to continued anion substitution and a phase transformation into hexagonal barium borohydride chloride h-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, which accommodates higher amounts of borohydride, possibly x ∼ 0.85 and resembles h-BaCl2. Thus, two solid solutions are in equilibrium during mechano-chemical treatment of LiBH4-BaCl2 (1 : 1) whereas LiBH4-BaCl2 (2 : 1) converts to h-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15. Upon thermal treatment at T > ∼200 °C, h-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15 transforms into another orthorhombic barium borohydride chloride compound, o-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15, which is structurally similar to o-BaBr2. The samples with M = Na and K have lower reactivity and form o-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, x ∼ 0.1 and a solid solution of sodium chloride dissolved in solid sodium borohydride, Na(BH4)1-xClx, x = 0.07. The new compounds and reaction mechanisms are investigated by in situ synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (SR-PXD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and simultaneous thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), mass spectroscopy (MS) and temperature programmed photographic analysis (TPPA). PMID:27109871

  20. Poly (vinyl alcohol) hydrogel membrane as electrolyte for direct borohydride fuel cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N A Choudhury; S K Prashant; S Pitchumani; P Sridhar; A K Shukla

    2009-09-01

    A direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC) employing a poly (vinyl alcohol) hydrogel membrane electrolyte (PHME) is reported. The DBFC employs an AB5 Misch metal alloy as anode and a goldplated stainless steel mesh as cathode in conjunction with aqueous alkaline solution of sodium borohydride as fuel and aqueous acidified solution of hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. Room temperature performances of the PHME-based DBFC in respect of peak power outputs; ex-situ cross-over of oxidant, fuel, anolyte and catholyte across the membrane electrolytes; utilization efficiencies of fuel and oxidant, as also cell performance durability are compared with a similar DBFC employing a Nafion®-117 membrane electrolyte (NME). Peak power densities of ∼30 and ∼40 mW cm-2 are observed for the DBFCs with PHME and NME, respectively. The crossover of NaBH4 across both the membranes has been found to be very low. The utilization efficiencies of NaBH4 and H2O2 are found to be ∼24 and ∼59%, respectively for the PHME-based DBFC; ∼18 and ∼62%, respectively for the NME-based DBFC. The PHME and NME-based DBFCs exhibit operational cell potentials of ∼ 1.2 and ∼ 1.4 V, respectively at a load current density of 10 mA cm-2 for ∼100 h.

  1. Method for labeling technetium or rhenium using borohydride exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have established a new method for labelling a disulfide with technetium or rhenium. This method consists of the reduction of both pertechnetate or perrhenate and the disulfide in the presence of borohydride exchange resin resulting in a complex of technetium or rhenium with thiol. This method makes it possible to skip the synthetic step of thiol-protected S-precursor and it can be applied to the production of high value-added radiophamaceuticals

  2. Nanoconfined Alkali-metal borohydrides for Reversible Hydrogen Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngene, P.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen has been identified as a promising energy carrier. Its combustion is not associated with pollution when generated from renewable energy sources like solar and wind. The large-scale use of hydrogen for intermittent energy storage and as a fuel for cars can contribute to the realization of a

  3. A composite of borohydride and super absorbent polymer for hydrogen generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z. P.; Liu, B. H.; Liu, F. F.; Xu, D.

    To develop a hydrogen source for underwater applications, a composite of sodium borohydride and super absorbent polymer (SAP) is prepared by ball milling sodium borohydride powder with SAP powder, and by dehydrating an alkaline borohydride gel. When sodium polyacrylate (NaPAA) is used as the SAP, the resulting composite exhibits a high rate of borohydride hydrolysis for hydrogen generation. A mechanism of hydrogen evolution from the NaBH 4-NaPAA composite is suggested based on structure analysis by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The effects of water and NiCl 2 content in the precursor solution on the hydrogen evolution behavior are investigated and discussed.

  4. Effect of sodium borohydride synthesis on NaBH4-H2 system economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hazards and negative impacts of fossil fuel usage on environment and the prospect of fossil fuel depletion in near future have urged scientists to search for and use clean energy sources and alternative fuels. Hydrogen is the best fuel among others, which can minimize the effects of global warming. Although it is currently more expensive than other fuels, it will be cheaper following further developments in hydrogen technologies from production till end-use. Hydrogen storage is a critical issue in terms of safety and economics of hydrogen energy system. Chemical hydrides are an attractive hydrogen storage method due to their potential of achieving high volumetric and gravimetric storage densities. Among chemical hydrides, sodium borohydride (NaBH4) is given a big attention, due to its 10.8% theoretical hydrogen storage capacity. Hydrogen, which can be released by sodium borohydride hydrolysis reaction on-site, can be used in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) at anode. on the other hand, sodium borohydride solution can be used directly in a borohydride fuel cell (DBFC) at anode. Like the other chemical hydrides, sodium borohydride has been an expensive material up to now, constituting a major obstacle to commercialization of sodium borohydride as a hydrogen storage method. This paper aims to give an approximate estimation process cost of the NaBH4-H2 system by taking into account both the energy and raw material costs, starting with sodium borohydride production till recycling of it. Two different methods to synthesize sodium borohydride are analyzed and their effects on total cost are compared. It was found that the usage of Bayer process to synthesize sodium borohydride makes the overall sodium borohydride - hydrogen system cost higher than the total cost of the alternative process which starts with the production of sodium borohydride from borax decahydrate. (authors)

  5. AB5-type Hydrogen Storage Alloy Modified with Ti/Zr Used as Anodic Materials in Borohydride Fuel Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lianbang WANG; Chunan MA; Xinbiao MAO; Yuanming SUN; Seijiro SUDA

    2005-01-01

    Fuel cell using borohydride as the fuel has received much attention. AB5-type hydrogen storage alloy used as the anodic material instead of noble metals has been investigated. In order to restrain the generation of hydrogen and enhance the utilization of borohydride, Ti/Zr metal powders has been added into the parent LmNi4.78Mn0.22 (where Lm is La-richened mischmetal) alloy (LNM) by ball milling and heat treatment methods. It is found that the addition of Ti/Zr metal powders lowers the electrochemical catalytic activity of the electrodes, at the same time, restrains the generation of hydrogen and enhances the utilization of the fuel. All the results show that the hydrogen generation rate or the utilization of the fuel is directly relative to the electrochemical catalytic activity or the discharge capability of the electrodes. The utilization of the fuel increases with discharge current density. It is very important to find a balance between the discharge capability and the utilization of the fuel.

  6. Borohydride electro-oxidation by Ag-doped lanthanum chromites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Suresh Balaji; A Usha; V V Giridhar

    2014-05-01

    The electrocatalytic activity of Ag-doped lanthanum chromites electrode materials viz., LaCr0.4Ag0.6O3 and LaCr0.7Ag0.3O3 prepared by decomposing the precursor complex is studied. Pure LaCrO3 is synthesized by combustion route using oxalic acid as a fuel. The decomposition behaviour of the assynthesized powder obtained in the latter method is characterized by TGA-DTA and XRD. Both the precursor complex and the as-synthesized powder are calcined at 900°C for 7 and 10 h, respectively. XRD of the final product after calcinations indicated the formation of perovskite phase with minor amounts of impurity phases of component oxides in the Ag-doped lanthanum chromites and pure perovskite phase in the undoped one. The surface morphology of the perovskites is studied by SEM. The electrocatalytic activity of the perovskite powders for borohydride oxidation is studied by using cyclic voltammetry (CV) at a catalyst loading of 0.7 mgcm−2 for both Ag-doped and undoped LaCrO3 coated on glassy carbon substrate. Calibration plots are obtained by plotting the anodic peak current versus concentration of borohydride in the range of 20-100 mM. The sensitivities of the three perovskites towards borohydride oxidation indicated that LaCr0.4Ag0.6O3 is the best among all the perovskites studied giving a value of 1.395 A/mM.

  7. Sodium borohydride reduction of aromatic carboxylic acids via methyl esters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aamer Saeed; Zaman Ashraf

    2006-09-01

    A number of important aromatic carboxylic acids precursors, or intermediates in the syntheses of natural products, are converted into methyl esters and reduced to the corresponding primary alcohols using a sodium borohydride-THF-methanol system. The alcohols are obtained in 70-92% yields in 2-5 hours, in a pure state. This two-step procedure not only provides a better alternative to aluminum hydride reduction of acids but also allows the selective reduction of esters in presence of acids, amides, nitriles or nitro functions which are not affected under these conditions.

  8. Separate Determination of Borohydride, Borate, Hydroxide, and Carbonate in the Borohydride Fuel Cell by Acid-Base and Iodometric Potentiometric Titration

    OpenAIRE

    Churikov, A. V.; S. L. Shmakov; Romanova, V. O.; Zapsis, K. V.; Ushakov, A. V.; Ivanishchev, A. V.; Churikov, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    A methodology for quantitative chemical analysis of the complex “borohydride-borate-hydroxide-carbonate-water” mixtures used as fuel in the borohydride fuel cell was developed and optimized. The methodology includes the combined usage of the acid-base and iodometric titration methods. The acid-base titration method, which simultaneously uses the technique of differentiation and computer simulation of titration curves, allows one to determine the contents of hydroxide (alkali), carbonate, and ...

  9. In situ infrared (FTIR) study of the borohydride oxidation reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Concha, B. Molina; Chatenet, M. [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et de Physico-chimie, des Materiaux et des Interfaces (LEPMI), UMR 5631 CNRS/Grenoble-INP/UJF, 1130 Rue de la Piscine, BP75, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Coutanceau, C.; Hahn, F. [Laboratoire de Catalyse en Chimie Organique (LACCO), UMR 6503 CNRS, Universite de Poitiers, 40 Av. du, Recteur Pineau, 86000 Poitiers (France)

    2009-01-15

    The direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC) is an interesting alternative for the electrochemical power generation at lower temperatures due to its high anode theoretical specific capacity (5 A h g{sup -1}). However, the borohydride oxidation reaction (BOR) is a very complex eight-electron reaction, influenced by the nature of the electrode material (catalytic or not with respect to BH{sub 4}{sup -} hydrolysis), the [BH{sub 4}{sup -}][OH{sup -}] ratio and the temperature. In order to understand the BOR mechanism, we performed in situ infrared reflectance spectroscopy measurements (SPAIRS technique) in 1 M NaOH/1 M NaBH{sub 4} with the aim to study intermediate reactions occurring on a gold electrode (a poor BH{sub 4}{sup -} hydrolysis catalyst). We monitored several bands in B-H (1184 cm{sup -1}) and B-O bond regions (1326 and 1415 cm{sup -1}), appearing sequentially with increasing electrode polarisation. Thanks to these experimental findings, we propose possible initial elementary steps for the BOR. (author)

  10. Life time test in direct borohydride fuel cell system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamard, Romain [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), LITEN-DTNM-LCH, 17 av. des martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Laboratoire de Catalyse en Chimie Organique LACCO UMR6503, 40 av. du Recteur Pineau, 86022 Poitiers (France); Salomon, Jeremie; Martinent-Beaumont, Audrey [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), LITEN-DTNM-LCH, 17 av. des martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Coutanceau, Christophe [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Laboratoire de Catalyse en Chimie Organique LACCO UMR6503, 40 av. du Recteur Pineau, 86022 Poitiers (France)

    2009-09-05

    The electric performances of direct borohydride fuel cells (DBFCs) are evaluated in terms of power density and life time with respect to the NaBH{sub 4} concentration. A DBFC constituted of an anionic membrane, a 0.6 mg{sub Pt} cm{sup -2} anode and a commercial non-platinum based cathode led to performances as high as 200 mW cm{sup -2} at room temperature and with natural convection of air. Electrochemical life time test at 0.55 mA cm{sup -2} with a 5 M NaBH{sub 4}/1 M NaOH solution shows a voltage diminution of 1 mV h{sup -1} and a drastic drop of performances after 250 h. The life time is twice longer with 2 M NaBH{sub 4}/1 M NaOH solution (450 h) and the voltage decrease is 0.5 mV h{sup -1}. Analyses of the components after life time tests indicate that voltage loss is mainly due to the degradation of the cathode performance. Crystallisation of carbonate and borate is observed at the cathode side, although the anionic membrane displays low permeability to borohydride. (author)

  11. High electrocatalytic activity for borohydride oxidation on palladium nanocubes enclosed by {200} facets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Haiying; Chen, Kaijian; Zhu, Cai; Liu, Jiabin; Wang, Juan; He, Yan; Chi, Hongzhong; Ni, Hualiang; Ji, Zhenguo

    2015-12-01

    Pd nanocubes enclosed by {200} facets are synthesized and used as an anode catalyst in direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC) to study the electrocatalytic activity of Pd towards borohydride oxidation reaction (BOR) by modifying its surface atomic structure. A 7e reaction towards BOR is implemented on Pd nanocubes with a borohydride concentration as high as 3.26 M. The cell using Pd nanocubes as anode catalyst exhibits an obvious higher power density than the cell using commercial Pd/C, and maintained 99% of its voltage after 50 h stability test. It suggests that the Pd nanocubes could be a promising anode catalyst for the DBFC application.

  12. Reduction of Aldehydes and Ketones with Potassium Borohydride as Reductant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗慧谋; 李毅群

    2005-01-01

    A series of aldehydes and ketones were reduced by potassium borohydride in an ionic liquid/water ([bmim]PF6/H2O) biphasic system to afford corresponding alcohol with high purity in excellent yields. The ionic liquid/water biphasic system could promote the chemoselectivity and the substituents such as nitro group and chlorine remained intact. Aromatic ketones were not as active as aromatic aldhydes and cyclic ketones owing to their higher steric hindrance. The ionic liquid could be recycled and reused. This protocol has notable advantages of no need of phase transfer catalyst and organic solvents, mild conditions, simple operation, short reaction time, ease work-up, high yields and recycling of the ionic liquid.

  13. Improving SERS Detection of Bacillus thuringiensis Using Silver Nanoparticles Reduced with Hydroxylamine and with Citrate Capped Borohydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of techniques that could be useful in fields other than biological warfare agents countermeasures such as medical diagnostics, industrial microbiology, and environmental applications have become a very important subject of research. Raman spectroscopy can be used in near field or at long distances from the sample to obtain fingerprinting information of chemical composition of microorganisms. In this research, biochemical components of the cell wall and endospores of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) were identified by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy using silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NPs) reduced by hydroxylamine and borohydride capped with sodium citrate. Activation of hot spots, aggregation and surface charge modification of the NPs, was studied and optimized to obtain signal enhancements from Bt by SERS. Slight aggregation of the NPs as well as surface charge modification to a more acidic ambient was induced using small-size borohydride-reduced NPs in the form of metallic suspensions aimed at increasing the Ag NP-Bt interactions. Hydroxylamine-reduced NPs required slight aggregation and no pH modifications in order to obtain high spectral quality results in bringing out SERS signatures of Bt.

  14. PALLADIUM COATED STEEL ELECTRODE - PREPARATION, CHARACTERIZATION AND THEIR USE OF BOROHYDRIDE DETERMINATION

    OpenAIRE

    Karaboduk, Kuddusi; Hasdemir, Erdoğan; Aksu, Mehmet Levent

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is the fabrication of a cost effective palladium coated steel electrode (pd-S) for the direct analysis of the sodium borohydride (BH4-). The electrode was prepared by the cyclic voltammetry. The electrode was observed to have a high catalytic effect on the oxidation of BH4-. The Pd-S surface was characterized with profilometri, scanning electron microscope, ferrocene test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic technique. The effects of  borohydride concentration...

  15. Electronic structure of nickel(II) and zinc(II) borohydrides from spectroscopic measurements and computational modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrochers, Patrick J; Sutton, Christopher A; Abrams, Micah L; Ye, Shengfa; Neese, Frank; Telser, Joshua; Ozarowski, Andrew; Krzystek, J

    2012-03-01

    The previously reported Ni(II) complex, Tp*Ni(κ(3)-BH(4)) (Tp* = hydrotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borate anion), which has an S = 1 spin ground state, was studied by high-frequency and -field electron paramagnetic resonance (HFEPR) spectroscopy as a solid powder at low temperature, by UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy in the solid state and in solution at room temperature, and by paramagnetic (11)B NMR. HFEPR provided its spin Hamiltonian parameters: D = 1.91(1) cm(-1), E = 0.285(8) cm(-1), g = [2.170(4), 2.161(3), 2.133(3)]. Similar, but not identical parameters were obtained for its borodeuteride analogue. The previously unreported complex, Tp*Zn(κ(2)-BH(4)), was prepared, and IR and NMR spectroscopy allowed its comparison with analogous closed shell borohydride complexes. Ligand-field theory was used to model the electronic transitions in the Ni(II) complex successfully, although it was less successful at reproducing the zero-field splitting (zfs) parameters. Advanced computational methods, both density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio wave function based approaches, were applied to these Tp*MBH(4) complexes to better understand the interaction between these metals and borohydride ion. DFT successfully reproduced bonding geometries and vibrational behavior of the complexes, although it was less successful for the spin Hamiltonian parameters of the open shell Ni(II) complex. These were instead best described using ab initio methods. The origin of the zfs in Tp*Ni(κ(3)-BH(4)) is described and shows that the relatively small magnitude of D results from several spin-orbit coupling (SOC) interactions of large magnitude, but with opposite sign. Spin-spin coupling (SSC) is also shown to be significant, a point that is not always appreciated in transition metal complexes. Overall, a picture of bonding and electronic structure in open and closed shell late transition metal borohydrides is provided, which has implications for the use of these complexes in catalysis and

  16. Formation of borohydride-reduced nickel-boron coatings on various steel substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitry, V.; Delaunois, F.

    2015-12-01

    Electroless nickel-boron coatings are widely used in industrial on various substrates: ferrous and non-ferrous alloys mainly but also in some cases non-metallic materials. However, their growth process is still not fully understood and the influence of the nature of the substrate on this process is completely unknown. The formation of electroless nickel-boron was observed on five ferrous alloys: a mild steel, a high carbon unalloyed steel, a cryogenic steel (that contains 9 wt.% nickel), an austenitic stainless steel and an austeno-ferritic (duplex) stainless steel. Nickel-boron films were prepared by electroless deposition, using sodium borohydride as a reducing agent. Samples were immersed in a plating bath for times ranging from 5 s to 60 min. The influence of the nature of the substrate on the initial deposition of the coatings was investigated in detail: the initiation mechanism was identified for all substrates and it was found to be related to catalytic oxidation of the reducing agent rather than to a displacement process. The delay before initiation was influenced by the nickel content of the coating and by a high number of grain boundaries. In all cases, the plating rate varied with plating time, with a slower period during the first 10 min that corresponds to morphological modification of the coating.

  17. Aqueous sodium borohydride induced thermally stable porous zirconium oxide for quick removal of lead ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Nadiya B.; Nayak, Bibhuti B.

    2016-03-01

    Aqueous sodium borohydride (NaBH4) is well known for its reducing property and well-established for the development of metal nanoparticles through reduction method. In contrary, this research paper discloses the importance of aqueous NaBH4 as a precipitating agent towards development of porous zirconium oxide. The boron species present in aqueous NaBH4 play an active role during gelation as well as phase separated out in the form of boron complex during precipitation, which helps to form boron free zirconium hydroxide [Zr(OH)4] in the as-synthesized condition. Evolved in-situ hydrogen (H2) gas-bubbles also play an important role to develop as-synthesized loose zirconium hydroxide and the presence of intra-particle voids in the loose zirconium hydroxide help to develop porous zirconium oxide during calcination process. Without any surface modification, this porous zirconium oxide quickly adsorbs almost hundred percentages of toxic lead ions from water solution within 15 minutes at normal pH condition. Adsorption kinetic models suggest that the adsorption process was surface reaction controlled chemisorption. Quick adsorption was governed by surface diffusion process and the adsorption kinetic was limited by pore diffusion. Five cycles of adsorption-desorption result suggests that the porous zirconium oxide can be reused efficiently for removal of Pb (II) ions from aqueous solution.

  18. Sodium borohydride removes aldehyde inhibitors for enhancing biohydrogen fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Richen; Cheng, Jun; Ding, Lingkan; Song, Wenlu; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2015-12-01

    To enhance biohydrogen production from glucose and xylose in the presence of aldehyde inhibitors, reducing agent (i.e., sodium borohydride) was in situ added for effective detoxification. The detoxification efficiencies of furfural (96.7%) and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF, 91.7%) with 30mM NaBH4 were much higher than those of vanillin (77.3%) and syringaldehyde (69.3%). Biohydrogen fermentation was completely inhibited without detoxification, probably because of the consumption of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) by inhibitors reduction (R-CHO+2NADH→R-CH2OH+2NAD(+)). Addition of 30mM NaBH4 provided the reducing power necessary for inhibitors reduction (4R-CHO+NaBH4+2H2O→4R-CH2OH+NaBO2). The recovered reducing power in fermentation resulted in 99.3% recovery of the hydrogen yield and 64.6% recovery of peak production rate. Metabolite production and carbon conversion after detoxification significantly increased to 63.7mM and 81.9%, respectively. PMID:26342346

  19. In situ X-ray Raman spectroscopy study of the hydrogen sorption properties of lithium borohydride nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miedema, Piter S; Ngene, Peter; van der Eerden, Ad M J; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Nordlund, Dennis; Au, Yuen S; de Groot, Frank M F

    2014-11-01

    Nanoconfined alkali metal borohydrides are promising materials for reversible hydrogen storage applications, but the characterization of hydrogen sorption in these materials is difficult. Here we show that with in situ X-ray Raman spectroscopy (XRS) we can track the relative amounts of intermediates and final products formed during de- and re-hydrogenation of nanoconfined lithium borohydride (LiBH4) and therefore we can possibly identify the de- and re-hydrogenation pathways. In the XRS of nanoconfined LiBH4 at different points in the de- and re-hydrogenation, we identified phases that lead to the conclusion that de- and re-hydrogenation pathways in nanoconfined LiBH4 are different from bulk LiBH4: intercalated lithium (LiCx), boron and lithium hydride were formed during de-hydrogenation, but as well Li2B12H12 was observed indicating that there is possibly some bulk LiBH4 present in the nanoconfined sample LiBH4-C as prepared. Surprisingly, XRS revealed that the de-hydrogenated products of the LiBH4-C nanocomposites can be partially rehydrogenated to about 90% of Li2B12H12 and 2-5% of LiBH4 at a mild condition of 1 bar H2 and 350 °C. This suggests that re-hydrogenation occurs via the formation of Li2B12H12. Our results show that XRS is an elegant technique that can be used for in and ex situ study of the hydrogen sorption properties of nanoconfined and bulk light-weight metal hydrides in energy storage applications. PMID:25231357

  20. Understanding oscillatory phenomena in molecular hydrogen generation via sodium borohydride hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budroni, M A; Biosa, E; Garroni, S; Mulas, G R C; Marchettini, N; Culeddu, N; Rustici, M

    2013-11-14

    The hydrolysis of borohydride salts represents one of the most promising processes for the generation of high purity molecular hydrogen under mild conditions. In this work we show that the sodium borohydride hydrolysis exhibits a fingerprinting periodic oscillatory transient in the hydrogen flow over a wide range of experimental conditions. We disproved the possibility that flow oscillations are driven by supersaturation phenomena of gaseous bubbles in the reactive mixture or by a nonlinear thermal feedback according to a thermokinetic model. Our experimental results indicate that the NaBH4 hydrolysis is a spontaneous inorganic oscillator, in which the hydrogen flow oscillations are coupled to an "oscillophor" in the reactive solution. The discovery of this original oscillator paves the way for a new class of chemical oscillators, with fundamental implications not only for testing the general theory on oscillations, but also with a view to chemical control of borohydride systems used as a source of hydrogen based green fuel. PMID:24084866

  1. Preparation and characterization of PtRu/C, PtBi/C, PtRuBi/C electrocatalysts for direct electro-oxidation of ethanol in PEM fuels cells using the method of reduction by sodium borohydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pt/C, PtBi/C, PtRu/C and PtRuBi/C electrocatalysts were prepared by a borohydride reduction methodology and tested for ethanol oxidation. This methodology consists in mix a solution with sodium hydroxide and sodium borohydride to a mixture containing water/isopropyl alcohol, metallic precursors and the Vulcan XC 72 carbon support. It was studied the addition method of borohydride (drop by drop addition or rapid addition). The obtained electrocatalysts were characterized by energy dispersive X ray spectroscopy (EDX), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and cyclic voltammetry. The ethanol electro-oxidation was studied by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry using the thin porous coating technique. The electrocatalysts were tested in real conditions of operation by unit cell tests. The stability of PtRuBi/C electrocatalysts was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry using the ultra-thin porous coating technique and ring-disk electrode. The PtRuBi/C electro catalyst apparently presented a good performance for ethanol electro-oxidation but experimental evidences showed accentuated bismuth dissolution. (author)

  2. Platinum-rare earth cathodes for direct borohydride-peroxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, D. S. P.; Santos, D. M. F.; Šljukić, B.; Sequeira, C. A. C.; Macciò, D.; Saccone, A.

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is being actively investigated as an oxidant for direct borohydride fuel cells. Herein, platinum-rare earth (RE = Sm, Dy, Ho) alloys are prepared by arc melting and their activity for hydrogen peroxide reduction reaction (HPRR) is studied in alkaline media. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry measurements show that Pt-Sm electrode displays the highest catalytic activity for HPRR with the lowest activation energy, followed by Pt-Ho, while Pt-Dy alloys show practically no activity. Laboratory direct borohydride-peroxide fuel cells (DBPFCs) are assembled using these alloys. The DBPFC with Pt-Sm cathode gives the highest peak power density of 85 mW cm-2, which is more than double of that obtained in a DBPFC with Pt electrodes.

  3. Studies on sodium-borohydride-reducible hexose in glucosyl-albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, K K; Rai, K B; Pattabiraman, T N

    1983-08-01

    Glucosylated albumin of human serum isolated by dye-ligand chromatography on blue Sepharose, was not found to be completely reducible by sodium borohydride. The percentage reducible hexose as judged by phenol-sulphuric acid reaction was in the range of 49.7 +/- 12.8 in control subjects (n = 24) and 53.8 +/- 14.2 in diabetics (n = 50). Increase in the level of total hexose bound to albumin and reducible hexose were equally significant in diabetes (P less than 0.001). Sodium chloride gradient elution during chromatography on blue Sepharose showed that glucosylated albumin had lesser affinity than the native protein to the matrix. It is proposed that an addition product between hexose and albumin is formed during nonenzymatic reaction and this adduct is fairly stable and is not reducible by sodium borohydride. PMID:6626188

  4. Investigation of the porous nanostructured Cu/Ni/AuNi electrode for sodium borohydride electrooxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electrochemical approach to nanostructured Cu/Ni/AuNi catalyst design using the electrodeposition process followed by galvanic replacement technique is presented. The procedure consisted of the electrodeposition of Ni–Zn on the Ni coating with subsequent replacement of the zinc by gold at open circuit potential in a gold containing alkaline solution. The surface morphologies and compositions of coatings were determined by energy dispersive X-ray and scanning electron microscopy techniques. The results showed that the Cu/Ni/AuNi coatings were porous composing of discrete Au nanoparticles. The electrocatalytic activity of Cu/Ni/AuNi electrodes for sodium borohydride electro-oxidation was studied using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, chronopotentiometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. The electro-oxidation current on Cu/Ni/AuNi catalyst is much higher than that on flat Au catalyst. The onset potential and peak potential on Cu/Ni/AuNi catalysts are more negative than that on flat Au catalyst for borohydride electrooxidation. The impedance behavior also shows different patterns, capacitive, and negative resistances and inductive loops at different applied anodic potentials. All results show that the Cu/Ni/AuNi catalysts can be applied as potential anode catalysts for the direct borohydride fuel cells

  5. Destabilized and catalyzed borohydride for reversible hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtadi, Rana F.; Nakamura, Kenji; Au, Ming; Zidan, Ragaiy

    2012-01-31

    A process of forming a hydrogen storage material, including the steps of: providing a first material of the formula M(BH.sub.4).sub.X, where M is an alkali metal or an alkali earth metal, providing a second material selected from M(AlH.sub.4).sub.x, a mixture of M(AlH.sub.4).sub.x and MCl.sub.x, a mixture of MCl.sub.x and Al, a mixture of MCl.sub.x and AlH.sub.3, a mixture of MH.sub.x and Al, Al, and AlH.sub.3. The first and second materials are combined at an elevated temperature and at an elevated hydrogen pressure for a time period forming a third material having a lower hydrogen release temperature than the first material and a higher hydrogen gravimetric density than the second material.

  6. Borohydride-reducible components in soluble collagen irradiated with gamma rays in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation with 100 krad of gamma rays of neutral-soluble rat skin collagen decreased the content of aldol cross-links by a factor of three, whereas it did not affect the content of allysine. On reduction with tritiated sodium borohydride, five new components were detected showing different stability towards acid and alkali. (author) tetracycline. The results of kinetic and autoradiographic studies and microscopical analysis of bone preparations suggest that stable strontium inhibits the mineralization of newly formed bone tissue without affecting the physicochemical processes related to ion exchange. (author)

  7. Innovative reactor prototype for Hydrogen production in a stationary application using sodium borohydride

    OpenAIRE

    Barbosa, Rui; Ferreira, V.; Silva, D; Condes, J.; Ramos, S.; Amaral, V.; Pinto, A. M. F. R.; Figueiredo, A; Rangel, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen storage has proved to be the greatest obstacle preventing hydrogen from replacing fossil fuels. Hence, a safe, efficient and economical method of storing hydrogen must be available to turn viable a hydrogen economy based on renewable resources [1]. Hydrogen can be stored in chemical hydrides such as sodium borohydride (NaBH4), with large theoretical H2 content of 10,9 wt%. With the aid of catalysts, and at room temperatures, the alkaline hydrolysis of NaBH4 can be enhanced [2]. In th...

  8. Batch sodium borohydride hydrolysis systems: Effect of sudden valve opening on hydrogen generation rate

    OpenAIRE

    M. J. F. Ferreira; Coelho, F; Rangel, C. M.; Pinto, A. M. F. R.

    2012-01-01

    A study was undertaken in order to investigate the potential of hydrogen (H 2) generation by hydrolysis of sodium borohydride solution (10 wt% NaBH 4 and 7 wt% NaOH), in batch reactors, operating at moderate pressures (up to #8764;1.2 MPa), in the presence of a powdered nickel-ruthenium based catalyst, reused between 311 and 316 times, to feed on-demand a proton exchange membrane fuel cell. A different approach to the testing of the performance of the batch NaBH 4 hydrolysis system is explore...

  9. Dehydrogenation in lithium borohydride/conventional metal hydride composite based on a mutual catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, X.B.; Shi, Qing; Vegge, Tejs;

    2009-01-01

    The dehydrogenation of LiBH4 ball-milled with hydrogenated 40Ti–15Mn–15Cr–30V alloy was investigated. It was found that there is a mutual catalysis between the two hydrides, lowering the temperature of hydrogen release from both hydrides. In the case of 1h milled LiBH4/40Ti–15Mn–15Cr–30V with a...

  10. Solid-state Asymmetric Reduction of (S)-1, l'-Bi-2-naphtholAcetylferrocene Molecular Compound with Sodium Borohydride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG, Ji-Ben; DU, Hai-Feng; DING, Kui-Ling

    2001-01-01

    A novel molecular crystal formed between enanteopure 1,l'bi-2-naphthoi and acetylferrocene has been prepared andcharacterized in this communication. The examination on itsreducton with soditma borohydride showed that the asymnetric inducton was observed in the solid state but not in the solution phase. The asymmetric induction in the solid-state reaction may be attributed to the chiral microenviromnent ofmolecular crystal.

  11. Studies on the sodium borohydride reduction of unsaturated keto nucleosides. Novel route to deoxy nucleosides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reduction of α,β-unsaturated (ketohexosyl)purines, which constitute the first examples of unsaturated keto nucleosides, with sodium borohydride gave the corresponding deoxy nucleosides. Contrary to the recently reported (4',6'-dideoxy-β-L-glycero-hex3'-enopyranosulosyl)purines, which were obtained by acetylation of the corresponding keto nucleosides, the α anomer, subsequently described, was prepared by oxidation of the partially protected deoxyhexosylpurine. The mechanisms of these reductions were established by a study of the NMR spectra of the deoxy nucleosides using NaBH4 in deuterated solvents and sodium borodeuteride in light solvents. 1,2 addition of the hydride was shown to be the mode of reduction of all the studied α- and β-unsaturated keto nucleosides. The ready availability of these unsaturated keto nucleosides provides extremely useful synthetic intermediate nucleosides especially for the preparation of nucleosides containing rare deoxy sugars

  12. Electrochemical oxidation of sodium borohydride on carbon supported Pt-Zn nanoparticle bimetallic catalyst and its implications to direct borohydride-hydrogen peroxide fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The Pt-Zn/C catalyst as anode catalyst for DBHFC were facilely synthesized. • The average particle size of Pt-Zn bimetallic nanoparticles is approximately 2.5 nm. • The Zn-doping can apparently improve the catalytic activity for BH4− electrochemical oxidation. • The maximum power density of DBHFC employing Pt-Zn/C as anode catalyst is as high as 79.9 mW cm−2 at 79.5 mA cm−2 and 25 °C. - Abstract: Carbon supported Pt-Zn bimetallic nanoparticle electrocatalysts (Pt-Zn/C) are facilely prepared by a modified NaBH4 reduction method in aqueous solution at room temperature and investigated as alternative anode catalysts for direct borohydride-hydrogen peroxide fuel cell (DBHFC). The physical and electrochemical properties of the as-prepared nanospherical electrocatalysts are investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA) and fuel cell test. Based on results of TEM and XRD, the Pt-Zn nanoparticles show average particle size of approximately 2.5 nm on the carbon surface. The fundamental electrochemical results show that the Pt-Zn/C catalysts exhibit much higher catalytic activity and stability for the direct oxidation of BH4− than Pt/C catalyst since Pt atoms are partly substituted by Zn atoms in Pt-Zn catalyst. Among various Pt-Zn catalysts with different compositions, the Pt67Zn33/C catalyst presents the highest catalytic activity for BH4− electrooxidation. The DBHFC using Pt67Zn33/C as anode catalyst and Pt/C as cathode catalyst obtains the maximum power density as high as 79.9 mW cm−2 at 79.5 mA cm−2 and 25 °C

  13. PtRu-LiCoO 2—an efficient catalyst for hydrogen generation from sodium borohydride solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Palanichamy; Yang, Tae-Hyun; Lee, Won-Yong; Kim, Chang-Soo

    Hydrogen generation by the hydrolysis of aqueous sodium borohydride (NaBH 4) solutions is studied using IRA-400 anion resin dispersed Pt, Ru catalysts and lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO 2) supported Pt, Ru and PtRu catalysts. The performance of the LiCoO 2 supported catalysts is better than that of ion-exchange resin dispersed catalysts. There is a marked concentration dependence on the performance of the LiCoO 2 supported catalysts and the hydrogen generation rate decreases if the borohydride concentration is increased beyond 10 wt.%. The efficiency of PtRu-LiCoO 2 is almost double that of either Ru-LiCoO 2 or Pt-LiCoO 2 for NaBH 4 concentrations up to 10 wt.%.

  14. Durability and reutilization capabilities of a Ni-Ru catalyst for the hydrolysis of sodium borohydride in batch reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, A.M.F.R.; M.J.F. Ferreira; Fernandes, V. R.; Rangel, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    The study of catalyst durability and reutilization on catalyzed hydrolysis of sodium borohydride is essential from an application point of view. Few works on this topic are available in the literature. In the present work, a powder nickel-ruthenium based catalyst, unsupported, used in two different schemes of NaBH 4 hydrolysis (alkaline and alkali free hydrolysis), performed in batch reactors with different volumes and bottom geometries (flat and conical), was investigated in terms of durabil...

  15. Direct rotating ring-disk measurement of the sodium borohydride diffusion coefficient in sodium hydroxide solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the experimental determination of the diffusion coefficient of borohydride anion and solution kinematic viscosity for a large panel of NaOH + NaBH4 electrolytic solutions relevant for use as anolyte in Direct Borohydride Fuel Cells (DBFC). The diffusion coefficients have been measured by the transit-time technique on gold rotating ring-disk electrodes, and verified using other classical techniques reported in the literature, namely the Levich method and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy on a gold RDE, or chronoamperometry at a gold microdisk. The agreement between these methods is generally good. The diffusion coefficients measured from the RRDE technique are however ca. twice larger than those previously reported in the literature (e.g. ca. 3 x 10-5 cm2 s-1 in 1 M NaOH + 0.01 M NaBH4 at 25 deg. C in the present study vs. ca. 1.6 x 10-5 cm2 s-1 in 1 M NaOH + 0.02 M NaBH4 at 30 deg. C in the literature, as measured by chronoamperometry at a gold microsphere), which is thoroughly discussed. Our measurements using chronoamperometry at a gold microdisk showed that such technique can yield diffusion coefficient values below what expected. The origin of such finding is explained in the frame of the formation of both a film of boron-oxide(s) at the surface of the (static) gold microdisk and the generation of H2 bubbles at the electrode surface (as a result of the heterogeneous hydrolysis at Au), which alter the access to the electrode surface and thus prevents efficient measurements. Such film formation and H2 bubbles generation is not so much of an issue for rotating electrodes thanks to the convection of electrolyte which sweeps the electrode surface. In addition, should such film be present, the transit-time determination technique on a RRDE displays the advantage of not being very sensible to its presence: the parameter measured is the time taken by a perturbation generated the disk to reach the ring trough a distance several orders of

  16. Direct rotating ring-disk measurement of the sodium borohydride diffusion coefficient in sodium hydroxide solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatenet, M. [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et de Physico-chimie des Materiaux et des Interfaces, LEPMI, UMR 5631 CNRS/Grenoble-INP/UJF, 1130 rue de la piscine, BP75, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres Cedex (France)], E-mail: Marian.Chatenet@phelma.grenoble-inp.fr; Molina-Concha, M.B. [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et de Physico-chimie des Materiaux et des Interfaces, LEPMI, UMR 5631 CNRS/Grenoble-INP/UJF, 1130 rue de la piscine, BP75, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); El-Kissi, N. [Laboratoire de Rheologie, UMR 5520 CNRS/Grenoble-INP/UJF, 1301 rue de la piscine, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Parrour, G.; Diard, J.-P. [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et de Physico-chimie des Materiaux et des Interfaces, LEPMI, UMR 5631 CNRS/Grenoble-INP/UJF, 1130 rue de la piscine, BP75, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres Cedex (France)

    2009-07-15

    This paper presents the experimental determination of the diffusion coefficient of borohydride anion and solution kinematic viscosity for a large panel of NaOH + NaBH{sub 4} electrolytic solutions relevant for use as anolyte in Direct Borohydride Fuel Cells (DBFC). The diffusion coefficients have been measured by the transit-time technique on gold rotating ring-disk electrodes, and verified using other classical techniques reported in the literature, namely the Levich method and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy on a gold RDE, or chronoamperometry at a gold microdisk. The agreement between these methods is generally good. The diffusion coefficients measured from the RRDE technique are however ca. twice larger than those previously reported in the literature (e.g. ca. 3 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1} in 1 M NaOH + 0.01 M NaBH{sub 4} at 25 deg. C in the present study vs. ca. 1.6 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1} in 1 M NaOH + 0.02 M NaBH{sub 4} at 30 deg. C in the literature, as measured by chronoamperometry at a gold microsphere), which is thoroughly discussed. Our measurements using chronoamperometry at a gold microdisk showed that such technique can yield diffusion coefficient values below what expected. The origin of such finding is explained in the frame of the formation of both a film of boron-oxide(s) at the surface of the (static) gold microdisk and the generation of H{sub 2} bubbles at the electrode surface (as a result of the heterogeneous hydrolysis at Au), which alter the access to the electrode surface and thus prevents efficient measurements. Such film formation and H{sub 2} bubbles generation is not so much of an issue for rotating electrodes thanks to the convection of electrolyte which sweeps the electrode surface. In addition, should such film be present, the transit-time determination technique on a RRDE displays the advantage of not being very sensible to its presence: the parameter measured is the time taken by a perturbation generated the

  17. Sodium borohydride as an additive to enhance the performance of direct ethanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lianqin; Fang, Xiang; Shen, Pei Kang [The Key Laboratory of Low-carbon Chemistry and Energy Conservation of Guangdong Province, The State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Bambagioni, Valentina; Bevilacqua, Manuela; Bianchini, Claudio; Filippi, Jonathan; Lavacchi, Alessandro; Marchionni, Andrea; Vizza, Francesco [Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organometallici (ICCOM-CNR), via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy)

    2010-12-15

    The effect of adding small quantities (0.1-1 wt.%) of sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) to the anolyte solution of direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs) with membrane-electrode assemblies constituted by nanosized Pd/C anode, Fe-Co cathode and anion-exchange membrane (Tokuyama A006) was investigated by means of various techniques. These include cyclic voltammetry, in situ FTIR spectroelectrochemistry, a study of the performance of monoplanar fuel cells and an analysis of the ethanol oxidation products. A comparison with fuel cells fed with aqueous solutions of ethanol proved unambiguously the existence of a promoting effect of NaBH{sub 4} on the ethanol oxidation. Indeed, the potentiodynamic curves of the ethanol-NaBH{sub 4} mixtures showed higher power and current densities, accompanied by a remarkable increase in the fuel consumption at comparable working time of the cell. A {sup 13}C and {sup 11}B {l_brace}{sup 1}H{r_brace}NMR analysis of the cell exhausts and an in situ FTIR spectroelectrochemical study showed that ethanol is converted selectively to acetate while the oxidation product of NaBH{sub 4} is sodium metaborate (NaBO{sub 2}). The enhancement of the overall cell performance has been explained in terms of the ability of NaBH{sub 4} to reduce the PdO layer on the catalyst surface. (author)

  18. Structure determination of ultra dense magnesium borohydride: A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jing; Duan, Defang; Jin, Xilian; Bao, Kuo; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Tian

    2013-06-01

    Magnesium borohydride (Mg(BH4)2) is one of the potential hydrogen storage materials. Recently, two experiments [Y. Filinchuk, B. Richter, T. R. Jensen, V. Dmitriev, D. Chernyshov, and H. Hagemann, Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 50, 11162 (2011);, 10.1002/anie.201100675 L. George, V. Drozd, and S. K. Saxena, J. Phys. Chem. C 113, 486 (2009), 10.1021/jp807842t] found that α-Mg(BH4)2 can irreversibly be transformed to an ultra dense δ-Mg(BH4)2 under high pressure. Its volumetric hydrogen content at ambient pressure (147 g/cm3) exceeds twice of DOE's (U.S. Department of Energy) target (70 g/cm3) and that of α-Mg(BH4)2 (117 g/cm3) by 20%. In this study, the experimentally proposed P42nm structure of δ-phase has been found to be dynamically unstable. A new Fddd structure has been reported as a good candidate of δ-phase instead. Its enthalpy from 0 to 12 GPa is much lower than P42nm structure and the simulated X-ray diffraction spectrum is in satisfied agreement with previous experiments. In addition, the previously proposed P-3m1 structure, which is denser than Fddd, is found to be a candidate of ɛ-phase due to the agreement of Raman shifts.

  19. (Iminophosphoranyl)(thiophosphoranyl)methane rare-earth borohydride complexes: synthesis, structures and polymerization catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Matthias; Oña-Burgos, Pascual; Guillaume, Sophie M; Roesky, Peter W

    2015-07-21

    The (iminophosphoranyl)(thiophosphoranyl)methanide {CH(PPh2=NSiMe3)(PPh2=S)}(-) ligand has been used for the synthesis of divalent and trivalent rare-earth borohydride complexes. The salt metathesis of the potassium reagent [K{CH(PPh2=NSiMe3)(PPh2=S)}]2 with [Yb(BH4)2(THF)2] resulted in the divalent monoborohydride ytterbium complex [{CH(PPh2=NSiMe3)(PPh2=S)}Yb(BH4)(THF)2]. The 2D (31)P/(171)Yb HMQC-NMR spectrum clearly showed the coupling between both nuclei. The trivalent bisborohydrides [{CH(PPh2=NSiMe3)(PPh2=S)}Ln(BH4)2(THF)] (Ln = Y, Sm, Tb, Dy, Er, Yb and Lu) were obtained by reaction of [K{CH(PPh2=NSiMe3)(PPh2=S)}]2 with [Ln(BH4)3(THF)3]. All new compounds were characterized by single X-ray diffraction. The divalent and trivalent compounds were next used as initiators in the ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of ε-caprolactone (CL) and trimethylene carbonate (TMC). All complexes afforded a generally well-controlled ROP of both of these cyclic esters. High molar mass poly(ε-caprolactone) diols (Mn,NMR trimethylene carbonate)s (Mn,NMR < 20,000 g mol(-1), ĐM = 1.61) were thus synthesized under mild operating conditions. PMID:25683468

  20. Reductive reactivity of borohydride- and dithionite-synthesized iron-based nanoparticles: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoming; He, Di; Jones, Adele M; Collins, Richard N; Waite, T David

    2016-02-13

    In this study sodium dithionite (NaS2O4) and sodium borohydride (NaBH4) were employed as reducing agents for the synthesis of nanosized iron-based particles. The particles formed using NaBH4 (denoted nFe(BH4)) principally contained (as expected) Fe(0) according to XAS and XRD analyses while the particles synthesized using NaS2O4, (denoted nFe(S2O4)) were dominated by the mixed Fe(II)/Fe(III) mineral magnetite (Fe3O4) though with possible presence of Fe(0). The ability of both particles to reduce trichloroethylene (TCE) under analogous conditions demonstrated remarkable differences with nFe(BH4) resulting in complete reduction of 1.5mM of TCE in 2h while nFe(S2O4) were unable to effect complete reduction of TCE in 120 h. Moreover, acetylene was the major reaction product formed in the presence of nFe(S2O4) while the major reaction product formed following reaction with nFe(BH4) was ethylene, which was further reduced to ethane as the reaction proceeded. Considering that effective Pd reduction to Pd(0) requires the presence of Fe(0), this is consistent with our finding that Fe(0) is not the dominant phase formed when employing dithionite as a reducing agent under the conditions employed in this study. PMID:26513569

  1. Alkali free hydrolysis of sodium borohydride for hydrogen generation under pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, M.J.F.; Pinto, A.M.F.R. [Centro de Estudos de Fenomenos de Transporte, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias s/n, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Gales, L. [Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 823, 4150-180 Porto and Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas Abel Salazar, Largo Prof. Abel Salazar 2, 4099-003 Porto (Portugal); Fernandes, V.R.; Rangel, C.M. [Laboratorio Nacional de Energia e Geologia - LNEG, Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Unit Estrada do Paco do Lumiar 22, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2010-09-15

    The present study is related with the production of hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}), at elevated pressures and with high gravimetric storage density, to supply a PEM fuel cell on-demand. To achieve this goal, solid sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) was mixed with a proper amount of a powder reused nickel-ruthenium based catalyst (Ni-Ru based/NaBH{sub 4}: 0.2 and 0.4 g/g; {approx}150 times reused) inside the bottom of a batch reactor. Then, a stoichiometric amount of pure liquid water (H{sub 2}O/NaBH{sub 4}: 2-8 mol/mol) was added and the catalyzed NaBH{sub 4} hydrolysis evolved, in the absence of an alkali inhibitor. In this way, this research work is designated alkali free hydrolysis of NaBH{sub 4} for H{sub 2} generation. This type of hydrolysis is excellent from an environmental point of view because it does not involve strongly caustic solutions. Experiments were performed in three batch reactors with internal volumes 646, 369 and 229 cm{sup 3}, and having different bottom geometries (flat and conical shapes). The H{sub 2} generated was a function of the added water and completion was achieved with H{sub 2}O/NaBH{sub 4} = 8 mol/mol. The results show that hydrogen yields and rates increase remarkably increasing both system temperature and pressure. Reactor bottom shape influences deeply H{sub 2} generation: the conical bottom shape greatly enhances the rate and practically eliminates the reaction induction time. Our system of compressed hydrogen generation up to 1.26 MPa shows 6.3 wt% and 70 kg m{sup -3}, respectively, for gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen storage capacities (materials-only basis) and therefore is a viable hydrogen storage candidate for portable applications. (author)

  2. Preparation and characterization of PtRu/C, PtBi/C, PtRuBi/C electrocatalysts for direct electro-oxidation of ethanol in PEM fuels cells using the method of reduction by sodium borohydride; Preparacao e caracterizacao de eletrocatalisadores PtRu/C, PtBi/C, PtRuBi/C para eletro-oxidacao direta de etanol em celulas a combustivel tipo PEM utilizando a metodologia da reducao via borohidreto de sodio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandalise, Michele

    2010-07-01

    Pt/C, PtBi/C, PtRu/C and PtRuBi/C electrocatalysts were prepared by a borohydride reduction methodology and tested for ethanol oxidation. This methodology consists in mix a solution with sodium hydroxide and sodium borohydride to a mixture containing water/isopropyl alcohol, metallic precursors and the Vulcan XC 72 carbon support. It was studied the addition method of borohydride (drop by drop addition or rapid addition). The obtained electrocatalysts were characterized by energy dispersive X ray spectroscopy (EDX), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and cyclic voltammetry. The ethanol electro-oxidation was studied by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry using the thin porous coating technique. The electrocatalysts were tested in real conditions of operation by unit cell tests. The stability of PtRuBi/C electrocatalysts was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry using the ultra-thin porous coating technique and ring-disk electrode. The PtRuBi/C electro catalyst apparently presented a good performance for ethanol electro-oxidation but experimental evidences showed accentuated bismuth dissolution. (author)

  3. Solid State NMR Characterization of Complex Metal Hydrides systems for Hydrogen Storage Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Son-Jong; Bowman, Robert C., Jr.; Kim, Chul; Zan, Jason A.; Reiter, Joseph W.

    2011-01-01

    Solid state NMR is widely applied in studies of solid state chemistries for hydrogen storage reactions. Use of ^(11)B MAS NMR in studies of metal borohydrides (BH_4) is mainly focused, revisiting the issue of dodecaborane formation and observation of ^(11)B{^1H} Nuclear Overhauser Effect.

  4. XPS, TEM and SAD investigations of nanosized Co{sub x}B{sub y}H{sub z} particles obtained by two different borohydride methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krastev, V. [Bulgarian Acad. of Sci., Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. of General and Inorg. Chem.; Stoycheva, M. [Central Laboratory of Electrochemical Power Sources, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Lefterova, E. [Central Laboratory of Electrochemical Power Sources, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Dragieva, I. [Central Laboratory of Electrochemical Power Sources, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Stoynov, Z. [Central Laboratory of Electrochemical Power Sources, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria)

    1996-07-01

    The nanosized Co{sub x}B{sub y}H{sub z} particles synthesised by the ``tea`` and ``antigravity`` methods using a borohydride reduction process have been subjected to structure and composition studies by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area diffraction (SAD). The amounts of the elements Co, B, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2} and C as mean volume values, and surface values for the as-prepared particles, as well as after Ar{sup +} etching to a depth of about 15 nm and 30 nm from the initial particle surface, are determined. About 1.5 atoms of cobalt per atom of boron correspond to samples obtained by the ``antigravity`` method. The binding energy (BE) of 1s electrons of boron atoms has only one value. These particles are angular and are in the typical nanocrystalline state. In the case of samples prepared by the ``tea`` method, two atoms of cobalt per atom of boron are found. The presence of two kinds of BE (B{sup I} and B{sup II}) of 1s electrons of boron atoms in the particles obtained by the ``tea`` method is observed and almost equal amounts of these two states are established in the spectrum. The particles` shape and structure are typical of the amorphous state. The fact that there is one peak when the ``antigravity`` method is applied, in contrast to the two peaks with the ``tea`` method indicates the presence of a metal amorphous state in the latter case. (orig.)

  5. Capacity enhancement of aqueous borohydride fuels for hydrogen storage in liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, David; Neiner, Doinita [U.S. Borax Inc., Rio Tinto, Greenwood Village, CO (United States); Bowden, Mark [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Whittemore, Sean; Holladay, Jamie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Huang, Zhenguo [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Autrey, Tom [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Adjusting ratio of Q = Na/B will maximize H{sub 2} storage capacity of liquid carrier. • Mixtures of hydrolysis products are desirable to maximize solubility. • 6.5 wt.% hydrogen and remains liquid from beginning to end. - Abstract: In this work we demonstrate enhanced hydrogen storage capacities through increased solubility of sodium borate product species in aqueous media achieved by adjusting the sodium (NaOH) to boron (B(OH){sub 3}) ratio, i.e., M/B, to obtain a distribution of polyborate anions. For a 1:1 mol ratio of NaOH to B(OH){sub 3}, M/B = 1, the ratio of the hydrolysis product formed from NaBH{sub 4} hydrolysis, the sole borate species formed and observed by {sup 11}B NMR is sodium metaborate, NaB(OH){sub 4}. When the ratio is 1:3 NaOH to B(OH){sub 3}, M/B = 0.33, a mixture of borate anions is formed and observed as a broad peak in the {sup 11}B NMR spectrum. The complex polyborate mixture yields a metastable solution that is difficult to crystallize. Given the enhanced solubility of the polyborate mixture formed when M/B = 0.33 it should follow that the hydrolysis of sodium octahydrotriborate, NaB{sub 3}H{sub 8}, can provide a greater storage capacity of hydrogen for fuel cell applications compared to sodium borohydride while maintaining a single phase. Accordingly, the hydrolysis of a 23 wt.% NaB{sub 3}H{sub 8} solution in water yields a solution having the same complex polyborate mixture as formed by mixing a 1:3 M ratio of NaOH and B(OH){sub 3} and releases >8 eq of H{sub 2}. By optimizing the M/B ratio a complex mixture of soluble products, including B{sub 3}O{sub 3}(OH){sub 5}{sup 2−}, B{sub 4}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 4}{sup 2−}, B{sub 3}O{sub 3}(OH){sub 4}{sup −}, B{sub 5}O{sub 6}(OH){sub 4}{sup −} and B(OH){sub 3}, can be maintained as a single liquid phase throughout the hydrogen release process. Consequently, hydrolysis of NaB{sub 3}H{sub 8} can provide a 40% increase in H{sub 2} storage density compared to the hydrolysis

  6. Carbon-supported Pt0.75M0.25 (M = Ni or Co) electrocatalysts for borohydride oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • BH4− electrooxidation at carbon supported Pt-alloys (Pt0.75M0.25/C, M = Ni or Co). • Influence of BH4− concentration and temperature on BH4− electrooxidation. • Evaluation of charge transfer coefficients and number of electrons exchanged. • Assessment of heterogeneous rate constants and activation energies. • Higher catalytic activity of Pt0.75M0.25/C than Pt/C for BH4− electrooxidation. -- Abstract: Electrochemical oxidation of sodium borohydride (NaBH4) at carbon-supported platinum (Pt/C) and carbon-supported bimetallic platinum alloys (Pt0.75M0.25/C, with M = Ni or Co) is studied in alkaline media using cyclic voltammetry and linear scan voltammetry with rotating disc electrode. Main kinetic parameters (e.g., charge transfer coefficients, number of electrons exchanged, standard heterogeneous rate constants and activation energies) for NaBH4 oxidation on these electrocatalysts are determined. Results indicate the highest catalytic activity of Pt0.75Ni0.25/C alloy electrocatalyst, followed by Pt0.75Co0.25/C, while the lowest activity is observed for Pt/C electrocatalyst. The influence of electrolyte composition and temperature on NaBH4 electrooxidation at the three materials is also explored. The good performance of these bimetallic alloys makes them a lower cost alternative to single Pt as electrocatalysts for the direct borohydride fuel cell anode

  7. Nanoporous carbon supported platinum-copper nanocomposites as anode catalysts for direct borohydride-hydrogen peroxide fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • NPC supported Pt-Cu nanocomposites are used firstly as anode catalysts for DBHFC. • The average size of the Pt-Cu nanocrystals is around 2.3 nm. • The DBHFC with Pt2Cu/NPC anode shows the maximum power density of 89 mW cm−2. -- Abstract: Nanoporous carbon (NPC) supported Pt-Cu nanocomposites (PtxCu/NPC) with different Pt/Cu molar ratios have been successfully synthesized via NaBH4 reduction method and used as anode catalysts for direct borohydride-hydrogen peroxide fuel cell (DBHFC). The as-synthesized PtxCu/NPC electrocatalysts are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA), rotating disc electrode (RDE) and fuel cell test. It has been found that the PtCu nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed on the surface of the NPC support with average size of about 2.3 nm. Besides, the PtxCu/NPC catalysts show higher activities for borohydride oxidation than that of monometallic Pt/NPC and Vulcan XC-72 carbon supported Pt2Cu (Pt2Cu/XC-72) catalysts. Especially, the DBHFC equipped with Pt2Cu/NPC as anode catalyst shows the maximum power density of 89 mW cm−2 at 25 °C

  8. Study of the ultrafast polarization dynamics in lithium borohydride by means of femtosecond X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis the ultrafast electronic polarisation in the crystalline material lithium borohydride (LiBH4) is examined. The material is excited by a femtosecond long optical pulse and scanned by a likewise short X-ray pulse. Using X-ray scattering the optically induced spatial rearrangement of electronic charge can be directly mapped with atomic spatial resolution. Copper K-alpha X-rays for the experiment are produced in a laboratory table-top laserplasma source with 1 kHz repetition rate. This radiation is then focused on a powdered sample. Debye-Scherrer rings produced from powder diffraction are collected on a large area detector and processed to yield intensity profiles. Using pump-probe technique the change in diffracted intensity, triggered by excitation with a femtosecond optical pulse is examined. The temporal resolution is given by the delay between pump and probe pulse. This way insight is gained into the dynamic electronic evolution of the system. Intensity changes can be correlated to changes in charge density in the relevant material to elucidate structural dynamics on the femtosecond time scale. Lithium borohydride was chosen since it displays necessary characteristics for the exploration of ultrafast electronic polarisation. Up to date there has been no spatially resolved research in the femtosecond regime elucidating this electronic phenomenon. This work presents the ultrafast resonse in Lithiumborhydrid (LiBH4) to strong electronic fields with optical frequencies, which leads to charge relocation accompanied by electronic polarisation.

  9. Zeolite-confined ruthenium(0) nanoclusters catalyst: record catalytic activity, reusability, and lifetime in hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of sodium borohydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahmakiran, Mehmet; Ozkar, Saim

    2009-03-01

    Sodium borohydride, NaBH4, has been considered the most attractive hydrogen-storage material for portable fuel cell applications, as it provides a safe and practical means of producing hydrogen. In a recent communication (Zahmakiran, M.; Ozkar, S. Langmuir 2008, 24, 7065), we have reported a record total turnover number (TTON) of 103 200 mol H2/mol Ru and turnover frequency (TOF) up to 33 000 mol H2/mol Ru x h obtained by using intrazeolite ruthenium(0) nanoclusters in the hydrolysis of sodium borohydride. Here we report full details of the kinetic studies on the intrazeolite ruthenium(0) nanoclusters catalyzed hydrolysis of sodium borohydride in both aqueous and basic solutions. Expectedly, the intrazeolite ruthenium(0) nanoclusters show unprecedented catalytic lifetime, TTON = 27 200 mol H2/mol Ru, and TOF up to 4000 mol H2/mol Ru x h in the hydrolysis of sodium borohydride in basic solution (5% wt NaOH) as well. More importantly, the intrazeolite ruthenium(0) nanoclusters are isolable, bottleable, redispersible, and yet catalytically active. They retain 76% or 61% of their initial catalytic activity at the fifth run with a complete release of hydrogen in aqueous and basic medium, respectively. The intrazeolite ruthenium(0) nanoclusters were isolated as black powder and characterized by using a combination of advanced analytical techniques including XRD, HRTEM, TEM-EDX, SEM, XPS, ICP-OES, and N2 adsorption. PMID:19437749

  10. Water co-adsorption and electric field effects on borohydride structures on Os(1 1 1) by first-principles calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Difference in Pt, Os electronic structures lead to different borohydride structures. ► Promotion of B–H bond breaking on Os due to water effects. ► Control of borohydride structure on Os catalyst using electric field. -- Abstract: Periodic density functional theory calculations are performed to investigate the nature of the BH4ad and its interaction with H2Oad in the presence of homogenous electric field. We observed a significant charge polarity of BH4ad on Os(1 1 1) and such property could explain the electrostatic interaction with water monomer (Had) with its HOH plane parallel to the surface. This interaction changes the BHad molecular structure to BH3ad + Had. In the presence of homogenous electric field, the water co-adsorption effect is reduced due to the stabilization of H2Oad on the surface and the deviation of the O–H bond from the plane, decreasing the electrostatic interaction between BH4ad and H2Oad. These fundamental findings imply accessible control of borohydride structures on an electrode surface, which could be relevant for direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC) and reversible hydrogen storage/release applications

  11. Temperature-mediated phase transformation, pore geometry and pore hysteresis transformation of borohydride derived in-born porous zirconium hydroxide nanopowders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Nadiya B.; Nayak, Bibhuti B.

    2016-05-01

    Development of in-born porous nature of zirconium hydroxide nanopowders through a facile hydrogen (H2) gas-bubbles assisted borohydride synthesis route using sodium borohydride (NaBH4) and novel information on the temperature-mediated phase transformation, pore geometry as well as pore hysteresis transformation of in-born porous zirconium hydroxide nanopowders with the help of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) isotherm and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) images are the main theme of this research work. Without any surfactants or pore forming agents, the borohydride derived amorphous nature of porous powders was stable up to 500 °C and then the seed crystals start to develop within the loose amorphous matrix and trapping the inter-particulate voids, which led to develop the porous nature of tetragonal zirconium oxide at 600 °C and further sustain this porous nature as well as tetragonal phase of zirconium oxide up to 800 °C. The novel hydrogen (H2) gas-bubbles assisted borohydride synthesis route led to develop thermally stable porous zirconium hydroxide/oxide nanopowders with an adequate pore size, pore volume, and surface area and thus these porous materials are further suggested for promising use in different areas of applications.

  12. Carbon supported Cu-Pd nanoparticles as anode catalyst for direct borohydride-hydrogen peroxide fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon supported Cu-Pd bimetallic nanoparticles were prepared by a successive reduction method in aqueous solution and used as anode electrocatalyst for direct borohydride-hydrogen peroxide fuel cell (DBHFC). The physical and electrochemical properties of the as-prepared electrocatalysts are investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronopotentiometry (CP), linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) and fuel cell test. The results show that the size of the crystallite is around 12.5 nm, the Cu1Pd1/C catalyst presents the highest catalytic activity among all the resultant catalysts, and the DBHFC using Cu1Pd1/C as anode catalyst and Pt mesh (1 cm × 1 cm) as cathode electrode obtains the maximum power density as high as 39.8 mW cm-2 at a discharge current density of 80.1 mA cm-2 at 20 °C

  13. Alkaline sodium borohydride gel as a hydrogen source for PEMFC or an energy carrier for NaBH 4-air battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, B. H.; Li, Z. P.; Chen, L. L.

    In this preliminary study, we tried to use sodium polyacrylate as the super absorbent polymer to form alkaline NaBH 4 gel and explored its possibilities for borohydride hydrolysis and borohydride electro-oxidation. It was found that the absorption capacity of sodium polyacrylate decreased with increasing NaBH 4 concentration. The formed gel was rather stable in the sealed vessel but tended to slowly decompose in open air. Hydrogen generation from the gel was carried out using CoCl 2 catalyst precursor solutions. Hydrogen generation rate from the alkaline NaBH 4 gel was found to be higher and impurities in hydrogen were less than that from the alkaline NaBH 4 solution. The NaBH 4 gel also successfully powered a NaBH 4-air battery.

  14. Alkaline sodium borohydride gel as a hydrogen source for PEMFC or an energy carrier for NaBH{sub 4}-air battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, B.H. [Department of Materials and Engineering, Zhejiang University (China); Li, Z.P.; Chen, L.L. [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2008-05-15

    In this preliminary study, we tried to use sodium polyacrylate as the super absorbent polymer to form alkaline NaBH{sub 4} gel and explored its possibilities for borohydride hydrolysis and borohydride electro-oxidation. It was found that the absorption capacity of sodium polyacrylate decreased with increasing NaBH{sub 4} concentration. The formed gel was rather stable in the sealed vessel but tended to slowly decompose in open air. Hydrogen generation from the gel was carried out using CoCl{sub 2} catalyst precursor solutions. Hydrogen generation rate from the alkaline NaBH{sub 4} gel was found to be higher and impurities in hydrogen were less than that from the alkaline NaBH{sub 4} solution. The NaBH{sub 4} gel also successfully powered a NaBH{sub 4}-air battery. (author)

  15. Synthesis and Thermal Behavior of Metallic Cobalt Micro and Nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marlene Gonzalez Montiel; P Santiago-Jacinto; J A I Daz Gongora; E Reguera; Geonel Rodrguez-Gattorno

    2011-01-01

    In this contribution, a comparative study of metallic cobalt micro and nanoparticles obtained in solution by four different chemical routes is reported. Classic routes such as borohydride reduction in aqueous media and the so-called polyol methodology were used to obtain the cobalt nanostructures to be studied. Using CTAB as surfactant, cobalt hollow nanostructures were obtained. The use of strong reducing agents, like sodium borohydride, favors the formation of quasi-monodispersed nanoparticles of about 2 nm size but accompanied with impurities; for hydrazine (a mild reducer), nanoparticles of larger size are obtained which organize in spherical microagglomerates. Valuable information on the particles thermal stability and on nature of the species anchored at their surface was obtained from thermogravimetric curves. The samples to be studied were characterized from UV-vis, IR, X-ray diffraction, and electron microscopy images (scanning and transmission).

  16. The affects of membrane on the cell performance when using alkaline borohydride-hydrazine solutions as the fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Haiying; Liu, Zixuan; Guo, Yanfeng; Li, Zhoupeng [Department of Chemical and Bio-chemical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2010-04-15

    The cell performance and the polarization behavior of the fuel cell using alkaline NaBH{sub 4}-N{sub 2}H{sub 4} solutions as the fuel were investigated. It was found that the use of different membrane: anion exchange membrane (AEM) or cation exchange membrane (CEM) would influence the cell performance and cathode polarization behavior. The direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC) using CEM gave a higher power density than that using AEM, but the direct hydrazine fuel cell (DHFC) using CEM gave a lower power density compared with the DHFC using AEM. In the DBFCs using CEM, N{sub 2}H{sub 4} addition in alkaline NaBH{sub 4} solution improved the cell performance but it did not make any difference when adding more N{sub 2}H{sub 4}. On the other hand, in the DBFCs using AEM, cell performance was improved with increasing the amount of N{sub 2}H{sub 4} in the anolyte. (author)

  17. Investigation of platinum and palladium as potential anodic catalysts for direct borohydride and ammonia borane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olu, Pierre-Yves; Deschamps, Fabien; Caldarella, Giuseppe; Chatenet, Marian; Job, Nathalie

    2015-11-01

    Platinum and palladium are investigated as anodic catalysts for direct borohydride and direct ammonia borane fuel cells (DBFC and DABFC). Half-cell characterizations performed at 25 °C using NH3BH3 or NaBH4 alkaline electrolytes demonstrate the lowest open-circuit potential and highest electrocatalytic activity for the NH3BH3 alkaline electrolyte for Pd and Pt rotating disk electrodes, respectively. Voltammograms performed in fuel cell configuration at 25 °C confirm this trend: the highest open circuit voltage (1.05 V) and peak power density (181 mW·cm-2) are monitored for DABFC using Pd/C and Pt/C anodes, respectively. Increasing the temperature heightens the peak power density (that reaches 420 mW·cm-2 at 60 °C for DBFC using Pt/C anodes), but strongly generates gas from the fuel hydrolysis, hindering the overall fuel cells performances. The anode texture strongly influences the fuel cell performances, highlighting: (i) that an open anode texture is required to efficiently circulate the anolyte and (ii) the difficulty to compare potential anodic catalysts characterized using different fuel cell setups within the literature. Furthermore, TEM imaging of Pt/C and Pd/C catalysts prior/post DBFC and DABFC operation shows fast degradation of the carbon-supported nanoparticles.

  18. Development of Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems Based on Complex Metal Hydrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten B. Ley

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This review describes recent research in the development of tank systems based on complex metal hydrides for thermolysis and hydrolysis. Commercial applications using complex metal hydrides are limited, especially for thermolysis-based systems where so far only demonstration projects have been performed. Hydrolysis-based systems find their way in space, naval, military and defense applications due to their compatibility with proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cells. Tank design, modeling, and development for thermolysis and hydrolysis systems as well as commercial applications of hydrolysis systems are described in more detail in this review. For thermolysis, mostly sodium aluminum hydride containing tanks were developed, and only a few examples with nitrides, ammonia borane and alane. For hydrolysis, sodium borohydride was the preferred material whereas ammonia borane found less popularity. Recycling of the sodium borohydride spent fuel remains an important part for their commercial viability.

  19. Hydrogen generation and storage system using sodium borohydride at high pressures for operation of a 100 W-scale PMF stack

    OpenAIRE

    M.J.F. Ferreira; Rangel, C. M.; Pinto, A. M. F. R.

    2008-01-01

    A study is reported on the generation and storage of hydrogen from sodium borohydride (NaBH4) solutions in batch reactors, under pressures up to 4 MPa, in the presence of an improved and reused non-noble nickel-based powered catalyst. It follows references [1-10]. The first two purposes of the present work were to study the influence of the solution medium in the volume of hydrogen generated by hydrolysis of NaBH4, with a specific interest in: (1) comparing the performance of water and viscou...

  20. Hydrogen storage in complex metal hydrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BORISLAV BOGDANOVIĆ

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex metal hydrides such as sodium aluminohydride (NaAlH4 and sodium borohydride (NaBH4 are solid-state hydrogen-storage materials with high hydrogen capacities. They can be used in combination with fuel cells as a hydrogen source thus enabling longer operation times compared with classical metal hydrides. The most important point for a wide application of these materials is the reversibility under moderate technical conditions. At present, only NaAlH4 has favourable thermodynamic properties and can be employed as a thermally reversible means of hydrogen storage. By contrast, NaBH4 is a typical non- -reversible complex metal hydride; it reacts with water to produce hydrogen.

  1. A simple and generic approach for synthesizing colloidal metal and metal oxide nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloud, Jacqueline E.; Yoder, Tara S.; Harvey, Nathan K.; Snow, Kyle; Yang, Yongan

    2013-07-01

    A simple and generic approach--alternating voltage induced electrochemical synthesis (AVIES)--has been reported for synthesizing highly dispersed colloidal metal (Au, Pt, Sn, and Pt-Pd) and metal oxide (ZnO and TiO2) nanocrystals. The respective nanocrystals are produced when a zero-offset alternating voltage at 60 Hz is applied to a pair of identical metal wires, which are inserted in an electrolyte solution containing capping ligands. In the case of Au, the obtained nanocrystals are highly crystalline nano-icosahedra of 14 +/- 2 nm in diameter, the smallest Au icosahedra synthesized in aqueous solutions via green chemistry. Their catalytic activity has been demonstrated through facilitating the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol by sodium borohydride. This AVIES approach is an environmentally benign process and can be adopted by any research lab.

  2. The mechanism of unexpected reduction of dimethyl pyridine-2,3-dicarboxylate to 1,2,3,4-tetrahydrofuro[3,4-b]-pyridin-5(7H)-one with sodium borohydride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Bo Tang; Qing Jian Zhang; De Quan Yu

    2012-01-01

    An unexpected reduction of dimethyl pyridine-2,3-dicarboxylate to 1,2,3,4-tetrahydrofuro[3,4-b]pyridin-5(7H)-one with sodium borohydride in ethanol and tetrahydrofuran,respectively,is described,a hypothetic mechanism for the unusual reductive product is proposed.

  3. Thermal Decomposition of Anhydrous Alkali Metal Dodecaborates M2B12H12 (M = Li, Na, K)

    OpenAIRE

    Liqing He; Hai-Wen Li; Etsuo Akiba

    2015-01-01

    Metal dodecaborates M2/nB12H12 are regarded as the dehydrogenation intermediates of metal borohydrides M(BH4)n that are expected to be high density hydrogen storage materials. In this work, thermal decomposition processes of anhydrous alkali metal dodecaborates M2B12H12 (M = Li, Na, K) synthesized by sintering of MBH4 (M = Li, Na, K) and B10H14 have been systematically investigated in order to understand its role in the dehydrogenation of M(BH4)n. Thermal decomposition of M2B12H12 indicates m...

  4. Structural analysis of some bis-(8-isopropyl-isoquinolinium) derivatives reveals a preferential folded conformation leading to a stereoselective attack by sodium borohydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilly, Sébastien; Badarau, Eduard; Dufour, Fabien; Nistor, Iolanda; Hubert, Philippe; Seutin, Vincent; Wouters, Johan; Liégeois, Jean-François

    2014-09-01

    Reduction of symmetrical bis-isoquinolinium derivatives with sodium borohydride generates normally a mixture of three 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline stereoisomers. In a series of 8-isopropyl analogues, chiral resolution failed for the analogues with propyl and m-xylyl linkers since two and one peaks respectively were detected by HPLC. Further analysis by MS and CD of both peaks of the propyl analogue revealed that each peak corresponds to an enantiomer. Conformational analysis and X-ray cristallography showed a folded conformation of the propyl and m-xylyl analogues responsible for the observed stereoselectivity following the reduction step. Additional 1H NMR investigations confirm structural features detected by theoretical analysis.

  5. Use of a nickel-boride-silica nanocomposite catalyst prepared by in-situ reduction for hydrogen production from hydrolysis of sodium borohydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yingbo; Kim, Hern [Department of Environmental Engineering and Biotechnology, Myongji University, San 38-2 Namdong, Yongin, Kyonggi-do 449-728 (Korea)

    2008-10-15

    Hydrogen was produced by hydrolysis of sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) using nickel-boride-silica nanocomposite catalyst. The catalyst was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX). The Ni-B-silica nanocomposite catalyst was found to consist of amorphous Ni-B nanoparticles attached to the surface of amine-modified silica nanosphere. The kinetics of hydrolysis of NaBH{sub 4} by Ni-B-silica composite catalyst was investigated. The effects of temperature, NaBH{sub 4} concentration, and catalyst concentration on hydrogen generation were also investigated. A rate of hydrogen generation as high as 1916 ml H{sub 2}/min/g Ni was achieved by catalytic hydrolysis of NaBH{sub 4}. The stability of the composite catalyst was also explored. (author)

  6. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering study of riboflavin on borohydride-reduced silver colloids: Dependence of concentration, halide anions and pH values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fangfang; Gu, Huaimin; Lin, Yue; Qi, Yajing; Dong, Xiao; Gao, Junxiang; Cai, Tiantian

    2012-01-01

    The influences of concentration, halide anions and pH on the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of riboflavin adsorbed on borohydride-reduced silver colloids were studied. The optimum concentration for the SERS of riboflavin is 10 -6 mol/L while the SERS enhancement varies for different modes. The addition of 0.2 mol/L halide (NaCl, NaBr, and NaI) aqueous solutions, leads to a general decrease of the SERS intensity and a change of spectral profile of riboflavin excited at 514.5 nm. Riboflavin interacts with the silver surface possibly through the C dbnd O and N-H modes of the uracil ring. The SERS spectra of riboflavin were recorded in the 3.4-11.6 pH range. By analyzing several SERS marker bands, the protonated, deprotonated or the coexistence of both molecular species adsorbed on the colloidal silver particles was proved.

  7. Method for synthesizing metal bis(borano) hypophosphite complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordaro, Joseph G.

    2013-06-18

    The present invention describes the synthesis of a family of metal bis(borano) hypophosphite complexes. One procedure described in detail is the syntheses of complexes beginning from phosphorus trichloride and sodium borohydride. Temperature, solvent, concentration, and atmosphere are all critical to ensure product formation. In the case of sodium bis(borano) hypophosphite, hydrogen gas was evolved upon heating at temperatures above 150.degree. C. Included in this family of materials are the salts of the alkali metals Li, Na and K, and those of the alkaline earth metals Mg and Ca. Hydrogen storage materials are possible. In particular the lithium salt, Li[PH.sub.2(BH.sub.3).sub.2], theoretically would contain nearly 12 wt % hydrogen. Analytical data for product characterization and thermal properties are given.

  8. Reductive demercuration of hex-5-enyl-1-mercuric bromide by metal hydrides. Rearrangement, isotope effects, and mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of the rearrangement of hex-5-enyl radical intermediates as a mechanistic probe has been examined in the reductive demercurations of hex-5-enyl-l-mercuric bromide (1). Methylcyclopentane and 1-hexene are the major products from reductions of 1 by sodium borohydride, lithium aluminum hydride, and tri-n-butyltin hydride. The formation of methylcyclopentane and the absence of cyclohexane are consistent with a noncage, free-radical chain mechanism for these reductions. The sodium amalgam reduction of 1 produces only 1-hexene. Hex-5-en-l-ol and a peroxide are formed from sodium borohydride reductions of 1 in the presence of molecular oxygen. Isotope effects for transfer of hydrogen to the intermediate hex-5-enyl radicals have been determined from the 1-hexene/methylcyclopentane product ratio, since rearrangement of the 5-hexenyl radical competes with hydrogen abstraction. The magnitude of these isotope effects (1.8 +- 0.2) is the same for reductive demercurations of 1 by sodium borohydride, lithium aluminum hydride, and tri-n-butyltin hydride; these results provide evidence for a common hydrogen-transfer agent, such as hex-5-enyl-1-mercuric hydride, for all of these metal-hydride reductions. The validity of the competing rearrangement method of determining hydrogen isotope effects has been demonstrated by determining the isotope effect for the tri-n-butyltin hydride reduction of 6-bromo-1-hexene (2.8 +- 0.2) at 400C

  9. 活化硼氢化钠在有机合成中的应用%The Applications of the Activated Sodium Borohydride in Organic Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴利

    2012-01-01

    介绍了有机合成反应中NaBH4与添加剂共同作用的反应,其中包括烯烃和炔烃的还原,羧酸的还原,氨基酸及其衍生物的还原,羧酸酯的还原,酰胺的还原,腈基的还原,酰氯的还原,硝基化合物的还原,醛酮的还原等。与LiAIH4的还原相比较,其反应条件更温和,反应过程更安全、易操控、易放大。%Introduced the applications of the activated sodium borohydride . It concluded reduction of alkene, alkyne, carboxylic acid, carboxylic acid ester, amide, nitrile group, acyl chloride, nitro group, aldehydes, ketones, amino acids as well as their derivatives. Comparing to the reduction of lithium aluminum hydride, it had milder reaction conditions, more secure reaction process and it was more easily controlled and amplified.

  10. Experimental study on the formation and growth of electroless nickel-boron coatings from borohydride-reduced bath on mild steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitry, Veronique, E-mail: veronique.vitry@umons.ac.be [Service de Metallurgie, Universite de Mons, Rue de l' Epargne 56, 7000 Mons (Belgium); Sens, Adeline [Service de Metallurgie, Universite de Mons, Rue de l' Epargne 56, 7000 Mons (Belgium); Kanta, Abdoul-Fatah [Service de Sciences des Materiaux, Universite de Mons, Rue de l' Epargne 56, 7000 Mons (Belgium); Delaunois, Fabienne [Service de Metallurgie, Universite de Mons, Rue de l' Epargne 56, 7000 Mons (Belgium)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Initiation mechanism of electroless Ni-B on St-37 steel has been identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different phases of the plating process were observed and identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Influence of chemical heterogeneity on coating morphology was revealed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Batch replenishment of the plating bath induces new germination phase. - Abstract: Quality and homogeneity of electroless nickel-boron coatings are very important for applications in corrosion and electronics and are completely dependent on the formation of the deposit. The growth and formation process of electroless nickel-boron was investigated by immersing mild steel (St-37) samples in an un-replenished bath for various periods of time (from 5 s to 1 h). The coatings obtained at the different stages of the process were then characterized: thickness was measured by SEM, morphology was observed, weight gain was recorded and top composition of the coatings was obtained from XPS. Three main phases were identified during the coating formation and links between plating time, instantaneous deposition rate, chemistry of last formed deposit and morphology were established. The mechanism for initial deposition on steel substrate for borohydride-reduced electroless nickel bath was also observed. Those results were confronted with chemistry evolution in the unreplenished plating bath during the process. This allowed getting insight about phenomena occurring in the plating bath and their influence on coating formation.

  11. Synthesis and application of CeO2–NiO loaded TiO2 nanofiber as novel catalyst for hydrogen production from sodium borohydride hydrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple electrospinning technique was used to fabricate cerium–nickel loaded titanium nanofibers for efficient use in catalytic applications for hydrogen production. The prepared nanofibers were characterized by the SEM (scanning electron microscopy), EDX (energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer), FTIR (fourier transform infrared spectroscopy), XRD (X-ray diffraction), BET (Brunauer–Emmett–Teller) technique and TEM (transmission electron microscopy). The SEM and TEM analyses showed that fabricated nanofibers were defect-free and had well deposition of cerium and nickel. The BET analysis concluded that cerium–nickel loaded titanium oxide nanofiber showed greater surface area and high porosity than other nanofiber compositions. The experimental results showed that addition of cerium with nickel enhanced the catalytic activity significantly, but excessive cerium-loading had a negative effect on sodium borohydride hydrolysis. Activation energy of cerium–nickel loaded titanium oxide nanofiber was comparatively lesser than nickel-loaded titanium oxide nanofiber. It was evident that cerium had a beneficial effect in the catalytic activity for hydrogen production. Furthermore, it is very convenient to recover the catalyst at the end of reactions; the solid catalyst left could be readily reused for the next consecutive cycles. - Highlights: • A simple electrospinning is used to allow uniform deposition of spherical CeO2 and NiO NPs on nanofiber based TiO2. • The prepared materials were characterized by SEM, EDX, TEM, XRD, BET and FT–IR analyses. • The presence of Ni with Ce has beneficial attributes on the catalyst performance by structural modifications. • In this study, 1:2 ratio of Ce/Ni was found to be the best for CeO2–NiO–TiO2 catalyst system. • The catalysts obtained show high catalytic activity and good stability to produce H2 with higher reusability

  12. Hydrogen storage properties of rare earth (RE) borohydrides (RE = La, Er) in composite mixtures with LiBH{sub 4} and LiH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frommen, Christoph; Heere, Michael [Institute for Energy Technology, Physics Department, P.O. Box 40, NO-2027 Kjeller (Norway); Riktor, Marit D. [Institute for Energy Technology, Physics Department, P.O. Box 40, NO-2027 Kjeller (Norway); SINTEF Materials and Chemistry, Forskningsveien 1, NO-0314 Oslo (Norway); Sørby, Magnus H. [Institute for Energy Technology, Physics Department, P.O. Box 40, NO-2027 Kjeller (Norway); Hauback, Bjørn C., E-mail: bjorn.hauback@ife.no [Institute for Energy Technology, Physics Department, P.O. Box 40, NO-2027 Kjeller (Norway)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • 6LiBH{sub 4}–RECl{sub 3}–3LiH composites (RE = La, Er) studied for the first time. • Drastically reduced decomposition temperature (300 {sup o}C) compared to LiBH{sub 4} (>400 °C). • Partial reversibility for 6LiBH{sub 4}–LaCl{sub 3}–3LiH: (19% at 340 °C, 10 MPa). • Excellent reversibility for 6LiBH{sub 4}–ErCl{sub 3}–3LiH: (80% at 340 °C, 10 MPa). • Reversibility comparable to that obtained for pure LiBH{sub 4} (76% at 600 °C and 15.5 MPa). - Abstract: Mixtures of 6LiBH{sub 4}–RECl{sub 3}–3LiH (RE = La, Er) have been produced by mechanochemical milling and their structure, thermal decomposition and reversibility have been studied. Hydrogen desorption starts around 300 °C in both composites. Heating to 400 °C yields LaB{sub 6}, ErB{sub 4} and REH{sub 2+δ} as major decomposition products. LiBH{sub 4} is destabilized by REH{sub 2+δ} formed through decomposition of the parent borohydrides LiLa(BH{sub 4}){sub 3}Cl and Er(BH{sub 4}){sub 3}, respectively, and its hydrogen release temperature is reduced by 100 °C as compared to pure ball-milled LiBH{sub 4}. The lanthanum-containing composite releases 4.2 wt.% H between 300 and 350 °C and shows a limited reversibility of ∼20% (340 °C, 10 MPa) probably due to hydrogen uptake by some amorphous boron-containing phases. For 6LiBH{sub 4}–ErCl{sub 3}–3LiH about 3 wt.% H is evolved up to 400 °C. Desorption against 0.5 MPa backpressure results in an increased reversibility (∼80%) as compared to vacuum (∼66%). Rehydrogenation (340 °C, 10 MPa) shows the formation of ErH{sub 3} and LiBH{sub 4} at drastically reduced conditions compared to pure LiBH{sub 4} (>400 °C, >10 MPa)

  13. Rotational disorder in lithium borohydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LiBH4 has been discussed as a promising hydrogen storage material and as a solid-state electrolyte in lithium-ion batteries. It contains 18.5 wt% hydrogen and undergoes a structural phase transition at 381 K which is associated with a large increase in rotational disorder of the [BH4]- anion and the increase of [Li]+ conductivity by 3 orders of magnitude. We investigated the [BH4]- anion dynamic in bulk LiBH4, in LiBH4-LiI solid solutions and in nano-confined LiBH4 by quasielastic neutron scattering, complemented by DFT calculations. In all cases the H-dynamics is dominated by thermally activated rotational jumps of the [BH4]- anion in the tera hertz range. The addition of LiI as well as nano-confinement favours the disordered high temperature phase and lowers the phase transition below room temperatures. The results are discussed on the basis of first principles calculations and in relation to ionic conductivity of [Li]+. (authors)

  14. Rotational disorder in lithium borohydride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remhof Arndt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available LiBH4 has been discussed as a promising hydrogen storage material and as a solid-state electrolyte in lithium-ion batteries. It contains 18.5 wt% hydrogen and undergoes a structural phase transition at 381 K which is associated with a large increase in rotational disorder of the [BH4]− anion and the increase of [Li]+ conductivity by three orders of magnitude. We investigated the [BH4]− anion dynamic in bulk LiBH4, in LiBH4-LiI solid solutions and in nano-confined LiBH4 by quasielastic neutron scattering, complemented by DFT calculations. In all cases the H-dynamics is dominated by thermally activated rotational jumps of the [BH4]− anion in the terahertz range. The addition of LiI as well as nano-confinement favours the disordered high temperature phase and lowers the phase transition below room temperatures. The results are discussed on the basis of first principles calculations and in relation to ionic conductivity of [Li]+.

  15. Recovery of high purity precious metals from printed circuit boards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waste printed circuit boards (WPCB) have an inherent value because of the precious metal content. For an effective recycling of WPCB, it is essential to recover the precious metals. This paper reports a promising method to recover the precious metals. Aqua regia was used as a leachant and the ratio between metals and leachant was fixed at 1/20 (g/ml). Silver is relatively stable so the amount of about 98 wt.% of the input was recovered without an additional treatment. Palladium formed a red precipitate during dissolution, which were consisted of Pd(NH4)2Cl6. The amount precipitated was 93 wt.% of the input palladium. A liquid-liquid extraction with toluene was used to extract gold selectively. Also, dodecanethiol and sodium borohydride solution were added to make gold nanoparticles. Gold of about 97 wt.% of the input was recovered as nanoparticles which was identified with a high-resolution transmission electron microscopy through selected area electron diffraction and nearest-neighbor lattice spacing.

  16. 低分子量壳聚糖及其衍生物与金属离子配合物研究%Coordination Compounds of Metal Ions with Low-molecular Weight Chitosan and Their Derivative

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁德润

    2005-01-01

    Chitosan(CTS) of molecular weight 3 × 106 was degraded by oxidation with H2O2. The molecular weight of degraded chitosan (CTS′) was between 5 500-6 000. Through the reaction of degraded chitosan with glyoxylic acid and sodium borohydride, the modified derivative of N-Carboxymethyl degraded chitosan (NCTS′) was obtained. The metal ions of Fe(Ⅱ), Ni(Ⅱ), Cu(Ⅱ) and Cr(Ⅲ) were coordinated at different conditions by degraded chitosan(CTS′→ M(Ⅱ)) and its derivative (NCTS′→ M(Ⅱ))). These coordination compounds were characterized with UV and IR spectroscopy.

  17. 153Sm metallic-hydroxide macroaggregates. An improved preparation for radiation synovectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new type of preparation employing 153Sm metallic-hydroxide macroaggregates (153Sm-MHM) for radiation synovectomy was developed. The radiopharmaceutical was prepared by reacting the aqueous solution of 153SmCl3 with sodium borohydride solution in 0.5N NaOH. Microscopic analysis showed that 153Sm-MHM mean particle size was 4μm (range 1-15 μm) avoiding the formation of fine particles (153Sm-hydroxide macroaggregates preparations (153Sm-HM). Also, suspension properties as sedimentation rate, were better for 153Sm-MHM than for 153Sm-hydroxyapatite and 153Sm-HM. Biological studies in normal rabbits demonstrated high retention into de Knee joint space even at 48 h after administration of 153Sm-MHM (>99%). (author)

  18. Thermoregulated Coacervation, Metal-Encapsulation and Nanoparticle Synthesis in Novel Triazine Dendrimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Crescencio, Fermín; Enciso, Alan E; Hasan, Mirza; da Costa, Viviana C P; Annunziata, Onofrio; Redón, Rocío; Coffer, Jeffery L; Simanek, Eric E

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis and solubility behaviors of four generation five (G5) triazine dendrimers are studied. While the underivatized cationic dendrimer is soluble in water, the acetylated and propanoylated derivatives undergo coacervation in water upon increasing temperature. Occurring around room temperature, this behavior is related to a liquid-liquid phase transition with a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) and is explained by differences in composition, notably, the hydrophobic nature of the terminal groups. Interestingly, the water solubility of the acetylated dendrimer is affected by the addition of selected metal ions. Titrating solutions of acetylated dendrimer at temperatures below the LCST with gold or palladium ions promoted precipitation, but platinum, iridium, and copper did not. Gold nanoparticles having diameters of 2.5 ± 0.8 nm can be obtained from solutions of the acetylated dendrimer at concentrations of gold less than that required to induce precipitation by treating the solution with sodium borohydride. PMID:27187331

  19. Thermoregulated Coacervation, Metal-Encapsulation and Nanoparticle Synthesis in Novel Triazine Dendrimers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fermín Ramírez-Crescencio

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis and solubility behaviors of four generation five (G5 triazine dendrimers are studied. While the underivatized cationic dendrimer is soluble in water, the acetylated and propanoylated derivatives undergo coacervation in water upon increasing temperature. Occurring around room temperature, this behavior is related to a liquid-liquid phase transition with a lower critical solution temperature (LCST and is explained by differences in composition, notably, the hydrophobic nature of the terminal groups. Interestingly, the water solubility of the acetylated dendrimer is affected by the addition of selected metal ions. Titrating solutions of acetylated dendrimer at temperatures below the LCST with gold or palladium ions promoted precipitation, but platinum, iridium, and copper did not. Gold nanoparticles having diameters of 2.5 ± 0.8 nm can be obtained from solutions of the acetylated dendrimer at concentrations of gold less than that required to induce precipitation by treating the solution with sodium borohydride.

  20. Reduction of N-Cyanomethyl Groups on a Macrocyclic Nickel(II) Complex Using Sodium Borohydride: Synthesis of a Complex Bearing Two N-(2-Aminoethyl) Pendant Arms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stepwise protonation constants for [NiL2]2+ were determined by a spectrophotometric titration.17 The approximate pKa1 value (ca. 3.6) was found to be somewhat larger than the pKa2 value (ca. 2.4), as usual. The low pKa1 and pKa2 values may be result from the relatively strong interactions between the functional groups and the central metal of the complex. NaBH4 is an efficient reagent for the reduction of [NiL1]2+ in the presence of methanol, even though the N-CH2CN groups are not involved in coordination. The stepwise protonation constants for [NiL2]2+ indicate that the pendant amino groups-central metal interactions are relatively strong

  1. Synthesis of a tritium labeled tetrafluoro-substituted aryl azide photoaffinity labeling agent for chloride channels. Application of [3H]-sodium borohydride-cobalt chloride to tritium labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    5-Nitro-2-[N-3-(4-azido-2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenyl)-propylamino]-benzoic acid (FAzNPPB), a photoaffinity analog of the potent epithelial chloride channel blocker 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid (NPPB) has been prepared in five steps from commercially available 4-amino-2,3,5,6-tetrafluorobenzonitrile. The main feature of this synthesis was the use of NaBH4-CoCl2 to convert an aryl-substituted alkenyl nitrile precursor to the corresponding alkyl amine. The feasibility of this approach and the stoichiometry were developed by model work with cinnamonitrile. Using sodium borotritide-cobalt chloride, [3H]-FAzNPPB (specific activity 13.9 mCi/mmol, radiochemical purity >99%) was prepared in three steps from (E)-4-amino-2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-cinnamonitrile. [3H]-Sodium borohydride, cobalt chloride, azide, photaffinity, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid (NPPB). (author)

  2. Facilely Tuning Porous NiCo2 O4 Nanosheets with Metal Valence-State Alteration and Abundant Oxygen Vacancies as Robust Electrocatalysts Towards Water Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chengzhou; Fu, Shaofang; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2016-03-14

    Great efforts in developing clean electrochemical water splitting technology leads to the rational design and synthesis of highly efficient oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalysts with low overpotential and fast reaction kinetics. Herein, we focus on the role that morphology and composition play in the OER performance to rationally design freestanding 3D porous NiCo2O4 nanosheets with metal valence states alteration and abundant oxygen vacancies as robust electrocatalysts towards water splitting. Besides metal valence-state alteration, surface modification regarding the evolution of oxygen vacancies is facilely realized upon the sodium borohydride treatment, which is beneficial for the enhanced OER performance. Taking advantage of the porous nanostructures and abundant surface activity sites with high reactivity, the resultant nanostructures exhibit excellent OER activity and stability in alkaline electrolytes that outperform that of pristine NiCo2O4 and commercial RuO2, thus holding great potential for the water splitting. PMID:26845062

  3. Metal interferences and their removal prior to the determination of As(T) and As(III) in acid mine waters by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleskey, R. Blaine; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Ball, James W.

    2003-01-01

    Hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS) is a sensitive and selective method for the determination of total arsenic (arsenic(III) plus arsenic(V)) and arsenic(III); however, it is subject to metal interferences for acid mine waters. Sodium borohydride is used to produce arsine gas, but high metal concentrations can suppress arsine production. This report investigates interferences of sixteen metal species including aluminum, antimony(III), antimony(V), cadmium, chromium(III), chromium(IV), cobalt, copper(II), iron(III), iron(II), lead, manganese, nickel, selenium(IV), selenium(VI), and zinc ranging in concentration from 0 to 1,000 milligrams per liter and offers a method for removing interfering metal cations with cation exchange resin. The degree of interference for each metal without cation-exchange on the determination of total arsenic and arsenic(III) was evaluated by spiking synthetic samples containing arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) with the potential interfering metal. Total arsenic recoveries ranged from 92 to 102 percent for all metals tested except antimony(III) and antimony(V) which suppressed arsine formation when the antimony(III)/total arsenic molar ratio exceeded 4 or the antimony(V)/total arsenic molar ratio exceeded 2. Arsenic(III) recoveries for samples spiked with aluminum, chromium(III), cobalt, iron(II), lead, manganese, nickel, selenium(VI), and zinc ranged from 84 to 107 percent over the entire concentration range tested. Low arsenic(III) recoveries occurred when the molar ratios of metals to arsenic(III) were copper greater than 120, iron(III) greater than 70, chromium(VI) greater than 2, cadmium greater than 800, antimony(III) greater than 3, antimony(V) greater than 12, or selenium(IV) greater than 1. Low recoveries result when interfering metals compete for available sodium borohydride, causing incomplete arsine production, or when the interfering metal oxidizes arsenic(III). Separation of interfering metal cations using

  4. Immobilization of CoCl2 (cobalt chloride) on PAN (polyacrylonitrile) composite nanofiber mesh filled with carbon nanotubes for hydrogen production from hydrolysis of NaBH4 (sodium borohydride)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composite nanofiber sheets containing multiwalled carbon nanotubes and cobalt chloride dispersed in PAN (polyacrylonitrile) were produced by an electrospinning technique. The synthesized PAN/CoCl2/CNTs composite nanofiber was used as the catalyst for hydrogen production from the hydrolysis of sodium borohydride. FT-IR characterization showed that the pretreated CNTs possess different organic functional groups which help improve the compatibility between CNTs and PAN organic polymer. SEM (scanning electron microscopy), TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and EDX (energy-dispersive X-ray technique) were used to characterize the composite nanofiber and it was found that CNTs can be coaxially dispersed into the PAN nanofiber. During the hydrolysis of NaBH4, this PAN/CoCl2/CNTs composite nanofiber exhibited higher catalytic activity compared to the composite without CNTs doping. Kinetic analysis of NaBH4 hydrolysis shows that the reaction of NaBH4 hydrolysis based on this catalyst can be ascribed to the first-order reaction and the activation energy of the catalyst was approximately 52.857 kJ/mol. Meanwhile, the composite nanofiber catalyst shows excellent stability and reusability in the recycling experiment. - Highlights: • Composite nanofiber sheets were prepared via electrospinning. • PAN (polyacrylonitrile)/CoCl2 (cobalt chloride)/CNTs (carbon nanotubes) nanofiber was used as the catalyst for hydrogen production. • CNTs can be coaxially dispersed into the PAN nanofiber. • PAN/CoCl2/CNTs composite nanofiber exhibited higher catalytic activity. • The composite nanofiber catalyst shows excellent stability and reusability

  5. NaBH4 (sodium borohydride) hydrogen generator with a volume-exchange fuel tank for small unmanned aerial vehicles powered by a PEM (proton exchange membrane) fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A proton exchange membrane fuel cell system integrated with a NaBH4 (sodium borohydride) hydrogen generator was developed for small UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles). The hydrogen generator was composed of a catalytic reactor, liquid pump and volume-exchange fuel tank, where the fuel and spent fuel exchange the volume within a single fuel tank. Co–B catalyst supported on a porous ceramic material was used to generate hydrogen from the NaBH4 solution. Considering the power consumption according to the mission profile of a UAV, the power output of the fuel cell and auxiliary battery was distributed passively as an electrical load. A blended wing-body was selected considering the fuel efficiency and carrying capability of fuel cell components. First, the fuel cell stack and hydrogen generator were evaluated under the operating conditions, and integrated into the airframe. The ground test of the complete fuel cell UAV was performed under a range of load conditions. Finally, the fuel cell powered flight test was made for 1 h. The volume-exchange fuel tank minimized the fuel sloshing and the change in center of gravity due to fuel consumption during the flight, so that much stable operation of the fuel cell system was validated at different flight modes. - Highlights: • PEMFC system with a NaBH4 hydrogen source was developed for small UAVs. • Volume-exchange fuel tank was used to reduce the size of the fuel cell system. • Passive power management was used for a stable power output during the flight. • BWB UAV was selected by taking the fuel cell integration into consideration. • Stable operation of the fuel cell system was verified from the flight test

  6. New metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this report is to estimate the exposure to various metals and metal compounds and discuss the available information of the possible toxic effects of these metals and compounds. In the first section, some metals are defined as those with either a large or a fast increasing exposure to living organisms. The available information on toxicity is discussed in the second section. In the third section interesting metals are defined as compounds having a large exposure and an apparent insufficient knowledge of their possible toxic effects. Comments on each of these metals are also to be found in the third section. (G.B.)

  7. Chelant extraction and REDOX manipulation for mobilization of heavy metals from contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was the result of open burning and open detonation of chemical agents and munitions in the Toxic Burning Pits area at J-Field, located in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground in Harford County, Maryland, soils have been contaminated with heavy metals. Simultaneous extraction is complicated because of the multitude of contaminant forms that exist. This paper uses data from a treatability study performed at Argonne National Laboratory to discuss and compare several treatment methods that were evaluated for remediating metals-contaminated soils. J-Field soils were subjected to a series of treatability experiments designed to determine the feasibility of using soil washing/soil flushing, enhancements to soil washing/soil flushing, solidification/stabilization, and electrokinetics for remediating soils contaminated with metals. Chelating and mobilizing agents evaluated included ammonium acetate, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, citric acid, Citranox, gluconic acid, phosphoric acid, oxalic acid, and nitrilotriacetic acid, in addition to pH-adjusted water. REDOX manipulation can maximize solubilities, increase desorption, and promote removal of heavy metal contaminants. Reducing agents that were studied included sodium borohydride, sodium metabisulfite, and thiourea dioxide. The oxidants studied included hydrogen peroxide, sodium percarbonate, sodium hypochlorite, and potassium permanganate. This paper summaries the results from the physical/chemical characterization, soil washing/soil flushing, and enhancements to soil washing/soil flushing portions of the study

  8. 硼氢化钠制氢技术在质子交换膜燃料电池中的研究进展%Recent advances in the study of sodium borohydride hydrolysis for pure hydrogen supply to PEM fuel cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玉晓

    2009-01-01

    硼氢化钠储氢量高达10.6%,安全、无爆炸危险,携带和运输方便;供氢系统设备简单,启动速度快,产氢速度可调,因此是一个非常良好的氢载体,是为质子交换膜燃料电池供氢的理想储氢介质.硼氢化钠供氢系统也已逐步应用于质子交换膜燃料电池电源中.介绍了这种制氢方式的几项关键技术:硼氢化钠水解制氢催化剂、硼氢化钠制氢反应器、氢气净化系统等在质子交换膜燃料电池中的研究进展,并指出了今后的研究发展方向.%Sodium borohydride contains hydrogen as high as 10.6%, and it is safe, no fire and explosion danger, and portable. This hydrogen supply system has the features of simple structure, fast starting, and adjustable hydrogen production speed. Therefore, sodium borohydride is a very promising hydrogen carrier and a perfect medium for pure hydrogen supply to proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). In fact, the hydrolysis of sodium borohydride for hydrogen supply to PEMFC is in the way to real application. This review summarizes the recent advances in this hydrogen generation system including catalysts, reactors and purification methods, and the direction for sequent research is also discussed.

  9. Silicone metalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter; Hamilton, Julie

    2008-12-09

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  10. Silicone metalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter; Hamilton, Julie

    2006-12-05

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  11. Attachment of noble metal nanoparticles to conducting polymers containing sulphur - preparation conditions for enhanced electrocatalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taking advantage of the spontaneous deposition of noble metals on polymers containing sulphur, the inclusion of gold and platinum in poly(3-methylthiophene) and poly(3,4-ehylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOTh) layers, achieved by immersion of the polymer into the metal nanoparticles suspension, is reported in the present work. Platinum and gold nanoparticles (NPs), with diameters between 3 and 17 nm, have been prepared from colloidal methods (citrate or borohydride reduction in the presence of citrate capping agent) and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The electropolymerization was carried out under potentiostatic and potentiodynamic conditions, imparting distinct morphologies, as revealed by atomic force microscopy. After polymer films immersion in the colloidal solutions, evidence of the NPs confinement and distribution was provided by XRD analysis and scanning electron microscopy. For thin layers, the quantity of attached metal NPs could be estimated from quartz crystal microbalance data collected throughout the films immersion.The influence of the polymer type and morphology, NPs nature, size and incorporated amount on the electrocatalytic activity of the so-prepared modified electrodes towards the hydrazine oxidation, in phosphate buffer solution, has been investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The results clearly show the superior properties of potentiodynamically prepared PEDOTh films attaching very small (3 nm) freshly prepared Pt-NPs.

  12. VLSI metallization

    CERN Document Server

    Einspruch, Norman G; Gildenblat, Gennady Sh

    1987-01-01

    VLSI Electronics Microstructure Science, Volume 15: VLSI Metallization discusses the various issues and problems related to VLSI metallization. It details the available solutions and presents emerging trends.This volume is comprised of 10 chapters. The two introductory chapters, Chapter 1 and 2 serve as general references for the electrical and metallurgical properties of thin conducting films. Subsequent chapters review the various aspects of VLSI metallization. The order of presentation has been chosen to follow the common processing sequence. In Chapter 3, some relevant metal deposition tec

  13. Metal oxinitride

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Tiancun; Jiang, Zheng

    2008-01-01

    A process for preparing a metal oxynitride, said process comprising: a) forming a solution of a metal compound and a compound having a nitrogen-containing functional group in a polar organic solvent, and b) converting said solution into a solid residue

  14. Metal Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington-Lueker, Donna

    1992-01-01

    Schools that count on metal detectors to stem the flow of weapons into the schools create a false sense of security. Recommendations include investing in personnel rather than hardware, cultivating the confidence of law-abiding students, and enforcing discipline. Metal detectors can be quite effective at afterschool events. (MLF)

  15. Metals 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, S.W.; Rogers, L.C.; Slaughter, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Boensch, F.D. [6025 Oak Hill Lane, Centerville, OH (United States); Claus, R.O.; de Vries, M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    This strategic planning exercise identified and characterized new and emerging advanced metallic technologies in the context of the drastic changes in global politics and decreasing fiscal resources. In consideration of a hierarchy of technology thrusts stated by various Department of Defense (DOD) spokesmen, and the need to find new and creative ways to acquire and organize programs within an evolving Wright Laboratory, five major candidate programs identified are: C-17 Flap, Transport Fuselage, Mach 5 Aircraft, 4.Fighter Structures, and 5. Missile Structures. These results were formed by extensive discussion with selected major contractors and other experts, and a survey of advanced metallic structure materials. Candidate structural applications with detailed metal structure descriptions bracket a wide variety of uses which warrant consideration for the suggested programs. An analysis on implementing smart skins and structures concepts is given from a metal structures perspective.

  16. Atomic absorption determination, in metal sulphide concentrates, of the elements that form gaseous hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An account is given of the investigational work on the determination of trace amounts of arsenic, antimony, bismuth, germanium, selenium, and tellurium by the technique using hydride generation and atomic-absorption spectrophotometry. The gaseous hydride is generated by reduction with sodium borohydride, and is subsequently swept by a flow of nitrogen into an air-entrained hydrogen-nitrogen flame. The generation equipment used is simple and inexpensive, and can be readily assembled in most laboratories. The optimum parameters were determined for each element. The effects of 31 probable interfering elements were investigated, and it was found that, although the majority did not interfere, severe interference was encountered when copper, nickel, and the noble metals were present. Methods for the elimination of copper and nickel were developed to allow the determination of arsenic, antimony, bismuth, selenium, and tellurium at the lower parts-per-million level in metal sulphide concentrates with an acceptable accuracy and precision. The determination of microgram amounts of germanium was found to be unsatisfactory

  17. Metal pneumoconiosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The occurrence of two cases of metal pneumoconiosis in a metal works has been used to draw attention to this rare occupational disease. The technology for the manufacture and precessing is described with special reference to dust exposure at the various stages. After an historical review, there is a detailed discussion of the clinical and radiological features of the two cases. Problems concerning the prognosis, differential diagnosis and the laws concerning compensation are discussed. (orig.)

  18. Plasma metallization

    CERN Document Server

    Crowther, J M

    1997-01-01

    Many methods are currently used for the production of thin metal films. However, all of these have drawbacks associated with them, for example the need for UHV conditions, high temperatures, exotic metal precursors, or the inability to coat complex shaped objects. Reduction of supported metal salts by non-isothermal plasma treatment does not suffer from these drawbacks. In order to produce and analyse metal films before they become contaminated, a plasma chamber which could be attached directly to a UHV chamber with XPS capability was designed and built. This allowed plasma treatment of supported metal salts and surface analysis by XPS to be performed without exposure of the metal film to the atmosphere. Non-equilibrium plasma treatment of Nylon 66 supported gold(lll) chloride using hydrogen as the feed gas resulted in a 95% pure gold film, the remaining 5% of the film being carbon. If argon or helium were used as the feed gases during plasma treatment the resultant gold films were 100% pure. Some degree of s...

  19. Metallic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvera, Isaac; Zaghoo, Mohamed; Salamat, Ashkan

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogen is the simplest and most abundant element in the Universe. At high pressure it is predicted to transform to a metal with remarkable properties: room temperature superconductivity, a metastable metal at ambient conditions, and a revolutionary rocket propellant. Both theory and experiment have been challenged for almost 80 years to determine its condensed matter phase diagram, in particular the insulator-metal transition. Hydrogen is predicted to dissociate to a liquid atomic metal at multi-megabar pressures and T =0 K, or at megabar pressures and very high temperatures. Thus, its predicted phase diagram has a broad field of liquid metallic hydrogen at high pressure, with temperatures ranging from thousands of degrees to zero Kelvin. In a bench top experiment using static compression in a diamond anvil cell and pulsed laser heating, we have conducted measurements on dense hydrogen in the region of 1.1-1.7 Mbar and up to 2200 K. We observe a first-order phase transition in the liquid phase, as well as sharp changes in optical transmission and reflectivity when this phase is entered. The optical signature is that of a metal. The mapping of the phase line of this transition is in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions for the long-sought plasma phase transition to metallic hydrogen. Research supported by the NSF, Grant DMR-1308641, the DOE Stockpile Stewardship Academic Alliance Program, Grant DE-FG52-10NA29656, and NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, Award NNX14AP17H.

  20. Halide Free M(BH4)2 (M = Sr, Ba, and Eu) Synthesis, Structure, and Decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manish; Didelot, Emilie; Spyratou, Alexandra; Lawson Daku, Latévi Max; Černý, Radovan; Hagemann, Hans

    2016-07-18

    Borohydrides have attained high interest in the past few years due to their high volumetric and gravimetric hydrogen content. Synthesis of di/trimetallic borohydride is a way to alter the thermodynamics of hydrogen release from borohydrides. Previously reported preparations of M(BH4)2 involved chloride containing species such as SrCl2. The presence of residual chloride (or other halide) ions in borohydrides may change their thermodynamic behavior and their decomposition pathway. Pure monometallic borohydrides are needed to study decomposition products without interference from halide impurities. They can also be used as precursors for synthesizing di/trimetallic borohydrides. In this paper we present a way to synthesize halide free alkaline earth metal (Sr, Ba) and europium borohydrides starting with the respective hydrides as precursors. Two novel high temperature polymorphs of Sr and Eu borohydrides and four polymorphs of Ba borohydride have been characterized by synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction, thermal analysis, and Raman and infrared spectroscopy and supported by periodic DFT calculations. The decomposition routes of these borohydrides have also been investigated. In the case of the decomposition of strontium and europium borohydrides, the metal borohydride hydride (M(BH4)H3, M = Sr, Eu) is observed and characterized. Periodic DFT calculations performed on room temperature Ba(BH4)2 revealed the presence of bidentate and tridentate borohydrides. PMID:27351948

  1. Prospects of metal research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topical questions about modern metal research are considered covering fundamentals and applications. Many, hitherto undeveloped distinguished properties of metals, such as resistance against particle and quantum radiations, neutrons, very high and very low temperatures , stresses, and chemical agents; memory effects; superconductivity etc. are pointed out. The following topics are treated: subject and methodology of the science of metals, significance of metals; discovery of new properties of metallic materials; theory of metallic alloys; extreme conditions; intermetallic compounds, polymorphic metals; rare metals (rare earth metals, rhenium, noble metals); questions of strength and technology of metals and alloys; temperature zones of brittle fracture in metals and alloys; alloys with particular electrophysical properties; superconductive metalic materials; 'biological' science of metals; and conclusions. The booklet will be useful for students at technical schools and universities as well as for engineers and scientists engaged in metal research

  2. Reactivity patterns of transition metal hydrides and alkyls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complex PPN+ CpV(CO)3H- (Cp=eta5-C5H5 and PPN = (Ph3P)2) was prepared in 70% yield and its physical properties and chemical reactions investigated. PPN+ CpV(CO)3H- reacts with a wide range of organic halides. The organometallic products of these reactions are the vanadium halides PPN+[CpV(C)3X]- and in some cases the binuclear bridging hydride PPN+ [CpV(CO)3]2H-. The borohydride salt PPN+[CpV(CO)3BH4]- has also been prepared. The reaction between CpV(CO)3H- and organic halides was investigated and compared with halide reductions carried out using tri-n-butyltin hydride. Results demonstrate that in almost all cases, the reduction reaction proceeds via free radical intermediates which are generated in a chain process, and are trapped by hydrogen transfer from CpV(CO)3H-. Sodium amalgam reduction of CpRh(CO)2 or a mixture of CpRh(CO)2 and CpCo(CO)2 affords two new anions, PPN+ [Cp2Rh3(CO)4]- and PPN+[Cp2RhCo(CO)2]-. CpMo(CO)3H reacts with CpMo(CO)3R (R=CH3,C2H5, CH2C6H5) at 25 to 500C to produce aldehyde RCHO and the dimers [CpMo(CO)3]2 and [CpMo(CO)2]2. In general, CpV(CO)3H- appears to transfer a hydrogen atom to the metal radical anion formed in an electron transfer process, whereas CpMo(CO)3H transfers hydride in a 2-electron process to a vacant coordination site. The chemical consequences are that CpV(CO)3H- generally reacts with metal alkyls to give alkanes via intermediate alkyl hydride species whereas CpMo(CO)3H reacts with metal alkyls to produce aldehyde, via an intermediate acyl hydride species

  3. METALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>20111705 An Junbo(Team 603,Bureau of Nonferrous Metals Geological Exploration of Jilin Province,Hunchun 133300,China);Xu Renjie Geological Features and Ore Genesis of Baishilazi Scheelite Deposit in Yanbian Area(Jilin Geology,ISSN1001-2427,CN22-1099/P,29(3),2010,p.39-43,2 illus.,2 tables,7 refs.)Key words:tungsten ores,Jilin ProvinceThe Baishilazi scheelite deposit is located in contacting zone between the marble of the Late Palaeozoic Qinglongcun Group and the Hercynian biotite granite.The vein and lenticular major ore body is obviously controlled by NE-extending faults and con

  4. The use of superporous p(AAc (acrylic acid)) cryogels as support for Co and Ni nanoparticle preparation and as reactor in H2 production from sodium borohydride hydrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here, we report for the first time the use of p(AAc (p(acrylic acid)) cryogel for in situ metal nanoparticle preparation, and their use as a superporous reactor for H2 generation from hydrolysis of NaBH4. Superporous p(AAc) cryogels and conventional hydrogels were prepared via free radical polymerization technique at low (−18 °C) and moderate (40 °C) temperatures, respectively. They were characterized by employing various methods such as swelling experiments, optical imaging, and SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) analysis. By reducing Co2+ and Ni2+ ions within p(AAc) cryogel and hydrogel matrices, the obtained Co and Ni metal nanoparticles were employed for H2 generation from NaBH4 hydrolysis. Various factors such as porosity, metal type, temperature, and the amount of sodium hydroxide were investigated to determine their effects on hydrogen generation from NaBH4 hydrolysis. Activation energy (Ea), enthalpy (ΔH#) and entropy (ΔS#) for NaBH4 hydrolysis by superporous p(AAc)-Co metal composites were 29.35 kJ mol−1,=36.85 kJ mol−1, and –157.88 J mol−1K−1, respectively. Cryogels showed better catalytic activity than conventional hydrogels in the hydrolysis reaction, and have a higher TOF (turnover frequency) value of 4.10 mol H2 (mol catalyst min)−1 compared to conventional hydrogels, due to its highly porous nature, short diffusion distances and fast response times. - Highlights: • Superporous cryogel supports for in situ metal nanoparticle preparation. • Fast H2 production from chemical hydride hydrolysis by cryogel-M composites. • Soft, superporous cryogel reactors for energy applications

  5. Metal fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Systems formed by fluorides of alkali, alkali earth, rare earth elements, yttrium, zirconium, hafnium, bismuth, antimony are investigated with the aim of preparing new fluoride materials and studying their thermodynamic and other physical and chemical properties. The respective phase diagrams are plotted. On the basis of the research fluoroberyllate glasses with rare earth additions of improved qualities (moisture resistance, crystallization resistance, resistance against radiation up to 100 Mrad) are prepared. The rho-T-x phase diagrams of the systems studied show that many compounds are sublimated congruently at certain temperatures and incongruently - above them. The existence of congruently sublimated compounds and azeotropically sublimated compositions provides for the preparation of uniform optical films. In connection with the search for new materials-luminophores and matrices of optical quantum generators - the fluoride systems of alkali metals and lanthanides are studied; the formation of binary fluorides of M3LnF6, M2LnF5, MLnF4, MLn2F7, MLn3F10 compositions is established. To search for new solid electrolytes, the solid-phase interaction of Sb-and Bi trifluorides with their oxides and alakali metal fluorides is studied. The electric conductivity of the compounds obtained is studied

  6. Metal filled porous carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Adam F.; Vajo, John J.; Cumberland, Robert W.; Liu, Ping; Salguero, Tina T.

    2011-03-22

    A porous carbon scaffold with a surface and pores, the porous carbon scaffold containing a primary metal and a secondary metal, where the primary metal is a metal that does not wet the surface of the pores of the carbon scaffold but wets the surface of the secondary metal, and the secondary metal is interspersed between the surface of the pores of the carbon scaffold and the primary metal.

  7. Metal-phosphate binders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Beth Ann [Lewistown, IL; Chaps-Cabrera, Jesus Guadalupe [Coahuila, MX

    2009-05-12

    A metal-phosphate binder is provided. The binder may include an aqueous phosphoric acid solution, a metal-cation donor including a metal other than aluminum, an aluminum-cation donor, and a non-carbohydrate electron donor.

  8. Final Report: DE- FC36-05GO15063, Fundamental Studies of Advanced High-Capacity, Reversible Metal Hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Craig [University of Hawaii; McGrady, Sean [University of New Brunswick; Severa, Godwin [University of Hawaii; Eliseo, Jennifer [University of Hawaii; Chong, Marina [University of Hawaii

    2015-02-08

    The project was component of the US DOE, Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE). The Sandia National Laboratory led center was established to conduct highly collaborative and multi-disciplinary applied R&D to develop new reversible hydrogen storage materials that meet or exceed DOE/FreedomCAR 2010 and 2015 system targets for hydrogen storage materials. Our approach entailed a wide variety of activities ranging from synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of new candidate hydrogen storage materials; screening of catalysts for high capacity materials requiring kinetics enhancement; development of low temperature methods for nano-confinement of hydrides and determining its effects on the kinetics and thermodynamics of hydrides; and development of novel processes for the direct re-hydrogenation of materials. These efforts have resulted in several advancements the development of hydrogen storage materials. We have greatly extended the fundamental knowledge about the highly promising hydrogen storage carrier, alane (AlH₃), by carrying out the first crystal structure determinations and the first determination of the heats of dehydrogenation of β–AlH₃ and γ-AlD₃. A low-temperature homogenous organometallic approach to incorporation of Al and Mg based hydrides into carbon aerogels has been developed that that allows high loadings without degradation of the nano-porous scaffold. Nano-confinement was found to significantly improve the dehydrogenation kinetics but not effect the enthalpy of dehydrogenation. We conceived, characterized, and synthesized a novel class of potential hydrogen storage materials, bimetallic borohydrides. These novel compounds were found to have many favorable properties including release of significant amounts of hydrogen at moderate temperatures (75-190ºC). However, in situ IR studies in tandem with thermal gravimetric analysis have shown that about 0.5 equivalents of diborane are released during the dehydrogenation making re

  9. Ultrasound-assisted synthesis of nanosized zero-valent iron for metal cations extraction and wastewater treatment applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, I. Yu; Lysov, D. V.; Levina, V. V.; Mazov, I. N.; Gusev, A. A.; Yudintseva, T. I.; Kuznetsov, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    Nanosized zero-valent iron has shown good results in wastewater treatment and activation of physicochemical processes. Its applications in modern industry are complicated by high production costs of nanomaterials produced via existing synthesis routes. Therefore there is a need of cheap and high-productive methods of nanosized zero-valent iron with advanced functional properties. Improvement of oxidative conditions with additions may find its place in extraction of rare-earth metals, where high cost of nanomaterials could be viable. In this paper we studied an effect of ultrasonic irradiation on specific surface area and particle size of nanosized zero-valent iron synthesized by methods of chemical precipitation with high- temperature reduction in hydrogen flow and sodium borohydride reduction. Obtained results showed significant decrease of particle size and differences in particles morphology depending on presence of ultrasonication during synthesis and on chosen method. For ultrasonic-assisted synthesis with 100% amplitude, particle size calculated from specific surface area was 70 nm for sample synthesized by chemical precipitation with high-temperature reduction and 35 nm for borohydide reduction method compared to 63 nm for reference sample without ultrasonication.

  10. From Metal String Complexes to Metal Wires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG; SheMing

    2001-01-01

    Our efforts to extend the metal number from dinuclear metal complexes to linear oligonuclear metal complexes with all-syn form of oligo-( α-pyridyl)amido ligands are successful. The oligonuclear complexes are divided into two systems according their MM bond strength, one is the oligonickel( Ⅱ ) complexes without M-M bond, the other is the oligochromium(Ⅱ) and cobalt(H) complexes with a strong M-M bond. Their structures and magnetic behaviors for various metal complexes with specific metal numbers are summarized. The potential application of these metal complexes as a molecular metal wire is discussed by the band structures of hypothetical onedinensional metal strings based on the polynuclear Cr, Co and Ni complexes. Moreover, self-assembled monolayers of n-alkanethiols are employed as a two-dinensional matrix to isolate the metal string complexes, which exhibit protrusions under the measurements of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) imaging. The topographic STM images reveal that the protruding features for tricobalt and trichromium complexes are, respectively, 0.3 nm and 0.6 nm higher than that of trinickel complex. The increasing trend in conductivity is consistent with their bond orders, obtained from qualitative EHMO calculations.  ……

  11. From Metal String Complexes to Metal Wires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG SheMing

    2001-01-01

    @@ Our efforts to extend the metal number from dinuclear metal complexes to linear oligonuclear metal complexes with all-syn form of oligo-( α-pyridyl)amido ligands are successful. The oligonuclear complexes are divided into two systems according their MM bond strength, one is the oligonickel( Ⅱ ) complexes without M-M bond, the other is the oligochromium(Ⅱ) and cobalt(H) complexes with a strong M-M bond. Their structures and magnetic behaviors for various metal complexes with specific metal numbers are summarized. The potential application of these metal complexes as a molecular metal wire is discussed by the band structures of hypothetical onedinensional metal strings based on the polynuclear Cr, Co and Ni complexes. Moreover, self-assembled monolayers of n-alkanethiols are employed as a two-dinensional matrix to isolate the metal string complexes, which exhibit protrusions under the measurements of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) imaging. The topographic STM images reveal that the protruding features for tricobalt and trichromium complexes are, respectively, 0.3 nm and 0.6 nm higher than that of trinickel complex. The increasing trend in conductivity is consistent with their bond orders, obtained from qualitative EHMO calculations.

  12. Hydrogen storage material and related processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloveichik; Grigorii Lev , Andrus; Matthew John

    2010-07-13

    Disclosed herein is a composition comprising a complex hydride and a borohydride catalyst wherein the borohydride catalyst comprises a BH.sub.4 group, and a group IV metal, a group V metal, or a combination of a group IV and a group V metal. Also disclosed herein are methods of making the composition.

  13. Glassy metallic plastics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports a class of bulk metallic glass including Ce-, LaCe-, CaLi-, Yb-, and Sr-based metallic glasses, which are regarded as glassy metallic plastics because they combine some unique properties of both plastics and metallic alloys. These glassy metallic plastics have very low glass transition temperature (Tg~25oC to 150oC) and low Young’s modulus (~20 GPa to 35 GPa). Similar to glassy plastics, these metallic plastics show excellent plastic-like deformability on macro-, micro- and even nano-scale in their supercooled liquid range and can be processed, such as elongated, compressed, bent, and imprinted at low temperatures, in hot water for instance. Under ambient conditions, they display such metallic properties as high thermal and electric conductivities and excellent mechanical properties and other unique properties. The metallic plastics have potential applications and are also a model system for studying issues in glass physics.

  14. Metal cleaner poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metal cleaners are very strong chemical products that contain acids. This article discusses poisoning from swallowing or ... Metal cleaners contain organic compounds called hydrocarbons, including: 1,2-butylene oxide Boric acid Cocoyl sarcosine Dicarboxylic ...

  15. Marks of Metal Copenhell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Planchebaseret udendørs udstilling på musikfestivalen Copenhell 18-20/6 2015. En mindre udgave af udstillingen Marks of Metal - Logodesign og visualitet i heavy metal. Udarbejdet i samarbejde med Mediemuseet.......Planchebaseret udendørs udstilling på musikfestivalen Copenhell 18-20/6 2015. En mindre udgave af udstillingen Marks of Metal - Logodesign og visualitet i heavy metal. Udarbejdet i samarbejde med Mediemuseet....

  16. The Sounds of Metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grund, Cynthia M.

    2015-01-01

    In Part One, it is suggested that sounds that are heard as music – rather than just as sounds simpliciter – are sounds that are heard counterfactually. Counterfactual hearing is the apprehension of sounds as if they were something else, something that in itself is not a sequence of sounds. In Part...... Two, I propose that this framework allows for at least a theoretical distinction between the way in which extreme metal – e.g. black metal, doom metal, funeral doom metal, death metal – relates to its sound as music and the way in which much other music may be conceived of as being constituted...

  17. Metal-ligand cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khusnutdinova, Julia R; Milstein, David

    2015-10-12

    Metal-ligand cooperation (MLC) has become an important concept in catalysis by transition metal complexes both in synthetic and biological systems. MLC implies that both the metal and the ligand are directly involved in bond activation processes, by contrast to "classical" transition metal catalysis where the ligand (e.g. phosphine) acts as a spectator, while all key transformations occur at the metal center. In this Review, we will discuss examples of MLC in which 1) both the metal and the ligand are chemically modified during bond activation and 2) bond activation results in immediate changes in the 1st coordination sphere involving the cooperating ligand, even if the reactive center at the ligand is not directly bound to the metal (e.g. via tautomerization). The role of MLC in enabling effective catalysis as well as in catalyst deactivation reactions will be discussed. PMID:26436516

  18. High Metallicity LGRB Hosts

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, J F; Levesque, E M; Kewley, L J; Tanvir, N R; Levan, A J; Patel, S K; Misra, K; Huang, K -H; Reichart, D E; Nysewander, M; Schady, P

    2015-01-01

    We present our imaging and spectroscopic observations of the host galaxies of two dark long bursts with anomalously high metallicities, LGRB 051022 and LGRB 020819B, which in conjunction with another LGRB event with an optical afterglow comprise the three LGRBs with high metallicity host galaxies in the Graham & Fruchter (2013) sample. In Graham & Fruchter (2013), we showed that LGRBs exhibit a strong and apparently intrinsic preference for low metallicity environments (12+log(O/H) < 8.4 in the KK04 scale) in spite of these three cases with abundances of about solar and above. These exceptions however are consistent with the general star-forming galaxy population of comparable brightness & redshift. This is surprising: even among a preselected sample of high metallicity LGRBs, were the metal aversion to remain in effect for these objects, we would expect their metallicity to still be lower than the typical metallicity for the galaxies at that luminosity and redshift. Therefore we deduce that it...

  19. Semi-metallic polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bubnova, Olga; Khan, Zia Ullah; Wang, Hui;

    2014-01-01

    Polymers are lightweight, flexible, solution-processable materials that are promising for low-cost printed electronics as well as for mass-produced and large-area applications. Previous studies demonstrated that they can possess insulating, semiconducting or metallic properties; here we report...... that polymers can also be semi-metallic. Semi-metals, exemplified by bismuth, graphite and telluride alloys, have no energy bandgap and a very low density of states at the Fermi level. Furthermore, they typically have a higher Seebeck coefficient and lower thermal conductivities compared with metals, thus being...... a Fermi glass to a semi-metal. The high Seebeck value, the metallic conductivity at room temperature and the absence of unpaired electron spins makes polymer semi-metals attractive for thermoelectrics and spintronics....

  20. Metal Nitrides for Plasmonic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, Gururaj V.; Schroeder, Jeremy; Guler, Urcan;

    2012-01-01

    Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications.......Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications....

  1. Joining ceramics to metals using metallic foam

    OpenAIRE

    Shirzadi, A. A.; Zhu, Y.; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H.

    2008-01-01

    A general method for brazing ceramics to metals using a compliant metallic foam as a buffer layer has been developed. Using stainless steel foams, bonds between alumina and 316 stainless steel with shear strengths up to 33 MPa have been achieved. The resultant ductility enhances the resistance of the joint to thermal cycling; AlN-Inconel 600 bonds exhibited good thermal shock resistance. Alumina - stainless steel bonds withstood more that 60 thermal cycles between 200 and 800°C in air.

  2. radiolabeling of metallic and metal oxide nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanobiology, nanomedicine, and naontoxicology are newly developed interdisciplinary research fields accompanied by the development of nanotechnology. Quantitative determination of nanomaterials in vivo is the common problem that is experienced by these disciplines. Radiotracer techniques had the advantage of high sensitivity, good accuracy, simplicity and low interference. This review describes radiolabeling methods of 6 important metallic and metal oxide nanomaterials, such as gold, silver, iron oxide, titanium oxide, and zinc oxide nanoparticles. Advantage, disadvantage, and caution of each method are summarized. (authors)

  3. Liquid metal steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A liquid metal heated steam generator is described which in the event of a tube failure quickly exhausts out of the steam generator the products of the reaction between the water and the liquid metal. The steam is generated in a plurality of bayonet tubes which are heated by liquid metal flowing over them between an inner cylinder and an outer cylinder. The inner cylinder extends above the level of liquid metal but below the main tube sheet. A central pipe extends down into the inner cylinder with a centrifugal separator between it and the inner cylinder at its lower end and an involute deflector plate above the separator so that the products of a reaction between the liquid metal and the water will be deflected downwardly by the deflector plate and through the separator so that the liquid metal will flow outwardly and away from the central pipe through which the steam and gaseous reaction products are exhausted. (U.S.)

  4. Metal Foam Shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Eric L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper compares the ballistic performance of metallic foam sandwich structures with honeycomb structures. Honeycomb sandwich structures, consisting of metallic or composite facesheets and honeycomb cores, are often used in spacecraft construction due to their light-weight and structural stiffness. Honeycomb panels, however, are considered rather poor candidates for protection from micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) particles because the honeycomb channels the debris cloud from MMOD impacts on outer facesheet causing a concentrated load on the second facesheet. Sandwich structures with light-weight, open-cell metallic cores and metal or composite facesheets provide improved MMOD protection because channeling does not occur and because the core is more effective at disrupting hypervelocity impacts then honeycomb. This paper describes hypervelocity impact tests on metallic foam sandwich structures (aluminum and titanium) with metallic facesheets, compare them to equivalent mass and thickness honeycomb panels, based on the results of hypervelocity impact tests.

  5. Mesostructured metal germanium sulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLachlan, M.J.; Coombs, N.; Bedard, R.L.; White, S.; Thompson, L.K.; Ozin, G.A.

    1999-12-29

    A new class of mesostructured metal germanium sulfide materials has been prepared and characterized. The synthesis, via supramolecular assembly of well-defined germanium sulfide anionic cluster precursors and transition-metal cations in formamide, represents a new strategy for the formation of this class of solids. A variety of techniques were employed to examine the structure and composition of the materials. Structurally, the material is best described as a periodic mesostructured metal sulfide-based coordination framework akin to periodic hexagonal mesoporous silica, MCM-41. At the molecular scale, the materials strongly resemble microstructured metal germanium sulfides, in which the structure of the [Ge{sub 4}S{sub 10}]{sup 4{minus}} cluster building-blocks are intact and linked via {mu}-S-M-S bonds. Evidence for a metal-metal bond in mesostructured Cu/Ge{sub 4}S{sub 10} is also provided.

  6. Light metal production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Qinbai

    2016-04-19

    An electrochemical process for the production of light metals, particularly aluminum. Such a process involves contacting a light metal source material with an inorganic acid to form a solution containing the light metal ions in high concentration. The solution is fed to an electrochemical reactor assembly having an anode side containing an anode and a cathode side containing a cathode, with anode side and the cathode side separated by a bipolar membrane, with the solution being fed to the anode side. Light metal ions are electrochemically transferred through the bipolar membrane to the cathode side. The process further involves reducing the light metal ions to light metal powder. An associated processing system is also provided.

  7. Spin and holographic metals

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandrov, Victor; Coleman, Piers

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we discuss two-dimensional holographic metals from a condensed matter physics perspective. We examine the spin structure of the Green's function of the holographic metal, demonstrating that the excitations of the holographic metal are "chiral", lacking the inversion symmetry of a conventional Fermi surface, with only one spin orientation for each point on the Fermi surface, aligned parallel to the momentum. While the presence of a Kramer's degeneracy across the Fermi surface per...

  8. Chemistry of carcinogenic metals.

    OpenAIRE

    Martell, A E

    1981-01-01

    The periodic distribution of known and suspected carcinogenic metal ions is described, and the chemical behavior of various types of metal ions is explained in terms of the general theory of hard and soft acids and bases. The chelate effect is elucidated, and the relatively high stability of metal chelates in very dilute solutions is discussed. The concepts employed for the chelate effect are extended to explain the high stabilities of macrocyclic and cryptate complexes. Procedures for the us...

  9. Ferrocene base metal chelates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Review of the works, devoted to different types of ferrocene metal chelates and to a possibility of ferrocene-containing ligand modification by means of complexing, is presented. Structure, properties and spectral characteristics of transitional metal, rare earth element, Cd2+, UO22+, Th4+ etc. complexes with ferrocene diketones, ferrocene acyl derivatives based on thiosemicarbazones and hydrazones and other heterometal ferrocene-containing metal chelates, are considered. 134 refs., 1 tab

  10. Metal atom oxidation laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides

  11. Metal atom oxidation laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-10-28

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides. (auth)

  12. Honeycomb metal panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Product constituted by a honeycomb metal panel that can be employed to advantage for manufacturing lagging by sandwiching it between two plane sheets, utilized in particular in the nuclear industry where lagging has to have a very long life strength. The honeycomb metal panel is made of an expanded metal extrusion previously cut so as to form, after additional drawing, a honeycomb structure with square or rectangular cells with a plane surface

  13. Economics of Metal Markets

    OpenAIRE

    Tilton, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    Simple economic principles can provide useful insights into the behavior of metal markets. In applying these principles, however, the analyst must take into account technology, market structure, government policies, and other institutional factors influencing the nature of metal supply and demand. Knowledge of both economics and the metal markets is essential. One without the other is likely to lead to sterile or even misleading results. In support of the above conclusion, this study exa...

  14. Tritium in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this Chapter a review is given of some of the important features of metal tritides as opposed to hydrides and deuterides. After an introduction to the topics of tritium and tritium in metals information will be presented on a variety of metal-tritium systems. Of main interest here are the differences from the classic hydrogen behavior; the so called isotope effect. A second important topic is that of aging effects produced by the accumulation of 3He in the samples. (orig.)

  15. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huxford, Theodore J.

    1993-01-01

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal.

  16. Conducting metal dithiolate complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Underhill, A. E.; Ahmad, M. M.; Turner, D. J.; Clemenson, P. I.; Carneiro, K.; Yueqiuan, S.; Mortensen, Kell

    Further work on the chemical composition of the one-dimensional metallic metal dithiolene complex Li-Pt(mnt) is reported. The electrical conduction and thermopower properties of the nickel and palladium complexes are reported and compared with those of the platinum compound......Further work on the chemical composition of the one-dimensional metallic metal dithiolene complex Li-Pt(mnt) is reported. The electrical conduction and thermopower properties of the nickel and palladium complexes are reported and compared with those of the platinum compound...

  17. Recycling of Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Anders; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    Metals like iron and aluminium are produced from mineral ore and used for a range of products, some of which have very short lifetimes and thus constitute a major fraction of municipal waste. Packaging in terms of cans, foils and containers are products with a short lifetime. Other products like...... describes briefly how iron and aluminium are produced and how scrap metal is recycled in the industry. Quality requirements and use of recycled products are discussed, as are the resource and environmental issues of metal recycling. Copper and other metals are also found in waste but in much smaller...

  18. Conducting metal dithiolate complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Underhill, A. E.; Ahmad, M. M.; Turner, D. J.;

    1985-01-01

    Further work on the chemical composition of the one-dimensional metallic metal dithiolene complex Li-Pt(mnt) is reported. The electrical conduction and thermopower properties of the nickel and palladium complexes are reported and compared with those of the platinum compound......Further work on the chemical composition of the one-dimensional metallic metal dithiolene complex Li-Pt(mnt) is reported. The electrical conduction and thermopower properties of the nickel and palladium complexes are reported and compared with those of the platinum compound...

  19. Metal pad instabilities in liquid metal batteries

    CERN Document Server

    Zikanov, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    A mechanical analogy is used to analyze the interaction between the magnetic field, electric current and deformation of interfaces in liquid metal batteries. It is found that, during charging or discharging, a sufficiently large battery is prone to instabilities of two types. One is similar to the metal pad instability known for aluminum reduction cells. Another type is new. It is related to the destabilizing effect of the Lorentz force formed by the azimuthal magnetic field induced by the base current and the current perturbations caused by the local variations of the thickness of the electrolyte layer.

  20. Virus templated metallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljabali, Alaa A. A.; Barclay, J. Elaine; Lomonossoff, George P.; Evans, David J.

    2010-12-01

    Plant viruses are considered as nanobuilding blocks that can be used as synthons or templates for novel materials. Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) particles have been shown to template the fabrication of metallic nanoparticles by an electroless deposition metallization process. Palladium ions were electrostatically bound to the virus capsid and, when reduced, acted as nucleation sites for the subsequent metal deposition from solution. The method, although simple, produced highly monodisperse metallic nanoparticles with a diameter of ca. templated particles were prepared with cobalt, nickel, iron, platinum, cobalt-platinum and nickel-iron.Plant viruses are considered as nanobuilding blocks that can be used as synthons or templates for novel materials. Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) particles have been shown to template the fabrication of metallic nanoparticles by an electroless deposition metallization process. Palladium ions were electrostatically bound to the virus capsid and, when reduced, acted as nucleation sites for the subsequent metal deposition from solution. The method, although simple, produced highly monodisperse metallic nanoparticles with a diameter of ca. templated particles were prepared with cobalt, nickel, iron, platinum, cobalt-platinum and nickel-iron. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional experimental detail, agarose gel electrophoresis results, energy dispersive X-ray spectra, ζ-potential measurements, dynamic light scattering data, nanoparticle tracking analysis and an atomic force microscopy image of Ni-CPMV. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00525h

  1. Metallized polymeric foam material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, B. A.; Bilow, N.

    1974-01-01

    Open-celled polyurethane foams can be coated uniformly with thin film of metal by vapor deposition of aluminum or by sensitization of foam followed by electroless deposition of nickel or copper. Foam can be further processed to increase thickness of metal overcoat to impart rigidity or to provide inert surface with only modest increase in weight.

  2. Nonferrous metals - Nickel, lead, and tin alloys, precious metals, primary metals; Reactive metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains specifications for nickel and nickel alloys, including pipe and tube, plate, sheet and strip, rod, bar and wires; other nonferrous metals and alloys, including cadmium, copper, gold, hafnium, iridium, lead, lithium, palladium, platinum, rhodium, ruthenium, silver, tin and zinc; and reactive and refractory metals and alloys: molybdendum, niobium, tantalum, titanium, and zirconium

  3. Marks of Metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Udstilling på Mediemuseet med fokus på den visuelle side af heavy metal: Logoer, pladecovers og lignende.......Udstilling på Mediemuseet med fokus på den visuelle side af heavy metal: Logoer, pladecovers og lignende....

  4. Modelling of Metal Nanoimprinting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis addresses the feasibility of a new nanotechnology, direct metal nanoimprinting. The main aim of this work is to investigate, by means of computer simulations, the possibility to create reproducible patterns in a metal layer by plastically deforming it with a rigid template.

  5. Liquid metal hydrogen barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen barriers are disclosed which comprise liquid metals in which the solubility of hydrogen is low and which have good thermal conductivities at operating temperatures of interest. Such barriers are useful in nuclear fuel elements containing a metal hydride moderator which has a substantial hydrogen dissociation pressure at reactor operating temperatures. 2 claims, 3 figures

  6. Metallic nanowire networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yujiang; Shelnutt, John A.

    2012-11-06

    A metallic nanowire network synthesized using chemical reduction of a metal ion source by a reducing agent in the presence of a soft template comprising a tubular inverse micellar network. The network of interconnected polycrystalline nanowires has a very high surface-area/volume ratio, which makes it highly suitable for use in catalytic applications.

  7. Structural phase transitions and adduct release in calcium borohydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paolone, A.; Palumbo, O.; Rispoli, P.; Miriametro, A.; Cantelli, R.; Luedtke, A.; Rönnebro, E.; Chandra, D.

    2011-09-01

    Ca(BH4)2 compounds were investigated above room temperature by anelastic spectroscopy (AS) and concomitant measurements of thermogravimetry and mass spectrometry (TGA/MS). Both AS and TGA/MS indicate that even after a thermal treatment at 125 °C for 20 h, a non-negligible residual of THF adduct is still present in the sample, which can be removed on a subsequent thermal treatment at temperatures lower than 250 °C. Above 250 °C dehydrogenation takes place. Moreover, AS sensitively detects the occurrence of the α → α’ structural phase transition around 180 °C, and the α’ → β transformation, which is completed around 330 °C. Finally, we also show that both transitions are irreversible and are not accompanied by a latent heat.

  8. Oxidation/Sodium Borohydride Reduction Protocol in One Pot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvano Cruz-Gregorio

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available La reacción de oxidación de Swern-reducción con borohidruro de sodio en un solo paso de los derivados de 1,2-O-isopropilidenofuranosa con configuración D-gluco o D-xilo, producen sus estereoisómeros correspondientes, los cuales provienen de la inversión estereoselectiva del C-3. Este método es una adaptación al procedimiento tradicional de oxidación de Swern, en donde al término de la reacción se adiciona una mezcla de H2O/EtOH (1:4 a -60 ºC, en la cual se disuelve NaBH4. Así, la inversión de la configuración del C-3 en los derivados de 1,2-O-isopropylidenofuranosa se logra en rendimientos hasta del 98%.

  9. Production of magnesium metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blencoe, James G [Harriman, TN; Anovitz, Lawrence M [Knoxville, TN; Palmer, Donald A [Oliver Springs, TN; Beard, James S [Martinsville, VA

    2010-02-23

    A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention further relates to a process for production of magnesium metal or a magnesium compound where an external source of carbon dioxide is not used in any of the reactions of the process. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

  10. Method of producing homogeneous mixed metal oxides and metal-metal oxide mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for preparing particulate metal or metal oxide of controlled partile size comprises contacting an an aqueous solution containing dissolved metal values with excess urea at a temperature sufficient to cause urea to react with water to provide a molten urea solution containing the metal values; heating the molten urea solution to cause the metal values to precipitate, forming a mixture containing precipitated metal values; heating the mixture containing precipitated metal values to evaporate volatile material leaving a dry powder containing said metal values. The dry powder can be calcined to provide particulate metal oxide or reduced to provide particulate metal. Oxide mixtures are provided when the aqueous solution contains values of more than one metal. Homogeneousmetal-metal oxide mistures for preparing cermets can be prepared by selectively reducing at least one of the metal oxides. (auth)

  11. Borohydride electro-oxidation in a molten alkali hydroxide eutectic mixture and a novel borohydride-periodate battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Andrew; Gyenge, Előd L.

    2015-05-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of BH4- in a molten NaOH-KOH eutectic mixture (0.515:0.485 mole fractions), is investigated for the first time by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Anodically oxidized Ni is electrocatalytically more active than Pt for BH4- oxidation in the molten alkali electrolyte as shown by the more than three times higher exchange current density (i.e. 15.8 mA cm-2 vs. 4.6 mA cm-2 at 185 °C). Next the proof-of-concept for a novel BH4-/IO4- molten alkali electrolyte battery is presented. Using oxidized Ni mesh anode and Pt mesh cathode a maximum power density of 63 mW cm-2 is achieved at 185 °C.

  12. Metal-Poor Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Frebel, Anna

    2008-01-01

    The abundance patterns of metal-poor stars provide us a wealth of chemical information about various stages of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy. In particular, these stars allow us to study the formation and evolution of the elements and the involved nucleosynthesis processes. This knowledge is invaluable for our understanding of the cosmic chemical evolution and the onset of star- and galaxy formation. Metal-poor stars are the local equivalent of the high-redshift Universe, and offer crucial observational constraints on the nature of the first stars. This review presents the history of the first discoveries of metal-poor stars that laid the foundation to this field. Observed abundance trends at the lowest metallicities are described, as well as particular classes of metal-poor stars such as r-process and C-rich stars. Scenarios on the origins of the abundances of metal-poor stars and the application of large samples of metal-poor stars to cosmological questions are discussed.

  13. Dyeing fabrics with metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalivas, Georgia

    2002-06-01

    Traditionally, in textile dyeing, metals have been used as mordants or to improve the color produced by a natural or synthetic dye. In biomedical research and clinical diagnostics gold colloids are used as sensitive signals to detect the presence of pathogens. It has been observed that when metals are finely divided, a distinct color may result that is different from the color of the metal in bulk. For example, when gold is finely divided it may appear black, ruby or purple. This can be seen in biomedical research when gold colloids are reduced to micro-particles. Bright color signals are produced by few nanometer-sized particles. Dr. William Todd, a researcher in the Department of Veterinary Science at the Louisiana State University, developed a method of dyeing fabrics with metals. By using a reagent to bond the metal particles deep into the textile fibers and actually making the metal a part of the chemistry of the fiber. The chemicals of the fabric influence the resulting color. The combination of the element itself, the size of the particle, the chemical nature of the particle and the interaction of the metal with the chemistry of the fabric determine the actual hue. By using different elements, reagents, textiles and solvents a broad range of reproducible colors and tones can be created. Metals can also be combined into alloys, which will produce a variety of colors. The students of the ISCC chapter at the Fashion Institute of Technology dyed fabric using Dr. Todd's method and created a presentation of the results. They also did a demonstration of dyeing fabrics with metals.

  14. Deformation in nanocrystalline metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Van Swygenhoven

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available It is now possible to synthesize polycrystalline metals made up of grains that average less than 100 nm in size. Such nanocrystalline metals contain a significant volume fraction of interfacial regions separated by nearly perfect crystals. The small sizes involved limit the conventional operation of dislocation sources and thus a fundamental question arises: how do these materials deform plastically? We review the current views on deformation mechanisms in nanocrystalline, face-centered cubic metals based on insights gained by atomistic computer simulations. These insights are discussed with reference to recent striking experimental observations that can be compared with predictions made by the simulations.

  15. Homochiral metal phosphonate nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xun-Gao; Bao, Song-Song; Huang, Jian; Otsubo, Kazuya; Feng, Jian-Shen; Ren, Min; Hu, Feng-Chun; Sun, Zhihu; Zheng, Li-Min; Wei, Shiqiang; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2015-10-21

    A new type of homochiral metal-organic nanotubular structures based on metal phosphonates are reported, namely, (R)- or (S)-[M(pemp)(H2O)2][M = Co(II) (1), Ni(II) (2)] [pemp(2-) = (R)- or (S)-(1-phenylethylamino)methylphosphonate]. In these compounds, the tube-walls are purely inorganic, composed of metal ions and O-P-O bridges. The cavity of the nanotube is hydrophilic with one coordination water pointing towards the center, while the outer periphery of the nanotube is hydrophobic, decorated by the phenylethyl groups of pemp(2-). The thermal stabilities, adsorption and proton conductivity properties are investigated. PMID:26324662

  16. Ultralight metal foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bin; He, Chunnian; Zhao, Naiqin; Nash, Philip; Shi, Chunsheng; Wang, Zejun

    2015-09-01

    Ultralight (silver mirror reaction and electroless plating. We have produced ultralight monolithic metal foams, such as silver, nickel, cobalt, and copper via this method. The resultant ultralight monolithic metal foams have remarkably low densities down to 7.4 mg/cm3 or 99.9% porosity. The metal foams have a long flat stress-train curve in compression tests and the densification strain ɛD of the Ni/Ag foam with a porosity of 99.8% can reach 82%. The plateau stress σpl was measured and found to be in agreement with the value predicted by the cellular solids theory.

  17. Supported metals in catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, James A

    2011-01-01

    With contributions from experts in supported metal catalysis from both the industry and academia, this book presents the latest developments in characterization and application of supported metals in heterogeneous catalysis. In addition to thorough and updated coverage of the traditional aspects of heterogeneous catalysis such as preparation, characterization and use in well-established technologies such as vehicle emission control, the book also includes emerging areas where supported metal catalysis will make significant contributions to future developments, such as fuel cells and fine chemi

  18. Preparation of uniform nanoparticles of ultra-high purity metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, metals, and metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodfield, Brian F.; Liu, Shengfeng; Boerio-Goates, Juliana; Liu, Qingyuan; Smith, Stacey Janel

    2012-07-03

    In preferred embodiments, metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal (alloy) nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal oxide nanoparticles are provided. According to embodiments, the nanoparticles may possess narrow size distributions and high purities. In certain preferred embodiments, methods of preparing metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal nanoparticles are provided. These methods may provide tight control of particle size, size distribution, and oxidation state. Other preferred embodiments relate to a precursor material that may be used to form nanoparticles. In addition, products prepared from such nanoparticles are disclosed.

  19. Thin Nanoporous Metal-Insulator-Metal Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramesh, Morteza; Djalalian-Assl, Amir; Aghili Yajadda, Mir Massoud; Prawer, Steven; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken

    2016-02-24

    Insulating nanoporous materials are promising platforms for soft-ionizing membranes; however, improvement in fabrication processes and the quality and high breakdown resistance of the thin insulator layers are needed for high integration and performance. Here, scalable fabrication of highly porous, thin, silicon dioxide membranes with controlled thickness is demonstrated using plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor-deposition. The fabricated membranes exhibit good insulating properties with a breakdown voltage of 1 × 10(7) V/cm. Our calculations suggest that the average electric field inside a nanopore of the membranes can be as high as 1 × 10(6) V/cm; sufficient for ionization of wide range of molecules. These metal-insulator-metal nanoporous arrays are promising for applications such soft ionizing membranes for mass spectroscopy. PMID:26846250

  20. Metallization of bacteria cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Xiangfeng; (黎向锋); LI; Yaqin; (李雅芹); CAI; Jun; (蔡军); ZHANG; Deyuan; (张德远)

    2003-01-01

    Bacteria cells with different standard shapes are well suited for use as templates for the fabrication of magnetic and electrically conductive microstructures. In this paper, metallization of bacteria cells is demonstrated by an electroless deposition technique of nickel-phosphorus initiated by colloid palladium-tin catalyst on the surfaces of Citeromyces matritensis and Bacillus cereus. The activated and metallized bacteria cells have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). Results showed that both Citeromyces matritensis and Bacillus cereus had no deformation in shape after metallization; the metallized films deposited on the surfaces of bacteria cells are homogeneous in thickness and noncrystalline in phase structure. The kinetics of colloid palladium-tin solution and electroless plating on bacteria cells is discussed.

  1. Oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Azevedo, Cristina G.; Vollhardt, K. Peter C.

    2002-01-18

    Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes, namely those of fulvalene, tercyclopentadienyl, quatercyclopentadienyl, and pentacyclopentadienyl(cyclopentadienyl) are the subject of this account. Thermal-, photo-, and redox chemistries of homo- and heteropolynuclear complexes are described.

  2. Vacuum welding of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This new welding process has been developed by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) in France. The edges of the work-pieces are melted by the impact of an electron beam produced by an electron gun. Welding is carried out in a vacuum of 10-4 to 10-8 mm of mercury. The welding machine consists, diagrammatically, of: a) a metal enclosure in which a vacuum is produced; b) a cathode for electron emission, a high-voltage generator for accelerating these electrons, a focusing device; c) a mechanical device for moving (rotating) the work-piece. Advantages of the process: 1) possible welding of highly oxidizable metals (e.g. zirconium); 2) fabrication of high-vacuum-sealed metal containers; 3) production of very deeply penetrated welds. Therefore, this new process is particularly advantageous for atomic power applications, the fabrication of electron tubes and, more generally, for all industries in which very special metals are used. (author)

  3. Triple Point Topological Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ziming; Winkler, Georg W.; Wu, QuanSheng; Li, Ju; Soluyanov, Alexey A.

    2016-07-01

    Topologically protected fermionic quasiparticles appear in metals, where band degeneracies occur at the Fermi level, dictated by the band structure topology. While in some metals these quasiparticles are direct analogues of elementary fermionic particles of the relativistic quantum field theory, other metals can have symmetries that give rise to quasiparticles, fundamentally different from those known in high-energy physics. Here, we report on a new type of topological quasiparticles—triple point fermions—realized in metals with symmorphic crystal structure, which host crossings of three bands in the vicinity of the Fermi level protected by point group symmetries. We find two topologically different types of triple point fermions, both distinct from any other topological quasiparticles reported to date. We provide examples of existing materials that host triple point fermions of both types and discuss a variety of physical phenomena associated with these quasiparticles, such as the occurrence of topological surface Fermi arcs, transport anomalies, and topological Lifshitz transitions.

  4. On metallic Riemannian structures

    OpenAIRE

    Gezer, Aydin; KARAMAN, ÇAĞRI

    2015-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the study of metallic Riemannian structures. An integrability condition and curvature properties for these structures by means of a $\\Phi $-operator applied to pure tensor fields are presented. Examples of these structures are also given.

  5. Metal corrosion for nanofabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hai-Dong; Zhang, Zhongping; Han, Ming-Yong

    2012-09-10

    The annual cost of corrosion has been increasing globally, and it has now reached beyond 3% of the world's gross domestic product. It remains a challenge to reduce or prevent unwanted corrosion effectively after many decades of effort. Nowadays, more efforts are being made to develop anti-corrosion platforms for decreasing the huge cost of corrosion. In parallel, it is also highly expected to be able to use corrosion for producing useful materials with reduced energy consumption. In this review, recent progress in how methods for controlling metal corrosion can be used to produce structure-diversified nanomaterials are summarized along with a presentation of their applications. As a valuable addition to the scientists' toolbox, metal corrosion strategies can be applied to different metals and their alloys for the production of various nanostructured materials; this also provides insights into how metal corrosion can be further prevented and into how corrosion wastage can be reduced. PMID:22707341

  6. Micro metal forming

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Micro Metal Forming, i. e. forming of parts and features with dimensions below 1 mm, is a young area of research in the wide field of metal forming technologies, expanding the limits for applying metal forming towards micro technology. The essential challenges arise from the reduced geometrical size and the increased lot size. In order to enable potential users to apply micro metal forming in production, information about the following topics are given: tribological behavior: friction between tool and work piece as well as tool wear mechanical behavior: strength and formability of the work piece material, durability of the work pieces size effects: basic description of effects occurring due to the fact, that the quantitative relation between different features changes with decreasing size process windows and limits for forming processes tool making methods numerical modeling of processes and process chains quality assurance and metrology All topics are discussed with respect to the questions relevant to micro...

  7. Metallic mineral deposits

    OpenAIRE

    Crow, M J; van Leeuwen, T.M.

    2005-01-01

    This account concentrates on the the primary metallic mineral deposits and occurrences in Sumatra, in particular the recent discoveries of gold, tin and base metals. The residual and placer deposits are given less emphasis, as no significant discoveries have been made in recent years. The history of mineral exploration and discovery in Indonesia has been reviewed recently by van Leeuwen (1993, 1994), documenting the change in emphasis of mineral-based activities from western to eastern I...

  8. Metal-Poor Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Frebel, Anna

    2008-01-01

    The abundance patterns of metal-poor stars provide us a wealth of chemical information about various stages of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy. In particular, these stars allow us to study the formation and evolution of the elements and the involved nucleosynthesis processes. This knowledge is invaluable for our understanding of the cosmic chemical evolution and the onset of star- and galaxy formation. Metal-poor stars are the local equivalent of the high-redshift Universe, and offer cru...

  9. Chelation in Metal Intoxication

    OpenAIRE

    Flora, Swaran J.S.; Vidhu Pachauri

    2010-01-01

    Chelation therapy is the preferred medical treatment for reducing the toxic effects of metals. Chelating agents are capable of binding to toxic metal ions to form complex structures which are easily excreted from the body removing them from intracellular or extracellular spaces. 2,3-Dimercaprol has long been the mainstay of chelation therapy for lead or arsenic poisoning, however its serious side effects have led researchers to develop less toxic analogues. Hydrophilic chelators like meso-2,3...

  10. Radiation effects in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current understanding of radiation damage in metals is reviewed, simplifying the actual complexity of the effects by considering some aspects separately. The production of point defects in metals, the primary damage state are first studied. The second part of the lecture is devoted to the evolution of this primary damage state as a function of temperature and dose: the steady state concentration of point defects, the nucleation of secondary defects and their growth are successively considered

  11. Metal recycle and recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain, Zaib-un-nisa

    1999-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. The development of techniques for the removal and recovery of metals from industrial effluent taking account of the consequences of the definition of waste in the Basel Convention on transfrontier shipment of waste is reported. The use of fluidised bed cell electrolysis in the recovery of metals from dilute solutions is investigated, and the conditions for recovery optimised. For the first...

  12. Ototoxicity of Divalent Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Jerome A; Salvi, Richard

    2016-08-01

    Excess exposure to both essential and non-essential heavy metals can lead to a variety of adverse clinical conditions which selectively affect a variety of organs and cells in the body. The diverse, but highly specific nature of the symptoms produced by each metal indicates that they can interact with a restricted population of cellular targets ultimately resulting in unique clinical manifestations. The symptoms, which can be reversible or irreversible, often present with different patterns and outcomes depending on the net accumulated dose of any given metal. There are some common pathological conditions that result from excess exposure to heavy metals which unfortunately have not received widespread recognition and thus, have not been extensively investigated. For example, chronic exposure to several heavy metals such as Co, Mn, Cd, Pb, and Hg has the potential to affect hearing in humans and experimental animals based on previous studies including case reports and ex vivo studies. Understanding exactly how these metals induce hearing deficits is complicated by the fact that the inner ear is an extremely complex system that composed of a diverse collection of sensory, neural, and supporting cells which must act in synchrony to produce a neurophysiological signal terminating in the central auditory system. This review will focus on the anatomical, cellular, and functional changes that occur in the cochlea, the sensory organ for hearing, due to excessive exposure to manganese, cadmium, cobalt, lead, and mercury. PMID:27142062

  13. Metal-Polymer Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolais, Luigi; Carotenuto, Gianfranco

    2004-09-01

    A unique guide to an essential area of nanoscience Interest in nano-sized metals has increased greatly due to their special characteristics and suitability for a number of advanced applications. As technology becomes more refined-including the ability to effectively manipulate and stabilize metals at the nanoscale-these materials present ever-more workable solutions to a growing range of problems. Metal-Polymer Nanocomposites provides the first guide solely devoted to the unique properties and applications of this essential area of nanoscience. It offers a truly multidisciplinary approach, making the text accessible to readers in physical, chemical, and materials science as well as areas such as engineering and topology. The thorough coverage includes: * The chemical and physical properties of nano-sized metals * Different approaches to the synthesis of metal-polymer nanocomposites (MPN) * Advanced characterization techniques and methods for study of MPN * Real-world applications, including color filters, polarizers, optical sensors, nonlinear optical devices, and more * An extensive list of references on the topics covered A unique, cutting-edge resource for a vital area of nanoscience development, Metal-Polymer Nanocomposites is an invaluable text for students and practitioners of materials science, engineering, polymer science, chemical engineering, electrical engineering, and optics.

  14. Peroxotitanates for Biodelivery of Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, David; Elvington, M.

    2009-02-11

    Metal-based drugs are largely undeveloped in pharmacology. One limiting factor is the systemic toxicity of metal-based compounds. A solid-phase, sequestratable delivery agent for local delivery of metals could reduce systemic toxicity, facilitating new drug development in this nascent area. Amorphous peroxotitanates (APT) are ion exchange materials with high affinity for several heavy metal ions, and have been proposed to deliver or sequester metal ions in biological contexts. In the current study, we tested a hypothesis that APT are able to deliver metals or metal compounds to cells. We exposed fibroblasts (L929) or monocytes (THP1) to metal-APT materials for 72 h in vitro, then measured cellular mitochondrial activity (SDH-MTT method) to assess the biological impact of the metal-APT materials vs. metals or APT alone. APT alone did not significantly affect cellular mitochondrial activity, but all metal-APT materials suppressed the mitochondrial activity of fibroblasts (by 30-65% of controls). The concentration of metal-APT materials required to suppress cellular mitochondrial activity was below that required for metals alone, suggesting that simple extracellular release of the metals from the metal-APT materials was not the primary mechanism of mitochondrial suppression. In contrast to fibroblasts, no metal-APT material had a measurable effect on THP1 monocyte mitochondrial activity, despite potent suppression by metals alone. This latter result suggested that 'biodelivery' by metal-APT materials may be cell type-specific. Therefore, it appears that APT are plausible solid phase delivery agents of metals or metal compounds to some types of cells for potential therapeutic effect.

  15. Alkali metal ionization detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  16. Effects of metal-inlay thickness in polyethylene cups with metal-on-metal bearings.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Vena, P.; Stolk, J.; Huiskes, R.

    2002-01-01

    A way to prevent polyethylene wear in total hip replacements is to use metal-on-metal bearings. The cup design of these bearings may be a metal inlay in a polyethylene cup. However, these metal inlays are relatively thin and may deform on loading. The purpose of the current study was to determine wh

  17. PREFACE: Half Metallic Ferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowben, Peter

    2007-08-01

    Since its introduction by de Groot and colleagues in the early 1980s [1], the concept of half metallic ferromagnetism has attracted great interest. Idealized, half-metals have only one spin channel for conduction: the spin-polarized band structure exhibits metallic behavior for one spin channel, while the other spin band structure exhibits a gap at the Fermi level. Due to the gap for one spin direction, the density of states at the Fermi level has, theoretically, 100 & spin polarization. This gap in the density of states in one spin at the Fermi level, for example ↓ so N↓ (EF) = 0, also causes the resistance of that channel to go to infinity. At zero or low temperatures, the nonquasiparticle density of states (electron correlation effects), magnons and spin disorder reduce the polarization from the idealized 100 & polarization. At higher temperatures magnon-phonon coupling and irreversible compositional changes affect polarization further. Strategies for assessing and reducing the effects of finite temperatures on the polarization are now gaining attention. The controversies surrounding the polarization stability of half metallic ferromagnets are not, however, limited to the consideration of finite temperature effects alone. While many novel half metallic materials have been predicted, materials fabrication can be challenging. Defects, surface and interface segregation, and structural stability can lead to profound decreases in polarization, but can also suppress long period magnons. There is a 'delicate balance of energies required to obtain half metallic behaviour: to avoid spin flip scattering, tiny adjustments in atomic positions might occur so that a gap opens up in the other spin channel' [2]. When considering 'spintronics' devices, a common alibi for the study of half metallic systems, surfaces and interfaces become important. Free enthalpy differences between the surface and the bulk will lead to spin minority surface and interface states, as well as

  18. Metal copper dissolving method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This method is applied to remove copper deposited on steam generators of PWR type reactors. A solution containing ammonium hydrogen carbonate (NH4HCO3) and an oxidizing agent is brought into contact with metal copper. NH4HCO3 used in the solution has a neutral pH region, as an aqueous solution, of about 7.8, and ammonium scarcely evaporates from a solution at such a pH region. Therefore, it scarcely worsens the operation circumstance. When it is used together with an oxidizing agent, the dissolving capacity for metal copper is greater compared with a case of using ammonium or other ammonium salt, so that metal copper can efficiently be dissolved. The oxidizing agent can include hydrogen peroxide, ammonium persulfate. (T.M.)

  19. Thermohydraulics in liquid metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottowski, H. M.

    Heat transfer problems in single-phase and two-phase liquid metal forced convection flow are reviewed. Liquid metal boiling heat transfer in pool flow; and dry out heat fluxes are considered. It is shown that in technological plants working with liquid metals, superheating up to 150 C occurs, and can lead to nonstationary hydraulic transition between the single-phase and established two-phase flows. Boiling phases relative to subcooled boiling and bubble boiling have no importance for technological processes. Piston, slug and annular flow patterns dominate. On the basis of the flow patterns observed during boiling, the separate flow model principle is the only one suitable for calculating the two-phase flow pressure drop. Using this model and total pressure drop measurements, a relationship for the two-phase frictional pressure characteristic, valid for tubular and annular geometry, can be determined.

  20. Chelation in metal intoxication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaseth, Jan; Skaug, Marit Aralt; Cao, yang;

    2015-01-01

    The present review provides an update of the general principles for the investigation and use of chelating agents in the treatment of intoxications by metals. The clinical use of the old chelators EDTA (ethylenediamine tetraacetate) and BAL (2,3-dimercaptopropanol) is now limited due to the...... inconvenience of parenteral administration, their own toxicity and tendency to increase the neurotoxicity of several metals. The hydrophilic dithiol chelators DMSA (meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid) and DMPS (2,3-dimercapto-propanesulphonate) are less toxic and more efficient than BAL in the clinical treatment...... of heavy metal poisoning, and available as capsules for oral use. In copper overload, DMSA appears to be a potent antidote, although d-penicillamine is still widely used. In the chelation of iron, the thiols are inefficient, since iron has higher affinity for ligands with nitrogen and oxygen, but the...

  1. Sensor for metal detection

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2014-06-26

    NOVELTY - The sensor has a microfluidic flow channel that is provided with an inlet port, an outlet port, and a detection chamber. The detection chamber is provided with a group of sensing electrodes (4) having a working electrode (8), a counter electrode (9), and a reference electrode (10). A flow sensor is configured to measure flow in the channel. A temperature sensor (6) is configured to measure temperature in the channel (3). An electrical connection is configured to connect the sensor to a sensing device. USE - Sensor for detecting metal such as toxic metal in sample such as clinical sample such as stool, saliva, sputum, bronchial lavage, urine, vaginal swab, nasal swab, biopsy, tissue, tears, breath, blood, serum, plasma, cerebrospinal fluid, peritoneal fluid, pleural fluid, pericardial fluid, joint fluid, and amniotic fluid, water sample, food sample, air sample, and soil sample (all claimed). ADVANTAGE - The sensor for use with the portable analytical instrument is configured for detection of metalsin samples. The sensor can provide the excellent solution for on-site metal detection, including heavy metal detection. The sensors can provide significant advantages in higher throughput, lower cost, at the same time being less labor intensive and less dependent on individual skills. The disposable design of the sensor, the enhanced reliability and repeatability of measurements can be obtained. The sensors can be widely applied in various industries. DETAILED DESCRIPTION - INDEPENDENT CLAIMS are included for the following: (1) a system for detecting metal in sample; and (2) a method for using sensor for detecting metal in sample. DESCRIPTION OF DRAWING(S) - The drawing shows a schematic view of the sensor prototype. Channel (3) Sensing electrodes (4) Temperature sensor (6) Working electrode (8) Counter electrode (9) Reference electrode (10)

  2. Analysis of metal samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An elemental analysis, metallographic and of phases was realized in order to determine the oxidation states of Fe contained in three metallic pieces: block, plate and cylinder of unknown material. Results are presented from the elemental analysis which was carried out in the Tandem Accelerator of ININ by Proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE). The phase analysis was carried out by X-ray diffraction which allowed to know the type of alloy or alloys formed. The combined application of nuclear techniques with metallographic techniques allows the integral characterization of industrial metals. (Author)

  3. Hardness of metallic crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wuhui Li; Fengzhang Ren; Juanhua Su; Zhanhong Ma; Ke Cao; Baohong Tian

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents a new formula for calculating the hardness of metallic crystals, resulted from the research on the critical grain size with stable dislocations. The formula is = 6 /[(1 – )], where is the hardness, the coefficient, the shear modulus, the Poisson’s ratio, a function of the radius of an atom () and the electron density at the atom interface (). The formula will not only be used to testify the critical grain size with stable dislocations, but also play an important role in the understanding of mechanical properties of nanocrystalline metals.

  4. Skylab experiments on metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    The Skylab Materials Processing Facility is described. Eight experiments on metal processing under near-zero-gravity conditions were performed in this facility. Three of these involved metals and procedures of potential application to fabrication in space. A Multipurpose electric furnace within the Materials Processing Facility was employed to heat three ampoules of samples for each of the other five experiments. These five investigations cover diffusion versus convection rates in molten zinc, several immiscible alloy compositions, a whisker-reinforced silver-based composite, heat treating of porous silver samples, and a copper-aluminum eutectic.

  5. Metals in Finnish liqueurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harju, K; Ronkainen, P

    1984-05-01

    The metal content of some representative Finnish berry liqueurs was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. The berry liqueurs were prepared from cloudberry (Rubus chamaemorus), arctic bramble (Rubus arcticus), cranberry (Vaccinum oxycoccus), lingonberry (Vaccinum vitis-idaea) and sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides). In addition some other Finnish berry, fruit and herbal liqueurs were analyzed. The trace elements studied were Al, As, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Rb, and Zn. The level of poisonous metals in all the samples was very low: As less than 0.1, Cd less than 0.005 and Pb less than or equal to 0.1 mg/l. PMID:6464557

  6. Liquid metal detection apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensing instrument for use in detecting the presence or absence of liquid metal in a non-magnetic pipe or container comprises a pair of electromagnetic elements, each having a magnetic core and a primary induction coil, a third magnetic core bridging the end faces of the cores and a secondary induction coil wound about the third magnetic core on an axis normal to the axis of the pair of magnetic cores. Applied to nuclear reactors cooled by liquid metals eg. sodium or lead. (U.K.)

  7. Metallic coating of microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extremely smooth, uniform metal coatings of micrometer thicknesses on microscopic glass spheres (microspheres) are often needed as targets for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. The first part of this paper reviews those methods used successfully to provide metal coated microspheres for ICF targets, including magnetron sputtering, electro- and electroless plating, and chemical vapor pyrolysis. The second part of this paper discusses some of the critical aspects of magnetron sputter coating of microspheres, including substrate requirements, the sticking of microspheres during coating (preventing a uniform coating), and the difficulties in growing the desired dense, smooth, uniform microstructure on continuously moving spherical substrates

  8. Crystalline mesoporous metal oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenbo Yue; Wuzong Zhou

    2008-01-01

    Since the discovery of many types of mesoporous silicas, such as SBA-15, KIT-6, FDU-12 and SBA-16, porous crystalline transition metal oxides, such as Cr2O3, Co3O4, In2O3, NiO, CeO2, WO3, Fe2O3 and MnO2, have been synthesized using the mesoporous silicas as hard templates. Several synthetic methods have been developed. These new porous materials have high potential applications in catalysis, Li-ion rechargeable batteries and gas sensors. This article gives a brief review of the research of porous crystals of metal oxides in the last four years.

  9. Metal-smelting facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently there are 90,000 tons of contaminated ferrous and nonferrous scrap metal stored in aboveground scrap yards at the Department of Energy's Uranium Enrichment Facilities in Tennessee, Kentucky, and Ohio. This scrap is primarily contaminated with 100 to 500 ppM uranium at an average enrichment of 1 to 1.5% 235U. A study was performed that evaluated smelting of the ORGDP metal in a reference facility located at Oak Ridge. The study defined the process systems and baseline requirements, evaluated alternatives to smelting, and provided capital and operating costs for the reference facility. A review of the results and recommendations of this study are presented

  10. Metal Hypersensitivity in Orthodontic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Maheshwari Sanjeev K

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic treatment of individuals with metal hypersensitivity is a matter of concern for the orthodontist. Orthodontic appliances contain metals like Nickel, Cobalt and Chromium etc. Metals may cause allergic reactions and are known as allergens. Reaction to these metals is due to biodegradation of metals in the oral cavity. This may lead to the formation of corrosion products and their exposure to the patient. Nickel is the most common metal to cause hypersensitivity reaction. Chromium ranks second among the metals, known to trigger allergic reactions. The adverse biological reactions to these metals may include hypersensitivity, dermatitis and asthma. In addition, a significant carcinogenic and mutagenic potential has been demonstrated. The orthodontist must be familiar with the best possible alternative treatment modalities to provide the safest, most effective care possible in these cases. The present article focuses on the issue of metal hypersensitivity and its management in orthodontic

  11. Heavy Metal Pumps in Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, J.F.

    2000-10-01

    The long term goal of the funded research is to understand how heavy metals are taken up from the soil and translocated throughout the plant. The potential application of this research is to create plants with better heavy metal uptake systems and thereby improve the ability of these plants to help clean up toxic metals from soils. A rate limiting step is using plant for bioremediation is the normally poor capacity of plants to concentrate toxic metals. Our interest in metal ion transport systems includes those for essential mineral nutrients such as molybdenum, copper, iron, manganese, as well as toxic metals such as cerium, mercury, cesium, cadmium, arsenic and selenium. Understanding the pathways by which toxic metals accumulate in plants will enable the engineering of plants to exclude toxic metals and create healthier food sources, or to extract toxic metals from the soil as a strategy to clean up polluted lands and water.

  12. Bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) ytterbium: Electron-transfer reactions with organotransition metal complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunaga, P.T.

    1991-11-01

    The divalent lanthanide complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}Yb, reacts with methylcopper to produce the base-free, ytterbium-methyl complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbMe. This product forms a asymmetric, methyl-bridged dimer in the solid state. The bulky alkyl complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbCH(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}, displays similar chemistry to (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbMe, but at a reduced reaction rate due to the limited accessibility of the metal in (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbCH(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}. Copper and silver halide salts react with (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}V to produce the trivalent halide derivatives, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}VX (X + F, Cl, Br, I). The chloride complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}VCl, reacts with lithium reagents to form the phenyl and borohydride species. Nitrous oxide transfers an oxygen atom to (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}V producing the vanadium-oxo complex, (Me{sub 5}Ce{sub 5}){sub 2}VO. The trivalent titanium species, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}TiX (X = Cl, Br, Me, BH{sub 4}), form bimetallic coordination complexes with (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}Yb. The magnetic behavior of the products indicates that electron transfer has not occurred. The solid state structures of the chloride and bromide complexes show unusual bend angles for the halide bridges between ytterbium and titanium. A model based on frontier orbital theory has been proposed to account for the bending behavior in these species. The bimetallic methyl complex contains a linear methyl bridge between ytterbium and titanium.

  13. Amorphous metallic films in silicon metallization systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, F.; Kolawa, E.; Nicolet, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Diffusion barrier research was focussed on lowering the chemical reactivity of amorphous thin films on silicon. An additional area of concern is the reaction with metal overlays such as aluminum, silver, and gold. Gold was included to allow for technology transfer to gallium arsenide PV cells. Amorphous tungsten nitride films have shown much promise. Stability to annealing temperatures of 700, 800, and 550 C were achieved for overlays of silver, gold, and aluminum, respectively. The lower results for aluminum were not surprising because there is an eutectic that can form at a lower temperature. It seems that titanium and zirconium will remove the nitrogen from a tungsten nitride amorphous film and render it unstable. Other variables of research interest were substrate bias and base pressure during sputtering.

  14. Commodity profiles for selected metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the basic characteristics of 35 metals and gives the prices and production of these metals for the period 1979 to 1983/4. The description of each metal includes the ore grades and reserves, the major minerals in which the metal occurs, and the discovery, selected physical properties, sources, uses, substitutes, and effects on the environment of the metal. Graphs showing price and production cover the period 1950 to 1984, and possible future developments in these areas are forecast for each metal until the year 2000

  15. Metals in Metal Salts: A Copper Mirror Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    A simple lecture demonstration is described to show the latent presence of metal atoms in a metal salt. Copper(II) formate tetrahydrate is heated in a round-bottom flask forming a high-quality copper mirror.

  16. Metal derivatives of tetrazoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Published data on the synthesis, structure, properties and applications of metal derivatives of tetrazoles are generalised and described systematically. Compounds based on the anionic and neutral tetrazole forms, C- and N-mono- and C,N-disubstituted tetrazoles are considered.

  17. Metal derivatives of tetrazoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaponik, Pavel N; Voitekhovich, Sergei V; Ivashkevich, Oleg A [Research Institute for Physical Chemical Problems of the Belarusian State University, Minsk (Belarus)

    2006-06-30

    Published data on the synthesis, structure, properties and applications of metal derivatives of tetrazoles are generalised and described systematically. Compounds based on the anionic and neutral tetrazole forms, C- and N-mono- and C,N-disubstituted tetrazoles are considered.

  18. The magic metal uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ''Magic Metal'' was the first in a range of programmes for the younger secondary student. It is a very simple explanation of how a nuclear reactor works, of the basics of fission and compares nuclear with other fuels. The concepts employed were developed using classroom trials. (author)

  19. Metallicity and Quasar Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Huiyuan; Yuan, Weimin; Wang, Tinggui

    2012-01-01

    Correlations are investigated of the outflow strength of quasars, as measured by the blueshift and asymmetry index (BAI) of the CIV line (Wang et al. 2011), with intensities and ratios of broad emission lines, based on composite quasar spectra built from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We find that most of the line ratios of other ions to CIV prominently increases with BAI. These behaviors can be well understood in the context of increasing metallicity with BAI. The strength of dominant coolant, CIV line, decreases and weak collisionally excited lines increase with gas metallicity as a result of the competition between different line coolants. Using SiIV+OIV]/CIV as an indicator of gas metallicity, we present, for the first time, a strong correlation between the metallicitiy and the outflow strength of quasars over a wide range of 1.7 to 6.9 times solar abundance. Our result implies that the metallicity plays an important role in the formation of quasar outflows, likely via affecting outflow acceleration. This ...

  20. Complex metal hydrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ley, Morten Brix

    2014-01-01

    og batterier de to mest lovende energibærere til mobile applikationer. Komplekse metalhydrider er blevet undersøgt i vid udstrækning over de sidste tyve år, siden de gravimetrisk og volumetrisk kan indeholde store mængder brint. Derfor er metal borhydrider velegnet til faststofopbevaring af brint...

  1. Metal forming and lubrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels

    2000-01-01

    Lubrication is essential in most metal forming processes. The lubricant film has two basic functions, [1]: i. to separate the work piece and tool surfaces and ii. to cool the workpiece and the tool. Separation of the two surfaces implies lower friction facilitating deformation and lowering the tool...

  2. Metal analysis of cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seven varieties of cotton were investigated for 8 metal ions (K, Na, Mg, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Mn) using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectroscopy. All of the varieties were grown at the same location. Half of the samples were dry (rain fed only) and the other were well-watered (irrigat...

  3. Wings of Stretched Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelken, Miranda

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a lesson that allows students to make bird ornaments using a metal tooling as it can be textured, cut, and colored. In this lesson, students choose a bird and sketch it on a piece of paper. Once the sketches are complete, students copy their pictures on a second piece of paper by taping the sketch over a sheet of blank paper…

  4. Light metal compound casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Konrad; J.; M.; PAPIS; Joerg; F.; LOEFFLER; Peter; J.; UGGOWITZER

    2009-01-01

    ‘Compound casting’simplifies joining processes by directly casting a metallic melt onto a solid metal substrate. A continuously metallurgic transition is very important for industrial applications, such as joint structures of spaceframe constructions in transport industry. In this project, ‘compound casting’ of light metals is investigated, aiming at weight-saving. The substrate used is a wrought aluminium alloy of type AA5xxx, containing magnesium as main alloying element. The melts are aluminium alloys, containing various alloying elements (Cu, Si, Zn), and magnesium. By replacing the natural oxygen layer with a zinc layer, the inherent wetting difficulties were avoided, and compounds with flawless interfaces were successfully produced (no contraction defects, cracks or oxides). Electron microscopy and EDX investigations as well as optical micrographs of the interfacial areas revealed their continu- ously metallic constitution. Diffusion of alloying elements leads to heat-treatable microstructures in the vicinity of the joining interfaces in Al-Al couples. This permits significant variability of mechanical properties. Without significantly cutting down on wettability, the formation of low-melting intermetallic phases (Al3Mg2 and Al12Mg17 IMPs) at the interface of Al-Mg couples was avoided by applying a protective coating to the substrate.

  5. Light metal compound casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Konrad J.M.PAPIS; Joerg F.LOEFFLER; Peter J.UGGOWITZER

    2009-01-01

    'Compound casting'simplifies joining processes by directly casting a metallic melt onto a solid metal substrate. A continuously metallurgic transition is very important for industrial applications, such as joint structures of spaceframe constructions in transport industry. In this project, 'compound casting' of light metals is investigated, aiming at weight-saving. The substrate used is a wrought aluminium alloy of type AA5xxx, containing magnesium as main alloying element. The melts are aluminium alloys, containing various alloying elements (Cu, Si, Zn), and magnesium. By replacing the natural oxygen layer with a zinc layer, the inherent wetting difficulties were avoided, and compounds with flawless interfaces were successfully produced (no contraction defects, cracks or oxides). Electron microscopy and EDX investigations as well as optical micrographs of the interfacial areas revealed their continu-ously metallic constitution. Diffusion of alloying elements leads to heat-treatable microstructures in the vicinity of the joining interfaces in Al-Al couples. This permits significant variability of mechanical properties. Without significantly cutting down on wettability, the formation of low-melting intermetallic phases (Al3Mg2 and AI12Mg17 IMPs) at the interface of Al-Mg couples was avoided by applying a protec-tive coating to the substrate.

  6. Metal detector system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, R. D.

    1970-01-01

    Signal voltage resulting from the disturbance of an electromagnetic field within the volume of a sensitive area is compared with a reference ac voltage for polarity information, which identifies the material. System output amplitude and polarity indicate approximate size and type of metal, respectively.

  7. Metal foams: A survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael; F.; Ashby; LU; Tianjian(卢天健)

    2003-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art in the development of cellular metal foams is reviewed, with focus on their fabrication, mechanical/thermal/acoustic properties, and potential applications as lightweight panels, energy absorbers, heat exchangers, and acoustic liners. Foam property charts with scaling relations are presented, allowing scoping and selection through the use of material indices.

  8. Monolithic metal oxide transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yongsuk; Park, Won-Yeong; Kang, Moon Sung; Yi, Gi-Ra; Lee, Jun-Young; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2015-04-28

    We devised a simple transparent metal oxide thin film transistor architecture composed of only two component materials, an amorphous metal oxide and ion gel gate dielectric, which could be entirely assembled using room-temperature processes on a plastic substrate. The geometry cleverly takes advantage of the unique characteristics of the two components. An oxide layer is metallized upon exposure to plasma, leading to the formation of a monolithic source-channel-drain oxide layer, and the ion gel gate dielectric is used to gate the transistor channel effectively at low voltages through a coplanar gate. We confirmed that the method is generally applicable to a variety of sol-gel-processed amorphous metal oxides, including indium oxide, indium zinc oxide, and indium gallium zinc oxide. An inverter NOT logic device was assembled using the resulting devices as a proof of concept demonstration of the applicability of the devices to logic circuits. The favorable characteristics of these devices, including (i) the simplicity of the device structure with only two components, (ii) the benign fabrication processes at room temperature, (iii) the low-voltage operation under 2 V, and (iv) the excellent and stable electrical performances, together support the application of these devices to low-cost portable gadgets, i.e., cheap electronics. PMID:25777338

  9. Flexible metal bellows

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    A set of flexible metal bellows being fatigue-tested by repeated offset motion. Such bellows assemblies were used in the SPS vacuum system at places where , for instance, beam stoppers and collimators had to be moved frequently in and out of the beam path.

  10. The Production of Uranium Metal by Metal Hydrides Incorporated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, P. P.

    1943-01-01

    Metal Hydrides Incorporated was a pioneer in the production of uranium metal on a commercial scale and supplied it to all the laboratories interested in the original research, before other methods for its production were developed. Metal Hydrides Inc. supplied the major part of the metal for the construction of the first experimental pile which, on December 2, 1942, demonstrated the feasibility of the self-sustaining chain reaction and the release of atomic energy.

  11. Plasmonic Nanoslit Array Enhanced Metal-Semiconductor-Metal Optical Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Eryilmaz, Sukru Burc; Okyay, Ali K

    2014-01-01

    Metallic nanoslit arrays integrated on germanium metal-semiconductor-metal photodetectors show many folds of absorption enhancement for transverse-magnetic polarization in the telecommunication C-band. Such high enhancement is attributed to resonant interference of surface plasmon modes at the metal-semiconductor interface. Horizontal surface plasmon modes were reported earlier to inhibit photodetector performance. We computationally show, however, that horizontal modes enhance the efficiency of surface devices despite reducing transmitted light in the far field.

  12. Injection seeding of metal-metal terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Maussang, K; Wang, F.; A. Brewer; Freeman, JR; Maysonnave, J; Moumdji, S; Colombelli, R.; Li, L; Linfield, EH; Davies, AG; Beere, HE; Ritchie, DA; Tignon, J; Dhillon, SS

    2014-01-01

    We show the coherent detection of the laser emission from seeded terahertz (THz) quantum cascade lasers (QCL) with metal-metal waveguides using free-space coupling of a THz pulses to the sub-wavelength waveguide. We implement a simple, monolithic planar horn antenna design on the metalmetal waveguide that reduces the impedance mismatch to the waveguide. The laser emission is seeded and coherently detected using electro-optic sampling. Injection seeding of metal-metal waveguides with a LO phon...

  13. Production of metal powders and compounds, especially of refractory metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the invention of filament lamps and hard metals, powder metallurgy has increasingly been used for production of semifinished products and finished products from a multitude of metals, hard metals and composite materials. Methods have been developed by which powders can be made to measured, usually physical methods, chemical-metallurgical methods, or combined methods. Requirements on metal powders are listed as well as suitable methods of fabrication. (orig.)

  14. Direct Metal Laser Sintering: A Digitised Metal Casting Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Venkatesh, K. Vijay; Nandini, V. Vidyashree

    2013-01-01

    Dental technology is undergoing advancements at a fast pace and technology is being imported from various other fields. One such imported technology is direct metal laser sintering technology for casting metal crowns. This article will discuss the process of laser sintering for making metal crowns and fixed partial dentures with a understanding of their pros and cons.

  15. Institutional conditions for Swedish metal production : a comparison of subsidies to metal mining and metal recycling

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, Nils; Krook, Joakim; Eklund, Mats

    2014-01-01

    This article examines and contrasts the level of Swedish governmental subsidies to two different ways of producing metal: the metal recycling sector and the metal mining sector. In 2010, the metal mining sector was subsidized by € 40 million and the metal recycling sector € 0.6 million. If the exemption from landfill tax is considered a subsidy, the level of subsidization to the metal mining sector changes drastically to approximately € 4000 million. Regardless of how the concept “subsidy” is...

  16. Transition metals in carbohydrate chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Robert

    1997-01-01

    This review describes the application of transition metal mediated reactions in carbohydrate synthesis. The different metal mediated transformations are divided into reaction types and illustrated by various examples on monosaccharide derivatives. Carbon-carbon bond forming reactions are further ...

  17. Electroless metal plating of plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Lawrence J.

    1984-01-01

    Process for plating main group metals on aromatic polymers is carried out by the use of a nonaqueous solution of a salt of an alkali metal in a positive valence state and a main group metal in a negative valence state with contact between the solution and polymer providing a redox reaction causing the deposition of the main group metal and the reduction of the polymer. Products from the process exhibit useful decorative and electrical properties.

  18. Electrochemical analysis of metal complexes.

    OpenAIRE

    Jong, de, J.

    1987-01-01

    The present study is concerned with the electroanalytical chemistry of complexes of metals with large ligands. The main purpose was to develop quantitative descriptions of the voltammetric current-potential relation of metal complex systems with different diffusion coefficients of the species involved and of the conductometric response of metal/polyelectrolyte systems at various metal-to-ligand ratios. A further goal was to illustrate the theoretical treatments with some experiments on model ...

  19. Metal semiconductor contacts and devices

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Simon S; Einspruch, Norman G

    1986-01-01

    VLSI Electronics Microstructure Science, Volume 13: Metal-Semiconductor Contacts and Devices presents the physics, technology, and applications of metal-semiconductor barriers in digital integrated circuits. The emphasis is placed on the interplay among the theory, processing, and characterization techniques in the development of practical metal-semiconductor contacts and devices.This volume contains chapters that are devoted to the discussion of the physics of metal-semiconductor interfaces and its basic phenomena; fabrication procedures; and interface characterization techniques, particularl

  20. Blackletter logotypes and metal music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Vitus

    2016-01-01

    Text and band logos based on blackletter scripts are a common sight in visual metal music culture such as on album covers. This article develops a framework for analysing the affinity between blackletter script and metal music. The analytical framework includes five themes: genre tradition...... insights provide an answer to the question why blackletter scripts have become part of the visual repertoire of metal music and why so many famous metal band logotypes are based on blackletter....

  1. Methods of recovering alkali metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumhansl, James L; Rigali, Mark J

    2014-03-04

    Approaches for alkali metal extraction, sequestration and recovery are described. For example, a method of recovering alkali metals includes providing a CST or CST-like (e.g., small pore zeolite) material. The alkali metal species is scavenged from the liquid mixture by the CST or CST-like material. The alkali metal species is extracted from the CST or CST-like material.

  2. Upgrading platform using alkali metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A process for removing sulfur, nitrogen or metals from an oil feedstock (such as heavy oil, bitumen, shale oil, etc.) The method involves reacting the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and a radical capping substance. The alkali metal reacts with the metal, sulfur or nitrogen content to form one or more inorganic products and the radical capping substance reacts with the carbon and hydrogen content to form a hydrocarbon phase. The inorganic products may then be separated out from the hydrocarbon phase.

  3. Birch's Law for fluid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By comparing acoustic velocities in fluid metals over a very wide range of densities we have established Birch's Law as an approximate representation over the entire liquid range. For a given liquid metal the acoustic velocity is close to linear in density, with a slope determined by the atomic weight. The measurements include isobaric expansion to less than half normal density, ultrasonics on molten metals at 1 atmosphere, and shock melted metals to greater than twice normal density

  4. Multiple Bonds Between Metal Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Cotton, F Albert; Walton, Richard A

    2006-01-01

    Provides a discussion of preparations, reactions, bonding, and physical properties for two of the d-block transition metals in groups 5-10. This title includes catalytic and chemotherapeutic applications, and discusses metal-metal bonds of orders 0.5 to 4 discussed in than 4000 compounds, with citations to approximately 2500 references.

  5. Bygningsmaterialer - Metallære

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders

    Textbook on basic metallurgy for civil engineering students on their first courses. The basic properties and corrosion properties of metals are treated in common. Steel and the heat treatments of steel, light metals and other metals used in the civil engineering are described....

  6. METAL SPECIATION BY DONNAN DIALYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    In Donnan dialysis aqueous samples are separated from receiver electrolytes by an ion exchange membrane. The present work demonstrates that the dialysis of metals into salt solutions occurs in proportion to the sum of the concentrations of the free metal and the metal held in the...

  7. Electrical Conductivity in Transition Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Christopher; Vickneson, Kishanda

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this "Science Note" is to describe how to test the electron-sea model to determine whether it accurately predicts relative electrical conductivity for first-row transition metals. In the electron-sea model, a metal crystal is viewed as a three-dimensional array of metal cations immersed in a sea of delocalised valence…

  8. Metal working and dislocation structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels

    2007-01-01

    Microstructural observations are presented for different metals deformed from low to high strain by both traditional and new metal working processes. It is shown that deformation induced dislocation structures can be interpreted and analyzed within a common framework of grain subdivision on a finer...... metals with structures on the scale from about 10 nm to 1 mu m....

  9. Subcutaneous infusion: non-metal cannulae vs metal butterfly needles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Maria Carrion

    2002-07-01

    This review aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of non-metal cannulae compared to metal butterfly needles in maintaining subcutaneous infusion sites in patients receiving palliative care. The Cochrane Library, Medline, Pre-Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Amed and Cancerlit were searched for relevant studies. Controlled trials comparing non-metal cannulae with metal butterfly needles for giving subcutaneous infusion to palliative care patients were included. The outcome considered was site duration in terms of hours of patency or until change was required. Four trials met the inclusion criteria although overall quality was poor due to low follow-up. Studies examined either Teflon or Vialon-coated catheters. All studies showed non-metal cannulae to be superior to metal. In individual studies estimates in mean increase in duration of the site range from 21 to 159 hours. It seems that non-metal cannulae are more effective in maintaining the duration of subcutaneous infusion sites than butterfly needles. Both types of non-metal catheter showed clear benefits. This review has not examined other outcomes but in general adverse effects lead to the removal of the catheter and so would be reflected in the outcome of considered. Although historically non-metal cannulae have been considerably more expensive there is now little difference between metal and Teflon-coated catheters. This review recommends the use of non-metal cannulae in preference to butterfly needles. PMID:12131852

  10. Bacterial metal resistance genes and metal bioavailability in contaminated sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In bacteria a metal may be defined as bioavailable if it crosses the cytoplasmic membrane to reach the cytoplasm. Once inside the cell, specific metal resistance systems may be triggered. In this research, specific metal resistance genes were used to estimate metal bioavailability in sediment microbial communities. Gene levels were measured by quantitative PCR and correlated to metals in sediments using five different protocols to estimate dissolved, particle-adsorbed and occluded metals. The best correlations were obtained with czcA (a Cd/Zn/Co efflux pump) and Cd/Zn adsorbed or occluded in particles. Only adsorbed Co was correlated to czcA levels. We concluded that the measurement of czcA gene levels by quantitative PCR is a promising tool which may complement the classical approaches used to estimate Cd/Zn/Co bioavailability in sediment compartments. - Highlights: • Metal resistance genes were used to estimate metal bioavailability in sediments. • Gene levels were correlated to metals using 5 different metal extraction protocols. • CzcA gene levels determined by quantitative PCR is a promising tool for Cd/Zn/Co. - Capsule Bacterial czcA is a potential biomarker of Cd, Zn and Co bioavailability in aquatic sediments as shown by quantitative PCR and sequential metal extraction

  11. Heavy metal tolerance in metal hyperaccumulator plant, Salvinia natans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhir, B; Srivastava, S

    2013-06-01

    Metal tolerance capacity of Salvinia natans, a metal hyperaccumulator, was evaluated. Plants were exposed to 10, 30 and 50 mg L⁻¹ of Zn, Cd, Co, Cr, Fe, Cu, Pb, and Ni. Plant biomass, photosynthetic efficiency, quantum yield, photochemical quenching, electron transport rate and elemental (%C, H and N) constitution remained unaffected in Salvinia exposed to 30 mg L⁻¹ of heavy metals, except for Cu and Zn exposed plants, where significant reductions were noted in some of the measured parameters. However, a significant decline was noted in most of the measured parameters in plants exposed to 50 mg L⁻¹ of metal concentration. Results suggest that Salvinia has fairly high levels of tolerance to all the metals tested, but the level of tolerance varied from metal to metal. PMID:23553503

  12. Invisible metallic mesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Dexin; Lu, Ling; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljačić, Marin; Ran, Lixin

    2016-03-01

    A solid material possessing identical electromagnetic properties as air has yet to be found in nature. Such a medium of arbitrary shape would neither reflect nor refract light at any angle of incidence in free space. Here, we introduce nonscattering corrugated metallic wires to construct such a medium. This was accomplished by aligning the dark-state frequencies in multiple scattering channels of a single wire. Analytical solutions, full-wave simulations, and microwave measurement results on 3D printed samples show omnidirectional invisibility in any configuration. This invisible metallic mesh can improve mechanical stability, electrical conduction, and heat dissipation of a system, without disturbing the electromagnetic design. Our approach is simple, robust, and scalable to higher frequencies. PMID:26884208

  13. Metallic spintronic devices

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xiaobin

    2014-01-01

    Metallic Spintronic Devices provides a balanced view of the present state of the art of metallic spintronic devices, addressing both mainstream and emerging applications from magnetic tunneling junction sensors and spin torque oscillators to spin torque memory and logic. Featuring contributions from well-known and respected industrial and academic experts, this cutting-edge work not only presents the latest research and developments but also: Describes spintronic applications in current and future magnetic recording devicesDiscusses spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory (STT-MRAM) device architectures and modelingExplores prospects of STT-MRAM scaling, such as detailed multilevel cell structure analysisInvestigates spintronic device write and read optimization in light of spintronic memristive effectsConsiders spintronic research directions based on yttrium iron garnet thin films, including spin pumping, magnetic proximity, spin hall, and spin Seebeck effectsProposes unique solutions for ...

  14. Layered metal uranyl phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HUO2PO4·4H2O (HUP) forms a laminar intercalate with butylamine, c = 29.30(5) angstrom, which accepts cationic metals in exchange for the n-butylammonium ions. Hydrated uranyl metal phosphates M(UO2PO4)2·nH2O (M=Mn,Co,Ni,Cu,Zn,Cd) are obtained by ionic exchange and were studied by thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction. The tetragonal structures of all these product compounds are derived from HUP. The diffuse electronic reflectance spectra of every sample show characteristic UO22+ absorption bands. In the spectra of the Co, Ni and Cu phosphates there are other bands in the 500-800 nm zone compatible with their observed aquocation transitions

  15. METALIC NANOPARTICLES AND NANOSTRUCTURES

    OpenAIRE

    Nohavica, Dušan

    2010-01-01

    A brief overview of the field of metallic nanoparticles and nanocrystalline materials preparation and their properties is presented. Dependence of the chemical potential on surface curvature is important for particles solubility in the melt, vapour pressure of liquids as a function of droplet radius, Ostwald ripening and sintering of the individual particles. Melting point and lattice constant depends on the radius of nanoparticles as well. The major processing for nanocrystalline materials ...

  16. Metallic Magnetic Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    A Hernando; P. Crespo; M. A. García

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we reviewed some relevant aspects of the magnetic properties of metallic nanoparticles with small size (below 4 nm), covering the size effects in nanoparticles of magnetic materials, as well as the appearance of magnetism at the nanoscale in materials that are nonferromagnetic in bulk. These results are distributed along the text that has been organized around three important items: fundamental magnetic properties, different fabrication procedures, and characterization techniqu...

  17. Contemporary Metal Music Production

    OpenAIRE

    Mynett, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Distinct challenges are posed when conveying Contemporary Metal Music’s(CMM) sounds and performance perspectives within a recorded and mixed form. CMM often features down tuned, heavily distorted timbres, alongside high tempi, fast and frequently complex subdivisions, and highly synchronised instrumentation. The combination of these elements results in a significant concentration of dense musical sound usually referred to as ‘heaviness’. The publications for this thesis present approaches, pr...

  18. Domestic metallic mercury poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeil, N.I.; Issler, H.C.; Olver, R.E.; Wrong, O.M.

    1984-02-04

    In a family exposed to metallic mercury vapour two patients had acrodynia, one had the nephrotic syndrome, and one person remained well. Recognition of the variable manifestations of the disease and prevention of further exposure were the most important aspects of management. Recovery appeared to be complete as blood mercury levels fell to normal. Urinary mercury levels were too variable to be reliable as indications of progress.

  19. Efek Berbagai Perlakuan pada Permukaan Metal dan pada Unit Metal Keramik terhadap Ikatan Metal Keramik

    OpenAIRE

    Elina Karlina; Ellyza Herda

    2015-01-01

    Principally, metal ceramic bonding were determined by availability of forming oxide layer on the interface between metal and ceramic. Only a thin film of oxide layer that needed for provide sufficient adherence. Many investigations were done in order to increase this condition, for example kinds of treatment on the interface e.g. alternative oxidation, sandblasting and finishing metal direction. These investigations purposed to measure the magnitude of metal ceramic bonding through the kinds ...

  20. Closo-Carborane-metal complexes containing metal-carbon and metal-boron sigma-bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines the metal derivatives of the closo-carboranes formed through carborane carbon-metal and carborane boron-metal bonds. In order to provide a better perspective of the closo-carborane-metal compounds the authors include derivatives containing carboranyl groups bonded to boron and silicon, which are normally classified as nonmetals. The structures, nomenclature system, and general preparative methods of the closo-carboranes are examined

  1. Foam Decontamination of Metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The foam decontamination is quite promising method for purifying radioactive contaminated surfaces. Foam decontamination solutions allow creating the necessary volume of deactivating medium and forming a relatively small amount of secondary liquid waste so that this method may be applicable to bulky objects. Also it should be noted that foam compositions can be effective for objects with a complex geometry. Despite the numerous advantages the well known foam decontamination methods are unpopular today due to their low efficiency and difficulties of recycling waste decontamination solutions. We have made some attempts to improve the attractiveness of foam decontamination process. Currently two compositions (acidic and alkaline) for foam decontamination have been tested. The main advantage of both tested compositions is that they are based on easily degradable surfactants. At the same time the acidic composition has a very low salt content. The preliminary results of tests carried out in real production conditions showed that such approach for metal decontamination was very promising. Metal decontamination factors over 2500 were achieved for consequent treating of metal surfaces with acidic and alkali foam solutions in industrial conditions. The total flow rate of foam generating solutions was 1 L/m2 and processing time was 1 hour. Presently we are trying to modify the foam physical properties to improve the process of decontamination of vertical, inclined and inverted surfaces. Also methods and scheme of spent foam generating solutions treatment are under development. (authors)

  2. Liquid metal storage tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns a liquid metal storage tank used for an FBR type reactor plant. It comprises a tank main body disposed in a pit chamber, a sealing tub disposed at an upper outer circumferential surface of the tank main body, a roof portion which closes the opening a the upper end of the pit chamber, a sealing partitioning cylinder suspended from the lower surface of the roof and having its lower end extended to the inside of the tub and a sealing liquid metal filled in the tub. The tank main body is kept at a high temperature by the liquid metal while the roof in the upper portion of the pit chamber is kept at a low temperature. Further, since the tank main body and the inside of the pit chamber are sealed by the sealing partitioning cylinder, no large thermal stresses are caused to the wall of the tank main body. Even if hydrogen gases are generated in the tank main body, since they can be released to the inside of the pit chamber, the integrity of the tank can be maintained, even if abrupt pressure elevation is caused in the tank main body. (I.S.)

  3. Electron energies in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modern era of electron-electron interactions began a decade ago. Plummer's group initiated a program of using angular resolved photoemission to examine the band structure of the simple metals. Beginning with aluminum, and carrying on to sodium and potassium, they always found that the occupied energy bands were much narrower than expected. For example, the compressed energy bands for metallic potassium suggest a band effective mass of m* = 1.33me. This should be compared to the band mass found from optical conductivity m*/me = 1.01 ± 0.01. The discrepancy between these results is startling. It was this great difference which started my group doing calculations. Our program was two-fold. On one hand, we reanalyzed the experimental data, in order to see if Plummer's result was an experimental artifact. On the other hand, we completely redid the electron-electron self-energy calculations for simple metals, using the most modern choices of local-field corrections and vertex corrections. Our results will be reported in these lectures. They can be summarized as following: Our calculations give the same effective masses as the older calculations, so the theory is relatively unchanged; Our analysis of the experiments suggests that the recent measurements of band narrowing are an experimental artifact. 38 refs., 9 figs

  4. 21 CFR 888.3640 - Shoulder joint metal/metal or metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... intended to be implanted to replace a shoulder joint. The device prevents dislocation in more than one... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Shoulder joint metal/metal or metal/polymer... § 888.3640 Shoulder joint metal/metal or metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis....

  5. Hydrothermal alkali metal recovery process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfs, Denise Y.; Clavenna, Le Roy R.; Eakman, James M.; Kalina, Theodore

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by treating them with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of an added base to establish a pH during the treatment step that is higher than would otherwise be possible without the addition of the base. During the treating process the relatively high pH facilitates the conversion of water-insoluble alkali metal compounds in the alkali metal residues into water-soluble alkali metal constituents. The resultant aqueous solution containing water-soluble alkali metal constituents is then separated from the residue solids, which consist of the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment step, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preferably, the base that is added during the treatment step is an alkali metal hydroxide obtained by water washing the residue solids produced during the treatment step.

  6. Lanthanide metal-organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Peng (ed.) [Nankai Univ., Tianjin (China). Dept. of Chemistry

    2015-03-01

    This book contains the following nine chapters: lanthanide metal-organic frameworks: syntheses, properties, and potential applications (Stephen Fordham, Xuan Wang, Mathieu Bosch, Hong-Cai Zhou); 2. chiral lanthanide metal-organic frameworks (Weisheng Liu, Xiaoliang Tang); 3. Porous lanthanide metal-organic frameworks for gas storage and separation (Bin Li, Banglin Chen); 4. Luminescent lanthanide metal-organic frameworks (Xue-Zhi Song, Shu-Yan Song, Hong-Jie Zhang); 5. Metal-organic frameworks based on lanthanide clusters (Lian Chen, Feilong Jiang, Kang Zhou, Mingyan Wu, Maochun Hong); 6. metal-organic frameworks with d-f cyanide bridges: structural diversity, bonding regime, and magnetism (Marilena Ferbinteanu, Fanica Cimpoesu, Stefania Tanase); 7. transition-lanthanide heterometal-organic frameworks: synthesis, structures, and properties (Wei Shi, Ke Liu, Peng Cheng); 8: MOFs of uranium and the actinides (Juan Su, Jiesheng Chen); 9. Nanostructured and/or nanoscale lanthanide metal-organic frameworks (Zhonghao Zhang, Zhiping Zheng).

  7. Lanthanide metal-organic frameworks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains the following nine chapters: lanthanide metal-organic frameworks: syntheses, properties, and potential applications (Stephen Fordham, Xuan Wang, Mathieu Bosch, Hong-Cai Zhou); 2. chiral lanthanide metal-organic frameworks (Weisheng Liu, Xiaoliang Tang); 3. Porous lanthanide metal-organic frameworks for gas storage and separation (Bin Li, Banglin Chen); 4. Luminescent lanthanide metal-organic frameworks (Xue-Zhi Song, Shu-Yan Song, Hong-Jie Zhang); 5. Metal-organic frameworks based on lanthanide clusters (Lian Chen, Feilong Jiang, Kang Zhou, Mingyan Wu, Maochun Hong); 6. metal-organic frameworks with d-f cyanide bridges: structural diversity, bonding regime, and magnetism (Marilena Ferbinteanu, Fanica Cimpoesu, Stefania Tanase); 7. transition-lanthanide heterometal-organic frameworks: synthesis, structures, and properties (Wei Shi, Ke Liu, Peng Cheng); 8: MOFs of uranium and the actinides (Juan Su, Jiesheng Chen); 9. Nanostructured and/or nanoscale lanthanide metal-organic frameworks (Zhonghao Zhang, Zhiping Zheng).

  8. Synthetic Metal-Containing Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manners, Ian

    2004-04-01

    The development of the field of synthetic metal-containing polymers - where metal atoms form an integral part of the main chain or side group structure of a polymer - aims to create new materials which combine the processability of organic polymers with the physical or chemical characteristics associated with the metallic element or complex. This book covers the major developments in the synthesis, properties, and applications of synthetic metal-containing macromolecules, and includes chapters on the preparation and characterization of metal-containing polymers, metallocene-based polymers, rigid-rod organometallic polymers, coordination polymers, polymers containing main group metals, and also covers dendritic and supramolecular systems. The book describes both polymeric materials with metals in the main chain or side group structure and covers the literature up to the end of 2002.

  9. Reduction of Metal Oxide to Metal using Ionic Liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Ramana Reddy

    2012-04-12

    A novel pathway for the high efficiency production of metal from metal oxide means of electrolysis in ionic liquids at low temperature was investigated. The main emphasis was to eliminate the use of carbon and high temperature application in the reduction of metal oxides to metals. The emphasis of this research was to produce metals such as Zn, and Pb that are normally produced by the application of very high temperatures. The reduction of zinc oxide to zinc and lead oxide to lead were investigated. This study involved three steps in accomplishing the final goal of reduction of metal oxide to metal using ionic liquids: 1) Dissolution of metal oxide in an ionic liquid, 2) Determination of reduction potential using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and 3) Reduction of the dissolved metal oxide. Ionic liquids provide additional advantage by offering a wide potential range for the deposition. In each and every step of the process, more than one process variable has been examined. Experimental results for electrochemical extraction of Zn from ZnO and Pb from PbO using eutectic mixtures of Urea ((NH2)2CO) and Choline chloride (HOC2H4N(CH3)3+Cl-) or (ChCl) in a molar ratio 2:1, varying voltage and temperatures were carried out. Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy studies of ionic liquids with and without metal oxide additions were conducted. FTIR and induction coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICPS) was used in the characterization of the metal oxide dissolved ionic liquid. Electrochemical experiments were conducted using EG&G potentiostat/galvanostat with three electrode cell systems. Cyclic voltammetry was used in the determination of reduction potentials for the deposition of metals. Chronoamperometric experiments were carried out in the potential range of -0.6V to -1.9V for lead and -1.4V to -1.9V for zinc. The deposits were characterized using XRD and SEM-EDS for phase, morphological and elemental analysis. The results showed that pure metal was deposited on the cathode

  10. Utility industry evaluation of the metal fuel facility and metal fuel performance for liquid metal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A team of utility industry representatives evaluated the liquid metal reactor metal fuel process and facility conceptual design being developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) under Department of Energy sponsorship. The utility team concluded that a highly competent ANL team was making impressive progress in developing high performance advanced metal fuel and an economic processing and fabrication technology. The utility team concluded that the potential benefits of advanced metal fuel justified the development program, but that, at this early stage, there are considerable uncertainties in predicting the net overall economic benefit of metal fuel. Specific comments and recommendations are provided as a contribution towards enhancing the development program. 6 refs

  11. Study of concentrated metal-ammonia solutions: magnetic properties and non metal-metal transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetic susceptibility of alkali metal-liquid ammonia solutions has been measured in the concentration range where the solutions show a progressive passage toward the metallic state. The Knight shift of the metal nuclei and the nitrogen nucleus have been determined as a function of concentration and temperature, in Na-NH3 and Cs-NH3 solutions. A phenomenological analysis of the transport properties of metal-ammonia solutions is also presented. This analysis permits the presentation of a model for the mechanism of the transition to the metallic state. (author)

  12. Efek Berbagai Perlakuan pada Permukaan Metal dan pada Unit Metal Keramik terhadap Ikatan Metal Keramik

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina Karlina

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Principally, metal ceramic bonding were determined by availability of forming oxide layer on the interface between metal and ceramic. Only a thin film of oxide layer that needed for provide sufficient adherence. Many investigations were done in order to increase this condition, for example kinds of treatment on the interface e.g. alternative oxidation, sandblasting and finishing metal direction. These investigations purposed to measure the magnitude of metal ceramic bonding through the kinds of test e.g. shear bonding and flexural biaxial testing. Besides, metal ceramic bonding might be detected by the amount of remained ceramic adherence. Treatment on the metal ceramic unit investigated the influence of moisture environment to the metal ceramic bonding.

  13. Metal hydride actuation device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A self-recocking actuation device is disclosed. One possible use for it is in conjunction with a pneumatic fire protection system. This invention employs the process known as occlusion to store large amounts of gas in a small volume. Metal hydrides in a chamber are used to store hydrogen in the disclosed preferred embodiment. Upon the application of heat-from a heat source like a resistance heater-the charged metal hydride releases its hydrogen (H2) in a chamber having only one exit opening which empties into a sealed bellows. This bellows contacts a piston located in another chamber wherein a biased resetting spring is provided to normally maintain the piston in contact with the bellows. As the pressure from the H2 gas builds up, it overcomes the biased spring to move it and the piston along with an associated pin or other actuator. If used to actuate a pneumatic fire protection system, the pin or actuator at the downward side of its stroke in turn, may puncture a shearable diaphragm or in some other way releases the contents of a container containing a second gas, like nitrogen (N2), which is then released from a second exit port in a different chamber to charge the fire protection system. Recocking of the piston begins as the heating of the metal hydride ceases. As cooling takes place the hydrogen is absorbed to reenter the hydride to decrease the gas pressure supplied. The piston's biased resetting spring then recocks the piston to its original position

  14. Metal-Organic Frameworks Based on Main Group Metals

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Xiang

    2011-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) represent a large family of crystalline porous materials which have been extensively studied during the past decade. Due to their great porosity, precise and uniform pore size and functional organic linkers, they have found applications in the area of gas storage, separation, ion-exchange, catalysis and sensors. While previous studies in this area emphasize more on transition metal based MOFs, the main group metal based MOFs have been relatively less explored, ...

  15. Management of failed metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Griffin, Justin W.; D’Apuzzo, Michele; Browne, James A.

    2012-01-01

    The theoretical advantages of metal-on-metal (MOM) bearing couples in total hip arthroplasty (THA) have been recently balanced by concerns regarding adverse local and systemic effects. Higher than anticipated early revision rates have been reported by several joint registries. Failed MOM hips present with a spectrum of symptoms and findings and traditional methods of failure must be considered in addition to the failure modes that appear to be unique to the MOM bearing couple. Metal hypersens...

  16. Liquid metal MHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presented LMMHD cycles (Rankine MHD or Brayton MHD) show a potential superior to conventional power plants and their realisation is possible with available techniques. For the high temperature components ceramic materials can be used, which are compatible with alkali metals up to high temperatures. One can mention, that the greatest losses in the LMMHD cycles are localised in the two-phase flow region and especially in the separator. The calculations of the efficiencies of the separator are based on experimental results with low rates. Probably these efficiencies will be better for larger power installations, this could drive to an increased actual efficiency of η>0.50

  17. Metallic fuel design development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Woan; Kang, H. Y.; Lee, B. O. and others

    1999-04-01

    This report describes the R and D results of the ''Metallic Fuel Design Development'' project that performed as a part of 'Nuclear Research and Development Program' during the '97 - '98 project years. The objectives of this project are to perform the analysis of thermo-mechanical and irradiation behaviors, and preliminary conceptual design for the fuel system of the KALIMER liquid metal reactor. The following are the major results that obtained through the project. The preliminary design requirements and design criteria which are necessary in conceptual design stage, are set up. In the field of fuel pin design, the pin behavior analysis, failure probability prediction, and sensitivity analysis are performed under the operation conditions of steady-state and transient accidents. In the area of assembly duct analysis; 1) KAFACON-2D program is developed to calculate an array configuration of inner shape of assembly duct, 2) Stress-strain analysis are performed for the components of assembly such as, handling socket, mounting rail and wire wrap, 3) The BDI program is developed to analyze mechanical interaction between pin bundle and duct, 4) a vibration analysis is performed to understand flow-induced vibration of assembly duct, 5) The NUBOW-2D, which is bowing and deformation analysis code for assembly duct, is modified to be operated in KALIMER circumstance, and integrity evaluation of KALIMER core assembly is carried out using the modified NUBOW-2D and the CRAMP code in U.K., and 6) The KALIMER assembly duct is manufactured to be used in flow test. In the area of non-fuel assembly, such as control, reflector, shielding, GEM and USS, the states-of-the-arts and the major considerations in designing are evaluated, and the design concepts are derived. The preliminary design description and their design drawing of KALIMER fuel system are prepared based upon the above mentioned evaluation and analysis. The achievement of conceptual

  18. Ultralight metallic microlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaedler, T A; Jacobsen, A J; Torrents, A; Sorensen, A E; Lian, J; Greer, J R; Valdevit, L; Carter, W B

    2011-11-18

    Ultralight (coating the template by electroless nickel plating, and subsequently etching away the template. The resulting metallic microlattices exhibit densities ρ ≥ 0.9 milligram per cubic centimeter, complete recovery after compression exceeding 50% strain, and energy absorption similar to elastomers. Young's modulus E scales with density as E ~ ρ(2), in contrast to the E ~ ρ(3) scaling observed for ultralight aerogels and carbon nanotube foams with stochastic architecture. We attribute these properties to structural hierarchy at the nanometer, micrometer, and millimeter scales. PMID:22096194

  19. Metallic fuel design development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the R and D results of the ''Metallic Fuel Design Development'' project that performed as a part of 'Nuclear Research and Development Program' during the '97 - '98 project years. The objectives of this project are to perform the analysis of thermo-mechanical and irradiation behaviors, and preliminary conceptual design for the fuel system of the KALIMER liquid metal reactor. The following are the major results that obtained through the project. The preliminary design requirements and design criteria which are necessary in conceptual design stage, are set up. In the field of fuel pin design, the pin behavior analysis, failure probability prediction, and sensitivity analysis are performed under the operation conditions of steady-state and transient accidents. In the area of assembly duct analysis; 1) KAFACON-2D program is developed to calculate an array configuration of inner shape of assembly duct, 2) Stress-strain analysis are performed for the components of assembly such as, handling socket, mounting rail and wire wrap, 3) The BDI program is developed to analyze mechanical interaction between pin bundle and duct, 4) a vibration analysis is performed to understand flow-induced vibration of assembly duct, 5) The NUBOW-2D, which is bowing and deformation analysis code for assembly duct, is modified to be operated in KALIMER circumstance, and integrity evaluation of KALIMER core assembly is carried out using the modified NUBOW-2D and the CRAMP code in U.K., and 6) The KALIMER assembly duct is manufactured to be used in flow test. In the area of non-fuel assembly, such as control, reflector, shielding, GEM and USS, the states-of-the-arts and the major considerations in designing are evaluated, and the design concepts are derived. The preliminary design description and their design drawing of KALIMER fuel system are prepared based upon the above mentioned evaluation and analysis. The achievement of conceptual design technology on metallic fuel

  20. Metal-carbon nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrafine particles formed by XeCl laser photolysis of M(CO)6, M = V, Cr, Mo, and W, have been analyzed by Fourier transform mass spectrometry and other techniques. Novel metal carbide clusters, (MoC4)n, n = 1 - 4 and (WC4)m, m = 1 - 8, were detected and studied. The material produced by photolysis of V(CO)6 shows a series of vanadium-oxygen clusters, VxO2x+2, x = 2 - 10. No clusters of any type were detected in the photolysis product of Cr(CO)6. Structures based on the experimental evidence are proposed and discussed in light of their chemical reactivity

  1. Ultralight Metallic Microlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaedler, T. A.; Jacobsen, A. J.; Torrents, A.; Sorensen, A. E.; Lian, J.; Greer, J. R.; Valdevit, L.; Carter, W. B.

    2011-11-01

    Ultralight (microlattices. These materials are fabricated by starting with a template formed by self-propagating photopolymer waveguide prototyping, coating the template by electroless nickel plating, and subsequently etching away the template. The resulting metallic microlattices exhibit densities ρ ≥ 0.9 milligram per cubic centimeter, complete recovery after compression exceeding 50% strain, and energy absorption similar to elastomers. Young’s modulus E scales with density as E ~ ρ2, in contrast to the E ~ ρ3 scaling observed for ultralight aerogels and carbon nanotube foams with stochastic architecture. We attribute these properties to structural hierarchy at the nanometer, micrometer, and millimeter scales.

  2. Perforating Thin Metal Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Sheets only few mils thick bonded together, punched, then debonded. Three-step process yields perforated sheets of metal. (1): Individual sheets bonded together to form laminate. (2): laminate perforated in desired geometric pattern. (3): After baking, laminate separates into individual sheets. Developed for fabricating conductive layer on blankets that collect and remove ions; however, perforated foils have other applications - as conductive surfaces on insulating materials; stiffeners and conductors in plastic laminates; reflectors in antenna dishes; supports for thermal blankets; lightweight grille cover materials; and material for mockup of components.

  3. Semiconducting transition metal oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Open shell transition metal oxides are usually described as Mott or charge transfer insulators, which are often viewed as being disparate from semiconductors. Based on the premise that the presence of a correlated gap and semiconductivity are not mutually exclusive, this work reviews electronic structure calculations on the binary 3d oxides, so to distill trends and design principles for semiconducting transition metal oxides. This class of materials possesses the potential for discovery, design, and development of novel functional semiconducting compounds, e.g. for energy applications. In order to place the 3d orbitals and the sp bands into an integrated picture, band structure calculations should treat both contributions on the same footing and, at the same time, account fully for electron correlation in the 3d shell. Fundamentally, this is a rather daunting task for electronic structure calculations, but quasi-particle energy calculations in GW approximation offer a viable approach for band structure predictions in these materials. Compared to conventional semiconductors, the inherent multivalent nature of transition metal cations is more likely to cause undesirable localization of electron or hole carriers. Therefore, a quantitative prediction of the carrier self-trapping energy is essential for the assessing the semiconducting properties and to determine whether the transport mechanism is a band-like large-polaron conduction or a small-polaron hopping conduction. An overview is given for the binary 3d oxides on how the hybridization between the 3d crystal field symmetries with the O-p orbitals of the ligands affects the effective masses and the likelihood of electron and hole self-trapping, identifying those situations where small masses and band-like conduction are more likely to be expected. The review concludes with an illustration of the implications of the increased electronic complexity of transition metal cations on the defect physics and doping, using

  4. Metallic Graphene Nanodisks

    OpenAIRE

    Ezawa, Motohiko

    2007-01-01

    We explore the electronic properties of finite-length graphene nanoribbons as well as graphene nanodisks with various sizes and shapes in quest of metallic ones. For this purpose it is sufficient to search zero-energy states. We find that there exist no zero-energy states in finite-length zigzag nanoribbons though all infinite-length zigzag nanoribbons have zero-energy states. The occurrence of zero-energy states is surprisingly rare. Among typical nanodisks, only trigonal zigzag nanodisks ha...

  5. Advances in metal forming expert system for metal forming

    CERN Document Server

    Hingole, Rahulkumar Shivajirao

    2015-01-01

    This comprehensive book offers a clear account of the theory and applications of advanced metal forming. It provides a detailed discussion of specific forming processes, such as deep drawing, rolling, bending extrusion and stamping. The author highlights recent developments of metal forming technologies and explains sound, new and powerful expert system techniques for solving advanced engineering problems in metal forming. In addition, the basics of expert systems, their importance and applications to metal forming processes, computer-aided analysis of metalworking processes, formability analysis, mathematical modeling and case studies of individual processes are presented.

  6. Molecular metal-metal bonds compounds, synthesis, properties

    CERN Document Server

    Liddle, Stephen T

    2015-01-01

    Systematically covering all areas of the Periodic Table, this is a comprehensive and handy introduction to metal-metal bonding. The 15 chapters follow a uniform, coherent structure for a clear overview, allowing readers easy access to the information. The important molecules at the genesis of each area are mentioned but the focus lies principally on research published since 2005. Important topics such as synthesis, properties, structures,notable features, reactivity and examples of applications of the most important compounds in each group with metal-metal bonding throughout the periodic ta

  7. Enhanced Structural Support of Metal Sites as Nodes in Metal-Organic Frameworks Compared to Metal Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Sanjit

    2013-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks are a new class of crystalline, porous solid-state materials with metal ions periodically linked by organic linkers. This gives rise to one-, two- or three-dimensional structures. Here, we compare the stability of similar metal sites toward external ligand (solvent) induced disruption of the coordination environment in metal complexes and in metal-organic frameworks. Our experimental results show that a metal site as node of a metal-organic framework retains much high...

  8. Degenerate doping of metallic anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Cody A; Zeller, Robert A; Johnson, Paul B; Switzer, Elise E

    2015-05-12

    Embodiments of the invention relate to an electrochemical cell comprising: (i) a fuel electrode comprising a metal fuel, (ii) a positive electrode, (iii) an ionically conductive medium, and (iv) a dopant; the electrodes being operable in a discharge mode wherein the metal fuel is oxidized at the fuel electrode and the dopant increases the conductivity of the metal fuel oxidation product. In an embodiment, the oxidation product comprises an oxide of the metal fuel which is doped degenerately. In an embodiment, the positive electrode is an air electrode that absorbs gaseous oxygen, wherein during discharge mode, oxygen is reduced at the air electrode. Embodiments of the invention also relate to methods of producing an electrode comprising a metal and a doped metal oxidation product.

  9. Supported molten-metal catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Ravindra; Singh, Ajeet; Halasz, Istvan; Serban, Manuela

    2001-01-01

    An entirely new class of catalysts called supported molten-metal catalysts, SMMC, which can replace some of the existing precious metal catalysts used in the production of fuels, commodity chemicals, and fine chemicals, as well as in combating pollution. SMMC are based on supporting ultra-thin films or micro-droplets of the relatively low-melting (<600.degree. C.), inexpensive, and abundant metals and semimetals from groups 1, 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16, of the periodic table, or their alloys and intermetallic compounds, on porous refractory supports, much like supported microcrystallites of the traditional solid metal catalysts. It thus provides orders of magnitude higher surface area than is obtainable in conventional reactors containing molten metals in pool form and also avoids corrosion. These have so far been the chief stumbling blocks in the application of molten metal catalysts.

  10. Hydrogen in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report briefly describes the results of the single projects promoted by the German Council of Research (DFG). The subjects deal with diffusion, effusion, permeation and solubility of hydrogen in metals. They are interesting for many disciplines: metallurgy, physical metallurgy, metal physics, materials testing, welding engineering, chemistry, nuclear physics and solid-state physics. The research projects deal with the following interrelated subjects: solubility of H2 in steel and effects on embrittlement, influence of H2 on the fatigue strength of steel as well as the effect of H2 on welded joints. The studies in solid-state research can be divided into methodological and physico-chemical studies. The methodological studies mainly comprise investigations on the analytical determination of H2 by means of nuclear-physical reactions (e.g. the 15N method) and the application of the Moessbauer spectroscopy. Physico-chemical problems are mainly dealt with in studies on interfacial reactions in connection with the absorption of hydrogen and on the diffusion of H2 in different alloy systems. The properties of materials used for hydrogen storage were the subject of several research projects. 20 contributions were separately recorded for the data bank 'Energy'. (MM)

  11. Progress of biodegradable metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huafang Li

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable metals (BMs are metals and alloys expected to corrode gradually in vivo, with an appropriate host response elicited by released corrosion products, then dissolve completely upon fulfilling the mission to assist with tissue healing with no implant residues. In the present review article, three classes of BMs have been systematically reviewed, including Mg-based, Fe-based and Zn-based BMs. Among the three BM systems, Mg-based BMs, which now have several systems reported the successful of clinical trial results, are considered the vanguards and main force. Fe-based BMs, with pure iron and Fe–Mn based alloys as the most promising, are still on the animal test stage. Zn-based BMs, supposed to have the degradation rate between the fast Mg-based BMs and the slow Fe-based BMs, are a rising star with only several reports and need much further research. The future research and development direction for the BMs are proposed, based on the clinical requirements on controllable degradation rate, prolonged mechanical stability and excellent biocompatibility, by optimization of alloy composition design, regulation on microstructure and mechanical properties, and following surface modification.

  12. Metal silicide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lih-Juann; Wu, Wen-Wei

    2015-07-01

    The growth, properties and applications of metal silicide nanowires (NWs) have been extensively investigated. The investigations have led to significant advance in the understanding of one-dimensional (1D) metal silicide systems. For example, CoSi is paramagnetic in bulk form, but ferromagnetic in NW geometry. In addition, the helimagnetic phase and skyrmion state in MnSi are stabilized by NW morphology. The influencing factors on the growth of silicide phase have been elucidated for Ni-Si, Pt-Si, and Mn-Si systems. Promising results were obtained for spintronics, non-volatile memories, field emitter, magnetoresistive sensor, thermoelectric generator and solar cells. However, the main thrust has been in microelectronic devices and integrated circuits. Transistors of world-record small size have been fabricated. Reconfigurable Si NW transistors, dually active Si NW transistors and circuits with equal electron and hole transport have been demonstrated. Furthermore, multifunctional devices and logic gates with undoped Si NWs were reported. It is foreseen that practical applications will be realized in the near future.

  13. Clean Metal Casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The objective of this project is to develop a technology for clean metal processing that is capable of consistently providing a metal cleanliness level that is fit for a given application. The program has five tasks: Development of melt cleanliness assessment technology, development of melt contamination avoidance technology, development of high temperature phase separation technology, establishment of a correlation between the level of melt cleanliness and as cast mechanical properties, and transfer of technology to the industrial sector. Within the context of the first task, WPI has developed a standardized Reduced Pressure Test that has been endorsed by AFS as a recommended practice. In addition, within the context of task1, WPI has developed a melt cleanliness sensor based on the principles of electromagnetic separation. An industrial partner is commercializing the sensor. Within the context of the second task, WPI has developed environmentally friendly fluxes that do not contain fluorine. Within the context of the third task, WPI modeled the process of rotary degassing and verified the model predictions with experimental data. This model may be used to optimize the performance of industrial rotary degassers. Within the context of the fourth task, WPI has correlated the level of melt cleanliness at various foundries, including a sand casting foundry, a permanent mold casting foundry, and a die casting foundry, to the casting process and the resultant mechanical properties. This is useful in tailoring the melt cleansing operations at foundries to the particular casting process and the desired properties of cast components.

  14. Magnetic metallic multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utilizing self-consistent Hartree-Fock calculations, several aspects of multilayers and interfaces are explored: enhancement and reduction of the local magnetic moments, magnetic coupling at the interfaces, magnetic arrangements within each film and among non-neighboring films, global symmetry of the systems, frustration, orientation of the various moments with respect to an outside applied field, and magnetic-field induced transitions. Magnetoresistance of ferromagnetic-normal-metal multilayers is found by solving the Boltzmann equation. Results explain the giant negative magnetoresistance encountered in these systems when an initial antiparallel arrangement is changed into a parallel configuration by an external magnetic field. The calculation depends on (1) geometric parameters (thicknesses of layers), (2) intrinsic metal parameters (number of conduction electrons, magnetization, and effective masses in layers), (3) bulk sample properties (conductivity relaxation times), (4) interface scattering properties (diffuse scattering versus potential scattering at the interfaces, and (5) outer surface scattering properties (specular versus diffuse surface scattering). It is found that a large negative magnetoresistance requires considerable asymmetry in interface scattering for the two spin orientations. Features of the interfaces that may produce an asymmetrical spin-dependent scattering are studied: varying interfacial geometric random roughness with no lateral coherence, correlated (quasi-periodic) roughness, and varying chemical composition of the interfaces. The interplay between these aspects of the interfaces may enhance or suppress the magnetoresistance, depending on whether it increases or decreases the asymmetry in the spin-dependent scattering of the conduction electrons

  15. Microbiological metal extraction processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of biotechnological principles in the mineral processing, especially in hydrometallurgy, has created new opportunities and challenges for these industries. During the 1950's and 60's, the mining wastes and unused complex mineral resources have been successfully treated in bacterial assisted heap and dump leaching processes for copper and uranium. The interest in bio-leaching processes is the consequence of economic advantages associated with these techniques. For example, copper can be produced from mining wastes for about 1/3 to 1/2 of the costs of copper production by the conventional smelting process from high-grade sulfide concentrates. The economic viability of bio leaching technology lead to its world wide acceptance by the extractive industries. During 1970's this technology grew into a more structured discipline called 'bio hydrometallurgy'. Currently, bio leaching techniques are ready to be used, in addition to copper and uranium, for the extraction of cobalt, nickel, zinc, precious metals and for the desulfurization of high-sulfur content pyritic coals. As a developing technology, the microbiological leaching of the less common and rare metals has yet to reach commercial maturity. However, the research in this area is very active. In addition, in a foreseeable future the biotechnological methods may be applied also for the treatment of high-grade ores and mineral concentrates using adapted native and/or genetically engineered microorganisms. (author)

  16. Progress of biodegradable metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huafang Li; Yufeng Zheng; Ling Qin

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable metals (BMs) are metals and alloys expected to corrode gradually in vivo, with an appropriate host response elicited by released corrosion products, then dissolve completely upon fulfilling the mission to assist with tissue healing with no implant residues. In the present review article, three classes of BMs have been systematically reviewed, including Mg-based, Fe-based and Zn-based BMs. Among the three BM systems, Mg-based BMs, which now have several systems reported the successful of clinical trial results, are considered the vanguards and main force. Fe-based BMs, with pure iron and Fe–Mn based alloys as the most promising, are still on the animal test stage. Zn-based BMs, supposed to have the degradation rate between the fast Mg-based BMs and the slow Fe-based BMs, are a rising star with only several reports and need much further research. The future research and development direction for the BMs are proposed, based on the clinical requirements on controllable degradation rate, prolonged mechanical stability and excellent biocompat-ibility, by optimization of alloy composition design, regulation on microstructure and mechanical properties, and following surface modification.

  17. Magnetic metallic multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hood, R.Q.

    1994-04-01

    Utilizing self-consistent Hartree-Fock calculations, several aspects of multilayers and interfaces are explored: enhancement and reduction of the local magnetic moments, magnetic coupling at the interfaces, magnetic arrangements within each film and among non-neighboring films, global symmetry of the systems, frustration, orientation of the various moments with respect to an outside applied field, and magnetic-field induced transitions. Magnetoresistance of ferromagnetic-normal-metal multilayers is found by solving the Boltzmann equation. Results explain the giant negative magnetoresistance encountered in these systems when an initial antiparallel arrangement is changed into a parallel configuration by an external magnetic field. The calculation depends on (1) geometric parameters (thicknesses of layers), (2) intrinsic metal parameters (number of conduction electrons, magnetization, and effective masses in layers), (3) bulk sample properties (conductivity relaxation times), (4) interface scattering properties (diffuse scattering versus potential scattering at the interfaces, and (5) outer surface scattering properties (specular versus diffuse surface scattering). It is found that a large negative magnetoresistance requires considerable asymmetry in interface scattering for the two spin orientations. Features of the interfaces that may produce an asymmetrical spin-dependent scattering are studied: varying interfacial geometric random roughness with no lateral coherence, correlated (quasi-periodic) roughness, and varying chemical composition of the interfaces. The interplay between these aspects of the interfaces may enhance or suppress the magnetoresistance, depending on whether it increases or decreases the asymmetry in the spin-dependent scattering of the conduction electrons.

  18. Lanthanides: New life metals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistoserdova, Ludmila

    2016-08-01

    Lanthanides (Ln(3+)) that are Rare Earth Elements, until recently thought to be biologically inert, have recently emerged as essential metals for activity and expression of a special type of methanol dehydrogenase, XoxF. As XoxF enzyme homologs are encoded in a wide variety of microbes, including microbes active in important environmental processes such as methane and methanol metabolism, Ln(3+) may represent some of the key biogeochemical drivers in cycling of carbon and other elements. However, significant gaps in understanding the role of Ln(3+) in biological systems remain as the functions of most of the proteins potentially dependent of Ln(3+) and their roles in specific metabolic networks/respective biogeochemical cycles remain unknown. Moreover, enzymes dependent on Ln(3+) but not related to XoxF enzymes may exist, and these so far have not been recognized. Through connecting the recently uncovered genetic divergence and phylogenetic distribution of XoxF-like enzymes and through elucidation of their activities, metal and substrate specificities, along with the biological contexts of respective biochemical pathways, most parsimonious scenarios for their evolution could be uncovered. Generation of such data will firmly establish the role of Ln(3+) in the biochemistry of Life inhabiting this planet. PMID:27357406

  19. Sinuous flow in metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Ho; Viswanathan, Koushik; Compton, Walter Dale; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    2015-08-11

    Annealed metals are surprisingly difficult to cut, involving high forces and an unusually thick "chip." This anomaly has long been explained, based on ex situ observations, using a model of smooth plastic flow with uniform shear to describe material removal by chip formation. Here we show that this phenomenon is actually the result of a fundamentally different collective deformation mode--sinuous flow. Using in situ imaging, we find that chip formation occurs via large-amplitude folding, triggered by surface undulations of a characteristic size. The resulting fold patterns resemble those observed in geophysics and complex fluids. Our observations establish sinuous flow as another mesoscopic deformation mode, alongside mechanisms such as kinking and shear banding. Additionally, by suppressing the triggering surface undulations, sinuous flow can be eliminated, resulting in a drastic reduction of cutting forces. We demonstrate this suppression quite simply by the application of common marking ink on the free surface of the workpiece material before the cutting. Alternatively, prehardening a thin surface layer of the workpiece material shows similar results. Besides obvious implications to industrial machining and surface generation processes, our results also help unify a number of disparate observations in the cutting of metals, including the so-called Rehbinder effect. PMID:26216980

  20. Extraction of refractory noble metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Review of the literature data published during the past ten years devoted to extraction of refractory metals (Zr, Mo, Hf, W, Re) is presented. Considered are extractants and reagents used in the processes, kinetics, efficiency of separation and isolation processes. Methods of solvent extraction of refractory metals used in analytical chemistry are analyzed. Extraction methods of refractory metal isolation directly from solid phase are considered

  1. Air and metal hydride battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampinen, M.; Noponen, T. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Applied Thermodynamics

    1998-12-31

    The main goal of the air and metal hydride battery project was to enhance the performance and manufacturing technology of both electrodes to such a degree that an air-metal hydride battery could become a commercially and technically competitive power source for electric vehicles. By the end of the project it was possible to demonstrate the very first prototype of the air-metal hydride battery at EV scale, achieving all the required design parameters. (orig.)

  2. Composite and Nanocomposite Metal Foams

    OpenAIRE

    Isabel Duarte; José M. F. Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Open-cell and closed-cell metal foams have been reinforced with different kinds of micro- and nano-sized reinforcements to enhance their mechanical properties of the metallic matrix. The idea behind this is that the reinforcement will strengthen the matrix of the cell edges and cell walls and provide high strength and stiffness. This manuscript provides an updated overview of the different manufacturing processes of composite and nanocomposite metal foams.

  3. Corrosion-resistant metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    2009-03-24

    The present invention relates to metal surfaces having thereon an ultrathin (e.g., less than ten nanometer thickness) corrosion-resistant film, thereby rendering the metal surfaces corrosion-resistant. The corrosion-resistant film includes an at least partially crosslinked amido-functionalized silanol component in combination with rare-earth metal oxide nanoparticles. The invention also relates to methods for producing such corrosion-resistant films.

  4. Nanotoxicology of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Amedea B. Seabra; Nelson Durán

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses recent advances in the synthesis, characterization and toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles obtained mainly through biogenic (green) processes. The in vitro and in vivo toxicities of these oxides are discussed including a consideration of the factors important for safe use of these nanomaterials. The toxicities of different metal oxide nanoparticles are compared. The importance of biogenic synthesized metal oxide nanoparticles has been increasing in recent years; howeve...

  5. Metallization of some simple systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the metallization of Xe, Ar, He, I2, H2, and N2 in terms of some recent theoretical work and shock-wave experiments. New shock-wave data on liquid hydrogen and deuterium leads to a predicted pressure above 3 Mbar for the appearance of a monatomic metal phase. We expect CsI to become metallic near 0.8 Mbar

  6. Metallization of some simple systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, M.; McMahan, A.K.

    1981-01-01

    We discuss the metallization of Xe, Ar, He, I/sub 2/, H/sub 2/, and N/sub 2/ in terms of some recent theoretical work and shock-wave experiments. New shock-wave data on liquid hydrogen and deuterium leads to a predicted pressure above 3 Mbar for the appearance of a monatomic metal phase. We expect CsI to become metallic near 0.8 Mbar.

  7. Hydrogen Bonds Involving Metal Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlović, G.; N. Raos

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds involving metal center as a hydrogen donor or hydrogen acceptor are only a specific type of metal-hydrogen interactions; it is therefore not easy to differentiate hydrogen bond from other metal-hydrogen interactions, especially agostic ones. The first part of the review is therefore devoted to the results of structural chemistry and molecular spectroscopy (NMR, IR), as a tool for differentiating hydrogen bondings from other hydrogen interactions. The classical examples of Pt···...

  8. Hydrogen permeation through metallic foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of electrolytic permeation of hydrogen through metallic foils is studied. A double electrolytic cell, in glass, in which the two compartments of reaction are separated by a metallic foil to be studied, was built. As direct result, the hydrogen diffusion coefficient in the metal is obtained. The hydrogen diffusion coefficients in the palladium and, in austenitic stainless steels 304 and 304 L, used in the Angra-1 reactor, were obtained. Samples of stainless steels with and without welding, were used. (Author)

  9. Metal deposition using seed layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hsein-Ping; Chen, Gang; Bo, Yu; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Shuo; Poudel, Bed

    2013-11-12

    Methods of forming a conductive metal layers on substrates are disclosed which employ a seed layer to enhance bonding, especially to smooth, low-roughness or hydrophobic substrates. In one aspect of the invention, the seed layer can be formed by applying nanoparticles onto a surface of the substrate; and the metallization is achieved by electroplating an electrically conducting metal onto the seed layer, whereby the nanoparticles serve as nucleation sites for metal deposition. In another approach, the seed layer can be formed by a self-assembling linker material, such as a sulfur-containing silane material.

  10. Epidemiological Approaches to Metal Toxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, Philippe; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben

    2014-01-01

    testing and further refining methods for study design and data analysis. In contrast to most organic compounds, metals are not broken down, and many of them are retained in the body for long periods, thereby facilitating exposure assessment. In conjunction with the use of inexpensive metal analytical...... propensity to cause chronic or delayed toxicity, epidemiological studies of metal toxicity have focused on a wide variety of organ systems, subtle effects as well as mortality, and differences in susceptibility. Toxic metals often serve as paradigms of environmental and occupational toxicity. For these...

  11. Trace metals in urban soils

    OpenAIRE

    Linde, Mats

    2005-01-01

    Urban areas can be considered risk areas as regards trace metals and will continue to be so for a long time, according to predictions. The present work started as a sub-project in the urban part of the multifaceted research project Metals in Urban and Forest Environments.The overall aim of the work was to gain systematic knowledge about the amounts and behaviour of trace metals in urban soils, with Stockholm (the capital of Sweden) as the study area. The concentrations of trace metals (Cd, Cr...

  12. Antimicrobial Polymers with Metal Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Palza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Metals, such as copper and silver, can be extremely toxic to bacteria at exceptionally low concentrations. Because of this biocidal activity, metals have been widely used as antimicrobial agents in a multitude of applications related with agriculture, healthcare, and the industry in general. Unlike other antimicrobial agents, metals are stable under conditions currently found in the industry allowing their use as additives. Today these metal based additives are found as: particles, ions absorbed/exchanged in different carriers, salts, hybrid structures, etc. One recent route to further extend the antimicrobial applications of these metals is by their incorporation as nanoparticles into polymer matrices. These polymer/metal nanocomposites can be prepared by several routes such as in situ synthesis of the nanoparticle within a hydrogel or direct addition of the metal nanofiller into a thermoplastic matrix. The objective of the present review is to show examples of polymer/metal composites designed to have antimicrobial activities, with a special focus on copper and silver metal nanoparticles and their mechanisms.

  13. The biogeochemistry of metal cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nealson, Kenneth H. (Editor); Nealson, Molly (Editor); Dutcher, F. Ronald (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The results of the Planetary Biology and Microbial Ecology's summer 1987 program are summarized. The purpose of the interdisciplinary PBME program is to integrate, via lectures and laboratory work, the contributions of university and NASA scientists and student interns. The 1987 program examined various aspects of the biogeochemistry of metal cycling, and included such areas as limnology, metal chemistry, metal geochemistry, microbial ecology, and interactions with metals. A particular area of focus was the use of remote sensing in the study of biogeochemistry. Abstracts and bibliographies of the lectures and reports of the laboratory projects are presented.

  14. Early Main Group Metal Catalysis : How Important is the Metal?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penafiel, Johanne; Maron, Laurent; Harder, Sjoerd

    2015-01-01

    Organocalcium compounds have been reported as efficient catalysts for various alkene transformations. In contrast to transition metal catalysis, the alkenes are not activated by metal-alkene orbital interactions. Instead it is proposed that alkene activation proceeds through an electrostatic interac

  15. Cosmic metal production and the mean metallicity of the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Calura, F

    2004-01-01

    By means of detailed chemo-photometric models for elliptical, spiral and irregular galaxies, we evaluate the cosmic history of the production of chemical elements as well as the metal mass density of the present-day universe. We then calculate the mean metal abundances for galaxies of different morphological types, along with the average metallicity of galactic matter in the universe (stars, gas and intergalactic medium). For the average metallicity of galaxies in the local universe, we find Z_gal= 0.0175, i.e. close to the solar value. We find the main metal production in spheroids (ellipticals and bulges) to occur at very early times, implying an early peak in the metal production and a subsequent decrease. On the other hand, the metal production in spirals and irregulars is always increasing with time. We perform a self-consistent census of the baryons and metals in the local universe finding that, while the vast majority of the baryons lies outside galaxies in the inter-galactic medium (IGM), 52 % of the ...

  16. Plasmons in metallic monolayer and bilayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kirsten; Thygesen, Kristian S.

    2013-01-01

    We study the collective electronic excitations in metallic single-layer and bilayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) using time dependent density functional theory in the random phase approximation. For very small momentum transfers (below q≈0.02 Å−1), the plasmon dispersion follows the √q...

  17. Interplay of metal-allyl and metal-metal bonding in dimolybdenum allyl complexes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trovitch, R. J.; John, K. D.; Martin, R. L.; Obrey, S. J.; Sattelberger, A. P.; Scott, B. L.; Baker, R. T.; LANL; Univ. of Ottawa

    2009-01-01

    Addition of PMe{sub 3} to Mo{sub 2}(allyl){sub 4} afforded Mo{sub 2}(allyl){sub 4}(PMe{sub 3}){sub 2}, in which two of the allyl groups adopt an unprecedented {mu}{sub 2}-{eta}{sup 1}, {eta}{sup 3} bonding mode; theoretical studies elucidate the roles of the {sigma}- and {pi}-donor ligands in the interplay of metal-allyl and metal-metal bonding.

  18. Melting of Transition Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, M; Japel, S; Boehler, R

    2005-04-11

    We review the transition melting studies carried out at Mainz, and describe a recently developed model used to explain that the relatively low melting slopes are due to the partially filled d-bands, and the persistence of the pressure induced s-d transition. The basic tenets of the model have now been reconfirmed by new measurements for Cu and Ni. The measurements show that Cu which has a filled 3d-band, has a melt slope that is about 2.5 greater than its neighbor Ni. In the case of Mo, the apparent discrepancy of DAC melting measurements with shock melting can be explained by accounting for the change in melt slope due to the bcc-cp transition observed in the shock studies. The Fe melt curve is revisited. The possible relevance of the Jahn-Teller effect and recently observed transition metal melts with Icosahedral Short-Range Order (ISRO) is discussed.

  19. Radiation disorder in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extensive study of the radiation disorder accompayning implantation of 27 different ions in single crystals of Al, Cu and Ni has been made. The technique of Rutherford backscattering and channeling of MeV helium ions is used to determine the relative amount and the depth of radiation disorder. The dependence on fluence, energy and temperature of implantation is also studied. The results show minimum disorder for self ion bombardment. The disorder depths are anomalously high, e.g. about 7-19 times the mean ion ranges in copper. The observed disorder depths are also found to exceed well beyond the maximum range of a small channeled fraction of the implanted ions in Cu and Ni. It is observed that the recent conclusions of Borders and Poats, regarding the nature of disorder in metals, are not consistent with those of the present extensive study. (author)

  20. Creating bulk nanocrystalline metal.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredenburg, D. Anthony (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Saldana, Christopher J. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Gill, David D.; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Roemer, Timothy John (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Vogler, Tracy John; Yang, Pin

    2008-10-01

    Nanocrystalline and nanostructured materials offer unique microstructure-dependent properties that are superior to coarse-grained materials. These materials have been shown to have very high hardness, strength, and wear resistance. However, most current methods of producing nanostructured materials in weapons-relevant materials create powdered metal that must be consolidated into bulk form to be useful. Conventional consolidation methods are not appropriate due to the need to maintain the nanocrystalline structure. This research investigated new ways of creating nanocrystalline material, new methods of consolidating nanocrystalline material, and an analysis of these different methods of creation and consolidation to evaluate their applicability to mesoscale weapons applications where part features are often under 100 {micro}m wide and the material's microstructure must be very small to give homogeneous properties across the feature.

  1. Flexible Laser Metal Cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villumsen, Sigurd; Jørgensen, Steffen Nordahl; Kristiansen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a new flexible and fast approach to laser cutting called ROBOCUT. Combined with CAD/CAM technology, laser cutting of metal provides the flexibility to perform one-of-a-kind cutting and hereby realises mass production of customised products. Today’s laser cutting techniques...... possess, despite their wide use in industry, limitations regarding speed and geometry. Research trends point towards remote laser cutting techniques which can improve speed and geometrical freedom and hereby the competitiveness of laser cutting compared to fixed-tool-based cutting technology...... such as punching. This paper presents the concepts and preliminary test results of the ROBOCUT laser cutting technology, a technology which potentially can revolutionise laser cutting....

  2. Metallic Coaxial Nanolasers

    CERN Document Server

    Hayenga, William E; Hodaei, Hossein; Fainman, 1 Yeshaiahu; Khajavikhan, Mercedeh

    2016-01-01

    The last two decades have witnessed tremendous advancements in the area of nanophotonics and plasmonics. Undoubtedly, the introduction of metallic structures has opened a path towards light con?nement and manipulation at the subwavelength scale { a regime that was previously thought to be out of reach in optics. Of central importance is to devise e?cient light sources to power up the future nanoscale optical circuits. Coaxial resonators can provide a platform to implement such subwavelength sources. They support ultrasmall cavity modes and o?er large mode-emitter overlap as well as multifold scalability. Given their large modulation bandwidth, they hold promise for high speed optical interconnects { where they can be used for light generation and modulation simultaneously. In addition, the possibility of thresholdless operation in such devices may have implications in developing the next generation of e?cient lighting systems. In this review article, the physics and applications of coaxial nanolasers will be ...

  3. Spherical rhenium metal powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of a high-density, spherical rhenium powder (SReP) possessing excellent flow characteristics has enabled the use of advanced processing techniques for the manufacture of rhenium components. The techniques that were investigated were vacuum plasma spraying (VPS), direct-hot isostatic pressing (D-HIP), and various other traditional powder metallurgy processing methods of forming rhenium powder into near-net shaped components. The principal disadvantages of standard rhenium metal powder (RMP) for advanced consolidation applications include: poor flow characteristics; high oxygen content; and low and varying packing densities. SReP will lower costs, reduce processing times, and improve yields when manufacturing powder metallurgy rhenium components. The results of the powder characterization of spherical rhenium powder and the consolidation of the SReP are further discussed. (author)

  4. Metal hydride air conditioner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Ke; DU; Ping; LU; Man-qi

    2005-01-01

    The relationship among the hydrogen storage properties, cycling characteristics and thermal parameters of the metal hydride air conditioning systems was investigated. Based on a new alloy selection model, three pairs of hydrogen storage alloys, LaNi4.4 Mn0.26 Al0.34 / La0.6 Nd0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0.2 Cu0. 1, LaNi4.61Mn0. 26 Al0.13/La0.6 Nd0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0.2 Cu0. 1 and LaNi4.61 Mn0.26 Al0.13/La0.6 Y0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0. 2, were selected as the working materials for the metal hydride air conditioning system. Studies on the factors affecting the COP of the system showed that higher COP and available hydrogen content need the proper operating temperature and cycling time,large hydrogen storage capacity, flat plateau and small hysterisis of hydrogen alloys, proper original input hydrogen content and mass ratio of the pair of alloys. It also needs small conditioning system was established by using LaNi4.61 Mn0.26 Al0. 13/La0.6 Y0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0.2 alloys as the working materials, which showed that under the operating temperature of 180℃/40℃, a low temperature of 13℃ was reached, with COP =0.38 and Wnet =0.09 kW/kg.

  5. Shape-Controlled Metal-Metal and Metal-Polymer Janus Structures by Thermoplastic Embossing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Molla; Kahler, Niloofar; Kumar, Golden

    2016-05-01

    We report the fabrication of metal-metal and metal-polymer Janus structures by embossing of thermoplastic metallic glasses and polymers. Hybrid structures with controllable shapes and interfaces are synthesized by template-assisted embossing. Different manufacturing strategies such as co-embossing and additive embossing are demonstrated for joining the materials with diverse compositions and functionalities. Structures with distinct combinations of properties such as hydrophobic-hydrophilic, opaque-transparent, insulator-conductor, and nonmagnetic-ferromagnetic are produced using this approach. These anisotropic properties are further utilized for selective functionalization of Janus structures. PMID:27064306

  6. Infection or metal hypersensitivity? The diagnostic challenge of failure in metal-on-metal bearings.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Galbraith, John G

    2011-04-01

    The use of second generation metal-on-metal hip articulations has gained favour in the past few years. A hypersensitivity reaction to the metal-on-metal bearing, although rare, is a reported complication and is a novel mode of failure of these implants. Differentiating failure secondary to infection from failure secondary to metal hypersensitivity represents a significant diagnostic challenge. A retrospective review of all cases of hip arthroplasty using metal-on-metal bearings over a 5-year period at a tertiary referral centre identified 3 cases of failure secondary to metal hypersensitivity. Clinical presentation, serological markers, radiological imaging and histological analysis of all cases identified were evaluated. Histological analysis of periprosthetic tissue in all 3 cases identified characteristic features such as perivascular lymphocytic aggregates and chronic inflammation consistent with aseptic lymphocytic vasculitis-associated lesions (ALVAL). This study highlights that failure secondary to metal hypersensitivity must be considered in patients presenting with the reappearance of persistent pain, marked joint effusion, and the development of early osteolysis in the absence of infection.

  7. Electric field gradients in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the recent works on electric field gradient in metals is given. The main emphasis is put on the temperature dependence of the electric field gradient in nonmagnetic metals. Some methods of investigation of this effect using nuclear probes are described. One of them is nuclear accoustic resonance method. (S.B.)

  8. Metal chemistry of the transactinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The elements with atomic numbers between 104 and 116 are expected to behave as metals. Their interaction with metal surfaces is of uppermost importance both to design experimental separation procedures as well as for their chemical characterization. This interaction is quantified by the net adsorption enthalpy. The determination of the net adsorption enthalpy requires the calculation of the solution enthalpy of transactinides in the bulk-phases of the solid adsorbent metals. These solution enthalpies have been calculated with the Miedema-model. For that purpose the necessary parameters of the transactinides: the metal radius, the molar volume, the electronic density at the Wigner-Seitz-Cell boundary and the electronegativity (Miedema Scale) have been obtained on the basis of empirical correlations starting from the entropies of solid transactinides. These entropies were estimated by extrapolations as a function of atomic masses along the groups of the periodic table. The results of the calculations show a strong dependence on the cohesion energy of the solid adsorbent metals as well as on the solution enthalpies of transactinides in the bulk-phase of these metals. The enthalpies of segregation of transactinides from the metallic bulk-phases as the 'driving forces' of the surface enrichment process were calculated. The calculated data allow the selection of the best suitable materials for the gas phase transport as well as of the adsorbent metal for chromatographic separations, for sampling and for electrochemical deposition in experiments with the transactinides. (author)

  9. LCA of metal nanomaterial production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miseljic, Mirko; Diaz, Elsa Gabriela Alvarado; Olsen, Stig Irving

    The use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in commercial product has reached a new stage, where consumers in their daily life are frequently encountered with products containing this new material class. Metal and metal-oxide nanomaterials are among the most commonly used ENMs in products. Potential...

  10. Low-dimensional molecular metals

    CERN Document Server

    Toyota, Naoki; Muller, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Assimilating research in the field of low-dimensional metals, this monograph provides an overview of the status of research on quasi-one- and two-dimensional molecular metals, describing normal-state properties, magnetic field effects, superconductivity, and the phenomena of interacting p and d electrons.

  11. Nanostructured metal-polyaniline composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsing-Lin; Li, Wenguang; Bailey, James A.; Gao, Yuan

    2010-08-31

    Metal-polyaniline (PANI) composites are provided together with a process of preparing such composites by an electrodeless process. The metal of the composite can have nanoscale structural features and the composites can be used in applications such as catalysis for hydrogenation reactions and for analytical detection methods employing SERS.

  12. Electrochemical analysis of metal complexes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de H.G.

    1987-01-01

    The present study is concerned with the electroanalytical chemistry of complexes of metals with large ligands. The main purpose was to develop quantitative descriptions of the voltammetric current-potential relation of metal complex systems with different diffusion coefficients of the species involv

  13. Radiochemical synthesis of pure anhydrous metal halides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, W. H.; Marsik, S. J.; May, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    Method uses radiation chemistry as practical tool for inorganic preparations and in particular deposition of metals by irradiation of their aqueous metal salt solutions with high energy electrons. Higher valence metal halide is dissolved in organic liquid and exposed to high energy electrons. This causes metal halide to be reduced to a lower valence metal halide.

  14. QUALITY IN METALLIZED COATING APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bülent Eker

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Metalized coating is attained by atomizing the coating metal by melting with proper gas (propane, acetylene or others and oxygen compound and then spraying it with compressed air all over the surface to be coated. Metallization in the application is the process of vaporization of the needed metal with tungsten in vacuumed media. This system among the PVD Coating groups is known as Evaporation Coating all through the world. Although the very fine metal layer that condenses over the product to be coated varies from sector to sector; it is generally used with aesthetic and decorative aims. The surface of the part to be coated is cleaned off the effects such as dirt, dust and oils etc. this cleaning method varies according to the size, shape and material of the piece to be coated. Surface cleaning before coating is very important in the sense of coating life, quality and strength. Otherwise, expected yield cannot be attained from the metalized and corrosion start can be observed shortly due to remnants on the places which are not thoroughly cleaned. Since metallization is a vaporization method; it is ionized by melting on all places which are in high-vacuumed. But there occurs an adsorption problem on some plastic types, therefore a smooth coating is attained applying an adherence through interlayer on these products before coating or with corona application. In food packaging sector metalized coated products are used because of their barrier feature towards light, water vapor, oxygen and other gases. This method of packaging is widely used in such kinds of sectors due to being most economical in packaging sector. For example; food packaging sector which holds a great place in flexible packaging group uses metalized coating system due to their barrier feature of metalized film with the aim of preventing oxidation of food products, decreasing the need of protective addition agent and extending the shell-life. Moreover cosmetic packaging group and

  15. Metal-induced apoptosis: mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The past decade has seen an intense focus on mechanisms of apoptosis. Many important observations on the various signaling pathways mediating apoptotic cell death have been made and our understanding of the importance of apoptosis in both normal growth and development and pathophysiology has greatly increased. In addition, mechanisms of metal-induced toxicity continue to be of interest given the ubiquitous nature of these contaminants. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of the apoptotic pathways that are initiated by metals, mainly established (arsenic, cadmium, chromium, nickel, beryllium) and possible (lead, antimony, cobalt) human carcinogens. Increased understanding of metal-induced apoptosis is critical to illuminate mechanisms of metal-induced carcinogenesis, as well as the potential of metal species (arsenic) as chemotherapeutic agents

  16. Heavy metal sorption by microalgae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandau, E. [IGV - Inst. fuer Getreideverarbeitung GmbH, Bergholz-Rehbruecke (Germany); Sandau, P. [IGV - Inst. fuer Getreideverarbeitung GmbH, Bergholz-Rehbruecke (Germany); Pulz, O. [IGV - Inst. fuer Getreideverarbeitung GmbH, Bergholz-Rehbruecke (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    Viable microalgae are known to be able to accumulate heavy metals (bioaccumulation). Against a background of the increasing environmental risks caused by heavy metals, the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris and Spirulina platensis and their potential for the biological removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions were taken as an example for investigation. Small-scale cultivation tests (50 l) with Cd-resistant cells of Chlorella vulgaris have shown that approx. 40% of the added 10 mg Cd/l was removed from the solution within seven days. At this heavy metal concentration sensitive cells died. Non-viable microalgae are able to eliminate heavy metal ions in a short time by biosorption in uncomplicated systems, without any toxicity problems. Compared with original biomasses, the sorption capacity of microalgal by-products changes only insignificantly. Their low price makes them economical. (orig.)

  17. Nanostructured polymer- and metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Alexander Bruun

    well as structural enhancement of light absorption in thin metal films, deposited on nanostructured substrates. Large areas of nanostructures were realized using the black silicon (BSi) method: a mask less reactive ion etching process, resulting in tapered nanostructures with tunable dimensions, on......, the optical properties of thin metal films deposited on nanostructured surfaces was studied. When a metal film was deposited on BSi structures in Ormocomp, the reflectance of the metal film was lowered significantly, and the absorption was increased. In contrast to their reflective planar counterparts......This Ph.D. thesis explores the optical properties of nanostructured dielectric and metallic surfaces. Focusing on scalable fabrication methods for antireflective nanostructures, this experimental study has resulted in the proof of concept of inexpensive, large area antireflective nanostructures, as...

  18. Metallic surfaces with special wettability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kesong; Jiang, Lei

    2011-03-01

    Metals are important and irreplaceable engineered materials in our society. Nature is a school for scientists and engineers, which has long served as a source of inspiration for humans. Inspired by nature, a variety of metallic surfaces with special wettability have been fabricated in recent years through the combination of surface micro- and nanostructures and chemical composition. These metallic surfaces with special wettability exhibit important applications in anti-corrosion, microfluidic systems, oil-water separation, liquid transportation, and other fields. Recent achievements in the fabrication and application of metallic surfaces with special wettability are presented in this review. The research prospects and directions of this field are also briefly addressed. We hope this review will be beneficial to expand the practical applications of metals and offer some inspirations to the researchers in the fields of engineering, biomedicine, and materials science.

  19. Heavy metal sorption by microalgae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viable microalgae are known to be able to accumulate heavy metals (bioaccumulation). Against a background of the increasing environmental risks caused by heavy metals, the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris and Spirulina platensis and their potential for the biological removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions were taken as an example for investigation. Small-scale cultivation tests (50 l) with Cd-resistant cells of Chlorella vulgaris have shown that approx. 40% of the added 10 mg Cd/l was removed from the solution within seven days. At this heavy metal concentration sensitive cells died. Non-viable microalgae are able to eliminate heavy metal ions in a short time by biosorption in uncomplicated systems, without any toxicity problems. Compared with original biomasses, the sorption capacity of microalgal by-products changes only insignificantly. Their low price makes them economical. (orig.)

  20. Durability of metals from archaeological objects, metal meteorites, and native metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metal durability is an important consideration in the multi-barrier nuclear waste storage concept. This study summarizes the ancient metals, the environments, and factors which appear to have contributed to metal longevity. Archaeological and radiochemical dating suggest that human use of metals began in the period 6000 to 7000 BC. Gold is clearly the most durable, but many objects fashioned from silver, copper, bronze, iron, lead, and tin have survived for several thousand years. Dry environments, such as tombs, appear to be optimum for metal preservation, but some metals have survived in shipwrecks for over a thousand years. The metal meteorites are Fe-base alloys with 5 to 60 wt% Ni and minor amounts of Co, I, and S. Some meteoritic masses with ages estimated to be 5,000 to 20,000 years have weathered very little, while other masses from the same meteorites are in advanced stages of weathering. Native metals are natural metallic ores. Approximately five million tonnes were mined from native copper deposits in Michigan. Copper masses from the Michigan deposits were transported by the Pleistocene glaciers. Areas on the copper surfaces which appear to represent glacial abrasion show minimal corrosion. Dry cooling tower technology has demonstrated that in pollution-free moist environments, metals fare better at temperatures above than below the dewpoint. Thus, in moderate temperature regimes, elevated temperatures may be useful rather than detrimental for exposures of metal to air. In liquid environments, relatively complex radiolysis reactions can occur, particularly where multiple species are present. A dry environment largely obviates radiolysis effects

  1. Durability of metals from archaeological objects, metal meteorites, and native metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Francis, B.

    1980-01-01

    Metal durability is an important consideration in the multi-barrier nuclear waste storage concept. This study summarizes the ancient metals, the environments, and factors which appear to have contributed to metal longevity. Archaeological and radiochemical dating suggest that human use of metals began in the period 6000 to 7000 BC. Gold is clearly the most durable, but many objects fashioned from silver, copper, bronze, iron, lead, and tin have survived for several thousand years. Dry environments, such as tombs, appear to be optimum for metal preservation, but some metals have survived in shipwrecks for over a thousand years. The metal meteorites are Fe-base alloys with 5 to 60 wt% Ni and minor amounts of Co, I, and S. Some meteoritic masses with ages estimated to be 5,000 to 20,000 years have weathered very little, while other masses from the same meteorites are in advanced stages of weathering. Native metals are natural metallic ores. Approximately five million tonnes were mined from native copper deposits in Michigan. Copper masses from the Michigan deposits were transported by the Pleistocene glaciers. Areas on the copper surfaces which appear to represent glacial abrasion show minimal corrosion. Dry cooling tower technology has demonstrated that in pollution-free moist environments, metals fare better at temperatures above than below the dewpoint. Thus, in moderate temperature regimes, elevated temperatures may be useful rather than detrimental for exposures of metal to air. In liquid environments, relatively complex radiolysis reactions can occur, particularly where multiple species are present. A dry environment largely obviates radiolysis effects.

  2. How to build a Bad Metal from good metal components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnason, Stephen; Hebard, Arthur

    1998-03-01

    One of the most fascinating sub-fields of contemporary condensed matter physics is the study of bad metals. A distinguishing characteristic of a bad metal is that its resistivity as a function of temperature increases linearly past the scale where one wou ld infer a scattering length comparable to the inter-atomic spacing (at this range the Boltzmann transport theory ceases to be self consistent). By contrast, good metals exhibit resistive saturation when the resistivity approaches this scale. We have grow n thin films composed of a good metal, Ag, that mimic the characteristics of bad metals, very high resistivities and lack of resistive saturation. We have characterised the microstructure that leads to this behavior with a novel application of electrostat ic force microscopy, EFM. This microstructure leads to an anomalous negative magnetoresistance, which is quadratic in the applied field.. Finally, we have identified a criterion which can be used to distinguish this mimicry from intrinsic bad metallicity, a criterion that is met by A_3C_60 (A=K,Rb), indicating that caution should be exercised before classifying these materials as bad metals.

  3. Spectroscopy and interactions of metal and metal cation complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Plowright, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    The work in this thesis looks at the spectroscopy and interactions of metals and metal cation complexes. There are two aspects of this vast subject that are considered: the electronic spectroscopy of Au-RG complexes and the ion-molecule chemistry of metals important in the mesosphere-lower thermosphere (MLT) region of the atmosphere. The spectroscopy of the molecular states in the vicinity of the strong Au 2P3/2, 1/2 ← 2S1/2 atomic transition, have been studied for the Au-RG (RG = Ne, Ar...

  4. Fluid metals the liquid-vapor transition of metals

    CERN Document Server

    Hensel, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    This is a long-needed general introduction to the physics and chemistry of the liquid-vapor phase transition of metals. Physicists and physical chemists have made great strides understanding the basic principles involved, and engineers have discovered a wide variety of new uses for fluid metals. Yet there has been no book that brings together the latest ideas and findings in the field or that bridges the conceptual gap between the condensed-matter physics relevant to a dense metallic liquid and the molecular chemistry relevant to a dilute atomic vapor. Friedrich Hensel and William Warren seek

  5. Alkali metal and alkali earth metal gadolinium halide scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Parms, Shameka; Porter-Chapman, Yetta D.; Wiggins, Latoria K.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a gadolinium halide, optionally cerium-doped, having the formula A.sub.nGdX.sub.m:Ce; wherein A is nothing, an alkali metal, such as Li or Na, or an alkali earth metal, such as Ba; X is F, Br, Cl, or I; n is an integer from 1 to 2; m is an integer from 4 to 7; and the molar percent of cerium is 0% to 100%. The gadolinium halides or alkali earth metal gadolinium halides are scintillators and produce a bright luminescence upon irradiation by a suitable radiation.

  6. Surface polaritons of a metal-insulator-metal curved slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2016-09-01

    The properties of s- and p-polarized surface polariton modes propagating circumferentially around a portion of a cylindrical metal-insulator-metal structure are studied, theoretically. By using the Maxwell equations in conjunction with the Drude model for the dielectric function of the metals and applying the appropriate boundary conditions, the dispersion relations of surface waves for two types of modes, are derived and numerically solved. The effects of the slab curvature and insulator thickness on the propagation of electromagnetic modes are investigated. The differences of the s- and p-polarized surface modes are also shown.

  7. Metal detector and swallowed metal foreign bodies in children.

    OpenAIRE

    Doraiswamy, N. V.; Baig, H; Hallam, L.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a metal detector to diagnose swallowed radio-opaque metal foreign bodies (MFBs) in children, and whether they can detect non-radio-opaque MFBs. METHODS: In a prospective study, 231 children, who presented to the accident and emergency department with a history of swallowing MFBs, were evaluated by the metal detector as well as radiography to confirm and locate the presence or absence of MFBs. RESULTS: A definite history of swallowing a MFB by the child was given by 186 ...

  8. Analytical performance of a lab-made concomitant metal analyzer to generate volatile species of Ag, Au, Cd, Cu, Ni, Sn and Zn using 8-hydroxyquinoline as a reaction media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva-Alonso, Julia; Peña-Vázquez, Elena; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar

    2012-10-15

    This study evaluated the main parameters affecting Ag, Au, Cd, Cu, Ni, Sn and Zn vapor generation using a lab-made concomitant metal analyzer (CMA) as a reaction chamber and gas-liquid separator. The modifier used in the reaction media was 8-hydroxyquinoline, and Inductively-Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry was used as detection technique. The performance of the lab-made concomitant analyzer was compared with the performance of a continuous flow gas-liquid separator and of a cyclonic spray chamber. Standards were prepared in acid media and included 1 mg L(-1) of Co as a catalyzer. The optimum concentrations of the reagents in the standards were: 450 mg L(-1) of 8-hydroxyquinoline and 0.4 M nitric acid. The optimum concentration of sodium borohydride to generate the vapors was 2.25% (w/v) (prepared in 0.4% (w/v) NaOH). The volatile species were swept from the CMA to the torch by an argon flow of 0.6 mL min(-1). The use of the CMA led to an improvement of the detection limits for some elements compared to conventional nebulization: 1.1 μg L(-1) for Ag, 7.0 μg L(-1) for Au and 4.3 μg L(-1) for Sn. The limit of detection for Cu was 1.4 μg L(-1) and for Ni 22.5 μg L(-1). The direct mixing of the reagents on the spray chamber was not effective for Cd and Zn; a deviation of the linearity was observed for these elements. PMID:23141310

  9. Metal nitrate conversion method, patent application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2008-01-01

    A method for converting a supported metal nitrate into the corresponding supported metal comprises heating the metal nitrate to effect its decomposition under a gas mixture that contains nitric oxide and has an oxygen content of

  10. Metallic quantum ferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brando, M.; Belitz, D.; Grosche, F. M.; Kirkpatrick, T. R.

    2016-04-01

    An overview of quantum phase transitions (QPTs) in metallic ferromagnets, discussing both experimental and theoretical aspects, is given. These QPTs can be classified with respect to the presence and strength of quenched disorder: Clean systems generically show a discontinuous, or first-order, QPT from a ferromagnetic to a paramagnetic state as a function of some control parameter, as predicted by theory. Disordered systems are much more complicated, depending on the disorder strength and the distance from the QPT. In many disordered materials the QPT is continuous, or second order, and Griffiths-phase effects coexist with QPT singularities near the transition. In other systems the transition from the ferromagnetic state at low temperatures is to a different type of long-range order, such as an antiferromagnetic or a spin-density-wave state. In still other materials a transition to a state with glasslike spin dynamics is suspected. The review provides a comprehensive discussion of the current understanding of these various transitions and of the relation between experiment and theory.

  11. Laser generating metallic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Marc A.; Shannon, G. J.; Steen, William M.

    1997-04-01

    Recent developments in rapid prototyping have led to the concept of laser generating, the first additive manufacturing technology. This paper presents an innovative process of depositing multi-layer tracks, by fusing successive powder tracks, to generate three dimensional components, thereby offering an alternative to casting for small metal component manufacture. A coaxial nozzle assembly has been designed and manufactured enabling consistent omni-directional multi-layer deposition. In conjunction with this the software route from a CAD drawing to machine code generation has been established. The part is manufactured on a six axes machining center incorporating a 1.8 kW carbon-dioxide laser, providing an integrated opto-mechanical workstation. The part build-up program is controlled by a P150 host computer, linked directly to the DNC machining center. The direct manufacturing route is shown, including initial examples of simple objects (primitives -- cube, cylinder, cone) leading to more complex turbine blade generation, incorporating build-up techniques and the associated mechanical properties.

  12. Mixed valent metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riseborough, P. S.; Lawrence, J. M.

    2016-08-01

    We review the theory of mixed-valent metals and make comparison with experiments. A single-impurity description of the mixed-valent state is discussed alongside the description of the nearly-integer valent or Kondo limit. The degeneracy N of the f-shell plays an important role in the description of the low-temperature Fermi-liquid state. In particular, for large N, there is a rapid cross-over between the mixed-valent and the Kondo limit when the number of f electrons is changed. We discuss the limitations on the application of the single-impurity description to concentrated compounds such as those caused by the saturation of the Kondo effect and those due to the presence of magnetic interactions between the impurities. This discussion is followed by a description of a periodic lattice of mixed-valent ions, including the role of the degeneracy N. The article concludes with a comparison of theory and experiment. Topics covered include the single-impurity Anderson model, Luttinger’s theorem, the Friedel sum rule, the Schrieffer–Wolff transformation, the single-impurity Kondo model, Kondo screening, the Wilson ratio, local Fermi-liquids, Fermi-liquid sum rules, the Noziéres exhaustion principle, Doniach’s diagram, the Anderson lattice model, the Slave-Boson method, etc.

  13. Heavy metals in linseed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, H.; Weigert, P.

    1987-11-01

    Linseed offered on the German market was examined for the heavy metals Pb, Cd, Hg, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Zn, as well as As and Se. 490 samples were taken and examined by 31 laboratories of the official food control on the initiative of ALS (Working Group of Experts in Food Chemistry of the Laender and the Federal Health Office). Brown as well as yellow linseed, a new variety, was included in the investigations. The overall results of the investigations show that cadmium contents represent a certain problem from a health point of view. Brown linseed contains an average of 0.380 mg/kg and yellow linseed 0.231 mg/kg cadmium. Considering a weekly linseed intake of 140 g, the potential intake of cadmium corresponds to 10.1% of the WHO value fixed for the time being as tolerable weekly intake for an adult male and 12.2% for an adult female person. The guide value has been fixed at 0.3 mg/kg. Thus, the Cd intakes as related to the WHO value may be reduced by 50% and more.

  14. Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosch, R.G.; Stephens, H.P.; Stohl, F.V.

    1983-07-21

    In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

  15. Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchanges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosch, Robert G.; Stephens, Howard P.; Stohl, Frances V.

    1985-01-01

    In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

  16. Predicted metal binding sites for phytoremediation

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Ashok; Roy, Sudeep; Tripathi, Kumar Parijat; Roy, Pratibha; Mishra, Manoj; Khan, Feroz; Meena, Abha

    2009-01-01

    Metal ion binding domains are found in proteins that mediate transport, buffering or detoxification of metal ions. The objective of the study is to design and analyze metal binding motifs against the genes involved in phytoremediation. This is being done on the basis of certain pre-requisite amino-acid residues known to bind metal ions/metal complexes in medicinal and aromatic plants (MAP's). Earlier work on MAP's have shown that heavy metals accumulated by aromatic and medicinal plants do no...

  17. Metal nanoparticles functionalized with metal-ligand covalent bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xiongwu

    Metal-organic contact has been recognized to play important roles in regulation of optical and electronic properties of nanoparticles. In this thesis, significant efforts have been devoted into synthesis of ruthenium nanoparticles with various metal-ligand interfacial linkages and investigation of their electronic and optical properties. Ruthenium nanoparticles were prepared by the self-assembly of functional group onto bare Ru colloid surface. As to Ru-alkyne nanoparticles, the formation of a Ru-vinylidene (Ru=C=CH--R) interfacial bonding linkage was confirmed by the specific reactivity of the nanoparticles with imine derivatives and olefin at the metal-ligand interface, as manifested in NMR, photoluminescence, and electrochemical measurements. Interestingly, it was found the electronic coupling coefficient (beta)for strongly depend upon such metal-ligand interfacial bonding. Next, such metal-ligand interfacial bonding was extended to ruthenium-nitrene pi bonds on ruthenium colloids, which were investigated by XPS. The nanoparticles exhibited a 1:1 atomic ratio of nitrogen to sulfur, consistent with that of sulfonyl nitrene fragments. In addition, the nanoparticle-bound nitrene moieties behaved analogously to azo derivatives, as manifested in UV-vis and fluorescence measurements. Further testimony of the formation of Ru=N interfacial linkages was highlighted in the unique reactivity of the nanoparticles with alkenes by imido transfer. Extensive conjugation between metal-ligand interfacial bond results in remarkable intraparticle charge delocalization on Ru-alkynide nanoparticles, which was manipulated by simple chemical reduction or oxidation. Charging of extra electrons into the nanoparticle cores led to an electron-rich metal core and hence red-shift of the triple bond stretching mode, lower binding energy of sp hybridized C 1s and dimmed fluorescence of nanoparticles. Instead, chemical oxidation resulted in the opposite impacts on these properties. By taking

  18. Probing biopolymer conformation by metallization with noble metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a novel method for the simple visual (colorimetric) and spectroscopic monitoring of the conformational state of a biopolymer. We present an experimental example of the detection of the change in the conformation of a giant DNA molecule. This methodology is based on the difference in the manner of metallization with noble metals on a polymer scaffold depending on its conformation. Spectroscopic analysis of the metallization of DNA by metallic silver or gold provides information on the critical concentration of DNA binder, at which the folding transition from the elongated into the compact state occurs, together with the dimension and morphology of a compact DNA condensate. This method may be suitable for use in a rapid screening procedure for the high-throughput analysis of large chemical libraries to evaluate their ability to induce DNA compaction, protein folding and similar important processes

  19. Subsurface excitations in a metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ray, M. P.; Lake, R. E.; Sosolik, C. E.; Thomsen, Lasse Bjørchmar; Nielsen, Gunver; Chorkendorff, Ib; Hansen, Ole

    2009-01-01

    We investigate internal hot carrier excitations in a Au thin film bombarded by hyperthermal and low energy alkali and noble gas ions. Excitations within the thin film of a metal-oxide-semiconductor device are measured revealing that ions whose velocities fall below the classical threshold given by...... the free-electron model of a metal still excite hot carriers. Excellent agreement between these results and a nonadiabatic model that accounts for the time-varying ion-surface interaction indicates that the measured excitations are due to semilocalized electrons near the metal surface....

  20. Metal Stable Isotopes in Paleoceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbar, Ariel D.; Rouxel, Olivier

    2007-05-01

    Considered esoteric only a few years ago, research into the stable isotope geochemistry of transition metals is moving into the geoscience mainstream. Although initial attention focused on the potential use of some of these nontraditional isotope systems as biosignatures, they are now emerging as powerful paleoceanographic proxies. In particular, the Fe and Mo isotope systems are providing information about changes in oxygenation and metal cycling in ancient oceans. Zn, Cu, Tl, and a number of other metals and metalloids also show promise. Here we review the basis of stable isotope fractionation as it applies to these elements, analytical considerations, and the current status and future prospects of this rapidly developing research area.

  1. Corrosion by the Alkali Metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a review of the state of the art of corrosion testing of materials by the alkali metals, the models proposed to explain the observed corrosion results, and the status of materials selection for application in alkali metal-cooled systems. Corrosion of structural and fuel cladding materials by liquid Na and NaK has been studied intensively, but intermittently for the last 18 years. These studies and the liquid-metal-cooled reactors in operation demonstrate that stainless steels can be considered for structural and cladding applications below 650°C. Above this temperature increased corrosion and radiation-induced embrittlement make them unsatisfactory. Corrosion models are reviewed and their inability to explain all the experimental observations discussed. An alternate model is proposed which qualitatively is in agreement with experimental observations. In this model, the rate-controlling step is either the surface reaction of Fe with ''available oxygen'' (dissolved Na2O) to form an Fe-O-Na complex or the rate at which ''available oxygen'' can reach the surface to form the complex; which process is rate controlling depends on the temperature, Na velocity and oxygen concentration in the Na. The solution chemistry of oxygen, carbon and alkali metal-oxygen-transition metal complexes dissolved in the alkali metals is reviewed. ''Molecular'' complexes appear unlikely to exist in solution in the alkali metals, although the thermodynamic tendencies for them to form suggest that stable bonds exist in solution between oxygen, the transition and the alkali metals. The insolubility of carbon in ''oxygen-free'' sodium indicates that carbon transfer may be associated with oxygen in sodium down to very low oxygen levels, although experimental data do not generally confirm this postulate. Corrosion of refractory metals by boiling alkali metals at temperatures above 1000°C is markedly affected by impurities in either the liquid or refractory metal; the addition of Ti, Zr or

  2. Nanodisturbances in deformed Gum Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Systematic experiments have been performed to characterize defect structures in deformed Gum Metal, a special titanium alloy with high strength, low Young's modulus, excellent cold workability and low resistance to shear in certain crystallographic planes. Results from high-resolution transmission electron microscopy characterization reveal nanodisturbances (planar nanoscopic areas of local shear) as typical elements of defect structures in deformed Gum Metal. A theoretical model is suggested describing nanodisturbances as nanoscale dipoles of non-conventional partial dislocations with arbitrary, non-quantized Burgers vectors. It is shown theoretically that the homogeneous generation of nanodisturbances is energetically favorable in Gum Metal, where they effectively carry plastic flow

  3. Are Vicinal Metal Surfaces Stable?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frenken, J. W. M.; Stoltze, Per

    1999-01-01

    We use effective medium theory to demonstrate that the energies of many metal surfaces are lowered when these surfaces are replaced by facets with lower-index orientations. This implies that the low-temperature equilibrium shapes of many metal crystals should be heavily faceted. The predicted...... instability of vicinal metal surfaces is at variance with the almost generally observed stability of these surfaces. We argue that the unstable orientations undergo a defaceting transition at relatively low temperatures, driven by the high vibrational entropy of steps....

  4. METAL NANOPARTICLES FUNCTIONALIZED WITH METAL-LIGAND COVALENT BONDS

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Xiongwu

    2012-01-01

    Metal-organic contact has been recognized to play important roles in regulation of optical and electronic properties of nanoparticles. In this thesis, significant efforts have been devoted into synthesis of ruthenium nanoparticles with various metal-ligand interfacial linkages and investigation of their electronic and optical properties. Ruthenium nanoparticles were prepared by the self-assembly of functional group onto bare Ru colloid surface. As to Ru-alkyne nanoparticles, the formation of ...

  5. Nanocrystalline Metal Oxides for Methane Sensors: Role of Noble Metals

    OpenAIRE

    S. Basu; Basu, P. K.

    2009-01-01

    Methane is an important gas for domestic and industrial applications and its source is mainly coalmines. Since methane is extremely inflammable in the coalmine atmosphere, it is essential to develop a reliable and relatively inexpensive chemical gas sensor to detect this inflammable gas below its explosion amount in air. The metal oxides have been proved to be potential materials for the development of commercial gas sensors. The functional properties of the metal oxide-based gas sensors can ...

  6. Ceramic-metal composite formation by reactive metal penetration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehman, R.E.; Ewsuk, K.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fahrenholtz, W.G. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Materials Lab.; Lakshman, B.B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Ceramic-metal composites can be made to near-net-shape by reactive penetration of dense ceramic preforms by molten metals. Reactive metal penetration is driven by a strongly negative Gibbs energy for reaction. For Al, the general form of the reaction is (x+2) Al + (3/y) MO[sub y] yields Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] + M[sub 3/y]Al[sub x], where MO[sub y] is an oxide that is wet by molten Al. In low PO[sub 2] atmospheres and at temperatures above about 900 degrees C, molten Al reduces mullite to produce Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] and Si. The Al/mullite reaction has a delta G[sub r] degree(927 degrees C) of -338 per mole of mullite and, for fully dense mullite, the theoretical volume change on reaction is less than 1%. Experiments with commercial mullite containing a silicate grain boundary phase average less than 2% volume change on reaction. In the Al/mullite system, reactive metal penetration produces a fine-grained alumina skeleton with an interspersed metal phase. With > or =15 vol.% excess aluminum, mutually interpenetrating ceramic-metal composites are produced. Properties measurements show that ceramic-metal composites produced by reactive metal penetration of mullite by Al have a Young`s modulus and hardness similar to that of Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], with improved fracture toughness. Other compositions also are candidates for in- situ reaction synthesis, but they exhibit differences in reaction kinetics, most probably due to different wetting behavior.

  7. Machining of Metal Matrix Composites

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Machining of Metal Matrix Composites provides the fundamentals and recent advances in the study of machining of metal matrix composites (MMCs). Each chapter is written by an international expert in this important field of research. Machining of Metal Matrix Composites gives the reader information on machining of MMCs with a special emphasis on aluminium matrix composites. Chapter 1 provides the mechanics and modelling of chip formation for traditional machining processes. Chapter 2 is dedicated to surface integrity when machining MMCs. Chapter 3 describes the machinability aspects of MMCs. Chapter 4 contains information on traditional machining processes and Chapter 5 is dedicated to the grinding of MMCs. Chapter 6 describes the dry cutting of MMCs with SiC particulate reinforcement. Finally, Chapter 7 is dedicated to computational methods and optimization in the machining of MMCs. Machining of Metal Matrix Composites can serve as a useful reference for academics, manufacturing and materials researchers, manu...

  8. Metal investigation of beams durable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya.A. Balabukh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Results of metal researches of long-term storage beams are considered. It is determined that the steel of beams meets the requirements of Norms. Their acceptability for construction of bridges is established.

  9. Ferrous Metal Mines - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer includes ferrous metal mines in the United States. The data represent commodities covered by the Minerals Information Team (MIT) of the U.S....

  10. METAL MELTS – NANOSTRUCTURED SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Yu. Stetsenko

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of thermodynamic analysis it is shown that metal melts are the nanostructured systems which consist of phases and atoms nanocrystals. Nanocrystalsmake 97% ofthemeltvolume.

  11. Transition metal contacts to graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Politou, Maria, E-mail: Maria.Politou@imec.be; De Gendt, Stefan; Heyns, Marc [KU Leuven, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Asselberghs, Inge; Radu, Iuliana; Conard, Thierry; Richard, Olivier; Martens, Koen; Huyghebaert, Cedric; Tokei, Zsolt [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Lee, Chang Seung [SAIT, Samsung Electronics Co., Suwon 443-803 (Korea, Republic of); Sayan, Safak [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Intel Corporation, 2200 Mission College Blvd, Santa Clara, California 95054 (United States)

    2015-10-12

    Achieving low resistance contacts to graphene is a common concern for graphene device performance and hybrid graphene/metal interconnects. In this work, we have used the circular Transfer Length Method (cTLM) to electrically characterize Ag, Au, Ni, Ti, and Pd as contact metals to graphene. The consistency of the obtained results was verified with the characterization of up to 72 cTLM structures per metal. Within our study, the noble metals Au, Ag and Pd, which form a weaker bond with graphene, are shown to result in lower contact resistance (Rc) values compared to the more reactive Ni and Ti. X-ray Photo Electron Spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy characterization for the latter have shown the formation of Ti and Ni carbides. Graphene/Pd contacts show a distinct intermediate behavior. The weak carbide formation signature and the low Rc values measured agree with theoretical predictions of an intermediate state of weak chemisorption of Pd on graphene.

  12. Radioactive materials in metal scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics are covered: Dutch law and regulations on radioactive materials; guidelines for the industry; difficulties related to radioactivity in metal scrap; and services provided and experience gained by Roentgen Technische Dienst bv. (P.A.)

  13. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Metal Silicates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lii Kwang-Hwa

    2004-01-01

    Organically templated metal phosphates have been extensively studied because of interesting structural chemistry and potential applications in catalysis. However, in most cases the organic templates cannot be removed without collapse of the frameworks. This is in contrast to the high thermal stability and extensive applications of zeolites in refinery and petrochemical processes.Therefore, studies have been directed to the synthesis of transition metal silicates to produce more stable frameworks. Our synthetic methods are twofold, namely mild hydrothermal reactions in Teflon-lined autoclaves at 100-200 ℃ using organic amines as templates and high-temperature,high-pressure hydrothermal reactions in gold ampoules contained in a high-pressure reaction vessel at ca. 550 ℃ and 150 Mpa using alkali metal cations as templates. In this presentation I will report the high-temperature, high-pressure hydrothermal synthesis, crystal structures, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy of a number of new silicates of indium, uranium, and transition metals.

  14. Nonferrous Metal Mines - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer includes nonferrous metal mines in the United States. The data represent commodities covered by the Minerals Information Team (MIT) of the U.S....

  15. Silver metallization stability and reliability

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Daniel; Mayer, James W

    2007-01-01

    Anyone involved in circuit technology will find this an absolute must-read. It's the first book to discuss the current understanding of silver metallization and its potential as a future interconnect material for integrated circuit technology.

  16. Nano-strip Metal Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we consider a design of a Nano-strip Metal Detector (NMD) for applications based on micro-beams of charged particles or synchrotron radiation (microbiology, radiation therapy, new construction materials etc

  17. Plasticity and creep of metals

    CERN Document Server

    Rusinko, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Here is a systematic presentation of the postulates, theorems and principles of mathematical theories of plasticity and creep in metals, and their applications. Special attention is paid to analysis of the advantages and shortcomings of the classical theories.

  18. Rechargeable Lithium Metal Cell Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — PSI proposes to develop a rechargeable lithium metal cell with energy density >400Wh/kg. This represents a >70% increase as compared to similarly constructed...

  19. High dose metal ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To affect non-electronic surface properties (wear, corrosion and so on) the implanted material must reach measureable atom percentages, on the order of 10%, requiring ion implantation does in the range of 1017/cm2. For this reason, the MEVVA metallic ion source, developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, has been modified to provide metal ions for high dose metal ion implantation. The modifications inlcude increasing the arc efficiency, increasing beam spot size, and increasing beam divergence. The extracted beams have been characterized as to beam cross section and the depth profiles of implants. Time-average beam currents in excess of 20 mA have been extracted. Beams of titanium, tantalum, and other refractory metal ions, plus other refractory materials, such as titanium carbide, have been extracted and used to produce modifications in the surface properties of materials. (orig.)

  20. Organometallic chemistry of metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The organometallic chemistry of metal surfaces is defined as a function of surface crystallography and of surface composition for a set of cyclic hydrocarbons that include benzene, toluene, cyclohexadienes, cyclohexene, cyclohexane, cyclooctatetraene, cyclooctadienes, cyclooctadiene, cycloheptatriene and cyclobutane. 12 figures

  1. Nanotoxicology of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amedea B. Seabra

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses recent advances in the synthesis, characterization and toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles obtained mainly through biogenic (green processes. The in vitro and in vivo toxicities of these oxides are discussed including a consideration of the factors important for safe use of these nanomaterials. The toxicities of different metal oxide nanoparticles are compared. The importance of biogenic synthesized metal oxide nanoparticles has been increasing in recent years; however, more studies aimed at better characterizing the potent toxicity of these nanoparticles are still necessary for nanosafely considerations and environmental perspectives. In this context, this review aims to inspire new research in the design of green approaches to obtain metal oxide nanoparticles for biomedical and technological applications and to highlight the critical need to fully investigate the nanotoxicity of these particles.

  2. Methods for synthesizing metal oxide nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunkara, Mahendra Kumar; Kumar, Vivekanand; Kim, Jeong H.; Clark, Ezra Lee

    2016-08-09

    A method of synthesizing a metal oxide nanowire includes the steps of: combining an amount of a transition metal or a transition metal oxide with an amount of an alkali metal compound to produce a mixture; activating a plasma discharge reactor to create a plasma discharge; exposing the mixture to the plasma discharge for a first predetermined time period such that transition metal oxide nanowires are formed; contacting the transition metal oxide nanowires with an acid solution such that an alkali metal ion is exchanged for a hydrogen ion on each of the transition metal oxide nanowires; and exposing the transition metal oxide nanowires to the plasma discharge for a second predetermined time period to thermally anneal the transition metal oxide nanowires. Transition metal oxide nanowires produced using the synthesis methods described herein are also provided.

  3. Chain formation of metal atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahn, Sune Rastad; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2001-01-01

    The possibility of formation of single-atomic chains by manipulation of nanocontacts is studied for a selection of metals (Ni, Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag, Au). Molecular dynamics simulations show that the tendency for chain formation is strongest for Au and Pt. Density functional theory calculations indicate...... that the metals which form chains exhibit pronounced many-atom interactions with strong bonding in low coordinated systems....

  4. Bifunctional Chelates for Metal Nuclides

    OpenAIRE

    Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2007-01-01

    The use of “non-standard” metallic radionuclides continues to be an expanding field of investigation. Radiolabeling small molecules, peptides, proteins, and up to nano-particles are all areas of active investigation for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. All require a common variable – the need for appropriate chelation chemistry for adequate sequestration of the metallic radionuclide that is equal to the intended application. A brief overview of the array of the chelation chemistr...

  5. Plasma electrolytic oxidation of metals

    OpenAIRE

    Stojadinović Stevan

    2013-01-01

    In this lecture results of the investigation of plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process on some metals (aluminum, titanium, tantalum, magnesium, and zirconium) were presented. Whole process involves anodizing metals above the dielectric breakdown voltage where numerous micro-discharges are generated continuously over the coating surface. For the characterization of PEO process optical emission spectroscopy and real-time imaging were used. These investigations enabled the determinati...

  6. Interfacial metal and antibody recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Tongqing; Hamer, Dean H.; Hendrickson, Wayne A.; Sattentau, Quentin J.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2005-01-01

    The unique ligation properties of metal ions are widely exploited by proteins, with approximately one-third of all proteins estimated to be metalloproteins. Although antibodies use various mechanisms for recognition, to our knowledge, none has ever been characterized that uses an interfacial metal. We previously described a family of CD4-reactive antibodies, the archetype being Q425. CD4:Q425 engagement does not interfere with CD4:HIV-1 gp120 envelope glycoprotein binding, but it blocks subse...

  7. Risk Management of Precious Metals

    OpenAIRE

    Hammoudeh, Shawkat; Malik, Farooq; McAleer, Michael

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThis paper examines volatility and correlation dynamics in price returns of gold, silver, platinum and palladium, and explores the corresponding risk management implications for market risk and hedging. Value-at-Risk (VaR) is used to analyze the downside market risk associated with investments in precious metals, and to design optimal risk management strategies. We compute the VaR for major precious metals using the calibrated RiskMetrics, different GARCH models, and the semi-para...

  8. Metallic glasses: properties and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dugdale, J.S.; Pavuna, D.; Rhodes, P.

    1985-01-01

    Metallic glasses are a class of disordered materials that contrast with crystalline metals and provide a new challenge to theories of electronic structure and magnetic interactions in solids. Their study will undoubtedly broaden and deepen our understanding of the solid state. In addition, they are now finding a wide variety of technological applications. Some of these applications as well as their magnetic properties are presented here. 7 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  9. Pillared layered transition metal oxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent progress in the synthesis and application of pillared transition metal oxides during the last decade, mainly concerning the synthetic methods, structures, physical properties and catalytic applications of the layered transition metal oxides pillared by inorganic oxides. The factors and their affecting regularity in the process of preparation, and some important results obtained in the catalytic application studies are summarized. Finally, a prospect on the potential new directions in this research area is also presented.

  10. Actively convected liquid metal divertor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Michiya; Hirooka, Yoshi

    2014-12-01

    The use of actively convected liquid metals with j × B force is proposed to facilitate heat handling by the divertor, a challenging issue associated with magnetic fusion experiments such as ITER. This issue will be aggravated even more for DEMO and power reactors because the divertor heat load will be significantly higher and yet the use of copper would not be allowed as the heat sink material. Instead, reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel alloys with heat conductivities substantially lower than that of copper, will be used as the structural materials. The present proposal is to fill the lower part of the vacuum vessel with liquid metals with relatively low melting points and low chemical activities including Ga and Sn. The divertor modules, equipped with electrodes and cooling tubes, are immersed in the liquid metal. The electrode, placed in the middle of the liquid metal, can be biased positively or negatively with respect to the module. The j × B force due to the current between the electrode and the module provides a rotating motion for the liquid metal around the electrodes. The rise in liquid temperature at the separatrix hit point can be maintained at acceptable levels from the operation point of view. As the rotation speed increases, the current in the liquid metal is expected to decrease due to the v × B electromotive force. This rotating motion in the poloidal plane will reduce the divertor heat load significantly. Another important benefit of the convected liquid metal divertor is the fast recovery from unmitigated disruptions. Also, the liquid metal divertor concept eliminates the erosion problem.

  11. Forces in Liquid Metal Contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duggen, Lars; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Using rather well known theory about capillary bridges between two electrodes we calculate the tensile force that can be applied to liquid metal contacts in the micrometer regime. Assuming circular symmetry, full wetting of the electrodes, and neglecting gravity, we present a brief review...... of the necessary theory and find numerically the forces to be in the 100μN range for liquid metals as mercury and liquid Gallium suspended between electrodes of 20μm radius....

  12. Heavy metal depositions in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods and importance of the measurement of dust precipitation and its metallic components are discussed. Test programs and results of heavy metal measurements in precipitations in Germany are summarized. The focus is on measurements of lead and cadmium. There is a clearly decreasing trend also seen in long-term test programs. The limiting values set in the Clean Air Act were hardly ever exceeded in recent years. (orig.)

  13. Risk Management of Precious Metals

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines volatility and correlation dynamics in price returns of gold, silver, platinum and palladium, and explores the corresponding risk management implications for market risk and hedging. Value-at-Risk (VaR) is used to analyze the downside market risk associated with investments in precious metals, and to design optimal risk management strategies. We compute the VaR for major precious metals using the calibrated RiskMetrics, different GARCH models, and the semi-parametric Filte...

  14. Casimir force between metallic mirrors

    OpenAIRE

    Lambrecht, Astrid; Reynaud, Serge

    1999-01-01

    We study the influence of finite conductivity of metals on the Casimir effect. We put the emphasis on explicit theoretical evaluations which can help comparing experimental results with theory. The reduction of the Casimir force is evaluated for plane metallic plates. The reduction of the Casimir energy in the same configuration is also calculated. It can be used to infer the reduction of the force in the plane-sphere geometry through the `proximity theorem'. Frequency dependent dielectric re...

  15. Polarizability effect in metallic clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ş Şentürk; K Harigaya; O Özsoy

    2006-03-01

    Langevin approach implemented in the inelastic cross-sections measured for the low-energy electrons colliding with metallic clusters points out that statical form of the polarizability dominate at energies less than 1.25 eV. The dynamical form comes into play at energies around 1.3 eV. The form of the polarizabilities indicates that polarizability of the metallic clusters is energy-dependent.

  16. Metals, Molecules, Life and Death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In our normal everyday lives we are exposed to an incredibly complex chemical soup consisting of an enormous variety of different chemical compounds. Many of these compounds contain metal atoms which, once inside us, can either fulfill roles that are essential to health, or act as poisons. Studies at SLAC's Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) reveal the molecular details of metals in living systems; how they interact with one another, how they confer beneficial properties, and how they act as poisons.

  17. Titanium metal: extraction to application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambogi, Joseph (USGS, Reston, VA); Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2002-09-01

    In 1998, approximately 57,000 tons of titanium metal was consumed in the form of mill products (1). Only about 5% of the 4 million tons of titanium minerals consumed each year is used to produce titanium metal, with the remainder primarily used to produce titanium dioxide pigment. Titanium metal production is primarily based on the direct chlorination of rutile to produce titanium tetrachloride, which is then reduced to metal using the Kroll magnesium reduction process. The use of titanium is tied to its high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. Aerospace is the largest application for titanium. In this paper, we discuss all aspects of the titanium industry from ore deposits through extraction to present and future applications. The methods of both primary (mining of ore, extraction, and purification) and secondary (forming and machining) operations will be analyzed. The chemical and physical properties of titanium metal will be briefly examined. Present and future applications for titanium will be discussed. Finally, the economics of titanium metal production also are analyzed as well as the advantages and disadvantages of various alternative extraction methods.

  18. Metallic carbon nanotubes with metal contacts: electronic structure and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zienert, A.; Schuster, J.; Gessner, T.

    2014-10-01

    We study quasi-ballistic electron transport in metallic (6,0) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) of variable length in contact with Al, Cu, Pd, Pt, Ag, and Au electrodes by using the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism in combination with either density functional theory or self-consistent extended Hückel theory. We find good agreement between both. Visualizing the local device density of states of the systems gives a descriptive link between electronic structure and transport properties. In comparison with bare finite and infinite tubes, we show that the electronic structure of short metallic CNTs is strongly modified by the presence of the metallic electrodes, which leads to pronounced size effects in the conductance. The mean conductances and linear response currents allow a ranking of the metals regarding their ability to form low-Ohmic contacts with the nanotube: Ag≲ Au\\lt Cu\\ll Pt≈ Pd\\ll Al. These findings are contrasted with similar trends in contact distance, binding energy, calculated work function of the metal surfaces, and various results from literature.

  19. The structure of metallic complexes of polyacetylene with alkali metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughman, R. H.; Murthy, N. S.; Miller, G. G.

    1983-07-01

    The crystal structures of sodium, potassium, rubidium, and cesium doped polyacetylene have been determined using crystal packing and x-ray diffraction analyses. Each of these metallic complexes is tetragonal, with the polyacetylene chains forming a host lattice in which the alkali metal ions are present in channels. Lithium appears to be too small to stabilize the channel structure and an amorphous structure is observed. Predicted unit cell parameters and x-ray diffraction intensities are in agreement with observed values. Similarities with the alkali metal doped graphite suggest that hybridization between carbon pz orbitals and metal s orbitals occurs. Such hybridization is expected to result in a high conductivity component normal to the chain direction. On the other hand, direct overlap between polymer chains appears small, since alkali metal columns separate polymer chains. Compositions calculated for the channel structures (from meridional diffraction spacings, the intensity of equatorial diffraction lines, measured volume expansion, and distances in model complexes) all range from y=0.12 to 0.18 for (CHMy)x, where M is sodium, potassium, rubidium, or cesium.

  20. Merging transition-metal activation and aminocatalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Rios, Ramon; Meazza, Marta

    2015-01-01

    In this review the principal enantioselective methodologies merging transition-metal catalysis and aminocatalysis are disclosed. 1 Introduction 2 Transition-Metal and Enamine Catalysis 3 Transition-Metal and Iminium Catalysis 4 Transition-Metal Catalysis and Organocascade (Iminium/Enamine) Activation 5 Conclusions and Perspectives

  1. Metal salt catalysts for enhancing hydrogen spillover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ralph T; Wang, Yuhe

    2013-04-23

    A composition for hydrogen storage includes a receptor, a hydrogen dissociating metal doped on the receptor, and a metal salt doped on the receptor. The hydrogen dissociating metal is configured to spill over hydrogen to the receptor, and the metal salt is configured to increase a rate of the spill over of the hydrogen to the receptor.

  2. Metal oxide nanostructures with hierarchical morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lao, Jing Yu; Banerjee, Debasish

    2007-11-13

    The present invention relates generally to metal oxide materials with varied symmetrical nanostructure morphologies. In particular, the present invention provides metal oxide materials comprising one or more metallic oxides with three-dimensionally ordered nanostructural morphologies, including hierarchical morphologies. The present invention also provides methods for producing such metal oxide materials.

  3. Active metal brazing of different metals to aluminium nitride ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During recent years aluminium nitride ceramics for substrates, coolers and components have found more applications in micro- and power electronics. Aluminium nitride ceramic with high thermal conductivity, small CTE and good thermal shock resistance is used in aeronautical equipment as well as in drive systems of undergrounds and high speed trains. Different metals and alloys can be bonded to AIN by the so-called 'AMB-process'. The bonding mechanism is based on the use of so-called active metals like Ti, Zr, Hf. Copper conductor lines can be brazed onto AIN-substrates and components, resistor sheets can be applied on ceramic water coolers and a couple of other metals and alloys like tantalium, titanium, KOVAR and steel can be attached to AIN-ceramics by active brazing. Processing, analytical aspects and some special applications will be discussed. (author)

  4. INEL metal recycle radioactive scrap metal survey report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE requested that inventory and characterization of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) be conducted across the DOE complex. Past studies have estimated the metal available from unsubstantiated sources. In meetings held in FY-1993, with seven DOE sites represented and several DOE-HQ personnel present, INEL personnel discovered that these numbers were not reliable and that large stockpiles did not exist. INEL proposed doing in-field measurements to ascertain the amount of RSM actually available. This information was necessary to determine the economic viability of recycling and to identify feed stock that could be used to produce containers for radioactive waste. This inventory measured the amount of RSM available at the selected DOE sites. Information gathered included radionuclide content and chemical form, general radiation field, alloy type, and mass of metal

  5. INEL metal recycle radioactive scrap metal survey report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funk, D.M.

    1994-09-01

    DOE requested that inventory and characterization of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) be conducted across the DOE complex. Past studies have estimated the metal available from unsubstantiated sources. In meetings held in FY-1993, with seven DOE sites represented and several DOE-HQ personnel present, INEL personnel discovered that these numbers were not reliable and that large stockpiles did not exist. INEL proposed doing in-field measurements to ascertain the amount of RSM actually available. This information was necessary to determine the economic viability of recycling and to identify feed stock that could be used to produce containers for radioactive waste. This inventory measured the amount of RSM available at the selected DOE sites. Information gathered included radionuclide content and chemical form, general radiation field, alloy type, and mass of metal.

  6. Metal-induced crystallization fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zumin; Mittemeijer, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Introduction to Metal-Induced CrystallizationAtomic Mechanisms and Interface Thermodynamics of Metal-Induced Crystallization of Amorphous Semiconductors at Low TemperaturesThermodynamics and Kinetics of Layer Exchange upon Low-Temperature Annealing Amorphous Si/Polycrystalline Al Layered StructuresMetal-Induced Crystallization by Homogeneous Insertion of Metallic Species in Amorphous SemiconductorsAluminum-Induced Crystallization: Applications in Photovoltaic TechnologiesApplications of Metal-Induced Crystallization for Advanced Flat-Panel DisplaysLaser-Assisted Meta

  7. Reversible photodeposition and dissolution of metal ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Nancy S.; Koval, Carl A.; Noble, Richard D.

    1994-01-01

    A cyclic photocatalytic process for treating waste water containing metal and organic contaminants. In one embodiment of the method, metal ions are photoreduced onto the photocatalyst and the metal concentrated by resolubilization in a smaller volume. In another embodiment of the method, contaminant organics are first oxidized, then metal ions removed by photoreductive deposition. The present invention allows the photocatalyst to be recycled until nearly complete removal of metal ions and organic contaminants is achieved.

  8. Coated Metal Articles and Method of Making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boller, Ernest R.; Eubank, Lowell D.

    2004-07-06

    The method of protectively coating metallic uranium which comprises dipping the metallic uranium in a molten alloy comprising about 20-75% of copper and about 80-25% of tin, dipping the coated uranium promptly into molten tin, withdrawing it from the molten tin and removing excess molten metal, thereupon dipping it into a molten metal bath comprising aluminum until it is coated with this metal, then promptly withdrawing it from the bath.

  9. Mesoporous metal oxide graphene nanocomposite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Kou, Rong; Wang, Donghai

    2016-05-24

    A nanocomposite material formed of graphene and a mesoporous metal oxide having a demonstrated specific capacity of more than 200 F/g with particular utility when employed in supercapacitor applications. A method for making these nanocomposite materials by first forming a mixture of graphene, a surfactant, and a metal oxide precursor, precipitating the metal oxide precursor with the surfactant from the mixture to form a mesoporous metal oxide. The mesoporous metal oxide is then deposited onto a surface of the graphene.

  10. Metal Dusting of Heat-Resistant Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Meshari, Abdulaziz I.

    2008-01-01

    Metal dusting leads to disintegration of such alloys as iron and nickel-based into a ?dust? of particulate metal, metal carbide, carbon, and/or oxide. It occurs in strongly carburising environments at 400-900?C. Literature survey has shown that alloys behave differently in metal dusting conditions based on their composition and the environment. Metal dusting mechanisms for iron and nickel-based alloys have been proposed but, nevertheless, have not been agreed upon and numerous modifications t...

  11. Valence-Bond Concepts in Coordination Chemistry and the Nature of Metal-Metal Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauling, Linus; Herman, Zelek S.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the valence-bond method, applying it to some coordination compounds of metals, especially those involving metal-metal bonds. Suggests that transition metals can form as many as nine covalent bonds, permitting valence-theory to be extended to transition metal compounds in a more effective way than has been possible before. (JN)

  12. The future role of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing.

    OpenAIRE

    Matharu, GS; Pandit, HG; Murray, DW; Treacy, RB

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this review was to assess the ten to 15-year outcomes of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing (MoM HR) when performed at designing and independent centres, and make recommendations for the future use of MoM HR. METHODS: Studies reporting ten to 15-year outcomes for modern MoM HR devices from both designing and independent centres were reviewed. Outcomes from these studies were assessed to allow the formulation of recommendations for the future use of MoM HR. RESULTS: Two MoM...

  13. Zone refining of plutonium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The zone refining process was applied to Pu metal containing known amounts of impurities. Rod specimens of plutonium metal were melted into and contained in tantalum boats, each of which was passed horizontally through a three-turn, high-frequency coil in such a manner as to cause a narrow molten zone to pass through the Pu metal rod 10 times. The impurity elements Co, Cr, Fe, Ni, Np, U were found to move in the same direction as the molten zone as predicted by binary phase diagrams. The elements Al, Am, and Ga moved in the opposite direction of the molten zone as predicted by binary phase diagrams. As the impurity alloy was zone refined, δ-phase plutonium metal crystals were produced. The first few zone refining passes were more effective than each later pass because an oxide layer formed on the rod surface. There was no clear evidence of better impurity movement at the slower zone refining speed. Also, constant or variable coil power appeared to have no effect on impurity movement during a single run (10 passes). This experiment was the first step to developing a zone refining process for plutonium metal

  14. Hidden scale invariance of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Felix; Kresse, Georg; Dyre, Jeppe C.; Pedersen, Ulf R.

    2015-11-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of 58 liquid elements at their triple point show that most metals exhibit near proportionality between the thermal fluctuations of the virial and the potential energy in the isochoric ensemble. This demonstrates a general "hidden" scale invariance of metals making the condensed part of the thermodynamic phase diagram effectively one dimensional with respect to structure and dynamics. DFT computed density scaling exponents, related to the Grüneisen parameter, are in good agreement with experimental values for the 16 elements where reliable data were available. Hidden scale invariance is demonstrated in detail for magnesium by showing invariance of structure and dynamics. Computed melting curves of period three metals follow curves with invariance (isomorphs). The experimental structure factor of magnesium is predicted by assuming scale invariant inverse power-law (IPL) pair interactions. However, crystal packings of several transition metals (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Nb, Mo, Ta, W, and Hg), most post-transition metals (Ga, In, Sn, and Tl), and the metalloids Si and Ge cannot be explained by the IPL assumption. The virial-energy correlation coefficients of iron and phosphorous are shown to increase at elevated pressures. Finally, we discuss how scale invariance explains the Grüneisen equation of state and a number of well-known empirical melting and freezing rules.

  15. Metallicity dependence of HMXB populations

    CERN Document Server

    Douna, V M; Mirabel, I F; Pedrosa, S E

    2015-01-01

    High-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) might have contributed a non-negligible fraction of the energy feedback to the interstellar and intergalactic media at high redshift, becoming important sources for the heating and ionization history of the Universe. However, the importance of this contribution depends on the hypothesized increase in the number of HMXBs formed in low-metallicity galaxies and in their luminosities. In this work we test the aforementioned hypothesis, and quantify the metallicity dependence of HMXB population properties. We compile from the literature a large set of data on the sizes and X-ray luminosities of HMXB populations in nearby galaxies with known metallicities and star formation rates. We use Bayesian inference to fit simple Monte Carlo models that describe the metallicity dependence of the size and luminosity of the HMXB populations. We find that HMXBs are typically ten times more numerous per unit star formation rate in low-metallicity galaxies (12 + log(O/H) < 8, namely < 20% so...

  16. Radioactive metal sodium processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To burn metal sodium in airs into powdery sodium carbonate without containing unreacted sodium and with no generation of hydrogen. Constitution: Metal sodium to be treated in heated to fluidize by a heater at the outer periphery of a supply tank and contained by way of a pipe into a metal vessel. Metal sodium is burnt in the oxidizing reaction tank within the vessel while supplying airs. Then, the burning products are transferred to a geseous carbon dioxide reaction tank in the identical metal vessel. Gaseous carbon dioxide is blown to the combustion product to form sodium carbonate. The sodium carbonate is caused to fall by a scraper into a receiver vessel. Smokes resulted through the combustion is released externally through a filter by way of a blower. Since no water is used, hydrogen is not produced to eliminate the explosive danger and the protection countermeasure can be simplified. In addition, since the product is powdery, the amount of wastes is reduced. (Ikeda, J.)

  17. Development of novel catalytically active polymer-metal-nanocomposites based on activated foams and textile fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domènech, Berta; Ziegler, Kharla K.; Carrillo, Fernando; Muñoz, Maria; Muraviev, Dimitri N.; Macanás, Jorge

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we report the intermatrix synthesis of Ag nanoparticles in different polymeric matrices such as polyurethane foams and polyacrylonitrile or polyamide fibers. To apply this technique, the polymer must bear functional groups able to bind and retain the nanoparticle ion precursors while ions should diffuse through the matrix. Taking into account the nature of some of the chosen matrices, it was essential to try to activate the support material to obtain an acceptable value of ion exchange capacity. To evaluate the catalytic activity of the developed nanocomposites, a model catalytic reaction was carried out in batch experiments: the reduction of p-nitrophenol by sodium borohydride.

  18. Fermi level pinning in metal/Al2O3/InGaAs gate stack after post metallization annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of post metal deposition annealing on the effective work function in metal/Al2O3/InGaAs gate stacks was investigated. The effective work functions of different metal gates (Al, Au, and Pt) were measured. Flat band voltage shifts for these and other metals studied suggest that their Fermi levels become pinned after the post-metallization vacuum annealing. Moreover, there is a difference between the measured effective work functions of Al and Pt, and the reported vacuum work function of these metals after annealing. We propose that this phenomenon is caused by charging of indium and gallium induced traps at the annealed metal/Al2O3 interface

  19. The formation of metal/metal-matrix nano-composites by the ultrasonic dispersion of immiscible liquid metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keppens, V.M.; Mandrus, D.; Boatner, L.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rankin, J. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States). Div. of Engineering

    1996-12-01

    Ultrasonic energy has been used to disperse one liquid metallic component in a second immiscible liquid metal, thereby producing a metallic emulsion. Upon lowering the temperature of this emulsion below the mp of the lowest-melting constituent, a metal/metal-matrix composite is formed. This composite consists of sub-micron-to-micron- sized particles of the minor metallic phase that are embedded in a matrix consisting of the major metallic phase. Zinc-bismuth was used as a model system, and ultrasonic dispersion of a minor Bi liquid phase was used to synthesize metal/metal-matrix composites. These materials were characterized using SEM and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis.

  20. Fermi level pinning in metal/Al2O3/InGaAs gate stack after post metallization annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, R.; Krylov, I.; Cytermann, C.; Tang, K.; Ahn, J.; McIntyre, P. C.; Eizenberg, M.

    2015-08-01

    The effect of post metal deposition annealing on the effective work function in metal/Al2O3/InGaAs gate stacks was investigated. The effective work functions of different metal gates (Al, Au, and Pt) were measured. Flat band voltage shifts for these and other metals studied suggest that their Fermi levels become pinned after the post-metallization vacuum annealing. Moreover, there is a difference between the measured effective work functions of Al and Pt, and the reported vacuum work function of these metals after annealing. We propose that this phenomenon is caused by charging of indium and gallium induced traps at the annealed metal/Al2O3 interface.

  1. Intoxicación por metales Metal poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ferrer

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Los metales están entre los tóxicos más antiguos conocidos por el hombre. En el industrializado mundo actual las fuentes de exposición a metales son ubicuas tanto en el campo laboral como a partir de agua, los alimentos o el ambiente contaminados. Su toxicidad está caracterizada por el elemento metálico en cuestión pero se ve modificada por el tipo de compuesto, orgánico o inorgánico y sus características de hidro o liposolubilidad, que determina su toxicocinética y por tanto sus posibilidad de alcanzar sus dianas. Las biomoléculas más afectadas por los metales son las proteínas con actividad enzimática por lo que su patología es multisistema. Los principales sistemas afectados son el gastrointestinal, neurológico central y periférico, hemático y renal. Algunos de los compuestos metálicos son carcinógenos. Los metales se benefician de un tratamiento condicionado por su reactividad química. Pueden ser inactivados y eliminados mediante la administración de substancias quelantes que producen con ellos moléculas complejas, atóxicas y excretables. Los principales agentes quelantes son: BAL (British Anti-Lewisite o dimercaprol, DMPS (ácido 2,3-dimercapto-1-propanosulfonico y DMSA (ácido meso-2,3-dimercatosuccínico o Succimer, EDTA, Penicilamina (ß,ß-dimetilcisteína y Desferoxamina. Se exponen a continuación las características toxicocinéticas, mecanismo de acción, clínica y tratamiento de alguno de los metales y metaloides más relevantes: plomo, mercurio y arsénico.Metals are amongst the oldest toxic substances known to man. In today’s industrialized world the sources of exposure to metals are ubiquitous both in the field of work and from polluted water, foodstuffs and the environment. Their toxicity is characterized by the metallic element in question, but this is modified by the type of compound, whether organic or inorganic, and its characteristics of hydrosolubility and liposolubility, which determines its

  2. Structure and properties of metals

    CERN Document Server

    Kurzydlowski, K J

    1999-01-01

    Metals are one of the most widely used types of engineering materials. Some of their properties, e.g. elastic constants, can be directly related to the nature of the metallic bonds between the atoms. On the other hand, macro- and $9 microstructural features of metals, such as point defects, dislocations, grain boundaries, and second phase particles, control their yield, flow, and fracture stress. Images of microstructural elements can be obtained by modern $9 imaging techniques. Modern computer aided methods can be further used to obtain a quantitative description of these microstructures. These methods take advantage of the progress made in recent years in the field of image processing, $9 mathematical morphology and quantitative stereology. Quantitative description of the microstructures are used for modeling processes taking place under the action of applied load at a given temperature and test (service) environment. $9 These model considerations can be illustrated on the example of an austenitic stainless...

  3. Metal-air electrochemical cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarbacher, R. I.; Fechter, H. R.

    1985-01-01

    An electrochemical cell for which fuel is prepared and introduced under artificial gravity forces. The active metal is deposited through the action of the field on an anode current collecting member, effecting good compaction and reduced cell internal impedance. A microprocessor provides control of the induced gravity, flow rates, temperature, and other variables-enabling the active metal to be controlled in its thickness as well as providing a predetermined separation from the cathode. Abrasion of the cathode and the possibility of shorting are avoided by the presence of outwardly directed radial forces. These forces are induced by rotation of the electrolyte, air cathode, anode collector and the active metal. The forces promote also the passage of moisture laden air through the air cathode elements. Reaction products produced within the cell volume are circulated to an outside container for separation and possible reuse.

  4. Conduction electrons in magnetic metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conduction electrons in magnetic metals are sometimes themselves responsible for the magnetism, as in the 3d transition metals, and sometimes are magnetic intermediaries, as in the rare earths. In both cases the calculated magnitude of the exchange interactions is now in good agreement with experiment. The effect of magnetism upon the crystal structure of the 3d transition metals is reviewed. In the rare earths the manner in which the conduction electrons mediate the interactions between the 4f states is examined by using constrained calculations. The actinides present a more complex problem since there are large orbital contributions to the magnetic moments which are not, as in the rare earths, determined by Russel-Saunders coupling and the Wigner-Eckart theorem. (au)

  5. Thermoplastic blow molding of metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Schroers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available While plastics have revolutionized industrial design due to their versatile processability, their relatively low strength has hampered their use in structural components. On the other hand, while metals are the basis for strong structural components, the geometries into which they can be processed are rather limited. The “ideal” material would offer a desirable combination of superior structural properties and the ability to be precision (net shaped into complex geometries. Here we show that bulk metallic glasses (BMGs, which have superior mechanical properties, can be blow molded like plastics. The key to the enhanced processability of BMG formers is their amenability to thermoplastic forming. This allows complex BMG structures, some of which cannot be produced using any other metal process, to be net shaped precisely.

  6. Molecular Architectonic on Metal Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Johannes V.

    2007-05-01

    The engineering of highly organized systems from instructed molecular building blocks opens up new vistas for the control of matter and the exploration of nanodevice concepts. Recent investigations demonstrate that well-defined surfaces provide versatile platforms for steering and monitoring the assembly of molecular nanoarchitectures in exquisite detail. This review delineates the principles of noncovalent synthesis on metal substrates under ultrahigh vacuum conditions and briefly assesses the pertaining terminology—self-assembly, self-organization, and self-organized growth. It presents exemplary scanning-tunneling-microscopy observations, providing atomistic insight into the self-assembly of organic clusters, chains, and superlattices, and the metal-directed assembly of low-dimensional coordination architectures. This review also describes hierarchic-assembly protocols leading to intricate multilevel order. Molecular architectonic on metal surfaces represents a versatile rationale to realize structurally complex nanosystems with specific shape, composition, and functional properties, which bear promise for technological applications.

  7. Heavy metal mining using microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlings, Douglas E

    2002-01-01

    The use of acidiphilic, chemolithotrophic iron- and sulfur-oxidizing microbes in processes to recover metals from certain types of copper, uranium, and gold-bearing minerals or mineral concentrates is now well established. During these processes insoluble metal sulfides are oxidized to soluble metal sulfates. Mineral decomposition is believed to be mostly due to chemical attack by ferric iron, with the main role of the microorganisms being to reoxidize the resultant ferrous iron back to ferric iron. Currently operating industrial biomining processes have used bacteria that grow optimally from ambient to 50 degrees C, but thermophilic microbes have been isolated that have the potential to enable mineral biooxidation to be carried out at temperatures of 80 degrees C or higher. The development of higher-temperature processes will extend the variety of minerals that can be commercially processed. PMID:12142493

  8. Anodematerials for Metal Hydride Batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the work on development of hydride forming alloys for use as electrode materials in metal hydride batteries. The work has primarily been concentrated on calcium based alloys derived from the compound CaNi5. This compound has a higher capacity compared with alloys used in today...... was developed. The parameters milling time, milling intensity, number of balls and form of the alloying metals were investigated. Based on this a final alloying technique for the subsequent preparation of electrode materials was established. The technique comprises milling for 4 hours twice possibly...... followed by annealing at 700°C for 12 hours. The alloys appeared to be nanocrystalline with an average crystallite size around 10 nm before annealing. Special steel containers was developed for the annealing of the metal powders in inert atmosphere. The use of various annealing temperatures was...

  9. The Clustering of Intergalactic Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Pichon, C; Aracil, B; Petitjean, P; Aubert, D; Bergeron, J; Colombi, S; Pichon, Christophe; Scannapieco, Evan; Aracil, Bastien; Petitjean, Patrick; Aubert, Dominique; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Colombi, Stephane

    2003-01-01

    We measure the spatial clustering of metals in the intergalactic medium from z = 1.7 to 3.0, as traced by 643 CIV and 104 SiIV N >= 10^12 cm^-2 absorption systems in 19 high signal-to-noise (40-80) and high resolution (R = 45000) quasar spectra. The number densities and two-point correlation functions of both these species are largely constant with redshift, suggesting the bulk of metal ejection occurred at z >= 3. However, at z = M_s, and use numerical simulations to derive best-fit values of R_s ~ 2 comoving Mpc and M_s ~ 5x10^11 solar masses at z = 3. This does not exclude that metals could have been produced at higher redshifts in smaller, but equally rare, objects. At the level of detection of this survey, IGM enrichment is likely to be incomplete and inhomogeneous, with a filling factor ~ 10%.

  10. Elastic properties of Gum Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ X-ray diffraction measurements under tensile loading and dynamic mechanical analysis were performed to investigate the mechanisms of elastic deformation in Gum Metal. Tensile stress-strain curves for Gum Metal indicate that cold working substantially decreases the elastic modulus while increasing the yield strength, thereby confirming nonlinearity in the elastic range. The gradient of each curve decreased continuously to about one-third its original value near the elastic limit. As a result of this decrease in elastic modulus and nonlinearity, elastic deformability reaches 2.5% after cold working. Superelasticity is attributed to stress-induced martensitic transformations, although the large elastic deformation in Gum Metal is not accompanied by a phase transformation

  11. Irradiation performance of metallic fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argonne National Laboratory has been working for the past five years to develop and demonstrate the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept. The concept involves a closed system for fast-reactor power generation and on-site fuel reprocessing, both designed specifically around the use of metallic fuel. The Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) has used metallic fuel for all of its 25-year life. In 1985, tests were begun to examine the irradiation performance of advanced-design metallic fuel systems based on U-Zr or U-Pu-Zr fuels. These tests have demonstrated the viable performance of these fuel systems to high burnup. The initial testing program will be described in this paper. 2 figs

  12. Hidden scale invariance of metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummel, Felix; Kresse, Georg; Dyre, Jeppe C.;

    2015-01-01

    of metals making the condensed part of the thermodynamic phase diagram effectively one dimensional with respect to structure and dynamics. DFT computed density scaling exponents, related to the Grüneisen parameter, are in good agreement with experimental values for the 16 elements where reliable data were......Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of 58 liquid elements at their triple point show that most metals exhibit near proportionality between the thermal fluctuations of the virial and the potential energy in the isochoric ensemble. This demonstrates a general “hidden” scale invariance...... available. Hidden scale invariance is demonstrated in detail for magnesium by showing invariance of structure and dynamics. Computed melting curves of period three metals follow curves with invariance (isomorphs). The experimental structure factor of magnesium is predicted by assuming scale invariant...

  13. Metal accumulating plants: Medium's role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabier, J.; Prudent, P.; Szymanska, B.; Mevy, J.-P.

    2003-05-01

    To evaluate phytoremediation potentialities by metal accumulation in tolerant plants, trials are carried out using in vitro cultures. Organie compounds influence on metal accumulation is studied with metals supplemented media. The tested compounds on zinc and lead absorption by Brassica juncea, are chelating agents (EDTA, citric acid) and soluble organic fractions of compost. EDTA seems to enhance the transfer of lead in plant but it is the opposite in the case of zinc. Citric acid stimulates root absorption for both zinc and lead. For the aqueous extracts of compost, variable effects are obtained according to the origin of compost (green wastes and food wastes). In'all tested conditions of cultures, zinc is mainly exported towards shoot while lead is stored in root.

  14. Unique chemical properties of metal-carbon bonds in metal-carboranyl and metal-carboryne complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The metal-carbon bonds in metal-carboranyl and metal-carboryne complexes behave very differently from those in classical organometallic complexes. The unique electronic and steric properties of ico-sahedral carboranyl moiety make the M-C bond in metal-carboranyl complexes inert toward unsaturated molecules, and on the other hand, the sterically demanding carborane cage can induce unexpected C-C coupling reactions. The M-C bonds in metal-carboryne complexes are, however, active toward various kinds of unsaturated molecules and the reactivity patterns are dependent upon the electronic configurations of the metal ions. This account provides an overview of our recent work in this area.

  15. Structural Color of Metallic Surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolařík, Vladimír; Horáček, Miroslav; Urbánek, Michal; Matějka, Milan; Krátký, Stanislav; Chlumská, Jana; Bok, Jan

    Ostrava: TANGER, 2014, s. 962-967. ISBN 978-80-87294-52-9. [METAL 2014. Mezinárodní konference metalurgie a materiál ů /23./. Brno (CZ), 21.05.2014-23.05.2014] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA TA ČR TE01020233 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : nano structures * structural color * metallic surface * e-beam lithography Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  16. Mechanical and metal trades handbook

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Englische Ausgabe des vielfach bewährten Tabellenbuchs Metall, 45. Auflage. Translation of the 45th edition of the well-known "Tabellenbuch Metall". It is well suited for shop reference, tooling, machine building, maintenance and as a general book of knowledge. It is also useful for educational purposes, especially in practical work or curricula, continuing education programs. The contents of this book include tables and formulae in eight chapters. The tables contain the most important guidelines, designs, types, dimensions and standard values for their subject areas.

  17. MOD silver metallization for photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vest, G. M.; Vest, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of utilizing metallo-organic decomposition (MOD) silver inks were investigated for front contact metallization of solar cells. Generic synthesis procedures were developed for all metallo-organic compounds investigated. Silver neodecanoate was found to be the most suitable silver metallo-organic compound for use in thick film inks, but the quality of the inks was found to be highly dependent on its purity. Although neither the process nor inks were completely optimized for solar cell front contact metallization, they show great promise for this application.

  18. Creep kinetics for metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental results on metallic glass creep are presented aimed to test earlier developed model of structural relaxation in the field of external mechanical stresses. The experiments were carried out on amorphous ribbons of alloy Ni77.5Si7.5B15 under creep at 523, 573, 623 and 663 K for 500 and 3600 s. It is shown that the model allows a correct qualitative description of creep kinetics in metallic glasses except for the initial period of loading (20-200 s). This stage of transient creep is assumed to be conditioned by a spectrum of activation volumes of structural relaxation elementary acts

  19. Development of metallic fuel fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the vacuum melting and casting of the U-10wt%Zr alloy which is metallic fuel for liquid metal fast breeder reactor, we studied the microstructure of the alloy and the parameters of the melting and casting for the fuel rods. Internal defects of the U-10wt%Zr fuel by gravity casting, were inspected by non-destructive test. U-10wt%Zr alloy has been prepared for the thermal stability test in order to estimate the decomposition of the lamellar structure with relation to swelling under irradiation condition. (author)

  20. Development of metallic fuel fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Young Ho; Lee, Chong Yak; Lee, Myung Ho and others

    1999-03-01

    With the vacuum melting and casting of the U-10wt%Zr alloy which is metallic fuel for liquid metal fast breeder reactor, we studied the microstructure of the alloy and the parameters of the melting and casting for the fuel rods. Internal defects of the U-10wt%Zr fuel by gravity casting, were inspected by non-destructive test. U-10wt%Zr alloy has been prepared for the thermal stability test in order to estimate the decomposition of the lamellar structure with relation to swelling under irradiation condition. (author)

  1. Platinum Group Metals New Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Ming; ZHANG Jiankang; WANG Saibei; HU Jieqiong; LIU Manmen; CHEN Yongtai; ZHANG Jiming; YANG Youcai; YANG Yunfeng; ZHANG Guoquan

    2012-01-01

    Platinum group metals (PGM) include six elements,namely Pt,Pd,Rh,Ir,Os and Ru.PGM and their alloys are the important fundamental materials for modern industry and national defense construction,they have special physical and chemical properties,widely used in metallurgy,chemical,electric,electronic,information,energy,environmental protection,aviation,aerospace,navigation and other high technology industry.Platinum group metals and their alloys,which have good plasticity and processability,can be processed to electrical contact materials,resistance materials,solder,electronic paste,temperature-measurement materials,elastic materials,magnetic materials and high temperature structural materials.

  2. METHOD OF PRODUCING NIOBIUM METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, H.A.; Stevens, E.R.

    1960-05-24

    A process is given for preparing ductile niobium metal by the reduction of niobium pentoxide with carbon. The invention resides in the addition, to the reaction mass, of from 0.05 to 0.4 atom of titanium (in the form of metallic titanium, titanium carbide, and/or titanium oxide) per one mole of niobium pentoxide. The mixture is heated under subatmospheric pressure to above 1300 deg C but below the melting point of niobium, and the carbon- and oxygen-free niobium sponge obtained is cooled under reduced pressure.

  3. Green Lubricants for Metal Forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels

    The increasing focus on legislation towards diminishing the impact on working environment as well as external environment has driven efforts to develop new, environmentally benign lubricants for metal forming. The present paper gives an overview of these efforts to substitute environmentally haza...... hazardous lubricants in cold, warm and hot forging as well as sheet forming and punching/blanking with new, less harmful lubricants.......The increasing focus on legislation towards diminishing the impact on working environment as well as external environment has driven efforts to develop new, environmentally benign lubricants for metal forming. The present paper gives an overview of these efforts to substitute environmentally...

  4. Transport properties of metal-metal and metal-insulator heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadlallah Elabd, Mohamed Mostafa

    2010-06-09

    In this study we present results of electronic structure and transport calculations for metallic and metal-insulator interfaces, based on density functional theory and the non-equilibrium Green's function method. Starting from the electronic structure of bulk Al, Cu, Ag, and Au interfaces, we study the effects of different kinds of interface roughness on the transmission coefficient (T(E)) and the I-V characteristic. In particular, we compare prototypical interface distortions, including vacancies, metallic impurities, non-metallic impurities, interlayer, and interface alloy. We find that vacancy sites have a huge effect on transmission coefficient. The transmission coefficient of non-metallic impurity systems has the same behaviour as the transmission coefficient of vacancy system, since these systems do not contribute to the electronic states at the Fermi energy. We have also studied the transport properties of Au-MgO-Au tunnel junctions. In particular, we have investigated the influence of the thickness of the MgO interlayer, the interface termination, the interface spacing, and O vacancies. Additional interface states appear in the O-terminated configuration due to the formation of Au-O bonds. An increasing interface spacing suppresses the Au-O bonding. Enhancement of T(E) depends on the position and density of the vacancies (the number of vacancies per unit cell). (orig.)

  5. Metal-Metal Bonding in Uranium-Group 10 Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlina, Johann A; Pankhurst, James R; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Arnold, Polly L

    2016-03-16

    Heterobimetallic complexes containing short uranium-group 10 metal bonds have been prepared from monometallic IU(IV)(OAr(P)-κ(2)O,P)3 (2) {[Ar(P)O](-) = 2-tert-butyl-4-methyl-6-(diphenylphosphino)phenolate}. The U-M bond in IU(IV)(μ-OAr(P)-1κ(1)O,2κ(1)P)3M(0), M = Ni (3-Ni), Pd (3-Pd), and Pt (3-Pt), has been investigated by experimental and DFT computational methods. Comparisons of 3-Ni with two further U-Ni complexes XU(IV)(μ-OAr(P)-1κ(1)O,2κ(1)P)3Ni(0), X = Me3SiO (4) and F (5), was also possible via iodide substitution. All complexes were characterized by variable-temperature NMR spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The U-M bonds are significantly shorter than any other crystallographically characterized d-f-block bimetallic, even though the ligand flexes to allow a variable U-M separation. Excellent agreement is found between the experimental and computed structures for 3-Ni and 3-Pd. Natural population analysis and natural localized molecular orbital (NLMO) compositions indicate that U employs both 5f and 6d orbitals in covalent bonding to a significant extent. Quantum theory of atoms-in-molecules analysis reveals U-M bond critical point properties typical of metallic bonding and a larger delocalization index (bond order) for the less polar U-Ni bond than U-Pd. Electrochemical studies agree with the computational analyses and the X-ray structural data for the U-X adducts 3-Ni, 4, and 5. The data show a trend in uranium-metal bond strength that decreases from 3-Ni down to 3-Pt and suggest that exchanging the iodide for a fluoride strengthens the metal-metal bond. Despite short U-TM (transition metal) distances, four other computational approaches also suggest low U-TM bond orders, reflecting highly transition metal localized valence NLMOs. These are more so for 3-Pd than 3-Ni, consistent with slightly larger U-TM bond orders in the latter. Computational studies of the model systems (PH3)3MU(OH)3I (M = Ni, Pd) reveal

  6. Electrical transport through a metal-molecule-metal junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the electrical transport through a very few molecules connected to metallic electrodes at room temperature. First, the state of the art in molecular electronics is outlined. We present the most convincing molecular devices reported so far in the literature and the theoretical tools available to analyze the electron transport mechanism through a molecular junction. Second, we describe the use of mechanically controllable break junctions to investigate the electron transport properties through a metal-molecule-metal junction. Two kinds of molecules were adsorbed on the two facing gold electrodes, dodecane-thiol (DT) and bis-thiol-ter-thiophene (α,ω T3), that are basically expected to behave as an insulator and as a molecular wire, respectively. In the latter case, we study the chemical reactivity of the molecule and show that α,ω T3 is chemically adsorbed on gold electrodes. Current-voltage characteristics of the junction were observed at room temperature. The Gold-DT-Gold junction behaves as a simple metal-insulator-metal junction. On the other hand, the electron transport through a Gold-α,ω T3-Gold junction explicitly involves the electronic structure of the molecule which gives rise to step-like features in the current-voltage characteristics. The measured zero bias conductance is interpreted using the scattering theory. At high bias, we discuss two different models: a coherent model where the electron has no time to be completely re-localized in the molecule and a sequential model where the electron is localized in the molecule during the transfer. Finally, we show that the mechanical action of decreasing the inter-electrodes spacing can be used to induce a strong modification of the current-voltage characteristics. (author)

  7. Recent trends in metals extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regel-Rosocka, M.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available After near 70 years of practical usage, solvent extraction is a perfectly mastered technique of separation, widely used on an industrial scale for the separation of metals mainly from raw materials. However, currently, in the era of depleting natural resources and increasingly less accessible deposits, environmental restrictions, etc., an increasing interest, both from social and economical constrains, is being directed at the extraction of metals from the secondary sources (such as batteries, electronic scrap. In many cases, solvent extraction, due to its operational characteristics, can be considered as the Best Available Technology for the purpose of separating multielemental metal solutions. This paper provides a brief overview of past achievements and present scenario of solvent extraction investigations and developments, describing some recently commissioned solvent extraction plants, whereas the Skorpion Zinc plant (Namibia for zinc extraction from raw materials and caesium removal from radioactive High Level Wastes (HLWs are told over in detail as case studies. The paper also presents some proposals for the use of liquid-liquid extraction to separate metal ions from secondary sources (e.g. cobalt from industrial waste streams. The review highlights the emerging use of ionic liquids as new extractants for metals, providing an insight into this exciting research field. Despite its detractors, solvent extraction has entered in force into XXI century as a leading separation technology for metals.Después de casi 70 años de uso práctico, la extracción líquido-líquido o extracción con disolventes es una técnica de separación muy evolucionada, utilizándose a escala industrial en el beneficio de metales obtenidos de diversas materias primas. Sin embargo, con el agotamiento de los recursos naturales y el aumento de depósitos minerales de más difícil acceso, restricciones medio ambientales, etc., ha aumentado el interés, tanto desde

  8. Propagation Characteristics of Multilayer Hybrid Insulator-Metal-Insulator and Metal-Insulator-Metal Plasmonic Waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Talafi Noghani

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Propagation characteristics of symmetrical and asymmetrical multilayer hybrid insulator-metal-insulator (HIMI and metal-insulator-metal (HMIM plasmonic slab waveguides are investigated using the transfer matrix method. Propagation length (Lp and spatial length (Ls are used as two figures of merit to qualitate the plasmonic waveguides. Symmetrical structures are shown to be more performant (having higher Lp and lower Ls, nevertheless it is shown that usage of asymmetrical geometry could compensate for the performance degradation in practically realized HIMI waveguides with different substrate materials. It is found that HMIM slab waveguide could support almost long-range subdiffraction plasmonic modes at dimensions lower than the spatial length of the HIMI slab waveguide.

  9. Solid-state rechargeable magnesium battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Yuyan; Liu, Jun; Liu, Tianbiao; Li, Guosheng

    2016-09-06

    Embodiments of a solid-state electrolyte comprising magnesium borohydride, polyethylene oxide, and optionally a Group IIA or transition metal oxide are disclosed. The solid-state electrolyte may be a thin film comprising a dispersion of magnesium borohydride and magnesium oxide nanoparticles in polyethylene oxide. Rechargeable magnesium batteries including the disclosed solid-state electrolyte may have a coulombic efficiency .gtoreq.95% and exhibit cycling stability for at least 50 cycles.

  10. Phytoremediation of heavy metal polluted sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nature of soil, the contaminant's chemical and physical characteristics and environmental factors such as climate and hydrology interact to determine the accumulation, mobility, toxicity, and overall significance of the contaminant in any specific instance. Although many metals are essential, all metals are toxic at higher concentrations, because they cause oxidative stress by formation of free radicals. Another reason why metals may be toxic is that they can replace essential metals in enzymes disrupting their function. Thus, metals render the land unsuitable for plant growth and destroy the biodiversity. Metal contaminated soil can be remediated by chemical, physical and biological techniques

  11. Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jonathan; Mendoza, Daniel; Chen, Chun-Ku

    2008-04-15

    Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles. The method includes generating an aerosol of solid metallic microparticles, generating plasma with a plasma hot zone at a temperature sufficiently high to vaporize the microparticles into metal vapor, and directing the aerosol into the hot zone of the plasma. The microparticles vaporize in the hot zone into metal vapor. The metal vapor is directed away from the hot zone and into the cooler plasma afterglow where it oxidizes, cools and condenses to form solid metal oxide nanoparticles.

  12. The Inflammatory Phenotype in Failed Metal-On-Metal Hip Arthroplasty Correlates with Blood Metal Concentrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erja-Leena Paukkeri

    Full Text Available Hip arthroplasty is the standard treatment of a painful hip destruction. The use of modern metal-on-metal (MOM bearing surfaces gained popularity in total hip arthroplasties during the last decade. Recently, worrisome failures due to adverse reaction to metal debris (ARMD, including pseudotumor response, have been widely reported. However, the pathogenesis of this reaction remains poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the ARMD response by flow cytometry approach.Sixteen patients with a failed Articular Surface Replacement (ASR hip prosthesis were included in the study. Samples of pseudotumor tissues collected during revision surgery were degraded by enzyme digestion and cells were typed by flow cytometry. Whole blood chromium and cobalt concentrations were analyzed with mass spectrometry before revision surgery.Flow cytometry analysis showed that the peri-implant pseudotumor tissue expressed two principal phenotypes, namely macrophage-dominated and T-lymphocyte-dominated response; the average portions being 54% (macrophages and 25% (T-lymphocytes in macrophage-dominated inflammation and 20% (macrophages and 54% (T-lymphocytes in T-lymphocyte-dominated response. The percentages of B-lymphocytes and granulocytes were lower in both phenotypes. Interestingly, the levels of blood chromium and cobalt were significantly higher in patients with macrophage-dominated response.The results suggest that the adverse tissue reactions induced by MOM wear particles contain heterogeneous pathogeneses and that the metal levels are an important factor in the determination of the inflammatory phenotype. The present results support the hypothesis that higher metal levels cause cytotoxicity and tissue injury and macrophages are recruited to clear the necrotic debris. On the other hand, the adverse response developed in association with lower metal levels is T-lymphocyte-dominated and is likely to reflect hypersensitivity reaction.

  13. The Inflammatory Phenotype in Failed Metal-On-Metal Hip Arthroplasty Correlates with Blood Metal Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paukkeri, Erja-Leena; Korhonen, Riku; Hämäläinen, Mari; Pesu, Marko; Eskelinen, Antti; Moilanen, Teemu; Moilanen, Eeva

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hip arthroplasty is the standard treatment of a painful hip destruction. The use of modern metal-on-metal (MOM) bearing surfaces gained popularity in total hip arthroplasties during the last decade. Recently, worrisome failures due to adverse reaction to metal debris (ARMD), including pseudotumor response, have been widely reported. However, the pathogenesis of this reaction remains poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the ARMD response by flow cytometry approach. Methods Sixteen patients with a failed Articular Surface Replacement (ASR) hip prosthesis were included in the study. Samples of pseudotumor tissues collected during revision surgery were degraded by enzyme digestion and cells were typed by flow cytometry. Whole blood chromium and cobalt concentrations were analyzed with mass spectrometry before revision surgery. Results Flow cytometry analysis showed that the peri-implant pseudotumor tissue expressed two principal phenotypes, namely macrophage-dominated and T-lymphocyte-dominated response; the average portions being 54% (macrophages) and 25% (T-lymphocytes) in macrophage-dominated inflammation and 20% (macrophages) and 54% (T-lymphocytes) in T-lymphocyte-dominated response. The percentages of B-lymphocytes and granulocytes were lower in both phenotypes. Interestingly, the levels of blood chromium and cobalt were significantly higher in patients with macrophage-dominated response. Conclusions The results suggest that the adverse tissue reactions induced by MOM wear particles contain heterogeneous pathogeneses and that the metal levels are an important factor in the determination of the inflammatory phenotype. The present results support the hypothesis that higher metal levels cause cytotoxicity and tissue injury and macrophages are recruited to clear the necrotic debris. On the other hand, the adverse response developed in association with lower metal levels is T-lymphocyte-dominated and is likely to reflect

  14. Model Based Metal Transfer Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jesper Sandberg

    In pulsed gas metal arc welding (pulsed GMAW) current pulses are used for detaching drops at the tip of the electrode. To obtain a high weld quality one drop should be detached for every pulse, and moreover, the amount of energy used for detachment should be kept at a minimum. Thus, each pulse mu...

  15. Plastic Deformation of Metal Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels; Zhang, Xiaodan; Huang, Xiaoxu

    2013-01-01

    Plastic deformation of metal surfaces by sliding and abrasion between moving parts can be detrimental. However, when the plastic deformation is controlled for example by applying different peening techniques hard surfaces can be produced which can increase the fracture resistance and fatigue life...

  16. Alkali and transition metal phospholides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major tendencies in modern chemistry of alkali and transition metal phospholides (phosphacyclopentadienides) are systematized, analyzed and generalized. Basic methods of synthesis of these compounds are presented. Their chemical properties are considered with a special focus on their complexing ability. Potential applications of phospholides and their derivatives are discussed. The bibliography includes 184 references

  17. Metallic Xenon. Conductivity or Superconductivity?

    OpenAIRE

    Bogomolov, V. N.

    1999-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the point of view that metallization of xenon as a result of a band - gap closure has some discrepancies with experimental result. A superconductivity transition as an alternative possibility is examined. At such supposition critical temperature of superconductivity transition T is about 5000 K. A mechanism of inert gas condensation by virtual excitations of molecular type is discussed.

  18. Kolm maailma metallis / Tanel Veenre

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Veenre, Tanel, 1977-

    2011-01-01

    Näitused Tallinnas: Maria Valdma "Võõrastemaja" Iida galeriis 31. jaan.-ni 2012, Kaie Partsi retrospektiivnäitus "Metall ja kivi" Vabaduse galeriis 6. dets.-ni 2011, Ülle Kõutsi "Vesi" A-Galeriis 5. dets.-ni 2011

  19. The surface energy of metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitos, Levente; Ruban, Andrei; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    We have used density functional theory to establish a database of surface energies for low index surfaces of 60 metals in the periodic table. The data may be used as a consistent starting point for models of surface science phenomena. The accuracy of the database is established in a comparison with...

  20. Superconductivity of small metal grains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG; Renrong; CHEN; Zhiqian; ZHU; Shunquan

    2005-01-01

    The formulas of the energy gap and superconducting critical temperature appropriate for systems with both odd and even number of electrons are derived; the bases of the derivations are BCS theory and energy level statistics. Numerical results qualitatively agree with the experimental phenomena. i.e., the superconductivity of small metallic grains will first enhance then decrease to zero when the grain are getting smaller and smaller. The calculations indicate that the above phenomena happen in the metallic grains belonging to Gaussian Orthogonal Ensemble (GOE) and Gaussian Unitary ensemble (GUE) with zero spin; The superconductivity of small metallic grains in Gaussian Symplectic Ensemble (GSE) will monotonically decrease to zero with the decreasing of the grain size. The analyses suggest that the superconductivity enhancements come from pairing and the balance of the strengths between spin-orbital coupling and external magnetic field. In order to take the latter into account, it is necessary to include the level statistics given by Random Matrix Theory (RMT) in describing small metallic grains.

  1. Stress in hard metal films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, G.C.A.M.; Kamminga, J.D.

    2004-01-01

    In the absence of thermal stress, tensile stress in hard metal films is caused by grain boundary shrinkage and compressive stress is caused by ion peening. It is shown that the two contributions are additive. Moreover tensile stress generated at the grain boundaries does not relax by ion bombardment

  2. Corrosion resistant metallic bipolar plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P.; Schneibel, Joachim H.; Pint, Bruce A.; Maziasz, Philip J.

    2007-05-01

    A corrosion resistant, electrically conductive component such as a bipolar plate for a PEM fuel cell includes 20 55% Cr, balance base metal such as Ni, Fe, or Co, the component having thereon a substantially external, continuous layer of chromium nitride.

  3. Metal Materials for Hydrogen Storage

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soukup, Karel; Rogut, J.; Ludwik-Pardala, M.; Wiatkowski, M.; Šolcová, Olga

    Prague : JHI, 2008, s. 73-74. [Symposium on Catalysis /40./. Prague (CZ), 03.11.2008-05.11.2008] Grant ostatní: RFCR(XE) CT/2007/00006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : hydrogen storage * redox of metal oxide * transport properties Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  4. Electrical properties of metallic electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragheb, T; Geddes, L A

    1990-03-01

    The series equivalent resistance R and capacitance C of metal/saline electrode/electrolyte interfaces were measured as a function of frequency (100 Hz-20k Hz) and current density (0.25 to 1000 A m-2) for eight typical electrode metals. For each of the metals tested, R decreased and C increased as the current density was increased above a critical value (with the exception of silver and MP35N at frequencies above 1 kHz for which R increased and C decreased slightly). With the exception of copper, the current density linearity limit (for 10 per cent decrease in R or 10 per cent increase in C) increased with increasing frequency and, in most cases, the current density linearity limit for 10 per cent increase in C was slightly less than that for 10 per cent decrease in R. Among the metals tested, copper and aluminium had the lowest current carrying capability and rhodium had the highest current-carrying capability. The current carrying capabilities of 316 SS, platinum, silver and MP35N, were intermediate and similar. With increasing current density, an increase in the electrode/electrolyte capacitance was the most sensitive indicator of the current-carrying linearity limit. PMID:2376994

  5. Nanostructured metals. Fundamentals to applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grivel, J.-C.; Hansen, N.; Huang, X.; Juul Jensen, D.; Mishin, O.V.; Nielsen, S.F.; Pantleon, W.; Toftegaard, H.; Winther, G.; Yu, T. (eds.)

    2009-07-01

    In the today's world, materials science and engineering must as other technical fields focus on sustainability. Raw materials and energy have to be conserved and metals with improved or new structural and functional properties must be invented, developed and brought to application. In this endeavour a very promising route is to reduce the structural scale of metallic materials, thereby bridging industrial metals of today with emerging nanometals of tomorrow, i.e. structural scales ranging from a few micrometres to the nanometre regime. While taking a focus on metals with structures in this scale regime the symposium spans from fundamental aspects towards applications, uniting materials scientists and technologists. A holistic approach characterizes the themes of the symposium encompassing synthesis, characterization, modelling and performance where in each area significant progress has been made in recent years. Synthesis now covers top-down processes, e.g. plastic deformation, and bottom-up processes, e.g. chemical and physical synthesis. In the area of structural and mechanical characterization advanced techniques are now widely applied and in-situ techniques for structural characterization under mechanical or thermal loading are under rapid development in both 2D and 3D. Progress in characterization techniques has led to a precise description of different boundaries (grain, dislocation, twin, phase), and of how they form and evolve, also including theoretical modelling and simulations of structures, properties and performance. (au)

  6. Nanostructured metals. Fundamentals to applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the today's world, materials science and engineering must as other technical fields focus on sustainability. Raw materials and energy have to be conserved and metals with improved or new structural and functional properties must be invented, developed and brought to application. In this endeavour a very promising route is to reduce the structural scale of metallic materials, thereby bridging industrial metals of today with emerging nanometals of tomorrow, i.e. structural scales ranging from a few micrometres to the nanometre regime. While taking a focus on metals with structures in this scale regime the symposium spans from fundamental aspects towards applications, uniting materials scientists and technologists. A holistic approach characterizes the themes of the symposium encompassing synthesis, characterization, modelling and performance where in each area significant progress has been made in recent years. Synthesis now covers top-down processes, e.g. plastic deformation, and bottom-up processes, e.g. chemical and physical synthesis. In the area of structural and mechanical characterization advanced techniques are now widely applied and in-situ techniques for structural characterization under mechanical or thermal loading are under rapid development in both 2D and 3D. Progress in characterization techniques has led to a precise description of different boundaries (grain, dislocation, twin, phase), and of how they form and evolve, also including theoretical modelling and simulations of structures, properties and performance. (au)

  7. Lightweight, Wearable, Metal Rubber Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    For autonomous health monitoring. NanoSonic, Inc., has developed comfortable garments with multiple integrated sensors designed to monitor astronaut health throughout long-duration space missions. The combined high electrical conductivity, low mechanical modulus, and environmental robustness of the sensors make them an effective, lightweight, and comfortable alternative to conventional use of metal wiring and cabling.

  8. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reference is made to liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors of the 'pool' type. In such reactors the core, the heat exchangers, and the coolant circulating pumps are submerged in a pool of liquid metal. In operation of the reactor it is necessary to be able to locate and identify components submerged in the pool, and before moving rotating shields in the roof of the pool-containing vault it is necessary to ensure that all the normally suspended absorber rods have been inserted in the core and released from their suspensions. Television cameras are unsuitable for use in the opaque liquid metal but ultrasound in the megahertz range has been used to give a television screen kind of display. There is some difficulty, however, in transmitting ultrasound signals from a transducer into the pool of coolant because the transducer must be protected from the high temperature environment of the coolant. This difficulty has been partially overcome, however, by transmitting the signals by way of a wave guide extending from the transducer into the coolant pool. Such a wave guide may comprise a column of liquid metal within a dip tube. The column of liquid coolant is uninterrupted by a supporting diaphragm. Such a system is here described. (U.K.)

  9. Analysis of autofrettaged metal tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thick-walled cylinders are widely used as compressor cylinders, pump cylinders, high pressure tubing, process reactors and vessels, nuclear reactors, isostatic vessels and gun barrels. In practice, cylinders are generally subjected to sudden and frequently drastic pressure fluctuations, such as the pressure generated in a gun barrel upon the firing of the weapon, pressure reversals in pump cylinders or in process reactors employing high-pressure piping, necessitating enhanced strength of such cylinders. A process for enhancing the strength of thick-walled cylinders has been in service, and is referred to as 'autofrettage'. It extends the service life of the cylinder. The autofrettage is achieved by increasing elastic strength of a cylinder with various methods such as hydraulic pressurization, mechanical swaging, or by utilizing the pressure of a powder gas. This research work deals with the hydraulic and mechanical autofrettage of metal tubes with the objective to attain enhanced strength. Five metal tubes are taken randomly for analysis purpose. The experimental data for five metal tubes is obtained to analyze the behavior of different parameters used during, before, and after autofrettage process. For this research, two-stage autofrettage is taken into consideration. The modeling of the metal tube is carried out in WildFire-ProEngineering, and for analysis purpose, finite element software ANSYS7 and COSMOS are used. The graphical analysis of swage autofrettage is carried out using MATLAB7. The results are validated using available experimental and numerical data. (author)

  10. Formation mechanisms of metal colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halaciuga, Ionel

    Highly dispersed uniform metallic particles are widely used in various areas of technology and medicine and are likely to be incorporated into many other applications in the future. It is commonly accepted that size, shape and composition of the particles represent critical factors in most applications. Thus, understanding the mechanisms of formation of metal particles and the ways to control the physical (e.g. shape, size) and chemical (e.g. composition) properties is of great importance. In the current research, the formation of uniform silver spheres is investigated experimentally. The parameters that influence the formation of silver particles when concentrated iso-ascorbic acid and silver-polyamine complex solutions are rapidly mixed were studied in the absence of dispersants. We found that by varying the nature of the amine, temperature, concentration of reactants, silver/amine molar ratio, and the nature of the silver salt, the size of the resulting silver particles can be varied in a wide range (0.08--1.5 microm). The silver particles were formed by aggregation of nanosize subunits as substantiated by both electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques and by the vivid rapid color changes during the chemical precipitation process. From the practical standpoint, the goal of this research was to prepare well dispersed spherical silver particles having a relatively smooth surface and a diameter of about 1 microm to satisfy the demands of the current electronic materials market. A two stage particle growth model previously developed to explain the narrow size distribution occurring in synthesis of gold spheres was applied to the present experimental system, and the parameters that control the size distribution characteristics were identified. The kinetic parameter required to match the final particle size was found to be in agreement with the one used previously in modeling formation of gold spheres, suggesting that similar kinetics governs the

  11. Simulations of Metallic Nanoscale Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Karsten W.

    2003-03-01

    Density-functional-theory calculations can be used to understand and predict materials properties based on their nanoscale composition and structure. In combination with efficient search algorithms DFT can furthermore be applied in the nanoscale design of optimized materials. The first part of the talk will focus on two different types of nanostructures with an interesting interplay between chemical activity and conducting states. MoS2 nanoclusters are known for their catalyzing effect in the hydrodesulfurization process which removes sulfur-containing molecules from oil products. MoS2 is a layered material which is insulating. However, DFT calculations indicates the exsistence of metallic states at some of the edges of MoS2 nanoclusters, and the calculations show that the conducting states are not passivated by for example the presence of hydrogen gas. The edge states may play an important role for the chemical activity of MoS_2. Metallic nanocontacts can be formed during the breaking of a piece of metal, and atomically thin structures with conductance of only a single quantum unit may be formed. Such open metallic structures are chemically very active and susceptible to restructuring through interactions with molecular gases. DFT calculations show for example that atomically thin gold wires may incorporate oxygen atoms forming a new type of metallic nanowire. Adsorbates like hydrogen may also affect the conductance. In the last part of the talk I shall discuss the possibilities for designing alloys with optimal mechanical properties based on a combination of DFT calculations with genetic search algorithms. Simulaneous optimization of several parameters (stability, price, compressibility) is addressed through the determination of Pareto optimal alloy compositions within a large database of more than 64000 alloys.

  12. Aircraft Sheet Metal Practices, Blueprint Reading, Sheet Metal Forming and Heat Treating; Sheet Metal Work 2: 9855.04.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    This course is designed to familiarize vocational students with construction in sheet metal layout. The document outlines goals, specific block objectives, layout practices, blueprint reading, sheet metal forming (by hand and by machine), and heat treatment of metals, and includes posttest samples. Layout techniques and air foil developing are…

  13. No Superiority of Cemented Metal-on-Metal vs Metal-on-Polyethylene THA at 5-Year Follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, Wierd P.; Cheung, John; Sietsma, Maurits S.; van Raay, Jos J. A. M.; Deutman, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial was performed to compare the cemented Stanmore metal-on-metal (Biomet, Warsaw, Indiana) total hip arthroplasty (THA; 102 hips) to the cemented Stanmore metal-on-polyethylene (Biomet) THA (98 hips). The primary outcome was clinical performance. Radiological performance,

  14. Metal Ion Controlled Polymorphism of a Peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Lars Bo Stegeager; Jancso, Attila; Szunyogh, Daniel; Larsen, Flemming Hofmann; Thulstrup, Peter Waaben; Christensen, Niels Johan; Gyurcsik, Bela

    2011-01-01

    In this work a metal ion binding model dodecapeptide was investigated in terms of its capacity to adopt different structures depending on the metal ion to peptide stoichiometry. The dodecapeptide is much simpler than real proteins, yet displays sufficient complexity to model the effect of metal...... ions on fully or partially unstructured proteins, or the effect of metal ions on protein aggregation. Metal ions may be employed to fold (or misfold) individual peptides in a controlled manner depending on the potential metal ion coordinating amino acid side chains (Cys, His, Asp, Glu, …) in the...... peptide, and the ligand and structural preferences of the metal ion (in our studies Zn2+, Cd2+, Hg2+, Cu+/2+). Simultaneously, new species such as metal ion bridged ternary complexes or even oligomers may be formed. In recent previous studies we have observed similar polymorphism of zinc finger model...

  15. Metals: In Sickness and in Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Metals: In Sickness and in Health By Stephanie Dutchen ... 2012 We're not quite Iron Man, but metals are intricately entwined with our bodies. They make ...

  16. Radiopure Metal-Loaded Liquid Scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosero, Richard [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.; Yeh, Minfang [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.

    2015-03-18

    Metal-loaded liquid scintillator plays a key role in particle and nuclear physics experiments. The applications of metal ions in various neutrino experiments and the purification methods for different scintillator components are discussed in this paper.

  17. Radiopure metal-loaded liquid scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metal-loaded liquid scintillator plays a key role in particle and nuclear physics experiments. The applications of metal ions in various neutrino experiments and the purification methods for different scintillator components are discussed in this paper

  18. Bonding theory for metals and alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Frederick E

    2005-01-01

    Bonding Theory for Metals and Alloys exhorts the potential existence of covalent bonding in metals and alloys. Through the recognition of the covalent bond in coexistence with the 'free' electron band, the book describes and demonstrates how the many experimental observations on metals and alloys can all be reconciled. Subsequently, it shows how the individual view of metals and alloys by physicists, chemists and metallurgists can be unified. The physical phenomena of metals and alloys covered in this book are: Miscibility Gap between two liquid metals; Phase Equilibrium Diagrams; Phenomenon of Melting. Superconductivity; Nitinol; A Metal-Alloy with Memory; Mechanical Properties; Liquid Metal Embrittlement; Superplasticity; Corrosion; The author introduces a new theory based on 'Covalon' conduction, which forms the basis for a new approach to the theory of superconductivity. This new approach not only explains the many observations made on the phenomenon of superconductivity but also makes predictions that ha...

  19. Metal ions, Alzheimer's disease and chelation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budimir, Ana

    2011-03-01

    In the last few years, various studies have been providing evidence that metal ions are critically involved in the pathogenesis of major neurological diseases (Alzheimer, Parkinson). Metal ion chelators have been suggested as potential therapies for diseases involving metal ion imbalance. Neurodegeneration is an excellent target for exploiting the metal chelator approach to therapeutics. In contrast to the direct chelation approach in metal ion overload disorders, in neurodegeneration the goal seems to be a better and subtle modulation of metal ion homeostasis, aimed at restoring ionic balance. Thus, moderate chelators able to coordinate deleterious metals without disturbing metal homeostasis are needed. To date, several chelating agents have been investigated for their potential to treat neurodegeneration, and a series of 8-hydroxyquinoline analogues showed the greatest potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21406339

  20. Graphene oxide-based flexible metal-insulator-metal capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, A.; Hota, M. K.; Mallik, S.; Maiti, C. K.

    2013-05-01

    This work explores the fabrication of graphene oxide (GO)-based metal-insulator-metal (MIM) capacitors on flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates. Electrical properties are studied in detail. A high capacitance density of ˜4 fF µm-2 measured at 1 MHz and permittivity of ˜6 have been obtained. A low voltage coefficient of capacitance, VCC-α, and a low dielectric loss tangent indicate the potential of GO-based MIM capacitors for RF applications. The constant voltage stressing study has shown a high reliability against degradation up to a projected period of 10 years. Degradation in capacitance of the devices on flexible substrates has been studied by bending radius down to 1 cm even up to 6000 times of repeated bending.