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Sample records for alix binding requirements

  1. Solution structure of the Equine Infectious Anemia Virus p9 protein: a rationalization of its different ALIX binding requirements compared to the analogous HIV-p6 protein

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    Henklein Peter

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The equine infection anemia virus (EIAV p9 Gag protein contains the late (L- domain required for efficient virus release of nascent virions from the cell membrane of infected cell. Results In the present study the p9 protein and N- and C-terminal fragments (residues 1-21 and 22-51, respectively were chemically synthesized and used for structural analyses. Circular dichroism and 1H-NMR spectroscopy provide the first molecular insight into the secondary structure and folding of this 51-amino acid protein under different solution conditions. Qualitative 1H-chemical shift and NOE data indicate that in a pure aqueous environment p9 favors an unstructured state. In its most structured state under hydrophobic conditions, p9 adopts a stable helical structure within the C-terminus. Quantitative NOE data further revealed that this α-helix extends from Ser-27 to Ser-48, while the N-terminal residues remain unstructured. The structural elements identified for p9 differ substantially from that of the functional homologous HIV-1 p6 protein. Conclusions These structural differences are discussed in the context of the different types of L-domains regulating distinct cellular pathways in virus budding. EIAV p9 mediates virus release by recruiting the ALG2-interacting protein X (ALIX via the YPDL-motif to the site of virus budding, the counterpart of the YPXnL-motif found in p6. However, p6 contains an additional PTAP L-domain that promotes HIV-1 release by binding to the tumor susceptibility gene 101 (Tsg101. The notion that structures found in p9 differ form that of p6 further support the idea that different mechanisms regulate binding of ALIX to primary versus secondary L-domains types.

  2. Structure-based in silico identification of ubiquitin-binding domains provides insights into the ALIX-V:ubiquitin complex and retrovirus budding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren-Kaplan, Tal; Attali, Ilan; Estrin, Michael; Kuo, Lillian S; Farkash, Efrat; Jerabek-Willemsen, Moran; Blutraich, Noa; Artzi, Shay; Peri, Aviyah; Freed, Eric O; Wolfson, Haim J; Prag, Gali

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitylation signal promotes trafficking of endogenous and retroviral transmembrane proteins. The signal is decoded by a large set of ubiquitin (Ub) receptors that tether Ub-binding domains (UBDs) to the trafficking machinery. We developed a structure-based procedure to scan the protein data bank for hidden UBDs. The screen retrieved many of the known UBDs. Intriguingly, new potential UBDs were identified, including the ALIX-V domain. Pull-down, cross-linking and E3-independent ubiquitylation assays biochemically corroborated the in silico findings. Guided by the output model, we designed mutations at the postulated ALIX-V:Ub interface. Biophysical affinity measurements using microscale-thermophoresis of wild-type and mutant proteins revealed some of the interacting residues of the complex. ALIX-V binds mono-Ub with a Kd of 119 μM. We show that ALIX-V oligomerizes with a Hill coefficient of 5.4 and IC50 of 27.6 μM and that mono-Ub induces ALIX-V oligomerization. Moreover, we show that ALIX-V preferentially binds K63 di-Ub compared with mono-Ub and K48 di-Ub. Finally, an in vivo functionality assay demonstrates the significance of ALIX-V:Ub interaction in equine infectious anaemia virus budding. These results not only validate the new procedure, but also demonstrate that ALIX-V directly interacts with Ub in vivo and that this interaction can influence retroviral budding. PMID:23361315

  3. Decoding the intrinsic mechanism that prohibits ALIX interaction with ESCRT and viral proteins.

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    Zhou, Xi; Si, Jiali; Corvera, Joe; Gallick, Gary E; Kuang, Jian

    2010-12-15

    The adaptor protein ALIX [ALG-2 (apoptosis-linked-gene-2 product)-interacting protein X] links retroviruses to ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) machinery during retroviral budding. This function of ALIX requires its interaction with the ESCRT-III component CHMP4 (charged multivesicular body protein 4) at the N-terminal Bro1 domain and retroviral Gag proteins at the middle V domain. Since cytoplasmic or recombinant ALIX is unable to interact with CHMP4 or retroviral Gag proteins under non-denaturing conditions, we constructed ALIX truncations and mutations to define the intrinsic mechanism through which ALIX interactions with these partner proteins are prohibited. Our results demonstrate that an intramolecular interaction between Patch 2 in the Bro1 domain and the TSG101 (tumour susceptibility gene 101 protein)-docking site in the proline-rich domain locks ALIX into a closed conformation that renders ALIX unable to interact with CHMP4 and retroviral Gag proteins. Relieving the intramolecular interaction of ALIX, by ectopically expressing a binding partner for one of the intramolecular interaction sites or by deleting one of these sites, promotes ALIX interaction with these partner proteins and facilitates ALIX association with the membrane. Ectopic expression of a GFP (green fluorescent protein)-ALIX mutant with a constitutively open conformation, but not the wild-type protein, increases EIAV (equine infectious anaemia virus) budding from HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells. These findings predict that relieving the autoinhibitory intramolecular interaction of ALIX is a critical step for ALIX to participate in retroviral budding.

  4. Alix differs from ESCRT proteins in the control of autophagy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petiot, Anne; Strappazzon, Flavie; Chatellard-Causse, Christine; Blot, Beatrice; Torch, Sakina; Jean-Marc Verna; Sadoul, Remy

    2008-01-01

    Alix/AIP1 is a cytosolic protein that regulates cell death through mechanisms that remain unclear. Alix binds to two protein members of the so-called Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT), which facilitates membrane fission events during multivesicular endosome formation, enveloped virus budding and cytokinesis. Alix itself has been suggested to participate in these cellular events and is thus often considered to function in the ESCRT pathway. ESCRT proteins were recently implicated in autophagy, a process involved in bulk degradation of cytoplasmic constituents in lysosomes, which can also participate in cell death. In this study, we shown that, unlike ESCRT proteins, Alix is not involved in autophagy. These results strongly suggest that the capacity of several mutants of Alix to block both caspase-dependent and independent cell death does not relate to their capacity to modulate autophagy. Furthermore, they reinforce the conclusion of other studies demonstrating that the role of Alix is different from that of classical ESCRT proteins

  5. Novel tetra-peptide insertion in Gag-p6 ALIX-binding motif in HIV-1 subtype C associated with protease inhibitor failure in Indian patients.

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    Neogi, Ujjwal; Rao, Shwetha D; Bontell, Irene; Verheyen, Jens; Rao, Vasudev R; Gore, Sagar C; Soni, Neelesh; Shet, Anita; Schülter, Eugen; Ekstrand, Maria L; Wondwossen, Amogne; Kaiser, Rolf; Madhusudhan, Mallur S; Prasad, Vinayaka R; Sonnerborg, Anders

    2014-09-24

    A novel tetra-peptide insertion was identified in Gag-p6 ALIX-binding region, which appeared in protease inhibitor failure Indian HIV-1C sequences (odds ratio=17.1, P < 0.001) but was naturally present in half of untreated Ethiopian HIV-1C sequences. The insertion is predicted to restore ALIX-mediated virus release pathway, which is lacking in HIV-1C. The clinical importance of the insertion needs to be evaluated in HIV-1C dominating regions wherein the use of protease inhibitor drugs are being scaled up.

  6. Novel tetra-peptide insertion in Gag-p6 ALIX-binding motif in HIV-1 subtype C associated with protease inhibitor failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neogi, Ujjwal; RAO, Shwetha D; BONTELL, Irene; VERHEYEN, Jens; RAO, Vasudev R; GORE, Sagar C; SONI, Neelesh; SHET, Anita; SCHÜLTER, Eugen; EKSTRAND, Maria L.; WONDWOSSEN, Amogne; KAISER, Rolf; MADHUSUDHAN, Mallur S.; PRASAD, Vinayaka R; SONNERBORG, Anders

    2014-01-01

    A novel tetra-peptide insertion was identified in Gag-p6 ALIX-binding region which is appears in protease inhibitor (PI) failure Indian HIV-1C sequences (Odds Ratio 17.1, p<0.001) but naturally present in half of untreated Ethiopian sequences. The insertion will probably restore the ALIX mediated virus release pathway, which is lacking in HIV-1C. The clinical importance of such insertion need to be evaluated in HIV-1C dominating regions were PI-drugs are being scaled up as second line treatment options. PMID:25102091

  7. ALIX and ESCRT-III coordinately control cytokinetic abscission during germline stem cell division in vivo.

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    Åsmund H Eikenes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abscission is the final step of cytokinesis that involves the cleavage of the intercellular bridge connecting the two daughter cells. Recent studies have given novel insight into the spatiotemporal regulation and molecular mechanisms controlling abscission in cultured yeast and human cells. The mechanisms of abscission in living metazoan tissues are however not well understood. Here we show that ALIX and the ESCRT-III component Shrub are required for completion of abscission during Drosophila female germline stem cell (fGSC division. Loss of ALIX or Shrub function in fGSCs leads to delayed abscission and the consequent formation of stem cysts in which chains of daughter cells remain interconnected to the fGSC via midbody rings and fusome. We demonstrate that ALIX and Shrub interact and that they co-localize at midbody rings and midbodies during cytokinetic abscission in fGSCs. Mechanistically, we show that the direct interaction between ALIX and Shrub is required to ensure cytokinesis completion with normal kinetics in fGSCs. We conclude that ALIX and ESCRT-III coordinately control abscission in Drosophila fGSCs and that their complex formation is required for accurate abscission timing in GSCs in vivo.

  8. Structure of the Bro1 domain protein BROX and functional analyses of the ALIX Bro1 domain in HIV-1 budding.

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    Qianting Zhai

    Full Text Available Bro1 domains are elongated, banana-shaped domains that were first identified in the yeast ESCRT pathway protein, Bro1p. Humans express three Bro1 domain-containing proteins: ALIX, BROX, and HD-PTP, which function in association with the ESCRT pathway to help mediate intraluminal vesicle formation at multivesicular bodies, the abscission stage of cytokinesis, and/or enveloped virus budding. Human Bro1 domains share the ability to bind the CHMP4 subset of ESCRT-III proteins, associate with the HIV-1 NC(Gag protein, and stimulate the budding of viral Gag proteins. The curved Bro1 domain structure has also been proposed to mediate membrane bending. To date, crystal structures have only been available for the related Bro1 domains from the Bro1p and ALIX proteins, and structures of additional family members should therefore aid in the identification of key structural and functional elements.We report the crystal structure of the human BROX protein, which comprises a single Bro1 domain. The Bro1 domains from BROX, Bro1p and ALIX adopt similar overall structures and share two common exposed hydrophobic surfaces. Surface 1 is located on the concave face and forms the CHMP4 binding site, whereas Surface 2 is located at the narrow end of the domain. The structures differ in that only ALIX has an extended loop that projects away from the convex face to expose the hydrophobic Phe105 side chain at its tip. Functional studies demonstrated that mutations in Surface 1, Surface 2, or Phe105 all impair the ability of ALIX to stimulate HIV-1 budding.Our studies reveal similarities in the overall folds and hydrophobic protein interaction sites of different Bro1 domains, and show that a unique extended loop contributes to the ability of ALIX to function in HIV-1 budding.

  9. Structural requirements of cholesterol for binding to Vibrio cholerae hemolysin.

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    Ikigai, Hajime; Otsuru, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Koichiro; Shimamura, Tadakatsu

    2006-01-01

    Cholesterol is necessary for the conversion of Vibrio cholerae hemolysin (VCH) monomers into oligomers in liposome membranes. Using different sterols, we determined the stereochemical structures of the VCH-binding active groups present in cholesterol. The VCH monomers are bound to cholesterol, diosgenin, campesterol, and ergosterol, which have a hydroxyl group at position C-3 (3betaOH) in the A ring and a C-C double bond between positions C-5 and C-6 (C-C Delta(5)) in the B ring. They are not bound to epicholesterol and dihydrocholesterol, which form a covalent link with a 3alphaOH group and a C-C single bond between positions C-5 and C-6, respectively. This result suggests that the 3betaOH group and the C-CDelta(5) bond in cholesterol are required for VCH monomer binding. We further examined VCH oligomer binding to cholesterol. However, this oligomer did not bind to cholesterol, suggesting that the disappearance of the cholesterol-binding potential of the VCH oligomer might be a result of the conformational change caused by the conversion of the monomer into the oligomer. VCH oligomer formation was observed in liposomes containing sterols with the 3betaOH group and the C-C Delta(5) bond, and it correlated with the binding affinity of the monomer to each sterol. Therefore, it seems likely that monomer binding to membrane sterol leads to the assembly of the monomer. However, since oligomer formation was induced by liposomes containing either epicholesterol or dihydrocholesterol, the 3betaOH group and the C-C Delta(5) bond were not essential for conversion into the oligomer.

  10. rRNA chemical groups required for aminoglycoside binding.

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    Blanchard, S C; Fourmy, D; Eason, R G; Puglisi, J D

    1998-05-26

    Through an affinity chromatography based modification-interference assay, we have identified chemical groups within Escherichia coli 16S ribosomal RNA sequence that are required for binding the aminoglycoside antibiotic paromomycin. Paromomycin was covalently linked to solid support via a nine atom spacer from the 6"'-amine of ring IV, and chemical modifications to an A-site oligonucleotide that disrupted binding were identified. Positions in the RNA oligonucleotide that correspond to G1405(N7), G1491(N7), G1494(N7), A1408(N7), A1493(N7), A1408(N1), A1492(N1), and A1493(N1), as well as the pro-R phosphate oxygens of A1492 and A1493 in 16S rRNA are chemical groups that are essential for a high-affinity RNA-paromomycin interaction. These data are consistent with genetic, biochemical, and structural studies related to neomycin-class antibiotics and provide additional information for establishing an exact model for their interaction with the ribosome.

  11. The secretion ATPase ComGA is required for the binding and transport of transforming DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Briley, Kenneth; Dorsey-Oresto, Angella; Prepiak, Peter; Dias, Miguel J.; Mann, Jessica M.; Dubnau, David

    2011-01-01

    Transformation requires specialized proteins to facilitate the binding and uptake of DNA. The genes of the B. subtilis comG operon (comGA–G) are required for transformation and to assemble a structure, the pseudopilus, in the cell envelope. No role for the pseudopilus has been established and the functions of the individual comG genes are unknown. We show that among the comG genes, only comGA is absolutely required for DNA binding to the cell surface. ComEA, an integral membrane DNA binding p...

  12. Le récit et ses limites dans l’œuvre d’Alberto García Alix

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    Anouk Chirol

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Bien que l’œuvre photographique d’Alberto García Alix ait souvent été qualifiée de « narrative », en particulier parce qu’elle montre les différentes étapes de sa vie, il est difficile d’avoir un récit dans une seule photographie. Il n’apparaît qu’en germe, à travers le titre... Pour deux expositions de 2006 (No me sigas… estoy perdido et Tres vídeos tristes, Alberto García Alix a délibérément choisi deux formes plus narratives: le diaporama et la vidéo. Pourtant, l’artiste n’exploite pas ce potentiel narratif puisque la vidéo lui permet d’approfondir le regard qu’il porte sur lui-même dans un autoportrait où le récit n’est que secondaire.Aunque la obra fotográfica de Alberto García Alix fue calificada a menudo de “narrativa”, en particular porque muestra las diferentes etapas de su vida, es difícil encontrar un relato en una sola fotografía. Sólo aparece en germen, a través del título… Para dos exposiciones de 2006 (No me sigas… estoy perdido y Tres vídeos tristes, Alberto García Alix ha elegido dos medios más narrativos: el diaporama y el vídeo. Sin embargo, el artista no utiliza ese potencial narrativo porque el vídeo le permite centrarse en sí mismo en un autorretrato en el que el relato sólo es secundario.

  13. The secretion ATPase ComGA is required for the binding and transport of transforming DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briley, Kenneth; Dorsey-Oresto, Angella; Prepiak, Peter; Dias, Miguel J; Mann, Jessica M; Dubnau, David

    2011-08-01

    Transformation requires specialized proteins to facilitate the binding and uptake of DNA. The genes of the Bacillus subtilis comG operon (comGA-G) are required for transformation and to assemble a structure, the pseudopilus, in the cell envelope. No role for the pseudopilus has been established and the functions of the individual comG genes are unknown. We show that among the comG genes, only comGA is absolutely required for DNA binding to the cell surface. ComEA, an integral membrane DNA-binding protein plays a minor role in the initial binding step, while an unidentified protein which communicates with ComGA must be directly responsible for binding to the cell. We show that the use of resistance to DNase to measure 'DNA uptake' reflects the movement of transforming DNA to a protected state in which it is not irreversibly associated with the protoplast, and presumably resides outside the cell membrane, in the periplasm or associated with the cell wall. We suggest that ComGA is needed for the acquisition of DNase resistance as well as for the binding of DNA to the cell surface. Finally, we show that the pseudopilus is required for DNA uptake and we offer a revised model for the transformation process. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Stereochemical requirements of chitin synthase for ligand binding at the allosteric site for N-acetylglucosamine.

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    Horsch, M; Mayer, C; Rast, D M

    1996-04-15

    The substrate kinetics of chitin synthase (CS) were non-Michaelian, irrespective of the type of enzyme preparation studied (105-S chitosomal CS, and 16-S ex walls), even in the presence of saturating GlcNAc. An unexplained idiosyncrasy of this enzyme, which is likely to be responsible for this phenomenon, is evident from the striking non-linearity of product deposition with time at low substrate or low enzyme concentrations, particularly in the absence of GlcNac. The possibility can be excluded that this non-linearity is due to the formation of soluble by-products or intermediates in the form of chito-oligomers, as shown by HPLC/pulsed amperometric detection analysis. Additional evidence was sought for the tenet that CS is homotropically-heterotropically regulated, at least under steady-state reaction conditions. Substrate kinetic curves established from rate data for the linear reaction phase only were used for modelling. These could be reasonably well parameterised on the basis of the Monod mathematical model for co-operative ligand binding. Within a series of test compounds used to assess the stereochemical conditions of the allosteric site of CS for effector binding, N-acetylglucosaminono-1,5-lactone oxime excelled. Requirements for effector binding are as follows: (a) an aminoglucopyranose skeleton with the amino function acetylated, and (b) a single-bonded oxo-function present at C(1), which is preferentially a hydrogen bond donor, that may be equatorially spaced off, but must not be alpha-anomeric. The implications of these findings for chitin synthesis in vivo are discussed in terms of a mechanistically based fitness of CS to operate efficiently under vastly different combinations of substrate could be coordinately linked to the catabolism of chitin.

  15. β-lactoglobulin's conformational requirements for ligand binding at the calyx and the dimer interphase: a flexible docking study.

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    Lenin Domínguez-Ramírez

    Full Text Available β-lactoglobulin (BLG is an abundant milk protein relevant for industry and biotechnology, due significantly to its ability to bind a wide range of polar and apolar ligands. While hydrophobic ligand sites are known, sites for hydrophilic ligands such as the prevalent milk sugar, lactose, remain undetermined. Through the use of molecular docking we first, analyzed the known fatty acid binding sites in order to dissect their atomistic determinants and second, predicted the interaction sites for lactose with monomeric and dimeric BLG. We validated our approach against BLG structures co-crystallized with ligands and report a computational setup with a reduced number of flexible residues that is able to reproduce experimental results with high precision. Blind dockings with and without flexible side chains on BLG showed that: i 13 experimentally-determined ligands fit the calyx requiring minimal movement of up to 7 residues out of the 23 that constitute this binding site. ii Lactose does not bind the calyx despite conformational flexibility, but binds the dimer interface and an alternate Site C. iii Results point to a probable lactolation site in the BLG dimer interface, at K141, consistent with previous biochemical findings. In contrast, no accessible lysines are found near Site C. iv lactose forms hydrogen bonds with residues from both monomers stabilizing the dimer through a claw-like structure. Overall, these results improve our understanding of BLG's binding sites, importantly narrowing down the calyx residues that control ligand binding. Moreover, our results emphasize the importance of the dimer interface as an insufficiently explored, biologically relevant binding site of particular importance for hydrophilic ligands. Furthermore our analyses suggest that BLG is a robust scaffold for multiple ligand-binding, suitable for protein design, and advance our molecular understanding of its ligand sites to a point that allows manipulation to control

  16. The cholesterol-dependent cytolysins pneumolysin and streptolysin O require binding to red blood cell glycans for hemolytic activity.

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    Shewell, Lucy K; Harvey, Richard M; Higgins, Melanie A; Day, Christopher J; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren E; Chen, Austen Y; Gillen, Christine M; James, David B A; Alonzo, Francis; Torres, Victor J; Walker, Mark J; Paton, Adrienne W; Paton, James C; Jennings, Michael P

    2014-12-09

    The cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) pneumolysin (Ply) is a key virulence factor of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Membrane cholesterol is required for the cytolytic activity of this toxin, but it is not clear whether cholesterol is the only cellular receptor. Analysis of Ply binding to a glycan microarray revealed that Ply has lectin activity and binds glycans, including the Lewis histo-blood group antigens. Surface plasmon resonance analysis showed that Ply has the highest affinity for the sialyl LewisX (sLeX) structure, with a K(d) of 1.88 × 10(-5) M. Ply hemolytic activity against human RBCs showed dose-dependent inhibition by sLeX. Flow cytometric analysis and Western blots showed that blocking binding of Ply to the sLeX glycolipid on RBCs prevents deposition of the toxin in the membrane. The lectin domain responsible for sLeX binding is in domain 4 of Ply, which contains candidate carbohydrate-binding sites. Mutagenesis of these predicted carbohydrate-binding residues of Ply resulted in a decrease in hemolytic activity and a reduced affinity for sLeX. This study reveals that this archetypal CDC requires interaction with the sLeX glycolipid cellular receptor as an essential step before membrane insertion. A similar analysis conducted on streptolysin O from Streptococcus pyogenes revealed that this CDC also has glycan-binding properties and that hemolytic activity against RBCs can be blocked with the glycan lacto-N-neotetraose by inhibiting binding to the cell surface. Together, these data support the emerging paradigm shift that pore-forming toxins, including CDCs, have cellular receptors other than cholesterol that define target cell tropism.

  17. Stable MCC binding to the APC/C is required for a functional spindle assembly checkpoint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein, Jamin B; Nilsson, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    normally, but IR motif integrity is particularly important for stable binding to the APC/C. Cells expressing Cdc20 with a mutated IR motif have a compromised SAC, as uninhibited Cdc20 can compete with the MCC for APC/C binding and activate it. We thus show that stable MCC association with the APC....../C is critical for a functional SAC....

  18. Protein S binding to human endothelial cells is required for expression of cofactor activity for activated protein C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hackeng, T. M.; Hessing, M.; van 't Veer, C.; Meijer-Huizinga, F.; Meijers, J. C.; de Groot, P. G.; van Mourik, J. A.; Bouma, B. N.

    1993-01-01

    An important feedback mechanism in blood coagulation is supplied by the protein C/protein S anticoagulant pathway. In this study we demonstrate that the binding of human protein S to cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) is required for the expression of cofactor activity of

  19. Specific binding sites for an antifungal plant defensin from Dahlia (Dahlia merckii) on fungal cells are required for antifungal activity.

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    Thevissen, K; Osborn, R W; Acland, D P; Broekaert, W F

    2000-01-01

    Dm-AMP1, an antifungal plant defensin from seeds of dahlia (Dahlia merckii), was radioactively labeled with t-butoxycarbonyl-[35S]-L-methionine N-hydroxy-succinimi-dylester. This procedure yielded a 35S-labeled peptide with unaltered antifungal activity. [35S]Dm-AMP1 was used to assess binding on living cells of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa and the unicellular fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Binding of [35S]Dm-AMP1 to fungal cells was saturable and could be competed for by preincubation with excess, unlabeled Dm-AMP1 as well as with Ah-AMP1 and Ct-AMP1, two plant defensins that are highly homologous to Dm-AMP1. In contrast, binding could not be competed for by more distantly related plant defensins or structurally unrelated antimicrobial peptides. Binding of [35S]Dm-AMP1 to either N. crassa or S. cerevisiae cells was apparently irreversible. In addition, whole cells and microsomal membrane fractions from two independently obtained S. cerevisiae mutants selected for resistance to Dm-AMP1 exhibited severely reduced binding affinity for [35S]Dm-AMP1, compared with wild-type yeast. This finding suggests that binding of Dm-AMP1 to S. cerevisiae plasma membranes is required for antifungal activity of this protein.

  20. Conserved RNA-Binding Proteins Required for Dendrite Morphogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans Sensory Neurons

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    Antonacci, Simona; Forand, Daniel; Wolf, Margaret; Tyus, Courtney; Barney, Julia; Kellogg, Leah; Simon, Margo A.; Kerr, Genevieve; Wells, Kristen L.; Younes, Serena; Mortimer, Nathan T.; Olesnicky, Eugenia C.; Killian, Darrell J.

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of dendritic branching is critical for sensory reception, cell−cell communication within the nervous system, learning, memory, and behavior. Defects in dendrite morphology are associated with several neurologic disorders; thus, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms that govern dendrite morphogenesis is important. Recent investigations of dendrite morphogenesis have highlighted the importance of gene regulation at the posttranscriptional level. Because RNA-binding proteins mediate many posttranscriptional mechanisms, we decided to investigate the extent to which conserved RNA-binding proteins contribute to dendrite morphogenesis across phyla. Here we identify a core set of RNA-binding proteins that are important for dendrite morphogenesis in the PVD multidendritic sensory neuron in Caenorhabditis elegans. Homologs of each of these genes were previously identified as important in the Drosophila melanogaster dendritic arborization sensory neurons. Our results suggest that RNA processing, mRNA localization, mRNA stability, and translational control are all important mechanisms that contribute to dendrite morphogenesis, and we present a conserved set of RNA-binding proteins that regulate these processes in diverse animal species. Furthermore, homologs of these genes are expressed in the human brain, suggesting that these RNA-binding proteins are candidate regulators of dendrite development in humans. PMID:25673135

  1. Remote memory and cortical synaptic plasticity require neuronal CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF).

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    Kim, Somi; Yu, Nam-Kyung; Shim, Kyu-Won; Kim, Ji-Il; Kim, Hyopil; Han, Dae Hee; Choi, Ja Eun; Lee, Seung-Woo; Choi, Dong Il; Kim, Myung Won; Lee, Dong-Sung; Lee, Kyungmin; Galjart, Niels; Lee, Yong-Seok; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2018-04-30

    The molecular mechanism of long-term memory has been extensively studied in the context of the hippocampus-dependent recent memory examined within several days. However, months-old remote memory maintained in the cortex for long-term has not been investigated much at the molecular level yet. Various epigenetic mechanisms are known to be important for long-term memory, but how the three-dimensional (3D) chromatin architecture and its regulator molecules contribute to neuronal plasticity and systems consolidation are still largely unknown. CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) is an eleven-zinc finger protein well known for its role as a genome architecture molecule. Male conditional knockout (cKO) mice in which CTCF is lost in excitatory neurons during adulthood showed normal recent memory in the contextual fear conditioning and spatial water maze tasks. However, they showed remarkable impairments in remote memory in both tasks. Underlying the remote memory-specific phenotypes, we observed that female CTCF cKO mice exhibit disrupted cortical long-term potentiation (LTP), but not hippocampal LTP. Similarly, we observed that CTCF deletion in inhibitory neurons caused partial impairment of remote memory. Through RNA-sequencing, we observed that CTCF knockdown in cortical neuron culture caused altered expression of genes that are highly involved in cell adhesion, synaptic plasticity, and memory. These results suggest that remote memory storage in the cortex requires CTCF-mediated gene regulation in neurons while recent memory formation in the hippocampus does not. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT CTCF is a well-known 3D genome architectural protein that regulates gene expression. Here, we use two different CTCF conditional knockout mouse lines and reveal for the first time that CTCF is critically involved in the regulation of remote memory. We also show that CTCF is necessary for appropriate expression of genes, many of which we found to be involved in the learning and memory related

  2. CREB binding protein is required for both short-term and long-term memory formation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, G.; Zou, X.; Watanabe, H.; Deursen, J.M.A. van; Shen, J.

    2010-01-01

    CREB binding protein (CBP) is a transcriptional coactivator with histone acetyltransferase activity. Our prior study suggested that CBP might be a key target of presenilins in the regulation of memory formation and neuronal survival. To elucidate the role of CBP in the adult brain, we generated

  3. Structural determinants required to target penicillin-binding protein 3 to the septum of Escherichia coli.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piette, A.; Aarsman, M.E.G.; Fraipont, C.; den Blaauwen, T.; Pastoret, S.; Nguyen-Disteche, M.

    2004-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, cell division is mediated by the concerted action of about 12 proteins that assemble at the division site to presumably form a complex called the divisome. Among these essential division proteins, the multimodular class B penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3), which is

  4. FASTKD2 is an RNA-binding protein required for mitochondrial RNA processing and translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popow, Johannes; Alleaume, Anne-Marie; Curk, Tomaz; Schwarzl, Thomas; Sauer, Sven; Hentze, Matthias W

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial RNA processing is an essential step for the synthesis of the components of the electron transport chain in all eukaryotic organisms, yet several aspects of mitochondrial RNA biogenesis and regulation are not sufficiently understood. RNA interactome capture identified several disease-relevant RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) with noncanonical RNA-binding architectures, including all six members of the FASTK (FAS-activated serine/threonine kinase) family of proteins. A mutation within one of these newly assigned FASTK RBPs, FASTKD2, causes a rare form of Mendelian mitochondrial encephalomyopathy. To investigate whether RNA binding of FASTKD2 contributes to the disease phenotype, we identified the RNA targets of FASTKD2 by iCLIP. FASTKD2 interacts with a defined set of mitochondrial transcripts including 16S ribosomal RNA (RNR2) and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6) messenger RNA. CRISPR-mediated deletion of FASTKD2 leads to aberrant processing and expression of RNR2 and ND6 mRNA that encodes a subunit of the respiratory complex I. Metabolic phenotyping of FASTKD2-deficient cells reveals impaired cellular respiration with reduced activities of all respiratory complexes. This work identifies key aspects of the molecular network of a previously uncharacterized, disease-relevant RNA-binding protein, FASTKD2, by a combination of genomic, molecular, and metabolic analyses. © 2015 Popow et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  5. The acyl-CoA binding protein is required for normal epidermal barrier function in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Bek, Signe; Marcher, Ann-Britt

    2012-01-01

    The acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) is a 10 kDa intracellular protein expressed in all eukaryotic species. Mice with targeted disruption of Acbp (ACBP(-/-) mice) are viable and fertile but present a visible skin and fur phenotype characterized by greasy fur and development of alopecia and scaling...

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Universal Stress Protein Rv2623 Regulates Bacillary Growth by ATP Binding: Requirement for Establishing Chronic Persistent Infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drumm, J.; Mi, K; Bilder, P; Sun, M; Lim, J; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, H; Basaraba, R; So, M; Zhu, G; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculous latency and reactivation play a significant role in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis, yet the mechanisms that regulate these processes remain unclear. The Mycobacterium tuberculosisuniversal stress protein (USP) homolog, rv2623, is among the most highly induced genes when the tubercle bacillus is subjected to hypoxia and nitrosative stress, conditions thought to promote latency. Induction of rv2623 also occurs when M. tuberculosis encounters conditions associated with growth arrest, such as the intracellular milieu of macrophages and in the lungs of mice with chronic tuberculosis. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that Rv2623 regulates tuberculosis latency. We observed that an Rv2623-deficient mutant fails to establish chronic tuberculous infection in guinea pigs and mice, exhibiting a hypervirulence phenotype associated with increased bacterial burden and mortality. Consistent with this in vivo growth-regulatory role, constitutive overexpression of rv2623 attenuates mycobacterial growth in vitro. Biochemical analysis of purified Rv2623 suggested that this mycobacterial USP binds ATP, and the 2.9-A-resolution crystal structure revealed that Rv2623 engages ATP in a novel nucleotide-binding pocket. Structure-guided mutagenesis yielded Rv2623 mutants with reduced ATP-binding capacity. Analysis of mycobacteria overexpressing these mutants revealed that the in vitro growth-inhibitory property of Rv2623 correlates with its ability to bind ATP. Together, the results indicate that i M. tuberculosis Rv2623 regulates mycobacterial growth in vitro and in vivo, and ii Rv2623 is required for the entry of the tubercle bacillus into the chronic phase of infection in the host; in addition, iii Rv2623 binds ATP; and iv the growth-regulatory attribute of this USP is dependent on its ATP-binding activity. We propose that Rv2623 may function as an ATP-dependent signaling intermediate in a pathway that promotes persistent infection.

  7. Golgi localisation of GMAP210 requires two distinct cis-membrane binding mechanisms

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    Goud Bruno

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Golgi apparatus in mammals appears as a ribbon made up of interconnected stacks of flattened cisternae that is positioned close to the centrosome in a microtubule-dependent manner. How this organisation is achieved and retained is not well understood. GMAP210 is a long coiled-coil cis-Golgi associated protein that plays a role in maintaining Golgi ribbon integrity and position and contributes to the formation of the primary cilium. An amphipathic alpha-helix able to bind liposomes in vitro has been recently identified at the first 38 amino acids of the protein (amphipathic lipid-packing sensor motif, and an ARF1-binding domain (Grip-related Arf-binding domain was found at the C-terminus. To which type of membranes these two GMAP210 regions bind in vivo and how this contributes to GMAP210 localisation and function remains to be investigated. Results By using truncated as well as chimeric mutants and videomicroscopy we found that both the N-terminus and the C-terminus of GMAP210 are targeted to the cis-Golgi in vivo. The ALPS motif was identified as the N-terminal binding motif and appeared concentrated in the periphery of Golgi elements and between Golgi stacks. On the contrary, the C-terminal domain appeared uniformly distributed in the cis-cisternae of the Golgi apparatus. Strikingly, the two ends of the protein also behave differently in response to the drug Brefeldin A. The N-terminal domain redistributed to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER exit sites, as does the full-length protein, whereas the C-terminal domain rapidly dissociated from the Golgi apparatus to the cytosol. Mutants comprising the full-length protein but lacking one of the terminal motifs also associated with the cis-Golgi with distribution patterns similar to those of the corresponding terminal end whereas a mutant consisting in fused N- and C-terminal ends exhibits identical localisation as the endogenous protein. Conclusion We conclude that the Golgi

  8. DNA binding and unwinding by Hel308 helicase requires dual functions of a winged helix domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northall, Sarah J; Buckley, Ryan; Jones, Nathan; Penedo, J Carlos; Soultanas, Panos; Bolt, Edward L

    2017-09-01

    Hel308 helicases promote genome stability linked to DNA replication in archaea, and have homologues in metazoans. In the crystal structure of archaeal Hel308 bound to a tailed DNA duplex, core helicase domains encircle single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) in a "ratchet" for directional translocation. A winged helix domain (WHD) is also present, but its function is mysterious. We investigated the WHD in full-length Hel308, identifying that mutations in a solvent exposed α-helix resulted in reduced DNA binding and unwinding activities. When isolated from the rest of Hel308, the WHD protein alone bound to duplex DNA but not ssDNA, and DNA binding by WHD protein was abolished by the same mutations as were analyzed in full-length Hel308. Isolated WHD from a human Hel308 homologue (HelQ) also bound to duplex DNA. By disrupting the interface between the Hel308 WHD and a RecA-like domain, a topology typical of Ski2 helicases, we show that this is crucial for ATPase and helicase activities. The data suggest a model in which the WHD promotes activity of Hel308 directly, through binding to duplex DNA that is distinct from ssDNA binding by core helicase, and indirectly through interaction with the RecA-like domain. We propose how the WHD may contribute to ssDNA translocation, resulting in DNA helicase activity or in removal of other DNA bound proteins by "reeling" ssDNA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Sterol regulation of human fatty acid synthase promoter I requires nuclear factor-Y- and Sp-1-binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, S; Chirala, S S; Wakil, S J

    2000-04-11

    To understand cholesterol-mediated regulation of human fatty acid synthase promoter I, we tested various 5'-deletion constructs of promoter I-luciferase reporter gene constructs in HepG2 cells. The reporter gene constructs that contained only the Sp-1-binding site (nucleotides -82 to -74) and the two tandem sterol regulatory elements (SREs; nucleotides -63 to -46) did not respond to cholesterol. Only the reporter gene constructs containing a nuclear factor-Y (NF-Y) sequence, the CCAAT sequence (nucleotides -90 to -86), an Sp-1 sequence, and the two tandem SREs responded to cholesterol. The NF-Y-binding site, therefore, is essential for cholesterol response. Mutating the SREs or the NF-Y site and inserting 4 bp between the Sp-1- and NF-Y-binding sites both resulted in a minimal cholesterol response of the reporter genes. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays using anti-SRE-binding protein (SREBP) and anti-NF-Ya antibodies confirmed that these SREs and the NF-Y site bind the respective factors. We also identified a second Sp-1 site located between nucleotides -40 and -30 that can substitute for the mutated Sp-1 site located between nucleotides -82 and -74. The reporter gene expression of the wild-type promoter and the Sp-1 site (nucleotides -82 to -74) mutant promoter was similar when SREBP1a [the N-terminal domain of SREBP (amino acids 1-520)] was constitutively overexpressed, suggesting that Sp-1 recruits SREBP to the SREs. Under the same conditions, an NF-Y site mutation resulted in significant loss of reporter gene expression, suggesting that NF-Y is required to activate the cholesterol response.

  10. High Affinity Binding of Chp1 Chromodomain to K9 Methylated Histone H3 is Required to Establish Centromeric Hterochromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schalch, T.; Job, G; Noffsinger, V; Shanker, S; Kuscu, C; Joshua-Tor, L; Partridge, J

    2009-01-01

    In fission yeast, assembly of centromeric heterochromatin requires the RITS complex, which consists of Ago1, Tas3, Chp1, and siRNAs derived from centromeric repeats. Recruitment of RITS to centromeres has been proposed to depend on siRNA-dependent targeting of Ago1 to centromeric sequences. Previously, we demonstrated that methylated lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me) acts upstream of siRNAs during heterochromatin establishment. Our crystal structure of Chp1's chromodomain in complex with a trimethylated lysine 9 H3 peptide reveals extensive sites of contact that contribute to Chp1's high-affinity binding. We found that this high-affinity binding is critical for the efficient establishment of centromeric heterochromatin, but preassembled heterochromatin can be maintained when Chp1's affinity for H3K9me is greatly reduced.

  11. Normocyte-binding protein required for human erythrocyte invasion by the zoonotic malaria parasitePlasmodium knowlesi

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, Robert W.

    2016-06-15

    The dominant cause of malaria in Malaysia is now Plasmodium knowlesi, a zoonotic parasite of cynomolgus macaque monkeys found throughout South East Asia. Comparative genomic analysis of parasites adapted to in vitro growth in either cynomolgus or human RBCs identified a genomic deletion that includes the gene encoding normocyte-binding protein Xa (NBPXa) in parasites growing in cynomolgus RBCs but not in human RBCs. Experimental deletion of the NBPXa gene in parasites adapted to growth in human RBCs (which retain the ability to grow in cynomolgus RBCs) restricted them to cynomolgus RBCs, demonstrating that this gene is selectively required for parasite multiplication and growth in human RBCs. NBPXa-null parasites could bind to human RBCs, but invasion of these cells was severely impaired. Therefore, NBPXa is identified as a key mediator of P. knowlesi human infection and may be a target for vaccine development against this emerging pathogen.

  12. Somitogenesis clock-wave initiation requires differential decay and multiple binding sites for clock protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Campanelli

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Somitogenesis is a process common to all vertebrate embryos in which repeated blocks of cells arise from the presomitic mesoderm (PSM to lay a foundational pattern for trunk and tail development. Somites form in the wake of passing waves of periodic gene expression that originate in the tailbud and sweep posteriorly across the PSM. Previous work has suggested that the waves result from a spatiotemporally graded control protein that affects the oscillation rate of clock-gene expression. With a minimally constructed mathematical model, we study the contribution of two control mechanisms to the initial formation of this gene-expression wave. We test four biologically motivated model scenarios with either one or two clock protein transcription binding sites, and with or without differential decay rates for clock protein monomers and dimers. We examine the sensitivity of wave formation with respect to multiple model parameters and robustness to heterogeneity in cell population. We find that only a model with both multiple binding sites and differential decay rates is able to reproduce experimentally observed waveforms. Our results show that the experimentally observed characteristics of somitogenesis wave initiation constrain the underlying genetic control mechanisms.

  13. The Rho-GTPase binding protein IQGAP2 is required for the glomerular filtration barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano, Yuya; Lindenmeyer, Maja T; Auberger, Ines; Ziegler, Urs; Segerer, Stephan; Cohen, Clemens D; Neuhauss, Stephan C F; Loffing, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Podocyte dysfunction impairs the size selectivity of the glomerular filter, leading to proteinuria, hypoalbuminuria, and edema, clinically defined as nephrotic syndrome. Hereditary forms of nephrotic syndrome are linked to mutations in podocyte-specific genes. To identify genes contributing to podocyte dysfunction in acquired nephrotic syndrome, we studied human glomerular gene expression data sets for glomerular-enriched gene transcripts differentially regulated between pretransplant biopsy samples and biopsies from patients with nephrotic syndrome. Candidate genes were screened by in situ hybridization for expression in the zebrafish pronephros, an easy-to-use in vivo assay system to assess podocyte function. One glomerulus-enriched product was the Rho-GTPase binding protein, IQGAP2. Immunohistochemistry found a strong presence of IQGAP2 in normal human and zebrafish podocytes. In zebrafish larvae, morpholino-based knockdown of iqgap2 caused a mild foot process effacement of zebrafish podocytes and a cystic dilation of the urinary space of Bowman's capsule upon onset of urinary filtration. Moreover, the glomerulus of zebrafish morphants showed a glomerular permeability for injected high-molecular-weight dextrans, indicating an impaired size selectivity of the glomerular filter. Thus, IQGAP2 is a Rho-GTPase binding protein, highly abundant in human and zebrafish podocytes, which controls normal podocyte structure and function as evidenced in the zebrafish pronephros.

  14. Histone acetylation and CREB binding protein are required for neuronal resistance against ischemic injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferah Yildirim

    Full Text Available Epigenetic transcriptional regulation by histone acetylation depends on the balance between histone acetyltransferase (HAT and deacetylase activities (HDAC. Inhibition of HDAC activity provides neuroprotection, indicating that the outcome of cerebral ischemia depends crucially on the acetylation status of histones. In the present study, we characterized the changes in histone acetylation levels in ischemia models of focal cerebral ischemia and identified cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB-binding protein (CBP as a crucial factor in the susceptibility of neurons to ischemic stress. Both neuron-specific RNA interference and neurons derived from CBP heterozygous knockout mice showed increased damage after oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD in vitro. Furthermore, we demonstrated that ischemic preconditioning by a short (5 min subthreshold occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA, followed 24 h afterwards by a 30 min occlusion of the MCA, increased histone acetylation levels in vivo. Ischemic preconditioning enhanced CBP recruitment and histone acetylation at the promoter of the neuroprotective gene gelsolin leading to increased gelsolin expression in neurons. Inhibition of CBP's HAT activity attenuated neuronal ischemic preconditioning. Taken together, our findings suggest that the levels of CBP and histone acetylation determine stroke outcome and are crucially associated with the induction of an ischemia-resistant state in neurons.

  15. Comparative analysis of hepatitis B virus polymerase sequences required for viral RNA binding, RNA packaging, and protein priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Scott A; Clark, Daniel N; Cao, Feng; Tavis, John E; Hu, Jianming

    2014-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus replicates a DNA genome through reverse transcription of a pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) by using a multifunctional polymerase (HP). A critical function of HP is its specific association with a viral RNA signal, termed ε (Hε), located on pgRNA, which is required for specific packaging of pgRNA into viral nucleocapsids and initiation of viral reverse transcription. HP initiates reverse transcription by using itself as a protein primer (protein priming) and Hε as the obligatory template. HP is made up of four domains, including the terminal protein (TP), the spacer, the reverse transcriptase (RT), and the RNase H domains. A recently developed, Hε-dependent, in vitro protein priming assay was used in this study to demonstrate that almost the entire TP and RT domains and most of the RNase H domain were required for protein priming. Specific residues within TP, RT, and the spacer were identified as being critical for HP-Hε binding and/or protein priming. Comparison of HP sequence requirements for Hε binding, pgRNA packaging, and protein priming allowed the classification of the HP mutants into five groups, each with distinct effects on these complex and related processes. Detailed characterization of HP requirements for these related and essential functions of HP will further elucidate the mechanisms of its multiple functions and aid in the targeting of these functions for antiviral therapy.

  16. Complement-mediated neutralization of dengue virus requires mannose-binding lectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avirutnan, Panisadee; Hauhart, Richard E; Marovich, Mary A

    2011-01-01

    -dependent activation of the complement cascade neutralized insect cell-derived West Nile virus (WNV) in cell culture and restricted pathogenesis in mice. Here, we investigated the antiviral activity of MBL in infection by dengue virus (DENV), a related flavivirus. Using a panel of naïve sera from mouse strains...... with lower levels. Our studies suggest that allelic variation of MBL in humans may impact complement-dependent control of DENV pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-transmitted virus that causes a spectrum of clinical disease in humans ranging from subclinical infection to dengue...... hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Four serotypes of DENV exist, and severe illness is usually associated with secondary infection by a different serotype. Here, we show that mannose-binding lectin (MBL), a pattern recognition molecule that initiates the lectin pathway of complement activation...

  17. Complement-mediated neutralization of dengue virus requires mannose-binding lectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avirutnan, Panisadee; Hauhart, Richard E; Marovich, Mary A

    2011-01-01

    hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Four serotypes of DENV exist, and severe illness is usually associated with secondary infection by a different serotype. Here, we show that mannose-binding lectin (MBL), a pattern recognition molecule that initiates the lectin pathway of complement activation......-dependent activation of the complement cascade neutralized insect cell-derived West Nile virus (WNV) in cell culture and restricted pathogenesis in mice. Here, we investigated the antiviral activity of MBL in infection by dengue virus (DENV), a related flavivirus. Using a panel of naïve sera from mouse strains...... with lower levels. Our studies suggest that allelic variation of MBL in humans may impact complement-dependent control of DENV pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-transmitted virus that causes a spectrum of clinical disease in humans ranging from subclinical infection to dengue...

  18. Lantibiotic transporter requires cooperative functioning of the peptidase domain and the ATP binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishie, Mami; Sasaki, Makoto; Nagao, Jun-ichi; Zendo, Takeshi; Nakayama, Jiro; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2011-04-01

    Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptide antibiotics that contain unusual amino acids such as dehydro and lanthionine residues. Nukacin ISK-1 is a class II lantibiotic, whose precursor peptide (NukA) is modified by NukM to form modified NukA. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter NukT is predicted to cleave off the N-terminal leader peptide of modified NukA and secrete the mature peptide. Multiple sequence alignments revealed that NukT has an N-terminal peptidase domain (PEP) and a C-terminal ATP binding domain (ABD). Previously, in vitro reconstitution of NukT has revealed that NukT peptidase activity depends on ATP hydrolysis. Here, we constructed a series of NukT mutants and investigated their transport activity in vivo and peptidase activity in vitro. Most of the mutations of the conserved residues of PEP or ABD resulted in failure of nukacin ISK-1 production and accumulation of modified NukA inside the cells. NukT(N106D) was found to be the only mutant capable of producing nukacin ISK-1. Asn(106) is conserved as Asp in other related ABC transporters. Additionally, an in vitro peptidase assay of NukT mutants demonstrated that PEP is on the cytosolic side and all of the ABD mutants as well as PEP (with the exception of NukT(N106D)) did not have peptidase activity in vitro. Taken together, these observations suggest that the leader peptide is cleaved off inside the cells before peptide secretion; both PEP and ABD are important for NukT peptidase activity, and cooperation between these two domains inside the cells is indispensable for proper functioning of NukT.

  19. Lantibiotic Transporter Requires Cooperative Functioning of the Peptidase Domain and the ATP Binding Domain*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishie, Mami; Sasaki, Makoto; Nagao, Jun-ichi; Zendo, Takeshi; Nakayama, Jiro; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptide antibiotics that contain unusual amino acids such as dehydro and lanthionine residues. Nukacin ISK-1 is a class II lantibiotic, whose precursor peptide (NukA) is modified by NukM to form modified NukA. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter NukT is predicted to cleave off the N-terminal leader peptide of modified NukA and secrete the mature peptide. Multiple sequence alignments revealed that NukT has an N-terminal peptidase domain (PEP) and a C-terminal ATP binding domain (ABD). Previously, in vitro reconstitution of NukT has revealed that NukT peptidase activity depends on ATP hydrolysis. Here, we constructed a series of NukT mutants and investigated their transport activity in vivo and peptidase activity in vitro. Most of the mutations of the conserved residues of PEP or ABD resulted in failure of nukacin ISK-1 production and accumulation of modified NukA inside the cells. NukT(N106D) was found to be the only mutant capable of producing nukacin ISK-1. Asn106 is conserved as Asp in other related ABC transporters. Additionally, an in vitro peptidase assay of NukT mutants demonstrated that PEP is on the cytosolic side and all of the ABD mutants as well as PEP (with the exception of NukT(N106D)) did not have peptidase activity in vitro. Taken together, these observations suggest that the leader peptide is cleaved off inside the cells before peptide secretion; both PEP and ABD are important for NukT peptidase activity, and cooperation between these two domains inside the cells is indispensable for proper functioning of NukT. PMID:21303905

  20. Rasp21 sequences opposite the nucleotide binding pocket are required for GRF-mediated nucleotide release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leonardsen, L; DeClue, J E; Lybaek, H

    1996-01-01

    The substrate requirements for the catalytic activity of the mouse Cdc25 homolog Guanine nucleotide Release Factor, GRF, were determined using the catalytic domain of GRF expressed in insect cells and E. coli expressed H-Ras mutants. We found a requirement for the loop 7 residues in Ras (amino ac...... and the human Ras like proteins RhoA, Rap1A, Rac1 and G25K revealed a strict Ras specificity; of these only S. pombe Ras was GRF sensitive....

  1. VIM1, a methylcytosine-binding protein required for centromeric heterochromatinization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Hye Ryun; Pontes, Olga; Pikaard, Craig S.; Richards, Eric J.

    2007-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation in eukaryotes is executed by a complex set of signaling interactions among small RNA species and chromatin marks, including histone modification and DNA methylation. We identified vim1 (VARIANT IN METHYLATION 1), an Arabidopsis mutation causing cytosine hypomethylation and decondensation of centromeres in interphase. VIM1 is a member of a small gene family, encoding proteins containing PHD, RING, and SRA (SET- and RING-associated) domains, which are found together in mammalian proteins implicated in regulation of chromatin modification, transcription, and the cell cycle. VIM1 is an unconventional methylcytosine-binding protein that interacts in vitro with 5mCpG- and 5mCpHpG-modified DNA (via its SRA domain), as well as recombinant histones (H2B, H3, H4, and HTR12) in plant extracts. VIM1 associates with methylated genomic loci in vivo and is enriched in chromocenters. Our findings suggest that VIM1 acts at the DNA methylation–histone interface to maintain centromeric heterochromatin. PMID:17242155

  2. The Actin-Binding Protein α-Adducin Is Required for Maintaining Axon Diameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Sérgio Carvalho; Sampaio, Paula; Sousa, Vera Filipe; Nogueira-Rodrigues, Joana; Pinto-Costa, Rita; Peters, Luanne Laurel; Brites, Pedro; Sousa, Mónica Mendes

    2016-04-19

    The actin-binding protein adducin was recently identified as a component of the neuronal subcortical cytoskeleton. Here, we analyzed mice lacking adducin to uncover the function of this protein in actin rings. α-adducin knockout mice presented progressive axon enlargement in the spinal cord and optic and sciatic nerves, followed by axon degeneration and loss. Using stimulated emission depletion super-resolution microscopy, we show that a periodic subcortical actin cytoskeleton is assembled in every neuron type inspected including retinal ganglion cells and dorsal root ganglia neurons. In neurons devoid of adducin, the actin ring diameter increased, although the inter-ring periodicity was maintained. In vitro, the actin ring diameter adjusted as axons grew, suggesting the lattice is dynamic. Our data support a model in which adducin activity is not essential for actin ring assembly and periodicity but is necessary to control the diameter of both actin rings and axons and actin filament growth within rings. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Actin-Binding Protein α-Adducin Is Required for Maintaining Axon Diameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Carvalho Leite

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The actin-binding protein adducin was recently identified as a component of the neuronal subcortical cytoskeleton. Here, we analyzed mice lacking adducin to uncover the function of this protein in actin rings. α-adducin knockout mice presented progressive axon enlargement in the spinal cord and optic and sciatic nerves, followed by axon degeneration and loss. Using stimulated emission depletion super-resolution microscopy, we show that a periodic subcortical actin cytoskeleton is assembled in every neuron type inspected including retinal ganglion cells and dorsal root ganglia neurons. In neurons devoid of adducin, the actin ring diameter increased, although the inter-ring periodicity was maintained. In vitro, the actin ring diameter adjusted as axons grew, suggesting the lattice is dynamic. Our data support a model in which adducin activity is not essential for actin ring assembly and periodicity but is necessary to control the diameter of both actin rings and axons and actin filament growth within rings.

  4. A DNA Binding Protein Is Required for Viral Replication and Transcription in Bombyx mori Nucleopolyhedrovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Cui; Zhang, Chen; Chen, Bin; Shi, Yanghui; Quan, Yanping; Nie, Zuoming; Zhang, Yaozhou; Yu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A DNA-binding protein (DBP) [GenBank accession number: M63416] of Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus (BmNPV) has been reported to be a regulatory factor in BmNPV, but its detailed functions remain unknown. In order to study the regulatory mechanism of DBP on viral proliferation, genome replication, and gene transcription, a BmNPV dbp gene knockout virus dbp-ko-Bacmid was generated by the means of Red recombination system. In addition, dbp-repaired virus dbp-re-Bacmid was constructed by the means of the Bac to Bac system. Then, the Bacmids were transfected into BmN cells. The results of this viral titer experiment revealed that the TCID50 of the dbp-ko-Bacmid was 0; however, the dbp-re-Bacmid was similar to the wtBacmid (p>0.05), indicating that the dbp-deficient would lead to failure in the assembly of virus particles. In the next step, Real-Time PCR was used to analyze the transcriptional phases of dbp gene in BmN cells, which had been infected with BmNPV. The results of the latter experiment revealed that the transcript of dbp gene was first detected at 3 h post-infection. Furthermore, the replication level of virus genome and the transcriptional level of virus early, late, and very late genes in BmN cells, which had been transfected with 3 kinds of Bacmids, were analyzed by Real-Time PCR. The demonstrating that the replication level of genome was lower than that of wtBacmid and dbp-re-Bacmid (pviral replication, but also a viral gene that has a significant impact on transcription and expression during all periods of baculovirus life cycle.

  5. The ligand binding domain of GCNF is not required for repression of pluripotency genes in mouse fetal ovarian germ cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah M Okumura

    Full Text Available In mice, successful development and reproduction require that all cells, including germ cells, transition from a pluripotent to a differentiated state. This transition is associated with silencing of the pluripotency genes Oct4 and Nanog. Interestingly, these genes are repressed at different developmental timepoints in germ and somatic cells. Ovarian germ cells maintain their expression until about embryonic day (E 14.5, whereas somatic cells silence them much earlier, at about E8.0. In both somatic cells and embryonic stem cells, silencing of Oct4 and Nanog requires the nuclear receptor GCNF. However, expression of the Gcnf gene has not been investigated in fetal ovarian germ cells, and whether it is required for silencing Oct4 and Nanog in that context is not known. Here we demonstrate that Gcnf is expressed in fetal ovarian germ cells, peaking at E14.5, when Oct4 and Nanog are silenced. However, conditional ablation of the ligand-binding domain of Gcnf using a ubiquitous, tamoxifen-inducible Cre indicates that Gcnf is not required for the down-regulation of pluripotency genes in fetal ovarian germ cells, nor is it required for initiation of meiosis and oogenesis. These results suggest that the silencing of Oct4 and Nanog in germ cells occurs via a different mechanism from that operating in somatic cells during gastrulation.

  6. Distinct phosphorylation requirements regulate cortactin activation by TirEPEC and its binding to N-WASP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez-Quiles Narcisa

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cortactin activates the actin-related 2/3 (Arp2/3 complex promoting actin polymerization to remodel cell architecture in multiple processes (e.g. cell migration, membrane trafficking, invadopodia formation etc.. Moreover, it was called the Achilles' heel of the actin cytoskeleton because many pathogens hijack signals that converge on this oncogenic scaffolding protein. Cortactin is able to modulate N-WASP activation in vitro in a phosphorylation-dependent fashion. Thus Erk-phosphorylated cortactin is efficient in activating N-WASP through its SH3 domain, while Src-phosphorylated cortactin is not. This could represent a switch on/off mechanism controlling the coordinated action of both nucleator promoting factors (NPFs. Pedestal formation by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC requires N-WASP activation. N-WASP is recruited by the cell adapter Nck which binds a major tyrosine-phosphorylated site of a bacterial injected effector, Tir (translocated intimin receptor. Tir-Nck-N-WASP axis defines the current major pathway to actin polymerization on pedestals. In addition, it was recently reported that EPEC induces tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin. Results Here we demonstrate that cortactin phosphorylation is absent on N-WASP deficient cells, but is recovered by re-expression of N-WASP. We used purified recombinant cortactin and Tir proteins to demonstrate a direct interaction of both that promoted Arp2/3 complex-mediated actin polymerization in vitro, independently of cortactin phosphorylation. Conclusion We propose that cortactin binds Tir through its N-terminal part in a tyrosine and serine phosphorylation independent manner while SH3 domain binding and activation of N-WASP is regulated by tyrosine and serine mediated phosphorylation of cortactin. Therefore cortactin could act on Tir-Nck-N-WASP pathway and control a possible cycling activity of N-WASP underlying pedestal formation.

  7. Binding of ADAM12, a marker of skeletal muscle regeneration, to the muscle-specific actin-binding protein, alpha -actinin-2, is required for myoblast fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galliano, M F; Huet, C; Frygelius, J

    2000-01-01

    of differentiation. Using the yeast two-hybrid screen, we found that the muscle-specific alpha-actinin-2 strongly binds to the cytoplasmic tail of ADAM12. In vitro binding assays with GST fusion proteins confirmed the specific interaction. The major binding site for alpha-actinin-2 was mapped to a short sequence......ADAM12 belongs to the transmembrane metalloprotease ADAM ("a disintegrin and metalloprotease") family. ADAM12 has been implicated in muscle cell differentiation and fusion, but its precise function remains unknown. Here, we show that ADAM12 is dramatically up-regulated in regenerated, newly formed...... in a dominant negative fashion by inhibiting fusion of C2C12 cells, whereas expression of a cytosolic ADAM12 lacking the major alpha-actinin-2 binding site had no effect on cell fusion. Our results suggest that interaction of ADAM12 with alpha-actinin-2 is important for ADAM12 function....

  8. Efficient RNA pseudouridylation by eukaryotic H/ACA ribonucleoproteins requires high affinity binding and correct positioning of guide RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caton, Evan A; Kelly, Erin K; Kamalampeta, Rajashekhar

    2018-01-01

    Abstract H/ACA ribonucleoproteins (H/ACA RNPs) are responsible for introducing many pseudouridines into RNAs, but are also involved in other cellular functions. Utilizing a purified and reconstituted yeast H/ACA RNP system that is active in pseudouridine formation under physiological conditions, we describe here the quantitative characterization of H/ACA RNP formation and function. This analysis reveals a surprisingly tight interaction of H/ACA guide RNA with the Cbf5p–Nop10p–Gar1p trimeric protein complex whereas Nhp2p binds comparably weakly to H/ACA guide RNA. Substrate RNA is bound to H/ACA RNPs with nanomolar affinity which correlates with the GC content in the guide-substrate RNA base pairing. Both Nhp2p and the conserved Box ACA element in guide RNA are required for efficient pseudouridine formation, but not for guide RNA or substrate RNA binding. These results suggest that Nhp2p and the Box ACA motif indirectly facilitate loading of the substrate RNA in the catalytic site of Cbf5p by correctly positioning the upper and lower parts of the H/ACA guide RNA on the H/ACA proteins. In summary, this study provides detailed insight into the molecular mechanism of H/ACA RNPs. PMID:29177505

  9. Oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) is required for the perinuclear localization of intra-Golgi v-SNAREs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Taki; Uchida, Yasunori; Yachi, Rieko; Kudlyk, Tetyana; Lupashin, Vladimir; Inoue, Takao; Taguchi, Tomohiko; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2013-11-01

    Oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) and OSBP-related proteins (ORPs) have been implicated in the distribution of sterols among intracellular organelles. OSBP regulates the Golgi cholesterol level, but how it relates to Golgi function is elusive. Here we report that OSBP is essential for the localization of intra-Golgi soluble vesicle N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion attachment protein receptors (v-SNAREs). Depletion of OSBP by small interfering RNA causes mislocalization of intra-Golgi v-SNAREs GS28 and GS15 throughout the cytoplasm without affecting the perinuclear localization of Golgi target-SNARE syntaxin5 and reduces the abundance of a Golgi enzyme, mannosidase II (Man II). GS28 mislocalization and Man II reduction are also induced by cellular cholesterol depletion. Three domains of OSBP-an endoplasmic reticulum-targeting domain, a Golgi-targeting domain, and a sterol-binding domain-are all required for Golgi localization of GS28. Finally, GS28 mislocalization and Man II reduction in OSBP-depleted cells are largely restored by depletion of ArfGAP1, a regulator of the budding of coat protein complex (COP)-I vesicles. From these results, we postulate that Golgi cholesterol level, which is controlled by OSBP, is essential for Golgi localization of intra-Golgi v-SNAREs by ensuring proper COP-I vesicle transport.

  10. Attention is required for maintenance of feature binding in visual working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zokaei, Nahid; Heider, Maike; Husain, Masud

    2014-01-01

    Working memory and attention are intimately connected. However, understanding the relationship between the two is challenging. Currently, there is an important controversy about whether objects in working memory are maintained automatically or require resources that are also deployed for visual or auditory attention. Here we investigated the effects of loading attention resources on precision of visual working memory, specifically on correct maintenance of feature-bound objects, using a dual-task paradigm. Participants were presented with a memory array and were asked to remember either direction of motion of random dot kinematograms of different colour, or orientation of coloured bars. During the maintenance period, they performed a secondary visual or auditory task, with varying levels of load. Following a retention period, they adjusted a coloured probe to match either the motion direction or orientation of stimuli with the same colour in the memory array. This allowed us to examine the effects of an attention-demanding task performed during maintenance on precision of recall on the concurrent working memory task. Systematic increase in attention load during maintenance resulted in a significant decrease in overall working memory performance. Changes in overall performance were specifically accompanied by an increase in feature misbinding errors: erroneous reporting of nontarget motion or orientation. Thus in trials where attention resources were taxed, participants were more likely to respond with nontarget values rather than simply making random responses. Our findings suggest that resources used during attention-demanding visual or auditory tasks also contribute to maintaining feature-bound representations in visual working memory-but not necessarily other aspects of working memory.

  11. Attention is required for maintenance of feature binding in visual working memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heider, Maike; Husain, Masud

    2013-01-01

    Working memory and attention are intimately connected. However, understanding the relationship between the two is challenging. Currently, there is an important controversy about whether objects in working memory are maintained automatically or require resources that are also deployed for visual or auditory attention. Here we investigated the effects of loading attention resources on precision of visual working memory, specifically on correct maintenance of feature-bound objects, using a dual-task paradigm. Participants were presented with a memory array and were asked to remember either direction of motion of random dot kinematograms of different colour, or orientation of coloured bars. During the maintenance period, they performed a secondary visual or auditory task, with varying levels of load. Following a retention period, they adjusted a coloured probe to match either the motion direction or orientation of stimuli with the same colour in the memory array. This allowed us to examine the effects of an attention-demanding task performed during maintenance on precision of recall on the concurrent working memory task. Systematic increase in attention load during maintenance resulted in a significant decrease in overall working memory performance. Changes in overall performance were specifically accompanied by an increase in feature misbinding errors: erroneous reporting of nontarget motion or orientation. Thus in trials where attention resources were taxed, participants were more likely to respond with nontarget values rather than simply making random responses. Our findings suggest that resources used during attention-demanding visual or auditory tasks also contribute to maintaining feature-bound representations in visual working memory—but not necessarily other aspects of working memory. PMID:24266343

  12. Human Brain-Derived Aβ Oligomers Bind to Synapses and Disrupt Synaptic Activity in a Manner That Requires APP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zemin; Jackson, Rosemary J; Hong, Wei; Taylor, Walter M; Corbett, Grant T; Moreno, Arturo; Liu, Wen; Li, Shaomin; Frosch, Matthew P; Slutsky, Inna; Young-Pearse, Tracy L; Spires-Jones, Tara L; Walsh, Dominic M

    2017-12-06

    Compelling genetic evidence links the amyloid precursor protein (APP) to Alzheimer's disease (AD) and several theories have been advanced to explain the relationship. A leading hypothesis proposes that a small amphipathic fragment of APP, the amyloid β-protein (Aβ), self-associates to form soluble aggregates that impair synaptic and network activity. Here, we used the most disease-relevant form of Aβ, protein isolated from AD brain. Using this material, we show that the synaptotoxic effects of Aβ depend on expression of APP and that the Aβ-mediated impairment of synaptic plasticity is accompanied by presynaptic effects that disrupt the excitatory/inhibitory (E/I) balance. The net increase in the E/I ratio and inhibition of plasticity are associated with Aβ localizing to synapses and binding of soluble Aβ aggregates to synapses requires the expression of APP. Our findings indicate a role for APP in AD pathogenesis beyond the generation of Aβ and suggest modulation of APP expression as a therapy for AD. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Here, we report on the plasticity-disrupting effects of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) isolated from Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain and the requirement of amyloid precursor protein (APP) for these effects. We show that Aβ-containing AD brain extracts block hippocampal LTP, augment glutamate release probability, and disrupt the excitatory/inhibitory balance. These effects are associated with Aβ localizing to synapses and genetic ablation of APP prevents both Aβ binding and Aβ-mediated synaptic dysfunctions. Our results emphasize the importance of APP in AD and should stimulate new studies to elucidate APP-related targets suitable for pharmacological manipulation. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/3711947-20$15.00/0.

  13. Identification of RNA Binding Proteins Associated with Dengue Virus RNA in Infected Cells Reveals Temporally Distinct Host Factor Requirements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V Viktorovskaya

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available There are currently no vaccines or antivirals available for dengue virus infection, which can cause dengue hemorrhagic fever and death. A better understanding of the host pathogen interaction is required to develop effective therapies to treat DENV. In particular, very little is known about how cellular RNA binding proteins interact with viral RNAs. RNAs within cells are not naked; rather they are coated with proteins that affect localization, stability, translation and (for viruses replication.Seventy-nine novel RNA binding proteins for dengue virus (DENV were identified by cross-linking proteins to dengue viral RNA during a live infection in human cells. These cellular proteins were specific and distinct from those previously identified for poliovirus, suggesting a specialized role for these factors in DENV amplification. Knockdown of these proteins demonstrated their function as viral host factors, with evidence for some factors acting early, while others late in infection. Their requirement by DENV for efficient amplification is likely specific, since protein knockdown did not impair the cell fitness for viral amplification of an unrelated virus. The protein abundances of these host factors were not significantly altered during DENV infection, suggesting their interaction with DENV RNA was due to specific recruitment mechanisms. However, at the global proteome level, DENV altered the abundances of proteins in particular classes, including transporter proteins, which were down regulated, and proteins in the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, which were up regulated.The method for identification of host factors described here is robust and broadly applicable to all RNA viruses, providing an avenue to determine the conserved or distinct mechanisms through which diverse viruses manage the viral RNA within cells. This study significantly increases the number of cellular factors known to interact with DENV and reveals how DENV modulates and usurps

  14. Conformational plasticity of the coiled coil domain of BmrR is required for bmr operator binding - the structure of unliganded BmrR

    OpenAIRE

    Kumaraswami, Muthiah; Newberry, Kate J.; Brennan, Richard G.

    2010-01-01

    The multidrug-binding transcription regulator, BmrR, from Bacillus subtilis is a MerR family member that binds to a wide array of cationic lipophilic toxins to activate transcription of the multidrug efflux pump gene, bmr. Transcription activation from the σA-dependent bmr operator requires BmrR to remodel the nonoptimal 19 base pair spacer between the −10 and −35 promoter elements in order to facilitate productive RNA polymerase binding. Despite the availability of several structures of BmrR...

  15. Additional sex combs-like 2 is required for polycomb repressive complex 2 binding at select targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hsiao-Lei; Wang, Q Tian

    2013-01-01

    Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins are epigenetic repressors of gene expression. The Drosophila Additional sex combs (Asx) gene and its mammalian homologs exhibit PcG function in genetic assays; however, the mechanism by which Asx family proteins mediate gene repression is not well understood. ASXL2, one of three mammalian homologs for Asx, is highly expressed in the mammalian heart and is required for the maintenance of cardiac function. We have previously shown that Asxl2 deficiency results in a reduction in the bulk level of histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3), a repressive mark generated by the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2). Here we identify several ASXL2 target genes in the heart and investigate the mechanism by which ASXL2 facilitates their repression. We show that the Asxl2-deficient heart is defective in converting H3K27me2 to H3K27me3 and in removing ubiquitin from mono-ubiquitinated histone H2A. ASXL2 and PRC2 interact in the adult heart and co-localize to target promoters. ASXL2 is required for the binding of PRC2 and for the enrichment of H3K27me3 at target promoters. These results add a new perspective to our understanding of the mechanisms that regulate PcG activity and gene repression.

  16. Additional sex combs-like 2 is required for polycomb repressive complex 2 binding at select targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Lei Lai

    Full Text Available Polycomb Group (PcG proteins are epigenetic repressors of gene expression. The Drosophila Additional sex combs (Asx gene and its mammalian homologs exhibit PcG function in genetic assays; however, the mechanism by which Asx family proteins mediate gene repression is not well understood. ASXL2, one of three mammalian homologs for Asx, is highly expressed in the mammalian heart and is required for the maintenance of cardiac function. We have previously shown that Asxl2 deficiency results in a reduction in the bulk level of histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3, a repressive mark generated by the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2. Here we identify several ASXL2 target genes in the heart and investigate the mechanism by which ASXL2 facilitates their repression. We show that the Asxl2-deficient heart is defective in converting H3K27me2 to H3K27me3 and in removing ubiquitin from mono-ubiquitinated histone H2A. ASXL2 and PRC2 interact in the adult heart and co-localize to target promoters. ASXL2 is required for the binding of PRC2 and for the enrichment of H3K27me3 at target promoters. These results add a new perspective to our understanding of the mechanisms that regulate PcG activity and gene repression.

  17. Requirement for an A-tract structure at the binding site of phage phi 29 transcriptional activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuez, B; Rojo, F; Salas, M

    1994-03-25

    The Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29 transcriptional activator, protein p4, binds to the 5'-AACT-TTTT-15 base-pair spacer-AAAATGTT-3' inverted repeat. In this communication, we study the influence in protein p4 binding of the DNA helical structure within the protein p4 recognition sequences, 5'-AAAATAG-3'. Protein p4 could efficiently bind to a modified target in which the A-tracts had been changed into T-tracts (a different sequence with a similar structure). Binding was lost when the structure of the binding site was modified by an interrupting C residue. The results suggest that the DNA helical structure of the A-tracts is critical for p4 binding. Two models are described that would explain how protein p4 recognized its target sequences on the DNA.

  18. Requirement for the Phospho-H2AX Binding Module of Crb2 in Double-Strand Break Targeting and Checkpoint Activation▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Steven L.; Arida, Ahmad R.; Phan, Funita P.

    2010-01-01

    Activation of DNA damage checkpoints requires the rapid accumulation of numerous factors to sites of genomic lesions, and deciphering the mechanisms of this targeting is central to our understanding of DNA damage response. Histone modification has recently emerged as a critical element for the correct localization of damage response proteins, and one key player in this context is the fission yeast checkpoint mediator Crb2. Accumulation of Crb2 at ionizing irradiation-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs) requires two distinct histone marks, dimethylated H4 lysine 20 (H4K20me2) and phosphorylated H2AX (pH2AX). A tandem tudor motif in Crb2 directly binds H4K20me2, and this interaction is required for DSB targeting and checkpoint activation. Similarly, pH2AX is required for Crb2 localization to DSBs and checkpoint control. Crb2 can directly bind pH2AX through a pair of C-terminal BRCT repeats, but the functional significance of this binding has been unclear. Here we demonstrate that loss of its pH2AX-binding activity severely impairs the ability of Crb2 to accumulate at ionizing irradiation-induced DSBs, compromises checkpoint signaling, and disrupts checkpoint-mediated cell cycle arrest. These impairments are similar to that reported for abolition of pH2AX or mutation of the H4K20me2-binding tudor motif of Crb2. Intriguingly, a combined ablation of its two histone modification binding modules yields a strikingly additive reduction in Crb2 activity. These observations argue that binding of the Crb2 BRCT repeats to pH2AX is critical for checkpoint activity and provide new insight into the mechanisms of chromatin-mediated genome stability. PMID:20679488

  19. Requirement for the phospho-H2AX binding module of Crb2 in double-strand break targeting and checkpoint activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Steven L; Arida, Ahmad R; Phan, Funita P

    2010-10-01

    Activation of DNA damage checkpoints requires the rapid accumulation of numerous factors to sites of genomic lesions, and deciphering the mechanisms of this targeting is central to our understanding of DNA damage response. Histone modification has recently emerged as a critical element for the correct localization of damage response proteins, and one key player in this context is the fission yeast checkpoint mediator Crb2. Accumulation of Crb2 at ionizing irradiation-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs) requires two distinct histone marks, dimethylated H4 lysine 20 (H4K20me2) and phosphorylated H2AX (pH2AX). A tandem tudor motif in Crb2 directly binds H4K20me2, and this interaction is required for DSB targeting and checkpoint activation. Similarly, pH2AX is required for Crb2 localization to DSBs and checkpoint control. Crb2 can directly bind pH2AX through a pair of C-terminal BRCT repeats, but the functional significance of this binding has been unclear. Here we demonstrate that loss of its pH2AX-binding activity severely impairs the ability of Crb2 to accumulate at ionizing irradiation-induced DSBs, compromises checkpoint signaling, and disrupts checkpoint-mediated cell cycle arrest. These impairments are similar to that reported for abolition of pH2AX or mutation of the H4K20me2-binding tudor motif of Crb2. Intriguingly, a combined ablation of its two histone modification binding modules yields a strikingly additive reduction in Crb2 activity. These observations argue that binding of the Crb2 BRCT repeats to pH2AX is critical for checkpoint activity and provide new insight into the mechanisms of chromatin-mediated genome stability.

  20. The yeast Pan2 protein is required for poly(A)-binding protein-stimulated poly(A)-nuclease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeck, R; Tarun, S; Rieger, M; Deardorff, J A; Müller-Auer, S; Sachs, A B

    1996-01-05

    The removal of the mRNA poly(A) tail in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is stimulated by the poly(A)-binding protein (Pab1p). A large scale purification of the Pab1p-stimulated poly(A) ribonuclease (PAN) identifies a 76-kDa and two 135-Da polypeptides as candidate enzyme subunits. Antibodies against the Pan1p protein, which is the minor 135-kDa protein in the preparation, can immunodeplete Pan1p but not PAN activity. The protein sequence of the major 135-kDa protein, Pan2p, reveals a novel protein that was also found in the previously reported PAN purification (Sachs, A. B., and Deardorff, J. A. (1992) Cell 70, 961-973). Deletion of the non-essential PAN2 gene results in an increase of the average length of mRNA poly(A) tails in vivo, and a loss of Pab1p-stimulated PAN activity in crude extracts. These data confirm that Pan2p and not Pan1p is required for PAN activity, and they suggest that ribonucleases other than the Pab1p-stimulated PAN are capable of shortening poly(A) tails in vivo.

  1. Midbody Targeting of the ESCRT Machinery by a Noncanonical Coiled Coil in CEP55

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyung Ho; Elia, Natalie; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Hurley, James H. (NIH)

    2008-11-14

    The ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) machinery is required for the scission of membrane necks in processes including the budding of HIV-1 and cytokinesis. An essential step in cytokinesis is recruitment of the ESCRT-I complex and the ESCRT-associated protein ALIX to the midbody (the structure that tethers two daughter cells) by the protein CEP55. Biochemical experiments show that peptides from ALIX and the ESCRT-I subunit TSG101 compete for binding to the ESCRT and ALIX-binding region (EABR) of CEP55. We solved the crystal structure of EABR bound to an ALIX peptide at a resolution of 2.0 angstroms. The structure shows that EABR forms an aberrant dimeric parallel coiled coil. Bulky and charged residues at the interface of the two central heptad repeats create asymmetry and a single binding site for an ALIX or TSG101 peptide. Both ALIX and ESCRT-I are required for cytokinesis, which suggests that multiple CEP55 dimers are required for function.

  2. RAE-1, a novel PHR binding protein, is required for axon termination and synapse formation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, Brock; Chen, Lizhen; Tulgren, Erik D; Baker, Scott T; Bienvenut, Willy; Anderson, Matthew; Quadroni, Manfredo; Jin, Yishi; Garner, Craig C

    2012-02-22

    Previous studies in Caenorhabditis elegans showed that RPM-1 (Regulator of Presynaptic Morphology-1) regulates axon termination and synapse formation. To understand the mechanism of how rpm-1 functions, we have used mass spectrometry to identify RPM-1 binding proteins, and have identified RAE-1 (RNA Export protein-1) as an evolutionarily conserved binding partner. We define a RAE-1 binding region in RPM-1, and show that this binding interaction is conserved and also occurs between Rae1 and the human ortholog of RPM-1 called Pam (protein associated with Myc). rae-1 loss of function causes similar axon and synapse defects, and synergizes genetically with two other RPM-1 binding proteins, GLO-4 and FSN-1. Further, we show that RAE-1 colocalizes with RPM-1 in neurons, and that rae-1 functions downstream of rpm-1. These studies establish a novel postmitotic function for rae-1 in neuronal development.

  3. Stimulation of translation by human Unr requires cold shock domains 2 and 4, and correlates with poly(A) binding protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Swagat; Anderson, Emma C

    2016-03-03

    The RNA binding protein Unr, which contains five cold shock domains, has several specific roles in post-transcriptional control of gene expression. It can act as an activator or inhibitor of translation initiation, promote mRNA turnover, or stabilise mRNA. Its role depends on the mRNA and other proteins to which it binds, which includes cytoplasmic poly(A) binding protein 1 (PABP1). Since PABP1 binds to all polyadenylated mRNAs, and is involved in translation initiation by interaction with eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G), we investigated whether Unr has a general role in translational control. We found that Unr strongly stimulates translation in vitro, and mutation of cold shock domains 2 or 4 inhibited its translation activity. The ability of Unr and its mutants to stimulate translation correlated with its ability to bind RNA, and to interact with PABP1. We found that Unr stimulated the binding of PABP1 to mRNA, and that Unr was required for the stable interaction of PABP1 and eIF4G in cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Unr reduced the overall level of cellular translation in cells, as well as that of cap-dependent and IRES-dependent reporters. These data describe a novel role for Unr in regulating cellular gene expression.

  4. Guanine nucleotide-binding protein (Gα) endocytosis by a cascade of ubiquitin binding domain proteins is required for sustained morphogenesis and proper mating in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Gauri; Baker, Rachael; Sacks, Carly M; Torres, Matthew P; Dohlman, Henrik G

    2014-05-23

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are well known to transmit signals from cell surface receptors to intracellular effector proteins. There is growing appreciation that G proteins are also present at endomembrane compartments, where they can potentially interact with a distinct set of signaling proteins. Here, we examine the cellular trafficking function of the G protein α subunit in yeast, Gpa1. Gpa1 contains a unique 109-amino acid insert within the α-helical domain that undergoes a variety of posttranslational modifications. Among these is monoubiquitination, catalyzed by the NEDD4 family ubiquitin ligase Rsp5. Using a newly optimized method for G protein purification together with biophysical measures of structure and function, we show that the ubiquitination domain does not influence enzyme activity. By screening a panel of 39 gene deletion mutants, each lacking a different ubiquitin binding domain protein, we identify seven that are necessary to deliver Gpa1 to the vacuole compartment including four proteins (Ede1, Bul1, Ddi1, and Rup1) previously not known to be involved in this process. Finally, we show that proper endocytosis of the G protein is needed for sustained cellular morphogenesis and mating in response to pheromone stimulation. We conclude that a cascade of ubiquitin-binding proteins serves to deliver the G protein to its final destination within the cell. In this instance and in contrast to the previously characterized visual system, endocytosis from the plasma membrane is needed for proper signal transduction rather than for signal desensitization. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. CYB5D2 requires heme-binding to regulate HeLa cell growth and confer survival from chemotherapeutic agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Bruce

    Full Text Available The cytochrome b5 domain containing 2 (CYB5D2; Neuferricin protein has been reported to bind heme, however, the critical residues responsible for heme-binding are undefined. Furthermore, the relationship between heme-binding and CYB5D2-mediated intracellular functions remains unknown. Previous studies examining heme-binding in two cytochrome b5 heme-binding domain-containing proteins, damage-associated protein 1 (Dap1; Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1, have revealed that conserved tyrosine (Y 73, Y79, aspartic acid (D 86, and Y127 residues present in human CYB5D2 may be involved in heme-binding. CYB5D2 binds to type b heme, however, only the substitution of glycine (G at D86 (D86G within its cytochrome b5 heme-binding (cyt-b5 domain abolished its heme-binding ability. Both CYB5D2 and CYB5D2(D86G localize to the endoplasmic reticulum. Ectopic CYB5D2 expression inhibited cell proliferation and anchorage-independent colony growth of HeLa cells. Conversely, CYB5D2 knockdown and ectopic CYB5D2(D86G expression increased cell proliferation and colony growth. As PGRMC1 has been reported to regulate the expression and activities of cytochrome P450 proteins (CYPs, we examined the role of CYB5D2 in regulating the activities of CYPs involved in sterol synthesis (CYP51A1 and drug metabolism (CYP3A4. CYB5D2 co-localizes with cytochrome P450 reductase (CYPOR, while CYB5D2 knockdown reduced lanosterol demethylase (CYP51A1 levels and rendered HeLa cells sensitive to mevalonate. Additionally, knockdown of CYB5D2 reduced CYP3A4 activity. Lastly, CYB5D2 expression conferred HeLa cell survival from chemotherapeutic agents (paclitaxel, cisplatin and doxorubicin, with its ability to promote survival being dependent on its heme-binding ability. Taken together, this study provides evidence that heme-binding is critical for CYB5D2 in regulating HeLa cell growth and survival, with endogenous CYB5D2 being required to

  6. An intact sequence-specific DNA-binding domain is required for human cytomegalovirus-mediated sequestration of p53 and may promote in vivo binding to the viral genome during infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenke, Kyle; Samuel, Melanie A.; McDowell, Eric T.; Toerne, Melissa A.; Fortunato, Elizabeth A.

    2006-01-01

    The p53 protein is stabilized during infection of primary human fibroblasts with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). However, the p53 in HCMV-infected cells is unable to activate its downstream targets. HCMV accomplishes this inactivation, at least in part, by sequestering p53 into viral replication centers within the cell's nucleus soon after they are established. In order to better understand the interplay between HCMV and p53 and the mechanism of sequestration, we constructed a panel of mutant p53-GFP fusion constructs for use in transfection/infection experiments. These mutants affected several post-translational modification sites and several sites within the central sequence-specific DNA-binding domain of the protein. Two categories of p53 sequestration were observed when the mutant constructs were transfected into primary fibroblasts and then infected at either high or low multiplicity. The first category, including all of the post-translational modification mutants, showed sequestration comparable to a wild-type (wt) control, while the second category, mutants affecting the DNA-binding core, were not specifically sequestered above control GFP levels. This suggested that the DNA-binding ability of the protein was required for sequestration. When the HCMV genome was analyzed for p53 consensus binding sites, 21 matches were found, which localized either to the promoters or the coding regions of viral proteins involved in DNA replication and processing as well as structural proteins. An analysis of in vivo binding to these identified sites via chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed differential binding to several of the sites over the course of infection

  7. Distinct cytoplasmic domains of the growth hormone receptor are required for glucocorticoid- and phorbol ester-induced decreases in growth hormone (GH) binding. These domains are different from that reported for GH-induced receptor internalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    King, A P; Tseng, M J; Logsdon, C D

    1996-01-01

    to be required for maximal DEX-induced inhibition of GH binding. DEX decreased GH binding to a GHR mutant F346A, which is reported to be deficient in ligand-induced internalization, suggesting that DEX decreases GH binding by a mechanism distinct from that of ligand-induced GHR internalization. PMA reduced GH...

  8. Thyroid hormone receptor binds to a site in the rat growth hormone promoter required for induction by thyroid hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, R.J.; Brent, G.A.; Warne, R.L.; Larsen, P.R.; Moore, D.D.

    1987-01-01

    Transcription of the rat growth hormone (rGH) gene in pituitary cells is increased by addition of thyroid hormone (T3). This induction is dependent on the presence of specific sequences just upstream of the rGH promoter. The authors have partially purified T3 receptor from rat liver and examined its interaction with these rGH sequences. They show here that T3 receptor binds specifically to a site just upstream of the basal rGH promoter. This binding site includes two copies of a 7-base-pair direct repeat, the centers of which are separated by 10 base pairs. Deletions that specifically remove the T3 receptor binding site drastically reduce response to T3 in transient transfection experiments. These results demonstrate that T3 receptor can recognize specific DNA sequences and suggest that it can act directly as a positive transcriptional regulatory factor

  9. Exploring QSAR with E-state index: selectivity requirements for COX-2 versus COX-1 binding of terphenyl methyl sulfones and sulfonamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Santanu; Sengupta, Chandana; Roy, Kunal

    2004-09-20

    An attempt has been made to explore selectivity requirements for cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) versus cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) binding of terphenyl methyl sulfones and sulfonamides using electrotopological state (E-state) index and suitable indicator parameters. Multiple linear regression analyses produced statistically acceptable equations: the best relation based on 'all-possible-subsets regression' for COX-1 binding (n=18) showed predicted variance and explained variance of 0.675 and 0.777, respectively, while in case of the best equation for COX-2 binding (n=38), these values rose to 0.842 and 0.874, respectively. For the selectivity relation (n=17), predicted variance and explained variance values were 0.601 and 0.687, respectively. Based on the results of the analyses, three important sites have been suggested: sites A (methylsulfonyl or aminosulfonyl moiety), B (central phenyl ring), and C (terminal phenyl ring containing different substituents). All three sites are important for COX-2 binding while sites B and C are important for COX-1 binding. For COX-2 selectivity, only site C plays an important role. The study shows the utility of E-state index in developing statistically acceptable model having direct physicochemical significance.

  10. Targeted deletion of multiple CTCF-binding elements in the human C-MYC gene reveals a requirement for CTCF in C-MYC expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy M Gombert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulators and domain boundaries both shield genes from adjacent enhancers and inhibit intrusion of heterochromatin into transgenes. Previous studies examined the functional mechanism of the MYC insulator element MINE and its CTCF binding sites in the context of transgenes that were randomly inserted into the genome by transfection. However, the contribution of CTCF binding sites to both gene regulation and maintenance of chromatin has not been tested at the endogenous MYC gene. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To determine the impact of CTCF binding on MYC expression, a series of mutant human chromosomal alleles was prepared in homologous recombination-efficient DT40 cells and individually transferred by microcell fusion into murine cells. Functional tests reported here reveal that deletion of CTCF binding elements within the MINE does not impact the capacity of this locus to correctly organize an 'accessible' open chromatin domain, suggesting that these sites are not essential for the formation of a competent, transcriptionally active locus. Moreover, deletion of the CTCF site at the MYC P2 promoter reduces transcription but does not affect promoter acetylation or serum-inducible transcription. Importantly, removal of either CTCF site leads to DNA methylation of flanking sequences, thereby contributing to progressive loss of transcriptional activity. CONCLUSIONS: These findings collectively demonstrate that CTCF-binding at the human MYC locus does not repress transcriptional activity but is required for protection from DNA methylation.

  11. Vaccinia protein F12 has structural similarity to kinesin light chain and contains a motor binding motif required for virion export.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth W Morgan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Vaccinia virus (VACV uses microtubules for export of virions to the cell surface and this process requires the viral protein F12. Here we show that F12 has structural similarity to kinesin light chain (KLC, a subunit of the kinesin-1 motor that binds cargo. F12 and KLC share similar size, pI, hydropathy and cargo-binding tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs. Moreover, molecular modeling of F12 TPRs upon the crystal structure of KLC2 TPRs showed a striking conservation of structure. We also identified multiple TPRs in VACV proteins E2 and A36. Data presented demonstrate that F12 is critical for recruitment of kinesin-1 to virions and that a conserved tryptophan and aspartic acid (WD motif, which is conserved in the kinesin-1-binding sequence (KBS of the neuronal protein calsyntenin/alcadein and several other cellular kinesin-1 binding proteins, is essential for kinesin-1 recruitment and virion transport. In contrast, mutation of WD motifs in protein A36 revealed they were not required for kinesin-1 recruitment or IEV transport. This report of a viral KLC-like protein containing a KBS that is conserved in several cellular proteins advances our understanding of how VACV recruits the kinesin motor to virions, and exemplifies how viruses use molecular mimicry of cellular components to their advantage.

  12. Binding of a 100-kDa ubiquitous factor to the human prolactin promoter is required for its basal and hormone-regulated activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peers, B; Nalda, A M; Monget, P; Voz, M L; Belayew, A; Martial, J A

    1992-11-15

    cAMP strongly stimulates the activity of the human prolactin (hPRL) promoter. We have previously shown that two types of cis-element are required for this cAMP regulation; binding sites for the pituitary-specific factor Pit-1, and the sequence spanning nucleotides -115 to -85 (named sequence A). Sequence A contains the TGACG motif found in the consensus sequence of the cAMP-responsive element (CRE). In this study, we show that a mutation in the TGACG motif of sequence A strongly reduces not only the cAMP regulation but also the Ca2+ regulation and basal activity of the hPRL promoter. Furthermore, gel-shift assays indicate that the mutation prevents binding of a ubiquitous factor which is not the CRE-binding protein. Southwestern experiments suggest that this ubiquitous factor's molecular mass is approximately 100 kDa. We conclude that binding of a 100-kDa ubiquitous factor to sequence A is required for full basal and hormonal regulation of hPRL-promoter activity.

  13. Conformational plasticity of the coiled-coil domain of BmrR is required for bmr operator binding: the structure of unliganded BmrR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaraswami, Muthiah; Newberry, Kate J; Brennan, Richard G

    2010-04-30

    The multidrug-binding transcription regulator BmrR from Bacillus subtilis is a MerR family member that binds to a wide array of cationic lipophilic toxins to activate the transcription of the multidrug efflux pump gene bmr. Transcription activation from the sigma(A)-dependent bmr operator requires BmrR to remodel the nonoptimal 19-bp spacer between the -10 promoter element and the -35 promoter element in order to facilitate productive RNA polymerase binding. Despite the availability of several structures of BmrR bound to DNA and drugs, the lack of a BmrR structure in its unliganded or apo (DNA free and drug free) state hinders our full understanding of the structural transitions required for DNA binding and transcription activation. Here, we report the crystal structure of the constitutively active, unliganded BmrR mutant BmrR(E253Q/R275E). Superposition of the ligand-free (apo BmrR(E253Q/R275E)) and DNA-bound BmrR structures reveals that apo BmrR must undergo significant rearrangement in order to assume the DNA-bound conformation, including an outward rotation of minor groove binding wings, an inward movement of helix-turn-helix motifs, and a downward relocation of pliable coiled-coil helices. Computational analysis of the DNA-free and DNA-bound structures reveals a flexible joint that is located at the center of the coiled-coil helices. This region, which is composed of residues 94 through 98, overlaps the helical bulge that is observed only in the apo BmrR structure. This conformational hinge is likely common to other MerR family members with large effector-binding domains, but appears to be missing from the smaller metal-binding MerR family members. Interestingly, the center-to-center distance of the recognition helices of apo BmrR is 34 A and suggests that the conformational change from the apo BmrR structure to the bmr operator-bound BmrR structure is initiated by the binding of this transcription activator to a more B-DNA-like conformation. (c) 2010 Elsevier

  14. Direct ATP photolabeling of Escherichia coli recA proteins: identification of regions required for ATP binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banks, G.R.; Sedgwick, S.G.

    1986-01-01

    When the Escherichia coli RecA protein is UV irradiated in the presence of [alpha- 32 P]ATP, a labeled protein--ATP adduct is formed. All the experimental evidence indicates that, in forming such an adduct, the ATP becomes specifically immobilized in the catalytically relevant ATP binding site. The adduct can also be identified after irradiation of E. coli cell lysates in a similar manner. This direct ATP photolabeling of RecA proteins has been used to identify regions of the polypeptide chain involved in the binding of ATP. The photolabeling of a RecA protein that lacks wild-type carboxy-terminal amino acids is not detectable. A RecA protein in which the amino-terminal sequence NH2-Ala-Ile-Asp-Glu-Asn- is replaced by NH2-Thr-Met-Ile-Thr-Asn-Ser-Ser-Ser- is only about 5% as efficiently photolabeled as the wild-type protein. Both of these RecA protein constructions, however, contain all the elements previously implicated, directly or indirectly, in the binding of ATP. ATP-photolabeled RecA protein has also been chemically cleaved at specific amino acids in order to identify regions of the polypeptide chain to which the nucleotide becomes covalently photolinked. The evidence is consistent with a region comprising amino acids 116-170. Thus, this work and that of others suggest that several disparate regions of the unfolded polypeptide chain may combine to form the ATP binding site upon protein folding or may influence binding through long-range effects

  15. Slow Off-rates and Strong Product Binding Are Required for Processivity and Efficient Degradation of Recalcitrant Chitin by Family 18 Chitinases*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurašin, Mihhail; Kuusk, Silja; Kuusk, Piret; Sørlie, Morten; Väljamäe, Priit

    2015-01-01

    Processive glycoside hydrolases are the key components of enzymatic machineries that decompose recalcitrant polysaccharides, such as chitin and cellulose. The intrinsic processivity (PIntr) of cellulases has been shown to be governed by the rate constant of dissociation from polymer chain (koff). However, the reported koff values of cellulases are strongly dependent on the method used for their measurement. Here, we developed a new method for determining koff, based on measuring the exchange rate of the enzyme between a non-labeled and a 14C-labeled polymeric substrate. The method was applied to the study of the processive chitinase ChiA from Serratia marcescens. In parallel, ChiA variants with weaker binding of the N-acetylglucosamine unit either in substrate-binding site −3 (ChiA-W167A) or the product-binding site +1 (ChiA-W275A) were studied. Both ChiA variants showed increased off-rates and lower apparent processivity on α-chitin. The rate of the production of insoluble reducing groups on the reduced α-chitin was an order of magnitude higher than koff, suggesting that the enzyme can initiate several processive runs without leaving the substrate. On crystalline chitin, the general activity of the wild type enzyme was higher, and the difference was magnifying with hydrolysis time. On amorphous chitin, the variants clearly outperformed the wild type. A model is proposed whereby strong interactions with polymer in the substrate-binding sites (low off-rates) and strong binding of the product in the product-binding sites (high pushing potential) are required for the removal of obstacles, like disintegration of chitin microfibrils. PMID:26468285

  16. Unbiased mutagenesis of MHV68 LANA reveals a DNA-binding domain required for LANA function in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clinton R Paden

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen (LANA, encoded by ORF73, is a conserved gene among the γ2-herpesviruses (rhadinoviruses. The Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV LANA is consistently expressed in KSHV-associated malignancies. In the case of the rodent γ2-herpesvirus, murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68, the LANA homolog (mLANA is required for efficient virus replication, reactivation from latency and immortalization of murine fetal liver-derived B cells. To gain insights into mLANA function(s, knowing that KSHV LANA binds DNA and can modulate transcription of a variety of promoters, we sought out and identified a mLANA-responsive promoter which maps to the terminal repeat (TR of MHV68. Notably, mLANA strongly repressed activity from this promoter. We extended these analyses to demonstrate direct, sequence-specific binding of recombinant mLANA to TR DNA by DNase I footprinting. To assess whether the DNA-binding and/or transcription modulating function is important in the known mLANA phenotypes, we generated an unbiased library of mLANA point mutants using error-prone PCR, and screened a large panel of mutants for repression of the mLANA-responsive promoter to identify loss of function mutants. Notably, among the mutant mLANA proteins recovered, many of the mutations are in a predicted EBNA-1-like DNA-binding domain. Consistent with this prediction, those tested displayed loss of DNA binding activity. We engineered six of these mLANA mutants into the MHV68 genome and tested the resulting mutant viruses for: (i replication fitness; (ii efficiency of latency establishment; and (iii reactivation from latency. Interestingly, each of these mLANA-mutant viruses exhibited phenotypes similar to the mLANA-null mutant virus, indicating that DNA-binding is critical for mLANA function.

  17. Slow Off-rates and Strong Product Binding Are Required for Processivity and Efficient Degradation of Recalcitrant Chitin by Family 18 Chitinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurašin, Mihhail; Kuusk, Silja; Kuusk, Piret; Sørlie, Morten; Väljamäe, Priit

    2015-11-27

    Processive glycoside hydrolases are the key components of enzymatic machineries that decompose recalcitrant polysaccharides, such as chitin and cellulose. The intrinsic processivity (P(Intr)) of cellulases has been shown to be governed by the rate constant of dissociation from polymer chain (koff). However, the reported koff values of cellulases are strongly dependent on the method used for their measurement. Here, we developed a new method for determining koff, based on measuring the exchange rate of the enzyme between a non-labeled and a (14)C-labeled polymeric substrate. The method was applied to the study of the processive chitinase ChiA from Serratia marcescens. In parallel, ChiA variants with weaker binding of the N-acetylglucosamine unit either in substrate-binding site -3 (ChiA-W167A) or the product-binding site +1 (ChiA-W275A) were studied. Both ChiA variants showed increased off-rates and lower apparent processivity on α-chitin. The rate of the production of insoluble reducing groups on the reduced α-chitin was an order of magnitude higher than koff, suggesting that the enzyme can initiate several processive runs without leaving the substrate. On crystalline chitin, the general activity of the wild type enzyme was higher, and the difference was magnifying with hydrolysis time. On amorphous chitin, the variants clearly outperformed the wild type. A model is proposed whereby strong interactions with polymer in the substrate-binding sites (low off-rates) and strong binding of the product in the product-binding sites (high pushing potential) are required for the removal of obstacles, like disintegration of chitin microfibrils. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. IGD motifs, which are required for migration stimulatory activity of fibronectin type I modules, do not mediate binding in matrix assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M Maurer

    Full Text Available Picomolar concentrations of proteins comprising only the N-terminal 70-kDa region (70K of fibronectin (FN stimulate cell migration into collagen gels. The Ile-Gly-Asp (IGD motifs in four of the nine FN type 1 (FNI modules in 70K are important for such migratory stimulating activity. The 70K region mediates binding of nanomolar concentrations of intact FN to cell-surface sites where FN is assembled. Using baculovirus, we expressed wildtype 70K and 70K with Ile-to-Ala mutations in (3FNI and (5FNI; (7FNI and (9FNI; or (3FNI, (5FNI, (7FNI, and (9FNI. Wildtype 70K and 70K with Ile-to-Ala mutations were equally active in binding to assembly sites of FN-null fibroblasts. This finding indicates that IGD motifs do not mediate the interaction between 70K and the cell-surface that is important for FN assembly. Further, FN fragment N-(3FNIII, which does not stimulate migration, binds to assembly sites on FN-null fibroblast. The Ile-to-Ala mutations had effects on the structure of FNI modules as evidenced by decreases in abilities of 70K with Ile-to-Ala mutations to bind to monoclonal antibody 5C3, which recognizes an epitope in (9FNI, or to bind to FUD, a polypeptide based on the F1 adhesin of Streptococcus pyogenes that interacts with 70K by the β-zipper mechanism. These results suggest that the picomolar interactions of 70K with cells that stimulate cell migration require different conformations of FNI modules than the nanomolar interactions required for assembly.

  19. Characterization of a highly conserved binding site of Mlh1 required for exonuclease I-dependent mismatch repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dherin, Claudine; Gueneau, Emeric; Francin, Mathilde

    2009-01-01

    , and Sgs1 proteins, designated as site S2 by reference to the Mlh1/Pms1 heterodimerization site S1. We show that site S2 is also involved in the interaction between human MLH1 and EXO1 or BLM. Binding at this site involves a common motif on Mlh1 partners that we called the MIP-box for the Mlh1 interacting...

  20. Mapping of a region of dengue virus type-2 glycoprotein required for binding by a neutralizing monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trirawatanapong, T; Chandran, B; Putnak, R; Padmanabhan, R

    1992-07-15

    Envelope glycoprotein E of flaviviruses is exposed at the surface of the virion, and is responsible for eliciting a neutralizing antibody (Ab) response, as well as protective immunity in the host. In this report, we describe a method for the fine mapping of a linear sequence of the E protein of dengue virus type-2 (DEN-2), recognized by a type-specific and neutralizing monoclonal Ab (mAb), 3H5. First, an Escherichia coli expression vector containing a heat-inducible lambda pL promoter was used to synthesize several truncated, and near-full length E polypeptides. Reactivities of these polypeptides with polyclonal mouse hyperimmune sera, as well as the 3H5 mAb revealed the location of the 3H5-binding site to be within a region of 166 amino acids (aa) between aa 255 and 422. For fine mapping, a series of targeted deletions were made inframe within this region using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The hydrophilicity pattern of this region was used as a guide to systematically delete the regions encoding the various groups of surface aa residues within the context of a near-full-length E polypeptide by using PCR. The 3H5-binding site was thus precisely mapped to a region encoding 12 aa (between aa 386 and 397). A synthetic peptide containing this sequence was able to bind to the 3H5 mAb specifically, as shown by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In addition, we show that rabbit Abs raised against the synthetic peptide of 12 aa were able to bind to the authentic E protein, and to neutralize DEN-2 virus in a plaque reduction assay.

  1. Identification of a Residue (Glu60) in TRAP Required for Inducing Efficient Transcription Termination at thetrpAttenuator Independent of Binding Tryptophan and RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, Natalie M; Patterson, Andrea; Gollnick, Paul

    2017-03-15

    Transcription of the tryptophan ( trp ) operon in Bacillus subtilis is regulated by an attenuation mechanism. Attenuation is controlled by the t rp R NA-binding a ttenuation p rotein (TRAP). TRAP binds to a site in the 5' leader region of the nascent trp transcript in response to the presence of excess intracellular tryptophan. This binding induces transcription termination upstream of the structural genes of the operon. In prior attenuation models, the role of TRAP was only to alter the secondary structure of the leader region RNA so as to promote formation of the trp attenuator, which was presumed to function as an intrinsic terminator. However, formation of the attenuator alone has been shown to be insufficient to induce efficient termination, indicating that TRAP plays an additional role in this process. To further examine the function of TRAP, we performed a genetic selection for mutant TRAPs that bind tryptophan and RNA but show diminished termination at the trp attenuator. Five such TRAP mutants were obtained. Four of these have substitutions at Glu60, three of which are Lys (E60K) substitutions and the fourth of which is a Val (E60V) substitution. The fifth mutant obtained contains a substitution at Ile63, which is on the same β-strand of TRAP as Glu60. Purified E60K TRAP binds tryptophan and RNA with properties similar to those of the wild type but is defective at inducing termination at the trp attenuator in vitro IMPORTANCE Prior models for attenuation control of the B. subtilis trp operon suggested that the only role for TRAP is to bind to the leader region RNA and alter its folding to induce formation of an intrinsic terminator. However, several recent studies suggested that TRAP plays an additional role in the termination mechanism. We hypothesized that this function could involve residues in TRAP other than those required to bind tryptophan and RNA. Here we obtained TRAP mutants with alterations at Glu60 that are deficient at inducing termination in

  2. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase β-Subunit Requires Internal Motion for Optimal Carbohydrate Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieri, Michael; Mobbs, Jesse I.; Koay, Ann; Louey, Gavin; Mok, Yee-Foong; Hatters, Danny M.; Park, Jong-Tae; Park, Kwan-Hwa; Neumann, Dietbert; Stapleton, David; Gooley, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase interacts with oligosaccharides and glycogen through the carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) containing the β-subunit, for which there are two isoforms (β1 and β2). Muscle-specific β2-CBM, either as an isolated domain or in the intact enzyme, binds carbohydrates more tightly than the ubiquitous β1-CBM. Although residues that contact carbohydrate are strictly conserved, an additional threonine in a loop of β2-CBM is concurrent with an increase in flexibility in β2-CBM, which may account for the affinity differences between the two isoforms. In contrast to β1-CBM, unbound β2-CBM showed microsecond-to-millisecond motion at the base of a β-hairpin that contains residues that make critical contacts with carbohydrate. Upon binding to carbohydrate, similar microsecond-to-millisecond motion was observed in this β-hairpin and the loop that contains the threonine insertion. Deletion of the threonine from β2-CBM resulted in reduced carbohydrate affinity. Although motion was retained in the unbound state, a significant loss of motion was observed in the bound state of the β2-CBM mutant. Insertion of a threonine into the background of β1-CBM resulted in increased ligand affinity and flexibility in these loops when bound to carbohydrate. However, these mutations indicate that the additional threonine is not solely responsible for the differences in carbohydrate affinity and protein dynamics. Nevertheless, these results suggest that altered protein dynamics may contribute to differences in the ligand affinity of the two naturally occurring CBM isoforms. PMID:22339867

  3. High-affinity binding of Chp1 chromodomain to K9 methylated histone H3 is required to establish centromeric heterochromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalch, Thomas; Job, Godwin; Noffsinger, Victoria J; Shanker, Sreenath; Kuscu, Canan; Joshua-Tor, Leemor; Partridge, Janet F

    2009-04-10

    In fission yeast, assembly of centromeric heterochromatin requires the RITS complex, which consists of Ago1, Tas3, Chp1, and siRNAs derived from centromeric repeats. Recruitment of RITS to centromeres has been proposed to depend on siRNA-dependent targeting of Ago1 to centromeric sequences. Previously, we demonstrated that methylated lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me) acts upstream of siRNAs during heterochromatin establishment. Our crystal structure of Chp1's chromodomain in complex with a trimethylated lysine 9 H3 peptide reveals extensive sites of contact that contribute to Chp1's high-affinity binding. We found that this high-affinity binding is critical for the efficient establishment of centromeric heterochromatin, but preassembled heterochromatin can be maintained when Chp1's affinity for H3K9me is greatly reduced.

  4. Analysis of the EIAV Rev-responsive element (RRE reveals a conserved RNA motif required for high affinity Rev binding in both HIV-1 and EIAV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Hyung Lee

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A cis-acting RNA regulatory element, the Rev-responsive element (RRE, has essential roles in replication of lentiviruses, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 and equine infection anemia virus (EIAV. The RRE binds the viral trans-acting regulatory protein, Rev, to mediate nucleocytoplasmic transport of incompletely spliced mRNAs encoding viral structural genes and genomic RNA. Because of its potential as a clinical target, RRE-Rev interactions have been well studied in HIV-1; however, detailed molecular structures of Rev-RRE complexes in other lentiviruses are still lacking. In this study, we investigate the secondary structure of the EIAV RRE and interrogate regulatory protein-RNA interactions in EIAV Rev-RRE complexes. Computational prediction and detailed chemical probing and footprinting experiments were used to determine the RNA secondary structure of EIAV RRE-1, a 555 nt region that provides RRE function in vivo. Chemical probing experiments confirmed the presence of several predicted loop and stem-loop structures, which are conserved among 140 EIAV sequence variants. Footprinting experiments revealed that Rev binding induces significant structural rearrangement in two conserved domains characterized by stable stem-loop structures. Rev binding region-1 (RBR-1 corresponds to a genetically-defined Rev binding region that overlaps exon 1 of the EIAV rev gene and contains an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE. RBR-2, characterized for the first time in this study, is required for high affinity binding of EIAV Rev to the RRE. RBR-2 contains an RNA structural motif that is also found within the high affinity Rev binding site in HIV-1 (stem-loop IIB, and within or near mapped RRE regions of four additional lentiviruses. The powerful integration of computational and experimental approaches in this study has generated a validated RNA secondary structure for the EIAV RRE and provided provocative evidence that high affinity Rev binding sites of

  5. The Yersinia pestis Ail protein mediates binding and Yop delivery to host cells required for plague virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felek, Suleyman; Krukonis, Eric S

    2009-02-01

    Although adhesion to host cells is a critical step in the delivery of cytotoxic Yop proteins by Yersinia pestis, the mechanism has not been defined. To identify adhesins critical for Yop delivery, we initiated two transposon mutagenesis screens using the mariner transposon. To avoid redundant cell binding activities, we initiated the screen with a strain deleted for two known adhesins, pH 6 antigen and the autotransporter, YapC, as well as the Caf1 capsule, which is known to obscure some adhesins. The mutants that emerged contained insertions within the ail (attachment and invasion locus) gene of Y. pestis. A reconstructed mutant with a single deletion in the ail locus (y1324) was severely defective for delivery of Yops to HEp-2 human epithelial cells and significantly defective for delivery of Yops to THP-1 human monocytes. Specifically, the Yop delivery defect was apparent when cell rounding and translocation of an ELK-tagged YopE derivative into host cells were monitored. Although the ail mutant showed only a modest decrease in cell binding capacity in vitro, the KIM5 Deltaail mutant exhibited a >3,000-fold-increased 50% lethal dose in mice. Mice infected with the Deltaail mutant also had 1,000-fold fewer bacteria in their spleens, livers, and lungs 3 days after infection than did those infected with the parental strain, KIM5. Thus, the Ail protein is critical for both Y. pestis type III secretion in vitro and infection in mice.

  6. Suppression of intragenic transcription requires the MOT1 and NC2 regulators of TATA-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Maria J E; Yildirim, Asli D; Weil, P Anthony; Holstege, Frank C P; Timmers, H Th Marc

    2014-04-01

    Chromatin structure in transcribed regions poses a barrier for intragenic transcription. In a comprehensive study of the yeast chromatin remodelers and the Mot1p-NC2 regulators of TATA-binding protein (TBP), we detected synthetic genetic interactions indicative of suppression of intragenic transcription. Conditional depletion of Mot1p or NC2 in absence of the ISW1 remodeler, but not in the absence of other chromatin remodelers, activated the cryptic FLO8 promoter. Likewise, conditional depletion of Mot1p or NC2 in deletion backgrounds of the H3K36 methyltransferase Set2p or the Asf1p-Rtt106p histone H3-H4 chaperones, important factors involved in maintaining a repressive chromatin environment, resulted in increased intragenic FLO8 transcripts. Activity of the cryptic FLO8 promoter is associated with reduced H3 levels, increased TBP binding and tri-methylation of H3K4 and is independent of Spt-Ada-Gcn5-acetyltransferase function. These data reveal cooperation of negative regulation of TBP with specific chromatin regulators to inhibit intragenic transcription.

  7. Exploring selectivity requirements for COX-2 versus COX-1 binding of 2-(5-phenyl-pyrazol-1-yl)-5-methanesulfonylpyridines using topological and physico-chemical parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Santanu; Sengupta, Chandana; Roy, Kunal

    2005-04-01

    Considering the current need for development of selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors, an attempt has been made to explore physico-chemical requirements of 2-(5-phenyl-pyrazol-1-yl)-5-methanesulfonylpyridines for binding with COX-1 and COX-2 enzyme subtypes and also to explore the selectivity requirements. In this study, E-states of different common atoms of the molecules (calculated according to Kier & Hall), first order valence connectivity and physicochemical parameters (hydrophobicity pi, Hammett sigma and molar refractivity MR of different ring substituents) were used as independent variables along with suitable dummy parameters in the stepwise regression method. The best equation describing COX-1 binding affinity [n = 25, Q2 = 0.606, R(a)2 = 0.702, R2 = 0.752, R = 0.867, s = 0.447, F = 15.2 (df 4, 20)] suggests that the COX-1 binding affinity increases in the presence of a halogen substituent at R1 position and a p-alkoxy or p-methylthio substituent at R2 position. Furthermore, a difluoromethyl group is preferred over a trifluoromethyl group at R position for the COX-1 binding. The best equation describing COX-2 binding affinity [n = 32, Q2 = 0.622, R(a)2= 0.692, R2 = 0.732, R = 0.856, s = 0.265, F = 18.4 (df 4, 27)] shows that the COX-2 binding affinity increases with the presence of a halogen substituent at R1 position and increase of size of R2 substituents. However, it decreases in case of simultaneous presence of 3-chloro and 4-methoxy groups on the phenyl nucleus and in the presence of highly lipophilic R2 substituents. The best selectivity relation [n = 25, Q2 = 0.455, R(a)2 = 0.605, R2 = 0.670, R = 0.819, s = 0.423, F = 10.2 (df 4, 20)] suggests that the COX-2 selectivity decreases in the presence of p-alkoxy group and electron-withdrawing para substituents at R2 position. Again, a trifluoro group is conductive for the selectivity instead of a difluoromethyl group at R position. Furthermore, branching may also play significant role in

  8. Only one ATP-binding DnaX subunit is required for initiation complex formation by the Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III holoenzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Anna; Downey, Christopher D; Dallmann, H Garry; McHenry, Charles S

    2010-09-17

    The DnaX complex (DnaX(3)δδ'χ psi) within the Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III holoenzyme serves to load the dimeric sliding clamp processivity factor, β(2), onto DNA. The complex contains three DnaX subunits, which occur in two forms: τ and the shorter γ, produced by translational frameshifting. Ten forms of E. coli DnaX complex containing all possible combinations of wild-type or a Walker A motif K51E variant τ or γ have been reconstituted and rigorously purified. DnaX complexes containing three DnaX K51E subunits do not bind ATP. Comparison of their ability to support formation of initiation complexes, as measured by processive replication by the DNA polymerase III holoenzyme, indicates a minimal requirement for one ATP-binding DnaX subunit. DnaX complexes containing two mutant DnaX subunits support DNA synthesis at about two-thirds the level of their wild-type counterparts. β(2) binding (determined functionally) is diminished 12-30-fold for DnaX complexes containing two K51E subunits, suggesting that multiple ATPs must be bound to place the DnaX complex into a conformation with maximal affinity for β(2). DNA synthesis activity can be restored by increased concentrations of β(2). In contrast, severe defects in ATP hydrolysis are observed upon introduction of a single K51E DnaX subunit. Thus, ATP binding, hydrolysis, and the ability to form initiation complexes are not tightly coupled. These results suggest that although ATP hydrolysis likely enhances β(2) loading, it is not absolutely required in a mechanistic sense for formation of functional initiation complexes.

  9. Developmentally regulated GTP-binding protein 2 is required for stabilization of Rac1-positive membrane tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Muralidharan; Lee, Unn Hwa; Yoon, Nal Ae; Yoon, Eun Hye; Lee, Byung Ju; Cho, Wha Ja; Park, Jeong Woo

    2017-11-04

    Previously we have reported that developmentally regulated GTP-binding protein 2 (DRG2) localizes on Rab5 endosomes and plays an important role in transferrin (Tfn) recycling. We here identified DRG2 as a key regulator of membrane tubule stability. At 30 min after Tfn treatment, DRG2 localized to membrane tubules which were enriched with phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate [PI(4)P] and did not contain Rab5. DRG2 interacted with Rac1 more strongly with GTP-bound Rac1 and tubular localization of DRG2 depended on Rac1 activity. DRG2 depletion led to destabilization of membrane tubules, while ectopic expression of DRG2 rescued the stability of the membrane tubules in DRG2-depleted cells. Our results reveal a novel mechanism for regulation of membrane tubule stability mediated by DRG2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Requirements for capsid-binding and an effector function in TRIMCyp-mediated restriction of HIV-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Vandegraaff, Nick; Li Yuan; McGee-Estrada, Kathleen; Stremlau, Matthew; Welikala, Sohanya; Si Zhihai; Engelman, Alan; Sodroski, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    In owl monkeys, a retrotransposition event replaced the gene encoding the retroviral restriction factor TRIM5α with one encoding TRIMCyp, a fusion between the RING, B-box 2 and coiled-coil domains of TRIM5 and cyclophilin A. TRIMCyp restricts human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection by a mechanism dependent on the interaction of the cyclophilin A moiety and the HIV-1 capsid protein. Here, we show that infection by retroviruses other than HIV-1 can be restricted by TRIMCyp, providing an explanation for the evolutionary retention of the TRIMCyp gene in owl monkey lineages. The TRIMCyp-mediated block to HIV-1 infection occurs before the earliest step of reverse transcription. TRIMCyp-mediated restriction involves at least two functions: (1) capsid binding, which occurs most efficiently for trimeric TRIMCyp proteins that retain the coiled-coil and cyclophilin A domains, and (2) an effector function that depends upon the B-box 2 domain

  11. The Yersinia pestis Ail Protein Mediates Binding and Yop Delivery to Host Cells Required for Plague Virulence▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felek, Suleyman; Krukonis, Eric S.

    2009-01-01

    Although adhesion to host cells is a critical step in the delivery of cytotoxic Yop proteins by Yersinia pestis, the mechanism has not been defined. To identify adhesins critical for Yop delivery, we initiated two transposon mutagenesis screens using the mariner transposon. To avoid redundant cell binding activities, we initiated the screen with a strain deleted for two known adhesins, pH 6 antigen and the autotransporter, YapC, as well as the Caf1 capsule, which is known to obscure some adhesins. The mutants that emerged contained insertions within the ail (attachment and invasion locus) gene of Y. pestis. A reconstructed mutant with a single deletion in the ail locus (y1324) was severely defective for delivery of Yops to HEp-2 human epithelial cells and significantly defective for delivery of Yops to THP-1 human monocytes. Specifically, the Yop delivery defect was apparent when cell rounding and translocation of an ELK-tagged YopE derivative into host cells were monitored. Although the ail mutant showed only a modest decrease in cell binding capacity in vitro, the KIM5 Δail mutant exhibited a >3,000-fold-increased 50% lethal dose in mice. Mice infected with the Δail mutant also had 1,000-fold fewer bacteria in their spleens, livers, and lungs 3 days after infection than did those infected with the parental strain, KIM5. Thus, the Ail protein is critical for both Y. pestis type III secretion in vitro and infection in mice. PMID:19064637

  12. Neutralizing mutations of carboxylates that bind metal 2 in T5 flap endonuclease result in an enzyme that still requires two metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Christopher G; Syson, Karl; Sengerová, Blanka; Atack, John M; Sayers, Jon R; Swanson, Linda; Tainer, John A; Williams, Nicholas H; Grasby, Jane A

    2011-09-02

    Flap endonucleases (FENs) are divalent metal ion-dependent phosphodiesterases. Metallonucleases are often assigned a "two-metal ion mechanism" where both metals contact the scissile phosphate diester. The spacing of the two metal ions observed in T5FEN structures appears to preclude this mechanism. However, the overall reaction catalyzed by wild type (WT) T5FEN requires three Mg(2+) ions, implying that a third ion is needed during catalysis, and so a two-metal ion mechanism remains possible. To investigate the positions of the ions required for chemistry, a mutant T5FEN was studied where metal 2 (M2) ligands are altered to eliminate this binding site. In contrast to WT T5FEN, the overall reaction catalyzed by D201I/D204S required two ions, but over the concentration range of Mg(2+) tested, maximal rate data were fitted to a single binding isotherm. Calcium ions do not support FEN catalysis and inhibit the reactions supported by viable metal cofactors. To establish participation of ions in stabilization of enzyme-substrate complexes, dissociation constants of WT and D201I/D204S-substrate complexes were studied as a function of [Ca(2+)]. At pH 9.3 (maximal rate conditions), Ca(2+) substantially stabilized both complexes. Inhibition of viable cofactor supported reactions of WT, and D201I/D204S T5FENs was biphasic with respect to Ca(2+) and ultimately dependent on 1/[Ca(2+)](2). By varying the concentration of viable metal cofactor, Ca(2+) ions were shown to inhibit competitively displacing two catalytic ions. Combined analyses imply that M2 is not involved in chemical catalysis but plays a role in substrate binding, and thus a two-metal ion mechanism is plausible.

  13. Neutralizing Mutations of Carboxylates That Bind Metal 2 in T5 Flap Endonuclease Result in an Enzyme That Still Requires Two Metal Ions*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Christopher G.; Syson, Karl; Sengerová, Blanka; Atack, John M.; Sayers, Jon R.; Swanson, Linda; Tainer, John A.; Williams, Nicholas H.; Grasby, Jane A.

    2011-01-01

    Flap endonucleases (FENs) are divalent metal ion-dependent phosphodiesterases. Metallonucleases are often assigned a “two-metal ion mechanism” where both metals contact the scissile phosphate diester. The spacing of the two metal ions observed in T5FEN structures appears to preclude this mechanism. However, the overall reaction catalyzed by wild type (WT) T5FEN requires three Mg2+ ions, implying that a third ion is needed during catalysis, and so a two-metal ion mechanism remains possible. To investigate the positions of the ions required for chemistry, a mutant T5FEN was studied where metal 2 (M2) ligands are altered to eliminate this binding site. In contrast to WT T5FEN, the overall reaction catalyzed by D201I/D204S required two ions, but over the concentration range of Mg2+ tested, maximal rate data were fitted to a single binding isotherm. Calcium ions do not support FEN catalysis and inhibit the reactions supported by viable metal cofactors. To establish participation of ions in stabilization of enzyme-substrate complexes, dissociation constants of WT and D201I/D204S-substrate complexes were studied as a function of [Ca2+]. At pH 9.3 (maximal rate conditions), Ca2+ substantially stabilized both complexes. Inhibition of viable cofactor supported reactions of WT, and D201I/D204S T5FENs was biphasic with respect to Ca2+ and ultimately dependent on 1/[Ca2+]2. By varying the concentration of viable metal cofactor, Ca2+ ions were shown to inhibit competitively displacing two catalytic ions. Combined analyses imply that M2 is not involved in chemical catalysis but plays a role in substrate binding, and thus a two-metal ion mechanism is plausible. PMID:21734257

  14. Conformation change of tRNA/sub Glu/ in the complex with glutamyl-tRNA synthetase is required for the specific binding of L-glutamate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara-Yokoyama, M.; Yokoyama, S.; Miyazawa, T.

    1986-01-01

    The binding of Thermus thermophilus glutamyl-tRNA synthetase (GluRS) with T. thermophilus tRNA/sup Glu/, Escherichia coli tRNA/sup Glu/, and amino acids was studied by fluorescence measurements. In the absence of tRNA/sup Glu/, GluRS binds with D-glutamate as well as L-glutamate. However, in the presence of E.coli tRNA/sup Glu/, GluRS binds specifically with L-glutamate. The KCl effects on the Michaelis constants (K/sub m/) for tRNA/sup Glu/, L-glutamate, and ATP were studied for the aminoacylation of the homologous tRNA/sup Glu/ and heterologous tRNA/sup Glu/ species. As the KCl concentration is raised from 0 to 100 mM, the K/sub m/ value for L-glutamate in the heterologous system is remarkably increased whereas the K/sub m/ value for L-glutamate in the homologous system is only slightly increased. The circular dichroism analyses were made mainly of the bands due to the 2-thiouridine derivatives of tRNA/sup Glu/ in the complex. The conformation change of T. thermophilus tRNA/sup Glu/ upon complex formation with GluRS is not affected by addition of KCl. In contrast, the heterologous tRNA/sup Glu/GluRS complex is in equilibrium of two forms that depends on KCl concentration. The predominant form at low KCl concentration is closely related to the small K/sub m/ value for L-glutamate. In this form of the complex, the conformation of tRNA/sup Glu/ is appreciably different from that of free molecule. Accordingly, such a conformation change of tRNA/sup Glu/ in the complex with GluRS is required for the specific binding of L-glutamate as the substrate

  15. Full trans-activation mediated by the immediate-early protein of equine herpesvirus 1 requires a consensus TATA box, but not its cognate binding sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong K; Shakya, Akhalesh K; O'Callaghan, Dennis J

    2016-01-04

    The immediate-early protein (IEP) of equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) has extensive homology to the IEP of alphaherpesviruses and possesses domains essential for trans-activation, including an acidic trans-activation domain (TAD) and binding domains for DNA, TFIIB, and TBP. Our data showed that the IEP directly interacted with transcription factor TFIIA, which is known to stabilize the binding of TBP and TFIID to the TATA box of core promoters. When the TATA box of the EICP0 promoter was mutated to a nonfunctional TATA box, IEP-mediated trans-activation was reduced from 22-fold to 7-fold. The IEP trans-activated the viral promoters in a TATA motif-dependent manner. Our previous data showed that the IEP is able to repress its own promoter when the IEP-binding sequence (IEBS) is located within 26-bp from the TATA box. When the IEBS was located at 100 bp upstream of the TATA box, IEP-mediated trans-activation was very similar to that of the minimal IE(nt -89 to +73) promoter lacking the IEBS. As the distance from the IEBS to the TATA box decreased, IEP-mediated trans-activation progressively decreased, indicating that the IEBS located within 100 bp from the TATA box sequence functions as a distance-dependent repressive element. These results indicated that IEP-mediated full trans-activation requires a consensus TATA box of core promoters, but not its binding to the cognate sequence (IEBS). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Identification of the promoter region required for human adiponectin gene transcription: Association with CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-β and tumor necrosis factor-α

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Atsushi; Yamasaki, Hironori; Kuwahara, Hironaga; Moriuchi, Akie; Fukushima, Keiko; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Fukushima, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Ryoko; Abiru, Norio; Uotani, Shigeo; Kawasaki, Eiji; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2005-01-01

    Adiponectin, an adipose tissue-specific plasma protein, is involved in insulin sensitizing and has anti-atherosclerotic properties. Plasma levels of adiponectin are decreased in obese individuals and patients with type 2 diabetes with insulin resistance. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) decreases the expression of adiponectin in adipocytes. The aims of the present study were: (1) to identify the promoter region responsible for basal transcription of the human adiponectin gene, and (2) to investigate the mechanism by which adiponectin was regulated by TNF-α. The human adiponectin promoter (2.1 kb) was isolated and used for luciferase reporter analysis by transient transfection into 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Deletion analysis demonstrated that the promoter region from -676 to +41 was sufficient for basal transcriptional activity. Mutation analysis of putative response elements for sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) (-431 to -423) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) (-230 to -224) showed that both elements were required for basal promoter activity. Adiponectin transcription was increased 3-fold in cells that over-expressed constitutively active C/EBP-β. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay, using nuclear extract from 3T3-L1 cells and the -258 to -199 region as a probe, demonstrated specific DNA-protein binding, which was abolished by TNF-α treatment. The present data indicate that the putative response elements for SREBP and C/EBP are required for human adiponectin promoter activity, and that suppression by TNF-α may, at least in part, be associated with inactivation of C/EBP-β

  17. Cellular adhesion responses to the heparin-binding (HepII) domain of fibronectin require heparan sulfate with specific properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahalingam, Yashithra; Gallagher, John T; Couchman, John R

    2006-01-01

    Cell surface heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans are required in development and postnatal repair. Important classes of ligands for HS include growth factors and extracellular matrix macromolecules. For example, the focal adhesion component syndecan-4 interacts with the III(12-14) region of fibron......Cell surface heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans are required in development and postnatal repair. Important classes of ligands for HS include growth factors and extracellular matrix macromolecules. For example, the focal adhesion component syndecan-4 interacts with the III(12-14) region...... required for optimal inhibition. The presence of N-sulfated glucosamine in the HS was essential, whereas 2-O-sulfation of uronic acid or 6-O-sulfation of glucosamine had marginal effects. In the more complex response of focal adhesion formation through syndecan-4, N-sulfates were again required and also...... glucosamine 6-O-sulfate. The significance of polymer N-sulfation and sulfated domains in HS was confirmed by studies with mutant Chinese hamster ovary cells where heparan sulfation was compromised. Finally, focal adhesion formation was absent in fibroblasts synthesizing short HS chains resulting from a gene...

  18. The Calmodulin-Binding Transcription Activator CAMTA1 Is Required for Long-Term Memory Formation in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bas-Orth, Carlos; Tan, Yan-Wei; Oliveira, Ana M. M.; Bengtson, C. Peter; Bading, Hilmar

    2016-01-01

    The formation of long-term memory requires signaling from the synapse to the nucleus to mediate neuronal activity-dependent gene transcription. Synapse-to-nucleus communication is initiated by influx of calcium ions through synaptic NMDA receptors and/or L-type voltage-gated calcium channels and involves the activation of transcription factors by…

  19. The сalix[4]arene C-107 is highly effective supramolecular inhibitor of the Na(+,K(+-АТРase of plasmatic membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Bevza

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The inhibition of the Na+,K+-АТРase activity of the myometrium cell plasma membranes with calixarene С-107 (5,17-diamino(2-pyridylmethylphosphono-11,23-di-tret-butyl-26,28-dihydroxy-25,27-dipropoxycalix[4]arene was investigated. It has been shown that calixarene С-107 reduced the Na+,K+-АТРase activity more efficiently than ouabain did, while it did not practically influence the “basal” Mg2+-АТРase activity of the same membrane. The magnitude of the cofficient of inhibition I0.5 was 33 ± 4 nМ, Hill coefficient was 0.38 ± 0.06. The model calixa­rene C-150 – the calixarene “scaffold” (26,28-dihydroxy-25,27-dipropoxycalix[4]arene, and the model compound М-3 (4-hydroxyaniline(2-pyridinemethylphosphonic acid – a fragment of the calixarene С-107, had practically no influence on the enzymatic activity of Na+,K+-АТРase and Mg2+-АТРаse. We carried out the computer simulation of interaction of calixarenes C-107 and the mentioned model compound with ligand binding sites of the Na+,K+-АТРase of plasma membrane and structure foundation of their intermolecular interaction was found out. The participation of hydrogen, hydrophobic, electrostatic and π-π (stacking interaction between calixarene and enzyme aminoacid residues, some of which are located near the active center of Na+,K+-АТРase, was discussed.

  20. Hepatitis delta antigen requires a flexible quasi-double-stranded RNA structure to bind and condense hepatitis delta virus RNA in a ribonucleoprotein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Brittany L; Chasovskikh, Sergey; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Casey, John L

    2014-07-01

    The circular genome and antigenome RNAs of hepatitis delta virus (HDV) form characteristic unbranched, quasi-double-stranded RNA secondary structures in which short double-stranded helical segments are interspersed with internal loops and bulges. The ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) formed by these RNAs with the virus-encoded protein hepatitis delta antigen (HDAg) perform essential roles in the viral life cycle, including viral replication and virion formation. Little is understood about the formation and structure of these complexes and how they function in these key processes. Here, the specific RNA features required for HDAg binding and the topology of the complexes formed were investigated. Selective 2'OH acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE) applied to free and HDAg-bound HDV RNAs indicated that the characteristic secondary structure of the RNA is preserved when bound to HDAg. Notably, the analysis indicated that predicted unpaired positions in the RNA remained dynamic in the RNP. Analysis of the in vitro binding activity of RNAs in which internal loops and bulges were mutated and of synthetically designed RNAs demonstrated that the distinctive secondary structure, not the primary RNA sequence, is the major determinant of HDAg RNA binding specificity. Atomic force microscopy analysis of RNPs formed in vitro revealed complexes in which the HDV RNA is substantially condensed by bending or wrapping. Our results support a model in which the internal loops and bulges in HDV RNA contribute flexibility to the quasi-double-stranded structure that allows RNA bending and condensing by HDAg. RNA-protein complexes (RNPs) formed by the hepatitis delta virus RNAs and protein, HDAg, perform critical roles in virus replication. Neither the structures of these RNPs nor the RNA features required to form them have been characterized. HDV RNA is unusual in that it forms an unbranched quasi-double-stranded structure in which short base-paired segments are interspersed

  1. Mad2 binding to Mad1 and Cdc20, rather than oligomerization, is required for the spindle checkpoint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sironi, L; Melixetian, M; Faretta, M

    2001-01-01

    Mad2 is a key component of the spindle checkpoint, a device that controls the fidelity of chromosome segregation in mitosis. The ability of Mad2 to form oligomers in vitro has been correlated with its ability to block the cell cycle upon injection into Xenopus embryos. Here we show that Mad2 forms...... incompatible complexes with Mad1 and Cdc20, neither of which requires Mad2 oligomerization. A monomeric point mutant of Mad2 can sustain a cell cycle arrest of comparable strength to that of the wild-type protein. We show that the interaction of Mad2 with Mad1 is crucial for the localization of Mad2...

  2. Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT) Transcription Requires Sp1/Sp3 Binding to the Promoter and a Permissive Chromatin Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, De; Zhao, Yuanjun; Wang, Shuwen; Jia, Wenwen; Kang, Jiuhong; Zhu, Jiyue

    2015-12-11

    The transcription of human telomerase gene hTERT is regulated by transcription factors (TFs), including Sp1 family proteins, and its chromatin environment. To understand its regulation in a relevant chromatin context, we employed bacterial artificial chromosome reporters containing 160 kb of human genomic sequence containing the hTERT gene. Upon chromosomal integration, the bacterial artificial chromosomes recapitulated endogenous hTERT expression, contrary to transient reporters. Sp1/Sp3 expression did not correlate with hTERT promoter activity, and these TFs bound to the hTERT promoters in both telomerase-positive and telomerase-negative cells. Mutation of the proximal GC-box resulted in a dramatic decrease of hTERT promoter activity, and mutations of all five GC-boxes eliminated its transcriptional activity. Neither mutations of GC-boxes nor knockdown of endogenous Sp1 impacted promoter binding by other TFs, including E-box-binding proteins, and histone acetylation and trimethylation of histone H3K9 at the hTERT promoter in telomerase-positive and -negative cells. The result indicated that promoter binding by Sp1/Sp3 was essential, but not a limiting step, for hTERT transcription. hTERT transcription required a permissive chromatin environment. Importantly, our data also revealed different functions of GC-boxes and E-boxes in hTERT regulation; although GC-boxes were essential for promoter activity, factors bound to the E-boxes functioned to de-repress hTERT promoter. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Sequence characteristics required for cooperative binding and efficient in vivo titration of the replication initiator protein DnaA in E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming G.; Christensen, Bjarke Bak; Atlung, Tove

    2007-01-01

    Plasmids carrying the mioC promoter region, which contains two DnaA boxes, R5 and R6 with one misfit to the consensus TT(A)/(T)TNCACA, are as efficient in in vivo titration of the DnaA protein as plasmids carrying a replication-inactivated oriC region with its eight DnaA boxes. Three additional Dna......A boxes around the promoter proximal R5 DnaA box were identified and shown by mutational analysis to be necessary for the cooperative binding of DnaA required for titration. These four DnaA boxes are located in the same orientation and with a spacing of two or three base-pairs. The cooperative binding...... was eliminated by insertion of half a helical turn between any of the DnaA boxes. Titration strongly depends on the presence and orientation of the promoter distal R6 DnaA box located 104 bp upstream of the R5 box as well as neighbouring sequences downstream of R6. Titration depends on the integrity of a 43 bp...

  4. Mutational analysis of the RNA-binding domain of the Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) movement protein reveals its requirement for cell-to-cell movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmen Herranz, Ma; Sanchez-Navarro, Jesus-Angel; Sauri, Ana; Mingarro, Ismael; Pallas, Vicente

    2005-01-01

    The movement protein (MP) of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) is required for cell-to-cell movement. MP subcellular localization studies using a GFP fusion protein revealed highly punctate structures between neighboring cells, believed to represent plasmodesmata. Deletion of the RNA-binding domain (RBD) of PNRSV MP abolishes the cell-to-cell movement. A mutational analysis on this RBD was performed in order to identify in vivo the features that govern viral transport. Loss of positive charges prevented the cell-to-cell movement even though all mutants showed a similar accumulation level in protoplasts to those observed with the wild-type (wt) MP. Synthetic peptides representing the mutants and wild-type RBDs were used to study RNA-binding affinities by EMSA assays being approximately 20-fold lower in the mutants. Circular dichroism analyses revealed that the secondary structure of the peptides was not significantly affected by mutations. The involvement of the affinity changes between the viral RNA and the MP in the viral cell-to-cell movement is discussed

  5. Sapovirus translation requires an interaction between VPg and the cap binding protein eIF4E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosmillo, Myra; Chaudhry, Yasmin; Kim, Deok-Song; Goodfellow, Ian; Cho, Kyoung-Oh

    2014-11-01

    Sapoviruses of the Caliciviridae family of small RNA viruses are emerging pathogens that cause gastroenteritis in humans and animals. Molecular studies on human sapovirus have been hampered due to the lack of a cell culture system. In contrast, porcine sapovirus (PSaV) can be grown in cell culture, making it a suitable model for understanding the infectious cycle of sapoviruses and the related enteric caliciviruses. Caliciviruses are known to use a novel mechanism of protein synthesis that relies on the interaction of cellular translation initiation factors with the virus genome-encoded viral protein genome (VPg) protein, which is covalently linked to the 5' end of the viral genome. Using PSaV as a representative member of the Sapovirus genus, we characterized the role of the viral VPg protein in sapovirus translation. As observed for other caliciviruses, the PSaV genome was found to be covalently linked to VPg, and this linkage was required for the translation and the infectivity of viral RNA. The PSaV VPg protein was associated with the 4F subunit of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF4F) complex in infected cells and bound directly to the eIF4E protein. As has been previously demonstrated for feline calicivirus, a member of the Vesivirus genus, PSaV translation required eIF4E and the interaction between eIF4E and eIF4G. Overall, our study provides new insights into the novel mechanism of sapovirus translation, suggesting that sapovirus VPg can hijack the cellular translation initiation mechanism by recruiting the eIF4F complex through a direct eIF4E interaction. Sapoviruses, which are members of the Caliciviridae family, are one of the causative agents of viral gastroenteritis in humans. However, human sapovirus remains noncultivable in cell culture, hampering the ability to characterize the virus infectious cycle. Here, we show that the VPg protein from porcine sapovirus, the only cultivatable sapovirus, is essential for viral translation and

  6. Talpid3-binding centrosomal protein Cep120 is required for centriole duplication and proliferation of cerebellar granule neuron progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanqing Wu

    Full Text Available Granule neuron progenitors (GNPs are the most abundant neuronal type in the cerebellum. GNP proliferation and thus cerebellar development require Sonic hedgehog (Shh secreted from Purkinje cells. Shh signaling occurs in primary cilia originating from the mother centriole. Centrioles replicate only once during a typical cell cycle and are responsible for mitotic spindle assembly and organization. Recent studies have linked cilia function to cerebellar morphogenesis, but the role of centriole duplication in cerebellar development is not known. Here we show that centrosomal protein Cep120 is asymmetrically localized to the daughter centriole through its interaction with Talpid3 (Ta3, another centrosomal protein. Cep120 null mutant mice die in early gestation with abnormal heart looping. Inactivation of Cep120 in the central nervous system leads to both hydrocephalus, due to the loss of cilia on ependymal cells, and severe cerebellar hypoplasia, due to the failed proliferation of GNPs. The mutant GNPs lack Hedgehog pathway activity. Cell biological studies show that the loss of Cep120 results in failed centriole duplication and consequently ciliogenesis, which together underlie Cep120 mutant cerebellar hypoplasia. Thus, our study for the first time links a centrosomal protein necessary for centriole duplication to cerebellar morphogenesis.

  7. QSAR of estrogen receptor modulators: exploring selectivity requirements for ER(alpha) versus ER(beta) binding of tetrahydroisoquinoline derivatives using E-state and physicochemical parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Subhendu; Saha, Achintya; Roy, Kunal

    2005-02-15

    Considering importance of developing selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), the present paper explores selectivity requirements of tetrahydroisoquinoline derivatives for binding with ER(alpha) versus ER(beta) receptors using E-state index and physicochemical parameters. The best model [n=21, Q(2)=0.512, R(a)(2)=0.613, R=0.819, F=11.6 (df 3,17)] for ER(alpha) binding data obtained from radioligand binding assay showed importance of C(1), C(15) and lipophilicity (logP) while the best model [n=21, Q(2)=0.768, R(a)(2)=0.796, R=0.904, F=40.1 (df 2,18)] for ER(beta) binding data showed importance of C(1) and molar refractivity (MR). While modeling ER(alpha)/ER(beta) selectivity [n=21, Q(2)=0.695, R(a)(2)=0.739, R=0.882, F=19.8 (df 3,17)], C(1), C(15) and molar refractivity were found to be significant contributors. The data obtained from cellular transcription assay were also modeled. In case of ER(alpha), the best equation involving E-state values of C(1) and C(14) and logP explained 62.1% of the variance while the best equation for ER(beta) involving E-state values of C(1) and C(15) and MR explained 64.6% of the variance of the response variable. In case of ER(alpha)/ER(beta) selectivity, the best equation involving E-state values of O(8), C(14) and N(27) showed 48.3% explained variance, which increased to 63.5% on deletion of single outlier. From the analysis it appears that the nitrogen atom of the aminoethoxyphenyl substituent and 6-hydroxy substituent of the tetrahydroisoquinoline nucleus play important roles for ER(alpha)/ER(beta) selectivity in addition to R(1) and R(2) substituents.

  8. The galactophilic lectin (PA-IL, gene LecA) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Its binding requirements and the localization of lectin receptors in various mouse tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Svend; Hansen, Axel K; d'Apice, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    . It is concluded that the carbohydrate recognizing site of the lectin can have a binding requirement of only one saccharide. Lectin histochemistry was performed on sections from wild type mice and from knock-out mice, which lack function of the alpha.1,3-galactosyltransferase gene. All assays with the P......, kidney and adrenal gland while none of the two lectins were able to detect capillaries in the pancreas. This could indicate a differential glycosylation with respect to endothelial cell Gal alpha. epitopes among different organs. Further, since no PA-IL bindingto the endothelial cells in the KO mouse...... was observed, it seems that, in the mouse, the Pseudomonas lectin adheres to the Gal alpha l-3Ga4 beta 1-G1cNAc carbohydrate on endothelial cells in most organs and tissues. Finally, lectin staining of the basement membrane of the acini in the exocrine pancreas suggests the presence of Ga1 alpha 1-3Gal...

  9. Mgm101p is a novel component of the mitochondrial nucleoid that binds DNA and is required for the repair of oxidatively damaged mitochondrial DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meeusen, S.; Tieu, Q.; Wong, E.; Weiss, E.; Schieltz, D.; Yates, J.R.; Nunnari, J.

    1999-01-01

    Maintenance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) during cell division is required for progeny to be respiratory competent. Maintenance involves the replication, repair, assembly, segregation, and partitioning of the mitochondrial nucleoid. MGM101 has been identified as a gene essential for mtDNA maintenance in S. cerevisiae, but its role is unknown. Using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry, we identified Mgm101p as a component of highly enriched nucleoids, suggesting that it plays a nucleoid-specific role in maintenance. Subcellular fractionation, indirect immunofluorescence and GFP tagging show that Mgm101p is exclusively associated with the mitochondrial nucleoid structure in cells. Furthermore, DNA affinity chromatography of nucleoid extracts indicates that Mgm101p binds to DNA, suggesting that its nucleoid localization is in part due to this activity. Phenotypic analysis of cells containing a temperature sensitive mgm101 allele suggests that Mgm101p is not involved in mtDNA packaging, segregation, partitioning or required for ongoing mtDNA replication. We examined Mgm101p's role in mtDNA repair. As compared with wild-type cells, mgm101 cells were more sensitive to mtDNA damage induced by UV irradiation and were hypersensitive to mtDNA damage induced by gamma rays and H2O2 treatment. Thus, we propose that Mgm101p performs an essential function in the repair of oxidatively damaged mtDNA that is required for the maintenance of the mitochondrial genome. (author)

  10. Rad51 ATP binding but not hydrolysis is required to recruit Rad10 in synthesis-dependent strand annealing sites inS. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin, Justin; Fischhaber, Paula L

    2013-06-01

    Several modes of eukaryotic of DNA double strand break repair (DSBR) depend on synapsis of complementary DNA. The Rad51 ATPase, the S. cerevisiae homolog of E. coli RecA, plays a key role in this process by catalyzing homology searching and strand exchange between an invading DNA strand and a repair template (e.g. sister chromatid or homologous chromosome). Synthesis dependent strand annealing (SDSA), a mode of DSBR, requires Rad51. Another repair enzyme, the Rad1-Rad10 endonuclease, acts in the final stages of SDSA, hydrolyzing 3' overhanging single-stranded DNA. Here we show in vivo by fluorescence microscopy that the ATP binding function of yeast Rad51 is required to recruit Rad10 SDSA sites indicating that Rad51 pre-synaptic filament formation must occur prior to the recruitment of Rad1-Rad10. Our data also show that Rad51 ATPase activity, an important step in Rad51 filament disassembly, is not absolutely required in order to recruit Rad1-Rad10 to DSB sites.

  11. The Lon protease-like domain in the bacterial RecA paralog RadA is required for DNA binding and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Masao; Fukui, Kenji; Fujii, Yuki; Nakagawa, Noriko; Yano, Takato; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Masui, Ryoji

    2017-06-09

    Homologous recombination (HR) plays an essential role in the maintenance of genome integrity. RecA/Rad51 paralogs have been recognized as an important factor of HR. Among them, only one bacterial RecA/Rad51 paralog, RadA, is involved in HR as an accessory factor of RecA recombinase. RadA has a unique Lon protease-like domain (LonC) at its C terminus, in addition to a RecA-like ATPase domain. Unlike Lon protease, RadA's LonC domain does not show protease activity but is still essential for RadA-mediated DNA repair. Reconciling these two facts has been difficult because RadA's tertiary structure and molecular function are unknown. Here, we describe the hexameric ring structure of RadA's LonC domain, as determined by X-ray crystallography. The structure revealed the two positively charged regions unique to the LonC domain of RadA are located at the intersubunit cleft and the central hole of a hexameric ring. Surprisingly, a functional domain analysis demonstrated the LonC domain of RadA binds DNA, with site-directed mutagenesis showing that the two positively charged regions are critical for this DNA-binding activity. Interestingly, only the intersubunit cleft was required for the DNA-dependent stimulation of ATPase activity of RadA, and at least the central hole was essential for DNA repair function. Our data provide the structural and functional features of the LonC domain and their function in RadA-mediated DNA repair. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Intravital Imaging of Vascular Transmigration by the Lyme Spirochete: Requirement for the Integrin Binding Residues of the B. burgdorferi P66 Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devender Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Vascular extravasation, a key step in systemic infection by hematogenous microbial pathogens, is poorly understood, but has been postulated to encompass features similar to vascular transmigration by leukocytes. The Lyme disease spirochete can cause a variety of clinical manifestations, including arthritis, upon hematogenous dissemination. This pathogen encodes numerous surface adhesive proteins (adhesins that may promote extravasation, but none have yet been implicated in this process. In this work we report the novel use of intravital microscopy of the peripheral knee vasculature to study transmigration of the Lyme spirochete in living Cd1d-/-mice. In the absence of iNKT cells, major immune modulators in the mouse joint, spirochetes that have extravasated into joint-proximal tissue remain in the local milieu and can be enumerated accurately. We show that BBK32, a fibronectin and glycosaminoglycan adhesin of B. burgdorferi involved in early steps of endothelial adhesion, is not required for extravasation from the peripheral knee vasculature. In contrast, almost no transmigration occurs in the absence of P66, an outer membrane protein that has porin and integrin adhesin functions. Importantly, P66 mutants specifically defective in integrin binding were incapable of promoting extravasation. P66 itself does not promote detectable microvascular interactions, suggesting that vascular adhesion of B. burgdorferi mediated by other adhesins, sets the stage for P66-integrin interactions leading to transmigration. Although integrin-binding proteins with diverse functions are encoded by a variety of bacterial pathogens, P66 is the first to have a documented and direct role in vascular transmigration. The emerging picture of vascular escape by the Lyme spirochete shows similarities, but distinct differences from leukocyte transmigration.

  13. The E3 Ubiquitin Ligase- and Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-binding Domains of the Alpha4 Protein Are Both Required for Alpha4 to Inhibit PP2A Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeNoue-Newton, Michele; Watkins, Guy R.; Zou, Ping; Germane, Katherine L.; McCorvey, Lisa R.; Wadzinski, Brian E.; Spiller, Benjamin W. (Vanderbilt)

    2012-04-30

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is regulated through a variety of mechanisms, including post-translational modifications and association with regulatory proteins. Alpha4 is one such regulatory protein that binds the PP2A catalytic subunit (PP2Ac) and protects it from polyubiquitination and degradation. Alpha4 is a multidomain protein with a C-terminal domain that binds Mid1, a putative E3 ubiquitin ligase, and an N-terminal domain containing the PP2Ac-binding site. In this work, we present the structure of the N-terminal domain of mammalian Alpha4 determined by x-ray crystallography and use double electron-electron resonance spectroscopy to show that it is a flexible tetratricopeptide repeat-like protein. Structurally, Alpha4 differs from its yeast homolog, Tap42, in two important ways: (1) the position of the helix containing the PP2Ac-binding residues is in a more open conformation, showing flexibility in this region; and (2) Alpha4 contains a ubiquitin-interacting motif. The effects of wild-type and mutant Alpha4 on PP2Ac ubiquitination and stability were examined in mammalian cells by performing tandem ubiquitin-binding entity precipitations and cycloheximide chase experiments. Our results reveal that both the C-terminal Mid1-binding domain and the PP2Ac-binding determinants are required for Alpha4-mediated protection of PP2Ac from polyubiquitination and degradation.

  14. Feature Binding in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Neri

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Binding operations are primarily ascribed to cortex or similarly complex avian structures. My experiments show that the zebrafish, a lower vertebrate lacking cortex, supports visual feature binding of form and motion for the purpose of social behavior. These results challenge the notion that feature binding may require highly evolved neural structures and demonstrate that the nervous system of lower vertebrates can afford unexpectedly complex computations.

  15. Evidence that the requirements for ATP and wheat germ initiation factors 4A and 4F are affected by a region of satellite tobacco necrosis virus RNA that is 3' to the ribosomal binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, K S; Fletcher, L; Ravel, J M

    1988-06-15

    A cDNA containing the complete genome of satellite tobacco necrosis virus (STNV) RNA was constructed and cloned into a plasmid vector containing the T7 polymerase promotor. A second clone containing the first 54 nucleotides from the 5' end, which includes the ribosome binding site, was also constructed. RNAs were transcribed from these plasmids (pSTNV1239 and pSTNV54) and tested for their ability to bind to wheat germ 40 S ribosomal subunits in the presence of wheat germ initiation factors eIF-4A, eIF-4F, eIF-4G, eIF-3, eIF-2, Met-tRNA, ATP, and guanosine 5'-(beta, gamma-imino)triphosphate (GMP-PNP). Maximal binding of the STNV RNA transcribed from pSTNV1239 is obtained only in the presence of all the initiation factors and ATP. In contrast, close to maximal binding of STNV RNA transcribed from pSTNV54 is obtained in the absence of eIF-4A, eIF-4F, eIF-4G, and ATP. A series of deletion clones from the 3' end of the STNV cDNA was prepared, and the requirements for binding to 40 S ribosomal subunits were determined. STNV RNAs containing more than 134 nucleotides from the 5' end require eIF-4A, eIF-4F, eIF-4G, and ATP for maximal binding to 40 S ribosomal subunits, whereas STNV RNAs containing 86 nucleotides or less no longer require ATP and these factors. These findings indicate that a region 3' to the initiation codon affects the requirements for eIF-4A, eIF-4F, eIF-4G, and ATP.

  16. Dsc E3 ligase localization to the Golgi requires the ATPase Cdc48 and cofactor Ufd1 for activation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, Risa; Ribbens, Diedre; Raychaudhuri, Sumana; Stewart, Emerson V; Ho, Jason; Espenshade, Peter J

    2017-09-29

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe regulate lipid homeostasis and the hypoxic response under conditions of low sterol or oxygen availability. SREBPs are cleaved in the Golgi through the combined action of the Dsc E3 ligase complex, the rhomboid protease Rbd2, and the essential ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities (AAA + ) ATPase Cdc48. The soluble SREBP N-terminal transcription factor domain is then released into the cytosol to enter the nucleus and regulate gene expression. Previously, we reported that Cdc48 binding to Rbd2 is required for Rbd2-mediated SREBP cleavage. Here, using affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry experiments, we identified Cdc48-binding proteins in S. pombe , generating a list of many previously unknown potential Cdc48-binding partners. We show that the established Cdc48 cofactor Ufd1 is required for SREBP cleavage but does not interact with the Cdc48-Rbd2 complex. Cdc48-Ufd1 is instead required at a step prior to Rbd2 function, during Golgi localization of the Dsc E3 ligase complex. Together, these findings demonstrate that two distinct Cdc48 complexes, Cdc48-Ufd1 and Cdc48-Rbd2, are required for SREBP activation and low-oxygen adaptation in S. pombe . © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Discovery of novel membrane binding structures and functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kufareva, Irina; Lenoir, Marc; Dancea, Felician; Sridhar, Pooja; Raush, Eugene; Bissig, Christin; Gruenberg, Jean; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The function of a protein is determined by its intrinsic activity in the context of its subcellular distribution. Membranes localize proteins within cellular compartments and govern their specific activities. Discovering such membrane-protein interactions is important for understanding biological mechanisms, and could uncover novel sites for therapeutic intervention. Here we present a method for detecting membrane interactive proteins and their exposed residues that insert into lipid bilayers. Although the development process involved analysis of how C1b, C2, ENTH, FYVE, Gla, pleckstrin homology (PH) and PX domains bind membranes, the resulting Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) method yields predictions for a given protein of known three dimensional structures without referring to canonical membrane-targeting modules. This approach was tested on the Arf1 GTPase, ATF2 acetyltransferase, von Willebrand factor A3 domain and Neisseria gonorrhoeae MsrB protein, and further refined with membrane interactive and non-interactive FAPP1 and PKD1 pleckstrin homology domains, respectively. Furthermore we demonstrate how this tool can be used to discover unprecedented membrane binding functions as illustrated by the Bro1 domain of Alix, which was revealed to recognize lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA). Validation of novel membrane-protein interactions relies on other techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) which was used here to map the sites of micelle interaction. Together this indicates that genome-wide identification of known and novel membrane interactive proteins and sites is now feasible, and provides a new tool for functional annotation of the proteome. PMID:25394204

  18. The Anti-sigma Factor RsiV Is a Bacterial Receptor for Lysozyme: Co-crystal Structure Determination and Demonstration That Binding of Lysozyme to RsiV Is Required for σV Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L Hastie

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available σ factors provide RNA polymerase with promoter specificity in bacteria. Some σ factors require activation in order to interact with RNA polymerase and transcribe target genes. The Extra-Cytoplasmic Function (ECF σ factor, σV, is encoded by several Gram-positive bacteria and is specifically activated by lysozyme. This activation requires the proteolytic destruction of the anti-σ factor RsiV via a process of regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP. In many cases proteases that cleave at site-1 are thought to directly sense a signal and initiate the RIP process. We previously suggested binding of lysozyme to RsiV initiated the proteolytic destruction of RsiV and activation of σV. Here we determined the X-ray crystal structure of the RsiV-lysozyme complex at 2.3 Å which revealed that RsiV and lysozyme make extensive contacts. We constructed RsiV mutants with altered abilities to bind lysozyme. We find that mutants that are unable to bind lysozyme block site-1 cleavage of RsiV and σV activation in response to lysozyme. Taken together these data demonstrate that RsiV is a receptor for lysozyme and binding of RsiV to lysozyme is required for σV activation. In addition, the co-structure revealed that RsiV binds to the lysozyme active site pocket. We provide evidence that in addition to acting as a sensor for the presence of lysozyme, RsiV also inhibits lysozyme activity. Thus we have demonstrated that RsiV is a protein with multiple functions. RsiV inhibits σV activity in the absence of lysozyme, RsiV binds lysozyme triggering σV activation and RsiV inhibits the enzymatic activity of lysozyme.

  19. The Anti-sigma Factor RsiV Is a Bacterial Receptor for Lysozyme: Co-crystal Structure Determination and Demonstration That Binding of Lysozyme to RsiV Is Required for σV Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Jessica L; Williams, Kyle B; Bohr, Lindsey L; Houtman, Jon C; Gakhar, Lokesh; Ellermeier, Craig D

    2016-09-01

    σ factors provide RNA polymerase with promoter specificity in bacteria. Some σ factors require activation in order to interact with RNA polymerase and transcribe target genes. The Extra-Cytoplasmic Function (ECF) σ factor, σV, is encoded by several Gram-positive bacteria and is specifically activated by lysozyme. This activation requires the proteolytic destruction of the anti-σ factor RsiV via a process of regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP). In many cases proteases that cleave at site-1 are thought to directly sense a signal and initiate the RIP process. We previously suggested binding of lysozyme to RsiV initiated the proteolytic destruction of RsiV and activation of σV. Here we determined the X-ray crystal structure of the RsiV-lysozyme complex at 2.3 Å which revealed that RsiV and lysozyme make extensive contacts. We constructed RsiV mutants with altered abilities to bind lysozyme. We find that mutants that are unable to bind lysozyme block site-1 cleavage of RsiV and σV activation in response to lysozyme. Taken together these data demonstrate that RsiV is a receptor for lysozyme and binding of RsiV to lysozyme is required for σV activation. In addition, the co-structure revealed that RsiV binds to the lysozyme active site pocket. We provide evidence that in addition to acting as a sensor for the presence of lysozyme, RsiV also inhibits lysozyme activity. Thus we have demonstrated that RsiV is a protein with multiple functions. RsiV inhibits σV activity in the absence of lysozyme, RsiV binds lysozyme triggering σV activation and RsiV inhibits the enzymatic activity of lysozyme.

  20. The lectin domains of polypeptide GalNAc-transferases exhibit carbohydrate-binding specificity for GalNAc: lectin binding to GalNAc-glycopeptide substrates is required for high density GalNAc-O-glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandall, Hans H; Irazoqui, Fernando; Tarp, Mads Agervig

    2007-01-01

    Initiation of mucin-type O-glycosylation is controlled by a large family of UDP GalNAc:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (GalNAc-transferases). Most GalNAc-transferases contain a ricin-like lectin domain in the C-terminal end, which may confer GalNAc-glycopeptide substrate specificity...... to the enzyme. We have previously shown that the lectin domain of GalNAc-T4 modulates its substrate specificity to enable unique GalNAc-glycopeptide specificities and that this effect is selectively inhibitable by GalNAc; however, direct evidence of carbohydrate binding of GalNAc-transferase lectins has...... not been previously presented. Here, we report the direct carbohydrate binding of two GalNAc-transferase lectin domains, GalNAc-T4 and GalNAc-T2, representing isoforms reported to have distinct glycopeptide activity (GalNAc-T4) and isoforms without apparent distinct GalNAc-glycopeptide specificity (Gal...

  1. The PDZ-binding motif of Yes-associated protein is required for its co-activation of TEAD-mediated CTGF transcription and oncogenic cell transforming activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura, Tadanori; Miyamura, Norio; Hata, Shoji; Miura, Ryota; Hirayama, Jun; Nishina, Hiroshi

    2014-01-17

    YAP is a transcriptional co-activator that acts downstream of the Hippo signaling pathway and regulates multiple cellular processes, including proliferation. Hippo pathway-dependent phosphorylation of YAP negatively regulates its function. Conversely, attenuation of Hippo-mediated phosphorylation of YAP increases its ability to stimulate proliferation and eventually induces oncogenic transformation. The C-terminus of YAP contains a highly conserved PDZ-binding motif that regulates YAP's functions in multiple ways. However, to date, the importance of the PDZ-binding motif to the oncogenic cell transforming activity of YAP has not been determined. In this study, we disrupted the PDZ-binding motif in the YAP (5SA) protein, in which the sites normally targeted by Hippo pathway-dependent phosphorylation are mutated. We found that loss of the PDZ-binding motif significantly inhibited the oncogenic transformation of cultured cells induced by YAP (5SA). In addition, the increased nuclear localization of YAP (5SA) and its enhanced activation of TEAD-dependent transcription of the cell proliferation gene CTGF were strongly reduced when the PDZ-binding motif was deleted. Similarly, in mouse liver, deletion of the PDZ-binding motif suppressed nuclear localization of YAP (5SA) and YAP (5SA)-induced CTGF expression. Taken together, our results indicate that the PDZ-binding motif of YAP is critical for YAP-mediated oncogenesis, and that this effect is mediated by YAP's co-activation of TEAD-mediated CTGF transcription. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Incorporation of podoplanin into HIV released from HEK-293T cells, but not PBMC, is required for efficient binding to the attachment factor CLEC-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Platelets are associated with HIV in the blood of infected individuals and might modulate viral dissemination, particularly if the virus is directly transmitted into the bloodstream. The C-type lectin DC-SIGN and the novel HIV attachment factor CLEC-2 are expressed by platelets and facilitate HIV transmission from platelets to T-cells. Here, we studied the molecular mechanisms behind CLEC-2-mediated HIV-1 transmission. Results Binding studies with soluble proteins indicated that CLEC-2, in contrast to DC-SIGN, does not recognize the viral envelope protein, but a cellular factor expressed on kidney-derived 293T cells. Subsequent analyses revealed that the cellular mucin-like membranous glycoprotein podoplanin, a CLEC-2 ligand, was expressed on 293T cells and incorporated into virions released from these cells. Knock-down of podoplanin in 293T cells by shRNA showed that virion incorporation of podoplanin was required for efficient CLEC-2-dependent HIV-1 interactions with cell lines and platelets. Flow cytometry revealed no evidence for podoplanin expression on viable T-cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Podoplanin was also not detected on HIV-1 infected T-cells. However, apoptotic bystander cells in HIV-1 infected cultures reacted with anti-podoplanin antibodies, and similar results were obtained upon induction of apoptosis in a cell line and in PBMCs suggesting an unexpected link between apoptosis and podoplanin expression. Despite the absence of detectable podoplanin expression, HIV-1 produced in PBMC was transmitted to T-cells in a CLEC-2-dependent manner, indicating that T-cells might express an as yet unidentified CLEC-2 ligand. Conclusions Virion incorporation of podoplanin mediates CLEC-2 interactions of HIV-1 derived from 293T cells, while incorporation of a different cellular factor seems to be responsible for CLEC-2-dependent capture of PBMC-derived viruses. Furthermore, evidence was obtained that podoplanin expression is

  3. Incorporation of podoplanin into HIV released from HEK-293T cells, but not PBMC, is required for efficient binding to the attachment factor CLEC-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Münch Jan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platelets are associated with HIV in the blood of infected individuals and might modulate viral dissemination, particularly if the virus is directly transmitted into the bloodstream. The C-type lectin DC-SIGN and the novel HIV attachment factor CLEC-2 are expressed by platelets and facilitate HIV transmission from platelets to T-cells. Here, we studied the molecular mechanisms behind CLEC-2-mediated HIV-1 transmission. Results Binding studies with soluble proteins indicated that CLEC-2, in contrast to DC-SIGN, does not recognize the viral envelope protein, but a cellular factor expressed on kidney-derived 293T cells. Subsequent analyses revealed that the cellular mucin-like membranous glycoprotein podoplanin, a CLEC-2 ligand, was expressed on 293T cells and incorporated into virions released from these cells. Knock-down of podoplanin in 293T cells by shRNA showed that virion incorporation of podoplanin was required for efficient CLEC-2-dependent HIV-1 interactions with cell lines and platelets. Flow cytometry revealed no evidence for podoplanin expression on viable T-cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Podoplanin was also not detected on HIV-1 infected T-cells. However, apoptotic bystander cells in HIV-1 infected cultures reacted with anti-podoplanin antibodies, and similar results were obtained upon induction of apoptosis in a cell line and in PBMCs suggesting an unexpected link between apoptosis and podoplanin expression. Despite the absence of detectable podoplanin expression, HIV-1 produced in PBMC was transmitted to T-cells in a CLEC-2-dependent manner, indicating that T-cells might express an as yet unidentified CLEC-2 ligand. Conclusions Virion incorporation of podoplanin mediates CLEC-2 interactions of HIV-1 derived from 293T cells, while incorporation of a different cellular factor seems to be responsible for CLEC-2-dependent capture of PBMC-derived viruses. Furthermore, evidence was obtained that

  4. Independent regions of adenovirus E1A are required for binding to and dissociation of E2F-protein complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fattaey, A R; Harlow, E; Helin, K

    1993-01-01

    The transcription factor E2F is present in independent complexes with the product of the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene, pRB, and a related gene product, p107, in association with the cyclin A-cdk2 or the cyclin E-cdk2 kinase complex. pRB and p107 can negatively regulate E2F activity, since...... compete with the CR1 but not CR2 domain of E1A for binding to pRB. These results indicate that E1A CR1 and E2F-1 may bind to the same or overlapping sites on pRB and that E1A CR2 binds to an independent region. On the basis of our results, we propose a two-step model for the release of E2F from pRB and p...

  5. Heterodimerization of the transcription factors E2F-1 and DP-1 is required for binding to the adenovirus E4 (ORF6/7) protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, K; Harlow, E

    1994-01-01

    Adenovirus infection leads to E1A-dependent activation of the transcription factor E2F. E2F has recently been identified in complexes with cellular proteins such as the retinoblastoma protein (pRB) and the two pRB family members p107 and p130. E1A dissociates E2F from these cellular proteins......, and another viral protein, E4 (ORF6/7), can bind to E2F. The binding of E4 to E2F induces the formation of a stable DNA-binding complex containing the two proteins, and stimulation of the adenovirus E2 early promoter can occur. Recent studies have shown that E2F is the combined activity of several proteins...

  6. The DMI1 and DMI2 Early Symbiotic Genes of Medicago truncatula Are Required for a High-Affinity Nodulation Factor-Binding Site Associated to a Particulate Fraction of Roots1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Bridget V.; Cullimore, Julie V.; Ranjeva, Raoul; Bono, Jean-Jacques

    2006-01-01

    The establishment of the legume-rhizobia symbiosis between Medicago spp. and Sinorhizobium meliloti is dependent on the production of sulfated lipo-chitooligosaccharidic nodulation (Nod) factors by the bacterial partner. In this article, using a biochemical approach to characterize putative Nod factor receptors in the plant host, we describe a high-affinity binding site (Kd = 0.45 nm) for the major Nod factor produced by S. meliloti. This site is termed Nod factor-binding site 3 (NFBS3). NFBS3 is associated to a high-density fraction prepared from roots of Medicago truncatula and shows binding specificity for lipo-chitooligosaccharidic structures. As for the previously characterized binding sites (NFBS1 and NFBS2), NFBS3 does not recognize the sulfate group on the S. meliloti Nod factor. Studies of Nod factor binding in root extracts of early symbiotic mutants of M. truncatula reveals that the new site is present in Nod factor perception and does not make infections 3 (dmi3) mutants but is absent in dmi1 and dmi2 mutants. Roots and cell cultures of all these mutants still contain sites similar to NFBS1 and NFBS2, respectively. These results suggest that NFBS3 is different from NFBS2 and NFBS1 and is dependent on the common symbiotic genes DMI1 and DMI2 required for establishment of symbioses with both rhizobia and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. The potential role of this site in the establishment of root endosymbioses is discussed. PMID:16377749

  7. Mrd1p binds to pre-rRNA early during transcription independent of U3 snoRNA and is required for compaction of the pre-rRNA into small subunit processomes

    OpenAIRE

    Segerstolpe, Åsa; Lundkvist, Pär; Osheim, Yvonne N.; Beyer, Ann L.; Wieslander, Lars

    2008-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, synthesis of the small ribosomal subunit requires assembly of the 35S pre-rRNA into a 90S preribosomal complex. SnoRNAs, including U3 snoRNA, and many trans-acting proteins are required for the ordered assembly and function of the 90S preribosomal complex. Here, we show that the conserved protein Mrd1p binds to the pre-rRNA early during transcription and is required for compaction of the pre-18S rRNA into SSU processome particles. We have exploited the fact that a...

  8. MHC class I molecules with superenhanced CD8 binding properties bypass the requirement for cognate TCR recognition and nonspecifically activate CTLs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Wooldridge (Linda); M. Clement (Mathew); A. Lissina (Anna); E.S.J. Edwards (Emily); K. Ladell (Kristin); J. Ekeruche (Julia); R.E. Hewitt (Rachel); B. Laugel (Bruno); E. Gostick (Emma); D.K. Cole (David); J.E.M.A. Debets (Reno); C.A. Berrevoets (Cor); J.J. Miles (John); S.R. Burrows (Scott); D.A. Price (David); A.K. Sewell (Andrew)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractCD8+CTLs are essential for effective immune defense against intracellular microbes and neoplasia. CTLs recognize short peptide fragments presented in association with MHC class I (MHCI) molecules on the surface of infected or dysregulated cells. Ag recognition involves the binding of

  9. Domain interplay in the urokinase receptor. Requirement for the third domain in high affinity ligand binding and demonstration of ligand contact sites in distinct receptor domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Ronne, E; Dano, K

    1996-01-01

    The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a membrane protein comprised of three extracellular domains. In order to study the importance of this domain organization in the ligand-binding process of the receptor we subjected a recombinant, soluble uPAR (suPAR) to specific proteolytic...

  10. The Staphylococcus aureus group II biotin protein ligase BirA is an effective regulator of biotin operon transcription and requires the DNA binding domain for full enzymatic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Sarah K; Cronan, John E

    2016-11-01

    Group II biotin protein ligases (BPLs) are characterized by the presence of an N-terminal DNA binding domain that functions in transcriptional regulation of the genes of biotin biosynthesis and transport. The Staphylococcus aureus Group II BPL which is called BirA has been reported to bind an imperfect inverted repeat located upstream of the biotin synthesis operon. DNA binding by other Group II BPLs requires dimerization of the protein which is triggered by synthesis of biotinoyl-AMP (biotinoyl-adenylate), the intermediate in the ligation of biotin to its cognate target proteins. However, the S. aureus BirA was reported to dimerize and bind DNA in the absence of biotin or biotinoyl-AMP (Soares da Costa et al. (2014) Mol Microbiol 91: 110-120). These in vitro results argued that the protein would be unable to respond to the levels of biotin or acceptor proteins and thus would lack the regulatory properties of the other characterized BirA proteins. We tested the regulatory function of the protein using an in vivo model system and examined its DNA binding properties in vitro using electrophoretic mobility shift and fluorescence anisotropy analyses. We report that the S. aureus BirA is an effective regulator of biotin operon transcription and that the prior data can be attributed to artifacts of mobility shift analyses. We also report that deletion of the DNA binding domain of the S. aureus BirA results in loss of virtually all of its ligation activity. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Two distinct binding modes define the interaction of Brox with the C-terminal tails of CHMP5 and CHMP4B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Ruiling; Dussupt, Vincent; Jiang, Jiansheng; Sette, Paola; Rudd, Victoria; Chuenchor, Watchalee; Bello, Nana F; Bouamr, Fadila; Xiao, Tsan Sam

    2012-05-09

    Interactions of the CHMP protein carboxyl terminal tails with effector proteins play important roles in retroviral budding, cytokinesis, and multivesicular body biogenesis. Here we demonstrate that hydrophobic residues at the CHMP4B C-terminal amphipathic α helix bind a concave surface of Brox, a mammalian paralog of Alix. Unexpectedly, CHMP5 was also found to bind Brox and specifically recruit endogenous Brox to detergent-resistant membrane fractions through its C-terminal 20 residues. Instead of an α helix, the CHMP5 C-terminal tail adopts a tandem β-hairpin structure that binds Brox at the same site as CHMP4B. Additional Brox:CHMP5 interface is furnished by a unique CHMP5 hydrophobic pocket engaging the Brox residue Y348 that is not conserved among the Bro1 domains. Our studies thus unveil a β-hairpin conformation of the CHMP5 protein C-terminal tail, and provide insights into the overlapping but distinct binding profiles of ESCRT-III and the Bro1 domain proteins. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A protein binding AT-rich sequence in the soybean leghemoglobin c3 promoter is a general cis element that requires proximal DNA elements to stimulate transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, N B; Larsen, K; Knudsen, J Y

    1994-01-01

    that the interaction between NAT2 and NAT2 BS1 is responsible for the observed reactivation. Further activation experiments with the lbc3 and the leaf-specific Nicotiana plumbaginifolia ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase small subunit (rbcS-8B) promoter suggested that another specific cis element...... in combination with other trans-acting factor(s) to increase expression. The finding of NAT2-like binding activities in different plant organs and the specific expression of the hybrid NAT2 BS1/-312 rbcS-8B promoter in leaves suggest that NAT2 is a general activator of transcription. Udgivelsesdato: 1994-May...

  13. At least two Fc Neu5Gc residues of monoclonal antibodies are required for binding to anti-Neu5Gc antibody

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Chuanfei; Gao, Kai; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Wenbo; Wang, Lan; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Chunyu; Li, Meng; Wormald, Mark R.; Rudd, Pauline M.; Wang, Junzhi

    2016-01-01

    Two non-human glycan epitopes, galactose-Į-1,3-galactose (Į-gal) and Neu5Gc-Į-2-6-galactose (Neu5Gc) have been shown to be antigenic when attached to Fab oligosaccharides of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) , while Į-gal attached to Fc glycans were not. However, the antigenicity of Neu5Gc on the Fc glycans remains unclear in the context that most mAbs carry only Fc glycans. After studying two clinical mAbs carrying significant amounts of Fc Neu5Gc, we show that their binding activity with anti-Ne...

  14. The PR-Set7 binding domain of Riz1 is required for the H4K20me1-H3K9me1 trans-tail ‘histone code’ and Riz1 tumor suppressor function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congdon, Lauren M.; Sims, Jennifer K.; Tuzon, Creighton T.; Rice, Judd C.

    2014-01-01

    PR-Set7/Set8/KMT5a is the sole histone H4 lysine 20 monomethyltransferase (H4K20me1) in metazoans and is essential for proper cell division and genomic stability. We unexpectedly discovered that normal cellular levels of monomethylated histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9me1) were also dependent on PR-Set7, but independent of its catalytic activity. This observation suggested that PR-Set7 interacts with an H3K9 monomethyltransferase to establish the previously reported H4K20me1-H3K9me1 trans-tail ‘histone code’. Here we show that PR-Set7 specifically and directly binds the C-terminus of the Riz1/PRDM2/KMT8 tumor suppressor and demonstrate that the N-terminal PR/SET domain of Riz1 preferentially monomethylates H3K9. The PR-Set7 binding domain was required for Riz1 nuclear localization and maintenance of the H4K20me1-H3K9me1 trans-tail ‘histone code’. Although Riz1 can function as a repressor, Riz1/H3K9me1 was dispensable for the repression of genes regulated by PR-Set7/H4K20me1. Frameshift mutations resulting in a truncated Riz1 incapable of binding PR-Set7 occur frequently in various aggressive cancers. In these cancer cells, expression of wild-type Riz1 restored tumor suppression by decreasing proliferation and increasing apoptosis. These phenotypes were not observed in cells expressing either the Riz1 PR/SET domain or PR-Set7 binding domain indicating that Riz1 methyltransferase activity and PR-Set7 binding domain are both essential for Riz1 tumor suppressor function. PMID:24423864

  15. A conserved Polϵ binding module in Ctf18-RFC is required for S-phase checkpoint activation downstream of Mec1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rodríguez, Luis J; De Piccoli, Giacomo; Marchesi, Vanessa; Jones, Richard C; Edmondson, Ricky D; Labib, Karim

    2015-10-15

    Defects during chromosome replication in eukaryotes activate a signaling pathway called the S-phase checkpoint, which produces a multifaceted response that preserves genome integrity at stalled DNA replication forks. Work with budding yeast showed that the 'alternative clamp loader' known as Ctf18-RFC acts by an unknown mechanism to activate the checkpoint kinase Rad53, which then mediates much of the checkpoint response. Here we show that budding yeast Ctf18-RFC associates with DNA polymerase epsilon, via an evolutionarily conserved 'Pol ϵ binding module' in Ctf18-RFC that is produced by interaction of the carboxyl terminus of Ctf18 with the Ctf8 and Dcc1 subunits. Mutations at the end of Ctf18 disrupt the integrity of the Pol ϵ binding module and block the S-phase checkpoint pathway, downstream of the Mec1 kinase that is the budding yeast orthologue of mammalian ATR. Similar defects in checkpoint activation are produced by mutations that displace Pol ϵ from the replisome. These findings indicate that the association of Ctf18-RFC with Pol ϵ at defective replication forks is a key step in activation of the S-phase checkpoint. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Acyl-CoA-binding protein, Acb1p, is required for normal vacuole function and ceramide synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færgeman, Nils J.; Feddersen, Søren; Christiansen, Janne K

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, we show that depletion of acyl-CoA-binding protein, Acb1p, in yeast affects ceramide levels, protein trafficking, vacuole fusion and structure. Vacuoles in Acb1p-depleted cells are multi-lobed, contain significantly less of the SNAREs (soluble N -ethylmaleimide......-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptors) Nyv1p, Vam3p and Vti1p, and are unable to fuse in vitro. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed a dramatic reduction in the content of ceramides in whole-cell lipids and in vacuoles isolated from Acb1p-depleted cells. Maturation of yeast aminopeptidase I...... be compartmentalized. We suggest that the reduced ceramide synthesis in Acb1p-depleted cells leads to severely altered vacuole morphology, perturbed vacuole assembly and strong inhibition of homotypic vacuole fusion....

  17. Selective binding and lateral clustering of α5β1 and αvβ3 integrins: Unraveling the spatial requirements for cell spreading and focal adhesion assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaufler, Viktoria; Czichos-Medda, Helmi; Hirschfeld-Warnecken, Vera; Neubauer, Stefanie; Rechenmacher, Florian; Medda, Rebecca; Kessler, Horst; Geiger, Benjamin; Spatz, Joachim P; Cavalcanti-Adam, E Ada

    2016-09-02

    Coordination of the specific functions of α5β1 and αvβ3 integrins is crucial for the precise regulation of cell adhesion, spreading and migration, yet the contribution of differential integrin-specific crosstalk to these processes remains unclear. To determine the specific functions of αvβ3 and α5β1 integrins, we used nanoarrays of gold particles presenting immobilized, integrin-selective peptidomimetic ligands. Integrin binding to the peptidomimetics is highly selective, and cells can spread on both ligands. However, spreading is faster and the projected cell area is greater on α5β1 ligand; both depend on ligand spacing. Quantitative analysis of adhesion plaques shows that focal adhesion size is increased in cells adhering to αvβ3 ligand at 30 and 60 nm spacings. Analysis of αvβ3 and α5β1 integrin clusters indicates that fibrillar adhesions are more prominent in cells adhering to α5β1 ligand, while clusters are mostly localized at the cell margins in cells adhering to αvβ3 ligand. αvβ3 integrin clusters are more pronounced on αvβ3 ligand, though they can also be detected in cells adhering to α5β1 ligand. Furthermore, α5β1 integrin clusters are present in cells adhering to α5β1 ligand, and often colocalize with αvβ3 clusters. Taken together, these findings indicate that the activation of αvβ3 integrin by ligand binding is dispensable for initial adhesion and spreading, but essential to formation of stable focal adhesions.

  18. The stress granule protein Vgl1 and poly(A)-binding protein Pab1 are required for doxorubicin resistance in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Takahiro [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, Kowakae 3-4-1, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Satoh, Ryosuke [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, Kowakae 3-4-1, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, 1-8 Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8472 (Japan); Umeda, Nanae; Kita, Ayako [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, Kowakae 3-4-1, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Sugiura, Reiko, E-mail: sugiurar@phar.kindai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, Kowakae 3-4-1, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stress granules (SGs) as a mechanism of doxorubicin tolerance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We characterize the role of stress granules in doxorubicin tolerance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deletion of components of SGs enhances doxorubicin sensitivity in fission yeast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doxorubicin promotes SG formation when combined with heat shock. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doxorubicin regulates stress granule assembly independent of eIF2{alpha} phosphorylation. -- Abstract: Doxorubicin is an anthracycline antibiotic widely used for chemotherapy. Although doxorubicin is effective in the treatment of several cancers, including solid tumors and leukemias, the basis of its mechanism of action is not completely understood. Here, we describe the effects of doxorubicin and its relationship with stress granules formation in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We show that disruption of genes encoding the components of stress granules, including vgl1{sup +}, which encodes a multi-KH type RNA-binding protein, and pab1{sup +}, which encodes a poly(A)-binding protein, resulted in greater sensitivity to doxorubicin than seen in wild-type cells. Disruption of the vgl1{sup +} and pab1{sup +} genes did not confer sensitivity to other anti-cancer drugs such as cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and paclitaxel. We also showed that doxorubicin treatment promoted stress granule formation when combined with heat shock. Notably, doxorubicin treatment did not induce hyperphosphorylation of eIF2{alpha}, suggesting that doxorubicin is involved in stress granule assembly independent of eIF2{alpha} phosphorylation. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of fission yeast for elucidating the molecular targets of doxorubicin toxicity and suggest a novel drug-resistance mechanism involving stress granule assembly.

  19. QSAR of adenosine receptor antagonists. Part 3: Exploring physicochemical requirements for selective binding of 1,2,4-triazolo[5,1-i]purine derivatives with human adenosine A3 receptor subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Kunal; Leonard, J Thomas; Sengupta, Chandana

    2004-07-16

    Considering potential of selective adenosine A3 receptor antagonists in the development of prospective therapeutic agents, an attempt has been made to explore selectivity requirements of 1,2,4-triazolo[5,1-i]purine derivatives for binding with cloned human adenosine A3 receptor subtype. In this study, partition coefficient (logP) values of the molecules (calculated by Crippen's fragmentation method) and Wang-Ford charges of the common atoms of the triazolopurine nucleus (calculated from molecular electrostatic potential surface of energy minimized geometry using AM1 technique) were used as independent variables along with suitable dummy parameters. The best equation describing A3 binding affinity [n=29, Q2=0.796, Ra2=0.853, R2=0.874, R=0.935, s=0.342, F=41.5 (df 4,24), SDEP=0.396] showed parabolic relation with logP (optimum value being 4.134). Further, it was found that an aromatic substituent conjugated with the triazole nucleus should be present at R2 position for A3 binding affinity. Again, high negative charges on N2 and N4 are conducive to the binding affinity. While exploring selectivity requirements of the compounds for binding with A3 receptor over that with A2A receptor, the selectivity relation [n=23, Q2=0.909, Ra2=0.918, R2=0.933, R=0.966, s=0.401, F=62.4 (df 4,18), SDEP=0.412] showed that an aromatic R2 substituent conjugated with the triazole nucleus contributes significantly to the selectivity. Again, presence of a 4-substituted-phenyl ring (except 4-OH-phenyl and 4-CH3-phenyl) at R2 position also increases selectivity. Further, charge difference between N2 and N11 (negative charge on the former should be higher and that on the latter should be less) contributes significantly to the selectivity. In addition, negative charge on N7 is conducive while presence of substituents like propyl, butyl, pentyl or phenyl at R1 position is detrimental for the A3 selectivity.

  20. The RNA-binding protein, ZC3H14, is required for proper poly(A) tail length control, expression of synaptic proteins, and brain function in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rha, Jennifer; Jones, Stephanie K; Fidler, Jonathan; Banerjee, Ayan; Leung, Sara W; Morris, Kevin J; Wong, Jennifer C; Inglis, George Andrew S; Shapiro, Lindsey; Deng, Qiudong; Cutler, Alicia A; Hanif, Adam M; Pardue, Machelle T; Schaffer, Ashleigh; Seyfried, Nicholas T; Moberg, Kenneth H; Bassell, Gary J; Escayg, Andrew; García, Paul S; Corbett, Anita H

    2017-10-01

    A number of mutations in genes that encode ubiquitously expressed RNA-binding proteins cause tissue specific disease. Many of these diseases are neurological in nature revealing critical roles for this class of proteins in the brain. We recently identified mutations in a gene that encodes a ubiquitously expressed polyadenosine RNA-binding protein, ZC3H14 (Zinc finger CysCysCysHis domain-containing protein 14), that cause a nonsyndromic, autosomal recessive form of intellectual disability. This finding reveals the molecular basis for disease and provides evidence that ZC3H14 is essential for proper brain function. To investigate the role of ZC3H14 in the mammalian brain, we generated a mouse in which the first common exon of the ZC3H14 gene, exon 13 is removed (Zc3h14Δex13/Δex13) leading to a truncated ZC3H14 protein. We report here that, as in the patients, Zc3h14 is not essential in mice. Utilizing these Zc3h14Δex13/Δex13mice, we provide the first in vivo functional characterization of ZC3H14 as a regulator of RNA poly(A) tail length. The Zc3h14Δex13/Δex13 mice show enlarged lateral ventricles in the brain as well as impaired working memory. Proteomic analysis comparing the hippocampi of Zc3h14+/+ and Zc3h14Δex13/Δex13 mice reveals dysregulation of several pathways that are important for proper brain function and thus sheds light onto which pathways are most affected by the loss of ZC3H14. Among the proteins increased in the hippocampi of Zc3h14Δex13/Δex13 mice compared to control are key synaptic proteins including CaMK2a. This newly generated mouse serves as a tool to study the function of ZC3H14 in vivo. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Adaptive immune stimulation is required to obtain high protection with fatty acid binding protein vaccine candidate against Fasciola hepatica in Balb/C mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Abán, Julio; Esteban, Ana; Vicente, Belén; Rojas-Caraballo, José; del Olmo, Esther; Martínez-Fernández, Antonio R; Hillyer, George V; Muro, Antonio

    2012-06-01

    Fascioliasis is a parasitic disease that mainly affects cattle and sheep, causing significant economic losses with a great impact in developing countries. Human fascioliasis is becoming more important with the high endemicity in some countries of the world. Previous studies have shown the importance of Fasciola hepatica fatty acid binding proteins (FABP) as protective molecules against fascioliasis in various animal models including mice, rabbits, and sheep. Our studies have shown the protective efficacy of recombinant FABP (rFh15) when the protein is formulated in the adjuvant adaptation system (ADAD), using either natural or synthetic immunomodulators. The ADAD system is most effective when it is used 5 days before each dose of specific vaccine antigen. The results showed survival rates of up to 50% with less severe hepatic lesions and high levels of IgG2a or IFNγ in immunized mice, using the ADAD system, compared to survival rates of 13% with no hepatic lesion reduction and high levels of IgG1 and IL-4 in those mice immunized with the simplified mode (ADADs).

  2. At least two Fc Neu5Gc residues of monoclonal antibodies are required for binding to anti-Neu5Gc antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chuanfei; Gao, Kai; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Wenbo; Wang, Lan; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Chunyu; Li, Meng; Wormald, Mark R; Rudd, Pauline M; Wang, Junzhi

    2016-01-29

    Two non-human glycan epitopes, galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-gal) and Neu5Gc-α-2-6-galactose (Neu5Gc) have been shown to be antigenic when attached to Fab oligosaccharides of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) , while α-gal attached to Fc glycans was not. However, the antigenicity of Neu5Gc on the Fc glycans remains unclear in the context that most mAbs carry only Fc glycans. After studying two clinical mAbs carrying significant amounts of Fc Neu5Gc, we show that their binding activity with anti-Neu5Gc antibody resided in a small subset of mAbs carrying two or more Fc Neu5Gc, while mAbs harboring only one Neu5Gc showed no reactivity. Since most Neu5Gc epitopes were distributed singly on the Fc of mAbs, our results suggest that the potential antigenicity of Fc Neu5Gc is low. Our study could be referenced in the process design and optimization of mAb production in murine myeloma cells and in the quality control of mAbs for industries and regulatory authorities.

  3. PARP-1 is required for retrieval of cocaine-associated memory by binding to the promoter of a novel gene encoding a putative transposase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lax, E; Friedman, A; Massart, R; Barnea, R; Abraham, L; Cheishvili, D; Zada, M; Ahdoot, H; Bareli, T; Warhaftig, G; Visochek, L; Suderman, M; Cohen-Armon, M; Szyf, M; Yadid, G

    2017-04-01

    Reward-related memory is an important factor in cocaine seeking. One necessary signaling mechanism for long-term memory formation is the activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), via poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. We demonstrate herein that auto-poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of activated PARP-1 was significantly pronounced during retrieval of cocaine-associated contextual memory, in the central amygdala (CeA) of rats expressing cocaine-conditioned place preference (CPP). Intra-CeA pharmacological and short hairpin RNA depletion of PARP-1 activity during cocaine-associated memory retrieval abolished CPP. In contrast, PARP-1 inhibition after memory retrieval did not affect CPP reconsolidation process and subsequent retrievals. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing revealed that PARP-1 binding in the CeA is highly enriched in genes involved in neuronal signaling. We identified among PARP targets in CeA a single gene, yet uncharacterized and encoding a putative transposase inhibitor, at which PARP-1 enrichment markedly increases during cocaine-associated memory retrieval and positively correlates with CPP. Our findings have important implications for understanding drug-related behaviors, and suggest possible future therapeutic targets for drug abuse.

  4. Both TEAD-binding and WW domains are required for the growth stimulation and oncogenic transformation activity of yes-associated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Kim, Joungmok; Ye, Xin; Lai, Zhi-Chun; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2009-02-01

    The Yes-associated protein (YAP) transcription coactivator is a candidate human oncogene and a key regulator of organ size. It is phosphorylated and inhibited by the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway. TEAD family transcription factors were recently shown to play a key role in mediating the biological functions of YAP. Here, we show that the WW domain of YAP has a critical role in inducing a subset of YAP target genes independent of or in cooperation with TEAD. Mutation of the WW domains diminishes the ability of YAP to stimulate cell proliferation and oncogenic transformation. Inhibition of YAP oncogenic-transforming activity depends on intact serine residues 127 and 381, two sites that could be phosphorylated by the Hippo pathway. Furthermore, genetic experiments in Drosophila support that WW domains of YAP and Yki, the fly YAP homologue, have an important role in stimulating tissue growth. Our data suggest a model in which YAP induces gene expression and exerts its biological functions by interacting with transcription factors through both the TEAD-binding and WW domains.

  5. RCN1/OsABCG5, an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, is required for hypodermal suberization of roots in rice (Oryza sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiono, Katsuhiro; Ando, Miho; Nishiuchi, Shunsaku; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Kohtaro; Nakamura, Motoaki; Matsuo, Yuichi; Yasuno, Naoko; Yamanouchi, Utako; Fujimoto, Masaru; Takanashi, Hideki; Ranathunge, Kosala; Franke, Rochus B; Shitan, Nobukazu; Nishizawa, Naoko K; Takamure, Itsuro; Yano, Masahiro; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Schreiber, Lukas; Yazaki, Kazufumi; Nakazono, Mikio; Kato, Kiyoaki

    2014-10-01

    Suberin is a complex polymer composed of aliphatic and phenolic compounds. It is a constituent of apoplastic plant interfaces. In many plant species, including rice (Oryza sativa), the hypodermis in the outer part of roots forms a suberized cell wall (the Casparian strip and/or suberin lamellae), which inhibits the flow of water and ions and protects against pathogens. To date, there is no genetic evidence that suberin forms an apoplastic transport barrier in the hypodermis. We discovered that a rice reduced culm number1 (rcn1) mutant could not develop roots longer than 100 mm in waterlogged soil. The mutated gene encoded an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter named RCN1/OsABCG5. RCN1/OsABCG5 gene expression in the wild type was increased in most hypodermal and some endodermal roots cells under stagnant deoxygenated conditions. A GFP-RCN1/OsABCG5 fusion protein localized at the plasma membrane of the wild type. Under stagnant deoxygenated conditions, well suberized hypodermis developed in wild types but not in rcn1 mutants. Under stagnant deoxygenated conditions, apoplastic tracers (periodic acid and berberine) were blocked at the hypodermis in the wild type but not in rcn1, indicating that the apoplastic barrier in the mutant was impaired. The amount of the major aliphatic suberin monomers originating from C(28) and C(30) fatty acids or ω-OH fatty acids was much lower in rcn1 than in the wild type. These findings suggest that RCN1/OsABCG5 has a role in the suberization of the hypodermis of rice roots, which contributes to formation of the apoplastic barrier. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Independent regions of adenovirus E1A are required for binding to and dissociation of E2F-protein complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fattaey, A R; Harlow, E; Helin, K

    1993-01-01

    overexpression of pRB or p107 in cells lacking a functional pRB leads to the repression of E2F activity. The products of the adenovirus E1A gene can disrupt E2F complexes and result in free and presumably active E2F transcription factor. The regions of E1A required for this function are also essential...

  7. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 is required for the regulation of rat oval cell proliferation and differentiation in the 2AAF/PHX model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole C Steiger-Luther

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Nicole C Steiger-Luther1, Houda Darwiche1, Seh-Hoon Oh1, Jennifer M Williams1, Bryon E Petersen1,21Department of Pathology, Immunology and Laboratory Medicine, 2Program in Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USAAbstract: Oval cell-mediated liver regeneration is a highly complex process that involves the coordination of several signaling factors, chemokines and cytokines to allow for proper maintenance of the liver architecture. When hepatocyte proliferation is inhibited, an hepatic stem cell population, often referred to as “oval cells”, is activated to aid in liver regeneration. The function of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3 during this process of oval cell activation is of particular interest because it is produced in liver and has been shown to induce migration and differentiation of other stem cell populations both in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, IGFBP-3 production has been linked to the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β superfamily, a pathway known to be induced during oval cell proliferation. In this study, we set out to determine whether IGFBP-3 plays a role in oval cell proliferation, migration and differentiation during this specific type of regeneration. Through activation of the oval cell-mediated liver regeneration in a rat model, we found that IGFBP-3 is elevated in the liver and serum of animals during peak days of oval cell activation and proliferation. Furthermore, in vitro assays found that WB-344 cells, a liver stem cell line similar to oval cells, were induced to migrate in the presence of IGFBP-3. When expression of IGFBP-3 was knocked down during oval cell activation in vivo, we found that oval cell proliferation was increased and observed the appearance of numerous atypical ductular structures, which were OV-6 and Ki67-positive. Finally, quantitative realtime PCR analysis of liver tissue from IGFBP-3 small interfering

  8. 3'UTR AU-Rich Elements (AREs) and the RNA-Binding Protein Tristetraprolin (TTP) Are Not Required for the LPS-Mediated Destabilization of Phospholipase-Cβ-2 mRNA in Murine Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Smita; Elson, Genie; Blackshear, Perry J; Lutz, Carol S; Leibovich, S Joseph

    2017-04-01

    We have shown previously that bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated suppression of phospholipase-Cβ-2 (PLCβ-2) expression is involved in M1 (inflammatory) to M2-like (wound healing) phenotypic switching of macrophages triggered by adenosine. This suppression is mediated post-transcriptionally by destabilization of PLCβ-2 mRNA (messenger ribonucleic acid). To investigate the mechanism of this LPS-mediated destabilization, we examined the roles of RNA-binding agents including microRNAs and RNA-binding proteins that are involved in regulating stability of mRNAs encoding growth factors, inflammatory mediators, and proto-oncogenes. Adenylate and uridylate (AU)-rich elements (AREs) in 3'UTRs are specific recognition sites for RNA-binding proteins including tristetraprolin (TTP), HuR, and AUF1 and for microRNAs that are involved in regulating mRNA stability. In this study, we investigated the role of TTP and AREs in regulating PLCβ-2 mRNA stability. The 3'UTR of the PLCβ-2 gene was inserted into the pLightswitch luciferase reporter plasmid and transfected into RAW264.7 cells. LPS suppressed luciferase expression from this reporter. Luciferase expression from mutant 3'UTR constructs lacking AREs was similarly downregulated, suggesting that these regions are not required for LPS-mediated suppression of PLCβ-2. TTP was rapidly upregulated in both primary murine macrophages and RAW264.7 cells in response to LPS. Suppression of PLCβ-2 by LPS was examined using macrophages from mice lacking TTP (TTP -/- ). LPS suppressed PLCβ-2 expression to the same extent in wild type (WT) and TTP -/- macrophages. Also, the rate of decay of PLCβ-2 mRNA in LPS-treated macrophages following transcriptional blockade was similar in WT and TTP -/- macrophages, clearly indicating that TTP is not involved in LPS-mediated destabilization of PLCβ-2 mRNA in macrophages.

  9. Potent and selective small-molecule inhibitors of cIAP1/2 proteins reveal that the binding of Smac mimetics to XIAP BIR3 is not required for their effective induction of cell death in tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haiying; Lu, Jianfeng; Liu, Liu; Yang, Chao-Yie; Wang, Shaomeng

    2014-04-18

    Cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 and 2 (cIAP1/2) and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) are key apoptosis regulators and promising new cancer therapeutic targets. This study describes a set of non-peptide, small-molecule Smac (second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases) mimetics that are selective inhibitors of cIAP1/2 over XIAP. The most potent and most selective compounds bind to cIAP1/2 with affinities in the low nanomolar range and show >1,000-fold selectivity for cIAP1 over XIAP. These selective cIAP inhibitors effectively induce degradation of the cIAP1 protein in cancer cells at low nanomolar concentrations and do not antagonize XIAP in a cell-free functional assay. They potently inhibit cell growth and effectively induce apoptosis at low nanomolar concentrations in cancer cells with a mechanism of action similar to that of other known Smac mimetics. Our study shows that binding of Smac mimetics to XIAP BIR3 is not required for effective induction of apoptosis in tumor cells by Smac mimetics. These potent and highly selective cIAP1/2 inhibitors are powerful tools in the investigation of the role of these IAP proteins in the regulation of apoptosis and other cellular processes.

  10. Hereditary folate malabsorption: A positively charged amino acid at position 113 of the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT/SLC46A1) is required for folic acid binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasry, Inbal; Berman, Bluma; Glaser, Fabian; Jansen, Gerrit; Assaraf, Yehuda G.

    2009-01-01

    The proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT/SLC46A1) mediates intestinal folate uptake at acidic pH. Some loss of folic acid (FA) transport mutations in PCFT from hereditary folate malabsorption (HFM) patients cluster in R113, thereby suggesting a functional role for this residue. Herein, unlike non-conservative substitutions, an R113H mutant displayed 80-fold increase in the FA transport Km while retaining parental Vmax, hence indicating a major fall in folate substrate affinity. Furthermore, consistent with the preservation of 9% of parental transport activity, R113H transfectants displayed a substantial decrease in the FA growth requirement relative to mock transfectants. Homology modeling based on the crystal structures of the Escherichia coli transporter homologues EmrD and glycerol-3-phosphate transporter revealed that the R113H rotamer properly protrudes into the cytoplasmic face of the minor cleft normally occupied by R113. These findings constitute the first demonstration that a basic amino acid at position 113 is required for folate substrate binding.

  11. Hereditary folate malabsorption: A positively charged amino acid at position 113 of the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT/SLC46A1) is required for folic acid binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasry, Inbal; Berman, Bluma [The Fred Wyszkowski Cancer Research Laboratory, Dept. of Biology, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Glaser, Fabian [Bioinformatics Knowledge Unit, The Lorry I. Lokey Interdisciplinary Center for Life Sciences and Engineering, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Jansen, Gerrit [Department of Rheumatology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Assaraf, Yehuda G., E-mail: assaraf@tx.technion.ac.il [The Fred Wyszkowski Cancer Research Laboratory, Dept. of Biology, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2009-08-28

    The proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT/SLC46A1) mediates intestinal folate uptake at acidic pH. Some loss of folic acid (FA) transport mutations in PCFT from hereditary folate malabsorption (HFM) patients cluster in R113, thereby suggesting a functional role for this residue. Herein, unlike non-conservative substitutions, an R113H mutant displayed 80-fold increase in the FA transport Km while retaining parental Vmax, hence indicating a major fall in folate substrate affinity. Furthermore, consistent with the preservation of 9% of parental transport activity, R113H transfectants displayed a substantial decrease in the FA growth requirement relative to mock transfectants. Homology modeling based on the crystal structures of the Escherichia coli transporter homologues EmrD and glycerol-3-phosphate transporter revealed that the R113H rotamer properly protrudes into the cytoplasmic face of the minor cleft normally occupied by R113. These findings constitute the first demonstration that a basic amino acid at position 113 is required for folate substrate binding.

  12. Pictorial binding: endeavor to classify

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinchenko S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the classification of bindings of the 1-19th centuries with a unique and untypical book binding decoration technique (encaustic, tempera and oil paintings. Analysis of design features, materials and techniques of art decoration made it possible to identify them as a separate type - pictorial bindings and divide them into four groups. The first group consists of Coptic bindings, decorated with icon-painting images in encaustic technique. The second group is made up of leather Western bindings of the 13-14th centuries, which have the decoration and technique of ornamentation close to iconography. The third group involves parchment bindings, ornamentation technique of which is closer to the miniature. The last group comprises bindings of East Slavic origin of the 15-19th centuries, decorated with icon-painting pictures made in the technique of tempera or oil painting. The proposed classification requires further basic research as several specific kinds of bindings have not yet been investigated

  13. Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor-mediated uptake of 45Ca2+ by cultured rat Sertoli cells does not require activation of cholera toxin- or pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding proteins or adenylate cyclase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasso, P.; Reichert, L.E. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    We have previously reported that FSH stimulates flux of 45Ca2+ into cultured Sertoli cells from immature rats via voltage-sensitive and voltage-independent calcium channels. In the present study, we show that this effect of FSH does not require cholera toxin (CT)- or pertussis toxin (PT)-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding (G) protein or activation of adenylate cyclase (AC). Significant stimulation of 45Ca2+ influx was observed within 1 min, and maximal response (3.2-fold over basal levels) was achieved within 2 min after exposure to FSH. FSH-stimulated elevations in cellular cAMP paralleled increases in 45Ca2+ uptake, suggesting a possible coupling of AC activation to 45Ca2+ influx. (Bu)2cAMP, however, was not able to enhance 45Ca2+ uptake over basal levels at a final concentration of 1000 microM, although a concentration-related increase in androstenedione conversion to estradiol was evident. Exposure of Sertoli cells to CT (10 ng/ml) consistently stimulated basal levels of androstenedione conversion to estradiol but had no effect on basal levels of 45Ca2+ uptake. Similarly, CT had no effect on FSH-induced 45Ca2+ uptake, but potentiated FSH-stimulated estradiol synthesis. PT (10 ng/ml) augmented basal and FSH-stimulated estradiol secretion without affecting 45Ca2+ influx. The adenosine analog N6-phenylisopropyladenosine, which binds to Gi-coupled adenosine receptors on Sertoli cells, inhibited FSH-stimulated androgen conversion to estradiol in a dose-related (1-1000 nM) manner, but FSH-stimulated 45Ca2+ influx remained unchanged. Our results show that in contrast to FSH-stimulated estradiol synthesis, the flux of 45Ca2+ into Sertoli cells in response to FSH is not mediated either directly or indirectly by CT- or PT-sensitive G protein, nor does it require activation of AC. Our data further suggest that the FSH receptor itself may function as a calcium channel

  14. Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor-mediated uptake of sup 45 Ca sup 2+ by cultured rat Sertoli cells does not require activation of cholera toxin- or pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding proteins or adenylate cyclase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasso, P.; Reichert, L.E. Jr. (Albany Medical College, NY (USA))

    1990-08-01

    We have previously reported that FSH stimulates flux of 45Ca2+ into cultured Sertoli cells from immature rats via voltage-sensitive and voltage-independent calcium channels. In the present study, we show that this effect of FSH does not require cholera toxin (CT)- or pertussis toxin (PT)-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding (G) protein or activation of adenylate cyclase (AC). Significant stimulation of 45Ca2+ influx was observed within 1 min, and maximal response (3.2-fold over basal levels) was achieved within 2 min after exposure to FSH. FSH-stimulated elevations in cellular cAMP paralleled increases in 45Ca2+ uptake, suggesting a possible coupling of AC activation to 45Ca2+ influx. (Bu)2cAMP, however, was not able to enhance 45Ca2+ uptake over basal levels at a final concentration of 1000 microM, although a concentration-related increase in androstenedione conversion to estradiol was evident. Exposure of Sertoli cells to CT (10 ng/ml) consistently stimulated basal levels of androstenedione conversion to estradiol but had no effect on basal levels of 45Ca2+ uptake. Similarly, CT had no effect on FSH-induced 45Ca2+ uptake, but potentiated FSH-stimulated estradiol synthesis. PT (10 ng/ml) augmented basal and FSH-stimulated estradiol secretion without affecting 45Ca2+ influx. The adenosine analog N6-phenylisopropyladenosine, which binds to Gi-coupled adenosine receptors on Sertoli cells, inhibited FSH-stimulated androgen conversion to estradiol in a dose-related (1-1000 nM) manner, but FSH-stimulated 45Ca2+ influx remained unchanged. Our results show that in contrast to FSH-stimulated estradiol synthesis, the flux of 45Ca2+ into Sertoli cells in response to FSH is not mediated either directly or indirectly by CT- or PT-sensitive G protein, nor does it require activation of AC. Our data further suggest that the FSH receptor itself may function as a calcium channel.

  15. Pentosan polysulfate binds to STRO-1+mesenchymal progenitor cells, is internalized, and modifies gene expression: a novel approach of pre-programing stem cells for therapeutic application requiring their chondrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiehua; Shimmon, Susan; Paton, Sharon; Daly, Christopher; Goldschlager, Tony; Gronthos, Stan; Zannettino, Andrew C W; Ghosh, Peter

    2017-12-13

    The pharmaceutical agent pentosan polysulfate (PPS) is known to induce proliferation and chondrogenesis of mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) in vitro and in vivo. However, the mechanism(s) of action of PPS in mediating these effects remains unresolved. In the present report we address this issue by investigating the binding and uptake of PPS by MPCs and monitoring gene expression and proteoglycan biosynthesis before and after the cells had been exposed to limited concentrations of PPS and then re-established in culture in the absence of the drug (MPC priming). Immuno-selected STRO-1 + mesenchymal progenitor stem cells (MPCs) were prepared from human bone marrow aspirates and established in culture. The kinetics of uptake, shedding, and internalization of PPS by MPCs was determined by monitoring the concentration-dependent loss of PPS media concentrations using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the uptake of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labelled PPS by MPCs. The proliferation of MPCs, following pre-incubation and removal of PPS (priming), was assessed using the Wst-8 assay method, and proteoglycan synthesis was determined by the incorporation of 35 SO 4 into their sulphated glycosaminoglycans. The changes in expression of MPC-related cell surface antigens of non-primed and PPS-primed MPCs from three donors was determined using flow cytometry. RNA sequencing of RNA isolated from non-primed and PPS-primed MPCs from the same donors was undertaken to identify the genes altered by the PPS priming protocol. The kinetic studies indicated that, in culture, PPS rapidly binds to MPC surface receptors, followed by internalisation and localization within the nucleus of the cells. Following PPS-priming of MPCs and a further 48 h of culture, both cell proliferation and proteoglycan synthesis were enhanced. Reduced expression of MPC-related cell surface antigen expression was promoted by the PPS priming, and RNA sequencing analysis revealed changes in the

  16. Distinct cytoplasmic domains of the growth hormone receptor are required for glucocorticoid- and phorbol ester-induced decreases in growth hormone (GH) binding. These domains are different from that reported for GH-induced receptor internalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    King, A P; Tseng, M J; Logsdon, C D

    1996-01-01

    Glucocorticoids inhibit growth in children and antagonize the growth-promoting action of GH in peripheral tissues. Recently, they have been shown to decrease GH binding. In this study we examine the molecular mechanisms by which the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (DEX) and the phorbol ester phorbol...... myristate acetate (PMA) decrease cellular GH binding. In 3T3-F442A fibroblasts, DEX and PMA decrease the number of GH receptors (GHRs) capable of binding GH by 50% (t1/2 = 6 h) and 70% (t1/2 = 15 min), respectively. Neither appear to decrease the total number of cellular GHR. Rather, they appear...... to redistribute GHRs away from the plasma membrane or inactivate GHRs on the membrane such that they cannot bind GH. DEX and PMA also decrease GH-induced tyrosyl phosphorylation of GHR and JAK2 with a magnitude and time course correlating with that of inhibition of GH binding. DEX- and PMA-induced reductions...

  17. Mutagenesis of Ly49B reveals key structural elements required for promiscuous binding to MHC class I molecules and new insights into the molecular evolution of Ly49s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickiewicz, Katarzyna M; Gays, Frances; Lewis, Richard J; Brooks, Colin G

    2014-02-15

    Ly49B is a potentially important immunoregulator expressed on mouse myeloid cells, and it is thus an unusual member of the wider Ly49 family whose members are ordinarily found on NK cells. Ly49B displays substantial sequence divergence from other Ly49s and in particular shares virtually no amino acid sequence identity with the residues that have been reported to bind to MHC class I (cI) ligands in other Ly49s. Despite this, we show in this study that the BALB/c, but not the C57, isoform of Ly49B displays promiscuous cI binding. Binding was not significantly affected by inactivation of any of the four predicted N-linked glycosylation sites of Ly49B, nor was it affected by removal of the unique 20-aa C-terminal extension found in Ly49B. However, transfer of these C-terminal 20 aa to Ly49A inhibited cI binding, as did the addition of a hemagglutinin tag to the C terminus of Ly49B, demonstrating unexpectedly that the C-terminal region of Ly49s can play a significant role in ligand binding. Systematic exchange of BALB/c and C57 residues revealed that Trp(166), Asn(167), and Cys(251) are of major importance for cI binding in Ly49B. These residues are highly conserved in the Ly49 family. Remarkably, however, Ly49B(BALB) variants that have C57 residues at positions 166 or 167, and are unable to bind cI multimers, regain substantial cI binding when amino acid changes are made at distal positions, providing an explanation of how highly divergent Ly49s that retain the ability to bind cI molecules might have evolved.

  18. In Vivo Studies Suggest that Induction of VanS-Dependent Vancomycin Resistance Requires Binding of the Drug to d-Ala-d-Ala Termini in the Peptidoglycan Cell Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwun, Min Jung; Novotna, Gabriela; Hesketh, Andrew R.; Hill, Lionel

    2013-01-01

    VanRS two-component regulatory systems are key elements required for the transcriptional activation of inducible vancomycin resistance genes in bacteria, but the precise nature of the ligand signal that activates these systems has remained undefined. Using the resistance system in Streptomyces coelicolor as a model, we have undertaken a series of in vivo studies which indicate that the VanS sensor kinase in VanB-type resistance systems is activated by vancomycin in complex with the d-alanyl-d-alanine (d-Ala-d-Ala) termini of cell wall peptidoglycan (PG) precursors. Complementation of an essential d-Ala-d-Ala ligase activity by constitutive expression of vanA encoding a bifunctional d-Ala-d-Ala and d-alanyl-d-lactate (d-Ala-d-Lac) ligase activity allowed construction of strains that synthesized variable amounts of PG precursors containing d-Ala-d-Ala. Assays quantifying the expression of genes under VanRS control showed that the response to vancomycin in these strains correlated with the abundance of d-Ala-d-Ala-containing PG precursors; strains producing a lower proportion of PG precursors terminating in d-Ala-d-Ala consistently exhibited a lower response to vancomycin. Pretreatment of wild-type cells with vancomycin or teicoplanin to saturate and mask the d-Ala-d-Ala binding sites in nascent PG also blocked the transcriptional response to subsequent vancomycin exposure, and desleucyl vancomycin, a vancomycin analogue incapable of interacting with d-Ala-d-Ala residues, failed to induce van gene expression. Activation of resistance by a vancomycin–d-Ala-d-Ala PG complex predicts a limit to the proportion of PG that can be derived from precursors terminating in d-Ala-d-Lac, a restriction also enforced by the bifunctional activity of the VanA ligase. PMID:23836175

  19. Mutagenesis of the Agrobacterium VirE2 single-stranded DNA-binding protein identifies regions required for self-association and interaction with VirE1 and a permissive site for hybrid protein construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X R; Christie, P J

    1999-07-01

    The VirE2 single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB) of Agrobacterium tumefaciens is required for delivery of T-DNA to the nuclei of susceptible plant cells. By yeast two-hybrid and immunoprecipitation analyses, VirE2 was shown to self-associate and to interact with VirE1. VirE2 mutants with small deletions or insertions of a 31-residue oligopeptide (i31) at the N or C terminus or with an i31 peptide insertion at Leu236 retained the capacity to form homomultimers. By contrast, VirE2 mutants with modifications outside a central region located between residues 320 and 390 retained the capacity to interact with VirE1. These findings suggest the tertiary structure of VirE2 is important for homomultimer formation whereas a central domain mediates formation of a complex with VirE1. The capacity of VirE2 mutants to interact with full-length VirE2 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae correlated with the abundance of the mutant proteins in A. tumefaciens, suggesting that VirE2 is stabilized by homomultimerization in the bacterium. We further characterized the promoter and N- and C-terminal sequence requirements for synthesis of functional VirE2. A PvirB::virE2 construct yielded functional VirE2 protein as defined by complementation of a virE2 null mutation. By contrast, PvirE or Plac promoter constructs yielded functional VirE2 only if virE1 was coexpressed with virE2. Deletion of 10 or 9 residues from the N or C terminus of VirE2, respectively, or addition of heterologous peptides or proteins to either terminus resulted in a loss of protein function. However, an i31 peptide insertion at Tyr39 had no effect on protein function as defined by the capacity of the mutant protein to (i) interact with native VirE2, (ii) interact with VirE1, (iii) accumulate at abundant levels in A. tumefaciens, and (iv) restore wild-type virulence to a virE2 null mutant. We propose that Tyr39 of VirE2 corresponds to a permissive site for insertion of heterologous peptides or proteins of interest

  20. Carboplatin binding to histidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanley, Simon W. M. [University of Manchester, Brunswick Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Diederichs, Kay [University of Konstanz, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M. J. [Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Levy, Colin [University of Manchester, 131 Princess Street, Manchester M1 7DN (United Kingdom); Schreurs, Antoine M. M. [Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Helliwell, John R., E-mail: john.helliwell@manchester.ac.uk [University of Manchester, Brunswick Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-29

    An X-ray crystal structure showing the binding of purely carboplatin to histidine in a model protein has finally been obtained. This required extensive crystallization trials and various novel crystal structure analyses. Carboplatin is a second-generation platinum anticancer agent used for the treatment of a variety of cancers. Previous X-ray crystallographic studies of carboplatin binding to histidine (in hen egg-white lysozyme; HEWL) showed the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin owing to the high NaCl concentration used in the crystallization conditions. HEWL co-crystallizations with carboplatin in NaBr conditions have now been carried out to confirm whether carboplatin converts to the bromine form and whether this takes place in a similar way to the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin observed previously in NaCl conditions. Here, it is reported that a partial chemical transformation takes place but to a transplatin form. Thus, to attempt to resolve purely carboplatin binding at histidine, this study utilized co-crystallization of HEWL with carboplatin without NaCl to eliminate the partial chemical conversion of carboplatin. Tetragonal HEWL crystals co-crystallized with carboplatin were successfully obtained in four different conditions, each at a different pH value. The structural results obtained show carboplatin bound to either one or both of the N atoms of His15 of HEWL, and this particular variation was dependent on the concentration of anions in the crystallization mixture and the elapsed time, as well as the pH used. The structural details of the bound carboplatin molecule also differed between them. Overall, the most detailed crystal structure showed the majority of the carboplatin atoms bound to the platinum centre; however, the four-carbon ring structure of the cyclobutanedicarboxylate moiety (CBDC) remained elusive. The potential impact of the results for the administration of carboplatin as an anticancer agent are described.

  1. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta inhibits proliferation in monocytic cells by affecting the retinoblastoma protein/E2F/cyclin E pathway but is not directly required for macrophage morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutsch, Romina; Kandemir, Judith D; Pietsch, Daniel; Cappello, Christian; Meyer, Johann; Simanowski, Kathrin; Huber, René; Brand, Korbinian

    2011-07-01

    Monocytic differentiation is orchestrated by complex networks that are not fully understood. This study further elucidates the involvement of transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ). Initially, we demonstrated a marked increase in nuclear C/EBPβ-liver-enriched activating protein* (LAP*)/liver-enriched activating protein (LAP) levels and LAP/liver-enriched inhibiting protein (LIP) ratios in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-treated differentiating THP-1 premonocytic cells accompanied by reduced proliferation. To directly study C/EBPβ effects on monocytic cells, we generated novel THP-1-derived (low endogenous C/EBPβ) cell lines stably overexpressing C/EBPβ isoforms. Most importantly, cells predominantly overexpressing LAP* (C/EBPβ-long), but not those overexpressing LIP (C/EBPβ-short), exhibited a reduced proliferation, with no effect on morphology. PMA-induced inhibition of proliferation was attenuated in C/EBPβ-short cells. In C/EBPβ(WT) macrophage-like cells (high endogenous C/EBPβ), we measured a reduced proliferation/cycling index compared with C/EBPβ(KO). The typical macrophage morphology was only observed in C/EBPβ(WT), whereas C/EBPβ(KO) stayed round. C/EBPα did not compensate for C/EBPβ effects on proliferation/morphology. Serum reduction, an independent approach known to inhibit proliferation, induced macrophage morphology in C/EBPβ(KO) macrophage-like cells but not THP-1. In PMA-treated THP-1 and C/EBPβ-long cells, a reduced phosphorylation of cell cycle repressor retinoblastoma was found. In addition, C/EBPβ-long cells showed reduced c-Myc expression accompanied by increased CDK inhibitor p27 and reduced cyclin D1 levels. Finally, C/EBPβ-long and C/EBPβ(WT) cells exhibited low E2F1 and cyclin E levels, and C/EBPβ overexpression was found to inhibit cyclin E1 promoter-dependent transcription. Our results suggest that C/EBPβ reduces monocytic proliferation by affecting the retinoblastoma/E2F/cyclin E

  2. Molecular anatomy of CCR5 engagement by physiologic and viral chemokines and HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins: differences in primary structural requirements for RANTES, MIP-1 alpha, and vMIP-II Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navenot, J M; Wang, Z X; Trent, J O; Murray, J L; Hu, Q X; DeLeeuw, L; Moore, P S; Chang, Y; Peiper, S C

    2001-11-09

    Molecular analysis of CCR5, the cardinal coreceptor for HIV-1 infection, has implicated the N-terminal extracellular domain (N-ter) and regions vicinal to the second extracellular loop (ECL2) in this activity. It was shown that residues in the N-ter are necessary for binding of the physiologic ligands, RANTES (CCL5) and MIP-1 alpha (CCL3). vMIP-II, encoded by the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, is a high affinity CCR5 antagonist, but lacks efficacy as a coreceptor inhibitor. Therefore, we compared the mechanism for engagement by vMIP-II of CCR5 to its interaction with physiologic ligands. RANTES, MIP-1 alpha, and vMIP-II bound CCR5 at high affinity, but demonstrated partial cross-competition. Characterization of 15 CCR5 alanine scanning mutants of charged extracellular amino acids revealed that alteration of acidic residues in the distal N-ter abrogated binding of RANTES, MIP-1 alpha, and vMIP-II. Whereas mutation of residues in ECL2 of CCR5 dramatically reduced the binding of RANTES and MIP-1 alpha and their ability to induce signaling, interaction with vMIP-II was not altered by any mutation in the exoloops of the receptor. Paradoxically, monoclonal antibodies to N-ter epitopes did not block chemokine binding, but those mapped to ECL2 were effective inhibitors. A CCR5 chimera with the distal N-ter residues of CXCR2 bound MIP-1 alpha and vMIP-II with an affinity similar to that of the wild-type receptor. Engagement of CCR5 by vMIP-II, but not RANTES or MIP-1 alpha blocked the binding of monoclonal antibodies to the receptor, providing additional evidence for a distinct mechanism for viral chemokine binding. Analysis of the coreceptor activity of randomly generated mouse-human CCR5 chimeras implicated residues in ECL2 between H173 and V197 in this function. RANTES, but not vMIP-II blocked CCR5 M-tropic coreceptor activity in the fusion assay. The insensitivity of vMIP-II binding to mutations in ECL2 provides a potential rationale to its inefficiency as an

  3. The Tomato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat (NLR) Immune Receptor I-2 Couples DNA-Binding to Nucleotide-Binding Domain Nucleotide Exchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fenyk, S.; Dixon, C.H.; Gittens, W.H.; Townsend, P.D.; Sharples, G.J.; Pålsson, L.O.; Takken, F.L.W.; Cann, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable plants to recognise and respond to pathogen attack. Previously, we demonstrated that the Rx1 NLR of potato is able to bind and bend DNA in vitro. DNA binding in situ requires its genuine activation following pathogen perception.

  4. Total iron binding capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003489.htm Total iron binding capacity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total iron binding capacity (TIBC) is a blood test to ...

  5. Ethylene binding site affinity in ripening apples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankenship, S.M. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Horticultural Science); Sisler, E.C. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Scatchard plots for ethylene binding in apples (Malus domestica Borkh.), which were harvested weekly for 5 weeks to include the ethylene climacteric rise, showed C[sub 50] values (concentration of ethylene needed to occupy 50% of the ethylene binding sites) of 0.10, 0.11, 0.34, 0.40, and 0.57 [mu]l ethylene/liter[sup [minus]1], respectively, for each of the 5 weeks. Higher ethylene concentrations were required to saturate the binding sites during the climacteric rise than at other times. Diffusion of [sup 14]C-ethylene from the binding sites was curvilinear and did not show any indication of multiple binding sites. Ethylene was not metabolized by apple tissue.

  6. The C-terminal 20 Amino Acids of Drosophila Topoisomerase 2 Are Required for Binding to a BRCA1 C Terminus (BRCT) Domain-containing Protein, Mus101, and Fidelity of DNA Segregation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-tsung Shane; Wu, Jianhong; Modrich, Paul; Hsieh, Tao-shih

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic topoisomerase 2 (Top2) and one of its interacting partners, topoisomerase IIβ binding protein 1 (TopBP1) are two proteins performing essential cellular functions. We mapped the interacting domains of these two proteins using co-immunoprecipitation and pulldown experiments with truncated or mutant Drosophila Top2 with various Ser-to-Ala substitutions. We discovered that the last 20 amino acids of Top2 represent the key region for binding with Mus101 (the Drosophila homolog of TopBP1) and that phosphorylation of Ser-1428 and Ser-1443 is important for Top2 to interact with the N terminus of Mus101, which contains the BRCT1/2 domains. The interaction between Mus101 and the Top2 C-terminal regulatory domain is phosphorylation-dependent because treatment with phosphatase abolishes their association in pulldown assays. The binding affinity of N-terminal Mus101 with a synthetic phosphorylated peptide spanning the last 25 amino acids of Top2 (with Ser(P)-1428 and Ser(P)-1443) was determined by surface plasmon resonance with a Kd of 0.57 μm. In an in vitro decatenation assay, Mus101 can specifically reduce the decatenation activity of Top2, and dephosphorylation of Top2 attenuates this response. Next, we endeavored to establish a cellular system for testing the biological function of Top2-Mus101 interaction. Top2-silenced S2 cells rescued by Top2Δ20, Top2 with 20 amino acids truncated from the C terminus, developed abnormally high chromosome numbers, which implies that Top2-Mus101 interaction is important for maintaining the fidelity of chromosome segregation during mitosis. PMID:27129233

  7. Tighter binding of HIV reverse transcriptase to RNA-DNA vs. DNA-DNA results mostly from interactions in the polymerase domain and requires just a small stretch of RNA-DNA*

    OpenAIRE

    Bohlayer, William P.; DeStefano, Jeffrey J.

    2006-01-01

    Binding of HIV reverse transcriptase (RT) to unique substrates that positioned RNA-DNA or DNA-DNA near the polymerase or RNase H domains was measured. The substrates consisted of a 50 nucleotide template and DNA primers ranging from 23–43 nucleotides. Five different types of template strands were used: homogeneous (1) RNA or (2) DNA, (3) first 20 5′ nucleotides DNA and last 30 RNA, (4) first 20 RNA and last 30 DNA, (5) 15 nucleotides DNA followed by 5 RNA then 30 DNA. The different length pri...

  8. DNS & Bind Cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Cricket

    2011-01-01

    The DNS & BIND Cookbook presents solutions to the many problems faced by network administrators responsible for a name server. Following O'Reilly's popular problem-and-solution cookbook format, this title is an indispensable companion to DNS & BIND, 4th Edition, the definitive guide to the critical task of name server administration. The cookbook contains dozens of code recipes showing solutions to everyday problems, ranging from simple questions, like, "How do I get BIND?" to more advanced topics like providing name service for IPv6 addresses. It's full of BIND configuration files that yo

  9. Managing tight-binding receptors for new separations technologies. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, D.H.; Givens, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    'Whereas such traditional separation methodologies as ion exchange and solvent extraction require rapid interaction between ligands and metal ions, the most strongly binding ligands invariably bind slowly; e.g., cryptates bind and dissociate more slowly than macrocycles, which are slower than open-chain chelating ligands. This project seeks to maximize the binding and dissociation rates for tight-binding receptors in order to make them more useful to separations science. An alternative slow-binding technology is also under exploration.'

  10. DNS BIND Server Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu MARSANU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available After a brief presentation of the DNS and BIND standard for Unix platforms, the paper presents an application which has a principal objective, the configuring of the DNS BIND 9 server. The general objectives of the application are presented, follow by the description of the details of designing the program.

  11. DNS BIND Server Configuratio

    OpenAIRE

    Radu MARSANU

    2011-01-01

    After a brief presentation of the DNS and BIND standard for Unix platforms, the paper presents an application which has a principal objective, the configuring of the DNS BIND 9 server. The general objectives of the application are presented, follow by the description of the details of designing the program.

  12. DNS BIND Server Configuration

    OpenAIRE

    Radu MARSANU

    2011-01-01

    After a brief presentation of the DNS and BIND standard for Unix platforms, the paper presents an application which has a principal objective, the configuring of the DNS BIND 9 server. The general objectives of the application are presented, follow by the description of the details of designing the program.

  13. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Packer, S; Fairchild, R G; Watts, K P; Greenberg, D; Hannon, S J

    1980-01-01

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed. (PSB)

  14. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packer, S.; Fairchild, R.G.; Watts, K.P.; Greenberg, D.; Hannon, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed

  15. Zc3h13/Flacc is required for adenosine methylation by bridging the mRNA-binding factor Rbm15/Spenito to the m6A machinery component Wtap/Fl(2)d.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuckles, Philip; Lence, Tina; Haussmann, Irmgard U; Jacob, Dominik; Kreim, Nastasja; Carl, Sarah H; Masiello, Irene; Hares, Tina; Villaseñor, Rodrigo; Hess, Daniel; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A; Biggiogera, Marco; Helm, Mark; Soller, Matthias; Bühler, Marc; Roignant, Jean-Yves

    2018-03-01

    N 6 -methyladenosine (m 6 A) is the most abundant mRNA modification in eukaryotes, playing crucial roles in multiple biological processes. m 6 A is catalyzed by the activity of methyltransferase-like 3 (Mettl3), which depends on additional proteins whose precise functions remain poorly understood. Here we identified Zc3h13 (zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein 13)/Flacc [Fl(2)d-associated complex component] as a novel interactor of m 6 A methyltransferase complex components in Drosophila and mice. Like other components of this complex, Flacc controls m 6 A levels and is involved in sex determination in Drosophila We demonstrate that Flacc promotes m 6 A deposition by bridging Fl(2)d to the mRNA-binding factor Nito. Altogether, our work advances the molecular understanding of conservation and regulation of the m 6 A machinery. © 2018 Knuckles et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  16. Adjustment of legally binding local plans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvingel, Line Træholt; Aunsborg, Christian; Christensen, Finn Kjær

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, and by law, new urban areas in Denmark are regulated and planned through legally binding local plans. Recently a tendency has occurred: The municipalities make the legally binding local plans quite open for future adjustment, and they are using a substantial amount of ‘empowerment......, which seem to be beyond the scope of the Danish Planning Act. This paper deals with this problem through case studies and a legal analysis of present law. If the combination of the legally binding local plan and subsequent added requirements is misused, it will weaken the legal rights of the citizens...... the considerations of legal rights, the extend of the legal use of empowerment provisions and the combination of the use of legal binding local plans and other legal instruments such as easements and sales agreements....

  17. The nucleocapsid region of HIV-1 Gag cooperates with the PTAP and LYPXnL late domains to recruit the cellular machinery necessary for viral budding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Dussupt

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 release is mediated through two motifs in the p6 region of Gag, PTAP and LYPX(nL, which recruit cellular proteins Tsg101 and Alix, respectively. The Nucleocapsid region of Gag (NC, which binds the Bro1 domain of Alix, also plays an important role in HIV-1 release, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we show that the first 202 residues of the Bro1 domain (Bro(i are sufficient to bind Gag. Bro(i interferes with HIV-1 release in an NC-dependent manner and arrests viral budding at the plasma membrane. Similar interrupted budding structures are seen following over-expression of a fragment containing Bro1 with the adjacent V domain (Bro1-V. Although only Bro1-V contains binding determinants for CHMP4, both Bro(i and Bro1-V inhibited release via both the PTAP/Tsg101 and the LYPX(nL/Alix pathways, suggesting that they interfere with a key step in HIV-1 release. Remarkably, we found that over-expression of Bro1 rescued the release of HIV-1 lacking both L domains. This rescue required the N-terminal region of the NC domain in Gag and the CHMP4 binding site in Bro1. Interestingly, release defects due to mutations in NC that prevented Bro1 mediated rescue of virus egress were rescued by providing a link to the ESCRT machinery via Nedd4.2s over-expression. Our data support a model in which NC cooperates with PTAP in the recruitment of cellular proteins necessary for its L domain activity and binds the Bro1-CHMP4 complex required for LYPX(nL-mediated budding.

  18. A common highly conserved cadmium detoxification mechanism from bacteria to humans: heavy metal tolerance conferred by the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter SpHMT1 requires glutathione but not metal-chelating phytochelatin peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prévéral, Sandra; Gayet, Landry; Moldes, Cristina; Hoffmann, Jonathan; Mounicou, Sandra; Gruet, Antoine; Reynaud, Florie; Lobinski, Ryszard; Verbavatz, Jean-Marc; Vavasseur, Alain; Forestier, Cyrille

    2009-02-20

    Cadmium poses a significant threat to human health due to its toxicity. In mammals and in bakers' yeast, cadmium is detoxified by ATP-binding cassette transporters after conjugation to glutathione. In fission yeast, phytochelatins constitute the co-substrate with cadmium for the transporter SpHMT1. In plants, a detoxification mechanism similar to the one in fission yeast is supposed, but the molecular nature of the transporter is still lacking. To investigate further the relationship between SpHMT1 and its co-substrate, we overexpressed the transporter in a Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain deleted for the phytochelatin synthase gene and heterologously in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in Escherichia coli. In all organisms, overexpression of SpHMT1 conferred a markedly enhanced tolerance to cadmium but not to Sb(III), AgNO(3), As(III), As(V), CuSO(4), or HgCl(2). Abolishment of the catalytic activity by expression of SpHMT1(K623M) mutant suppressed the cadmium tolerance phenotype independently of the presence of phytochelatins. Depletion of the glutathione pool inhibited the SpHMT1 activity but not that of AtHMA4, a P-type ATPase, indicating that GSH is necessary for the SpHMT1-mediated cadmium resistance. In E. coli, SpHMT1 was targeted to the periplasmic membrane and led to an increased amount of cadmium in the periplasm. These results demonstrate that SpHMT1 confers cadmium tolerance in the absence of phytochelatins but depending on the presence of GSH and ATP. Our results challenge the dogma of the two separate cadmium detoxification pathways and demonstrate that a common highly conserved mechanism has been selected during the evolution from bacteria to humans.

  19. Myeloperoxidase selectively binds and selectively kills microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Robert C; Stephens, Jackson T

    2011-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is reported to selectively bind to bacteria. The present study provides direct evidence of MPO binding selectivity and tests the relationship of selective binding to selective killing. The microbicidal effectiveness of H(2)O(2) and of OCl(-) was compared to that of MPO plus H(2)O(2). Synergistic microbicidal action was investigated by combining Streptococcus sanguinis, a H(2)O(2)-producing microbe showing low MPO binding, with high-MPO-binding Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa without exogenous H(2)O(2), with and without MPO, and with and without erythrocytes (red blood cells [RBCs]). Selectivity of MPO microbicidal action was conventionally measured as the MPO MIC and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) for 82 bacteria including E. coli, P. aeruginosa, S. aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, and viridans streptococci. Both H(2)O(2) and OCl(-) destroyed RBCs at submicrobicidal concentrations. Nanomolar concentrations of MPO increased H(2)O(2) microbicidal action 1,000-fold. Streptococci plus MPO produced potent synergistic microbicidal action against all microbes tested, and RBCs caused only a small decrease in potency without erythrocyte damage. MPO directly killed H(2)O(2)-producing S. pyogenes but was ineffective against non-H(2)O(2)-producing E. faecalis. The MPO MICs and MBCs for E. coli, P. aeruginosa, and S. aureus were significantly lower than those for E. faecalis. The streptococcal studies showed much higher MIC/MBC results, but such testing required lysed horse blood-supplemented medium, thus preventing valid comparison of these results to those for the other microbes. E. faecalis MPO binding is reportedly weak compared to binding of E. coli, P. aeruginosa, and S. aureus but strong compared to binding of streptococci. Selective MPO binding results in selective killing.

  20. CARBOHYDRATE-CONTAINING COMPOUNDS WHICH BIND TO CARBOHYDRATE BINDING RECEPTORS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1995-01-01

    Carbohydrate-containing compounds which contain saccharides or derivatives thereof and which bind to carbohydrate binding receptors are useful in pharmaceutical products for treatment of inflammatory diseases and other diseases.......Carbohydrate-containing compounds which contain saccharides or derivatives thereof and which bind to carbohydrate binding receptors are useful in pharmaceutical products for treatment of inflammatory diseases and other diseases....

  1. The inhibition of assembly of HIV-1 virus-like particles by 3-O-(3',3'-dimethylsuccinyl betulinic acid (DSB is counteracted by Vif and requires its Zinc-binding domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouaziz Serge

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DSB, the 3-O-(3',3'dimethylsuccinyl derivative of betulinic acid, blocks the last step of protease-mediated processing of HIV-1 Gag precursor (Pr55Gag, which leads to immature, noninfectious virions. When administered to Pr55Gag-expressing insect cells (Sf9, DSB inhibits the assembly and budding of membrane-enveloped virus-like particles (VLP. In order to explore the possibility that viral factors could modulate the susceptibility to DSB of the VLP assembly process, several viral proteins were coexpressed individually with Pr55Gag in DSB-treated cells, and VLP yields assayed in the extracellular medium. Results Wild-type Vif (Vifwt restored the VLP production in DSB-treated cells to levels observed in control, untreated cells. DSB-counteracting effect was also observed with Vif mutants defective in encapsidation into VLP, suggesting that packaging and anti-DSB effect were separate functions in Vif. The anti-DSB effect was abolished for VifC133S and VifS116V, two mutants which lacked the zinc binding domain (ZBD formed by the four H108C114C133H139 coordinates with a Zn atom. Electron microscopic analysis of cells coexpressing Pr55Gag and Vifwt showed that a large proportion of VLP budded into cytoplasmic vesicles and were released from Sf9 cells by exocytosis. However, in the presence of mutant VifC133S or VifS116V, most of the VLP assembled and budded at the plasma membrane, as in control cells expressing Pr55Gag alone. Conclusion The function of HIV-1 Vif protein which negated the DSB inhibition of VLP assembly was independent of its packaging capability, but depended on the integrity of ZBD. In the presence of Vifwt, but not with ZBD mutants VifC133S and VifS116V, VLP were redirected to a vesicular compartment and egressed via the exocytic pathway.

  2. Ethylene-induced stabilization of ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE3 and EIN3-LIKE1 is mediated by proteasomal degradation of EIN3 binding F-box 1 and 2 that requires EIN2 in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Fengying; Zhao, Qiong; Ji, Yusi; Li, Wenyang; Jiang, Zhiqiang; Yu, Xiangchun; Zhang, Chen; Han, Ying; He, Wenrong; Liu, Yidong; Zhang, Shuqun; Ecker, Joseph R; Guo, Hongwei

    2010-07-01

    Plant responses to ethylene are mediated by regulation of EBF1/2-dependent degradation of the ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE3 (EIN3) transcription factor. Here, we report that the level of EIL1 protein is upregulated by ethylene through an EBF1/2-dependent pathway. Genetic analysis revealed that EIL1 and EIN3 cooperatively but differentially regulate a wide array of ethylene responses, with EIL1 mainly inhibiting leaf expansion and stem elongation in adult plants and EIN3 largely regulating a multitude of ethylene responses in seedlings. When EBF1 and EBF2 are disrupted, EIL1 and EIN3 constitutively accumulate in the nucleus and remain unresponsive to exogenous ethylene application. Further study revealed that the levels of EBF1 and EBF2 proteins are downregulated by ethylene and upregulated by silver ion and MG132, suggesting that ethylene stabilizes EIN3/EIL1 by promoting EBF1 and EBF2 proteasomal degradation. Also, we found that EIN2 is indispensable for mediating ethylene-induced EIN3/EIL1 accumulation and EBF1/2 degradation, whereas MKK9 is not required for ethylene signal transduction, contrary to a previous report. Together, our studies demonstrate that ethylene similarly regulates EIN3 and EIL1, the two master transcription factors coordinating myriad ethylene responses, and clarify that EIN2 but not MKK9 is required for ethylene-induced EIN3/EIL1 stabilization. Our results also reveal that EBF1 and EBF2 act as essential ethylene signal transducers that by themselves are subject to proteasomal degradation.

  3. Opioid binding sites in the guinea pig and rat kidney: Radioligand homogenate binding and autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dissanayake, V.U.; Hughes, J.; Hunter, J.C. (Parke-Davis Research Unit, Addenbrookes Hospital Site, Cambridge (England))

    1991-07-01

    The specific binding of the selective {mu}-, {delta}-, and {kappa}-opioid ligands (3H)(D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly-ol5)enkephalin ((3H) DAGOL), (3H)(D-Pen2,D-Pen5)enkephalin ((3H)DPDPE), and (3H)U69593, respectively, to crude membranes of the guinea pig and rat whole kidney, kidney cortex, and kidney medulla was investigated. In addition, the distribution of specific 3H-opioid binding sites in the guinea pig and rat kidney was visualized by autoradiography. Homogenate binding and autoradiography demonstrated the absence of {mu}- and {kappa}-opioid binding sites in the guinea pig kidney. No opioid binding sites were demonstrable in the rat kidney. In the guinea pig whole kidney, cortex, and medulla, saturation studies demonstrated that (3H)DPDPE bound with high affinity (KD = 2.6-3.5 nM) to an apparently homogeneous population of binding sites (Bmax = 8.4-30 fmol/mg of protein). Competition studies using several opioid compounds confirmed the nature of the {delta}-opioid binding site. Autoradiography experiments demonstrated that specific (3H)DPDPE binding sites were distributed radially in regions of the inner and outer medulla and at the corticomedullary junction of the guinea pig kidney. Computer-assisted image analysis of saturation data yielded KD values (4.5-5.0 nM) that were in good agreement with those obtained from the homogenate binding studies. Further investigation of the {delta}-opioid binding site in medulla homogenates, using agonist ((3H)DPDPE) and antagonist ((3H)diprenorphine) binding in the presence of Na+, Mg2+, and nucleotides, suggested that the {delta}-opioid site is linked to a second messenger system via a GTP-binding protein. Further studies are required to establish the precise localization of the {delta} binding site in the guinea pig kidney and to determine the nature of the second messenger linked to the GTP-binding protein in the medulla.

  4. binding protein (HABP1)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    adsorbed on carbon coated copper grid (400 mesh) for. 5 min at room temperature. The grids were subsequently .... and inhibition by GAGs and DMA were determined on polystyrene wells of microtitre plates (Costar, ... for binding inhibition assays was carried out by mixing equal volumes of the conjugate and the inhibitor at ...

  5. Quarkeosynthesis Binding Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Bill

    2009-05-01

    Quarkeosynthesis shows that the binding energy of a nucleus is the difference between the relativistic kinetic energies of its threesome of Jumbo Quarks and that of its building block quarks from neutrons and protons. There is no involvement of a nuclear strong force or gluon material.

  6. Sequential memory: Binding dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afraimovich, Valentin; Gong, Xue; Rabinovich, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Temporal order memories are critical for everyday animal and human functioning. Experiments and our own experience show that the binding or association of various features of an event together and the maintaining of multimodality events in sequential order are the key components of any sequential memories—episodic, semantic, working, etc. We study a robustness of binding sequential dynamics based on our previously introduced model in the form of generalized Lotka-Volterra equations. In the phase space of the model, there exists a multi-dimensional binding heteroclinic network consisting of saddle equilibrium points and heteroclinic trajectories joining them. We prove here the robustness of the binding sequential dynamics, i.e., the feasibility phenomenon for coupled heteroclinic networks: for each collection of successive heteroclinic trajectories inside the unified networks, there is an open set of initial points such that the trajectory going through each of them follows the prescribed collection staying in a small neighborhood of it. We show also that the symbolic complexity function of the system restricted to this neighborhood is a polynomial of degree L - 1, where L is the number of modalities.

  7. binding protein (HABP1)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    of HA in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting its multiligand affinity amongst carbohydrates. rHABP1 shows differential affinity ... site is seen to correspond to the carbohydrate-binding site in E-selectin, which has similarity in the ... adsorbed on carbon coated copper grid (400 mesh) for. 5 min at room temperature.

  8. Binding energies of hypernuclei and hypernuclear interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodmer, A.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Physics; Murali, S.; Usmani, Q.N. [Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Physics

    1996-05-01

    In part 1 the effect of nuclear core dynamics on the binding energies of {Lambda} hypernuclei is discussed in the framework of variational correlated wave functions. In particular, the authors discuss a new rearrangement energy contribution and its effect on the core polarization. In part 2 they consider the interpretation of the {Lambda} single-particle energy in terms of basic {Lambda}-nuclear interactions using a local density approximation based on a Fermi hypernetted chain calculation of the A binding to nuclear matter. To account for the data strongly repulsive 3-body {Lambda}NN forces are required. Also in this framework they discuss core polarization for medium and heavier hypernuclei.

  9. Binding energies of hypernuclei and hypernuclear interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodmer, A.R.; Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL; Murali, S.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1996-01-01

    In part 1 the effect of nuclear core dynamics on the binding energies of Λ hypernuclei is discussed in the framework of variational correlated wave functions. In particular, the authors discuss a new rearrangement energy contribution and its effect on the core polarization. In part 2 they consider the interpretation of the Λ single-particle energy in terms of basic Λ-nuclear interactions using a local density approximation based on a Fermi hypernetted chain calculation of the A binding to nuclear matter. To account for the data strongly repulsive 3-body ΛNN forces are required. Also in this framework they discuss core polarization for medium and heavier hypernuclei

  10. Binding biological motion and visual features in working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaowei; Zhao, Yangfan; Wu, Fan; Lu, Xiqian; Gao, Zaifeng; Shen, Mowei

    2015-06-01

    Working memory mechanisms for binding have been examined extensively in the last decade, yet few studies have explored bindings relating to human biological motion (BM). Human BM is the most salient and biologically significant kinetic information encountered in everyday life and is stored independently from other visual features (e.g., colors). The current study explored 3 critical issues of BM-related binding in working memory: (a) how many BM binding units can be retained in working memory, (b) whether involuntarily object-based binding occurs during BM binding, and (c) whether the maintenance of BM bindings in working memory requires attention above and beyond that needed to maintain the constituent dimensions. We isolated motion signals of human BM from non-BM sources by using point-light displays as to-be-memorized BM and presented the participants colored BM in a change detection task. We found that working memory capacity for BM-color bindings is rather low; only 1 or 2 BM-color bindings could be retained in working memory regardless of the presentation manners (Experiments 1-3). Furthermore, no object-based encoding took place for colored BM stimuli regardless of the processed dimensions (Experiments 4 and 5). Central executive attention contributes to the maintenance of BM-color bindings, yet maintaining BM bindings in working memory did not require more central attention than did maintaining the constituent dimensions in working memory (Experiment 6). Overall, these results suggest that keeping BM bindings in working memory is a fairly resource-demanding process, yet central executive attention does not play a special role in this cross-module binding. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Deletion of the p107/p130-binding domain of Mip130/LIN-9 bypasses the requirement for CDK4 activity for the dissociation of Mip130/LIN-9 from p107/p130-E2F4 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Raudel; Pilkinton, Mark; Colamonici, Oscar R

    2009-10-15

    Mip130/LIN-9 is part of a large complex that includes homologs of the Drosophila dREAM (drosophila RB-like, E2F, and Myb) and C. elegans DRM complexes. This complex also includes proteins such as Mip40/LIN-37, Mip120/LIN-54, and LIN-52. In mammalian cells, Mip130/LIN-9 specifically associates with the p107/p130-E2F4 repressor complex in G0/G1 and with B-Myb in S-phase. However, little is known about how the transition occurs and whether Mip130/LIN-9 contributes to the repressor effect of p107/p130. In this report, we demonstrate that Mip130/LIN-9, Mip40/LIN-37, Mip120/LIN-54, and Sin3b form a core complex, the Mip Core Complex or LIN Complex (MCC/LINC), which is detectable in all phases of the cell cycle. This complex specifically recruits transcriptional repressors such as p107, p130, E2F4 and HDAC1 in G0/G1, and B-Myb in S-phase. Importantly, we provide strong evidence that the transition between repressors and activators of transcription is mediated by CDK4, through the phosphorylation of the pocket proteins, p107 and p130. The requirement for CDK4 activity is bypassed by the deletion of the first 84 amino acids (Mip130/LIN-9(Delta84)), since this mutant is unable to interact with p107/p130 in G0/G1, while maintaining its association with B-Myb. Importantly, the Mip130/LIN-9(Delta84) allele rescues the low expression of G1/S genes observed in CDK4(-/-) MEFs demonstrating that Mip130/LIN-9 contributes to the repression of these E2F-regulated genes in G0/G1.

  12. RasV12-Mediated Down-Regulation of CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein β in Immortalized Fibroblasts Requires Loss of p19Arf and Facilitates Bypass of Oncogene-Induced Senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Thomas; Johnson, Peter F.

    2009-01-01

    The transcription factor C/EBPβ is involved in cellular responses to oncogenic and physiological Ras signals. C/EBPβ is required for premature senescence of primary mouse fibroblasts induced by expression of H-RasV12, demonstrating its role in oncogene-induced senescence. Here we have investigated the mechanisms by which Ras inhibits proliferation of normal cells but transforms immortalized cells. We show that oncogenic Ras down-regulates C/EBPβ expression in NIH 3T3 cells, which are immortalized by a deletion of the CDKN2A locus and therefore lack the p16Ink4a and p19Arf tumor suppressors. RasV12–induced silencing of C/EBPβ occurred at the mRNA level and involved both the Raf/MEK/ERK and PI3K signaling pathways. Oncogenic Ras decreased C/EBPβ expression in Ink4a/Arf−/− MEFs but increased C/EBPβ levels in wildtype MEFs. C/EBPβ down-regulation in NIH 3T3 cells was reversed by expression of p19Arf but not p53 or p16Ink4a, highlighting a critical role for p19Arf in sustaining C/EBPβ levels. Ectopic expression of p34 C/EBPβ (LAP) inhibited RasV12–mediated transformation of NIH 3T3 cells, suppressed their tumorigenicity in nude mice, and reactivated expression of the pro-apoptotic Fas receptor, which is also down-regulated by Ras. Our findings indicate that CEBPB gene silencing eliminates a growth-inhibitory transcription factor that would otherwise restrain oncogenesis. We propose that C/EBPβ is part of a p53-independent, p19Arf–mediated network that enforces Ras-induced cell cycle arrest and tumor suppression in primary fibroblasts. PMID:19276382

  13. The Tomato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat Immune Receptor I-2 Couples DNA-binding to Nucleotide-binding Domain Nucleotide Exchange*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenyk, Stepan; Dixon, Christopher H.; Gittens, William H.; Townsend, Philip D.; Sharples, Gary J.; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L. W.; Cann, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable plants to recognize and respond to pathogen attack. Previously, we demonstrated that the Rx1 NLR of potato is able to bind and bend DNA in vitro. DNA binding in situ requires its genuine activation following pathogen perception. However, it is unknown whether other NLR proteins are also able to bind DNA. Nor is it known how DNA binding relates to the ATPase activity intrinsic to NLR switch function required to immune activation. Here we investigate these issues using a recombinant protein corresponding to the N-terminal coiled-coil and nucleotide-binding domain regions of the I-2 NLR of tomato. Wild type I-2 protein bound nucleic acids with a preference of ssDNA ≈ dsDNA > ssRNA, which is distinct from Rx1. I-2 induced bending and melting of DNA. Notably, ATP enhanced DNA binding relative to ADP in the wild type protein, the null P-loop mutant K207R, and the autoactive mutant S233F. DNA binding was found to activate the intrinsic ATPase activity of I-2. Because DNA binding by I-2 was decreased in the presence of ADP when compared with ATP, a cyclic mechanism emerges; activated ATP-associated I-2 binds to DNA, which enhances ATP hydrolysis, releasing ADP-bound I-2 from the DNA. Thus DNA binding is a general property of at least a subset of NLR proteins, and NLR activation is directly linked to its activity at DNA. PMID:26601946

  14. The Tomato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat Immune Receptor I-2 Couples DNA-binding to Nucleotide-binding Domain Nucleotide Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenyk, Stepan; Dixon, Christopher H; Gittens, William H; Townsend, Philip D; Sharples, Gary J; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L W; Cann, Martin J

    2016-01-15

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable plants to recognize and respond to pathogen attack. Previously, we demonstrated that the Rx1 NLR of potato is able to bind and bend DNA in vitro. DNA binding in situ requires its genuine activation following pathogen perception. However, it is unknown whether other NLR proteins are also able to bind DNA. Nor is it known how DNA binding relates to the ATPase activity intrinsic to NLR switch function required to immune activation. Here we investigate these issues using a recombinant protein corresponding to the N-terminal coiled-coil and nucleotide-binding domain regions of the I-2 NLR of tomato. Wild type I-2 protein bound nucleic acids with a preference of ssDNA ≈ dsDNA > ssRNA, which is distinct from Rx1. I-2 induced bending and melting of DNA. Notably, ATP enhanced DNA binding relative to ADP in the wild type protein, the null P-loop mutant K207R, and the autoactive mutant S233F. DNA binding was found to activate the intrinsic ATPase activity of I-2. Because DNA binding by I-2 was decreased in the presence of ADP when compared with ATP, a cyclic mechanism emerges; activated ATP-associated I-2 binds to DNA, which enhances ATP hydrolysis, releasing ADP-bound I-2 from the DNA. Thus DNA binding is a general property of at least a subset of NLR proteins, and NLR activation is directly linked to its activity at DNA. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Cognitive and neuropsychological underpinnings of relational and conjunctive working memory binding across age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geldorp, Bonnie; Parra, Mario A; Kessels, Roy P C

    2015-01-01

    The ability to form associations (i.e., binding) is critical for memory formation. Recent studies suggest that aging specifically affects relational binding (associating separate features) but not conjunctive binding (integrating features within an object). Possibly, this dissociation may be driven by the spatial nature of the studies so far. Alternatively, relational binding may simply require more attentional resources. We assessed relational and conjunctive binding in three age groups and we included an interfering task (i.e., an articulatory suppression task). Binding was examined in a working memory (WM) task using non-spatial features: shape and colour. Thirty-one young adults (mean age = 22.35), 30 middle-aged adults (mean age = 54.80) and 30 older adults (mean age = 70.27) performed the task. Results show an effect of type of binding and an effect of age but no interaction between type of binding and age. The interaction between type of binding and interference was significant. These results indicate that aging affects relational binding and conjunctive binding similarly. However, relational binding is more susceptible to interference than conjunctive binding, which suggests that relational binding may require more attentional resources. We suggest that a general decline in WM resources associated with frontal dysfunction underlies age-related deficits in WM binding.

  16. Megalin binds and mediates cellular internalization of folate binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birn, Henrik; Zhai, Xiaoyue; Holm, Jan

    2005-01-01

    to express high levels of megalin, is inhibitable by excess unlabeled FBP and by receptor associated protein, a known inhibitor of binding to megalin. Immortalized rat yolk sac cells, representing an established model for studying megalin-mediated uptake, reveal (125)I-labeled FBP uptake which is inhibited...... to bind and mediate cellular uptake of FBP. Surface plasmon resonance analysis shows binding of bovine and human milk FBP to immobilized megalin, but not to low density lipoprotein receptor related protein. Binding of (125)I-labeled folate binding protein (FBP) to sections of kidney proximal tubule, known...

  17. Binding matrix: a novel approach for binding site recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jan T; Gewehr, Jan E; Martinetz, Thomas

    2004-06-01

    Recognition of protein-DNA binding sites in genomic sequences is a crucial step for discovering biological functions of genomic sequences. Explosive growth in availability of sequence information has resulted in a demand for binding site detection methods with high specificity. The motivation of the work presented here is to address this demand by a systematic approach based on Maximum Likelihood Estimation. A general framework is developed in which a large class of binding site detection methods can be described in a uniform and consistent way. Protein-DNA binding is determined by binding energy, which is an approximately linear function within the space of sequence words. All matrix based binding word detectors can be regarded as different linear classifiers which attempt to estimate the linear separation implied by the binding energy function. The standard approaches of consensus sequences and profile matrices are described using this framework. A maximum likelihood approach for determining this linear separation leads to a novel matrix type, called the binding matrix. The binding matrix is the most specific matrix based classifier which is consistent with the input set of known binding words. It achieves significant improvements in specificity compared to other matrices. This is demonstrated using 95 sets of experimentally determined binding words provided by the TRANSFAC database.

  18. Seamless Requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Naumchev, Alexandr; Meyer, Bertrand

    2017-01-01

    Popular notations for functional requirements specifications frequently ignore developers' needs, target specific development models, or require translation of requirements into tests for verification; the results can give out-of-sync or downright incompatible artifacts. Seamless Requirements, a new approach to specifying functional requirements, contributes to developers' understanding of requirements and to software quality regardless of the process, while the process itself becomes lighter...

  19. Optical Binding of Nanowires

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Simpson, Stephen Hugh; Zemánek, Pavel; Marago, O.M.; Jones, P.H.; Hanna, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 6 (2017), s. 3485-3492 ISSN 1530-6984 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36681G Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) CNR-16-12 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : optical binding nanowires * Brownian motion * self -organization * non-equilibrium thermodynamics * non-equilibrium steady state * spin-orbit coupling * emergent phenomena Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 12.712, year: 2016

  20. The Role of Attention in Item-Item Binding in Visual Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Dwight J.; Naveh-Benjamin, Moshe

    2017-01-01

    An important yet unresolved question regarding visual working memory (VWM) relates to whether or not binding processes within VWM require additional attentional resources compared with processing solely the individual components comprising these bindings. Previous findings indicate that binding of surface features (e.g., colored shapes) within VWM…

  1. IGF binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Leon A

    2017-12-18

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) 1-6 bind IGFs but not insulin with high affinity. They were initially identified as serum carriers and passive inhibitors of IGF actions. However, subsequent studies showed that, although IGFBPs inhibit IGF actions in many circumstances, they may also potentiate these actions. IGFBPs are widely expressed in most tissues, and they are flexible endocrine and autocrine/paracrine regulators of IGF activity, which is essential for this important physiological system. More recently, individual IGFBPs have been shown to have IGF-independent actions. Mechanisms underlying these actions include (i) interaction with non-IGF proteins in compartments including the extracellular space and matrix, the cell surface and intracellularly; (ii) interaction with and modulation of other growth factor pathways including EGF, TGF- and VEGF; and (iii) direct or indirect transcriptional effects following nuclear entry of IGFBPs. Through these IGF-dependent and IGF-independent actions, IGFBPs modulate essential cellular processes including proliferation, survival, migration, senescence, autophagy and angiogenesis. They have been implicated in a range of disorders including malignant, metabolic, neurological and immune diseases. A more complete understanding of their cellular roles may lead to the development of novel IGFBP-based therapeutic opportunities.

  2. A look at ligand binding thermodynamics in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claveria-Gimeno, Rafael; Vega, Sonia; Abian, Olga; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian

    2017-04-01

    Drug discovery is a challenging endeavor requiring the interplay of many different research areas. Gathering information on ligand binding thermodynamics may help considerably in reducing the risk within a high uncertainty scenario, allowing early rejection of flawed compounds and pushing forward optimal candidates. In particular, the free energy, the enthalpy, and the entropy of binding provide fundamental information on the intermolecular forces driving such interaction. Areas covered: The authors review the current status and recent developments in the application of ligand binding thermodynamics in drug discovery. The thermodynamic binding profile (Gibbs energy, enthalpy, and entropy of binding) can be used for lead selection and optimization (binding enthalpy, selectivity, and adaptability). Expert opinion: Binding thermodynamics provides fundamental information on the forces driving the formation of the drug-target complex. It has been widely accepted that binding thermodynamics may be used as a decision criterion along the ligand optimization process in drug discovery and development. In particular, the binding enthalpy may be used as a guide when selecting and optimizing compounds over a set of potential candidates. However, this has been recently called into question by arguing certain difficulties and in the light of certain experimental examples.

  3. Conformational Transitions and Convergence of Absolute Binding Free Energy Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapelosa, Mauro; Gallicchio, Emilio; Levy, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    The Binding Energy Distribution Analysis Method (BEDAM) is employed to compute the standard binding free energies of a series of ligands to a FK506 binding protein (FKBP12) with implicit solvation. Binding free energy estimates are in reasonably good agreement with experimental affinities. The conformations of the complexes identified by the simulations are in good agreement with crystallographic data, which was not used to restrain ligand orientations. The BEDAM method is based on λ -hopping Hamiltonian parallel Replica Exchange (HREM) molecular dynamics conformational sampling, the OPLS-AA/AGBNP2 effective potential, and multi-state free energy estimators (MBAR). Achieving converged and accurate results depends on all of these elements of the calculation. Convergence of the binding free energy is tied to the level of convergence of binding energy distributions at critical intermediate states where bound and unbound states are at equilibrium, and where the rate of binding/unbinding conformational transitions is maximal. This finding mirrors similar observations in the context of order/disorder transitions as for example in protein folding. Insights concerning the physical mechanism of ligand binding and unbinding are obtained. Convergence for the largest FK506 ligand is achieved only after imposing strict conformational restraints, which however require accurate prior structural knowledge of the structure of the complex. The analytical AGBNP2 model is found to underestimate the magnitude of the hydrophobic driving force towards binding in these systems characterized by loosely packed protein-ligand binding interfaces. Rescoring of the binding energies using a numerical surface area model corrects this deficiency. This study illustrates the complex interplay between energy models, exploration of conformational space, and free energy estimators needed to obtain robust estimates from binding free energy calculations. PMID:22368530

  4. The effectiveness of ski bindings and their professional adjustment for preventing alpine skiing injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, C F; Kelsall, H L

    1998-06-01

    This article presents a critical review of the extent to which alpine ski bindings and their adjustment have been formally demonstrated to prevent injuries. It considers a range of evidence, from anecdotal evidence and informed opinion to biomechanical studies, testing of equipment, epidemiological studies and controlled field evaluations. A total of 15 published studies examining the effectiveness of bindings and their adjustment were identified. All of these included anecdotal or informed opinion, and all but one focused on equipment design. Seven studies involved the testing of bindings or binding prototypes, 2 studies presented biomechanical models of the forces involved in binding operation, 6 reported an epidemiological evaluation of ski bindings and 2 considered skiers' behaviours towards binding adjustment. Some of the reviewed articles relate to the study of the biomechanics of ski bindings and their release in response to various loads and loading patterns. Other studies examined the contribution of bindings and binding-release to lower extremity, equipment-related injuries, the effect of various methods of binding adjustment on injury risk and the determinants of skiers' behaviour relating to professional binding adjustment. Most of the evidence suggests that currently used bindings are insufficient for the multidirectional release required to reduce the risk of injury to the lower limb, especially at the knee. This evidence suggests that further technical developments and innovations are required. The standard of the manufacture of bindings and boots also needs to be considered. The optimal adjustment of bindings using a testing device has been shown to be associated with a reduced risk of lower extremity injury. Generally, however, the adjustment of bindings has been shown to be inadequate, especially for children's bindings. Recommendations for further research, development and implementation with respect to ski binding and their adjustment are given

  5. The Receptor Binding Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin Stereotype C Binds Phosphoinositides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Varnum, Susan M.

    2012-03-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most toxic proteins known for humans and animals with an extremely low LD50 of {approx} 1 ng/kg. BoNTs generally require a protein and a ganglioside on the cell membrane surface for binding, which is known as a 'dual receptor' mechanism for host intoxication. Recent studies have suggested that in addition to gangliosides, other membrane lipids such as phosphoinositides may be involved in the interactions with the receptor binding domain (HCR) of BoNTs for better membrane penetration. Here, using two independent lipid-binding assays, we tested the interactions of BoNT/C-HCR with lipids in vitro. BoNT/C-HCR was found to bind negatively charged phospholipids, preferentially phosphoinositides. Additional interactions to phosphoinositides may help BoNT/C bind membrane more tightly and transduct signals for subsequent steps of intoxication. Our results provide new insights into the mechanisms of host cell membrane recognition by BoNTs.

  6. UV-induced DNA-binding proteins in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazer, P.M.; Greggio, N.A.; Metherall, J.E.; Summers, W.C.

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the response of human cells to DNA-damaging agents such as UV irradiation, the authors examined nuclear protein extracts of UV-irradiated HeLa cells for the presence of DNA-binding proteins. Electrophoretically separated proteins were transferred to a nitrocellulose filter that was subsequently immersed in a binding solution containing radioactively labeled DNA probes. Several DNA-binding proteins were induced in HeLa cells after UV irradiation. These included proteins that bind predominantly double-stranded DNA and proteins that bind both double-stranded and single-stranded DNA. The binding proteins were induced in a dose-dependent manner by UV light. Following a dose of 12 J/m 2 , the binding proteins in the nuclear extracts increased over time to a peak in the range of 18 hr after irradiation. Experiments with metabolic inhibitors (cycloheximide and actinomycin D) revealed that de novo synthesis of these proteins is not required for induction of the binding activities, suggesting that the induction is mediated by protein modification

  7. Analysis of leukocyte binding to depletion filters: role of passive binding, interaction with platelets, and plasma components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henschler, R; Rüster, B; Steimle, A; Hansmann, H L; Walker, W; Montag, T; Seifried, E

    2005-08-01

    Since limited knowledge exists on the mechanisms which regulate cell binding to leukocyte removal filter surfaces, we investigated the binding patterns of leukocytes to individual layers of leukocyte depletion filters. After passage of 1 unit of whole blood, blotting of isolated filter layers on glass slides or elution of cells from filter layers revealed that most leukocytes were located within the first 10 of a total of 28 filter layers, peaking at layers 6 to 8, with granulocytes binding on average to earlier filter layers than lymphocytes. Leukocytes preincubated with inhibitors of actin activation showed unchanged distribution between filter layers, suggesting that cytoskeletal activation does not significantly contribute to their binding. When leukocytes were directly incubated with single filter layers, binding of up to 30% of input cells was recorded in the absence of Ca(2+). Immunohistological analyses showed colocalization of platelets and leukocytes, with co-clustering of platelets and leukocytes. Monocytes and to some degree lymphocytes but not granulocytes competed with platelets for filter binding. Precoating of filter layers with individual plasma components showed that hyaluronic acid, plasma type fibronectin, and fibrinogen all increased the binding of leukocytes compared with albumin coating. In conclusion, leukocytes can bind passively to filters in a process which does not require Ca(2+), which is independent of cytoskeletal activation and which may depend on individual plasma components. These results are of importance when new selective cell enrichment or depletion strategies through specific filters are envisaged.

  8. Metal binding by food components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Ning

    For calcium binding: Electrochemical method (calcium ion selective electrode) combined with quantum mechanical calculations (density functional theory) were used to investigate the calcium binding affinity of the amino acids and small glycine peptides. The effects of the ionic strength and p......, synergistic effect in calcium binding was found for the small glycine peptide rather than amino acids mixtures with the enhanced driving force up to -6 kJ/mol. Such study provides useful information for the future development of calcium supplements. For zinc binding: Isothermal titration calorimetry...... titration calorimetry and quantum mechanical calculations. This is due to the zinc binding affinity of the relatively softer ligands (investigated food components) will become much stronger than citrate or phytate when they present together in aqueous solution. This mechanism indicates these food components...

  9. Pro DNS and BIND 10

    CERN Document Server

    Aitchison, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Pro DNS and BIND 10 guides you through the challenging array of features surrounding DNS with a special focus on the latest release of BIND, the world's most popular DNS implementation. This book unravels the mysteries of DNS, offering insight into origins, evolution, and key concepts like domain names and zone files. This book focuses on running DNS systems based on BIND 10, the first stable release that includes support for the latest DNSSEC standards. Whether you administer a DNS system, are thinking about running one, or you simply want to understand the DNS system, then this book for you.

  10. Protein binding of psychotropic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    Based upon fluorescence measurements, protein binding of some psychotropic agents (chlorpromazine, promethazine, and trifluoperazine) to human IgG and HSA was studied in aqueous cacodylate buffer, PH7. The interaction parameters determined from emission quenching of the proteins. The interaction parameters determined include the equilibrium constant (K), calculated from equations derived by Borazan and coworkers, the number of binding sites (n) available to the monomer molecules on a single protein molecule. The results revealed a high level of affinity, as reflected by high values of K, and the existence of specific binding sites, since a limited number of n values are obtained. 39 tabs.; 37 figs.; 83 refs

  11. Requirements Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Hull, Elizabeth; Dick, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    Written for those who want to develop their knowledge of requirements engineering process, whether practitioners or students.Using the latest research and driven by practical experience from industry, Requirements Engineering gives useful hints to practitioners on how to write and structure requirements. It explains the importance of Systems Engineering and the creation of effective solutions to problems. It describes the underlying representations used in system modeling and introduces the UML2, and considers the relationship between requirements and modeling. Covering a generic multi-layer r

  12. Software requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Wiegers, Karl E

    2003-01-01

    Without formal, verifiable software requirements-and an effective system for managing them-the programs that developers think they've agreed to build often will not be the same products their customers are expecting. In SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS, Second Edition, requirements engineering authority Karl Wiegers amplifies the best practices presented in his original award-winning text?now a mainstay for anyone participating in the software development process. In this book, you'll discover effective techniques for managing the requirements engineering process all the way through the development cy

  13. Binding Energy and Equilibrium of Compact Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germano M.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical analysis of the existence of a limit mass for compact astronomic ob- jects requires the solution of the Einstein’s equations of g eneral relativity together with an appropriate equation of state. Analytical solutions exi st in some special cases like the spherically symmetric static object without energy sou rces that is here considered. Solutions, i.e. the spacetime metrics, can have a singular m athematical form (the so called Schwarzschild metric due to Hilbert or a nonsingula r form (original work of Schwarzschild. The former predicts a limit mass and, conse quently, the existence of black holes above this limit. Here it is shown that, the origi nal Schwarzschild met- ric permits compact objects, without mass limit, having rea sonable values for central density and pressure. The lack of a limit mass is also demonst rated analytically just imposing reasonable conditions on the energy-matter densi ty, of positivity and decreas- ing with radius. Finally the ratio between proper mass and to tal mass tends to 2 for high values of mass so that the binding energy reaches the lim it m (total mass seen by a distant observer. As it is known the negative binding energ y reduces the gravitational mass of the object; the limit of m for the binding energy provides a mechanism for stable equilibrium of any amount of mass to contrast the gravitatio nal collapse.

  14. Modulatory effects of peroxovanadates on insulin receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, D W; Leung, W N; Xu, M; Zhu, S Q; Cheng, C H

    1996-11-15

    The insulin-mimetic effects exhibited by vanadate, hydrogen peroxide, and some peroxovanadates have recently been shown to occur, at least in part, through an activation of the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity. In this study, we examine the effects of these compounds on insulin receptor binding using receptor preparations from human placental membranes. Among the 16 vanadium(V)-peroxo complexes studied, the [VO(O2)2(bipy)]- ion, where bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine, was found to increase insulin receptor binding by 24%, whereas the [VO(O2)2(en)]- ion, where en = ethylenediamine, was found to reduce insulin receptor binding by about the same amount under steady-state conditions. Scatchard analysis of the binding data indicates that the observed effect of the [VO(O2)2(bipy)]- ion on insulin receptor binding is exerted mainly at the high-capacity low-affinity sites. Furthermore, this modulatory effect is reversible and requires a continuous presence of the compound. By perturbing the membrane environment of the insulin receptor, we have shown that an intact membrane structure is essential for an observable effect. The observed modulation of insulin receptor binding by peroxovanadates is interpreted in terms of a ternary complex model in which the peroxovanadate acts as an allosteric effector modulating the binding equilibrium between insulin and its receptor.

  15. SHBG (Sex Hormone Binding Globulin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Iron-binding Capacity (TIBC, UIBC) Trichomonas Testing Triglycerides Troponin Tryptase Tumor Markers Uric Acid Urinalysis Urine ... Syndrome CME. Medscape From Nature Clinical Practice Endocrinology & Metabolism [On-line information]. Available online at http://www. ...

  16. SCOWLP classification: Structural comparison and analysis of protein binding regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Gerd

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detailed information about protein interactions is critical for our understanding of the principles governing protein recognition mechanisms. The structures of many proteins have been experimentally determined in complex with different ligands bound either in the same or different binding regions. Thus, the structural interactome requires the development of tools to classify protein binding regions. A proper classification may provide a general view of the regions that a protein uses to bind others and also facilitate a detailed comparative analysis of the interacting information for specific protein binding regions at atomic level. Such classification might be of potential use for deciphering protein interaction networks, understanding protein function, rational engineering and design. Description Protein binding regions (PBRs might be ideally described as well-defined separated regions that share no interacting residues one another. However, PBRs are often irregular, discontinuous and can share a wide range of interacting residues among them. The criteria to define an individual binding region can be often arbitrary and may differ from other binding regions within a protein family. Therefore, the rational behind protein interface classification should aim to fulfil the requirements of the analysis to be performed. We extract detailed interaction information of protein domains, peptides and interfacial solvent from the SCOWLP database and we classify the PBRs of each domain family. For this purpose, we define a similarity index based on the overlapping of interacting residues mapped in pair-wise structural alignments. We perform our classification with agglomerative hierarchical clustering using the complete-linkage method. Our classification is calculated at different similarity cut-offs to allow flexibility in the analysis of PBRs, feature especially interesting for those protein families with conflictive binding regions

  17. The Streptococcal Binding Site in the Gelatin-binding Domain of Fibronectin Is Consistent with a Non-linear Arrangement of Modules*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkin, Kate E.; Brentnall, Andrew S.; Harris, Gemma; Bingham, Richard J.; Erat, Michele C.; Millard, Christopher J.; Schwarz-Linek, Ulrich; Staunton, David; Vakonakis, Ioannis; Campbell, Iain D.; Potts, Jennifer R.

    2010-01-01

    Fibronectin-binding proteins (FnBPs) of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes mediate invasion of human endothelial and epithelial cells in a process likely to aid the persistence and/or dissemination of infection. In addition to binding sites for the N-terminal domain (NTD) of fibronectin (Fn), a number of streptococcal FnBPs also contain an upstream region (UR) that is closely associated with an NTD-binding region; UR binds to the adjacent gelatin-binding domain (GBD) of Fn. Previously, UR was shown to be required for efficient streptococcal invasion of epithelial cells. Here we show, using a Streptococcus zooepidemicus FnBP, that the UR-binding site in GBD resides largely in the 8F19F1 module pair. We also show that UR inhibits binding of a peptide from the α1 chain of type I collagen to 8F19F1 and that UR binding to 8F1 is likely to occur through anti-parallel β-zipper formation. Thus, we propose that streptococcal proteins that contain adjacent NTD- and GBD-binding sites form a highly unusual extended tandem β-zipper that spans the two domains and mediates high affinity binding to Fn through a large intermolecular interface. The proximity of the UR- and NTD-binding sequences in streptococcal FnBPs is consistent with a non-linear arrangement of modules in the tertiary structure of the GBD of Fn. PMID:20843804

  18. Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira, Maria Teresa; Lee, Jiwoong

    2017-01-01

    solvents, thus increasing their applicability in synthesis. The expansion of this concept to chiral polyethers led to the emergence of asymmetric cation-binding catalysis, where chiral counter anions are generated from metal salts, particularly using BINOL-based polyethers. Alkali metal salts, namely KF...... and KCN, are selectively bound to the catalyst, providing exceptionally high enantioselectivities for kinetic resolutions, elimination reactions (fluoride base), and Strecker synthesis (cyanide nucleophile). Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis was recently expanded to silicon-based reagents, enabling...

  19. STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF PALLADIN’S ACTIN BINDING DOMAIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Moriah R.; Dixon, Richard D.S.; Goicoechea, Silvia M.; Murphy, Grant S.; Brungardt, Joseph G.; Beam, Matthew T.; Srinath, Pavan; Patel, Julie; Mohiuddin, Jahan; Otey, Carol A.; Campbell, Sharon L.

    2013-01-01

    Here we report the NMR structure of the actin-binding domain contained in the cell adhesion protein palladin. Previously we demonstrated that one of the immunoglobulin domains of palladin (Ig3) is both necessary and sufficient for direct F-actin binding in vitro. In this study, we identify two basic patches on opposite faces of Ig3 that are critical for actin binding and crosslinking. Sedimentation equilibrium assays indicate that the Ig3 domain of palladin does not self-associate. These combined data are consistent with an actin crosslinking mechanism that involves concurrent attachment of two actin filaments by a single palladin molecule by an electrostatic mechanism. Palladin mutations that disrupt actin binding show altered cellular distributions and morphology of actin in cells, revealing a functional requirement for the interaction between palladin and actin in vivo. PMID:23806659

  20. Dissecting electrostatic screening, specific ion binding, and ligand binding in an energetic model for glycine riboswitch folding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipfert, Jan; Sim, Adelene Y.L.; Herschlag, Daniel; Doniach, Sebastian (Stanford)

    2010-09-17

    Riboswitches are gene-regulating RNAs that are usually found in the 5{prime}-untranslated regions of messenger RNA. As the sugar-phosphate backbone of RNA is highly negatively charged, the folding and ligand-binding interactions of riboswitches are strongly dependent on the presence of cations. Using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and hydroxyl radical footprinting, we examined the cation dependence of the different folding stages of the glycine-binding riboswitch from Vibrio cholerae. We found that the partial folding of the tandem aptamer of this riboswitch in the absence of glycine is supported by all tested mono- and divalent ions, suggesting that this transition is mediated by nonspecific electrostatic screening. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations using SAXS-derived low-resolution structural models allowed us to perform an energetic dissection of this process. The results showed that a model with a constant favorable contribution to folding that is opposed by an unfavorable electrostatic term that varies with ion concentration and valency provides a reasonable quantitative description of the observed folding behavior. Glycine binding, on the other hand, requires specific divalent ions binding based on the observation that Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, and Mn{sup 2+} facilitated glycine binding, whereas other divalent cations did not. The results provide a case study of how ion-dependent electrostatic relaxation, specific ion binding, and ligand binding can be coupled to shape the energetic landscape of a riboswitch and can begin to be quantitatively dissected.

  1. Structural Basis for Endosomal Targeting by the Bro1 Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaewon; Sitaraman, Sujatha; Hierro, Aitor; Beach, Bridgette M.; Odorizzi, Greg; Hurley, James H.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Proteins delivered to the lysosome or the yeast vacuole via late endosomes are sorted by the ESCRT complexes and by associated proteins, including Alix and its yeast homolog Bro1. Alix, Bro1, and several other late endosomal proteins share a conserved 160 residue Bro1 domain whose boundaries, structure, and function have not been characterized. The crystal structure of the Bro1 domain of Bro1 reveals a folded core of 367 residues. The extended Bro1 domain is necessary and sufficient for binding to the ESCRT-III subunit Snf7 and for the recruitment of Bro1 to late endosomes. The structure resembles a boomerang with its concave face filled in and contains a triple tetratricopeptide repeat domain as a substructure. Snf7 binds to a conserved hydrophobic patch on Bro1 that is required for protein complex formation and for the protein-sorting function of Bro1. These results define a conserved mechanism whereby Bro1 domain-containing proteins are targeted to endosomes by Snf7 and its orthologs. PMID:15935782

  2. The necessity of connection structures in neural models of variable binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velde, Frank; de Kamps, Marc

    2015-08-01

    In his review of neural binding problems, Feldman (Cogn Neurodyn 7:1-11, 2013) addressed two types of models as solutions of (novel) variable binding. The one type uses labels such as phase synchrony of activation. The other ('connectivity based') type uses dedicated connections structures to achieve novel variable binding. Feldman argued that label (synchrony) based models are the only possible candidates to handle novel variable binding, whereas connectivity based models lack the flexibility required for that. We argue and illustrate that Feldman's analysis is incorrect. Contrary to his conclusion, connectivity based models are the only viable candidates for models of novel variable binding because they are the only type of models that can produce behavior. We will show that the label (synchrony) based models analyzed by Feldman are in fact examples of connectivity based models. Feldman's analysis that novel variable binding can be achieved without existing connection structures seems to result from analyzing the binding problem in a wrong frame of reference, in particular in an outside instead of the required inside frame of reference. Connectivity based models can be models of novel variable binding when they possess a connection structure that resembles a small-world network, as found in the brain. We will illustrate binding with this type of model with episode binding and the binding of words, including novel words, in sentence structures.

  3. Functional connectivity supporting the selective maintenance of feature-location binding in visual working memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachiko eTakahama

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Information on an object’s features bound to its location is very important for maintaining object representations in visual working memory. Interactions with dynamic multi-dimensional objects in an external environment require complex cognitive control, including the selective maintenance of feature-location binding. Here, we used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate brain activity and functional connectivity related to the maintenance of complex feature-location binding. Participants were required to detect task-relevant changes in feature-location binding between objects defined by color, orientation, and location. We compared a complex binding task requiring complex feature-location binding (color-orientation-location with a simple binding task in which simple feature-location binding, such as color-location, was task-relevant and the other feature was task-irrelevant. Univariate analyses showed that the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC, hippocampus, and frontoparietal network were activated during the maintenance of complex feature-location binding. Functional connectivity analyses indicated cooperation between the inferior precentral sulcus (infPreCS, DLPFC, and hippocampus during the maintenance of complex feature-location binding. In contrast, the connectivity for the spatial updating of simple feature-location binding determined by reanalyzing the data from Takahama et al. (2010 demonstrated that the superior parietal lobule (SPL cooperated with the DLPFC and hippocampus. These results suggest that the connectivity for complex feature-location binding does not simply reflect general memory load and that the DLPFC and hippocampus flexibly modulate the dorsal frontoparietal network, depending on the task requirements, with the infPreCS involved in the maintenance of complex feature-location binding and the SPL involved in the spatial updating of simple feature-location binding.

  4. Structural parameterization of the binding enthalpy of small ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Irene; Freire, Ernesto

    2002-11-01

    A major goal in ligand and drug design is the optimization of the binding affinity of selected lead molecules. However, the binding affinity is defined by the free energy of binding, which, in turn, is determined by the enthalpy and entropy changes. Because the binding enthalpy is the term that predominantly reflects the strength of the interactions of the ligand with its target relative to those with the solvent, it is desirable to develop ways of predicting enthalpy changes from structural considerations. The application of structure/enthalpy correlations derived from protein stability data has yielded inconsistent results when applied to small ligands of pharmaceutical interest (MW the enthalpy associated with any possible conformational change in the protein or ligand upon binding; and, (3) the enthalpy associated with protonation/deprotonation events, if present. As in the case of protein stability, the intrinsic binding enthalpy scales with changes in solvent accessible surface areas. However, an accurate estimation of the intrinsic binding enthalpy requires explicit consideration of long-lived water molecules at the binding interface. The best statistical structure/enthalpy correlation is obtained when buried water molecules within 5-7 A of the ligand are included in the calculations. For all seven protein systems considered (HIV-1 protease, dihydrodipicolinate reductase, Rnase T1, streptavidin, pp60c-Src SH2 domain, Hsp90 molecular chaperone, and bovine beta-trypsin) the binding enthalpy of 25 small molecular weight peptide and nonpeptide ligands can be accounted for with a standard error of +/-0.3 kcal x mol(-1). Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Characterization of soluble fibronectin binding to Bacille Calmette-Guérin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanzadeh, J; Brown, E J; Quillin, S P; Ritchey, J K; Ratliff, T L

    1989-10-01

    Fibronectin (FN), a 420 kDa glycoprotein, consists of two similar subunits linked by a disulphide bond near the C-terminal end. FN is present in soluble and matrix forms in various body fluids and tissues and has been shown to bind to variety of organisms. We characterized the conditions required for 125I-FN binding to Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG). The binding was dose-dependent, reached saturation within 3 min, and was essentially irreversible for at least 24 h under optimal binding conditions at pH 6.0. In contrast, the binding was reversible (greater than 90% in 24 h) when the pH was increased to 10.0. Scatchard analysis of the dose-response experiments produced a straight line, suggesting the presence of a single class of FN receptor on BCG. 125I-FN binding was trypsin-sensitive, suggesting that the BCG-binding molecule is a protein. The number of FN receptors was determined to be 8000-15,000 per bacterium. 125I-FN binding was pH dependent, with maximal binding at acidic pH. 125I-FN binding was sensitive to the presence of NaCl, with 0.08 M-NaCl inhibiting binding by 85%. These data demonstrate that soluble FN binds to a trypsin-sensitive cell-surface component of BCG in an essentially irreversible manner.

  6. A synthetic peptide from the COOH-terminal heparin-binding domain of fibronectin promotes focal adhesion formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; McCarthy, J B; Furcht, L T

    1993-01-01

    of focal adhesion and stress fiber formation requires additional interactions. Heparin-binding fragments of fibronectin can provide this signal. The COOH-terminal heparin-binding domain of fibronectin contains five separate heparin-binding amino acid sequences. We show here that all five sequences...

  7. Water binding in legume seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertucci, C. W.; Leopold, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    The physical status of water in seeds has a pivotal role in determining the physiological reactions that can take place in the dry state. Using water sorption isotherms from cotyledon and axis tissue of five leguminous seeds, the strength of water binding and the numbers of binding sites have been estimated using van't Hoff analyses and the D'Arcy/Watt equation. These parameters of water sorption are calculated for each of the three regions of water binding and for a range of temperatures. Water sorption characteristics are reflective of the chemical composition of the biological materials as well as the temperature at which hydration takes place. Changes in the sorption characteristics with temperature and hydration level may suggest hydration-induced structural changes in cellular components.

  8. A 3D-QSAR-driven approach to binding mode and affinity prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosco, Paolo; Balle, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    A method for predicting the binding mode of a series of ligands is proposed. The procedure relies on three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships (3D-QSAR) and does not require structural knowledge of the binding site. Candidate alignments are automatically built and ranked...... according to a consensus scoring function. 3D-QSAR analysis based on the selected binding mode enables affinity prediction of new drug candidates having less than 10 rotatable bonds....

  9. Co-suppression of sterol-regulatory element binding protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-06-22

    Jun 22, 2011 ... In Arabidopsis,. At5g35220 gene being sterol regulatory element-binding protein site 2, protease and metalloendopeptidase activity were required for chloroplast development and play a role in regulation of endodermal plastid size and number that are involved in ethylene-dependent gravitropism of light-.

  10. 17 CFR 260.7a-19 - Margin for binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Margin for binding. 260.7a-19...) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, TRUST INDENTURE ACT OF 1939 Formal Requirements § 260.7a-19 Margin for... and documents filed as a part thereof, shall have a back or stitching margin of at least 11/2 inches...

  11. Si Tight-Binding Parameters from Genetic Algorithm Fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimeck, G.; Bowen, R.; Boykin, T.; Salazar-Lazaro, C.; Cwik, T.; Stoica, A.

    1999-01-01

    Quantum mechanical simulations of carrier transport in Si require an accurate model of the complicated Si bandstructure. Tight-binding models are an attractive method of choice since they bear the full electronic structure symmetry in them and they can discretize a realistic device on an atomic scale.

  12. Functional diversity of CTCFs is encoded in their binding motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Rongxin; Wang, Chengqi; Skogerbo, Geir; Zhang, Zhihua

    2015-08-28

    The CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) has diverse regulatory functions. However, the definitive characteristics of the CTCF binding motif required for its functional diversity still remains elusive. Here, we describe a new motif discovery workflow by which we have identified three CTCF binding motif variations with highly divergent functionalities. Supported by transcriptomic, epigenomic and chromatin-interactomic data, we show that the functional diversity of the CTCF binding motifs is strongly associated with their GC content, CpG dinucleotide coverage and relative DNA methylation level at the 12th position of the motifs. Further analysis suggested that the co-localization of cohesin, the key factor in cohesion of sister chromatids, is negatively correlated with the CpG coverage and the relative DNA methylation level at the 12th position. Finally, we present evidences for a hypothetical model in which chromatin interactions between promoters and distal regulatory regions are likely mediated by CTCFs binding to sequences with high CpG. These results demonstrate the existence of definitive CTCF binding motifs corresponding to CTCF's diverse functions, and that the functional diversity of the motifs is strongly associated with genetic and epigenetic features at the 12th position of the motifs.

  13. Closure requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, I.P.G.; Ellison, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Closure of a waste management unit can be either permanent or temporary. Permanent closure may be due to: economic factors which make it uneconomical to mine the remaining minerals; depletion of mineral resources; physical site constraints that preclude further mining and beneficiation; environmental, regulatory or other requirements that make it uneconomical to continue to develop the resources. Temporary closure can occur for a period of several months to several years, and may be caused by factors such as: periods of high rainfall or snowfall which prevent mining and waste disposal; economic circumstances which temporarily make it uneconomical to mine the target mineral; labor problems requiring a cessation of operations for a period of time; construction activities that are required to upgrade project components such as the process facilities and waste management units; and mine or process plant failures that require extensive repairs. Permanent closure of a mine waste management unit involves the provision of durable surface containment features to protect the waters of the State in the long-term. Temporary closure may involve activities that range from ongoing maintenance of the existing facilities to the installation of several permanent closure features in order to reduce ongoing maintenance. This paper deals with the permanent closure features

  14. Porcine sperm surface beta1,4galactosyltransferase binds to the zona pellucida but is not necessary or sufficient to mediate sperm-zona pellucida binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebeiz, M; Miller, D J

    1999-12-01

    The binding of sperm to the zona pellucida is an integral part of the mammalian fertilization process, investigated most extensively in the mouse. Several sperm receptors for the murine zona pellucida have been studied (Snell WJ, White JM. 1996. Cell 85:629-637; Wassarman PM. 1999. Cell 96:175-183), but the most compelling evidence exists for beta-1,4-galactosyltransferase (GalTase). Considering that GalTase is present on the surface of porcine sperm (Larson JL, Miller DJ. 1997. Biol Reprod 57:442-453), we investigated the role of GalTase in porcine sperm-zona binding. Sperm surface GalTase catalyzed the addition of uridine diphosphate-[(3)H]galactose to the 55 kDa group of the porcine zona pellucida proteins implicated in sperm binding, demonstrating that GalTase binds the porcine zona. The functional importance of GalTase-zona pellucida binding was tested. Addition of uridine diphosphate galactose, a substrate that completes the GalTase enzymatic reaction and disrupts GalTase mediated adhesion, had no effect on binding of sperm to porcine oocytes. Furthermore, removal of the GalTase zona ligand by incubation of oocytes with N-acetylglucosaminidase had no effect on binding of sperm to oocytes. These results suggest that GalTase is not necessary for sperm to bind to the zona pellucida. Digestion of isolated porcine zona proteins with N-acetylglucosaminidase did not affect the biological activity of soluble porcine zona proteins in competitive sperm-zona binding assays, suggesting that GalTase alone is not sufficient to mediate sperm-zona attachment. From these results, it appears that, although GalTase is able to bind porcine zona proteins, its function in porcine sperm-zona binding is not necessary or sufficient for sperm-zona binding. This supports the contention that porcine sperm-zona binding requires redundant gamete receptors. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Synthesis of Sulochrin-125I and Its Binding Affinity as α-Glucosidase Inhibitor using Radioligand Binding Assay (RBA Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Lestari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Most of diabetics patients have type 2 diabetes mellitus or non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. Treatment type 2 diabetes mellitus can be done by inhibiting α-glucosidase enzyme which converts carbohydrates into glucose. Sulochrin is one of the potential compounds which can inhibit the function of α-glucosidase enzyme. This study was carried out to obtain data of sulochrin binding with α-glucosidase enzyme as α-glucosidase inhibitor using Radioligand Binding Assay (RBA method. Primary reagent required in RBA method is labeled radioactive ligand (radioligand. In this study, the radioligand was sulochrin-125I and prior to sulochrin-125I synthesis, the sulochrin-I was synthesized. Sulochrin-I and sulochrin-125I were synthesized and their bindings were studied using Radioligand Binding Assay method. Sulochrin-I was synthesized with molecular formula C17H15O7I and molecular weight 457.9940. Sulochrin-125I was synthesized from sulochrin-I by isotope exchange method. From the RBA method, dissociation constant (Kd and maximum binding (Bmax were obtained 26.316 nM and Bmax 9.302 nM respectively. This low Kd indicated that sulochrin was can bind to α-glucosidase

  16. Ascorbic acid enables reversible dopamine receptor 3H-agonist binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leff, S.; Sibley, D.R.; Hamblin, M.; Creese, I.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of ascorbic acid on dopaminergic 3 H-agonist receptor binding were studied in membrane homogenates of bovine anterior pituitary and caudate, and rat striatum. In all tissues virtually no stereospecific binding (defined using 1uM (+)butaclamol) of the 3 H-agonists N-propylnorapomorphine (NPA), apomorphine, or dopamine could be demonstrated in the absence of ascorbic acid. Although levels of total 3 H-agonist binding were three to five times greater in the absence than in the presence of 0.1% ascorbic acid, the increased binding was entirely non-stereospecific. Greater amounts of dopamine-inhibitable 3 H-NPA binding could be demonstrated in the absence of 0.1% ascorbic acid, but this measure of ''specific binding'' was demonstrated not to represent dopamine receptor binding since several other catecholamines and catechol were equipotent with dopamine and more potent than the dopamine agonist (+/-)amino-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronapthalene (ADTN) in inhibiting this binding. High levels of dopamine-displaceable 3 H-agonist binding were detected in fresh and boiled homogenates of cerebellum, an area of brain which receives no dopaminergic innervation, further demonstrating the non-specific nature of 3 H-agonist binding in the absence of ascorbic acid. These studies emphasize that under typical assay conditions ascorbic acid is required in order to demonstrate reversible and specific 3 H-agonist binding to dopamine receptors

  17. When is protein binding important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuberger, Jules; Schmidt, Stephan; Derendorf, Hartmut

    2013-09-01

    The present paper is an ode to a classic citation by Benet and Hoener (2002. Clin Pharm Ther 71(3):115-121). The now classic paper had a huge impact on drug development and the way the issue of protein binding is perceived and interpreted. Although the authors very clearly pointed out the limitations and underlying assumptions for their delineations, these are too often overlooked and the classic paper's message is misinterpreted by broadening to cases that were not intended. Some members of the scientific community concluded from the paper that protein binding is not important. This was clearly not intended by the authors, as they finished their paper with a paragraph entitled: "When is protein binding important?" Misinterpretation of the underlying assumptions in the classic work can result in major pitfalls in drug development. Therefore, we revisit the topic of protein binding with the intention of clarifying when clinically relevant changes should be considered during drug development. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. LEGACY MANAGEMENT REQUIRES INFORMATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CONNELL, C.W.; HILDEBRAND, R.D.

    2006-01-01

    ''Legacy Management Requires Information'' describes the goal(s) of the US Department of Energy's Office of Legacy Management (LM) relative to maintaining critical records and the way those goals are being addressed at Hanford. The paper discusses the current practices for document control, as well as the use of modern databases for both storing and accessing the data to support cleanup decisions. In addition to the information goals of LM, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, known as the ''Tri-Party Agreement'' (TPA) is one of the main drivers in documentation and data management. The TPA, which specifies discrete milestones for cleaning up the Hanford Site, is a legally binding agreement among the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The TPA requires that DOE provide the lead regulatory agency with the results of analytical laboratory and non-laboratory tests/readings to help guide them in making decisions. The Agreement also calls for each signatory to preserve--for at least ten years after the Agreement has ended--all of the records in its or its contractors, possession related to sampling, analysis, investigations, and monitoring conducted. The tools used at Hanford to meet TPA requirements are also the tools that can satisfy the needs of LM

  19. LEGACY MANAGEMENT REQUIRES INFORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CONNELL, C.W.; HILDEBRAND, R.D.

    2006-12-14

    ''Legacy Management Requires Information'' describes the goal(s) of the US Department of Energy's Office of Legacy Management (LM) relative to maintaining critical records and the way those goals are being addressed at Hanford. The paper discusses the current practices for document control, as well as the use of modern databases for both storing and accessing the data to support cleanup decisions. In addition to the information goals of LM, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, known as the ''Tri-Party Agreement'' (TPA) is one of the main drivers in documentation and data management. The TPA, which specifies discrete milestones for cleaning up the Hanford Site, is a legally binding agreement among the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The TPA requires that DOE provide the lead regulatory agency with the results of analytical laboratory and non-laboratory tests/readings to help guide them in making decisions. The Agreement also calls for each signatory to preserve--for at least ten years after the Agreement has ended--all of the records in its or its contractors, possession related to sampling, analysis, investigations, and monitoring conducted. The tools used at Hanford to meet TPA requirements are also the tools that can satisfy the needs of LM.

  20. Molecular determinants of receptor binding and signaling by the CX3C chemokine fractalkine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mizoue, L S; Sullivan, S K; King, D S

    2001-01-01

    , but not all, pathways required for migration. Fractalkine also binds the human cytomegalovirus receptor US28, and analysis of the mutants indicates that US28 recognizes many of the same epitopes of fractalkine as CX3CR1. Comparison of the binding surfaces of fractalkine and the CC chemokine MCP-1 reveals...

  1. Reflection-Based Python-C++ Bindings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generowicz, Jacek; Lavrijsen, Wim T.L.P.; Marino, Massimo; Mato, Pere

    2004-01-01

    Python is a flexible, powerful, high-level language with excellent interactive and introspective capabilities and a very clean syntax. As such, it can be a very effective tool for driving physics analysis. Python is designed to be extensible in low-level C-like languages, and its use as a scientific steering language has become quite widespread. To this end, existing and custom-written C or C++ libraries are bound to the Python environment as so-called extension modules. A number of tools for easing the process of creating such bindings exist, such as SWIG and Boost. Python. Yet, the process still requires a considerable amount of effort and expertise. The C++ language has few built-in introspective capabilities, but tools such as LCGDict and CINT add this by providing so-called dictionaries: libraries that contain information about the names, entry points, argument types, etc. of other libraries. The reflection information from these dictionaries can be used for the creation of bindings and so the process can be fully automated, as dictionaries are already provided for many end-user libraries for other purposes, such as object persistency. PyLCGDict is a Python extension module that uses LCG dictionaries, as PyROOT uses CINT reflection information, to allow /cwPython users to access C++ libraries with essentially no preparation on the users' behalf. In addition, and in a similar way, PyROOT gives ROOT users access to Python libraries

  2. Comprehensive human transcription factor binding site map for combinatory binding motifs discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnoldo J Müller-Molina

    Full Text Available To know the map between transcription factors (TFs and their binding sites is essential to reverse engineer the regulation process. Only about 10%-20% of the transcription factor binding motifs (TFBMs have been reported. This lack of data hinders understanding gene regulation. To address this drawback, we propose a computational method that exploits never used TF properties to discover the missing TFBMs and their sites in all human gene promoters. The method starts by predicting a dictionary of regulatory "DNA words." From this dictionary, it distills 4098 novel predictions. To disclose the crosstalk between motifs, an additional algorithm extracts TF combinatorial binding patterns creating a collection of TF regulatory syntactic rules. Using these rules, we narrowed down a list of 504 novel motifs that appear frequently in syntax patterns. We tested the predictions against 509 known motifs confirming that our system can reliably predict ab initio motifs with an accuracy of 81%-far higher than previous approaches. We found that on average, 90% of the discovered combinatorial binding patterns target at least 10 genes, suggesting that to control in an independent manner smaller gene sets, supplementary regulatory mechanisms are required. Additionally, we discovered that the new TFBMs and their combinatorial patterns convey biological meaning, targeting TFs and genes related to developmental functions. Thus, among all the possible available targets in the genome, the TFs tend to regulate other TFs and genes involved in developmental functions. We provide a comprehensive resource for regulation analysis that includes a dictionary of "DNA words," newly predicted motifs and their corresponding combinatorial patterns. Combinatorial patterns are a useful filter to discover TFBMs that play a major role in orchestrating other factors and thus, are likely to lock/unlock cellular functional clusters.

  3. Drosophila DNA-Binding Proteins in Polycomb Repression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksim Erokhin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of individual gene expression patterns in different cell types is required during differentiation and development of multicellular organisms. Polycomb group (PcG proteins are key epigenetic regulators responsible for gene repression, and dysregulation of their activities leads to developmental abnormalities and diseases. PcG proteins were first identified in Drosophila, which still remains the most convenient system for studying PcG-dependent repression. In the Drosophila genome, these proteins bind to DNA regions called Polycomb response elements (PREs. A major role in the recruitment of PcG proteins to PREs is played by DNA-binding factors, several of which have been characterized in detail. However, current knowledge is insufficient for comprehensively describing the mechanism of this process. In this review, we summarize and discuss the available data on the role of DNA-binding proteins in PcG recruitment to chromatin.

  4. Regulatory pathways for ATP-binding cassette transport proteins in kidney proximal tubules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masereeuw, R.; Russel, F.G.M.

    2012-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transport proteins (ABC transporters) represent important determinants of drug excretion. Protective or excretory tissues where these transporters mediate substrate efflux include the kidney proximal tubule. Regulation of the transport proteins in this tissue requires

  5. Proteoform-specific protein binding of small molecules in complex matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Characterizing the specific binding between protein targets and small molecules is critically important for drug discovery. Conventional assays require isolation and purification of small molecules from complex matrices through multistep chromatographic fractionation, which may alter their original ...

  6. Mutated primer binding sites interacting with different tRNAs allow efficient murine leukemia virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M; Lovmand, J

    1993-01-01

    Two Akv murine leukemia virus-based retroviral vectors with primer binding sites matching tRNA(Gln-1) and tRNA(Lys-3) were constructed. The transduction efficiency of these mutated vectors was found to be comparable to that of a vector carrying the wild-type primer binding site matching t......RNA(Pro). Polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequence analysis of transduced proviruses confirmed the transfer of vectors with mutated primer binding sites and further showed that tRNA(Gln-2) may act efficiently in conjunction with the tRNA(Gln-1) primer binding site. We conclude that murine leukemia virus...... can replicate by using various tRNA molecules as primers and propose primer binding site-tRNA primer interactions to be of major importance for tRNA primer selection. However, efficient primer selection does not require perfect Watson-Crick base pairing at all 18 positions of the primer binding site....

  7. Mapping Protein Binding Sites and Conformational Epitopes Using Cysteine Labeling and Yeast Surface Display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najar, Tariq Ahmad; Khare, Shruti; Pandey, Rajesh; Gupta, Satish K; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2017-03-07

    We describe a facile method for mapping protein:ligand binding sites and conformational epitopes. The method uses a combination of Cys scanning mutagenesis, chemical labeling, and yeast surface display. While Ala scanning is widely used for similar purposes, often mutation to Ala (or other amino acids) has little effect on binding, except at hotspot residues. Many residues in physical contact with a binding partner are insensitive to substitution with Ala. In contrast, we show that labeling of Cys residues in a binding site consistently abrogates binding. We couple this methodology to yeast surface display and deep sequencing to map conformational epitopes targeted by both monoclonal antibodies and polyclonal sera as well as a protein:ligand binding site. The method does not require purified protein, can distinguish buried and exposed residues, and can be extended to other display formats, including mammalian cells and viruses, emphasizing its wide applicability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Calcium binding by dietary fibre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, W.P.T.; Branch, W.J.; Southgate, D.A.T.

    1978-01-01

    Dietary fibre from plants low in phytate bound calcium in proportion to its uronic-acid content. This binding by the non-cellulosic fraction of fibre reduces the availability of calcium for small-intestinal absorption, but the colonic microbial digestion of uronic acids liberates the calcium. Thus the ability to maintain calcium balance on high-fibre diets may depend on the adaptive capacity on the colon for calcium. (author)

  9. Ligand binding by PDZ domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Celestine N.; Bach, Anders; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    The postsynaptic density protein-95/disks large/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ) protein domain family is one of the most common protein-protein interaction modules in mammalian cells, with paralogs present in several hundred human proteins. PDZ domains are found in most cell types, but neuronal proteins...... as pathological conditions have been reviewed recently. In this review, we focus on the molecular details of how PDZ domains bind their protein ligands and their potential as drug targets in this context....

  10. Binding energy of protonium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assad Abdel-Raouf, Mohamed

    2009-11-01

    The goal of the present work is to calculate the binding energy of the protonium ions bar PPe+ and bar PPe- using Rayleigh- Ritz variational method. It is indicated that an employment of 21 components of the trial wavefunction yields -0.08793 eV as the ground state energy of these ions. Our result agrees quite well with recently obtained results based on elaborate Monte Carlo approximations. It confirms the possible formation of these ions in laboratory.

  11. Material Binding Peptides for Nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urartu Ozgur Safak Seker

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Remarkable progress has been made to date in the discovery of material binding peptides and their utilization in nanotechnology, which has brought new challenges and opportunities. Nowadays phage display is a versatile tool, important for the selection of ligands for proteins and peptides. This combinatorial approach has also been adapted over the past decade to select material-specific peptides. Screening and selection of such phage displayed material binding peptides has attracted great interest, in particular because of their use in nanotechnology. Phage display selected peptides are either synthesized independently or expressed on phage coat protein. Selected phage particles are subsequently utilized in the synthesis of nanoparticles, in the assembly of nanostructures on inorganic surfaces, and oriented protein immobilization as fusion partners of proteins. In this paper, we present an overview on the research conducted on this area. In this review we not only focus on the selection process, but also on molecular binding characterization and utilization of peptides as molecular linkers, molecular assemblers and material synthesizers.

  12. Anion binding in biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feiters, Martin C [Department of Organic Chemistry, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Faculty of Science, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram [EMBL Hamburg Outstation at DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Kostenko, Alexander V; Soldatov, Alexander V [Faculty of Physics, Southern Federal University, Sorge 5, Rostov-na-Donu, 344090 (Russian Federation); Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris-VI, Station Biologique de Roscoff, Place Georges Teissier, BP 74, F-29682 Roscoff cedex, Bretagne (France); Kuepper, Frithjof C [Scottish Association for Marine Science, Dunstaffnage Marine Laboratory, Oban, Argyll PA37 1QA, Scotland (United Kingdom); Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics, ETH Zuerich, Schafmattstrasse 20, Zuerich, 8093 (Switzerland); Bevers, Loes E; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R, E-mail: m.feiters@science.ru.n [Department of Biotechnology, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 67, 2628 BC Delft (Netherlands)

    2009-11-15

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L{sub 3} (2p{sub 3/2}) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  13. Anion binding in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feiters, Martin C; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Kostenko, Alexander V; Soldatov, Alexander V; Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe; Kuepper, Frithjof C; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P; Bevers, Loes E; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R

    2009-01-01

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L 3 (2p 3/2 ) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  14. Anion binding in biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiters, Martin C.; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Kostenko, Alexander V.; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe; Küpper, Frithjof C.; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P.; Bevers, Loes E.; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2009-11-01

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L3 (2p3/2) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  15. Working memory binding of visual object features in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Christina A; Rogers, Jeffrey M; Wilson, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    Accurate mental representation of visual stimuli requires retaining not only the individual features but also the correct relationship between them. This associative process of binding is mediated by working memory (WM) mechanisms. The present study re-examined reports of WM-related binding deficits with aging. In Experiment 1, 31 older and 31 younger adults completed a visual change detection task with feature-location relations presented either simultaneously or sequentially; the paradigm was also designed specifically to minimize the impact of lengthy retention intervals, elaborative rehearsal, and processing demands of multi-stimulus probes. In Experiment 2, 38 older and 42 younger adults completed a modified task containing both feature-location relations and feature-feature conjunctions. In Experiment 1 although feature-location binding was more difficult with sequential compared with simultaneous presentation, the effect was independent of age. In Experiment 2 while older adults were overall slower and less accurate than young adults, there were no age-specific deficits in WM binding. Overall, after controlling for methodological factors, there was no evidence of an age-related visual WM binding deficit for surface or location features. However, unlike younger adults, older adults appeared less able to restrict processing of irrelevant features, consistent with reported declines with age in strategic capacities of WM.

  16. Mycobacterium smegmatis Ku binds DNA without free ends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, Ambuj K; Grove, Anne

    2013-12-01

    Ku is central to the non-homologous end-joining pathway of double-strand-break repair in all three major domains of life, with eukaryotic homologues being associated with more diversified roles compared with prokaryotic and archaeal homologues. Ku has a conserved central 'ring-shaped' core domain. While prokaryotic homologues lack the N- and C-terminal domains that impart functional diversity to eukaryotic Ku, analyses of Ku from certain prokaryotes such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Mycobacterium smegmatis have revealed the presence of distinct C-terminal extensions that modulate DNA-binding properties. We report in the present paper that the lysine-rich C-terminal extension of M. smegmatis Ku contacts the core protein domain as evidenced by an increase in DNA-binding affinity and a decrease in thermal stability and intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence upon its deletion. Ku deleted for this C-terminus requires free DNA ends for binding, but translocates to internal DNA sites. In contrast, full-length Ku can directly bind DNA without free ends, suggesting that this property is conferred by its C-terminus. Such binding to internal DNA sites may facilitate recruitment to sites of DNA damage. The results of the present study also suggest that extensions beyond the shared core domain may have independently evolved to expand Ku function.

  17. MOCCS: Clarifying DNA-binding motif ambiguity using ChIP-Seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Haruka; Iwasaki, Wataru

    2016-08-01

    As a key mechanism of gene regulation, transcription factors (TFs) bind to DNA by recognizing specific short sequence patterns that are called DNA-binding motifs. A single TF can accept ambiguity within its DNA-binding motifs, which comprise both canonical (typical) and non-canonical motifs. Clarification of such DNA-binding motif ambiguity is crucial for revealing gene regulatory networks and evaluating mutations in cis-regulatory elements. Although chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) now provides abundant data on the genomic sequences to which a given TF binds, existing motif discovery methods are unable to directly answer whether a given TF can bind to a specific DNA-binding motif. Here, we report a method for clarifying the DNA-binding motif ambiguity, MOCCS. Given ChIP-Seq data of any TF, MOCCS comprehensively analyzes and describes every k-mer to which that TF binds. Analysis of simulated datasets revealed that MOCCS is applicable to various ChIP-Seq datasets, requiring only a few minutes per dataset. Application to the ENCODE ChIP-Seq datasets proved that MOCCS directly evaluates whether a given TF binds to each DNA-binding motif, even if known position weight matrix models do not provide sufficient information on DNA-binding motif ambiguity. Furthermore, users are not required to provide numerous parameters or background genomic sequence models that are typically unavailable. MOCCS is implemented in Perl and R and is freely available via https://github.com/yuifu/moccs. By complementing existing motif-discovery software, MOCCS will contribute to the basic understanding of how the genome controls diverse cellular processes via DNA-protein interactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Localization of cellular retinol-binding protein and retinol-binding protein in cells comprising the blood-brain barrier of rat and human

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, P.N.; Ong, D.E.; Bok, D.

    1990-01-01

    Brain is not generally recognized as an organ that requires vitamin A, perhaps because no obvious histologic lesions have been observed in severely vitamin A-deficient animals. However, brain tissue does contain cellular vitamin A-binding proteins and a nuclear receptor protein for retinoic acid. In the present study, immunohistochemical techniques were used to determine the cell-specific location of cellular retinol-binding protein in human and rat brain tissue. Cellular retinol-binding protein was localized specifically within the cuboidal epithelial cells of the choroid plexus, two primary sites of the mammalian blood-brain barrier. In addition, autoradiographic procedures demonstrated binding sites for serum retinol-binding protein in the choroidal epithelium. These observations suggest that a significant movement of retinol across the blood-brain barrier may occur

  19. Filamin actin-binding and titin-binding fulfill distinct functions in Z-disc cohesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicanor González-Morales

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins contribute to the contractile properties of muscles, most notably myosin thick filaments, which are anchored at the M-line, and actin thin filaments, which are anchored at the Z-discs that border each sarcomere. In humans, mutations in the actin-binding protein Filamin-C result in myopathies, but the underlying molecular function is not well understood. Here we show using Drosophila indirect flight muscle that the filamin ortholog Cheerio in conjunction with the giant elastic protein titin plays a crucial role in keeping thin filaments stably anchored at the Z-disc. We identify the filamin domains required for interaction with the titin ortholog Sallimus, and we demonstrate a genetic interaction of filamin with titin and actin. Filamin mutants disrupting the actin- or the titin-binding domain display distinct phenotypes, with Z-discs breaking up in parallel or perpendicularly to the myofibril, respectively. Thus, Z-discs require filamin to withstand the strong contractile forces acting on them.

  20. Solute-vacancy binding in aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolverton, C.

    2007-01-01

    Previous efforts to understand solute-vacancy binding in aluminum alloys have been hampered by a scarcity of reliable, quantitative experimental measurements. Here, we report a large database of solute-vacancy binding energies determined from first-principles density functional calculations. The calculated binding energies agree well with accurate measurements where available, and provide an accurate predictor of solute-vacancy binding in other systems. We find: (i) some common solutes in commercial Al alloys (e.g., Cu and Mg) possess either very weak (Cu), or even repulsive (Mg), binding energies. Hence, we assert that some previously reported large binding energies for these solutes are erroneous. (ii) Large binding energies are found for Sn, Cd and In, confirming the proposed mechanism for the reduced natural aging in Al-Cu alloys containing microalloying additions of these solutes. (iii) In addition, we predict that similar reduction in natural aging should occur with additions of Si, Ge and Au. (iv) Even larger binding energies are found for other solutes (e.g., Pb, Bi, Sr, Ba), but these solutes possess essentially no solubility in Al. (v) We have explored the physical effects controlling solute-vacancy binding in Al. We find that there is a strong correlation between binding energy and solute size, with larger solute atoms possessing a stronger binding with vacancies. (vi) Most transition-metal 3d solutes do not bind strongly with vacancies, and some are even energetically strongly repelled from vacancies, particularly for the early 3d solutes, Ti and V

  1. Lactoferrin binding molecules in human seminal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, C J; Vanderpuye, O A; McIntyre, J A; Faulk, W P

    1990-10-01

    During ejaculation, the iron binding protein lactoferrin binds to sperm and forms a major component of sperm-coating antigens. Physicochemical properties of lactoferrin in seminal plasma (SP) and on sperm differ from those of purified lactoferrin. These differences have been attributed to the binding of unknown seminal macromolecules to lactoferrin. We have studied lactoferrin binding molecules in SP. The SP samples were coated onto microtiter plates and tested for binding of biotinylated lactoferrin. SP was found to specifically bind biotinylated lactoferrin. This binding was competitively inhibited by coincubation with unlabeled lactoferrin but was not affected by control incubations done with human IgG or transferrin. Lactoferrin binding molecules in SP were biochemically characterized by using SDS-PAGE and ligand blotting. Biotinylated lactoferrin bound to SP molecules of approximately 120, 60 and 30 kDa. No binding was observed with biotinylated transferrin. The presence of molecules that associate with lactoferrin in SP was further studied by using crossed immunoelectrophoresis. Lactoferrin in SP immunoprecipitated as two peaks, one of which corresponded to purified lactoferrin. These results suggest that some lactoferrin molecules in SP are free and that others are associated with lactoferrin binding molecules. Binding of lactoferrin to lactoferrin binding molecules appears to change its physicochemical properties and thus could influence its biologic activity and its affinity to sperm.

  2. Acyl-coenzyme A binding protein (ACBP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, B B; Knudsen, J; Poulsen, F M

    1999-01-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A binding proteins are known from a large group of eukaryote species and to bind a long chain length acyl-CoA ester with very high affinity. Detailed biochemical mapping of ligand binding properties has been obtained as well as in-depth structural studies on the bovine apo-protein a...

  3. Polymeric competitive protein binding adsorbents for radioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    Serum protein comprising specific binding proteins such as antibodies, B 12 intrinsic factor, thyroxin binding globulin and the like may be copolymerized with globulin constituents of serum by the action of ethylchloroformate to form readily packed insoluble precipitates which, following purification as by washing, are eminently suited for employment as competitive binding protein absorbents in radioassay procedures. 10 claims, no drawings

  4. Genome-scale study of the importance of binding site context for transcription factor binding and gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronne Hans

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of mRNA transcription is controlled by transcription factors that bind to specific DNA motifs in promoter regions upstream of protein coding genes. Recent results indicate that not only the presence of a motif but also motif context (for example the orientation of a motif or its location relative to the coding sequence is important for gene regulation. Results In this study we present ContextFinder, a tool that is specifically aimed at identifying cases where motif context is likely to affect gene regulation. We used ContextFinder to examine the role of motif context in S. cerevisiae both for DNA binding by transcription factors and for effects on gene expression. For DNA binding we found significant patterns of motif location bias, whereas motif orientations did not seem to matter. Motif context appears to affect gene expression even more than it affects DNA binding, as biases in both motif location and orientation were more frequent in promoters of co-expressed genes. We validated our results against data on nucleosome positioning, and found a negative correlation between preferred motif locations and nucleosome occupancy. Conclusion We conclude that the requirement for stable binding of transcription factors to DNA and their subsequent function in gene regulation can impose constraints on motif context.

  5. Crystallographic structure and substrate-binding interactions of the molybdate-binding protein of the phytopathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Andrea; Santacruz-Pérez, Carolina; Moutran, Alexandre; Ferreira, Luís Carlos Souza; Neshich, Goran; Gonçalves Barbosa, João Alexandre Ribeiro

    2008-02-01

    In Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac or X. citri), the modA gene codes for a periplasmic protein (ModA) that is capable of binding molybdate and tungstate as part of the ABC-type transporter required for the uptake of micronutrients. In this study, we report the crystallographic structure of the Xac ModA protein with bound molybdate. The Xac ModA structure is similar to orthologs with known three-dimensional structures and consists of two nearly symmetrical domains separated by a hinge region where the oxyanion-binding site lies. Phylogenetic analysis of different ModA orthologs based on sequence alignments revealed three groups of molybdate-binding proteins: bacterial phytopathogens, enterobacteria and soil bacteria. Even though the ModA orthologs are segregated into different groups, the ligand-binding hydrogen bonds are mostly conserved, except for Archaeglobus fulgidus ModA. A detailed discussion of hydrophobic interactions in the active site is presented and two new residues, Ala38 and Ser151, are shown to be part of the ligand-binding pocket.

  6. Genome-wide prediction, display and refinement of binding sites with information theory-based models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leeder J Steven

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present Delila-genome, a software system for identification, visualization and analysis of protein binding sites in complete genome sequences. Binding sites are predicted by scanning genomic sequences with information theory-based (or user-defined weight matrices. Matrices are refined by adding experimentally-defined binding sites to published binding sites. Delila-Genome was used to examine the accuracy of individual information contents of binding sites detected with refined matrices as a measure of the strengths of the corresponding protein-nucleic acid interactions. The software can then be used to predict novel sites by rescanning the genome with the refined matrices. Results Parameters for genome scans are entered using a Java-based GUI interface and backend scripts in Perl. Multi-processor CPU load-sharing minimized the average response time for scans of different chromosomes. Scans of human genome assemblies required 4–6 hours for transcription factor binding sites and 10–19 hours for splice sites, respectively, on 24- and 3-node Mosix and Beowulf clusters. Individual binding sites are displayed either as high-resolution sequence walkers or in low-resolution custom tracks in the UCSC genome browser. For large datasets, we applied a data reduction strategy that limited displays of binding sites exceeding a threshold information content to specific chromosomal regions within or adjacent to genes. An HTML document is produced listing binding sites ranked by binding site strength or chromosomal location hyperlinked to the UCSC custom track, other annotation databases and binding site sequences. Post-genome scan tools parse binding site annotations of selected chromosome intervals and compare the results of genome scans using different weight matrices. Comparisons of multiple genome scans can display binding sites that are unique to each scan and identify sites with significantly altered binding strengths

  7. Structural and histone binding ability characterizations of human PWWP domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wu

    Full Text Available The PWWP domain was first identified as a structural motif of 100-130 amino acids in the WHSC1 protein and predicted to be a protein-protein interaction domain. It belongs to the Tudor domain 'Royal Family', which consists of Tudor, chromodomain, MBT and PWWP domains. While Tudor, chromodomain and MBT domains have long been known to bind methylated histones, PWWP was shown to exhibit histone binding ability only until recently.The PWWP domain has been shown to be a DNA binding domain, but sequence analysis and previous structural studies show that the PWWP domain exhibits significant similarity to other 'Royal Family' members, implying that the PWWP domain has the potential to bind histones. In order to further explore the function of the PWWP domain, we used the protein family approach to determine the crystal structures of the PWWP domains from seven different human proteins. Our fluorescence polarization binding studies show that PWWP domains have weak histone binding ability, which is also confirmed by our NMR titration experiments. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structures of the BRPF1 PWWP domain in complex with H3K36me3, and HDGF2 PWWP domain in complex with H3K79me3 and H4K20me3.PWWP proteins constitute a new family of methyl lysine histone binders. The PWWP domain consists of three motifs: a canonical β-barrel core, an insertion motif between the second and third β-strands and a C-terminal α-helix bundle. Both the canonical β-barrel core and the insertion motif are directly involved in histone binding. The PWWP domain has been previously shown to be a DNA binding domain. Therefore, the PWWP domain exhibits dual functions: binding both DNA and methyllysine histones.This article can also be viewed as an enhanced version in which the text of the article is integrated with interactive 3D representations and animated transitions. Please note that a web plugin is required to access this enhanced functionality. Instructions for the

  8. Drug binding properties of neonatal albumin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, R; Honoré, B

    1989-01-01

    Neonatal and adult albumin was isolated by gel chromatography on Sephacryl S-300, from adult and umbilical cord serum, respectively. Binding of monoacetyl-diamino-diphenyl sulfone, warfarin, sulfamethizole, and diazepam was studied by means of equilibrium dialysis and the binding data were analyzed...... by the method of several acceptable fitted curves. It was found that the binding affinity to neonatal albumin is less than to adult albumin for monoacetyl-diamino-diphenyl sulfone and warfarin. Sulfamethizole binding to the neonatal protein is similarly reduced when more than one molecule of the drug is bound...... per albumin molecule, and binding of the first sulfamethizole molecule is possibly reduced as well. Diazepam binds with equal affinity to the fetal and adult proteins. Among the two main albumin drug-binding functions, for warfarin and diazepam, the former is thus compromised in the newborn infant...

  9. Structural insights into the binding mode and conformational changes of BSA induced by bixin and crocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Sankari; Hemachandran, Hridya; Sneha, P; George Priya Doss, C; Godwin Christopher, J; Jayaraman, Gurunathan; Ramamoorthy, Siva

    2017-06-30

    Bixin and crocin are natural apocarotenoids utilized as food colorants and additives in food industries worldwide. For safety assessment, it is necessary to understand the biological interaction of food colorants. In our present study, we report the interaction of two apocarotenoids with bovine serum albumin (BSA) at physiological pH using spectroscopic techniques and in silico tools. The binding constant and the mode of binding sites have been studied. The enthalpic and entropic contribution to the intermolecular binding event was analyzed and it was found that the contribution of hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions was dominant. The adverse temperature dependence in the unusual static quenching is found to be a reasonable consequence of the large activation energy requirement in the binding process, which is required to overcome the fundamental block and is a direct result of the unique microstructure of the binding sites. To confirm the experimental analysis, we investigated the binding patterns using different in silico tools. A combination of molecular docking, molecular dynamics, and toxicity analysis was performed, and the obtained results revealed that both the apocarotenoids had high binding affinity with a binding energy of -5.44 and -5.93 kcal/mol for bixin and crocin, respectively, with no toxic effects and are in accordance with our experimental analysis. The results directly revealed the flexibility of the protein toward bixin and crocin which has a great impact on the interaction. Thus bixin and crocin can guardedly be used as food colorants in food industries.

  10. Insulin binding to individual rat skeletal muscles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koerker, D.J.; Sweet, I.R.; Baskin, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    Studies of insulin binding to skeletal muscle, performed using sarcolemmal membrane preparations or whole muscle incubations of mixed muscle or typical red (soleus, psoas) or white [extensor digitorum longus (EDL), gastrocnemius] muscle, have suggested that red muscle binds more insulin than white muscle. We have evaluated this hypothesis using cryostat sections of unfixed tissue to measure insulin binding in a broad range of skeletal muscles; many were of similar fiber-type profiles. Insulin binding per square millimeter of skeletal muscle slice was measured by autoradiography and computer-assisted densitometry. We found a 4.5-fold range in specific insulin tracer binding, with heart and predominantly slow-twitch oxidative muscles (SO) at the high end and the predominantly fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) muscles at the low end of the range. This pattern reflects insulin sensitivity. Evaluation of displacement curves for insulin binding yielded linear Scatchard plots. The dissociation constants varied over a ninefold range (0.26-2.06 nM). Binding capacity varied from 12.2 to 82.7 fmol/mm2. Neither binding parameter was correlated with fiber type or insulin sensitivity; e.g., among three muscles of similar fiber-type profile, the EDL had high numbers of low-affinity binding sites, whereas the quadriceps had low numbers of high-affinity sites. In summary, considerable heterogeneity in insulin binding was found among hindlimb muscles of the rat, which can be attributed to heterogeneity in binding affinities and the numbers of binding sites. It can be concluded that a given fiber type is not uniquely associated with a set of insulin binding parameters that result in high or low binding

  11. Insulin binding to individual rat skeletal muscles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koerker, D.J.; Sweet, I.R.; Baskin, D.G. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Studies of insulin binding to skeletal muscle, performed using sarcolemmal membrane preparations or whole muscle incubations of mixed muscle or typical red (soleus, psoas) or white (extensor digitorum longus (EDL), gastrocnemius) muscle, have suggested that red muscle binds more insulin than white muscle. We have evaluated this hypothesis using cryostat sections of unfixed tissue to measure insulin binding in a broad range of skeletal muscles; many were of similar fiber-type profiles. Insulin binding per square millimeter of skeletal muscle slice was measured by autoradiography and computer-assisted densitometry. We found a 4.5-fold range in specific insulin tracer binding, with heart and predominantly slow-twitch oxidative muscles (SO) at the high end and the predominantly fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) muscles at the low end of the range. This pattern reflects insulin sensitivity. Evaluation of displacement curves for insulin binding yielded linear Scatchard plots. The dissociation constants varied over a ninefold range (0.26-2.06 nM). Binding capacity varied from 12.2 to 82.7 fmol/mm2. Neither binding parameter was correlated with fiber type or insulin sensitivity; e.g., among three muscles of similar fiber-type profile, the EDL had high numbers of low-affinity binding sites, whereas the quadriceps had low numbers of high-affinity sites. In summary, considerable heterogeneity in insulin binding was found among hindlimb muscles of the rat, which can be attributed to heterogeneity in binding affinities and the numbers of binding sites. It can be concluded that a given fiber type is not uniquely associated with a set of insulin binding parameters that result in high or low binding.

  12. A tool for calculating binding-site residues on proteins from PDB structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Jing

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the research on protein functional sites, researchers often need to identify binding-site residues on a protein. A commonly used strategy is to find a complex structure from the Protein Data Bank (PDB that consists of the protein of interest and its interacting partner(s and calculate binding-site residues based on the complex structure. However, since a protein may participate in multiple interactions, the binding-site residues calculated based on one complex structure usually do not reveal all binding sites on a protein. Thus, this requires researchers to find all PDB complexes that contain the protein of interest and combine the binding-site information gleaned from them. This process is very time-consuming. Especially, combing binding-site information obtained from different PDB structures requires tedious work to align protein sequences. The process becomes overwhelmingly difficult when researchers have a large set of proteins to analyze, which is usually the case in practice. Results In this study, we have developed a tool for calculating binding-site residues on proteins, TCBRP http://yanbioinformatics.cs.usu.edu:8080/ppbindingsubmit. For an input protein, TCBRP can quickly find all binding-site residues on the protein by automatically combining the information obtained from all PDB structures that consist of the protein of interest. Additionally, TCBRP presents the binding-site residues in different categories according to the interaction type. TCBRP also allows researchers to set the definition of binding-site residues. Conclusion The developed tool is very useful for the research on protein binding site analysis and prediction.

  13. Structure of a group C streptococcal protein that binds to fibrinogen, albumin and immunoglobulin G via overlapping modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talay, S R; Grammel, M P; Chhatwal, G S

    1996-04-15

    Pathogenic streptococci express surface proteins that bind to host serum proteins. A novel multiple-ligand-binding protein has now been identified in a species belonging to serotype C streptococci. This protein binds to fibrinogen, albumin and IgG and was therefore designated FAI protein. The structure of the fai gene has been determined, and deletion analysis and expression of FAI fusion polypeptides revealed that the binding domain for fibrinogen and IgG is located within the nonrepetitive N-terminal half of the protein. A 93-amino acid peptide retained the ability to bind both proteins, whereas a 56-amino acid subpeptide only bound fibrinogen. IgG-binding activity required the complete fibrinogen-binding domain and an additional 37 amino acids C-terminal to it, and albumin-binding activity was only obtained with a polypeptide reflecting the complete surface-exposed region of FAI protein indicating that the binding sites for each ligand were located on overlapping modules. Signal sequence, C repeat region and C-terminus revealed high homology to group A streptococcal M proteins whereas the N-terminal region containing the fibrinogen/IgG-binding domains is completely different and exhibits no similarity to any other previously characterized protein. Thus FAI protein exhibits a framework structure that might have evolved in group C streptococci via fusion of unrelated sequences, thereby generating an albumin-binding domain in the functional context of multiple-ligand-binding activity.

  14. Multiple protonation equilibria in electrostatics of protein-protein binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piłat, Zofia; Antosiewicz, Jan M

    2008-11-27

    All proteins contain groups capable of exchanging protons with their environment. We present here an approach, based on a rigorous thermodynamic cycle and the partition functions for energy levels characterizing protonation states of the associating proteins and their complex, to compute the electrostatic pH-dependent contribution to the free energy of protein-protein binding. The computed electrostatic binding free energies include the pH of the solution as the variable of state, mutual "polarization" of associating proteins reflected as changes in the distribution of their protonation states upon binding and fluctuations between available protonation states. The only fixed property of both proteins is the conformation; the structure of the monomers is kept in the same conformation as they have in the complex structure. As a reference, we use the electrostatic binding free energies obtained from the traditional Poisson-Boltzmann model, computed for a single macromolecular conformation fixed in a given protonation state, appropriate for given solution conditions. The new approach was tested for 12 protein-protein complexes. It is shown that explicit inclusion of protonation degrees of freedom might lead to a substantially different estimation of the electrostatic contribution to the binding free energy than that based on the traditional Poisson-Boltzmann model. This has important implications for the balancing of different contributions to the energetics of protein-protein binding and other related problems, for example, the choice of protein models for Brownian dynamics simulations of their association. Our procedure can be generalized to include conformational degrees of freedom by combining it with molecular dynamics simulations at constant pH. Unfortunately, in practice, a prohibitive factor is an enormous requirement for computer time and power. However, there may be some hope for solving this problem by combining existing constant pH molecular dynamics

  15. Human plasminogen binding protein tetranectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, J S; Rasmussen, H; Nielsen, B B

    1997-01-01

    The recombinant human plasminogen binding protein tetranectin (TN) and the C-type lectin CRD of this protein (TN3) have been crystallized. TN3 crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4(2)2(1)2 with cell dimensions a = b = 64.0, c = 75.7 A and with one molecule per asymmetric unit. The crystals...... to at least 2.5 A. A full data set has been collected to 3.0 A. The asymmetric unit contains one monomer of TN. Molecular replacement solutions for TN3 and TN have been obtained using the structure of the C-type lectin CRD of rat mannose-binding protein as search model. The rhombohedral space group indicates...... diffract X-rays to at least 2.0 A resolution. A complete diffraction data set has been collected to 2.7 A resolution. The crystals of TN, obtained by the vapour-diffusion reverse salting-in method at 280 K, are rhombohedral, space group R3, with the hexagonal axes a = b = 89.1, c = 75.8 A, and diffract...

  16. Improved receptor analysis in PET using a priori information from in vitro binding assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litton, J.-E.; Hall, H.; Blomqvist, G. [Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Hospital, S-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-08-01

    An accurate determination of non-specific binding is required for the analysis of in vitro and in vivo receptor binding data. For some radioligands the non-specific binding is of the same magnitude as the specific binding. Furthermore, in vitro measurements have shown that the non-specific binding can be different in different brain regions. If this is the case in a PET study for determining B{sub max} and K{sub d}, a correction for the non-specific binding has to be applied. The aim of the present communication is to present a means for determining corrected B{sub max} and K{sub d} with Scatchard analysis using in vitro binding studies. The influence of non-specific binding on the free and specifically bound radioligand is expressed with the aid of a correction factor, which can be calculated from measurable quantities. Introduction of the corrected free and specifically bound radioligand should give binding parameters closer to reality than previously obtained results. (author)

  17. Neural correlates of shape-color binding in visual working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Mario A; Della Sala, Sergio; Logie, Robert H; Morcom, Alexa M

    2014-01-01

    The present study addressed an outstanding issue regarding feature binding in working memory (WM): whether this function engages specific resources relative to those required to process individual features. We investigated the brain regions supporting the encoding and maintenance of features and bindings in a change detection task, in which 22 healthy young volunteers remembered visual arrays of abstract shapes, colors or shape-color bindings while undergoing fMRI. After an unfilled delay they saw a second array and judged whether the features or combination of features presented across the two arrays were the same or different. Temporary retention of feature bindings was found to involve additional cortical regions compared with retaining single features, regardless of whether the number of objects or the number of features differed between feature-only and binding conditions. This binding-specific activation is consistent with the involvement of different neural generators that collectively support visual temporary memory for features and for feature bindings. Regions within the parietal, temporal and occipital cortex, but not within the prefrontal cortex or the medial temporal lobe, appear to support the integrated object binding function investigated in this study. Our findings suggest that both individual features and their binding within integrated objects are used to represent complex objects in WM. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A role for carbohydrate recognition in mammalian sperm-egg binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Gary F., E-mail: clarkgf@health.missouri.edu

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: • Mammalian sperm-egg binding as a carbohydrate dependent species recognition event. • The role of carbohydrate recognition in human, mouse and pig sperm-egg binding. • Historical perspective and future directions for research focused on gamete binding. - Abstract: Mammalian fertilization usually requires three sequential cell–cell interactions: (i) initial binding of sperm to the specialized extracellular matrix coating the egg known as the zona pellucida (ZP); (ii) binding of sperm to the ZP via the inner acrosomal membrane that is exposed following the induction of acrosomal exocytosis; and (iii) adhesion of acrosome-reacted sperm to the plasma membrane of the egg cell, enabling subsequent fusion of these gametes. The focus of this review is on the initial binding of intact sperm to the mammalian ZP. Evidence collected over the past fifty years has confirmed that this interaction relies primarily on the recognition of carbohydrate sequences presented on the ZP by lectin-like egg binding proteins located on the plasma membrane of sperm. There is also evidence that the same carbohydrate sequences that mediate binding also function as ligands for lectins on lymphocytes that can inactivate immune responses, likely protecting the egg and the developing embryo up to the stage of blastocyst hatching. The literature related to initial sperm-ZP binding in the three major mammalian models (human, mouse and pig) is discussed. Historical perspectives and future directions for research related to this aspect of gamete adhesion are also presented.

  19. A role for carbohydrate recognition in mammalian sperm-egg binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Gary F.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Mammalian sperm-egg binding as a carbohydrate dependent species recognition event. • The role of carbohydrate recognition in human, mouse and pig sperm-egg binding. • Historical perspective and future directions for research focused on gamete binding. - Abstract: Mammalian fertilization usually requires three sequential cell–cell interactions: (i) initial binding of sperm to the specialized extracellular matrix coating the egg known as the zona pellucida (ZP); (ii) binding of sperm to the ZP via the inner acrosomal membrane that is exposed following the induction of acrosomal exocytosis; and (iii) adhesion of acrosome-reacted sperm to the plasma membrane of the egg cell, enabling subsequent fusion of these gametes. The focus of this review is on the initial binding of intact sperm to the mammalian ZP. Evidence collected over the past fifty years has confirmed that this interaction relies primarily on the recognition of carbohydrate sequences presented on the ZP by lectin-like egg binding proteins located on the plasma membrane of sperm. There is also evidence that the same carbohydrate sequences that mediate binding also function as ligands for lectins on lymphocytes that can inactivate immune responses, likely protecting the egg and the developing embryo up to the stage of blastocyst hatching. The literature related to initial sperm-ZP binding in the three major mammalian models (human, mouse and pig) is discussed. Historical perspectives and future directions for research related to this aspect of gamete adhesion are also presented

  20. Cross-modal working memory binding and word recognition skills: how specific is the link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shinmin; Allen, Richard J

    2018-04-01

    Recent research has suggested that the creation of temporary bound representations of information from different sources within working memory uniquely relates to word recognition abilities in school-age children. However, it is unclear to what extent this link is attributable specifically to the binding ability for cross-modal information. This study examined the performance of Grade 3 (8-9 years old) children on binding tasks requiring either temporary association formation of two visual items (i.e., within-modal binding) or pairs of visually presented abstract shapes and auditorily presented nonwords (i.e., cross-modal binding). Children's word recognition skills were related to performance on the cross-modal binding task but not on the within-modal binding task. Further regression models showed that cross-modal binding memory was a significant predictor of word recognition when memory for its constituent elements, general abilities, and crucially, within-modal binding memory were taken into account. These findings may suggest a specific link between the ability to bind information across modalities within working memory and word recognition skills.

  1. Hetero-multivalent binding of cholera toxin subunit B with glycolipid mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Pratik; Singla, Akshi; Lee, Chin-An; Weatherston, Joshua D; Worstell, Nolan C; Wu, Hung-Jen

    2017-12-01

    GM 1 has generally been considered as the major receptor that binds to cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) due to its low dissociation constant. However, using a unique nanocube sensor technology, we have shown that CTB can also bind to other glycolipid receptors, fucosyl-GM 1 and GD 1 b. Additionally, we have demonstrated that GM 2 can contribute to CTB binding if present in a glycolipid mixture with a strongly binding receptor (GM 1 /fucosyl-GM 1 /GD 1 b). This hetero-multivalent binding result was unintuitive because the interaction between CTB and pure GM 2 is negligible. We hypothesized that the reduced dimensionality of CTB-GM 2 binding events is a major cause of the observed CTB binding enhancement. Once CTB has attached to a strong receptor, subsequent binding events are confined to a 2D membrane surface. Therefore, even a weak GM 2 receptor could now participate in second or higher binding events because its surface reaction rate can be up to 10 4 times higher than the bulk reaction rate. To test this hypothesis, we altered the surface reaction rate by modulating the fluidity and heterogeneity of the model membrane. Decreasing membrane fluidity reduced the binding cooperativity between GM 2 and a strong receptor. Our findings indicated a new protein-receptor binding assay, that can mimic complex cell membrane environment more accurately, is required to explore the inherent hetero-multivalency of the cell membrane. We have thus developed a new membrane perturbation protocol to efficiently screen receptor candidates involved in hetero-multivalent protein binding. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Reshaping the Energy Landscape Transforms the Mechanism and Binding Kinetics of DNA Threading Intercalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Andrew G; Naufer, M Nabuan; Westerlund, Fredrik; Lincoln, Per; Rouzina, Ioulia; Paramanathan, Thayaparan; Williams, Mark C

    2018-02-06

    Molecules that bind DNA via threading intercalation show high binding affinity as well as slow dissociation kinetics, properties ideal for the development of anticancer drugs. To this end, it is critical to identify the specific molecular characteristics of threading intercalators that result in optimal DNA interactions. Using single-molecule techniques, we quantify the binding of a small metal-organic ruthenium threading intercalator (Δ,Δ-B) and compare its binding characteristics to a similar molecule with significantly larger threading moieties (Δ,Δ-P). The binding affinities of the two molecules are the same, while comparison of the binding kinetics reveals significantly faster kinetics for Δ,Δ-B. However, the kinetics is still much slower than that observed for conventional intercalators. Comparison of the two threading intercalators shows that the binding affinity is modulated independently by the intercalating section and the binding kinetics is modulated by the threading moiety. In order to thread DNA, Δ,Δ-P requires a "lock mechanism", in which a large length increase of the DNA duplex is required for both association and dissociation. In contrast, measurements of the force-dependent binding kinetics show that Δ,Δ-B requires a large DNA length increase for association but no length increase for dissociation from DNA. This contrasts strongly with conventional intercalators, for which almost no DNA length change is required for association but a large DNA length change must occur for dissociation. This result illustrates the fundamentally different mechanism of threading intercalation compared with conventional intercalation and will pave the way for the rational design of therapeutic drugs based on DNA threading intercalation.

  3. 16 CFR 1512.8 - Requirements for drive chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for drive chain. 1512.8 Section... REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Regulations § 1512.8 Requirements for drive chain. The drive chain shall operate over the sprockets without catching or binding. The tensile stength of the drive chain shall be no...

  4. Sialic Acid Binding Properties of Soluble Coronavirus Spike (S1) Proteins: Differences between Infectious Bronchitis Virus and Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahwan, Katarina; Hesse, Martina; Mork, Ann-Kathrin; Herrler, Georg; Winter, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The spike proteins of a number of coronaviruses are able to bind to sialic acids present on the cell surface. The importance of this sialic acid binding ability during infection is, however, quite different. We compared the spike protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) and the spike protein of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV). Whereas sialic acid is the only receptor determinant known so far for IBV, TGEV requires interaction with its receptor aminopeptidase N to initiate infection of cells. Binding tests with soluble spike proteins carrying an IgG Fc-tag revealed pronounced differences between these two viral proteins. Binding of the IBV spike protein to host cells was in all experiments sialic acid dependent, whereas the soluble TGEV spike showed binding to APN but had no detectable sialic acid binding activity. Our results underline the different ways in which binding to sialoglycoconjugates is mediated by coronavirus spike proteins. PMID:23896748

  5. Sialic Acid Binding Properties of Soluble Coronavirus Spike (S1 Proteins: Differences between Infectious Bronchitis Virus and Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Winter

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The spike proteins of a number of coronaviruses are able to bind to sialic acids present on the cell surface. The importance of this sialic acid binding ability during infection is, however, quite different. We compared the spike protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV and the spike protein of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV. Whereas sialic acid is the only receptor determinant known so far for IBV, TGEV requires interaction with its receptor aminopeptidase N to initiate infection of cells. Binding tests with soluble spike proteins carrying an IgG Fc-tag revealed pronounced differences between these two viral proteins. Binding of the IBV spike protein to host cells was in all experiments sialic acid dependent, whereas the soluble TGEV spike showed binding to APN but had no detectable sialic acid binding activity. Our results underline the different ways in which binding to sialoglycoconjugates is mediated by coronavirus spike proteins.

  6. Binding characteristics of swine erythrocyte insulin receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieberg, G.; Bryan, G.S.; Sartin, J.L.; Williams, J.C.; Prince, T.J.; Kemppainen, R.J.

    1985-09-01

    Crossbred gilts had 8.8 +/- 1.1% maximum binding of ( SVI)insulin to insulin receptors on erythrocytes. The number of insulin-binding sites per cell was 137 +/- 19, with a binding affinity ranging from 7.4 X 10(7)M-1 to 11.2 X 10(7)M-1 and mean of 8.8 X 10(7)M-1. Pregnant sows had a significant increase in maximum binding due to an increase in number of receptor sites per cell. Lactating sows fed a high-fiber diet and a low-fiber diet did not develop a significant difference in maximum binding of insulin. Sows fed the low-fiber diet had a significantly higher number of binding sites and a significantly lower binding affinity than did sows fed a high-fiber diet. Receptor-binding affinity was lower in the low-fiber diet group than in cycling gilts, whereas data from sows fed the high-fiber diet did not differ from data for cycling gilts. Data from this study indicated that insulin receptors of swine erythrocytes have binding characteristics similar to those in other species. Pregnancy and diet will alter insulin receptor binding in swine.

  7. LRRK2 kinase activity is dependent on LRRK2 GTP binding capacity but independent of LRRK2 GTP binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc Taymans

    Full Text Available Leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 is a Parkinson's disease (PD gene that encodes a large multidomain protein including both a GTPase and a kinase domain. GTPases often regulate kinases within signal transduction cascades, where GTPases act as molecular switches cycling between a GTP bound "on" state and a GDP bound "off" state. It has been proposed that LRRK2 kinase activity may be increased upon GTP binding at the LRRK2 Ras of complex proteins (ROC GTPase domain. Here we extensively test this hypothesis by measuring LRRK2 phosphorylation activity under influence of GDP, GTP or non-hydrolyzable GTP analogues GTPγS or GMPPCP. We show that autophosphorylation and lrrktide phosphorylation activity of recombinant LRRK2 protein is unaltered by guanine nucleotides, when co-incubated with LRRK2 during phosphorylation reactions. Also phosphorylation activity of LRRK2 is unchanged when the LRRK2 guanine nucleotide binding pocket is previously saturated with various nucleotides, in contrast to the greatly reduced activity measured for the guanine nucleotide binding site mutant T1348N. Interestingly, when nucleotides were incubated with cell lysates prior to purification of LRRK2, kinase activity was slightly enhanced by GTPγS or GMPPCP compared to GDP, pointing to an upstream guanine nucleotide binding protein that may activate LRRK2 in a GTP-dependent manner. Using metabolic labeling, we also found that cellular phosphorylation of LRRK2 was not significantly modulated by nucleotides, although labeling is significantly reduced by guanine nucleotide binding site mutants. We conclude that while kinase activity of LRRK2 requires an intact ROC-GTPase domain, it is independent of GDP or GTP binding to ROC.

  8. Actin binding proteins and spermiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mruk, Dolores D

    2011-01-01

    Drebrin E, an actin-binding protein lacking intrinsic activity in the regulation of actin dynamics (e.g., polymerization, capping, nucleation, branching, cross-linking, bundling and severing), is known to recruit actin regulatory proteins to a specific cellular site. Herein, we critically evaluate recent findings in the field which illustrate that drebrin E works together with two other actin-binding proteins, namely Arp3 (actin-related protein 3, a component of the Arp2/3 complex that simultaneously controls actin nucleation for polymerization and branching of actin filaments) and Eps8 (epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8 that controls capping of the barbed ends of actin filaments, as well as actin filament bundling) to regulate the homeostasis of F-actin filament bundles at the ectoplasmic specialization (ES), a testis-specific atypical adherens junction (AJ) in the seminiferous epithelium. This is mediated by the strict temporal and spatial expression of these three actin-binding proteins at the apical and basal ES at the Sertoli cell-spermatid (step 8–19) and Sertoli-Sertoli cell interface, respectively, during the seminiferous epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis. In this Commentary, we put forth a possible model by which drebrin E may be acting as a platform upon which proteins (e.g., Arp3) that are needed to alter the conformation of actin filament bundles at the ES can be recruited to the site, thus facilitating changes in cell shape and cell position in the epithelium during spermiogenesis and spermiation. In short, drebrin E may be acting as a “logistic” distribution center to manage different regulatory proteins at the apical ES, thereby regulating the dynamics of actin filament bundles and modulating the plasticity of the apical ES. This would allow adhesion to be altered continuously throughout the epithelial cycle to accommodate spermatid movement in the seminiferous epithelium during spermiogenesis and spermiation. We also

  9. Synthetic LPS-Binding Polymer Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tian

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), one of the principal components of most gram-negative bacteria's outer membrane, is a type of contaminant that can be frequently found in recombinant DNA products. Because of its strong and even lethal biological effects, selective LPS removal from bioproducts solution is of particular importance in the pharmaceutical and health care industries. In this thesis, for the first time, a proof-of-concept study on preparing LPS-binding hydrogel-like NPs through facile one-step free-radical polymerization was presented. With the incorporation of various hydrophobic (TBAm), cationic (APM, GUA) monomers and cross-linkers (BIS, PEG), a small library of NPs was constructed. Their FITC-LPS binding behaviors were investigated and compared with those of commercially available LPS-binding products. Moreover, the LPS binding selectivity of the NPs was also explored by studying the NPs-BSA interactions. The results showed that all NPs obtained generally presented higher FITC-LPS binding capacity in lower ionic strength buffer than higher ionic strength. However, unlike commercial poly-lysine cellulose and polymyxin B agarose beads' nearly linear increase of FITC-LPS binding with particle concentration, NPs exhibited serious aggregation and the binding quickly saturated or even decreased at high particle concentration. Among various types of NPs, higher FITC-LPS binding capacity was observed for those containing more hydrophobic monomers (TBAm). However, surprisingly, more cationic NPs with higher content of APM exhibited decreased FITC-LPS binding in high ionic strength conditions. Additionally, when new cationic monomer and cross-linker, GUA and PEG, were applied to replace APM and BIS, the obtained NPs showed improved FITC-LPS binding capacity at low NP concentration. But compared with APM- and BIS-containing NPs, the FITC-LPS binding capacity of GUA- and PEG-containing NPs saturated earlier. To investigate the NPs' binding to proteins, we tested the NPs

  10. Sex hormone binding globulin phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelisse, M M; Bennett, Patrick; Christiansen, M

    1994-01-01

    Human sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) is encoded by a normal and a variant allele. The resulting SHBG phenotypes (the homozygous normal SHBG, the heterozygous SHBG and the homozygous variant SHBG phenotype) can be distinguished by their electrophoretic patterns. We developed a novel detection....... This method of detection was used to determine the distribution of SHBG phenotypes in healthy controls of both sexes and in five different pathological conditions characterized by changes in the SHBG level or endocrine disturbances (malignant and benign ovarian neoplasms, hirsutism, liver cirrhosis...... on the experimental values. Differences in SHBG phenotypes do not appear to have any clinical significance and no sex difference was found in the SHBG phenotype distribution....

  11. Binding of Lysozyme to Spherical Poly(styrenesulfonate Gels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Andersson

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyelectrolyte gels are useful as carriers of proteins and other biomacromolecules in, e.g., drug delivery. The rational design of such systems requires knowledge about how the binding and release are affected by electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between the components. To this end we have investigated the uptake of lysozyme by weakly crosslinked spherical poly(styrenesulfonate (PSS microgels and macrogels by means of micromanipulator assisted light microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS in an aqueous environment. The results show that the binding process is an order of magnitude slower than for cytochrome c and for lysozyme binding to sodium polyacrylate gels under the same conditions. This is attributed to the formation of very dense protein-rich shells in the outer layers of the microgels with low permeability to the protein. The shells in macrogels contain 60 wt % water and nearly charge stoichiometric amounts of lysozyme and PSS in the form of dense complexes of radius 8 nm comprising 30–60 lysozyme molecules. With support from kinetic modelling results we propose that the rate of protein binding and the relaxation rate of the microgel are controlled by the protein mass transport through the shell, which is strongly affected by hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. The mechanism explains, in turn, an observed dependence of the diffusion rate on the apparent degree of crosslinking of the networks.

  12. Binding Mode Prediction of Evodiamine within Vanilloid Receptor TRPV1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaping Liang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Accurate assessment of the potential binding mode of drugs is crucial to computer-aided drug design paradigms. It has been reported that evodiamine acts as an agonist of the vanilloid receptor Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1. However, the precise interaction between evodiamine and TRPV1 was still not fully understood. In this perspective, the homology models of TRPV1 were generated using the crystal structure of the voltage-dependent shaker family K+ channel as a template. We then performed docking and molecular dynamics simulation to gain a better understanding of the probable binding modes of evodiamine within the TRPV1 binding pocket. There are no significant interspecies differences in evodiamine binding in rat, human and rabbit TRPV1 models. Pharmacophore modeling further provided confidence for the validity of the docking studies. This study is the first to shed light on the structural determinants required for the interaction between TRPV1 and evodiamine, and gives new suggestions for the rational design of novel TRPV1 ligands.

  13. Binding thermodynamics of a glutamate transporter homologue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Nicolas; Oh, SeCheol; Boudker, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate transporters catalyze concentrative uptake of the neurotransmitter into glial cells and neurons. Their transport cycle involves binding and release of the substrate on the extra- and intracellular sides of the plasma membranes, and translocation of the substrate-binding site across the lipid bilayers. The energy of the ionic gradients, mainly sodium, fuels the cycle. Here, we used a cross-linking approach to trap a glutamate transporter homologue from Pyrococcus horikoshii in key conformational states with substrate-binding site facing either the extracellular or intracellular sides of the membrane to study their binding thermodynamics. We show that the chemical potential of sodium ions in solution is exclusively coupled to substrate binding and release, and not to substrate translocation. Despite the structural symmetry, the binding mechanisms are distinct on the opposite sides of the membrane and more complex than the current models suggest. PMID:23563139

  14. Both HMG boxes in Hmo1 are essential for DNA binding in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashino, Ayako; Shiwa, Yuh; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Kokubo, Tetsuro; Kasahara, Koji

    2015-01-01

    Hmo1, a member of the high mobility group B family proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, associates with the promoters of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) to direct accurate transcriptional initiation. Here, to identify factors involved in the binding of Hmo1 to its targets and the mechanism of Hmo1-dependent transcriptional initiation, we developed a novel reporter system using the promoter of the RPG RPS5. A genetic screen did not identify any factors that influence Hmo1 binding, but did identify a number of mutations in Hmo1 that impair its DNA binding activity in vivo and in vitro. These results suggest that Hmo1 binds to its target promoters autonomously without any aid of additional factors. Furthermore, characterization of Hmo1 mutants showed that the box A domain plays a pivotal role in DNA binding and may be required for the recognition of structural properties of target promoters that occur in native chromatin.

  15. Characterization of feline serum-cobalt binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnelle, Amy N; Barger, Anne M; MacNeill, Amy L; Mitchell, Mark M; Solter, Philip

    2015-06-01

    Oxidative stress inhibits albumin's ability to complex with cobalt. Feline serum-cobalt binding has not been described. The objective was to develop a cobalt binding test for use with feline serum, and correlate the results with other biochemical and cellular constituents in blood, and with clinical diseases of cats. A colorimetric test of cobalt binding, based on the oxidation-reduction reaction of Co(+2) and dithiothreitol, was developed using feline serum. The test was used to measure cobalt binding in stored serum from 176 cats presented to the University of Illinois Veterinary Teaching Hospital for a variety of disease conditions. Time-matched hematology and biochemical data, and clinical information, were obtained from the medical record of each cat and correlated with the serum-cobalt binding results. Serial dilution of feline serum with phosphate-buffered saline resulted in a highly linear decrease in serum-cobalt binding (r(2)  = .9984). Serum-cobalt binding of the clinical samples also correlated with albumin concentrations in a stepwise linear regression model (r(2)  = .425), and both cobalt binding and albumin were significantly decreased in cases of inflammation. Albumin and cobalt binding also shared significant correlations with several erythron variables, and serum concentration of total calcium and bilirubin. The correlation of cobalt binding measured by a colorimetric test with albumin concentration in the clinical samples and with serum dilution is consistent with feline albumin-cobalt complex formation. Hypoalbuminemia is the likely cause of reduced serum-cobalt binding in inflammation and the correlations observed between cobalt binding and other variables. © 2015 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  16. Binding energy of the barbell exciton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, F. M.; Golub, J. E.

    1991-02-01

    The exciton binding energy in asymmetric coupled double quantum wells is calculated. As the system is electrically tuned from type I to type II, the exciton binding energy decreases from that of a two-dimensional exciton to the binding energy of a spatially separated electron-hole pair, i.e., the barbell exciton.$-- We compare our theoretical results with a recent experiment and find good agreement.

  17. CAP binding proteins associated with the nucleus.

    OpenAIRE

    Patzelt, E; Blaas, D; Kuechler, E

    1983-01-01

    Cap binding proteins of HeLa cells were identified by photo-affinity labelling using the cap analogue gamma-[32P]-[4-(benzoyl-phenyl)methylamido]-7-methylguanosine-5'- triphosphate. Photoreaction with whole cell homogenates resulted in specific labelling of five major polypeptides. The small molecular weight polypeptide appeared to be identical to the 24 000 to 26 000 dalton cap binding protein previously identified in initiation factors. A cap binding protein of 37 000 dalton was found in in...

  18. Mutated Leguminous Lectin Containing a Heparin-Binding like Motif in a Carbohydrate-Binding Loop Specifically Binds to Heparin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirohito Abo

    Full Text Available We previously introduced random mutations in the sugar-binding loops of a leguminous lectin and screened the resulting mutated lectins for novel specificities using cell surface display. Screening of a mutated peanut agglutinin (PNA, revealed a mutated PNA with a distinct preference for heparin. Glycan microarray analyses using the mutated lectin fused to the Fc region of human immunoglobulin, revealed that a particular sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG, heparin, had the highest binding affinity for mutated PNA among 97 glycans tested, although wild-type PNA showed affinity towards Galβ1-3GalNAc and similar galactosylated glycans. Further analyses of binding specificity using an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay demonstrated that the mutated PNA specifically binds to heparin, and weakly to de-2-O-sulfated heparin, but not to other GAG chains including de-6-O-sulfated and de-N-sulfated heparins. The mutated PNA had six amino acid substitutions within the eight amino acid-long sugar-binding loop. In this loop, the heparin-binding like motif comprised three arginine residues at positions 124, 128, and 129, and a histidine at position 125 was present. Substitution of each arginine or histidine residue to alanine reduced heparin-binding ability, indicating that all of these basic amino acid residues contributed to heparin binding. Inhibition assay demonstrated that heparin and dextran sulfate strongly inhibited mutated PNA binding to heparin in dose-dependent manner. The mutated PNA could distinguish between CHO cells and proteoglycan-deficient mutant cells. This is the first report establishing a novel leguminous lectin that preferentially binds to highly sulfated heparin and may provide novel GAG-binding probes to distinguish between heterogeneous GAG repeating units.

  19. Mutated Leguminous Lectin Containing a Heparin-Binding like Motif in a Carbohydrate-Binding Loop Specifically Binds to Heparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo, Hirohito; Soga, Keisuke; Tanaka, Atsuhiro; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    We previously introduced random mutations in the sugar-binding loops of a leguminous lectin and screened the resulting mutated lectins for novel specificities using cell surface display. Screening of a mutated peanut agglutinin (PNA), revealed a mutated PNA with a distinct preference for heparin. Glycan microarray analyses using the mutated lectin fused to the Fc region of human immunoglobulin, revealed that a particular sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG), heparin, had the highest binding affinity for mutated PNA among 97 glycans tested, although wild-type PNA showed affinity towards Galβ1-3GalNAc and similar galactosylated glycans. Further analyses of binding specificity using an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay demonstrated that the mutated PNA specifically binds to heparin, and weakly to de-2-O-sulfated heparin, but not to other GAG chains including de-6-O-sulfated and de-N-sulfated heparins. The mutated PNA had six amino acid substitutions within the eight amino acid-long sugar-binding loop. In this loop, the heparin-binding like motif comprised three arginine residues at positions 124, 128, and 129, and a histidine at position 125 was present. Substitution of each arginine or histidine residue to alanine reduced heparin-binding ability, indicating that all of these basic amino acid residues contributed to heparin binding. Inhibition assay demonstrated that heparin and dextran sulfate strongly inhibited mutated PNA binding to heparin in dose-dependent manner. The mutated PNA could distinguish between CHO cells and proteoglycan-deficient mutant cells. This is the first report establishing a novel leguminous lectin that preferentially binds to highly sulfated heparin and may provide novel GAG-binding probes to distinguish between heterogeneous GAG repeating units.

  20. Drug binding properties of neonatal albumin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, R; Honoré, B

    1989-01-01

    Neonatal and adult albumin was isolated by gel chromatography on Sephacryl S-300, from adult and umbilical cord serum, respectively. Binding of monoacetyl-diamino-diphenyl sulfone, warfarin, sulfamethizole, and diazepam was studied by means of equilibrium dialysis and the binding data were analyzed...... by the method of several acceptable fitted curves. It was found that the binding affinity to neonatal albumin is less than to adult albumin for monoacetyl-diamino-diphenyl sulfone and warfarin. Sulfamethizole binding to the neonatal protein is similarly reduced when more than one molecule of the drug is bound...

  1. Bitopic Ligands and Metastable Binding Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fronik, Philipp; Gaiser, Birgit I; Sejer Pedersen, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    of orthosteric binding sites. Bitopic ligands have been employed to address the selectivity problem by combining (linking) an orthosteric ligand with an allosteric modulator, theoretically leading to high-affinity subtype selective ligands. However, it remains a challenge to identify suitable allosteric binding...... that have been reported to date, this type of bitopic ligands would be composed of two identical pharmacophores. Herein, we outline the concept of bitopic ligands, review metastable binding sites, and discuss their potential as a new source of allosteric binding sites....

  2. Parathyroid hormone binding to cultured avian osteoclasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teti, A.; Rizzoli, R.; Zambonin Zallone, A. (Univ. of Bari (Italy))

    1991-02-14

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) increases serum calcium concentration via a controversial cellular mechanism. We investigated whether PTH binds avian osteoclasts. Isolated hypocalcaemic hen osteoclasts were incubated with ({sup 125}I)--bovine PTH (1-84). Specific binding of the hormone to the cells, which reached the equilibrium within 60 min, was observed. Half maximal binding was reached by 10 min. Binding was competitively inhibited by increasing doses of unlabeled PTH, and was about 55% displaced by adding, at the equilibrium, 10(-6) M unlabeled PTH. Autoradiography demonstrated specific label on the osteoclast. The cellular mechanism activated by the hormone remains to be elucidated.

  3. Characterization of Novel Calmodulin Binding Domains within IQ Motifs of IQGAP1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Deok-Jin; Ban, Byungkwan; Lee, Jin-A

    2011-01-01

    IQ motif-containing GTPase-activating protein 1 (IQGAP1), which is a well-known calmodulin (CaM) binding protein, is involved in a wide range of cellular processes including cell proliferation, tumorigenesis, adhesion, and migration. Interaction of IQGAP1 with CaM is important for its cellular functions. Although each IQ domain of IQGAP1 for CaM binding has been characterized in a Ca2+-dependent or -independent manner, it was not clear which IQ motifs are physiologically relevant for CaM binding in the cells. In this study, we performed immunoprecipitation using 3xFLAGhCaM in mammalian cell lines to characterize the domains of IQGAP1 that are key for CaM binding under physiological conditions. Interestingly, using this method, we identified two novel domains, IQ(2.7-3) and IQ(3.5-4.4), within IQGAP1 that were involved in Ca2+-independent or -dependent CaM binding, respectively. Mutant analysis clearly showed that the hydrophobic regions within IQ(2.7-3) were mainly involved in apoCaM binding, while the basic amino acids and hydrophobic region of IQ(3.5-4.4) were required for Ca2+/CaM binding. Finally, we showed that IQ(2.7-3) was the main apoCaM binding domain and both IQ(2.7-3) and IQ(3.5-4.4) were required for Ca2+/CaM binding within IQ(1- 2-3-4). Thus, we identified and characterized novel direct CaM binding motifs essential for IQGAP1. This finding indicates that IQGAP1 plays a dynamic role via direct interactions with CaM in a Ca2+-dependent or -independent manner. PMID:22080369

  4. Retinoid-binding proteins: similar protein architectures bind similar ligands via completely different ways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ru Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinoids are a class of compounds that are chemically related to vitamin A, which is an essential nutrient that plays a key role in vision, cell growth and differentiation. In vivo, retinoids must bind with specific proteins to perform their necessary functions. Plasma retinol-binding protein (RBP and epididymal retinoic acid binding protein (ERABP carry retinoids in bodily fluids, while cellular retinol-binding proteins (CRBPs and cellular retinoic acid-binding proteins (CRABPs carry retinoids within cells. Interestingly, although all of these transport proteins possess similar structures, the modes of binding for the different retinoid ligands with their carrier proteins are different. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, we analyzed the various retinoid transport mechanisms using structure and sequence comparisons, binding site analyses and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that in the same family of proteins and subcellular location, the orientation of a retinoid molecule within a binding protein is same, whereas when different families of proteins are considered, the orientation of the bound retinoid is completely different. In addition, none of the amino acid residues involved in ligand binding is conserved between the transport proteins. However, for each specific binding protein, the amino acids involved in the ligand binding are conserved. The results of this study allow us to propose a possible transport model for retinoids. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results reveal the differences in the binding modes between the different retinoid-binding proteins.

  5. Clip binds to HLA class II using methionine-based, allele-dependent motifs as well as allele-independent supermotifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geluk, A; Van Meijgaarden, K E; Drijfhout, J W; Ottenhoff, T H

    1995-09-01

    The invariant chain (Ii) region that interacts with class II and inhibits premature peptide binding has been mapped to amino acids 82-107, known as CLIP. It is unclear whether CLIP binds directly to the class II peptide binding groove and thus competitively blocks binding of other peptides, or whether it binds to conserved class II sites and indirectly inhibits peptide binding by inducing conformational changes in class II. Here we show evidence that strongly suggests that CLIP binds within the peptide binding groove, as CLIP binds to various HLA-DR alleles using allele-dependent as well as allele-independent, methionine-based binding motifs. First, a core sequence of 12 amino acids was identified within CLIP which is required for optimal binding to DR1, DR2, DR3(17) and DR7. This sequence is composed of CLIP p88-99 (SKMRMATPLLMQ). By substitution analysis, all three methionine residues appeared to control CLIP binding to HLA-DR. However, whereas M90 controlled binding to all four alleles, M92 and M98 were of different importance for the various alleles: M92 is involved in CLIP binding to DR1 and DR3(17) but not to DR2 or DR7, and M98 controls CLIP binding to DR2, DR3(17) and DR7 but not DR1. Also, CLIP competes with known immunogenic peptides for class II binding in a manner indistinguishable from regular, class II binding competitor peptides. Finally, the dissociation rates of CLIP-class II complexed are similar to those of antigenic peptide-class II complexes. Thus, CLIP most likely binds to the class II peptide binding groove, since most allelic class II differences are clustered here. CLIP uses unconventional methionine anchor residues representing an allele-independent supermotif (M90) as well as allele-dependent motifs (M92 and M98).

  6. Extratelomeric Binding of the Telomere Binding Protein TRF2 at the PCGF3 Promoter Is G-Quadruplex Motif-Dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Gunjan; Mukherjee, Ananda Kishor; Sharma, Shalu; Chowdhury, Shantanu

    2018-04-11

    Telomere repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) is critical for the protection of chromosome ends. Mounting evidence suggests that TRF2 associates with extratelomeric sites and TRF2 functions may not be limited to telomeres. Here, we show that the PCGF3 promoter harbors a sequence capable of forming the DNA secondary structure G-quadruplex motif, which is required for binding of TRF2 at the PCGF3 promoter. We demonstrate that promoter binding by TRF2 mediates PCGF3 promoter activity, and both the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of TRF2 are necessary for promoter activity. Altogether, this shows for the first time that a telomere binding factor may regulate a component of the polycomb group of proteins.

  7. The human HIP gene, overexpressed in primary liver cancer encodes for a C-type carbohydrate binding protein with lactose binding activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christa, L; Felin, M; Morali, O; Simon, M T; Lasserre, C; Brechot, C; Sève, A P

    1994-01-03

    HIP was originally identified as a gene expression in primary liver cancers, and in normal tissues such as pancreas and small intestine. Based on gene data base homologies, the HIP protein should consist of a signal peptide linked to a single carbohydrate recognition domain. To test this hypothesis HIP and the putative carbohydrate recognition domain encoded by the last 138 C-terminal amino acids, were expressed as glutathione-S-transferase proteins (GST-HIP and GST-HIP-142, respectively). Both recombinant proteins were purified by a single affinity purification step from bacterial lysates and their ability to bind saccharides coupled to trisacryl GF 2000M were tested. Our results show that HIP and HIP-142 proteins bind to lactose, moreover the binding requires divalent cations. Thus the HIP protein is a lactose-binding lectin with the characteristics of a C-type carbohydrate recognition domain of 138 amino acids in the C-terminal region.

  8. Self-assembled FUS binds active chromatin and regulates gene transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liuqing; Gal, Jozsef; Chen, Jing; Zhu, Haining

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease. Fused in sarcoma (FUS) is a DNA/RNA binding protein and mutations in FUS cause a subset of familial ALS. Most ALS mutations are clustered in the C-terminal nuclear localization sequence of FUS and consequently lead to the accumulation of protein inclusions in the cytoplasm. It remains debatable whether loss of FUS normal function in the nucleus or gain of toxic function in the cytoplasm plays a more critical role in the ALS etiology. Moreover, the physiological function of FUS in the nucleus remains to be fully understood. In this study, we found that a significant portion of nuclear FUS was bound to active chromatin and that the ALS mutations dramatically decreased FUS chromatin binding ability. Functionally, the chromatin binding is required for FUS transcription activation, but not for alternative splicing regulation. The N-terminal QGSY (glutamine-glycine-serine-tyrosine)-rich region (amino acids 1–164) mediates FUS self-assembly in the nucleus of mammalian cells and the self-assembly is essential for its chromatin binding and transcription activation. In addition, RNA binding is also required for FUS self-assembly and chromatin binding. Together, our results suggest a functional assembly of FUS in the nucleus under physiological conditions, which is different from the cytoplasmic inclusions. The ALS mutations can cause loss of function in the nucleus by disrupting this assembly and chromatin binding. PMID:25453086

  9. Receptor concentration and diffusivity control multivalent binding of Sv40 to membrane bilayers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliwia M Szklarczyk

    Full Text Available Incoming Simian Virus 40 particles bind to their cellular receptor, the glycolipid GM1, in the plasma membrane and thereby induce membrane deformation beneath the virion leading to endocytosis and infection. Efficient membrane deformation depends on receptor lipid structure and the organization of binding sites on the internalizing particle. To determine the role of receptor diffusion, concentration and the number of receptors required for stable binding in this interaction, we analyze the binding of SV40 to GM1 in supported membrane bilayers by computational modeling based on experimental data. We measure the diffusion rates of SV40 virions in solution by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and of the receptor in bilayers by single molecule tracking. Quartz-crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D is used to measure binding of SV40 virus-like particles to bilayers containing the viral receptor GM1. We develop a phenomenological stochastic dynamics model calibrated against this data, and use it to investigate the early events of virus attachment to lipid membranes. Our results indicate that SV40 requires at least 4 attached receptors to achieve stable binding. We moreover find that receptor diffusion is essential for the establishment of stable binding over the physiological range of receptor concentrations and that receptor concentration controls the mode of viral motion on the target membrane. Our results provide quantitative insight into the initial events of virus-host interaction at the nanoscopic level.

  10. Tissue specificity of endothelin binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolger, G.T.; Liard, F.; Krogsrud, R.; Thibeault, D.; Jaramillo, J. (BioMega, Inc., Laval, Quebec (Canada))

    1990-09-01

    A measurement was made of the binding of 125I-labeled endothelin (125I-ET) to crude membrane fractions prepared from rat aorta, atrium, ventricle, portal vein, trachea, lung parenchyma, vas deferens, ileum, bladder, and guinea-pig taenia coli and lung parenchyma. Scatchard analysis of 125I-ET binding in all tissues indicated binding to a single class of saturable sites. The affinity and density of 125I-ET binding sites varied between tissues. The Kd of 125I-ET binding was approximately 0.5 nM for rat aorta, trachea, lung parenchyma, ventricle, bladder, and vas deferens, and guinea-pig taenia coli and lung parenchyma, 1.8 nM for rat portal vein and atrium, and 3.3 nM for ileum. The Bmax of 125I-ET binding had the following rank order of density in rat tissues: trachea greater than lung parenchyma = vas deferens much greater than aorta = portal vein = atrium greater than bladder greater than ventricle = ileum. The properties of 125I-ET endothelin binding were characterized in rat ventricular membranes. 125I-ET binding was time dependent, reaching a maximum within 45-60 min at 25 degrees C. The calculated microassociation constant was 9.67 x 10(5) s-1 M-1. Only 15-20% of 125I-ET dissociated from its binding site even when dissociation was studied as long as 3 h. Preincubation of ventricular membranes with ET prevented binding of 125I-ET. 125I-ET binding was destroyed by boiling of ventricular membranes and was temperature, pH, and cation (Ca2+, Mg2+, and Na+) dependent.

  11. The serotonin transporter: Examination of the changes in transporter affinity induced by ligand binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    The plasmalemmal serotonin transporter uses transmembrane gradients of Na + , Cl - and K + to accumulate serotonin within blood platelets. Transport is competitively inhibited by the antidepressant imipramine. Like serotonin transport, imipramine binding requires Na + . Unlike serotonin, however, imipramine does not appear to be transported. To gain insight into the mechanism of serotonin transport the author have analyzed the influences of Na + and Cl - , the two ions cotransported with serotonin, on both serotonin transport and the interaction of imipramine and other antidepressant drugs with the plasmalemmal serotonin transporter of human platelets. Additionally, the author have synthesized, purified and characterized the binding of 2-iodoimipramine to the serotonin transporter. Finally, the author have conducted a preliminary study of the inhibition of serotonin transport and imipramine binding produced by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. My results reveal many instances of positive heterotropic cooperativity in ligand binding to the serotonin transporter. Na + binding enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine and several other antidepressant drugs, and also increases the affinity for Cl - . Cl - enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine, as well as for Na + . At concentrations in the range of its K M for transport serotonin is a competitive inhibitor of imipramine binding. At much higher concentrations, however, serotonin also inhibits imipramines dissociation rate constant. This latter effect which is Na + -independent and species specific, is apparently produced by serotonin binding at a second, low affinity site on, or near, the transporter complex. Iodoimipramine competitively inhibit both [ 3 H]imipramine binding and [ 3 H]serotonin transport

  12. [3H]Ouabain binding and Na+, K+-ATPase in resealed human red cell ghosts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoemaker, D.G.; Lauf, P.K.

    1983-01-01

    The interaction of the cardiac glycoside [ 3 H]ouabain with the Na+, K+ pump of resealed human erythrocyte ghosts was investigated. Binding of [ 3 H]ouabain to high intracellular Na+ ghosts was studied in high extracellular Na+ media, a condition determined to produce maximal ouabain binding rates. Simultaneous examination of both the number of ouabain molecules bound per ghost and the corresponding inhibition of the Na+, K+-ATPase revealed that one molecule of [ 3 H]ouabain inhibited one Na+, K+-ATPase complex. Intracellular magnesium or magnesium plus inorganic phosphate produced the lowest ouabain binding rate. Support of ouabain binding by adenosine diphosphate (ADP) was negligible, provided synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) through the residual adenylate kinase activity was prevented by the adenylate kinase inhibitor Ap5A. Uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP) alone did not support ouabain binding after inhibition of the endogenous nucleoside diphosphokinase by trypan blue and depletion of residual ATP by the incorporation of hexokinase and glucose. ATP acting solely at the high-affinity binding site of the Na+, K+ pump (Km approximately 1 microM) promoted maximal [ 3 H]ouabain binding rates. Failure of 5'-adenylyl-beta-gamma-imidophosphate (AMP-PNP) to stimulate significantly the rate of ouabain binding suggests that phosphorylation of the pump was required to expose the ouabain receptor

  13. Identifying Conformational-Selection and Induced-Fit Aspects in the Binding-Induced Folding of PMI from Markov State Modeling of Atomistic Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Fabian; Noé, Frank; Weikl, Thomas R

    2018-03-27

    Unstructured proteins and peptides typically fold during binding to ligand proteins. A challenging problem is to identify the mechanism and kinetics of these binding-induced folding processes in experiments and atomistic simulations. In this Article, we present a detailed picture for the folding of the inhibitor peptide PMI into a helix during binding to the oncoprotein fragment 25-109 Mdm2 obtained from atomistic, explicit-water simulations and Markov state modeling. We find that binding-induced folding of PMI is highly parallel and can occur along a multitude of pathways. Some pathways are induced-fit-like with binding occurring prior to PMI helix formation, while other pathways are conformational-selection-like with binding after helix formation. On the majority of pathways, however, binding is intricately coupled to folding, without clear temporal ordering. A central feature of these pathways is PMI motion on the Mdm2 surface, along the binding groove of Mdm2 or over the rim of this groove. The native binding groove of Mdm2 thus appears as an asymmetric funnel for PMI binding. Overall, binding-induced folding of PMI does not fit into the classical picture of induced fit or conformational selection that implies a clear temporal ordering of binding and folding events. We argue that this holds in general for binding-induced folding processes because binding and folding events in these processes likely occur on similar time scales and do exhibit the time-scale separation required for temporal ordering.

  14. Stepwise bending of DNA by a single TATA box binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolic-Nørrelykke, Simon F; Rasmussen, Mette B; Pavone, Francesco S

    2006-01-01

    The TATA-box binding protein (TBP) is required by all three eucaryotic RNA polymerases for the initiation of transcription from most promoters. TBP recognizes, binds to, and bends promoter sequences called "TATA-boxes" in the DNA. We present results from the study of individual Saccharomyces...... cerevisiae TBPs interacting with single DNA molecules containing a TATA-box. Using video microscopy, we observed the Brownian motion of the beads tethered by short surface-bound DNA. When TBP binds to and bends the DNA, the conformation of the DNA changes and the amplitude of Brownian motion of the tehtered...

  15. Serum amyloid P component binds to influenza A virus haemagglutinin and inhibits the virus infection in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Vilsgaard Ravn, K; Juul Sørensen, I

    1997-01-01

    that SAP can bind to influenza A virus and inhibit agglutination of erythrocytes mediated by the virus subtypes H1N1, H2N2 and H3N2. SAP also inhibits the production of haemagglutinin (HA) an the cytopathogenic effect of influenza A virus in MDCK cells. The binding of SAP to the virus requires...

  16. New DNA-binding radioprotectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roger

    The normal tissue damage associated with cancer radiotherapy has motivated the development at Peter Mac of a new class of DNA-binding radioprotecting drugs that could be applied top-ically to normal tissues at risk. Methylproamine (MP), the lead compound, reduces radiation induced cell kill at low concentrations. For example, experiments comparing the clonogenic survival of transformed human keratinocytes treated with 30 micromolar MP before and dur-ing various doses of ionising radiation, with the radiation dose response for untreated cells, indicate a dose reduction factor (DRF) of 2. Similar survival curve experiments using various concentrations of MP, with parallel measurements of uptake of MP into cell nuclei, have en-abled the relationship between drug uptake and extent of radioprotection to be established. Radioprotection has also been demonstrated after systemic administration to mice, for three different endpoints, namely lung, jejunum and bone marrow (survival at 30 days post-TBI). The results of pulse radiolysis studies indicated that the drugs act by reduction of transient radiation-induced oxidative species on DNA. This hypothesis was substantiated by the results of experiments in which MP radioprotection of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks, assessed as -H2AX foci, in the human keratinocyte cell line. For both endpoints, the extent of radioprotection increased with MP concentration up to a maximal value. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that radioprotection by MP is mediated by attenuation of the extent of initial DNA damage. However, although MP is a potent radioprotector, it becomes cytotoxic at higher concentrations. This limitation has been addressed in an extensive program of lead optimisation and some promising analogues have emerged from which the next lead will be selected. Given the clinical potential of topical radioprotection, the new analogues are being assessed in terms of delivery to mouse oral mucosa. This is

  17. Binding of (/sup 3/H)imipramine to human platelet membranes with compensation for saturable binding to filters and its implication for binding studies with brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, O.M.; Wood, K.M.; Williams, D.C.

    1984-08-01

    Apparent specific binding of (/sup 3/H)imipramine to human platelet membranes at high concentrations of imipramine showed deviation from that expected of a single binding site, a result consistent with a low-affinity binding site. The deviation was due to displaceable, saturable binding to the glass fibre filters used in the assays. Imipramine, chloripramine, desipramine, and fluoxetine inhibited binding to filters whereas 5-hydroxytryptamine and ethanol were ineffective. Experimental conditions were developed that eliminated filter binding, allowing assay of high- and low-affinity binding to membranes. Failure to correct for filter binding may lead to overestimation of binding parameters, Bmax and KD for high-affinity binding to membranes, and may also be misinterpreted as indicating a low-affinity binding component in both platelet and brain membranes. Low-affinity binding (KD less than 2 microM) of imipramine to human platelet membranes was demonstrated and its significance discussed.

  18. Scoring functions for transcription factor binding site prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friberg Markus

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factor binding site (TFBS prediction is a difficult problem, which requires a good scoring function to discriminate between real binding sites and background noise. Many scoring functions have been proposed in the literature, but it is difficult to assess their relative performance, because they are implemented in different software tools using different search methods and different TFBS representations. Results Here we compare how several scoring functions perform on both real and semi-simulated data sets in a common test environment. We have also developed two new scoring functions and included them in the comparison. The data sets are from the yeast (S. cerevisiae genome. Our new scoring function LLBG (least likely under the background model performs best in this study. It achieves the best average rank for the correct motifs. Scoring functions based on positional bias performed quite poorly in this study. Conclusion LLBG may provide an interesting alternative to current scoring functions for TFBS prediction.

  19. Evaluation of galectin binding by frontal affinity chromatography (FAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, Jun; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Frontal affinity chromatography (FAC) is a simple and versatile procedure enabling quantitative determination of diverse biological interactions in terms of dissociation constants (K d), even though these interactions are relatively weak. The method is best applied to glycans and their binding proteins, with the analytical system operating on the basis of highly reproducible isocratic elution by liquid chromatography. Its application to galectins has been successfully developed to characterize their binding specificities in detail. As a result, their minimal requirements for recognition of disaccharides, i.e., β-galactosides, as well as characteristic features of individual galectins, have been elucidated. In this chapter, we describe standard procedures to determine the K d's for interactions between a series of standard glycans and various galectins.

  20. Glucose Binding Protein as a Novel Optical Glucose Nanobiosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majed DWEIK

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Development of an in vivo optical sensor requires the utilization of Near Infra Red (NIR fluorophores due to their ability to operate within the biological tissue window. Alexa Fluor 750 (AF750 and Alexa Fluor 680 (AF680 were examined as potential NIR fluorophores for an in vivo fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET glucose biosensor. AF680 and AF750 found to be a FRET pair and percent energy transfer was calculated. Next, the tested dye pair was utilized in a competitive binding assay in order to detect glucose. Concanavalin A (Con A and dextran have binding affinity, but in the presence of glucose, glucose displaces dextran due to its higher affinity to Con A than dextran. Finally, the percent signal transfer through porcine skin was examined. The results showed with approximately 4.0 mm porcine skin thickness, 1.98 % of the fluorescence was transmitted and captured by the detector.

  1. Multiple binding modes of ibuprofen in human serum albumin identified by absolute binding free energy calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Evoli, Stefania

    2016-11-10

    Human serum albumin possesses multiple binding sites and transports a wide range of ligands that include the anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen. A complete map of the binding sites of ibuprofen in albumin is difficult to obtain in traditional experiments, because of the structural adaptability of this protein in accommodating small ligands. In this work, we provide a set of predictions covering the geometry, affinity of binding and protonation state for the pharmaceutically most active form (S-isomer) of ibuprofen to albumin, by using absolute binding free energy calculations in combination with classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and molecular docking. The most favorable binding modes correctly reproduce several experimentally identified binding locations, which include the two Sudlow\\'s drug sites (DS2 and DS1) and the fatty acid binding sites 6 and 2 (FA6 and FA2). Previously unknown details of the binding conformations were revealed for some of them, and formerly undetected binding modes were found in other protein sites. The calculated binding affinities exhibit trends which seem to agree with the available experimental data, and drastically degrade when the ligand is modeled in a protonated (neutral) state, indicating that ibuprofen associates with albumin preferentially in its charged form. These findings provide a detailed description of the binding of ibuprofen, help to explain a wide range of results reported in the literature in the last decades, and demonstrate the possibility of using simulation methods to predict ligand binding to albumin.

  2. Thermodynamics of Ligand Binding to Acyl-Coenzyme A Binding Protein Studied by Titration Calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færgeman, Nils Joakim; Sigurskjold, Bent Walther; Kragelund, Birthe B.

    1996-01-01

    Ligand binding to recombinant bovine acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) was examined using isothermal microcalorimetry. Microcalorimetric measurements confirm that the binding affinity of acyl-CoA esters for ACBP is strongly dependent on the length of the acyl chain with a clear preference for acyl-...

  3. Thermodynamics of ligand binding to acyl-coenzyme A binding protein studied by titration calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færgeman, Nils J.; Sigurskjold, B W; Kragelund, B B

    1996-01-01

    Ligand binding to recombinant bovine acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) was examined using isothermal microcalorimetry. Microcalorimetric measurements confirm that the binding affinity of acyl-CoA esters for ACBP is strongly dependent on the length of the acyl chain with a clear preference for acyl-...

  4. Intentional binding of visual effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruess, Miriam; Thomaschke, Roland; Kiesel, Andrea

    2018-04-01

    When an action produces an effect, the effect is perceived earlier in time compared to a stimulus without preceding action. This temporal bias is called intentional binding (IB) and serves as an implicit measure of sense of agency. Typically, IB is investigated by presenting a rotating clock hand while participants execute an action and perceive a resulting tone. Participants are asked to estimate the time point of tone onset by referring to the clock hand position. This time point estimate is compared to a time point estimate of a tone in a condition in which the tone occurs without preceding action. Studies employing this classic clock paradigm employed auditory action effects. We modified this paradigm to investigate potential IB of visual action effects, and, additionally, to investigate how IB differs for visual action effects (Experiment 1) in comparison to auditory action effects (Experiment 2). Our results show that, like the IB of an auditory effect, the time point of a visual action effect is shifted toward the causing action, and that the size of the IB depends on the delay duration of the effect. Comparable to auditory action effects, earlier action effects showed stronger IB compared to later action effects. Yet overall IB of the visual effects was weaker than IB of the auditory effects. As IB is seen as an indicator of sense of agency, this may have important implications for the design of human-machine interfaces.

  5. Localization-enhanced biexciton binding in semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langbein, Wolfgang Werner; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1999-01-01

    The influence of excitonic localization on the binding energy of biexcitons is investigated for quasi-three-dimensional and quasi-two-dimensional AlxGa1-xAs structures. An increase of the biexciton binding energy is observed for localization energies comparable to or larger than the free biexcito...

  6. Neurotransmitter Receptor Binding in Bovine Cerebral Microvessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peroutka, Stephen J.; Moskowitz, Michael A.; Reinhard, John F.; Synder, Solomon H.

    1980-05-01

    Purified preparations of microvessels from bovine cerebral cortex contain substantial levels of alpha-adrenergic, beta-adrenergic, and histamine 1 receptor binding sites but only negligible serotonin, muscarinic cholinergic, opiate, and benzodiazepine receptor binding. Norepinephrine and histamine may be endogenous regulators of the cerebral microcirculation at the observed receptors.

  7. Identification of Glossina morsitans morsitans odorant binding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tsetse flies are vectors of trypanosome parasites, causative agents of Trypanosomiasis in humans and animals. Odorant Binding Proteins (OBPs) are critical in insect olfaction as they bind volatile odours from the environment and transport them to receptors within olfactory receptor neurons for processing providing critical ...

  8. Binding of corroded ions to human saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, H J

    1985-05-01

    Employing equilibrium dialysis, the binding abilities of Cu, Al, Co and Cr ions from corroded Cu-Al and Co-Cr dental casting alloys towards human saliva and two of its gel chromatographic fractions were determined. Results indicate that both Cu and Co bind to human saliva i.e. 0.045 and 0.027 mg/mg protein, respectively. Besides possessing the largest binding ability, Cu also possessed the largest binding capacity. The saturation of Cu binding was not reached up to the limit of 0.35 mg protein/ml employed in the tests, while Co reached full saturation at about 0.2 mg protein/ml. Chromium showed absolutely no binding to human saliva while Al ions did not pass through the dialysis membranes. Compared to the binding with solutions that were synthetically made up to contain added salivary-type proteins, it is shown that the binding to human saliva is about 1 order of magnitude larger, at least for Cu ions.

  9. Factor VIIa binding and internalization in hepatocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortoe, G; Sorensen, B B; Petersen, L C

    2005-01-01

    The liver is believed to be the primary clearance organ for coagulation proteases, including factor VIIa (FVIIa). However, at present, clearance mechanisms for FVIIa in liver are unknown. To obtain information on the FVIIa clearance mechanism, we investigated the binding and internalization...... no effect. HEPG2 cells internalized FVIIa with a rate of 10 fmol 10(-5) cells h(-1). In contrast to HEPG2 cells, FVIIa binding to primary rat hepatocytes was completely independent of TF, and excess unlabeled FVIIa partly reduced the binding of 125I-FVIIa to rat hepatocytes. Further, compared with HEPG2...... cells, three- to fourfold more FVIIa bound to rat primary hepatocytes, and the bound FVIIa was internalized at a faster rate. Similar FVIIa binding and internalization profiles were observed in primary human hepatocytes. Plasma inhibitors had no effect on FVIIa binding and internalization in hepatocytes...

  10. (TH) diazepam binding to human granulocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, P.A.; Cundall, R.L.; Rolfe, B.

    1985-07-08

    (TH)-diazepam binds to sites on human granulocyte membranes, with little or no binding to platelets or lymphocytes. These (TH)-diazepam binding sites are of the peripheral type, being strongly inhibited by R05-4864 (Ki=6.23nM) but only weakly by clonazepam (Ki=14 M). Binding of (TH) diazepam at 0 is saturable, specific and stereoselective. Scatchard analysis indicates a single class of sites with Bmax of 109 +/- 17f moles per mg of protein and K/sub D/ of 3.07 +/- 0.53nM. Hill plots of saturation experiments gave straight lines with a mean Hill coefficient of 1.03 +/- 0.014. Binding is time dependent and reversible and it varies linearly with granulocyte protein concentration over the range 0.025-0.300 mg of protein. 11 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  11. Functional interchangeability of late domains, late domain cofactors and ubiquitin in viral budding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Zhadina

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The membrane scission event that separates nascent enveloped virions from host cell membranes often requires the ESCRT pathway, which can be engaged through the action of peptide motifs, termed late (L- domains, in viral proteins. Viral PTAP and YPDL-like L-domains bind directly to the ESCRT-I and ALIX components of the ESCRT pathway, while PPxY motifs bind Nedd4-like, HECT-domain containing, ubiquitin ligases (e.g. WWP1. It has been unclear precisely how ubiquitin ligase recruitment ultimately leads to particle release. Here, using a lysine-free viral Gag protein derived from the prototypic foamy virus (PFV, where attachment of ubiquitin to Gag can be controlled, we show that several different HECT domains can replace the WWP1 HECT domain in chimeric ubiquitin ligases and drive budding. Moreover, artificial recruitment of isolated HECT domains to Gag is sufficient to stimulate budding. Conversely, the HECT domain becomes dispensable if the other domains of WWP1 are directly fused to an ESCRT-1 protein. In each case where budding is driven by a HECT domain, its catalytic activity is essential, but Gag ubiquitination is dispensable, suggesting that ubiquitin ligation to trans-acting proteins drives budding. Paradoxically, however, we also demonstrate that direct fusion of a ubiquitin moiety to the C-terminus of PFV Gag can also promote budding, suggesting that ubiquitination of Gag can substitute for ubiquitination of trans-acting proteins. Depletion of Tsg101 and ALIX inhibits budding that is dependent on ubiquitin that is fused to Gag, or ligated to trans-acting proteins through the action of a PPxY motif. These studies underscore the flexibility in the ways that the ESCRT pathway can be engaged, and suggest a model in which the identity of the protein to which ubiquitin is attached is not critical for subsequent recruitment of ubiquitin-binding components of the ESCRT pathway and viral budding to proceed.

  12. Glucocorticoid receptor binding to chromatin is selectively controlled by the coregulator Hic-5 and chromatin remodeling enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Brian H; Stallcup, Michael R

    2017-06-02

    The steroid hormone-activated glucocorticoid receptor (GR) regulates cellular stress pathways by binding to genomic regulatory elements of target genes and recruiting coregulator proteins to remodel chromatin and regulate transcription complex assembly. The coregulator hydrogen peroxide-inducible clone 5 (Hic-5) is required for glucocorticoid (GC) regulation of some genes but not others and blocks the regulation of a third gene set by inhibiting GR binding. How Hic-5 exerts these gene-specific effects and specifically how it blocks GR binding to some genes but not others is unclear. Here we show that site-specific blocking of GR binding is due to gene-specific requirements for ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes. By depletion of 11 different chromatin remodelers, we found that ATPases chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 9 (CHD9) and Brahma homologue (BRM, a product of the SMARCA2 gene) are required for GC-regulated expression of the blocked genes but not for other GC-regulated genes. Furthermore, CHD9 and BRM were required for GR occupancy and chromatin remodeling at GR-binding regions associated with blocked genes but not at GR-binding regions associated with other GC-regulated genes. Hic-5 selectively inhibits GR interaction with CHD9 and BRM, thereby blocking chromatin remodeling and robust GR binding at GR-binding sites associated with blocked genes. Thus, Hic-5 regulates GR binding site selection by a novel mechanism, exploiting gene-specific requirements for chromatin remodeling enzymes to selectively influence DNA occupancy and gene regulation by a transcription factor. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Structural and binding studies of a C-type galactose-binding lectin from Bothrops jararacussu snake venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartim, Marco A; Pinheiro, Matheus P; de Pádua, Ricardo A P; Sampaio, Suely V; Nonato, M Cristina

    2017-02-01

    BJcuL is a snake venom galactoside-binding lectin (SVgalL) isolated from Bothrops jararacussu and is involved in a wide variety of biological activities including triggering of pro-inflammatory response, disruption of microbial biofilm structure and induction of apoptosis. In the present work, we determined the crystallographic structure of BJcuL, the first holo structure of a SVgalL, and introduced the fluorescence-based thermal stability assay (Thermofluor) as a tool for screening and characterization of the binding mechanism of SVgalL ligands. BJcuL structure revealed the existence of a porous and flexible decameric arrangement composed of disulfide-linked dimers related by a five-fold symmetry. Each monomer contains the canonical carbohydrate recognition domain, a calcium ion required for BJcuL lectinic activity and a sodium ion required for protein stabilization. BJcuL thermostability was found to be induced by calcium ion and galactoside sugars which exhibit hyperbolic saturation profiles dependent on ligand concentration. Serendipitously, the gentamicin group of aminoglycoside antibiotics (gAGAs) was also identified as BJcuL ligands. On contrast, gAGAs exhibited a sigmoidal saturation profile compatible with a cooperative mechanism of binding. Thermofluor, hemagglutination inhibition assay and molecular docking strategies were used to identify a distinct binding site in BJcuL localized at the dimeric interface near the fully conserved intermolecular Cys86-Cys86 disulfide bond. The hybrid approach used in the present work provided novel insights into structural behavior and functional diversification of SVgaLs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja; Cho, Christine; Govindappa, Sowmya; Apicella, Michael A.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2014-01-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states

  15. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Cho, Christine [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Govindappa, Sowmya [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Apicella, Michael A. [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Ramaswamy, S., E-mail: ramas@instem.res.in [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India)

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  16. Specific insulin binding in bovine chromaffin cells; demonstration of preferential binding to adrenalin-storing cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serck-Hanssen, G.; Soevik, O.

    1987-01-01

    Insulin binding was studied in subpopulations of bovine chromaffin cells enriched in adrenalin-producing cells (A-cells) or noradrenalin-producing cells (NA-cells). Binding of 125 I-insulin was carried out at 15 0 C for 3 hrs in the absence or presence of excess unlabeled hormone. Four fractions of cells were obtained by centrifugation on a stepwise bovine serum albumin gradient. The four fractions were all shown to bind insulin in a specific manner and the highest binding was measured in the cell layers of higher densities, containing mainly A-cells. The difference in binding of insulin to the four subpopulations of chromaffin cells seemed to be related to differences in numbers of receptors as opposed to receptor affinities. The authors conclude that bovine chromaffin cells possess high affinity binding sites for insulin and that these binding sites are mainly confined to A-cells. 24 references, 2 figures, 1 table

  17. Split tasks of asymmetric nucleotide-binding sites in the heterodimeric ABC exporter EfrCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hürlimann, Lea M; Hohl, Michael; Seeger, Markus A

    2017-06-01

    Many heterodimeric ATP-binding cassette (ABC) exporters evolved asymmetric ATP-binding sites containing a degenerate site incapable of ATP hydrolysis due to noncanonical substitutions in conserved sequence motifs. Recent studies revealed that nucleotide binding to the degenerate site stabilizes contacts between the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of the inward-facing transporter and regulates ATP hydrolysis at the consensus site via allosteric coupling mediated by the D-loops. However, it is unclear whether nucleotide binding to the degenerate site is strictly required for substrate transport. In this study, we examined the functional consequences of a systematic set of mutations introduced at the degenerate and consensus site of the multidrug efflux pump EfrCD of Enterococcus faecalis. Mutating motifs which differ among the two ATP-binding sites (Walker B, switch loop, and ABC signature) or which are involved in interdomain communication (D-loop and Q-loop) led to asymmetric results in the functional assays and were better tolerated at the degenerate site. This highlights the importance of the degenerate site to allosterically regulate the events at the consensus site. Mutating invariant motifs involved in ATP binding and NBD closure (A-loop and Walker A) resulted in equally reduced transport activities, regardless at which ATP-binding site they were introduced. In contrast to previously investigated heterodimeric ABC exporters, mutation of the degenerate site Walker A lysine completely inactivated ATPase activity and substrate transport, indicating that ATP binding to the degenerate site is essential for EfrCD. This study provides novel insights into the split tasks of asymmetric ATP-binding sites of heterodimeric ABC exporters. © 2017 The Authors. The FEBS Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  18. Subcortical18F-AV-1451 binding patterns in progressive supranuclear palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hanna; Choi, Jae Yong; Hwang, Mi Song; Lee, Seung Ha; Ryu, Young Hoon; Lee, Myung Sik; Lyoo, Chul Hyoung

    2017-01-01

    Accumulation of cortical and subcortical tau pathology is the primary pathological substrate for progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). 18 F-AV-1451, a radiotracer that binds to the pathological tau protein, may be helpful for in vivo visualization and quantitation of tau pathology in PSP. The objectives of this study were to investigate cortical and subcortical 18 F-AV-1451 binding patterns in patients with PSP. We recruited 14 PSP patients and compared their cortical and subcortical binding patterns in 18 F-AV-1451 positron emission tomography (PET) studies with those of 15 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and 15 healthy controls. In both the PD and PSP groups, subcortical 18 F-AV-1451 binding did not correlate with the severity of motor dysfunctions, and cortical binding did not differ between the controls and each patient group. However, the PSP patients showed greater 18 F-AV-1451 binding in the putamen, globus pallidus, subthalamic nucleus, and dentate nucleus when compared with the controls, whereas the PD patients showed lower 18 F-AV-1451 binding in the substantia nigra than controls. The PSP and PD patients showed distinct subcortical 18 F-AV-1451 binding patterns reflecting subcortical tau pathology in PSP and reduced nigral neuromelanin in PD. However, there was no correlation with the severity of motor dysfunction, no cortical regions with increased binding in PSP patients, and variable degrees of subcortical binding even in the controls. Therefore, the 18 F-AV-1451 PET may be less than ideal for assessing tau pathology in PSP. Further studies will be required to validate the clinical correlation and to understand the clinical utility of 18 F-AV-1451 PET for PSP patients. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  19. Kinetic analysis of PCNA clamp binding and release in the clamp loading reaction catalyzed by Saccharomyces cerevisiae replication factor C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzahn, Melissa R; Hayner, Jaclyn N; Meyer, Jennifer A; Bloom, Linda B

    2015-01-01

    DNA polymerases require a sliding clamp to achieve processive DNA synthesis. The toroidal clamps are loaded onto DNA by clamp loaders, members of the AAA+family of ATPases. These enzymes utilize the energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis to perform a variety of cellular functions. In this study, a clamp loader-clamp binding assay was developed to measure the rates of ATP-dependent clamp binding and ATP-hydrolysis-dependent clamp release for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae clamp loader (RFC) and clamp (PCNA). Pre-steady-state kinetics of PCNA binding showed that although ATP binding to RFC increases affinity for PCNA, ATP binding rates and ATP-dependent conformational changes in RFC are fast relative to PCNA binding rates. Interestingly, RFC binds PCNA faster than the Escherichia coli γ complex clamp loader binds the β-clamp. In the process of loading clamps on DNA, RFC maintains contact with PCNA while PCNA closes, as the observed rate of PCNA closing is faster than the rate of PCNA release, precluding the possibility of an open clamp dissociating from DNA. Rates of clamp closing and release are not dependent on the rate of the DNA binding step and are also slower than reported rates of ATP hydrolysis, showing that these rates reflect unique intramolecular reaction steps in the clamp loading pathway. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Thermodynamic binding constants for gallium transferrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, W.R.; Pecoraro, V.L.

    1983-01-18

    Gallium-67 is widely used as an imaging agent for tumors and inflammatory abscesses. It is well stablished that Ga/sup 3 +/ travels through the circulatory system bound to the serum iron transport protein transferrin and that this protein binding is an essential step in tumor localization. However, there have been conflicting reports on the magnitude of the gallium-transferrin binding constants. Therefore, thermodynamic binding constants for gallium complexation at the two specific metal binding sites of human serum transferrin at pH 7.4 and 5 mM NaHCO/sub 3/ have been determined by UV difference spectroscopy. The conditional constants calculated for 27 mM NaHCO/sub 3/ are log K/sub 1/* = 20.3 and log K/sub 2/* = 19.3. These results are discussed in relation to the thermodynamics of transferrin binding of Fe/sup 3 +/ and to previous reports on gallium binding. The strength of transferrin complexation is also compared to that of a series of low molecular weight ligands by using calculated pM values (pM = -log (Ga(H/sub 2/O)/sub 6/)) to express the effective binding strength at pH 7.4.

  1. Druggability of methyl-lysine binding sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, C.; Nguyen, K.; Schapira, M.

    2011-12-01

    Structural modules that specifically recognize—or read—methylated or acetylated lysine residues on histone peptides are important components of chromatin-mediated signaling and epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Deregulation of epigenetic mechanisms is associated with disease conditions, and antagonists of acetyl-lysine binding bromodomains are efficacious in animal models of cancer and inflammation, but little is known regarding the druggability of methyl-lysine binding modules. We conducted a systematic structural analysis of readers of methyl marks and derived a predictive druggability landscape of methyl-lysine binding modules. We show that these target classes are generally less druggable than bromodomains, but that some proteins stand as notable exceptions.

  2. Measuring Binding Affinity of Protein-Ligand Interaction Using Spectrophotometry: Binding of Neutral Red to Riboflavin-Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenprakhon, Pirom; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2010-01-01

    The dissociation constant, K[subscript d], of the binding of riboflavin-binding protein (RP) with neutral red (NR) can be determined by titrating RP to a fixed concentration of NR. Upon adding RP to the NR solution, the maximum absorption peak of NR shifts to 545 nm from 450 nm for the free NR. The change of the absorption can be used to determine…

  3. Disruption of key NADH-binding pocket residues of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis InhA affects DD-CoA binding ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Daniel J; Robb, Kirsty; Vetter, Beatrice V; Tong, Madeline; Molle, Virginie; Hunt, Neil T; Hoskisson, Paul A

    2017-07-05

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a global health problem that affects over 10 million people. There is an urgent need to develop novel antimicrobial therapies to combat TB. To achieve this, a thorough understanding of key validated drug targets is required. The enoyl reductase InhA, responsible for synthesis of essential mycolic acids in the mycobacterial cell wall, is the target for the frontline anti-TB drug isoniazid. To better understand the activity of this protein a series of mutants, targeted to the NADH co-factor binding pocket were created. Residues P193 and W222 comprise a series of hydrophobic residues surrounding the cofactor binding site and mutation of both residues negatively affect InhA function. Construction of an M155A mutant of InhA results in increased affinity for NADH and DD-CoA turnover but with a reduction in V max for DD-CoA, impairing overall activity. This suggests that NADH-binding geometry of InhA likely permits long-range interactions between residues in the NADH-binding pocket to facilitate substrate turnover in the DD-CoA binding region of the protein. Understanding the precise details of substrate binding and turnover in InhA and how this may affect protein-protein interactions may facilitate the development of improved inhibitors enabling the development of novel anti-TB drugs.

  4. The telomere binding protein TRF2 induces chromatin compaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmaa M Baker

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian telomeres are specialized chromatin structures that require the telomere binding protein, TRF2, for maintaining chromosome stability. In addition to its ability to modulate DNA repair activities, TRF2 also has direct effects on DNA structure and topology. Given that mammalian telomeric chromatin includes nucleosomes, we investigated the effect of this protein on chromatin structure. TRF2 bound to reconstituted telomeric nucleosomal fibers through both its basic N-terminus and its C-terminal DNA binding domain. Analytical agarose gel electrophoresis (AAGE studies showed that TRF2 promoted the folding of nucleosomal arrays into more compact structures by neutralizing negative surface charge. A construct containing the N-terminal and TRFH domains together altered the charge and radius of nucleosomal arrays similarly to full-length TRF2 suggesting that TRF2-driven changes in global chromatin structure were largely due to these regions. However, the most compact chromatin structures were induced by the isolated basic N-terminal region, as judged by both AAGE and atomic force microscopy. Although the N-terminal region condensed nucleosomal array fibers, the TRFH domain, known to alter DNA topology, was required for stimulation of a strand invasion-like reaction with nucleosomal arrays. Optimal strand invasion also required the C-terminal DNA binding domain. Furthermore, the reaction was not stimulated on linear histone-free DNA. Our data suggest that nucleosomal chromatin has the ability to facilitate this activity of TRF2 which is thought to be involved in stabilizing looped telomere structures.

  5. Context influences on TALE–DNA binding revealed by quantitative profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Julia M.; Barrera, Luis A.; Reyon, Deepak; Sander, Jeffry D.; Kellis, Manolis; Joung, J Keith; Bulyk, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins recognize DNA using a seemingly simple DNA-binding code, which makes them attractive for use in genome engineering technologies that require precise targeting. Although this code is used successfully to design TALEs to target specific sequences, off-target binding has been observed and is difficult to predict. Here we explore TALE–DNA interactions comprehensively by quantitatively assaying the DNA-binding specificities of 21 representative TALEs to ∼5,000–20,000 unique DNA sequences per protein using custom-designed protein-binding microarrays (PBMs). We find that protein context features exert significant influences on binding. Thus, the canonical recognition code does not fully capture the complexity of TALE–DNA binding. We used the PBM data to develop a computational model, Specificity Inference For TAL-Effector Design (SIFTED), to predict the DNA-binding specificity of any TALE. We provide SIFTED as a publicly available web tool that predicts potential genomic off-target sites for improved TALE design. PMID:26067805

  6. Context influences on TALE-DNA binding revealed by quantitative profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Julia M; Barrera, Luis A; Reyon, Deepak; Sander, Jeffry D; Kellis, Manolis; Joung, J Keith; Bulyk, Martha L

    2015-06-11

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins recognize DNA using a seemingly simple DNA-binding code, which makes them attractive for use in genome engineering technologies that require precise targeting. Although this code is used successfully to design TALEs to target specific sequences, off-target binding has been observed and is difficult to predict. Here we explore TALE-DNA interactions comprehensively by quantitatively assaying the DNA-binding specificities of 21 representative TALEs to ∼5,000-20,000 unique DNA sequences per protein using custom-designed protein-binding microarrays (PBMs). We find that protein context features exert significant influences on binding. Thus, the canonical recognition code does not fully capture the complexity of TALE-DNA binding. We used the PBM data to develop a computational model, Specificity Inference For TAL-Effector Design (SIFTED), to predict the DNA-binding specificity of any TALE. We provide SIFTED as a publicly available web tool that predicts potential genomic off-target sites for improved TALE design.

  7. Amphipathic small molecules mimic the binding mode and function of endogenous transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhrlage, Sara J; Bates, Caleb A; Rowe, Steven P; Minter, Aaron R; Brennan, Brian B; Majmudar, Chinmay Y; Wemmer, David E; Al-Hashimi, Hashim; Mapp, Anna K

    2009-05-15

    Small molecules that reconstitute the binding mode(s) of a protein and in doing so elicit a programmed functional response offer considerable advantages in the control of complex biological processes. The development challenges of such molecules are significant, however. Many protein-protein interactions require multiple points of contact over relatively large surface areas. More significantly, several binding modes can be superimposed upon a single sequence within a protein, and a true small molecule replacement must be preprogrammed for such multimodal binding. This is the case for the transcriptional activation domain or TAD of transcriptional activators as these motifs utilize a poorly characterized multipartner binding profile in order to stimulate gene expression. Here we describe a unique class of small molecules that exhibit both function and a binding profile analogous to natural transcriptional activation domains. Of particular note, the small molecules are the first reported to bind to the KIX domain within the CREB binding protein (CBP) at a site that is utilized by natural activators. Further, a comparison of functional and nonfunctional small molecules indicates that an interaction with CBP is a key contributor to transcriptional activity. Taken together, the evidence suggests that the small molecule TADs mimic both the function and mechanism of their natural counterparts and thus present a framework for the broader development of small molecule transcriptional switches.

  8. Characterization of Dnmt1 Binding and DNA Methylation on Nucleosomes and Nucleosomal Arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Schrader

    Full Text Available The packaging of DNA into nucleosomes and the organisation into higher order structures of chromatin limits the access of sequence specific DNA binding factors to DNA. In cells, DNA methylation is preferentially occuring in the linker region of nucleosomes, suggesting a structural impact of chromatin on DNA methylation. These observations raise the question whether DNA methyltransferases are capable to recognize the nucleosomal substrates and to modify the packaged DNA. Here, we performed a detailed analysis of nucleosome binding and nucleosomal DNA methylation by the maintenance DNA methyltransferase Dnmt1. Our binding studies show that Dnmt1 has a DNA length sensing activity, binding cooperatively to DNA, and requiring a minimal DNA length of 20 bp. Dnmt1 needs linker DNA to bind to nucleosomes and most efficiently recognizes nucleosomes with symmetric DNA linkers. Footprinting experiments reveal that Dnmt1 binds to both DNA linkers exiting the nucleosome core. The binding pattern correlates with the efficient methylation of DNA linkers. However, the enzyme lacks the ability to methylate nucleosomal CpG sites on mononucleosomes and nucleosomal arrays, unless chromatin remodeling enzymes create a dynamic chromatin state. In addition, our results show that Dnmt1 functionally interacts with specific chromatin remodeling enzymes to enable complete methylation of hemi-methylated DNA in chromatin.

  9. The conserved Tarp actin binding domain is important for chlamydial invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis J Jewett

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The translocated actin recruiting phosphoprotein (Tarp is conserved among all pathogenic chlamydial species. Previous reports identified single C. trachomatis Tarp actin binding and proline rich domains required for Tarp mediated actin nucleation. A peptide antiserum specific for the Tarp actin binding domain was generated and inhibited actin polymerization in vitro and C. trachomatis entry in vivo, indicating an essential role for Tarp in chlamydial pathogenesis. Sequence analysis of Tarp orthologs from additional chlamydial species and C. trachomatis serovars indicated multiple putative actin binding sites. In order to determine whether the identified actin binding domains are functionally conserved, GST-Tarp fusions from multiple chlamydial species were examined for their ability to bind and nucleate actin. Chlamydial Tarps harbored variable numbers of actin binding sites and promoted actin nucleation as determined by in vitro polymerization assays. Our findings indicate that Tarp mediated actin binding and nucleation is a conserved feature among diverse chlamydial species and this function plays a critical role in bacterial invasion of host cells.

  10. Anomalous DNA binding by E2 regulatory protein driven by spacer sequence TATA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Zhiqun; Zhang, Yongli; Hegde, Rashmi S; Shakked, Zippora; Crothers, Donald M

    2010-06-01

    We have investigated the anomalously weak binding of human papillomavirus (HPV) regulatory protein E2 to a DNA target containing the spacer sequence TATA. Experiments in magnesium (Mg(2+)) and calcium (Ca(2+)) ion buffers revealed a marked reduction in cutting by DNase I at the CpG sequence in the protein-binding site 3' to the TATA spacer sequence, Studies of the cation dependence of DNA-E2 affinities showed that upon E2 binding the TATA sequence releases approximately twice as many Mg(2+) ions as the average of the other spacer sequences. Binding experiments for TATA spacer relative to ATAT showed that in potassium ion (K(+)) the E2 affinity of the two sequences is nearly equal, but the relative dissociation constant (K(d)) for TATA increases in the order K(+ )TATA relative to ATAT is independent of ion concentration, whereas for Mg(2+) the affinity for TATA drops sharply as ion concentration increases. Thus, ions of increasing positive charge density increasingly distort the E2 binding site, weakening the affinity for protein. In the case of Mg(2+), additional ions are bound to TATA that require displacement for protein binding. We suggest that the TATA sequence may bias the DNA structure towards a conformation that binds the protein relatively weakly.

  11. Molecular Determinants Underlying Binding Specificities of the ABL Kinase Inhibitors: Combining Alanine Scanning of Binding Hot Spots with Network Analysis of Residue Interactions and Coevolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Amanda; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2015-01-01

    residues. This study has outlined mechanisms by which inhibitor binding could modulate resilience and efficiency of allosteric interactions in the kinase structures, while preserving structural topology required for catalytic activity and regulation. PMID:26075886

  12. The fine specificity of mannose-binding and galactose-binding lectins revealed using outlier motif analysis of glycan array data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupin, Kevin A; Liden, Daniel; Haab, Brian B

    2012-01-01

    Glycan-binding proteins are commonly used as analytical reagents to detect the levels of specific glycan structures in biological samples. A detailed knowledge of the specificities of glycan-binding proteins is required for properly interpreting their binding data. A powerful technology for characterizing glycan-binding specificity is the glycan array. However, the interpretation of glycan-array data can be difficult due to the complex fine specificities of certain glycan-binding proteins. We developed a systematic approach, called outlier-motif analysis, for extracting fine-specificity information from glycan-array data, and we applied the method to the study of four commonly used lectins: two mannose binders (concanavalin A and Lens culinaris) and two galactose binders (Bauhinia purpurea and peanut agglutinin). The study confirmed the known, primary specificity of each lectin and also revealed new insights into their binding preferences. Lens culinaris's main specificity may be non-terminal, α-linked mannose with a single linkage at its 2' carbon, which is more restricted than previous definitions. We found broader specificity for bauhinea purpurea (BPL) than previously reported, showing that BPL can bind terminal N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) and penultimate β-linked galactose under certain limitations. Peanut agglutinin may bind terminal Galβ1,3Gal, a glycolipid motif, in addition to terminal Galβ1,3GalNAc, a common O-linked glycoprotein motif. These results could be used to more accurately interpret data obtained using these well-studied lectins. Furthermore, this study demonstrates a systematic and general approach for extracting fine-specificity information from glycan-array data.

  13. The involvement of coordinative interactions in the binding of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase to titanium dioxide-Localization of a putative binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayan, Avraham; Babin, Gilad; Ganoth, Assaf; Kayouf, Nivin Samir; Nitoker Eliaz, Neta; Mukkala, Srijana; Tsfadia, Yossi; Fleminger, Gideon

    2017-08-01

    Titanium (Ti) and its alloys are widely used in orthodontic and orthopedic implants by virtue to their high biocompatibility, mechanical strength, and high resistance to corrosion. Biointegration of the implants with the tissue requires strong interactions, which involve biological molecules, proteins in particular, with metal oxide surfaces. An exocellular high-affinity titanium dioxide (TiO 2 )-binding protein (TiBP), purified from Rhodococcus ruber, has been previously studied in our lab. This protein was shown to be homologous with the orthologous cytoplasmic rhodococcal dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (rhDLDH). We have found that rhDLDH and its human homolog (hDLDH) share the TiO 2 -binding capabilities with TiBP. Intrigued by the unique TiO 2 -binding properties of hDLDH, we anticipated that it may serve as a molecular bridge between Ti-based medical structures and human tissues. The objective of the current study was to locate the region and the amino acids of the protein that mediate the protein-TiO 2 surface interaction. We demonstrated the role of acidic amino acids in the nonelectrostatic enzyme/dioxide interactions at neutral pH. The observation that the interaction of DLDH with various metal oxides is independent of their isoelectric values strengthens this notion. DLDH does not lose its enzymatic activity upon binding to TiO 2 , indicating that neither the enzyme undergoes major conformational changes nor the TiO 2 binding site is blocked. Docking predictions suggest that both rhDLDH and hDLDH bind TiO 2 through similar regions located far from the active site and the dimerization sites. The putative TiO 2 -binding regions of both the bacterial and human enzymes were found to contain a CHED (Cys, His, Glu, Asp) motif, which has been shown to participate in metal-binding sites in proteins. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Zinc and ATP Binding of the Hexameric AAA-ATPase PilF from Thermus thermophilus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzer, Ralf; Herzberg, Martin; Nies, Dietrich H.; Joos, Friederike; Rathmann, Barbara; Thielmann, Yvonne; Averhoff, Beate

    2014-01-01

    The traffic AAA-ATPase PilF is essential for pilus biogenesis and natural transformation of Thermus thermophilus HB27. Recently, we showed that PilF forms hexameric complexes containing six zinc atoms coordinated by conserved tetracysteine motifs. Here we report that zinc binding is essential for complex stability. However, zinc binding is neither required for pilus biogenesis nor natural transformation. A number of the mutants did not exhibit any pili during growth at 64 °C but still were transformable. This leads to the conclusion that type 4 pili and the DNA translocator are distinct systems. At lower growth temperatures (55 °C) the zinc-depleted multiple cysteine mutants were hyperpiliated but defective in pilus-mediated twitching motility. This provides evidence that zinc binding is essential for the role of PilF in pilus dynamics. Moreover, we found that zinc binding is essential for complex stability but dispensable for ATPase activity. In contrast to many polymerization ATPases from mesophilic bacteria, ATP binding is not required for PilF complex formation; however, it significantly increases complex stability. These data suggest that zinc and ATP binding increase complex stability that is important for functionality of PilF under extreme environmental conditions. PMID:25202014

  15. Peptide binding specificity of the chaperone calreticulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandhu, N.; Duus, K.; Jorgensen, C.S.

    2007-01-01

    Calreticulin is a molecular chaperone with specificity for polypeptides and N-linked monoglucosylated glycans. In order to determine the specificity of polypeptide binding, the interaction of calreticulin with polypeptides was investigated using synthetic peptides of different length and composit...

  16. HEAVY QUARK POTENTIALS AND QUARKONIA BINDING.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETRECZKY,P.

    2004-11-04

    The author reviews recent progress in studying in-medium modification of inter-quark forces at finite temperature in lattice QCD. Some applications to the problem of quarkonium binding in potential models is also discussed.

  17. Fatty Acid Binding Proteins in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jett, Marti

    2000-01-01

    We have shown that there is a distinct pattern of fatty acid binding protein (FAEP) expression in prostate cancer vs normal cells and that finding has be confirmed in patient samples of biopsy specimens...

  18. Salt bridge exchange binding mechanism between streptavidin and its DNA aptamer--thermodynamics and spectroscopic evidences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tai-Chih; Lee, Peng-Chen; Tsai, Ching-Wei; Chen, Wen-Yih

    2013-03-01

    Protein-nucleic acids binding driven by electrostatic interactions typically are characterized by the release of counter ions, and the salt-inhibited binding association constant (K(a)) and the magnitude of exothermic binding enthalpy (ΔH). Here, we report a non-classical thermodynamics of streptavidin (SA)-aptamer binding in NaCl (140-350 mM) solutions near room temperatures (23-27 °C). By using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and circular dichroism (CD)/fluorescence spectroscopy, we found that the binding was enthalpy driven with a large entropy cost (ΔH -20.58 kcal mol(-1), TΔS -10.99 kcal mol(-1), and K(a) 1.08 × 10(7)  M(-1) at 140 mM NaCl 25 °C). With the raise of salt concentrations, the ΔH became more exothermic, yet the K(a) was almost unchanged (ΔH -26.29 kcal mol(-1) and K(a) 1.50 × 10(7)  M(-1) at 350 mM NaCl 25 °C). The data suggest that no counter Na(+) was released in the binding. Spectroscopy data suggest that the binding, with a stoichiometry of 2, was accompanied with substantial conformational changes on SA, and the changes were insensitive to the variation of salt concentrations. To account for the non-classical results, we propose a salt bridge exchange model. The intramolecular binding-site salt bridge(s) of the free SA and the charged phosphate group of aptamers re-organize to form the binding complex by forming a new intermolecular salt bridge(s). The salt bridge exchange binding process requires minimum amount of counter ions releasing but dehydration of the contacting surface of SA and the aptamer. The energy required for dehydration is reduced in the case of binding solution with higher salt concentration and account for the higher binding exothermic mainly. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Exciton Binding Energy of Monolayer WS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bairen; Chen, Xi; Cui, Xiaodong

    2015-03-01

    The optical properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDC) feature prominent excitonic natures. Here we report an experimental approach to measuring the exciton binding energy of monolayer WS2 with linear differential transmission spectroscopy and two-photon photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy (TP-PLE). TP-PLE measurements show the exciton binding energy of 0.71 +/- 0.01 eV around K valley in the Brillouin zone.

  20. Antimicrobial activities of heparin-binding peptides.

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Emma; Rydengård, Victoria; Sonesson, Andreas; Mörgelin, Matthias; Björck, Lars; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2004-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are effector molecules of the innate immune system. We recently showed that the human antimicrobial peptides alpha-defensin and LL-37 bind to glycosaminoglycans (heparin and dermatan sulphate). Here we demonstrate the obverse, i.e. structural motifs associated with heparin affinity (cationicity, amphipaticity, and consensus regions) may confer antimicrobial properties to a given peptide. Thus, heparin-binding peptides derived from laminin isoforms, von Willebrand factor...

  1. Semi-empirical quantum evaluation of peptide - MHC class II binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Ronald; Suárez, Carlos F.; Bohórquez, Hugo J.; Patarroyo, Manuel A.; Patarroyo, Manuel E.

    2017-01-01

    Peptide presentation by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a key process for triggering a specific immune response. Studying peptide-MHC (pMHC) binding from a structural-based approach has potential for reducing the costs of investigation into vaccine development. This study involved using two semi-empirical quantum chemistry methods (PM7 and FMO-DFTB) for computing the binding energies of peptides bonded to HLA-DR1 and HLA-DR2. We found that key stabilising water molecules involved in the peptide binding mechanism were required for finding high correlation with IC50 experimental values. Our proposal is computationally non-intensive, and is a reliable alternative for studying pMHC binding interactions.

  2. RNA-binding protein conserved in both microtubule- and microfilament-based RNA localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havin, Leora; Git, Anna; Elisha, Zichrini; Oberman, Froma; Yaniv, Karina; Schwartz, Sigal Pressman; Standart, Nancy; Yisraeli, Joel K.

    1998-01-01

    Vg1 mRNA translocation to the vegetal cortex of Xenopus oocytes requires intact microtubules, and a 3′ UTR cis-acting element (termed VLE), which also mediates sequence-specific binding of several proteins. One protein, the 69-kD Vg1 RBP, associates Vg1 RNA to microtubules in vitro. Here we show that Vg1 RBP-binding sites correlate with vegetal localization. Purification and cloning of Vg1 RBP revealed five RNA-binding motifs: four KH and one RRM domains. Surprisingly, Vg1 RBP is highly homologous to the zipcode binding protein implicated in the microfilament-mediated localization of β actin mRNA in fibroblasts. These data support Vg1 RBP’s direct role in vegetal localization and suggest the existence of a general, evolutionarily conserved mechanism for mRNA targeting. PMID:9620847

  3. RNA-binding protein conserved in both microtubule- and microfilament-based RNA localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havin, L; Git, A; Elisha, Z; Oberman, F; Yaniv, K; Schwartz, S P; Standart, N; Yisraeli, J K

    1998-06-01

    Vg1 mRNA translocation to the vegetal cortex of Xenopus oocytes requires intact microtubules, and a 3' UTR cis-acting element (termed VLE), which also mediates sequence-specific binding of several proteins. One protein, the 69-kD Vg1 RBP, associates Vg1 RNA to microtubules in vitro. Here we show that Vg1 RBP-binding sites correlate with vegetal localization. Purification and cloning of Vg1 RBP revealed five RNA-binding motifs: four KH and one RRM domains. Surprisingly, Vg1 RBP is highly homologous to the zipcode binding protein implicated in the microfilament-mediated localization of beta actin mRNA in fibroblasts. These data support Vg1 RBP's direct role in vegetal localization and suggest the existence of a general, evolutionarily conserved mechanism for mRNA targeting.

  4. Does the hippocampus mediate objective binding or subjective remembering?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotnick, Scott D

    2010-01-15

    Human functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) evidence suggests the hippocampus is associated with context memory to a greater degree than item memory (where only context memory requires item-in-context binding). A separate line of fMRI research suggests the hippocampus is associated with "remember" responses to a greater degree than "know" or familiarity based responses (where only remembering reflects the subjective experience of specific detail). Previous studies, however, have confounded context memory with remembering and item memory with knowing. The present fMRI study independently tested the binding hypothesis and remembering hypothesis of hippocampal function by evaluating activity within hippocampal regions-of-interest (ROIs). At encoding, participants were presented with colored and gray abstract shapes and instructed to remember each shape and whether it was colored or gray. At retrieval, old and new shapes were presented in gray and participants classified each shape as "old and previously colored", "old and previously gray", or "new", followed by a "remember" or "know" response. In 3 of 11 hippocampal ROIs, activity was significantly greater for context memory than item memory, the context memory-item memory by remember-know interaction was significant, and activity was significantly greater for context memory-knowing than item memory-remembering. This pattern of activity only supports the binding hypothesis. The analogous pattern of activity that would have supported the remembering hypothesis was never observed in the hippocampus. However, a targeted analysis revealed remembering specific activity in the left inferior parietal cortex. The present results suggest parietal cortex may be associated with subjective remembering while the hippocampus mediates binding.

  5. Feed tank transfer requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover; DOE responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements; records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor for use during Phase 1B

  6. Electrostatically biased binding of kinesin to microtubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry J Grant

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The minimum motor domain of kinesin-1 is a single head. Recent evidence suggests that such minimal motor domains generate force by a biased binding mechanism, in which they preferentially select binding sites on the microtubule that lie ahead in the progress direction of the motor. A specific molecular mechanism for biased binding has, however, so far been lacking. Here we use atomistic Brownian dynamics simulations combined with experimental mutagenesis to show that incoming kinesin heads undergo electrostatically guided diffusion-to-capture by microtubules, and that this produces directionally biased binding. Kinesin-1 heads are initially rotated by the electrostatic field so that their tubulin-binding sites face inwards, and then steered towards a plus-endwards binding site. In tethered kinesin dimers, this bias is amplified. A 3-residue sequence (RAK in kinesin helix alpha-6 is predicted to be important for electrostatic guidance. Real-world mutagenesis of this sequence powerfully influences kinesin-driven microtubule sliding, with one mutant producing a 5-fold acceleration over wild type. We conclude that electrostatic interactions play an important role in the kinesin stepping mechanism, by biasing the diffusional association of kinesin with microtubules.

  7. DNA-Aptamers Binding Aminoglycoside Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Nikolaus

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are short, single stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that are able to bind specifically and with high affinity to their non-nucleic acid target molecules. This binding reaction enables their application as biorecognition elements in biosensors and assays. As antibiotic residues pose a problem contributing to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens and thereby reducing the effectiveness of the drug to fight human infections, we selected aptamers targeted against the aminoglycoside antibiotic kanamycin A with the aim of constructing a robust and functional assay that can be used for water analysis. With this work we show that aptamers that were derived from a Capture-SELEX procedure targeting against kanamycin A also display binding to related aminoglycoside antibiotics. The binding patterns differ among all tested aptamers so that there are highly substance specific aptamers and more group specific aptamers binding to a different variety of aminoglycoside antibiotics. Also the region of the aminoglycoside antibiotics responsible for aptamer binding can be estimated. Affinities of the different aptamers for their target substance, kanamycin A, are measured with different approaches and are in the micromolar range. Finally, the proof of principle of an assay for detection of kanamycin A in a real water sample is given.

  8. Radiation damage to DNA-binding proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culard, G.; Eon, S.; DeVuyst, G.; Charlier, M.; Spotheim-Maurizot, M.

    2003-01-01

    The DNA-binding properties of proteins are strongly affected upon irradiation. The tetrameric lactose repressor (a dimer of dimers) losses its ability to bind operator DNA as soon as at least two damages per protomer of each dimer occur. The monomeric MC1 protein losses its ability to bind DNA in two steps : i) at low doses only the specific binding is abolished, whereas the non-specific one is still possible; ii) at high doses all binding vanishes. Moreover, the DNA bending induced by MC1 binding is less pronounced for a protein that underwent the low dose irradiation. When the entire DNA-protein complexes are irradiated, the observed disruption of the complexes is mainly due to the damage of the proteins and not to that of DNA. The doses necessary for complex disruption are higher than those inactivating the free protein. This difference, larger for MC1 than for lactose repressor, is due to the protection of the protein by the bound DNA. The oxidation of the protein side chains that are accessible to the radiation-induced hydroxyl radicals seems to represent the inactivating damage

  9. Identification of pseudomurein cell wall binding domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenbakkers, Peter J M; Geerts, Wim J; Ayman-Oz, Nilgün A; Keltjens, Jan T

    2006-12-01

    Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus is a methanogenic Gram-positive microorganism with a cell wall consisting of pseudomurein. Currently, no information is available on extracellular pseudomurein biology and so far only two prophage pseudomurein autolysins, PeiW and PeiP, have been reported. In this paper we show that PeiW and PeiP contain two different N-terminal pseudomurein cell wall binding domains. This finding was used to identify a novel domain, PB007923, on the M. thermautotrophicus genome present in 10 predicted open reading frames. Three homologues were identified in the Methanosphaera stadtmanae genome. Binding studies of fusion constructs of three separate PB007923 domains to green fluorescent protein revealed that it also constituted a cell wall binding domain. Both prophage domains and the PB007923 domain bound to the cell walls of Methanothermobacter species and fluorescence microscopy showed a preference for the septal region. Domain specificities were revealed by binding studies with other pseudomurein-containing archaea. Localized binding was observed for M. stadtmanae and Methanobrevibacter species, while others stained evenly. The identification of the first pseudomurein cell wall binding domains reveals the dynamics of the pseudomurein cell wall and provides marker proteins to study the extracellular pseudomurein biology of M. thermautotrophicus and of other pseudomurein-containing archaea.

  10. The readiness potential reflects intentional binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Gue eJo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available When a voluntary action is causally linked with a sensory outcome, the action and its consequent effect are perceived as being closer together in time. This effect is called intentional binding. Although many experiments were conducted on this phenomenon, the underlying neural mechanisms are not well understood. While intentional binding is specific to voluntary action, we presumed that preconscious brain activity (the readiness potential, RP, which occurs before an action is made, might play an important role in this binding effect. In this study, the brain dynamics were recorded with electroencephalography (EEG and analyzed in single-trials in order to estimate whether intentional binding is correlated with the early neural processes. Moreover, we were interested in different behavioral performance between meditators and non-meditators since meditators are expected to be able to keep attention more consistently on a task. Thus, we performed the intentional binding paradigm with twenty mindfulness meditators and compared them to matched controls. Although, we did not observe a group effect on either behavioral data or EEG recordings, we found that self-initiated movements following ongoing negative deflections of slow cortical potentials (SCPs result in a stronger binding effect compared to positive potentials, especially regarding the perceived time of the consequent effect. Our results provide the first direct evidence that the early neural activity within the range of SCPs affects perceived time of a sensory outcome that is caused by intentional action.

  11. LIBRA: LIgand Binding site Recognition Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Le Viet; Caprari, Silvia; Bizai, Massimiliano; Toti, Daniele; Polticelli, Fabio

    2015-12-15

    In recent years, structural genomics and ab initio molecular modeling activities are leading to the availability of a large number of structural models of proteins whose biochemical function is not known. The aim of this study was the development of a novel software tool that, given a protein's structural model, predicts the presence and identity of active sites and/or ligand binding sites. The algorithm implemented by ligand binding site recognition application (LIBRA) is based on a graph theory approach to find the largest subset of similar residues between an input protein and a collection of known functional sites. The algorithm makes use of two predefined databases for active sites and ligand binding sites, respectively, derived from the Catalytic Site Atlas and the Protein Data Bank. Tests indicate that LIBRA is able to identify the correct binding/active site in 90% of the cases analyzed, 90% of which feature the identified site as ranking first. As far as ligand binding site recognition is concerned, LIBRA outperforms other structure-based ligand binding sites detection tools with which it has been compared. The application, developed in Java SE 7 with a Swing GUI embedding a JMol applet, can be run on any OS equipped with a suitable Java Virtual Machine (JVM), and is available at the following URL: http://www.computationalbiology.it/software/LIBRAv1.zip. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Zinc Binding by Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasna Mrvčić

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc is an essential trace element in all organisms. A common method for the prevention of zinc deficiency is pharmacological supplementation, especially in a highly available form of a metalloprotein complex. The potential of different microbes to bind essential and toxic heavy metals has recently been recognized. In this work, biosorption of zinc by lactic acid bacteria (LAB has been investigated. Specific LAB were assessed for their ability to bind zinc from a water solution. Significant amount of zinc ions was bound, and this binding was found to be LAB species-specific. Differences among the species in binding performance at a concentration range between 10–90 mg/L were evaluated with Langmuir model for biosorption. Binding of zinc was a fast process, strongly influenced by ionic strength, pH, biomass concentration, and temperature. The most effective metal-binding LAB species was Leuconostoc mesenteroides (27.10 mg of Zn2+ per gram of dry mass bound at pH=5 and 32 °C, during 24 h. FT-IR spectroscopy analysis and electron microscopy demonstrated that passive adsorption and active uptake of the zinc ions were involved.

  13. Selective metal binding to Cys-78 within endonuclease V causes an inhibition of catalytic activities without altering nontarget and target DNA binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, M.A.; Friedman, B.; Gruskin, E.A.; Schrock, R.D. III; Lloyd, R.S.

    1991-01-01

    T4 endonuclease V is a pyrimidine dimer-specific DNA repair enzyme which has been previously shown not to require metal ions for either of its two catalytic activities or its DNA binding function. However, we have investigated whether the single cysteine within the enzyme was able to bind metal salts and influence the various activities of this repair enzyme. A series of metals (Hg2+, Ag+, Cu+) were shown to inactivate both endonuclease Vs pyrimidine dimer-specific DNA glycosylase activity and the subsequent apurinic nicking activity. The binding of metal to endonuclease V did not interfere with nontarget DNA scanning or pyrimidine dimer-specific binding. The Cys-78 codon within the endonuclease V gene was changed by oligonucleotide site-directed mutagenesis to Thr-78 and Ser-78 in order to determine whether the native cysteine was directly involved in the enzyme's DNA catalytic activities and whether the cysteine was primarily responsible for the metal binding. The mutant enzymes were able to confer enhanced ultraviolet light (UV) resistance to DNA repair-deficient Escherichia coli at levels equal to that conferred by the wild type enzyme. The C78T mutant enzyme was purified to homogeneity and shown to be catalytically active on pyrimidine dimer-containing DNA. The catalytic activities of the C78T mutant enzyme were demonstrated to be unaffected by the addition of Hg2+ or Ag+ at concentrations 1000-fold greater than that required to inhibit the wild type enzyme. These data suggest that the cysteine is not required for enzyme activity but that the binding of certain metals to that amino acid block DNA incision by either preventing a conformational change in the enzyme after it has bound to a pyrimidine dimer or sterically interfering with the active site residue's accessibility to the pyrimidine dimer

  14. Mannose-Binding Lectin Binds to Amyloid Protein and Modulates Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykol Larvie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mannose-binding lectin (MBL, a soluble factor of the innate immune system, is a pattern recognition molecule with a number of known ligands, including viruses, bacteria, and molecules from abnormal self tissues. In addition to its role in immunity, MBL also functions in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. We present evidence here that MBL binds to amyloid β peptides. MBL binding to other known carbohydrate ligands is calcium-dependent and has been attributed to the carbohydrate-recognition domain, a common feature of other C-type lectins. In contrast, we find that the features of MBL binding to Aβ are more similar to the reported binding characteristics of the cysteine-rich domain of the unrelated mannose receptor and therefore may involve the MBL cysteine-rich domain. Differences in MBL ligand binding may contribute to modulation of inflammatory response and may correlate with the function of MBL in processes such as coagulation and tissue homeostasis.

  15. Immobilized purified folate-binding protein: binding characteristics and use for quantifying folate in erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, S.I.; Holm, J.; Nexo, E.

    1987-01-01

    Purified folate-binding protein from cow's milk was immobilized on monodisperse polymer particles (Dynospheres) activated by rho-toluenesulfonyl chloride. Leakage from the spheres was less than 0.1%, and the binding properties were similar to those of the soluble protein with regard to dissociation, pH optimum for binding pteroylglutamic acid, and specificity for binding various folate derivatives. We used the immobilized folate-binding protein as binding protein in an isotope-dilution assay for quantifying folate in erythrocytes. The detection limit was 50 nmol/L and the CV over a six-month period was 2.3% (means = 1.25 mumol/L, n = 15). The reference interval, for folate measured in erythrocytes of 43 blood donors, was 0.4-1.5 mumol/L

  16. To Bind or not to Bind: It’s in the Contract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvarnø, Christina D.

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the formalization of collaboration through partnering contracts in the construction industry in the USA, Great Britain and Denmark. The article compares the different types of collaborative partnering contracts in the three countries, and provides a conclusion on whether...... the collaborative partnering contract should be binding or non-binding, based on the three empirical contracts analyzed in this article. The partnering contracts in Great Britain and Denmark are legally binding, while in the USA the partnering agreements are non-binding charters or letters of intent. This article...... discusses, in a theoretical perspective, the legal reasoning behind the different partnering approaches, both from a historical and contract law perspective, and furthermore applies a game theoretical approach in evaluating binding versus non-binding partnering contracts. The analysis focuses on private...

  17. MeCP2 Binding Cooperativity Inhibits DNA Modification-Specific Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrapunov, Sergei; Tao, Yisong; Cheng, Huiyong; Padlan, Camille; Harris, Richard; Galanopoulou, Aristea S; Greally, John M; Girvin, Mark E; Brenowitz, Michael

    2016-08-09

    Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is a multifunctional protein that guides neuronal development through its binding to DNA, recognition of sites of methyl-CpG (mCpG) DNA modification, and interaction with other regulatory proteins. Our study explores the relationship between mCpG and hydroxymethyl-CpG (hmCpG) recognition mediated by its mCpG binding domain (MBD) and binding cooperativity mediated by its C-terminal polypeptide. Previous study of the isolated MBD of MeCP2 documented an unusual mechanism by which ion uptake is required for discrimination of mCpG and hmCpG from CpG. MeCP2 binding cooperativity suppresses discrimination of modified DNA and is highly sensitive to both the total ion concentration and the type of counterions. Higher than physiological total ion concentrations completely suppress MeCP2 binding cooperativity, indicating a dominant electrostatic component to the interaction. Substitution of SO4(2-) for Cl(-) at physiological total ion concentrations also suppresses MeCP2 binding cooperativity, This effect is of particular note as the intracellular Cl(-) concentration changes during neuronal development. A related effect is that the protein-stabilizing solutes, TMAO and glutamate, reduce MeCP2 (but not isolated MBD) binding affinity by 2 orders of magnitude without affecting the apparent binding cooperativity. These observations suggest that polypeptide flexibility facilitates DNA binding by MeCP2. Consistent with this view, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses show that ions have discrete effects on the structure of MeCP2, both MBD and the C-terminal domains. Notably, anion substitution results in changes in the NMR chemical shifts of residues, including some whose mutation causes the autism spectrum disorder Rett syndrome. Binding cooperativity makes MeCP2 an effective competitor with histone H1 for accessible DNA sites. The relationship between MeCP2 binding specificity and cooperativity is discussed in the context of chromatin

  18. Src binds cortactin through an SH2 domain cystine-mediated linkage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jason V.; Ammer, Amanda G.; Jett, John E.; Bolcato, Chris A.; Breaux, Jason C.; Martin, Karen H.; Culp, Mark V.; Gannett, Peter M.; Weed, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Tyrosine-kinase-based signal transduction mediated by modular protein domains is critical for cellular function. The Src homology (SH)2 domain is an important conductor of intracellular signaling that binds to phosphorylated tyrosines on acceptor proteins, producing molecular complexes responsible for signal relay. Cortactin is a cytoskeletal protein and tyrosine kinase substrate that regulates actin-based motility through interactions with SH2-domain-containing proteins. The Src kinase SH2 domain mediates cortactin binding and tyrosine phosphorylation, but how Src interacts with cortactin is unknown. Here we demonstrate that Src binds cortactin through cystine bonding between Src C185 in the SH2 domain within the phosphotyrosine binding pocket and cortactin C112/246 in the cortactin repeats domain, independent of tyrosine phosphorylation. Interaction studies show that the presence of reducing agents ablates Src-cortactin binding, eliminates cortactin phosphorylation by Src, and prevents Src SH2 domain binding to cortactin. Tandem MS/MS sequencing demonstrates cystine bond formation between Src C185 and cortactin C112/246. Mutational studies indicate that an intact cystine binding interface is required for Src-mediated cortactin phosphorylation, cell migration, and pre-invadopodia formation. Our results identify a novel phosphotyrosine-independent binding mode between the Src SH2 domain and cortactin. Besides Src, one quarter of all SH2 domains contain cysteines at or near the analogous Src C185 position. This provides a potential alternative mechanism to tyrosine phosphorylation for cysteine-containing SH2 domains to bind cognate ligands that may be widespread in propagating signals regulating diverse cellular functions. PMID:23097045

  19. Metal binding spectrum and model structure of the Bacillus anthracis virulence determinant MntA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigonsky, Elena; Fish, Inbar; Livnat-Levanon, Nurit; Ovcharenko, Elena; Ben-Tal, Nir; Lewinson, Oded

    2015-10-01

    The potentially lethal human pathogen Bacillus anthracis expresses a putative metal import system, MntBCA, which belongs to the large family of ABC transporters. MntBCA is essential for virulence of Bacillus anthracis: deletion of MntA, the system's substrate binding protein, yields a completely non-virulent strain. Here we determined the metal binding spectrum of MntA. In contrast to what can be inferred from growth complementation studies we find no evidence that MntA binds Fe(2+) or Fe(3+). Rather, MntA binds a variety of other metal ions, including Mn(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Co(2+), and Ni(2+) with affinities ranging from 10(-6) to 10(-8) M. Binding of Zn(2+) and Co(2+) have a pronounced thermo-stabilizing effect on MntA, with Mn(2+) having a milder effect. The thermodynamic stability of MntA, competition experiments, and metal binding and release experiments all suggest that Mn(2+) is the metal that is likely transported by MntBCA and is therefore the limiting factor for virulence of Bacillus anthracis. A homology-model of MntA shows a single, highly conserved metal binding site, with four residues that participate in metal coordination: two histidines, a glutamate, and an aspartate. The metals bind to this site in a mutually exclusive manner, yet surprisingly, mutational analysis shows that for proper coordination each metal requires a different subset of these four residues. ConSurf evolutionary analysis and structural comparison of MntA and its homologues suggest that substrate binding proteins (SBPs) of metal ions use a pair of highly conserved prolines to interact with their cognate ABC transporters. This proline pair is found exclusively in ABC import systems of metal ions.

  20. The Role of Genome Accessibility in Transcription Factor Binding in Bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio L C Gomes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ChIP-seq enables genome-scale identification of regulatory regions that govern gene expression. However, the biological insights generated from ChIP-seq analysis have been limited to predictions of binding sites and cooperative interactions. Furthermore, ChIP-seq data often poorly correlate with in vitro measurements or predicted motifs, highlighting that binding affinity alone is insufficient to explain transcription factor (TF-binding in vivo. One possibility is that binding sites are not equally accessible across the genome. A more comprehensive biophysical representation of TF-binding is required to improve our ability to understand, predict, and alter gene expression. Here, we show that genome accessibility is a key parameter that impacts TF-binding in bacteria. We developed a thermodynamic model that parameterizes ChIP-seq coverage in terms of genome accessibility and binding affinity. The role of genome accessibility is validated using a large-scale ChIP-seq dataset of the M. tuberculosis regulatory network. We find that accounting for genome accessibility led to a model that explains 63% of the ChIP-seq profile variance, while a model based in motif score alone explains only 35% of the variance. Moreover, our framework enables de novo ChIP-seq peak prediction and is useful for inferring TF-binding peaks in new experimental conditions by reducing the need for additional experiments. We observe that the genome is more accessible in intergenic regions, and that increased accessibility is positively correlated with gene expression and anti-correlated with distance to the origin of replication. Our biophysically motivated model provides a more comprehensive description of TF-binding in vivo from first principles towards a better representation of gene regulation in silico, with promising applications in systems biology.

  1. Doubling the Size of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Ligand Binding Pocket by Deacylcortivazol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suino-Powell, Kelly; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Chenghai; Tao, Yong-guang; Tolbert, W. David; Simons, Jr., S. Stoney; Xu, H. Eric (NIH)

    2010-03-08

    A common feature of nuclear receptor ligand binding domains (LBD) is a helical sandwich fold that nests a ligand binding pocket within the bottom half of the domain. Here we report that the ligand pocket of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) can be continuously extended into the top half of the LBD by binding to deacylcortivazol (DAC), an extremely potent glucocorticoid. It has been puzzling for decades why DAC, which contains a phenylpyrazole replacement at the conserved 3-ketone of steroid hormones that are normally required for activation of their cognate receptors, is a potent GR activator. The crystal structure of the GR LBD bound to DAC and the fourth LXXLL motif of steroid receptor coactivator 1 reveals that the GR ligand binding pocket is expanded to a size of 1,070 {angstrom}{sup 3}, effectively doubling the size of the GR dexamethasone-binding pocket of 540 {angstrom}{sup 3} and yet leaving the structure of the coactivator binding site intact. DAC occupies only {approx}50% of the space of the pocket but makes intricate interactions with the receptor around the phenylpyrazole group that accounts for the high-affinity binding of DAC. The dramatic expansion of the DAC-binding pocket thus highlights the conformational adaptability of GR to ligand binding. The new structure also allows docking of various nonsteroidal ligands that cannot be fitted into the previous structures, thus providing a new rational template for drug discovery of steroidal and nonsteroidal glucocorticoids that can be specifically designed to reach the unoccupied space of the expanded pocket.

  2. The Structure of the Iron Binding Protein, FutA1, from Synechocystis 6803*

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koropatkin, Nicole; Randich, Amelia M.; Bhattacharyya-Pakrasi, Maitrayee; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    Cyanobacteria account for a significant percentage of aquatic primary productivity even in areas where the concentrations of essential micronutrients are extremely low. To better understand the mechanism of iron selectivity and transport, the structure of the solute-binding domain of an ABC iron transporter, FutA1, was determined in the presence and absence of iron. The iron ion is bound within the 'C-clamp' structure via four tyrosine and one histidine residues. There are extensive interactions between these ligating residues and the rest of the protein such that the conformations of the side chains remain relatively unchanged as the iron is released by the opening of the metal binding cleft. This is in stark contrast to the zinc binding protein, ZnuA, where the domains of the metal binding protein remain relatively fixed while the ligating residues rotate out of the binding pocket upon metal release. The rotation of the domains in FutA1 is facilitated by two flexible β-strands running along the back of the protein that act like a hinge during domain motion. This motion may require relatively little energy since total contact area between the domains is the same whether the protein is in the open or closed conformation. Consistent with the pH dependency of iron binding, the main trigger for iron release is likely the histidine in the iron-binding site. Finally, neither FutA1 nor FutA2 binds iron as a siderophore complex or in the presence of anions and both preferentially bind ferrous over ferric ions

  3. Characterization of angiotensin converting enzyme by [3H]captopril binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strittmatter, S.M.; Snyder, S.H.

    1986-01-01

    We demonstrate that [3H]captopril selectively labels angiotensin converting enzyme (EC 3.14.15.1) (ACE) and employ this technique to probe enzyme-inhibitor interactions. [3H]Captopril binding sites copurify with ACE activity from rat lung or rat brain. At each stage of the purification the Vmax/Bmax ratio, or kcat is 17,000 min-1 with hippuryl-L-histidyl-L-leucine as substrate. The specificity of [3H]captopril binding is apparent in the similar pharmacologic profile of inhibition in crude and pure enzyme preparations. Furthermore, binding sites and enzyme activity comigrate in gel filtration and sucrose gradient sedimentation experiments. Equilibrium analysis of [3H]captopril binding to purified ACE reveals a Bmax of 6 nmol/mg of protein (KD = 2 nM), demonstrating the presence of one inhibitor binding site per polypeptide chain. The kinetics of [3H]captopril binding are characterized by monophasic association and dissociation rate constants of 0.026 nM-1 min-1 and 0.034 min-1, respectively. The affinity of ACE for both [3H] captopril and enalaprilat is greater at 37 degrees than at 0 degree, demonstrating that these interactions are entropically driven, perhaps by an isomerization of the enzyme molecule. The ionic requirements for [3H]captopril binding and substrate catalysis differ. Chloride and bromide ion, but not fluoride, are about 100-fold more potent stimulators of binding than catalysis. When the active site Zn2+ ion is replaced by Co2+, catalysis was stimulated 2-fold, whereas binding activity was decreased by 70%

  4. Binding dynamics of hepatitis C virus' NS5A amphipathic peptide to cell and model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Nam-Joon; Cheong, Kwang Ho; Lee, ChoongHo; Frank, Curtis W; Glenn, Jeffrey S

    2007-06-01

    Membrane association of the hepatitis C virus NS5A protein is required for viral replication. This association is dependent on an N-terminal amphipathic helix (AH) within NS5A and is restricted to a subset of host cell intracellular membranes. The mechanism underlying this specificity is not known, but it may suggest a novel strategy for developing specific antiviral therapy. Here we have probed the mechanistic details of NS5A AH-mediated binding to both cell-derived and model membranes by use of biochemical membrane flotation and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) with dissipation. With both assays, we observed AH-mediated binding to model lipid bilayers. When cell-derived membranes were coated on the quartz nanosensor, however, significantly more binding was detected, and the QCM-derived kinetic measurements suggested the existence of an interacting receptor in the target membranes. Biochemical flotation assays performed with trypsin-treated cell-derived membranes exhibited reduced AH-mediated membrane binding, while membrane binding of control cytochrome b5 remained unaffected. Similarly, trypsin treatment of the nanosensor coated with cellular membranes abolished AH peptide binding to the cellular membranes but did not affect the binding of a control lipid-binding peptide. These results therefore suggest that a protein plays a critical role in mediating and stabilizing the binding of NS5A's AH to its target membrane. These results also demonstrate the successful development of a new nanosensor technology ideal both for studying the interaction between a protein and its target membrane and for developing inhibitors of that interaction.

  5. Binding Dynamics of Hepatitis C Virus' NS5A Amphipathic Peptide to Cell and Model Membranes▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Nam-Joon; Cheong, Kwang Ho; Lee, ChoongHo; Frank, Curtis W.; Glenn, Jeffrey S.

    2007-01-01

    Membrane association of the hepatitis C virus NS5A protein is required for viral replication. This association is dependent on an N-terminal amphipathic helix (AH) within NS5A and is restricted to a subset of host cell intracellular membranes. The mechanism underlying this specificity is not known, but it may suggest a novel strategy for developing specific antiviral therapy. Here we have probed the mechanistic details of NS5A AH-mediated binding to both cell-derived and model membranes by use of biochemical membrane flotation and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) with dissipation. With both assays, we observed AH-mediated binding to model lipid bilayers. When cell-derived membranes were coated on the quartz nanosensor, however, significantly more binding was detected, and the QCM-derived kinetic measurements suggested the existence of an interacting receptor in the target membranes. Biochemical flotation assays performed with trypsin-treated cell-derived membranes exhibited reduced AH-mediated membrane binding, while membrane binding of control cytochrome b5 remained unaffected. Similarly, trypsin treatment of the nanosensor coated with cellular membranes abolished AH peptide binding to the cellular membranes but did not affect the binding of a control lipid-binding peptide. These results therefore suggest that a protein plays a critical role in mediating and stabilizing the binding of NS5A's AH to its target membrane. These results also demonstrate the successful development of a new nanosensor technology ideal both for studying the interaction between a protein and its target membrane and for developing inhibitors of that interaction. PMID:17428867

  6. Crystal Structure of the Botulinum Neurotoxin Type G Binding Domain: Insight into Cell Surface Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenmark, Pål; Dong, Min; Dupuy, Jérôme; Chapman, Edwin R.; Stevens, Raymond C. (Scripps); (UW)

    2011-11-02

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) typically bind the neuronal cell surface via dual interactions with both protein receptors and gangliosides. We present here the 1.9-{angstrom} X-ray structure of the BoNT serotype G (BoNT/G) receptor binding domain (residues 868-1297) and a detailed view of protein receptor and ganglioside binding regions. The ganglioside binding motif (SxWY) has a conserved structure compared to the corresponding regions in BoNT serotype A and BoNT serotype B (BoNT/B), but several features of interactions with the hydrophilic face of the ganglioside are absent at the opposite side of the motif in the BoNT/G ganglioside binding cleft. This may significantly reduce the affinity between BoNT/G and gangliosides. BoNT/G and BoNT/B share the protein receptor synaptotagmin (Syt) I/II. The Syt binding site has a conserved hydrophobic plateau located centrally in the proposed protein receptor binding interface (Tyr1189, Phe1202, Ala1204, Pro1205, and Phe1212). Interestingly, only 5 of 14 residues that are important for binding between Syt-II and BoNT/B are conserved in BoNT/G, suggesting that the means by which BoNT/G and BoNT/B bind Syt diverges more than previously appreciated. Indeed, substitution of Syt-II Phe47 and Phe55 with alanine residues had little effect on the binding of BoNT/G, but strongly reduced the binding of BoNT/B. Furthermore, an extended solvent-exposed hydrophobic loop, located between the Syt binding site and the ganglioside binding cleft, may serve as a third membrane association and binding element to contribute to high-affinity binding to the neuronal membrane. While BoNT/G and BoNT/B are homologous to each other and both utilize Syt-I/Syt-II as their protein receptor, the precise means by which these two toxin serotypes bind to Syt appears surprisingly divergent.

  7. Are many Z-DNA binding proteins actually phospholipid-binding proteins?

    OpenAIRE

    Krishna, P; Kennedy, B P; Waisman, D M; van de Sande, J H; McGhee, J D

    1990-01-01

    We used a Z-DNA affinity column to isolate a collection of Z-DNA binding proteins from a high salt extract of Escherichia coli. We identified one of the major Z-DNA binding proteins of this fraction, not as a protein involved in gene regulation or genetic recombination, but rather as an outer membrane porin protein. We then showed that several other known phospholipid-binding proteins (bovine lung annexins and human serum lipoproteins) also bind much more tightly to Z-DNA than to B-DNA. In al...

  8. Determining the binding mode and binding affinity constant of tyrosine kinase inhibitor PD153035 to DNA using optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Chih-Ming [School of Dental Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30043, Taiwan (China); Lee, Yuarn-Jang [Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Wang, Wei-Ting [School of Dental Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Chien-Ting [Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Jing-Shin [School of Dental Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chien-Ming [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30043, Taiwan (China); Ou, Keng-Liang [Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); and others

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} PD153035 is a DNA intercalator and intercalation occurs only under very low salt concentration. {yields} The minimum distance between adjacent bound PD153035 {approx} 11 bp. {yields} Binding affinity constant for PD153035 is 1.18({+-}0.09) x 10{sup 4} (1/M). {yields} The change of binding free energy of PD153035-DNA interaction is -5.49 kcal mol{sup -1} at 23 {+-} 0.5 {sup o}C. -- Abstract: Accurately predicting binding affinity constant (K{sub A}) is highly required to determine the binding energetics of the driving forces in drug-DNA interactions. Recently, PD153035, brominated anilinoquinazoline, has been reported to be not only a highly selective inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor but also a DNA intercalator. Here, we use a dual-trap optical tweezers to determining K{sub A} for PD153035, where K{sub A} is determined from the changes in B-form contour length (L) of PD153035-DNA complex. Here, L is fitted using a modified wormlike chain model. We found that a noticeable increment in L in 1 mM sodium cacodylate was exhibited. Furthermore, our results showed that K{sub A} = 1.18({+-}0.09) x 10{sup 4} (1/M) at 23 {+-} 0.5 {sup o}C and the minimum distance between adjacent bound PD153035 {approx} 11 bp. We anticipate that by using this approach we can determine the complete thermodynamic profiles due to the presence of DNA intercalators.

  9. Use of Bacteria- and Fungus-Binding Mesh in Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Provides Significant Granulation Tissue Without Tissue Ingrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmsjö, Malin; Lindstedt, Sandra; Ingemansson, Richard; Gustafsson, Lotta

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Bacteria- and fungus-binding mesh traps and inactivates bacteria and fungus, which makes it interesting, alternative, and wound filler for negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). The aim of this study was to compare pathogen-binding mesh, black foam, and gauze in NPWT with regard to granulation tissue formation and ingrowth of wound bed tissue in the wound filler. Methods: Wounds on the backs of 8 pigs underwent 72 hours of NPWT using pathogen-binding mesh, foam, or gauze. Microdeformation of the wound bed and granulation tissue formation and the force required to remove the wound fillers was studied. Results: Pathogen-binding mesh produced more granulation tissue, leukocyte infiltration, and tissue disorganization in the wound bed than gauze, but less than foam. All 3 wound fillers caused microdeformation of the wound bed surface. Little force was required to remove pathogen-binding mesh and gauze, while considerable force was needed to remove foam. This is the result of tissue growth into the foam, but not into pathogen-binding mesh or gauze, as shown by examination of biopsy sections from the wound bed. Conclusions: This study shows that using pathogen-binding mesh as a wound filler for NPWT leads to a significant amount of granulation tissue in the wound bed, more than that with gauze, but eliminates the problems of ingrowth of the wound bed into the wound filler. Pathogen-binding mesh is thus an interesting wound filler in NPWT. PMID:24501617

  10. Unsaturated long-chain fatty acids inhibit the binding of oxidized low-density lipoproteins to a model CD36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Marie; Kozai, Yuki; Tsuzuki, Satoshi; Matsuno, Yukari; Fujioka, Maiko; Kamei, Kozue; Inagaki, Hitomi; Eguchi, Ai; Matsumura, Shigenobu; Inoue, Kazuo; Fushiki, Tohru

    2014-01-01

    Transmembrane protein CD36 binds multiple ligands, including oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDLs) and long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs). Our aim was to determine whether LCFAs compete with oxLDLs for binding to CD36. We addressed this issue by examining the inhibitory effect of LCFAs against the binding of Alexa-fluor-labeled oxLDLs (AFL-oxLDL) to a synthetic peptide representing the oxLDL-binding site on CD36 (3S-CD36₁₅₀₋₁₆₈). All of the unsaturated LCFAs tested, inhibited the binding of AFL-oxLDL to 3S-CD36₁₅₀₋₁₆₈, albeit to varying degrees. For instance, the concentrations required for 50% inhibition of binding for oleic, linoleic, and α-linolenic acids were 0.25, 0.97, and 1.2 mM, respectively. None of the saturated LCFAs tested (e.g. stearic acid) exhibited inhibitory effects. These results suggest that at least unsaturated LCFAs can compete with oxLDLs for binding to CD36. The study also provides information on the structural requirements of LCFAs for inhibition of oxLDLs-CD36 binding.

  11. Structure-function relationships of Na+, K+, ATP, or Mg2+ binding and energy transduction in Na,K-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Peter L.; Pedersen, Per Amstrup

    2000-01-01

    Na,K-ATPase; Mutagenesis; Na+ binding; K+ binding; Tl+ binding; Mg2+ binding; ATP binding; Cation binding site; Energy transduction......Na,K-ATPase; Mutagenesis; Na+ binding; K+ binding; Tl+ binding; Mg2+ binding; ATP binding; Cation binding site; Energy transduction...

  12. Pre-binding prior to full engagement improves loading conditions for front-row players in contested Rugby Union scrums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preatoni, E; Cazzola, D; Stokes, K A; England, M; Trewartha, G

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the effect of a "PreBind" engagement protocol on the biomechanics of contested Rugby Union scrummaging at different playing levels. "PreBind" requires front-row props to take a bind on opposing players prior to the engagement, and to maintain the bind throughout the scrum duration. Twenty-seven teams from five different playing levels performed live scrums under realistic conditions. Video analysis, pressures sensors, and inertial measurement units measured biomechanical outcomes as teams scrummaged following different engagement protocols: the CTPE (referee calls "crouch-touch-pause-engage"), the CTS ("crouch-touch-set"), and the PreBind ("crouch-bind-set") variants. PreBind reduced the set-up distance between the packs (-27%) and the speed at which they came into contact by more than 20%. The peak biomechanical stresses acting on front rows during the engagement phase were decreased in PreBind by 14-25% with respect to CTPE and CTS, without reducing the capability to generate force in the subsequent sustained push. No relevant main effects were recorded for playing level due to within-group variability and there were no interaction effects between playing level and engagement protocol. Pre-binding reduced many mechanical quantities that have been indicated as possible factors for chronic and acute injury, and may lead to safer engagement conditions without affecting subsequent performance. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The conserved WW-domain binding sites in Dystroglycan C-terminus are essential but partially redundant for Dystroglycan function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng W-M

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dystroglycan (Dg is a transmembrane protein that is a part of the Dystrophin Glycoprotein Complex (DGC which connects the extracellular matrix to the actin cytoskeleton. The C-terminal end of Dg contains a number of putative SH3, SH2 and WW domain binding sites. The most C-terminal PPXY motif has been established as a binding site for Dystrophin (Dys WW-domain. However, our previous studies indicate that both Dystroglycan PPXY motives, WWbsI and WWbsII can bind Dystrophin protein in vitro. Results We now find that both WW binding sites are important for maintaining full Dg function in the establishment of oocyte polarity in Drosophila. If either WW binding site is mutated, the Dg protein can still be active. However, simultaneous mutations in both WW binding sites abolish the Dg activities in both overexpression and loss-of-function oocyte polarity assays in vivo. Additionally, sequence comparisons of WW binding sites in 12 species of Drosophila, as well as in humans, reveal a high level of conservation. This preservation throughout evolution supports the idea that both WW binding sites are functionally required. Conclusion Based on the obtained results we propose that the presence of the two WW binding sites in Dystroglycan secures the essential interaction between Dg and Dys and might further provide additional regulation for the cytoskeletal interactions of this complex.

  14. Mannose-binding geometry of pradimicin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yu; Doi, Takashi; Taketani, Takara; Takegoshi, K; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Ito, Yukishige

    2013-08-05

    Pradimicins (PRMs) and benanomicins are the only family of non-peptidic natural products with lectin-like properties, that is, they recognize D-mannopyranoside (Man) in the presence of Ca(2+) ions. Coupled with their unique Man binding ability, they exhibit antifungal and anti-HIV activities through binding to Man-containing glycans of pathogens. Notwithstanding the great potential of PRMs as the lectin mimics and therapeutic leads, their molecular basis of Man recognition has yet to be established. Their aggregate-forming propensity has impeded conventional interaction analysis in solution, and the analytical difficulty is exacerbated by the existence of two Man binding sites in PRMs. In this work, we investigated the geometry of the primary Man binding of PRM-A, an original member of PRMs, by the recently developed analytical strategy using the solid aggregate composed of the 1:1 complex of PRM-A and Man. Evaluation of intermolecular distances by solid-state NMR spectroscopy revealed that the C2-C4 region of Man is in close contact with the primary binding site of PRM-A, while the C1 and C6 positions of Man are relatively distant. The binding geometry was further validated by co-precipitation experiments using deoxy-Man derivatives, leading to the proposal that PRM-A binds not only to terminal Man residues at the non-reducing end of glycans, but also to internal 6-substituted Man residues. The present study provides new insights into the molecular basis of Man recognition and glycan specificity of PRM-A. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Alpine ski bindings and injuries. Current findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natri, A; Beynnon, B D; Ettlinger, C F; Johnson, R J; Shealy, J E

    1999-07-01

    In spite of the fact that the overall incidence of alpine ski injuries has decreased during the last 25 years, the incidence of serious knee sprains usually involving the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has risen dramatically since the late 1970s. This trend runs counter to a dramatic reduction in lower leg injuries that began in the early 1970s and to date has lowered the risk of injury below the knee by almost 90%. One of the primary design objectives of modern ski boots and bindings has been to protect the skier from tibia and ankle fractures. So, in that sense, they have done an excellent job. However, despite advances in equipment design, modern ski bindings have not protected the knee from serious ligament trauma. At the present time, we are unaware of any binding design, settings or function that can protect both the knee and lower extremities from serious ligament sprains. No innovative change in binding design appears to be on the horizon that has the potential to reduce the risk of these severe knee injuries. Indeed, only 1 study has demonstrated a means to help reduce this risk of serious knee sprains, and this study involved education of skiers, not ski equipment. Despite the inability of bindings to reduce the risk of severe knee injuries there can be no doubt that improvement in ski bindings has been the most important factor in the marked reduction in incidence of lower leg and ankle injuries during the last 25 years. The authors strongly endorse the application of present International Standards Organisation (ISO) and American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards concerning mounting, setting and maintaining modern 'state of the art' bindings.

  16. An ODP computational model of a cooperative binding object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logé, Christophe; Najm, Elie; Chen, Ken

    1997-12-01

    A next generation of systems that should appear will have to manage simultaneously several geographically distributed users. These systems belong to the class of computer-supported cooperative work systems (CSCW). The development of such complex systems requires rigorous development methods and flexible open architectures. Open distributed processing (ODP) is a standardization effort that aims at providing such architectures. ODP features appropriate abstraction levels and a clear articulation between requirements, programming and infrastructure support. ODP advocates the use of formal methods for the specification of systems and components. The computational model, an object-based model, one of the abstraction levels identified within ODP, plays a central role in the global architecture. In this model, basic objects can be composed with communication and distribution abstractions (called binding objects) to form a computational specification of distributed systems, or applications. Computational specifications can then be mapped (in a mechanism akin to compilation) onto an engineering solution. We use an ODP-inspired method to computationally specify a cooperative system. We start from a general purpose component that we progressively refine into a collection of basic and binding objects. We focus on two issues of a co-authoring application, namely, dynamic reconfiguration and multiview synchronization. We discuss solutions for these issues and formalize them using the MT-LOTOS specification language that is currently studied in the ISO standardization formal description techniques group.

  17. CaMELS: In silico prediction of calmodulin binding proteins and their binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Wajid Arshad; Asif, Amina; Andleeb, Saiqa; Minhas, Fayyaz Ul Amir Afsar

    2017-09-01

    Due to Ca 2+ -dependent binding and the sequence diversity of Calmodulin (CaM) binding proteins, identifying CaM interactions and binding sites in the wet-lab is tedious and costly. Therefore, computational methods for this purpose are crucial to the design of such wet-lab experiments. We present an algorithm suite called CaMELS (CalModulin intEraction Learning System) for predicting proteins that interact with CaM as well as their binding sites using sequence information alone. CaMELS offers state of the art accuracy for both CaM interaction and binding site prediction and can aid biologists in studying CaM binding proteins. For CaM interaction prediction, CaMELS uses protein sequence features coupled with a large-margin classifier. CaMELS models the binding site prediction problem using multiple instance machine learning with a custom optimization algorithm which allows more effective learning over imprecisely annotated CaM-binding sites during training. CaMELS has been extensively benchmarked using a variety of data sets, mutagenic studies, proteome-wide Gene Ontology enrichment analyses and protein structures. Our experiments indicate that CaMELS outperforms simple motif-based search and other existing methods for interaction and binding site prediction. We have also found that the whole sequence of a protein, rather than just its binding site, is important for predicting its interaction with CaM. Using the machine learning model in CaMELS, we have identified important features of protein sequences for CaM interaction prediction as well as characteristic amino acid sub-sequences and their relative position for identifying CaM binding sites. Python code for training and evaluating CaMELS together with a webserver implementation is available at the URL: http://faculty.pieas.edu.pk/fayyaz/software.html#camels. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A type IV pilus mediates DNA binding during natural transformation in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurenceau, Raphaël; Péhau-Arnaudet, Gérard; Baconnais, Sonia; Gault, Joseph; Malosse, Christian; Dujeancourt, Annick; Campo, Nathalie; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Le Cam, Eric; Claverys, Jean-Pierre; Fronzes, Rémi

    2013-01-01

    Natural genetic transformation is widely distributed in bacteria and generally occurs during a genetically programmed differentiated state called competence. This process promotes genome plasticity and adaptability in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Transformation requires the binding and internalization of exogenous DNA, the mechanisms of which are unclear. Here, we report the discovery of a transformation pilus at the surface of competent Streptococcus pneumoniae cells. This Type IV-like pilus, which is primarily composed of the ComGC pilin, is required for transformation. We provide evidence that it directly binds DNA and propose that the transformation pilus is the primary DNA receptor on the bacterial cell during transformation in S. pneumoniae. Being a central component of the transformation apparatus, the transformation pilus enables S. pneumoniae, a major Gram-positive human pathogen, to acquire resistance to antibiotics and to escape vaccines through the binding and incorporation of new genetic material.

  19. A type IV pilus mediates DNA binding during natural transformation in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Laurenceau

    Full Text Available Natural genetic transformation is widely distributed in bacteria and generally occurs during a genetically programmed differentiated state called competence. This process promotes genome plasticity and adaptability in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Transformation requires the binding and internalization of exogenous DNA, the mechanisms of which are unclear. Here, we report the discovery of a transformation pilus at the surface of competent Streptococcus pneumoniae cells. This Type IV-like pilus, which is primarily composed of the ComGC pilin, is required for transformation. We provide evidence that it directly binds DNA and propose that the transformation pilus is the primary DNA receptor on the bacterial cell during transformation in S. pneumoniae. Being a central component of the transformation apparatus, the transformation pilus enables S. pneumoniae, a major Gram-positive human pathogen, to acquire resistance to antibiotics and to escape vaccines through the binding and incorporation of new genetic material.

  20. Perlecan is recruited by dystroglycan to nodes of Ranvier and binds the clustering molecule gliomedin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombelli, Cristina; Palmisano, Marilena; Eshed-Eisenbach, Yael; Zambroni, Desirée; Pavoni, Ernesto; Ferri, Cinzia; Saccucci, Stefania; Nicole, Sophie; Soininen, Raija; McKee, Karen K; Yurchenco, Peter D; Peles, Elior; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Feltri, M Laura

    2015-02-02

    Fast neural conduction requires accumulation of Na(+) channels at nodes of Ranvier. Dedicated adhesion molecules on myelinating cells and axons govern node organization. Among those, specific laminins and dystroglycan complexes contribute to Na(+) channel clustering at peripheral nodes by unknown mechanisms. We show that in addition to facing the basal lamina, dystroglycan is found near the nodal matrix around axons, binds matrix components, and participates in initial events of nodogenesis. We identify the dystroglycan-ligand perlecan as a novel nodal component and show that dystroglycan is required for the selective accumulation of perlecan at nodes. Perlecan binds the clustering molecule gliomedin and enhances clustering of node of Ranvier components. These data show that proteoglycans have specific roles in peripheral nodes and indicate that peripheral and central axons use similar strategies but different molecules to form nodes of Ranvier. Further, our data indicate that dystroglycan binds free matrix that is not organized in a basal lamina. © 2015 Colombelli et al.

  1. The Instant Glidein; A generic approach for the late binding of jobs to various resource types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Laurence; Steers, Iain

    2017-10-01

    High-throughput computing requires resources to be allocated so that jobs can be run. In a highly distributed environment that may be comprised of multiple levels of queueing, it may not be certain where, what and when jobs will run. It is therefore desirable to first acquire the resource before assigning it a job. This late binding approach has been implemented in resources managed by batch systems using the pilot jobs paradigm, with the HTCondor glidein being a reference implementation. For resources that are managed by other means such as the IaaS, alternative approaches for late binding may be required. This contribution describes one such approach, the instant glidein, as a generic method for implementing late binding to various resource types.

  2. Failed fertilization with conventional oocyte insemination can be overcome with the ability of ICSI according to binding or failing to bind to the zona pellucida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Check, J H; Bollendorf, A; Wilson, C

    2016-01-01

    To determine the frequency of failed fertilization with conventional oocyte insemination and to determine the ability of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) to overcome the failed fertilization according to binding or failing to bind to the zona pellucida. Retrospective review of 12,448 in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle to identify cycles where failed fertilization occurred following conventional oocyte insemination with seemingly normal sperm. A number of three oocytes retrieved was required. There were only 12 cases of failed fertilization (0.1%). Six were related to failure of any or few sperm attaching to the zona pellucida These six had high fertilization rates with ICSI. Six had normal attachment and five attempted another cycle, this time with ICSI. Only 60% had good fertilization. When there is failed fertilization with normal sperm oocyte binding following conventional oocyte insemination, ICSI may still be effective in 60% of the cases, but it would be probably recommended to combine ICSI with artificial oocyte activation by calcium ionophore.

  3. Haptenation: Chemical Reactivity and Protein Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itai Chipinda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Low molecular weight chemical (LMW allergens are commonly referred to as haptens. Haptens must complex with proteins to be recognized by the immune system. The majority of occupationally related haptens are reactive, electrophilic chemicals, or are metabolized to reactive metabolites that form covalent bonds with nucleophilic centers on proteins. Nonelectrophilic protein binding may occur through disulfide exchange, coordinate covalent binding onto metal ions on metalloproteins or of metal allergens, themselves, to the major histocompatibility complex. Recent chemical reactivity kinetic studies suggest that the rate of protein binding is a major determinant of allergenic potency; however, electrophilic strength does not seem to predict the ability of a hapten to skew the response between Th1 and Th2. Modern proteomic mass spectrometry methods that allow detailed delineation of potential differences in protein binding sites may be valuable in predicting if a chemical will stimulate an immediate or delayed hypersensitivity. Chemical aspects related to both reactivity and protein-specific binding are discussed.

  4. Computational search for aflatoxin binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Jinfeng; Zhang, Lujia; He, Xiao; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2017-10-01

    Aflatoxin is one of the mycotoxins that contaminate various food products. Among various aflatoxin types (B1, B2, G1, G2 and M1), aflatoxin B1 is the most important and the most toxic one. In this study, through computational screening, we found that several proteins may bind specifically with different type of aflatoxins. Combination of theoretical methods including target fishing, molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, MM/PBSA calculation were utilized to search for new aflatoxin B1 binding proteins. A recently developed method for calculating entropic contribution to binding free energy called interaction entropy (IE) was employed to compute the binding free energy between the protein and aflatoxin B1. Through comprehensive comparison, three proteins, namely, trihydroxynaphthalene reductase, GSK-3b, and Pim-1 were eventually selected as potent aflatoxin B1 binding proteins. GSK-3b and Pim-1 are drug targets of cancers or neurological diseases. GSK-3b is the strongest binder for aflatoxin B1.

  5. Engineering Escherichia coli to bind to cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zijian; Meng, Liuyi; Ni, Congjian; Yao, Lanqiu; Zhang, Fengyu; Jin, Yuji; Mu, Xuelang; Zhu, Shiyu; Lu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Shiyu; Yu, Congyu; Wang, Chenggong; Zheng, Pu; Wu, Jie; Kang, Li; Zhang, Haoqian M; Ouyang, Qi

    2017-03-01

    We engineered Escherichia coli cells to bind to cyanobacteria by heterologously producing and displaying lectins of the target cyanobacteria on their surface. To prove the efficacy of our approach, we tested this design on Microcystis aeruginosa with microvirin (Mvn), the lectin endogenously produced by this cyanobacterium. The coding sequence of Mvn was C-terminally fused to the ice nucleation protein NC (INPNC) gene and expressed in E. coli. Results showed that E. coli cells expressing the INPNC::Mvn fusion protein were able to bind to M. aeruginosa and the average number of E. coli cells bound to each cyanobacterial cell was enhanced 8-fold. Finally, a computational model was developed to simulate the binding reaction and help reconstruct the binding parameters. To our best knowledge, this is the first report on the binding of two organisms in liquid culture mediated by the surface display of lectins and it may serve as a novel approach to mediate microbial adhesion. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Assessment of the binding properties of granuloszint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubiger, P.A.; Hasler, P.H.; Novak-Hofer, I.; Blaeuenstein, P.

    1989-09-01

    /sup 123/I-granuloszint (a murine monoclonal antibody - called AK-47 - against NCA-95 glycoprotein of granulocytes) has been proved to be a very convenient and successful radiopharmaceutical for visualizing infectious diseases. For a broad introduction in routine nuclear medicine it was necessary to optimize the labelling method and to determine in vitro exactly those biological and binding parameters which are relevant for an effective application in vivo. Binding to granulocytes has been shown to be specific and saturable (nonspecific binding about 10%) and is not via the Fc part of the antibody. The investigation of the binding properties of /sup 125/I-labelled AK-47 gave the following results: Affinity constant 5x10/sup 8/, 20,000-100,000 epitopes per granulocyte and an immunoreactivity of more than 90%. Labelling with /sup 123/I reduced the immunoreactivity to 40%. The Lindmo method and immunoblotting are used as quality control to check the likely in vivo behaviour of the labelled antibody. There is a good correspondence between the results from the two methods. With our special labelling method and the different in vitro checks we have found a reliable way to control the production and to assure an optimal binding behaviour of /sup 123/I-granuloszint. (orig.).

  7. Human serum albumin binding of certain antimalarials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Olivera S.; Cvijetić, Ilija N.; Zlatović, Mario V.; Opsenica, Igor M.; Konstantinović, Jelena M.; Terzić Jovanović, Nataša V.; Šolaja, Bogdan A.; Verbić, Tatjana Ž.

    2018-03-01

    Interactions between eight in-house synthesized aminoquinolines, along with well-known chloroquine, and human serum albumin (HSA) have been studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. The synthesized aminoquinolines, despite being structurally diverse, were found to be very potent antimalarials. Fluorescence measurements indicate that three compounds having additional thiophene or benzothiophene substructure bind more strongly to HSA than other studied compounds. Competitive binding experiments indicate that these three compounds bind significantly stronger to warfarin compared to diazepam binding site. Fluorescence quenching at three temperatures (20, 25, and 37 °C) was analyzed using classical Stern-Volmer equation, and a static quenching mechanism was proposed. The enthalpy and entropy changes upon sulphur-containing compound-HSA interactions were calculated using Van't Hoff equation. Positive values of enthalpy and entropy changes indicate that non-specific, hydrophobic interactions are the main contributors to HSA-compound interaction. Molecular docking and calculated lipophilicity descriptors indicate the same, pointing out that the increased lipophilicity of sulphur-containing compounds might be a reason for their better binding to HSA. Obtained results might contribute to design of novel derivatives with improved pharmacokinetic properties and drug efficacy.

  8. Binding of anandamide to bovine serum albumin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen, I.N.; Hansen, Harald S.

    2003-01-01

    The endocannabinoid anandamide is of lipid nature and may thus bind to albumin in the vascular system, as do fatty acids. The knowledge of the free water-phase concentration of anandamide is essential for the investigations of its transfer from the binding protein to cellular membranes, because a...... in aqueous compartments. - Bojesen, I. N., and H. S. Hansen. Binding of anandamide to bovine serum albumin.......The endocannabinoid anandamide is of lipid nature and may thus bind to albumin in the vascular system, as do fatty acids. The knowledge of the free water-phase concentration of anandamide is essential for the investigations of its transfer from the binding protein to cellular membranes, because...... a water-phase shuttle of monomers mediates such transfers. We have used our method based upon the use of albumin-filled red cell ghosts as a dispersed biological "reference binder" to measure the water-phase concentrations of anandamide. These concentrations were measured in buffer (pH 7.3) in equilibrium...

  9. Endocytosis of Integrin-Binding Human Picornaviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirjo Merilahti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Picornaviruses that infect humans form one of the largest virus groups with almost three hundred virus types. They include significant enteroviral pathogens such as rhino-, polio-, echo-, and coxsackieviruses and human parechoviruses that cause wide range of disease symptoms. Despite the economic importance of picornaviruses, there are no antivirals. More than ten cellular receptors are known to participate in picornavirus infection, but experimental evidence of their role in cellular infection has been shown for only about twenty picornavirus types. Three enterovirus types and one parechovirus have experimentally been shown to bind and use integrin receptors in cellular infection. These include coxsackievirus A9 (CV-A9, echovirus 9, and human parechovirus 1 that are among the most common and epidemic human picornaviruses and bind to αV-integrins via RGD motif that resides on virus capsid. In contrast, echovirus 1 (E-1 has no RGD and uses integrin α2β1 as cellular receptor. Endocytosis of CV-A9 has recently been shown to occur via a novel Arf6- and dynamin-dependent pathways, while, contrary to collagen binding, E-1 binds inactive β1 integrin and enters via macropinocytosis. In this paper, we review what is known about receptors and endocytosis of integrin-binding human picornaviruses.

  10. DNA binding studies of tartrazine food additive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashanian, Soheila; Zeidali, Sahar Heidary

    2011-07-01

    The interaction of native calf thymus DNA with tartrazine in 10 mM Tris-HCl aqueous solution at neutral pH 7.4 was investigated. Tartrazine is a nitrous derivative and may cause allergic reactions, with a potential of toxicological risk. Also, tartrazine induces oxidative stress and DNA damage. Its DNA binding properties were studied by UV-vis and circular dichroism spectra, competitive binding with Hoechst 33258, and viscosity measurements. Tartrazine molecules bind to DNA via groove mode as illustrated by hyperchromism in the UV absorption band of tartrazine, decrease in Hoechst-DNA solution fluorescence, unchanged viscosity of DNA, and conformational changes such as conversion from B-like to C-like in the circular dichroism spectra of DNA. The binding constants (K(b)) of DNA with tartrazine were calculated at different temperatures. Enthalpy and entropy changes were calculated to be +37 and +213 kJ mol(-1), respectively, according to the Van't Hoff equation, which indicated that the reaction is predominantly entropically driven. Also, tartrazine does not cleave plasmid DNA. Tartrazine interacts with calf thymus DNA via a groove interaction mode with an intrinsic binding constant of 3.75 × 10(4) M(-1).

  11. Three complement-like repeats compose the complete alpha2-macroglobulin binding site in the second ligand binding cluster of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolmer, Klavs; Gettins, Peter G W

    2006-11-10

    Given the importance of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) as an essential endocytosis and signaling receptor for many protein ligands, and of alpha2-macroglobulin (alpha2M)-proteinase complexes as one such set of ligands, an understanding of the specificity of their interaction with LRP is an important goal. A starting point is the known role of the 138-residue receptor binding domain (RBD) in binding to LRP. Previous studies have localized high affinity alpha2M binding to the eight complement repeat (CR)-containing cluster 2 of LRP. In the present study we have identified the minimum CR domains that constitute the full binding site for RBD and, hence, for alpha2M on LRP. We report on the ability of the triple construct of CR3-4-5 to bind RBD with an affinity (Kd = 130 nM) the same as for isolated RBD to intact LRP. This Kd is 30-fold smaller than for RBD to CR5-6-7, demonstrating the specificity of the interaction with CR3-4-5. Binding requires previously identified critical lysine residues but is almost pH-independent within the range of pH values encountered between extracellular and internal compartments, consistent with an earlier proposed model of intracellular ligand displacement by intramolecular YWTD domains. The present findings suggest a model to explain the ability of LRP to bind a wide range of structurally unrelated ligands in which a nonspecific ligand interaction with the acidic region present in most CR domains is augmented by interactions with other CR surface residues that are unique to a particular CR cluster.

  12. Estrogen receptor diminishes DNA-binding activities of chicken GATA-1 and CACCC-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holth, L T; Sun, J M; Coutts, A S; Murphy, L C; Davie, J R

    1997-12-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) repressed erythroid differentiation and erythroid-specific gene expression. In this study, we investigated the effect of ER alpha (referred to throughout as ER) on DNA-binding activities of transcription factors involved in regulating the expression of erythroid-specific genes, and, in particular, the histone H5 gene. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we found that in the presence of rabbit reticulocyte lysate, human ER reduced the binding activities of chicken immature erythrocyte nuclear extracted proteins to GATA and CACCC sites in the H5 promoter and enhancer. In contrast, the binding activities of NF1 and Sp1 were not affected by ER. Binding of ER to an estrogen response element was enhanced by addition of rabbit reticulocyte lysate. This lysate was also necessary for ER to diminish the DNA-binding activity of GATA-1. These results suggest that additional factor(s) are necessary for full ER function. Both GATA-1 and CACCC-binding proteins are critical for the developmentally regulated expression of erythroid-specific genes. We hypothesize that interference in DNA-binding activities of GATA-1 and CACCC-binding proteins is the mechanism by which the ER inhibits regulation of these genes.

  13. Quantification of Cooperativity in Heterodimer-DNA Binding Improves the Accuracy of Binding Specificity Models*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakova, Alina; Berset, Yves; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Deplancke, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Many transcription factors (TFs) have the ability to cooperate on DNA elements as heterodimers. Despite the significance of TF heterodimerization for gene regulation, a quantitative understanding of cooperativity between various TF dimer partners and its impact on heterodimer DNA binding specificity models is still lacking. Here, we used a novel integrative approach, combining microfluidics-steered measurements of dimer-DNA assembly with mechanistic modeling of the implicated protein-protein-DNA interactions to quantitatively interrogate the cooperative DNA binding behavior of the adipogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ):retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) heterodimer. Using the high throughput MITOMI (mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions) platform, we derived equilibrium DNA binding data for PPARγ, RXRα, as well as the PPARγ:RXRα heterodimer to more than 300 target DNA sites and variants thereof. We then quantified cooperativity underlying heterodimer-DNA binding and derived an integrative heterodimer DNA binding constant. Using this cooperativity-inclusive constant, we were able to build a heterodimer-DNA binding specificity model that has superior predictive power than the one based on a regular one-site equilibrium. Our data further revealed that individual nucleotide substitutions within the target site affect the extent of cooperativity in PPARγ:RXRα-DNA binding. Our study therefore emphasizes the importance of assessing cooperativity when generating DNA binding specificity models for heterodimers. PMID:26912662

  14. Quantification of Cooperativity in Heterodimer-DNA Binding Improves the Accuracy of Binding Specificity Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakova, Alina; Berset, Yves; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Deplancke, Bart

    2016-05-06

    Many transcription factors (TFs) have the ability to cooperate on DNA elements as heterodimers. Despite the significance of TF heterodimerization for gene regulation, a quantitative understanding of cooperativity between various TF dimer partners and its impact on heterodimer DNA binding specificity models is still lacking. Here, we used a novel integrative approach, combining microfluidics-steered measurements of dimer-DNA assembly with mechanistic modeling of the implicated protein-protein-DNA interactions to quantitatively interrogate the cooperative DNA binding behavior of the adipogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ):retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) heterodimer. Using the high throughput MITOMI (mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions) platform, we derived equilibrium DNA binding data for PPARγ, RXRα, as well as the PPARγ:RXRα heterodimer to more than 300 target DNA sites and variants thereof. We then quantified cooperativity underlying heterodimer-DNA binding and derived an integrative heterodimer DNA binding constant. Using this cooperativity-inclusive constant, we were able to build a heterodimer-DNA binding specificity model that has superior predictive power than the one based on a regular one-site equilibrium. Our data further revealed that individual nucleotide substitutions within the target site affect the extent of cooperativity in PPARγ:RXRα-DNA binding. Our study therefore emphasizes the importance of assessing cooperativity when generating DNA binding specificity models for heterodimers. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Salt-mediated two-site ligand binding by the cocaine-binding aptamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Miguel A D; Slavkovic, Sladjana; Churcher, Zachary R; Johnson, Philip E

    2017-02-17

    Multisite ligand binding by proteins is commonly utilized in the regulation of biological systems and exploited in a range of biochemical technologies. Aptamers, although widely utilized in many rationally designed biochemical systems, are rarely capable of multisite ligand binding. The cocaine-binding aptamer is often used for studying and developing sensor and aptamer-based technologies. Here, we use isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and NMR spectroscopy to demonstrate that the cocaine-binding aptamer switches from one-site to two-site ligand binding, dependent on NaCl concentration. The high-affinity site functions at all buffer conditions studied, the low-affinity site only at low NaCl concentrations. ITC experiments show the two ligand-binding sites operate independently of one another with different affinities and enthalpies. NMR spectroscopy shows the second binding site is located in stem 2 near the three-way junction. This ability to control ligand binding at the second site by adjusting the concentration of NaCl is rare among aptamers and may prove a useful in biotechnology applications. This work also demonstrates that in vitro selected biomolecules can have functions as complex as those found in nature. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. The interrelationship between ligand binding and self-association of the folate binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jan; Schou, Christian; Babol, Linnea N.

    2011-01-01

    The folate binding protein (FBP) regulates homeostasis and intracellular trafficking of folic acid, a vitamin of decisive importance in cell division and growth. We analyzed whether interrelationship between ligand binding and self-association of FBP plays a significant role in the physiology of ...

  17. Feed tank transfer requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-09-16

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover. Also, DOE and PC responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements are presented for two cases (i.e., tank modifications occurring before tank turnover and tank modification occurring after tank turnover). Finally, records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor are presented.

  18. Chaotic neuron dynamics, synchronization and feature binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arecchi, F. T.

    2004-07-01

    Neuroscience studies how a large collection of coupled neurons combines external data with internal memories into coherent patterns of meaning. Such a process is called “feature binding”, insofar as the coherent patterns combine together features which are extracted separately by specialized cells, but which do not make sense as isolated items. A powerful conjecture, with experimental confirmation, is that feature binding implies the mutual synchronization of axonal spike trains in neurons which can be far away and yet contribute to a well defined perception by sharing the same time code. Based on recent investigations of homoclinic chaotic systems, and how they mutually synchronize, a novel conjecture on the dynamics of the single neuron is formulated. Homoclinic chaos implies the recurrent return of the dynamical trajectory to a saddle focus, in whose neighbourhood the system susceptibility (response to an external perturbation) is very high and hence it is very easy to lock to an external stimulus. Thus homoclinic chaos appears as the easiest way to encode information by a train of equal spikes occurring at erratic times. In conventional measurements we read the number indicated by a meter's pointer and assign to the measured object a set position corresponding to that number. On the contrary, a time code requires a decision time T¯ sufficiently longer than the minimal interspike separation t1, so that the total number of different set elements is related in some way to the size T¯/t 1. In neuroscience it has been shown that T¯≃200 ms while t 1≃3 ms. In a sensory layer of the brain neocortex an external stimulus spreads over a large assembly of neurons building up a collective state, thus synchronization of trains of different individual neurons is the basis of a coherent perception. The percept space can be given a metric structure by introducing a distance measure. This distance is conjugate of the duration time in the sense that an uncertainty

  19. Binding of alkylpyridinium chloride surfactants to sodium polystyrene sulfonate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishiguro, M.; Koopal, L.K.

    2009-01-01

    Binding of cationic surfactants to anionic polymers is well studied. However, the surfactant binding characteristics at very low concentration near the start of binding and at high concentration, where charge compensation may Occur. are less well known. Therefore, the binding characteristics of

  20. Asporin competes with decorin for collagen binding, binds calcium and promotes osteoblast collagen mineralization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalamajski, Sebastian; Aspberg, Anders; Lindblom, Karin

    2009-01-01

    The interactions of the ECM (extracellular matrix) protein asporin with ECM components have previously not been investigated. Here, we show that asporin binds collagen type I. This binding is inhibited by recombinant asporin fragment LRR (leucine-rich repeat) 10-12 and by full-length decorin......, but not by biglycan. We demonstrate that the polyaspartate domain binds calcium and regulates hydroxyapatite formation in vitro. In the presence of asporin, the number of collagen nodules, and mRNA of osteoblastic markers Osterix and Runx2, were increased. Moreover, decorin or the collagen-binding asporin fragment...... LRR 10-12 inhibited the pro-osteoblastic activity of full-length asporin. Our results suggest that asporin and decorin compete for binding to collagen and that the polyaspartate in asporin directly regulates collagen mineralization. Therefore asporin has a role in osteoblast-driven collagen...

  1. AUXIN BINDING PROTEIN1: the outsider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Michael; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen

    2011-06-01

    AUXIN BINDING PROTEIN1 (ABP1) is one of the first characterized proteins that bind auxin and has been implied as a receptor for a number of auxin responses. Early studies characterized its auxin binding properties and focused on rapid electrophysiological and cell expansion responses, while subsequent work indicated a role in cell cycle and cell division control. Very recently, ABP1 has been ascribed a role in modulating endocytic events at the plasma membrane and RHO OF PLANTS-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangements during asymmetric cell expansion. The exact molecular function of ABP1 is still unresolved, but its main activity apparently lies in influencing events at the plasma membrane. This review aims to connect the novel findings with the more classical literature on ABP1 and to point out the many open questions that still separate us from a comprehensive model of ABP1 action, almost 40 years after the first reports of its existence.

  2. The binding of Np to rat bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramounet, B.; Taylor, D.M.

    1997-01-01

    Neptunium has been shown to massively deposit in bone, after intravenous or intramuscular injections. Initially, it was uniformly distributed on periosteal and endosteal bone surfaces. The nature of the binding molecules, for this actinide, in the skeleton, has not yet been identified. The aim of this work was to characterize the ligands of neptunium by selective extractions of bone components. The preliminary results displayed the binding of 237 Np(IV) in the organic phase of bone, after intravenous or intramuscular contamination. Further studies are in progress, to quantify the fraction of Np bound to the organic and mineral compartment of bone, and to determine the affinity constant and the turn-over of the binding proteins. (authors)

  3. Different types of working memory binding in epilepsy patients with unilateral anterior temporal lobectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geldorp, B. van; Bouman, Z.; Hendriks, M.; Kessels, R.P.C.

    2014-01-01

    The medial temporal lobe is an important structure for long-term memory formation, but its role in working memory is less clear. Recent studies have shown hippocampal involvement during working memory tasks requiring binding of information. It is yet unclear whether this is limited to tasks

  4. Sex Hormone Binding Globulin Deficiency Due to a Homozygous Missense Mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, M. J.; Mijnhout, G. S.; Rondeel, J. M. M.; Baron, W.; Groeneveld, P. H. P.

    Context: SHBG is known as the major sex steroid binding protein in plasma, and it regulates the bioavailability of both T and estradiol levels required for effects on target tissues. We identified a man with an undetectable SHBG concentration in combination with low total T. He presented with a

  5. Challenges in Archetypes Terminology Binding Using SNOMED-CT Compositional Grammar: The Norwegian Patient Summary Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco-Ruiz, Luis; Pedersen, Rune

    2017-01-01

    In order to cover the requirements for interoperability in the Norwegian context, we studied the terminology binding of archetypes to terminology expressions created with the SNOMED-CT compositional grammar. As a result we identified important challenges categorized as technical, expressivity, human, and models mismatch.

  6. ICBP90, a Novel Methyl K9 H3 Binding Protein Linking Protein Ubiquitination with Heterochromatin Formation▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagianni, Panagiota; Amazit, Larbi; Qin, Jun; Wong, Jiemin

    2008-01-01

    Methylation of histone H3 on lysine 9 is critical for diverse biological processes including transcriptional repression, heterochromatin formation, and X inactivation. The biological effects of histone methylation are thought to be mediated by effector proteins that recognize and bind to specific patterns of methylation. Using an unbiased in vitro biochemical approach, we have identified ICBP90, a transcription and cell cycle regulator, as a novel methyl K9 H3-specific binding protein. ICBP90 and its murine homologue Np95 are enriched in pericentric heterochromatin of interphase nuclei, and this localization is dependent on H3K9 methylation. Specific binding of ICBP90 to methyl K9 H3 depends on two functional domains, a PHD (plant homeodomain) finger that defines the binding specificity and an SRA (SET- and RING-associated) domain that promotes binding activity. Furthermore, we present evidence that ICBP90 is required for proper heterochromatin formation in mammalian cells. PMID:17967883

  7. ICBP90, a novel methyl K9 H3 binding protein linking protein ubiquitination with heterochromatin formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagianni, Panagiota; Amazit, Larbi; Qin, Jun; Wong, Jiemin

    2008-01-01

    Methylation of histone H3 on lysine 9 is critical for diverse biological processes including transcriptional repression, heterochromatin formation, and X inactivation. The biological effects of histone methylation are thought to be mediated by effector proteins that recognize and bind to specific patterns of methylation. Using an unbiased in vitro biochemical approach, we have identified ICBP90, a transcription and cell cycle regulator, as a novel methyl K9 H3-specific binding protein. ICBP90 and its murine homologue Np95 are enriched in pericentric heterochromatin of interphase nuclei, and this localization is dependent on H3K9 methylation. Specific binding of ICBP90 to methyl K9 H3 depends on two functional domains, a PHD (plant homeodomain) finger that defines the binding specificity and an SRA (SET- and RING-associated) domain that promotes binding activity. Furthermore, we present evidence that ICBP90 is required for proper heterochromatin formation in mammalian cells.

  8. Interaction of complement-solubilized immune complexes with CR1 receptors on human erythrocytes. The binding reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, H H; Svehag, S E; Jarlbaek, L

    1986-01-01

    showed no binding. IC solubilized in 50% human serum in the presence of autologous RBC bound rapidly to RBC-CR1, with maximal binding within less than 1 min at 37 degrees C. Release of CR1-bound IC under these conditions occurred slowly, requiring more than 30 min. Only binding of 'partially' solubilized...... of an intact classical pathway in preparing the IC for binding to RBC-CR1. C-solubilized IC could be absorbed to solid-phase conglutinin or antibody to C3c and C4c, and these ligands were able to inhibit the binding of solubilized IC to RBC. Heparin also exerted a marked, dose-dependent inhibitory effect...

  9. Recognition of anesthetic barbiturates by a protein binding site: a high resolution structural analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Oakley

    Full Text Available Barbiturates potentiate GABA actions at the GABA(A receptor and act as central nervous system depressants that can induce effects ranging from sedation to general anesthesia. No structural information has been available about how barbiturates are recognized by their protein targets. For this reason, we tested whether these drugs were able to bind specifically to horse spleen apoferritin, a model protein that has previously been shown to bind many anesthetic agents with affinities that are closely correlated with anesthetic potency. Thiopental, pentobarbital, and phenobarbital were all found to bind to apoferritin with affinities ranging from 10-500 µM, approximately matching the concentrations required to produce anesthetic and GABAergic responses. X-ray crystal structures were determined for the complexes of apoferritin with thiopental and pentobarbital at resolutions of 1.9 and 2.0 Å, respectively. These structures reveal that the barbiturates bind to a cavity in the apoferritin shell that also binds haloalkanes, halogenated ethers, and propofol. Unlike these other general anesthetics, however, which rely entirely upon van der Waals interactions and the hydrophobic effect for recognition, the barbiturates are recognized in the apoferritin site using a mixture of both polar and nonpolar interactions. These results suggest that any protein binding site that is able to recognize and respond to the chemically and structurally diverse set of compounds used as general anesthetics is likely to include a versatile mixture of both polar and hydrophobic elements.

  10. Recombinant Collagen Engineered to Bind to Discoidin Domain Receptor Functions as a Receptor Inhibitor*

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Bo; Abbonante, Vittorio; Xu, Huifang; Gavriilidou, Despoina; Yoshizumi, Ayumi; Bihan, Dominique; Farndale, Richard W.; Kaplan, David L.; Balduini, Alessandra; Leitinger, Birgit; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    A bacterial collagen-like protein Scl2 has been developed as a recombinant collagen model system to host human collagen ligand-binding sequences, with the goal of generating biomaterials with selective collagen bioactivities. Defined binding sites in human collagen for integrins, fibronectin, heparin, and MMP-1 have been introduced into the triple-helical domain of the bacterial collagen and led to the expected biological activities. The modular insertion of activities is extended here to the discoidin domain receptors (DDRs), which are collagen-activated receptor tyrosine kinases. Insertion of the DDR-binding sequence from human collagen III into bacterial collagen led to specific receptor binding. However, even at the highest testable concentrations, the construct was unable to stimulate DDR autophosphorylation. The recombinant collagen expressed in Escherichia coli does not contain hydroxyproline (Hyp), and complementary synthetic peptide studies showed that replacement of Hyp by Pro at the critical Gly-Val-Met-Gly-Phe-Hyp position decreased the DDR-binding affinity and consequently required a higher concentration for the induction of receptor activation. The ability of the recombinant bacterial collagen to bind the DDRs without inducing kinase activation suggested it could interfere with the interactions between animal collagen and the DDRs, and such an inhibitory role was confirmed in vitro and with a cell migration assay. This study illustrates that recombinant collagen can complement synthetic peptides in investigating structure-activity relationships, and this system has the potential for the introduction or inhibition of specific biological activities. PMID:26702058

  11. Relational and conjunctive binding functions dissociate in short-term memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Mario A; Fabi, Katia; Luzzi, Simona; Cubelli, Roberto; Hernandez Valdez, Maria; Della Sala, Sergio

    2015-02-01

    Remembering complex events requires binding features within unified objects (conjunctions) and holding associations between objects (relations). Recent studies suggest that the two functions dissociate in long-term memory (LTM). Less is known about their functional organization in short-term memory (STM). The present study investigated this issue in patient AE affected by a stroke which caused damage to brain regions known to be relevant for relational functions both in LTM and in STM (i.e., the hippocampus). The assessment involved a battery of standard neuropsychological tasks and STM binding tasks. One STM binding task (Experiment 1) presented common objects and common colors forming either pairs (relations) or integrated objects (conjunctions). Free recall of relations or conjunctions was assessed. A second STM binding task used random polygons and non-primary colors instead (Experiment 2). Memory was assessed by selecting the features that made up the relations or the conjunctions from a set of single polygons and a set of single colors. The neuropsychological assessment revealed impaired delayed memory in AE. AE's pronounced relational STM binding deficits contrasted with his completely preserved conjunctive binding functions in both Experiments 1 and 2. Only 2.35% and 1.14% of the population were expected to have a discrepancy more extreme than that presented by AE in Experiments 1 and 2, respectively. Processing relations and conjunctions of very elementary nonspatial features in STM led to dissociating performances in AE. These findings may inform current theories of memory decline such as those linked to cognitive aging.

  12. Arsenic Directly Binds to and Activates the Yeast AP-1-Like Transcription Factor Yap8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Nallani Vijay; Yang, Jianbo; Pillai, Jitesh K.; Rawat, Swati; Solano, Carlos; Kumar, Abhay; Grøtli, Morten; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosen, Barry P.; Tamás, Markus J.

    2015-12-28

    The AP-1-like transcription factor Yap8 is critical for arsenic tolerance in the yeastSaccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the mechanism by which Yap8 senses the presence of arsenic and activates transcription of detoxification genes is unknown. Here we demonstrate that Yap8 directly binds to trivalent arsenite [As(III)]in vitroandin vivoand that approximately one As(III) molecule is bound per molecule of Yap8. As(III) is coordinated by three sulfur atoms in purified Yap8, and our genetic and biochemical data identify the cysteine residues that form the binding site as Cys132, Cys137, and Cys274. As(III) binding by Yap8 does not require an additional yeast protein, and Yap8 is regulated neither at the level of localization nor at the level of DNA binding. Instead, our data are consistent with a model in which a DNA-bound form of Yap8 acts directly as an As(III) sensor. Binding of As(III) to Yap8 triggers a conformational change that in turn brings about a transcriptional response. Thus, As(III) binding to Yap8 acts as a molecular switch that converts inactive Yap8 into an active transcriptional regulator. This is the first report to demonstrate how a eukaryotic protein couples arsenic sensing to transcriptional activation.

  13. Mucin Binding Reduces Colistin Antimicrobial Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Johnny X.; Blaskovich, Mark A. T.; Pelingon, Ruby; Ramu, Soumya; Kavanagh, Angela; Elliott, Alysha G.; Butler, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Colistin has found increasing use in treating drug-resistant bacterial lung infections, but potential interactions with pulmonary biomolecules have not been investigated. We postulated that colistin, like aminoglycoside antibiotics, may bind to secretory mucin in sputum or epithelial mucin that lines airways, reducing free drug levels. To test this hypothesis, we measured binding of colistin and other antibiotics to porcine mucin, a family of densely glycosylated proteins used as a surrogate for human sputum and airway mucin. Antibiotics were incubated in dialysis tubing with or without mucin, and concentrations of unbound antibiotics able to penetrate the dialysis tubing were measured over time using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The percentage of antibiotic measured in the dialysate after 4 h in the presence of mucin, relative to the amount without mucin, was 15% for colistin, 16% for polymyxin B, 19% for tobramycin, 52% for ciprofloxacin, and 78% for daptomycin. Antibiotics with the strongest mucin binding had an overall polybasic positive charge, whereas those with comparatively little binding were less basic. When comparing MICs measured with or without added mucin, colistin and polymyxin B showed >100-fold increases in MICs for multiple Gram-negative bacteria. Preclinical evaluation of mucin binding should become a standard procedure when considering the potential pulmonary use of new or existing antibiotics, particularly those with a polybasic overall charge. In the airways, mucin binding may reduce the antibacterial efficacy of inhaled or intravenously administered colistin, and the presence of sub-MIC effective antibiotic concentrations could result in the development of antibiotic resistance. PMID:26169405

  14. New binding mode to TNF-alpha revealed by ubiquitin-based artificial binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hoffmann

    Full Text Available A variety of approaches have been employed to generate binding proteins from non-antibody scaffolds. Utilizing a beta-sheet of the human ubiquitin for paratope creation we obtained binding proteins against tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha. The bioactive form of this validated pharmacological target protein is a non-covalently linked homo-trimer. This structural feature leads to the observation of a certain heterogeneity concerning the binding mode of TNF-alpha binding molecules, for instance in terms of monomer/trimer specificity. We analyzed a ubiquitin-based TNF-alpha binder, selected by ribosome display, with a particular focus on its mode of interaction. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, specific binding to TNF-alpha with nanomolar affinity was observed. In isothermal titration calorimetry we obtained comparable results regarding the affinity and detected an exothermic reaction with one ubiquitin-derived binding molecule binding one TNF-alpha trimer. Using NMR spectroscopy and other analytical methods the 1:3 stoichiometry could be confirmed. Detailed binding analysis showed that the interaction is affected by the detergent Tween-20. Previously, this phenomenon was reported only for one other type of alternative scaffold-derived binding proteins--designed ankyrin repeat proteins--without further investigation. As demonstrated by size exclusion chromatography and NMR spectroscopy, the presence of the detergent increases the association rate significantly. Since the special architecture of TNF-alpha is known to be modulated by detergents, the access to the recognized epitope is indicated to be restricted by conformational transitions within the target protein. Our results suggest that the ubiquitin-derived binding protein targets a new epitope on TNF-alpha, which differs from the epitopes recognized by TNF-alpha neutralizing antibodies.

  15. Salt modulates the stability and lipid binding affinity of the adipocyte lipid-binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Ruiz, Carmen R.; Joubert, Allison M.; Yang, Xuemei; LiCata, Vince J.

    2003-01-01

    Adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP or aP2) is an intracellular fatty acid-binding protein that is found in adipocytes and macrophages and binds a large variety of intracellular lipids with high affinity. Although intracellular lipids are frequently charged, biochemical studies of lipid-binding proteins and their interactions often focus most heavily on the hydrophobic aspects of these proteins and their interactions. In this study, we have characterized the effects of KCl on the stability and lipid binding properties of ALBP. We find that added salt dramatically stabilizes ALBP, increasing its Delta G of unfolding by 3-5 kcal/mol. At 37 degrees C salt can more than double the stability of the protein. At the same time, salt inhibits the binding of the fluorescent lipid 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) to the protein and induces direct displacement of the lipid from the protein. Thermodynamic linkage analysis of the salt inhibition of ANS binding shows a nearly 1:1 reciprocal linkage: i.e. one ion is released from ALBP when ANS binds, and vice versa. Kinetic experiments show that salt reduces the rate of association between ANS and ALBP while simultaneously increasing the dissociation rate of ANS from the protein. We depict and discuss the thermodynamic linkages among stability, lipid binding, and salt effects for ALBP, including the use of these linkages to calculate the affinity of ANS for the denatured state of ALBP and its dependence on salt concentration. We also discuss the potential molecular origins and potential intracellular consequences of the demonstrated salt linkages to stability and lipid binding in ALBP.

  16. Fluorescent Receptor Binding Assay for Detecting Ciguatoxins in Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardison, D Ransom; Holland, William C; McCall, Jennifer R; Bourdelais, Andrea J; Baden, Daniel G; Darius, H Taiana; Chinain, Mireille; Tester, Patricia A; Shea, Damian; Quintana, Harold A Flores; Morris, James A; Litaker, R Wayne

    2016-01-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning is an illness suffered by > 50,000 people yearly after consumption of fish containing ciguatoxins (CTXs). One of the current methodologies to detect ciguatoxins in fish is a radiolabeled receptor binding assay (RBA(R)). However, the license requirements and regulations pertaining to radioisotope utilization can limit the applicability of the RBA(R) in certain labs. A fluorescence based receptor binding assay (RBA(F)) was developed to provide an alternative method of screening fish samples for CTXs in facilities not certified to use radioisotopes. The new assay is based on competition binding between CTXs and fluorescently labeled brevetoxin-2 (BODIPY®-PbTx-2) for voltage-gated sodium channel receptors at site 5 instead of a radiolabeled brevetoxin. Responses were linear in fish tissues spiked from 0.1 to 1.0 ppb with Pacific ciguatoxin-3C (P-CTX-3C) with a detection limit of 0.075 ppb. Carribean ciguatoxins were confirmed in Caribbean fish by LC-MS/MS analysis of the regional biomarker (C-CTX-1). Fish (N = 61) of six different species were screened using the RBA(F). Results for corresponding samples analyzed using the neuroblastoma cell-based assay (CBA-N2a) correlated well (R2 = 0.71) with those of the RBA(F), given the low levels of CTX present in positive fish. Data analyses also showed the resulting toxicity levels of P-CTX-3C equivalents determined by CBA-N2a were consistently lower than the RBA(F) affinities expressed as % binding equivalents, indicating that a given amount of toxin bound to the site 5 receptors translates into corresponding lower cytotoxicity. Consequently, the RBA(F), which takes approximately two hours to perform, provides a generous estimate relative to the widely used CBA-N2a which requires 2.5 days to complete. Other RBA(F) advantages include the long-term (> 5 years) stability of the BODIPY®-PbTx-2 and having similar results as the commonly used RBA(R). The RBA(F) is cost-effective, allows high sample

  17. Fluorescent Receptor Binding Assay for Detecting Ciguatoxins in Fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Ransom Hardison

    Full Text Available Ciguatera fish poisoning is an illness suffered by > 50,000 people yearly after consumption of fish containing ciguatoxins (CTXs. One of the current methodologies to detect ciguatoxins in fish is a radiolabeled receptor binding assay (RBA(R. However, the license requirements and regulations pertaining to radioisotope utilization can limit the applicability of the RBA(R in certain labs. A fluorescence based receptor binding assay (RBA(F was developed to provide an alternative method of screening fish samples for CTXs in facilities not certified to use radioisotopes. The new assay is based on competition binding between CTXs and fluorescently labeled brevetoxin-2 (BODIPY®-PbTx-2 for voltage-gated sodium channel receptors at site 5 instead of a radiolabeled brevetoxin. Responses were linear in fish tissues spiked from 0.1 to 1.0 ppb with Pacific ciguatoxin-3C (P-CTX-3C with a detection limit of 0.075 ppb. Carribean ciguatoxins were confirmed in Caribbean fish by LC-MS/MS analysis of the regional biomarker (C-CTX-1. Fish (N = 61 of six different species were screened using the RBA(F. Results for corresponding samples analyzed using the neuroblastoma cell-based assay (CBA-N2a correlated well (R2 = 0.71 with those of the RBA(F, given the low levels of CTX present in positive fish. Data analyses also showed the resulting toxicity levels of P-CTX-3C equivalents determined by CBA-N2a were consistently lower than the RBA(F affinities expressed as % binding equivalents, indicating that a given amount of toxin bound to the site 5 receptors translates into corresponding lower cytotoxicity. Consequently, the RBA(F, which takes approximately two hours to perform, provides a generous estimate relative to the widely used CBA-N2a which requires 2.5 days to complete. Other RBA(F advantages include the long-term (> 5 years stability of the BODIPY®-PbTx-2 and having similar results as the commonly used RBA(R. The RBA(F is cost-effective, allows high sample

  18. Ubiquitin-binding proteins: similar, but different

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Katrine M; Hofmann, Kay; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    and phosphatases, specific sets of ubiquitinating/deubiquitinating enzymes control the degree of ubiquitination. A large number of ubiquitin-binding proteins act at different steps in the downstream pathways, followed by the ubiquitinated protein. Different families of ubiquitin-binding proteins have been...... described. UBA (ubiquitin-associated) domain-containing proteins is the largest family and includes members involved in different cell processes. The smaller groups of UIM (ubiquitin-interacting motif), GAT [GGA (Golgi-associated gamma-adaptin homologous) and Tom1 (target of Myb 1)], CUE (coupling...

  19. Binding energy of two-dimensional biexcitons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Jai; Birkedal, Dan; Vadim, Lyssenko

    1996-01-01

    Using a model structure for a two-dimensional (2D) biexciton confined in a quantum well, it is shown that the form of the Hamiltonian of the 2D biexciton reduces into that of an exciton. The binding energies and Bohr radii of a 2D biexciton in its various internal energy states are derived...... analytically using the fractional dimension approach. The ratio of the binding energy of a 2D biexciton to that of a 2D exciton is found to be 0.228, which agrees very well with the recent experimental value. The results of our approach are compared with those of earlier theories....

  20. Stage-specific adhesion of Leishmania promastigotes to sand fly midguts assessed using an improved comparative binding assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Wilson

    2010-09-01

    and metacyclic forms. Further they show that although gut binding may be necessary for parasite establishment, in several vector-parasite pairs the specificity of such in vitro binding alone is insufficient to explain overall vector specificity. Other significant barriers to development must exist in certain refractory Leishmania parasite-sand fly vector combinations. A re-appraisal of the specificity of the Leishmania-sand fly relationship is required.

  1. Environmental impact statement requirements for CNEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciurciolo, Melisa N.; Mender, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the legal framework on Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) regarding the activities of the National Atomic Energy Commission (Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, CNEA), and particularly, the Procedure for Internal Management of Environmental Impact Statements of CNEA (PN-PR-027). According to the distribution of powers stated in article 41 of the National Constitution, the environmental legal framework is constituted by National minimum standards for environmental protection and complementary provincial and municipal regulations. As a result, the EIA legal framework is not uniform across the Nation, and therefore, it differs according to the jurisdiction in which the activity subject to EIA is developed. Notwithstanding, the General Statute of the Environment (25.675) requires EIA for any project or activity developed in the National territory, which may cause a significant degradation to the environment, any of its components, or affect the populations' quality of life in a significant way. Since CNEA develops activities along the National territory, it is not possible to determine a uniform legal EIA framework for the entire Institution. Consequently, the binding requirements for Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) of CNEA activities differ among the activities developed in the different locations and atomic centers. In order to achieve a uniform environmental performance in CNEA, it has been considered necessary to uniform, in the internal sphere, the binding requirements for EIS, by means of a procedure written within the framework of the Environmental Management System of the Institution. The purpose of the Procedure for Internal Management of Environmental Impact Statements is to determine the requirements to be complied by the atomic centers, locations and enterprises associated with CNEA, regarding EIS Management. This Procedure shall apply to those projects and activities subjected to EIA, according to a

  2. Feature bindings are maintained in visual short-term memory without sustained focused attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvenne, Jean-François; Cleeremans, Axel; Laloyaux, Cédric

    2010-01-01

    Does the maintenance of feature bindings in visual short-term memory (VSTM) require sustained focused attention? This issue was investigated in three experiments, in which memory for single features (i.e., colors or shapes) was compared with memory for feature bindings (i.e., the link between the color and shape of an object). Attention was manipulated during the memory retention interval with a retro-cue, which allows attention to be directed and focused on a subset of memory items. The retro-cue was presented 700 ms after the offset of the memory display and 700 ms before the onset of the test display. If the maintenance of feature bindings - but not of individual features - in memory requires sustained focused attention, the retro-cue should not affect memory performance. Contrary to this prediction, we found that both memory for feature bindings and memory for individual features were equally improved by the retro-cue. Therefore, this finding does not support the view that the sustained focused attention is needed to properly maintain feature bindings in VSTM.

  3. A second essential function of the Est1-binding arm of yeast telomerase RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebo, Kevin J; Niederer, Rachel O; Zappulla, David C

    2015-05-01

    The enzymatic ribonucleoprotein telomerase maintains telomeres in many eukaryotes, including humans, and plays a central role in aging and cancer. Saccharomyces cerevisiae telomerase RNA, TLC1, is a flexible scaffold that tethers telomerase holoenzyme protein subunits to the complex. Here we test the hypothesis that a lengthy conserved region of the Est1-binding TLC1 arm contributes more than simply Est1-binding function. We separated Est1 binding from potential other functions by tethering TLC1 to Est1 via a heterologous RNA-protein binding module. We find that Est1-tethering rescues in vivo function of telomerase RNA alleles missing nucleotides specifically required for Est1 binding, but not those missing the entire conserved region. Notably, however, telomerase function is restored for this condition by expressing the arm of TLC1 in trans. Mutational analysis shows that the Second Essential Est1-arm Domain (SEED) maps to an internal loop of the arm, which SHAPE chemical mapping and 3D modeling suggest could be regulated by conformational change. Finally, we find that the SEED has an essential, Est1-independent role in telomerase function after telomerase recruitment to the telomere. The SEED may be required for establishing telomere extendibility or promoting telomerase RNP holoenzyme activity. © 2015 Lebo et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  4. A Rational Engineering Strategy for Designing Protein A-Binding Camelid Single-Domain Antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin A Henry

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal protein A (SpA and streptococcal protein G (SpG affinity chromatography are the gold standards for purifying monoclonal antibodies (mAbs in therapeutic applications. However, camelid VHH single-domain Abs (sdAbs or VHHs are not bound by SpG and only sporadically bound by SpA. Currently, VHHs require affinity tag-based purification, which limits their therapeutic potential and adds considerable complexity and cost to their production. Here we describe a simple and rapid mutagenesis-based approach designed to confer SpA binding upon a priori non-SpA-binding VHHs. We show that SpA binding of VHHs is determined primarily by the same set of residues as in human mAbs, albeit with an unexpected degree of tolerance to substitutions at certain core and non-core positions and some limited dependence on at least one residue outside the SpA interface, and that SpA binding could be successfully introduced into five VHHs against three different targets with no adverse effects on expression yield or antigen binding. Next-generation sequencing of llama, alpaca and dromedary VHH repertoires suggested that species differences in SpA binding may result from frequency variation in specific deleterious polymorphisms, especially Ile57. Thus, the SpA binding phenotype of camelid VHHs can be easily modulated to take advantage of tag-less purification techniques, although the frequency with which this is required may depend on the source species.

  5. ATP Binding and Hydrolysis Properties of ABCB10 and Their Regulation by Glutathione

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wei; Liesa, Marc; Carpenter, Elizabeth P.; Shirihai, Orian S.

    2015-01-01

    ABCB10 (ATP binding cassette sub-family B10) is a mitochondrial inner-membrane ABC transporter. ABCB10 has been shown to protect the heart from the impact of ROS during ischemia-reperfusion and to allow for proper hemoglobin synthesis during erythroid development. ABC transporters are proteins that increase ATP binding and hydrolysis activity in the presence of the transported substrate. However, molecular entities transported by ABCB10 and its regulatory mechanisms are currently unknown. Here we characterized ATP binding and hydrolysis properties of ABCB10 by using the 8-azido-ATP photolabeling technique. This technique can identify potential ABCB10 regulators, transported substrates and amino-acidic residues required for ATP binding and hydrolysis. We confirmed that Gly497 and Lys498 in the Walker A motif, Glu624 in the Walker B motif and Gly602 in the C-Loop motif of ABCB10 are required for proper ATP binding and hydrolysis activity, as their mutation changed ABCB10 8-Azido-ATP photo-labeling. In addition, we show that the potential ABCB10 transported entity and heme precursor delta-aminolevulinic acid (dALA) does not alter 8-azido-ATP photo-labeling. In contrast, oxidized glutathione (GSSG) stimulates ATP hydrolysis without affecting ATP binding, whereas reduced glutathione (GSH) inhibits ATP binding and hydrolysis. Indeed, we detectABCB10 glutathionylation in Cys547 and show that it is one of the exposed cysteine residues within ABCB10 structure. In all, we characterize essential residues for ABCB10 ATPase activity and we provide evidence that supports the exclusion of dALA as a potential substrate directly transported by ABCB10. Last, we show the first molecular mechanism by which mitochondrial oxidative status, through GSH/GSSG, can regulate ABCB10. PMID:26053025

  6. G-quadruplex RNA binding and recognition by the lysine-specific histone demethylase-1 enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschi, Alexander; Martin, William J; Luka, Zigmund; Loukachevitch, Lioudmila V; Reiter, Nicholas J

    2016-08-01

    Lysine-specific histone demethylase 1 (LSD1) is an essential epigenetic regulator in metazoans and requires the co-repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor (CoREST) to efficiently catalyze the removal of mono- and dimethyl functional groups from histone 3 at lysine positions 4 and 9 (H3K4/9). LSD1 interacts with over 60 regulatory proteins and also associates with lncRNAs (TERRA, HOTAIR), suggesting a regulatory role for RNA in LSD1 function. We report that a stacked, intramolecular G-quadruplex (GQ) forming TERRA RNA (GG[UUAGGG]8UUA) binds tightly to the functional LSD1-CoREST complex (Kd ≈ 96 nM), in contrast to a single GQ RNA unit ([UUAGGG]4U), a GQ DNA ([TTAGGG]4T), or an unstructured single-stranded RNA. Stabilization of a parallel-stranded GQ RNA structure by monovalent potassium ions (K(+)) is required for high affinity binding to the LSD1-CoREST complex. These data indicate that LSD1 can distinguish between RNA and DNA as well as structured versus unstructured nucleotide motifs. Further, cross-linking mass spectrometry identified the primary location of GQ RNA binding within the SWIRM/amine oxidase domain (AOD) of LSD1. An ssRNA binding region adjacent to this GQ binding site was also identified via X-ray crystallography. This RNA binding interface is consistent with kinetic assays, demonstrating that a GQ-forming RNA can serve as a noncompetitive inhibitor of LSD1-catalyzed demethylation. The identification of a GQ RNA binding site coupled with kinetic data suggests that structured RNAs can function as regulatory molecules in LSD1-mediated mechanisms. © 2016 Hirschi et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  7. Inactivation of transferrin iron binding capacity by the neutrophil myeloperoxidase system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.A.; Pearson, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    Human serum apotransferrin was exposed to the isolated myeloperoxidase-H2O2-halide system or to phorbol ester-activated human neutrophils. Such treatment resulted in a marked loss in transferrin iron binding capacity as well as concomitant iodination of transferrin. Each component of the cell-free system (myeloperoxidase, H2O2, iodide) or neutrophil system (neutrophils, phorbol ester, iodide) was required in order to observe these changes. In the cell-free system, the H2O2 requirement was fulfilled by either reagent H2O2 or the peroxide-generating system glucose oxidase plus glucose. Both loss of iron binding capacity and transferrin iodination by either the myeloperoxidase system or activated neutrophils were blocked by azide or catalase. The isolated peroxidase system had an acidic pH optimum, whereas the intact cell system was more efficient at neutral pH. The kinetics of changes in iron binding capacity and iodination closely paralleled one another, exhibiting t1/2 values of less than 1 min for the myeloperoxidase-H2O2 system, 3-4 min for the myeloperoxidase-glucose oxidase system, and 8 min for the neutrophil system. That the occupied binding site is protected from the myeloperoxidase system was suggested by (1) a failure to mobilize iron from iron-loaded transferrin, (2) an inverse correlation between initial iron saturation and myeloperoxidase-mediated loss of iron binding capacity, and (3) decreased myeloperoxidase-mediated iodination of iron-loaded versus apotransferrin. Since as little as 1 atom of iodide bound per molecule of transferrin was associated with substantial losses in iron binding capacity, there appears to be a high specificity of myeloperoxidase-catalyzed iodination for residues at or near the iron binding sites. Amino acid analysis of iodinated transferrin (approximately 2 atoms/molecule) demonstrated that iodotyrosine was the predominant iodinated species

  8. Pyrrolic tripodal receptors for carbohydrates. Role of functional groups and binding geometry on carbohydrate recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciarini, Martina; Nativi, Cristina; Norcini, Martina; Staderini, Samuele; Francesconi, Oscar; Roelens, Stefano

    2011-02-21

    The contribution from several H-bonding groups and the impact of geometric requirements on the binding ability of benzene-based tripodal receptors toward carbohydrates have been investigated by measuring the affinity of a set of structures toward octyl β-D-glucopyranoside, selected as a representative monosaccharide. The results reported in the present study demonstrate that a judicious choice of correct geometry and appropriate functional groups is critical to achieve the complementary hydrogen bonding interactions required for an effective carbohydrate recognition.

  9. The Drosophila DHR96 nuclear receptor binds cholesterol and regulates cholesterol homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Horner, Michael A.; Pardee, Keith; Liu, Suya; King-Jones, Kirst; Lajoie, Gilles; Edwards, Aled; Krause, Henry M.; Thummel, Carl S.

    2009-01-01

    Cholesterol homeostasis is required to maintain normal cellular function and avoid the deleterious effects of hypercholesterolemia. Here we show that the Drosophila DHR96 nuclear receptor binds cholesterol and is required for the coordinate transcriptional response of genes that are regulated by cholesterol and involved in cholesterol uptake, trafficking, and storage. DHR96 mutants die when grown on low levels of cholesterol and accumulate excess cholesterol when maintained on a high-choleste...

  10. Myeloperoxidase Selectively Binds and Selectively Kills Microbes ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Robert C.; Stephens, Jackson T.

    2010-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is reported to selectively bind to bacteria. The present study provides direct evidence of MPO binding selectivity and tests the relationship of selective binding to selective killing. The microbicidal effectiveness of H2O2 and of OCl− was compared to that of MPO plus H2O2. Synergistic microbicidal action was investigated by combining Streptococcus sanguinis, a H2O2-producing microbe showing low MPO binding, with high-MPO-binding Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, ...

  11. Binding of benzocaine in batrachotoxin-modified Na+ channels. State-dependent interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G K; Wang, S Y

    1994-03-01

    Hille (1977. Journal of General Physiology. 69:497-515) first proposed a modulated receptor hypothesis (MRH) to explain the action of benzocaine in voltage-gated Na+ channels. Using the MRH as a framework, we examined benzocaine binding in batrachotoxin (BTX)-modified Na+ channels under voltage-clamp conditions using either step or ramp command signals. We found that benzocaine binding is strongly voltage dependent. At -70 mV, the concentration of benzocaine that inhibits 50% of BTX-modified Na+ currents in GH3 cells (IC50) is 0.2 mM, whereas at +50 mV, the IC50 is 1.3 mM. Dose-response curves indicate that only one molecule of benzocaine is required to bind with one BTX-modified Na+ channel at -70 mV, whereas approximately two molecules are needed at +50 mV. Upon treatment with the inactivation modifier chloramine-T, the binding affinity of benzocaine is reduced significantly at -70 mV, probably as a result of the removal of the inactivated state of BTX-modified Na+ channels. The same treatment, however, enhances the binding affinity of cocaine near this voltage. External Na+ ions appear to have little effect on benzocaine binding, although they do affect cocaine binding. We conclude that two mechanisms underlie the action of local anesthetics in BTX-modified Na+ channels. Unlike open-channel blockers such as cocaine and bupivacaine, neutral benzocaine binds preferentially with BTX-modified Na+ channels in a closed state. Furthermore, benzocaine can be modified chemically so that it behaves like an open-channel blocker. This compound also elicits a use-dependent block in unmodified Na+ channels after repetitive depolarizations, whereas benzocaine does not. The implications of these findings for the MRH theory will be discussed.

  12. VP24 Is a Chitin-Binding Protein Involved in White Spot Syndrome Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zaipeng; Han, Yali; Xu, Limei

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral ingestion is the major route of infection for the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). However, the mechanism by which virus particles in the digestive tract invade host cells is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that WSSV virions can bind to chitin through one of the major envelope proteins (VP24). Mutagenesis analysis indicated that amino acids (aa) 186 to 200 in the C terminus of VP24 were required for chitin binding. Moreover, the P-VP24186–200 peptide derived from the VP24 chitin binding region significantly inhibited the VP24-chitin interaction and the WSSV-chitin interaction, implying that VP24 participates in WSSV binding to chitin. Oral inoculation experiments showed that P-VP24186–200 treatment reduced the number of virus particles remaining in the digestive tract during the early stage of infection and greatly hindered WSSV proliferation in shrimp. These data indicate that binding of WSSV to chitin through the viral envelope protein VP24 is essential for WSSV per os infection and provide new ideas for preventing WSSV infection in shrimp farms. IMPORTANCE In this study, we show that WSSV can bind to chitin through the envelope protein VP24. The chitin-binding domain of VP24 maps to amino acids 186 to 200 in the C terminus. Binding of WSSV to chitin through the viral envelope protein VP24 is essential for WSSV per os infection. These findings not only extend our knowledge of WSSV infection but also provide new insights into strategies to prevent WSSV infection in shrimp farms. PMID:26512091

  13. Synthetic peptides mimicking the binding site of human acetylcholinesterase for its inhibitor fasciculin 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafurke, Uwe; Erijman, Ariel; Aizner, Yonatan; Shifman, Julia M; Eichler, Jutta

    2015-09-01

    Molecules capable of mimicking protein binding and/or functional sites present useful tools for a range of biomedical applications, including the inhibition of protein-ligand interactions. Such mimics of protein binding sites can currently be generated through structure-based design and chemical synthesis. Computational protein design could be further used to optimize protein binding site mimetics through rationally designed mutations that improve intermolecular interactions or peptide stability. Here, as a model for the study, we chose an interaction between human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE) and its inhibitor fasciculin-2 (Fas) because the structure and function of this complex is well understood. Structure-based design of mimics of the hAChE binding site for Fas yielded a peptide that binds to Fas at micromolar concentrations. Replacement of hAChE residues known to be essential for its interaction with Fas with alanine, in this peptide, resulted in almost complete loss of binding to Fas. Computational optimization of the hAChE mimetic peptide yielded a variant with slightly improved affinity to Fas, indicating that more rounds of computational optimization will be required to obtain peptide variants with greatly improved affinity for Fas. CD spectra in the absence and presence of Fas point to conformational changes in the peptide upon binding to Fas. Furthermore, binding of the optimized hAChE mimetic peptide to Fas could be inhibited by hAChE, providing evidence for a hAChE-specific peptide-Fas interaction. Copyright © 2015 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Studies on folate binding and a radioassay for serum and whole blood folate using goat milk as binding agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piyasena, R.D.; Weerasekera, D.A.; Hettiaratchi, N.; Wikramanayake, T.W.; Sri Lanka Univ., Peradeniya Campus. Nuclear Medicine Unit)

    1977-01-01

    Preparations of cow, goat, buffalo, and human milk in addition to pig plasma were tested for folate binding properties. Of these, only pig plasma and goat milk showed sufficient binding to enable use as binding agents in a radioassay for serum and whole blood folate. The binding of folate by cow mild preparations in particular was found to be very poor. (orig.) [de

  15. Characterizing low affinity epibatidine binding to α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Person Alexandra M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Along with high affinity binding of epibatidine (Kd1≈10 pM to α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR, low affinity binding of epibatidine (Kd2≈1-10 nM to an independent binding site has been reported. Studying this low affinity binding is important because it might contribute understanding about the structure and synthesis of α4β2 nAChR. The binding behavior of epibatidine and α4β2 AChR raises a question about interpreting binding data from two independent sites with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding, both of which can affect equilibrium binding of [3H]epibatidine and α4β2 nAChR. If modeled incorrectly, ligand depletion and nonspecific binding lead to inaccurate estimates of binding constants. Fitting total equilibrium binding as a function of total ligand accurately characterizes a single site with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding. The goal of this study was to determine whether this approach is sufficient with two independent high and low affinity sites. Results Computer simulations of binding revealed complexities beyond fitting total binding for characterizing the second, low affinity site of α4β2 nAChR. First, distinguishing low-affinity specific binding from nonspecific binding was a potential problem with saturation data. Varying the maximum concentration of [3H]epibatidine, simultaneously fitting independently measured nonspecific binding, and varying α4β2 nAChR concentration were effective remedies. Second, ligand depletion helped identify the low affinity site when nonspecific binding was significant in saturation or competition data, contrary to a common belief that ligand depletion always is detrimental. Third, measuring nonspecific binding without α4β2 nAChR distinguished better between nonspecific binding and low-affinity specific binding under some circumstances of competitive binding than did presuming nonspecific binding to be residual [3H]epibatidine binding after

  16. Discovering system requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahill, A.T.; Bentz, B. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Systems and Industrial Engineering; Dean, F.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Cost and schedule overruns are often caused by poor requirements that are produced by people who do not understand the requirements process. This report provides a high-level overview of the system requirements process, explaining types, sources, and characteristics of good requirements. System requirements, however, are seldom stated by the customer. Therefore, this report shows ways to help you work with your customer to discover the system requirements. It also explains terminology commonly used in the requirements development field, such as verification, validation, technical performance measures, and the various design reviews.

  17. A common theme in interaction of bacterial immunoglobulin-binding proteins with immunoglobulins illustrated in the equine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Melanie J; Meehan, Mary; Owen, Peter; Woof, Jenny M

    2008-06-20

    The M protein of Streptococcus equi subsp. equi known as fibrinogen-binding protein (FgBP) is a cell wall-associated protein with antiphagocytic activity that binds IgG. Recombinant versions of the seven equine IgG subclasses were used to investigate the subclass specificity of FgBP. FgBP bound predominantly to equine IgG4 and IgG7, with little or no binding to the other subclasses. Competitive binding experiments revealed that FgBP could inhibit the binding of staphylococcal protein A and streptococcal protein G to both IgG4 and IgG7, implicating the Fc interdomain region in binding to FgBP. To identify which of the two IgG Fc domains contributed to the interaction with FgBP, we tested two human IgG1/IgA1 domain swap mutants and found that both domains are required for full binding, with the CH3 domain playing a critical role. The binding site for FgBP was further localized using recombinant equine IgG7 antibodies with single or double point mutations to residues lying at the CH2-CH3 interface. We found that interaction of FgBP with equine IgG4 and IgG7 was able to disrupt C1q binding and antibody-mediated activation of the classical complement pathway, demonstrating an effective means by which S. equi may evade the immune response. The mode of interaction of FgBP with IgG fits a common theme for bacterial Ig-binding proteins. Remarkably, for those interactions studied in detail, it emerges that all the Ig-binding proteins target the CH2-CH3 domain interface, regardless of specificity for IgG or IgA, streptococcal or staphylococcal origin, or host species (equine or human).

  18. Binding sites analyser (BiSA: software for genomic binding sites archiving and overlap analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matloob Khushi

    Full Text Available Genome-wide mapping of transcription factor binding and histone modification reveals complex patterns of interactions. Identifying overlaps in binding patterns by different factors is a major objective of genomic studies, but existing methods to archive large numbers of datasets in a personalised database lack sophistication and utility. Therefore we have developed transcription factor DNA binding site analyser software (BiSA, for archiving of binding regions and easy identification of overlap with or proximity to other regions of interest. Analysis results can be restricted by chromosome or base pair overlap between regions or maximum distance between binding peaks. BiSA is capable of reporting overlapping regions that share common base pairs; regions that are nearby; regions that are not overlapping; and average region sizes. BiSA can identify genes located near binding regions of interest, genomic features near a gene or locus of interest and statistical significance of overlapping regions can also be reported. Overlapping results can be visualized as Venn diagrams. A major strength of BiSA is that it is supported by a comprehensive database of publicly available transcription factor binding sites and histone modifications, which can be directly compared to user data. The documentation and source code are available on http://bisa.sourceforge.net.

  19. RBPmap: a web server for mapping binding sites of RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Inbal; Kosti, Idit; Ares, Manuel; Cline, Melissa; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2014-07-01

    Regulation of gene expression is executed in many cases by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that bind to mRNAs as well as to non-coding RNAs. RBPs recognize their RNA target via specific binding sites on the RNA. Predicting the binding sites of RBPs is known to be a major challenge. We present a new webserver, RBPmap, freely accessible through the website http://rbpmap.technion.ac.il/ for accurate prediction and mapping of RBP binding sites. RBPmap has been developed specifically for mapping RBPs in human, mouse and Drosophila melanogaster genomes, though it supports other organisms too. RBPmap enables the users to select motifs from a large database of experimentally defined motifs. In addition, users can provide any motif of interest, given as either a consensus or a PSSM. The algorithm for mapping the motifs is based on a Weighted-Rank approach, which considers the clustering propensity of the binding sites and the overall tendency of regulatory regions to be conserved. In addition, RBPmap incorporates a position-specific background model, designed uniquely for different genomic regions, such as splice sites, 5' and 3' UTRs, non-coding RNA and intergenic regions. RBPmap was tested on high-throughput RNA-binding experiments and was proved to be highly accurate. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. ALG-2, a multifunctional calcium binding protein?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarabykina, Svetlana; Mollerup, Jens; Winding Gojkovic, P.

    2004-01-01

    ALG-2 was originally discovered as a pro-apoptotic protein in a genetic screen. Due to its ability to bind calcium with high affinity it was postulated to provide a link between the known effect of calcium in programmed cell death and the molecular death execution machinery. This review article d...

  1. Tension-induced binding of semiflexible biopolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benetatos, Panayotis; Heydt, Alice von der; Zippelius, Annette

    2014-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the effect of polymer tension on the collective behavior of reversibly binding cross-links. For this purpose, we employ a model of two weakly bending wormlike chains aligned in parallel by a tensile force, with a sequence of inter-chain binding sites regularly spaced along the contours. Reversible cross-links attach and detach at the sites with an affinity controlled by a chemical potential. In a mean-field approach, we calculate the free energy of the system and find the emergence of a free-energy barrier which controls the reversible (un)binding. The tension affects the conformational entropy of the chains which competes with the binding energy of the cross-links. This competition gives rise to a sudden increase in the fraction of bound sites as the tension increases. We show that this transition is related to the cross-over between weak and strong localization of a directed polymer in a pinning potential. The cross-over to the strongly bound state can be interpreted as a mechanism for force-stiffening which exceeds the capabilities of single-chain elasticity and thus available only to reversibly cross-linked polymers. (paper)

  2. Cross-Modal Binding in Developmental Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Manon W.; Branigan, Holly P.; Parra, Mario A.; Logie, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to learn visual-phonological associations is a unique predictor of word reading, and individuals with developmental dyslexia show impaired ability in learning these associations. In this study, we compared developmentally dyslexic and nondyslexic adults on their ability to form cross-modal associations (or "bindings") based…

  3. Telomere-binding proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentgraf, U

    1995-02-01

    The nucleoprotein structure of Arabidopsis thaliana telomeres was investigated. A protein specifically binding to telomeric sequences was characterized by gel mobility shift assays with synthetic oligonucleotides consisting of four 7 bp telomeric repeats of Arabidopsis (TTTAGGG) and crude nuclear protein extracts of Arabidopsis leaves. These DNA-protein binding studies revealed that the binding affinity of this telomere-binding protein to the G-rich single-strand as well as to the double-stranded telomeric DNA is much higher than to the C-rich single-strand. The molecular mass of the protein was identified by SDS-PAGE to be 67 kDa. The isoelectric points were determined to be 5.0, 4.85 and 4.7, respectively, indicating that either one protein with different modifications or three slightly different proteins have been isolated. An RNA component, possibly serving as a template for reverse transcription of a plant telomerase, does not mediate the DNA-protein contact because the DNA-protein interactions were not RNAse-sensitive.

  4. Binding of cationic surfactants to humic substances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishiguro, M.; Tan, W.; Koopal, L.K.

    2007-01-01

    Commercial surfactants are introduced into the environment either through waste products or site-specific contamination. The amphiphilic nature of both surfactants and humic substances (HS) leads to their mutual attraction especially when surfactant and HS are oppositely charged. Binding of the

  5. Ribosome binding site recognition using neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Ferreira da Silva Oliveira

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Pattern recognition is an important process for gene localization in genomes. The ribosome binding sites are signals that can help in the identification of a gene. It is difficult to find these signals in the genome through conventional methods because they are highly degenerated. Artificial Neural Networks is the approach used in this work to address this problem.

  6. tPA-binding RNA Aptamers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Nils

    2015-01-01

    -density lipoprotein receptor Related Protein-1 (LRP-1). Here, we describe the selection and characterisation of structured RNA ligands (“RNA aptamers”) to tPA, K18 and K32. Both aptamers were truncated to minimal 32-nucleotide constructs (v2) with improved or unchanged activities, and were shown to bind tPA with low...

  7. Non-binding relationship between visual features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan eRangelov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The answer as to how visual attributes processed in different brain loci at different speeds are bound together to give us our unitary experience of the visual world remains unknown. In this study we investigated whether bound representations arise, as commonly assumed, through physiological interactions between cells in the visual areas. In a focal attentional task in which correct responses from either bound or unbound representations were possible, participants discriminated the colour or orientation of briefly presented single bars. On the assumption that representations of the two attributes are bound, the accuracy of reporting the colour and orientation should co-vary. By contrast, if the attributes are not mandatorily bound, the accuracy of reporting the two attributes should be independent. The results of our psychophysical studies reported here supported the latter, non-binding, relationship between visual features, suggesting that binding does not necessarily occur even under focal attention. We propose a task-contingent binding mechanism, postulating that binding occurs at late, post-perceptual, stages through the intervention of memory.

  8. Nucleotide binding to Na+/K+-ATPase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubala, Martin; Lánský, Zdeněk; Ettrich, R.; Plášek, J.; Teisinger, Jan; Amler, Evžen

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 272, č. S1 (2005), s. 191-191 E-ISSN 1742-4658. [FEBS Congress /30./ and IUBMB Conference /9./. 02.07.2005-07.07.2005, Budapest] Keywords : Na+/K+- ATPase * ATP binding * TNP-ATP Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  9. The Double Bind: The next Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcom, Lindsey E.; Malcom, Shirley M.

    2011-01-01

    In this foreword, Shirley Malcom and Lindsey Malcom speak to the history and current status of women of color in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. As the author of the seminal report "The Double Bind: The Price of Being a Minority Woman in Science", Shirley Malcom is uniquely poised to give us an insightful…

  10. Protein Binding Capacity of Different Forages Tannin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusiati, L. M.; Kurniawati, A.; Hanim, C.; Anas, M. A.

    2018-02-01

    Eight forages of tannin sources(Leucaena leucocephala, Arachis hypogaea, Mimosa pudica, Morus alba L, Swietenia mahagoni, Manihot esculenta, Gliricidia sepium, and Bauhinia purpurea)were evaluated their tannin content and protein binding capacity. The protein binding capacity of tannin were determined using precipitation of bovine serum albumin (BSA). Swietenia mahagonihas higest total tannin level and condensed tannin (CT) compared with other forages (Ptannin (HT) level (Ptannin content of Swietenia mahagoni were 11.928±0.04 mg/100 mg and 9.241±0.02mg/100mg dry matter (DM) of leaves. The hydrolysable tannin content of Leucaena leucocephala was 5.338±0.03 mg/100 mg DM of leaves. Binding capacity was highest in Swietenia mahagoni and Leucaena leucocephala compared to the other forages (Ptannin in Leucaena leucocephala and Swietenia mahagoniwere1.181±0.44 and 1.217±0.60mg/mg dry matter of leaves. The present study reports that Swietenia mahagoni has highest of tannin content and Leucaena leucocephala and Swietenia mahagoni capacity of protein binding.

  11. Alkali binding in hydrated Portland cement paste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Wei; Brouwers, Jos

    2010-01-01

    The alkali-binding capacity of C–S–H in hydrated Portland cement pastes is addressed in this study. The amount of bound alkalis in C–S–H is computed based on the alkali partition theories firstly proposed by Taylor (1987) and later further developed by Brouwers and Van Eijk (2003). Experimental data

  12. Dynamically Partitionable Autoassociative Networks as a Solution to the Neural Binding Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Jeffrey Hayworth

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available An outstanding question in theoretical neuroscience is how the brain solves the neural binding problem. In vision, binding can be summarized as the ability to represent that certain properties belong to one object while other properties belong to a different object. I review the binding problem in visual and other domains, and review its simplest proposed solution – the anatomical binding hypothesis. This hypothesis has traditionally been rejected as a true solution because it seems to require a type of one-to-one wiring of neurons that would be impossible in a biological system (as opposed to an engineered system like a computer. I show that this requirement for one-to-one wiring can be loosened by carefully considering how the neural representation is actually put to use by the rest of the brain. This leads to a solution where a symbol is represented not as a particular pattern of neural activation but instead as a piece of a global stable attractor state. I introduce the Dynamically Partitionable AutoAssociative Network (DPAAN as an implementation of this solution and show how DPANNs can be used in systems which perform perceptual binding and in systems that implement syntax-sensitive rules. Finally I show how the core parts of the cognitive architecture ACT-R can be neurally implemented using a DPAAN as ACT-R’s global workspace. Because the DPAAN solution to the binding problem requires only ‘flat’ neural representations (as opposed to the phase encoded representation hypothesized in neural synchrony solutions it is directly compatible with the most well developed neural models of learning, memory, and pattern recognition.

  13. Retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 has an interdigitated double Tudor domain with DNA binding activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Weibin; Wang, Jinfeng; Perrett, Sarah; Feng, Yingang

    2014-02-21

    Retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 (RBBP1) is a tumor and leukemia suppressor that binds both methylated histone tails and DNA. Our previous studies indicated that RBBP1 possesses a Tudor domain, which cannot bind histone marks. In order to clarify the function of the Tudor domain, the solution structure of the RBBP1 Tudor domain was determined by NMR and is presented here. Although the proteins are unrelated, the RBBP1 Tudor domain forms an interdigitated double Tudor structure similar to the Tudor domain of JMJD2A, which is an epigenetic mark reader. This indicates the functional diversity of Tudor domains. The RBBP1 Tudor domain structure has a significant area of positively charged surface, which reveals a capability of the RBBP1 Tudor domain to bind nucleic acids. NMR titration and isothermal titration calorimetry experiments indicate that the RBBP1 Tudor domain binds both double- and single-stranded DNA with an affinity of 10-100 μM; no apparent DNA sequence specificity was detected. The DNA binding mode and key interaction residues were analyzed in detail based on a model structure of the Tudor domain-dsDNA complex, built by HADDOCK docking using the NMR data. Electrostatic interactions mediate the binding of the Tudor domain with DNA, which is consistent with NMR experiments performed at high salt concentration. The DNA-binding residues are conserved in Tudor domains of the RBBP1 protein family, resulting in conservation of the DNA-binding function in the RBBP1 Tudor domains. Our results provide further insights into the structure and function of RBBP1.

  14. Five of Five VHHs Neutralizing Poliovirus Bind the Receptor-Binding Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Mike; Schotte, Lise; Thys, Bert; Filman, David J; Hogle, James M

    2016-01-13

    Nanobodies, or VHHs, that recognize poliovirus type 1 have previously been selected and characterized as candidates for antiviral agents or reagents for standardization of vaccine quality control. In this study, we present high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of poliovirus with five neutralizing VHHs. All VHHs bind the capsid in the canyon at sites that extensively overlap the poliovirus receptor-binding site. In contrast, the interaction involves a unique (and surprisingly extensive) surface for each of the five VHHs. Five regions of the capsid were found to participate in binding with all five VHHs. Four of these five regions are known to alter during the expansion of the capsid associated with viral entry. Interestingly, binding of one of the VHHs, PVSS21E, resulted in significant changes of the capsid structure and thus seems to trap the virus in an early stage of expansion. We describe the cryo-electron microscopy structures of complexes of five neutralizing VHHs with the Mahoney strain of type 1 poliovirus at resolutions ranging from 3.8 to 6.3Å. All five VHHs bind deep in the virus canyon at similar sites that overlap extensively with the binding site for the receptor (CD155). The binding surfaces on the VHHs are surprisingly extensive, but despite the use of similar binding surfaces on the virus, the binding surface on the VHHs is unique for each VHH. In four of the five complexes, the virus remains essentially unchanged, but for the fifth there are significant changes reminiscent of but smaller in magnitude than the changes associated with cell entry, suggesting that this VHH traps the virus in a previously undescribed early intermediate state. The neutralizing mechanisms of the VHHs and their potential use as quality control agents for the end game of poliovirus eradication are discussed. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Binding site graphs: a new graph theoretical framework for prediction of transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy E Reddy

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Computational prediction of nucleotide binding specificity for transcription factors remains a fundamental and largely unsolved problem. Determination of binding positions is a prerequisite for research in gene regulation, a major mechanism controlling phenotypic diversity. Furthermore, an accurate determination of binding specificities from high-throughput data sources is necessary to realize the full potential of systems biology. Unfortunately, recently performed independent evaluation showed that more than half the predictions from most widely used algorithms are false. We introduce a graph-theoretical framework to describe local sequence similarity as the pair-wise distances between nucleotides in promoter sequences, and hypothesize that densely connected subgraphs are indicative of transcription factor binding sites. Using a well-established sampling algorithm coupled with simple clustering and scoring schemes, we identify sets of closely related nucleotides and test those for known TF binding activity. Using an independent benchmark, we find our algorithm predicts yeast binding motifs considerably better than currently available techniques and without manual curation. Importantly, we reduce the number of false positive predictions in yeast to less than 30%. We also develop a framework to evaluate the statistical significance of our motif predictions. We show that our approach is robust to the choice of input promoters, and thus can be used in the context of predicting binding positions from noisy experimental data. We apply our method to identify binding sites using data from genome scale ChIP-chip experiments. Results from these experiments are publicly available at http://cagt10.bu.edu/BSG. The graphical framework developed here may be useful when combining predictions from numerous computational and experimental measures. Finally, we discuss how our algorithm can be used to improve the sensitivity of computational predictions of

  16. Predicting binding within disordered protein regions to structurally characterised peptide-binding domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waqasuddin Khan

    Full Text Available Disordered regions of proteins often bind to structured domains, mediating interactions within and between proteins. However, it is difficult to identify a priori the short disordered regions involved in binding. We set out to determine if docking such peptide regions to peptide binding domains would assist in these predictions.We assembled a redundancy reduced dataset of SLiM (Short Linear Motif containing proteins from the ELM database. We selected 84 sequences which had an associated PDB structures showing the SLiM bound to a protein receptor, where the SLiM was found within a 50 residue region of the protein sequence which was predicted to be disordered. First, we investigated the Vina docking scores of overlapping tripeptides from the 50 residue SLiM containing disordered regions of the protein sequence to the corresponding PDB domain. We found only weak discrimination of docking scores between peptides involved in binding and adjacent non-binding peptides in this context (AUC 0.58.Next, we trained a bidirectional recurrent neural network (BRNN using as input the protein sequence, predicted secondary structure, Vina docking score and predicted disorder score. The results were very promising (AUC 0.72 showing that multiple sources of information can be combined to produce results which are clearly superior to any single source.We conclude that the Vina docking score alone has only modest power to define the location of a peptide within a larger protein region known to contain it. However, combining this information with other knowledge (using machine learning methods clearly improves the identification of peptide binding regions within a protein sequence. This approach combining docking with machine learning is primarily a predictor of binding to peptide-binding sites, and is not intended as a predictor of specificity of binding to particular receptors.

  17. Blood coagulation factor XIa binds specifically to a site on activated human platelets distinct from that for factor XI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, D.; Seaman, F.S.; Koshy, A.; Knight, L.C.; Walsh, P.N.

    1984-01-01

    Binding of 125 I-Factor XIa to platelets required the presence of high molecular weight kininogen, was enhanced when platelets were stimulated with thrombin, and reached a plateau after 4-6 min of incubation at 37 degrees C. Factor XIa binding was specific: 50- to 100-fold molar excesses of unlabeled Factor XIa prevented binding, whereas Factor XI, prekallikrein, Factor XIIa, and prothrombin did not. When washed erythrocytes, added at concentrations calculated to provide an equivalent surface area to platelets, were incubated with Factor XIa, only a low level of nonspecific, nonsaturable binding was detected. Factor XIa binding to platelets was partially reversible and was saturable at concentrations of added Factor XIa of 0.2-0.4 microgram/ml (1.25-2.5 microM). The number of Factor XIa binding sites on activated platelets was estimated to be 225 per platelet (range, 110-450). We conclude that specific, high affinity, saturable binding sites for Factor XIa are present on activated platelets, are distinct from those previously demonstrated for Factor XI, and require the presence of high molecular weight kininogen

  18. Studies on the chitin/chitosan binding properties of six cuticular proteins analogous to peritrophin 3 from Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, M; Ren, Y; Liu, Y; Yang, Q

    2017-08-01

    Chitin deacetylation is required to make the cuticle rigid and compact through chitin chain crosslinking. Thus it is presumed that specialized proteins are required to bind deacetylated chitin chains together. However, deacetylated-chitin binding proteins have not ever been reported. In a previous work, six cuticular proteins analogous to peritrophin 3 (CPAP3s) were found to be abundant in the moulting fluid of Bombyx mori. In this study, these BmCPAP3s (BmCPAP3-A1, BmCPAP3-A2, BmCPAP3-B, BmCPAP3-C, BmCPAP3-D1 and BmCPAP3-D2) were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using metal-chelating affinity chromatography. Their binding activities demonstrated that although all of the BmCPAP3s showed similar binding abilities toward crystalline chitin and colloidal chitin, they differed in their affinities toward partially and fully deacetylated chitin. Amongst them, BmCPAP3-D1 exhibited the highest binding activity toward deacetylated chitin. The gene expression pattern of BmCPAP3-D1 was similar to BmCPAP3-A1 and BmCPAP3-C at most stages except that it was dramatically upregulated at the beginning of the pupa to adult transition stage. This work is the first report of a chitin-binding protein, BmCPAP3-D1, which exhibits high binding affinity to deacetylated chitin. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  19. Screening of Lactobacillus strains for their ability to bind benzo(a)pyrene and the mechanism of the process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongfei; Zhou, Fang; Qi, Yeqiong; Dziugan, Piotr; Bai, Fengling; Walczak, Piotr; Zhang, Bolin

    2013-09-01

    In order to investigate the binding ability of Lactobacillus strains to Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), 15 strains were analysed. L. plantarum CICC 22135 and L. pentosus CICC 23163 exhibited high efficiency in removing BaP from aqueous medium; the binding rates were 66.76% and 64.31%, respectively. This process was affected by temperature, incubation time and pH, and cell viability was not necessary for the binding ability. Additionally, both strains, especially strain CICC 23163 showed high specificity in binding BaP. The cell-BaP complexes were stable in aqueous medium. The mechanism of binding was investigated by examining the binding ability of different components of the microorganism cells. The results revealed that peptidoglycans played an important role in binding BaP and its structural integrity was required. Consequently, we proposed that the mechanism of this process was a physisorption and peptidoglycan was the main binding site. These two strains may be used for dietary detoxification in human diet and animal feed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Novel Bat Influenza Virus NS1 Proteins Bind Double-Stranded RNA and Antagonize Host Innate Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkington, Hannah L; Juozapaitis, Mindaugas; Kerry, Philip S; Aydillo, Teresa; Ayllon, Juan; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Schwemmle, Martin; Hale, Benjamin G

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that novel bat HL17NL10 and HL18NL11 influenza virus NS1 proteins are effective interferon antagonists but do not block general host gene expression. Solving the RNA-binding domain structures revealed the canonical NS1 symmetrical homodimer, and RNA binding required conserved basic residues in this domain. Interferon antagonism was strictly dependent on RNA binding, and chimeric bat influenza viruses expressing NS1s defective in this activity were highly attenuated in interferon-competent cells but not in cells unable to establish antiviral immunity. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Phe783, Thr797, and Asp804 in transmembrane hairpin M5-M6 of Na+,K+-ATPase play a key role in ouabain binding.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qiu, L.Y.; Koenderink, J.B.; Swarts, H.G.P.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Pont, J.J.H.H.M. de

    2003-01-01

    Ouabain is a glycoside that binds to and inhibits the action of Na+,K+-ATPase. Little is known, however, about the specific requirements of the protein surface for glycoside binding. Using chimeras of gastric H+,K+-ATPase and Na+,K+-ATPase, we demonstrated previously that the combined presence of

  2. DNA binding sites recognised in vitro by a knotted class 1 homeodomain protein encoded by the hooded gene, k, in barley (Hordeum vulgare)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krusell, L; Rasmussen, I; Gausing, K

    1997-01-01

    of knotted1 from maize was isolated from barley seedlings and expressed as a maltose binding protein fusion in E. coli. The purified HvH21-fusion protein selected DNA fragments with 1-3 copies of the sequence TGAC. Gel shift experiments showed that the TGAC element was required for binding and the results...

  3. Li+-ligand binding energies and the effect of ligand fluorination on the binding energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W.

    2018-02-01

    The Li+-ligand binding energies are computed for seven ligands and their perfluoro analogs using Density Functional Theory. The bonding is mostly electrostatic in origin. Thus the size of the binding energy tends to correlate with the ligand dipole moment, however, the charge-induced dipole contribution can be sufficiently large to affect the dipole-binding energy correlation. The perfluoro species are significantly less strongly bound than their parents, because the electron withdrawing power of the fluorine reduces the ligand dipole moment.

  4. Chromate Binding and Removal by the Molybdate-Binding Protein ModA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpus, Jason; Bosscher, Michael; Ajiboye, Ifedayo; Zhang, Liang; He, Chuan

    2017-04-04

    Effective and cheap methods and techniques for the safe removal of hexavalent chromate from the environment are in increasingly high demand. High concentrations of hexavalent chromate have been shown to have numerous harmful effects on human biology. We show that the E. coli molybdate-binding protein ModA is a genetically encoded tool capable of removing chromate from aqueous solutions. Although previously reported to not bind chromate, we show that ModA binds chromate tightly and is capable of removing chromate to levels well below current US federal standards. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. PiRaNhA: A server for the computational prediction of RNA-binding residues in protein sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Murakami, Yoichi; Spriggs, Ruth V; Nakamura, Haruki; Jones, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The PiRaNhA web server is a publicly available online resource that automatically predicts the location of RNA-binding residues (RBRs) in protein sequences. The goal of functional annotation of sequences in the field of RNA binding is to provide predictions of high accuracy that require only small numbers of targeted mutations for verification. The PiRaNhA server uses a support vector machine (SVM), with position-specific scoring matrices, residue interface propensity, predicted residue acces...

  6. QSAR modeling on dopamine D2 receptor binding affinity of 6-methoxy benzamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Soma; Debnath, Bikash; Gayen, Shovanlal; Ghosh, Balaram; Basu, Anindya; Srikanth, Kolluru; Jha, Tarun

    2005-10-01

    QSAR modeling was performed on 58 (S) N-[(1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) methyl]-6-methoxy benzamides as dopamine (DA) D2 receptor antagonists to identify the structural requirements for DA D2 receptor binding affinity. The study pointed out that the presence of hydrophobic substituents at R3 position and electron-donating groups at R5 position increased the biological activity. Substitutions at phenyl ring favored the binding affinity of these benzamides. Ethyl group and iodine at R3 position were advantageous to the activity whereas nitro group at phenyl ring hindered the antagonistic activity.

  7. The Single-Molecule Centroid Localization Algorithm Improves the Accuracy of Fluorescence Binding Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Boyang; Wang, Yanbo; Park, Seongjin; Han, Kyu Young; Singh, Digvijay; Kim, Jin H; Cheng, Wei; Ha, Taekjip

    2018-03-13

    Here, we demonstrate that the use of the single-molecule centroid localization algorithm can improve the accuracy of fluorescence binding assays. Two major artifacts in this type of assay, i.e., nonspecific binding events and optically overlapping receptors, can be detected and corrected during analysis. The effectiveness of our method was confirmed by measuring two weak biomolecular interactions, the interaction between the B1 domain of streptococcal protein G and immunoglobulin G and the interaction between double-stranded DNA and the Cas9-RNA complex with limited sequence matches. This analysis routine requires little modification to common experimental protocols, making it readily applicable to existing data and future experiments.

  8. Rate Constants and Mechanisms of Protein-Ligand Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2017-05-22

    Whereas protein-ligand binding affinities have long-established prominence, binding rate constants and binding mechanisms have gained increasing attention in recent years. Both new computational methods and new experimental techniques have been developed to characterize the latter properties. It is now realized that binding mechanisms, like binding rate constants, can and should b